Citation
Mother Goose nursery tales

Material Information

Title:
Mother Goose nursery tales
Uniform Title:
Blue Beard
Mother Goose
Hansel and Gretel
Little Red Riding Hood
Cinderella
Beauty and the beast
Goldilocks and the three bears
Jack and the beanstalk
Puss in boots
Sleeping Beauty
Creator:
Watson, R. Marriott ( Author, Primary )
Bennett, Emily ( Author, Secondary )
Hoyer, A. M ( Author, Secondary )
Weedon, L. L. ( Lucy L ) ( Author, Secondary )
Nesbit, E. ( Edith ), 1858-1924 ( Author, Secondary )
Irwin, M ( Madelaine ) ( Illustrator )
Nister, Ernest ( Publisher )
E.P. Dutton (Firm) ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
New York
Publisher:
Ernest Nister
E.P. Dutton & Co.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
207 p., [20] leaves of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Fairy tales -- 1895 ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1895 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1895
Genre:
Fairy tales ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Germany -- Bavaria
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations engraved by E. Nister after M. Irwin.
Statement of Responsibility:
by R. Marriott Watson, Emily Bennett, A.M. Hoyer, L.L. Weedon, E. Nesbit, & others.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026534716 ( ALEPH )
11567768 ( OCLC )
ALG0056 ( NOTIS )

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URSERY GALES

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R, MARRTOtS Watson,
EMILY BENNETT, A.M.Hover_,
LLWeeDon, €.NESBIT,
é& OTHERS

Lonoon: New. Yorn:
ERNEST NISTER. € P DUCCON. és C=
: Printed in Bavarta :

No. 859.









CINDERELLA

Tue THREE SPINNERS

HanseL AND GRETEL

Tue Turee Littte Pics

SWEET Poreipes

THE SLEEPING BeEauty

THE Straw, THE COAL, AND THE BEAN
THE WATERSPRITE

THE Goupen Birp

ALADDIN AND THE WoNDERFUL Lamp
TEENY TINY

Tue Goose GIRL

THE Goipen Key

THe Wotr anD THE SEVEN LitTLE Goats
How Six ComrapEs JouRNEYED THROUGH THE WorLpD.
Jack AND THE BEANSTALK _

Jack in Luck

Littte Rep Ripinc-Hoop

Motruer Hutpa

PAGE

17
21
BI
37
39
49
51
52
62
74
76
85
86
go
98
105
113
118



8 CONTENTS.

PAGE
THE RaGAMUFFINS . : ; : : : : : : : AB}
BLUEBEARD : : ; : ; . : : : : : te 20
THE WANDERING MINSTRELS . : : : : : | : 6 gy)
CuICKEN-LICKEN - ; : i : . : : : : sete)
Tue Froc Prince. . é . : ; . - . : Bees TART
Tue Wuite Car. : : : . ; . : : : rey,
Tue CoBBLER AND THE BROWNIES. : : : : . eee 54,
Tue Nai. . 5 : : ; : : : ; , ; : re eS
Tue VaviantT LitrLte TarLor ; é . i : . A . 158
GoLpILocks, OR THE THREE Bears : : : ; z : ee erO8
BEauTY AND THE Bezast : : : : : : : : 3
RUMPELSTILTZKIN . . ° : : a : . : ; + 186
Puss 1n Boots . : os ; : : : : : .- IQI
JoHNNY AND THE GOLDEN GOoosE : . : : : i : + FQQ9-

Tue Star Fiorins . A 5 % 5 : 5 : : ; . 206


















NCE upon atime there lived a noble gentleman who had
one dear little daughter. Poor child! her own kind
mother was dead, and her father, who loved her very
dearly, was afraid that his little girl was sometimes
lonely. So he married a grand lady who had two
daughters of her own, and who, he thought, would be kind and

good to his little one. But no sooner did the stepmother enter
her new home than she began to show her true character. Her step-
daughter was so much prettier and sweeter than her own children, that
she was jealous of her, and gave her all the hard work of the house to
do, whilst the two proud sisters spent their time at pleasant parties and
entertainments.

The only pleasure ‘the poor child had was to spend her evenings
sitting in the chimney-corner, resting her weary limbs, and for this reason



10 NURSERY TALES.

her sisters mockingly nicknamed her “Cinderella.” The sisters’ fine clothes
made Cinderella feel very shabby; but, in her little torn frock and ragged
shoes, she was a thousand times more lovely than they.

Now, it chanced that the King’s son gave a grand ball, to which he
invited all the lords and ladies in the country, and, amongst the rest,
Cinderella’s two sisters were asked. How pleased and excited they were
when the invitation arrived! For days they could talk of nothing but
the clothes they should wear and the grand folk they hoped to meet.

When at last the great day arrived, Cinderella was kept running
about from early till late, decking the sisters, and dressing their hair.

“Don't you wish you were going to the ball?” said one of them.

“Indeed I do,” sighed the poor little maid. The sisters burst out
laughing. “A pretty spectacle you would be,” ney said rudely. ‘‘Go back
to your cinders—they are fit company for rags.” Then, stepping carefully
into their carriage so that they might not crush their fine clothes, they
drove away to the ball.

Cinderella went back to her chimney-corner, and tried not to feel
envious, but the tears would gather in the pretty eyes, and trickle down
the sorrowful little face.

“What are you crying for, child?” cried a silvery voice.

Cinderella started, and raised her eyes. Who could it be? Then in
a moment she knew—it was her fairy Godmother!

“T do so want ” began Cinderella; then her sobs stopped her.

“To go to the ball,” finished the Godmother. Cinderella nodded.
“Well, leave off crying—be a good girl, and you shall go. Run quickly
into the garden, and bring the largest pumpkin you can find.”

Cinderella could not imagine how a pumpkin could help her to go
to the ball, but her only thought was to obey her Godmother. In a few
moments she was back again, with a splendid pumpkin. Her Godmother
scooped out the inside—one touch of the wand, and the pumpkin was a
golden coach, lined with white satin.

“Now, godchild, quick—the mouse-trap from the pantry !”

“Here it is, Godmother,” said Cinderella breathlessly.

One by one six fat sleek mice passed through the trap door. As
each appeared, a touch of the wand transformed it into a cream-coloured
horse, fit for a queen.





CINDERELLA. II

“Now, Cinderella, can you find a coachman?”

“There is a large grey rat in the rat-trap—would he do, Godmother ?”

“Run and fetch him, child, and then I can judge.” So Cinderella
ran to fetch the rat, and her Godmother said he was just made for a
coachman; and I think you would have agreed with her had you seen
him a moment later, with his powdered wig and silk stockings.

Six lizards from behind the pumpkin-frame became six footmen in
splendid liveries—you would have thought they had been footmen all
their lives. Cinderella was so excited that she could scarcely speak.

“Oh! Godmother,” she cried, “it is all so lovely!” Then suddenly
she thought of her shabby frock. ‘There is my white muslin,” she said
wistfully, “if—do you think

But before Cinderella could realise what was happening, her God-














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12 NURSERY TALES.

mother’s wand tapped her lightly on the shoulder, and in place of the
shabby frock, there was a gleam of satin, silver, and pearls. ees

- Ah! who can describe a robe made by the fairies? It was’ white
as snow, and as dazzling; round the hem hung a fringe of diamonds,
sparkling like dew-drops in the sunshine. The lace about the throat and
arms could only have been ‘spun by fairy spiders. Surely ‘it: was a dream |
Cinderella put her daintily-gloved hand to her throat, and softly touched
the pearls that encircled her neck.

“Come, child,’ said the Godmother, ‘for you will be late.”

As Cinderella moved, the firelight shone upon her dainty shoes.

“They are of diamonds,” she said. .

“No,” answered her Godmother, smiling; “they are better than that—
they are of glass, made by the fairies. And now, child, go,. and’ enjoy
yourself to your heart’s content. Only remember, if you stay at the
palace one instant after midnight, your coach and servants will vanish,
and you will be the little grey Cinderella once more!”

A few moments later, the coach dashed into the royal courtyard,
the door was flung open, and Cinderella alighted. As she walked slowly
up the richly-carpeted staircase, there was a murmur of admiration, and
the King’s son hastened to meet her. “Never,” said he to himself, “ have
I seen anyone so lovely!” He led her into the ball-room, where the
King, who was much taken with her sweet face and pretty, modest
manners, whispered to the Queen that she must surely be a foreign princess.

The evening passed away in a dream of delight, Cinderella dancing
with no one but the handsome young Prince, and being waited on by his
own hands at supper-time. The two sisters could not recognise their
ragged little sister in the beautiful and graceful lady to whom the Prince
paid so much attention, and felt quite pleased and flattered when she
addressed a few words to them.

Presently a clock chimed the three quarters past eleven, and,
remembering her Godmother’s warning, Cinderella at once took leave of
the Prince, and, jumping into her coach, was driven rapidly home. Here
she found her Godmother waiting to hear all about the ball. “It was
' lovely,” said Cinderella; “and oh! Godmother, there is to be another
to-morrow night, and I should so much like to go to it!”

“Then you shall,’ replied the kind fairy, and, kissing her godchild








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tenderly, she vanished. When the sisters returned from the ball, they found
a sleepy little maiden sitting in the chimney-corner, waiting for them.

“How late you are!” cried Cinderella, yawning. “Are you not very
tired ?” :

“Not in the least,” they answered, and then they told her what a
delightful ball it had been, and how the loveliest Princess in the world
had been there, and had spoken to them, and admired their pretty dresses.

“Who was she?” asked Cinderella slyly..

“That we cannot say,” answered the sisters. “She would not tell
her name, though the Prince begged her to do so on bended knee.”

“Dear sister,’ said Cinderella, “I, too, should like to see the beau-
tiful Princess. Will you not lend me your old yellow gown, that I may
go to the ball to-morrow with you?”

“What!” cried her sister angrily; “lend one of my dresses to a little
cinder-maid? Don’t talk nonsense, child!”



14 NURSERY TALES.

The next night, the sisters were more particular than ever about their
attire, but at last they were dressed, and as soon as their carriage had
driven away, the Godmother appeared. Once more she touched her god-
child with her wand, and in a moment she was arrayed in a beautiful
dress that seemed as though it had been woven of moon-beams and sun-
shine, so radiantly did it gleam and shimmer. She put her arms round
her Godmother's neck and kissed and thanked her. ‘Good-bye, childie ;
enjoy yourself, but whatever you do, remember to leave the ball before
the clock strikes twelve,” the Godmother said, and Cinderella promised.

But the hours flew by so happily and so swiftly that Cinderella
forgot her promise, until she happened to look at a clock and saw that
it was on the stroke of twelve. With a cry of alarm she fled from the
room, dropping, in her haste, one of the little glass slippers ; but, with the
sound of the clock strokes in her ears, she dared not wait to pick it up.
The Prince hurried after her in alarm, but when he reached the entrance
hall, the beautiful Princess had vanished, and there was no one to be
seen but a forlorn little beggar-maid creeping away into the darkness.

Poor little Cinderella!—she hurried home through the dark streets,
weary, and overwhelmed with shame.

The fire was out when she reached her home, and there was no
Godmother waiting to receive her; but she sat down in the chimney-
corner to await her sisters’ return. When they came in they could speak
of nothing but the wonderful things that had happened at the ball.

The beautiful Princess had been there again, they said, but had dis-
appeared just as the clock struck twelve, and though the Prince had
searched everywhere for her, he had been unable to find her. “ He was
quite beside himself with grief,’ said the elder sister, “for there is no
doubt he hoped to make her his bride.”

Cinderella listened in silence to all they had to say, and, slipping
her hand into her pocket, felt that the one remaining glass slipper was
safe, for it was the only thing of all her grand apparel that remained to her.

On the following morning there was a great noise of trumpets and
drums, and a procession passed through the town, at the head of which
rode the King’s son. Behind him came a herald, bearing a velvet cushion,
upon which rested a little glass slipper. The herald blew a blast upon
the trumpet, and then read a proclamation saying that the King’s son





















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16 NURSERY TALES.

would wed any lady in the land who could fit the slipper upon her foot,
if she could produce another to match it.

Of course, the sisters tried to squeeze their feet into the slipper, but it
was of no use—they were much too large. Then Cinderella shyly begged
that she might try. How the sisters laughed with scorn: when the Prince
knelt to fit the slipper on the cinder-maid’s foot; but what was their
surprise when it slipped on with the greatest ease, and the next moment
Cinderella produced the other from her pocket! Once more she stood in
the slippers, and once more the sisters saw before them the lovely Princess
who was to be the Prince’s bride. For at the touch of the magic shoes,
the little grey frock disappeared for ever, and in place of it she wore the
beautiful robe the fairy Godmother had given to her.

The sisters hung their heads with sorrow and vexation; but kind
little Cinderella put her arms round their necks, kissed them, and forgave
them for all their unkindness, so that they could not help but love her. |

The Prince could not bear to part from his little love again, so he
carried her back to the palace in his grand coach, and they were married
that very day. Cinderella’s step-sisters were present at the feast, but in
the place of honour sat the fairy Godmother.

So the poor little cinder-maid married the Prince, and in time they
came to be King and Queen, and lived happily ever after.







who would not spin, and, let her mother

say what she would, she could not make

her do it. At last, the mother, in a fit.

of impatience, gave her a blow which
£ made the girl cry out loudly.

eee ‘
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i a At that very instant, the Queen
ie f /'/ drove by, and, hearing the screams, she
ah; stopped the carriage, came into the house,.

and: asked the mother why she beat her
daughter in such a way that people in
passing could hear the cries.

Then the mother felt ashamed that
_ her daughter’s laziness should be known,
so she said: “Oh, your Majesty, I cannot take her away from her
spinning: she spins from morning till night, and I am so poor that I
cannot afford to buy the flax.”

“There is nothing I like better than to hear the sound of spinning,”
the Queen replied, “and nothing pleases me more than the whirl of
spinning-wheels. Let me take your daughter home with me to the castle;
I have flax enough, and she may spin there to her heart’s content.”

The mother rejoiced greatly in her heart, and the Queen took the
maiden home with her. When they arrived in the castle, she led her up
into three rooms, which were piled from top to bottom with the finest flax.



18 | NURSERY TALES.

“Now spin me this flax,’ said the Queen, “and when thou hast
spun it all, thow shalt have my eldest son for a husband. Although thou
art poor, yet I do not despise thee on that account, for thy untiring
industry is dowry enough.”

The maiden was filled with inward terror, for she could not have
spun the flax had she sat there day and night until she was three hundred
years old! When she was left alone, she began to weep, and thus she
sat for three days without stirring a finger.

On the third day the Queen came, and when she saw that nothing
was as yet spun, she wondered over it, but the maiden excused herself
by saying that she could not begin in consequence of the great sorrow
she felt in being separated from her mother.

This satisfied the Queen, who, on leaving her, said—

“Thou must begin to work for me to-morrow.”

But when the maiden was once more alone, she did not know
what to do, or how to help herself, and in her distress she went to the
window and looked out. She saw three women passing by, the first of
whom had a great broad foot, the second such a large under-lip that it
hung down to her chin, and the third an enormous thumb.

They stopped under the window, and, looking up, asked the maiden
what was the matter.

When she had told them of her trouble, they immediately offered her
their help, and said—

“Wilt thou invite us to the wedding, and not be ashamed of us, but
call us thy aunts, and let us sit at thy table? If thou wilt, we will spin
all the flax, and do it in a very short time.”

“With all my heart,” answered the girl, “only come in, and begin
at once.” y

Then she admitted the three strange women, and, making a clear
space in the first room, they sat themselves down and began spinning.

One drew the thread and trod the wheel, the other moistened: the
thread, the third pressed it and beat it on the table, and every time she
did so, a pile of thread fell on the ground spun in the finest way.

The maiden concealed the three spinners from the Queen, but
showed her the heaps of spun yarn whenever she came, and received no
end of praise for it.





When the first room was empty, the second was commenced, and
when that was finished, the third was begun, and very soon cleared.

Then the three spinners took their leave, saying to the maiden—

“Forget not what thou hast promised us; it will make thy fortune.”



20 NURSERY TALES.

When the girl showed the Queen the empty rooms and the great
piles of thread, the wedding was announced. The bridegroom rejoiced that
he had won so clever and industrious a wife, and he praised her exceedingly.

“JT have three aunts,’ said the maiden, “and as they have done me
many kindnesses, I could not forget them in my good fortune; permit me
to invite them to our wedding and allow them to sit with me at table.”

So the Queen and the bridegroom consented.

When the feast commenced, the three old women entered, clothed
in the greatest splendour, and the bride said—

“Welcome, my dear aunts!”

“Alas!” exclaimed the bridegroom, “how is it you have such ugly
relations?” and going up to the one with a broad foot, he asked—

“Why have you such a broad foot?”

“Fyrom threading, from threading,” she answered.

Then he went to the second, and asked—

“Why have you such an overhanging lip?”

“From moistening the thread,’ she replied, “from moistening the
thread.”

Then he asked the third—

“Why have you such a big thumb?”

“From pressing the thread,’ answered she.

Then the Prince became frightened, and said—

“Then shall my lovely bride never more turn a spinning-wheel, as
long as she lives!”

Thus was the maiden freed from the hated flax-spinning.









ANY -years ago, a woodcutter and his wife, with their
two children, Hans and Gretel, lived upon the outskirts
of a dense wood. They were very poor, so that
when a famine fell upon the land, and bread became
dear, they could no longer afford to buy sufficient
food for the whole family.

One night, as the poor man lay tossing on his

4 hard bed, he cried aloud in his grief and anguish—

“Alas! what will become of us? How can I feed my hungry little
ones when we have no food for ourselves?”

“Listen to me, good-man,” answered his wife, who was stepmother
to the children. “As it is no longer possible for us to keep our children,
we will take them into the wood with us to-morrow, light a fire for
them, and give each a piece of bread and leave them. They will not easily
find their way back, and so we shall be rid of the burden of them.”

But the father said: “No, no! I could not find it in my heart to
leave my darlings to perish. The wild beasts would tear them limb from
limb.”



22 NURSERY TALES.

“Then,” answered the wife, “we must all four die of hunger.” She
gave her husband no peace until he promised to do as she wished, and
at last, very unwillingly, he consented.

Now, the two children had been too hungry to go to sleep that
night, and so it happened that they overheard all that their parents were
saying. Gretel wept bitterly, but brave little Hansel did his best to
comfort her. “Don’t be afraid,’ he said; “I will take care of you.”

As soon as his father and stepmother were asleep, he slipped on
his smock, and, opening the door softly, went out into the garden. The
moon was shining brightly, and by its light he could see the little white
pebbles that lay scattered in front of the house, shining like little pieces





HANSEL AND GRETEL. 23

of silver. He stooped and filled his pockets as full as he could, and then
went back to Gretel, and once more bidding her be comforted, for God
would be sure to watch over them, he jumped into bed, and ey, both
fell fast asleep.

Early in the morning, before the sun had risen, the stepmother came
and wakened the children. “Rise, little lie-a-beds,” she said, “and come
with us into the wood to gather fuel.’ :

She gave them each a piece of bread for their dinner, and told them
to be sure not to eat it too soon, for they would get nothing more.

Gretel carried the bread in her pinafore, because Hansel had his
pockets full, and then they all set out upon their way to the wood.

As they trudged along, the father noticed that his little son kept
turning back to look at the house. “Take care, my boy,” he said, “or
you will slip. What are you looking at so earnestly ?”

“T am watching my kitten, father: she is sitting on the roof to bid
me good-bye.”

“Silly little lad, that is not your cat,’ said the stepmother; “it is
only the morning sun shining on the chimney.”

But Hansel had not been watching his cat at all; he had stayed
behind to drop the pebbles upon the path.

When they reached the thickest part of the forest, the father bade
the children gather wood, that he might kindle a fire for them, so that
they might rest beside it and warm themselves whilst he and his wife
were cutting the fuel. So they gathered a pile of brushwood and twigs,
and as soon as it was well alight, the parents left them, promising to
return as soon as they had finished their work.

Hansel and Gretel sat down by the fire, and when midday came
they ate their bread and sat listening to the strokes of their father’s axe,
thinking all the time that he was near to them. But what they heard
was only a dry branch which the man had bound to a tree, so that the
wind swung it hither and thither, and the noise it made deceived the
children. At last the poor, tired, little eyelids closed, and, side by side,
brother and sister fell asleep.

When they awoke, the night was very dark, and Gretel was frightened,
and began to cry. Hansel put his arms around her and whispered: “Wait,
dearie, till the moon rises; we shall soon find our way home then.”



24 NURSERY ALES.

As soon as the: bright moon rose, Hansel took his little sister by the
“hand, and all night long they followed ‘the track of the little white
‘pebbles, until at daybreak they came to their father’s house.

They knocked at the door, and no sooner did the stepmother. open
“it than she began to scold them for having stayed out so long in the
“w6od; but the father greeted them kindly, for he had grieved sorely for
his little ones.

In a short time they were eis off as ever, and one night they.
again heard their mother trying to persuade her husband to take them
‘out into the wood and lose them. “There is nothing left in the house
but half a loaf of bread,’ she said; “for our own sakes it is better to get
rid of the children; but this time we will lead them farther away, so that
they will not be able to find their way home.”

But the man would not agree. “Better to divide our last morsel
-with them,” he said, “and then die together.”

His wife would not listen to what he said, but ‘scolded him for his
want of thought for her; and at last the poor man uae way a oe
time, just as he had done at first. i

But the children had overheard all that was said, and as soon as
the mother and father were asleep, Hansel stole down to the door, meaning
to go and collect pebbles as he had done before; but the door was locked
and bolted, and he could not get out. ao NEyen mind, Gretel,’ he said

consolingly, “the good God will surely help us.’

Early in the morning the woman wakened the children, and, giving
them a small piece of bread, bade them follow her and their father into
the wood. As-they went, Hansel crumbled his morsel of bread in his
pocket and strewed the crumbs upon the path.

“Come, Hansel,” said the father, “don’t loiter so, sonny. What can
you see to stare at so often?”

“My little dove, father. It is sitting on the housetop, bidding me
good-bye.” ara

“Nonsense,” said the woman, “it is not your dove; it is only the
rising sun shining upon the chimney.”

Hansel did not answer, but he went on strewing his crumbs care-
fully until the last morsel of bread was gone.

Deeper and deeper into the wood they went, where the children









“Gretel shut
the tron door

and shot the bolt.”

had never been before. There a great fire was kindled, and the mother
said: “Stay here, children, whilst your father and I go to cut wood.
If you are tired you may sleep a while, and we will fetch you when it
is time to go home.”

When dinner-time came, Gretel divided her piece of bread with
Hansel, because he had scattered all his share upon the road; and then
they went to sleep. The evening shadows fell, but still no one came to
fetch the poor children, and it was not until midnight that they awakened.

Hansel put his arms round his sister and told her not to fear, for

we



26 NURSERY TALES.

when the moon rose they would easily be able to see the crumbs, and
so find their way home again.

So when the moon rose they set out upon their way; but alas!
there were no crumbs to be seen, for the little birds that lived in the
green wood were as hungry as the children, and had eaten them all up.

“We will find the way somehow,” cried cheerful little Hansel; but
though they travelled all night long, and the next day too, they could
not find it. Poor little mites, how tired and hungry they were, for they
had nothing to eat but the berries that grew by the roadside!

When at length the weary little feet could go no farther, the children
lay down beneath a tree and slept.

On the third day they were still as far away as ever, and it
seemed to them that the longer they walked the deeper they got
into the wood, and they began to be afraid that they would die of cold
and hunger.

But presently, when the midday sun was shining brightly, they
noticed a little snow-white bird singing so sweetly that they could not
help but stay to listen. When the birdie’s song was ended, he spread his
wings and flew away.

The children followed him until they reached a little house, on the
roof of which he perched. Then the children saw with surprise that
the strange little house was built entirely of bread, roofed with cakes,
and with windows of barley sugar.

“See, Gretel,” cried Hansel joyfully, “there is food for us in plenty.
I will take a piece of the roof, and you shall have one of the windows.”

He stretched out his hand to help himself, and Gretel had already
begun to nibble one of the window-panes, when suddenly they heard a
voice call from within :—

“Nibbly, nibbly, mouse!
Who’s nibbling at my house?”

The children answered quickly :—

‘°Tis my Lady Wind that blows,
As round about the house she goes.’’

And then they went on eating as though nothing had happened, for
the cake of which the roof was made just suited Hansel’s taste, whilst



HANSEL AND GRETEL. 27

the barley-sugar window-panes were better than any sweetmeat Gretel
had ever tasted before.

All at once the door of the cottage flew wide open, and out came
an old, old woman, leaning upon a crutch. The children were so fright-
ened that they dropped their food and clung to each other.

The old woman nodded her head to them, and said: “Who brought
you here, my pets? Come inside, come inside; no one will hurt you.”

She took their hands and led them into the house, and set before
them all kinds of delicious foods, milk, sugared pancakes, apples, and nuts.
When they had finished their meal she showed them two cosy little white —
beds, and as Hansel and Gretel lay snugly tucked up in them, they
thought to themselves that surely they had now found the most delightful
place in the whole wide world.

But the old woman had only pretended to be friendly and kind, for
she was really a wicked old witch, who was always lying in wait to catch
little children; indeed, she had built the little house of bread and cakes
especially to entice them in. Whenever anyone came into her power, she
cooked and ate him, and thought what a fine feast she had had.

Witches have red eyes and cannot see
far, but they have keen scent, like animals, ,
and can tell at once when a human being ©
is near to them.

As soon as Hansel and Gretel came '
into her neighbourhood she
laughed to herself and said
mockingly: “Ha, ha! they
are mine already; they
will not easily escape me.”

Early in the morning,
before the children were
awake, she stood beside
them and admired their
rosy cheeks and _ soft
round limbs.

“What nice tit-
bits for me,” murmured















28 NURSERY TALES.

she. Then, seizing Hansel by the hand, she led him to a little stable,
and, in spite of his cries and screams, shut him up and left him. Then
she shook Gretel until she was awake, and bade her get up at once and
carry food and drink to her brother, and it must be of the best too, for
she wished to fatten him.

“When he is nice and plump, I shall eat him,” said the cruel old
witch. Gretel wept bitterly, but it was quite in vain, for she was obliged
to do the witch’s bidding; and every day she cooked the choicest food for
her brother, while she herself lived upon nothing but oyster-shells.

Day by day the old woman visited the stable and called to Hansel
to put his finger through the window bars, that she might see if he were
getting fat; but the little fellow held out a bone instead, and as her eyes
were dim with age, she mistook the bone for the boy’s finger, and thought
how thin and lean he was. When a whole month had passed without
Hansel becoming the least bit fatter, the old witch lost patience and
declared she would wait no longer. “Hurry, Gretel,’ she said to the
little girl, “fill the pot with water, for to-morrow, be he lean or fat,
Hansel shall be cooked for my dinner.”

The tears chased each other down Gretel’s cheeks as she carried in
the water, and she sobbed aloud in her grief. “Dear God,” she cried,
“we have no one to help us but Thou. Alas! if only the wild beasts in
the wood had devoured us, at least we should have died together.”

“Cease your chattering,” cried the old witch angrily. “It will not
help you, so you may as well be still.”

The next morning poor Gretel was forced to light the fire and hang
the great pot of water over it, and then the witch said: “First we will
bake. I have kneaded the dough, and heated the oven; you shall creep
inside it to see if it is hot enough to bake the bread.”

But Gretel guessed that the old witch meant to shut the door upon
her and roast her, so she pretended that she did not know how to get in.

“Silly goose,” said the witch. “The door is wide enough, to be
sure. Why, even I could get inside it.’ As she spoke, she popped her
head into the oven. In a moment Gretel sprang towards her, pushed
her inside, shut the iron door,-and shot the bolt. Oh! how she squealed
and shrieked, but Gretel ran ‘off as fast as she could, and so there was
an end of the cruel old witch.



HANSEL AND GRETEL. ae)

Quick as thought, Gretel
ran to her brother. “We
are saved, Hansel,” she cried,
opening the door of the
stable, “the wicked old witch
is dead.”

Hans flew from his
prison as a bird from its
cage, and the two happy
little children kissed each
other and jumped for joy.
No longer afraid of the old
witch, they entered the house,
hand in hand, and then they
saw that in every corner of
the room were boxes of
pearls and diamonds, and as i
all kinds of precious gems. a ee

“Ah!” said Hansel merrily, “these are better than pebbles, Gretel,”
and he stuffed his pockets with the jewels, whilst Gretel filled her
pinafore. “Now,” said Hansel, “we will leave the witch’s wood behind
us as fast as we can.”



So off they ran, and never stopped until they came to a lake,
upon which swam a large white duck.

“How can we cross,” said Hansel, “for there is no bridge any-
where ?”

‘“‘And no ship either,” Gretel answered ; “but we will ask the pretty
white duck to carry us over.” So they cried aloud :—

“Tittle duck, little duck,
With wings so white,
Carry us over
The waters bright.’

The duck came at once, and, taking Hansel upon her back, carried
him over to the other side, and then did the same for Gretel. They went
merrily on their way, and very soon they found themselves in a part of
the wood they knew quite well.

Ds)



30 NURSERY TALES.

When they saw the roof of their father’s house in the distance
they began to run, and, breathless with haste, half laughing. and half
crying, they rushed into the cottage and flung themselves into their
father’s arms. ‘

Oh! how pleased he was to see them once again, for he had not
known a happy hour since he had left them alone in the wood. Gretel
shook out her pinafore, and Hansel emptied his pockets, and the floor of
the little room was quite covered with glittering precious stones.

So now their troubles were at an end, for the cruel stepmother
was dead, and Hansel and Gretel and their father lived together happily
ever after.

My story is ended, and see, there runs a little mouse, and the first
who catches him shall have a fur cap made from his skin.







i little pes




NCE upon a time, when pigs could talk and no one had
ever heard of bacon, there lived an old piggy mother
with her three little sons.

They had a very pleasant home in the middle of

an oak forest, and were all just as happy as the day
was long, until one sad year the acorn crop failed; then, indeed, poor

Mrs. Piggy-wiggy often had hard work to make both ends meet.

One day she called her sons to her, and, with tears in her eyes,
told them that she must send them out into the wide world to seek
their fortune.

She kissed them all round, and the three little pigs set out upon



32 NURSERY TALES.

their travels, each taking a different road, and carrying a bundle slung on
a stick across his shoulder. :

The first little pig had not gone far before he met a man carrying
a bundle of straw; so he said to him: “Please, man, give me that straw
to build me a house?” The man was very good-natured, so he gave
him the bundle of straw, and the little pig built a pretty little house
with it.

No sooner was it finished, and the little pig thinking of going to
bed, than a wolf came lone, knocked at the door, and said: “Little pig,
little pig, let me come in.’

But the little pig laughed softly, and answered: “No, no, by the
hair of my chinny-chin-chin.”

Then said the wolf sternly: “I will make you let me in; for Pll
huff, and I'll puff, and Til blow your house in!”

So he huffed and he puffed, and he blew his house in, because,
you see, it was only of straw and too light; and when he had blown the
house in, he ate up the little pig, and did not leave so much as the tip
of his tail.

The second little pig also met a man, and fe was carrying a bundle
of furze; so piggy said politely: “Please, kind man, will you give me
that furze to build me a house?”

The man agreed, and piggy set to work to build himself a
snug little house before the night came on. It was scarcely finished
when the wolf came along, and said: ‘Little pig, little pig, let me
come in.”

“No, no, by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin,”
little pig.

“Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your
house in!” said the wolf. So he huffed and he
puffed, and he puffed, and he huffed, and at last he

blew the house in, and gobbled the little pig up
in a trice.

Now, the third little pig met a man with a as
load of bricks and mortar, and he said: “Please, man, LE

will you give me those bricks to build a house with?” GS
So the man gave him the bricks and mortar,

answered the second












“o>

(GY
ee
abe 6 Mo




f
7

“Little pig, are they nice apples?”



34 NURSERY TALES.

and a little trowel as well, and the little pig
BY tas, eee built himself a nice strong little house. As

; a Ses “~~ soon as it was finished the wolf came to call, ©
ef Yo @ | just as he had done to the other little pigs,
a Co and said: “Little pig, little pig, let me in!”




But the little pig answered: “No, no,
by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin.”

“Then,” said the wolf, “I'll huff, and
I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in.”

Well, he huffed, and he puffed, and he
puffed, and he huffed, and he huffed, and
‘he puffed; but he could zof get the house
down. At last he had no breath left to huff
and puff with, so he sat down outside the
little pig’s house and thought for awhile.

ZR Presently he called out: “Little pig, I
know where there is a nice field of turnips.”

“Where ?” said the little pig.

“Behind the farmer’s house, three fields away, and if you will be
“ready to-morrow morning I will call for you, and we will go together
and get some breakfast.”

“Very well,” said the little pig; “I will be sure to be ready. What
time do you mean to start?”

“At six o'clock,” replied the wolf.

Well, the wise little pig got up at five, scampered away to the field,
and brought home a fine load of turnips before the wolf came. At six
o'clock the wolf came to the little pig’s house and said: “Little pig, are
you ready?”

“Ready!” cried the little pig. “Why, I have been to the field and
come back again long ago, and now I am busy boiling a potful of turnips
for breakfast.”

The wolf was very angry indeed; but he made up his mind to catch
the little pig somehow or other; so he told him that he knew where
there was a nice apple-tree.

“Where?” said the little pig.

“Round the hill in the squire’s orchard,” the wolf said. “So if you





THE THREE LITTLE PIGS. 35

will promise to play me no tricks, I will come for you to-morrow morning
at five o'clock, and we will go there together and get some rosy-
cheeked apples.”

The next morning piggy got up at four o'clock and was off and
away long before the wolf came.

But the orchard was a long way off, and besides, he had the tree
to climb, which is a difficult matter for a little pig, so that before the
sack he had brought with him was quite filled he saw the wolf coming
towards him.

He was dreadfully frightened, but he thought it better to put a
good face on the matter, so when the wolf said: “Little pig, why are
you here before me? Are they nice apples?” he replied at once: “Yes,
very; I will throw down one for you to taste.” So he picked an apple
and threw it so far that whilst the wolf was running to fetch it he had
time to jump down and scamper away home.

The next day the wolf came again, and told the little pig that there
was going to be a fair in the town that afternoon, and asked him if he
would go with him.

“Oh! yes,” said the pig, “I will go with pleasure. What time will
you be ready to start?”

“At half-past three,” said the wolf.

Of course, the little pig started long before the time, went to the
fair, and bought a fine large butter-churn, and was trotting away with it
on his back when he saw the
wolf coming.

He did not know what to
do, so he crept into the churn
to hide, and by so doing started
it rolling.

Down the hill it went, _ jy
rolling over and over, with the -
little pig squeaking inside.

The wolf could not think
what the strange thing rolling % Uy §, 4 :
down the hill could be; so he {(*agears ier 4 ax 7) td
turned tail and ran away home Ree tah 7? On [outer








36 NURSERY TALES.

in a fright without ever going to the fair at all. He went to the little
pig’s house to tell him how frightened he had been by a large round
thing which came rolling past him down the hill.

“Ha! ha!” laughed the little pig; “so I frightened you, eh? I had
been to the fair and bought a butter-churn; when I saw you I got inside
it and rolled down the hill.”

This made the wolf so angry that he declared that he wozld eat
up the little pig, and that nothing should save him, for he would jump
down the chimney.

But the clever little pig hung a pot full of water over the hearth
and then made a blazing fire, and just as the wolf was coming down
the chimney he took off the cover and in fell the wolf. In a second the
little pig had popped the lid on again.

Then he boiled the wolf, and ate him for supper, and after that he
lived quietly and comfortably all his days, and was never troubled by
a wolf again.








Wi
1 a (

/
i

ai

ce
aS \y ASP w03s ago there was a little girl who lived all alone with
ees her mother, and they were so poor that they had nothing

4 A 2 at all left in the house to eat.
Me eZ The Ins gin went to the forest to see if she could
7 find a few sticks with which to make a fire, and on her

way she met an old woman who gave her a little pot which she said
would prevent her from ever being hungry again :—“ You have only to
say: ‘Cook, little pot, cock!’ and at once you will have as much good,
sweet porridge as you can wish for. When you have had sufficient you
must say: ‘Stop, little pot!’ and it will cease to cook.”

The little girl thanked the old woman, and carried the pot home



38 NURSERY TALES.

to her mother. From that time they had plenty to eat, for when they
were hungry they only had to call upon the pot to cook.

One day the little girl went out and stayed away so long that the
mother became hungry, so she cried: “Cook, little pot, cook!”

But when she had made a good meal, and wanted the pot to stop
cooking, it still went on, for she did not know the magic words to stop it.

So the pot boiled over at last, and began to fill the kitchen. When
the kitchen was full, the porridge streamed out all over the house, then
into the next house, and the next, and the next, until at last the whole
village was full of porridge. There is no knowing what would have
happened if the little girl had not come back and cried to the pot to stop.

Then it left off cooking, but for many a long day the folk who
wished to get into the village had to eat their way through a mountain
of sweet porridge.














Lier â„¢fy
Ge. 'p



pt
<<



Ne CG VPON A TIME long ago—so long, indeed, that

even the very oldest people now alive could not remember
it—there lived a King and Queen in a beautiful palace, a great
white marble palace, with wide halls and high towers, and a golden roof
that flashed in the sun.

And all round the palace, for miles and miles, there were lovely —
gardens and pleasure-grounds, with terraces and green lawns, and ancient
trees where the birds would sit and sing all day and all night long, and
more flowers than you could ever think of if you were to think a whole
summer through. There were peacocks and birds of paradise on the
broad lawns, and pretty slender brown deer in the shady glades, and gold
and silver fishes in the ponds and fountains, and great red and yellow
fruits ripened in the orchards.

There was everything there that heart could wish—except just one,
and that was the one thing in all the world that this King and Queen
wanted to make them perfectly happy. For there was no little child to





40 NURSERY TALES.

run and play about the sunny gardens and pick the flowers, and pet the
birds and beasts that wandered there. And this would often make them
very sad.

But at last, after many years, they had their wish, and a little baby
daughter was born to them—a tiny child with a face like a blush rose-
bud, eyes like violets, and a little red mouth like the pimpernel flowers
that grow in the cornfields and by the wayside in summer-time.

Now, you can easily think how glad this King and Queen were, and
what great rejoicings were made over all the country.

Bonfires as big as haystacks were kept burning all night, fat oxen
were roasted whole in the market-place of every town, the church-bells
were rung and rung again until the ringers were out of breath and their
arms were aching, and every little child in the kingdom was given a
beautiful present for the baby Princess’s sake.

In the palace, of course, all was bustle and hurry to make ready
for the christening-feast ; the maids were busy putting flowers all about
the halls and chambers, and sprinkling the shining floors with sweet-
smelling leaves and petals. :

For the most important guests invited to this christening were
seven very powerful fairies, and you know, I am sure, how particular
fairies are about what they eat and drink. Not that they are greedy;
but they are used to such delicate food that even the very best of
ours seems strange to them. So the Queen was very anxious that
they should be pleased; for they had been asked to be godmothers
to the baby Princess, and she wanted them to be in a good humour
so that they should be kind to her little one.

It was a beautiful summer afternoon, and the roses on the palace
terrace were nodding their heads sleepily in the warm breeze, when
the fairies’ chariots came into sight, sailing through the blue sky like a
flight of bright-winged butterflies,

They were all good fairies, and had known the King and Queen
all their lives long, and as they had not seen them for some time there
was a great deal to talk about and much news to tell. And, dear me!
how pleased they were with the baby! They all agreed that she was
the prettiest little darling they had ever seen—almost as pretty as a
real fairy baby—and that was a compliment indeed, I can tell you.





«Beyond the wood was an enchanted palace, where a beautiful

princess had been sleeping for a hundred years.”



42 aa NURSERY TALES.

And when they went in to the great banqueting-hall and sat down
to table, they were even more delighted than at first. For each one
of them there was a set of six golden dinner things—knife, spoon, fork,
cup, dish, and plate—made on purpose as a present for each, and all
different. One was set with pearls, another with diamonds, the third
with rubies, the fourth with opals, the fifth with amethysts, the sixth
with emeralds, the seventh with SADE ess ; and nobody could tell which
was the most beautiful.

_ They were just going to begin, and everybody was as happy as
happy could be, when, all of a sudden, there was a clashing of brazen
claws and a rushing of wings, and something like a black cloud seemed
to pass before the tall windows and darken all the room, so that the
guests could hardly see their plates. Then the great doors burst open
with a terrible bang, and an old fairy in a long trailing black gown,
with her face almost hidden.in a black hood, jumped out of a black
chariot drawn by fierce griffins, and stalked up to the table.

The King turned pale, and the Queen nearly fainted away, for
this was the spiteful fairy Tormentilla, who lived all alone, an immense
distance away from everywhere and everyone, in a dismal black stone
castle in the middle of a desert. The poor Queen had been so happy
and so busy that she had forgotten all about her, and never sent her
an invitation.

However, they all tried to make the best of it, and another
chair was brought, and another place laid for Tormentilla; and both
the King and Queen told ‘her over and over again how very, very
sorry they were not to have asked her.

It was all in vain. Nothing could please her; she would eat and
drink nothing, and she sat, scowling and looking angrily at the other
fairies’ jewelled cups and dishes, until the feast was over, and it was time
to give the presents.

Then they all went into the great tapestry saloon. where the tiny
Princess lay sleeping in her mother-o’-pearl cradle, and the seven fairies
began to say what they would each give her.

The first stepped forward and said: “She shall always be as good as
gold”; the second: “She shall be the cleverest Princess in the world”;
the third: “She shall be the most beautiful”; the fourth: “ She shall be







THE SLEEPING BEAUTY. e243

the happiest”; the fifth: “She shall have the sweetest voice that was ever
heard”; the sixth: “Everyone shall love her.” And then the wicked old
cross fairy strode over to the cradle with long quick steps, and said,
shaking her black crooked stick at the King and Queen: “And J say that
she shall prick her hand with a spindle and die of the wound!”

At this the Queen fell on her knees and begged and prayed Tormentilla
to call back her cruel words; but suddenly the seventh fairy, the youngest
of all, who knew Tormentilla well, and had hidden herself behind the
curtains for fear that some such thing might happen, came out and said—

“Do not cry so, dear Queen; I cannot quite undo my cousin’s wicked
enchantment, but I can promise you that your daughter shall not die, but
only fall asleep for a hundred years. And, when these are past and gone,
a Prince shall come and awaken her with a kiss.”

So the King and Queen dried their tears and thanked the kind
‘fairy Heartsease for her goodness; and all the fairies went back to their
homes, and things went on much as usual in the palace. But you can
imagine how careful the Queen was of her little girl; and the King made
a law that every spindle in the country must be destroyed, and that no
more should be made, and that anyone who had a spindle should be
heavily punished, if not executed at once.

Well, the years went by happily enough until the Princess Miranda
was almost eighteen years old, and all that the six fairies had. promised
came true, for she was the best and the prettiest and the cleverest
Princess in all the world, and everybody loved her. And, indeed, by this
time Tormentilla’s spiteful words were almost forgotten.

“Poor old thing,’ the Queen would sometimes say, “she was so
angry at having been left out that she did not know what she was saying.
Of course, she did not really mean it.”

Now, the King and Queen had to go away for a few days to a great
entertainment that one of their richest nobles was giving at his country
house; and, as the Princess did not wish to go, they left her behind with
her ladies-in-waiting in the beautiful old palace. For the first two days
she amused herself very well, but on the third she missed her father and
mother so much that, to pass the time till they came back, she began
exploring all the old lumber-rooms and out-of-the-way attics in the palace,
and laughing at the dusty furniture and queer curiosities she found there.

at



44 . NURSERY TALES.

