Citation
The Doomed ship, or, The wreck in the Arctic regions

Material Information

Title:
The Doomed ship, or, The wreck in the Arctic regions
Parallel title:
Wreck in the Arctic regions
Creator:
Hurton, William
William Andrews & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
William Andrews & Co.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1865
Language:
English
Physical Description:
257, [12] p. [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 20 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Shipwrecks -- Fiction -- Arctic regions ( lcsh )
Sailors -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Courtship -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Superstition -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Courage -- Fiction ( lcsh )
Sea stories -- 1865 ( rbgenr )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1865 ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1865 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1865
Genre:
sea stories ( aat )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by William Hurton.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA8253 ( LTQF )
AMA4468 ( NOTIS )
22592363 ( OCLC )
002399547 ( AlephBibNum )

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THE DOOMED SHIP.











BLACKBIRD jim’s ENCOUNTER WITH A BEAR,







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Hoomed Ship ;
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Arctic Regions,
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Wiffiam Burton.

LONDON :

WILLIAM ANDREWS & CO., 5, FARRINGDON AVENUE.








Che Doomed Ship;

The Wreck in the Arctic Regions.

———_ ><
CHAPTER I.

RIDAY, the seventh day of July, 1822, was appointed
for the sailing of the good barque ‘“ Lady Emily,”
chartered from Hull to Tromso, in Nordland, with a cargo
of coals and salt, and thence in ballast up the Baltic to
St. Petersburgh to ship timber and deals for the return
voyage. The barque was a large, bluff-bowed, square-
sterned, old-fashioned craft of 389 tons O.M., very heavily
timbered, as she had originally been a Baffin’s Bay whaler.
Although a mere tea waggon as regarding her sailing
qualities, she was in high repute’as a remarkably fortunate
craft (a reputation of great weight with sailors), for in all the
voyages she had made during the twenty years she had
been afloat, no accident of any consequence had ever
befallen her. The present crew consisted of captain, two
mates, carpenter, cook, steward, fourteen men before the
mast, and two boys—in all twenty-two hands. I was
nephew of the captain, and acted as second mate, being
then a young fellow of five-and-twenty.
A singular and melancholy occurrence attended our

1



2 THE DOOMED SHIP.

clearing out of port, and the superstitious among us might
well regard it as an evil augury.

We had taken in our cargo in the Humber Dock, and
thence warped out into the basin. After clearing the end
of the south pier, which was crowded with spectators, we
sent a boat off to fasten a hawser to the great pile-head at
the pier point, to drop the ship gently out whilst her sails
were being set. One of the hands remained in the boat,
and the other, a sailor named James Lenton, or Lentowr.,
secured the hawser. The tide was running strongly, and as
soon as the ship swung out, the hawser tightened, and kept
snapping and jerking til] it smoked again, as the hands on
board payed it out. It was a six-inch rope, quite new, and
capable of bearing an immense strain ; but Lenton, for-
seeing that an accident might happen, loudly warned the
spectators to stand back, as it is not unusual for legs to be
broken by the snapping of a hawser and the recoil of its
broken end. They took the hint, but he himself stood by,
ready to cast off when the signal was given from the ship.

The latter had dropped some fifty to sixty yards, when
the hawser fouled on board owing to its excessive stiffness
(for it had never been used before), and ere the men
could clear its kinks, the ship was brought up with a heavy
jerk. For an instant the hawser stretched out straight
and stiff as a bar of steel, and then with a report like a
small cannon it parted, a fathom from the pier post, and
the fragment whirled round in the air and struck poor
James Lenton full on the head. He fell like an ox in a
butcher’s shambles, and never uttered moan nor any cry,
nor ever stirred more.

We perceived the accident from the ship, and the captain



THE DOOMED SHIP. 3

instantly ordered an anchor to be let go, and sent me to the
pier in a shore-boat that was holding on by our mizzen-
chains. When I landed I found poor Lenton quite dead.
His skull was fairly beaten in by the terrible blow. Loud
were the exclamations of the crowd, and I especially re-
member the remark of one gruff old mariner—

“ Aye,” said he, “that poor fellow ’ll never stand his
watch any more, God forgive him! But what better could
be expected from a ship’s sailing on a Friday ?* Did any
of ye ever know such a v’yage to turn out good, mateys?
No! there’s a power aloft as won’t be joked with anyhow !”

A murmur of assent ran through the nautical members of
the crowd, but one man boldly and emphatically laughed
the superstition to scorn.

“Sawdust!” growled he. ‘ What’s Friday more nor any
other day? D’ye mean to tell me, old Grampus, that if this
here hawser had parted in the same fashion on a Monday,
and had struck a fellow on the head, as it wouldn’t have

1”

stopt his grog? Gammon, old chaw-quid

* The superstitions of sailors have been much sneered at, and none
more so than their belief that Friday is a very unlucky day for com-
mencing a voyage. Perhaps the author’s early life and companionship
may have rendered him peculiarly susceptible of such impressions, but
at any rate he is not ashamed to confess that he himself firmly believes
there is more in some of the superstitions of mariners than proud philo-
sophy can explain. He has known many startling instances of disaster
occurring to vessels that left port on a Friday. On one occasion he
sailed in a foreign ship on a Friday, and for several days she was in
imminent peril. Very soon afterwards the same vessel again sailed (on
the evil day it is believed), and was wrecked on the coast of Sweden,
and every soul on board perished.

People may laugh at the idea as much as they please, but if the
author commanded a ship he would not set sail on a Friday for any
consideration. Fenimore Cooper mentions the following remarkable
fact in connection with the subject :—‘‘ A merchant of Connecticut,



4 THE DOOMED SHIP.

“But it wouldn’t ha’ parted on a Monday !” obstinately
retorted the dogmatic old tar, setting his arms a-kimbo, and
looking fiercely at his sceptical brother blue-jacket. ‘Them
only laughs at sailing on Fridays as knows no better. Live
and larn, says I; but there’s some as never'll larn, and
waint tek a warning. And I say that this here mischanter
is a God’s judgment and warning of weat’ll befall that there
ship on the wyage. There she is,” as he held out his
brawny arm in the direction of the “Lady Emily,” which
had now swung round to her anchor, with her bowsprit
pointed to the pier, ‘and ye may look at her, for she'll
never corne back again to port. I wouldn’t swing my
hammock aboard on her, if ye would give me my chest full
o’ Spanish doubloons.”

“Then I would!” answered the unbeliever in the popular
superstition, “‘and if the captain Il give me a berth in room
0’ this poor fellow, I’m ready and willing to ship this blessed
moment !”

“And so you shall, my man!” exclaimed I, “for we
shall not sail short-handed. What name d’ye hail by?”

“Blackbird Jim, sir!” replied the man, who was a deeply-
bronzed and thorough-looking seaman. The soubriquet of
“Blackbird Jim,” as I subsequently learnt, had been

imagining that he could give a death-blow to the opinion sailors
entertain about Friday, caused the keel of a very large ship to be laid
on a Friday; she was launched on a Friday; christened ‘‘The
Friday” ; a captain was found to command her whose name was also
Friday ; and finally she sailed on her first voyage on a Friday, bound
with a costly cargo to China, and in every respect as noble an Indiaman
as ever left port. The result was that she was never seen nor heard of
more !”

Only a few hours after the above was written, the “ Amazon,” West
India steamer was lost ; and on reading the appalling narrative, I find
that she sailed on a Friday /



THE DOOMED SHIP. 5

bestowed on him because he had for many years been
engaged on the African coast in the respectable and
lucrative profession of ‘blackbird catching,” ze. aboard a
slaver, and under this name he had been repeatedly entered
on ships’ books, for sailors frequently sign article, and sail
under the most extraordinary nicknames conceivable.

The departure of the ‘Lady Emily” was delayed four-
and-twenty hours by the accident, as a portion of the crew
and the officers were compelled to give evidence at the
inquest held on the body of the ill-fated sailor. I in-
troduced Mr. Blackbird Jim to the captain, who immediately
shipped him in the room of the deceased, well knowing that
Jim’s enlightened opinions and bold offer to “step into a
dead man’s shoes” would have a very powerful effect in re-
moving the gloomy forebodings the crew would certainly
indulge in.

But we were fated to proceed on our voyage short-handed,
after all; for when we had passed Spurn Point and got into
the open sea, the crew were mustered to be divided into
watches, and one man was missing. As he had assuredly
been doing duty whilst we were in the Humber, we thought
he must either have fallen overboard unnoticed, or else have
deserted in the pilot-boat or in a fishing smack that had
been alongside and sold us some fish. All doubt was
settled by one of the crew producing a letter which he stated
he had found lying on the lid of the missing man’s chest in
the forecastle. This epistle was directed to the captain,
and its strange contents were to the effect that the writer
was so awfully impressed by the accident on the pier at
Hull, together with a dream he had had as we lay at anchor
that night (and which he declared distinctly revealed to him



6 THE DOOMED SHIP.

that the ship and all on board were certain to be lost on the
voyage), that he had resolved to desert and save his life by
concealing himself on board the fishing-boat, which was
coming alongside at the time he wrote the letter in his
berth. He concluded by begging pardon of the captain for
this meditated crime, and added a wild kind of rhapsody
_about his “sinful messmates doomed to perish in their
benighted condition.”

The sailor who wrote this (a well educated man, and a
capital seaman), was a firm believer in the Muggletonian*
creed, and he, at any rate, testified his sincerity on the
present occasion by leaving his chest, hammock, and all his
clothes on board,—everything, in a word, which the poor
fellow possessed in the world, except half-a-dozen precious
volumes of the Muggletonian writings, and these he man-
aged to smuggle away with him.

My uncle read the letter aloud to the deeply attentive
crew, and sternly, but judiciously, commented on the act of
their infatuated shipmate, forcibly pointing out its folly and
criminality. But still the men only listened in gloomy
silence ; and it was very obvious that a profound super-
stitious idea—that we were indeed doomed to destruction—
was fast gaining an ascendency over them, when Blackbird
Jim most opportunely requested permission to ‘‘say his
say,” as he expressed it ; and that being granted, he boldly

* Muggleton was a fanatic of the time of the Commonwealth, and
professed himself to be a prophet—and something more. The author
personally knows a veteran skipper who to this hour carries a library of
Muggleton’s prophecies and hymns in his cabin, and most reverentially
and potentially does he believe them! The same skipper once fancied
he beheld a vision when sailing on the Humber in the dead of night,
and avows his belief that it was identically the same as that which St.
John beheld in the Isle of Patmos.



THE DOOMED SHIP. 7

addressed them off-hand, with considerable acuteness and
tact, in precisely such language as was calculated to make
the deepest impression on foremost Jacks ; and as he wound
up with facetious allusions to the creed and some of the
former doings of the deserter (who had once sailed in the
same ship as himself when engaged in the impious trade of -
“blackbird-catching ”), he not only brought the crew into
temporary good-humour, but set most of them on the broad
grin. The captain politically clenched the matter by
ordering the steward to serve out a stiff caulker of grog to
all hands, to drink success to the voyage.

A fine steady wind set in that night, and after a tolerably
quick and prosperous run, we safely cast anchor in the
harbour of Tromso, on the 28th day of July.



CHAPTER II.

E were nearly a month discharging our cargo; and

after we had shipped a heavy ballast, and warped

out midway between the island on which Tromso stands,

and the mainland of Finmark, we yet remained another

week at anchor, as a considerable time was consumed in

settling with the different merchants and traders who had
purchased our cargo in small quantities.

During this interval an event happened, which although
apparently trivial in itself, and of ordinary occurrence on
board large vessels, must be narrated, as the reader will
eventually find that its result exercised a tremendous
influence over the fate of every soul on board.

First, let me introduce my uncle, Captain Larpent, and
his black steward, Smutta, personally to the reader. The
former was a native of the West Indies, where he and his
sister (my mother) were born, being the children of a small
planter, whose wife died in giving birth to my uncle, who
was reared at the breast of a young negro woman, a slave
on the estate. This negress had a little boy only a few
weeks older than my uncle, and a very particular affection
existed between him and his black foster-brother—an
affection they seemed to have imbibed with the milk they
sucked in turns from one generous bosom. As the children
grew up from infancy to boyhood, the little black slave was
the humble, but inseparable companion and friend of his



THE DOOMED SHIP. 9

young master; and when the latter chose the sea as a pro-
fession, poor Smutta was permitted to ship with him.

Time wore on, and in his twenty-fourth year, my uncle
became commander of a large West Indian privateer, and
Smutta, who had never parted from him, became, as a
matter of course, his steward. After several successful
cruises, the privateer unfortunately fell in with a French
frigate, and, after a desperate defence, was captured.

This blow ruined my grandfather, whose whole estate had _
been mortgaged to fit her out. As to my uncle, he spent
three years in a French prison, with his devoted foster-
brother. After this, he commanded merchant vessels in
every quarter of the globe, and three years before the epoch
of this story, he became master of the ‘Lady Emily,”—
Smutta still being his steward ; and the glory of the faithful
follower was to boast that, from my uncle’s birth, they
had never been separated more than three days at a time.

My uncle was now in his fiftieth year—a short, square-
built, powerful man, with a very dark complexion, and a
resolute cast of countenance. He was a most excellent
navigator, and a member of the Royal Society of London—
into which distinguished body he had been admitted in
consequence of several papers he communicated, containing
valuable results of nautical and astronomical observations.
He was a strict disciplinarian, but a kind-hearted man. He
had never married, and when the decease of my parents left
me a poor friendless orphan of fourteen, he adopted me,
and, taking me to sea with him, made, as he himself used
emphatically to say, ‘‘a sailor and a man of me.”

Smutta was a gigantic fellow with a skin as black and
shining as polished ebony. So vast was his physical power,



Io THE DOOMED SHIP.

that he could lift a bower anchor, weighing ten hundred-
weight, and hold it on a level with his breast ; and I have
seen him take a piece of new half-inch rope, of the strongest
make, and, wrapping each end round his mighty hands,
snap it asunder with a single jerk, as easily as I could a bit
of packthread. His height was six feet nine inches, but his
bulk was so remarkable, that at a little distance he by no
means looked so tall as he really was. His arm was as
thick as an ordinary man’s thigh, and the span of his hand
was fifteen inches. His features were of the true Congo
type, and certainly poor Smutta was anything but a beauty,
even for a negro. When he opened his enormous mouth
to the full extent, and displayed the cavity with rows of
huge teeth, white as the purest ivory, the effect was quite
startling to a stranger. He always dressed very smartly,
his invariable costume being white duck trousers, with a
broad black belt of varnished leather, confined by a bright
brass clasp ; a white shirt, and a blue jacket of fine cloth,
jauntily braided and frogged. He used to turn down the
broad collar of his shirt, and leave his bull-like neck
exposed to all seasons and in all weathers. He never wore
hat nor cap, and indeed his great head was thatched with
such a dense mass of frizzled wool, that any artificial cover-
ing would, to say the least, have been superfluous. For
ornament, he wore large gold ear-rings, richly chased. He
was, in his way, a nautical dandy, and had the rare merit,
in a negro, of being scrupulously clean, both in his dress
and person. Every morning, at eight bells, he went on the
forecastle, and, stripping to the waist, made one of the boys
scrub him heartily, and finish off by dashing over him a
couple of buckets of salt water.



THE DOOMED SHIP. TI

Such was Smutta the Great (no misnomer) ; but although
he had a giant’s strength, he never used it tyrannously like
a giant, but was a gentle and kind-hearted creature. The
only thing that ever gave him personal offence was when
the men called him ‘“ Snowball.” He would reply—‘“I not
Snowball—I Smutta; dat you know berry well ;” and, if
they teased him very much, he would. occasionally be so far
roused, as to coolly stretch forth one arm, and, seizing the
offender by the nape of the neck, lift him up and give him
a shake in the air, just as one might do a naughty child.
But if ever the crew had any little favour to beg of the
captain, they always made Smutta (he was “ Mister” Smutta
then, not Snowball) the intercessor, and never in vain.

I remember once hearing some of the men bantering him
by a comparison between King George and his captain, they
pretending to be in dispute as to which was the greatest
man, and begging Smutta to decide the knotty question.
The steward listened very gravely to all their roguish mock
arguments, and then gave this oracular judgment—“ Berry
good. King Shorge, be berry great man—yah, dat is so.
King Shorge I nebber hab seen,—but he no sailor ; he not
eben know how splice rope! Ugh! Captain Larpen’, he
my king!” Go along, yah !”

Smutta’s love and devotion to his foster-brother and
captain was really quite affecting. Whatever Captain
Larpent said or did was, in Smutta’s opinion, necessarily
right. He would go through fire and water at the slightest
hint from the captain ; and once, when the latter was laid
up in his berth, dangerously ill, I thought Smutta would
have gone altogether distracted.

He would sit moaning to himself by the captain’s bed-



12 THE DOOMED SHIP.

side, tending him, and watching him, as a fond mother does
a sick child, and would permit no living being but himself
to administer anything. At times his agony and despair
was such, that he would run sobbing on deck, and wring
his hands, crying, “‘Oh de cappen! he die—Smutta die
too!” And I verily think that if the ‘‘cappen” had died,
Smutta would not have long survived him. One peculiar
act of this simple, but noble-hearted creature, affected me
to tears.

One night, when the captain’s disorder reached its crisis, I
went on deck. We were then in the latitude of the Azores,
and it was almost a dead calm. I was astonished to see all
hands congregated on the forecastle in a close group.
Stepping up, I found them surrounding Smutta, while one
of the boys, by the light of a lanthorn, was reading aloud the
prayers for a sick person from the Book of Common
Prayer. The reader stopped at my presence, and the crew
made a movement to separate, but I said, ‘Go on!” and
the lad read to the end, amid a silence broken only by the
convulsive sobs of Smutta, and the pattering of his heavy
tears, as they trickled down his sable cheeks, and fell on deck.

It seems that this devoted fellow had taken the captain’s
large Prayer-book from the cabin, and, as he could not read
himself, he had made one of the boys his chaplain, and had
actually roused up the watch below, and induced all hands to
assemble to pray for his beloved captain! Heaven surely
listened to those prayers !

Thrice had Smutta saved the captain’s life—on two
occasions from drowning, and once when in action with the
French. The bonds which united them were altogether
extraordinary. On his part, the captain reciprocated his



THE DOOMED SHIP. 13

foster-brother’s affection with almost equal intensity. Next
to the captain, Smutta loved and reverenced me. I was near
akin to his idol, and looked upon as the great captain’s son,
and from my boyhood had been constantly with them both.

And now for the incident I alluded to. One of the ship’s
apprentices, who chiefly acted as cabin-boy, was a lad about
fifteen years of age, named Claude Chepini, born in
England, but of Italian parents. He was a tall, active
fellow, with strongly-marked Italian features, large black
eyes, and long black hair.

Three days before we sailed from Tromso, the captain
ordered this boy to clean his favourite telescope. In doing
this on deck, Chepini very carelessly laid the pieces of the
telescope on the top of the bulwark, and one of the largest
rolled overboard. The captain was so vexed, that at the
moment he snatched up a rope-end, and gave the boy three
or four blows, but not very severe ones.

Nothing more was thought of this at the time; but the
next morning the boat which had been lying alongside was
missing, and Chepini also. He had run the ship.

Inquiries were immediately made, and the boat was soon
found drifting along the shore of the opposite mainland. A
party was sent in search of the deserter, and in a few hours
they captured him hiding among the brushwood of
Tromsdal (a ravine near the shore), and brought him back
to the ship. ° He was forthwith marched to the quarter-deck
before the captain, who was naturally very angry.

“Now, Chepini, what made you run the ship?” said he.

The lad never spoke, but turned deathly pale, and hung
down his head.

“Have I not always been a good and kind captain to you?”



14 THE DOOMED SHIP.

My uncle had really been quite a father to the boy,
having paid for his out-fit, a year before, out of his own
pocket, and ever had treated him most kindly, and had
even recently begun to teach him navigation.

Still Chepini made no reply.

“Do you hear me, boy?” repeated the captain with
increasing irritation.

This time Chepini raised his head, and I shall never
forget the startling glance of malignancy which shot from
his flashing black eyes, as he hissed, rather than said,

“You struck me yesterday !”

“Struck you! and hadn’t Ia right? Whoare you? It
is high time, I find, to teach you your station. Will you
beg pardon for running the ship ?”

The boy clenched his teeth, and again hanging down his
head, muttered something inaudible.

“What do you say? Once more, will you beg pardon?”

Not a syllable did the culprit reply. The captain’s brow
grew black with passion, and turning round to the steward,
who, as usual, was at his elbow, following him like a dog,
he quickly said,

“ Smutta, strip that lad and swing him up!”

No sooner said than done. The gigantic black handled
Chepini precisely as if he were an infant, and, stripping him
naked to the waist, lashed him fast by the wrists to the
mizen shrouds.

“Now, Chepini.” said the captain, biting his lip to
refrain his anger, ‘‘any other captain but me would flog you
within an inch of your life, but I will yet forgive you, if you
will only say you are sorry for what you have done, and beg
my pardon.”



THE DOOMED SHIP. 15

No reply.

Without wasting another word, the captain seized a coil
or two of the log-line (a hard-twisted cord, about the thick-
ness of a lady’s little finger), and doubling the bight, took a
turn round his right hand, and inflicted half-a-dozen smart
lashes on the boy’s bare back. Then he paused, and again
asked the obstinate offender if he would beg pardon, but, as
before, no reply could be elicited. Incensed by this, the
captain lashed him till his shoulders and back were covered
with weals, and began to bleed. He had, for a boy,
received a very sound flogging. But not a single expression
of pain, not a murmur of deprecation, escaped his firmly
closed lips.

“Take him down, and lock him up in the store-room till
the ship sails,” said the captain.

As Chepini was led away, he lifted his head for a moment,
and fixed his glaring eyes on the captain with a look that
almost made me shudder. One read there the untamed
ferocity of the tiger, combined with the deadly malignancy
of the rattlesnake. Italian eyes alone could shoot forth
such a horrible expression.

The opinion of the crew on the matter was tolerably
well indicated by some remarks I overheard.

“Tf that fellow grows up, he'll take his six dozen at the
gangway without so much as winking,” said one.

“Ay,” replied another, “but if ’d been the captain, I’m
not blessed if I wouldn’t have cut his back to ribbons, till I
made him squeak for pardon. He’s an ungrateful Italian -
whelp !”

“So he is, messmate, and a mischief-making son of a gun
to boot !”



CHAPTER III.

HE evening before the day appointed for sailing,
Captain Larpent told me that we were to take a
passenger with us, and land her at Copenhagen on our way
to St. Petersburgh. This passenger was a young Danish
lady, named Oriana Neilsen, who had been staying a year
with an uncle of hers, a merchant of Tromso, and who
would now take advantage of the rare opportunity presented
by our vessel to return direct to her home at Copenhagen.
The captain ordered me to go to her uncle’s house, and
inform him that she must be prepared to embark the next
morning, as we should positively sail at noon.

On arriving at the merchant’s residence, I found that the
young lady’s friends, in anticipation of her departure, had
assembled a large party of guests to bid her farewell. My
message being delivered, her uncle warmly insisted on my
passing the evening with them, and he forthwith introduced
me to Jomfrue Oriana Neilsen herself.

She was a young lady twenty years of age, and a fair type
of her Danish countrywomen. She was middle-sized,
well-shaped, and of very lady-like demeanour. Her long,
light auburn hair, floated over her shoulders, and her pure
white brow rose above a set of features which, although
certainly not beautiful, were so pleasant and charming in
their general effect, that I felt delighted to gaze on them.

As soon as her uncle had told her who I was, her fine
blue eyes sparkled, and she extended her hand to me with



THE DOOMED SHIP. 17

winning frankness, and in somewhat broken, but very
tolerable English, and with a voice peculiarly sweet, said—

“‘ How kind for you to come! I am very much glad, and
you shall be very welcome to-night with us all!”

I said something or other, and she smilingly added—

“Come with me, and let me give you to eat!”

So saying, she led me to the end of the spacious room,
in which about fifty people of all ages were assembled, and
seated me at a table covered with every delicacy this
far-northern region could furnish.

Although not hungry, in compliment to my fair young
hostess, I ate a little reindeer tongue, which she sliced for
me, spreading over it some delicious moltebcers, and then
she poured me a glass of generous wine, doing all with as
much innocent self-possession as though I were a very old
friend.

“Your ship, it really will set the sail to-morrow?”

I assured her that it would.

“Well, I am ready for to go, and you see how many good,
dear friends come to say, ‘ Farvel, Oriana !’”

Her eyes filled with tears as she glanced round, but,
hastily subduing her emotion, she added, with a smile—

“But we must all be what is the English word P—
merry, dat is, to-night. Why not for your uncle, the good
captain, to come! O, he must, I am so sure!”

She here called her own uncle to her side, and suggested to
him that a message should be sent to the ship to that effect.
He most heartily acquiesced, and at their request I wrote a
note inviting him to come and join the party, and to bring
his chief mate with him. This was immediately despatched
by our boat.



2



18 THE DOOMED SHIP.

Oriana—henceforth and for ever let me drop the surname,
as she herself very speedily taught me to do—then gracefully
introduced me to several of her friends, and, as dances were
going on with much animation, she said to me with
charming naivete,—

“Will you not have one little dance with me?”

I blushed to the very temples, and stammered,—

“TJ am very sorry, but I cannot dance !”

“Cannot dance!” and she opened her bright eyes widely
with surprise.

“No, indeed, I cannot; I never was taught. I never
danced in all my life!”

This was quite true; and never before had I felt my
deficiency so acutely. Indeed, poor fellow as I was, I had
not mixed in polished society half a dozen times in my life,
and although well enough educated, I was, consequently, as
bashful and out of my element in a large mixed company as
any fore-mast Jack could possibly be.

Oriana instantly divined my feelings with true womanly
tact, and, lightly laying her hand on my arm, she said, in a
soft winning tone, and with a look of gentle sympathy—

“Never mind dat; you can do many better things than
dancing. But I wish I had known you when your beautiful
ship first came here, for I would have taught you to dance.
You would let me teach you, 1 am so sure?” questioned
she, with an arch look.

I was about to reply when a young Norwegian came up
to ask her hand fora national dance, but as she left my
side, I saw her whisper a word or two to her uncle, the
import of which I rightly enough guessed, for the next
moment he joined me, and very delicately expressing his



THE DOOMED SHIP. 19

wish to make me feel at home, led me by the arm to a
group of friends, who knew a little English, and in a few
minutes set me at my ease, talking and chatting with them.

When the dance concluded in which Oriana was engaged,
she came back to me, and was in the act of exchanging a
few kind words, when my uncle entered in full togs. He
had answered the invitation even more promptly than I
expected, and he had not only brought our first mate with
him, but also no less a personage than Mr. Smutta!

“IT must beg pardon,” said my uncle, “for the liberty I
take of bringing a third party with me, but this faithful
fellow is my foster-brother, I owe my life to him; and, in
fact, he follows me like my shadow—a very black shadow
he is, too, as you may see!”

Herr Duhrendahl, our host, laughed, and said that if
Captain Larpent had brought all his crew with him, they
should have been heartily welcome. As to Oriana, she went
to poor Smutta, who stood bolt upright, donned in his
smartest attire, his face shining like burnished mahogany,
while his great eyes rolled all round, and taking one of his
immense black paws between both her own little white
palms, she looked smilingly up to him, and said—

“You are very much welcome here! We are very glad
to see you, and you must make yourself comfortable and

1

happy !
Blacks don’t blush, so it is said, but I am certain that

Smutta felt the blood tingling all over him. Never before
in his life had a real lady taken him by the hand, and
spoken such honeyed words. I saw that Oriana had won
the giant’s simple heart in a moment, and that he was
henceforth her slave. He looked down at her genial



20 THE DOOMED SHIP.

countenance, and involuntarily the words broke from
him—

“OQ, berry lubly lady! © berry kind, berry good, yah!”

Without more ado, she led him to the refreshment table,
and did not leave him till he had, at her repeated invitation,
commenced a terrible onslaught on the good things placed
before him. This trait of her unaffectedly amiable
disposition increased the already deep sentiment of respect
and admiration I entertained for her.

My uncle was quite at home at once. He danced with
‘Oriana and half the ladies in the room, and joked, sang,
drank, and enjoyed himself thoroughly.

As the night drew on, “the mirth and fun waxed fast and
furious.” My uncle suddenly proposed that Smutta should
give us a fashionable Congo dance, and Smutta, nothing
loth, forthwith took to the floor, and, to the vociferous
delight of the Nordlanders, executed a series of flings and
capers, the like of which had never been seen in “gamle
Norge” before, and never will again. I really thought he
would have brought down the house about our ears, for at
every leap he shook it like an earthquake ; and he accom-
panied his performance with a song in his native Congo
dialect, which was, doubtless, very elegant and sentimental,
but after a few syllables, became a stunning supernatural yell.

It was three o’clock in the morning ere the party broke
up, and we strangers all slept at the house, and when we
departed, conveyed Oriana aboard with us, and set sail at
noon, September 2nd.

The first ten days after leaving port, we had a light wind
dead a-head, and did not make fifty miles of our southward
course all the time. One morning I said to Smutta—



THE DOOMED SHIP. 21

“ How do you like our lady passenger ?”

““O, Massa Sharl” (my name was Charles Meredith), “I
like her berry much! She got good kind heart,” and he
laid his black paw over that part of his body where he
imagined his own heart to beat, that is to say, some eleven
inches below its actual locality. “It good to hear her
*peak, she so berry sweet leetle tongue dat I lub much to
listen. ‘Tree times she hab gibben me her lily leetle hand
to shake, and she nebber call me Snowball like de black-
guard peoples, but she look at me wid, O, so nice a smile!
and she say, ‘Massa Smutta,’ she always call me Massa,
‘you be so good as to do dis or dat!’ O, she good lubly
lady, yah !” .

“You are very right, Smutta!” emphatically said I.

“‘ Massa Sharl, I tell you what I tink !”

“Well, what is that ?”

“T tink what a nice darling little wife she make you, and
den when Smutta grow too old to go to sea wid you, he
stay ashore and play wid your leetle piccaninies, yah!” and
he grinned from ear to ear at the conceit.

“Get along with you for a great ugly black porpoise !”
exclaimed I, giving him a hearty push, which moved him
no more than if he were a rock. But somehow, when I lay
in my berth that night, I couldn’t help smiling complacently
over his honest suggestion.



CHAPTER IV.

AILORS have a pleasant superstition that the presence

of a woman or child on ship-board is decidedly lucky.

Oriana was consequently welcomed heartily by the crew.

Just after she came on board at Tromso, Blackbird Jim

(who already considered himself a privileged person) doffed

his tarpauling, and making his best bow and scrape of the
feet, exclaimed,—

“Bless your smiling face, ma’am! a lady like you is
sunshine on ship-board, and always brings fair winds and
fine weather !”

“What’s that you say, my man?” cried my uncle, who
happened to overhear him. ‘I fancied that you didn’t
believe in salt-water superstitions ?”

The gallant Blackbird was taken a little aback, but
twirling his tarpauling round his fist, he replied, with a
roguish twinkle of his large grey eyes,—‘‘ Oh yes, captain, I
believe in fortinit notions, but not in them as promises ill-
luck. And if this here pretty young lady doesn’t bring us a
capful o’ wind, and that of the right sort, I ain’t no prophet!
The boys o’ Copenhagen, ma’am,” continued he in an
explanatory way, “they’ll get hold o’ the tow-rope and haul
us to the Sound hand-over-fist. That shall be true, as
Charley Baxter said when he banged his wife’s head agen
the bed-post !”

Unfortunately for Mr. Blackbird Jim’s prophetical
reputation, the first ten days, as already mentioned, the



THE DOOMED SHIP. 23

wind was chock ahead, but he took an opportunity of
explaining to the laughing Danish girl that the reason of
this was, that the Copenhagen boys were getting an extra
strong tow-rope expressly manufactured.

The cabin of the “Lady Emily” was large and well
furnished, and the state-room being devoted to Oriana, she
was very comfortable. Every evening Captain Larpent had
a game at chess with her, as the baffling wind was so light
that the ship was generally steady enough. My uncle
prided himself on his skill at chess, but he had met his
match now. Mr. Smutta on one occasion watched the
progress of a protracted game with intense admiration, and
in the fulness of his heart he at length exclaimed—

““O, de lubly lady play ’mazing, but it nebber possible to
beat Cappen Larpen !”

At that moment Oriana demurely gave check-mate,—a
practical lesson for Smutta that even his “cappen” was not
invincible. Poor Smutta constantly studied how to pay
every convenient attention to promote the comfort of the
“lubly lady,” and his manifestations of affection and respect
were at times droll enough.

One night I heard him soundly rating a seaman for having
carelessly flung a heavy chain-tye down on the deck just
over Oriana’s berth, for Smutta fancied the crash would
awake and frighten her. He led the wooden-legged cook a
sad life, also, owing to his anxiety that everything intended
for the cabin table should be served up in the most perfect
style, and to do Smutta justice, few ship’s stewards could
excel him in his vocation.

Oriana had with her a beautiful little silken-haired dog,
and Smutta used to pamper this unfortunate animal with



24 THE DOOMED SHIP.

delicate tit-bits to such a degree that the dog’s mistress
found it necessary to check the steward’s well-meant kind-
ness, else the creature would have died of absolute repletion.

Chepini, the cabin-boy, was liberated from confinement
the day after we left Tromso. I expected that he would
have been sullen and obstinate, but he was the reverse ; he
set about his usual duties with surprising alacrity, and
answered the captain promptly, and in the most respectful
manner, when spoken to.

His countenance bore no trace of lingering irritation, and
to all outward appearance, he had already forgotten his
punishment. Come, thought I, the whipping and the two
or three days of solitude have had a beneficial effect on you,
my fine fellow! But somehow I could not help remember-
ing the fearful display of revengeful passion he had previously
manifested ; and singularly enough, the young Danish lady,
although ignorant that the boy had grossly misbehaved,
entertained an involuntary feeling of repulsion towards him.
I noticed her gazing strangely at him whenever he was
occupied in the cabin, and once she fairly shuddered when
he suddenly met her look. I hinted to her that she did not
seem to like the lad, and the reply she made struck me
deeply :—

‘“No, I am very much sorry, but dat boy I cannot like.
He has the evil eye!”

“The evil eye! What do you mean?”

“OQ, Iam so sure he has! I have seen him look at the
captain, oh, so dreadful a look, I will never forget! Pray,”
added she, in an earnest and frightened tone, “do not you
do anything to make dat boy hate you!”

This opinion of hers, joined to my own secret misgivings,



THE DOOMED SHIP. 25

induced me to henceforth watch Chepini pretty closely, but
there was certainly nothing whatever in his actions or his
words to enable me to judge whether he was hypocritically
acting a part, with revenge gnawing his soul.

Something even worse than head-winds befel us after the
teens were ended, for a dead calm ensued, which lasted an
entire week—a very unusual circumstance in that latitude,
where a wind of some kind or other is nearly always blowing,
and a calm rarely lasts twelve hours. This certainly was a
gloomy commencement of the voyage, and we were hard put
to shifts to keep the men employed—for on shipboard it
will not do to let a man be idle. Officers say (and very
truly), “If we don’t find the men something to do, the
devil will!” We had actually not got one degree south in
seventeen days! This state of inaction was the more
trying, because the days were now rapidly shortening, and
in the latitude we were (a degree north of the Arctic Circle),
we had now only a very few hours of daylight.

On the seventh day of the calm, Oriana cheerfully chatted
with me on deck, and I was astonished to find that she
knew the names of almost every sail and rope in the ship.
I told her she was quite a sailor, and she replied—‘“ So I
ought! my forefathers were Vikings, dat is, Sea Kings, a
thousand years ago.”

This, like all ladies’ logic, was unanswerable.

Smutta was by, most industriously engaged in polishing
one of the brass signal-carronades, for lack of better employ-
ment, but he paused, and addressing her, said—

‘‘Spose, now, you be so good as bring us good wind.”

‘“ Ah, I wish I could, Mr. Smutta!”

“© berry easy. A lubly lady can make wind come as



26 THE DOOMED SHIP.

she like. All got to do, look out in de right quarter, and
whistle in de proper way, and de wind hear and come, yah !”

“ But I do not know the right way to whistle.”

“©, for dat,” grinned the sable rascal, ‘‘ Massa Sharl dere,
him know berry well, he tell you!” :

I explained the way to her, and she forthwith pursed her
rosy mouth, and to Smutta’s glee, invoked the unseen
Spirit of Air by the most silvery, coaxing little whistle ever
heard on shipboard.

“OQ, dat is ’mazing good!” cried the delighted black,
“noting could be betterer. Ah, you sall see, we sall hab
de good big wind come down before eight bells.

For once in his life, Smutta proved a partially true
prophet, for sure enough, just after sunset, a roaring gale
suddenly sprung up, but as it happened to be as unfavour-
able as possible, the chief benefit we derived from it was to
give all hands plenty to do in tacking and reefing throughout
the long hours of utter darkness.



CHAPTER V.

HAT most materially aggravated our position was,

that we were very likely to run short of provisions.

We had been detained much longer at Tromso than we had
anticipated, and we found it impossible to make up the
deficiency of our stores at that place, for no supply could be
had except at an enormous price. In fact, the people lived
then, as they do yet, chiefly on fish—the poorer classes
subsisting almost entirely on fish and coffee. On leaving
Tromso, we had not more than thirty-five days’ stock of
provisions, but we hoped to reach Copenhagen (where
provisions were abundant and cheap) in three, or at most
four, weeks, and therefore felt no inquietude at sailing ; but
the startling fact that seventeen days had already passed
without taking us a degree on our voyage, made my uncle
resolve to put the crew on half allowance. The gale, which
had set in after the calm, moderated the next day, but the
wind continued a-head, and after a full allowance had once
more been served out, the men were informed that they
necessarily would be put on short allowance henceforward.
They seemed taken by surprise, and some murmurs were
heard, but taking their recent heavy exertion into considera-
tion (all hands having been up many hours), the captain
ordered the steward to serve out a liberal allowance of grog,
and the good humour of the crew (for the time being, at any
rate) was restored. Shall I confess the truth? I myself
secretly felt rather glad than sorry that we were likely to



28 THE DOOMED SHIP.

have an exceedingly protracted voyage. Never before in
my life had I been accustomed to the society of an amiable
and accomplished woman—and now to spend many hours
in close contact with her daily—to listen to her inexpressibly
melodious voice—to feast on her pleasant countenance—to
exchange kindly little courtesies with her—was to me a new
and delicious existence. Feelings which I have never known
before, and which I as yet only half understood, swelled my
bosom, and I even felt an increased affection for the old ship
that had been my home three years, because it was the
medium of my enjoying undreamt-of happiness. Gentlemen
who enjoy constant communion with refined circles, graced
by the female sex, can little imagine what a wondrous
charm a poor sailor like me found in the society of a young
lady whom they, perchance, would have thought very
ordinary and common-place. During the night of the gale,
I slipped down several times into the cabin, and listened at
the door of her state-room, fearful that she would be very ill
and alarmed, but I heard not the slightest noise, and at
daybreak she entered the cabin, fresh asa rose, and in
answer to my inquiries, she said she believed the storm had
only made her sleep sounder than usual.

“But were you not frightened at the roar of the waves,
and the tossing of the ship?”

“Ono, why should I? Did I not tell you that I am the
daughter of Vikings? Besides,” added she with her winning
frankness, and truthful, innocent way of speaking, “I knew
dat I was in a good ship, and dat you and all the brave
men were keeping watch over me.”

How my heart leapt as I mentally repeated, “ And you
were keeping watch over me!” To her I said aloud—



THE DOOMED SHIP. 29

“ Aye, and the angels in heaven were keeping watch over
you also !” .

‘“‘God’s angels keep watch over us always, in the calm as
well as in the storm,” responded she; adding in Danish,
whilst a lovely expression of religious faith lit up her
features—‘‘ Hans hellig Engleskare en Skanse om os
Slade!” [His (God’s) holy angel-host a fence around us
places !]

The best and holiest emotions of our nature are surely
sympathetic, for I who, throughout life, had been brought,
as a sailor, into frequent contact with the most sublime and
impressive manifestations of God’s omnipotence and
sublimity, and consequently always felt in my _ better
moments a certain degree of that rude and brief, but sincere,
piety characteristic of seamen, I, in listening to this innocent
young creature’s artless expression of her perfect reliance in
His watchful providence, experienced a warmer and more
spiritual influence of devotional gratitude and faith than I
had ever before been conscious of.

“A strange visitor boarded us in the course of the night,
and when the gale was at its worst,” said I, after a pause.

“Indeed ! was it the Ghost of a Viking ?”

“Faith ! your suggestion is not a bad one,” laughed I.

“ Tell me its shape, and I shall know whether it was one
of my brave old practical ancestors.”

“That of a beautiful white bird. It fell suddenly on the
quarter-deck, and I have taken care of it for you. Here
it is.”

I thereupon opened a locker, and showed her the bird,
which was of a species unknown to me. Its body was the
size of a dove, but its tapering wings were of extraordinary



30 THE DOOMED SHIP.

length. Its feet and long beak were of a bright red colour,
and the former were partially webbed. All its feathers were
spotlessly white.

“Ah!” exclaimed she, with a cry of pleasure, “it is a
Himmelsfugl, dat is, heaven’s bird! O, I am so glad you
have given it to me! I will feed it till it is strong enough to
fly.”

She tenderly released it from its prison, and pressing its
head to her lips, began to caress and smooth its tempest-
ruffled plumage. The bird, which had previously struggled
much in my rough grasp, seemed instinctively to know that
it had nothing to fear now, for it gave a little twittering cry
or two, and then, hiding its head in Oriana’s bosom, spread
forth its wings and remained quite motionless. JI left her
fondling her Himmelsfugl, and thought that she herself was
equally a ‘“ heaven’s bird.”

A day and night more of head-wind, and then it changed
to a light but favourable breeze. On the twentieth day after
leaving Tromso, we got an observation at noon, and found
our latitude to be 65.37.42 N. and our longitude 6.3.19 E.
We were consequently only seven or eight miles north of the
Arctic Circle—Calliskaal, on the coast of Norway, bearing
about one hundred miles distant. We had given the coast
a wide berth, to be thoroughly clear of the numerous
dangerous rocks, which rise far out at sea. I mention our
exact position, because this actually proved the very last
observation ever taken on board the “ Lady Emily.” Just as
I had marked off our position and laid down my quadrant,
Oriana came on deck, with her Himmelsfugl pressed to her
bosom.

“Tt is quite strong now,” said she “and I will let it



THE DOOMED SHIP. 31

fly, for it would be cruel to keep the poor bird a
captive.”

I had my own private doubts about the presumed
“cruelty” of the matter, for the bird had thriven “ mazing,”
as Smutta said, under Oriana’s tender and judicious care,
and although she allowed it to go about the cabin at perfect
liberty, it never seemed inclined to escape by the medium
of the open companion. She fed it in a very singular way,
giving it nothing but the white of hard boiled eggs, chopped
fine, and rolled in powdered loaf-sugar. Strange to say,
the Himmelsfugl took at once to this diet, and ina few
hours it pecked out of her hand as though it had been
domesticated for years.

‘“Farevel, dear, pretty Himmelsfugl!” cried she, holding
forth her arm, with the bird perched on her wrist. But it did
not at all seem desirous of quitting so kind a protector, for
after giving two or three flutters with its wings, it folded them
closely, and nestled very composedly where it was.

“The bird loves you too well already to wish to leave
you,” cried I.

2

“Vent lidt! It will go very soon ;” replied she, and she
was right, as, after a minute of inaction, the Himmelsfugl
gave a powerful swoop with its snowy pinions, and launched
into the air, rising in a spiral direction till it remained, to all
appearance, quite stationary, a mere speck directly overhead.
Then it rapidly descended, and hovered in narrow circles
round our mizzen top-gallant mast-head, and finally settled
on the truck. Throughout the afternoon it remained there,
—sometimes quitting its perch for a few minutes, during
which it resumed its aerial circlings, and then settled again.
Towards night-fall, after a longer rest than usual, it gave a



32 THE DOOMED SHIP.

prolonged shrill wild cry, as though to say, ‘ Farewell for
ever!” and disappeared with astonishing swiftness, flying
due North in a horizontal line.

“Who will feed and cherish the poor Himmelsfugl to
night ?” said I.

“Tt is God’s own bird, and He will do that,” responded
Oriana, with devout simplicity.

The sailors had watched the manceuvres of the bird with
much curiosity, and drew their own omens from its visit
and mysterious departure. Could any of us have foreseen
what would befal us, we should indeed have been justified
in regarding the Himmelsfugl as a mystic messenger from

God.



CHAPTER VI.

S I entered up our day’s reckoning in the log-book
that evening, Oriana peeped over my shoulder a
long while, and at length she said :—

“What use for so many columns ?”

“The daughter of the Vikings,” replied I, somewhat
maliciously, “ ought to know that intuitively.”

“Det er muligt, min ven!” responded she good-
humouredly, but you know that the Vikings were so good
sailors, they never kept any reckoning at all !”

“‘ Very true, I dare say, but, unfortunately, they forgot to
bequeath their wonderful skill to us poor timid modern
mariners! Now, I will tell you what these columns are for.
The entries, you perceive, are made every hour of the day
and night, and show the knots run, the courses, the winds,
the leeway, the latitude, and longitude, and the last column
is for remarks. These other entries give the compass,
course, the tack, the points of leeway, the points of
variation, and, finally, the true course.”

“Thank you, all very good, but I think your ship makes
very much more leeway than you write here.”

The demure way in which she spoke, added to my
high opinion of the degree of nautical knowledge she had
evidently some way acquired, completely deceived me, and
I hastily replied with great earnestness ’:—

“No, indeed, it does not. We have had a light wind all
day, and yet I have allowed a full point for leeway. My

3



34 THE DOOMED SHIP.

uncle, a first-rate. navigator, often allows only one point
when there isa strong breeze, and he never allows more
than three points, or at most three and a-half, even when
under close-reefed topsails.”

‘‘Ah, you don’t understand me,” laughed she. “Iam
very sure that you and Captain Larpent are brave, good
sailors, but the ship is bewitched. Yes, dat is it, 1am so
sure ! She sails like a crab sideways. Oh! pray do not bite
your lip, and be angry with me !”

“Tt is natural,” I replied, with a heavy sigh, “that you
should be weary of our poor old ship, and we certainly have
been very unfortunate this voyage so far, but ”—

“Who told you I am weary of it?” promptly but
soothingly interrupted she.

““J—I feared so. There is nothing whatever to amuse
you, and you doubtless long to embrace your parents at
Copenhagen.”

“My parents are in heaven!” solemnly answered she,
and her eyes filled with tears.

“Oh! pray forgive me: I knew not that. I, also, have
been an orphan from childhood.”

“You an orphan, like me!’ and as though she were
impelled by an irresistible impulse of subtle sympathy, she
offered me her hand. I pressed it warmly ; and not with-
drawing it, she continued :—

“‘ Have you broders and sisters ?”

“No, I have neither. Have you ?”

‘“* Yes, one broder and one sister.” f

“‘ Ah, how often have I yearned for a sister’s love! How
often have I intensely wished that God had given me a
sister !”



THE DOOMED SHIP. 35

‘‘Well, you must let me be your sister!’ responded she
in an affectionate tone, and with a look of the most innocent
endearment ; “ and you shall be my broder.”

I raised her hand to my trembling lips, and turned away
to hide my emotion.

That night I had the middle watch (twelve p.m. to four
a.m.) on deck, and two bells (one o’clock) had just been
struck, and I was in the act of glancing at the compass in
the binnacle, when a cry of agony arose from the companion-
way—a cry so fearful, so thrilling, so unearthly, that I felt my
heart give one convulsive bound, and then momentarily
cease to beat.

“Gracious heaven! what is that?” ejaculated I, gazing
at the pallid face of the steersman, who in his alarm let the
wheel slip half round.

A moment of confused irresolution, and then I rushed
headlong down into the cabin, which, as usual, was obscurely
lighted by a large night lamp swinging from a beam overhead.

Startling and incomprehensible was the sight that I beheld.
Captain Larpent, whose berth was on the larboard side of the
cabin, and opened into the latter simply by a slide (in the
old-fashioned style), was half out of bed, supported in the
arms of Smutta, who had sprung from his own berth at the
foot of the stairs, on being aroused by the dreadful cry.
The captain’s features were agonizingly distorted ; his glaring
eyeballs vacantly wandered round; great drops of sweat
trickled down his forehead; his naturally dark bronzed
complexion was pallid as a corpse ; and his entire body shook
as though he were in a violent ague-fit.

“OQ, Cappen! O, my broder!” moaned the terrified
steward.



36 THE DOOMED SHIP.

“ Uncle, dear uncle !” exclaimed I, ‘in the name of
goodness what is the matter ?”

He clenched my hand in an iron grip, and his eyes settled
on me at the sound of my familiar voice, and a great groan
burst from him, but he did not speak. The first mate, Mr.
Shields, a plain, honest, warm-hearted fellow, who had a
particular affection for my uncle, now hurried in.

“Good gracious! what is it? Is the captain in a fit?”

“No, Shields, I—I’m better know!” and he stretched
forth a hand that trembled like an aspen leaf.

“Thank God!” responded we both, and poor Smutta
burst into tears, crying, “Oh! de cappen ’peak again? Me
nebber tink me hear him ’peak more !”

“Don’t leave me, Smutta! You won’t desert me now?”
tremulously exclaimed the captain.

Had my uncle been himself he never would have uttered
such a request as this. Smutta leave him? Why, if the
ship were sinking, or on fire, Smutta would not stir an inch
from his captain’s side for the universe.

“Oh,” groaned my uncle, reclining heavily on Smutta’s
breast, and covering his face with his hands, ‘’twas horrible,
most horrible !”

Shields and myself exchanged a glance, and I said,—

“ Dear uncle, what was most horrible 2?”

“Yes it will—it must come to pass. God have mercy on
all our souls! But, Charles,” and suddenly he withdrew his
hands from his face and grasped my right hand between
both his, “there is that poor dear Danish girl on board.
Promise me, boy, that you will defend and save her with
your life !”

“ Before God I do promise it, uncle!”



THE DOOMED SHIP. 37

“His mind is wandering—he does not know what he
says,” whispered Shields in my ear.

But I myself was far from thinking that his mind
wandered now.

“Cappen Larpen’ know me—know Smutta—know him
broder?” blubbered the devoted black, bending over his
shattered idol with mingled despair and hope.

“Oh! yes,” faintly murmured the foster-brother, ‘“I
know you, Smutta, and shall know you when we meet aloft !
We have lived together, and we shall die together.”

All this while the captain trembled so that the berth
shook, but the appalling distortion of his features gradually
was passing away. His brow and hands were cold as ice,
and clammy with sweat, but he was becoming calmer and
better.

‘“‘ How did this illness seize you ?”—

“TlIness!” murmured he with a ghastly smile, ‘‘ I’m not
seized with illness, but it is, it was—don’t ask me, boy !”

What was it, or is it? thought I. What can have caused
this inexplicable attack? Captain Larpent was as brave a
seaman as ever trod a deck ; a man of undaunted resolution
and iron nerve. He had retired to his berth two hours
before in perfect health, and now his body and mind
seemed alike awfully stricken. Had some tremendous
vision of impending calamity appeared to him in his sleep ?
Or could it be that, long years ago, he had committed some
dark deed of sin, and the spirit of his victim had now stood
before him in the silent watches of the night, to warn him
that he must prepare to soon meet his Judge on high? All
was a mystery.

“Mr. Meredith, go to your duty, Sir!” all at once



38 THE DOOMED SHIP.

exclaimed the captain, in such a tone of stern, prompt
command, that I started in renewed amazement. ‘An
officer should not quit his watch on deck for a moment.”

“T did not know what had happened, Sir,” replied I.
“The cry was so terrible that J——”

“Captain Larpent,” kindly interrupted the first mate,
“Jet me take charge of the deck, that Mr. Meredith may
stay with you.”

“You are a good fellow, Shields,” replied the captain, in
a softened tone, ‘and you may. But he shall relieve you
soon, for I am better; I shall be myself in the morning !”

As the mate turned away, I happened to look towards the
cabin stairs, and there I beheld the face of Chepini, who
was stretching forward as far as he dare, to see and hear all
that was going on. The instant he perceived himself
observed, he disappeared, but the glimpse of his features
struck a fresh chill to my heart, for I thought of all that had
passed, and the vague suspicions and dread entertained of
him. There was no mistaking the feeling that animated his
soul on the present occasion. His flashing eyes, and every
lineament of his features were expressive of savage triumph.
He regarded the prostration of the captain as the first sweet
morsel of. his anticipated feast of revenge. So, at least, I
instinctively interpreted it at the time.

“ You had better lie down,” said I.

‘Ay, I will, for I shiver like a sail in the blast,” replied
the captain ; and he did so.

At this moment, to my astonishment, Oriana noiselessly
entered the cabin. I had forgotton her in my agitation—
although, as related, the captain himself had made an
unaccountable allusion to her. She had heard the cry, and



THE DOOMED SHIP. 39

had hurriedly risen and dressed herself. She appeared to
understand at a glance what had occurred—at any rate, as
well as I did myself—and though very pale, was quite
composed. Captain Larpent saw her, and after hastily
muttering something to himself, he said aloud,—

“My dear young lady, I am very sorry indeed that you
have been disturbed.”

“OQ, never mind dat!” cheerfully cried she, frankly
coming close up to the side of his berth. ‘‘ You have been
taken ill?”

“ Ves—that is, I—a sudden attack—a—better now!”
confusedly answered the captain, and he pressed one hand
tightly over his eyes, as though to shut out some horrid
sight, whilst I distinctly overheard the words, ‘God have
mercy !” involuntarily burst from his quivering white lips.

“Oh! de cappen hab been a’most die! I nebber seen
him in so way afore!” cried Smutta, whose eyes glistened
with pleasure at the presence of Oriana, as though he
actually fancied she possessed some heavenly power to charm
away the evil demon from the captain’s soul. His remark,
that he had never seen the latter afflicted in the same way
before, was a satisfaction to me, for I had felt doubtful on
that head. Even as Smutta spoke, the strong shivering
again seized the captain, and Oriana laid her hand on his
cold, wet temples with the grave air of a physician. I trust
I shall have such an one, if ever I fall sick! thought I at the
time.

‘Dear Captain Larpent,” said she, in her sweet, winning
voice, “I see you are indeed very ill, but if you will let me
be your nurse, you shall be quite well to-morrow.”

I gave her an eager, grateful look, and she smiled gently,



40 THE DOOMED SHIP.

saying, “ Yes, I know what to do. The captain shall be the
strong man again on the morrow, but he must obey me
to-night.”

My uncle removed his hand from his eyes, and gazed at
her a moment in silent amazement, and then cried, AOU
are very good, but go back to your room at once, my dear
young lady—this is no place for you.”

“JT will not leave you till you are better, and you must,
and shall, obey me this one night,” answered she, very
quietly, but with an air of firmness that evinced her deter-
mination to have her will.

The captain looked again at this extraordinary girl, and
sighed deeply, while some inaudible utterance trembled on
his lips, and his head sank backward on the pillow. I
nodded an approval of what Oriana said, for I loved my
uncle dearly, and I knew not myself what to do to relieve
him, but I felt an instinctive reliance on Oriana. Smutta,
however, settled the matter. ‘‘Cappen,” said he, with great
solemnity, ‘“‘you must do what de lubly lady tink good—
yah !”

“Get some water boiled directly, and bring me brandy
and sugar,” said Oriana to the steward—who jumped up
with such precipitation to obey her, that he struck his woolly
head against the beams with a loud crash.

In a very few minutes the ingredients were set down on
the locker-lid by the side of the berth, and Oriana
rapidly mixed a large tumbler full of half-and-half, or nearly
so. All this while, the captain had never uttered a
word, but occasionally groaned, and shivered as much as
ever.

“‘ Now, captain,” said she, ‘here is your medicine. You



THE DOOMED SHIP. : 41

know dat I have mixed your grog several times before, and
you praised my skill very much.”

“Yah!” eagerly cried Smutta ; and without ceremony he
lifted up the captain, and sustained him with his mighty arm.

“Drink dat—every little drop !” exclaimed the physician.

My uncle looked at all of us with a queer, puzzled air,
and tried to grasp the glass, but his hand shook like that of
one in the palsy.

“T shall give you to drink!” said Oriana; and she held
the tumbler to his lips, from time to time, until he had
drained it. Ere he had done this, his shivering gradually
lessened, but the sweat poured from him. ‘“ Now lie down,”
said she; and he obeyed as submissively as a child; and
then Oriana wiped his brow, and drew the covering well up
to his throat. How I could have hugged her to my heart
at that moment !

After a few minutes spent silent in watching, she again
laid her hand on the captain’s brow, and withdrew it
smilingly. ‘ Feel!” said she to me: I did so, and found
that it was now warm.

“Mr. Smutta, some more water!” cheerfully cried she,
‘Cand keep up a good fire.”

Mr. Smutta sprang about like a harlequin to do her
bidding, and she mixed a second tumbler equally potent as
the first.

“Now, another dose of my medicine—you do not dislike
it, 1 am so sure!”—The way in which she pronounced her
frequent phrase of ‘‘I am so sure,” had an inexpressible
charm for me.

The captain made no demur this time.

“You are very much better now!”



42 THE DOOMED SHIP.

‘‘Thank heaven, yes!”—and indeed it was evident that
the simple remedy of brandy and water, combined with, as
I suspect, some marvellous faith in Oriana on the part of
the patient, had already worked wonders—“ Yes,” continued
the fair physician, “you will be quite yourself after a sound
sleep, and you will play a little game of chess with me the
next night.”

“God Almighty bless you, lady!” ejaculated my uncle,
and, for the first time in my life, I beheld him burst into
tears.

“Amen!” responded I, from the depth of my soul; and
then I felt choked with emotions of thankfulness and love.

“Oh!” exclaimed Smutta, blubbering, and rubbing his
hands for joy, “de cappen’s himself—de lubly lady hab
cure him, yah!”

“There are no lubly ladies here, Mr. Smutta!” cried
Oriana, laughing ; and she playfully gave a hearty lug at the
wool of the enraptured steward, who was quite ready to fall
down and worship her.

In a few minutes after this, the captain sank into a sound
sleep, and as Oriana refused to quit him at present, I left
her and Smutta, and went on deck, anxious to relieve the
first mate. I found him leaning pensively over the
bulwarks.

“ How is the captain?” inquired he, anxiously.

I told him all that had occurred, and he exclaimed,
“Bless my soul! what a wonderful girl that is! He will
be quite himself at daybreak.”

“She says he will,” returned I, “and I have faith in her.”

‘“ But,” whispered Shields, “ whatever could be the cause
of the captain’s queer illness ?”



THE DOOMED SHIP. 43

** Heaven only knows.”

“‘T wonder,” continued he, reflectively, ‘“‘ whether it was a
dream ?”

“Pooh! said I, desirous of turning the conversation ;
“dreams are nothing to such a man as the captain—he is
not very likely to be shaken by a dream.”

“JT don’t know that,” replied Shields, very seriously ;
“your grand philosophers may sneer at dreams, but when a
man has sailed the blue water as long as I have, he knows
better than to laugh at ’em,”

“ Laugh at what ?—philosophers or dreams?”

“Why, dreams.”

“You don’t mean to say that any dream of yours was
ever realised ?”

“Ves, I do,” stoutly answered Shields, ‘and I'll show
how. When I was a young fellow, serving before the mast
in a Yankee ship called the ‘‘ Diana,” I was one day ordered
on the look-out at the fore-topmast cross-trees. We were
then under the tropics, and the heat was such that it gave
me a motion, more lively than pleasant, of what crabs must
feel while they are being slowly boiled alive. I hadn’t been
long perched on the cross-trees before I began to nod, and
in half-a-bell I was fast as a church. How long I slept I
never knew, but I hada horrible dream. I fancied I was
dozing on the summit of the North Cape of Lapland, when
suddenly a serpent twisted his tail round my body, just
below the arm-pits, and hauled me along till I was at the
brink of the precipice which overhangs the sea at the height
of a thousand feet, andis almost sheer perpendicular. Then
[imagined myself hurled forth, I felt my body cleaving the
air—I felt my body plunge into the water with the



44 THE DOOMED SHIP.

momentum of a cannon-ball—I felt a tremendous sense of
suffocation, and I awoke with a bubbling yell. And where
d’ye think I found myself? Not on the cross-trees, but
overboard, as I am a sinner! And the serpent’s tail I
dreamt about was nothing else than a spare halyard tightly
jambed round me. It seems that I slept so soundly that
our old man,* Zebulun Salter, hailed me two or three times
without rousing me, and finding how matters were, what did
the old grampus do, but order three or four hands to run
aloft and reeve a halyard through the starboard fore-topsail
yard-arm, one end being dropped on deck, for all hands to
tail on to, and the other end turned into a noose, with a
bow-line knot, and slipped over my shoulders while I snored.
Then the hands aloft slid me to the yard-arm so softly that
I didn’t wake, and when the old man gave the word—‘ Let
fall by the run !’—sink me, if they didn’t let me drop souse
into the sea! A dozen times they hauled me chock-a-block,
and let me drop again by the run; and at length, when I
was more dead than alive, Zebulun let me be swayed on
deck, and as I lay vomiting out the salt water I had
swallowed by the bucketful, he laughed in his dry, crackling
fashion, and cried, ‘ Wal, younker, I rayther calkelate that
arter this, ye’ll never again shut both eyes at a time when
Zebulun Salter sends ye aloft to keep a bright look out.’
And so my dream was fulfilled.”

* Sailors frequently call the captain ‘‘ the Old Man.”



CHAPTER VII.

HEN morning at length dawned, Captain Larpent
was on deck again, and to one who knew not
how he had been prostrated a few hours before, there was
nothing in his manner to indicate what had recently befallen
him. He had enjoyed an unbroken sleep of nine hours, and
although his complexion was pallid, his eye was steady and
piercing as usual, his features composed, and his bearing
quiet, grave, and rather subdued than excited. He enquired
the ship’s course, and what knots she had run in the night,
and expressed his satisfaction to find that we had made very
good way, and that a very strong and highly-favourable wind
was now blowing, although the weather was obscure. What
was yet more extraordinary, he did not make the slightest
allusion whatever to his illness, and appeared unconscious
that it had occurred. When Oriana reminded him at dinner
that he was to play a game of chess with her that evening,
he slightly started, and a sickening smile swept over his
features, as he simply bowed assent. During the day he gave
his orders in his usual prompt and able manner, and seemed
anxious to pack sail on the ship to the utmost. Ere turning
in for the night, he repeated his instructions, that all safe sail
should be kept on the ship, and the log should be regularly
hove, and a careful reckoning kept.
Some hours after dark, I was much surprised to see
Oriana come on deck, and step close up to me, as I stood on



46 THE DOOMED SHIP,

the windward quarter, for the weather was very cold, and a
drizzling rain fell.

“JT want to speak,” whispered she. ‘“ What for has
Captain Larpent made the steward load all the guns and
pistols in the cabin this afternoon?”

* Load the firearms!” exclaimed I, in amazement ; “ you
surely must be mistaken. I suppose the steward was only
cleaning out the barrels with a ramrod and cotton ?”

“Qh, no,” replied she, in an earnest, positive tone, “ I was
in my stateroom after dinner, and I heard the captain order
Mr Smutta to get them all out of their racks and charge them,
and I opened my door a little bit, and could see the steward
load four guns and two great pistols, and the captain stood
by, and said something to the steward, dat I could not
hear.”

* But what did he load them with ?”

“ With bullets.”

““ Tmpossible !”

“But it is tue. Two bullets in every gun and pistol.
And then the steward put them all together in dat cupboard
just over the captain’s berth, and took three cutlasses out of
a locker, and put them im the cupboard also, and locked it,
and gave the key to the captain. Do tell me what Captain
Larpent is going to shoot ?”

My astonishment was now so great, that I answered mot
a word.

“You need not fear to tell me, I am so sure!” said she,
coaxingly.

“T declare I have no idea. I mever kmew my uncle keep
firearms loaded with ball im his cabim before.”

«Ah, I see dat you really not know, contimwed the shrewd



THE DOOMED SHIP. 47

girl ; and, after a pause, she added, “I thought it so very
strange thing, dat I ought to tell you; but pray do not let
the captain know, for he would be very angry with me for
being a naughty little spy.”

“Vou may depend I will not. But do not be frightened
—the guns will not go off in the cupboard.”

“ Frightened at guns! O, Himlen! you don’t know me!
I have charged guns for my uncle when shooting ptarmigans
in Nordland, and I have fired them more than once
myself.”

“Bless my heart ! you are quite a heroine, Oriana.”

“No; dat I am not. But I am a Danish girl, and
daughter of the Vikings ””—and she laughed archly. “ But
I do very much wonder why the captain has loaded all his
guns with two bullets.”

“So do I. Is Smutta in the cabin ?”

“T think so.”

“ Well, pray go below, for it is very cold, and just whisper
to him that I wish to speak to him on deck, will you ?”

She nodded understandingly, and without another word,
descended to the cabin, and in a few minutes the steward
was by my side.

“ You want to ‘peak to me, Massa Shar] ?”

* Ay, I do, Smutta. What have you been doing in the
cabin after dinner ?”

“Oh, berry many tings. Why you ask ?”

** Because I want to know why you have loaded all the
firearms—why you have charged them with double balls—
why you have put them in the captain’s private locker, and
the cutlasses also ?”

““Gorra ! de somebody himself must hab tell you all dis,



48 THE DOOMED SHIP.

Massa Sharl!” exclaimed the astonished Smutta. ‘Not a
body was in the cabin to see.”

“ Never mind who told me—I know, and that’s enough.
Why did you load with ball ?”

“‘Cappen Larpen’ order me.”

‘“‘ And he told you the reason.”

“T not know.”

“ Come, Smutta, ’m aware that my uncle tells you his
mind more freely than he does to me, and I’m very sure
you know what the guns are loaded for, so it is no use
trying to deceive me.”

‘Massa Sharl, I neber hab tell you lie in all my life,”
said the poor fellow, reproachfully.

“Then you really don’t know.”

“No, Massa Sharl, dat I don’t. De cappen order me to
load—Gorra ! I do it; and I tink it like de old time when I
wid him in de privateer. De cappen used to say I de best
hand to load musket he hebber hab see—but plenty practice
den! He neber tell me to-day why I load, but he order
me put two balls ; and he order me not tell anybody what I
done. De cappen himself must hab tell you ?”

“No, Smutta, he didn’t. But did he ever before order
you to load the guns in the cabin with ball since the war
was over ?”

“* Neber !”

“Tt is very strange ?”

“J tink so my own self. But what Cappen Larpen’
order, dat must be right, and we no business ask why.”

“Very true; but, Smutta, I wish you would take good
care to be near the captain while this voyage lasts, and
attend well to him.”



THE DOOMED SHIP. 7 49

* Bigh, no need tell Smutta do dat !” answered he. And
indeed there was not.

After the steward left me, I reflected whether the
mysterious attack of illness had not disordered the captain’s
intellect, for it seemed otherwise. quite incomprehensible
why he had done such a thing as the Danish girl had so
singularly revealed to me. It was very evident that he
wished the affair to be kept a secret even from me. Can
this, thought I, be the cunning of a madman, preparing to
carry out some insane freak? But the captain’s demeanour
all day showed him to be perfectly rational in word and
deed, so far as related to the ship’s management. In fine,
I was bewildered, and knew not what to conclude. I
resolved, however, to watch him closely, and the result was,
that during the several succeeding days, I perceived nothing
whatever in his conduct but what indicated him to be in
perfect possession of his faculties, although he grew more
and more grave and reserved—and that might reasonably
be attributed to the unsatisfactory nature of the voyage.



CHAPTER VIII.

URING the four following days the same powerful
wind blew with occasional lulls, and we averaged
for the whole time about six knots an hour—a good rate of
sailing for such a slow craft as the “‘ Lady Emily.” - All this
time the sun was constantly obscured, and at nights fogs
prevented our getting any observation from the heavenly
bodies, so that we had no other means of judging our
position than the reckoning kept by frequent and careful
heaving of the log, and I need hardly say that this mode of
estimating a ship’s way is, for many reasons, very far from
being accurate and reliable. The consequent anxiety of
Captain Larpent, and indeed of all of us, grew hourly
greater, for according to the best calculations we could
make, we must be about latitude 59°'N.—Stavanger, in
Norway, bearing probably fifty miles distant. What we
deemed especially unaccountable was the fact that the days,
which ought to have materially lengthened, seemed to grow,
if anything, shorter; but the foggy weather prevented us
from coming to any clear understanding on the subject.

On the evening of the 27th of September, Captain
Larpent appeared particularly uneasy about our uncertain
latitude, and for the first time in his life (as I believe) he
held a formal consultation with his officers on such a subject.
We all three went over the reckonings since our last solar
observation, and our united opinions were, that the ship’s
course had been so carefully kept by the log, that unless we



THE DOOMED SHIP. i 51

had met with unknown currents—and it happened that none
of us had sailed these seas before—we must be somewhere
about the position above named. The determination of the
captain finally was (and both the first mate and myself fully
agreed with him), that in case we got no observation by
noon the next, we should bear up for the Skagerrack, for we
reckoned that if the wind held the same we should certainly
be abreast of it by that time. We could not help thinking
it very remarkable, not only that we had experienced such
foul weather, but also that we met with no vessels, although
the last two or three days we must have crossed the track of
such as were bound to and from Trondhjem, Christiansund,
Bergen, &c.

All that night the wind blew a gale, and we rushed along at
the rate of eight or nine knots, under close-reefed topsails.
All hands were up the greater part of the night, and Captain
Larpent himself never quitted the deck. We had large
lanterns lighted forward and aft, and triced in the rigging, to
guard against the danger of collisions with other vessels, but
the look-out we kept was necessarily of small avail, for snow,
hail, and sleet pelted us without intermission, and the cold
grew intense. Grog was served to all hands every two
hours. It was indeed dismal weather, and we anxiously
prayed ‘for day-break. But day did not dawn perceptibly
till considerably after ten o’clock in the forenoon, a circum-
stance utterly inexplicable for such a latitude as we pre-
sumed we were in. Not long after this came the awful,
thrilling cry of —“ Hard a-port! Rocks ahead!”

The helm was ported instantly, and we swept close by an
enormous rock, as we thought at the moment, but im-
mediately after the first mate exclaimed—



52 THE DOOMED SHIP.

* An Iceberg, by heaven !”

The ship tore by the berg, amidst the oaths and exclama-
tions of the amazed and excited crew, and a minute later
came the cry—

* Starboard—hard-a-starboard! Another iceberg!”

“A fleet of them, by !” echoed the man at the
wheel ; and indeed it was so, for several more loomed in



sight.
“OQ God! the hour has come!” ejaculated Captain

Larpent in a tone of piercing anguish and despair, and for a
brief space nothing but horror and consternation prevailed
fore and aft.

Where are we? No man knew, and the sense of
impending destruction, imminent and appalling as it was,
made the seamen rage and tear about like madmen. But
the captain, after the first shock, was himself again. Seizing
his speaking-trumpet, he sprang on the bulwarks, and passing
his left arm round the mizen backstay to hold on by, he
cried—‘“ Silence in the ship !”

The instinct of obedience prevailed, and then the captain
rapidly issued energetic orders for working the ship in this
astounding and inexplicable emergency. The fog suddenly
lifted, and without being able to conceive by what accursed
means we had béen brought hither, the youngest boy in the
ship now knew we were on the coast of the Arctic Regions!

The horror of this discovery blanched the heart of the
bravest man on board. An Arctic winter close at hand—
few day’s provisions left—hourly in danger of being crushed
to pieces by icebergs, or fast frozen up—no knowledge of
our locality—what could be more appalling and hopeless?
But the imminency of the danger from the nearest bergs did



THE DOOMED SHIP. 53

not permit any present pause, and the crew were kept in
constant exertion for half-an-hour.

“Stand clear of the binnacle!” cried the man at the
wheel, to somebody who obstructed his view of the compass.
The captain turned sharply round at the words, and a
withering expression of savage contempt distorted his
features, as he thundered—

“Leave the compass! Steer as I order, Sir! Don’t look
at that thing !”

Shields exchanged a glance with me, but neither of us then
understood the motives of the captain, who continued to
work the ship, motioning with his hand the way in which
the wheel was to be turned, and at times sternly giving his
orders aloud. At length he got the barque so clear of the
numerous icebergs, that there was sufficient room to lay to,
and this was immediately done inthe captain’s usual
admirable style.



No sooner was the vessel stationary than Captain Larpent
ordered Smutta to bring up a spare compass instantly, and
when it was brought, he compared its bearing with that of
the binnacle-compass, and it was then seen that the needles
of the two compasses were almost diametrically at variance.
Loud cries burst from all around at the sight, and the
captain hoarsely exclaimed—

‘“Here is the mystery of our false course! All hands
aft!”

There was little necessity for this order, as every man
crowded aft the moment the compass had been brought
from the cabin.

“Men!” continued the captain, “treachery has been at
work. There is a fiendish villain among ye!”



54 THE DOOMED SHIP.

The crew were now silent as death, but each, man
looked ferociously at the rest, as though to detect signs of
guilt.

“Take that compass out of the binnacle,” was the next
stern order.

It was done, and on being removed and examined, all
saw to their horror and unspeakable rage, that several bits
of iron had been dexterously fixed in such a way between
the outer and inner box, that although the compass-needle
would apparently revolve well enough, it was nevertheless
attracted altogether in a false direction. So great is the
precaution taken on shipboard to guard against iron
attracting the compass, that not a nail is used in constructing
the binnacle, and the ‘‘gimbals” on which the compass-box
swings, are of course made of brass. But what avails every
human precaution when subtle villany isaboard? The crew
began to fiercely question each other, but the captain cried—

“Silence, all! Who attends to the lights in the binnacle ?”

‘‘Chepini !” responded a dozen voices.

My heart turned sick, for I now understood all.

“Where is he ?”

In a moment the Italian lad was dragged before the
binnacle.

“ Hold him, Smutta.”

The steward instantly grasped Chepini by one arm, and a
steel vice would not have held him more securely. I fixed
my gaze on the boy’s face, and beheld it positively radiant
with triumphant revenge. His black eyes glowed like balls
of fire, and the conscious peril of his position seemed not to
appal him in the least. The demon who possessed the dark
soul of that young lad must have been very strong.



THE DOOMED SHIP. 55

“‘Chepini,” slowly said the captain, in a deep distinct voice,
amid the breathless silence of the crew, “it has been your duty
to attend to the binnacle-light ever since we left Tromso ?”

“Ves!” firmly responded the boy.

“Look there,” and the captain pointed to the damning
evidences.

“Did you do it ?”

Chepini glanced round at the terribly menacing faces of
the exasperated crew, and then meeting the captain’s eye,
he unflinchingly answered—‘“‘I did !”

A roar of rage burst from the men, but the captain
silenced them.

“ Wretch !” exclaimed he, ‘“‘ Why have you done this deed ?”

“ Because you flogged me like adog! Id do it again a
thousand times if I could! Kill me!—I don’t care—I’m
revenged! If Igo below, you'll all soon follow!”

Again did the entire crew break forth in imprecations,
and many cried—‘“ Kill him !” and rushed forward to rend
him to pieces. Once more the captain silenced them, and
then with fearful calmness he spake as follows :—

“Officers and crew of this ship !—Claude Chepini, by
his own confession, which you have just heard, declares that
he has committed an infernal act that has now brought us all
into dreadful jeopardy of our lives. JI ask you what
punishment ought to be at once inflicted on him.”

“Death !” cried the crew, with one voice.

“* Officers and crew,” resumed the captain, “if there is one
among you says that this boy ought to be permitted to live,
let him now speak, or for ever hold his peace.”

Not a voice among us all was raised for mercy—an awful
silence prevailed for the space of a minute. The captain



56 . THE DOOMED SHIP.

uncovered his head, and, as ifactuated by the same impulse,
his example was followed by every one of us. We were now
judges of life and death, and our captain was about to
pronounce in our names a judgment which would render us
murderers by the law of our country.

“Officers and crew !” solemnly cried the captain, amid a
brooding stillness, ‘for the doom I now pronounce in my
name and yours, I hold us justified in the sight of God.
We condemn Claude Chepini to be forthwith hanged by the
neck from the fore topsail yard-arm till he be dead !”

A perfect silence of a second ensued, and then the crew,
as one man, gave a tremendous cheer in testimony of their
approval of the sentence. Next they tumultuously hurried
forward and began to reeve a rope through the yard-arm on
the starboard side.

“ Officers,” said Captain Larpent, addressing the first mate
and myself, “remain on the quarter-deck with me. Steward,
lead Chepini to his doom !”

In a very few minutes the rope was reeved and secured
round the neck of the condemned, whose arms were
pinioned behind him, and several fathoms of chain were
lashed to his legs. The crew then tailed-on to the fall of
the rope, and everything being prepared, with one accord
they looked towards the quarter-deck for the signal.

‘All ready, for’ard >” demanded Captain Larpent, with
as much self-possession as though he was about to issue an
ordinary command.

“ All ready, Sir !”

The captain once more uncovered, and _ instantly
afterwards the fatal words issued from his lips in firm
sonorous tones—“ Run him up !”



THE DOOMED SHIP. 57

In a moment the fiendish boy (who had never quailed in
his demeanour, nor uttered one word after quitting the
quarter-deck) was swinging between sea and sky. Not-
withstanding the heavy weight at his feet, he convulsively
jerked up his knees, till they almost touched his breast—
writhed and quivered for a minute or two—and then swang
to and fro a corpse. After being suspended ten minutes,
the rope was severed, and the body cleaved the dark waters,
to rise no more till the day of judgment.



CHAPTER IX.

ARDLY had the bubbles ceased to rise over the spot

where Chepini was entombed, ere we were recalled

from our rapt excitement regarding his execution, to attend

to the pressing danger by which we were menaced by the

near approach of five or six icebergs, brought down upon us

by the wind. These floating mountains rolled heavily in
the water, and one or two loomed high upon our trucks.

Captain Larpent took a rapid survey of our position, and
in a couple of minutes the ship was put about before the
wind, and bore up what we soon perceived to be either an
estuary or a strait—perceived, alas! too late. The bergs
closed astern, and forbad all hope of beating back, and
scores of small floes of ice threatened us on every side.
There was nothing left but the desperate expedient of
steering onward—whither we knew not.

The strait narrowed the further we advanced, and the
quantity of smaller bergs and floes increased to a fearful
degree. We tacked every minute to avoid them, but it was
speedily evident that a powerful current, or the tide, or both
combined, was aiding the wind to urge us on at a rapid rate.
At length we were driven shorewards, and three several
times the ship missed stays. The noise caused by the
masses of ice grinding over each other was appalling. Great
fragments would suddenly be forced out of the conglomera-
ting heaps, and rise perpendicularly from twenty to fifty feet
in the air—then fall with a horrible crash, and splinter to
atoms.



THE DOOMED SHIP. 59
fas

“God have mercy upon us!” groaned Shields, fast losing
his presence of mind, and yielding to the despair which now
filled every soul. As to the crew, they executed Aevery fresh
manceuvre with less alacrity, and too evidently looked upon
our fate as sealed, and were beginning to be dlesperate and
reckless of what might next befall. And whem one considers
all they had undergone, and the frightful prospect before
them, there was some excuse for this. The hour of doom
was now nigh at hand—Nemesis “sat ifn the clouds and
mocked us.” f

For the fourth time we were in the yery act of attempting
to wear, when a sudden and heavy squall caught us, and at
the same moment a huge submerge@ iceberg rose under our
stern, and shattered the rudder to/pieces. The barque was
now unmanageable, and filling away before the wind, she
plunged wildly ahead, and in five minutes her bows struck
smash against a berg, and another simultaneously rolled
against her starboard quarter, and heeled her over almost on
her beam-ends. The shock carried away the foremast short
off by the deck, and the main and mizen topmasts were both
dragged over with it, and/ the bowsprit was torn clean out of
the bitts. Had it not been that the “ Lady Emily” was an
exceedingly strong vessel, (built, as I mentioned at the
commencement, for the whale fishery,) and also in ballast,
down she must have gone in a moment ; but the brave “‘old
barkey ” righted, and her bows remained embedded in the
iceberg on which she struck, her head being bodily lifted
three feet out of water, and thus held immovable.

The catastrophe precipitated the unfortunate first mate,
the carpenter, and a boy into the sea, where they miserably
perished without the possibility of our saving them.



60 THE DOOMED SHIP.

Would to God I could blot out of my memory the scenes
that ensted! The crew had by this time become stimulated
to the pitch of madness, and when the captain, whose stern
self-possessinn did not waver even at this dread moment,
issued his orjers to clear away the wreck of the masts, and
to man the pumps, &c., the crew refused to obey, and
clustered together in violent and rapid consultation. Again
and again did the captain reiterate his orders, and I seconded
them, but open mutiny now prevailed. The crew were
aware of the fact that we had only a few days’ provisions left
for all hands, and conceiving themselves certainly doomed
to destruction, happen what might, or do what they would,
they, with the reckless desperation seamen have too often
evinced when similarly circumstanced, resolved to die in a
state of drunkenness and blasphemy.

The captain, well understanding their intention, advanced
to the break of the quarter-deck, and attempted to reason
with them, but they were excited to a pitch of madness, and
drowned his voice with yells and mocks, openly expressing
their determination to break into, the steerage and cabin, to
get at the spirits, &c. May God forgive me if I wrong them,
but I certainly thought then, and think now, that the worst
among them were also tempted by the hope of subjecting
our helpless passenger to their brutal lusts. It was my
uncle’s opinion also. \

This day was Friday—oh, that ever fatal day !—on a
Friday we commenced our disastrous voyage—on a Friday
Chepini received the punishment which awoke his fiendish
spirit of revenge—on a Friday our do1om was to be con-
summated ! \

Finding all efforts to regain his ascenda'nev over the crew



THE DOOMED SHIP. 61

hopeless, Captain Larpent strode aft, and seizing my hand,
gripped it till the blood almost started from the finger-ends
whilst he hoarsely exclaimed—“ Boy, let us die doing our
duty before God and man !” .

“ We will, uncle!”

‘*Go,” said he, with terrible significance; ‘lose not a
moment. Go andspeak to her! ‘Take her below till all is
over! Tell her we will defend her to the last gasp!”

He alluded to Oriana, who had witnessed the whole of
the recent horrible scenes, standing close to the companion-
way, and never uttering word nor cry from first to last. She
now resembled a statue, her features rigid and colourless,
her eyes expanded and fixed on us, her arms hanging down
full length before her, with the hands clutched together. I
sprang to her side, but for the life of me I could not utter a
word. I threw my arm around her, and hurried her below,
without the least resistance. Soon as we were in the cabin,
I found broken utterance.

Oriana,” said I, ‘‘ you must stay here. The ship is not
sinking, but a worse danger threatens. I—we—we will die
for you!” :

Her lips parted, quivered, and closed again. But she
placed both her hands in mine, and turned her eyes upward
with a look of sublime resignation which could not be mis-
understood.

“Yes,” responded I, “God can strengthen us—and God
can save you if we perish !”

At this moment the steward rushed into the cabin, and
opening the locker over the captain’s berth, handed out the
arms. Oriana and myself exchanged a glance, for we now
fully understood the captain’s reason for having ordered



62 THE DOOMED SHIP.

them to be loaded. But how was it possible that he had
had the prescience to foresee such a use for them as this ?

*‘ Flere is Smutta—worth a dozen men himself!” said I.

The steward turned round, and made a step to our side.

“Hab no fear,” cried he; ‘“‘Smutta hab often fought side
o’ cappen Larpen’, and Smutta will die for de lubly lady !—
yah !”

She gave him her hand in a moment, and he pressed it
very hard against his honest, faithful breast—then turned
away, saying—‘‘Come a-deck, Massa Sharl—come dis
minute!” and he gathered the whole of the weapons, and
sprang up stairs with them.

The gaze which Oriana and myself now exchanged,
revealed our souls more than if we had spoken for hours. I
strained her convulsively to my breast, and pressed her lips
to mine. Twas our first kiss—Heaven only knew if ’twere
our last !—and ’twas the first time I had ever pressed the lips
of woman since my childhood.

“God save my—my broder!” murmured the heroic
Danish girl, and as I released her from my embrace, she
fell on her knees, and bowed her head, and clasped her
hands in an attitude of prayer. So I left her.



CHAPTER X.

HE first thing of which I became conscious, as I
emerged on deck was the appalling yells, oaths, and
threats of the mutineers, who had by this time armed them-
selves with handspikes, and the axes kept on deck, and also
with the axes, &c., out of the carpenter’s chest, which they
had broken open. They were tumultously gathering together
for an attack upon us, and evidently were resolved to take
the ship, and carry out their diabolical designs. The captain
had already girded on a cutlass, and held a musket in his
hands. The two pistols and the other cutlasses laid upon
the top of the binnacle, and two muskets reared against
the companion, the other being in the grasp of Smutta. My
uncle silently pointed to the arms, and I lost not an instant
in thrusting a pistol in my bosom, and seizing a musket.
We all three stood in a line just in front of the companion,
the entrances to which I had closed. I glanced at my uncle,
and read nothing in his features but the most stern and
merciless expression. His lips were tightly compressed ;
his nostrils distended; his eyes sparkling. It seemed as
though his old battle-spirit animated him once more. Smutta
stood immovable on his right hand (I was on his left), and
the proportions of the black were more gigantic than ever,
with suppressed excitement ; his mighty hand clutched the
musket as though he would flatten in its barrel! his thick
projecting lips were wide open, revealing the broad white
teeth, clenched and slowly grinding over each other; and



64 THE DOOMED SHIP.

his great black eyes seemed to emit a lurid glow as they
were mutely fixed on the face of his beloved captain. I
thought even at that moment of the words of my uncle, when
suffering during his mysterious illness,—‘‘ Yes, Smutta, I
know you—and I shall know you when we meet aloft! We
have lived together, and we shall die together!” Was the
hour now come for them to die together ? I only knew one
thing, and that was, Smutta would die rather than a hair of
his foster-brother’s head should be injured.

What was our prospect in the deadly, unnatural conflict
now inevitable? We were three men—three determined and
powerful men, well armed, opposed to fourteen desperate
mutineers. We might at most kill or disable half-a-dozen at
the first discharge ; but if this did not daunt and repel the
survivors, they would be upon us in an instant, and then the
odds would be fearful. There would be no time to reload
our arms, and mighty as was Smutta’s strength, one mortal
blow could despatch him, in which event, what hope
remained for my uncle and myself? My blood turned icy
in my veins as I thought of the certain fate of Oriana after
such a catastrophe. Instinctively I grasped my musket as
the mutineers moved aft from the forecastle, where they had
armed themselves, and apparently made up their minds for
the mode of assault. The captain now said to us, in a low
quick voice,—‘‘ When I give the word ‘Fire!’ be sure of
your men.”

We then awaited the dread moment of attack without
moving a muscle. For my own part, although ready to diea
thousand deaths to save Oriana, I confess that I trembled
violently, and a clammy perspiration bedewed my forehead.
My uncle and Smutta had been often in mortal combat in



THE DOOMED SHIP. 65

their younger days, and had each slain many of their fellow-
beings; but I had never in my life fought in battle,—and
what was a fair open battle against one’s country’s foes, com-
pared to a deadly hand-to-hand struggle with one’s own
countrymen, one’s own crew, one’s own shipmates? I knew
every one of the men who were about to seek my life, and I
theirs—I had spoken to them daily. for months, and they
had hitherto obeyed my orders more promptly and obediently
than a child obeys its father. More than this, there was
even the strong bond of crime between us,: for not an hour
before they and we had mutually committed what the law
would deem a deliberate act of murder—albeit a deed just
in itself. Oh! ’twas too horribly like fratricide, and no
marvel that I feltas I did. But their blood be upon their
own heads !

The mutineers saw how we were prepared for them, yet
this did not check nor alter their desperate resolve. But
when they came in a body, brandishing their weapons, as far
as the mainmast, they clustered together, and a scuffle and
altercation gave us hope they were divided among themselves,
and that all were not quite the villains they appeared. Nor
were we deceived, for, after a fierce contention, Blackbird
Jim suddenly sprang from their midst, and hurling his
handspike with a crash against the bulwarks, he thundered,—

“No! I’m if I'll join in any bloody mutiny! Now I
know what you mean to do, I tell you to your face you are
a crew of blood-hounds! Who'll follow me, to stand and
die by our captain?”



Two men—and two only—responded to this appeal; and
before the mutineers could intercept them, the three faithful
fellows all reached the quarter-deck, and were ranged by

5



66 / THE DOOMED SHIP.

our side, after sharing out our remaining arms among

them.
“ Hurra !” shouted Blackbird Jim, flourishing a cutlass at
his late associates. ‘‘ Hurra!” repeated his two messmates.

“ Hurra!” echoed I myself—for I couldn’t help it in the joy
of my poor throbbing heart, and oh! how I thanked God for
thus sending us unlooked-for, unhoped-for help in our darkest
hour of need. But my uncle merely gave the three mena
grim look of thanks, and, stamping his foot on deck, said,—
* Silence all! Stand to your arms!”

Then he advanced a step, and in a loud determined voice
addressed these warning words to the mutineers :—
“The first man among ye who sets foot on the quarter-
deck, dies that moment! Throw down your weapons,
and yield, or by the living God ye shall be shot like
dogs!”

“ Ay, ay,” hoarsely muttered Blackbird Jim, who stood by
my side, ‘‘they’ll get their bread buttered on both sides
now, as Charley Baxter said, when Spanking Tom and Bob
Cummins kissed the gunner’s daughter* three days hand-
running !”

The mutineers answered the captain with a roar such as the
tiger vents when about to spring on its prey, and, spreading
out in line, they were upon us as soon as we could raise
muskets to our shoulders—led on by a ferocious fellow nick-
named Corporal Jack (from his having formerly served in the
army), but whose real name was George Martin. He had
been the most conspicuous ringleader throughout, and I was

* “ Kissing the gunner’s daughter,” means to be lashed fast to the
gratings at the gangway to ‘‘catch the rabbit,”—v.e., to be flogged
with a cat.



THE DOOMED SHIP. 67

determined that he, at any rate, should not live to boast of
the results of his villany.

We met them with a simultaneous discharge. I know not
how many fell, and I have only a dim, confused recollection
of the horrible butchery which ensued on the quarter-deck.
I hardly know what I did myself at the time, but was after-
wards assured that I fought “like a lion.” For a minute or
two there was nought but the clash of steel—for the arms of
the mutineers were fearful weapons at close quarters—and I
beheld my uncle fall bathed in blood. A fellow stooped
over him with uplifted axe, and it was in the act of
descending, when Smutta gave a yell that rung loud above
all the din, and struck the murderer with the butt-end of a
musket, smashing his head to atoms. Then I saw the red
blood spout in torrents out of the gashed side and limbs of
the black himself, and I gave and received blows: with the
rapidity of thought. Another moment, and of all the late
raging foes, only one was yet on his feet, fighting with
Blackbird Jim. I then saw Smutta, collecting the last
remains of his fast-ebbing strength, seize this mutineer. round
the body, and hurl him sheer over the bulwarks into the
sea. This done, the devoted black gave one bubbling cry,
and fell flat on his face by the side of his insensible captain.
Two or three of the mutineers, yet alive, and shrieking in
agony, were mercilessly despatched by the three men who
had so nobly fought on our side, and without whose aid all
had been lost.



CHAPTER XI.

~“OON as my recollection returned, I—Oh! how I yet
remember it !—I tore open the companion-way and
bounded into the cabin. Oriana met me, and, as | live!
she flung herself with a cry into my extended arms—‘“‘Saved !
saved !” was all I could ejaculate, and after straining her to
my bursting heart, I again sprang on deck. . Blackbird Jim
and his two messmates, who were all slightly wounded, had
already thrown overboard the bodies of the mutineers ; and
side by side, on the deck, so slippery with blood, lay my
poor uncle and his steward. The former was flat on his
back, his teeth clenched, his eyes closed, his features dis-
torted, and his iron-grey hair drenched in blood. I did not
immediately perceive where he was wounded, but felt over
his heart, and to my unutterable joy it yet beat, though very
faintly. I next hurriedly turned Smutta face upward from
the pool of gore in which he lay, and he also was yet alive,
but insensible, like his foster-brother.

With much difficulty, the men and myself carried the
captain and steward into the cabin (having previously ascer-
tained that the ship was in no immediate danger of sinking),
and then we laid them on mattresses and blankets spread on
the table, and cut away their blood-clotted garments to
discover their wounds. And now it was that Oriana began
to show herself in her true colours. She just once murmured,
‘Oh, poor dear, kind Captain Larpent !—Oh, poor Smutta !”
and then she raised their heads with pillows, one after the



THE DOOMED SHIP. 69

other, and sprang to a locker for brandy and other restora-
tives. Meanwhile I tore open my uncle’s shirt, and found
that his worst wound was in the upper part of his right side—
a gaping, frightful wound it was, with jagged edges, and so
deep that it cut through into the cavity of the breast. A
very little blood now oozed from it; and when Oriana had
glanced at it a moment, she flew to her own state-room, and
returned with her arms full of her own fine soft linen, which
she tore up in strips, and with a dexterity and nerve few
surgeons could surpass, she temporarily bandaged it. Then
she gently poured brandy down my uncle’s throat, and chafed
his cold temples with her hands. In a very brief space the
captain groaned, his lips unclosed, and his eyes opened a
little—‘ Oh, thank God!” ejaculated I.

Perceiving that the seamen were clumsily trying to restore
Smutta, Oriana pushed them aside, and did for him what
she had just done for the captain. Smutta had certainly
received no wound mortal in itself, but he was cut and
slashed so fearfully all over his breast, shoulders, and thighs,
that his body seemed a mere bath of blood.

Blackbird Jim gazed at Oriana in mute admiration for a
moment, and then the rough, but honest-hearted fellow
furtively dashed his sleeve across his eyes, and in his own
rude way expressed his feelings,—‘‘ Oh,” growled he, “I’ve
heerd o’ angels coming down from heaven, but I never seed
one afore!”

Smutta was restored to sensibility before the captain, and
the very first thing the dying negro did was to turn round on
his side towards his foster-brother, and throw his right arm
over the neck of the latter, as though fearful of being parted
from him even in death.



7O THE DOOMED SHIP.

“De cappen dead,” murmured he, in a faint, broken
voice. ‘Smutta die wid him.”

“No, not dead, Smutta—not dead, my dear fellow!”
cried I. ‘‘God will, I trust, restore you both.”

Smutta gazed at me a moment, and then with difficulty
uttered the words—‘‘Nebber possible, Massa Sharl! De
cappen die—Smutta die—go to hebben togeder !”

He raised his arm as he spoke, and the blood gushed
anew from his mangled body at the movement, and closing
his eyes, whilst a bloody froth oozed from his lips. Oriana
wiped it away, and endeavoured to administer some brandy,
but not a drop would pass his clenched teeth. ‘He is
dying fast,” whispered she ; and so indeed he was.

My uncle now begun to revive, and the first sign of
returning sensibility was evinced by his silently giving my
hand a feeble but eloquent pressure. Then his eyes slowly
glanced around, and at length fell on the body of the
steward by his side.—‘‘ Oh, poor Smutta!” ejaculated he.

