Citation
Stories of Scotland and its adjacent islands

Material Information

Title:
Stories of Scotland and its adjacent islands
Creator:
Geldart, Hannah Ransome, 1820?-1861
Fletcher, Josiah ( Publisher )
Fletcher and Alexander ( Printer )
Hall, Virtue, and Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Norwich
Publisher:
Arthur Hall, Virtue & Co.
Josiah Fletcher
Manufacturer:
Fletcher and Alexander
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1851
Language:
English
Physical Description:
iv, 174, [9] p., [5] leaves of plates (1 fold.) : ill., map (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Description and travel -- Juvenile literature -- Scotland ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1851 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
England -- Norwich
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
"Fourth thousand"--T.p.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Mrs. Thomas Geldart.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA8266 ( ltqf )
ALG6787 ( notis )
04451954 ( oclc )
026697606 ( alephbibnum )

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Full Text




ELEGANT PRESENTS
For. Poungy People,
BY MRS. THOMAS GELDART.
~~ EEE |
Gmilie the Peacemaker,
Third Edition. 18mo. cloth, elegant. Is. 6d.

Teuth is Goerpthing.

Third Edition. 18mo. cloth, elegant. 1s. 6d.

Daily Choughts for a Chil.

Second Edition. 18mo. cloth, elegant. 1s, 6d.

| Bay Dundas,

Foolscap 8vo. cloth, elegant. Price 2s. 6d.

Glimpses of our Fsland Pome,

With many Illustrations. - Foolscap 8vo. cloth,
elegant. Price 2s. 6d.

Second Edition. Foolscap 8vo. cloth, elegant. |
Price 2s. 6d.



|
| Stories of Srotland.
|

The Baldwin Library
| University
|RmB vv
; Florida








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KNOX’S HOUSE AT EDINBURGH.





STORIES OF SCOTLAND

And its Adjacent Islinds.

MRS. THOMAS GELDART,

AUTHOR OF ‘‘ TRUTH IS EVERYTHING 3”? “ RMILIE THE PEACEMAKER 3”?
“STORIES OF ENGLAND AND HER FORTY COUNTIES ;”?
: ‘STORIES OF IRELAND ;”? .
&e., &e.

Fourth Thousand.

. LONDON:
ARTHUR HALL, VIRTUE, & CO.
NORWICH: J. FLETCHER.







CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

Inrropuctory REMARKS—THE Earty Kines

CHAPTER II.

Taree Borper CountTizs.—BERWICKSHIRE—
RoxBURGHSHIRE—DUMFRIESSHIRE ..
, :

CHAPTER III.

SELKIRKSHIRE—PEEBLESHIRE, OR TWEEDDALE
—LAnarksHirE—RENFREWSHIRE

CHAPTER IV.

AYRSHIRE—KIRKCUDBRIGHT, OR GALLOWAY
—WIGTONSHIRE, OR WxST GAaLLoway—
HADDINGTONSHIRE.. 2c ee ee ee oe

4

CHAPTER V.

LINLITHGOW—EDINBURGH, OR Min-LoTHIAN

CHAPTER VI.

FIFesHiInE—KINROSS .. «soe ee

PAGE

13

37

53

75

91



lv CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VII.

CLACKMANNAN—STIRLINGSHIRE—DUMBARTON
—ARGYLESHIRE 6. os ‘ee oe oe oe

CHAPTER VIII.

PERTHSHIRE 4. ce oe ce ee ee ee
CHAPTER IX. “4
Forrar-- KincaRDINE—ABERDEEN— BANFF—
ELGIN «. 60 +e ee oe we we
CHAPTER X.

NAIRNSHIRE—-CROMARTY—INVERNESS «- «oe

CHAPTER XI.

Ross—SUTHERLAND--CAITHNESS .- «ee

CHAPTER XII.

HrpripEs—MuLL—BUTESHIRE .. 2... ee

CHAPTER XIII.

CONCLUDING REMARKS .. .. «+ «se ee oe

PAGE

101

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119

132

148

154

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STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

Oe

Chapter First.

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS—THE EARLY KINGS, &e.

Scorranp is the northern division of the cele-
brated island of Great Britain. If you look at
it on a map, you will be struck with its rugged
appearance. Its coast is jagged and irregular,
and its interior for the most part covered with
mountains and watered with lakes. Separated
from England by the Cheviot Hills, which ex-
tend almost from sea to sea, with a breadth of
from forty to sixty miles, it would seem as though
nature herself had determined the boundaries of
each country; but man willed it otherwise, and
from very early times these two neighbours,
isolated from other parts of the world by large

and stormy seas, began to quarrel and fight like
20 B



2 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

bitter enemies. Wars—cruel, bloody, desolating
wars—lasted at short intervals for many years ;
and it is very likely that this quarrelsome spirit
was encouraged .by those ambitious, battle-
loving people, the Romans.

The Romans, you know, had it in contempla-
tion to conquer the whole world, and to make
their own. city of Rome the head of all the
nations on the face of the earth. They suc-
ceeded better in the flat parts of Britain than
in the hilly countries; and, although they pos-
sessed themselves of England and a part of the
south of Scotland, they could not make their
way into those great northern mountains, where
the hardy mountaineers were prepared to resist
them steadily, and where the rough fare of a
barbarous country was distasteful enough to the
more civilized and luxurious Roman soldier; so
they retreated.

These wild people, however, having been once
unsettled, began to come down from their
mountain fastnesses, and invade that part of
the land which had already been conquered by
the Romans. The people of the northern part
of Scotland were not one nation; there were



INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 3

some called Scots and others Picts. The earliest
authentic information which we possess of the
Scots is that they were a people inhabiting
Ireland, which island they appear, in the 5th
century, to have divided with the Hiberni, the
previous inhabitants, over whom they gradually
acquired so decided a superiority as to give their
name to the country exclusively called Scotia
from the 5th to the 10th century. In the
beginning of the 6th century, a colony of this
people crossed over from the north of Ireland
to North Britain and settled in the county now
called Argyle. There have been many different
opinions however as to the origin both of the
Scots and Picts, the latter seeming to be a term
commonly used by Roman writers to describe
painted men rather than any distinct race; but
the discussion of this matter would not be inter-
esting to you. Quarrelsome as they were with
one another, the Picts and Scots made common
cause against the people who had attacked them ;
and their inroads were rather alarming to the
new settlers. The Romans therefore built a very
long wall between one side of the island ‘and
the other, made towers on the wall, and filled
B2



4 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

camps with soldiers in various places around ; so
that at the least alarm the men might hasten to
defend any part of the wall which was attacked.
This first Roman wall you may see marked on
the map; it was built between the two friths
of Clyde and Forth, just where the island of
Britain is at the narrowest. Some parts of it
still remain, but the work was quite a failure.
The Barbarians,* as the Romans called the Picts
and Scots, were not to be kept away by a wall,
so the Romans resolved to give up a portion of
the country in hopes of keeping them quiet;
and therefore built a new wall stronger than
before, about sixty miles further back. The
Barbarians made very persevering attempts to
get over this wall, but in vain: and in the midst
of the contest the Roman soldiers were wanted
in Rome, for civil war had broken out there,
and the Emperor sent orders for them all to
come and help to fight in their own country.

So leaving the Britons and Scots with the
fighting mania upon them, they forsook them
and returned, and then, indeed, the Barbarians

* Barbarians was a general name given by the Romans to
the inhabitants of most countries in central Europe.



THE EARLY KINGS. 5

rushed in like a flood on the poor Britons, who,
terribly alarmed, sent for help to Germany, and
these people, called Saxons, came over and, being
a very warlike nation, were glad to assist the
Britons. ‘

The Saxons, however, expected payment for
their trouble, and prepared to take advantage of
the condition of distress in which they found
the Britons, by helping themselves to the best of
everything they saw, taking possession of the
country, and using the inhabitants as slaves and
servants. Many of the Britons fled into Wales,
which country they defended for a long time,
and lived under their own government and laws;
until the English got possession of that also.
Scotland, however, was not so easy a conquest,
as England found to her cost, and still remained
free.

The history of the early Scottish kings is
deeply interesting. There was old king Duncan
in the very early times, his sons Malcolm and
Donaldbane, and his famous relative Macbeth,
in whose story Shakespeare the poet has mixéd
up truth and. fiction, till the former is hard to
come at. JI will tell you the tale of Macbeth



6 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

and the witches, as it is generally believed, when
we come to the proper place; but these events
occurred in the reign of our Saxon king, called
Edward the Confessor, who, in assisting the
Scottish king to recover possession of the throne,
acted more generously than his successors, and
never thought of paying himself for his help out
of the Scotch kingdom as his predecessors did.

Then came the Norman conquest, which,
although it did. not involve Scotland, had an
indirect effect on the. country.

Many Saxons who were driven from England
by William’s cruelty and oppression took re-
fuge in Scotland, and this was one means of
greatly civilising the southern part of the land.
Edgar Atheling, a relation of the amiable
Edward the Confessor, accompanied the exiles,
and Malcolm Cammore, who had received much
kindness i in former times from Edward, remem-
bering ‘that kindness, married the Princess
Margaret, and made her Queen of Scotland.
Malcolm tried to seat Edgar on the English
throne, but in vain; William and his Normans
were not to be vanquished. After Malcolm;
came three kings in succession, who made little



THE EARLY KINGS. © 7

figure in Scottish history; and then Malcolm’s
sons, Edgar, Alexander, and David.

David made war against England, and in his
reign was fought the noted battle of the Standard.
He it was that founded the abbeys, to which you
will hear frequent reference. That at Holyrood,
in Edinburgh; Melrose, in Roxburghshire ;
Dryburgh, in Berwickshire, and others. He
appears according to his knowledge to have been
a religious man, and was called by fhe Roman
Catholics, Saint David.

James I of England and VI of. Scotland,
thought his predecessor rather too generous to
the church, for he once said of him that.“ Saint
David had proved a sore saint to the crown.”
One reason which probably had weight with
David was that out of veneration to religion,
church lands were frequently spared, when other
parts of the country were laid waste and plunder-
ed. David, therefore, considered perhaps that by
putting land under the protection of the church,
he had done his best to secure them against
devastation, and most of his monasteries were
founded in those parts of the country peculiarly
exposed to danger from the enemy’s attacks.



8 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

At.the time of Edward I, of England, Scot-
land was reduced almost to the condition of a
conquered country. The Lord High Justice
Ormesby, called all men to account who refused
an oath of allegiance to King Edward. Such
persons were summoned to the courts of justice,
fined, deprived of their estates, and otherwise
severely punished. Scotland was therefore in
great distress, and the inhabitants determined
to rise against the English or southern men, as
they called them, to recover the liberty and
independence of their country. Their leader
was the celebrated William Wallace, whose name
is still mentioned with reverence and affection
in Scotland. Some particulars of the story of
Wallace and Bruce you will read in the proper
place, for it is not my design to give you a
regular history of the kings in succession. Bruce
succeeded in his efforts to free his country from
much tyranny and oppression, but in his suc-
cessor’s time, the warlike Edward III, war was
again declared against Scotland. Robert Bruce,
one of the greatest of the Scottish kings, being
dead, the kingdom descended to his son David,
who was but four years old when his father died.



THE EARLY KINGS. 9

There was, therefore, a Regent appointed,
Randolph, Earl of Murray; that is to say, a
person who exercised the authority of king for
a time, until the young king was of an age to
reign. Randolph was a just but very severe
ruler, he appears to have taken great pleasure
in putting criminals to death; there was no
mercy with his judgment. He once sent orders
to the Highlands to have certain thieves and
robbers executed, and his officer caused their
heads to be hung round the walls of the castle
to the number of fifty.. When Randolph came
down the lake in a barge and saw the castle of
Ellangowan, where the execution had taken
place, adorned with their bloody heads, he said
that he loved better to look on them than on a
garland of roses.

Edward Baliol, the son of .a certain John
Baliol, whom Edward I had formerly created
king, and afterwards dethroned, came over from
France, where he had been living since his
father’s dethronement, and laid claim to the
crown. Edward III took up his cause, with a
view, no doubt, to secure Scotland for himself,
and the country was reducéd to a sad state by



10 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

repeated wars. Hdward was busily engaged too
at this time against the French king, and this
rather weakened his force in Scotland, or it is
possible he might have completed the conquest.
Whilst he was.absent on one of his French
expeditions, the battle of Nevill’s Cross. was
fought near Durham, when David II was taken
prisoner and led in triumph through the streets.
of London.

We are coming to the end of the Scottish
kings. After David Bruce’s death the crown
was claimed by the Stuarts, a smgularly unfor-
tunate family. Robert Stuart, who had married
a daughter of David Bruce, was the first of the
line of Stuart kings. James I was assassinated ;
James IT was killed by a cannon, which burst at
the siege of Roxborough; James III fell in the
battle field, by the hands of his own subjects;
James IV also fell at the battle of Flodden Field,
fought against the English; James V, after a
great defeat in the time of Henry VITI, died it
isvsaid of grief. The fate of his daughter Mary,
Queen of Scots, is well known. After the union,
Charles I, king of Scotland and England, was
beheaded. Charles II wandered many years as



ITS PRODUCTIONS. li

an exile. James II was obliged to resign the
crown ; and his son and grandson, known by the
names of the Pretenders, vainly trying to recover
the kingdom, were proclaimed traitors, and had
a price of £4000 set upon their heads.

Thus we have glanced at the history of
Scotland, which will enable you, I hope, slight
as is the sketch, to understand the allusions
which may be made to the different kings in
the course of this little volume. And now let
us look for a moment at the country as a whole.
Those deep indentations made by the sea into
the land are, in the language of the country,
called friths or firths, such as the frith of Forth,
the friths of Clyde, &c., giving Scotland the
irregular outline, which you see on the map.
The lakes are called Lochs; thus you will hear
of Loch Lomond, Loch Katrine. The surface of
the country is extremely unequal and varied ; it
is divided into the Highlands and Lowlands.
The Grampians, a long chain of hills, dividing
the two districts.

The climate of Scotland, Sina with that
of England, is wet and cold, and corn, fruit, and
vegetables, are usually much more forward with



12 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

us than with our neighbours. The productions
are numerous and valuable.

There is a great quantity of coal, iron is
found very generally, as well as lead and marble
in the northern counties, plumbago in Dumfries,
one of the southern, and slate in Argyleshire
and Perthshire, which are more northerly.

The ancient name of this interesting country
was Caledonia, and its inhabitants probably
Celts, that migratory people who came from
the neighbourhood of the Euxine and Caspian
seas. We will now proceed to notice each county
separately, and see if we can accomplish the task
of learning the name and peculiarity of every
one of the thirty-three counties.





Chapter Second.

THREE BORDER COUNTIES,
BERWICKSHIRE.

Flodden—-James the Fourth’s death—Polworth and Lady Grizzell
Baillie.
ROXBURGHSHIRE.

King David’s Abbeys—Kelso—Siege of Roxburgh—Bursting of the Can-
non—Death of James—Jedburgh—Its Abbey—Dryburgh—Scott’s
burial place—Melrose—Sculpture—Michael Scott’s Tomb—Character
of the Monks—Abbotsford—Galashiel’s Convenient Shop.

DUMFRIESSHIRE.

Gretna—Johnny Armstrotig—Cure for great Talkers—Gray Mare’s Tail
Mountain Seenery—Stories of the Covenanters— Feudal System—
Watch Hill—Dumfries—Burns.

Tre divisions of Scotland are thirty-three. It
has eleven counties to the north, nine in the
middle, and thirteen in the south. We will first
try and learn the names of those which are
usually called the Border Counties. You must
look at the map and see which these counties
are, Do not merely take my account of them,
see for yourself. No book on geography can
stand in the place of a map. It is there that
you see the exact position and relation of one



14 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

country to another. Whilst its very form may
be helpful to you in recollecting its locality and
name.

We will begin with Berwicxsuirne. This
county you see has a small portion of North-
umberland to the south-east : the German Ocean
to the east;. Haddington to the north; and a
part of Edinburgh and Roxburghshire to the
west and south.

Berwick, usually called Berwick upon Tweed,
is unlike every other town in Britam. It was
fortified by King Charles I in 1639, for the
purpose of overawing the Covenanters, part of
whose history I hope to give you in another
place. It is said that Berwickshire people are
unable to sound the letter R. This defect,
which is called the burr, gives a very singular
sound to their speech; I think if you have once
heard a native of Berwickshire talk, you will
not easily forget the peculiarity.

There is a ford across the river Tweed, about
twelve miles west of the town of Berwick, which
the Scotch and English armies usually crossed
when they invaded one another’s country. It
was also a great place of conference; and



BERWICKSHIRE. 15

Holywell Haugh, close by, is the field where
Edward I had a meeting with the Scotch
nobility, to settle the dispute between Baliol
and Bruce, about the right to the throne of
Scotland, to which you have seen reference in
the previous chapter. Coldstream in this county
had at one time a handsome Priory. You may
have heard of a regiment. of soldiers called the
Coldstream Guards. It was originally raised
by General Monk, who lived at Coldstream in
Charles the Second’s reign ; and has ever since
borne the name of the Coldstream Guards.

The field, or rather hill, of Flodden, is about
six miles from this town. It is memorable as
the scene of a great battle, the particulars of
which, connected as they are with the Scot-
tish history at that period, I will give you.
James IV reigned over Scotland at the time
that Henry VII was king of England. James
had rebelled against his own father, who, after
receiving some wounds in the battle field, was
treacherously murdered by a priest who pretended
to come and hear his confession. James IV
had not long been on the throne before he
began to feel some remorse for his undutiful



16 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

conduct; and according to the doctrines of the
Roman Catholic Church, which but too greatly
tend to lead men away from the Saviour of
sinners, he tried to atone for it by various acts
of penance. Amongst other tokens of repent-
ance, he caused an iron belt or girdle to be made,
which he wore constantly under his clothes,
every year of his life adding another link of
an ounce or two to the weight of it. James
was, however, for the times in which he lived, a
good king. He was not fond of flatterers; but
ruled by the counsel of the wisest of his nobility,
and won the hearts of his people. He used to
go about in disguise amongst the poorer classes,
and ask questions about the king, thus dis-
covering his subjects’ opinion of him, and many
a good lesson did he receive, in these private
visits, from the simple chiefs or the lowlier part
of his subjects.

James IV being one of the most popular
monarchs. that ever reigned in Scotland, his
countrymen have endeavoured to make out that
he could not have been accessory to the insur-
rection against his father, as they affirm him to
have been but thirteen or fourteen when it



BERWICKSHIRE. 17

occurred. His birth, however, taking place in
1472, and his father’s death having occurred in
1488, he must then have entered his seventeenth
year. Henry VII of England, who was very
anxious to make a friend of James IV, was
not a warlike king; for he loved money, and
wars are expensive affairs. He therefore pro-
jected a marriage between his eldest daughter,
Margaret Tudor, and James, whilst Margaret
was yet an infant; and when still an mexpe-
rienced girl of less than fourteen, the marriage
was actually completed. The king was eighteen
years older than his girl queen, and was at the
time of their marriage the handsomest sovereign
in Europe. Sir Walter Scott, in one of his
poems thus describes him :—

“ For hazel was his eagle eye,
And auburn of the darkest dye
His short curled beard and hair;
Light was his footstep in the dance,
And firm his stirrup in. the lists ;
And oh, he had that merry glance,
Which seldom lady’s heart resists.’’

The king appears to have been very kind and
persevering in his efforts to please and conciliate
his bride, but she was a difficult young lady to
please, it seems; and was somewhat like her

c



18 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

brother, King Henry VIII, in temper and dis-
position. Her first letter to her father after their
marriage was one of complaint and murmur,
although her husband was doing his utmost to
entertain and oblige her and bid her welcome
to Scotland. "

When Henry VII died, Margaret’s brother
Henry, who was of a much more impetuous,
fiery, despotic disposition, could not agree with
James at all. The cause of their quarrel
you may read in Scottish history; the result
was the disastrous battle of Flodden, where
James and many of his warlike peers and loyal
gentry fell on the field. The conquerors lost
5000 men, but the Scots perhaps twice that
number.! The English lost but few of distinction,
whilst the Scots left on their battle field—the
king, two bishops, two mitred abbots,? twelve

! This battle was fought in the year 1513.

2? You may wonder to hear of an abbot’s mitre. In the
early history of the church, abbots did not wear mitres, only
bishops being permitted that. honour; but as the wealth and
importance of monasteries and abbeys increased so did the pomp
of their heads or superiors. -The abbot was then a person of
great importance, and was regarded in the monasteries as a lord
and father, no appeal being allowed from his decision. Abbots
or Priors sat in the upper House of Parliament and wore a
silver mitre, in order to distinguish it from that of the bishops,
which was of pure gold.



BERWICKSHIRE. 19

earls, thirteen lords, and five eldest sons of peers.
James was not permitted a burial, for the Pope
having excommunicated him no priest dared
pronounce the burial service over his body.
The corpse was therefore embalmed, and sent
to the monastery of Shene, in Surrey. It lay
there until the Reformation, when all religious
houses of the kind were broken up; anid the
monastery of Shene was given to the Duke of
Suffolk. After this period, the body, which
was wrapped up in lead, was tossed about the
house as a piece of useless lumber. Stowe, the
noted historian of Londen, who lived at this
time, saw it flung into a waste room among old
pieces of wood, lead, and other rubbish. ‘“ Some
idle workmen, for their foolish pleasure,’ says
that historian, “hewed off the head; and one
Lancelot Young, master glazier to Queen
Elizabeth, finding a sweet. smell come from
thence, owing doubtless to the spices used for
embalming the body, carried the head home
and kept it for some time; but at last caused
the sexton of St Michael’s Wood Street to bury
it in the charnel house.” What a humiliating
end to that king, once so proud and powerful;
c2



20 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

and what a lesson on the nothingness of human
greatness !

Two miles north of Greenlaw, at the edge of
a vast black heath, are the remains of a Roman
camp. . You may have read an account in some
child’s book, of Lady Grizzell Baillie. Polworth
Church, in this county, is the place where the
Earl of Marchmont concealed himself, for six
weeks, during the reign of King James II; he,
with many more, having fallen under the dis-
pleasure of that monarch for his religious. as
well as political opimions. The greater part
of his family were ignorant of the place of his
concealment, but it fell to his daughter Grizzell’s
lot to carry him food; and one day, to the great
amusement of the elder and the indignation of
the younger childrén, she managed to take away
from the dinner table, a whole sheep’s head, of
which dish she knew her father tobe fond. The
vault in which the Earl lay hidden was full of
bones, and he was surrounded by human skulls.
How strong is the love of life in man’s heart;
he is content. to live with the dead awhile, if
hope of life be held out to him. The Earl
learned by heart the whole of Buchanan’s Psalms,



BERWICKSHIRE. 21

in this dreary lodging, and many portions of
Scripture. Lady Grizzell must have been very
courageous, as well as discreet, for she never
shrank from her midnight walk, although obliged
to perform it alone, or divulged the secret of
her father’s hiding-place, a greater mark still of
a firm, well-disciplined mind. Joanna Baillie, a
poetess of some note, gives a pretty description
‘of Lady Grizzell’s character when young. I
think you would like to read it :—

‘ And well, with ready hand and heart,

Each task of toilsome duty taking ;

Did one dear inmate take her part,

The last asleep, the earliest waking.
Her hands each nightly couch prepared,
And frugal meal on which they fared,
Unfolding spread the servet white,

And decked the board with tankard bright.
Through fretted hose and garment rent, '
Her tiny needle deftly went, \
Till hateful penury, so graced,

Was scarcely in their dwelling traced.
With reverence to the old she clung,

With sweet affection, to the young.

To her was crabbed lesson said ;

To her the sly petition made;

To her was told each petty care;

To’ her was lisped each tardy prayer ;
What time the urchin half undrest,
And half asleep, was put to rest.’”’—



22 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

The next of the border counties is Rox-
BURGHSHIRE, which is bounded on the north
and north-west by Berwick and Selkirkshire,
on the west by Dumfries, on the south by the
Cheviot hills, and on the east by part of North-
umberland.

Kelso, although not the county town, is the
largest in Roxburghshire; it is pleasantly situated
on the river Tweed. . Towering above the town,
are the remains of Kelso Abbey, one of that chain
of abbeys to which I have referred, founded by
King David, in 1128, for the protection of the
border.

Roxburgh was besieged in 1460, by James IT.
It had formerly a strong border castle, which
had for many years been in the possession of
the English; and James, being very anxious to
gain possession of this bulwark, summoned the
full force of his kingdom to accomplish this
great enterprise. The nobles attended in great
numbers, and the siege of Roxburgh commenced.
A battery was formed, of such large clumsy
cannon as were constructed at that time, upon
the north of the Tweed. Those were awkwardly
framed out of bars of iron, fastened together by



ROXBURGHSHIRE. 23

hoops of the same metal, somewhat in the same
manner as casks are made, and far more liable
to accident than our modern cannon, which are
cast in one solid piece. It was one of those ill-
made guns which was the immediate cause of
James’ death. It burst in gomg off, and a
fragment of iron broke his thigh-bone and
killed him on the spot, he having unwisely
stood too near the cannon in order to mark the
effect of the shot. A thorn-tree in the park of
the Duke of Roxburgh still marks the spot
where he died at the early age of twenty-nine.

Jedburgh is a very picturesque village; it
consists of one long street; but the remains of
its fine old abbey are interesting and beautiful.
The Jedburgh people were a few years since,
a very simple set, and so little given to travel,
that it is related of a certain barber, that for
seventy-one years he had never left the town,
for a greater distance than three miles during
his life.

Dryburgh, another of King David’s abbeys,
lies upon a level around which the river Tweed
sweeps. More of the domestic parts of the
abbey, than of the church remain. It is a spot



24 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

full of interest, and here Sir Walter Scott, the
celebrated novelist, is buried.

By far the most striking of the three, how-
ever, is the Abbey of Melrose: I cannot give
you any idea of the extreme beauty of these
ruins. I had heard a great deal of them, and
had seen many views of different parts of the
ruin, but neither drawing nor fancy. equalled
the reality. It is of that style of architecture
called Gothic. There is an oriel window almost
entire, and many of the shapely pillars are
standing. I think that Scott’s description, which
an intelligent girl repeated to me on the spot,
will give you some idea of the extreme delicacy
and beauty of the carving. The sculpture of
two rows of pillars in particular may be com-
pared. to the figuring of richest lace.

Now slow and faint he led the way,

Where cloistered round, the garden lay;

The pillared arches were over their head,

And beneath their feet were the bones of the dead;
Spreading herbs and flowerets bright,

Glistened with the dew of night.

Nor hetb nor floweret glistened there

But was carved in the cloister arches fair ;

The moon on the east oriel shone

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ROXBURGHSHIBE. 25

By foliaged tracery combined ;

Thou wouldst have thought some fairy’s hand

Twixt poplars straight the osier wand

In many a freakish knot had twined;

Then framed a spell when the work was done,
, And changed the willow wreath to stone.

These lines are from Scott’s “ Lay of the Last
Minstrel,” a little poem well worth your reading.
The above refer to a midnight visit paid by a
certain William of Deloraine to Melrose, whither
he had been dispatched by a lady from the
Border to search for a book of magic reputed to
be buried in the tomb of Michael Scott, who
was buried in the Abbey. Michael Scott is not
a fictitious character, but his great discoveries
in chemistry and alchemy brought on him the
suspicion of that ignorant and superstitious age
of being a wizard, and it is probable that he
encouraged the idea.

Sir Walter Scott has used the fact of his
being buried at Melrose as the foundation of
the story in his little ballad.

The knight had orders to go to fair Tweedside
and to inquire for the Monk of St. Mary’s Aisle
at the Abbey, to bring back the treasured volume,
but into which he must by no means look. The



26 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

monk, who had been an old friend of Michael’s,
rather unwillingly led the way to the cloisters,
and sitting down on the tomb of Robert Bruce,
the old man told him of the mighty book which
lay in the magician’s tomb, and pointed out the
spot where he had been buried. . The knight
accomplished his task, carried away the book,
but the monk is reported to have been found
dead in his cell at noontide on the following day.

At the time of the Reformation, and probably
long before, the monks of Melrose bore a very
moderate character, especially as being too fond
of good living and breaking the rules of the
church which enjoined fasting on certain days.
There is an old verse in reference to this which
had only too much truth in it.

“The monks of Melrose made gude kail!
On Fridays when they fasted ;

Nor wanted they good beef and ale, }
As lang as their neighbour’s lasted.’?

It is much to be regretted that this beautiful
ruin has been so defaced. by the intemperate zeal
of Cromwell’s army, who at the time of the
civil wars battered its fine walls from the Gat-

: ? Broth.



DUMFRIES. 27

tonside hills. The village of Melrose is curious.
It is in the form of a triangle, having small
streets leading out of each corner.

Abbotsford, the seat of the late Sir Walter
Scott, is about three miles west of Melrose.
The house, garden, pleasure grounds, and woods,
were the creation of the owner, and many of
the trees were planted by his own hands. His
maxim was, “If you have nothing to do, be aye
(ever) planting a tree, it will be growing when
you are sleeping.”” I must not enter into par-
ticulars of the beauties of Abbotsford. They
would of themselves fill a chapter. J remember
seeing there a very striking picture of Mary
Queen of Scots, taken after her decapitation at
Fotheringay, and said to be an original. The
little study beyond the library where Sir Walter’s
many works were written, contains one interest-
ing evidence of his affectionate disposition. The
old-fashioned bureau at which he always wrote,
belonged to his mother. ;

There is a large tartan manufactory at Gala-
shiels which has much increased of late years, but
within the memory of many was an insignifi-
cant little village with few shops, and possessing



28 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

not a single bookseller in the place. A singular
shopkeeper, known by the name of “Willie a
things,” used to keep in his warehouse, as his
advertisements will show, a strange variety, and
dealt in goods usually divided amongst a dozen
shopkeepers. Red herrings and parasols, yellow
sugar and yellow sand, treacle and linen, cradles
and coffins,?

At Mount Benger the poet ot Hoge resided ; he
is known generally by the title of the Ettrick
Shepherd.

Dumrrizs completes the border line, it
adjoims the county of Roxburgh, and is the
most important of the southern counties. It is
bounded on the south by part of Cumberland
and the Solway Frith, on the north-east by
Roxburgh and Selkirkshire, on the north by
Peebles and Lanark, and on the north-west by
Ayr and Kirkcudbright.

The entrance to Scotland from Carlisle is
certainly not pleasing. The first place you
come to on the border is the disgraceful village
of Gretna, where there have been so many
clandestine marriages. A man of the name of

1 Chambers’ Picture of Scotland.



DUMFRIES. 29

Paisley commenced the trade. Gretna is near
the village of Springfield, and is a dull, dis-
agreeable looking place. _

Moffat is noted for its medicinal springs, and
from its hills flow the Tweed, the Clyde, and
the Annan. The vale of the Esk is noted for
the deeds of the far-famed Johnnie Armstrong.
His strong tower of Gilnockie still stands,
although it is now converted into a cow-house.
Langholm is on the left bank of the river Esk.
It-was at Langholm that Johnnie and his band
of thirty-six men, gomg forth to meet king
James V, on one of his thief-destroying journeys,
met with a disastrous fate, for James instead of
receiving his allegiance, ordered them all out to
execution.

There used to be a curious instrument at
Langholm, called the Branks, which was put on
the head of very talkative ill-tempered wives,
called shrews, and by projecting a sharp spike
into the mouth, subdued the tongue at once.

There is some fine scenery in this county.
Near the village of Moffat is the great natural
curiosity called the Grey Mare’s tail. It is a
cataract formed by a small stream which leaves



30 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

the mountain Lake Loch'Skene. The water
is precipitated over a rock three hundred feet
in height; it falls down a dark precipice with
slight ledges projecting, and the interruption
which the course of the tiny stream receives
produces a curious effect. The mountains are
very wild in these parts, but there are associa-
tions with them still more interesting than the
natural beauty of the spot; associations with
the Covenanters. Now how important does a
knowledge of history become in travelling !
The hills of this part of Scotland would not
attract you particularly if you were ignorant of
the scenes that were enacted amongst them.

Before you can understand the history of the
Covenanters you must be a little acquainted
with the circumstances which led to the con-
duct of those conscientious although enthusiastic
people.

James VI of Scotland and I of England,
as you know, succeeded Queen Elizabeth on
the throne, thus uniting the two kingdoms
which for years had been at frequent and bitter
warfare. On ascending the throne of England,
James found himself at the head of a people



DUMFRIES. 31

who had lost both the power and habit of con-
testing the will of their sovereign. The Tudors
were all but despotic in their rule. At the
arbitrary will of King Henry VIII the Church
of England was disjomed from Rome. After
the death of Henry VI, his sister Mary restored
the Roman Catholic Faith, and Elizabeth at her
accession again declared it Protestant, and all
this without much resistance. Now Scotland
was under different circumstances. The feudal
nobility retained much of their power and many
of their privileges ; but here again I am reminded
that you may not know the meaning of that
word feudal. The connexion of a king as sove-
reign over his princes and great men as vassals
must first be understood. A king or sovereign
prince gave large promises or grants of land to
his dukes, earls, and noblemen, and each of
them possessed nearly as much power within
his own district as the king in the rest of his
dominions; but then the vassal, whether duke,
earl, or lord, was obliged to provide his sovereign
with a certain number of men when he was
engaged in war. In like manner these vassals
of the crown, as they were called, divided the



82 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

lands which they held under the king into estates,
which they bestowed on knights and gentlemen
whom they thought fit to follow them in war,
and attend their courts in peace; for they too
held courts and administered justice each in his
own province and county. This system of hold-
ing lands for the purpose of providing soldiers
for the king in time of war was called the feudal
system, and was general throughout Europe for
many ages.

This system was abolished in England before
it was done away with in Scotland. Henry VI,
a wise and cunning prince, had by his success
at Bosworth attained a secure seat on the throne.
He took advantage of the weak state of the
barons and peers to undermine the power which
the feudal system had given to the lords over
their vassals, and they submitted, feeling, I dare
say, that it had been a stormy sort of rule that
their forefathers had exercised. They now,
therefore, exacted rents from their tenants instead
of service in battle, and became peaceful and
wealthy. At the first appearance this is an im-
provement, but then on the other hand the taxes
which the king raised were enormous. James



DUMFRIES. 33

tried, on his accession, to bring Scotland into the
same submissive state in which he had found
England, and proposed that the Parliament of
each country should appoint commissioners to
consider of the terms on which it might be pos-
sible to unite both under the same constitution.
But, as you may suppose, this did not answer ;
the English demanding that the whole system
of English law should be extended to Scotland,
and Scotland indignantly rejecting the proposal.
So for the time James was obliged to give that
up, but he was determined if possible to make
the form of the Scottish Church as near as
possible like that of England.

You must recollect that the Reformation in
Scotland was effected by different means from
that in England. The new plans of church
government differed no less than the outward
form. It is necessary that you should under-
stand this before you can at all appreciate
the firmness of the Covenanters in resisting the
religion forced upon them by James. To tell
you here the many distinctions between Epis-
copacy and Presbyterianism would occupy too
much space. The Presbyterians acknowledge

D



34 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

no visible head of the church but Jesus Christ
alone. The Episcopalians, whilst they acknow-
ledge Christ alone as their spiritual Head,
recognise the King or Queen as their temporal
head. To an ambitious man like James, there-
fore, their resistance was very provoking, and
without regard to it he elected thirteen bishops,
a step peculiarly offensive to the Presbyterian
party.

There were other points on which James and
the Parliament insisted, and the Presbyterians,
feeling that the great work of the Reformation
was about to be undone by their King, were
much alarmed and aggrieved. To force a reli-
gion on a people with the principles of which
they do not unite, and cannot conscientiously
agree, is certainly an act of injustice, and you
must bear in mind in the history of the Cove-
nanters, that those points which to us may seem
unimportant, were to them great matters, in-
volving great principles. Charles I, who succeeded
his father James, was as a private gentleman an
amiable and virtuous man, but he inherited his
father’s notions of kingly prerogative to the full,
and it was a legacy that proved his ruin. He



DUMFRIES. 35

too resolved to bring the Church of Scotland,
in point of church government and ceremonies,
to the model of the Church of England.

The enforcing the use of the prayer book
brought matters to a crisis, and a species of
engagement, or declaration, was drawn up by
a large proportion of the Scotch; the principal
object of which was the eradication of Prelacy,
and the establishment of Presbytery. This
engagement was called the National Covenant,
and was sworn to by hundreds and thousands of
all ages, who were thence called Covenanters.
Now I do not expect that thus far the account
of the Covenanters has interested you, but it is
necessary that you should understand the matter
at the commencement of the book, as there will
be more than one reference to them in the course
of our notice of different parts of Scotland.

To return to Dumfries. The mountains of
which I spoke to you were the hiding places
of the Covenanters in Charles the Second’s
time, who continued the religious persecutions
of his ancestors. Though very wild and barren,
yet here they remained days, months, nay years,
without shelter; exposed to cold, rai, and the

D2



86 ' «STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

killing night dews. Claverhouse, the inveterate
foe and scourge of the suffermg band, used to
pursue them into their mountain fastnesses, and.
hill sides are shown to this day almost as steep
as a wall, where, mounted on his great black
steed, he would gallop in pursuit of them. The
hill opposite the village of Burkhill is called the
“Watch hill,” on account of the custom that
these wanderers had of placing one of their
number to watch the motions of the soldiers,
whilst the rest were engaged in worship in the
deep.dell behind. On one occasion Claverhouse,
by means of a glass, discerned the watch and
made for the place, but long before he approached
the sentinel had given warning, and the wor-
shippers had dispersed amidst the heather. On
another occasion he surprised them at their
devotions. and four men fell almost in the act of
worship.

You have most likely heard of Burns, the
celebrated Scotch poet. He resided for many
years at the town of Dumfries, and was interred
‘in the same place.



Chapter Third.



7 SELKIRKSHIRE.
Yarrow—Park’s birthplace.

PEEBLESHIRE, OR TWEEDDALE.
Border castles—The Tweed.

LANARKSHIRE.

Glasgow—The Cathedral—Cemetery—College—Museum—The Clyde ;
its falls—Hamilton — Bothwell bridge—More about the Cove-
nanters.

RENFREWSHIRE.
Paisley—Founders of the cotton trade—Curious names of streets—

Elderslie—Birthplace of Wallace—Greenock—Watt.
SELKIRKSHIRE is the adjoining county to Rox-
burgh. Its boundaries are, Peebles on the
north and west, Roxburghshire on the east, and
Dumfries on the south.

Not many centuries ago, it was a royal
hunting forest; it is now for the most part a
desolate looking county. Selkirk, the capital,
stands on the river Ettrick. Near this town a
female was found dead with an infant at her
breast, after the battle of Flodden. She lad



88 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

gone out to meet her husband, but sank on the
way, exhausted. The vale of the river Yarrow
is narrow at the opening, and somewhat woody ;
but the greater part is composed of those
green pastoral: hills, celebrated in the poems of
Wordsworth. .
Not far from the town of Selkirk, at Foul-
shiels, a farm on the banks of the Yarrow, the
well-known traveller, Mungo Park, was born.
Day by day little Mungo, with satchel on his
back, trod the path to the parish school at
Selkirk, and was often seen with book in hand
or thinking deeply whilst other lads were at
play. He did not, however, shun all the bold
adventurous sports of his age, and the greater
the danger, the greater temptation to the lad,
At fifteen years of age he was apprenticed to a
surgeon, at Selkirk, and afterwards removed to
Edinburgh, where he attended the lectures of
the University, When his studies were ended,
he obtained an appointment of assistant-surgeon
to the Worcester, Kast Indiaman, and made his
first voyage to Sumatra, at which time he added
to his stock of knowledge of natural history, and
during his stay on the coasts of the island made



SELKIRKSHIRE. 39

many useful observations and discoveries on
fishes, eight of which had never been previously
described. At the period of his return there
was great interest in the minds of many in-
telligent people on the subject of Africa, and
especially as to the existence and course of the
river mentioned by old geographers as the Niger.
A traveller-who had already been sent out by
“the African Association” for the purpose of
discovering its source, had recently died in
Africa, and men naturally shrank from encoun-
tering the dangers of an untried path.

Park at length offered himself to the Associ-
ation, and in July 1795 we find him at Pisania,
a British factory about 200 miles up the river
Gambia, which you will find marked on the map
of Africa. Here he studied the Mandingo lan-
guage under Dr. Lindley, and collected useful
information for his dangerous undertaking, on
which he embarked on the 2nd of December.

Many wild undisciplined bands beset his path,
negroes and wandering Moors, and at Yarra he
was detained prisoner by a Moorish chief, who
believed him to be a spy, where he remained
from February to July. When he obtained his



40 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

release, he had only his horse, a few articles of
clothing, and a pocket compass which he had
hidden in the sand. Alone and unprotected the
brave Scotchman set forth, and after a journey
of fifteen days arrived at Jolibe. At Kamalia,
500 miles from any European settlement, his
health gave way, and for more than five months
he was dependent on the care and charity of a
strange race, of some of whom, however, there
have been touching instances recorded of sym-
pathy and kindness. His lonely wanderings
occupied nineteen months, and he returned to
England with abundance of adventures to record,
but little of discovery or success. After a few
years passed in his native country, devoted to
close study of astronomy, geography, and the
Arabic language, he once more set forth. This
time under the escort of soldiers provided by the
Association, and merchandize to defray travel-
ling expenses. They left Pisania in May, 1805.
In November, he wrote word that of forty-four
Europeans, who had left the Gambia in health,
five soldiers only remained, having fallen victims
to the rainy seasons of the country. The fate
of Park was never correctly known, but it is



PEEBLESHIRE. 41

believed that he died either by the hands of the
natives, or from an accident on a rapid of that
river, Niger, whose source and history he had
devoted the energies of his life to discover.

PreesiesHire, or Tweeddale, is bounded on
the north by Midlothian, on the south by
Dumfries, on the west by Lanark, and on the
east by Selkirk. The Tweed takes its rise
here and gives to this district the popular
name of Tweeddale. It abounds in trout and
salmon. ,

Peebles, the capital town, is a dull place.
The hilly region of Peebleshire was dreadfully
exposed, in early times, to the unfriendly
visits of marauding Englishmen. To provide
against these, strong castles were built by the
Scottish kings, on the lower part of the Tweed,
and the chain was continued by many great
proprietors of land, towards the head of the
river. These castles are now in ruins, but
there are many remains still to be seen. They
were built in the shape of square towers, of
stone and lime. They consisted usually of
three stories; the lower story, which was
vaulted in order to afford protection to the



42 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

cattle of the ‘owner in time of danger; the
great hall in which the family lived; and the
highest, in which were the bed-rooms, designed
for the safety of the inhabitants. These were,
by common consent, built alternately on each
side of the river, and in a continued view of
each other. A fire, kindled on the top of these
towers, was the well known signal of the
approach of an enemy: the smoke gave notice
by day, and the flame by night. You cannot
travel in Scotland, without bemg constantly
reminded of the correctness of some of. Scott’s
beautiful descriptions; and, when I saw the
ruins of the border castles, these lines, which
I will transcribe for you, came very pleasantly
into my mind ; .
‘ Sweet Teviot, on thy silver tide

The glaring hill-fires blaze no more;

No longer steel-clad warriors ride

Along thy wild and willowed shore.

Where’er thou wind’st by dale or hill,

AN], all is peaceful; all is still

As if thy waves, since Time was born,

Since first they rolled upon the Tweed,

Had only heard the Shepherd’s reed,
Nor started at the bugle horn.’’

We may almost fancy the river murmur has



LANARK. 43

a joyful tone, now that the sound of the war-cry
is heard no more on its banks, and sheep graze
peacefully on green pastures once crimson with
the blood of dying warriors.

Lanark, otherwise called Clydesdale, is a
large and important county. It is bounded ou
the south by Dumfries and part of Ayr; on the
east by Peebles and Edinburgh ; on the north,
by Linlithgow and Dumbarton; and on the
west, by Renfrew and part of Ayr.

The capital of Lanark is Glasgow, a very
important town. It is the first city, in pomt
of population, in Scotland. The principal part
of the city occupies a plaim, on the north-east
side of the Clyde, which has of late years been
made navigable, at high tides, for vessels of great
burden. It has large manufactures of cotton.
T have heard old people speak of the time when
there was only one boat on the river for the
accommodation of travellers, which was drawn
by horses. Glasgow has some handsome streets,
and so many objects of interest, that I scarcely
know which to mention to you.

The cathedral, or high church as it is called,
stands at the upper end of High street, and was



44 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

founded in 1123. It narrowly escaped destruc-
tion at the time of the Reformation, and is, with
the exception of St. Magnus in Kirkwall, Orkney,
the only ancient. gothic cathedral Fee
entire, in all Scotland.

The inner church, and the arched roof of a
vestry supported by a single pillar, are very
beautiful, and the vaulted cemetery beneath the
inner church, is a curious and interesting place.
There is an extensive burial ground near, which
is situated on very high ground.

Then there is the college, with its library,
and the valuable museum, bequeathed to. the
university by the late celebrated Dr. William
Hunter, It consists of a rare library of books
and manuscripts, a fine collection of insects,
corals, and shells, and a cabinet of coins and
medals, besides a collection of Dr. Hunter’s
anatomical preparations. Glasgow is not the
only interesting place in Lanarkshire; indeed
there are few countries so rich in associations,
as Scotland. The difficulty in writing its history,
is to select the most interesting among so many
tempting subjects.

The town of old Lanark; which’ travellers



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CORRA LINN.



LANARK. 45

from the south usually visit is not particularly
striking.

I told you that Lanarkshire is sometimes
called Clydesdale, from its being the vale
formed by the course of the river Clyde. To
see the falls of this river is alone worth a
journey to Scotland, 80, at least you and I may
say, who have never seen those of Niagara.
I must leave it for the pencil to give you a
faint idea of that which it is impossible justly
to describe.

There are three falls made by the Clyde.
Corra Linn—so called from a tradition that
Corra, daughter of an ancient Scottish king,
was drowned in it—is the first of the three.
The river does not descend in an unbroken
sheet of water, but is precipitated eighty-four
feet, when two ledges of rock break it, as you
may see in the little drawing annexed ; but of
the beauty and richness of the foliage, the
grand effect of the sun upon the glittering
spray, and the sound of the cataract, it is
impossible to convey an idea. Boniton, the
second, is also very beautiful. Above the fall
the river is as calm and smooth as a lake,



46 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

when it suddenly throws itself into the abyss
below. The channel is narrow, and the banks
are composed of solid rock singularly and re-
gularly perpendicular. The extreme regularity
of these layers of rock is extraordinary. At
the first view it appears almost like the work
of art, but there is no architect like the
Almighty. The third fall is that of Stonebyres,
which was exhibited to us by a curious half-
cracked old woman, called Janet McDougal.
A guide is needful, for the best place for seeing
the fall is not free from danger, and although
a “daft” guide is not exactly the kind we
should choose to conduct us to the edge of a
precipice, old Janet was harmless and amusing
enough in her way.

Hamilton Palace, the seat of the ‘duke of
Hamilton, stands on a plam between the town
of Hamilton and the river. The pictures at
the palace are worth seeing. There is one by a
great painter named Rubens, which is called
the “Glory of Hamilton.” The subject is
Daniel in the lions’ den. Rubens was born at
Cologne; in Germany, in 1557. He was not
only a fine painter, but a learned man, and



LANARK. 47

understood seven languages. This neighbour-
hood, however, owes its principal interest to a
great conflict which took place between Claver-
house and the Covenanters, at a place called
Drumclog. On one occasion a large body of
country people had collected at Harelaw, near
Loudon Hill, to hold a meeting, which, in con-
sequence of an Act of Parliament forbidding
such assemblies, was illegal. Many came armed,
and had, according to custom, posted a watch
on Loudon Hill, whilst the service was pro-
ceeding. Whilst they worshipped, Grahame of
Claverhouse, to whom I have already referred,
arrived at a village close by, bearing with him
two field preachers, whom he had just captured
near the town of Hamilton; and, hearing of the
large number collected at Loudon Hill, he pushed
forward to that place. Here he was opposed by
a large body in point of numbers but very rudely
armed, although there were fifty horse, and as
many infantry with guns, the principal part of
the little army consisted of men armed with
pikes, scythes, and forks, and women who en-
tered into the enthusiasm of the scene likewise
prepared to offer resistance. As they approached



48 ' STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

singing psalms, according to their custom, Cla-
verhouse ordered a volley of shot to be fired; to
avoid which the Covenanters fell on their faces
and little mischief ensued. They met on a
boggy piece of ground very unfit for the action
of cavalry, and a broad ditch between the parties
seems to have given the advantage to the Cove-
nanters ; for, when Claverhouse ordered his men
to charge, they, being ignorant of the nature of
the soil, plunged into a bog and were thrown
into the greatest disorder. The day was there-
fore in favour of the Covenanters. The famous
‘black steed of Claverhouse was wounded by a
scythe, and was scarcely able to bear him from
the battle-field, and thirty of the defeated party
were slain. As Claverhouse passed the place
where he had left the imprisoned. preachers in
the morning, King, the name of one of them,
called out to him, in derision, to stay and take
the afternoon sermon. . ‘

This victory encouraged the Covenanters to
attempt bolder undertakings, but they were
doomed to suffer defeat more often than triumph.
Their zeal and vehemence could scarcely stand
against the superior military knowledge and



RENFREW. - 49

force of their enemies, and Bothwell Bridge, not
far from Hamilton palace, was the scene of one
of their most frightful defeats, when the Duke
of Monmouth scattered them like a flock of
sheep. The slaughter that took place on this
occasion was, however,-against his orders, and
partly owing to the temper of Claverhouse,
who was determined to avenge his, defeat at
Drumclog. Four hundred were killed and twelve
hundred made prisoners the latter were marched
to Edinburgh and imprisoned in the Greyfriars’
churchyard like cattle in a penfold, while several
ministers were ordered out for execution.

The county of Renrrew is very small. It is
bounded on the west and north-west by the Frith
of Clyde, on the south and south-west by Ayr, and
on the east by part of Dumbarton and Lanark.

The principal town is Paisley, which has very
extensive cotton manufactures. The persons
who commenced these manufactures were ped-
lars, accustomed to travel about the country,,
and the object of every such packman’s ambition
was. ultimately to become a merchant. Many of
them succeeded, and ended their days in comfort
and affluence.. At first Paisley was noted for

E



50. STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

a coarse chequered linen cloth, then for cotton
handkerchiefs; now silk gauze, thread, and
shawls form part of its manufactures. The names
of some of the streets are curious. There is a
Gauze Street, Cambric Street, and Thread Street.
Three miles west of Paisley is Elderslie, the
birth-place of the celebrated William Wallace.
Greenock may be called the Liverpool of
Scotland. It is a very important port, but
that which will be most interesting to you to
remember, connected with it, is the fact of its
being the birth-place of the celebrated James
Watt, who made such great improvements in
the steam engine. Both the grandfather and
uncle of Watt were men of repute as mathe-
matical teachers and surveyors in the west of
Scotland. Watt's father was a merchant in
Greenock, and his son James was born there
in 1736. At avery early age he showed great
skill in mechanics. Even when in after years
he could have employed hundreds to do his
bidding, he loved to work with his own hands.
Watt was a practical man. At eighteen he
went to London to be apprenticed to a mathema-
tical instrument maker, but his health failing,



RENFREW. 51

he was obliged to return in little more than a
year. Shortly after his return, the University
of Glasgow appointed him their mathematical
instrument maker. Robert Simpson, Adam
Smith, and Dr. Black, all celebrated men, were
at that time professors there. In the winter
of 1763, his mind was directed to that subject
which has made his name illustrious all over the
world. He was employed to repair the working
model of a steam engine of Newcomen’s con-
struction, by which he was led to discover that
there was a great waste of steam. in its mode of
working, and. consequently of fuel. By a long
course of experiments he brought to perfection
his invention of the condensing steam engine,
now most generally used in mines, factories,
and steam packets. It would be useless to
describe it more particularly here, as it would
be necessary that you should be more thoroughly
acquainted with the whole construction of that
wonderful machine than it may be supposed you
are. The patience and perseverance manifested
by Watt, are worth notice. He had many
discouragements, and at first few appreciated
the value of his invention. Of the importance





i STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

of it to trade, a child can have no idea; the use
of it in mines alone is immense. In the deep
mines of Cornwall the new engine was first
introduced, and the saving of fuel amounted to
three-fourths of the quantity consumed by the
old-fashioned ones. Independently of this great
attainment in mechanics, Watt was a wonderful
man. He was well informed, and well read,
and his conversation is described as having been
very delightful. He was amiable, unaffected,
and unpretending, disliked all parade and show,
and was an honest, straightforward character.
He died at Heathfield, in Staffordshire, at the
age of eighty-four.





































































































BOTHWELL BRIDGE,

eT a eG iy oF mee eal ae



Chapter Fourth.

FOUR COUNTIES.
AYRSHIRE.
Ailsa Craig.—Ayr the Capital.—Birth-places of Poets.—Burns arid
Montgomery.
KIRKCUDBRIGHT OR GALLOWAY.
Dundrennan Abbey.—Amworth.—Story of Rutherford.

WIGTONSHIRE OR WEST GALLOWAY.
Portpatrick.
HADDINGTONSHIRE.
Preston.—Story of. the Pretender.—Battle of Preston Pans.—Colonel

Gardiner’s Death.—Tranent.—Haddington.—Knox’s Birth-place.—

History of Knox.
AYRSHIRE is one of the largest counties south
of the Forth, it stretches eighty miles in a
crescent shape, and is a very productive county.
It is bounded on the north by Renfrew; on
the east by Lanark and Dumfries; on the
south by Kirkcudbright and Wigton; and on
the west by the Irish Channel.

Ailsa Craig is one of the must striking curi-
osities in Ayrshire; it rises fifteen miles from
the ‘shore, out of the sea, like an inverted top.
On this singular island the Solan goose is found



54 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

in great abundance, and it is an aviary for a
variety of other sea birds, whose screaming is
quite deafening. It is about two miles in
circumference and uninhabited.

Ayr, the capital of Ayrshire, is a well-built.
town, at the mouth of a river of the same
name. A mile and a half from Ayr is the cot-
tage where the poet Burns was born; it consists
but of two rooms, and was the work of his
father’s own hands. Montgomery, another poet,
was born at Irvine, a ‘small sea-port im this
county; also Galt, a celebrated novel-writer,
and the author of an amusing book, called
the “Ayrshire Legatees,” which is a humourous
account of a simple country minister coming
up to London on the event of some property
being left him. J remember there is one droll
account of a quarrel with a hackney coachman.
He had been told that if a coachman charged him
too much he was to take the number of the coach,
and a driver overcharging him he accordingly
proceeded tocut the number off thevehicle, having
thus literally interpreted his friend’s advice.

Kirxcupsricnt is bounded by Ayr and
part of Dumfries on the north; on the-east and



KIRKCUDBRIGHT. 55

south east is part of Dumfries and the Solway
Firth, on the west and south west a portion of
Wigton and Wigton Bay. Kirkcudbright is
the ancient district of Galloway. It is noted
for a breed of horses.. The Galloway horses
are a Spanish race.

At Dundrennan Abbey, in this county, the
unfortunate Mary Stuart spent her last night
in Scotland. She arrived late in the evening,
and was hospitably received by the monks.
The building is greatly dilapidated, but it bears
marks of former splendour. Its walls are now
covered with a grey moss.

Kirkcudbright, the principal town, is a sea-
port.

At Amworth resided Rutherford, the eminent
Presbyterian divine; he lived in the reign of
Charles II. Archbishop Usher, who had heard
of the fame of Rutherford, once went secretly
to Amworth in order to hear him preach
and converse. .He appeared at the Manse
(so the parsonage house, or residence of the
minister, is called in Scotland,) disguised as a
beggar, and asked a night’s lodging. We should
now think a beggar very bold to make such a



56 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

request, but in those times amongst the simple
Scottish people this was not extraordinary.
He was desired to sit down in the kitchen, when
Mrs. Rutherford came, according to custom,.to
catechise their servants. She did not omit
to ask the beggar some questions, and amongst
others, inquired of him how many command-
ments there were. He replied, “eleven;” Mrs.
Rutherford was greatly shocked at his ignorance,
however she gave him a good supper and sent
him to bed in one of the garrets. The Arch-
bishop had a great desire to hear Rutherford
pray, and for some time listened for the sound
of his voice, at his evening devotions, as his
room was just over that of his host. Hearing
no voice, however, he commenced pouring out
his own soul in prayer to God. Rutherford,
now heard him, and at once suspecting the
truth, that the pretended beggar was the great
Archbishop Usher, forthwith proceeded to. the
stranger’s room, when he told him his suspicion.
At Mr. Rutherford’s earnest request the visitor
consented to preach the next day at Amworth
church, but it was, of course, needful to keep
the matter a profound secret, for if it were



WIGTONSHIRE. 57

known that he had done so, great trouble and
disgrace would have ensued to the archbishop.
Disguised, therefore, in a suit of Myr. Ruther-
ford’s clothes, the Bishop went out very early
into the fields, where Mr. Rutherford followed
him, and shortly brought him in to breakfast,
introducing him asa stranger who had promised
to preach for him that day. Mrs. Rutherford
hearing from the servants that the beggar had
left early, was not surprised, and after breakfast
they all went to church. The Archbishop
preached. from John xiii, 34, «A new com-
mandment give I unto you, that ye love one
another,” and observed that this might be called
the eleventh commandment. The minister’s
wife was puzzled. ‘“ Why,” said she to herself,
“that is the very answer the beggar gave me last
night, surély this cannot be he.” In the morn-
ing the Bishop left without being discovered.
Wieronsuire, or West Galloway, consists
principally of two peninsulars jutting out from
the more continental part of Galloway. Luce
Bay divides the promontories. Its boundaries
are Ayr and Kirkcudbright on the north, the
Trish Sea on the west, and on the south, Luce



58 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

Bay. I have very little that is interesting to
tell you of Wigtonshire. Its capital, Wigton,
is a dull town; the principal street of which lies
within a space laid out in shrubberies. The soil
in many parts of Wigtonshire is very productive,
and the wheat grown there is considered of a
superior description. Port Patrick is the nearest
port to Ireland, the Channel in this part being
but twenty-one miles across; steamers are con-
stantly employed between the two countries.

The county of Happineton, or East Lothian,
is bounded on the south by Berwick, on the
north and east by the Frith of Forth, and on
the west by Mid-Lothian.

The story of the Pretender is so associated
with this county, that I will begin my account
of him in this chapter, endeavouring, after I
have explained the circumstances of his landing
in Scotland, to confine myself to those events
of his life which took place in Haddington.
Charles Edward, known by the name of the
Young Pretender, was the grandson of James
If, of England, who was, as you know, com-
-pelled to abdicate the crown, and was succeeded.
by his son-in-law, William, Prince of Orange,



HADDINGTON. 59

and his daughter Mary; who reigned jointly
with William, and after their death by Anne
his youngest daughter. Historians have called
Anne the last Stuart, but George I, who
succeeded her, had no claim to the crown but
as a Stuart also. His mother was the Electress
Sophia of Hanover, the daughter of the Queen
of Bohemia, who was herself the daughter of
James I, of the Stuart line, who reigned in
England. George was a prince in his own
country, and governed Hanover as well as
England. It is not of James the Second’s son,
however, that I propose to write here, but of his
grandson. The Old Pretender from some cause
excited less sympathy and interest than his son.
After fruitless ‘endeavours to obtain the crown,
he retired from the contest, and the Rebellion of
1715 ended, as an historian says, without even
the sad éclat of a defeat. After his return from
Scotland he was.compelled to leave France, and
was obliged to settle in Italy, where his two sons
were born, Prince Charles Edward, known by
the name of the Young Pretender, and Henry
Benedict, who bore the title of Duke of York,
and was promoted to the rank of Cardinal in



60 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

the Roman Catholic Church. Prince Charles
Edward, at this time was, according to the
statements of those who were not so enthusiastic
in his cause as to be blind to his defects, a
young man of pleasant and courteous manners,
personal courage, and a good temper, but his
education had been strangely neglected. Instead
of being instructed in the constitution and rights
of the English nation, he had been trained up in
those absurd, perverse, and antiquated notions
of divine hereditary right,. out of which so many
of his grandfather’s misfortunes had arisen.
He had also been strictly brought up in the
Roman Catholic Faith, and. this was much
against his cordial reception by the greater. part
of the English. The Jacobites, as the adherents
of the Stuarts were called, had long ceased to
think of restoring the Old Pretender, but they
turned their thoughts to his eldest son, who was
deeply anxious to recover the throne of his
ancestors. After many discouragements from
his father, and disappomtments of help from
France, Charles determined to try upon his
own. resources, and set sail on his perilous
expedition with only a few attendants in a man-



HADDINGTON. 61

of-war of sixty guns, to which a frigate was
added. He landed in Scotland after some days,
but received a very disheartening reception.
His reply to Lochiel, who attempted to reason
with him on the madness of his enterprise, and
advised him at once to return home was, “ Sir,
IT am come home, and, moreover, I am come with
my mind made up to reclaim my rights, or to
perish.” He soon gained followers, and collected
a considerable army; but not to pursue him
through this part of his eventful career in
Scotland, I will tell you that he arrived safely
at Edinburgh, and prepared. to take possession of
the palace of Holyrood. As Charles approached
the palace, crowds of persons pressed upon him.
His personal appearance was prepossessing. His
dress was after the Highland fashion. He worea
short tartan coat, anda blue bonnet with a white
rose. He had, in his course from the Highlands,
been joined by many persons of distinction.
The courage of the Highland soldiers was well
known, and hopes were high that victory and
restoration were in store for the exiled Stuarts.
He was proclaimed king at Edinburgh Cross,
by the title of James VIII, and for a while a



62 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

gleam of sunshine and splendour lighted up
Prince Charles’ fortunes.

While these things were going on at
Edinburgh, General Cope, with the govern-
ment force, landed at Dunbar, a seaport at
Haddington. Charles went forth to meet him.
The progress of the Highland regiment was
almost in silence, in order to conceal their
situation from the enemy, who were lying in
wait for them; not a whisper was heard
amongst them. On the 21st of September
they began their march whilst the sun was
three hours below the horizon. It was just
dawn, and the mist was fast retirmg, when the
Highlanders began their attack. A writer on
the subject, says: ‘Morning was already on
the waters of the Forth, and the mist was
rolling in huge masses over the crofts, or
meadows, to the left, but it was not yet
sufficiently clear for the armies to perceive each
other. A darkness lay between.them, which
was soon to disclose the dreadful spectacle of
an armed enemy.”! The Highlanders still kept
a silence broken only by the sound of their

1 Chambers’ History of the Rebellion.



HADDINGTON. 63

feet passing over the stubble. From General
Cope’s army, an occasional drum was heard.