At last she found herself at the top of a narrow winding stairway in
a tall turret that seemed even older than all the rest of the palace. And
when she lifted the latch of the door in front of her she saw a little
low chamber with curiously painted walls, and there sat a little old,
old woman in a high white cap, spinning at a wheel.

For some time she stood at the door, watching the old woman
curiously; she could not imagine what she was doing, for the Princess
had never seen a spinning-wheel in her life before, because, as I told
you, the King had ordered them all to be destroyed.

Now, it happened that the poor old woman who lived in this
tower had never heard the King’s: command, for she was so deaf that
if you shouted until you were hoarse she would never have been able
to understand you.

“What pretty work you are doing there, Goody? And why does
that wheel go whirr, whirr, whirr?” said the Princess. The old woman
neither answered nor looked up, for, of course, she did not hear.

So the Princess stepped into the room and laid her hand upon
the old woman’s shoulder.

Goody started then, looked up, and rubbed her eyes.

“Deary, deary me!” cried she, in a high, cracked voice. “And
who may you be, my pretty darling?”

“I’m the Princess Miranda,’ screamed the maiden in her ear, but
the old woman only shook her head—she could hear nothing.

Then the Princess pointed to the spindle, and made the old
woman understand that she wanted to try if she could work it.

So Goedy nodded, and laughed, and got up from her seat, and
the Princess sat down and took the spindle in her hand. But no sooner
did she touch it than she pricked the pa of her hand with the
point, and sank down in a swoon.

Immediately a deep silence fell on all around. The little bird
that only a moment before had been singing so sweetly upon the
window-sill hushed his song. The distant hum of voices from the
courtyard beneath ceased; even Goody stopped short in the directions
she was giving the Princess, and neither moved hand nor foot towards
the poor little maid, and all because she had fallen fast asleep as
she stood.



THE SLEEPING BEAUTY. 45

Below in the castle it was just the same. The King and Queen,
who had that moment returned from their journey and were enquiring
for their daughter, fell asleep before the lady-in-waiting could answer
them, and as to the lady herself she had begun to snore—in a ladylike
manner, of course—before you could have winked your eye.

The soldiers and men-at-arms slumbered as they stood. The page-
boy fell asleep with his mouth wide open, and a fly that had just
: been going to settle on his nose fell
asleep too in mid-air.

Although the sun had been
shining brightly when the Princess
took the spindle in her hand, no
sooner did she prick herself with
the point than deep shadows
darkened the sunny rooms and
gardens,

It was just as though night
had overtaken them, but there was
no one in or near the palace to
heed whether it were dark or light.

This sudden darkness had been
caused by a magic wood which
had sprung up all around the
palace and its grounds. It
__ was at least half a mile thick,
2S and was composed of thorns
and prickly plants, through
_ which it seemed impossible for
. anyone to penetrate. It was
, so thick and high that it hid
even the topmost towers of the



















i oe, Ft, |) enchanted castle, and no one
“SER yd yt ; r outside could have dreamed
SN ade i ( a yy, a that such a castle lay behind it.

re eH Wis Ly a ee Well, and so the years
AE eo. e went on, and on, and on, until



46 NURSERY TALES.

a hundred years had passed, and the palace and the story of it were all
but forgotten. And it happened that a King’s son from a neighbouring
country came hunting that way with his men, and horses, and dogs.
And in the excitement of the chase he rode on and on until he became
separated from his servants and attendants, and found himself in a part
of the country where he had never been before. In vain he tried to
retrace his steps: he only seemed to wander farther away in the
wrong direction.

Presently he came to a woodcutter’s cottage, and dismounted to
ask his way. An old, old man lived in this hut, and after he had
directed the Prince as to the best way back, the young man pointed
to a thick wood ahead, and asked what lay beyond it. Then the old
man told him that there was a legend that beyond the wood was an
enchanted palace where a beautiful Princess had lain sleeping for a hundred
years, and whom a Prince was to awaken with a kiss.

Directly the Prince Florimond heard this, nothing would serve but
he must go there and see for himself if the tale were true. So he rode
and he rode until he came to the edge of the wood, and there he got
off his horse and began to push his way through the thorny thicket.
It was hard work indeed, for the briars were so strong and so sharp
that you would never believe that anyone could get past them, and
they closed up behind him as he went.

But he was strong and brave, and after a time the way became
easier, until at last he came to the palace.

There everyone was sleeping—the sentinels and soldiers in the court-

yard, the cooks in the kitchen, and pages and lords- and ladies-in-waiting | .

in the corridors and chambers; and, in the great throne-room the King
and Queen on their golden and ivory thrones. .

Prince Florimond- passed on, wondering more and more, till he
came at length to the narrow staircase which led to the little tower
in which the Princess had fallen asleep. He mounted this, and then
came the greatest wonder of all—the beautiful sleeping lady, in her
glistening white robes. She was so beautiful that to see her almost
took away his breath; and, falling on his knees, he bent to kiss her cheek.
And ashe kissed her, she opened her lovely blue eyes and said, smiling:
“Oh! Prince, have you come at last? I have had such pleasant dreams.”





Then she sat up laughing and rubbing her eyes, and gave him:
her hand, and they went hand in hand together down the stairs and
along the corridors, till they came to the throne-room. And there were
the King and Queen rubbing their eyes too, and they kissed their
daughter and welcomed the Prince most gladly.

And, all at the same time, the whole palace was awake. Cocks
crowed, dogs barked, the cats began to mew, the spits to turn, the
clocks to strike, the soldiers presented arms, the heralds blew their
trumpets, the head cook boxed a little scullion’s ears, the butler went on.



48 NURSERY TALES.

drinking his half-finished tankard of wine, the first lady-in-waiting
finished winding her skein of silk.

Everything, in short, went on exactly as though the spell had
lasted a hundred seconds instead of years. .To be sure, Princess
Miranda's pretty white dress was just such a one as Prince Florimond’s
great-grandmother might have worn. But that gave them something
to laugh at.

And now my story is done, for I need hardly tell you that the
Prince and Princess were married amid great rejoicings, and lived happily
ever after; and that the seven fairy godmothers danced at the wedding.
So all ended well, and what more could anyone wish?







bE THE Straw -—
elt = ON ne Gene
AND THE. JEAN,

Y








2
i LL alone, in a quiet little village, lived a poor old
woman. One day she had a dish of beans which

= she wanted’ to cook for dinner, so she made a fire
on the hearth, and in order that it should ‘burn up quickly she lighted
it with a handful of straw.

She hung the pot over the fire, and poured in the beans; but
one fell on to the floor without her noticing it, and rolled away beside
a piece of straw. Soon afterwards a live coal flew out of the fire and.

joined their company. Then the straw began to speak.
“Dear friends,” said he, “whence come you?”

‘ “I was fortunate enough to spring out of the fire,” answered the
coal. “Had I not exerted myself to get out when I did, I should.
most certainly have been burnt to ashes.”

“T have also just managed to save my Skin,” said the bean..
“Had the old woman succeeded in putting me into the pot, I should.






50 NURSERY TALES.

have been stewed without mercy, just as my comrades are being
‘served now.”

“My fate might have been no better,’ the straw told them. “The
old woman burnt sixty of my brothers at once, but fortunately I was
able to slip through her fingers,”

“What shall we do now?” said the coal,

“Well,” answered the bean, “my opinion is that, as we have all
been so fortunate as to escape death, we should leave this place before
any new misfortune overtakes us. Let us all three become travelling
‘companions and set out upon a journey to some unknown country.”

This suggestion pleased both the straw and the coal, so away they all
went at once. Before long they came to a brook, and as there was no
bridge across it they did not know how to get to the other side; but the
straw had a good idea: “I will lay myself over the water, and you can
walk across me as though I were a bridge,” he said. So he stretched himself
from one bank to the other, and the coal, who was of a hasty disposition,
at once tripped gaily on to the newly-built bridge. Half way across she
hesitated, and began to feel afraid of the rushing water beneath her. She
‘dared go no farther, but neither would she return; but she stood there so
long that the straw caught fire, broke in two, and fell into the stream.
‘Of course, the coal was bound to follow. No sooner did she touch
the water than—hiss, zish! out she went, and never glowed again.

The bean, who was a careful fellow, had stayed on the bank, to
‘watch how the coal got across, before trusting himself to such a slender
bridge. But when he saw what very queer figures his friends cut, he
‘could not help laughing. He laughed and laughed till he could not stop,
and at length he split his side.

It would have gone badly with him then, had not a tailor happened
to pass by. He was a kind-hearted fellow, and at once took out his
needle and thread and began to repair the mischief.

The bean thanked him politely, for he knew that the tailor had
saved his life, but unfortunately he had used black thread, and from
that time till to-day every bean has a little black stitch in its side.








'
ilk ‘ay






y 7 |
oe LITTLE brother and
ay: sister were one day playing beside a deep stream, when
ee ' they slipped and fell plump into the water. Now, in
"A the stream there lived a water-sprite, and no sooner
i did she see these two pretty little children than she
determined to make them work for her. The girl she set to fetch water
in a pail that had no bottom to it; the boy was made to cut down trees
with a blunt axe, and all the food she gave them was doughy dumplings.
At last the children could bear this cruel treatment no longer, so
one day, when the water-sprite was from home, they ran away. When
the water-sprite returned, she ran as fast as ever she could to try and over-
take them. The children saw her coming, and the little girl threw her
brush behind her. In a second it had grown into a mountain of bristles,
over which the sprite had the greatest difficulty in climbing. But she
succeeded at last, and when the children saw how very near she was to
them the boy threw his comb behind him. This grew into a mountain
of sharp spikes, but the sprite was so anxious to catch the children that
she clambered over the spikes and never seemed to feel the slightest prick.
Then the girl threw her mirror behind her, and immediately it grew
into a mountain of glass, which was so slippery that the sprite could not
climb over it, try as much as she would. So home she went to fetch an
axe; but by the time she came back and had chopped down the mountain
of glass the children had reached their home and were safe in their
mother’s arms. Then there was nothing left for the water-sprite to do
but to go back to her spring and work for herself.









ty tet 0

16. ¢






oe
deh

{‘
‘ees
S _ Sy

|

€ pleasure-garden behind his palace, in which grew a tree that
AP bore golden apples. As fast as the apples ripened they were
vi counted, but the next day one was always missing.

This was made known to the King, who commanded.
that a watch should be kept every night. under the tree. Now, the King
had three sons, and he sent the eldest into the garden when night was
coming on; but at midnight he fell fast asleep, and in the morning another
apple was missing. The following night the second son had to watch, but
he did not succeed any better, and again another apple was missing in the
morning. Now came the turn of the youngest son, who was eager to go;
but the King did not rely much upon him, and thought he would watch
even worse than his brothers; however, at last he consented.

The youth threw. himself on the ground under the tree and watched
steadily, without letting sleep master him. As twelve o'clock struck, .
something rustled in the air, and he saw a bird fly by in the moonlight,
whose feathers were of shining gold. The bird alighted on the tree and
was just picking off one of the apples when the young Prince shot a bolt
at it. Away flew the bird, but the arrow had knocked off one of its
feathers, which was of the finest gold. The youth picked it up and showed
it to the King next morning, and told him all he had seen in the night.



THE GOLDEN BIRD. 53

Thereupon the King assembled his council, and each one declared that
asingle feather like this one was of greater value than the whole kingdom.

“However valuable this feather may be,” said the King, “one will
not be of much use to me—I must have the whole bird.”

So the eldest son went forth on his travels, to look for the wonder-
ful bird, and he had no doubt that he would be able to find it.

When he had gone a short distance, he saw a fox sitting close to
the edge of the forest, so he drew his bow to shoot. But the fox cried
out: “Do not shoot me, and I will give you a piece of good advice!
You are now on the road to the golden bird, and this evening you will
come to a village where two inns stand opposite to each other: one will
be brilliantly lighted, and great merriment will be going on inside; do
not, however, go in, but rather enter the other, even though it appears
but a poor place to you.”

“How can such a ridiculous animal give me rational advice ?” thought
the young Prince, and shot at the fox, but missed it, so it ran away
with its tail in the air. The King’s son then walked on, and in the
evening he came to a village where the two inns stood: in one there was
dancing and singing, but the other was quiet, and had avery mean
and wretched appearance.

“I should be an idiot,” thought he to himself, “if I were to go to
this gloomy old inn while the other is so bright and cheerful.” Therefore,
he went into the merry one, lived there in rioting and revelry, and so
forgot the golden bird, his father, and all good behaviour.

As time passed away, and the eldest son did not return home,
the second son set out on his travels to seek the golden bird. Like the
eldest brother, he met with the fox, and did not follow the good advice
it gave him. He likewise came to the two inns, and at the window of
the noisy one his brother stood entreating him to come in. This he could
not resist, so he went in, and began to live a life of pleasure only.

Again a long time passed by without any news, so the youngest
Prince wished to try his luck, but his father would not hear of it. At
last, for the sake of peace, the King was obliged to consent, for he had
no rest as long as he refused. The fox was again sitting at the edge of
the forest, and once more it begged for its own. life and gave its good
advice. The youth was good-hearted, and said—



54 NURSERY TALES.

“Have no fear, little fox; I will not do thee any harm.”

“Thou wilt never repent of thy good nature,” replied the fox, “and
in order that thou mayest travel more quickly, get up behind on my tail.”

Scarcely had the youth seated himself, when away went the fox
over hill and dale, so fast that the Prince’s hair whistled in the wind.
When they came to the village, the youth dismounted, and following the
fox’s advice, he turned at once into the shabby-looking inn, where he slept
peacefully through the night. The next morning, when the Prince went
into the fields, the fox was already there, and said—

“J will tell thee what further thou must do. Go straight on, and
thou wilt come to a castle before which a whole troop of soldiers will be
lying asleep. Go right through the midst of them into the castle, and
thou wilt come to a chamber where is hanging a wooden cage containing
a golden bird. Close by stands an empty golden cage, for show; but be
careful that thou dost not take the bird out of its ugly cage and put it
in the splendid one, or it will be very unlucky for thee.”

With these words the fox once more stretched out its tail, and the
King’s son sat upon it again, and away they went over hill and dale, with
their hair whistling in the wind.

When they arrived at the castle, the Prince found everything as the
fox had said, and he soon discovered the room in which the golden bird
was sitting in its wooden cage; by it stood a golden one; while three
golden apples were lying about the room. But the Prince thought it
-would be silly to put such a lovely bird in so ugly and common a cage;
so, opening the door, he placed it in the golden cage. In an instant the
bird set up a piercing shriek, which awakened all the soldiers, who rushed
in and made him prisoner. :

The next morning he was brought before a judge, who at once
condemned him to death. Still, the King said his life should be spared
on one condition, and that was, that he brought him the golden horse,
which ran faster than the wind; and if he succeeded he should also receive
the golden bird as a reward.

The young Prince set out on his journey, but he sighed and felt
very sorrowful, for where was he to find the golden horse? All at once,
he saw his old friend, the fox, sitting by the wayside.

“Ah!” exclaimed the fox, “thou seest now what has happened





The Golden ‘Bird.



56 NURSERY TALES.

through not listening to me. But be of good courage; I will look after
thee, and tell thee how thou mayest discover the horse. Thou must travel
‘straight along this road until thou comest to a castle; the horse is there in
one of the stables. Thou wilt find a stable boy fying before the stall, but
he will be fast asleep and snoring, so thou wilt be able to lead out the
golden horse quite quietly. But there is one thing thou must be carefu!
about, and that is to put on the shabby old saddle of wood and leather,
and not the golden one which hangs beside it—otherwise everything will
go wrong with thee.” Then the fox stretched out his tail, the Prince
took a seat upon it, and away they went over hill ond dale, with their
hair whistling in the wind.

Everything happened as
the fox had said. The Prince
came to the stable where the
golden horse was standing, but,
as he was about to put on the
Shabby old saddle, he thought
to himself; “It does seem a
shame that such a lovely animal
should be disgraced with this.
The fine saddle is his by right;
it must go on.”

Scarcely had the golden
saddle rested on the horse’s
back when it began to neigh
loudly. This awakened the
stable boy, who awakened the
grooms, who rushed in and
seized the Prince and made
him a prisoner. The following
morning he was brought to
trial and condemned to death,
but the King promised him
his life, as well as the golden
horse, if the youth could find
the beautiful daughter of the





THE GOLDEN BIRD. 57

King of the golden castle. Once more, with a heavy heart, the Prince
set out on his journey, and by great good fortune he soon came across
the faithful fox.

“T really should have left thee to the consequences of thy folly,”
said the fox; “but as I feel great compassion for thee, I will help thee
out of thy new misfortune. The path to the castle lies straight before
thee; thou wilt reach it about the evening. At night, when everything is
quiet, the lovely Princess will go to the bath-house, to bathe there. As
soon as she enters, thou must spring forward and give her a kiss; then she
will follow thee wherever thou carest to lead her; only be careful that
she does not take leave of her parents, or everything will go wrong.”

Then the fox stretched out his tail, the Prince seated himself on it,
and away they both went over hill and dale, their hair whistling in
the wind.

When the King’s son came to the golden palace, everything happened
as the fox had predicted. He waited until midnight, and when everyone
was soundly asleep the beautiful Princess went into the bath-house, so
he sprang forward and kissed her. The Princess then said she would
joyfully follow him, but she besought him with tears in her eyes to allow
her to say farewell to her parents. At first he withstood her entreaties,
but as she wept still more, and fell at his feet, he at last yielded.

Scarcely was the maiden at the bedside of her father, when he
awoke, and so did everyone else in the palace; so the foolish youth was
captured and put into prison.

On the following morning the King said to him: “Thy life is for-
feited, and thou canst only find mercy if thou clearest away the mountain
that lies before my windows, and over which I cannot see, but it must
be removed within eight days. If thou dost succeed thou shalt have
my daughter as a reward.”

So the Prince commenced at once to dig and to shovel away the
earth without cessation, but when after seven days he saw how little he
had been able to accomplish, and that all his labour was as nothing, he
fell into a great grief and gave up all hope.

On the evening of the seventh day, however, the fox appeared.
“Thou dost not deserve that I should take thy part or befriend thee, but
do thou go away and lie down to sleep, and I will do the work for thee.”

5



58 NURSERY TALES,

And the next morning, when he awoke and looked out of the
window, the mountain had disappeared! Then the Prince, quite over-
joyed, hastened to the King and told him that the conditions were fulfilled,
so that the King, whether he would or not, was obliged to keep his word
and give him his daughter.

Then these two went away together, and it was not long before the
faithful fox came to them. ;

“Thou hast indeed gained the best of all,’ said he; “but to the
maiden of the golden castle belongs also the golden horse.”

“How can I get it?” enquired the youth.

“YT will tell thee,” answered the fox; “first of all, take the lovely
Princess to the King who sent you to the golden palace. There will then
be unheard-of joy; they will gladly lead the golden horse to thee and
give it thee. Mount it instantly, and give your hand to everyone at
parting, and last of all to the Princess. Grasp her hand firmly; make her
spring into the saddle behind thee, and then gallop away; no one will be
able to overtake thee, for the golden horse runs faster than the wind.”

This was all happily accomplished, and the King’s son carried off
the beautiful Princess on the golden horse. The fox did not remain
behind, and spoke thus to the young Prince—

“Now I will help thee to find the golden bird. When thou comest
near the castle where the bird is to be found, let the Princess dismount,
and I will take her under my protection. Then ride on the golden horse
to the courtyard of the palace, where thy coming will cause great joy,
and they will fetch the golden bird for thee. Dey the cage is in thy
hands, gallop back to us and fetch the maiden again.”

When this plot was successfully carried out, and the Pras was
about to ride home with his treasure, the fox said: “Now must thou
reward me for all my services.”

“What is it that thou dost desire?” enquired the Prince.

“When we come to yonder wood, thou must shoot me dead and
cut off my head and paws.”

“That would be a fine sort of gratitude,” said the King’s son; “that
I cannot possibly promise thee.”

“Then,” replied the fox, “if thou wilt not, I must leave thee; but
before I go I will give thee again some good advice. Beware of two



THE GOLDEN BIRD, 59



things—buy no gallows’-flesh,
and see that thou dost not sit
on the brink of a well!”

With this the fox ran off
into the forest. :

“Ah!” thought the young
Prince, “that is a wonderful
animal with very whimsical
ideas! Who would buy gal-
lows’-flesh, and when have I
ever had the slightest desire
to sit on the brink of a well?”

So he rode on with the
beautiful maiden, and his path
led him once more through
the village in which his two
brothers had stopped. Here
there was great tumult and
lamentation, and when he
asked what it all meant, he
was told that two men
were going to be hanged.
When he came nearer, he
saw that they were his two
brothers, who had com-
mitted every kind of wicked ?
folly and had squandered all their money. Then the young Prince asked
if they could not be freed.

_ “Supposing you do pay for them,” the people answered, “where is

the good of wasting your money in order to free such villains?”

Nevertheless, he did not hesitate, but paid for them, and when the
brothers were freed they all rode away together. They came to the forest
where they first encountered the fox, and as it was cool and pleasant
away from the burning sun, the two brothers said—

“Let us sit and rest a little by this well, and eat and drink
something.”




















on

5*



60 NURSERY TALES.

The young Prince consented, and while they were all talking together
he quite forgot the fox’s warning, and suspected no evil.

But suddenly the two brothers threw him backwards into the well,
and, seizing the maiden, the horse, and the golden bird, they went home
to their father.

“We not only bring you the golden. bird,” said they, “but we have
also found the golden palace.”

There was great rejoicing, but the horse would not eat, neither
would the bird sing, and the maiden only sat and wept.

But the youngest brother had not perished. By good fortune the
well was dry, and he had fallen on soft moss without hurting himself,
but he could not get out again.

Even in this misfortune the faithful fox did not desert him, but came
springing down to him and scolded him for not following his advice.

“Still I cannot forsake thee,” said he, “and I will help to show thee
daylight once more.”

Then he told him to seize hold of his tail and hold on tightly ;
and so saying, he lifted him up in the air.

“Even now thou art not out of danger,” said the fox, “for thy
brothers were not certain of thy death, and have set spies to watch for
thee in the forest, who will certainly kill thee if they see thee.”

There was an old man sitting by the wayside with whom the young
Prince changed clothes, and, thus disguised, he reached the court of
the King.

No one recognised him, but the golden bird began to sing, and the ~
golden horse commenced to eat, and the lovely maiden ceased to weep.

The King was astonished and asked: ‘What does this all mean?”

Then said the maiden: “I know not, but I was so sad, and now |
feel light-hearted; it is-as if my true husband had returned.”

Then she told him all that had happened, although the other brothers
had threatened to kill her if she betrayed them.

The King then summoned all the people in the castle before him:
and there came with them the young Prince dressed as a beggar in his
rags, but the maiden recognised him instantly and fell upon his neck.

So the wicked brothers were seized and executed, but the young
Prince married the lovely Princess and was made his father’s heir.



THE GOLDEN BIRD. 61

But: what became of the poor fox?

Long afterwards the young Prince went again into the forest, and
there he met once more with the fox, who said—

“Thou hast now everything in the world thou canst desire, but to
my misfortunes there can be no end, although it is in thy power to
release me from them.”

So he entreated the Prince to shoot him dead and cut off his head
and feet.

At last the Prince consented to do so, and scarcely was the deed
done than the fox was changed into a man, who was no other than
the brother of the beautiful Princess, at last released from the spell that
had bound him.

So now nothing was wanting to the happiness of the Prince and
his bride as long as they lived.








LADD IN

AND

THe VGNDERFUL
J APP

N a great city in China
there once lived a boy
named Aladdin, who was,

unfortunately, a very idle fellow. Even when

his father died, he still refused to work, and passed all his time
playing in the streets with other bad boys of his own age.

One day, as he was amusing himself thus, a stranger, who had paused
to watch their games, called to him.

“O youth,” he said, “are you not the son of Mustapha, the tailor?”

“Yes,” replied Aladdin, somewhat astonished, unaware that the man
had been enquiring about him, “yes, but my father is dead! How did
you guess I was his son?”

“By your wonderful resemblance to my dearest brother,’ exclaimed
the stranger, who wore the dress of an African merchant, and flinging his
arms round Aladdin’s neck, he kissed him, and giving him a handful of
small coins, bade him take them to his mother. Aladdin-ran home, but
when his mother heard his story she was very much astonished.

“You have no uncle,” she said. “Neither your father nor I ever
had a brother. There must be some mistake.”



ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 63

However, the stranger came next day, and explained that he had
been absent from his birthplace for forty years, travelling in distant lands,
till a great desire to see his home had seized him.

“Tt is very sad to return,’ he continued, wiping away his tears,
“and find that Mustapha is dead. My only comfort is that he has left
this son, who so closely resembles his dear father that wherever I met
him I should have known him. And what is his occupation? Does he
follow his father’s profession ?”

At this question Aladdin hung his head.

“Alas, brother,” answered the mother, “I am sorry to say Aladdin
is very idle. I have to toil to maintain him, and he grows so big and
eats so heartily that I cannot support him much longer!”

“Dear, dear!” said the uncle. “This should not be. But perhaps
I can help. Would you like to keep a shop, nephew, if I provided you
with one?”

Aladdin, who hated hard work, thought this would be delightful, and
rejoiced that he had met so charming an uncle.

Next day the merchant took Aladdin out and bought him new
clothes and other presents, and then suggested that they should make a
little trip into the country where Aladdin had never been. So one fine
morning they set out and walked a long way, till they almost reached
the mountains. There, in a narrow valley between high hills, the
stranger paused.

“There is something very curious here which I should like to show
you,’ he said. “But first I must make a fire, so gather mea heap of
dry sticks.”

This done, the merchant kindled a fire, on which he threw some
incense, repeating at the same moment certain magical words. Instantly
the earth opened before them, and discovered a huge stone in which was
fastened a brass ring. Aladdin was so frightened that he would have run
away, but his uncle caught him roughly by the arm.

“Stay still,” he said, “as you value your life, and be obedient! And
first take hold of that ring and lift the stone!”

“Then you must help me,” gasped Aladdin, trembling with fear. “It
is much too heavy for me to move alone.”

“Do as I tell you,” answered his uncle sternly, and Aladdin, too



64 NURSERY TALES.

alarmed to refuse, caught hold of the ring and the stone came up quite
easily, disclosing a flight of steps descending to a door under ground.

“Now,” said his uncle, “go down and open the door. Within you
will find a palace divided into three great halls, in each of which stand
four brass coffers full of gold and silver; but touch them not at your
peril, nor let even your dress so much as brush the wall, or you will die.
Pass quickly through to a garden planted with trees laden with fruit,
of which you may pluck if you like. There, on a terrace, you will see
in a niche a lighted lamp. Take it down, extinguish it, throw away
the oil, and putting it in your waistband, bring it to me. But see, take
this ring,’ and the stranger drew one from his finger and put it on
Aladdin's hand; “it is a talisman against all evil. Go boldly, and we shall
both be rich all our lives,” ‘

Aladdin obeyed. He found all as his uncle had described. He
passed safely through the fatal halls, found the lamp, and put it

into his waistband, but as he re-

turned across the garden he stopped
to pluck some of the fruit from the
trees, and found it, as he thought,
made of glass. Some of it was
white, some red, and some green;
but he was too ignorant to recog-
nise that really these fruits were
precious stones of enormous value—
diamonds, pearls, rubies, sapphires,
and amethysts! However, he filled
his pockets, wrapped some in the
skirt of his robe, and crammed _ his
vest as full as he could. So laden he
returned, and found his uncle waiting
for him at the top of the steps.

“Have you got the lamp?”
he cried,

“Yes,” Aladdin answered. “But,
uncle, just give me your hand to
help me up these steep steps!”





ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 65,

“Give me the lamp first,’ said the stranger. “It will be in
your way.”

“J will as soon as IJ am up,” replied Aladdin; “but I cannot get at
it without dropping the fruit I have plucked.”

“But you must give it me first,” cried the merchant, who did not
intend the boy to come up alive. He was only using him to obtain the
magic lamp, which must be a voluntary gift from someone, or he would
not have power over it; and Aladdin was just an idle vagabond whom no
one would miss if he did not return. But still the boy refused to give
him the lamp, and at last, irritated past bearing, the wicked magician
threw some more incense on to the fire, muttered his charms, and lo! the
stone suddenly moved back to its place, shutting Aladdin down in darkness
in the bowels of the earth!

His horror can be imagined. In a moment he understood that this.
cruel wretch could be no uncle of his, but a wicked sorcerer who had
deceived him for his own fell purposes. He tried to return to the palace,
hoping to escape by the garden, but the door was fast shut. He screamed
and shouted, but no one heard him, and then, resigning himself to his fate,
he tried to remember some of the prayers which his father and mother
had often striven to teach him. “There is no help forme but in Allah!”
he said. Now, in joining his hands to pray, he rubbed the ring which
the magician had placed on his finger, and to his extreme astonishment
there stood before him a terrible genie, who said—

“What wouldest thou have? I am ready to obey thee, for both I
and the other slaves of the ring are bound to serve him who possesses it!”

“Get me out of this!” promptly exclaimed Aladdin, and in a moment
he was standing in the valley with no sign of the cave or the stone. He
hurried off home as quickly as his legs would carry him, and there told
his mother all that had befallen him, and how the pretended uncle was
nothing but a wicked magician.

“And do give me something to eat, mother,” he cried, “for I perish
with hunger !” :

“Alas, child,’ she teplied, “I have not a morsel in the house, but
I have spun a little cotton: I will go and sell that and buy a loaf.”

“Why not sell this lamp?” said Aladdin, taking it out of his waist-
band. “It will fetch more than the cotton.”



66 cates NURSERY TALES.

“Tis but ‘a dirty old thing,” she answered; “Jet me rub it up a bit,
and then you may get a better price.”

So saying, she: began to clean the lamp, when in an instant a
dreadful genie appeared before her, saying in a voice of thunder—

“What wouldst thou have? I am ready to obey thee—I and the
other slaves of the lamp.” Whereupon the poor woman was so frightened
that she fainted dead away. | j

But Aladdin snatched the lamp from his mother’s hand, and cried
boldly— Eee

“T am hungry—bring me food !”

The genie disappeared, and instantly returned with a large silver
tray, on which were six covered dishes of the same metal, containing
delicious viands, two flagons of wine, and two silver cups. All these he
placed on the carpet, and vanished.

Aladdin’s mother soon recovered from her faint, and surveyed the
refreshments with astonishment, asking if the Sultan had sent them. But
Aladdin suggested they should have their meal first and he would tell
her afterwards, which he did to her great astonishment and horror, she
even beseeching her son to rid himself of both lamp and ring as being
enchanted and connected with evil powers. But Aladdin could not quite
make up his mind to do that.

After this, things went very well with them. When all the pro-
visions were eaten up, Aladdin took the silver dishes one by one and
sold them. And when all were gone, he summoned the genie to bring»
him more; so that he and his mother grew quite rich and prosperous.

But people are seldom long content, and so it happened to Aladdin.
One day he heard a proclamation that all the inhabitarits were to
shut their shops and keep indoors while the Princess Buddir al Baddoor
went to the bath. This Princess was said to be the most beautiful
creature in the world, and a great desire to see her took possession of
Aladdin. So he managed to hide behind the door of the bath, and was
lucky enough to gain a full view of her face, for she removed her veil in
passing the spot where he was concealed. Then he went home so sad
and thoughtful that his mother asked him if anything was the matter.

“Mother,” he said, “I have seen the Princess, and she is so
beautiful that I am resolved to ask her in marriage from the Sultan!”



'

Sr ar
a we ‘
iN NI





68 NURSERY TALES.

“Marry the Princess!” gasped his mother. “Child! you must be
mad! Do you think the Sultan will give his daughter to such as you?”

“That is to be seen!” replied Aladdin. “ But, mother, you must
help me. Now I have a secret to tell you. Those fruits I brought
home from the enchanted garden are not pieces of glass as I thought:
they are jewels of enormous value—so the man to whom I sold the
silver dishes tells me. Well, I want you to take them, arranged on
your best china dish, to the divan where the Sultan sits to judge cases,
and present them to him.”

The poor woman was much distressed, believing that her son had
lost his wits, but she agreed to do what he asked. Together they
arranged the jewels, and indeed they were dazzling enough to astonish
anyone. Then she wrapped the dish in a clean napkin, and carried
it to the divan, where she was careful to place herself so that the
Sultan might see her. But that day
there were so many cases, that she
had no chance to speak, and so it
happened day after day.

But still she always went, and
at last the Sultan, seeing her waiting,
became curious to know her business,
and commanded that she should be
brought before him.

“Good woman,” he said, “what
business is it which brings you here
day after day?” ,

“O King, live for ever!” she
exclaimed. “I come to make a peti-
_tion, but it is of so strange a nature
that ere I speak I implore your for-
giveness |” 5

“Tt is granted,” replied the Sultan,
more curious than ever. ‘Speak
boldly, and no harm shall come to
you.”

“My son,” went on the widow,





ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 69

“loves your daughter, the Princess, and has sent me to ask her hand
in marriage. He also sends these jewels which he entreats your Majesty
to accept.”

At first the Sultan was inclined to laugh at the idea of giving
his daughter to the poor widow’s son, but when he saw the beautiful
jewels she had brought he hesitated, and then said that he would ©
probably give his consent at the end of three months.

However, before the three months had passed Aladdin found out
that preparations were being made for the tia vaee of the Princess to
the son of the Grand Vizier.

In surprise and sorrow Aladdin lost no time in tubbing the lamp
and calling up the genie, whom he commanded to frighten the Vizier’s
son so that he would no longer wish to marry the Princess. This the
genie did by carrying him off and imprisoning him in a dark and
dismal place until he was willing to give up his bride. Then, by the
aid of the genie of the lamp, Aladdin carried to the Sultan such
magnificent presents that at last he consented to accept him as_his
son-in-law, and sent word that the sooner he came to receive the
Princess the greater favour he would be doing him.

Aladdin did not delay long, but first he commanded the genie
to convey him to a bath and provide suitable raiment. In a moment
he found himself in a splendid marble edifice where he was bathed
in scented waters of various degrees of heat, and then clad in magni-
ficent robes. ;

After this, the genie supplied him with a beautiful horse, which he
mounted, and, accompanied by forty slaves, who cast handfuls of gold
among the crowd in the streets, he proceeded to the palace, where the
Sultan received him with. every mark of respect and honour.

First there was a great entertainment, at which the Sultan and
Aladdin sat at a table by themselves, and later the Chief Cadi was
directed to draw the marriage-contract, the Sultan asking Aladdin if
he would remain and complete it the same day.

“Sire,” he replied, “though I am most impatient to behold the
Princess, still I wish very much to have a suitable residence prepared
to receive her. Grant me, I beg you, sufficient ground near your
palace, and I will have it finished with the utmost speed!”



_ 79 NURSERY TALES.

Of course, the Sultan consented, and as soon as Aladdin got. home
again he summoned his genie.

“Genie,” he said, “build me a palace, the most magnificent ever
seen, of porphyry and marble, and whatever bricks you use must be of
gold and silver. Let the chief hall have twenty-four windows enriched
with precious stones. And there must be gardens full of flowers and
fountains, and stables with fine horses, and servants and slaves, and
especially a treasure-house filled with. gold and silver.”

Next morning, when the Sultan’s porter opened the palace gates,
he saw something shining so brightly that he rubbed his eyes in
astonishment. He looked again and again ere he realised that on a spot
which the night before had only been a garden there had arisen a
marvellous building. He ran to a servant of the Grand Vizier, who
waked his master, who rushed off and told the Sultan.

“Why, that must be Aladdin’s palace!” exclaimed the Sultan,
jumping out of bed and running to the window; “built up in one night!
Well, he is a wonderful fellow, certainly !”

That day was the wedding-day. First of all Aladdin and his mother
(who was now suitably dressed in splendid attire) took possession of the
palace, and at night the bride was brought home in a splendid litter
accompanied by a grand procession. So much magnificence had never
before been seen in the city, where Aladdin was now a great favourite
by reason of the gold his slaves had flung to the people. As for the
Princess, she and Aladdin adored one another, and they lived together
very happily.

But alas! a great misfortune was in store for poor Aladdin. For it
happened some years later that the African magician remembered Aladdin,
and by his magic arts sought to learn if the lad had perished in the
enchanted hall.

To his great annoyance he discovered that Aladdin was not dead,
but living in much splendour by the aid of the wonderful lamp; where-
upon he started off to see if he could not do him a mischief.

_ As soon as he saw Aladdin’s palace he at once recognised that it had
ever been built by mortal hands. Then again he consulted his magic
powers, and learnt that the lamp was still in the palace, eee caused
him to rub his hands with glee.







ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 7k

Now, just then Aladdin was away
on a hunting expedition which would
last eight days, and the Princess found
herself rather dull. As she: sat in her
room one morning, yawning -a little,
she heard a great shouting and noise
outside, and sent one of her slaves to-
see what it was.

“ancy, madam,” she said, “there
is a queer old man. outside with a.
basket full of beautiful lamps, and he
is crying out: ‘Old lamps for new!
old lamps for new!’ All the people
are laughing at him!”

“Why, he must be mad!” ex-
claimed another slave. “Madam, there:
is a shabby old lamp-in Prince Aladdin’s.
room; shall we try if he will really
change it for a new one?”

“Yes, do!” said the Princess, who-
had no idea of the value of the lamp.
Then one of the slaves fetched it and
offered it to the old man, who of course:
was the magician using this artifice to obtain the precious lamp. He was.
overjoyed, and bade the girl choose what she liked from his basket, and
hurried away, having obtained all he wanted. As soon as it was night,
he retired to a quiet spot, and, summoning the genie, he bade him remove
Aladdin’s palace straightway to Africa.

What was the dismay of the Sultan the next morning when he
found that not only was his son-in-law’s fine palace gone as quickly as.
it came, but that his daughter had vanished with it! In a transport of
rage he sent for Aladdin from his hunting, and as soon as he arrived
condemned him to be put to death!

“But why?” exclaimed poor Aladdin, who did not know what had
occurred. “Why, sire, do you treat me thus? What crime have I
committed ?”





72 NURSERY TALES.

“Crime, wretch!” shouted the Sultan; “look out of window and tell
me what has become of my daughter?”.

Aladdin looked and looked again, but his splendid home was no
longer visible! Then he guessed what had happened.

“OQ King!” he cried, “give me forty days, and if in that time I
have not brought back both your daughter and my palace, you can cut
off my head and welcome!”

The Sultan granted his request, and Aladdin went forth depressed
and miserable. He wandered about for three days, not knowing what to
do or where to go. But accidentally when near the river he slipped and,
clutching at a rock to save himself, he rubbed the ring which the
magician had given him and which he always wore, though he had
forgotten its power—and there stood the genie before him.

“What wouldst thou have?” said the terrible being. “I am ready
to obey thee, both I and the other slaves of the ring!”

“Show me where my palace is!” cried Aladdin, “or bring it back
here if thou canst!”

“That is beyond my power,” replied the genie, “but I can transport
you to it!” and whisking Aladdin up, he transported him to Africa and
put him down just outside the Princess’s window, from which she, at that
moment, was gazing in a forlorn mood.

With a cry of joy she recognised him, and in another minute they
were weeping in one another's arms. But when they had somewhat
recovered their calmness, Aladdin began to ask questions.

“Dearest Princess,” he said, “there was an old lamp

“Ah!” interrupted the Princess, “I knew that that lamp had
something to do with it, for the very morning after I had changed it for
a new one I found myself in this strange place, and in the power of a
horrid old man who keeps the lamp carefully in his bosom. He pulled
it out one day in triumph to show me—odious old creature that he is!”

“Ah,” cried Aladdin, “now I know what to do. Wait for me here,
‘dearest; 1 will be back directly.”

Off flew Aladdin to the nearest town, where he purchased a certain
powder which he bade the Princess put in a cup of wine, and offer it to
the magician at an entertainment to which she must invite him. “When
he has drunk it, he will become insensible,’ he said; “then call me!”

”





ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 73

The Princess obeyed him faithfully. She invited the Magician, and
made her slaves sing to him, and then offered him the drugged cup.
The moment he had drunk the wine he fell back lifeless on the sofa.

“Aladdin!” cried the Princess, “come quickly !”

“Now we are saved!” he exclaimed ; “leave me alone a minute,
dearest, and I will see if we cannot get home again.”

The Princess felt two little shocks: one when the building was
lifted up, and one when it was set down, and there was her father’s
palace standing over the way as usual. Need I say how overjoyed
the Sultan was to see his daughter again, and how he quite forgave
Aladdin and received him into favour?

So they lived in great felicity, and when the Sultan died, the
Princess succeeded him on the throne, and she and Aladdin reigned many
years and left a numerous and illustrious posterity.









et
Re i ,

=

AU,

a

WA A
Pa
ge sea

a2 7 f \Z

HERE was once upon a time a teeny-tiny woman who lived
in a teeny-tiny house in a teeny-tiny village. Now, one day
this teeny-tiny woman put on her teeny-tiny bonnet, and
went out of her teeny-tiny house to take a teeny-tiny walk.

And when this teeny-tiny woman had gone a teeny-tiny way, she came
to a teeny-tiny gate; so the teeny-tiny woman opened the teeny-tiny
gate, and went into a teeny-tiny churchyard. And when this teeny-tiny
woman had got into the teeny-tiny churchyard, she saw a teeny-tiny
bone on a teeny-tiny grave, and the teeny-tiny woman said to her
teeny-tiny self: “This teeny-tiny bone will make me some teeny-tiny
soup for my teeny-tiny supper.” So the teeny-tiny woman put the
teeny-tiny bone into her teeny-tiny pocket, and went home to her
teeny-tiny house.



Now, when the teeny-tiny woman got home to her teeny-tiny house,
she was a teeny-tiny tired; so she went up her teeny-tiny stairs to her
teeny-tiny bed, and put the teeny-tiny bone into a teeny-tiny cupboard.
And when this teeny-tiny woman had been to sleep a teeny-tiny time,



TEENY-TINY. 75

she was awakened by a teeny-tiny voice from the teeny-tiny cupboard,
which said—
“GIVE ME MY BONE!”

And this teeny-tiny woman was a teeny-tiny frightened, so she hid
her teeny-tiny head under the teeny-tiny clothes, and went to sleep
again. And when she had been asleep again a teeny-tiny time, the
teeny-tiny voice again cried out from the teeny-tiny cupboard a teeny-
tiny louder—

“GIVE ME MY BONE!”

This made the teeny-tiny woman a teeny-tiny more frightened,
so she hid her teeny-tiny head a teeny-tiny farther under the teeny-
tiny clothes. And when the teeny-tiny woman had been asleep again
a teeny-tiny time, the teeny-tiny voice from the teeny-tiny cupboard
said again a teeny-tiny louder—

“GIVE ME MY BONE!”

At this the teeny-tiny woman was a teeny-tiny bit more frightened ;
put she put her teeny-tiny head out of the teeny-tiny clothes, and said
in her loudest teeny-tiny voice—

AK Tell:








Fee
: a |
: oe Mer

~_ PGRN &
of (Mb se, Nop
Vowe A
Ss Za ee Oz
, we >
JH LA J =
i =e y) Li fe : 3
= 7 es dy
Poco
= 1 Bl

) Nee UPON fF TIME there lived a Queen whose
SAS Ae â„¢ husband had long been dead. She had an only daughter,
BC oes whom she loved most tenderly; but she had promised

Ke to give her in marriage to the son of a King who lived far
away, and the time had come when the maiden must journey
to the country of her bridegroom. The Queen packed up all kinds
of costly stuffs, and jewels, and gold and silver goblets—everything,
in fact, which a royal bride must needs have. She also chose for her
a waiting-maid, whom she believed she could trust, and’ who was to
accompany the Princess and deliver her safely into the hands of her
bridegroom. They had to make the journey on horseback, so each was
provided with a good steed. The Princess's horse was. named Falada
and he had the power of speech. When at last the sorrowful hour of
parting came, the Queen took a sharp little knife, and making a cut on
her own finger, she let three drops of blood fall on to a white hand-
kerchief, and this she gave to her daughter, saying: “Dearest child,
take good care of it. It may be of the greatest use to you on the



THE GOOSE GIRL. 77

journey.” So the Princess put the handkerchief into her bosom that
she might guard it most heedfully, and set out upon her journey.

