Citation
The Christian garland, or, A companion for leisure hours

Material Information

Title:
The Christian garland, or, A companion for leisure hours consisting of original and selected pieces in poetry and prose
Portion of title:
Companion for leisure hours
Creator:
Religious Tract Society ( Publisher )
Kronheim & Co ( Engraver )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Religious Tract Society
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1855
Language:
English
Edition:
New ed.
Physical Description:
iv, 251, [i.e. 252] p., [8] leaves of plates : col. ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Natural history -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1855 ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1855 ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1855 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1855
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Contains poetry, fiction, and non-fiction.
General Note:
Illustrations chromolithographed by J.M. Kronheim & Co.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA8100 ( ltqf )
ALF9882 ( notis )
02421931 ( oclc )
026531058 ( alephbibnum )

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Full Text
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THE

CHRISTIAN GARLAND;

OR, A

COMPANION FOR LEISURE HOURS:

CONSISTING OF

ORIGINAL AND SELECTED PIECES IN POETRY
AND PROSE.



A NEW EDITION.

LONDON:

THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY :
Instituted 1799.
DEPOSITORY, 56, PATERNOSTER ROW, AND 65, ST. PAUL’S
. CHURCHYARD; AND SOLD BY
THE BOOKSELLERS.






CONTENTS.

Fiowrrs and Pants oF Sorrpturn, with an Engraving
Tur Litizs or THe Finny.

Tur Frencu Conscrirts .

Win FiLowsrs, with an Engraving

BEAUTINS OF THE FIELD

Tae FUNERAL at THE Gate or Narn ; .

A Mipyieur Vistr to Mount Vesuvius .
GaRDEN FLOWERS, with an Engraving .
MorwING. . 2 2 1 1 ew ew ew ec
Socrates, THE Citizen TEACHER

Wuy NorP 2. 2. 1 1 1 ew ee ew
Witp Fruits, with an Engraving .

Tur Unseen Hanp .

Faitu anp OBEDIENCE. . .

Exotic Frurrs, with an Engraving . . 2 1 0 ss



iv CONTENTS.

PAGE
Tue STARS 2 6 ee ew ee ee ee ee ee 185

“LirrLe Lorre” 6 Y f
Fresuwater SHELLS, with an Engraving . . . . . . 162
SEASONS OF PRAYER... 1 1 ee ee ee. 167
Tur Proprem Resonvep . . . . 2... 170
A Wrisn TomBsTONE . . ........ . . 180
Sea Snurus, with an Engraving «1... . 1 we. 188
Tne Sea-SHoRE 2... ee ee ee ee ee 189
CAN SHE BE SPAREDP . . . 1... ee es 91
Tue SPRING AS AN EMBLEM OF THE RESURRECTION . . 202

Sea Wrens, with an Engraving «2. 1 ww ww ee 217

Tur Mornine Revrn . . . . . 1. we ew ke 222
SENSIBILITY 2 6 6 ee we ee ee ew ws 229
AUTUMN 2. 2. ew ew eee ee ee ee 281

Yertow Leaves . 2. 1 we we ee ww ws 289
Otp Humpurey on Kinpness anp Discretion . . . 241
Tue Weit-spent Day . . . . .. 1 we ee. MS

THe MILLENNIAL SABBATH... ww we we. 252



FLOWERS AND PLANTS OF SCRIPTURE.

“ Flowers worthy of Paradise, which not nice art,
Tn beds and curious knots, but nature boon
Pour'd forth profuse, on hill, and dale, and plain,
Both where the morning sun first warmly smote
The open field, and where the unpierced shade
Embrown’d the noontide bowers.”

One striking feature in the poetry of the Bible is its
continual reference to. the imagery supplied by the
material world. Coming forth from the inmost heart
of the inspired writer, and destined to influence every
human faculty, the words of Holy Writ appeal to the
sentiments and affections, as well as to the under-
standing of man, in all ages. They call his attention
to the beauty of the world around him, and render all
outward loveliness subservient to holy and devout
emotions by the vividness with which it. depicts eternal
truth. The flowers of the field, fading so quickly; the —
grass, withering even before it grows up; the shadow
that declineth, are all remembrancers of man’s mortality.
The trees and high hills were not looked on carelessly
by the inspired writers. They understood all their
meanings, and from them, as from the voice of the
turtle, and the coming of the crane and the swallow,
they gathered thoughts of God.
B



2 FLOWERS AND PLANTS OF SCRIPTURE.

And so it is now, that when we walk abroad in fields
and gardens, by river side, or on mountain summit, the
reader, familiar with his Bible, is reminded of its truths
by innumerable associations. God never meant, when
he inspired these lessons, that we should be inattentive
to the objects whence they were drawn. Besides the
various references made, in the pages of Holy Writ, to
natural objects in general, there are more than three
hundred places in which plants are mentioned. Some-
times they occur in Scripture narratives, and tell us of
ancient usages; often they remind us of the character,
soil, and climate of the scenes of some of the most
solemn events of history; in some cases they serve to
identify the spots on which they once flourished, as
those on which they flourish still ; but more often they
are emblematic, and are types of persons or of events,
or serve as figures by which the feelings of the reader
shall be raised from things seen to those which are
unseen. But they were never intended to be regarded
merely as ornaments of poetry. They had all their
lessons, from the lily of the valleys and the rose of
Sharon, which foreshadowed a coming Lord, down to
the thorn and thistle, which tell us, even yet, of man’s
sin and sorrow.

We are not idly employed when secking to identify
with the descriptions of the sacred writers the various
trees and flowers to which they allude. In many
imstances this must be the labour of the learned man,
and requires patient thought and investigation, as well
as much skill in ancient languages, and in the botany
of eastern lands. But every patient study of God’s
word is sure to bring valuable results, and to show not



FLOWERS AND PLANTS OF SCRIPTURE. 3

only how well fitted for illustration were the: emblems
employed, but also how true to all that recent science
has discovered. are its statements; while the labour of
one man on the subject may serve to enlighten the
thousands whose time and toil must be otherwise em-
ployed.: A great deal has been discovered, during the
last few years, respecting the botany of Scripture; and
though much remains so uncertain that we wish we
could read the volume of the wise man, who spake of
them, from the cedar of Lebanon to the hyssop of the
wall, yet is our knowledge of the subject far more accu-
rate now than at any former period of modern. times.
Coming years and further study may teach us more ;
for that Bible in which the way of salvation is made so
plain as that a little child can understand it, has yet its
depths, to be explored. by the Christian philosopher and
the man of science.

The rose, the lily, and the vine, are Sete the most
interesting of all the plants of Scripture, for they have
all been given us as figures of Him who was not only
the Lord of nature, but the Lord and Saviour of im-
‘ mortal souls. Jn all times men have desired to know

which of the flowers of the Hast was the rose of Sharon.
Yet even now we are not certain of its identity... Older
writers thought it was a large and deeply-coloured rose.
| Later writers have thought it was the rose of Damascus.
The plain of Sharon is still beautiful, with its bright
grass and numerous wild flowers; but no thorny rose-
‘bush is there. All over its plains and grassy slopes,
however, may be found numerous clumps of the rose-
flowering cistus, whose rich pink blossoms, shaped like
those of our wild brier, are thought by some writers to



4 FLOWERS AND PLANTS OF SCRIPTURE.

be the rose of Sharon. But when we consider how,
from earliest ages, the true rose has been the favourite
flower of the Kast, and that in other parts of Palestine
wild roses are blooming still, we can hardly doubt that
the rose of Sharon, though it grows there no longer,
was some one of those lovely roses which yet grow
wild, or are cultivated, in the Holy Land.

Neither can we exactly tell which was the lily either
of the Old or New Testament, though, in the account of
Solomon’s temple, in the Canticles, and in the references
of the prophets, we find it frequently mentioned.
Dr. Royle thinks that the lily of the Old Testament
is not the same flower as that on which our Saviour
looked when he reminded the disciples of God’s un-
ceasing love and care, and of their duty of unwavering
faith and hope. The former flower has been thought
to be the violet, or the jessamine ; but the use of it, as
forming an ornament of molten brass for the pillars and
brazen sea, as well as the reference, in the Canticles,
to “feeding among the lilies,” induces Dr. Royle to
believe that the lily was the beautiful lotus once so
plentiful on the waters of the Nile, and still so common
on streams of the East. Amidst the many opinions
formed on the subject of the lily alluded to by the
Saviour, the most likely seems that which concludes it
to be the Martagon lily of our gardens.

But if we are not certain of these two flowers, there
are many plants of Scripture on which we can entertain
no doubt. The vine of Eshcol yet grows in the
neighbouring Hebron, and many of the hill-sides of
Palestine still resound to the shouts of the vintage.
The tall cedars of Lebanon are green as they might



FLOWERS AND PLANTS OF SCRIPTURE. 5

have been when David looked on them exultingly, and
compared them to.the righteous man; and these vege-
table monuments of past ages yet send forth, at eventide,
the “smell of Lebanon.” Sweet ‘valleys lying among
the hills of Judah are fragrant now with the myrtle-
bough, and far away over the spring landscape the
flowering almond-trees are beautiful to look upon. The
broad shadow of the sycamore flickers on the ground
_ of the wayside, and might serve to conceal the listener,
as once it hid Zaccheus; and the fig-tree, whose fruits
formed a chief source of the food of Israel, is there still
to shelter and to nourish the tribes who wander under
its shade. The rich blossom or fruit of the pomegranate
reddens among its verdant branches, and the rarer
bay-tree now occasionally reminds the traveller of the
moment of sadness in which the Psalmist once looked
upon it. The willow waves its grey-green foliage by
several streams of the Holy Land, and still fringes
the waters of the Euphrates and the Tigris, where
captive Israel once uttered their lament in strains
of sweet poetry. The garden has its rue, and anise,
and mint, and cummin; and the modern traveller yet
looks on the lodge of the garden of cucumbers, in which
the watcher dwells. The palm-tree, once so charac-
teristic of its scenery, is almost gone, but the wheat
and the barley are still in Israel’s land, but not in glory
and richness as in the day when his was the land of
corn and of wine. Pleasant now to the Christian’s
memory are the thoughts suggested by the olive hills,
yet scattered over with those old trees, on which David
looked when he went up the mountain sides in sorrow,
and which still cluster at the foot of the Mount of



6 FLOWERS AND PLANTS OF SCRIPTURE,

Olives, in the garden which witnessed the agonies of
spirit of the blessed Saviour. But more striking than
all are the thorns and thistles which abound in Palestine,
rendering some of her hills impassable, and entangling
the foot of the traveller on spots once rich in culture.
God was angry with that land, and he smiles not on it
as once he did; yet it still waits for the glorious time,
when, literally and figuratively, its deserts shall again
rejoice, and blossom like the rose.
A. P.



THE LILIES OF THE FIELD.

Marr, vi. 28, 29.

Frowzrs of. the field! *tis yours to preach
Lessons of truth, and humbly teach
The faithless and the proud :
Array’d in garb of lovely hue,
Our Fatuer’s care we trace in you;
And still to Him who made you, true,
Ye warn the thoughtless crowd.

Let those of feeble faith, whose breast

With doubts and fears can never rest,
Consider how ye grow:

Ye toil not with perplexing care:

Ye do not spin the coats ye wear,

Nor paint those colours bright and fair,
In which ye sweetly glow.

The hand of Him who built the skies,
. Adorns His flowers with varied dyes,

And clothes each beauteous plant ;
Th’ Eternal One, whose sovereign power
Can make earth’s haughtiest. despot cower,
Stoops to regard the humblest flower,

And tend each little want.

Rev. J. 8S. Broan, M.A.



THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

Tue burning sun of the South of France had just
gone down, and a weary soldier, who trod languidly
along the bare and dusty road that led from the great
sea-port of Marseilles to a small and pleasant town,
about a day’s journey from the former place, rejoiced in
the cooling air of evening. His aspect bore traces of
the hardship and fatigues of war in a forcign clime:
his face was browned by an African sun, and it seemed
as if his health had suffered by the same.

It was, in fact, the time when the French were at
war with the Algerines, and Eugéne Dupré had com-
pleted his term of seven years’ service in what is called
“the army of Africa.” His service had been performed
with credit to himself, and he had obtained his congé,
or dismissal, after having been rapidly advanced to the
rank of sergeant.

And now some hills, yet at a couple of hours’ distance,
rose to his sight, and close to them, Eugéne knew, was
the home of his youth, his father’s house, where he
hoped his mother’s arms would receive him, and his
fond little sister’s smiles make him forget his trials
and sufferings. Although he had been a good soldier,
and gained as such the regard of his superiors, Eugene



THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. 9

was glad to leave the army of Africa; while with it he
had beheld and shared in many a dreadful scene. The
fierce war in Algeria he was well satisfied no longer to
bear a part in. There are some minds which will perform
well whatever duty they undertake; and that of a soldier,
though well performed by Eugéne Dupré, was not that
which was most agreeable to his own disposition; the
law of conscription in France compels all men, after
eighteen years of age, to serve in the army for seven
years, should the state require it; and Hugéne had
entered the army against his own inclination, as a
conscript. This had been peculiarly trying to him just
then, for he had been long attached to a young female
who lived in his neighbourhood, and circumstances had
appeared to promise favourably for their marriage; but
when Eugéne was obliged to depart for the army, her
father would no longer listen to the proposal; he-even
made the young man promise not to attempt to form
any engagement with his daughter, or even to write to
her as long as he was a soldier.

Eugene kept both promises: he had never heard from
Annette during his long absence from his home; and
now, as he was returning, and drawing nearer to it, he
was thinking if he should find all his friends as he had
left them, and laying before himself some pictures of
happiness, peace, and quiet, which were very pleasant
to the weary soldier’s imagination. What busy thoughts
filled his mind as his native village came in view!
Would Annette be changed—was she already married
to another ?—had his father grown much older ?—was
his mother’s kind face the same as ever P—and his little
sister, who was only ten years of age at his departure,



10 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

was she as pleasing, as playful as she had been? Then
there was another old friend, though one much younger
than himself—Henry Vincent—who had made himself
so useful to his father during his absence, and had been
his little sister’s companion and friend: he thought of
him, too, and wondered if Henry had grown up to be as
good, as generous, as truthful, as he promised to be
when a boy, and as his fine open countenance had once
declared him to be.

But while thus thinking, some weary, yet more hasty
steps led him into the village street, and he stood before
the draper’s shop which his father kept. The shades of
evening fall suddenly ina southern clime ; it was almost
dark when he paused at the well-remembered door.
And then he recollected how, in former days, he used
to dislike to stand behind that counter, waiting for
customers, and how Henry would take his place, and
make himself so useful; and though he did not feel
more disposed to like shop-keeping now than he had
done formerly, he felt he had been wrong then, and
owned in his heart that it is both wiser and happier
to be content with that state of life to which it has
pleased God to call us, not knowing but that to which
we should prefer to call ourselves would be found still
more unsuitable to us, Then, suddenly entering the
house, he crossed the passage, and there, assembled
round the wide kitchen hearth,—for the evening had
grown chill,—he beheld all the objects of his thoughts,
with the exception of Annette, to be sure: she was
not present. But there, at opposite corners of the wide
hearth, sat an elderly man and woman, silent, with their
figures bent forward, their arms on their knees, their eyes



THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. AL

fixed on the fire before them. Between them, in the
middle space, was a pale but interesting young girl, with
tears upon her cheeks; and «young man, of a kind and
open countenance, the pleasant expression of which was
darkened by some sorrow, and whose attempts to console
the girl at his side only seemed to increase her grief.

In surprise Hugéne, gazed at the scene before him.
But his step was heard, and his father, thinking a cus-
tomer had entered, rose to attend the shop: Henry
sprang up to save him the trouble.

“ Leave him, my son,” said the old woman to Henry,
“leave him to attend to his business himself: he must
soon do so without assistance.” Eugéne, seeing he was
not recognised, requested permission to rest himself.
Even his voice was changed, and the father, saluting him
as a stranger and traveller, pulled off his cap, and politely
requested him to be seated at their hearth. But the
mother looked at the war-changed soldier, and with a
cry, opened her arms, and fell on the bosom of her son.
Then Eugéne was clasped to his father’s breast, and
then his loving sister’s tears ceased to flow, or their
cause was forgotten in wonder and joy.. And Henry
stood with ‘smiling eyes and countenance, waiting for
his embrace to come. And now how happy was Eugéne
Dupré! All that had passed, vexations, and hardships,
and dangers, were quite forgotten: or actually converted,
in retrospect, into pleasures. It was pleasant to tell of
them; pleasant to see the interest with which they were
listened to; pleasant, above all, to give God thanks for
deliverance from them—to hear his parents do so.

Then he was rested and refreshed; his mother and
sister relieved his aching feet, and set out the neat



12 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

reviving supper, consisting partly of the fine rich grapes
of Southern France. Oh! how happy was the soldier’s
return; how devout his thankfulness !

However tired a traveller may be, yet if he returns
to an affectionate family, it is usually late before he
retires to rest; there is so much to be told, and when
all is told, there is so much to hear.

Eugéne, unlike most returned travellers, wished to
hear first; so when the supper was over, he asked his
sister Violette, whom he was surprised to find grown
into a young woman, to tell him of all the changes
that had taken place among their old friends.

“Oh! there have been many changes since you left
us, my brother,” said Violette ; “old Menon, whom you
remember so well, is dead, and your friend André
married his daughter Elise, and keeps the house now;
and my old companion Julie has left this place, and
gone to live with a lady who travels very far, so they
say Julie will be likely to see even Paris before she
comes back.”

“That is surprising,’ said Hugéne, smiling; “but
have you no more interesting news to tell me ?”

“Why, yes; there is poor Antony and his lame
mother.”

“Oh!” cried Kugéne, interrupting her, “ that may
be all very interesting, I confess; but then—in short,
why do you not mention those who are most interesting
to me ?—Annette, for instance, my old friend: you have
said nothing of her.”

“No, indeed, nor is it likely I should have done so;
you asked me to tell you of changes, brother ;—now no
change has taken place with regard to Annette.”

>



THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. 138

« Ah! [thought she might: be married! Well, I must
go and see her to-morrow morning,” said Eugéne.

* No, sheis not married,” his sister replied, “ and
whenever she makes some purchase at the shop, she
always asks about you—and oh! brother, when we got
that dreadful letter to tell us how youhad been wounded,
and nearly killed by the Arabs, and how you suffered
from the climate—ah!”—hissister looked at Henry, who
was listening to her, and stopping short in her speech,
put her hand over her eyes and burst into tears.

Eugéne, thinking it was the recollection of his suffer-
ings that caused these tears, began to laugh at them, and
then, to divert her, commenced telling of many greater
hazards he had run, of wild scenes he had witnessed,
and fearful perils he had passed.

He was interrupted by his sister’s sobs, and by a
request from Henry that he would not alarm her more.

“ Ah!” said Hugéne, “it cannot be on my account
she is alarmed, else she would smile now that I am
safe. Look atme, my sister,” he said, trying to remove
her hands; “ tell me what is the matter.”

Violette could not speak, and Eugéne, turning to his
father and mother, said, “I saw Violette in tears when
I came in, but I forgot that in the general joy; I am
sure something is wrong; tell me, I pray you, what
it is.”

* Not till to-morrow, my son,” said the mother;
“ you require repose.”

“ Bugéne will not sleep while he is in doubt,” said
the father ; “itis better he should know all now.” Then
turning towards his son, the old man continued :-—

“ You see Henry, my son, who sits beside you ; well,



14 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

when you had left us, Henry supplied your place ; only
less dear than our own son, he was asa son to us. I had
no need in the morning to regulate the shop, for Henry
was there, and all was done before I appeared. In the
evening, I had no trouble with my accounts, my books
were settled for me. His only amusement was to take
out Violette sometimes for a walk in the country. You
will not marvel that he became very dear to us; and
when he asked us for our daughter in marriage, we were
glad, for we thought we should live with our children
and children’s children, and go down to the grave in
peace with their love and blessing.”

“Then are these tears of joy and happiness?” asked
Eugene, kissing his sister’s cheek: but her head drop-
ped on his shoulder, and she looked pale and faint.

“No, my son; you must hear the rest ;” said the
old man. “ Henry’s name was enrolled in the con-
scription list, for men wanted for the army of Africa,—
the army you have left. Only yesterday, he drew a bad
number,—Henry is a conscript,—he must leave us for
Africa.”

A silence followed.

« But a substitute,” cried Eugéne,—“ he can buy
one,—I have money, if you have not.”

“A substitute for Africa cannot be got,” said his
father; “ the time, too, is short; Henry must go.”

« But I will return, father Dupré,” cried the young
man, Henry: “ we must hope and trust :—courage, dear
Violette,” he added, but his voice was broken, and his
eyes dim with tears.

Eugéne sat silent, his eyes bent down, and a look of
painful thought upon his brow. ‘“ Mother, I am very



THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. 15

weary,” he said at last, “I wish to repose.” He kissed
his sister’s youthful brow, and whispering the word
“Hope,” was conducted by his mother to the chamber
that had been his in boyhood. ‘There, as soon.as he was
alone, the returned soldier fell on his knees, and prayed
long to God,—he wanted help and courage,—wanted
them more than in the hour of battle. He wanted
to form a resolution which he believed to be virtuous
and right, but which most strangely and unexpectedly
crossed all his expectations, all his hopes and plans.

He rose strengthened. in it, for those who seek shall
find ; and Kugéne Dupré had sought for grace and power
to conquer the natural selfishness of the human. heart,
and to follow the. example which Christ left us, when
he loved us and gave himself for us.

But during that wakeful night,—for not even bodily
fatigue could prevent it from being wakeful,—some
painful thoughts would dart across the mind of the
released soldier.

“ Ah!” he would say to himself, as he impatiently
tossed on his pillow, “ I was so happy ; I believed myself
so free; I was thankful to Providence for leading me
back in peace to my home, my family, my friends; why
am I then thus tried, why so sorely disappointed ? Why
is the cup of mortal happiness just.presented to us, and
dashed away almost before we can taste it?”

- Eugene could not answer these questions then; but
he remembered some words spoken by Christ to his
apostle Peter; “ What I do thou knowest not now,
but thou shalt know hereafter ;” and saying to himself,
“ Perhaps even I, insignificant as I may well judge my
concerns to be in the view of the Almighty, even I may



16 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

one day know the meaning of all this, and find it has
been for my good. At all events, as a soldier, when I
knew my duty I was bound to do it; as a Christian,
I can do no less.”

Tired as he was, Eugéne rose soon after the sun, and
went out. He walked through the village, and turned
towards a neat and comfortable looking house, with a
vineyard and garden around it, standing on the slope
of a hill, just beyond its outskirts. He looked at it,
but did not go there, as he had told Violette the night
before he would do. That house belonged to Annette’s
father; Eugéne would not now go to see her, “ there
would be no use, but perhaps mutual pain in doing so,”
he said to himself, as he passed it. “I want to be
strengthened, not made weaker.”

So he went on a little further, until he came to a
humble dwelling, occupied by the good old pastor, who
had been his teacher and guide in childhood, whose
lessons of piety had preserved him, by God’s blessing,
from many of the temptations of the ungodly, from
many of the sins to which his life had peculiarly
exposed him.

He met the old pastor up, and, early as it was,
walking abroad, after the custom of France, with a
book in his hand. The conversation which passed
between the pastor and the soldier might be inte-
resting, but as we shall find its results in the scene
which followed, we shall pass over the recital of
their discourse. On his return from the pastor’s
- house, Eugéne called on the authorities of thé town,
or village, and having made all his arrangements
without announcing his intentions to his family,



THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. 1%

he went back to meet them at their simple morning
meal.

The mother was preparing the breakfast; Violette,
pale as death, but having taken a strong resolution to
be ealm in her newly arrived brother’s presence, was
endeavouring to assist her, but in reality did what her
more active mother had toundo. Henry was arranging
some bills for Father Dupré, as the old man was called ;
and Father Dupré himself was sitting in his large
chair, doing nothing, but looking as if he thought a
great deal. Into such an assembled party came the
returned soldier; his knapsack, which he had carried
the day before, once more packed up, and his cloak
strapped on it. He flung it on a chair as he entered,
laid his stout stick beside it, and having pulled off his
cap, and saluted the whole family round, beginning with
the mother, he inquired, in a manner too evidently
careless to be quite natural, if breakfast would be ready
ere the sun were much higher.

“Tt is ready, my son,” said the mother.

“One would think, brother, you were going on the
high road again to-day,”’ said Violette.

“And they would think rightly, my sister,” said
Hugene, seizing, as if in haste, on some of the pro-
visions of the table, but only to divert or conceal a
rising agitation. '

“Tow—why? the first day of your return? where
are you going ?” said both father and mother.

“Yes, tell us where you are going,” said Violette,
trying to smile, “you said you would go to see Annette
to-day; it is not so far, you will not require your
knapsack or walking stick.”

c

-



18 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

“Tam not going to see Annette, my little sister, I
do not intend to go to see her. If you see her, tell her
I think the same of her as ever—that is all.”

“Where then are you going ? is it a secret ?”

“No; I go to Marseilles first, then to Africa—to
Algeria, where I came from.”

No voice echoed his words; they seemed to have
struck the whole party dumb and motionless. With
lips apart, yet moveless, and eyes fixed in wonder and
almost in fear upon the speaker, sat father, mother,
sister, and the young conscript Henry. Eugene
coughed to clear his own voice, and after a moment’s
effort, spoke calm and firmly.

“Yes, my dear parents,” he said, “all the arrange-
ments are made; you must not be left without Henry ;
he is more useful to you than I ever was, or now ever
could be, for I know nothing of your business. Yes,
Violette, you must not be deprived of your betrothed
husband; his is not a constitution to stand the fatigues
or the climate of Africa. Yes, Henry, you shall not lose
the reward dueto your love and attentions toour parents.
Tam your substitute, only too happy that I arrived in
timeto make myself such, and to saveus all such sorrow.”

Still for a moment there was no voice to reply, but
the silence was broken by a cry from Violette. Springing
from her seat, she threw her arms around her brother,
and held him convulsively embraced, as if such a restraint
must be sufficient to retain him amongst them. Henry
then came forward.

“This is well, Eugéne, on your part,” he said, “but
if you think me capable of accepting such a sacrifice,
you are mistaken.”



THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS, 19

“Forbear, young man, to prevent it,” said a mild,
yet solemn voice from the door: they turned and saw
the old pastor. “Young man,” he repeated, “beware
how you tempt the goodness of a gracious Providence,
who in so singular a manner appears to have interposed
to save you, perhaps, from death, this young girl from
a life of piming sorrow, your aged father and mother
from years of anxiety, toil and grief. Would you
have them left to mourn over the blighted life of their
only daughter, daily to witness her fears, and to have
their latter days harassed by cares which they hoped
now would devolve upon you?”

Henry bent his head before the pastor; the eyes
which had sparkled with a pride that refused to accept
so noble a sacrifice on his account, now filled with
tears, as he felt the truth of what was said.

“These considerations,” the pastor continued, “ in-
fluence Eugéne ; his constitution is prepared, his duty
is known, and a return to it will be both less irksome
and less dangerous. He feels that his departure from
the army left a vacancy, and that he might thus
look upon it as the means of your being a conscript.
He would suffer if he were to witness the sufferings of
those he loved. These are considerations to induce
you all to submit to lose again him who so lately was
found; but if they are not sufliclent—still I say, beware
—beware how you interfere to stop the performance
of a good and noble purpose. My friends, your son and
your brother is a Christian; Christ is his great com-
mander; he would follow where Christ has led; the
Saviour loved us and gave himself for us, He was our
substitute, our. sacrifice. In an inferior manner let his



20 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

servant follow our Divine Leader ; God will bless this
brother’s sacrifice—”

‘And you too will bless me, my parents,” cried the
soldier, sinking on his knees before his father and
mother. ‘Let me take your blessing with me, for I
must be gone—by making speed I can regain my place
in my old regiment, where my loss was regretted ; my
former rank will I doubt not be restored to me.”

But the parents could not speak ; they threw them-
selves sobbing on his neck. At that moment an excla-
mation of terror from Henry drew all their attention to
poor Violette, who had fallen from her chair in a faint.

“This is well,” said the pastor, in a low voice to
Eugene, “let Henry carry her to another room, and
leave the domestic and him to attend her. She will
soon recover.”

“ And I meantime may depart,” said Hugtne ; but a
pang shot to his heart, even as he saw his wished-for
departure expedited. “Give me then thy blessing,
sir,’ he added. “Let my father’s, my mother’s, my
sister’s, and her husband’s, follow me where Igo. Give
me thy blessing, and pray that the blessing of God may
go with me.”

The old Pastor blessed the young soldier in the name
of God.

‘And thou shalt be blessed, my son,” he added:
“whatever be the temptations, trials, perils that beset
thee, the grace and blessing of God will be a shield for
thee; he can cover thy head in the day of battle.
Jacob served seven years for a wife, and they seemed
but as a few days from the love he bore her: thou
wilt serve a few years for a sister, a father, a mother.



THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. 2]

I know thy sacrifice is great, but should it ever appear
painful, think of the sacrifice that was made for thee
when the Son of God left the glory he had with the
Father, and suffered banishment, toil, pain, and death in
our miserable world, for us men and for our salvation.’”’
Then the Pastor saying, “Let us pray,” the parents and
son knelt, and peace came to their hearts. They rose,
and tottered with outstretched arms to their noble son;
they pressed him to their hearts; they wet his head
with their tears; and while they lifted up their voice
and wept, they found words to bid him go and do as
his brave and unselfish heart dictated. Soothed by
their consent, the soldier departed as he had come,
from his home and native place.

When Henry heard he had gone, he muttered, almost
angrily, “No matter, I shall get to Africa almost as
soon as he.” '

Tt was at first his resolution to start off, and super-
sede the necessity of his brother’s sacrifice. But this
resolution soon became less firm, and gradually melted
away, when he found himself called upon to comfort
Violette, and assist her father.

Well, years passed away: long years— perhaps
longer in the judgment of Eugéne Dupré than in that
of either Henry or Violette. Time, however we may
seem to reckon it, moves, notwithstanding, in the same
equal pace, in joy or in sorrow, in pleasure or pain. It
passed on, and more than the term of service passed.
away. One summer, in the south of France, was ex.
cessively hot ; ‘even the vines and olives that cover the



22 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

fields, much as they love the sun, looked as if they had
had too much of its beams.

Most people preferred travelling at night, and indeed
it was at night, and very early in the morning, that
people most went abroad. On one of this summer’s
bright mornings a traveller entered the village, where
the family of Dupré resided, at a very early hour; it
was not yet five o’clock, but the Place—as the planted
piece of ground, allotted for the recreation of the inha-
bitants of French towns, is usually called—was already
occupied by early risers, enjoying the cool of the
morning by walking, or sitting on the seats beneath
the shade.

A young happy mother occupied a large chair on
this Place; a child, of about a year old, was creeping
round her knees, with one hand leaning on them, the
other ‘stretched to a little urchin of about double its
age, who was tempting the little sister to trust her
tottering steps, and run to catch the delicious bunch of
grapes he held provokingly to her and withdrew again.

The traveller had dismounted from his tired horse,
and led by the bridle a fine animal, which would have
been coal black, except for streaks of foam plenti-
fully scattered over its shining coat. Pitying its heat
and fatigue, ‘the traveller stopped to loosen the saddle
girth, and the animal suddenly shaking itself, scattered
a shower of foam over a fine boy of perhaps five years
old, who stood admiring and wondering beside it.

‘Come here, Eugéne, come here directly, my son,”
cried the young woman, who sat with the two younger
children. The traveller, who wore the military undress
of an officer, turned, and throwing loose the bridle of



THE. FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. 93

his horse, which was too well trained to stir, caught up
the little boy, and kissed him warmly, then running to
the young mother, cried aloud, “ Violette, Violette, my
sister—is it not?”

The voice was the voice of Eugéne Dupré; but the
face, the figure—ah! both were changed: the one was
sallow and sharp, the other was wasted. Violette at
first doubted; doubt soon gave way; but joy, grief, and
gratitude strangely mingled, as she clung to her restored
brother, weeping and laughing, pressing her little chil-
dren into his arms, and calling him to look at Eugéne,
his namesake, whom she flattered herself would be like
him ; her firstborn, whom she called after the brother
who had sacrificed his own happiness to her’s.

“Not sacrificed, I trust, my sister—only delayed,”
said Hugéne, as holding his little nephew’s hand in-one
of his, and leading his horse with the other, he walked
with Violette and her children to his father’s house :
the boy touching his sword, gazing into his face,
admiring his horse, and wondering if this tall, grave-
looking officer were the uncle whom his grandfather
and grandmother, and his own parents, had always told
him he must try to be like, because he was so good,
and loved the good of others.

And now Eugéne Dupré was at home again; the
soldier had become an officer, for such an event is not
uncommon in the French army; and in his home he
found that all was peace, and comfort, and happiness :
there he had been the means of promoting these bless-
ings, and there he now returned to enjoy them. And
who can tell what joy and wonder, love and exultation,
filled the humble abode of father and mother Dupré,



24 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

when it was inhabited by their always loved, and now
honoured son. But before the mother had done ad-
miring, and pitying, and caressing him, Violette drew
near, and whispered,

“ Dear brother, in your last unhappy visit——”

Oh! do not call it unhappy, sister; say, rather, my
last blessed visit: look at your children, your husband,
our dear parents——”

“ God, indeed, has blessed a brother’s sacrifice!”
said Violette, as her tearful eyes wandered round the
group he named.

“But, brother, I only wanted to tell you that in your
last—yes, I will call it, blessed visit,—you left me a
message for Annette—poor, dear Annette! TI gave it
to her, and Annctte is not changed.”

* And I am not changed,” said Eugtne smiling.

Scarcely more than an hour afterwards, Eugine Dupré
stood leaning his arms on a small wooden gate, which
opened into a sort of yard at the side of that farm-house
in the vineyard, on the slope of the hill, just outside his
native village. A neat and modest-looking woman came
out, with a flat basket in her hand, containing food for
a variety of fowls which were kept there. They flew
fluttering about her. She was not young—thirty years
is considered a good age in France—and she was not
remarkably pretty, but her countenance was very sweet,
and gave the beholder an idea of one that might he
trusted in.

She was surprised to see an officer leaning against
her father’s gate; but, perceiving that he looked ill,
she supposed he was fatigued with walking up the hill,
and, advancing to the gate, politely asked him to walk



THE FRENCH. CONSCRIPTS. 25

in and rest. Eugene perceived that he was not known;
he almost feared that he himself was forgotten, although
he knew well his person was greatly changed. He
wished to know this.

“There was a soldier in my regiment,’ te said,
‘who knew you, Mademoiselle.”

“ Ah! was it Hugtne Dupré?” said Annette.

“ You have not forgotten him, then, Mademoiselle,”
said Hugéne, rather slyly, “he has not forgotten you.”

“T have never heard from him,” said Annette, pong
surprised.

“ Because he promised your “father never to write to
you while he was a soldier ;—but he promised you, too,
never to forget you. He has kept both promises for
many long years :——dear Annette, do you not know
me? Eugéne Dupré is a soldier no longer.”

And Eugéne was happy, and Annette was happy.;
the whole family of Dupré were happy; and, last of
all, the good old pastor was happy,

The brother’s sacrifice was ended; the old man felt
that his prayers had been heard, and the blessing he
asked for had been given. He was soon called to assist
at a happier scene than that of Hugéne’s departure for
Africa: he married him to Annette, and saw them
established, with her father’s full approbation, in the
pleasant farm-house which he thenceforth resigned to
them.

Eugéne’s father and mother, brother and sister, re-
joiced in the joy of him who had sacrificed his happiness
to theirs. Little Hugéne loved to sit at his uncle’s side,



26 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

and listen to tales about wild Arabs, and tried to re-
member that his mother constantly told him, it was
far better to try to imitate his uncle’s virtues, than to
wish to share his adventures.

Was there ever a selfish heart made so happy as that
of Eugéne Dupré? No, a purely selfish heart is a
miserable, a barren, a forlorn one. Selfishness is the
characteristic of our nature—a fallen nature. Christ
came to raise and restore that nature: his character
was the only entirely unselfish one ever seen or known
in this world :—He became poor, that we might become
rich—He died, that we might live.

It is wrong to believe that any human virtues, any
self-denying actions, can entitle us to the favour of
God, for that favour is procured to us through his well-
beloved Son alone; but it would be wrong, also, to
think that these are not acceptable in his sight; and
that his blessing is not sure to come upon those who
set Christ Jesus the Lord alway before them, and
endeavour to follow in the steps of his most godly
life. 8. B.







WILD FLOWERS.

“ Beautiful things ye are, where’er ye grow,
The wild red-rose, the speedwell’s peeping eyes,
Our own blue-bell, the daisy, that doth rise
Wherever sunbeams fall or winds do blow,
And thousands more of blessed forms and dyes.
T love you all.”

Win flowers, how much do we owe them! Scattered
by millions on our pathway, they are little heeded
by some who tread them down without one look at
their beauty, without one thought of the skill by which
they are fashioned. And yet to many hearts what a
tale of blessing do they bring! The busy man is
toiling onwards; the curse pronounced in Eden when
man fell, that by labour he should eat bread, falls
heavily upon him. His heart is full of cares, not for
to-day only, but for to-morrow; but some little wild
flower catches his eye, and he remembers that, like the
lily of the field, he should walk hopefully and trustingly
on the ways of life. The wanderer travels on alone
and cheerless, but a wild moss is springing at his foot,
and he feels that God is everywhere. The stranger in
some strange land sees a daisy, and home and its sweet



28 WILD FLOWERS.

remembrances come vividly before him, and the voices
of those who loved him in childhood, and who love
him still, seem there to cheer him. And the sick man,
as he looks out upon the green blades of the spring
cornfield, likens it, with the apostle, to that glorious
body which shall arise from the seed about to be sown
in God’s garden, when he too must lay him down to die.
Thoughts of sweet scenes and sweeter voices; of
childhood, and its innocent delights; of the sounds of
trees, and the rippling of waters, and the rustling
corn; of the noonday sun and the evening twilight,
are often brought before us by the sight of a wild
flower.