Thus it was that the very first words these foster-brothers
severally uttered were expressive of their mutual affection.

**Fe’s not dead, uncle, and—and we’ve conquered—we’ve
killed ’em all.”

“Thank God, boy! But your old uncle must slip his
cable this bout—and Smutta, oh, poor dear Smutta !”

The expiring black heard the voice of the captain, and
recognised the loved accents, and, to the amazement of us
all, he sprang upright on his mattress, and in a wild, gurgling
voice—‘ De cappen ’peak ’gen! He call Smutta! Oh,
cappen! Oh, broder !

As the last word issued from his lips, he attempted to
embrace his foster-brother, but fell backward in the act,



THE DOOMED. SHIP. 71

muttering, ““O Lord, receive me!” and his spirit passed
away on the instant, but his glazed eyes retained even in
death .an expression of that profound love and reverence
which from his very infancy he had undeviatingly borne to-
wards his idolized captain.

“T’m foundered if that fellow hadn’t a soul that’s gone
aloft, though he was only a neegur,” was the characteristic
remark of Blackbird Jim.

I was ordering the men to move the body, when my uncle
motioned imperatively for us not to do so, murmuring, “Let
him be. Let us die side by side, as we have lived.”

I accordingly closed the eyes of the steward, and spread
a sheet over him, just as he had expired. O, thought J,
what a terrible and inscrutable mystery is death! One hour
ago this negro possessed the strength of almost ten ordinary
men ;—now he is a mere mass of inert clay. A moment or
two ago, his simple, yet most noble heart throbbed with the
purest brotherly love and devotion which ever animated
human breast ;—now that heart has ceased to beat for ever.
But thy soul, dear Smutta, has fled to receive its guerdon.
God knew thee, and God will judge thee.

My uncle now swallowed some brandy, held to his lips by
Oriana, and then asked for water, of which he drunk eagerly.
He revived considerably, and I was beginning to hope that
his hurts were not mortal after all, when he turned towards
me, and, with an intonation that thrilled my heart, said,
** My boy, I have loved you as a father.”

“Yes, uricle—dear uncle, you have indeed been a father
to me!”

“We must part, boy. God has called me, and I must go.
I cannot live many hours.” i



72 THE DOOMED SHIP.

“Oh, do not say so.”

“Yes, I am bleeding inwardly, and all the doctors in the
world could not save me. Listen, my boy,” and he spoke
with calm yet anxious seriousness. ‘‘ Are you sure that the
ship is not in a sinking state?”

“Not at present, uncle.”

“Well, I cannot think it possible for her to keep long
afloat after she breaks clear of the iceberg, and that may
happen at any moment. Get the long boat cleared and
ready for launching, and all the provisions on deck, and the
spirits, arms, ammunition, and other necessaries. If the
ship founders, you will then be able to live ashore, and God,
I trust, will send you relief. Perhaps there is a Danish
settlement not far off—get an observation to find the latitude
and longitude as soon as possible, and you will then be able
to judge your position. Probably you will, sooner or later,
meet with the natives, and come what may, you will have a
chance for life, and I know you will make the best of it.
Men!” and here he turned towards the silent and attentive
survivors of the crew—‘“‘you have acted nobly, and your
dying captain thanks you. If you don’t get your reward on
earth, you will in heaven !”

“We've only done our duty, captain,” answered Blackbird
Jim, as spokesman.

“You have done it well, and you will so-continue to do
it to the last, I am sure,” quickly and anxiously continued
the captain. ‘I shall soon be gone, but Mr. Meredith will
take my place, and you must obey him as you have me.
If you do this, there is every likelihood that you will
escape; but if you do not stand by him and obey him,
the fate of you all will soon be sealed. Swear to me,



THE DOOMED SHIP. 73

men, that you will do whatever he orders, and never desert
him !”

The men, one and all, called God to witness they would
obey me to their last gasp, and a faint smile of satisfaction
flitted over my uncle’s working lineaments as he murmured,
—‘ Now I shall die easier! God bless you, my lads! give
me your hands!”

The men each shook their Sing captain by the hand with
considerable emotion, for such rough characters as they
were, and I also shook their hands in turn. Thus we at
once felt we understood, and could rely on one another in
the appalling struggle for life, which we too well knew
awaited us.

‘Give them grog, and to eat!” said my uncle, thoughtful
for their wants even at this awful moment, when his life was
fast ebbing away.

Oriana instantly anticipated me, by acting as steward, and
my poor uncle followed her movements with a look of
indescribable admiration and affection. He now said he
felt no pain whatever, and knew, from what he had seen of
men dying of wounds similar to his own, that he should
retain his senses to the last moment.

“Boy,” whispered he to me, as I supported his head on
my breast, ‘that girl is a miracle of goodness and bravery !
God will never fail you while she is with you.

The men swallowed their food and grog almost as soon
as it was given to them, and, with an alacrity that argued
well for their future conduct, declared themselves ready and
willing to set to work. My uncle then, with as much
precision and wonderful presence of mind and forethought,
as though he were perfectly well, gave them orders what to



74 ' THE DOOMED SHIP.

do on deck, and they at once quitted the cabin to perform
their duties. The instant they were gone, he turned his
head towards Oriana, who now stood by his side, and gazed
eagerly at her in silence. At length he stretched forth his
hand, and she pressed it between both her own.—“ My dear
young lady,” said he, “you know this calamity has not
befallen the ship through any fault of mine. I have ever
done »

“Oh, dear Captain Larpent!” tearfully interrupted she,
**T know all dat—do not talk about it.”

* Well, I won’t then ; but listen to me, both of you. You
remember that night when I was seized with an illness—or





you knew not what. It was a dream—an awful warning
dream sent by God. I saw in it all that has come to pass,
I saw my ship driven on an unknown coast, my crew
mutineers,—all was foreshown me that up to this moment
has been realized. It was that which so unmanned me, for
I felt it to be indeed a-revelation from heaven.”

T listened with awe and amazement to this dying declara-
tion, and asked my uncle whether he was induced to order
the firearms to be loaded through his belief in the vision.
He replied affirmatively, and truly remarked, that to this
special providential warning we were indebted for our victory
over the mutineers, for the mutiny was so sudden that, had
not the arms been previously prepared, we should, in all
human probability, not have had time to get them out and
load them ere the attack commenced.

The captain now spoke to Oriana with evident and
increasing agitation. “You will now,” he said, “have to
undergo hardships and- dangers which might appal even a
brave man, but God will be your supporter and helper.



THE DOOMED SHIP. 75

Here is my nephew, trust in him fearlessly. He will do all
for you that brother could do for sister, and he 2

“Oh, yes! he is my broder, I know dat very well!”
eagerly cried Oriana, and she gave me her hand with a look
of affection and perfect reliance. My uncle, with the quick
apprehension which is frequently evinced by dying men,
caught our glances of mutual intelligence, and a smile of
grateful confidence played around his white and quivering
lips.

“Tt is well,” cried he, ‘may God Almighty bless and save
you both!” He then sank back heavily, and closed his
eyes with a deep, prolonged groan.

“Uncle, oh, dear uncle!” ejaculated I, thinking at the
moment that his spirit had fled. He opened his eyes again
with a strong shuddering effort, and motioned for brandy.
Oriana promptly held a glass to his lips, and its contents
instantaneously revived him.

*“‘T am going fast, boy !” was the first expression he uttered.
“Let me see his face once more !”

I understood him, and drew aside the sheet from the head
of his steward. My uncle gazed yearningly at the rigid
features of his foster-brother, and muttered, ‘‘I’ll soon meet
you again, Smutta—meet you to part no more! God grant,
for His Son’s sake, it may be in heaven !”

Hardly had he thus spoken, when a violent convulsion
seized him, and although he desperately strove to tell me
something, he expired in my arms without being able to
articulate a single word.





CHAPTER XII.

HE dissolution of my uncle was so very sudden that I
was quite stupified by the blow, and could hardly
believe he was really dead. A cry and an exclamation from
Oriana attested the fact, but I hardly heeded her at the
moment. Long did I press his senseless clay to my breast,
and bitterly did Isob and moan. The heroic Danish girl
—who was henceforward to watch over me as my guardian
angel—gently, but firmly, disengaged me from the corpse,
and led me to a seat, where I sank down, and yielded to an
agony of grief. I thought not of my own peril, no, nor even
Oriana’s; all I could realise was, that my noble-bearted
uncle, who had been a father to me through life, and whom
‘I loved and reverenced as such, was gone for ever. Never
more would his words of counsel and encouragement sound
in my ears, never more should I gaze on his commanding
form with affectionate pride, never more should I hear his
words of piety and submission to the will of God. My
excessive grief might be unmanly, selfish, and wrong under
the peculiar circumstances, but I could not help it. Oriana
let me unrestrainedly indulge it for some time, but after she
had herself closed my uncle’s eyes, and spread the sheet
over him, she came to my side, and there stood silent and
motionless. At length her hand was laid on my arm, and
her sweet voice whispered, ‘‘ My broder!” I answered not.
““My broder! Captain Larpent has gone to heaven, he has
done his duty, he has repented of his. sins, he has believed
in his Saviour, and is happy now !”



THE DOOMED SHIP. "7

“T shall never see him more!” cried I, with a passionate
burst of grief.

“Yes, you will see him again in heaven—dat you will! if
you only do your duty, and serve your heavenly Master as
he did. Come, my broder! you must not weep any more
now. Remember dat your good, wise uncle himself said dat
you must do many things to save our lives, and his spirit
will be angry with you if youdo not. We must all leave the
ship, he said so, and you are the captain now, and must
order the men what to do, or what will become of us?
Broder! dear broder! it indeed is wrong to weep now.
Won’t you try to. save your life—mine ?”

The music of her words fell like honey-dew on my soul,
the wisdom of her gentle reproof aroused my stunned
faculties, the love of her recalled me to myself. I arose to
my feet, embraced her fervently, and felt once more a man,
ready and able to battle for life.

On deck, I found that the men had already cleared the
long-boat, and fixed tackles for hoisting her out, and had
also gathered together a variety of things, which they judged
might be needful ashore. They had worked well, poor
fellows, and cold as it was, with a dense frost-smoke rising
from the water, they were stripped to their shirts, and trying
to heave up the long-boat, one end at a time. I bore a
hand with them, but our united strength was insufficient to
move her an inch. As I knew that the very first thing to be
done in our precarious position was to get out this boat
(which was unusually large and heavy) to be ready for any
emergency, I cast about for the means to effect it. By
doubling the purchases, and carrying the fall through snatch-
blocks, and then attaching a luff-tackle to it (the fall), we



78 THE DOOMED SHIP.

succeeded, finally, in multiplying our motive power so much
that we got the boat clear over the bulwarks, but we dared
not lower her into the water at present, lest she should be
stove in by some of the floes of ice which yet occasionally
brushed the ship’s sides. This done, we next investigated
the actual state of the barque. We found that she had
made about three feet of water, and that the leak slowly, but
surely, gained. On examining the bows, which were yet fast
embedded in that fatal berg, we perceived that they were so
completely stove in, that the moment she swung clear of the
berg, she would inevitably fill, and go down in a very short
time. This alarming discovery stimulated us to the most
eager exertion. It was now night, and so obscure that we
knew not what dangers threatened from bergs floating around
us, but we could from time to time hear them grinding and
cracking, with appalling distinctiveness. We also knew, that
although the sea was smooth, there was a current, or tide, or
both, carrying the iceberg and ship before it at the rate of
four knots. Self-preservation now became the sole inspiration
—the one pervading idea—and it is marvellous how men’s
faculties concentrate themselves to effect it, when there is
anything like a glimpse of hope. Having seen that the oars,
etc., of the long-boat were deposited in her, and her rudder
shipped, our next care was to get, the provisions on deck.
This, alas! was no very heavy task, but there was a tolerable
stock of spirits, wine, ale, sugar, coffee, spices, and other
luxuries in poor Smutta’s department. While the men were
removing these, I hurried to Oriana’s state-rroom to warn
her, but she had already made her little preparations for
departure. We soon conveyed her effects on deck, after
which she called our attention to a bulky package, closely



THE DOOMED SHIP. 79

wrapped in reindeer skins. ‘Dat must go too! It is good
rein flesh.” On enquiry, she explained that it was a quantity
of dried reindeer flesh, which she had in charge as a present
from her uncle in Nordland to their friends at Copenhagen.
We were all very thankful for this unlooked-for addition to
our means of existence.

Three hours or more were spent in preparing for the event
which we knew must sooner or later happen; and finding
that the tackles were quite strong enough to lower the long-
boat, even when laden, we filled her with provisions, spirits,
bedding, clothing, arms, etc. In the stern sheets I made a
sort of little tent with the blankets stretched over some
broken studding-sail booms, to protect Oriana from the
inclemency of the weather, for no one knew how long we
might drift about in the boat ere we could land. ‘Two
things more were added at her prudent suggestion, viz., fuel,
and water. The necessity of the first was sufficiently
apparent, but the latter I thought highly superfluous, as we
were about to live among nought but snow and ice. But
Oriana persisted that we ought to take water, for her
residence in Nordland had taught her that it is impossible
to suck or melt the snow in one’s mouth in very cold regions
without experiencing a terrible burning sensation in the
throat and stomach, owing to the intense degree of cold in
the snow. The only way, as she said, to procure water from
the snow and ice, would be by melting it with fire, and we
could not do this in the boat. Convinced that she was
right, we got a keg of water in the long-boat, and then
lowering the light stern boat from the davits, we put a cask
of water in her, and as much fuel as she could carry. I
secured the ship’s papers and log-book, with various



80 THE DOOMED SHIP.

mememtoes of my poor uncle, and such things as were
valuable and useful, but of small bulk, not forgetting
compasses, quadrant, etc. Finally, after we had rummaged
the lockers both of the cabin and of the steward’s pantry,
and convinced ourselves that not a scrap of food was left in
the ship, we felt that we had done all that was possible in
the way of preparation, and the rest was in the hands of
God.

I was just about to order the men to get a meal, when we
felt a heavy shock through the ship, as though the iceberg,
which had hitherto towed her along, had struck against
another berg, or rock ; and directly afterwards it split open
with a crack like the report of a cannon, and the bows of
the barque being released, her head at once went down five
or six feet, and we could hear the water rushing into the
forecastle, and thence into the hold. ‘The crisis had arrived
—there was not a moment to lose. I lifted Oriana into the
long-boat, and we lowered it safely on the water. Briefly
ordering the men to see all clear for pushing off, I ran below
to take a last farewell-look of the inanimate clay of my
beloved uncle and his foster-brother. I drew aside the
sheet from their faces, as they reposed side by side, and by
the dim light of the lamp overhead, I gazed with unutterable
emotion on them one after the other. Their trials were ended;
their souls were anchored in a port where no tempests could
ever more disturb them. My eye caught a large union-jack,
which had been dragged out of a locker in our search, and
left on the cabin floor. This I lifted, and threw it decently
over them both, and then I felt that my last duty in the ship
was performed. On regaining the deck, the men called
upon me to embark instantly, for the barque was sinking



THE DOOMED SHIP. 81

much faster than we had anticipated, and her water-ways
were already within a couple of feet of the sea’s level. I
ordered them into the boat, and I,—as became the officer,
—was the last to quit the deck, hat in hand. We pushed off
to a safe distance, and in five minutes we saw the ill-fated
“Lady Emily” give one downward lurch head-foremost, and
then she disappeared for ever, a fitting coffin for the remains
of her late gallant commander.



CHAPTER XIII.

“THERE goes the poor old barkey!” cried Mr.

Blackbird Jim, as he composedly put on his pea
jacket, and freshened his quid, and hitched up his tarry
breeks, and tightened his waist belt, ‘‘and here are we the
boys as never says die while there’s a shot in the locker.
Pass the word, captain, and we'll do it, whatever it is, sink
me!”

I started at being addressed as “captain,” and bitterly
thought of my departed uncle. But it was no time to
indulge in emotion and reverie.—‘ The first thing you do,
my lads,” replied I, ‘‘shall be to eat a good supper, for you
have well earned and will need it.”

By the light of a lanthorn, the fragments of cooked
provisions found in the larder of the poor steward were
overhauled. I had no difficulty in persuading Oriana to
eat. She made a very tolerable meal, and spoke cheerfully,
with the evident intention of inspiriting me. I could not
myself swallow a morsel—it would have choked me. But
what animals sailors are! The three men actually appeared
to have already forgotten the recent horrible events, and
their own present jeopardy, for they ate and drank, and
laughed and joked, precisely as though they were safely
seated around the kit of a forecastle mess. I felt inclined
to sternly check them, but on reflection I forbore, for it was
infinitely better that they should be callous of the past, and
reckless of the future, than to yield to moody despair. I



THE DOOMED SHIP. 83

knew that so long as a sailor could laugh and joke, there
was no fear of him shrinking from any amount of hardship
and danger. The meal ended, I induced Oriana to retire
to the shelter of the little tent I had provided, and when I
had given her additional blankets for her couch, and
satisfied myself that she really was, as she laughingly
asserted, ‘warm as a dormouse in its nest,” I felt a load off
my heart, and could give my undivided attention to my
responsible duties.

The sea was now very calm, although a stiff breeze blew,
and this induced me to suppose that we could not be far
from the shore, and that in all probability we had drifted up
an inlet, and were in a bight towards its extremity. The
weather was so thick that we could not see two boat-lengths
ahead, and as we knew the ice was floating in every
direction, it would have been exceedingly dangerous and
foolish to have rowed in the dark. I thereto resolved to
lie-to till daybreak and ordered the men to stow themselves
away in the forepart of the boat, whilst I kept watch by
myself. They were unwilling at first, but I told them I felt
unable to sleep at present, and that they would need to
husband their strength for the next day. They accordingly
coiled themselves up beneath the blankets and _ spare
clothes, and were, like true seamen, in the magical “ Land
of Nod” almost immediately, and slept as soundly and
snored as loudly ‘“‘as a Dutchman between two feather
beds.” -

For many dreary hours did I keep my truly melancholy
watch. Nothing occurred to disturb me, and the only inter-
ruption to my sad reflections was when I occasionally bent
my ear to listen to the gentle breathings of Oriana, as she



84 THE DOOMED SHIP.

slumbered with that fearless and perfect confidence in God’s
ever watchful providence, which a holy faith can alone
impart. At length I felt myself growing drowsy, and
awaking one of the men, I bade him keep watch, and in
case danger threatened from ice, to arouse me instantly. I
then laid down, and the man covered me well up with
blankets. Hardly had I uttered a brief prayer, and closed
my eyes, ere I fell sound asleep. Blessings on that wonder
—blessings on that mysterious agent, that giver and
confirmer of health and strength—a thousand blessings on
that thing which men call Sleep !
‘© The Mariner whose eye is bright,
Whose beard with age is hoar,”

—that strange old man, the wanderer of a bygone age, who
goeth about pouring lofty and imperishable lessons into the
ears that are open—saith,

“ Oh sleep ! it is a gentle thing
Beloved from pole to pole !”

And that itis. ‘A gentle thing!” Ay, and much more.
It is a mighty thing! for it boweth and subjecteth alike in
its own proper time the delving peasant and the thinking
philosopher ; the storm-tossed sailor-boy and the velvet-
cradled prince; the beggar who wearily lays aside his
wallet, and the sovereign who has gladly resigned his crown.
Sleep is the portal alike to joy and to sorrow. It can
elevate star-plucking ambition to a dizzier eminence than,
when walking, it ever aspired to reach; and it can hurl
splendour from its proud pedestal to roll grovelling in the
dust. It is the rewarder of the good, and the tormentor of
the evil. It can crush the oppressor, and uplift the
oppressed. It can knock off the fetters of the condemned,



THE DOOMED SHIP. 85

and lead him forth from his dark dungeon to revel among
the green meadows where he disported in innocent
childhood. It restoreth in one little hour the exile unto
the land of his fathers, and he kneeleth down and in
rapture kisseth the soil that gave him birth. It drieth the
tears of the mourner, and stilleth the wailing of the orphan.
It giveth relief unto the pain-wrung sufferer, and taketh
away the sting of the world. It restoreth wealth to the
bankrupt, and health to the invalid:—the one is again
happy in counting his coffered thousands, and the other is
again bounding aith elastic limbs across the breeze-swept
lea. It is resistless when its hour hath come, for it seizeth
the sallow-wrinkled miser, stooping in his dismal closet by
the flickering lamp, with his coins uncounted in his skinny
palm, and the rosy, smiling child basking in the sunny
meadow, with his chaplet of flowers in his chubby little
hand, and there and then doth it alike bind them in its
fetters. It can open futurity to our gaze, or revivify the
past. It can invoke to us the friends of our youth—the
departed—the sainted: it waves but its magic pinions, and
lo! they are present! We see, we touch, we converse with
them once more. Sleep knoweth no distinction between
prattling infancy and garrulous senility ; between the golden
spring of youth and the busy summer of manhood. It
spreads its volumed wings over the earth, and over the face
of the deep; it penetrates the hovel and the palace; the
great city teeming with life, and the forest with but one
solitary dweller. Its power is unlimited—its dominion is
supreme ; it giveth strength and life under the semblance of
death. IT IS GIVEN TO MAN OF GoD.

I was awakened from my prolonged slumber by the



86 THE DOOMED SHIP.

blanket being drawn from my head, and on opening my
eyes, I beheld the smiling face of Oriana bending over me.
“Tt is just daybreak,” said she, “and we can see the
shore.” I cast aside the coverings, and leaped to my feet.
There was land, sure enough, about a mile distant, but un-
fortunately the sea was frozen for at least a quarter of a mile
and how we were to land our cargo without immense labour
I knew not. I carefully swept the shore with a telescope,
and at length saw what I conceived to be an opening
through the ice, leading to a bluff headland. Ordering the
men to give way, 1 steered towards it, and to our great
satisfaction we found the ice so thin that we easily broke
through it, till we were enabled to force the boats close up
to a projecting rock. I then landed to look out for a
suitable spot to fix our temporary abode. The shore was
everywhere covered with snow a foot or more in depth, and
was very rocky. A sheltered hollow, or ravine, close to
where we landed, seemed to be the best side I could at
present select, and as there was no time to be lost, we
swallowed a hasty meal, and then set to work unloading the
long-boat. Having got everything out of her, we fixed her
two masts upright, to form the centre poles of two tents,
and lashed to them the oars and some light ricker spars
which we had brought with this object in view. These
frameworks were quickly covered with sails, and then spread
tarpaulings over them, and pegged the lower portions in the
ground. The exteriors of the tents being thus rudely but
efficiently constructed, we brought everything under their
shelter except the fuel with which the small boat was loaded.
Then we worked away to fit up the interiors. One tent was
exclusively for the men, and the other for Oriana and



THE DOOMED SHIP. 87

myself. Whilst they arranged their own to their liking, we
did the same with ours, and, strange as it may appear, we
caught ourselves laughing heartily more than once at our
contrivances to render the tent comfortable. We had a
superabundance of blankets, etc., and by fixing ropes across
the tent, it was divided into two portions, blankets being
hung as a partition between them. The smaller of these
divisions was to be Oriana’s sleeping-room, and I had the
satisfaction to behold how expertly the cheerful girl set
about rendering it a most cosy berth. The larger division
(which was to be common to us by day, and my sleeping-
room by night), was lumbered with the arms, provisions,
and all the spirits, etc., for I dared not trust any of the
latter in the men’s tent, well knowing that the temptation
would be irresistible.

It was about ten o’clock that night (Saturday, September
2gth), ere our arrangements were completed, 4vo fem. I
ought to mention that a small brass stove had been brought
from the ship’s cabin, and this we set up, and with some
difficulty fixed so that the smoke cleared away pretty well
through a slit in the tent side. I then served out a good
supper to the men, and gave them a bottle of rum, for they
had behaved so well and worked so hard, that they really
deserved encouragement. Oriana and myself, of course,
supped together, and I now ate with a very fair appetite, for
she searched about the tent till she found some of the
culinary utensils we had taken the precaution to bring from
the ship, and then cutting a few slices from one of her
dried rein-breasts, and adding condiments, she speedily
produced such a savoury stew, or whatever it might be
called, that I began to deem her as wise in the art of



88 THE DOOMED SHIP.

cookery as in everything else. We talked long and seriously
that night about our prospects, and although we could not
yet form any very tangible idea of the future which awaited
us, we, at any rate, both agreed in most fervently thanking
God for so mercifully preserving us hitherto. Just as
Oriana was bidding me good-night, she started, and
exclaimed—“ What is dat? Hark!” I jumped up, for I
heard, too, a wild kind of cry. I rushed out of the tent
into the open air, and the mystery was at once solved.
The'tent of my worthy crew was only about half-a-dozen
paces from our own, and they were all joining in a most
vociferous chorus, in honour of Saturday night, I suppose.
And what does the reader think they were singing on this
first night of landing on an unknown shore? Why they
were yelling, ‘‘ Britons never, never, never shall be slaves!”
This is the literal fact. I re-entered our tent, smiling: in
spite of myself. Once more, I say, what animals sailors
are! These three men were utterly reckless of what the
morrow might bring forth, and notwithstanding the terrible
prospect before them, they were just as jovial and happy
over their bottle of rum as though they were’ in the tap-
room of the “Jolly Sailors,” at Hull. In fact, seamen
never can be taught to consider that any responsibility or
care rests with themselves. They will obey orders with
alacrity, but never trouble themselves to think for a moment
whether the orders are right or wrong. ‘That’s the
captain’s business,” says Jack; and he indeed thinks
everything, whatever it is, the “captain’s business.” I was
perfectly aware that happen what might to us, I must think
and act for them the same as though they were children,
and children sailors really are in many respects.



CHAPTER XIV.

HE next day was Sunday, and I was determined that
it should be kept as a day of rest and thanksgiving.
I read the prayers, lessons, and psalms for the day from
my uncle’s Church of England Prayer-Book, and the crew
listened with attention, although I did not think they
evinced the least feeling on the occasion—but a sailor often
feels more than he shows. No kind of work was performed
all day, but towards nightfall one of the men came to tell
me that he had seen the footmarks of some large beast
which had been prowling in our vicinity. I examined them,
and at once understood that we had a bear for our neigh-
bour—not a very agreeable discovery, for the white Polar
bear isa most daring and ferocious animal, and I felt by
no means sure that the one in question would not pay a
visit of exploration to the tents in the course of the night.
I therefore cautioned the men to lay the axes and cutlasses
ready at hand when they went to rest, in case the stranger
should disturb their innocent slumbers; and for my cwn
part, I loaded three of the guns with ball.

Not long after midnight, I was awakened by a smothered
sort of cry from Oriana, but as it was not repeated, I fancied
she had only cried out in a dream. . A moment or two
afterwards, however, I distinctly heard her call, ‘‘ Broder!”
and she pushed aside the suspended blanket, and stood
before me with a lighted lamp in her hand. I had laid
down in my clothes, and now sprung up to ask what was the



go THE DOOMED SHIP.

matter, for she was very pale, although her aspect was
resolute enough.—‘‘ Bring your guns, and you shall see!”
was her mysterious reply.

I obeyed, marvelling very much what was to be done.
When she raised her lamp, as we entered her apartment (if
I may so call it), I saw nothing remarkable, except that her
little Danish pet dog, Nem, was cowering at our feet, with
every expression of intense terror—the poor creature being
huddled up like a ball, and his teeth fairly chattering.

“What is the matter?” asked I.

“Hush! Look here! What do you call dat?”

I looked where she pointed, and sure enough, I beheld,
to my amazement and alarm, an enormous shaggy paw
thrust under the canvas at the bottom of the tent, and
moving slowly to and fro, as though in search of something
nice. She hastily whispered to me that she had been
awakened by this very paw, roughly groping beneath her bed
and the ground. I involuntarily raised my gun to my
shoulder, but she cried—‘ Do not fire yet! Wait, and you
will see his head.”

She was right. In a moment or two the animal grew
impatient, and emitting a low growl, attempted to shove his
head through the opening made by his paws. I clapped the
gun barrel to his muzzle, and drew the trigger. The report
was deafening, and we could see nothing for smoke, but a
tremendous roar from the wounded beast apprised us, at any
rate, that he was not killed. Grasping my two loaded guns,
I rushed out of the tent into the open air, and was met by
the crew, who had turned out in great alarm, armed with
hatchets. It was fortunately a very brilliant night, and we
could see objects with great distinctness. Not many yards



Full Text

THE DOOMED SHIP.


have probably forgotten the day altogether, but for
Oriana.
"Now," said she, gaily, "I have made preparations for a
little feast, and you must give the men a holiday, and invite
them to share it"
"Yes, dear Oriana !"
We all enjoyed the day most cordially, and as though to
yet more singularly mark the coincidence of its being the
same day of the week in which I was born, a violent tempest
and snow-storm set in, and the day was so awful in the open
air that only those who have seen such a day in the Arctic
Regions, in mid-winter, can conceive what it was like.
When our guests had left us that night, we sat talking
affectionately and confidingly together for some time, and
at length Oriana said,-"Broder, I will now tell you my
own birthday."
Ah, I wish you would."
"It is this very day, same as yours !"
"Indeed! can that be possible !"
"True, dear broder."
"And what day of the week was it ?"
"A Wednesday, same as yours !"
"Marvellous and was it also a stormy day ?"
"Ah, yes, broder, just like this; and my poor father, the
captain of a ship, was lost at sea that very day with all his
crew, and my mother died, as your's nearly died, in giving
me birth; so from the day and hour in which I was born I
became an orphan."
I embraced her tenderly, and whispered,-" Dearest
Oriana, it must be the hand of God Himself that has so
wonderfully brought us together! Both orphans, both born







THE DOOMED SHIP. I57

ling her beautiful little pet, and now his remains were hashed
up and partially devoured, and his silken coat, which I had
seen her caress thousands of times, was in my hand. A
lover dearly loves his mistress's dog !
"Ye gormandizing brutes !" at length roared I, "ye are
worse than cannibals! The only living creature she had
to love and cherish ye have stolen, and butchered to
gratify your gluttonous cravings! Shame on ye, men!
Little did I think when I last saw the poor little thing,
that- "
"Nay, captain," interrupted Paddy, unable to restrain his
native drollery, although he saw me much excited, -"the
craytur wasn't poor, but fat as butter !"
I was so incensed that I aimed a blow at the speaker's
head, but he dodged cleverly, and got out of my reach, whilst
Sandy whined out,-"We shouldna been tempted to do
siccan a thing, Sir, if the poor wee beestie hadna cam his
ainsell frae the cabin intil oor hoose here. It was wrang o'
us, I maun e'en say, but it was no' possible to resist sic a
temptation."
"Ay, Sir, added Blackbird Jim, we knowed we wor
a-doing wrong, and our hearts misgev us at the time, but
sink it I You see, Sir, there's no argufying agen a wolfish
stomach. I'm sure we all on us '11 lay down our life for the
poor young lady, and it is-hang it! yes, it is a blackguard
act we've done-there's no gainsaying that; but what's
done can't be undone, as Charley Baxter said when his wife
blow'd him up for pawning the bed !"
I could bear no more, so turning round, banged their
door after me, not feeling very charitably towards them, and
well knowing that their repentance would not prevent them





THE DOOMED SHIP.


on the same day of the week and of the month, and almost
under the same melancholy circumstances."
"Yes, broder, I think it is God's own doing."
There was a pause, and then I somewhat innocently
said-" But surely you cannot also be just the same age as
myself ?"
She gave a little laugh, and archly responded,-" You are
a sailor, and not a courtier, broder Pray do I look as old
as you?"
"No, certainly not. I thought your age was about
twenty ? "
"Well, I am twenty this day."
And may I also ask whether in Denmark you deem girls
who are born in the stormy month to be wild March birds,'
as well as the boys ?"
"Ah, broder, it is not fair to shoot me with my own gun !"
I lay awake several hours in my berth that night, pon-
dering on the extraordinary coincidence of our respective
birthdays.
On Saturday evening in the same week, when we were
sitting together after supper, Oriana, as usual, had her little
dog in her lap, and was fondling him-" Why do you call it
Nem?" said I.
it is a Danish word."
"Yes, but what does it mean?"
"It means 'Docility,' and he really deserves his name,
pretty, dear little Nem?"
The creature seemed to understand her, for he immediately
wagged his tail, and rising up, stretched his fore-paws on
her bosom, and lifted his head to her face, with sparkling eyes.
"See how he loves me! He begs a kiss, and he shall





THE DOOMED SHIP.


from devouring the last morsel of the unfortunate Nem the
moment I was gone.
How to face Oriana, and reveal to her the scandalous
fate of her little pet, I knew not; but concealing the skin
under my jacket, I entered the cabin. Oriana instantly
perceived that something had highly enraged me, and a few
questions from her elicited the truth. She turned very pale,
but said not a word till I gave her the skin, and then she
sat down with it in her lap, and burst into tears. "Oh,"
sobbed she, "cruel, very cruel! I would have given them
my share of food to spare my little dog's life-dat I would !
Poor dear little Nem He loved me so much-O, my poor
dumb friend!-the only thing dat I had, and they have
killed you!"
The sight of her tears and distress drove me distracted.
I gnashed my teeth, and vented passionate imprecations
and threats against the men who had committed the brutal
act. She promptly recovered herself, and exerted all her
power to soothe me. "Dear broder," said she, "pray do
not speak so wickedly. It is true they have done very
wrong, but we must not forget we owe our lives to them-
and they are poor, rude men, and know not any better.
"I will teach them, then !" cried I, with a bitter oath.
"No, my broder, say no more about it. They will be
very sorry for what they have done in the morning. Besides,
it is only a little dog, and I shall soon get another pet and
forget him."
I knew better than that. As to her forgetting Nem, I
was very certain she would not and could not do anything
of the sort. Indeed, when she had retired to her state-
room for the night, I heard her sobbing and ejaculating.-





THE DOOMED SHIP.


goes a-exploring, and we shoots four nice ptarmigans, two
mollemokes, and a bos'n, the which I here brings you
and he thereupon deposited them all at her feet.
"And we finds in one of the traps a young fox, not a bit hurt,
and says we, this here will do for ma'am to bring up tame-
for, d'ye see, ma'am, we knows you can tame anything
whatsomdever, as all things loves you, 'cause why? they
can't help it-and here the creeter is, ma'am, all alive and
kicking !"
Saying this, he drew aside his jacket, and displayed a
very pretty little fox-cub, perfectly white, and not in the
least injured by being caught in a trap, constituted on what
he called the humane principle--though what the said
"humanity" consisted of I am at a loss to conceive, as all
the difference between an ordinary trap and a "humane"
one was, that the former .put its victims out of their misery
at once, whilst the latter kept them alive only to be killed a
few hours later.
Qriana eagerly accepted the peace-offering, saying,
"'tween a tear and a smile,"-" Thank you very much, it is
good of you to have thought of me; I will try and tame the
little creature, dat I will!" and she at once took it from his
hand, and began to untie the rope-yarns with which the
captors had bound its legs rather tightly together.
Jim was highly gratified at being so well received, and
muttering something or other, he very hastily withdrew,
being evidently afraid of my angry looks. When he was
gone, Oriana temporarily placed her new pet in an empty
locker, and then turning to me, with all the winning
persuasiveness she could so well evince, said,-" Dear
broder, you know dat I much loved my poor little Nem,





THE DOOMED SHIP.


"Nem-min lille Nem-min kjcere lille Nem !" (Nem
-my little Nem-my dear little Nem!) Poor girl! well
might she mourn his loss. The beautiful and affectionate
little creature was ever at her side, and used to trot after
her to her state-room at night, and repose on a piece of
reindeer skin by her sleeping-berth, and regularly awakened
her in the morning (as she once told me) by gently patting
her cheek with his soft paw, or else by licking her hand.
Ere we had finished breakfast the next morning, a timid
tap came at the cabin door. I was too much enraged
against the men to take any notice of it whatever, but
Oriana bade the visitor enter, and when the bronzed visage of
Blackbird Jim showed itself, she saluted him, bidding him
good morrow in her usual cheerful, .warm-hearted manner.
without a shade of reproach discernible in her tone. Jim
himself-delinquent as he was !-seemed as utterly dumb-
founded and abashed at the moment as it was possible for
such a being to be, but I roared out,-" You brutal rascal !
how dare you show your face here, after what you have
done ?"
"Broder, dear broder!" exclaimed Oriana, hastily
interposing, and forgetting her usual demure custom of
calling me "Captain Meredith" in presence of the men;
"pray do not-for my sake, do not speak so !"
"Why, you sees, ma'am," cried the guilty Blackbird, in a
rueful, penitent tone, "you knows as how we've been and
done a-a sort-a-oh, split me we was downright savages
last night, and we repents, ma'am, and is all on us afear'd to
look on your sweet, kind face agin. But what's done can't
be undone, as Charley Bax-hum I well ma'am, we turned
out this here blessed morning long afore you was up, and





THE DOOMED SHIP,


you gallant fellows can have nice little hot suppers
forward !"
"Mother o' mine," growled the Irishman, "I tould yer
he'd smell it !"
The old Scotchman looked glumly at Paddy, and Paddy
stared vacantly at Blackbird Jim, who in turn looked like a
culprit going to Tyburn. Meanwhile, I stirred the hash with
a spoon, and it really smelt delicious, but it was so minced
up that I could not discover whether it was fish, flesh, or
fowl-or all three. But I burst into a passion, upbraiding
them with their selfish duplicity, and asking how they could
sit feasting there, well knowing that the young lady had
nothing to eat but a little insipid dry flesh.
"The wee beestie," answered the old Scotchman, pointing
dolorously to the hash, "wasna tekken in the traps, captain,
and we wad a' been fu' blithe to ha' brou't it to the leddy,
on'y she wadna ha',teuched it, ye ken !" The other two
chorussed affirmatively.
"How do you know that ?" retorted I. "It smells daintily
enough. What is it? Where did you get it?"
"The beestie came on board its ainsell," muttered Sandy,
hanging down his head..
What beestie? Is it a fox, a hare, a glutton, or what?"
Not a soul replied. "I insist on knowing! Where is the
skin? You haven't devoured it, surely?"
Even as I spoke I felt something soft underfoot, and
stooping down, I picked up the skin of the "wee beestie."
What thinks the reader was it ? The skin of Oriana's little
dog, Nem A regular groan burst from the delinquents at
this discovery, and for a moment I stood speechless with
rage. Not an hour before I had seen the Danish girl fofd-





THE DOOMED SHIP.


have it, dear little Nem !" and accordingly she caressed and
kissed his silken head repeatedly."
"Upon my word, Oriana,,you will make me jealous."
"Why, you don't think you are so beautiful as my own
dear little Nem, do you?"
"But I love you as much as he does !"
"Eh do you? Well, perhaps."
"You surely don't mean that, Oriana?" said I, quickly,
feeling hurt and half angry.
She looked at me a moment in surprise, and then smiling
affectionately, gave her hand to me in silence. I pressed it
to my heart that she might feel how it beat; and were
both-ah, dear me how happy we both were !
And so our solitary life passed on, and yet we were con-
tented, and enjoyed unutterable happiness in each other's
society. Perhaps never since man first loved woman had
a courtship been carried on under more peculiar circum-
stances than ours, and I question whether I should ever have
had the courage to declare how I loved her, had we merely
met in the ordinary intercourse of society. Thus it is that
God orders all things for the best; turning pains into joys;
misfortunes into felicities.
Our ill success with the traps the last week or two in
March once more threw us back on our reserved store, and,
of course, we stinted ourselves to a very small allowance.
The men received their portion without a murmur, as they
knew it could not be helped at present; but when many days
passed in this way, and the weather continued so tempestuous
that the wild creatures never came near the ship, then my
little crew, one and all, began to express, by their eager
famished looks, that they suffered much, although in silence.





THE DOOMED SHIP.


I have already explained that their mess-room was in the
forecastle of the ship, a good distance from the cabin occu-
pied by Oriana and myself, and as we sat together one
evening, I happened to slightly open the door communicating
with the hold to get some article lying beyond, when a
savoury, unmistakable odour from the men's room instantly
penetrated the cabin.
"Those rascals must have lied about not finding any
animal in the traps to-day!" exclaimed I, "for they are
feasting at this very moment."
0, pray, don't swear, and don't be angry with the poor
people!" soothingly cried Oriana. "They have suffered
much, and have been very good and obedient, and they are
only eating some little bird or creature they picked up, I
am so sure !"
"If it's only a mouse, they ought to have brought it here
for-for you!" muttered I, more angrily still, and hastily
passing into the hold, guided by the light which streamed
from the chink in their bulk-head, I reached the door; and
opening it, stood in a moment before the astonished crew,
who were detected at the very commencement of their guilty
feast.
On the lid of a chest stood their wooden kit, filled with a
smoking hash, just poured from a tin-saucepan, and the three
voracious fellows were in the act of fishing out pieces with
their fingers. Blackbird Jim gave a dismal groan, and almost
choked himself by desperately gulping down a fragment he
had in his mouth.
"Good evening, gentlemen," said I, with bitter irony, I
hope I do not disturb you in the least. I am very glad to
find that, although we are on short commons in the cabin,