Now, the waiting-woman had a bad heart, and she was full of
schemes as to how she could take advantage of her young mistress. It
was a very hot day, and the sun shone down brightly on the white road
as it wound away over the hills, and after riding for some time the
Princess became very thirsty. Presently they had to cross a clear
little stream, and there she drew rein, and called to her waiting-maid.

“Please get down,” she said, “and fill my cup from the brook,
and bring it to me to drink, for I am so thirsty!”

But the waiting-maid tossed her head, and answered rudely—

“Get down yourself, and stoop and drink, for I will serve you
no longer!” The Princess was greatly astonished at this rude reply, but
she was young and timid, and being really very thirsty, she did dismount
and, as she was afraid to ask for her cup, stooped to drink from the
clear water in the brook as it came rippling down over the stones.
And as she did so, she sighed, “Ah, me!” and the Three Drops of
Blood answered :—

“‘If thy mother dear of thy grief but knew,
Her loving heart would break in two!”’

But the Princess was gentle and timid, and she said nothing, but
when she had quenched her thirst she mounted Falada and rode on.
Yet as they went on and she grew tired, and the heat increased, she
once more became very thirsty, and coming to another stream, she again
spoke to her waiting-maid, and asked her to dismount and fill her cup
with water. But the waiting-maid replied more haughtily than before—

“Get down yourself and drink; for I will be your waiting-maid
no longer.”

So the poor Princess had to dismount and stoop down to the
stream, her thirst was so great. But as she bent down she wept a little
and sighed, “Ah, me!” and again the Three Drops of Blood answered :—

‘Tf thy mother dear of thy grief but knew,
Her loving heart would break in two!”’

And as she bent down the handkerchief fell out of her bosom, and
the flowing water carried it away, but the Princess did not see it, for



78 NURSERY TALES.

her eyes were full of tears. But the waiting-maid noticed the loss and
rejoiced, for now she knew she would have full power over her young
mistress, and as the poor Princess was about to remount she told her
rudely to get on her nag, for she herself meant to ride Falada. More-
over, she forced the poor little Princess to take off her rich dress and
put on her waiting-maid’s attire, while she dressed herself in the Princess's
clothes; and beyond all this she insisted on her taking a solemn oath
that she would tell no man what had been done, threatening her with .
instant death if she broke her vow!

Then the waiting-maid mounted Falada, and on they rode.

In this way they reached the castle of the King, and there everyone
ran out to give them a joyful welcome, and the Prince lifted the waiting-
maid from Falada, and led her up the great staircase to the guest-chamber,
while the Princess was left waiting in the courtyard. But as the Prince
was talking to his bride, the old King happened to look out of the window
and saw the poor girl standing forlorn and lonely, not knowing where to
go or what to do, and he noticed that she was very beautiful.

“Who is that you have brought with you?” he enquired of the
false bride.

“That girl!” she answered indifferently. “Oh! just someone for
company. Please give her some work to do that she may not stand
idling about.”

“Then she must mind the geese!” replied the old King. “There is
nothing else for her to do. . Kurdchen, the gooseherd, is but a lad, and
he will be glad of help!” Thus the Princess became a goose girl!

Now, all this pleased the wicked waiting-maid very well, and there
remained one thing only to disquiet her, and that was the fear lest Falada
should speak and betray her secret. So after a little while she said to
the Prince—

“Dearest husband, will you do me one little favour?”

“Of course, I will,’ he answered; “only tell me what it is!”

“Well, then, will you send for the man who slays the cattle, and
bid him cut off the head of the horse on which I rode, for he carried me
so ill that he vexed me exceedingly !”

The Prince was sorry when he heard this, for he had noticed what
a beautiful intelligent-looking creature Falada was when he had lifted the







80 NURSERY TALES.

waiting-maid from the saddle. He thought, too, that his future wife must
have rather a cruel disposition; but still, it was her first request, and he
could not very well refuse it.

So poor Falada was condemned to die! When the news came to
the ears of the Princess she was very, very sorry, but she could not
hinder the cruel deed; only she sought out the man who was to slay
Falada, and offered him a piece of gold if he would bring her the poor
horse’s head so that she might see it again, and, moreover, would fasten
it up in a dark gateway under which she and Kurdchen drove the geese:
morning and evening. And the man promised to do so.

Early the next morning the Princess drove out the geese, with
Kurdchen, and as she passed under the dark gateway, there was poor
Falada’s head nailed to the wall. The Princess looked up and said:—

‘Alas! poor Falada, hanging so high!”’

and the head answered :—
“Alas! Princess! that thou passest by!
If thy mother dear of thy grief but knew,
Her loving heart would break in two!”’

Then they went on farther from the town, till they drove their geese
out into the meadows, where the Princess sat down and unfastened her
hair, so that it fell all round her like a shower of gold.

Kurdchen, who had never seen anything so beautiful in his life,
shouted with joy, and tried to seize it in his grubby little hands. But
she cried out:—

“Blow, wind, blow, I pray!

Carry Kurdchen’s hat away.

Over meadow, over hill,

Whisk it, frisk it, at thy will.
Make him chase it here and there:
Give me time to braid my hair.”’

And the wind heard what she said, and whirled Kurdchen’s hat away,
and he had to run after it so far and so long that when he came back
her hair was all bound up under her little white cap, and Kurdchen could
not touch it. He was very cross for atime, but presently he grew better,
and they herded the geese all day in the pleasant meadows and brought
them home safely in the evening. The next morning the same thing



THE GOOSE GIRL. 81

happened. As they went through the dark gateway the Princess looked
up and said :—

“Alas! poor Falada, hanging so high!’
and the head answered :—

“Alas! Princess! that thou passest by!
If thy mother dear of thy grief but knew,
Her loving heart would break in two!’’

And when they reached the meadow, she let down her hair, and when
Kurdchen tried to seize it, she cried to the wind :—
“Blow, wind, blow, I pray!
Carry Kurdchen’s hat away.
Over meadow, over hill,
Whisk it, frisk it, at thy will.
Make him chase it here and there:
Give me time to braid my hair.’’

And again the wind listened and whirled Kurdchen’s hat away, and he
had to run after it so fast and so far that before he returned her hair
was all braided up under her little white cap. But that night when they
had driven the geese home, Kurdchen went to the old King, and said:
“T cannot herd the geese any more with that maiden!”

“Why not?” asked the King.

“Oh!” said the lad, “she vexes me so! For under the dark gate-
way there is nailed up a horse’s head, and as we pass it in the morning
she says :— :
“Alas! poor Falada, hanging so high!’ —

and the head answers :—

***Alas! Princess! that thou passest by!
If thy mother dear of thy grief but knew,
Her loving heart would break in two!’’’

And then he told the King all that followed.

The King listened thoughtfully to all he said, and then he bade the
lad go once again with the goose girl as if nothing had happened. But
he himself the next morning rose very early, and went out and hid himself
in the dark gateway where they drove out the geese, and he heard what
the Princess said to the horse’s head. Then he followed them to the



82 NURSERY TALES.

meadow, and, standing behind an old thorn-tree, he watched the goose girl
let down her hair, which quite dazzled him with its splendour and beauty
as it shone in the morning sunshine. And as Kurdchen again tried to
grasp it, the maiden cried :—
“Blow, wind, blow, I pray!

Carry Kurdchen’s hat away.

Over meadow, over hill,

Whisk it, frisk it, at thy will.

Make him chase it here and there:

Give me time to braid my hair.”

Then came a gust of wind and blew away Kurdchen’s hat, and whilst
he ran after it the maiden combed and plaited her hair and bound it up
under her little white cap.

When they brought the geese back to the castle that night, the
King called the goose girl to him.

“Why do you do thus?” he asked, and told her what he had seen.

“That I must not tell you,” she answered sadly, “for I have sworn
an oath not to tell any man, and if I break my vow I must die.”

This troubled the King, and he sat silent and thoughtful for a time,
but presently he said to her—

“This must you do! Go, creep into the great oven in the bake-
house and there lament ycur grief aloud; so will you tell no man nor
break your oath.”

So the maiden crept into the great oven and there began to bemoan
her hard fate.

“Alas, alas!” she wept, “how sad am I! Here I sit alone in the
world, I who am a Queen’s daughter, and my false waiting-maid has gained
power over me by wicked arts, and has forced me to lay aside my rich
garments, which she wears, while she sits by my bridegroom's side. Alas,
alas! if my dearest mother only knew, her heart would break !”

Now, the old King stood by the oven-door and heard all she said.
Then he called to her tocome forth, and he bade his servants clothe her
in costly clothes, and when she was so clad everyone was astonished at
her beauty.

Meanwhile, he hastened to his son and told him how he had been
deceived. He brought him to see the true bride, and when the Prince



THE GOOSE GIRL. 83

looked at her, he was overjoyed at her beauty and grace, for the more
he had seen of the false bride the less he had liked her.

But what was to be done? How was the wrong to be set right?
The King and the Prince thought and thought, and at last they decided
on a plan.

They sent out invitations for a feast, to which they invited all
the nobles and great people. When the day came, the Prince sat in
the most honourable seat, and on one side of him was the false bride
and on the other the Princess, but the wicked waiting-woman was so



dazzled with the grandeur of the scene that she never recognised her
young mistress.

There were all kinds of dainties set forth on gold and silver
dishes, and costly wines, and everyone was dressed in their best, and
sparkling with jewels.

And when they had eaten and drunk and were all in a joyful
mood, the old King began asking them riddles, and the company had
to guess them.

But presently he told them a story, which indeed was the story



84 NURSERY TALES.

of the Princess and her false waiting-maid, and asked them what punish-
ment they thought so unfaithfiil a servant deserved.

And the false bride was still so dazzled with her greatness, and
puffed up with pride and vanity, that she even yet did not understand
what was meant, and she cried—

“Such a wicked person deserves to be put into a cask full of sharp
nails, to which two white horses shall be harnessed, and so dragged about
the streets till she dies!”

“So shall it be!” said the old King sternly. “You have pronounced
your own sentence and chosen your own punishment!”

So they took her away to be punished as she deserved, and then
the Prince married the true Princess, and they lived in peace and happiness
all the rest of their days!












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Key.

i ny) (e cold winter's day, when the snow was. thick upon
the ground, a poor little lad was’ sent into the forest to
gather wood, which he was to stack upon a little sledge
and bring home for fuel. By the time he had collected
enough, he was so cold that he thought he would make
a fire and warm himself before he went home. So he scraped away the
snow, and in so doing found a little golden key.

“Ah!” said he to himself, “where the key is, there, to be sure,
will the lock be found,” and went on scraping away the snow until
he found an iron chest. “Now,” he said, “if only the key fits the
lock, I shall no doubt find all sorts of precious things in the chest.”

He searched for a long time, and at last he discovered a lock—so
small, however, that one could scarcely see it.

He tried the key, and it fitted * exactly ; he turned it slowly,
slowly, and—if only we wait patiently until he has turned it right round
and opened the lid, why then we shall know what was inside the chest.







THE. WOLF AND THE,
SEVEN LITTLE. Goats.







i
as was once an old goat who had seven little
— i ones, whom she loved just as dearly as your mother
| loves you. One day, finding that there was no food
|! in the larder, she called her children together and said—
oa “My dears, I am obliged to go to the wood to
ox fetch some food for you; so promise me that on no account
» whatever will you allow the wolf to enter. If you do, he will
gobble you all up, and what will your poor mother do then? You must
be very careful, for he is a sly fellow and might easily deceive you. Still,
you cannot fail to recognise him by his rough voice and black feet.”



THE WOLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE GOATS. 87

The little goats promised their mother that they would be very
careful; so she kissed them all, bade them good-bye, and set out upon
her way. Before long, there came a tap, tap, tapping at the cottage-door,
and a rough voice cried: ‘Open the door, my pets, it is only mother,
and I have brought you each a fine, fresh young cabbage from the market.”

But the little goats answered: “No, no, that is not our mother’s
voice; her tones are low and sweet. We will not let you in; go away,
wicked wolf!”

Then the wolf went to a shop and bought a lump of chalk, which
he swallowed, so that his voice might sound less harsh and grating; after
that he returned to the cottage and knocked at the door once more.

“Open the door, children,” he cried; “mother has brought you each
a present.” His words were soft and low, but, as he spoke, he laid his
black paw upon the window-sill, and the little goats saw it, and cried:
“You are not our mother; she has pretty white feet. We will not open
the door, Mr. Wolf.”

Then the wolf ran to the baker. “I have wounded my foot,” said
he; “pray bind it up for me with a piece of dough.”

When the baker had done this, the wolf ran to the miller. “ Powder
my paw with flour,” he said; but the miller hesitated, for he was afraid
that the wolf meant mischief to someone. However, the wicked fellow
threatened to eat him up if he still refused, so the miller powdered his
foot quite white, and the rascal made his way back to the cottage-door.

A third time he called to the little ones: “Open the door: it is I,
your mother, and I have brought you something nice from the wood.”

“First show your paw,’ answered the little goats, “so that we
may know if you are reaily our own dear mother.”

He laid his paw upon the window-sill, and when they saw that
it was white, they thought it must be the old goat, so they opened
the door, and in came the wolf. Oh! how frightened they were!

One jumped under the table, another into the bed, a third into
the oven, a fourth hid in the kitchen, a fifth in the cupboard, a sixth
in the washing-tub, and the youngest in the case of the old grand-
father’s clock.

But the wolf found them all except the youngest, and made
short work of them. One after another he swallowed them, and



88 NURSERY TALES.

then, having had a hearty meal, he
went out into the green meadow,
laid himself down beneath a tree, and
fell fast asleep.
Soon afterwards the old goat came
home from the wood.
What a terrible sight she saw!
The house-door stood wide open, the
chairs and tables lay upside down, the
wash-tub was in pieces, and the pillows
and sheets were torn from the bed
and scattered about the floor. In vain
Il she sought for her dear little ones.
r- ———.— Alas! they were nowhere to be
found.

One after.another she called
them by name, but no one ans-
wered her, until she came to the youngest. Then a little voice cried—

“Dear mother, I am hidden in the clock-case.”

The mother opened the door and out jumped the little goat.
With sobs and cries she told the sad story of how the wolf had
eaten her brothers and sisters, and the poor old goat shed bitter tears
for the loss of her pretty darlings.

Sorrowfully she wandered from the house, weeping and wringing
her paws as she went, and the little goat ran beside her.

When they came to the meadow they saw the wolf lying beneath
‘the tree, snoring so that the branches shook. They gazed at him
from every side, and saw with amazement that something was bobbing
up and down inside him. “Ah, me!” said the mother, ‘can it be
possible that my children are still alive after having furnished a supper
for that monster?” f

She sent the little goat home to fetch scissors, needle, and thread,
and then began to cut open the wolf’s stomach. No sooner had she
made a tiny little slit than a little goat poked out his head, and presently
the whole six were hopping about on the soft green grass, and not a
bit the worse for their adventure.









THE WOLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE GOATS. 89

How the mother kissed and hugged her darlings! She was quite
beside herself with joy.

“Now, my pets,’ she cried, “make haste and fetch me some
stones from the riverside. Whilst the wolf sleeps I will fill his stomach
with them, so that he may not miss you when he awakes.”

The little goats dragged the heaviest stones they could lift, and
placed them inside the wolf, and the mother goat stitched him up as
fast as she could, and he never winked an eye until she had finished.

When at length he roused himself, and stood up on his legs, the
stones lay heavy on his chest and made him thirsty, so he went to
the brook to drink. As he moved the stones began to jingle, and the
wolf cried out :—

‘“‘This rumbling and grumbling shakes my very bones;
I do believe instead of goats I’ve swallowed only stones.’’

He stooped to drink, but the stones were so heavy that he lost
his balance and fell headlong into the stream and was drowned.

Then the goat and her seven little ones came out of their hiding-
places, and danced upon the banks of the stream, singing for joy,
because the wicked wolf was no more.



~y






Ho con CONRAD 3
Sourve yen TH Rouse.
THEYVORED

HERE WAS ONCE a man who had served bravely

in the wars, and when they were ended he received his

Sate and three florins, which was all he had to face the world with.

“This is mean treatment!” said he. “But wait a bit; if only I can
get hold of the right people, the King shall be made to give me the
treasures of the whole kingdom.”

So, full of wrath, he went into the forest, where he came across a
man who had just uprooted six trees as if they had been cornstalks.

“Wilt thou be my servant and travel with me?” said our hero.

“Yes,” replied the man; “but first 1 must take home these few
faggots to my mother,’ and picking up one of the trees, he twisted it
round the other five, and, lifting the bundle on his shoulders, he carried
it away.

Then he returned to his master, who said: “We two shall be a match
for all the world.”



THE SIX COMRADES. gi

Now, when they had jour-
neyed for a little space they met
with a huntsman, who was on his
knees taking aim with his gun.

Then the master said: “Tell
me, huntsman, what it is you
are going to shoot.”

And the man answered:
i ae alee a there is a fly sitting on the branch of an oak-tree,
whose left eye I intend to shoot out.”

“Come with me!” said the master; “we three shall be a match for
all the world.”

The huntsman was quite willing, and came with him, and they
soon arrived at seven windmills whose sails were whirling round at
tremendous speed, although there was not a breath of wind even to
stir a leaf on the trees.

Then said the master: “I cannot think what it is that drives the
windmills, for there is not the slightest breeze.” But going on farther
with his servants for about two miles, they saw a man sitting on a
tree, puffing out his cheeks and blowing.

“My good fellow, what are you doing up there?”

“Oh!” replied the man, “there are seven windmills two miles from
here; just look how I am sending them round.” p ?
“Come with me!” cried the master; “we four shall \
be a match for all the world.” €

So the blower climbed down and accompanied
him, and presently they came upon a man who was
standing on one leg, for he had unbuckled the other
and it was lying on the ground by his side. Then the
master said—



“I suppose you want to make yourself more com-
fortable while resting ?”

“No,” said the man; “I am a runner, and in order
not to race over the ground too quickly, I have unbuckled
my leg, for, if I were to run with both, I should go
faster than any bird flies.”



|
4



92 NURSERY TALES. 4

“Come with me!” said the master; “we
five shall be a match for all the world.”

The five comrades all started off together,
and soon they met a man who had on a hat,
which he wore tilted over one ear.

Then said the master: “Manners, my
friend, manners! Don’t wear your hat like
that, but put it on properly; you look like a
simpleton.”

“T dare not do it,’ returned the man,
“for, if I did, there would come such a fearful frost that the very birds
in the sky would freeze and fall dead upon the ground.”

“Come with me!” said the master; “we six shall be a match for all
the world.”

Then the six companions came to a city where the King had pro-
claimed that whoever should run in a race with his daughter and be

victorious might become her husband, but if he lost the race he would
also lose his head.



This was told to our hero, who said: “I will make my servant run
for me.”

Then the King answered: ‘Then must thou also forfeit thine own
life as well as thy servant’s, for both heads must be sacrificed if the race
be lost.”

When these conditions were agreed upon, and everything was
arranged, the master buckled on the runner's other leg, saying: “Now,
be as nimble as you can, and don’t fail to win!”

Now, the wager was that whoever was the
first to bring water from a distant spring should be
‘the winner.

The runner received a pitcher, as did also the
King’s daughter, and they both began to run at the
same moment; but when the Princess had run a little
way the runner was quite out of sight, and it seemed
as if there had only been a rustling of the wind. Ina
very short time he had reached the well, so he drew
up the water to fill his pitcher and turned back.





THE SIX COMRADES. 93

But when he was half way home, he was overcome with fatigue,
so he put the pitcher down, stretched himself on the ground, and fell
asleep. He made a pillow of a horse’s skull, which was lying close by,
thinking that, as it was so hard, he would very soon wake up again.

_ In the meantime, the King’s daughter, who was a splendid runner
and ran better than many a man, reached the spring and hurried back
with her pitcher of water. Suddenly, she saw the runner lying asleep
on the wayside; she was overjoyed at this, and exclaimed: “The enemy
is given into my hands!” Then, emptying his pitcher, she ran on as fast
as she could.

Now, all would have been lost if by great good fortune the huntsman
had not been standing on one of the castle towers and seen everything
with his sharp eyes.

Said he: “The King’s daughter shall be no match for us if I
can help it.” So, loading his gun, he aimed so true that he shot away
the horse’s skull from under the runners head without harming him
in the least. :





94 NURSERY TALES.

This awakened the runner, who, springing up, saw in a flash that
his pitcher had been emptied, and that the King’s daughter was already
far ahead of him.

However, he did not lose courage, but ran back swiftly to the well,
drew up fresh water, filled his pitcher, and was back again full ten
minutes sooner than the King’s daughter.

“See what I can do,” cried he, “when I really use my legs; what
I did before could scarcely be called running.”

The King was displeased, and so was his daughter, that a common
discharged soldier should have won the race; so they consulted with
each other how they could rid themselves of him, together with his
five comrades.

Then the King said to his daughter: “Do not be afraid, my
child, for I have found a way to prevent them coming back.”

So he said to the six companions: “You must now eat, drink, and
be merry.” Saying which, he led them to a room that had an iron floor
and iron doors, and even the windows were secured with iron bars.

In this apartment there was a table covered with the most delicious
appetising dishes; and the King said: “Now come in and sit down and
enjoy yourselves.”

Directly they were all inside he had the doors locked and bolted.
This done, the King sent for the cook, and commanded him to light
a fire underneath the room, until the iron should be red-hot.

The heat soon became so great that the six comrades guessed that
the King wished to suffocate them.

But the man with the hat set it straight on his head, and immediately
a frost fell on everything, andall the heat vanished, while the very meats
on the dishes began to freeze.

When the King believed they had all perished in the fearful heat,
he ordered the doors to be opened, and there stood all the six men safe
and sound!

They said they would like very much to come out and warm them-
selves, for the cold had been so intense that the meat had frozen on their
plates. Le

Then the King demanded why the cook had not obeyed his
commands.



Full Text


3

Joanie Vripley




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5 eee ep o

oAHER Goose"!
URSERY GALES

Se A








R, MARRTOtS Watson,
EMILY BENNETT, A.M.Hover_,
LLWeeDon, €.NESBIT,
é& OTHERS

Lonoon: New. Yorn:
ERNEST NISTER. € P DUCCON. és C=
: Printed in Bavarta :

No. 859.



CINDERELLA

Tue THREE SPINNERS

HanseL AND GRETEL

Tue Turee Littte Pics

SWEET Poreipes

THE SLEEPING BeEauty

THE Straw, THE COAL, AND THE BEAN
THE WATERSPRITE

THE Goupen Birp

ALADDIN AND THE WoNDERFUL Lamp
TEENY TINY

Tue Goose GIRL

THE Goipen Key

THe Wotr anD THE SEVEN LitTLE Goats
How Six ComrapEs JouRNEYED THROUGH THE WorLpD.
Jack AND THE BEANSTALK _

Jack in Luck

Littte Rep Ripinc-Hoop

Motruer Hutpa

PAGE

17
21
BI
37
39
49
51
52
62
74
76
85
86
go
98
105
113
118
8 CONTENTS.

PAGE
THE RaGAMUFFINS . : ; : : : : : : : AB}
BLUEBEARD : : ; : ; . : : : : : te 20
THE WANDERING MINSTRELS . : : : : : | : 6 gy)
CuICKEN-LICKEN - ; : i : . : : : : sete)
Tue Froc Prince. . é . : ; . - . : Bees TART
Tue Wuite Car. : : : . ; . : : : rey,
Tue CoBBLER AND THE BROWNIES. : : : : . eee 54,
Tue Nai. . 5 : : ; : : : ; , ; : re eS
Tue VaviantT LitrLte TarLor ; é . i : . A . 158
GoLpILocks, OR THE THREE Bears : : : ; z : ee erO8
BEauTY AND THE Bezast : : : : : : : : 3
RUMPELSTILTZKIN . . ° : : a : . : ; + 186
Puss 1n Boots . : os ; : : : : : .- IQI
JoHNNY AND THE GOLDEN GOoosE : . : : : i : + FQQ9-

Tue Star Fiorins . A 5 % 5 : 5 : : ; . 206















NCE upon atime there lived a noble gentleman who had
one dear little daughter. Poor child! her own kind
mother was dead, and her father, who loved her very
dearly, was afraid that his little girl was sometimes
lonely. So he married a grand lady who had two
daughters of her own, and who, he thought, would be kind and

good to his little one. But no sooner did the stepmother enter
her new home than she began to show her true character. Her step-
daughter was so much prettier and sweeter than her own children, that
she was jealous of her, and gave her all the hard work of the house to
do, whilst the two proud sisters spent their time at pleasant parties and
entertainments.

The only pleasure ‘the poor child had was to spend her evenings
sitting in the chimney-corner, resting her weary limbs, and for this reason
10 NURSERY TALES.

her sisters mockingly nicknamed her “Cinderella.” The sisters’ fine clothes
made Cinderella feel very shabby; but, in her little torn frock and ragged
shoes, she was a thousand times more lovely than they.

Now, it chanced that the King’s son gave a grand ball, to which he
invited all the lords and ladies in the country, and, amongst the rest,
Cinderella’s two sisters were asked. How pleased and excited they were
when the invitation arrived! For days they could talk of nothing but
the clothes they should wear and the grand folk they hoped to meet.

When at last the great day arrived, Cinderella was kept running
about from early till late, decking the sisters, and dressing their hair.

“Don't you wish you were going to the ball?” said one of them.

“Indeed I do,” sighed the poor little maid. The sisters burst out
laughing. “A pretty spectacle you would be,” ney said rudely. ‘‘Go back
to your cinders—they are fit company for rags.” Then, stepping carefully
into their carriage so that they might not crush their fine clothes, they
drove away to the ball.

Cinderella went back to her chimney-corner, and tried not to feel
envious, but the tears would gather in the pretty eyes, and trickle down
the sorrowful little face.

“What are you crying for, child?” cried a silvery voice.

Cinderella started, and raised her eyes. Who could it be? Then in
a moment she knew—it was her fairy Godmother!

“T do so want ” began Cinderella; then her sobs stopped her.

“To go to the ball,” finished the Godmother. Cinderella nodded.
“Well, leave off crying—be a good girl, and you shall go. Run quickly
into the garden, and bring the largest pumpkin you can find.”

Cinderella could not imagine how a pumpkin could help her to go
to the ball, but her only thought was to obey her Godmother. In a few
moments she was back again, with a splendid pumpkin. Her Godmother
scooped out the inside—one touch of the wand, and the pumpkin was a
golden coach, lined with white satin.

“Now, godchild, quick—the mouse-trap from the pantry !”

“Here it is, Godmother,” said Cinderella breathlessly.

One by one six fat sleek mice passed through the trap door. As
each appeared, a touch of the wand transformed it into a cream-coloured
horse, fit for a queen.


CINDERELLA. II

“Now, Cinderella, can you find a coachman?”

“There is a large grey rat in the rat-trap—would he do, Godmother ?”

“Run and fetch him, child, and then I can judge.” So Cinderella
ran to fetch the rat, and her Godmother said he was just made for a
coachman; and I think you would have agreed with her had you seen
him a moment later, with his powdered wig and silk stockings.

Six lizards from behind the pumpkin-frame became six footmen in
splendid liveries—you would have thought they had been footmen all
their lives. Cinderella was so excited that she could scarcely speak.

“Oh! Godmother,” she cried, “it is all so lovely!” Then suddenly
she thought of her shabby frock. ‘There is my white muslin,” she said
wistfully, “if—do you think

But before Cinderella could realise what was happening, her God-














a
WATTS
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‘ll
all

2*
12 NURSERY TALES.

mother’s wand tapped her lightly on the shoulder, and in place of the
shabby frock, there was a gleam of satin, silver, and pearls. ees

- Ah! who can describe a robe made by the fairies? It was’ white
as snow, and as dazzling; round the hem hung a fringe of diamonds,
sparkling like dew-drops in the sunshine. The lace about the throat and
arms could only have been ‘spun by fairy spiders. Surely ‘it: was a dream |
Cinderella put her daintily-gloved hand to her throat, and softly touched
the pearls that encircled her neck.

“Come, child,’ said the Godmother, ‘for you will be late.”

As Cinderella moved, the firelight shone upon her dainty shoes.

“They are of diamonds,” she said. .

“No,” answered her Godmother, smiling; “they are better than that—
they are of glass, made by the fairies. And now, child, go,. and’ enjoy
yourself to your heart’s content. Only remember, if you stay at the
palace one instant after midnight, your coach and servants will vanish,
and you will be the little grey Cinderella once more!”

A few moments later, the coach dashed into the royal courtyard,
the door was flung open, and Cinderella alighted. As she walked slowly
up the richly-carpeted staircase, there was a murmur of admiration, and
the King’s son hastened to meet her. “Never,” said he to himself, “ have
I seen anyone so lovely!” He led her into the ball-room, where the
King, who was much taken with her sweet face and pretty, modest
manners, whispered to the Queen that she must surely be a foreign princess.

The evening passed away in a dream of delight, Cinderella dancing
with no one but the handsome young Prince, and being waited on by his
own hands at supper-time. The two sisters could not recognise their
ragged little sister in the beautiful and graceful lady to whom the Prince
paid so much attention, and felt quite pleased and flattered when she
addressed a few words to them.

Presently a clock chimed the three quarters past eleven, and,
remembering her Godmother’s warning, Cinderella at once took leave of
the Prince, and, jumping into her coach, was driven rapidly home. Here
she found her Godmother waiting to hear all about the ball. “It was
' lovely,” said Cinderella; “and oh! Godmother, there is to be another
to-morrow night, and I should so much like to go to it!”

“Then you shall,’ replied the kind fairy, and, kissing her godchild





air ce



tenderly, she vanished. When the sisters returned from the ball, they found
a sleepy little maiden sitting in the chimney-corner, waiting for them.

“How late you are!” cried Cinderella, yawning. “Are you not very
tired ?” :

“Not in the least,” they answered, and then they told her what a
delightful ball it had been, and how the loveliest Princess in the world
had been there, and had spoken to them, and admired their pretty dresses.

“Who was she?” asked Cinderella slyly..

“That we cannot say,” answered the sisters. “She would not tell
her name, though the Prince begged her to do so on bended knee.”

“Dear sister,’ said Cinderella, “I, too, should like to see the beau-
tiful Princess. Will you not lend me your old yellow gown, that I may
go to the ball to-morrow with you?”

“What!” cried her sister angrily; “lend one of my dresses to a little
cinder-maid? Don’t talk nonsense, child!”
14 NURSERY TALES.

The next night, the sisters were more particular than ever about their
attire, but at last they were dressed, and as soon as their carriage had
driven away, the Godmother appeared. Once more she touched her god-
child with her wand, and in a moment she was arrayed in a beautiful
dress that seemed as though it had been woven of moon-beams and sun-
shine, so radiantly did it gleam and shimmer. She put her arms round
her Godmother's neck and kissed and thanked her. ‘Good-bye, childie ;
enjoy yourself, but whatever you do, remember to leave the ball before
the clock strikes twelve,” the Godmother said, and Cinderella promised.

But the hours flew by so happily and so swiftly that Cinderella
forgot her promise, until she happened to look at a clock and saw that
it was on the stroke of twelve. With a cry of alarm she fled from the
room, dropping, in her haste, one of the little glass slippers ; but, with the
sound of the clock strokes in her ears, she dared not wait to pick it up.
The Prince hurried after her in alarm, but when he reached the entrance
hall, the beautiful Princess had vanished, and there was no one to be
seen but a forlorn little beggar-maid creeping away into the darkness.

Poor little Cinderella!—she hurried home through the dark streets,
weary, and overwhelmed with shame.

The fire was out when she reached her home, and there was no
Godmother waiting to receive her; but she sat down in the chimney-
corner to await her sisters’ return. When they came in they could speak
of nothing but the wonderful things that had happened at the ball.

The beautiful Princess had been there again, they said, but had dis-
appeared just as the clock struck twelve, and though the Prince had
searched everywhere for her, he had been unable to find her. “ He was
quite beside himself with grief,’ said the elder sister, “for there is no
doubt he hoped to make her his bride.”

Cinderella listened in silence to all they had to say, and, slipping
her hand into her pocket, felt that the one remaining glass slipper was
safe, for it was the only thing of all her grand apparel that remained to her.

On the following morning there was a great noise of trumpets and
drums, and a procession passed through the town, at the head of which
rode the King’s son. Behind him came a herald, bearing a velvet cushion,
upon which rested a little glass slipper. The herald blew a blast upon
the trumpet, and then read a proclamation saying that the King’s son


















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16 NURSERY TALES.

would wed any lady in the land who could fit the slipper upon her foot,
if she could produce another to match it.

Of course, the sisters tried to squeeze their feet into the slipper, but it
was of no use—they were much too large. Then Cinderella shyly begged
that she might try. How the sisters laughed with scorn: when the Prince
knelt to fit the slipper on the cinder-maid’s foot; but what was their
surprise when it slipped on with the greatest ease, and the next moment
Cinderella produced the other from her pocket! Once more she stood in
the slippers, and once more the sisters saw before them the lovely Princess
who was to be the Prince’s bride. For at the touch of the magic shoes,
the little grey frock disappeared for ever, and in place of it she wore the
beautiful robe the fairy Godmother had given to her.

The sisters hung their heads with sorrow and vexation; but kind
little Cinderella put her arms round their necks, kissed them, and forgave
them for all their unkindness, so that they could not help but love her. |

The Prince could not bear to part from his little love again, so he
carried her back to the palace in his grand coach, and they were married
that very day. Cinderella’s step-sisters were present at the feast, but in
the place of honour sat the fairy Godmother.

So the poor little cinder-maid married the Prince, and in time they
came to be King and Queen, and lived happily ever after.




who would not spin, and, let her mother

say what she would, she could not make

her do it. At last, the mother, in a fit.

of impatience, gave her a blow which
£ made the girl cry out loudly.

eee ‘
\ 7 m, NCE upon a time there was a lazy maiden




i a At that very instant, the Queen
ie f /'/ drove by, and, hearing the screams, she
ah; stopped the carriage, came into the house,.

and: asked the mother why she beat her
daughter in such a way that people in
passing could hear the cries.

Then the mother felt ashamed that
_ her daughter’s laziness should be known,
so she said: “Oh, your Majesty, I cannot take her away from her
spinning: she spins from morning till night, and I am so poor that I
cannot afford to buy the flax.”

“There is nothing I like better than to hear the sound of spinning,”
the Queen replied, “and nothing pleases me more than the whirl of
spinning-wheels. Let me take your daughter home with me to the castle;
I have flax enough, and she may spin there to her heart’s content.”

The mother rejoiced greatly in her heart, and the Queen took the
maiden home with her. When they arrived in the castle, she led her up
into three rooms, which were piled from top to bottom with the finest flax.
18 | NURSERY TALES.

“Now spin me this flax,’ said the Queen, “and when thou hast
spun it all, thow shalt have my eldest son for a husband. Although thou
art poor, yet I do not despise thee on that account, for thy untiring
industry is dowry enough.”

The maiden was filled with inward terror, for she could not have
spun the flax had she sat there day and night until she was three hundred
years old! When she was left alone, she began to weep, and thus she
sat for three days without stirring a finger.

On the third day the Queen came, and when she saw that nothing
was as yet spun, she wondered over it, but the maiden excused herself
by saying that she could not begin in consequence of the great sorrow
she felt in being separated from her mother.

This satisfied the Queen, who, on leaving her, said—

“Thou must begin to work for me to-morrow.”

But when the maiden was once more alone, she did not know
what to do, or how to help herself, and in her distress she went to the
window and looked out. She saw three women passing by, the first of
whom had a great broad foot, the second such a large under-lip that it
hung down to her chin, and the third an enormous thumb.

They stopped under the window, and, looking up, asked the maiden
what was the matter.

When she had told them of her trouble, they immediately offered her
their help, and said—

“Wilt thou invite us to the wedding, and not be ashamed of us, but
call us thy aunts, and let us sit at thy table? If thou wilt, we will spin
all the flax, and do it in a very short time.”

“With all my heart,” answered the girl, “only come in, and begin
at once.” y

Then she admitted the three strange women, and, making a clear
space in the first room, they sat themselves down and began spinning.

One drew the thread and trod the wheel, the other moistened: the
thread, the third pressed it and beat it on the table, and every time she
did so, a pile of thread fell on the ground spun in the finest way.

The maiden concealed the three spinners from the Queen, but
showed her the heaps of spun yarn whenever she came, and received no
end of praise for it.


When the first room was empty, the second was commenced, and
when that was finished, the third was begun, and very soon cleared.

Then the three spinners took their leave, saying to the maiden—

“Forget not what thou hast promised us; it will make thy fortune.”
20 NURSERY TALES.

When the girl showed the Queen the empty rooms and the great
piles of thread, the wedding was announced. The bridegroom rejoiced that
he had won so clever and industrious a wife, and he praised her exceedingly.

“JT have three aunts,’ said the maiden, “and as they have done me
many kindnesses, I could not forget them in my good fortune; permit me
to invite them to our wedding and allow them to sit with me at table.”

So the Queen and the bridegroom consented.

When the feast commenced, the three old women entered, clothed
in the greatest splendour, and the bride said—

“Welcome, my dear aunts!”

“Alas!” exclaimed the bridegroom, “how is it you have such ugly
relations?” and going up to the one with a broad foot, he asked—

“Why have you such a broad foot?”

“Fyrom threading, from threading,” she answered.

Then he went to the second, and asked—

“Why have you such an overhanging lip?”

“From moistening the thread,’ she replied, “from moistening the
thread.”

Then he asked the third—

“Why have you such a big thumb?”

“From pressing the thread,’ answered she.

Then the Prince became frightened, and said—

“Then shall my lovely bride never more turn a spinning-wheel, as
long as she lives!”

Thus was the maiden freed from the hated flax-spinning.






ANY -years ago, a woodcutter and his wife, with their
two children, Hans and Gretel, lived upon the outskirts
of a dense wood. They were very poor, so that
when a famine fell upon the land, and bread became
dear, they could no longer afford to buy sufficient
food for the whole family.

One night, as the poor man lay tossing on his

4 hard bed, he cried aloud in his grief and anguish—

“Alas! what will become of us? How can I feed my hungry little
ones when we have no food for ourselves?”

“Listen to me, good-man,” answered his wife, who was stepmother
to the children. “As it is no longer possible for us to keep our children,
we will take them into the wood with us to-morrow, light a fire for
them, and give each a piece of bread and leave them. They will not easily
find their way back, and so we shall be rid of the burden of them.”

But the father said: “No, no! I could not find it in my heart to
leave my darlings to perish. The wild beasts would tear them limb from
limb.”
22 NURSERY TALES.

“Then,” answered the wife, “we must all four die of hunger.” She
gave her husband no peace until he promised to do as she wished, and
at last, very unwillingly, he consented.

Now, the two children had been too hungry to go to sleep that
night, and so it happened that they overheard all that their parents were
saying. Gretel wept bitterly, but brave little Hansel did his best to
comfort her. “Don’t be afraid,’ he said; “I will take care of you.”

As soon as his father and stepmother were asleep, he slipped on
his smock, and, opening the door softly, went out into the garden. The
moon was shining brightly, and by its light he could see the little white
pebbles that lay scattered in front of the house, shining like little pieces


HANSEL AND GRETEL. 23

of silver. He stooped and filled his pockets as full as he could, and then
went back to Gretel, and once more bidding her be comforted, for God
would be sure to watch over them, he jumped into bed, and ey, both
fell fast asleep.

Early in the morning, before the sun had risen, the stepmother came
and wakened the children. “Rise, little lie-a-beds,” she said, “and come
with us into the wood to gather fuel.’ :

She gave them each a piece of bread for their dinner, and told them
to be sure not to eat it too soon, for they would get nothing more.

Gretel carried the bread in her pinafore, because Hansel had his
pockets full, and then they all set out upon their way to the wood.

As they trudged along, the father noticed that his little son kept
turning back to look at the house. “Take care, my boy,” he said, “or
you will slip. What are you looking at so earnestly ?”

“T am watching my kitten, father: she is sitting on the roof to bid
me good-bye.”

“Silly little lad, that is not your cat,’ said the stepmother; “it is
only the morning sun shining on the chimney.”

But Hansel had not been watching his cat at all; he had stayed
behind to drop the pebbles upon the path.

When they reached the thickest part of the forest, the father bade
the children gather wood, that he might kindle a fire for them, so that
they might rest beside it and warm themselves whilst he and his wife
were cutting the fuel. So they gathered a pile of brushwood and twigs,
and as soon as it was well alight, the parents left them, promising to
return as soon as they had finished their work.

Hansel and Gretel sat down by the fire, and when midday came
they ate their bread and sat listening to the strokes of their father’s axe,
thinking all the time that he was near to them. But what they heard
was only a dry branch which the man had bound to a tree, so that the
wind swung it hither and thither, and the noise it made deceived the
children. At last the poor, tired, little eyelids closed, and, side by side,
brother and sister fell asleep.

When they awoke, the night was very dark, and Gretel was frightened,
and began to cry. Hansel put his arms around her and whispered: “Wait,
dearie, till the moon rises; we shall soon find our way home then.”
24 NURSERY ALES.

As soon as the: bright moon rose, Hansel took his little sister by the
“hand, and all night long they followed ‘the track of the little white
‘pebbles, until at daybreak they came to their father’s house.

They knocked at the door, and no sooner did the stepmother. open
“it than she began to scold them for having stayed out so long in the
“w6od; but the father greeted them kindly, for he had grieved sorely for
his little ones.

In a short time they were eis off as ever, and one night they.
again heard their mother trying to persuade her husband to take them
‘out into the wood and lose them. “There is nothing left in the house
but half a loaf of bread,’ she said; “for our own sakes it is better to get
rid of the children; but this time we will lead them farther away, so that
they will not be able to find their way home.”

But the man would not agree. “Better to divide our last morsel
-with them,” he said, “and then die together.”

His wife would not listen to what he said, but ‘scolded him for his
want of thought for her; and at last the poor man uae way a oe
time, just as he had done at first. i

But the children had overheard all that was said, and as soon as
the mother and father were asleep, Hansel stole down to the door, meaning
to go and collect pebbles as he had done before; but the door was locked
and bolted, and he could not get out. ao NEyen mind, Gretel,’ he said

consolingly, “the good God will surely help us.’

Early in the morning the woman wakened the children, and, giving
them a small piece of bread, bade them follow her and their father into
the wood. As-they went, Hansel crumbled his morsel of bread in his
pocket and strewed the crumbs upon the path.

“Come, Hansel,” said the father, “don’t loiter so, sonny. What can
you see to stare at so often?”

“My little dove, father. It is sitting on the housetop, bidding me
good-bye.” ara

“Nonsense,” said the woman, “it is not your dove; it is only the
rising sun shining upon the chimney.”

Hansel did not answer, but he went on strewing his crumbs care-
fully until the last morsel of bread was gone.

Deeper and deeper into the wood they went, where the children



“Gretel shut
the tron door

and shot the bolt.”

had never been before. There a great fire was kindled, and the mother
said: “Stay here, children, whilst your father and I go to cut wood.
If you are tired you may sleep a while, and we will fetch you when it
is time to go home.”