At setting out on the charge, the Highlanders
pulled off their bonnets and uttered a short
prayer. Their mode of fighting, so different to
that of the king’s soldiers, quite puzzled the
enemy. They. advanced with the utmost
speed, fired within musket length of the object,
then throwing down their pieces drew their
swords, and holding a target in their left,
and-a dirk in their right hand, darted on the
enemy through the smoke of their own fire,
and cut them down. The actual conflict,
on this memorable occasion, lasted but four
minutes. The royal army was quite defeated ;
nearly 400 slain, 700 taken prisoners, whilst
but 170 escaped. The celebrated Colonel
Gardiner was present at this battle; he was a
rare example of a conscientious, prayerful, and
religious man, amidst the excitement of a
warrior’s life.. He was at this time very old,
and. so weak, that he had to be. carried, in a
chair, from Haddington to the field. Deserted
by his dragoons, and severely wounded, he put
himself at the head of a small body of foot, and



64 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

only ceased to fight when brought to the ground.
by severe wounds. He died in the Manse, or
Parsonage house, of Tranent. He was buried
in Tranent churchyard, and some years after-
wards, when the ground was disturbed, his head
was found, marked by the stroke of the scythe
that was the cause of his death. The wounded
were on this occasion treated very kindly by the
conquering army. A journalist of the time,
says: ““Whatever notions Low country people
may have of the Highlanders, I can attest that
they gave many proofs of kindness. Many
after the battle ran to Port Seton, for ale and
other liquor, to revive the wounded or dying.
I saw a Highlander, with patient, tender kind-
ness, carrying a poor wounded soldier on. his
back, and leave him in a house with sixpence to
pay his charge”? The wounded men of both
sides were taken to Colonel Gardiner’s house
at Tranent, and a few years ago it was thought
possible to discern the stains of their blood on
the old oak floor. The Highlanders were very
active in despoiling the slain. Every article
of value, according to their notion, was appro-
priated, and in their simplicity they often



HADDINGTON. ; 65

made ludicrous mistakes. “One who got a
watch, exchanged it for some worthless trifle,
remarking that he was glad he had done so, for
it had died that night, because it had stopped ;
another exchanged a horse for a pistol.” Rough
old Highlanders were seen going about with
the fine shirts of English officers, stretched
over the rest of their clothes; whilst boys were
seen strutting about with gold laced cock’d
hats on their heads.. Thus ended the battle
of Preston Pans.! :

The Prince’s conduct appears to have been
both moderate and merciful; he forbade any
outward signs of joy, inasmuch as he said,
blood had been shed and involved so many in
sorrow. The remainder of his history I will
relate in. its proper place, for I have something
more to tell you of Haddington, and we have
heard enough of battles for the present.

The county-town of Haddington is situated
on the south side of the Firth of Forth. In this
town, or in the neighbouring village of. Gifford,
was born the celebrated reformer John Knox.

Some writers have said that Knox’s parents

? Chambers’ History of the Rebellion.
F



66 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

were in poor circumstances. This does not
appear to have been the case. They were able
to give their son a good education, which in
that age was far from a common advantage.
In his youth he was sent to the Haddington
Grammar School, and thence to the University
of St. Andrew’s, at that time the first School
for learning in Scotland. He was ordained a
Priest in the Romish Church at an earlier age
than usual, and taught philosophy likewise in
the University. That you may rightly appre-
ciate the conduct and character of Knox, look
for a few moments at the circumstances of the
times in which he lived. Nothing perhaps has
given so great a prejudice to his actions as igno-
rance of the corruptions which reigned in the
Romish Church at that time. Full half of the
wealth of the nation belonged to the clergy.
Avarice and ambition, and the love of pomp and
show, influenced the men who pretended to teach
the religion of the meek and lowly Jesus. The
lives of the clergy were a scandal to their pro-
fession. Through the superstitions of princes
and. nobles, monasteries had multiplied greatly.
Dr. Mc Crie, in his life of Knox, says, “The



HADDINGTON. 67

kingdom swarmed with ignorant, idle, luxurious
monks, who like locusts devoured the fruits of
the earth. Friars, white, black, grey,” &c.
Then the clergy were shamefully ignorant.
Even bishops declared, and that without a blush,
that they never read any part of the Bible but
that which they met with im their missals or
Prayer Books. People were truly perishing for
lack of knowledge, for to that book which was
able te make them wise unto salvation, they had.
no access. It was locked up from them, and the
use of it in their own language was forbidden
under the heaviest penalties. The services were
mumbled in the Latin tongue, which many of
the priests did not understand, and some few
could scarcely read; and “scarce anything
remained of Christianity in Scotland, but its
name.” Many mediators were made to share
the honour of procuring the divine favour with
the “One Mediator between God and man,’
and more prayers were offered to the Virgin
Mary, than to Him who “ever liveth to make
intercession for us.” Men were taught to con-
fess to the Priests, to go on pilgrimage’ to the
shrine of some saint, to eat no flesh on Friday,
F2



68 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

to pay tithes and other church dues, and then
they were told they were safe. The sermons
were usually mere tales of the wonderful holi-
ness of a founder of some religious order, his
miracles, his watchings, fastings, combats with
the devil; but of the truths of the Bible, and
the glorious gospel of the blessed God, not a
word. The dying beds of rich men were visited
indeed, but for what purpose? was it to whisper
words of hope and comfort, or to point to Christ
as the Way, the Truth, and the Life? No—but
avaricious priests were ever hovering about the
dying man, to extort legacies for themselves or
the church. Nosooner had a poor husbandman
breathed his last, than the vicar came and
carried off the “corpse present ;” this consisted
of the best cow belongmg to the deceased, and
the uppermost covering of his bed, or upper
clothes. The service of God was neglected,
churches deserted, and places of worship served
only for houses of traffic, resorts for pastime, or
sanctuaries for malefactors. Such was popery
in Scotland.

The doctrines of the Reformation had made
some progress however, in the country, before



HADDINGTON. 69

Knox embraced them. As early as 1526, before
Henry the Eighth’s quarrel with the Pope, which
doubtless brought about the Reformation in
England, a youth of the name of Patrick
Hamilton, made known the glad tidings of the
gospel to his country-men. He was of a noble
family, and went over to Wittemberg to confer
with Luther; he came back after serious study,
of the Scriptures, and in 1528 was cruelly put to
death, at St. Andrew’s, by Archbishop Beatoun.
A reformer, whose name was George Wishart,
was very useful to Knox, in instructing him
in the great doctrines of the Bible: he however
suffered martyrdom, leaving Knox; almost alone,
to follow in his steps.

Cardinal Beatoun, the great persecutor of
the reformers, was put to death by a small but
determined band of men, soon after Wishart’s
martyrdom; and Knox has been accused of
being privy to the death of the cardinal. It is
impossible to justify Knox, if such were the
case, and his vindication of the act cannot be
denied. His sentiments were now so fully
known that his life was in great danger, and
he was obliged to take refuge in the castle



70 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

of St. Andrew, then held by the Protestants.
Here he began his ministry. He was shortly
after sent to France, and at the instigation of
the Pope was. kept close prisoner there, put in
chains, and treated with great severity. In 1549,
when Edward the Sixth came to the throne, he
was liberated, and returned to Scotland.

He was appointed to preach at Berwick, and
was very useful there. He resided in England
for some time, and was appointed one of King
Edward’s chaplains, but he did not agree with
the principles of the English Church nor with
the use of the common Prayer Book. In 1556
he went to Geneva, in Switzerland, to be Pastor
over an English Church there, and greatly en-
joyed Calvin’s friendship. At this’ time he
assisted several exiles from England, in preparing
a translation of the Bible. This is commonly
called the Geneva Bible.

In 1557 Knox received letters from several,
good men in Scotland, entreating him to return.
Queen Mary’s cruel persecution of the Protest-
ants, was the cause of a singular production of
the Reformer. Its title was, “The first blast
of the trumpet against the monstrous Regiment



HADDINGTON. 71

of Women,” i. e., regimén or government; in
which he freely attacked the practice of permit-
ting females to govern nations. In Elizabeth’s
reign he wrote an awkward apology, but it
is very likely that Cecil, her secretary, never
presented it to her, for he was friendly to the
Scotch Congregation, and knew that Knox’s
uncourtly style was not, likely to please his
royal mistress. Queen Mary, soon after her
arrival from France, had an interview with
Knox. Mary seems to have expected to awe
the bold man into submission by her authority,
but she little knew Knox. She accused him of
writing a book against her authority, and many
other charges. To these Knox replied that if
to teach the truth of God in sincerity, and to ex-
hort people to worship God according to his word,
were to excite subjects to rebel, he was guilty.
The conversation between him and the young
queen is extremely interesting, and so instructive
that I cannot resist copying you a portion of it.

After a long argument, Mary said, “Well, I
perceive that my subjects shall obey you and
not me: and will do what they please, not what
T command.”



72 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

“God forbid, madam,” replied Knox, “my
travail and desire is that princes and subjects
may obey God. And think not, madam, that
wrong is done to you, that you are required to
be subject to God. He craves of kings that
they be as foster fathers, and queens as nursing
mothers to his people.”

“But you are not the church that I will
nourish,” said the wilful queen, “TI will defend
the church of Rome, for it is, I think, the true
church of God.”

“Your will, madam, is no reason, neither
doth your thought make the Roman harlot the
spouse of Jesus Christ.”

He also warmly opposed Mary’s marriage
with a Papist; and in his interview with her,
his free uncourtly language so offended her
that she wept bitterly. His remarks on these
occasions brought him into sad disgrace, and he
was summoned to take his trial. When the
queen had taken her seat at the council, and
perceived Knox at the foot of the table, she
burst into a loud fit of laughter. “That man,”
she said, “had made her weep and shed never a
tear himself; she would now see if she could



LINLITHGOW. 73

make him weep.’ He was, however, to. the
queen’s bitter disappointment, not only un-
moved, but finally acquitted. He died in the
67th year of his age, worn out with anxieties
and Jabours. From the time that he embraced
the Reformed Religion, he enjoyed little rest.
For many years an outlaw and an exile, and
constantly exposed to danger, it must to him
have been a glorious exchange, when he fell
asleep in Jesus.

His character has been so differently judged,
that it is difficult to give a correct sketch of it.
Many of his faults may be traced to his natural
temperament, and to the character of the age
and country in which he lived. His passions
were strong—he was an earnest man in every
thing, and knew neither disguise nor affectation.
His language was often coarse and intemperate,
and some of his actions seem to have sadly
lacked the spirit of Christian meekness. McCrie
says, at the close of his memoir, “In contem-
plating such a character as that of Knox, it is
not the man so much as the reformer that ought
to engage our attention.”

The wisdom of God in raising up persons
endued with qualities suited to the work



74 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

allotted to them, should engage our particular
admiration. It is easy for us in the present
day to censure the great movers in the grand
scheme of reforming a corrupt church, but we
may nevertheless take some useful lessons from
the manly, uncompromising Luther, and even
from the stern and somewhat coarse Knox,
in the stedfastness with which they followed
their motto—to “ hearken unto God rather than
to men.” They did not consider their fellow-
creatures’ opinions, they looked to no worldly
gain, to no rich preferment, to no future wealth
nor living ; but, “‘ what says the word of God ?”
was the question which ever and anon they put
when combatting with the obstinate superstitions
of the Romish church. Study the character of
such men as Knox now. It is a time that’ calls
upon the young to do this; and remember that
which men and children are too apt to forget—
that there is but one authority on earth for any
religious opmion whatever, the Holy Bible, the
sure word of God. We will now close our long
chapter on this interesting county, but I hope
you will not regret the space I have given to so
important a subject as that of the Reformation
in Scotland.



Chapter Hitth.

/ LINLITHGOW.
The Palace—James [V—The apparition explained—Mary’s birth-placo
—Queen’s ferry.
EDINBURGH OR MIDLOTHIAN.

The Old Town--The Castle—Description of the old-fashioned inhabitant
—Greyfriars Church—Signing of the Covenant—The Covenanters—
Holyrood House, story of Mary—Dalkeith—Roslin—Hawthornden.

Of all the palaces so fair,

Built for the royal dwelling ;

In Scotland fair, beyond compare, |

Linlithgow is excelling.
Tus next county that we will consider is that of
Linuirugow. Its boundaries are the Frith of
Forth on the east, Stirlmgshire on the north,
Peebles and Lanark on the south, which last
county also bounds it on the west.

Linlithgow, the capital, lies in a hollow along
the borders of a lake, surrounded by hills. . The
village consists of a long narrow street, but the
principal object of terest is the fine old palace.
There are many interesting associations with



76 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

this place. The exterior is rather rough, and it
was evidently constructed in troublous times
with a view to defence. A few windows above
and as many slits below are the only apertures
that open to the outside'of the building. The
architecture of the interior court is the best.

No part of the ruins is roofed. The walls
are all that remain of this once noble palace.
Edward the First spent a whole winter at Lin-
lithgow, during the wars which succeeded his
invasion of Scotland.

You read in a former chapter of the disastrous
battle of Flodden. At the church in Linlith-
gow palace, James IV saw the apparition of
which the superstitious and ignorant have made
many strange tales, but the facts are, I believe,
these :—

Queen Margaret, his wife, who was sister of
Henry VIII, was at that time passing a few
days with James at this palace. The day before
the battle when the king was attending vespers,
as the evening service was called, and praying
for success on his intended expedition, there
“came in a man clad in a blue gown or blowse,
belted about him with a roll of white’ linen.



EDINBURGH. 77

His head was bare, bald at the top, with yellow
locks hanging on each side, and his age about
fifty. He came fast forward among the lords
crying and speering especially for the king,
saying he wanted to.speak to him.” At last
the man reached the desk where King James
was at prayer; he made no reverence to him, but
leaned on him gruffling (or bending down to the
desk) and spoke thus. “ Sir king, my mother
hath sent me to thee, charging thee not to go
where thou hast purposed, which if thou do
thou shalt not fare well, nor none that is with
thee.” : ;
These words spoken, the messenger escaped
from among the assembly, and so suddenly dis-
appeared-that he ‘seemed to vanish miraculously.
There is no doubt that those who wished to
dissuade James from the battle tried to work
on his superstitious mind by this means, and
therefore dressed up a man to represent St.
John, called the adopted son of the Virgin
Mary. ‘
The Roman Catholics believed in the pos-
sibility of the souls of departed saints and
apostles appearing on earth, and many impos-



78 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

tures of which you may read in history are of
this kind. Nothing, however, could dissuade
James, and the result you have already heard.

James V, the son of this king, and father of
Mary Stuart, was scarcely less unfortunate.
He died of grief at the loss of a large army, and
when news was brought him of her birth, gave
a mournful reply. He was scarcely thirty-one
years old, and survived his child’s birth but a
few days. Her troubles ‘began very early, and
in this old ruined palace did she first see the
light. The supposed room is still shewn, and
there is something very affecting in visiting the
birthplace of one whose life from the cradle to
the grave was a constant scene of disquietude
and sorrow.

Henry VIII of England was very anxious to
get possession of this infant Queen, and eagerly
desired a marriage with her to his only son,
afterwards Edward VI, but the Scotch were a
little suspicious of King Henry’s motives and
declined the honour. Mary, when very young;
was accordingly sent to France, with a view to
her education'and subsequent union with the
young heir of that kingdom, whilst Mary of



LINLITHGOW. 79

Guise, her mother, an ambitious woman and a
bigoted Catholic, was appointed Queen Regent,
and she and the persecuting Cardinal Beatoun,
who, as I told you, was the murderer of Hamil-
ton and Wishart, ruled the kingdom much as
they pleased during Mary’s minority. Of her
marriage and early widowhood, it is no part of
the present pages to treat; we will talk more
of Mary bye and bye, when we come to any
place rendered memorable by her residence or
her misfortunes. __ “

The Parliament ‘hall is a long noble room,
but very ruinous. The kitchens are spacious,
and on the side of one of them is a large oven
with seats all round it,

A great part of Linlithgow Palace was
destroyed in 1746, when the royal army was
proceeding to meet the Pretender, and lay on
straw in thesé princely halls. The town of
Queens-ferry, on the Frith of Forth, is a small
seaport, and derives its name from Margaret, wife
of Malcolm ITI, often crossing over that passage
to Dunfermline, where there was a palace.

We will now look at Epinpuren or Mip-
Loratan, which contains the capital of Scotland.



80 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

The county of Edinpurgh is bounded on the
north by the Frith of Forth, on the north-east
‘and east by Haddington and Berwickshire, on
the south by Lanarkshire, Peebles, and Selkirk-
shire, and on the west by Linlithgow.

Edinburgh, the capital, is a most interesting
town. It was at the beginning of George ITI’s
reign an inconvenient, ill-built, and old-fashioned
place, of about 70,000 inhabitants. It is now a
kind of double city, first there is the picturesque
old town, occupied now by the poorer classes,
and secondly, there is the beautiful modern town,
inhabited by the upper classes. Many a poor
family now dwells in a fine house in the old
town, once the residence of some grand. person,
and many a fine oak-panclled room or carved
ceiling shelters poverty and misery where once
there were riches and comfort.

The city is built on three ridges running east
and west. The central ridge is ended by a
rocky precipice on which is the castle, a fine
old building. The rock on, which it stands
is two hundred feet in height, and many
interesting events have occurred within the
walls of this castle. Here Queen Mary gave



EDINBURGH. 81

birth to her only son, afterwards James I of
England. /

Across the valley which separates the old
from the new town, a bridge was erected, and
further west, across the same valley, a mound
of earth, chiefly formed of the rubbish removed
in digging the foundations of the newly-erected
houses, was begun in 1783. A third and nearer
bridge connects the western part of the new town
with the southern district. Before these bridges
were built, the only communication to the south
and north was by those narrow, steep lanes,
called closes and wynds, which descend from
both sides of the high street. The meaning of
close, is a passage in a town for persons on
foot; wynds are passages for carriages. Some
of these curious narrow little streets are com-
posed of immensely high houses, and are so
narrow that persons may shake hands with their
opposite neighbours.

It is really a treat to walk about this anti-
quated part of the town, and to recal the habits
of the simple people who once lived there.
Ladies used to have their tea drinkings at six,
and were lighted to their friend’s house by a girl

G



82 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

bearing a lantern. Gas was unknown in the old
times at Edinburgh, but if the night were very
dark a sedan-chair was ordered, a kind of carriage
carried by men. The dresses of the ladies in the
last century were very odd. An old gentleman
has been heard to describe two hooped ladies
moving up and down the Lawn market on a
summer’s evening, whose figures took up the
whole path. In the narrow lanes they had often
to tilt their hoops up and carry them under their
arms, Stays were made so stiff and long that
they touched the chair both before and behind
when the lady sat down, and she had to hold fast
by the bed post whilst the maid laced her. There
is a book called “Traditions of Edinburgh,” by
Mr. Robert Chambers, in which you may read
many amusing anecdotes. I will copy you a
curious advertisement of a school for young
ladies, which that book contains, and which was
extracted from an old Edinburgh Gazette, of
the year 1763. “Wax work of all sorts taught
by a gentlewoman from London ; filigree work,
japan work on amber or glass; gum work ;
pastry of all sorts; boning a fowl without cutting
the back: butter work; preserving pickles ;



EDINBURGH. - 88

writing and arithmetic, music and dancing,”
with many more accomplishments too tedious to
mention. In the College Wynd, in Edinburgh,
Sir Walter Scott was born. In the Netherbow,
in the old town, is the residence or manse of the
celebrated Reformer Knox, and perched in a
corner above the door is a curious little effigy of
him preaching in a stone pulpit. Grayfriars’
Church is a very interesting part of the old town,
it lies near the Grass Market, and. here are the
remains of many celebrated men—Robertson,
the historian; Ramsay, who was induced by
his friend Fenelon, archbishop of Cambray, to
change his deistical opinions, and who afterwards
educated the children of the pretender, and
many others. But this churchyard will ever be
a memorable place, as the scene of the signing
of the covenant. The document was handed
outafter a sermon from one of their celebrated.
preachers, and multitudes signed on the flat
monumental stones, amidst prayers and tears,
some even writing with their blood.

At the south-west angle of the churchyard i is
a gateway leading to an inclosure where several
hundred of these faithful covenanters were

a2



84 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

imprisoned after the Battle of Bothwell Bridge,
which I mentioned to you in a former chapter.
The cruelty these poor creatures endured seems
incredible. They were allowed scarcely any-.
thing to lie upon or to cover them, their food
was but four ounces of bread daily, and they
were guarded day and night. If any person
arose from the ground at night he was shot at.
Some gained their liberty by signing a bond
never to take up arms against the King, but
four hundred refusing were kept five months
in this frightful state, only being permitted
shingle huts at the approach of winter, which
was boasted of as a great mercy. A remnant,
about two hundred and fifty-seven in number,
were afterwards sent to Barbadoes, but the
vessel was wrecked and only forty-nine came on
shore alive. :

The old Tolbooth or prison of Edinburgh was
burnt in the time of George IT, during some
riots known by the name of the Porteous riots.
It was near St. Giles’ church. There used to
be a great many booths or shops around the
church, but the council ordered that none but
booksellers’, watchmakers’, and jewellers’ shops



Full Text

ELEGANT PRESENTS
For. Poungy People,
BY MRS. THOMAS GELDART.
~~ EEE |
Gmilie the Peacemaker,
Third Edition. 18mo. cloth, elegant. Is. 6d.

Teuth is Goerpthing.

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With many Illustrations. - Foolscap 8vo. cloth,
elegant. Price 2s. 6d.

Second Edition. Foolscap 8vo. cloth, elegant. |
Price 2s. 6d.



|
| Stories of Srotland.
|

The Baldwin Library
| University
|RmB vv
; Florida


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KNOX’S HOUSE AT EDINBURGH.


STORIES OF SCOTLAND

And its Adjacent Islinds.

MRS. THOMAS GELDART,

AUTHOR OF ‘‘ TRUTH IS EVERYTHING 3”? “ RMILIE THE PEACEMAKER 3”?
“STORIES OF ENGLAND AND HER FORTY COUNTIES ;”?
: ‘STORIES OF IRELAND ;”? .
&e., &e.

Fourth Thousand.

. LONDON:
ARTHUR HALL, VIRTUE, & CO.
NORWICH: J. FLETCHER.

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

Inrropuctory REMARKS—THE Earty Kines

CHAPTER II.

Taree Borper CountTizs.—BERWICKSHIRE—
RoxBURGHSHIRE—DUMFRIESSHIRE ..
, :

CHAPTER III.

SELKIRKSHIRE—PEEBLESHIRE, OR TWEEDDALE
—LAnarksHirE—RENFREWSHIRE

CHAPTER IV.

AYRSHIRE—KIRKCUDBRIGHT, OR GALLOWAY
—WIGTONSHIRE, OR WxST GAaLLoway—
HADDINGTONSHIRE.. 2c ee ee ee oe

4

CHAPTER V.

LINLITHGOW—EDINBURGH, OR Min-LoTHIAN

CHAPTER VI.

FIFesHiInE—KINROSS .. «soe ee

PAGE

13

37

53

75

91
lv CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VII.

CLACKMANNAN—STIRLINGSHIRE—DUMBARTON
—ARGYLESHIRE 6. os ‘ee oe oe oe

CHAPTER VIII.

PERTHSHIRE 4. ce oe ce ee ee ee
CHAPTER IX. “4
Forrar-- KincaRDINE—ABERDEEN— BANFF—
ELGIN «. 60 +e ee oe we we
CHAPTER X.

NAIRNSHIRE—-CROMARTY—INVERNESS «- «oe

CHAPTER XI.

Ross—SUTHERLAND--CAITHNESS .- «ee

CHAPTER XII.

HrpripEs—MuLL—BUTESHIRE .. 2... ee

CHAPTER XIII.

CONCLUDING REMARKS .. .. «+ «se ee oe

PAGE

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STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

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Chapter First.

INTRODUCTORY REMARKS—THE EARLY KINGS, &e.

Scorranp is the northern division of the cele-
brated island of Great Britain. If you look at
it on a map, you will be struck with its rugged
appearance. Its coast is jagged and irregular,
and its interior for the most part covered with
mountains and watered with lakes. Separated
from England by the Cheviot Hills, which ex-
tend almost from sea to sea, with a breadth of
from forty to sixty miles, it would seem as though
nature herself had determined the boundaries of
each country; but man willed it otherwise, and
from very early times these two neighbours,
isolated from other parts of the world by large

and stormy seas, began to quarrel and fight like
20 B
2 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

bitter enemies. Wars—cruel, bloody, desolating
wars—lasted at short intervals for many years ;
and it is very likely that this quarrelsome spirit
was encouraged .by those ambitious, battle-
loving people, the Romans.

The Romans, you know, had it in contempla-
tion to conquer the whole world, and to make
their own. city of Rome the head of all the
nations on the face of the earth. They suc-
ceeded better in the flat parts of Britain than
in the hilly countries; and, although they pos-
sessed themselves of England and a part of the
south of Scotland, they could not make their
way into those great northern mountains, where
the hardy mountaineers were prepared to resist
them steadily, and where the rough fare of a
barbarous country was distasteful enough to the
more civilized and luxurious Roman soldier; so
they retreated.

These wild people, however, having been once
unsettled, began to come down from their
mountain fastnesses, and invade that part of
the land which had already been conquered by
the Romans. The people of the northern part
of Scotland were not one nation; there were
INTRODUCTORY REMARKS. 3

some called Scots and others Picts. The earliest
authentic information which we possess of the
Scots is that they were a people inhabiting
Ireland, which island they appear, in the 5th
century, to have divided with the Hiberni, the
previous inhabitants, over whom they gradually
acquired so decided a superiority as to give their
name to the country exclusively called Scotia
from the 5th to the 10th century. In the
beginning of the 6th century, a colony of this
people crossed over from the north of Ireland
to North Britain and settled in the county now
called Argyle. There have been many different
opinions however as to the origin both of the
Scots and Picts, the latter seeming to be a term
commonly used by Roman writers to describe
painted men rather than any distinct race; but
the discussion of this matter would not be inter-
esting to you. Quarrelsome as they were with
one another, the Picts and Scots made common
cause against the people who had attacked them ;
and their inroads were rather alarming to the
new settlers. The Romans therefore built a very
long wall between one side of the island ‘and
the other, made towers on the wall, and filled
B2
4 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

camps with soldiers in various places around ; so
that at the least alarm the men might hasten to
defend any part of the wall which was attacked.
This first Roman wall you may see marked on
the map; it was built between the two friths
of Clyde and Forth, just where the island of
Britain is at the narrowest. Some parts of it
still remain, but the work was quite a failure.
The Barbarians,* as the Romans called the Picts
and Scots, were not to be kept away by a wall,
so the Romans resolved to give up a portion of
the country in hopes of keeping them quiet;
and therefore built a new wall stronger than
before, about sixty miles further back. The
Barbarians made very persevering attempts to
get over this wall, but in vain: and in the midst
of the contest the Roman soldiers were wanted
in Rome, for civil war had broken out there,
and the Emperor sent orders for them all to
come and help to fight in their own country.

So leaving the Britons and Scots with the
fighting mania upon them, they forsook them
and returned, and then, indeed, the Barbarians

* Barbarians was a general name given by the Romans to
the inhabitants of most countries in central Europe.
THE EARLY KINGS. 5

rushed in like a flood on the poor Britons, who,
terribly alarmed, sent for help to Germany, and
these people, called Saxons, came over and, being
a very warlike nation, were glad to assist the
Britons. ‘

The Saxons, however, expected payment for
their trouble, and prepared to take advantage of
the condition of distress in which they found
the Britons, by helping themselves to the best of
everything they saw, taking possession of the
country, and using the inhabitants as slaves and
servants. Many of the Britons fled into Wales,
which country they defended for a long time,
and lived under their own government and laws;
until the English got possession of that also.
Scotland, however, was not so easy a conquest,
as England found to her cost, and still remained
free.

The history of the early Scottish kings is
deeply interesting. There was old king Duncan
in the very early times, his sons Malcolm and
Donaldbane, and his famous relative Macbeth,
in whose story Shakespeare the poet has mixéd
up truth and. fiction, till the former is hard to
come at. JI will tell you the tale of Macbeth
6 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

and the witches, as it is generally believed, when
we come to the proper place; but these events
occurred in the reign of our Saxon king, called
Edward the Confessor, who, in assisting the
Scottish king to recover possession of the throne,
acted more generously than his successors, and
never thought of paying himself for his help out
of the Scotch kingdom as his predecessors did.

Then came the Norman conquest, which,
although it did. not involve Scotland, had an
indirect effect on the. country.

Many Saxons who were driven from England
by William’s cruelty and oppression took re-
fuge in Scotland, and this was one means of
greatly civilising the southern part of the land.
Edgar Atheling, a relation of the amiable
Edward the Confessor, accompanied the exiles,
and Malcolm Cammore, who had received much
kindness i in former times from Edward, remem-
bering ‘that kindness, married the Princess
Margaret, and made her Queen of Scotland.
Malcolm tried to seat Edgar on the English
throne, but in vain; William and his Normans
were not to be vanquished. After Malcolm;
came three kings in succession, who made little
THE EARLY KINGS. © 7

figure in Scottish history; and then Malcolm’s
sons, Edgar, Alexander, and David.

David made war against England, and in his
reign was fought the noted battle of the Standard.
He it was that founded the abbeys, to which you
will hear frequent reference. That at Holyrood,
in Edinburgh; Melrose, in Roxburghshire ;
Dryburgh, in Berwickshire, and others. He
appears according to his knowledge to have been
a religious man, and was called by fhe Roman
Catholics, Saint David.

James I of England and VI of. Scotland,
thought his predecessor rather too generous to
the church, for he once said of him that.“ Saint
David had proved a sore saint to the crown.”
One reason which probably had weight with
David was that out of veneration to religion,
church lands were frequently spared, when other
parts of the country were laid waste and plunder-
ed. David, therefore, considered perhaps that by
putting land under the protection of the church,
he had done his best to secure them against
devastation, and most of his monasteries were
founded in those parts of the country peculiarly
exposed to danger from the enemy’s attacks.
8 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

At.the time of Edward I, of England, Scot-
land was reduced almost to the condition of a
conquered country. The Lord High Justice
Ormesby, called all men to account who refused
an oath of allegiance to King Edward. Such
persons were summoned to the courts of justice,
fined, deprived of their estates, and otherwise
severely punished. Scotland was therefore in
great distress, and the inhabitants determined
to rise against the English or southern men, as
they called them, to recover the liberty and
independence of their country. Their leader
was the celebrated William Wallace, whose name
is still mentioned with reverence and affection
in Scotland. Some particulars of the story of
Wallace and Bruce you will read in the proper
place, for it is not my design to give you a
regular history of the kings in succession. Bruce
succeeded in his efforts to free his country from
much tyranny and oppression, but in his suc-
cessor’s time, the warlike Edward III, war was
again declared against Scotland. Robert Bruce,
one of the greatest of the Scottish kings, being
dead, the kingdom descended to his son David,
who was but four years old when his father died.
THE EARLY KINGS. 9

There was, therefore, a Regent appointed,
Randolph, Earl of Murray; that is to say, a
person who exercised the authority of king for
a time, until the young king was of an age to
reign. Randolph was a just but very severe
ruler, he appears to have taken great pleasure
in putting criminals to death; there was no
mercy with his judgment. He once sent orders
to the Highlands to have certain thieves and
robbers executed, and his officer caused their
heads to be hung round the walls of the castle
to the number of fifty.. When Randolph came
down the lake in a barge and saw the castle of
Ellangowan, where the execution had taken
place, adorned with their bloody heads, he said
that he loved better to look on them than on a
garland of roses.

Edward Baliol, the son of .a certain John
Baliol, whom Edward I had formerly created
king, and afterwards dethroned, came over from
France, where he had been living since his
father’s dethronement, and laid claim to the
crown. Edward III took up his cause, with a
view, no doubt, to secure Scotland for himself,
and the country was reducéd to a sad state by
10 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

repeated wars. Hdward was busily engaged too
at this time against the French king, and this
rather weakened his force in Scotland, or it is
possible he might have completed the conquest.
Whilst he was.absent on one of his French
expeditions, the battle of Nevill’s Cross. was
fought near Durham, when David II was taken
prisoner and led in triumph through the streets.
of London.

We are coming to the end of the Scottish
kings. After David Bruce’s death the crown
was claimed by the Stuarts, a smgularly unfor-
tunate family. Robert Stuart, who had married
a daughter of David Bruce, was the first of the
line of Stuart kings. James I was assassinated ;
James IT was killed by a cannon, which burst at
the siege of Roxborough; James III fell in the
battle field, by the hands of his own subjects;
James IV also fell at the battle of Flodden Field,
fought against the English; James V, after a
great defeat in the time of Henry VITI, died it
isvsaid of grief. The fate of his daughter Mary,
Queen of Scots, is well known. After the union,
Charles I, king of Scotland and England, was
beheaded. Charles II wandered many years as
ITS PRODUCTIONS. li

an exile. James II was obliged to resign the
crown ; and his son and grandson, known by the
names of the Pretenders, vainly trying to recover
the kingdom, were proclaimed traitors, and had
a price of £4000 set upon their heads.

Thus we have glanced at the history of
Scotland, which will enable you, I hope, slight
as is the sketch, to understand the allusions
which may be made to the different kings in
the course of this little volume. And now let
us look for a moment at the country as a whole.
Those deep indentations made by the sea into
the land are, in the language of the country,
called friths or firths, such as the frith of Forth,
the friths of Clyde, &c., giving Scotland the
irregular outline, which you see on the map.
The lakes are called Lochs; thus you will hear
of Loch Lomond, Loch Katrine. The surface of
the country is extremely unequal and varied ; it
is divided into the Highlands and Lowlands.
The Grampians, a long chain of hills, dividing
the two districts.

The climate of Scotland, Sina with that
of England, is wet and cold, and corn, fruit, and
vegetables, are usually much more forward with
12 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

us than with our neighbours. The productions
are numerous and valuable.

There is a great quantity of coal, iron is
found very generally, as well as lead and marble
in the northern counties, plumbago in Dumfries,
one of the southern, and slate in Argyleshire
and Perthshire, which are more northerly.

The ancient name of this interesting country
was Caledonia, and its inhabitants probably
Celts, that migratory people who came from
the neighbourhood of the Euxine and Caspian
seas. We will now proceed to notice each county
separately, and see if we can accomplish the task
of learning the name and peculiarity of every
one of the thirty-three counties.


Chapter Second.

THREE BORDER COUNTIES,
BERWICKSHIRE.

Flodden—-James the Fourth’s death—Polworth and Lady Grizzell
Baillie.
ROXBURGHSHIRE.

King David’s Abbeys—Kelso—Siege of Roxburgh—Bursting of the Can-
non—Death of James—Jedburgh—Its Abbey—Dryburgh—Scott’s
burial place—Melrose—Sculpture—Michael Scott’s Tomb—Character
of the Monks—Abbotsford—Galashiel’s Convenient Shop.

DUMFRIESSHIRE.

Gretna—Johnny Armstrotig—Cure for great Talkers—Gray Mare’s Tail
Mountain Seenery—Stories of the Covenanters— Feudal System—
Watch Hill—Dumfries—Burns.

Tre divisions of Scotland are thirty-three. It
has eleven counties to the north, nine in the
middle, and thirteen in the south. We will first
try and learn the names of those which are
usually called the Border Counties. You must
look at the map and see which these counties
are, Do not merely take my account of them,
see for yourself. No book on geography can
stand in the place of a map. It is there that
you see the exact position and relation of one
14 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

country to another. Whilst its very form may
be helpful to you in recollecting its locality and
name.

We will begin with Berwicxsuirne. This
county you see has a small portion of North-
umberland to the south-east : the German Ocean
to the east;. Haddington to the north; and a
part of Edinburgh and Roxburghshire to the
west and south.

Berwick, usually called Berwick upon Tweed,
is unlike every other town in Britam. It was
fortified by King Charles I in 1639, for the
purpose of overawing the Covenanters, part of
whose history I hope to give you in another
place. It is said that Berwickshire people are
unable to sound the letter R. This defect,
which is called the burr, gives a very singular
sound to their speech; I think if you have once
heard a native of Berwickshire talk, you will
not easily forget the peculiarity.

There is a ford across the river Tweed, about
twelve miles west of the town of Berwick, which
the Scotch and English armies usually crossed
when they invaded one another’s country. It
was also a great place of conference; and
BERWICKSHIRE. 15

Holywell Haugh, close by, is the field where
Edward I had a meeting with the Scotch
nobility, to settle the dispute between Baliol
and Bruce, about the right to the throne of
Scotland, to which you have seen reference in
the previous chapter. Coldstream in this county
had at one time a handsome Priory. You may
have heard of a regiment. of soldiers called the
Coldstream Guards. It was originally raised
by General Monk, who lived at Coldstream in
Charles the Second’s reign ; and has ever since
borne the name of the Coldstream Guards.

The field, or rather hill, of Flodden, is about
six miles from this town. It is memorable as
the scene of a great battle, the particulars of
which, connected as they are with the Scot-
tish history at that period, I will give you.
James IV reigned over Scotland at the time
that Henry VII was king of England. James
had rebelled against his own father, who, after
receiving some wounds in the battle field, was
treacherously murdered by a priest who pretended
to come and hear his confession. James IV
had not long been on the throne before he
began to feel some remorse for his undutiful
16 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

conduct; and according to the doctrines of the
Roman Catholic Church, which but too greatly
tend to lead men away from the Saviour of
sinners, he tried to atone for it by various acts
of penance. Amongst other tokens of repent-
ance, he caused an iron belt or girdle to be made,
which he wore constantly under his clothes,
every year of his life adding another link of
an ounce or two to the weight of it. James
was, however, for the times in which he lived, a
good king. He was not fond of flatterers; but
ruled by the counsel of the wisest of his nobility,
and won the hearts of his people. He used to
go about in disguise amongst the poorer classes,
and ask questions about the king, thus dis-
covering his subjects’ opinion of him, and many
a good lesson did he receive, in these private
visits, from the simple chiefs or the lowlier part
of his subjects.

James IV being one of the most popular
monarchs. that ever reigned in Scotland, his
countrymen have endeavoured to make out that
he could not have been accessory to the insur-
rection against his father, as they affirm him to
have been but thirteen or fourteen when it
BERWICKSHIRE. 17

occurred. His birth, however, taking place in
1472, and his father’s death having occurred in
1488, he must then have entered his seventeenth
year. Henry VII of England, who was very
anxious to make a friend of James IV, was
not a warlike king; for he loved money, and
wars are expensive affairs. He therefore pro-
jected a marriage between his eldest daughter,
Margaret Tudor, and James, whilst Margaret
was yet an infant; and when still an mexpe-
rienced girl of less than fourteen, the marriage
was actually completed. The king was eighteen
years older than his girl queen, and was at the
time of their marriage the handsomest sovereign
in Europe. Sir Walter Scott, in one of his
poems thus describes him :—

“ For hazel was his eagle eye,
And auburn of the darkest dye
His short curled beard and hair;
Light was his footstep in the dance,
And firm his stirrup in. the lists ;
And oh, he had that merry glance,
Which seldom lady’s heart resists.’’

The king appears to have been very kind and
persevering in his efforts to please and conciliate
his bride, but she was a difficult young lady to
please, it seems; and was somewhat like her

c
18 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

brother, King Henry VIII, in temper and dis-
position. Her first letter to her father after their
marriage was one of complaint and murmur,
although her husband was doing his utmost to
entertain and oblige her and bid her welcome
to Scotland. "

When Henry VII died, Margaret’s brother
Henry, who was of a much more impetuous,
fiery, despotic disposition, could not agree with
James at all. The cause of their quarrel
you may read in Scottish history; the result
was the disastrous battle of Flodden, where
James and many of his warlike peers and loyal
gentry fell on the field. The conquerors lost
5000 men, but the Scots perhaps twice that
number.! The English lost but few of distinction,
whilst the Scots left on their battle field—the
king, two bishops, two mitred abbots,? twelve

! This battle was fought in the year 1513.

2? You may wonder to hear of an abbot’s mitre. In the
early history of the church, abbots did not wear mitres, only
bishops being permitted that. honour; but as the wealth and
importance of monasteries and abbeys increased so did the pomp
of their heads or superiors. -The abbot was then a person of
great importance, and was regarded in the monasteries as a lord
and father, no appeal being allowed from his decision. Abbots
or Priors sat in the upper House of Parliament and wore a
silver mitre, in order to distinguish it from that of the bishops,
which was of pure gold.
BERWICKSHIRE. 19

earls, thirteen lords, and five eldest sons of peers.
James was not permitted a burial, for the Pope
having excommunicated him no priest dared
pronounce the burial service over his body.
The corpse was therefore embalmed, and sent
to the monastery of Shene, in Surrey. It lay
there until the Reformation, when all religious
houses of the kind were broken up; anid the
monastery of Shene was given to the Duke of
Suffolk. After this period, the body, which
was wrapped up in lead, was tossed about the
house as a piece of useless lumber. Stowe, the
noted historian of Londen, who lived at this
time, saw it flung into a waste room among old
pieces of wood, lead, and other rubbish. ‘“ Some
idle workmen, for their foolish pleasure,’ says
that historian, “hewed off the head; and one
Lancelot Young, master glazier to Queen
Elizabeth, finding a sweet. smell come from
thence, owing doubtless to the spices used for
embalming the body, carried the head home
and kept it for some time; but at last caused
the sexton of St Michael’s Wood Street to bury
it in the charnel house.” What a humiliating
end to that king, once so proud and powerful;
c2
20 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

and what a lesson on the nothingness of human
greatness !

Two miles north of Greenlaw, at the edge of
a vast black heath, are the remains of a Roman
camp. . You may have read an account in some
child’s book, of Lady Grizzell Baillie. Polworth
Church, in this county, is the place where the
Earl of Marchmont concealed himself, for six
weeks, during the reign of King James II; he,
with many more, having fallen under the dis-
pleasure of that monarch for his religious. as
well as political opimions. The greater part
of his family were ignorant of the place of his
concealment, but it fell to his daughter Grizzell’s
lot to carry him food; and one day, to the great
amusement of the elder and the indignation of
the younger childrén, she managed to take away
from the dinner table, a whole sheep’s head, of
which dish she knew her father tobe fond. The
vault in which the Earl lay hidden was full of
bones, and he was surrounded by human skulls.
How strong is the love of life in man’s heart;
he is content. to live with the dead awhile, if
hope of life be held out to him. The Earl
learned by heart the whole of Buchanan’s Psalms,
BERWICKSHIRE. 21

in this dreary lodging, and many portions of
Scripture. Lady Grizzell must have been very
courageous, as well as discreet, for she never
shrank from her midnight walk, although obliged
to perform it alone, or divulged the secret of
her father’s hiding-place, a greater mark still of
a firm, well-disciplined mind. Joanna Baillie, a
poetess of some note, gives a pretty description
‘of Lady Grizzell’s character when young. I
think you would like to read it :—

‘ And well, with ready hand and heart,

Each task of toilsome duty taking ;

Did one dear inmate take her part,

The last asleep, the earliest waking.
Her hands each nightly couch prepared,
And frugal meal on which they fared,
Unfolding spread the servet white,

And decked the board with tankard bright.
Through fretted hose and garment rent, '
Her tiny needle deftly went, \
Till hateful penury, so graced,

Was scarcely in their dwelling traced.
With reverence to the old she clung,

With sweet affection, to the young.

To her was crabbed lesson said ;

To her the sly petition made;

To her was told each petty care;

To’ her was lisped each tardy prayer ;
What time the urchin half undrest,
And half asleep, was put to rest.’”’—
22 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

The next of the border counties is Rox-
BURGHSHIRE, which is bounded on the north
and north-west by Berwick and Selkirkshire,
on the west by Dumfries, on the south by the
Cheviot hills, and on the east by part of North-
umberland.

Kelso, although not the county town, is the
largest in Roxburghshire; it is pleasantly situated
on the river Tweed. . Towering above the town,
are the remains of Kelso Abbey, one of that chain
of abbeys to which I have referred, founded by
King David, in 1128, for the protection of the
border.

Roxburgh was besieged in 1460, by James IT.
It had formerly a strong border castle, which
had for many years been in the possession of
the English; and James, being very anxious to
gain possession of this bulwark, summoned the
full force of his kingdom to accomplish this
great enterprise. The nobles attended in great
numbers, and the siege of Roxburgh commenced.
A battery was formed, of such large clumsy
cannon as were constructed at that time, upon
the north of the Tweed. Those were awkwardly
framed out of bars of iron, fastened together by
ROXBURGHSHIRE. 23

hoops of the same metal, somewhat in the same
manner as casks are made, and far more liable
to accident than our modern cannon, which are
cast in one solid piece. It was one of those ill-
made guns which was the immediate cause of
James’ death. It burst in gomg off, and a
fragment of iron broke his thigh-bone and
killed him on the spot, he having unwisely
stood too near the cannon in order to mark the
effect of the shot. A thorn-tree in the park of
the Duke of Roxburgh still marks the spot
where he died at the early age of twenty-nine.

Jedburgh is a very picturesque village; it
consists of one long street; but the remains of
its fine old abbey are interesting and beautiful.
The Jedburgh people were a few years since,
a very simple set, and so little given to travel,
that it is related of a certain barber, that for
seventy-one years he had never left the town,
for a greater distance than three miles during
his life.

Dryburgh, another of King David’s abbeys,
lies upon a level around which the river Tweed
sweeps. More of the domestic parts of the
abbey, than of the church remain. It is a spot
24 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

full of interest, and here Sir Walter Scott, the
celebrated novelist, is buried.

By far the most striking of the three, how-
ever, is the Abbey of Melrose: I cannot give
you any idea of the extreme beauty of these
ruins. I had heard a great deal of them, and
had seen many views of different parts of the
ruin, but neither drawing nor fancy. equalled
the reality. It is of that style of architecture
called Gothic. There is an oriel window almost
entire, and many of the shapely pillars are
standing. I think that Scott’s description, which
an intelligent girl repeated to me on the spot,
will give you some idea of the extreme delicacy
and beauty of the carving. The sculpture of
two rows of pillars in particular may be com-
pared. to the figuring of richest lace.

Now slow and faint he led the way,

Where cloistered round, the garden lay;

The pillared arches were over their head,

And beneath their feet were the bones of the dead;
Spreading herbs and flowerets bright,

Glistened with the dew of night.

Nor hetb nor floweret glistened there

But was carved in the cloister arches fair ;

The moon on the east oriel shone

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ROXBURGHSHIBE. 25

By foliaged tracery combined ;

Thou wouldst have thought some fairy’s hand

Twixt poplars straight the osier wand

In many a freakish knot had twined;

Then framed a spell when the work was done,
, And changed the willow wreath to stone.

These lines are from Scott’s “ Lay of the Last
Minstrel,” a little poem well worth your reading.
The above refer to a midnight visit paid by a
certain William of Deloraine to Melrose, whither
he had been dispatched by a lady from the
Border to search for a book of magic reputed to
be buried in the tomb of Michael Scott, who
was buried in the Abbey. Michael Scott is not
a fictitious character, but his great discoveries
in chemistry and alchemy brought on him the
suspicion of that ignorant and superstitious age
of being a wizard, and it is probable that he
encouraged the idea.

Sir Walter Scott has used the fact of his
being buried at Melrose as the foundation of
the story in his little ballad.

The knight had orders to go to fair Tweedside
and to inquire for the Monk of St. Mary’s Aisle
at the Abbey, to bring back the treasured volume,
but into which he must by no means look. The
26 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

monk, who had been an old friend of Michael’s,
rather unwillingly led the way to the cloisters,
and sitting down on the tomb of Robert Bruce,
the old man told him of the mighty book which
lay in the magician’s tomb, and pointed out the
spot where he had been buried. . The knight
accomplished his task, carried away the book,
but the monk is reported to have been found
dead in his cell at noontide on the following day.

At the time of the Reformation, and probably
long before, the monks of Melrose bore a very
moderate character, especially as being too fond
of good living and breaking the rules of the
church which enjoined fasting on certain days.
There is an old verse in reference to this which
had only too much truth in it.

“The monks of Melrose made gude kail!
On Fridays when they fasted ;

Nor wanted they good beef and ale, }
As lang as their neighbour’s lasted.’?

It is much to be regretted that this beautiful
ruin has been so defaced. by the intemperate zeal
of Cromwell’s army, who at the time of the
civil wars battered its fine walls from the Gat-

: ? Broth.
DUMFRIES. 27

tonside hills. The village of Melrose is curious.
It is in the form of a triangle, having small
streets leading out of each corner.

Abbotsford, the seat of the late Sir Walter
Scott, is about three miles west of Melrose.
The house, garden, pleasure grounds, and woods,
were the creation of the owner, and many of
the trees were planted by his own hands. His
maxim was, “If you have nothing to do, be aye
(ever) planting a tree, it will be growing when
you are sleeping.”” I must not enter into par-
ticulars of the beauties of Abbotsford. They
would of themselves fill a chapter. J remember
seeing there a very striking picture of Mary
Queen of Scots, taken after her decapitation at
Fotheringay, and said to be an original. The
little study beyond the library where Sir Walter’s
many works were written, contains one interest-
ing evidence of his affectionate disposition. The
old-fashioned bureau at which he always wrote,
belonged to his mother. ;

There is a large tartan manufactory at Gala-
shiels which has much increased of late years, but
within the memory of many was an insignifi-
cant little village with few shops, and possessing
28 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

not a single bookseller in the place. A singular
shopkeeper, known by the name of “Willie a
things,” used to keep in his warehouse, as his
advertisements will show, a strange variety, and
dealt in goods usually divided amongst a dozen
shopkeepers. Red herrings and parasols, yellow
sugar and yellow sand, treacle and linen, cradles
and coffins,?

At Mount Benger the poet ot Hoge resided ; he
is known generally by the title of the Ettrick
Shepherd.

Dumrrizs completes the border line, it
adjoims the county of Roxburgh, and is the
most important of the southern counties. It is
bounded on the south by part of Cumberland
and the Solway Frith, on the north-east by
Roxburgh and Selkirkshire, on the north by
Peebles and Lanark, and on the north-west by
Ayr and Kirkcudbright.

The entrance to Scotland from Carlisle is
certainly not pleasing. The first place you
come to on the border is the disgraceful village
of Gretna, where there have been so many
clandestine marriages. A man of the name of

1 Chambers’ Picture of Scotland.
DUMFRIES. 29

Paisley commenced the trade. Gretna is near
the village of Springfield, and is a dull, dis-
agreeable looking place. _

Moffat is noted for its medicinal springs, and
from its hills flow the Tweed, the Clyde, and
the Annan. The vale of the Esk is noted for
the deeds of the far-famed Johnnie Armstrong.
His strong tower of Gilnockie still stands,
although it is now converted into a cow-house.
Langholm is on the left bank of the river Esk.
It-was at Langholm that Johnnie and his band
of thirty-six men, gomg forth to meet king
James V, on one of his thief-destroying journeys,
met with a disastrous fate, for James instead of
receiving his allegiance, ordered them all out to
execution.

There used to be a curious instrument at
Langholm, called the Branks, which was put on
the head of very talkative ill-tempered wives,
called shrews, and by projecting a sharp spike
into the mouth, subdued the tongue at once.

There is some fine scenery in this county.
Near the village of Moffat is the great natural
curiosity called the Grey Mare’s tail. It is a
cataract formed by a small stream which leaves
30 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

the mountain Lake Loch'Skene. The water
is precipitated over a rock three hundred feet
in height; it falls down a dark precipice with
slight ledges projecting, and the interruption
which the course of the tiny stream receives
produces a curious effect. The mountains are
very wild in these parts, but there are associa-
tions with them still more interesting than the
natural beauty of the spot; associations with
the Covenanters. Now how important does a
knowledge of history become in travelling !
The hills of this part of Scotland would not
attract you particularly if you were ignorant of
the scenes that were enacted amongst them.

Before you can understand the history of the
Covenanters you must be a little acquainted
with the circumstances which led to the con-
duct of those conscientious although enthusiastic
people.

James VI of Scotland and I of England,
as you know, succeeded Queen Elizabeth on
the throne, thus uniting the two kingdoms
which for years had been at frequent and bitter
warfare. On ascending the throne of England,
James found himself at the head of a people
DUMFRIES. 31

who had lost both the power and habit of con-
testing the will of their sovereign. The Tudors
were all but despotic in their rule. At the
arbitrary will of King Henry VIII the Church
of England was disjomed from Rome. After
the death of Henry VI, his sister Mary restored
the Roman Catholic Faith, and Elizabeth at her
accession again declared it Protestant, and all
this without much resistance. Now Scotland
was under different circumstances. The feudal
nobility retained much of their power and many
of their privileges ; but here again I am reminded
that you may not know the meaning of that
word feudal. The connexion of a king as sove-
reign over his princes and great men as vassals
must first be understood. A king or sovereign
prince gave large promises or grants of land to
his dukes, earls, and noblemen, and each of
them possessed nearly as much power within
his own district as the king in the rest of his
dominions; but then the vassal, whether duke,
earl, or lord, was obliged to provide his sovereign
with a certain number of men when he was
engaged in war. In like manner these vassals
of the crown, as they were called, divided the
82 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

lands which they held under the king into estates,
which they bestowed on knights and gentlemen
whom they thought fit to follow them in war,
and attend their courts in peace; for they too
held courts and administered justice each in his
own province and county. This system of hold-
ing lands for the purpose of providing soldiers
for the king in time of war was called the feudal
system, and was general throughout Europe for
many ages.

This system was abolished in England before
it was done away with in Scotland. Henry VI,
a wise and cunning prince, had by his success
at Bosworth attained a secure seat on the throne.
He took advantage of the weak state of the
barons and peers to undermine the power which
the feudal system had given to the lords over
their vassals, and they submitted, feeling, I dare
say, that it had been a stormy sort of rule that
their forefathers had exercised. They now,
therefore, exacted rents from their tenants instead
of service in battle, and became peaceful and
wealthy. At the first appearance this is an im-
provement, but then on the other hand the taxes
which the king raised were enormous. James
DUMFRIES. 33

tried, on his accession, to bring Scotland into the
same submissive state in which he had found
England, and proposed that the Parliament of
each country should appoint commissioners to
consider of the terms on which it might be pos-
sible to unite both under the same constitution.
But, as you may suppose, this did not answer ;
the English demanding that the whole system
of English law should be extended to Scotland,
and Scotland indignantly rejecting the proposal.
So for the time James was obliged to give that
up, but he was determined if possible to make
the form of the Scottish Church as near as
possible like that of England.

You must recollect that the Reformation in
Scotland was effected by different means from
that in England. The new plans of church
government differed no less than the outward
form. It is necessary that you should under-
stand this before you can at all appreciate
the firmness of the Covenanters in resisting the
religion forced upon them by James. To tell
you here the many distinctions between Epis-
copacy and Presbyterianism would occupy too
much space. The Presbyterians acknowledge

D
34 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

no visible head of the church but Jesus Christ
alone. The Episcopalians, whilst they acknow-
ledge Christ alone as their spiritual Head,
recognise the King or Queen as their temporal
head. To an ambitious man like James, there-
fore, their resistance was very provoking, and
without regard to it he elected thirteen bishops,
a step peculiarly offensive to the Presbyterian
party.

There were other points on which James and
the Parliament insisted, and the Presbyterians,
feeling that the great work of the Reformation
was about to be undone by their King, were
much alarmed and aggrieved. To force a reli-
gion on a people with the principles of which
they do not unite, and cannot conscientiously
agree, is certainly an act of injustice, and you
must bear in mind in the history of the Cove-
nanters, that those points which to us may seem
unimportant, were to them great matters, in-
volving great principles. Charles I, who succeeded
his father James, was as a private gentleman an
amiable and virtuous man, but he inherited his
father’s notions of kingly prerogative to the full,
and it was a legacy that proved his ruin. He
DUMFRIES. 35

too resolved to bring the Church of Scotland,
in point of church government and ceremonies,
to the model of the Church of England.

The enforcing the use of the prayer book
brought matters to a crisis, and a species of
engagement, or declaration, was drawn up by
a large proportion of the Scotch; the principal
object of which was the eradication of Prelacy,
and the establishment of Presbytery. This
engagement was called the National Covenant,
and was sworn to by hundreds and thousands of
all ages, who were thence called Covenanters.
Now I do not expect that thus far the account
of the Covenanters has interested you, but it is
necessary that you should understand the matter
at the commencement of the book, as there will
be more than one reference to them in the course
of our notice of different parts of Scotland.

To return to Dumfries. The mountains of
which I spoke to you were the hiding places
of the Covenanters in Charles the Second’s
time, who continued the religious persecutions
of his ancestors. Though very wild and barren,
yet here they remained days, months, nay years,
without shelter; exposed to cold, rai, and the

D2
86 ' «STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

killing night dews. Claverhouse, the inveterate
foe and scourge of the suffermg band, used to
pursue them into their mountain fastnesses, and.
hill sides are shown to this day almost as steep
as a wall, where, mounted on his great black
steed, he would gallop in pursuit of them. The
hill opposite the village of Burkhill is called the
“Watch hill,” on account of the custom that
these wanderers had of placing one of their
number to watch the motions of the soldiers,
whilst the rest were engaged in worship in the
deep.dell behind. On one occasion Claverhouse,
by means of a glass, discerned the watch and
made for the place, but long before he approached
the sentinel had given warning, and the wor-
shippers had dispersed amidst the heather. On
another occasion he surprised them at their
devotions. and four men fell almost in the act of
worship.

You have most likely heard of Burns, the
celebrated Scotch poet. He resided for many
years at the town of Dumfries, and was interred
‘in the same place.
Chapter Third.



7 SELKIRKSHIRE.
Yarrow—Park’s birthplace.

PEEBLESHIRE, OR TWEEDDALE.
Border castles—The Tweed.

LANARKSHIRE.

Glasgow—The Cathedral—Cemetery—College—Museum—The Clyde ;
its falls—Hamilton — Bothwell bridge—More about the Cove-
nanters.

RENFREWSHIRE.
Paisley—Founders of the cotton trade—Curious names of streets—

Elderslie—Birthplace of Wallace—Greenock—Watt.
SELKIRKSHIRE is the adjoining county to Rox-
burgh. Its boundaries are, Peebles on the
north and west, Roxburghshire on the east, and
Dumfries on the south.

Not many centuries ago, it was a royal
hunting forest; it is now for the most part a
desolate looking county. Selkirk, the capital,
stands on the river Ettrick. Near this town a
female was found dead with an infant at her
breast, after the battle of Flodden. She lad
88 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

gone out to meet her husband, but sank on the
way, exhausted. The vale of the river Yarrow
is narrow at the opening, and somewhat woody ;
but the greater part is composed of those
green pastoral: hills, celebrated in the poems of
Wordsworth. .
Not far from the town of Selkirk, at Foul-
shiels, a farm on the banks of the Yarrow, the
well-known traveller, Mungo Park, was born.
Day by day little Mungo, with satchel on his
back, trod the path to the parish school at
Selkirk, and was often seen with book in hand
or thinking deeply whilst other lads were at
play. He did not, however, shun all the bold
adventurous sports of his age, and the greater
the danger, the greater temptation to the lad,
At fifteen years of age he was apprenticed to a
surgeon, at Selkirk, and afterwards removed to
Edinburgh, where he attended the lectures of
the University, When his studies were ended,
he obtained an appointment of assistant-surgeon
to the Worcester, Kast Indiaman, and made his
first voyage to Sumatra, at which time he added
to his stock of knowledge of natural history, and
during his stay on the coasts of the island made
SELKIRKSHIRE. 39

many useful observations and discoveries on
fishes, eight of which had never been previously
described. At the period of his return there
was great interest in the minds of many in-
telligent people on the subject of Africa, and
especially as to the existence and course of the
river mentioned by old geographers as the Niger.
A traveller-who had already been sent out by
“the African Association” for the purpose of
discovering its source, had recently died in
Africa, and men naturally shrank from encoun-
tering the dangers of an untried path.

Park at length offered himself to the Associ-
ation, and in July 1795 we find him at Pisania,
a British factory about 200 miles up the river
Gambia, which you will find marked on the map
of Africa. Here he studied the Mandingo lan-
guage under Dr. Lindley, and collected useful
information for his dangerous undertaking, on
which he embarked on the 2nd of December.

Many wild undisciplined bands beset his path,
negroes and wandering Moors, and at Yarra he
was detained prisoner by a Moorish chief, who
believed him to be a spy, where he remained
from February to July. When he obtained his
40 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

release, he had only his horse, a few articles of
clothing, and a pocket compass which he had
hidden in the sand. Alone and unprotected the
brave Scotchman set forth, and after a journey
of fifteen days arrived at Jolibe. At Kamalia,
500 miles from any European settlement, his
health gave way, and for more than five months
he was dependent on the care and charity of a
strange race, of some of whom, however, there
have been touching instances recorded of sym-
pathy and kindness. His lonely wanderings
occupied nineteen months, and he returned to
England with abundance of adventures to record,
but little of discovery or success. After a few
years passed in his native country, devoted to
close study of astronomy, geography, and the
Arabic language, he once more set forth. This
time under the escort of soldiers provided by the
Association, and merchandize to defray travel-
ling expenses. They left Pisania in May, 1805.
In November, he wrote word that of forty-four
Europeans, who had left the Gambia in health,
five soldiers only remained, having fallen victims
to the rainy seasons of the country. The fate
of Park was never correctly known, but it is
PEEBLESHIRE. 41

believed that he died either by the hands of the
natives, or from an accident on a rapid of that
river, Niger, whose source and history he had
devoted the energies of his life to discover.