Truly God gave us a source of great enjoyment
when he made them so plentiful, when he gave them to
man as common things. If we wander by the stream,
listening to its soft music, there we find them clustering
on its surface, or crowding among the verdant sedges and
grassy banks through which it flows. And white crow-
foots lie in patches, and rich blue forget-me-nots peep
up from the waters, and the tall yellow iris waves like
a banner, and brooklimes, and water-violets, and water-
cresses, show their blue, and lilac, and snowy blossoms.
On the banks the yellow flowers of the silver-weed
glisten among the grey green leaves, and the sweet
odour of the queen-of-the-meadows is wafted far away
over the land, like a sweet strain of melody; and, as
we linger, looking on the beauties of the crystal
streamlet, we see that we are not the only beings who
delight in its flowers, though to man alone has God given
the intellect and the imagination fully to enjoy them.
Yet among these pond-weeds and duck-weeds which lie



WILD FLOWERS. 29

on the stream, and among the crowding leaves of those
alders and willows which throw their shadow over it,
are countless living creatures, revelling in activity and
joy; and little shell-fish lie hid there, and birds and
winged insects stoop there for their meal; and the stately
swan or moorfowl glide calmly among the plants to
satiate their longings.

We turn away from the stream to look on the green
meadow, only to see the abundance of Nature. Grasses
of many kinds, each well marked to the botanist by its
form of leaf, and stem, and flower, so constant in the
most minute particulars as never to mislead him, are
erowded there? Who shall count the number of those
blades of grass which form the green carpet? which
are not alone delightful to our tread, and soothing to
our sight in all their variations of sun and shadow,
but on which the flocks and herds find herbage and
resting-places. They are bright and beautiful, in mass
as well as in detail, as, speckled in spring by their
millions of daisies, and buttercups, and speedwells, and,
in the later year, by the golden hawkweeds, they lie
stretched out before us; while not one of all those
erasses or flowers, beautiful as it seems to us there,
has not also an unseen beauty,—a beauty which it
needs the most powerful microscope to reveal to us.
We gather it and examine it minutely, and we may
perhaps see its delicate ‘petals, as well as its green
leaves, fringed and studded with minute hairs, which
serve to keep them warm and to collect the dews from
the atmosphere; and little glands which we saw not
before, disclose where its scent lies hid; and the won-
drous contrivances of its pistils and stamens show



30 WILD FLOWERS.

how its seed is perfected; and the very seed-vessel
which holds those seeds is, in its form, fitness, and
arrangement for the dispersion of its contents, in
itself a history,—a history of power and exquisite skill,
compared to which man’s ablest invention seems poor
indeed. And when the heat of the sun bids us seek
the woodland shadow, we find there the flowers fitted
forthe shade, and which would grow there only. That
sunny meadow would not have suited the sweet lily of
the valley, which, enwrapped in its broad green leaves,
hides beneath the bough of the tree, any more than the
crowds of buttercups could have flourished without the
full rays of the sun, and amidst the frequent drippings
and moisture of the trees.

The cornfield, so rich with its bending grain, has, too,
its own wreath of blossoms. The scarlet poppies tower
amidst it, and rich purple thistles, and bright blue suc-
cory, and pale lilac scabious, and deeper-coloured corn-
cockle, and azure blue cornflowers, and many a blossom
of the cultured field are there, to delight the lover of
wild flowers, though they please not the cultivator.
Even the sandy plain has the sandwort and spurry-
flower, and rich gorses and brooms lend their golden
beauty to the heath, with blossoms that seem like
butterflies ready for a flight; while a sweet perfume
rises from the heather-bells which are swinging in
multitudes among their dark and delicate foliage, now
in richest tints of purple, now arrayed in fainter rose
colour. The tall and bushy ling, elegant both in flowers
and leaves, serves, too, to shelter from the burning sun
the little yellow tormentils and the graceful bluebells,
which, on light stem, are bending beneath its shadow ;



WILD FLOWERS. 81

while the bee is telling amidst them all a tale of
summer airs and blue heavens :

“ He speaks to the ear, and they to the eye.”

The very. cliff by the sea has its own blossoms, and
pale sea-lavender, and pink thrift can find a home
among its crevices; and the samphire, smiling’ far above
the reach of the wave, looks down on the yellow poppy
which gladdens the sand or shingle. Even the salt
marshes have their flowers, from the tall lilac starwort
and pale green southernwood, down to the lowly sea-
side pearlwort. The bog on which our foot can scarcely
tread has a whole store of wealth for the botanist ; and
amid the large mosses, whose decay shall, in the course
of centuries, form a firmer soil, the richly fringed bog
bean, and the glittering sun-dew, and the yellow
asphodel, and the orchis, and the large pimpernel, and
the spearwort, and many another flower rises up before
his view. -The old castle frowns down from the height,
but the snapdragon, and the ivy, and the gay wall-
flowers, have found a way to reach to its very summit :
and the mountain peak glitters with snow, and yet, near
to the eternal ice and frost, the blue gentian and the
saxifrage lift their heads in fearless beauty; while all
the way downwards on those heights wave pinks, and
stonecrops, and other flowers, until we reach the green
and luxuriant valley beneath. Nota spot is there on
earth on which the plant can take root, but there God has
sown it in beauty, as if to bid us learn everywhere, in
all places, and in all times, a lesson of “the flower of
the field.” - A. P.



BEAUTIES OF THE FIELD.

Ye Field Flowers! the gardens eclipse you, ’tis true,
Yet, wildlings of Nature, I doat upon you,
For ye waft me to summers of old,
When the earth teem’d around me with fairy delight,
And when daisies and buttercups gladden’d my sight,
Like treasures of silver and gold.

I love you for lulling me back into dreams

Of the blue Highland mountains and echoing streams,
And of broken glades breathing their balm ;

While the deer was scen glancing in sunshine remote,

And the deep mellow crush of the wood-pigeon’s note,
Made music that sweeten’d the calm.

Not a pastoral song has a pleasanter tune

Than ye speak to my heart, little wildlings of June ;
Of old ruinous castles ye tell ;

Where I thought it delightful your beauties to find,

When the magic of Nature first breathed on my mind,
And your blossoms were part of her spell.

Ev’n now what affections the violet awakes !

What loved little islands, twice seen in their lakes,
Can the wild water-lily restore !

What landscapes I read in the primrose’s looks,

And what pictures of pebbled and minnowy brooks
In the vetches that tangled their shore!



BEAUTIES OF THE FIELD. 33

Earth’s cultureless buds, to my heart ye were dear,
Ere the fever of passion, or ague of fear,
Had scathed my existence’s bloom ;
Once I welcome you more, in life’s passionless stage,
With the visions of youth to revisit my age,
And I wish you to grow near my tomb.
CAMPBELL,



THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN.

It is hardly necessary to advert to the manner in
which the circumstances connected with this incident
have been recorded by the pen of inspiration. He
who wrote a narrative so brief and expressive, emphatic
in its conciseness, and most touching in its simplicity,
must himself have been deeply affected; nor could he
have been the man to impose on credulity. No
fictitious scene is here-—We know that the young are
not too young to die; that the nearest relations are
not too close to be sundered; that the happiest heart is
not secure against the pangs of sorrow. We have
heard the lamentations of the widowed heart; we have
sat down and wept by the side of the mother as she
mourned in bitterness of soul over the corpse of her
child; we have seen death making its resistless way
into the mansion of health and peace—sparing not
even the only son—until that once so happy wife and
doating mother was left alone to tell the tale of woe.
What an idea of sorrow is compressed in these few
words ; “ There was a dead man carried out, the only
son of his mother, and she was a widow!” Tt is all told
as it happened: the gate of every city has furnished
many a parallel to the funeral at the gate of Nain.



THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN. 35

The door of the sepulchre has not yet closed. over the
human family—ere long we may be carried out and
borne to the house appointed for all the living. Hence
the interest we necessarily take in a narrative attested
by every day’s observation of human life; embodying
no indistinct idea of the toils and trials and issues
of our common humanity; recalling to many a grief-
stricken heart the facts in its own bitter experience,
and teaching lessons of urgent moment to every dweller
in this vale of tears.

Whatever diversity there may be in outward circum:
stances, as the social affections of our nature open an
equal source of pleasure to all, we may suppose that
this woman, to whom our subject in part refers, had -
vested her happiness in the domestic relation. But
when her dream of conjugal bliss had vanished, so far
from. realizing that she herself had become a living
witness of the instability of all earthly happiness, her
heart turned with a warmer grasp to her only son.
With what intense affection does she scan those
features, which image to her mind, as in a mirror, the
face now shrouded from her view! How do his ex-
panding faculties and budding promise elate her heart!
He is to cheer the gloom of her loneliness—to support
the feebleness of her declining steps; and when she
herself shall be laid upon a dying bed, he will be by
her side to perform each little act of filial kindness,
and to attend to her last request; to see her body
consigned to the selected spot, and to water her grave
with his tears. Such was the dreaming language of
the widow’s heart. Though we may see the approach
of death toward others, we have little apprehension



86 THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN.

of its invading our own circle. The more we love,
the less can we admit the thought of being severed
from the objects of our affection. The child, for
example, is so entwined in the mother’s heart—so
blended with all she either proudly hopes for or fondly
anticipates—that she cannot realize its mortality. Even
when the breath has parted from its lips, she cannot
feel that the clay-cold form she presses to her bosom
no more contains the living spirit of her child. Long
is it before we come to realize the sad breach which
has been made in the circle of our affections ; and then,
awaking as for the first time to the perishable nature
of all our earthly comforts, we feel that at any moment
another object of affection may be cut down—that the
morrow may again summon us to entomb the cherished
hopes and joys of years—that we may yet be found at
the very hearth where now so many endearments
cluster, solitary and forlorn. Thus is it also in our
relation to riches and honours: though we may have
been often told that honour is a bubble, and that riches
take to themselves wings, yet in the time of our pro-
sperity we virtually say, “I shall not be moved.” But
how slight the circumstance which may strip us of our
riches, and leave us shorn of our honours! Oh, the
vanity of the world and the creature! How many
monitions have we that these are fading honours—
perishing riches—dying comforts! Even the more
secure we may feel in our possessions, the greater our
danger—the more we love, the stronger, I had almost
said, the probability of our speedy bereavement. God
does not take from us what we can most readily spare.
He knows that often no means short of a blecding



THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN. 37

heart can wean us from a soul-destroying world.
Hence, the source of our securest income sometimes
fails; the greenest wreath oftimes withers; the most
beloved, the only son may be taken away. Such is the
lot of mortals; our deepest afflictions are nurtured in
the bosom of our warmest affections. We love, as it
were, only to grieve—joy but to sorrow—hope but to
despair. Shall we impeach the goodness of our
Maker? The fault is not in God, but in ourselves: we
enshrine an idol in the heart where God alone should
reign; we seek for perfect happiness where it is not
to be found. The troubles in which our earthborn
affections involve us—the sorrows in which our earthily-
joys terminate—the graves that open for our loves
almost as soon as they ravish our hearts, all are ordered
in mercy, to teach us that no gift. may exclude the
homage due to the Giver; to remind us, as we are so
apt to lose sight of our deathless interest, that the
creature is not owr God—the world not our final
home.

If we are ever disposed to mourn over out siiis, it
is when we see in our lost comforts, in our buried
loves, the evidence of a sin-offended God. If ever
disposed to give our hearts to God, it is when he has
cut the cords which bind us to earth; when the voice-
less lips of him with whom we were linked in bonds
of love, are speaking to us as it were from the other
world, bidding us to prepare for death and eternity.
How does God illustrate the riches of his grace; what
glory does he gather to his own name, when though
stripped of our creature comforts we feel that our
essential interest is undisturbed; though the rod has



38 THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN.

bruised us, we are enabled to bless the chastening
hand of our Heavenly Father !
«Tis over now—and oh; I bless thee, Lord,
For making me thus desolate below ;
For severing, one by one, the ties that bind me
To this cold world; for whither can earth’s outcast
Flee—but to heaven ?”

It is the Christian’s prerogative to triumph over
losses which desolate the worldly heart ; to rejoice in
hope amidst the darkest ills of life. Herein may be
seen the beneficent adaptation of Christianity to the
wants of our nature. No religion, for a being so
constituted and conditioned as man, were worth a
moment’s thought, which does not come to him with
such bright discoveries of God and immortality, and
convey to him such precious promises.

Return we now to the “ gate of the city.” Affecting
scene! He who bade so fair to live, is now stretched
upon that bier, a wan corpse, borne along by strong
men to its bed of dust. And there follows the widowed
mother, slowly, sadly; her heart still yearning in its
bitter agony over the remains of her only son. Ah,
what grief is hers; such as no other earthly ill could
have caused! She would have toiled through sleepless
nights, or groaned in bondage, or gone down herself
to the cold grave, to save her boy. And now, in less
than one brief hour she may not even look upon that
face so beautiful in its quiet sleep ; the damp, dark sod
will press upon it, and she must go back to a lone
hearth. What is life now to thee, poor, broken-hearted
woman ? Who can share thy sorrows, or will heed thy
woe? See how many pass by without one sigh of pity,



THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN. 39

so bent are they on their cold, selfish ends. The
rich and the powerful may not deign to notice the
lowly procession, much less pause to sympathize: so
little do they reflect in their prosperity what life in its
shanges may bring about for them. But there, where
the dead man was carried out, is One who could not
have turned away in cold indifference. It is Jusus,
the Friend of suffering humanity; he might have been
a stranger to her, but she is no stranger to him. Oh
what love was blended with authority when he came
and touched the bier! What tenderness beamed from
his face as he said unto the afflicted mother, “ Weep
not!” Jf no other instance of the kind had been
recorded of our Lord, this alone would serve to prove
that his was a tender, feeling heart—a well-spring of
sympathy and love. Most remarkable is it, while
serving to reveal to us in an attractive light the depth
and tenderness of his sensibilities, that the power by
which he could raise the dead was never exercised save
in behalf of an only brother, an only daughter, and an
only son. It was not that he lamented the dead; he
felt for the living. He could not see misery without
atear. He could not pass by suffering without tendering
relief : such was the heart of Jesus. No wonder that
our misery touched his heart, and brought him down
from heaven to earth, and rendered him willing to
suffer the humiliating death of the cross, that man
might be saved from the bitter pains of death eternal.
There can be no scriptural ground for either error or
doubt as to the beneficent object of his mission: This
is he who, before taking on himself our nature, gave
that gracious charge to his evangelic prophet, “ Comfort,



40 THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN,

ye, comfort ye my people ;” who affirmed as he entered
on his self-denying ministry of love, “The Spirit of
the Lord God is upon me; because the Lord hath
anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor ;” whose
last command to his disciples was, that they should
proclaim the glad tidings of great joy to every creature;
who has himself gone to prepare a place for us, and
who will come again “and receive us to himself, that
where he is there we may be also.”

In a world like this, where trouble and trial inevitably
await us at some stage of our pilgrimage, and sin
mingles its sad ingredients in every cup of earthly joy,
what do we need so much, yet so seldom find, as
sympathy and succour? “ The heart knoweth its own
bitterness :” it may be the cold grasp of want, or the
sharp anguish of calumny—the pangs of neglected
love, or of bereaved affection—the struggles with some
besetting sin, or the forebodings of unrepented guilt.
But why turn to man, who, by your tale of sorrow,
may be only awakened to a sense of his own deeper
woes? We call it sympathy when the ear kindly listens,
and the eye moistens into tears; and so it is. In the
hour of trial, any one is welcome who brings not with
him the heartless laugh or frigid apathy of the selfish
worldling ; but what can sympathy avail, except to tell
us that some other, from his own sad trials or boding
cares, knows how to feel for us?—powerless is it to
console, though it may afford a momentary relief to
the aching heart. What, then, do we not owe to God
for such a Friend as Christ ?—one who “bore our grief,
and carried our sorrows.” Go tell Aim of your griefs,
for he was the Man of sorrows; go lean your aching



THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN.” 4t

head on his bosom, for it is full of compassion. Oh
that you could be induced to take him at his word!
Weary ‘and heavy laden, I know that he would give
thee rest. Poor stricken one! I know that he pities
thee, and waits to bind up thy wounds. So great is
his compassion, not only would he heal the broken.
‘heart, but cleanse the polluted soul; not only console
the mourner, but save the sinner.

“ Weep not /”’—those words, uttered in the accents
of Divime benevolence, methinks must have made their
way to the heart of that sad, solitary woman, and
stayed her tears. But, wonderful to relate! he who
thus spake to the mother, said to the corpse of her
son, “ Young man, I say unto thee, arrse!”—*“ And
he that was dead sat up, and began to speak, and he
delivered him to his mother.”

We can image to our eye scenes more captivating
to the fancy, or recal historic scenes of more thrilling
interest to the earth-bound vision ; but none surpassing
this in its influence over the mind, which, while sympa-
thizing with the woes of humanity, pants after deliver-
ance from the power of death. Even the resurrection
scene at the mouth of the cave, though bespeaking the
same Divine energy, and revealing the tenderness of
the same sympathizing heart, is wanting in one element
of pathetic interest: she who bare him is not there
when Lazarus comes forth, to disclose the depths of
a mother’s joyous love. But here—and yet we may
not attempt to describe what can only be realized in an
interval of serious, susceptible thought—a mother, but
a moment since weeping over the bier of her only son,
now clasping to her bosom that son brought back to



42 THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN.

life—the multitude filled with awe and wonder; and
there in the midst of them, Hz who had wrought this
miracle, oblivious of self, in his calm enjoyment of
others’ happiness. Tell us, sceptics! is not a greater
than Socrates here? or if you cannot withhold a
tribute to his wonder-working beneficence, will you
dare to class him with the prophets of old? Alas!
that sunlight evidence, such as never irradiated the
person of a mere prophet, can be rejected through
man’s proud reluctance to bow to Him whose right
alone it is to reign. What prophet ever exercised
independent power ? It is worthy of emphatic remark,
that in every recorded instance of restoration to life
through human agency, the prophet or the apostle
recognised his dependence, and invoked Almighty aid.
Thus Elijah “cried unto the Lord,” before the dead
man was raised through his agency. Elisha “ prayed
unto the Lord” that the Shunamite’s son might be
restored ; and, in like manner, as became a mortal,
Peter, before accosting Tabitha, “ kneeled down and
prayed.” But Christ, as became the Arbiter of quick
and dead, spoke in his own name; he relied on his own
power; he uttered but a word, and it was done.
« Arise,” said he; “ and he that was dead sat up, and
began to speak !”

To accredit the record, except so far as it embodies
the supernatural, were to do violence to all the rules of
historic criticism; and especially as it preserves the
same lucid brevity and serene simplicity in reporting
the most astounding with the most familiar occur-
rences ; but to admit its authenticity, and nevertheless
to deny the Divinity of the Mighty Actor in this



THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN. 43

miraculous scene, is an inconsistency too egregiously
palpable not to be intuitively detected, save by a mind
which prejudice has blinded, or error hopelessly per-
verted. Evidently no doctrine of Christianity is
at once so interesting and elevating as that which
reveals its founder in the twofold aspect of both God
andman. I love to contemplate him in the mysterious
constitution of his person—the blending of all that is
lowly with all that is dignified ; all that is sympathizing
with all that is commanding—tenderness without
weakness, authority without sternness, stainless virtue,
weeping benevolence, superhuman power—yes, God
manifest in the flesh. If I am attracted by his tones
of mingled softness and majesty, so am I awed by the
sublimity of his deeds of mercy. If there is some-
thing in those accents of love that wins my confidence,
there is more in that mighty voice of his which
commands my homage. I see in such a miracle not
less the power than the compassion of God; not less
the authority of a Sovereign Lawgiver, than the bene-
volence of a Divine Saviour. I cannot doubt that
he is not only willing, but able to give me the consola-
tions I need; not only willing, but able to forgive my
sins, to sanctify my heart, to save my soul, to rescue
my body from the power of death, and make it like
unto his own glorious body. Let me but know that
I have a place in his heart, and I cannot doubt his
infinite ability to relieve the wants and woes of my
poor fallen nature. He who in the exercise of his own
independent authority could cleanse the leper, open
the eyes of the blind, stop the raging of the sea, and
raise the dead, might without infrmgement on the



Ad THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN.

rights of Deity say, “Thy sins are forgiven thee ! ”—
without arrogance declare, “ Without me ye can do
nothing ! ’—without any feigned or impotent sympathy,
invite “ the weary and heavy-laden to come unto him
for rest ;”—without any mockery of the woes of our
nature, say unto us, “ Weep not?’ All power has been
given unto him. He is the Consolation of Israel—the
only Mediator between God and man—the Great
Deliverer from the power of death and hell.

But though we need relicf as well as sympathy, the
scepticism of the natural heart may be at times de-
tected even in its hour of trial. The bereaved think
only of their loss—their heart is in the grave; even
there, where others have been laid never more to
return—where the earth-worm preys on the remains of
their loved ones, and no miracle will now be wrought
to restore their dead to life. Be it so; but why dis-
turb that dust which sleeps so gently in the hope of
a glorious resurrection at the last day? or why call
back again to a life of sin and sorrow the already sancti-
fied spirit of your friend? THe who afflicted you cer-
tainly knows best what is most for your good. He
who fills heaven with his gracious presence can fill the
void in your heart. And what are a few more years
of communion with an earthly friend, compared with
preparation for a world of final reunion with the loved
and lost on earth? Other and higher ends had Christ
when he approached that bier, than merely to restore
a son to his mother, or to furnish another proof that
he was the Messiah sent of God: it was to proclaim
to a dying world that death is not the end of man;
that there is a life beyond the grave—another world,



THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN. - 45

far above the sins and sufferings of this, where all his
followers shall meet at last—parents restored to their
children, and children to their parents, who here fall
asleep in Jesus, there reunited in love and peace, never
more to part!

But, solemn, affecting thought, there may be an
end even to the compassion of. Jesus Christ! -The day
approaches when mercy will give place to vengeance—
compassion to “the wrath of the Lamb.” He who so
often said to the sons and the daughters of afflicted
humanity, “Weep not,” will then say, “Depart, ye
cursed!” Fearful truth !—there is power in Christ to
destroy as well as to save; there is to be an exhibition
of his power, transcendantly magnificent—infinitely
greater than any this earth has witnessed. At his
‘command, “ Time shall be no longer”—the dead, both
small and great, shall rise and stand before: God—
“the elements shall melt with fervent heat; and at
the word of this same Being, the righteous shall enter
into life eternal, and the wicked go away into everlast-
ing punishment. Alas! for those who will not accept
as their Saviour Him who will be their final Judge! I
know that men in their devotion to the world are prone
to ascribe all Christian solicitude in their behalf to
ascetic views; but He who sympathized with a poor
afflicted woman, could have had no heart to occasion
unnecessary alarm; much less could he have made
such tremendous announcements of coming wrath, un:
less he uttered the “true sayings of God.”—Even so:
every unbeliever is in danger of the judgment of the
last great day.

BR. W. DICKINSON.



A MIDNIGHT VISIT TO MOUNT VESUVIUS.

“Great and glorious are thy works, O Lord God
Almighty!” said the psalmist; and never have I been
more impressed with all the feeling which the excla-
_ mation indicates, than when I stood in the calm of the
midnight hour in the desolate and singular region of
Mount Vesuvius.

Familiar as we all are from childhood with descrip-
tions of that often visited volcano, my own view of
it far exceeded any ideas I had formed of it; for my
companions and myself did not see Vesuvius in that
quiescent state in which so many travellers have ascended
its cone, and even descended a portion of its crater. We
saw it in a remarkable and splendid state of activity.

When ‘first approaching Naples in the road from
Rome, we beheld a white column of smoke rising high
up into the pure and sunny atmosphere. “See,” said a
gentleman who accompanied us from Rome; “there is
Vesuvius.”

We regarded it with curiosity, but with a strong
sense of disappointment. It was curious, indeed, to
see the smoke when we knew it proceeded from internal
fire; but without that knowledge it would not have
presented any extraordinary spectacle.

The day had been intensely hot, and tired of so long



A MIDNIGHT VISIT TO MOUNT VESUVIUS. 47

a journey, we longed, on our arrival at Naples, for the
shades of evening to refresh us. They came, and I
went out upon a stone platform, on which opened the
window of my room at the top of the house, to enjoy
the freshening air and lovely view of the Bay, over
which the softened light of retiring day was yet lingering,
and blending gradually with the clearer one of the
rising moon. Then first I beheld the fire of Vesuvius ;
a dark red spot on the mountain side, issuing from an
orifice near to the crater, but not from the crater itself.
It was not a blaze, but a deep burning light, seen
through and behind the mists which followed the depar-
ture of the sun.

I went to call my friends to see it: some delay took
place in finding them, and when I came back to the
platform, an exclamation of wonder and delight broke
from us all. That dark red spot of light had, appa-
rently, spread out, or flowed on into a long wide
stream, to have descended the entire length of the
great cone, and reached the plain below. It was only
the increasing gloom that rendered it visible.

LT afterwards watched it many a time, as it appeared
gradually to unfold, lengthening, and widening, and
brightening as the strong sunlight faded, until I saw its
long, deep, fiery shadow rest over the clear blue waters
of the bay. Instead of a white column of smoke, we
then saw a pillar of fire rising up from the crater high
into the quiet air, through which shot up innumerable
sparkles, presenting a singular display of natural fire-
works, dispersing as by the force of an internal explosion,
and falling in a glowing shower on the outer sides of
the crater, which soon presented the aspect of a heap of



48 A MIDNIGHT VISIT

fire. From time to time large stones, red-hot, were
flung up from the burning and unquiet centre; we saw
them fall, roll down the sides of the crater, and lose
their brightness.

It was a source of pleasure and interest which I can
scarcely express, to sit on that pleasant platform, and
watch the workings of that ever-burning mountain; and
in the stillness of the warm moonlight nights Lhave lain
upon my bed, and gazed upon it from my window,
ever at work, yet ever varying, while the deep coppery
red of its shadow seemed almost to form a bridge of
fire across the unbroken water which lay between.

The beautiful aspect of Vesuvius by night, as well
as the intense heat of the weather, determined us to
choose that time for its ascent; indeed, we could have
attempted it at no other. That night was one which I
shall not forget, and I bless God who gave me the
capacity in my mind, as well as body, to enjoy it.

The form of Vesuvius is remarkable: it has two
summits, and rises in a gentle swell from the sea-shore.
The lower region or base of the mountain presents a
strong contrast to the upper. At five o’clock on a
charming afternoon we left Naples in a carriage, hoping
to traverse this lower region in time to see the sun set
from the more elevated one. We engaged the carriage
to carry us to the Hermitage, situated at that part of
the mountain from whence the real difficulty of the
ascent begins ; for it is an instance of the rare facilities
which our times afford to exploring travellers, that a
carriage-road, rather difficult, but perfectly practicable,
has been made upon Mount Vesuvius; a circumstance
which produces much indignation, and meets with great



TO MOUNT VESUVIUS. 49

opposition, from the numerous guides and conductors
whose business it was to supply mules and ponies for
that purpose.

The road has not been formed solely for the con-
venience of curious travellers; an observatory has
been erected on Mount Vesuvius, and a carriage road
on this account has been made up to the Hermitage,
which may be said to terminate the first of the two
distinct regions into which the mountain is divided.

This lower region, which we thus traversed, is one of
the most fertile, populous, and lovely that can be con-
‘ ceived; the higher is the most awful, stern, and
singular that is commonly to be seen. The first region,
both on the side of the coast and inland, is covered
with towns and villages, the sites of which have been
swept over by the destroying lava, and again built on by
their persevering inhabitants. Portici, the most consi-
derable of these, is about six miles from Naples, and
at the foot of Vesuvius. Underneath this town, and
below its royal palace, lies buried, at the depth of
seventy feet, the ancient city of Herculaneum, the first
town known to be destroyed by the eruptions of
Vesuvius.

We entered its buried, but partly re-opened theatre,
still underground, and in darkness. How strange and
interesting asight! Its passages, choked up with lava,
tell a fearful tale. The seats for the spectators are yet
to be seen, but awful is the recollection of the fate of
those who filled them. The stage, too, is visible, but
nearly two thousand years have passed since its actors
were swept away. Of the whole city little more than
this half-excavated theatre is re-opened. The safety of

E



50 A MIDNIGHT VISIT ©

the town above it would be endangered by further
excavations; and Herculaneum, which tradition says
was founded by the hero Hercules, remains entirely
covered by lava, cemented by a mixture of water,
and beneath the weight of the shower of ashes that
destroyed it. “It is choked up as completely as if
molten lead had been poured into it.”

Pompeii, which has been so beautifully brought to
light, was destroyed by cinders, with which so much
water did not mingle, and which, being less cemented,
were more easily removed. The town was discovered
only twelve feet below the surface of the ground.

In the smaller town of Torre del Greco, the lava which
in later eruptions nearly overwhelmed it is still to be
seen, but the love of the inhabitants for their homes, or
the inconvenience of a remove, causes them to rebuild
or repair the dwellings which the volcano destroys or
injures. The whole road from Naples is indeed almost
a continuous town.

Even when these towns are passed, the whole base of
.the mountain presents scenery of the richest and most
luxuriant, as well as cultivated nature. The productive
vines, orange-trees, figs, pomegranates, and numerous
plants and trees which are exotics to our clime, bor-
dered the road, and gave it additional interest, while
every advancing step opened to us a more charming
prospect, as the lovely plain from which we ascended,
the bay with its islands of historic and classic celebrity,
and the busy town of Naples with its villas and gar-
dens, became more revealed to us, bathed in the rich-
ness of a rapidly sinking sun.

What a contrast was this to the upper region of the



TO MOUNT VESUVIUS. 51

same mountain! A scene of perfect desolation: an
immense cone, flat on the top, and formed almost
entirely of ashes and cinders, which in the ascent yield
to the foot that toils up it, traced on all sides by broad
black lines, the marks which the burning lava has left,
and which can be distinctly seen at a considerable
distance. There is here no vegetation, no trace of life :
nothing but the ceaseless volcano appears to be in
movement.

Vesuvius has not always been ascended by travellers
when in the excited state in which we visited it. Many
persons have recorded their entrance into the crater,
or at least their inspection of it, and the common
feat of throwing stones into it. An approach to that
erater in the night I describe, would probably have
been death.

One of the travellers who relates an ascent of this
voleano when in a tranquil state, speaks as follows :—
«When we reached the summit, we found ourselves on
a narrow ledge of burnt earth or cinders, with the
crater of the voleano open before us. This orifice, in
its present form, (for it varies at almost every eruption,)
is about a mile and a half in circumference, and may be
about three hundred and fifty feet in depth. Its
eastern border is considerably higher. than the western.
Its sides are formed of ashes and cinders, with some
rock and masses of lava intermingled. They shelve in
a steep declivity, enclosing at the bottom a flat space of
about three quarters of a mile in circumference. We
descended some way, but observing that the slightest
movement brought great quantities of stones and
ashes rolling together from the sides, and being called



52 A MIDNIGHT VISIT

back by our guides, who assured us we could not go
lower with safety, nor even remain in our station, we
re-ascended. We were near enough to the bottom,
however, to observe that it seemed to bea sort of crust
of brown, burnt earth, and that a little on one side there
were three orifices, like funnels, from whence ascended
a vapour, so thin as to be scarcely perceptible.”’*

Such was the state of the crater in the year 1802.
A later, though in these travelling days, not a modern
traveller, has left us his description also.

«When you arrive at the top, it is an awful sight. . .
As you approach the great crater, the crust on which
you tread becomes so hot that you cannot stand long on
one spot: if you push your stick an inch below the
surface, it takes fire, and you may light paper by
thrusting it into any of the cracks of the crust... .
Altogether it was amost sublime and impressive scene.
The look down into the great crater is frightfully grand,
and when you turn from the contemplation of this
fearful abyss, you are presented with the most forcible
contrast, in the rich and luxuriant prospect of Naples
and the surrounding country, where all is soft and
smiling as far as the eye can see.”-f

But now the crater presented to our eyes a glowing
mass, over which a fiery shower was almost constantly
descending, forming a spectacle which, in the gloom
and stillness of night, was at once grand and terrific.
My anxious desire was to get to the lava stream, which
Thad watched from my window, and the representations
and, I am almost ashamed to say, entreaties of some of
our party could not dissuade me from the attempt. We

* Bustace’s Classical Tour in Italy. + Diary of an Invalid.



TO MOUNT VESUVIUS, 53

left our carriage at the Hermitage, singularly miscalled,
and I was mounted on a mule, which took me along a
path about three quarters of a mile further on, while the
gentlemen proceeded on foot. The guides were pro-
vided with large torches, perhaps eight feet long; at
the spot where I dismounted, these were lighted, and
the glare they flung around revealed the most singular
scene I ever beheld.

A field of blocks of lava, of that dark colour it
assumes when cold, lay stretched beside us; ashes,
cinders, and those sharp, hard masses, covered the whole
space, up to the cone, from whose red summit the pillar
of flame shot out in fitful variations, while fiery stones
descended from the skies they had been thrown to, and
fell, sometimes back into the burning crater, some-
times beyond it; glowing ashes, more like sparkles from
blazing wood, dispersing around, diffused a fiery light
on the midnight sky, and red-hot cinders made the out-
side of the crater one brilliant, and apparently burning,
though not blazing mass.

It was over this field of lava I was to walk : our guide
said it was impossible I could do it, and offered to
remain with me while the stronger members of our
society visited the living lava in my stead. But, as I
saw the man would be glad of any excuse to get off the
toil of an expedition for which he was paid, but which
he had to make too often, I would not yield to his per-
suasions, but, on the contrary, persuaded myself that
interested motives induced him to influence my friends
against my accomplishing my desire. I set out on the
blocks of lava with a good heart, for I firmly believed
that a path had been made through them, and would



54 A MIDNIGHT VISIT

soon be found; a delusion which, I believe, enabled me
to effect my object ; for had I known that I was really
to walk for more than a mile on the sharp, hard, un-
steady blocks, almost like pointed irons to the feet, up
ridges and into furrows, guided only by the fitful light
of torches, for the moon had not then risen—had I
known this from the beginning, I fear I should not
have persisted, but turned back with the less reluctant
guide, as I had promised to do if weary. How like is
this to the pathway of life! How many would shrink
from tracing all its steps, if they knew the end from the
beginning! Better is it to be led on im ignorance,
trusting that as our day is, so shall our strength be.
Weary, indeed, I was, and several times ready to give
up; but some little assistance, some kind solicitude, or
some encouraging words, again cheered me to go
onward.

In ascending Vesuvius, I am aware that ladies and
even gentlemen need not, unless they wish it, undergo
any fatigue, or make any exertion. A little money
obviates all this, and they may be carried up in a chair,
or pulled up by guides, and satisfy their own curiosity
at the expense only of other men’s labours. Mine,
however, was a different expedition, and in this place
no such assistance could be given. Yet was I not well
repaid? and would not the friends who had patience
with me, and helped me in my difficulties, be repaid’
too, if they knew the lasting enjoyment which the
memory of that night afforded ?

At length the increasing heat told of our approach
to the fiery region; the air was sulphureous, and gave
a choking sensation; it was also loaded with smoke.



TO MOUNT VESUVIUS. 55

The ground grew hotter and hotter; we mounted a
ridge of cinders, and there, at the other side, I heheld
my lava stream. I stood beside it, on the brink of the
bed it had tracked for itself. It was a river of fire,
about thirty feet broad, slowly moving on; over the
top was heard a slight fizzing sound, just such as
cinders make. A light smoke rose from it, but much
less than might be expected.

The ground was so hot, and my feet so sore, that I
found it impossible to stand for a moment on one
spot ; my shoes were almost entirely burnt off. One
of my friends, catching my hand, caused me to bend
over the stream to see the lava in motion; I could
only compare it to a thick muddy stream on fire, and
moving through masses of matter spread over the
surface. But as I bent over it, the oppressive atmo-
sphere suddenly overcame me; I felt a dizziness and
sense of faintness, and catching the arm of the guide,
precipitately descended the ridge of cinders that
bounded my lava stream, and hid myself from it with
still more eagerness than I had sought it.

It required, indeed, some fortitude to conceal my
state, or to struggle against yielding to it; but, aware
of the consternation which I should occasion, I was
enabled to do both, and sat quietly on a block of lava
out of sight, till the effect of the heat and suffocation
passed away. After a walk of equal toil, occupying
at least an hour in returning, as it had done in going,
we once more arrived on smooth ground, and when I
saw my mule patiently awaiting my return, I was too
glad to mount to my former seat, leaving the gentlemen
to continue their way alone to the summit of the cone,



56 A MIDNIGHT VISIT

where several parties, both of ladies and gentlemen,
had preceded them, attended by chairs and porters,
and guides with leathern straps round their waists, in

_ which a feebler traveller being enclosed, he or she is
pulled up by the stronger animal. I did not covet
either mode of ascent, and as they could not approach
the crater, I knew they could not have so good a view
of it as I had from a lower station: at least self-love
comforted itself with such conclusions, as I wandered
back alone to the Hermitage.