When dinner-time came, Gretel divided her piece of bread with
Hansel, because he had scattered all his share upon the road; and then
they went to sleep. The evening shadows fell, but still no one came to
fetch the poor children, and it was not until midnight that they awakened.

Hansel put his arms round his sister and told her not to fear, for

we
26 NURSERY TALES.

when the moon rose they would easily be able to see the crumbs, and
so find their way home again.

So when the moon rose they set out upon their way; but alas!
there were no crumbs to be seen, for the little birds that lived in the
green wood were as hungry as the children, and had eaten them all up.

“We will find the way somehow,” cried cheerful little Hansel; but
though they travelled all night long, and the next day too, they could
not find it. Poor little mites, how tired and hungry they were, for they
had nothing to eat but the berries that grew by the roadside!

When at length the weary little feet could go no farther, the children
lay down beneath a tree and slept.

On the third day they were still as far away as ever, and it
seemed to them that the longer they walked the deeper they got
into the wood, and they began to be afraid that they would die of cold
and hunger.

But presently, when the midday sun was shining brightly, they
noticed a little snow-white bird singing so sweetly that they could not
help but stay to listen. When the birdie’s song was ended, he spread his
wings and flew away.

The children followed him until they reached a little house, on the
roof of which he perched. Then the children saw with surprise that
the strange little house was built entirely of bread, roofed with cakes,
and with windows of barley sugar.

“See, Gretel,” cried Hansel joyfully, “there is food for us in plenty.
I will take a piece of the roof, and you shall have one of the windows.”

He stretched out his hand to help himself, and Gretel had already
begun to nibble one of the window-panes, when suddenly they heard a
voice call from within :—

“Nibbly, nibbly, mouse!
Who’s nibbling at my house?”

The children answered quickly :—

‘°Tis my Lady Wind that blows,
As round about the house she goes.’’

And then they went on eating as though nothing had happened, for
the cake of which the roof was made just suited Hansel’s taste, whilst
HANSEL AND GRETEL. 27

the barley-sugar window-panes were better than any sweetmeat Gretel
had ever tasted before.

All at once the door of the cottage flew wide open, and out came
an old, old woman, leaning upon a crutch. The children were so fright-
ened that they dropped their food and clung to each other.

The old woman nodded her head to them, and said: “Who brought
you here, my pets? Come inside, come inside; no one will hurt you.”

She took their hands and led them into the house, and set before
them all kinds of delicious foods, milk, sugared pancakes, apples, and nuts.
When they had finished their meal she showed them two cosy little white —
beds, and as Hansel and Gretel lay snugly tucked up in them, they
thought to themselves that surely they had now found the most delightful
place in the whole wide world.

But the old woman had only pretended to be friendly and kind, for
she was really a wicked old witch, who was always lying in wait to catch
little children; indeed, she had built the little house of bread and cakes
especially to entice them in. Whenever anyone came into her power, she
cooked and ate him, and thought what a fine feast she had had.

Witches have red eyes and cannot see
far, but they have keen scent, like animals, ,
and can tell at once when a human being ©
is near to them.

As soon as Hansel and Gretel came '
into her neighbourhood she
laughed to herself and said
mockingly: “Ha, ha! they
are mine already; they
will not easily escape me.”

Early in the morning,
before the children were
awake, she stood beside
them and admired their
rosy cheeks and _ soft
round limbs.

“What nice tit-
bits for me,” murmured












28 NURSERY TALES.

she. Then, seizing Hansel by the hand, she led him to a little stable,
and, in spite of his cries and screams, shut him up and left him. Then
she shook Gretel until she was awake, and bade her get up at once and
carry food and drink to her brother, and it must be of the best too, for
she wished to fatten him.

“When he is nice and plump, I shall eat him,” said the cruel old
witch. Gretel wept bitterly, but it was quite in vain, for she was obliged
to do the witch’s bidding; and every day she cooked the choicest food for
her brother, while she herself lived upon nothing but oyster-shells.

Day by day the old woman visited the stable and called to Hansel
to put his finger through the window bars, that she might see if he were
getting fat; but the little fellow held out a bone instead, and as her eyes
were dim with age, she mistook the bone for the boy’s finger, and thought
how thin and lean he was. When a whole month had passed without
Hansel becoming the least bit fatter, the old witch lost patience and
declared she would wait no longer. “Hurry, Gretel,’ she said to the
little girl, “fill the pot with water, for to-morrow, be he lean or fat,
Hansel shall be cooked for my dinner.”

The tears chased each other down Gretel’s cheeks as she carried in
the water, and she sobbed aloud in her grief. “Dear God,” she cried,
“we have no one to help us but Thou. Alas! if only the wild beasts in
the wood had devoured us, at least we should have died together.”

“Cease your chattering,” cried the old witch angrily. “It will not
help you, so you may as well be still.”

The next morning poor Gretel was forced to light the fire and hang
the great pot of water over it, and then the witch said: “First we will
bake. I have kneaded the dough, and heated the oven; you shall creep
inside it to see if it is hot enough to bake the bread.”

But Gretel guessed that the old witch meant to shut the door upon
her and roast her, so she pretended that she did not know how to get in.

“Silly goose,” said the witch. “The door is wide enough, to be
sure. Why, even I could get inside it.’ As she spoke, she popped her
head into the oven. In a moment Gretel sprang towards her, pushed
her inside, shut the iron door,-and shot the bolt. Oh! how she squealed
and shrieked, but Gretel ran ‘off as fast as she could, and so there was
an end of the cruel old witch.
HANSEL AND GRETEL. ae)

Quick as thought, Gretel
ran to her brother. “We
are saved, Hansel,” she cried,
opening the door of the
stable, “the wicked old witch
is dead.”

Hans flew from his
prison as a bird from its
cage, and the two happy
little children kissed each
other and jumped for joy.
No longer afraid of the old
witch, they entered the house,
hand in hand, and then they
saw that in every corner of
the room were boxes of
pearls and diamonds, and as i
all kinds of precious gems. a ee

“Ah!” said Hansel merrily, “these are better than pebbles, Gretel,”
and he stuffed his pockets with the jewels, whilst Gretel filled her
pinafore. “Now,” said Hansel, “we will leave the witch’s wood behind
us as fast as we can.”



So off they ran, and never stopped until they came to a lake,
upon which swam a large white duck.

“How can we cross,” said Hansel, “for there is no bridge any-
where ?”

‘“‘And no ship either,” Gretel answered ; “but we will ask the pretty
white duck to carry us over.” So they cried aloud :—

“Tittle duck, little duck,
With wings so white,
Carry us over
The waters bright.’

The duck came at once, and, taking Hansel upon her back, carried
him over to the other side, and then did the same for Gretel. They went
merrily on their way, and very soon they found themselves in a part of
the wood they knew quite well.

Ds)
30 NURSERY TALES.

When they saw the roof of their father’s house in the distance
they began to run, and, breathless with haste, half laughing. and half
crying, they rushed into the cottage and flung themselves into their
father’s arms. ‘

Oh! how pleased he was to see them once again, for he had not
known a happy hour since he had left them alone in the wood. Gretel
shook out her pinafore, and Hansel emptied his pockets, and the floor of
the little room was quite covered with glittering precious stones.

So now their troubles were at an end, for the cruel stepmother
was dead, and Hansel and Gretel and their father lived together happily
ever after.

My story is ended, and see, there runs a little mouse, and the first
who catches him shall have a fur cap made from his skin.




i little pes




NCE upon a time, when pigs could talk and no one had
ever heard of bacon, there lived an old piggy mother
with her three little sons.

They had a very pleasant home in the middle of

an oak forest, and were all just as happy as the day
was long, until one sad year the acorn crop failed; then, indeed, poor

Mrs. Piggy-wiggy often had hard work to make both ends meet.

One day she called her sons to her, and, with tears in her eyes,
told them that she must send them out into the wide world to seek
their fortune.

She kissed them all round, and the three little pigs set out upon
32 NURSERY TALES.

their travels, each taking a different road, and carrying a bundle slung on
a stick across his shoulder. :

The first little pig had not gone far before he met a man carrying
a bundle of straw; so he said to him: “Please, man, give me that straw
to build me a house?” The man was very good-natured, so he gave
him the bundle of straw, and the little pig built a pretty little house
with it.

No sooner was it finished, and the little pig thinking of going to
bed, than a wolf came lone, knocked at the door, and said: “Little pig,
little pig, let me come in.’

But the little pig laughed softly, and answered: “No, no, by the
hair of my chinny-chin-chin.”

Then said the wolf sternly: “I will make you let me in; for Pll
huff, and I'll puff, and Til blow your house in!”

So he huffed and he puffed, and he blew his house in, because,
you see, it was only of straw and too light; and when he had blown the
house in, he ate up the little pig, and did not leave so much as the tip
of his tail.

The second little pig also met a man, and fe was carrying a bundle
of furze; so piggy said politely: “Please, kind man, will you give me
that furze to build me a house?”

The man agreed, and piggy set to work to build himself a
snug little house before the night came on. It was scarcely finished
when the wolf came along, and said: ‘Little pig, little pig, let me
come in.”

“No, no, by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin,”
little pig.

“Then I'll huff, and I'll puff, and I'll blow your
house in!” said the wolf. So he huffed and he
puffed, and he puffed, and he huffed, and at last he

blew the house in, and gobbled the little pig up
in a trice.

Now, the third little pig met a man with a as
load of bricks and mortar, and he said: “Please, man, LE

will you give me those bricks to build a house with?” GS
So the man gave him the bricks and mortar,

answered the second









“o>

(GY
ee
abe 6 Mo




f
7

“Little pig, are they nice apples?”
34 NURSERY TALES.

and a little trowel as well, and the little pig
BY tas, eee built himself a nice strong little house. As

; a Ses “~~ soon as it was finished the wolf came to call, ©
ef Yo @ | just as he had done to the other little pigs,
a Co and said: “Little pig, little pig, let me in!”




But the little pig answered: “No, no,
by the hair of my chinny-chin-chin.”

“Then,” said the wolf, “I'll huff, and
I'll puff, and I'll blow your house in.”

Well, he huffed, and he puffed, and he
puffed, and he huffed, and he huffed, and
‘he puffed; but he could zof get the house
down. At last he had no breath left to huff
and puff with, so he sat down outside the
little pig’s house and thought for awhile.

ZR Presently he called out: “Little pig, I
know where there is a nice field of turnips.”

“Where ?” said the little pig.

“Behind the farmer’s house, three fields away, and if you will be
“ready to-morrow morning I will call for you, and we will go together
and get some breakfast.”

“Very well,” said the little pig; “I will be sure to be ready. What
time do you mean to start?”

“At six o'clock,” replied the wolf.

Well, the wise little pig got up at five, scampered away to the field,
and brought home a fine load of turnips before the wolf came. At six
o'clock the wolf came to the little pig’s house and said: “Little pig, are
you ready?”

“Ready!” cried the little pig. “Why, I have been to the field and
come back again long ago, and now I am busy boiling a potful of turnips
for breakfast.”

The wolf was very angry indeed; but he made up his mind to catch
the little pig somehow or other; so he told him that he knew where
there was a nice apple-tree.

“Where?” said the little pig.

“Round the hill in the squire’s orchard,” the wolf said. “So if you


THE THREE LITTLE PIGS. 35

will promise to play me no tricks, I will come for you to-morrow morning
at five o'clock, and we will go there together and get some rosy-
cheeked apples.”

The next morning piggy got up at four o'clock and was off and
away long before the wolf came.

But the orchard was a long way off, and besides, he had the tree
to climb, which is a difficult matter for a little pig, so that before the
sack he had brought with him was quite filled he saw the wolf coming
towards him.

He was dreadfully frightened, but he thought it better to put a
good face on the matter, so when the wolf said: “Little pig, why are
you here before me? Are they nice apples?” he replied at once: “Yes,
very; I will throw down one for you to taste.” So he picked an apple
and threw it so far that whilst the wolf was running to fetch it he had
time to jump down and scamper away home.

The next day the wolf came again, and told the little pig that there
was going to be a fair in the town that afternoon, and asked him if he
would go with him.

“Oh! yes,” said the pig, “I will go with pleasure. What time will
you be ready to start?”

“At half-past three,” said the wolf.

Of course, the little pig started long before the time, went to the
fair, and bought a fine large butter-churn, and was trotting away with it
on his back when he saw the
wolf coming.

He did not know what to
do, so he crept into the churn
to hide, and by so doing started
it rolling.

Down the hill it went, _ jy
rolling over and over, with the -
little pig squeaking inside.

The wolf could not think
what the strange thing rolling % Uy §, 4 :
down the hill could be; so he {(*agears ier 4 ax 7) td
turned tail and ran away home Ree tah 7? On [outer





36 NURSERY TALES.

in a fright without ever going to the fair at all. He went to the little
pig’s house to tell him how frightened he had been by a large round
thing which came rolling past him down the hill.

“Ha! ha!” laughed the little pig; “so I frightened you, eh? I had
been to the fair and bought a butter-churn; when I saw you I got inside
it and rolled down the hill.”

This made the wolf so angry that he declared that he wozld eat
up the little pig, and that nothing should save him, for he would jump
down the chimney.

But the clever little pig hung a pot full of water over the hearth
and then made a blazing fire, and just as the wolf was coming down
the chimney he took off the cover and in fell the wolf. In a second the
little pig had popped the lid on again.

Then he boiled the wolf, and ate him for supper, and after that he
lived quietly and comfortably all his days, and was never troubled by
a wolf again.





Wi
1 a (

/
i

ai

ce
aS \y ASP w03s ago there was a little girl who lived all alone with
ees her mother, and they were so poor that they had nothing

4 A 2 at all left in the house to eat.
Me eZ The Ins gin went to the forest to see if she could
7 find a few sticks with which to make a fire, and on her

way she met an old woman who gave her a little pot which she said
would prevent her from ever being hungry again :—“ You have only to
say: ‘Cook, little pot, cock!’ and at once you will have as much good,
sweet porridge as you can wish for. When you have had sufficient you
must say: ‘Stop, little pot!’ and it will cease to cook.”

The little girl thanked the old woman, and carried the pot home
38 NURSERY TALES.

to her mother. From that time they had plenty to eat, for when they
were hungry they only had to call upon the pot to cook.

One day the little girl went out and stayed away so long that the
mother became hungry, so she cried: “Cook, little pot, cook!”

But when she had made a good meal, and wanted the pot to stop
cooking, it still went on, for she did not know the magic words to stop it.

So the pot boiled over at last, and began to fill the kitchen. When
the kitchen was full, the porridge streamed out all over the house, then
into the next house, and the next, and the next, until at last the whole
village was full of porridge. There is no knowing what would have
happened if the little girl had not come back and cried to the pot to stop.

Then it left off cooking, but for many a long day the folk who
wished to get into the village had to eat their way through a mountain
of sweet porridge.











Lier â„¢fy
Ge. 'p



pt
<<



Ne CG VPON A TIME long ago—so long, indeed, that

even the very oldest people now alive could not remember
it—there lived a King and Queen in a beautiful palace, a great
white marble palace, with wide halls and high towers, and a golden roof
that flashed in the sun.

And all round the palace, for miles and miles, there were lovely —
gardens and pleasure-grounds, with terraces and green lawns, and ancient
trees where the birds would sit and sing all day and all night long, and
more flowers than you could ever think of if you were to think a whole
summer through. There were peacocks and birds of paradise on the
broad lawns, and pretty slender brown deer in the shady glades, and gold
and silver fishes in the ponds and fountains, and great red and yellow
fruits ripened in the orchards.

There was everything there that heart could wish—except just one,
and that was the one thing in all the world that this King and Queen
wanted to make them perfectly happy. For there was no little child to


40 NURSERY TALES.

run and play about the sunny gardens and pick the flowers, and pet the
birds and beasts that wandered there. And this would often make them
very sad.

But at last, after many years, they had their wish, and a little baby
daughter was born to them—a tiny child with a face like a blush rose-
bud, eyes like violets, and a little red mouth like the pimpernel flowers
that grow in the cornfields and by the wayside in summer-time.

Now, you can easily think how glad this King and Queen were, and
what great rejoicings were made over all the country.

Bonfires as big as haystacks were kept burning all night, fat oxen
were roasted whole in the market-place of every town, the church-bells
were rung and rung again until the ringers were out of breath and their
arms were aching, and every little child in the kingdom was given a
beautiful present for the baby Princess’s sake.

In the palace, of course, all was bustle and hurry to make ready
for the christening-feast ; the maids were busy putting flowers all about
the halls and chambers, and sprinkling the shining floors with sweet-
smelling leaves and petals. :

For the most important guests invited to this christening were
seven very powerful fairies, and you know, I am sure, how particular
fairies are about what they eat and drink. Not that they are greedy;
but they are used to such delicate food that even the very best of
ours seems strange to them. So the Queen was very anxious that
they should be pleased; for they had been asked to be godmothers
to the baby Princess, and she wanted them to be in a good humour
so that they should be kind to her little one.

It was a beautiful summer afternoon, and the roses on the palace
terrace were nodding their heads sleepily in the warm breeze, when
the fairies’ chariots came into sight, sailing through the blue sky like a
flight of bright-winged butterflies,

They were all good fairies, and had known the King and Queen
all their lives long, and as they had not seen them for some time there
was a great deal to talk about and much news to tell. And, dear me!
how pleased they were with the baby! They all agreed that she was
the prettiest little darling they had ever seen—almost as pretty as a
real fairy baby—and that was a compliment indeed, I can tell you.


«Beyond the wood was an enchanted palace, where a beautiful

princess had been sleeping for a hundred years.”
42 aa NURSERY TALES.

And when they went in to the great banqueting-hall and sat down
to table, they were even more delighted than at first. For each one
of them there was a set of six golden dinner things—knife, spoon, fork,
cup, dish, and plate—made on purpose as a present for each, and all
different. One was set with pearls, another with diamonds, the third
with rubies, the fourth with opals, the fifth with amethysts, the sixth
with emeralds, the seventh with SADE ess ; and nobody could tell which
was the most beautiful.

_ They were just going to begin, and everybody was as happy as
happy could be, when, all of a sudden, there was a clashing of brazen
claws and a rushing of wings, and something like a black cloud seemed
to pass before the tall windows and darken all the room, so that the
guests could hardly see their plates. Then the great doors burst open
with a terrible bang, and an old fairy in a long trailing black gown,
with her face almost hidden.in a black hood, jumped out of a black
chariot drawn by fierce griffins, and stalked up to the table.

The King turned pale, and the Queen nearly fainted away, for
this was the spiteful fairy Tormentilla, who lived all alone, an immense
distance away from everywhere and everyone, in a dismal black stone
castle in the middle of a desert. The poor Queen had been so happy
and so busy that she had forgotten all about her, and never sent her
an invitation.

However, they all tried to make the best of it, and another
chair was brought, and another place laid for Tormentilla; and both
the King and Queen told ‘her over and over again how very, very
sorry they were not to have asked her.

It was all in vain. Nothing could please her; she would eat and
drink nothing, and she sat, scowling and looking angrily at the other
fairies’ jewelled cups and dishes, until the feast was over, and it was time
to give the presents.

Then they all went into the great tapestry saloon. where the tiny
Princess lay sleeping in her mother-o’-pearl cradle, and the seven fairies
began to say what they would each give her.

The first stepped forward and said: “She shall always be as good as
gold”; the second: “She shall be the cleverest Princess in the world”;
the third: “She shall be the most beautiful”; the fourth: “ She shall be

THE SLEEPING BEAUTY. e243

the happiest”; the fifth: “She shall have the sweetest voice that was ever
heard”; the sixth: “Everyone shall love her.” And then the wicked old
cross fairy strode over to the cradle with long quick steps, and said,
shaking her black crooked stick at the King and Queen: “And J say that
she shall prick her hand with a spindle and die of the wound!”

At this the Queen fell on her knees and begged and prayed Tormentilla
to call back her cruel words; but suddenly the seventh fairy, the youngest
of all, who knew Tormentilla well, and had hidden herself behind the
curtains for fear that some such thing might happen, came out and said—

“Do not cry so, dear Queen; I cannot quite undo my cousin’s wicked
enchantment, but I can promise you that your daughter shall not die, but
only fall asleep for a hundred years. And, when these are past and gone,
a Prince shall come and awaken her with a kiss.”

So the King and Queen dried their tears and thanked the kind
‘fairy Heartsease for her goodness; and all the fairies went back to their
homes, and things went on much as usual in the palace. But you can
imagine how careful the Queen was of her little girl; and the King made
a law that every spindle in the country must be destroyed, and that no
more should be made, and that anyone who had a spindle should be
heavily punished, if not executed at once.

Well, the years went by happily enough until the Princess Miranda
was almost eighteen years old, and all that the six fairies had. promised
came true, for she was the best and the prettiest and the cleverest
Princess in all the world, and everybody loved her. And, indeed, by this
time Tormentilla’s spiteful words were almost forgotten.

“Poor old thing,’ the Queen would sometimes say, “she was so
angry at having been left out that she did not know what she was saying.
Of course, she did not really mean it.”

Now, the King and Queen had to go away for a few days to a great
entertainment that one of their richest nobles was giving at his country
house; and, as the Princess did not wish to go, they left her behind with
her ladies-in-waiting in the beautiful old palace. For the first two days
she amused herself very well, but on the third she missed her father and
mother so much that, to pass the time till they came back, she began
exploring all the old lumber-rooms and out-of-the-way attics in the palace,
and laughing at the dusty furniture and queer curiosities she found there.

at
44 . NURSERY TALES.

At last she found herself at the top of a narrow winding stairway in
a tall turret that seemed even older than all the rest of the palace. And
when she lifted the latch of the door in front of her she saw a little
low chamber with curiously painted walls, and there sat a little old,
old woman in a high white cap, spinning at a wheel.

For some time she stood at the door, watching the old woman
curiously; she could not imagine what she was doing, for the Princess
had never seen a spinning-wheel in her life before, because, as I told
you, the King had ordered them all to be destroyed.

Now, it happened that the poor old woman who lived in this
tower had never heard the King’s: command, for she was so deaf that
if you shouted until you were hoarse she would never have been able
to understand you.

“What pretty work you are doing there, Goody? And why does
that wheel go whirr, whirr, whirr?” said the Princess. The old woman
neither answered nor looked up, for, of course, she did not hear.

So the Princess stepped into the room and laid her hand upon
the old woman’s shoulder.

Goody started then, looked up, and rubbed her eyes.

“Deary, deary me!” cried she, in a high, cracked voice. “And
who may you be, my pretty darling?”

“I’m the Princess Miranda,’ screamed the maiden in her ear, but
the old woman only shook her head—she could hear nothing.

Then the Princess pointed to the spindle, and made the old
woman understand that she wanted to try if she could work it.

So Goedy nodded, and laughed, and got up from her seat, and
the Princess sat down and took the spindle in her hand. But no sooner
did she touch it than she pricked the pa of her hand with the
point, and sank down in a swoon.

Immediately a deep silence fell on all around. The little bird
that only a moment before had been singing so sweetly upon the
window-sill hushed his song. The distant hum of voices from the
courtyard beneath ceased; even Goody stopped short in the directions
she was giving the Princess, and neither moved hand nor foot towards
the poor little maid, and all because she had fallen fast asleep as
she stood.
THE SLEEPING BEAUTY. 45

Below in the castle it was just the same. The King and Queen,
who had that moment returned from their journey and were enquiring
for their daughter, fell asleep before the lady-in-waiting could answer
them, and as to the lady herself she had begun to snore—in a ladylike
manner, of course—before you could have winked your eye.

The soldiers and men-at-arms slumbered as they stood. The page-
boy fell asleep with his mouth wide open, and a fly that had just
: been going to settle on his nose fell
asleep too in mid-air.

Although the sun had been
shining brightly when the Princess
took the spindle in her hand, no
sooner did she prick herself with
the point than deep shadows
darkened the sunny rooms and
gardens,

It was just as though night
had overtaken them, but there was
no one in or near the palace to
heed whether it were dark or light.

This sudden darkness had been
caused by a magic wood which
had sprung up all around the
palace and its grounds. It
__ was at least half a mile thick,
2S and was composed of thorns
and prickly plants, through
_ which it seemed impossible for
. anyone to penetrate. It was
, so thick and high that it hid
even the topmost towers of the



















i oe, Ft, |) enchanted castle, and no one
“SER yd yt ; r outside could have dreamed
SN ade i ( a yy, a that such a castle lay behind it.

re eH Wis Ly a ee Well, and so the years
AE eo. e went on, and on, and on, until
46 NURSERY TALES.

a hundred years had passed, and the palace and the story of it were all
but forgotten. And it happened that a King’s son from a neighbouring
country came hunting that way with his men, and horses, and dogs.
And in the excitement of the chase he rode on and on until he became
separated from his servants and attendants, and found himself in a part
of the country where he had never been before. In vain he tried to
retrace his steps: he only seemed to wander farther away in the
wrong direction.

Presently he came to a woodcutter’s cottage, and dismounted to
ask his way. An old, old man lived in this hut, and after he had
directed the Prince as to the best way back, the young man pointed
to a thick wood ahead, and asked what lay beyond it. Then the old
man told him that there was a legend that beyond the wood was an
enchanted palace where a beautiful Princess had lain sleeping for a hundred
years, and whom a Prince was to awaken with a kiss.

Directly the Prince Florimond heard this, nothing would serve but
he must go there and see for himself if the tale were true. So he rode
and he rode until he came to the edge of the wood, and there he got
off his horse and began to push his way through the thorny thicket.
It was hard work indeed, for the briars were so strong and so sharp
that you would never believe that anyone could get past them, and
they closed up behind him as he went.

But he was strong and brave, and after a time the way became
easier, until at last he came to the palace.

There everyone was sleeping—the sentinels and soldiers in the court-

yard, the cooks in the kitchen, and pages and lords- and ladies-in-waiting | .

in the corridors and chambers; and, in the great throne-room the King
and Queen on their golden and ivory thrones. .

Prince Florimond- passed on, wondering more and more, till he
came at length to the narrow staircase which led to the little tower
in which the Princess had fallen asleep. He mounted this, and then
came the greatest wonder of all—the beautiful sleeping lady, in her
glistening white robes. She was so beautiful that to see her almost
took away his breath; and, falling on his knees, he bent to kiss her cheek.
And ashe kissed her, she opened her lovely blue eyes and said, smiling:
“Oh! Prince, have you come at last? I have had such pleasant dreams.”


Then she sat up laughing and rubbing her eyes, and gave him:
her hand, and they went hand in hand together down the stairs and
along the corridors, till they came to the throne-room. And there were
the King and Queen rubbing their eyes too, and they kissed their
daughter and welcomed the Prince most gladly.

And, all at the same time, the whole palace was awake. Cocks
crowed, dogs barked, the cats began to mew, the spits to turn, the
clocks to strike, the soldiers presented arms, the heralds blew their
trumpets, the head cook boxed a little scullion’s ears, the butler went on.
48 NURSERY TALES.

drinking his half-finished tankard of wine, the first lady-in-waiting
finished winding her skein of silk.

Everything, in short, went on exactly as though the spell had
lasted a hundred seconds instead of years. .To be sure, Princess
Miranda's pretty white dress was just such a one as Prince Florimond’s
great-grandmother might have worn. But that gave them something
to laugh at.

And now my story is done, for I need hardly tell you that the
Prince and Princess were married amid great rejoicings, and lived happily
ever after; and that the seven fairy godmothers danced at the wedding.
So all ended well, and what more could anyone wish?




bE THE Straw -—
elt = ON ne Gene
AND THE. JEAN,

Y








2
i LL alone, in a quiet little village, lived a poor old
woman. One day she had a dish of beans which

= she wanted’ to cook for dinner, so she made a fire
on the hearth, and in order that it should ‘burn up quickly she lighted
it with a handful of straw.

She hung the pot over the fire, and poured in the beans; but
one fell on to the floor without her noticing it, and rolled away beside
a piece of straw. Soon afterwards a live coal flew out of the fire and.

joined their company. Then the straw began to speak.
“Dear friends,” said he, “whence come you?”

‘ “I was fortunate enough to spring out of the fire,” answered the
coal. “Had I not exerted myself to get out when I did, I should.
most certainly have been burnt to ashes.”

“T have also just managed to save my Skin,” said the bean..
“Had the old woman succeeded in putting me into the pot, I should.



50 NURSERY TALES.

have been stewed without mercy, just as my comrades are being
‘served now.”

“My fate might have been no better,’ the straw told them. “The
old woman burnt sixty of my brothers at once, but fortunately I was
able to slip through her fingers,”

“What shall we do now?” said the coal,

“Well,” answered the bean, “my opinion is that, as we have all
been so fortunate as to escape death, we should leave this place before
any new misfortune overtakes us. Let us all three become travelling
‘companions and set out upon a journey to some unknown country.”

This suggestion pleased both the straw and the coal, so away they all
went at once. Before long they came to a brook, and as there was no
bridge across it they did not know how to get to the other side; but the
straw had a good idea: “I will lay myself over the water, and you can
walk across me as though I were a bridge,” he said. So he stretched himself
from one bank to the other, and the coal, who was of a hasty disposition,
at once tripped gaily on to the newly-built bridge. Half way across she
hesitated, and began to feel afraid of the rushing water beneath her. She
‘dared go no farther, but neither would she return; but she stood there so
long that the straw caught fire, broke in two, and fell into the stream.
‘Of course, the coal was bound to follow. No sooner did she touch
the water than—hiss, zish! out she went, and never glowed again.

The bean, who was a careful fellow, had stayed on the bank, to
‘watch how the coal got across, before trusting himself to such a slender
bridge. But when he saw what very queer figures his friends cut, he
‘could not help laughing. He laughed and laughed till he could not stop,
and at length he split his side.

It would have gone badly with him then, had not a tailor happened
to pass by. He was a kind-hearted fellow, and at once took out his
needle and thread and began to repair the mischief.

The bean thanked him politely, for he knew that the tailor had
saved his life, but unfortunately he had used black thread, and from
that time till to-day every bean has a little black stitch in its side.





'
ilk ‘ay






y 7 |
oe LITTLE brother and
ay: sister were one day playing beside a deep stream, when
ee ' they slipped and fell plump into the water. Now, in
"A the stream there lived a water-sprite, and no sooner
i did she see these two pretty little children than she
determined to make them work for her. The girl she set to fetch water
in a pail that had no bottom to it; the boy was made to cut down trees
with a blunt axe, and all the food she gave them was doughy dumplings.
At last the children could bear this cruel treatment no longer, so
one day, when the water-sprite was from home, they ran away. When
the water-sprite returned, she ran as fast as ever she could to try and over-
take them. The children saw her coming, and the little girl threw her
brush behind her. In a second it had grown into a mountain of bristles,
over which the sprite had the greatest difficulty in climbing. But she
succeeded at last, and when the children saw how very near she was to
them the boy threw his comb behind him. This grew into a mountain
of sharp spikes, but the sprite was so anxious to catch the children that
she clambered over the spikes and never seemed to feel the slightest prick.
Then the girl threw her mirror behind her, and immediately it grew
into a mountain of glass, which was so slippery that the sprite could not
climb over it, try as much as she would. So home she went to fetch an
axe; but by the time she came back and had chopped down the mountain
of glass the children had reached their home and were safe in their
mother’s arms. Then there was nothing left for the water-sprite to do
but to go back to her spring and work for herself.






ty tet 0

16. ¢






oe
deh

{‘
‘ees
S _ Sy

|

€ pleasure-garden behind his palace, in which grew a tree that
AP bore golden apples. As fast as the apples ripened they were
vi counted, but the next day one was always missing.

This was made known to the King, who commanded.
that a watch should be kept every night. under the tree. Now, the King
had three sons, and he sent the eldest into the garden when night was
coming on; but at midnight he fell fast asleep, and in the morning another
apple was missing. The following night the second son had to watch, but
he did not succeed any better, and again another apple was missing in the
morning. Now came the turn of the youngest son, who was eager to go;
but the King did not rely much upon him, and thought he would watch
even worse than his brothers; however, at last he consented.

The youth threw. himself on the ground under the tree and watched
steadily, without letting sleep master him. As twelve o'clock struck, .
something rustled in the air, and he saw a bird fly by in the moonlight,
whose feathers were of shining gold. The bird alighted on the tree and
was just picking off one of the apples when the young Prince shot a bolt
at it. Away flew the bird, but the arrow had knocked off one of its
feathers, which was of the finest gold. The youth picked it up and showed
it to the King next morning, and told him all he had seen in the night.
THE GOLDEN BIRD. 53

Thereupon the King assembled his council, and each one declared that
asingle feather like this one was of greater value than the whole kingdom.

“However valuable this feather may be,” said the King, “one will
not be of much use to me—I must have the whole bird.”

So the eldest son went forth on his travels, to look for the wonder-
ful bird, and he had no doubt that he would be able to find it.

When he had gone a short distance, he saw a fox sitting close to
the edge of the forest, so he drew his bow to shoot. But the fox cried
out: “Do not shoot me, and I will give you a piece of good advice!
You are now on the road to the golden bird, and this evening you will
come to a village where two inns stand opposite to each other: one will
be brilliantly lighted, and great merriment will be going on inside; do
not, however, go in, but rather enter the other, even though it appears
but a poor place to you.”

“How can such a ridiculous animal give me rational advice ?” thought
the young Prince, and shot at the fox, but missed it, so it ran away
with its tail in the air. The King’s son then walked on, and in the
evening he came to a village where the two inns stood: in one there was
dancing and singing, but the other was quiet, and had avery mean
and wretched appearance.

“I should be an idiot,” thought he to himself, “if I were to go to
this gloomy old inn while the other is so bright and cheerful.” Therefore,
he went into the merry one, lived there in rioting and revelry, and so
forgot the golden bird, his father, and all good behaviour.

As time passed away, and the eldest son did not return home,
the second son set out on his travels to seek the golden bird. Like the
eldest brother, he met with the fox, and did not follow the good advice
it gave him. He likewise came to the two inns, and at the window of
the noisy one his brother stood entreating him to come in. This he could
not resist, so he went in, and began to live a life of pleasure only.

Again a long time passed by without any news, so the youngest
Prince wished to try his luck, but his father would not hear of it. At
last, for the sake of peace, the King was obliged to consent, for he had
no rest as long as he refused. The fox was again sitting at the edge of
the forest, and once more it begged for its own. life and gave its good
advice. The youth was good-hearted, and said—
54 NURSERY TALES.

“Have no fear, little fox; I will not do thee any harm.”

“Thou wilt never repent of thy good nature,” replied the fox, “and
in order that thou mayest travel more quickly, get up behind on my tail.”

Scarcely had the youth seated himself, when away went the fox
over hill and dale, so fast that the Prince’s hair whistled in the wind.
When they came to the village, the youth dismounted, and following the
fox’s advice, he turned at once into the shabby-looking inn, where he slept
peacefully through the night. The next morning, when the Prince went
into the fields, the fox was already there, and said—

“J will tell thee what further thou must do. Go straight on, and
thou wilt come to a castle before which a whole troop of soldiers will be
lying asleep. Go right through the midst of them into the castle, and
thou wilt come to a chamber where is hanging a wooden cage containing
a golden bird. Close by stands an empty golden cage, for show; but be
careful that thou dost not take the bird out of its ugly cage and put it
in the splendid one, or it will be very unlucky for thee.”

With these words the fox once more stretched out its tail, and the
King’s son sat upon it again, and away they went over hill and dale, with
their hair whistling in the wind.

When they arrived at the castle, the Prince found everything as the
fox had said, and he soon discovered the room in which the golden bird
was sitting in its wooden cage; by it stood a golden one; while three
golden apples were lying about the room. But the Prince thought it
-would be silly to put such a lovely bird in so ugly and common a cage;
so, opening the door, he placed it in the golden cage. In an instant the
bird set up a piercing shriek, which awakened all the soldiers, who rushed
in and made him prisoner. :

The next morning he was brought before a judge, who at once
condemned him to death. Still, the King said his life should be spared
on one condition, and that was, that he brought him the golden horse,
which ran faster than the wind; and if he succeeded he should also receive
the golden bird as a reward.

The young Prince set out on his journey, but he sighed and felt
very sorrowful, for where was he to find the golden horse? All at once,
he saw his old friend, the fox, sitting by the wayside.

“Ah!” exclaimed the fox, “thou seest now what has happened


The Golden ‘Bird.
56 NURSERY TALES.

through not listening to me. But be of good courage; I will look after
thee, and tell thee how thou mayest discover the horse. Thou must travel
‘straight along this road until thou comest to a castle; the horse is there in
one of the stables. Thou wilt find a stable boy fying before the stall, but
he will be fast asleep and snoring, so thou wilt be able to lead out the
golden horse quite quietly. But there is one thing thou must be carefu!
about, and that is to put on the shabby old saddle of wood and leather,
and not the golden one which hangs beside it—otherwise everything will
go wrong with thee.” Then the fox stretched out his tail, the Prince
took a seat upon it, and away they went over hill ond dale, with their
hair whistling in the wind.

Everything happened as
the fox had said. The Prince
came to the stable where the
golden horse was standing, but,
as he was about to put on the
Shabby old saddle, he thought
to himself; “It does seem a
shame that such a lovely animal
should be disgraced with this.
The fine saddle is his by right;
it must go on.”

Scarcely had the golden
saddle rested on the horse’s
back when it began to neigh
loudly. This awakened the
stable boy, who awakened the
grooms, who rushed in and
seized the Prince and made
him a prisoner. The following
morning he was brought to
trial and condemned to death,
but the King promised him
his life, as well as the golden
horse, if the youth could find
the beautiful daughter of the


THE GOLDEN BIRD. 57

King of the golden castle. Once more, with a heavy heart, the Prince
set out on his journey, and by great good fortune he soon came across
the faithful fox.

“T really should have left thee to the consequences of thy folly,”
said the fox; “but as I feel great compassion for thee, I will help thee
out of thy new misfortune. The path to the castle lies straight before
thee; thou wilt reach it about the evening. At night, when everything is
quiet, the lovely Princess will go to the bath-house, to bathe there. As
soon as she enters, thou must spring forward and give her a kiss; then she
will follow thee wherever thou carest to lead her; only be careful that
she does not take leave of her parents, or everything will go wrong.”

Then the fox stretched out his tail, the Prince seated himself on it,
and away they both went over hill and dale, their hair whistling in
the wind.

When the King’s son came to the golden palace, everything happened
as the fox had predicted. He waited until midnight, and when everyone
was soundly asleep the beautiful Princess went into the bath-house, so
he sprang forward and kissed her. The Princess then said she would
joyfully follow him, but she besought him with tears in her eyes to allow
her to say farewell to her parents. At first he withstood her entreaties,
but as she wept still more, and fell at his feet, he at last yielded.

Scarcely was the maiden at the bedside of her father, when he
awoke, and so did everyone else in the palace; so the foolish youth was
captured and put into prison.

On the following morning the King said to him: “Thy life is for-
feited, and thou canst only find mercy if thou clearest away the mountain
that lies before my windows, and over which I cannot see, but it must
be removed within eight days. If thou dost succeed thou shalt have
my daughter as a reward.”

So the Prince commenced at once to dig and to shovel away the
earth without cessation, but when after seven days he saw how little he
had been able to accomplish, and that all his labour was as nothing, he
fell into a great grief and gave up all hope.

On the evening of the seventh day, however, the fox appeared.
“Thou dost not deserve that I should take thy part or befriend thee, but
do thou go away and lie down to sleep, and I will do the work for thee.”

5
58 NURSERY TALES,

And the next morning, when he awoke and looked out of the
window, the mountain had disappeared! Then the Prince, quite over-
joyed, hastened to the King and told him that the conditions were fulfilled,
so that the King, whether he would or not, was obliged to keep his word
and give him his daughter.

Then these two went away together, and it was not long before the
faithful fox came to them. ;

“Thou hast indeed gained the best of all,’ said he; “but to the
maiden of the golden castle belongs also the golden horse.”

“How can I get it?” enquired the youth.

“YT will tell thee,” answered the fox; “first of all, take the lovely
Princess to the King who sent you to the golden palace. There will then
be unheard-of joy; they will gladly lead the golden horse to thee and
give it thee. Mount it instantly, and give your hand to everyone at
parting, and last of all to the Princess. Grasp her hand firmly; make her
spring into the saddle behind thee, and then gallop away; no one will be
able to overtake thee, for the golden horse runs faster than the wind.”

This was all happily accomplished, and the King’s son carried off
the beautiful Princess on the golden horse. The fox did not remain
behind, and spoke thus to the young Prince—

“Now I will help thee to find the golden bird. When thou comest
near the castle where the bird is to be found, let the Princess dismount,
and I will take her under my protection. Then ride on the golden horse
to the courtyard of the palace, where thy coming will cause great joy,
and they will fetch the golden bird for thee. Dey the cage is in thy
hands, gallop back to us and fetch the maiden again.”

When this plot was successfully carried out, and the Pras was
about to ride home with his treasure, the fox said: “Now must thou
reward me for all my services.”

“What is it that thou dost desire?” enquired the Prince.

“When we come to yonder wood, thou must shoot me dead and
cut off my head and paws.”

“That would be a fine sort of gratitude,” said the King’s son; “that
I cannot possibly promise thee.”

“Then,” replied the fox, “if thou wilt not, I must leave thee; but
before I go I will give thee again some good advice. Beware of two
THE GOLDEN BIRD, 59



things—buy no gallows’-flesh,
and see that thou dost not sit
on the brink of a well!”

With this the fox ran off
into the forest. :

“Ah!” thought the young
Prince, “that is a wonderful
animal with very whimsical
ideas! Who would buy gal-
lows’-flesh, and when have I
ever had the slightest desire
to sit on the brink of a well?”

So he rode on with the
beautiful maiden, and his path
led him once more through
the village in which his two
brothers had stopped. Here
there was great tumult and
lamentation, and when he
asked what it all meant, he
was told that two men
were going to be hanged.
When he came nearer, he
saw that they were his two
brothers, who had com-
mitted every kind of wicked ?
folly and had squandered all their money. Then the young Prince asked
if they could not be freed.

_ “Supposing you do pay for them,” the people answered, “where is

the good of wasting your money in order to free such villains?”

Nevertheless, he did not hesitate, but paid for them, and when the
brothers were freed they all rode away together. They came to the forest
where they first encountered the fox, and as it was cool and pleasant
away from the burning sun, the two brothers said—

“Let us sit and rest a little by this well, and eat and drink
something.”




















on

5*
60 NURSERY TALES.

The young Prince consented, and while they were all talking together
he quite forgot the fox’s warning, and suspected no evil.

But suddenly the two brothers threw him backwards into the well,
and, seizing the maiden, the horse, and the golden bird, they went home
to their father.

“We not only bring you the golden. bird,” said they, “but we have
also found the golden palace.”

There was great rejoicing, but the horse would not eat, neither
would the bird sing, and the maiden only sat and wept.

But the youngest brother had not perished. By good fortune the
well was dry, and he had fallen on soft moss without hurting himself,
but he could not get out again.

Even in this misfortune the faithful fox did not desert him, but came
springing down to him and scolded him for not following his advice.

“Still I cannot forsake thee,” said he, “and I will help to show thee
daylight once more.”

Then he told him to seize hold of his tail and hold on tightly ;
and so saying, he lifted him up in the air.

“Even now thou art not out of danger,” said the fox, “for thy
brothers were not certain of thy death, and have set spies to watch for
thee in the forest, who will certainly kill thee if they see thee.”

There was an old man sitting by the wayside with whom the young
Prince changed clothes, and, thus disguised, he reached the court of
the King.

No one recognised him, but the golden bird began to sing, and the ~
golden horse commenced to eat, and the lovely maiden ceased to weep.