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'2012-06-29T07:29:49-04:00'
describe
'3637336' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLC' 'sip-files00247.tif'
eef81006caa61aebf32255504194238b
aac27e804b184db7f7fd9e1b974049562c7608ac
'2012-06-29T07:39:05-04:00'
describe
'7043644' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLD' 'sip-files00091.tif'
d951761e41323c6cab82803291c8c10e
8fcc4e8c0b1819e8a6a601e6c868f0a9274eae5c
'2012-06-29T07:29:27-04:00'
describe
'7047368' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLE' 'sip-files00147.tif'
30f0cfbc80517baaa0b035a27324f393
423ac969bcb9e2e57605f6b90efb2e2cbd39947b
'2012-06-29T07:37:41-04:00'
describe
'82886' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLF' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
9e583e3d70838310875afaeaf3025c5e
5257f228cb8e5f9ec52fa6974433e1e8e0db1b94
'2012-06-29T07:39:39-04:00'
describe
'86215' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLG' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
d7425135210840db2c97d4984ccc049c
e596e3f3845c4b4752c978ce667df80d018643b3
'2012-06-29T07:43:11-04:00'
describe
'3637228' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLH' 'sip-files00039.tif'
db0e9dbc03b48e0402232e2bfcbb0bf5
8d981490eff4286a47dbe2692aec74e2173f3902
'2012-06-29T07:38:40-04:00'
describe
'7047288' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLI' 'sip-files00118.tif'
edf2dd38ac1420296c53a18a7383313b
e0ffe73bc80c7bb1fae45dd25640c383e31d8c70
'2012-06-29T07:28:47-04:00'
describe
'292738' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLJ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
0313df2e58c0dd766a4701568c2d56c6
d6d09b6950cd9964de2dcc37757b1e565b27899e
'2012-06-29T07:45:00-04:00'
describe
'44502' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLK' 'sip-files00224.pro'
3f5a13c522eff48f432190c2f169484d
13b0931e2238471a024d2b69efba0e8f466ae46c
'2012-06-29T07:37:03-04:00'
describe
'451945' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLL' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
f1f1dd55f0b4a18b9098e17f15ec2ac1
bf6389bcdc133d2b0b41a03ede84cc1839feb7a0
'2012-06-29T07:28:30-04:00'
describe
'71414' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLM' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
493033d5930d09cc331b3275a8657feb
2144cff4cf95ceaf7dcd0c0eb21e3b6affe7f9d3
'2012-06-29T07:29:46-04:00'
describe
'7047364' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLN' 'sip-files00109.tif'
a8fc1db0df05a6ff99e92ad7b44ac110
7848c609a28d836f380639050f35f5e41b6190e8
'2012-06-29T07:35:56-04:00'
describe
'3637048' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLO' 'sip-files00190.tif'
7fe2aac28dac44ac1f8fe1f69fffc739
3ec6b60264a53ced0650cc20a7a9ce4880337c58
'2012-06-29T07:41:20-04:00'
describe
'452030' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLP' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
bbd3d274521bc945100b64836f949dbf
43f497be63d9ce7f6f9ceb55d97cc053430ec91c
'2012-06-29T07:29:02-04:00'
describe
'3636756' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLQ' 'sip-files00204.tif'
aa686edf6452806a3d03f9d705ea0998
26d3a7975742a3a26012e283eed6ca68b25be61f
'2012-06-29T07:40:58-04:00'
describe
'1767744' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLR' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
6c3c988ae07647b9a8157fdbf7e7a170
183185e562010dd2b29e0da062a142f34969b8cd
'2012-06-29T07:44:34-04:00'
describe
'143408' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLS' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
d493665ad18aa25c0b0cea2ac71c1d2c
61836f12a8cda4bec63cd48a356feb504719efdd
'2012-06-29T07:42:22-04:00'
describe
'152' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLT' 'sip-files00008.txt'
062250951b49ea519a9a92fd85c9391b
44bacb5672bd21638861d7957fd9b0cbc2183200
'2012-06-29T07:43:50-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'7047380' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLU' 'sip-files00140.tif'
b737da65d3843ede758f247223d812ea
1e4173ff51ef9bafa19c9449559ef0e67abebb46
'2012-06-29T07:35:11-04:00'
describe
'45828' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLV' 'sip-files00116.pro'
30358cf7a90d24df02352b88b913d2af
e8b18669dce7b4ac06f3ac8baa1210cdeae6bc97
'2012-06-29T07:38:19-04:00'
describe
'175386' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLW' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
4be2199ce226b32051ce1419253e8d85
b8c45a426eb013a3ba47fd197ed870f418015b49
'2012-06-29T07:40:42-04:00'
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLX' 'sip-files00025.txt'
6dbe99013a8a0487073fc0c11e5b5aee
ee3801e68dfbe4d2e50d4b8b9e080b25acd862c2
'2012-06-29T07:28:28-04:00'
describe
'58250' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLY' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
7264ac09d1869382ebeaefb2888d5ac5
70cccedf4c1d719d9babae17ff2512343117dea3
'2012-06-29T07:33:37-04:00'
describe
'292720' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWLZ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
f3d4977a3896871f6fc75afe13ea1ca2
4e942cf824b1312adddcf1460d430eb4e97667d4
'2012-06-29T07:36:14-04:00'
describe
'113278' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMA' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
51eddba8717de1c9f0a2098ebe89c6f1
0f577839504b4645169efcde2a61fe8ec842136c
'2012-06-29T07:41:06-04:00'
describe
'195773' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMB' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
6829216b58666d7f6292baadb8c29c4f
7f8cf35399de80338afeff49a054ea92d7f8dab5
'2012-06-29T07:37:46-04:00'
describe
'35217' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMC' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
51ec964548122b6301de910b5ef4439b
3ef35a7aa58eaf868d067714a18abc2008e80b7d
'2012-06-29T07:36:24-04:00'
describe
'45367' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMD' 'sip-files00182.pro'
42d2aa10848484ee5ac7d4ad9c1db7e9
17d3573f350d541396c035eeb188cdc1bd257791
'2012-06-29T07:38:11-04:00'
describe
'44522' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWME' 'sip-files00242.pro'
14f7298c07eb0334bd3818efacdc2cc8
f83b8c2357c46760c7f7b04ec16049a4552f5d64
'2012-06-29T07:42:47-04:00'
describe
'208268' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMF' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
7cf6ec1c2bbf81f1b7822f8e13ec8f14
462ea2dcdc2e8bfe396c08690b576a4e63c50577
'2012-06-29T07:30:01-04:00'
describe
'44072296' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMG' 'sip-files00286.tif'
7f6bb39e5355394951ee01bbb405aac1
f8aa917a71f162ee9b83ff0862d2cae6566ce4ff
'2012-06-29T07:31:07-04:00'
describe
'28357' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMH' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
f5fb009f21e22da1d0a738bd9e710889
531f968467b50c3a25cc0eb3cf7b4a2ea738879b
'2012-06-29T07:39:12-04:00'
describe
'7047292' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMI' 'sip-files00103.tif'
f624f885c1ad54d3eaea1de85ed837b5
c81e0b151cb1a6a61f352edd70636dc029c81e62
'2012-06-29T07:30:22-04:00'
describe
'1534' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMJ' 'sip-files00172.txt'
853b8d072a08826ec3774f9a65c0da52
80cae1452c3f6ce97eeae3d11c378636301fd90e
'2012-06-29T07:36:19-04:00'
describe
'7047020' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMK' 'sip-files00088.tif'
af74c95d2f8ac164327af487209596ca
d7bfc68ccae1623f337f8e4bc7620d0682c1b8a4
'2012-06-29T07:39:43-04:00'
describe
'126752' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWML' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
245f7f40e9766d3288e176b42f519f67
4f1c977a086f574df5d78688f768e49609ff70d0
'2012-06-29T07:32:00-04:00'
describe
'20858' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMM' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
dd36c6ea5f7e8c487f0cbb0df4bfe55f
cfef018525e35d551a4c3e799691129a53602098
'2012-06-29T07:29:57-04:00'
describe
'29238' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMN' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
b1e008ffc18800069939c3f800a4c645
0884a6ea7c6cb08e58f2e3a5657b68593d7f0284
'2012-06-29T07:30:37-04:00'
describe
'45142' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMO' 'sip-files00239.pro'
0c1437e737df925902a505db703c0a40
e8c6889bd6b44af1f27791f4eae17ccf8e978318
'2012-06-29T07:30:19-04:00'
describe
'1845' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMP' 'sip-files00147.txt'
0839ae587e3a5c5901c2789b5e702773
3312ec7036133c36c4ded78ae6f338d76d892bd9
'2012-06-29T07:36:47-04:00'
describe
'42601' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMQ' 'sip-files00164.pro'
a8c0417ec4d2535992af7a712e1967eb
55e9b8cc797746f230a5af6f6553734dcc31e0b0
'2012-06-29T07:31:27-04:00'
describe
'43270' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMR' 'sip-files00108.pro'
7bf629b96ca83c7b555410f9245b1416
102cd23b559ba3ef6b13fca3be404de96c4ebb56
'2012-06-29T07:38:45-04:00'
describe
'134827' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMS' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
ac238d4cce1de861782296aabbe11dd0
9f3c05aea3ba44ddc34f524aae9f252e48a81cc1
'2012-06-29T07:30:46-04:00'
describe
'44708' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMT' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
1592ff2d4fa295a2e36a3e7fa56a1a2b
5788315b74c4a17820026dda0943cce300117bff
describe
'83388' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMU' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
8cef031c2354e15dc1e27ea06ff4f523
ed6ab5cadb7e3bd72e452c81e62e7992bb32a1e0
'2012-06-29T07:34:29-04:00'
describe
'44089' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMV' 'sip-files00012.pro'
694ec571a85376c40b5804931b2415af
b350fe98a8eccd0e5dd190d085fd4b9863fb92c1
'2012-06-29T07:38:20-04:00'
describe
'26064' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMW' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
d3f6d336b167e74b1315e21a58d2b826
f72402111b2ce869830e6f015095122c4a0215fc
'2012-06-29T07:29:13-04:00'
describe
'29980' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMX' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
0eb638e430fe2147783edcf339775d4d
974f2e317d1b00032e889f5281c7d277bd88290b
'2012-06-29T07:40:56-04:00'
describe
'41771' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMY' 'sip-files00040.pro'
8dde381f8cd6009973ee3805877aecf2
b879730d9f439c257c4f8efeb323c91ccbac4c0e
'2012-06-29T07:28:41-04:00'
describe
'46218' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWMZ' 'sip-files00174.pro'
dc2111837fe78d7d85e23d10cb572b1d
dd9a557c7144c050ae44cb3075916dcfbc6bf6c3
describe
'1610' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNA' 'sip-files00210.txt'
3acced558c9cc356a29624f122a0b51c
71d0da2ab7db7ef1060629511799fcc601a5dddf
'2012-06-29T07:30:29-04:00'
describe
'1756' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNB' 'sip-files00215.txt'
f51d3f8239a481172920e36081538ce1
4d50f7b7c6139a1cbdad519fefd3f9aebe3b4f70
'2012-06-29T07:37:26-04:00'
describe
'29237' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNC' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
ec3f61afa991941b10ea66875234b9d1
47696482cb788bac853783aaafbe752a7902416b
'2012-06-29T07:44:31-04:00'
describe
'30681' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWND' 'sip-files00111.pro'
6d78835987a52517c5cb3b8ed9edbd46
a5ab739eb5912c6f54c60b72a2018336620cff30
'2012-06-29T07:33:30-04:00'
describe
'451978' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNE' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
e91c5674a1be4ef02dc607cbc83a0dd1
4e57522766ff02982ea38d8f872dd90346d0e02f
'2012-06-29T07:37:57-04:00'
describe
'292742' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNF' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
32e9dcb3e9a8860695aba7898ed1d984
b73f15ec6644084bccf95c1c19f6d67304462f6c
'2012-06-29T07:38:37-04:00'
describe
'292711' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNG' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
72af5fcc9a6c21a0e2656cc66eb678f8
754f4ff5c0e5ef553f3ced185e314e0565d5ea55
describe
'83886' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNH' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
18980268d4a83c25c24b7d7115512441
4bc4b415b3a003f4ee3e1f9705655c1ae45f66bf
'2012-06-29T07:35:55-04:00'
describe
'35573' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNI' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
f4907439020287014b14fe9b01a3091f
b24c3aeb4fbbbf1f8d297a4edec83c15832bc40b
'2012-06-29T07:40:29-04:00'
describe
'37107' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNJ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
72361150ec56d54cc5d5b9609a8ff962
ea150c7a34cda8b5b97dfcaf35090f9407171826
'2012-06-29T07:31:12-04:00'
describe
'83279' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNK' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
76b7c8ffd24f95b360e46304a82d453e
fd88f6f5d809e33060d783e867eadac785aef312
'2012-06-29T07:41:40-04:00'
describe
'452022' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNL' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
65e7b90317e244cb88ff05c7965d4bc9
77eb862a55c2d3c43b163715fb5d1a377d3fc95f
'2012-06-29T07:36:55-04:00'
describe
'203076' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNM' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
a79f03322f9fd59e79730f19ac5bb1e6
433e7254fded1c760ad28f448af154d89bfc26a6
'2012-06-29T07:43:15-04:00'
describe
'1641' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNN' 'sip-files00235.txt'
16dfc1adc448a3e900a5c6b31d689eb6
d68ad153620c7fda880df117936b218518ec0ee5
'2012-06-29T07:44:41-04:00'
describe
'56213' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNO' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
d18e1f0de47bcd47a2e229422a8421fb
d0e55582f4f2a569ce6336d4869075d0b03ff558
'2012-06-29T07:44:22-04:00'
describe
'41073' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNP' 'sip-files00134.pro'
c83d64daef77f44613549035d1ae3cac
2d80a479800cc8ae79fa84373ee2d2836f15e8cb
'2012-06-29T07:39:45-04:00'
describe
'106011' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNQ' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
a247474afc5449c2e410a9912acfa78a
eb26c81c49e131f4e192ebc44c92a2f8e83d1f10
'2012-06-29T07:30:34-04:00'
describe
'186995' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNR' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
1316a8bb24284cf76880130ea2a4145a
0c1ee5dd9e602d9b92169e9d420ba81681adc71f
'2012-06-29T07:44:53-04:00'
describe
'130808' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNS' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
d77173330e1a72cab14e4498612c7cbb
2d2b63d347cabf4a8474238a1ea215071d6982bb
'2012-06-29T07:44:36-04:00'
describe
'34152' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNT' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
4f9fe90ae0baf8c48699dd09dad258bf
c09e81aa934d6782016816085caff74ad1cceeb8
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNU' 'sip-files00229.txt'
fe8fcd7ca5287fec999d237a64db4faa
2830159783eb1f2f9d3e6dc908d2229a068272cb
'2012-06-29T07:39:44-04:00'
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNV' 'sip-files00192.txt'
51c58065b9d3330b445e66de321f8505
17d49c57d399adc270e1178ff30838b8fdd30726
'2012-06-29T07:30:30-04:00'
describe
'451986' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNW' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
6405fc494f27a94abfd9e7c519203ac1
306c5daa7e154bd6449fc96497f484e31c48277c
describe
'849532' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNX' 'sip-files00162.tiff'
bc8a412d5956f014e7812df4a51d74ff
5a1c91301959e57331a1b470152303b352ac9c8f
'2012-06-29T07:38:53-04:00'
describe
'3637024' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNY' 'sip-files00178.tif'
c21838d8d357f30471ed88abce4fda57
d16c7e6a038c845897e5f786e7284e10692300f2
'2012-06-29T07:29:03-04:00'
describe
'136578' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWNZ' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
bfb4a26e3e930347675e14cfe76473d2
21f0bd2851794a5b1101c1b921502a7c7508c281
'2012-06-29T07:28:36-04:00'
describe
'25694' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOA' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
afbfbc0af17ef74ff63a0151182b06b5
243f5985b16a8c8a802d96cac986cb894eeaf01f
'2012-06-29T07:33:29-04:00'
describe
'36385' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOB' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
cf1cacbf4e6f7b746ce59b3e0c4b9258
4780c9994d72939c62f36c394a51b79cf2667d1d
'2012-06-29T07:29:32-04:00'
describe
'292619' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOC' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
26a4f9f2db624e4d53c7ea5ddd5c2640
e1a0c4ff8749995924ef59a9be279b107487159b
'2012-06-29T07:39:51-04:00'
describe
'25373' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOD' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
0cbfa68765bcad31e34a32795586a26c
fe258177b860bebb042b5251f242a5496c1e8537
'2012-06-29T07:36:27-04:00'
describe
'27152' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOE' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
4c119fad4fa520d3be7793d50ed3b19c
07d31006b9c6111d235ffcc951da58ccc54d43d5
'2012-06-29T07:28:59-04:00'
describe
'56660' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOF' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
b306fa407fb3947b3d9a611415743270
811264efd3eb57925022dee1f477d95a42b84a46
'2012-06-29T07:36:04-04:00'
describe
'451963' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOG' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
09f8ded3355f6697e68c9f51d15e078d
27d83d4f21e55b6ad6229890175b7f046bee2213
'2012-06-29T07:42:52-04:00'
describe
'40487' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOH' 'sip-files00165.pro'
8ccd17eded37a9c9225276dc8472d7d3
47c0a471609af3f0ad83254d379934d245a5863c
'2012-06-29T07:35:20-04:00'
describe
'74425' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOI' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
69e93c992396fde271f4767531b07d80
792ea8f2bdddfa93dc759e9588b93e0226c26d97
'2012-06-29T07:36:02-04:00'
describe
'67077' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOJ' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
d6e582011f128c36781118e2011367f8
1b07cf38183530f1b167db7f5e585aa63070b4f6
'2012-06-29T07:42:51-04:00'
describe
'7046456' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOK' 'sip-files00153.tif'
949747d18813cae93b4121004f2ada3f
98563680aa4a87fac4b4db4f90f70b45ec16aded
'2012-06-29T07:34:00-04:00'
describe
'452025' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOL' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
33f0c514fe1ac977a57bbd41fc045613
ab757a64bf0aa1f2b153daf8c8c21fb134f1a0d7
'2012-06-29T07:42:23-04:00'
describe
'33725' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOM' 'sip-files00058.pro'
a445eddad3976d3aacf3c44335716a6d
f212e3d4135c0a6d0ad44de507bca93a1f0f6ea6
'2012-06-29T07:33:59-04:00'
describe
'292700' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWON' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
5aff93051fd900cd2c525614818a4424
41ce42283818301a67c5b3d4bd862524cc67d86d
'2012-06-29T07:33:09-04:00'
describe
'134966' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOO' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
73e5ce9e288e05d6e97a75e64b8566b5
335047e27bdf8167280fe431e6c210e937c90834
'2012-06-29T07:40:52-04:00'
describe
'1798' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOP' 'sip-files00209.txt'
ea59556338c40782c826d7fd6e43ab9d
872f18e9f8490e762170118170a5130d61b43483
'2012-06-29T07:35:51-04:00'
describe
'451938' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOQ' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
c1600bc3903d396d3573e69091b35a99
5295be974f44b704800386015d5fd64679253694
'2012-06-29T07:37:34-04:00'
describe
'53683' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOR' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
a4ad0385917fb2aa6824d077e41fdb11
9b0b9894ba3f65303e3516d9cc27832259498f56
'2012-06-29T07:28:33-04:00'
describe
'217960' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOS' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
c662226b3d7883c9a2e3ee49689b41f8
9a849659b4c51706732da4b3d350df3b11bed0ca
'2012-06-29T07:31:03-04:00'
describe
'36477' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOT' 'sip-files00230.pro'
c107e53529b52f8c46f645866208a69f
327d2c19c3ca0689f7ed41359379056ba74994e8
describe
'135991' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOU' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
fe960011a0e969de7fa80c9ec1faa402
8c61522ced91de7c07f89fc106ad5d23e5ffc92a
'2012-06-29T07:29:17-04:00'
describe
'3637380' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOV' 'sip-files00239.tif'
3215aa6fa1f6a3aa6b68e86ddfbe1998
86ef6e8b41294231218726bc5541e82e793bb218
'2012-06-29T07:44:16-04:00'
describe
'195855' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOW' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
210b5e1acb9e066a701ac1f84d8f3b07
36633d4dff627e7bfedc7fd87e410f9e49c0b54a
'2012-06-29T07:39:07-04:00'
describe
'29305' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOX' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
4ecf42498e885b9bca41c472e269abb1
35ff1d991c07897e7e0c73d834ea1739b74953a2
'2012-06-29T07:31:05-04:00'
describe
'35002' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOY' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
0f170378356bf6a9865994793b2d584c
15173f1494221a2d33f5b54524cc962afbf03c11
'2012-06-29T07:29:56-04:00'
describe
'451981' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWOZ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
1974737483d2fdefa138d98f4516a18f
2c4e872c6322f1b46b31655dbd52424c4862c185
'2012-06-29T07:40:11-04:00'
describe
'1811' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPA' 'sip-files00097.txt'
9ccf0b090c5da256a29ebd841f7e285b
c2f64ee71ff5cd5322ca48d09a0eb5da0e732b4b
'2012-06-29T07:37:07-04:00'
describe
'36689' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPB' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
a377b3c19621f546065f798ecefd3272
01b4dfcb461bbed0929c8aaaa1da5d5c18cc2936
'2012-06-29T07:43:28-04:00'
describe
'292743' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPC' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
e2a58fdf41b3c037ee4981838298672b
1a1cb5a060c2118fb5da45ab2986b6045be025cf
'2012-06-29T07:33:32-04:00'
describe
'1817' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPD' 'sip-files00154.txt'
e10cb0268418c6c55e7cbba2a9b4cd75
a5c325ef46e944307177f30d5c582e7fbc149fb9
'2012-06-29T07:32:15-04:00'
describe
'57826' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPE' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
672686836d34883f3bed329e9685f1c3
934d197cc1eaa71935195469393396bc6775a681
'2012-06-29T07:28:27-04:00'
describe
'375338' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPF' 'sip-filesUF00015722_00001.xml'
b73fa354f90c2d8f5692042faebfd0fa
a07c47ef60c97d15399014b5ca72757b65c8a993
'2012-06-29T07:43:18-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'2013-12-10T02:16:59-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'160956' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPI' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
5bebf636166bdfe303b6f394c9029659
7246442fe8a236f27e5224525439d44d9d63ecb8
'2012-06-29T07:29:23-04:00'
describe
'191905' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPJ' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
d814998429bd1224e6578efa7bcefb84
51b4e3b5b931ef5e5829ae7b699294126309adc3
'2012-06-29T07:39:21-04:00'
describe
'37531' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPK' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
eb5e773167bd20dde9b8f61d83209399
309c7dce97eb819f9be17a28a9a06416c9c5ff9d
'2012-06-29T07:34:14-04:00'
describe
'20514' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPL' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
180a34d925d3aaa15f11260fd8d22873
f9589ed62d87a8486ed44901e537ac519feddcbc
'2012-06-29T07:39:00-04:00'
describe
'22676' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPM' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
6817bd6510e281c953b6b213b33fb13f
02d01ee9c2c180d2f76fbec8ad3404e64dfa2194
'2012-06-29T07:41:27-04:00'
describe
'65309' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPN' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
784d23fa498fbf7678d87287564c43b1
0406d7a0537ab3af9fe6c4aed6266c96d0ebc720
describe
'21140' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPO' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
3ef4944465b964c581adb4df86f966ca
0b0a5a8af2a0587256db37e6298975fe65a02cea
'2012-06-29T07:44:23-04:00'
describe
'104799' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
36fcffed15500cf0359ca30fc9617733
b524eb167bf5f8bed16c1f43756278845282a4f1
'2012-06-29T07:31:10-04:00'
describe
'141135' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPQ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
ddd3fbb9cc01994dd10271fb11aa5d7d
14dc37b143dd0f201c67aa84802cefe6db76bfdf
'2012-06-29T07:30:03-04:00'
describe
'150036' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPR' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
598bc43339be172bf3c89c8cc0e713a4
fd058b611bf3e92c00976ac9a871da1507adf5fc
'2012-06-29T07:44:21-04:00'
describe
'143746' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPS' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
58b8a4d905645349b96ba91419a1196b
7118eeb99125197efb1a263f4fec3a4dc9dc7663
'2012-06-29T07:30:35-04:00'
describe
'142544' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPT' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
9c601b48fb7bd3210a9ed63cc5c975d7
a4d192b881a8fa1bed9eb109312e1b64e08fbb88
'2012-06-29T07:43:39-04:00'
describe
'145826' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPU' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
ab49b28b2434466e80f38fb155c2bd69
3bcbe0e03424e4149b8c7d58383eb2e7725a7df7
'2012-06-29T07:38:42-04:00'
describe
'78057' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPV' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
8255c7e17a016347580d91cfd2ea80d4
c165259653af5e0980bd472c489c70c40b7cddc6
'2012-06-29T07:30:40-04:00'
describe
'118521' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPW' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
d5e5bb633601f286d0a68240eb7d038e
faf849695aac26bd7f28af34d065358ef8b1cbed
'2012-06-29T07:36:06-04:00'
describe
'140424' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPX' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
bd42ab252d7a81c9b01f99606cdfe848
b41c83bbfd728a5ee736a61f18b9231ad6f742e7
'2012-06-29T07:35:31-04:00'
describe
'143471' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPY' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
79595ce5883dfea04767fd2e4c291ad4
796528bed040276ddac1524cdcce9ae02230067e
'2012-06-29T07:37:12-04:00'
describe
'140933' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWPZ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
eb43ef2d3157c8d6dc13dd6eb5fa82ae
1c90875e6a240a5bbb6bf9f9f0a78457297d4eb3
'2012-06-29T07:31:43-04:00'
describe
'141215' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQA' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
e570d96d91f0160763e9a2fb612a3c6b
bdac0c8f43bfc2c2b2e55f8db6184594327cdd1c
'2012-06-29T07:28:49-04:00'
describe
'138137' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
94cdf504510ba82631313ebd47d0d463
59ef0da4ab81a5729b83fad1687ce308a3ed65e7
'2012-06-29T07:31:15-04:00'
describe
'125498' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQC' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
fa2fbaf3f63cb667bf5c650b6676da21
34541c0be4c0262ef7402685f7ae4fbd67ad06a3
'2012-06-29T07:31:14-04:00'
describe
'128189' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQD' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
1ac38b634200f67f773715193b81a3de
84d4e029a8ae5cd4d630e8773d3c4735c24e5cf9
'2012-06-29T07:33:24-04:00'
describe
'122362' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQE' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
8c9f76c608aa989f95470f6f539a2c03
b7387f365b64cf72bb2f3d136b179aea702c94e8
'2012-06-29T07:31:56-04:00'
describe
'131278' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQF' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
71e3519604a4b40906512ebbc150c75f
a238b0c74f75fc7d0cd9ebae96dd686706935d18
'2012-06-29T07:36:15-04:00'
describe
'136763' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQG' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
83615a62b6e19b6b69eeab8694b242d5
b65df75c7b0200f79a2311bc9f0ad13679730a8e
describe
'136272' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQH' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
5860210dc8b5c8b6cf2155bfc8a0668a
16ef402cbdd3f70f0c36c9af0ff9602d9d944504
'2012-06-29T07:44:54-04:00'
describe
'109208' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQI' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
76be5108696372747914ada012a62225
dd03f7a3ea2234968b6d5e74256cba3323e89db7
'2012-06-29T07:42:19-04:00'
describe
'116080' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQJ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
fc8cae23390ecb12ea3538051a04a3ee
fe4aab0cb609f9db2982248a8e8bc27275055dc8
'2012-06-29T07:30:15-04:00'
describe
'135835' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQK' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
2521565009aa8e90dd1824c2869ab505
14672e8c5b5ec32d6df86beaddd198e656694dbc
'2012-06-29T07:42:41-04:00'
describe
'138175' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQL' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
83f11c52838cf4aa68d1a2267e650f79
35f484b9e14560c32c6e81bc5252f836f57c1961
'2012-06-29T07:34:15-04:00'
describe
'87933' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQM' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
5a00d17f8598447d7e1a7028fc4bb2bd
ce3e749d834a82dcb3dd7f77e675a8ec301941c3
'2012-06-29T07:35:21-04:00'
describe
'125578' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQN' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
db76e32dc165c2ccff1aa3a9e839a9d4
a92b86ae2afa5f27aee7443f41b7012b5f6a43a9
'2012-06-29T07:44:33-04:00'
describe
'140000' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQO' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
9e8a632d40ae4dd533b6a8d081bf0239
2460c3e6b64b414447a65cb6d83b9bd4be34e044
'2012-06-29T07:32:36-04:00'
describe
'129913' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQP' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
5a3beadbbeffc671251b53887a22b9f4
0b0f730ba87c8a7b32e18ebff8e2cc5880fd70a3
'2012-06-29T07:29:55-04:00'
describe
'133750' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQQ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
4e6730c8805bf9c77e99f637c138ca40
599c3783df8a9dc516106092eb9a3544cf419772
'2012-06-29T07:33:07-04:00'
describe
'136182' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQR' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
25bebc08cc264a00a2b12db643783b0d
6768a0c65e85b48639ecd2721813adae94f7c540
describe
'66242' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQS' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
166887a41da03b8c416edd9f201012e1
ad1cd384552792f77eeb68734f4b39bda16012b6
'2012-06-29T07:33:48-04:00'
describe
'113589' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQT' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
fa0a21b588e9926ad7ba85d43bbb4c21
e57c6a7cb3f311b00d45d3732747f7f5a3beb49c
'2012-06-29T07:29:00-04:00'
describe
'120904' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQU' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
bb642a747e4dc6af6b370307b3491844
8b0a487f55ad6726ebf065f085770ebb97cfdf8b
'2012-06-29T07:42:05-04:00'
describe
'132137' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQV' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
ca3f1d7260b4a44c3e223070aa994a8a
187bc2cc987880d66e032796f3f99c371c0aea12
'2012-06-29T07:34:10-04:00'
describe
'187959' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQW' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
cbdfc0a7905d6950166b774fcf6b6bdb
202b92f21dd3648c0de42ab577aaaf166d9f824d
'2012-06-29T07:29:09-04:00'
describe
'186611' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQX' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
e57893dd7c4b4b6bea1aae2e94decdb2
e6e6b5604387e82050faa2c525fbca7d8db62b92
'2012-06-29T07:40:26-04:00'
describe
'204576' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQY' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
2180ccf6defa10c637f4bcc275f111f4
788f74200440754db5462e373c0bd819b7fe000a
'2012-06-29T07:31:19-04:00'
describe
'197703' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWQZ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
f4758d568f02a6750cda33693df67caa
1210f20e26fd9dbb1e073a262b03d656db390f1b
'2012-06-29T07:35:46-04:00'
describe
'190966' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRA' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
8e6caef996c1623c781b25edf9814963
e4c6db104b7a1f270f53c9c16d44149ccb95e116
'2012-06-29T07:30:53-04:00'
describe
'186118' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRB' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
8ac50a3ed8bc09d0082f65f6fbd2624a
40740e68371fc2a81b335b4459eac806fa94737c
'2012-06-29T07:34:16-04:00'
describe
'188181' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRC' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
60ae45f1b746ffaef0140982f3b55a96
c801fe0264fe9836143dcab2a0edd48bfe58f7bc
describe
'193330' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRD' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
3db299388852458182642302db8414cc
14385c60a15f61bb7421072ba63f6f4f10bbe7c9
'2012-06-29T07:32:30-04:00'
describe
'178168' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRE' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
4552f657b1cc44ad29e2cc815aebea80
a67e4abb1c2b843335373c7517f4f74b74378654
describe
'173813' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRF' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
4963b4a6bfcaae178579b353ec7fd7dc
bf3a18ad38a95902fe841e0fa1e9733017ab07f0
'2012-06-29T07:40:38-04:00'
describe
'162063' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRG' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c63fe13f024f690e192523679a4d6584
5f2e3a722715aee7d488f4aba2b3e1053f869481
'2012-06-29T07:38:35-04:00'
describe
'176065' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRH' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
3b2a1c280e455cdfa62f951675f58f2e
1c3fdff44ae3eb1dbac4e05fe9e054b8720a470e
'2012-06-29T07:33:44-04:00'
describe
'170236' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRI' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
9190dbb7ac0655b09c613ed49cfe3fe3
be20b4d010696468ee78361f7bdd74f4346a72f1
'2012-06-29T07:44:47-04:00'
describe
'154148' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRJ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
3ae78e41f06db1ebdbe62abdf792949a
a57ec92a1fc53a5b6f9d5b36ced3b031fe04db0f
'2012-06-29T07:37:11-04:00'
describe
'206260' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRK' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
f3d5689de9bd3cb2a045b0bd52488f76
9ac2d1bed7b96b52d423e73461169bef3fa4d2f2
describe
'191889' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRL' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
51999c091c2b6ce6e50ba720c08a11da
95a7c711785ae70204abb5df1f4ac5899dd70e4d
describe
'188028' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRM' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
a9343a55c033505e0574ffa325eeec37
23ad9037ae9f1101410fe9700c40bc0cf5a19ec0
'2012-06-29T07:38:06-04:00'
describe
'184652' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRN' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
0dfc754221898ab53eff1d7754dcd7c7
912265965dd56128b8014d736c9445e8ec8dbca4
'2012-06-29T07:36:34-04:00'
describe
'190160' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRO' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
e91068d4ed3e6978c2668ef7b4b9c8e4
72479acb89c18d6999ec84d1cc7c852ab28a809c
'2012-06-29T07:45:06-04:00'
describe
'190518' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRP' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
292a60424cc5e176e94639694e484808
10cd1cc28e9e435799fc46cf18b8462be2a1b332
'2012-06-29T07:41:43-04:00'
describe
'82634' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRQ' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
39cef9011543afcdbf13ad24d989ad5a
5edf8862de1f937e51178cb70828cbbc32a4b2f4
'2012-06-29T07:28:38-04:00'
describe
'179970' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRR' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
923fbdcbeb82b08ff108031862a7769f
3cb1801c68a33946e9ee444e16b09c3cfa86bdd9
'2012-06-29T07:37:56-04:00'
describe
'206947' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRS' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
ee76afd6728e077701c45ad1a6019aa2
ad25efa65042f7483c0d5e8d615e65693ce660bb
'2012-06-29T07:29:10-04:00'
describe
'207452' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRT' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
9a42ecc48bf5143e6bfa2b4e4ee6babd
3a2692889969696f848d1cca7b5e3a57d7f0f4cb
'2012-06-29T07:43:42-04:00'
describe
'149624' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRU' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
60144ff94f7c8e64346aea8b934bf38f
ff92d9d6629ab9040af68e43177e1b5090588e61
'2012-06-29T07:43:33-04:00'
describe
'183569' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRV' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
a5881163184f7311c633eb665ff97825
c602a0424775653cdae4c306e5623e522e01df45
'2012-06-29T07:32:53-04:00'
describe
'207581' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRW' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
3e0e5df8a16078d3af29a913b28b389d
35c9223454fd35e0479679e972c7d54c50ae86ea
'2012-06-29T07:30:16-04:00'
describe
'206755' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRX' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
801ebcabfe7003d4853cfd1ef7165e43
a076543e7ed8f1c365d0e9d3a1d5ff80b2b3542e
'2012-06-29T07:30:50-04:00'
describe
'182370' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRY' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
03266cadcc441176ddcc43dbd4c4cd1f
0d3650cf3ecd6a19f2403de7beca99506c5a2106
describe
'180038' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWRZ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
6e718a841461cde666c9e4bcb87001ad
cd84ab0697ff989be847f479bbbd41e4c6dc0000
'2012-06-29T07:31:24-04:00'
describe
'203668' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100607_AABWSA' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
f1788d5fb03d1ff1b280ea88ff871c3c
4b974f711c904c4ad2ba406c0145b8edaeb9057e
'2012-06-29T07:43:48-04:00'
describe
'195521' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAA' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
039672a48c231dfa546cbefe7dc6d51c
34b732bb5d5af6c722a23105050c08bcdc59d2d8
'2012-06-29T07:40:05-04:00'
describe
'196283' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAB' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
2ac954881c9b45be36d3c3fcc1e4d157
0a8663c5edc8748a82bb6e6c272cce1a6cae2561
'2012-06-29T07:29:39-04:00'
describe
'192397' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAC' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
ab78f090850471d91975e39fa6bc6c8e
6d029b42d66cd2b92a77f834f2001673128733fc
'2012-06-29T07:40:16-04:00'
describe
'192119' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAD' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
0653312ea0024be0a0b6b381a5be2886
bdacccf2ac00c78993f582d59f31aabbaff7f7b1
'2012-06-29T07:32:22-04:00'
describe
'185277' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAE' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
e6cf816052bd8265cf65ba57c0adb45f
893c8af4cee2f21bd4a1801fcfad78042f6f31f7
'2012-06-29T07:28:58-04:00'
describe
'176189' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAF' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
ccbc38c123e1fa27851791d2f9234f8e
4dc6cea11b28b3da373019cf71cd8e83d5f7fd0d
'2012-06-29T07:43:27-04:00'
describe
'183754' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAG' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
a73d1c8c4d450c94ead913ef4a7ce262
30ae670b2c24cc9800a98d63785bad4d26bae83b
'2012-06-29T07:32:35-04:00'
describe
'197969' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAH' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
5aec5c4865c22ca0bf3e0f485a8f9f5c
431ba97ec094302e5bfd367447ff96cf52884654
'2012-06-29T07:38:52-04:00'
describe
'209401' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAI' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
54665e512dc5954b9d421ba751135cf6
bb50157ed68bc7a629fe4bd6f0f5b93670b52181
'2012-06-29T07:38:55-04:00'
describe
'201447' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAJ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
8b0bd5f0efed761f856b6f4f77c49e10
6ddecfb98af1ff6246d5601de67bd86f27f57672
'2012-06-29T07:30:02-04:00'
describe
'76824' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAK' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
032348d6ca44f9a732f7a0efc9f27db9
99bfdca78de2e9ed05e6d51bef8a7c4238cdf3a6
'2012-06-29T07:43:49-04:00'
describe
'175811' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAL' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
d3259541631f5142f47c4bd64b8ccef0
4d54056b64269c24a63082c88063dc8963438afa
'2012-06-29T07:31:38-04:00'
describe
'209754' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAM' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
0c068b17aa96f53fae11083c2b38f2e0
2fcf67855651993bef5397cd20198a9df71207ae
'2012-06-29T07:29:12-04:00'
describe
'188661' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAN' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
5dbadb4b82dd714c0e943fc1d39004e2
5af5432796f293a382f6562725f67919274e987b
describe
'201983' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAO' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
0ec09ac12789818836c9ce3ebef8ad78
04aa40aa4dd1ca444f75091946da68d1937fd8a8
describe
'183082' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAP' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
7cd56ea90d36d75068b5ac12bf43d0ef
1089833647980a857d895ed210d8c83f9cbb9aaf
'2012-06-29T07:39:08-04:00'
describe
'198000' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAQ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
5530105fe5389fd4dd4a965e533b8ab6
e35aa607fb0e3ba313401ec06a76f46ccac5b69f
'2012-06-29T07:37:29-04:00'
describe
'210408' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAR' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
0cf409804b4a30624ca6acbada7b5d5d
87c0ca797859d2592d2b1617c31bd720f4fd22f6
'2012-06-29T07:40:01-04:00'
describe
'203650' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAS' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
8a5c5a65c7c1ab5de00fb9b1fe9afb71
5e2bc833d33c83839a8ffcca460e7b0f0ff25ea8
describe
'193072' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAT' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
a30ee9e7b98882c0f36ac3d4c50c6c5f
6639b46a44305d08c1aef2ecc61ea44ad6a04cd0
'2012-06-29T07:38:46-04:00'
describe
'184625' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAU' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
7d9fda0152d95f0feb2f86169d2920d3
76a5dff8fef2d5d41a152f3aeac3297f9d7856c8
'2012-06-29T07:29:38-04:00'
describe
'153621' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAV' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
094a668039bb3cddc14cc2ab465c6812
d703582286905abb9c35970091902cf3a8bc29bb
'2012-06-29T07:42:12-04:00'
describe
'176523' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAW' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
032581f532bb00171369d6d0e5a64d9b
c51fe683d48ddaf6dbd8ea3c392aaab9536a1a8b
'2012-06-29T07:30:44-04:00'
describe
'203999' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAX' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
96a3d231ca2a074bc6ea7789ec33f652
08eda481787890b2dd6c14b55c900134ced7fb9e
'2012-06-29T07:39:30-04:00'
describe
'193759' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAY' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
d15bb2682150eb249a3a122bb0ab3d6a
8dbcc6c72e51efcaf79d87ee127d981d0325e073
describe
'204523' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAAZ' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
dbde08b78dd8b2aeb48c02b208f58061
7ce6286d1e6d6324ccb070d1ffb783a058750619
'2012-06-29T07:44:17-04:00'
describe
'191344' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABA' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
00ee10f8757aeb430c922b3d91c3b939
48d66d64278ee5565c4e25a1ebad6dc065c87506
'2012-06-29T07:44:09-04:00'
describe
'159217' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABB' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
73f57526fc5de1bc5fb612ac19bc0fcd
a2488e5f86353bb340039015116b405345c42462
'2012-06-29T07:40:34-04:00'
describe
'168501' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABC' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
cbd3510ec22cd25783fe45bdd41f732d
eb34fb4e1f18d190d2e7cda3454c79f9091bd07e
'2012-06-29T07:41:00-04:00'
describe
'209269' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABD' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
bb4d2469324cc1e5ca27a6f14b2c6349
abc479f152add0815e1865aef4987089fe3417d4
'2012-06-29T07:28:34-04:00'
describe
'198729' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABE' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
7156c75a432332ae9d956a0a9d324f3f
2d50a9c6edf1bdf14427593322c8e7e38bd372f3
describe
'201671' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABF' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
6c49cbf0a7f5a6e4d37b70dd0f0e2fb1
7faeac95758b4030f94585221792853f8292267b
'2012-06-29T07:41:41-04:00'
describe
'202417' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABG' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
3d3639d3ba11cf72275e7152cb6cb9df
fee4da719698b4f02f80fde625f5005da4153409
describe
'208067' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABH' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
1a82240e860fb67096720b89d74ad4f6
e09375c08cda82c42f7d128a0d229bcbd6cc43f2
describe
'201672' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABI' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
1d799cf163396fbe7d8ae062037b467d
da804ad64d1f0c59f8968465366df3141bdd6932
'2012-06-29T07:33:00-04:00'
describe
'174069' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABJ' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
c498310948d503cbcffdf7a2768dd06b
398bfec1a1883f9444e4dfe3d4cb19c1ab65ff2e
'2012-06-29T07:36:31-04:00'
describe
'209933' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABK' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
36bb7ed4f55c3dcb2762b059d3e7871d
10c39f4c9a7503023fd5223b8c253220029cc7a3
'2012-06-29T07:30:59-04:00'
describe
'199907' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABL' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
fd42f6735e3550fdbaa092da58304129
a5b89625fbcb358dcffe426799ce4fe25b16b81e
'2012-06-29T07:29:43-04:00'
describe
'202472' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABM' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
e2ef4ac123af8944d9bd914bfc8747e1
d5016b245d08c011c5cf2e7d1fea1b76e53be624
'2012-06-29T07:42:10-04:00'
describe
'124092' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABN' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
e78790b5f564ddbb42a21955653233f3
f3509d810931390fa2b1b9b51b418d6186db82ea
describe
'169977' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABO' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
72d8ddf7673fe4300f19631cbd7d4d88
76594f5fb0bafa42212457e491bffedf2242c8fa
'2012-06-29T07:30:20-04:00'
describe
'202679' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABP' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
1519a78a12030017867203b266c3a4ff
df86dfe01df692b1de2362c600f7910ce8e1dfa4
'2012-06-29T07:39:58-04:00'
describe
'203523' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABQ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
a7420340954b906a847077b58715e696
6bc85c16bd6fa674b42fce686fbaea30f8594547
describe
'206245' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABR' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
b990e806bbf7c42964ba935ee79d01d7
4427cf5865d629943ec1d7b53739093a58e31305
'2012-06-29T07:31:20-04:00'
describe
'204856' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABS' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
9f0fd6af0f992f956022daf9d6c0f4df
90e975a9353ee548ce8c6dc3ef534e784cd1d220
'2012-06-29T07:32:33-04:00'
describe
'184549' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABT' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
5c42459c16d43bf3ba2925068ec5ee50
c38ae8eaf4511c0608433db2b9ee55208f70c1f5
'2012-06-29T07:39:47-04:00'
describe
'190199' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABU' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
cf2359928fe4ef4e8124b0e1b17a76a4
c4aec9f5a01c170bb35c42d12c631e02e6f621a2
'2012-06-29T07:44:18-04:00'
describe
'192147' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABV' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
a4e1d2ad0b1206816caee47cac80818e
6c98c9d04dd4161e89891360ad204a7f520efb9c
'2012-06-29T07:37:36-04:00'
describe
'187145' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABW' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
e6f264fa0c913c1f5f5544bff5e9166a
6bb4c341c7a8ae1b594c38c547d802d67fdf49e7
describe
'98858' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABX' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
5188c4fab76c4888b3b47aff3cc364e6
8cb28bed0f903e5974a34e0669f6c885c073a77f
'2012-06-29T07:40:33-04:00'
describe
'171557' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABY' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
c4a01ae942299eb3e30d9dd0f5ee4cb5
94ff8e6931c3d5aa37ee59bff2a387503576dce1
describe
'196435' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAABZ' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
54a666afa848edde1e9f95ef5aabcd4a
8a9a24cc83d060fbcc9af6ad23e5cc73430a0aef
describe
'197701' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACA' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
d9fbd8b7850fa7e07c5d58b2d7892975
8f90f59edc78eda5db2e8bc28e30e02d7a1defd6
describe
'194023' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACB' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
75f1c0817fb0583f145f9dfe2d50c538
5a3978d90d34838ea01cf3226a72751e1176c6f9
'2012-06-29T07:30:09-04:00'
describe
'193900' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACC' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
ebc6319164785897f09b93f20f89ec34
c391079a754176da7fdf4923f25ebc562295e5d9
'2012-06-29T07:29:35-04:00'
describe
'180676' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACD' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
70a20c9b0c565d58985f556b73584bd0
2203cb9cea7ceba6e6d427fb29ef3f3f8f096ff7
'2012-06-29T07:31:59-04:00'
describe
'181385' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACE' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
2691cefd5f1ca58cce39c4425fc7bce5
c93a8888139812dd3170882135071c0269d2b939
'2012-06-29T07:42:13-04:00'
describe
'206625' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACF' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
d4f21e38a70a9de8e444020b3665203a
88fae0aa1499fa0dd0f1f6a715f8957837fd371e
'2012-06-29T07:44:57-04:00'
describe
'111133' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACG' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
2284e03325f5f865f846490c417234ed
adf50a391210e714d447624cc8ae9c81a73042a5
describe
'183477' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACH' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
e73e352ad3b5808c1a501aa4d2f1a480
ae6148f95dbf3fee088b9a0f5c1ee809c9d7327a
'2012-06-29T07:37:27-04:00'
describe
'209453' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACI' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
a960d01b1b08c85d05174932c31f7390
572e703919af4c248b76c9a5456517abc723c3fb
'2012-06-29T07:30:33-04:00'
describe
'208479' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACJ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
673a6aca7de1695f7259e35cfe518461
880521d16cf57f06e2be2bc5152d46fd2ddf25fc
describe
'200651' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACK' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
43c35593b212f9f14bad04dff54e367c
8d8ff6b632a78188e2b26c1813fa0bf349571424
'2012-06-29T07:30:31-04:00'
describe
'205941' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACL' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
51525fa436a7457ea4d47d7e395905f7
4da8ded4289e2abd8c5de68727a89ee58a855e08
describe
'201118' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACM' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
faf75975ad81483f936487c8461d39e0
2a58472b36f1ddc58d4a9daa10a6a3358239045b
'2012-06-29T07:32:43-04:00'
describe
'172398' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACN' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
10d4e6098026cdb38b5f5bea7b79108b
d82c79736d6c90ec5c5eed8606339a6280a30818
describe
'175118' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACO' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
93c5c12d23581c6fdf1b2df173467332
f33064aa632bc1475195d4edad7a5874b2c15272
'2012-06-29T07:33:39-04:00'
describe
'210333' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACP' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
d0659818ae3d5e091fed299c6470c79c
88912bc7f5b4c2a8f9b833f1503efd500993e7e8
'2012-06-29T07:43:57-04:00'
describe
'207584' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACQ' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
56f4c051723adf0e71241efc3c5331ce
0c26f716046a420945de042dd26ed7d8cc12705b
'2012-06-29T07:35:58-04:00'
describe
'203822' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACR' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
7531108ab68ce4cdba3dd0b58e640d07
ed41a2f09ae88c218dbc0cd8539c0a000f91d4c6
'2012-06-29T07:35:54-04:00'
describe
'196300' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACS' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
ac72e69da2b6c164dd6695e1bb9d1906
e92ca2ef4afb156aebd7bfb6191a097e58cf1be9
'2012-06-29T07:44:39-04:00'
describe
'57012' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACT' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
0e3bf27a73821998875618dda3b61e9c
a69ff9e884b3d5d4cd68cd20e2b263e2fe72485e
'2012-06-29T07:32:28-04:00'
describe
'154973' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACU' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
b2ae64e92fbbd26e32b45a4874d7f456
904f46ed59da897421fa675837098efafbcc8c39
'2012-06-29T07:43:19-04:00'
describe
'191471' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACV' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
fb10c4f5042b5acccab5633094a712ba
57bcba198eac8ba8c98a101beb7fbf6e54b25991
'2012-06-29T07:42:14-04:00'
describe
'116890' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACW' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
a5fddc9ad22461e3075fc22d802c8884
e567209ebad3a596041fcc389ce9808bbc394dc1
'2012-06-29T07:40:25-04:00'
describe
'142401' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACX' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
430f52d7eecc3dbe3c0bf31c2693cd62
c15608a558c82998aac48b643b6c0b6d05169bbe
'2012-06-29T07:39:18-04:00'
describe
'132838' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACY' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
9fe9192b62f06630613b5653a6aa929a
cee13550c11276f27ff04c7666ef46dad4cbf8c2
describe
'138694' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAACZ' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
2b7cccc7db4b29e16dbd020ada428ade
4f0a03cbc21114112b02cb2990d23edab0e00057
'2012-06-29T07:43:41-04:00'
describe
'125002' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADA' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
e2d1a66d04a751e9a1cc75a9b28b477b
6b700246a2817bc81eed26f462cbf9657b402f4d
'2012-06-29T07:29:36-04:00'
describe
'139693' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADB' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
cf64f86ef260d6903058ea37f6213d58
e7b438e9b82e627c3965b647ff645a08aa6a9ed3
'2012-06-29T07:41:48-04:00'
describe
'117699' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADC' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
123017e237c7f2b29b85017ffc35f27d
62af147416c88c9c64119a6d62d77cc4e4dedb65
'2012-06-29T07:34:41-04:00'
describe
'43083' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADD' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
22baf9e98fe4ffe7d8ba7f92bf85d2ed
562d45b92a5ffb5f8dcb7937a5def0d3de2bda33
describe
'120422' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADE' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
5c1c0d7863b74ef0f373725f32410976
09a47efefdaa2878c44031b6df600fb1bd44f81f
'2012-06-29T07:39:24-04:00'
describe
'149154' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADF' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
7cef809c9cf1ccf74d4ce21e14b454a5
5571e599595b3953fdf2d9e3fedb795d1cdf8e1c
'2012-06-29T07:39:11-04:00'
describe
'135888' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADG' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
82ae5dae3eacb6cfc2e623bc50dc7f46
7e377d6f193fdac9eb022813d2da6398bd1fbe58
'2012-06-29T07:31:09-04:00'
describe
'130558' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADH' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
20b4f6026c61b681b77d301ac6095211
9aa64e160aacadc92ed00b3e3cdfaf76e35ff7fd
'2012-06-29T07:31:16-04:00'
describe
'135377' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADI' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
23efb73eb8629c398b2094764323c934
5a3ee45ec36222c5590297c555ea08a3a00509c8
'2012-06-29T07:41:16-04:00'
describe
'138886' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADJ' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
7eb2b40d81001f66d582d28a4840b70b
c569e568582144435255f290623d156989ac1021
'2012-06-29T07:36:42-04:00'
describe
'126271' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADK' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
933adbab6a79e6e33ab94c8225cbc8bc
ab9715e0469d94777535cc008dd961b0d3a30e1e
'2012-06-29T07:28:40-04:00'
describe
'75863' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADL' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
1290f6d6ee7d08825e820ee68c8ceb56
a47526aa84459fc78651da5d9c5391ce5197ede3
describe
'119634' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADM' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
e2220f724ef1990ab722c1acc0c3d7f1
f654cee43202df1765b5f83b10fad835a08e2752
'2012-06-29T07:34:21-04:00'
describe
'139609' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADN' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
3d067eba624290967594cbf967a713c5
282e51f7f5199c5e440f23fa5793e2082a7881bb
'2012-06-29T07:38:12-04:00'
describe
'135682' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADO' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
b82d9689adb10414a7335208e7671278
028107f4bcdb229e26b6bf04832f209eee914341
describe
'138283' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADP' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
025cbcb2fa4bd209281c23e071854690
e990ade1177efb52f42ef2b8bf32d1eaea86e5a2
describe
'124729' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADQ' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
fa494f60455fa8acf5732bb8b927090f
7f5d75a89ebc27673d5e9b45053c5dcf82aa467d
'2012-06-29T07:29:47-04:00'
describe
'137330' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADR' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
d84b2cd924f16a01ffa644c5f13e65a1
84878fe09e4a0d12c1977bff0b676bd585d08e8e
'2012-06-29T07:38:47-04:00'
describe
'130045' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADS' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
9ffb4c5ed1fbdb0eff649e8afb49fac1
04d1c910259af6975f88ddbcfcdbc3d51f521475
'2012-06-29T07:41:31-04:00'
describe
'143338' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADT' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
4df6e24e486d628abf9b975a65a62c44
e5bf1d9c1c0a0221a71631ade4a9053550b27c21
'2012-06-29T07:40:21-04:00'
describe
'139868' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADU' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
e53b5896e77887354cf4639e7714de7a
355fae061e8d7787240b8f800cdb5930efb2f730
'2012-06-29T07:36:56-04:00'
describe
'145662' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADV' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
369859b33f36884c438af46f7a89c809
a3bce00d5ae4ff307ceaf6e99f2fc9d33d1756bd
describe
'137238' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADW' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
e8d26b4e7fb8aebc4dbac6486da7059e
adeb6942c759e4f9a3425b58f09b07a96c574372
'2012-06-29T07:32:09-04:00'
describe
'146291' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADX' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
b76146e2b6670a2c2f7bee556f6c4976
932f88100333023b2f84cdfa43cb6c8b3bda6d10
'2012-06-29T07:43:30-04:00'
describe
'135822' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADY' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
11a14e6caa16bdc18f8dd9d55ee6ec24
c079aedb419d67c6c3e6749cde0a2af5745beed6
describe
'113404' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAADZ' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
d021ac9cf63951f3897119c20d95b267
61dba21e044514aadf95aba778d8edfbf529d706
'2012-06-29T07:28:25-04:00'
describe
'121421' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEA' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
70fb08539f5cda9ce9053251149457db
5f24d5528bcfccdba04daa964a92e9e6275b5fec
'2012-06-29T07:29:33-04:00'
describe
'142628' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEB' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
2e3f7c89b0ed10a4063dce2afa0ebe92
929ed3393f4c8ec6f069afd7f9eeb748240afd02
'2012-06-29T07:38:32-04:00'
describe
'138840' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEC' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
e238394259acde4d8854ca72517b2e43
9260a1e1afb9327cbdb133281679e41ed5ed3ef1
'2012-06-29T07:39:01-04:00'
describe
'123464' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAED' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
38b5d862002dc5f65ea5bce54ec7cb83
70bc3832f3c29b46ab266694af3f784b7f7f0358
'2012-06-29T07:32:58-04:00'
describe
'124938' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEE' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
0ff51ace4067a23677c9309112c6a62f
2bf0fd548a1dbee763c410998535ed8528dad994
'2012-06-29T07:36:51-04:00'
describe
'137101' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEF' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
385129723d1a2ac2b92c6df1dde67cdb
f17d1ab6887528f879d035579945e3b2f649317c
'2012-06-29T07:31:48-04:00'
describe
'146340' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEG' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
ca6b9e70d6d2adabb8d2a7bf658ca333
644733c2584439ffd638b90b1518eba17b948dba
'2012-06-29T07:37:01-04:00'
describe
'139128' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEH' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
7f66b15ce6e7df76caae1174000e82a6
104ece533e78c562ef41fde81dce3737b681f09c
'2012-06-29T07:29:19-04:00'
describe
'138983' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEI' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
c5cc83eb4bf3db93b2342ac4be3b1b63
1304843570758efa2f7d7d7266043d2c26ce72f9
'2012-06-29T07:41:11-04:00'
describe
'137805' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEJ' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
a268b7f2831061a80a983e5cb4f4bb99
a352111aae1bfff6064ef598fd4fecffc42c8f38
describe
'142228' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEK' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
be81f6c6868e942829c82c4f92672763
07a466719e6cd094c83bb408b90bfbf97edf9425
'2012-06-29T07:40:03-04:00'
describe
'140846' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEL' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
99ccad5c7681ca37561a5b904040dabb
0511e5ed49ca4ae64cc671ab7453fd61c2d592d2
'2012-06-29T07:30:52-04:00'
describe
'117323' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEM' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
cebad070b2fa8e287128bb00c672c107
95c12bfed5f6c449db9418fe761b14d602170ccd
'2012-06-29T07:41:03-04:00'
describe
'131169' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEN' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
89a5cc72ff3f0a960851a0fc008ee7cf
4913d9479c6580079a4e6cbb4554d861d9e24977
'2012-06-29T07:43:43-04:00'
describe
'144138' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEO' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
78f4bc0306bb41acfaa2770f96c37fb8
b337aeb9a31cd29d166e9b57e851264b853fc6e6
describe
'133294' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEP' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
7cd1583c575a3dc28e25d89f9191268d
feb360bdf357bb8553f22b05c90fd1827c2de65d
'2012-06-29T07:35:41-04:00'
describe
'139592' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEQ' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
b8d98a50e1f1169e2713e9db2c73df4a
fb83e72594a31a7709841de39fd2dbc29d8f8186
'2012-06-29T07:28:26-04:00'
describe
'141887' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAER' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
701e1dcb3d987b4810108b00981496ab
6ed3028077812243903ee5b7c3e031c67c7625ad
'2012-06-29T07:40:19-04:00'
describe
'136133' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAES' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
7f976dcf96c0e2ce58ebf0918e6e86a6
ba70e05e3954484883d933f1b0370fe638131b13
'2012-06-29T07:40:35-04:00'
describe
'95454' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAET' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
d75f2af5e459892578a013c49e10b649
8d9a10129cddf267475667967518ff2c87b5a1a4
'2012-06-29T07:37:49-04:00'
describe
'117168' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEU' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
7e6e00876ce6b6f555c9e2c691884f25
a6a0333ba021c34d0862ab6669db4fc55b850420
'2012-06-29T07:30:48-04:00'
describe
'142161' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEV' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
2be75ee1504bec29d3de09426282c4e4
188e8e4043550667ee3a961107b68e31cb34f930
'2012-06-29T07:39:22-04:00'
describe
'126716' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEW' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
0c19cb21e5c833ee4d80d133dff7ad76
d6f8c2e851881cfa57cb1a4084a919529d181352
'2012-06-29T07:30:38-04:00'
describe
'140222' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEX' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
ecbd986747533ba024bf9f574f35eb55
103b5663b1f177cc2f08096b874fcf9517bf7bb6
'2012-06-29T07:38:43-04:00'
describe
'124641' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEY' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
23929d5395eee6e6b5c527b0b97b373d
f284e96df3979102e54b0d553d04704107bd1346
describe
'134653' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAEZ' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
0a9923a07de6f0f1952598e38641456c
70b26822266f1a9a0ac2d3ad556934776d683ca3
'2012-06-29T07:31:46-04:00'
describe
'144870' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFA' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
db171a738b0b898bc9ea3e47f9833f25
e35df4e1d4f249efcde8e89f041597fc12e0ccd5
'2012-06-29T07:34:03-04:00'
describe
'137670' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFB' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
e6de4e1251866edd5cf7601fb51322a9
a845e5cbac9ff94f3338db07c8c7abdca19aaefc
'2012-06-29T07:37:17-04:00'
describe
'135054' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFC' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
876575d4409a9ff72ab181541387cb1e
5c19dca74b5457b11e5ff7698fa59b5c6e3ee334
'2012-06-29T07:44:26-04:00'
describe
'143212' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFD' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
ed52d4527b3ef7a251b290befa23e46e
94e39376862b578117f6b7ee7ec6af9144c9797b
'2012-06-29T07:35:47-04:00'
describe
'135760' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFE' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
2e6d376891511d01781772a89d194838
9573fc98aa6e6da4a6a7c48c270dea6cc9bd364f
'2012-06-29T07:35:50-04:00'
describe
'142455' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFF' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
6d8f26b870868344e273b80e2bea4dc2
d392e90d72c403b0d7618eb2eb914e2e2055204d
describe
'123943' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFG' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
164f3eb852fe227fec1fb859301dd629
2e0cc599239332d163879b10a47e3afa3ff06a37
describe
'137721' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFH' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
79855bc0801f86268b293a64e9b3b8b9
ba127ad052f235d709b7fb619a2f07f18873d315
'2012-06-29T07:33:05-04:00'
describe
'142365' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFI' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
60033282f7179867f0587ca28e02ee58
71f6cb30adf09e9d2fca9243da51289f2265e9c7
describe
'133787' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFJ' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
5aa2862f0e2d81c3f0bd448465ded409
07fd94dc8c8c42bc886c4eabe0563bc3f7d36fbd
'2012-06-29T07:29:48-04:00'
describe
'48071' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFK' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
2525f9db7996c939af6eebcf13c64431
7a0e0e1cfda959b4d848a586c1e54118e89cd370
'2012-06-29T07:40:53-04:00'
describe
'195684' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFL' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
504f3734de53a9c7595c03d079274bb6
40638f498318e45732bcd7d709c5b7fbbc558d59
describe
'194382' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFM' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
ab96e06b6957098e9f0e297907206a61
58496223d9c3b8e60015e52db54c84eadf64b771
'2012-06-29T07:43:01-04:00'
describe
'101640' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFN' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
5db79acdb1c7942f1a99fd50b34280e9
7975192aa39cb03f66d04c62fbdc6c3a02d81752
describe
'1871515' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFO' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
b4ca158a2f710cc3daad93e46d5b0782
b19f6680c8e7276274bd017188b65261d37e184b
'2012-06-29T07:41:02-04:00'
describe
'1869933' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFP' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
4d9a151fdc8f20a2bf1fbbca6fb254f9
dedd10793b86028c14cf6166bb01cbbe53b141df
'2012-06-29T07:31:31-04:00'
describe
'1716002' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFQ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
75819dc7ba727cf704d996b8921436b2
d3d4e5978f7fcd13f99cac9f1bda36823c362367
'2012-06-29T07:30:14-04:00'
describe
'134455' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFR' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
90754951ce7957b794740af715f9b560
f61fc716f08beb9c8f83d9e54058efac0c035880
'2012-06-29T07:33:02-04:00'
describe
'50533' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFS' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
1d7f91ed5a88a741a314e11920caaed3
97fc37aa1c969955e4c0a2ee4ba6583e04ee2f1b
'2012-06-29T07:33:55-04:00'
describe
'2140' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFT' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
c13c466838be15b1ac5dec6817462465
87bfd987227a2e22f98b80c73ae4597e919e779a
describe
'45021' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFU' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
2058343802871195370cf7888373ad75
4c3be54f281f17b8ff9f1b9232be6f64a8fae4cb
'2012-06-29T07:34:04-04:00'
describe
'452009' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFV' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
c605f0bb2aee43c3558237c8a30ae3a7
b484d0113e03e9d0ce068417f494e7ef5ac2d835
'2012-06-29T07:37:32-04:00'
describe
'1679217' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFW' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
121df8909d64ffa74c1d5ea56183b0b2
b5b3cacddd01fa805356ca5c801afdc84befddce
'2012-06-29T07:44:35-04:00'
describe
'19673' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFX' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
539e265896ef77b19b97b8e6d8e6e31e
bd8eab131f01cb3271e22b4b1c8c6e342cf2a2a0
describe
'452013' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFY' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
78b37f022f8635cc8d71a07e4e4f1a3f
9f5fbe879b1ba041a51fc8f05c2f5e56a3ba4b6c
'2012-06-29T07:41:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAFZ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
938fad1cd64b53765c5a68b201ee7031
09a93a12801af0e7dc0ae8740214da92d4a417d6
describe
'451976' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGA' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
58acb240242bf0a841adaa0fceab5a4f
d4727d4dc1432e0c5ac54fb1668d6712e9434b0a
describe
'451949' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGB' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
3c05272fa03c4ab5e21a8d5c61bad4af
12b76643a7c7a116a0c7dc751373b53da73bd52d
describe
'344429' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGC' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
67253cad5f346664adee97f44b16da3d
19310b38b8f3f7ef981ebbae8a4ebe84ada6f86a
'2012-06-29T07:44:42-04:00'
describe
'452019' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGD' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
8e0b31373b9ecb9db7ad52be2184b313
54b9a26cb5826ef4524c49a616177c7ba1993eec
'2012-06-29T07:28:50-04:00'
describe
'451974' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGE' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
ee63f4008aecb55e6bbcb82b4552b4bf
573a856aac6d98b59509247448822684c9880597
describe
'452017' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGF' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
c68b3548b84576c9fdbfa44d43880214
24c985ce1e62f8546f3b56b72c682a3efb6f3645
'2012-06-29T07:35:59-04:00'
describe
'451980' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGG' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
669bbb067590c0fa84e78de400166b0f
78b6a6779c48c3b673ecc341d2d3dfc02dcae509
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGH' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
53579c9a21100e44a7f5409d5ae8063b
64d30b7a96e0883d6d614195ed80c092f2b3becf
describe
'452011' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGI' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
08df7787f1d259dd6bdbcd1c169c76c5
a9034795f342898f8becc1f1b9476bf5bb69df88
'2012-06-29T07:35:08-04:00'
describe
'451998' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGJ' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
2dbdd9a693f3fe69e64f35b035ade721
f55ea8449a0f2474f1da3e2382f52d0fa615c7d9
'2012-06-29T07:33:15-04:00'
describe
'452033' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGK' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
71169a28192c6af6e0b942c275ef502d
633d2560469f73381cc519091856d4e6d8dffe71
'2012-06-29T07:45:01-04:00'
describe
'451991' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGL' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
47229f413c07c50e2d76cd127bca7ca0
2b1180b72a66ac05238a7f1b4f586a6bd9a4177c
describe
'452028' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGM' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e969a66b76c491b76dd7b28b7f477ec5
abad532ea269abc1ea5dc3b71b77db0da508976e
'2012-06-29T07:31:22-04:00'
describe
'452002' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGN' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
2ffedf6b1189dac22c0fc8dca49e3af4
1de4298d1ccc77204400bdc799f930367d10aa2a
'2012-06-29T07:41:21-04:00'
describe
'452032' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGO' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
0806f2f7bf0c592d888520471d7cdb48
09bf70bcb874e4d06626c4529171f7840d42f676
describe
'451912' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGP' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
5ff8badddda542202dbd6192616cd0c3
a8981a0b82ee391098f56688b93e397529509624
'2012-06-29T07:29:04-04:00'
describe
'452010' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGQ' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
1e115ce16ca19de65d45812b488bbc45
dc62fe0a8eebd6d78524e63fc0039825368ed106
'2012-06-29T07:28:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGR' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
d13fe29e6a0ce908881e4d6a3c4902be
dfa654b995c2868fd0044e027ff674aaa6ec8680
describe
'452018' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGS' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
b90f50c7936a900ed53ccdb024bd80d2
798f2745859f81c60407d106fe221ef9fb591b54
'2012-06-29T07:44:30-04:00'
describe
'452004' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGT' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
52843a3838d03612d02185784f9a688e
015a4a62cb4d91cd3f1024e03e178ae4a7b7d999
describe
'407929' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGU' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
15c8c0b14631c48be383f0ad16ccbf8e
9b7a6ddad76b40c3960e6a163d14e7458f9f06e4
'2012-06-29T07:30:11-04:00'
describe
'451973' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGV' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
23c4e53069b662cf2581f9fcd0d9df5c
8729a703864278e0edde087c5690bc059e2a77e5
'2012-06-29T07:38:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGW' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
8cfba5a78172a500acf71c3ac8d04d98
76632d78593347bf1bdb67d0d77c1c4a61046a03
'2012-06-29T07:42:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGX' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
fd58ec3070d3f50f10cff5df14d27ce9
297b16be38d9280cae5a3d20c6b8dd3f79ce66b8
'2012-06-29T07:41:46-04:00'
describe
'452020' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGY' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b13679039d94be990af526edd4f84610
c75becfa07132e659652b9915c78687a27ed6d4e
'2012-06-29T07:35:13-04:00'
describe
'292198' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAGZ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
74955482d02bb23799c4b4fa7c1f5f92
b6f06c4f3e3bbdd9833e9faadb08f424cbe15326
'2012-06-29T07:43:58-04:00'
describe
'452029' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHA' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
7331445595074601997c9f2988bd27db
39ee7bccc9e50fdd440511ad15d8fddde7ad626a
'2012-06-29T07:36:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHB' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
6215bbc65ff31f23f3b3b0a061f05d09
a1595ad696fa00f552d87723c947985a89371765
'2012-06-29T07:37:20-04:00'
describe
'292712' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHC' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
2161166386f122800b08a9269cb771aa
46ec4641e3eb37b33dbe78b2ce47bc13ef4f59e6
'2012-06-29T07:41:01-04:00'
describe
'292588' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHD' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
3a3b4364ad14e3d3be10e25ca5622df0
c01c87008178162b0eb02c4106e370ca7e9a9910
describe
'292747' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHE' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
f8ef6bba3e9d1554f3314cecb66081b7
072ae6b3f0bd0587e8fa9cf25ae9c96e6c553bf8
describe
'292689' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHF' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
a6b90c4bc6099eac75810db29ef52147
9e4b49bbf3d50f0c05a06da6f7f92700f68848fb
describe
'292733' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHG' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
b128854b9737c8988269e1b0c36d44ac
f97bdf98527831066dcf52ae99676750f14a2daf
describe
'292659' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHH' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
fdb4999f76e6c5eaf86d62469f4e7fb1
80639881831364f90fd7a61c3c50df6ab70123f0
'2012-06-29T07:32:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHI' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
c9bb3c5f3c9d42d2ab29a98b3f58444d
e2e553ed32f4ff81c95ca73749b1670a234a3982
'2012-06-29T07:39:40-04:00'
describe
'292721' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHJ' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
4ceba5ec10a2071f2d0a15feb75616b8
c475c68f0aa82af36fff0dda8d962a098424fc1c
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHK' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
9d93127c2252303165e3ba2c8d3bf7c7
2b98e56aeb804df31bfed1dbc745dc95324451c0
describe
'292669' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHL' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
ef14e3cbf32379b1d096288bdb2b7d4e
24bbf43df9fba7a61ae42dd61c05fc38673ab783
'2012-06-29T07:29:29-04:00'
describe
'292731' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHM' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
fa75f63f16387bf875a34f8253a2f224
ba883d2daf3b43b595ac98f511d4cc3ae38e408c
'2012-06-29T07:37:40-04:00'
describe
'292710' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHN' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
1c1f2692ef7aab988385fe003e44cf1f
b42d498e0dadbb29d19cbd5cd444843f4d074a60
'2012-06-29T07:44:44-04:00'
describe
'292667' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHO' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
bc42968fe9e20f98066e8fbbc6777147
ba6d568fa3b2bde4f77de7a3cb0bf4eab67cf527
describe
'292737' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHP' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
7e32043a6e4258b0b8d86649fa396207
f902cc4fae1dc435442c41a87949380f858859b0
describe
'292696' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHQ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
d20c9301ee73c5605e49e06389952eff
80d85c0f72d64c4277c7d1db5cd51b9cb5ead30e
'2012-06-29T07:40:50-04:00'
describe
'292715' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHR' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
7e44310bf8ddae6454ee603a40373863
ed07bb47ddef1a9ac9aab7cba1e3fc7a8fa75902
'2012-06-29T07:28:39-04:00'
describe
'292693' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHS' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
5ca4be929098894c92c333897d3ad1cc
304c44596ea7ed091a75cb99f2c5a651a11661c0
'2012-06-29T07:41:36-04:00'
describe
'292639' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHT' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
1745b3baa2394c0aa77190d03b28c6f8
341d1e70ccb98fdc68c6a864918e4a53ba3abcbe
'2012-06-29T07:29:06-04:00'
describe
'292704' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHU' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
c41a101ee17341fbc4238636617e2d75
dd7f6639dca5d550ed88684751b31a9e953541fb
describe
'292722' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHV' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
c9f956d9e4fd320cff6beb06f6bc59c2
e773411f6c1ae68cc9522e5dae3b02756c3fe898
'2012-06-29T07:34:42-04:00'
describe
'292614' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
4596f6a9b88c4bce5c0afe3eca319e7c
c6b239ecc1130cad95828c795dd661859f699aab
'2012-06-29T07:31:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHX' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
73e94efb917ae41d20da69e5bb6e3c3b
29aa4ed9d7fd85661208eeb33c42ac8410761170
'2012-06-29T07:38:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHY' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
7110a0eb39538b9d43b6f0afa9be082d
fc645a57913db4cf71d127b56be387931243081c
describe
'292441' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAHZ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
802cd89404cab9189e6be476d30ce67e
72aa270f67c64318bf40b1d33cdd8b7a837ba9d9
'2012-06-29T07:44:12-04:00'
describe
'292697' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIA' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
b8c25ab14440f3e3e26fff5e146cc01e
7098a6a96c52a62815eb42aaeb33211e5c9ccaf7
'2012-06-29T07:39:37-04:00'
describe
'292734' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIB' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
bf9a3c0dc5fa3d9df9a2fe847a9d688c
150ea020e1a61aa15bab56da288f0a7ca0e5cbc3
'2012-06-29T07:42:59-04:00'
describe
'292557' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIC' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
d5e941bdfa06eb3dd6e630ee65f97c0c
9129ac56ca6e5be778a11abc0c60ee655bc58861
'2012-06-29T07:38:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAID' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
4e5507e062931c8b425cb65d95ec5b3d
1c8b0b339aa11ecad4934df1ae3cea4b25bfdd62
'2012-06-29T07:32:59-04:00'
describe
'292719' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIE' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
f8f142a66d4a5577c71c663632bcb607
113afa1d88d4061604e57c9c12d61d4c0b920cfa
'2012-06-29T07:39:19-04:00'
describe
'292729' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIF' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
aff6ba6854c09eaaddf0629d9a51e7fc
6f275a9371e6770864d640dd5cb585de3b74b291
'2012-06-29T07:36:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIG' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
945811c4ff29c504300a804ae92df1a2
7a694a5edbeb86b355d4c345099e4b82b236c04e
'2012-06-29T07:31:18-04:00'
describe
'292746' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIH' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
e6008add0cca0023a616551efd34e341
56aa127873a68753b19aae36a16f9c8ddb509d01
'2012-06-29T07:31:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAII' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
a1e3667117ac89f49b0b2fe8f18667c2
ef982ac6e9fff41bb1fe988dda6ed277c56c9fc8
'2012-06-29T07:42:50-04:00'
describe
'292739' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIJ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
0a064bc7de0ebf81436701c94bd0384c
c97b76411fa1f3b42df964bd994a8eaff8489237
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIK' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
1f45ae5b39588597962d67f7bdc2e055
dfb026392e4dfff0c20533855c4398de8874245e
'2012-06-29T07:37:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIL' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
bb13e6a1e7fe6f307d79324aef3e9b6e
9b6b898aaa5388134487390d296b135807c78f59
'2012-06-29T07:33:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIM' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
a70288ba789f3841b4a2e50a2f6a8b03
f8b7b484f38dc48b5012321430f1c29246abaaf9
'2012-06-29T07:44:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIN' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
3729c2739ea8833e6f05b75f865afadd
6065c1fe8a93d77c137af4cec3e00f6630517774
'2012-06-29T07:44:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIO' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
b45c658716477c30eac302201269ce5e
938829dd484bcd63f04d8c0454ecb327b6f5f4e1
describe
'292741' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIP' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
d56458d0cd91db1f414a5ba4673fda92
d6cd337af6286a65912c2586fa0092d73bba1d5d
'2012-06-29T07:28:53-04:00'
describe
'292681' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIQ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
051cdbae67448ab0032d0d567ae7a532
5df5a27f6d1dfd190c38e0900c42e3745ed81018
'2012-06-29T07:33:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIR' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
063d2573328c91843815a8ebc04d2365
d4eae0bb2407acce403c92e71f07c4a0c7646466
'2012-06-29T07:44:56-04:00'
describe
'292555' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIS' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
9ddcb213536789bf871676860b7cf576
f27dd28fb7fa5266c78a1c085f9164abd0f375cb
'2012-06-29T07:36:36-04:00'
describe
'292668' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIT' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
c17377294ac206f97dc7e710b00b91ae
ec912aa967aede19afd5232cff9e95043e4addbc
describe
'292698' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIU' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
abc7cce020e7602ee6817957b4b421f7
2ae8e669b13d3e042ea26654051d1cb2a01adb45
'2012-06-29T07:41:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIV' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
d0807decf54d5d0ca809b7b0b7dffb90
8dc6071c5303bbe4e238fc11dfc4fae3f72db368
'2012-06-29T07:41:39-04:00'
describe
'292586' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIW' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
f9857acb70a094408b70e5883c455153
f4a7e33eeb9479dcb3c3f4960bc5f2a613747c0b
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIX' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
0aeecb1552cda77eb6a03af5252f95a4
dd334e1451ccedcb6b8d5c8d4298237bbe3e71d1
describe
'292730' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIY' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
a6d5e7ad5d084d7dd6777a483ca330c8
b000bc89bb75d3edd9bfd2c9baff9e6b8268491e
'2012-06-30T09:08:18-04:00'
describe
'292740' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAIZ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
a2c9ce487eaca90eb99d58d5df811ee6
3c156b75945496f6c8f4507243d5117926f91200
'2012-06-29T07:43:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJA' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
dd38827db08d1efa2d87cf99032981e0
41e3a9eac32bd8ca35db4b1953cfbc1d4362339f
describe
'292684' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJB' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
9ec6f7ee44926bdf1ae7c85e3945f9ae
6f984875c34c53e1b309eda6a72b34ab76d7362d
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJC' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
986e7bdd38e05cfacd339359d9ac7ef3
ca7b98406983927412bf2f8cad0955dee4b8d0ba
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJD' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
4b8c62ec2445481940140f230684459a
abb9c88034f6c4955fa97c15d996552c9de48601
'2012-06-29T07:36:54-04:00'
describe
'292744' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJE' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
19c141435ec7073a8acc205d62074537
c4443e89c3c07ece6e70a909257b2acc785db182
'2012-06-29T07:40:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJF' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
139244cf0c26e80eb6541b1a82d9ca5a
e225c8e5d0311fa6368ec24752ac5c017e4843f1
'2012-06-29T07:32:55-04:00'
describe
'292699' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJG' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
a290351f48d12d939d14be389aadc758
26ee8c0c9d2ab7ee4fced977ad411c4ff855e844
'2012-06-29T07:30:55-04:00'
describe
'292695' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJH' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
70475c91d54fec251e8c056cd2338d7d
6fd5caa9b02d56f59006e12fcba6c720f726a1eb
'2012-06-29T07:39:38-04:00'
describe
'292717' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJI' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
822d40ec0cd1b1772b7eb2c28ed51cd2
107d3b37bea4c9b6ca3fa9e67017f6816a475e72
'2012-06-29T07:34:45-04:00'
describe
'292726' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJJ' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
bdf5d8e3de8547afe73039709614f7ea
f72c5f712718273138628caac7a3a09e294d974c
describe
'292728' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJK' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
d5e441dbbf3fcb5d6c7309d0b5c3144a
a4fe14a53fe2c93fae6a765fb14cdc4aed06d2b2
'2012-06-29T07:44:28-04:00'
describe
'292683' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJL' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
cc0684a87e5af931efa3739f76abba54
f3d1d630ba136938ac984c88c6b2b47a761f7f3e
'2012-06-29T07:39:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJM' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
3960d8ac4456ff4a5c064553a9d0c907
f2d6a888ef00f15dd31a5fa31b957a43edca4268
'2012-06-29T07:31:40-04:00'
describe
'292506' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJN' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
d3113d89a829746a1042e1d00fc31f4f
a02889d73223f7cd6168ab1f1eb8ed38ad638037
'2012-06-29T07:31:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJO' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
3d2ab63bb1fd63660d2a5c7df2d5ef29
87bbe5d04f2270e8d86f4deb93727a5867b456f3
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJP' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
b9e496210e2f48f97ca659db970bac50
9c90034d7c84dcd21db7e36f0bfddded712d6481
'2012-06-29T07:40:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJQ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
35d1b714a600448fb082e1336cdf0936
2a4a200aa7141fabed35fc6fada3967280022736
'2012-06-29T07:43:32-04:00'
describe
'292611' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJR' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
08f5def5393fcf26eea17cdfe402216d
e93cf8c374f7b83dd922b8462010feaade22609c
'2012-06-29T07:40:17-04:00'
describe
'292723' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJS' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
53fd6b999ee03c01edd2766be55990a3
2f83e1e9571ef8686c09318f0a89ebf459d5cee0
'2012-06-29T07:41:42-04:00'
describe
'292637' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJT' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
b6a1c13d72c311eb1379e227aa458b76
97f33689eaabc6ccb2183dbcee9d5f0285d74145
'2012-06-29T07:35:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJU' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
9372241c8b0caf7099e59e1064662785
45c9540f2f1d25d6c1b19bf0f52a6de8c98f6d1c
'2012-06-29T07:36:40-04:00'
describe
'292749' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJV' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
7028a21eafd7b299adb145d3ad6e37ee
c5f7b333bf79999a79c3a6b07e5dd1ee342aa251
'2012-06-29T07:31:50-04:00'
describe
'292686' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJW' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
4690d453bc5b977cc457c0f15067e176
1fc103dbc84ec39ac31df6530efa687bd389db55
'2012-06-29T07:30:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJX' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
db2f88b9b966d30f0cb934948df184a1
cd1e27fa7d5b6a3cfdc04fe835ebd189ae07e472
'2012-06-29T07:35:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJY' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
1c19bbbd969baac4e3b8b5e42d200d5c
aae499940285151b9fc2c13f2c1e973168393594
'2012-06-29T07:28:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAJZ' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
fab29505941c05d8633eb1eecd26a169
30a28d2864a7b517ddab1542cc22c3a09d7abde4
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKA' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
a39593e6d4b9813c4a093adb3f8195c2
a0e169cb3874b500922b6a999099f475c99edd9a
'2012-06-29T07:41:47-04:00'
describe
'292631' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKB' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
c14673d00339c55d697c57bd338ef424
bf8c7e00f3fb803cf3b7f27a62ab35190a57c138
describe
'292745' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKC' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
0127ae6cb44ca6ab62d38b9bd5225ba1
a83406f6fa30eed1178b1d88554b6dcfc9d67eca
'2012-06-29T07:38:50-04:00'
describe
'292616' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKD' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
a0b771dc8b741e5294619310690e4b59
05fdc8148fa532a4acdcac683d4225d2475ec279
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKE' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
ba4d6e032360b772bdccfa0d903d99c0
de55f38dded16beb3d30981ecf0264c1cf7dbc9b
describe
'292617' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKF' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
62fb879fdd44afeadd94a5cc5249ad7c
a97a6a72d0cb149d9a90dee0b5da8a909b323a60
'2012-06-29T07:42:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKG' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
fd61cb4ef78ffcb33deecad629df240a
e04774759fea0a4fc9dc62dfc865760602b7286d
'2012-06-29T07:38:18-04:00'
describe
'292703' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKH' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
c097ea3ee5d3819697d665d504518af2
54749342afbeeb6f26cf58b43d59ed1ab5d35f16
describe
'292635' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKI' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
0411e15d3e06c90d09d82760cd2b6d36
44f1c42a8ec357cd3326e7d47b887d622c270384
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKJ' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
a2dd4acfa2bd90308ccbfd31185b5ab3
c0e15c2d932f6ae12b46bf4737dfaa96dffbda8d
'2012-06-29T07:30:41-04:00'
describe
'292732' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKK' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
732b30ad2a940b3240bc351720c5dc54
def08338584b1b753d3faa09c8d6539ee9feae1d
'2012-06-29T07:28:54-04:00'
describe
'292632' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKL' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
c160f18cb461fa0d584cc24fa5c776f0
d842bc9843bc7c3cf62609e867e50146812c458b
describe
'292724' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKM' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
b9e3605f9ad084eb3ded5bf46f417088
ba450d98fa71cab60f79c6032b43f57dfa5867ce
'2012-06-29T07:40:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKN' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
18116cb6ebfcbdccdba4128fe26a80c9
00c388718e4ffdfc2bc3af0f3f674e4af49a6692
'2012-06-29T07:33:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKO' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
5ff7bed06605428d642e49927fee04c6
31385dc0cb1eeb3ee254cb150df8651407cc0fc2
describe
'292568' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKP' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
a5a4db848b3ef2e779952cba6016327d
cf3b48484f9533e492f45adbe6d5aefeb4fe413e
'2012-06-29T07:30:21-04:00'
describe
'292687' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKQ' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
3658fb2907c31993cedf7d922d584603
10d5c23390ca612495c217f3d80d4056e1a8ba94
'2012-06-29T07:34:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKR' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
529bec947dbaa2a2aea2164f9a5d9f43
1c8e589d72dac7b5e22e812ae34b3878ec4b0687
'2012-06-29T07:30:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKS' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
6bb354fcbac0633f3b38d5748f66759c
950499a567e1131ea3ce3eaf4d10e796b1288334
'2012-06-29T07:32:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKT' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
56228c5c7036b5f820540c35b89e487d
8aa64ebf9207747a2145dde00a7b010e8b13dcf7
'2012-06-29T07:37:33-04:00'
describe
'292671' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKU' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
bd0cef414c6fc59f8158634369e16e82
c2b8ae5e76cf63609659cb127bbc2e217edb3d79
'2012-06-29T07:29:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKV' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
6e0b496b3d4c5df9a8651f492c7e9761
5f925afcdf9ab92e4284adce85077f3a951fdc8a
describe
'292735' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKW' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
b3aebe4e6d7b23e0d5342b75139bd419
1da28f50b779760a3489e857a661f3bb27a342a0
describe
'292495' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKX' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
b4bb59f7737f0911ab108182ac7691a0
60b601e5d30bb28a53e1d2b488937fedda4af8aa
'2012-06-29T07:29:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKY' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
fe9b083dedef9f71e8f2b99e20eb30aa
82b78cec71b11df4c006618cdb1299095df9d633
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAKZ' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
319754f8c942210789c70d47714796f7
f0e10aa2638ac533a2fd1a743ca95b2a0ab35fcc
'2012-06-29T07:33:50-04:00'
describe
'292574' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALA' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
26d7b87e21e65ffe865685d6d2ce2842
f776b573f6d600a093bbc16f144ae29913b37bb3
'2012-06-29T07:35:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALB' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
954ce88ca4373a7fb8d66acc967de63a
9f64225d2243fe812e997b98358d29d5ee622991
describe
'292736' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALC' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
5e596b5997d79a989e9aee1e5e177b2e
a570f606d991a04dea434bfd86dfcadc8fde9972
'2012-06-29T07:40:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALD' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
03b092c4ec9cbb01bf031c6d8d8459dc
a33938ce238ecd27286d09737a6cf2764015a1a9
describe
'292431' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALE' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
4f1e00ea613ae2514e8efdf575d51f80
69922f87fb190a7c2862506a29bc7bb5008bd533
'2012-06-29T07:41:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALF' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
d1192ae909106e74c103a17f8d06d1bb
4b39b3521bdaf8bb55da0fc42fae61aa21f23c62
'2012-06-29T07:33:31-04:00'
describe
'452024' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALG' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
7832ccfc00f48abf8adccc19a2cae6ba
a1b11267a1f8299f65589dadcf82e737f87f7a35
'2012-06-29T07:33:26-04:00'
describe
'452015' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALH' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
91a91bacf0d1b9410e49a05d09fcb569
dbd66f3a3f1cf1f4f1ffe1229d6b16bd99652ae3
'2012-06-29T07:29:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALI' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
fa5ba4822ff7061f1b34a31caf5db576
b39905a0051c8437039e4655bd4099a76ee0c05c
'2012-06-29T07:43:34-04:00'
describe
'452034' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALJ' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
13004b3988e923d4dd7b7e180cc527a9
c683db5909b42b613f5e9fbfd27b73abfc2f0c1c
'2012-06-29T07:44:27-04:00'
describe
'451914' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALK' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
42df7692baf7b6dd3aa3bedd50dba0ed
1daf9e6b7e4b3ee1e4207465506b148565eb20d5
describe
'451996' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALL' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
b59c9fde29b2868a188a67c14a739822
4bd6ba566bc663f61f9bd62b81014dc3812d2af0
describe
'138459' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALM' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
aefb1e60206bcd61b15bc45326638566
b3368f942cbbbb4dfffc976eb8e5f8c0b010db54
describe
'451993' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALN' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
3762dc44980879cd30db8389095aef32
ab68d95c79d9fcac37c6c3b4f42949844abe1a37
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALO' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
3b67404493f8fde62dd3ef1952441118
de9704a62f48292e2b20ef05a3d1f9397b479ec1
'2012-06-29T07:31:47-04:00'
describe
'451966' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALP' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
5e18dac61fa5b451dc916d3d378d1f32
f900463f462bf62b17bf3a1e33b3cbe4e67b3ded
'2012-06-29T07:31:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALQ' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
a4231a19c410cecab3d042ecc885a990
b852ed531403ac1f5617dbcf0555fd63ea9fda49
'2012-06-29T07:40:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALR' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
8f60fd773f3cf9e990fbcb31cdc7afc2
b824c5ef15aabc8424b46d3d9f02046cc4a63021
'2012-06-29T07:31:39-04:00'
describe
'452006' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALS' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
a0ff770402efe8abbf45df6e65568efe
88453a230aed509aa758b525af2d5d2d42aef951
'2012-06-29T07:36:33-04:00'
describe
'335759' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALT' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
2f0f27c9c0e69654b59042e8ab9e4210
4777e1337c50632f018cb2215d79aa7d2fb1c188
describe
'452023' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALU' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
6c5cb46f67547819788212da4ee468ba
92a3189ebccc887a9258fcba3f8509d253fdadde
'2012-06-29T07:35:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALV' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
13d5ac972f62edaeaf5bee8409eaec5a
69feea97528096a49fad30b651387fb727eaefc8
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALW' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
931368475d793fa78f0ead451c39ecbf
5d430aa73ec4554b7494ae420c520e535eb64318
'2012-06-29T07:44:06-04:00'
describe
'451999' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALX' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
c9f45a20ed6d503645668fac1b5756a8
0eb9fe1bb93b61e882ec4e223afa15a3e899efe4
'2012-06-29T07:30:43-04:00'
describe
'296204' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALY' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
67c914ff0addd822dfabab90a716a3a0
03a10bbdc2b46b588df289b769563d90e249c09d
'2012-06-29T07:33:45-04:00'
describe
'451988' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAALZ' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
e8556fce34f78b22a2f0a763ba852119
ada39884bc0f042b9054c4315a94d54968fc8225
'2012-06-29T07:29:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMA' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
67e442754eb173131010f8f03e3f8027
128f7dffd0301b92b6e9dc613f0893d7d53075cd
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMB' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
2c385cc03c079837eec621e94282e0c7
1797d76af595f7bc5d21e2833ce296418a8dfd5e
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMC' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
a7948062629567b2e17f70cca3e60193
f68c5c3363355ff0286a6f94cf350e9aa3b286dc
describe
'452003' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMD' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
2115c37274b70cf8550b63686ea0c3dc
157ce178f962b9e1e6799f16cfa715e939e3435c
'2012-06-29T07:41:26-04:00'
describe
'452031' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAME' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
7704c7d511f991d9b8b11c5d8771808a
c4795d45c5c2c66d549064d2780fec1ea66d2ff8
'2012-06-29T07:30:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMF' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
dd3d74bdcb95be6fca1fc0c3c72dbdcf
a65851258707620f2a10a13e6553dd29b1abc04b
'2012-06-29T07:31:25-04:00'
describe
'451977' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMG' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
83e0b40553d6211cd3e748337883e9c5
364d157ff7e9340ee794ca3f1ea9736b8842dc83
describe
'451982' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMH' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
4c5cce12946bfe1867668c419aeb459a
297f01aa59743bae1c71370e2e780ea7ae7ff326
'2012-06-29T07:34:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMI' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
b08cc38068cfa4b73c82592fab3c0231
d560d51221e3b8dd78b2765f4aa021a2c71ac3e8
'2012-06-29T07:28:56-04:00'
describe
'451972' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMJ' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
b8416c90452f30bb6d4e369d90b08e65
f201990cf2cd8313aaf030d5b764c28a73412a4b
'2012-06-29T07:40:40-04:00'
describe
'451961' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMK' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
5002ff0df1765b3a9157f3b8a6f667da
35f0981a55032eebf58ed58265440d1bf5ad2b74
'2012-06-29T07:35:03-04:00'
describe
'451954' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAML' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
22aa8625b4c5eab70565af6e4899ab6e
e800cc363770cd89111fa063ab51dbcaf9ec8c98
describe
'451947' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMM' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
a320e98a2d61f1122a6a429a5835e15a
984dae897673ddfeaa7dba1a6d8e9493038ccb99
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMN' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
793aee1087c22d5a8341ca0980b9f566
721a31e488e825e43a93e82ed84e4fb8fe89b747
'2012-06-29T07:40:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMO' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
511ddcbf7e1bb0da657f5487d6b66926
1a865d0ad9a1b75f760f6f00b42eb11ba9030cda
'2012-06-29T07:37:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMP' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
d93c26471aedde921edf45dfd87b5370
3ad13af6fb254e2add7fb1456cf7c893b9691735
describe
'452007' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMQ' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
77b89e46c35f512fd3ca722a0d185a29
66e219d6755a92f5c05279ec1f306faf3f1e973f
'2012-06-29T07:35:53-04:00'
describe
'451994' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMR' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
412635e858c7a0a8e30a08af6f5ae7bd
38f16038ceddfbc67f78f7aaeafa426abfcd535a
describe
'451932' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMS' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
6704530146e13b01cab0af8c30daca93
a6ac5ecf3b4b63b48aa6c23b1c3d6067e510667a
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMT' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
87397828391c4b8ea31c5c32136d3c24
810f0f62e6db7ac1eb430fb5ce1c7dbd5ecf12f3
'2012-06-29T07:39:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMU' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
e4e28be512bb30aa4e3360c950e5a95f
8ecbdba88eb4143938d8a13f1f3da33a8e00d310
'2012-06-29T07:43:46-04:00'
describe
'451959' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMV' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
34e303870757312481aaade3a8ca5fdf
96280ff558b11d4cd5b25be6d61983859146c8c2
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMW' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
f07834c5ca8e8be537ff23607b8d39c5
d6398925498284fbda6e5f5ec9aaa055d3f5a5d9
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMX' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
19ae147cd0d214636201a6fa0cd0ebf3
2bcdf773bced0fd23ecdd4ba8081fbd9342e083f
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMY' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
c46326229f56b288036745afeceac584
4041652e25dc463adba2a15fcea3b56a4b8a78ab
describe
'451950' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAMZ' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
114efca9a9e69b018765df2dc958c622
95574099869944197623e52db23504baae04b4d7
'2012-06-29T07:30:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANA' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
110a8261921ed61114a7418319239212
1b49bd5c18a9841356ce2d19d6f1a04f03b1eb1c
describe
'451987' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANB' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
01ec67fe50e1f407c606a4917a0bfef4
cd1b71c5ca562c59eeeefe6a27cc32ca769e90d8
'2012-06-29T07:43:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANC' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
580fe0952ee985fbd80a67a50295f8b3
f41882c56f88eb349059dd03b401cdb49804f179
describe
'451934' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAND' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
63e44fa2879aa713e835cca962d3404f
04df5b1f5ffe596354bf973f0035d97ba10ddaf0
describe
'451955' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANE' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
8dbcdde2124f8f6d944f276ddd5ff207
e867f9d202558430f12cd4dc8fe29e479737f785
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANF' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
11ff47a55a97f2ce7e335cfaa45493d2
598c12f29c35676bbf8b21c22ec8b9810b4f2e74
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANG' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
80f7b179aec6734903b2c59239ab0b98
38f2f7d123cec0cc3082d3f7905afc063e26bb30
describe
'451975' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANH' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
b4b68cb0d537278bbc97a183515630d0
64c6c570c1b17a8faf087f82969f4e7801bdbb53
'2012-06-29T07:43:54-04:00'
describe
'451995' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANI' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
b2c58ea624911cabfaa4f00d22bbc0f2
a14e327bf99f66ce0239c37c5f9ab410929f2422
'2012-06-29T07:29:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANJ' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
be41f47346fffb8f47ea4582f45f4803
8ecb4abfd8da0b2e7bde661e8b7da2dd270493cd
'2012-06-29T07:33:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANK' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
a675b239209d0c513a47c4ce4823cb24
4c727663f3005acd24d5b0f864ca56cefe0a56de
'2012-06-29T07:34:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANL' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
8aca5e4b80089a03b4244bca0486585e
07c11af54819716fb484ded13101d5cd3917fc56
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANM' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
0c33f7f9985f4d60c382136a0a3885d0
f63c215d2be7ec873248621f8eeb33e0ea4f5ebb
describe
'118217' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANN' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
89ed440afa0ec473241c1bb37145b8ff
23eda5778f66bb7630409164f0134d46e9133856
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANO' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
158a8a3e9ad6de8cba09aadcaa7a8f62
dcc60e0d6ea65ff497bd6c17c00ccb361cd38324
describe
'452005' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANP' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
06a82b41617ef97a4a3e6eee9cb55e35
38a0ea2657ccde48dcc4ba9ad101fa436690254a
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANQ' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
2e42daf427c2162312dbff10d67c2c37
5138defb37745de90c1650b1b67d450cc680b0b5
describe
'451992' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANR' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
2c3e298bea41cb86aabc0a9af3441eff
0d2900209ab6502ad9e89ada463846432573a210
'2012-06-29T07:41:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANS' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
fbf86aa7636411a01cac9b28bdc17e45
0ccf18aec48cd5c097aebf8da0414a2d23a5ab62
'2012-06-29T07:33:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANT' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
1fa7c6eb55c3609d27b909f8ac9e41f6
8f14fbe8826379c764c270ac690e8875551c22f2
describe
'452001' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANU' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
f715ac385f3c1de5c8edd5062cde62c5
c46f36569a10e61142fb15ce077790ca00ea0b55
'2012-06-29T07:44:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANV' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
3df6ac902f207085dca3ef86cd8ef073
637907752f890f4f7e321f44a8949a0e7cf3df28
'2012-06-29T07:31:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANW' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
0a347cffd044bd4d07ffa68992a45f9b
fe714d4e3ee17d31316019bde51a0aac804f1395
'2012-06-30T09:08:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANX' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
5568fbb33975e9320decb840c9f0dbc5
805a7f144f3ecfd0d91886cc5961795893b144b7
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANY' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
6aad6478b3b4163db889d81938fd19cc
ab3ee653cdd369d682a6ec9944fcf4af1ba76a9f
'2012-06-29T07:34:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAANZ' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
c29b416630139823eb0f982ee3d8a3a0
8d75f894e85ac2d157c1033aa5709fe477044154
'2012-06-29T07:43:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOA' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
73f80105472188e3bec78b25ad98a858
1982257fdfb888666bed86e0ce5f9827595e11ad
'2012-06-29T07:33:25-04:00'
describe
'170938' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOB' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
c84e8d683c35b1739b5bfb7175a5d3de
a7f86b080182874bea1d279ca929557f89a70ec0
'2012-06-29T07:30:42-04:00'
describe
'1927793' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOC' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
cc5e26da4c968172f8c7a012e48480e8
685998c97b1d058449043e26ccf1eb3660cb4988
'2012-06-29T07:37:42-04:00'
describe
'1835925' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOD' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
dd45e2324faa8fe06d5a1c5efe6311c7
9c24d568ceac5a4e3b4ed20a5a470f572e699048
describe
'580534' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOE' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
79f202c5ff8772d7dedf999b62af9ff9
f871d15fceb06eabd73c45d5ced69ce7c5ad6972
'2012-06-29T07:29:24-04:00'
describe
'44936220' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOF' 'sip-files00001.tif'
647df7aff8b0eb2614731130737418be
d02258f5ebff3af6da633146ba8185ca6d8c06e7
'2012-06-29T07:41:34-04:00'
describe
'44899516' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOG' 'sip-files00002.tif'
68dae5ec272bd732fde79dd0a05f7a12
43e36886d20d08fbd1f3b4dcc5f87bdde71246ac
'2012-06-29T07:43:04-04:00'
describe
'41199652' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOH' 'sip-files00003.tif'
1a86b96b64e01f9027c0577babce2d44
5b203e1834e460eecbd35e23149a4cebaf067943
'2012-06-29T07:32:05-04:00'
describe
'3633868' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOI' 'sip-files00005.tif'
30edc2a577c84e21d1a34b82a8b62d2c
7fc6f90e3abd7705b21a53d100f355927ebd8a5b
'2012-06-29T07:29:52-04:00'
describe
'3633720' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOJ' 'sip-files00006.tif'
fdceb2e631d516787786cb6bfae15bf1
81028dda8e9f71e2f98860a3c0ce889899e39952
'2012-06-29T07:28:29-04:00'
describe
'3633712' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOK' 'sip-files00007.tif'
4eeb3e8d679b97f3dcf541d34340ff91
7d15f5b7ad4588b03ce7a6c0e5a0fe6fc0e90c22
describe
'3636176' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOL' 'sip-files00008.tif'
4395aa9a4aa925908bb6a5eea9499acc
5ebea19c4e4a80304158bd3bd70e6a328c5017e8
'2012-06-29T07:41:17-04:00'
describe
'40310128' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOM' 'sip-files00009.tif'
689387911fb59c4935854871981da429
777fc9fc7183efadd0b5e9a5fcf4606b743604ac
'2012-06-29T07:33:35-04:00'
describe
'3633680' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAON' 'sip-files00010.tif'
53410fc771b4ce0e3172964645101360
789912264145cf67de70b94dc6315a962bd819e9
'2012-06-29T07:33:11-04:00'
describe
'3636568' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOO' 'sip-files00011.tif'
8bd96b5aaf7110d2e9820a0c2334f313
316f4324c5067817a73e748d7f2de635388b1ca9
'2012-06-29T07:33:06-04:00'
describe
'3637476' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOP' 'sip-files00012.tif'
d5e7e0fcb731a7258eeee4ceb6f2c249
6b9ca16c774ea56a43f02b4b5d91d1eec2518ec9
describe
'3637216' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOQ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
3e3791f863a858c78012a61856f6a478
c795b9527aab9a19724e1bb8909d328e3fdcfcfa
'2012-06-29T07:43:47-04:00'
describe
'3637444' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOR' 'sip-files00014.tif'
1d31305013a4b2dd5d779ce1a2307f69
dffb307047931eeca9a6d052a0e2e3d14833ae21
'2012-06-29T07:41:22-04:00'
describe
'3637276' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOS' 'sip-files00015.tif'
475d51368659bc2c266dca913714b45c
61dc8950b186b8b37e8878d2b92d00ae8e99bf58
describe
'3637360' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOT' 'sip-files00016.tif'
b122f6a149db3cba1400dbfb0e74e61e
52e1cef9a273fa69b51724ade7438303667ee3b3
describe
'3635348' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOU' 'sip-files00017.tif'
4c86892fa86195fbcb854735a8d8f58a
2157d61a6312e5af52f374f0fd43ddd625ddbb72
'2012-06-29T07:36:49-04:00'
describe
'3636684' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOV' 'sip-files00018.tif'
128b65a8aad9acd79baa454b2aa4a2f4
ca1e8033156f4839dfbf75c9e442c449a30e5930
describe
'3637164' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOW' 'sip-files00019.tif'
2db620612ca0dae4f7eabdcffa9acad8
8cbde7696cb3a2da55ed0fc2edd38fd8567457c6
'2012-06-29T07:41:57-04:00'
describe
'3637708' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOX' 'sip-files00020.tif'
79905eadda6f43280f6c1c9b167d7fc7
f53b911c26497ac6077890b28218cd8a2a2e1852
describe
'3637340' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOY' 'sip-files00021.tif'
b2d13d05a9a1399ebc5687a6187f36ea
1c68b9522c12969e56e343334966e8a5c9346033
'2012-06-29T07:29:16-04:00'
describe
'3637468' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAOZ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
910797c8faf0e55704c78e507df1e902
6e4eacfebff0c644116a29a252e5ca124946396f
'2012-06-29T07:38:00-04:00'
describe
'3637204' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPA' 'sip-files00023.tif'
c2b39f0a694a837fe519795a0da56e4c
fbc5cf3f1b6aee03d7eb6cd357c632adb4b8cfa0
describe
'3637404' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPB' 'sip-files00024.tif'
c4db805ec278460b8a1e4042779037ac
20d2a27dcbdbc2426e771e007d47d970cec89425
describe
'3637176' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPC' 'sip-files00025.tif'
1e31e4bc8b92c1ee5f7ad46ee39ff1b2
4fd885fd5540d9e0cede973b8e679742a5648f43
'2012-06-29T07:44:25-04:00'
describe
'3637012' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPD' 'sip-files00026.tif'
2310925e289ea263c6b4ef87a7a93ffc
e50a16dc4e54d307b0d7a5092cd3922f5ffb4e29
describe
'3637280' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPE' 'sip-files00027.tif'
42b45c4a80941991bcb31b7f50dffe2a
8d0921a9a657113471e2eee0f69c69fe02a4d680
'2012-06-29T07:38:25-04:00'
describe
'3637112' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPF' 'sip-files00028.tif'
05d96abb80295a7cd4a327c12b6c66c9
9df0aa367659e5ab991193b732230c8827511991
'2012-06-29T07:32:11-04:00'
describe
'3637356' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPG' 'sip-files00029.tif'
25aef8caee452a159e91187a75e121ef
722a55f668752bd93d58b09c2f967875eca53bef
'2012-06-29T07:28:48-04:00'
describe
'3637472' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPH' 'sip-files00030.tif'
e7e35a413bbd67f6d4a5702a7009ec0c
2ca9b222be324eb560c89fbfbefeb8af68d5a079
'2012-06-29T07:36:16-04:00'
describe
'3636424' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPI' 'sip-files00031.tif'
2269450b0e34e4818078251c4acd4033
b4ba9a9adf1f39d5c1205e3c00f2ded0d1154069
describe
'3636920' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPJ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
2856f51a8fb30feb16708c21ceaa0e24
33996b99d1dd6a03b7cd16c0f662ae9da1600f8e
'2012-06-29T07:29:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPK' 'sip-files00033.tif'
505982054ab0b829278499c50f2b4174
0169bc75b88ee568d99a4fe8bd1a88fcd6de7ae4
'2012-06-29T07:40:57-04:00'
describe
'3637488' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPL' 'sip-files00034.tif'
ce67a6e320378926e9a73497e50fbb29
fcd5542e5545cc56756c3122e7b8f113eedd25d9
describe
'3637324' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPM' 'sip-files00035.tif'
5eb0753307e9317a26dd18b6f4f222eb
f058dc31cb91efe4aeb8443a3625597391f465af
'2012-06-29T07:42:43-04:00'
describe
'3635980' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPN' 'sip-files00036.tif'
013b4dffcd8852e12013983eb9dd1865
6e606162ccb5617a463d253e15ccc5ea4d8fb6ee
'2012-06-29T07:42:01-04:00'
describe
'3636668' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPO' 'sip-files00037.tif'
b442f395f186a17b1e1ec1a00596b387
53f4a6b08aec8a8a986e2f9d4201dfd768c0e864
describe
'3637520' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPP' 'sip-files00038.tif'
3c58236b250be610540977ccd40f859e
2552c103dae81c1176394e166c62a1b7052e15fe
'2012-06-29T07:29:14-04:00'
describe
'3637500' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPQ' 'sip-files00040.tif'
0f9dd3ab8703e91ce12e18af3e61d00f
9f97cfa425a2c124c74bcdd77f4f1d42002170da
'2012-06-29T07:38:28-04:00'
describe
'3637496' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPR' 'sip-files00041.tif'
457b898eadf3ed639f3bd52947ab334d
0127db83544921150b8694046dc82918e4b4b871
describe
'3636532' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPS' 'sip-files00043.tif'
bab2b2043f22c7810c9f0103a246828c
69e8c35dd077d69282080454f4f7bd14abc5b798
'2012-06-29T07:36:25-04:00'
describe
'3637140' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPT' 'sip-files00044.tif'
3119e885707fe129ff0cc06c99b01250
365f209c7c36fef04eae5162676d2638462c5025
'2012-06-29T07:40:06-04:00'
describe
'3637064' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPU' 'sip-files00045.tif'
0c71679ddab48392e8cff1223695a955
56feebe8944ad4cf7583b4ce948fff6009eb4ba6
'2012-06-29T07:31:21-04:00'
describe
'7046688' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPV' 'sip-files00046.tif'
1ff5167f2d4e52adb28f46772afcfffc
db140f8d5e81b0efbe83aa11dfccbdc15ededc45
'2012-06-29T07:28:24-04:00'
describe
'7046772' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPW' 'sip-files00047.tif'
65b64d540475ae25cf729fc1e13f6885
a062e4106e5cca6640089bb7533cb463b7e10b83
'2012-06-29T07:41:13-04:00'
describe
'7047144' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPX' 'sip-files00048.tif'
f55c2bb22891a2bfa3cf2a7f3a96d099
040ada90e62135db9e5255a2d69d00b5287f352e
'2012-06-29T07:29:20-04:00'
describe
'7047156' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPY' 'sip-files00049.tif'
e95176a82ec689bb245261a961359934
7dd99b8be38f5e6fcb3433e71f09fa1ae3cfc0cf
'2012-06-29T07:36:00-04:00'
describe
'7046940' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAPZ' 'sip-files00050.tif'
2a0a6bef5c963b5856a540df514660c3
cda9331ecb4efffbe8aaf6752412843f3584a6cc
'2012-06-29T07:29:11-04:00'
describe
'7046868' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQA' 'sip-files00051.tif'
2c059ed1ab879a16dd990a153d56f980
407f82eb27f903e34fb22ab6441200162aa1713a
'2012-06-29T07:30:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQB' 'sip-files00052.tif'
04ac2b0c316191409e9b3bf77c866e58
996322ac4aaaff833b2ffec7a3fb19a967dd77e0
describe
'7047116' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQC' 'sip-files00053.tif'
63d3078d97e8756ce467396ea6127fed
a68c669bf5a439a4eea308dc705f682b4e8139f5
'2012-06-29T07:38:03-04:00'
describe
'7046276' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQD' 'sip-files00054.tif'
7fe931d977dc7f41704078af66a81f33
6ceed2a5506060954c5b5499ae40bccae5dd734c
describe
'7046256' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQE' 'sip-files00055.tif'
f2139aeef185518d85468dcab691aec9
e1df7d90760e9be0cd1ef51f736b39db07f68b8a
describe
'7046584' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQF' 'sip-files00056.tif'
3e32eacfe88d58ff8b0ea5386a5a27cd
eb99b8d323f43a00458eabd2a49b331edcd15d17
'2012-06-29T07:36:10-04:00'
describe
'7046840' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQG' 'sip-files00057.tif'
72f3ec1bffda38aaf3789f50cc253ae1
9116eef29ec94e0dad47818136c0c7c440595347
'2012-06-29T07:42:36-04:00'
describe
'7046436' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQH' 'sip-files00058.tif'
f96943034510df30d7653707a563f1c8
1b21ecf61385a2b833805e4adf7e1ebc09a5da93
'2012-06-29T07:44:46-04:00'
describe
'7045580' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQI' 'sip-files00059.tif'
3dcd8a07eb97f464804e06a159c91912
710dc46a37a8d696bb7d41eb94b121bb1ffe3bee
'2012-06-29T07:28:52-04:00'
describe
'7046404' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQJ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
77e71c21c54c3b723137fe26c884f54b
544b3e2502e5fc1f795959d6a758fe5c5927ed78
'2012-06-29T07:33:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQK' 'sip-files00061.tif'
2ca4f52bcc4d366a9d20e2f789164327
77c2c93b44208d4ed03effabc0b0d0be0cdc4b57
'2012-06-29T07:34:06-04:00'
describe
'7047052' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQL' 'sip-files00062.tif'
675fd60b11c263144e4c3a871adb292b
b6c770c062a90d6aec70fecca55df49d3b679852
'2012-06-29T07:37:21-04:00'
describe
'7047084' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQM' 'sip-files00063.tif'
c7503d5a405d087d383c085fd01ab28f
edf81d3caacc9941c5c1bceb150d19ebbd2f5fac
'2012-06-29T07:33:43-04:00'
describe
'7046764' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQN' 'sip-files00064.tif'
011a6e0eda48498cf663fb7d36143121
64a12bfbbeb29a45b3756cf62839b860321d8285
'2012-06-29T07:32:16-04:00'
describe
'7047160' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQO' 'sip-files00065.tif'
5b277f065f5956cb5a045e749c5fcc54
c4ee8d1a0350f8cc4bf215ea0c1b6b7df7944dfa
describe
'7047220' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQP' 'sip-files00066.tif'
fbf313a870236231bd8a23e4618022b1
62cacdd42f86c8856af26900da20446dd2254a81
'2012-06-29T07:38:17-04:00'
describe
'7043864' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQQ' 'sip-files00067.tif'
96acfa1b554db5c29a5cef0fe78baa36
a31ad7f41e9c6c76212ff108c4ead1ce8e12043e
'2012-06-29T07:30:49-04:00'
describe
'7046636' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQR' 'sip-files00068.tif'
a9ff4fcbcdc4dba81747d9e63594181e
0d34d25bafc6ad1fbb48fd53a3e7ec0a2804e466
'2012-06-29T07:31:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQS' 'sip-files00069.tif'
8964a26891e8dd53257d3b3e524a6556
779a59d0ed2dc71251bbb478d9fac378445c4af7
'2012-06-29T07:32:26-04:00'
describe
'7047404' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQT' 'sip-files00070.tif'
baefc319e66b68382391f09fb8807001
d5c30897f4f118669a83f11fea3e1f16cdcb5b27
'2012-06-29T07:39:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQU' 'sip-files00071.tif'
a0133aabf65f8a156db53c2dc1596fc9
ad8c041f6173b7c78bf1d5df8489d77d0500a525
describe
'7045768' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQV' 'sip-files00072.tif'
bb2c35f3cf03c441c9768e7027e5e05d
60766b8c0d826d3ed36304d82b6f57041b060f2f
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQW' 'sip-files00073.tif'
7b0cd28273bb9d921545401f49a1e306
9590724adba66f0e57d2a90c96e3e69e53c7c8ef
describe
'7047376' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQX' 'sip-files00074.tif'
8cc205f03b72c2a927d22cf746b4eb1a
92cc03229d16ee45b5b9c2ececd96eb0ee69fd4f
'2012-06-29T07:36:11-04:00'
describe
'7047216' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQY' 'sip-files00075.tif'
ce59a12e1a659eae3b0414050ca5ceaa
dc6a1fff48b6b3bb8a42c637b961bdb54f568ce9
'2012-06-29T07:41:54-04:00'
describe
'7046744' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAQZ' 'sip-files00076.tif'
47bed5b917d2519558c7e8a6aab379f0
fec0168e46a9bf6a5752491fd707a615f2abd078
'2012-06-29T07:31:29-04:00'
describe
'7046376' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARA' 'sip-files00077.tif'
052d2ab8d8def4efc3b2043acd3327a0
e0958036b5a2af795f2f4201c16acac7c0002b7d
'2012-06-29T07:43:53-04:00'
describe
'7046416' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARB' 'sip-files00078.tif'
01af0e8a781fd087e2a5da96a6736a75
1d6856d84da046a451c07cfa33c01e9bc31ad5f3
'2012-06-29T07:35:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARC' 'sip-files00079.tif'
798d18c26e5e29200d737ea34cd39584
9be88438ad76ef5d12b30b4a57a36a1f130f4c85
'2012-06-29T07:31:02-04:00'
describe
'7046972' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARD' 'sip-files00080.tif'
6fe09e4e52ab6639107f02b50dc1e4d4
06599c0fcbf8b59a5246db336abf40d6a0d998a0
'2012-06-29T07:33:10-04:00'
describe
'7046992' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARE' 'sip-files00081.tif'
2579fa81d3526d2b2fc6cff780597e36
be0dfd86bebe52f40dc0a8cbe508c54e0917fa15
'2012-06-29T07:29:22-04:00'
describe
'7046900' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARF' 'sip-files00082.tif'
2feb314fb7254d3eae310b230fe29bba
57965a6eeaa227bf19b57febbb809b621b894af9
'2012-06-29T07:42:17-04:00'
describe
'7047048' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARG' 'sip-files00083.tif'
176a26fd3fa511215c22ae1c70c43176
3fc8d715d18ee51bd0bad5d2322afd8edb853592
describe
'7046932' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARH' 'sip-files00084.tif'
0f49c95761fff7143cf1b53c575ba324
07b3c798b1c971d6f10d2fd756a7176bec8e513f
'2012-06-29T07:41:59-04:00'
describe
'7046460' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARI' 'sip-files00085.tif'
5277df6abfe3f70e66361b7dae7e12db
5edf0f949481d4da81dba783e2bde30dd0d6a2e0
'2012-06-29T07:34:50-04:00'
describe
'7046512' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARJ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
de33cdbf9d4887c26e7438f180b57c1c
ab0c9297776d10e9c0294b990f610965ef9e4cf4
'2012-06-29T07:29:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARK' 'sip-files00087.tif'
277a22f101e762674651005d1181a37a
d64f59a76e84af2769eace1213492517605ada94
'2012-06-29T07:34:01-04:00'
describe
'7046872' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARL' 'sip-files00089.tif'
fa5a4995c0e4257a49bdf64a980bba05
47dc14e7cb8e835c3d6f08b7dfcbb8664510ab74
'2012-06-29T07:35:42-04:00'
describe
'7047124' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARM' 'sip-files00090.tif'
6b27fa579c4e5a15fa7ffaead97858f9
46e7d1fac55c207785dc3bda58573851a610e846
'2012-06-29T07:43:16-04:00'
describe
'7046444' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARN' 'sip-files00092.tif'
7e92115d08a201d2064376d0672abc34
4ac4604560547945037041cae03d962b674e1226
'2012-06-29T07:41:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARO' 'sip-files00094.tif'
a64a29595d23906d44709ba132ca25ea
7ec4dafab428f84bba32613fa8e1604a92bd4bfa
describe
'7047180' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARP' 'sip-files00095.tif'
0342c2d879007209fe59604aee0110a4
c5ff4d1bfd32b6fbefef44bfede6a166c4f3f5ed
'2012-06-29T07:31:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARQ' 'sip-files00096.tif'
c906e6a56559c3a2d7c8ba9ac8ab4b8c
9021d648040e0e9e1c57e9fe89e77800456e5273
describe
'7047452' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARR' 'sip-files00097.tif'
971bea9a354c57fe37b9456989d107e2
b0c9a42ab35db037a60bbc378ca2f830fd7854d2
'2012-06-29T07:41:45-04:00'
describe
'7047088' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARS' 'sip-files00098.tif'
9593ba0079ff231b1a3b84d714790a5f
996a8115aa27bed530148a1ea4c9d4c9ac5429ab
describe
'7046580' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAART' 'sip-files00099.tif'
76c126780ac36be5f20710faf0f3b94e
eb76ff70f8ebe05787e56f09bedd5d9669a5146d
describe
'7047224' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARU' 'sip-files00100.tif'
fc5bcf753b1b763fd75e7e2d74aa6bf4
97158466711fb9f88e5bb65aa88a88b01bdbf4a2
'2012-06-29T07:43:36-04:00'
describe
'7047300' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARV' 'sip-files00101.tif'
e9463f61a3e1f4c0000263ffdf3b875e
0ad481282c72fb4aeef5ea8aa9d6e60dc12bc193
'2012-06-29T07:36:29-04:00'
describe
'7047296' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARW' 'sip-files00102.tif'
80fb2f96d2ec606c448b31cf88edd91b
ce475bc1781405981ce963046161d033193bb07f
'2012-06-29T07:30:24-04:00'
describe
'7046796' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARX' 'sip-files00104.tif'
0128c848f53ce02a2bd86c426a84cdbc
87b8e39bf6f5f5f594d6bc7b87f6c8acf2626fe6
'2012-06-29T07:35:40-04:00'
describe
'7045760' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARY' 'sip-files00105.tif'
d0a9ab8b85bb7a7178ab053524013117
f32e36c6d49eb1127d104eec15eb95802448f6e0
'2012-06-29T07:42:26-04:00'
describe
'7046428' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAARZ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
4632ac61e7c64728bf32fddcf8d4728d
5faa9945ad3966f267f4c6152d7aee82bbcfc15a
describe
'7047120' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASA' 'sip-files00107.tif'
a4ea8f2bce58106a164604630bf1ae3a
e65f5d2e5d541da632087d6b46dd33f6af60844f
'2012-06-29T07:39:14-04:00'
describe
'7047064' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASB' 'sip-files00108.tif'
c13b8f6f53173ca07702d2b972a3627e
f6d3fc348263eeb9c30c4c6decd731efc521967a
'2012-06-29T07:44:01-04:00'
describe
'7046960' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASC' 'sip-files00110.tif'
0e5c251e907a958e3f70d17c2d9bb66a
eb6380e7e0b7c5ae95030a9c0cf90ae41353e26a
'2012-06-29T07:35:01-04:00'
describe
'7046080' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASD' 'sip-files00111.tif'
51c7eab849d3047dc3579fc20f2dc3fd
f43c29c196b3e96c05a68f40f4602c9adc20e984
'2012-06-29T07:32:40-04:00'
describe
'7046312' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASE' 'sip-files00112.tif'
05207cb40687205c59da97f12b963980
bf64cc9648a2db253807cad2251485824779aae4
'2012-06-29T07:29:45-04:00'
describe
'7047352' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASF' 'sip-files00113.tif'
f079d346def36110bc73f2567caf109f
43a08525c49f1558a1763cb9b127641448cfda44
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASG' 'sip-files00114.tif'
34bb049441f410dba074bb959c167810
80fc5645c5afc89cceb1f0c93f04d0f6f3f9e520
'2012-06-29T07:36:38-04:00'
describe
'7047192' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASH' 'sip-files00115.tif'
7e09e4f77850922ad3cc47057b656fdb
63c812cb700400f3275dd4a09b23986cb8a44f1f
'2012-06-29T07:30:54-04:00'
describe
'7047248' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASI' 'sip-files00116.tif'
1b1c1cdc8092ba0330c3764206cb1d38
d652f2d138b7e955a420b80a409ef43a5c0ef193
'2012-06-29T07:30:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASJ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
917fb23c50f7e026218926ee27a2ab1f
6a9e42c2f749562a31fdd7900c8da9ef03d497f0
'2012-06-29T07:39:28-04:00'
describe
'7046596' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASK' 'sip-files00119.tif'
9f58cbbb9bf0689c71ecbabfef842c57
383796a2acedbe3564ac159480a5d3d03f05d3b5
'2012-06-29T07:37:05-04:00'
describe
'7046400' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASL' 'sip-files00120.tif'
ad2457273e59f82b230dd15972ec5f5a
df660a470929e9ca0a037dc949fd5fcba02a7d93
'2012-06-29T07:31:55-04:00'
describe
'7047328' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASM' 'sip-files00121.tif'
f4b4936411f0ffa07f9ff19a9d08dda0
d0e4fc69be3321e6a5b5ae5faaab37b69aa4f956
'2012-06-29T07:35:37-04:00'
describe
'7047188' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASN' 'sip-files00122.tif'
249e05c77629b859bb1e5dad6aae6474
77626d8a40276017251466a352e880480ec59843
'2012-06-29T07:39:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASO' 'sip-files00123.tif'
8046936e99ba7c9d4fe1b161e5efd5c8
25ab596b6f7bb5ae374c4c5d6388081657ed1dde
'2012-06-29T07:43:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASP' 'sip-files00124.tif'
1a1520123cfee5c1726f385673a652bc
adb37cc708a4bde1d47b338a898c1c1ec7d90e93
describe
'7045020' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASQ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
ba0c09d82e2c2126fb5c990e722d6bea
8fb42375e1cb75dcc5bdbe155f2d00978d988222
'2012-06-29T07:45:02-04:00'
describe
'7046144' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASR' 'sip-files00126.tif'
ce95db46982533e21bf486e7bd47767d
9d1b967e8cea2d98378eefba9ba672e1c6570922
'2012-06-29T07:33:20-04:00'
describe
'7047200' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASS' 'sip-files00128.tif'
a5ec35a3f05f61407c6043769d914fe7
4df56a39ea5c5a58e2fff0a4281642f3531cbf15
'2012-06-29T07:43:51-04:00'
describe
'7047324' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAST' 'sip-files00129.tif'
46a7a61db7a339891382b366c7046d6f
7694c97b4407f8e0af07902638e6bd67f157c0f4
'2012-06-29T07:38:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASU' 'sip-files00130.tif'
85b275ee11db8671094f9630ac7690f4
da8eaee597f32fef04c9a62fb80a654c3b02b785
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASV' 'sip-files00131.tif'
917c443f4f89f854a5fa4de158c4681a
be6ab7800689a825a50d05b404964c171ae423cb
'2012-06-29T07:34:57-04:00'
describe
'7047308' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASW' 'sip-files00132.tif'
b99887c49ff281f66f983ee08f57feec
6caf36849446f5f4850a0971fda91696c7a9c0cd
describe
'7047092' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASX' 'sip-files00133.tif'
50e670c855de01878575cfb40cde7aa9
1e2f78dbaac4c8b0f33f7d91dd6208edd4ee7694
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASY' 'sip-files00134.tif'
4a0c3b3c7bcf7cbe267b9c50b922084b
f25c71afbe1a8dce91b5f562f82fb729371590ca
'2012-06-29T07:36:35-04:00'
describe
'7044316' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAASZ' 'sip-files00135.tif'
d6b843e7f1761db230e29ffe0c1e18f5
1c1af31325476c028c2c0a763c159c967809aa4e
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATA' 'sip-files00136.tif'
efcb36f0cd30c5505f8686f78b94facc
d21e4f6b4707b9d4ba34323381e434c682fee3dd
describe
'7047212' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATB' 'sip-files00137.tif'
728f46f07efb84e0ee848d8142c7cc0b
0652ca5c9e66b91b7751c6b7305303b1166b25c0
'2012-06-29T07:38:07-04:00'
describe
'7047256' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATC' 'sip-files00138.tif'
3ff0fd628df55470316536aece86a55d
632d3c12800f8a8ab8ef87fd0eef235aa286a198
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATD' 'sip-files00139.tif'
f16ef3b9eca93a7b480375e10486fc65
cd674edfca76af7c26ec1ee52116850194885177
'2012-06-29T07:34:09-04:00'
describe
'7047080' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATE' 'sip-files00141.tif'
bb477a2cf8f10c70a2eaba3cbc5a3b60
74cc1c31ce09fc85ceb8d2b1e4c423d67317cc7d
'2012-06-29T07:35:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATF' 'sip-files00142.tif'
f4ac886f00cd1457668f992a34d237ec
9b10f119a72cde37ae655287713d4f1f6bac00f7
'2012-06-29T07:38:57-04:00'
describe
'7047164' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATG' 'sip-files00143.tif'
cef45de94928e4dabc2e481c0782f5f7
24efce07cafcf8d48a2391ca556e66411fc78e9d
'2012-06-29T07:29:41-04:00'
describe
'7044776' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATH' 'sip-files00144.tif'
df2ca0df9619cd91585bb800db297289
6a1e9e50bf9679f3f39ed425419c723588232149
'2012-06-29T07:44:20-04:00'
describe
'7046620' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATI' 'sip-files00145.tif'
243f585c445a969158a3dc49aa679cf5
b7dbbacfbf1851c2be8acda9e2e72d4e6820430c
'2012-06-29T07:44:02-04:00'
describe
'7047032' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATJ' 'sip-files00146.tif'
f5326e86b70a6feda40461965e1c0293
b66d2118a329aaa31c38b942f9b19f20cdbf5080
'2012-06-29T07:33:41-04:00'
describe
'7047524' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATK' 'sip-files00148.tif'
c5335f337fa6d664f55f8331b4ef144d
39505647b9bf7b9041e4a73d31d5758283522f6d
describe
'7047340' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATL' 'sip-files00149.tif'
180d15c3cf588b2e7f7bfaa65c499375
15e40daf6c95b9d6aea7733523bd3860d86eda3c
'2012-06-29T07:31:35-04:00'
describe
'7047332' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATM' 'sip-files00150.tif'
be9da7ef1d2771c0a75f858bad0bbcfe
32cc012b0dabee2cc7038de6b25d615befb9a2ed
'2012-06-29T07:36:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATN' 'sip-files00151.tif'
bfee15107b40383e0cc9b4b851c13fa5
09221bec905a4c50820425fd11a81990f77d461d
'2012-06-29T07:44:03-04:00'
describe
'7046320' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATO' 'sip-files00152.tif'
f8d10f6951c95668cb38da914d4043b6
9cac3a6f04b1c0255db03ca44adc492352f114c7
'2012-06-29T07:40:41-04:00'
describe
'7047388' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATP' 'sip-files00154.tif'
e4503c31f06b8367b789c7ed398d6b8b
f10d04ffd3f001fd745ffbabe086588bce126ee0
'2012-06-29T07:42:42-04:00'
describe
'7046860' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATQ' 'sip-files00155.tif'
0a94921070b3593dedc935b958c88902
eb3a3c6be48611de785c9d1ddf485d6d0e5c2d8e
'2012-06-29T07:39:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATR' 'sip-files00156.tif'
0942471b6dc24e609273d2b8711ff577
bf14343f69d1d0e862017248978243ce2cbc677a
'2012-06-29T07:39:57-04:00'
describe
'7047276' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATS' 'sip-files00157.tif'
5beb7736a66792e24eecf06c69dab7d3
6f7823e76c41d240008181ba7027789f32ac1001
'2012-06-29T07:37:50-04:00'
describe
'7046676' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATT' 'sip-files00158.tif'
30106514dd9e2fa255bfb85c3c064e89
5a1fc3536f1fce9f320587b6d779ea3a782eef32
'2012-06-29T07:39:31-04:00'
describe
'7043056' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATU' 'sip-files00159.tif'
8f085ee5ec7ef14a083668b78a3352a9
5d58b180c8400b4490bd7cd67be7a2fcf3015d7c
'2012-06-29T07:34:26-04:00'
describe
'7046040' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATV' 'sip-files00160.tif'
7805e85d032e84bdde92b8ad29eca114
cca9a35f5095df5a6f029e9de694ae4d865695a8
'2012-06-29T07:36:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATW' 'sip-files00161.tif'
f425ebfe2774b21aae72d2d3ee72f344
7f5e24db00d3b10ae82aceb7fc1bf3edf0cc95aa
describe
'3636484' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATX' 'sip-files00172.tif'
2326ef8c1601aa99aefde866aeb7f521
4bb077a60edaac2db28f32f8f00887bd351a6d35
describe
'3637220' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATY' 'sip-files00173.tif'
8ba1919609f88e113c81b8e17b9d2ca1
44dc445c1930e68fc71ff6ef173820e39b6408ab
describe
'3636960' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAATZ' 'sip-files00174.tif'
e747bdb9cea7731b6e352310cc9a5a13
f18621a020f64653a8417b0b8b7e4074f70f15e2
'2012-06-29T07:40:12-04:00'
describe
'3637424' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUA' 'sip-files00175.tif'
b73eff5d2e82472cc0e294852f9fc4d1
7ca96dfae81939b3453e486ccb178c98180ce9a6
'2012-06-29T07:38:22-04:00'
describe
'3636912' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUB' 'sip-files00176.tif'
b18fe5f4105a96436b3ec08570f55343
8f79b1e6c2e45a19eb3789097e84453e4da0f523
describe
'3637568' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUC' 'sip-files00177.tif'
f9eaeb91f0005428478cca3ab7adfa23
81a30fcc80460921b3c8e16c630a67c6bf678327
describe
'3634440' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUD' 'sip-files00179.tif'
7cb5123af65fe23f8b18eca7a552abce
f0f516562573cc64032fafa9258daf0d1940868d
describe
'3636636' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUE' 'sip-files00180.tif'
93a1488de96bfa1bdc34ac183a3045b8
d34dd5c6b694c7142823e65eed8d2fe9d48bf003
'2012-06-29T07:42:16-04:00'
describe
'3637560' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUF' 'sip-files00181.tif'
1fc98a9ff9168cf568cdedaebd413be5
bc8977bdd1f5e9fbd03efaf63887c1b9e034f567
'2012-06-29T07:35:16-04:00'
describe
'3637148' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUG' 'sip-files00182.tif'
33eb7adbf8599192edefc6ab4103414a
de62f405ae7d7b557c19d30805800ecbf6658afd
'2012-06-29T07:44:37-04:00'
describe
'3637320' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUH' 'sip-files00183.tif'
3e5961d949c89ee1046f41a10a49c00b
40323cebb5f9a527695f2b9898753d1a9afe4ecd
'2012-06-29T07:41:25-04:00'
describe
'3636940' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUI' 'sip-files00184.tif'
15131d029c7becf5fc2914a18bd85aa9
b8a0a5809caf291b56756eb1e4dc1b655149c379
'2012-06-29T07:38:16-04:00'
describe
'3637436' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUJ' 'sip-files00185.tif'
d0d1524db1aebe565c7c87fd3ff12302
4bac7883eec4136b77626bb41b22c221eca2d4e5
'2012-06-29T07:40:27-04:00'
describe
'3637052' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUK' 'sip-files00186.tif'
3a59fb3ff204003b91d72f9be4516ea8
b88671646fc33da6f57287b6e2142b5b7ac9655b
describe
'3635488' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUL' 'sip-files00187.tif'
69405a2d084ecc9e7c113b85ebfd9f43
8bdd42e2bad7b639aabb667fb2d281a66a3a5499
'2012-06-29T07:39:33-04:00'
describe
'3636336' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUM' 'sip-files00188.tif'
f587a9ad722cd2d89e67adcc3863d3ed
f75e67a68998ca39be4c6fa474f833e61d3f54cd
describe
'3637504' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUN' 'sip-files00189.tif'
def6d2c3970b395f565371deae3562ef
e4a2abbe9074bd9912a768899e611dcb91e5d770
'2012-06-29T07:42:37-04:00'
describe
'3637412' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUO' 'sip-files00191.tif'
6f47a3b4159a4af0cc39fd0fea778af8
f9f2e6f39fc7daaf415df1420f74a41cb2734aa5
'2012-06-29T07:39:27-04:00'
describe
'3635544' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUP' 'sip-files00192.tif'
c4765023ab904955ef5d65a959e252e1
f22e87d624f3a66abf2fc4a8b12a8e4b858cffb0
'2012-06-29T07:37:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUQ' 'sip-files00193.tif'
e45d8f29e3edee02f1739d38bce8dacc
6d9c5b8f52b2354e5fae47554572ebcee27a08c8
'2012-06-29T07:38:36-04:00'
describe
'3637004' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUR' 'sip-files00194.tif'
5ba375f93671668a8ed7ac40af6b6d6b
14a31f1e9bbc1b3afe96ed5273d5ce9ac027f585
'2012-06-29T07:32:46-04:00'
describe
'3637388' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUS' 'sip-files00195.tif'
ae6af3ddb6e32e7cec60864e4962e172
181834faa1b4f170b46f7d606bc647280ad99efd
'2012-06-29T07:32:10-04:00'
describe
'3637136' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUT' 'sip-files00196.tif'
426eb4edd7c41199606947feaf12ec74
ce937a14363ec7031daa91ca194c1d286546661c
'2012-06-29T07:42:56-04:00'
describe
'3637716' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUU' 'sip-files00197.tif'
bd2261aa0a199527983a2147f49486eb
2f5c2c7f0cd16ca33a1a2d869775ed2bd9734141
'2012-06-29T07:45:04-04:00'
describe
'3637072' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUV' 'sip-files00198.tif'
643d35949c7e8da9a02fbbce63af7971
a6780f0977f077bad9ab0a9e6470716d4142a68d
'2012-06-29T07:31:26-04:00'
describe
'3637508' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUW' 'sip-files00199.tif'
b6f66e8b953e2276f09ac92bd2157e7c
077c2a0b2244e2b7bdf30d35c302ddc783d40a70
describe
'3637156' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUX' 'sip-files00200.tif'
126518a8e7a545694d02c0925010ff7c
9d241d7ae445616f090527d3b8f2157bf44f5167
'2012-06-29T07:28:31-04:00'
describe
'3637372' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUY' 'sip-files00201.tif'
82e33ad8d265720cb97b1f704a00ecec
02a8852b743c783efeb15e16f1d0a49ae8c43aaf
describe
'3637028' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAUZ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
fb4aaa2bc59620515f59313e046b6538
f130d20e49214b62ac20b315094618d47b26f830
describe
'3637376' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVA' 'sip-files00203.tif'
f75e064ec2e69a2a6824ae28212e0b88
3364b8c1b1f203fd9d7b25bf97dcd2380f7ea980
'2012-06-29T07:41:10-04:00'
describe
'3636584' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVB' 'sip-files00205.tif'
981cfef403b59a92dcf169a2edef2c1f
9c671e9e1af3164cb5723c0b2f6a9da4532cea8c
'2012-06-29T07:35:52-04:00'
describe
'3636652' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVC' 'sip-files00206.tif'
d7b47b4b464beb2dd0fc1952b41752e9
a06a3453ca8118510d6a9c20cd7a99c37fb7ef6d
'2012-06-29T07:43:06-04:00'
describe
'3637224' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVD' 'sip-files00207.tif'
00be18a108007b39d4fefc4f9227d015
4b3344030d6aadcce0eab66e586846a3acbb4ed3
'2012-06-29T07:28:43-04:00'
describe
'3637152' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVE' 'sip-files00208.tif'
f8d51ac952150a12612d6b31ed10df33
2089102cb6c85959f8a0bde7270514469cdd1854
describe
'3637184' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVF' 'sip-files00209.tif'
e95c314ad12924ec3b96f72338a2a3e4
b91f35d85c59572b21b7f6e3559a48991729f231
'2012-06-29T07:29:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVG' 'sip-files00210.tif'
ad677e9fd145afc69625723485d4f5f5
4ca53b1b49db63c837fae3b63de3513fc81b5f57
'2012-06-29T07:29:28-04:00'
describe
'3636760' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVH' 'sip-files00211.tif'
7b5f2ae55a883b2917409aa7ec8bacb5
70a286b9dfe447b7b0a097f3c47c0642ea9b1eb4
describe
'3637016' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVI' 'sip-files00212.tif'
fcdd7d421a8b39919c41d95c907bce59
87e4f85465e1cf5cf4ef56776214671dba96ba16
'2012-06-29T07:32:12-04:00'
describe
'3637484' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVJ' 'sip-files00213.tif'
6397ea30f66c7ff7ac75219df7a99dae
2c4ef02c53edc4ab1fc0afbd59032f30e38c17ca
'2012-06-29T07:39:54-04:00'
describe
'3637256' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVK' 'sip-files00214.tif'
5ce4d898b8093c7f200ba84b7475e65b
b92667e7c1445b245f934c9f5c3dc59209c544b9
'2012-06-29T07:38:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVL' 'sip-files00215.tif'
2b6388d33d88ea1ca45e98853b0c908c
6971f32a452d9cb0a09a5707b80ba6c5444d1f41
'2012-06-29T07:32:51-04:00'
describe
'3637124' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVM' 'sip-files00216.tif'
3f567f6b0ae422cda35cdec77e775722
fa6368e2772f6927565e692c5ff762586ad2c724
'2012-06-29T07:31:30-04:00'
describe
'3637352' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVN' 'sip-files00217.tif'
fe53233023355e2575a46ff870ac5044
8d20cc0bb456e1cc1986e4f3e0af74216031e10d
'2012-06-29T07:29:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVO' 'sip-files00218.tif'
bc7112cf37a5519a561244bef7293c95
c0c3ea3b1edfca6cd15f2e6f8d72299db3a04870
'2012-06-29T07:30:26-04:00'
describe
'3636192' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVP' 'sip-files00219.tif'
214b0af3fde0fdbeb739423ea68295b9
840621f9cf0e49ca0c1ffae2ecbd57a520cbd55b
describe
'3636396' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVQ' 'sip-files00220.tif'
b87081dab51bc369d2555ea61a8d5178
0d4c8359618d2a31322b9ff9b5970ae9e794b94c
'2012-06-29T07:44:55-04:00'
describe
'3637480' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVR' 'sip-files00221.tif'
3a6903ffa158c8d3193918874290dc6c
6a27d73b702f2498382d2e01ff9528c942e07f9d
'2012-06-29T07:34:34-04:00'
describe
'3637044' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVS' 'sip-files00222.tif'
908d99f2cd4ce9967c38cd7d4f1534e2
5e1b69a9448b6d3d91302c44870562b9b052c63a
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVT' 'sip-files00223.tif'
f11f2aaf674752cfa4632304068db4c7
a071c1337eb4ae41011d042072202df6bb2a794d
'2012-06-29T07:44:58-04:00'
describe
'3636972' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVU' 'sip-files00224.tif'
a6cd90a1c519b8b9e5062233d8e638a4
243cdf7c86cf7ec4682bc2493b39135ddf93f465
describe
'3637260' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVV' 'sip-files00225.tif'
4cac7cf54bb10d5d5b866b1c0a59c11d
4bacec4e9ce70694e89475d7b249d7c05d82f159
describe
'3637116' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVW' 'sip-files00226.tif'
e8ddf965d4ae25a9c4ce98f04d54c574
6affa35ab1958c8712ea30e7780edc10104234ec
'2012-06-29T07:42:45-04:00'
describe
'3637596' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVX' 'sip-files00227.tif'
5ae7d53d9e3e514b706d7650659d07a8
38bf852999663c5883915a8a991b9c526a8271c3
'2012-06-29T07:32:56-04:00'
describe
'3637120' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVY' 'sip-files00228.tif'
b117aa2c6b887c8ac5acb75e2418e03d
c78d3e9e5f084b2256f5f65281e6bdae43cea5af
'2012-06-29T07:32:50-04:00'
describe
'3635732' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAVZ' 'sip-files00229.tif'
2078ce77c169f9dc65da570269dc2c1c
01c1314cb406685cad563cc2bb234519c71e23f2
'2012-06-29T07:29:31-04:00'
describe
'3636604' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWA' 'sip-files00230.tif'
3fb0e656110c7cac2750381bb528058e
aeae8d418402f3180dd4cd7ebe552d986a0d7c4b
'2012-06-29T07:34:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWB' 'sip-files00231.tif'
a50460229d79c1d8eb1336df69138435
d2deaa093742784aaa6137e611c6060e0418a37e
'2012-06-29T07:31:08-04:00'
describe
'3636860' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWC' 'sip-files00232.tif'
113adcef6e835569ba835c4265582b6b
d8408a2df0375043fe7d9ef2a19eb30c8aa43764
'2012-06-29T07:36:18-04:00'
describe
'3637524' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWD' 'sip-files00233.tif'
02f6301daca71aad8cee32ff8d1d05a1
69c16155f499db56c16291de0d58739f0b6ad45d
describe
'3634360' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWE' 'sip-files00234.tif'
0f12d5d8710da8f5f7e1b89cac47f244
48a79fca7a5512f5f01364f4b3186f49ad42b3c8
'2012-06-29T07:37:16-04:00'
describe
'3636720' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWF' 'sip-files00235.tif'
7d57051895d8230befb055a266cbb2f2
3246805a03d74f511bc98e780a53dc33c7667646
describe
'3637100' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWG' 'sip-files00236.tif'
f3e517d6c9f4aaa9b7dee3bdbb94d414
9082dd52acb5b9d570662912f3da5975f59fb1b1
'2012-06-29T07:37:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWH' 'sip-files00237.tif'
06a9aed8e3dd0b5459e78e05dc2a370e
3a9544b789f263a297c746fd198ef39d2a7e79f7
'2012-06-29T07:41:51-04:00'
describe
'3637088' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWI' 'sip-files00238.tif'
6713d7abf3fa282445e605cab03a8f84
a9f1eaa41e678cbf556cf03aae835d63c8d96d9f
'2012-06-29T07:31:34-04:00'
describe
'3636952' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWJ' 'sip-files00240.tif'
5b13be80fcbf5f2a88119eb08fd429a3
1cbf46d8644e211ba1db6ebd651daadc37721d80
'2012-06-29T07:40:15-04:00'
describe
'3637312' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWK' 'sip-files00241.tif'
67e80dab4f554910703ded291939c5bd
d15b222011856711b918199ee9b3c2a9e500ceb9
'2012-06-29T07:37:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWL' 'sip-files00242.tif'
00a040b508675a227fb2ede33a06c389
14f6755d1e0cf21b81c92569b47505ce3c231e3f
'2012-06-30T09:08:17-04:00'
describe
'3637532' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWM' 'sip-files00243.tif'
36ae8c3f34c14e1f96add1233012d486
cc9569b9d1caa19c903ffbd63933a8e004332b18
'2012-06-29T07:33:46-04:00'
describe
'3636696' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWN' 'sip-files00244.tif'
da03b2ef243431061be906ad4591a8cd
0d8c0cdca71406649e2298ddf1ffd781a46083ec
'2012-06-29T07:32:17-04:00'
describe
'3636772' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWO' 'sip-files00245.tif'
a0232684db73c3a5b30cc389b3f226bc
4a7db5b20db905888ff2c6d291204df23eb0c9b9
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWP' 'sip-files00246.tif'
4d2c8ce37adccd243994d4c326c5399e
a68aaaeec12edef321b50249505fffd97cd067a4
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWQ' 'sip-files00248.tif'
61259b5dbaeba96038d043caa7b62b07
01b3770378c5dd9ea386ac20ffd9c2a3e98fa09f
'2012-06-29T07:43:59-04:00'
describe
'3634496' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWR' 'sip-files00249.tif'
fe244d83dd6f97eec1f18f8b2a3b5da6
c7c3e54064b66382e8c059f9a0f514c344f73e50
'2012-06-29T07:39:17-04:00'
describe
'42442616' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWS' 'sip-files00284.tif'
a65b7eeacd16cf47618883fc793e70d6
8c77a8685eb04d565013dc2b3744c6706cb3c0a0
'2012-06-29T07:34:36-04:00'
describe
'46281648' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWT' 'sip-files00285.tif'
233e15cedadf0bfc1e9f0c4e075138f9
0754e9d4164c500edb5a484f95484aab0eebcfe6
'2012-06-29T07:35:28-04:00'
describe
'13943472' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWU' 'sip-files00287.tif'
9a6344fa6c0f37d524e6adc9c58e6271
7fac2726fae81fa09b7f8e3e4b9ad81b15fcfeb7
'2012-06-29T07:30:07-04:00'
describe
'3983' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWV' 'sip-files00002.pro'
d75b495575d92c9c8334d5002e7252d1
4350dc93a20d7a966661c454ae971329be735b31
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWW' 'sip-files00004.pro'
39201106c59f11ed08a77a43c39290c2
e9c18562971e119060d9a844f1f7d4de491759d9
describe
'689' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWX' 'sip-files00005.pro'
195a90f9d0fb25ba21a7ce7fac816a7d
692137a28ea81789e7ac9a518e405fb6a1f55d83
'2012-06-29T07:30:27-04:00'
describe
'2057' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWY' 'sip-files00008.pro'
2d19a780c00d00a0bacbda0d4569dec9
aaca78638fb367c62e918340f564113889bccd5f
describe
'3207' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAWZ' 'sip-files00009.pro'
509ea429acb6880c702ce1aa51952118
3b5494d9510026785d91720c05cb352e51581067
describe
'28597' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXA' 'sip-files00011.pro'
a584129e53e53d8f0147248120f4c83c
fccfad976f0e41bf4659dab78cd948901f9ff815
'2012-06-29T07:41:08-04:00'
describe
'53074' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXB' 'sip-files00013.pro'
52b14905a30da8a779932139a80c5947
8310342c05ea1d6fdb773f8eca8de5e1eb4dcde3
'2012-06-29T07:32:48-04:00'
describe
'47958' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXC' 'sip-files00014.pro'
4b7460612be3a3ec049f48be5da8d08a
d71d730a73169fb12136dd82385a25942289b267
describe
'44394' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXD' 'sip-files00015.pro'
38fa89e5474c1bd7d4b8a3c28883834c
d5ef8b3de864eb8f871e61ff643192e4a97d9c37
describe
'48340' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXE' 'sip-files00016.pro'
9183ffe6486b54269910e22d3be839a6
b85458ec904acf8de6ad41e711f3d01a3ee3c502
describe
'20354' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXF' 'sip-files00017.pro'
18f0509be7391888fb28dae1c6c2c703
a4a4c1d1d2e1477feddb1f29c9a6e24a18188759
describe
'35451' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXG' 'sip-files00018.pro'
f1ee7bd05097d155704e5c9f67a61e6c
e9b1ee0de20722892a076adb652912a56c94119a
'2012-06-29T07:40:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXH' 'sip-files00019.pro'
70292eaec31d04f0b40b8024047baa6e
2dd9c0d7c53929940be2277f6e1efe9339ec48c2
describe
'45562' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXI' 'sip-files00020.pro'
8967a21396a8a817d94d76270eb343db
59f212b03ed6b068db6a26547e238ce25230509a
describe
'43627' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXJ' 'sip-files00021.pro'
57ab85a45c5ac164e9d7308e3a121048
c8d58e623d056286bd4717888ee201e3b01e5f7d
'2012-06-29T07:35:14-04:00'
describe
'43500' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXK' 'sip-files00022.pro'
aaca1eb2c23e8dc627aaf87f72f99653
e48b4e048f6266bee0dbe83a7549006e14a849d2
'2012-06-29T07:32:54-04:00'
describe
'42608' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXL' 'sip-files00023.pro'
7c25d97b3e13a20d7c3e7d3bbfa4d5c1
77933035ccf67f94aaf7fa50e474824ef70505da
describe
'37638' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXM' 'sip-files00024.pro'
b278c1f82f97287695563b567c6213aa
97cd01b4d2ad2f5ce0e94d9a0da819c3a5c4ea5f
'2012-06-29T07:39:02-04:00'
describe
'39260' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXN' 'sip-files00025.pro'
fc4abc60075c9198ed1ac9736a64a0bd
f50d5baae3606e782889dbbb4437bdc1d3035315
'2012-06-29T07:30:04-04:00'
describe
'36971' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXO' 'sip-files00026.pro'
6e852a7c25363025536f3750b5a70b23
c9ebe1e11c67976c4b8dc1c56e11b52c26475f39
describe
'40265' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXP' 'sip-files00027.pro'
a90f562577456697694bd6d04d29420d
078dfb7fe91e2b22882443bf036709d774a7fee8
'2012-06-29T07:36:22-04:00'
describe
'39814' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXQ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
9faa1804346c7b1e2ee91c2190e4a100
8c164920bd8ccf96e33eddbace06c330a2bd3c57
'2012-06-29T07:44:40-04:00'
describe
'42174' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXR' 'sip-files00029.pro'
08209af48448a5b68cad8bb363d44a56
4caf5358aceaa96ac00e2d5eecb1bb9f3fdd025c
describe
'42017' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXS' 'sip-files00030.pro'
c783c744f185b35c7c69c94ef7c60185
6cdc0a4bf42e0581ca3738a5e29241994d0b3aa1
describe
'32375' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXT' 'sip-files00031.pro'
4702d6a40a3ca59526c52df77bcca7e8
d5854eb24682d3a3abba4729981df468f2bc439c
'2012-06-29T07:30:12-04:00'
describe
'34233' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXU' 'sip-files00032.pro'
9020b764abfef883d3094318dde29ab9
70ef74efa36508968e4f478aa9f872d25cfeab72
'2012-06-29T07:40:02-04:00'
describe
'41961' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXV' 'sip-files00033.pro'
7a6a7a544a110ef939b7ae60c3110e9c
aa35f969369cbd9338023198d65e9ca9561700d3
describe
'42659' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXW' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0d9fe1801b2c0f0231eac6b2e568852c
34c8ad76d9eac730c5ba00e4ed82340c2eec955e
'2012-06-29T07:33:56-04:00'
describe
'24325' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXX' 'sip-files00036.pro'
9e7fadfda960cab6580761e50799eb8d
efecf5ac2e98eb48c5e28324f510e89bcf357fdb
describe
'38153' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXY' 'sip-files00037.pro'
698e16288a9e06fd2fe8d5ea739012bf
35b1d1b9ae539b28d6c7d464b69f9330da355adc
describe
'43505' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAXZ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
100c01b3f54db35dd0f56738e85ed668
7f8cb11776ed367b3b86002d194b93ffc454dc79
describe
'40442' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYA' 'sip-files00039.pro'
f006d43e73d1a4871cca8488cd1cbf70
ef8dda137c60a18cbb7788bbeb880840c655e7e1
describe
'43526' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYB' 'sip-files00041.pro'
824ae1686e18d7980ccbc87a29416771
cc6ede246f471497a9010263ec69d5e54377eb41
'2012-06-29T07:32:49-04:00'
describe
'15674' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYC' 'sip-files00042.pro'
78a9d87d86a47e340cf76c2b99ebd83b
91ce3dfb085836938c984969b54ecddb4c30d4f4
'2012-06-29T07:30:47-04:00'
describe
'34385' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYD' 'sip-files00043.pro'
0097b3b39c20c22a4d95b8941ff4739f
13bf3e39601dec109556ef3ce6620031fcd27292
'2012-06-29T07:41:49-04:00'
describe
'36328' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYE' 'sip-files00044.pro'
5f6a75226b4bc2ab947ae882d7b312a5
ba8087dc52f6625fa35efd336120df6b2ce33c5e
'2012-06-29T07:31:54-04:00'
describe
'41041' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYF' 'sip-files00045.pro'
e6e244e295fe343c07b3569e069e22f6
6ccfa2e56dfef20d90b84d3502f446b80bba3199
describe
'39784' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYG' 'sip-files00046.pro'
10197c1d3fcd8facbf91c9c3b664af67
1672b6280170da4f2f1c1aa449725911b0bc13e0
describe
'38657' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYH' 'sip-files00047.pro'
6cfde81aafdf1ff648c41eb771257bfb
1a25e5128bdf53ca8676f1446c1174e678e2b759
'2012-06-29T07:32:13-04:00'
describe
'43335' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYI' 'sip-files00048.pro'
43686c877e9eac19e52534943f5a3d4d
74ffd8ace25c3cd5d4b71af16b9991048081f61d
'2012-06-29T07:42:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYJ' 'sip-files00049.pro'
468fb7fb945029429513c1505dfa16f0
54cd9a6d01cb6ea80c5eaa8f48bdc1c465980f84
'2012-06-29T07:31:52-04:00'
describe
'40246' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYK' 'sip-files00050.pro'
d1df792f6260fc22b392d0448c9a4eac
53868561498b1295844ccfb10d21e1ad389b8caa
'2012-06-29T07:44:24-04:00'
describe
'38051' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYL' 'sip-files00051.pro'
d9892c4fc8d70ebf5f7ab1400c6f4757
9065edaed69491232a248728143207c9750e3e0a
describe
'37480' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYM' 'sip-files00052.pro'
8057fd87e166dc29fb3e9d836dfd8228
726527fc2fded7e0675fec6af8e93965b48e0e11
'2012-06-29T07:35:38-04:00'
describe
'39121' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYN' 'sip-files00053.pro'
596148336e9762da0ca0982fb4611f4f
de2a40540a5e810ecd91f9b9231d757115a44aa0
describe
'37425' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYO' 'sip-files00054.pro'
e88d591cdf10ad212aa7094bf31167f2
7e157b3901c64ef2988997d00f66f772d2ef0dc9
'2012-06-29T07:43:38-04:00'
describe
'36112' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYP' 'sip-files00055.pro'
40010b3d3fb76f7f10449a93c94bcf3c
9bf95ec4d24d51783234f55b1439455b7da168ca
'2012-06-29T07:33:01-04:00'
describe
'36498' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYQ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
8173619dad16abb4254b40ad0f154e64
5e2762a5592d17e678b4a07da1c5421a4a21f55a
'2012-06-29T07:33:16-04:00'
describe
'35512' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYR' 'sip-files00057.pro'
b4b66e618c82c3221ef5bf0d45dd40ed
f79db652fe2b7873ba999f543609ded199279d8e
'2012-06-29T07:33:12-04:00'
describe
'27644' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYS' 'sip-files00059.pro'
456d32b98d2535acc08a875f125cee6a
f15f3ad881a30d75160012ecc3505d9bc5ffbea9
describe
'38933' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYT' 'sip-files00060.pro'
0709ddb16e262969cc8a0bc0610d3577
ac7d3cbfd56215c63e97f96f179ea4a8c68823dc
describe
'43896' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYU' 'sip-files00061.pro'
22a0b47b3bc9e0c9b7bb4d280cd1864e
5ee7fc3d6e987ea179a3aff70a75f4c5f069398f
'2012-06-29T07:37:18-04:00'
describe
'39410' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYV' 'sip-files00062.pro'
3fe3a14271a513f21edeea9b795ad443
2c5dfc009c296be810c41c9046da3fd9dfceeb3b
describe
'37672' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYW' 'sip-files00063.pro'
137d9849159fb48e47b49531c00688b1
b17f1a223c399dc902abfe1028fe80e7c6b47035
describe
'40056' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYX' 'sip-files00064.pro'
6d4d5efe4ff48ecec1fcd0743dc273e1
c3219f6ad4d1b723758bbe4567f98f34087777fc
describe
'40851' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYY' 'sip-files00065.pro'
5433f87707d36c825c7689160b42505d