The moon had risen in all its brightness; it was
about half-past one o’clock in the morning, and its
unclouded presence more than supplied the absence of
the milder light of the uncertain torches which the
party had taken with them. As their voices died away,
and the shouts of the guides calling to their fellows
became fewer and more distant, I was glad to find the
Italian youth who was my cicerone, noisy as all natives
of Naples are, had loitered behind with some chance
comrade; for I enjoyed the silence of the hour and
strange splendour of the scene too much to wish to
have it broken by such nonsense as he had been
addressing to his mule, to which he gave the favourite
title of Macaroni.

In quiet musing I rode along, and might have gone
too far ; for the mule, deserted by its master, and left by
me to its own guidance, took a wrong path; the shouts
of the noisy Italian, as he missed me from the right one,
apprised me of the fact; he came running after his
Macaroni, and guided both wanderers back. I began
to think that meditation and musing, at midnight, were
not suitable to Mount Vesuvius; an idea that was not



TO MOUNT VESUVIUS. 57

removed on my entrance into the court of the Hermit-
age, which was filled with donkeys, ponies, guides,
carriages, and servants. There I was joined by two of
the gentlemen whom I had left, and who, finding
themselves sufiiciently fatigued by their walk to the
lava stream, had followed me back.

Thirsty and tired, we entered the Hermitage, thinking
it to be, as in fact it is, an inn which went by that
name. I was, however, rather surprised to find the
owner of the house to be a calm, respectable-looking
monk; his grave countenance, brown frock, cord,
rosary, crucifix, agreeing ill with the aspect of the
place, which was incessantly filled with parties going
to, and coming from the scene we had left.

At a table in the scantily furnished room sat a
comfortable-looking priest, with some bread, cheese,
apples, and a bottle of common wine before him. We
were glad to join in his supper: he informed us that
he was the chaplain who said mass in the adjoining
chapel, and he smiled good-humouredly when I asked
if that house were really a hermitage.

“ Certainly,” he replied, “and there is the hermit,”
nodding his head to where the monk sat at a distance.

“ A solitary?” I persisted.

“Yes,” he answered with a laugh, “a solitary who
is in society.”

It was a singular scene and a singular place. There:
were some young Germans and Italians present, and
the conversation that ensued was only broken up by
the advance of the grave and silent hermit, whose voice
I did not hear, and who now in silence, and with
gravity, approached the table, removed the bottle of



58 A MIDNIGHT VISIT

wine, and replaced it by another, adding, also, a fresh
supply of the bread, cheese, and apples. This movement
we took as a hint that our part of the repast was over,
and the table prepared for other guests. The priest
withdrew, and the party separated. For my part I re-
tired to the carriage, fell asleep, and forgot that I was
on Mount Vesuvius, until awakened by the voices of our
absent friends, whose fatigue scarcely allowed them
power to mount into the carriage: it was then three
o'clock, and that last exertion made, it was at once put
in motion, and preceded by our guide, carrying a flaming
torch, we began to descend on our return to Naples.
Before we reached it, the sun had risen on our heavy
and dazzled eyes.

I have put this little sketch on paper while its
subject is still fresh on my mind, and shall I not add
a few lines drawn from the reflections to which my
midnight excursion gave rise? A scene so grand and
terrific must, one would think, fill every mind with
solemn thoughts. The destruction of Sodom and
Gomorrah was brought before me, as I viewed the
gloomy vestiges of what was once the ancient city of
Herculaneum ; and perhaps there is no other scene more
calculated to convey an idea of the doom which the
Scriptures either describe or predict. Some authors
conjecture that not more than 20,000 persons have
perished in the several eruptions—about forty—which
are known to have taken place of Mount Vesuvius.
This number is probably greatly underrated; yet the
very idea of one of these fiery devastations, of the
overthrow of a single town or village, fills us with
horror; we wonder at the hardihood, or indifference,



TO MOUNT VESUVIUS. 59
that suffers people to dwell happily and at ease just
beneath that burning crater. Yet what is our own
position in this world? What is it to the careless and
godless dwellers therein, but a vast volcano, their
resting-place whereon is a thousand times more inse-
cure than that of the dweller on Vesuvius? There an
earthquake may prove the signal for flight, the groans
of the working mountain may give a timely warning ;
but of a more awful destruction we are told that it
shall come suddenly, in a moment, as a thief in the
night, even when men are saying, Peace and safety!

“Peace and safety!” these are sweet words, but
applicable only to the Christian, to the man, woman, or
even child, who has found peace and safety in the
salvation of Jesus Christ. ‘The Redeemer is the ark
of refuge. Oh! it is well if we are hid in him when
the “blast of the terrible ones is as a storm against the
wall.” There is no salvation in any other. Happy
is it to know that such is the case, else we might be
weary in seeking, and disappointed in finding that peace
and safety which he offers. But there is salvation in
Jesus Christ; and trembling in fear, hardened with sin,
or overwhelmed with sorrow, we can hear his voice
saying, “ Come unto me,” and hope, that kept by his
love and power, we shall find peace and safety even in
that hour which shall try all them that dwell upon
the earth.

B.



GARDEN FLOWERS.

“ And in yon mingled wilderness of flowers,
Fair-handed Spring unbosoms every grace,
Throws out the snowdrop and the crocus first ;
The daisy, primrose, violet darkly blue,

And polyanthus of unnumber’d dyes ;

The yellow wall-flower, stain’d with iron brown;
And lavish stock that scents the garden round,
From the soft wing of vernal breezes shed.
Anemonies ; auriculas enrich’d

With shining meal o’er all their verdant leaves ;
And full ranunculus of glowing red :

No gradual bloom is wanting ; from the bud
First-born of Spring, to Summer’s musky tribes,”

Tr wild flowers have their own claim to our regard, so
that we would seek to cherish, both in ourselves and
others, a love of these beautiful objects of God’s care,
so too have the flowers of the garden their own
peculiar advantages. Many of them have brighter
tints than any which chequer the green landscapes of
our native land, for they have been brought from the
sunny regions of Southern Europe, or of Asia, or
Africa, or from those lands of tropical America in
which vegetation revels in full luxuriance. They were
wild flowers once, decking with beauty the countries
in which skies, and birds, and insects, and flowers, have
deeper and more glowing colours. In some cases the
care and skill of man has rendered them larger and
fuller of petals than they were in their native haunts.
In some even their tint has been brightened by the







GARDEN FLOWERS, 61

appliances of art; but often they bloom on our parterres
with far fainter lustre than that which ornamented them
in more congenial climes, while in some instances, they
will not bloom at all in our gardens or hothouses, and.
still oftener, though we may have the blossom, yet we can
afterwards procure from the plant no ripened fruit.

Sweet as are our wild flowers with their soft breath-
ings borne to us upon the breezes; lovely in all their
associations with deep recesses, dark glens and woods,
and mountain streams, and sunny meadows, yet they
can neither rival the garden flowers in their perfumes,
nor in their longer continuance. Frail as are all
flowers, yet those of the field are especially so, for the
garden flower is often fuller of petals, and double
blossoms are usually less fragile than single ones. We
can have them too at all seasons of the year, and when
the cold autumnal, and winter, and spring winds have
swept before them all the: ornaments of our country
scenes, save some solitary daisy, or some little chick-
weed whose starry flowers fear neither cold nor heat,
there then are blossoms which grace the gardens ; and
Christmas roses, and aconites, and laurustinus, and the
snowdrop, and the crocus, and other bright flowers,
can bloom amid wind and snow.

Garden flowers often interest too by the care which
we bestow on them, and are

“ Prized for surpassing beauty, and no less
For the peculiar pains they have required ;”

for it is a blessed thing in our nature, that the object
which has most needed our love, is almost sure to get
a fuller share of it than that which needed it not. Few
can watch the gradual development of a garden flower,



62 - GARDEN FLOWERS.

clearing away from its leaves and stems the caterpillar
or snail, or slug, which would fain make a meal of it;
supplying the absence of the summer shower, by the
mimic rain; teaching its tendrils to twine about some-
thing stronger than itself, or sheltering it with care
from sunshine or from cold, without some additional
interest derived from that sense of appropriation which
makes it peculiarly their own. And the God who made
the love uf flowers and the pleasure in rearing them so
natural to us, who has thus linked our hearts to nature,
has bid them whisper to us of a more unworldly life,
calling us away from the earth and its cares and joys,
to finer and more elevated tastes and sympathies, and
often to holy thoughts of Him.

Though sin soon expelled our first parents from the
garden in which God had placed them, yet the love of
the garden remained in man, and we find traces of it in
earliest history. Doubtless the necessity of cultivating
herbs and fruits for food led men in remote ages to
the formation of gardens, but as civilization extended
itself, flowers would be reared as a source of refined
enjoyment. The orchards and gardens which Solomon
planted, had evidently sweet-smelling flowers and trees.
The ancient Persian gardens have been renowned from
the oldest times by Xenophon and other writers; and the
garden of Alcinous, described. in the Odyssey, had its
shadowy trees and its luxuriant fruits, its clear foun-
tains and its flowers, and some of the latter bloomed
in every season of the year. The Athenians had their
flower gardens, and at their flower markets, even in
winter, the nosegay of sweet violets was not wanting ;
while men were there, whose profession it was to make



GARDEN FLOWERS. 63

garlands of flowers, which should convey sentiments of
love and friendship to those skilled in their language.
In the later ages of Rome, when flowers came to be
used at banquets, many were doubtless cultivated for
this purpose. The Roman gardens had also shady walks,
and fountains and statues. Philosophers of old talked
with their disciples amid the walks of the garden,
while the citizens of ancient Rome had too, like the
modern artizan of London, a mimic garden in the culti-
vated flowers of the boxes which graced their balco-
nies. In their clearer climate, the flowers bloomed
more brightly than with us; but though those of our
great city are sometimes sadly disfigured, and rendered
pale by smoke and dust, yet they have their blessings
too, and the scent of the box of mignonette in the
street window is often most welcome to the passer-by,
bringing with it memories even sweeter than itself.

It is well that the practice is so general in our
country places, of cultivating the little garden of the
cottage: it is pleasant to think that the little plot,
well filled with pinks, roses, and columbines, belongs
to a home of comfort; for we know well, that neither
the careless nor the wretched will cultivate flowers.
The honeysuckle, the jessamine, and the China rose,
which are peeping in at the casement, are giving their
own sweets and home delights to the man of toil. It
is pleasing to think, that in the gardens of larger
houses, the culture of flowers affords recreation to some
whose leisure is but little, and furnishes a good and
healthful employment to many whose lot is not one of
labour. Though fashion has her influence on the choice
of the flowers which are to be reared, and tulips, pinks,



64 GARDEN FLOWERS.

auriculas, and dahlias, have each had their reign of ad-
miration and culture, and though many flowers once
admitted to the select garden are left now but to the
humblest, still in some cases taste will prevail over
fashion, and flowers of commanding beauty and sweet
odour will be the delight of all times and places.
Pliny ranked the rose as first of all flowers, and the lily
as second, and even to the present age there are few
who would dispute their claims. In our time so many
varieties of the rose are cultivated, that he who should
to-day tell their number, would perhaps have to alter
it to-morrow, as some new variety should be presented
to him. It is still the queen of flowers, as it was in
the time of the Romans. With them its early blossoms
were in so great demand for garlands on festive occa-
sions, that the rose was procured from Egypt, until the
gardeners of the ancient city found a method of forcing
it by placing plates of tale over the bushes, and
sprinkling them with warm water. Cleopatra, when she
wished to deck her banquet with roses, paid a sum equal
to two hundred pounds for the supply of these flowers.

The Persians have long held their celebrated “Feast
of Roses;” and Hafiz makes his hero say, “ Call for wine,
and scatter roses round ;” while we find one mentioned
in the Apocrypha, who said, “ Let us crown ourselves
with roses, before they are withered.” The Scripture
makes frequent mention of the rose, and the old Jewish
writers say, that Jerusalem was distinguished from all
the other towns in Judea, as by several other parti-
culars, so in this especially, that no gardens nor trees
were planted within its walls, save rose-bushes.

AP:



MORNING.

IN IMITATION OF “NIGHT,” BY MONTGOMERY.

Morn is the time to wake—
The eyelids to unclose—

Spring from the arms of sleep, and break
The fetters of repose ;

Walk at the dewy dawn abroad,

And hold sweet fellowship with God.

Morn is the time to pray—
How lovely and how meet

To send our earliest thoughts away,
Up to the mercy-seat !

Ambassadors, for us to claim

A blessing in our Master’s name.

Morn is the time to siag—
How charming ’tis to hear
The mingling notes of nature ring
In the delighted ear !
And with that swelling anthem raise
The soul’s fresh matin-song of praise !
F



66

MORNING.

Morn is the time to sow

The seeds of heavenly truth,
While balmy breezes softly blow

Upon the soil of youth ;
And look to thee, nor look in vain,
Our God, for sunshine and for rain.

Morn is the time to love—

As tendrils of the vine,
The young affections fondly rove,

And seek them where to twine;
Around thyself, in thine embrace,
Lord, let them find their resting-place.

Morn is the time to shine,
When skies are clear and blue—
Reflect the rays of light divine,
As morning dew-drops do;
Like early stars be early bright,
And melt away like them in light.

Morn is the time to think,

While thoughts are fresh and free,
Of life, just balanced on the brink

Of dark eternity ;
And ask our souls if they are meet
To stand before the judgment-seat ?

Morn is the time to die,

Just at the dawn of day,
When stars are fading in the sky,

To fade like them away—
But lost in light more brilliant far
Than ever merged the morning star.



MORNING. 67

Morn is the time to rise,

The resurrection morn—
Upspringing to the glorious skies,

On new-found pinions borne,
To meet a Saviour’s smile divine—
Be such ecstatic rising mine !

J. L. G.



SOCRATES, THE CITIZEN TEACHER.

In seems but yesterday, though many years have
elapsed; when for the first time I entered the chapel
of ——— College, on a sabbath morning, in the
company of some three hundred fellow students, all
clad in scarlet gowns. Every thing around told of
former days. The windows, the walls covered with
ancient paintings of the apostles, the carved roof and
the carved stalls, all carried us back to the age of
another faith, and of other manners. In the centre of
the chapel, conspicuous to every eye, lay the tombstone
of bishop Elphinstone, the founder of the college, and
beside it, beneath our feet, lay the tombstone of Hector
Boethius, its first principal. Every thing was strange
and striking, but nothing so strange and striking as the
sermon we heard that day. In seats of their own,
elevated above those of the students, on the right and
left of the preacher, sat our professors, in Genevan
gowns. The text has vanished from memory. One
characteristic of the sermon alone remains, and that can
never be forgotten. The name of Jesus Christ did not
once occur init. But of Socrates we heard much. The
beauty and dignity of virtue were painted gorgeously
and sentimentally. The immortality of the soul was



THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 69

spoken of, probably discussed, and all in connexion
with the names of Socrates and Plato. To me stich
preaching was novel and mysterious. But the remem-
brance still imparts interest to every inquiry into the
life and opinions of the great Athenian who forms the
subject of this sketch.

To understand any man’s position in relation to the
history of mind and of the world, we must acquaint
ourselves with his age and circumstances. The death of
Socrates took place 400 years B.c. At what stage of its
history and progress has the world at this date arrived?
Turn to Judea. The series of ancient prophets has
ceased; the ministry of Malachi has termimated some
twenty years before; Rome is 350 years old; the Tar-
quins have been expelled from the throne one hundred
years ; and the republic is full of ambition and vigour ;
but her days of greatest power, and, as men will have it,
of greatest glory, are still far in the future. Alexander
too, and the revolution which he is destined to effect,
are yet to come; the great Macedonian is born half a
century after the death of Socrates. Demosthenes,
being the contemporary of Alexander, belongs of course
likewise to the then future; but the days of Cyrus are
past, and the glory of the eastern empires is fading. The
philosophy of Greece is not in its dawn and infancy, but

_has worn itself out, when Socrates appears to rescue it,
and give it a new direction. Nearly 200 years have
passed since Thales asked, “ Whence are all things ?”
and concluded, “ Water is the beginning of all things.”
All attempts towards the solution of the problem of
existence have ended in the production of a class of
philosophers, whose name was chosen in pride, but is



70 SOCRATES,

now the synonym for an unsound and fallacious rea-
soner,—the Sophists. They are the reigning wise men of
Athens at the appearance of Socrates. And some will
have us to believe that they are a much calumniated
race. We know them only from their adversaries, and
the descriptions which Plato gives of them are
probably exaggerated.

The philosophy of the Sophists, such as it was, sprang
from the manifest failures of their predecessors. Their
father, Protagoras, was a porter of Abdera, and attracted
the notice of his countryman Democritus, who taught
that self-existent and eternal, but invisible atoms, were
the rudiments and first principles of all things. The
doctrines of Protagoras ended in scepticism, in a con-
viction of the vanity of all endeavour to penetrate the
mysteries of the universe. But, while many sceptics
contented themselves with this conviction, Protagoras
and his followers turned their attention in another di-
rection. “If there were no possibility of truth, there
only remained the possibility of persuasion. If one
opinion were as true as another,—that is, if neither were
true,—it was nevertheless desirable, for the sake of
society, that certain opinions should prevail; and, if
logic was powerless, rhetoric was efficient.” Having
discarded all essential difference between truth and
falsehood, the next step was, to discard all essential
difference between right and wrong. The variety of
laws and ordinances which they observed to prevail in
different states, impressed them with the conviction,
that there are no such things as right and wrong by
nature. This therefore became a fundamental precept
with them. “For men, there was no eternal right,



THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 7

because there was no eternal truth.” “That which
appears just and honourable to each city,” said Prota-
goras, “is so for that city, so long as the opinion is
entertained.”

Whether the Sophists carried out these dogmas,
either theoretically or practically, to all the wicked and
shameless consequences which flow from them logically
and legitimately, may well be questioned. But their
own boast was, that they could make the worse appear
the better reason. To teach this art, they demanded
enormous sums, and, to learn it, enormous sums were
readily given, and given by many. It is said, that
Protagoras made ten times the gain by his profession
of Sophist that his contemporary Phidias, the greatest
of statuaries, could make by his. Asa body, the Sophists
were wealthy and powerful. They were dazzling,
rhetorical, and shallow. They professed to teach every-
thing; and both themselves and their disciples were
filled with vain conceit, pride, and arrogance. Their
popularity is easily accounted for in a state like Athens,
where every man was a lawyer, every man a politician,
and every man a speaker, and where everything de-
pended on argument and popular declamation.

The Sophists were the philosophers of Athens when
Socrates appeared. The great battle of his life was
with them. In this city, the home of freedom, of art,
of civilization, of poetry, of philosophy, and of eloquence,
Socrates was born, taught, and died.

He was the son of a sculptor, and learned his father’s
profession. Some accounts represent him as having
attained such eminence as a sculptor, as to have some of
the Graces which he executed placed on the walls of



72 SOCRATES,

the Acropolis, close beside the Minerva of Phidias. A
wealthy Athenian, named Crito, who afterwards became
his most reverential disciple, is said to have withdrawn
him from the workshop, and to have educated him. In
early life he indulged in the speculations of philosophy,
- but relinquished them, on finding that they led to no
satisfactory result, and ended only in scepticism.

Socrates had attained middle age before he appeared
in the character of a teacher, and we know little of his
previous life. He performed military service in three
battles, and distinguished’ himself in each. In the first,
the prize of bravery was awarded to him. Various
anecdotes are told of him during his campaigns. In
spite of the severity of winter, when the ice and snow
were thick upon the ground, he went barefoot and
lightly clad. On one occasion itis said, that he stood
before the camp for four and twenty hours on the same
spot, absorbed in meditation.

The conduct of Socrates in civil life has been a sub-
ject of much dispute. Some would make him a bad
citizen, and an abettor of tyranny; while others can see
in his entire course nothing but virtue of the highest
order. His bravery as a soldier, his admirers say, was
surpassed by his bravery as a senator. He had that
high moral courage, which can brave not only death but
opinion, which can defy a tyrant, and also defy a tyran-
nical mob. The only state office he ever held was
that of Senator. The Athenian senate consisted of the
500 who were elected from the ten tribes; every 35th
or 36th day, one tribe had the presidency; these were
called Prytanes. Of the fifty Prytanes, ten had the
presidency every seven days; each day, one of these ten



THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 73

enjoyed the highest dignity, with the name of Epistates.
He laid everything before the assembly of the people,
put the question to the vote, examined the votes, and,
in short, conducted the whole business of the assembly.
He enjoyed this power, however, only for a single day.
For that day he was invested with the keys of the
citadel, and the treasury of the Republic.

“Socrates was Epistates, on the day when the unjust
sentence was to be passed on the admirals, who had
neglected to bury the dead after the battle of Arginusee.
.... The Prytanes, with Socrates at their head, re-
fused to put the illegal question to the vote. The
people became furious, and loudly demanded that those
who resisted their pleasure should themselves — be
brought to trial The Prytanes wavered—yielded ;
Socrates alone remained firm, defying the threats of the
mob. He stood there to administer justice, he would
not administer injustice. In consequence of his refusal,
the question could not be put to the vote, and the as-
sembly was again adjourned. The next day, a new
Epistates and other presidents were chosen, and the
admirals were condemned.”

There is one relation in which there is no doubt that
Socrates acted with indomitable courage and patience.
Who has not heard of Xantippe, his wife ? Lamprocles,
his son, on hearing his father descant on the anxieties
of parents, and all their efforts to care for their
children, is reported to have said: “ Although my
mother had done this and a thousand times more, no
man could bear with so much ill-humour.” “Do you
not think it easier,” said Socrates, “to bear the anger of
a mother than that of a wild beast?” “No, not of such



74 SOCRATES,

a mother,” was the son’s reply. “ But what harm
has she done you? Hath she kicked you, or bit you,
as wild beasts do when they are angry?” “No, but
she utters such things as no one can bear from any-
body.” Socrates reasoned, but the son rebelled. The
wise man’s imperturbable patience has become pro-
verbial, “Ido with Xantippe,” he said on one occasion,
“like those who would learn horsemanship : they do not
choose easy tame horses, or such as are manageable
at pleasure, but the highest mettled and the hardest
mouthed; believing if they can tame the natural heat
and impetuosity of these, there can be none too hard
for them to manage.”

But it is especially as a philosopher and teacher that
Socrates is remembered and admired. And yet he
never delivered a lecture in his life, wrote no books,
opened{no school, convened no assemblies. He was
a citizen who had certain notions in his head, and who
resolutely and untiringly talked out those notions
wherever he had an opportunity. From early morn
till late eve, it was his custom to wander about and
talk and dispute with everybody. He is now in the
market-place, and now in his friend’s house—now in
the workshop of the’ artizan, and now in earnest dis-
cussion with the senator or magistrate—here with the
statuary and painter, and there with the sophist—
questioning everybody, and provoking everybody. He
was what a historian has more correctly than politely
called him, a universal bore—a bore to the multitude who
believed themselves very wise, but whom he laboured
to convince that they knew nothing.

You could not be many days in Athens without



THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 75

seeing Socrates, for no man was more in the streets
than he. And having once seen him you could never
forget him. Were history silent, imagination would
delight to embody in our notion of his -person, those
ideas of the dignity and beauty of virtue which we are
traditionally taught to associate with his name. We
should paint to ourselves a large commanding form,
with symmetry in every limb and dignity in every
feature. But alas! history has been too minute and
specific to allow us to fashion a Socrates for ourselves.
And yet, we should not say alas / forit only teaches us
by another example that the mind is the measure of
the man. It is not the testimony of enemies we have
on this subject, but of friends, and of his own reputed
conversations as recorded by his admirer Xenophon.
The frequent comparison to which his appearance is
subjected is with Silenus, a demigod, who was repre-
sented as a fat and jolly old man, ridmg on an ass.
The fauns and satyrs in general were called Sileni
from their partial but imperfect approximation to the
human figure. Socrates had a flattened nose, with
wide and upturned nostrils, projecting eyeballs, thick
lips, with a squat and unwieldy figure.

Now, imagine Socrates wandering barefoot through
the streets of Athens. He has no philosopher’s cloak.
He is a simple citizen, of most ungainly figure, but of
most fascinating tongue. A citizen, who compels his
neighbours to listen to him, and yet they seldom listen
without being ashamed or humbled. The Athenians
are not a nation of sculptors and painters, of poets and
philosophers merely, but of men, with all the passions
and sensibilities of men. And the habits and teachings



76 SOCRATES,

of Socrates, while they draw around him admirers and
devotees, come into frequent and ungrateful collision
with their passions and prepossessions.

The manner of this Citizen-Teacher was very peculiar.
As we have said already, he delivered no lectures and
taught no classes. But he met on the street, it may
be, some one whom he supposed to be in error, or whom
he supposed to be unduly self-complacent, or ambitious,
or profligate. It may be a wild youth, or an aspiring
democrat, or a pretending Sophist. Socrates asks a
question. The question is simple and inoffensive. It
is answered. A second question arises out of the
answer; and a third, anda fourth. And the questioned
party is led on unconsciously to conclusions the most
adverse to himself. And the crooked and crabbed old
man (as the tortured citizen is disposed to call him),
who has thus entrapped his neighbour, leaves him to
writhe in the agony of self-confusion, or sends him
away with the mortifying impression, that he has made
a fool of himself.

With these questionings, Socrates mingled more or
less argument of his own, according to circumstances.
But we are compelled to acknowledge, that much of
his argument, as preserved by Plato and Xenophon, is
sophistical, in the now common sense of that word,
and so much so, that it must have been by design;
such argument often serving the purpose he had in view
as well as any other, namely, to convince the man that
he was not the wise and great man he took himself for.

This mode of questioning and argumentation, leading
men to unexpected conclusions from their own admis-
sions, has been called the Socratic Method, or the



THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 77

Socratic Dialogue. In the hands of most men, it is an
unsafe and unfair weapon. It presents too strong
temptations to a man.to exhibit his skill and tact, at
the expense of his honesty and simplicity ; while it is
scarcely possible for the most honest man to escape the
logical meshes, into which a skilful and dishonest
questioner seeks to draw him.

But in the hands of Socrates, this method accom-
plished important purposes. Philosophy, we have seen,
had exhausted itself in speculations regarding the origin
and nature of things. The Sophists were ascendant,
and though their fundamental principles were, that
truth and error, right and wrong, were not essentially
diverse, they professed to communicate all kinds of
knowledge, and to fit men for all high and important
stations in life and in the state. In labouring to con-
found such pretensions, Socrates might have done no
good, he might have left his fellow-citizens in the con-
fusion of feeling, that they knew nothing. But he
laboured at the same time to divert them from vain
speculations and empty pretensions, to what was
practical and intelligible. It is on this account he is
said to have brought philosophy down from heaven to
earth.

One example of Socrates’ method, will enable the
reader to enter into the life of this great man, though
it must be given in a very abbreviated form.

Euthydemus, surnamed the Fair, is a young man.
He has collected many of the writings of the most
celebrated poets and Sophists ; is much elated, and fan-
cies himself superior to any other of the same age, both
in knowledge and abilities; and does not doubt to see



78 SOCRATES,

himself the very first man in Athens, whether to manage
the affairs of the state or to harangue the people. He
is too young to be admitted into the public assemblies ;
and it is his custom to go into a bridle-cutter’s shop
near the Forum. Socrates, accompanied by some of his
friends, follows him one day into the bridle-cutter’s ;
aremark is made about Themistocles; and Socrates, to
pique Euthydemus, says, “It is monstrous folly for any
one to imagine, that whilst the knowledge of the very
lowest mechanic art is not to be attained without a
master, the science of governing the republic, which
requires for the right discharge of it all that human
prudence can perform, is to be had by intuition.”

Enthydemus hears the remark, but seems as if he did
not hear it, and takes care to avoid the company of
Socrates as much as possible. Circumstances, however,
bring them together again ere long. Socrates says to
some of his friends present, that no doubt Euthydemus
will speak his mind the very first time he is in the
assembly, if there should happen to be any business of
importance in debate; and that his first speech must.
resemble that of a man who should solicit the voices of
the people by saying, “It is true, gentlemen, I never
once thought of making physic my study ; I never once
applied to any one for instruction; and so far was I
from desiring to be well versed in this science, I even
wished not to have the reputation of it; but, gentlemen,
be so kind as to choose me for your physician, and
I will gain knowledge by making experiments upon
you.”

The laugh is immediately turned against Euthydemus,
and, though he no longer avoids the company and



THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 79

presence of Socrates, he affects themost profound silence.
At last Socrates succeeds in drawing him into conver-
sation. They have met in the bridle-cutter’s shop, and
are alone. “Is it true, Huthydemus,” said Socrates,
“that you have collected so many of the writings of
those men whom we call wise ?”

“ Most undoubtedly it is true; neither shall I give
over collecting till I have gained as many of them as I
well can.”

“ Truly,” said Socrates, “I admire you much for
thus endeavouriug to accumulate wisdom rather than
wealth; for by this, Euthydemus, you plainly discover
it to be your opinion that gold and silver cannot add
to our merit; whereas we furnish ourselves with an
inexhaustible fund of virtue, when we thus treasure up
the writings of these great men.”

Euthydemus is delighted. He has gained the appro-
bation of the universal fault-finder. But his joy is of
short duration.

“What employment do you intend to excel in, Euthy-
demus,” said Socrates, “that you collect so many
books ?”

The young man is now inextricably in the meshes of
the questioner. He is carried on in spite of himself
through a long conversation, in which as in a mirror,
he sees himself a child and a, fool.

“QO Socrates,” he exclaimed, “I will not deny to
you that I have hitherto believed I was no stranger to
philosophy, but had already gained that knowledge so
necessary for the man who aspires after virtue. What
then must be my concern to find, after all my labour, I
am not able to answer those questions which it most



80 SOCRATES,

imports me to know; and the more, as I see not what
method to pursue whereby I may render myself more
capable.”

“ Have you ever been at Delphos ?”

“T have been there twice.”

* Did you observe this inscription somewhere on the
front of the temple—‘ Know tHysExr ?’”

“ Yes, I read it.”

“ But it seems scarcely sufficient to have read it,
Euthydemus: did you consider it? and in consequence
of the admonition, set yourself diligently to find out
what you are?”

“T certainly did not,” said Euthydemus; “for I
imagined I must know this sufficiently already; and
indeed it will be difficult for us to know anything, if we
can be supposed to be at a loss here.”

“ But for a man to know himself properly,” said
Socrates, “it is scarcely enough that he knows his
own name. He who has purchased a horse, does not
imagine he has made the proper trial of his merit, till
by mounting him he has found out whether’ he is
tractable or unruly, strong or weak, fleet or heavy, with
everything else, either good or bad, in him: so likewise
we should not say, He knows himself as he ought, who
is ignorant of his own powers, or those duties which,
as a maui, it is incumbent on him to perform.”

The youth is then compelled to listen to many beau-
tiful sentiments on the nature and importance of self-
knowledge, till he professes himself fully convinced of
its excellence.

* You know what things are good, and what evil ?”
said Socrates, resuming the conversation.











THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 81

“Certainly,” replied Euthydemus ; “for otherwise I
should know less than the very lowest of our slaves.”

Show me then, I pray you, what you think good,
what evil.”

The poor youth is again entrapped and humbled.
He is drawn into a discussion, in which he flounders
miserably, and at last he rushes out of the bridle-cutter’s
shop, “full of confusion and contempt of himself, as
beginning to perceive his own insignificancy.” Unlike
many, however, whom Socrates only disgusted, Euthy-
demus courted his society, became attached to him, and
sat at his feet to be taught, says Xenophon, “those
things which it most imported him to know.”

The opinions of the Citizen-Teacher on the most
important subjects will appear in the two following
extracts.

Aristodemus, surnamed the Little, is a sophist and
a sceptic. He neither prays nor sacrifices to the gods,
nor yet consults any oracle; but, on the contrary,
ridicules and Jaughs at those who do. Socrates has
many arguments with him, and reasons thus: “ Which
seems to you most worthy of admiration, Aristodemus ?
—the artist who forms images void of motion and
intelligence; or one who has the skill to produce
animals that are endued, not only with activity, but
understanding? ....He who at the beginning made
man, endued him with senses because they were good
for him; eyes wherewith to behold whatever was
visible ; and ears to hear whatever was to be heard.
For say, Aristodemus, for what purpose should odours
be prepared if the sense of smelling had been denied ?
and why the distinctions of bitter and sweet, of savoury

G



82 SOCRATES,

and unsavoury, unless a palate had likewise been given,
conveniently placed, to arbitrate between them, and
declare the difference? Is not that providence, Aristo-
demus, in a most eminent manner conspicuous, which,
because the eye of man is so delicate in its contexture,
hath therefore prepared eyelids like doors, whereby to
secure it, which extend of themselves whenever it is
needful, and again close when sleep approaches? Are
not those eyelids provided, as it were, with a fence on
the edge of them to keep off the wind and guard the
eye? Even the eyebrow itself is not without its office,
but, as a penthouse, is prepared to turn off the sweat,
which, falling from the forehead, might enter and annoy
that no less tender than astonishing part of us......
And canst thou doubt, Aristodemus, whether a dispo-
sition of parts like this should be the work of chance, or
of wisdom and contrivance ?” Aristodemus professes to
be satisfied in the end that “man must be the master-
piece of some great artificer.”

In a conversation with Huthydemus, Socrates is
represented by Xenophon as saying: “ Even among all
those deities who so liberally bestow on us good things,
not one of them maketh himself an object of our sight.
And He who raised this whole universe, and still up-
holds the mighty frame, who perfected every part of it
in beauty and goodness, suffering none of these parts to
decay through age, but renewing them daily with un-
fading vigour, whereby they are able to execute what-
ever he ordains, with that readiness and precision which
surpass man’s imagination, even he, the Supreme God,
who performs all these wonders, still holds himself
invisible, and it is only in his works that we are capable



THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 83

of admiring him. But consider, my Euthydemus, the
sun, which seemeth as it were set forth to the view of
all men, yet suffereth not itself to be too curiously
examined, punishing those with blindness who too
rashly venture so todo. And those ministers of the
gods, whom they employ to execute their bidding,
remain to us invisible: for though the thunderbolt is
shot from on high, and breaks in pieces whatever it
finds in its way, yet no one sees it when it falls, when
it strikes, or when it retires. Neither are the winds
discoverable to our sight, though we plainly behold the
ravages they everywhere make, and with ease perceive
what time they are rising. But if there be anything in
man, my Euthydemus, partaking of the Divine nature, it
must surely be the soul which governs and directs him;
yet no one considers this as an object of his sight.
Learn, therefore, not to despise those things which you
cannot see. Judge of the greatness of the power by the
effects which are produced, and reverence the Spirit
which has produced them.”

These extracts present as favourable a specimen as
may be found of the theology of Socrates. It is very
obvious that this philosopher had some very beautiful
conceptions of God. It is equally obvious that he
believed in inferior deities. This remark does not
depend on inference. We have express statements on
the subject from himself and from his admirers. “It
was ever his practice,” says Xenophon, “to approve
himself a strict observer of the answer the Pythian
priestess gives to all who inquire the proper manner
of sacrificing to the gods, or paying honours to their
deceased ancestors: ‘Follow,’ saith the god, ‘the



84 SOCRATES,

custom of your country ;’ and therefore Socrates, in all
those exercises of his devotion and piety, confined him-
self altogether to what he saw practised by the republic ;
and to his friends he constantly advised the same thing,
saying it only savoured of vanity and superstition in
all those who did otherwise.” The statement will be
confirmed by his own defence on his trial.

How long Socrates moved about as a teacher in the
streets and in the shops of Athens, we have not the
means of knowing. The general statement is, that he
began to teach about the middle of his career.

In bis 72d year he was brought to trial, on the
following indictment : “Socrates is criminal ; iasmuch
as he acknowledges not the gods whom the republic
holds saéred, but introduces other and new deities. He
is likewise criminal because he corrupts the youth.”

From this accusation it has been erroneously inferred
that Socrates was a martyr to his faith in one Supreme
God. But all who are acquainted with the history of
Greece are agreed that his trial was a political one.
He had created for himself many enemies, who only
availed themselves of a popular accusation to get rid of
him. And there were some things in his teaching, no
doubt, which afforded some shadow of evidence in sup-
port of it. He despised the fables in which the poets
recounted the deeds of the popular deities, and on this
ground might be charged with denying the gods which
the republic held sacred. He spoke in a mysterious
style of a demon, or genius, or spirit, which revealed
many things to him, which commanded him to do this,
or forbade him to do that, and-on this ground might
plausibly be charged with introducing new deities.



THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 85

What Socrates meant by his demon is still a ques-
tion with the historians of philosophy. Some think
that he only meant his conscience. But if he meant
nothing more, he certainly threw an air of needless
mystery around a very simple matter, and ascribed to
it things which do not well correspond with the attri-
butes and functions of conscience. According to
others, Socrates believed implicitly in supernatural
communications, and that these proceed from a peculiar
demon, who, according to the doctrine of Plato, “is
allotted to every man, who is a witness and guardian of
his conduct in life, who, without being visible to any
one, is always present, and who is an arbitrator not
only of his deeds, but also of his thoughts. This
demon presides over the man inquisitively, participates
of all that concerns him, sees all things, understands
all things, and dwells in the most profound recesses of
the mind.” If this was the belief of Socrates, it was
natural for him to regard all strong impressions and
convictions of duty, all sudden thoughts, and all vivid
presentiments, as the voice of his demon.

As to the charge of corrupting youth, it was indig-
nantly repelled by Socrates, and is likewise by Xenophon
and Plato. Nor are we aware of any evidence by which
it was supported.