The King was astonished and asked: ‘What does this all mean?”

Then said the maiden: “I know not, but I was so sad, and now |
feel light-hearted; it is-as if my true husband had returned.”

Then she told him all that had happened, although the other brothers
had threatened to kill her if she betrayed them.

The King then summoned all the people in the castle before him:
and there came with them the young Prince dressed as a beggar in his
rags, but the maiden recognised him instantly and fell upon his neck.

So the wicked brothers were seized and executed, but the young
Prince married the lovely Princess and was made his father’s heir.
THE GOLDEN BIRD. 61

But: what became of the poor fox?

Long afterwards the young Prince went again into the forest, and
there he met once more with the fox, who said—

“Thou hast now everything in the world thou canst desire, but to
my misfortunes there can be no end, although it is in thy power to
release me from them.”

So he entreated the Prince to shoot him dead and cut off his head
and feet.

At last the Prince consented to do so, and scarcely was the deed
done than the fox was changed into a man, who was no other than
the brother of the beautiful Princess, at last released from the spell that
had bound him.

So now nothing was wanting to the happiness of the Prince and
his bride as long as they lived.





LADD IN

AND

THe VGNDERFUL
J APP

N a great city in China
there once lived a boy
named Aladdin, who was,

unfortunately, a very idle fellow. Even when

his father died, he still refused to work, and passed all his time
playing in the streets with other bad boys of his own age.

One day, as he was amusing himself thus, a stranger, who had paused
to watch their games, called to him.

“O youth,” he said, “are you not the son of Mustapha, the tailor?”

“Yes,” replied Aladdin, somewhat astonished, unaware that the man
had been enquiring about him, “yes, but my father is dead! How did
you guess I was his son?”

“By your wonderful resemblance to my dearest brother,’ exclaimed
the stranger, who wore the dress of an African merchant, and flinging his
arms round Aladdin’s neck, he kissed him, and giving him a handful of
small coins, bade him take them to his mother. Aladdin-ran home, but
when his mother heard his story she was very much astonished.

“You have no uncle,” she said. “Neither your father nor I ever
had a brother. There must be some mistake.”
ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 63

However, the stranger came next day, and explained that he had
been absent from his birthplace for forty years, travelling in distant lands,
till a great desire to see his home had seized him.

“Tt is very sad to return,’ he continued, wiping away his tears,
“and find that Mustapha is dead. My only comfort is that he has left
this son, who so closely resembles his dear father that wherever I met
him I should have known him. And what is his occupation? Does he
follow his father’s profession ?”

At this question Aladdin hung his head.

“Alas, brother,” answered the mother, “I am sorry to say Aladdin
is very idle. I have to toil to maintain him, and he grows so big and
eats so heartily that I cannot support him much longer!”

“Dear, dear!” said the uncle. “This should not be. But perhaps
I can help. Would you like to keep a shop, nephew, if I provided you
with one?”

Aladdin, who hated hard work, thought this would be delightful, and
rejoiced that he had met so charming an uncle.

Next day the merchant took Aladdin out and bought him new
clothes and other presents, and then suggested that they should make a
little trip into the country where Aladdin had never been. So one fine
morning they set out and walked a long way, till they almost reached
the mountains. There, in a narrow valley between high hills, the
stranger paused.

“There is something very curious here which I should like to show
you,’ he said. “But first I must make a fire, so gather mea heap of
dry sticks.”

This done, the merchant kindled a fire, on which he threw some
incense, repeating at the same moment certain magical words. Instantly
the earth opened before them, and discovered a huge stone in which was
fastened a brass ring. Aladdin was so frightened that he would have run
away, but his uncle caught him roughly by the arm.

“Stay still,” he said, “as you value your life, and be obedient! And
first take hold of that ring and lift the stone!”

“Then you must help me,” gasped Aladdin, trembling with fear. “It
is much too heavy for me to move alone.”

“Do as I tell you,” answered his uncle sternly, and Aladdin, too
64 NURSERY TALES.

alarmed to refuse, caught hold of the ring and the stone came up quite
easily, disclosing a flight of steps descending to a door under ground.

“Now,” said his uncle, “go down and open the door. Within you
will find a palace divided into three great halls, in each of which stand
four brass coffers full of gold and silver; but touch them not at your
peril, nor let even your dress so much as brush the wall, or you will die.
Pass quickly through to a garden planted with trees laden with fruit,
of which you may pluck if you like. There, on a terrace, you will see
in a niche a lighted lamp. Take it down, extinguish it, throw away
the oil, and putting it in your waistband, bring it to me. But see, take
this ring,’ and the stranger drew one from his finger and put it on
Aladdin's hand; “it is a talisman against all evil. Go boldly, and we shall
both be rich all our lives,” ‘

Aladdin obeyed. He found all as his uncle had described. He
passed safely through the fatal halls, found the lamp, and put it

into his waistband, but as he re-

turned across the garden he stopped
to pluck some of the fruit from the
trees, and found it, as he thought,
made of glass. Some of it was
white, some red, and some green;
but he was too ignorant to recog-
nise that really these fruits were
precious stones of enormous value—
diamonds, pearls, rubies, sapphires,
and amethysts! However, he filled
his pockets, wrapped some in the
skirt of his robe, and crammed _ his
vest as full as he could. So laden he
returned, and found his uncle waiting
for him at the top of the steps.

“Have you got the lamp?”
he cried,

“Yes,” Aladdin answered. “But,
uncle, just give me your hand to
help me up these steep steps!”


ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 65,

“Give me the lamp first,’ said the stranger. “It will be in
your way.”

“J will as soon as IJ am up,” replied Aladdin; “but I cannot get at
it without dropping the fruit I have plucked.”

“But you must give it me first,” cried the merchant, who did not
intend the boy to come up alive. He was only using him to obtain the
magic lamp, which must be a voluntary gift from someone, or he would
not have power over it; and Aladdin was just an idle vagabond whom no
one would miss if he did not return. But still the boy refused to give
him the lamp, and at last, irritated past bearing, the wicked magician
threw some more incense on to the fire, muttered his charms, and lo! the
stone suddenly moved back to its place, shutting Aladdin down in darkness
in the bowels of the earth!

His horror can be imagined. In a moment he understood that this.
cruel wretch could be no uncle of his, but a wicked sorcerer who had
deceived him for his own fell purposes. He tried to return to the palace,
hoping to escape by the garden, but the door was fast shut. He screamed
and shouted, but no one heard him, and then, resigning himself to his fate,
he tried to remember some of the prayers which his father and mother
had often striven to teach him. “There is no help forme but in Allah!”
he said. Now, in joining his hands to pray, he rubbed the ring which
the magician had placed on his finger, and to his extreme astonishment
there stood before him a terrible genie, who said—

“What wouldest thou have? I am ready to obey thee, for both I
and the other slaves of the ring are bound to serve him who possesses it!”

“Get me out of this!” promptly exclaimed Aladdin, and in a moment
he was standing in the valley with no sign of the cave or the stone. He
hurried off home as quickly as his legs would carry him, and there told
his mother all that had befallen him, and how the pretended uncle was
nothing but a wicked magician.

“And do give me something to eat, mother,” he cried, “for I perish
with hunger !” :

“Alas, child,’ she teplied, “I have not a morsel in the house, but
I have spun a little cotton: I will go and sell that and buy a loaf.”

“Why not sell this lamp?” said Aladdin, taking it out of his waist-
band. “It will fetch more than the cotton.”
66 cates NURSERY TALES.

“Tis but ‘a dirty old thing,” she answered; “Jet me rub it up a bit,
and then you may get a better price.”

So saying, she: began to clean the lamp, when in an instant a
dreadful genie appeared before her, saying in a voice of thunder—

“What wouldst thou have? I am ready to obey thee—I and the
other slaves of the lamp.” Whereupon the poor woman was so frightened
that she fainted dead away. | j

But Aladdin snatched the lamp from his mother’s hand, and cried
boldly— Eee

“T am hungry—bring me food !”

The genie disappeared, and instantly returned with a large silver
tray, on which were six covered dishes of the same metal, containing
delicious viands, two flagons of wine, and two silver cups. All these he
placed on the carpet, and vanished.

Aladdin’s mother soon recovered from her faint, and surveyed the
refreshments with astonishment, asking if the Sultan had sent them. But
Aladdin suggested they should have their meal first and he would tell
her afterwards, which he did to her great astonishment and horror, she
even beseeching her son to rid himself of both lamp and ring as being
enchanted and connected with evil powers. But Aladdin could not quite
make up his mind to do that.

After this, things went very well with them. When all the pro-
visions were eaten up, Aladdin took the silver dishes one by one and
sold them. And when all were gone, he summoned the genie to bring»
him more; so that he and his mother grew quite rich and prosperous.

But people are seldom long content, and so it happened to Aladdin.
One day he heard a proclamation that all the inhabitarits were to
shut their shops and keep indoors while the Princess Buddir al Baddoor
went to the bath. This Princess was said to be the most beautiful
creature in the world, and a great desire to see her took possession of
Aladdin. So he managed to hide behind the door of the bath, and was
lucky enough to gain a full view of her face, for she removed her veil in
passing the spot where he was concealed. Then he went home so sad
and thoughtful that his mother asked him if anything was the matter.

“Mother,” he said, “I have seen the Princess, and she is so
beautiful that I am resolved to ask her in marriage from the Sultan!”
'

Sr ar
a we ‘
iN NI


68 NURSERY TALES.

“Marry the Princess!” gasped his mother. “Child! you must be
mad! Do you think the Sultan will give his daughter to such as you?”

“That is to be seen!” replied Aladdin. “ But, mother, you must
help me. Now I have a secret to tell you. Those fruits I brought
home from the enchanted garden are not pieces of glass as I thought:
they are jewels of enormous value—so the man to whom I sold the
silver dishes tells me. Well, I want you to take them, arranged on
your best china dish, to the divan where the Sultan sits to judge cases,
and present them to him.”

The poor woman was much distressed, believing that her son had
lost his wits, but she agreed to do what he asked. Together they
arranged the jewels, and indeed they were dazzling enough to astonish
anyone. Then she wrapped the dish in a clean napkin, and carried
it to the divan, where she was careful to place herself so that the
Sultan might see her. But that day
there were so many cases, that she
had no chance to speak, and so it
happened day after day.

But still she always went, and
at last the Sultan, seeing her waiting,
became curious to know her business,
and commanded that she should be
brought before him.

“Good woman,” he said, “what
business is it which brings you here
day after day?” ,

“O King, live for ever!” she
exclaimed. “I come to make a peti-
_tion, but it is of so strange a nature
that ere I speak I implore your for-
giveness |” 5

“Tt is granted,” replied the Sultan,
more curious than ever. ‘Speak
boldly, and no harm shall come to
you.”

“My son,” went on the widow,


ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 69

“loves your daughter, the Princess, and has sent me to ask her hand
in marriage. He also sends these jewels which he entreats your Majesty
to accept.”

At first the Sultan was inclined to laugh at the idea of giving
his daughter to the poor widow’s son, but when he saw the beautiful
jewels she had brought he hesitated, and then said that he would ©
probably give his consent at the end of three months.

However, before the three months had passed Aladdin found out
that preparations were being made for the tia vaee of the Princess to
the son of the Grand Vizier.

In surprise and sorrow Aladdin lost no time in tubbing the lamp
and calling up the genie, whom he commanded to frighten the Vizier’s
son so that he would no longer wish to marry the Princess. This the
genie did by carrying him off and imprisoning him in a dark and
dismal place until he was willing to give up his bride. Then, by the
aid of the genie of the lamp, Aladdin carried to the Sultan such
magnificent presents that at last he consented to accept him as_his
son-in-law, and sent word that the sooner he came to receive the
Princess the greater favour he would be doing him.

Aladdin did not delay long, but first he commanded the genie
to convey him to a bath and provide suitable raiment. In a moment
he found himself in a splendid marble edifice where he was bathed
in scented waters of various degrees of heat, and then clad in magni-
ficent robes. ;

After this, the genie supplied him with a beautiful horse, which he
mounted, and, accompanied by forty slaves, who cast handfuls of gold
among the crowd in the streets, he proceeded to the palace, where the
Sultan received him with. every mark of respect and honour.

First there was a great entertainment, at which the Sultan and
Aladdin sat at a table by themselves, and later the Chief Cadi was
directed to draw the marriage-contract, the Sultan asking Aladdin if
he would remain and complete it the same day.

“Sire,” he replied, “though I am most impatient to behold the
Princess, still I wish very much to have a suitable residence prepared
to receive her. Grant me, I beg you, sufficient ground near your
palace, and I will have it finished with the utmost speed!”
_ 79 NURSERY TALES.

Of course, the Sultan consented, and as soon as Aladdin got. home
again he summoned his genie.

“Genie,” he said, “build me a palace, the most magnificent ever
seen, of porphyry and marble, and whatever bricks you use must be of
gold and silver. Let the chief hall have twenty-four windows enriched
with precious stones. And there must be gardens full of flowers and
fountains, and stables with fine horses, and servants and slaves, and
especially a treasure-house filled with. gold and silver.”

Next morning, when the Sultan’s porter opened the palace gates,
he saw something shining so brightly that he rubbed his eyes in
astonishment. He looked again and again ere he realised that on a spot
which the night before had only been a garden there had arisen a
marvellous building. He ran to a servant of the Grand Vizier, who
waked his master, who rushed off and told the Sultan.

“Why, that must be Aladdin’s palace!” exclaimed the Sultan,
jumping out of bed and running to the window; “built up in one night!
Well, he is a wonderful fellow, certainly !”

That day was the wedding-day. First of all Aladdin and his mother
(who was now suitably dressed in splendid attire) took possession of the
palace, and at night the bride was brought home in a splendid litter
accompanied by a grand procession. So much magnificence had never
before been seen in the city, where Aladdin was now a great favourite
by reason of the gold his slaves had flung to the people. As for the
Princess, she and Aladdin adored one another, and they lived together
very happily.

But alas! a great misfortune was in store for poor Aladdin. For it
happened some years later that the African magician remembered Aladdin,
and by his magic arts sought to learn if the lad had perished in the
enchanted hall.

To his great annoyance he discovered that Aladdin was not dead,
but living in much splendour by the aid of the wonderful lamp; where-
upon he started off to see if he could not do him a mischief.

_ As soon as he saw Aladdin’s palace he at once recognised that it had
ever been built by mortal hands. Then again he consulted his magic
powers, and learnt that the lamp was still in the palace, eee caused
him to rub his hands with glee.

ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 7k

Now, just then Aladdin was away
on a hunting expedition which would
last eight days, and the Princess found
herself rather dull. As she: sat in her
room one morning, yawning -a little,
she heard a great shouting and noise
outside, and sent one of her slaves to-
see what it was.

“ancy, madam,” she said, “there
is a queer old man. outside with a.
basket full of beautiful lamps, and he
is crying out: ‘Old lamps for new!
old lamps for new!’ All the people
are laughing at him!”

“Why, he must be mad!” ex-
claimed another slave. “Madam, there:
is a shabby old lamp-in Prince Aladdin’s.
room; shall we try if he will really
change it for a new one?”

“Yes, do!” said the Princess, who-
had no idea of the value of the lamp.
Then one of the slaves fetched it and
offered it to the old man, who of course:
was the magician using this artifice to obtain the precious lamp. He was.
overjoyed, and bade the girl choose what she liked from his basket, and
hurried away, having obtained all he wanted. As soon as it was night,
he retired to a quiet spot, and, summoning the genie, he bade him remove
Aladdin’s palace straightway to Africa.

What was the dismay of the Sultan the next morning when he
found that not only was his son-in-law’s fine palace gone as quickly as.
it came, but that his daughter had vanished with it! In a transport of
rage he sent for Aladdin from his hunting, and as soon as he arrived
condemned him to be put to death!

“But why?” exclaimed poor Aladdin, who did not know what had
occurred. “Why, sire, do you treat me thus? What crime have I
committed ?”


72 NURSERY TALES.

“Crime, wretch!” shouted the Sultan; “look out of window and tell
me what has become of my daughter?”.

Aladdin looked and looked again, but his splendid home was no
longer visible! Then he guessed what had happened.

“OQ King!” he cried, “give me forty days, and if in that time I
have not brought back both your daughter and my palace, you can cut
off my head and welcome!”

The Sultan granted his request, and Aladdin went forth depressed
and miserable. He wandered about for three days, not knowing what to
do or where to go. But accidentally when near the river he slipped and,
clutching at a rock to save himself, he rubbed the ring which the
magician had given him and which he always wore, though he had
forgotten its power—and there stood the genie before him.

“What wouldst thou have?” said the terrible being. “I am ready
to obey thee, both I and the other slaves of the ring!”

“Show me where my palace is!” cried Aladdin, “or bring it back
here if thou canst!”

“That is beyond my power,” replied the genie, “but I can transport
you to it!” and whisking Aladdin up, he transported him to Africa and
put him down just outside the Princess’s window, from which she, at that
moment, was gazing in a forlorn mood.

With a cry of joy she recognised him, and in another minute they
were weeping in one another's arms. But when they had somewhat
recovered their calmness, Aladdin began to ask questions.

“Dearest Princess,” he said, “there was an old lamp

“Ah!” interrupted the Princess, “I knew that that lamp had
something to do with it, for the very morning after I had changed it for
a new one I found myself in this strange place, and in the power of a
horrid old man who keeps the lamp carefully in his bosom. He pulled
it out one day in triumph to show me—odious old creature that he is!”

“Ah,” cried Aladdin, “now I know what to do. Wait for me here,
‘dearest; 1 will be back directly.”

Off flew Aladdin to the nearest town, where he purchased a certain
powder which he bade the Princess put in a cup of wine, and offer it to
the magician at an entertainment to which she must invite him. “When
he has drunk it, he will become insensible,’ he said; “then call me!”

”


ALADDIN AND THE WONDERFUL LAMP. 73

The Princess obeyed him faithfully. She invited the Magician, and
made her slaves sing to him, and then offered him the drugged cup.
The moment he had drunk the wine he fell back lifeless on the sofa.

“Aladdin!” cried the Princess, “come quickly !”

“Now we are saved!” he exclaimed ; “leave me alone a minute,
dearest, and I will see if we cannot get home again.”

The Princess felt two little shocks: one when the building was
lifted up, and one when it was set down, and there was her father’s
palace standing over the way as usual. Need I say how overjoyed
the Sultan was to see his daughter again, and how he quite forgave
Aladdin and received him into favour?

So they lived in great felicity, and when the Sultan died, the
Princess succeeded him on the throne, and she and Aladdin reigned many
years and left a numerous and illustrious posterity.






et
Re i ,

=

AU,

a

WA A
Pa
ge sea

a2 7 f \Z

HERE was once upon a time a teeny-tiny woman who lived
in a teeny-tiny house in a teeny-tiny village. Now, one day
this teeny-tiny woman put on her teeny-tiny bonnet, and
went out of her teeny-tiny house to take a teeny-tiny walk.

And when this teeny-tiny woman had gone a teeny-tiny way, she came
to a teeny-tiny gate; so the teeny-tiny woman opened the teeny-tiny
gate, and went into a teeny-tiny churchyard. And when this teeny-tiny
woman had got into the teeny-tiny churchyard, she saw a teeny-tiny
bone on a teeny-tiny grave, and the teeny-tiny woman said to her
teeny-tiny self: “This teeny-tiny bone will make me some teeny-tiny
soup for my teeny-tiny supper.” So the teeny-tiny woman put the
teeny-tiny bone into her teeny-tiny pocket, and went home to her
teeny-tiny house.



Now, when the teeny-tiny woman got home to her teeny-tiny house,
she was a teeny-tiny tired; so she went up her teeny-tiny stairs to her
teeny-tiny bed, and put the teeny-tiny bone into a teeny-tiny cupboard.
And when this teeny-tiny woman had been to sleep a teeny-tiny time,
TEENY-TINY. 75

she was awakened by a teeny-tiny voice from the teeny-tiny cupboard,
which said—
“GIVE ME MY BONE!”

And this teeny-tiny woman was a teeny-tiny frightened, so she hid
her teeny-tiny head under the teeny-tiny clothes, and went to sleep
again. And when she had been asleep again a teeny-tiny time, the
teeny-tiny voice again cried out from the teeny-tiny cupboard a teeny-
tiny louder—

“GIVE ME MY BONE!”

This made the teeny-tiny woman a teeny-tiny more frightened,
so she hid her teeny-tiny head a teeny-tiny farther under the teeny-
tiny clothes. And when the teeny-tiny woman had been asleep again
a teeny-tiny time, the teeny-tiny voice from the teeny-tiny cupboard
said again a teeny-tiny louder—

“GIVE ME MY BONE!”

At this the teeny-tiny woman was a teeny-tiny bit more frightened ;
put she put her teeny-tiny head out of the teeny-tiny clothes, and said
in her loudest teeny-tiny voice—

AK Tell:





Fee
: a |
: oe Mer

~_ PGRN &
of (Mb se, Nop
Vowe A
Ss Za ee Oz
, we >
JH LA J =
i =e y) Li fe : 3
= 7 es dy
Poco
= 1 Bl

) Nee UPON fF TIME there lived a Queen whose
SAS Ae â„¢ husband had long been dead. She had an only daughter,
BC oes whom she loved most tenderly; but she had promised

Ke to give her in marriage to the son of a King who lived far
away, and the time had come when the maiden must journey
to the country of her bridegroom. The Queen packed up all kinds
of costly stuffs, and jewels, and gold and silver goblets—everything,
in fact, which a royal bride must needs have. She also chose for her
a waiting-maid, whom she believed she could trust, and’ who was to
accompany the Princess and deliver her safely into the hands of her
bridegroom. They had to make the journey on horseback, so each was
provided with a good steed. The Princess's horse was. named Falada
and he had the power of speech. When at last the sorrowful hour of
parting came, the Queen took a sharp little knife, and making a cut on
her own finger, she let three drops of blood fall on to a white hand-
kerchief, and this she gave to her daughter, saying: “Dearest child,
take good care of it. It may be of the greatest use to you on the
THE GOOSE GIRL. 77

journey.” So the Princess put the handkerchief into her bosom that
she might guard it most heedfully, and set out upon her journey.

Now, the waiting-woman had a bad heart, and she was full of
schemes as to how she could take advantage of her young mistress. It
was a very hot day, and the sun shone down brightly on the white road
as it wound away over the hills, and after riding for some time the
Princess became very thirsty. Presently they had to cross a clear
little stream, and there she drew rein, and called to her waiting-maid.

“Please get down,” she said, “and fill my cup from the brook,
and bring it to me to drink, for I am so thirsty!”

But the waiting-maid tossed her head, and answered rudely—

“Get down yourself, and stoop and drink, for I will serve you
no longer!” The Princess was greatly astonished at this rude reply, but
she was young and timid, and being really very thirsty, she did dismount
and, as she was afraid to ask for her cup, stooped to drink from the
clear water in the brook as it came rippling down over the stones.
And as she did so, she sighed, “Ah, me!” and the Three Drops of
Blood answered :—

“‘If thy mother dear of thy grief but knew,
Her loving heart would break in two!”’

But the Princess was gentle and timid, and she said nothing, but
when she had quenched her thirst she mounted Falada and rode on.
Yet as they went on and she grew tired, and the heat increased, she
once more became very thirsty, and coming to another stream, she again
spoke to her waiting-maid, and asked her to dismount and fill her cup
with water. But the waiting-maid replied more haughtily than before—

“Get down yourself and drink; for I will be your waiting-maid
no longer.”

So the poor Princess had to dismount and stoop down to the
stream, her thirst was so great. But as she bent down she wept a little
and sighed, “Ah, me!” and again the Three Drops of Blood answered :—

‘Tf thy mother dear of thy grief but knew,
Her loving heart would break in two!”’

And as she bent down the handkerchief fell out of her bosom, and
the flowing water carried it away, but the Princess did not see it, for
78 NURSERY TALES.

her eyes were full of tears. But the waiting-maid noticed the loss and
rejoiced, for now she knew she would have full power over her young
mistress, and as the poor Princess was about to remount she told her
rudely to get on her nag, for she herself meant to ride Falada. More-
over, she forced the poor little Princess to take off her rich dress and
put on her waiting-maid’s attire, while she dressed herself in the Princess's
clothes; and beyond all this she insisted on her taking a solemn oath
that she would tell no man what had been done, threatening her with .
instant death if she broke her vow!

Then the waiting-maid mounted Falada, and on they rode.

In this way they reached the castle of the King, and there everyone
ran out to give them a joyful welcome, and the Prince lifted the waiting-
maid from Falada, and led her up the great staircase to the guest-chamber,
while the Princess was left waiting in the courtyard. But as the Prince
was talking to his bride, the old King happened to look out of the window
and saw the poor girl standing forlorn and lonely, not knowing where to
go or what to do, and he noticed that she was very beautiful.

“Who is that you have brought with you?” he enquired of the
false bride.

“That girl!” she answered indifferently. “Oh! just someone for
company. Please give her some work to do that she may not stand
idling about.”

“Then she must mind the geese!” replied the old King. “There is
nothing else for her to do. . Kurdchen, the gooseherd, is but a lad, and
he will be glad of help!” Thus the Princess became a goose girl!

Now, all this pleased the wicked waiting-maid very well, and there
remained one thing only to disquiet her, and that was the fear lest Falada
should speak and betray her secret. So after a little while she said to
the Prince—

“Dearest husband, will you do me one little favour?”

“Of course, I will,’ he answered; “only tell me what it is!”

“Well, then, will you send for the man who slays the cattle, and
bid him cut off the head of the horse on which I rode, for he carried me
so ill that he vexed me exceedingly !”

The Prince was sorry when he heard this, for he had noticed what
a beautiful intelligent-looking creature Falada was when he had lifted the

80 NURSERY TALES.

waiting-maid from the saddle. He thought, too, that his future wife must
have rather a cruel disposition; but still, it was her first request, and he
could not very well refuse it.

So poor Falada was condemned to die! When the news came to
the ears of the Princess she was very, very sorry, but she could not
hinder the cruel deed; only she sought out the man who was to slay
Falada, and offered him a piece of gold if he would bring her the poor
horse’s head so that she might see it again, and, moreover, would fasten
it up in a dark gateway under which she and Kurdchen drove the geese:
morning and evening. And the man promised to do so.

Early the next morning the Princess drove out the geese, with
Kurdchen, and as she passed under the dark gateway, there was poor
Falada’s head nailed to the wall. The Princess looked up and said:—

‘Alas! poor Falada, hanging so high!”’

and the head answered :—
“Alas! Princess! that thou passest by!
If thy mother dear of thy grief but knew,
Her loving heart would break in two!”’

Then they went on farther from the town, till they drove their geese
out into the meadows, where the Princess sat down and unfastened her
hair, so that it fell all round her like a shower of gold.

Kurdchen, who had never seen anything so beautiful in his life,
shouted with joy, and tried to seize it in his grubby little hands. But
she cried out:—

“Blow, wind, blow, I pray!

Carry Kurdchen’s hat away.

Over meadow, over hill,

Whisk it, frisk it, at thy will.
Make him chase it here and there:
Give me time to braid my hair.”’

And the wind heard what she said, and whirled Kurdchen’s hat away,
and he had to run after it so far and so long that when he came back
her hair was all bound up under her little white cap, and Kurdchen could
not touch it. He was very cross for atime, but presently he grew better,
and they herded the geese all day in the pleasant meadows and brought
them home safely in the evening. The next morning the same thing
THE GOOSE GIRL. 81

happened. As they went through the dark gateway the Princess looked
up and said :—

“Alas! poor Falada, hanging so high!’
and the head answered :—

“Alas! Princess! that thou passest by!
If thy mother dear of thy grief but knew,
Her loving heart would break in two!’’

And when they reached the meadow, she let down her hair, and when
Kurdchen tried to seize it, she cried to the wind :—
“Blow, wind, blow, I pray!
Carry Kurdchen’s hat away.
Over meadow, over hill,
Whisk it, frisk it, at thy will.
Make him chase it here and there:
Give me time to braid my hair.’’

And again the wind listened and whirled Kurdchen’s hat away, and he
had to run after it so fast and so far that before he returned her hair
was all braided up under her little white cap. But that night when they
had driven the geese home, Kurdchen went to the old King, and said:
“T cannot herd the geese any more with that maiden!”

“Why not?” asked the King.

“Oh!” said the lad, “she vexes me so! For under the dark gate-
way there is nailed up a horse’s head, and as we pass it in the morning
she says :— :
“Alas! poor Falada, hanging so high!’ —

and the head answers :—

***Alas! Princess! that thou passest by!
If thy mother dear of thy grief but knew,
Her loving heart would break in two!’’’

And then he told the King all that followed.

The King listened thoughtfully to all he said, and then he bade the
lad go once again with the goose girl as if nothing had happened. But
he himself the next morning rose very early, and went out and hid himself
in the dark gateway where they drove out the geese, and he heard what
the Princess said to the horse’s head. Then he followed them to the
82 NURSERY TALES.

meadow, and, standing behind an old thorn-tree, he watched the goose girl
let down her hair, which quite dazzled him with its splendour and beauty
as it shone in the morning sunshine. And as Kurdchen again tried to
grasp it, the maiden cried :—
“Blow, wind, blow, I pray!

Carry Kurdchen’s hat away.

Over meadow, over hill,

Whisk it, frisk it, at thy will.

Make him chase it here and there:

Give me time to braid my hair.”

Then came a gust of wind and blew away Kurdchen’s hat, and whilst
he ran after it the maiden combed and plaited her hair and bound it up
under her little white cap.

When they brought the geese back to the castle that night, the
King called the goose girl to him.

“Why do you do thus?” he asked, and told her what he had seen.

“That I must not tell you,” she answered sadly, “for I have sworn
an oath not to tell any man, and if I break my vow I must die.”

This troubled the King, and he sat silent and thoughtful for a time,
but presently he said to her—

“This must you do! Go, creep into the great oven in the bake-
house and there lament ycur grief aloud; so will you tell no man nor
break your oath.”

So the maiden crept into the great oven and there began to bemoan
her hard fate.

“Alas, alas!” she wept, “how sad am I! Here I sit alone in the
world, I who am a Queen’s daughter, and my false waiting-maid has gained
power over me by wicked arts, and has forced me to lay aside my rich
garments, which she wears, while she sits by my bridegroom's side. Alas,
alas! if my dearest mother only knew, her heart would break !”

Now, the old King stood by the oven-door and heard all she said.
Then he called to her tocome forth, and he bade his servants clothe her
in costly clothes, and when she was so clad everyone was astonished at
her beauty.

Meanwhile, he hastened to his son and told him how he had been
deceived. He brought him to see the true bride, and when the Prince
THE GOOSE GIRL. 83

looked at her, he was overjoyed at her beauty and grace, for the more
he had seen of the false bride the less he had liked her.

But what was to be done? How was the wrong to be set right?
The King and the Prince thought and thought, and at last they decided
on a plan.

They sent out invitations for a feast, to which they invited all
the nobles and great people. When the day came, the Prince sat in
the most honourable seat, and on one side of him was the false bride
and on the other the Princess, but the wicked waiting-woman was so



dazzled with the grandeur of the scene that she never recognised her
young mistress.

There were all kinds of dainties set forth on gold and silver
dishes, and costly wines, and everyone was dressed in their best, and
sparkling with jewels.

And when they had eaten and drunk and were all in a joyful
mood, the old King began asking them riddles, and the company had
to guess them.

But presently he told them a story, which indeed was the story
84 NURSERY TALES.

of the Princess and her false waiting-maid, and asked them what punish-
ment they thought so unfaithfiil a servant deserved.

And the false bride was still so dazzled with her greatness, and
puffed up with pride and vanity, that she even yet did not understand
what was meant, and she cried—

“Such a wicked person deserves to be put into a cask full of sharp
nails, to which two white horses shall be harnessed, and so dragged about
the streets till she dies!”

“So shall it be!” said the old King sternly. “You have pronounced
your own sentence and chosen your own punishment!”

So they took her away to be punished as she deserved, and then
the Prince married the true Princess, and they lived in peace and happiness
all the rest of their days!









: | ,
Dy - % . ip.








2h Wee,
aM AG JL
I) Gy i)
Ae

MING

Os os
We PAS

a SO

s =
We oe SBR a fies
2 wy, ZERSE
LATIAO Zs
Rn wa Goa ae +

~

Key.

i ny) (e cold winter's day, when the snow was. thick upon
the ground, a poor little lad was’ sent into the forest to
gather wood, which he was to stack upon a little sledge
and bring home for fuel. By the time he had collected
enough, he was so cold that he thought he would make
a fire and warm himself before he went home. So he scraped away the
snow, and in so doing found a little golden key.

“Ah!” said he to himself, “where the key is, there, to be sure,
will the lock be found,” and went on scraping away the snow until
he found an iron chest. “Now,” he said, “if only the key fits the
lock, I shall no doubt find all sorts of precious things in the chest.”

He searched for a long time, and at last he discovered a lock—so
small, however, that one could scarcely see it.

He tried the key, and it fitted * exactly ; he turned it slowly,
slowly, and—if only we wait patiently until he has turned it right round
and opened the lid, why then we shall know what was inside the chest.




THE. WOLF AND THE,
SEVEN LITTLE. Goats.







i
as was once an old goat who had seven little
— i ones, whom she loved just as dearly as your mother
| loves you. One day, finding that there was no food
|! in the larder, she called her children together and said—
oa “My dears, I am obliged to go to the wood to
ox fetch some food for you; so promise me that on no account
» whatever will you allow the wolf to enter. If you do, he will
gobble you all up, and what will your poor mother do then? You must
be very careful, for he is a sly fellow and might easily deceive you. Still,
you cannot fail to recognise him by his rough voice and black feet.”
THE WOLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE GOATS. 87

The little goats promised their mother that they would be very
careful; so she kissed them all, bade them good-bye, and set out upon
her way. Before long, there came a tap, tap, tapping at the cottage-door,
and a rough voice cried: ‘Open the door, my pets, it is only mother,
and I have brought you each a fine, fresh young cabbage from the market.”

But the little goats answered: “No, no, that is not our mother’s
voice; her tones are low and sweet. We will not let you in; go away,
wicked wolf!”

Then the wolf went to a shop and bought a lump of chalk, which
he swallowed, so that his voice might sound less harsh and grating; after
that he returned to the cottage and knocked at the door once more.

“Open the door, children,” he cried; “mother has brought you each
a present.” His words were soft and low, but, as he spoke, he laid his
black paw upon the window-sill, and the little goats saw it, and cried:
“You are not our mother; she has pretty white feet. We will not open
the door, Mr. Wolf.”

Then the wolf ran to the baker. “I have wounded my foot,” said
he; “pray bind it up for me with a piece of dough.”

When the baker had done this, the wolf ran to the miller. “ Powder
my paw with flour,” he said; but the miller hesitated, for he was afraid
that the wolf meant mischief to someone. However, the wicked fellow
threatened to eat him up if he still refused, so the miller powdered his
foot quite white, and the rascal made his way back to the cottage-door.

A third time he called to the little ones: “Open the door: it is I,
your mother, and I have brought you something nice from the wood.”

“First show your paw,’ answered the little goats, “so that we
may know if you are reaily our own dear mother.”

He laid his paw upon the window-sill, and when they saw that
it was white, they thought it must be the old goat, so they opened
the door, and in came the wolf. Oh! how frightened they were!

One jumped under the table, another into the bed, a third into
the oven, a fourth hid in the kitchen, a fifth in the cupboard, a sixth
in the washing-tub, and the youngest in the case of the old grand-
father’s clock.

But the wolf found them all except the youngest, and made
short work of them. One after another he swallowed them, and
88 NURSERY TALES.

then, having had a hearty meal, he
went out into the green meadow,
laid himself down beneath a tree, and
fell fast asleep.
Soon afterwards the old goat came
home from the wood.
What a terrible sight she saw!
The house-door stood wide open, the
chairs and tables lay upside down, the
wash-tub was in pieces, and the pillows
and sheets were torn from the bed
and scattered about the floor. In vain
Il she sought for her dear little ones.
r- ———.— Alas! they were nowhere to be
found.

One after.another she called
them by name, but no one ans-
wered her, until she came to the youngest. Then a little voice cried—

“Dear mother, I am hidden in the clock-case.”

The mother opened the door and out jumped the little goat.
With sobs and cries she told the sad story of how the wolf had
eaten her brothers and sisters, and the poor old goat shed bitter tears
for the loss of her pretty darlings.

Sorrowfully she wandered from the house, weeping and wringing
her paws as she went, and the little goat ran beside her.

When they came to the meadow they saw the wolf lying beneath
‘the tree, snoring so that the branches shook. They gazed at him
from every side, and saw with amazement that something was bobbing
up and down inside him. “Ah, me!” said the mother, ‘can it be
possible that my children are still alive after having furnished a supper
for that monster?” f

She sent the little goat home to fetch scissors, needle, and thread,
and then began to cut open the wolf’s stomach. No sooner had she
made a tiny little slit than a little goat poked out his head, and presently
the whole six were hopping about on the soft green grass, and not a
bit the worse for their adventure.



THE WOLF AND THE SEVEN LITTLE GOATS. 89

How the mother kissed and hugged her darlings! She was quite
beside herself with joy.

“Now, my pets,’ she cried, “make haste and fetch me some
stones from the riverside. Whilst the wolf sleeps I will fill his stomach
with them, so that he may not miss you when he awakes.”

The little goats dragged the heaviest stones they could lift, and
placed them inside the wolf, and the mother goat stitched him up as
fast as she could, and he never winked an eye until she had finished.

When at length he roused himself, and stood up on his legs, the
stones lay heavy on his chest and made him thirsty, so he went to
the brook to drink. As he moved the stones began to jingle, and the
wolf cried out :—

‘“‘This rumbling and grumbling shakes my very bones;
I do believe instead of goats I’ve swallowed only stones.’’

He stooped to drink, but the stones were so heavy that he lost
his balance and fell headlong into the stream and was drowned.

Then the goat and her seven little ones came out of their hiding-
places, and danced upon the banks of the stream, singing for joy,
because the wicked wolf was no more.



~y



Ho con CONRAD 3
Sourve yen TH Rouse.
THEYVORED

HERE WAS ONCE a man who had served bravely

in the wars, and when they were ended he received his

Sate and three florins, which was all he had to face the world with.

“This is mean treatment!” said he. “But wait a bit; if only I can
get hold of the right people, the King shall be made to give me the
treasures of the whole kingdom.”

So, full of wrath, he went into the forest, where he came across a
man who had just uprooted six trees as if they had been cornstalks.

“Wilt thou be my servant and travel with me?” said our hero.

“Yes,” replied the man; “but first 1 must take home these few
faggots to my mother,’ and picking up one of the trees, he twisted it
round the other five, and, lifting the bundle on his shoulders, he carried
it away.

Then he returned to his master, who said: “We two shall be a match
for all the world.”
THE SIX COMRADES. gi

Now, when they had jour-
neyed for a little space they met
with a huntsman, who was on his
knees taking aim with his gun.

Then the master said: “Tell
me, huntsman, what it is you
are going to shoot.”

And the man answered:
i ae alee a there is a fly sitting on the branch of an oak-tree,
whose left eye I intend to shoot out.”

“Come with me!” said the master; “we three shall be a match for
all the world.”

The huntsman was quite willing, and came with him, and they
soon arrived at seven windmills whose sails were whirling round at
tremendous speed, although there was not a breath of wind even to
stir a leaf on the trees.

Then said the master: “I cannot think what it is that drives the
windmills, for there is not the slightest breeze.” But going on farther
with his servants for about two miles, they saw a man sitting on a
tree, puffing out his cheeks and blowing.

“My good fellow, what are you doing up there?”

“Oh!” replied the man, “there are seven windmills two miles from
here; just look how I am sending them round.” p ?
“Come with me!” cried the master; “we four shall \
be a match for all the world.” €

So the blower climbed down and accompanied
him, and presently they came upon a man who was
standing on one leg, for he had unbuckled the other
and it was lying on the ground by his side. Then the
master said—



“I suppose you want to make yourself more com-
fortable while resting ?”

“No,” said the man; “I am a runner, and in order
not to race over the ground too quickly, I have unbuckled
my leg, for, if I were to run with both, I should go
faster than any bird flies.”



|
4
92 NURSERY TALES. 4

“Come with me!” said the master; “we
five shall be a match for all the world.”

The five comrades all started off together,
and soon they met a man who had on a hat,
which he wore tilted over one ear.

Then said the master: “Manners, my
friend, manners! Don’t wear your hat like
that, but put it on properly; you look like a
simpleton.”

“T dare not do it,’ returned the man,
“for, if I did, there would come such a fearful frost that the very birds
in the sky would freeze and fall dead upon the ground.”

“Come with me!” said the master; “we six shall be a match for all
the world.”

Then the six companions came to a city where the King had pro-
claimed that whoever should run in a race with his daughter and be

victorious might become her husband, but if he lost the race he would
also lose his head.



This was told to our hero, who said: “I will make my servant run
for me.”

Then the King answered: ‘Then must thou also forfeit thine own
life as well as thy servant’s, for both heads must be sacrificed if the race
be lost.”

When these conditions were agreed upon, and everything was
arranged, the master buckled on the runner's other leg, saying: “Now,
be as nimble as you can, and don’t fail to win!”

Now, the wager was that whoever was the
first to bring water from a distant spring should be
‘the winner.

The runner received a pitcher, as did also the
King’s daughter, and they both began to run at the
same moment; but when the Princess had run a little
way the runner was quite out of sight, and it seemed
as if there had only been a rustling of the wind. Ina
very short time he had reached the well, so he drew
up the water to fill his pitcher and turned back.


THE SIX COMRADES. 93

But when he was half way home, he was overcome with fatigue,
so he put the pitcher down, stretched himself on the ground, and fell
asleep. He made a pillow of a horse’s skull, which was lying close by,
thinking that, as it was so hard, he would very soon wake up again.

_ In the meantime, the King’s daughter, who was a splendid runner
and ran better than many a man, reached the spring and hurried back
with her pitcher of water. Suddenly, she saw the runner lying asleep
on the wayside; she was overjoyed at this, and exclaimed: “The enemy
is given into my hands!” Then, emptying his pitcher, she ran on as fast
as she could.

Now, all would have been lost if by great good fortune the huntsman
had not been standing on one of the castle towers and seen everything
with his sharp eyes.

Said he: “The King’s daughter shall be no match for us if I
can help it.” So, loading his gun, he aimed so true that he shot away
the horse’s skull from under the runners head without harming him
in the least. :


94 NURSERY TALES.

This awakened the runner, who, springing up, saw in a flash that
his pitcher had been emptied, and that the King’s daughter was already
far ahead of him.

However, he did not lose courage, but ran back swiftly to the well,
drew up fresh water, filled his pitcher, and was back again full ten
minutes sooner than the King’s daughter.

“See what I can do,” cried he, “when I really use my legs; what
I did before could scarcely be called running.”

The King was displeased, and so was his daughter, that a common
discharged soldier should have won the race; so they consulted with
each other how they could rid themselves of him, together with his
five comrades.

Then the King said to his daughter: “Do not be afraid, my
child, for I have found a way to prevent them coming back.”

So he said to the six companions: “You must now eat, drink, and
be merry.” Saying which, he led them to a room that had an iron floor
and iron doors, and even the windows were secured with iron bars.

In this apartment there was a table covered with the most delicious
appetising dishes; and the King said: “Now come in and sit down and
enjoy yourselves.”

Directly they were all inside he had the doors locked and bolted.
This done, the King sent for the cook, and commanded him to light
a fire underneath the room, until the iron should be red-hot.

The heat soon became so great that the six comrades guessed that
the King wished to suffocate them.