cd5da8e9139fd9d94c2f644e133d2249eb8f56f6
'2012-06-29T07:34:44-04:00'
describe
'40862' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAYZ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
fb5ab8faadec01a7c5b490a5657b51cc
3eef7cf5aac28fdb091761baf5978bb87c9ad9d5
describe
'13264' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZA' 'sip-files00067.pro'
6d0cda799495e9b8927c0de652f3d255
1d0439f6b706f920ec76c92bdf6e8de935998709
'2012-06-29T07:37:58-04:00'
describe
'38721' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZB' 'sip-files00068.pro'
529e1eb2c7090b2a3eec6b852d700224
a144a267bb98cca77209c55bd69b2ff45ae03a1b
'2012-06-29T07:44:50-04:00'
describe
'45856' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZC' 'sip-files00069.pro'
b408dc88247d16aa24a036df15211f6e
f6e9f1b9055025fe8e10634fd87b0a9fd327ea54
'2012-06-29T07:35:43-04:00'
describe
'42511' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZD' 'sip-files00070.pro'
57f20509cf417296fae7647ac1c513ca
9bb95214b1ee6e5f7c903f56adade8940425f3ec
'2012-06-29T07:31:36-04:00'
describe
'40776' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZE' 'sip-files00071.pro'
a2d4add7c7a1e23a5912e048f7fe73a8
b471bd101aa72d99297ad1f3b2b87f4e8e3cde57
'2012-06-29T07:36:50-04:00'
describe
'29528' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZF' 'sip-files00072.pro'
c7a67dda81c2e4299216728af4c1a02d
2592b1a9807849923ea23d29a9b161fe5c9ba152
describe
'39671' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZG' 'sip-files00073.pro'
54c548fbb75848a27af8942d1d65329a
4d8be0f49b5c2f433894124b8bd69fc29d67f2a0
describe
'44857' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZH' 'sip-files00074.pro'
101a993942011bf32f8f28d19b42d916
5896cd2fb3808c09f0b719b95f5eb52c99656195
'2012-06-29T07:32:32-04:00'
describe
'43260' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZI' 'sip-files00075.pro'
6db59c5e81a011eed01725f9d68f0289
54857eabf722ff0d0f24c354db156e488537a88e
'2012-06-29T07:30:32-04:00'
describe
'41136' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZJ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
2ed5384918347ba4cd2a3f80470edacf
7f5e42b39e357ae7aa2985869296e70f11cd18a6
describe
'38029' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZK' 'sip-files00077.pro'
ec86e28b16f1bffd9d8900e611edbad7
e89ea260649c6ebcc45d0e1d0802fba91acd24f4
'2012-06-29T07:41:52-04:00'
describe
'37770' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZL' 'sip-files00078.pro'
a375f0259aa85de92a2de77d209aaf26
f74bf7898e61fc16b088ea6a0ec6f79ffa869c98
describe
'43446' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZM' 'sip-files00079.pro'
211861465be56e69bddb220927e35f67
9dba8e0eaa3cdbc510f496db508212bccfdd09d0
describe
'40483' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZN' 'sip-files00080.pro'
ffd60bc50a62d905aeccafb4442c7981
2322e19f930ea580c77d874906d80da91df34c3a
'2012-06-30T09:08:16-04:00'
describe
'40545' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZO' 'sip-files00081.pro'
cb679d199f3ba9384b05c14cb630f063
25ea29f33d4c50d74449995c813d00ad669c38f6
'2012-06-29T07:42:02-04:00'
describe
'40985' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZP' 'sip-files00082.pro'
ee463525b14434e787eaa970bd8b9e0b
b2a3465287671b79276eab90c36650cf1ee9db09
describe
'39658' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZQ' 'sip-files00083.pro'
66806f8588db81d1fbd3d55cdb1a6b29
c17b85662a023909b21c3be9f9f0a0c4816368e8
'2012-06-29T07:38:31-04:00'
describe
'43432' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZR' 'sip-files00084.pro'
92c29f62232eacd7b76d5cba04baeb7b
e8ac3bbd2eb75cf76c6c42eed3d7b088e9455fb3
describe
'36271' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZS' 'sip-files00085.pro'
bb64b9cd4df3f43b5e0783d6afd6f4c7
d5efb209a4e24682f2fe5bbbb1f3462c7bf7a067
describe
'38633' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZT' 'sip-files00086.pro'
d14fe3cb076e259df188525d99c72990
625738bcabbf246c3393edd448ca43c253d20111
'2012-06-29T07:43:08-04:00'
describe
'42967' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZU' 'sip-files00087.pro'
dca835f047c44293117dc45ea865b4d1
e77657540debe5b57d0ae379a7ee6b1c96618206
describe
'44427' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZV' 'sip-files00090.pro'
af3c29070ae9de11d639fb396af4d15f
ccd0473a89f06ae625361aabc20c965117bbe4f4
'2012-06-29T07:41:35-04:00'
describe
'12054' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZW' 'sip-files00091.pro'
4146a0529f29a394744c1682dba60169
9b47aebca3cd9d2589954bbfe697588d32e6bd3d
'2012-06-29T07:34:52-04:00'
describe
'35968' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZX' 'sip-files00092.pro'
baff54dce39408b8e09f6ed67df69988
513af83cbefeae715b8cede80e6bcf3b18fe5282
describe
'42387' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZY' 'sip-files00093.pro'
3dda21494eeae7beb38e3f1b15659be4
8ce81921f1a84890f4760ed4d1df627d16591262
'2012-06-29T07:42:07-04:00'
describe
'42053' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAAAZZ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
6c0042751a1b03a1e7c6bde0992f673e
206e471dd3419297642e7bbc0316e8e0eff56db0
describe
'45752' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAA' 'sip-files00095.pro'
16f0a0fff4c070e7b99c2fada0a6dfc6
20fabd48da2a2701b7b7c36b22ab8c55c962857e
describe
'46596' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAB' 'sip-files00096.pro'
5db143292ef7f107bba5585f64291ac7
1ef7a3a35983b6eeaf7ef700d37a5921afd45f37
'2012-06-29T07:31:45-04:00'
describe
'44081' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAC' 'sip-files00097.pro'
e4f3ea49684b3e2c2a7c59b808cd0f7d
20663f773b31091ff3274734b608df30b59d3723
describe
'44302' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAD' 'sip-files00098.pro'
7513072b10926b65647d3ec98ecd8634
e2f3aa9443724cde493765833438f4684212d2dd
describe
'38594' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAE' 'sip-files00099.pro'
8bb9412e13bd4200adb64c4fdd180564
b60431448fe8a166d7bdfde2116113c45884ae5d
'2012-06-29T07:44:38-04:00'
describe
'41690' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAF' 'sip-files00100.pro'
5854664c5c0e3175e529deca2ec989e7
8535494a777c748c092fe3dc805e6fd20a42dbcd
describe
'46627' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAG' 'sip-files00101.pro'
a3bbba203023981b804f6303b6ddceb9
7ded61fedf044cfb85ff7c3ec919517fc53b317c
'2012-06-29T07:32:44-04:00'
describe
'46913' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAH' 'sip-files00102.pro'
269b3e0bd204d9f41a5ad9dfaafdd6fd
848349ab49c7fe7fd029cc62e98fd492d05bf936
describe
'40077' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAI' 'sip-files00103.pro'
3d722b50230db45ccdfd2cea0f3d4ba3
177275b5f9b00537757022d2bcd30b22fb23e1e9
'2012-06-29T07:33:17-04:00'
describe
'39792' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAJ' 'sip-files00104.pro'
cb056643989f250b2733d35f5dead971
324a683a2d90e542e33413e744024a77bd027814
describe
'31405' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAK' 'sip-files00105.pro'
3ebcf8fc04723244ab79d6663b65ccae
fa3a3e2357b53b3f0cd8d448af161d85ceacaa6a
'2012-06-29T07:32:31-04:00'
describe
'38638' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAL' 'sip-files00106.pro'
656e8eaa593fceefc1772750d667842f
5cc2be8215ced50c86e74a7596d017af8e69cec2
describe
'45063' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAM' 'sip-files00107.pro'
3c31dcf7b369dd3c7e5300a1b333af3b
614528604fd3d0efb23566408509fb2060de08a8
'2012-06-29T07:40:30-04:00'
describe
'42077' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAN' 'sip-files00109.pro'
76b7efb28cf3f7e116efd4100f300dfc
0bd4b3f43576df2956bc5b12a0c46e468d68bcdd
describe
'43608' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAO' 'sip-files00110.pro'
fb10986b3178af56ea94b44b6a31fa69
42ee7734254e4360767b6b082454d606be2d35e1
'2012-06-29T07:28:55-04:00'
describe
'35288' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAP' 'sip-files00112.pro'
d118670f31fdf887d86e618d197750f4
44dceaf065e0a9b073df90e985e10c678aeeaaaf
'2012-06-29T07:33:08-04:00'
describe
'46089' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAQ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
3cbf3721cae79098a6dda16db648ef2b
13109eea6e0b3e9e13f46bcef08d43d908296cc2
'2012-06-29T07:32:01-04:00'
describe
'45151' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAR' 'sip-files00114.pro'
56a7a739ba9323bc5e74dda22053f282
196080dd30ea6a9208da9e5016546ad5105c71ed
describe
'44946' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAS' 'sip-files00115.pro'
32699c9fa34e39345e4ab04f7f8fe204
7d6504acb8514a28c5ef4ef7cad09f2cf92ddb20
'2012-06-29T07:33:51-04:00'
describe
'46478' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAT' 'sip-files00117.pro'
82cdc1f804a1fed36e2bbf2311ea532d
b4c5664873e3d62d8c3f774ba72eddebefa57f90
'2012-06-30T09:08:15-04:00'
describe
'43836' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAU' 'sip-files00118.pro'
409ccdce82f5028106bb45a00925f3d9
2354effd993b76c492d0e49252dcd6182dd15a64
describe
'38610' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAV' 'sip-files00119.pro'
207061bc96ffb861e6c1d1e7bed4b0ee
a3bd843d8869b40d602da88213960f6dbd1d060f
'2012-06-29T07:28:57-04:00'
describe
'37345' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAW' 'sip-files00120.pro'
b6a82dcfe6223d6d589b58f00376bd56
00920bd42b8a8a1c3cf4b4ccf33f99b89f2b473a
describe
'47539' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAX' 'sip-files00121.pro'
18de6a2f5f1c1c008aa5a90f5b36e142
e888e73f3caf1c18b3e68697c3626622970100f0
describe
'44540' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAY' 'sip-files00122.pro'
aac421de06cfcb54dd36ff8a515cd89c
48272206801600e6f5e49bb3ff66fecf2de8885f
'2012-06-29T07:33:49-04:00'
describe
'45558' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABAZ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
a3ecd2ef923c9b92cfe44af51e6465e1
99ae443e00ae3688f9c36a91003fc8a45df9d49f
'2012-06-29T07:43:31-04:00'
describe
'46571' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBA' 'sip-files00124.pro'
099657f67874504ce16df596f46c1bb7
da4ab4e2534f413c1f3a32f3b1b3d891da8d66aa
describe
'24661' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBB' 'sip-files00125.pro'
db63555f124ae29c824b448ed0c1f7eb
4dbdbf51d020953a9419f4a920f95abed4c5765e
'2012-06-29T07:30:36-04:00'
describe
'38800' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBC' 'sip-files00126.pro'
0fcbb3b0f7efbfbaeadb2edde18afc90
eb12718eac32f5536a8d147518dcc2d6ce4acc5a
describe
'47986' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBD' 'sip-files00127.pro'
694cfbf70151a1cf8d03d105ae78aa4a
6c7e42b0b16ab2137b5fc38931d1ee128dbb1b2e
'2012-06-29T07:35:02-04:00'
describe
'46944' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBE' 'sip-files00128.pro'
150bb1437790ae9d6e31fa38864410f5
0e7a6e3edf186e97afbe3c5f901a608a960e869b
describe
'45133' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBF' 'sip-files00129.pro'
f71c6b5479bd40227510cf0e0a7d7190
8869d69ff7d63b17974f03d716ec336712f02f2b
'2012-06-29T07:40:23-04:00'
describe
'46163' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBG' 'sip-files00130.pro'
eec64f32f5d6e0a9cd755283dd3b8ed7
b5139740770e828d44408de371f59ce510a7ee0e
'2012-06-29T07:31:51-04:00'
describe
'40071' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBH' 'sip-files00131.pro'
16f57ebd88757b61b85803fe56eeda92
8cabb90468241e33bfad64fad19ff85c071d0beb
'2012-06-29T07:45:05-04:00'
describe
'40630' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBI' 'sip-files00132.pro'
6b8871e460323325845e74cd32a658ba
07863ded1c630aca65338f2952caece75ac8c7fd
describe
'41728' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBJ' 'sip-files00133.pro'
079b523f9befcda1de54fbf522995090
e16a8bd09a46afed16b1a32302717b96dec3e642
describe
'17861' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBK' 'sip-files00135.pro'
db2173b3a40a76854c2c3518e2d982c1
42f8648c17f1b05e15f933bad9bf033f8f847900
'2012-06-29T07:28:46-04:00'
describe
'37061' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBL' 'sip-files00136.pro'
c7431464c52665c1e5cecb6e84844dad
530bba569de573be98aa4c94347020d63d2d965c
describe
'42564' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBM' 'sip-files00138.pro'
a38d51777bedf583c8de14eda4cc04f5
87a070faaeda6c88151d5534b66230d48474e574
describe
'41684' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBN' 'sip-files00139.pro'
bc5adece76143d3ba17e532ead09fbfb
afd31a0f53f562759671c75a39abdc7bd327f6c2
'2012-06-29T07:30:13-04:00'
describe
'44426' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBO' 'sip-files00140.pro'
68541ac308cfbfe8c3eae460e415ad67
969ff78ce82f3e162df2804767e680d3fab22ac1
'2012-06-29T07:38:05-04:00'
describe
'38838' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBP' 'sip-files00141.pro'
e55ca12652206ea62efae832bce44665
37e0080e3a1a57e0e0901465d34fec27b2eec07c
'2012-06-29T07:37:39-04:00'
describe
'37918' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBQ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
2081c093f323ceea2b014903ec44a43f
9476c0c2417c4551e63173e87f2146f8150a4a2e
'2012-06-29T07:42:03-04:00'
describe
'45735' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBR' 'sip-files00143.pro'
10aa201c3f18f392dbe3851a378ae350
215eaa71771ca989d3d74957f87b7869d48bfcdd
describe
'20173' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBS' 'sip-files00144.pro'
28978661d58155b074eaa9c8486aa2cc
aea746620309afb8207a5d0d9c0eaebcbf3df838
describe
'38523' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBT' 'sip-files00145.pro'
483c3e56e59322c1ddfa9e85a072d8d2
7ba12dfd6486a125f03a446f5e4948fab49a180a
'2012-06-29T07:31:33-04:00'
describe
'40607' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBU' 'sip-files00146.pro'
fad4e92fe2eef2135c88cfc56cc1474b
3a3642cc5219b556a6e6f537d1dbf8b0efed11dd
'2012-06-29T07:39:25-04:00'
describe
'44923' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBV' 'sip-files00147.pro'
745d4775ecf457c280c419363865e9c2
ec43bfd494dff53daa9874ef3c8271e59e442971
describe
'43942' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBW' 'sip-files00148.pro'
620606c02d40f8aef135a9ffe4689048
62d993a3bca9b54c66261bf25fc3a1e0adcfc011
'2012-06-29T07:39:46-04:00'
describe
'40675' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBX' 'sip-files00149.pro'
bd65a789ddd7d717525a5ed0860a56f1
cbb385e20ada562e6ae08d3ffd3ec16fce76b7fb
describe
'45115' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBY' 'sip-files00150.pro'
23a6a09471e293893b5ace76872cfbb2
effc86a7ec6b17b79afacdf59042f9a32af7b5ac
'2012-06-29T07:40:20-04:00'
describe
'41882' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABBZ' 'sip-files00151.pro'
04caa5a3925996d07128c8af844a33fd
a9565631cac738956c43314ae850b4c195024f70
'2012-06-29T07:29:01-04:00'
describe
'36857' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCA' 'sip-files00152.pro'
be9744a01221b4b450db4d5c09b830c9
850dc53b6eb6d38c6d19f8fb849f5b45a554498d
'2012-06-29T07:30:06-04:00'
describe
'35473' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCB' 'sip-files00153.pro'
ac707611726a6b76413f83a0cfd4b87e
78ed45ec04ba0238aae94bf2de156653dbcbeb56
describe
'46006' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCC' 'sip-files00154.pro'
5b0928b124e921dc572f4cab951e7b5b
c6765ea081e54420569c3641a538ff4e3ab189cb
'2012-06-29T07:43:05-04:00'
describe
'45456' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCD' 'sip-files00155.pro'
b5ad679d9e4db1b878dd8021418fd801
6cca48153cc4f0ed6668714f87cc1ad283d7801b
describe
'44732' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCE' 'sip-files00156.pro'
023ec7ea90758006a3354ea118d216c8
fbb68f15882aa0f4032aedffa98964504d49cf84
describe
'46245' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCF' 'sip-files00157.pro'
3e2413792a0278fa779a95a72299a75b
4c65dd4f2eea93a45d1a2196d10e49154d8617cf
'2012-06-29T07:34:38-04:00'
describe
'42259' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCG' 'sip-files00158.pro'
eb65dd35dc6765c10d541cff27f08b4c
53201c513f02a29836b2fc0d3205513db1ff359d
'2012-06-29T07:32:06-04:00'
describe
'7640' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCH' 'sip-files00159.pro'
04d863519205011d95383226e59edff5
9d9f757b4fd3612197380f49c0ec084c51beeed0
'2012-06-29T07:30:05-04:00'
describe
'27598' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCI' 'sip-files00160.pro'
154d2918c19b5995d8dc011dd82bae15
d2e2343a56f989c27f78ebbc9feb7a122576e983
describe
'37739' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCJ' 'sip-files00172.pro'
be28dd102c2948638552a517501c7c16
c7e8d7ad00c4faf0a27ec2872031ea26f045118e
describe
'45090' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCK' 'sip-files00173.pro'
f96c36d038655c636b38980840174d8e
ead7caa32f1f4ff069949f9a8985c0101cd22cea
describe
'43965' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCL' 'sip-files00175.pro'
f4a40f1a3643098a4469956b5206ccc6
04133781eed2a58824224bf74c0247d6f49c05b7
'2012-06-29T07:38:29-04:00'
describe
'41361' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCM' 'sip-files00176.pro'
c0d2f16b00ef8fbbf254e0c442a08448
e9e68ea68c8e14c7c6587f1a0b37d3003a9548d4
describe
'37188' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCN' 'sip-files00178.pro'
6b59e5d08b9ad4e52415695e652456bb
1868514db07e630c649f3f46e512415b65fbd0f8
describe
'7451' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCO' 'sip-files00179.pro'
fec71e03789032c4b007ebed231e2842
b06e0523191ff52259894d2370aea780e47ebc13
'2012-06-29T07:37:38-04:00'
describe
'39184' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCP' 'sip-files00180.pro'
5b938fce6956ec4d5b0c23cc74e2023c
1bf6610dfedf9797682c84a9b532911ca4b81d70
'2012-06-29T07:37:02-04:00'
describe
'46851' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCQ' 'sip-files00181.pro'
16527d923b0e05007aa71c50927625dd
ee3ae7142160ae95106cf1fa0766ec88d81696e5
'2012-06-29T07:37:28-04:00'
describe
'40946' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCR' 'sip-files00183.pro'
4e4927c1cd46a2c4dd1df184a5745362
8491483aff03bcccf614a5695b20243e52a14748
describe
'44947' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCS' 'sip-files00184.pro'
f2f499e020a641ea0f84a647573eecf4
b996b08250ba1ac3f6307cbeb67b59108e9770d2
describe
'43584' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCT' 'sip-files00185.pro'
5681e02add57410be5a088f58d5f9f72
6d5d04b60aa1a0eba4819724a552c706c25a1487
describe
'40215' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCU' 'sip-files00186.pro'
7adc3fbaa97af51cf947fd9729f6947a
cec61b3781a57572dc91782569b456f98e16ed16
describe
'19074' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCV' 'sip-files00187.pro'
94ddcc29bd0fe9cecff3604b9a8d14aa
5bb4db8cd1de8811f4741ce7be011c35aaaadc95
'2012-06-29T07:42:18-04:00'
describe
'38844' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCW' 'sip-files00188.pro'
5597ea168721e24e377ea7a97a0c5532
2d866c3cceae1625e84c63f9a07467d3027e4604
describe
'43133' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCX' 'sip-files00189.pro'
211c67b73223db7b0f7f4fabdf789c9c
0b74d86a271faa74fb008f4ac51c05fb4243955b
describe
'45035' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCY' 'sip-files00190.pro'
eb6d3ec17c5d71c8685f06ef84a1918a
d8e56b8bce3dc62f50fc8f3e245b1cb6d24047b2
'2012-06-29T07:40:55-04:00'
describe
'42266' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABCZ' 'sip-files00191.pro'
45c1eb0922700bd061dc212a67f26166
ba40d24cbc36fc3b55e4a7374bdf43d5a1f5764c
describe
'19275' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDA' 'sip-files00192.pro'
cf48580824b83a39c8bf5847b5be0ea5
04fc81c95a9d0f042d40b5e0b7c972e38a3eaa75
'2012-06-29T07:29:07-04:00'
describe
'37617' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDB' 'sip-files00193.pro'
d0ee9317ade914212dfb1e25a5e405e7
2ba158449b42460067ca4fc6a7533bd88bc3d6eb
describe
'45029' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDC' 'sip-files00194.pro'
a720449b873c709e45f04fd5d4fc16ea
da402c101aac0beb1d0016c1dfb884d2ff344987
describe
'42208' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDD' 'sip-files00195.pro'
fdefbc90035f5a71cd95f5134593246c
653bd16e9731bd7b60c25657528afae3e03de484
'2012-06-29T07:37:37-04:00'
describe
'42245' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDE' 'sip-files00196.pro'
0726cf51dd235ea27634770f1d3ca73b
e90cdfff5aa35394fe43b80a5912e1e696cda63b
'2012-06-29T07:40:18-04:00'
describe
'43805' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDF' 'sip-files00197.pro'
be72f464416cf538638c1611c5172eb9
e986fa1d28a5979dc066f11d01b6ad93d3c92177
describe
'46278' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDG' 'sip-files00198.pro'
6eab90ba14855b609b705a05d88a247a
2c7ba6c83dbc33bb7e79249eb143ed5f848fec95
'2012-06-29T07:37:00-04:00'
describe
'44973' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDH' 'sip-files00199.pro'
2778170de9defcb0ec7549a281bc4f18
339286ffea6a37e90d35968097d8fa19665771f0
'2012-06-29T07:36:05-04:00'
describe
'45670' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDI' 'sip-files00200.pro'
530bc1244c517cefc7f15beca1e839b4
97572ffba5fb0ea8abe8d8f85f62642744246319
describe
'40574' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDJ' 'sip-files00201.pro'
e095313097ce86a21c51c2a31780088f
3ba26761aea50c1e378476f9b2f599b4341839e2
describe
'45491' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDK' 'sip-files00202.pro'
9f48db1e3478bc2b973c6bf70ee5a7e7
111c21cb7e620dd5e048d6e84b3b39a56c874bf2
'2012-06-29T07:38:34-04:00'
describe
'45716' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDL' 'sip-files00203.pro'
951ab0a833c033c1157ecfef4b4416a0
8e98b5320dc07797c151b10e74f8bcccdbdad7f0
describe
'46647' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDM' 'sip-files00204.pro'
ea8f2f9c64a53bf0aecac7962423a6ad
2eeb39e4a9dc78131e4198945eea1c2a834bb15d
describe
'33492' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDN' 'sip-files00205.pro'
7363ebfd252e1ff976412d30bc5ac36e
26ebe940b0c34ac00fcbb9ae952f2a8942a03af2
describe
'38931' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDO' 'sip-files00206.pro'
d05b7e98445d09180910aa42e9f9d4c7
1083a613f2eec6fcdb0a0f8a693d9600475a841a
describe
'45302' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDP' 'sip-files00207.pro'
7a96f81d96b35fa98751fd4d5f474639
761b1ecf6dc756a5f9583bb6e6051288bd2d078e
describe
'45674' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDQ' 'sip-files00208.pro'
5d215f331e0b87f81c886ad22364541b
63dcbc790ecc0fe642a344818db61fe086c1a013
describe
'44300' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDR' 'sip-files00209.pro'
ac8040a1e4e2c1d9c9beb0f280f6b5d0
a417e88c80dc16f264684b3406721a32dae22d90
'2012-06-29T07:42:28-04:00'
describe
'39541' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDS' 'sip-files00210.pro'
ce87846c5b2edcbdf566ec1b5a242156
0c3b977b0fdf553491cfa2579697903cd4861a3f
describe
'37550' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDT' 'sip-files00211.pro'
5fa87379d889d72a61c03e07a85c4e03
2a8f6ecee136b6f8ec2d864a3056d9422b92fe81
describe
'46565' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDU' 'sip-files00212.pro'
cb1d04055be7bbc673dfaddc9280e0c9
7f0ef641de548837c7db33f9e8f839783c709adf
describe
'46105' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDV' 'sip-files00213.pro'
1d7796d46b10fe20a66bf957c9a41d76
0ec089a38a6d99ba0d1d701a8f5a29ed47919d03
'2012-06-29T07:33:19-04:00'
describe
'45387' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDW' 'sip-files00214.pro'
8a082e02f187a57431d42e97fda6a1af
b3e67459da76118b73ca5ce6bc7ebc7600f314ed
describe
'43238' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDX' 'sip-files00215.pro'
3aa190360b013d05ff61f217153a4fba
c3c89e3711943c7ee7dc15f0c64b102497fc03a3
'2012-06-29T07:37:35-04:00'
describe
'45079' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDY' 'sip-files00216.pro'
36acc82b0a14f097364e68bc07b42ade
e2ae0c924bf41ef3fe015a15841d45920dd686c7
describe
'45964' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABDZ' 'sip-files00218.pro'
28562833da3bd74a2c16b13c7f97b8e0
79bdcc309cb658691296be84d11bbae9b7a4eb76
'2012-06-29T07:34:58-04:00'
describe
'27652' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEA' 'sip-files00219.pro'
e7d33b1d849e3c36c987fe7ef779cd49
58020dcbfae648dcd012efb96338504251035d7a
describe
'37605' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEB' 'sip-files00220.pro'
da4199b54d072d8e7d9001343a30eda6
f25af132ec228bea816791656c68ff561bb0de86
describe
'40854' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEC' 'sip-files00221.pro'
0ff4c3c6db6230c2166a8b27fcaf2b5c
29f56226abad223fcf3a2be6050050c97ea0d9d2
describe
'44285' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABED' 'sip-files00222.pro'
482d5b211638b1858c7f0475a523fa55
5f30be44e39b60766589f9aabcd675af3179b6df
describe
'45009' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEE' 'sip-files00223.pro'
76ea51527c7d1dd91bd3bfc20f7cc377
eba0ef87815d58fdfb2f381a75297ef962cc4ca6
describe
'44351' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEF' 'sip-files00225.pro'
870d091c47a9008d63a65bbc51458221
8e35f6de3667801d6b69fc183a124651ac1e343f
'2012-06-29T07:36:57-04:00'
describe
'44449' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEG' 'sip-files00226.pro'
6e8afd00479e5b189af62aed05351ca2
bc43fea4447679f3e680557cd186f0f209a5956f
describe
'43663' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEH' 'sip-files00227.pro'
806734ca22b786c8d7f0c3575e444af8
f1b1e767dccebfafe9fb89d6671522525d991e68
'2012-06-29T07:44:00-04:00'
describe
'44833' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEI' 'sip-files00228.pro'
fecb52408d49822155de5493b99b132e
2e5a63a08c7c29b890ae9d4e2ccafba8f05813c4
describe
'26058' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEJ' 'sip-files00229.pro'
c9a980b5d517c7384933f774876ba0b5
bc3b76970a1d7b064ed9196a1c193c505b786761
'2012-06-29T07:40:46-04:00'
describe
'44114' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEK' 'sip-files00231.pro'
b1e68a1cba8b970c1916adebcb82bbd4
f4c95c64f047bf654f7d6eb3255156c6c269fec8
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEL' 'sip-files00232.pro'
d92dc69f6825a83f989096c8cab5351f
bc55641d77d62e0dbd37dabdd258a9ae47bc096e
'2012-06-29T07:38:56-04:00'
describe
'43424' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEM' 'sip-files00233.pro'
f914c4b535781b85bf2fae7fb30d1de9
22a0bcc7913fd4a41b539b80f4f4a18e5935b959
describe
'7376' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEN' 'sip-files00234.pro'
689dbc68baad69da06560834d3aaf756
c05e6d38743a3b8c69732517e407e4870f1ef7d1
describe
'37965' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEO' 'sip-files00235.pro'
1b99ae49b3be20519b5420558a9880f5
d0361c295e841ad711bb31736948b0152365f2fd
'2012-06-29T07:40:36-04:00'
describe
'44440' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEP' 'sip-files00236.pro'
7a554616b524c2d0b8ba49daae288c0d
7e457f27e6db0462875e2186c96063a91936f0b9
'2012-06-29T07:43:17-04:00'
describe
'45198' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEQ' 'sip-files00237.pro'
4dee3f67309fbdc479b0ed58f97ea458
0fac9c9919e040a065685b6bb222b08789ab1f91
describe
'46094' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABER' 'sip-files00238.pro'
1cb615f084cd46e5c25d02d68b6f22c9
71fa4377810c849f6a95de6955d9a9a5c193823f
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABES' 'sip-files00240.pro'
763cd871059377c3b1e47109d21ef7d7
f57e689e8780f83cf580b8fd5be50060390f2f4f
describe
'45480' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABET' 'sip-files00241.pro'
98335769e777ae45077ef59d70a75e0a
41549da928708926c6bc1d78c546ac9d87902efe
'2012-06-29T07:29:21-04:00'
describe
'44637' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEU' 'sip-files00243.pro'
1c27a8835a18e1b9457278e2072c4655
c541d648a4d045a4ca760eba5149ac965811db78
describe
'35306' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEV' 'sip-files00244.pro'
93ecac5557385a42ce45f9c7f09fa531
bc940c1e0e0711efa51a34aa3423835f9a157cee
describe
'37117' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEW' 'sip-files00245.pro'
7f93c1fa6c0be43d9e22cd102acf96a2
6745758c72aa3407df9ca8d2af9695320e5c1a71
'2012-06-29T07:36:12-04:00'
describe
'44585' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEX' 'sip-files00246.pro'
4eac1b8866ea76f6540860b163c27935
e02cb90f52f96a59c62d4793ec3b7ec5831a1c29
describe
'45042' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEY' 'sip-files00247.pro'
82f0d2157ddf5162dbc5c1458345661d
3c9cc4ff1bd71616d4ca1f8c31de11fecbc7f678
describe
'44296' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABEZ' 'sip-files00248.pro'
95a320e242af744a65fd59f1f341ce18
381b3fd30d7e933fa44aeab7eb05952fa96e3506
describe
'8972' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFA' 'sip-files00249.pro'
33e6402ff97c03d43ef0c6faf4e3b46b
9db57961c5a6d8d6ba21a6992e4f924d1ac8284f
describe
'891' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFB' 'sip-files00287.pro'
16573295ef736a9a9e2c5eb0bb512bb0
fe12e7cfcbe55954656148e66281bc80f4802ceb
describe
'37' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFC' 'sip-files00001.txt'
bc5a6646a435679814796ca3238258a4
977fd29cbbd1c6cf764f3f9316e7e1ec7ef41c22
describe
'480' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFD' 'sip-files00002.txt'
fd6b485949e4391bf9478890b1babec4
ca067ee24a20e80ac9ac8d4e31975e6bb0f74d3d
'2012-06-29T07:40:24-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'74' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFE' 'sip-files00004.txt'
2114f4235873afc4c8ec4ac51a2b9836
54d62ab92ea909dceb586744aaccdd4724403c1d
'2012-06-29T07:44:05-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'51' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFF' 'sip-files00005.txt'
626bf24af3a98e18999de792725f6c6b
8d90e0a80c3a59c762bd6ef30c91ac8456d011d7
describe
'192' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFG' 'sip-files00009.txt'
512cbeb9ae63c0e052d7a457a0297059
073da1a96c137493bb6e86d8cec5c6dcf27b9497
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFH' 'sip-files00011.txt'
40770082483b04135c2ab94e7da89899
c9e424af73063a30e95c6d95892c9834e767ec1c
'2012-06-29T07:28:35-04:00'
describe
'1791' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFI' 'sip-files00012.txt'
d0ff6dc018bda4d84f8561f676e809b8
366cc959ae4cacdbb8ee97205a49ed5039cb9a29
describe
'2176' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFJ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
97c4c049f438cb3e510d9d3d603e9e6b
f4883cd20f9cfe7a7b15f44b23b45c15dce56c2b
describe
'1969' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFK' 'sip-files00014.txt'
9d90cd788d26702d06377e6f37b6afb6
47478c69d9cf5a4b7785ff6aa6bd8b2107cb7d8e
'2012-06-29T07:38:23-04:00'
describe
'1803' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFL' 'sip-files00015.txt'
96e18705723ca20d34f74565118d4b35
72d8f0d3498e66e565365b6bc6c421158ea866b9
'2012-06-29T07:39:41-04:00'
describe
'1963' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFM' 'sip-files00016.txt'
38b50eaa58cb38bc27038857c76b342d
206216262334f944d496ae4a1023083ce1d36906
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFN' 'sip-files00017.txt'
ff691f6b7dbade7a2d6e62474c2d386e
ce8d82a2d81e62454679dc4fc1dd6a0ebfd808f8
'2012-06-29T07:38:27-04:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFO' 'sip-files00018.txt'
a59ee38d396c4d0418c3ba5aecb95a26
070e6cc46ceed28db4b9c73b2ae35f2c722a57e1
'2012-06-29T07:34:30-04:00'
describe
'1814' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFP' 'sip-files00019.txt'
fa7891b0068ace77a976ef168b0cb694
858a7256ac9d8cc91fe9716baf5303304a452a3c
describe
'1842' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFQ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
5ca16aa32846b2059b10cf06060f9c87
59a2f0f4f4a8f0d1b4f278750276ce5b5ab91fe9
'2012-06-29T07:39:53-04:00'
describe
'1780' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFR' 'sip-files00021.txt'
08e891fd6d3591b9c09dc82985de3296
333c7bfb2c7755b9cc81e6b6496d87bbe9e40f20
'2012-06-29T07:39:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFS' 'sip-files00022.txt'
7a6141c69d4685c00f59ab7de2d49b5b
146514470c9af30f150a82d3e5f1ccbbb51702e6
describe
'1751' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFT' 'sip-files00023.txt'
02adb2595340f9b65130fb2f3111ea1a
d2aa805e5c5a061f4db27f6a52884eb4bc9df0b4
'2012-06-29T07:38:30-04:00'
describe
'1557' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFU' 'sip-files00024.txt'
edade80a1a845519b6b692786fe1af61
01e648e8a16675e469ec8f2209ff4e03a5c3bf34
'2012-06-29T07:35:32-04:00'
describe
'1518' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFV' 'sip-files00026.txt'
0c37ab106e740cddaf7a09cba9a50ed4
88135c38c2816b7c8f9ffa6180912ce9a755d121
describe
'1675' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFW' 'sip-files00027.txt'
dda3c1ca346c0f9f58db18e2a107d0da
d678288666a2a572801b4c760cdc20668cf4e8e9
describe
'1638' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFX' 'sip-files00028.txt'
bbe95a14b34c4b8d6c17d6726fb8f8f2
d42a978982b1abe9e957be05f36a27b351a54533
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFY' 'sip-files00029.txt'
84f8d093ae5f65e999dcf97e7a18ecb1
bfd8491dbd140bcda1e9adde3a853f0317c972fb
describe
'1722' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABFZ' 'sip-files00030.txt'
a53215d57b06cd8ddf25e2af6b2e98cf
dbbb38610a7820c739dce3df705e8d716959a1db
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGA' 'sip-files00031.txt'
1d22a31b519cde0eac2414c0bb193279
bf6ea592d06edcc17e6c24af7fdbd4602f1958e8
describe
'1405' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGB' 'sip-files00032.txt'
328ec45b1588f4280c509dd5003483a8
efaeb40c864ef3f4f31108669fc02c110014b7fa
'2012-06-29T07:32:03-04:00'
describe
'1714' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGC' 'sip-files00033.txt'
bc657a1565a7a2eb9e108496d2a2a0dd
e20eb630ca97d941e98d715f2978ff6ed77bfa9e
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGD' 'sip-files00034.txt'
d7dafa323b1d655cfcbeaef35ccac95a
deebaf2a8d1e275f980a1e3e6543778c151e60c0
'2012-06-29T07:38:01-04:00'
describe
'1747' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGE' 'sip-files00035.txt'
06accebf91f3dc079c0f9306eaeded0a
af0e0d8c16c9fa6659c08f75e8fa4088136ce85f
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGF' 'sip-files00036.txt'
56a9fd3347a4127d2be8270e2105b922
a15726f1ef36bcc69f03f4d7e4ab26ff0bbb0393
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGG' 'sip-files00037.txt'
aeda84cddc0b4cf9c5249402cd1f6b4a
a0b083412a9bfcbe0886e25462544c82b5cdf458
describe
'1771' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGH' 'sip-files00038.txt'
037b717bb31627b666456264bef43b4f
bb84823f867f37c55131959b0cd61e6043370949
describe
'1662' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGI' 'sip-files00039.txt'
8c3e0405d9908741b2f653861571b7ad
c98d82d56514c55088531fa3bd8e8d1e4ff3df43
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGJ' 'sip-files00040.txt'
e7cf2d62ad0f5c9f2c5026c8bd3a7e1a
1a3f5bb08a3ea884b00d47f24692d038fedfd487
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGK' 'sip-files00041.txt'
4a7ea7f74b4225386007555cfe3e5acc
4e7a767b351b544cb126cd1f170a72fd25d2e41c
describe
'660' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGL' 'sip-files00042.txt'
b4551eddb118f32bec697f4f03ecaacf
9e7cfb7644623fa0a399c4442c0f5b0408945a3e
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGM' 'sip-files00043.txt'
61a5765eee82c375253b151ad7dee668
787a52d1d28236495f484213223fae393a7426ea
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGN' 'sip-files00044.txt'
12f0f7ec5e09b6111d232ff4e0cb5424
1cf960ce926cf941aac6fe91fc98734090adbf7a
'2012-06-29T07:42:49-04:00'
describe
'1681' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGO' 'sip-files00045.txt'
b13b9e27091f2817f9447ec03af9a6db
1338ff2ef4222eeed220d56b50f9fcd65a6fc905
'2012-06-29T07:38:48-04:00'
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGP' 'sip-files00046.txt'
d0db9b003775db28a36d6fe6b9917e81
898cdd3f067a2e94d8e21bb207014bd182e0d465
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGQ' 'sip-files00047.txt'
5fe2a6d9b326d8bf48a47ec89ff8aa7d
b149dd2c0890bb61fddbacf87e7a704b5be9db3b
describe
'1736' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGR' 'sip-files00048.txt'
7e635e120a551fba83bbde46b4b405be
ce52a04a01007ce43e2e9f7da273abbfa50f8d00
describe
'1697' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGS' 'sip-files00049.txt'
c71ef0e39f38c79bbb138cfe9e20d333
03f35ea637229e38e3d2df7b91bbc8436da55a70
describe
'1611' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGT' 'sip-files00050.txt'
8f913cbf880cb3bf12b00e1f776a35da
37f817e0aeb5fc38451f7a521740b4a35181e975
'2012-06-29T07:32:20-04:00'
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGU' 'sip-files00051.txt'
d8354ba8b7c5188e677fd5b7aad3f23f
ff79bc76844717bef88ec920fd5b5f5354c2c0f3
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGV' 'sip-files00052.txt'
744ad9271c4db0e07a8e26b6cc968c57
2c909e6b3dbaf0d2d296af072a419e31b3eb4c6d
describe
'1622' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGW' 'sip-files00053.txt'
d92a8f121eb28d37ea7f92f085299c24
66a2d541ee20ade7e344f57bf05d5d235b728f93
describe
'1540' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGX' 'sip-files00054.txt'
55f12f2d0f56ac5442d56bebaffd5198
e50a51d4fedb5a360a8eec06cd861b118ed74bce
describe
'1493' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGY' 'sip-files00055.txt'
82de7514528ea014cab4919a558f31b5
3ce8625632c87f577ca84891908e5aee20b96e2e
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABGZ' 'sip-files00056.txt'
0a0f7758d5fa0d8665cee4190456a788
617a13a74fba822a99d5e9773fbc48ebdc7ab138
'2012-06-29T07:36:26-04:00'
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHA' 'sip-files00057.txt'
dd931593d66108145901d8369f38f1ea
269e39a2ff616cd33c4e2f13d7b6fbc3f32725f3
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHB' 'sip-files00058.txt'
d6c16cc9d6a074b0cf8e325990e00c84
4b9b758d5fef449d5bf9ee81a9d229d8971663ef
'2012-06-29T07:43:12-04:00'
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHC' 'sip-files00059.txt'
1bc5c95bcc9ba245cc4b83635ba8a28a
757d698184df2391de359ca7f33368c79c34264d
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHD' 'sip-files00060.txt'
f2f615120d54b92f5f2751eadfeabe97
193add37b1216b5d714cc98af8d3b9aad5f757cc
describe
'1822' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHE' 'sip-files00061.txt'
168b8df1b3736aaadcf7e9ef96e212a6
b175ff651ec48f85ed566cf200ad4a53e3632e41
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHF' 'sip-files00062.txt'
0b4d6ead1c3db04c94f7e4aa8ce0d9fd
03b814230b44b94a5e54779da46a423a735b36dc
describe
'1569' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHG' 'sip-files00063.txt'
03df9275cbacd9add443dfe2170e9e0b
53b23712eabee39562e1506b50cdb007a0d61916
'2012-06-29T07:39:42-04:00'
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHH' 'sip-files00064.txt'
4783e8a8ee7e66b325e20d13729faa1c
ac3aad48a2c188dc345b6bcfa78471c1aab8e900
'2012-06-29T07:33:13-04:00'
describe
'1649' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHI' 'sip-files00065.txt'
4bbe8ecbfb1eb9b68815068501d779e5
f7d3da88b1290ce8b9fa6f91cf1af6fed9e37dee
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHJ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
3c095c9808f452b7f31fe93dd25100e6
d0b4c36dd1a33b6b52a03674ea94ce401a4458fc
'2012-06-29T07:36:45-04:00'
describe
'600' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHK' 'sip-files00067.txt'
5f7216d6ca5032f28e50bc87de0cb935
d8432c9ec8e95db8aa65f7e51e95ec1c73a3f9b7
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHL' 'sip-files00068.txt'
116e635f5708c438b969229a95d52fe9
236c89a9f34374fdc0659d8d8513bd1e79d61cb7
'2012-06-29T07:34:19-04:00'
describe
'1828' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHM' 'sip-files00069.txt'
6d93a726104970bc8d9f45cd249e2dfd
40cdefba1bb500d12771813685af0f2083ff35d5
describe
'1767' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHN' 'sip-files00070.txt'
db4933a8ffdd019a390e72bb1bcb6a8b
d346084460d5140de2337b708d4d4ca0b0995dc1
describe
'1633' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHO' 'sip-files00071.txt'
f6ad3c15967550904aa276e7e97d3d8a
b7b1bc485b95514010b049cc291b4fd0951da7dc
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHP' 'sip-files00072.txt'
b88b3d275d3727473683f5de5b8e29fd
586eaed072995b890eb8bfa9b61e69a83bf0ae82
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHQ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
66ab42391ef8132288b40f06fecf66eb
316136bdb337f59dcfc27183022209fa39ae473f
'2012-06-29T07:33:22-04:00'
describe
'1792' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHR' 'sip-files00074.txt'
8e53eca003e44c5cd5889bea08bf7ed6
6104e98eae3ad67ff6aa844b2817213918c36ad6
describe
'1833' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHS' 'sip-files00075.txt'
b4fe0e603be336af2dd301f44999d62f
3ec906eb990edfc40fe5a8513f5f2d6ed41466ec
'2012-06-29T07:42:31-04:00'
describe
'1657' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHT' 'sip-files00076.txt'
65b3ce9a451230abe2eeb4c15d850847
01115b3f119adc97d442bdbd63c311fe31edf897
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHU' 'sip-files00078.txt'
a1fb3a450ea0c187e57aa616622cadbb
ae90477da3c6a539119284ed70f7c404aa6692ba
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHV' 'sip-files00079.txt'
2a118296f8689f5e12c86bd6ce5d9de5
f1299f6d2c0affbbadcf68b967db4b660b301f15
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHW' 'sip-files00080.txt'
368f301567b70131c685ccc7169b9ddc
8605ccfd9f435a3144cff3cec2bf6aa3f93f23f6
describe
'1674' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHX' 'sip-files00081.txt'
1ec3e4dfd06caa79fd3d8991e4526880
5c6692a30c4536754788e5074468b3c92c394ab5
describe
'1698' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHY' 'sip-files00082.txt'
f5686d72448efe049fbf69b6a16547f7
b80c5faaeedc0a9fd95fdfc1ad0c8c6357e012a8
describe
'1639' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABHZ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
3298287b6f474d83261b1f14d532bc9a
46f439712666737966da8824f08acbbfa58133aa
describe
'1726' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIA' 'sip-files00084.txt'
6ad3cfa2a614586ff65fc6483d5376a5
7819f8d219b08cd7139bfde87618510e50f0b83f
'2012-06-29T07:39:29-04:00'
describe
'1503' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIB' 'sip-files00085.txt'
aaea651ce5dfde1e00810a74c48e5d4b
d8ab0e727665252e1fcd76d4d2d87b1db5e99e0d
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIC' 'sip-files00086.txt'
e6f04ff32bffae072d6bbc26f6ca332c
263caf8d649c255bc2db05cd71395abd72f078d7
'2012-06-29T07:37:06-04:00'
describe
'1769' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABID' 'sip-files00087.txt'
f08e92ad99723379f6b8e2430b63e1e5
dae2b2b4f319e5e11c61a7a2bbc3d2664c0e043d
describe
'1896' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIE' 'sip-files00088.txt'
2ca540d49029370495a9cd64e0e39000
885decf626061f7652af63f75ed46b5cdd1b8fe2
describe
'1823' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIF' 'sip-files00090.txt'
0a736b21b18294d4b247d8760fb388fa
95c4d02e7630bef5cd8c6db436612b0c87386e98
'2012-06-29T07:30:56-04:00'
describe
'551' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIG' 'sip-files00091.txt'
c46fc4b928ed3c7a2f5a974ab8f1d7e7
89bcc17c4b8385e79566ac0a3fa51746a0a1100c
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIH' 'sip-files00092.txt'
829427b32705ff01c773c14fd4c3b347
dfe1cfdeb76d255e6bf97a64468f420756487954
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABII' 'sip-files00093.txt'
726d26e10c0a5f88b21cdeb0bbda9036
ae9f4b3aac24f5b37a986d9dfc71ac66ed029b41
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIJ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
86073f5add273670fb75cff44cb13b96
161e1cea045f710de64c98e45224dd11f8653d1a
'2012-06-29T07:36:41-04:00'
describe
'1816' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIK' 'sip-files00095.txt'
716dfa1544c68ed728ef3c15dfede7d5
cca9cdbf955861c00700f7ca10b42691d8bf753a
describe
'1867' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIL' 'sip-files00096.txt'
02974687656726cb601ea3fc278f150a
c89fddc15557757636c1678a02ff3e2f04c63402
'2012-06-29T07:34:02-04:00'
describe
'1821' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIM' 'sip-files00098.txt'
765d83a1a1037c9abba25ddd79e5e757
97f408295cca24750cbac3b058cdfe9326b0fd17
'2012-06-29T07:31:53-04:00'
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIN' 'sip-files00099.txt'
d2a8905b9131a7b2a55de2da5951fd83
31654e87ce923cbd7c0d9a35c18f24320b3c46ea
describe
'1741' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIO' 'sip-files00100.txt'
1a6380f7bb9b632cab8386a1446ef7da
b5f0ab86c19d640c12ef3f4d12fc81eac8ea5e9a
describe
'1844' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIP' 'sip-files00101.txt'
522b4724176a1ab7c7977b25d5f061b7
8e273feafc693e08d034739fdcaedda0382c5ffd
describe
'1884' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIQ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
9970f40c18d416e91bb25596afddb8c8
028b0346d8b15d4fbf6526c5b670689d1624b70b
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIR' 'sip-files00103.txt'
e6118dbfacbf5e8670b10b9aaab3097b
904fbcf52da650d500efbe2415ac2af6ccf885bd
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIS' 'sip-files00104.txt'
e5deeace14647027a33d1c55bd345500
fffe577abd8e5071a60c40cfe618656b1f63fabe
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIT' 'sip-files00105.txt'
5596e74f529caed5f107a7d5b48e3217
02c2ca8c58a157c70203590c407145ef68363a1f
'2012-06-29T07:43:45-04:00'
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIU' 'sip-files00106.txt'
ae691e1a797718807c10ec20f83d72c2
d0746d9d48c76881f612ea958780d43d77e60153
describe
'1788' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIV' 'sip-files00107.txt'
e796e4b4526d688248fa3c5baae60cb4
f8baaca1f8026b5d9e8597430d07530d6ce43d2c
describe
'1745' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIW' 'sip-files00108.txt'
8fb439de2fde960db3b75e88e9aa30fa
dc4b029a32d8d39a09dcf899980589028f8083ac
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIX' 'sip-files00109.txt'
cab70d7174084feda96b6bada8c6379c
7e25f6340ae641516e458c2119af4b00b170154e
'2012-06-29T07:39:15-04:00'
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIY' 'sip-files00110.txt'
b6f0c085c4245cb6bab282889f1e516f
b6aa8b15e8516cceba19508d7da40237890f690c
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABIZ' 'sip-files00111.txt'
0c36bdf847e951112db379a536c79d38
0fd47ee0423d3979311f299a4da8eb38c727ebfa
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJA' 'sip-files00112.txt'
823f92d7274e64c6a834a2a4f7c21dda
2a75c99173a318a0a7a81914b58924bf22ca43f3
'2012-06-29T07:30:51-04:00'
describe
'1825' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJB' 'sip-files00113.txt'
770b395574e9a8e38b11dd7c8e22f73e
d7010855d3944476854fa80a202b675ee475e5c7
describe
'1786' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJC' 'sip-files00114.txt'
62d05db32c712150ec0b8f42077f5245
e10f4f19eaef10fbacf301251379ef4d6dff110f
describe
'1850' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJD' 'sip-files00115.txt'
ed86e20dd3de3019463694757b10a78a
9d367ee1040a7316018997b1bd588c9bce481b53
describe
'1912' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJE' 'sip-files00116.txt'
fa0031265263eda0723c60a21bf37d22
2ff0e4e6a527a6128d8b09852d96587d9d36e4b1
describe
'1838' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJF' 'sip-files00117.txt'
d851ab81c877bc2d77b8237eb5f3b23b
63aa582b2669aa01d787b8771f294b7f71bc68eb
'2012-06-29T07:40:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJG' 'sip-files00118.txt'
281a564868d040b3f88f3a95b7c1ec10
f74d17dbaef375523f47ee3cedce10356df48883
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJH' 'sip-files00119.txt'
c5c7074a08059848527a0b4de469ee63
3758364cae80e408febd9c3a21cf517b8fa5b354
describe
'1554' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJI' 'sip-files00120.txt'
e0f206ba9af506e6c4dfe5a1ace88f8b
689e78cada832e9a38ce1488615bef0268a98569
'2012-06-29T07:42:11-04:00'
describe
'1879' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJJ' 'sip-files00121.txt'
496929928c432c94875dfef87df75ef1
8d1993ae2193a32aa2529b32210ca59692ec85c0
'2012-06-29T07:35:57-04:00'
describe
'1855' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJK' 'sip-files00122.txt'
408f78df9e75fc05f8d1721f13b24813
cb324ada0501de9b30649bf0078b90f1b299b91e
describe
'1919' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJL' 'sip-files00123.txt'
f7887d7ee0c2acaf82e607f927603a1c
1f4fbb8a6c455778f3ea37061ea927093c10a238
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJM' 'sip-files00124.txt'
c779795047f95af24e74bf3499661336
f7cfe6c76570939af3044b2afcb873974fe2e7f7
describe
Invalid character
'993' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJN' 'sip-files00125.txt'
5a31f116f0f13f9632d34a01738eef31
cbe61673e4043654f32566e817ff045985b75e34
describe
'1542' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJO' 'sip-files00126.txt'
0b9e50e3745934c96b49be623d9dfc7e
82f4174e2abee33ff84dd0e12ce208578da4ba83
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJP' 'sip-files00127.txt'
f4de53bfcc33631b4b4b0e38fe3f28af
76d1c26c8fa3ed8921e4af42dea34c4c28aa7b48
describe
'1856' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJQ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
cd481fcb03038b911f74adb201e14ec8
2790089cceb3dfc32fdd52d2121f0c101a710edc
describe
'1854' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJR' 'sip-files00129.txt'
d952563a9b90e760f726e2a1b861ff1e
9e72218d7947e334b480da828be8f07eb93e0175
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJS' 'sip-files00130.txt'
4467e34cf55bc1ee271051fbbfc42b04
261f5b7f4607a63a398a5f7b5268396bf109380d
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJT' 'sip-files00131.txt'
35e14f4f769148ba356451b307f70bd4
cc23e17a8a51b378afc94622e835e21f4e5ace32
describe
'1696' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJU' 'sip-files00132.txt'
32d04ba95f1e6fc94b2e14c71df2ad8a
c0eb22f63343d8224e952076dfc1e5d2cbc21a39
'2012-06-29T07:36:17-04:00'
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJV' 'sip-files00133.txt'
ffa848c438de541041f8e06a840ff66b
f1401c11ae94ce527ed192e514cdc12cb0938d57
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJW' 'sip-files00134.txt'
1fb6fdd64a577679eb62dc800e57ab00
6a3f72c4484c05b36818d7d367777c4317f497ec
describe
'761' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJX' 'sip-files00135.txt'
225a4717f491b1e0333a0851e6785761
1e3c64e4c01b92741abd17081000e181762ffc37
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJY' 'sip-files00136.txt'
09b351ac3bf773a9c1da588bd20395ca
21f076790a0ac4dd7a70fe4357a7227fdd37c27c
'2012-06-29T07:42:06-04:00'
describe
'1710' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABJZ' 'sip-files00137.txt'
98bfbfa7a2be49ee7ba5c2fecaa8414e
29382d773aa2ac965b890d2ebb695010d437f976
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKA' 'sip-files00138.txt'
75dc0b3c090cad7d8e380c68c0b53ec3
b7a54d3c0bbc746d469522b2c2e9e27d22ca76da
describe
'1729' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKB' 'sip-files00139.txt'
92d7e1876305561cf52763efb0e96c73
096d5a1eeec9f3a9782e8b5844537a324aa3bdea
describe
'1762' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKC' 'sip-files00140.txt'
a2b343a159ab509ca5fc1cc87379bce4
275c4c31e5b317db67845065949af565a5077b40
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKD' 'sip-files00141.txt'
67cc25c4de3c3541885e7a7f5f03e649
401be33fb859f2939fdd8fe28dbe2752fc77484c
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKE' 'sip-files00142.txt'
b8837f1cfd4332df623c1c707dd747a4
a1f380f0902b7574770ec945ae59abc396f7bdb3
'2012-06-29T07:28:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKF' 'sip-files00143.txt'
39057ae4b9cccd02ce050d1edcbe1528
8ad1a44cae174f0c5d7674e6e4b367d2a82ee1b3
describe
'853' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKG' 'sip-files00144.txt'
840648a46fe87623f91c5fb95f8d24ea
887a982e4ea1f1952eec7c0c15fab11354b3698d
'2012-06-29T07:43:56-04:00'
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKH' 'sip-files00145.txt'
57b53cc901ef42d464129afe5c4d7e4c
2c8270566af6fda1e44749969dc5908666560306
'2012-06-29T07:33:04-04:00'
describe
'1774' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKI' 'sip-files00146.txt'
3b5e175becad6c8ea10c60c2ffd4176e
fd7e2286cc8eef8175c42556c3e221c79cab9ff9
describe
'1744' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKJ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
55d092e1347a526b49d4938af0b3d590
296ce5fe628a266288aeb817e11345140777a3de
describe
'1690' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKK' 'sip-files00149.txt'
b73ba62b4b70dbdba92324d5e78f5176
892ec883ad28f64c25f7458b5cb05b6118d7f842
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKL' 'sip-files00150.txt'
4042419aaba1adc94ae7c5c454733789
a0a90a27f80c5d0f104570343cbe00c27f5a08ea
describe
'1730' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKM' 'sip-files00151.txt'
9474f48b68dd9a82787ec43969aea2d1
42b00d4017f44c2cff9d909b4a928980ea0379ac
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKN' 'sip-files00152.txt'
51f1cd546b32715e46a7ff9798fb97aa
937ab7e302459a9b96c6e4ebd693c5f63086899b
'2012-06-29T07:32:02-04:00'
describe
'1508' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKO' 'sip-files00153.txt'
1069e3c22ac232118e6f03fdc034dbce
5540e370d177e5d95a35890b889e647559ab0046
describe
'1911' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKP' 'sip-files00155.txt'
3a06cf276a5c61572f9520e59a4fa2e8
c803aad1691690f2be7af2f12c381b29ba5552d7
describe
'1860' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKQ' 'sip-files00156.txt'
cc0c2d4f52cc9ebf92bf2fef1a7d6e0f
8ff918f69be10785577864e0ed3df68b4c71e226
describe
'1832' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKR' 'sip-files00157.txt'
c3b54fe1a74251f0a7fb9134232cff99
71130e9d1e6745a90b63e8a941f8cc999ad84094
'2012-06-29T07:44:04-04:00'
describe
'1752' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKS' 'sip-files00158.txt'
e0aa118641b4023d1d0b64b7075481ec
41081ab97f4c42e43bf71d108e3ca8acdd68a582
describe
'376' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKT' 'sip-files00159.txt'
0c0411accafab97e9d54c06f11397d5d
1d86d353409714ef4cb5cf225136f5895516573b
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKU' 'sip-files00160.txt'
82b246982e2f52a6e5dbabdf2831bdc9
cb7ecdef699952cd6ba9be87fdfc8c43d875b727
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKV' 'sip-files00161.txt'
e38cb90325402b340f8e15211e4dde82
00ca0d0291956f9a11770231e1ee4c20a5d07761
describe
'1831' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKW' 'sip-files00173.txt'
e23acbb4810db29d884d26d619bc3f98
1a6e71722eca642e67683842f36265a3be9ba287
describe
'1874' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKX' 'sip-files00174.txt'
95da971b8082277b71508d9da0a5ee01
1d57e66fa8b0bce1e192e9db0cb59fd148efdf0c
describe
'1688' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKY' 'sip-files00176.txt'
f8cf2f0df3dc4795440d64e3575cab74
589b537f546201d43031bda9e217585c628125c9
describe
'1755' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABKZ' 'sip-files00177.txt'
81a54a8bf71f28d3cced7ba464612227
9822ad4e8ca7b1ecaf421e032995f19b36efc7eb
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLA' 'sip-files00178.txt'
db4d864fcac3b5d4a7527e3e66542aa2
628cc931992e5e2fbb32e3ac602f8dcb2896bd5b
'2012-06-29T07:39:03-04:00'
describe
'344' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLB' 'sip-files00179.txt'
ec3cbed162110af1fdb845c753d7700d
bd573477ea434e83851b0f15247a0ada5defabcc
'2012-06-29T07:42:40-04:00'
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLC' 'sip-files00180.txt'
68caf053ba3943f2cf3b821ef7a3f9df
9e93ee6ec631c31a1cfe4047291b2c7ea0be860b
'2012-06-29T07:44:48-04:00'
describe
'1897' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLD' 'sip-files00181.txt'
52e4738ee70fe17e2d2f18ad05af53e6
84ff5902bfe43b5dbe6119a85e8013e8dbd5b029
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLE' 'sip-files00182.txt'
e0d13a7dd92efba045a4e87d320e0757
e87a73aefdacac929d083094942b435e93c362aa
'2012-06-29T07:29:50-04:00'
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLF' 'sip-files00183.txt'
1344aa3320cfd14678f3a47b3d222159
5dd2c389f0ad1e0571206f984722e9036bb2c6c2
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLG' 'sip-files00184.txt'
f909db6c5aef4da7ce1e91ea970d6671
8584e8386fcf1b6011fcfa3e525d3cd65d513aac
'2012-06-29T07:44:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLH' 'sip-files00185.txt'
1dbfeff9519c96193f12a9a263a2e5a1
eface1e6c9d56ba01c869be18e355d9f07e7ca4c
describe
'1646' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLI' 'sip-files00186.txt'
b76ea1d5bb25ed678367c664ef6e6323
1d314dadf17b4619090896401f9a2bd823ad9373
describe
'783' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLJ' 'sip-files00187.txt'
7beb05a2580a7399c145282af3849ec9
218574781a9c5117b29c00aa043888815be81574
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLK' 'sip-files00188.txt'
fc1eac96890a59840cf0bee1dfd296a9
dc421881c30e3ca39059ebb08c18bfa5900cc9a6
describe
'1753' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLL' 'sip-files00189.txt'
41101b871ed82e1e55d472340edf73ce
8f3f9ce37e7a1e7fc7d98732cc1a9ca1b6bd3a14
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLM' 'sip-files00190.txt'
1548285978010360247f152d289f00f4
d2a7bfcdb61d3dfefdb3e9b0e34a5b1fdd6afa52
'2012-06-29T07:29:44-04:00'
describe
'1720' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLN' 'sip-files00191.txt'
82fc8df9c96f1e704b74c1bc77313496
b1fa1e9017f21797e2303f2692d988b3ab9cbfe8
'2012-06-29T07:40:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLO' 'sip-files00193.txt'
cbb294cbd3928fbeb42434c409091278
1d14e5fedb6e1379ff00654a773870baa401bef8
describe
'1826' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLP' 'sip-files00194.txt'
2ac8e95b5b5b91faf39caccd15928f01
1cb4908ab85ca5642b11a80d7e9b8f66395d8ed6
'2012-06-29T07:39:50-04:00'
describe
'1723' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLQ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
31b0713d3dd332ed2b6a6c021b018fd4
fb0f507965f89536607a6c6a6cc21ae2562de978
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLR' 'sip-files00196.txt'
3edf269286cbf52f9dba7c0f52d3d9b4
2d4cf60f9644b2ad5b7370cf47517c0bcee4bbf8
describe
'1778' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLS' 'sip-files00197.txt'
94e05fb4fde81081d2390d93cc701474
a481780c6b10563eeb86ecec7c7068955fe87c75
describe
'1876' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLT' 'sip-files00198.txt'
331dc3ab53876b86b742660d11d8bc87
2c63adbd27f3a718ade51e7f8ebe6b91e0bc6b23
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLU' 'sip-files00199.txt'
5bf3a1158b6204b6c1dccd945cbc9674
ecafc69204d10a4697b8b201af8dc4ecd8299511
describe
'1853' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLV' 'sip-files00200.txt'
37f75a2cf6db1e01e6f6ced45c01b23e
c059caeaa39c42ea78a04d93352ba75d63228119
describe
'1673' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLW' 'sip-files00201.txt'
3e2de7f254bfb8ee382f5451c09f00f9
ca9e5bc786144c8cc9f22097a372e2c0dfd3f75a
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLX' 'sip-files00202.txt'
f921b929c0c1c43f13a2d21aa56a1108
ca2e4588d8da1ca149a38e55aa7e7b331eebe4aa
describe
'1906' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLY' 'sip-files00203.txt'
9c926cff1114100c8c844f6ac4019198
fd0cc4ee247a49e84dbe4fa621132a42e88bc6e4
describe
'1888' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABLZ' 'sip-files00204.txt'
dea79ca70a100a6c49407ac9ded68e65
0ee047d3b0d6d5e3fa961ee8e1a9d939069292db
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMA' 'sip-files00205.txt'
abfcf82dbe5ed8c2f453d65970db91e9
ae4f75fff74bcc45f29c23120e8a33bacc6017d9
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMB' 'sip-files00206.txt'
685203e26b6103f89155675ee8db2e20
4ca3b32df9d36174c24a223d9792ff23bd36c455
describe
'1839' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMC' 'sip-files00207.txt'
3e59eb96dc71b7c7e76fe795bdc740df
13c936665ce1b3d8aa056c80d4e62d8aee2bee02
'2012-06-29T07:43:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMD' 'sip-files00208.txt'
d5226b618ff9308f9f37b5352f994c6a
d977e966b56f4a64979e7bca557933517bc613d5
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABME' 'sip-files00211.txt'
b416f2b8b08ecb38830422bd5c89712c
883307f52bdee98ec93c9a8145e4493717135b1b
describe
'1887' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMF' 'sip-files00212.txt'
33e37019068e3432769fa66edf4de5f1
d1c80cfe85f20d096a03796684814391e9f07ceb
'2012-06-29T07:39:35-04:00'
describe
'1870' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMG' 'sip-files00213.txt'
bba19a33620ca25526cac9151ffed7f8
0cf33469c5750fe4afcdae250a3b42d2a88bcc93
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMH' 'sip-files00214.txt'
d2d66919d220f8d3abaf0c294c0a064c
cd59628290bb37309e3245c131d1266e8621f8f0
describe
'1827' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMI' 'sip-files00216.txt'
a4813e12602b4acac83c43e412a235e5
a5f97d1a96aabe1a92443056b2a18e11b674adf6
'2012-06-29T07:36:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMJ' 'sip-files00217.txt'
0ac3316082e13383762ec4a09106d29b
df2724c7178c6f3afd34c7b2326110b4c728c71d
'2012-06-29T07:32:14-04:00'
describe
'1866' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMK' 'sip-files00218.txt'
5042f8260612e83ffedff7ebe4b719bc
15ad78a60d40424e95f22a9f5cd0a89ff1358497
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABML' 'sip-files00219.txt'
4d89ed2b446829ba4cf9f11bf9e5f0b6
f458614050c63fe9739279de2e899f1b8cf5bcdd
'2012-06-29T07:41:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMM' 'sip-files00220.txt'
62fd796fed3bd164539b77013f5d0215
3db89bda10db5f5da075e7af97b81ad50ee4d44f
describe
'1680' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMN' 'sip-files00221.txt'
8970586c1c3bd389c23feda83cf7db6a
c9170510ab01466df08e6badafe4d5cea8f27f98
describe
'1797' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMO' 'sip-files00222.txt'
fcc9714be93c5f8fbcfcbb9e67f5aac3
778598fa6afa53cb18e07659121aa98cfd12c1eb
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMP' 'sip-files00223.txt'
a67a39c28604dd9371b25726af769ef7
f9f728360ef63b714fece08801f44af1450dcf5e
describe
'1808' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMQ' 'sip-files00224.txt'
47fe80d68731f7f75d64ee5b6b13f078
5ea075fb360ace8feb096ef41d815c5a9481c131
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMR' 'sip-files00225.txt'
d0356645b49f7723408b2aaacd9227fe
c7993f68b24deb422799bb17b0b9c0f0cbd68046
'2012-06-29T07:39:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMS' 'sip-files00226.txt'
fff6677f2e13f8220e3a4cfb5d5adc47
6f95e2c50ef10a551c3c9d681db9b24387d97611
describe
'1779' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMT' 'sip-files00227.txt'
e4f346246e8ce4e3bf3598f2189189b5
7c18afed716b86e635825abc83c342618a617ad8
describe
'1818' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMU' 'sip-files00228.txt'
b55494c083642a4670af19b048fa3b51
9947d41647aadb0cb62abd5b3107145b9e745fd6
describe
'1507' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMV' 'sip-files00230.txt'
272aab9e1fd05c9d01ae0a185ff707a3
cb412ec9d63334e58bedca01560b56ac5f7f1fc6
describe
'1793' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMW' 'sip-files00231.txt'
eb6634a9cab4cdfad14050cbfd348bbf
d58c82fcd2b049d4bd600fe2cece6c9289e9ed10
describe
'1668' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMX' 'sip-files00232.txt'
031db93b931fc1b9aa4b5be3e2508a5c
8fb86dcc3831b5d1dbffc4b8a92c253ac2cb0d19
'2012-06-29T07:34:47-04:00'
describe
'316' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMY' 'sip-files00234.txt'
b959692e5964f2baf790ab327ad09a71
d45d83c71b1d3746f6fe5f5d1e7c27c793e7387b
describe
'1807' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABMZ' 'sip-files00236.txt'
5bd0a03d28486b8ed106c60c76b5d392
ba5d9f1f45dcf914c8f71d46081e1d163f2d9f30
describe
'1871' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNA' 'sip-files00238.txt'
2ea1e152a233af6b526a76e5541c8838
f8f74c0144dfb8cfdee1135683d9478070d7efe9
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNB' 'sip-files00239.txt'
d69820fdb92cc8e9601b37b965d93974
9a7ca3f9233cbbd32d333f588c8e0ebf04749390
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNC' 'sip-files00240.txt'
3c2c98f209bb1d154e34e7b749ae49af
d1f11d43941acfc17b48ca880b76bc031ada1a3d
'2012-06-29T07:44:32-04:00'
describe
'1864' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABND' 'sip-files00241.txt'
c716f666d435c0eab59e10acd47eb697
38c92d95590fe554121ba5b6ba8adb2903a97f05
describe
'1805' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNE' 'sip-files00242.txt'
66d7df2050144b2b4d1fb4c57fdb69e8
e617072c5e580bdea6d28cf8c30f0149781be5ed
'2012-06-29T07:32:52-04:00'
describe
'1815' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNF' 'sip-files00243.txt'
03fb68bee90f8416f6c87f4b8a8ad0cc
a318c6a84d2bf98e165c336167934483a5add3b9
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNG' 'sip-files00244.txt'
7deb1e456282f19a5fdb833721d948f3
e1084ea6815c3eb323a2c8a3952a553f9ede49c0
'2012-06-29T07:30:23-04:00'
describe
'1512' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNH' 'sip-files00245.txt'
f572d7a4939579b837ba97a008f6e49c
dc06869de4b5f0928fe77a7081a5a369d269a6ae
describe
'1810' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNI' 'sip-files00246.txt'
75f729d6bc91df75106affe5f87a7184
7e8c97e43a7a2f17bcdb6a0b94a9589ccfb3fa52
'2012-06-29T07:40:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNJ' 'sip-files00247.txt'
d141ad9264f308a56d520e72504a28ef
c5543053928e950c42af3292c182d2e9dc15fa9e
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNK' 'sip-files00248.txt'
d1fb83d2264dacedead20179d116dcbd
7b6feeadcfcc481cd28c3be9ffb80bc560f31f93
describe
'402' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNL' 'sip-files00249.txt'
d3080f8666f432ced09c420f20b9ca65
e7806967d5e69c45929f4153ebb1b0e2863ca17a
describe
'170' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNM' 'sip-files00287.txt'
c3401f0fbe12368640e3c1cb3784f0b4
6af7ebc1e0966042afa4db7c85d892e305c597f7
describe
Invalid character
'26402' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNN' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
1d61aed419e6670536e330d04f9482cb
65e9f033df450a5f4a6a7ad26c8a181d59c441fb
describe
'1243996' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNO' 'sip-files00168.tiff'
a0dd19cb2f04e19807488826ab1c315a
df132f5a728f0977113bf47fd5e9c9b93c774047
describe
'1162616' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNP' 'sip-files00165.tiff'
fddec745ee737c6481c23eba10270414
9cced64326ad59a97e0c9d21f292a6562ca1288c
describe
'1109208' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNQ' 'sip-files00171.tiff'
7a0150883a55ce59ddd9c771ef18473a
73e9942c275051ffffe36edbd82228bdb85ecd27
describe
'53238' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNR' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
8a91c2811e51016a1985ab6d89b56751
b0a0c97c9e0fc28d2e974e39e09166957b57944c
describe
'1134856' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNS' 'sip-files00163.tiff'
d6911eb7ac6fae8fcdd21b6972d43114
9c029d0fc8464fb79acfabc2e678bb46136a45e9
describe
'1281404' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNT' 'sip-files00166.tiff'
63d44d69a0a236d3a9e60063734cbb5d
04326be4555f6779fc19bcda4b68335b7689918e
describe
'1206648' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNU' 'sip-files00167.tiff'
fee87ee9980a791f21ff69f63af7ea86
f4b15636608a5a8b52d9a0f365d59fac855bee26
describe
'1259236' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNV' 'sip-files00164.tiff'
5e6956d33fd23ba5b2d447957d749ff1
d2a958db2ece506721369a8759368c869f06ce9b
describe
'66012' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNW' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
55ec9a8d0e8cd05e6da6478fe1432c4d
45128e4dc20fd89bdf910f968f774fe8306a8013
describe
'28151' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNX' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
a6115e49f3940fedb50503f5206e982f
01eebd593db7c0c4287f73e98ea635c16afd1d2b
describe
'25104' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNY' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
3519aed7911787858b17ee8ad5fcb41b
7f1d365eafb442d9b49eab8e02534de481457108
describe
'20888' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABNZ' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
994b1d8a00f086500f761957c0d5a310
779638e8068d9129770d8d113f43f4d4277f2232
describe
'19120' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOA' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
6f37bf1655f8dc1215cb9d968252a3b8
b3ad0f2b20b4e285b76f264b4149e0ee74fa8dec
'2012-06-29T07:34:20-04:00'
describe
'18774' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOB' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
fcb5638227a07244e430f4172bd10120
5a8975456ee77e28c884dd0efe3046ecef836120
describe
'18321' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOC' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
59af05ca77c59f857d7544ef4e94886a
49c1f16bf1415efaeefe1860775f5d0416f175fa
'2012-06-29T07:41:23-04:00'
describe
'19200' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOD' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
49c8740e8f3e1ca39e214e8f3b0e6f4a
ee638bccc9c9d6f2642f86339c3245a63efa6c50
'2012-06-29T07:42:57-04:00'
describe
'18381' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOE' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
c89c89c77d489ec05fdaf9d04aef90cc
faf193c207c6e5fab8dd34599476fbd5199c9e81
'2012-06-29T07:36:43-04:00'
describe
'39464' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOF' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
364050be82ba78118ddf1a274a8d69bc
7afae1f16d18a4092bbaacebb07eb44731dc54d8
describe
'26916' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOG' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
27667f1be5539024f83a7a816daa6c1c
4c98f46da53aa157fd82e41387851938b32867e2
describe
'15737' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOH' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
c688475510978195d7cf9377a4486733
e8135a170ce9e4968ed045d5c8c743e225621295
'2012-06-29T07:43:52-04:00'
describe
'18860' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOI' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
a5a30531ee2e4df15a0c9b88ca7ee5fc
e4839e332363c988cbe6f8630defbea14cdc0ea1
'2012-06-29T07:35:12-04:00'
describe
'18283' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOJ' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
75484360e089ccab375574f8ca69b70a
9ba8afeb118058144fc7da2e047d646b9683d9f5
'2012-06-29T07:38:39-04:00'
describe
'47249' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOK' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
cd6cfc4c729b1d8b8465475b899ce5b9
2e048feedb5de04d337bba306a0fd8592025a0e5
describe
'26949' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOL' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
c7e020c1777cb98b1e424030e2590427
9a7e9afaaaa4b54c1de836233e02240949af4dad
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOM' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
a6ec1556c8ed48ca8b24b1493be0ac9b
4f5b47cb6aee0c7e23d4b6316a4fc658aa382675
'2012-06-29T07:37:14-04:00'
describe
'29900' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABON' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
90d380cdb097d9bae78653dc98a8937d
96b4cc136a48185fac70b8dbd747c29fbe15754b
describe
'56558' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOO' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
a76b831b068506e547c83a2f8bc134f0
df039678914b8118f70c843fd41ce85bf1273fe1
describe
'29040' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOP' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
24b10b82be3d93cabf9dc56562ee0494
358ab4d4150ed90fbd1b00f2602a98397765852b
describe
'57772' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOQ' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
d9c37caf32596e3561e8091517df2f2e
aef301852a376f6df3f174152b60a80d9e16b873
'2012-06-29T07:32:41-04:00'
describe
'29519' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOR' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
943e9c44cd65b4c155709946595bccf7
8eaffff4bd369e65001f434f0d38059a919c0bf6
describe
'57933' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOS' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
1bae4052a0fa3a8413836c63e96d829a
d7b46292b131f7c501ecbacb888d32da13931b71
describe
'29248' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOT' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
cba223bc831872f8879639ff19526a37
af4d1da7bb8e3f526878ea83641d26a0a41e3aba
describe
'57503' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOU' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
f151413bf5a45cf4a41e3d7158f6142a
cad81d9b54f4c26a2d6b1824a984e88f3a90daca
describe
'29061' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOV' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
64ec0fc0f8ea11b63cc76d9ee10df801
2c04a28133b5c9d3fb75461df5cab60cccb4e596
'2012-06-29T07:36:48-04:00'
describe
'37629' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOW' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
077707b13556957fe0b922ce44de66fa
a49666097378993f2f9db677432ed744b1aa324c
describe
'23407' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOX' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
edfb1f5c1a339585183b590a6e3f3a2c
ee1f00f4d2d4f5bf5940b2be2686189d734ae44e
'2012-06-29T07:41:15-04:00'
describe
'28788' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOY' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
8ec7ea9858fbf13c5befee8959c311ea
c3504d720196359b8f689428cf5d2e9049bf149c
describe
'59406' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABOZ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
3e6e74db54da3f678edd3dd5cf7264cd
c2090ae53321e8414bdc5602e83d502e111cad3c
describe
'29838' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPA' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
088cf41079dfa68d3c7bf3318fd63b7c
dcf0350175004431c4d023f7210583b9bc19d8ec
describe
'58267' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPB' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
9807d86b6b7d67842c8cb112f8c139bb
64511cf7d6aa8b7add1b3b71fe838dc55c1c17bc
'2012-06-29T07:40:28-04:00'
describe
'29458' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPC' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
4c40978fb83a052462014ff89201de4d
00b164b56509cc8c1db6d45919ad2c235478afae
'2012-06-29T07:33:57-04:00'
describe
'57980' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPD' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
fec957a1eaf93e8f126798b1f97dfbde
b3cf84fbd0c6d8c2fa8cfc172d23958291103710
describe
'29372' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPE' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
9bbef0eb1843c7838ad0bfcbb091caa7
fdb352d092cf5330acd5f350b52490710e0434ed
'2012-06-29T07:32:29-04:00'
describe
'57622' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPF' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
8ddd262f55d631e837ed79113b5028c0
78c7a47df818b8d951eae5618e5ef31824c2f758
describe
'28941' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPG' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
6fceff3f9e7f0c7d2a6cfac7e5c92701
b6e859cb1183dd8a167a5ffc85a76da1c93601e8
describe
'54555' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPH' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
069581d23bb53466f156577849f0c22d
9ab947ae4b58d2ae330c77dff26204503f7ca1de
describe
'28885' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPI' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
154da0ccc8569ecd576356a3f46ed740
212afcf3e4b8e4cfa6d9fb656d07eb6ec7605cb9
describe
'53776' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPJ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
50d00a5144e6410776547af7bf4853df
295d58a07de4b1ef784d291ceea55fc465cfc2c2
describe
'28795' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPK' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
9f19efdc33f2c47d6bab41c1339d2780
0dc81cbec7b7869af4cd71844251d33cf9cd3a46
describe
'52187' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPL' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
52e46aad53a5e48ea409c6509f43238b
7fb81883f0d6f71a2e6ced0accce0c52981c9706
describe
'27858' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPM' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
7867244a24979d2dc700574c11d7371a
a0386cf68682d05c495f008745ba6a35748192d6
describe
'55930' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPN' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
ecdbd3e8f68be527f4999e8c2da182a1
26d1758b02d9f5f8f4cd11f2647530628ad4eb51
describe
'28988' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPO' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
bfec8d84ee4f9d724387dc9611c64a14
33d16bb2959fb9d90e42be0c36388668a4c61361
describe
'54291' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPP' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
d7e5ce681a89464be545dd85cc0dbcc0
5cda8bb06e5f8c0fdc6dc5c7fccaf88b5809298c
describe
'28345' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPQ' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
5cc8677dcbec3fc229e5b07bf6e29444
7e8c4a8c7ebe4710e0a1302ccf416a926c1b3a4f
describe
'58050' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPR' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
1da9f14674534f46308da41ba65659bd
6b53ee4770844b298c3f39eabb294e23250b9e21
describe
'29481' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPS' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
3dd51badbfad7cffc21a8c8ef2a79106
00057bdf733bd4f556ee3c2caae200991695d71d
describe
'57135' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPT' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
25e1b6ec26c638e066b4f437bbdc49a3
4a361bf3960ea4b017f6faf4ad7d7ea822634447
describe
'29393' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPU' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
978b5ca9f7f6ae95faa3a95c648944de
d2517bf7c0428c466638d55d39b29c9622784a8a
'2012-06-29T07:31:57-04:00'
describe
'48052' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPV' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
5da0ed73667677fb44426a6edc26f833
22d1d00a7f83d38af7ed6b3dd263d51c0b3accdb
describe
'26786' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPW' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
0ce98a44e8f9d1316bb372327d213bc4
59a2dda979cfbbc2f6ed10d8bb20ebe690207f9d
'2012-06-29T07:28:37-04:00'
describe
'51290' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPX' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
148291e6b290177548a9a67af1dbb7e6
ae38adac1138a79c82707a4d4defc07ca6518bfc
describe
'27856' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPY' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
815b0c4cf188ce58bf011b2fc179e20f
afddf73eb696af21c5a04b074f46b13561042518
describe
'56783' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABPZ' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
4c9201aea8de8499d74c799963572384
c2fc4fe66bb36a2ae143b5ff2a444c6cc78ff768
describe
'29330' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQA' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
83455faab2b1b4e85ea802854626a39d
92592ce9b1ffd2f5e1870b378a80dcb84df1c68e
describe
'57479' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQB' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
aeec91ac074383d6af5ee21e2634fda2
97d5bd78b398dc42c979a41004aef64db6ae6e7f
describe
'29096' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQC' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
1ed7eaf13bca994ecb89a2f3969945a8
d9ddc7ec1f4dd713bc33b1b086cfd62184c34b4d
describe
'57075' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQD' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
31ee40b0404c5356b8b710c5bf583d73
bcad0cb59647f1d89cd6f4b11d11e5d993da5e04
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQE' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
66cb051a1098e55a3f2a61c7fa8d41f4
c38c7e8ae1463af800fb0483d90b4846aa8df114
describe
'41219' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQF' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
d11bb235f4a3ebebf92a43c6fff96b64
7ba8208da32b84fc0ae4c6c4e19117e54f379424
describe
'25096' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQG' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
a3f4c7ede6203c58e2bedd2f62919fc7
b15c9ac6ae6b97296d48e392f1c096548d06d989
describe
'52878' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQH' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
162592b5883a1bf8a0ff362aa0660c6f
8eadb7f7d6331dadf48d4cc4f5f454533f73b826
describe
'27385' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQI' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
406374e51f5f6c1b80cfb4f392503ba4
0a7a5c4596aa40ae1ef213f9bda6d00418402b31
describe
'58329' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQJ' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
46b5be6d8264d95f62deb6f2b0bb4fb6
9a0607a2c4288acfea58f444e333474749614225
describe
'29521' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQK' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
43db0fd8c60a0cbe0b197abae844c5de
208a64bb57e904dd618ef0fff140fb63e9ea80a7
'2012-06-29T07:30:57-04:00'
describe
'54272' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQL' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
7a06cbbac420c6a23c067391c8deddda
092511a4a1e4a80c6b895be1453884bebb2c6481
describe
'28802' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQM' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
30e3b7051377e83e16b86b04dbce5118
60952bbbfb09f1123bc9802a7f7e853d7f0f67c1
describe
'56220' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQN' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
547088366515f512a0c6ddf0d23d37d0
d5271e03e8ea03118688525ee409fc423b330248
describe
'29338' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQO' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
eaf318d6baf22b77338420f70fefe28b
6d9288cb3752388fa892486bead453fb8c2bb03c
describe
'57035' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQP' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
d866fc93f3e9c72487f9c89985c04a1c
5f78d6b3232b218aba67da832341070b5a0e565f
describe
'29301' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQQ' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
dee305cedc3c97167a76386361e1f382
6a758eb71b4740913ed20f0985b3ed806b999a6d
'2012-06-29T07:38:02-04:00'
describe
'34195' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQR' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
54d0b7a623e492454f32baa22fa9bedf
ee7874c735cffaa98d6bac4c5871329a4147f27e
describe
'22939' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQS' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
90e91d5587d4105533aa73c6e229d6c2
e5383885f4b7f08f92752c928260f55e1112764b
describe
'48973' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQT' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
b634c8368593c45491ecd645c41c31ff
226f220f5e628bf7c55dd52e36c07242fa6003c4
describe
'26931' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQU' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
2eda438fa4ac1a44cc5b1325139e0f42
f8a20dafa94a59d4908777874bae9032b52f4870
describe
'52869' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQV' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
602505ff2b01472311a9a24a57edf00a
b0094eb498fef885e0f490945c669de1f0f40ce1
describe
'28627' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQW' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
1ab2a99ded9acf95233e839fcb2a1f91
11a58f2550aa1efec263cf9906d91d63f7efbd9d
'2012-06-29T07:43:10-04:00'
describe
'55481' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQX' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
d4005a61f64d69c17b2832d08d987a9a
b2e354eee26ebfe01ad9f0164a1980796f900af5
describe
'28522' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQY' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
e78026e85ffc4e72fafd9096fd5b4ae8
057e0997f96d0e2ae2d15fe2a9d8a795e3a25c04
'2012-06-29T07:42:08-04:00'
describe
'75436' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABQZ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
6cff78c793597b992c2278b96a9f8ad7
9b7209e2ea6c9c102ff02eefd66b6b7c9dd6f221
'2012-06-29T07:34:46-04:00'
describe
'34692' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRA' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
31541083b42ec818181f403a244329c4
b772f4e7b6ebb88088bbe26b5d03be4eced67fa3
'2012-06-29T07:28:45-04:00'
describe
'76767' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRB' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
493c223a8e33392ea62246b95de9e35d
6640f32dc9788e9d2cf187432d626089b4f83008
'2012-06-29T07:35:17-04:00'
describe
'34797' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRC' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
9e74cae259cf89850b7081a8bfd9dd58
b8b52a36249bece37bb2a0be4850b02498cb9c08
describe
'81142' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRD' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
ad0d71351b8b8a71c819c56038f3ecaf
079b6e0c474868f4ea8a99dd93f83f5dfbcec1e2
describe
'36218' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRE' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
7a26362b090275c734125af9ab936dd0
9efc5d89222c460840cb245a40c2a42d4d2c691e
'2012-06-29T07:39:16-04:00'
describe
'80222' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRF' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
6523614d0813702935cf3b1436b169ee
5ec960f42237f154c0b4ab835967647b23fb286d
describe
'36089' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
3e4657afa4175fbb91be94779a3434e3
66faefcef7597a583acccfb2c78577315af90668
describe
'77603' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRH' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
d822a568c3a497954037c493aaa39cf4
4d7af7c99b9cb7f750b98e7c9b3f6e05bbc9c9f2
describe
'35142' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRI' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
f6af1e015fac84e95d849a5cae70d024
52a7f4b3e355df479948ed7577843dbf58a25261
describe
'76147' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRJ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
cecaf0ad905fc23ab3096bfc804961bd
4dadf1dda040fa4febfcaa7a71c64ef782fa17d0
describe
'35023' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRK' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
c735106220eddc021f07027abb1e6787
2a2b9d6fd94851c6fcf6d5b2584ad06f63acadc9
describe
'77726' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRL' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
47816318fe21f9413782e7b9634c1915
93515b6083aff2555b054ac9cc4e3ff349295dbf
describe
'35234' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRM' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
5b610c00286b3e0dfe06b8ae9eb52a28
e04406665d90399e2f62a321a71a94f8416f7f61
describe
'78945' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRN' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
08fa97428d22f39e4082e1885c1e4074
15b99c9b350a8c4255fa4653c6d57687a33873dc
describe
'35826' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRO' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
28753be271ff6ff9f68b6edb78be7358
7cb525b4c4d57fe370f1f20c2d86692328b548e5
'2012-06-29T07:44:10-04:00'
describe
'72955' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRP' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3b8504f88b40d0b3264146c12b040531
1a7f76acdd56340e9e2a014a4d3175ce9cb987ea
describe
'33409' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRQ' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
88ddcbb9efd1113add0f0de9c8f683ea
4675aa436f402055ff64198864a49a4b9d242ae9
describe
'74154' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRR' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
67fde21b7b2841ecc535e84f95263843
c900e32e2f8d92d8f6673ea2be2130d151fb9b8c
'2012-06-29T07:28:32-04:00'
describe
'34033' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRS' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
16608c8f82832428dbee816e8b72c932
e04612a54875bbe180331eb663b859bbcc56d808
describe
'82389' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRT' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
43744d85d4f187193dbb1e376b664eca
597e5f6c39f007f3a3a5885bdfcfb5c617cba392
describe
'36360' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRU' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
4e51cb4b1b93a55d42ad8e87349e3fd5
ebe23b48aa13c8f3ab6852ea77631c9cfb83702b
'2012-06-29T07:29:15-04:00'
describe
'77787' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRV' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
a78477cf01935531b87a3a01ec599469
9372af0331dcd46c1bb857803b0fe41b4166a3ad
describe
'35881' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRW' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
3a024cace03aa410cf7881ea6b736734
6c02644821e4c2ec1fbc515dab0d03d93ee39554
describe
'77754' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRX' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
cf0a0bc9910bad0691e8d10c53fbf37a
2aaa8bbf47d7e8f4f5238646746c9f8521c6caac
describe
'35453' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRY' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
9e658f0c9769d0dfee413e3aacf3493f
0c059585c8dfb3fdaaec2b98baa49358081b2a22
describe
'76144' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABRZ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
db79fe715cc558b0bd41e4ea63abd973
6fb256230e9645fe848fbe7f13c64783854259d4
describe
'34850' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSA' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
991fb5e0573f684c26509a4aa07bde0f
9334d47480a7d0e73a2b96cb4b255a631687763a
describe
'79135' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSB' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
e5881533c5eedb8ba7bb32c861e74036
483d146a7ede3f59261b6f34d023c2ac2aff2254
describe
'35999' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSC' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
f9585fc3bc094d50c636e23732acba2d
5055c39ca2dd19d6dc62076ce4669c5c1e8820cd
describe
'79108' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSD' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
b2b9a314810fa29501e691c5808977d1
c2d30a559b05528b0a5786ecfeced6057c10dd37
describe
'36138' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSE' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
a906324d430bc97726477ac0b7d7c745
1654e923d1c271583fc002206f7db4b73c3beb78
describe
'40891' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSF' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
6375c9993539b9a702882cc2eb5f9eab
facbf3b785b166398e0b668354b374ac66cf95e9
'2012-06-29T07:38:54-04:00'
describe
'25094' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSG' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
e32a867a0229015a9f7c38539ce614de
7e4f526eadff4475f1791d72bc2ac54d9c959c1b
describe
'75170' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSH' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
e26859f52c7769efca20386a43dad356
7e50ba9017ac15c4244922c6aa8bccd64cc984c2
describe
'34163' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSI' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
795a4402c5feb6c0358f02805a6a1c76
556c787f415accaab73ab8e9f15120f2b1dacc2d
'2012-06-29T07:41:56-04:00'
describe
'83983' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSJ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
1dcf97d5a43a46b737ebfd2d44098737
2827624c66ee67037873c60551e10272ed51197f
describe
'81770' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSK' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
cde24b00eef0664942d85753c904b491
a8cb0a571e731d345f2ca0eee44c45f6ea261620
describe
'36099' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSL' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
488a9221d9d6732fb42e32bfca6f3620
af022fc24a3a4444869d3d1d21217d10cd53560f
describe
'76833' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSM' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
9093765eed6eaae96f7d509bb9288347
67b10e8b9b928c653987141f4b009caebe227909
describe
'74213' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSN' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
0dc6ac3f2e792cd7bead213808d8500d
a8aaca010db24db0af7566a1ecd7a21bae8fb530
describe
'33663' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSO' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
c55a2495356e4aeffb50cb0495b9b940
8027e9b866d3dba47aeaa3db19bf5c349becf3e4
describe
'75244' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSP' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
43287fddec93a6f1c9e6e9b20e6e8307
c86acc3ae57175dc8ef615a2d07a3d67d6ce306c
describe
'81016' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSQ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
5476c6a97f8e89d5b45440d38114c5c4
6f686ba1b2cc03bee8b9e002b674c7f992e42e3c
'2012-06-29T07:39:06-04:00'
describe
'35981' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSR' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
ad2bfce395ae9ba25f74fec8b563b6d5
324e4febb949b2ff09b23a913cc35e303828bc50
describe
'83174' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSS' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
8b0aac13e1233f6fe4b6227e4fd12350
fa811259fe6edc8a7daa898c7544cb02cd47576f
describe
'36030' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABST' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
5e21499cdf441b39aa2b645b2dd59a87
b7824c7dc9916606f0bcb1d99a657481c1a0c4e3
describe
'81249' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSU' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
e045ee7cf98da3d1b9f6e218e2b14ecc
28588937f683871d7354d85446ed6e269b275535
describe
'35741' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSV' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
954709129531b8b859b7d9e20c54f8b9
22ce81a4b34a225f7cf942cc0038305048d842b9
describe
'82733' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSW' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
4569b81888ea5fba6fe5f1d08dbb28e7
60589b6da0fb1a3a0649b3074a2a053081e68231
describe
'36222' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSX' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
435d536217f6fea47692130172982141
fcf806f30c4e37ac7d9ce78bbedf6f6112cdc3e4
describe
'38032' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSY' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
ce6309c696c11dfec2f3c92f59dcf6ed
4062b59a3cf60cb0155baff92af9fdc899aac8c2
describe
'24177' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABSZ' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
0914a872c5d7da208f3c0d2d5b778d1d
bb617d4b4660ee60de121dd186592d38e4b51112
describe
'71921' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTA' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
4ad64e8ce22f3267fdc9c4b6facbe7eb
fca3f7a8f6162be9ab24b30a8cbafb5e78fbea1c
'2012-06-29T07:36:20-04:00'
describe
'33329' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTB' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
ff2a2b55c7f7de9f58095c53b793f184
7b61c6f9cd6361a2f4224c424d70c125c04bcd2a
describe
'68826' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTC' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
0add7aa38c8a17f8645e477a3157832c
b06f519bdda0a699404855a810231d3d9afcd70f
'2012-06-29T07:38:44-04:00'
describe
'34042' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTD' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
7c285c8b76aea5173f4a1b759ece633f
d98f30ecec20cf950bd04054f87600719d6411c2
describe
'73387' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTE' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
5083801f41cb80867b9cd164ed30ba69
a2182ac3bae126aaed5c9d49320ebd270abab210
describe
'34536' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTF' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
736d63d1e1f0911073f7a372ae75b13d
814bc9dd26ce2c3c8045dda3cc46fcba16ebb8ec
'2012-06-29T07:36:13-04:00'
describe
'70339' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTG' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
184acbad16f83c48dc1ec437438ecaf2
a98ff4f555f4c836222c888b0d2e452c19813195
describe
'33618' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTH' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
404978c99a41a47b3306ba90c4803a05
0cba656b3acef3c67c78843ef2033cf21348e516
describe
'62941' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTI' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
fde080fcb929f6d7a594093dfe2bf0b9
d4c175431d3dc91c3ef0a46c5eea9d2c01fe5095
describe
'30874' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTJ' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
9ea2fcab1c148e1c63c7496bed14fa97
b322a23351bc9c58ff55d6351a854d16d34a2f82
describe
'75209' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTK' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
ceec8bed2629f4582acd66b89863189d
e0a9ac605506dd2467f7795a685f33f526ea2e1c
describe
'34318' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTL' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
274ccae98f5bec54480f4a7f54ff2fdb
36820cb56eed23971c0ae0ae5d9b5daf5b1ff2c9
describe
'81588' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTM' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
c88bcdb5a7089430f992bc6a81ab04fd
7d35f63189187a5918cbde572f83228258b22085
describe
'36174' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTN' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
f49b207659f06331b73d1d0a4579d6e2
bdeef35e73c8bab9e341c980aa1d1f3628a1b614
'2012-06-29T07:43:00-04:00'
describe
'83912' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTO' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
e5e4bf8395a8b876e9e213fa64fde573
b8e127b93688231f5997537b7222348fd5a47b8f
'2012-06-29T07:32:27-04:00'
describe
'36500' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTP' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
aeca905bafda34869fe7d78a75e907a6
de5b1e2aa5f18746c48ea536ecaa50ccf0159526
describe
'83637' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTQ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
232c40f9f02779b208879f1262d5c5bb
8a417a7ce5accd932402ca94a2f9e9291ca95540
describe
'36713' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTR' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
de3559487f6fc9333635a7a423280ebb
0a19ae2ddea045ce5b96c5a6018b2689c9b57fba
describe
'77836' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTS' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
ec17cdaafac9ee0144ca95a0dc46b093
d0f90f9b220fb006dfa46ee7cb39d5ec56724679
describe
'36100' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTT' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
f5ea87734127b53ab4275438fba41b31
356e4fcf68a07c0e42a630134859694b9977c513
'2012-06-29T07:43:35-04:00'
describe
'76269' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTU' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
2e95ab94f903e33a9af8a1b78413d9c0
8c5fbfb24a2fb1d8e3acb161c00401db07623068
'2012-06-29T07:33:18-04:00'
describe
'35122' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTV' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
7d81303bb47151760bb46ad84221ccd6
53c4f700621f84ec3f288eaf1c0c27e8f2a4a22a
describe
'64193' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTW' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
8bf743d0e51912c091f7f71190eeb22b
bb5b1de57708948ab1d00d4b93b5b35576296695
describe
'31327' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTX' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
b26577c6fa18d2cf77aaf9f6ddc1ceec
0d48ae2409b2f55f47ecd80c763bbf81d6d0ea00
describe
'74018' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTY' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
447e55abc94a7df74efeb330165f5674
61df7470afc19340020af2f896bbb391eb59c321
'2012-06-29T07:32:37-04:00'
describe
'33895' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABTZ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
e4f49ee4de1c445ef8aab7f13886efed
4456e5ba6d00433f23f6a7e91361e99ca470d223
describe
'81220' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUA' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
61ed5096d164b04bd08c329e698841e5
cc01b15a65bffd2b2da5f59d37f112694f06d901
describe
'36120' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUB' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
a2aec018dfd39c04ad32b220984f3bfb
b1b87e3f279381404f79464a5078a9e82f8bd898
describe
'79101' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUC' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
18b96b5cb87589102dd810ca5a4bc6a2
dfca23f1094562a4e96dca60b0d0b1f55524d41c
describe
'35699' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUD' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
e85d01521d1e3bcbea805d697b08d5d6
255b953633e7954cff7b8f21b8e90c369c8bcf6f
describe
'78741' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUE' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
8861398fb17023a770b2014e1d6d9ab3
c173664f1b6281fe4688cb37cafc7e2d81c21d7d
describe
'35465' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUF' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
d0c76200e4acb347e244f206fa972c62
738f8a1706ae36344041ed830cd8298f110c7d59
describe
'78907' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUG' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
7bc186ecb808def4a798b2d3e3d5f0b5
10ba3663a6a12acf1f7bc661f827a4a0e0742f19
'2012-06-29T07:41:37-04:00'
describe
'35430' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUH' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
ddbb5b9d88df0bd739999eba2138867e
3a8bf58aaba63ee16e1dd403e9e1c09394865e2c
describe
'78454' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUI' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
f949ef157c20eb631b794de5636c9da2
6cd78ee8ed3f6410f6177b660a2ea06c85fc5a4f
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUJ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
859bad47183cc4783d6c1c7bd42ee450
21e3b6062b758874c358471c456f61bb2d985b07
describe
'78289' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUK' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
705dc808bcad8c9d75317d2370cbafd1
dfef323d520e9f7c546467146290f9b79972cda7
describe
'35509' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUL' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
ac58b83e7fddbc366086e10b440fddbf
9df6a20ed844ad2f986c984f6951e631301ab0bb
describe
'71302' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUM' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
c94a02fb028f54d6da832473707dcd90
0a629fb57e2ff8fd3b802ec89ff337c6b78970e6
describe
'33771' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUN' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
8d61146bb4a69a6ebf4c987a5e11f707
93d3595df85e93bf6ce1624cb7b6067fbc1a3d84
'2012-06-29T07:43:14-04:00'
describe
'72033' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUO' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
dd34837cb419a971c4e7839530398dd7
23d886c16f4b40c1ed7b1c55d8daa0f44092d8f5
describe
'33773' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUP' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
dcb439075f97d1578a0fb32f022c0f19
4eb529a98cec1416bd2bb874db08b8fb714c4d3f
'2012-06-29T07:43:07-04:00'
describe
'84089' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUQ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
961905cea18c52cd282dac9b177655d7
c12cd553d243a7b090be34bf0ccddce92ec449ce
describe
'36735' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUR' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
af4f3fe7a09bd95d5c600623d9db1d12
0da78a74fc7f60b5610facc66e2c41f96aba7bba
describe
'82021' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUS' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
566471e1d0264c884a64b0553691275d
f6b5ab53066790d0479b3df7d4b2001119803af2
describe
'36468' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUT' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
f6db12395e7772462e62ae29bd97ec32
a4b08b9f4f45e839b52571843c9fdb0d01ecccc8
describe
'81068' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUU' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
62c1b36ad46336e942a58ef8aaf709f3
ed737c61e8d80e38f9feddd31a12d8fea7b0e8f6
describe
'66088' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUV' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
a98d6ec58befff883923d94f2417ac1d
554a50f2577e2b8bc67de13cffcaac2b798047b1
describe
'28102' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUW' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
b6a66664dfd010394fb5acb3d5c2bec0
1f1062a6d76109f7c8dbc41e2d7002756a8c167c
'2012-06-29T07:34:51-04:00'
describe
'36341' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUX' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
8667fe860ccdca74380835d82be9ad99
67eef39f0c33948aafa8ede484cf83084c7ca5c2
describe
'83223' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUY' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
93817da861fb21b32754757425c39db8
ccfb1cccf9c94c79d76046d081cc63cf594bd13d
'2012-06-29T07:40:13-04:00'
describe
'36587' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABUZ' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
0970a6a250a028d109edda1a583da9d1
143825bfb2ceea152e5c500eb217919a5d873db3
describe
'84371' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVA' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
1aa0360d2c4438518d1bf07249a6f2db
7e253d62e793f8838af3524ae9f78baa3bb12040
describe
'36777' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVB' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
81df6df07affd80c059e3166e8070ac6
7552b45f6426a2e574676649ed7a736331182995
describe
'83384' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVC' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
2a4f74714685266ea34444176dcc74c6
10ebd0d229f35e11b41de8004fdef1fb9885d90d
describe
'36590' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVD' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
0c299cc3a625035846c3a1a4ed3719b9
93149152ed81836d9ede110d70aa3afdf913ae4e
describe
'75274' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVE' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
918857d4e5e80c012b00c75d89b62376
9cd2b9fb30cb17a64cb86ad13fce058e24fb455c
'2012-06-29T07:37:43-04:00'
describe
'34399' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVF' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
12e92d4d7aee120adab7e88988af9b1b
51a7267ea14536805e6c068d99d87c7340337306
describe
'74270' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVG' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
f3043beffc4dd793df4c04e615738d2a
18349afe6c2551bece13c61948e294326c21cf84
'2012-06-29T07:42:20-04:00'
describe
'34024' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVH' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
7776af93adcc7b7f3c31030320e6ae48
84c266648b20039b26f693c75fab8c32b1d2c2d8
describe
'36046' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVI' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
c355041882efd55404a211aedd817ec6
8af205a6485669a3401347d940c21b7a6b039d6a
describe
'82174' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVJ' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
677db2575ab98d809578559fb348189e
7cddad3f67424e36c77e9c371d9a27d8e6c94e1c
describe
'80305' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVK' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
fd1c86ae1bc78b6ac18f17ae2474dd87
08f1f7b3406a7e343691d472be11a5eeac3a8061
describe
'35970' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVL' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
da96bbd02ccb87fa93a30b77c3830eb1
edc68718e89c0144a5aca6802304b28902d09e42
describe
'36595' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVM' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
05dea1406957661bbe8a0e2536bbc67d
47de665345508a52276a9cef87bdd397f1acd290
describe
'82635' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVN' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
65525738375bd72622406442a2634e26
a3c71a2c1cb2517b8d8d3b16783f0bac5270980e
describe
'79376' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVO' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
8b0552b03e5f0a80564a18c76f5bd57b
9db34dd3937f5dc7e0d6b614ff9cebbc070e6bff
describe
'65610' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVP' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
441bc17762e88fb9c65bc70fd214a191
64949dfd3f586ac4dbd19c9d6bd2f3c652cb081d
describe
'32175' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVQ' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
3c4b4b5b9843b62e36633748fb412d00
fc0f081b9d55ef16c409a2f3061aaa3897ea3573
describe
'71721' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVR' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
cbde4e82fd0a201664c7e646528ea202
a83b67dc023ee8910eb643501b8457df5b312153
'2012-06-29T07:35:45-04:00'
describe
'33245' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVS' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
01a3d4722734589dba18f8a0fa26e49c
f4c7e1f8578b095752397b24b81d4e97fadb59a3
describe
'82823' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVT' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
a587b51e349330e4884cb1371803b33d
ebcf57124a560c7d81bc8260f4bdcc0f4f81117f
describe
'36048' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVU' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
3f390c66b9f797c7de618a0a5a2b8aa9
82666f479ca7fc030e9b1e2fe1013bd8f885fb45
describe
'83670' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVV' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
c34ae839f9bbf862b7ec85957b8130d5
99c779704475f899c94ddf95ebf747be146de9b6
'2012-06-29T07:38:38-04:00'
describe
'36450' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVW' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
a9813710ddc30930a7a80d2c144884bf
4ab4a2ea5cfc4393ec3df5a3b3221bc90078f118
describe
'84966' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVX' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
574ba4d6bdfbc0a3d55dbae4e6f117ea
519cb4ebdf8dc2137d6095a0f5513c251a8afcd0
'2012-06-29T07:38:41-04:00'
describe
'36983' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVY' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
b37bddf899baefedb1df9697b2e4b185
f76cb2a4e917eabde689f694b8dc0a72d4beb425
'2012-06-29T07:41:55-04:00'
describe
'77015' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABVZ' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
ac0a5dbb2bd579321b8dc353610ed511
5f9acb8724ffacbac218e6c08c03a84942044e21
describe
'35336' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWA' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
1b85676b0129ccfb844241c2de32a504
7b32fe1eb1db9b26f76e45198f543d5e6028369b
'2012-06-29T07:40:32-04:00'
describe
'79857' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWB' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
37750fcafc117876aefe88665006889f
4575366127e4ddcd2ae79d69c1fd2b3fe3f3d0f9
describe
'36294' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWC' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
6e6bdc439af214497cd17abca40370be
5dfc8fcb5b100c6f71d207fee8c02023953dcfd9
describe
'78923' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWD' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
9b8d47d071656eb329d3e06704076206
184983983d0997976293a1900ad3c323c9a45382
describe
'78332' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWE' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
e6ab1f8872eacbf855a44b47387cf1b9
dab02510dd21b355c8e4c759b341dbd49d4c6736
'2012-06-29T07:35:48-04:00'
describe
'35674' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWF' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
86fc6267d7cf7160b0e8daf14450bdc3
ab45c15f2180330d7d96db404e86cb841e2001f7
describe
'45877' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWG' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
8e43ea36964f67067a4f734c37cc80e4
d6b0a7fa486771108f9ed4b96d453712bab2ff78
describe
'26697' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWH' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
7453acb645af5da78d0d86690cab5886
15778edb3f1437a1d12677a1786778933bf9a9c5
describe
'72757' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWI' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
bb405647a40ebf2d36c6592e1e30ff00
5ce13373642035896f8ef6d0387b4a4ceff08e13
describe
'33968' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWJ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
664a0f1525a77641d878a1e5819e49cb
89932e488570e2533f20abc36af4979b5dc9beed
describe
'81182' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWK' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
3f5fdce3308caba25c68679292c0a5d1
c7f76ee040a37fc585f755854f70db6f18abf147
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWL' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
8a437e410cbe5824085fa7b179f7c5c0
c3a3cb4ef483d713403e192c9cce3591033dd56b
'2012-06-29T07:33:42-04:00'
describe
'81548' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWM' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
25f339e851512e3bd9072fade937a6b8
f88687ae1f5cb10666824a3a661308527f798c72
describe
'36574' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWN' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
693fd763e22fd34028573bd6871aa300
299bb0bf1ff3e6fb64c97ad566592e388f2b806f
describe
'79750' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWO' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
17d4abc0219cb35ff493a6b5e0a469cd
638aa7f76d5cf5c552505da32ac74c3e93f12dae
'2012-06-29T07:40:37-04:00'
describe
'35937' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWP' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
503a684cc2941b14b0adc447f53f93c7
e1af40a742dd122b9b8f50d6a43abaf77d291285
describe
'81808' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWQ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
f8ce4ea41ec7cc6910f71632950b78ce
fca7ae3e3436f794ad9b3bb538bc2b8121900c1b
describe
'36708' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWR' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
5860bf6bf89ec66fcae6dce9c64927f7
4e9e81cdcafcc5166d6d659c5c77735690f6654a
describe
'35647' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWS' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
afa053dbb2343343c090404c9e5bf64e
e9086976e900947e6f88b507e325bcb2b8a3960b
'2012-06-29T07:40:51-04:00'
describe
'76525' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWT' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
4ad3a71f3fa4a9cbbaa525d1884d044c
7b112f4d85a026e0cc19d98ae5ffa6b87540b4bc
describe
'75191' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWU' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
5e560a061dddb2ddcde6dace9db0b667
a6e77b414cb03e4879c01783d4e5156186e35bab
describe
'83407' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWV' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
033c1c0096b0fe4f4bc6ef493650f919
d411dc9646e860cf558cd1da1987b5c241140f21
'2012-06-29T07:42:27-04:00'
describe
'36467' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWW' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
76241455194551486c53394240d86b96
c3e7bfccbb301adc6fce5dcb32b52259f047767d
describe
'50530' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWX' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
e7a7e9cb3145ee09101f860563cf84c3
5e21627e127b2d17966f27243fe9d6db00b87132
describe
'27837' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWY' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
4d936142049014b6c33b3b245eb2d102
1bf3adf2027add8872c9840b3830fc3e118ee15b
describe
'76085' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABWZ' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
c9a30e34fc4f1aca1fc90f730586db0d
66a803cef0609f847f7f7243ff7425151111a3ef
describe
'34471' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXA' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
1a429821a2700a2e020391963e4341cb
8a30a356ad0b0fae0b85d0843bad22b7c2930b21
describe
'79356' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXB' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
4b860fcc30d9b2b8b1cdc4d1ce0eb701
30647a4a69542decc0a989400de17bd72850e571
describe
'35646' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXC' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
18d306cf55a7c0e5c2a907e26052d601
c7f61b9f8c2bfe60661dc0d378fdb022d1615f2d
describe
'84613' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXD' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
8b5c3705ee8f5c37356c622c05837f9a
18b42bee9528432bab79b6519267c62446870ff4
describe
'36733' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXE' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
098c187cf3ea13fcbe042059b8c5c643
8a7c018d4b52892301d07498ef618186eab57917
describe
'37260' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXF' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
746273b217cc61c4238ad34a0a3c70b2
89f0a1189ddcfd1e166fa2b5b0ecf86828e9c793
describe
'81350' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXG' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
206106b652ab60df347a68afb3e7773b
4f04b84eabb72bd04561aeb5ee1acdab1c63242d
describe
'36555' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXH' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
a54b91cfbe2d5767f91be77c075048ad
0ccd7644d1d7cd44eb5dd5de917a27b38a0dac4c
describe
'36854' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXI' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
55885e93935a532b0ed1bd1a443f87f3
4563569d266532abf45d05e8d54b1d3d546fd5a6
'2012-06-29T07:33:53-04:00'
describe
'84535' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXJ' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
8a29e6fe8fc76328cdfa25f79191bdc4
a9f17b7643c03be30426a321e80812b7b75fa784
describe
'81824' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXK' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
009296093ed4afa4d465c8bddf65ece4
65d3d83a08b2aa85f8969b12ab1208d88807dcdb
describe
'36390' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXL' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
2249e67e78852542117dfd1d51d41db9
98ebeb6b705887eacb39b5058679eef6624e3f03
describe
'33157' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXM' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
9e51fcd6b669620f54c3d5982b091e0a
c81f3cb8a13a312c8b7b04909c6c729d49a3b3cc
describe
'64461' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXN' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
16e6aa8bff7bc1555d36b64763e5848b
8f42f0306715018cb982e95e738b3f5036238137
'2012-06-29T07:35:18-04:00'
describe
'32396' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXO' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
a5863092c5280534cf97b4b560dbc2c8
cb3e8a486775e98624b068fe96be33b224c57ecb
describe
'78895' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXP' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
ed9b524abaad0b3df11931f5845848c0
df8607ecfd4db2f83667ca76f708e8f001921884
describe
'35686' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXQ' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
f9c4f0b2305a970cf3cee8740996ae0d
a09e1dd2db95858b4c629cd3867136948d15e7fd
describe
'160786' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXR' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
62ba89f186e05992cbcf62cefe1ffbca
916ee21ec2ab5800cc33f1aea320d7647b13234d
'2012-06-29T07:37:44-04:00'
describe
'64003' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXS' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
f4feab295cec7f40337e12c86b839129
ee08c8faf1230d5f90b6018c8dee99aa01ad1536
describe
'28569' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXT' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
7f2abb85804c90c57fe72b762adb4288
5622baf59f57ce3be1880cc21bdcce17e1986f0e
describe
'311780' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXU' 'sip-files00162f.jp2'
02106268b613295c2959656f21816438
9f3dec39d43a009fb78ca74d39261443a5456753
describe
'158287' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXV' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
cd742cea15ffc92d859ee41b702ca8d3
787552681e12ff9dc10e2d400186e5c83597f4e0
'2012-06-29T07:33:28-04:00'
describe
'63504' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXW' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
9097f6e543a9ddec68c61806e5b2f179
cfbb899e1ff36793740305cfbc53ddaf8a479b4c
describe
'28386' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXX' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
8a4e6ecc4da51b73e2735b493c4a85e5
79f7010ba83d6151dd97a74f8e63f2708b3fb444
describe
'311667' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXY' 'sip-files00163f.jp2'
62ee5eab1864dc83b6ec556ab6740715
4ee31f34e793778b7de1c032ac948eaa545c0f9e
describe
'181444' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABXZ' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
87f015d7ccf9fe1fe57575e248e90a61
2dfe16c25a2102b14c9c710e83e32e4436c93769
describe
'71073' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYA' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
57f685f666b3ec9de3c612a30f68dbde
3a44fc98942c70bd9d58d357794a01586001378d
describe
'29894' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYB' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
bc42efe7848642d4a3aea005a1d4ddf9
bb9d8ba75f0565be54a7ad1e71864f2a56f6f00c
'2012-06-29T07:41:07-04:00'
describe
'311752' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYC' 'sip-files00164f.jp2'
29d64481b5f7a42a5e083f5d8ac77f4a
2990bf79d0968086d4630ab87093c69c393b24ac
'2012-06-29T07:36:08-04:00'
describe
'177598' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYD' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
395a2db17c3b1895d3be6fdc6058b17e
3eb2dad5b571848f92effef7728803b42a7c16a2
'2012-06-29T07:37:22-04:00'
describe
'70130' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYE' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
1543258b9b6a12068eb645edd929f245
78c6ff3f6d67e6e8ac122f950578969fd6ad89d4
describe
'29794' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYF' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
dc74f53135b621192085d8b6ef51f8e0
81d7e9bc8fef11bdd3b67080e8025ede6aaf64fa
describe
'311700' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYG' 'sip-files00165f.jp2'
23aa3b177a609449b29094891b01b51e
aabd72e8ec69cc6b8ab8247296d7713497cfaf5d
describe
'178203' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYH' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
a9245097bb378710cf9d14954cb79ede
1ad8f040107e2f74aef3797b0d31b02f1f29145d
'2012-06-29T07:38:08-04:00'
describe
'69158' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYI' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
181a9a7f9071cfb5d5ff9ffa4d0640e1
03f06164303139dcaa69d3aab34e0dff1cf53765
describe
'29555' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYJ' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
8717d2d30d295788d1bfb688f8fc61c4
5375a43e490dfb7f556ab704467a7603da1523d4
describe
'311767' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYK' 'sip-files00166f.jp2'
a867849b374494399384d5a392d776d6
847ec24dbf9b3185b397a8cdb50bfac8a03cc4a6
describe
'177608' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYL' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
bc10db71407391fc6cc4cce315f48014
e649ee8e6b1a84c962c541a46be215daede7acbd
'2012-06-29T07:32:47-04:00'
describe
'70067' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYM' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
5de11d0d34ca9bf79b10082cb22ffaf4
58b47b9473581c78c89509437f426d14728b7240
describe
'29382' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYN' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
b2abbad517314a0eaedbc1fea0bc9fe2
1a4f4b4a51f19c2238cf168503e3424e1fcaf323
describe
'311702' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYO' 'sip-files00167f.jp2'
ef7d9cde7dc7ebe168bf2871d0781c92
f259b8f41aef282aa0e8d86c496dcacbaca24be0
describe
'182809' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYP' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
8a3dc93866dee6f094e1334b1fa1639e
826a60c1956c31a999c2bf132d99ac28ae70aee5
describe
'71706' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYQ' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
4bbc79a454a20ad31d6657ab420db1f8
424433aeebcb914c853ec408e0da56c755885813
describe
'29985' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYR' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
c8214dc48d9d9f008b10ffe52cf9263c
55051afcdc8b09485b7ec5adb47c05bc6224c044
describe
'311778' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYS' 'sip-files00168f.jp2'
cee68c2f715ee3e88c7032c0c9bb0611
bb6b5645c7d50100ad27f98b6fc64e74a338377b
'2012-06-29T07:42:09-04:00'
describe
'184953' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYT' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
11f4c42916a59a0bb99b277b46d31747
c1147c539ae8343790f8a68364c7f91ca0e5e763
'2012-06-29T07:34:23-04:00'
describe
'74455' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYU' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
09eab98b98699384d241470ba928436a
963d8f82bc5c397b01c0014cf244af526647c0b7
'2012-06-29T07:39:10-04:00'
describe
'30195' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYV' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
a8f08b616f6936b433b6b02384105a10
5bd4e91a3be390d5ae97aea65b438eb4b0896f76
describe
'311766' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYW' 'sip-files00169f.jp2'
6174149b84fbc1c36ca0be04dfc85ea9
9399b8548eaa1be9cac7a571c651439d9165a5c7
describe
'183016' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYX' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
61c0a4a7200fdbe41d4a83b9e4c5d473
3a2e7354afd6e01e1b25b6d01fa9396ed784f8e9
describe
'71505' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYY' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
3563e69d2527d63edf10369feeb521cd
a278aa8a916794521698aa9cbf338eeba1d67676
describe
'29605' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABYZ' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
c0487ad41f4decae94572b43555034f2
b29e848deb29b28b9db107d2f78981e5a74fa369
describe
'311779' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZA' 'sip-files00170f.jp2'
94a541da3e169c50be2cf5955efc1ca6
444417a43ca3e9b31505faba567d4be664a83369
describe
'135319' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZB' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
26286ab062a97b0f21c4321b8f862678
1c189e183a6c424aef1838908b3dda27ce52ebee
describe
'25857' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZC' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
e2af6dd1c726fba4136e80c25a7e602d
c4da6d719b3bce60745547d943a5fa8e5587f39b
describe
'311785' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZD' 'sip-files00171f.jp2'
2df928e3efe7b4a0ace21f03ac0ac320
80312be78e6f22c0857c29d343e84088275fade3
describe
'50199' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZE' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
d063d3a873cae3029a72ed6b9ff4fcd0
7ce0cc9aadc15dd5bad9183fec43f8dc4f096b4b
'2012-06-29T07:39:34-04:00'
describe
'26771' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZF' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
05d31174abbb261488cdc894ec72c5d4
4c1da572f0a031a64fa544526852c975b14e3515
describe
'57462' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZG' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
73488ed04f9384141c18dc73e1c7dc68
3dbe6648fd6c08a24212800f3c05b65d6b035833
describe
'56052' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZH' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
1faa111c02253d3ffdb583db4a0fbe73
fe7808a115b6da9c06b822130cfa205a78e1f54a
describe
'28134' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZI' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
7fd3b6ad84e8512d71e5eea6c8d28ac9
7324fa3874de78f8bdcf9a908d2eaffb5e4b91af
describe
'58233' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZJ' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
386b6d509fa59a56b6384ef65994a2a6
c4b24d8686f38598369d5896e1f9c71bc98a6f4d
describe
'29185' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZK' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
5fb0e6e32ba6674def5c9f40a36432b3
d52c0f4800ef87686ef259eaae6c5de59265bcab
describe
'53329' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZL' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
3cbc44304dfea75546f079a86499bcd9
e42bf8ad371125fb83440c869233dbc909dc9b14
describe
'27971' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZM' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
eaf68036b4b2ac48c2891b3b9b7ef5ec
6bd44037b580230a307b5a04ec826c3e39124da4
'2012-06-29T07:42:00-04:00'
describe
'29585' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZN' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
7952a8b75353b1c84523c751eab00ef0
6a84e51c16490e9e30bff51181996c0d8183696b
'2012-06-29T07:40:45-04:00'
describe
'58540' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZO' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
bce48f7a4f9ec15fb77b7dce783ffdb8
7ecc796d00609ea4fa47ddca24589c2a7ab31430
describe
'52156' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZP' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
19e00082423382b2e9c173b6e6b73dbe
073b736e87eac0896e165f7ce9d57de8bbfc38e5
'2012-06-29T07:36:58-04:00'
describe
'28172' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZQ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
6e892def861dbf6976ac6e2ce0f3ca08
0c32e212ac939046e7d458c49af49e953d71d49d
describe
'20853' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZR' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
2104a81276533e0b3696e18cb87cf6c3
185302d10d5a1d21c78604f0938dc738fa82d674
describe
'51618' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZS' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
580c1ec27061dc9cc02030cbef4c2f35
876d039f1ce977d2e6327b2cde4c93f97acea7f9
describe
'27037' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZT' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
7adf4ea3645b1924f508d447c9d7e4a7
38b28d204496425d64468defa45d595ec21cddb0
describe
'59776' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZU' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
c090bb2722d783a63493592764c5330e
6622e540434a6cac8674fa53ee3b51375095d807
describe
'29597' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZV' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
915f8888410036e7d8a95b6ef89a245e
3afe58617dad52bc40957aa50f3871a8a8b62c13
describe
'56304' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZW' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
d7c1f52914d21ba96230acb234c2f225
3283138d2e4147c2f71a436f2a2067abbdb8d9ca
describe
'28625' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZX' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
2e67093ea64efc36fd939b07a172cce0
5b3635d4732f604e4fc70c43ce585b92b07a0061
'2012-06-29T07:37:30-04:00'
describe
'55648' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZY' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
5b2c7d2e24f9d82f8b0156c65e19dfd4
2178b598be39f2398854332d70e8b251c6f17195
describe
'28942' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAABZZ' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
5111d55a40a443e5d327a94a6a3f9aff
5e869046283bffdeef2ed23e74723a1155e33d0d
describe
'56218' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAA' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
e77c90c378436b5d331bf7676899c8b6
7ac84d1074fead49f276685188b8688297b2bf11
describe
'28363' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAB' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
608d78ca90f6d66505d8c225dfe7478d
4d9580383c215d9871b96434f8e2531f6e846971
'2012-06-29T07:34:37-04:00'
describe
'58319' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAC' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
4eafed7f333253547b27438432c16d83
4819d0e8a2e5bedf40d40d4e459aba82db84bf25
describe
'29319' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAD' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
3d1fdbcbabc7d63fdc662a52e53d0789
b8335181c39ccdd00ca01e0b6558dc15d7b25209
describe
'37140' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAE' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
6ee1e017537321eeee2a29a27ca648b4
3ec1e3acd7acffd9a6e0d370c4fd14e61aa00957
describe
'23745' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAF' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
8dfbd8bf644f896498fb9dd735564449
df68a236ae3788ff1f3fba31c2ba1e49eda2f680
describe
'26834' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAG' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
c400611f007ebfc9915cec8949e21aba
12ec75e3fd848bb1be5a7daacbd4b15f38556314
describe
'51123' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAH' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
a65da763d5c62be2187b916d92178eb2
50eeeabe9e8d3df5deb5ede1a4509fb987987250
describe
'58562' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAI' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
c7f94c9e9082c228cac97406980ab9f1
4f2255c597a306337a9202804303e1ec0f263f77
describe
'29577' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAJ' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
6ac6991041275d758d74b984224b6741
b5a4c3c4f04d4355614305705d753b40627da8b0
describe
'56619' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAK' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
81c4df0604abcbf3112c50e3e05f6c25
23ea33c03d3171a989192d715eb9b3d65e4e12b7
describe
'28488' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAL' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
7e46d2fa927e2b6b00eae087dd6061ae
9b93f6eb44f696b03f1299e0e5eb4a95ede14c7e
describe
'57998' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAM' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
235dda54d80e4999f8b9297c302605f8
15ea5648509fb4a9456f5a4733f9a05efd441c1d
describe
'29152' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAN' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
3ad37ad636b9cb2da8ab3254d31f5147
8ee2972adf985d1b853bc292943577822b7c2df3
describe
'37143' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAO' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
ec32e5128ad4538fe01187f631f8a404
5e8cd0d72bd7efa4584056dc88db8d502639370b
describe
'23781' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAP' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
df5a2334358d1498168baf136d2790a0
7b3119a3f9e3aef599e484e6e5223547b5329f04
describe
'74678' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAQ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
90e25048386d887dca7aac6ac51885c9
48f6a9703ffcdc3906c0b8db92e50cdfc074a5e3
describe
'83032' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAR' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
22ba5f5be8565bfdb67cbc369aded51c
431f7c1d449f4f3a5b3177f634ce04906527041e
describe
'36368' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAS' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
f25fdc15903bc51a095046706fa1e7d8
04283ec3c45419de9deca3f0c452858dab05dc48
describe
'83763' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAT' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
a02edd9c786a7595b1b812ca7fc7580e
96833c0b2ee5f18c339463b7de757a7930425198
'2012-06-29T07:44:52-04:00'
describe
'36774' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAU' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
9abc99857984fbe7410e9548081601f4
75f8a2edb9c4e61ed2a18ee835f9e813479e5f3a
describe
'78767' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAV' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
5472123fd16566b4f674039f8ed4f6f9
583a2778dd848edb59aef563220d4f14a9aea5a6
describe
'36157' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAW' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
e070e056416dc04d01c4a0683aa2eb53
15105a45f4e9aecc0f7bde3a4fe7c114da0d625c
describe
'63290' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAX' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
f5d7fa8b7324954ea4bf1d692c971f2f
493f84b24a39c3a0741fa513b3f157c04f0c4e8a
describe
'31383' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAY' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
cc98ce46c8dba92998b43298c937e632
0ede34a56a941200447f844f922f44bb2a911911
describe
'53242' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACAZ' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
d71b2161dfc1efad4c63c4a2b8c0ee11
dd6fe4ae4124449590ad038389a0f99d47dd8873
describe
'27537' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBA' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
687454145db851c81daacd30030ba1af
e47a2b836698d8edfb1585478587a4de6c4f725c
describe
'28287' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBB' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
52b774a73661ea1734db699d9c834ef7
3f29865c5d5017608625b03b7e0bfb2a5c3046d1
describe
'56927' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBC' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
ddd83c570e9cb13fca62796bd97a73d7
142adc553825e88078b49d2c8ad33a6b677bac38
describe
'29258' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBD' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
11dc614a3cd025f0d509a52e4cce8a8e
d56a7b42943493d111207c1d7839a2e6db21da5b
describe
'55559' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBE' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
af51cb7d7b7c7156a354cd3130115e52
3e5b5d3e34a9152be3eed491dd614d5adabfc128
'2012-06-29T07:31:42-04:00'
describe
'28509' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBF' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
08b019a7dcba82bccae6d9da3de3800c
68e0f56ea7c6536188fe8f08db8a902de676b943
describe
'60426' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBG' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
b537904885f36f0896b7dd925f77dd6a
2d1e359f424800bf41a327d7113ee09eb8e0d187
describe
'57383' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBH' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
1f2d894aca1017f192cb79e9a30060a2
b05ab4e20c26a5a18da5b47a5329a7ee0b8adbfb
describe
'28507' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBI' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
1d603d33529c99c5fd7f95f9fb9aa965
86333547c7ad98b719cfa2420d443a0bd5411a33
describe
'59852' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBJ' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
2f08338ec7f242d92846b67be855e13b
bc4f82c223fd23a94c4f95dd7fa841b3c48a411f
'2012-06-29T07:29:25-04:00'
describe
'29572' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBK' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
589bf43df751be39a4fcfbd0646e0730
cc37e30e55206b0ddc35bffa16773b4ded4e3bfd
describe
'58226' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBL' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
aa87e0428e6412fc2fdecf5246312fa2
8e4a1c2b9335f839d9ff54a79c3b220999031743
describe
'28847' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBM' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
5774839ace7f2a08698002f97e0e8f28
16d82f9cb6e7b064baf6bc5ca9b571e48b56f7a2
describe
'57172' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBN' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
e6fdcbd182fac4f3d88869220d6f1530
8da44c3711fbc6f22ec0e6a0499e5ffa9a8aff11
describe
'28461' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBO' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
e65394e6dc7bba8ddc456ddd73972e3d
bd2ae11049757f956158548c299a64a262becb8f
describe
'59431' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBP' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
789c8d314308bba3a40af5ab661a30dd
f5c21829bd8f7a57e15e0a034113f4088af1cd0f
describe
'29504' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBQ' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
48632d86416f6aeaecbea1b06d164eda
ee558353a9d24d0c1932060e455d8576d38dd373
'2012-06-29T07:29:42-04:00'
describe
'56069' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBR' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
54fb84960cadeb89e38d9e5cf79ee814
6183a9f6530ee39d3dad2afa0a6c116dda352068
describe
'27991' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBS' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
b6c72b0ef08eb32bbbc08cf4af32fef3
8cfa028c6677a9e10b9d458d528e4060a4141eb2
'2012-06-29T07:36:52-04:00'
describe
'49605' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBT' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
5a3345e907d8cb287991661c4d52f118
38c9079bb3f58a6c008a3b44227bed5b1f486e78
describe
'26851' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBU' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
b7335118de4e590c5cdc33fd19e8ce74
572c870e1080547ae06dc4b4f186ded3568c402e
'2012-06-29T07:34:11-04:00'
describe
'73283' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBV' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
71217e6d8acedc6c8080e2c4c4cf483b
2e905f1ba4c7d1aedfa156f1b698cc3d70e94018
describe
'34115' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBW' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
85d0bfa1a89a1cb2bf242ad5e47e4689
2162e905deca09957125b75d21f0ee9351bdcee3
describe
'83122' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBX' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
343196825dad354bd63cd09b2b9bbf8b
991fab7a250266fe42f3664bbeab4f4061b73186
describe
'36510' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBY' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
403e5b27790b4c5c880664d9219515f7
dbe437fee764e42e1a003e8803b2ecf707d49369
describe
'76650' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACBZ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
d4f89d2f468b960dfc6fb1f87139ed39
13f2dda3cbbf489a5927ad16b4c6801a82c2d637
describe
'35114' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCA' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
1375776951c19589dbf0c1e2a5a3e343
b35d53dc574e76a1f05700545b19a1973cf10fc3
describe
'84523' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCB' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
fa6cec42cea218e9aeaee6a523bbd431
f47f479d609edaa2d00e7f9c8c133d54c8015706
describe
'36381' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCC' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
eb1f96c9860647741b912e11f39c9d57
fc0ab4adb3398851a276c7050b82305a44ac888e
describe
'82926' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCD' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
eedf4c3bb0b4314c2d8f34d8fedbc03e
2d18b9358df2efb38a702729c3ec63036f4d4c95
describe
'37288' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCE' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
e83751beb434af59bf8b9def91bfdba1
cb88242c18bc0dffa7dd8c35b07867b58ae50264
describe
'36248' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCF' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
998009b076bb3627d92bbec21f2b18c0
891eafde07c2a19b7572cf2e6e408aa04f6e2c9c
describe
'82744' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCG' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
003068ed7cd6e4e7c6ccbfcd8ea06237
563db0afc904be9c0c35e433afd8afa3723bd3ae
describe
'51724' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCH' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
d47c82cfeb9bc124796acce9eff29fc4
75bd25b1d030d1da8b8c6bfaee0adaf9ed4933e5
describe
'27183' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCI' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
d054a2251917c6f73e710acce5d8fdc2
79007c435341211a7cca9cdc14df536a6a3179c5
'2012-06-29T07:44:08-04:00'
describe
'29371' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCJ' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
77ee5c35fb4ed3f6251ebc7384aec667
c659eb1a0c17d0f68afd1fb3084f0ff9d773695f
describe
'57158' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCK' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
e281cc947be67a188fba51a1d33eebf4
6a0dd8b891ea9d2fc550e50d0625c7892a1178e7
describe
'28497' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCL' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
c8f4054cde3cf23a2f6eef901a267192
737187ce01a1ac0fcd3414db2e0f241aa9402f8c
describe
'58040' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCM' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
9caedbb4fb1849f03844245f1e26fb9a
5e5ddf171b93a98410dbbd0a8a6525154ddee1c8
'2012-06-29T07:37:13-04:00'
describe
'29084' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCN' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
ea98f4ade1f055fa8845ede1fa645c52
c2c1ffaff076dc20eaab63825adb1bb72318e3b9
describe
'53642' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCO' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
fa0be1138bfe335ec8fa1259c23344fa
719c9420c6ef29b4cdf76ab3064db21599b07e02
describe
'27970' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCP' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
93ba5158f6528ca3420d3308406f9429
17d608aa846e9b606e5492db5421ab18b44fcc16
'2012-06-29T07:35:05-04:00'
describe
'53497' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCQ' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
67582016b3877bb9442273c062687fc8
b907f4b7a4cb0ec6deb1b77b377efde5e705f50e
describe
'27506' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCR' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
7abbcd72e8c706120f6993fd46eb311b
4dc8d19b3fbd764d14a99c1f6c363cc397b1688f
describe
'56966' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCS' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
b02d5ce83288ea0f2f4599b06be0aea2
eb1c229a036c09a2a58d394cb009f92ecc9dc1fd
describe
'28476' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCT' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
3cf73d3036342e20ea5f04fa25ea9805
77b8b163f2d4638db57890485396f0de169173d7
describe
'59558' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCU' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
6ffe9e830ec68e6ad5e9c812bdfee7ad
aa72f73a824c4cea72d4db68629fb6ad7978067d
'2012-06-29T07:42:30-04:00'
describe
'29562' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCV' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
c1b08520f3edd066489a5a068d09873b
014dbf4625d337ee73b4761c5102470094011126
describe
'58109' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCW' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
856ac88d8f95f51348e2c1bf2cd62c12
e046a4f6a92fc5615397801c5bccf31a85316280
'2012-06-29T07:33:58-04:00'
describe
'29094' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCX' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
b7f7f42330a42f4c943abfa69fc61b42
40710891492432643eb10169838c450de38339af
describe
'58670' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCY' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
e170e7ceef2e0088007e203cfb3577e4
fdbfdcb2837d7729ed921113746123515d2e0c86
'2012-06-29T07:30:17-04:00'
describe
'28596' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACCZ' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
c81c46a10d341d630a32fd84943a8876
6ceee4789373c843e8327ac20fee6a94e17206b7
describe
'59028' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDA' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
05030693b749eac793370a5d11c8d5b3
6f29a6b78cdee23ef551ee184a11410cf46ff84c
describe
'29272' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDB' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
a2163d17d603576d3cf4f0a00b425db9
e18526f3a34c651abf2a213984f744bdfea417a3
describe
'58017' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDC' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
918cea61ea55d420dfdaa4e928f508c6
3274449af87a4a148981b134855ddd42a2067e14
describe
'28846' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDD' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
23ee27daf140f89a5aad232e9c81e3d8
0db22e067583befdb78b0091beb9895b87d8b0d1
describe
'73560' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDE' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
77aa4fe0bb73fbee4ec123d72d591e4c
23e50e8ed0867a7765ca5788f3a30f22789ff2cb
describe
'33866' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDF' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
2cb61bacdb29fbe6bdb196af5961b045
2f3ccb36df3a8024265a9c5eb0a9d3d3c0009983
describe
'85787' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDG' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
762bed6cfea4f05cfcc76c895a893fcd
32b43d8ae2f2ed82c759d646b4e64a7d046df699
describe
'37097' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDH' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
ce142832c715f0c4d35b741861fe4479
899545b64a5420e3886146a828ec877160f2019c
describe
'81613' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDI' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
756735749b2b974fbc3adeb537ce4509
c3b6b61f4f89268ff9b629cc7444da3954babf1e
describe
'35627' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDJ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
05d662c9e7ef9d5b5d922c4506bed116
fd34e6b7cba82f7c86dd6f8b752f068c2adf4822
'2012-06-29T07:38:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDK' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
03641da64484ff7ab97bd6561ca52b41
a4a0ab66630177518fc33977a46b611ffc33f1fd
'2012-06-29T07:39:20-04:00'
describe
'83003' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDL' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
091c259d3b20732b7c0bcc095c61da54
c2bc70150db15bc17a0332bf66dc50ac733513fa
describe
'36546' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDM' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
487e06df3f13cada29d330fb446cfc64
5694bf56bfcaf95940018d89bf6d7522cf2a32e6
'2012-06-29T07:36:01-04:00'
describe
'78136' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDN' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
d6fe2ce3beb1b091ec515ef719d5f9ec
9c049bfbe1547932694527f4fec96ac7f2da6f2b
describe
'35054' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDO' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
5fd2d0a0a7d37b6baf1c89750b7f3d15
40dc3c2135ba3aff3422742f6dcacf1b55b1ebe5
'2012-06-29T07:33:38-04:00'
describe
'31438' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDP' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
67f2c92f6f09d599ea68c5ac1472de5a
d2518f7df8dd556bab114ff1ecca48299bcf7d8d
describe
'22372' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDQ' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
bd13db9969ab2c6a4d0bc47e3c420fe4
cf950c60c1d059fc3f36442532ea60e61b683671
describe
'50287' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDR' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
7bbcd533aeade02a6329759b6e95ce62
806a5d2a7836b1d81bc4f2e27cf831f08d2768ae
describe
'26812' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDS' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
36f3684bde61d25027bfbc204c8c8cbf
f5aaab91a6a8737f60cfc311405ada81234fb8db
describe
'56617' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDT' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
93ed69b0d4d0cb37f73652a8193f8597
ca54be3882ef1745d95d48542ea736ec3867463c
describe
'29374' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDU' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
90b55394964c44430cc756738bee7d2c
3389b6d016272e1acfb311ceb551fd6842b776cc
'2012-06-29T07:35:19-04:00'
describe
'55835' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDV' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
776733556872e297635c9aa317b25a2c
c01d7f52c1f72d69b9b40b705221a50e082fef99
describe
'28183' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDW' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
8c38ba22f71a0c9551dd1846023f1dd4
f8600fac6ff474d8c9a09cc988073d1c6d9b9e42
describe
'58487' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDX' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
46afa39877679fcb3f892c7df6fc8ef9
fd000c9538ba79cacb7539e87de9b0082c2f8e3d
'2012-06-29T07:42:48-04:00'
describe
'29172' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDY' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
75744d03161ab8abfeb089e19bef45fa
49c550003b7dd37afc01163a22b39c1e2581cb4b
describe
'55878' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACDZ' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
6f95f8d13dfa343fc0e84063f7cd64a4
d7a77eca665fcf1bd6ebef9abcb56a1073616f66
describe
'28324' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEA' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
2c8beb9b260ffb1ac7d3c65426dd7de9
9444e274d9ab856c80c6934745a662642644fd32
describe
'29091' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEB' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
7411b41101e31f9d02ad10034c2d546d
6d6105b3ee4fc759cb0e15bc1b9a3825e40addb1
describe
'58210' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEC' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
7831c4b8c28a63b216ae0c0e6ac8213d
7097dd18292ef3a414eb4abc5b4250b5d8983afb
'2012-06-29T07:37:08-04:00'
describe
'57084' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACED' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
2dc1eb6f5a45d9c663e83b24f1482dc7
d886ea812640ab391b129a332d20f264f70ce710
describe
'28639' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEE' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
62341725c96923bbccfbcf677fc760bc
293b6069a9bf4e70f5145adc951c8d0f640c017f
describe
'29793' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEF' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
f134e3381f436893fdf294a16ca938db
b5f5a6fadc403f18e1fa8c9d0922764e37e23bc9
describe
'59139' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEG' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
85b4824725ccf043b43739349dc59361
706c609944082a0159ae30ea90bc030de3e0485f
'2012-06-29T07:29:05-04:00'
describe
'57224' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEH' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
90e42e7ede6eb84be3410dfcf31bfacf
eb05baf0d90227fd3a2d9578e7049067bc90bdff
describe
'28581' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEI' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
8f6968ef9a9826696c9d15e1750ca6fa
0f90a9182b668b284c67df1dafcbdd141ea268b4
describe
'42547' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEJ' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
ba691d5298dbeeccd96f9be3d6dcb120
c74b8045fa751f43efe9ec5e0306a080fd151930
describe
'24848' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEK' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
f4af2ca1a45712e27871de0cd26d013c
789911dcb7445d614f272d1a740241a2e90ab9d2
describe
'50657' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEL' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
82db5db2fa942d5d67bff9de4724a430
0e87d3ab2b2a54a62e8f174259cb809d517b82b9
describe
'26971' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEM' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
8e70a5294608277aee06904f3a3a7908
b22e5d34791b6d5c61f44d91e3e0f3e141aed0de
describe
'58921' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEN' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
3ced5a87bf61507a4adf5cfefe33ed18
32a87b30fe6d0350387535e83ad510b74ca270fd
describe
'29590' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEO' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
bef89cadd188e6268ccd250d8fed3a52
61f392a7c31d3c313ad1534a0524824aab098ea5
'2012-06-29T07:43:29-04:00'
describe
'54244' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEP' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
3c6f1c478d7aed6b49b94e4c4e249472
00c0d6de63241d8c55b50558b526678daf842771
describe
'28037' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEQ' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
639d299eb9f17d874e1f66733f913aa5
ba24a868bf52f0b38f2502618af847e64b28ef75
describe
'58504' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACER' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
36152bd0d4ebe66b8b4960942cc92965
d88ac476b002316a1a68463bd39cb2a417e7d463
describe
'29575' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACES' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
3993adc29c9fa658ac1182e3b1166d1a
1095e68db82e86d99623511e9437d1ee50eb48c5
'2012-06-29T07:42:53-04:00'
describe
'25771' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACET' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
20ce4cb19b33be821c5d0e4395b1b7aa
568f5081dc101afc4647fb0390b4e51f614c1dba
describe
'20400' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEU' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
93948025a58d33f12045677e172ab177
6ad7528c5ad66bdc72f97b392097db7bb803ec0c
describe
'73516' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEV' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
c6cbee66a19e8e0371bd9b4259acd49e
3253d0a8cf4764c1f0f7406f1be25a781aa14d51
describe
'33820' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEW' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
ed50e13b4f4cd404ca7bcb89da1ced0b
188d7f4ac61f1150411ded47d56466ce9872f822
describe
'84645' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEX' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
3d307aaa0f019039682114f92d63add6
7800cc952de147c4af80a9f62f277dd9b54316b8
describe
'84418' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEY' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
a724dacf52f20a316920fd27f0fa3863
f648d5bcbe4c4435c9571641dd5934d27f63fa96
describe
'36688' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACEZ' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
e666278f08ddc6702227ea4c51e939c0
8b728e8f9dcdda3a977074567f7124d3d63810d5
describe
'82307' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFA' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
ec82e5afbb321eda6d4617879aa3d2ab
7e2c387a35555dab2c521b50b1026b260056b7b9
describe
'36568' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFB' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
e1105a6156ce9f3fcef7fcfb6ad061b8
a8c670b61b68797bde8cd87f36f8507a8ef37b4a
describe
'54938' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFC' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
082c47939106e50d0041f3eace526594
f5df390b396d4e8888328b26694efc01df2c39e1
describe
'28763' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFD' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
4829b5647b36502ef98d1d096d47ddb2
36c61a1ff5fe9ded3390fdb5d5d6fa065d4a20a6
describe
'52670' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFE' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
e5090fa58a1182d9317b9f34adedebd5
0440973463aa83d0226502a8a0057b6112f5bbcf
describe
'27605' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFF' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
666a7866ba711a45107b84ac09bc20b1
960131eedc747ad4d1ca94fa541a15056bfc054c
describe
'56755' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFG' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
f09547d0e4f76a51f825504a2d260826
100bc86d5c62f9f3c9aca9b40332e19595878928
describe
'28564' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFH' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
296c0a87085fa16301036692b9661b7f
0bacb7aaef626799148cda3ebe9139dc5527fded
describe
'60070' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFI' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
6bdc80b2e8316a1d003b06af7d3c9726
b0c36b4d2e18f55f5a61086fb6b7062ec970c0fe
'2012-06-29T07:34:53-04:00'
describe
'29576' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFJ' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
aa762f8a1df863f9117cee803c4bc4d5
a7a6bda4db2c0dfdab09dad83cf9e7ae9ee492d9
describe
'57155' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFK' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
03a9c5520d62a0a16d6917bd3f595b9d
603573e980afc19ed74b50afdd46cddde62e26ec
describe
'28533' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFL' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
9635524ef7c64ad29b1288d5f90c18eb
e15b7a0724d5340f949109e905de4251c4d0f34f
'2012-06-29T07:41:28-04:00'
describe
'58864' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFM' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
9fe9b0b4281c3e4bc1333fd7fcdd38f8
4a0208c177e218566b376770a863da7a70c8ca53
describe
'56150' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFN' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
9e566596d499185cdfd7c77cada9c23a
3856cc416e353947311264367f9a7c2c16886754
describe
'28374' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFO' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
256af085f3002c7c935cdc563e812df3
3e2b7ab877a4d34dd88821bddf57ff6f4ec38f5b
'2012-06-29T07:33:33-04:00'
describe
'58783' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFP' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
214cbce21170c4e57244888e611bd859
03fc318c4b84dcf141010f4015e67dfd0e3fffcd
'2012-06-29T07:40:08-04:00'
describe
'1190456' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFQ' 'sip-files00169.tiff'
5f33b412d1e2c9ac8e092f0a2fa9851e
c903d352758205795e75153a83e5b38ac7d3cd1b
describe
'1298656' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFR' 'sip-files00170.tiff'
bbcf13a4477fcb90a6babd2c4f145a0e
be1b6eb1b6d99f8596b0022c09d9ea7d62078983
describe
'56527' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFS' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
3f582e3a6f4ec004d0a0f926dee02061
6f786886d13110e1dd38644e359d967ae9ce4107
describe
'28640' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFT' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
16ee9ce801664812d758966af72625e3
b0cc655cf8e183c1defbfda1879f5515846f35ad
describe
'58928' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFU' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
9068241a6b47481d9e1546de90571209
4bfe9dc0dc755682235b92b8d3709ad0824b6b5b
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFV' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
73408dd0d32e46d78660bb36fe5344ad
c8e3396e9246fc82d9b76789c33d019cf3688133
'2012-06-29T07:42:39-04:00'
describe
'49855' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFW' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
608bc6d2b8dbff971cbaae16f5e99259
eb0054aad4e3ff54cfba8d8d49eee48e2e03d9c8
describe
'27284' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFX' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
ac8aa3e3958757adb20141d043477bd1
ceb8f121e637453aa7a3aef0f399b0933dc2d247
describe
'52512' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFY' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
c628bb0b405e7da96ac558bd7b91b28d
69ea218cdc4c860c79d3a985ed71252fcf3aec4a
describe
'27525' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACFZ' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
1da08a3d5412317b523065b563cfd8b6
e205a051031cf312f4fc7fc07968f5d9cdda2f8b
describe
'57936' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGA' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
6fe261a7219a23a4c1d29fb10fb953cb
648e687524ea10d275c7911c275eeee68a527696
describe
'28886' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGB' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
2a1a5de1ba5bdb3489366be46b4d525d
68aad96424aefb9c1bc9b08829d282d1d20ff5b4
describe
'58756' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGC' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
ae73d671b3c0cf68cc1bbcb72093a802
31963961d31419b26a5a1aabe3f5232e9f9bd1e6
describe
'29666' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGD' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
c9d7ec867cc87f7d1168083758d1f6c4
8a18be8b8abfd96ad56cb2ca14c0249acc02cc8c
'2012-06-29T07:40:39-04:00'
describe
'56083' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGE' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
ef783e167602808c910ac70933f0d8ec
5c1c336ca95e156db9df885120553c75f167a27e
describe
'28292' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGF' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
e3bbbf7109ce8e32d967e13a74acdf0e
e1832a9d337405f6e9e93340802725fea7b67e22
describe
'27311' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGG' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
089ee9fc9ceb72f6f446dbdd91375498
3ca91bc121b82e81b80a9d5b421fd87fa3d131cd
describe
'20791' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGH' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
f0c333f7de49792baefc206108983e88
3e1fcfd96899b5a615203fec68dcda72397b21b4
describe
'66982' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGI' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
dc3939542a67f66ac8db4dd146668cb9
1c5d53a08e00fcfb4f0aa555ca152fe48277fbf6
describe
'28527' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGJ' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
76c516dd6b82bef32b49cb122bc26a85
73dd86762a2d60ceb974b3dd5ebcb691bae4918b
describe
'65828' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGK' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
8ff05aaa7cfa58c433409affe8287631
f7685d2f4c4ef87376c4cbe3405ce0c0315679f5
describe
'28441' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGL' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
5b993e55b8c8d36be38479acceadab4b
42c92e9c41d4134e1d8f76589bf33ec0fca2e2b5
describe
'29314' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGM' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
0ebade734becfe576c851fc87b6f8c3e
a6f4dd9375554c12d27fa86cc2bc40b0a37bae1d
'2012-06-29T07:39:49-04:00'
describe
'13762' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGN' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
b516265e8e969f9292b1a402af030351
5e26bc811a87592f085776a82fb34dcb14e40f76
describe
'27753' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGO' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
14ce85217285d00e4115ef79c6d81239
734aed50fd94f52e6823ae2b862b16337f3476c6
describe
'18536' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGP' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
b9b56d5bb6879af3948e2c8363030f60
5c3f67ad7bd1fd3157a54f94680d6a4a5e0c6cd9
describe
'283664' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGQ' 'sip-filesUF00015722_00001.mets'
00dde9e883f546d7313c889203e5c4bd
5b0d31b50a73ca495f9c34aeb5316fe8669bc0eb
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'2013-12-10T02:16:56-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'1713' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGR' 'sip-files00168.txt'
ae48374c12a9de51ed34a0c71e1b3252
86fedf4fcedddd00faaa39467cd75334f2286517
describe
'1671' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGS' 'sip-files00165.txt'
bc7a6a4ac5023c446fc4848f4bf677b8
4b584b880d6003047864a09f6d9b3ccabc259a59
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGT' 'sip-files00162.txt'
146a23c932a587b408ec0358381ffb6e
57d63075b9a087ab13efb4e9cfe98d6f79bb16ab
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGU' 'sip-files00171.txt'
d91fc88c1e5f58541c1961fc39155b53
8c51273ca736dca0e18e884cc5a5d61f0af50513
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGV' 'sip-files00163.txt'
249943d94e5293d3e8745f3de933883a
12b6efc1ed580a3a9ff68a691760202d744d6fdc
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGW' 'sip-files00166.txt'
8c9fe2dbef99c76212cdac4f6cd2d88c
206cc60d43639fc1560dcc24e50464b9af373acd
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGX' 'sip-files00167.txt'
d49dd6486fc41f6f38101ff10a705913
8a4addbe9a6addefd1f1260919b8a0d05f3d36b4
describe
'1705' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGY' 'sip-files00164.txt'
ceb8e5d4e74222cf1e5129923e692c1f
ca7152686fe245681377e8959cff127c9c4ad5b8
describe
'1763' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACGZ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
97d81a287ddd5499b3e91785d255d769
4d5ca8a9334ab5227549ec2de295494b03c649eb
describe
'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACHA' 'sip-files00170.txt'
bdc78c16d275ffd3a3cfeb74d2cda8c1
886ab7e3cf82010973d3ed0457d4892dd2cad84f
describe
'42961' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACHB' 'sip-files00168.pro'
b6bd5e43af8b9c76b113a6cf36a941a6
47956903d7cf82c24f856e665c3e11d9e7443abc
describe
'36985' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACHC' 'sip-files00162.pro'
58ff6e8180873f47167bcc9b1cb67b2d
fb9708f01c720816e8108a219529f7cdeecedd68
describe
'27219' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACHD' 'sip-files00171.pro'
d1669d6ecafb8443cfd59994c4b3af29
a7c439d9c898d9964b934051c11b4a2a9b1bd98a
describe
'34603' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACHE' 'sip-files00163.pro'
11fc8008acf5e6fdb6b097b550e77b37
d87f7705ed7e7c835f5758ff40160ea3d4d072a9
describe
'40322' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACHF' 'sip-files00166.pro'
4c48d8ee2ca557bc411a8f1d02b8fc83
97eac91658ddc741659fafb66fc673842684d229
describe
'41478' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACHG' 'sip-files00167.pro'
abf0aeada4b611e8aea5e39e5642e725
eadb7000bbe989f0721f49d0fa2f869ae74ca973
describe
'44490' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACHH' 'sip-files00169.pro'
4dc5a3f7d9efde370af0b0cd41a5d33c
48eb2a35c918fb815cd418581c41a77f12d398f9
'2012-06-29T07:36:53-04:00'
describe
'42417' 'info:fdaE20100607_AAAAEEfileF20100608_AAACHI' 'sip-files00170.pro'
7e024da55eb4728ac7700026a7a8e796
2472fbf794578b12c60400d92ac1f5c181a7705a
describe