PreesiesHire, or Tweeddale, is bounded on
the north by Midlothian, on the south by
Dumfries, on the west by Lanark, and on the
east by Selkirk. The Tweed takes its rise
here and gives to this district the popular
name of Tweeddale. It abounds in trout and
salmon. ,

Peebles, the capital town, is a dull place.
The hilly region of Peebleshire was dreadfully
exposed, in early times, to the unfriendly
visits of marauding Englishmen. To provide
against these, strong castles were built by the
Scottish kings, on the lower part of the Tweed,
and the chain was continued by many great
proprietors of land, towards the head of the
river. These castles are now in ruins, but
there are many remains still to be seen. They
were built in the shape of square towers, of
stone and lime. They consisted usually of
three stories; the lower story, which was
vaulted in order to afford protection to the
42 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

cattle of the ‘owner in time of danger; the
great hall in which the family lived; and the
highest, in which were the bed-rooms, designed
for the safety of the inhabitants. These were,
by common consent, built alternately on each
side of the river, and in a continued view of
each other. A fire, kindled on the top of these
towers, was the well known signal of the
approach of an enemy: the smoke gave notice
by day, and the flame by night. You cannot
travel in Scotland, without bemg constantly
reminded of the correctness of some of. Scott’s
beautiful descriptions; and, when I saw the
ruins of the border castles, these lines, which
I will transcribe for you, came very pleasantly
into my mind ; .
‘ Sweet Teviot, on thy silver tide

The glaring hill-fires blaze no more;

No longer steel-clad warriors ride

Along thy wild and willowed shore.

Where’er thou wind’st by dale or hill,

AN], all is peaceful; all is still

As if thy waves, since Time was born,

Since first they rolled upon the Tweed,

Had only heard the Shepherd’s reed,
Nor started at the bugle horn.’’

We may almost fancy the river murmur has
LANARK. 43

a joyful tone, now that the sound of the war-cry
is heard no more on its banks, and sheep graze
peacefully on green pastures once crimson with
the blood of dying warriors.

Lanark, otherwise called Clydesdale, is a
large and important county. It is bounded ou
the south by Dumfries and part of Ayr; on the
east by Peebles and Edinburgh ; on the north,
by Linlithgow and Dumbarton; and on the
west, by Renfrew and part of Ayr.

The capital of Lanark is Glasgow, a very
important town. It is the first city, in pomt
of population, in Scotland. The principal part
of the city occupies a plaim, on the north-east
side of the Clyde, which has of late years been
made navigable, at high tides, for vessels of great
burden. It has large manufactures of cotton.
T have heard old people speak of the time when
there was only one boat on the river for the
accommodation of travellers, which was drawn
by horses. Glasgow has some handsome streets,
and so many objects of interest, that I scarcely
know which to mention to you.

The cathedral, or high church as it is called,
stands at the upper end of High street, and was
44 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

founded in 1123. It narrowly escaped destruc-
tion at the time of the Reformation, and is, with
the exception of St. Magnus in Kirkwall, Orkney,
the only ancient. gothic cathedral Fee
entire, in all Scotland.

The inner church, and the arched roof of a
vestry supported by a single pillar, are very
beautiful, and the vaulted cemetery beneath the
inner church, is a curious and interesting place.
There is an extensive burial ground near, which
is situated on very high ground.

Then there is the college, with its library,
and the valuable museum, bequeathed to. the
university by the late celebrated Dr. William
Hunter, It consists of a rare library of books
and manuscripts, a fine collection of insects,
corals, and shells, and a cabinet of coins and
medals, besides a collection of Dr. Hunter’s
anatomical preparations. Glasgow is not the
only interesting place in Lanarkshire; indeed
there are few countries so rich in associations,
as Scotland. The difficulty in writing its history,
is to select the most interesting among so many
tempting subjects.

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CORRA LINN.
LANARK. 45

from the south usually visit is not particularly
striking.

I told you that Lanarkshire is sometimes
called Clydesdale, from its being the vale
formed by the course of the river Clyde. To
see the falls of this river is alone worth a
journey to Scotland, 80, at least you and I may
say, who have never seen those of Niagara.
I must leave it for the pencil to give you a
faint idea of that which it is impossible justly
to describe.

There are three falls made by the Clyde.
Corra Linn—so called from a tradition that
Corra, daughter of an ancient Scottish king,
was drowned in it—is the first of the three.
The river does not descend in an unbroken
sheet of water, but is precipitated eighty-four
feet, when two ledges of rock break it, as you
may see in the little drawing annexed ; but of
the beauty and richness of the foliage, the
grand effect of the sun upon the glittering
spray, and the sound of the cataract, it is
impossible to convey an idea. Boniton, the
second, is also very beautiful. Above the fall
the river is as calm and smooth as a lake,
46 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

when it suddenly throws itself into the abyss
below. The channel is narrow, and the banks
are composed of solid rock singularly and re-
gularly perpendicular. The extreme regularity
of these layers of rock is extraordinary. At
the first view it appears almost like the work
of art, but there is no architect like the
Almighty. The third fall is that of Stonebyres,
which was exhibited to us by a curious half-
cracked old woman, called Janet McDougal.
A guide is needful, for the best place for seeing
the fall is not free from danger, and although
a “daft” guide is not exactly the kind we
should choose to conduct us to the edge of a
precipice, old Janet was harmless and amusing
enough in her way.

Hamilton Palace, the seat of the ‘duke of
Hamilton, stands on a plam between the town
of Hamilton and the river. The pictures at
the palace are worth seeing. There is one by a
great painter named Rubens, which is called
the “Glory of Hamilton.” The subject is
Daniel in the lions’ den. Rubens was born at
Cologne; in Germany, in 1557. He was not
only a fine painter, but a learned man, and
LANARK. 47

understood seven languages. This neighbour-
hood, however, owes its principal interest to a
great conflict which took place between Claver-
house and the Covenanters, at a place called
Drumclog. On one occasion a large body of
country people had collected at Harelaw, near
Loudon Hill, to hold a meeting, which, in con-
sequence of an Act of Parliament forbidding
such assemblies, was illegal. Many came armed,
and had, according to custom, posted a watch
on Loudon Hill, whilst the service was pro-
ceeding. Whilst they worshipped, Grahame of
Claverhouse, to whom I have already referred,
arrived at a village close by, bearing with him
two field preachers, whom he had just captured
near the town of Hamilton; and, hearing of the
large number collected at Loudon Hill, he pushed
forward to that place. Here he was opposed by
a large body in point of numbers but very rudely
armed, although there were fifty horse, and as
many infantry with guns, the principal part of
the little army consisted of men armed with
pikes, scythes, and forks, and women who en-
tered into the enthusiasm of the scene likewise
prepared to offer resistance. As they approached
48 ' STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

singing psalms, according to their custom, Cla-
verhouse ordered a volley of shot to be fired; to
avoid which the Covenanters fell on their faces
and little mischief ensued. They met on a
boggy piece of ground very unfit for the action
of cavalry, and a broad ditch between the parties
seems to have given the advantage to the Cove-
nanters ; for, when Claverhouse ordered his men
to charge, they, being ignorant of the nature of
the soil, plunged into a bog and were thrown
into the greatest disorder. The day was there-
fore in favour of the Covenanters. The famous
‘black steed of Claverhouse was wounded by a
scythe, and was scarcely able to bear him from
the battle-field, and thirty of the defeated party
were slain. As Claverhouse passed the place
where he had left the imprisoned. preachers in
the morning, King, the name of one of them,
called out to him, in derision, to stay and take
the afternoon sermon. . ‘

This victory encouraged the Covenanters to
attempt bolder undertakings, but they were
doomed to suffer defeat more often than triumph.
Their zeal and vehemence could scarcely stand
against the superior military knowledge and
RENFREW. - 49

force of their enemies, and Bothwell Bridge, not
far from Hamilton palace, was the scene of one
of their most frightful defeats, when the Duke
of Monmouth scattered them like a flock of
sheep. The slaughter that took place on this
occasion was, however,-against his orders, and
partly owing to the temper of Claverhouse,
who was determined to avenge his, defeat at
Drumclog. Four hundred were killed and twelve
hundred made prisoners the latter were marched
to Edinburgh and imprisoned in the Greyfriars’
churchyard like cattle in a penfold, while several
ministers were ordered out for execution.

The county of Renrrew is very small. It is
bounded on the west and north-west by the Frith
of Clyde, on the south and south-west by Ayr, and
on the east by part of Dumbarton and Lanark.

The principal town is Paisley, which has very
extensive cotton manufactures. The persons
who commenced these manufactures were ped-
lars, accustomed to travel about the country,,
and the object of every such packman’s ambition
was. ultimately to become a merchant. Many of
them succeeded, and ended their days in comfort
and affluence.. At first Paisley was noted for

E
50. STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

a coarse chequered linen cloth, then for cotton
handkerchiefs; now silk gauze, thread, and
shawls form part of its manufactures. The names
of some of the streets are curious. There is a
Gauze Street, Cambric Street, and Thread Street.
Three miles west of Paisley is Elderslie, the
birth-place of the celebrated William Wallace.
Greenock may be called the Liverpool of
Scotland. It is a very important port, but
that which will be most interesting to you to
remember, connected with it, is the fact of its
being the birth-place of the celebrated James
Watt, who made such great improvements in
the steam engine. Both the grandfather and
uncle of Watt were men of repute as mathe-
matical teachers and surveyors in the west of
Scotland. Watt's father was a merchant in
Greenock, and his son James was born there
in 1736. At avery early age he showed great
skill in mechanics. Even when in after years
he could have employed hundreds to do his
bidding, he loved to work with his own hands.
Watt was a practical man. At eighteen he
went to London to be apprenticed to a mathema-
tical instrument maker, but his health failing,
RENFREW. 51

he was obliged to return in little more than a
year. Shortly after his return, the University
of Glasgow appointed him their mathematical
instrument maker. Robert Simpson, Adam
Smith, and Dr. Black, all celebrated men, were
at that time professors there. In the winter
of 1763, his mind was directed to that subject
which has made his name illustrious all over the
world. He was employed to repair the working
model of a steam engine of Newcomen’s con-
struction, by which he was led to discover that
there was a great waste of steam. in its mode of
working, and. consequently of fuel. By a long
course of experiments he brought to perfection
his invention of the condensing steam engine,
now most generally used in mines, factories,
and steam packets. It would be useless to
describe it more particularly here, as it would
be necessary that you should be more thoroughly
acquainted with the whole construction of that
wonderful machine than it may be supposed you
are. The patience and perseverance manifested
by Watt, are worth notice. He had many
discouragements, and at first few appreciated
the value of his invention. Of the importance


i STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

of it to trade, a child can have no idea; the use
of it in mines alone is immense. In the deep
mines of Cornwall the new engine was first
introduced, and the saving of fuel amounted to
three-fourths of the quantity consumed by the
old-fashioned ones. Independently of this great
attainment in mechanics, Watt was a wonderful
man. He was well informed, and well read,
and his conversation is described as having been
very delightful. He was amiable, unaffected,
and unpretending, disliked all parade and show,
and was an honest, straightforward character.
He died at Heathfield, in Staffordshire, at the
age of eighty-four.





































































































BOTHWELL BRIDGE,

eT a eG iy oF mee eal ae
Chapter Fourth.

FOUR COUNTIES.
AYRSHIRE.
Ailsa Craig.—Ayr the Capital.—Birth-places of Poets.—Burns arid
Montgomery.
KIRKCUDBRIGHT OR GALLOWAY.
Dundrennan Abbey.—Amworth.—Story of Rutherford.

WIGTONSHIRE OR WEST GALLOWAY.
Portpatrick.
HADDINGTONSHIRE.
Preston.—Story of. the Pretender.—Battle of Preston Pans.—Colonel

Gardiner’s Death.—Tranent.—Haddington.—Knox’s Birth-place.—

History of Knox.
AYRSHIRE is one of the largest counties south
of the Forth, it stretches eighty miles in a
crescent shape, and is a very productive county.
It is bounded on the north by Renfrew; on
the east by Lanark and Dumfries; on the
south by Kirkcudbright and Wigton; and on
the west by the Irish Channel.

Ailsa Craig is one of the must striking curi-
osities in Ayrshire; it rises fifteen miles from
the ‘shore, out of the sea, like an inverted top.
On this singular island the Solan goose is found
54 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

in great abundance, and it is an aviary for a
variety of other sea birds, whose screaming is
quite deafening. It is about two miles in
circumference and uninhabited.

Ayr, the capital of Ayrshire, is a well-built.
town, at the mouth of a river of the same
name. A mile and a half from Ayr is the cot-
tage where the poet Burns was born; it consists
but of two rooms, and was the work of his
father’s own hands. Montgomery, another poet,
was born at Irvine, a ‘small sea-port im this
county; also Galt, a celebrated novel-writer,
and the author of an amusing book, called
the “Ayrshire Legatees,” which is a humourous
account of a simple country minister coming
up to London on the event of some property
being left him. J remember there is one droll
account of a quarrel with a hackney coachman.
He had been told that if a coachman charged him
too much he was to take the number of the coach,
and a driver overcharging him he accordingly
proceeded tocut the number off thevehicle, having
thus literally interpreted his friend’s advice.

Kirxcupsricnt is bounded by Ayr and
part of Dumfries on the north; on the-east and
KIRKCUDBRIGHT. 55

south east is part of Dumfries and the Solway
Firth, on the west and south west a portion of
Wigton and Wigton Bay. Kirkcudbright is
the ancient district of Galloway. It is noted
for a breed of horses.. The Galloway horses
are a Spanish race.

At Dundrennan Abbey, in this county, the
unfortunate Mary Stuart spent her last night
in Scotland. She arrived late in the evening,
and was hospitably received by the monks.
The building is greatly dilapidated, but it bears
marks of former splendour. Its walls are now
covered with a grey moss.

Kirkcudbright, the principal town, is a sea-
port.

At Amworth resided Rutherford, the eminent
Presbyterian divine; he lived in the reign of
Charles II. Archbishop Usher, who had heard
of the fame of Rutherford, once went secretly
to Amworth in order to hear him preach
and converse. .He appeared at the Manse
(so the parsonage house, or residence of the
minister, is called in Scotland,) disguised as a
beggar, and asked a night’s lodging. We should
now think a beggar very bold to make such a
56 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

request, but in those times amongst the simple
Scottish people this was not extraordinary.
He was desired to sit down in the kitchen, when
Mrs. Rutherford came, according to custom,.to
catechise their servants. She did not omit
to ask the beggar some questions, and amongst
others, inquired of him how many command-
ments there were. He replied, “eleven;” Mrs.
Rutherford was greatly shocked at his ignorance,
however she gave him a good supper and sent
him to bed in one of the garrets. The Arch-
bishop had a great desire to hear Rutherford
pray, and for some time listened for the sound
of his voice, at his evening devotions, as his
room was just over that of his host. Hearing
no voice, however, he commenced pouring out
his own soul in prayer to God. Rutherford,
now heard him, and at once suspecting the
truth, that the pretended beggar was the great
Archbishop Usher, forthwith proceeded to. the
stranger’s room, when he told him his suspicion.
At Mr. Rutherford’s earnest request the visitor
consented to preach the next day at Amworth
church, but it was, of course, needful to keep
the matter a profound secret, for if it were
WIGTONSHIRE. 57

known that he had done so, great trouble and
disgrace would have ensued to the archbishop.
Disguised, therefore, in a suit of Myr. Ruther-
ford’s clothes, the Bishop went out very early
into the fields, where Mr. Rutherford followed
him, and shortly brought him in to breakfast,
introducing him asa stranger who had promised
to preach for him that day. Mrs. Rutherford
hearing from the servants that the beggar had
left early, was not surprised, and after breakfast
they all went to church. The Archbishop
preached. from John xiii, 34, «A new com-
mandment give I unto you, that ye love one
another,” and observed that this might be called
the eleventh commandment. The minister’s
wife was puzzled. ‘“ Why,” said she to herself,
“that is the very answer the beggar gave me last
night, surély this cannot be he.” In the morn-
ing the Bishop left without being discovered.
Wieronsuire, or West Galloway, consists
principally of two peninsulars jutting out from
the more continental part of Galloway. Luce
Bay divides the promontories. Its boundaries
are Ayr and Kirkcudbright on the north, the
Trish Sea on the west, and on the south, Luce
58 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

Bay. I have very little that is interesting to
tell you of Wigtonshire. Its capital, Wigton,
is a dull town; the principal street of which lies
within a space laid out in shrubberies. The soil
in many parts of Wigtonshire is very productive,
and the wheat grown there is considered of a
superior description. Port Patrick is the nearest
port to Ireland, the Channel in this part being
but twenty-one miles across; steamers are con-
stantly employed between the two countries.

The county of Happineton, or East Lothian,
is bounded on the south by Berwick, on the
north and east by the Frith of Forth, and on
the west by Mid-Lothian.

The story of the Pretender is so associated
with this county, that I will begin my account
of him in this chapter, endeavouring, after I
have explained the circumstances of his landing
in Scotland, to confine myself to those events
of his life which took place in Haddington.
Charles Edward, known by the name of the
Young Pretender, was the grandson of James
If, of England, who was, as you know, com-
-pelled to abdicate the crown, and was succeeded.
by his son-in-law, William, Prince of Orange,
HADDINGTON. 59

and his daughter Mary; who reigned jointly
with William, and after their death by Anne
his youngest daughter. Historians have called
Anne the last Stuart, but George I, who
succeeded her, had no claim to the crown but
as a Stuart also. His mother was the Electress
Sophia of Hanover, the daughter of the Queen
of Bohemia, who was herself the daughter of
James I, of the Stuart line, who reigned in
England. George was a prince in his own
country, and governed Hanover as well as
England. It is not of James the Second’s son,
however, that I propose to write here, but of his
grandson. The Old Pretender from some cause
excited less sympathy and interest than his son.
After fruitless ‘endeavours to obtain the crown,
he retired from the contest, and the Rebellion of
1715 ended, as an historian says, without even
the sad éclat of a defeat. After his return from
Scotland he was.compelled to leave France, and
was obliged to settle in Italy, where his two sons
were born, Prince Charles Edward, known by
the name of the Young Pretender, and Henry
Benedict, who bore the title of Duke of York,
and was promoted to the rank of Cardinal in
60 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

the Roman Catholic Church. Prince Charles
Edward, at this time was, according to the
statements of those who were not so enthusiastic
in his cause as to be blind to his defects, a
young man of pleasant and courteous manners,
personal courage, and a good temper, but his
education had been strangely neglected. Instead
of being instructed in the constitution and rights
of the English nation, he had been trained up in
those absurd, perverse, and antiquated notions
of divine hereditary right,. out of which so many
of his grandfather’s misfortunes had arisen.
He had also been strictly brought up in the
Roman Catholic Faith, and. this was much
against his cordial reception by the greater. part
of the English. The Jacobites, as the adherents
of the Stuarts were called, had long ceased to
think of restoring the Old Pretender, but they
turned their thoughts to his eldest son, who was
deeply anxious to recover the throne of his
ancestors. After many discouragements from
his father, and disappomtments of help from
France, Charles determined to try upon his
own. resources, and set sail on his perilous
expedition with only a few attendants in a man-
HADDINGTON. 61

of-war of sixty guns, to which a frigate was
added. He landed in Scotland after some days,
but received a very disheartening reception.
His reply to Lochiel, who attempted to reason
with him on the madness of his enterprise, and
advised him at once to return home was, “ Sir,
IT am come home, and, moreover, I am come with
my mind made up to reclaim my rights, or to
perish.” He soon gained followers, and collected
a considerable army; but not to pursue him
through this part of his eventful career in
Scotland, I will tell you that he arrived safely
at Edinburgh, and prepared. to take possession of
the palace of Holyrood. As Charles approached
the palace, crowds of persons pressed upon him.
His personal appearance was prepossessing. His
dress was after the Highland fashion. He worea
short tartan coat, anda blue bonnet with a white
rose. He had, in his course from the Highlands,
been joined by many persons of distinction.
The courage of the Highland soldiers was well
known, and hopes were high that victory and
restoration were in store for the exiled Stuarts.
He was proclaimed king at Edinburgh Cross,
by the title of James VIII, and for a while a
62 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

gleam of sunshine and splendour lighted up
Prince Charles’ fortunes.

While these things were going on at
Edinburgh, General Cope, with the govern-
ment force, landed at Dunbar, a seaport at
Haddington. Charles went forth to meet him.
The progress of the Highland regiment was
almost in silence, in order to conceal their
situation from the enemy, who were lying in
wait for them; not a whisper was heard
amongst them. On the 21st of September
they began their march whilst the sun was
three hours below the horizon. It was just
dawn, and the mist was fast retirmg, when the
Highlanders began their attack. A writer on
the subject, says: ‘Morning was already on
the waters of the Forth, and the mist was
rolling in huge masses over the crofts, or
meadows, to the left, but it was not yet
sufficiently clear for the armies to perceive each
other. A darkness lay between.them, which
was soon to disclose the dreadful spectacle of
an armed enemy.”! The Highlanders still kept
a silence broken only by the sound of their

1 Chambers’ History of the Rebellion.
HADDINGTON. 63

feet passing over the stubble. From General
Cope’s army, an occasional drum was heard.

At setting out on the charge, the Highlanders
pulled off their bonnets and uttered a short
prayer. Their mode of fighting, so different to
that of the king’s soldiers, quite puzzled the
enemy. They. advanced with the utmost
speed, fired within musket length of the object,
then throwing down their pieces drew their
swords, and holding a target in their left,
and-a dirk in their right hand, darted on the
enemy through the smoke of their own fire,
and cut them down. The actual conflict,
on this memorable occasion, lasted but four
minutes. The royal army was quite defeated ;
nearly 400 slain, 700 taken prisoners, whilst
but 170 escaped. The celebrated Colonel
Gardiner was present at this battle; he was a
rare example of a conscientious, prayerful, and
religious man, amidst the excitement of a
warrior’s life.. He was at this time very old,
and. so weak, that he had to be. carried, in a
chair, from Haddington to the field. Deserted
by his dragoons, and severely wounded, he put
himself at the head of a small body of foot, and
64 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

only ceased to fight when brought to the ground.
by severe wounds. He died in the Manse, or
Parsonage house, of Tranent. He was buried
in Tranent churchyard, and some years after-
wards, when the ground was disturbed, his head
was found, marked by the stroke of the scythe
that was the cause of his death. The wounded
were on this occasion treated very kindly by the
conquering army. A journalist of the time,
says: ““Whatever notions Low country people
may have of the Highlanders, I can attest that
they gave many proofs of kindness. Many
after the battle ran to Port Seton, for ale and
other liquor, to revive the wounded or dying.
I saw a Highlander, with patient, tender kind-
ness, carrying a poor wounded soldier on. his
back, and leave him in a house with sixpence to
pay his charge”? The wounded men of both
sides were taken to Colonel Gardiner’s house
at Tranent, and a few years ago it was thought
possible to discern the stains of their blood on
the old oak floor. The Highlanders were very
active in despoiling the slain. Every article
of value, according to their notion, was appro-
priated, and in their simplicity they often
HADDINGTON. ; 65

made ludicrous mistakes. “One who got a
watch, exchanged it for some worthless trifle,
remarking that he was glad he had done so, for
it had died that night, because it had stopped ;
another exchanged a horse for a pistol.” Rough
old Highlanders were seen going about with
the fine shirts of English officers, stretched
over the rest of their clothes; whilst boys were
seen strutting about with gold laced cock’d
hats on their heads.. Thus ended the battle
of Preston Pans.! :

The Prince’s conduct appears to have been
both moderate and merciful; he forbade any
outward signs of joy, inasmuch as he said,
blood had been shed and involved so many in
sorrow. The remainder of his history I will
relate in. its proper place, for I have something
more to tell you of Haddington, and we have
heard enough of battles for the present.

The county-town of Haddington is situated
on the south side of the Firth of Forth. In this
town, or in the neighbouring village of. Gifford,
was born the celebrated reformer John Knox.

Some writers have said that Knox’s parents

? Chambers’ History of the Rebellion.
F
66 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

were in poor circumstances. This does not
appear to have been the case. They were able
to give their son a good education, which in
that age was far from a common advantage.
In his youth he was sent to the Haddington
Grammar School, and thence to the University
of St. Andrew’s, at that time the first School
for learning in Scotland. He was ordained a
Priest in the Romish Church at an earlier age
than usual, and taught philosophy likewise in
the University. That you may rightly appre-
ciate the conduct and character of Knox, look
for a few moments at the circumstances of the
times in which he lived. Nothing perhaps has
given so great a prejudice to his actions as igno-
rance of the corruptions which reigned in the
Romish Church at that time. Full half of the
wealth of the nation belonged to the clergy.
Avarice and ambition, and the love of pomp and
show, influenced the men who pretended to teach
the religion of the meek and lowly Jesus. The
lives of the clergy were a scandal to their pro-
fession. Through the superstitions of princes
and. nobles, monasteries had multiplied greatly.
Dr. Mc Crie, in his life of Knox, says, “The
HADDINGTON. 67

kingdom swarmed with ignorant, idle, luxurious
monks, who like locusts devoured the fruits of
the earth. Friars, white, black, grey,” &c.
Then the clergy were shamefully ignorant.
Even bishops declared, and that without a blush,
that they never read any part of the Bible but
that which they met with im their missals or
Prayer Books. People were truly perishing for
lack of knowledge, for to that book which was
able te make them wise unto salvation, they had.
no access. It was locked up from them, and the
use of it in their own language was forbidden
under the heaviest penalties. The services were
mumbled in the Latin tongue, which many of
the priests did not understand, and some few
could scarcely read; and “scarce anything
remained of Christianity in Scotland, but its
name.” Many mediators were made to share
the honour of procuring the divine favour with
the “One Mediator between God and man,’
and more prayers were offered to the Virgin
Mary, than to Him who “ever liveth to make
intercession for us.” Men were taught to con-
fess to the Priests, to go on pilgrimage’ to the
shrine of some saint, to eat no flesh on Friday,
F2
68 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

to pay tithes and other church dues, and then
they were told they were safe. The sermons
were usually mere tales of the wonderful holi-
ness of a founder of some religious order, his
miracles, his watchings, fastings, combats with
the devil; but of the truths of the Bible, and
the glorious gospel of the blessed God, not a
word. The dying beds of rich men were visited
indeed, but for what purpose? was it to whisper
words of hope and comfort, or to point to Christ
as the Way, the Truth, and the Life? No—but
avaricious priests were ever hovering about the
dying man, to extort legacies for themselves or
the church. Nosooner had a poor husbandman
breathed his last, than the vicar came and
carried off the “corpse present ;” this consisted
of the best cow belongmg to the deceased, and
the uppermost covering of his bed, or upper
clothes. The service of God was neglected,
churches deserted, and places of worship served
only for houses of traffic, resorts for pastime, or
sanctuaries for malefactors. Such was popery
in Scotland.

The doctrines of the Reformation had made
some progress however, in the country, before
HADDINGTON. 69

Knox embraced them. As early as 1526, before
Henry the Eighth’s quarrel with the Pope, which
doubtless brought about the Reformation in
England, a youth of the name of Patrick
Hamilton, made known the glad tidings of the
gospel to his country-men. He was of a noble
family, and went over to Wittemberg to confer
with Luther; he came back after serious study,
of the Scriptures, and in 1528 was cruelly put to
death, at St. Andrew’s, by Archbishop Beatoun.
A reformer, whose name was George Wishart,
was very useful to Knox, in instructing him
in the great doctrines of the Bible: he however
suffered martyrdom, leaving Knox; almost alone,
to follow in his steps.

Cardinal Beatoun, the great persecutor of
the reformers, was put to death by a small but
determined band of men, soon after Wishart’s
martyrdom; and Knox has been accused of
being privy to the death of the cardinal. It is
impossible to justify Knox, if such were the
case, and his vindication of the act cannot be
denied. His sentiments were now so fully
known that his life was in great danger, and
he was obliged to take refuge in the castle
70 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

of St. Andrew, then held by the Protestants.
Here he began his ministry. He was shortly
after sent to France, and at the instigation of
the Pope was. kept close prisoner there, put in
chains, and treated with great severity. In 1549,
when Edward the Sixth came to the throne, he
was liberated, and returned to Scotland.

He was appointed to preach at Berwick, and
was very useful there. He resided in England
for some time, and was appointed one of King
Edward’s chaplains, but he did not agree with
the principles of the English Church nor with
the use of the common Prayer Book. In 1556
he went to Geneva, in Switzerland, to be Pastor
over an English Church there, and greatly en-
joyed Calvin’s friendship. At this’ time he
assisted several exiles from England, in preparing
a translation of the Bible. This is commonly
called the Geneva Bible.

In 1557 Knox received letters from several,
good men in Scotland, entreating him to return.
Queen Mary’s cruel persecution of the Protest-
ants, was the cause of a singular production of
the Reformer. Its title was, “The first blast
of the trumpet against the monstrous Regiment
HADDINGTON. 71

of Women,” i. e., regimén or government; in
which he freely attacked the practice of permit-
ting females to govern nations. In Elizabeth’s
reign he wrote an awkward apology, but it
is very likely that Cecil, her secretary, never
presented it to her, for he was friendly to the
Scotch Congregation, and knew that Knox’s
uncourtly style was not, likely to please his
royal mistress. Queen Mary, soon after her
arrival from France, had an interview with
Knox. Mary seems to have expected to awe
the bold man into submission by her authority,
but she little knew Knox. She accused him of
writing a book against her authority, and many
other charges. To these Knox replied that if
to teach the truth of God in sincerity, and to ex-
hort people to worship God according to his word,
were to excite subjects to rebel, he was guilty.
The conversation between him and the young
queen is extremely interesting, and so instructive
that I cannot resist copying you a portion of it.

After a long argument, Mary said, “Well, I
perceive that my subjects shall obey you and
not me: and will do what they please, not what
T command.”
72 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

“God forbid, madam,” replied Knox, “my
travail and desire is that princes and subjects
may obey God. And think not, madam, that
wrong is done to you, that you are required to
be subject to God. He craves of kings that
they be as foster fathers, and queens as nursing
mothers to his people.”

“But you are not the church that I will
nourish,” said the wilful queen, “TI will defend
the church of Rome, for it is, I think, the true
church of God.”

“Your will, madam, is no reason, neither
doth your thought make the Roman harlot the
spouse of Jesus Christ.”

He also warmly opposed Mary’s marriage
with a Papist; and in his interview with her,
his free uncourtly language so offended her
that she wept bitterly. His remarks on these
occasions brought him into sad disgrace, and he
was summoned to take his trial. When the
queen had taken her seat at the council, and
perceived Knox at the foot of the table, she
burst into a loud fit of laughter. “That man,”
she said, “had made her weep and shed never a
tear himself; she would now see if she could
LINLITHGOW. 73

make him weep.’ He was, however, to. the
queen’s bitter disappointment, not only un-
moved, but finally acquitted. He died in the
67th year of his age, worn out with anxieties
and Jabours. From the time that he embraced
the Reformed Religion, he enjoyed little rest.
For many years an outlaw and an exile, and
constantly exposed to danger, it must to him
have been a glorious exchange, when he fell
asleep in Jesus.

His character has been so differently judged,
that it is difficult to give a correct sketch of it.
Many of his faults may be traced to his natural
temperament, and to the character of the age
and country in which he lived. His passions
were strong—he was an earnest man in every
thing, and knew neither disguise nor affectation.
His language was often coarse and intemperate,
and some of his actions seem to have sadly
lacked the spirit of Christian meekness. McCrie
says, at the close of his memoir, “In contem-
plating such a character as that of Knox, it is
not the man so much as the reformer that ought
to engage our attention.”

The wisdom of God in raising up persons
endued with qualities suited to the work
74 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

allotted to them, should engage our particular
admiration. It is easy for us in the present
day to censure the great movers in the grand
scheme of reforming a corrupt church, but we
may nevertheless take some useful lessons from
the manly, uncompromising Luther, and even
from the stern and somewhat coarse Knox,
in the stedfastness with which they followed
their motto—to “ hearken unto God rather than
to men.” They did not consider their fellow-
creatures’ opinions, they looked to no worldly
gain, to no rich preferment, to no future wealth
nor living ; but, “‘ what says the word of God ?”
was the question which ever and anon they put
when combatting with the obstinate superstitions
of the Romish church. Study the character of
such men as Knox now. It is a time that’ calls
upon the young to do this; and remember that
which men and children are too apt to forget—
that there is but one authority on earth for any
religious opmion whatever, the Holy Bible, the
sure word of God. We will now close our long
chapter on this interesting county, but I hope
you will not regret the space I have given to so
important a subject as that of the Reformation
in Scotland.
Chapter Hitth.

/ LINLITHGOW.
The Palace—James [V—The apparition explained—Mary’s birth-placo
—Queen’s ferry.
EDINBURGH OR MIDLOTHIAN.

The Old Town--The Castle—Description of the old-fashioned inhabitant
—Greyfriars Church—Signing of the Covenant—The Covenanters—
Holyrood House, story of Mary—Dalkeith—Roslin—Hawthornden.

Of all the palaces so fair,

Built for the royal dwelling ;

In Scotland fair, beyond compare, |

Linlithgow is excelling.
Tus next county that we will consider is that of
Linuirugow. Its boundaries are the Frith of
Forth on the east, Stirlmgshire on the north,
Peebles and Lanark on the south, which last
county also bounds it on the west.

Linlithgow, the capital, lies in a hollow along
the borders of a lake, surrounded by hills. . The
village consists of a long narrow street, but the
principal object of terest is the fine old palace.
There are many interesting associations with
76 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

this place. The exterior is rather rough, and it
was evidently constructed in troublous times
with a view to defence. A few windows above
and as many slits below are the only apertures
that open to the outside'of the building. The
architecture of the interior court is the best.

No part of the ruins is roofed. The walls
are all that remain of this once noble palace.
Edward the First spent a whole winter at Lin-
lithgow, during the wars which succeeded his
invasion of Scotland.

You read in a former chapter of the disastrous
battle of Flodden. At the church in Linlith-
gow palace, James IV saw the apparition of
which the superstitious and ignorant have made
many strange tales, but the facts are, I believe,
these :—

Queen Margaret, his wife, who was sister of
Henry VIII, was at that time passing a few
days with James at this palace. The day before
the battle when the king was attending vespers,
as the evening service was called, and praying
for success on his intended expedition, there
“came in a man clad in a blue gown or blowse,
belted about him with a roll of white’ linen.
EDINBURGH. 77

His head was bare, bald at the top, with yellow
locks hanging on each side, and his age about
fifty. He came fast forward among the lords
crying and speering especially for the king,
saying he wanted to.speak to him.” At last
the man reached the desk where King James
was at prayer; he made no reverence to him, but
leaned on him gruffling (or bending down to the
desk) and spoke thus. “ Sir king, my mother
hath sent me to thee, charging thee not to go
where thou hast purposed, which if thou do
thou shalt not fare well, nor none that is with
thee.” : ;
These words spoken, the messenger escaped
from among the assembly, and so suddenly dis-
appeared-that he ‘seemed to vanish miraculously.
There is no doubt that those who wished to
dissuade James from the battle tried to work
on his superstitious mind by this means, and
therefore dressed up a man to represent St.
John, called the adopted son of the Virgin
Mary. ‘
The Roman Catholics believed in the pos-
sibility of the souls of departed saints and
apostles appearing on earth, and many impos-
78 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

tures of which you may read in history are of
this kind. Nothing, however, could dissuade
James, and the result you have already heard.

James V, the son of this king, and father of
Mary Stuart, was scarcely less unfortunate.
He died of grief at the loss of a large army, and
when news was brought him of her birth, gave
a mournful reply. He was scarcely thirty-one
years old, and survived his child’s birth but a
few days. Her troubles ‘began very early, and
in this old ruined palace did she first see the
light. The supposed room is still shewn, and
there is something very affecting in visiting the
birthplace of one whose life from the cradle to
the grave was a constant scene of disquietude
and sorrow.

Henry VIII of England was very anxious to
get possession of this infant Queen, and eagerly
desired a marriage with her to his only son,
afterwards Edward VI, but the Scotch were a
little suspicious of King Henry’s motives and
declined the honour. Mary, when very young;
was accordingly sent to France, with a view to
her education'and subsequent union with the
young heir of that kingdom, whilst Mary of
LINLITHGOW. 79

Guise, her mother, an ambitious woman and a
bigoted Catholic, was appointed Queen Regent,
and she and the persecuting Cardinal Beatoun,
who, as I told you, was the murderer of Hamil-
ton and Wishart, ruled the kingdom much as
they pleased during Mary’s minority. Of her
marriage and early widowhood, it is no part of
the present pages to treat; we will talk more
of Mary bye and bye, when we come to any
place rendered memorable by her residence or
her misfortunes. __ “

The Parliament ‘hall is a long noble room,
but very ruinous. The kitchens are spacious,
and on the side of one of them is a large oven
with seats all round it,

A great part of Linlithgow Palace was
destroyed in 1746, when the royal army was
proceeding to meet the Pretender, and lay on
straw in thesé princely halls. The town of
Queens-ferry, on the Frith of Forth, is a small
seaport, and derives its name from Margaret, wife
of Malcolm ITI, often crossing over that passage
to Dunfermline, where there was a palace.

We will now look at Epinpuren or Mip-
Loratan, which contains the capital of Scotland.
80 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

The county of Edinpurgh is bounded on the
north by the Frith of Forth, on the north-east
‘and east by Haddington and Berwickshire, on
the south by Lanarkshire, Peebles, and Selkirk-
shire, and on the west by Linlithgow.

Edinburgh, the capital, is a most interesting
town. It was at the beginning of George ITI’s
reign an inconvenient, ill-built, and old-fashioned
place, of about 70,000 inhabitants. It is now a
kind of double city, first there is the picturesque
old town, occupied now by the poorer classes,
and secondly, there is the beautiful modern town,
inhabited by the upper classes. Many a poor
family now dwells in a fine house in the old
town, once the residence of some grand. person,
and many a fine oak-panclled room or carved
ceiling shelters poverty and misery where once
there were riches and comfort.

The city is built on three ridges running east
and west. The central ridge is ended by a
rocky precipice on which is the castle, a fine
old building. The rock on, which it stands
is two hundred feet in height, and many
interesting events have occurred within the
walls of this castle. Here Queen Mary gave
EDINBURGH. 81

birth to her only son, afterwards James I of
England. /

Across the valley which separates the old
from the new town, a bridge was erected, and
further west, across the same valley, a mound
of earth, chiefly formed of the rubbish removed
in digging the foundations of the newly-erected
houses, was begun in 1783. A third and nearer
bridge connects the western part of the new town
with the southern district. Before these bridges
were built, the only communication to the south
and north was by those narrow, steep lanes,
called closes and wynds, which descend from
both sides of the high street. The meaning of
close, is a passage in a town for persons on
foot; wynds are passages for carriages. Some
of these curious narrow little streets are com-
posed of immensely high houses, and are so
narrow that persons may shake hands with their
opposite neighbours.

It is really a treat to walk about this anti-
quated part of the town, and to recal the habits
of the simple people who once lived there.
Ladies used to have their tea drinkings at six,
and were lighted to their friend’s house by a girl

G
82 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

bearing a lantern. Gas was unknown in the old
times at Edinburgh, but if the night were very
dark a sedan-chair was ordered, a kind of carriage
carried by men. The dresses of the ladies in the
last century were very odd. An old gentleman
has been heard to describe two hooped ladies
moving up and down the Lawn market on a
summer’s evening, whose figures took up the
whole path. In the narrow lanes they had often
to tilt their hoops up and carry them under their
arms, Stays were made so stiff and long that
they touched the chair both before and behind
when the lady sat down, and she had to hold fast
by the bed post whilst the maid laced her. There
is a book called “Traditions of Edinburgh,” by
Mr. Robert Chambers, in which you may read
many amusing anecdotes. I will copy you a
curious advertisement of a school for young
ladies, which that book contains, and which was
extracted from an old Edinburgh Gazette, of
the year 1763. “Wax work of all sorts taught
by a gentlewoman from London ; filigree work,
japan work on amber or glass; gum work ;
pastry of all sorts; boning a fowl without cutting
the back: butter work; preserving pickles ;
EDINBURGH. - 88

writing and arithmetic, music and dancing,”
with many more accomplishments too tedious to
mention. In the College Wynd, in Edinburgh,
Sir Walter Scott was born. In the Netherbow,
in the old town, is the residence or manse of the
celebrated Reformer Knox, and perched in a
corner above the door is a curious little effigy of
him preaching in a stone pulpit. Grayfriars’
Church is a very interesting part of the old town,
it lies near the Grass Market, and. here are the
remains of many celebrated men—Robertson,
the historian; Ramsay, who was induced by
his friend Fenelon, archbishop of Cambray, to
change his deistical opinions, and who afterwards
educated the children of the pretender, and
many others. But this churchyard will ever be
a memorable place, as the scene of the signing
of the covenant. The document was handed
outafter a sermon from one of their celebrated.
preachers, and multitudes signed on the flat
monumental stones, amidst prayers and tears,
some even writing with their blood.

At the south-west angle of the churchyard i is
a gateway leading to an inclosure where several
hundred of these faithful covenanters were

a2
84 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

imprisoned after the Battle of Bothwell Bridge,
which I mentioned to you in a former chapter.
The cruelty these poor creatures endured seems
incredible. They were allowed scarcely any-.
thing to lie upon or to cover them, their food
was but four ounces of bread daily, and they
were guarded day and night. If any person
arose from the ground at night he was shot at.
Some gained their liberty by signing a bond
never to take up arms against the King, but
four hundred refusing were kept five months
in this frightful state, only being permitted
shingle huts at the approach of winter, which
was boasted of as a great mercy. A remnant,
about two hundred and fifty-seven in number,
were afterwards sent to Barbadoes, but the
vessel was wrecked and only forty-nine came on
shore alive. :

The old Tolbooth or prison of Edinburgh was
burnt in the time of George IT, during some
riots known by the name of the Porteous riots.
It was near St. Giles’ church. There used to
be a great many booths or shops around the
church, but the council ordered that none but
booksellers’, watchmakers’, and jewellers’ shops
EDINBURGE. 85

should be permitted in that neighbourhood.
The goldsmiths were quite a superior class of
tradesmen, and wore scarlet cloaks and cocked
hats. Their principal trade was in Parliament
Close. You have, no doubt, heard of the noted
George Heriot. His shop and workshop were
in this part of the town. King James I, who
had frequent occasion to borrow money of him,
often paid private visits to him in this little
seven-feet square shop. How unlike the gold-
smiths’ shops of the present day. - Hume, the
celebrated historian, was born in Edinburgh. -

We must not omit to notice Holyrood house.
Of the ancient palace built by James V, but
little remains. It is at the east end of the
Canongate, and occupies the site of one of the
many abbeys of David I. In the chapel the
remains of many royal persons are ‘buried.
There are some relics of Mary Queen of Scots
which are very interesting.

I have already told you a little about Mary,
and I cannot now give you the full particulars of
her story. She was sent very young to a French
court, and married the French King Francis.
At nineteen she was left a widow, and returned
86 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

to Scotland at a time when it was distracted
with quarrels and discord. Her second mar-
riage, with Darnley, was an unhappy one,
and her intimacy with her secretary, David
Rizzio, was a very ill-advised and foolish thing
in a married woman, to say the least of it.
She had received a bad education, and, in a
French court, which was at that time very
wicked, it is possible that her nice notions of
propriety were blunted. She had chosen a
foolish headstrong boy of nineteen for her
husband, who was extremely ambitious to have
the title of King. This crown-matrimonial
Mary had no intention of bestowing with her
hand, and Darnley, seeing Rizzio so high in
his wife’s favour, suspected that he encouraged
her in the refusal. About eight o’clock one
Saturday night, Mary was sitting at supper in
a small room adjoining her bed chamber in
Holyrood Palace, with the Countess of Argyle.
Rizzio was at the cupboard in a closet of the
bed chamber, tasting some meats intended for
the queen; when suddenly a panel opened
and Darnley, accompanied by a certain Lord
Ruthven, entering by a secret staircase, burst
EDINBURGH. 87

into the little dressing room and looked
gloomily at his victim Rizzio. The Queen and
Countess started up from table, and Rizzio at
once perceiving the intentions of the armed
men, got behind his mistress and clasped the
folds of her gown, earnestly imploring for
justice or mercy. ‘The assassins threw down
the table and seized on Rizzio, whilst Darnley
held the Queen. It was their intention, doubt-
less, to have seized the Italian and dragged
him from her presence in order to kill him
elsewhere, but their impatience hurried them to
instant murder. He fell, pierced with fifty-six
wounds, at the head of the staircase, the Queen
continuing to beg his life with tears and prayers;
but when she learned that he was dead, she
dried her tears and said, “I will now think of
revenge.”

In the following June, 1566, Mary gave
birth to a son, and for a time it seemed as
though Darnley and she were reconciled; but
it was only an outward reconciliation. In
January of the next year, Darnley fell ill of
the small pox, and the Queen, either really or
in pretence, softened after a time, brought him
88 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

to a religious house near Edinburgh, called
the Kirk of Field, just without the city walls.
The Queen and infant remained at Holyrood.
On the 9th of February some servants of the
Earl of Bothwell, a person who had been in
Mary’s confidence for some time, and a bitter
enemy of Darnley, found entrance to the cellars
underneath Darnley’s bed chamber, and placed
gunpowder there. About two hours after mid-
night, Bothwell, disguised in a riding cloak,
came to see the cruel scheme put in execution,
and soon an explosion took place. The body
of Darnley, and his chamber groom, were found
im an orchard the next day.

Whether Mary had any share in this horrid
crime it is not for us to determine. Had she
brought Bothwell to justice as he deserved, she
might not have been suspected; but although
there was a show of a trial, she shortly after,
and without much resistance, suffered herself to
be carried off and married by her late husband’s
murderer. We will leave her now, as her life in
Holyrood ends here. There is a baby’s basket
in Mary’s bedchamber, prepared, doubtless, by
her, before her infant’s birth; besides some of
EDINBURGH. 89

her needlework and other articles which belonged
to the unhappy queen, interesting and affecting
memorials of the past.

T have left little room to tell you of the new
town, which is very fine. Prince’s Street, Queen
Street, and many handsome squares are worth
notice; but the description would not perhaps
gratify you much.

Dalkeith is, next to Edinburgh and Leith,
the most considerable town of Mid Lothian;
and it was for some time the residence of
General Monk, to whom Cromwell delegated
the government of Scotland.

Roslin chapel and castle, seven miles from
Edinburgh, are well worth seemg. The castle
overhangs the glen of the river Esk, and is
separated from the neighbouring ground by a
cut in the solid rock. The beautiful scenery
is confined to the banks of the Esk. Neigh-
bouring coal mines sadly deface the country
around.

Hawthornden is a mansion of Charles the
First’s time. The Scottish poet, Drummond, a
friend of Shakespeare, built this place. It is said
that Ben Jonson, the poet, wit, and dramatist,
90 - STORIES OF SCOTLAND. ct

actually walked from London to pay Drummond
a visit here. Like a good landlord, eran ae 4
met him at the gate, exclaiming—

‘Welcome! welcome! royal Ben.”
To which Jonson replied— |
“Thank ye, thank ye, Hawthornden.”’

We must now leave the interesting county of

Edinburgh and Mid Lothian.





























io, i! | ne
es I a





























HOLYROOD HOUSE.


Chapter Sixth.

FIFESHIRE.

Highlands and Lowlands—Dunfermline Abbey—Queen Margaret—
Discovery of Bruce’s coffin—Charles the First’s Birthplace—Sst.
Andrew’s—Largo—Story of Alexander Selkirk.

KINROSS.

Lochleven Castle—Reason of its name—More about Mary—Her escape
from Lochleven—Her defeat—Flight to England.
Havine considered the thirteen southern coun-
ties of Scotland, it will be necessary before
I commence the next nine, to give you a
little history of the distinction which existed
between the Highlands and the Lowlands.
The range of mountainous counties of which
you are about to learn, was inhabited by a race
of men, different, in manners and language,
to those who lived in that part called the
Lowlands. The English used to call these
people the “Wild Scots,” the French the
“Scottish Savages.” The losses which the
Low Country had sustained in early. times,
92 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

by the English wars, had so weakened the
district. near the Highlands, that the people
became quite unable to repress the incursions of
the mountaineers, who came down from their
hills, burned, destroyed, and plundered them,
as if it were an enemy’s country. These
were at one time divided into forty different
clans, families, or tribes, each clan dwelling on
its own portion of land or territory. This little
corner of Europe had been the last to shelter
the remains of that early race, called Celts,
of whom ancient history speaks as possessing
the old continent, but who were gradually dis-
persed by other nations, whom we call ancient,
to the extremities of the known world. The
Highlanders believing that the Lowlanders
were their foes, were always invading their
territories. This was the cause for the erection
of certain forts, of which I shall’ have occasion
to speak presently, which were established and
garrisoned by government to keep the turbu-
lent clans in proper order. Hach clan was
governed by a chief or head of the family. In
almost every clan were subordinate chiefs or
chieftains.
HIGHLANDS AND LOWLANDS. 93

The Highland dress is very picturesque,
but it is not often used now, except on gala
days. In the reign of George II, a curious
act was passed to prohibit its beg worn. It
was enacted that from and after the first of
August, 1747, any person, whether man or boy,
within Scotland, excepting officers or soldiers
in his Majesty’s service, who should on any
pretence wear or put on the clothes called
Highland clothes, namely, the plaid, philibeg,
trews, shoulder belts, or any part of the High-
land garb, or should use great coats made
of party-coloured plaid, or stuff, should be
imprisoned without bail for six months. The
dress is composed of a tartan, or plaid, grace-
fully folded round the body, and the philibeg,
or short petticoat, with tartan stockings and
bonnet.

The county of Fire is a district including
also that of Kinross. It is a sort of peninsular,
bounded on one side by the German Ocean, and
on two sides by the Frith of Forth and Tay.
The great passage across the, Forth, called
Queens Ferry, belonged, before the Reformation,
to the Abbot of Dunfermline.
94 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

Dunfermline is an ancient and interesting
town, and at a very early period of Scottish
history it was the seat of government. It
once had a wealthy abbey. Queen Margaret,
who gave the name to Queen’s Ferry, was the
grandniece of our. Saxon king, called Edward
the Confessor. She fled from England at the
time of the Norman Conquest, and was kindly
received by the Scotch king, Malcolm, who
shortly after her arrival married her. She was
a learned, excellent woman, and softened the
eharacter of her rough and warlike ‘husband.
Queen Margaret and Robert Bruce are both
said to be buried in Dunfermline Abbey; also
David I, the celebrated abbey builder; and it
was on the occasion of James the First’s visit
to Dunfermline, that he made the well known
observation that king David had been “a sair
saunt to the crown.” The coffin of Bruce was
dug up in 1818, the lead in which the body was
wrapped was entire, and even some fragments of
fine cloth embroidered with gold, which formed
his shroud. Charles I was born at Dunfermline
Palace. He was the son of James I and Anne

of Denmark. The bed which Queen Anne
FIFESHIRE. 95

brought from her own country, a large, cumbrous
four-post affair, was for many years shown at
the public house of Dunfermline.

St. Andrew’s is\an ancient city, and has.
a University. Its Cathedral, still a splendid
ruin, was destroyed by John Knox’s followers
in 1559. It was avery common saying of the
stern old Reformer, that “if the nest were pulled
down the rooks would fly away,” but certainly
with all due allowance for the excitement of the
times, we cannot but regret the untempered
zeal which has deprived us of so many of our
finest architectural ornaments, built in many
instances if with mistaken still with sincere
desires to glorify God.

At Largo, on the coast of Fifeshire, the
celebrated Alexander Selkirk was born, in 1796.
His father was a fisherman. Alexander was a
hot-tempered boy, and soon offended. He came
home one night from work, and being thirsty
took up a mug of water to drink, which turned
out to be salt water. This disgusted and irri-
tated him, and his brother who was sitting by
still further increased his anger by laughing
at the mistake. Alexander struck him, a fight
96 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

ensued, and the end of it was that he left Largo
in disgrace.

He went to sea, and was shipwrecked on
the desert Island of Juan Fernandez, where
he lived sometime in solitude. He was taken
off the Island by a vessel, and after many
years absence returned home, bringing his gun,
sea chest, and the cup of his own making,
which the family still preserve with great care.
Alexander did not remain long at home, how-
ever, and was never heard of after the second
time he left it. .

Dr. Adam Smith, author of a work called the
“Wealth of Nations,” was born at Kirkaldy in
Fife.

Krwross is surrounded by the counties of Fife
and Perth. Lochleven castle is on an island of
about two acres, in the loch which has, according
to the Scotch, the following peculiarities. It
is eleven miles round, encompassed by eleven
hills, is fed by eleven streams, and contains
eleven kinds of fish, and is also studded with
eleven islands. This is doubtless the origin
of its name. The castle consists of one square
tower, not very massive, although five stories
FIFESHIRE. 97

in height. It is now partly in ruins and quite
dismantled. ,

Here Mary Queen of Scots was confined.
After her unpardonable indiscretion in marry-
ing Bothwell, her husband’s murderer, her fate
seemed sealed. He used her very ill, and
being disappointed in his hopes of getting
the young Prince into his keeping, used such
upbraiding language to her that she prayed for
a knife with which to stab herself, rather. than
endure his ill-treatment. In the meantime the
people were very indignant, anda large party of
the nobility determined to remove Bothwell from
his usurped power. An army was raised on
each side, and the Queen gave herself up. The
common soldiers hooted at her, and most believed
her guilty. As she approached Edinburgh, led
in triumph by the victors, the lower classes
grossly insulted her. A banner was carried
before her, coarsely displaying the portrait of
Darnley as he lay murdered under a tree in the
fatal orchard, with these words embroidered,
“Judge and avenge my cause O Lord!” and
on the other side, the little Prince on his knees,
holding up his hands. ’

H
98 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

As the Queen rode through the streets, with
her hair loose, and her garments in disorder,
covered with dust and overpowered with shame,
grief, and fatigue, this dreadful flag was dis-
played before her eyes, while the voice of the.
people sounded in her ears, accusing her of
being privy to Darnley’s murder.

The castle of Lochleven was her prison, and
here a great many lords of the council with
Murray and the Regent, waited on her to
compel her to surrender her crown to James
her son. Murray was Mary’s half-brother, but
she found little kindness or compassion from
him, and Lord Lindsay seized her delicate arm
with main force and left the print of his iron
glove there in his earnest effort to force her to
take the pen which was to sign away her right
to the crown of her ancestors. Sir William
Douglas, the Laird of Lochleven, was related
to the Regent Murray, and was a severe jailer,
but his younger brother, George, laid a plan to
deliver her from prison for which he was Pes
the island.

There was a boy in the castle, of fifteen or
sixteen years of age, a relation’ of the family,
KINEOSS. $9

called “little William Douglas,” who at length
contrived to steal the keys of the castle, while
the family were at supper, and when all had gone
to rest, he let Mary and her attendant out of the
tower, locked the castle gates, put the Queen
and her waiting-woman in a little boat, rowed
them to shore, and threw the keys into the lake.
A large party of Mary’s friends who knew of
the plot were waiting for her. On the Sunday
Mary was a helpless captive. On the Saturday
following she was at the head of a powerful army,
by which nine earls, nine bishops, eighteen lords,
and many gentlemen of rank engaged to defend
her person and restore her power. This army
however was completely defeated, and Mary,
escorted by a few faithful followers, rode sixty
miles before she stopped to rest at Dundrennan
Abbey, in Galloway, where her last night in
Scotland was spent.

Her resolution to take refuge in England,
and its consequences, axe not subjects for the
present little volume, which relates only to
Scotland. At twenty-six years of age a pall
was thrown over Mary’s life, and the remaining
nineteen years were passed in a kind of living

, H 2
100 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

death. Her faults were many; and her misfor-
tunes and disadvantages, whilst they excite our
compassion, should not blind us to the greatness
of her indiscretion, if not of her guilt. Sorrow
and grief, persecution and injustice, cannot
make a saint of Mary.

I do not know of anything more to tell you
of the little county of Kinross, with which I
will end this chapter.


Chapter Seventh.



. CLACKMANNAN.
Origin of its name.
STIRLINGSHIRE,

Castle—James I at his Parliament House—Carron Iron Works —
Bannockburn.
’ DUMBARTON,

Castle—Loch Lomond—Mountains—Peat Island—Water Birds. .

ARGYLESHIRE.
Inverary~«Its Castle—Marriage Tree—General Wade’s Roads—Glencroe

—Massacre of Glencoe.

THERE is but little to tell you of the county
of CrackMannan. It is bounded on the north
by Perthshire, on the south by the Frith of
Forth, on the east by Fife, and on the west
by the Frith of Forth, which separates it from
Stirling.

Its capital, Clackmannan, is a miserable old
town. When King Robert Bruce lived in Clack-
mannan tower, before the town was built, he one
day, when going a journey, happened to stop at
a certain shapeless blue stone, on which he lay
his glove, and then went on his way. He did
102 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

not discover his loss for some little time, when
he sent his servant back, desiring him to go to
the clack, .or stone, and seek his mannan, or
glove. This it is said gives the name of Clack-
mannan to the town. It. is usual for visitors to
chip a piece out of the stone, in remembrance
of the great fighting hero. -

STIRLINGSHIRE is one of the most beautiful
of the Scottish counties. It is bounded on the
north by Perth; on the south by Lanark and
Dumbarton, which county also bounds it on the
west ;.and on the east by the isthmus formed
by the Firths of Forth and Clyde.

Stirling, the capital, is a town of more than
nine thousand inhabitants, situated on an
eminence overlooking the Frith of Forth. Its
castle is a very striking object. James II of
Scotland was born there. James III, who was
very fond of Stirling as a residence, erected a
Parliament House there, which is now converted
into barracks. It is related of King James VI,
that when a very little child, according to the
formal usages of. the times, he was compelled to
be present at a somewhat stormy meeting of the
Parliament, and that his little Majesty casting












































































































































i
ACAI i
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ae
mR Na

STIRLING CASTLE.






STIRLINGSHIRE. 108

up his eyes, observed a hole in the roof of the
hall; the Scottish treasury being rather low in
its funds. Upon which he remarked, “TI think
this be but a broken Parliament,” an uncon-
scious satire with more truth in it than the
child imagined.

Upon the road, between Falkirk and Stirling,
there are the remains of a forest, famous in the
history of Wallace, a tree existed there until
lately which is said to have sheltered him se
his wanderings.

Carron iron works, in this county, are the
largest of the kind in the world. Every de-
scription of cast-iron articles is made here;
instruments of war, implements of agriculture,
and articles for domestic use. They are always
sold at a very reasonable rate. The beauty of
the casting, and the finish, is considered superior
to any in the world.

Bannockburn is noted for the great battle
fought between Edward II and Robert Bruce,
in which Edward lost thirty thousand men and
seven hundred knights.

There are many coal mines in n Stirlingshire.
Its principal river is the Forth.
104 STORIES OF SCOTLAND. |

DumpBarton.—The scenery of Dumbarton-
shire is extremely fine, and owns the celebrated
Loch Lomond as its principal ornament. This
loch or lake divides the county from Stirling-
shire on the north-east; on the north-west it
is bounded by Loch, or Lake Long; and on the
south by the river Clyde.

The’ capital, Dumbarton, is noted for its
castle, which is built on a rock shooting up
five hundred and sixty feet out of a plain, just
at the part of the river which joins the sea. It
measures nearly a mile in circumference, and
its situation is very picturesque.

The little village of Luss is built on a head-
larid that projects into the lake. Many persons
speak the Gaelic language there, and you may
frequently see the Highland dress.

Tarbet is a place where persons travelling in
Scotland usually stay, in order to see the beauty
of this splendid Loch Lomond, which, with its
polished surface, its soft hills in the distance,
and its lovely little green islands, cannot fail to
delight even those who may have seen the larger
and grander lakes of other countries. The loch
extends thirty miles. It is seldom wider than
DUMBARTONSHIRE. 105

eight or ten miles, and gradually narrows until
it ends in a little mountain streamlet. The
mountain called Ben Lomond is a striking
object. It is not, as is often the case with
mountains, so surrounded with inferior hills that
it is difficult to recognize it from its companions.
It rises three thousand two hundred and forty
feet above the level of the sea, and looks, indeed,
like a king of the whole territory.

There are other high mountains to be seen in
the neighbourhood of Tarbet. Ben Voizlich,
Benvenue, and Ben Arthur. Peat Island, on
Loch Lomond, is a favourite resort of waterfowl.
At the end of some little point of land may the
patient heron be seen, waiting till the incautious
fish, tempted by the warm sun to the shallows,
shall be within reach of its harpoon bill. The
rock and river ousel, also abound in the vicinity
and about the banks of Loch Lomond. The
rock ousel is fond of rocks and precipices, and
usually builds among them. When disturbed
it will fly from stone to stone, uttering a grating
chirp. The male ousel has a white ring round
the throat, the female none. The little river-
ousel, or dipper, another variety, feeds on water
106 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

insects and fish roe. It does not migrate, that
is to say, it does not leave the island at the
approach of winter, and is a hardy little bird,
for sometimes when both land and water are
bound in frost, it will strike up its cheerful song,
a sound as cheerful and strange as that of the
nightingale at midnight.

The next county is AreyLesHiIne, which is
bounded by Inverness on the north, Perth and
Loch Long on the east, the Firth of Clyde
on the south, and Jura Sound on the west.
Argyleshire signifies the land of strangers. The
Scots or Scoti, who came from Ireland, first
landed here.

Inverary, the county town, stands on a small
bay at the head of Loch Fine. The herring
fishery of Loch Fine has long been famous, and
the arms of the town are a net with a herring
in it. ;

A short distance from Inverary is an extra-
ordinary tree, called the marriage tree, from
the circumstance of its trunk, which separates
a few feet above the ground, again uniting
twenty feet higher up. This junction is formed
by a small branch, extending from the one stem
ARGYLESHIRE. 107

to the other. The handsome castle belonging
to the Duke of Argyle is worth seeing. It is
an interesting place, but I must not describe it
particularly, as I cannot undertake to write a
guide-book to all the wonders of this beautiful
country. The Argyle family have inhabited
Inverary castle for more than four hundred years,
but the foundation of the present castle was not
laid until 1745, and finished many years after-
wards. It is built of blue granite, in the style
of a castle, with towers at its angles.

There is a wild district in this part. of the
county, called Glencroe, which is about six
miles long, and with its frowning mountains, and
desolate cliffs, is a remarkable place. After
ascending gradually for about three miles, the
road runs, in a winding ‘direction, up the side of
the mountain, to the summit of a pass, where
is a stone seat, on which are inscribed the
words, “Rest and be thankful.” The road on
looking back looks like a narrow ribbon. You
will be told that this is one of General Wade’s
roads. This will not be very useful informatiqn
to you, unless you know when and wherefore
these roads were constructed. I will tell you.
108 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

After the rebellion in favour of the first
Pretender, that is to say the son of James II,
in which the Highlanders were so. active, the
English government determined to make great
efforts entirely to subdue this warlike race. A
warrant was therefore granted to Field Marshal
General Wade to inspect and report upon the
state of the Highlands. Their arms were taken
away in the first stance, and General Wade
boasted that the Highlanders, instead of going
armed with guns, swords, and dirks, now tra-
velled to market and to church with only staff
in hand; but little did General Wade suspect
how many thousand weapons lay in Highland
caverns concealed, ready for use whenever occa~
sion should offer. The great work, however,
that Wade had in view, and that with which
we have now more particularly to do, was the
establishment of military roads, through the
desolate and rugged regions of the north, insuring
a free passage for troops in a country of which
it might be said that every mountain was a
fortress built by nature. Hitherto the Highland
roads were mere tracts, made by the feet of men
and cattle, interrupted by rocks, morasses, and
ARGYLESHIRE. 109

torrents. These paths, Wade formed into solid
and excellent roads, and. the soldiers were, after
the fashion of the Romans, employed in the
undertaking. Now you will understand any
references hereafter made to General Wade’s
roads.