As to the main charge, Socrates himself is reported
to have said: “What I chiefly marvel at, O ye judges!
is this; whence Melitus infers, that I esteem not
those as gods whom the city holds sacred. For that
I sacrifice at the appointed festivals, on our common
altars, was evident to all others, and might have been
to Melitus had he been so minded.” After his con-



86 SOCRATES,

demnation, he said, “That I, in anywise, should be
more troubled and cast down than before my condem-
nation, I see not; since I stand here unconvicted of
any of the crimes whereof I was accused: for no one
has proved against me that I sacrificed to any new
deity; or by oath appealed to, or even made mention
of the names of any other than Jupiter, Juno, and the
rest of the deities, which, together with these, our city
holds sacred; neither have they once shown what were
the means I made use of to corrupt the youth, at the
very time that I was inuring them to a life of patience
and frugality.”

Though found guilty, the likelihood is that his
judges would not have condemned him to death, had he
humbled and submitted himself to their mercy, and
sued for pardon, in the style common to persons in his
position. But he was bold, undaunted, and self-com-
placent, and exasperated his adversaries. “Somewhat
haughty, perhaps,” says an admirer, “but the hanghti-
ness of a brave soul fighting for the truth!” The
injustice of his sentence is granted, but what ¢rath he
was fighting for we find it difficult to ascertain. Four
hundred years after, another, a stranger, was charged
on the same Mars’ Hill, with being a setter forth of
strange gods. But instead of labouring to wash him-
self from the charge of unbelief in Jupiter and Juno,
and the other deities of the Athenians, he boldly denied
the divinity of every one of them, and proclaimed the
unity, spirituality, and government of One Living and
True God, and that in sublimer terms than any orator or
philosopher of Athens had ever attained. He had truth
to contend for, and the God of truth was with him.