But the man with the hat set it straight on his head, and immediately
a frost fell on everything, andall the heat vanished, while the very meats
on the dishes began to freeze.

When the King believed they had all perished in the fearful heat,
he ordered the doors to be opened, and there stood all the six men safe
and sound!

They said they would like very much to come out and warm them-
selves, for the cold had been so intense that the meat had frozen on their
plates. Le

Then the King demanded why the cook had not obeyed his
commands.







Ye, % A fl Be
q es AR Gs
ii Ail,
eae

; oa aa ile ‘
S ao ne
; i ae
Beane ae “He blew the two regiments
obi s fi

up into the aur.”
96 NURSERY TALES.

But the cook pointed to the tremendous fire that was still burning,
and the King saw that he could not harm the six comrades in this way.

In despair the King began to cast about in his mind for some
other way to rid himself of his unwelcome guests; so he commanded
the master to be sent before him.

“If you will give up all claim to my daughter,’ said he, “you
shall have as much gold as you can wish for.”

“Indeed, your Majesty,” replied the master, “if you will only
give me as much as my servant can carry, I will no longer demand
your daughter.”

This pleased the King very much, and the master said that he
would return in fourteen days to take away the gold.

Thereupon the master ordered all the tailors in the kingdom
to sew him a sack of such a size that it would take fourteen days
to make. When it was finished he sent the strong man who had
uprooted’ trees with the sack on his shoulder to the King.

So the King ordered a ton of gold to be fetched, which it required
sixteen men to carry; but the strong man took it up with one hand,
and threw it into the sack, saying: “Why don’t you bring more at a
time? This scarcely covers the bottom of the sack.”

So the King sent again and again for all his treasure to be
brought, and the strong man threw it all into the sack, which was yet
not half full, ;

“Bring me more!” cried he; “these few crumbs won't fill it.”

Therefore they were obliged to bring seven thousand wagons laden
with gold to the palace; these the strong man pushed into his sack,
together with the oxen which were yoked to the wagons.

At last, when everything that could possibly be found had been
put in, he said: “Well, I must finish this; at any rate, if the sack
isn't quite full, it’s all the easier to tie it up.”

Saying which, he lifted it on to his back and went off with his
companions.

When the King saw how this one man was carrying off all the
wealth of his kingdom, he flew into a great passion and ordered all
his cavalry out to pursue the six comrades, commanding them to take
away the sack from the strong man.
THE SIX COMRADES. 97

The two regiments soon overtook the six men and shouted to them—

“Halt! You are our Busoners: Put down that sack of gold, or
we will cut you all to pieces.”

“What is it you are saying?” asked the blower coolly. “We are
your prisoners? Aha! First you must have a little dance together up
in the air!”

Then he puffed out his cheeks and blew the two regiments up into
the sky. Some were blown away on one side of the mountains, and
some disappeared in the blue distance on the other.

A sergeant cried for mercy: he had nine wounds, and was a
brave fellow and did not deserve such a disgrace. So the blower blew
gently after him, which brought him back to the ground without
hurting him.

“Now go home,” said the blower, “and tell the King that he
may send any number of horsemen after us, but I will blow them all
into the air.”

When the King received this message, he said: “Let the fellows
go! they will meet with their deserts.”

So the six comrades brought home the wealth of the kingdom,
which they divided, and lived happily to the end of their days.




sand Losi Nae, (ze wd @ WG
RGAE EL. wk Ai als
oe CW OO py


oe

—\, ee) 8 GS ee ee
TACK amd te HeANSTALK by
wn Oy

ae

NCE upon a time there lived a poor widow who had an only
son named Jack. She was very poor, for times had been hard,
and Jack was too young to work. Almost all the furniture
of the little cottage had been sold to buy bread, until at last
there was nothing left worth selling. Only the good cow,
Milky White, remained, and she gave milk every morning, which they

took to market and sold. But one sad day Milky White gave no milk,

and then things looked bad indeed.


FACK AND THE BEANSTALK. 99

“Never mind, mother,’ said Jack. “We must sell Milky White.
Trust me to make a good bargain,’ and away he went to the market.

For some time he went along very sadly, but after a little he
quite recovered his spirits. “I may as well ride as walk,” said he; so
instead of leading the cow by the halter, he jumped on her back, and
so he went whistling along until he met a butcher.

“Good morning,’ said the butcher.

“Good morning, sir,’ answered Jack.

“Where are you going?” said the butcher.

“JT am going to market to sell the cow.”

“Tt’s lucky I met you,” said the butcher. “You may save yourself
the trouble of going so far.”

With this, he put his hand in his pocket, and pulled out five
curious-looking beans. “What do you call these?” he said.

“Beans,” said Jack.

“Yes,” said he, “beans, but they’re the most wonderful beans that
ever were known. If you plant them overnight, by the next morning
they'll grow up and reach the sky. But to save you the trouble of
going all the ey, to market, I don’t mind exchanging them for that
cow of yours.”

“Done!” cried Jack, who was so delighted with the bargain that he
ran all the way home to tell his mother how lucky he had been.

But oh! how disappointed the poor widow was.

“Off to bed with you!” she cried; and she was so angry that she
threw the beans out of the window into the garden. So poor Jack went
to bed without any supper, and cried himself to sleep.

When he woke up the next morning, the room was almost dark ;
and Jack jumped out of bed and ran to the window to see what ‘was
the matter. The sun was shining brightly outside, but from the ground
right up beside his window there was growing a great. beanstalk, which
stretched up and up as far as he could see, into the sky.

“T’ll just see where it leads to,” thought Jack, and with that he
stepped out of the window on to the beanstalk, and began to climb
upwards. He climbed up and up, till after a time his mother’s cottage
looked a mere speck below, but at last the stalk ended, and he found
himself ina new and beautiful country. A little way off there was a great
100 NURSERY TALES.

castle, with a broad road leading straight up to the front gate. But what
most surprised Jack was to find a beautiful maiden suddenly standing
beside him.

“Good morning, ma'am,” said he, very politely.

“Good morning, Jack,’ said she; and: Jack was more surprised than
ever, for he could not imagine how she had learned his name. But he
soon found that she knew a great deal more about him than his name;
for she told him how, when he was quite a little baby, his father, a gallant
knight, had been slain by the giant who lived in yonder castle, and how
his mother, in order to save Jack, had been obliged to promise never to
tell the secret.

“All that the giant has is yours,” she said, and then disappeared
quite as suddenly as she came.

“She must be a fairy,” thought ie

As he drew near to the castle, he saw the giant’s wife standing at
the door.

“Tf you please, ma'am,” said he, “ would you kindly give me some
breakfast? I have had nothing to eat since yesterday.”

Now, the giant’s wife, although very big and very ugly, had a kind
heart, so she said: “Very well, little man, come in; but you must be
quick about it, for if my husband, the giant, finds you here, he will eat
you up, bones and all.”

So in Jack went, and the giant’s wife gave him a good breakfast, but
before he had half finished it there came a terrible knock at the front
door, which seemed to shake even the thick walls of the castle.

“Dearie me, that is my husband!” said the giantess, in a terrible
tright; “we must hide you somehow,” and she lifted Jack up and popped
him into the empty copper.

No sooner had-the giant’s wife opened the door than her husband
roared out :—

“Fee, fi, fo, fum,
I smell the blood of an Englishman;

Be he alive, or be he dead,
T’ll grind his bones to make my bread!

It’s a boy, I’m sure it is,’ he continued. ‘Where is he? I'll have him
for my breakfast.”






Jack and the Beanstalk.
102 NURSERY TALES.

“Nonsense!” said his wife; “you must be mistaken. It’s the ox’s
hide you smell.” So he sat down, and ate up the greater part of the ox.
When he had finished he said: “Wife, bring me my money-bags.” So
his wife brought him two bags full of gold, and the giant began to count
his money. But he was so sleepy that his head soon began to nod, and
then he began to snore, like the rumbling of thunder. Then Jack crept
out, snatched up the two bags, and though the giant’s dog barked loudly,
he made his way down the beanstalk back to the cottage before the
giant awoke,

Jack and his mother were now quite rich; but it occurred to him
one day that he would like to see how matters were going on at the
giant’s castle. So while his mother was away at market, he climbed up,
and up, and up, and up, until he got to the top of the beanstalk again.

The giantess was standing at the door, just as before, but she did
not know Jack, who, of course, was more finely dressed than on his first
visit. “If you please, ma'am,” said he, “will you give me some breakfast ?”

“Run away,” said she, “or my husband the giant will eat you up,
bones and all. The last boy who came here stole two bags of gold—off
with you!” But the giantess had a kind heart, and after a time she
allowed Jack to come into the kitchen, where she set before him enough
breakfast to last him a week. Scarcely had he begun to eat than there
was a great rumbling like an earthquake, and the giantess had only time
to bundle Jack into the oven when in came the giant. No sooner was
he inside the room than he roared :—

“Fee, fi, fo, fum,
I smell the blood ot an Englishman;

Be he alive, or be he dead,
I'll grind his bones to make my bread!”

But his wife told him he was mistaken, and after breakfasting off a
roasted bullock, just as if it were a lark, he called out: “Wife, bring the
little brown hen!” The giantess went out and brought in a little brown
hen, which she placed on the table. ;

“Lay!” said the giant; and the hen at once laid a golden egg.
“Lay!” said the giant a second time; and she laid another golden egg.
“Lay!” said the giant a third time; and she laid a third golden egg.

“That will do for to-day,” said he, and stretched himself out to go
FACK AND THE BEANSTALK. 103

to sleep. As soon as he began to
snore, Jack crept out of the oven,
went on tiptoe to the table, and,
snatching up the little brown hen,
made a dash for the door. Then
the hen began to cackle, and the
giant began to wake up; but be-
fore he was quite awake, Jack
had escaped from the castle, and,
climbing as fast as he could down
the beanstalk, got safe home to
his mother’s cottage.

The little brown hen laid so
many golden eggs that Jack and
his mother had now more money
than they could spend. But Jack
was always thinking about the beanstalk ;
the window again, and climbed up, and up, and up, and up, until he
reached the top.

This time, you may be sure, he was careful not to be seen; so he
crept round to the back of the castle, and when the giant’s wife went
out he slipped into the kitchen and hid himself in the oven. In came
the giant, roaring louder than ever :—



“Fee, fi, fo, fum,
I smell the blood of an Englishman;
Be he alive, or be he dead,
I’ll grind his bones to make my bread,”

But the giantess was quite sure that she had seen no little boys
that morning; and after grumbling a great deal, the giant sat down to
breakfast. Even then he was not quite satisfied, for every now and
again he would say :—

“Fee, fi, fo, fum,
I smell the blood of an Englishman,’
and once he got up and looked in the copper. But, of course, Jack was
in the oven all the time!
When the giant had finished, he called out: “Wife, bring me the
104 NURSERY TALES.

golden harp!” So she brought in the golden harp, and placed it on the
table. “Sing!” said the giant; and the harp at once began to sing the
most beautiful songs that ever were heard. It sang so sweetly that
the giant soon fell fast asleep; and then Jack crept quietly out of the
oven, and going on tiptoe to the table, seized hold of the golden harp.
But the harp at once called out: “ Master! master!” and the giant woke
up just in time to catch sight of Jack running out of the kitchen-door.

With a fearful roar, he seized his oak-tree club, and dashed
after Jack, who held the harp tight, and ran faster than he had ever
run before. The giant, brandishing his club, and taking terribly long
strides, gained on Jack at every instant, and he would have been
caught if the giant hadn’t slipped over a boulder. Before he could
pick himself up, Jack began to climb down the beanstalk, and when the
giant arrived at the edge he was nearly half-way to the cottage. The
giant began to climb down too; but as soon as Jack saw him coming,
he called out: “Mother, bring me an axe!” and the widow hurried out
with a chopper. Jack had no sooner reached the ground than he cut the
beanstalk right in two. Down came the giant with a terrible crash, and
that, you may be sure, was the end of him. What became of the giantess
and the castle nobody knows. But Jack and his mother grew very rich,
and lived happy ever after.







LS Bi ND,
RES G7 Ge

ten LE
TTA IO BG
Sty +f
Bs




Gh
3 A CK had served his master seven long years; so he said
to him: ‘Master, my time is out, and my wish is to return
home to my mother: give me, if you please, my reward.”

The master answered: “Thou hast truly and faithfully
served me; as the service was, so shall the reward be.” And
he gave Jack a piece of gold as big as his head.

Jack pulled out his handkerchief, wrapped up the lump of gold in
it, and, throwing it over his shoulder, made his way home. As he went
on his way, always putting one foot before the other, he met a man
galloping briskly along on a fine horse.

“Ah!” said Jack, quite aloud, “what a capital thing it is to ride!
There you sit as comfortably as in a chair, kicking against no stones,

—


106 NURSERY TALES.

saving your shoe-leather, and getting to your journey’s end almost with-
out knowing it!”

The horseman, who heard this, pulled up and cried, “Hullo, Jack,
why do you trudge on foot?”

“Because I must,” answered he; “for I have this big lump to carry
home. It is real gold, you know; but, all the same, I can scarcely hold
up my head, it weighs so terribly on my shoulders.”

“Tl tell you what,” said the horseman: “we'll just exchange. I'll
give you my horse and you give me your lump of gold.”

“With all my heart!” said Jack. “But I warn you, youll have a
job to carry it.”

The horseman dismounted, took the gold, and helped Jack up; and,
giving the bridle into his hand, said: “If you want him to go at full
speed, you must cluck with your tongue and cry ‘C’ck! cck!’”

Jack was heartily delighted, as he sat on his horse and rode gaily
along.

After a while he fancied he would like to go faster, so he began
to cluck with his tongue and cry “C’ck! cck!” The horse broke into
a smart trot, and before Jack was aware he was thrown off—splash !—
into a ditch which divided the highway from the fields, and there he lay.
The horse, too, would have run away had it not been stopped by a
peasant, as he came along the road, driving his cow before him.

s Jack pulled himself together and got

Ves upon his legs again. He felt very downcast,
sey, and said to the peasant: “It’s a poor joke,
Gy, that riding, ear when one The upon

a ie such a brute as this, which kicks and throws



one off so that one comes near to breaking
) one’s neck. You don’t catch me on his
$4 (ue i ‘back again. Now, there’s more sense in a
My LO cow like yours, behind which you can walk
in peace and quietness, besides having your
butter, milk, and cheese every morning for
certain. What would I not give for such
a cow!”
“Well,” said the peasant, “if it would
FACK IN LUCK. 107

give you so much pleasure, I will
exchange my cow for your horse.”

Jack gladly consented, and
the peasant flung himself on the
horse and rode quickly off.

Jack drove the cow peacefully
along, thinking: “What a lucky
fellow Iam! I have just to get a
bit of bread (and that isn’t a diffi-
cult matter) and then, as often as
-I like, I can eat my butter and
cheese with it. If I am thirsty, I
just milk my cow and drink. What Ley.
more could I desire?” eee

When he came to an inn, he made a stop, and in his great joy
ate all the food he had with him right up, both dinner and supper.
With his two last farthings, he bought himself half a glass of beer.
Then he drove his cow towards his mother’s village.

As the morning went on, the more oppressive the heat became, and
Jack found himself upon a heath some three miles long.

Then he felt so hot that his tongue was parched with thirst. “This
is soon cured,” thought Jack. “1 have only to milk my cow, drink, and
xefresh myself.”



He tied the cow to a withered tree, and as he had no pitcher he
placed his leathern cap underneath her; but in spite of all his trouble not
a drop of milk could be got.

And he went to work so clumsily that the impatient brute gave
him such a kick with her hind leg that he was knocked over and quite
dazed, and for a long time did not know where he was.

Luckily a butcher came by just then, wheeling a young pig in a
barrow. |

“What kind of joke is this?” cried he, helping our friend Jack
to rise. ek

Jack told him what had happened. The butcher passed him his
bottle and said—

“There, drink and revive yourself. That cow will never give any

8*
108 NURSERY TALES.

milk; she is an old animal and, at the best, is only fit for the plough
or the butcher.”

“Oho!” said Jack, running his fingers through his hair. ‘Who would
have thought it? It is all right indeed when you can slaughter such a
beast in your own house. But I don’t think much of cow’s flesh; it is
not tender enough. Now, if one had a young pig! That would taste far
different, to say nothing of the sausages!”

“Listen, Jack,’ said the butcher. “For your sake, I will exchange,
and let;you have my pig for your cow.”

“May Heaven reward your friendship!” said Jack, and at once gave
him the cow.

The man untied the pig from the wheelbarrow, and gave the rope
with which it was bound into Jack’s hand.

Jack marched on, thinking: “What a lucky fellow Iam. As soon
as anything goes wrong, something turns up and all’s right again.”

Just then, up came a youth, carrying a fine white goose under his
arm. They were friends, and Jack began to talk about his luck and how
he always came off best in his exchanges. The youth told him he was
taking the goose to a christening feast.

“Just hold it,” he continued, seizing it by the wings, “and feel how
heavy it is: yet it was only fattened for eight weeks. It will be a rich
morsel when roasted.”

“Yes,” said Jack, weighing it with his hand, “it is certainly heavy,
but my pig is by no means to be despised.”

Meanwhile the lad was looking thoughtfully around, shaking his head.
“Listen,” he said, “I don’t think it’s all right about your pig. In the
village I have just come through, one has lately been stolen from the
magistrate’s own sty. I fear it is the one you have. They have sent
people out, and it would be a bad business if they found you with the
pig. The least they would do would be to throw you into gaol.”

Our friend Jack was downcast. “Alas,” he cried, “help me in my
need! You know your way here better than I. Take my pig then, and
give me your goose.”

“T shall be running great risks,” said the youth, “but at least I will
prevent your getting into trouble.”

He took the rope in his hand and drove the pig quickly away


Gack went on,

oe

th the goose

WU

”

ws arm

under h


TIO NURSERY TALES.

down a by-path, and Jack went on relieved of his sorrow, towards home,
with the goose under his arm.

“What a lucky fellow I am!” he said to himself. “First, I shall
have a good roast; then there is the quantity of dripping that will fall
out, which will keep me in bread-and-dripping for a quarter of a year;
and lastly, the splendid white feathers, with which I will have my pillow
stuffed; then I shall fall asleep without rocking. How glad my mother
will be!”

When he was at length come to the village, there stood in the street
a scissors-grinder with his truck. His wheel hummed, and he sang the

while :—
‘““My wheel I turn, and the scissors I grind,

And my cloak hangs flowing free in the wind.’’

Jack remained standing, and watched him; at length he spoke to
him, and said—

“You must be doing well since you are so merry over your grinding.”

_ “Yes,” said the scissors-grinder; “the work has gold at the bottom

of it. A proper scissors-ginder is the sort of man who, whenever he puts
his hand in his pocket, finds money there. But where have you bought
that fine goose?”

“T did not buy it, but exchanged it for my pig.”

“And the pig?”

“T obtained him for a cow.”

“And the cow?”

“J had her for a horse.”

“And the horse?” Le
“For him I gave a lump of gold as big as my head.” | Da :
“And the gold?”
“Why, that was my reward for seven years of

service.”

“You have certainly done
well for yourself each time,” said
the scissors-grinder. “If you could
only hear money rattling in your
pocket every time you got up,
your fortune would be made.”




FACK IN LUCK. ILE

“ow shall I set about it?” said
Jack.

“You must become a grinder, like
me. All you want is a grindstone: the
rest comes of itself. I have one which
is a little damaged indeed, but for which
I. would ask nothing more than your
goose; would that suit you?”

“Flow can you ask me?” answered
Jack. “I shall be the luckiest fellow on
earth. If I have money as often as I
feel in my pocket, what else shall I have
to care about?” And he handed over
the goose, and took the grindstone in
receipt.

“Now,” said the grinder, lifting up.
an ordinary heavy field-stone, which lay
beside him. “There you have a capital
stone, which will be just the thing to hammer your old nails straight
upon. Take it and lift it up carefully.”

Jack raised the stone and marched on with a joyful heart, his eyes
shining with pleasure.

“TI must have been born lucky,” he cried out. “All that I desire
comes to me, as to a Sunday-child.”

Meanwhile, having been on his legs since daybreak, he began to
feel tired; besides which, he was tormented by hunger, for he had eaten
up all his provision in his joy over the exchange of the cow.

At length he could only proceed with great trouble and must needs
stop every minute; the stones, too, crushed him terribly. Then he could
not conceal the thought: “How nice it would be now to have nothing
to carry!”

Like a snail he crept up to a well, wishing to rest himself and
enjoy a refreshing drink.

In order not to spoil the stones in setting them down, he laid them
carefully on the ground one beside the other, and bent himself down to


112 NURSERY TALES.

drink, but by an accident he gave them a little push, and both stones
went splashing down.

Jack, when he saw them sinking in the depths of the well, jumped
up with joy, kneeled down and thanked God, with tears in his eyes, that
He had shown him this grace and, without troubling him to think what
to do with them, had relieved him of the heavy stones which would have
been such a hindrance to him.

“There is no man under the sun,” he cried out, “so lucky as I.”

With a bright heart and free from all care, he sprang upon his
way, until he was home at his mother’s.






\. N a great wide forest, full of beautiful trees, and green
é 8 glades, and thorny thickets, there lived a long time ago
a wood-cutter and his wife, who had only one child, a
little girl. She was so pretty, and so good, that the sun
Pe seemed to shine more brightly when its light fell upon
y a ¥. her rosy little face, and the birds would seem to sing more
i sweetly when she was passing by.

Her real name was Maisie; but the neighbours round about all
called her “Little Red Riding-Hood,” because of a scarlet riding-hood and
cloak that her kind old grandmother had made for her, and which
she nearly always wore.

She was a happy, merry little child, with a smile and a gentle
word for everybody, and so you may easily believe that everybody loved
her, and was glad to catch a glimpse of her golden curls and her scarlet.
cloak as she tripped along, singing, under the green boughs.

Now, this, let me tell you before I forget, was at the time when
all the birds and beasts, or very nearly all, could speak just as well as.
at NURSERY TALES.

you or I; and nobody was surprised to hear them talk, as I suppose one
would be nowadays.

Well, as I was saying, Little Red Riding-Hood lived with her
parents in a little white cottage with a green door and a thatched roof,
and red and white roses climbing all over the walls, and even putting
their pretty heads in at the latticed windows, to peep at the child who
was so like them.

It was on a bright spring morning early in May, when little Red
Riding-Hood had just finished putting away the breakfast-cups, that her
mother came bustling in from the dairy.

“Flere’s a to-do,” she said. “Farmer Hodge has this very minute
told me that he hears your Grannie isn’t quite well, and I can’t leave
the cheese-making this morning for love or money! Do you go, my dear,
and find out how she is—and—stay—take her this little pot of sweet
fresh butter, and these two new-laid eggs, and these nice tasty little
pasties. Maybe they'll tempt her to eat a bit. Here’s your basket, and
don’t be too long away, honey.”

So little Red Riding-Hood pulled her hood over her curls, and set
off down the sunny green slope, with her basket in her hand, at a brisk
pace. But as she got deeper into the forest, she walked more slowly.
Everything was so beautiful; the great trees waved their huge arms over
her, the birds were calling to one another from the thorns all white with
blossom, and the child began singing as she went, she could not have told
why, but I think it was because the beautiful world made her feel glad.

The path wound along through the trees, and, as it grew wider after
turning a corner, Red Riding-Hood saw that she was likely to have
company on her walk; for, where two cross-paths divided, there sat a
big grey Wolf licking his long paws, and looking sharply about him. And
“Good morning, Red Riding-Hood,” said he.

“Good morning, Mr. Wolf,” she answered.

“And where may you be going, sweet lass?” said the Wolf, as
he walked beside her.

“Oh, Grannie isn’t very well, and mother cannot leave the cheese-
making this morning, and so I’m taking her some little dainties in my
basket, and I am to see how she is, and tell mother when I get back,”
said the child, with a smile.



“And,” said the Wolf, “where does your good Grannie live,
little lady?”

“Through the copse, and down the hollow, and over the bridge,
and three meadows after the mill.”

“Does she indeed?” cried he. “Why, then, I do believe she is a
very dear old friend of mine, whom I have not seen for years and years.
Now, I'll tell you what we'll do, you and I: I will go by this way, and
you shall take that, and whoever gets there first shall be the winner of
the game.”

So the Wolf trotted off one way, and Red Riding-Hood went the
other; and I am sorry to say that she lingered and loitered more than
she ought to have done on the road.

Well, what with one thing and another, the sun was right up in
the very mid-most middle of thé sky when she crossed the last meadow
from the mill and came in sight of her grandmother's cottage, and the
big lilac-bushes that grew by the garden gate.
116 NURSERY TALES.

“Oh! dear, how I must have lingered!” said the child, when she
saw how high the sun had climbed since she set out on her journey ; and,
pattering up the garden-path, she tapped at the cottage door.

“Who's there?” said a very gruff kind of voice from inside.

“Tt’s only I, Grannie dear, your little Red Riding-Hood, with some
goodies for you in my basket,’ answered the child.

“Then pull the bobbin,” cried the voice, “and the latch will go up.”

“What a dreadful cold poor Grannie must have, to be sure, to make
her so hoarse,’ thought the child. Then she pulled the bobbin, and the
latch went up, and Red Riding-Hood pushed open the door, and stepped
inside the cottage.

It seemed very dark in there after the bright sunlight outside, and
all Red Riding-Hood could see was that the window-curtains and the bed-
curtains were still drawn, and her grandmother seemed to be lying in
bed with the bed-clothes pulled almost over her head, and her great
white-frilled nightcap nearly hiding her face.

Now, you and I have guessed by this time, although poor Red
Riding-Hood never even thought of such a thing, that it was not her
Grannie at all, but the wicked Wolf, who had hurried to the cottage and
put on Grannie’s nightcap and popped into her bed, to pretend that he
was Grannie herself.

And where was Grannie all this time, you will say? Well, we shall
see presently.

“Come and sit down beside my bed, dearie,’ wheezed the Wolf,
“and let us have a little chat.” Then the Wolf stretched out his large
hairy paws and began to unfasten the basket.

“Oh!” said Red Riding-Hood, “what great arms you have, Grannie!”

“All the better to hug you with,” said the Wolf.

“And what great rough ears you have, Grannie!”

“All the better to hear you with, my little dear.”

“And your eyes, Grannie ; what great yellow eyes you have!”

“All the better to see you with, my pet,’ grinned the Wolf.

“And oh! oh! Grannie,” cried the child, in a sad fright, ‘what
great sharp teeth you have!”

“All the better to eat you with!” growled the Woif, springing up
suddenly at Red Riding-Hood. But just at that very moment the door
LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD. 117

flew open, and two tall wood-cutters rushed in with their heavy axes, and
killed the wicked Wolf in far less time than it takes me to tell you
about it.

“But where is Grannie ?” asked Little Red Riding-Hood, when she
had thanked the brave wood-cutters. ‘Oh! where can poor Grannie be ?
Can the cruel Wolf have eaten her up?”

And she began to cry and sob bitterly—when, who should walk in
but Grannie herself, as large as life, and as hearty as ever, with her
marketing-basket on her arm! For it was another old dame in the village
who was not very well, and Grannie had been down to visit her and
give her some of her own famous herb-tea.

So everything turned out right in the end, and all lived happily ever
after ; but I promise you that little Red Riding-Hood never made friends
with a Wolf again !




Ci ee one was as pretty as could be, and worked

S 7 hard for her living; but the other was both ugly and idle.
Now, it chanced that the widow loved the ugly
daughter better than the pretty one, because she was her very own,
whilst the pretty maiden was only her step-daughter. So, besides doing
all the work of the house, the poor girl was sent every day to sit beside
the village well and spin a bundle of flax into yarn. Sometimes she had
to work so hard that her poor little fingers were covered with blood;
and one day, when this happened, and a few drops of blood had fallen
upon the spindle, she bent over the well to wash it clean again, and
dropped it in.

She ran weeping to her step-mother, to tell her what had happened,
and the angry woman scolded her without mercy. “As you have let the
spindle fall in,” said she, “you must just go and fetch it out again.”

So the poor little maid went back to the well, and, in her sorrow and
despair, she jumped straight into it, to see if she could find her spindle.
At once she lost all consciousness, and when she came to herself again

i
|
2
&.
MOTHER HULDA. 119

she found that she had fallen into a beautiful meadow, decked with every
sweet and lovely flower, and where the sun was shining brightly.

As she strolled along the meadow path, she came to an oven full
of bread. “Take us out! take us out! or we shall burn,” cried the loaves;
“we are just baked enough.”

So the girl opened the oven door and took out the bread, and then
went on her way again. Presently she came to an apple-tree, weighed
down with fruit, and it called to her as she passed: “Shake me! shake
me! My apples are all ripe.” So she shook the apple-tree till the apples
fell like rain around her. When there were no more left upon the tree,
she stacked them in heaps, and went her way.

At length she reached a little house, where an old woman was
looking out of the window. The girl was afraid of her great big teeth, and
would have run away, but she called to her: “Do not be afraid of me,
dear child; I am Mother Hulda.
Stay with me, and help me with
the house work. If you are a
good girl, all shall go well with
you. But you must take great
pains to shake up my bed and
make the feathers fly, or else §
there will be no snow to cover
up the earth.”

The old woman spoke so
kindly that the girl took courage
and agreed to stay with her.

She worked as hard as she
was able, and pleased the old
woman in everything she did.
She shook the bed with such a
will that the feathers flew like
snow-flakes. So she led a happy
life, with never an unkind word
to grieve her, and had boiled and
baked meats to eat every day.
Time passed on, and the little


120 NURSERY TALES.

maid grew pale and sad, though she herself could not tell at first what
ailed her. At length she thought it must be home-sickness, for, although
she was treated a thousand times better than ever she had been at home,
she had a great longing to go back again. So she went to the old
woman and told her how she felt. “I have been very happy here,” she
said; “but I have such a longing to see my own people once again that
I can stay here no longer.”

“Tt is right you should wish to go home, my child,” answered
Mother Hulda. “You have served me faithfully all this long time, so I
will see that you have a safe journey back.”

She took the girl by the hand and led her to a great gate, which
stood wide open. As soon as she passed through, a shower of golden
rain fell and covered her with glittering gold from head to foot, so that
she looked as though she were clad in a golden mantle. “That is
my gift to you, because you have been a good, hard-working girl,” said
Mother Hulda, and then gave her as well the spindle which she had let
fall into the well so long ago.

Immediately afterwards the gate shut with a clang, and the girl found
herself back in the world once more, and quite near to her mother’s
house. As she entered the courtyard, the cock began to crow :—

“* Cock-a-doodle-doo-doo-doo !
The golden girl’s come back to you!”

Then the little maid went in to her mother and sister, who made
a great fuss of her, now that she had come home covered with gold.

She told them all that had happened, and when the mother heard
how her pretty daughter had come by her fortune, she was anxious
that her ugly daughter should have the same good luck. So she sent her
to sit by the side of the well, and put a spindle into her hand. The
lazy girl had never pricked her fingers with spinning, but she thrust her
hand into a thorn-bush, so that it might look as though she had.

Then she threw the spindle into the well, and jumped in after it.

She fell, just as her sister had done, into a beautiful flowery meadow,
and followed the same path.

When she came to the oven, the bread cried out as before: “Take
us out, or we shall burn. We are just baked enough.”


The lazy girl answered: “I am not going to soil my hands for you.”

Soon she came to the apple-tree. “Shake me! shake me! my apples
are all ripe,” it cried.

But the girl tossed her head and went on her way. “If I were to
shake you,” she said scornfully, “I might get a bump on my head from
one of you for my pains.”

When she reached Mother Hulda’s house, she saw her looking out
of the window, but was not in the least afraid of her, because she had
heard beforehand of her large teeth. She engaged herself to the old
woman, and at first things went very well. She remembered the gold she
would receive at the end of her service, and did her work as well as she
was able.

But very soon she grew lazy, and would not get up in the
mornings. Then, too, she neglected Mother Hulda’s bed shamefully, and
scarcely shook it at all, so that there was not a feather to be seen. So
her mistress soon tired of her, and told her to go home.
122 NURSERY TALES.

Miss Lazybones was delighted, for she thought the time had now
come for the shower of gold, but when Mother Hulda led her beneath
the great gateway, instead of gold there fell a shower of pitch. “This is
the reward for your services,” said the old woman, and banged the door
behind the idle girl.

And so, when she reached home, covered with pitch, and as black as
a sweep, the cock perched on the wall beside the well, began to crow:—

“« Cock-a-doodle-doo-doo-doo !
Your dirty girl’s come back to you.”

And dirty the girl remained all the days of her life, for, try as much
as she would, she could never wash the pitch off again.




SHE, FRAGAMUP FINS -—~

HE cock said to the little hen: “The nuts are getting ripe,
wifie, so let us make a little picnic to the hill where
they grow, and have a nice feast before the squirrels have

eA eaten them all.”
a @ The little hen was delighted. ‘We will have fine fun
together,” she said, and away they went, arm in arm, to the place where
the nuts grew. The day was fine, and they enjoyed themselves so much
that they stayed there until night began to fall, and then they were so
tired that they felt they really could not walk home. So the cock began
to build a carriage of nutshells.

When it was finished, the little hen seated herself in it and told
the cock to harness himself to the carriage and take her home.

“Indeed, no!” answered the cock. “I am as tired as you, and I
have no mind to draw you, madam. Your coachman I will willingly be,
and sit upon the box, but more I will not do.”

So they squabbled with each other, until a duck came waddling by.



g*
124 NURSERY TALES.

“Flullo! you thieves!” cried she, “what are you doing on my nut-
hill? Wait a minute, and I'll teach you to keep away in future.”

She flew at the cock with wings outspread, but the plucky little
fellow met her with equal fury, and after a time the duck found she was
getting the worst of it, and had to beg for mercy. So, as a punishment,
she was made to harness herself to the carriage. The cock seated himself
upon the box, cracked his whip, and away they went like the wind.

Before they had gone far, they met a couple of foot passengers—a
pin and a needle. They called to the cock to stop, and asked if he and
his wife would give them a lift, as they were too tired to go another step,
and the roads were too muddy to make a comfortable resting-place. They
said that they had stayed at the Tailor’s Inn for refreshment, and had
not noticed how quickly the time was passing, and how late they were. ”

When the cock saw what thin little folk they were, he bade them
get inside the carriage, but made them promise on no account to crush
his wife or tread on her toes.

Late that night they came to an inn, at which they alighted, for
they felt sure that they would get no farther before morning. The duck
was an unsteady steed, and besides shaking the carriage violently from
side to side, complained terribly of pains in her pe for she was not a
good walker.

But the host did not much like the appearance of the travellers,
and made ‘all sorts of excuses to get rid of them.

However, the cock spoke so persuasively, promising him the egg
which his wife had laid coming along, as well as that of the duck, which,
he said, laid an egg every day, that at last he consented to let the com-
pany of ragamuffins stay one night.

So they set to work to enjoy themselves, ordered the best of food
and drink, and passed the night in comfortable beds.

As soon as morning began to dawn, the cock awakened the hen,
pecked a hole in the egg, and together they ate it up, and threw the shell
upon the hearth.

Then they went to the needle, which was still asleep. picked it up
by the eye, and stuck it in the seat of the host’s chair; the pin they hid
in the poor man’s towel; and after that they flew away, over hedge,
ditch, and field, as fast as ever they could.
THE RAGAMUFFINS. 125

The duck, who had slept in the courtyard all night, heard the cock
and the hen fluttering overhead, and waddled away well pleased to the
stream, splashed in and swam away, far more quickly than she had drawn
the carriage.

Two hours later, the host got up, washed himself, and took the towel
to dry himself with, when the pin scratched him in the face and made
a red scar from ear to ear.

He went down to the kitchen, and stooped over the hearth to light
his pipe. At once the egg-shells flew up into his face.

“Everything seems to fly at my head this morning,” he said, quite
crossly, and sat down in the old grandfather’s chair. With a cry of pain
he sprang up as though he had been shot.

He was now thoroughly angry, but happening to remember the
guests who had arrived the night before, he went to see how they had
slept. But they had disappeared!

So the host made a vow that never again would he harbour a troop
of ragamuffins, who ate folk out of house and home, paid nothing, and
played one such shabby tricks into the bargain.





NCE upon a time there lived a very rich man, whose
palace was so splendid and so richly furnished that even
the Sultan’s could not be compared with it. The pillars

which supported the roof were of pure gold, the walls were adorned

with every kind of curious and antique weapon, the hilts and scab-
bards of which shone and sparkled with a thousand gems, and the
curtains and hangings were of the richest and softest silk.

Near to this beautiful palace lived a widow lady and her two
daughters. The mother often looked with longing eyes towards her
neighbour's house, and sighed as she thought of her children’s obstinacy
in refusing to become the mistress of such a magnificent mansion. For
the rich man had made offers of marriage to both the pretty maidens
in turn, but neither Fatima nor Anne would consent to become his wile.

The fact of the matter was that the rich man unfortunately had a
bright blue beard, and this made him so extremely ugly that they could
not bear to look at him. Added to this, Bluebeard had been married
several times already, and no one quite knew what had become of his
wives, though he made all sorts of excuses to account for their disappearance.

One day Bluebeard decided to give a series of entertainments

BLUEBEARD. 127

at one of his country mansions. Fatima and her mother and sister
were invited to spend a week there, in company with many other
ladies and young people; and no sooner did they set foot in the house
than they were loaded with gifts of the most costly description. At meals
they were served with the most delicious foods, and dancing and music
’ were provided for their amusement.

Before many days had passed, Fatima began to think that the
beard she had imagined to be so ugly was not so very blue after all;
and when the end of the week came, she decided that, as her host was
so kind and polite, it would be a pity to refuse to become his wife
on account of such a mere trifle as a blue beard.

Shortly after their return home, Fatima and Bluebeard were
married, and at first everything went well. A month passed away, and
one morning Bluebeard told his wife that he had received some news
which would oblige him to leave her for a few weeks.

He kissed her affectionately, and, giving her the keys of the whole
castle, bade her amuse herself during his absence in any way she pleased.
He showed her the keys which opened the treasure-chests and wardrobes ;
then, pointing to a small key of polished steel, he said—

“T forbid you to use that key; it opens the door of the little closet
at the end of the long gallery. Go where you will, do what you please,
but remember that I have forbidden you to go near that room!”

Fatima promised faithfully to obey his orders, watched him step into
his chariot, and stood waving her hand to him from the palace gates as
he drove away. Scarcely was the carriage out of sight than Fatima began
to wonder what could possibly lie hidden behind the closet door. However,
she had little time to think about it, for the guests who had been invited
to keep her company during her husband’s absence began to arrive, and
for some time she was so busy entertaining them that she did not think
about the keys. But presently, in looking for the key of one of the great
treasure-chests, something seemed to burn her hand.

It was the key of thé little closet at the end of the long gallery.

Her guests were busy admiring the beautiful ornaments and dresses
that Bluebeard had presented to his pretty bride; so she stole softly
from the room, ran like a hare down the narrow passage, and fitted the
key into the lock. For a moment she paused, remembering her husband’s
128 NURSERY TALES.

command, but her curiosity was too much for her; she turned the key,
and entered the room. She uttered a cry of horror, and the key fell
from her trembling hand, for the sight which met her wondering gaze
froze the blood in her veins. Upon the floor lay the bodies of all the
lovely ladies Bluebeard had married, and who had disappeared so
_ mysteriously! Their heads were severed from their bodies, and hung in
a row upon the wall !!

With a sinking heart, and cheeks as white as snow, Fatima returned
to her guests; but she was too terrified to attend to their comfort or to
attempt to entertain them; so one by one they bade their hostess good-
bye, and went home, until at last there was no one left with her except
her sister Anne.

It was then that Fatima noticed a spot of blood upon the fatal key!
She wiped it carefully, but the spot remained; then she washed it and
scoured it with sand; but it was all in vain, for it was a fairy key, and
as fast as she washed away the blood on one side it appeared on the other.

Early the next evening, Bluebeard unexpectedly returned. He
had met a horseman by the way, he said, who had told him that
the “business” had already been settled, so that it was no longer
necessary for him to continue his journey.

Fatima tried to welcome her husband with every appearance of
pleasure, but all the time she was dreading the moment when he would
ask for the keys. This he did not do until the following morning,
and then she gave them to him with a hand which shook so terribly
that Bluebeard easily guessed what had happened. “How is it that you
have not brought me the key of the little closet?” he asked sternly.

“T must have left it upstairs,’ answered the poor girl.

“Bring it to me at once!” said Bluebeard, and Fatima was forced
to go upstairs and make a pretence of looking for the key, which was
hidden in her pocket the whole time.

At last Bluebeard became so angry that she was obliged to give
him the key, and he at once demanded the cause of the stain upon it.

“T do not know!” faltered Fatima.

“But J-know,” thundered her lord. “You have disobeyed my
commands and have visited the room which I ordered you not to
enter. You shall go there again, madam, but you will never return.


”

d you to use that key.

U

b

J for

a
32 NURSERY TALES.

You shall join the company you
were so curious to see.”

Fatima fell upon her knees
at his feet and begged for mercy,
but the cruel man bade her pre-
pare for death. “Give me but a
few minutes,’ she cried, and Blue-
beard answered: “Ten minutes
only will I grant you; after that
you must die.”

Poor Fatima hastened to
the little turret chamber, to which
her sister had fled in terror, and
cried in grief: “Sister Anne,
mount, I pray you, to the top of
the tower, and see if my brothers
are not in view. They promised
to visit me to-day, and if you
should see them, sign to them
to make haste.” So the sister
mounted the little staircase lead-
ing to the tower, and Fatima
cried again: “Sister Anne, sister Anne, do you see anyone coming?”

“T see nothing but the sun, whose slanting rays are like dust, and
the grass which grows tall and green.”

The ten minutes had passed away, and Bluebeard had sharpened
his two-edged scimitar and stood at the foot of the staircase, calling to
his wife to come down. “One moment longer,” said she, and called very
softly to her sister: “Sister Anne, sister Anne, do you see anyone coming ? Y

Sister Anne replied sadly: “I see nothing but the sun, whose slanting
rays are like dust, and the grass which grows tall and green.”

“Come down at once,” Bluebeard cried, in great wrath, “or must
I come and fetch you?”

“Sister Anne, sister Anne,’ sobbed the wretched wife, “look once
again, I pray you. Is there zo one upon the road?” And the weeping
sister replied: “I see a cloud of dust, which rises on one side.”


BLUEBEARD. ES

“Perchance it is my brothers,’ said Fatima.

“Alas! no,” sister Anne said, “it is but a flock of sheep.”

“Fatima, I command you to come down,’ roared Bluebeard.

“One moment—only one moment more,” said his wife. “Sister
Anne, sister Anne, is there zo one in sight?”

“T see,” cried Anne, “two horsemen, but they are yet a great way off.”

“Heaven be praised!” said the poor wife. ‘They must be my
brothers. Oh! sign to them to hasten.”

By this time Bluebeard was so enraged that his loud voice, as he
shouted to his wife to come down, shook the whole castle. Fatima dared
not delay any longer, but descended to the great hall, threw herself at
her wicked husband's feet, and besought him once more to spare her life.

“Silence!” cried Bluebeard, and seizing her by her lovely, rippling
hair, he raised his scimitar to strike.

At that moment there was a loud knocking at the castle gates. Blue-
beard paused, and before he had time to let the scimitar fall upon his wife’s
neck, the two brothers burst into the hall. One of them tore his sister
from Bluebeard’s grasp, whilst the other plunged a sword into his heart.