THE DOOMED SHIP.


but after all, he was only a dog, and what is a dog compared
to our fellow-beings ? I would rather loose a million dogs
than the least accident should happen to you, my broder !-
dat I would! Now, do please forgive the men their one
fault. They are very sorry for what they did, I knew they
would and, you see, they have been out this morning to get
something to bring me amends. I forgive them with all my
heart, and will not you, dear broder?"
But in spite of all she could say, I nourished what I now
feel were wicked and revengeful thoughts, and sullenly
refused to forgive them. Oriana thereupon, without saying
another word, took a roll of tobacco and a little rum out of
the store, and selecting two ptarmigans and a mollemoke,
she herself-God bless her !-carried all to the forecastle to
the penitent crew, who, as I subsequently learned, were so
overcome by her heavenly goodness, that they actually shed
tears, and in their own rude way emphatically invoked
blessings on her. And so she had her reward even on earth.






ONG



=e

= w-aPa-e;

=

we Sf ee Setere. —th&

Nae * *
ee

The Baldwin Library




os

Cli ety LT
Zee Cie fi cae?
4
. Once cen LEG & ;
THE DOOMED SHIP.


BLACKBIRD jim’s ENCOUNTER WITH A BEAR,




The a oe

Hoomed Ship ;
Or.

The Wreek

in fBe
Arctic Regions,
Be
Wiffiam Burton.

LONDON :

WILLIAM ANDREWS & CO., 5, FARRINGDON AVENUE.


Che Doomed Ship;

The Wreck in the Arctic Regions.

———_ ><
CHAPTER I.

RIDAY, the seventh day of July, 1822, was appointed
for the sailing of the good barque ‘“ Lady Emily,”
chartered from Hull to Tromso, in Nordland, with a cargo
of coals and salt, and thence in ballast up the Baltic to
St. Petersburgh to ship timber and deals for the return
voyage. The barque was a large, bluff-bowed, square-
sterned, old-fashioned craft of 389 tons O.M., very heavily
timbered, as she had originally been a Baffin’s Bay whaler.
Although a mere tea waggon as regarding her sailing
qualities, she was in high repute’as a remarkably fortunate
craft (a reputation of great weight with sailors), for in all the
voyages she had made during the twenty years she had
been afloat, no accident of any consequence had ever
befallen her. The present crew consisted of captain, two
mates, carpenter, cook, steward, fourteen men before the
mast, and two boys—in all twenty-two hands. I was
nephew of the captain, and acted as second mate, being
then a young fellow of five-and-twenty.
A singular and melancholy occurrence attended our

1
2 THE DOOMED SHIP.

clearing out of port, and the superstitious among us might
well regard it as an evil augury.

We had taken in our cargo in the Humber Dock, and
thence warped out into the basin. After clearing the end
of the south pier, which was crowded with spectators, we
sent a boat off to fasten a hawser to the great pile-head at
the pier point, to drop the ship gently out whilst her sails
were being set. One of the hands remained in the boat,
and the other, a sailor named James Lenton, or Lentowr.,
secured the hawser. The tide was running strongly, and as
soon as the ship swung out, the hawser tightened, and kept
snapping and jerking til] it smoked again, as the hands on
board payed it out. It was a six-inch rope, quite new, and
capable of bearing an immense strain ; but Lenton, for-
seeing that an accident might happen, loudly warned the
spectators to stand back, as it is not unusual for legs to be
broken by the snapping of a hawser and the recoil of its
broken end. They took the hint, but he himself stood by,
ready to cast off when the signal was given from the ship.

The latter had dropped some fifty to sixty yards, when
the hawser fouled on board owing to its excessive stiffness
(for it had never been used before), and ere the men
could clear its kinks, the ship was brought up with a heavy
jerk. For an instant the hawser stretched out straight
and stiff as a bar of steel, and then with a report like a
small cannon it parted, a fathom from the pier post, and
the fragment whirled round in the air and struck poor
James Lenton full on the head. He fell like an ox in a
butcher’s shambles, and never uttered moan nor any cry,
nor ever stirred more.

We perceived the accident from the ship, and the captain
THE DOOMED SHIP. 3

instantly ordered an anchor to be let go, and sent me to the
pier in a shore-boat that was holding on by our mizzen-
chains. When I landed I found poor Lenton quite dead.
His skull was fairly beaten in by the terrible blow. Loud
were the exclamations of the crowd, and I especially re-
member the remark of one gruff old mariner—

“ Aye,” said he, “that poor fellow ’ll never stand his
watch any more, God forgive him! But what better could
be expected from a ship’s sailing on a Friday ?* Did any
of ye ever know such a v’yage to turn out good, mateys?
No! there’s a power aloft as won’t be joked with anyhow !”

A murmur of assent ran through the nautical members of
the crowd, but one man boldly and emphatically laughed
the superstition to scorn.

“Sawdust!” growled he. ‘ What’s Friday more nor any
other day? D’ye mean to tell me, old Grampus, that if this
here hawser had parted in the same fashion on a Monday,
and had struck a fellow on the head, as it wouldn’t have

1”

stopt his grog? Gammon, old chaw-quid

* The superstitions of sailors have been much sneered at, and none
more so than their belief that Friday is a very unlucky day for com-
mencing a voyage. Perhaps the author’s early life and companionship
may have rendered him peculiarly susceptible of such impressions, but
at any rate he is not ashamed to confess that he himself firmly believes
there is more in some of the superstitions of mariners than proud philo-
sophy can explain. He has known many startling instances of disaster
occurring to vessels that left port on a Friday. On one occasion he
sailed in a foreign ship on a Friday, and for several days she was in
imminent peril. Very soon afterwards the same vessel again sailed (on
the evil day it is believed), and was wrecked on the coast of Sweden,
and every soul on board perished.

People may laugh at the idea as much as they please, but if the
author commanded a ship he would not set sail on a Friday for any
consideration. Fenimore Cooper mentions the following remarkable
fact in connection with the subject :—‘‘ A merchant of Connecticut,
4 THE DOOMED SHIP.

“But it wouldn’t ha’ parted on a Monday !” obstinately
retorted the dogmatic old tar, setting his arms a-kimbo, and
looking fiercely at his sceptical brother blue-jacket. ‘Them
only laughs at sailing on Fridays as knows no better. Live
and larn, says I; but there’s some as never'll larn, and
waint tek a warning. And I say that this here mischanter
is a God’s judgment and warning of weat’ll befall that there
ship on the wyage. There she is,” as he held out his
brawny arm in the direction of the “Lady Emily,” which
had now swung round to her anchor, with her bowsprit
pointed to the pier, ‘and ye may look at her, for she'll
never corne back again to port. I wouldn’t swing my
hammock aboard on her, if ye would give me my chest full
o’ Spanish doubloons.”

“Then I would!” answered the unbeliever in the popular
superstition, “‘and if the captain Il give me a berth in room
0’ this poor fellow, I’m ready and willing to ship this blessed
moment !”

“And so you shall, my man!” exclaimed I, “for we
shall not sail short-handed. What name d’ye hail by?”

“Blackbird Jim, sir!” replied the man, who was a deeply-
bronzed and thorough-looking seaman. The soubriquet of
“Blackbird Jim,” as I subsequently learnt, had been

imagining that he could give a death-blow to the opinion sailors
entertain about Friday, caused the keel of a very large ship to be laid
on a Friday; she was launched on a Friday; christened ‘‘The
Friday” ; a captain was found to command her whose name was also
Friday ; and finally she sailed on her first voyage on a Friday, bound
with a costly cargo to China, and in every respect as noble an Indiaman
as ever left port. The result was that she was never seen nor heard of
more !”

Only a few hours after the above was written, the “ Amazon,” West
India steamer was lost ; and on reading the appalling narrative, I find
that she sailed on a Friday /
THE DOOMED SHIP. 5

bestowed on him because he had for many years been
engaged on the African coast in the respectable and
lucrative profession of ‘blackbird catching,” ze. aboard a
slaver, and under this name he had been repeatedly entered
on ships’ books, for sailors frequently sign article, and sail
under the most extraordinary nicknames conceivable.

The departure of the ‘Lady Emily” was delayed four-
and-twenty hours by the accident, as a portion of the crew
and the officers were compelled to give evidence at the
inquest held on the body of the ill-fated sailor. I in-
troduced Mr. Blackbird Jim to the captain, who immediately
shipped him in the room of the deceased, well knowing that
Jim’s enlightened opinions and bold offer to “step into a
dead man’s shoes” would have a very powerful effect in re-
moving the gloomy forebodings the crew would certainly
indulge in.

But we were fated to proceed on our voyage short-handed,
after all; for when we had passed Spurn Point and got into
the open sea, the crew were mustered to be divided into
watches, and one man was missing. As he had assuredly
been doing duty whilst we were in the Humber, we thought
he must either have fallen overboard unnoticed, or else have
deserted in the pilot-boat or in a fishing smack that had
been alongside and sold us some fish. All doubt was
settled by one of the crew producing a letter which he stated
he had found lying on the lid of the missing man’s chest in
the forecastle. This epistle was directed to the captain,
and its strange contents were to the effect that the writer
was so awfully impressed by the accident on the pier at
Hull, together with a dream he had had as we lay at anchor
that night (and which he declared distinctly revealed to him
6 THE DOOMED SHIP.

that the ship and all on board were certain to be lost on the
voyage), that he had resolved to desert and save his life by
concealing himself on board the fishing-boat, which was
coming alongside at the time he wrote the letter in his
berth. He concluded by begging pardon of the captain for
this meditated crime, and added a wild kind of rhapsody
_about his “sinful messmates doomed to perish in their
benighted condition.”

The sailor who wrote this (a well educated man, and a
capital seaman), was a firm believer in the Muggletonian*
creed, and he, at any rate, testified his sincerity on the
present occasion by leaving his chest, hammock, and all his
clothes on board,—everything, in a word, which the poor
fellow possessed in the world, except half-a-dozen precious
volumes of the Muggletonian writings, and these he man-
aged to smuggle away with him.

My uncle read the letter aloud to the deeply attentive
crew, and sternly, but judiciously, commented on the act of
their infatuated shipmate, forcibly pointing out its folly and
criminality. But still the men only listened in gloomy
silence ; and it was very obvious that a profound super-
stitious idea—that we were indeed doomed to destruction—
was fast gaining an ascendency over them, when Blackbird
Jim most opportunely requested permission to ‘‘say his
say,” as he expressed it ; and that being granted, he boldly

* Muggleton was a fanatic of the time of the Commonwealth, and
professed himself to be a prophet—and something more. The author
personally knows a veteran skipper who to this hour carries a library of
Muggleton’s prophecies and hymns in his cabin, and most reverentially
and potentially does he believe them! The same skipper once fancied
he beheld a vision when sailing on the Humber in the dead of night,
and avows his belief that it was identically the same as that which St.
John beheld in the Isle of Patmos.
THE DOOMED SHIP. 7

addressed them off-hand, with considerable acuteness and
tact, in precisely such language as was calculated to make
the deepest impression on foremost Jacks ; and as he wound
up with facetious allusions to the creed and some of the
former doings of the deserter (who had once sailed in the
same ship as himself when engaged in the impious trade of -
“blackbird-catching ”), he not only brought the crew into
temporary good-humour, but set most of them on the broad
grin. The captain politically clenched the matter by
ordering the steward to serve out a stiff caulker of grog to
all hands, to drink success to the voyage.

A fine steady wind set in that night, and after a tolerably
quick and prosperous run, we safely cast anchor in the
harbour of Tromso, on the 28th day of July.
CHAPTER II.

E were nearly a month discharging our cargo; and

after we had shipped a heavy ballast, and warped

out midway between the island on which Tromso stands,

and the mainland of Finmark, we yet remained another

week at anchor, as a considerable time was consumed in

settling with the different merchants and traders who had
purchased our cargo in small quantities.

During this interval an event happened, which although
apparently trivial in itself, and of ordinary occurrence on
board large vessels, must be narrated, as the reader will
eventually find that its result exercised a tremendous
influence over the fate of every soul on board.

First, let me introduce my uncle, Captain Larpent, and
his black steward, Smutta, personally to the reader. The
former was a native of the West Indies, where he and his
sister (my mother) were born, being the children of a small
planter, whose wife died in giving birth to my uncle, who
was reared at the breast of a young negro woman, a slave
on the estate. This negress had a little boy only a few
weeks older than my uncle, and a very particular affection
existed between him and his black foster-brother—an
affection they seemed to have imbibed with the milk they
sucked in turns from one generous bosom. As the children
grew up from infancy to boyhood, the little black slave was
the humble, but inseparable companion and friend of his
THE DOOMED SHIP. 9

young master; and when the latter chose the sea as a pro-
fession, poor Smutta was permitted to ship with him.

Time wore on, and in his twenty-fourth year, my uncle
became commander of a large West Indian privateer, and
Smutta, who had never parted from him, became, as a
matter of course, his steward. After several successful
cruises, the privateer unfortunately fell in with a French
frigate, and, after a desperate defence, was captured.

This blow ruined my grandfather, whose whole estate had _
been mortgaged to fit her out. As to my uncle, he spent
three years in a French prison, with his devoted foster-
brother. After this, he commanded merchant vessels in
every quarter of the globe, and three years before the epoch
of this story, he became master of the ‘Lady Emily,”—
Smutta still being his steward ; and the glory of the faithful
follower was to boast that, from my uncle’s birth, they
had never been separated more than three days at a time.

My uncle was now in his fiftieth year—a short, square-
built, powerful man, with a very dark complexion, and a
resolute cast of countenance. He was a most excellent
navigator, and a member of the Royal Society of London—
into which distinguished body he had been admitted in
consequence of several papers he communicated, containing
valuable results of nautical and astronomical observations.
He was a strict disciplinarian, but a kind-hearted man. He
had never married, and when the decease of my parents left
me a poor friendless orphan of fourteen, he adopted me,
and, taking me to sea with him, made, as he himself used
emphatically to say, ‘‘a sailor and a man of me.”

Smutta was a gigantic fellow with a skin as black and
shining as polished ebony. So vast was his physical power,
Io THE DOOMED SHIP.

that he could lift a bower anchor, weighing ten hundred-
weight, and hold it on a level with his breast ; and I have
seen him take a piece of new half-inch rope, of the strongest
make, and, wrapping each end round his mighty hands,
snap it asunder with a single jerk, as easily as I could a bit
of packthread. His height was six feet nine inches, but his
bulk was so remarkable, that at a little distance he by no
means looked so tall as he really was. His arm was as
thick as an ordinary man’s thigh, and the span of his hand
was fifteen inches. His features were of the true Congo
type, and certainly poor Smutta was anything but a beauty,
even for a negro. When he opened his enormous mouth
to the full extent, and displayed the cavity with rows of
huge teeth, white as the purest ivory, the effect was quite
startling to a stranger. He always dressed very smartly,
his invariable costume being white duck trousers, with a
broad black belt of varnished leather, confined by a bright
brass clasp ; a white shirt, and a blue jacket of fine cloth,
jauntily braided and frogged. He used to turn down the
broad collar of his shirt, and leave his bull-like neck
exposed to all seasons and in all weathers. He never wore
hat nor cap, and indeed his great head was thatched with
such a dense mass of frizzled wool, that any artificial cover-
ing would, to say the least, have been superfluous. For
ornament, he wore large gold ear-rings, richly chased. He
was, in his way, a nautical dandy, and had the rare merit,
in a negro, of being scrupulously clean, both in his dress
and person. Every morning, at eight bells, he went on the
forecastle, and, stripping to the waist, made one of the boys
scrub him heartily, and finish off by dashing over him a
couple of buckets of salt water.
THE DOOMED SHIP. TI

Such was Smutta the Great (no misnomer) ; but although
he had a giant’s strength, he never used it tyrannously like
a giant, but was a gentle and kind-hearted creature. The
only thing that ever gave him personal offence was when
the men called him ‘“ Snowball.” He would reply—‘“I not
Snowball—I Smutta; dat you know berry well ;” and, if
they teased him very much, he would. occasionally be so far
roused, as to coolly stretch forth one arm, and, seizing the
offender by the nape of the neck, lift him up and give him
a shake in the air, just as one might do a naughty child.
But if ever the crew had any little favour to beg of the
captain, they always made Smutta (he was “ Mister” Smutta
then, not Snowball) the intercessor, and never in vain.

I remember once hearing some of the men bantering him
by a comparison between King George and his captain, they
pretending to be in dispute as to which was the greatest
man, and begging Smutta to decide the knotty question.
The steward listened very gravely to all their roguish mock
arguments, and then gave this oracular judgment—“ Berry
good. King Shorge, be berry great man—yah, dat is so.
King Shorge I nebber hab seen,—but he no sailor ; he not
eben know how splice rope! Ugh! Captain Larpen’, he
my king!” Go along, yah !”

Smutta’s love and devotion to his foster-brother and
captain was really quite affecting. Whatever Captain
Larpent said or did was, in Smutta’s opinion, necessarily
right. He would go through fire and water at the slightest
hint from the captain ; and once, when the latter was laid
up in his berth, dangerously ill, I thought Smutta would
have gone altogether distracted.

He would sit moaning to himself by the captain’s bed-
12 THE DOOMED SHIP.

side, tending him, and watching him, as a fond mother does
a sick child, and would permit no living being but himself
to administer anything. At times his agony and despair
was such, that he would run sobbing on deck, and wring
his hands, crying, “‘Oh de cappen! he die—Smutta die
too!” And I verily think that if the ‘‘cappen” had died,
Smutta would not have long survived him. One peculiar
act of this simple, but noble-hearted creature, affected me
to tears.

One night, when the captain’s disorder reached its crisis, I
went on deck. We were then in the latitude of the Azores,
and it was almost a dead calm. I was astonished to see all
hands congregated on the forecastle in a close group.
Stepping up, I found them surrounding Smutta, while one
of the boys, by the light of a lanthorn, was reading aloud the
prayers for a sick person from the Book of Common
Prayer. The reader stopped at my presence, and the crew
made a movement to separate, but I said, ‘Go on!” and
the lad read to the end, amid a silence broken only by the
convulsive sobs of Smutta, and the pattering of his heavy
tears, as they trickled down his sable cheeks, and fell on deck.

It seems that this devoted fellow had taken the captain’s
large Prayer-book from the cabin, and, as he could not read
himself, he had made one of the boys his chaplain, and had
actually roused up the watch below, and induced all hands to
assemble to pray for his beloved captain! Heaven surely
listened to those prayers !

Thrice had Smutta saved the captain’s life—on two
occasions from drowning, and once when in action with the
French. The bonds which united them were altogether
extraordinary. On his part, the captain reciprocated his
THE DOOMED SHIP. 13

foster-brother’s affection with almost equal intensity. Next
to the captain, Smutta loved and reverenced me. I was near
akin to his idol, and looked upon as the great captain’s son,
and from my boyhood had been constantly with them both.

And now for the incident I alluded to. One of the ship’s
apprentices, who chiefly acted as cabin-boy, was a lad about
fifteen years of age, named Claude Chepini, born in
England, but of Italian parents. He was a tall, active
fellow, with strongly-marked Italian features, large black
eyes, and long black hair.

Three days before we sailed from Tromso, the captain
ordered this boy to clean his favourite telescope. In doing
this on deck, Chepini very carelessly laid the pieces of the
telescope on the top of the bulwark, and one of the largest
rolled overboard. The captain was so vexed, that at the
moment he snatched up a rope-end, and gave the boy three
or four blows, but not very severe ones.

Nothing more was thought of this at the time; but the
next morning the boat which had been lying alongside was
missing, and Chepini also. He had run the ship.

Inquiries were immediately made, and the boat was soon
found drifting along the shore of the opposite mainland. A
party was sent in search of the deserter, and in a few hours
they captured him hiding among the brushwood of
Tromsdal (a ravine near the shore), and brought him back
to the ship. ° He was forthwith marched to the quarter-deck
before the captain, who was naturally very angry.

“Now, Chepini, what made you run the ship?” said he.

The lad never spoke, but turned deathly pale, and hung
down his head.

“Have I not always been a good and kind captain to you?”
14 THE DOOMED SHIP.

My uncle had really been quite a father to the boy,
having paid for his out-fit, a year before, out of his own
pocket, and ever had treated him most kindly, and had
even recently begun to teach him navigation.

Still Chepini made no reply.

“Do you hear me, boy?” repeated the captain with
increasing irritation.

This time Chepini raised his head, and I shall never
forget the startling glance of malignancy which shot from
his flashing black eyes, as he hissed, rather than said,

“You struck me yesterday !”

“Struck you! and hadn’t Ia right? Whoare you? It
is high time, I find, to teach you your station. Will you
beg pardon for running the ship ?”

The boy clenched his teeth, and again hanging down his
head, muttered something inaudible.

“What do you say? Once more, will you beg pardon?”

Not a syllable did the culprit reply. The captain’s brow
grew black with passion, and turning round to the steward,
who, as usual, was at his elbow, following him like a dog,
he quickly said,

“ Smutta, strip that lad and swing him up!”

No sooner said than done. The gigantic black handled
Chepini precisely as if he were an infant, and, stripping him
naked to the waist, lashed him fast by the wrists to the
mizen shrouds.

“Now, Chepini.” said the captain, biting his lip to
refrain his anger, ‘‘any other captain but me would flog you
within an inch of your life, but I will yet forgive you, if you
will only say you are sorry for what you have done, and beg
my pardon.”
THE DOOMED SHIP. 15

No reply.

Without wasting another word, the captain seized a coil
or two of the log-line (a hard-twisted cord, about the thick-
ness of a lady’s little finger), and doubling the bight, took a
turn round his right hand, and inflicted half-a-dozen smart
lashes on the boy’s bare back. Then he paused, and again
asked the obstinate offender if he would beg pardon, but, as
before, no reply could be elicited. Incensed by this, the
captain lashed him till his shoulders and back were covered
with weals, and began to bleed. He had, for a boy,
received a very sound flogging. But not a single expression
of pain, not a murmur of deprecation, escaped his firmly
closed lips.

“Take him down, and lock him up in the store-room till
the ship sails,” said the captain.

As Chepini was led away, he lifted his head for a moment,
and fixed his glaring eyes on the captain with a look that
almost made me shudder. One read there the untamed
ferocity of the tiger, combined with the deadly malignancy
of the rattlesnake. Italian eyes alone could shoot forth
such a horrible expression.

The opinion of the crew on the matter was tolerably
well indicated by some remarks I overheard.

“Tf that fellow grows up, he'll take his six dozen at the
gangway without so much as winking,” said one.

“Ay,” replied another, “but if ’d been the captain, I’m
not blessed if I wouldn’t have cut his back to ribbons, till I
made him squeak for pardon. He’s an ungrateful Italian -
whelp !”

“So he is, messmate, and a mischief-making son of a gun
to boot !”
CHAPTER III.

HE evening before the day appointed for sailing,
Captain Larpent told me that we were to take a
passenger with us, and land her at Copenhagen on our way
to St. Petersburgh. This passenger was a young Danish
lady, named Oriana Neilsen, who had been staying a year
with an uncle of hers, a merchant of Tromso, and who
would now take advantage of the rare opportunity presented
by our vessel to return direct to her home at Copenhagen.
The captain ordered me to go to her uncle’s house, and
inform him that she must be prepared to embark the next
morning, as we should positively sail at noon.

On arriving at the merchant’s residence, I found that the
young lady’s friends, in anticipation of her departure, had
assembled a large party of guests to bid her farewell. My
message being delivered, her uncle warmly insisted on my
passing the evening with them, and he forthwith introduced
me to Jomfrue Oriana Neilsen herself.

She was a young lady twenty years of age, and a fair type
of her Danish countrywomen. She was middle-sized,
well-shaped, and of very lady-like demeanour. Her long,
light auburn hair, floated over her shoulders, and her pure
white brow rose above a set of features which, although
certainly not beautiful, were so pleasant and charming in
their general effect, that I felt delighted to gaze on them.

As soon as her uncle had told her who I was, her fine
blue eyes sparkled, and she extended her hand to me with
THE DOOMED SHIP. 17

winning frankness, and in somewhat broken, but very
tolerable English, and with a voice peculiarly sweet, said—

“‘ How kind for you to come! I am very much glad, and
you shall be very welcome to-night with us all!”

I said something or other, and she smilingly added—

“Come with me, and let me give you to eat!”

So saying, she led me to the end of the spacious room,
in which about fifty people of all ages were assembled, and
seated me at a table covered with every delicacy this
far-northern region could furnish.

Although not hungry, in compliment to my fair young
hostess, I ate a little reindeer tongue, which she sliced for
me, spreading over it some delicious moltebcers, and then
she poured me a glass of generous wine, doing all with as
much innocent self-possession as though I were a very old
friend.

“Your ship, it really will set the sail to-morrow?”

I assured her that it would.

“Well, I am ready for to go, and you see how many good,
dear friends come to say, ‘ Farvel, Oriana !’”

Her eyes filled with tears as she glanced round, but,
hastily subduing her emotion, she added, with a smile—

“But we must all be what is the English word P—
merry, dat is, to-night. Why not for your uncle, the good
captain, to come! O, he must, I am so sure!”

She here called her own uncle to her side, and suggested to
him that a message should be sent to the ship to that effect.
He most heartily acquiesced, and at their request I wrote a
note inviting him to come and join the party, and to bring
his chief mate with him. This was immediately despatched
by our boat.



2
18 THE DOOMED SHIP.

Oriana—henceforth and for ever let me drop the surname,
as she herself very speedily taught me to do—then gracefully
introduced me to several of her friends, and, as dances were
going on with much animation, she said to me with
charming naivete,—

“Will you not have one little dance with me?”

I blushed to the very temples, and stammered,—

“TJ am very sorry, but I cannot dance !”

“Cannot dance!” and she opened her bright eyes widely
with surprise.

“No, indeed, I cannot; I never was taught. I never
danced in all my life!”

This was quite true; and never before had I felt my
deficiency so acutely. Indeed, poor fellow as I was, I had
not mixed in polished society half a dozen times in my life,
and although well enough educated, I was, consequently, as
bashful and out of my element in a large mixed company as
any fore-mast Jack could possibly be.