At Glencoe, which you must not confound
with Glencroe, in the northern part of Argyle-
shire, was a frightful massacre of the inhabitants,
in the reign of William and Mary, 1691. The
Clan of Glencoe inhabited a valley formed by
the river Coe, which falls into Loch Leven, not
fax from Loch Etive. The Government had sent
orders to the Highland Chiefs in August, 1691,
to submit to‘the king on ‘the first of January,
1692, and if they did not they -were threatened
with fire and sword. ‘Whis prodlamation -was
framed “by the Privy Council, unter ‘the ‘influ-
ence of Sir John ‘Dalrymple, master of Stair,
as. he was called. The Highlanders, I should
tell you, secretly retained their fidelity to King
James. The massacre was in winter; the scene
must have been dreadful; flying from their
burning huts, the half-naked Highlanders com-
mitted themselves to the darkness, snow, and
110 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

storm, of a winter’s morning; and bewildered
in snow-wreaths, many sank to rise no more.
The number massacred was thirty-eight, and
certainly this act is a stam on King William’s
character, who signed the warrant for the deed

of butchery.

































































































































LOCH LOMOND.
Chapter Gighth.



PERTHSHIRE.
Perth—The Reformation—John Knox’s Sermon—Murder of James I, at

Black Friars’ Abbey-—-The house in which Charles Edward slept—

Scone Palace—Coronation chair—The hills and crags of Kinnoul,

flowers and plants—Dunkeld--Dumblane—Archbishop Leighton—

Battle of Sheriffmuir—Loch Katrine—Scott’s description——Rob Roy.
Tue county of Pertusutre is one of the largest
counties in Scotland; it may be called the
Yorkshire of the country. It is partly situated
in the Highlands and partly im the Lowlands.
Its boundaries are, Stirlmg, Clackmannan, and
Kinross, on the south; Angus, and the Firth
of Tay, on the east; Inverness, and part of
Aberdeen, on the north; and Argyle, on the
west.

The capital, known by the name of the “ fair
city of Perth,” well deserves the appellation.
It has manufactures of gingham, shawls, and
handkerchiefs, and also carries on a great trade
in salmon. Jt is situated on the river Tay, and
112 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

the scenery around is lovely ; but it will be more
interesting to you to recall some of the scenes
in history, which have taken place within its
walls. It was at Perth that the reformed religion
was first publicly avowed. John Knox preached
a sermon in the parish church, against idolatry,
on the 11th of May, 1559; after the sermon,
one of the priests having given some provocation,
a number of people, in their zeal, broke down
all the altars and images in the church, and
then proceeded to demolish the monasteries.
After that Thursday, an afternoon sermon was
on that day preached for many years, and I
believe remains the custom still. .

Scone palace is about two miles from the town
of Perth, and the scene of the coronation of
many a Scottish king. Here too was the famous
stone chair, which Edward the First carried off
from Scotland as a trophy of one of his victo-
ries, and in which chair, since that time to the
present, all our kings and queens have been
crowned in Westminster Abbey. - There are
many fables. told of it, but of its antiquity
there can be no doubt. The stone is said to
have been originally conveyed from the kingdom
PERTHSHIRE. 113

of Gallicia in Spain, into Ireland, about 700
years before the birth of Christ, and thence
into Scotland, by King Fergus, about 370 years
afterwards, and in the year 850 it was placed
in the abbey of Scone, by King Kenneth, who
caused it to be inclosed in a wooden chair.

The old Palace does not now exist, but a
new building has been erected in its place; and
much of the ancient furniture and monuments
belonging to the old palace, are still preserved
in the present one. How many interesting
associations and recollections are connected with
this spot. Here was the coronation known in
Scotland as the “ Mourning Coronation” of the
Infant King, James the Fifth, father of Mary
Stuart. The old crown of Scotland being held
over the brow of a fatherless babe of one year and
five months, most of the witnesses and assistants
burst into a passion of sobs and tears; they wept
not only in recollection of their own losses at
Flodden, but of their late king who was dear to
all men whilst living, and, as Buchanan says,
“mightily lamented by his people at his death.”’

It was at Perth that James the First, King
of Scotland, was murdered. He was a just and

I
114 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

wise king, but his predecessors had not ruled
the nation wisely, and this reign was a constant
struggle with the nobles and priests.. These
nobles, who reigned like kings in their little
territories, resisted the new rules of their sensible
monarch, and a plot was laid for his assassination.
Sir Robert Grahame was the chief person con-
cerned in the undertaking. The king, whilst
at Perth, lived in the Abbey of Blackfriars,
there being no castle or palace suitable for his
residence. The day of the murder had been
spent in feasting and mirth, and at midnight the
assassins secretly entered the house, and stood
around: the king’s bed-chamber door, who was
in his night-gown and slippers, and was standing
gaily conversing with the queen before the fire.
At this moment a noise was heard, and the
king immediately took alarm, remembering his
bitter enemy Grahame. It is related that a
maid of honor, missmg the bar which should
have secured the door, and which had been
previously removed, thrust. her arm into the
aperture, which snapped in two as the murderers
forced their way in. James first tried to get
out of the windows, but they were barred. The
PERTHSHIRE. 116

description of his death is too horrid to relate ;
he fell pierced by sixteen wounds, in the forty-
fourth year of his age, in the year 1437. He is
described by an abbot who was at Perth on the
night of the murder, as “fair and comely in
person, under the middle size, but strong and
manly.” He was “skilled in music, and was
no mean poet.” It was the misfortune of James,
says an author, that his maxims and manners
were. too refined for the age in which he lived.

Prince Charles Edward, on his way to Edin-
burgh, slept at Perth in an antique house with
a wooden front, where the Union Bank now
stands; it belonged to Viscount Stormont.
Charles had but a guinea in his fee on that
night at Perth.

The hills in the neighbourhood of this inter-
esting town, are rich in minerals. On the right
bank of the Tay, the hills of Moncrief possess
many rare plants. Among the crags of Kinnoul
are the cat-mint, vine, garlick, silver cinque-foil,
and rock speed-well; there are foxes and weasels
in abundance, ‘as well as pole-cats among the
hills.
Dunkeld is a beautiful spot.
116 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

At the ancient cathedral-city of Dumblane,
lived the good Archbishop Leighton, whose
works are, even to the present day, greatly
valued. He lived in the reign of Charles II,
and favored the Presbyterian party. There is
a walk near the town still called the bishop’s
walk.

The battle of Sheriff Muir, near Dumblane,
was fought by the son of James IT, called the
Old Pretender, or the Chevalier St. George,
in which he was entirely defeated.

Perthshire has so many natural beauties that
it is impossible to tell you one half of theni.
The lochs are extremely fine. Loch Katrine,
at the south of the county, is the most remark-
able. The description of the lake, by Seott, in
the little poem called the “ Lady of the Lake,”
is more impressive than any that I could give
you, and so you will say if ever you see it.

“ Gleaming with the setting sun,
One burnished sheet of living gold,
Loch Katrine lay before him rolled.
In all her length fair winding lay,
‘With promontory, creek, and bay;
And islands that, empurpled bright,
Floated amid the livelier light ;
PERTHSHIRE. : 117

And mountains that like giants stand,

To sentinel enchanted land.

High on the south huge Benvenue,

Down on the lake its masses threw;

Crags, knolls, and mounds, confusedly hurled,
The fragments of an earlier world.”

There is an island at the eastern extremity
of the lake, the shores of which are covered
with a fine white sand and gravel. Many of
these localities are celebrated by Scott, but as
they are not facts, but tales, I will not allude
to. them in a book which is intended only to
relate simple truths. +

The Trosachs, so called in this part of the
country, means, in Gaelic, a rough, bristled
territory.

Benledi is the most magnificent mountain in
Scotland, three thousand feet in height. Its
name signifies, “the hill of God!” It is sup-
posed that the Druids used to worship here.

In Balquidder church is Rob Roy’s grave.
You may have heard Rob Roy’s name, but are
not, perhaps, quite clear about his history, which
is so mixed up with tales and romances that it
is not.easy to arrive at the facts. Rob Roy,
who was also called Campbell and Mc Gregor,
118 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

was the brother of the Laird of Mc Gregor, a
chief of the clan Mc Alpine, once a powerful
tribe of Highlanders, and was, on an expedition
in his brother’s absence, appointed to the com-
mand of the clan. He was always a great enemy
to the oppressions of the rich and powerful,
but whatever romance may be thrown over his
history, he was, in fact, a turbulent and dishonest
man, and was finally out-lawed by the govern-
ment. Many a cave and hiding place is shown
where Rob is said to have concealed himself,
but, as I said before, it is difficult to say how
far such accounts are to be depended upon.

The red deer, roe deer, hares, foxes, rabbits,
badgers, pine martens, polecats, weasels, and
moles, abound in these districts. - From the
wooded shelter afforded by the banks of the
Tay, many birds are to be found. Among the
native birds are the grouse, black-cock, eagle,
kite, buzzard,. and several of the hawk tribe.
Grouse shooting is a favourite amusement here
with many persons who visit Scotland for this
purpose.
Chapter Hirth,



FORFAR OR ANGUS,
The Tay—Story of Macbeth—Glamis Castle.

KINCARDINE.
Dunnottar Castle—The regalia—Queen Margaret.

ABERDEEN,
Old and New Town—Curious Bridge—College—Trade of Aberdeen.

BANFF.
‘Capital—Archbishop. Sharpe’s Murder—The Spey.

ELGIN OR MORAYSHIRE. =
Remains of the Cathedral—Removal of the Lead—Fate of the Vessel—

History of the Witches.

Tue county of Forrar is bounded on'the north
by Aberdeen and Kincardine; on the west by
Perthshire; on the south by the Firth of Tay,
‘which separates it from Fife; and on the east
by the German Ocean.

, Dundee, the capital, is remarkable for the
many sieges it has undergone. It is a well-
built seaport, and has a fine harbour on the
Frith of Tay. The Tay at this place is very
wide, and is supposed to discharge more water
120 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

into the sea than any other river in Great
Britain. The place where the Forfar witches
used. to be burned, is a little to the north of the
town.

I wonder whether you know the. story of
Macbeth and the witches. I fear. that, like
some other historical tales, it owes some interest
to romance, but I will give you, as nearly as I
can, the facts.of Macbeth’s history. At Glamis
there was, in old times, a castle, and Glamis
Castle, in Forfarshire, is the place: where the
event occurred which I am about to relate,
Very early in the history of Scotland, when the
Scots and Picts were one people, there was a
King of Scotiand, called Duncan. He had two
sons, Malcolm and Donaldbane. The Danes,
at the close of good old King Duncan’s reign,
landed in Scotland, with a great army. The
Danes, you know, were the dread of all the
nations in Europe. They were a. wandering,
mischievous, and cruel race of men’; and did so
much mischief, that in church people used to
put up prayers to God to save them from these
destructive northmen. King Duncan being too
old to go to battle against them, sent out one
FORFAR. 121

of his near. relations, called Macbeth: he was
son of Finel, who was thane of Glamis. The
governors of provinces ‘were at that time
called thanes; they were afterwards called earls.
Macbeth put himself at the head of an army,
therefore, and marched against the Danes. A
relation of his, called Banquo, accompanied him,
and a great battle was fought, in which Macbeth
and Banquo were victorious. Then Macbeth
and his army marched back to a town in the
north of Scotland, called Forres. There lived
at. Forres (so the tale runs, at least) three old
women who people thought were witches, and
witches were supposed by the ignorant and
superstitious people of early times to be able to
tell what would happen. These old women saw
that they were respected and feared, and they
used to impose upon people very often, and get
a great deal-of money by their witchcraft. So
the three old women went and stood by the
wayside, and stepping before Macbeth as he
marched at the head of his soldiers, the first
woman said, “All hail, Macheth! hail to the
Thane of Glamis.” The second said he should
be the Thane of Cawdor; but the third said,
122 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

* All hail to thee, Macbeth, that shalt be King
of Scotland!’ Before: Macbeth could recover
from his astonishment, a messenger came to
tell him that his father was dead, so that he was
Thane of Glamis by inheritance; and that the
Thane of Cawdor had lost his office and that
Macbeth was to be thane in his place. But do
you not think that the witches had had some
news of these events before? I should think
there was no doubt of it. The third compliment
was very likely occasioned by his great victory,
which made the old women think flattery sea-
sonable.

Macbeth seeing that part of their words were
come true, began to think how the rest was to
come to pass; and he and his wife plotted
together how they should get possession of the
crown of Scotland. He invited Duncan, there-
fore, to come and see him at his castle; and the
poor old king innocently went. Macbeth and
his lady received him with apparent joy, and
made a great feast in honour of the king’s visit.
About the middle of the night the king retired
to rest. Two armed men, as was the custom in
those barbarous times, slept in his chamber to
FORFAR. 123

defend him; but Lady Macbeth put some drugs
into their wine, in order to make. them sleep
soundly. Then came Macbeth, about two in
the morning, to the three sleepers, and, taking
the dirks of the watchers from them, stabbed
poor king Duncan to the heart. Then Macbeth
put the bloody daggers into the hands of the
sentinels and went to bed.

Next morning you may suppose the confusion
and excitement there was in the castle. Macbeth
of course pretended the greatest surprise and
indignation, but King Duncan’s sons did not
believe his story, and Malcolm, the eldest son,
went oyer to England to beseech assistance from
the English king to place him on the Scottish
throne. In the meantime Macbeth was king,
but terribly fearful and unhappy. Edward the
Confessor, one of the Saxon kings, gave Malcolm
the help he desired, and Macbeth was killed in
battle. e

Shakspeare the poet has made use of these
circumstances in one of his most celebrated
plays, which is called Macbeth, after the hero
of the story.

I have now mentioned all the nine middle
124 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

counties, with the exception of Bute, which is
an island, and with that of Arran, forms the
ninth county. I will notice it in the chapter
upon the islands.

There are eleven counties to the north, the
first at which you must look is that of Krv-
cARDINE or Mearns. Kincardine is bounded
on the north by Aberdeenshire, on the west
and south by Forfar, and on the east by the
German Ocean.

Its capital, Kincardine, is not remarkable,
although some ship-building is carried on there.
There are the ruins of Dunnottar castle, a very
ancient. place, built as early as Bruce’s time, in
which the Scottish Regalia were kept after 1650,
and in the reign of Charles IT it was used as a
prison for the Covenanters. In order to preserve
it from the English republican army, it is related
that the garrison at Dunnottar castle, held out
against the English for some time, but being
reduced by famine, the regalia were conveyed
away, and hid under the pulpit of Kineff church.
Mrs. Grainger, wife of the minister of Kineff,
having obtained permission to visit Mrs. Ogilvy,
the governor’s lady, packed up the crown in
KINCARDINE. 125

some clothes, and carried it out of the castle in
her lap, whilst her maid carried the sword and
sceptre in a bag of flax upon her back. Here
James the Fourth’s young queen, Margaret,
sister of King Henry VIII, of England, resided
for a short time in the early part of her married
life, on account of some disturbances among the
clans, which almost caused a civil war in Scot-
land. She was very young at the time of her
marriage, being scarcely fourteen years old, and
a wilful, spoiled little lady she seems to have
been; a very unfit partner for a husband of
thirty-one. She was much like her brother, the
bluff King Harry, im disposition, as her acts,
when Queen Regent, proved.

The county of ABERDEENSHIRE is a long
county, bounded by the German Ocean or
North Sea on the east and north; by Banff on
the west; and by the Grampian mountains and
Kincardine on the south.

Aberdeen, the capital of the county, and
indeed of the north of Scotland, is very different
in its appearance to most towns in the country.
The houses are built of the grey granite which
is found in the neighbourhood, and which,
126 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

although handsome, gives it rather a gloomy
appearance. The ancient city of Aberdeen is
called Old Aberdeen, and is about a mile north
of the: modern city. The principal curiosity
in its neighbourhood, is the bridge over the river
Don, which consists of one spacious gothic arch,
stretching from the rock on one side to the rock
on the opposite bank.

The college of Old Aberdeen is celebrated.
Dr. Beattie also lived and died in this town.
He was a poet, and his poem, called “the Min-
atrel,” is considered very beautiful. The Old
Pretender landed at Aberdeen on his fruitless
expedition to Scotland in 1715, disguised as a
sailor. He did not declare his real character for
some days, and the site of the house in which
he lodged is still shown.

Lord Byron, when a boy, lived in Broad
Street, in the new town of Aberdeen.

Aberdeen has a great trade with the Baltic
Sea and the West India Islands; it manufac-
tures stockings, thread, white and coloured
calicoes, and cotton. It carries on large fisheries
of salmon, herrings, and haddocks, cured in a
peculiar manner.
BANFE. 127

The county of Banrr is bounded on the
north by the North Sea; on the east and south
by Aberdeen; and on the west by Elgin.

The capital, Banff, on the river Doveran, is
noted for its salmon fisheries.

Archbishop Sharpe was a native of Banff.
This man incurred the contempt and suspicion
of the Presbyterians by having changed his
principles, for he was before the time of the
Restoration, their warm supporter and leader,
but accepted the highest office in the new Epis-
copal establishment in the reign of Charles IT.
In the year 1688, a preacher, of the name of
Mitchell, fired a pistol into the archbishop’s
coach, but missed his aim, and escaped in the
confusionj The affair was hushed up, but
sometime after the archbishop, on one occasion,
observed a man whose face was imprinted on
his memory, who proved to be Mitchell. He was
seized and put to the most frightful tortures, and
then sent to the Bass Rock prison, in the Frith
of Forth, where after four years imprisonment
he was executed. Another and successful at-
tempt was soon afterwards made on the unpopular
archbishop. .A band of murderers followed his
128 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

carriage on horseback, and although the old
man came out of the coach and entreated for
mercy, he was cruelly pierced with the sword.
This act brought much scandal on the Pres-
byterians; although Sharpe had been a cruel
persecuting man, there could be no excuse for
attacking him, when defenceless, in so cruel and
cowardly a manner, and the increased severity
with which the Covenanters were afterwards
treated, may somewhat be accounted for although
not palliated.

‘I do not know of anything else likely to
interest you in the county of Banff. I ought,
however, to mention the river Spey, which is
noted for thé extreme rapidity of its stream.

The province of Morayshire comprehends the
already named county of Banff, as well as that
of Elgin. Exner is bounded on the north by
the Murray Frith; on the east by Banff; and
on the south and south-west by Inverness.

Elgin, the capital, is a fine old-fashioned city,
on a level piece of ground, within a few miles
of the sea. The remains of the cathedral form
the principal object of interest. This cathedral
was rebuilt after a fire in 1890, and the height
ELGIN. : 129

of the spire was 198 feet. After the Reforma-
tion, the Sheriff of Aberdeen had orders from
government to take the lead off the cathedral
churches of Aberdeen and Elgin, and to sell it
for the maintenance of Regent Murray’s soldiers.
The ship had scarcely left Aberdeen harbour,
with its cargo for Holland, when it sunk.

There is a very useful free school established
at Elgin for children, with a provision for the
clothing and maintenance of such whose parents
are very poor. Major Andrew Anderson, a native
of Elgin, established it,

His history is a singular one. His mother was
a poor widow who lived in a small apartment
amongst the ruins of the cathedral, surrounded
by gravés. Here Anderson. spent his child-
hood; he was, perhaps, the most wretched and
despised boy in the town. His good conduct
and exertions, however, raised him to affluence,
he made his fortune in foreign countries, and the
remembrance of his early sufferings, in poverty,
inspired: him with the benevolent desire to give his
fellow-townspeople the advantages of education.

Forres is a neat, clean town, consisting of one
long, straight street. It was near this spot that
K
180 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

the three witches are said to have met Macbeth,
and put into his head the ambitious design of
becoming King of Scotland.

I may as well in this place give you a little
more detailed account of witchcraft, and the
influence it had with all classes of society in
Scotland a century or two ago, than I was able
to do in the former part of this chapter. The
Bible, you know, refers to the existence of
witches; and most European nations have, during
the darker periods of their history, retained in
their statutes, laws founded on the text in Exodus,
“Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live”? Even
after the Reformation the Church believed in
their existence, and enforced heavy penalties on
all whom they believed to be witches, wizards,
or the like. It has been remarked by a learned
writer, that since God has ceased to manifest
his power by direct suspension of the laws of
nature, it is inconsistent to believe that evil
spirits should be: left at liberty, in the present
day, to form a league with wretched mortals,
and to impart to them supernatural powers of
injuring or tormenting others. In the seven-
teenth century, however, belief in witchcraft
BANNE. 131

was general, especially in Scotland, and James
the VI, wrote a treatise against it, for the cre-
dulity of the people led to great evils. Impostors
of both sexes were found, who practised dreadful
deceptions by pretending to have intercourse
with supernatural powers, and furnished those
who consulted them with potions for the purpose
of revenging themselves on their enemies. Most
of those who suffered death for witchcraft, how-
ever, were poor old lone women; cross, perhaps,
or envious, who sometimes in one of their bad
moods would desire or express a desire for their
neighbour’s injury. If a child fell sick, or a horse
lame, or a cow died, or any misfortune happened
in the family against which ill-will had been
thus expressed ; woe to the poor witch, so called.
She was brought to trial and charges were made
against her. The crossness of her temper, her
habit of speaking to herself, or any other oddity
in which she might indulge, were received as
evidence, and.she rarely escaped being burnt to
death. The lastexecution for witchcraft took place
in Sutherland, in 1727. The laws against witch-
craft are now abolished, and it is very rare to
hear of it, even amongst the vulgar and ignorant.
Kk2
Chapter Tenth.



NAIRNSHIRE.
Nairn—James the First’s description of the town—Cawdor Castle—Story
of Simon—Lord Lovyat.
CROMARTY.
Its fisheries.
INVERNESS.

The Great Caledonian Canal—Battle of Culloden—Defeat of the Pre-
tender—Cruelty of the victors—Forts—Ben Nevis.

NarrnsHirE is bounded on the north by the
Firth of Moray; on the east and north-east by
Elgin: and on the south and west by Inverness-

Its capital, Nairn, is a small, ill paved town,
although improved within the last few years;
Gaelic was formerly spoken at one end of the
town, and Lowland Scotch or English at the
other. James I, of England, once astonished
some of his new English courtiers, who were
joking him about the insignificant country of
his birth, by saying, “Gentlemen, I can tell
ye though, that I have a town in Scotland, that
of Nairn, which is sae big that twa different
NAIRNSHIRE. ; 133

tongues are spoken in it, and the natives at the
ae end canna understand what is spoken by the
natives of the other.

At Cawdor Castle is a curiously contrived
secret. chamber, where the noted Simon, Lord
Lovat, hid in the insurrection of 1745. Lord
Lovat, who was affronted with the government
for some of their proceedings against him, was
one of those who invited Prince Charles Edward
over to Scotland, in order to regain possession
of his dominions. He was a mean and con-
temptible character however, thoroughly selfish,
and quite incapable of any sincere regard to
the Pretender or any one else.- He was very
undecided in his conduct and deficient in all
principle. Lord Lovat was twice married. His
second wife he treated with terrible cruelty, and
without provocation shut up the poor lady in
a turret of his castle, neither allowing her food
nor clothes suitable to her situation. It is said
that a friend of hers went to Castle Downie, to
see if the report she had heard of her lot were
true. She did not give Lovat any warning of
her intention, and he was obliged, therefore, to
let her see his wife. Accordingly he went to
134 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

her lonely prison chamber and announced the
arrival of her friend. “As it is my pleasure,
madam,” he said, “ that you receive your visitor
in the character of a contented, affectionate wife,
be pleased to dress yourself and come down
with the free air of the mistress of the mansion,
happy in her husband’s affections. It will become
you to beware how you. give the least hint of
discord between you and me; for secret eyes
will be wpon you.” In this manner the poor
lady met her friend, who, although she had no
opportunity of speaking to her in private, saw
quite enough to convince her of her wretched-
ness; and when she left the castle implored
Lady Lovat’s family to liberate her, and soon
afterwards she was freed from her long and cruel
confinement, and obtained a separation from her
husband.

He was beheaded at the Tower for his part
in the rebellion. He was very old at the time
of his death, and shewed no signs of fear or
regret. There is an old adage, that “it is easier
to die well than to live well,’ but there are
Scripture words still more to the purpose, that
“ the wicked have no bands in their death.”
CROMARTY. : 185

I have not any thing interesting to tell you
of the county of Nairn, and we will therefore
proceed to that of Cromarry, a very small
county, which seems as though it ought to be
included in Ross, by which county it is bounded
on the south, and by the Cromarty Frith on
the north.

The capital, Cromarty, is one of the prettiest
towns in Scotland; it lies on a promontory jutting
out between the Cromarty and Moray Friths,
and the ground is slightly elevated. The common
people are very industrious and fully employed
in herring fisheries. It has a capital harbour
capable of admitting vessels of 400 tons.

- Weare now come to consider that part of Scot-

land usually called the North Highlands, which
in a general sense comprehends the counties of
Inverness, Ross, Sutherland, and Caithness; all
that vast tract lying beyond the Caledonian
canal, which you may see marked on the map.

The county of Invernzss is bounded on the
north by Ross; on the south by Argyle and
Perth ; on the east by Nairn, Elgin, and Banff;
and on the west by Skye and the Atlantic
Ocean.
186 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

The Great Caledonian Glen, which stretches
upwards of 50 miles, is almost entirely occupied
by a chain of beautiful lakes. Its eastern ex-
tremity opens at the passage at the river Ness
into the Moray Firth, and on the west it com-
municates with the ocean, by a long inlet of sea,
called Linnhe Loch. The long chain of lakes
which occupy the Great Glen, suggested the
idea of opening one grand passage through this
part of the country, between the German Ocean
on the east and the Atlantic on the west, in
order to obviate the danger of sailing round the
entire north of Scotland. It was also imagined
that as the depth of the lakes was uniform, the
expense of making this canal would not be very
great. Government granted twenty thousand
pounds for the purpose, but the work cost more
than a million of money. The length of this
eanal or artificial river is sixty miles and a half,
of which more than thirty-seven pass through
Loch Ness, Loch Oich, and Loch Lochie. It
begins at Clachnacary, near Inverness, and ends
at Corpach, near Fort William. This great un-
dertaking after twenty years’ labour was opened.
from sea to sea, in the year 1822. The canal,
INVERNESS. * 187

where artificial, is one hundred and twenty feet
wide at the surface, and twenty feet in depth,
and is capable of passing a thirty-two gun frigate,
or any of the largest of the ships which sail
from the Baltic, from sea to sea. The extreme
depth of Loch Ness, one of the largest fresh
water lakes, is one hundred and thirty-five
fathoms, and it has never been known to freeze.

The town of Inverness stands on the river
Ness. It is a large well built town, and is
considered the capital of the North Highlands.
It is a place of great antiquity. In 1816 an
earthquake which extended over the greater
part of Scotland, was severely felt in Inverness.
The shock was preceded by a great rumbling
noise, bells rung, birds were knocked from their
perches, and much damage was done to many
buildings. The imhabitants were terrified, and
many hurried. to the fields, where they remained
till evening. The married women of the lower
ranks in this town walk the streets without
bonnets, and the single women without even
caps. There was in 1819 only one mail coach,
established between Inverness and Thurso.
When a great man once. entered the town in a
1388 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

carriage, before this period, the simple people
made low bows to the coachman, actually be-
lieving him to be the most important person in
the vehicle.

The object.of the greatest interest in the
vicinity of Inverness, is a steep rugged hill, called
Craig Phadric, one thousand one hundred and
fifty feet above the river Ness. It lies nearly
a mile west of the town, and commands a
beautiful view. Craig Phadric is noted for the
remains of one of those fortifications common
in the north and west of Scotland and which
from the appearance of the stones, have received
the name of Vitrified Fort. Vitrification comes
from a Latin word signifying glass, and these
stones or flints appear of a glassy nature. These
forts are supposed to have been the work of the
very early inhabitants of Scotland.

Culloden in this county is noted for the defeat
of Prince Charles Edward, the Pretender. His
triumph at Preston encouraged him to go to
England, but he was soon obliged to retreat.
A curious incident is told as having occurred
during this march, which will show you how
ignorant in the seventeenth century, were the
INVERNESS. 139

English of their northern neighbours. A poor
woman at Carlisle actually hid up her children,
and confessed to one of the soldiers, that she, in
common with many of her neighbours, believed
that Highlanders were cannibals, and particu-
larly loved the flesh of young children.

After several contests the two armies drew
up on Culloden Moor. The Government army
was commanded by the Duke of Cumberland,
son of George II. The defeat of the Pretender
was total. Many accounts are given of the ex-
treme cruelty of the Duke of Cumberland after
battle, but it is very likely they are exaggerated
by his enemies. The Duke had learned war in
Germany, where the severest infliction upon the
enemy was never withheld, if necessary, or sup-
posed necessary, either to obtain an advantage
or to preserve one when gained: Even the day
after the battle, when the first excitement was
passed, parties of wounded men were dragged
from the thickets and huts in which they had
found refuge, and cruelly fired upon, or coolly
knocked on the head by the soldiers with thick
muskets. The conquering army lost one thou-
sand men. One thousand men! You read it
140 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

carelessly, perhaps; but stop a moment and
consider. One thousand men, out of whom
one trembles to think how few were prepared—
one thousand men hurried to. eternity by the
dreadful heartless, cruel, desolating scourge of
war. And yet in this our nineteenth century it
is not uncommon to hear war excused, nay, even
extolled. Boys are wont to read of battles in
history with all the interest that they would
feel in an exciting cricket match; and, in fancy,
stand upon the battle field, caring little for the
wounded or the dying around, if but their
favourite side win the day. There is no glory in
battle, children; it cannot be too often sounded
in your ears.. There is no glory in war. Look
at Culloden. It is not an extreme case.

After the battle the prisoners were sent to
the Tolbooth, or jail, at Inverness; allowed but
a scanty portion of meal for food; and after a
season of confinement they were put into a vessel
and sent to London, to be dealt with according
to the pleasure of government. In one vessel
one hundred and fifty-seven half-starved, half-
clad, creatures were crowded ; they were kept at
sea nearly eight months, and out of one hundred
INVERKESS. / 141

and fifty-seven, but forty-nine lived to land.
Of Charles’ escape and melancholy end, I will
tell you in another place.

Fort George stands on a peninsular running
into the Moray Frith; it was begun in 1747,
and cost more than £160,000. There are many
wild and beautiful scenes in Invernessshire-
The fall of Foyers is well worth seeing ; the poet
Burns, when standing by this fall, described it
thus :-—

“ Among the heathy hills and ragged woods,
The roaring Foyers pours his mossy floods,

Till full he dashes on the rocky mounds,

Where through a shapeless breach his stream resounds ;

Prone down the rock the whitening sheet descends,

And viewless Echo’s ear astonished rends.”’

In the rocks adjoining the falls are many
curious caverns. Near Fort William is the
beautiful mountain of Ben Nevis, which is no
less than four thousand three hundred and eighty
feet in height,.and part of it is composed of
porphyry, or red granite; the ascent is not very
easy, but the views are considered sufficiently
fine to repay the traveller for his toil. At the
summit, and towards the north-east side, of the
mountain is a tremendous precipice, and snow
142 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

lies there throughout the year. You may on a
clear day, and that it must be confessed by
mountain climbers is not a very common event,
see across the whole island, from the German
to the Atlantic ocean. The chain of lakes, the
lofty mountains, and the scattered islands, may,
if fogs clear away and the day be fine, be seen
distinetly. And now we must leave Inverness-
shire, after but a fait description of its great
and many beauties.


Chapter Eleventh,

; ROSS.
Ben Wyvis.

SUTHERLAND,
Dornoch—An Old Cathedral—Once a Bishopric.
CAITHNESS.
Story of the family of Groat—Origin of John O’Groat’s house—Orkney
Islands — Manufacture of Kelp — Otters — Guillemots — Shetland
’ Islands—Simplicity of the Inhabitants—Shetland Ponies.

Tue county of Ross is bounded on the north

by Sutherland; on the South by Inverness; on’

the east by Moray and Dornoch Friths; and
on the west by the great Minch. :

This is a mountainous county stretching from
sea to sea. Dingwall, its capital, is a neat town,
but Tain is the chief town of the county. It is
said that James IV, who lost his life at Flodden,
once made a pilgrimage to Tain to expiate some
offence. There are the ruins of a very ancient
church here. Ben Wyvis, a lofty mountain
whose top is covered with snow, is worth notice,
but there is little of interest connected with
these northern counties.

°@
144 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

SurHERLAND is bounded on the south by
Ross; on the north-east by Caithness ; on the
west by the great Minch; and on the north by
the Atlantic Ocean.

It is a large square county.’ At its north-
western extremity is Cape Wrath, a very singular
and gigantic headland. The hills in Sutherland
are mostly dark and bleak, but here and there
are some lovely vales. Dornoch, the county
town of Sutherlandshire, was once a bishopric.
It has now fallen into decay and is but a poor
village. Its old cathedral is used as a parish
‘church, and the palace as a county jail. It
stands on a low sandy beach, half sand, half moor,
and carries on some trade in fishing. Dornoch
was one of the earliest settlements in Scotland.

And now we are come to Carruness, the
most northerly of Scotland’s thirty-three coun-
ties, bounded on the north by the Atlantic; on
the south and east by the German Ocean; and
on the west by Sutherlandshire.

Caithness is generally a level county, but
destitute of trees; its appearance, therefore,
is not pleasing. Wick, the county town, is
irregularly built and stands low, upon a river of
CAITHNESS. ‘ 145

the same name. It is greatly improved within
the last few years by the number of trees that
have been planted. The northern part is called
John o’Groat’s house.

The tale of John o’Groat I will tell you. For .
its truth I’ cannot vouch, but I think it is not
wise to discard all legends, as there is usually
some foundation for such stories, and some truth —
at the bottom of a heap of fiction. A lowlander
of the name of Groat once arrived at Caithness
bearmg a letter of recommendation to the gen-
tlemen of the county from king James IV, with
a request to some lairds, or land owners, to
grant this Mr. Groat and his brother some land.
They obtained land, settled, married, and became
founders of families.

One night when the Groats had become a
numerous race there was a grand family party ;
on what occasion I forget, but it might be
Christmas. Unfortunately a quarrel arose as
to who should have the privilege of heading
the table and occupying that seat, considered in
Scotland the most honourable, next to the door.
High words began, and fighting was threatened,
when John, a person of some importance and

L
146 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

owner of the ferry to Orkney, rose, and, having
with difficulty stilled the tumult by those soft
words which usually turn away wrath, promised
at the next meeting to settle the point peaceably
and to the satisfaction of all parties. Accordingly
he set to work and erected on the extreme point
of land an octagonal or eight-sided building,
corresponding to. the eight branches of the
family, having a door and window at each side,
each division being furnished with a table of
precisely the same shape; and when the next
family gathering took place, he introduced his
guests into the new building, desirimg each of
his relatives to enter at his own door, and take
his seat at his own table. Thus the whole affair
tumed into a joke, and this is the commonly
received story of John o’Groat’s house; the
ruins of which are still to be seen at the extreme
point of Caithness, the most northerly county
of Scotland.

To the north of Caithness lie several islands
which are reckoned amongst the thirty-three
counties of Scotland as one county. The
Orkneys, that cluster which is nearest to
Scotland, consist of a number of small islands
THE ORKNEY ISLES. 147

surrounding one much larger, called Pomona,
the capital of which, Kirkwall, has about two
thousand two hundred inhabitants, and its
ancient cathedral is well worth seeing. It is
the only cathedral with the exception of that
at Glasgow, which survived the Reformation
without injury.

A large fair is held yearly at Kirkwall, which
used to last twenty days. The Orkney isles
export a great deal of kelp, and there is
much cod, ling, and other fish, caught by the
islanders.

The situation of these northern islands is
such that fuel is of course very scarce, and the
sea is made to compensate for this deficiency by
providing immense quantities of a weed, called,
in Scotland, tangle. The common English name
is sea girdle, or sea hanger. The scientific
name is Jaminaria digitata, so called because
the frond is curiously divided into an unequal
number of strap-shaped segments, somewhat
resembling digits or fingers. This weed is very
useful as manure, but especially so as fuel.
When young the tender stalks of the frond are
cried about the streets of Edinburgh as an

L2
148 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

article of food. Dulse, too, another sea-plant,
has been very useful in. time of scarcity, and.
formed a principal part of the food of the poor
Highlanders during a dreadful famine.
I told you that the Orkney Isles exported a
great deal of kelp. I will tell you what kelp is.
It is manufactured from seaweed. ‘All the larger
fuci, (a class of marine plants,) are employed for
the purpose, but some are more productive than
others. The crop is collected in summer, when
most of the weeds have attained their full growth.
Like hay they are dried as rapidly as possible,
collected in heaps, and at the end of the season
burnt; this is done by placing them in pits
along the sea-shore, when they are set on fire
till they are reduced to dark hard cakes, and im
that state called kelp and exported; it is very
useful as manure. When the manufacture of
kelp was first introduced into Scotland, the
country people opposed it, dreading the smoke
which they said would arise from the kilns
where the weed was burnt. The smell they all
declared would sicken, or kill, all the fish, or
drive them far beyond the fisherman’s reach ;
but the value of this manufacture to the poor
. THE ORKNEY ISLES. 149

islanders is great, and their fears and prejudices
have proved groundless.

Seals and otters are to be seen about the
coasts of the Orkneys, and both seal and otter
hunting is a favourite diversion of the Scotch.
As I have described the seal in a former little
volume which I wrote on Ireland, and think it
likely you may have read it, I will give a page
to that curious creature the otter.

The otter belongs to the Mustela tribe, and
is a kind of water weasel; it is distinguished
by a peculiarly broad, flat, head; the lips are
large and fleshy, furnished with strong whiskers,
which evidently communicate feeling; the ears
are small and close to the skull; ‘and the eyes
are provided with a membrane as a defence to
the surface. Its tail is long, very stout, and
muscular. In swimming and diving it uses
this long tail as a rudder. Its fur is close,
short, and_ fine, consisting of a thick woolly
under-coat, and an upper layer of smooth glossy
hairs. It dwells in hollows or caverns, and is
an amphibious animal, going out to sea to fish,
or entering mouths of rivers, where it makes sad
havoc among the salmon; so much so, that in
1506 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

some places a price is set upon its head. The
otter goes out to hunt for its prey by night.
In the day time it hides in some deep recess.
Its movements im the water are very elegant.
When fish is scarce the otter will feed on rats
or frogs. It has even been known to go far
inland, and to attack lambs, poultry, and suck-
ing pigs. When the female wants to obtain
fish for her young she will sometimes go five,
six, or even ten miles in a night. The otter
may be tamed, but it is capable of inflicting
a very severe bite, and it does not look a very
pleasant or amiable animal. There are otters
in the Zoological Gardens in London, which T
recommend you to observe if you have an
opportunity of going there.

The variety of aquatic birds which frequent
these islands is very interesting. There is a
curious bird called by naturalists the Foolish
Guillemot, or Uria Troile, which abound in the
Orkneys. It obtains its name from suffering
itself to be taken rather than quit the single
egg over which it broods. They are migratory
in their habits, and in winter time immense
flocks pass along the coasts of Norway, France,
THE ORKNEY ISLES. Lt

England, and Holland. - They cover the ledges
of the rocks, ranged in crowded rows, each
female sitting quite upright upon her solitary
egg, which she lays on the bare rock. They sit
a whole month. In the autumn the guillemots
leave the rock, and betake themselves entirely
to the ocean, when the old bird moults or
changes its feathers. The flocks now gradually
pass southward, and following the shoals of
fishes which leave our coast, they at length
reach the Mediterranean and the coast of Sicily,
where they feed on little fish, called anchovies
and sardines.

In summer the plumage of the guillemot is
black about the head and neck, but the new
plumage white, and in spring it becomes black,
clouded. with ash colour.

The black guillemot, another species, breeds

abundantly both in the Orkney and Shetland
Isles, but is little known in the southern parts
of the kingdom.
- The Suerianp Istus, which were formerly
attached to the Danish. kingdom, are very
numerous. The principal are Yell, Unst,
Bressa, and the largest, called Mainland.
152 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

Shetland is about sixty miles long. The
chief town is Lerwick. These Shetlanders, cut
off as they are from all communication with
others, one would suppose were very sociable
amongst themselves, but this seems to be by no
means the case. They know very little about
their neighbours.

There are no trees, and the general aspect is
dreary enough, but the Shetlanders live happy
simple lives. There are not, as you may suppose,
many shops, and it is not an uncommon thing
for a shopkeeper, if he wants a holiday, to shut
up his shop at noon, and go out on a summer
day’s excursion.

They are famous for a small breed of ponies.
The Shetland pony is often handsome, but
the shoulders are low and thick; the limbs
however are well made, and the strength of the
animal, in proportion to its size, is very great.
It is a sure-footed, useful little animal, and of
great value amongst the Highland mountains.
It would. surprise you to see how surely and
carefully the little Shetlander ascends difficult
and stony paths, or crosses the rocky beds of the
mountain streams.
THE SHEELAND ISLES. 1538

The wool of the Shetland sheep is very
beautiful. The Shetlanders are said to pass a
great deal of time in sleep. They suffer much
from poverty, and in time of scarcity the want
of food is severely felt by these poor islanders.


Chapter Thelfth.

HEBRIDES,

Skye — Uist— Benbecula—Story of Flora Macdonald—Eseape of the
Pretender—His disappointment—The close of his Life.

MULL.
Minerals—Its mountains, &c.—Staffa—Iona.

BUTESHIRE.
Story of the Duke of Rothsay—St. Kilda—Lady Grange.

Tue Hesripes or Western Istes amount to
nearly three hundred, of which eighty-six are
inhabited. In habits, language, dress, and cus-
toms, they are not to be distinguished from the
Highlanders of the main land. These islands
were at one time independent, and governed by
their own princes until the ninth century, when
the Danes and Norwegians invaded and con-
quered them. They then gradually became the
haunts of pirates, as the robbers of the sea are
called. In the thirteenth century the Hebrides
were nominally yielded to the Scottish King,
THE HEBRIDES. 155

but still in reality governed by powerful chief-
tains, who were very unwilling to submit to, or
acknowledge, higher authority. These chiefs
and their descendants are known in history as
the lords of the isles.

Several of these islands are interesting, as
having afforded shelter to the Pretender, whose
story I promised to finish. When last we left
him it was after the battle of Culloden, and
from this time the account of his life among
these islands might almost make a tale of itself.
After the total defeat of Culloden he and a few
companions fled from the field. They had to
encounter a dreadful storm before landing at
Long Island, from which place he hoped to
escape by a friend’s ship. You must look for
this island on the map. " “ His palace that night
was a cowhouse, without a door; his couch of
state was a dirty sail cloth and straw, and his
banquet oatmeal and a portion of a boiled cow.”

Benbecula, another of the western isles, and
South Uist, were by turns his retreat, where he
make known his arrival to Clanranald, a chief,
and a friend of his cause. When Clanranald
went to pay his respects to the young prince,
156 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

he found him in a wretched hovel, little better
than a pigsty, his face haggard and his clothes
dirty and torn.

At Glencoridale, in South Uist, after various
dangers, he spent a few weeks in comparative
comfort. Every lurking place, however, was
carefully sought, and there was no rest for
the poor wanderer. General Campbell, in the
employ of the government, at length landed at
South Uist, and poor Charles was then in the
utmost danger, on which occasion he owed his
preservation to a young lady of the name of
Flora Macdonald. The home of this lady was
at Skye, but she was, at the very time of
the Pretender’s need, at South Uist, on a. visit
to her brother, and, fortunately for Charles,
intimate with the Clanranalds, who, as I told
you, favoured his cause. Her step-father was
an enemy to the prince, and as he had the com-
mand of the soldiers then stationed at South
Vist, to get Charles away was rather a difficult
matter.. She therefore obtained a disguise for
him, and dressing him in a flowered cotton gown,
a light-coloured quilted petticoat, a white apron,
and a dun camlet, made after the Irish fashion,
THE HEBRIDES. . 157

resolved that he should personate an Irish girl
who she was going to take to the service of
some friend of hers in Skye. Thus disguised
she obtained from her father a passport for
herself and the pretended Betty Burke, with a
man servant who accompanied them. During
their wandermgs they excited great curiosity ;
the servant, who did not know the secret, said
to Flora one day, “ What long strides that jade
takes, I dare say she’s an Irish woman, or may
be a man dressed up in woman’s clothes.” . In
crossing a stream Charles once held his petticoats
so high that Flora told him he would certainly
be discovered if he were not more careful, so
the next time he let them float in the water,
and this did no better. ‘ Your enemies,” said
one of his friends who joined them, “call you
the Pretender ; all I can say is, that you are the
worst I ever saw at your trade.”

After many dangers and narrow escapes they
reached Kilbride in the Isle of Skye; but
they were now in the country of Alexander
Macdonald, the prince’s.enemy; and you will
say that Flora ran some risk, when I tell you
that she actually took the disguised prince into
158 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

Macdonald’s house. He was absent, indeed,
but the house was full of watchful, armed militia,
and Flora had no alternative but to trust the
secret to his wife, Lady Margaret Macdonald,
who, although alarmed, did not betray him.

He was then put under the guidance of
another person, and shortly afterwards Flora
herself fell into the hands of the soldiers. She
was taken to London and kept in a kind of
honourable imprisonment until the act of indem-
nity was passed, in 1747, when this courageous
girl returned to Scotland. She was very much
courted after her liberation, but flattery never
spoiled her. She was modest and unaffected,
never appearing to think that she had done
any thing but an act of common humanity.
She married in Scotland and went to reside in
America, but returned to her native island and
died at Skye at the age of seventy. She was
buried in one of the sheets that Charles slept in
on one of his visits during his wanderings in
the Hebrides, so romantic was her attachment
through life to the Stuart family. —

And now we must close the story of Charles.
After five months’ hardships and dangers, skulk-
THE HEBRIDES. 159

ing about the seas, the islands, and finally the
mountains of the western islands, he received
intelligence that two French frigates had arrived
at Loch-na-Nuagh, a bay in the county of
Inverness, which were ready to convey him and
others of his party to France. The parting
with the old companions of his adventures was
very touching; many shed tears. He arrived
safely in France, but quite failed in persuading
King Louis to. help him to renew his attempts
at recovering his kingdom. He quarrelled with
his father and brother also, who tried to dis-
suade him from the attempt, and at last he was
banished from France. It is related that he
came over to London privately, and had a secret
interview with one or two of the Jacobite party,
but nothing encouraging transpired, and he
returned a disappointed man.

The last years of his life were wretched. | As
a young man, whilst hope was high in his heart,
and be was occupied in endeavouring to secure’
the darling object of his life, there appeared
some good and amiable features in his character.
He was, undoubtedly, very dear to many of the
Highlanders. When first he entered on his
160 - STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

campaign in Scotland, he would walk by the side
of some old Highland chief, talking familiarly
with him on things that he knew would interest
him; would listen with untiring attention to
long details of his ancestors, family affairs, songs
and legends, and so did he win on the affections
of those simple people, that many years after-
wards his fellow-adventurers could not speak
of him without a sigh or a tear. After his
banishment from France and the death of all
his hopes, he fell into very bad habits. He had,
during his Highland wanderings, contracted
a taste for drinking, and this grew upon him.
Disappointment had soured his temper, and he
made his wife; Louisa Princess Stolberg, so
unhappy that she retired to a convent.

Some gleams of love of his country, and of
romantic and ardent attachment to the High-
lands are mentioned amidst the dark closing
years of his life. Mr. Greathead, a friend of the
celebrated statesman Fox, succeeded in obtaining
an interview with Prince Charies, who then
resided at Rome, and he led the conversation
to the failure of his enterprise years before.
At first Charles. seemed reluctant to speak of
THE HEBRIDES. 161

it, but after a time he shook off his wonted
dulness, and the poor old man grew bright as
he narrated all his wanderings, his campaigns,
and finally his escapes from the Hebrides; but
suddenly the tide of recollection grew too strong,
his eye glazed, and he fell in convulsions on the
floor... The noise brought in his daughter, who
said to Mr. Greathead, “ Sir, what is this? no
one dares to mention these subjects to my
father. You-have been talking of Scotland and
the Highlands.” He died at Florence, in 1798,
of palsy, and was buried at Frescati. We have
only noticed the Hebrides as connected with
the history of the Pretender, but they possess
many attractions.

The island of Mull is of considerable extent,
‘and is very much intersected with arms of the
sea. It is hilly and even mountainous.

The mineralogy of this island is very inter-
esting; a great part of it hes upon a bed of
greenstone or whinstone, and in a great many
places the rocks are of basalt. Limestone is
also abundant, and coals have been found in
different’ parts. There are rocks of a rare
mineral, called white lava. Pebbles of great

M
162 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

variety and beauty are found upon the sea-
shore, and there are some curious caves in the
island.

The mountain called Ben More, near the
head of Lock-na-Keal, is supposed to rise three
thousand feet above the level of the sea, and
commands a view of nearly the whole of the
Hebrides. There are numerous herds of deer,
with large coveys of grouse, black-cock, and
other game.

The island of St. Kilda was a place of con-
finement for the unfortunate Lady Grange.
Lord and Lady Grange had lived happily
together for some years, and had had several
children, when, in 1730, they determined to
separate. Of course it is difficult to determine
who was really in fault, and very likely, as is the
case with quarrels generally, there were faults
on both sides. However this may have been,
they separated, Lord Grange agreeing to give
his wife one hundred pounds a-year if she kept
away from him. After spending some time in
the country she came to Edinburgh, that she
might sometimes see her children, and tried to
imduce him to take her back. According to
THE HEBRIDES. 163

Lord Grange, she used to follow him and tor-
ment him by calling after him in the street and
even at church. It appears, however, that her
threats to expose some, treasonable practices of
Lord Grange, frightened him, for she was once
actually on her way to London for that purpose.
“ What,” said he, “was a man to do with such
awife?” I will tell you what hedid. He laid'a
plan with some Highland chiefs, amongst whom
was the noted Lord Lovat, to seize her at her
lodgings, gag her, and carry her off as though
she had been dead. After being imprisoned in
different places she was conveyed to the lonely
island of St. Kilda. There she must have led a
desolate life imdeed, for the few inhabitants
there were could only speak Gaelic. -No books,
no intelligence from the world, reached her.
In this manner seven dreary years passed at
St. Kilda. She often made efforts to bribe the
islanders to rescue- her. Once a stray vessel
sent a boat ashore for water. She no sooner
heard of it than she sent the minister’s wife to
apprize the sailors of her situation, but Mrs.
Maclennan did not reach the spot in time. ‘She
was kind to the poor people, often giving them
M 2
164 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

of her stores, but her temper and habits did not
gain their esteem. She often drank too much,
and whenever any one near her made any mis-
take, she flew into a violent passion.

At last Mrs. Maclennan, who left the island,
communicated the secret of her confinement to
her friends. A vessel was sent to liberate her,
but did not succeed in arriving at the island.
And. shortly after she died in her place of im~
prisonment. This circumstance shews us how
barbarous, even at that time, were the habits
of the Scottish gentry. Lady Grange died as
late as 1785. Now-a-days she would have
been kindly and humanely treated, and placed in
temporary confinement, where her ungovernable
temper would have been treated as a mental
defect, and every means used to restore her to
reason and liberty.

About eight miles from Mull is the island of
Staffa. It is about two miles in circumference,
bounded by cliffs and broken into numerous
recesses and promontories. The Clamshell cave,
so called from its supposed resemblance to a
shell of that description, is very remarkable.

The magnificent columns which form the
THE HEBRIDES. 165

principal objects of interest in Staffa, com-
mence here upon the left of the entrance, and
over-hanging it, they extend from forty to fifty
feet without a joint, and are so bent as to form
a series of ribs not unlike the timbers of a ship.
On the other side, the broken ends of columns
look like a honey-comb; but by far the most
singular of the caverns is that which is known
by the name of Fingal’s cave. The original
Gaelic name is Uaimh Binn, the musical cave,
a name derived from the echo of the waves.
The entrance to the cave is about sixty-six feet
high, and the full wonders and beauties of this
curious place can only be seen by entering it in
a boat. The roof is in some places formed of
rock, and in others of the broken ends of pillars;
from the crevices stalactites appear, and the
variety of tints reflected on these, cause a mar-
vellous and beautiful effect. As the sea never
entirely leaves the cave, the only floor is the
lovely green water.

The island of Staffa lies in the same longitude
as the celebrated Giant’s causeway on the north
eoast of Ireland, and it is thought probable
that the curious basaltic formation is contiued
166 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

underneath the sea from one to the other. Its
name Staffa is Norwegian, and derived from
Staf or Stave, its pillars having been supposed to
resemble staves. The diameter of the columns
varies from two to four feet.

- The island of Iona or Icolmkill lies south-west
of Staffa, at a distance of nine miles, Both
Tona and Staffa lie in the great bay called
Loch-na-Keal, which, as you may observe on
ov the map, almost divides the island of Mull.
The common name is Iona, which signifies island
of waves. Before Christianity was imtroduced,
there is said to have been a druidical estab-
lishment on the island; and a green eminence
still retains the name of the Druids’ Burial
Place.

In 565 St. Columba landed here from Ireland,
to preach Christianity to the Picts, who made
him a grant of the whole island. Here he
founded an order of monks, who differed in
some particulars from the Romish church.
Columba died in the seventy-seventh: year of
his age. The religious establishment flourished
for more than two centuries, but. in 807 the
Danes invaded Iona, killed most of the monks,
THE HEBRIDES. 167

and compelled the others, with Collach their
abbot, to take flight.

The cathedral is said to have been rebuilt by
Queen Margaret about the end of the eleventh
century. The high altar of white marble which
stood at the head of the chancel, has been
removed. piece-meal, from a superstitious notion
that a fragment of it was a sure protection
against shipwrecks or other calamities. . The
remains of the cloisters and the college are very
interesting. It was the usual cemetery of the
ancient Scottish Kings. This is the ground
alluded to by Shakespeare in his tragedy of
Macbeth, which I have already mentioned to
you. The lines to which I refer, in speaking
of King Duncan’s body, are these,

“ Carried to Colmes-kill; a
The sacred storehouse of his predecessors,
And guardian of their bones.”

Here are the remains of forty-eight Scotch, four
Irish, eight Norwegian, and one French King,
and near the royal tombs repose many lords
of the isles. At the monastery of Iona were
deposited the old Scottish-records.
168 ' STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

The island is about three miles long, and con-
tains some inhabitants. A place of worship has
been erected. In the middle of the island there
are some slight hills, but it is generally flat.
The hills produce fine pasture. It abounds in
valuable minerals, particularly a beautiful kind
of mineral called the green serpentine. In the
bay of Port-na-Curaich, where Columba first
landed, are some very curious green pebbles, and
many rare plants are found in different parts.

The county of Bure comprises the three
islands, Bute, Arran, and Cumbray. Bute is a
healthy, pleasant place, and its climate is much
milder than that of many parts of Scotland.

The old castle of Rothsay was a favorite
residence of Robert III, who made: his eldest
son Duke of Rothsay, a title since borne by the
heir to the British crown. King Robert III
was a peaceful, religious man, but not firm, and
easily imposed upon, particularly by his brother,
the Duke of Albany. ‘This Prince, the next
heir to the crown, continually made mischief
between the Duke and his father, and at last
persuaded the King to consign the young man
to his care. The history of that time is imper
THE HEBRIDES. 169

fect, and I am not sure what charges were made
against the Duke, but he was imprisoned in
Falkland castle, in Fife, belonging to Albany.
When in that gloomy place he was shut up in
a dungeon, and deprived of food. It is said
that one woman, who heard his groans, con-
veyed a few barley cakes to the captive, but she
was discovered, and the unhappy prince was
actually allowed to starve to death, in the month
of March, 1402. There is no evidence that the
poor old king suspected the foul play which his
son received; he did not live very long after,
but, died broken hearted.

The island of Arran, celebrated for its moun-
tains and glens, of which Goat Fell is the
highest, has some very picturesque scenery, and
part of it is well farmed. I do not think that
any of the other islands belonging to Scotland
are worthy of particular notice.


Concluding Chapter.

We have now finished our account of Scotland,
its thirty-three counties, and adjacent islands.
It has been difficult to resist many interesting
subjects, which would have swelled the little
volume to an undesirable size; but if the few
sketches we have given should induce you to
look deeper into the history of the country, it
will have answered the end for which it was
written. The Scotch character is, like that of
the Irish, variously dealt with. You will hear
some persons abuse the Scotch, call them a
crafty, double minded, over-reaching nation, and
so forth, Now bear in mind that of all preju-
dices national prejudices are the most foolish.
Burns has said :-— .

“ Oh if some power the gift would gie us,
To see ourselves as others see us,’’
CONCLUDING CHAPTER. : 171

and certainly our self-conceit would be wonder-
fully humbled, and our national conceit be
brought equally low if we had that power. The
Scotch do not view us as perfect. And it is
worth while sometimes to see what foreigners
say of us.

_ Dr. Carus, a physician in the train of the King
of Saxony, who travelled through England and
Scotland in 1844, speaks of the English as pos-
sessing plenty of pedantry and unconcealed and
cofispicuous egotism. He says, moreover, that
we have never owned one great historical painter,
sculptor, or musician. Of some things in the
great city of London, of which we, and especially
Londoners, are so proud, this same Carus says,
“St. Paul’s is one of the most tasteless collections
of columns, vaulted roofs, eaves, and statues,
that encumbers the earth; Westminster Abbey
is great, but not imposing, and the design of the
New Houses of Parliament irrational. In the
exhibition of paintings, he complains that he had
to read in the catalogue all he did not see in the
pictures; and of our musical taste he says, “the
English are prone to mistake mere noise for
music,” &. So you see how we strike strangers.
172 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

Kohl, the author of some interesting books
of travel, speaks of a conversation with a
Scotchman on the pay of schoolmasters. He
asked Kohl what a schoolmaster was paid in
Germany. “It varies,” replied Kohl; “some
have a hundred, some a hundred and fifty, but
many no more than fifty dollars.” “How
many dollars go to a pound?” he asked.
“Seven dollars go to a pound,” said Kohl.
“What!” replied his fellow-traveller, starting
up, “do you mean to say they pay a school-
master only seven pounds a-year? I know no
one who gets less than forty to fifty pounds in
all Scotland, but the average is seventy or
eighty pounds, and many go as high as a
hundred and fifty pounds.” This will show
you that the ‘Scotch value education,—some
proof surely of intelligence and good sense.

Scotland is a beautiful country, but it is sad
to reflect how, amidst the loveliest of nature’s
scenes, poverty darkens the fairest picture.
How suffering and starvation oppress those
whose eyes behold, day by day, some of the
noblest of the Creator’s works. Within a few
miles of Dunkeld, in the lovely county of
CONCLUDING CHAPTER. 178

Perthshire, there is a wretched group of huts,
worse than which are scarcely to be met with
even amidst the wildest mountain scenery, and
fay in the Highlands the misery of the inhabit-
ants is not surpassed by that of the poor Irish.
The love of drink is, alas, a great snare to the
Scotch. In Glasgow, the amount of spirituous
liquors consumed is enormous. And this habit
has a very evil influence on the poorer classes.
The Scotch are generally industrious and thriv-
ing; they are great gardeners, are active in
their habits, and a strong muscular people.
They ascribe much of this to their national food
of oatmeal, which forms a large portion of the
diet of the peasantry. It is made into thin
cakes, and some persons are very fond of it, but
it is a taste that has usually to be acquired.

Old differences and feuds are now healed,
and there is little more to distinguish the Scotch
from the English than the variety of dialect
and some few habits. A Cornish man is not
exactly like a Yorkshire man; neither is an
inhabitant of Scotland like an Englishman in
all respects, but there is less and less jealousy
and more and more friendly and brotherly feel-
174 STORIES OF SCOTLAND.

ing between the two countries, united under one
government. Civilization and increased facilities
for travelling bring us nearer together, and as -
we see more of one another we shall be disposed
both to feel and to be brotherly and charitable
to the defects which we each possess; and to
rejoice like those of one family in the good and
prosperity which each enjoys.















AEBOTSFORD. SEE PAGE 27,








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jects treated almost innumerable.’’—WNorfolk Chronicle.

“The work is fall of information of the most useful kind,
is written in a very pleasing style, and cannot fail to become
a great favourite, whether used as a schoo) book, a present to
a child, or a boo of reference for home use.”?— Bookselle-.

“Its contents are admirably selected and arranged. The
contents of many volumes are here compressed into one.”—
Baptist Mugazine.


Porwotch:

PRINTED BY FLETCHER AND ALEXANDER.
*



A Hook for ebery Family ans School.

Fifth thousand, just issued, cloth gilt, 2s. 6d.

AIL about it:

OR THE 7
HISTORY & MYSTERY OF COMMON THINGS.
ecg on |

“This is a valuable encyclopzdia for old and young.”
~—Eelectic Review. : |

“The knowledge of common things is here imparted |
in a catechetical form, and people who are troubled
with inquisitive children, will do well to buy the |
book.’ —Literary Gazette. !