So the wicked Bluebeard perished miserably; and Fatima divided
all his great wealth between herself, her faithful sister, and her two brave
brothers, and they lived happily together ever afterwards.

af


Che Wandering

® instrels:



44 “HERE once lived a donkey, who, for many a
long day, had cheerfully carried his master’s sacks
to the mill, but who was beginning to get old
and infirm, so that he was almost useless as a
servant. Then the master thought to get rid of
him, but the donkey guessed there was an ill
wind blowing, and took to his heels.

He chose the road to the town of Bremen,
where he made up his mind to become a street
musician. He had not gone far before he met
a hound, lying in the road, and whining, as though he were footsore and
weary.

“What are you whining for, old Belltongue?” asked the donkey.

“Oh!” said the hound sadly, “every day I grow older and weaker,
and can no longer follow the hunt. For this reason my master would
have slain me, had I not run away. But alas! how shall I ever earn a
living now ?”

“T have an idea!” the donkey cried: “I am going to Bremen to
become a street musician ; why not join the profession, and go with me?
I will play the lute, and you can beat the kettledrum.”

The idea pleased the dog, so they journeyed on together.

Before long they met a cat, sitting on the path, with a face as long
as three wet days.
THE WANDERING MINSTRELS. 133

“What's the matter with you, old Whisker-washer, that you pull
such a long face?” said the donkey.

“Who could be merry with his neck in danger?” answered the cat.
“My mistress has ordered me to be drowned, simply because, being old,
and with no teeth to speak of, 1 naturally prefer a warm corner by the
hearth, to chasing rats and mice. It is true I have made my escape, but
give me a word of advice—whither shall I go?”

“Go with us to Bremen. You understand evening melodies, and
are therefore quite competent to become a street musician.”

The cat was willing, so on they trudged together. Presently the
three fugitives came to a courtyard, on the gate of which sat a cock,
crowing with might and main.

“Hush!” cried the donkey, “your voice goes through one. What
is all this noise about?”

“T prophesy fine weather,” crowed the cock. “To-morrow I am to
be cooked for dinner, and therefore I am anxious to make all the noise
I can, in the short time left to me.”

“Come, Redcap,” said the donkey. “Don’t give in. You had much
better join our party and go with us to Bremen. At least you will find
something better than death. You have a good voice, and when we
play in concert the effect should be very fine indeed.”

The suggestion seemed a good one, so the cock joined the little
party, and on they went.

As they could not hope to reach Bremen that day, they decided to
pass the night in a neighbouring wood. The donkey and the dog lay
down at the foot of a great tree, but the cat and the cock sprang up
into the branches, the cock being determined to roost upon the very top
of the tree, where he knew he could rest in safety.

Before he settled himself to sleep, he had a good look round, and
. fancied he could see a bright little spark shining in the distance.

He called to his comrades, and told them that there must be a
house near, for he could see a light burning.

Said the donkey: “We had better rouse ourselves and go there; the
shelter here is not so good as we could wish for.” The dog, too, thought
he could eat a couple of bones and a plate of meat.

So they got up and went in the direction of the light, which soon
134 NURSERY TALES.

became larger and brighter, until at length they stood before a well-
lighted house, which belonged to a band of robbers.
The donkey, being the biggest, approached the window and peeped in.
“What do you see, Greysteed?” questioned the cock.

“What do I see?” answered the donkey.

“A table covered with

the most delicious food and drink, and robbers sitting round it, enjoying

De
ir? \



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reas ( v
els :
= LS WE ea

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whe
SW oH



the good things.”

“T wish it belonged
to us,” said the cock.

“So do I,” answered
the donkey.

The four comrades
laid their heads together
and soon resolved on a
plan to frighten the robbers
away.

The donkey stood
upon his hind legs, placing
his forefeet upon the
window-sill, the dog sprang

=. upon his back, the cat

climbed upon the dog, and
the cock settled himself
upon the cat’s head. As
soon as this was done, at
a given signal, they all
began to sing. The donkey
brayed, the dog barked, the
cat mewed, and the cock
crowed. Then they flung
themselves against the win-
dow. Crash! went the
panes, and into the room
they came tumbling. The
robbers sprang from their
seats, screaming with terror,
THE WANDERING MINSTRELS. 135

for they believed a bogey > Se is
was in the midst of them, @ feeb, ) Ss 2w—- Sy

SS a ws e
and ran for their lives, out g a EN ]





into the dark wood. 7 pes =

The four friends then BoA i
seated themselves at the table,
and ate and drank as though
they were not to taste food
again for a month.

When they had finished their meal, they put out the lights and pre-
pared for bed, each seeking the couch his nature taught him to consider
the most comfortable. The donkey laid himself upon a heap of refuse in
the courtyard, the dog curled up behind the door, the cat made a bed
of the warm ashes upon the hearth, and the cock flew up to the rafters.

Being very tired with their long journey, they were soon sound asleep.

Midnight came, and the robbers, watching from a distance, saw that
no light streamed from the windows of their house, and that all was still;
so the captain said—

“ How foolish we were to allow ourselves to be so easily frightened!”
and, calling one of his men, ordered him to go back to the house and
see if all was right there.



The man crept up to the house and, hearing no sound, entered the
kitchen. Of course he needed a light, and seeing the cat’s eyes gleaming
in the darkness, mistook them for live coals, and held a match towards
them, expecting it would kindle.

But the cat was very angry, and flew at his face, spitting and
scratching.

He started back in alarm, and made for the door, disturbing the dog,
who sprang out and bit him in the leg. Out into the courtyard he rushed,
only to be received by the donkey, who struck out with his hind hoofs,
and almost stunned him.

All this noise had awakened the cock, and he was as lively as a
cricket.

“‘Cock-a-doodle-doo!” he cried; ‘cock-a-doodle-doo !”

The man waited for no more, but ran back to his captain as fast
as he could.
136 NURSERY TALES.

“Woe is me!” he cried. “A horrible witch has taken possession
of the house; she spat at me, and scratched my face with her long nails;
by the door stood a man who stuck his knife into my leg; and in the
courtyard a black monster met me and struck me with a club, whilst
on the roof sat the judge, who cried with a loud voice, ‘Bring the
rascal here!’ So I thought it was time I came away.”

After this the robbers were afraid to trust themselves in the house
again, and as the four wandering minstrels found it very much to their
taste, they made up their minds to stay there.

And that is the last I heard of them.






CR y 7 caxNe eS â„¢: eae IN
* Ch * WS (Ome Ry A roe ai LGING 200)





S Chicken-licken was going one day to the wood, whack ! an acorn
fell from a tree on to his head.
“Gracious goodness me!” said Chicken-licken, “the sky
must have fallen; I must go and tell the King.”

So Chicken-licken turned back, and met Hen-len,

“Well, Hen-len, where are you going?” said he.

“I’m going to the wood,” said she.

“Oh, Hen-len, don’t go!” said he, “for as I was going the sky fell
on to my head, and I’m going to tell the King.”

So Hen-len turned back with Chicken-licken, and met Cock-lock.

“I’m going to the wood,” said he.

Then Hen-len said: “Oh, Cock-lock, don’t go, for I was going, and
I met Chicken-licken, and Chicken-licken had been at the wood, and the
sky had fallen on to his head, and we are going to tell the King.”


138 NURSERY TALES.

So Cock-lock turned back, and they met Duck-luck.

“Well, Duck-luck, where are you going ?”

And Duck-luck said: “I’m going to the wood.”

Then Cock-lock said: “Oh! Duck-luck, don’t go, for I was going,
and I met Hen-len, and Hen-len met Chicken-licken, and Chicken-licken
had been at the wood, and the sky had fallen on to his head, and we are
going to tell the King.”

So Duck-luck turned back, and met Drake-lake.

“Well, Drake-lake, where are you going ?”



And Drake-lake said: “I’m going to the wood.”

Then Duck-luck-said: “Oh! Drake-lake, don’t go, for I was going,
and I met Cock-lock, and Cock-lock met Hen-len, and Hen-len met Chicken-
licken, and Chicken-licken had been at the wood, and the sky had fallen
on to his head, and we are going to tell the King.”

So Drake-lake turned back, and met Goose-loose.

“Well, Goose-loose, where are you going ?”

And Goose-loose said: “I’m going to the wood.”

Then Drake-lake said: “Oh, Goose-loose, don’t go, for I was going,


and I met Duck-luck, and Duck-luck met Cock-lock, and Cock-lock met
Hen-len, and Hen-len met Chicken-licken, and Chicken-licken had been
at the wood, and the sky had fallen on to his head, and we are going
to tell the King.”

So Goose-loose turned back, and met Gander-lander.

“Well, Gander-lander, where ‘are you going?”

And Gander-lander said: “I’m going to the wood.”

Then Goose-loose said: ‘Oh! Gander-lander, don’t go, for I was
going, and I met Drake-lake, and Drake-lake met Duck-luck, and Duck-luck
met Cock-lock, and Cock-lock met Hen-len, and Hen-len met Chicken-
licken, and Chicken-licken had been at the wood, and the sky had fallen
on to his head, and we are going to tell the King.”

So Gander-lander turned back, and met Turkey-lurkey.

“Well, Turkey-lurkey, where are you going?”

And Turkey-lurkey said: “I’m going to the wood.”

Then Gander-lander said: “Oh! Turkey-lurkey, don’t go, for I was
going, and I met Goose-loose, and Goose-loose met Drake-lake, and Drake-
Jake met Duck-luck, and Duck-luck met Cock-lock, and Cock-lock met
Hen-len, and Hen-len met Chicken-licken, and Chicken-licken had been
at the wood, and the sky had fallen on to his head, and we are going to
tell the King.”

So Turkey-lurkey turned back, and walked with Gander-lander,
Goose-loose, Drake-lake, Duck-luck, Cock-lock, Hen-len, and Chicken-
licken.
140 NURSERY TALES.

And as they were going along, they met Fox-lox. And Fox-lox said :

“Where are you going?”

And they said: “Chicken-licken went to the wood, and the sky fell
on to his head, and we are going to tell the King.”

And Fox-lox said: “Come along with me, and I will show you
the way.”

But Fox-lox took them into the fox’s hole, and he and his young
ones soon ate up poor Chicken-licken, Hen-len, Cock-lock, Duck-luck,
Drake-lake, Goose-loose, Gander-lander, and Turkey-lurkey; and they
never saw the King to tell him that the sky had fallen.









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aoe: long ago, in the days when one had only to wish for a thing

to possess it, there lived a King who had the most beautiful

daughters in the world.

{ The youngest was so lovely that even the sun, who has

seen so much, wondered at her beauty each time that he shone
upon her face.

Not far from the Royal castle was a thick wood, and in this wood,
beneath a tall lime-tree, was a deep, dark pool. Whenever the weather
was warm, the King’s little daughter would go and sit beside the pool,
and if she were dull, she would take out her golden ball and play
142 NURSERY TALES.

with it, tossing it into the air and catching it again, for the ball was
her favourite toy.

Now, it happened once that the Princess let the ball slip through
her fingers and roll with a splash into the pool. She followed it with
her eyes, but the ball disappeared, for the pool was too deep for her
to see down to the bottom. Then she began to weep, and sobbed as
though she would never find comfort again. But in the midst of her
weeping, someone cried to her—

‘What ails thee, Princess? Thy tears would melt even a heart
of stone.”

The Princess turned her head to see who was speaking to her, and
to her surprise she found that it was a big ugly frog.

“Ah! Froggy, is it you?” she said. “I am weeping for the loss of
my golden ball, which has fallen into the pool.”

“Do not weep, little Princess,’ answered the frog. “ I can find your
ball for you again, but what will you promise me if I do?”

“Whatever you will, dear Frog,” said she. “My dresses, my pearls
and jewels, or even the golden crown that I wear.”

But the frog shook his head. “Your dresses and jewels would be
useless to me,” he said, “and I will have none of them. I only want
you to love me a little. If you will let me be your playfellow, sit beside
you at table, eat from your plate, and sleep in your little white bed at
night, I will give you back your golden ball.”

And the Princess promised, but she thought to herself—

“ How foolishly the frog talks, to be sure! As if he could be my
companion! He can only sit in the water all day and croak to the
other frogs.”

The frog no sooner heard her promise than he dived beneath the
water, and after a minute or two reappeared with the ball in his mouth,
and threw it upon the grass. |

The Princess was so pleased to have her pretty plaything again that
she picked it up and ran off with it without once remembering the
poor frog.

“Wait, wait,” he cried; “I cannot run as fast as you, and you must
take me with you.”

But it was of no use, for, croak as loud as he would, she would not
THE FROG PRINCE. 143

‘listen to him, but hastened home to the palace, where she soon forgot
all about him, so that there was nothing for it but to hop back into his
pool again.

The next day, when the Princess sat at table with the King her
father, and all the nobles of the Court, and ate daintily from her golden
plate, there was heard a pitter-patter, pitter-patter, up the marble stairs.
Then came a knocking at the door and a harsh voice ‘cried—

“King’s daughter, King’s daughter, open the door!”

So the Princess ran to see what it could be, and there sat the frog.

She shut the door hastily, and went back to her seat, but she was
very much afraid.

The King could hear his little daughter’s heart beating fast, so he
asked her—

“Child, of what are you afraid? Is there a giant at the door who
has come to fetch you?”

“No, father,’ she answered. “It is no giant, but an ugly frog.”

“And what does the frog want?” asked the King.

“Yesterday, as I played beside the pool,” replied the Princess, “1

Bos


144 NURSERY TALES.

dropped my golden ball into it, and while I sat and wept for the loss of
it, the frog came to me and told me he would bring it back to me again
if I would let him be my playfellow. This I promised readily enough,
for I thought he would never be able to leave the water to come after
me. But now he sits at the door and wants to come in.”

At that moment the frog knocked again, and cried—

‘Little Princess
So dear, so. dear,
Open the door—
Iam waiting here!
By the deep pool
You promised me
My little playfellow
You would be.’’

Then said the King: “That which you have promised must be
performed. Open the door to him, my child.”

So she opened the door, and the frog hopped in and followed her
as she went back to her chair. Then he stopped and cried: “Lift me up!”

The Princess hesitated, but the King ordered her to take him up
and put him on the chair beside her. From the chair he hopped upon
the table, and bade the Princess push her golden plate nearer to him, so
that he might eat with her.

This she unwillingly did, and the frog made a hearty meal, but the
Princess could touch nothing. When the frog had finished his supper, he
told the Princess that he was tired, and she must carry him upstairs and
put him to sleep in her soft silken bed.

Then the Princess began to cry; she did not like to touch him,
and could not bear to think of him sleeping in her clean, white bed. But
the King was very angry with her. “He helped you in your distress,” he
said to his daughter, “and now you must keep your promise to him.”

So she lifted the frog between her finger and thumb, carried him
upstairs to her room, and put him away in the farthest corner.

Then she jumped into bed herself, and lay there cosily enough until
the frog came creeping up to her and said: “I am tired and would sleep
as well as you. Take me up, or I will tell your father of you.”

Then the Princess was so angry that she took the frog in her hand


and threw him with all her strength against the wall, crying: “Now take
your rest, you ugly frog!”

But he was no longer a frog; for as he fell he changed into a hand-
some Prince, with beautiful, smiling eyes; and with her father’s consent
he became both her companion and her bridegroom.

Then he told her how a wicked witch had cast her spells upon
him, and changed him into a frog, and that the Princess alone had the
power to release him, but that now they would go back to his kingdom
together.

The next morning, as soon as the sun rose, a magnificent carriage
drew up at the palace gates. It was drawn by eight snow-white steeds,
wearing ostrich plumes upon their heads, and harnessed in chains of pure
gold. Behind stood the young Prince’s servant, who was called “the
faithful Henry.”

This servant had grieved so sorely when his dear master was changed
into a frog that, had he not bound three iron bands around his heart,
it would have broken in two.

But now, having handed the Prince and his bride into the carriage
which was to take them back to their kingdom, his heart began once
more to beat high with joy.
= NURSERY TALES.
Before they had driven far, the Prince heard a loud cracking noise
behind him, so he turned in his seat and cried: “Henry, the wheel must
be breaking.”
But Henry replied:—
“Nay, master, ’twas my joyful heart,
Which burst an iron band apart.’’

Again there was a mighty crack, then once again, and each time
the Prince and the Princess thought that surely the carriage must be
breaking.

But it was the three iron bands around the faithful Henry's heart,
which were bursting because his heart was too full of joy over his
master’s release to be bound by them any longer.





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HERE was once a King who had three sons, and because
they were all so good and so handsome, he could not make
up his mind to which of them to give his kingdom. For -
he was growing an old man, and began to think it would
soon be time for him to let one of them reign in his stead.

So he determined to set them a task to perform, and whichever
should be the most successful was to have the kingdom as his reward.

It was some time before he could decide what the task should be.
But at last he told them that he had a fancy for a very beautiful little
dog, and that they were all to set out to find one for him. They were
to have a whole year in which to search, and were all to return to the
castle on the same day, and present the various dogs they had chosen at
the same hour.

The three princes were greatly surprised by their father’s sudden
fancy for a little dog, but when they heard that whichever of them
brought back the prettiest little animal was to succeed his father on
the throne, they made no further objection, for it gave the two younger
sons a chance they would not otherwise have had of being King.


148 NURSERY TALES.

So they bade their father good-bye, and after agreeing to be back
at the castle at the same hour, and on the same day, when a year should
have passed away, the three brothers all started together.

A great number of lords and servants accompanied them out of the
city, but when they had ridden about a league they sent everyone back,
and after embracing one another affectionately, they all set out to try their
luck in different directions.

The two eldest met with many adventures on their travels, but the
youngest saw the most wonderful sights of all.

He was young and handsome, and as clever as a prince should be,
besides being brave. 3

Wherever he went he enquired for dogs, and hardly a day passed
without his buying several, big and little, greyhounds, spaniels, lap-dogs,
and sheep-dogs—in fact, every kind of dog that you could think of, and
very soon he had a troop of fifty or sixty trotting along behind him,
one of which he thought would surely win the prize.

So he journeyed on from day to day, not knowing where he was
going, until one night he lost his way in a thick dark forest, and after
wandering many weary miles in the wind and rain he was glad to see
at last a bright light shining through the trees. He thought he must be
near some woodcutter’s cottage, but what was his surprise when he found
himself before the gateway of a splendid castle!

At first he hesitated about entering, for his garments were travel-
stained, and he was drenched with rain, so that no one could have
possibly taken him for a prince. All the beautiful little dogs he had taken
so much trouble to collect had been lost in the forest, and he was
thoroughly weary and disheartened.

However, something seemed to bid him enter the castle, so he
pulled the bell. Immediately the gateway flew open, and a number of
beautiful white hands appeared, and beckoned to him to cross the court-
yard and enter the great hall.

Here he found a splendid fire blazing, beside which stood a com-
fortable arm-chair; the hands pointed invitingly towards it, and as soon
as the prince had seated himself they proceeded to take off his wet,
muddy clothes, and dress him in a magnificent suit of silk and velvet.

When he was ready, the hands led him into a brilliantly-lighted








room, in which was a table spread for supper. At the end of the room
was a raised platform, upon which a number of cats were seated, all
playing different musical instruments.

The prince began to think he must be dreaming, when the door
opened, and a lovely little White Cat came in. She wore a long black
veil, and was accompanied by a number of cats, dressed in black, and
carrying swords.

She came straight up to the prince, and in a sweet, sad little voice
bade him welcome. Then she ordered supper to be served, and the
whole company sat down together.

They were waited upon by the mysterious hands, but many of the
dishes were not to the prince’s liking. Stewed rats and mice may be a
first-rate meal for a cat, but the prince did not feel inclined to try them.

However, the White Cat ordered the hands to serve the prince with
the dishes he liked best, and at once, without his even mentioning his
favourite food, he was supplied with every dainty he could think of.
150 NURSERY TALES. :

After the prince had satisfied his hunger, he noticed that the Cat
wore a bracelet upon her paw, in which was set a miniature of himself;
but when he questioned her about it, she sighed, and seemed so sad that,
like a well-behaved prince, he said no more about the matter.

Soon after supper, the hands conducted him to bed, when he at
once fell fast asleep, and did not awaken until late the next morning.
On looking out of his window, he saw that the White Cat and her atten-
dants were about to start out on a hunting expedition.

As soon as the hands had dressed him in a hunting-suit of green,
he hurried down to join his hostess.

The hands led him up to a wooden horse, and seemed to expect
him to mount. At first the prince was inclined to be angry, but the
White Cat told him so gently that she had no better steed to offer him,
that he at once mounted, feeling very much ashamed of his ill-humour.

They had an excellent day’s sport. The White Cat, who rode a
wionkey, proved herself a clever huntress, climbing the tallest trees with
the greatest ease, and without once falling from her steed.

Never was there a pleasanter hunting party, and day after day the
time passed so happily away that the prince forgot all about the little
dog he was searching for, and even forgot his own home and his father’s
promise.

At length the White Cat reminded him that in three days he must
"appear at Court, and the prince was terribly upset to think that he had
now no chance of winning his father’s kingdom. But the White Cat told
him that all would be well, and giving him an acorn, bade him mount
the wooden horse and ride away.

The prince thought she must be mocking him, but when she held ~
the acorn to his ear, he heard quite plainly a little dog’s bark.

“Inside this acorn,” she said, “is the prettiest little dog in the
world. But, be sure you do not open the fruit until you are in the
King’s presence.” ae

The -prince thanked her, and having bidden her a sorrowful farewell,
mounted his wooden steed and rode away.

Before he reached the castle, he met his two brothers, who made
fine fun of the wooden horse, and also of the big ugly dog which trotted
by his side. ;











TREE AWEEMAGE SGA. 151

They imagined this to be the one their brother had, brought back
from his travels, hoping that it would gain the prize.

When they reached the palace, everyone was loud in.praise of the
two lovely little dogs the elder brothers had brought back with them,
but when the youngest opened his acorn and showed a tiny dog, lying
upon a white satin cushion, they knew that this must be the prettiest
little dog in the world.

However, the King did not feel inclined to give up his throne just
yet, so he told the brothers that there was one more task they must
first perform: they must bring him a piece of muslin so fine that it would
pass through the eye of a needle.

So once more the brothers set out upon their travels. As for the
youngest, he mounted his wooden horse and rode straight back to his
dear White Cat.

She was delighted to welcome him, and when the prince told her
that the King had now ordered him to find a piece of muslin fine enough
to go through the eye of a needle, she smiled at him very sweetly, and
told him to be of good cheer.

“In my palace I have some very clever spinners,” she said, “and
I will set them to work upon the muslin.” :

The prince had begun to suspect by this time that the White Cat
was no ordinary pussy, but whenever he begged her to tell him her
history, she only shook her head mournfully and sighed.

Well, the second year passed away as quickly as the first, and the
night before the-day on which the three princes were expected at their
father’s court, the White Cat gave the young prince a walnut, telling
him that it contained the muslin. Then she bade him good-bye, and he
mounted the wooden horse and rode away. .

This time the young prince was so late that his brothers had
already begun to display their pieces of muslin to the King when he arrived
at the castle gates. The materials they had brought were of extremely
fine texture, and passed easily through the eye of a darning-needle, but
through the small needle the King had provided they would zo/ pass.
Then the youngest prince stepped into the great hall and produced his
walnut. He cracked it carefully, and found inside a hazel-nut. This
when cracked held a cherrystone, inside the cherrystone was a grain of
E52 NURSERY TALES.

wheat, and in the wheat a millet-seed. The prince himself began to
mistrust the White Cat, but he instantly felt a cat’s claw scratch him gently,
so he persevered, opened the millet-seed, and found inside a beautiful
piece of soft white muslin that was four hundred ells long at the very
least. It passed with the greatest ease through the eye of the smallest
needle in the kingdom, and the prince felt that now the prize must be his.

But the old King was still very loth to give up ruling, so he told
the princes that before any one of them could become King he must find a
princess to marry him who would be lovely enough to grace her high
station; and whichever of the princes brought home the most beautiful
bride should really have the kingdom for his own. ;

Of course, the prince went back to the White Cat, and told her
how very unfairly his father had behaved to him. She comforted him as
best she could, and told him not to be afraid, for she would introduce
him to the loveliest princess the sun had ever shone upon.

The appointed time passed happily away, and one evening the White
Cat reminded the prince that on the next day he must return home.

“ Alas!” said he, “where shall I find a princess now? The time
is so short that I cannot even look for one.”

Then the White Cat told him that if only he would do as she bade
him all would be well. s

“Take your sword, cut off my head and my tail, and cast them
into the flames,” she said.

The prince declared that on no account would he treat her so cruelly ;
but she begged him so earnestly to do as she asked that at last he
consented. gh

No sooner had he cast the head and the tail into the fire than a
beautiful princess appeared where the body of the cat had been. The
spell that had been cast upon her was broken, and at the same time her
courtiers and attendants, who had also been changed into cats, hastened
in in their proper forms again, to pay their respects to their mistress.

The prince at once fell deeply in love with the charming princess,
and begged her to accompany him to his father’s Court as his bride.

She consented, and together they rode away. During the journey,
the princess told her husband the story of her enchantment.

She had been brought up by the fairies, who treated her with great
THE WHITE CAT. 153

kindness until she offended them by falling in love with the young man
whose portrait the prince had seen upon her paw, and who exactly
resembled him.

Now, the fairies wished her to marry the King of the Dwarfs, and
were so angry when she declared she would marry no one but her own
true love, that they changed her into a White Cat as a punishment.

When the prince and his bride reached the Court, all were bound
to acknowledge that the princess was by far the loveliest lady they had
ever seen.

So the poor old King felt that now he would be obliged to give up
his kingdom. But the princess knelt by his side, kissed his hand
gently, and told him that there was no reason for him to cease ruling,
for she was rich enough to give a mighty kingdom to each of his elder
sons, and still have three left for herself and her dear husband.

So everyone was pleased, and there was great rejoicing and feasting
in the King’s palace, and they all lived happily ever after.




MERCHANT was coming from the fair with his money-bags
well filled with gold and silver, for he had had a good
day’s business, and had sold all his wares. He was anxious
to reach home before night came on, so he had packed his money-bags
in a large box and placed it behind him on his horse. At midday he
rested for a while at an inn, and when it was time to start again the
ostler who brought him his horse told him that there was a nail wanting
in its left hind shoe. “Never mind,” said the merchant, “the shoe will
hold very well without it, I daresay. I am in a hurry and cannot wait.”

In the afternoon he dismounted at a wayside inn to give his horse
a feed of corn, and the ostler who brought it told him, just as the first
had done, that a nail was wanting in his horse’s left hind shoe, and asked
if he should take it to the blacksmith’s.

“No, no,” said the merchant; “I have not far to go now. I am in
a hurry and cannot wait, and the shoe will hold till I get home.”

He rode away, but very soon the horse began to limp. It had not
been limping long before it began to stumble, and it had not been stumbling
long before it fell down and broke a leg.

The merchant was obliged to leave the horse lying im the road,
strap the box of money to his own shoulders, and trudge the rest of the
way on foot, so that, of course, it was long past nightfall when he
reached home. “And all my misfortunes are owing to the loss of that
unlucky nail,” said he to himself,

More haste, less speed !


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: . HERE WAS ONCE, a cobbler who, . though
Cy he worked early and late, could never manage to earn a living,
4 and at last became so poor that he had nothing left but a
(3 little leather, which was just sufficient to make one pair of

AY shoes. He cut out the shoes at night, meaning to set to work
upon them the next morning, and then, “knowing that he had done his
best, he laid himself to rest, prayed God to bless him, and fell asleep.

The next morning he rose, said his-prayers, and sat down to his
work; but what was his surprise to find the shoes standing upon the
bench, already finished ! A

He took them in his hand and examined-them carefully. There was
not a false stitch nor.a raw edge anywhere. They were perfect !

Presently a customer came in and admired the shoes so much that
he not only bought them, but paid more than twice the ordinary price,

fe

(

ae.
THE COBBLER AND THE BROWNIES. 155

so that the cobbler was able to buy enough leather to make two pairs
of shoes.

He cut them out in the evening, and determined to rise early the
next morning and get them finished in good time.

But there was no need, for, when he rose, the shoes were already
made, and soon afterwards two customers entered and bought them, pay-
ing an extra good price because they were so neatly sewn.

And now the cobbler was able to buy leather for four pairs of shoes.

Early in the morning the four pairs of shoes were finished, and so
it went on. Whatever he cut out at night was made up by the morning,
so that at length he began to have quite a large business, and was a
well-to-do man.

One night, when Christmas was near at hand, the cobbler cut out
the leather as usual, but before going to bed he said to his wife—

“How would it be if we were to sit up to-night and watch ? Perhaps
we might see who it is that gives us such a helping hand.”

The wife was willing, so she lighted a candle, and then the two hid
themselves in the corners of the room, behind some coats and dresses
that were hanging up, and watched.

At midnight a number of little naked men appeared, seated them-
selves at the cobbler’s bench, took up the pieces ‘of leather, and began,
with skilful fingers, to sew and hammer. The cobbler could scarce believe
his eyes.

The brownies worked straight on, until the shoes were all finished,
and then they disappeared.

The next morning the cobbler’s wife said to her husband—

“The little men have made our fortune; we must do something to
show them how grateful we are. Poor little things, they must be cold
with no clothes on; I will make a little shirt, a coat and vest, and a pair
of breeches for each of them, and knit them some nice warm stockings,
too; you can make them each a little pair of shoes.”

The man was well pleased, and in the evening, when all the clothes
were finished, instead of the leather they laid the presents upon the
cobbler’s bench, and hid themselves, so that they might see what the
little men would do.

At midnight the brownies came dancing in, all ready for work. When

11*
156 . NURSERY TALES.

they could find no leather, but saw the pretty little garments put in the
place of it, they were at first too much astonished to do anything.

But they soon recovered from their surprise, and then they did not
know how to express their joy. They dressed themselves with haste,
patted the coats, and admired the fit, and then began to sing:—

: “‘Such pretty dainty boys as we
Can no longer cobblers be! ’’

Then they danced and jumped for joy, chased one another over
tables and chairs, and at length danced out of the room.

They never came again, but so long as the cobbler lived, things went
well with him, and whatever he took in hand was sure to prosper.










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» NCE, on a summer morning, a little tailor was sitting on his
aK. table and sewing away with all his might, quite merrily.
a OC) Presently a woman came up the street, crying out : “Good
preserves for sale! Good preserves for sale!”

This sounded very sweet to the tailor’s ears, so, putting his cunning
little head out of the window, he called her—

“Come up here, my good woman; bring your wares up here!”

The woman went up the three steps with her heavy basket to the
tailor, and began to unpack all the pots before him. He looked at them
all, held them up to the light, smelt them, and said at last: “These
preserves seem to be very good; weigh me out three ounces, my good
woman, and if it comes to a quarter of a pound, it does not matter.”
THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR. 159

The woman, who had hoped to find a good customer, gave him
what he asked for, but she went away grumbling, and looking very cross.

“Now, Heaven send me a blessing on this preserve!” cried the
little man, “and it will give me fresh strength and vigour.” And taking
some bread out of the cupboard, he cut a slice the size of the whole loaf
and spread the jam thickly upon it.

“That won't taste half so bad,” said he, chuckling, “but I will finish
this doublet before I eat it.”

So he placed the appetising morsel down by his side, and stitched
away, making larger and larger stitches every time for joy.

Meanwhile, the smell of the delicious jam mounted to the wall,

where numbers of flies were sitting, so that it enticed them down in
_ swarms, and they settled on the bread.

“Ha! who invited you, may I ask?” exclaimed the little tailor,
chasing away the uninvited guests. But the flies, who did not under-
stand English, would not be driven away, and came down again in
much larger numbers than before.

This put him in a terrible rage, so he reached down an old
piece of cloth from his collection, and saying: “Now, you shall catch
it!” he dealt them an unmerciful blow.

When he raised it again, he counted no fewer than seven lying dead
before him, with their legs stretched out.

“What a fellow you are!” he said, wondering at his own great
bravery ; “the whole town must be told of this!”

So in great haste he cut out a belt for himself, hemmed it, and
sewed on these words in large letters :—

“SEVEN AT A BLOW!”

“What do I say? the ¢own/” said he presently ; “not only the town,
but the whole world, shall hear of it!” and his heart fluttered with joy,
like the tail of a lambkin.

Presently the little man tied the belt round his body, and set out
into the wide world, for he thought that his workshop was far too small
for his valiant deeds.

Before he started, he searched about his house to see if there were
anything which he could take away with him, but he found nothing except
160 NURSERY TALES.

an old cheese, which he put in his pocket. By the door he caught sight
of a bird which had become entangled in the bushes, so he took it, and
pocketed that also.

Then he set out on his travels with a brave heart, and, as he was
light and active, he did not feel at all tired.

His road led him up a mountain, and when he had gained the summit
there sat a tremendous giant, who was looking about him quite com-
posedly. Our hero marched boldly up to him, and spoke to him, saying—

“Good day, comrade! Mercy on me, thou sittest there and lookest
down at the whole world stretching around thee! I am on my road to
it to try my fortune. How wouldst thou like to join me?”

The giant looked down with great contempt at the little tailor,
and said: “Thou miserable fellow, thou pigmy!”

“That may be,” replied the tailor, unbuttoning his coat to show the
giant his belt, “but read this, and thou wilt see for thyself the sort of
man I am!”

The giant read: “Seven at a blow!” and thinking, of course, they
must be men that the tailor had killed, he began to feel a kind of
respect for the little fellow.

But he wanted to prove him first, so he picked up a stone, and
squeezed it in his hand until water dropped from it.

“Do that after me!” said the giant, “if thou art man enough.”

“Qh, is that all?” replied the little tailor coolly, diving into his
pocket, “that is mere child’s-play with me.” So saying, he drew out
the soft cheese, and squeezed it so that the whey ran out of it.

“Tt strikes me,’ he said, “that was a trifle better than yours!”

The giant was at a loss as to what he should say, and could
not believe it of the little man.

Then he picked up another stone and threw it so high that
one could scarcely see it in the distance.

“Now, you mannikin!” he said, “do that!”

“Well thrown!” exclaimed the tailor, “but the stone will come
down again to the ground; now, I'll throw one that will not come back!”

He put his hand in his pocket, drew out the bird, and threw
it up in the air. The little creature, rejoicing in its freedom, rose
like a flash, flew away, and did not return.
THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR. 161

“How doth that little feat please thee,
comrade?” enquired the tailor.

“Thou canst throw well, that is cer-
tain,’ answered the giant; “but now we will
see if thou art man enough to carry some-
thing out of the common.”

So saying, he led the little tailor to a
gigantic oak-tree, which had fallen, and was
lying on the ground.

“Now, if thou art strong enough, help
me to carry this to my cave; then thou shalt
stay with me and have a merry time.”

“With all my heart,” said the little man.
“Come thou and take the trunk upon thy
shoulder, and I will raise the boughs and
branches and carry those, for they are cer-
tainly the heavier part.”

The giant heaved the trunk on his shoulder,
but the tailor, knowing that his companion was not able to look back
and see him, coolly sat on one of the branches, so that the giant was
obliged to carry the whole tree and the tailor as well.

There he sat, as merrily as possible, chuckling over his own
cleverness, and whistling the song: “ There rode three tailors out at the
gate,’ just as if the carrying of trees was mere child’s-play.

But when he came to the giant’s cave, he did not like the look of
it, so he slid off the branch and ran away, fearing danger.

So the little tailor journeyed on, always following his own sharp
little nose.

After he had wandered on for a long distance, he came to the
courtyard of a royal palace, and as he felt very tired, he stretched
himself upon the soft grass and fell fast asleep.

While he was lying there, the people came and looked at hin,
examined him on all sides, and read on his belt: “Seven at a blow!”

“Oho!” said they, ‘‘what does this great warrior do here in time
of peace? This must be some mighty hero!”

So they went and told the King, thinking that, in the event of war,


162 NURSERY TALES.

here was an important and practical man with whom it would be sheer
folly to part, and whom they should on no account allow to go away.

The King was pleased with the counsel, and sent one of his courtiers
to the tailor to ask him for his military services.

The messenger remained by the sleeper’s side until he had stretched
his limbs, yawned, and opened his eyes, and then gave him the King’s
message.

“T came here for that very reason,” replied the little tailor; “I am
quite ready to enter into the King’s service.”

He was then led into the palace, received with much honour, and
a finely-appointed house was given him in which to live.

The men in the army, however, were all hostile to him, and wished
that he were a thousand miles away.

“What will come of it all?” said they among themselves; “for
when we are in battle, and he kills seven at one blow, we shall be
nowhere, and we cannot stand that.” So they all made up their minds
to send in their resignations to the King.

“We are not made,” said they, “to fight by the side of a man who
can kill seven at one blow.”

This grieved the King, who could not bear to lose all his faithful
soldiers for the sake of one; so he heartily wished he had never set eyes
on the little man, and would now gladly be rid of him.

However, he feared very much to dismiss him, because he was
afraid, if he did, that the tailor would kill him, and place himself on
the throne.

The King thought over it for a long time, until at last he came to a
decision; so he sent for the little man and told him that, seeing that he
was so great a hero, he wished to beg a favour of him.

“In my kingdom,” said the King, “there isa certain, forest, wherein
two terrible giants are living, who have laid waste by fire, committed
murder and robbery, and done great havoc in the land. Now, no one
dare go near them without imperilling his own life. If thou conquerest and
killest both these giants, I will give my only daughter for thy bride, and
the half of my kingdom for thy marriage-portion; I will also send a
hundred troopers to travel with thee as thy bodyguard.”

“Anyhow, that is something for such a man as I am,” thought the
THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR. 163

tailor to himself; “the beautiful daughter of a King and half a kingdom
are not offered to one every day.”

“Oh, yes,” he replied, “I will soon subdue those two giants, and
the hundred troopers are really not necessary to me, for a man who can
kill seven at a blow need not stand in any fear of.two!”

Whereupon the little tailor set out, the hundred horsemen follow-
ing him. When they came to the borders of the forest, he turned to
his followers and said: “All of you stay here; I would rather fight
these giants alone,” and, eager for the fray, he started off into the
forest, peering about to the right and left of him.

After a while, he caught sight of the two giants, who were lying
asleep under a tree, and snoring so loudly that the branches shook to
and fro.

The little tailor filled his pockets full of stones, and clambered
up the tree as bravely as possible.

When he had climbed to the middle, he slid along a branch,
until he came right over the sleepers’ heads; then he sat down and
began to drop one stone after another on the chest of one of them.
For some time the giant did not seem to feel it; but at last he
awakened, and, pushing his
companion, said—

“Why art thou hit-
ting me?”

“Thou art dreaming,”
answered the other; “I
never touched thee.”

So they settled them-
selves again to sleep. Pre-
sently, the tailor threw
down a stone upon the
other giant. ‘What art
thou doing?” cried this
other; “why dost thou
knock me about ?”

“T am not touching
thee,” answered the first, in


164 NURSERY TALES,

a tage. Then they wrangled over it for some time; but, both being
very tired, they said, “Never mind!” and once more closed their eyes,

The little tailor began his sport afresh, and picking out the biggest
stone from his pocket, he threw it down on the first giant with all his
might.

“That is too bad!” cried the giant, springing like a madman on his
companion, and throwing him against the tree, which made it rock to
and fro. Now the fight began in earnest.

The two giants rooted up trees with which to beat each other
about, and they did so in such a terrible way that they both fell dead
on the ground.

Then the little tailor sprang down, drew his sword, and, cutting a
deep wound in the breast of each giant, he went back to the horsemen
and said—

“The deed is done! I have put an end to both the giants,”

The troopers would not believe it, or give him credit for such
bravery, so they rode into the forest to see for themselves ; and there
they found the two giants lying in their blood, and the uprooted trees
strewn all-around them.

The tailor then demanded his reward from the King, who began to
repent of his promise, and tried to think of some new plan to get rid of
the hero.

“Before thou dost receive my daughter and the half of my kingdom,”
said the King, “thou must perform yet one more heroic deed. In the
forest a unicorn is running wild, which does no end of damage ; thou
must first catch it.”

“A unicorn will be much less trouble than two giants. ‘Seven at a
blow !’—that is my motto!” said the tailor.

Then he took a rope and an axe with him into the forest, and bade
those who accompanied him to wait on the outskirts.

He had not to search very long, for the unicorn soon appeared, and
immediately made a wild rush at him, as if he would pierce the tailor
on the spot.

“Gently, gently!” exclaimed the latter; “I am not so quickly
killed, my friend!” and, waiting until the animal was close upon him,
he jumped nimbly behind a tree,
THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR. 165

The unicorn rushed with all its force against the tree, and fixed,
its horn so firmly in the trunk that it could not draw it out again,
and thus it was imprisoned.

“Now I have caught my little bird,’ said the tailor; and, coming
from behind the tree, he bound the rope round its neck, and then,
chopping the horn out of the tree with his axe, he put everything in
order and led the animal back to the King.



The King, however, was still unwilling to give him the promised
reward, and made him a third challenge.

Before the wedding took place, he was to catch a wild boar which
was doing great injury everywhere; and he was allowed to have the
huntsmen to help him.

“With pleasure,” said the tailor; “that is mere child’s-play.”

However, he left the huntsmen behind, much to their satisfaction,
for the wild boar had already hunted them so often that they had no
166 NURSERY. TALES.

desire to lie in wait for it. Directly the boar caught sight of the tailor,
it rushed upon him in a fury, but our hero sprang into a chapel that
happened to be near, and leaped through the open window down on the
other side.

The boar ran after him, and the tailor, by rushing round, shut the
door behind it, and thus the furious beast was caught.

The little man called the huntsmen, as he wished them to see
the prisoner with their own eyes.

When our hero presented himself, the King was obliged to fulfil
his promise, whether he would-or not, and to surrender his daughter
and the half of his kingdom.

The wedding took place with great splendour, but with small
rejoicing, and a king was made out of a tailor.

Some little time afterwards, the young Queen heard her husband
saying these words in his sleep:—

. “Boy, make me this doublet, and stitch up these breeches for me,
or I will lay the yard-measure about thine ears !”

Then the Queen guessed in what rank of life her lord had been
born. So she went to her royal father in the morning and complained
to him about it, asking him to free her from her husband, who was
nothing but a tailor.

The King comforted her and said—

“To-night, leave the door of thy chamber open; my servants shall
stand outside, and when thy husband is fast asleep, they shall enter,
bind him, and carry him off to a ship, which shall bear him away into
the wide world.”

This scheme delighted the young wife, but the old King’s armour-
bearer, who had overheard everything and was devoted to the new King,
ran to him and disclosed the whole plot.

“TI will shoot a bolt on this affair,” said the little tailor.

At night, he went to bed at the usual hour, and, when the young
Queen thought he was fast asleep, she ran to the door and opened it.

The tailer, however, having only pretended~-to-be asleep, now began
to call out in a loud voice—

“Boy, make me this doublet, and stitch up these breeches, or I will
lay the yard-measure about thine ears! I have killed seven at a blow, I
THE VALIANT LITTLE TAILOR. 167

have slain two giants, 1 have captured a unicorn, and I have caught a
wild boar, and shall I have any fear of those who stand without my
chamber ?” i

When the men heard these words spoken by the tailor, they were
seized with a great dread, and ran away as if an army of savages were
behind them; and after this no man was brave enough to oppose him.

Thus the little tailor became a king, and remained one all the rest
of his days.


e001 LOCKS; OR THE THREE BEARSIS V







IITLE Goldilocks was a pretty girl who lived once upon
a time in a far-off country.

One day she was sitting on the hearthtug playing
with her two kittens, and you would have thought she was
as happy as a queen, and quite contented to stay where she was instead
of wanting to run about the world meddling with other people’s property.
But it happened that she was rather a mischievous little maid, and
could not resist teasing her pets, so one of them scratched her, and
then she would play with them no longer.