Oriana instantly divined my feelings with true womanly
tact, and, lightly laying her hand on my arm, she said, in a
soft winning tone, and with a look of gentle sympathy—

“Never mind dat; you can do many better things than
dancing. But I wish I had known you when your beautiful
ship first came here, for I would have taught you to dance.
You would let me teach you, 1 am so sure?” questioned
she, with an arch look.

I was about to reply when a young Norwegian came up
to ask her hand fora national dance, but as she left my
side, I saw her whisper a word or two to her uncle, the
import of which I rightly enough guessed, for the next
moment he joined me, and very delicately expressing his
THE DOOMED SHIP. 19

wish to make me feel at home, led me by the arm to a
group of friends, who knew a little English, and in a few
minutes set me at my ease, talking and chatting with them.

When the dance concluded in which Oriana was engaged,
she came back to me, and was in the act of exchanging a
few kind words, when my uncle entered in full togs. He
had answered the invitation even more promptly than I
expected, and he had not only brought our first mate with
him, but also no less a personage than Mr. Smutta!

“IT must beg pardon,” said my uncle, “for the liberty I
take of bringing a third party with me, but this faithful
fellow is my foster-brother, I owe my life to him; and, in
fact, he follows me like my shadow—a very black shadow
he is, too, as you may see!”

Herr Duhrendahl, our host, laughed, and said that if
Captain Larpent had brought all his crew with him, they
should have been heartily welcome. As to Oriana, she went
to poor Smutta, who stood bolt upright, donned in his
smartest attire, his face shining like burnished mahogany,
while his great eyes rolled all round, and taking one of his
immense black paws between both her own little white
palms, she looked smilingly up to him, and said—

“You are very much welcome here! We are very glad
to see you, and you must make yourself comfortable and

1

happy !
Blacks don’t blush, so it is said, but I am certain that

Smutta felt the blood tingling all over him. Never before
in his life had a real lady taken him by the hand, and
spoken such honeyed words. I saw that Oriana had won
the giant’s simple heart in a moment, and that he was
henceforth her slave. He looked down at her genial
20 THE DOOMED SHIP.

countenance, and involuntarily the words broke from
him—

“OQ, berry lubly lady! © berry kind, berry good, yah!”

Without more ado, she led him to the refreshment table,
and did not leave him till he had, at her repeated invitation,
commenced a terrible onslaught on the good things placed
before him. This trait of her unaffectedly amiable
disposition increased the already deep sentiment of respect
and admiration I entertained for her.

My uncle was quite at home at once. He danced with
‘Oriana and half the ladies in the room, and joked, sang,
drank, and enjoyed himself thoroughly.

As the night drew on, “the mirth and fun waxed fast and
furious.” My uncle suddenly proposed that Smutta should
give us a fashionable Congo dance, and Smutta, nothing
loth, forthwith took to the floor, and, to the vociferous
delight of the Nordlanders, executed a series of flings and
capers, the like of which had never been seen in “gamle
Norge” before, and never will again. I really thought he
would have brought down the house about our ears, for at
every leap he shook it like an earthquake ; and he accom-
panied his performance with a song in his native Congo
dialect, which was, doubtless, very elegant and sentimental,
but after a few syllables, became a stunning supernatural yell.

It was three o’clock in the morning ere the party broke
up, and we strangers all slept at the house, and when we
departed, conveyed Oriana aboard with us, and set sail at
noon, September 2nd.

The first ten days after leaving port, we had a light wind
dead a-head, and did not make fifty miles of our southward
course all the time. One morning I said to Smutta—
THE DOOMED SHIP. 21

“ How do you like our lady passenger ?”

““O, Massa Sharl” (my name was Charles Meredith), “I
like her berry much! She got good kind heart,” and he
laid his black paw over that part of his body where he
imagined his own heart to beat, that is to say, some eleven
inches below its actual locality. “It good to hear her
*peak, she so berry sweet leetle tongue dat I lub much to
listen. ‘Tree times she hab gibben me her lily leetle hand
to shake, and she nebber call me Snowball like de black-
guard peoples, but she look at me wid, O, so nice a smile!
and she say, ‘Massa Smutta,’ she always call me Massa,
‘you be so good as to do dis or dat!’ O, she good lubly
lady, yah !” .

“You are very right, Smutta!” emphatically said I.

“‘ Massa Sharl, I tell you what I tink !”

“Well, what is that ?”

“T tink what a nice darling little wife she make you, and
den when Smutta grow too old to go to sea wid you, he
stay ashore and play wid your leetle piccaninies, yah!” and
he grinned from ear to ear at the conceit.

“Get along with you for a great ugly black porpoise !”
exclaimed I, giving him a hearty push, which moved him
no more than if he were a rock. But somehow, when I lay
in my berth that night, I couldn’t help smiling complacently
over his honest suggestion.
CHAPTER IV.

AILORS have a pleasant superstition that the presence

of a woman or child on ship-board is decidedly lucky.

Oriana was consequently welcomed heartily by the crew.

Just after she came on board at Tromso, Blackbird Jim

(who already considered himself a privileged person) doffed

his tarpauling, and making his best bow and scrape of the
feet, exclaimed,—

“Bless your smiling face, ma’am! a lady like you is
sunshine on ship-board, and always brings fair winds and
fine weather !”

“What’s that you say, my man?” cried my uncle, who
happened to overhear him. ‘I fancied that you didn’t
believe in salt-water superstitions ?”

The gallant Blackbird was taken a little aback, but
twirling his tarpauling round his fist, he replied, with a
roguish twinkle of his large grey eyes,—‘‘ Oh yes, captain, I
believe in fortinit notions, but not in them as promises ill-
luck. And if this here pretty young lady doesn’t bring us a
capful o’ wind, and that of the right sort, I ain’t no prophet!
The boys o’ Copenhagen, ma’am,” continued he in an
explanatory way, “they’ll get hold o’ the tow-rope and haul
us to the Sound hand-over-fist. That shall be true, as
Charley Baxter said when he banged his wife’s head agen
the bed-post !”

Unfortunately for Mr. Blackbird Jim’s prophetical
reputation, the first ten days, as already mentioned, the
THE DOOMED SHIP. 23

wind was chock ahead, but he took an opportunity of
explaining to the laughing Danish girl that the reason of
this was, that the Copenhagen boys were getting an extra
strong tow-rope expressly manufactured.

The cabin of the “Lady Emily” was large and well
furnished, and the state-room being devoted to Oriana, she
was very comfortable. Every evening Captain Larpent had
a game at chess with her, as the baffling wind was so light
that the ship was generally steady enough. My uncle
prided himself on his skill at chess, but he had met his
match now. Mr. Smutta on one occasion watched the
progress of a protracted game with intense admiration, and
in the fulness of his heart he at length exclaimed—

““O, de lubly lady play ’mazing, but it nebber possible to
beat Cappen Larpen !”

At that moment Oriana demurely gave check-mate,—a
practical lesson for Smutta that even his “cappen” was not
invincible. Poor Smutta constantly studied how to pay
every convenient attention to promote the comfort of the
“lubly lady,” and his manifestations of affection and respect
were at times droll enough.

One night I heard him soundly rating a seaman for having
carelessly flung a heavy chain-tye down on the deck just
over Oriana’s berth, for Smutta fancied the crash would
awake and frighten her. He led the wooden-legged cook a
sad life, also, owing to his anxiety that everything intended
for the cabin table should be served up in the most perfect
style, and to do Smutta justice, few ship’s stewards could
excel him in his vocation.

Oriana had with her a beautiful little silken-haired dog,
and Smutta used to pamper this unfortunate animal with
24 THE DOOMED SHIP.

delicate tit-bits to such a degree that the dog’s mistress
found it necessary to check the steward’s well-meant kind-
ness, else the creature would have died of absolute repletion.

Chepini, the cabin-boy, was liberated from confinement
the day after we left Tromso. I expected that he would
have been sullen and obstinate, but he was the reverse ; he
set about his usual duties with surprising alacrity, and
answered the captain promptly, and in the most respectful
manner, when spoken to.

His countenance bore no trace of lingering irritation, and
to all outward appearance, he had already forgotten his
punishment. Come, thought I, the whipping and the two
or three days of solitude have had a beneficial effect on you,
my fine fellow! But somehow I could not help remember-
ing the fearful display of revengeful passion he had previously
manifested ; and singularly enough, the young Danish lady,
although ignorant that the boy had grossly misbehaved,
entertained an involuntary feeling of repulsion towards him.
I noticed her gazing strangely at him whenever he was
occupied in the cabin, and once she fairly shuddered when
he suddenly met her look. I hinted to her that she did not
seem to like the lad, and the reply she made struck me
deeply :—

‘“No, I am very much sorry, but dat boy I cannot like.
He has the evil eye!”

“The evil eye! What do you mean?”

“OQ, Iam so sure he has! I have seen him look at the
captain, oh, so dreadful a look, I will never forget! Pray,”
added she, in an earnest and frightened tone, “do not you
do anything to make dat boy hate you!”

This opinion of hers, joined to my own secret misgivings,
THE DOOMED SHIP. 25

induced me to henceforth watch Chepini pretty closely, but
there was certainly nothing whatever in his actions or his
words to enable me to judge whether he was hypocritically
acting a part, with revenge gnawing his soul.

Something even worse than head-winds befel us after the
teens were ended, for a dead calm ensued, which lasted an
entire week—a very unusual circumstance in that latitude,
where a wind of some kind or other is nearly always blowing,
and a calm rarely lasts twelve hours. This certainly was a
gloomy commencement of the voyage, and we were hard put
to shifts to keep the men employed—for on shipboard it
will not do to let a man be idle. Officers say (and very
truly), “If we don’t find the men something to do, the
devil will!” We had actually not got one degree south in
seventeen days! This state of inaction was the more
trying, because the days were now rapidly shortening, and
in the latitude we were (a degree north of the Arctic Circle),
we had now only a very few hours of daylight.

On the seventh day of the calm, Oriana cheerfully chatted
with me on deck, and I was astonished to find that she
knew the names of almost every sail and rope in the ship.
I told her she was quite a sailor, and she replied—‘“ So I
ought! my forefathers were Vikings, dat is, Sea Kings, a
thousand years ago.”

This, like all ladies’ logic, was unanswerable.

Smutta was by, most industriously engaged in polishing
one of the brass signal-carronades, for lack of better employ-
ment, but he paused, and addressing her, said—

‘‘Spose, now, you be so good as bring us good wind.”

‘“ Ah, I wish I could, Mr. Smutta!”

“© berry easy. A lubly lady can make wind come as
26 THE DOOMED SHIP.

she like. All got to do, look out in de right quarter, and
whistle in de proper way, and de wind hear and come, yah !”

“ But I do not know the right way to whistle.”

“©, for dat,” grinned the sable rascal, ‘‘ Massa Sharl dere,
him know berry well, he tell you!” :

I explained the way to her, and she forthwith pursed her
rosy mouth, and to Smutta’s glee, invoked the unseen
Spirit of Air by the most silvery, coaxing little whistle ever
heard on shipboard.

“OQ, dat is ’mazing good!” cried the delighted black,
“noting could be betterer. Ah, you sall see, we sall hab
de good big wind come down before eight bells.

For once in his life, Smutta proved a partially true
prophet, for sure enough, just after sunset, a roaring gale
suddenly sprung up, but as it happened to be as unfavour-
able as possible, the chief benefit we derived from it was to
give all hands plenty to do in tacking and reefing throughout
the long hours of utter darkness.
CHAPTER V.

HAT most materially aggravated our position was,

that we were very likely to run short of provisions.

We had been detained much longer at Tromso than we had
anticipated, and we found it impossible to make up the
deficiency of our stores at that place, for no supply could be
had except at an enormous price. In fact, the people lived
then, as they do yet, chiefly on fish—the poorer classes
subsisting almost entirely on fish and coffee. On leaving
Tromso, we had not more than thirty-five days’ stock of
provisions, but we hoped to reach Copenhagen (where
provisions were abundant and cheap) in three, or at most
four, weeks, and therefore felt no inquietude at sailing ; but
the startling fact that seventeen days had already passed
without taking us a degree on our voyage, made my uncle
resolve to put the crew on half allowance. The gale, which
had set in after the calm, moderated the next day, but the
wind continued a-head, and after a full allowance had once
more been served out, the men were informed that they
necessarily would be put on short allowance henceforward.
They seemed taken by surprise, and some murmurs were
heard, but taking their recent heavy exertion into considera-
tion (all hands having been up many hours), the captain
ordered the steward to serve out a liberal allowance of grog,
and the good humour of the crew (for the time being, at any
rate) was restored. Shall I confess the truth? I myself
secretly felt rather glad than sorry that we were likely to
28 THE DOOMED SHIP.

have an exceedingly protracted voyage. Never before in
my life had I been accustomed to the society of an amiable
and accomplished woman—and now to spend many hours
in close contact with her daily—to listen to her inexpressibly
melodious voice—to feast on her pleasant countenance—to
exchange kindly little courtesies with her—was to me a new
and delicious existence. Feelings which I have never known
before, and which I as yet only half understood, swelled my
bosom, and I even felt an increased affection for the old ship
that had been my home three years, because it was the
medium of my enjoying undreamt-of happiness. Gentlemen
who enjoy constant communion with refined circles, graced
by the female sex, can little imagine what a wondrous
charm a poor sailor like me found in the society of a young
lady whom they, perchance, would have thought very
ordinary and common-place. During the night of the gale,
I slipped down several times into the cabin, and listened at
the door of her state-room, fearful that she would be very ill
and alarmed, but I heard not the slightest noise, and at
daybreak she entered the cabin, fresh asa rose, and in
answer to my inquiries, she said she believed the storm had
only made her sleep sounder than usual.

“But were you not frightened at the roar of the waves,
and the tossing of the ship?”

“Ono, why should I? Did I not tell you that I am the
daughter of Vikings? Besides,” added she with her winning
frankness, and truthful, innocent way of speaking, “I knew
dat I was in a good ship, and dat you and all the brave
men were keeping watch over me.”

How my heart leapt as I mentally repeated, “ And you
were keeping watch over me!” To her I said aloud—
THE DOOMED SHIP. 29

“ Aye, and the angels in heaven were keeping watch over
you also !” .

‘“‘God’s angels keep watch over us always, in the calm as
well as in the storm,” responded she; adding in Danish,
whilst a lovely expression of religious faith lit up her
features—‘‘ Hans hellig Engleskare en Skanse om os
Slade!” [His (God’s) holy angel-host a fence around us
places !]

The best and holiest emotions of our nature are surely
sympathetic, for I who, throughout life, had been brought,
as a sailor, into frequent contact with the most sublime and
impressive manifestations of God’s omnipotence and
sublimity, and consequently always felt in my _ better
moments a certain degree of that rude and brief, but sincere,
piety characteristic of seamen, I, in listening to this innocent
young creature’s artless expression of her perfect reliance in
His watchful providence, experienced a warmer and more
spiritual influence of devotional gratitude and faith than I
had ever before been conscious of.

“A strange visitor boarded us in the course of the night,
and when the gale was at its worst,” said I, after a pause.

“Indeed ! was it the Ghost of a Viking ?”

“Faith ! your suggestion is not a bad one,” laughed I.

“ Tell me its shape, and I shall know whether it was one
of my brave old practical ancestors.”

“That of a beautiful white bird. It fell suddenly on the
quarter-deck, and I have taken care of it for you. Here
it is.”

I thereupon opened a locker, and showed her the bird,
which was of a species unknown to me. Its body was the
size of a dove, but its tapering wings were of extraordinary
30 THE DOOMED SHIP.

length. Its feet and long beak were of a bright red colour,
and the former were partially webbed. All its feathers were
spotlessly white.

“Ah!” exclaimed she, with a cry of pleasure, “it is a
Himmelsfugl, dat is, heaven’s bird! O, I am so glad you
have given it to me! I will feed it till it is strong enough to
fly.”

She tenderly released it from its prison, and pressing its
head to her lips, began to caress and smooth its tempest-
ruffled plumage. The bird, which had previously struggled
much in my rough grasp, seemed instinctively to know that
it had nothing to fear now, for it gave a little twittering cry
or two, and then, hiding its head in Oriana’s bosom, spread
forth its wings and remained quite motionless. JI left her
fondling her Himmelsfugl, and thought that she herself was
equally a ‘“ heaven’s bird.”

A day and night more of head-wind, and then it changed
to a light but favourable breeze. On the twentieth day after
leaving Tromso, we got an observation at noon, and found
our latitude to be 65.37.42 N. and our longitude 6.3.19 E.
We were consequently only seven or eight miles north of the
Arctic Circle—Calliskaal, on the coast of Norway, bearing
about one hundred miles distant. We had given the coast
a wide berth, to be thoroughly clear of the numerous
dangerous rocks, which rise far out at sea. I mention our
exact position, because this actually proved the very last
observation ever taken on board the “ Lady Emily.” Just as
I had marked off our position and laid down my quadrant,
Oriana came on deck, with her Himmelsfugl pressed to her
bosom.

“Tt is quite strong now,” said she “and I will let it
THE DOOMED SHIP. 31

fly, for it would be cruel to keep the poor bird a
captive.”

I had my own private doubts about the presumed
“cruelty” of the matter, for the bird had thriven “ mazing,”
as Smutta said, under Oriana’s tender and judicious care,
and although she allowed it to go about the cabin at perfect
liberty, it never seemed inclined to escape by the medium
of the open companion. She fed it in a very singular way,
giving it nothing but the white of hard boiled eggs, chopped
fine, and rolled in powdered loaf-sugar. Strange to say,
the Himmelsfugl took at once to this diet, and ina few
hours it pecked out of her hand as though it had been
domesticated for years.

‘“Farevel, dear, pretty Himmelsfugl!” cried she, holding
forth her arm, with the bird perched on her wrist. But it did
not at all seem desirous of quitting so kind a protector, for
after giving two or three flutters with its wings, it folded them
closely, and nestled very composedly where it was.

“The bird loves you too well already to wish to leave
you,” cried I.

2

“Vent lidt! It will go very soon ;” replied she, and she
was right, as, after a minute of inaction, the Himmelsfugl
gave a powerful swoop with its snowy pinions, and launched
into the air, rising in a spiral direction till it remained, to all
appearance, quite stationary, a mere speck directly overhead.
Then it rapidly descended, and hovered in narrow circles
round our mizzen top-gallant mast-head, and finally settled
on the truck. Throughout the afternoon it remained there,
—sometimes quitting its perch for a few minutes, during
which it resumed its aerial circlings, and then settled again.
Towards night-fall, after a longer rest than usual, it gave a
32 THE DOOMED SHIP.

prolonged shrill wild cry, as though to say, ‘ Farewell for
ever!” and disappeared with astonishing swiftness, flying
due North in a horizontal line.

“Who will feed and cherish the poor Himmelsfugl to
night ?” said I.

“Tt is God’s own bird, and He will do that,” responded
Oriana, with devout simplicity.

The sailors had watched the manceuvres of the bird with
much curiosity, and drew their own omens from its visit
and mysterious departure. Could any of us have foreseen
what would befal us, we should indeed have been justified
in regarding the Himmelsfugl as a mystic messenger from

God.
CHAPTER VI.

S I entered up our day’s reckoning in the log-book
that evening, Oriana peeped over my shoulder a
long while, and at length she said :—

“What use for so many columns ?”

“The daughter of the Vikings,” replied I, somewhat
maliciously, “ ought to know that intuitively.”

“Det er muligt, min ven!” responded she good-
humouredly, but you know that the Vikings were so good
sailors, they never kept any reckoning at all !”

“‘ Very true, I dare say, but, unfortunately, they forgot to
bequeath their wonderful skill to us poor timid modern
mariners! Now, I will tell you what these columns are for.
The entries, you perceive, are made every hour of the day
and night, and show the knots run, the courses, the winds,
the leeway, the latitude, and longitude, and the last column
is for remarks. These other entries give the compass,
course, the tack, the points of leeway, the points of
variation, and, finally, the true course.”

“Thank you, all very good, but I think your ship makes
very much more leeway than you write here.”

The demure way in which she spoke, added to my
high opinion of the degree of nautical knowledge she had
evidently some way acquired, completely deceived me, and
I hastily replied with great earnestness ’:—

“No, indeed, it does not. We have had a light wind all
day, and yet I have allowed a full point for leeway. My

3
34 THE DOOMED SHIP.

uncle, a first-rate. navigator, often allows only one point
when there isa strong breeze, and he never allows more
than three points, or at most three and a-half, even when
under close-reefed topsails.”

‘‘Ah, you don’t understand me,” laughed she. “Iam
very sure that you and Captain Larpent are brave, good
sailors, but the ship is bewitched. Yes, dat is it, 1am so
sure ! She sails like a crab sideways. Oh! pray do not bite
your lip, and be angry with me !”

“Tt is natural,” I replied, with a heavy sigh, “that you
should be weary of our poor old ship, and we certainly have
been very unfortunate this voyage so far, but ”—

“Who told you I am weary of it?” promptly but
soothingly interrupted she.

““J—I feared so. There is nothing whatever to amuse
you, and you doubtless long to embrace your parents at
Copenhagen.”

“My parents are in heaven!” solemnly answered she,
and her eyes filled with tears.

“Oh! pray forgive me: I knew not that. I, also, have
been an orphan from childhood.”

“You an orphan, like me!’ and as though she were
impelled by an irresistible impulse of subtle sympathy, she
offered me her hand. I pressed it warmly ; and not with-
drawing it, she continued :—

“‘ Have you broders and sisters ?”

“No, I have neither. Have you ?”

‘“* Yes, one broder and one sister.” f

“‘ Ah, how often have I yearned for a sister’s love! How
often have I intensely wished that God had given me a
sister !”
THE DOOMED SHIP. 35

‘‘Well, you must let me be your sister!’ responded she
in an affectionate tone, and with a look of the most innocent
endearment ; “ and you shall be my broder.”

I raised her hand to my trembling lips, and turned away
to hide my emotion.

That night I had the middle watch (twelve p.m. to four
a.m.) on deck, and two bells (one o’clock) had just been
struck, and I was in the act of glancing at the compass in
the binnacle, when a cry of agony arose from the companion-
way—a cry so fearful, so thrilling, so unearthly, that I felt my
heart give one convulsive bound, and then momentarily
cease to beat.

“Gracious heaven! what is that?” ejaculated I, gazing
at the pallid face of the steersman, who in his alarm let the
wheel slip half round.

A moment of confused irresolution, and then I rushed
headlong down into the cabin, which, as usual, was obscurely
lighted by a large night lamp swinging from a beam overhead.

Startling and incomprehensible was the sight that I beheld.
Captain Larpent, whose berth was on the larboard side of the
cabin, and opened into the latter simply by a slide (in the
old-fashioned style), was half out of bed, supported in the
arms of Smutta, who had sprung from his own berth at the
foot of the stairs, on being aroused by the dreadful cry.
The captain’s features were agonizingly distorted ; his glaring
eyeballs vacantly wandered round; great drops of sweat
trickled down his forehead; his naturally dark bronzed
complexion was pallid as a corpse ; and his entire body shook
as though he were in a violent ague-fit.

“OQ, Cappen! O, my broder!” moaned the terrified
steward.
36 THE DOOMED SHIP.

“ Uncle, dear uncle !” exclaimed I, ‘in the name of
goodness what is the matter ?”

He clenched my hand in an iron grip, and his eyes settled
on me at the sound of my familiar voice, and a great groan
burst from him, but he did not speak. The first mate, Mr.
Shields, a plain, honest, warm-hearted fellow, who had a
particular affection for my uncle, now hurried in.

“Good gracious! what is it? Is the captain in a fit?”

“No, Shields, I—I’m better know!” and he stretched
forth a hand that trembled like an aspen leaf.

“Thank God!” responded we both, and poor Smutta
burst into tears, crying, “Oh! de cappen ’peak again? Me
nebber tink me hear him ’peak more !”

“Don’t leave me, Smutta! You won’t desert me now?”
tremulously exclaimed the captain.

Had my uncle been himself he never would have uttered
such a request as this. Smutta leave him? Why, if the
ship were sinking, or on fire, Smutta would not stir an inch
from his captain’s side for the universe.

“Oh,” groaned my uncle, reclining heavily on Smutta’s
breast, and covering his face with his hands, ‘’twas horrible,
most horrible !”

Shields and myself exchanged a glance, and I said,—

“ Dear uncle, what was most horrible 2?”

“Yes it will—it must come to pass. God have mercy on
all our souls! But, Charles,” and suddenly he withdrew his
hands from his face and grasped my right hand between
both his, “there is that poor dear Danish girl on board.
Promise me, boy, that you will defend and save her with
your life !”

“ Before God I do promise it, uncle!”
THE DOOMED SHIP. 37

“His mind is wandering—he does not know what he
says,” whispered Shields in my ear.

But I myself was far from thinking that his mind
wandered now.

“Cappen Larpen’ know me—know Smutta—know him
broder?” blubbered the devoted black, bending over his
shattered idol with mingled despair and hope.

“Oh! yes,” faintly murmured the foster-brother, ‘“I
know you, Smutta, and shall know you when we meet aloft !
We have lived together, and we shall die together.”

All this while the captain trembled so that the berth
shook, but the appalling distortion of his features gradually
was passing away. His brow and hands were cold as ice,
and clammy with sweat, but he was becoming calmer and
better.

‘“‘ How did this illness seize you ?”—

“TlIness!” murmured he with a ghastly smile, ‘‘ I’m not
seized with illness, but it is, it was—don’t ask me, boy !”

What was it, or is it? thought I. What can have caused
this inexplicable attack? Captain Larpent was as brave a
seaman as ever trod a deck ; a man of undaunted resolution
and iron nerve. He had retired to his berth two hours
before in perfect health, and now his body and mind
seemed alike awfully stricken. Had some tremendous
vision of impending calamity appeared to him in his sleep ?
Or could it be that, long years ago, he had committed some
dark deed of sin, and the spirit of his victim had now stood
before him in the silent watches of the night, to warn him
that he must prepare to soon meet his Judge on high? All
was a mystery.

“Mr. Meredith, go to your duty, Sir!” all at once
38 THE DOOMED SHIP.

exclaimed the captain, in such a tone of stern, prompt
command, that I started in renewed amazement. ‘An
officer should not quit his watch on deck for a moment.”

“T did not know what had happened, Sir,” replied I.
“The cry was so terrible that J——”

“Captain Larpent,” kindly interrupted the first mate,
“Jet me take charge of the deck, that Mr. Meredith may
stay with you.”

“You are a good fellow, Shields,” replied the captain, in
a softened tone, ‘and you may. But he shall relieve you
soon, for I am better; I shall be myself in the morning !”

As the mate turned away, I happened to look towards the
cabin stairs, and there I beheld the face of Chepini, who
was stretching forward as far as he dare, to see and hear all
that was going on. The instant he perceived himself
observed, he disappeared, but the glimpse of his features
struck a fresh chill to my heart, for I thought of all that had
passed, and the vague suspicions and dread entertained of
him. There was no mistaking the feeling that animated his
soul on the present occasion. His flashing eyes, and every
lineament of his features were expressive of savage triumph.
He regarded the prostration of the captain as the first sweet
morsel of. his anticipated feast of revenge. So, at least, I
instinctively interpreted it at the time.

“ You had better lie down,” said I.

‘Ay, I will, for I shiver like a sail in the blast,” replied
the captain ; and he did so.

At this moment, to my astonishment, Oriana noiselessly
entered the cabin. I had forgotton her in my agitation—
although, as related, the captain himself had made an
unaccountable allusion to her. She had heard the cry, and
THE DOOMED SHIP. 39

had hurriedly risen and dressed herself. She appeared to
understand at a glance what had occurred—at any rate, as
well as I did myself—and though very pale, was quite
composed. Captain Larpent saw her, and after hastily
muttering something to himself, he said aloud,—

“My dear young lady, I am very sorry indeed that you
have been disturbed.”

“OQ, never mind dat!” cheerfully cried she, frankly
coming close up to the side of his berth. ‘‘ You have been
taken ill?”

“ Ves—that is, I—a sudden attack—a—better now!”
confusedly answered the captain, and he pressed one hand
tightly over his eyes, as though to shut out some horrid
sight, whilst I distinctly overheard the words, ‘God have
mercy !” involuntarily burst from his quivering white lips.

“Oh! de cappen hab been a’most die! I nebber seen
him in so way afore!” cried Smutta, whose eyes glistened
with pleasure at the presence of Oriana, as though he
actually fancied she possessed some heavenly power to charm
away the evil demon from the captain’s soul. His remark,
that he had never seen the latter afflicted in the same way
before, was a satisfaction to me, for I had felt doubtful on
that head. Even as Smutta spoke, the strong shivering
again seized the captain, and Oriana laid her hand on his
cold, wet temples with the grave air of a physician. I trust
I shall have such an one, if ever I fall sick! thought I at the
time.

‘Dear Captain Larpent,” said she, in her sweet, winning
voice, “I see you are indeed very ill, but if you will let me
be your nurse, you shall be quite well to-morrow.”

I gave her an eager, grateful look, and she smiled gently,
40 THE DOOMED SHIP.

saying, “ Yes, I know what to do. The captain shall be the
strong man again on the morrow, but he must obey me
to-night.”

My uncle removed his hand from his eyes, and gazed at
her a moment in silent amazement, and then cried, AOU
are very good, but go back to your room at once, my dear
young lady—this is no place for you.”

“JT will not leave you till you are better, and you must,
and shall, obey me this one night,” answered she, very
quietly, but with an air of firmness that evinced her deter-
mination to have her will.

The captain looked again at this extraordinary girl, and
sighed deeply, while some inaudible utterance trembled on
his lips, and his head sank backward on the pillow. I
nodded an approval of what Oriana said, for I loved my
uncle dearly, and I knew not myself what to do to relieve
him, but I felt an instinctive reliance on Oriana. Smutta,
however, settled the matter. ‘‘Cappen,” said he, with great
solemnity, ‘“‘you must do what de lubly lady tink good—
yah !”

“Get some water boiled directly, and bring me brandy
and sugar,” said Oriana to the steward—who jumped up
with such precipitation to obey her, that he struck his woolly
head against the beams with a loud crash.

In a very few minutes the ingredients were set down on
the locker-lid by the side of the berth, and Oriana
rapidly mixed a large tumbler full of half-and-half, or nearly
so. All this while, the captain had never uttered a
word, but occasionally groaned, and shivered as much as
ever.

“‘ Now, captain,” said she, ‘here is your medicine. You
THE DOOMED SHIP. : 41

know dat I have mixed your grog several times before, and
you praised my skill very much.”

“Yah!” eagerly cried Smutta ; and without ceremony he
lifted up the captain, and sustained him with his mighty arm.

“Drink dat—every little drop !” exclaimed the physician.

My uncle looked at all of us with a queer, puzzled air,
and tried to grasp the glass, but his hand shook like that of
one in the palsy.

“T shall give you to drink!” said Oriana; and she held
the tumbler to his lips, from time to time, until he had
drained it. Ere he had done this, his shivering gradually
lessened, but the sweat poured from him. ‘“ Now lie down,”
said she; and he obeyed as submissively as a child; and
then Oriana wiped his brow, and drew the covering well up
to his throat. How I could have hugged her to my heart
at that moment !

After a few minutes spent silent in watching, she again
laid her hand on the captain’s brow, and withdrew it
smilingly. ‘ Feel!” said she to me: I did so, and found
that it was now warm.

“Mr. Smutta, some more water!” cheerfully cried she,
‘Cand keep up a good fire.”

Mr. Smutta sprang about like a harlequin to do her
bidding, and she mixed a second tumbler equally potent as
the first.

“Now, another dose of my medicine—you do not dislike
it, 1 am so sure!”—The way in which she pronounced her
frequent phrase of ‘‘I am so sure,” had an inexpressible
charm for me.

The captain made no demur this time.

“You are very much better now!”
42 THE DOOMED SHIP.

‘‘Thank heaven, yes!”—and indeed it was evident that
the simple remedy of brandy and water, combined with, as
I suspect, some marvellous faith in Oriana on the part of
the patient, had already worked wonders—“ Yes,” continued
the fair physician, “you will be quite yourself after a sound
sleep, and you will play a little game of chess with me the
next night.”

“God Almighty bless you, lady!” ejaculated my uncle,
and, for the first time in my life, I beheld him burst into
tears.

“Amen!” responded I, from the depth of my soul; and
then I felt choked with emotions of thankfulness and love.

“Oh!” exclaimed Smutta, blubbering, and rubbing his
hands for joy, “de cappen’s himself—de lubly lady hab
cure him, yah!”

“There are no lubly ladies here, Mr. Smutta!” cried
Oriana, laughing ; and she playfully gave a hearty lug at the
wool of the enraptured steward, who was quite ready to fall
down and worship her.

In a few minutes after this, the captain sank into a sound
sleep, and as Oriana refused to quit him at present, I left
her and Smutta, and went on deck, anxious to relieve the
first mate. I found him leaning pensively over the
bulwarks.

“ How is the captain?” inquired he, anxiously.

I told him all that had occurred, and he exclaimed,
“Bless my soul! what a wonderful girl that is! He will
be quite himself at daybreak.”

“She says he will,” returned I, “and I have faith in her.”

‘“ But,” whispered Shields, “ whatever could be the cause
of the captain’s queer illness ?”
THE DOOMED SHIP. 43

** Heaven only knows.”

“‘T wonder,” continued he, reflectively, ‘“‘ whether it was a
dream ?”

“Pooh! said I, desirous of turning the conversation ;
“dreams are nothing to such a man as the captain—he is
not very likely to be shaken by a dream.”

“JT don’t know that,” replied Shields, very seriously ;
“your grand philosophers may sneer at dreams, but when a
man has sailed the blue water as long as I have, he knows
better than to laugh at ’em,”

“ Laugh at what ?—philosophers or dreams?”

“Why, dreams.”

“You don’t mean to say that any dream of yours was
ever realised ?”

“Ves, I do,” stoutly answered Shields, ‘and I'll show
how. When I was a young fellow, serving before the mast
in a Yankee ship called the ‘‘ Diana,” I was one day ordered
on the look-out at the fore-topmast cross-trees. We were
then under the tropics, and the heat was such that it gave
me a motion, more lively than pleasant, of what crabs must
feel while they are being slowly boiled alive. I hadn’t been
long perched on the cross-trees before I began to nod, and
in half-a-bell I was fast as a church. How long I slept I
never knew, but I hada horrible dream. I fancied I was
dozing on the summit of the North Cape of Lapland, when
suddenly a serpent twisted his tail round my body, just
below the arm-pits, and hauled me along till I was at the
brink of the precipice which overhangs the sea at the height
of a thousand feet, andis almost sheer perpendicular. Then
[imagined myself hurled forth, I felt my body cleaving the
air—I felt my body plunge into the water with the
44 THE DOOMED SHIP.

momentum of a cannon-ball—I felt a tremendous sense of
suffocation, and I awoke with a bubbling yell. And where
d’ye think I found myself? Not on the cross-trees, but
overboard, as I am a sinner! And the serpent’s tail I
dreamt about was nothing else than a spare halyard tightly
jambed round me. It seems that I slept so soundly that
our old man,* Zebulun Salter, hailed me two or three times
without rousing me, and finding how matters were, what did
the old grampus do, but order three or four hands to run
aloft and reeve a halyard through the starboard fore-topsail
yard-arm, one end being dropped on deck, for all hands to
tail on to, and the other end turned into a noose, with a
bow-line knot, and slipped over my shoulders while I snored.
Then the hands aloft slid me to the yard-arm so softly that
I didn’t wake, and when the old man gave the word—‘ Let
fall by the run !’—sink me, if they didn’t let me drop souse
into the sea! A dozen times they hauled me chock-a-block,
and let me drop again by the run; and at length, when I
was more dead than alive, Zebulun let me be swayed on
deck, and as I lay vomiting out the salt water I had
swallowed by the bucketful, he laughed in his dry, crackling
fashion, and cried, ‘ Wal, younker, I rayther calkelate that
arter this, ye’ll never again shut both eyes at a time when
Zebulun Salter sends ye aloft to keep a bright look out.’
And so my dream was fulfilled.”

* Sailors frequently call the captain ‘‘ the Old Man.”
CHAPTER VII.

HEN morning at length dawned, Captain Larpent
was on deck again, and to one who knew not
how he had been prostrated a few hours before, there was
nothing in his manner to indicate what had recently befallen
him. He had enjoyed an unbroken sleep of nine hours, and
although his complexion was pallid, his eye was steady and
piercing as usual, his features composed, and his bearing
quiet, grave, and rather subdued than excited. He enquired
the ship’s course, and what knots she had run in the night,
and expressed his satisfaction to find that we had made very
good way, and that a very strong and highly-favourable wind
was now blowing, although the weather was obscure. What
was yet more extraordinary, he did not make the slightest
allusion whatever to his illness, and appeared unconscious
that it had occurred. When Oriana reminded him at dinner
that he was to play a game of chess with her that evening,
he slightly started, and a sickening smile swept over his
features, as he simply bowed assent. During the day he gave
his orders in his usual prompt and able manner, and seemed
anxious to pack sail on the ship to the utmost. Ere turning
in for the night, he repeated his instructions, that all safe sail
should be kept on the ship, and the log should be regularly
hove, and a careful reckoning kept.
Some hours after dark, I was much surprised to see
Oriana come on deck, and step close up to me, as I stood on
46 THE DOOMED SHIP,

the windward quarter, for the weather was very cold, and a
drizzling rain fell.

“JT want to speak,” whispered she. ‘“ What for has
Captain Larpent made the steward load all the guns and
pistols in the cabin this afternoon?”

* Load the firearms!” exclaimed I, in amazement ; “ you
surely must be mistaken. I suppose the steward was only
cleaning out the barrels with a ramrod and cotton ?”

“Qh, no,” replied she, in an earnest, positive tone, “ I was
in my stateroom after dinner, and I heard the captain order
Mr Smutta to get them all out of their racks and charge them,
and I opened my door a little bit, and could see the steward
load four guns and two great pistols, and the captain stood
by, and said something to the steward, dat I could not
hear.”

* But what did he load them with ?”

“ With bullets.”

““ Tmpossible !”

“But it is tue. Two bullets in every gun and pistol.
And then the steward put them all together in dat cupboard
just over the captain’s berth, and took three cutlasses out of
a locker, and put them im the cupboard also, and locked it,
and gave the key to the captain. Do tell me what Captain
Larpent is going to shoot ?”

My astonishment was now so great, that I answered mot
a word.

“You need not fear to tell me, I am so sure!” said she,
coaxingly.

“T declare I have no idea. I mever kmew my uncle keep
firearms loaded with ball im his cabim before.”

«Ah, I see dat you really not know, contimwed the shrewd
THE DOOMED SHIP. 47

girl ; and, after a pause, she added, “I thought it so very
strange thing, dat I ought to tell you; but pray do not let
the captain know, for he would be very angry with me for
being a naughty little spy.”

“Vou may depend I will not. But do not be frightened
—the guns will not go off in the cupboard.”

“ Frightened at guns! O, Himlen! you don’t know me!
I have charged guns for my uncle when shooting ptarmigans
in Nordland, and I have fired them more than once
myself.”

“Bless my heart ! you are quite a heroine, Oriana.”

“No; dat I am not. But I am a Danish girl, and
daughter of the Vikings ””—and she laughed archly. “ But
I do very much wonder why the captain has loaded all his
guns with two bullets.”

“So do I. Is Smutta in the cabin ?”

“T think so.”

“ Well, pray go below, for it is very cold, and just whisper
to him that I wish to speak to him on deck, will you ?”

She nodded understandingly, and without another word,
descended to the cabin, and in a few minutes the steward
was by my side.

“ You want to ‘peak to me, Massa Shar] ?”

* Ay, I do, Smutta. What have you been doing in the
cabin after dinner ?”

“Oh, berry many tings. Why you ask ?”

** Because I want to know why you have loaded all the
firearms—why you have charged them with double balls—
why you have put them in the captain’s private locker, and
the cutlasses also ?”

““Gorra ! de somebody himself must hab tell you all dis,
48 THE DOOMED SHIP.

Massa Sharl!” exclaimed the astonished Smutta. ‘Not a
body was in the cabin to see.”

“ Never mind who told me—I know, and that’s enough.
Why did you load with ball ?”

“‘Cappen Larpen’ order me.”

‘“‘ And he told you the reason.”

“T not know.”

“ Come, Smutta, ’m aware that my uncle tells you his
mind more freely than he does to me, and I’m very sure
you know what the guns are loaded for, so it is no use
trying to deceive me.”

‘Massa Sharl, I neber hab tell you lie in all my life,”
said the poor fellow, reproachfully.

“Then you really don’t know.”

“No, Massa Sharl, dat I don’t. De cappen order me to
load—Gorra ! I do it; and I tink it like de old time when I
wid him in de privateer. De cappen used to say I de best
hand to load musket he hebber hab see—but plenty practice
den! He neber tell me to-day why I load, but he order
me put two balls ; and he order me not tell anybody what I
done. De cappen himself must hab tell you ?”

“No, Smutta, he didn’t. But did he ever before order
you to load the guns in the cabin with ball since the war
was over ?”

“* Neber !”

“Tt is very strange ?”

“J tink so my own self. But what Cappen Larpen’
order, dat must be right, and we no business ask why.”

“Very true; but, Smutta, I wish you would take good
care to be near the captain while this voyage lasts, and
attend well to him.”
THE DOOMED SHIP. 7 49

* Bigh, no need tell Smutta do dat !” answered he. And
indeed there was not.

After the steward left me, I reflected whether the
mysterious attack of illness had not disordered the captain’s
intellect, for it seemed otherwise. quite incomprehensible
why he had done such a thing as the Danish girl had so
singularly revealed to me. It was very evident that he
wished the affair to be kept a secret even from me. Can
this, thought I, be the cunning of a madman, preparing to
carry out some insane freak? But the captain’s demeanour
all day showed him to be perfectly rational in word and
deed, so far as related to the ship’s management. In fine,
I was bewildered, and knew not what to conclude. I
resolved, however, to watch him closely, and the result was,
that during the several succeeding days, I perceived nothing
whatever in his conduct but what indicated him to be in
perfect possession of his faculties, although he grew more
and more grave and reserved—and that might reasonably
be attributed to the unsatisfactory nature of the voyage.
CHAPTER VIII.

URING the four following days the same powerful
wind blew with occasional lulls, and we averaged
for the whole time about six knots an hour—a good rate of
sailing for such a slow craft as the “‘ Lady Emily.” - All this
time the sun was constantly obscured, and at nights fogs
prevented our getting any observation from the heavenly
bodies, so that we had no other means of judging our
position than the reckoning kept by frequent and careful
heaving of the log, and I need hardly say that this mode of
estimating a ship’s way is, for many reasons, very far from
being accurate and reliable. The consequent anxiety of
Captain Larpent, and indeed of all of us, grew hourly
greater, for according to the best calculations we could
make, we must be about latitude 59°'N.—Stavanger, in
Norway, bearing probably fifty miles distant. What we
deemed especially unaccountable was the fact that the days,
which ought to have materially lengthened, seemed to grow,
if anything, shorter; but the foggy weather prevented us
from coming to any clear understanding on the subject.

On the evening of the 27th of September, Captain
Larpent appeared particularly uneasy about our uncertain
latitude, and for the first time in his life (as I believe) he
held a formal consultation with his officers on such a subject.
We all three went over the reckonings since our last solar
observation, and our united opinions were, that the ship’s
course had been so carefully kept by the log, that unless we
THE DOOMED SHIP. i 51

had met with unknown currents—and it happened that none
of us had sailed these seas before—we must be somewhere
about the position above named. The determination of the
captain finally was (and both the first mate and myself fully
agreed with him), that in case we got no observation by
noon the next, we should bear up for the Skagerrack, for we
reckoned that if the wind held the same we should certainly
be abreast of it by that time. We could not help thinking
it very remarkable, not only that we had experienced such
foul weather, but also that we met with no vessels, although
the last two or three days we must have crossed the track of
such as were bound to and from Trondhjem, Christiansund,
Bergen, &c.

All that night the wind blew a gale, and we rushed along at
the rate of eight or nine knots, under close-reefed topsails.
All hands were up the greater part of the night, and Captain
Larpent himself never quitted the deck. We had large
lanterns lighted forward and aft, and triced in the rigging, to
guard against the danger of collisions with other vessels, but
the look-out we kept was necessarily of small avail, for snow,
hail, and sleet pelted us without intermission, and the cold
grew intense. Grog was served to all hands every two
hours. It was indeed dismal weather, and we anxiously
prayed ‘for day-break. But day did not dawn perceptibly
till considerably after ten o’clock in the forenoon, a circum-
stance utterly inexplicable for such a latitude as we pre-
sumed we were in. Not long after this came the awful,
thrilling cry of —“ Hard a-port! Rocks ahead!”

The helm was ported instantly, and we swept close by an
enormous rock, as we thought at the moment, but im-
mediately after the first mate exclaimed—
52 THE DOOMED SHIP.

* An Iceberg, by heaven !”

The ship tore by the berg, amidst the oaths and exclama-
tions of the amazed and excited crew, and a minute later
came the cry—

* Starboard—hard-a-starboard! Another iceberg!”

“A fleet of them, by !” echoed the man at the
wheel ; and indeed it was so, for several more loomed in



sight.
“OQ God! the hour has come!” ejaculated Captain

Larpent in a tone of piercing anguish and despair, and for a
brief space nothing but horror and consternation prevailed
fore and aft.

Where are we? No man knew, and the sense of
impending destruction, imminent and appalling as it was,
made the seamen rage and tear about like madmen. But
the captain, after the first shock, was himself again. Seizing
his speaking-trumpet, he sprang on the bulwarks, and passing
his left arm round the mizen backstay to hold on by, he
cried—‘“ Silence in the ship !”

The instinct of obedience prevailed, and then the captain
rapidly issued energetic orders for working the ship in this
astounding and inexplicable emergency. The fog suddenly
lifted, and without being able to conceive by what accursed
means we had béen brought hither, the youngest boy in the
ship now knew we were on the coast of the Arctic Regions!

The horror of this discovery blanched the heart of the
bravest man on board. An Arctic winter close at hand—
few day’s provisions left—hourly in danger of being crushed
to pieces by icebergs, or fast frozen up—no knowledge of
our locality—what could be more appalling and hopeless?
But the imminency of the danger from the nearest bergs did
THE DOOMED SHIP. 53

not permit any present pause, and the crew were kept in
constant exertion for half-an-hour.

“Stand clear of the binnacle!” cried the man at the
wheel, to somebody who obstructed his view of the compass.
The captain turned sharply round at the words, and a
withering expression of savage contempt distorted his
features, as he thundered—

“Leave the compass! Steer as I order, Sir! Don’t look
at that thing !”

Shields exchanged a glance with me, but neither of us then
understood the motives of the captain, who continued to
work the ship, motioning with his hand the way in which
the wheel was to be turned, and at times sternly giving his
orders aloud. At length he got the barque so clear of the
numerous icebergs, that there was sufficient room to lay to,
and this was immediately done inthe captain’s usual
admirable style.



No sooner was the vessel stationary than Captain Larpent
ordered Smutta to bring up a spare compass instantly, and
when it was brought, he compared its bearing with that of
the binnacle-compass, and it was then seen that the needles
of the two compasses were almost diametrically at variance.
Loud cries burst from all around at the sight, and the
captain hoarsely exclaimed—

‘“Here is the mystery of our false course! All hands
aft!”

There was little necessity for this order, as every man
crowded aft the moment the compass had been brought
from the cabin.

“Men!” continued the captain, “treachery has been at
work. There is a fiendish villain among ye!”
54 THE DOOMED SHIP.

The crew were now silent as death, but each, man
looked ferociously at the rest, as though to detect signs of
guilt.

“Take that compass out of the binnacle,” was the next
stern order.

It was done, and on being removed and examined, all
saw to their horror and unspeakable rage, that several bits
of iron had been dexterously fixed in such a way between
the outer and inner box, that although the compass-needle
would apparently revolve well enough, it was nevertheless
attracted altogether in a false direction. So great is the
precaution taken on shipboard to guard against iron
attracting the compass, that not a nail is used in constructing
the binnacle, and the ‘‘gimbals” on which the compass-box
swings, are of course made of brass. But what avails every
human precaution when subtle villany isaboard? The crew
began to fiercely question each other, but the captain cried—

“Silence, all! Who attends to the lights in the binnacle ?”

‘‘Chepini !” responded a dozen voices.

My heart turned sick, for I now understood all.

“Where is he ?”

In a moment the Italian lad was dragged before the
binnacle.

“ Hold him, Smutta.”

The steward instantly grasped Chepini by one arm, and a
steel vice would not have held him more securely. I fixed
my gaze on the boy’s face, and beheld it positively radiant
with triumphant revenge. His black eyes glowed like balls
of fire, and the conscious peril of his position seemed not to
appal him in the least. The demon who possessed the dark
soul of that young lad must have been very strong.
THE DOOMED SHIP. 55

“‘Chepini,” slowly said the captain, in a deep distinct voice,
amid the breathless silence of the crew, “it has been your duty
to attend to the binnacle-light ever since we left Tromso ?”

“Ves!” firmly responded the boy.

“Look there,” and the captain pointed to the damning
evidences.

“Did you do it ?”

Chepini glanced round at the terribly menacing faces of
the exasperated crew, and then meeting the captain’s eye,
he unflinchingly answered—‘“‘I did !”

A roar of rage burst from the men, but the captain
silenced them.

“ Wretch !” exclaimed he, ‘“‘ Why have you done this deed ?”

“ Because you flogged me like adog! Id do it again a
thousand times if I could! Kill me!—I don’t care—I’m
revenged! If Igo below, you'll all soon follow!”

Again did the entire crew break forth in imprecations,
and many cried—‘“ Kill him !” and rushed forward to rend
him to pieces. Once more the captain silenced them, and
then with fearful calmness he spake as follows :—

“Officers and crew of this ship !—Claude Chepini, by
his own confession, which you have just heard, declares that
he has committed an infernal act that has now brought us all
into dreadful jeopardy of our lives. JI ask you what
punishment ought to be at once inflicted on him.”

“Death !” cried the crew, with one voice.

“* Officers and crew,” resumed the captain, “if there is one
among you says that this boy ought to be permitted to live,
let him now speak, or for ever hold his peace.”

Not a voice among us all was raised for mercy—an awful
silence prevailed for the space of a minute. The captain
56 . THE DOOMED SHIP.

uncovered his head, and, as ifactuated by the same impulse,
his example was followed by every one of us. We were now
judges of life and death, and our captain was about to
pronounce in our names a judgment which would render us
murderers by the law of our country.

“Officers and crew !” solemnly cried the captain, amid a
brooding stillness, ‘for the doom I now pronounce in my
name and yours, I hold us justified in the sight of God.
We condemn Claude Chepini to be forthwith hanged by the
neck from the fore topsail yard-arm till he be dead !”

A perfect silence of a second ensued, and then the crew,
as one man, gave a tremendous cheer in testimony of their
approval of the sentence. Next they tumultuously hurried
forward and began to reeve a rope through the yard-arm on
the starboard side.

“ Officers,” said Captain Larpent, addressing the first mate
and myself, “remain on the quarter-deck with me. Steward,
lead Chepini to his doom !”

In a very few minutes the rope was reeved and secured
round the neck of the condemned, whose arms were
pinioned behind him, and several fathoms of chain were
lashed to his legs. The crew then tailed-on to the fall of
the rope, and everything being prepared, with one accord
they looked towards the quarter-deck for the signal.

‘All ready, for’ard >” demanded Captain Larpent, with
as much self-possession as though he was about to issue an
ordinary command.

“ All ready, Sir !”

The captain once more uncovered, and _ instantly
afterwards the fatal words issued from his lips in firm
sonorous tones—“ Run him up !”
THE DOOMED SHIP. 57

In a moment the fiendish boy (who had never quailed in
his demeanour, nor uttered one word after quitting the
quarter-deck) was swinging between sea and sky. Not-
withstanding the heavy weight at his feet, he convulsively
jerked up his knees, till they almost touched his breast—
writhed and quivered for a minute or two—and then swang
to and fro a corpse. After being suspended ten minutes,
the rope was severed, and the body cleaved the dark waters,
to rise no more till the day of judgment.
CHAPTER IX.

ARDLY had the bubbles ceased to rise over the spot

where Chepini was entombed, ere we were recalled

from our rapt excitement regarding his execution, to attend

to the pressing danger by which we were menaced by the

near approach of five or six icebergs, brought down upon us

by the wind. These floating mountains rolled heavily in
the water, and one or two loomed high upon our trucks.

Captain Larpent took a rapid survey of our position, and
in a couple of minutes the ship was put about before the
wind, and bore up what we soon perceived to be either an
estuary or a strait—perceived, alas! too late. The bergs
closed astern, and forbad all hope of beating back, and
scores of small floes of ice threatened us on every side.
There was nothing left but the desperate expedient of
steering onward—whither we knew not.

The strait narrowed the further we advanced, and the
quantity of smaller bergs and floes increased to a fearful
degree. We tacked every minute to avoid them, but it was
speedily evident that a powerful current, or the tide, or both
combined, was aiding the wind to urge us on at a rapid rate.
At length we were driven shorewards, and three several
times the ship missed stays. The noise caused by the
masses of ice grinding over each other was appalling. Great
fragments would suddenly be forced out of the conglomera-
ting heaps, and rise perpendicularly from twenty to fifty feet
in the air—then fall with a horrible crash, and splinter to
atoms.
THE DOOMED SHIP. 59
fas

“God have mercy upon us!” groaned Shields, fast losing
his presence of mind, and yielding to the despair which now
filled every soul. As to the crew, they executed Aevery fresh
manceuvre with less alacrity, and too evidently looked upon
our fate as sealed, and were beginning to be dlesperate and
reckless of what might next befall. And whem one considers
all they had undergone, and the frightful prospect before
them, there was some excuse for this. The hour of doom
was now nigh at hand—Nemesis “sat ifn the clouds and
mocked us.” f

For the fourth time we were in the yery act of attempting
to wear, when a sudden and heavy squall caught us, and at
the same moment a huge submerge@ iceberg rose under our
stern, and shattered the rudder to/pieces. The barque was
now unmanageable, and filling away before the wind, she
plunged wildly ahead, and in five minutes her bows struck
smash against a berg, and another simultaneously rolled
against her starboard quarter, and heeled her over almost on
her beam-ends. The shock carried away the foremast short
off by the deck, and the main and mizen topmasts were both
dragged over with it, and/ the bowsprit was torn clean out of
the bitts. Had it not been that the “ Lady Emily” was an
exceedingly strong vessel, (built, as I mentioned at the
commencement, for the whale fishery,) and also in ballast,
down she must have gone in a moment ; but the brave “‘old
barkey ” righted, and her bows remained embedded in the
iceberg on which she struck, her head being bodily lifted
three feet out of water, and thus held immovable.

The catastrophe precipitated the unfortunate first mate,
the carpenter, and a boy into the sea, where they miserably
perished without the possibility of our saving them.
60 THE DOOMED SHIP.

Would to God I could blot out of my memory the scenes
that ensted! The crew had by this time become stimulated
to the pitch of madness, and when the captain, whose stern
self-possessinn did not waver even at this dread moment,
issued his orjers to clear away the wreck of the masts, and
to man the pumps, &c., the crew refused to obey, and
clustered together in violent and rapid consultation. Again
and again did the captain reiterate his orders, and I seconded
them, but open mutiny now prevailed. The crew were
aware of the fact that we had only a few days’ provisions left
for all hands, and conceiving themselves certainly doomed
to destruction, happen what might, or do what they would,
they, with the reckless desperation seamen have too often
evinced when similarly circumstanced, resolved to die in a
state of drunkenness and blasphemy.

The captain, well understanding their intention, advanced
to the break of the quarter-deck, and attempted to reason
with them, but they were excited to a pitch of madness, and
drowned his voice with yells and mocks, openly expressing
their determination to break into, the steerage and cabin, to
get at the spirits, &c. May God forgive me if I wrong them,
but I certainly thought then, and think now, that the worst
among them were also tempted by the hope of subjecting
our helpless passenger to their brutal lusts. It was my
uncle’s opinion also. \

This day was Friday—oh, that ever fatal day !—on a
Friday we commenced our disastrous voyage—on a Friday
Chepini received the punishment which awoke his fiendish
spirit of revenge—on a Friday our do1om was to be con-
summated ! \

Finding all efforts to regain his ascenda'nev over the crew
THE DOOMED SHIP. 61

hopeless, Captain Larpent strode aft, and seizing my hand,
gripped it till the blood almost started from the finger-ends
whilst he hoarsely exclaimed—“ Boy, let us die doing our
duty before God and man !” .

“ We will, uncle!”

‘*Go,” said he, with terrible significance; ‘lose not a
moment. Go andspeak to her! ‘Take her below till all is
over! Tell her we will defend her to the last gasp!”

He alluded to Oriana, who had witnessed the whole of
the recent horrible scenes, standing close to the companion-
way, and never uttering word nor cry from first to last. She
now resembled a statue, her features rigid and colourless,
her eyes expanded and fixed on us, her arms hanging down
full length before her, with the hands clutched together. I
sprang to her side, but for the life of me I could not utter a
word. I threw my arm around her, and hurried her below,
without the least resistance. Soon as we were in the cabin,
I found broken utterance.

Oriana,” said I, ‘‘ you must stay here. The ship is not
sinking, but a worse danger threatens. I—we—we will die
for you!” :

Her lips parted, quivered, and closed again. But she
placed both her hands in mine, and turned her eyes upward
with a look of sublime resignation which could not be mis-
understood.

“Yes,” responded I, “God can strengthen us—and God
can save you if we perish !”

At this moment the steward rushed into the cabin, and
opening the locker over the captain’s berth, handed out the
arms. Oriana and myself exchanged a glance, for we now
fully understood the captain’s reason for having ordered
62 THE DOOMED SHIP.

them to be loaded. But how was it possible that he had
had the prescience to foresee such a use for them as this ?

*‘ Flere is Smutta—worth a dozen men himself!” said I.

The steward turned round, and made a step to our side.

“Hab no fear,” cried he; ‘“‘Smutta hab often fought side
o’ cappen Larpen’, and Smutta will die for de lubly lady !—
yah !”

She gave him her hand in a moment, and he pressed it
very hard against his honest, faithful breast—then turned
away, saying—‘‘Come a-deck, Massa Sharl—come dis
minute!” and he gathered the whole of the weapons, and
sprang up stairs with them.

The gaze which Oriana and myself now exchanged,
revealed our souls more than if we had spoken for hours. I
strained her convulsively to my breast, and pressed her lips
to mine. Twas our first kiss—Heaven only knew if ’twere
our last !—and ’twas the first time I had ever pressed the lips
of woman since my childhood.

“God save my—my broder!” murmured the heroic
Danish girl, and as I released her from my embrace, she
fell on her knees, and bowed her head, and clasped her
hands in an attitude of prayer. So I left her.
CHAPTER X.

HE first thing of which I became conscious, as I
emerged on deck was the appalling yells, oaths, and
threats of the mutineers, who had by this time armed them-
selves with handspikes, and the axes kept on deck, and also
with the axes, &c., out of the carpenter’s chest, which they
had broken open. They were tumultously gathering together
for an attack upon us, and evidently were resolved to take
the ship, and carry out their diabolical designs. The captain
had already girded on a cutlass, and held a musket in his
hands. The two pistols and the other cutlasses laid upon
the top of the binnacle, and two muskets reared against
the companion, the other being in the grasp of Smutta. My
uncle silently pointed to the arms, and I lost not an instant
in thrusting a pistol in my bosom, and seizing a musket.
We all three stood in a line just in front of the companion,
the entrances to which I had closed. I glanced at my uncle,
and read nothing in his features but the most stern and
merciless expression. His lips were tightly compressed ;
his nostrils distended; his eyes sparkling. It seemed as
though his old battle-spirit animated him once more. Smutta
stood immovable on his right hand (I was on his left), and
the proportions of the black were more gigantic than ever,
with suppressed excitement ; his mighty hand clutched the
musket as though he would flatten in its barrel! his thick
projecting lips were wide open, revealing the broad white
teeth, clenched and slowly grinding over each other; and
64 THE DOOMED SHIP.

his great black eyes seemed to emit a lurid glow as they
were mutely fixed on the face of his beloved captain. I
thought even at that moment of the words of my uncle, when
suffering during his mysterious illness,—‘‘ Yes, Smutta, I
know you—and I shall know you when we meet aloft! We
have lived together, and we shall die together!” Was the
hour now come for them to die together ? I only knew one
thing, and that was, Smutta would die rather than a hair of
his foster-brother’s head should be injured.

What was our prospect in the deadly, unnatural conflict
now inevitable? We were three men—three determined and
powerful men, well armed, opposed to fourteen desperate
mutineers. We might at most kill or disable half-a-dozen at
the first discharge ; but if this did not daunt and repel the
survivors, they would be upon us in an instant, and then the
odds would be fearful. There would be no time to reload
our arms, and mighty as was Smutta’s strength, one mortal
blow could despatch him, in which event, what hope
remained for my uncle and myself? My blood turned icy
in my veins as I thought of the certain fate of Oriana after
such a catastrophe. Instinctively I grasped my musket as
the mutineers moved aft from the forecastle, where they had
armed themselves, and apparently made up their minds for
the mode of assault. The captain now said to us, in a low
quick voice,—‘‘ When I give the word ‘Fire!’ be sure of
your men.”

We then awaited the dread moment of attack without
moving a muscle. For my own part, although ready to diea
thousand deaths to save Oriana, I confess that I trembled
violently, and a clammy perspiration bedewed my forehead.
My uncle and Smutta had been often in mortal combat in
THE DOOMED SHIP. 65

their younger days, and had each slain many of their fellow-
beings; but I had never in my life fought in battle,—and
what was a fair open battle against one’s country’s foes, com-
pared to a deadly hand-to-hand struggle with one’s own
countrymen, one’s own crew, one’s own shipmates? I knew
every one of the men who were about to seek my life, and I
theirs—I had spoken to them daily. for months, and they
had hitherto obeyed my orders more promptly and obediently
than a child obeys its father. More than this, there was
even the strong bond of crime between us,: for not an hour
before they and we had mutually committed what the law
would deem a deliberate act of murder—albeit a deed just
in itself. Oh! ’twas too horribly like fratricide, and no
marvel that I feltas I did. But their blood be upon their
own heads !

The mutineers saw how we were prepared for them, yet
this did not check nor alter their desperate resolve. But
when they came in a body, brandishing their weapons, as far
as the mainmast, they clustered together, and a scuffle and
altercation gave us hope they were divided among themselves,
and that all were not quite the villains they appeared. Nor
were we deceived, for, after a fierce contention, Blackbird
Jim suddenly sprang from their midst, and hurling his
handspike with a crash against the bulwarks, he thundered,—

“No! I’m if I'll join in any bloody mutiny! Now I
know what you mean to do, I tell you to your face you are
a crew of blood-hounds! Who'll follow me, to stand and
die by our captain?”



Two men—and two only—responded to this appeal; and
before the mutineers could intercept them, the three faithful
fellows all reached the quarter-deck, and were ranged by

5
66 / THE DOOMED SHIP.

our side, after sharing out our remaining arms among

them.
“ Hurra !” shouted Blackbird Jim, flourishing a cutlass at
his late associates. ‘‘ Hurra!” repeated his two messmates.

“ Hurra!” echoed I myself—for I couldn’t help it in the joy
of my poor throbbing heart, and oh! how I thanked God for
thus sending us unlooked-for, unhoped-for help in our darkest
hour of need. But my uncle merely gave the three mena
grim look of thanks, and, stamping his foot on deck, said,—
* Silence all! Stand to your arms!”

Then he advanced a step, and in a loud determined voice
addressed these warning words to the mutineers :—
“The first man among ye who sets foot on the quarter-
deck, dies that moment! Throw down your weapons,
and yield, or by the living God ye shall be shot like
dogs!”

“ Ay, ay,” hoarsely muttered Blackbird Jim, who stood by
my side, ‘‘they’ll get their bread buttered on both sides
now, as Charley Baxter said, when Spanking Tom and Bob
Cummins kissed the gunner’s daughter* three days hand-
running !”

The mutineers answered the captain with a roar such as the
tiger vents when about to spring on its prey, and, spreading
out in line, they were upon us as soon as we could raise
muskets to our shoulders—led on by a ferocious fellow nick-
named Corporal Jack (from his having formerly served in the
army), but whose real name was George Martin. He had
been the most conspicuous ringleader throughout, and I was

* “ Kissing the gunner’s daughter,” means to be lashed fast to the
gratings at the gangway to ‘‘catch the rabbit,”—v.e., to be flogged
with a cat.
THE DOOMED SHIP. 67

determined that he, at any rate, should not live to boast of
the results of his villany.

We met them with a simultaneous discharge. I know not
how many fell, and I have only a dim, confused recollection
of the horrible butchery which ensued on the quarter-deck.
I hardly know what I did myself at the time, but was after-
wards assured that I fought “like a lion.” For a minute or
two there was nought but the clash of steel—for the arms of
the mutineers were fearful weapons at close quarters—and I
beheld my uncle fall bathed in blood. A fellow stooped
over him with uplifted axe, and it was in the act of
descending, when Smutta gave a yell that rung loud above
all the din, and struck the murderer with the butt-end of a
musket, smashing his head to atoms. Then I saw the red
blood spout in torrents out of the gashed side and limbs of
the black himself, and I gave and received blows: with the
rapidity of thought. Another moment, and of all the late
raging foes, only one was yet on his feet, fighting with
Blackbird Jim. I then saw Smutta, collecting the last
remains of his fast-ebbing strength, seize this mutineer. round
the body, and hurl him sheer over the bulwarks into the
sea. This done, the devoted black gave one bubbling cry,
and fell flat on his face by the side of his insensible captain.
Two or three of the mutineers, yet alive, and shrieking in
agony, were mercilessly despatched by the three men who
had so nobly fought on our side, and without whose aid all
had been lost.
CHAPTER XI.

~“OON as my recollection returned, I—Oh! how I yet
remember it !—I tore open the companion-way and
bounded into the cabin. Oriana met me, and, as | live!
she flung herself with a cry into my extended arms—‘“‘Saved !
saved !” was all I could ejaculate, and after straining her to
my bursting heart, I again sprang on deck. . Blackbird Jim
and his two messmates, who were all slightly wounded, had
already thrown overboard the bodies of the mutineers ; and
side by side, on the deck, so slippery with blood, lay my
poor uncle and his steward. The former was flat on his
back, his teeth clenched, his eyes closed, his features dis-
torted, and his iron-grey hair drenched in blood. I did not
immediately perceive where he was wounded, but felt over
his heart, and to my unutterable joy it yet beat, though very
faintly. I next hurriedly turned Smutta face upward from
the pool of gore in which he lay, and he also was yet alive,
but insensible, like his foster-brother.

With much difficulty, the men and myself carried the
captain and steward into the cabin (having previously ascer-
tained that the ship was in no immediate danger of sinking),
and then we laid them on mattresses and blankets spread on
the table, and cut away their blood-clotted garments to
discover their wounds. And now it was that Oriana began
to show herself in her true colours. She just once murmured,
‘Oh, poor dear, kind Captain Larpent !—Oh, poor Smutta !”
and then she raised their heads with pillows, one after the
THE DOOMED SHIP. 69

other, and sprang to a locker for brandy and other restora-
tives. Meanwhile I tore open my uncle’s shirt, and found
that his worst wound was in the upper part of his right side—
a gaping, frightful wound it was, with jagged edges, and so
deep that it cut through into the cavity of the breast. A
very little blood now oozed from it; and when Oriana had
glanced at it a moment, she flew to her own state-room, and
returned with her arms full of her own fine soft linen, which
she tore up in strips, and with a dexterity and nerve few
surgeons could surpass, she temporarily bandaged it. Then
she gently poured brandy down my uncle’s throat, and chafed
his cold temples with her hands. In a very brief space the
captain groaned, his lips unclosed, and his eyes opened a
little—‘ Oh, thank God!” ejaculated I.

Perceiving that the seamen were clumsily trying to restore
Smutta, Oriana pushed them aside, and did for him what
she had just done for the captain. Smutta had certainly
received no wound mortal in itself, but he was cut and
slashed so fearfully all over his breast, shoulders, and thighs,
that his body seemed a mere bath of blood.

Blackbird Jim gazed at Oriana in mute admiration for a
moment, and then the rough, but honest-hearted fellow
furtively dashed his sleeve across his eyes, and in his own
rude way expressed his feelings,—‘‘ Oh,” growled he, “I’ve
heerd o’ angels coming down from heaven, but I never seed
one afore!”

Smutta was restored to sensibility before the captain, and
the very first thing the dying negro did was to turn round on
his side towards his foster-brother, and throw his right arm
over the neck of the latter, as though fearful of being parted
from him even in death.
7O THE DOOMED SHIP.

“De cappen dead,” murmured he, in a faint, broken
voice. ‘Smutta die wid him.”

“No, not dead, Smutta—not dead, my dear fellow!”
cried I. ‘‘God will, I trust, restore you both.”

Smutta gazed at me a moment, and then with difficulty
uttered the words—‘‘Nebber possible, Massa Sharl! De
cappen die—Smutta die—go to hebben togeder !”

He raised his arm as he spoke, and the blood gushed
anew from his mangled body at the movement, and closing
his eyes, whilst a bloody froth oozed from his lips. Oriana
wiped it away, and endeavoured to administer some brandy,
but not a drop would pass his clenched teeth. ‘He is
dying fast,” whispered she ; and so indeed he was.

My uncle now begun to revive, and the first sign of
returning sensibility was evinced by his silently giving my
hand a feeble but eloquent pressure. Then his eyes slowly
glanced around, and at length fell on the body of the
steward by his side.—‘‘ Oh, poor Smutta!” ejaculated he.

Thus it was that the very first words these foster-brothers
severally uttered were expressive of their mutual affection.

**Fe’s not dead, uncle, and—and we’ve conquered—we’ve
killed ’em all.”

“Thank God, boy! But your old uncle must slip his
cable this bout—and Smutta, oh, poor dear Smutta !”

The expiring black heard the voice of the captain, and
recognised the loved accents, and, to the amazement of us
all, he sprang upright on his mattress, and in a wild, gurgling
voice—‘ De cappen ’peak ’gen! He call Smutta! Oh,
cappen! Oh, broder !

As the last word issued from his lips, he attempted to
embrace his foster-brother, but fell backward in the act,
THE DOOMED. SHIP. 71

muttering, ““O Lord, receive me!” and his spirit passed
away on the instant, but his glazed eyes retained even in
death .an expression of that profound love and reverence
which from his very infancy he had undeviatingly borne to-
wards his idolized captain.

“T’m foundered if that fellow hadn’t a soul that’s gone
aloft, though he was only a neegur,” was the characteristic
remark of Blackbird Jim.

I was ordering the men to move the body, when my uncle
motioned imperatively for us not to do so, murmuring, “Let
him be. Let us die side by side, as we have lived.”

I accordingly closed the eyes of the steward, and spread
a sheet over him, just as he had expired. O, thought J,
what a terrible and inscrutable mystery is death! One hour
ago this negro possessed the strength of almost ten ordinary
men ;—now he is a mere mass of inert clay. A moment or
two ago, his simple, yet most noble heart throbbed with the
purest brotherly love and devotion which ever animated
human breast ;—now that heart has ceased to beat for ever.
But thy soul, dear Smutta, has fled to receive its guerdon.
God knew thee, and God will judge thee.

My uncle now swallowed some brandy, held to his lips by
Oriana, and then asked for water, of which he drunk eagerly.
He revived considerably, and I was beginning to hope that
his hurts were not mortal after all, when he turned towards
me, and, with an intonation that thrilled my heart, said,
** My boy, I have loved you as a father.”

“Yes, uricle—dear uncle, you have indeed been a father
to me!”

“We must part, boy. God has called me, and I must go.
I cannot live many hours.” i
72 THE DOOMED SHIP.

“Oh, do not say so.”

“Yes, I am bleeding inwardly, and all the doctors in the
world could not save me. Listen, my boy,” and he spoke
with calm yet anxious seriousness. ‘‘ Are you sure that the
ship is not in a sinking state?”

“Not at present, uncle.”

“Well, I cannot think it possible for her to keep long
afloat after she breaks clear of the iceberg, and that may
happen at any moment. Get the long boat cleared and
ready for launching, and all the provisions on deck, and the
spirits, arms, ammunition, and other necessaries. If the
ship founders, you will then be able to live ashore, and God,
I trust, will send you relief. Perhaps there is a Danish
settlement not far off—get an observation to find the latitude
and longitude as soon as possible, and you will then be able
to judge your position. Probably you will, sooner or later,
meet with the natives, and come what may, you will have a
chance for life, and I know you will make the best of it.
Men!” and here he turned towards the silent and attentive
survivors of the crew—‘“‘you have acted nobly, and your
dying captain thanks you. If you don’t get your reward on
earth, you will in heaven !”

“We've only done our duty, captain,” answered Blackbird
Jim, as spokesman.

“You have done it well, and you will so-continue to do
it to the last, I am sure,” quickly and anxiously continued
the captain. ‘I shall soon be gone, but Mr. Meredith will
take my place, and you must obey him as you have me.
If you do this, there is every likelihood that you will
escape; but if you do not stand by him and obey him,
the fate of you all will soon be sealed. Swear to me,
THE DOOMED SHIP. 73

men, that you will do whatever he orders, and never desert
him !”

The men, one and all, called God to witness they would
obey me to their last gasp, and a faint smile of satisfaction
flitted over my uncle’s working lineaments as he murmured,
—‘ Now I shall die easier! God bless you, my lads! give
me your hands!”

The men each shook their Sing captain by the hand with
considerable emotion, for such rough characters as they
were, and I also shook their hands in turn. Thus we at
once felt we understood, and could rely on one another in
the appalling struggle for life, which we too well knew
awaited us.

‘Give them grog, and to eat!” said my uncle, thoughtful
for their wants even at this awful moment, when his life was
fast ebbing away.

Oriana instantly anticipated me, by acting as steward, and
my poor uncle followed her movements with a look of
indescribable admiration and affection. He now said he
felt no pain whatever, and knew, from what he had seen of
men dying of wounds similar to his own, that he should
retain his senses to the last moment.

“Boy,” whispered he to me, as I supported his head on
my breast, ‘that girl is a miracle of goodness and bravery !
God will never fail you while she is with you.

The men swallowed their food and grog almost as soon
as it was given to them, and, with an alacrity that argued
well for their future conduct, declared themselves ready and
willing to set to work. My uncle then, with as much
precision and wonderful presence of mind and forethought,
as though he were perfectly well, gave them orders what to
74 ' THE DOOMED SHIP.

do on deck, and they at once quitted the cabin to perform
their duties. The instant they were gone, he turned his
head towards Oriana, who now stood by his side, and gazed
eagerly at her in silence. At length he stretched forth his
hand, and she pressed it between both her own.—“ My dear
young lady,” said he, “you know this calamity has not
befallen the ship through any fault of mine. I have ever
done »

“Oh, dear Captain Larpent!” tearfully interrupted she,
**T know all dat—do not talk about it.”

* Well, I won’t then ; but listen to me, both of you. You
remember that night when I was seized with an illness—or





you knew not what. It was a dream—an awful warning
dream sent by God. I saw in it all that has come to pass,
I saw my ship driven on an unknown coast, my crew
mutineers,—all was foreshown me that up to this moment
has been realized. It was that which so unmanned me, for
I felt it to be indeed a-revelation from heaven.”

T listened with awe and amazement to this dying declara-
tion, and asked my uncle whether he was induced to order
the firearms to be loaded through his belief in the vision.
He replied affirmatively, and truly remarked, that to this
special providential warning we were indebted for our victory
over the mutineers, for the mutiny was so sudden that, had
not the arms been previously prepared, we should, in all
human probability, not have had time to get them out and
load them ere the attack commenced.

The captain now spoke to Oriana with evident and
increasing agitation. “You will now,” he said, “have to
undergo hardships and- dangers which might appal even a
brave man, but God will be your supporter and helper.
THE DOOMED SHIP. 75

Here is my nephew, trust in him fearlessly. He will do all
for you that brother could do for sister, and he 2

“Oh, yes! he is my broder, I know dat very well!”
eagerly cried Oriana, and she gave me her hand with a look
of affection and perfect reliance. My uncle, with the quick
apprehension which is frequently evinced by dying men,
caught our glances of mutual intelligence, and a smile of
grateful confidence played around his white and quivering
lips.

“Tt is well,” cried he, ‘may God Almighty bless and save
you both!” He then sank back heavily, and closed his
eyes with a deep, prolonged groan.

“Uncle, oh, dear uncle!” ejaculated I, thinking at the
moment that his spirit had fled. He opened his eyes again
with a strong shuddering effort, and motioned for brandy.
Oriana promptly held a glass to his lips, and its contents
instantaneously revived him.

*“‘T am going fast, boy !” was the first expression he uttered.
“Let me see his face once more !”

I understood him, and drew aside the sheet from the head
of his steward. My uncle gazed yearningly at the rigid
features of his foster-brother, and muttered, ‘‘I’ll soon meet
you again, Smutta—meet you to part no more! God grant,
for His Son’s sake, it may be in heaven !”

Hardly had he thus spoken, when a violent convulsion
seized him, and although he desperately strove to tell me
something, he expired in my arms without being able to
articulate a single word.


CHAPTER XII.

HE dissolution of my uncle was so very sudden that I
was quite stupified by the blow, and could hardly
believe he was really dead. A cry and an exclamation from
Oriana attested the fact, but I hardly heeded her at the
moment. Long did I press his senseless clay to my breast,
and bitterly did Isob and moan. The heroic Danish girl
—who was henceforward to watch over me as my guardian
angel—gently, but firmly, disengaged me from the corpse,
and led me to a seat, where I sank down, and yielded to an
agony of grief. I thought not of my own peril, no, nor even
Oriana’s; all I could realise was, that my noble-bearted
uncle, who had been a father to me through life, and whom
‘I loved and reverenced as such, was gone for ever. Never
more would his words of counsel and encouragement sound
in my ears, never more should I gaze on his commanding
form with affectionate pride, never more should I hear his
words of piety and submission to the will of God. My
excessive grief might be unmanly, selfish, and wrong under
the peculiar circumstances, but I could not help it. Oriana
let me unrestrainedly indulge it for some time, but after she
had herself closed my uncle’s eyes, and spread the sheet
over him, she came to my side, and there stood silent and
motionless. At length her hand was laid on my arm, and
her sweet voice whispered, ‘‘ My broder!” I answered not.
““My broder! Captain Larpent has gone to heaven, he has
done his duty, he has repented of his. sins, he has believed
in his Saviour, and is happy now !”
THE DOOMED SHIP. "7

“T shall never see him more!” cried I, with a passionate
burst of grief.

“Yes, you will see him again in heaven—dat you will! if
you only do your duty, and serve your heavenly Master as
he did. Come, my broder! you must not weep any more
now. Remember dat your good, wise uncle himself said dat
you must do many things to save our lives, and his spirit
will be angry with you if youdo not. We must all leave the
ship, he said so, and you are the captain now, and must
order the men what to do, or what will become of us?
Broder! dear broder! it indeed is wrong to weep now.
Won’t you try to. save your life—mine ?”

The music of her words fell like honey-dew on my soul,
the wisdom of her gentle reproof aroused my stunned
faculties, the love of her recalled me to myself. I arose to
my feet, embraced her fervently, and felt once more a man,
ready and able to battle for life.

On deck, I found that the men had already cleared the
long-boat, and fixed tackles for hoisting her out, and had
also gathered together a variety of things, which they judged
might be needful ashore. They had worked well, poor
fellows, and cold as it was, with a dense frost-smoke rising
from the water, they were stripped to their shirts, and trying
to heave up the long-boat, one end at a time. I bore a
hand with them, but our united strength was insufficient to
move her an inch. As I knew that the very first thing to be
done in our precarious position was to get out this boat
(which was unusually large and heavy) to be ready for any
emergency, I cast about for the means to effect it. By
doubling the purchases, and carrying the fall through snatch-
blocks, and then attaching a luff-tackle to it (the fall), we
78 THE DOOMED SHIP.

succeeded, finally, in multiplying our motive power so much
that we got the boat clear over the bulwarks, but we dared
not lower her into the water at present, lest she should be
stove in by some of the floes of ice which yet occasionally
brushed the ship’s sides. This done, we next investigated
the actual state of the barque. We found that she had
made about three feet of water, and that the leak slowly, but
surely, gained. On examining the bows, which were yet fast
embedded in that fatal berg, we perceived that they were so
completely stove in, that the moment she swung clear of the
berg, she would inevitably fill, and go down in a very short
time. This alarming discovery stimulated us to the most
eager exertion. It was now night, and so obscure that we
knew not what dangers threatened from bergs floating around
us, but we could from time to time hear them grinding and
cracking, with appalling distinctiveness. We also knew, that
although the sea was smooth, there was a current, or tide, or
both, carrying the iceberg and ship before it at the rate of
four knots. Self-preservation now became the sole inspiration
—the one pervading idea—and it is marvellous how men’s
faculties concentrate themselves to effect it, when there is
anything like a glimpse of hope. Having seen that the oars,
etc., of the long-boat were deposited in her, and her rudder
shipped, our next care was to get, the provisions on deck.
This, alas! was no very heavy task, but there was a tolerable
stock of spirits, wine, ale, sugar, coffee, spices, and other
luxuries in poor Smutta’s department. While the men were
removing these, I hurried to Oriana’s state-rroom to warn
her, but she had already made her little preparations for
departure. We soon conveyed her effects on deck, after
which she called our attention to a bulky package, closely
THE DOOMED SHIP. 79

wrapped in reindeer skins. ‘Dat must go too! It is good
rein flesh.” On enquiry, she explained that it was a quantity
of dried reindeer flesh, which she had in charge as a present
from her uncle in Nordland to their friends at Copenhagen.
We were all very thankful for this unlooked-for addition to
our means of existence.

Three hours or more were spent in preparing for the event
which we knew must sooner or later happen; and finding
that the tackles were quite strong enough to lower the long-
boat, even when laden, we filled her with provisions, spirits,
bedding, clothing, arms, etc. In the stern sheets I made a
sort of little tent with the blankets stretched over some
broken studding-sail booms, to protect Oriana from the
inclemency of the weather, for no one knew how long we
might drift about in the boat ere we could land. ‘Two
things more were added at her prudent suggestion, viz., fuel,
and water. The necessity of the first was sufficiently
apparent, but the latter I thought highly superfluous, as we
were about to live among nought but snow and ice. But
Oriana persisted that we ought to take water, for her
residence in Nordland had taught her that it is impossible
to suck or melt the snow in one’s mouth in very cold regions
without experiencing a terrible burning sensation in the
throat and stomach, owing to the intense degree of cold in
the snow. The only way, as she said, to procure water from
the snow and ice, would be by melting it with fire, and we
could not do this in the boat. Convinced that she was
right, we got a keg of water in the long-boat, and then
lowering the light stern boat from the davits, we put a cask
of water in her, and as much fuel as she could carry. I
secured the ship’s papers and log-book, with various
80 THE DOOMED SHIP.

mememtoes of my poor uncle, and such things as were
valuable and useful, but of small bulk, not forgetting
compasses, quadrant, etc. Finally, after we had rummaged
the lockers both of the cabin and of the steward’s pantry,
and convinced ourselves that not a scrap of food was left in
the ship, we felt that we had done all that was possible in
the way of preparation, and the rest was in the hands of
God.

I was just about to order the men to get a meal, when we
felt a heavy shock through the ship, as though the iceberg,
which had hitherto towed her along, had struck against
another berg, or rock ; and directly afterwards it split open
with a crack like the report of a cannon, and the bows of
the barque being released, her head at once went down five
or six feet, and we could hear the water rushing into the
forecastle, and thence into the hold. ‘The crisis had arrived
—there was not a moment to lose. I lifted Oriana into the
long-boat, and we lowered it safely on the water. Briefly
ordering the men to see all clear for pushing off, I ran below
to take a last farewell-look of the inanimate clay of my
beloved uncle and his foster-brother. I drew aside the
sheet from their faces, as they reposed side by side, and by
the dim light of the lamp overhead, I gazed with unutterable
emotion on them one after the other. Their trials were ended;
their souls were anchored in a port where no tempests could
ever more disturb them. My eye caught a large union-jack,
which had been dragged out of a locker in our search, and
left on the cabin floor. This I lifted, and threw it decently
over them both, and then I felt that my last duty in the ship
was performed. On regaining the deck, the men called
upon me to embark instantly, for the barque was sinking
THE DOOMED SHIP. 81

much faster than we had anticipated, and her water-ways
were already within a couple of feet of the sea’s level. I
ordered them into the boat, and I,—as became the officer,
—was the last to quit the deck, hat in hand. We pushed off
to a safe distance, and in five minutes we saw the ill-fated
“Lady Emily” give one downward lurch head-foremost, and
then she disappeared for ever, a fitting coffin for the remains
of her late gallant commander.
CHAPTER XIII.

“THERE goes the poor old barkey!” cried Mr.

Blackbird Jim, as he composedly put on his pea
jacket, and freshened his quid, and hitched up his tarry
breeks, and tightened his waist belt, ‘‘and here are we the
boys as never says die while there’s a shot in the locker.
Pass the word, captain, and we'll do it, whatever it is, sink
me!”

I started at being addressed as “captain,” and bitterly
thought of my departed uncle. But it was no time to
indulge in emotion and reverie.—‘ The first thing you do,
my lads,” replied I, ‘‘shall be to eat a good supper, for you
have well earned and will need it.”

By the light of a lanthorn, the fragments of cooked
provisions found in the larder of the poor steward were
overhauled. I had no difficulty in persuading Oriana to
eat. She made a very tolerable meal, and spoke cheerfully,
with the evident intention of inspiriting me. I could not
myself swallow a morsel—it would have choked me. But
what animals sailors are! The three men actually appeared
to have already forgotten the recent horrible events, and
their own present jeopardy, for they ate and drank, and
laughed and joked, precisely as though they were safely
seated around the kit of a forecastle mess. I felt inclined
to sternly check them, but on reflection I forbore, for it was
infinitely better that they should be callous of the past, and
reckless of the future, than to yield to moody despair. I
THE DOOMED SHIP. 83

knew that so long as a sailor could laugh and joke, there
was no fear of him shrinking from any amount of hardship
and danger. The meal ended, I induced Oriana to retire
to the shelter of the little tent I had provided, and when I
had given her additional blankets for her couch, and
satisfied myself that she really was, as she laughingly
asserted, ‘warm as a dormouse in its nest,” I felt a load off
my heart, and could give my undivided attention to my
responsible duties.

The sea was now very calm, although a stiff breeze blew,
and this induced me to suppose that we could not be far
from the shore, and that in all probability we had drifted up
an inlet, and were in a bight towards its extremity. The
weather was so thick that we could not see two boat-lengths
ahead, and as we knew the ice was floating in every
direction, it would have been exceedingly dangerous and
foolish to have rowed in the dark. I thereto resolved to
lie-to till daybreak and ordered the men to stow themselves
away in the forepart of the boat, whilst I kept watch by
myself. They were unwilling at first, but I told them I felt
unable to sleep at present, and that they would need to
husband their strength for the next day. They accordingly
coiled themselves up beneath the blankets and _ spare
clothes, and were, like true seamen, in the magical “ Land
of Nod” almost immediately, and slept as soundly and
snored as loudly ‘“‘as a Dutchman between two feather
beds.” -

For many dreary hours did I keep my truly melancholy
watch. Nothing occurred to disturb me, and the only inter-
ruption to my sad reflections was when I occasionally bent
my ear to listen to the gentle breathings of Oriana, as she
84 THE DOOMED SHIP.

slumbered with that fearless and perfect confidence in God’s
ever watchful providence, which a holy faith can alone
impart. At length I felt myself growing drowsy, and
awaking one of the men, I bade him keep watch, and in
case danger threatened from ice, to arouse me instantly. I
then laid down, and the man covered me well up with
blankets. Hardly had I uttered a brief prayer, and closed
my eyes, ere I fell sound asleep. Blessings on that wonder
—blessings on that mysterious agent, that giver and
confirmer of health and strength—a thousand blessings on
that thing which men call Sleep !
‘© The Mariner whose eye is bright,
Whose beard with age is hoar,”

—that strange old man, the wanderer of a bygone age, who
goeth about pouring lofty and imperishable lessons into the
ears that are open—saith,

“ Oh sleep ! it is a gentle thing
Beloved from pole to pole !”

And that itis. ‘A gentle thing!” Ay, and much more.
It is a mighty thing! for it boweth and subjecteth alike in
its own proper time the delving peasant and the thinking
philosopher ; the storm-tossed sailor-boy and the velvet-
cradled prince; the beggar who wearily lays aside his
wallet, and the sovereign who has gladly resigned his crown.
Sleep is the portal alike to joy and to sorrow. It can
elevate star-plucking ambition to a dizzier eminence than,
when walking, it ever aspired to reach; and it can hurl
splendour from its proud pedestal to roll grovelling in the
dust. It is the rewarder of the good, and the tormentor of
the evil. It can crush the oppressor, and uplift the
oppressed. It can knock off the fetters of the condemned,
THE DOOMED SHIP. 85

and lead him forth from his dark dungeon to revel among
the green meadows where he disported in innocent
childhood. It restoreth in one little hour the exile unto
the land of his fathers, and he kneeleth down and in
rapture kisseth the soil that gave him birth. It drieth the
tears of the mourner, and stilleth the wailing of the orphan.
It giveth relief unto the pain-wrung sufferer, and taketh
away the sting of the world. It restoreth wealth to the
bankrupt, and health to the invalid:—the one is again
happy in counting his coffered thousands, and the other is
again bounding aith elastic limbs across the breeze-swept
lea. It is resistless when its hour hath come, for it seizeth
the sallow-wrinkled miser, stooping in his dismal closet by
the flickering lamp, with his coins uncounted in his skinny
palm, and the rosy, smiling child basking in the sunny
meadow, with his chaplet of flowers in his chubby little
hand, and there and then doth it alike bind them in its
fetters. It can open futurity to our gaze, or revivify the
past. It can invoke to us the friends of our youth—the
departed—the sainted: it waves but its magic pinions, and
lo! they are present! We see, we touch, we converse with
them once more. Sleep knoweth no distinction between
prattling infancy and garrulous senility ; between the golden
spring of youth and the busy summer of manhood. It
spreads its volumed wings over the earth, and over the face
of the deep; it penetrates the hovel and the palace; the
great city teeming with life, and the forest with but one
solitary dweller. Its power is unlimited—its dominion is
supreme ; it giveth strength and life under the semblance of
death. IT IS GIVEN TO MAN OF GoD.

I was awakened from my prolonged slumber by the
86 THE DOOMED SHIP.

blanket being drawn from my head, and on opening my
eyes, I beheld the smiling face of Oriana bending over me.
“Tt is just daybreak,” said she, “and we can see the
shore.” I cast aside the coverings, and leaped to my feet.
There was land, sure enough, about a mile distant, but un-
fortunately the sea was frozen for at least a quarter of a mile
and how we were to land our cargo without immense labour
I knew not. I carefully swept the shore with a telescope,
and at length saw what I conceived to be an opening
through the ice, leading to a bluff headland. Ordering the
men to give way, 1 steered towards it, and to our great
satisfaction we found the ice so thin that we easily broke
through it, till we were enabled to force the boats close up
to a projecting rock. I then landed to look out for a
suitable spot to fix our temporary abode. The shore was
everywhere covered with snow a foot or more in depth, and
was very rocky. A sheltered hollow, or ravine, close to
where we landed, seemed to be the best side I could at
present select, and as there was no time to be lost, we
swallowed a hasty meal, and then set to work unloading the
long-boat. Having got everything out of her, we fixed her
two masts upright, to form the centre poles of two tents,
and lashed to them the oars and some light ricker spars
which we had brought with this object in view. These
frameworks were quickly covered with sails, and then spread
tarpaulings over them, and pegged the lower portions in the
ground. The exteriors of the tents being thus rudely but
efficiently constructed, we brought everything under their
shelter except the fuel with which the small boat was loaded.
Then we worked away to fit up the interiors. One tent was
exclusively for the men, and the other for Oriana and
THE DOOMED SHIP. 87

myself. Whilst they arranged their own to their liking, we
did the same with ours, and, strange as it may appear, we
caught ourselves laughing heartily more than once at our
contrivances to render the tent comfortable. We had a
superabundance of blankets, etc., and by fixing ropes across
the tent, it was divided into two portions, blankets being
hung as a partition between them. The smaller of these
divisions was to be Oriana’s sleeping-room, and I had the
satisfaction to behold how expertly the cheerful girl set
about rendering it a most cosy berth. The larger division
(which was to be common to us by day, and my sleeping-
room by night), was lumbered with the arms, provisions,
and all the spirits, etc., for I dared not trust any of the
latter in the men’s tent, well knowing that the temptation
would be irresistible.

It was about ten o’clock that night (Saturday, September
2gth), ere our arrangements were completed, 4vo fem. I
ought to mention that a small brass stove had been brought
from the ship’s cabin, and this we set up, and with some
difficulty fixed so that the smoke cleared away pretty well
through a slit in the tent side. I then served out a good
supper to the men, and gave them a bottle of rum, for they
had behaved so well and worked so hard, that they really
deserved encouragement. Oriana and myself, of course,
supped together, and I now ate with a very fair appetite, for
she searched about the tent till she found some of the
culinary utensils we had taken the precaution to bring from
the ship, and then cutting a few slices from one of her
dried rein-breasts, and adding condiments, she speedily
produced such a savoury stew, or whatever it might be
called, that I began to deem her as wise in the art of
88 THE DOOMED SHIP.

cookery as in everything else. We talked long and seriously
that night about our prospects, and although we could not
yet form any very tangible idea of the future which awaited
us, we, at any rate, both agreed in most fervently thanking
God for so mercifully preserving us hitherto. Just as
Oriana was bidding me good-night, she started, and
exclaimed—“ What is dat? Hark!” I jumped up, for I
heard, too, a wild kind of cry. I rushed out of the tent
into the open air, and the mystery was at once solved.
The'tent of my worthy crew was only about half-a-dozen
paces from our own, and they were all joining in a most
vociferous chorus, in honour of Saturday night, I suppose.
And what does the reader think they were singing on this
first night of landing on an unknown shore? Why they
were yelling, ‘‘ Britons never, never, never shall be slaves!”
This is the literal fact. I re-entered our tent, smiling: in
spite of myself. Once more, I say, what animals sailors
are! These three men were utterly reckless of what the
morrow might bring forth, and notwithstanding the terrible
prospect before them, they were just as jovial and happy
over their bottle of rum as though they were’ in the tap-
room of the “Jolly Sailors,” at Hull. In fact, seamen
never can be taught to consider that any responsibility or
care rests with themselves. They will obey orders with
alacrity, but never trouble themselves to think for a moment
whether the orders are right or wrong. ‘That’s the
captain’s business,” says Jack; and he indeed thinks
everything, whatever it is, the “captain’s business.” I was
perfectly aware that happen what might to us, I must think
and act for them the same as though they were children,
and children sailors really are in many respects.
CHAPTER XIV.