“The topics are well selected, and are accurately |
and sufficiently treated; so that as a class-book for |
schools or for home tuition, it may be safely recom.
mended.’ —Critée. ‘

nnn

Stripture Lessons for my Infant Class.
Illustrated. Cloth extra. Price 1s. 6d. i

AA AA ARAL AA RAL AR AR IAAL

STORIES ABOUT BIRDS,

By Mrs. Farrrizip. Coloured. Illustrations.
16mo. cloth, elegant. Price 2s. 6d.
*,* This charming little book, under the assumed name of

Mrs. Fairfield, is by Miss Brightwell, the author of |
“Life of Mrs. Opie,” §&e.
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describe
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describe
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'2012-06-29T06:57:16-04:00'
describe
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c24dcb6910c93c872464ed4a78991fea
25468e13ccbd46df8cdb0342e7ef10c91e731529
'2012-06-29T06:59:24-04:00'
describe
'28828' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABUJ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
0a000a52c5067f449b20ff3ddb776fbc
b9a142556c4e87ac7c08bbd8fc61292a146ddf7b
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describe
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306990fa54163e0d9d2f7a100de36c01
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describe
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d61f82b13856047fc301e848ad3ccad1
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'2012-06-29T07:05:50-04:00'
describe
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8a53721d86c8fd6ba7f3cd362a8a365b
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'2012-06-29T07:02:41-04:00'
describe
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9386321cb249aea9424edf47293369c6
b35528034a0020583dab75a6985b533db97a9580
'2012-06-29T06:55:52-04:00'
describe
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f32fa86424e9d88f16f95edba59c423d
0033fd919486d663c566a8c7142ddd77b8db73c4
'2012-06-29T06:57:39-04:00'
describe
'22187' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABUP' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
f13c9948eb96400704782d7dc4e34489
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'2012-06-29T06:54:03-04:00'
describe
'291192' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABUQ' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
5bc6ac485422dfbdb1df79318800624b
da050607290972f7f90a83d18ddc63903794167c
'2012-06-29T06:59:35-04:00'
describe
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a845234fe8d8cdff6c2c4f0325c00a53
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'2012-06-29T07:04:15-04:00'
describe
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5bb9df65de5d932fdc503f15b4102f05
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'2012-06-29T07:00:08-04:00'
describe
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'2012-06-29T06:56:25-04:00'
describe
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'2012-06-29T06:59:19-04:00'
describe
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a59cbdeb816f15b088784663bd462127
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'2012-06-29T06:56:19-04:00'
describe
'30256' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABUX' 'sip-files00088.pro'
48c3801d1484d449c5b20609b506132d
fdba62e8ea01ab840947672f49ed1df146541502
'2012-06-29T07:00:12-04:00'
describe
'287044' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABUY' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
8457aecdb0353b36a9808789c27421ea
bcef56d2a93e385cbd2d2f7f24a51b44565ec210
'2012-06-29T06:55:39-04:00'
describe
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c61c7f570e3bd51b069d8b94257b704f
4645a3356d644d5a9e1f413e8a87c328c014697c
'2012-06-29T06:58:37-04:00'
describe
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375011e0374af23ee4cde6942b1fdc51
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'2012-06-29T07:01:42-04:00'
describe
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'2012-06-29T06:59:13-04:00'
describe
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'2012-06-29T07:03:13-04:00'
describe
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c02c0cc093088b83ac8cdd4fb9ae250d
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'2012-06-29T07:01:14-04:00'
describe
'29454464' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVE' 'sip-files00039.tif'
eca0a451138e1798776cc49297b6f6ba
67a06e8a074aceec87b93c2a4d535c8f5a90121b
'2012-06-29T07:00:06-04:00'
describe
'2521340' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVF' 'sip-files00118.tif'
ebde4e551d2619ff8ef9006866fa5a68
5cb053e69d0a42be17a7378a690b40093491ab79
'2012-06-29T07:02:18-04:00'
describe
'312680' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVG' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
135564731fbd42d73072ec0a3de3dbfd
f5eee1ac7a7e6a7fcd854ca6de74dd01f7ba4f1a
'2012-06-29T07:05:23-04:00'
describe
'312703' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVH' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
99663d09f9cbc760f6b71972e439ad9b
88c9286ad0bc305e202fa0ef44504dfa116e4cf9
'2012-06-29T07:03:18-04:00'
describe
'92649' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVI' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
80cdcb480c3c5bf2a5e6a6a738c25d30
e4a7dcfeac88139d052c36bc99565713a2dc413a
'2012-06-29T06:56:35-04:00'
describe
'2522176' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVJ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
5aaece31fc77d42d11cb308abc2f9244
f8fdefaff047d9e91ed219168df6cd3f2b0871bc
'2012-06-29T07:01:43-04:00'
describe
'2522232' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVK' 'sip-files00190.tif'
bc14aa3c8c93f6262d842d80d79b8a67
68dcd1bb760340111b04fa3447dff9a36bfb301d
'2012-06-29T06:59:27-04:00'
describe
'215978' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVL' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
4a0241aa50d5f800adfcb06d3475bc89
1f4f9896eee50e125c1b4df245af0c9277650383
'2012-06-29T06:55:33-04:00'
describe
'2519424' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVM' 'sip-files00204.tif'
a503a7de34beafd7414ca9e9e0a216be
95b03786b2cf333bef50381eb6aaa50a15414f3d
'2012-06-29T07:02:42-04:00'
describe
'426' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVN' 'sip-files00008.txt'
84bd04f88927a5c85790246a35e0bc22
4784e15279f687bdc2ad6b2ca758f37ca69fc818
'2012-06-29T07:02:03-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'2523332' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVO' 'sip-files00140.tif'
60c49280744f623becb9c142709827a3
cd74d9ee094439f460989d74a5726013a6d21ed9
'2012-06-29T06:59:56-04:00'
describe
'29586' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVP' 'sip-files00116.pro'
9e6bb11322fc8ee8d3d9dc0464923c35
2683e8dbfd5cc1f78970e3fe92e22e0416802980
'2012-06-29T06:59:55-04:00'
describe
'301816' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVQ' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
a91526df5b91a7c614b72bdc96496820
63c68554ad322ecc06deebf1e8a43f1536cc5aff
'2012-06-29T06:54:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVR' 'sip-files00025.txt'
32b13dc8e519000ef9b8d467c3fdf4a5
f3857a24a8ae46a48dfb0a3b266d164fa76572d9
'2012-06-29T06:55:55-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'121819' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVS' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
b1f9155e0d4ec33cdd82c7fe353f1f70
f39c3ae5cd594323d1c42d454da5c17262983bb9
'2012-06-29T06:58:18-04:00'
describe
'312693' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVT' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
1b5bcd792dadb1fca0843b6aefd9de84
9746b8d2eb34a679c0e0f056a412cdf8cfca6b2d
'2012-06-29T07:04:08-04:00'
describe
'215726' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVU' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
1e8a27abb477c3ba2a711918c1e64cd9
d592f2a4290528b6a60a968e44aa06b5ee93782d
'2012-06-29T06:57:46-04:00'
describe
'52846' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVV' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
98d8a9ee75b738ce8197c289b91b5a72
f0a3466034bce8838b2df4c2019ae6a2c7f696ae
'2012-06-29T07:04:45-04:00'
describe
'28310' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVW' 'sip-files00182.pro'
a5faacce02349b54cf99c314c655c7f3
653beccaee601923f9cd4c7f79eb46a50731fa8a
'2012-06-29T06:59:48-04:00'
describe
'288925' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVX' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
5e470118d73768a5a52456c32014aafb
4543a4d7bb2959aeb796b08ee993748e1bed431e
'2012-06-29T07:01:44-04:00'
describe
'52517' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVY' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
0eaa1b385c546eb0739baf46fb59540b
22a106cb5f2193dcb7688c9689c67874c99c4ed8
'2012-06-29T06:56:11-04:00'
describe
'2523712' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABVZ' 'sip-files00103.tif'
bf14d5a84dd5579aad68b8f1f457cb9f
4bd584fe6237d83bc42948c03ac9972231e917bb
'2012-06-29T07:03:57-04:00'
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWA' 'sip-files00172.txt'
529c4926020135b445824070f0600078
cff18e469250c823375ca13ad58caf1da3cafb99
'2012-06-29T06:59:33-04:00'
describe
'2523564' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWB' 'sip-files00088.tif'
08409fe8e223d3ac11898f826acf6902
cc2be68d383d01237a7b5731baa6c567ae6fb183
'2012-06-29T07:02:57-04:00'
describe
'291780' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWC' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
96de2ed8ce3453eb69abbd0fa9240f25
9af75669ff1d766cd88452fe0a4d3e74cc48e268
'2012-06-29T07:00:52-04:00'
describe
'23769' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWD' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
d86a4a99cb92350c7e57b3773b5d66c2
dd6de5344260c579aa6f36ef75f9143bf11a3380
'2012-06-29T06:55:35-04:00'
describe
'31326' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWE' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
6ba5e4c56b8543d66c0b17150913345f
328d4d66fbeaf0b7e0610a292fcd50f28dbeb435
'2012-06-29T06:54:59-04:00'
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWF' 'sip-files00147.txt'
6fbba134edd061b382c21b0ff49ad688
117ad3dd7ab5a2eb9746720651a3f329ad951d8d
'2012-06-29T07:02:58-04:00'
describe
'29690' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWG' 'sip-files00164.pro'
e3715cc3834a5c80df08b6db3d6d09bc
2c5fec342bbdfa1b641fecbc3cd18691dcbaf104
'2012-06-29T07:02:48-04:00'
describe
'9894' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWH' 'sip-files00108.pro'
d49c0b5a86dfe8ce1be5925ff663186f
9b20b16f2abeda142c97f3856e091b21b1a7d350
'2012-06-29T06:58:58-04:00'
describe
'129644' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWI' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
01dbfa679aec9d97edf68999a41be7ba
d335cdb9f4f46beafa50b3dd178cbeee6ec0390a
'2012-06-29T06:59:14-04:00'
describe
'75566' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWJ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
673b32500eba5ecff17e0588f96763dc
1787a4e858c700648203953972018630861e30d5
'2012-06-29T06:57:37-04:00'
describe
'48985' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWK' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
aecc57d96f311655a32c5f1a08c55076
979c3a03848ebc7d736b5c14339ecf8d89c9d6ca
'2012-06-29T07:03:30-04:00'
describe
'20439' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWL' 'sip-files00174.pro'
2d2e2e0d379d7e0683727beb54b70e91
3ec2963ef9428113b85846abfc7aeeaaebf61ab2
'2012-06-29T06:58:25-04:00'
describe
'47973' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWM' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
dc1997f64754c7592e1d689db2caeee1
b03f40b8d7c3aa64b2343a8eb9ea9381f847142a
'2012-06-29T06:57:36-04:00'
describe
'29128' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWN' 'sip-files00111.pro'
4bb74b46de5bbd8c41d8b6a4697b4fb2
cc94cbf30e5673ca4ee678fc83819c89e2ed75cf
'2012-06-29T07:05:18-04:00'
describe
'312678' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWO' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
11c06be375ea7402824773f4f3360122
82ba53b19bdb37a1f025edfd0332d1506b4c6411
'2012-06-29T07:02:59-04:00'
describe
'312667' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWP' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
00c13973b2403aba152e72e946b7ca7a
2984d33753be8f8b9f9e5af6db3b3fff596d0373
'2012-06-29T07:04:21-04:00'
describe
'312706' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWQ' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
d9147e93dc0c4105f2f07997b4e277e2
c78fcb24e288bbe75a45545cf0735dcfcef5e340
'2012-06-29T06:58:34-04:00'
describe
'124483' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWR' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
704548fce0360fa4f1873d1b9c7fd826
6d1b5f49e73bf1e192e7559b11ec82938b3e06b1
'2012-06-29T06:57:12-04:00'
describe
'51600' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWS' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
95209e85b322355bc4bf3509cab34d12
6c071a45b56dc62620ac02e9c38bd3fb24debb5d
'2012-06-29T06:55:06-04:00'
describe
'52378' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWT' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
849e8c3c08aadc6a1c918c9386604d79
8e3265003d913d0f8416a8d16e3e118323cf4363
'2012-06-29T07:05:02-04:00'
describe
'29848' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWU' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
4561493cbd61e2361f86b5e6e3ce7365
36b24dfb64825418da1eab2666fb58eafcbe7a0c
'2012-06-29T06:59:05-04:00'
describe
'312622' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWV' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
140b91ceb47b7327fbea89420187d56b
02145f0868a8fa108139a81ea1ad798c21193fba
'2012-06-29T06:55:40-04:00'
describe
'303929' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWW' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
19fb0167ac62d06e464d9417198d35d5
5f13c291c7d5aae2b3ec094f7ed068605d41a25f
'2012-06-29T06:53:52-04:00'
describe
'113764' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWX' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
0616889864fb8fa1c4865655e8d58f9b
3b734d16daf59634e5ab58c84f639fb80aeb72af
'2012-06-29T07:03:09-04:00'
describe
'31104' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWY' 'sip-files00134.pro'
75628349c371bf82c1eda4a01ba89928
5b477a8f365d5311f558d28ffe098c2077556c90
'2012-06-29T07:02:45-04:00'
describe
'119306' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABWZ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
9c885975144ae4a64d22704b613eaae0
fff8343e8f23db1476ddb5485d5dae8274f92714
'2012-06-29T07:01:59-04:00'
describe
'306556' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXA' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
49187ce5d69c4f2a52583711b104d6db
e53b93ae0e3482d85f5d85f4cbd39b6911cc137f
'2012-06-29T07:04:00-04:00'
describe
'306932' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXB' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
a7fd3dedd3a62329ed2065fd955ddd5d
153ac64c0bbf36edc0863bf5b2652df741e9a3e4
'2012-06-29T07:01:57-04:00'
describe
'52108' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXC' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
804b05bc1a0b43d3a33431dd723b4e2f
cba8a0c1fe6d21ef0af7d30eefb8b171293a26e0
'2012-06-29T06:55:22-04:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXD' 'sip-files00192.txt'
9a1e7c2bd71d130476933979f76d01fc
027e0740809d906f8106abc8c572b6a4b2586c71
'2012-06-29T07:00:44-04:00'
describe
'2523616' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXE' 'sip-files00178.tif'
b81e279d4aa74bd9f4d5d1dca57101e3
1e298c3a5757d613262500e6552a9dadc2a93f31
'2012-06-29T06:55:36-04:00'
describe
'471891' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXF' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
0be9835534f7ad20d1ba65d948bd61fa
35432313972c83509a4a5c0262bbba95f6413afe
'2012-06-29T06:53:58-04:00'
describe
'52769' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXG' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
6e0cf9bd62182ea8ef600d59c1a2218e
a2f5b9b6fb9b506ee08c53f552648fbe9ae1fd12
'2012-06-29T06:58:39-04:00'
describe
'312669' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXH' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
fb0dce635a90a21c7cac96ca83ba2899
9355910a21094091e9dde3a14d93fc3e97872fab
'2012-06-29T06:55:38-04:00'
describe
'30505' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXI' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
1cd3e159344fe947502667a128d2bf65
7f0eef804c945e874323c9887d1b9ef166af13fd
'2012-06-29T06:59:02-04:00'
describe
'53760' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXJ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
747b0cdb2bb4abef3db0634b89610acd
9c33cc4c1d186ccce9338f144683cb3d03399b5d
'2012-06-29T06:55:29-04:00'
describe
'140310' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXK' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
f17545c22923b12330ecb0ec812a8cd5
64147a65de352d92bd94c8dd60aa6121d6f2616c
'2012-06-29T06:54:23-04:00'
describe
'312641' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXL' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
13176f7d9fd106b20b6147188f61d188
37e2974c89fdabb9891cfb6f1f77599ca6e9cdc6
describe
'29503' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXM' 'sip-files00165.pro'
1ea726fa1a01af89c9e92a95a7b36801
4e77748e71db26be3b3b9145bb237c3c02579e7d
'2012-06-29T06:54:20-04:00'
describe
'300609' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXN' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
2ee16cd31749c7282140d0145f57b16d
67cd39476b7dc80db12db35ab0111284e0043e35
'2012-06-29T06:58:51-04:00'
describe
'2523676' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXO' 'sip-files00153.tif'
4af5d81c15ffce8fd8b21d6b71cb4340
56fd09dabbccd6177b025cfe9e273886351c2ff1
'2012-06-29T07:05:04-04:00'
describe
'29481' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXP' 'sip-files00058.pro'
e1773ffefd098e4b1d0ddd1367655618
a669a6eb8a6ca529e435cd052ddddff7eac8f34b
'2012-06-29T06:58:32-04:00'
describe
'312675' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXQ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
fec93ed839580396c9063c72c8365df0
8507cf3fbe88f3157e6caf3fc7d3d5253f0728d9
'2012-06-29T06:56:12-04:00'
describe
'110' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXR' 'sip-files00209.txt'
70e377eba5631af0c4ea25cf8d9ed10a
bb78aa5913b91460fd527b5e04a3b3402077062a
'2012-06-29T06:57:03-04:00'
describe
'121266' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXS' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
3d0de3228ec4f13a7142fcfe266d52b6
0692c73838243aac87e7f87ec53d3e4f0ac259fa
'2012-06-29T06:57:29-04:00'
describe
'294817' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXT' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
0eb9ddc7fde8af94e87a2ae043b1651e
179b99183a3124986c0882b6e417297f62362066
'2012-06-29T06:59:53-04:00'
describe
'314469' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXU' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
3533e31c1b339e7e5e4de19350637d02
f97fb182f6df8751642236eb9235f727d2e21e3c
'2012-06-29T06:58:41-04:00'
describe
'312694' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXV' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
a20e48044a192aa3f72bcb177908ce7f
90b6035c041ffa80c3b6ef6830f9c56fdfcddd39
'2012-06-29T06:56:21-04:00'
describe
'52055' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXW' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
9242cd3f5e7e310522070e3f06cdb1a5
fcb04d3f86d21d1ccfae3970ede25a659068f033
'2012-06-29T07:03:53-04:00'
describe
'4512749' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXX' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
3d13f333674b456eb9117700ea34fdce
d5b2e30f5a08a75d6adcf2a97b5c91776538500b
'2012-06-29T06:54:08-04:00'
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXY' 'sip-files00097.txt'
bb0f423fce445bb4659e111737f5e583
a875b623924090ec2ab884709e144eea742ff0c4
describe
'34810' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABXZ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
54c7c7929bdb626ea8e7cce753cefe4c
b103a52369a4c3272fd2fa76675afacb378a26ae
'2012-06-29T07:02:56-04:00'
describe
'312732' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYA' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
8ea51401ad7346f8ed91972d7517af1c
a76b01d2c474823d88774bd7cbf84960b2dedfcb
'2012-06-29T07:01:52-04:00'
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYB' 'sip-files00154.txt'
dc65fea720848a9531c2446dfdd2bf29
3805f796561f94ca542f61ee76e83d926a16cc8f
'2012-06-29T07:00:47-04:00'
describe
'95293' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYC' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
ff0982706435d1dae3a1807933ca4c7f
71d00088bd1d53474d86bcaed5ccea16046646b0
'2012-06-29T06:54:51-04:00'
describe
'219370' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYD' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
7962f548770aec1245058c03b1dc1075
bbf9e0d1a616f3d2a7fe227fccfc3cae690aab76
'2012-06-29T06:57:01-04:00'
describe
'2523644' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYE' 'sip-files00064.tif'
566ada016183f2b5e218b239f0095217
9886fc3013b02a2859f05e723907cc8493e5ebff
'2012-06-29T07:03:00-04:00'
describe
'910' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYF' 'sip-files00209.pro'
cdd8c5a2b3f3ce68ad355f6ae473d1ca
76a1b03cef0597b6bf4b7d12743dcd08d4439e76
'2012-06-29T07:02:12-04:00'
describe
'52548' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYG' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
4dc5a374de6d7b6b210ee596eb698013
6c3cc70de87894900e1bfdb20ae3086091651114
'2012-06-29T07:01:30-04:00'
describe
'57862' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYH' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
763dccedb99d9e95e312d8d2b9823356
05d061e7d814fac3d1a5c84ba7190320a7ce3de1
'2012-06-29T07:05:17-04:00'
describe
'129912' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYI' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
1559f159816bcd4fec2bf362a409eb3e
2de9e5ed4c764e2658c8aad68c4feede5f0a6479
'2012-06-29T06:54:50-04:00'
describe
'28517' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYJ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
e27eb07d3ce72c221947e08459712de4
a1bf77c01c76b9ea8e24fe97df8b81142e10bb5c
'2012-06-29T06:55:42-04:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYK' 'sip-files00132.txt'
de60e0a3b004ef69b9deca89969d6f79
ecacf96a38d804266f46af4e479493988f4d3d7a
'2012-06-29T06:55:10-04:00'
describe
'56514' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYL' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
1876bb8e1faf39161b40c00f3ff3a7a6
771e82d81289877c83f05c81a79073baed77ab7b
describe
'28246' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYM' 'sip-files00126.pro'
3395eae77250d0e16ffee6fc15c7b5f4
de100f2fce4ab0a3ee6bcc3615744dc7c03ccd36
'2012-06-29T06:57:17-04:00'
describe
'2017' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYN' 'sip-files00198.txt'
fe117af3b4deca734983be95d698052e
c6bc22ec2b6ce83a61a477ff637aea8a8c7b28b8
'2012-06-29T07:05:29-04:00'
describe
'2522208' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYO' 'sip-files00026.tif'
ce5d9b37079ff79541e0641cc3adce50
281206bfd71e8fa0c2c9108f49739778c12db5da
'2012-06-29T06:55:13-04:00'
describe
'312686' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYP' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
dc6fc5555ef2dce69c5357b9153d10b6
2a772c523c633737abfe0660c693433524ee630f
'2012-06-29T06:56:53-04:00'
describe
'2523720' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYQ' 'sip-files00179.tif'
0b95d28d6691eb93411d37a7543e29a3
af331b20af8d32b6b8ce0bd394d90ad2668ae7b0
'2012-06-29T07:00:15-04:00'
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYR' 'sip-files00018.txt'
b71f5d1e9711bb2d71a29f7ec9013c67
74f954d0f92d3b89abd96a3d6e39e55ed720dab3
'2012-06-29T06:56:15-04:00'
describe
'300581' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYS' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
66143b9b6c1ea34d5122be04df753138
8bbdffdb5d8772fe460281d726f34b0cf8c36ae8
'2012-06-29T06:58:08-04:00'
describe
'28100' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYT' 'sip-files00199.pro'
83ec883202effab54249241f7665fb13
23bdfb9a9057d12edea9611424b641daa33dde90
'2012-06-29T06:58:01-04:00'
describe
'30687' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYU' 'sip-files00075.pro'
363d0f3c051e8a2f8c51b3092e5a3c90
86c064801109b05ab35a2561d10ccabb920d1898
describe
'2519364' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYV' 'sip-files00005.tif'
9bf27816d59b03607aec80ed0f3f7674
6aa549138d0cf4cdca1cde450fc0be55933c50de
'2012-06-29T06:58:24-04:00'
describe
'19776' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYW' 'sip-files00190.pro'
b0fd0b0ae76781c84d9235cdd107069c
dcb58f2d736723c0f71c1c585f5a698cee93d6c3
'2012-06-29T06:55:46-04:00'
describe
'259988' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYX' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
934f0b8966e34b43237b7cbedd30b78a
fe7055296d6e61a3ae13fa5258186c86082efd40
'2012-06-29T06:57:53-04:00'
describe
'2523636' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYY' 'sip-files00169.tif'
672c46b2ab7207ccd451948ec1de296b
f35cb6d10e3ede01e33e187d3feb260b527b114c
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABYZ' 'sip-files00142.txt'
4604fabaadff55d7f10070901ec949a5
8aa671b5476bc4c24201b6a3cfa0f209bb9e8116
'2012-06-29T06:54:07-04:00'
describe
'295670' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZA' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
a848d41e2543eb3ebb3e90c8c2ee40c0
b6545473b43a8a3ff9931691ba69b4d92514a204
'2012-06-29T07:03:54-04:00'
describe
'312650' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZB' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
e2a382d10ef8cb709ad498bbba47ae16
437164b0aaae0978bf7acf0ffa17d282923b0c22
'2012-06-29T06:54:22-04:00'
describe
'2523492' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZC' 'sip-files00020.tif'
0b8a420107317e877f7e0b7b19a68d40
763765d25d9406684b8730a577eb2fc57cb9ee88
describe
'120931' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZD' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
fc69be9c6ac8dd2b250416821996e6d8
ffb1c237ed8451a80ae22814fab0b1faed01a4bd
'2012-06-29T06:56:33-04:00'
describe
'10736' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZE' 'sip-files00118.pro'
70e08a192104b5bcd4c0c570193d77d4
56542c5bdf925b492700566753d9ceac88731a52
'2012-06-29T06:56:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZF' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
3cafd7f469a285e97053060a9d53dc90
9e91d77945a0318383a91d6a25d64ac9b185195c
'2012-06-29T07:05:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZG' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
31a42ea03d1cf450334f412bcaa021f6
27bcb0ff76ba6f5b167e3dcb08b5ee761c90d33d
'2012-06-29T06:57:14-04:00'
describe
'2523552' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZH' 'sip-files00192.tif'
c67f08ed06455b04fe7b30e25d05d1b5
44b5ea85f98d01df54007d264f55d32bd7c66c48
'2012-06-29T06:55:51-04:00'
describe
'1207615' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZI' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
721703dff654f5048b44ee6269fc7825
4465d9637a8ed94dee45488c92eff9886af2dd30
'2012-06-29T06:57:09-04:00'
describe
'125696' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZJ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
8335bbb6f1ad84f837d698b8478988cf
bf2eee02d35f6ce7f23684a0652467feb0ddda15
'2012-06-29T06:55:12-04:00'
describe
'1195646' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZK' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
6677978733836610dc85c6d7841e7421
47698c2c86d1898577ab2adac4bb0082a089d9d6
'2012-06-29T07:05:32-04:00'
describe
'312692' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZL' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
cbd3ad319a7c46b73305f79cbc2288ec
6dc1380a6f229dbe0ab2008f25e59091ef8d714c
'2012-06-29T06:54:43-04:00'
describe
'49249' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZM' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
cdc35a5822171b198af444fa977fe5cd
a44f01a41049c5e8faf1b94212abcd2e5d048de4
'2012-06-29T07:04:31-04:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZN' 'sip-files00185.txt'
fddbf9a13a461f06e22c0ac0bc020eb4
218a014ea885e1a17bdaa6f332edc70339a2de0e
'2012-06-29T06:56:03-04:00'
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZO' 'sip-files00051.txt'
4120876aa2207e68bcf7f9a2eed4ccfe
f8328a5786064585fbff7aad0b691facd0384f05
describe
'2523384' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZP' 'sip-files00028.tif'
86b672cf63b35684628f4f8202d498d6
bb8bf48dc46493ee34df86517172e61dc1b054ba
describe
'312651' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZQ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
abed1c28e3e26913db279bad36e0afa8
e8a46b63425d66d8292946be9571f59d6d49410e
'2012-06-29T07:04:23-04:00'
describe
'122486' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZR' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
c4e4a6fecd828e0bef22642ab64bc6ba
30ce3a7feb73c116426996d4c619d0c3dd466d4f
'2012-06-29T06:56:05-04:00'
describe
'312632' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZS' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
563b043f3cd6acade826b7b75cfd7c02
0643b8365ab7ba709160bdefa138f1b6ea99e7c7
'2012-06-29T06:58:33-04:00'
describe
'309611' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZT' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
cf0911884f0c9829a9184fb10722a574
df2a0f13ffbbbdfbadc4b905d5ad78e67156a16d
'2012-06-29T07:05:05-04:00'
describe
'107661' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZU' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
d177f799298b5b9d210bccb5e78fcea6
56a20929692b9986cb158dfccb14c0d4d5cb654b
'2012-06-29T06:59:39-04:00'
describe
'126147' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZV' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
a49f62d4d05e5b56af099d7a69cfb7dd
1e78fcc6d86bb689ad092467561ed43fde479568
describe
'312662' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZW' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
39c7c483d28f4ab363a675555f078b52
ff53c7c5febd20f18729a7d11639479913662351
'2012-06-29T06:55:24-04:00'
describe
'2523544' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZX' 'sip-files00056.tif'
c02b8bbfdb3f940ddba3395e3306901a
be16da5bd4bfc025c80066d13a4ec2e8f530b6ee
'2012-06-29T07:01:48-04:00'
describe
'30335' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZY' 'sip-files00178.pro'
a78808a77f6b72ce58d8de742b593ee4
0013a17711156c21635bae7ac8976ec6a5917e9e
'2012-06-29T06:57:15-04:00'
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAABZZ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
6c97a96204ea3bcf10cf3f32c0402ff5
6a9fd3a884eea14d53967a924a97c16de4f523c8
'2012-06-29T06:56:58-04:00'
describe
'312727' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAA' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
2dc4d1d85ba474f98a697fe4287a6f5b
9878e048c423c70b7a6ba53c1b0df01bbb009eb1
'2012-06-29T06:58:12-04:00'
describe
'312704' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAB' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
cff08a91857aac01332b790232cb7047
4f4158b572b00bf855e9ad3d97cfd1a72e543da0
'2012-06-29T06:55:43-04:00'
describe
'128954' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAC' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
ee0205fb568a762c366c68938f2e0128
dba7266fab67618ee8bae42300048fb866922d1b
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAD' 'sip-files00146.txt'
3dacf1b17016c92b12b347436735022c
0c409929a9d0210e0bbcc3cac6909109ad114d95
describe
'2523204' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAE' 'sip-files00143.tif'
01a53012d5f34495203776bbb5135dd6
a68f92dd5bb434fbb2c47ddb6f3b762e515e51d9
'2012-06-29T06:56:54-04:00'
describe
'305998' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAF' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
ddbef5cd14b6a14057be61f3617e8995
e53d3346bdd723017b736f53a76d04e74a785a6c
'2012-06-29T06:54:33-04:00'
describe
'2520672' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAG' 'sip-files00008.tif'
397fd97a4b8fac018dc980e729631be4
59985cf0587aa6ae942e926eb1d68c98d4d4b239
'2012-06-29T06:54:38-04:00'
describe
'303547' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAH' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
e94861b72c99a39b0f445e527da686bb
9fe025d2cd4cbe7ff1d7fcdf17c56c59d73706a3
describe
'313112' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAI' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
fb42bbf797d9093abdec2e0b30345499
ada84986986b11d9d9785053b69404e6bfdfc40c
describe
'52389' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAJ' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
db3fbed65df48084fdf65d5ed308ac50
a9aabde985236336616ab8aefcf5df0971dba565
'2012-06-29T06:59:47-04:00'
describe
'259246' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAK' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
6fc11f629f8de4802fe5691e048c1b7c
9368a89b9e287e449492f0b0f917727c5467e6c4
'2012-06-29T06:54:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAL' 'sip-files00046.tif'
735f41fc2cad34f7416d987740d29271
4393fdccd8c2c114c1f41e85197ca0ada53ca578
'2012-06-29T06:59:29-04:00'
describe
'99' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAM' 'sip-files00121.txt'
bbbf314af7abd0a512aac5ad824eaaaa
d68fff550f2e629c0625806010d1c197cdce7b7d
'2012-06-29T06:59:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAN' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
e9946911699cdffcc6354bb624187a82
75f490c8c4e02a78444c922730532e47bf86e2ba
'2012-06-29T07:00:58-04:00'
describe
'244167' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAO' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
4726ae7c1dfdbfa4909dc816d889b5f3
1a80579c419b320bf5ab57ef4b0ed7e05aaff1ba
'2012-06-29T07:05:19-04:00'
describe
'2523088' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAP' 'sip-files00138.tif'
61427fa1a28e34c926bda7b7e5fd516b
6d04f50cda7ef25bd2e86483c17f266be26a94d8
'2012-06-29T06:57:43-04:00'
describe
'292646' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAQ' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
2702b775f7bca60b5651e8364a370f0e
f9006662cf362a1427661698fd5868aa5ee926fd
'2012-06-29T06:56:51-04:00'
describe
'50666' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAR' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
3e07ac8d0569e4d9616d246ec51b9e6d
d4f90b6ecf59f1bc097b97b0957a0cdb9049cba7
'2012-06-29T06:59:59-04:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAS' 'sip-files00170.txt'
f91a1d371a54bc9a59310af5ba9d26b4
e53cbf5389edb95f3ab7270236a3a104bc3a3ac8
'2012-06-29T06:55:47-04:00'
describe
'222220' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAT' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
ac28eb3779c655766af0df894c3fe1e6
91df0739137525ece61d0d3a50c7df450781ceb6
'2012-06-29T07:00:48-04:00'
describe
'312646' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAU' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
41f0897a076f42a5073690ba75a23794
dc14bbd784446690c5f453b38832e1fadc92e9e5
'2012-06-29T06:59:30-04:00'
describe
'29285' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAV' 'sip-files00099.pro'
ca22d7b76e886278eae8810e09f6abe8
1f65345c5dd3998dbd58a5786115121db389644b
'2012-06-29T06:53:54-04:00'
describe
'2523844' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAW' 'sip-files00018.tif'
054cc715c86e8bcca35ba42c1ac63501
cc646d75d3c0d4e704208411551a01d371b7bfa0
'2012-06-29T06:57:52-04:00'
describe
'312683' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAX' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
c05d9121039b6cc93fc550fe7e8bc9f4
72cd6df123ecfc94f85835a9bfdc2a12d4cd7fef
'2012-06-29T07:01:12-04:00'
describe
'7091' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAY' 'sip-files00008.pro'
d37cc825440ba18cd0cddbfa0462401f
2edff7c6643bb37c2bcbfba7a8c1b5b067d917d9
'2012-06-29T06:54:53-04:00'
describe
'453' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACAZ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
c8c7ea9821b890c572885cdc518b8258
6f5aac79dbc2f9bc22cc231e2044d4f2fd8df182
'2012-06-29T07:04:39-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'30345' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBA' 'sip-files00117.pro'
7e07434fad4c1f51b4ae2d681351812e
19070c381e0ac14a24ae04fa0a7db2044386bf6c
describe
'51690' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBB' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
34ed57d76acbf0bd9c175aebca38040e
f449e764e1ea65eef8b227691c14b4cf1aa913f0
'2012-06-29T06:54:36-04:00'
describe
'53287' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBC' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
99f0dc89a9d4d78befa626f6fe320635
912395492ff9a7bcadea77524be2cce388c02f46
'2012-06-29T06:56:10-04:00'
describe
'131323' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBD' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
6c2d4b394cabbcfbb722fe13081e30d1
262cf8bd1a3613be9859a67cd3b39725163c8de2
describe
'52268' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBE' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
38ca0ee872b72fe9e7c38db75f13b210
23bac4c5b554817125c2318ad17bf18ddf2eb90b
'2012-06-29T07:01:39-04:00'
describe
'51379' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBF' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
51e264be4e799cac3f69c59e00fc438c
d39d55aa482022bf9d8ba9bfc8c6e9e22d376981
'2012-06-29T07:02:09-04:00'
describe
'123081' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBG' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
81c64a6f796ce42703ca2c63295adb1e
521b7891a2ded71e41dc7584f1d0459f4c082bfe
'2012-06-29T07:04:06-04:00'
describe
'21151' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBH' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
85615abb82aaccf1be19e6056b24b99f
6fb2c06ef609bc1ce7b7e9225a9e1afbb4a2bec6
'2012-06-29T07:00:45-04:00'
describe
'30293' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBI' 'sip-files00153.pro'
7df6e9bee0d7602873fd6f35707e5fcf
6030bd48e20c7710a7562a70b9794a60862726f7
'2012-06-29T06:59:01-04:00'
describe
'125747' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBJ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
7bdf0e0fe306e57fcab1acec151db82d
abe8352248aed6438868b1d06566d55876b288e5
describe
'221631' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBK' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
45d8e275c4b6ed0edb4f7c65cbd7904e
915fc2c89e0d4d820e7760dc37d09e24cd779c8d
'2012-06-29T07:03:25-04:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBL' 'sip-files00055.txt'
b5b5a4b8e6fffa88d5fd17f5475d6324
4867cf994b6d3211654a5d66ee64dd6b3f688472
describe
'314704' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBM' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
078d27cae96091be23f5d80fa235fafe
9c07b350c95e6a124890df6713adf3f9fc7a8372
'2012-06-29T06:57:35-04:00'
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBN' 'sip-files00093.txt'
dc0e9258d16fed2a34faf846106dea35
55c525edaab68ec85fb22175f241d852bb151445
'2012-06-29T06:54:09-04:00'
describe
'298733' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBO' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
c880d13ab5b91d41254c4ff51d8556e1
1984d58496fd3800a53fef6e04a22612bad5835c
'2012-06-29T06:54:42-04:00'
describe
'302137' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBP' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
69db7810a8260a6aff2793a1d3aaa66b
5d4fb1b598eeaf4b7165ffd34c67c0f3694d7ced
'2012-06-29T07:02:28-04:00'
describe
'52090' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBQ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
ca60f1a13ba015384a0779c142ff37ad
203f46ea36aa278ed9d7e2e235134004f3d7363b
describe
'312708' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBR' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
35ed030923641938d468f1e8443125f1
88a4b2849d2d2cb01cc1b56fa8fa608c24735e7f
'2012-06-29T06:57:38-04:00'
describe
'25443' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBS' 'sip-files00027.pro'
eb16e75b4a4c6b68d25da20153704e3c
3cd6f9203306e9c362334ef5d8c879363edfb9f9
describe
'2523420' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBT' 'sip-files00080.tif'
66cf4c86ddbf82b41ef993a9db6c6735
54616b8fc064b8cdab0d63346eb74a62166c3113
'2012-06-29T06:56:30-04:00'
describe
'117319' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBU' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
0bf4f6debb797948656c1730814cb22c
b92c218fbe2f5ec4951fd18953ef53253c49920a
'2012-06-29T06:57:06-04:00'
describe
'23261' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBV' 'sip-files00189.pro'
368ccdaa784eda0812a80988d1fadd81
d232a5f032b3c55ebaaae2f2875d4334910dad62
'2012-06-29T06:56:17-04:00'
describe
'129722' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBW' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
e938bde23226a6dca45362888de8760c
8e13fc9514428cb5e6c7faacbd02a15c866b24ab
'2012-06-29T06:59:44-04:00'
describe
'312617' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBX' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
2e3811e9a0240d8cfbb4c71595df6ce9
e8866db0e006bffeed2c66cefb566379bed5a030
'2012-06-29T07:04:40-04:00'
describe
'2523400' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBY' 'sip-files00155.tif'
d45a6073f3a29cc6d30000d5c2dd5f4c
db8768f99586ff6d0b7b5aa763d2fff9a1b76b03
'2012-06-29T06:56:45-04:00'
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACBZ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
a22708980bd8864e43f30be45236b30c
8572fb331a1c4b7e0a1716d795498c060c46b747
'2012-06-29T06:56:08-04:00'
describe
'312707' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
9b2aed765aec5dccd8e3c3ea30387690
0713409d7397f68f64787546165c02895ba547df
'2012-06-29T06:56:24-04:00'
describe
'28611' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCB' 'sip-files00135.pro'
7be04771c0fd8dfd63af9a7a4c406a09
db03b8da2b84cdc5b76dc35a4d254959ebe7fc64
'2012-06-29T07:00:09-04:00'
describe
'312698' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCC' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
ad825905a573b61476c0806d3f7d7691
859215f45be4550a9532e6f58ef65c2667c2785d
describe
'31165' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCD' 'sip-files00156.pro'
2a42ac3283a672d84e5cae16c4d6f4d6
1c4351be7b9f7e8fe3188c462838ef91e6133727
describe
'2522968' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCE' 'sip-files00200.tif'
eefeb1da35eb6a6f442b34f8284b8f4d
c2135f4883a19aa2d2425331f26f188d9881a211
describe
'2523172' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCF' 'sip-files00038.tif'
9dd004c82c2ee66e60b081289ae67b9c
0814569591780723f6fd5af22271587d0a4dbccb
'2012-06-29T07:04:54-04:00'
describe
'310543' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCG' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
dea4e1896ba77ff51f06257cc6cdcd07
7865c60af1143f49332f3f41c7dbfdafc6fcbaf5
describe
'302093' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCH' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
8aa446d7f1fb27cde807ff124db7d6df
ae0a7a1eb4489e90fdf5f13997851a01184c3c2e
'2012-06-29T07:04:34-04:00'
describe
'212620' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCI' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
bbde6ab8ebb447bbf4c2a0b0dee22b7c
1317cb0d0290fe8acd76a4af919220dbd56ccd6e
'2012-06-29T07:01:24-04:00'
describe
'312725' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCJ' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
1ccdd9a3e76f5fb594357eb596f8aa29
fe26bae885ff588b14f17c9ee5d6b535d44a3c97
'2012-06-29T06:53:45-04:00'
describe
'19691' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCK' 'sip-files00015.pro'
524ca3f153754ea492428ff01241d86f
d32fe3ac02d0bed52d32224153eded0e711b1db0
'2012-06-29T07:02:39-04:00'
describe
'51863' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCL' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
017163a9c192103a8c22a6d5666218e9
6c192a6a48a79b2a675e3acb3d35b612ea6ebfea
'2012-06-29T07:00:46-04:00'
describe
'28359' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCM' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
0f6475ca6e312810e572261d5898a421
8cc7b085789c0458f7482b6a1f088c60bbe4ad74
describe
'128459' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCN' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
a6c13422f161051d05030ad7726ee43f
e6ecc7535e3eea7ec968779d2bbbf65f95a1ded0
describe
'31214' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCO' 'sip-files00160.pro'
563cf86c069e10cdff98969e035b704f
4f45d70c88bc40508ba3d32a8a39d19b2928a845
describe
'2523144' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCP' 'sip-files00198.tif'
9ef2efedef4b5fe929dc57c672cf8067
e219855410c26dee5a06abbde4d181bbc1a3aa80
'2012-06-29T06:56:29-04:00'
describe
'312729' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCQ' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
42f5bda66361b25baf54b40f30639ebb
5c4bc5421f77c52f26b8d447dee0a2665a59a162
describe
'312657' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCR' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
f968c5dca3497a27b6a804c7a2ccec23
f6ba52b76f5117347f84a9fd188b1da06a826930
'2012-06-29T06:59:21-04:00'
describe
'672' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCS' 'sip-files00121.pro'
bc6aee2ea9eaa8f199e6035d7642ae75
cfdbebb4136291a9611be4ab4fe43565eb5068ea
'2012-06-29T06:54:48-04:00'
describe
'725194' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCT' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
c0db27c2b6c862ebc956d633292fb15b
b39296fd9a4cafb67cdd913051de3c62d5b868a0
'2012-06-29T06:59:40-04:00'
describe
'124166' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCU' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
92d1e76329f7261370cfde1f081bdf6d
54df8752e22f5fc15505009b44a311bc34db32cd
'2012-06-29T07:04:07-04:00'
describe
'81496' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCV' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
36ee92921ceae855f776e0615462f5af
90f9f2c6ed1c35f676aeb6ae383b728ef9a50537
describe
'308320' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCW' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
2154513fe48381c150efd0745f4001c3
6d81821da806e2019888e034a4d999f483f2085d
'2012-06-29T07:02:51-04:00'
describe
'52316' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCX' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
aa6dcfd9ad7c418a4a61da30e5c526d4
2d64ce799761d7187de301d2aa9faa9a21eb995b
describe
'29192' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCY' 'sip-files00083.pro'
caa307eb1e4c73dc0d11f5adae9e0b61
4f62f6e89b613e0e9adc6b9c41760eb2a6cfe4b1
'2012-06-29T06:54:16-04:00'
describe
'53084' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACCZ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
307e90d2d34a653ec9df2f0a37139490
ee0a9ce4cc8a1a2261ba7214e484073921cfe6a4
'2012-06-29T06:56:47-04:00'
describe
'92' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDA' 'sip-files00062.txt'
53927ba790e3e0b10ee1d489ad194a6e
b155a2814fec23788ed19246a44096e3c3369cca
'2012-06-29T07:04:53-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'2523044' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDB' 'sip-files00031.tif'
ae1c52d170c2dfb505557e5a26c7de69
13cf8c3ab4e2c16937d200338e5d92c98e138a72
'2012-06-29T06:58:20-04:00'
describe
'312630' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDC' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
f9bf96b0da78a4eee0ad2c4c3bbf19a5
68b91556a528bde6848fb74674b064a5c9f28258
'2012-06-29T06:57:33-04:00'
describe
'28291' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDD' 'sip-files00136.pro'
188f5049048630e0125aa563367bc20f
b12a009027ebdfd2cc422ed308598411b776deac
'2012-06-29T06:59:04-04:00'
describe
'640' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDE' 'sip-files00011.txt'
7b20a343d667e7525a381848464f5de2
73e40fc7b0bb25d32ad17238475212fff1776f8d
'2012-06-29T06:58:27-04:00'
describe
'313425' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDF' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
d48e50816bbe5fed6751a78a6a49e681
bec50d3c4d61ae88a9a57842932e1d25c4480251
'2012-06-29T07:00:14-04:00'
describe
'312728' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDG' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
831d5785d75b6779ea44bf1602ddfe76
5562dfc0080e7bb0e83769717d33d17d06173857
'2012-06-29T07:02:38-04:00'
describe
'128201' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDH' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
9ac6247f1e440d5716ff3da9115824c1
53db19e947f1265129ff54894cf72701bead0b7f
'2012-06-29T06:58:09-04:00'
describe
'127557' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDI' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
1a9a5ba30896816092be2fcfc8751dc1
c6e62a406b797148532da42221776b7dcc8dbf5c
'2012-06-29T07:03:36-04:00'
describe
'20535' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDJ' 'sip-files00053.pro'
6b70c30fea0f01a5d90dc80657717548
61c4007bfa56d4de9f83bbb7e17b7ee65e71a664
'2012-06-29T07:04:36-04:00'
describe
'312715' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDK' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
7353ca9cb7c6c1e6247990cdccc32933
cc6eeb086a336cb39a3dec26d0949350c12a2380
'2012-06-29T06:54:31-04:00'
describe
'45656' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDL' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
cc348b9580da148befe2e3b757550d0a
a188e2dd2b2b56f80f6a25263f4d8cddba80dc2a
'2012-06-29T07:03:11-04:00'
describe
'2523240' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDM' 'sip-files00067.tif'
39536a7ac3ce06206166c08cd46d1884
88de62cee5b397c14cdc971f19c7538542af4135
describe
'309699' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDN' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
73d5d04924c114bbd574284b94da459e
f3036de93a229cb087bef42aa9a75af1e41c34ce
'2012-06-29T06:53:48-04:00'
describe
'312658' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDO' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
fce222bcb3b642575410bd8fec802d2c
3a43451d621fba10a3469104f8f47de575bcb5da
'2012-06-29T07:03:28-04:00'
describe
'21253' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDP' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
6b09fc7cd1237985b8a97599f62b70ff
fcb6b3ec12585fa75c6979550682bba132f4bb34
'2012-06-29T06:56:34-04:00'
describe
'49297' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDQ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
90c9e60eab377e5f9bbd08715c4811bb
1780da3b4a45db48e093532801414fd4393b323f
describe
'2523640' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDR' 'sip-files00023.tif'
5ca2f715ad38d60fac31fef6e65af6f1
01733c1ea84b7c6d732d4d6d4f9cd44807e34f92
'2012-06-29T07:04:48-04:00'
describe
'52239' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDS' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
06f08355beeacfae4dd130505e416814
0db776d3720830bedbf11d6f969410e7a5580a40
describe
'31830' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDT' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
0acce55bcff75b84bf4715657cdc6798
14de19a0aabb1c9e8813128ba1c3c925cf7037fc
'2012-06-29T06:56:44-04:00'
describe
'559908' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDU' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
cc3cfd74642e557a5a598e056bf0371d
5ed9023009a5e79d05eb7a2b794e956a042dddbf
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDV' 'sip-files00145.txt'
c5f1357bd031f970c93c9873f2e40eab
5f2ad6b340783419a9a608c3ff6f98ac61dc2320
'2012-06-29T06:56:27-04:00'
describe
'24086' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDW' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
cab3cc0944e8be5573bcd89a1c076419
ec40eb0b3ffce65bce9249f19ed9e3c4c5c1d900
'2012-06-29T07:03:01-04:00'
describe
'89895' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDX' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
480cb4649fee7a866281e25a0699d5d9
75bc01216b78f90f3cd47b88128cf39b8f01cd8d
'2012-06-29T06:59:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDY' 'sip-files00098.txt'
1895fe581a799388ca178eb849f00184
3f690de9a8627c230f30d978c1200eaa6308f1d0
'2012-06-29T07:02:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACDZ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
c099da6bb6732dbc9c8d502990869944
69436036f9680692fc24e35b5fa69b645f2e1265
describe
'2519416' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEA' 'sip-files00061.tif'
0d6c1272ae78fa523038ed4a11954e65
ddf84b2d303aa6242f8dcf769b818fa94917565a
'2012-06-29T06:57:31-04:00'
describe
'312705' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEB' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
4891a9165db98eda742486797fe7c28c
a436be9b6e3da099fa87e5553b0aa0d827d74272
'2012-06-29T07:04:44-04:00'
describe
'2523324' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEC' 'sip-files00063.tif'
6a590a7bde03d467b39cdbf002ac7949
f537756c88352ae0e49930b5990a8c7cd7a9e51c
'2012-06-29T07:03:44-04:00'
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACED' 'sip-files00187.txt'
1b14243868ddbc0c59b3b51d228b1942
d7eaec7d177e79055fbb575eb4209ffd77a8c352
'2012-06-29T07:03:19-04:00'
describe
'53511' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEE' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
6506717b1cc0a40a85ec4e85409aa2ea
3629c8e0b21360e0856b003ac0d58d9e4eefbc6a
describe
'28631' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEF' 'sip-files00172.pro'
f1925479256276c14f73d322a01eb4bb
a5862fb395f1cf1044d3fa9309c7b74020c16336
'2012-06-29T06:55:23-04:00'
describe
'312740' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEG' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
7420a43744df20174c5e6af23151d9cc
1a3beeda5e460064c8352db200033833005f6c7a
'2012-06-29T07:02:04-04:00'
describe
'312737' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEH' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
6c40f7863da81bc6b5961e1b2da467f4
fad7379ddbd7e8d32f76cc7b99948c9f955a51b0
'2012-06-29T07:00:39-04:00'
describe
'85643' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEI' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
10d4c1ec634edf85fed03755d7362265
64bec0294efdcc694cd990d7c02fa81b8a16b6e5
'2012-06-29T07:01:22-04:00'
describe
'2523440' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEJ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
ab7d3dcef416191cb8712ba993e92a5c
d30f02696b2cd3d7483e741d31bba389b344117d
'2012-06-29T07:04:52-04:00'
describe
'289415' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEK' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
37cb83ad0da665ccbd6e08efb8c8dd70
89b65581093c694086eb2dbfe441786d18c16701
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEL' 'sip-files00085.txt'
a0694458ded22137c6d1cebd10e52b0a
3ddb3f823e194d4676514cecc806aba948745f63
'2012-06-29T06:54:14-04:00'
describe
'312710' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEM' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
2595a5a9836866c90605a6b52c8640a0
c4fe3649b327212e7ab56c4f12c36448598c8612
'2012-06-29T06:57:25-04:00'
describe
'23397' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEN' 'sip-files00071.pro'
3c5359bec5f8ff3a9b43d5d765c9ada5
964c7d134e810c8c8b36e65ac6116b13b8db44fd
describe
'312723' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEO' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
62881ab368b5dd9eecfe108d5c066a16
70ebca10581f6cb4a337e836a21578d88b8ed140
'2012-06-29T06:53:55-04:00'
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEP' 'sip-files00062.pro'
286fd0eb69dba4dd9823bff44dd3b509
b3833dad2159c746c3f5762b7f5da38f6d4da3df
'2012-06-29T07:02:02-04:00'
describe
'30513' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEQ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
3cd540f5674e57e737aaf868c613283c
504c0804e4c4ab5a78a02b920369a3c44f16073a
'2012-06-29T07:00:41-04:00'
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACER' 'sip-files00169.txt'
ee235658f36f06f6fd244fac3e1aa663
21976285df714f24b2f8759d5b8484807df42281
'2012-06-29T07:04:19-04:00'
describe
'2523408' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACES' 'sip-files00095.tif'
40f4dc2c6bd4f71ff152f60b8580fff8
eedd7f75dbbdaddf9dfd2ca0f9729c8986ac11e7
'2012-06-29T07:02:20-04:00'
describe
'88159' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACET' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
1e0fd09a57facc167ae25f80ef62bc13
dd49520fb12d11423c6aab95aac639e20d405013
'2012-06-29T06:53:47-04:00'
describe
'295253' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEU' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
de7f023ddac165ed2589f028f86e2dc6
8cd37ebd970554a02473bc97f09c9734e48a2a0d
'2012-06-29T06:53:50-04:00'
describe
'60686' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEV' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
b24235fd8305dc1b25792bc30b267414
1589b7a357b353bb695c2d26217b980cac67d0ec
'2012-06-29T07:02:27-04:00'
describe
'301432' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEW' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
c9e42cec8f6bfb7f75148053929b7d31
71f4a9cc5e8c5fec27fdc466f0cc45ddf6dab58d
'2012-06-29T07:03:14-04:00'
describe
'2519440' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEX' 'sip-files00122.tif'
43507de28f2b0233dca2ef584fad0a00
6721a072263018d90c466369a44d7db733fb1407
'2012-06-29T06:53:51-04:00'
describe
'127609' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEY' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
56b6e264dcd28c72c585bc60cb679f2b
4a8d86e13736f8fb9b083d3c82819ffa821f575c
'2012-06-29T07:05:43-04:00'
describe
'2519496' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACEZ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
27a713c9041476147c84e2c032126b8a
96e4ec0940b0af2e87aa73e96e1e299dd6f98738
'2012-06-29T06:59:38-04:00'
describe
'316961' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFA' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
78379e01adfa6f6154b3e3705655a452
045ef36564100e7999c565c06a05344cfc99c351
'2012-06-29T06:58:02-04:00'
describe
'312701' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFB' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a8567e4b79876653f7dd708dd052d6c5
670b1022f4a7a6913168d56fce793afec922257e
'2012-06-29T07:02:46-04:00'
describe
'47907' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFC' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
def55fa350a2d3e3fc71d9a9f3430c74
c83f64f8ad97f68dbd24a10195f23f8aa9b467db
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFD' 'sip-files00115.tif'
90d3d7f811d572d264781ad3e22d9cd1
7b71bd4216c9d95ceda3f937386463ad274dfdf2
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFE' 'sip-files00031.pro'
d500540d98a94b0315f0388cb4796ebd
4477bf50e8d9786fe81607ed57f07a400c760b60
'2012-06-29T06:55:44-04:00'
describe
'312714' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFF' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
5a1169500a982d6894dcce652dec2427
075c9baa5505cde0404754ff9516485aa3c37a33
'2012-06-29T06:55:14-04:00'
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFG' 'sip-files00088.txt'
e66762d2a6325f50922265f028b65c9d
2bbb9f4eec2ac32ca49f41bcab56052f5b2ad4ca
'2012-06-29T07:01:00-04:00'
describe
'124980' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFH' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
6f40c3f3c2a93c249574e6c3756da8ec
8b8ccfed78a48eaabca6da34c55842cb66675d8f
'2012-06-29T07:04:03-04:00'
describe
'312726' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFI' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
55f41710a36ecc51642892a49d54fb53
472b8d5473583ac2417bdb9b3a9f95e6f5e89913
describe
'463' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFJ' 'sip-files00194.txt'
62f714e13ee9de627b119316184961cb
c0fcc679ff9f1af3747e745bd2ccd36358feeb32
'2012-06-29T06:54:25-04:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFK' 'sip-files00094.txt'
5f5ef913fb8d00a0e5fc307875526ce5
ef9d344db0d3fc53f3ade158a22363664b78410a
'2012-06-29T07:00:53-04:00'
describe
'312685' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFL' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
32fc6632f869e6ec1c4defbc35d848b7
3f1c3b3310ec396d32ede77469515ef8f034b9be
describe
'23062' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFM' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
55849cea273266f8f3f47a95c5d2acde
aa75ca3fc86fda6e9132afdfdcea31bb1bacd85b
'2012-06-29T07:03:29-04:00'
describe
'1226724' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFN' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
0621cab0fc4078483f08119d3276bbce
f7101bac28ccdd44efb9d9e353fd916291511d96
describe
'52180' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFO' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
abbc123bc1cded30b97ca66641295750
f6725fa886e276ab45243db37db24ee405632ddc
'2012-06-29T06:55:56-04:00'
describe
'2523212' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFP' 'sip-files00136.tif'
4ba095d5f36974e35768bc0df3458c83
7c4606b45c33d442c1f8c5fbf546099298da459d
'2012-06-29T06:57:30-04:00'
describe
'30930' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFQ' 'sip-files00079.pro'
45102c630839284c0bb84ae23644fa98
9ef5f83b1d6bd5d3f9d13569a0679cc731412034
'2012-06-29T07:01:35-04:00'
describe
'23518' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFR' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
c585761323c39fc373597be42b509a7c
a28a644ad9d6283cdb0da56421b75a1917b188d9
'2012-06-29T06:58:54-04:00'
describe
'112402' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFS' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
8aebe164194610d71092113b5854f354
45e892d6b06fe5a888f0b87b4ee98c0768beacec
'2012-06-29T06:54:37-04:00'
describe
'52069' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFT' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
7df205142dd7e0cceb109e7089a81968
182bb1940cccd3daa5168029baa7feb43ba09f3c
'2012-06-29T06:58:26-04:00'
describe
'312572' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFU' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d84ae486df0b46e1fc654397d30a6085
9b671948a14932512955b3236dd602eb74db0f81
'2012-06-29T06:59:20-04:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFV' 'sip-files00156.txt'
e5844a49a3bb68480ea10cce4543c4df
d5df62ab612bd5a55b20da49f5087ca1a8204c87
describe
'30099' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFW' 'sip-files00021.pro'
5eb7cb5b3ac91a932d146cab77974a22
1b32aa0d0843895de376eec6267d79ce2aec9b2b
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFX' 'sip-files00133.tif'
14947dbf2ec238876bff255fa802238d
6ea0bb84cd4a6c0357a5c705f084dd059200dfaf
'2012-06-29T07:00:36-04:00'
describe
'30642' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFY' 'sip-files00066.pro'
4086977f10c73d2c046c7fe5d674f1dd
dedcb72fd530ba9c56865aab63ca9ec82d4e0fe6
'2012-06-29T07:05:46-04:00'
describe
'129163' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACFZ' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
4c32818a499d433230471f3ff301c4bb
91a1ffd8e82b979eb29d1d17e8c799c19eb3338a
'2012-06-29T07:04:43-04:00'
describe
'276778' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGA' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
1892c0821a69ac05bf0f49af189c2f8b
752d36b5e4f0c2b811ca5688fa9261194daec4bd
describe
'312681' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGB' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
02f2e5679c12b714b72d954ddeb1b535
934467da121fd6195d0d8637ab9ee4fb67e97387
'2012-06-29T06:55:11-04:00'
describe
'53302' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGC' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
4fd065c5c3817b8a0acfa1681dc9ca86
c9fb256780dadc525ad751c35bdee29ba17b626f
'2012-06-29T07:01:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGD' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
b9927cccd9cd8974a43f1ad32ea74b36
364d460380b0110c1a1057a77aa0503087948d02
describe
'85288' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGE' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
8b398e42b1ddfb3994871f26bdbbf8f0
e7e1899583dd372e873e29f593a515443106b7bf
'2012-06-29T06:58:59-04:00'
describe
'30965' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGF' 'sip-files00127.pro'
47a199eff5b0847e276c2feaf46b278c
b9107099892c684e1b8ec8a6805fac265493bc60
'2012-06-29T07:01:23-04:00'
describe
'304821' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGG' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
e3d70527af9d5eeb657a3275fe76cdda
733b9f30cf317d8b56de4865830a93fc9adcef54
'2012-06-29T06:58:52-04:00'
describe
'117631' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGH' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
43845498c56d274e5ff5ad532cf6198a
879bc4a1a8eacddab21f1ae612447693dacdaae1
'2012-06-29T07:03:50-04:00'
describe
'128172' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGI' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
1fff621538349de5ee46691d4d997f9a
385d0e335a24d26630f21e6afb8c2545ed6e652b
'2012-06-29T06:57:22-04:00'
describe
'109163' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGJ' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
91766d84d162998bb3a7a042a9794bcd
5971be020a7f8fb3c57787391209ef16da34c43f
'2012-06-29T06:55:37-04:00'
describe
'89278' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGK' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
35dd799d3298804c372c9906dcaa056d
08badc46cb7568a781f3bd7d0de7a61707811fab
'2012-06-29T07:05:07-04:00'
describe
'2523572' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGL' 'sip-files00132.tif'
ece114ee57ec8f49466bcea954199daa
3985476a671160877da643beaf499207c243a7c3
'2012-06-29T07:00:17-04:00'
describe
'21914' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGM' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
252a4c642e3bab16adaaaee94885fb44
3f196509c483e70557f4797660e216385d6d258d
'2012-06-29T06:55:45-04:00'
describe
'29564' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGN' 'sip-files00064.pro'
8135412a84847b80c3c32f63ccb732f8
d851c1ad7f37560b45f86218d051a9f947cdab36
'2012-06-29T07:01:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGO' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
901d7bd74e093563f55aeab451100bb3
9d7d45f04ee846d273952c1b657c653538a27c38
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGP' 'sip-files00125.txt'
c50996183ca5f5e247a13e9f6ce4ccef
3dfb99610016fdbb519291bfda9f45118e860146
'2012-06-29T06:59:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGQ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
9f92fa036f1d546fae13bacff282d08e
e5f02cfb91d1bcce5a6ee49bb4b25ea0524f5656
'2012-06-29T06:57:18-04:00'
describe
'30108' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGR' 'sip-files00124.pro'
2fb60b6b7c195f373de221ff36d5f19d
64fc840524f4ca88c59c8469f9d2aacc99a84e58
'2012-06-29T06:56:40-04:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGS' 'sip-files00017.txt'
60400b8525773ff5764326c0d7666c17
e309660c059f88dc02248f3e6d4625d3f6903f5a
'2012-06-29T06:57:24-04:00'
describe
'2523484' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGT' 'sip-files00126.tif'
d991d6c8bd582a8f3eb6358868979f79
27a41cb2b8d2a9c4a69753b083f489d6c4c98587
describe
'128174' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGU' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
69e5ea0c0504d30587001514ec965fd8
c94899e0a17c77acd16f1c6931bc093a0c230740
'2012-06-29T06:54:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGV' 'sip-files00191.tif'
1672dd0216d4715f5458e584135e281e
003d02188084c1f8215d41f27a661005f89a7f27
'2012-06-29T07:03:59-04:00'
describe
'48816' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
468abdfa6755d54d535530dacec9dac0
534d759e27c705081411dd42afc8d75b52f5f568
'2012-06-29T07:01:08-04:00'
describe
'2519332' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGX' 'sip-files00206.tif'
521f7ad1d8ae6c9a65351faa0723651d
1752d271900f59939abe2d9f606c78d7eef5aa55
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGY' 'sip-files00030.tif'
12cc40bfd4a9b37d5ffa616fb397d829
4043e9752be018c70a075478a4f9a03bdb55f4e5
describe
'28342' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACGZ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
301a9025d3c41e5c1b9f5223004bb9b9
3ca617feb784a4e7a18b0235df194b33c5d7cf24
describe
'51418' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHA' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
99fbc93fdfc26fe4775c04b3372b265d
77cbe1c7bc898560f855f82790fbac63c0fcbeb9
'2012-06-29T06:55:15-04:00'
describe
'2521024' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHB' 'sip-files00010.tif'
090fee0282e666d2d00f87cee5d70b2f
c2954e6c6d7f5a013accca3eb271acbc77449403
'2012-06-29T07:00:30-04:00'
describe
'312633' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHC' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
5ae30e9d065a026e43857b5a297030d3
9a44e5e30df3cf3e8431f598a1cfe5a60776a96f
'2012-06-29T06:55:49-04:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHD' 'sip-files00183.txt'