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8a8afdcba72f6c1a751497794adc84ad1fb42ccd
'2012-05-01T20:37:52-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'32418' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVQS' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
5733691702911dea260cfb7c226e4d89
f72f09c825260a94bb118fa5095412d60d7013b7
'2012-05-01T20:34:36-04:00'
describe
'267787' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVQT' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
418084a46e309cf67d38166942fbf871
339c26305fda1fedbb98df67b59d1e6ffcf47e93
'2012-05-01T20:35:16-04:00'
describe
'91957' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVQU' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
3226c16419acc22508532a77104e35f6
8bf401994a8a52a1b882cce7f455c932600f71d4
'2012-05-01T20:40:27-04:00'
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVQV' 'sip-files00002.pro'
00e88ce4f333b6ae2b1dcadac7252e32
d56ca255a1a5a9b30b5bda13524e92e2ef23153d
'2012-05-01T20:34:03-04:00'
describe
'36485' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVQW' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
9ce7c833fb8c833f8dee46e4fc02f8fe
e84a57311fd6235b17c4ad0ec64dd503cb89f130
'2012-05-01T20:33:10-04:00'
describe
'2161236' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVQX' 'sip-files00002.tif'
dcf6700d6133575025dc441c759ca390
b1797bca89a0a71509ef4db33cf610676baeaf9e
'2012-05-01T20:33:48-04:00'
describe
'307' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVQY' 'sip-files00002.txt'
71c45056a0ddb7ebd569cc2bb6eb2d9c
7b8012dc2887d9ddacd721f4e1ea66012a5c9a3b
'2012-05-01T20:40:54-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'23352' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVQZ' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
2cf511d78f6bfd6b6aa4621204909c66
2c24defd28580606572d3e010d509147abaedbe4
'2012-05-01T20:41:21-04:00'
describe
'263445' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRA' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
fc5bbf42d34205b732e3b5df7e048ced
d10193087b4e9ddbbaba7a85cf3c01305e47f835
'2012-05-01T20:44:43-04:00'
describe
'77304' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRB' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
30d25e8909305b7a2a2182606eab95a3
eb0026443a67f5a6d41e0cf270c0ce674950d417
'2012-05-01T20:36:28-04:00'
describe
'33241' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRC' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
4bfbb372c58fb59bea5beb05a63f6cc8
fc4201ab7c2b539db9ca26fc2ca8e6911c844ff8
'2012-05-01T20:39:14-04:00'
describe
'2126288' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRD' 'sip-files00003.tif'
b13b200df6caff32efc637d8799432fb
d066cd2863bf5d1b3277f264cda17cae173c1354
'2012-05-01T20:44:18-04:00'
describe
'62' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRE' 'sip-files00003.txt'
add8205ed82478e61280e53f943a5209
3fa51185ee8980ae9ea241fc8cff5f7dfd8c4ae3
'2012-05-01T20:31:49-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'22928' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRF' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
50b69b9ef7c35b84564bda3ebc1e24e6
d947ac5b4b2aacc9927e77470fc9f4055287f76d
'2012-05-01T20:37:44-04:00'
describe
'190317' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRG' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
a1ced4ad2ace1ae886023777a921ed43
6f67057bfe1906be418fa324a4fdd0d1f85b5396
'2012-05-01T20:35:18-04:00'
describe
'55895' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRH' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
eea0933d719ebd529f35bde7bd1fbb09
715d0f08721dd321a3a491a3d5a94c77eea20262
'2012-05-01T20:41:04-04:00'
describe
'29028' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRI' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
1f63c11b1372652473ac42890feaae2c
827d240f4f48c58d1b543626b0cf3cefee666b47
'2012-05-01T20:40:28-04:00'
describe
'2113916' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRJ' 'sip-files00004.tif'
5b5fb94d026570c50a9c62b2e50d6618
39ff1b46fb31d4c722069a5cab6eab01c65b4e5a
'2012-05-01T20:37:08-04:00'
describe
'21695' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRK' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
27894f2fb85c6358aea44bd94b304f8a
76a2d0607b4fecc66034a2d04768543da86b5767
'2012-05-01T20:46:05-04:00'
describe
'263429' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRL' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
4b9f69d610779502a0307bcbaebdabbf
3ab5b2910447ae47f4ebc12a16cfaa46f4db1a2a
'2012-05-01T20:38:28-04:00'
describe
'69218' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRM' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
85dc3e4ae9c5b216d05e227a9307e0f3
905cd2416e624f6fb415f020f6b6aba1aa268a07
'2012-05-01T20:37:20-04:00'
describe
'30060' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRN' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
267488a915b158a4778e7f65a503db4b
31eafa14c68f158f5581bf4788c2d468094a6c3a
'2012-05-01T20:39:28-04:00'
describe
'2126192' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRO' 'sip-files00005.tif'
874c9713ff932f2b73ad60102a03f4f8
6e4e5c3bdc75cf40fba7487cc884cd8e845fe03a
'2012-05-01T20:41:32-04:00'
describe
'21545' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRP' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
123c1dd82413b5eb545f1eea446b154b
7e393a6644336500f3c0b892c83dbd98e1095f6e
'2012-05-01T20:41:46-04:00'
describe
'903522' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRQ' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
66cf24470de793673b48fe05bef8a766
3c3b4419fb28bb7237ef85ffbf6e3f80349e9626
'2012-05-01T20:35:29-04:00'
describe
'78108' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRR' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
e2c17be5f3e063dfb67afd8872e87beb
332671c3327f9386ce9d34929907ee0c2e62bf10
'2012-05-01T20:32:57-04:00'
describe
'21706956' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRS' 'sip-files00006.tif'
d30b9486c869d5c714ee2a014c8ef678
f342b732ab0ea26f90ee1414e17d6b48b9f91dd1
'2012-05-01T20:32:29-04:00'
describe
'39991' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRT' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
b7f9d534756a1cc4d174ce3ef3a11387
2c3aa7e354e7f5425a4ae268f75aaf96f07d59d8
'2012-05-01T20:38:56-04:00'
describe
'160495' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRU' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
1e0f88c98361e4480e0a52a8d5a07f36
ebe24843700f182877c7bbdb43ce965fc198e4dc
'2012-05-01T20:40:09-04:00'
describe
'47282' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRV' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
64f570a2d72f7115ac40961bc045b074
b11f895fd3063903c776a66838d10a406b51efa7
'2012-05-01T20:40:32-04:00'
describe
'26271' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRW' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
f0d1608f40ed18b9bd8ef1e986431075
ff557365563b4fe3380c6a6c24ea2bc7d54a6000
'2012-05-01T20:33:08-04:00'
describe
'2180168' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRX' 'sip-files00007.tif'
7d295c5bbcf786b789a706b8934b676c
ef366b19804d4d262fb13b0fea77747589e7688f
'2012-05-01T20:35:45-04:00'
describe
'21083' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRY' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
634b5c93860db2dc7d8a6e795280ba08
a9f4f678ffc4fc76d2ecf98f560abeab2a542bfd
'2012-05-01T20:38:18-04:00'
describe
'167655' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVRZ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
546b87fbffbe7e57c85bd0c58e2bbc7b
9adc2436c55cb1291d075acd90a34f0cee323499
'2012-05-01T20:39:04-04:00'
describe
'26468' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSA' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
f888a629753313587ea1de06b287e17c
0056e9bde53d6271216f90970c8c44053f07ccae
'2012-05-01T20:33:22-04:00'
describe
'20670' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSB' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
ec984213f6dcd18bf2f3adcbf0a55409
d71e90084c675cd87170c8b991ac1a3efcd97a23
'2012-05-01T20:39:46-04:00'
describe
'7407624' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSC' 'sip-files00008.tif'
21628e300746096e3884d16fd65bcfed
ea3da10bddebd185ed0c06982334d9dc16941bbf
'2012-05-01T20:43:43-04:00'
describe
'19298' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSD' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
cfccd7499be0dc6fcf49b71e636313cd
51b01bad2a09ae0b8079fee35df90be4c7575af1
'2012-05-01T20:43:12-04:00'
describe
'238985' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSE' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
8d2a2f817cf76a4f84caaa0bd44e4797
bd1f5beb14b390217e1c9e836810f94866f97592
'2012-05-01T20:38:38-04:00'
describe
'94334' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSF' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
53046c2125aa0728f5aa36fc73f2dee9
7049359647a078bcb82390126299ac5fcbe8f39d
'2012-05-01T20:35:32-04:00'
describe
'45643' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSG' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
712621dbb59adaa913745f5023cfd67a
a81a61bfc74bb3321402ba46d62373e5436259f4
'2012-05-01T20:35:31-04:00'
describe
'1932704' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSH' 'sip-files00009.tif'
600e7c6e3fcc5849684cdef06a848ec2
2ced2feffaa13e85fa6aaa768b5126be34ae6af9
'2012-05-01T20:44:28-04:00'
describe
'436' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSI' 'sip-files00009.txt'
fcb2ce4af49de90240ab8408ab2862af
d120fb25677aa7a7be4c73386b06fee09a633bbc
describe
'28749' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSJ' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
b6f0b7362fe0a1b99f58674756763152
9f4d07cc336242d336f9bfd8be026677d28e015f
'2012-05-01T20:46:29-04:00'
describe
'37757' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSK' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
eba75e6d1f268a616a0b2e059bc19052
c31e3779e266f2c6d7f474ce9e558cf59383fb97
'2012-05-01T20:35:59-04:00'
describe
'24757' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSL' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
fc0795dbff0b1133f4e969200044f343
01207c9e1c2b32ac3a053b517852dbcc4e01b34f
'2012-05-01T20:35:35-04:00'
describe
'20594' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSM' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
acf6620535b26b88c30bb8b680c54a7e
b83ab4ca78344d45fe3be3beae3ac1d84cc308d4
'2012-05-01T20:30:30-04:00'
describe
'2117044' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSN' 'sip-files00010.tif'
e92ed054a939bbb618f7ab3a02fc95ea
e48fd2d120e9a9e817c4053548d872205c70f07c
'2012-05-01T20:35:07-04:00'
describe
'19540' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSO' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
717fc54c112d60dbce97d730598f07d7
3ca620992cda4d3afc4a98b08391250070d829ed
'2012-05-01T20:32:27-04:00'
describe
'256262' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSP' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
1fb813aba7ef944f36f6931f7652501f
2af7a0751c3ba8902a9a3621fa718c677a24992a
'2012-05-01T20:36:08-04:00'
describe
'107057' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSQ' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
d0fac11bac74124f316e969523759363
4eaa9d3aae17684c45b2b279e6907a386e537ae7
describe
'18239' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSR' 'sip-files00011.pro'
c0b9b3859748a3462e7018882e913a71
65d50478bc46c215d83c02915671dbe874ec06b0
'2012-05-01T20:38:01-04:00'
describe
'50869' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSS' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
b4902ea0652b013f437bc372899a2c56
96ba4825ef61b202219af1ee50dfbbd78dcaa526
'2012-05-01T20:38:32-04:00'
describe
'2070504' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVST' 'sip-files00011.tif'
d3dc38e0183c0c08929f7514598da1b3
ff6eb6ad0af91c035c8a4ddbf9dacaede326723d
'2012-05-01T20:36:44-04:00'
describe
'861' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSU' 'sip-files00011.txt'
c535695e7a8a6b473e2d8ed8803b98dd
964271e36cd5d2cb6386c41fe463414142c54b93
'2012-05-01T20:43:22-04:00'
describe
'240569' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSV' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
f3ce90b45e7196db1d2e31850e9f1ac1
b11cbb652369cad9b7e4d1c70cd0aa0eb4d7cec6
'2012-05-01T20:40:50-04:00'
describe
'90671' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSW' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
999035cc2f472e6cff9e2776a3cecb51
ec528bcfca5a38b61f65060cd5044cf0e00ac969
'2012-05-01T20:35:21-04:00'
describe
'22895' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSX' 'sip-files00012.pro'
c0041891ce580c9e5a2ccdc7586ca0ac
608e688418045d222005ff506f747e0aef04192c
'2012-05-01T20:45:28-04:00'
describe
'48767' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSY' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
793f8610820f25fd1ea1e29f1ebcc792
e5df8d60ac8f8b8ab5f8bd5090ff018392bc3ac1
'2012-05-01T20:29:54-04:00'
describe
'2184456' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVSZ' 'sip-files00012.tif'
2a0389f32554769da88a1c3ed9bd585b
dcdd5e711a83e60332490a062bb0e8a3997e45e1
'2012-05-01T20:34:50-04:00'
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTA' 'sip-files00012.txt'
ce8d0d41613b6d5cb01051712b886906
25a5ba67dccf3bc6592d4fe1a82d27c4d82463f6
'2012-05-01T20:39:23-04:00'
describe
'29283' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTB' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
5fc3bab5afc2bf2d6d436aaebb4f89f1
a393d7aff8ee4eaf634c7f747c02ca2e9ec446fc
'2012-05-01T20:46:10-04:00'
describe
'254601' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTC' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
d185da3dfa2b751461b815a373d67fff
e7f37b75369b3881cabc58e839b825992d8e6725
'2012-05-01T20:35:11-04:00'
describe
'136986' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTD' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
4f6d739fa91349a8340e84d69233cb4f
b98d67c620956eb21cf85d25daeaafbd5c607c3f
'2012-05-01T20:43:04-04:00'
describe
'31446' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTE' 'sip-files00013.pro'
9c4f2771e9f2c4baa32bcec4bb9dc261
04a1c88240456724354c3a02c188672514519e5f
'2012-05-01T20:34:54-04:00'
describe
'55491' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTF' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
34acc905a42c0ecb32e6c57900258304
b0702e96ecbd038ac6dcc8473c9398a538a15a85
'2012-05-01T20:39:39-04:00'
describe
'2058748' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTG' 'sip-files00013.tif'
af6e702b9ce4325fa6e2c39c0219988e
e4ee688aa2332a08617b925b0711d6352afe4c42
'2012-05-01T20:33:05-04:00'
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTH' 'sip-files00013.txt'
787d7a5d5c3ea711bf9826e83d4c7005
66bf7afc81d55a1bb8d5b7f89aac875230a4f508
'2012-05-01T20:35:27-04:00'
describe
'30368' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTI' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
e9cbc24c50847c96bddbc51486ca2948
9900702b34f665b4cf244f3952007731a014e70d
'2012-05-01T20:37:13-04:00'
describe
'273325' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTJ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
3a1e421a78e763bd00d5fa5157143699
d749dddd0bcffad227dc8daa414fc81d0db02edd
describe
'161358' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTK' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
46665407252d6c3e536cf824297f453c
728b5f10e267c0e5eddb253843f0d23b3bc9c1be
'2012-05-01T20:35:53-04:00'
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTL' 'sip-files00003.pro'
263954f192202cf5475698d6090894d2
f02c1c86af964ec5f1757338954116f957e667e6
'2012-05-01T20:36:13-04:00'
describe
'226669' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTM' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
3a261bf5ec81d94fd9a3d2bc594ef2cb
f51205421df13ca2131d88fe8cdf34ea96ef373f
'2012-05-01T20:36:24-04:00'
describe
'7752' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTN' 'sip-files00009.pro'
b3f980025713653dba05aaac355b9ace
ad3a32d7414985435edde55c6236b8a3d3d3fc74
'2012-05-01T20:33:30-04:00'
describe
'28775' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTO' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
eb11c3dab1564dc28a1dff3601e16966
9b5f27f5c68734a60f07ba7a053413e31927d9ca
'2012-05-01T20:39:33-04:00'
describe
'43480' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTP' 'sip-files00014.pro'
0642e4a4227eedb7a64d8c1277e90da7
3c6f8fffbc8434fe5d26eb38eca02ad12ae3f18c
'2012-05-01T20:40:48-04:00'
describe
'1802' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTQ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
acdaf7526a5aa3751655eca92209ca15
2f15a6f2f4139b13bce2f719e1c9481b7ddab8a3
'2012-05-01T20:30:34-04:00'
describe
'254510' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTR' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
0251010554e895cc120332b1b853ed34
9a826ba8d18e045bb9874a33bfd27401ba2ce6ff
describe
'80277' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTS' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
1f3fdc777a4ae1e1b452f00ba7acf646
3aba58ca5876207a85e4879ff5e761bc7b2ef171
describe
'183373' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTT' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
aa025553764b3e2cb612cdd5db943ab5
eedf6f20d591aa479e7b96992e1b356c655cc26b
'2012-05-01T20:32:36-04:00'
describe
'2067908' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTU' 'sip-files00028.tif'
bb6a8b8d03f6be9209669720a7c19d83
1a2e9c27f6e882c329d5dabcee161da30e42cf25
'2012-05-01T20:38:20-04:00'
describe
'35717' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTV' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
0715742b1b53f1e38b79c7d3eac6e2c9
1035ac3971b7d5f1eb70a4a3aba1c1d2b317ea9d
'2012-05-01T20:38:17-04:00'
describe
'39232' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTW' 'sip-files00033.pro'
e2bd2a73bbb5cb4b43290df15ec35afc
4457c4b2ee1c0685a18f48897d6f52ccd27db0d9
'2012-05-01T20:34:59-04:00'
describe
'1735' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTX' 'sip-files00035.txt'
b5ed580f85cb109c02046f45f32cc559
64010f0ce7582726f0013ab8fa7c2fdd4b3c2ab6
'2012-05-01T20:35:39-04:00'
describe
'245163' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTY' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
50700b88bbdafc8c3f53a8f9715597d1
bf1426d9d2aae91b3e0c79d902c9bf2242f3d445
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVTZ' 'sip-files00043.txt'
6f59768da72fe835750733395b8c0cbb
a9238060355c824f033617897041b96c81ba1133
'2012-05-01T20:33:36-04:00'
describe
'257067' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUA' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
3f9b0b9213e9f45ba386e65f9bf65d16
489749fc45fb78edd90149d04b7c059cd2dc2a38
'2012-05-01T20:35:01-04:00'
describe
'67228' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUB' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
c9d01e5348f9f3a33ea73b405a446ebb
411175d692f61ddf49afe0523a975daed98261c0
'2012-05-01T20:43:00-04:00'
describe
'2209664' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUC' 'sip-files00014.tif'
f34a4ddbf9609080abe088e65c6f0b59
cdbd85f39c4a25faa52a56170886a924f6917857
'2012-05-01T20:36:02-04:00'
describe
'1783' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUD' 'sip-files00014.txt'
4d974b517264d32bfd6c56c2d9370e84
bdce67e8f7efe37a6486e9a093830b0b3f9ff16c
describe
'32296' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUE' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
485d4253c6be95d17ae631c38bbef17f
e565d0ca75c10f36e728e02d6e3bef1d4e0f0613
'2012-05-01T20:41:16-04:00'
describe
'254447' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUF' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
01426b4853074c75888493af1e1cdfd4
d69070d0791659df4be6173be1cef830003403bd
'2012-05-01T20:44:08-04:00'
describe
'220311' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUG' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
c7e26941fe78a8c6822ae25fe4566f00
76eb3b9ffa8fddb2d94d1eb146c1ca00e3bfd3fa
'2012-05-01T20:40:14-04:00'
describe
'43710' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUH' 'sip-files00015.pro'
6f8e8fe1a89b527464c9080bd73d1357
7cd341861d6843494971beac5e6438ae78fb05b5
describe
'82303' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUI' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
badca9a9145411812f776a3e7ca9f3ba
5318e50c5871d506bc2c552b441935ac909c630d
'2012-05-01T20:34:21-04:00'
describe
'2058212' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUJ' 'sip-files00015.tif'
346a3210205e14bd32c819562eec203a
db5a246ab258b16d2ded67e53f521ddf8a1d9728
'2012-05-01T20:30:38-04:00'
describe
'1838' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUK' 'sip-files00015.txt'
3cfe6e7b86d68a05a31dfdce3e5f06d1
55fb972e9293b6fd5effc6c850055452dc030503
'2012-05-01T20:45:21-04:00'
describe
'37775' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUL' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
fc0c9be09fbb315503fb30d5c69950d0
059f8bd22651504a592d6a84eb285a3f14d09b09
'2012-05-01T20:39:31-04:00'
describe
'267502' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUM' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
b7ee651c841b8f4781f468ea605d2877
c675293c334e9e9639922082c69f04b42c6b3bff
'2012-05-01T20:47:09-04:00'
describe
'196258' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUN' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
3070b10ed63c2cf164a89ed92403a3a9
907ffacde9d13eefa40b830f0773bdba9696cae1
'2012-05-01T20:39:57-04:00'
describe
'43436' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUO' 'sip-files00016.pro'
ab238c114526a91f6f3c2d90bc2cee48
3e646a9ec589937a93341ea883cc08f1d9247d23
describe
'77943' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUP' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
9330826e8e9df48aa91156e99d63546f
4c4d2584e229677ad49bd6668bcd31b6a9fad6ea
'2012-05-01T20:32:00-04:00'
describe
'2162180' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUQ' 'sip-files00016.tif'
502ab9388fd65f2e27ff8758202f5755
639bb176112df9747862c374d1915b1c9578dee4
'2012-05-01T20:29:48-04:00'
describe
'35449' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUR' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
d5456691098b36fc0a1d7b6351dd1e01
b999f3321d470d2a40bb49aacca8017f5a7918e1
'2012-05-01T20:36:25-04:00'
describe
'249574' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUS' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
c258be362f96869ff1ed971f4988feb2
67f52103c00866abd3c434ce5f4ad9fa1acac08c
'2012-05-01T20:46:52-04:00'
describe
'215125' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUT' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
5fb21540efd9070102fac9c61796ba15
1fcba4590dd9231d14258d4eeebddcec780a1d4c
'2012-05-01T20:40:56-04:00'
describe
'43854' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUU' 'sip-files00017.pro'
6b1e2701ef892dd233a7e9e7e57416f6
23958fc42e3f43529a820064520a92df927c4f4e
'2012-05-01T20:37:14-04:00'
describe
'79962' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUV' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
74f800af0b16ecc94765a35d4bcc3939
39907ab9f43558e37bcb5e2ec16962f3ad2d0701
'2012-05-01T20:33:34-04:00'
describe
'2019428' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUW' 'sip-files00017.tif'
67ee793fde1b25344349c1af0a4520c1
a19ea40561ef4ca47ed4fc6e7947c5b15f129744
'2012-05-01T20:39:54-04:00'
describe
'1812' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUX' 'sip-files00017.txt'
ec87d694922e37d7d62e60f178dfb0fa
69e8933567d1850dec3837769e4fd9d4a2dc0a7f
'2012-05-01T20:45:04-04:00'
describe
'37605' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUY' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
d1d4e9f7121ba646468649358cfaa03e
b009f05fd6a5728fe8d4a8fa250fa0ec87a4c741
describe
'189624' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVUZ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
6757bb7ce6f2635cd3309b30d95aa476
29e49a2e45e1a0558dd8937161078798f483cd23
'2012-05-01T20:45:20-04:00'
describe
'78171' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVA' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
6df4e929ec24c4a074ef822512c4d060
a3f9ed49c5e20f1ebad77d72f60a7c1ea281363c
'2012-05-01T20:32:58-04:00'
describe
'13443' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVB' 'sip-files00018.pro'
f4cd9d1f03b38976afaf7e665767ec12
2e65d83b091dc0d9f0e005fc53c9065f3b61e053
'2012-05-01T20:43:38-04:00'
describe
'38900' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVC' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
e4f6b26c2877df870d0b8eaa1ef6d325
41b72bfab4c0ab7612a36c5f0039693b7dcf0a03
'2012-05-01T20:39:13-04:00'
describe
'2045092' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVD' 'sip-files00018.tif'
c6b852ff2751faa293716a92ad15d1f6
ea8f103b8df3b5acbcb8a30ba7e7c3ae23682302
'2012-05-01T20:33:11-04:00'
describe
'603' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVE' 'sip-files00018.txt'
de4d204754af6d93eaeaf3b918c2a262
388b3311afe8d5a9ac8398a6d4dc3a2f176acc17
'2012-05-01T20:42:20-04:00'
describe
'25167' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVF' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
de57de42376e301bb7231bbaa74328c1
089665f3bb8699b14ac93e519019e3fb394b7864
'2012-05-01T20:36:56-04:00'
describe
'130282' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVG' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
e3a00aa3ae1133c91d55539669b17110
c9209ce55754052105d342515e171df94829e69f
'2012-05-01T20:31:09-04:00'
describe
'20538' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVH' 'sip-files00019.pro'
1b5013f48744cd1f7186fb741b9aee10
c96c054d112d519684cfa67019501ab172ef7bb8
'2012-05-01T20:43:15-04:00'
describe
'53936' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVI' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
8efa361d0bf694869a873d2047f1ab25
1a21bc02d65d615c5a3a4d40627bd210216a1025
'2012-05-01T20:38:36-04:00'
describe
'2057560' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVJ' 'sip-files00019.tif'
0bfb8d1d5fe5aeb3bf595ac53776fb6d
8560fcd71971555d338a01f30f4131ec146e3ddf
'2012-05-01T20:30:13-04:00'
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVK' 'sip-files00019.txt'
036ee0c141cf0cd3dea0180e9d8de951
f1c803553b4124f5dc94aa25f68ca93fc061c0b3
describe
'30083' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVL' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
7e9291371fde5186a373705b5524f0ce
61119948e9ff1c5e76a0439a3f8e9c1b002c9f69
'2012-05-01T20:34:33-04:00'
describe
'270614' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVM' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
f4e025d438c67e6314088d8bfd621530
abfb2843471b9dbbea4fbef3287346872e413eb4
'2012-05-01T20:41:47-04:00'
describe
'150141' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVN' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
8cd97f86653c120a1db50f0ec485a22b
e4533aeb47ab2a78ddf1112b26d14cfdd963ef46
'2012-05-01T20:35:05-04:00'
describe
'30692' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVO' 'sip-files00020.pro'
5f88b7a9f28404b139531a4affbd2a4a
fa2e452ff35d75197485b15694d4223659c51838
'2012-05-01T20:38:49-04:00'
describe
'61731' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVP' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
3e8efc29e164ba9037c11c6a89f11c6f
bec6cfc9568babc8b3048ca968feb9c9791b8d76
'2012-05-01T20:33:55-04:00'
describe
'2186944' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVQ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
21cd35ecd9196af6bcb7c62ba5a289a1
b4cc8e35dacddc275649a76e164eed8f9dbfd3c0
'2012-05-01T20:33:06-04:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVR' 'sip-files00020.txt'
bd2ce7e1494bc008e901557333ec2c89
44d849217d0a275c5a65025cefb0486183a5e41c
describe
'30981' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVS' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
a368b523dfb99490ccd3ca8ed75a2c90
bb036359b7707373409b056f8db50235af12e1d9
describe
'255097' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVT' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
6df4e303b35e6ff099a901e9dca5515e
e9c54b4615373318019188d8af83ce3361fd4db1
'2012-05-01T20:42:37-04:00'
describe
'214445' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVU' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
f52f7301e9e12e8cda749625ca090f70
05ecdfd6312893d25735bc69e2122e6c9d8ef1b1
'2012-05-01T20:42:06-04:00'
describe
'43341' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVV' 'sip-files00021.pro'
04b24bff952e4953e1bb89e58f810113
248257a914b555ae31da670b53f4de48d5dc42ff
'2012-05-01T20:33:01-04:00'
describe
'2063908' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVW' 'sip-files00021.tif'
9bfd97caa9f8c87578aa3364323c6ade
49d19647af9dbda15dfead3cfe0ca62f4d2f2a34
'2012-05-01T20:36:45-04:00'
describe
'1801' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVX' 'sip-files00021.txt'
ae1c304e7bb6c805ebf34660a8ce5064
7cdf9778767d6b604327ba0e3dbdf76257b2142f
'2012-05-01T20:41:12-04:00'
describe
'37230' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVY' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
6c21aa6aa955a7ac49c7c4d59041ab27
e2c856516894dca9a292a70afa785efb22466de3
'2012-05-01T20:39:53-04:00'
describe
'269311' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVVZ' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
395d5581126aaf2f7a75ecaf367d66ed
d1dedbd5beb984ac617f4c1f3538635bd1c85a03
'2012-05-01T20:45:23-04:00'
describe
'197872' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWA' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
beea5fec9f791a0b14a5487b6e7ed696
2611b25654737dc520ce1d40faecb359b538da5e
describe
'43287' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWB' 'sip-files00022.pro'
d333b62eaab67a4ff013358be1d1a981
2291bfac87d61ab50e5346298942ee712e9437d3
'2012-05-01T20:42:18-04:00'
describe
'77833' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWC' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
98782b76a6dbe51f0946cc395275121f
834c09686672cd2d523b89c1103818ad0cd1f56e
'2012-05-01T20:33:41-04:00'
describe
'2177500' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWD' 'sip-files00022.tif'
a47f97ccdd2147ac142e984f41fcf6b1
24825d85a57c30ca4a6328efb55d785052651c0e
'2012-05-01T20:35:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWE' 'sip-files00022.txt'
ec09ef9e25fc9b08286d238e36a3076b
48c02c23e5afa26cebca90a952ae5965163a7532
'2012-05-01T20:30:25-04:00'
describe
'35397' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWF' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
2702bdf714c6c3240b437575b0582e2f
44dfcb0ea6e819ff36e3062a96e498cc8940b959
describe
'267277' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWG' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
2974147e28cdee318e49ca0d1372abd9
c8f48cf7c3e16fc3c238215fb7b466028d635cd4
'2012-05-01T20:43:33-04:00'
describe
'219958' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWH' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
882b5b83bf20a0f0ef67678da028b351
217429cbaf1b07d05b8b8cf7fa47e062353ecec3
'2012-05-01T20:42:42-04:00'
describe
'43917' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWI' 'sip-files00023.pro'
bf23962ef4b574fd6d5cf5dd461a2dec
7991e47954ef1521d091ab1ed4857a6d820d51e5
'2012-05-01T20:36:11-04:00'
describe
'81008' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWJ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
7db28cde97446b8d40470203ffd64227
3e91a496ee2459508a716df57b6ca15e4eb57a8d
describe
'2161240' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWK' 'sip-files00023.tif'
883da8a48e69c0b697c5e9db7633ff01
a0e6c33b97ad4e2ee6f73b9b775f23edc721bc24
'2012-05-01T20:37:29-04:00'
describe
'1840' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWL' 'sip-files00023.txt'
c1740666c00a3c4c9780776f6247ab45
23f1a64c07a7a47340ec82638e3372350af4fc28
'2012-05-01T20:40:16-04:00'
describe
'36405' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWM' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
13f6d331a021c28d9558150d53f34af9
3180506a13e930f58b3bbacbbe4a4136fedc42c1
'2012-05-01T20:36:34-04:00'
describe
'256560' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWN' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
a33f861ab85f4ab053578d9ecd693ead
7c765f2fd5b089316562a710605fb9313b3d7811
'2012-05-01T20:45:42-04:00'
describe
'184004' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWO' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
02a7876677e590a09e4ce77d0c58dff8
f73ae15d199ceabddfceffdc28e704da0d84c39d
'2012-05-01T20:44:38-04:00'
describe
'39163' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWP' 'sip-files00024.pro'
26d10f71f6131e4972f0ac4deb54e5a6
299f8f227d0cd9f86a28deda59fe4c2908965275
'2012-05-01T20:41:18-04:00'
describe
'73345' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWQ' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
4f9eb2eaf509d0eb4ccdfa1345f5faa6
685120fc67e575a29eec22fdc4e40307d5014dc4
'2012-05-01T20:44:36-04:00'
describe
'2074904' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWR' 'sip-files00024.tif'
a9724ab1a37ac8d6cd8d4dbc52fdf8f7
c1ea55c6a583cd03fd3d8a781f0b4708e50786ef
'2012-05-01T20:44:19-04:00'
describe
'1635' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWS' 'sip-files00024.txt'
5a2c71ba13e4ecb6dfe521de6ef78ebd
95fad11e50446d21b94c483a8ed2dafdbb378cd8
'2012-05-01T20:34:47-04:00'
describe
'35400' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWT' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
27fe4809a5ca1d9a841c8e6bbe493a12
b885ee60a73fe7791355a7f46655541862167afa
'2012-05-01T20:45:56-04:00'
describe
'265201' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWU' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
11c2126184680467f10e7303c7374cbd
1bbbfcd9f26c18e7459e99e14717b239ddbaa8fb
'2012-05-01T20:36:41-04:00'
describe
'198887' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWV' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
d127494cbb3aedb3e07b4b499984f0d6
b91235d18a27b970d4d2cec5c5155ee0fb894587
'2012-05-01T20:35:26-04:00'
describe
'40345' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWW' 'sip-files00025.pro'
ecd42af992632a898885e51eadd08021
f59bc3fd1bf6a2b301c4669b407b194f131f4d3d
'2012-05-01T20:32:09-04:00'
describe
'75218' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWX' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
3d2a5c57439c330c3c1360fa3eedf2ba
e8aec8961a11a70467df74280a98c3a799472db1
'2012-05-01T20:40:40-04:00'
describe
'2144036' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWY' 'sip-files00025.tif'
cc7ffbe802395edb9a262eae61296d0e
bac31f904727c510b2a5f11f7135fa6d094f82ce
'2012-05-01T20:36:42-04:00'
describe
'1679' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVWZ' 'sip-files00025.txt'
dd0bbb8a046ef8714f73516f7908e158
a211e8f9913798d9fdd0f91bffc9f90e5cd87f69
'2012-05-01T20:36:04-04:00'
describe
'35872' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXA' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
68fdf27b50a19c910ed6fd04e6d73046
ccbdaa00cdab178f70a11e5360bfc55f679ce264
'2012-05-01T20:39:25-04:00'
describe
'263577' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXB' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
6d4bcac5c8a4e22b73b67b62deaa5b34
84ddd8ca8a8a6615105461dde1b70d75c811d72d
'2012-05-01T20:39:56-04:00'
describe
'39860' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXC' 'sip-files00026.pro'
583b6e2499812be415979ce059985c21
a13b8d609df496b5b457173500f8d3e43ca8bceb
'2012-05-01T20:40:23-04:00'
describe
'74331' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXD' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
a156c6fcfb51ac0093562f5457e85f6b
d7f423d35b79808e1c95aebdf051d29096b59629
'2012-05-01T20:42:15-04:00'
describe
'2131272' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXE' 'sip-files00026.tif'
e4a02cb4292f6abe6b0f0e090ea7dd1f
23c9b4264f6577b4df9822d6dd3b46c3313b7736
'2012-05-01T20:41:13-04:00'
describe
'1657' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXF' 'sip-files00026.txt'
da72fb120a3482b749f3ed49de89bb23
5e0c115170dd61f9eceabb6acdeda8c4325b22fe
'2012-05-01T20:40:42-04:00'
describe
'34804' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXG' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
53475d87c480c3067676b18d417a4f63
9f0358b982b112107f4745e895be5e30c08bb08c
describe
'257892' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXH' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
8bb5cf92814f270e22f6843510ef643c
0afd3fd3af490f524ca7cf10542e376bc5fa7787
describe
'216281' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXI' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
b01eea7b25b18816c3d1ac50d2562fb8
a593b759c529183a1b1557292666c085b39d4d2d
'2012-05-01T20:45:58-04:00'
describe
'42173' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXJ' 'sip-files00027.pro'
0ad30298c2c81f0677493567e8e904d3
d45e9732dc5abeed78237bfc27f995afdd1ba2ec
'2012-05-01T20:41:31-04:00'
describe
'80478' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXK' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
f0514c6de0f8402da97951a3d54e8493
5aa1320badd6592e008d08e10d588ea59a8e76c0
'2012-05-01T20:40:30-04:00'
describe
'2086016' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXL' 'sip-files00027.tif'
b3e30bc439b7542481ca07e2dad223fc
f964f1d86f885935648608931329740e0758b4f1
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXM' 'sip-files00027.txt'
2d2a4550f6ddc0dc33fe3e574373cfe9
348063fdff12890c485f72ccca285f4fbfd0f799
'2012-05-01T20:38:43-04:00'
describe
'37136' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXN' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
c8dd12a776914b697ae8f57d982f534b
d06f1c01167dedb9f71138dbc8d6a14b223a51fa
'2012-05-01T20:37:51-04:00'
describe
'255698' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXO' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
76b72b71777989a2be7d7d9b7ab384a1
566d40cfe8c38cbf4f03799d56d7111b6feb98b5
'2012-05-01T20:37:31-04:00'
describe
'188641' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXP' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
ccfb32a40562b80a30cd45ad6a371d97
28d682628a86d422000011ae2a0a485c3b15b6e9
'2012-05-01T20:40:43-04:00'
describe
'40468' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXQ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
eddad319e1ab005a5c12b875356db594
e3cc51426ae02734932654d2cf6220e01ddafe51
'2012-05-01T20:46:25-04:00'
describe
'76669' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXR' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
2d0553dd0cca87c26ab61818d64b8375
4ec360b2304ded81b7cb95e78ae5460311111c41
'2012-05-01T20:39:05-04:00'
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXS' 'sip-files00028.txt'
bfb07f204d598d1614b20a0db979924f
0d10f339eefd0073bd368e1f346d1ea3083c581b
'2012-05-01T20:43:36-04:00'
describe
'35723' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXT' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
fba0136a099a31401bdff99f7e5e094f
ccbd1ca3fdbb822848097f7d9247d526591b05b2
'2012-05-01T20:34:29-04:00'
describe
'261138' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXU' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
f8535986f850b474ffa39a4c94787e2e
4c600bf4cf8220cb47c4f1a8e416f64ea6c9d9ef
'2012-05-01T20:37:41-04:00'
describe
'186682' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXV' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
fc2eb7c417b196c3ad1e13743e7c678b
22de64df4a930d5fa8977cbc5d2f74f611456f0c
'2012-05-01T20:41:00-04:00'
describe
'39019' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXW' 'sip-files00029.pro'
3a38b9ab6eb69f7d8e8e94c021167475
c136d3671f2c5685a5723528247cfabf198b75f0
'2012-05-01T20:32:31-04:00'
describe
'70283' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXX' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
eebbcb109f80d71190b26aff274486b4
a97e262faf5120c974d237b2e2d1730b773c9d99
'2012-05-01T20:36:22-04:00'
describe
'2107340' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXY' 'sip-files00029.tif'
b79c1d551ab9a073fa4526e936cbe52e
4938f268f956346c8b10e615f0f0f86fd52d559a
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVXZ' 'sip-files00029.txt'
b986ffdfb7a4c22638f7baff6cb3ade5
5d20e26e97832d81cfaa53e62c2573689c55fce4
'2012-05-01T20:33:03-04:00'
describe
'30578' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYA' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
d59313fc2996a98c5b6b26618b027bd8
18a2aa62e63a0f3964fa69c6be5bc61b85816ddd
'2012-05-01T20:32:14-04:00'
describe
'249751' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYB' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
164a4c3614643496e6072d4c6ce3a0ef
aac0efa82d032291ce3e3aa97c67aa983d3899b7
'2012-05-01T20:45:54-04:00'
describe
'187060' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYC' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
e033b6eb28391054b3e66bcf115f3796
f9086d8219932143c4d3ef7ddcb9ce299c4e003d
'2012-05-01T20:31:50-04:00'
describe
'40772' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYD' 'sip-files00030.pro'
901285cbe52a52ae8c012e1acfd5d018
5ed315f074d9225793c27798aeff5931adb264fa
'2012-05-01T20:37:33-04:00'
describe
'75195' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYE' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
d668a96ca0c9be9f1730f761d9aac6bd
2dab6f5821aaaa2bc6d399bf09583dcdf0ba32df
'2012-05-01T20:37:04-04:00'
describe
'2019728' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYF' 'sip-files00030.tif'
9f323123ea5e8480257a47f7b7a120dd
eee1f2ca0468c8a967f687085a40f01e57f6500f
'2012-05-01T20:39:41-04:00'
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYG' 'sip-files00030.txt'
3ea5546b028ff2e6999a12de936554dc
3fe87e18522612aecce2847946ca9edc671d7d9c
'2012-05-01T20:37:24-04:00'
describe
'265756' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYH' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
1d9b2ba8807ae7a06ee18e4add8887b1
22cb23d52119558245e161a82d9ea002749a7755
describe
'213052' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYI' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
47d690266e590188890f3c7d7752afb7
e699072a1f25c1196fa60170601da79b8204a904
'2012-05-01T20:31:36-04:00'
describe
'42797' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYJ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
b91dbdd5f6dbdd892cc7fef645fabbf3
50b16c9d21b7e588dc9d6508d8b0d89504b6c07a
describe
'78623' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYK' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
e1edd336a8cebb79c2a5cf742fbe7cbe
6eedb582e2cfd830f84af460860d136eab843f07
'2012-05-01T20:35:14-04:00'
describe
'2148904' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYL' 'sip-files00031.tif'
390b0754b22e72a1a5808ef74d3d549e
c554896677f3cdcee36efb5acf68188c47f599a9
'2012-05-01T20:34:20-04:00'
describe
'1777' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYM' 'sip-files00031.txt'
b1f79dcf7e15ed56a488cb19404b046f
72228d2d4e9e78f8c3e0b375cd494b5a864d7f8c
'2012-05-01T20:42:08-04:00'
describe
'35699' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYN' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
fb240fd2edaf7f1aa6f898f6cd4fef2a
9ca8bc931cc41175b6a93a27c0551fc6c1abef00
'2012-05-01T20:32:52-04:00'
describe
'255173' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYO' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
73bc6fb2ad53e1f6c09d92b27763bf43
387676f8ba3e28c7384359fceae9f7ebe096e5c9
'2012-05-01T20:46:50-04:00'
describe
'184123' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYP' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
45797b051d0de0389e73fa3484318128
21214e7cb0e56aa7f50e4e9d323da3a0c1155f87
'2012-05-01T20:40:19-04:00'
describe
'39204' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYQ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
cb501c239cd97fd52364573c2b4079c8
e1115ab18a2412093a1d3ead43dadfc37dffbd53
'2012-05-01T20:37:19-04:00'
describe
'77196' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYR' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
847cc084588331184892acbe57494c39
afb9c41e25dc11a25cd308ab649e7525f6c65e7d
'2012-05-01T20:38:35-04:00'
describe
'2065448' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYS' 'sip-files00032.tif'
04a6fae43b5d9b53f827cc45510713a3
9417f7d1d4f807a1f26bc0f4df2ff641773a3647
'2012-05-01T20:35:04-04:00'
describe
'1619' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYT' 'sip-files00032.txt'
7bbcad29b0c4f0bead5b1884129efaae
83c65eefbec6cfe7830ced7636e28f4782e0c3e2
describe
'36459' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYU' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
3d4124bf0b5d78e7f1f6e7014b7bae61
aa395636608fb8e7fcd2b3553a82e3f884f40255
'2012-05-01T20:35:09-04:00'
describe
'259986' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYV' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
aacc923dfcb0959989a5f9915f5499bd
132efe65f94c0e3bbad09d341a8894be5ef971bf
'2012-05-01T20:38:29-04:00'
describe
'164886' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYW' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
6e53f3f8ebcea0c92c6784792dd09185
432d17991a67d8d72b624442d68db4da4d8ca102
describe
'65034' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYX' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
d5d5bcafeb3ce40cee834101e40aa0a5
8aad95bdab2884cf3edbd6cc0f732104805a704a
'2012-05-01T20:40:51-04:00'
describe
'2102280' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYY' 'sip-files00033.tif'
710a02812998359ac784901f1e1a2820
a95ba03ceb2f9e3b2b520e0d8a98780d435a1f02
'2012-05-01T20:39:10-04:00'
describe
'1642' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVYZ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
9153e0faee6eac83460d07dde198ea1b
957fa844bde40fd668cba63c2fe4d0d6495b52b5
'2012-05-01T20:40:29-04:00'
describe
'33036' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZA' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
3751dd50e342e549757db419e4ea471b
e5e397f76fdb45045198b0935d19e6872b42797d
'2012-05-01T20:33:53-04:00'
describe
'261247' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZB' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
ab8f48ef503897a951389aec9cfdd90d
5e6bc0f6d5335a52d4554192a626547b5b5a5d61
'2012-05-01T20:41:02-04:00'
describe
'195145' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZC' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
a5eb4cb9e6bcb046c3721493d984695d
88234458ad5b127875f031c1ed1cf5c0509e6e9c
'2012-05-01T20:33:40-04:00'
describe
'42081' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZD' 'sip-files00034.pro'
54b6c0c09a7775b6d060c01e957d21a0
877e24adb66428f11ba8a03ccf5d2e9f0dd4eb60
'2012-05-01T20:41:05-04:00'
describe
'77391' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZE' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
0710857252bc36cb1fb047adb0b8ff33
bba3e4ac7a86a9f8faf498ad93fab22266b31ec9
'2012-05-01T20:38:16-04:00'
describe
'2112404' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZF' 'sip-files00034.tif'
f98d847351b55886a204adb3654f7880
b8ab20d7626255fc981680b2cc045b37390edd44
'2012-05-01T20:30:40-04:00'
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZG' 'sip-files00034.txt'
14325aa0d38422272bcb5f91c513724e
fcaa313c603421414f773e1ec4a8097282e5a0c0
describe
'36425' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZH' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
1f634c6a15d68ecbe7f59bb153c8c934
72a5330423a41e9b34a9f1c236436e1b61844163
'2012-05-01T20:33:24-04:00'
describe
'265793' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZI' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
1bdf3140a31db84ded7709f192c8611f
e24bb2fba83534e07d0264fe8946fe9e888bfc31
'2012-05-01T20:32:51-04:00'
describe
'207739' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZJ' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
7701e390d19e75c752489888f5e9874f
e2d2e22612756014dadf6d70c98211c1ea213d84
'2012-05-01T20:35:49-04:00'
describe
'42094' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZK' 'sip-files00035.pro'
0b23eadf874b0093b2f40b9ac3cd0d9f
b1daa018c6ed1b346bbce1c47c935fc301e902c5
describe
'78810' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZL' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
fae2ea59c2ecbfbee4faeb9e8835b5f0
16c71db2f10821a6233286743542095ab6fe0002
describe
'2150040' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZM' 'sip-files00035.tif'
6033b21b2a3a2cbf469cd78e2f3a5b77
d8c94c23b5ee37ef522232da55676d9a7f1adccc
'2012-05-01T20:34:41-04:00'
describe
'36034' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZN' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
b563d3d22359c9796d2cc94d68f3a3e7
5499cc4ce91e575956bba4e4aea286bf73d6adaa
describe
'248207' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZO' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
b00f6726711824fd65d82264b0bbbf8a
2710752d13ac6f3ba9fd291aef6d0bca9b20d9d5
'2012-05-01T20:45:26-04:00'
describe
'182779' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZP' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
7e6e0dfd6d002f5490c2f471f5fe96e9
f98c4c19972e3ad96097decdfbd619546d31b37b
'2012-05-01T20:37:59-04:00'
describe
'39429' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZQ' 'sip-files00036.pro'
e28b0c15bbbaf6ad26d785e2de902b60
370aa679679d5cec2593d58188050d765fb3e703