HE next day was Sunday, and I was determined that
it should be kept as a day of rest and thanksgiving.
I read the prayers, lessons, and psalms for the day from
my uncle’s Church of England Prayer-Book, and the crew
listened with attention, although I did not think they
evinced the least feeling on the occasion—but a sailor often
feels more than he shows. No kind of work was performed
all day, but towards nightfall one of the men came to tell
me that he had seen the footmarks of some large beast
which had been prowling in our vicinity. I examined them,
and at once understood that we had a bear for our neigh-
bour—not a very agreeable discovery, for the white Polar
bear isa most daring and ferocious animal, and I felt by
no means sure that the one in question would not pay a
visit of exploration to the tents in the course of the night.
I therefore cautioned the men to lay the axes and cutlasses
ready at hand when they went to rest, in case the stranger
should disturb their innocent slumbers; and for my cwn
part, I loaded three of the guns with ball.

Not long after midnight, I was awakened by a smothered
sort of cry from Oriana, but as it was not repeated, I fancied
she had only cried out in a dream. . A moment or two
afterwards, however, I distinctly heard her call, ‘‘ Broder!”
and she pushed aside the suspended blanket, and stood
before me with a lighted lamp in her hand. I had laid
down in my clothes, and now sprung up to ask what was the
go THE DOOMED SHIP.

matter, for she was very pale, although her aspect was
resolute enough.—‘‘ Bring your guns, and you shall see!”
was her mysterious reply.

I obeyed, marvelling very much what was to be done.
When she raised her lamp, as we entered her apartment (if
I may so call it), I saw nothing remarkable, except that her
little Danish pet dog, Nem, was cowering at our feet, with
every expression of intense terror—the poor creature being
huddled up like a ball, and his teeth fairly chattering.

“What is the matter?” asked I.

“Hush! Look here! What do you call dat?”

I looked where she pointed, and sure enough, I beheld,
to my amazement and alarm, an enormous shaggy paw
thrust under the canvas at the bottom of the tent, and
moving slowly to and fro, as though in search of something
nice. She hastily whispered to me that she had been
awakened by this very paw, roughly groping beneath her bed
and the ground. I involuntarily raised my gun to my
shoulder, but she cried—‘ Do not fire yet! Wait, and you
will see his head.”

She was right. In a moment or two the animal grew
impatient, and emitting a low growl, attempted to shove his
head through the opening made by his paws. I clapped the
gun barrel to his muzzle, and drew the trigger. The report
was deafening, and we could see nothing for smoke, but a
tremendous roar from the wounded beast apprised us, at any
rate, that he was not killed. Grasping my two loaded guns,
I rushed out of the tent into the open air, and was met by
the crew, who had turned out in great alarm, armed with
hatchets. It was fortunately a very brilliant night, and we
could see objects with great distinctness. Not many yards
THE DOOMED SHIP. gti

off we beheld an immense white bear seated on his haunches,
with one paw raised to his wounded head, from which blood
was trickling freely. The creature evinced no disposition
to retreat, but continually growled in a menacing undertone,
and snapped his horrible jaws together with a noise anything
but pleasant. I again fired, and he instantly made towards
us in an erect attitude, but was met by a point-blank
discharge from my remaining gun. The next instant the
mighty brute wrenched the weapon from my hands, and
struck me to his feet with one blow from his paw. My
situation was critical, but the men bravely attacked him, and
at the moment I regained my feet, Blackbird Jim drove his
hatchet smash into the bear’s skull, with the polite remark,—
*'That’s one for luck, my skilligalee!’—A few convulsive
struggles, and our truly formidable enemy expired. We then
huzzaed, and attaching a rope to his heels, dragged him into
the men’s tent, highly delighted with our achievement, for
we knew that the flesh of a bear, in good condition as this
was, is excellent food; and the fat would serve, when melted,
to burn in lieu of candles. After I had reloaded the guns,
to be prepared in case we had a visit from a second
“illustrious stranger,” I brought Oriana to the tent to look
at the grim prostrate foe, who so nearly succeeded in making
his supper off her-—for, had not the canvas of the tent been
very strong, and well secured to the ground, he would have
found his way in and carried her off, dead or alive. Truly
his proportions were so majestic now he was stretched at full
length, that I was less surprised at his desperate defence and
tenacity of life, than at the comparatively brief space of time
the battle lasted. 3

“My eyes!” exclaimed the philosophical Blackbird,
92 THE DOOMED SHIP.

‘“‘what a slinge this here fellow would have made among the
tarts and kickshaws in a pastrycook’s shop !”

‘As to Oriana, the extraordinary girl did not appear to
reflect with anything like dread on her own escape, nor did
she shrink from the enemy who looked so terrible even in
death, but she was filled with glee, and sang some old Norse
hunting chorus, and clapped her little hands together in
triumph over him, and lifted up his vast paws one after the
other to examine their fearful claws, and opened his small
red eyes, and pulled his short ears, and peeped into his
cavernous mouth, with all the curiosity of a child. Indeed,
I myself was mightily proud of our affair, for it was the first
time in my life that I had been engaged with a bear. And.
what a magnificent fellow this was! He was, without
exception, much larger than any I subsequently saw.
The following were his principal dimensions :—From the
muzzle to the end of the tail (which was short), rz ft. 9 in. ;
from the muzzle to the shoulder-blade, 3 ft. 4 in. ; height at
the shoulder, 5 ft. 2in. ; circumference of the body, near the
fore-legs, 6 ft. 1 in.; breadth of a- fore-paw, 1 ft. 2 in.
What his weight was I have no idea, but it was as much as
three men could drag him along over the snow. Oriana
suggested that he ought to be skinned and cut up without
loss of time, otherwise, she said, he would be frozen long ere
morning, and it would then be impossible to get the skin off.
She had often seen the hunters in Nordland cut up the bears
they had slain, and she now with great eagerness began to
give the sailors instructions how to proceed.

“Ay, ay, ma’am, we’re the boys to do your bid, night or
day,” responded Blackbird Jim, “ but surely, ma’am, it ain’t
to be a dry job, eh? This here is the first lovely brute
THE DOOMED SHIP. 93

we’ve tackled, but there’s plenty more where he comes from,
and I hope, ma’am, and I sartainly believe,” added he, in
an affected whisper, “as you'll give the captain orders to
handsel it ?”

“Me give the captain orders !” ejaculated the blushing
Oriana, whilst I bit my lip in silence, for it was evident that
the shrewd fellow guessed pretty accurately that Oriana’s
will and word were already my law. ‘It is for the captain
to command me, for I am now the stewardess !”

* Ay, ay, ma’am,” replied the unabashed Blackbird,
“every word you says is truth, split me; but axing yer
parding, I fancies, d’ye see, that our captain is the ship, but
you is the compass he steers by, ma’am !”

“You hear,” said Oriana, turning to me, ‘‘ what he says,
but I don’t quite understand him.” (I greatly fear that she
now fibbed a little for the first time in her life.)

“Oh,” said I, with a laugh, “they want a bottle of rum,
that’s all.”

“Ts dat all? Very well, then I think you ought to give
them a bottle this time, and I shall just go and get some
hot water and sugar, and make the grog for them myself—
dat I will !”

The men gave her a cheer, and I—what could I say or
do ?—“ May I bring them a bottle, please, Captain Mere-
dith >” formally demanded the self-constituted stewardess,
with the gravest air, and most respectful, and at the same
time most provoking, curtsey in the world.

I steadily shook my head, but as she wilfully chose to
interpret that as a sign of consent, she gave me a second
curtsey, and ran laughing away to our tent, whence she soon
returned with all she had promised.
94 THE DOOMED SHIP.

“ Now then,” she said, after the men had drank her health
most heartily, “turn his Royal Highness on his back, and
first make a cut just there !” pointing to the throat.

Her orders were promptly obeyed—the delighted Black-
bird being the operator-in-chief, his two messmates and
myself the assistants, whilst Oriana held the lamp.

“Now cut straight down the breast—there—stop! Put
the knife between the flesh and the skin, and lift the skin
up. No, not that way, you stupid man! Give me the
knife, and let me show you, or we shall never get the skin
off, 1am so sure. And I want the skin, for it is mine, you
know.”

She took the knife, but, alas! her delicate hand was far
too weak for the task. Jim, however, now understood how
it was to be done, and after a very hard struggle for even his
fish-hooks or fingers and brawny arms, he succeeded, with
our help, in stripping the thick tough skin away from the
throat and breast.

“Dat will do. Now you must cut down the under side of
these fore-arms in a straight line to the pretty little paws.”

Jim followed her directions, and forced off the skin—not
without sundry mysterious references to his perpetual oracle,
‘Charley Baxter.”

“Oh, pray be more careful—do not make the skin bloody,
please Captain Meredith !”

By the way, Oriana, from this time forward, demurely
addressed me as ‘‘Captain Meredith,” whenever the men
were by ; but at all other times I was “Broder.” What a
sly little puss !

Finally, we succeeded in getting off the remarkable fine
coat of Mr. Bruin, but not till all of us were more than once
THE DOOMED SHIP. 95

out of breath ; for as the body stiffened, it became as much as
we could do by our united strength to rip off the skin inch
by inch. We now perceived that the first time I fired,
although the muzzle of the gun touched the animal’s head,
the ball glanced along the hard skull, merely inflicting a
deep scalp wound. The second and third balls were both
lodged in the chest, but as they had touched no vital part,
the terrible beast might have been the death of some of us,
but for the coup de grace from Jim’s hatchet, or rather axe,
for it was one of the carpenter’s, which the mutineers had
used with murderous effect. I carried the skin to our own tent,
and stretched it out to dry.. Then I made the men arrange
some empty chests and cases around the outside of Oriana’s
division of the tent, that in case a second bear should fall
in love with her, she would ‘“‘hear something to her ad-
vantage,” in the rattle they would make ere the animal
could get to the canvas. The whole time occupied from
the death of the bear and the disposal of its body, was no
less than two hours, and Mr. Blackbird Jim and his mess-
mates made merry for another hour with the residue of
Oriana’s bounty.
CHAPTER XV.

N Monday I took account of all our ‘‘ goods, chattels,

and eating timber,” as Blackbird Jim called them.

I found that the provisions from the ship (salted beef and
pork, and biscuits) were sufficient for six weeks’ full allow-
ance, not to reckon half a sack of flour, a small bag of
oatmeal, two large cheeses, several pounds of raisins, figs,
‘and prunes, some lemons and oranges, and a few jars of
preserves, pickles, spices, etc. Of coffee in the berry there
might be eight pounds, and there was a large canister of
excellent black tea. Of sugar, both loaf and powder, there
was an ample supply. Moreover, there was Oriana’s dried
rein flesh, and the carcass of the bear; so that altogether
we had nothing to apprehend on the score of immediate
starvation. Very fortunately, also, we had secured the
whole stock of candles and lamp-oil on board the barque ;
the former were of all sorts and sizes, and might amount to
a dozen pounds, and the latter was about a gallon and a-half
in a store-bottle. Another item was three parcels of leaf
tobacco, and very pleased I was to find them, for I felt that
so long as the tobacco lasted, I possessed a powerful spell
to keep the crew in good humour by occasionally distribut-
ing it, and, to tell the truth, I highly relished a little tobacco
myself. What sailor does not? ‘The spirits were three
quart bottles of brandy, thirteen pint bottles, and one runlet
of rum, and a case-bottle of Hollands. Of wine there were
five bottles of Maderia, six of sherry, and seven or eight of
THE DOOMED SHIP. 97

port. Of porter there was one dozen, and a dozen and a
half of Burton ale (the strongest in the world). The latter
was a present the captain intended for a friend at St.
Petersburgh. My poor dear uncle always prided himself
on keeping a capital stock of good things, as he loved to
exercise hospitality in his cabin when in foreign ports; and
Smutta was no less proud to be the humble dispenser thereof.

I have already mentioned that we had brought away an
abundant stock of bedding, etc. There was also a small
variety of miscellaneous articles, which we had hastily cast
pell-mell into a sack, and these I left unexamined till a
future day. The arms consisted of four guns, my uncle’s
two large boarding pistols (which he had used in the
privateer in his youth), and three cutlasses. There were
ten pounds of powder in two tin cases, and a large brass
flask, half-full. A bag containing a good stock of bullets,
and lead for casting, with a mould. There was also a very
beautiful light doublebarrelled fowling-piece, made by
Lapagt, of Paris, but it was absolutely useless, being fitted
with percussion-locks (then newly invented), and we had no
percussion caps for it. It also had been intended for a
present to a merchant at St. Petersburgh.

One very sad loss I discovered, viz., the quadrant and
some other nautical instruments were irretrievably broken,
having been crushed in the hurry of pushing off from the
sinking ship. I was thus deprived of the ability of ascer-
taining our latitude and longitude, as my uncle had strongly
recommended.

Having completed my temporary survey, I called the men
into their own tent, and briefly but seriously addressed
them. I told them that I would do all that man could to

od

( iz
98 THE DOOMED SHIP.

extricate us from our calamity, but that I never could
achieve this unless they implicitly obeyed me, as they had
sworn to do in the presence of our dying commander.
They at once repeated: our pledge, and I then told them
that I had taken stock, and should always serve out to them
as much of everything as I thought could be prudently
allowed. I added, that we perhaps should be many long
months ere we could get away, but that, with God’s blessing,
I had no fear of our ultimate deliverance. They cheerfully
assented to all I said, and assured me in their own rough,
but emphatic way, that I might indeed depend on them to
their last breath. I then spoke to them on another
subject I had much at heart.

“ My lads,” said I, “we have with us a young lady whom
I love far more than my own life. Should any accident
happen to me, I ask you, as men, whether you will respect
and defend her as you would your own sister ?”

“We will, captain, so help us God !”

“T am satisfied, and may God do unto you as you do
unto her!” replied I, shaking their hands.

After this we went down to the boats, and found that the
sea, as far as eye could reach, was now all frozen up.
Escape in that direction was hopeless till the long Arctic
winter (which had just commenced) should be over. I set
them to work unlading the fuel from the small boat, and
when that was done, we cut the ice away from her sides, and
managed to haul her out on the beach, and turn her bottom
upwards; but the long-boat was far too heavy for our
strength, and we were content to securely moor her to the
rocks in such a way that no future accumulation of snow
and ice could possibly sink her. Thus ended our day’s
THE DOOMED SHIP, 99

work out of doors, but we were all—Oriana included, for
she made herself the busiest of the busy—engaged many
hours after sunset in assorting and arranging our
“ properties.”

I slept very late the next day, for I was thoroughly worn
out, and I was only aroused by the voice of Blackbird Jim,
who stuck his grizzled head through the opening in the
tent about an hour after daybreak, and vociferated with all
his might and main,—“ Captain! a sail! a sail!”

I leapt up, hardly knowing whether I was dreaming or
not, but forgetting for the moment where we were, I
mechanically responded just as though we were at sea,—
‘*Where away?”

Another moment and I was in the open air, the men
clustering about me, and explaining the matter in an
excited fashion. It seemed that Jim had taken it into his
head to climb one of the rocks to have a “look out” round
the horizon. The air, during the previous days, had been
foggy, but now it was much clearer, and he at once saw a
ship, apparently frozen up, some three or, four miles distant.
He then hurried to impart the joyful intelligence.

I brought a telescope and surveyed her myself, after the
first motion was over. . She was a full-rigged ship, and some
of her sails were hanging loosely from the yards. At the
gaff appeared a flag, or a remnant of one, though I could
not well make out what it was, but from her rig, I concluded
she was either English or Danish, but whatever country she
belonged to, I felt certain that we should at once be
hospitably received on board.. I therefore determined first
to despatch a letter addressed to her commander, informing
him briefly of our position, and requesting he would send a
Io0o THE DOOMED SHIP.

party of men to help us to remove our effects to the vessel.
After writing the letter, Oriana added a postscript in
Danish, that in case the vessel was a Dane, they would
equally understand us. This I immediately sent off by
Blackbird Jim, and whilst he was gone, the rest of us were
busily engaged in packing up for our anticipated removal.

At the expiration of three hours, my messenger returned
all alone, and instead of the happy care-for-nothing fellow I
expected to see, he slunk up to me with his head hanging
down, and his eyes staring half out of their sockets, and
without speaking a word, he. handed to me a letter. I
gazed at him in amazement, and on glancing at the letter,
perceived it was my own, unopened.

‘‘What on earth does this mean?”

*Tt’s horrid shocking, Sir,”

“What! are you drunk or mad?”

“T’ve seen enough to make me, captain! Yon ship’s
worse than Vanderdecken’s, the ‘ Flying Dutchman !’”

He then told his story more intelligibly, and a very
marvellous story it was. He said that he had gone straight
to the ship, and on nearing, he felt somewhat surprised at
the slovenly way in which her sails and rigging were
dangling, and especially he saw no people on deck, and no
trace of them on shore, although the ship was fast frozen
When he came alongside, he hailed her repeatedly, loud as
he could, but not an echo replied. This seemed so un-
accountable that he grew frightened, and, sailor like, thought
her a ship bewitched. Perceiving that a port-hole between
the main and mizzen chain was opened, he climbed up to it,
and peeped in. He saw a man sitting at a table, and
shouted to him, but the man never spoke nor stirred, and
THE DOOMED SHIP. IOI

this completed his own terror to such a degree that,
although ordinarily as brave a fellow as ever trod a plank ;
he confessed that he jumped down on the ice and ran all
the way back to us, without once turning his head to look
again at the “‘ bewitched ship,” as he persisted in calling
her.

What to make of this astounding narrative I knew not. I
was quite sure that poor Jim was telling the truth as far as
he knew.

**Didn’t you look what name she bore on her counter?”

“No, sir, I was afear’d, split me !”

“ And what flag is that at her gaff?”

‘‘Never a one o’ me knows, captain, but I’ll swear she’s
English—or was English afore she was bewitched—by her
rig.”

Jim’s messmates listened open-mouthed to this marvellous
recital, and were at once infected by his superstitious
notions concerning the mysterious ship. It was now
nightfall, and as the evening set in stormy and snowy, I felt
that my anxiety to visit the vessel myself could not be
indulged in till the next day. So I made no comment at
the time, but briefly and decidedly ordered the men to be
prepared to accompany me to her at daybreak next morning,
a thing not one of them seemed inclined to do, if they could
any way help it.
CHAPTER XVI.

RE the morrow’s dawn I was up, and called the
reluctant men. Oriana, God bless her! had been
a-foot long before me, and had prepared a capital breakfast
of coffee, biscuits, and smoking rashers of rein-flesh, for the
crew as well as ourselves. Whatever the superstitious mis-
givings of the sailors might amount to, they at any rate did
most ample justice to the creature comforts she had provided,
but a real blue-water Jack will eat and drink even if he is
going the next minute to certain death. Blackbird Jim
besought me to set out well armed,—‘‘cause why?” said
he,- very gravely, “‘a witch herself is afear’d of Christian
muskets.”

“Especially if loaded with silver bullets!” added I, with
a laugh; but I agreed that we should each carry a loaded
gun, and we all four set out so armed, leaving Oriana in
charge of the tents.

The reader is already tolerably acquainted with Mr.
Blackbird Jim, but I have not hitherto described his two
messmates. One of the latter was a Scotchman, and the
other an Irishman, and consequently they were respectively
known on shipboard as “‘Sawney” and “Paddy.” So I
must continue to call them, for I really do not now re-
member what names they had shipped under in the “ Lady
Emily.” The Scotchman was the oldest of us all, and must
have seen fifty summers at least, being quite a veteran for
a seaman (for sailors very rarely live beyond that age if
THE DOOMED SHIP. 103

permanently engaged in their wear-and-tear calling). He
was a little wiry fellow, but tough as whalebone, or, to use
his own expression, “‘teuch as pin-wire.” The Irishman
was a Kilkenny boy, a big rollicking fellow, full of fun and
frolic as an egg is full of meat, and although a very good
seaman, he was in all other respects without exception the
most stupid ignoramus I ever met with. But he, like the
Scotchman, was very willing and good-natured, and there-
fore I had nothing to complain of.

The morning was happily very clear, and the sun shed its
faint beams on us as we silently trudged onward through
the frosty air. It was not very cold, and we soon began to
perspire, for the snow lay a foot or eighteen inches deep,
and was so feathery that our feet sank through it at every
step, and we therefore found it heavy walking, especially as
the ground was very rough, causing us to frequently stumble,
and sometimes fall outright. Paddy in particular, with his
rolling sailor’s gait, floundered about and pitched on his nose
so often, that I ordered him to walk in advance, for I feared
that his musket would go off sooner or later, and maim some
of us. Nor was I altogether wrong, as he finally pitched
head-foremost in a hollow filled up with snow, and the lock
of the gun jarring against his knee, it was discharged, and
the blundering fellow yelled, “Och! I’m kilt for sartin, and
no praist to bliss me!”

When we came within a hundred yards of the ship, I
indeed saw enough to amaze me. The “‘fid” of the main
top-gallant mast having given way, the latter had slipped
half its length through the cross-trees, and they had opened
so much, that it lay over to larboard as though it would
altogether come down by the run at any moment ; her other
104 THE DOOMED SHIP.

masts were all up with the yards crossed, but only a few
fragments of canvas clung to them. The main and mizen
courses, the foretopsail,aand the spanker, were brailed up,
but full of immense rents, and looked as though they would
drop to pieces at the first gust of wind. The staysail was
hauled down, but the jib was set, or, to speak more
correctly, it had been set, for nothing now remained of it
but the hanks up the stay and the leach-rope, with a morsel
or two of canvas. All the ropes and stays were bleached
white and evidently rotten, many were broken or missing,
and the fore-shrouds on the starboard side had fallen,down
on deck, having rotted off at the mast-head. The flag at the
gaff was now a mere bundle of rags. On our nearer
approach I perceived that the ship’s hull was battered, or
rather weather beaten, to a most extraordinary degree.
Her seams gaped wide open, and her planking was warped
and twisted, long strips of the caulking have slipped out,
and now hung dangling down. Her counter-stern had a
figure of Neptune in. relief, and some nautical devices were
painted and gilded, but there was no ship’s name nor port’s
name.

- My men hung back from me when I climbed up to the
open port-hole, and looked in, There, sure enough, was a
man sitting on a table, just as Jim had asserted. His back
was towards me, but the light was so feeble that I could
not well perceive more than that he appeared to be in the
act of writing. I spoke to him, but he stirred not, and my
voice echoed with a marvellously startling sound through
the cabin. I now began to suspect the awful truth, and, gun
in hand, I climbed up the mizzen chains, calling on my crew
to follow me, but not one of them had the courage to do
THE DOOMED SHIP. I05

so. I cared little for this, and bade them stay where they
were until I returned.

On gaining the deck, I found ‘it thickly covered with
snow, but not a trace was there of footsteps—neither of
man, beast, nor bird. With difficulty I descended by the
companion-way into a sort of steerage, communicating with
the main or after-cabin. It was in this steerage that the
man I had seen through the open port-hole was seated.
My heart sank within me as I stepped close up to him, for
I perceived (as I had anticipated) that he was a corpse!
There was a log-book open on the table before him, and his
hand rested on it, with a pen yet grasped between the
fingers. A slimy greenish mould encrusted his face and his
eyes, which were wide open. ‘The under jaw had fallen,
exposing the teeth and mouth; and a bristly beard covered
the chin and throat. He was doubtless the mate of the
ship. The last entry in the log-book—the one which he
had evidently written just before he expired—was in a
tremulous but distinct hand, and I here subjoin it, word for
word :—

“Nov. 14th, 1809.*—We have now been enclosed in the
ice seventeen days. The fire went out yesterday, and our
master has been trying ever since to kindle it again without
success. His wife died this morning. There is no relief.”

* This story of a frozen ship is not a fiction. The author has faithfully
described everything according to his authority, but he must inform the
reader that the actual date of the last entry above quoted was Nov. 14th,
1762. The awful discovery was made in August, 1775, by Captain
Warren, of the whale-ship ‘‘ Greenland ;” and thus the other ship had
been frozen up thirteen years; but as the date of this narrative is 1822,
I have been compelled to assign, in the text, the year 1809 instead of
1762.
106 THE DOOMED SHIP.

“God be merciful unto us!” ejaculated I, for I felt a
thrill of despair at this fearful example of the fate which
thirteen years before had befallen the miserable man whose
mortal remains I beheld, and I thought how likely it was
that sooner or later my own doom would be fixed.

Heart-sick I turned away, and entered the main cabin.
The first object I saw was a woman, lying on a bed on the
floor, her body reclining half upright, supported by one arm
—her chin resting on its palm. Her countenance was quite
fresh (owing probably to the non-admission of air, as there
was no port-hole open here), but her limbs were contracted
and withered. Her eyes were open, and she appeared to
have died in the act of intensely gazing at a man of about
thirty years of age (her husband, the captain, as I knew from
the passage in the log-book), who was seated on the floor,
with a piece of steel in his left hand, and a flint in his right,
uplifted in the act of striking a light on the tinder. A stove
was in the cabin, filled with broken wood and a few partially
charred chips at the bottom—evincing that a light had been
applied to them without their fairly igniting. At the foot of
the stairs was the body of a boy in a crouching attitude. I
did not stay to examine particularly the half-open lockers of
the cabin, but after peeping in the state-rooms adjoining, I
returned to the deck, and thence proceeded to the fore-
castle. Here I found a number of the crew dead in their
berths and on the floor, in every variety of attitude. One
figure especially struck me. I knew he was a carpenter by
the rule-pocket in his trousers. He was a remarkably large
man, and sat ona chest, with his back resting against the
bulk-head, and his arms were stretched straight upward,
with the hands locked together in an attitude of agonized
THE DOOMED SHIP. 107

supplication. His head was also thrown back, with the face
uplifted, and the lips apart. He had died invoking the help
of heaven. At his feet another sailor, a negro (probably the
cook), was huddled in a ball-like figure—his knees being
drawn up to his breast, and his head partially sunk between
them, while his long arms were clasped tightly round his
legs. A third had evidently died in a state of rigid
convulsion, for he was flat on his back, with his legs screwed,
as it were, around each other; one arm was flung out full
length with the fist clenched, and the other was bent with
the hand clutching the hair of the head. His features were
frightfully contorted, his lips wide apart, and the grinning
teeth (which were not at all mildewed, but retained their
original whiteness), seemed yet in the act of grinding over
each other. It was a dreadful sight.

All the bodies I could count amounted only to nineteen,
and as the original crew of so large a whale-ship must have
been thrice that number, I could only account for the
deficiency by supposing that the residue had deserted her
in hope of relief on shore, and had there doubtless miserably
perished. What subsequently convinced me of the pro-
bability of this, was the fact that when we rummaged every
part of the ship, we found no food whatever, and therefore
the missing men must have taken it with them, and
presumably did this after the death of their captain. and
shipmates, fleeing themselves to escape the same doom.
One thing astonished me, and that was, there was no trace
of foxes, bears, or any wild creature, ever having visited the
ship. They must have been deterred by some subtle instinct
of fear and awe. When I emerged on deck again, the men
greeted me with a cheer, for they had been mortally
108 THE DOOMED SHIP.

apprehensive they would never see me more. I called them
to come on deck, and they now obeyed. I then briefly
explained to them the whole mystery, and no sooner did
they understand that there was nothing supernatural nor
diabolic in the case, than all their superstitious cowardice
gave place to their ordinary unreflecting hardihood. They
readily descended with me to the cabin, and although the
scene caused both the Scotchman and the Irishman to stand
in dumb awe, yet Blackbird Jim, after coolly surveying the
bodies a moment, put a fresh quid in his cheek, and
remarked,—‘“ Ay, them theer’s nateral mummies, split me !”
and, turning away with callous indifference, he would have
begun to rummage the lockers on the spot, but I sternly
ordered him to desist. I then told them that what had
proved the destruction of the crew of this ship might prove
our own salvation, for I intended that we should take up our
quarters in her forthwith.

I ordered them to at once remove the bodies from the
cabin and convey them on deck, and this they promptly
performed. The flesh of these unhappy victims was hard
and perfectly dry, and when lifted up they rigidly retained
the posture in which they had died. When the captain’s
body was removed from the floor, I perceived his silver
watch lying by his side, face uppermost. The silver was
quite black, but on opening the case I found the works in
perfect order. The watch had stopped at twelve precisely.
There was a faded silk riband attached to it, with a key, and
on applying the latter, I easily wound up the works, and the
watch began to tick again as though it had stopped only the
minute before. On the back of the outside case were
engraved the initials, ‘‘G.P.D.,” and the maker’s name on
THE DOOMED SHIP. Iog

the enamel of the face was, ‘ Leonard Galwin, Liverpool,
r8or.” I hung up the watch on a nail in the beam
overhead, and in doing this perceived a bunch of keys
belonging to the private lockers and cupboards. I put them
in my pocket for the present, and followed the men on deck.
Under my directions they placed the bodies temporarily on
the forecastle deck, and to give them heart to go through the
remainder of their most melancholy task, I gave them a
dram each from a bottle I had brought with me. They then
got all the bodies out of the forecastle, and also the one
sitting at the table in the steerage, with the log-book before
him. Not one of the corpses exhibited any sign of
decomposition. They were all dried as thoroughly as
though they had been placed in a lime-kiln. This painful
duty occupied a considerable time, and when it was
completed, the night had set in dark and stormy. Nothing
more could be done now, so I gave the welcome order to
return to our tents, being very anxious to rejoin Oriana.
Guided by our previous tracts through the snow, we safely
arrived, and the dear girl welcomed us to a capital dinner
she had prepared in anticipation of our return. I could eat
nothing myself after the awful spectacles I had beheld, but the
three hungry sailors made a perfect feast. I marvel, indeed,
what sight ever did, or could, deprive such beings as those
of appetite? They would eat and drink in the very ribs of
death, and crack their jokes if the solid earth were dissolving
under their feet !
CHAPTER XVII.

COMMUNICATED all that had occurred to Oriana,
and she entirely agreed with me that it was a providen-
tial thing for us that we had been cast ashore near to the
frozen ship ; for we both felt that had we no better shelter
than our tents through the winter, we should probably perish
with cold. She eagerly insisted upon going with us herself
the next day, and although I wished her to remain, that she
might be spared the sight of the dead bodies, she carried her
point. Accordingly, we all set off the ensuing morning
before daybreak, taking some provisions with us, and also
axes and tools; but we might have spared ourselves the
labour, as we subsequently found the carpenter’s chest in
the forecastle.

On arriving at the ship, we cut a spare boom in two, and
nailed boards across it so as to form a rude sledge. On to
this sledge we placed the bodies four at a time, and dragged
them a distance of three hundred yards behind a low range
of rocks, and there we placed them in a natural hollow
(laying the poor captain and his wife side by side, a little
distance from his crew), and piled upon them all the loose
stones we could collect, until there was a considerable mound
above them, so that the wild beasts could not disturb their
bones. This was all we could do, for it was impossible to
dig a pit in the ground, which was frozen hard as iron.

Oriana was left behind in the ship, and the fearless girl
set herself to work during our temporary absence, and to our
THE DOOMED SHIP. EDT

great astonishment we beheld, on our return, smoke issuing
from the long-disused chimney of the cabin-stove, for she
had struck a light with materials she had brought with her
unknown to me, and had somehow managed to ignite the
very fuel which the unfortunate captain had died in the act
of attempting to set fire to. We now all ate and drank
together for the first time in the cabin, and very solemn and
awful were my thoughts at the moment. We had just
removed the late tenants of the cabin—they who for thirteen
years had silently occupied it—and we were ourselves hence-
forth to make it our home. Would their fate only be a
herald of our own? Heaven only knew!

The meal ended, I gave the men an extra drain, for I felt
the urgent necessity of getting them to work with a hearty
will, so that we might safely take up our quarters in the ship
while the fine weather lasted. The first thing we did was to
overhaul the lockers—excepting the private ones of which I
had the keys, as before mentioned—and empty them of all
their contents, except what would be immediately useful. We
found the usual miscellanea, and the greater portion we cast
aside into the steerage for the present, to be out of the way.
For six hours we all worked away (none so eagerly as Oriana!),
and then we really had got the cabin in habitable condition.
All the bedding in the berths, and in the state-rooms, we threw
in.a heap into the steerage, having plenty of excellent bedding
of our own in the tents. The whole of the place was swept
out clean, and rubbed dry with cloths, and we kept a roaring
fire in the stove, having split up an empty blubber-cask for
that purpose. I repeatedly begged Oriana to content herself
with giving orders, instead of toiling as she did; but she
only laughed, and answered “Rest! we shall have all the
Ii2 THE DOOMED SHIP.

long winter to rest and be merry in!” and so worked away
harder than ever. When we had quitted the ship for the
night, we made up a great fire in the stove, and closed the
door leading into the steerage, and also the companion-way,
in order that the cabin should get a thorough warming.

Our “homeward” stroll was pleasant enough. The men
were in high spirits, and frolicked in advance, as though
they were boys just out of school; and Oriana and myself
walked together behind them, very talkative and very happy.
The stars were out in myriads, and a soft dreamy light floated
through the frosty atmosphere. We were tantalized by the
sight of so many hares and foxes, but having no firearms
with us, of course we could not secure any.

The ensuing morn we were up long before daybreak, and
constructed a temporary sledge of the pieces of boom, &c.,
we had brought from the “Lady Emily.” This we heavily
loaded with bedding, clothing, and various necessaries, and
after a hasty (but by no means slight) breakfast, set off,
dragging it by ropes to the frozen ship. Oriana this day

, remained behind to pack up whatever she thought most
suitable and necessary for the next day’s sledge-load. We
found that as rude as our sledge was, it yet ran very smoothly
and easily over the surface of the snow (which had now
happily frozen hard), and we should have gone the whole
distance between the tents and the ship in little more than
two hours had not the lashings of the luggage given way,
owing to the carelessness of the men in dragging the sledge
down a deep declivity, where it struck against a fragment of
rock, and “turned turtle,’ as Blackbird Jim said, “e,
capsized. At length, however, we reached the ship, and
soon got our merchandise down into the cabin. We then
THE DOOMED SHIP. II3

stowed a portion of it away in the lockers, and the residue
we hung up in the cabin to give it a thorough airing, having
made a fire in the stove, which was a very excellent and
handsome one of polished brass ; and even after the lapse
of thirteen years’ disuse, it was only tarnished in some places,
and quite bright in others. The general arrangements for
living on board the ship had been most cordially agreed
upon between Oriana and myself on the previous night.
There were three state-rooms leading from the cabin, all of
them perfectly snug and dry, with tightly-fitting doors, and
very neatly furnished with commodious sleeping-berths, &c.
One of these was to be Oriana’s sleeping-room, and the
adjoining one also strictly her private room for dressing, or
whatever she pleased, and their utility and convenience was
greatly enhanced by the fact that a door (at present slightly
nailed up) opened between them. I now drew out the nails,
and the door opened freely. These rooms were on the
larboard side, and the third state-room was on the starboard,
and that I should occupy myself. Adjoining the latter room
was the steward’s pantry, which contained abundance of
culinary utensils, &c., in very good order, and quite fit for
immediate use. The, main cabin was, of course, to be
common to us both for meals, and to spend our leisure time
in. As to the men, the forecastle was assigned for their
domain ; and as it was a large place, and could soon be
rendered very comfortable, they were eager to take possession
of it, Mr. Blackbird Jim asserting that they should there
“be happy as three grunters in a stye!”—a dubious but
characteristic simile. Having nothing more to do in the
cabin at present, we proceeded td the forecastle, and after
clearing out all the bedding in the berths and hammocks,:
8
II4 THE DOOMED SHIP.

swept the place clean, and then we inspected the contents
of the seamen’s chests. The first we opened proved to be
the poor carpenter’s, containing in one compartment his
clothes and watch, and in the other.a capital assortment of
carefully-stowed tools, none of which were in the least rusted.
The other chests contained the usual very miscellaneous
articles which a sailor takes with him to sea. Almost every
chest had a few books in it, and letters from friends. All
these I sent to the cabin, that I might afterwards examine
them at my leisure. Most of the chests also had a little
money in canvas purses, and I took possession of the several
sums, noting down the deceased owner from his name on
the chest lid, and where no name or initials were painted, I
guessed it by the names written on the books, and marked
on the linen, &c. If I lived to return to England, I intended
to restore this money (the entire sum amounted to near
440) to the representatives of the deceased men, if they
could be discovered. We found in all five silver watches,
and as they were in good order and had keys attached, I
gave them to the men (they having none of their own) to
wear for the present, and they were mightily pleased, and
agreed to draw lots for the choice of ‘‘tickers” on a future
occasion. JI also told them they could freely use any of the
articles of clothing they required, but they did not seem to
relish the idea, as it clashed with their superstitious notions—
Jim gravely observing that he “never knowed any good
come of wearing a dead man’s things.” All sailors entertain
a similar belief.

For the present, therefore, the chests were stowed away
in spare berths, the men having previously selected three of
the latter to sleep in themselves. They had plenty of choice ;
THE DOOMED SHIP. Im5

for the great forecastle contained not less than twenty-two
sleeping-berths, and about as many hammocks. Judging
by this, I should say that the entire crew of the ship must
have been fifty or sixty hands, for whalers carry very large
crews. When the chests were out of the way (excepting
three or four left to sit upon, and a large one to serve as a
table), the forecastle was an exceedingly roomy place, so
much so that Jim declared with a grin that there was room
enough for all hands to dance “the cobbler’s hornpipe !”
It was a lofty forecastle too, being fully eight feet from the
floor to deck.

Our day’s work completed, we returned to the tents, and,
as on the former occasion, Oriana had provided a famous
dinner (or rather supper) for us, and I did ample justice to
it this time. That evening I discussed with her the events
of the day, and we agreed on the plans for the morrow, when
she would herself accompany us.
CHAPTER XVIII.

RE daybreak we were prepared for another “ overland
expedition,” and, by the way, I have not yet explained
the precise position of the frozen ship. She was, as nearly
as I could estimate, five English miles from the spot where
we had pitched our tents. She was frozen up in a very
narrow inlet, not above two hundred yards in width, and
how she got there was a mystery. Probably she was driven
up the same channel as the “ Lady Emily” by a storm, and
frozen fast, as the latter unfortunate vessel undoubtedly would
have been, had she not struck the iceberg and sunk. We
could walk on solid ground to within forty yards of the frozen
ship, and the inlet was clearly defined by its dead level,
which was considerably lower than the shores. We, this
day, loaded the sledge with the whole stock of spirits, wines,
ale, &c. (excepting a few bottles), and also as large a quantity
of provisions as it would carry, in addition. The day proved
raw and foggy, much like a very severe November day in
England. I consequently wished Orianato remain behind, but
she resolutely would go, asserting that she wished to put the
cabin a little in order that we might, as we had previously
arranged, take possession of it on the ensuing day. It was
useless to argue with her, and to tell the truth, I was always
too happy to have her near me to seriously oppose her
wishes.
On account of the thick weather, we were a long time
reaching the ship, and should haye lost our way had not the
THE DOOMED SHIP. TT,

previous tracks in the snow guided us. It also seemed that
we had loaded the sledge too heavily, for it was as much as
we all four could-do to haul it along at a respectable pace.
Oriana ever and anon seized hold of the tow-rope, and pulled
with all her might, laughingly asserting that she must do so
to keep warm. The men were hourly more fascinated with
her, and I am sure they would have died to save or defend
her from any danger. The only accident that happened
this time was the breakage of a bottie of rum, by a sudden
jerk of the sledge over a stone, to the intense grief and rage
of Mr. Blackbird Jim, who, on the occurrence of this melan-
choly catastrophe, first emphatically particularised his own
precious eyes and limbs; secondly, those belonging to his
messmates ; thirdly, he anathematised the sledge; fourthly,
the fog; fifthly, the tow-rope ; sixthly, the stone; seventhly
and lastly, all things in general. But as he discovered that
about a table-spoonful of the precious liquid remained in the
bottom of the broken bottle, he observed that it was worse
than sin and a shame for a drop to be wasted, and therefore
he poured it down his capacious throat, and grew pacified.
At length we were alongside the ship, and it was interesting
to note how very carefully the men passed every bottle up
the gangway-ladder (which we had now fixed with a man-
rope over the ship’s side to the ice, which it just reached).
There was no need to tell them to mind what they were
about. While I superintended the removal of the goods,
Oriana lighted a fire in the cabin stove, and we next
temporarily stowed the provisions and liquids in the lockers.
This done, we all had luncheon together, and then I and the
men went to fit up the forecastle, leaving Oriana as busy as
a bee, and merry as a cricket. The first thing we did was to
118 THE DOOMED SHIP.

get the fire-grate, or more properly I might call it the cooking
apparatus, out of the caboose on deck, and this we lowered
in the forecastle, and raised it on logs of wood, till the
smoke-pipe was more than long enough to pass through the
deck overhead. Then I got the proper tools out of the poor
carpenter’s chest, and proceeded to cut an orifice through
the deck for the insertion of the pipe. Fortunately, I had
in early youth, when a sea-apprentice under my uncle, taken
a great fancy to ship-carpentering, and often worked as a
voluntary assistant to our “chips” or “carfindo” (as sailors
call the carpenter), and he in return taught me how to use
his tools. I now found this of use to me; any species of
knowledge we acquire is sure to prove useful sooner or later ;
for I had not forgotten my old ‘‘cunning of hand.” After
the men had swept away the snow from the deck, I set a
pair of compasses to a sweep somewhat larger than the cir-
cumference of the top of the pipe, and then described a
circle on the deck between two beams. Next I bored an
augur hole (through a plank just within this circle) large
enough to insert a narrow “turning” saw, and in a quarter
of an hour I completely cut out the round piece. We then
set up the pipe in a permanent position, and caulked round
the interstices between it and the deck. A fire was then
lighted, and we found it to answer admirably.

My next act was to set to work to cut a doorway out of
the bulkhead, separating the forecastle from the hold, for I
rightly reckoned that were the entrance to the forecastle to
continue to be by the ordinary hatchway, it would never be
kept warm for any length of time, as the hatch must
necessarily be frequently removed for egress and ingress
and the cold air would rush in like a tempest. Now the
THE DOOMED SHIP. I1g

companion-way down to the cabin branched off at the foot
of the stairs, leading aft to the cabin, and forward to the
steerage. Why not, thought I, use this as the one common
entrance to the interior of the ship? The men could pass
at all hours down the companion-way without in the least
disturbing Oriana and myself in the cabins, and going
through the forecabin (or steerage) pass the length of the
hold, and opening a little door in the bulkhead, be at once
in their own domain. Accordingly, after finishing the job
of the stove, we entered the hold, and found it lumbered
with piles of huge oil-casks, tanks for blubber, and all the
outfit of a whaleman. It appeared that not more than one
small fish had been taken by the unfortunate crew, for we
found its jaw-bone, &c., and the blubber had evidently
been boiled down in the coppers in the ship’s waist, and
filled two casks with oil. All the rest were empty, as well
as the tanks. I was thankful to discover this oil, as it
would furnish us with an ample supply for our lamps. We
set to work clearing away the casks and the. miscellanea, so
as to form a sort of gangway the length of the hold, and
this we laid with loose planks all the way from the steerage
to the forecastle. It may be imagined this was heavy work,
and occupied a long time, indeed it was eight p.m. ere we
knocked off work, tired enough. Oriana had been just as
busy in her own way, and already had made the cabin look
quite another place. We left the ship with our empty
sledge, intending that this should be the last night passed
by us in the tents. Happily the fog cleared away, and it
was a clear starlight night, but bitterly cold, and minute
frozen particles of snow occasionally drifted cuttingly in
our faces. The next day we loaded the sledge with a large
120 . THE DOOMED SHIP.

cargo of provisions, bedding, clothing, &c., but there yet
remained several sledge-loads of different articles. The day
was fine, but yet colder than before, and I had the good
fortune to shoot a very fine fat duck on our way. I also
might have shot a white fox, but not knowing then, as I did
afterwards, that these foxes were excellent for eating, I did
not fire, although the animal stood impudently grinning at
us within little more than a dozen paces. Blackbird Jim
affirmed his belief that all foxes were tenanted by the
transmigrated souls of lawyers, as a punishment for their
deeds when in the human shape, and I fear that many
better educated men than Jim do not think much more
charitably of the class of men in question. We arrived at
the ship about eleven a.m., and unloaded our sledge with
high glee, for we were henceforward to have our home here.
Oriana and myself had agreed that to inaugurate our taking
permanent possession of the ship, we should give the men
a dinner in the cabin, and accordingly preparations were at
once set about, for I was quite willing, at her request, to
keep the day as a grand holiday.

We had worked very hard for several days, and the men
deserved all the encouragement I could afford them.
After they had stowed away their bedding, and made some
little arrangements in the forecastle, they were put under
command of Oriana, and it was difficult to tell which was
proudest, Oriana to give orders, or the sailors to execute
them. She seemed happy as happy could be, chatting,
laughing, singing, bustling about, without a moment's pause.
She went to the forecastle, and, after Blackbird Jim had got
up a roaring fire there, she appointed him the assistant-
cook, giving him beef and pork, and instructing him to
THE DOOMED SHIP. 121

melt snow for water to boil them in; and then she returned
to the cabin to commence her own labours.

“ Now, broder,” said she, “you must make yourself useful
and handy, or I shall scold you very much.”

“Well, what am I to do?”

“Whatever I order, to be sure. I mean to give a real
banquet ; and I only wish I had twenty fingers and thumbs
instead of ten, and you should see what I would do, dat
you should.”

“T’]l lend you my two hands for the occasion.”

“© yes, but men are such clumsy, stupid creatures;
especially sailors. But come, don’t pout, but be a good,
obedient boy, and perhaps I shall reward you—sometime !
Go and fetch me plenty of fuel, and pile it just there.”

Off I flew, and Oriana, in the meanwhile, spread the
locker-lids with all sorts of things, and when I returned
with Paddy and Sawney, all three of us with our arms full
of the broken staves of an oil-cask, she was in the act of peep-
ing into cannisters, smelling preserves, tasting spices, &c.,
with all the gravity and judgment of an experienced
housewife.

“Here,” said she, turning to the two men after they had
deposited their loads, ‘‘take those two great brass lamps,
and clean and polish them very bright.”

Away the sailors went, and then Oriana pertly ordered
me to go to my own state-room and wash my hands very
clean. This done, she set me to cut open raisins and pick
the stones out. I have already mentioned that from
among the stores we brought from the “ Lady Emily ” were
raisins, prunes, figs, oranges, lemons, preserves, pickles.
spices, Xc.; so that there were plenty of materials for her to
122 THE DOOMED SHIP.

exercise her housewifery skill upon, and the steward’s
pantry of the frozen ship furnished plenty of cooking
utensils, &c.

“ Tet me see,” soliloquised Oriana “there is the beef,
the pork, and the duck, dat is three solid dishes. I must
have one more, for those hungry men will eat. O dear, they
will eat like sharks, Iam so sure! Ja, I will have another
dish of rashers of bear-steaks and rein-flesh. Well, then I
must have two great plum-puddings, and I must have some
little tartlets for dessert, and I must also have some nice cakes,
and some—what are you laughing at, Sir?”

“Oh, nothing! I was only wondering how you are ever
to manage all these things, that’s all.”

“Eh! what do you know about cookery? Have you
picked the raisins ?”

“ Yes, I’ve just done.”

“Very well; then run with dat fat duck to the forecastle,
and set the old Scotsman to pluck all the feathers off, and
tell him not to tear the skin !”

Away I went with the duck, and on my return, Oriana
ordered me to cut slices from a reindeer breast, and steaks
from the bear, ready for rashers. While I did this, she got
some flour from the half-sack, which was all we had, and
commenced operations. Fortunately, we had brought from
poor Smutta’s pantry his stock of preserved yeast. It was
dried .by being spread with a brush in layers on strips of
clean new flannel, and to be ready for use, had only to be
steeped ina little warm-water. Yeast, thus prepared, will
keep for a score years. How eagerly and admiringly did I
watch the labours of the Danish girl, when she bared her
beautifully shaped white arms up to the elbow, and
THE DOOMED SHIP. 123

commenced making the dough. I involuntarily suspended
my own task to gaze at her. She noticed this, and
laughingly cried—

“Pray, don’t look at me as if you never saw me before.
Go on with your own work, or I shall have something to say
to you soon !”

A few minutes later came a knock at the door, and the
old Scotsman entered with the plucked duck,—

“‘ Here the creetur is, maw leddy !”

“ Ah,” said she; “I see dat. But you must go back and
draw it.”

“Ay, ay, my leddy ; aw ken varry well.”

What a happy, busy time followed! When Sawney
brought back the duck, properly drawn and singed, Oriana
gave him a quantity of coffee-berries to grind, and she also
kept me constantly employed. By degrees the puddings
were prepared for boiling, and the tarts and cakes for baking,
the latter being stuck with raisins, in lieu of currants, and
richly spiced and sweetened. Oriana then sent me to see
how Jim was getting on with his duty of boiling the beef
and pork, and next ordered me to mix the mustard. By-and-
by we commenced laying out the table. The cabin was a
large and handsome one fora whaler, and we had ample
room for everything. After the cloth was spread, the knives,
forks, plates, &c., were arranged, and Oriana consulted her
little gold watch. Her cakes and tartlets (intended for the
dessert) were now nicely. baked, and she set them aside on a
locker-lid, in lieu of a sideboard, together with figs, oranges,
raisins, and dates, piled in plates, and covered all with a
napkin, to give the men a pleasant surprise when the time
came. Next she directed me what liquids to set on the
124 THE DOOMED SHIP.

table, and what to place in reserve. My next order was to
take the two puddings to the forecastle and boil them myself
in fresh snow water, she strictly instructing me how long
they were to boil, &c.

When I returned with them, she was not in the cabin,
and I placed the great saucepan, containing them, on the
stove to keep warm. A minute afterwards, in came Oriana.
I absolutely started when she stepped up, and made me a
formal bow, and a bewitching curtsey. She had been to
her rooms, and attired herself in the very dress in which I
first beheld her at her uncle’s house at Tromso. My heart
beat at the thought, and my eyes filled with tears. I did
not say a word, but gazed at her with silent emotion and
delight, as she stood radiant in her goodness and innocence
before me.

She enjoyed my confusion a moment, and then said—‘ I
am the mistress of the cabin, and must dress to receive my
guests, you know !”

“That’s a broad hint to me and the rest,” thought I, and
away I hurried to the forecastle.

“My lads,” said I, “trig out in your sprucest roast-beef
toggery, as quick as you can! And, d’ye hear? brighten
yourselves up, wood-ashes will do for soap. Look lively,
and be a credit to me !”

“ Ay, ay, Sir! that we will!”

I then scudded to my own state-room, which I could reach
from the steerage without entering the main cabin, and
there I donned myself in my very best. Oriana rewarded
me with a sweet friendly look of approval when I entered the
cabin. By the way, her pet dog Nem, a most beautiful
little creature that I loved very much (for who could help
THE DOOMED SHIP. 125

loving what she loved, and that loved her) seemed to be in
holiday trim also, and I am much deceived if his mistress
had not given his silken coat an extra brush in honour of
the day. :

“ Broder, ” said she, ‘I don’t quite know what course to
serve up at table first. Must I give the puddings first ?”

“©, dear no! that will never do! Yon fellows would
devour your puddings in a moment. Let them first eat
their fill of the solid dishes, and even then you'll find they
won’t leave a crumb of the puddings.”

“Ah, dat is what I thought myself. We are quite ready
now, the duck is nicely roasted, and you may go and tell
them to bring in the beef and pork.”
CHAPTER XIX.

T was now after six p.m.—dquite a fashionable dinner
hour !—and'I went to the forecastle. The men were
all busy “rigging” themselves out, and their shiny faces
proved that they had taken my hint. The beef and pork
were well boiled, and I myself carried it to the cabin,
ordering them to follow me as soon as possible. By the
time the four solid dishes of beef, pork, duck, and rashers
of bear and reindeer flesh, with condiments, and a basket
of biscuits, were properly placed, a tap came at the door,
and our three guests sailed in. The poor fellows had put on
clean check shirts, and their very smartest white ducks and
blue jackets, with red silk bandanas in the pockets. They
doffed their tarpaulins, and stood quite confused and
abashed in the presence of Oriana, who now looked, as
indeed she was, every inch the perfect lady; but she at
once set them at ease by placing them at the table, with
kindly words of welcome. The great pair of polished brass
lamps were suspended and lighted, in addition to two
candles on the table, so that the cabin was quite illumin-
ated, and was warm and comfortable in every respect.
Oriana occupied the arm-chair at the head of the table, and
I sat on her right hand, and Blackbird Jim on her left, his
two messmates being opposite each other, the Irishman next
to me, and the Scotsman next to Jim.
“Will you please say grace, Captain Meredith ?” inquired
Oriana.
THE DOOMED SHIP. 127

I did so with full heart, for I felt that God had indeed
“spread a table in the wilderness” for us. The great
business of the day now commenced. I cut hearty slices of
beef and pork for the men, and Oriana helped them to
rashers of the bear and rein-flesh, just as they preferred,
and it was amusing to observe the very awkward way in
which they used their knives and forks—as sailors are
accustomed to nothing but their own broad-bladed clasp
knives, as they sit round a mess of junk in the kit. Their
muttered ejaculations were also characteristic.

“Eh, my!” said the Scotsman, “this leuks mickle like
auld lang syne, whin I ance sitted doon at thae minister’s
ain table at Torrieburn !”

“My daddy! what a spread!” exclaimed the Irishman.

Blackbird Jim’s remark was very brief, but very eloquent.
His bronzed cheeks were distended with a full mouthful,
and his keen visual organs glistened as he uttered his
comprehensive phrase of—‘‘O, my eyes!”

Oriana surveyed her voracious guests with ‘delight, and I
am sure she enjoyed seeing them eat quite as much as they
enjoyed the act of eating itself’ I now commenced carving
the duck, as Oriana said she would like a slice off the
breast. To my astonishment I found she had stuffed it full
of—preserved plums! When I expressed surprise, she said
that in Denmark that was the invariable stuffing, and I have
since known it to be so, but to this hour I do not relish it.
The duck proved delicious, and when I had helped her and
myself, I turned it over to the men, and they picked its very
bones.

“My lads,” cried I, after a while, “you must really keep
a corner for what’s coming yet !”
128 THE DOOMED SHIP.

They stared, for they were not aware of the existence of
the plum-puddings, and when these were served up in all
their smoking glory, and on fire with brandy sauce, I never
shall forget the look of the sailors. Oriana clapped her
hands with glee, and as I placed the first before her, she
balanced her spoon a moment ere she archly cried, ‘‘ Mr.
Blackbird Jim, may I give you a little—a very little slice of
pudding?”

“Bless me!” ejaculated the bewildered Blackbird, “a
little slice ma’am? Why, sink me! I feels as the boy did
when he said, ‘Fayther, cut me all that ere plum-pudding!’”

The joy of the delighted Oriana was unbounded when
they were helped all round to mighty slices, for the pudding
was indeed most excellent. I asked her how it was that
she had learnt to make such a genuine English plum-
pudding, and she replied that an old Yorkshire lady, resident
at Copenhagen, had taught her. In a very few minutes
there was not a morsel of the pudding nor a drop of brandy
sauce left.

“Well,” said Blackbird Jim, “‘if this here’s the living we
gets in these latitudes, I sha’n’t wish to get home just yet!”

A bottle or two of the strong Burton ale and porter had
been allowed to dinner, and after a pause the dessert was
served up, to the fresh amazement of the men. Oriana’s
nice crisp plum cakes and luscious little tartlets made their
mouths water, and when they could eat no more of them,
they attacked the oranges, figs, and prunes. Capital coffee
followed in Danish fashion. Never in all their lives had
they enjoyed such a feast. At a signal from Oriana, I
placed two decanters of port wine on table, and the reader
may guess whether her health was not rapturously drunk.
THE DOOMED SHIP. 129

“Well,” cried Blackbird Jim, wiping his lips on the cuff
of his jacket (for sailors carry silk handkerchiefs only for
ornament—they never use them), “this is the real thing as
Charley Baxter said when—”

“Who is Charley Baxter?” interrupted Oriana, with a
demure, roguish smile. ‘“ You always are talking about him.
Do tell me who he is.”

“Charley Baxter, ma’am !” exclaimed the Blackbird, with
a droll look, ‘don’t you know him? I thought everybody
know’d Charley Baxter !”*

We were as unenlightened as ever, but judging from the
oracular sayings and doings of the redoubted Charley
Baxter, as communicated from time to time by his quoter
and admirer, I came to the conclusion that the said Charley
Baxter was by no means the most exemplary character in
the world.

By-and-by, Mr, Blackbird Jim, in the exuberance of his
satisfaction, began to favour us with some queer details of
his experience of different modes of living. He said that
he had handled chopsticks with John Chinaman, and had
lived on rice for months with the Malays. He also hinted
that stewed monkeys (‘‘’specially ring-tailed uns!”) and
parrot pie, and ‘‘ musical Jack” (¢e., roasted rattlesnakes)
were very good dishes; and that alligator soup was not to
be sneered at for a change.

Poor Oriana turned pale at the frightful idea, and looked
at Blackbird Jim, who complacently chuckled. He had no

* The author has personally heard the sayings of ‘‘ Charley Baxter ”
quoted almost daily for years, but he could never ascertain the private
history of Mr. Baxter, and he fears that illustrious oracle is as much a
myth as the ‘‘ Old King Cole” of England, or the ‘‘ Rio d’ Yvetot ” of
France.

9
130 THE DOOMED SHIP.

idea but what his conversation was now in a vein peculiarly
entertaining and delightful for a young lady to listen to,
and therefore he continued —“‘Dear me, ma’am, I re-
members once when I was in a Indyman, the young reefers
they chops off the captain’s monkey’s tail, split’em! and
they bribes the steward to sarve it up for eel pie, and the
skipper, he never know’d the difference. But that was
nothing to what the reefers did when we lay at anchor up
the Hooghly. You see, ma’am, a boat’s crew on us had
been out alligator fishing, and we nabbed a young un alive;
so what did the reefers do, but they ——”

I here authoritatively. cut short his reminiscences, and
requested him to give a song instead. He was nothing
loth, but he paused a while to consider which of his
melodies might be most suitable for a lady’s ear, and then
sang one in true sailor fashion; but even in it there
occurred a few words which he imagined were not sufficiently
refined, so he omitted them, supplying their places with a
whistle. Poor Jim! I appreciated his feeling, and so did
Oriana. When I afterwards learnt his history, I only
wondered that he was not a yet ruder being. He was born
at sea, and brought up in a fishing-boat which his father
commanded, and never had a day’s schooling in his life.
When only nine years old, he went asa cabin-boy in an
African slaver, and, of course, he had been a sailor ever
since.

I asked him how he learnt to box the compass, as
he could not even repeat the alphabet. He replied that it
was true he could not tell one letter from another in a book,
but by looking so often at the compass, and being told that
N stood for north, and so forth, he soon learnt to box it
THE DOOMED SHIP. I31

(i.e, repeat the points and know them when at the wheel)
as well as any man.

Oriana next gave us a song in her native Danish—a
dialogue song between a girl and her betrothed. She said it
was a “Sunday song” of the island of Amager, near
Copenhagen. Of course she had to sustain both parts, and
this she did with astonishing spirit and address; and her
peculiarly sweet voice absolutely entranced us all, although
we understood not a word. Never shall I forget the
indescribably arch look she gave me as she sung the
lines :—

“ Lisbet ! Lisbet ! 0; hvor er Du fod og net!
See paa mig ret.”

With songs and talk, our evening flew away most happily.
The sailors felt themselves on good behaviour, and they
really behaved with the utmost propriety, for Oriana’s
presence seemed to refine them unconsciously. At eleven
o’clock she gaily cried, ‘‘ Now I must give you a nightcap
each. You will sleep well in my nightcaps, I am so sure!”

12

“Nightcaps, ma’am!” ejaculated Jim; “you means well,
bless your kind heart, ma’am! but fellers like us ain’t worn
them theer things in all our lives. I couldn’t sleep a wink
in one, no more nor I could in a bed o’ down !”

“Ah!” laughed she, ‘‘ never too late to learn.”

She then produced a little saucepan in which she had
secretly concocted a reeking hot “nightcap,” composed of
rum, port wine, sugar, and spices. Briskly pouring a glass
each for the men, she asked which of them would now
decline her nightcaps ?

“Now, my lads,” said I, “ you have got your nightcaps, so
you know what next to do.”
132 THE DOOMED SHIP.

They took the hint and withdrew, brimful of gratitude
and good humour.

“ Dear Oriana,” said I, when we were alone, ‘‘ how happy
have you made us all this day!”

“©, broder, I like to make everybody happy! I only
wish I could make all the world happy—dat I do! But
our little feast came off well.”

“Tndeed it has! You worked marvels. But were you
satisfied with me as your ‘stupid, clumsy’ assistant ? ”

“Oh, yes, very much so, and you will improve with
practice.”

“Then I suppose I may claim my reward.”

* Reward!”

‘Oh, you know very well that you promised me ‘a
reward’ if I behaved well!” :

“Ah, what a terrible memory you have, broder! I will
never make rash promises any more. I’m so sure I didn’t
mean it, and I’m so sure I won’t pay the reward—to-night—
no, dat I won’t!” and she screwed up her rosy little mouth
most obstinately.

“Well, then, if you won’t pay it, I must make myself
content with mere thanks.”

We then sat together, and consulted seriously about the
future. We both were of opinion that we should assuredly
have not the slightest opportunity of escape until the return
of summer—nine long months hence! Oriana, with her
usual foresight and strong sense, freely gave her opinion of
the way in which our little community should be regulated ;
and I felt the wisdom of her advice so deeply that I resolved
to adopt it implicitly. She said that after we had got the
residue of our effects from the encampment, and finished
THE DOOMED SHIP. 133,

the domestic arrangements for our residence in the ship, we
must live on a regularly defined plan. Nothing could
preserve the health and harmony of us all but employment.
I must, she said, find regular work for the men to do, of
some kind or other,—even useless work would be better than
letting them be idle. One thing which would find us much
occupation, as well as profit, would be the hunting of wild
creatures-—and unless we could capture them, we must soon
be short of food. She suggested that it would be good
policy, as well as a kind act, to invite the men invariably to
dine with us in the cabin on Sundays, as it would make
them feel that although discipline was preserved, we yet
regarded them as brothers, and they would look forward to their
Sunday’s dinner, when she would always provide such little
delicacies as were in her power. If they could read also, I
must lend them books likely to suit their taste, and this
would enable them to spend their leisure hours in a rational
way.

This matter discussed, Oriana remarked that as this was
our first night in our new home, we ought not to retire to
rest without thanking God for all His goodness in providing
it, and to pray to Him to support and guide us through the
trials in store. She wished me to read something
appropriate from my poor uncle’s -Prayer-book, and I gladly
assented. I could hardly restrain my sobs, any more than
Oriana, when I read the following precious promises, so
applicable to our position :—‘“ Behold, the eye of the Lord
is upon them that fear Him: and upon them that put their
trust in His mercy. . To deliver their soul from death ; and
to feed them in the time of dearth. Our soul has patiently
tarried for the Lord: for He is our help and our shield.
134 THE DOOMED SHIP.

For our heart shall rejoice in Him: because we have hoped
in His holy name. Let Thy merciful kindness, O Lord, be
upon us: like as we do put our trust in Thee. The angel
of the Lord tarrieth round about them that fear Him: and
delivereth them. O, fear the Lord, ye that are His saints:
for they that fear Him lack nothing. The lions do lack
and suffer ‘hunger: but they that fear the Lord shall lack no
manner of thing that is good. The Lord delivereth the
souls of His servants: and all they that put their trust in
Him shall not be deserted.”

The inspired Word filled our souls with cheerful faith and
hope. We, indeed, felt that God is everywhere, and that
He would never forsake us, nor fail us in our hour of need.
And in this frame of mind we parted for the night.
CHAPTER XxX.

HE remainder of the first week the men were occupied
in transporting the residue of the articles from the
tents to the ship, and myself and Oriana were busily
engaged in completing our domestic arrangements. She
contrived to impart an air of real comfort, and even of
elegance, to the cabin, for what cannot the taste and
industry of a clever woman accomplish, even with the
commonest materials? And for weeks and months after-
wards she continually was devising some new improvement
—some little addition or contrivance which would add to
our social comfort. By her order the sailors cut up some
spare sails of strong new canvas (which we found in the
boatswain’s store-room) to. make a carpet of three thick-
nesses for the cabin floor, and a very excellent carpet it
proved. I reminded Oriana that carpets were almost un-
known in her own country, and she replied that was true,
but she thought them much better than bare boards herself,
especially in the Arctic Regions. The grand skin of the
mighty bear we had killed was stretched as a hearth-rug in
front of the stove, and few noblemen could boast of one
equal to it. Every Saturday afternoon the men were called
in to brush the carpet, rub the pannelling and locker-lids,
and doors quite bright, clean the knives and forks, polish
the furniture, the stove, the lamps, &c., under Oriana’s
direction, and she always rewarded them with a hot glass of
grog, or some equivalent or other. - But I am anticipating.
136 THE DOOMED SHIP.

The first Sunday of our sojourn in the ship we kept in
the same way as all succeeding ones. After breakfast, the
men having dressed themselves in their best, came to
the cabin to hear me read the lessons and psalms for the
day. Then they did what they pleased till two p.m., when
they returned to partake of dinner, and pass the rest of the
day with us. Oriana always provided the best she could,
and it was sure to be accompanied by some little delicacy
or other. Conversation and appropriate reading occupied
the residue of the evening till eight o’clock, when supper
was served, and after it was over, I read the evening prayers,
and any passages of Scripture which Oriana or myself had
selected as being appropriate to our condition. Oriana
also generally sung some devotional hymns in the Danish
language, two of which especial favourites with us all, viz.,
“Sondags Morgenslutning,” and “Sondags Aftenslutning ”
(Sunday morning and evening songs). It was indeed
charming to hear her sing the touching ‘‘ Evening Song,”
beginning with,—

‘* Sabbatsdagen maa nu vige,
Os paafalder morke Nat ;
Give Gud. vi i dit Rige,
Evigholde maa Sabbat.”

Henceforward I settled the allowance of food, &c., to the
men, which although not so ample as I wished, was as
much as I could prudently assign. They cooked their own
food, and one day in the week they were allowed a gill of
rum each, and occasionally I varied this by giving them a
bottle of ale or porter instead. On Sundays they had just
the same fare as ourselves, with grog or a glass of wine. A
fresh allowance of coffee and sugar was given them each
THE DOOMED SHIP. 137

morning, for had I served out their whole week’s allowance
at once, sailors are such improvident creatures, that they
would assuredly have used it all in a day or two. They
were perfectly’ content with the allowance I assigned,
knowing that it was the utmost I dared allow, and, besides,
we had good reason to hope that we should capture con-
siderable numbers of animals, birds, and fish, when we had
leisure to hunt them, and so dispense with much of the
preserved provisions.

The second and third weeks we were entirely occupied by
completing the arrangements of the forecastle, and making
the various doorways and entrances snugger, for we could not
hope that the present comparatively mild weather would last
long. During this period we also prepared a great stock
of fuel by sending to the deck the whole of the topmasts and
topgallants, and also all the yards, booms, and blocks of the
rigging, &c. These we cut into short lengths, and split them
up with iron wedges and axes. The wood was very little
decayed, the turpentine in it, and the coats of oil and paint,
having preserved it ; but all the rigging was blanched white,
and even when thick backstays were cut in two, they did not
exhibit a trace of tar. This surprised me much. The men
seemed to enjoy their rough, heavy work, for they continually
kept up a running fire of jokes and sea-slang,—one Charley
Baxter being frequently appealed to as an indisputable
authority. When the spars were all cut up and split, the
fuel (which was very excellent as such) was conveyed to the
hold, and piled conveniently for the use of both cabin and
forecastle. There was an immense quantity, so that we had
no fear of keeping up capital fires both fore and aft, for even
when this stock was expended there were many great blubber-
138 THE DOOMED SHIP.

casks, and loose planks in the hold, not to mention the ship’s
lower masts, bulwarks, and whale-boats, of which there were
seven on deck and suspended over the bulwarks. These
boats were fitted up with oars, long whale-lines beautifully
coiled in a tub in the bows, and harpoons and lances. The
latter weapons we subsequently found very useful for spearing
seals. I did not cut upasternsail boom or two and some
of the light spare spars, as I thought they might eventually
prove of service, and so they did, but in a way I little
anticipated. We quickly found that the fuel must be broken
into much smaller pieces for use, and so the men had
employment from time to time in doing that in the hold, as
occasion required, or opportunity served.

We had hitherto worked double tides, but after completing
the arrangements above alluded to, we had an easier time,
and began to lay plans for our projected hunting operations.
I wanted some shot or slugs to shoot birds and small
animals with, but was sorely puzzled how to make them,
although I had abundance of materials, having cut up one of
the leaden pumps of the ship for the purpose, as there was
no use for the latter, the vessel being perfectly tight below
the water-line. I melted some of the lead, and made sundry
experiments, but could not succeed in casting anything at all
in the shape of shot, and at length was driven to the expedient
of cutting bits of the material with a knife and hammer.
Oriana had slyly watched my clumsy doings, and now laughed
right merrily.

“Let me show you, broder !”

“Why, what do you know aboutit? This is something
different from cookery.”

“You shall see. Get a bucket full of-water.”
THE DOOMED SHIP. 139

“A bucket of water! What for?”

“ Never mind dat. Do as I bid you this minute, Sir !”

I obeyed, by ordering one of the men to melt some snow,
and when the water was cold, to bring a bucket full to the
cabin. ‘This was soon done, and Oriana then produced a
tin cullender from the steward’s pantry, and rubbed a little
bear’s fat on its bottom.

“Ts the lead ready for casting ?” said she.

ceViesiy

‘Well, hold this cullender as high as you can over the
water, and then pour the lead into it.” I did so, and the
lead of course dropped through the holes in the cullender
into the water, and the result was very good shot, although
not quite so round as it would have been if we could have
dropped it from a greater height. I was delighted at this
fresh instance of the never-failing ingenuity of Oriana, and
praised her much, but she would not permit me, asserting
that it was not her own invention, as she had seen it done
at her uncle’s in Nordland.

Having provided a good store of this ‘““home-manufactured”
shot, Oriana made us very convenient pouches of reindeer
skin to hold it and the powder, and the next morning was
appointed for our first essay as hunters, for the men having
been out several tines as scouts, reported that many birds,
foxes, and hares were to be met with. After breakfast,
Oriana said,—‘“‘ Now, broder, I have a little present for you,
which you will find very useful.”

“What is it?” said I, and I felt rather curious to know,
for I had seen her working very busily during the last few
days, and she would not tell me what she was making.

To my surprise and amusement she now produced,—what
140 THE DOOMED SHIP.

does the reader think? Why, a huge wig, or hood, made of a
piece of new blanketing! She said it would save me from being
frost-bitten, and insisted on my putting it on forthwith, that
she might see how it fitted. I complied, and found that it
covered my neck behind, and drew down in front nearly to
my eyes, and had two flaps which entirely protected the ears
and cheeks, and fastened under the chin. When Oriana
had arranged it to her own satisfaction, she danced around me,
clapping her hands and screaming with glee, and finally led
me up to the cabin mirror, that I might see what an Adonis
I looked. I burst into a roar of laughter myself when I
beheld my comical appearance ; but I felt deeply grateful to
her for her thoughtful kindness, as the hood was exceedingly
comfortable, and would undoubtedly save me from the risk
of being seriously frost-bitten in the open air, which was now
piercingly keen. On emerging to the deck to join the men,
they saluted me with broad grins, as well they might, but
Oriana promptly told them that she intended to ‘trans-
mogrify” them in the same fashion in a few days.

Off the four of us set (leaving Oriana in command of the
ship), well provided with ammunition, including bullets, as
we might happen to meet with bears or wolves. Blackbird
Jim and the Scotchman were armed with a gun each, like
myself, for they were both expert at firearms (having
acquired their skill in a not very creditable way in former
years) ; but as to the big Irishman, he was such a stupid,
reckless loon of a fellow, that I dared not trust him with a
gun, lest he should shoot either himself or one of us; so
his duty was to look out for game, and carry any or all that
we might have the good fortune to kill.

“Tsay, Pat, my lively beauty,” cried Mr. Blackbird Jim,
THE DOOMED SHIP. I4I

“TJ wishes we could transmogrify you into a four-footed
creetur to hunt up the game—cause why? d’ye see you ain’t
fit for nought else; but that ain’t yer fault, but yer mother’s.”

Paddy indignantly spluttered something to the effect that
he was a Christian man, and never had been a savage hunter
of poor black neegurs.

“Oh, youre a hingured hinnocent, sartainly,” retorted the
other; “ but as to catching——”

“Come, my lads,” interrupted I, “no more of this,
Keep a bright look out, and don’t waste a single shot, for
we can’t manufacture powder from snow and ice.”

At this moment I heard Jim mutter, “TI have you, my
skilligalee!” and immediately he fired at a fox which was
peeping incautiously out of its burrow in the snow. The
animal was killed in the hole, and dragged out with the
exulting remark, “‘ That’s Number One. A blue fox with
red blood!”

I reproved Jim for killing it, because I thought its flesh
could not be eaten ; but the Scotchman asserted that he
had heard whalemen say that fox flesh was very good.
I strongly doubted this, and, at any rate, I forbade that any
more foxes should be shot, until we knew whether they were
eatable. We then separated fifty yards apart, and all of us
were successful in bringing down different birds and animals,
so that at length Paddy presented a perfectly ludicious
appearance, being hung round with game (which he had tied
together with rope-yarns, and slung over his shoulders and
round his belt) till he had as much as he could stagger
under. We were highly delighted with our extraordinary
success—far greater, by-the-bye, than ever happened again
—and reached the ship after five hours’ absence. The
142 THE DOOMED SHIP.

game was forthwith deposited at the feet of Oriana in the
cabin, and she examined them with the eager glee of a
child. We found the fruits of our united skill to consist of
five white hares, one blue fox, one ermine, two ducks, four
plump snow-white ptarmigans, one gannet, and three sheer-
waters—seventeen head of all kinds. The hares, ducks,
and ptarmigans, we all knew, were excellent; but as to. the
fox, the gannet, and the sheerwaters, I reckoned that we
might throw them away at once, and also the ermine, after
preserving its skin. But Oriana, although admitting her
doubts about the fox and ermine, asserted that the disagree-
able fishy flavour both of the gannet and the sheerwater (as
well as different species of gulls) was solely in the fat, and
that when the latter was separated, they were as good eating
as the domestic pigeon, as she had experienced in Nordland.
We found she was quite right, and also that fox’s flesh, when
properly cooked, was very palatable and nutritious. The
ermine, however, was not wholesome, but its beautiful skin
furnished Oriana with a pair of warm mits. After she had
selected what she thought proper for the cabin-table, the
residue of animals and birds we given to the men to cook
for themselves. I need only add that this supply not only
was highly welcome as an agreeable variety of food, but also
materially saved our preserved provisions.
CHAPTER XXI.

E had only made our foray just in the nick of time,
for the very next day commenced a dense snow-
storm, which lasted, with little intermission, for nearly a
fortnight. This dismal period—for it was quite dark, even
for the one hour or so when it should have been daylight—
I set the men to little jobs of all sorts, and kept them in
tolerable employment, and their leisure hours were spent in
singing, dancing the cobbler’s hornpipe, spinning yarns, and
“ arguefying ” (thanks to the controversial spirit instilled by
the old Scotchman) in the forecastle. As to Oriana and
myself, we were chiefly employed together in overhauling
the books, letters, &c., previously brought from the sea-
men’s chests; and also in examining the contents of the
private lockers in the cabin, which I had not hitherto:
opened. We first looked over the books, and in all there
were at least one hundred volumes. Of these, about twenty
were Bibles and Prayer-books, and it was touching to read
some of the inscriptions on their title-pages. Many had
merely (in colossal characters) name and date, as, ‘‘ John
Jackson, his Book, May 7th, 1798.” One large Bible had

the common school-boy couplet—

‘¢ Steal not this book for fear or shame,
As there you see the owner’s name.”
James Clarke, his Book, 1804.

This particular Bible, like too many others, did not appear
to have even been read. Most of them were wrapped up
144 THE DOOMED SHIP.

very carefully in clean new canvas as sacred things, and so
stowed away at the bottom of their respective owner’s chests ;
and in this way, year after year, they had been taken from
ship to ship into every quarter of the world, and probably
were never dragged to daylight, except to read beside the
hammock of a dying shipmate, or when destruction threat-
ened the vessel. Several Bibles were gifts from mothers
to their sons when the latter first went to sea, and one
inscription especially deeply affected me. It was written in
a tremulous but very neat woman’s hand, and was as
follows :—‘‘ Ellen Henderson presents this Bible to her
darling only child, William Henderson, on going his first
voyage to sea, April 16th 1809.” Underneath this was
written in the same hand-writing—“ God is the husband of
the widow, and the father of the fatherless. My boy! tread
thou in His righteous paths; forsake not His holy ordin-
ances; study His Word; so shalt thou be blessed; and
although thou mayst never see thy widowed mother more,
God will be thy helper in thy hour of need, and never
forsake thee until thou forsakest Him.” Alas! what was
the fate of this orphan sailor-boy? Had we buried him
with his messmates, or was he one of that portion of the
crew who (as we conjectured) had deserted the ship after
she became frozen, and their captain and officers died?
The date of the presentation (which was blotted ‘with the
“‘widowed mother’s” tears as she wrote it) proved that the
“first voyage” alluded to was the one on which the ship
and crew met their awful doom. The other books were
chiefly tales of shipwreck and adventure, lives of pirates and
highwaymen, song-books, and novels. There were no less
than four copies of ‘‘ Robinson Crusoe” (how many boys
THE DOOMED SHIP. 145

has that book sent to sea in search of imaginary islands !),
two “Arabian Nights,” three ‘‘ Newgate Calendars,” and one
‘“ Pilgrim’s Progress.” Of the novels, the most remarkable
were—‘‘ Pamela; or, Virtue Rewarded” (who would have
expected to find such a book in a seaman’s chest ?), the
“Vicar of Wakefield” (very much thumb-worn, and marked
in every page with tarry fingers), an odd volume of Shakes-
peare, a neat little pocket-edition of the “Sorrows of
Werter” (another strange book for a sailor, yet evidently
much read), and Smollett’s “ Humphrey Clinker.” Five of
the miscellaneous books were of a most infamous description,
and I instantly consigned them to the flames of the cabin
stove, as well as a work of atheistical character. J then
selected three of the largest-print Bibles, and a variety of
the tales, &c., which I thought most suitable, and delivered
them to the men ; but, unfortunately, the Scotchman was the
only one who could read. He, however, was proud to show
his erudition (as Blackbird Jim then observed, “It’s a fine
thing to be a schollard!”), and his messmates used to listen
open-mouthed to him night after night. Their favourite
books, I was pleased to find, was Bunyan’s “ Pilgrim” and
“Robinson Crusoe”; but of the two, the former seemed to
interest and delight them most. On one occasion I went to
the forecastle just to listen to the reader, and whatever the
old Scotchman’s scholarly acquirements might have been in
his younger days, he now stumbled at many long words,
and spelled them over letter by letter. These little interrup-
tions became so frequent, that Jim’s patience was exhausted,
and he roared out, ‘“‘ Why don’t you say, ‘hard word,’ and go
on?” Ever after this, when the reader met with a passage
he did not comprehend, or any word he could not pro-

10
146 THE DOOMED SHIP.

nounce, he invariably skipped it, with the remark, “hard
word, and go on.”

Our next task was to overhaul the mass of letters—at least
one hundred and fifty in all. From one chest alone there
was a bundle of twenty-nine letters, the dates of which
ranged from 1789 to 1809—the poor fellow to whom they
were addressed having hoarded them, and tied up the letters
of each year separately with a piece of twine! The majority
of all the letters were from fathers, mothers, wives, and
sisters ; and a score or two were love-letters. They were
written in every style—some in excellent handwriting, and
others in little better than hieroglyphics. What a curious
insight into the human heart did these letters unfold! The
deep feelings of parents, sisters, wives, and sweethearts were
often sublime in their heartless eloquence ; and both Oriana
and myself shed tears over numerous passages. Were this
a mere book of ordinary fiction, I might ‘give copies of some
of the letters, but as it is, I do not feel justified in doing so.
Such records of love and sorrow are sacred things, and
ought not to be subjected to the glare of publicity. Finally,
we opened the captain’s private lockers, and, as we expected,
found them full of articles personally belonging to himself
and wife. Some of these were intrinsically valuable, and
others were very useful to us in our present situation, and
all were affecting mementoes of the deceased. There were
a few standard works, and several books of navigation, but
what I wanted most of all—viz., a quadrant and other
nautical instruments, to ascertain our latitude and longitude
—were not to be found. Probably the men who deserted
the ship took them away. I may here add, that I regularly
kept the log of the “Lady Emily” from the day of her
THE DOOMED SHIP. I47

wreck, but, of course, all I had to enter was a brief statement
of our every-day life. Who would read that log? Would
it merely meet the eye of some subsequent discoverer of our
frozen bodies ?

After the fortnight or so of tempest was over, we had
several weeks of calm, but intensely cold weather. Every
night there was a glorious borealis, and I never wearied in
gazing mutely on the sublime sight, and could read the
smallest print by its light. One of our first acts was to pile
up a solid mass of snow in a sloping direction from the ice
to a level with the ship’s bulwarks, and then cut out steps in
this, so that the act of ascending and descending from the
ship was greatly facilitated. Next, we resumed our hunting
operations, but altheugh for the first few days we had a fair
degree of success, yet the various creatures became, by rapid
degrees, so shy at the sight and sound of our guns, that we
at length rarely shot more than two or three head of game
in a day. This would never do; and then we thought of
setting traps, but how to make them was the question.
Oriana came to the rescue, and showed us the plan adopted
in Nordland ; this we imitated, and set traps, in a semi-circle,
about a couple of miles from the ship. On the average, I
think, we caught a dozen of hares, foxes, etc., in a week—
sometimes more, but oftener less ; and occasionally we shot
a variety of birds, including ducks, geese, ptarmigans,
sand-larks, snipes, sheerwaters, ivory gulls, grouse, buntings,
mollemokes, boatswains, divers, etc. We also shot a few
ermines, and a huge raven, that looked at least two
centuries old. Jim also, once when alone, had the good
fortune to kill a glutton, and its remarkably fine skin
furnished Oriana with a tippet to wear in the open air. The
148 THE DOOMED SHIP.

men now each wore a hood similar to mine—and, of course,
made by the same industrious little fingers. At the end of
November the ptarmigans migrated southward, and at this
time the sun totally disappeared, and did not shine above
the horizon again for nearly two months.

We kept Christmas-tide and the New Year in the best
style we could, and I particularly remember at the
Christmas-day dinner one delicious dish, which Oriana had
concocted of the bear's paws! The utmost harmony
continued to prevail, and the men were in good spirits and
good health. Indeed, Oriana regularly visited their fore-
castle once or twice a week, to see that they kept it clean
and well-ventilated, and she from time to time suggested
whatever she thought conducive to their health and comfort,
and they implicitly obeyed her.

One day we found distinct traces of a bear’s footmarks,
and the old Scotchman on one occasion got a shot at the
creature, but without avail. I then pondered on the
possibility of entrapping him, and at first thought of digging
a pitfall, but the ground was hard as iron, and we had no
pickaxes or other proper tools. The scheme I finally
adopted was to firmly set up three pieces of studding-sail-
booms, each about twelve feet long, in the form of a triangle,
and lashed together at the top. From the apex we
suspended a strong rope with a well-greased ‘running noose,
in the centre of which was placed a tempting lump of boiled
beef, :

The first night the bait was unmolested, but on the
ensuing morning we found to our delight a small white bear
fast secured round the neck by the noose! He had made
desperate efforts to drag down the apparatus, but its was too
THE DOOMED SHIP. 149

strong for him, and he now was quite helpless and stupified,
the rope having jambed so tightly, that but for his thick felt
of hair it would have hanged him outright. A blow from
Jim’s axe gave him the coup de grace, and we dragged his
carcase in triumph to the ship.
CHAPTER XXII.

ns RODER,” said Oriana, one Sunday morning, ‘‘ when
is your birthday?”

“ My birthday ! why do you ask that?”

* Because I wish to know?”

“Tt is the second of March.”

‘The second of March! how wonderful !”

“Why so?”

‘*T will tell you some other time. And so you are what
we call in Denmark a ‘wild March bird,’ for all boys born
in March are sure to become wild, adventurous men, good
for nothing but sailors, or hunters, or something of that
kind.”

“Upon my word, Oriana, you are highly complimentary.”

“Tt is true, I am so sure!”

‘Well, it was certainly a wild enough time when I was
born, for I have been told that it was on a day of fearful
storm, and my poor mother very nearly died in giving me
birth.”

“Ah, min hart! And what day was it?”

“How curious you are! Do you want to cast my
horoscope ?”

“Never mind dat, but tell me, please, dear broder !”

“Well, it was a Wednesday, about four bells—I mean
two p.m., that I was launched on the ocean of life.”

“Eh! a Wednesday? Let me think; this is February
the 27th, and is a Sunday ; 28th is Monday; March the rst
THE DOOMED SHIP. I51

is Tuesday ; and the second is Wednesday. O, dear me!
how very strange, it is the same day of the week as that on
which you were born!”

So it is! A curious coincidence.”

“ And how old will you be on Wednesday, broder ?”

“T shall be twenty-six.”

She did not reply, but sat musing over her unfinished cup
of coffee—for we were at breakfast.

“Come,” said I, ‘‘it is my turn now to ask you when your
birthday will be?”

“Oh, never mind dat now, I will tell you when the day
comes.”

Our monotonous life sped as usual, and I had quite
forgotten this conversation, when, on rising one morning, I
entered the cabin, and found Oriana, as usual, up before
me, for I always was a sad slug-a-bed, but she seemed
dressed with unusual care; although, indeed, she was
invariably extremely neat in her attire, and compelled me
also to reform the slovenly habits I had contracted as
a sailor. I did not reflect about the possible reason, but
took my customary seat at the table. The next moment
she came to my side, and crying,—‘‘A happy birthday to
you, dear broder !” blushingly kissed my forehead.

I flung my arms round her neck, and embraced her with
tears of joy and gratitude. Never since my mother’s death,
when I was left a poor orphan boy of fourteen, had any
living being wished me happiness on the anniversary of my
birth, but I sometimes fondly fancied my mother’s spirit
hovered o’er my couch to bless me, when I opened my eyes
in a morning, and said to myself, “This day I am so
many years old!” On the present occasion I should
CHAPTER XXIII.

HAVE not hitherto particularly alluded to the appear-

ance of the locality to which we were necessarily
confined, and I need only say that the general impression it
conveyed was one of unspeakable desolation. ‘There were
immense ranges of rocks many miles distant inland ; but’in
our immediate vicinity all was nearly level, except the low
range before mentioned, a few hundred yards from the ship.
The heavens overhead were sometimes sublime, but the
prevailing feeling one experienced was a dread sense of
horrible isolation, and this made us turn more eagerly and
fondly to each other’s society, for not a sound ever broke
the awful brooding stillness of nature, except the occasional
scream of a bird, or the savage howl of a beast. I do not
intend to weary the reader with minute descriptions of
Arctic scenery and climate, for many books have been
written by intelligent officers of recent expeditions—although
I have not myself read any of them, except Sir John Ross’s
deeply-affecting narrative of his sojourn in 1829, and three
following years.

We continued to entrap foxes (the hares having nearly all
migrated), and occasionally shot a few birds; and as the
days were lengthening a little, we were able to take wider
circuits for the chase, but our success, nevertheless, was far
inferior to what it had been in former months. The reason
doubtless was partially attributable to our having thinned
the game, but yet more so to the fact that they had grown
THE DOOMED SHIP. 163

very shy and wary. At first the hares, and even the cunning
foxes, would complacently gaze at the deadly tube levelled
for their destruction; but now they sped away, swift as the
wind, at a mere glimpse of a gun-barrel. We made holes in
the ice to catch seals; and, after many experiments, at
length captured a few by transfixing them with the whale
harpoons and lances of the frozen ship, when the animals
came up to breathe. But the only portion of the seal’s flesh
which we could bring our yet dainty stomachs to relish, was
the head and neck, and also the broad tail. The rest we
boiled for oil, and the skins were very useful for a variety of
purposes. The blundering Irishman one day tumbled
head-foremost into one of the seal-holes, and it was a
miracle that he ever came to the surface again, but happily
Blackbird Jim heard the splash, and running to the spot,
twisted his harpoon into the man’s jacket, and so hauled
him out, half-drowned. We were then at least two miles -
from the ship, and at once hurried poor hapless Paddy
toward it; but before he had gone half the distance, his
clothes were as stiff as sheet-iron, so that he could not put
one foot before the other, and we had to lay him across our
guns, just as though he were a corpse being carried from a
battle-field, and thus conveyed him (dismally groaning) to
the ship. When there, we had to cut his clothes off, and
then placed him in his berth between hot blankets, and
gave him a couple of stiff glasses of hot brandy and water.
The result was, he suffered dreadfully for several days from
being frost-bitten, and he could not quit the forecastle for
upwards of a fortnight.

About this period (the middle of March), we, for the first
time, caught sight of a small herd of reindeer, and gave
164 THE DOOMED SHIP.

instant and eager chase. ‘They fled with the swiftness of
the wind at the first fire, but we killed a very fine one, and
also shot two foxes on our return to the ship with the prize.
This reminds me to mention that the little fox-cub which
Jim presented to Oriana, became thoroughly domesticated
within a very few days. How she possessed the skill to
charm it, I could not conceive (for it was mortally afraid of me
and of all the men), but it is a fact, that not twenty-four hours
after its capture, it laid contentedly in Oriana’s lap, and ate
out of her hand. A day or two later, it played with her like
a kitten, and before the end of the week, actually ran to her
side when she called it by name. It was at perfect liberty,
but made no attempt to escape from the cabin. Its favourite
food was biscuit steeped in water, and mixed with
morsels of cheese, but it ate very little at a time. On the
16th day of March, a most afflicting calamity befel us. The
Scotchman and the Irishman went out together after
breakfast to examine the traps and shoot any game they
might meet with, myself and Jim remaining in the ship,
having something to occupy us there. When five or six
hours sped and they did not return, I grew alarmed, and
sent Jim to seek for them. He, in turn, was fully three
hours away, and the news he brought was anything but
reassuring. He said that he had first gone round to all the
traps, and that he was quite sure they had also visited them,
for they were re-baited ; but although he had gone a good
distance further, he had not seen his absent messmates.
This was indeed startling and inexplicable, and I immedi-
ately got two large lanthorns and suspended them at a mast
top, and fired several guns, in hope that if the men were
within moderate distance, they would either hear the latter,
THE DOOMED SHIP. 165

or see the lights. Nothing resulted from this, and next we
kindled a great bonfire on deck, and kept it blazing several
hours, for the night was now intensely dark and murky, so
that it would have been madness to have gone forth in
search of them again.

A night of distressing anxiety passed, and the men yet
were missing. At day-dawn we both set out in search,
thinking we could certainly track them by footsteps, and
should at least have the melancholy satisfaction of recovering
their bodies, for we concluded they were frozen to death ;
but snow had fallen during the night to the depth of several
inches, and we could not trace them anywhere, except in the
immediate vicinity of the traps, where the snow was much
trodden down by our former frequent visits.

What fate had befallen them? Had they wandered ina
wrong direction and lost themselves? Or had bears or
wolves killed and devoured them? Or had they fallen into
seal-holes? The latter seemed the most probable, and I
fancied myself that the reckless Irishman had perhaps first
tumbled in, and that his messmate, in endeavouring to
rescue him, had shared the same fate. We therefore
examined every hole, but new ice now covered them all,
and although we broke this and felt with our lances under-
neath the solid ice, we found them not.

For days and weeks we sought.far and near, and with the
same sad result. Alas! what a blow was this! And not
the least painful thing about it was, the utter uncertainty as
to their actual fate; for if they had really perished in a seal-
hole, it was hardly likely that both fell in together; and if
one first made a false step, and the other was drawn in by
endeavouring to rescue him, it was natural to suppose that
166 THE DOOMED SHIP.

either the gun of the Scotchman, or the harpoon the Irishman
always carried with him, would have been left on the snow,
yet such was not the case. And had bears carried them off,
that could hardly have happened without leaving some trace
of the combat, yet we could find none. All was a frightful
mystery ; but we knew that our poor messmates were lost to
us for ever.

About a fortnight after the mysterious disappearance of
the two men, Blackbird Jim came to the cabin one evening,
at eight p.m., and tapped at the door. I happened to be
doing something in my state-room at the time, so he
addressed Oriana, saying that he had just thought that as it
was a brilliant night, he would take a stroll out to visit the
traps, and re-set any that were sprung.

“Oh, no,” said she, “do not go to-night—better wait till
morning.”

But he persisted, saying that he should certainly be back
in an hour or two at latest, and hoped to be able to bring
her a hare, or some kind of animal, for supper. She then
gave him a small glass of rum; and after thanking her
kindly, the poor fellow set off in better spirits than he had
evinced since the loss of his two jovial messmates. When
I returned to the cabin, Oriana told me that he had gone to
examine the traps, and I remarked that it was a foolish and
useless thing, for I did not think it likely that any creature
would be found in them so early, and he might get frost-
bitten, or loose his way.

“It is a strange whim too,” added I, “for Jim always
before seemed greatly to prefer staying in the forecastle
on an evening.”

“Ves, but you know, broder, dat the poor man must feel
THE DOOMED SHIP. 167

very lonely now his messmates are gone, and he cannot
read to amuse himself. I think you ought in future to
invite him every evening to the cabin, to sit and take supper
with us. Please do, broder, and I am so sure dat he will
be grateful, and behave very well.”

“That I will, since you wish it,” I replied; and I may
here mention, that since the other two sailors were gone, I
had occasionally invited Jim to the cabin of an evening, as
well as to spend all day with us on Sundays, and he
conducted himself with such propriety that I now felt
perfectly willing to extend the privilege—for a privilege and
pleasure he evidently felt it. His conversation on these
occasions, though highly characteristic of the man, was
often very amusing both to Oriana and myself. He never
spoke, however, when he saw that I wished either to read
to myself or aloud, and he would then sit as quiet as a
mouse, platting rope-yarn mats for the cabin passage, and
was ever delighted when Oriana said a kind word to him, or
set him to do any little job that she thought within his
capacity. We both, in fact, liked him more the longer we
knew him, and he was proud of our esteem, and did
his very utmost to further deserve it. His behaviour
towards Oriana, especially, was profoundly respectful and
devoted.

The evening wore away as usual, but when ten o’clock
came, we felt surprised that he had not returned, and I
went on deck to see if he was in sight. It was a glorious
night, the heavens being in a blaze with auroras, and I
could see to a great distance, except in the direction where
the range of rocks (behind which we had buried the crew of
the frozen ship) intervened. All was silent as death, and
168 THE DOOMED SHIP.

not a living creature was to be seen. I therefore returned
to the cabin somewhat vexed, and also uneasy.

“He promised to bring me some animal for supper,”
said Oriana, “but I think we had better sup on what
we have, or else we shall have to go hungry to
bed !”

“You are quite right, min pige! He has gone on a
foolish errand, and I only hope that he has not lost his way
—though I hardly think that likely, for he is a real sailor,
and would therefore be sure to notice the bearings of
objects. Besides, he knows every foot of ground by this
time.”