23ba2948c195e8fbd5ff2557b53f9f32
29491341fab8b278ca6f939df6f0b5cdbb539ec2
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHE' 'sip-files00207.txt'
739d8212f3e3bc723d8c531e16d821fe
6984bcbf7c003fed5f608c7e86276a40745e358c
'2012-06-29T07:02:44-04:00'
describe
'298750' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHF' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
dd4420d4ce3d8139430a865c035f1451
e4192a35d42d5b1a6c4b9bcce4061fe45feb6180
'2012-06-29T06:55:57-04:00'
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHG' 'sip-files00050.txt'
1135eddc84d25f4e5730aeeb898b1c94
8e656ced5017a330da3a7efd961e32d46090fd6e
'2012-06-29T07:05:44-04:00'
describe
'27303' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHH' 'sip-files00107.pro'
1da840f4d1d03044a9b97b4c5a7b6225
1413ec0936adc40e4d1cfc9d8c809578267e7adb
describe
'305358' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHI' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
76da73d8c094b72ca5674670f03795e8
9d3cdf5cb6b580b86000b1f7e07c6cc20f79768d
'2012-06-29T07:03:26-04:00'
describe
'302053' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHJ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
a8eb341c0dce5e038bca052c7438c21f
6cb5bb1dfd1ee2679a1fe31cb8121914eaa9dbc2
describe
'52993' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHK' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
603f3a70c4d99ec51b579bb41270c60c
c36f4bff23082432a826959b59fc6b5e4482c59a
'2012-06-29T07:03:52-04:00'
describe
'30369' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHL' 'sip-files00175.pro'
2042770e5d12b2c362bc75a3a873f7b6
57439bf287d4e1b42192c57a3cea6b3731a04038
describe
'29487' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHM' 'sip-files00140.pro'
08949a77c2e7dc2603caa59ad7a40652
b48bbc797a3096f10984f29e0c4702e356284462
'2012-06-29T06:56:43-04:00'
describe
'30159' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHN' 'sip-files00025.pro'
306d8742cbb7774e41ac83e86edf1834
ef3074d8753a6e31a4003d8623587e771c159741
'2012-06-29T07:01:20-04:00'
describe
'52483' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHO' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
5091b78c18533f96c1958afac598495c
29cc919a0fb60fff0306e8b4b0cef15e5b5d40b4
'2012-06-29T07:02:35-04:00'
describe
'2522816' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHP' 'sip-files00195.tif'
a5eb0377e18f26f7eb65dacfde8c1713
25fb1254a825a0aff09ee9c47811c9591877e49f
'2012-06-29T06:56:59-04:00'
describe
'310854' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHQ' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
ac2999f200aab50cba2bd5c76fbd38f7
0728aa9458d653af2e24d23fe8b5e8e60fd029e6
'2012-06-29T06:56:56-04:00'
describe
'123976' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHR' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
696061e65717e2f2109279f5b3424b31
6be739b7c7e34f889f6a72c4d9477ed8e7518a09
'2012-06-29T06:54:40-04:00'
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHS' 'sip-files00136.txt'
116f3cad087ebe52732d6a6bbc40a03d
df6fdf132d470ea3e0e248a552cb1da76603fb07
'2012-06-29T07:01:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHT' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
7650fd255ba9e11254c41ce6d267ded3
e789791db2a2aba2e8a8965f4483ef67df9cb934
'2012-06-29T06:58:13-04:00'
describe
'312687' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHU' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
170b87d01f5edb34003f9b4392662e82
6cce92b0b1b7476aa280ab26a2689ad37c386c9f
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHV' 'sip-files00180.txt'
798edcd2e1b0b73082fe856b05d9673d
d2c82c781bee74b80c2e3b989814f7c109f6d1ed
'2012-06-29T07:03:03-04:00'
describe
'120770' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHW' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
7df7406218f679b76804bc2c2177f9f3
aeb8e291a328cc26d3b156094accb1a7521f3e47
'2012-06-29T07:02:49-04:00'
describe
'62463' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHX' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
c8e311fea05757fab3b194fb71b085d0
b19564654155c392d9459e6091b6de9f65b9bfa1
'2012-06-29T06:58:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHY' 'sip-files00193.tif'
88bb18fe9376c81b04eecab905b3308b
fea7c0d4e2d779fb2068733bf823257608d224f9
describe
'53417' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACHZ' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
db4dc5695ebbdce100d8720d9f4e581c
39a3d265820ac923ea07bb1c3607bfec474de962
describe
'53059' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIA' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
bf78c4f2dffaa47ae9993ec54938e58f
1b6fec753d9f7a6192583a3733d44a0d10b395ed
describe
'54595' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIB' 'sip-files00202.pro'
db6cf28ef120977868e1e38ab521e96f
8b57197e520b32d179e226019dfff7194cdd9121
'2012-06-29T07:03:46-04:00'
describe
'2522004' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIC' 'sip-files00053.tif'
f89b82ff092dd748fcc5a9ae61e37de5
f89599e2b0e59382a3fd07b6aee3009600a1e704
'2012-06-29T06:55:07-04:00'
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACID' 'sip-files00102.txt'
300abfdad41bf5ea6ef9d8126e3c5a54
746cd5e93546a6020d66d7ec8e54ada09b77a194
'2012-06-29T07:01:05-04:00'
describe
'128988' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIE' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
f922496bb7dc2cc6ed16b0c1bf0c9e98
3d8072cc2ca688b8351b61444397b42515612ca8
'2012-06-29T06:56:55-04:00'
describe
'129058' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIF' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
1bd579d4d7bcc6ea1a45351962aad4de
c275bd1a483089bda66d8423bd3b00d828582dc7
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIG' 'sip-files00131.txt'
266687d807c0c00acde330d49cddd06d
48866059e30ee7c0290f12a9a8f0f616ae59dea5
describe
Invalid character
'36920' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIH' 'sip-files00032.pro'
c14250d0a6af2efc4fe069d6a256965b
1cdb97b62a20c17c0a1cda17b0f8f4ee3e76c37d
'2012-06-29T06:57:47-04:00'
describe
'2519352' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACII' 'sip-files00205.tif'
6aa7e2d3ee48647a9ff9d0e5a3979e42
f2514a5465d3efd8288c91d2173d06f4d667f390
'2012-06-29T07:03:10-04:00'
describe
'2523504' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIJ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
dc0466e9b1055028779c601ea1c411cf
c1f96b276fb9e769090bc0c5866d0163cb5e9adf
'2012-06-29T07:03:07-04:00'
describe
'2522280' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIK' 'sip-files00207.tif'
d096f54700e17352cdc0de9dcdf27764
1bd102ae574715284f0a019ae2006aeb8b8509a7
'2012-06-29T06:57:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIL' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
297de73f937098f2a969fc38251ed9a6
c77474ca075561360cbe46acefb43f9f45611477
describe
'729' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIM' 'sip-files00070.txt'
8c26bd216108e473c54618c135043938
d513020d270f104d1efb729d8d7bfa5a70e80bc5
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIN' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
62bfa782a79dec81df7bedf887d68c74
af0b1bdc99353b225bf1307156386540af6ca9f7
'2012-06-29T06:57:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIO' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
244e56fbc68b5dd4d8f3f43afd4042b2
1937768d56e483f028b0376c1c57c97d2ed2e6fb
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIP' 'sip-files00078.txt'
ea056285e5934ee145ccf053c8b853d8
45fbcbef8189021ea553d557ae4a85bb91e1d778
'2012-06-29T06:54:26-04:00'
describe
'1228832' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIQ' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
1ed997387324d92ab6ebd00c20f9bfb3
926868f21efd774b0d64c946017e32b6b7192403
'2012-06-29T07:02:07-04:00'
describe
'51647' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIR' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
f710770e3bc8d72050444e395fdf5852
fe558acfb13f07578671337e0243fbf00dfbec16
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIS' 'sip-files00107.txt'
570cce747507153edd75a3ebd2a7145c
a39a791b388ad1ed9f450a7a182b91fcb853fc6a
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIT' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
4cbe529dc374a0d278096da0bb7ad7dd
bfbb02db3d4d63f984c06331c90ab3057e38c7b9
'2012-06-29T06:56:32-04:00'
describe
'289231' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIU' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
f33299b5827a5056c0ea0888384df562
4c7b06686c313c4e702cedeb28452d383d339c02
'2012-06-29T06:55:20-04:00'
describe
'53023' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIV' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
a5a07fc9dccd054fb951b0da6dcb4306
f4dee2da849f1dc6a5cb771da796bd79a86e08f2
'2012-06-29T07:01:19-04:00'
describe
'53983' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIW' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
3b0d929baf911ddb9b8f242f05e044db
b5de7dc6c5059789c16263747e577d857b4f4408
'2012-06-29T06:57:20-04:00'
describe
'305228' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIX' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
0c40fe7f745376d88217fb2934af7559
d69a584ab45c136030d618895abb5c400b94daf9
describe
'2523500' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIY' 'sip-files00090.tif'
8fabdaf182de431d0a37875cc91486f2
bebb809acb7d9b5ad1136e0c36baea4f22c1e664
'2012-06-29T07:03:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACIZ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
b78474911e0dde4c62d0512cb0845e80
97efe3aa09625191d19ccc21720f060239a05740
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJA' 'sip-files00150.txt'
cf6096fef3694ce0172b0dac769d7a0d
ae711cf08113640fceee79af8e164c2a5e45b6be
'2012-06-29T07:01:34-04:00'
describe
'312699' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJB' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
e8f88720123b3a5679392404c6eb13da
4216b1823e408d24763cc17e90cd7007116a1cd3
'2012-06-29T06:56:18-04:00'
describe
'312720' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJC' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
1b742645efe5201762fe898e7269ebe5
e1c20007493bb6a985b7a5d9c174f49dcb3a356b
'2012-06-29T06:56:31-04:00'
describe
'125666' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJD' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
6214696f361f34c7c6afe1873dc165af
e8202878d5dcdd116cd0c71556c31d23795eb1d5
describe
'122986' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJE' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
0cc9db0be4f6ab1e70f077f523760b42
88a4f389839dd8792e40550dc70904a7ec6a45dc
'2012-06-29T06:54:19-04:00'
describe
'312679' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJF' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
ad4f414a3cd5bb6f1f0ec7c2fa6ee4b9
ab6094b9b07ed54228c389618475ecc0e05736a2
'2012-06-29T06:54:06-04:00'
describe
'36477' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJG' 'sip-files00200.pro'
92b0a03cbe236cccea288e1f488cc340
8a7fe36d742bd5e527685f1f3a667fbda6e47c9e
describe
'2523576' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJH' 'sip-files00159.tif'
7c448d8c31fdaec46c87c737e740458c
e9bfe02016c37d31b5bfcf2e08d10868d912ed45
'2012-06-29T06:56:48-04:00'
describe
'28885' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJI' 'sip-files00167.pro'
f189755d634c2511eb53871bcf480687
9bb4f09ad4dc052895d339b6aac56019272445aa
describe
'128700' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJJ' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
c769add38ccacfa08e607d04f10c0d3b
fad2db403a6de7dfbbb49145a575038c34c4c962
describe
'29758' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJK' 'sip-files00037.pro'
9fac09d26c5cc30275b31ca243ed590b
966f97b5ab05a9a70aa5dff6f11f529635fc1ca7
describe
'51740' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJL' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
a059c0a0c8ee2bf29c5fa7997a04e93a
26a7e47c462e9b1cc6d5c72a643791533f447a2e
'2012-06-29T06:59:49-04:00'
describe
'2523684' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJM' 'sip-files00176.tif'
e84ccface6f92b0dfa2cccca7dcc0940
96db6444f0c66df6865619de79df14170d7a238e
'2012-06-29T06:58:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJN' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
7002f40d2caaf576621b1a4c1e2f2343
787bf2c8611862d03a85bcad1a1d650cb791a352
'2012-06-29T06:56:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJO' 'sip-files00094.tif'
fe650ea362fd933c40b46f704487e5c1
5e9ded1ca3cb3f0be6810fca5d797f1445cb7ca2
'2012-06-29T06:58:06-04:00'
describe
'52048' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJP' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
904f91c80ef848a251997a69ce604285
6a71450198dc1afb63b7e5216bfb9e62fdff038e
'2012-06-29T07:04:20-04:00'
describe
'2523580' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJQ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
371fd631f435c9482e9a94778d3977a9
91e2b7ac8420769640a4b896ff513e9320196a63
'2012-06-29T06:55:28-04:00'
describe
'43665' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJR' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
3ba7695ae222466ca943752730e73543
278fadbf79aaa8224074a69bb228c5ee36b6b306
'2012-06-29T07:01:58-04:00'
describe
'129210' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJS' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
c6e4c4321dbb64e49b421d08c2fdef92
f77cc77a87c8613fd185182ea2f6594d1f2404b7
'2012-06-29T06:57:50-04:00'
describe
'96001' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJT' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
30da19f1f4b87946b95388ece9547d68
976a6f760a8a7cf63c65b6b5da8c853b4b338efe
'2012-06-29T07:05:25-04:00'
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJU' 'sip-files00182.txt'
732ba1bdbdc7d98745e41256e502f8d1
ce8948d599d22b94083e8e1f705563f2eaf2833d
describe
'307196' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJV' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
f6e3c4d02f75d8624687cdc139e73af8
f92fa1900cd8972ebf991859487d98643852d298
'2012-06-29T06:56:20-04:00'
describe
'106862' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJW' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
bf45403f3e555887c19dc0a84527aaac
c5da7571fa896dd76a3fd9fbe424bdc11dc1482f
describe
'29804' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJX' 'sip-files00148.pro'
91d11f5f12d2e6e89557ae6cdcc8a264
99b786026fa91fe0bf07117ceb71876efd7f5f85
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJY' 'sip-files00191.txt'
0d453e18df3462f1bb0f8d4b309ca281
c720068ba4391eed23d481f2112183786233d53e
'2012-06-29T07:04:05-04:00'
describe
'129927' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACJZ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
aa8753d5d6d21dbbcdbe38ddf5e7ff55
24f09928178c8f4b838d2049e201ce2d5f865dea
describe
'129693' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKA' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
07847dd1deff98a7c3f951d056707a16
2b2a938e65386a5ef9d6d4ebb14b38ec9d3a3a79
'2012-06-29T06:58:43-04:00'
describe
'299762' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKB' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
17cae45ed4c67bb587263a7da51242ef
307d0512b07b10a7fc3bab8537def0b4308aaa20
'2012-06-29T06:58:57-04:00'
describe
'102853' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKC' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
8688919158f6555d265f80a55c0e348f
24b6d441f0aa05c29745ebb8b0af86617af144f1
describe
'51835' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKD' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
6e3557ebcc30e3f9e9799155b9ed62f4
6fda2971f4dbd26a6fce97fa424710fffad821a5
'2012-06-29T07:03:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKE' 'sip-files00069.txt'
0a7951a6708cadc5f3abc6f3e4cd1f67
fd92bf34fecd32b8857411f1c84b855d346ec4b0
'2012-06-29T06:58:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKF' 'sip-files00134.txt'
959507b3ebe8516a741f89451aa13d8d
2af9c0f3d79ea5773d4ae2e619362cb3184b87ad
describe
'2523752' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKG' 'sip-files00100.tif'
71e1a55949f63398721483cdf4ddd423
49838830f9c3a4d8474f945e31fe527562c69a5d
'2012-06-29T07:01:09-04:00'
describe
'312739' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKH' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
844b306d20fbf6295b1cb84a865b5466
072d6dfd18164a49a4cc22897f1dd99f2f0c11e9
'2012-06-29T07:01:29-04:00'
describe
'7800' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKI' 'sip-files00130.pro'
9b44f94abd87ccc880db2cc1860bce1a
bfe798dd0c3168cecad3555fc0576464474bc9c4
'2012-06-29T07:05:14-04:00'
describe
'30536' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKJ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
2c3a86b811a9b3ad63e540a1a94b019f
46b5d6f0bba9f711a5381c460ba94964f2326fa0
describe
'52311' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKK' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
b2a8fb1f76a980c8223084ebab9ee0ff
caa5c890acf50b181e1da901858b22f74570bb9c
'2012-06-29T06:56:26-04:00'
describe
'29502180' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKL' 'sip-files00194.tif'
388a76e4fc61b0422859ab6c25741db8
8690ad1eb895b8a994255fd1e5b697a1beb92cae
describe
'2522964' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKM' 'sip-files00201.tif'
18e682a8facce2ef88f246f2b7801c8d
57e14aaca5a6a42cf71675d05a61d2da37c3bb81
'2012-06-29T06:54:04-04:00'
describe
'2523672' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKN' 'sip-files00168.tif'
4b2b352aa6ef29ab50db56662cffbf84
2383f2cf4d824c9c547ef8d3804ca8ed29a90bd4
describe
'312735' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKO' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
8404a56b84697942e6f1a9d378b3243d
02bc28310d91b2e64c596e259dd131fdbbfa2167
describe
'2523508' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKP' 'sip-files00180.tif'
b359868ba7ef9ab0fbfc929112f184c1
19099f7ff36918a3a321a43f4dbfa053ccfcba2d
'2012-06-29T07:00:59-04:00'
describe
'38341' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKQ' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
e324658763600ea8ec742962b5e8ced2
70c3b5db424f2074c1ff5bbb5b95cf18be16c0ce
describe
'73289' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKR' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
1f7f65f0939ca15bb6da37be2ee0f0b4
ea37c20abe2980f66d726c0adc9f5e6504ec5f72
describe
'121528' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKS' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
90a55398ca73cd5c932669e79ba7a6d7
3fe5f0bf12add6e0e2c4633ce86bf6643ffc683e
'2012-06-29T06:58:55-04:00'
describe
'128378' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKT' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
39ecd6d30aba8bb527bb0c83c0c8d837
cb78dc1002789978e31ea1741f1dd54009533efb
'2012-06-29T06:58:45-04:00'
describe
'281945' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKU' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
93bd44ae29d22f3eaa184651fd153668
7908e64b47c92c9eb311bc76ac36b2e958d231d0
'2012-06-29T06:59:11-04:00'
describe
'309726' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKV' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
6043bb49437ac9e60e5672995ceda0af
c2de24ff7fc39665d7c91a5f5e616ca79832eb1a
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKW' 'sip-files00043.txt'
6912dc1e58e435a49aa1ba521ae7ffa0
47a20eab60e1f2912102d8eb5b43a86726efc51d
'2012-06-29T07:03:23-04:00'
describe
'29921' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKX' 'sip-files00142.pro'
594b0880676e5b0f6a10d4c1a2cfa915
265ba69f898909933881d182b530f153d4ce5347
'2012-06-29T06:58:35-04:00'
describe
'51564' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKY' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
b594e6849dbd70cfb5ae4f6a52c6685e
de69e7a796901bf4d9aa9da69b25b46e201a883f
describe
'2522256' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACKZ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
e5eb84128f8286dadf5ae8bf098a5a56
9e457bd930791ac58a662bb96b689d36b16cb53e
describe
'300703' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLA' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
496edd502c24bcaff9bd6ee110006951
08b4c036192a2c68fb7e3c8e7deb61781c8870e4
'2012-06-29T06:58:15-04:00'
describe
'296783' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLB' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
0413549b5c954849bc46f721a6efa7ed
b24196aad257dd12f620ef73085ec160cc00d5c9
'2012-06-29T06:53:53-04:00'
describe
'2523316' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLC' 'sip-files00149.tif'
b53e67a4243dbc63eff977998918d794
779ea4f8b677321fe484205683d587e07f67a3b0
'2012-06-29T07:04:55-04:00'
describe
'26960' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLD' 'sip-files00187.pro'
05ef14381ef80eae75030188fca5f855
2058f4179c7ee8578c3dfc1f83aa623feec74d85
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLE' 'sip-files00186.txt'
3d6cc010fd1efa7699e591a25bfa51ca
f40296794223dcb8c051bf5829f02ccbb74220ce
'2012-06-29T07:00:40-04:00'
describe
'121369' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLF' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
0191cdafa975b26aec2a2d80cb1f8305
779a2448df6cce1611e6492859a68daa85794fbb
describe
'52491' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLG' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
3a4575812d62787f5b6c1040fc282259
c981f17797f5901fab4af1fd4b9f19e538d89394
'2012-06-29T06:55:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLH' 'sip-files00172.tif'
c2ee7fda1f5725c58923cfd7b40122fa
683c03c7682c9035426f493293fc8b0d9e153c04
'2012-06-29T07:02:53-04:00'
describe
'30122' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLI' 'sip-files00020.pro'
e1900ab781d5719362bdc1c99fab0cf7
b19065b025d0305d434d690749554cab18430b84
describe
'128012' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLJ' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
be7d08993ccb2bc1e0578072241873d0
50e660623c26c464b604d5dc6595aca8aa23ce0c
'2012-06-29T07:05:09-04:00'
describe
'37440' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
0e7ba05f4a957d334f27b4aaebf23500
a1e3d78ca7e62c52f1d988ff6df524630fc5a89f
'2012-06-29T06:56:57-04:00'
describe
'300333' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLL' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
197368377b80f6d69bb8e6d4b1f4a700
af1d83de9d7025fc426141538d8d86485cfbe7b2
describe
'30133' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLM' 'sip-files00029.pro'
a043759701c214156eb954f1af669771
663227f25a0b2536d9be26a440709c9df458c9cc
describe
'27460' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLN' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
5fff11161c88e7937abea1191c8a3147
2d1bfa90d92fb5fb4c575ab69ff7b6405763d02f
'2012-06-29T06:54:34-04:00'
describe
'2522284' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLO' 'sip-files00152.tif'
d507113be4de4abd85b1f1231a15b5ad
10dddff1269a5cd723b648627374b96854d0d560
'2012-06-29T07:04:33-04:00'
describe
'32093' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLP' 'sip-files00151.pro'
bd37f73153ef305ffd799e14f1013c3b
7c8ef40f279cf515ebb6cb6095b14ef269ad9545
'2012-06-29T06:57:04-04:00'
describe
'312741' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLQ' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
f6a2726cbbb37414c781592a3796be1e
62aa623329ab1ea826887d6ea74768126d69f47d
describe
'312722' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLR' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
3b6cf469c4d8ffec6879730d1ad64e35
203068830c2fac17ecf7296aaf40b22d0ca024a3
'2012-06-29T07:02:24-04:00'
describe
'40407' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLS' 'sip-files00201.pro'
f2d538137e05638de2adce7f714e056e
ad63ae9849a39209c7278354922a6ea2789fe506
'2012-06-29T06:57:11-04:00'
describe
'1505284' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLT' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
f8e3bd1ac644f9674d313dc69d86bef4
c4c205f5143c7307864968e107759835baabc9a5
describe
'314008' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLU' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
58c2a916bc296ab12ef149956bfabe45
c3e830311fd5b065268ad278a595dbb07ecd91cd
describe
'296742' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLV' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
027b5ebbe5a3842217de9f8ab325ac2a
c3ed3a0622f8f658d1dba524d6516d03f7d223c0
'2012-06-29T06:55:48-04:00'
describe
'87170' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLW' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
315031a3c0b4716bddb26df9cfddee4d
a7e85350866284cda47da9554fa81e5db1b5fa2a
describe
'309915' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLX' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
23ac198f297211d89840270c0d719e54
03c17c0b91b3d3d93d07c29c6409904668a8ef18
describe
'49347' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLY' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
b92b9ccf13cb5b5ffdb218dbc75b8d86
6e3247474d08e0c7bc5f91b244be783b29299da9
'2012-06-29T07:03:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACLZ' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
d10170362d1ee924a2fe88b99d6ea881
41a2f24c37a058da7dd49955817b9b8124e68c97
'2012-06-29T06:56:49-04:00'
describe
'53309' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMA' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
93b3459528510212a9e3eeee0ef0f637
b240814f2b4f80edfd8c8adeba4d607db6560952
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMB' 'sip-files00129.tif'
88ac7cc61a253edeedd9064a2c24cc73
a1eea0388d39a1a9c7bc9e632a225b2adc7b6edf
'2012-06-29T07:04:09-04:00'
describe
'51797' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMC' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
e865a6ca4749ccba56528b8bd500e6a3
56bb408e667aae8bfaf30545e19a7838b934e44d
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMD' 'sip-files00126.txt'
17d2510f24254d49e7cd3e374f2b6ffb
3ceb9ba1c0275e8d8d049cf4bef055251edb1a4d
'2012-06-29T06:56:01-04:00'
describe
'2523448' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACME' 'sip-files00037.tif'
59549c88cdba1ad4aba18e9a7a2068aa
af4389f3f53165d01aee31164915e9750b024d77
'2012-06-29T06:58:11-04:00'
describe
'2523512' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMF' 'sip-files00128.tif'
739fb1d03d69a7e72feb7fa546f59f8e
bda3c76ee5f03580834eeba7381230ccad3fe1a3
'2012-06-29T07:03:42-04:00'
describe
'2523264' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMG' 'sip-files00123.tif'
a30c4a9aa38be672e9f9790f5fc92051
5b45edee7f3f05740206f5dc2367ad315f374c15
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMH' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
ee20292051240a4ae6795108dd6dd30f
a49ae9c6c590c9da6512a111eb10b48b5b2583cf
describe
'1496' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMI' 'sip-files00032.txt'
be9a2f4bbf36f11635ba73dea371549d
f4182d18b14581c0107c8f281131ca476c406ffd
'2012-06-29T06:57:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMJ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
b3f63256eec5c8642dec325a015570eb
33565a5dcc1391e10f97bd6d031bf628d2e45b2b
'2012-06-29T06:57:19-04:00'
describe
'288309' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMK' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
81a112399b5c4c2656a871d2b31be7f3
bf186d137595abaddb7ebb8dc4f9be0a9289d043
describe
'2523368' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACML' 'sip-files00161.tif'
57cd99b727b14c69b0407a9a71f845b5
1536bd3fd5cce87874f8e0cca5209170294cb660
describe
'53137' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMM' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
7d0ae0e956f98e1eec3f02d9495078e6
c3f83f65bff79f7af041269fcb4fbe6a8cd58fb5
'2012-06-29T06:57:51-04:00'
describe
'2523308' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMN' 'sip-files00135.tif'
c223bdda60043e54f5d8a644ff642563
bec3116ec32769db1767828fe37e5c6dccddc91e
'2012-06-29T06:55:03-04:00'
describe
'221544' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMO' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
6cf9fcedac92aeaa9ade7a7908473a13
1d3a3fa64d8e1006c4187d3c6a7ac338f3634e2c
'2012-06-29T06:56:09-04:00'
describe
'127706' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMP' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
20f4474dd70c0f34bdbcabb854d2fd3d
92d098c896ac01f89e876d9eab0a8b97d2d02927
'2012-06-29T06:57:32-04:00'
describe
'307136' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMQ' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
ae64ab446c6cf9b676fcf4688664c156
90fd7211aa8104539ed08c1bfc9ad31621ebc328
describe
'48243' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMR' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
2274d267d2a677bd7b4531981a82d2bb
71393a696ed48cd205806851c6ab57a9a5e4e1db
'2012-06-29T07:02:17-04:00'
describe
'52616' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMS' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
0124c008ec5984e97294f0adf86e10cc
968335d5f87c9c21985f9bd248db2324f7d2d1a8
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMT' 'sip-files00020.txt'
8c9335618028895e94435138a4a6ece4
f479ac63248b1bc6f1398a165872fac42f7707e5
'2012-06-29T06:56:06-04:00'
describe
'126350' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMU' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
be2edf41fdf153e2ed037418994051c5
f61e4204b58b9174759e87615bd10ad34e904610
'2012-06-29T07:03:48-04:00'
describe
'312719' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMV' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
3b0aa758a31cc5923715f74778508c20
9d78e17b6358182237dd3f42b101fe7752cfc46a
'2012-06-29T06:55:59-04:00'
describe
'311205' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMW' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
229dcc0dcfd2ce14978a3f4aab13b0c5
8ce7f641c4c03737b942560f3cd9385a386ab01a
describe
'316593' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMX' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
df52d213f287f3aa983223f9b0caa4ed
80739839d87b47c5d164d2e377869bdeb0a067c3
'2012-06-29T07:01:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMY' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
dc2db84efeb51d84b617a994c6382100
3128c46becbd0d10070e6f421f5e783d3e04bc06
'2012-06-29T06:58:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACMZ' 'sip-files00059.txt'
6e7c0a80412cf8f3125a2a2d9deccfb9
c31162b81c1141350e077ca8e5f430e7dd48c712
describe
'295349' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNA' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
a6bd0c517065b74b90b6646d138623b0
92d49bbc842ecd4a70bc39ef4d4c3f7f59d13f03
'2012-06-29T06:54:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNB' 'sip-files00054.tif'
2809bd7dad2cea322163d7aa6b4faa42
73e32c8a1830b23b07e9c73336ba5ffe67e84968
describe
'30959' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNC' 'sip-files00035.pro'
4875cfe5b6891dec966422f5d26bb896
e3bd33cd5e4c356d5c07abe3d1a38f54683958b5
describe
'28322' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACND' 'sip-files00090.pro'
5c38e923590b15d35ec24ef686e5d2b9
3bd73ac88a3c1b3f1e23afde223652bd783ac4a6
'2012-06-29T06:55:17-04:00'
describe
'235871' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNE' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
ebe3265513a6ed0172c783ec65c8d1df
6c31ee0a70b5ba874c82102f1e2bdd616cca322a
describe
'51803' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNF' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
353a8baa7e0585eb42ee2cc2f6105565
d1e3746535b31b5256c66877c1738e0478f02ae1
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNG' 'sip-files00140.txt'
3894f0195c8cd697363eb49a5c295dcb
58516c40ab9ac8ba6ba8c5af9f065908d351a9f0
'2012-06-29T06:54:28-04:00'
describe
'287574' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNH' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
817b8ea502e0f39cebf93d655257783b
e853b100999f6993fcec8d0a00c1f3da1491595f
'2012-06-29T07:03:38-04:00'
describe
'128333' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNI' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
bec8aa2faea3e8e366e59c76b1c29567
8c73e77f6ea37c95249e228739ff040d8d9130db
describe
'51325' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNJ' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
b8a955362007a104b2d38ce80e4fb671
d5e16e26200efcbe78f01499979403181e64404f
describe
'119902' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNK' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
6dac43ef455c4bc01c744b9d7977b8e4
f5419612678e24c8522d8e719aa005c69ca454a4
describe
'29775' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNL' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
b8bc58c5f84ed97cb324036ddfde7787
d0e0921e94a638d808d3d2bdd11515c08b092029
describe
'50887' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNM' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
5ea168346134d258ba1036ba386f81bf
670eca22956f8f32454d08da3cbab9c1e016c2c7
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNN' 'sip-files00076.txt'
e911c5573202eee665aaf3523e9d1b6c
2f1373f5acf61fde6bdd4163ec381da323f4e7b0
'2012-06-29T07:00:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNO' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
5a6234a8a8f881089dd4a96e5fca98bb
72ec3285e32631e1c3bc6d48219c8db49c6bf7e1
describe
'126542' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNP' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
efd6cee5806c6ab491b23f5f53d461bc
033ebd6762115111738456ea755521dea24a1139
describe
'312712' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNQ' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
f612fb2b1345d151747d8c6c4174ac41
8d1cc6122ca5c7fb8a41eb005e3e35ee34523c54
describe
'9260948' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNR' 'sip-files00209.tif'
d4729339f4c7ca6cf2cc2e729b383c30
c92aaa593494f1984eacc930d93d2d8bd95cc9cf
'2012-06-29T07:00:34-04:00'
describe
'2523244' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNS' 'sip-files00097.tif'
1a726d91e185ee1ebff3fcc2083fa325
6771e10409de2df6c18b9a8aaf0ed45dff627b72
'2012-06-29T06:56:37-04:00'
describe
'313050' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNT' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
c238faa12eb037a1383247df83fb00aa
43f35f21eb7fd9e86496b8448aeaff5157613ad5
'2012-06-29T07:05:33-04:00'
describe
'320' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNU' 'sip-files00130.txt'
55adc0c1899aa1c1923f02ed9280d6d2
fcda7e57e3ccf22002feee6f46b9e135a293f664
describe
'30564' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNV' 'sip-files00069.pro'
1a91ffbfcc689faaf33f68109484f1a9
a93c7fb57c741d0d808c0762b09bc4030541f35d
'2012-06-29T06:55:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNW' 'sip-files00072.tif'
7784351901654d7da62d69a335a3243b
6cbf9fb7f13bbfd2b6f30a73511778e3b01c82ea
'2012-06-29T07:04:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNX' 'sip-files00079.txt'
836b394976e62bab7ce828b519a07344
2c29d53e29d79152a01d346fcac99a7747902249
'2012-06-29T07:04:04-04:00'
describe
'30361' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNY' 'sip-files00170.pro'
35c55ab5e7ee8366f0ea3b3cdedf2652
3a7bc6d57a71a787fd134866a03ddf4680abf792
describe
'307620' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACNZ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
6b7f4244caca99a0f92af3bd4fb495dd
e2852e6163159eeeb7d41eea43d5fba75ec4ae59
'2012-06-29T06:57:57-04:00'
describe
'2523464' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOA' 'sip-files00114.tif'
0599a91c932f8abdc52c626330feb208
909258338a50578782e9af836b3228beaaca3827
'2012-06-29T06:56:41-04:00'
describe
'2522304' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOB' 'sip-files00163.tif'
9fc23a3b64c0ace19c80e7cb621a7aaf
b8d574050051ccba38df42d4703ceebebcf10ff6
describe
'128169' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
0753cf38210a3ff263ef971461cccb48
059c97e17d911c4f0c6b28023b598d3b084f73b7
describe
'311366' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOD' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
a3c762e62d920eb2f40272e543bdd323
fc9ce2d507fe5d698482cbdbf28711c769d2b8bc
'2012-06-29T06:58:04-04:00'
describe
'30220' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOE' 'sip-files00154.pro'
0a5c6be2dbb6b6abf69f6b5239833bec
fd6ac01f3e222bb1221d0316cde7f8a1649f5486
describe
'316278' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOF' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
4ab575a6b2a817416295480477c69eaf
bb169f4a6afeacf189672028575daf5ad948abde
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOG' 'sip-files00199.txt'
74c72e147d7568b4477a8b076134fe02
e3b1629aef5ebd97927bba4c14a67ec4e9105294
'2012-06-29T07:02:43-04:00'
describe
'51749' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOH' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
f77570e80a765dbeb6938aa98f4e25cb
aaac80993a684c6342f44c2c77a13723214ef66e
'2012-06-29T07:03:17-04:00'
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOI' 'sip-files00179.txt'
bd77746fda2abae6d81cf0b180a5b8fa
066757dc144f629daeb01a0591ac0ecbc0c862cf
describe
'30757' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOJ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
84f74c3c3c141f268e5690b2831e7ece
446901b7b1a9609f059bce0b80ff8401a7eaff93
'2012-06-29T06:54:01-04:00'
describe
'51962' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOK' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
e86231fbac976b4a40eb5c5d3dde4c44
0eb9e93c59cdaea98ec197ff82d35c5ce7f87b88
'2012-06-29T06:55:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOL' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
baf68f2b39b9c0fc2b674b3e5c55c730
aab00f630f1f5f859b8b6f286e9207df5562de04
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOM' 'sip-files00177.tif'
1e4abfe050250ab854040af3174de585
80182207a0d317e6632147e5a160382e0af3d16f
'2012-06-29T07:05:16-04:00'
describe
'2521080' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACON' 'sip-files00011.tif'
58c777fb1555b00f8dd2481930a59cd1
276d117250db3117d9a159f2043d51de3d3f78b1
'2012-06-29T06:56:23-04:00'
describe
'30741' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOO' 'sip-files00084.pro'
76bd37b260348a9fc8fe125a7afd17b7
1ec48aa8554333f02770735d687cf2ef0270815a
'2012-06-29T06:54:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOP' 'sip-files00030.txt'
e970fcdb6147aa869bd7ea4842df3bd0
2d7090ad8d15bf408addc4a9d9b5cdf0b24cc3ba
describe
'312670' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOQ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
6a61df2dff732e0c62b4d659a9e6e133
da6db131411e17ceb77c24d602f70b8eafbe5dfa
'2012-06-29T06:57:42-04:00'
describe
'44086' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOR' 'sip-files00198.pro'
aaba3e7f750c808b4db4662b8e0ec1f0
255766f868e277aca1daf349627721901b0750e5
describe
'291845' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOS' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
1461015f6e89babff6b83b1df1cd944a
ccc9fae0c21ca0b1884f4aa659d3be961666d3f9
'2012-06-29T06:54:32-04:00'
describe
'312618' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOT' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
0024fe30c7f5605a0c737eecbec593b8
7ce7e2951bbfdf79b61e1911d872214d35a0c8ac
describe
'304575' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOU' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
6831993887342c2ba047be42de53166d
0406a598cdf11139b332181a48992e6a40daa1e4
describe
'309173' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOV' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
007c31169fec22d8e09d041d62b4d0ab
0d763d5931ea475e5ef4e012f1d0fa1c117be2a3
'2012-06-29T07:05:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOW' 'sip-files00154.tif'
548ef0d92803db5266acfa613df121c7
461072abfc06eafc8b3f4a69660fae6e7da7f6fe
'2012-06-29T06:58:23-04:00'
describe
'302045' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOX' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
32ec025004210db407c0b528c2ccd460
b7771a2905eaaf4870b0ddc6cff6a59323c7579b
'2012-06-29T06:56:04-04:00'
describe
'287631' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOY' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
27f5d54868623c5f1894fda033c72fdb
4cd3ec2e6728aa945db75fc82d81e68947354684
describe
'30171' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACOZ' 'sip-files00176.pro'
559c5187a60dc582296fd71006720feb
c70f27641604cf7856e8cd477b359e05fd578649
'2012-06-29T07:02:33-04:00'
describe
'316701' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPA' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
0d87698287640b44052b3cd73817a518
453565794d025f54900a8e89494c9b75ce03226e
describe
'51153' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPB' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
1c13eee2a97f9a14cd466e23d7c9342e
a0bbda051cea9e25303db19c2ec55182ebd51a12
describe
'43427' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPC' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
caf384ec536e576fc6df68e41b8a8623
cdc39e3a1e19dd674e854296272a11cc5b956e26
describe
'52885' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPD' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
989b91f62da363b540d6630f186e2ea7
8e6f2366db966886a232506e189a9b5f806f1a33
'2012-06-29T06:57:13-04:00'
describe
'312690' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPE' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
81c1569f72dd95819830576675ce9424
f4ca40d9fed68842e24b989557e39211ced8a63f
describe
'943' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPF' 'sip-files00119.txt'
a11e61225d01c37705dcc91cb48bd53e
1e61ccf16f07e6d6552dc961ee26cac9719bb55e
'2012-06-29T07:00:54-04:00'
describe
'2522224' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPG' 'sip-files00027.tif'
b18d5a5c225b88b9924bb8f8bccf5243
ff8996e0a73acf6d25a74d74d1788a895dec7c2b
'2012-06-29T07:05:30-04:00'
describe
'30267' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPH' 'sip-files00024.pro'
1e559c229a59f8d8aecba9725f922d4d
f56ad89d32adc659faebe676cee166f161bc3792
'2012-06-29T06:57:58-04:00'
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPI' 'sip-files00109.txt'
707a7f3ee564f123d07e412e0d14b1cc
22b2076e7aea3d378a40cd965e300eaabc66b7a9
describe
'29477' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPJ' 'sip-files00016.pro'
933858ecec5bb38543099cb8e694feb3
90019ac9b3d36a23a8a69a5bb7db9f43b46878ce
'2012-06-29T07:03:55-04:00'
describe
'273684' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPK' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
08817c5c697145e94e913ce1293d1384
f21359bb0856249c33a3a584f9f2988130b090a9
'2012-06-29T07:05:13-04:00'
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPL' 'sip-files00052.txt'
9d05acb775763b4eac8b6a911176d0a1
f730d720f04872d70bcdddbaf96d849e58cc1f4b
'2012-06-29T06:55:18-04:00'
describe
'48623' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPM' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
13cc55cd0a6a3cdec746f9368b785094
092c261f25794db8788d30e4e268e9ffcd823fdc
describe
'27751' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPN' 'sip-files00143.pro'
3b6dd548108573fb1e09e981be317fd8
277cafac8abf773c55a75ca6aed69d6399fe9cb3
'2012-06-29T06:56:00-04:00'
describe
'131380' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPO' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
e4e31378eb3d4a90932763ceef078d2a
8a335860cc9574e1ae7f6d001abab87858dbe73a
describe
'24279' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPP' 'sip-files00131.pro'
2359cf72e0469fc256c429f465ecebc8
3b4a771ac48314d4f25eab28e7807cfebaccd377
describe
'52886' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPQ' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
5afefef66c3dc1d09f8f985c79cae398
e649a2ac08c1122a2b71eb28b9678aec632f5b5c
'2012-06-29T06:53:44-04:00'
describe
'298290' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPR' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
97323d829e6d4995cbd9571688c1e718
2f4bc9595a7ecf5727735b543b596b4679b5f8c0
'2012-06-29T06:59:28-04:00'
describe
'28118' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPS' 'sip-files00063.pro'
94dd8443ce2393c81c521ccd9c5fac52
775d2c77d8fa9b9e58afa3d28606d289b7f1492d
describe
'29903' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPT' 'sip-files00041.pro'
eb5a26c23e2fade77d758d36618226a2
0c0372c22e6e312f4db32683780539fb17421072
describe
'471914' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPU' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
1ad99db9121e8729e51dc61214f15c90
096271d508863352f03476f30df3ace386b53cf8
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPV' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
f3c6ccf5b644f55e062bd06383a64cf4
02848fee4d5b5c287f50b6743a7c822f6e678f03
'2012-06-29T06:55:53-04:00'
describe
'23982' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPW' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
58828cf0e75daf5629fb324bd20fb722
51ade6a77131062cd605c4243537efa696b08e51
'2012-06-29T07:04:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPX' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
ea51343560b3008960a6b2fb5c57b80e
9758753487e42f95fee7f4158bc95b5c6674c9a6
describe
'30240' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPY' 'sip-files00086.pro'
f34f6b19f6b36e210e5add31705a2c78
956a884e623f7434ec2c3c1e747c29073d3696bb
'2012-06-29T06:59:46-04:00'
describe
'53936' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACPZ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
64d36dcdc6c4d6f8a75a9a4c33af242d
604ebb6596d2d8889474d5bbe6ba887428e5831e
'2012-06-29T07:00:03-04:00'
describe
'2523496' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQA' 'sip-files00065.tif'
bf5917e4133ed9d200bc24e066c569a5
d770fcd8e05a73db3e95ac6d7ebc6fbc7df4153c
'2012-06-29T07:03:33-04:00'
describe
'51044' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQB' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
478c3dc58e79c53b8c956225a4b2d076
14fa5c5a0b21a2a9b4d8ece92e2d88264fce58bb
'2012-06-29T07:02:50-04:00'
describe
'126212' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQC' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
62380e846ba497ed03380432006dcafb
d03db5f93db13672ec83156b0313557407ca28e1
'2012-06-29T06:57:27-04:00'
describe
'48226' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQD' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
b8f77061d5ee627fb28eb31a2ee97006
e6265ecaeab948c7a808c5d938a755867f712949
'2012-06-29T07:02:23-04:00'
describe
'31081' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQE' 'sip-files00125.pro'
12015b2aaa95a483195e0c30d6d093bc
4fff6759d1f2f2414db0b06d7739113a46b8f8a4
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQF' 'sip-files00144.tif'
3cebc4446bc5852b7b64a870657afa25
8b117c3cc676731477c3c09e8ae7819522e731cc
'2012-06-29T06:57:07-04:00'
describe
'29979' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQG' 'sip-files00141.pro'
97d004cd63c291930ec84819ae82a320
b2281ff101cef2a15beb44bcb127d56cbc202d2e
describe
'89263' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQH' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
c117d8464fdf41119ac34f63348744fd
7d344cf6e8a99704cb88416bdbc4160e11427c54
describe
'2523620' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQI' 'sip-files00184.tif'
42f16113f8d82965066d9393f6b13174
4e8ad0e5fbe26a300d861872af2702528941199c
describe
'124844' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQJ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
ad46049ec744dfe136af45a6d2a9378e
86e92bbe9b47beb46c49c754ea4ace0c69840e59
'2012-06-29T07:05:52-04:00'
describe
'312404' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQK' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
8aaf2209b8b5ef679b76b1307191f066
7cba456fd463654f10184960c457ea6123e5ecd2
'2012-06-29T06:55:32-04:00'
describe
'44878' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQL' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
a326e5e5d64d4a8fa5084e3cd006d2bc
98a1dabbd9c863e990f370416d64af4703da42d3
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQM' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
c3d9f2d9c4e1fa6a434e06345fe6cd57
d4f75277049ac8cb3efbf9e875a0825872f6a3eb
'2012-06-29T06:56:02-04:00'
describe
'312607' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQN' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
895271cf34323fbd74177c76245020b4
219fac108a9b7401c86ab7250eead28c49fd6fa8
describe
'2523096' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQO' 'sip-files00202.tif'
61260f10b81f9972b05d1c8f8cffaadf
f6335ba1ed215d029d654604f3a94dae4546fdb1
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
e88e22f91eaec152a763c67adca5ff4e
1583438ff92451b982fd746e8400e8c8e37d7cb2
'2012-06-29T06:54:39-04:00'
describe
'312653' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQQ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
37251eaabe283f810552022b2bffc824
17b3a756f90fbe5003a02c1f91c73e4b9ffa32f2
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQR' 'sip-files00065.txt'
c3a12cb85d4539c979428f0b3a6f117a
bbb3fb64369b80339f3e6576ac2d2b286abdf73c
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQS' 'sip-files00100.txt'
ee6da42be9b8bbb0805083992a58dc9e
fdce27fb5c8f6f6e2665486aba3923316db464e6
describe
'52034' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQT' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
a564cdf11b27cabd8cb05bba4e784ed1
0d7a444d014656cc04f82f46bcd49acbfe7947fa
'2012-06-29T06:56:13-04:00'
describe
'125612' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQU' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
7e124f5ed9270a488dadc13287589699
f4aca086316fcb3b02259c544f974717567d9821
describe
'48987' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQV' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
19b8be628973d0a0049349ca65b9a9ed
57f7a41b39c53239426be36664f5bb9953192f20
'2012-06-29T07:04:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQW' 'sip-files00113.txt'
2de0018457c9f7589079735ea4218e21
82f12593bd380e6c5f5dfada805fa61ba785087d
'2012-06-29T06:59:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQX' 'sip-files00112.txt'
f6f426c0c1bbe3d2f4799b53ff28b96d
f155d719b3c7f50a4737389905c6fd8e08f308cb
describe
'51002' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQY' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
2299db58ef8db485e1c6a9e568e45d82
41eab1de024e75d487e84ba5a513f891e87709c9
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACQZ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
7c9722a3007352e342b5f27120f6dff0
7e31499a4380d102ae6fa3866764939681d23fd1
'2012-06-29T07:01:32-04:00'
describe
'312697' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRA' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
aadc11c893e781c1fbb2bc0f36ffd227
937ba330534ae3f3c6a43836105850b2e6ffbcb1
'2012-06-29T06:58:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRB' 'sip-files00141.txt'
41b464c5fbb81318c802d066ce2cf1fd
73863ab33c1078681aad327f43f93fa392abef59
'2012-06-29T06:54:30-04:00'
describe
'2523568' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRC' 'sip-files00185.tif'
1a34c7c9bd437e1e733f44c59c31202f
bcfdf4828a0b3e09e73cb6b07ca9635f91489cfb
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRD' 'sip-files00138.txt'
3866c6858d5d29af3acbbc6ece60ae7a
5dbd5f967ef061aa418d8515de25782f0d8e484d
describe
'300881' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRE' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
f30ff45e4f5e10443cba76b903e12f66
7c8623bf9f8305fc3700f572901022cfe350d937
'2012-06-29T07:05:03-04:00'
describe
'215786' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRF' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
f6c4ff76210fd758a6d7c0add9614eb1
421e40c2dcf30ab1c6a992d5e0b7688db984c62a
describe
'312550' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRG' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
6b3c17d3489831553ee0ee891ccffb64
317ae10b4e36cc421e42908e61f0db558fc80303
'2012-06-29T06:58:56-04:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRH' 'sip-files00117.txt'
fbd76e5d5ca3fe1e00e94dc7b09b9898
110b6ac34b4787b3b127ae9d8500c2f3e1c54a23
'2012-06-29T07:00:31-04:00'
describe
'2523524' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRI' 'sip-files00167.tif'
c4d902596935197af29263809731f476
526f65e90c7dbee1dfea4be2a91413947df697d4
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRJ' 'sip-files00145.tif'
a7a813ce60c219827be652cd112bd1bd
3acdbe51cde6b1e9bc49b4e8c564c2ee3aac55d8
describe
'29352' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRK' 'sip-files00046.pro'
d75b124696ec8f35041dc8766d622420
16ebf17ef7e95788a010e50b6fed465138a0e2ae
describe
'100577' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRL' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
4c4b314c44efed606b7586e08c5d4e58
2c7a08a3425685bfe5fc4cd8a88c6ec243801002
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRM' 'sip-files00129.txt'
4324bf95eaffb8ae15f15fadd2145948
eed2d2ee0e8d72632916465762165ed801298ccc
'2012-06-29T06:54:13-04:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRN' 'sip-files00028.txt'
497cf8fa63a7eb35db720b98b6fa6b93
339e6d2f94af44dbee17153e729a3747546ad7ec
describe
'288135' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRO' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
444af8ce26efdc4f0c35bd787fc35fe9
e2e49d2628f10d3a667e880b098263fce67be3fe
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRP' 'sip-files00074.txt'
e6c8b5e51e967851716468f938780ca6
9818690dbb9c8777cd7b4db98ad7fd9c14e4efd2
'2012-06-29T07:03:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRQ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
514fe651c532824cbe9e92b04c690e52
92b37503f23179b422b6d00ceb7d7e8d2efff04d
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRR' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
9d41a6b4eac80055aef8f17eb8859477
2158b7858aa2754e8002ec74a4ac7ba59e809d97
describe
'51886' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRS' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
a876fcc3cd4909227f626e2d19f446eb
6a3157fbdec213e0d32dbf390b8c71d64cebd8cb
describe
'36694660' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRT' 'sip-files00208.tif'
baceffb4a2cc60322796caffcea7179f
b20031b38e6c7cb8e18166580cfe317b39d77dc4
'2012-06-29T07:05:01-04:00'
describe
'29000216' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRU' 'sip-files00130.tif'
743b248fa5c84617be8432001c86ba8f
7f928966f5dbd1a2d2e6393548627f57a1ae98f8
'2012-06-29T07:02:26-04:00'
describe
'312733' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRV' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
5023614c06531c235629518495ef09cd
93771dd2ade3c328a3c4d78d48b279d84d30f075
'2012-06-29T06:54:11-04:00'
describe
'312682' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRW' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
29d4889af1b0e43f9bf7d16998ab1871
1b9c60b5c8ccf5d562a247b4ab7d2067c7b2adae
'2012-06-29T07:04:42-04:00'
describe
'308217' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRX' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
abfa5b543481d3307713e2b54c1ae98a
9606e1f0441ed77ac7227e4a7d35e3627a47664d
'2012-06-29T06:57:05-04:00'
describe
'2506' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRY' 'sip-files00202.txt'
649b2d87ecc8850bdb4bc67e0207c956
2c63dd01833452beb2896bc5523d572056ff8928
'2012-06-29T07:02:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACRZ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
5b3bd136ad2516edbefeae00ace0278f
5cac841fe405539c7a310a2140ff38cfb68399af
'2012-06-29T07:05:41-04:00'
describe
'127905' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSA' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
ec8cdde91aaf909b3739c30b4182c9f1
a71dc1474710bf1a0efde097bbef80d98b265fa6
'2012-06-29T07:03:08-04:00'
describe
'212639' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSB' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
e96028e9403f77e708cc826eb11d598f
cbd9c17bbced0bfadb9b63ed89b3a05a778fa388
describe
'29977' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSC' 'sip-files00067.pro'
5216b7d380879d077b1a7f21300c6ae3
34988f2749408ae29319a953cfc5bd3a16c8d7f2
describe
'312642' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSD' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
7cce247b62d20c16796fbdb7c2a3ef5a
57cef5cc208a720f7a5a0ceefcd5bec67a18a8f7
'2012-06-29T06:58:29-04:00'
describe
'30707' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSE' 'sip-files00191.pro'
b2c859f07915351991bc8a17263f2752
7b463178452176713d55264eaa417639530185c1
'2012-06-29T07:02:10-04:00'
describe
'2523648' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSF' 'sip-files00112.tif'
98f139623964e49a6d9d2ab819732acb
07aef564bdfc0dbd8fb3730cae3adc72ae9a2177
'2012-06-29T06:56:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSG' 'sip-files00024.tif'
a07e2d0e4a0b2aae18542c396103f294
91f91b3ffe68035844734b79b11c8964663dd342
describe
'51566' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSH' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
baa492d37d4b891121321b768f9e1a30
a7bdc82d85bdf491cbca0fd91d6c75603cce4746
describe
'52597' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSI' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
00f26f814bcf7af68d3083d3cf1584e2
7fe7e96c1cb09c37fca4fa9c8a01f477b160a6c0
'2012-06-29T07:00:32-04:00'
describe
'1186432' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSJ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c4ddf993cdb6a3b600df6a49bb6c7d9c
e9698103448fe672644bbb9490901dcdf93afc03
'2012-06-29T07:03:20-04:00'
describe
'30327' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSK' 'sip-files00120.pro'
2c86a3d8a09e0e0538dc503fa2ba67e8
e20ed358a6c30359cb8687afe66cd5ce8972c9b1
'2012-06-29T07:04:50-04:00'
describe
'312676' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSL' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
6e44a87e53c5b8019c1970438c556641
3615bb2d95618faf5d2e830d4d704bbc54348ad3
describe
'57753' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSM' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
a7d68e69703ded9c8beb3de9a66c2612
2a79ccf831901f2c90e85e985973272f586976a6
'2012-06-29T07:03:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSN' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
2f58fb43515aba812873cc28d003de9a
2d2438abc4b775fcf1d417b3ec87cd28c333c662
'2012-06-29T06:56:07-04:00'
describe
'270533' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSO' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
aeb02623b36cc31781ab0d8b0551fc05
53ebc9df8feff239b4431eb27426d2b1500ea9e1
describe
'127156' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSP' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
b10333a1adc56d6c6d1d551a7ae01b60
d7f6e7d5305ab8a7fde07ceab3e1265006b6cc00
describe
'97056' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSQ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f8e77555e85699d0d92c572eae00e743
d621b646daba14199b1773d1ae321dafb3df6fd4
describe
'36135892' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSR' 'sip-files00001.tif'
0e3b4aa6b4e8ad985188f5b94525eeb7
43e654f2a41acef3b8d6ec48bf5be8dc6efcf518
describe
'30836' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSS' 'sip-files00180.pro'
a4ea2459462819bc6530f8f5a0e2c005
1f736df5a5d995fce11123433498454915636737
describe
'2523624' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACST' 'sip-files00141.tif'
35908aa8be1e42fa62e4b82c72285d20
ed14f6bab10be45ee9eb47429253e581250a11ea
'2012-06-29T06:57:49-04:00'
describe
'19475' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSU' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
9ced685e7ed1d1bb9c5554f3936d6ec9
659cdc2bd3c1e80cbefcf8f7ebe2995a47b1a6d5
describe
'34857' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSV' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
e7aa83ca522e9d71c336d773d0956b1f
7f8b7281edc5578de1ee3c6323e1ee9ff41b0136
'2012-06-29T07:00:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSW' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
df6da404f731235309700a00b2925ab1
600346991a1488191a6d95121abd2b22b1d3abc5
describe
'125814' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSX' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
9e6fa80287f67deb40f212f9a88abe6f
7c9b304130cbe784887427cb8df6b250b4d1e90a
describe
'1195643' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSY' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
315ab9a3d297100e33cbd52cb9eba498
fc75ff428ff5eb24bbd4ae203533277f73d142f7
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACSZ' 'sip-files00174.txt'
ed2f07ef0904c69db6af86b3088d901c
1ad825d9c0e566d5253414c516aa673f377102b9
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTA' 'sip-files00091.txt'
0ccc88aa4f518a9e3d3f0e45022cdf54
58bb7da214839d4b76b2858f1c9da9899be5197f
describe
'51758' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTB' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
d0fefafb88b9a1d1e0677bcc74ea97f6
9a6abf2c0595996690798414ebd8934b3df77cdb
'2012-06-29T07:00:16-04:00'
describe
'108327152' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTC' 'sip-files00013.tif'
1f89f85eeb09594f0e393bbf55450b97
af51fe9ddc3e355d9c1c4075fa4c56d74a89e3ff
describe
'42340' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTD' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
9b3ffae338a5a9e70d2ea5e399f88a18
81ba6aca1ecbd3fdd7e8f5b22d7bed448cc06af5
describe
'28927' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTE' 'sip-files00115.pro'
456481026e0141bc71a72ceb4b8c0689
7cfddbe5601af6834b697e500ae059753b794216
describe
'117504' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTF' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
bb577813fd51ec2017d22f8fd17a18c4
6dfe908fdc59a561a9d3493d495d1b5b8908b0f7
describe
'28709448' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTG' 'sip-files00121.tif'
c59f276736e529450b2a944875b40fbe
060a7672cc89c35e611c5b02934998154c3c80b2
'2012-06-29T06:55:31-04:00'
describe
'53338' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTH' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
7ef5de31138f026e0663908242431b85
538fe82ef7cc827ad57d25364e3ca3591887f3b1
describe
'117401' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTI' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
2a1573fb2aae5f70c4b1a0ce3cbd8037
f1d0f81c962be080861cdf8444907588631aee91
'2012-06-29T06:58:00-04:00'
describe
'2523040' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTJ' 'sip-files00197.tif'
73a1fd986e8eb89cd8bd3042759be0ad
419ab98c10d3bb5931a7b1758aa1beee3f33b318
describe
'51574' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTK' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
58868ac529d3e69eaba35a144f287d17
06c458b86321af44b3ebd220ae808390de0aa347
'2012-06-29T06:58:16-04:00'
describe
'52823' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTL' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
4148edcc43674ee7f11608383af05da1
3452d71732ea3c9880e5ae398553afed3751b483
'2012-06-29T07:03:04-04:00'
describe
'299753' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTM' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
974a7dee41d88c5b805b4ab9ab178ec9
787e2227a88bf50a9ceb4cf713d9e897a23afa54
'2012-06-29T06:55:00-04:00'
describe
'306244' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTN' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
e77e4fe464e9874f572f117ddc014bc4
c4b7d2edd47ee8fbd0732c2a25e4278855a66145
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTO' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
2e14087880b74404bd840040e2f8819c
767976146fba3f039b35728784ec3073035f3f0a
describe
'126961' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTP' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
2834e472f15c146f26147ff8ee8b1cfd
647edff01a9bdd0b581bfc322522a3fa50456721
'2012-06-29T06:55:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTQ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
5630dd109372da995a4b1c860967ae2c
302c6aba1b2b63c84219d677e013e9cca709142b
describe
'135160' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTR' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
f2ad6abf620fa28d66696afedd590692
a06f52d201666b35ba096dffda807de936d49e60
'2012-06-29T07:02:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTS' 'sip-files00111.txt'
44de028c4c991115e0f1c48ee81c5486
c21b884dbe77201f0dc6e52814e818b0e5fdd148
describe
'33547' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTT' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
9acd79f45900ac88afa4d6c0b0745e8a
8d46019bc0f21d783623446929eea2c5da6443ae
describe
'2519564' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTU' 'sip-files00006.tif'
fb1938e79b5fa11a11863a28474b0d2d
af03a060fcd2ff7d77ae1929d2879017c355692c
'2012-06-29T06:59:32-04:00'
describe
'1784' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTV' 'sip-files00201.txt'
48e571a8f42fbba7a079cd249a79198f
86f7a55c5d9fdaf9510c4b41bffb03d15f28566f
describe
'131874' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTW' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
26c25f7d361f2804d03cb00c408d9dec
bf4af8afb84fcef983f509003a155fd87625f480
'2012-06-29T07:02:15-04:00'
describe
'17971' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
a98143fb2cd5c2691b825b3d259c9cc6
86939c780785d3fa3493a19ab325e5eb6b40006e
'2012-06-29T06:57:10-04:00'
describe
'27727' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTY' 'sip-files00044.pro'
2e57410447d32c9e9de20a508b79f164
c1da853d25a8029468377315a6249bfd402ae16c
describe
'124583' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACTZ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
c417ad91d9430e4e97ac6eb8ecea7b94
50f19e22d9bbf3086906bb0ef5aec5d46a78f2e6
'2012-06-29T07:04:10-04:00'
describe
'292727' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUA' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
09fc8763748977caf9724b6a409f165b
aaaf3f12dba6a9894a005265e8d557d74f70177d
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUB' 'sip-files00115.txt'
e2a969aaf279ed77aaa9b68747fe47da
547ba0dc1525f55954df5543b5d62dc9deab2898
describe
'312996' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUC' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
98092a0daa10e8e922e2c38a1e6c9363
432e388a74deba0c923cc11bb146d20d1786188f
'2012-06-29T06:54:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUD' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
8ab4d163196933a4925d44d85ced83db
29bbf89e67e0bcb306a4f57e3c76b601b279745c
'2012-06-29T06:59:36-04:00'
describe
'29636' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUE' 'sip-files00102.pro'
dc2e3ab51ca0322d9871f5af99cbf4db
4a9f7d9a92021e132a9ba18e7b60cd895eade4c3
describe
'312648' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUF' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
0432b8548108f22db149ec0417f16e8d
fbc8d417eeb822db3a2ab4d32ed6459f4c9ca25c
describe
'12116' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUG' 'sip-files00010.pro'
e2d629632a9e24fac447578bbbd93a3e
877aeb138586ba8dc0fd6ca1fcac49bfde921839
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUH' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
f3501c1472aef4c4d6b6b2389ff3afa5
43f272b80a3089d60e0fc98000510b7eb40960ae
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUI' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
decd22102feddc410d4a5c5a4689a90c
7928e46175ed75d87de132b03ad22c37c13b7777
'2012-06-29T07:02:05-04:00'
describe
'314261' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUJ' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
44ae88a7f04d28494900962f9d0c01be
165157215f916f330bab54900b0c652940671811
'2012-06-29T06:54:21-04:00'
describe
'124190' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUK' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
f6b7eb75f9b074da2e6478aab1461c69
50ae99440a3a6b6d367a7f5d32d91dd0dbdbe825
'2012-06-29T07:05:27-04:00'
describe
'128131' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUL' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
d3483897ae3d3f12d44c01286275f3ae
c91ac0a01f70d595e26dcebb3074924638adf521
'2012-06-29T07:01:07-04:00'
describe
'307706' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUM' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
9eb74a580fccfde03bf85887e886fd3a
6d666eaed812b581bb4324a9b45250c52075f395
'2012-06-29T07:03:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUN' 'sip-files00092.tif'
732383c406cbe8e35837556e6f9255e7
727d5240d84ed0096ab4a5db3e7430ada728eccc
'2012-06-29T06:58:03-04:00'
describe
'36979' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUO' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
dd4a05d42a70d9aedb764f619a00a4f6
12428c32b06e38ac61d369b9c6a2a54d256da54c
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUP' 'sip-files00016.txt'
cae36bd606474c4bab166bb8f6d1bf15
f2d5231f5d2efeebcb83522c8272fdc05c2d944a
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUQ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
8aa8857b9db89b0663c7b63cd32d172d
ccc13f9bc066d0d217a6f7bbc6fed5a8ccdea2eb
describe