'2012-05-01T20:45:18-04:00'
describe
'74666' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZR' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
4ceadd3e43d2127a48c57bc693ab2272
368d6c296699f9e20e0de1e2cb34b83b8102925e
'2012-05-01T20:36:53-04:00'
describe
'2008160' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZS' 'sip-files00036.tif'
e66148de67deadcd26014990e8a79815
29ee4f46321efd18306ed06755e6d32d6863e127
'2012-05-01T20:41:50-04:00'
describe
'1636' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZT' 'sip-files00036.txt'
3bedc2c6c06abe53d03d713ca24cdb73
f659e6e2b336d67c67419ca862b2bbf7cbe67b8f
'2012-05-01T20:46:48-04:00'
describe
'37659' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZU' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
b11b693f2c949ea0248c443e38d607ac
52ff578a93dc4110a60ab06cde642b1ae36dfdd0
'2012-05-01T20:46:56-04:00'
describe
'269082' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZV' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
a6839d36e2b12d2f49e8e3fdbc5ce27b
3ad534fec8b36fd2df28d3cd4b488680b5d9b4ba
'2012-05-01T20:43:45-04:00'
describe
'190835' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZW' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
564c8ea1a99fc5477b05c8f6481b2643
973a48fd2a744ae81cd22e6d9539e3d6a3b599ad
'2012-05-01T20:47:07-04:00'
describe
'36012' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZX' 'sip-files00037.pro'
6e13d7af9a2aea828de955e29731d915
4417e9c020561aaed0df0ef24d51b61e1f068990
'2012-05-01T20:34:15-04:00'
describe
'73165' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZY' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
0ebe75ec61347200b0d9eacbdef9d539
88b66bf6cfed768375fb461b88ff9c45361bd1d1
'2012-05-01T20:42:25-04:00'
describe
'2175228' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACVZZ' 'sip-files00037.tif'
98c8b7afe2535ab853bdf15a1b2f7338
1d7bd724ad7be2fa1046a128eca03a08408e3d34
'2012-05-01T20:37:47-04:00'
describe
'1513' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAA' 'sip-files00037.txt'
b3016eee39bc836d8e8c9a0ee18e5e79
be09f339effd852f64cd728fc7095c423af2d3d2
describe
'35417' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAB' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
fd9c2ad25f942e3ae5f21c969e256002
4ffebb4ff6ba3b19818e19f47f39a89e2f54fa00
'2012-05-01T20:45:13-04:00'
describe
'135537' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAC' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
0cbd5917fe46bac9fa97d4f5ce166bb4
9b4f53f419dd1b7a593c95c66eec3b359d043fb6
'2012-05-01T20:37:48-04:00'
describe
'27383' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAD' 'sip-files00038.pro'
9ef6cb0f516f2a1a5d31e3b39604a99b
3e9526f4da8f7aa8ad89a94fbe26125c0f4077c3
'2012-05-01T20:35:20-04:00'
describe
'57972' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAE' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
630f90e4dc7f42af291b15a2d91ca1e0
473fb495562a38824b7eb1edc031be27ef2ce6a5
describe
'1982224' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAF' 'sip-files00038.tif'
eb9f5a22f3fb7dc71c55109f7e660e7e
523bf3e494ab2c07f20317895bb544078995490a
'2012-05-01T20:41:36-04:00'
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAG' 'sip-files00038.txt'
8d2dea3b704cf879048786bb2c0f33bf
cf36e64ee015d501d885c41e6443511e5ff84328
'2012-05-01T20:35:52-04:00'
describe
'30860' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAH' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ca7b176045688ca8db650c8546038f5b
efca970b6eee340e4e32a24a5b73efd7a1af52d8
'2012-05-01T20:40:46-04:00'
describe
'1007942' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAI' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
f41c6f3f37c15cdc9e105faa26a4a147
a07f51efe621e0ec13eebba29ce8e272d8de4930
'2012-05-01T20:36:10-04:00'
describe
'198263' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAJ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
0af9bb11e47ae026e21699d68422e6ca
af3a1393dc44d3c70b3b72ab5a0cd7f16a507c74
'2012-05-01T20:36:37-04:00'
describe
'74311' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAK' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
974b7b2902db4f4fb29cb9d14abf6a7e
4bb94c62844ec9db3fb45847a56cec1538d40ce9
'2012-05-01T20:30:43-04:00'
describe
'24212748' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAL' 'sip-files00040.tif'
e097bc66d87ee48d8a2379d2c8b0aeca
fbe72d2a009d0a27f208f489dab415f6cad2ee41
'2012-05-01T20:45:37-04:00'
describe
'38632' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAM' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
94b292414e70db482567a64f4243b89a
9d9d1dc4a52ebd27eec1bc9643549a77920b664f
'2012-05-01T20:31:53-04:00'
describe
'266470' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAN' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
4682c805ddaebd687f8f8bc416b002f8
37127740bcde5b20deed3e9dc1e73e836662c329
'2012-05-01T20:38:46-04:00'
describe
'152666' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAO' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
ebe6b39a0f745ca2385b14760f0ae44b
0c559cdbb7d90f3f32f439a88724e69755aa2d8c
describe
'28122' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAP' 'sip-files00043.pro'
7094da4ecc12cbfa4e028d52216d0a40
cc368d2537ba66e291865cd8e0537394a8dc23aa
'2012-05-01T20:36:43-04:00'
describe
'59618' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAQ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
37c9ff69a9321496338f5544a37b28e0
7de3086a61468973ef98e86a90281c51d271be2a
'2012-05-01T20:45:46-04:00'
describe
'2153420' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAR' 'sip-files00043.tif'
20698acba88d449a47e6ebdfa31d3ad9
cfa498759ae84c36d656efe145bc4379b116a488
'2012-05-01T20:47:29-04:00'
describe
'30829' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAS' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
66db6a8b30177174a8f2aba29f07179c
4fc74647434535788f3f9d280629995bdc5bc8d2
'2012-05-01T20:29:55-04:00'
describe
'250629' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAT' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
55d7383e5ee2f53c363b7627beda73b2
fc00da0fc9739805f5a76039aeb0462f9cdd5003
'2012-05-01T20:39:24-04:00'
describe
'195868' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAU' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
06322c9cd8c6959b43e94acf99da7907
1efbf77a4d40bb10fa6fb2e2f711424df839b746
'2012-05-01T20:33:37-04:00'
describe
'42222' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAV' 'sip-files00044.pro'
8fe5117c14949adf842675411f2c2ea2
605975418f563ea1dd82b86a8a17667baad1a1b0
'2012-05-01T20:34:49-04:00'
describe
'77458' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAW' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
b0681938098fdc8777f0fbe0b9d8bf8a
19419add5d8a5f6863624e9695e99010bfcf790f
'2012-05-01T20:44:49-04:00'
describe
'2027576' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAX' 'sip-files00044.tif'
47a15486b2112a7d779680aceba5c5da
b6e211c696fa7f62de753117a7ff21dfd712ec29
'2012-05-01T20:32:48-04:00'
describe
'1728' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAY' 'sip-files00044.txt'
49821e4580984a05c678fbfc8aca2aed
40b1666d776c6434819b9053a10456db9c6fd358
'2012-05-01T20:37:46-04:00'
describe
'37338' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWAZ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
52177ea831313e64b08e2c165b7340bf
4b57889f6c2b8e15f137292ac61d96dc70083f4d
describe
'264925' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBA' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
5d008679f7d4e8e990db5ddb234b67a6
45b79a6d254ed7561694d5f91fd22b1dd09696c2
'2012-05-01T20:38:31-04:00'
describe
'206735' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBB' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
f44631e9291345aabb2bad98bbfae0f8
58f1939589848325410f062f467c6d4e51f1bcb0
'2012-05-01T20:40:34-04:00'
describe
'42936' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBC' 'sip-files00045.pro'
905af11541e610d6bc4029403f971c6d
72f1da8939d878b75078c7721754088d1b2de7f0
'2012-05-01T20:35:00-04:00'
describe
'78879' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBD' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
11b6af08741d4b8e1c1f148e782ec55a
8ffa094df9780792e37c5b2f6964b0b12547f5a9
describe
'2142116' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBE' 'sip-files00045.tif'
a5ce94c9d17fdcb359e3b6f97ccb7696
f08682239920781571a56a8c853e8a311d06bb0b
'2012-05-01T20:41:20-04:00'
describe
'1785' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBF' 'sip-files00045.txt'
98d75116baf80fbcc39d000fc30eb6b0
4eab5dcbad71df700e59d84fcb073b57f4b3a124
'2012-05-01T20:30:07-04:00'
describe
'36205' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBG' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
85387d017b186f6ef12290365ed33f9c
f26ab7f67d95a1a47375f9b26b5c361ceedd37d5
'2012-05-01T20:37:49-04:00'
describe
'197570' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBH' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
95cd4c40553fd91fb7f0d80904e2a2f7
f7d7258751fbe089eb8de29ae0417e21bfdcfb8a
'2012-05-01T20:39:51-04:00'
describe
'43692' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBI' 'sip-files00046.pro'
b3f75cf9dbee1f42cd0ad88df852c90e
15add4e2c6361e28d5ee9fd6d8717e02e220609a
'2012-05-01T20:37:23-04:00'
describe
'77683' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBJ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
de87c9288c9dfece582e7e985f737f3b
acd700e62fefaee652113fd7194ceb5ccc2229df
'2012-05-01T20:36:27-04:00'
describe
'2079224' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBK' 'sip-files00046.tif'
75b12a7f6494fc4d6c8c14b133d6ed71
420d56e006f11dbdffc9676447df501e5e2fd8b3
'2012-05-01T20:40:01-04:00'
describe
'1800' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBL' 'sip-files00046.txt'
2dee09e31a484b05a93097a139bf468f
b1ec8841c84ac2f45e48e5b7f526a3fddcec3ad6
'2012-05-01T20:35:24-04:00'
describe
'36888' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBM' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
5182333f8d3822e77759262426df4da1
d82ba5e62acf5fd9845d890c89cbf076e442c00a
describe
'266813' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBN' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
b32022adb88711743471834b0a608138
a3a37e220ea0546d88b521346a546c0b7852f295
'2012-05-01T20:36:14-04:00'
describe
'199755' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBO' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
1dcc121e058126ba751ccc51324677fb
0a8c47f7ce9665ad0279320101db4fed7b04b63c
'2012-05-01T20:39:43-04:00'
describe
'40311' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBP' 'sip-files00047.pro'
8a06115cb7dce9cdacd8e02ea91a256f
c9536978b457977ef6752520400b256e5eb3ac53
'2012-05-01T20:36:05-04:00'
describe
'76323' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBQ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
a4c8618467214b62f1e0d3e6364fb8cf
12911357788a4a61a718b0945a8aef767dae0658
'2012-05-01T20:42:13-04:00'
describe
'2157776' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBR' 'sip-files00047.tif'
80585cd0f5e310cde8a2416ad584bff5
b970f0e81fb42fa370f1e79767d31509d348eacf
'2012-05-01T20:40:58-04:00'
describe
'1698' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBS' 'sip-files00047.txt'
9ff7e3b33a5fdf1bcb02b81a0442ca49
ad9648a7a2af23d8d592867e2a12f5e841522893
'2012-05-01T20:31:26-04:00'
describe
'35512' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBT' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
3af2fd0965427c66e74be653435015de
330de19e8609ce605f8680364748f4841ee3277f
describe
'258972' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBU' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
a5f705fc93d7e740312ea11964c11721
bda4ce3fae86d54a1171ee2dc9466e7f0d6c6e3c
'2012-05-01T20:33:42-04:00'
describe
'120532' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBV' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
8603f6673bc8d6978263f3d502b33c4e
b43337fe11f9cc378d619dfe1fa9dc6eabfe16c3
'2012-05-01T20:37:25-04:00'
describe
'28440' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBW' 'sip-files00048.pro'
26be4a10fe6e0c3b684a244cd4493005
f401b9d559fc1991cc9f76794839b4e514133956
'2012-05-01T20:40:37-04:00'
describe
'2093788' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBX' 'sip-files00048.tif'
238067e95bd388a1f16f5aaa07c2f57e
e2cf30b45c96a4fc604110030999b4fd93cede12
'2012-05-01T20:45:59-04:00'
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBY' 'sip-files00048.txt'
7dac5de58491d0e0120aec6f40ac0c69
0c18e59364fe13e265256be6401a7a3dd66d8248
'2012-05-01T20:31:35-04:00'
describe
'30303' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWBZ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
5c20e8d63fa5044c3259b99032e24991
538ea0d5f36e986b5578ca510196f29cd870b494
'2012-05-01T20:37:30-04:00'
describe
'246146' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCA' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
fff078835c334cacd37e581d908cf355
bc11fba33a8421183b61fb4c0fd5f6e4f65e6b98
'2012-05-01T20:39:40-04:00'
describe
'61430' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
ca777f1ea517ce8b0cca222d747babec
ff577779922ce2ec57c38d889efe8c02154bcf25
'2012-05-01T20:41:40-04:00'
describe
'7708' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCC' 'sip-files00049.pro'
56c4c729d804ee1a94390a1f9c729767
bd1723c97c4b87c85ccbebb2abbdc31c69e84ca1
'2012-05-01T20:31:13-04:00'
describe
'31925' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCD' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
d91b230f20e7d9607aeee1f3df36cb0a
296b3a763e0fadea4f2cce5e02a11a775dd29a71
'2012-05-01T20:35:47-04:00'
describe
'2085840' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCE' 'sip-files00049.tif'
1cb7dd0c03ae251c22124feb34e7f0f4
9788c3ac5017ec6ad62793e8b306443a1c235934
'2012-05-01T20:35:56-04:00'
describe
'374' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCF' 'sip-files00049.txt'
5262f6a39f01c43c5b672241bf1593ac
6ac40037ada1596ae6d665cf240c5eaf50c64214
'2012-05-01T20:45:51-04:00'
describe
'22911' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
c53b1fb33e780b301bd1ce692dead9ef
87343994599d29f6a9344eee85fb816640229384
'2012-05-01T20:34:56-04:00'
describe
'258963' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCH' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
19d32c1c000e9e3eb98707fa22f6726a
384d6dd962968f5a36cb64dcda43b97be9313f12
'2012-05-01T20:29:44-04:00'
describe
'152802' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCI' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
9558bff4a74acb1dc1676f3dfe77c423
a67f432dd9825ec68290e42301bf35ca2f7bf9b5
'2012-05-01T20:36:20-04:00'
describe
'31407' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCJ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
a6b1f65c6d4ae4c5816dddb0ee081f32
2551e7f96938b2fb404712991f8a73b79bbf770e
'2012-05-01T20:42:59-04:00'
describe
'64038' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCK' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
add83784a5678e89e65269e4b3a50b7c
6af749756ffe77550796bcc0c0514faf8439ccd0
'2012-05-01T20:40:05-04:00'
describe
'2093736' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCL' 'sip-files00050.tif'
d7e0c76c2477b4a2828a8ae79e1c316e
f0b981e59b627e6762be4272c54869c20df73213
'2012-05-01T20:37:35-04:00'
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCM' 'sip-files00050.txt'
1a6f04ec92c95380deceb4c4e4d252b5
1e28c75f3bf1162f1b2e3c091aa6face329ff3e2
'2012-05-01T20:36:31-04:00'
describe
'32368' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCN' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
f357a1e273bace274c873c2aa5f5a727
ddfbdfe62152f8e2f8ba77d812cba96972e7b89c
describe
'252146' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCO' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
03e2bf353456b16b9aded3ef82554ebe
01f281e1dfd8df236efb9d18df335605b24e2f94
'2012-05-01T20:38:45-04:00'
describe
'214745' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCP' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
5fe4e3bddf9e649a60a829c60eb470c9
4bd78077231769fc1a7e6a08f1d1495a8b6b520f
'2012-05-01T20:39:12-04:00'
describe
'42556' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCQ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
19227a956a23406a26a170ef721e9b83
5fb1cde8a6f2b266a96324e4127b7a578984639b
'2012-05-01T20:44:15-04:00'
describe
'81145' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCR' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
60f39d233a10c518463a529a786b068b
41a5bff628a8a73b307179990ef62f3fa54ee2af
'2012-05-01T20:33:31-04:00'
describe
'2039744' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCS' 'sip-files00051.tif'
5a898d14dbc2bcc2f0b1570fee272989
713e6a52dc961160352bb1edf360da1bdb101775
'2012-05-01T20:47:21-04:00'
describe
'1772' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCT' 'sip-files00051.txt'
f070276c07dafff4b83ab83c704d501c
800b335306ea34c28623019785033020c03b2d37
'2012-05-01T20:35:54-04:00'
describe
'37105' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCU' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
cfae6067e16f1b1dce63fb3f589eab68
b4e53702b4846480df23aa00712d88669f7f0dcc
'2012-05-01T20:40:25-04:00'
describe
'258057' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCV' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
d9c752e1c4d89622f33cc68425bfbe74
34bf837a4ed6b131689b6aa6ae97b4620524403a
'2012-05-01T20:46:36-04:00'
describe
'194358' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCW' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
1776ba574aa8bd7886f2c1b1258dd6be
d3066b2a4ed2a9ea7eeaf8fb0c97e8c3798e60f9
'2012-05-01T20:36:33-04:00'
describe
'43296' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
741a4176d6168b715244680264489ca7
169f39995d16c167a80a7d6022cc6982629ac450
'2012-05-01T20:37:36-04:00'
describe
'77167' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
35ba13400991c1929980d25d0c5356e3
f02eb79bbb9b8c28d9fffbc8c0e02656d6a83e17
'2012-05-01T20:40:12-04:00'
describe
'2086688' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWCZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
ddbee4b6560c5a503349a19f5f0d5ce4
feab8994f43eb55445cf5ae981f4a1060f929068
describe
'1769' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
89e6b4ad33d437681f0116fdafd581e4
04af1a20f9d81eeb5cdb0637daefcb1001ed781f
describe
'35873' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDB' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
697e21b76ccb9931c13af670c3d04e21
6ff620dab801b4424a46b947d4b36c2868cf160c
'2012-05-01T20:37:21-04:00'
describe
'269935' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDC' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
8cc60eb99c455981cbd5000fbf8c2e22
007e034d4a0f404b26a73af9ba6e8f60e7fa0cc7
'2012-05-01T20:40:00-04:00'
describe
'41882' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDD' 'sip-files00053.pro'
6250fcdf56e4b4b2a74b48b474480450
826a19e996fb6e4d419ab6a67544d45b2ea29f36
'2012-05-01T20:46:44-04:00'
describe
'77749' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDE' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
4d78b19dc906994c23bb0170badbb8ad
486bad7739cbe6fa535b23993b04d91ccd71ad42
'2012-05-01T20:32:06-04:00'
describe
'2183304' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDF' 'sip-files00053.tif'
09902a602b1cfb820d6ae5b397857d56
b59ce5a3a0ccc4127485c4c28e711be734b13805
'2012-05-01T20:34:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDG' 'sip-files00053.txt'
667a8fa08c2e69319b7d139667cbf79f
5c43d2db976bec0aa8768eb87bf65843261b7f4c
'2012-05-01T20:42:09-04:00'
describe
'35877' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDH' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
43088cf25101723f06279c201aa97a17
4248604243027c6c2328a6e1933ccf5730323f74
'2012-05-01T20:29:43-04:00'
describe
'257670' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDI' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
e56fb7b0b5e18addcaddee603a5894e2
f649a705a6c04849b5f4f4f8e3bde81407fde2df
'2012-05-01T20:40:55-04:00'
describe
'181657' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDJ' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
952ff526ca49a1a976679e9c93a56b4d
c84183a47d867dd219a09a08e0b18ea3343b893c
'2012-05-01T20:36:49-04:00'
describe
'40931' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDK' 'sip-files00054.pro'
c5e665e655a6b6c5ec148d95fc75f849
0025b01e2ff5b3d29b1f23df1d6b447802ac9ef7
describe
'72694' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDL' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3e9c6b20b7fa001686cacc35911daf86
2e079a4010f5a214b749c3165ea35cd0ea3e3237
'2012-05-01T20:37:55-04:00'
describe
'2083600' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDM' 'sip-files00054.tif'
0f21948cad0c5728f8577724a4073085
2bbcf7d7ab6652cf7a0d2f7f735818c19bdea57c
'2012-05-01T20:45:17-04:00'
describe
'1707' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDN' 'sip-files00054.txt'
3a103a923c15f0073a3e9314e35e97d5
3958812223d65892f5b7ebc6e0fd80b4d996ad3e
describe
'35824' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDO' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
82cf8e71b4e0ad4f730306ab826c59c4
7123fff82adf35803201fd90ff71f9fb3f7f70e7
'2012-05-01T20:39:42-04:00'
describe
'265829' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDP' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
3b081ecc7e208a2bfe7d8bebfec7bf42
9ae95ce9d78bec48a0017f004f233405addc0247
'2012-05-01T20:35:38-04:00'
describe
'215802' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDQ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
b283cd6fa57e5129c356fe4093b202d4
6bc41f3c13d9485d4ddec1d412594c38caeef60f
describe
'43672' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDR' 'sip-files00055.pro'
410d4d6d5e036254949f86eb16df8c6d
585a7fea85f0c236750b5b75af73c4992c6a337f
'2012-05-01T20:46:01-04:00'
describe
'82036' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDS' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
35b1d0237fa34c0086c72b44b84d82c3
b5fbcb71f648abd46f2d4f763f72db2fb78e58c9
'2012-05-01T20:32:59-04:00'
describe
'1799' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDT' 'sip-files00055.txt'
fa3985163418a1719d7813818e741510
9ace5943fc6c41329b7d00941158c904def4dbe2
'2012-05-01T20:41:23-04:00'
describe
'36633' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDU' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
421fe263ea45336ea615870657260add
c0d21483b04bf6f4a007af3118daa35dc729b8e7
describe
'256864' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDV' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
86c50896355af27a9be0a1c49561e00b
4b013b1ca79c44dc9f297bf88100d837b707296e
'2012-05-01T20:46:23-04:00'
describe
'199682' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDW' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
6d7ef21b9f7e1b58767563dfbed28753
fb1ca5fcf7d8850508937422211915baad7e2c34
'2012-05-01T20:40:06-04:00'
describe
'43242' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDX' 'sip-files00056.pro'
a4a3c617ba5a50890bcc08859a0ecbcc
4dd98f728f513d45d6dddb431b9215a94f76411f
'2012-05-01T20:34:48-04:00'
describe
'78310' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDY' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
53da9b8c9d51efdebb267eb252a6104a
18cee3e1536516f9d8c275a8e045fcb20a981716
'2012-05-01T20:45:53-04:00'
describe
'2077384' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWDZ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
fe656a8b9e8a22e606df13271de1de68
b4ebd267273dc4b59ed6e8e6c7f6f7642cfb16b8
'2012-05-01T20:34:08-04:00'
describe
'1789' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEA' 'sip-files00056.txt'
d2f3ac90a3e1ecf9be21cb982a9d1b70
a7bbca64a31ababf3986da9a2aa135491a063280
'2012-05-01T20:47:22-04:00'
describe
'36753' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEB' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
3730f489ce371ea920e948ee32d93b4d
38bbb93e0ba5c8840753bb8b100fcf0033f571b8
'2012-05-01T20:44:06-04:00'
describe
'264899' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEC' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
d4c250b952441b0e6e9f053644a6d90d
4f61d39b4aae19be84e3ab1fef44056e9684d296
'2012-05-01T20:30:24-04:00'
describe
'207011' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWED' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
47888497b2ffdb9eb9aa3394f868364a
7afc5b290510e68778f8dd9b14f1c65b9353772b
describe
'42127' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEE' 'sip-files00057.pro'
d4d000fd9d59285285bfba0942c3e05c
b22a8429cf20e03693a6806457f80f067622ddd3
'2012-05-01T20:46:17-04:00'
describe
'80006' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEF' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
26ac64f510a34e481e3d5c8229a80368
a6ddf018aa5368f99d8fab6021374d868e78b27c
'2012-05-01T20:39:02-04:00'
describe
'2142052' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEG' 'sip-files00057.tif'
bbe54a5a014d8df1a4910d83170688a9
179d8fdb11c98a5dfab62ee2a1b3275182bb3e20
'2012-05-01T20:39:48-04:00'
describe
'1727' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEH' 'sip-files00057.txt'
6f965716e1c61166ad54ea21b4aad39d
f321e23a7c4b024e453ff015c132f66e08d02f59
'2012-05-01T20:32:23-04:00'
describe
'262435' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEI' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
11ebfe0abe075cf3ea7d561ec5cb217f
3b88b4bf19c2e050c41c17838bae06a5b6008646
'2012-05-01T20:46:55-04:00'
describe
'192313' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEJ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
1dc5040f2601c6f56eed3090f67110f8
de285634a6c04dcf12074834e1bac94d40466635
describe
'42096' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEK' 'sip-files00058.pro'
1ff5bbd0c94d41d28504dcc7c0830edb
72e5ae80a407770be753105fb27bf70fe77cd192
'2012-05-01T20:29:39-04:00'
describe
'77678' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEL' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
fbf9115bb0309907c85110b9aee7451b
0d08b3e8c16c2190cfe61eafab57a25c5694179d
'2012-05-01T20:41:58-04:00'
describe
'2122060' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEM' 'sip-files00058.tif'
db19ad2c6a15f968a09d6082a9d9a70f
d89f75d64562148edccf20db5ccbc23b85153bce
'2012-05-01T20:32:53-04:00'
describe
'1719' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEN' 'sip-files00058.txt'
f47eb7394e3d16edc446343507fac0e2
53a9c2d48fab3b67aed7a093702a11b9a61e9572
'2012-05-01T20:44:54-04:00'
describe
'36483' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEO' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
070b19353722c3830ab39a8bc500cc87
ffadf5a984540dcf861be1be24b4013df8c99c9e
'2012-05-01T20:39:50-04:00'
describe
'269779' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEP' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
71c817b82f499ad18cdff50c7afb5390
089f7f0f895f453d8996a94ec2aae329d35eb7d2
'2012-05-01T20:36:15-04:00'
describe
'173036' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEQ' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
82252ba31bf1a318cff5d5672dd917f3
eb7dec6323f8b413d9c79e81fa3d52963bb9001b
'2012-05-01T20:30:09-04:00'
describe
'43652' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWER' 'sip-files00059.pro'
56b78436020f2750df923903286fa157
872ba8b951d2e22630e60be005a7d1bae6ee40e2
describe
'69035' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWES' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
119d1b82ab6f53006a92a6a703058217
eed129159bcab59d00669ab6ebf91aa51cb05be8
'2012-05-01T20:45:36-04:00'
describe
'2181068' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWET' 'sip-files00059.tif'
fb0844a123a1834f50034c9a47d69672
e80e95187afdc805cfb2dece6adc864349b2403e
'2012-05-01T20:35:19-04:00'
describe
'1791' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEU' 'sip-files00059.txt'
59e8f7c8fbc41d98a278aaa79f21063d
1329f92e49f1baea4979f9332a9bee6d1e59d434
describe
'32657' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEV' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
75af2c311ec9f61446e8c7c53d2da54c
611f8c3ef0ac8799e159caa2d9cc26a4eb314499
'2012-05-01T20:45:00-04:00'
describe
'262446' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEW' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
af6bd5e8e39235c7599b3d412d08ae76
a07c4cbeee458fb2eab9450a284f3b79c97bd44a
describe
'194517' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEX' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f274515c52ffc76de73d47255b9719c0
6ad59c83fde5073f80a764c32062078593ae7d07
'2012-05-01T20:42:44-04:00'
describe
'77481' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEY' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
7c03314a3a096489db30faf1dbbd32b9
f7a418559226aa38ccd7a52b5779c6c7350af7e0
describe
'2121880' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWEZ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
50ceb0c358792334c458d3301724c650
54058d9b42d544d701a683c7ea6bd2d959183e3b
describe
'1759' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFA' 'sip-files00060.txt'
292d6dadada663cd6d8cd42a34484aa4
caf7c335e8bd7542d08780ea2e91610066420fb2
describe
'36017' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFB' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
a5ed2beb33e83d664070499c188f1f88
f89c977ca3e1044b98c7f8f13e55f9b927db2a06
'2012-05-01T20:35:22-04:00'
describe
'267111' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFC' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
b3747d869d08e1f0da70c81272caaa99
3ae5aa52a52e1c11b7f20bcafa01137555a6757d
'2012-05-01T20:39:34-04:00'
describe
'163207' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFD' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
0ac3bbd6f95babe5e545d49dd597c403
c4e2528c2b272b3f5991dbed71df8ff2dbedc608
describe
'40723' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFE' 'sip-files00061.pro'
b5487509099109c8b3343e6589cf4873
d93d7002ae692bdd6809f44c0aee0890cf6a7c3c
'2012-05-01T20:30:12-04:00'
describe
'66074' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFF' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
1a3c23f76972fe4142fe67b93093d741
f56a154a03e564210d2b1591e5622c5073fe922a
'2012-05-01T20:32:33-04:00'
describe
'2159192' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFG' 'sip-files00061.tif'
caf7d6446c64bec3e073ca2c86e671e0
69c674a12fcbd2c975f524fa198c0318443c8240
'2012-05-01T20:44:57-04:00'
describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFH' 'sip-files00061.txt'
8f6fede61e28a15c4771a522e9add984
dd0e5f5b4dfc1f0acfe501c842c3cc1bf41c824c
'2012-05-01T20:44:48-04:00'
describe
'32350' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFI' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
0429858f105ca6d633627f19bd6a6f9a
12b97b429cfdfecd6c949a3df007d76df82d1130
'2012-05-01T20:41:37-04:00'
describe
'230668' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFJ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
50a52aa6cee112186ef45790481bacaf
6723d68e95323bb977a00dbe53c0ed93f6b06c65
'2012-05-01T20:34:23-04:00'
describe
'172521' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFK' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
81b8b3339a3e8f42bf79cf1640bbb27d
2038c4c0921f19e44fb41e2db73ec72d83d5c507
'2012-05-01T20:37:34-04:00'
describe
'30280' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFL' 'sip-files00062.pro'
0a44db62267eebd99a8d1c79365481e1
357ea8a15c5f1882e89232197ccd291017bc43e1
describe
'71092' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFM' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
365d6bae7dd8b8c832d5abf2c4afc50a
028be522d06610f591637e1e8dec2bcdb4975932
describe
'1868044' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFN' 'sip-files00062.tif'
2683fc7cae58524fb693dedbd5c9a13b
04c39c9055296bda656d8aa0557954765361213b
'2012-05-01T20:32:34-04:00'
describe
'33770' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFO' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
cadd149485e8330a00b6fcb206c6d81d
e218b5be965863523ffce5eb5eaa52202f5fed21
'2012-05-01T20:38:58-04:00'
describe
'209146' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFP' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
7e96f25bfc18731eb09d4e36aa6f9dae
628e28b66dcaf7ae6ae76f60916faf0f2b2827b6
'2012-05-01T20:31:15-04:00'
describe
'233892' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFQ' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
d379ad3091196af30dbba5df1ca61dd2
12865edfdc06ab76a237762971030e02e3ceb04a
'2012-05-01T20:31:41-04:00'
describe
'42841' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFR' 'sip-files00063.pro'
bf1a9b70751aa01498d1a8a8d9dd3c81
07f9e182257f4f17103493b73002667f9210dd6b
'2012-05-01T20:35:23-04:00'
describe
'92326' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFS' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
e5d9b000dcc71c8401b6cdcc18695248
c1ee04a7e5de8c82f6fea8ae38b43945090adc8f
'2012-05-01T20:38:48-04:00'
describe
'1696816' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFT' 'sip-files00063.tif'
2fb86552baf859bc7c4901dcfdb1f36d
be67c5b2c6888c22d40387c288722ee2a8de0199
'2012-05-01T20:36:55-04:00'
describe
'1784' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFU' 'sip-files00063.txt'
4f42a5816f1943cd423acdc56fa74d97
34b65160c76603899daecd962bec3b56c09c91d0
'2012-05-01T20:41:29-04:00'
describe
'41063' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFV' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
7c2ac70e81bf01dac02e85b2e99817a3
75f23aa1f3a561142b3e75af2ac3a3daab0f98de
'2012-05-01T20:41:33-04:00'
describe
'240626' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFW' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
7f591cd29952925eb100eed13ebe5e0b
ebd09ad71d60648495153c3e0fd101975d4ffbd5
'2012-05-01T20:33:17-04:00'
describe
'214882' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFX' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
13d0a026ff7ae6c9ef699e5cc332437e
b5b72158a4b919ce6e99ea0c10293cc0435dda47
'2012-05-01T20:46:40-04:00'
describe
'42728' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFY' 'sip-files00064.pro'
e61ede1e66f40c2fdf31dfd30316174f
e59b1894406fe3041d2f58950160c93c27c38298
describe
'84623' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWFZ' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
1090e4d892bbda26fc170e37f6bd98b8
b6ef431359a0b833ad18177a852b410c4af960b1
'2012-05-01T20:35:36-04:00'
describe
'1949040' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGA' 'sip-files00064.tif'
1c0fb6f50b208a901291720d62c8d8ee
ce2683d890a2e00432d749ba86da4278d68af8ec
'2012-05-01T20:45:11-04:00'
describe
'1758' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGB' 'sip-files00064.txt'
834686bba0dd85cd55166c9232f33a7a
1faae435996c306bb4f09576bee48d6e34deb8d6
'2012-05-01T20:42:49-04:00'
describe
'37465' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGC' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
eef887f6c3af3ab691074b3b2d26cf0c
b3cd558b7b6a7ec3bd83c748380fb7175b1155df
describe
'221373' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGD' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
d244a861b7ae84aae209b40dbfca47d3
09b444322c311dda3a0787c147722b869bb7abaa
'2012-05-01T20:42:19-04:00'
describe
'41476' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGE' 'sip-files00065.pro'
c091e05b6a3396cbf629d1b64c6a0b15
ab0de242303c3f9e0439d100857036e730b3eda9
'2012-05-01T20:43:40-04:00'
describe
'88239' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGF' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
e8c3b94c5eb36a00787ca8339286cf15
536b5a6ebcacff94f5019312052f0bad2cf86454
'2012-05-01T20:37:27-04:00'
describe
'1773068' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGG' 'sip-files00065.tif'
fef248f3edbc1b791d02656742c0e081
0625d29348215b58117ddeb51259c46caf1afe6d
'2012-05-01T20:43:55-04:00'
describe
'1761' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGH' 'sip-files00065.txt'
469e4a8eb1ae96bc15e8bfa9d444ec18
2b0e931a743ab9395dfe36ca64432f9ac7229f15
'2012-05-01T20:32:32-04:00'
describe
'39166' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGI' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
f1adbbb04b7650f478734647dcd8b8e9
53abbff18772e2b4e1908a7d878348bd8197fb73
'2012-05-01T20:34:42-04:00'
describe
'233517' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGJ' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
a90e822cbec564f180c2ccd9e0570b1b
6a3440d79d9d44fe9bf0ae900404ead8c3af6700
'2012-05-01T20:46:41-04:00'
describe
'214775' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGK' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
e11825a237c4ddd8bfbd73b122d43c1e
f0e6944ac8bd063a4b96ab9cfe4c578fed63162b
describe
'41645' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGL' 'sip-files00066.pro'
85c1eb6a21ca8d62abb047f7c8ef2956
cfb7e578fc761c23d7050d3b4ffd0e08131309fc
describe
'84866' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGM' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
8bca69c415f0e794cebbece5d32e24cf
92fd5a212ada3b3f41a59805e38ea7518716c1ad
'2012-05-01T20:32:04-04:00'
describe
'1890900' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGN' 'sip-files00066.tif'
350d46863917139ba7a66200fd599cc7
27fa5c0909b0700b54eb26db5e8a20d93ff387cf
'2012-05-01T20:42:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGO' 'sip-files00066.txt'
a1f3adb93b7c507433632b017ce53c34
aa3ef84342b5a92a5657eb54d00b51ddd2611842
'2012-05-01T20:35:50-04:00'
describe
'37453' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGP' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
459a275456ea7c6d256a63e163185944
b6109ac673902b8c21406f8a81f6f83bba02cd29
'2012-05-01T20:29:53-04:00'
describe
'258334' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGQ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
b9e447b03f8d8c98915c7686e5ff435b
04c4959a83b6ac465fc2c995480d715d63e0282f
describe
'200068' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGR' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
8cd0de33926f6544365e8e489d519088
1c9c5d55cadb55dd147ab3cfc05e641f5e672cb1
'2012-05-01T20:35:34-04:00'
describe
'41405' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGS' 'sip-files00067.pro'
76aaf81f41df2433fdf11e521972ff1b
f6c7af83bf1ceb6cbb6bfcd18ea5f9fca0c1727b
'2012-05-01T20:46:32-04:00'
describe
'2089704' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGT' 'sip-files00067.tif'
d314533fc69365cd08d00ebe41691906
3c758aa1236cd2c79b8766f5d17f848e39c5cdcf
'2012-05-01T20:34:01-04:00'
describe
'1696' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGU' 'sip-files00067.txt'
d3ba5ba5589af7175859419c6e769bcc
81d1bb3b0cb5e23814a3f29337245470c4b26c2e
'2012-05-01T20:31:07-04:00'
describe
'35606' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGV' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
1c35d20adc091e364228cc1d9dda6512
b3f9db30454f3ecb83b6cfe1516e70ce326500a0
'2012-05-01T20:45:25-04:00'
describe
'222877' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGW' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
34ad02cdf26b305264e68361803b9005
2c2c83436b876746bb4ae59d07ed50f45bda4d27
describe
'223840' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGX' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
c9dbf947f74f1b043aa0f33660e966b3
151115804f65b4009a7cdd668d540e9010e3c84c
'2012-05-01T20:39:15-04:00'
describe
'43020' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGY' 'sip-files00068.pro'
75e787681d108e90450205304d4e23c6
c8110b6f890c8fe5776dd112e648aadfe44e6172
'2012-05-01T20:39:55-04:00'
describe
'88939' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWGZ' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
d4f16363d050ec7d19a10e26a02622e9
b1e25f3cb46cdf8eaf8ae81be93ea28fe4561dbb
'2012-05-01T20:40:36-04:00'
describe
'1806156' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHA' 'sip-files00068.tif'
4c227c848f25d823db1ea8113f31c5d3
ac4a6ed5d004bff70466fb67b46b449bac7ec7e9
'2012-05-01T20:34:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHB' 'sip-files00068.txt'
d812a6c36595bf73781b95de7963ea21
6b95c64a46fb5aec2eb4cd701138f84cfd4b1211
'2012-05-01T20:46:47-04:00'
describe
'39224' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHC' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
3ec32c7d10fe50a57ea9310662b1b78c
6465c7422464dc45b3cc4a6687ea0b00cb346998
'2012-05-01T20:42:07-04:00'
describe
'251494' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHD' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
3b1f041072e986b1d4bda6a5538f9a17
875fda89c59062d83ec285b27d659aa1c7b717cc
describe
'217219' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHE' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
7fbe3f1fd441e65d6929d4ded26112f5
8d07ab6193863506de92a4ddd3429d6826e94672
'2012-05-01T20:46:27-04:00'
describe
'42608' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHF' 'sip-files00069.pro'
a9a6626e8e02dd976972647146d8e881
083e3ff94e807623c96af0afe4d472f496530797
describe
'83083' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHG' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
b3f1fe9905a0962c85e2953a37308745
d5932f0d286bfbb09a1c27de0f1fa4cf115e5473
'2012-05-01T20:40:35-04:00'
describe
'2035184' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHH' 'sip-files00069.tif'
15497e05c6ed41a3f396a17b9d3204b7
ca20edc5ce5dce0a4aef57b1d8e4f3d8a6144f79
'2012-05-01T20:35:40-04:00'
describe
'1747' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHI' 'sip-files00069.txt'
1d25f3dc38a8db569d5e0dd1f22aa768
4671b8346c6e36bf85060786ddc2c8e9fb3a8cb1
'2012-05-01T20:29:38-04:00'
describe
'36805' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHJ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
ee80ffa4fa2d50c5738fd0a16926674f
c84f8900c68ea30c665527ca3beaf83bc284e058
'2012-05-01T20:39:03-04:00'
describe
'232292' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHK' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
c7dc6ace68622396a70222afe07637d6
9263bf8fc6f34cc407ce85fe39a0105ba4e423b6
'2012-05-01T20:47:27-04:00'
describe
'215391' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHL' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
5b97ec07df544195e77e44f987a59017
f462c0248622039e06eb004656b12c76d58fb7a2
'2012-05-01T20:35:37-04:00'
describe
'41945' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHM' 'sip-files00070.pro'
a8c279ce5349a16130475ad475e8366c
02666cbecf37acd65b87a768e38cd5a941473045
describe
'85855' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHN' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
2c606315bd59c199e71666f951facc86
f6180c065f5f963dd7539e27d66ae6c537ca1a3e
'2012-05-01T20:45:52-04:00'
describe
'1881312' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHO' 'sip-files00070.tif'
23fb3ec2f28c1be76efe1c270b94194f
152e9e0f67c04675cb5fe27b49a9c3136401c93c
'2012-05-01T20:45:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHP' 'sip-files00070.txt'
d8538b0a4a901b10206ebe24b0c04176
56d328d4a28f86793f19f46afb2c2760642dd018
'2012-05-01T20:45:24-04:00'
describe
'37825' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHQ' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
c2e77f5b8a94954c9bccd89237c77bd9
bb9d3485031957f249f8c19a597a8b690d1ac873
describe
'251469' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHR' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
34ec63cd3333e015bb2c86f7f4517696
670941bfff9f7cdc52b2aaecd4d93e7bd4ddadb4
'2012-05-01T20:46:34-04:00'
describe
'206530' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHS' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
e0854bbcbebf602fb19992ed9472f98f
3ad61a3cd6682d5760b7bd5c838f49714220c08f
'2012-05-01T20:37:28-04:00'
describe
'42177' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHT' 'sip-files00071.pro'
99fea8b45688dae40d2511b11f90404f
b903270584092693460f32b530fe8af2d6b0b08f
describe
'81225' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHU' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
1b7ccc01d2655baea1ff03ef78d03087
9e9ac326514101ad5cf7923773f6b22ad1b79957
describe
'2034948' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHV' 'sip-files00071.tif'
b8ac6b1609312ed4166a377011a40f98
3d469cacdac8422cc6dcb435fbe60420941943f6
'2012-05-01T20:46:11-04:00'
describe
'1748' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHW' 'sip-files00071.txt'
6b31f0fc549b1e7c01d0d3e7e065fa24
d7ed19934e2652bf32609fec73b7ee96946ca64a
describe
'35897' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHX' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
92226f55f22f4889ba489f1548d4c3b4
d134c832b172f6fb016a348c0518f8571bc10833
'2012-05-01T20:39:19-04:00'
describe
'227032' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHY' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
1ded23ec6322aead2773f0c275c38203
475c8151e8a1e6961f213e2de2fb17e8d600179b
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWHZ' 'sip-files00072.pro'
90b49183bb6c4f78be76accbd16722d5
73b8a360e102de8e5d02312257b367c35953e231
'2012-05-01T20:40:07-04:00'
describe
'86958' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIA' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
9c2af123054d3867003fed5564d7f492
b8ebd1708772ee6690990b6c663a85ce61ae7c3c
'2012-05-01T20:36:30-04:00'
describe
'1839784' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIB' 'sip-files00072.tif'
ab9cbb05a82476ef3d34b0c7aba9fe25
f0d9c859cc2a2dc29d81c5c09fc2acdcd8448053
'2012-05-01T20:37:07-04:00'
describe
'1706' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIC' 'sip-files00072.txt'
9aa24dfb4e9da56336480e2cb039ff90
c4b562c747f2a4b1176a62c8a2d6f8eefb4f98ed
'2012-05-01T20:38:09-04:00'
describe
'38839' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWID' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
6968773163829528c25ad2ec50fae7ee
e6fe20924c22fe87fa07bfcc308c41f410799ede
describe
'241540' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIE' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
c9d152ae5510d3d60a6e2f804a20ae76
318abf083c81acd10883872c3a316408b72fdcc0
'2012-05-01T20:34:55-04:00'
describe
'208118' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIF' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
2b0b2d1dadad6460e277632aa2507202
8d97e6c1537ca64ae02d744e7f006be5d0ad190b
'2012-05-01T20:39:59-04:00'
describe
'40033' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIG' 'sip-files00073.pro'
ee572ddbebb1e5e5c0773da3ffe6c7ed
61edb920cdb7c6df8731178e17f8c87d5af1e3c0
'2012-05-01T20:37:01-04:00'
describe
'82327' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIH' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
fd4c137fe4a5acf12a4b9a1e6d303668
efe989207471c87739c8fa679b3c566fab7a7e99
'2012-05-01T20:42:05-04:00'
describe
'1955452' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWII' 'sip-files00073.tif'
26153ad4ec24e9e048a6a3105c6efce6
9bd228e19d0b05d6a9552396b62ae052db60249e
describe
'1681' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIJ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
0e188f8abcaa01af30288668ebe8a3fb
17ba9660b6b6ff5a743340fe2688529e58a75ebd
describe
'36467' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIK' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
3971564e1d6d5cc6340beae56a9ecca1
b3689e85541d3366aeb221a28e82ef4027e902f6
'2012-05-01T20:45:15-04:00'
describe
'243667' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIL' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
5474f1930fa053961b8b423f388ed02a
1e195587a0ed8df4f961f041ef5104242b78ce3e
describe
'211803' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIM' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
ed6dd1e2cf3db7c3012c65a68f813a19
115b6e1eceed8dc38c26e250461cf817895eba03
'2012-05-01T20:37:05-04:00'
describe
'42183' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIN' 'sip-files00074.pro'
715824b88fa372a49e4f37ae41ee8971
f48d51f85a3f0be13e98c2d904f2c1fa61383fa2
'2012-05-01T20:43:54-04:00'
describe
'83794' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIO' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
b24441ae87581104821b851c5bd8ad3e
56499496f22b81bb6366cfb10756c9411b58d670
describe
'1726' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIP' 'sip-files00074.txt'
d399c1af93600836402bc05c094a4638
5b2a76951684a755f7c79bd9bb7384df57aceb6e
'2012-05-01T20:33:47-04:00'
describe
'37233' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIQ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
a7179c7fa033e14eaed0fb59eacedc86
5a3cf610e43282c33f1ea99a384550bf5e78345f
'2012-05-01T20:37:54-04:00'
describe
'251509' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIR' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
ade843bf0aa8dedebdbfc63b5144576d
8989c7da9e4709df86be9a51c18f2744e0729959
'2012-05-01T20:34:12-04:00'
describe
'180132' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIS' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
d2581edaddedf7e458c807be422e7d4f
4b97e37a76e8bc8a0d42046b27277d3aba1a6983
'2012-05-01T20:45:16-04:00'
describe
'35492' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIT' 'sip-files00075.pro'
fd6da3c8969c6ba33fae272e070bea35
0af856837e4b4d49a1e55814a7d53d9fad06cf10
'2012-05-01T20:42:39-04:00'
describe
'72324' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIU' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
db3dfb23051346dc0efaebfe2bdb6513