She got up and trotted away into the wood behind her mother’s
house, and it was such a warm, pleasant day that she wandered on and
on until she came into a part of the wood where she had never been before.

Now, in this wood there lived a family of three Bears. The first
was a GREAT ‘BIG BEAR, the second was a MIDDLING-sIZED BEAR,
and the third was a Lirrce Teeny Tiny Bear, and they all lived together
in a funny little house, and very happy they were.

Goldilocks stopped when she came to the Bears’ house, and began
to wonder who lived there.
GOLDILOCKS; OR, THE THREE BEARS. 169

“J’]] just look in and see,” she said, and so she did; but there was
no one there, for the Bears had all gone out for a morning walk, whilst
the soup they were going to have for dinner cooled upon the table.

Goldilocks was rather hungry after her walk, and the soup smelt
so good that she began to wish the people of the house would come
home and invite her to have some. But although she looked everywhere,
under the table and into the cupboards, she could find no one, and at
last she could resist no longer, but made up her mind to take just a little
sip to see how the soup tasted. The soup had been put into three
bowls—a Great Big Bowl for the Great Big Bear, a Middling-sized Bowl
for the Middling-sized Bear, and a Teeny Tiny Bowl for the Teeny
Tiny Bear; beside each bowl lay a spoon, and Goldilocks took one and
helped herself to a spoonful of soup from the Great Big Bowl.

Ugh! how it burnt her mouth; it was so hot with pepper that she
did not like it at all; still, she was very hungry, so she thought she
would try. again.

This time she took
a sip of the Middling--
sized Bear’s soup; but she -
liked that no better, for
it was too salt. But
when she tasted the
Teeny Tiny Bear's soup
it was just as she liked
it; so she ate it up every
drop, without thinking
twice about it.

When she had fin-
ished her dinner she not-
iced three chairs stand- },
ing by the wall. One was
a Great Big Chair, and
she climbed upon that _.
and sat down. Oh, dear! ~
how hard it was! She
was sure she could not


170° NURSERY TALES.

sit there for long, so she climbed up on the
next, which was only a Middling-sized Chair,
but that was too soft for her taste; so she
went on to the last, which was a Teeny Tiny
Chair and suited her exactly.

It was so comfortable that she sat on
and on until, if you'll believe it, she actually
sat the bottom out. Then, of course, she was
comfortable no longer, so she got up and
began to wonder what she should do next.

There was a staircase in the bears’ house,
and Goldilocks thought she would go up it
and see where it led to. So up she went,
and when she reached the top she laughed outright, for the Bears’
bedroom was the funniest she had ever seen. In the middle of the room
stood a Great Big Bed, on one side of it there was a Middling-sized Bed,
and on the other side there was a Teeny Tiny Bed.

Goldilocks was sleepy, so she thought she would lie down and have
a little nap. First she got upon the Great Big Bed, but it was just as
hard as the Great Big Chair had been; so she jumped off and tried the
Middling-sized Bed, but it was so soft that she sank right down into the
feather cushions and was nearly smothered.

“T will try the Teeny Tiny Bed,” she said, and so she did, and it
was so comfortable that she soon fell fast asleep. -

Whilst she lay there, dreaming of all sorts of pleasant things, the
three Bears came home from their walk very hungry and quite ready for
their dinners.

But, oh! dear me! how cross the Great Big Bear looked when he
saw his spoon had been used and thrown under the table.

“WHO HAS BEEN TASTING MY SOUP?” he cried, in a Great
Big Voice.

“AND WHO HAS BEEN TASTING MINE?” cried the Middling-sized
Bear, in a Middling-sized Voice.

“BUT WHO HAS BEEN TASTING MINE AND TASTED IT ALL UP?’ cried the
poor little Teeny Tiny Bear, in a Teeny Tiny Voice, with the tears running
down his Teeny Tiny Face.



GOLDILOCKS; OR, THE THREE BEARS. 17

When the Great Big Bear went to sit down in his Great Big Chair,
he cried out in his Great Big Voice:

“WHO HAS BEEN SITTING ON MY CHAIR?”

And the Middling-sized Bear cried, in a Middling-sized Voice:

“WHO HAS BEEN SITTING ON MY CHAIR?”

But the Teeny Tiny Bear cried out in a Teeny Tiny Voice of anger:

“WHO HAS BEEN SITTING ON MY CHAIR, AND SAT THE BOTTOM OUT?”’

By this time the Bears were sure that someone had been in their
house quite lately; so they looked about to see if someone were not
there still.

There was certainly no one downstairs, so they went up the stair-
case to their bedroom.

As soon as the Great Big Bear looked at his bed, he cried out, in
his Great Big Voice:

“WHO HAS BEEN LYING ON MY BED?”

And the Middling-sized Bear, seeing that the coverlet was all
rumpled, cried out, in a Middling-sized Voice:

“WHO HAS BEEN LYING ON MY BED?”





12*
172 NURSERY TALES.

But the Teeny Tiny Bear cried out, in a Teeny Tiny Voice ot
astonishment :

“WHO HAS BEEN LYING ON MY BED AND LIES THERE STILL?”

Now, when the Great Big Bear began to speak, Goldilocks dreamt
that there was a bee buzzing in the room, and when the Middling-sized
Bear began to speak, she dreamt that it was flying out of the window;
but when the Teeny Tiny Bear began to speak, she dreamt that the bee
had come back ‘and stung her on the ear, and up she jumped. Oh! how
frightened she was when she saw the three Bears standing beside her.

She hopped out of bed and in a second was out through the open
window. Never stopping to wonder if the fall had hurt her, she got up
and ran and ran and ran until she could go no farther, always thinking
that the Bears were close behind her. And when at length she fell down
in a heap on the ground, because she was too tired to run any more, it
was her own mother who picked her up, because in her fright she had
run straight home without knowing it.










ME
Ans
















NCE upon a time there was a rich merchant, who had three

daughters. They lived in a very fine house in a beautiful
city, and had many servants in grand liveries to wait upon
them. All their food was served on gold and silver dishes,
and their gowns were made of the richest stuff sewn with
2 ~— jewels.

The two eldest were called Marigold and Dressalinda. Never a day
passed but these two went out to some feast or junketing; but Beauty,
the youngest, loved to stay at home and keep her old father company.

Now, it happened that misfortune came upon the merchant. Ships
of his which were sailing the high seas laden with merchandise of great


174 NURSERY TALES.

price, were wrecked, and in one day
he found that he was no longer the
richest merchant in the city, but a
very poor man.

There was still left to him a
little house in the country, and to
this, when everything else had been
sold, heretired. His three daughters,
of course, went with him.

Marigold and Dressalinda were
very cross to think that they had
lost all their money, and after being
so rich and sought after, they must
now live in a miserable cottage.

But Beauty’s only thought was
to cheer her old father, and while
her two sisters sat on wooden chairs
and cried and bewailed themselves,
Beauty lighted the fire and got the supper ready, for the merchant was
now so poor that he could not even keep a servant.

And so it went on. The two eldest sisters would do nothing but
sulk in corners, while Beauty swept the floors and washed the dishes,
and did her best to make the poor cottage pleasant. They led their
sister a dreadful life too, with their complaints, for not only did they
refuse to do anything themselves, but they said.that everything she did
was done wrong. But Beauty bore all their unkindness patiently, for her
father's sake.

In this way a whole year went by, and then one day a letter came
for the merchant.

He hastened to find his daughters, for he was anxious to tell them
the good news contained in the letter.

“My dear children,’ he said, “at last our luck has turned. This
letter says that one of the ships supposed to have been lost has come
safely home to port, and if that be so, we need no longer live in poverty.
We shall not be so rich as before, but we shall have enough to keep us
in comfort. Get me my travelling-cloak, Beauty. I will set out at once


BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. 175

to claim my ship. And now tell me, girls, what shall I bring you when
I come back?”

“A hundred pounds,” said Marigold, without hesitating an instant.

“T want a new silk dregs,” said Dressalinda, “an apple-green one,
sewn with seed-pearls, and green shoes with red heels, and a necklace
of emeralds, and a box of gloves.”

“And what shall I bring for you, my Beauty?” asked the father,
as his little daughter helped him to put on his travelling-cloak.

“Oh, bring me a rose,” said Beauty hastily.

Her father kissed her fondly, and set out,

“You silly girl,” said Marigold, “ you just want our father to
think you are more unselfish than we are—that’s what you want! A
rose, indeed!”

“Indeed, sister,’ said Beauty, “that was not the reason. I thought
our father would have enough to do in seeing to the safety of his ship,
without being troubled to do shopping for me.”

But the sisters were very much offended, and went off to sit in
their own room to talk of the fine things they would have when their
father came back.

In the meantime the
merchant went his way to
the city, full of hope and
great plans as to what he
would do with his money.

But when he got
there, he found that some-
one had played a trick on
him, and no ship of his
had come into harbour, so
he was just as badly off
as: before.

He spent the whole
day looking about to make
sure there was no truth in
the letter he had received, .
and it was beginning to


ee NURSERY TALES.

get dusk when he started out, with a sad heart, to make the journey
home again. He was tired and miserable, and he had tasted no food
since he left home in the morning.

It was quite dark by the time he came to the great wood through
_which he had to pass to get to his cottage, and when he saw a light
shining through the trees, he decided not to go to his home that night,
but to make his way towards the light in the wood and ask for food
and shelter.

He expected to find a woodcutter’s cottage, but what was his surprise,
as he drew near to the light, to find that it came from the windows of
a large and beautiful palace !

He knocked at the gates, but no one answered, and presently, driven
by hunger and cold, he made bold to enter, and mounted the marble
steps into the great hall.

All the way he never sawasoul. There was a big fire in the hall,
and when he had warmed himself, he set out to look for the master of -
the house. But he did not look far, for behind the first door he opened
was a cosy little room with supper set for one, a supper the mere look
of which made you hungry.

So the merchant sat down as bold as you please, and made a very
hearty supper, after which he again thought he would look for the master
of the house.

He started off and opened another door, but there he saw a bed,
merely to look at which made you sleepy, so he said to himself:

“This is some fairies’ work. I had better not look any farther for
the master of the house.”

And with that he tumbled into bed, and, being very tired, he went
to sleep at once, and slept like a top till it was time to get up in the
morning.

When he awoke he was quite surprised to find himself in such a
soft and comfortable bed, but presently he remembered all that had
happened to him.

“T must be going,’ he said to himself, “but I wish I could thank
my host for my good rest and my good supper.”

When he got out of bed he found he had something else to be
grateful for, for on the chair by the bedside lay a fine suit of new clothes,

















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marked with his name, and with ten gold pieces in every pocket. He
felt quite a different man when he had put on the suit of blue and silver,.
and jingled the gold pieces of money in his pockets.

When he went downstairs, he found a good breakfast waiting for
him in the little room where he had supped the night before, and when
he had made a good meal, he thought he would go for a stroll in the
garden.
178 NURSERY TALES.

Down the marble steps he went, and when he came to the garden,
he saw that it was full of roses, red and white and pink and yellow,
and the merchant looked at them, and remembered Beauty’s wish.

“Oh, my poor daughters,” he said, “what a disappointment it will
be to them to know that my ship has not. come home after all: but
Beauty at any rate can have what she wanted.”

So he stretched out his hand and plucked the biggest red rose
within his reach. ’

As the stalk snapped in his fingers, he started back in terror, for he
heard an angry roar, and the next minute a dreadful Beast sprang upon
him. It was taller than any man, and uglier than any animal, but,
what seemed most dreadful of all to the merchant, it spoke to him with
a man’s voice, after it had roared at him with the Beast’s.

“Ungrateful wretch!” said the Beast. “Have I not fed you, lodged
you, and clothed you, and now you must repay my hospitality by stealing
the only thing I care for, my roses?”

“Mercy! mercy!” cried the merchant.

“No,” said the Beast, “you must die!” The poor merchant fell upon his
knees and tried to
think of something
to say to soften the
heart of the cruel
Beast; and at last
q he said: “Sir, I

only stole this rose
because my young-
est daughter asked
me to bring her one.
I did not think, after
all you have given me,
that you would grudge
me a flower.”
“Tell me about this
daughter of yours,” said
the Beast suddenly. “Is
she a good girl?”











BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. 179

“The best and dearest in the world,” said the old merchant. And
then he began to weep, to think that he must die and leave his Beauty
alone in the world, with no one to be kind to her. I

“Oh!” he cried, “what will my poor children ;
do without me?”

“You should have thought of that before you
stole the rose,” said the Beast. “ However, if one of
your daughters loves you well enough to suffer instead
of you, she may. Go back and tell them what
has happened to you, but you must give me your
promise that either you, or one of your daughters,
shall be at my palace door in three months’ time
from to-day.”

The wretched man promised.

“At any rate,’ he thought, “I shall have three ‘yy, “WR
months more of life.” ERS

Then the Beast said, “I will not let you go empty-handed.”

So the merchant followed him back into the palace. There, on the
floor of the hall, lay a great and beautiful chest of wrought silver.

“Fill this with any treasures that take your fancy,” said the Beast.

And the merchant filled it up with precious things from the Beast’s
treasure-house. :

“T will send it home for you,” said the Beast, shutting down
the lid.

And so, with a heavy heart, the merchant went away; but as he
went through the palace gate, the Beast called to him that he had for-
gotten Beauty’s rose, and at the same time held out to him a large bunch
of the very best.

The merchant put these into Beauty's hand when she ran to meet
him at the door of their cottage.

“Take them, my child,” he said, “and cherish them, for they have
cost your poor father his life.”

And with that he sat down and told them the whole story. The
two elder sisters wept and wailed, and of course blamed Beauty for all
that had happened.

“Tf it had not been for your wanting a rose, our father would have








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left the palace in safety, with his new suit and his gold pieces; but your
foolishness has cost him his life.”

“No,” said Beauty, “it is my life that shall be sacrificed, for when
the three months are over, I shall go to the Beast, and he may kill me
if he will, but he shall never hurt my dear father.”

The father tried hard to persuade her not to go, but she had made
up her mind, and at the end of the three months she set out for the
Beast’s palace.

Her father went with her, to show her the way. As before, he
saw the lights shining through the wood, knocked and rang in vain at
the great gate, warmed himself at the fire in the big hall, and then found
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. 181

the little room with the supper on the table that made you hungry to
look at. Only this time the table was laid for two.

“Come, father dear,’ said Beauty, “take comfort. 1 do not think
the Beast means to kill me, or surely he would not have given me such
a good supper.”

But the next moment the Beast came into the room. Beauty
screamed and clung to her father.

“Don't be frightened,’ said the Beast gently, “but tell me, do you
come here of your own free will?”

“Yes,” said Beauty, trembling.

“You are a good girl,” said the Beast, and then, turning to the old
man, he told him that he might sleep there for that night, but in the
morning he must go and leave his daughter behind him.

They went to bed and slept soundly, and the next morning the
father departed, weeping bitterly.

Beauty, left alone, tried not to feel frightened. She ran here and
there through the palace, and found it more beautiful than anything she
had ever imagined. :

The most beautiful set of rooms in the palace had written over
the doors, “Beauty's Rooms,” and in them she found books and music,
canary-birds and Persian cats, and everything that could be thought of
to make the time pass pleasantly.

“Qh, dear!” she said; “if only I could see my poor father I should
be almost happy.”

As she spoke, she happened to look at a big mirror, and in it she
saw the form of her father reflected, just riding up to the door of his
cottage.

That night, when Beauty sat down to supper, the Beast came in.

“May I have supper with you?” said he.

“That must be as you please,” said Beauty.

So the Beast sat down to supper with her, and when it was
finished, he said:

“I am very ugly, Beauty, and I am very stupid, but I love you;
will you marry me?”

“No, Beast,” said Beauty gently.

The poor Beast sighed and went away.
1é2 NURSERY TALES.

And every night the same thing happened. He ate his supper with

her, and then asked her if she would marry him. And she always said,
“No, Beast.”

All this time she was waited on by invisible hands, as though
she had been a queen. Beautiful music came to her ears without her
being able to see the musicians, but the magic looking-glass was best
of all, for in it she could see whatever she wished. As the days went
by, and her lightest wish was granted, almost before she knew what
she wanted, she began to feel that the Beast must love her very dearly,
and she was very sorry to see how sad he looked every night when she
said “No” to his offer of marriage.

One day, she saw in her mirror that her father was ill, so that
night she said to the Beast:

“Dear Beast, you are so good to me, will you let me go home to
see my father? He is ill, and he thinks that I am dead. Do let me
go and cheer him up, and I will promise faithfully to return to you.”

“Very well,” said the Beast kindly, “but don’t stay away more
than a week, for if you do, I shall die of grief, because I love you so
dearly.”

“How shall I reach home?” said Beauty; “I do not know the way.”

Then the Beast gave her a ring, and told her to put it on her finger
when she went to bed, turn the ruby towards the palm of her hand, and
then she would wake up in her father’s cottage. When she wanted to
come back, she was to do the same thing.

So in the morning, when she awoke, she found herself at her father’s
house, and the old man was beside himself with joy to see her safe and
sound.

But her sisters did not welcome her very kindly, and when they
heard how kind the Beast was to her, they envied her her good luck in
living in a beautiful palace, whilst they had to be content with a cottage.

“T wish we had gone,” said Marigold. “Beauty always gets the
best of everything.”

“Tell us all about your grand palaces said Dressalinda, “and what
you do, and how you spend your time.”

So Beauty, thinking it would amuse them to ee told them, and
their envy increased day by day. At last Dressalinda said to Marigold:
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. oS

“She has promised to return in a week. If we could only make

her forget the day, the Beast might be angry and kill her, and then there
would be a chance for us.”
So on the day before she ought to have gone back, they put some
poppy juice in a cup of wine which they gave her, and this made her
so sleepy that she slept for two whole days and nights. At the end of
that time her sleep grew troubled, and she dreamed that she saw the:



- Beast lying dead among the roses in the beautiful gardens of his palace ;-
and from this dream she awoke crying bitterly.

Although she did not. know that a week and two days had gone
by since she left the Beast, yet after that dream she at once turned the
tuby towards her palm, and the next morning there she was, sure enough,.
in her bed in the Beast’s palace.

She did not know where his rooms in the palace were, but she felt
she could not wait till supper-time before seeing him, so she ran hither
184 NURSERY TALES.

and thither, calling his name. But the palace was empty, and no one
answered her when she called.

Then she ran through the gardens, calling his name again and again,
but still there was silence.

“Oh! what shall I do if I cannot find him?” she said. “TI shall
never be happy again.”

Then she remembered her dream, and ran to the rose garden, and
there, sure enough, beside the basin of the big fountain, lay the poor
Beast without any sign of life in him.

Beauty flung herself on her knees beside him.

“Oh, dear Beast,” she cried, “and are you really dead? Alas!
alas! then I, too, will die, for I cannot live without you.”

Immediately the Beast opened his eyes, sighed, and said:

“Beauty, will you marry me?”

And Beauty, beside herself with joy when she found that he was
still alive, answered:

“Yes, yes, dear Beast, for I love you dearly.”

At these words the rough fur dropped to the ground, and in place
of the Beast stood a handsome Prince, dressed in a doublet of white and
silver, like one made ready for a wedding. He knelt at Beauty’s feet
and clasped her hands.

“Dear Beauty,” he said, “nothing but your love could have disen-
chanted me. A wicked fairy turned me into a Beast, and condemned
me to remain one until some fair and good maiden should love me
well enough to marry me, in spite of my ugliness and stupidity. Now,
dear one, the enchantment is broken; let us go back to my palace. You
will find that all my servants—who, too, have been enchanted, and have
waited on you all this long time with invisible hands—will now becomie
visible.” i

So they returned to the palace, which by this time was crowded
with courtiers, eager to kiss the hands of the Prince and his bride. And
the Prince whispered to one of his attendants, who went out, and in a
very little time came back with Beauty’s father and sisters.

The sisters were condemned to be changed into statues, and to stand
at the right and left of the palace gates until their hearts should be
softened, and they should be sorry for their unkindness to their sister.
BEAUTY AND THE BEAST. 185

But Beauty, happily married to her Prince, went secretly to the statues
every day and wept over them.

And by her tears their stony hearts were softened, and they were
changed into flesh and blood again, and were good and kind for the rest
of their lives.

And Beauty and the Beast, who was a Beast no more, but a hand-
some Prince, lived happily ever after.

And indeed I believe they are living happily still, in the beautiful

land where dreams come true.
‘ E. Nesbit.




Seige



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af 4 vir ta
lezen we ae ey i
—f— Ceca

cS TI HERE was once a poor miller, who had but one
treasure in the whole wide world, and that

was his lovely little daughter.
It happened that once he came before the King, and because
no one spoke to him or noticed him in any way, the foolish fellow
must needs take to boasting, in order to make himself of more account.

“TY have a daughter,’ quoth he, “who can spin common straw into
the finest gold.”

The King at once turned to the miller. “If this be true,” he cried,
“your daughter would please me well. Bring her to the castle to-morrow
morning, and we will put her to the proof.”

So the maiden came, and the King led her into a room full of
straw, gave her a spinning-wheel and spindle, and bade her set to work
at once; for, he said, unless she wished to lose her life, she must spin
the straw into gold before the morning dawned. Then he shut the door
and left her all alone.

Poor little maid! what could she do? She knew no art by which




«Kumpelstilizkin is mp name.”
188 Se NURSERY TALES.

she could spin straw into gold, and so at length she began to cry. Sud-
denly the door flew open, and in walked a tiny little man.
_ “Good evening, my maid,” said he; “why do you sit and weep?”

“Alas!” answered the maiden, “the King has bidden me spin this
straw into gold; but I know not how I shall set about it.”

“What would you give me were I to do it for you?” asked the
little man.

“My necklace,’ answered the maiden.

So the little man took it, seated himself at the wheel, and, with
a. _whirr, whirr, whirr, the bobbin was full; then another and another,
until, when the morning dawned, the straw was all spun and the bobbins
were full of gold.

At sunrise came the King, and you can think how pleased he was
to see the glittering gold. He should have been satisfied with what he
had, but he was not; and taking the poor little girl into another room
full of straw, much larger than the first, he commanded her, as she valued
her life, to turn the whole of it into gold before the morning.

The maiden knew not what to do, and again began to weep, but
just as before the door flew open and the little man appeared, and said:

“What will you give me if I spin the straw into gold?”

“The ring from my finger,’ answered she.

The mannikin took the ring. Again the wheel went whirring round,
and by the morning the straw had all been spun into shining gold.

The King’s joy was boundless, but still the sight of the gold only
made him long for more. He took the poor girl into a room larger still
than either of the others, and packed full of straw, and said to her:

“This must you spin before morning, and then I will make you
my Queen.”

For he thought to himself; “though she be but a miller’s daughter,
I could never hope to wed a richer wife.”

When the maiden was left alone, the little man came to her for
the third time, and said:

“What will you give me this time if I spin the straw for you?”

“T have nothing left to give you,” she answered sadly.

“Promise me then that when you are Queen you will ane me your
first little child.”

RUMPELSTILTZKIN. 189

The maiden knew not what to do, and as she thought that many
strange things might happen before the time came for the promise to be
fulfilled, she at last agreed to the little man’s proposal. So the mannikin
once more spun the straw into gold, and left her.

When the King came in the morning, and found that the miller’s
daughter had done his bidding, he ordered the marriage feast to be
prepared, and made the beautiful little damsel his Queen.

Time passed on, and the fairies brought her a sweet baby Prince;
put she had forgotten all about her promise to the little man, when
suddenly he entered her chamber, and cried:

“Give me that which thou hast promised!”

The Queen shrank back in horror, and offered the mannikin all the
riches in her kingdom if only he would leave her her little child, but the
little man said:

“No; a little living boy is dearer to me than all the treasures in
the world.”

Then the Queen wept and wailed so bitterly that the little man
began to pity her.

“J will give you three days’ time,” he said, “in which to guess
my name. If you can tell it to me at the end of that time you shall
keep your child.” .

The whole night long the Queen sat and thought of all the names
she had ever heard; she sent also a messenger throughout the land to
collect whatever names he could.

The next day the little man came, and the Queen began to say
every name she had thought of—Caspar, Melchior, Balthazar, and so on,
one after another, but to every name the little man said: Notas

The second day she made inquiries in the neighbouring country,
and heard many very unusual and strange names; so when the little man
came she asked him:

“Are you called Ramshead or Crookedlegs ?”

But he answered as before: “No, that is not my name.”

On the third day the messenger returned, and said to the Queen:

“Not one single new name have I heard, your majesty, but as I
was passing through a lonely corner of the wood, where the fox and the
hare meet to say good-night, I saw a little house, and before the house
aoe) NURSERY TALES.

burnt a fire, and round the fire danced upon one leg a queer little man,
and as he danced he sang :—

«««To-day I bake, to-morrow I brew,
Then, little prince, I will come for you;
For no one knows, no matter his fame,

299

That Rumpelstiltzkin is my name.

The Queen’s heart beat fast for joy; and as soon as the little man
entered and asked: “Now, fair Queen, canst thou tell me my name?”
Shemanswered: = ls at Conraderes Nos Chlenny ne = eNO wemoulhen
perhaps it is Rumpelstiltzkin ?”

“What wicked little elf has told you that?” screamed the little
man, beside himself with rage.

In his anger he stamped his foot so violently that it entered the
ground and held him fast, and in his efforts to free himself the poor little
mannikin tore himself in two.


pe os in a

a “BBC (OOTS b>






~°” NCE upon a time there was a miller,
a who was so poor that at his death
i) a he had nothing to leave to his three
se - children but his mill, his ass, and his
cat. The eldest son took the mill,



y and the second the ass, so there was nothing left
ae \, lil for poor Jack but to take Puss.
( yy! il oa Jack could not help thinking that he had
ee aA ; | 2s been treated shabbily. “My brothers will be able
|

for me, though Puss may feed himself by catching
mice, I shall certainly die of hunger.”
——--- — The cat, who had overheard his young
a : master, jumped upon his shoulder, and, rubbing
himself gently against his cheek, began to speak. ‘Dear master,” said
he, “do not grieve. JI am not as useless as you think me, and will
undertake to make your fortune for you, if only you will buy me a pair
of boots, and give me that old bag.”
Now, Jack had very little money to spare, but, knowing Puss to be
a faithful old friend, he made up his mind to trust him, and so spent all
he possessed upon a smart pair of boots made of buff-coloured leather.
They fitted perfectly, so Puss put them on, took the old bag which his
master gave him, and trotted off to a neighbouring warren in which he
knew there was a great number of rabbits.
Having put some bran and fresh parsley into the bag, he laid it
upon the ground, hid himself, and waited. Presently two foolish little

| cee k
i ‘<~ to earn an honest livelihood,” he sighed, “but as
LOZ NURSERY TALES.

rabbits, sniffing the food, ran straight into the bag, when the clever cat
drew the strings and caught them.

Then, slinging the bag over his shoulder, he hastened off to the
palace, where he asked to speak to the King. Having been shown into
the royal presence, he bowed and said:

“Sire, my Lord the Marquis of Carabas has commanded me to pre-
sent these rabbits to your Majesty, with his respects.”

The monarch having desired his thanks to be given to the Marquis
(who, as you will guess, was really our poor Jack), then ordered his head
cook to dress the rabbits for dinner, and he and his daughter partook of
them with great enjoyment.

Day by day Puss brought home stores of good food, so that he and
his master lived in plenty, and besides that, he did not fail to keep the
King and his courtiers well supplied with game.

Sometimes he would lay a brace of partridges at the royal feet,
sometimes a fine large hare, but whatever it was, it always came with
the same message: “From my Lord the Marquis of Carabas”; so that
everyone at Court was talking of this strange nobleman, whom no one
had ever seen, but who sent such generous presents to his Majesty.

At length Puss decided that it was time for his master to be
introduced at Court. So one day he persuaded him to go and bathe in
a river near, having heard that the King
would soon pass that way.

Jack stood shivering up to his neck in
water, wondering what was to happen next,
when suddenly the King’s carriage appeared
in sight. At once Puss began to call out as
loudly as he could:

“Help, help! My Lord the Marquis
of Carabas is drowning !”

The King put his head out of the
carriage window and, recognising the cat,
_ ordered his attendants to go to the assistance
NG Sy of the Marquis. While Jack was being
taken out of the water, Puss ran to the King
and told him that some robbers had run off









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with his master’s clothes whilst he was bathing, the truth of the matter
being that the cunning cat had hidden them under a stone.

On hearing this story the King instantly despatched one of his.
grooms to fetch a handsome suit of purple and gold from the royal
wardrobe, and arrayed in this, Jack, who was a fine, handsome fellow,
looked so well that no one for a moment supposed but that he was
some noble foreign lord.

The King and his daughter were so pleased with his appearance:
104 NURSERY TALES.

that they invited him into their carriage. At os
first Jack hesitated, for he felt a little shy about
sitting next to a Princess, but she smiled at him
so sweetly, and was so kind and gentle, that
he soon forgot his fears and fell in love with
her there and then.

As soon as Puss had seen his master seated i, alae
in the royal carriage, he whispered directions to Ale
the coachman, and then ran on ahead as fast
as he could trot, until he came to a field of corn,
where the reapers were busy.

“Reapers,” said he fiercely, “the King will shortly pass this way. If
he should ask you to whom this field belongs, remember that you say,
“To the Marquis of Carabas. If you dare to disobey me, I will have
you all chopped up as fine as mincemeat.” The reapers were so afraid
the cat would keep his word that they promised to obey. Puss then ran
on and told all the other labourers whom he met to give the same
answer, threatening them with terrible punishments if they disobeyed.

Now, the King was in a very good humour, for the day was fine,
and he found the Marquis a very pleasant companion, so he told the
coachman to drive slowly, in order that he might admire the beautiful
country. “What a fine field of wheat!” he said presently. “To whom
does it belong?” Then the men answered as they had been told: “To
our Lord the Marquis of Carabas.” Next they met a herd of cattle, and
again to the King’s question, “To whom do they belong?” they were
told, “To the Marquis of Carabas.” And it was the same with every-
thing they passed.

The Marquis listened with the greatest astonishment, and thought
what a very wonderful cat his dear Puss was; and the King was delighted
to find that his new friend was as wealthy as he was charming.

Meanwhile Puss, who was well in advance of the Royal party, had
arrived at a stately castle, which belonged to a cruel Ogre, the richest
ever known, for all the lands the King had admired so much belonged to
him. Puss knocked at the door and asked to see the Ogre, who received
him quite civilly, for he had never seen a cat in boots before, and the
sight amused him.




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“Youd
PUSS IN BOOTS. 195

So he and Puss were soon chatting away together.

The Ogre, who was very conceited, began to boast of what clever
tricks he could play, and Puss sat and listened, with a smile on his face.

“TY once heard, great Ogre,” he said at last, “that you possessed
the power of changing yourself into any kind of animal you chose—a
lion or an elephant, for instance.”

“Well, so I can,” replied the Ogre.

“Dear me! how much I should like to see you do it now,” said
Puss sweetly. =

The Ogre was only too pleased to find a chance of showing how
very clever he was, so he promised to transform himself into any animal
Puss might mention.

“Oh! I will leave the choice to you,” said the cat politely.

Immediately there appeared where the Ogre had been seated, an
enormous lion, roaring, and. lashing with its tail, and looking as though
it meant to gobble the cat up in a trice.

Puss was. really very much frightened, and, jumping out of the

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196 NURSERY TALES.

window, managed to scramble on to the roof, though he could scarcely
hold on to the tiles on account of his high-heeled boots.

There he sat, refusing to come down, until the Ogre changed him-
self into his natural form, and laughingly called to him that he would
not hurt him.

Then Puss ventured back into the room, and began to compliment.
the Ogre on his cleverness.

“Of course, it was all very wonderful,” he said, “but it would be
more wonderful still if you, who are so great and fierce, could transform
yourself into some timid little creature, such as a mouse. That, I
suppose, would be quite impossible ?”

“Not at all,” said the vain Ogre; “one is quite as easy to me as
the other, as I will show you.” And in a moment a little brown mouse
was frisking about all over the floor, whilst the Ogre had vanished.

“Now or never,” said Puss, and with a spring he seized the mouse
and gobbled it up as fast as he could.

At the same moment all the gentlemen and ladies whom the wicked
Ogre had held in his castle under a spell, became disenchanted. They
were so grateful to their deliverer that they would have done anything
to please him, and readily agreed to enter into the service of the Marquis
of Carabas when Puss asked them to do so.

So now the cat had a splendid castle, which he knew to be full of
heaped-up treasures, at his command, and ordering a magnificent feast to
be prepared, he took up his station at the castle gates to welcome his
master and the royal party.

As soon as the castle appeared in sight, the King cuaured whose
it was, “For,” said he, “I have never seen a finer.”

Then Puss, bowing low, threw open the castle gates, and cried:

“May it please your Majesty to alight and enter the home of the
most noble the Marquis of Carabas.”

Full of surprise, the King turned to the Marquis. “Is this splendid
castle indeed yours?” he asked. “Not even our own palace is more
beautiful, and doubtless it is as splendid within as without.”

Puss then helped his Majesty to alight, and conducted him into the
castle, where a group of noble gentlemen and fair ladies were waiting to
receive them. Jack, or the Marquis as he was now called, gave his hand


«dtelp! help! the Mbarquis ts drowning!”
198 NURSERY TALES.

to the young Princess, and led her to the banquet. Long and merrily
they feasted, and when at length the guests rose to depart, the King
embraced the Marquis, and called him his dear son; and the Princess
blushed so charmingly and looked so shy and sweet, that Jack ventured
to. lay his heart and fortune at her feet.

And so the millers son married the King’s daughter, and there were
great rejoicings throughout the land.

On the evening of the wedding-day a great ball was given, to which
princes and noblemen from far and near were invited. Puss opened the
ball, wearing for the occasion a pair of boots made of the finest leather,
with gold tassels and scarlet heels. I only wish you could have
seen him.

When the old King died, the Princess and her husband reigned
in his stead, and their most honoured and faithful friend at Court was
Puss himself, for his master never forgot to whom he owed all his good
fortune. He lived upon the daintiest meat and most delicious cream, and
was petted and made much of all the days of his life, and never again
ran after mice and rats, except for exercise and amusement.








Ve
“x YZ —

ide Cites ee f

; an . Av ee

-

Be HERE was once a man who had three sons. Johnny, the
AG > youngest, was always looked upon as the simpleton of the family,
and had very little consideration or kindness shown him.

It happened one day that the eldest son was going out into the
wood to cut fuel; and before he started, his mother gave him a slice
of rich plum-cake and a flask of wine, so that he might not suffer from
hunger or thirst.

Just as he reached the wood, he met a queer little old man, dressed
in grey, who wished him “Good day,” and begged for a piece of the young
man’s cake and a drink of wine.

But the greedy youth replied: “If I were to give you cake and
wine, I should not have enough left for myself; so be off with you, and
leave me in peace.” : as

Then he pushed the little man rudely on one side and went his.
way. He soon came to a likely-looking tree, and began to hew it down,
but he made a false stroke, and instead of striking the tree he buried
his axe in his own arm, and was obliged to hurry home as fast as he
could to have the wound dressed. o
A. NURSERY TALES.

And this was what came of offending the little grey man!

The following day the second son set out to the wood, and his
mother treated him just as she had done her eldest son—gave him a
slice of cake and a flask of wine, in case he should feel hungry. The
little grey man met him at the entrance to the wood, and begged for a |
share of his food, but the young man answered:

ae more I give to you, the less I have for myself. Be off
with you.”

Then he left the little grey man standing in the road, and went on
his way. But it was not long before he, too, was punished; for the first
stroke he aimed at a tree glanced aside and wounded his leg, so that he
was obliged to be carried home.

Then said the Simpleton: “Father, let me go to the wood for once.
f will bring you home plenty of fuel.”

“Nonsense,” answered the father. “Both your brothers have got
into trouble, and it is not likely that I am going to trust you.”

But Johnny would not give up the idea, and worried his father, till
at last he said:

“Very well, my son, have your own way. You shall learn by
experience that I know better than you.”

There was no rich cake for the Simpleton of the family. His
mother just gave him a little loaf of dough and a bottle of sour beer.

No sooner did he reach the wood than the little grey man appeared.

“Give me a piece of your cake and a drink of your wine?” said he.

But the young man told him he had only a dough loaf and a bottle
of sour beer.

“Still,” said he, “you are welcome to a share of the food, such
as it is.”

So the two sat down together; but when Johnny took his humble
fare from his pocket, what was his surprise to find it changed into the
most delicious cake and wine. Then the young man and his guest made
a hearty meal, and when it was ended the little grey man said:

“Because you have such a kind heart, and have willingly shared
your food with me, I am going to reward you. Yonder stands an old
tree: hew it down, and deep in the heart of the roots you will find
something.”
FOHNNY AND THE GOLDEN GOOSE. ; 201

The old man then nodded kindly,
and disappeared in a moment.

Johnny at once did as he had
been told, and as soon as the tree
fell he saw, sitting in the midst of the
roots, a goose with feathers of purest
gold. He lifted it carefully out,
and carried it with him to the inn, wy
where he meant to spend the night.

Now, the landlord had three
daughters, and no sooner did they see
the goose than they wanted to know
what curious kind of bird it might be,
for never before had they seen a fowl
of any kind with feathers of pure gold.
The eldest made up her mind to wait
for a good opportunity and then pluck
a feather for herself. So as soon as
Johnny went out of the room she put
out her hand and seized the wing of the
goose, but what was her horror to find
that she could not unclasp her fingers
again, nor even move her
hand from the golden goose!

Very soon the second
sister came creeping into the
room, meaning also to steal
a feather; but no sooner
did she touch her sister than
she, too, was unable to
draw her hand away.

Lastly came the
third, anxious to secure a
feather before the goose’s
master returned.

“Go away ! go away!”






























202 NURSERY TALES.

screamed her two sisters, but she could not understand why she should
not help herself as well as the others.

So she paid no heed to their cries, but came towards them and
stretched out her hand to the goose.

In doing so she touched her second sister, and then, alas! she,
too, was held fast.

They pulled and tugged with might and main, but it was all of no
use; they could not get away, and there they had to remain the
whole night.

The next morning Johnny tucked the goose under his arm, and went
on his way, never troubling himself about the three girls hanging on
behind.

Then what a dance he led them: over hedges and ditches, high-
ways and byways! Wherever he led they were bound to follow. Half
way across a sunny meadow, they met the parson, who was Cees
shocked to see the three girls running after a young man. :

“For shame!” he cried angrily, and seized the youngest by the hand
to drag her away.

But no sooner did he touch her than the poor parson was made fast
too, and had to run behind the girls, whether he would or no.

They had scarcely gone half a dozen paces before they met the
sexton, who stared with astonishment to see his master running at the
heels of the three girls.

“Hil stop, your reverence,” he cried. “You will be late for the
christening.”

He seized the parson’s sleeve as he ran past him, but the poor sexton
had to join the procession too.

So now there were five of them, and just as they turned a corner
the parson saw two peasants, and called to them to set him and his
sexton free.

They threw down their spades at once and tried to do so, but they
too, stuck fast, and so Johnny had a fine string of seven folk hanging
on to the wing of his golden goose.

On and on they ran, until at length they came into the country of
a powerful King.

This King had an only daughter, who all her life had been so sad
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that no one had ever been able to make her laugh. So the King made
a decree that the man who could bring a smile to his daughter’s face
should have her for his bride.

When Johnny heard what the King had promised, he at once made
his way into the princess’s presence, and when she saw the goose, with
the seven queer-looking companions hanging on behind, she burst into
such a hearty fit of laughter that it was thought she would never be able
to stop again.

Of course, the Simpleton claimed her as his bride, but the King did
not fancy him for a son-in-law, so he made all sorts of excuses.

“You shall have her,’ said he, “if you can first bring me a man
who can drink up a whole cellarful of wine.”

Johnny at once remembered the little grey man, and, feeling sure
that he would help him, he set out for the wood where he had _ first
met him.

When he reached the stump of the old tree which he had himself
hewn down, he noticed a man sitting beside it, with a face as gloomy
as a rainy day.
204 NURSERY TALES.

Johnny asked politely what ailed him, and the man answered—

“T suffer from a thirst I cannot quench. Cold water disagrees with
me, and though I have, it is true, emptied a barrel of wine, it was no
more to me than a single drop of water upon a hot stone.”

You can think how pleased Johnny was to hear these words. He
took the man to the King’s cellar, where he seated himself before the
huge barrels, and drank and drank till, at the end of the day, not a drop
of wine was left. aoe

Then Johnny claimed his bride, but the King could not make up his
mind to give his daughter to “a ne’er-do-weel” who went by such a name
as “Simpleton.”

So he made fresh excuses, and said that he would not give her up
until the young man had found someone who could eat up a mountain
of bread in a single day.

So the young. man had no choice but to set out once more for
the wood.

And again he found a man sitting beside the stump of the tree.
He was very sad and hungry-looking, and sat tightening the belt round
his waist.

“T have eaten a whole ovenful of bread,” he said sadly, “but when
one is as hungry as I am, such a meal only serves to make one more
hungry still. I am so empty that if I did not tighten my belt I should
die of hunger.”

“You are the man for me!” said Johnny. “Follow me, and I will
give you a meal that will satisfy even your hunger.”

He led the man into the courtyard of the King’s palace, where all
the meal in the kingdom had been collected together and mixed into an
enormous mountain of bread.

The man from the wood placed himself in front of it and began to
eat, and before the day was over the mountain of bread had vanished.

A third time the Simpleton demanded his bride, but again the King
found an excuse.

“First bring me a ship that can sail both on land and sea, and then
you shall wed the princess,” he said.

Johnny went straightway to the wood, where he met the little grey
man with whom he had once shared his food.
JOHNNY AND THE GOLDEN GOOSE. a

“Good day,” he said, nodding his wise little head. “So you've come
to visit me again, eh? It was I, you know, who drank the wine and ate
the bread for you, and now I will finish by giving you the wonderful ship
which is to sail on either land or sea. All this I do for you because you
were kind and good to me.”

Then he gave him the ship, and when the King saw it he could find
no further excuse. :

So he gave the young man his daughter, and the pair were married
that very day. . :

When the old King died, the Simpleton became King in his stead,
and he and his wife lived happily ever after.





Hie ae tere ORM
°

HERE was once a little girl whose father and mother were dead,

and who was so poor that she no longer had a little room in

which to live, nor a little bed in which to sleep; and at last she had

nothing more than the clothes on her body, and a small piece of bread
in her hand, which a kind soul had given her.
THE STAR FLORINS. 207

But she was a good and pious little maid, and when she found
herself forsaken by all the world, she went into the fields trusting in God.

There she met a poor man, who said: “Oh! give me something
to eat, Iam so hungry.” The child gave him all her piece of bread,
saying, as she handed it to him: “God bless thee,’ and went farther.
Then she met a little girl who was crying bitterly, and who said: “Give
me something to cover my head, it is so cold!” So she took off her
own little hood and gave it her.

When she had gone still farther, she met another child that had
no coat, so she gave away her own; and presently she met another
who begged for her petticoat, and this she also parted with.

At last she reached the forest, and as it was growing dusk, she met
a fourth, who asked for her little shirt, and the good little maiden said
to herself: “It is a dark night, no one can see me, so I can easily give
away my little shirt.” So she took it off, and when she stood alone and
unclothed, having nothing more in the world, suddenly the silver stars in
heaven fell softly to the earth all around her, and they turned one by
one to solid bright florins, and in the place of the little shirt she had
given away she found herself clothed in a new one that was made of
such fine linen that it was like silk.

Then the child picked up the glittering star-money, which made
her rich all the rest of her life-time.








frinted in Bavaria,
SIN1655



See