'2519308' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUR' 'sip-files00009.tif'
bc4730493da811397e0ac98b55bcd819
8ac82f39ab27a8e5666ddc46f0b4a702bd41dd91
describe
'309366' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUS' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
329ebc465703a64e7d5566f0a2181657
062eff43e3149d585ab6d784ae95f6a23e79621c
'2012-06-29T06:58:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUT' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
2b265773069ca78e9e530f1f09871b1f
debe956857c4a64e4929f8395ecbee06d2822409
describe
'53374' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUU' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
dcb8015d75a2fb5a40bf7370320b7b5c
bbc8002d8b5ebabb7a93bc1297088516fc221c5c
'2012-06-29T07:02:55-04:00'
describe
'287765' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUV' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
8df27ebcdd6ddc263a84b20e547741db
7b6ef621373cd4381d92ef7b66a5111e1ccb1ec9
describe
'312713' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUW' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
8d2bc618ac9734a2b181d6597ffd530e
16380aaa3956774c4874d9bb8b496a6ea31f88e6
describe
'30512' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUX' 'sip-files00033.pro'
8896cb0427d01c8f7dd23c28950027d3
f225ea61caf25429ef9c622f6fbe64aa4531e60b
'2012-06-29T06:57:26-04:00'
describe
'51723' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUY' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
58781ebb78825e48dae27ab3cc58747e
725639788af180b2c2526d57df27caf8580cc2c5
'2012-06-29T06:55:34-04:00'
describe
'127014' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACUZ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
d3480aa2764aaca86b01a21b4197f5d3
eb23a54c536e0f46d63f507ae40e98142350f8c7
describe
'312666' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVA' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
2e5600e1781b0a6d36e4ca43bfb0a8fa
58b30bd70976997711e5bf562094f51814f3cb1e
'2012-06-29T06:54:02-04:00'
describe
'130503' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVB' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
48ebec3536eb3ae95aefb45881e11b1d
27c72544ba0998135c864763958c9c8d13717c0f
describe
'2523548' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVC' 'sip-files00096.tif'
378bda32cc9d29575e2b7c9690774ef8
8d58d4ad7f842f4d2e62468f5a210bf9350ae7cc
'2012-06-29T06:59:07-04:00'
describe
'307492' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVD' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
e1d1956ea9fedce6e3b9422070501019
90fd67622b8923a4d74fde2c295d3bfda64b2584
describe
'503' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVE' 'sip-files00162.txt'
53fd04385d23da09cf80151d5e6c7601
7ad9e7d30ab1da5d9480282235d8283139fda1f2
describe
'27597' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVF' 'sip-files00138.pro'
09ca9c1b144427473bde1db14a5a0a17
d7579ef1d76feef9483f55c2d32e5f37582777de
'2012-06-29T07:00:37-04:00'
describe
'1528574' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVG' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
2bc990504b666874e48c939dddbeb65f
545e909dfd305c7d0206b837ee533392bddde1da
'2012-06-29T06:55:58-04:00'
describe
'131367' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVH' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
6fb063499165a2af4fffccdf5bfeaffa
24204616a0f34fd348dc1b702cb7d7aabd93819f
describe
'49493' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVI' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
6288aab95cf85f67500225831e675e2b
5898d4093e17c17f99723c2899730d3f130a14db
'2012-06-29T06:54:00-04:00'
describe
'305173' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVJ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
8fb12b1b67fe30a10729adf10561500f
55ddec33626e69e36a88854b585b14cbae9813a3
'2012-06-29T07:02:29-04:00'
describe
'2522708' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVK' 'sip-files00035.tif'
afe2de7dc314a938fffb36c60e5a6366
fd208b5fae1098299329bf962c7472506b5472d7
'2012-06-29T06:59:54-04:00'
describe
'51578' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVL' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
9fdbfd649d1bf9ef5e2980683b980056
fd1b39d3cc3e8007011d31accde9ff4e55de1f33
describe
'128086' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVM' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
762f18a650b7994694e9f8fefe2f8844
b668c4fe61dd724337fbda5714f2b52fee2de4f3
'2012-06-29T07:05:58-04:00'
describe
'720' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVN' 'sip-files00026.txt'
38cad76488906076fc0569b12680fc11
a0e4f6b946580e44556bdb8d42adeb2df23b7169
describe
'49565' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVO' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
6c94d8d4ad1a632ef10d03c998259b7d
486be541e37939621321619a23e5ad07c1ac1d17
'2012-06-29T07:05:08-04:00'
describe
'52319' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVP' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
66702f5183b1a2b7b451b958039e917e
7fab683c185f435a02cfe57e29cd8bef521d7ea2
describe
'128679' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVQ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
d5fe3b20f8c97574ed6c6e129e3b3cbc
26febfffaad06ebbb63e40c5012307363b2d9340
describe
'312738' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVR' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
49840d182e523cb62ba41e0a31ba38c7
975adcb7683746d66d3728b370b9f538268b8888
describe
'53288' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVS' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
2ccd773ca62c34e70150a0dc0e37bff0
8c85eb4c27ec6a123d93976e7369f2232c1064c6
describe
'127867' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVT' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
546d0908cb21f02717a1afb2c0a0ce06
ffcb4171883f17cf14f374a2c470f11bffb11f69
describe
'2523716' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVU' 'sip-files00170.tif'
0756641b54a30ef46ca931ff31c3288f
7e9480e02e648aaff65c1c21c91cad537d9d6ad9
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVV' 'sip-files00116.txt'
b08621e1aac6c73c039c919ac6695dde
624a365adc00712a238afdd5f960184c05d6e2d2
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVW' 'sip-files00176.txt'
f7a828eccb6983e0b21007871af9ec15
eb665720d6420b78fc0f660d3f1440d2eb7a0cc0
describe
'2523428' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVX' 'sip-files00158.tif'
0c532e5cda68581a3c6c636f932e0f6c
5b761d24a5df195381ca390101a958aeed1720c4
'2012-06-29T07:02:13-04:00'
describe
'77754' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVY' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
59e4e533a4cb86db3324b2eb0441622a
2be20312db37c9481840ebf0fc4b2807f3f88178
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACVZ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
905b5e7bb47f39b839a8b4ff15a8b0c2
91f221cba841f2dfb60a78275cad9c56589b6d95
describe
'105648' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWA' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
2f5ea9815b82a5c6e4d47604a2291920
7bc3c14f89fa528ce52aad5352ea1e8295e97559
describe
'197585' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWB' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
5935e0e2969c386d03b885e7388f7cbe
435425fb8176933b68e3d63a83453f46399ea04c
'2012-06-29T07:02:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWC' 'sip-files00177.txt'
d05384f79501a3169bedbc3428675ae5
302fe175ffdf4402666f041ea450248ccdda63ab
describe
'117977' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWD' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
57c0892d1f2b15f3f49eff26c6a5be45
5cd27e095d68f09d00c81394f091841a1a55e601
'2012-06-29T06:54:35-04:00'
describe
'319514' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWE' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
beb8ad9a3643ee96cfdac58de08d4fe5
57b8372cd2daac22dd2dd3aa8bab1b3fabe226f8
'2012-06-29T07:03:39-04:00'
describe
'117682' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWF' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
a80004c3559d80f3a56ab8c816b35aa2
e4bef0e4071d54041e577c705f684f9b32bf8949
'2012-06-29T07:05:31-04:00'
describe
'301012' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWG' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
e212753d87109750c8482dc49035dac5
8b78fd0df397798584d26c3b30296f81f7dced00
describe
'51753' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWH' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
84fe6b81d111c68060a59c60a8a4796b
88202cc739ee011d0f028547e196c28e02e34061
describe
'2522072' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWI' 'sip-files00174.tif'
842af032fb08fa1bfc6029453b35279e
b88ca1e575edd0893d1b19efc97b917239da35df
'2012-06-29T07:04:13-04:00'
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWJ' 'sip-files00160.txt'
5d0d3b15141275df436df0824d35f9b7
381095d9eedfe3201c84419d32b4d162c712475b
'2012-06-29T06:57:45-04:00'
describe
'50885' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWK' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
475eb995bbdff568769a9c58f322e28e
326e399317ccd1518f9312056583b1953f7d4638
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWL' 'sip-files00127.txt'
47d1699ad619b175b61d49478ff08377
00a2e95b8fbc8e15a9fdf289127ecf6e1b89f4e1
'2012-06-29T06:57:21-04:00'
describe
'2521964' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWM' 'sip-files00003.tif'
6d7ad928550e7a0710e9770c48c82fda
749006d0a158b8423afc72c70c7e57a921c012a2
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWN' 'sip-files00181.txt'
c99b507b750897b44b104ff4aaf09ae6
68edd952072af7f9433a9b86ce33db4379f70cf2
describe
'126169' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWO' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
0645b944f7e53b8bf82fadb33f9b013d
2d3e1f84cde96b75ef8c2bd45a5976d90cc4bfea
describe
'304958' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWP' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
5441f7fce97b58a3e90e4ca06adc818f
aaf07c5176f3c6810ad3c4815afabe76d46a2a6c
describe
'29745' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWQ' 'sip-files00184.pro'
0b1a27ba987c2ef0694ae2578148d254
83cf316422fe2c0aee91238d68494cfac53289e1
'2012-06-29T07:04:22-04:00'
describe
'53357' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWR' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
66ed49a88765303ed4c704a7118ae9c7
b9037a33033b4e827fc5cd97c505757b8dead49f
describe
'2522336' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWS' 'sip-files00015.tif'
d9d38f16fdf69fa68d159023fbfb1fac
475b9c5bf465139181a712a550eac3aeaba2ec88
'2012-06-29T07:00:13-04:00'
describe
'2523424' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWT' 'sip-files00146.tif'
4baad2c9d75876ec928c85f82e462bd8
798e6f65f4b3dfe9229b131b0f6eb6bde17d957f
describe
'51528' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWU' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
28d1ba44d1ffe39b85bbd9bfd694f04b
5f9102e867544eb9191cacdfa9570b7b35a6750f
describe
'40810' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWV' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
a93efb1352fe3a5feddf758d5be81294
f3ce9c2adff9a22b2bf560c079a796b1e6aad628
describe
'30358' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWW' 'sip-files00050.pro'
d459e47e135fd82366bbdd69bae5084e
b624b34b2d947d2c65db10b39f3372a737b95205
describe
'62190' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWX' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
9fc8a70044238fe3323d9ea7a0dee661
6f81642447b42b66365658a63c3201685330f3eb
'2012-06-29T07:02:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWY' 'sip-files00041.txt'
02b344195294814cb90f00e77cff6b81
c4884c1d041a86c98f6a3ef852e79ebd09e48ae3
describe
'29643' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACWZ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
9126e4f75569b87ada88c60f57492543
a82b26cdb483cfa77f1516a5abc467aade84d451
describe
'123584' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXA' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
7574298a1efca56d0cdeab067e1561a1
7225dde0bc83baf2c526a4c0f8ae6535f456a1b3
'2012-06-29T07:01:56-04:00'
describe
'2519504' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXB' 'sip-files00203.tif'
2de245fd41892ab9f25608151c3c66be
8441a882c836d453549902ab8e0f0d743257305e
'2012-06-29T06:57:34-04:00'
describe
'277200' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXC' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
beb0076e8a00fcd6806146b61d33f7ee
96170259781cc22cad7544a99e07d3849cf172a3
describe
'51292' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXD' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
bc55efe6827955794641466860174203
f39fc3e7ffb1eaa9c1ca7c5b416d8ded6fdb9a88
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXE' 'sip-files00022.txt'
7397436cc24ca8094144b4d7673fcfd8
04804b9a5ee3190e227dbaad2754439e04fe8eb6
describe
'833' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXF' 'sip-files00190.txt'
df92d383354bd135d46bd8cf23f7cce4
a26bb4f5fec4831a6f6d34c3b35349e3aa3dc21f
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXG' 'sip-files00036.txt'
c2923af49f0a01733fd45cd0691cf0ee
9ef2411b09bb4f8378e3e1ec338481de26fb4249
describe
'52301' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXH' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
8483a7520c1cf1a3a65e7bfc0fcf6cac
b6c7e613d33fcb27f171ba7065f564b2f3e4ac47
'2012-06-29T06:53:49-04:00'
describe
'128798' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXI' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
6268510e456a952b2facbcbf6cdfe0af
1c6ac754a06e37ff4e0af43c8125332d1fd182bd
describe
'53242' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXJ' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
61854aedc1666686c5711f6dbfd73346
722d5f894e89ffe73424609a0817b25f67ae916d
describe
'326105' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXK' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
2286f242a33b122f72567ced596bf79d
012a1a9c0cd7b8f43b4fb50091ce69821404ff10
describe
'29511' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXL' 'sip-files00023.pro'
8c8bb2655bf66ac044607f2fda5b5b8b
7301e2e67c001fe3906469f54602de81e7c1c4e8
describe
'52102' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXM' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
35226ff016208b4e68dba1a89d7c4177
ebfca69c2c8e962db75e36079625d17ac35d424f
'2012-06-29T07:05:42-04:00'
describe
'43299' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXN' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
338d1ffd2014d890e075ee4bb2c0c5e0
25d71c86a10fb185a3a59785720cb94d85ad69b5
'2012-06-29T06:58:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXO' 'sip-files00083.tif'
8b4f3a1bf1bf3b33fc2548d4a14b2b54
b92a781506a361e2c82b306c738e8c9f743a95aa
'2012-06-29T07:01:54-04:00'
describe
'2520840' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXP' 'sip-files00173.tif'
701fe13bae233b1b2a3a539cf5d4c153
f31334be0338aafd46e6bf0e8ab2563cf10d2ea9
'2012-06-29T07:00:00-04:00'
describe
'172417' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXQ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
0bc625581d35db8bb86274c9c5a108fe
812e1e371d54309a12c03253aa332fd52612f5f2
describe
'52297' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXR' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
13e32f15dd961334e5869ffe1248f7ef
71f52c32f2eb4e7cb91c3bbdeaf9c44685288f69
describe
'122814' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXS' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
518f974b1e279f38c0f310746d32586f
63d54d499f5b3a6fc70a7b9c22f2113adb7a4ba4
'2012-06-29T07:03:05-04:00'
describe
'52986' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXT' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
6e79d6c25329cac06c0581c67be531b6
234fd133e9e2f0796cb3db28e7effa558d498106
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXU' 'sip-files00044.txt'
8c72dcb82f54453c5fec5cab32526425
5e6c9d632e3f8b7ce723c211e8f7c57c6a5e8b03
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXV' 'sip-files00151.txt'
4cd7a5dbca8b2b699663f5697c81e24b
d94b2d46ac7b6ed46c7f73f68d02bfb689c87fa6
'2012-06-29T07:05:40-04:00'
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXW' 'sip-files00083.txt'
849ff7374080a3d2548798226a2d2164
a4d7ad8d7cc8546a2988c6e81f4f8d7efd8dd062
describe
'52137' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXX' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
6e8ad57179295c142d2fc58e06ce0606
b5d334d93fa298f6757279de73a53edcf893f126
'2012-06-29T07:02:30-04:00'
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXY' 'sip-files00045.txt'
a269f5fe209903d364e464dbfe77af69
9d6473f43b80009274d9184a3a95361c568e55e7
describe
'48015' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACXZ' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
b52d16fc21fc92caa301828e1829189c
9b0732d7a64b1214d7a9fb3ae674fa70b9ebd62d
describe
'305025' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYA' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
e55a93de2b01325ae982dc53f52d4b60
6a9eef25e1cbc6e125abd97c282f9717d7f61c3d
describe
'124974' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYB' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
16630909b86c10a28131991207d5f4a4
69087733eb118a31eb4eb833809fd3172fea64b9
describe
'135921' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYC' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
da982cb02206f53165a318c1e8ff0659
b4079f64031e755770bf20d559daf5b9cefcbe5c
'2012-06-29T07:01:04-04:00'
describe
'51480' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYD' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
dcd0cc14d63c2542065748366592f571
e2c9e4b593a1822cc155897a790920cff42f88df
describe
'47581' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYE' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
a8e74a8fa2c82a75255ffdacd061d852
ccaeea88775ac061a78bfd50b3a354ecbd563449
'2012-06-29T07:01:13-04:00'
describe
'227143' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYF' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
4aab0d90d4a0e06b94ea379b0a92b4a7
fdfcf48be9dd294fec036381b4a24967bda1c5c6
describe
'36117' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYG' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
34dec31e067d64e7db0d19c694e70fdc
2a36b199de1ff2854014328f3f0c4fead9377295
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYH' 'sip-files00166.txt'
5e86b582feddc33e20e0fdf68f62e60f
9f51ee2fe27c4beb6b9a69fdcf214130aea25486
describe
'52554' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYI' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
40c59479c82fd9a352e355fbabba5761
3cf423d09ced72d6f99adaa4bb92fc2e2569e2b3
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYJ' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
8b400bcf1bd27713d9d13142e2f88088
e947a515421c781656eef5d366407e816c5b9c9c
describe
'2523444' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYK' 'sip-files00105.tif'
dc4bcc6f5e4aa5853769b977d66f8499
d6fa44f07de1d108b98576fddf8fb5e3ef4f69a3
'2012-06-29T06:56:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYL' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
16107e0eb4e98107bb00fcfa941f95cb
9e45f7be6a68099c5908215ba7cf7c40b12522c2
'2012-06-29T07:05:26-04:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYM' 'sip-files00027.txt'
ff886684e1fdee6aa16840e046cd0492
9dacda157ba47480eb71a57e5cfe615b297aaeac
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYN' 'sip-files00038.txt'
c0499bdf023301fbb6aae346c50d5db2
2740df309d6d1c54c5d41046d1b9ed167cfcd4ce
'2012-06-29T07:01:33-04:00'
describe
'41251' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYO' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
12c9eca8f6fcc49a6a7229659b6767de
3095b118fdb3d89d6dc2f4bee1a54cf9c0145094
describe
'126123' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYP' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
724766184f530c2c9ec8b22b81b17557
cac2b4b89a33dae3897bc298fbb08662e3920201
describe
'90879' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYQ' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
e5e0dfe45a3d1b843bb19a43e5636757
0004f5a1127642c7ab4736c3bdad5dfe64b49b89
describe
'51902' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYR' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
e655c7bfbbaede2b68319f016b10ab9d
12c328a4125bbcab37ab54f7c8296f8863118230
'2012-06-29T07:01:10-04:00'
describe
'631' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYS' 'sip-files00010.txt'
8be8e9e418b2573867cc0732e3bcf289
9e83aea27373872d68874a732854d4283fff7886
describe
'312767' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYT' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
6f7d304080b063884faca092bfd0fa31
0fe4564a0afa9bbbf1476f5577bdd5aa0598dbd3
'2012-06-29T06:58:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYU' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
bab0c9329ec53258e11834c71c1bab89
6891d38034c7b5aebfbbc3b8976d12492824a751
describe
'2522212' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYV' 'sip-files00119.tif'
d6528028ca1191039a8b38a0eddad657
23ed1433ef9d7c4864f432685cee263ba36aebfb
describe
'52347' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYW' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
e3212a12b992126767345938a5e05de8
c28f0f96c81b0b10a4127ac2ac6d1e7426c3dc1d
describe
'34949' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYX' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
7b5d335fabc71566753047a1f2ab1a92
825453de5cf1ec1298c756ec9cd57497c6867665
'2012-06-29T06:59:42-04:00'
describe
'129219' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYY' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
d2e4d93be5fa461b8fd3edf57431573f
b50d8f2d691dadc1279c1e1f788aa3432bb15780
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACYZ' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
c18d529c20a6c4f69e03cb01271f635c
f1764a8b413b7c8e00870f1d30decef3d3a1eec6
'2012-06-29T06:57:40-04:00'
describe
'30790' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZA' 'sip-files00100.pro'
572190a6853dd767fd5b184f93803146
e91f4c42dc66af4071d57067f3f346fbfaca5b70
describe
'30702' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZB' 'sip-files00048.pro'
b758bf5b9be0e33b199729c3ecbc2709
6a126b387aa78f1227fd8813edebd63aedd4aaf3
describe
'285751' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZC' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
48530fbe63011daf8f5d25d2889341a3
3a9859c0a5e8945dbd031e7889d68551d9001e17
describe
'2523528' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZD' 'sip-files00142.tif'
cdbfa5f293ae22f8eb54175ef79dc8de
efa67ac3775bf2d1d80f53a4770811d297e9e02f
describe
'131175' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZE' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
60dc13bf3b592a65791177c28ba07118
f99157d3b7863131dba4bafbfd87a885b04d5818
'2012-06-29T06:58:38-04:00'
describe
'2523536' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZF' 'sip-files00157.tif'
4e98569faad53bf2e145dd991fe775ed
11c01567bd6a7518f1a32359e392dd21913b1a4f
'2012-06-29T06:59:03-04:00'
describe
'208006' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZG' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
11dfd69e6b32fcbdde4fac230f9a5c43
ae230e294c6948ec2652f192174f61e48750b971
describe
'130092' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZH' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
e2fb2b278c7f0a2a103fce80662b491a
dc052152c6b625e9632bbcd42ad439ffe9881a44
'2012-06-29T07:02:01-04:00'
describe
'45385' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZI' 'sip-files00195.pro'
a840b57bf22aa4490d98e6fce95d75f2
9e71744e792504f86b1a7a951a21ac13dea6a94d
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZJ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
2cbe3aa71fd657425ae76030043b0e15
e180948a9853e6c403a4f75b586721d568282cb6
describe
'127316' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZK' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
a733b24365ff4a77b5eeaa545917109c
37d905df2ac16cca197f03b803e6c8b772ea3261
describe
'131136' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZL' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
0a57155722324c1bc2daac98ca673e06
e1c50eb61a3f493ca09fd11d352c153a31be8ce3
describe
'125156' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZM' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
1a100b12064dad19f7651fd13f4979c8
d14cc1a98ff5b96feb1eecf0f2872d98e5384488
describe
'27132' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZN' 'sip-files00095.pro'
8e39edc1d54e174affd81954447bc39e
447a9b3d3f79845574f4e470da763b7ddbb7fea5
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZO' 'sip-files00113.tif'
8bade6714b87f03535ea1c6e5c8350be
aae22a33e937a93e01c96111525f983bfa75fea4
describe
'293262' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZP' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
1bfe28654365dcfe920c399d7bb0cf05
82a2dea451b86484a20ce6e9e67ec7c4b24b387e
describe
'47262' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZQ' 'sip-files00197.pro'
5f1bef3b11e9389404d877e65f22723a
ad6f8a08a6b5354b5261cff2be3a2368dd854817
'2012-06-29T07:02:32-04:00'
describe
'53562' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZR' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
1de07344f4341b05cb501572149811ce
6e6ac32c5b11e687e9bf9e50183d5bed6c0645ee
describe
'30050' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZS' 'sip-files00072.pro'
aabcf3fa7d8d44adce9b2afd61616511
f76efeb5334161217100467ba22a647b728fe9af
'2012-06-29T06:54:12-04:00'
describe
'2523468' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZT' 'sip-files00074.tif'
737213d9bb3a28a2c58ed2c9cc29a1a0
3a3eb7269560ca8acc21db975fda425f16b27006
describe
'253809' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZU' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
846bb4e038dac70527dd9cd94da306a2
e17084d2b33a751905d015f3a0eb3f3c2d436ace
describe
'94437' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZV' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
7184fe306363c9d955b024a11c1206e8
c0246c5ee08e88e62dda061973385541783f997b
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZW' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
a3cca95ceb196f3a5f1c9d99dbe89871
5c6bfc543de7382bbcffd4343c82cc5944126b17
describe
'319440' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZX' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
9173732004493e29f3699543b64bc0c7
b5c73ba25a23cc366d96d7a093e06b94922a7426
'2012-06-29T06:59:57-04:00'
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZY' 'sip-files00163.txt'
4344880ea5727eb32d319e7d6c090436
d186f7b55681a984c37ac474df4fc6df897f78d2
describe
'2523296' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAACZZ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
11229a70f0ca34aaeaded5e0f47c4d1d
c604ef3283c4355118c1511f6bd3c34a1442a7e1
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAA' 'sip-files00087.tif'
bd9ff1f9001cfbb6e8be01a512c62f7a
e492bc27e59c231f054162a0cd272c2702edd1d1
'2012-06-29T06:59:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAB' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
70fea0c51c1b9cdb7990812037e6680f
32812a9985b26999833cd7a8ae5242c5c5dc7167
describe
'31028' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAC' 'sip-files00078.pro'
0dd142b1fcbcd385b56e118d7a609f93
5676b2cdf3f298db380336841afa78313a50cb19
describe
'121335' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAD' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
07f4b2443a7eb02c354660a6603d267e
754e4689ecdef9863bd06a73b06563db402450e2
describe
'31437' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAE' 'sip-files00017.pro'
6a7afad3b7622cfae715549c12f1626f
29e56a79023efa18d6b4acfbc928a3e328649a4c
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAF' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c9631f953c8d2bc1e560977c50d845b0
e79f92884d8f00ee134757ffd023e5bb72c9fe48
describe
'2523820' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAG' 'sip-files00160.tif'
bc526deb415548b59cfff2f122e08dbc
66a25e9357a30f5fb9be54f6500fd53e2760a5a4
'2012-06-29T07:01:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAH' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
67a51346a4e8ee7097cefc97e425de28
f79731a463d891e518bb5d9c773491714e5a0239
describe
'298419' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAI' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
3cbe3e5ccef26c3d63b4997cd01ddfec
094f7c90c0cbc5c9e30939fd50acb91edd2f87d6
'2012-06-29T07:05:24-04:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAJ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
6d4964f5c341a71e63d5fbcfa191a95e
a73f40f7643c431c78c7dc8488b1b7978967430c
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAK' 'sip-files00104.tif'
8536bb51c6c302ea6eeb7a207a89bb4d
5f585481b2952093d02b819e3578e17cad8ffc72
'2012-06-29T07:05:22-04:00'
describe
'31444' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAL' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
e379abf708f51754c060a1821e97d39c
a0da4ab30d701e4708048d1a5f13ceb6fde31ba3
'2012-06-29T07:01:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAM' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
0de09e516aba78d25c03c6c78c6cad53
ccc51ebd17f634c2d88985fbe14641e794ca668c
'2012-06-29T07:03:45-04:00'
describe
'31287' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAN' 'sip-files00056.pro'
80606b2ab8608dcb5fc30783a6f8c098
9fa210fe52179bcb4aa821d72e747c8b48576efb
describe
'23079' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAO' 'sip-files00109.pro'
0e8af88843178825f96a441c29b7bdc9
461f44e4113af7e1b3cf9259d3ef2aec9c798a76
'2012-06-29T07:00:55-04:00'
describe
'28682' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAP' 'sip-files00042.pro'
c2b899cfe68881549b173ec425208eca
270b71b19ed7b16ac9a3b1df195ce4819cc9191f
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAQ' 'sip-files00007.pro'
f4ab5f056739a3894a8a5521ce056348
ed52b0a966b9b31639f4ef3aef0e018a6480f5d9
describe
'2519296' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAR' 'sip-files00012.tif'
87b86819aa81ad631a13372624472d99
ccafa6f4e6fc0d875cb719ad0a78fb41c06cd52c
'2012-06-29T07:05:39-04:00'
describe
'128185' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAS' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
2d4ac1befd91f8bb12e0bde502851ee1
d1f0ed017ce77488429f46f037c4c9730df66ad8
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAT' 'sip-files00199.tif'
516f88a340e2c3c4c04cdc2942d36c64
8647184ac48d297c9d06e3b7cc95f6f1a2145718
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAU' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
1264f761cfddc46cbe6daa859c1c3e31
ca869e010a0b7698d8c0184cb00c7cd09afb1c64
describe
'28930' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAV' 'sip-files00080.pro'
06ff37547f6fece5d5b936982d8b54d9
06a6b56152d6807838a0618e6ba5a9a6c6813696
'2012-06-29T07:03:58-04:00'
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAW' 'sip-files00161.txt'
c7a0fcb1ec8a7b486aa41fe07fd757c9
094de82f2fe110d9d4997eaeb6c74ebb9c7e405b
describe
Invalid character
'52562' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAX' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
5329f9ed007ef7f4a3c499cfaaaace87
eb7a41769189c3b9a3043c7bd22ea6e5121f588e
'2012-06-29T07:02:11-04:00'
describe
'290368' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAY' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
71d01e4627e9eaeb03474ac62adb04b6
fc123080af137ebb8c2665c11969f81761e5a48b
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADAZ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
6ad63cd7ec0e9fd540b92bdf7a43aa9a
68892d30a7c13eeaa8540c81c14dc48c24723d21
describe
'130290' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBA' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
78f0056290ce76596c4d1c7b6ed1598f
24cbb3c981ba2ebfbfbcfac5e7ae9836a72f6f6e
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBB' 'sip-files00050.tif'
007c1576d9272a51ff14fc261cdb23a1
413baaac7c2cec522c45341be00f70c565898a3a
describe
'122065' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBC' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
a9e4bcbc11e0ceb073dbd9cc4bd78760
011a6f08c6d61678ac4f73992c0a71f747238dc7
'2012-06-29T06:58:44-04:00'
describe
'2168' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBD' 'sip-files00197.txt'
46f9a2dae97b67f8594a9b30c54fe5ac
c0dcdbaffb4c6af1eb2e00e9818774bc3c026be8
'2012-06-29T07:03:24-04:00'
describe
'54922' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBE' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
654e1310ed440bda17fa9e6402c5aed9
cbde81bfae712fa74fac598ba420bef3bdfb27dc
describe
'51814' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBF' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
480c4da52dddfaf3b36fe04467d8f265
be84dfae26339ee2a3f908939ab297fda928d45e
'2012-06-29T07:04:12-04:00'
describe
'124593' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBG' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
34332b0c111f966872ab2345cf097eae
2203eb52ac779e5a0724f0f5d168fe6b65d68337
describe
'25698' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBH' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
7107b3f5eed12f59bdc27886110cbd97
08e03a352eeb66d09c0c0e395239fce84f30aa56
'2012-06-29T07:03:51-04:00'
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBI' 'sip-files00058.txt'
6e8ef1e217e2dc3e1d9c2d36be838233
ad2a0624b5ca1ee6ab572e38c485f2b38a54ddfc
describe
'312661' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBJ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
c6f7e84c83a7e75f81cf848874587d5f
1f224af5a7b37cd5c0a9c5c0cc19232bc92a3da1
describe
'14403' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBK' 'sip-files00003.pro'
5c434542ca57d84f5a0abf1c78609e9a
965b10df53ac77b2c8d05530eac8434e0993f559
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBL' 'sip-files00095.txt'
3671e6e871d91509f467952a763b9e09
fa3596644ef7dbdb515ef0c9bb36d1df5507dd8b
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBM' 'sip-files00155.txt'
51640b94ad05211de179d0865cdc60fc
1408bea5b2356a1687a276a4f254cb02e73bd8df
describe
'312636' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBN' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
1123ec69d08e78cf2995cdad0ef5d574
a7e7f4ecd81f128cb6ae6af87612e4acbdf8e4f4
describe
'311095' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBO' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
cc75ceb19e5c413c6b1cac67afe2ea0d
0c42b270834b43773a55f94d58ccfafbd894b6f2
describe
'195994' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBP' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
9d39a9aa6382105eeba6746b1903d266
6cdfbb6a7619626f390c6b83d68eabccc59898d2
describe
'115867' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBQ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
d8bd5d6c757a2bdb57343be014e1c080
acde36c88222b58bb97ab160331bd9f649d24512
'2012-06-29T06:55:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBR' 'sip-files00089.tif'
f040f67fddb1423c17b04ce7a7b454f4
24d1ee4fba0943dbd94be31aa50bbea38a89b4ff
'2012-06-29T06:55:08-04:00'
describe
'312721' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBS' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
d4ef4f5c6eec355f0d2c261aea0445e9
515fd34f5981a64ad47d56b3e8d53cce144fda12
'2012-06-29T07:05:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBT' 'sip-files00153.txt'
44a1ae4e8733654ad6b274cf3e1d735e
65ac54f30b04729ca7db425b05f3b6a1be2acaa6
describe
'51218' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBU' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
1ae9d286a617cee7923fcd6d0cac1171
26df8538910309f5413b5a0dd989aeb381bff4af
'2012-06-29T07:04:14-04:00'
describe
'46721' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBV' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
ab903bfe27d0f53ffe844c6508d4d1ac
21b60b9d9c3e17c3450704f2fa980e80f8f80370
describe
'312409' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBW' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
224a49e546c85d043a67e87ecc6e836d
0c169bbc0b36fde3fb0396096d2bed06bc51b7cb
describe
'315334' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBX' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
c5720ee77907a203a3230034552bffad
7b5cbe570a05f3485fc292c396084c040a6457ac
describe
'53226' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBY' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
443ac5b3ca4b5596c6cfc8741b3169ea
98681979a7ff472d1f96d9e29a7f9b053bc6b48a
describe
'2523604' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADBZ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
b2bfdbf3d60bd47153d82b39fe9e8fb8
69dbd526774d5d807b216b61debfaa9eed15a0da
'2012-06-29T06:56:14-04:00'
describe
'2523744' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCA' 'sip-files00182.tif'
f8df41b1a0e81bd5d51c22cbe62788fe
c9c6cd090ce3a5b391407b8f3314aba5abd13697
describe
'43076' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCB' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
8726e78a35d367fc844deec4fc25e6c5
41b10124854693544a0607f1752d6d86d7966740
describe
'317183' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCC' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
e1f4bfd949afbd6944c3e58c274be002
8787238c851ac3cd2c528358b9ab0fa86dc63a67
'2012-06-29T07:04:41-04:00'
describe
'2521488' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCD' 'sip-files00162.tif'
9c707a5329ec8fb41d15b0c72da20577
5c0011965df43c5817facda95447ec5c4a43303a
describe
'129548' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCE' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
8fd35b5bb9a9d8dd309f96664ffc7e8c
2b6d3cf1820b601c4f8848128276fcc1fe41bc50
'2012-06-29T07:04:02-04:00'
describe
'312709' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCF' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
59b18a979d97910651fdb54565c8c100
ab08e87917d73c2d12382025dac413daef8d13d1
'2012-06-29T06:56:50-04:00'
describe
'264422' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCG' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
e5fc5cc0c05dd45f620d1155c7ded7bf
e0bf4ccf106cef038b50341bcc077757b5fae92c
'2012-06-29T07:03:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCH' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
773483479dc966c44645f5e2c175836a
18881cc313f0614f4e928ef60632d6093bf69679
describe
'312736' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCI' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
2159406f5341f4ac59c704c8d13816ff
7ccb2117b755f076c6ec8da0993c995da26c585a
'2012-06-29T07:05:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCJ' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
8d08c2a328916dcb76089f4781fa5b65
93991e65be0cf6e4b7df021efda3955d16b3a252
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCK' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
59fa99ff862f19151edbb13e45480730
8c6746e1d0a9d9db28080ec4e37ddad70f8aff1e
describe
'51838' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCL' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
9048e6707d3c1853a06ab71073068a19
10f0d1bbcea34f4dce7453da231b6cfa27fe75bf
describe
'173337' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCM' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
313613c791b6d7b2132f84f46fbab023
6707267f0775758d024c46e2e93c4c5c5412a85b
describe
'29790' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCN' 'sip-files00188.pro'
2dc4dbad6b3abc6f8f0c28f01eba4f7d
069e748100f2b1a28ea1d14bd43771fcf38367b8
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCO' 'sip-files00171.txt'
454c41911b245393ebe644562d7224d9
4149086b728e300dafc9ec9cc3c4ba9e6fb6b991
'2012-06-29T07:05:38-04:00'
describe
'31240' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCP' 'sip-files00022.pro'
876e59f6c85466c398bb10898fd7ebc2
5cb28dc21914edecb02b77062a6961a3b0c03817
'2012-06-29T06:54:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCQ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
25282c7ec4ae25ae62866faca5541578
2ead61820cca20d7f2cc955a8018f5918c1f69ef
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCR' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
5d567c731ca43af9454e51a0183feba9
8b041760938bc0de38006d78db1dbbd6b065751b
describe
'117268' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCS' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
4e8c440658ba361fcaa63a0aa6096bee
d5ecc5628fa971307bcff3556dab4dfbcc3ba977
describe
'2523372' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCT' 'sip-files00033.tif'
2ba449296ecdc88e412f02ed1da2fef3
a4cdb6ccaf122aadc413971159f3316aa5b4351a
'2012-06-29T06:56:22-04:00'
describe
'312012' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCU' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
7a330ed16323d517d382702304afb89f
b1600d2515fb34a0743ba119ec554f26219e763e
describe
'124888' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCV' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
4fa10dd1735a77e161e43d88735e2069
f4370f396f137d966bd9081836d5749ac9f19463
describe
'51743' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCW' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
9ccd824265ce45f13085187029fee882
dd6f646e671a943b0441521bbc291027e3d081bb
describe
'12454' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCX' 'sip-files00162.pro'
98ba8f870e4bbcdba39c79709842d2a1
5973711dc66a53f6b1807b151524aed501c57c87
'2012-06-29T06:54:44-04:00'
describe
'2523380' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCY' 'sip-files00075.tif'
0cb41dde729f27f0417c89e6f9ef8033
559e56fba7f53093e202e1b04c89f9afe7e691ae
'2012-06-29T07:01:06-04:00'
describe
'2523280' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADCZ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
a9abfb0874d5b97ec69a555a2750b66a
4daeeb50a56a847093cd1cb90d0ffd3149cc8a62
'2012-06-29T07:04:18-04:00'
describe
'2523220' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDA' 'sip-files00041.tif'
2bf0b2f069400586868c1681ec60e652
b1356af5688dbb88a7293c1be9e8b751d09a1398
'2012-06-29T06:59:58-04:00'
describe
'30949' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDB' 'sip-files00150.pro'
7818a72d4866a22688ac13a814325d93
ed8ad1af7ae58a868e03f994b8658511c2ee56e1
describe
'120688' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDC' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
ba6906f6b7f6e9311f973894078754b6
3bf5e802232ec3b0f7c4098b7b62730159ce992c
'2012-06-29T06:54:05-04:00'
describe
'2523592' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDD' 'sip-files00120.tif'
82b58554c0eea62ebf69fc9f3870f9ea
2eb5c47efdef851a6d840ff0b040e523adf920ce
describe
'385259' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDE' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
60c9c9883c48cb8ff611ce359e074478
d90f8d902f396d121efa1e77b2dcc60ca65eb8a3
describe
'74544' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDF' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
b624b7db85cb945c00cc6afa51a22580
7f4680ac18d71ff54db5dbb897bd28e9c16b86f8
describe
'49218' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDG' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
13b621e1118fd5d894af01fa8e6ae9bd
346ed7ba08e52dd7e8d4c9d3fcc8b35170d4cd94
describe
'26074' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDH' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
3bb331560524f458d1e1dc2f245de5d6
4654bc2a1045e23b0ef35ed102260cdaf3cd0b6e
describe
'130749' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDI' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
f8faa46c74b100729fccd5594a3cf04f
f1458bebd71dcc67466e8bfe69f54539faa77d7b
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDJ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
4d4d55034163439abac5c732a5b19dd6
2bbc3b3ae6c643ba928fc70d09932265f1eec195
'2012-06-29T07:01:03-04:00'
describe
'304829' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDK' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
27f7ac49f22fa4d65807d5e0a49f37a4
7f0ad71194d9d546347b27dc9c02dd770170f7f5
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDL' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
91cd0edae34281833f8084d7722a3ad5
785426c2e0e6a4241f0ebfc41c7e43e173d60f28
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDM' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
b684b7f6ef7a8f1de066704895bf124b
6198dd9684dd0c40181f80d485eedc6bb7f07d76
describe
'30714' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDN' 'sip-files00082.pro'
6e2b5420a4a4ef177e3456ac14c84888
a38152f565b4e5083a5170d990855cf56c300ed1
describe
'52545' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDO' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
9a8992a8eb002dc7f6d4e5a685020d6e
950f8c7c0ad41d8b59f2b1707648ca960c4a94d9
'2012-06-29T07:05:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDP' 'sip-files00120.txt'
2899aafd8bb19346a7d42245df0bf559
6e7e942a8857ad45c873cad5bbd3884c07015727
describe
'307134' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDQ' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
967669e1a75086fe3164ba7d5f27403c
6532299e525af6d1480f80eb41257937d86e6380
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDR' 'sip-files00080.txt'
e24d59e2d2ae734ec7a19b6d05a515b1
afafe932e5713acdc28de8c0fd1e03461208dd98
'2012-06-29T07:02:19-04:00'
describe
'123046' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDS' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
36d307ebdab3b0cd6f9a2eb928108252
b778ffd87d0bf055a47d5043df91e23fbb3c4a64
'2012-06-29T07:03:34-04:00'
describe
'305322' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDT' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
77817598577b9bdb262268ecf6cc82f9
b2693df3f97d5370d2872e42f0794dd674a38814
describe
'334561' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDU' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
89bee87fbd4193402e521a445b07a97e
b01bc755b79097f9798c970efe19c367d791f413
'2012-06-29T06:59:15-04:00'
describe
'127129' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDV' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
b963604f87ac0f48a640013690a6ecc2
b825e2f149dfe78ec6bd0cf42f403a2fadbdcf60
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDW' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
6db5a7d256774bcf815a35cb5a70c2d1
884b94b8c40e503b17e12b8b23c6b08731778783
'2012-06-29T06:53:43-04:00'
describe
'42924' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDX' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
364d8b0fffa66f3f8f6efeadbed8ec6a
e546a262f0e2cef91ab4c3a841cf7b6531e14e9f
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDY' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
534d9fccf32f4e326d464a2e1275c1a6
1eb07ef269321c619c025ae55af6aa85c7a76e49
'2012-06-29T06:57:41-04:00'
describe
'52933' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADDZ' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
2d731599a22bc216d13c4d5b7ab0cc47
05fd6e3e4e4a38696dac4dbb5f9b5cb5215ae7e6
describe
'27855' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEA' 'sip-files00073.pro'
43d8d63dac3d263525209f381fc02f70
b2c7750e9c3faee7174ea329f653e172fc83e82a
describe
'66762' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEB' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
a98bd7d25d2c960f3f2a52d806d89dd8
3f7bd3aefbf361b0ccf382b442d175d5a3b4a616
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEC' 'sip-files00091.pro'
0d882f4e95fa6fcc45e90070348ed7e0
ca6d59abaf072a80d0f8485bf75cac5289d29ed4
describe
'20928' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADED' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
d19fb5c0c455aae9d8eba64af2c93892
8745a974f515efb1a3873ae035576f5bb04555cd
describe
'123118' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEE' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
0384a03eb495c80b6de3661cd23d9678
9fc37260a305cf25c33b9cc37b5ca66b15cc6777
describe
'29672' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEF' 'sip-files00060.pro'
f23b9d37c55183d9387effea1f7ef303
f4b12c3808f2ecf13fe162391935e7b6ddd38f38
describe
'22195' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEG' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
fc82c8ad9b3d959c498854d94bda3261
68f0ca942de458ed84c8014ffe1daba8c89f7029
describe
'45174' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEH' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
a8da2ff39531aa212c26819c9b2e87f9
cf42d4a82ef7ea4e74ad735715987fd62c921328
'2012-06-29T07:05:48-04:00'
describe
'301828' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEI' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
8c3d7f3741c43cd65b26e3bb7b7edd80
87a98226480a5a1e3fc6cd729fec3f29cbc0891c
describe
'239549' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEJ' 'sip-filesUF00015736_00001.mets'
fa0a01856cd9218024c673c5dc55885a
fc74dc70dba2c11b38ee41d57c4a29f78db7b686
'2012-06-29T06:55:05-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'2013-12-09T22:04:12-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'636678' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEM' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
2e77e1a66a512653a7d832e812787964
483f271be06fe7f4d2f7b0bf69722f01a10e1419
describe
'205689' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEN' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
e96665215f61bc238aa01ad6e63f4913
c2c35a883959263d31c123b667da788d455c2156
describe
'51407' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEO' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
e24e50d5034bbd5c4c2b2e8f7123c69d
e41e8efda9c44c383407d886a1c9f35354d764e6
describe
'129956' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEP' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
334182901ba22565fbb2b09474e54729
ab052f5a9a3bd0492497dda7c79cabeb693ee2b0
describe
'28411' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEQ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
6a11466b18fa31da6d8dd57777e74d16
34f1884294902fb429c82d50c84eb21b3cdeb26e
describe
'311406' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADER' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
5cf36ee375f8df55bd78aa753cec0627
cedca4919ca4d9d2ce3a2c53102552bfa82900d3
'2012-06-29T07:02:21-04:00'
describe
'316092' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADES' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
55c77f7520cc88548c1317d56583f41a
505bfcd616a5ff816f77a433acf943128e98696b
describe
'320937' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADET' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
bb09516c0890b4c7c447436953de90ca
bc9961c6c1e71fc2424609ad5550949d6162dde1
describe
'288057' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEU' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
0f1a68560fed0eb61bb53d655e1d70c3
ee92a7487f9ef4d6312a4af045da7d5205c1c21a
describe
'291341' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEV' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
01fd05232ab53587d06cdd9cf594ebad
ebe9f7038fb3d851e6bcfc73bcd53d4f0ecd62f2
describe
'303292' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
da58633480abcf432a502afe79f9116c
5e9c1ce00a64f71aeb9ef5dac38a34b82d0c3c06
describe
'316056' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEX' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
e31bc0cea2208242b07b3d228f4d54ef
f01cf61d2575870fdf929d0b2921fdabf8a78420
'2012-06-29T07:00:04-04:00'
describe
'306160' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEY' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
274c507f82713350f471531f4addb9a9
68f81aeb1cf713c48b40d074343c742eff842eb7
describe
'305105' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADEZ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
9e654974c2a7cd67003a22c0394adffd
cce52b25b8ec56202e5a46d7a2b9c742e7b342fa
'2012-06-29T06:56:46-04:00'
describe
'287720' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFA' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
c5a7ea5df5f7473aee4bf70e4b487aa1
0e5128e4e1f6762a2156732a8b4d7a4fc3536aae
describe
'186881' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFB' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
3f4257981a670ce25e12c6de0977440f
155ee0aefb02e9fe3803a9e49f9f4521f323a3ed
'2012-06-29T06:59:10-04:00'
describe
'306496' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFC' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
2de4a480ddcfef239bfc51e527191da2
a733e35852ccc6e274cc968231ae899dc9e2394e
'2012-06-29T07:01:11-04:00'
describe
'284047' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFD' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
6fd1263ddc488f4d425e06db5cd4c808
47090f3720ed69b5fb1b9916bddf23cd852312b6
describe
'318492' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFE' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
d8b4cf0e91ff090d57f77f4c9a294c86
77e44ac01572b1272fbd5a40c7ab32910659db8a
describe
'552983' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFF' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
7706af2df711df3920f3e586af25ffd0
e2ea68aa765cecafa216462a8ad2e99d01872140
'2012-06-29T06:59:00-04:00'
describe
'303232' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFG' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
2cbc3bb1aaa3599887f58545cff4475a
c8b924d2d954c0379c6f74fad693d69b4f155909
'2012-06-29T06:58:28-04:00'
describe
'311327' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFH' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
30a949b4402b6e7422b1301cff680036
c1365b7b38fc2006563cc078f03ff0c8beaab341
describe
'312691' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFI' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
89c53a9763ff8632f270ef29c863785a
963b4b52100fc041a9b9f2bea42137aa859dca63
'2012-06-29T07:03:16-04:00'
describe
'298938' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFJ' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
7805c5e585b336d72c8dc34167ab12ee
42434f461bf28fcbaa2fa2ad2b15443cec5a4512
describe
'306217' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFK' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
beebcdf6a455bc6000a71a5b3af528f6
ffc606834d34795dc15c508995f22252abcd7737
describe
'310179' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFL' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
b38ecca7e19216ef293d40680d964fbf
d622acc5e39e2a9ae634cf4bd1b7509963f69eb7
describe
'302458' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFM' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
544169d78dce57cd82f03a660e7b40fc
927d36b38382d640783f81c1f4f195386e53ef68
describe
'298400' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFN' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
bfbb129cf4152b0a5284e77fcf033f25
e526a4b36bbf45e3832d68bebd73cf271a536baf
describe
'305364' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFO' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
4ed4391c0884fe99f201ed1d72bd1df8
90f2b41ff7e39a98e281d4d76c9c0390b9716949
describe
'295669' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFP' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
91cd6781e8ef231993c3255191abf55c
5f073b56ebeb2ffdab56f5897074575aff6fc658
describe
'315788' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFQ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
5963baa26fb05d607290fa2aad339c77
074250d08874c3404d12263a2c646c332306e27c
describe
'306946' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFR' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
9c2dab8586c1c2a4c86fa59b82663fcd
db15c81058438d95e292966ef4536f87a980cb84
describe
'306140' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFS' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
49bb18c23e787d90f1a964b7f3baa0c7
042734527dec8ae3e7e91b3a559103a674a5caa3
describe
'309703' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFT' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
1b5af7b568c1cdfbefa94cb5f334b82b
0237054515ea564b3a338c6287c9592d941a7281
describe
'456145' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFU' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
72f9fb8692c2bd39e765b175dc353184
24533c618c696602f0f2b33b3504f41a906ec780
'2012-06-29T06:54:15-04:00'
describe
'299842' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFV' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
ac0a83ee68da3a22cbd77abe05d44d6c
e7dbd305286c48f81db7a9f98eb592b1ccdd12d3
describe
'300971' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFW' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
4775ef87eee4cfcae77d7c59e4ff52c7
dbf1728b6ec6036cab076e7b53ffa3248931d73e
describe
'312870' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFX' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
8e4f532cbfef7129459964c1e38ba160
3bf14511d8b5fd6a80250e3111130dea8580174d
describe
'148892' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFY' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
181920c5ff9f8ac1229a98666e2b0770
3463811bcab1d855c5ae400f22c224d130e2c43e
describe
'308113' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADFZ' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
4e1531dc7076a8d3f0d7b07aa27ac2e4
9fd7150f3afb76545d1c3bc78f5446aa39806e54
'2012-06-29T06:54:24-04:00'
describe
'303871' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGA' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
0ab675a444160a193d9dc5b555fa2ff4
9ce925e4854fdfc1291e70a6e8c89c4127dd0874
describe
'312498' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGB' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
b1d530ce7ae80cd6c8009fd481fd19a7
e74672e396c29838e16c972134b0e5e616bb2845
'2012-06-29T06:57:23-04:00'
describe
'316916' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGC' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
2623f3dfb428ff680d1474e2be1e9916
9187ad4b8c148a6aa57209048704450e8afd18ae
'2012-06-29T07:04:57-04:00'
describe
'312078' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGD' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
e684a116ca813164839606add8d496bd
e24776a9d60cb03996ef78dbfbdab37d66ca256b
'2012-06-29T07:01:50-04:00'
describe
'278222' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGE' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
ee7524189be6c3f2b95a2178f533c6cf
f3cbedfbdf0a0150945367d134b5d53152110745
describe
'280812' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGF' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
aafcc55a515b5e098984ac57ca3f42d4
55bc3c48f975efd6b8098f00a1cdaf7f40c03933
describe
'194263' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGG' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
87432369e5c6b215637b64eed072e489
14e7843b4b4a783ca058cc17ff4090ea61a2257d
describe
'308736' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGH' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
81c6371ee5c0cfb30987f4c9b8f02d03
261f1ac739f8d10d23bea35c1f2baa2356b3748a
describe
'316496' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGI' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
46409948353515b654b03ba5054c5a09
72dd8ce2361e3b7df6a4ebf003fb4e4fd739f287
'2012-06-29T06:57:48-04:00'
describe
'215576' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGJ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
60c7e80b54dac44be07fdf35f3f5c276
4da741f71dc1f08eb7da7c84639fb5ffd1aafd8f
describe
'304946' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGK' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
f5ffa16499fde720ee2728bf33bf8a26
25511d8d0346c274e0c1232afdd23cf31268d979
describe
'317900' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGL' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
0855eb8f3c1413c655b58d06356ac7c5
45b6da648356cd9212feec7674f4c9a7c4a34ef1
describe
'299320' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGM' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
aac25d7cd9c21a41069443849fa99d00
e5dd9ad7e70809d7d9a9af03c2ca89bfc3ebd045
describe
'312591' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGN' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
54040939230424bc6155f32c19daf852
b5f3630ee31613e54e6a8b9b0f5092b717fb1e6a
'2012-06-29T07:05:53-04:00'
describe
'171090' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGO' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
64b25eae757e174b895789ec4927216d
e68e86c333169953e98ffa3e961791c5d72eb595
'2012-06-29T06:59:51-04:00'
describe
'225630' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGP' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
f5ea8204b3eea40ce07a28cfd6bc1ae6
1c67c90153a0f60feaf68ded69b64c05a91117d4
describe
'306193' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGQ' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
5fb9c09ad49bcdfd390f07471ab67e5e
d1bfb114af68b3d7b8b6ce3491544f6cb963495b
describe
'290415' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGR' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
4eb36b080bd58b8b8f97916305fdb587
629d146cf65b4a8a5d5d90bd7c305459dc4e089e
describe
'126116' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGS' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
2e2b74c18514f49863638a6965a0826d
3e78663c7877938346dc26c812f412a366ca49c8
describe
'314046' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGT' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
26abec8353f72294491a1640920ed5b9
11584b87c9b72ea545961db294e820c22b48c663
'2012-06-29T07:03:35-04:00'
describe
'297418' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGU' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
749497e82d211ddc7dda00223f2572e0
98d178dd3a421fa87d5fd92172d5db79abdb2d0a
'2012-06-29T07:01:01-04:00'
describe
'319625' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGV' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
ad25935407a47b3b1c7fcf0450020e97
9a748bdc9e891a755c467bcf5af0de0917c7d5aa
'2012-06-29T07:00:10-04:00'
describe
'313126' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGW' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
5e2e994f63ceda7918fa0732f25f62e6
3321eb32b2156200f1894a64f209a966474bd0d1
describe
'298518' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGX' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
3c5a29b12e92a54c08aa457efe234e06
3275da9a6ae1c324655e27ac080c4600fc7e8569
'2012-06-29T07:04:56-04:00'
describe
'300689' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGY' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
87e9da456650416e4e2ab3bf14e20aee
f5ca3457ac282f1e0f1d766c215d0d0a83bc808b
describe
'310480' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADGZ' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
ab61d61700f45ea5f09ac50ee932ee6f
a7967261b9aa6631aa86fbf8c537b22fb2c47817
describe
'295757' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHA' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
989874a09a5ed765e5fc9c0269b0cf40
56b100d93cc849e3e2949ee27ddc0922a93b87a4
describe
'37935' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHB' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
7c2432f28e224ae3f49aea1cc7010766
334922e0ff5ab2caa84bc98496eec085de22d516
describe
'47868' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHC' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
a4e785b98d7584ae0a63a2f90ed2648b
ba7c1cabe9ae7b331b62d79538e7756b0adf8a3f
describe
'661112' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHD' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
2e9d5733a5588e6dcf283710ad57c826
c9f3de2aabab6a933047c72fa07d7024f852c778
'2012-06-29T06:59:34-04:00'
describe
'1181205' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHE' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
ffebdfc801163c9555b3d735bc25f640
b65e1f5465bff538e06dd85055ad7a0fa2b9abbc
describe
'1667' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHF' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
94a33880c24060656d789a8aeb320d6c
dec708a94f7a8a85338fe7eca9392cc4714b0c70
describe
'312674' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHG' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
58b63f579384d2352b93e816cec924d2
5d843b5fcfddb51bf385242cf79b2f7517024a06
'2012-06-29T07:02:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHH' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
21630e1682f14e0293ea38e36322ac6d
38b7141c27051d05d616129720e32423645dae6e
'2012-06-29T07:01:47-04:00'
describe
'312628' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHI' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
fddc9fdff621477bc6080bbabc406392
e54db74f32707121f6692dff6ae5e836678f8238
describe
'312604' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHJ' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
5035137f189d581ef6077f0db3eceaa4
0c28c9b26a2c460080de3fdae312f1b03d087ae6
'2012-06-29T07:03:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHK' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
d9b4284acc82bbb5672fd127c814c6ce
0506e78acf23874d44a877fe1588835df341dfe8
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHL' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
baa3e5406cc887071077505d8b5aaf1b
71e4ca138c0d4735567693664d75c8e5fbe1c5b9
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHM' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
71055e3b4276d2091b2a92dbd773f2b7
8ea66cb9d0858905b0a1e260bd2f2df0b955282f
describe
'312734' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHN' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
6a6bc88d069f757b3fbe1daa1f934c3a
612fc3d0c09d13a75667b3781497d73cb4de3d7b
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHO' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
07de7b1854787eba8d1bc155cb198309
a014174a274b11a6702cadf8208e99865a7a617f
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHP' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
9e56935834fd0584a72f389724045d88
5daff811f8d7bb61399e42cfc83eca01a7735d3f
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHQ' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
256477ed282d8b54e19416beb56a19eb
ecc1e963227e40ee3f7f41a3fa3448d5d11a7872
describe
'28066' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHR' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
b50a20655860cce2200dbc1105957c39
de325d2865645a8e4fdc3898f05ff723aaf54f4b
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHS' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
92b4318d8556219db62796038a9d8d1b
6881c6ec9662b4b0a5bf2a2f8c3883e0e8bf1a81
'2012-06-29T07:00:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHT' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
3a5b0d90611d0ecdb545e80b942226ca
fea8d6e3aeb119127814cd47f16b855f7c2431ef
describe
'312624' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHU' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
fddc5ef2cd2c1f8f0f7274649ffee151
57e2ed9e622e1ded857089562f02201abbe687eb
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHV' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
e8ab96f3fb8426c9be2c05664fa9d1ff
bd990bd7fb38adda218e84dcd47904ff6de5b1f5
describe
'312649' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHW' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
188af5009b993cbb2d850f51907dddb4
830ed2966cebb053ff14e6a4944b47f8dd8e6495
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHX' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
6e8f1851aead9006b57d1cf3276baf26
36b191ae161f8fe3f3b24d5f6d16d47880683237
describe
'312629' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHY' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
f7313e9d41bd1b0b07143ffb45ba358f
2ca5d87e908b805ac116b344787fa6925e69ed6a
describe
'312645' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADHZ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
e2f5334c4da55324f515c82f1d212020
eb108010d12b7cc0ef6d9480f91096b535388c10
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIA' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
1acfff422e75014c628807b134c6aa64
728a04f5371a4ecefe4a658451b9f2508b90a012
describe
'312665' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIB' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
5901ebee40ed90be2295b0512ca76ce2
9f279df53f728626294d768f366f169aff082016
'2012-06-29T07:04:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIC' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
8eeaf0ee78c1098191e9ec4501fec700
393bfbf179948bf60d5ec48c01acd13abfee8185
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADID' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
e317b1e5df8d5569c4757d86fe3a72c5
79698288898b03eb1488a1eca2f5f0dfe05b46df
'2012-06-29T06:57:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIE' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
c372f36fcaca2ae1cfb632fa81f0899c
c2934d0170be7b44f45c2b3a4d3eff4929054d73
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIF' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
8849315da6f3f03746b4808a3bcbe5ab
8348df430db37cbab5f38ff953729f6cbe25fc71
'2012-06-29T06:56:42-04:00'
describe