c53aeede4511f0fdc27e4d9e1651dff0146f762c
'2012-05-01T20:33:16-04:00'
describe
'2034128' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIV' 'sip-files00075.tif'
28dd2696a96b43b00f5b7519426aee5f
26150d98928d1fd8212b8b93c7e64786c034cb0d
'2012-05-01T20:44:37-04:00'
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIW' 'sip-files00075.txt'
1cee3bf827bb3e3f4d44445a30d1d369
9066ea694c33bec8b25eb39896cff7f9a2941546
describe
'33596' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIX' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
859c992c3517af6007c1d1710cfd6ba9
305d23a6ca7f3c3427682eb2bf995d18a458bee9
'2012-05-01T20:38:51-04:00'
describe
'245671' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIY' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
e3fc3c9c0e5a148b4f981291adc5bb91
17c2cbf367e503d0be458e7a83fda6143aa59065
'2012-05-01T20:44:07-04:00'
describe
'177327' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWIZ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
5075d295980f21dfc2708f4640d8cba5
ba1201504cb5c6cf12b0173e08f0249784d20908
'2012-05-01T20:34:43-04:00'
describe
'35702' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJA' 'sip-files00076.pro'
a62fd9ef52327197fb834cd9583e0c09
b70d204b21a26db51b3018543434dfc7e30bfb98
describe
'70198' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJB' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
07acda199f46734dce49cf97be0a31e4
06d6904ff3457b2dee65ee8bc7b8da6373584438
'2012-05-01T20:44:03-04:00'
describe
'1987248' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJC' 'sip-files00076.tif'
bf5702f8de3b7e19482dd1aa7acd487c
83803fa91141b4210cb47d002f94ffe65562a307
'2012-05-01T20:43:14-04:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJD' 'sip-files00076.txt'
cc74e08eb3d08853829c106b77c4a345
c2a3801effd4e6b1fb64e105742bae3b546249ba
'2012-05-01T20:40:24-04:00'
describe
'1076479' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJE' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
8f3ca30e75f9e90f5f4d516f499c5724
326a808a5797b4e72fa663ed4f3462e0f40e86c8
'2012-05-01T20:33:57-04:00'
describe
'189623' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJF' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
cbf5bec71a842384cf1f909d79be5271
784bcc1925daf3f07cad62b9f4097d70c2975b57
'2012-05-01T20:41:27-04:00'
describe
'68056' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJG' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
8e6227bac06a6ca3a02d75a2707781b4
814317b824689316cd75dbfc179d5371e360693a
describe
'25857100' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJH' 'sip-files00079.tif'
ea2274c05a16c3a93725fec8cca102c9
10d53a3b8db696a7db4715316a2e4ef3f128be91
describe
'35688' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJI' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
a616ac0cc5407e322a422f330227afea
ffb0987a778a875ffc2f5f1521c7eb58834dc09c
'2012-05-01T20:46:57-04:00'
describe
'269196' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJJ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
c8382a8e90fdf484c6dc76b55359979e
8d86e0e996494afba28ca7823a0146b5a6c2eda5
describe
'213343' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJK' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
1f4ccb1a770441332a69f7aad8341015
d57bc6d04b870edfd60a358523428dfbb7fa29db
'2012-05-01T20:33:15-04:00'
describe
'42448' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJL' 'sip-files00081.pro'
08912b645f39e8a24d9b349a3a4c0bf8
d89543c7f04187b55c87b4ec2696c8b7559904e2
'2012-05-01T20:39:44-04:00'
describe
'80198' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJM' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
38d413d6f6c7c23c43432679d17d8e78
94f962f5117fce4067b127641706a252b8cdb178
describe
'2177140' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJN' 'sip-files00081.tif'
d14984b639436fcd18f07dffb66cff4a
5c71f394231ee1b52fbc444928947bca80f12fd6
'2012-05-01T20:39:08-04:00'
describe
'1749' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJO' 'sip-files00081.txt'
83010c2cc76a74cf82310f9c077c0319
b037b52665599a4032a585d6f61f359cae9b7256
describe
'36945' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJP' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
7f6d68fd152f9eb2ac47654bcbb65372
096840f3db711c0bb08dd13a9c001c52b3b29584
'2012-05-01T20:41:24-04:00'
describe
'254340' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJQ' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
10a4a4875e8a043bb43934193cc470d0
97a7d140945264db3a44ff867858abf0e2f9336b
'2012-05-01T20:44:39-04:00'
describe
'206771' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJR' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
c7fc6eb2faed2c5295651b5487d1b1c3
23031aeff664120479118e24cb5371117bbc0158
describe
'43450' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJS' 'sip-files00082.pro'
28b79854513114f2ac595405db13c763
307e3cbfc6eef2cf53d3bbe731e5b212b89ff17e
'2012-05-01T20:33:13-04:00'
describe
'79217' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJT' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
afbeb99b83665ee3afc888a964992bc3
48ab23f384df04e97bc587f090231261c1f8513d
describe
'1780' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJU' 'sip-files00082.txt'
7ba443026927b98d707a86e5fd84dab0
408a065d94209e467d2468b84c369aa561df5cf7
'2012-05-01T20:40:41-04:00'
describe
'36741' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJV' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
d6c0007899e4bba0b8eb41f729c52ab9
c3d1c0dea42fa6e7e320b0545618df9a1dffee1c
'2012-05-01T20:39:58-04:00'
describe
'263397' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJW' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
b1d2699f9811a85732a68ed51ebc986b
dda5166782b4e4970c44be94159ccc1efd3bd729
'2012-05-01T20:36:46-04:00'
describe
'210631' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJX' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
8f591544234dbe1b08312b3666512c01
0e653f80ebccc93536d623cfc6db5860c45ae5c9
'2012-05-01T20:37:16-04:00'
describe
'43784' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJY' 'sip-files00083.pro'
afd32f44fd4a1a71f811619ac1a8c9e6
20b047f53021a20ddd386e6a24b25aa64bb0da8d
'2012-05-01T20:32:22-04:00'
describe
'79277' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWJZ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
0362a25727d711e5b36646ed90482526
6adfb453ff0694fede95569798971fbbe4c5baac
'2012-05-01T20:40:20-04:00'
describe
'2129208' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKA' 'sip-files00083.tif'
c441172a6515912a70f4b894b7a0a523
6f3e56c69d408bda41542e2f0f34ab30b27dccbd
'2012-05-01T20:36:16-04:00'
describe
'1823' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKB' 'sip-files00083.txt'
07ad37e5a98f1296a1ecfd3e351bf77b
a44c69e1ebb12571cb4d043ab4c92992ecd8e21e
'2012-05-01T20:31:12-04:00'
describe
'36309' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKC' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
8499a243d396e454563b684392c6efac
ab5e48f28ad3bf96dd574ef32d3e46dc15a87686
describe
'262183' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKD' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
36c1a8469bc34948289692e7484ef292
0b1eac236f58908c60c3bb60bc8bf70cf07d6615
'2012-05-01T20:32:46-04:00'
describe
'200027' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKE' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
60dd12d64216b137562eb64dc0c6ecf4
500d11d934f435183f0b6c7e681d81d81d08b8d4
'2012-05-01T20:36:23-04:00'
describe
'42934' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKF' 'sip-files00084.pro'
07270dcb4d5ffd2c86e1b66d4043e8b0
e68dfbce03c9426c71e1e69cabf260cef639d7c1
'2012-05-01T20:30:11-04:00'
describe
'77674' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKG' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
7cf94f4fe27e8a06457e1b638bbf6ad1
eed4607fffd8fc15f3e168a9c3c1be115e142b36
'2012-05-01T20:36:39-04:00'
describe
'2120404' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKH' 'sip-files00084.tif'
e161e20104898b20d1ad50ecf5812f13
397f30961ac4f081d17e8e06aed5fa8015882e1f
describe
'1794' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKI' 'sip-files00084.txt'
a87e1c16b7b09947bd6b052b8ec7ed90
2d78d94e68c3583418ec904ba6cda3283bf5b08f
'2012-05-01T20:47:31-04:00'
describe
'257858' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKJ' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
2262327790567fa5c6d5d7d1a472481d
bf1d17b69a1c3c98240d67b81f283fc46bea2728
'2012-05-01T20:46:54-04:00'
describe
'100417' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKK' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
0ae89fff49efa6bc4e1b3a5e90c6a0b3
8c8986f34b42a6221607ad11d4a34e58071877b7
'2012-05-01T20:42:14-04:00'
describe
'15222' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKL' 'sip-files00085.pro'
a4384247d0ee83d5aadf190392e07e69
31336bd63326199472e15816c31ab99be4b19da6
'2012-05-01T20:34:58-04:00'
describe
'45964' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKM' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
43e098413bcc24e025a99b91edf02239
21337e246e87065f7b5eda25404bef4575568464
'2012-05-01T20:37:26-04:00'
describe
'2083052' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKN' 'sip-files00085.tif'
f12e64dea68f96c059a69fd7e6dad807
df808a64154f6ddd6858c61336ef99a7eab11e44
'2012-05-01T20:36:48-04:00'
describe
'734' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKO' 'sip-files00085.txt'
02745da0067eda3bec4d2fd162c1eee6
692f4a23d69cfb5c5e3234e9aaf201ccddb38507
'2012-05-01T20:40:08-04:00'
describe
'27895' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKP' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
deacc92762d4c588849374a63712789a
a5b802bc2f80ad176958609b30d71b5a8bcbc24e
describe
'264413' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKQ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
488cd243c12b96918272275ca399c36b
d1c617847c24dc4ab8a78efc093bde471f8ffb53
describe
'125974' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKR' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
bda236969c437033231c497be409c8ea
34ab4315e9508d5197bfe161f23b47af58434177
'2012-05-01T20:35:15-04:00'
describe
'23978' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKS' 'sip-files00086.pro'
5f76bd14c00197d037e8a70a5cd983f8
7c7ef3ebdc694289cd4663cb207fcc6342241f1b
'2012-05-01T20:31:51-04:00'
describe
'54632' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKT' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
7e4288dbbf8271d38cac62a10e46b35e
49d18c6c6e77092da7a867b883b5d9273253633f
'2012-05-01T20:39:11-04:00'
describe
'2136916' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKU' 'sip-files00086.tif'
2359f81660ee70f209244b578b70d205
c9d82ffe0d2d5a7b34cd1f994a4e0b3ddae9437c
'2012-05-01T20:33:51-04:00'
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKV' 'sip-files00086.txt'
dedf993c31183bd16177c2a88ecbd0c2
69b60758b768f856cb9cf5ba0497e23a0a9a77cb
'2012-05-01T20:34:51-04:00'
describe
'30387' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKW' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
fe9aac144c4430d72c40656816101fd6
ecbadaa7c1e16c56d60f683e814f66826fcb69a6
describe
'198118' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKX' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
2d6ea2f62d48e738438fab19e5a42aea
f1bdfbe6b45ef25456edabe03a0b59834223c394
'2012-05-01T20:35:57-04:00'
describe
'56387' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKY' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
17f3c2b392cdd64a817480748a758755
49bd2084083c1f34c6d11c8e89e78d451048db27
'2012-05-01T20:29:33-04:00'
describe
'30525' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWKZ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
daa6da65c30c861d082cf92033aa2a6d
b371483e246dc6a4a95856888aa35451d4ebb328
describe
'2251080' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLA' 'sip-files00087.tif'
5d9d860d6fa3ab1cfc3427254023b26e
5a84eaf290d613af0ce1374713d3d6e6a4d8ea9d
describe
'303' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLB' 'sip-files00087.txt'
511caee82479bf55953ac504175366d6
1a7ca1cadcf02351fcdeab1517f296c93494436e
'2012-05-01T20:42:51-04:00'
describe
'22749' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLC' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
2fd979af3204c4c93e1552c59c9b3245
0dc0eccf3093be35bc862f5a3e53551592cefba1
'2012-05-01T20:38:55-04:00'
describe
'269457' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLD' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
66731750689e19e3431a726e1d264d6a
09c09bbe1a47fce56fcc1c3f7dc9d1a62f3cc0b0
describe
'164281' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLE' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
53394d4f420b1099941a7a7db28c152e
31293c50a13cf57cf7996d233f96830c6363921b
'2012-05-01T20:42:04-04:00'
describe
'31602' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLF' 'sip-files00088.pro'
a31dff7a89e4962c48b71d4dfe60265c
7eddb42cb759ba93b4d49b436329bd6bcc6941ac
describe
'65826' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLG' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
a42c2090523acd136f900a66fc5ec99a
3495927ddde3e7522a66cf647020c91cd54b5978
describe
'2177284' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLH' 'sip-files00088.tif'
2fd093a45032882e3904f60650cedfc8
61898f9b901933cb0e1fade5d3e29c380800e986
'2012-05-01T20:33:45-04:00'
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLI' 'sip-files00088.txt'
a2dee0baffd5ceac4f7e8ad00951fdfc
29671ff8ffb918c30238fa7c0fab4f52b51069fe
describe
'32529' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLJ' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
b5bb6b4146470d8a9d12408bf1f1fcaf
c724169d47741bb0d33043f440b4d9c8161891b6
'2012-05-01T20:42:47-04:00'
describe
'254922' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLK' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
16b6c9e679841b43e7265dbff2dfacc2
cfda82232b074d6f8790af77002d30072e2fb290
describe
'212909' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLL' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
c5c3b287b419d6dd3c944565a3614618
21dfa3cfd91a4a7fe4021f788e7c8469311e3894
describe
'43409' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLM' 'sip-files00089.pro'
8130de130f88f083c54d9465baf26c68
c48148bdb5c5866535b4365fdc644e02414b4bcb
'2012-05-01T20:38:59-04:00'
describe
'79431' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLN' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
8c2ed2a6ff570b3f75c690bec2a6c719
c4a5edc166347758c8acdf5046f5bcca990dbb1c
'2012-05-01T20:37:06-04:00'
describe
'2062924' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLO' 'sip-files00089.tif'
3b768185aa1bbfaf9e31044b0d62e21f
b6c725607ff0cef848aa326329f8d8cbc8e20537
'2012-05-01T20:34:44-04:00'
describe
'37533' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLP' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
85954240f09ad2bf93ecc80039b49a0d
f7165a76c9df7099ce47d7fde8aad65d528de7a7
'2012-05-01T20:36:03-04:00'
describe
'259341' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLQ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
deea63c6eed7b511c7f64069a0ca672a
be0acacd2d27072de6aaa3974d3e9419c02a72fb
'2012-05-01T20:29:49-04:00'
describe
'204309' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLR' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
6c7e095638ae566dc8b9e5fbda0fa0af
ed57d0007e167acf3dffdf8460a9134b3b91a937
'2012-05-01T20:40:04-04:00'
describe
'42961' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLS' 'sip-files00090.pro'
21e2e033125cd0f917e8b4080081fbc8
fe369960642d5c86ca945a73e4b3454df1edac08
'2012-05-01T20:32:45-04:00'
describe
'79306' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLT' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
483cc1b5bcf5056ddceffffc3bb54983
0ea63b46565b0887893b570c8343e277e230a489
'2012-05-01T20:41:22-04:00'
describe
'2098340' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLU' 'sip-files00090.tif'
4190781d1460c4a27fb16e7328fe6e2f
275cff478e6979488d2c9bfe5d528c3f579617ff
'2012-05-01T20:34:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLV' 'sip-files00090.txt'
ca95b8a9f40d21b042de9fae4613e412
3deec107117d1f3cac64c6bbae07a9c5c05b2e6d
describe
'36645' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLW' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
45ff58223e6eff0f59ba0f399a61d9f1
22d6cc0bcb0ef09b17bd9ffca0591fd07c042e6a
'2012-05-01T20:39:17-04:00'
describe
'255511' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLX' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
b6f5e43fa13fdcf5cbd0c20f43e5ef81
ff27d6af60f23d1d33c86bf4ebc1aeb556ef444a
'2012-05-01T20:45:57-04:00'
describe
'205088' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLY' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
5ed986abf492920dbb2c409d04851ae7
d63ddbe3b6a16cd3610420529e25722df568f049
'2012-05-01T20:33:04-04:00'
describe
'42007' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWLZ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
0b5bbfa3f1e2fa010cb65268a7227b4f
aeeab1f26d126fe43f8e9d1d716241ea4a1d440a
'2012-05-01T20:40:10-04:00'
describe
'79951' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMA' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
366f98aa48da6f364e95e50d4bc7b109
daa8cf9aa7e7c3b09239e4a3e0a9f96e6759e385
describe
'2067604' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMB' 'sip-files00091.tif'
ade3f14b895b4895a56a13035f99f07a
0417e29f488bc5d77c1ac46365392a28683a716d
'2012-05-01T20:39:38-04:00'
describe
'1754' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMC' 'sip-files00091.txt'
3f2ce045b7daed2cb8e813855f9818e8
c8afc91f25046d03c6439fe2a3590894fe31d2b4
'2012-05-01T20:33:00-04:00'
describe
'37003' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMD' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
50a0dfb7eb86c7ec5a8eedee459b715d
ace916bac720b86e72cde66c04faad721b5bd3d5
'2012-05-01T20:35:10-04:00'
describe
'215490' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWME' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
41d15a1270658a44ac741dc897a56485
cdaf41cccd882129402d8bd2d07515fde4497f19
'2012-05-01T20:36:50-04:00'
describe
'43314' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMF' 'sip-files00092.pro'
3e82c350877e03bb26a7ba0004cca931
e5d4436ed340b3dfaad6afd22e5dababf3381b85
'2012-05-01T20:32:26-04:00'
describe
'82464' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMG' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
1c366b9563c0cc902ac72fc328b8eb2f
5f60035a7046de1dc9300c4c8d752b6cadd80c2a
'2012-05-01T20:31:11-04:00'
describe
'2163068' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMH' 'sip-files00092.tif'
86adcb9f65bf7493d03c0c3f31fd21f7
4785ab7dcda1af642eb9c88c7a0b7de9c75bedab
'2012-05-01T20:42:11-04:00'
describe
'1775' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMI' 'sip-files00092.txt'
eb2c7c5ff3c39b79fe518bae4de7076e
5f79fb4112a8e37668b497aa40ea39917b541188
'2012-05-01T20:34:38-04:00'
describe
'36110' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMJ' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
67325effcf928f5d30ad2c6a61811088
7474f98a8c1ba9ac7cf532905bebcb77463c31e1
describe
'263781' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMK' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
3805340852aff4c6ad8a9d51674ccbab
202251fbdee5371f83e40ba2568e1a52fb2f21b6
'2012-05-01T20:32:21-04:00'
describe
'206455' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWML' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
f06db9bbd717b76692805d56dd24d90d
ebde10051ede202a8a6777008c0a7ce2c0b99773
describe
'42849' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMM' 'sip-files00093.pro'
c48b9c5369054d3675da79e222f1ab78
2756e0801d3f1a14289327e70b0605d124ac9b45
describe
'79243' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMN' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
eb1a0b7363c6677fe64d009e81c1cd81
9dc3e618a1455ac7ae89613c7ba410cef72b29f9
'2012-05-01T20:44:23-04:00'
describe
'2133956' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMO' 'sip-files00093.tif'
f0543adf9b1f6f51338a1fda47239f44
32e44633094d4d28ace93e5ecba95d8f6fbc3193
'2012-05-01T20:35:55-04:00'
describe
'1773' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMP' 'sip-files00093.txt'
92c88a229abbc5840555836bd9f9869b
25d89c103785996d944cde4dcea4b54cfa5abead
'2012-05-01T20:36:38-04:00'
describe
'36582' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMQ' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
c8b2b27f813a57e9be6af7847ffaa706
9ebc66b0475b57eb1c67f01dc3069cb417a85773
describe
'261648' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMR' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
2619a10d62f72f01c0cc336e46cfc393
b6b1f6c26289e2e6911c58893b0e0140648be6e2
'2012-05-01T20:32:38-04:00'
describe
'203667' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMS' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
d0d704b0428847dc7dc201c98d1f8be9
4f78c8535ff2c2d4a6e4082c1120d67df1d24a7a
'2012-05-01T20:36:06-04:00'
describe
'41258' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMT' 'sip-files00094.pro'
500f5ce38fff094b830392f1912709b2
f18101d5c8a178d7b1549d9acbf2d6d4d04e9ac3
'2012-05-01T20:39:26-04:00'
describe
'2116000' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMU' 'sip-files00094.tif'
7407d9222c7b7a9dece669f1b37a1c16
87e6367cb5cda265115072a9bd7b5379ef8c8304
'2012-05-01T20:46:03-04:00'
describe
'1693' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMV' 'sip-files00094.txt'
48e82227115ee54355ff69350af5ef01
af55bd174e341ec8b95f7bb83092727ba72b5061
describe
'36010' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMW' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
e96949c61edd9220febfad03fe40cee5
772059413e3533109dc264b6340f1b6fca15cc3c
describe
'269737' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMX' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
3110dcb91141c9ba327bb8c426019b98
bd90d23b802f50bc4e9310d60682a845281e7df3
'2012-05-01T20:45:30-04:00'
describe
'203029' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMY' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
230c5868afa4b063cb7543ff97f0cf26
f6f78e51d15f2ad7167134697348fffadb906f58
'2012-05-01T20:37:11-04:00'
describe
'42958' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWMZ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
0d3ac37e7e8442792a34ed182c84d25f
cbfc15399a4e14794f2142b87469ec421352e835
'2012-05-01T20:41:42-04:00'
describe
'77704' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNA' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
d4f7a93dbdfcaa21657aa2e6b4234b3a
8d1724d8c513ff1cbbcd1b53914ce077c59a9c3d
describe
'2180568' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNB' 'sip-files00095.tif'
8da0bc45477125df35af6d935c900fb9
bf97604211651b2895cf63feec9b3feb7474c9b9
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNC' 'sip-files00095.txt'
8a06b84ce2b04d862eaf5d1ab1981b22
55b749eb5aa15f4f59c55221b68930e20e4244c3
'2012-05-01T20:46:26-04:00'
describe
'36271' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWND' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
ed4cd18617e867ff9747b2ae56368bb4
e891e252cc168b9d40480392656a459565e2afcc
'2012-05-01T20:45:14-04:00'
describe
'254150' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNE' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
9ebb5fa8a9e4387c59f06cd796ec822f
0bfcbc8a84aff307f4b4eacece806ff74e795851
describe
'201743' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNF' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
93f728a674eda72f94c1b2add73aa78f
b203beea4115aa1e40acdcbbeb14193915c019e6
'2012-05-01T20:34:06-04:00'
describe
'41966' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNG' 'sip-files00096.pro'
5595b49b5c51d6ec6ee8cc9316f63809
e0e2bf912f2483eb0b52846df01acb0ccd03e735
describe
'79675' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNH' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
1981350f264ed84e1a31249ca58fa6bd
228e644be4e5d06b57ad222f56ea928270abd370
describe
'2055656' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNI' 'sip-files00096.tif'
6ed49d61d35d856f77afb241fef7bcbc
6950787d2d4c54eccf13c0344963121ea2f702ca
describe
'1724' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNJ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
f52fd760fe0adb7897ba5282af95943e
54394f83776935df76259267fb316fb0131d50fd
'2012-05-01T20:42:50-04:00'
describe
'205080' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNK' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
55eadb7e2c66a13b8c0dabbda335c203
216358a57228b2b713c901a6678d100d37468b8c
describe
'2150180' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNL' 'sip-files00055.tif'
7a0144639e577adf06261788a4e2d6ed
2d2c68511444d17c04b61ecbf5e0305c83a8e3b0
'2012-05-01T20:30:41-04:00'
describe
'36079' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNM' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
1bf255c4fc8994bc9b9c2ff1c14a82a8
e67e29838c3a9904fe1e74cb5bc2c8d606bac929
'2012-05-01T20:37:43-04:00'
describe
'43058' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNN' 'sip-files00060.pro'
bacacd8c8a7dd3424595e434f120346f
2a67a06b8a7afd3b303fd058b764b2c638e632c5
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNO' 'sip-files00062.txt'
afbe28afb48426edfecf11114a11c407
71a1bb3a3650adcb19e32cfe1cd994f43c3b9198
describe
'218714' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNP' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
fae6c31eab487239660e347d0914cf49
92e601f958dbaf04a7a69a2d2554d03fe6779064
'2012-05-01T20:39:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNQ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
9283a6d89539ab750f54da2a133eafd0
bd2303c59a27727a8f4d4933f7380c6f8e41cc27
'2012-05-01T20:42:45-04:00'
describe
'221292' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNR' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
aca85626e0283e8fb6454aa3b32666ac
4e5ab308e9830aa813445a669eb69c924c2ceb05
describe
'1973280' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNS' 'sip-files00074.tif'
90d44161f8ce1e603c4a7ec721db53ee
57aba3975b1a63e091003a026d1c63acd181dd46
describe
'33142' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNT' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
bc5f97912a01d5d2b93c8cfcef78187f
50f938c2c6e6d778a9cbb446328b7b0d328161c8
'2012-05-01T20:39:09-04:00'
describe
'2056856' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNU' 'sip-files00082.tif'
59fd1919bb002056b17023a5065fd774
6e816f2263b4d0d45cca7fa59992f134d4e1ac52
'2012-05-01T20:32:41-04:00'
describe
'36148' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNV' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
ed44b98fde7f581dcd6f04ccd6bdec21
ed1832569d2ba10aa08044c056da36e670c39e44
'2012-05-01T20:30:14-04:00'
describe
'5490' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNW' 'sip-files00087.pro'
38926b3fe5be02fbeeb0be6e35a491dc
2ccbb0b396ad846436c0bcb0656d9ae74b045797
'2012-05-01T20:33:25-04:00'
describe
'1798' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNX' 'sip-files00089.txt'
ce65bd2e07b236bcac089ada15fabc0e
b8db746e4d308d0fb592712012f65eec1bbfc567
describe
'267397' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNY' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
a5232e50328087dc20029adeadd1f827
d53b64e731ba9a21037b4376812e07aa6a41cdff
'2012-05-01T20:42:34-04:00'
describe
'37056' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWNZ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
6aad0aa84ba02e486fc786369821a0f0
a8168c74409fc37f3fd10e117f43bebf9297cf2c
describe
'252974' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOA' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
93ebd71d49d51301b0821899943c6e5a
9209a7a8e23123b189b79e2e52b5d5de39aed37d
'2012-05-01T20:35:02-04:00'
describe
'200427' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOB' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
c80ecb41d03d016231e6a8c4bf1c7409
7c7db1bb5f25ef0ac8c543920561c1b26aa659e3
'2012-05-01T20:43:08-04:00'
describe
'41301' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOC' 'sip-files00097.pro'
c2372b11142a2ba88ad12f609bee8d30
b77d781a267677271c88cfca25dd453454506b91
'2012-05-01T20:44:17-04:00'
describe
'77673' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOD' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
5d1c4dc1279d9e9f251cfe7e1b8b70c2
f49811cd5192d6afb1adf273a0b314b4bdb3facf
'2012-05-01T20:46:09-04:00'
describe
'2046420' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOE' 'sip-files00097.tif'
43094cdfd49a99d62f4a9f1279827be7
2f85e4a50959ca6a791af19c91f9b95361a61c63
'2012-05-01T20:37:39-04:00'
describe
'1725' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOF' 'sip-files00097.txt'
ba76ccbf39e593d1b93b965484af10af
65afdaddf3037489be5d19a753429da37f770007
describe
'37342' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOG' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
f28a2e767b7b1fb8871673e325ba6721
078eab1068505945763d67df98aa05c25f58b45a
'2012-05-01T20:47:26-04:00'
describe
'251845' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOH' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
e1bb9f0296c8f866eb537d1e00243fc9
1db47b7380fb0c0172561298843f72b2ee01f89e
'2012-05-01T20:36:26-04:00'
describe
'206663' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOI' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
57b61ed11c74f6615f58d4fe556cfdba
86b9129a07fb9f707c279b250b5729787dedce53
describe
'42411' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOJ' 'sip-files00098.pro'
6092c105f143d783615761e36b051cd4
40afecd1209e7f661bd846c196afee52747b0dea
'2012-05-01T20:47:33-04:00'
describe
'80833' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOK' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
3093797e0656eb71bce7a0285fe6b809
937a217f1546c2b3df690a38fed6d67780a1f46c
describe
'2038244' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOL' 'sip-files00098.tif'
9197b401d45735dd8fb49ed52685e20c
6f37f13147d32dd7d356e6391885c4794601b5c4
'2012-05-01T20:46:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOM' 'sip-files00098.txt'
d2dfb54c67c631a23720a0cf95f5fe7f
d4d58104f0275cd95adc702ea1949041920f51a5
describe
'37763' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWON' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
1f76845178cbddba1b68e271da0d0b99
d4920ca4627528737cabdb3b76468613b41e9100
'2012-05-01T20:31:42-04:00'
describe
'270959' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOO' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
297e234d4383e9ed72eb98c6ad6fb30a
f160e7a5019aa41c59f3d87f187a9d35a3d5f5d7
'2012-05-01T20:39:18-04:00'
describe
'38669' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOP' 'sip-files00099.pro'
51573f0f45ff64bdbf6f187a7db91cbc
0d105b4d1ad0e57ec6957d4b7cdec15a41057d2c
describe
'73500' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOQ' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
a2232297ee2085d2d3ec4f6bfeaf0efd
f44364e08c911cf0b90c36c78e81c53ea16e10be
'2012-05-01T20:39:49-04:00'
describe
'2190248' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOR' 'sip-files00099.tif'
d06d5c8953f1d774765f8e41a62da278
4e39cab4206c72c6990c5d52ba1042f7ae2779be
'2012-05-01T20:44:55-04:00'
describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOS' 'sip-files00099.txt'
da39d5899e5be2467a33268989a48b15
ebf961aa1d3d52c00ab3e1164a06352127302815
'2012-05-01T20:45:39-04:00'
describe
'35759' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOT' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
4152223967094fdf38327e9967ff3dfa
d6cfa0dc880dc1f56b21fbf431654c21fb875318
describe
'268916' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOU' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
f8a127da8ed2f0e32879af5575af8ee2
f3d93dcb6b093746cb46a377829fe6432cf3d0d2
'2012-05-01T20:45:55-04:00'
describe
'183832' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOV' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
8483f5965471e9b17a35b872eafdf8a1
da3ddc9355aaeb4b7e47475380e7049a6b45cca2
'2012-05-01T20:41:51-04:00'
describe
'37203' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOW' 'sip-files00100.pro'
6a2734f1dc692dbb6f1af2fb2b45a234
4fd72beb2d733f2eb689086ae8b3222b4eef09fa
'2012-05-01T20:38:52-04:00'
describe
'72402' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOX' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
82a322e327ded2664aa01a8d09b260bf
406d0cb52ba92c8d4b6fed155631eae4495e9af4
'2012-05-01T20:37:40-04:00'
describe
'2174604' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOY' 'sip-files00100.tif'
b48aeeb95287b7bc49e921d48ad08315
67a9b2d95cd8bb5c68bcf054783985ebcb1b196b
'2012-05-01T20:47:02-04:00'
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWOZ' 'sip-files00100.txt'
52fcc510c3e9b7cb46ed182b33c6d135
ef0d43a985f3a3d98aa4290bcd026264fe4a689b
'2012-05-01T20:46:20-04:00'
describe
'35200' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPA' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
4ba2628f4db09d7ccd1689f0ddc69b74
159de1bda45d8bc8d211421413db36de4740481b
'2012-05-01T20:44:21-04:00'
describe
'265543' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPB' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
4ae45ee93dcd909ad4c30810c4658027
45802f331ca62b5268eb915f824ba320582e7a14
'2012-05-01T20:40:47-04:00'
describe
'195195' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPC' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
ad9f924bd04e80c2cae019a8b67ec0ca
fabf6f52f83b10b16d55cebb552f8bf7b8d32460
'2012-05-01T20:38:26-04:00'
describe
'40413' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPD' 'sip-files00101.pro'
07b0166e62e62be0cf368a36c12d71d8
955672b549242e8e3c3692d384bf847fd254de2a
describe
'77026' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPE' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
995127381977b600acf6c09515585a0b
a838253a6b73dad1334d13c4efb3fa2feacbaa10
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPF' 'sip-files00101.txt'
704a2a20836afaa4662379e20eb537e9
9212d6a21aee67441ff8469612f73dd2ccdc56b2
'2012-05-01T20:32:15-04:00'
describe
'36020' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPG' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
b65e50ade152da190917a618c633c8ea
04cc00bccaaad1614a42494b44367ee90c3322d4
'2012-05-01T20:34:17-04:00'
describe
'264973' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPH' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
8a533ad26135855f9e091dd51f13501b
7ecb58274327c578d74f80abfcad70aea7edd845
describe
'207153' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPI' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
fa80095dce419ffe1cffbc87b79ca020
db093f97d8a09cb2d36e0227d3f337b9ccb69faf
'2012-05-01T20:33:32-04:00'
describe
'43946' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPJ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
7481d954569875e45167537a1519f39c
74affd243d2192341f45f95f3cc8ab479af484e1
describe
'78662' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPK' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
dc0dfa3248f73c5d2c25544e4aa12950
a882b07a79d9db351814a10587a47d72dd24154a
'2012-05-01T20:46:35-04:00'
describe
'2143028' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPL' 'sip-files00102.tif'
5490c8515caa6dbbab359f8db64cd783
ca41c4b002b3156bba60e410471fbfeb39edffe3
'2012-05-01T20:30:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPM' 'sip-files00102.txt'
a8929c3ba343aa8bc71ad04334958d9d
4e7e168980208680c2869b2abd96b504d580f866
'2012-05-01T20:32:43-04:00'
describe
'35826' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPN' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
9b84548fdf40b707311d961cd925893f
000416cc18cdc21053a940521f70e5a320a863e0
'2012-05-01T20:34:34-04:00'
describe
'271910' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPO' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
1f1998fea948e9b27b94c28175d14b31
9a3a20ae407c289d57cc7d886115429d9ae948c1
describe
'201008' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPP' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
7c8de78838d206ef9b065b301f7885a4
8b98121480210951361841183baa4b5812c7a3a6
describe
'42553' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPQ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
bf96406e7cd86e263454563d65c1eabc
037ad6977284ce2a6dc32a4278957d16523430c9
describe
'77742' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPR' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
3ed113d8880741f9d13947745a12a2bc
02eac297b708f609a1047fa29d25cb204ae8c6a0
'2012-05-01T20:45:32-04:00'
describe
'2198468' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPS' 'sip-files00103.tif'
7302d1167925a9a52068105f1e5d7dd0
efd65ca3e6817c30e7913e836319dc9072201469
'2012-05-01T20:36:32-04:00'
describe
'1739' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPT' 'sip-files00103.txt'
b5b7a104f96c53a08ff5046e2f4fe8d4
b70582f4336d80a4002c01014b28d335bb6e20f9
describe
'254721' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPU' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
32343c16137822b574988eebbe43669c
933fc05d97f2c91dcd74de4019897c6c13f95c84
'2012-05-01T20:31:54-04:00'
describe
'210304' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPV' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
38499bc230f6536742a2d3b0d7af534e
f160fb935b4ad5360abdfab4cbcab31477a60850
describe
'43115' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPW' 'sip-files00104.pro'
1af39e76c7f1ab4e2c0bdee7f403291e
a5208fec3b026b5e608aca0ac911d18b8f081773
describe
'79409' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPX' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
198abd9cb94db0133cac8a8a97e4eabf
116420b70efaecbe5d5f6ef3937c23692d33dc3d
describe
'2059848' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPY' 'sip-files00104.tif'
2259ddab90cb4be368ceb49e7eaa6813
8174492c7f723ff8ae2eff22bf775306a8b7b767
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWPZ' 'sip-files00104.txt'
37632e7f71e35214d23db55e549118ef
efcc3e25477cbbff5e29d0b2ac25196b567b9293
describe
'36635' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQA' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
6d2473456e041812a1f790a9d0d260cb
d31e4b65d5667acd37d0d414f5f0f458c8eba568
describe
'252822' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQB' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
c391790dd44e8292e57a4f18d5543b13
db6957d41f5acc7543362a62a4c43451a7311fcb
describe
'201780' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQC' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
7f8222854d2bdacd9695fa162b770f47
b6916a722e6de6c0bf9642323faa00b9e6b6318b
describe
'42356' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQD' 'sip-files00105.pro'
013b4d37864177b6669b65fec15a0470
f60982b209e53f515e16627ea9fa2402b7ac28a5
'2012-05-01T20:37:42-04:00'
describe
'79287' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQE' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
af23f43638432fb2a570a1c2cd9b479d
0d83410b6100942c38be97cbd1fdd4f796ce2cae
describe
'2045896' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQF' 'sip-files00105.tif'
10b78062292be19da15fda1ebebe30ea
c087e015c8f3f399a0d07cabfe8cbc460340088d
'2012-05-01T20:39:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQG' 'sip-files00105.txt'
ed643e3f85bb4b7ad047a0bf68d42370
66c4f0e8f321abe8f7697ce43f50c1d1834e7eed
describe
'36702' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQH' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
2fa1201a7d1664c6d36c85b4dcdf4ed1
547857c4d2ebf0cf9d0b343b0a3abf72a02bdc22
'2012-05-01T20:46:04-04:00'
describe
'260670' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQI' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
494d3184067e6aa1f2c510bd0815b2a6
a36d6753b5de0e560694a8349d5986d59b96a443
'2012-05-01T20:35:12-04:00'
describe
'200297' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQJ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
df7f9b57b770fad866b849c98df0f17e
d81273a1f1c4a53cb7a69b56a5f93c7f89b50323
'2012-05-01T20:33:58-04:00'
describe
'77944' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQK' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
aa19c8070ba199b62978e334f668e1ae
c6fff65a662c23389d49e3f9673dd86ae8c0a586
describe
'2108808' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQL' 'sip-files00106.tif'
1c3256f4605b13059b2b90e34970146d
c1d10cb21cd31b8e6b1203da1dcb604c0f2080ab
'2012-05-01T20:35:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQM' 'sip-files00106.txt'
b86b3378047699b5c05de9a01e857590
03e36c6544c7e4517282b782aa58ffe730586a61
'2012-05-01T20:45:47-04:00'
describe
'36255' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQN' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
da6207c12d2e1a23b01e128bab44a8f5
1c4dec3246a51dd05cf2f8186116812be1670165
'2012-05-01T20:33:44-04:00'
describe
'257621' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQO' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
84652b5dc61c8f4704923d5af7b121ff
ad0c7e3d481929e0e09cf8920a9e8c39ebb6fd94
describe
'201119' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQP' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
a8594ff0d8208d1deaea9f6d9cb9363d
c0489ba4b4f213733483edb78132639a53c56b51
describe
'41975' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQQ' 'sip-files00107.pro'
9e7f2381a0d98e308585cc806b720ffe
ab8957f892ec82e9964690ab94d29a878559672c
'2012-05-01T20:45:12-04:00'
describe
'77283' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQR' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
1511e5514d8777fccf6f0d149954b16a
3bc0726140c8211106cd38013f73ad34ad267871
'2012-05-01T20:35:42-04:00'
describe
'2083660' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQS' 'sip-files00107.tif'
4ee771ddd1f93289a01bfb0306ee1576
2ef67a6c41d63d3af09a1f30dd9be835637ac850
describe
'1757' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQT' 'sip-files00107.txt'
ffc6bd24df7609b61a05325725a48ad1
bbba5bc34e54ae4983be2e6b03d398f2554ca335
describe
'36247' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQU' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
d11be5fd17b2b84c09c41562f24744f5
bc0ee3761786c5ca819a94d4330c9f26a53b1c6f
describe
'266042' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQV' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
f835e2dae92997bc2418011a0ecb400e
8b5a980ff395ed727e66184dc988159c15092cae
describe
'206186' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQW' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
b15091be7b930b7ff2b9ce6b66491147
a7f666b60df415c8ad4d1a844e0a1d38aea0f4a3
describe
'42532' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQX' 'sip-files00108.pro'
e527857feaf7a3765a73128c5478b655
b3fcd0fa92bce6258c814066125f6051591ad7da
'2012-05-01T20:38:12-04:00'
describe
'80391' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQY' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
c3e65236e745e3d657e9fbc1f9d2dc05
ffd78fa0735c79cf5cb477b1406e5d5da9c95360
describe
'2151092' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWQZ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
cb0781c8b8abf9e9092e733a111f82d5
8af4f1ef8d22b99c7fdbc50e7433b5dbc5fe7ab9
describe
'36347' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRA' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
9cb2f47fd24eb91295acd6cd22d2c346
4e3a4492b10a34a156f5ddf48d5bc86a6d1cfe24
'2012-05-01T20:41:11-04:00'
describe
'269340' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRB' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
c8ec181ce31bbee7cb0b9b0bb4eda331
6c1913f89947de5b68256806cbb79e2b3f61222f
'2012-05-01T20:37:00-04:00'
describe
'137825' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRC' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
5c76a8a4e56418beae9ca14b516e7fbd
1f3a61bfebe3c3580a4cf4b854125ab61100f569
'2012-05-01T20:43:39-04:00'
describe
'27188' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRD' 'sip-files00109.pro'
2efef6d3e1024612ad8d72de58f23589
5574f76ea32e56c9d4924cf89cdbfb999e1f0f59
describe
'56996' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRE' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
9b8224b4bc47cb8a3d6145e64e718397
9972a1b58a658a41a61daeca0a8299b1bb5c1774
describe
'2176036' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRF' 'sip-files00109.tif'
93cbdc30b45c84b405040f0828bfd873
ed7fea281377dee510d2cc3943db9de6db9eebe0
'2012-05-01T20:30:02-04:00'
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRG' 'sip-files00109.txt'
8db85645717a44649020169c9da3682c
107f27991f0ea8292acfad3f0650eb297e165651
describe
'30244' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRH' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
b8ec4ff955530a836b225b1982b8d770
a2eac1b47857da4091aa23084365c7bd7d69df02
'2012-05-01T20:40:02-04:00'
describe
'269851' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRI' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
af91a06e7ebd0d37d857a81a62883969
94cad1395364627511f9cb478d4eb33b67f13c77
'2012-05-01T20:45:49-04:00'
describe
'136583' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRJ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
d302d2af1b7e8ced474cee15bb2c09d8
8fd0d92d5d0043ad911e38e9fdf5e4a08af420d5
'2012-05-01T20:29:42-04:00'
describe
'27226' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRK' 'sip-files00110.pro'
453b5a15e7611284729edc8b859c7bdc
fc8116152f87414128c15f6c7ec2f672d193535d
describe
'58871' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRL' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
81bd5e02e7312ee39789b0a2dd890aa7
45c37aaa453aaa5d8af556589516f88cbacdab83
describe
'2180148' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRM' 'sip-files00110.tif'
a9983277e5fed2a72619c9fdc554a6d0
4e7096d06b0954c5f80a469a551ba1a5a63a950d
'2012-05-01T20:29:41-04:00'
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRN' 'sip-files00110.txt'
41a17bd68c2285eb136cdc5cd7375589
4a874c79c2307a41d367a047fa2ad80417578e0c
'2012-05-01T20:41:26-04:00'
describe
'30765' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRO' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
533dad4de909698431c562f1ed84d880
28ecb6aa91750901d43c99d021a70a1b7f3f961f
describe
'165797' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRP' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
41c637d314ff1a625273c4fa97b3e92d
9c24c2f6ea29185b4de06bc3168e3505f211596a
describe
'33022' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRQ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
24a32552ba1d62b561dc4063902bacac
d76aef033af91b01cfe14c6068ac9d53ad5704dc
'2012-05-01T20:34:30-04:00'
describe
'67378' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRR' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
4849747dee565372ffe467af5eb3dda8
dd1ab92648894a5dfdb7e32b6a8eed26fa9dc7b1
describe
'2022860' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRS' 'sip-files00111.tif'
64f601a8142371c64f1639056aaacb74
7d5370b9cbed4df5010231f568defedcaa4fd24d
'2012-05-01T20:43:37-04:00'
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRT' 'sip-files00111.txt'
d684bf7446e64410a3d407d8aeb4ee89
f0b597b812782916656f0cf35eaf298430d93dbd
describe
'35238' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRU' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
cab5c5c5016841a3e6e9f8e210a5a0d0
901be365a65b54bf484acc35fcc45450df078e2f
'2012-05-01T20:30:19-04:00'
describe
'259105' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRV' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
f572cf451cc7ac500bf343102953563a
23fefb664d90427e5a6d859804474f191d9175c6
'2012-05-01T20:43:31-04:00'
describe
'186000' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRW' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
9245af518cff253878b0085283d13627
d5327508e520b382c8b55567d7a06c6fdf331ccb
describe
'38263' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRX' 'sip-files00112.pro'
8aae4f1c3a8a8c8f0a0ce38973c20979
f70221d0c7dc216d387edd66675ed136d8189f44
'2012-05-01T20:42:21-04:00'
describe
'75763' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRY' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
189d52ffdb379cc332cfc08706ba42be
1c616fe0809d7e604670c3fa7d3e33af4430b7b1
describe
'2095680' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWRZ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
2f10fec8e779762ec581f57ad482e973
567c8b895258f0956b15ac711a2d329c32189af8
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSA' 'sip-files00112.txt'
4cc77dbfe5ecd43b73a46fae0a650cd6
c8081f07490edec1b60628696044ddb5d8fe6ea1
'2012-05-01T20:31:20-04:00'
describe
'35478' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSB' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
06875d82ec3c66c96507fc9c497b3233
9cde4943682d07dae6150c40097807a955333268
describe
'265519' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSC' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
1db957b4dfd57e0df90bc9b9e53f4bbf
5697ef004a50f64e426e1d331d2af1a44e8b9c10
'2012-05-01T20:30:22-04:00'
describe
'168352' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSD' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
1ab0dd7f1e7efd4396abd61cd1ba3e08
052a43421566d38fd4a18728e66e3f6542fb3724
describe