We supped and chatted together, but as time sped our
uneasiness about Jim’s absence gradually changed to down-
right alarm. We repeatedly went on deck, and looked out
for him in vain. At midnight I resolved to go forth in
search of him, for we both now felt too certain that some
serious calamity had occurred.

“He must have fallen in a seal-hole, or perhaps a
bear has met him,” said I. ‘Did he take arms with
him ?”

“Ves, he had what he calls his ‘Old Trusty’ hanging to
his belt.”

This ‘Old Trusty ” was the axe with which he had killed
the monster that visited us at the tents, and Jim had ever
since carried it with him whenever he went from the
ship.

“T’m glad of that,” returned IJ, “for if he really has had a
battle with a bear, he would use ‘Old Trusty’ manfully,
depend upon it! But I fear the poor fellow is wounded, or
disabled, at any rate, and perhaps frozen to death ere this.”
THE DOOMED SHIP. 169

“God forbid!” ejaculated Oriana, turning very pale.
“ But let us go at once, broder !”

“Us go! Why surely you are not going, Oriana? The
night is bitterly cold, and—”

“But I am!” resolutely replied she. ‘Dat poor man
saved us both at the mutiny, and—and I will go!”
CHAPTER XXIV.

HEN she said, “I will” in her present tone, I knew
well it was useless opposing her. She hastily
wrapped herself up, whilst I drew on my overcoats, and then
she put a small flask of brandy in her pocket. I loaded a
gun with double ball, and also buckled on a cutlass, for
there was no telling what use I might find for them. After
quitting the ship, we paused to consider in what direction to
search. There were footprints in the snow which we knew
to be Jim’s heavy rolling tread, but as no snow had fallen
during several days past, we could not tell whether they were
made by him this night or on a previous occasion, so it was
useless tracking them. Oriana suggested that we should
first go towards the rocks and look in their vicinity. We did
so; and hardly had we turned the first angle ere all our fears
and hopes were at an end. On the snow was stretched the
lifeless form of poor Blackbird Jim, and within half-a-dozen
paces of him lay a great white bear, quite dead, and the
trusty axe yet fast in its skull, whither it had been driven by
the last desperate exertion of Jim’s ebbing powers.

Oriana screamed at the sight, and then instantly knelt by
the side of the body, to ascertain whether life had really fled.
Fastened by a rope-yarn to Jim’s belt was a fine white hare,
and we at once comprehended that the poor fellow had
taken it from one of the traps, and was bringing it, doubtless
in high glee, for our supper, but was attacked when within
three hundred yards of the ship. Much icy blood was caked
THE DOOMED SHIP. 171

on his dress, and his body was quite stiffened with the frost,
syet Oriana declared her belief that he yet lived, as she
asserted she saw his lips quiver. She promptly poured
brandy down his throat, and without waiting for its effects, I
got him on my back and staggered as fast as I could—for he
was a heavy man—towards the ship; Oriana preceding me
with the gun. Assisted by her, 1 managed to get him on
board, and conveyed him to the forecastle, where we placed
him on blankets spread on two chests. He at once gave
unequivocal signs of returning animation by gasping and
moaning, and in less than an hour was restored to sensibility.
He was awfully mangled, and as soon as he recovered speech,
he explained how the fatal rencontre with the ferocious beast
came to pass. He had, as we surmised, taken the hare from
a trap, and was approaching the ship with it after about two
hours’ absence, when he was seized in an instant by a large
white bear, which had crouched behind a piece of rock, so
that he did not see it till he was within its terrible embrace.
Being an exceedingly powerful man, he fought desperately
for life, but he could not release himself from the beast, which
hugged him till he felt, and even heard, his ribs crack one
after the other, and the blood began to spurt from his ears,
nose, and mouth. The bear never attempted to bite him,
but merely to squeeze him to death. When it first attacked
him, it did so by rearing upright on its hind feet, and he
thought the struggle must have lasted fully five minutes ere
he fell to the ground, and the bear a-top of him, without
releasing its hold. By the fall, however, he managed to dis-
engage his right arm, and tried to untackle the axe from his
belt, but could not do so in the position in which he lay.
He now felt his left arm break in two places, and the hind
172 THE DOOMED SHIP.

claws of the brute were rending his thighs. Recollecting his
clasp-knife, he got it out of his pocket, and opening it with
his teeth, he stabbed the creature in both eyes, and the agony
caused it to instantly let go its hold, and roll over with
hideous howls. He sprang to his feet, seized his axe, and
with an expiring effort, drove it into the skull of his blinded
foe. This done, he staggered backwards, and falling on the
snow, became at once insensible, and continued so until
brought to the forecastle.

On examination, I found his wounds truly frightful. Every
rib on his left side was smashed—the whole of the left side,
in fact, seemed fairly crushed in. The four lower ribs of the
right side were also fractured, and so was the left arm in two
places. The muscular parts of his thighs were literally
ploughed up by the beast’s hinder claws. I was certain he
could not survive, and he himself knew it perfectly well. All
that we could do for him we did do; but even had a first-
rate surgeon, with every medical appliance, been on the spot,
his life could not possibly have been preserved. The only
marvel was that he had not died on the field of conflict. He
breathed with great difficulty, and I have no doubt that his
left ribs were pressed hard upon his lungs on that side. He,
however, bore his horrible sufferings with amazing fortitude—
sternly repressing his groans, and even uttering some of his
quaint jokes!

Oriana wept over him as she supported his head, and
wiped the froth from his lips, for he was a great favourite of
hers, and she justly deemed him one of the chief instruments,
under God, of preserving her during the mutiny. Indeed,
had he not acted as he did on that occasion, I myself must
have perished like my uncle, and she would have met a fate
THE DOOMED SHIP. 173

a thousand-fold worse than death. My grief, therefore, at
beholding him expiring thus, was as intense as hers. He
asked her for some rum, and drank it. Then he could speak
more distinctly, and addressing Oriana, cried—‘ Ma’am, I
can’t go aloft, d’ye see, till you forgives me !”

‘“‘Forgive you! I have nothing to forgive |”

“Yes, you have, ma’am, split me! You’re an angel, and
I was a wicked, ungrateful brute, for I killed your little dog,
and ”

“Oh!” sobbed she, ‘‘don’t talk of dat—I don’t care for
a thousand dogs !”



“Then you forgive me, ma’am ?”

“Ves, dear Jim, yes !”

“God bless you, ma’am, and—and God forgive me all my
misdoings! Captain! I’ve tried to do my.duty by you, as I
swore I would to the old man, and I hopes you are satisfied
with me in the long run?”

‘“‘Oh, yes, my dear fellow—my poor dear messmate !” cried
I, wringing his horny hand. ‘“‘ You’ve acted nobly through-
out,—we owe our lives and everything to you !”

“Them’s comfortable words to ring in a feller’s ears as
he trips his last anchor. here below!” responded he, with
a flash of satisfaction lighting up his features, “and mayhap
they’ll help me to gain a snug berth in the port of heaven !”

After a little pause, he muttered these characteristic ex-
pressions: ‘Split me! ain’t it hard, though, that a feller like
me, as has gone through the mill ever sin’ I was the height
of a biscuit, should live to be grappled and brought-to by a
horrid, ugly brute of a bear! Id sooner the black neegurs
in Guinea had captivated me—sink me, if I wouldn’t! But
it ain’t ship-shape, nor creditable, nor Christian-like, to die
174 THE DOOMED SHIP.

grumbling like a heathen lubber, seeing as how every bullet’s
got its commission, and we must all weigh when the signal’s
given—but it is hard that a Greenland bear should unreeve
my land-lines !”

A few minutes later he was obviously nigh his end. The
fatal rattle betokened the last struggle between the strong
man and death, and just at the parting moment he became
delirious, and in broken accents gasped—“ Ay, ay, I know’d
it, and I said it, sink me! It’s a lubberly thing to shorten
sail—for’ard first—should allus begin to clew up aft, d’ye
see ?—No’th East by No’th, Sir—ease her handsomely, Jack,
when she pitches, or you'll have her sticks out !—for-top-sail
halyard foul—never was in a prettier bit of wood and iron
than—the ‘Lively Nancy’—a-catching blackbirds—ay,
turned turtle at last, split me ;—eight bells, my hearties,
d’ye hear the news ?—turn in for a long caulk—for ever and
ever—O Lord Jesus, have mercy!—I’ve been a wicked
sinner!” Here the soul of poor Blackbird Jim passed to its
account, with words of prayer unfinished on his lips!

Both Oriana and myself bitterly moaned his loss, and
after we had decently composed his limbs, retired to our
cabin, the only living human beings perchance within hun-
dreds of miles. All that most miserable night we sat up,
and at noon the next day I went to the forecastle, and sewed
the body in one of the hammocks. In doing this I was
struck by the hieroglyphics tattooed in Indian ink, sailor-
fashion, on Jim’s broad, hairy breast. There was a raffled
anchor with initials between each of the flukes (probably the
initials of his own real name and that of his first sweetheart),
and beneath it were some very extraordinary oriental symbols,
which I think must have been tattooed by the Malays in
THE DOOMED SHIP. 175

their native language, as he once mentioned that he had
been shipwrecked, and lived among them for some months.
There was also a Neptune, with trident, and a “ heart-in-
hand,” all very neatly executed, and bordered with flourishes.
Two or three of his fingers were encircled by a blue band in
imitation of rings. My melancholy task performed, I left
him in the forecastle, and the next day carried him on deck,
and lowered him on to a sledge, which I dragged to the spot
where he had himself helped to pay the last duties to the
ship’s crew a few months before. Oriana accompanied me,
and we both shed sincere tears over the humble mound of
stones I piled above him. On our return, we passed the
body of the bear that had deprived us so cruelly of our last
earthly friend, and I wrenched poor Jim’s “trusty” axe out
of its skull, and took it with me to the ship.

To my dying day I cannot forget the look that Oriana
fixed on me that evening as we sat together in our solitary
cabin. At length she stretched forth her hand and laid it
on my arm, and gazing with her expressive eyes full upon
me, she said in a low, thrilling voice, to which her foreign
accent and broken English lent a peculiarly touching charm,
—“ We now all alone, all gone to the heaven but us two !”

“Tt is God’s will, and God’s will be done!” responded I,
with bursting heart.

“Yes, dat true. But God not forget us, He remembers
us, He sees us, He hears all we say. I want to speak !”

There was something in her manner that startled me, and
I involuntarily returned her piercing gaze. A. little flush
mantled her cheeks and forehead, and she momentarily
lowered her eyes, but the next instant fixed them on me
more firmly than ever.
176 THE DOOMED SHIP.

““You have heen good, very good and dear to me,” said
she, ‘‘and the God in heaven will you reward. But we are
now alone, only us two young Christian people living here,
we are by ourselves” (and I felt her grasp tighten on my
arm). ‘You very good, you will not be angry at my words.
There is only God with us here, only God sees us, only God
hears us, but you will never do wrong to the poor Danish
girl dat loves you so dearly ?”

I started, for I now understood her meaning, and it was
not without an intonation of reproach that I responded—
“Oriana; my mother is in heaven, and how do you think I
could ever hope to meet her there if I wronged you? I
swear before God that sooner than do that I would die ten

”



thousand deaths. You are my sister, and

“Ves, yes,” eagerly interrupted she, ‘I am your sister, and
you are my broder dat I love very much!”

She released my arm, and pressed my right hand between
both hers, whilst her eyes swam with tears.

“You forgive me what I said?” continued she, “It right
for me to speak once so, but I never will make my broder
grieve by speaking so again. God will reward my broder for
all his goodness, and if we die, God will receive us both in
heaven.”

“Ay, Oriana,” cried I, my emotion almost choking me,
‘so long as we live here together you are my sister, but if
it please God ever to rescue us from this misery, then I
shall hope to be something nearer and dearer to you than
a brother.”

“ Best not speak of dat now,” hastily replied she, “it not
right now. Only talk of us now as broder and sister, dat
love very much.”
THE DOOMED SHIP. 177

My head sank on my breast, and, bowing it between my
knees, I sobbed as though my heart would break.

“My broder!” ejaculated the noble Danish girl,—“ my
broder must not weep! he must be brave and strong, else
he never will save poor Oriana.”

Her divinely-inspired words pierced my very soul, and
lifting up my head, I saw she had knelt down. I knelt
beside her, and committed the care of us both to Him who
is an ever-present help in trouble. We then parted early
to rest, for we were wearied as much by grief as by the vigil
of the preceding night; but it was with a sweet feeling of
repose, for we felt that the dear God of heaven, our only
friend, our only witness, our only hope, looked down approv-
ingly from His throne on high.

12
CHAPTER XXV.

OR several weeks after this, nothing occurred worthy

of particular mention. The weather continued bit-

terly cold in general, but at times was quite mild, at least it
seemed so to us, and then I used to go out hunting, and
Oriana frequently accompanied me. On the whole, my
success was pretty fair, as I got a fresh supply of game of
some sort every few days. Our leisure time in the cabin
was spent much as usual. I did anything I could, or amused
myself with reading and keeping the log, and Oriana never
was idle, for even when conversing or relating one of her
interesting old Danish legends (of which she possessed an
inexhaustible stock), she invariably had work of some kind
in her hands ; and her beautiful little tame fox would lie in
her lap, or play with her just like a kitten or a dog. By the
way, she bestowed on him the name of her deceased pet,
Nem, and he really deserved it as much as his predecessor,
for he not merely followed Oriana like a dog when on board
the ship, but he actually would accompany her miles over
the snow, never attempting to leave her ; and once when we
happened to come suddenly upon a group of foxes, the young
tame one, which was composedly trotting by her side, so far
from being inclined to join his brethren, uttered a sharp cry
of terror, and sprang into the arms of his mistress for pro-
tection. Like the little dog, he also never failed to follow
her to her state-room at night, and would doubtless have
defended her from any intrusion to his last gasp. Poor
THE DOOMED SHIP. 179

Blackbird Jim was indeed right when he said that all creatures
loved Oriana ‘‘ because they couldn’t help it!” My own
mother had just the same wonderful power of charming all
kinds of dumb animals, but I never. possessed it myself in
any particular degree.

Oriana also spent much time in giving me lessons in
Danish. I am naturally a very poor linguist, but I certainly
learnt Danish tolerably fast under her sweet tuition. Well I
might! for I hung on every silvery sound that passed her
lips.

But we had much very serious and harassing discussion
on our prospects at this period. The winter was passing
away, and none of the natives had visited us (nor had we
seen any trace of their former encampments), so that our
once firm hope of being relieved by them, and guided to a
settlement of civilised men, seemed unlikely ever to be
realised. But one other chance of escape remained, that is,
when the summer came—would it ever come?—and the
snow and ice melted, we must rig out the long boat of the
“Lady Emily” (moored, as the reader will recollect, to the
rocks where we landed), and taking all the provisions which
might then be left, sail out of the estuary, and, committing
ourselves to the mercy of the winds and waves, endeavour
to reach Norway or Scotland, which ever seemed the most
easily-attained coast. But there would be fearful and in-
evitable risk in this, and yet, what other course remained ?
Alas! none whatever; and if we did not get off this first
summer, how could we hope ever to do so? Our scanty
preserved stores would be totally exhausted in,a few months,
and now I had only about three pounds of powder left.
How, also, could I navigate the boat on a voyage which,
180 THE DOOMED SHIP.

perchance, would last, even with fair winds and a moderate
sea, for several weeks? Had poor Blackbird Jim been
spared to me-—alas! everything reminded us of our loss in
him !—I should not have feared much, for he was a most
excellent seaman, and had seen ten-fold more boat-service
than myself. As it was, had it not been that Oriana
constantly cheered me with sanguine hopes and plans, I
should have sunk into a state of apathy and despair. I was
also perpetually tormenting myself with thinking what would
become of her if anything happened to me.

On what proved to be the last evening of this epoch of
our lives, occurred my first—and thank God my last !—little
quarrel with Oriana. I had been rather despondent and
irritable all day, and a question arising between us on a very
trifling matter (which I should be ashamed now even to
mention), we entertained different opinions, and by degrees
we quarrelled! It is true, and I only record it because the
sequel will show Oriana in her own true nobility of soul. I
have hitherto faithfully delineated her character, nothing
extenuating, and nothing exaggerating, and I am certain,
the fact that she once gave way to passion (and she also
really was in the wrong in her opinion), and afterwards so
characteristically made amends for it, will raise her in the
reader’s estimation as much as it did in mine. We quarrelled,
and for hours sat at the same table, and by the same
fire, without speaking a word. ‘There was not, to our know-
ledge, a human being within hundreds of miles of us,
and yet we, two young mutually-dependent people, who
loved each other more than life, we quarrelled! Let those
foolish philosophers, who would fain explain away the
Scripture-doctrine of the natural depravity of man, explain
THE DOOMED SHIP. : 181

this! God knows, that in all my life I never passed such
hours of agony as these. I had a book open before me
(Collin’s exquisite Poems), and I pretended to read. Oriana
had some linen in her hands, and pretended to sew. We
were each perfectly conscious that we both were simulating
—yet neither of us spoke. I would have given worlds to
have heard her say one single word, and as she subsequently
confessed, she felt the same as regarded me. Repeatedly
did I open my lips, but no sound issued. I did not even
raise my eyes from the blank pages of the book, but
doggedly rested my head between the palms of my hands—
idiot that I was! Thus the time passed, and at the usual
hour Oriana, as was her wont, laid a cloth on the table, and
arranged the supper. I acted the hypocrite by vigorously
attacking the viands, but I thought every mouthful would
have choked me. My supper over—for Oriana did not
touch a morsel—I again had recourse to my book, and she
to her sewing, but neither of us had yet spoken a syllable.
Another hour—an age of torment to us both—and Oriana
arose to retire. ,

“Good-night, Mr. Meredith !” said she.

I started, and gazed at her retiring form like a man ina
fearful dream, and heard her go to her little state-room and
shut the door, ere I could recollect myself. I thought I
should have died with mortification and remorse. I struck
the table passionately with my fist, and hurled the book
away from me. No kind word from her this night! Only
chilling “Mr. Meredith!” The words rung through my
brain, they were traced in fire wherever I turned my eyes.
In agony I bowed my head to the table, and buried it
between my hands.
182 THE DOOMED SHIP.

How long I had thus sat, I knew not, but was aroused
by a voice—the music of the spheres to me !—crying—
“ Broder! broder !”

At first I thought my imagination deceived, but again
“ Broder! broder!” sounded so palpably that I started up,
and lo! Oriana herself stood before me, pale as death.

“Broder! dear broder! forgive me! O, broder! I could
not pray to my God this night till I had been reconciled to
you! I have been very wicked! I was wrong—I know now
dat I was wrong—forgive me, my broder!”

“Forgive thee! O, Oriana! my beloved—my soul!”

“Oh, broder, I thought I should have died this night—I
did!”

We embraced, and then she ran back to her state-room,
sobbing with joy. I wonder which of us was happiest that
night ?
CHAPTER XXVI.

HE very next morning (April 28th), just after we had
risen from breakfast, Oriana happened to glance
through one of the cabin windows in the ship’s stern, and
immediately gave a loud cry of amazement and delight. I
was by her side in a moment, and looking forth in the
direction of her finger, I beheld—the Esquimaux! What
emotions swelled our souls at the sight! When hope was
getting to the lowest ebb, God sent us a sign that He had
not forgotten us, and that our best chance of preservation
was probably on the eve of realisation. How incoherent
were our ejaculations—how wild our gratitude and joy!

The natives were five in number, and were very leisurely
approaching the ship in a line with its hull. They were at
present about fifty yards distant, and, without pausing to
reflect what I was about, I snatched up a gun and rushed
on deck, and thence bounded to the ice to meet them.
When I appeared in sight, they gave a simultaneous shout of
astonishment and alarm, and stopping short, began to
brandish the spears with which they were armed. I was too
excited to comprehend the danger and impolicy of my rash
conduct, and instead of pausing to make signs of amity (as
Oriana, who was now on deck, called to me to do), I still
ran onward towards them, gun in hand. When I came
within twenty yards, they gave a savage whoop, or war-cry,
and poised their spears, the weapons being held in the right
hand, and levelled between the thumb and fore-finger of the
184 THE DOOMED SHIP,

left to steady the aim in launching them. Another moment,
and I probably should have paid the forfeit of my folly with
my life, had not my foot providentially slipped, throwing me
violently on my back. The shock recalled me to my senses,
and I immediately cast aside my gun (which, by the way,
was not loaded), and opened my arms widely in token of
peace and friendship. The poor natives responded by
crying Teema! Haja Teema!” (I spell the words as pro-
nounced), and they at once threw aside their spears, and
even drew the knives suspended in sheaths at their belts,
and cast them also on the snow. Perceiving that they did
not seem inclined to advance towards me, I walked to them,
and when I came within a couple of yards, one, who
appeared to be the principal man, stepped up to me, and
again crying, ‘““Haja Teema!” formally stroked my dress
with both his open hands, commencing at my shoulders, and
ending at my boots. Conceiving this to be the Esquimaux
etiquette, I gravely imitated him by performing the same
ceremony on himself, at which both he and his friends were
highly delighted, and repeated their cries of ‘‘Teema!”
The same operation was then gone through with the others,

and we were then all ‘hail fellows well met!”

as seamen
call it. Oriana now joined us, advancing with smiling face
and extended hands. They seemed utterly astounded at
her apparition, and at first, I am inclined to think, they
deemed her some celestial being. It was a couple of
minutes ere their leader mustered courage to reverentially
stroke her dress, and as she had watched from the ship the
same species of ceremony performed between myself and
them, she failed not to return the compliment. On this
they all vociferated their shouts of salutations louder than
THE DOOMED SHIP. 185

ever; and the four others, in turn, made her acquaintance
in the orthodox Esquimaux fashion. Hitherto no attempt
at conversation had been made, but Oriana, fancying they
perhaps had had some communication with one of the
Danish settlements, and might therefore know a little of
that language, addressed them, saying :—‘Taler de Dansk ?”
(Do you speak Danish ?)

Four of them only stared in dumb surprise, but the fifth
pricked his ears at the sound, anda gleam of intelligence
lighted up his features, as he gazed at the speaker, and
pointing at her with his finger, repeated the word ‘‘ Dansk ?”
in an interrogative tone.

“Ja!” eagerly said Oriana, “Jeg er Dansk, min ven!”
(Yes, I am a Dane, my friend !)

But the Esquimaux only reiterated the word “ Dansk,”
and nodded his head, to show that he, at any rate, understood
she was a Dane. She thereupon again questioned him
whether he spoke her language, and he, with much apparent
difficulty and stretch of memory, replied—‘“ Nei taler nei!”
(No—speak—no !), intimating that he only knew just a
word or two of Danish, but could not converse in it.

I now looked round the horizon, expecting to see more
natives or their huts, but nothing was in sight. On
mentioning this to Oriana, she contrived partly by speech,
and partly by a series of ingenious signs, to question them
on the subject, and they gave us to understand that their
encampment was a long way off, and that they themselves
had wandered in our vicinity in search of game, and that
seeing the ship this morning, they walked towards it.

“Broder,” said Oriana, in a quick, anxious tone, “we
must ask them into our cabin, and treat them well.”
186 THE DOOMED SHIP.

“Ves, but will it be safe ?”

“O, I will answer for dat! All we have to do is to let
them see we mean well, and that we have faith in them, and
they will give us no reason to repent our confidence.”

** But it will not do to admit them all at one time?”

“Yes, all!” replied she, in a decisive tone ; and as I had
much reason to estimate her judgment more highly than my
own, I acquiesced, and told her to act in all respects as she
deemed fit. She then turned to the natives, who had
listened to our little colloquy with great attention, as though
they well knew it related to their reception, and pointing to
the ship, she invited them to go on board with us. They
all expressed, both by words and gestures, great delight at
this, but cast longing and expressive glances, first at their
weapons, and then at myself. We well comprehended that
they wished to be permitted to carry their arms with them,
but Oriana promptly and explicitly refused to allow it, and
very rightly too, as I thought. Their countenances
darkened suspiciously at this, and they hastily conferred
together for a while. Then the spokesman, the man who
had held some intercourse at one time or other with the
Danes, pointed to the spears, and expressed their willingness
to leave them, but wished to be allowed to have their knives
with them.

“T think we may grant that—what is your opinion ?” said
I. For, to tell the truth, the knives did not appear very
formidable weapons.

“No, broder, we must be firm, for if we once permit them
to come on board with their knives, they will ever afterwards
expect the same privilege ; and next they will want to bring
their spears also.”
THE DOOMED SHIP. 187

The knives in question were those they had drawn from
their belts, and after some demur, they ceded the point, but
to our surprise drew from their bosoms another and much
smaller knife each, and asked whether they might retain it?
At any rate, it was very honest and open of them to ask
permission, for we had no idea they possessed a third
weapon, till they voluntarily showed it. One glance at the
little knives alluded to, quite satisfied Oriana, and she
smilingly assured the Esquimaux that they had full
permission to carry them on board, and she would give
them something wherewith to put their “bosom friends” to
use ; for they showed us, by expressive signs, that the only
use of the knives was to cut their food, and we fully
believed them.

All obstacles thus being removed, and an amicable
understanding at length come to by the aid of Oriana’s
diplomacy, our guests gleefully accompanied us, I leaving
my gun on the snow to add to their confidence. As we
ascended the staircase of snow which led up to the deck (as
before mentioned), the Esquimaux made signs of approval,
for it was something in their own style of work, and a thing
they could very well understand. On reaching the deck,
Oriana descended first, to make a little preparation in the
cabin, and I led our friends from end to end of the ship,
but they did not manifest much surprise or emotion at the
sight of the boats, nor anything else on deck. We then
descended to the cabin, and Oriana gave them a smiling
welcome, and seated them in a semi-circle round the stove.
Now it was that they begun to exhibit intense interest
and amazement, uttering voluble exclamations, and eagerly
pointing out different objects of novelty to one another.
£88 THE DOOMED SHIP.

The spokesman, or chief man among them, did not seem
quite so impressed with what he beheld, having doubtless
seen similar objects once before, but all the others evidently
now saw the inventions of civilised men for the very first
time. Nothing delighted them more than the stove, for its
utility was patent to their senses. They for a while seemed
to fancy it a living creature, and admired its front of polished
brass. One of them incautiously laid his naked hand on a
very hot portion of it, probably with the intention of stroking
it to make acquaintance, and the sudden yell he gave not a
little startled and frightened his companions ; but when they
understood the reason, on my opening the door and showing
them the blazing fire within, they all laughed most heartily,
and ridiculed their unfortunate companion instead of pitying
him. Human nature is the same all the world over, only
it is modified by the influence of climate and degree of
civilisation attained. English schoolboys invariably laugh
at one of their number who brings a punishment on himself
by his folly or stupidity, and Esquimaux evince precisely the
same sense of the ludicrous in their own special way.

Here I must pause to describe our guests personally.
They were very short, and exceedingly thick set men, and
in this respect reminded me strongly of the Laplanders whom
I had seen when our ship was at Tromso, but their features
were decidedly more prepossessing, being a regular oval, and
good-natured in expression. Their cheeks were plump, eyes
small, of a dark hazel colour, and rather near together ;
nose small and flat; complexion tawny, or to speak more
precisely, of a yellowish copper hue. Their hair was black,
and hung in elfie masses low down, and was very coarse
in quality. One of them, however, had his hair cropped
THE DOOMED SHIP. 189

short all round, but I cannot say that I thought his appear-
ance improved thereby. Another of them had ornamented
his hair by stringing the teeth of bears and foxes in two
circles around it. The same individual (who must have
been a dandy) had his forehead and left cheek tattooed all
over with parallel lines. They had every appearance of
being well-fed and contented animals. Their names, as
they informed us, were respectively Lakgalu, Neleoora,
Anguack, Hinkpanu, and Onulampi, the first being the one
who had known the Danes. Their. dress was substantial,
and doubtless comfortable, consisting of double upper
garments made of deer-skin, sewed with sinews, and fitting
closely round the neck, whence it descended almost to the
knees. The hair of the inner skin was next the body, and
that of the upper was worn outwards. These tunics had
wide sleeves, reaching to the finger ends when the arms hung
downwards. The back portion of the tunics was ingeniously
fashioned so as to form a cap or hood, which could be drawn
over the head at pleasure; and the skirts reached down
almost to the ankles. Three of them had trousers made of
deer-skin, and two of seal-skin, the hair inwards. They all
had two pair of boots of deer or seal-skin, the hair inwards ;
and the “dandy” had a species of light shoes or slippers
drawn over his boots. Their tunics were ornamented with
singular fringes of fish-bones, bears’ teeth, birds’ legs, and
beaks, &c. Two of them had pendants at. their breasts,
composed of foxes’ tails, ermine skins, and birds’ heads.
Neleoora was lame of a leg, from the bite of a wolf, as we
understood; Hinkpanu had lost an eye; and Onulampi
showed us that his left hand was quite withered and
paralysed, from what cause I do not know, but probably
Igo THE DOOMED SHIP.

from being frost-bitten. Such were our guests outwardly,
and I need only add here that their language sounded very
guttural, but soft and plaintive ; and Oriana averred that it
was quite different from the Lapponic. I fancied myself that
I should not have been able to distinguish one from the
other. The first rite of hospitality which Oriana thought
proper to exercise, was to present a cup of coffee to each of
the Esquimaux. ‘They regarded the cup itself with curiosity,
but when they tasted the beverage, they made comical,
wry faces, and bestowed on it some depreciatory name,
which we, of course, did not comprehend at the time,
but subsequently learnt that it meant “muddy water!”
Coffee being a failure, she successively presented them with
ale and porter, but they relished neither. She seemed bent
on experimenting on their tastes with a view to future profit,
for she next offered them our three different kinds of wine,
and as wine was yet less liked than either coffee, ale, or
porter, she tried Hollands, rum, and brandy, but the spirits
were liked least of all, and very glad I was of it! It thus
being evident that nothing we could offer in the shape of
liquids would be at all acceptable, she tried the solids, and
with what success the reader shall hear. First she gave
them a fragment of bread, and a biscuit or two. They looked
at the bread, and smelt it, and tasted it very cautiously,
and then shook their heads, and uttered a general grunt of
disapprobation. The biscuit was yet more summarily
condemned. Next she set before them the remains of our
yesterday’s dinner, consisting of boiled beef and pork,
and some roasted willow partridges that I had shot the
previous morning. They tasted the beef and pork, but
not one of them cared to take a second mouthful. The
THE DOOMED SHIP. I9gt

partridges, however, they devoured in an instant, bones and
all! They understood that species of food, at any rate.
Oriana then tried them with cheese, but they could not
swallow a morsel. After that she gave them, in despair,
figs, prunes, preserves, and—sugar! Not one of these but
what they rejected, with unequivocal contempt and loathing.
What was to be done? A bright thought struck Oriana!

“Broder,” said she, ‘didn’t you kill two seals a few days
ago?”

“Yes, and I brought you the skins, don’t you recollect ?”

“ But what did you do with the bodies ?”

“QO, I left them in the forecastle to boil down for oil
some time!”

“Well, go and fetch them down here directly.”

“ What for?”

‘Never you mind dat. Go at once, dear broder.”

I was now accustomed to obey her so implicitly that I at
once went, leaving her alone with the Esquimaux. Ina few
minutes I returned, dragging in the entire carcases of two
white seals. The moment our guests beheld them, they
uttered a simultaneous cry of delight, and with sparkling
eyes, mechanically drew forth their little knives. The latter
were made of reindeer horn, the haft and blade being all of
a piece. The blade was about four inches long, and an
inch wide. . It had no point, being cut off square at the
extremity, and the edges were very dull.

“Surely!” cried I, “they are not going to eat this seal-
blubber raw!” But they were! Seizing one of the seals,
they held it on their knees, and with the aid of their clumsy
knives, contrived to rend it into long strips of flesh. These
they divided fairly, and each man laid his share across his
192 THE DOOMED SHIP.

knee for conveniency. Their feast then commenced. They
took up astrip of seal-flesh, and rolled it between their
hands, until it attained a rounded shape, and then they
pushed it into their mouths as far as ever they could. This
done, they sawed it off close to their lips with their dull
knives, and bolted the mouthful with little or no mastication.
In this disgusting fashion the meal proceeded, and poor
Oriana turned so sick at the sight, that she hastily swallowed
a glass of wine, and retired awhile to her stateroom. They
actually continued to eat until compelled to desist from sheer
repletion, and that was only when they had gorged both the
seals, except the tail of one, and the head and flappers of
the other. They washed all down with repeated draughts of
snow-water, of which they drank a bucketful among them.
Then they smiled with the complacent air of men who had
dined entirely to their satisfaction, and tapped themselves to
intimate to me that they were now quite comfortable in the
unpoetical region. For my own part, I was so disgusted at
their astounding voracity, that nothing but the imperative
duty of hospitality kept me from following the example of
Oriana, by retiring from the scene. I mentally compared
my amiable friends to sharks, boa-constrictors, and glutton
bears; but at the same time I was exceedingly thankful
that they refused to eat civilised food, for had it been to
their liking, I now perceived that they would have devoured
as much at one meal as would have lasted Oriana and I
two or three weeks; and had they repeated such an
onslaught in half-a-dozen successive visits, they would have
completely emptied our lockers, and we might have been
famished outright in consequence.

The banquet being concluded, and the remnants put aside,
THE DOOMED SHIP. ' 193

Oriana returned to the cabin, and we proceeded to entertain
our guests in a more intellectual manner. Almost everything
they saw excited childish curiosity and delight, and their
eager exclamations and gestures were exceedingly amusing,
for they had now lost all fear of our meaning ill to them, and
were, therefore, quite at ease in our society. I happened to
possess a microscope, and when I exhibited its marvellous
powers to them, they absolutely screamed with glee. I next
adjusted a telescope to the proper focus, and levelling it
through the cabin window, caused them to take a look.
They all were amazed, and even alarmed, and made sudden
motions with their hands as though to repel objects, for they
imagined that the distant mountains were actually drawn
close upon them by the magical instrument. Nothing, how-
ever, so deeply interested them as articles of utility which
they could comprehend. The cabin lamps, the cooking
utensils, files, needles, scissors, &c., were profoundly admired,
but I think the brass stove, after all, yet retained the first
place in their estimation. I showed them my watch, and
after they had seen the mysterious movements of its hands,
and heard its ticking when held to their ears, nothing could
induce them to touch it, as they deemed it a living and
“uncanny ” thing.

Their curiosity somewhat appeased, and I thought it time to
begin to turn their visit to profitable account, and produced
a chart of the Arctic Regions, which I had found in one of
the lockers. I wished to know if they could recognise any
localities, so as to give me an idea of our position. They
all gazed attentively at the chart, and seemed to admire it as
a pretty toy, but by degrees Lakgalu (the one who had had
intercourse with the Danes) turned it about, and began

13
194 THE DOOMED SHIP.

tracing the lines with his finger. I watched him with great
anxiety, and at length beheld his eyes glisten. The next
moment he pointed decidedly to one particular spot, and
looking up, nodded at Oriana with the exclamation, ‘‘ Dansk!”
I eagerly looked at the place indicated, and sure enough it
was a Danish settlement in a very high Northern latitude.
This was a most important piece of information, and the
next point to be learnt was our distance from it. Both Oriana
and myself closely questioned Lakgalu, but although he
perfectly understood what we required, he evidently was
unable to recognise by the chart our present locality, and
only vaguely drew his fingers backwards and forwards, ending
by giving us the disheartening impression that we were a
very great distance from the settlement in question. We
then tried to learn whether there was not a nearer settlement,
but it was impossible to understand from his replies whether
such was the case, and probably he really did not know, or,
at any rate, could not explain. Clearly, nothing more was to
be gained by questioning further on this subject at present, but
we hoped that some of the natives at the encampment would
prove more intelligent than our first visitors. The latter
now intimated that they must take their departure. It was
somewhat singular that they expressed no surprise at seeing
only myself and Oriana in the ship. Perhaps they supposed
that the crew were all in another part of the ship, or absent
hunting, and certainly we had no desire to undeceive them.
As parting presents we gave each of them a large needle,
some strong glovers’ thread, and a piece of iron hoop, well
knowing how they value the latter material. They were in
ecstasies at our generosity, and loudly proclaimed their
intention of revisiting us in two days. I fancy that Oriana
THE DOOMED SHIP. 195

had a notion that women are everywhere more intelligent
than men, for she particularly desired them to bring one or
two of her own sex the next time, and they very gladly pro-
mised that they would.

We then all descended to the ice together, and on coming
to the spot where they had cast aside their weapons, they
willingly permitted me to examine them. The large knives
(worn in a sheath at the belt) were made, in three instances,
of pieces of old iron hoop. A fourth was simply of bone,
but very cleverly edged and pointed with iron. The fifth
was the blade of an English sailor’s clasp-knife, with the
name of the maker, “G. Fearnall, Sheffield,” distinctly
impressed. The hafts to the knives were some of wood and
others of bone. Their spears were exceedingly curious, and
ingeniously constructed. Their shafts were composed of
several. pieces of wood and.:the bones of fish, fitted with
great nicety together, and firmly secured. They were
pointed with horn (in one instance with iron), and at the
other end of the shaft was a sort of ball or knob, of bone or
wood. We bade each other adieu, with the same ceremonies
as attended our introduction, and in a quarter of an hour
the bulky figures of our newly-made friends grew dim in the
distance. Oriana and myself had plenty to talk about
that evening.
CHAPTER XXVII.

HE Esquimaux had promised to revisit us on the
second day, but on the evening of the first a storm

of sleet, hail, and snow intermingled, set in, and I began to
despair of seeing them, but Oriana persisted that they would
come in spite of the rigour of the elements. How to enter-
tain them, however, was a serious question. I had found
nothing in the traps, and had only shot a solitary snow-
bunting (the first of the season) on my return. The morning
of the second day the storm cleared off, so we had no longer
any doubt that our blubber-eating friends would soon make
their appearance—-which they did about eleven a.m., being
six in number. We went out to welcome them, and found
that four of the six were our former visitors, and that the
other two were women (a fact not easy to discern at a dis-
tance), being the wives respectively of Lakgalu and Hinkpanu.
They told us that Neleoora (the lame man) was very anxious
to accompany them, but was not able to undertake so long
a walk, having been quite exhausted on the former occasion.
One of the women had snow-spectacles, consisting of two
pieces of wood, with long narrow slits, worn across the eyes,
and tied round the head with sinews of reindeer. The use
of these is to protect the vision from the glare of the snow,
which frequently produces inflammation, and even total
blindness, among the natives as well as the Europeans. After
we were duly introduced to the women, the men laid down
their spears and large knives on the snow, and the entire
THE DOOMED SHIP. 197

a

party entered the cabin with us. A ludicrous incident then
occurred. Oriana’s little tame fox was sleeping on the bear-
skin by the side of the stove, and the Esquimaux, thinking
it was a wild one which had wandered into the ship, seized
it in a moment, and were about to despatch it, had I not
rescued it from their hands, and intimated to them that they
must never molest it. The poor frightened animal then ran
away to Oriana’s state-room, and never showed its face again
until our visitors had bid us good-bye. We had noticed that
our friends carried several bundles with them, and as soon
as they were seated in the cabin, they unrolled these, and
presented us with about twenty salmon and trout, a piece of
the flesh of a musk-ox, and four very fine ermine skins, as a
testimony of gratitude for their previous kind reception. We
thanked them heartily, and after stowing away the ermine
skins, the piece of musk-ox, and half-a-dozen salmon for
our own private use, we signified to our guests that. the
residue of the fish were at their service, to eat on the spot if
they thought proper, and they expressed much delight at
this ; and to our astonishment the entire party, women as
well as men, forthwith attacked the raw salmon, and in less
than an hour literally devoured every morsel of the fourteen
fish—the aggregate weight of which could not be less than
eighty pounds. Thus each individual, on the average, must
have gorged not less than twelve to fourteen pounds! I
assure the reader this is not an exaggeration ; and if my word
is doubted, I refer ta anyone who has visited the Arctic
Regions.

When their extempore banquet was ended, the natives
began to look around them, and it was amusing to note the
proud, eager way in which the men evinced their own superior
198 THE DOOMED SHIP.

intelligence by pointing out and explaining objects to the
two women. And here it will be as well to briefly describe
the latter. As already said, at a distance we could hardly
distinguish them from the men, for they were dressed
extremely like them, only their upper garment had a peak
in front as well as behind, and was ornamented with
shreds of skins. One of the women had a border of
ermine skins round each arm-hole of her dress, and tufts of
birds’ feathers on her shoulders, like a soldier’s epaulettes.
The other had an owl’s head suspended on her forehead,
and some tails of foxes, and a raven’s head and claws on her
breast, not to mention a bear’s paw hanging from her waist
belt. Doubtless they had put on their most magnificent
attire to pay us a visit of ceremony. In person they were
exceedingly short—not more, probably, than four feet and
an inch or two—but also exceedingly stout. Their features
were shaped much like the men’s, and were mild in character,
and of a dark, healthy hue. Their hair was long and
matted—combs being an unknown luxury, They were both
tattooed, not only on the forehead, but also on the chin and
cheeks, in the same fashion as one of the men as before
described. One of them, named Loogooklee, wife of Lakgalu,
had a large bag of seal-skin at her back, and at first I could
not conceive what it contained, until the living creature in
it struggled and cried, and then the mother unslung the bag,
and began to soothe the little prisoner—an infant of a few
months old. Oriana at once won the mother’s heart by her-
self taking the child—which was perfectly naked—in her
arms, and caressing it. I subsequently beheld this and other
infants nursed in the open air, and exposed without covering
to a temperature many degrees below freezing-point !
THE DOOMED SHIP. 199

A considerable time passed in entertaining our visitors
with the sight of our endless novelties, and then I resumed
the subject most at heart by again displaying the chart
before them, but the result was the same as on the first
occasion. I then intimated to Lakgalu that if he could
bring me any of his brethren who should prove better
qualified than himself to impart the desired information,
they should be liberally rewarded. He readily promised to
try what he could do in that respect, and pledged his word
to return the next day.

Ere the Esquimaux parted from us, we gave fresh presents
to them all, the men each receiving some trifling little
articles they admired (the chief of which was an old tin
saucepan, given to Lakgalu, and received with extravagant
joy), and the women being presented with needles and
thread, and also with a small glass bottle each, as they had
expressed profound admiration at the sight of the latter
articles. Both the women immediately suspended their
bottles with a loop of reindeer sinew over their bosoms,
and I recollect that to the last day of our sojourn among
the tribe, they still wore these singular ornaments, very
probably regarding them as a species of charm or amulet.
We accompanied our guests out of the ship as before, and
fortunately I happened to carry up a gun in my hand loaded
with shot, for a covey of ptarmigan had settled within twenty
yards of the vessel’s counter, and I fired at them, killing
five. Nothing could exceed the awe and admiration
expressed by the Esquimaux at the report of the piece, and
the execution it did. Not one of them had ever heard a
gun fired before, with the exception of Lakgalu, and he
evidently did not understand the mystery any better than
200 THE DOOMED SHIP.

his friends. They ran and picked up the slain birds, and
eagerly pointed out to one another the wounds and the
broken wings. My gun itself was regarded with super-
stitious terror,—they made no attempt to stroke it to curry
favour. One of the women looked hard at me, and then
turning to her companions, exclaimed, “ Ulun mil wala
Angelok!” (He is a great conjuror, or magician.) We
found subsequently, by-the-bye, that they possessed an
Angelok, or conjuror, themselves ;—more of that worthy
anon. We gave them three of the five ptarmigans, and
they received the present with great delight. The surest of
all ways to gain an Esquimaux’s heart is by an offering to
his stomach—for that is his god!

In the evening dear Oriana and myself feasted on the
very welcome present of the Esquimaux. One salmon was
much more than we both could eat, and yet it would
have been only a “sop in the pan”—a mere whetter of the
appetite to an Esquimaux !

On the following day Lakgalu returned, according to his
promise, bringing with him two strangers of his tribe, who,
he fancied, were qualified to impart the information we so
ardently longed for;—but alas! they proved even more
ignorant than himself. One thing, however, they made
known, which gave us much pleasure, and that was, the
entire Esquimaux encampment would be removed the very
next day to within a mile or two of the ship, solely that they
might have the benefit of an easier communication with us,
—an event which we as firmly expected to turn to our profit
as they did to theirs.
CHAPTER XXVIII.

ARLY the next morning, I discovered the Esquimaux

4 approaching our vicinity, and they did not halt until
they had come within a mile of the ship. Myself and
Oriana at once went forth to join them, and were welcomed
by Lakgalu, and all who had partaken of our hospitality,
with cordiality; and they in turn proudly presented us to
the rest of the tribe, which, in all, numbered about sixty to
eighty souls, men, women, and children included. Among
the crowd nobody was so eager to stroke us as poor
Neleoora (the lame man), and he addressed a long and
energetic speech to us, accompanied by abundant gesticu-
lations, but I could not comprehend what he meant.
Oriana, however, who was a tenfold better linguist, explained
that Neleoora was deploring that his lameness had prevented
him from visiting us along with his companions. This man,
I may remark, proved one of our staunchest and best
friends. All the tribe seemed delighted at our presence,
for our visitors had given glowing accounts of our kindness
and generosity, and their friends were anxious to testify
their sense of the honour our presence conferred.

We beheld many sledges and dogs, but where were the
tents or huts of the tribe? Our curiosity was soon set at
rest. The men divided into small parties, the task of each
being the erection of a hut or house. The first thing they
did was to determine on the site of the intended encamp-
ment. One was soon selected on the firth itself, and then
202 THE DOOMED SHIP.

they pushed their spears through the snow to ascertain
whether it was deep and solid enough for their purpose, and
this being satisfactory (for the snow was four or five feet in
thickness, and just of the requisite degree of malleability),
they beat it down yet more solidly by stamping upon it
with their feet, and striking it with a sort of rude wooden
shovel. The next operation consisted in drawing a tolerably
accurate circle, of perhaps a dozen feet in diameter, and,
commencing within this circle, a couple of Esquimaux cut
out wedges of the solid snow, two or three feet long, and a
foot or eighteen inches thick at the large end. While one
man cut these, the other pared them very accurately with
his knife to a uniform size, and then began to lay them just
outside the circle to form the first “course” of the super-
structure. Thus they continued to use up all the snow
within the circle, until they came to the pure ice of the firth,
—and it was to be the floor of the dwelling. Then recourse
was had to the snow outside the walls, and one architect
remained within and the other outside, and worked in
unison. When the walls had attained a certain height, they
gradually inclined inwards, more and more, until a perfect
dome was the result. We marvelled how the man within
would make his exit, but as soon as the last coping was put
to the dome, he thrust his long knife through the lower part
of the wall, and very quickly cut out a small doorway—the
material thus separated being at once applied towards fitting
up the interior with furniture. This furniture consisted of a
sofa, or seat, about eighteen inches wide, and two feet in
height from the floor, formed of solid snow all round the
hut ; and also some sleeping-berths—if I may use such an
expression in this instance,—conveniently arranged, but
THE DOOMED SHIP. 203

differing little from the seat in form, except being wider.
These seats and berths were covered with the skins of rein-
deer, bears, and seals, as the case might be, and were then
quite ready for use. Finally, a window was cut out of the
upper part of the dome—the opening, or frame, being filled
with an oval sheet of ice an inch or two thick, and con-
sequently quite transparent. In the meantime, the women
had been busy in pushing snow into the joints, and rubbing
all quite smooth with a piece of skin, and then threw a little
water over the sides and roof of the edifice, which almost
immediately became frozen as firmly together as though it
had been cut out of an iceberg, instead of being formed bit
by bit. The shell of the house was now quite completed,
and how long a time was consumed in its erection, from
first to last? Why, just thirty-five minutes by my watch!
The boys and women then proceeded to build out-houses,
porches, stores, &c., adjacent to the main building, and also
places for the dogs to sleep, and galleries leading from one
house to another, that the inmates might hold communica-
tion when desirable, without going into the open air.

The entire encampment, or rather village, I ought to call
it, was completed in a little more than an hour and a half,
consisting of seven substantial houses, and numerous out-
buildings ; and then the Esquimaux began to unload their
sledges, and unharness their dogs. I may remark that the
houses and buildings were erected without the slightest
regard to regularity, and also that one or two were consider-
ably larger than the rest, simply because a larger family was
to occupy them. The houses somewhat resembled bee-
hives, and the little doorway, which was usually approached
by a covered passage or gallery, was to leeward. I suppose
204 THE DOOMED SHIP.

that when the wind changes, they cut out a fresh doorway in
another quarter, and close the old one up.

The sledges were indeed astonishing contrivances. One
was entirely composed of fish, and another entirely of ice.
The fish sledge was made by disposing salmon and trout
in the form of an ordinary sledge, and a little layer of snow
and some water being placed between each fish, they were
frozen so hard and so firmly together that the sledge was as
strong as though made of wood. The reason assigned for
making a sledge of fish was very natural and convincing.
Lakgalu explained that it would have been a sledge load
more had not the salmon which composed the fish sledge
been applied to that purpose, and that they would not
suffer much wear and tear by being ‘in use,” and whenever
the fish were required for eating, the sledge could be broken
up, as occasion required. The weight of this sledge ‘must
have been very great, for its sides and bottom and ends
were all solid. ‘The ice sledge was exceedingly beautiful,
composed of pure ice, runners included. Notwithstanding
the brittle reputation of this material in England, it is very
much stronger in the Polar Regions, and a well-made ice
sledge will bear as much knocking about as any other
whatever, until it is fairly worn out. The rest of the sledges
were made in the following singular fashion:—the sides
were of bones of animals (chiefly the leg-bones of reindeer,
and the ribs, &c., of musk oxen), neatly jointed, and covered
with seal-skin. The cross pieces, &c., were also made of
bones, and the runners at bottom were made in a similar
way to the sides. The runners of all the sledges were well
coated with smooth new ice, formed by pouring water upon
their under side, to make them work glibly. ‘The length of
THE DOOMED SHIP. 205

the sledges was by no means uniform—varying from two
feet and a half to six feet. Their general shortness much
surprised me.

The dogs which drew the sledges greatly resembled the
Lapland reindeer dogs, but were larger, with very rough
shaggy hair, a bushy tail like a fox, and not much unlike
that animal in the face. They possess great strength, and
two of them will drag a moderately loaded sledge at a very
rapid pace over smooth ground. Sometimes four, and even
six, are harnessed to a sledge, but the latter number is rare,
as the sledges are all small. Although the prosperity, and
even the existence, of the Esquimaux may be said to depend
on their dogs, they treat these invaluable creatures most
cruelly, and when, on more than one occasion, both Oriana
and myself indignantly remonstrated with them in
consequence of witnessing their behaviour to their dogs; the
Esquimaux were amazed at our concern, and could not be
made to comprehend either that they treated the poor
brutes cruelly, or that the latter at all suffered from their
meagre fare and hard blows. The Laps, and indeed nearly
all the uncivilized people, precisely act like the Esquimaux
in this respect. ,

After witnessing the animated scene for a couple of hours,
we bade the tribe adieu for the day, telling them we would
visit them the next morning. We accordingly did so, but
not a human being was in sight—all were in their huts.
The dogs set up a-barking, and our old friend Neleoora
hobbled forth, and after thrashing the unfortunate four-
footed sentinels for having presumed to bark at such august
and honoured visitors, he bade us welcome in the usual
manner (of which we now secretly began to complain as a
206 THE DOOMED SHIP.

most annoying ceremony), and conducted us through the
ante-rooms and passages into one of the houses, but as we
found several men, women, and children all sleeping together
in a very promiscuous manner, I stopped Oriana from
entering, and we next went to the hut of Hinkpanu (the one-
eyed man), and found him and his wives—for the lucky
fellow had a couple!—and children, and a friend or two, all
in the act of devouring their morning meal, which they
hospitably invited us to share, but we courteously and very
promptly declined, and the reader will not, I trust, think we
were unnecessarily squeamish when he is informed that the
breakfast consisted of the following delicacies:—a sort of
stone trough was filled with salmon, chopped up in sections,
and stewed in seal-oil, a few morsels of seal-blubber being
intermixed. This tempting mess the two wives and their
offspring were amicably gorging, and as they fed themselves
with their fingers, they managed to plaster their faces and
bosoms with the luscious fragments. Hinkpanu himself,
together with a male friend or two, was partaking with
extreme relish of a smoking mess of walrus flesh, boiled in
oil in a kettle made of iron-stone. He seemed quite
astonished at our declining to take “pot luck,” and
repeatedly pressed us to try a little of his walrus flesh,
which he emphatically declared was first-rate stuff. Many
subsequent opportunities of beholding this tribe at their
meals, enable me to assert that each full-grown Esquimaux
consumes at least six pounds of either fish or flesh at break-
fast, and that in the twenty-four hours he eats not less than
twenty pounds. The women almost rival the men in their
astonishing gormandizing capabilities.

We entered two or three other houses, and in every
THE DOOMED: SHIP. 207

instance found the inmates either cooking, eating, or
sleeping. Finally, we visited Lakgalu, whose family
consisted of his wife, Loogooklee (already introduced to the
reader), and six children, besides the one at breast.
Lakgalu informed us, that he himself was only father of the
infant, for his wife was a widow with six children when he
married her, and he added that, although her husband had
only been dead a week, there were four suitors, rivals for her
hand, when he, Lakgalu, bore off the prize. The man spoke
with such evident triumph, that I fancied there must be
some powerful attraction to render a widow and six
children an object of such anxious competition. Was it her
beauty? IT looked at her tattooed and oil-smeared face, and
did not think her remarkably lovely, acccording to the
European standard—whatever she might be by the
Esquimaux. Was it her wealth? ‘There was no evidence
of opulence in the hut, for it boasted nothing but a few
skins and dresses, some spears, knives, bows and arrows, and
other implements of the chase, a cooking-dish of iron-stone,
and a lamp of the same material, supplied with oil and moss,
and constantly kept burning as the sole medium of warmth.
What, after all, made this widow such a prize in the lottery
of life? Lakgalu himself explained to me that in this
enviable country, a widow with a numerous offspring was
deemed an heiress, and as such preferred to the most
beauteous virgin, because children here constitute wealth,
and support their parents by hunting, when the latter grow
old. He said that a dozen children, so far from being
deemed an encumbrance, would constitute the height of
opulence. He himself was considered a wealthy man, for
he was a widower with three children when he married
208 THE DOOMED SHIP.

Loogooklee ; so that their united wealth, including the
infant, was ten children. He added, that much ill-will had
been manifested towards him by the rivals whom he
disappointed by winning the hand of Loogooklee.

This explanation gave us a very curious insight into the
domestic policy and the social organization of the Esquimaux,
and I am bound here to remark that their children ever
seemed obedient and affectionate towards their parents, and
all the parents whom we noticed were exceedingly fond of
their offspring, and nothing delighted them more than when
either of us—but especially Oriana—caressed the tawny little
republicans. Not once did we see a father or mother beating
their children ; and in the case of a step-father or a step-
mother, there was as much apparent warmth of attachment
between both children and father or mother-in-law, as though
the relationship were one of actual parentage. I shall have
occasion to say something concerning their system of marry-
ing and giving in marriage, in a future chapter.

On concluding our visit, four or five of our friends
accompanied us back to the ship, and stayed several hours,
as it was now only a few minutes’ walk to their village. They
behaved, as before, with great propriety, and gave us no
reason to suspect that we had anything to apprehend either
from violence or pilfering. The friendly intercourse by
degrees extended to the whole tribe, conjuror and all, and
during a week or ten days we were sure either to visit them,
or they us, once or twice every twenty-four hours. Presents
were regularly interchanged—vwe, on our part, giving not only
what we could well spare, but also. what made our poor friends
proud and happy, and receiving salmon, musk-ox flesh, rein-
deer-flesh and occasionally a bird or two—thus furnishing us
THE DOOMED SHIP. 209

with a variety of food highly agreeable and important in our
circumstances. They buried their fish and flesh in pits in
the snow, in which state it would keep for many months,
fresh as on the day it was deposited. They also gave us
some extremely handsome gloves, made of ermine skins,
and ornamented with fringes of birds’ feathers—or, to speak
accurately, with the bright yellow tufts or crowns, from the
heads of a species of swan which visits these regions in
spring and summer—though, indeed, both these seasons
may be said to be one.

Notwithstanding our frequent intercourse with the natives,
I made little or no progress in the Esquimaux language, but,
happily, Oriana. made more than amends for my dullness
and stupidity by the very rapid, and, to me, wonderful
manner in which she acquired the barbarous lingo in
question. In one short fortnight from our first meeting
with the natives, she learnt sufficient to enable her to almost
dispense with signs when in conversation with them—and
they evidently were yet more astonished at her gift of
tongues than even myself.

14
CHAPTER XXIX.

“\,NE morning, I think it was the roth of May, we
breakfasted earlier than usual, intending to pay a

visit to the Esquimaux village, when we were somewhat
surprised at the sharp barking of Oriana’s little pet fox—
poor Blackbird Jim’s legacy !—who had climbed on to the
ledge beneath one of the cabin windows. We both knew
that something unusual must have attracted his notice, and
looking out, we beheld two Esquimaux approaching the ship
in a very excited fashion, while a third, in whom we
recognised Neleoora, hobbled after them as well as his
lameness would permit. We rushed on deck to meet them,
and found that Hinkpanu and Onulampi were the other
two. Too evidently they were messengers of evil tidings,
and I thought at the moment that three more appropriate
heralds could not have been selected, for one was lame, one
was blind of an eye, and one had a withered hand. They
immediately commenced what seemed to me an incoherent
statement, but Oriana readily understood them, and ex-
plained to me the startling and melancholy announcement
that Lakgalu had been murdered during the past night, and
his body found on the snow some distance from the village.
The object of the messengers was to invite us to accompany
them back to the village, as they had some vague idea that
our superior intelligence would enable us to discover the
murderer. I was deeply grieved to hear this, partly because
I lamented the dismal fate of Lakgula, our very first friend,
THE DOOMED SHIP. 211

and partly because I feared the calamity might introduce
dissensions, or worse, between the tribe and ourselves.

“What must I do?” said Ito Oriana. ‘Do you think
it safe for me to go in their midst whilst they are so terribly
excited? Perhaps they even fancy I am the murderer

“O, no,” replied she; ‘they tell me they know he is one
of their own people, as the Esquimaux weapons were found
sticking in the dead man’s body.”

“Well, then, 1 will just buckle a cutlass on, and take a

1?

loaded gun in my hand, and go.”

“Wait a moment,” said Oriana to the messengers, “and
we will go back with you.”

I happened to understand the latter part of her speech,
and hastily interrupted her.

“You are not going, Oriana! I-cannot agree to that.”

“Indeed I am!” replied she. ‘Wherever my broder
goes, I go also.”

In a few minutes we set off, and on arriving at the village
found it a scene of indescribable confusion and excitement,
nor was this to be wondered at, when one reflects that this
tribe knew the murderer was one of their number, and in
their midst at that moment. We were noisily welcomed,
and a glance round assured me that I had nothing to
apprehend from the natives, either on my own account or
Oriana’s, but the dear brave girl was, as usual, more com-
posed, and had more presence of mind than myself; for
when the Esquimaux anxiously urged me to go back to the
ship and bring the telescope and other instruments which
they had seen in the cabin, in order to find out the
murderer by their aid, I was so started at this novel
proposition, that I knew not whether to deny that my
212 , THE DOOMED SHIP.

magical inventions possessed the power of discovering
criminals, or whether I should permit the tribe to continue
in their belief to that effect. On the one hand, I was
afraid of most seriously injuring our popularity should I
refuse to use the instruments for the astounding service the
natives required, and on the other, were I to explain to
them that my tubes of brass, etc., possessed not the power
they imagined, I might so lessen the degree of awe and
respect paid to me hitherto, that our property, and life itself,
might eventually pay the forfeit. But Oriana, without a
moment’s hesitation, assured them that if they themselves,
with the aid of their Angelok, failed to detect the murderer,
then we would bring all our skill to bear on the subject.
This arrangement quite satisfied them, for it implied a
compliment on their own presumed capabilities.

The Angelok, or conjuror, then retired to commence his
incantations, and we were conducted to the house of
Lakgalu, where the body of that ill-fated man reposed on
some skins. His wife and children were sitting around
him, and, strange to say, seemed the least excited or
concerned of all the tribe. It seemed that poor Lakgalu
had left home early the preceding morning alone, on a
hunting excursion, and not returning as he had promised to
do before nightfall, some children were sent to look after
him a little after midnight, and they found him lying dead
on the snow about a mile from the village. He was stabbed
through the back with a spear, and the weapon had broken
short off, and remained in his body. Besides this, he had
three gaping wounds in his breast, evidently inflicted by one
of the large Esquimaux knives, used for cutting up seals
and bears,
THE DOOMED SHIP. 213

In about half-an-hour, we were informed that the Angelok
was ready to commence his mystic rites, and the theatre
selected for the performance was the largest house, to which
we were conducted, and Oriana and myself were placed on
a sort of seat of honour, apparently provided for the solemn
occasion.. No Esquimaux women nor children were
permitted to be present, but all the males above fifteen
years of age—the age of puberty, or rather of marriageability
here—were assembled, being in number twenty-two,
including the Angelok. The latter was in the centre of the
room, as large a space being allotted him as was possible,
and the spectators were all disposed in a circle, either sitting
on the beds, or squatting on the floor.

I certainly felt not only a sensation of intense curiosity,
but even of awe, as I gazed round me. It was quite certain
that the murderer was present. Would the cunning of the
Angelok detect him? If not, how were we to fulfil our
pledge to do so in case of the former failing? And if the
real murderer was discovered at all, what vengeance
would these savage people inflict? It may be here re-
marked that we already knew that the tribe was a pure
democracy—or rather a system of practical socialism, such
as would have gladdened the soul of Fourier or Prudhomme
—there being no recognized chief or authority of any kind,
nor any official or privileged person, with the exception of the
Angelok, and even he seemed to be held in very little respect
or value, except when an emergency like the present
occurred, and then the people had recourse to his agency.
There was no priest, for the tribe had no religion whatever,
they were literally atheists. They did not know anything
about God or providence, they had no belief nor tradition
214 THE DOOMED SHIP.

respecting a future state. [he present was all in all to them,
and their life passed in eating and sleeping. JI am speaking
solely of the tribe in question, because, as I afterwards
learnt, the Esquimaux who live near the Danish settlement
have been taught some degree of religion and morality by
the excellent missionaries which the Danish Government—
to its honour be it said!—send wherever they establish a
factory.

The Angelok was an old man of such a repulsive and
crafty aspect, that had I known of any grudge between him
and Lakgalu, I should have been tempted to suspect the
magician himself of being the murderer—unjustly, however,
as events proved. His dress did not differ much from the
other Esquimaux, but he wore a lofty conical fur cap, and
had a broad belt made of the skins of different animals, very
curiously stitched so as to form fantastic figures and shapes.
This cap and belt were the insignia of his profession, and
only were worn when he was officially engaged. He had a
stone-dish full of boiling oil fixed over a lamp of the usual
kind, and in his hand he held a seal-skin bag, apparently
empty. A piece of salmon-skin was spread on the floor at
his feet, and on it the heads of seven owls were arranged in
the form of a star, their beaks meeting in the centre.

A profound silence reigned as the Angelok commenced
his extraordinary incantations and manceuvres. The first
thing he did was to bend his face closely over the boiling oil,
and muttered some calibre with great volubility and
earnestness. Then he took up the empty bag of seal-skin,
and peeped into it. Whatever he saw or did not see, he
shook his head with dissatisfaction, and addressing one of
the Esquimaux, the latter went out, and soon returned with
THE DOOMED SHIP. 215

the fatal spear, which had been extracted from the body of
the murdered man. The Angelok received it, and gravely
smelled at the blood which encrusted it. Then he held it
with both hands high above his head, and uttered a species
of chant, at least Oriana subsequently told me that it was a
metrical delivery, but what its meaning was she understood
no better than myself. The next move was an exceedingly
singular one. He dipped the point of the spear in the
boiling oil, and held it there for three minutes. Then he
touched each of the owls’ heads with the spear-point, and
stooped over them three several times, ejaculating with
great solemnity, ‘“‘Lakgalu! mee-shoo-luck!” at each
genuflection of his body. This done, he caused every
Esquimaux present to hold out his right hand, and going
round the circle, he touched each open palm in succession
with the spear-point, and I saw that the cunning old Angelok
keenly marked each individual’s countenance during the
ceremony, doubtless with a view to detect any sign of guilt
which might become apparent. But to all outward seeming,
not one man evinced any feeling but that of awe and
curiosity at the magician’s doings. Yet the murderer was
one of the number, that was quite certain, and I felt profound
interest in the further acts of the Angelok, for there was
something in his manner which impressed me with a belief
that he—wise old fellow !—really had a clue to the
perpetrator of the horrible crime, or at least a shrewd
suspicion of him ; and whenever his keen grey eye rested
particularly on any one of the oily faces around, I
involuntarily fixed my eyes there also, but at present no
sign of guilt was anywhere apparent.

The Angelok now paused, and for several minutes, whilst
216 THE DOOMED SHIP.

a breathless silence prevailed, he kept smelling the spear-
point, examining the owls’ heads, and peeping into the
mystical bag. ‘Then he made a long speech, the import of
which was that, having gone through certain indispensable
ceremonies, he was able to positively affirm that the guilty
man was then and there present. I thought this not a very
astonishing result, and judging by the countenances of the
Esquimaux, they were of the same opinion also. But when
the Angelok, with impressive gesticulations, proceeded to
emphatically announce that his art would very speedily
enable him to point out the criminal, a very lively sensation
pervaded the assembly—as well it might—and the Esquimaux
eagerly conversed with one another until the magician
conimanded silence.

He next took the seven owls’ heads, and dropped
them, as well as the piece of salmon-skin on which they had
been placed, into the boiling oil, and stirred them in silence
with the spear-point. This done, he traced a double circle
with the spear around the seal-skin bag, muttering to
himself all the while. The interested spectators watched
him with the most absorbing attention, and when he
suddenly gave a yell, they echoed it, without knowing why.
He then stretched himself flat on his back, and folding his
arms across his breast, closed his eyes, and remained in
that posture at least ten minutes. I presume he intended
by this mummery to intimate that he was_ receiving
preternatural counsel and aid. On arising, he inspected
the strange mess boiling in the oil, and uttered expressions
of satisfaction. Then he took the spear, and thrust its point
into one of the owl’s heads, which he dropped, all reeking,
into the empty bag. Having done this, he thrust his face
THE DOOMED SHIP. 217

so far into the bag that only the back part of his bald head
was visible. Almost immediately the collapsed sides of the
bag began to swell, until in a couple of minutes it appeared
full to bursting, and the Angelok held it exultingly forth, and
his simple friends screamed out with amazement and
admiration at what they deemed a miracle. His next act
was again to bury his face in the bag, and it at once became
empty again. My own impression of this act of subtle
conjury was that a reindeer bladder was concealed in the
bag, and that the Angelok inflated it with his breath, and
managed to then secure its mouth with his teeth, until he
again loosened it, and permitted it to resume its empty
condition ; but the Esquimaux, one and all, were evidently
believers in a more wondrous species of legerdemain. I
may myself be wrong in the above explanation of the trick
—but it was cleverly managed in some way or other, and
gave me a far higher estimation of the cunning of the
Angelok than I was previously inclined to entertain.

Again the magician took a spell on his back, but this
time his eyes were wide open, and he continually uttered
ejaculations and expressions, as though he were holding
communion with some unseen spirit. Finally, he gave
a wild shout, and springing to his feet, pointed decidedly to
one of the Esquimaux, and denounced him as _ the
murderer !

Never was accusation more promptly followed by
confession. The wretched criminal yelled piercingly, and
made a frantic effort to flee, but was instantly pinioned, and
then he confessed that he, and he alone, had committed the
fearful deed. The clamour which ensued was terrific, and
I at first thought the natives meant to put their guilty
218 THE DOOMED SHIP.

brother to death on the spot—and, whatever they might
have done, I certainly should have abstained from inter-
fering. But this did not take place, ard after a most exciting
scene, the Angelok, triumphant, and for the present
all-powerful, induced them to defer deciding on the fate of
Makguleski until the following day. The captive was
accordingly removed in custody, and being bound hand
and foot, was confined in a little snow-hut built forthwith
for his special use. The latter circumstance struck us
deeply, for it seemed that these poor savage people actually
had an instinctive idea that the presence of a murderer in
one of their habitations would be a contamination.

Ere Oriana and myself returned to the ship, our old
friends, Neleoora and Anguack, told us that the tribe would
hope for our presence next day, and we readily promised it.
Some hours after dark, when we were sitting in the cabin
discussing the extraordinary scenes we had witnessed, two
of the natives, a man and a woman, unexpectedly tapped
at the cabin window from the outside, and on going on
deck, we found that they brought us a welcome present of
four fine salmon, and also a pair of gloves each—the latter
being made of ermine skins in a very neat and ingenious
fashion. We invited’ them into the cabin, and liberally
rewarded them. They gave us to understand, however, that
the little present was not an individual one, but that it was sent
on behalf of the whole tribe, as an acknowledgement of our
kindness in attending to witness the discovery of the
murderer. They also added, what much surprised me at
the moment, that it was the wise Angelok himself who
suggested that the said present should be sent us. We
afterwards learnt the reason. The Angelok had at first
THE DOOMED SHIP. 219

been opposed to the proposition that we should be applied
to, that we might point out the murderer, for he entertained
such an extravagant opinion of our superior faculties, that
he made no doubt we could, if we pleased, at once infallibly
discover the criminal, and consequently he himself would be
thrown into discredit. But Oriana’s prudent suggestion
that the great magician should first try his skill, had warmed
his heart towards us, and in the exultation he naturally felt
at the signal success which had attended his incantations,
the old man gratefully made an acknowledgement, and I
may here add, he ever afterwards continued our steadfast
and really valuable, because influential, friend.

Oriana questioned the messengers as to what would be
the fate of the prisoner, but they averred they had no idea,
and said that the tribe was in consultation about it, but
were not likely to come to any decision until the morrow,
when a deputation would be sent to request our own
presence at the grand solemnity. |
CHAPTER XXX.

HAT the reader may not, like the Esquimaux, be
inclined to give undue credit to the sagacity of the
Angelok, I will here explain the why and the wherefore that
cunning old fox fixed the guilt on the right person. I have
already related that the victim himself, poor Lakgalu, told
us, with much triumph, that his second wife, and now his
widow, was esteemed a very great heiress at the death of
her first husband, because she was left with six children,
and that he won her hand in spite of several competitors,
who bore him much ill-will in consequence. Now, when
the body of Lakgalu was discovered, the suspicions of the
Angelok would be naturally directed against any one known
to have borne the victim a grudge. Who so likely as a
disappointed rival? But there were four of them—which
of them was it? The broken spear found in the body
furnished a clue. The Angelok recognised it as being the
private property of Makguleski, and he at once felt tolerably
certain that man was the murderer. But it was his policy
to go through his mummeries ere he finally taxed Makgul-
eski with the crime, in order that the simple natives might
be profoundly impressed with his own supernatural skill.
Such, as we subsequently learnt, were the true facts of the
case.
About noon the next day, three Esquimaux approached
the ship. We recognised in them the Angelok, Anguack,
and Onulampi, and their object, as we were aware, was to
THE DOOMED SHIP 221

invite us to the village. We at once accompanied them,
and were forthwith ushered into the same house as on the
previous day, and here we found all the adult males, and
also the prisoner, Makguleski. The latter was standing in
the centre, his arms being tightly bound behind his back
with thongs of reindeer skin. He was a man of about
forty years of age, and certainly a most villanous-looking
fellow. His features much more resembled those of a
Malay or a Chinese than an Esquimaux; and my early
experience both of Chinese and Malays (with whom I had
been in frequent contact during two or three trading voyages
in the East Indian seas, with my poor uncle, Captain
Larpent), was such that I at once set down any being who
resembled them as a rogue. The guilty wretch appeared
sullenly resigned ‘to his fate, whatever it might prove, and
he steadily kept his eyes bent on the ground. His guilt
was aggravated by the fact that he already had two wives
and five children, and yet was so maddened because
Lakgalu disappointed him in getting a third with a dowry of
six children, that he murdered the “ fortunate” rival.

When Oriana and myself were seated, the Angelok, as
spokesman, proceeded to announce the sentence the tribe
had determined upon, but he requested we would favour
them with our opinion as to its justice and propriety. He
explained that murder was so exceedingly rare among the
Esquimaux, that he, although an old man, had never known
an instance before, but knew that such an awful crime had
been formerly committed, by the tradition handed down
from generation to generation. What punishment had
been then accorded he did not know, and therefore the
tribe had no precedent to guide them, but in its absence
222 THE DOOMED SHIP.

they had come to the following resolve :—that the wives
and children of the criminal should be given to other men 3
that “‘a mark should be set upon him ;” and that he himself
should be banished from society for ever, and left to live
and die in utter solitude.

We expressed our full approval of this judicious sentence,
to the great delight of the Angelok, and preparations were
instantly commenced to execute it. The first thing to be
done was to “set the mark,” and when Oriana perceived
in what manner this would be carried into effect, she
hurried away from the dreadful coming scene, but I
remained.

This was what they did: a piece of broad hoop-iron,
which I had broken from a whale-cask, and given them a
few days previously, was heated red-hot, and Makguleski
was forced on his back, and held immovably down. The
Angelok then branded him across the forehead and on both
cheeks. It was a sickening sight to behold the reeking of
the burnt flesh, and the horrible convulsions of the criminal,
and yet more so to hear his tremendous shrieks of
agony.

Half-an-hour later, Makguleski was released from his
bonds, and a couple of salmon being put in a bag and
suspended round his waist, they gave him a bow and
arrows, a spear, and two knives, and leading him into the
open air, set him at liberty, amid the hootings and execra-
tions of the whole tribe—none being more violent than the
women and children. ‘The supremely wretched being gave
one thrilling whoop, and then set off at full speed, and
never once turned his back, nor ceased running, until his
figure was hid by some rising ground.
THE DOOMED SHIP. 223

Such was the terrible punishment inflicted by the
Esquimaux on a murderer, and I recommend this striking
instance of the “wild justice of revenge” to the attention of
the advocates for the abolition of capital punishment in my
own native country—or rather, of the country of which I
am a subject, for, as I mentioned in the early part of this
narrative, I was born in the West Indies.

Immediately afterwards, the Esquimaux proceeded to
bury the murdered man. I had anticipated seeing some
very curious and interesting rites on this occasion, but was
signally disappointed. The body of Lakgalu was wrapped
in skins and tied up with thongs, until it “resembled a
mummy, and then was placed on a sledge, and drawn by
dogs to a considerable distance from the village, where a
hole was made in the snow, and the corpse deposited, and
covered up with stones—just as I had buried poor Blackbird
Jim. The widow and children remained at the village, and
instead of indulging in frantic manifestations of grief, after
the manner of other savage people, they seemed very little
concerned. Only four or five men accompanied the body
to burial, and no rites nor ceremonies of any kind were
performed.

The Esquimaux, as already said, are mere practical
atheists, and appear to believe that when a human
being dies, there is “
a brute beast. I could not help feeling intensely shocked
by the utter insensibility of the natives in this respect.

an end of him,” just as though he were

There was something appalling in the thought of an entire
race living and dying, generation after generation, without
one spark of religion, one glimpse of immortality, ever
irradiating their dark souls. And where did this mysterious
224 THE DOOMED SHIP.

people (who, alas! seem only a link between the animal
creation and civilised man) first come from? How, and
under what circumstances, became they the denizens of the
terrible Arctic Regions? Let learned philosophers answer ;

I am only a simple sailor, and cannot.
CHAPTER XXXI.

HEN we returned to the village after the burial
another most startling revelation of the Esquimaux

manners and customs awaited us. Loogooklee, the widow
of the victim, was now the very richest heiress in the
country; for she had ten children, including the three
orphans of her late husband by his former wife. Under
these circumstances there were a dozen claimants for her
hand, and the men of the tribe forthwith met in conclave to
decide which of them was to have her. It appeared that
her own inclinations and predilections were held of no
account whatever. A furious debate ensued, and finally, by
the influence and skilful advocacy of the crafty old Angelok,
it was decided that Loogooklee was forthwith to become the
wife of Anguack, who already had a wife, but no children,
and was reckoned the most expert hunter of the tribe, and
therefore claimed, on that ground, a sort of right for pre-
ference. And no sooner was this decision come to, than
Loogooklee became his wife, for the only marriage ceremony
consisted in her going to his house with her children, which
she did with great composure and apparent satisfaction.
The whole affair struck me as being revolting. Here was a
man murdered one day, and the next day he was buried,
and a couple of hours after that, his widow became the wife
of another man! And yet poor Lakgalu always appeared,
and doubtless was, a happy and good husband. I don’t

affect to be a moralist, but I must say that before I witnessed
15
226 THE DOOMED SHIP.

these things, I never fully comprehended the depth of the
Scriptural declaration of the “natural depravity of man,” and
the things he would do when left to the devices and
machinations of his own heart, and the Divine Word
expressly tells us (and most unreservedly do I believe it)
that ‘the heart of man is desperately wicked.”

Nor did the results of the murder end here. Part of the
sentence on Makguleski was, that his two wives and five
children should be given to other men, and after Loogooklee
was disposed of, the tribe—that is, the men of the tribe—
proceeded to arrange who should possess the murderer’s
wives and children. Onulampi, whose own wife was
recently deceased, obtained one of the wives, with her four
children, and another native, who already had a spouse of
his own, received the other wife, with her one child! These
details may seem very shocking, but I deliberately give
them, because I have read in books very foolish arguments
in favour of a savage life, and I wish to give the reader an
idea of what the manners and customs of barbarous races
really are, when stripped of romantic colouring, and plainly
related by one who makes no pretensions to a poet’s vivid
imagination, and only speaks of things as he found them,
and saw them in the light of common sense.

I may fittingly conclude this chapter by briefly men-
tioning what appear to be the general matrimonial
arrangements among the Esquimaux. Boys and girls are
betrothed at a very early age, sometimes even, I believe,
when the future husband and wife are both infants in the
cradle—I ought to say “in the bag,” as the latter is the
substitute. When they respectively attain the age of from
fourteen to sixteen, they live together as man and wife—no
THE DOOMED SHIP. 227

ceremony being observed to celebrate the contract. The
system of polygamy is universal—and where it does not
happen, the reason is that the women of the tribe are not
sufficiently numerous. The cleverest men have the best
chance of getting more than one wife, and they also are best
able to maintain a double family. Sometimes it happens
that a woman has two husbands. is sure of being married again as soon as she pleases, for the
reasons formerly assigned. Strange to say, two wives of one
husband seem to agree very well, and the whole family to
live in harmony. The practice of divorcement is common,
and perhaps does not proceed so much from connubial
infidelity—although I fear that is a frequent and little cared
for occurrence—as from the vicious inclinations both of
husband and wife, rendering them solicitous of variety.
Two men will also agree (after the manner of the Romans
and Grecians, and other classical nations) to “exchange”
their wives for a season, or permanently. The children are
always treated extremely well by their step-fathers or step-
mothers, and this, at any rate, is something in favour of these
poor benighted people. As to celibacy, that is a thing they
cannot fora moment understand. They all unconsciously
fulfil the Divine command to “increase and multiply,” and
they very naturally suppose everybody else does the same.
I remember on one occasion, when we were entertaining a
party of natives in the cabin of the frozen ship, they
innocently asked how long myself and Oriana had been
married, and where our children were. Poor Oriana blushed
crimson, and very hastily informed them that we were not
man and wife, but brother and sister. They seemed
astounded, and then inquired where my wife was, and where
228 THE DOOMED SHIP.

Oriana’s husband was. We told them that neither of us
were married at all, and their astonishment, and even
incredulity, was highly entertaining.

Notwithstanding that our intercourse with the Esquimaux
was highly cheering, not only on account of relieving us from
the depressing monotony of our solitary life, but also as being
the means of furnishing us with a welcome variety of food,
yet in respect to the great question we had at heart—our own
final deliverance—we seemed as far offas ever. Lakgalu was
the most intelligent man, and none of the others could give
us any idea of our exact locality, but they told us that they
expected a visit from some other tribe in a few days, and
asserted that one man whom they knew would come, could
speak Danish, and knew all about the geography of these
desolate regions. This was very important news, if true, and
as the natives all persisted in the same statement when
questioned separately, we saw no reason to doubt it.

Meanwhile, we derived much amusement from their
frequent visits, and although we detected them pilfering
trifling articles from time to time, we thought it best to wink
at their delinquencies, lest a serious rupture in our hitherto
amicable intercourse might result. But when I caught a man
in the very act of purloining my best telescope, I grew very
angry, and determined to put a check to their audacity. For
this purpose I called the tribe together, and Oriana interpreted
to them that unless a general restitution took place within
four-and-twenty hours, I should, in some way or other, manage
to find out the identity of the several thieves, and the result
would be certain detection, and prompt punishment of the
guilty. This terrible announcement had the desired effect,
for they brought back not only everything we had missed,
THE DOOMED SHIP. 229

but also a score of trifling, and, to us, worthless articles we
had not missed—including a rusty old marlinspike, an iron
snatch-box, a tin saucepan full of holes, a sailor’s Nor’wester,
and a lump of lead! The great magician, or Angelok,
himself, was one of the evil-doers, for he tremblingly restored
a broken chisel, and prayed that we would not punish him
for what he had done. We thought it good policy to accept
back the whole of the articles, but to let them see that we
meant to continue good friends, we summoned them all
again the next day, and telling them that on condition they
never robbed us any more, we should freely forgive the past,
and in proof of our sincerity, we made a present of some
kind or other to every soul—the old Angelok getting a small
saw and a good serviceable chisel, and so delighted was he,
that he stroked us on his bended knees, and made an oration
to the tribe, in which, I dare say, we were lauded to the skies
for our generosity. After this, all things went on as before,
and they were. continually bringing us fish and game, and
skins, &c., for which we invariably rewarded them. I may
remark, that on the subject of thieving they appeared to have
no moral restraint. They only feared to be detected and
punished, but they did not think they were committing an
evil deed by stealing whatever they could lay their hands
on.

I frequently accompanied them on their hunting excursions,
and got a complete insight into their mode of capturing
various animals. They preferred night to day for seal-
hunting, and the following was their mode of catching this
somewhat cunning creature:—They make a hole in the ice
of,the firth, and in this they fix a small stick, and then
stand patiently watching with a spear poised in their hands.
230 THE DOOMED SHIP.

When the stick moves, they know that a seal has come to the
surface to breathe, and they instantly dart their spear with
great force, and transfix the unfortunate animal. Sometimes
it happens that the seal proves so strong, that it breaks away
and carries the spear with it, and occasionally its struggles
are such as to drag the Esquimaux into the hole, at the
imminent risk of his life. They also frequently capture the
seals at night, when the animals venture on the solid ice,
some distance from the hole. The Esquimaux then intercept,
and knock them on the head—one blow on the nose will
always completely stun a seal. The women invariably per-
form the pleasing duty of cutting up the seals, and the way in
which they clean the skins for use is as ingenious as it is
simple. They tie a thong to the skins, and let them down
into the sea, and in a very few hours the shrimps, and also
various kinds of marine insects, eat off every morsel of fat
and muscle.

The manner in which they catch salmon exhibits a yet
greater degree of intelligence. They fasten some white
shining stones, and bits of bone, to a thong, ora sinew of the
reindeer, and the other end of the thong is fastened to a
piece of wood, or, generally, a fish bone, about eighteen
inches long. This the Esquimaux holds in his left hand,
and keeps constantly agitating the deceptive baits, which
attracts the poor fish, and then he spears them with the
weapon held in readiness in his right hand. The fish-spear
in question has a couple of barbs, made very neatly, of bone,
or of the teeth of some animal or fish. It is amusing to
watch the dexterity evinced by the uncouth and clumsy-
looking fishermen, and it is astonishing what immense
quantities of fish—principally salmon—they catch by the
THE DOOMED SHIP. 231

method in question. But at the latter end of spring the
salmon migrate in such swarms, that even an inexperienced
hand could not fail to spear them very fast in certain locali-
ties—especially on the rivers up which they rush to spawn.

The Esquimaux plan of hunting the reindeer is very
similar to that practised by the Indians of North and South
America, and by savage races all over the world. One or
two men mark the spots where the deer resort, and then
disguise themselves as much like the animal as they can, by
fixing a pair of antlers on their heads, and sometimes the
entire head and antlers of a reindeer, and also by encasing
their bodies in reindeer skins, and mimicking the motions of
the animal—and very good mimics the Esquimaux are.
By these means they often get near enough to kill the
unsuspecting “reins” with spears or with arrows, or else
they fairly run them down with their dogs. An Esquimaux
himself, unwieldy as he appears, can run with great swiftness,
and for a long while, as I soon found. I, myself, had no
chance of contending with them in this respect, but this was
partly owing to their greater skill in running over snow.
They deem the reeking paunch of a reindeer, and its
contents, the most exquisite of all delicacies !

On one occasion I happened to be out with three or four
of them, when we came in sight of a fine musk-ox. The
animal darted away, and we in hot pursuit, and, after a chase
of an hour, the dogs brought him to bay. I was desirous of
seeing how the Esquimaux would kill so formidable a fellow,
and therefore abstained from firing. They commenced the
attack by loud yells, and discharged their arrows with good
aim, but the sides and chest of the ox were so well protected
with a thick skin and shaggy hair, that the arrows served
232 THE DOOMED SHIP.

little purpose but to render him furious, and he repeatedly
lowered his immense head, and rushed at his tormentors,
and it required all their skill and nimbleness to save
themselves. Indeed, had it not been for the courageous and
incessant attacks of the dogs, the ox would quickly have
escaped altogether. When their arrows were exhausted, they
exhibited considerable daring in the manner in which they
attacked the infuriated brute with spears and knives, and they
soon contrived to wound him so severely that his body
streamed with blood, but his strength and ferocity only
seemed to be increased. At length, Anguack, the best
hunter of the whole tribe, had the temerity to stab the ox in
the neck with his long knife, but he slipped at the moment
he gave the blow, and fell flat on his back. Another instant,
and his life would have paid the forfeit of his rashness, but I
levelled my gun, which was charged with two balls of one
ounce each, and shot the ox a little forward of his left
shoulder. The mighty creature gave a bound backward,
and then stood pawing and striking the snow in mortal
agony, when I boldly stepped up to him, and drew my cut-
lass across his throat. He then fell with a shock that fairly
shook the ground, and after a minute of convulsive struggling,
expired.

Nothing could exceed the admiration expressed by the
Exquimaux at the power of my wonderful gun. It was even
more amazing, in their estimation, to thus kill a musk ox than
to shoot a bird on the wing, as I did with a single ball the
same day. ‘They at once set to work, and flayed off the skin,
ere it had time to be frozen to the carcase, and then
proceeded to disembowel the animal. We found that both
the balls had gone through the heart. The Esquimaux
THE DOOMED SHIP. 233

greedily feasted on the warm blood, which they mixed with
snow, kneading it into a sort of dough with their dirty hands,
and were surprised when I declined to share this luscious
banquet. They next cut off the flesh in long strips, and
packed it up to transport it to the village. The flesh has
very little flavour of musk in the early part of the year, and
is good nutritious food.

Anguack said that sometimes the dogs alone would hunt
down and kill a musk-ox, and, however that may be, I know
that the dogs killed several bears during our sojourn, and on
one occasion a dog scented a bear in his lair, and had the
sagacity to lead its masters to the spot, when they killed the
creature with their knives, and sold us the skin and the hams
for a tin-pot and a couple of old files! By the way, they
seemed to have no idea whatever of the value of money—
a proof that they could have had no previous intercourse
with Europeans ; and once when I gave a half-crown each
to two women, they drilled holes through the coins, and
suspended them for ornaments round their necks.

Oriana often accompanied me when I went on excursions
with the natives, and on these occasions we, of course, locked
the companionway leading down to the cabin, and warned
the Esquimaux that if any of them presumed to set foot on
deck during our absence, we should infallibly know, and
would punish them severely. The mere threat was enough,
but the old Angelok was now our devoted friend, and we
constituted him a sort of guardian during our absence, and
he faithfully obeyed us, so that we had no fear whatever of
leaving our home for many hours at a time.

On one particular occasion the tribe, out of gratitude,
invited us to a grand feast and entertainment at the village,
234 THE DOOMED SHIP.

given entirely in our honour. We, of course, gladly attended,
but of the feast itself, the less said the better.

After it was over, the men and women danced. If the
reader ever saw a bear dance to a pipe and tabor, he will
have an exact idea of an Esquimaux ball,—but, if anything,
I believe the bear is more agile and graceful in its move-
ments,

The second act of the “‘divertissement” consisted of the
popular Esquimaux game of “bear and dogs,” the bear
being very well enacted by a man on all-fours, and the dogs
by a dozen children.

Act the third consisted of a concert given entirely by the
women. They stood ina circle, and shutting one or both
eyes, gave a succession of prolonged whoops, followed by a
variety of wild cries, groans, gurgling sounds, and shrill
screams. This was the concert. We cordially and
sincerely thanked the performers at its close—for we were
glad enough when it was over. In return, Oriana sang some
of her sweetest melodies, and the Esquimaux, one and all,
affected to be in ecstasies at her performance, but whether
they really were delighted, or cunningly simulated in order
to propitiate us, is more than I can affirm. It is, however,
only fair to add that the Danish missionaries assert that the
Esquimaux have great talent for music and _ singing,
especially the women. That may be, but I speak impar-
tially of what I heard and saw.
CHAPTER XXXII.

N the 22nd of May, the Angelok paid us a visit at
such an early hour that even Oriana was not up to
receive him, and he commenced a furious drumming with
his horny fists on the companion-top, till I sprang out of my
berth and let him in. His cunning old face was full of
meaning, and I at once knew he had some novel and im-
portant news to impart. Nor was he slow to open his
budget, for no sooner had he hastily stroked my dress, than
he began to tell me something with astonishing volubility ;
but I could make neither “flesh, fish, nor good red herring ”
of it. Oriana, however, speedily joined us, and he found a
more intelligent hearer.

Instead of listening to him, I then watched that dear —
girl’s countenance, and was delighted to observe that the
news was of a good description. As soon as the Angelok
paused, she briefly interpreted to me his speech, which was
to the effect that the party of strange Esquimaux the tribe
had long expected, had at length arrived, and that the man
who spoke Danish was of the number, and would come to
the ship in a few hours’ time. The Angelok had sufficient
sagacity to know that the bearer of such intelligence
would be highly welcome, and therefore he himself assumed
the duty, instead of sending a younger messenger. We at
once gave him a reward that far exceeded his most sanguine
expectations—viz., a small hatchet, a table-knife, a good
copper saucepan, and two files. The great magician was
236 THE DOOMED SHIP.

wild with joy at these presents, and actually went down on
his knees to stroke the hem of Oriana’s garment. He said
that he himself would bring the stranger as speedily as
possible, and away he went with his treasures, as happy as
a king on adding a new principality to his dominions.

Hardly had we swallowed a hasty breakfast, ere the
Angelok returned with a strange Esquimaux, and the latter
at once addressed us in very tolerable Danish. With what
joy did we welcome him! He was a thorough-bred Esqui-
maux, and differed neither in dress nor person from the
others, but he had lived many years in the neighbourhood
of the Danish settlements, and had consequently acquired a
considerable degree of civilization, for he was naturally a
very intelligent man, as we soon perceived. He told us
that his name in Esquimaux was Poukgleni, but he added,
with evident pride, that the Danish missionaries had
christened him by the name of Bertel Lundsen ; and we,
therefore, invariably addressed him by the latter appellation,
to his great satisfaction. He even effected to speak with
profound contempt of the tribe of Esquimaux living near
us, saying that they were one of the most degraded and
barbarous of all the tribes of his countrymen. We thought
afterwards that he greatly exaggerated in this respect, and
the truth was, Bertel Lundsen was so proud of his own
comparative civilization, that he was ambitious to be
regarded as a Dane, rather than an Esquimaux.

Of course we quickly put his knowledge to the test, and
to our unutterable joy his answers were prompt, straight-
forward, and of the most satisfactory description. He
pointed out on the map our present locality, and also where
the nearest Danish settlement was. ‘‘ Would he guide us to
THE DOOMED SHIP. 237

the latter?” He answered “ Yes,” but showed that he knew
well how to drive a bargain. He said that as the season
was so far advanced, there was not an hour to be lost in
preparing to depart, in order that we might travel in sledges
ere the snow began to melt—which, he said, it would do
with great rapidity when once the sun attained a certain
power. We inquired how long a time it would probably
take to reach the settlement? He replied that if we had
good dogs, and as light luggage as possible, we could go in
seven to ten days, provided the weather continued favour-
able; but if the snow melted prematurely, or tempestuous
weather intervened, we might be weeks on the toilsome
journey. This astonished me, for the distance, in anything
like a good course, did not appear by the map to exceed
two or three hundred miles ; but Lundsen explained that he
knew the way perfectly—adding that not another man but
himself possessed the requisite knowledge and skill—and
that it was quite possible for circumstances to compel him
to frequently make long circuits from the direct line, and
that, moreover, the Esquimaux dogs were never driven more
than three or four days at a time, and then must have a
couple of days’ rest ere they resumed their journey. He
said that thirty to forty miles a day was considered very fair,
but, under particularly favourable auspices, they would go
even sixty miles in the twenty-four hours. We subsequently
found this was all perfectly true.

For his own services Bertel Lundsen required that we
should guarantee him the payment of fifty Danish rix-dalers
(46 5s.), on arrival safely at our destination, and to this we
willingly consented. As to the sledges, dogs, and provisions,
we must make our own bargain with the tribe living near.
238 THE DOOMED SHIP.

He said that we should require one sledge for ourselves and
him, and two sledges for provisions and luggage—and, more-
over, a driver for each of the latter. At least a score of
dogs would be required, for although four dogs will draw a
moderate sledge load, we might lose some on the way by
accidents, and if the snow began to melt, additional dogs
would be requisite. We at once sent the Angelok to the
village to request the immediate presence of our old friends
Anguack and Neleoora, and those worthies promptly attended.
A bargain was soon struck. They agreed to furnish
us with the three best sledges they possessed, and twenty of
the finest dogs, and we paid them the stipulated reward on
the spot. Lundsen agreed to provide, for a certain re-
muneration, a driver for each of the provision sledges—
selecting two of the Esquimaux who had accompanied himself
to the spot. Finally it was arranged that by noon on the
following day, our long and somewhat perilous journey
should commence.

We told our Esquimaux friends that after our departure,
the ship and all it contained should be their reward for the
excellent behaviour they had manifested, and that it was our
desire to at once see the whole tribe assembled. Anguack
accordingly departed to the village, and in half-an-hour
every soul attended alongside the ship. Oriana then
addressed them to the above purport, and added that we
formally appointed the Angelok, Anguack, and Neleoora,
our three administrators, to impartially superintend the
distribution and division of what would render them the
wealthiest tribe in the Arctic Regions. This announcement
was hailed with rapturous demonstrations of joy, but we
signalised that we wished now to be left alone to prepare
THE DOOMED SHIP. 239

for our departure; and accordingly all took their leave,
including Bertel Lundsen, who reiterated his anxious advice
that we should burthen ourselves with the least possible
quantity of luggage; and he promised to attend us at the
ship by daybreak the next morning, with the sledges and
everything necessary to start forthwith.

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