'264957' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIG' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
70a3bbd9ba6091bfe6677fa98714a2d0
c0271c57f4cafba45ded07d6cb69e62d276bf5e6
describe
'312619' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIH' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
48aeb8518da8e2e30db1d5509dbd97f1
81c7b70049f90f3edbe4e466ce4392d0ea5c62bb
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADII' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
60d211ae5ff295c996e50aa47d860e4a
b387c6870096b6313f241209f38d36627600f2df
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIJ' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
faa527898b55f967a5eb123ccc1638ee
410b2f4f05b9c8e45e78c93f58f90ba55cc8bea3
'2012-06-29T06:55:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIK' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
8a0461ba77ae742a1eb734e030589ab6
34ab34a945150dafe2b22ef1f07d3a2fffb6f3dc
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIL' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
2a312b38924bcb710bc0563ff9cf1b65
ae5a044a47598b56215428ef6b95739f48c20b99
describe
'312631' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIM' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
58ce8c9be36c10e1f56e4c891545e718
a5cf3f2ca4f58dd727e28248a668893041870fff
'2012-06-29T07:00:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIN' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
7257603c6a5000225adf1e6b970494d1
ee307fd4ba11c29e65f5641481045ea40d14acde
'2012-06-29T06:58:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIO' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
97ea453f024afaf3a5afb8f3714c2048
0e62dddb34bed868e7e3cd5bb2625cbb10dc87dd
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIP' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
f4ac1a5f98c3eab362bbbe0349922895
79413cc5d7de44b8e78235977138bb68166a513e
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIQ' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
07d77a5e632e577d1e88a5042b116ffe
cbdab333990e877e0fd04ba275255aba8cf06b9a
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIR' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
7fb5ebe26dbd550b2079fc5e46838b70
20b23112de5c0e13d32f34d786d0d8edaec4c1e4
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIS' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
9f984c4fe823e2c6e0da1d4acc90621d
6ddc84a4f2216a691e5fe9f8a2a213d522a62141
describe
'312716' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIT' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
1dfe4dbb1b3da8692b6070ccff5b3d01
871fb2bdc1be3eedfd1d36f7c180e4901f176538
'2012-06-29T07:05:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIU' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
578c66d4f2967ac37d8ae98312bbef16
baf2ea7b6669e0270ea72e33fe3098d3aa3f84b4
describe
'312695' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIV' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
3b2e736b7bf8affe51fce38de37e5b13
517e71a6fd96c82f36424281b00bdf2512add0b2
describe
'312626' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIW' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
4f39dab412bf2e93b4516363a4afc04f
10c734b0fe339b3074656400a40852e0fdbe5272
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIX' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
88a54fa6bf6e87a0992f3d5cc6c0bfa9
e17da5975f3f07cafd4e3b5f2732d578abb1f9f2
describe
'312724' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIY' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
23269313100d36cf494c50dfd5309bea
306fb05e15ea0419e9827ae739f05fb9b92fa9ee
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADIZ' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
081745a9dbc26df772e04acd1976ebbd
67b5214293fd1c8b0f38ed16a59fa8f2e5cf7aac
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJA' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
0f671a3a73250fa3a441920570c17f7e
3dee7ae212bd81ecc0d4d4e5b93ad3c36d159b6c
describe
'312652' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJB' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
886211f1e2709bca502798cd86bbd659
b662c662ba809fb925b279d54d3b640b5fdbb21f
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJC' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
d119e7217bc3abfef3f9348202f355a8
e6920a3599dc5a93b1cbb1759f742d491e930db1
describe
'312647' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJD' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
1f69ae98735218b0eedb2b5fd28e1b0e
527669e235563efaef4ddb977a2cef0ca57458cb
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJE' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
2986f98eea5fa0edb3b338c7ede55458
193a587c39eac6b5bab365fb40a39b0ef0349f3c
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJF' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
fc4173ed2b6890f2ee5ca6ffdcf9050f
e971108cc3429c50d300f6e5bea54f2cfb9bd21f
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJG' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
e8fad86a8f31b0673996d1cef2bad594
73146a1eae2cb6230162b2d28cf7ad31ca0bbd2e
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJH' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
94487f906ce00cc2900459b317316fa7
d0b90f23984852afeec4b1b96d93c7300f94cbf8
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJI' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
6dabca82636d1877bc20d17794181896
5b96ecf9f6ee802c3df2bb4a3cfe71a48ff9707c
'2012-06-29T07:01:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJJ' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
5eba40b745080074cf737b2f6a712ee5
6e165643622d27030cd2add971bc8046ab43b5c7
describe
'67791' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJK' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
30826b0a3e2d4cc5b2958f2d190794e0
0ec0426e9574dbbef29c5d3b19b9342b77d0d98f
describe
'28370176' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJL' 'sip-files00007.tif'
d70a61c7d492eec75da19d21941b9c3c
4c880e9c82c297e31d93f1bed125b742db41ea13
'2012-06-29T07:04:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJM' 'sip-files00016.tif'
25ffdb04d999a5a38c8c9d68244776f7
3214138e5dce3d394379dca03937db9eb255cec8
describe
'2523300' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJN' 'sip-files00017.tif'
6d636276709b4e832d3fa0c88d9d1a10
254aeae074760e029b49a701038419999827672d
describe
'2523688' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJO' 'sip-files00019.tif'
097c8efda9d52ac9bd87006e81634b71
169c5fc5ae69469601a3dc7ec43b17b21a68636a
describe
'2523340' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJP' 'sip-files00021.tif'
d26bdc73b633e507e4143a9f6a290ca4
a2ba561e57d82cf9932e9ad6a07218e825b0fba2
describe
'2523732' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJQ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
2e648422bd4468550c272d02f1d616d5
f6cb4742d6cbd55385236973365a19114a64ddf6
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJR' 'sip-files00025.tif'
379a581c34cf5f4ee83550ecd3de447a
5ccba0d51bea1157a5ec0983298c5fd0602f5211
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJS' 'sip-files00032.tif'
300fe4780538ff2abb48523ad04c9534
dea964dda21362a9960c2237da90fa4e39e74c15
describe
'2523612' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJT' 'sip-files00036.tif'
82d8546dd8f251d08f10f9c06ea79d9e
305a6ab59446b418561a85ab90e3f5124ee51aa1
'2012-06-29T07:03:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJU' 'sip-files00044.tif'
90f25c636f82fc1400b59e2609f038a2
9bd76938c109e72f7d24b6db352acb8458e336f9
'2012-06-29T06:54:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJV' 'sip-files00045.tif'
89166486dc6b176cddd74cb37ea88225
de70867b87bc11f5c4569aa8d81204b1cf885a04
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJW' 'sip-files00047.tif'
9b84df8ccacee393e1efbca818f6ac80
52755424464e3b6c16e00d52dc2ef0599d5876d4
describe
'2523628' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJX' 'sip-files00048.tif'
99c56bbf80fcc0a37baf8dcd0e785518
cc0d940851c4f15ecd7840ac1764fad958db9968
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJY' 'sip-files00049.tif'
04f3c5d2f137f934ba5197d149eb7b7d
02a5e25a516c477dce961853440b6d8401e177f9
'2012-06-29T07:05:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADJZ' 'sip-files00051.tif'
4e217d998db994d2bc5d30caee83b8b5
e3adb9e07bfeba7dc715945c5f87624c24001153
'2012-06-29T07:01:37-04:00'
describe
'2523148' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKA' 'sip-files00052.tif'
a2d29d6df5e4d0e4679dd654f6550b7a
6602f3fa178f091a9fde485dee1b8f84411e0e09
'2012-06-29T06:59:50-04:00'
describe
'2523344' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKB' 'sip-files00057.tif'
3ca033e7c361b6fb286d68b8e59b35c7
e9df28565d7dd3359b1a389825509ec98b1da03f
'2012-06-29T06:55:02-04:00'
describe
'2523056' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKC' 'sip-files00058.tif'
93ff39c08d7a3c143658836eb4ac7e45
bfbfc37c08a6e5d683df2a7c2834aaa4ac8f00ef
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKD' 'sip-files00060.tif'
60780f94c6da4f6f82a060550430ce78
17abb002ba600536d701a1a06d1eebeab3055213
'2012-06-29T06:55:41-04:00'
describe
'28708056' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKE' 'sip-files00062.tif'
a10edb44089fc1cfa13ca4646d53e3f4
fdf8b614e86d01fa7271e13224c87c8ebe250f13
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKF' 'sip-files00066.tif'
f8abf9959151ca759242efc7da063bcc
f0f3e5495b6ebcec4a81e57fdad8e6fdb5f084d3
'2012-06-29T06:55:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKG' 'sip-files00069.tif'
40414d22e729af570745dc3c9d9fe0c7
6035c88dc4ae49fc4dcc840fea3da8f637daa999
'2012-06-29T07:01:40-04:00'
describe
'28492644' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKH' 'sip-files00070.tif'
e3b3c4bcf322ef788cfdf7345eb8e315
fead180d54dd232e8d63457ab5e402787b915f98
describe
'2522100' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKI' 'sip-files00071.tif'
8df7d15c0c01ccf74f290e2172df4389
73e39e8bdb16f3bcefbcf1732746667c319e9133
describe
'2523312' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKJ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
7955a3c9e2f7b6dc8db1a46bbe713d32
129afe8b72af683a0a9c19e5eadbcba6092702cd
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKK' 'sip-files00076.tif'
cd8dd01f7bf8c074048eeb969311ceb2
af2b6a48efb36d1fe9a099a92b5a02e006554a4a
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKL' 'sip-files00077.tif'
da40c18b898772785c1a20cf0222c899
e10cf8dd41d7cac4da9e84d672d02b32ffafca48
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKM' 'sip-files00078.tif'
386e268d50131f4855c2749994eaf598
14147193f64625a591ca599347d973766bb5a99c
describe
'2523404' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKN' 'sip-files00079.tif'
d95f1eb8206a2730f23c4b04fc12c149
6f7d972e0a590f246c655adf913c6ae7078ce682
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKO' 'sip-files00081.tif'
460bef3a6123778b4f8b01b7dd4675b7
41ac5a40bb14023155b81df8799849d33f2c620a
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKP' 'sip-files00082.tif'
021b8d0f1ef97047549331eddbfd01e2
154b6e0e0588c2212057851b2e7c250bd88cc5de
'2012-06-29T07:03:49-04:00'
describe
'2523460' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKQ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
bfc154be8af321355669b3f88a9ea276
727de700a7411e097c2d5417483edfeeabcd5d19
describe
'2523412' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKR' 'sip-files00085.tif'
19697b84b69b9556f6eaa74f909395a6
825ed6bbacaba1cae96a87a646cfb2f81485871b
'2012-06-29T06:58:40-04:00'
describe
'2523596' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKS' 'sip-files00086.tif'
e6d81087c98bcc4f432754eec7435e74
d836203b4b9f7736ee91e1cf79e42a1f045f7808
describe
'2523456' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKT' 'sip-files00098.tif'
639a9d332f54d318578c9865c262c5d6
590515c4c141c2fa7c749026e0171f88804a2f3e
describe
'2523336' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKU' 'sip-files00101.tif'
da3f86f95576900490055868496254ad
d42141f04978d73d41fad1c723c5184bdcbfc789
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKV' 'sip-files00102.tif'
1652fc909579820d56dcedfcbcd7c9cc
4ff4757047f2cf99007e0c1b17cf74112ba2718d
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKW' 'sip-files00106.tif'
57c0548d4511ea4b0ad7803295ee3cb9
3a27ee4afe487caa3e6019acd6bff628e0ef8055
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKX' 'sip-files00107.tif'
e0c5962070e29e76877848ec1b000e9c
873acd70009b96d2d9b6968678c3ea20743e5854
'2012-06-29T07:02:54-04:00'
describe
'28705416' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKY' 'sip-files00108.tif'
3e10330d60d0df76769811cdd987906a
bc362bad22ee46b0b397d661b74173d93540966d
describe
'2523360' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADKZ' 'sip-files00110.tif'
7c2dfc40fbc1b7c6478a89f39452b4ef
d6f7866b9c89f56abf4c1346f63ba87c84bbe7d5
'2012-06-29T06:59:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLA' 'sip-files00124.tif'
322489e205f4ebc0f6db994c165220b9
efdf5330b59de08031b687c8995280f0f84bdb7b
describe
'2523252' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLB' 'sip-files00137.tif'
0a0b12d19d4d91f796caa6fca11be365
9a880fd37af90ae2b6b7f55f3bb937d4027ae954
describe
'2521848' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLC' 'sip-files00139.tif'
ebd3545f045ed4bcab0a0774d3ceb87d
e836f7bcfa430cdf71e8748ccff612c7274ad540
'2012-06-29T07:01:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLD' 'sip-files00148.tif'
bb8bde8298f444be9fa9bc62e8397fdd
0e44860d1bc511c68e88e008e92ae2a39787b4c6
'2012-06-29T07:05:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLE' 'sip-files00150.tif'
2eac2c675478c3449e8fee606eec06dd
ca80bc6cfc67f87bfe505abe397e8026c66b5d61
'2012-06-29T06:58:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLF' 'sip-files00151.tif'
149ea8d6a6b8a05f616665092eed8fc3
ff69370d44d9a99e6077771a175b2a1abdddf748
'2012-06-29T06:58:14-04:00'
describe
'2523692' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLG' 'sip-files00156.tif'
30f03c58f2b21ea64636fc69c695098e
d7c43f989dcc4bfbdb0f4925f6ed595b3bb191c0
describe
'2523516' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLH' 'sip-files00164.tif'
63cdb5599507200208679049b38d0309
58644cbac939f8a47429e6535bd25499bed7fae4
describe
'2523376' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLI' 'sip-files00165.tif'
4373cbaf2217253ba075390d428560c2
3848d63c219b7da113287e279cd2d2cb79cf8d59
describe
'2523608' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLJ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
2da47244dd4d1aaa8aaa2d52c5f88e64
2982c8dce50dcf844a6664edab2a0f5b23eb79d9
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLK' 'sip-files00171.tif'
067916c65d505c72101cd7dc687f50b0
fefbb58efe27721477bc8256d126bd686e5cf6c3
'2012-06-29T06:56:28-04:00'
describe
'2523824' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLL' 'sip-files00175.tif'
fe4298fab39b5d467faf8fb495177a4d
a9936831dbc7d83f7ddab2a596b02ef5098c22bf
describe
'2523348' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLM' 'sip-files00181.tif'
d95e3b6b6cf4357c988abd970cc625b7
64f6993869c2e68f346a2498ddc0a604a0a09313
describe
'2523776' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLN' 'sip-files00183.tif'
a87c41c0dcff7eabe53c3b664800fba2
328ee40fdedf1fd15fcfb43609c1e4791e3890e5
'2012-06-29T06:53:57-04:00'
describe
'2523704' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLO' 'sip-files00186.tif'
56eec13fcdf3cf2c3458c431ebf86c8e
9e6a9f8455d00004b843b419f191fff9786cc4f0
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLP' 'sip-files00187.tif'
53ffab97ac63864d7052245e30b38efc
9336c4b2af2c7b2b820cfb193a5eeb51ac6920aa
describe
'2523600' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLQ' 'sip-files00188.tif'
12f7fd5a2889755d09efcc906d644236
9af881d846d5607092b0f6bbcb549fa65f5b9f00
describe
'2522640' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLR' 'sip-files00189.tif'
f651b44165a9373d89e5ee45d9d376b8
1eb26685f2a0ae6afbee90267b22afae7bd0db8e
describe
'2522880' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLS' 'sip-files00196.tif'
4686fda7519ee7162a593f175be2360c
1105ebd9f82bdcad311e2273faf50528c2ce3acb
describe
'11894' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLT' 'sip-files00011.pro'
8d48d448693681fb043488a2cf5fb849
b6db644381b308f8d3c681a2eb80af6f889bd54f
describe
'53749' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLU' 'sip-files00013.pro'
e07a15aad1f44954a3a847f388b70b87
b987434ec76621a78ba488c9bfdba159b957cae2
describe
'31188' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLV' 'sip-files00018.pro'
5382bfdae4476832dac958530787bb44
76c88e4bf0e006541fa31836626b14025ccfa6fe
describe
'29358' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLW' 'sip-files00019.pro'
0950e3ee87039ded2496ca9b3a70d650
928543e6868ad76575a05c5312e8b4c0cb806b16
describe
'28899' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLX' 'sip-files00036.pro'
0f0ec6d9161008b74551025a7b6fc6df
4e23caa5a08e98768a54456bcc67b459afa29564
describe
'30820' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLY' 'sip-files00038.pro'
d4fe33bde62e231b480467bdbc393867
949be8366ab0f057eb426aa7fe96f104f65feaec
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADLZ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
1a6c91f0db3ad318e89d06a75966d6b6
9418622c683072f79debe24671195fcdfbe0b1fe
describe
'30403' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMA' 'sip-files00043.pro'
6e119892a38c0ce4ce55b388b27d7b22
0f21763d32b7a376ad43770ec0e68688c9907ea2
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMB' 'sip-files00045.pro'
733a6587772b70f4f3e7f3c9138fbe79
b8a9c3d8b6d8c3e8b39351189e21b593ca172781
describe
'30667' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMC' 'sip-files00047.pro'
1d8b3844b2721cbd57499d8a6b20ada9
80612f5ae54522c7aeab590994f41e993644ac9c
describe
'30096' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMD' 'sip-files00049.pro'
30f7dea38d692729d4ab39cb91ff8693
bf80999ba192b3c37f34453bd5e8addda278a21b
describe
'30542' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADME' 'sip-files00051.pro'
63e4563e100152e48724f16cecde490b
5beb20b637147dd19c73c4f02769d6299e2ebdc0
'2012-06-29T07:01:15-04:00'
describe
'27114' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMF' 'sip-files00052.pro'
05ccdbb50dfcfdedf54ac8e92189026b
6920c2d1283668e437a2cb980b4f234c526949bb
'2012-06-29T06:57:00-04:00'
describe
'30265' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMG' 'sip-files00054.pro'
82c227216cac7a27ec14605760903d41
5c17028c8c63c62267d86bb9eb79ee944b66f229
describe
'30437' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMH' 'sip-files00055.pro'
f84f0dd9064256965884b0eabbc21c97
065f51b80f50608818eab15e5554a527da330598
describe
'28999' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMI' 'sip-files00057.pro'
7009a8abb06c13f3dbc302cdd985d8af
e1b5109303f87500471b4525a34f590175d7e254
describe
'29518' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMJ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
3e3db62000ac9f03d30416bb74252b2b
057270da5b78dbb98418a56918276ea1d00083a7
'2012-06-29T07:01:02-04:00'
describe
'30405' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMK' 'sip-files00068.pro'
83d6bc4bfb36ff2f372b4786782d27c4
99b7e70325efa8b179bc47a031ac2525f467a284
describe
'18338' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADML' 'sip-files00070.pro'
f14cbbb16216ed4a1cab9ca375a0a132
653b9d25ca2db5ef19326f1e44a731c63016c9a0
describe
'30673' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMM' 'sip-files00074.pro'
a778cbe24dd1ef9ae1f5eb484b62d1ca
8689857f6e4bce79711367765651016e861c6f7a
describe
'30351' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMN' 'sip-files00076.pro'
2001ef95e7e5f8d768ac0c01bf345213
78973f1b7d19217aaca9fc097f233533ac1b5dce
describe
'30339' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMO' 'sip-files00077.pro'
c90b2ea23ded341972a0df51b111f610
d7b9040a4170c80897e4053c5da2b747f7633b83
describe
'30129' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMP' 'sip-files00081.pro'
9982edd3b9ea62b63cf1a43bf46d908a
c1154923c5bc02ffb71204076b66ab449f59ca89
describe
'31389' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMQ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
e574514047f698c96c334103e59d199a
788fb865c6fee8db60c58d85b1aa6d78295a4ca6
describe
'23525' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMR' 'sip-files00093.pro'
e621c5afa10cf02e40d668c9f83f789a
fed273994857b51e6998b3208c6312c5993dd481
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMS' 'sip-files00094.pro'
bdc18e8743ee0fb46ea2b145751f2f88
463a49c0f5cd2b5f43dfa632e290a518cf17a2e6
describe
'29948' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMT' 'sip-files00096.pro'
1330dccc5ad96af030f293af79796544
5c2448156bb3c36e016d6e7594cfcb4bab5f6ade
describe
'28649' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMU' 'sip-files00097.pro'
2802d910f40264451aa840c80df5ff2e
b5fa52ef46e87cd611a34df3cf3261563a7a469d
'2012-06-29T07:00:29-04:00'
describe
'30318' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMV' 'sip-files00098.pro'
06533e9e84cde4d7f1d311b60dff05ab
bc2bf451408c2d6729a947021b06a292e178a716
describe
'30459' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMW' 'sip-files00101.pro'
9352f1286d09f9aed7ab1806e72fe282
9f5430f3556d13cc9aa62b0015babe449e3d785c
'2012-06-29T07:04:47-04:00'
describe
'29701' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMX' 'sip-files00103.pro'
32d3b7f25061409a12d9cc13c98198e6
09b2a329ecd88a5edb463066ac40c2a6415274a9
describe
'29905' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMY' 'sip-files00104.pro'
bae359e2d42aa96d016d0d8d959322ec
32d68bf6288f0fe1662fc7fdc60f5b83d9852c44
'2012-06-29T06:55:21-04:00'
describe
'29360' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADMZ' 'sip-files00105.pro'
0dc44db42cfa704b06c6bdd55747e236
17aeafa6675dfb50c0833e1b95d2a650534a6d34
describe
'30343' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNA' 'sip-files00106.pro'
61ec2dedb05660ddc144321becd307d8
7adfc7885e5528cb71ea01adab16a7597a0b0f30
describe
'29991' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNB' 'sip-files00110.pro'
d55ff7418f48a570cea7d06cfd57b119
59e36b712b5799135c09a5abddda56fb87f8a319
describe
'29830' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNC' 'sip-files00112.pro'
571203c9bf2def3be7293f3e0432097f
c390e8fe8e92e3598315b023f803080c80ceb1d5
describe
'29577' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADND' 'sip-files00113.pro'
f9497439fa89a4c77ec6ddd9fa10b9d6
f8464526607ce7c16b2048a43cc8dc6e45ca14de
describe
'28038' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNE' 'sip-files00114.pro'
69be7bbdc1e4e0b24e2fd8eb3a65e5a3
1fb38243b087a32be23e4b24782c6babddb3abc8
describe
'20845' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNF' 'sip-files00119.pro'
e5ea4f795495cc3d7abba9b52a77d0b0
73895df7cc33de1a15758562fdb6ee92b3481303
describe
'27660' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNG' 'sip-files00123.pro'
7e9c0e0a64b424a74b65c19ccc95dcb8
fcc9f01cb12ddcc9cc8b48dd3508b8130ece20b5
'2012-06-29T06:59:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNH' 'sip-files00128.pro'
ccf3d336908f69d63dba50cc9721dc55
35174b046b1a8af43a8cfa3d9b3968ddda210893
describe
'29566' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNI' 'sip-files00129.pro'
ebbc37f81e93b28cc420f0c6f7195b0a
f19fb2e8d4868e8c6104bdbeb612383d651bf3ad
describe
'30748' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNJ' 'sip-files00132.pro'
17aa13a8c337cd94522d812ef624b9cf
ad2757e9512acb479d1673cfbac1d719fc77c17a
describe
'30917' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNK' 'sip-files00133.pro'
04872004af38f0ec9999c8014fc776e5
66c3c5fdc46b5488dbae4fa269aafa7970f15aaa
describe
'20064' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNL' 'sip-files00139.pro'
099223cab1a6876a395bb2e56ff9dea6
c589b364d0065baeee952ac9878f04e7d862d7b4
describe
'28623' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNM' 'sip-files00144.pro'
0d91b583959a72c8f2ba2e0984d2e067
91f9dd16f6caeb883f48e825ecff0edd7a2f7dbc
describe
'29447' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNN' 'sip-files00145.pro'
f95d23460eafaef723e9ea3458a7520e
46fb3e2bf46611ca814d69c3ca3c80a28e6e840f
describe
'28833' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNO' 'sip-files00146.pro'
321d8abed667297f044fa269d027bf69
894c105dbda55dae9994e4547980ec87efb5d670
'2012-06-29T06:57:56-04:00'
describe
'29725' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNP' 'sip-files00147.pro'
058b3429d7f5a57d5ea490b4e40f7336
39d51a67b3ea94667439b7cf68f1b8041dfce854
describe
'30639' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNQ' 'sip-files00149.pro'
5a9f234f0dbb4c77bb1414000a3ceef3
23d19db458276f9fff1a76f3b6f1296ee4fe59fa
describe
'21963' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNR' 'sip-files00152.pro'
56e7c89c2732cc36930e371633a4c266
cffc652420e133deb3be480d40831a4bbf6a0b33
describe
'30527' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNS' 'sip-files00157.pro'
b651197fedb4d81ce339d5239e95b959
19ca48b90a6aca6ec43b3947e84a37eb77838763
describe
'29917' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNT' 'sip-files00158.pro'
ae469e133e185e927cebd5d4faa9dc79
b0e8a3b1688f7d59b201639ce96d13d46db35b91
describe
'30375' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNU' 'sip-files00159.pro'
6b9c927d0d2c779e12e2da75389d3cd1
838d28b430a35aa292e21e2e40a4399892ed2a1c
describe
'22097' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNV' 'sip-files00163.pro'
ffb9c5c07d4205b1c748a7bb40a7b8cf
7c46b994aa4e2d1aac87ae31e0232f937c3595f3
describe
'30465' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNW' 'sip-files00166.pro'
e1da6eee9df8040d36e12d0c6f9dcd1a
33c6f340c7947e53c0185e8bfb8ea3d4b36e3bfb
describe
'31252' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNX' 'sip-files00168.pro'
9009f4220c646ffcfac0b69fd1b2fd8c
f1c1ea02a7f51b769b4db3f1eb09c8f007b6ffb0
describe
'30494' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNY' 'sip-files00169.pro'
161c101f88115a25752e003b1b07a2a3
52bff94308d49004ffa675cd727c5917801bbedf
describe
'28025' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADNZ' 'sip-files00171.pro'
5aa00a253a3911441b8d49b480327f75
eac10841d008d1c00766b4953fcf8a3676505917
describe
'6918' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOA' 'sip-files00173.pro'
d181e95f58393002ddc36cdc4b332419
0b0d7776799a8541b132073751657574512b7fe4
describe
'30431' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOB' 'sip-files00179.pro'
04fd4fa2011bcf7287e88f07631984d9
bf29d07654f2941c7335806fd55936391809595f
describe
'29853' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOC' 'sip-files00181.pro'
a66efdb1004e35bf9d2312b93a55faa1
dcda2efd71b4bdee15a016bd4800782070abb15b
describe
'31160' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOD' 'sip-files00183.pro'
34016d0c3598237f43b421c7b3391616
e1fb19abe0d1a6e0f1c93decc71c9f213f4c23f2
describe
'30863' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOE' 'sip-files00185.pro'
0522f506ff1efd63716ffcfada28bf9c
b1dff5372bc75166587af90a9b569c361205c939
describe
'29154' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOF' 'sip-files00186.pro'
4fbc2046c3a04f24258aa654e1cf6fc8
7878bbbd2c3746aa600b774033b537ab8c43567f
describe
'29569' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOG' 'sip-files00192.pro'
634d3c39d76b7c068d4f8dda4b79b12b
1d17cccbfab85b58dc1e4269c4221f5bd695b954
describe
'31260' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOH' 'sip-files00193.pro'
97aee635565ebb723b81aef095fe9888
ad38246aca9c06c5aeae61a0547cac5554f6bd43
describe
'11513' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOI' 'sip-files00194.pro'
469ce2ae876feb9628a809a1f0a46a5c
64728567ba268ad08f6c0e0d2774933427b66a59
describe
'47048' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOJ' 'sip-files00196.pro'
6d217b97a4f2491d0d27e56bb3b3b523
a3e5f657740f1d5add07901698728a24cc2373dc
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOK' 'sip-files00203.pro'
2ac56cf1363be4c1fdbc69f3dac673b9
abec9f7c2a41acca42cea646ae52c3ac408d7e39
describe
'23141' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOL' 'sip-files00207.pro'
d070042bf7a246066b9393da07cb8fba
48796877dd54a02641edf62e27924aa895ce6569
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOM' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'748' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADON' 'sip-files00003.txt'
7b051949c53570d333b6495ca87e7638
eaf801d1e528c87c87554afe854cafbb48bb446c
describe
Invalid character
'151' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOO' 'sip-files00007.txt'
f5edfbc4fa8a31b6e541fc5ef756043b
9c9d0098549a3a82d2f3fd5b92e4279c7c223d63
describe
'2550' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOP' 'sip-files00013.txt'
b7b1fffba3bb45a61de3f1a05c299496
d64abc9c3d9dd4a89a613ff70ce0e5106d8dd83c
describe
Invalid character
'817' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOQ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
2f7411f065354950b07f57427df8c154
6a7f33bdae55152049e3c74fc5c6941b2275e0d4
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOR' 'sip-files00019.txt'
7f5c1738560b2613ea49d13dc9023887
eff18c5349b4ad08014f22d5bbe2ddaef161a10a
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOS' 'sip-files00021.txt'
4b2eebcd600c6fa74bef01d05c955881
f70a35e316f2fd82c4c093b99c9643a80083cee3
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOT' 'sip-files00023.txt'
1f53b2b8078a5f01edcae42a4c33cdb8
9925078a55cfeb3bd4e456c1439f1dc5e1c5713f
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOU' 'sip-files00029.txt'
9867242bf540dde871cdb29c4c471f23
a7344c90a9c5615483c9a4d804112add7fc383bb
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOV' 'sip-files00031.txt'
72c9687e69c29682909077c06e960e2e
b90606d43041337b9c83fad21cf92913ee1116d2
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOW' 'sip-files00033.txt'
633ddd1eb47428c8ae72b4790d1a1597
6a686205aea8385b3f603f3c4a7c79516a336a62
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOX' 'sip-files00034.txt'
e3e5fa4e7dfecff0fc60e20f275dff92
4fc3afe6660ca0ee66f9d605f85d1f9c87de1b9c
describe
'1455' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOY' 'sip-files00035.txt'
32cbad190f7e30273ca92b3a438f1d97
f98863f17c7097ff5bca69bac33e946c9a76f256
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADOZ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
16dbfa8bd1a24a39303df3484f514c74
88d321e81560c9f63f4b5ab3556491318a4941cf
describe
'98' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPA' 'sip-files00039.txt'
d6595cec2572e4a0d9f5b7c7b802c4db
e65c3382cf17aebc3ebe0c1444de61ed0c074405
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPB' 'sip-files00042.txt'
8fdba7ff31052c069c0aacccaa3164ad
e744d0b4bd7cc1f349b81387bc930443f3da75b8
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPC' 'sip-files00046.txt'
3d38e09185ce0fe8b70c36725ce2f09a
69bc84c71cfd82879dcff86b729e4ed26b654483
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPD' 'sip-files00047.txt'
8b3d5545e0990bf1f1f71c165c7df366
3db6528562d93361d2a8947abeab546c5d5157f9
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPE' 'sip-files00048.txt'
c0c0eaa71a8cde9edbfac88afa98fad7
978ea745d9238ca3a1b95e81fe63ad6f631e9014
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPF' 'sip-files00049.txt'
006a86fb449be09a44ef99b6f39a4ab3
5ac8b70110152f91cea7875042e85640eb944464
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPG' 'sip-files00053.txt'
d971494612817f7e55fba2e4d0a2ded9
6158948c3a364d6596df2609c5221f52d56b0c80
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPH' 'sip-files00054.txt'
a40e6a019039e3b0d5ea4befaac2194b
d4dc565da8053d6ec7e00fdd9c910a92f918c089
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPI' 'sip-files00056.txt'
d28ed41d219e2d3e0ddc68f1fed0417b
e74a1943ff6e0784fe23e8b3e442cfc25250a269
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPJ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
9c5a7459d1cb68a82621246bff78a9e2
0b1c20d4a9a5ef2660685e030c03e2f12df6d2d4
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPK' 'sip-files00060.txt'
3cb44d9a9231b1f6b6b89aced213fb21
55c256b4fe3a3da0684763bd7c9ce10248de03ed
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPL' 'sip-files00064.txt'
799dc37763d7d11785a13d8c40e85b01
602ba98b6f6d99bb0d7b5dc0f99b6a994366ec4e
'2012-06-29T07:05:06-04:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPM' 'sip-files00067.txt'
7054d83b8b0d4c8db0dabc8a408ac7a4
924ea3c6f1a49b522fd1b95dcb498f01f395a677
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPN' 'sip-files00068.txt'
163d1cfa1df8cb0beb716f97e84b33a9
eb779145c90b1da895dd11d550de201278475575
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPO' 'sip-files00071.txt'
9bbbe9ea1c453325d4040e201a2477d5
0c4d8b2c2cccea81e94d0bd88ea9c42321ed258e
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPP' 'sip-files00072.txt'
60d17dba0243b22a02e52c9e345b17d4
d614f8227655765c75e468e4492cd6674bc069dc
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPQ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
20e2c3c9cf6eea3bf444f7647c1fa228
a71e362e6146987674e6cd7c8c40101af9bf551e
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPR' 'sip-files00075.txt'
cad3c7b4db870e8f6e1e838540bcdd16
067b78f4061663614e48f5a7bfb1e61fb0c7ba79
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPS' 'sip-files00081.txt'
4e3075e221f35382b46f2f8ee559b92c
3631372a8cf99abdd57357910e968c8955669896
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPT' 'sip-files00082.txt'
4f9e4d3366f66f0e51d4169f8eb8ed97
ece1016499568e667da2b13f9144e306b0b3eb95
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPU' 'sip-files00084.txt'
3173b733861143912ac24683e39d9968
84cac9fa0aa0fae860fd5ad0b400fa737722c0e8
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPV' 'sip-files00086.txt'
be2a6dec1dc6eabfd3b233b1c2941e9a
8542170cf49adce1e831168baf5d799547ed62fc
'2012-06-29T07:02:08-04:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPW' 'sip-files00087.txt'
2359bbc41b93599f75b7d1ea508d38e9
7dc73f4729201a06d0ed1e548d5a034478083cb7
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPX' 'sip-files00090.txt'
802c0085e5a75167dfc0c66deb3a2707
9aa8d28ff5c82b04fa6c99a6fa2c9fd348a25b29
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPY' 'sip-files00092.txt'
66d372e57c42cb6e87858b903bb5e2e3
b3c23754877eea1885db049c906399473eb8ec6a
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADPZ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
4b3c2201e60d87d307070c2be6830f78
473baf46a28c977a3f8d1072a7fa13774319215b
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQA' 'sip-files00099.txt'
a9a89d44653c5be69d8a2a1560c0e4ee
68a530bfd599b6a8dbba45d29aa946068ee68c93
'2012-06-29T07:01:55-04:00'
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQB' 'sip-files00101.txt'
ef0c5b2017b21382df716f3d50a0b1af
3b9ea18ce5fb26819bef1b2032c16aba49b9559e
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQC' 'sip-files00103.txt'
dcc3af496863e58257986c947b130033
d6859eed5489297abfca0822ad7288c3f6aeb0db
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQD' 'sip-files00105.txt'
71aca30bebba8127b6f319535fe86ea5
da542d2f33526026731e685af62fa65e2bfa5ba4
'2012-06-29T07:05:45-04:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQE' 'sip-files00106.txt'
dad4b26c3ee3814bce67f0fd803f130e
1736fc2885041ec4256a760488b1b53fd50c1345
'2012-06-29T06:58:10-04:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQF' 'sip-files00110.txt'
e38b75a94469c32d8e6db925f26f7b0f
976ef96de6110ea5f965f45a366e88fc104fe838
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQG' 'sip-files00114.txt'
c7a74f692af03fdbd703514fed5ca8dc
0dcf3ffea52e74ef3fa77d22425f2fc2fd1657e1
describe
'469' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQH' 'sip-files00118.txt'
34f762ba7cf77c891568b5c7078854b0
32fd8f368ef07390f6d50ac5052f1b48989f9de1
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQI' 'sip-files00123.txt'
8da129b4bd8fe0ff75fbb90690c7a296
620a68aa1e0835ccd6098887c3fa25c8c6fb5702
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQJ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
df9b6782424d246b6e713cd9c996f4e8
a16b81fdef9f0fd3429ef7eca112f78ad62ad06e
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQK' 'sip-files00128.txt'
640cfff8904e7078e86925428dc9a5b2
a56716289fb73a0ff30ea372d3caba1616645693
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQL' 'sip-files00133.txt'
dd11547cae73f1571dc6eb08c98c0a1b
624a5fe9477ef6683486066bef3bf17f5b0768b1
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQM' 'sip-files00135.txt'
92e65ac225b4bb355794f305091179a4
3ff3cafe490ffeef39d5691d87092591d4d97224
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQN' 'sip-files00139.txt'
c15f1f3249e91b381ac90935e5e382f2
1585b80344168b55e48b26140420e6723198fd29
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQO' 'sip-files00143.txt'
ec786b25ee4672996ff36c6f4c8a6afe
23a847b9483562684eff14d8c04b5fc9b2ac22c5
'2012-06-29T06:55:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQP' 'sip-files00144.txt'
c6c5e8f14097350728624dd26a766766
ba5efb78f9551f2b5b48762748a34c5a9923e41e
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQQ' 'sip-files00152.txt'
7113a3d0f32e0ed8b74b308b44aefeb1
07b25da9d3b17bcb27d7beed7509f227f3ba6634
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQR' 'sip-files00157.txt'
c65cdde857130d7186dc393c65af841b
1783f5ca212a512b09e96d221855a8194a80d0bc
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQS' 'sip-files00158.txt'
a979f45cad9e4a56b30fadc8ef8ca949
df4c7595f0972856e00623c669683eeac9f8639e
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQT' 'sip-files00159.txt'
4ebd145d95e041b7b5bff9863e27e093
d781ffbb3e8d6a7b04030ba3431b2492d094042d
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQU' 'sip-files00164.txt'
d624ba002704dec8dbad68216f630bff
483c4a9ba60790897d309f24f474ee363fc995cf
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQV' 'sip-files00165.txt'
e61a0103540d7901416a68f48f88ee74
f6474457e9b963a3387f6a478eb8dd092c0aff7b
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQW' 'sip-files00167.txt'
99db582a4dd18b9e82bcb60ecd9040fa
bbf93b85ffbe37d9ced20d2d4323e3f243aca236
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQX' 'sip-files00168.txt'
d1d233d4395238386211b1041d755663
8ac60947c67bb672e4c12c8aa06e7daa669e0a23
describe
'328' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQY' 'sip-files00173.txt'
5910d9e9ae68257b6c5d657037d722c3
c33c79e2d69c2ad9aa95dfca4140a1db6f76d6c2
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADQZ' 'sip-files00178.txt'
edad220cebb5986320546049b241c699
1966481444b2471e679368e07c7461b513d39477
describe
'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRA' 'sip-files00184.txt'
023a8cc9c1da677356d574fa81596fde
ad9b69fd68e2148bd9a7dda4b2d52e3ec6048e0a
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRB' 'sip-files00188.txt'
556aa1148501e5c86669642c1985ffe7
e32ccf2bbf154c95f7b40ca0b7a9bb5012c635db
'2012-06-29T07:00:38-04:00'
describe
'963' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRC' 'sip-files00189.txt'
a12f8629f0992818c54333bd01ec2e86
d9f94fd91b1e5b336c8eedf90b7ebd531a05f642
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRD' 'sip-files00193.txt'
f1e74058fd8cdfeea9fb9ce61c3666f0
48162daa8eedd0bf252b3a45dcd722524f03edbc
describe
'2101' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRE' 'sip-files00195.txt'
bc88462a18ff4dbc50fbbf4e636f337d
a4366fac91d10f148a99442208c38b759a59a2fe
describe
'2167' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRF' 'sip-files00196.txt'
12ee82bdc75b0dae3f19106e93632e6f
ddb02cb8dd8d33fa0b4ba43bf9ede8bd611e1287
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRG' 'sip-files00200.txt'
1780d10e2614e0973b55a4b06719688e
bf7db7d69e68361a896a1d9e0f75818423d4f5a7
describe
Invalid character
'120' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRH' 'sip-files00203.txt'
f05c21393332b70f2b15bd51a1b3d1d5
a080140ebc14b508eea0e28212570d38ba4fcc37
describe
'42382' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRI' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
0489ee4db620fe9960344a36ff69abad
f81c0fde5ab728aa6964f8fd96441986979627a3
describe
'53178' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRJ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
d3703228587e8a73d1f4c69e8653ed71
b377c020118d11a8fcacb57745991b63a90b8d5d
describe
'91344' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRK' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
35c15870c1512d3f9520c86018b9be4c
06e3ee0086677d7479a2654f6d421beeaa45b9f8
'2012-06-29T06:59:09-04:00'
describe
'125967' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
78bc67b5a1c09fc27ddedbbcb7889610
63c0231a0c0388507233a94f28a78a3657c7e0d2
describe
'52834' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRM' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
54104d0384299b4274d86cd80aa4ebf6
9d97dd11f859aaca4c19f5d52078d1664d0a4dc4
describe
'128953' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRN' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4d5dbc70b683bc56d781a65782acecb7
a6c02a38fdab924630910292ebbc477a8ac5a1dc
describe
'130811' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRO' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
502aa3f99dcbcf0a669ddf9f4053f8fc
d9b6553a20e6ccd52cc0eb4a64f5d84c6e1cbace
describe
'53131' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRP' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
16557c25b177147f9c1a4594fb5df56c
26cc02184e40d532d05184c957e203f1f09f2b3b
describe
'49296' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRQ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
7973c7daef526f3d71e90294a70e212c
8d8f08e62de9f2234b06189d947ec307b6b605be
describe
'52379' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRR' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
318316d1baef43337be0b34075e7c433
2f41591068dff9e7856893d79994ef5b7e1dba31
describe
'52693' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRS' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
c055f8276b0f9a20c39ad2aaa9bde6d0
bec4b3bfc2d2087fcda0140fe628c1cd732f6474
describe
'115582' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRT' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
cca9839e3f6236a527430dfdd7f7f095
e21e6666a8fd7b01d4b0801839746d14770aa2a7
describe
'127674' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRU' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
f98121ce1a883303e931de558627a825
df048fb887f37a8b9cbb3168798a14887d2d0a06
'2012-06-29T06:56:16-04:00'
describe
'111822' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRV' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
a331128667c49b5983e4fd23093b8d83
54340144956ba7dbf62bc17926f0e8ed592749a1
'2012-06-29T07:05:34-04:00'
describe
'169538' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRW' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
f1bc1e552e46176ec6256fe53c4f48a2
44e1062c086d549625a4d33e78bd3d18862ccab8
describe
'126976' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRX' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
a55d87e4d88e54e63f95a33739869b62
a266d964540074e7e0fbb9838156f6c0c24a3791
'2012-06-29T06:53:42-04:00'
describe
'127537' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRY' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
ecc6d533912ccdb6e534592d5bce0937
66ce87393fa005cc68a5b6c479aa7435786a09ae
describe
'129733' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADRZ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
134d1c3012db1c7d15f061a38288cfb5
a965fc563594b7eebc30df75891d478176910e42
describe
'50752' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSA' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
c99856dbdbce01dcbe3d0c4cdefaa898
14dd862221f741ae02cbdc41b4a03d9bed4b691b
describe
'113958' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSB' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
dbfbca9df66b5a967f3342d4525e2599
ff7cc7af1a4aa12ff873ae4a4defd18ea7a88564
describe
'53342' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSC' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
47ad223e80d22588d79f84d0515e27e3
3dd2188fd0ae6cec7f16bf28428e837a63d10bb5
describe
'50370' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSD' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
b637b459471739bf563fa84e10796471
cda147e1927aa5287fcaf75d70a0bfd2da79d136
describe
'52465' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSE' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
cdb916a326ce30ba72d2ab9fe5e1f7c9
ddb1ec2522cf55d5c951abc14b24c671a1ab0946
describe
'128072' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSF' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
1e4ed8987cd2c712c18f6794faa23101
5cfe21cbb9379f85a1644c31b26d47b9cebe6a42
'2012-06-29T07:05:28-04:00'
describe
'124422' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSG' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
98f2463b88a853ccdaa19c3da4b168a9
c0569c0a78490324efcb2c7810760141dfb8748e
describe
'126768' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSH' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
11205ee267bf40cd917d26ec7db81fbf
868d172a929d460415fa2a3ca22ad4209b2d5e1c
'2012-06-29T07:04:16-04:00'
describe
'41903' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSI' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
0a63acbd891a9bf59169b20d127b99c2
c1d3c51d0978ecfcdc3b97afa954be3af693670c
describe
'52154' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSJ' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
b695a17e7332d7fb9e09832f0eaeb983
904ab2412a57c0285dcab469943c174c07c16e72
describe
'40908' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSK' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
e8a1ad92a1fb7becbf77548f04044ac5
fca568d32de612cbf182325d871de20b4f5544d3
describe
'25372' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSL' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
6f5cc8cc834c9a4b26559532c82261ab
aafaf1eb9d2b0c06fa0a388f77f7f95f950d5227
describe
'129098' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSM' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
0c19fb185ccbf0a197d987e069f0c013
b1c9fcd8179019af196d1a25f69602106d1f7304
describe
'124222' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSN' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
324b41d24004a60cf0e1746505404fd0
3a247a8e4ce7d6b8afb0ce59f085bd45c154c432
describe
'37810' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSO' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
77c0e3560ba35ec41b68376c6579b590
347b8a48a5159bb281de4ec25008aa7b6fe0fc2e
'2012-06-29T07:00:07-04:00'
describe
'211300' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSP' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
75044f7cf1837afb1df1c24849824965
b028e3f41757317fc545277728170a214ba2793e
describe
'179081' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSQ' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
95d9b1764afb190d419c755e5c7b70c5
e1b1001b599c81bceaaa5289fa56ee7f10aee3ea
describe
'51601' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSR' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
44185082c52fa5c832e6bb530e02b2d3
c7e2f586e1801bc29f03c60d22a6a43e4f92d0d8
describe
'40609' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSS' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
4cb96a15b9c30e8da4da9aab046b67ac
e31d1add688bca22011d5eccefc5d69246435d4c
describe
'52758' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADST' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
e884988d03dff401ab6aeadb0a4e60cd
bee408fd475a5d17a73007b8987fd246e7220028
describe
'125665' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSU' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
1e8f006aeca5712e0516c1c28f59f32e
1b6011cae161189f98a7ecd84f461a5c7486bbc6
describe
'42782' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSV' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
fad29400bb94ef543a5787de2052df9f
f3b727e2ea0961b97a65750dd58687f3f85a30ae
describe
'51299' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSW' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
5b392cb022b105d6c6b72cc64cf71178
185a5371ba3f9ee6f4a0e627a46fe5f732bae71e
describe
'52739' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSX' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
a0be18904837753d807ea19bbe48befd
77611a7da05bd666be64254018cdad8b4bf41380
describe
'51650' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSY' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
988c7f9e1f50f4548be8113d86ab5117
2258efc92cbc81415abc5f01b5e1a6706f50c03d
describe
'53093' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADSZ' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
6d6317abcf421d96f2f7d4a55e4c1739
b0da1b3f90ac0be6c9db7eca960f80abee3d3dc2
describe
'53072' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTA' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
77f1c1daac3f445a5dece8b9923ab477
52edcdb14d2100d2203600510763d86ca9257878
describe
'110101' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTB' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
deef95f5981c7a82cb2a34a56a6f9d63
6495e89d6d07381b607aa530f3d5690be66c39bb
describe
'51423' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTC' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
95f17c22c472a9caaaa8ceaca1306925
3bb58f474bd6a70080fd38f519729fab3c5baecc
describe
'123670' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTD' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
d63d9b80377b5ebb8c47e61b35ab2ad4
37d2021d04e71dd023c49e0207b223fb75d3585f
describe
'128058' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTE' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
057a742007ca55673f101913d9db5a40
3b4c184d0444130c73739b14b0b46bcd837772d7
describe
'124347' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTF' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
8bbe0e041775b0b86a61d2d1e1beafa0
abf185d80c279006acc6c3a9bb3e1263bc14c25b
'2012-06-29T06:59:37-04:00'
describe
'50339' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTG' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
0dbfbf0ab243969f3dbe06d64a804da4
dd2851a5796a7b9c7596ca481be4f6e8ec75d0f4
describe
'121942' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTH' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
aa26960eb7e99ca0f52fb1ebf815cea6
18dab796e1449468cb9612be7b0d33cc2664455f
describe
'52474' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTI' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
8edfb605ab0dfe7a402d7ae73222e6be
5efcab60d9c355e06dad03ad33881120c70de2e5
describe
'129695' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTJ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
31d3c11ce4d8c848cbb53f4a343caafe
bd24c695405c9f30d8d724b98e6dea505bb9d075
describe
'53193' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTK' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
ef61b7a8ba79c6f238d505f05294c8ce
3fead85adf48e3535f579c7fa8553b113bd894d3
describe
'51879' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTL' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
b48e11eb6a651d4140c0571e4c6672b2
e65ff007cf9e896c64fc5b3a692e38532c878ef8
describe
'121701' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTM' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
f755dd83a96a824667fcc3ef3296aa3c
5e1faee09f769f02367bcb676165bc116b3296c6
describe
'53573' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTN' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
084e8a18b820562d1963abed3d9a977d
d9f292947fe7c409cd6fbb605146ea0bdb72ab3f
describe
'48619' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTO' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
f60747169c0f0ab2f239edc90993279e
d5dbb9f7b50594f65bbf6fe3bec3e946701af680
describe
'53274' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTP' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
b8a5bd02745a4a09a4edf436fb13e4d3
9aa425d5ea7eceaaef7b6765a69855703f1746cd
describe
'127227' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTQ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
a542f6e78a9fad924a52e90fc06ec297
58d5fc8ce9caa6e775805af12353a255da6d6b45
describe
'53012' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTR' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
d91936e952beb7a1cac8e1bc6b5b1406
31f32c847da658bdc614443be3b9920bcca1654e
describe
'128827' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTS' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
628bb0df6cb58336cd4fe18cb56741fe
0c97cab0ac50af29d632ce12327e9b9d4b072131
describe
'104751' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTT' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
8f7c8ff6f16e4aab008a59bafb2097b4
d9d347b03d092079b7f98517bc0090ad8b75bd0f
'2012-06-29T07:01:53-04:00'
describe
'49895' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTU' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
0315d55de27bf4c6151e89737f486719
3c8ffb0644ae867fb30548c17f40c5abc2ea3add
describe
'53615' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTV' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
0caf0ddd3db2dc583a4350bd3e9e3e38
ea210c68a7187b31f7c05c6aaff97153fbf5164e
describe
'85431' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTW' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
7a924dcf36f5e7abd673adf99135eafe
636630e7fe2db5897c26a99c0ef3121c9d57fb32
describe
'128774' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTX' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
55c9d83261f48f5d5ce5a692cb4d4dea
27cb84fce383dd961fd45999a95689156361ed21
describe
'128590' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTY' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
fe37424d467e5b7c013c6d10b77c9a3d
915ba16ef632aec43dd825e8570d7a600cad8a3d
describe
'129333' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADTZ' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
6bd9e6c621e7d3e77040cd9bdd27a944
5dedbb892cb280d98e6314cff667705aa1e1cb76
describe
'50766' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUA' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
44529408032c0775b43d7c7db087942a
303dd687b665af30a0428a82564a8aff9d585f26
describe
'128752' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUB' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
489b7d2274e9e2f2d2540974cc1626b7
a7608bad62ca207d7e359ede4def1382581fe15a
describe
'124733' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUC' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
4c947026ce911a88b436ccad1f49e9f9
858259ff035e2205866fa54be96689fb13c30579
describe
'129339' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUD' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
dd3bcd1e2b8e34e067a4f92d628d1ff5
f6ba4862681c246f6264b2bd01aba31fe4bf869d
describe
'52161' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUE' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
d5156d1cd08d705cf2ab1bf5df9a933a
8a66f02eeeb8eaea3821b007214b70e7923b0cb5
describe
'130081' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUF' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
40ec0f4e98b472fb58c73e93ce29a2dd
6a7d8b6512df20448f9e7cd0c9acc167a9d305b6
describe
'52010' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUG' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
03df606161829bea7a237fe71f43b0dd
efa5b36a813f5feaf23df847e4112c8504abe729
describe
'128506' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUH' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
1c7d2e5222888dccdcb4397f97a7c416
2dddb900696a22e229819b36a331d4f6c1107ff9
'2012-06-29T06:53:56-04:00'
describe
'52446' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUI' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
0f1bac8fa5a03a13dc172228cd307e81
e256de6e58d3cb3a56b9f1c65d28e4ac2f4702c5
describe
'50244' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUJ' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
feefbca30c01e5a5e18ec2e8bc7f11d7
d53826d238d3f4247f12624863c7056240e50790
describe
'52632' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUK' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
a9d2f512019230e3494fc829754e6333
a6133859bd12ece9f4ebfb6d480265e585de23e8
describe
'127342' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUL' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
6779f3021a83da7353ddfac2f3060363
27ea5971987e5bb7077fc72f172d0c5ff6c3a098
describe
'125201' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUM' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
8b8b75dd0b05baafb3026de4a723a9ed
1e4bff2c79ed5e0b9a45444f5c09b01bda05ae32
describe
'41665' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUN' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
30dc937511d0ee1c03f50b8adcd610af
3eb922a5607d83e9259df8c6833b5b84bebc5a7f
describe
'129650' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUO' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
929868fc92c7b22d81f451812c77f61f
1722fa8497dd59a65166ba5d497695be26b3014f
describe
'128940' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUP' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
dbe6f6d90f216439618cab41258e9312
90fb10497af43851faba55c21a0abd4a51d0d857
describe
'51874' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUQ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
4e094928829da4062e155dd9e6519743
d4a1b56a5c93c90780fd5ba979ebc7ae947331d2
describe
'51665' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUR' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
9cd2b46189483a0f94aae3df43e41af6
cfd2071e904ebb4e58cc106398f1cf5b1f3bc0e7
describe
'308237' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUS' 'sip-filesUF00015736_00001.xml'
bdbf8819ae0e39bfceba755dd2b9bf70
a014f7d0fd9a564ebbba023277a0c7ab79257d20
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'2013-12-09T22:04:15-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'86132' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUT' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
c1a021931d89f9303376121dd2654f18
4ccd8e435c94b799a8881984036654bc0daacc3e
describe
'42453' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUU' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
4708c4fb11c58389fb775733264b2be9
d8966b7a7b5c29ec82c47da1077b58d99febbee2
describe
'21267' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUV' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
28f6f12c99f320c309b0e172653f6fe1
720cbe00b41c4444bf9ec9e61854301f1f4e07e7
describe
'44272' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUW' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
de24a083d2ce7cb6a5df6c88cae0e2d6
d16ed3a8706ef48886a8f9430828edd428796900
describe
'51495' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUX' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
41d92f33db6b788d88bcc8279b8a386a
caebe63860c1040e66844e1eab36189ca98177e5
describe
'51058' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUY' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
17f21b14acadd318754b09221a8ddb01
72990143d5b180939d2bf2154f6c9c608d981def
describe
'51653' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADUZ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
f35937b48b33964a916a7a2b008d8c6b
182bc888b0d320a27d2963025ec4ca36bad24c63
describe
'128136' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVA' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
7201656abc41a257e5b02a26dfaf4334
80eb98ee6bd48dd98e0ea401d939724887f84ca8
describe
'52671' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVB' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
5c21e323fc3228a6f73bb360c507c45d
29eafa82ba4ece38a9159e5280ecf8923620eb13
'2012-06-29T07:04:35-04:00'
describe
'123153' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVC' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
bb52240311586cc17a5bef7517ff8c16
612c1f1efbcc88ff77b5c117defd0aa09dc12ca1
describe
'77008' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVD' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
e98c66d65144c19933b334f906a51ab2
460d79768ca9fe6e9bbd6527f9c944e8504a9a18
describe
'119690' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVE' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
7fe718b06589475bcbef93cde1778258
a5a4885e7264dbcd389173126df162fbb705c06f
describe
'49286' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVF' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
a550bbb77eaf1a37c73327aa338f661f
8e82418a61d41e4919b960891c26d8904c1cef76
describe
'124943' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVG' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
c0afe44a601f47885f5ce241e850253e
2814e8197ab900310ad97dc78968fd0b03a3eca5
describe
'52770' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVH' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
829df411f1ca4ccc695d2dac24509393
d67ab40c8fe593f7b3c4240e9622be7e597205f3
describe
'52240' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVI' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
6475a669fa7e6c564d59ea096245bfcc
b2fad70edab162680b7308f7162608ddf52ddc57
describe
'117351' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVJ' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
07b43c9a8af8e1e08c5893f606cd4d11
b75e74d8160d1e90e9fe2f96e4ebf15c19a9e0a0
describe
'83493' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVK' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
e2def71d92c35eaff99239dd298af760
2a0fbce82443509a9cdc2822793038dd605cc42a
describe
'122565' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVL' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
6943a273995ae121cc6a09c8753ee07b
4b8a6867a6b4a67f367796d6e7524abe0eb57623
describe
'51011' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVM' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
cb18f27a6c7d45920c8aaeab9143fa87
562927b2db8bd96aa1b7f15065e7dc3b91c8dcfe
describe
'123939' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVN' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
c54f77fc0b488f5edd7a01e15162ce60
fc2956ddb40dbc56a5efcec4ed9d5536cb3fb774
describe
'52022' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVO' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
8b97b4c22fdb329151d7eb00a7f5287d
d305f7ab3f489a66fb609de09f3286a459c116c5
describe
'88059' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVP' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
a41f8a4442f4a9d2951100a787692441
6c3617b2a303a159e3e4f091c46892d925fc3930
describe
'42487' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVQ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
919f022c32dc73b924638a3e5c7e3c2b
7759ab628264f1bd5836c8b082c081e3b3fc730e
describe
'120703' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVR' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
0968bb43f604ff83a94c451938b67f74
cf9a7808f165483edba5d883c865d1f0644a915a
describe
'128990' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVS' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
20109b581a39b82b0427eeba175d62c9
8b32414b305b675ef7178600fc63dd8539f910ce
describe
'51479' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVT' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
ca15bad6cb6af5bfbbf11bbb36a9291d
b966ca8fdd148b3b971c5e0393a4414a2f97b24e
'2012-06-29T07:00:11-04:00'
describe
'122956' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVU' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
c70ed66ec384f46bd28eaf312205599d
32f62faa76d2469e09f4d987ef78e300740d160d
describe
'128171' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVV' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
70b9048ad868ce5a33a4e7d4f92d70e2
a77085542aa0bdd432d84860ec5d3d1b3c51a785
describe
'51334' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVW' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
67bc401034fc36ac8d53b9e571fba91f
c1f14fd7eb7f838c5d40c218620199324cf59d1a
'2012-06-29T07:01:28-04:00'
describe
'52150' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVX' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
de2733db1a0d73e71cc70288b5e7a6a9
1c7353f0cc3d91b7d4f22f1d3960c11d9192c80e
describe
'53372' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVY' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
1960912a756b2dbbeab5e4e30083610f
4f4960d9f1bdef0d0b23fce0a4865f4e4d65cd40
describe
'125097' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADVZ' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
48fc99fac2da75e92fa2ac30bc0b0563
eff23d08a7b757a7348a7ce995e1a7b4fc38bff9
describe
'42713' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWA' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
be8f463d9f970abef43a5c1e4173b040
327bd49dc3db6efc933904f016e7546878848f26
describe
'124191' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWB' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
bd29ce74da75c43bfcc040fa8ab9f62f
99171b9f3a43d6ae9b0d77bc6af04bcd9e626251
'2012-06-29T06:58:46-04:00'
describe
'129270' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWC' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
935d63b83c7414d4c27b7dbe1a767d41
a783446216154f30935c5d76bf28c7e8a538f3a2
describe
'126067' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWD' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
0c2b6fc16104f7560100ee6adf234663
8f2908d77a3548912b890191da94e2a262cd4932
describe
'53148' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWE' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
f681804c2a8e0c96188263a1bdcea55f
7f5bb07b95ce5c18d89da942fb33b893523598aa
'2012-06-29T07:00:18-04:00'
describe
'52285' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWF' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
9de780fc727c4f55398ba63f46c9261a
c683c28f53204cb7f934584781c0ad12057699e5
describe
'51919' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWG' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
3df305f4e04c9c51758de376e5171f77
9934e4e6a9a90dcc389ee178c142afa8b05e8357
describe
'39932' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWH' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
12176312e368a0e79d47e8dfe4b60e40
fd85b9fb7f510d1ac564af84fe1a5f2cadae6cee
describe
'50418' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWI' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
e65f33b7dcd49fcf0667765ed6c5bf6a
9c5bc2dc57e52cdd1a8242bfc44e501787dafe91
'2012-06-29T07:05:51-04:00'
describe
'127974' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWJ' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
ceddfbbb9dc1199b97aae512a20efddd
0c15b9d985ba1d9ef2799284036913837581e6e7
describe
'73458' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWK' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
0bc4771aaa64be02bb768221dcbe3d32
49f9076629c6e2ca418c8d7a67eb27cbf52f1ac0
describe
'128088' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWL' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
841c3b7f96ecff8210bbb76f480342be
171c393bb90f105cca6593ed9f413da61974f613
describe
'52835' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWM' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
803a8a4fafed5102e6ebe5f1e3794dd4
fc3ea0b3f641bdbd2a62df2c8b649b1e471398b1
describe
'56158' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWN' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
41974786b2ca374e9f71400f30125d1d
76fd49419227e4d2728b4b76d0a145382f03be7d
describe
'129684' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWO' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
ab2c9a06a3bc4cdd4957df5b11effd7c
3e81c49790fb0621138917034ece94506cc413b9
describe
'130278' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWP' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
9ad576ffd7ff5715c3351bb00c26a436
888bce7ed0b64598ad886eac5e1ff3f7a2629a12
describe
'131755' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWQ' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
76feb9453982d9c7ad6738cdefd44210
7d74461d7c6be576f7550da61602360578155b62
describe
'52746' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWR' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
9139ac194ff54266f3af2f719cb37a22
57350964e4ee9d44b106cac05ebe3d08a0165071
describe
'92921' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWS' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
0b7b3bfd5960a799b8ff80ebf2907d45
5f676a147caccf25fc1b0e61c4b44d2c4115f295
describe
'111873' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWT' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
a65ddeec863e3510fb72a30dd5421e12
145d3f108356439eefd0f5835384e823a66a6838
describe
'114851' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWU' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
ee3d97a815f3a7973d2e596a45ead307
3024e39f80a8b03010999c1cc1156d03648bf83e
describe
'50879' 'info:fdaE20100610_AAAAADfileF20100610_AAADWV' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
7c511f61aeeb8e088d46630b29cad43a
c9f82364ac70c8e2fe2e4b8fb8300d8f48773495
describe