'33694' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSE' 'sip-files00113.pro'
9af51a737a44749baf6872d8db43ff62
63eb22210833a4458dd2c4ecd3468b6a0b00018b
'2012-05-01T20:34:40-04:00'
describe
'2146620' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSF' 'sip-files00113.tif'
4a0bd2f158305d8e0a6dd9108b4d2e0b
bc90670b4bff32769746dec85ac7cd47af7a0a44
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSG' 'sip-files00113.txt'
b4779bba397b354537c80112252ed4be
91a4f0767a81f629ff52c2341bac9bece53ac35b
'2012-05-01T20:30:35-04:00'
describe
'34586' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSH' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
4300b8663b20be0002d67421ad01535a
7f9c4626de04ee74846c052e419c079b0590a199
describe
'252540' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSI' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
b44a0e266bfe8df2e2f380b1648df598
5cc408bd08ee43fef47323a64f5337d980c75748
describe
'194817' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSJ' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
c1397aa4769e247f8325cbf58c1d0b29
996ac0867f274ccb3786dc3643a0a55c207177d9
describe
'39263' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSK' 'sip-files00114.pro'
61dc9b7be4bc246c8a7961dc20d64119
050790f903a99598bb9d83746391e2a9908500f0
describe
'76262' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSL' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
3eb90af7b57608587b145f1988d69ddc
26303c649ce9bd6207550b28f3f98704f3897be2
'2012-05-01T20:38:39-04:00'
describe
'2042756' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSM' 'sip-files00114.tif'
5a6fffc4cd22a8944bfeb122721940b8
f8876ab084746536e995cf184f385e8b0aae2245
'2012-05-01T20:36:54-04:00'
describe
'1655' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSN' 'sip-files00114.txt'
36f61bbe904c9fa9c9fa8c0c8047b956
ee0bff2d1117ca3c0834694b1e75111591e04d27
'2012-05-01T20:47:17-04:00'
describe
'36531' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSO' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
633217c8a9c14bd4bcaf3b601c102947
e502fe63d58c545d1c9a5e7c034ce2f42d441c8c
'2012-05-01T20:31:33-04:00'
describe
'257388' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSP' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
7efa9671d0a52edead9f8e4f95d8762d
bab42e75729969b6359e555a9fdc1537d417bcd7
'2012-05-01T20:34:09-04:00'
describe
'200400' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSQ' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
8ef6c1dd89c5ecbe762f8bb4118871bc
9ddc76024047b76cefd40023f8d41849a66254c1
'2012-05-01T20:32:17-04:00'
describe
'41570' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSR' 'sip-files00115.pro'
99140ec241999413a28a24ab66c18677
4a4258a862beefd2b9ed7d9034b91476ee3abcb2
'2012-05-01T20:44:31-04:00'
describe
'76625' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSS' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
611b2f144e627e76078d44378c91b026
57d8cc19f0f2cacd2fcc8d88efa3f725604463ba
'2012-05-01T20:34:35-04:00'
describe
'2081576' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWST' 'sip-files00115.tif'
407b3bcf6c1f4dcefa5e9a23dbfd821d
468c8afe3f73683ab23171877927b93e93dab458
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSU' 'sip-files00115.txt'
289778737ba9fa7bbe89104fdd7bdbfd
ad66bb7168a5eb38179ac3bedd2d07569437f717
describe
'36622' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSV' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
1d70b457a0213b290b794c644bb041d3
94864c5210d6bff34fe4f5920d80f8a80af3dd73
describe
'252533' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSW' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
6ce8d321109d6a88e3bad46d593542fc
62ddf0b3c562ef7214522865238852facd4fd8b0
'2012-05-01T20:44:11-04:00'
describe
'191585' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSX' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
e426ed5ed47313acd688da9e9c0d5ccb
84ac2fb0664fa7ee417780cb6a06f98fb9c8147a
'2012-05-01T20:40:03-04:00'
describe
'39513' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSY' 'sip-files00116.pro'
a70a8aaa5430bdb07ffa0528a69484a2
6119d53023a8b60028ae9cbf70a94b6f5936791e
'2012-05-01T20:37:15-04:00'
describe
'74533' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWSZ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
bd2c361e00c83c6c45e48a6ffafaec22
d809b81eb2d81797650f3e8e354a5473f4be40f2
describe
'2042536' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTA' 'sip-files00116.tif'
16f27a46948142acb399183073752680
57af0a784c54c348a72c95c0bd0a82238c70dfd7
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTB' 'sip-files00116.txt'
2758258c61889d7fda2467e05bb820d4
8f99157e7dbc74914f524df876286cade56994d8
'2012-05-01T20:42:48-04:00'
describe
'35827' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTC' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
aab644d68bf6027c07075814ef11a4e4
269980d72a3ab2d9e7c2b603571b81f4265196ab
'2012-05-01T20:41:06-04:00'
describe
'266506' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTD' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
9da4dd4a3d5af178595cbb3003db72c4
76e1028bcf166ee64c2283bdda39fd5a9705aaf2
'2012-05-01T20:42:52-04:00'
describe
'197871' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTE' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
7380d096f6608262eb5b186c30b38211
debfe2378c5e6dc12ee993a0aabd402af720ef7c
'2012-05-01T20:33:38-04:00'
describe
'41663' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTF' 'sip-files00117.pro'
64c7d8b20a0030fdeddced971a93eda3
6b7158effd2656a2f5b798f75370a3052300de83
describe
'76874' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTG' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
64a8a3970d0de349d0ae31dc3158e4c3
fc31cc4a3a66963bb69de3b1563936a42d761a6a
describe
'2154780' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTH' 'sip-files00117.tif'
6754cab9e053782d8cd0c78eba53408b
7514192f37ef2826a589edc02b2af79e3ba518a2
'2012-05-01T20:32:50-04:00'
describe
'1765' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTI' 'sip-files00117.txt'
5933fd7048855ac0a26ad57d3704c5c9
cb01836e2a9c2a9879c4a230923c06cc81d336dc
'2012-05-01T20:46:46-04:00'
describe
'35875' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTJ' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
dacd76d5861dec7220a6368acb7f960f
54fc004be8245d133a46f6ff28702d4cc8560c15
describe
'268739' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTK' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
e998897beebd472ee7866245bd8c732d
cdf5aed9954f687b207636900cb83dde77c5d89a
'2012-05-01T20:29:37-04:00'
describe
'42369' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTL' 'sip-files00118.pro'
ffc103d89cb4efaf67626be76ba1999c
138e0a2985516090be5fc287d133ad43d63777eb
describe
'78709' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTM' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
024d7632744849e5cfe97ba469ac2193
31bbb251d35f2bb99e7d9e9bcc08e30b22e21983
'2012-05-01T20:40:44-04:00'
describe
'2172616' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTN' 'sip-files00118.tif'
cfec16205f3d6139a1df028d542fb775
c5c52c76b95cf0e9d59973f3060cc750fdf70c56
'2012-05-01T20:34:00-04:00'
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTO' 'sip-files00118.txt'
3cc0c9ce969f7c12af9d4cd34b5c3363
5c6a7c79465a8149b533711d75ecd7458b3a3ae2
describe
'35538' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTP' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
a1507ae350a5cb9f485c2a64d09a1c05
e8feb0249ff7c066742f90f3db91c01df6681ebc
describe
'252480' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTQ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
330e35c9e0e696d1ce650ab22f842231
b406f83863423375d441ace897cec39b489c641d
describe
'196723' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTR' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
45d4aef49e45f63001050016c91c6f04
8122640cec69c153d265d36d96678a9bcac5e2be
'2012-05-01T20:45:10-04:00'
describe
'40597' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTS' 'sip-files00119.pro'
a40ebc9dbd738158b5e1eec3847ccbc0
4b57458bf94acb61fe945b0dfc5fd22f3fd61b86
'2012-05-01T20:31:29-04:00'
describe
'75909' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTT' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
70a717b7a5d7f8827744674ca8047b79
aa606ba205532b30265ca50d95ea142b6e9302e7
describe
'2041944' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTU' 'sip-files00119.tif'
5751169ec80299b08125a751748caa92
d676cb9854696af4e1fa25c25a81b4287d0f809e
'2012-05-01T20:47:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTV' 'sip-files00119.txt'
53a038570efb88be41c5c9174318af29
327692f0f7b792eb0765dd7cb443e7b63af848e5
'2012-05-01T20:46:19-04:00'
describe
'36203' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTW' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
4621d6678f57b7be768fe734c1a5713e
33b1f999c321f68ba50a618a085bcfde8c78b6f4
'2012-05-01T20:40:52-04:00'
describe
'265992' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTX' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
3f33c8878f9d405fe83f522573ed6fc4
31e70968b0c1020311b4bfd148794497d251147e
'2012-05-01T20:41:28-04:00'
describe
'198065' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTY' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
69a997dd4231477aeccaaad36e69d493
35f3b6f7126945e612f5b1aea0d32bfd9734b81a
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWTZ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
b6ab17da0745b668f09ad5d3fddf98ba
18fea113cd575803b9ac6cbbabda80b42cd25fce
'2012-05-01T20:40:17-04:00'
describe
'76647' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUA' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
65313a0f3dce16e0e333a3a8d3c42629
a7685bccaff9dcbb0eba124b93b251ae87b18827
'2012-05-01T20:41:54-04:00'
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUB' 'sip-files00120.txt'
3223a4d845bc26149ef707a7b30bef39
aa320f482c7e27ed57e1408c551bb21f637757cf
describe
'35561' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUC' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
ac5173a2af64f3ad05ba2a89f89de9f8
020c649fb7279977ab41fd52e61158a2e44f9b17
'2012-05-01T20:47:10-04:00'
describe
'269109' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUD' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
3d4ef24e2908223db909472f7a22015c
8c6bb444751f42397b11579776ff27a31f1410e8
describe
'194752' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUE' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
5c8ca4b371d604ed60956281b10a7f8e
2c16f6bbeb81a1a9e9ec7366d3f806a0f6b4d976
describe
'40309' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUF' 'sip-files00121.pro'
1762f19f4709f0c281c85f78b5857653
0e6ee684292265957516094213201015ed66d18f
describe
'75660' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUG' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
ddfff97bc78aee818a9e054191835a02
56abbd7caf1c7670c0d4e7913b37b65783072bce
'2012-05-01T20:42:53-04:00'
describe
'2175464' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUH' 'sip-files00121.tif'
1cce0607f4b5c955dee47bc3c00006a3
482935fcd75d1fc147782adc0d19e68be56c79d0
describe
'1686' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUI' 'sip-files00121.txt'
a99e75023e43fc1a10730508e49413ce
4e93ad5de7d87c8c71da26e94a6469570c6ed695
'2012-05-01T20:30:03-04:00'
describe
'35720' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUJ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
04e45691cd95708cc7688b562e4f8cec
cf36cdf86dc70ee859aa1e50d86f37a350a93746
'2012-05-01T20:34:37-04:00'
describe
'255778' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUK' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
23bff2fb80fbae33d9b1ba574bbdd798
0ddc1e5565c2ae2d3d53ee1d412c41a98f677b22
'2012-05-01T20:45:27-04:00'
describe
'167837' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUL' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
17174709c5ef9dc30887992ee62f7dbd
849972b61b28f94b0a32dec09aa9cf8365c8ceee
'2012-05-01T20:45:03-04:00'
describe
'31039' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUM' 'sip-files00122.pro'
0665a6c7fc929ba954a12569b8df1fde
524adfe94502b3fbcd55b34ef42938d8899e6dc5
describe
'66277' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUN' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
c8ad4223684d5fdfe5e16eb3bcf2640a
f171cc14d52f469be5a375024fd29096e716ebda
describe
'2068068' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUO' 'sip-files00122.tif'
557eb64e073c021aec52c7545efe0da1
58f945db60cfeb2f862b47e94f03efc6bda0bd51
'2012-05-01T20:40:11-04:00'
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUP' 'sip-files00122.txt'
62c7c4b155087500c4d9883c0fc7ba28
56da441b131d8109eb4d01c4e79787fb12ce9468
'2012-05-01T20:47:08-04:00'
describe
'1024302' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUQ' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
575acf77797eab435bfddfd71f0b47ff
8a8d1326894793e9275e0e634f990e51f54f1eb4
describe
'100903' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUR' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
8631863cae48723e8dc0bd1865b49ff6
2299fde6a909ffc28c5e70cb2e9678a35eac2545
'2012-05-01T20:39:20-04:00'
describe
'44386' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUS' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
1200c338d2856371466ee693971a9f8a
86e9faf4e39950d83db1da82fe4dcb596369dfde
'2012-05-01T20:36:36-04:00'
describe
'24605088' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUT' 'sip-files00124.tif'
921690dec34f47aeddb02c197f02d0d8
ee4cb0f1e6c0d5aa48312405ebf8378fcce23f49
'2012-05-01T20:38:06-04:00'
describe
'28610' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUU' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
fc18d0ace4d88a8f56a7118073cd6171
2291fec03af7e787258d7814cd9ca1135b3eddcf
'2012-05-01T20:37:58-04:00'
describe
'263436' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUV' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
71c02c22d5af2c170ae7d8937dd306b4
c8717cb8032d9f74fb21229921dc52021968f0b7
describe
'153635' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUW' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
ea0d8edc02947fa578038b19c08dbac4
b5fd7233d963b7ad094657b8f129d9f9b390253d
'2012-05-01T20:34:45-04:00'
describe
'31253' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUX' 'sip-files00127.pro'
af5164b6761511675070abf2f93e4e59
5f0a9b5189802eb99a6e5314e7253177541d0076
'2012-05-01T20:33:39-04:00'
describe
'59378' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUY' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
7dcd80b0a597d9ce49bff7fa8037e254
1dba20a52168d3057449baf35a6babd33435b2f2
'2012-05-01T20:35:17-04:00'
describe
'2128628' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWUZ' 'sip-files00127.tif'
f14a13a531bdf421ee1d6958317a2daf
50438addbca242c59c880aa4da13e63838ade39c
'2012-05-01T20:36:18-04:00'
describe
'1379' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVA' 'sip-files00127.txt'
60cdf4d6b591eab1f5bcb5488483ac56
ee9187ddcbcc3d8f78f398331816932fe896b328
'2012-05-01T20:45:34-04:00'
describe
'30746' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVB' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
b7ad0f1182cfa33f3fb2db4f109d1d57
f95852c2e81ed4dd395cdc3e5174c046159f8d3f
describe
'267621' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVC' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
c97584c0f0e714bf4e0d587a1525b73f
03b2fd7a2c3a20e6bd32e7d64b1fb6b88ad187de
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVD' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
9e7720074fcdb63d9228f2e1a1a24363
fa37b167dfdf18af74d8950c2af45cf02f4e77d3
describe
'42447' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVE' 'sip-files00128.pro'
c35375d7442427380e78ee5c0a89995b
da394ff70f219f137cd5d24869b7df441ccefbf0
describe
'76851' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVF' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
f64dc510a5ae32444dbf39e73cc78bd2
32f1f1af81a403136ebbf339967f00093a5ecbb5
'2012-05-01T20:34:32-04:00'
describe
'1743' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVG' 'sip-files00128.txt'
e15bcdf8400ffcddd54e0286f518dc30
d1fc38211512109db461fdd5304a45601865e74e
'2012-05-01T20:45:01-04:00'
describe
'35301' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVH' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
1f70bbcc169c38190db4f3dcb46fbf1c
35aa9e4c36e2667e39b29a340ecf933bf25d57df
describe
'265477' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVI' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
1c1d20acf049b8b5e3ff145d4be82bab
204a334ebce7ffa5042e6728ca0118093004c561
describe
'205512' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVJ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
b8e23fd6d9e0cc90c7650ec582860607
202001da4433a97ed812d75f3a0ce2ad9a3ab234
describe
'43369' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVK' 'sip-files00129.pro'
e19ccdac130189b97463f01c1fa1c8b3
770eaaa3419d0dbb1255af9a74a97176d9ccdd6d
describe
'78367' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVL' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
c00760d4a1924b957fc32e684b6e6324
a65edd1613445f7461eac069f005c3d227fe2e78
'2012-05-01T20:39:37-04:00'
describe
'2146796' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVM' 'sip-files00129.tif'
b9e675abc6689c19f4201f6111d2883f
7be5eef685c289b0db40f37948ea963c7b01f283
'2012-05-01T20:35:33-04:00'
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVN' 'sip-files00129.txt'
97d8e7a68d98a14bf3edeefd31456ebe
8caecb744e025a673451af674e209dfef86650f5
'2012-05-01T20:32:55-04:00'
describe
'36307' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVO' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
f53c77f3b40b68eb7b8346d44a0981bc
fe1c0848ada798e35efae648962e79ab00dde6e3
'2012-05-01T20:43:35-04:00'
describe
'251435' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVP' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
b6eb9467cd4cb4ce210e90299103b5f2
d78b526207cdfefd893b4bbadaee29d26cec921c
describe
'202603' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVQ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
a335f0fa6bdf586682be6d2ab4bd6390
dedd11078cf6fe7fe6a6a414c7b92016afff49c7
'2012-05-01T20:37:22-04:00'
describe
'42834' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVR' 'sip-files00130.pro'
ab345a1506b5b2b5e902ef9da0228177
94247df4a0a350201e3dd7eafff7e3f9c464927d
'2012-05-01T20:34:16-04:00'
describe
'80221' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVS' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
d045af84fe1478e1036e721facb3622b
1676983b66c37d96a616ed5ffa3896114fcf7bba
'2012-05-01T20:46:13-04:00'
describe
'2034068' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVT' 'sip-files00130.tif'
bd70f6dff0d83df88e92a087e99c19d2
bcd3d0755c3c990fc31ee5b91f9436c20f1f3fa6
'2012-05-01T20:31:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVU' 'sip-files00130.txt'
8252fc554354e4cf743f5527823cb01f
a25edb257299db870208afd63ae638908775e28f
describe
'255361' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVV' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
168789429c46d7bce169f32a3e5bb5b1
97e6e81eb7e554b8750ecf0b8ab3a3366570b038
describe
'199949' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVW' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
3c780fbf05b9cab8e06b849f610eaa7b
8a2a209a004851a8bab88de1264ab97031ddcb5d
'2012-05-01T20:32:13-04:00'
describe
'42632' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVX' 'sip-files00131.pro'
c412ee83a2aa7d188150fb666846004d
553dbc5e69ca622ee129e80decb0a1b58b0eb797
describe
'76929' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVY' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
c84b8e895941d3766cf8eb729c7f8f53
63e89a8dc8d50fc07d8ae6211b1ea85ec35aac39
'2012-05-01T20:38:34-04:00'
describe
'2065340' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWVZ' 'sip-files00131.tif'
d4738515d9ac3a1e3d2d80341e5f830d
a92ae3d8e81ec3598f11bcff4bbc8999b4bbb5bf
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWA' 'sip-files00131.txt'
e0d912992cba376931228f1283c496ee
92222bb808e8f7d711a136b306f2633e14690e68
describe
'36947' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWB' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
aee4393e77d77ffee011293341810709
d9059d4127ea7ec951731947de54666fbe4159c4
describe
'259602' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWC' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
27adc6b433f184cea95991652e39ffd6
4fb67b543bcf106f7ed9205fa2c8360ed5d6f7e2
describe
'155737' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWD' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
de386cd5d678326d08bcfb85676fb0dc
fe65e3840eb78cd7256894bca2026c319868b544
'2012-05-01T20:45:08-04:00'
describe
'29935' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWE' 'sip-files00132.pro'
a972804560ae3ede3802e9a0ca16ab22
c6f38d8fbae92e76ef83b20cb38ab19ce5327fc5
'2012-05-01T20:44:52-04:00'
describe
'63414' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWF' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
4f040e754570900f9a2fa869370fa3af
2fdbc5092ebf035382f7e8b56455ee4f3e1c536e
'2012-05-01T20:32:30-04:00'
describe
'2098404' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWG' 'sip-files00132.tif'
95b8e23e3d7fdd124f20c84d65585dba
a8092c61a486fbc6f9ac9650444c877bdea552e8
'2012-05-01T20:33:54-04:00'
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWH' 'sip-files00132.txt'
fee7d32591d30b2e85efc847cc1df441
79bc695813ba09a676a18307e3c6789f1e6f7b70
describe
'31320' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWI' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
a383f1fed967392bb3511dcc51d5d817
239c3c58830d40fb86375562b0f751227c2ebc23
describe
'236864' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWJ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
9bca995cb965deab1b9480439da8d09e
2bdc5cdb7120ff8ff7d679fdf98eae43a4650ed3
describe
'203441' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWK' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
237f02282515f3688a45e967f51f24d2
dfb9358479d0291d9ab5986f4f717c6c520fc6e0
'2012-05-01T20:33:20-04:00'
describe
'79469' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWL' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
5a7afbb5bec31a766796728998fcd93b
3ab7b8e19a6aa8201a5937d187aa54f03106cc19
describe
'1917560' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWM' 'sip-files00133.tif'
172b22bf61269203f76e771c1f25c210
0ef33d601878e6495a8d78ed7a11ba7287a476f6
describe
'1674' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWN' 'sip-files00133.txt'
55648a2fca9e4b6d7b3265fe9c8fffd7
d21997235972850e5e71a32a2fe59fe71975e613
describe
'37598' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWO' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
0de841a6df1bc0bb2d49e23eed3c2055
f338b6e54bb745acc2e5b9f8ac63d578c6fbd57f
describe
'267581' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWP' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
da0ba0e614da2ab1c19a8a3932503ffd
de2bc6dce870b6530c3b08452ee042af11700cbd
describe
'193850' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWQ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
59e8d6a80035fa2c9a2d806a6e620586
de088f38649c21b9244723592da246683872486d
describe
'40479' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWR' 'sip-files00134.pro'
2085fbed2a9095bfb54501ca1309902c
f36fde6121a90294b8dcbfe60b9dcc0bbc636af0
'2012-05-01T20:43:49-04:00'
describe
'75781' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWS' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
a2da0e2b265583cbd2d899fc87bceba2
dbfbd059907f788e9afbbc3b0d5320b8e14a61e7
'2012-05-01T20:41:25-04:00'
describe
'2163552' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWT' 'sip-files00134.tif'
b5940b4034562066e5faf86531373761
2ea2c0c73f20c7933df1e35027cc6c2b8da95b94
'2012-05-01T20:43:52-04:00'
describe
'1662' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWU' 'sip-files00134.txt'
7ca8bbae62cc39934d3402251297dfc9
dcf907f8fc930cb0e165f1a10c8c091331553866
'2012-05-01T20:39:16-04:00'
describe
'34934' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWV' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
9d2d6f10de13a09578aa841ac32abfb0
1de026f69c25fc4ac480316705ca378bff5cc6b5
'2012-05-01T20:46:22-04:00'
describe
'250677' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWW' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
338e4fb3c6c2c8c63a5efd247e4c1917
e3ee272de4412efda71fb0392b5b772ce6bc4f3d
'2012-05-01T20:36:35-04:00'
describe
'163739' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWX' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
36f88fbaa342c04399f2afd6efb3d9dd
d18377684d7e0e44d5977b4b446537ba7f7d307c
'2012-05-01T20:37:37-04:00'
describe
'35496' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWY' 'sip-files00135.pro'
9886e66177ac9584b3d38167358fcb19
41091a963d36e0e11ea43431a5e0accb42e3a6ae
'2012-05-01T20:41:35-04:00'
describe
'66652' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWWZ' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
4f40ecc524c984246f78cde30a1c9ff0
b94f48e9967a48306409b22fb6c474faa2b85312
'2012-05-01T20:47:15-04:00'
describe
'2027116' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXA' 'sip-files00135.tif'
7142a5cf8550b0bb05de76f60016cc21
fffc1a988d806b1d9488b24b6442a0befcabe10f
describe
'33398' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXB' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
77350311e280675bda6816184800212d
708bec02046ceca9965213d2f7044e9edb2668ce
'2012-05-01T20:38:00-04:00'
describe
'264031' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXC' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
5742f586ea73396e36537e2d1d84318d
8ec4f428b49c9e86df73a54aa90037ee07e565d6
'2012-05-01T20:29:52-04:00'
describe
'189744' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXD' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
94dd22d260cfe2ceef182967b7efe4d7
2a766d7f7b8510ca45459b634bd69c6c1102d6f5
'2012-05-01T20:43:27-04:00'
describe
'39348' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXE' 'sip-files00136.pro'
5caebc57080896a41554ca534ed12595
03903f3bc95f9832063d4b3d5d432e31823b9ef6
'2012-05-01T20:34:14-04:00'
describe
'74083' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXF' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
a259b1ba80c25eda2261f0cbb4b6fe8a
c6f0a3d6685b10f4d4bc30a2fd979816812281ae
describe
'2134960' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXG' 'sip-files00136.tif'
386281511b39e8578d1a10e9f7056442
3a6ac160a24af0757e9ea56c93684c95dc51fecc
describe
'1625' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXH' 'sip-files00136.txt'
ef66b38e1b4e961cc7484c859fa01e41
dddcd8ef62fe66c50259fd1eb0e21b3bc34c9bc8
'2012-05-01T20:43:21-04:00'
describe
'34967' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXI' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
fc6c4066e85b61d5a5d7eabc6629f9df
5e551d77e79dfab70dc33f41d781b815838e9463
'2012-05-01T20:35:51-04:00'
describe
'253178' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXJ' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
0ae86f2a241ff27e42e652c835eb8daa
b0e7b3272f67d91a887b03e33fd106e52fb2455f
'2012-05-01T20:39:06-04:00'
describe
'189225' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXK' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
08c393f01ec1f82e8e0e626f2b75ef68
fed7f67341aae5aa95b8aab4aef8469ac7e3cb38
describe
'37821' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXL' 'sip-files00137.pro'
01b3245a8126c54f0613f6d8f79f8624
c467cb5ec973e3c96d73de8aa82ac7d663730717
'2012-05-01T20:40:53-04:00'
describe
'76906' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXM' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
a6c3dccaf85c44637e3136879677ea7a
96e397b63c12151985a2160bfd4c37178bf7e9f4
describe
'2048192' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXN' 'sip-files00137.tif'
9bbd19c751733a6b6960c09b7bf76abb
91d6a0804b72a67c0c1410e62fdfc5b768164db0
'2012-05-01T20:38:24-04:00'
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXO' 'sip-files00137.txt'
cf960a0980d0f7f3164fe953a4f1ec91
72de1e3479dcf6a9505161c19ffba03dbd184806
'2012-05-01T20:36:58-04:00'
describe
'36368' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXP' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
23e1118854596b613bd096ada69721f0
1808de7cf988c6508d63b0d36de7c864a16119dc
'2012-05-01T20:38:54-04:00'
describe
'194547' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXQ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
fd81b9822a9a75c9ace960d315440692
8f6ba269548591b232aa6ce3e92a26225880cddc
'2012-05-01T20:42:56-04:00'
describe
'40482' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXR' 'sip-files00138.pro'
c914381ed05e37b0391136017d3ce495
1aafabf6f0773a9f07accd2de371c013642b512e
describe
'79251' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXS' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
565bedfffbfd78102adf3ae069ec0e6b
817a5abbde9afd873bfa8c6ba2e3a04c7f5fbfdf
describe
'2038096' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXT' 'sip-files00138.tif'
259d82028c8f8822ca601b62697b821e
4049330d032273efa8af62aae5af5362162f19f1
describe
'1680' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXU' 'sip-files00138.txt'
b56f5b628dd43f6ed098b566c3a96055
13f85ff888bb35fb5fbb3ca36959b76782c4516e
'2012-05-01T20:46:24-04:00'
describe
'36886' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXV' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
82d35f11656d2e11ec32df7a4cbb66d0
5ff66525bc0874e1289eac5dbe4377f5140a1675
'2012-05-01T20:37:50-04:00'
describe
'240581' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXW' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
bb9bb33e1d9b0378f4e81b8f74536050
6352263e69371334f28f9194a6cff41c090ae330
describe
'206821' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXX' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
cee8042f5b5bd124df77e82572188146
7a0bb7703cc5c520aa222b570c9a732b1a944fb5
'2012-05-01T20:32:39-04:00'
describe
'41112' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXY' 'sip-files00139.pro'
840d57c56d08ce42c5dd163c14455533
31945af44ae73a56d38601383cdd49c3a990f116
describe
'81057' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWXZ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
360f82eac96e362ca7389d2b00873629
7ea788c255892723f3fb04d838b281628b7688df
'2012-05-01T20:31:59-04:00'
describe
'1948000' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYA' 'sip-files00139.tif'
74971238eaafafae734dbddad4152b75
2ce06d4dece1796f91ef531544f312897333f0fb
'2012-05-01T20:35:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYB' 'sip-files00139.txt'
4d70aa89524d0890055f6fffc2c46407
6ecf2283fdd0ce34f99cef8740a695a04a5f69d4
'2012-05-01T20:33:43-04:00'
describe
'38162' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYC' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
a347a23d2ba9d0e366daaca48210c765
d32513612e1448c0dbc57effc77e2d66f3c49f5e
describe
'270417' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYD' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
cb19cafa135ec80b93e5445fa08d120b
201fd38ddaf7cd6570188d50a22537604bf22cb6
'2012-05-01T20:36:12-04:00'
describe
'187188' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYE' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
be174a907c467b137a8efb52971d0f04
b1121ff29fad74e81c63b321663e67c88f9e353c
'2012-05-01T20:44:24-04:00'
describe
'37332' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYF' 'sip-files00140.pro'
19d10c2f9d087451c9ea2c705329325f
991bf291af96d80a028c64728053dcaab50093a7
'2012-05-01T20:32:24-04:00'
describe
'187820' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYG' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
3f2a06f08a2d0d4883e824b30465dcce
428048c08ce2ceadde1f5e4d41d6fc82fcb6b16b
'2012-05-01T20:40:15-04:00'
describe
'2146948' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYH' 'sip-files00101.tif'
3e3ba6d2e9cb47b3831fa2717e01f4c2
0653d12f023c2ec8d2a243428fb1f84ecb0d4c19
'2012-05-01T20:34:10-04:00'
describe
'36157' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYI' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
538ee118d206fbbd39b0288a9260765e
8d3d09dfd1296f1964354d5fc6083bddffc67199
'2012-05-01T20:36:51-04:00'
describe
'42463' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYJ' 'sip-files00106.pro'
a9a8cd4ab68ebf3794e412f4bae6c992
49ac7ca097d94732cd1ef705544a097663c72b04
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYK' 'sip-files00108.txt'
035d28e25562a2fc64b94937d7a85656
9587c616b1dc9cfeda056699558a39a6fafafe17
'2012-05-01T20:29:35-04:00'
describe
'250114' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYL' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
98d36f76c39a6593fcc5179f82f12ba5
7fb94d0084f800f748ae7c5ef8f95c547c2eed93
describe
'68065' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYM' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
dd0eee481f6066a517b744f357f2d2ff
2b1784dc382dc4388e86754eaf3b76c67c0eb54a
'2012-05-01T20:47:23-04:00'
describe
'200287' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYN' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
330f132b8aba844dd8e09188c2d79074
a8ec504c8a9569f73db9fbce65090eb17c4e29fc
'2012-05-01T20:38:33-04:00'
describe
'2150828' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYO' 'sip-files00120.tif'
d2387a3a1f0bdefb09a6875250ad7e74
b19360e81ae4b3fa533b59ad9ad9106eda8b71ec
describe
'33157' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYP' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
4cb7f560cd63d7a19e6475d68dd55c0c
0aafdd88d54dd78c0dabc00ee3658ea1758a67e0
'2012-05-01T20:38:21-04:00'
describe
'2163636' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYQ' 'sip-files00128.tif'
59b545284722a1c8dd0fb366f6764560
33a177b0865a2ab104a4cbb27b1e145d29bdf091
describe
'36361' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYR' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
ed390f79e40b965ba4681b400533a183
ef5fd1d7c278f37c9e9c1440fc438010b7a74eb5
describe
'40632' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYS' 'sip-files00133.pro'
fbeade8f717082c91d1392be9e5093df
a2414a6040a8fba6f9c157534a33e585a15c1abe
'2012-05-01T20:32:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYT' 'sip-files00135.txt'
354558df7071d30af004f0b2c3897cc6
688845ade17a97a82b081340d049b5483bab8fc6
'2012-05-01T20:41:30-04:00'
describe
'251782' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYU' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
acc779e30bc37bdbec74db1e305b56e2
dc4cfb46065e6e19c5a050324728a485ac5800d3
describe
'53340' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYV' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
0297bb10d8962801a3c6a0890a0fcc6c
bafb342a8d5a640f32c46d774ce7b86d6ce578e8
describe
'79061' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYW' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
53ae02742d89d5951d3637d7a32c8b8e
7fd466d3485a600c2588a89f312abd3177fbd479
'2012-05-01T20:31:32-04:00'
describe
'73857' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYX' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
bb249d50507d4ee04ca4bcd81b1a05c5
6d5bf3d7ef077648d91432a9cc98bbcb3cedc212
'2012-05-01T20:35:48-04:00'
describe
'77988' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYY' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
4732154f8a038e9076b320757eeecc11
f3dda43cb9d7ec3eb4b43b5965522739e8ac778c
'2012-05-01T20:36:01-04:00'
describe
'1099819' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWYZ' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
00e71289e9883f7981f8ea6bc4143b45
8760bc713a722cf29a42037c963f3fe9f41ddb34
'2012-05-01T20:30:39-04:00'
describe
'2186168' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZA' 'sip-files00140.tif'
385d4312169af7f2d36967885eaaee9b
da30c7d01188323c93ff4a9d34e547cc02964058
'2012-05-01T20:34:22-04:00'
describe
'1552' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZB' 'sip-files00140.txt'
f8a86d59271cda2c8622b34d196b230a
a52251c8bb8a09ea6d920f6b603fb0bc721fc58b
describe
'35364' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZC' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
ab7df577410cf25e27cad4c91bea41a2
6e5c93671cb231faf78ce431cac6997eb9fb8cf4
describe
'254587' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZD' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
fe2716f313fc9871f760cea76e0b8b5c
32797cdae0e2cb73e044c52f652d5dfbeeb0869a
'2012-05-01T20:30:21-04:00'
describe
'182296' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZE' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
b7819778196534241072f78c9afaff61
9b0684d259a6dea834caaff1a069ae0cf28ec2ef
'2012-05-01T20:36:59-04:00'
describe
'35803' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZF' 'sip-files00141.pro'
51ff1287a1ec36e7ceb16c87d1d6b425
401b4cb96d309e313022499cf98212412f8661f8
'2012-05-01T20:38:42-04:00'
describe
'74210' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZG' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
38fe5f21a8a20fe59311214e2892ad42
4d396da3505e1721cca3650980fc8ce34a7eb25a
'2012-05-01T20:29:46-04:00'
describe
'2060644' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZH' 'sip-files00141.tif'
82424f9dfe9d18a2741e2def445a75ef
293446a7a528c03129046e95806dfe2b239cd0ee
describe
'1524' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZI' 'sip-files00141.txt'
fe43395d581e687309434f77efb60030
bb04337bde3b5737f02f18c6b1ca111fcbd16bc6
'2012-05-01T20:30:18-04:00'
describe
'35810' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZJ' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
5a845386c915c476635e826c3f2bf399
9fa3e7b92b69ccb102257404466f5a065549d8b5
describe
'265986' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZK' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
591891dc4aa215a66b8e3202b0fc7766
0e5bdfdc1b20f4aec47c1ea181f351083942eedd
describe
'209158' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZL' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
d4d2f325ed01874bcbff57559a254495
62e31529e5013baac11c5338c1918c62c93ac059
describe
'42953' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZM' 'sip-files00142.pro'
98366681534b015b857d8154cc972dfe
38d3cc28f2816367ef6ca02fda6a654d697c9d87
'2012-05-01T20:46:33-04:00'
describe
'81513' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZN' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
101d1d6de9f599fbdc1897f6f72d8ae9
e779b8e7c8a1ed2e13e3fd1d8c7638f655d9ba3d
describe
'2151456' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZO' 'sip-files00142.tif'
a21776bec0ca62dfa789c93699a8c7e1
0b4ddb2791bb968a613a58adf0e13512cb206986
'2012-05-01T20:43:44-04:00'
describe
'1763' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZP' 'sip-files00142.txt'
30522c7ca4ad0f0b5d0ec78f94cf30fd
37c6ea55e0486e03a19ce273ad47b1ad450e75b0
'2012-05-01T20:32:47-04:00'
describe
'37268' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZQ' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
62af3c81c52039d71e10f499ad2c35eb
668594bde1801a16251409efd3e7bccea992d728
'2012-05-01T20:33:27-04:00'
describe
'250596' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZR' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
6d28b85635b2b8c6120cb8b3d32dafe6
3e2fef0d63d36abd4c5b90da293e9f04d2fece88
describe
'194655' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZS' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
e412f5e6ce91b718e1a601124be359e9
9b77fbfb6135ae45ef182d643950ff261bab2e94
describe
'37397' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZT' 'sip-files00143.pro'
1440d968105cba7ea92dc9581de6f61c
bf35fe88b563b3b424ffe715908e15e09d174691
describe
'77511' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZU' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
4aaf66e15c9eded862cfaaa85cf74c5e
1c65a11936b9f3e5c30c78e15466846462cfffc2
describe
'2027980' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZV' 'sip-files00143.tif'
03c89467417ad066f5673e95c65e46e7
9eaeff923e287d20cf2571b54e07613b2d886128
describe
'1581' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZW' 'sip-files00143.txt'
4c802921c894bf5dd5aa1cca6d52578c
375782dd46e3781641e36c82a149f207ac927687
describe
'37114' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZX' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
29a68f6b364b13a7ae770189578592dd
8d5782d49b7ba9e99fadb3e38058d365738b4073
describe
'251226' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZY' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
8df543f12cfc8262e3e2fef95c323ad7
2beee536ccd4c7e3167059b139fe8a7c3019212f
describe
'198449' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACWZZ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
c300429c94fa5a9a2c33e7c83e593da8
2b968b830b3c9d6721f80bb0eb5c73b9ad35555b
describe
'40249' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAA' 'sip-files00144.pro'
c18f3c9fe28cdbc6185e6c648fdc2524
48b4795da6f343946b43c9ee5a0930f4b390a7ae
'2012-05-01T20:43:09-04:00'
describe
'78223' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAB' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
adcd6fab6af397bedaf4c579495b4b8d
cfbd637766e71cf738cb5e4f3f3e3712da265261
'2012-05-01T20:41:55-04:00'
describe
'2032248' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAC' 'sip-files00144.tif'
4316947ba21adb36c8f0e9c327476af8
4e41878aef8f45d44851cea018a36aafdd99d8fa
describe
'1661' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAD' 'sip-files00144.txt'
ea0fab706b53504bede8e0d29840cf92
443863932b607d8719874953df13a29b724eea53
'2012-05-01T20:42:02-04:00'
describe
'37191' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAE' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
03a75b175ea0cf17bbb9da855cf2a54e
059ae76b7492ae1cef0010a8de5dfddff9eae62a
describe
'254524' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAF' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
4c95bb3dc41a001084881ebb9165b008
09be9a47374dfb5c7ec9ce2b1a6fd69bc2bc7b5e
describe
'39573' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAG' 'sip-files00145.pro'
e4bbe9e9f0979aff8895d6e2f1ce3ddd
a1dc1541cac3b3c3dcb4556387446dbc66f6037b
describe
'78042' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAH' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
5ca907b0c187744144841c3520d59756
3d41407b2326721761ad95b9b4af7340c6285960
'2012-05-01T20:42:12-04:00'
describe
'2058952' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAI' 'sip-files00145.tif'
13bddaaf2bb7b427b7d41652105a0e45
95c62b656a6a7a60226b5d5039171a3474e5d376
describe
'1656' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAJ' 'sip-files00145.txt'
d8e93d58ce4925f9a7f90f212be785df
eb64858178f01ddeff8437d85d0419f0c7232d15
'2012-05-01T20:29:58-04:00'
describe
'36527' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAK' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
f6a1bdcab4e0997b75a4a58c9d45dde8
cbd5abd120db5633f4126c427f1ca567b4180e1f
'2012-05-01T20:44:34-04:00'
describe
'258817' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAL' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
b573dd047078c5aabbf371466060d7a3
7ccab62c1c5a4af79c164bdb5a45afd6be7517ed
describe
'201449' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAM' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
c01f8b799900c25f553e18e9b8befc9b
293c54cce90f4e8dca6fc94ab9f3db022fad92d3
describe
'40977' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAN' 'sip-files00146.pro'
3848f060c68219af701c19c801827291
43c2812364691633ebf20abab0b4843605e2f232
describe
'79648' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAO' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
f2689f9ee37728262cd293f137f7cec6
2a029fe09926f2931cb78130c4021830cc4bff8a
'2012-05-01T20:37:12-04:00'
describe
'2093492' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAP' 'sip-files00146.tif'
08a69cdd47eb3af97be4e13a1dd86422
62916594cd8373356a94691b19535637a428ccf4
'2012-05-01T20:31:03-04:00'
describe
'1687' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAQ' 'sip-files00146.txt'
cab0655285052fd83016548b3619f011
f70b1d80e8ea5838ed0eb1d563be9cdd8dba70cf
'2012-05-01T20:42:46-04:00'
describe
'37728' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAR' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
7b9ebe42057866ad4b5546882f7b404d
0aa3a8fc7d4f579dd384001b3158f5f4565ccd6a
'2012-05-01T20:45:48-04:00'
describe
'255671' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAS' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
1e282bdb9bcfd2131b6cd36aa62e6bed
a6e7a1a31bb280458fc313692fb270b439c31ecf
'2012-05-01T20:36:29-04:00'
describe
'189263' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAT' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
548fc837c902912cb2fe55e976ee1446
58c54e2659462863a2a4507dc884d33d1c341446
'2012-05-01T20:46:28-04:00'
describe
'36550' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAU' 'sip-files00147.pro'
518a6a6889453313925ace6abdecac7c
eedd899d9779f8e30d4cd2b2c05e3c569a9a07f2
'2012-05-01T20:33:18-04:00'
describe
'77771' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAV' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
078b00db39d67a3e38066d791a176d89
1013fe01a9a9cee701ebff1799e70268295f59e0
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAW' 'sip-files00147.txt'
0fea47e6cfd10c6e77449db660835a5a
c12bb6a5ab8deb42cf5086cf72a6fc65093c462e
'2012-05-01T20:38:25-04:00'
describe
'36922' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAX' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
659ef64d91e1fc3624085a7ee7f3f589
74cf518ffa015097fa79c6cdf79c72db4e1b80a5
'2012-05-01T20:33:52-04:00'
describe
'184857' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAY' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
fc8526206bf3c8eb890a5aba8eee0515
b275e8a0c2a06eba7b92baf54c8771e26c673785
'2012-05-01T20:40:31-04:00'
describe
'68864' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXAZ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
5a82a8c8d3a8107768041c49fd636bb3
f0a5182c6b380665fd13ed0fc3bcd7ae2a1d1cae
describe
'9191' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBA' 'sip-files00148.pro'
8f7fa2124b9e447513254bff9e726287
f957b703923a07bd8654f2220935f4059dde1234
describe
'35693' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBB' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
04280981edddaf2d1be769f0323b16b6
72f1852b27332841aa0e5e197f3ce2a3ea6ef629
'2012-05-01T20:30:37-04:00'
describe
'2019644' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBC' 'sip-files00148.tif'
da911ff5284fefe2713259601dca803f
c8c858374b90002c4322f0d19908d7fac60ca169
'2012-05-01T20:43:24-04:00'
describe
'437' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBD' 'sip-files00148.txt'
0411149dcfe90c45630a5c46d2d0ef45
a6e4c1a204d871108839e7cc0a2bca049dada83c
describe
'24470' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBE' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
9d1ccf060e2f889e4158db3118533658
66fb1bca3c67e1f140622ee43b619149226d832c
describe
'246138' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBF' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
ec7b85a4abd5ed4905755cc2a772fe41
5bd1993007d81f962076ebbf60b1159ee94c5028
describe
'162122' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBG' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
8669213cf877f5c01b8fc9ba171b3fc5
697851b1f8b4b0890cd4487a14bdc7f016b30153
'2012-05-01T20:32:56-04:00'
describe
'31967' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBH' 'sip-files00149.pro'
ad5ff2a75e26e6124019e07e032ff788
367d47a318aa67bf242c539f126fd2bd8127f469
describe
'66689' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBI' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
661b304f9a04408709ac5900df3c668b
28e233af6da705b78a5b57d518ce96b4510b30c7
describe
'1991296' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBJ' 'sip-files00149.tif'
2e23148521f33ea8fe2e4bdef0b569f8
217fb525698b093195170cb81bf3586052adfde7
'2012-05-01T20:39:45-04:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBK' 'sip-files00149.txt'
347ae1790c1db96e3e6b84499f355d5a
c699395cf65f0c55636cf5a1f7143f7ee972ac6c
describe
'256758' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBL' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
3f7afa5d926d92777982e816add2bdab
c127413c8d19dd6652daf707fd6e5d93027d061a
describe
'209791' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBM' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
653655b638427b20e42711d16c7ac391
f1968fab18dbf026de24396f8b7f4b023187275a
'2012-05-01T20:31:24-04:00'
describe
'42967' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBN' 'sip-files00150.pro'
68a3a9c21a40c2ac8be6d24d8b7b7d53
f86370cea8982190be942c926d8dd3cf52e2266a
describe
'81191' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBO' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
323ddcab5d67503a1f337f99fd61b493
ad6acc008d03dd915493f59919b9389697ee6623
describe
'2077244' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBP' 'sip-files00150.tif'
d7cb65ed8140fe1983f49a0c2616ed98
d1c2ab49c7b0612b487e07433d9bf44cefb7f85a
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBQ' 'sip-files00150.txt'
06868ab595e098fa67469e7b570c6f03
6095f8d81dbaa4791f8e598b5b9a86b28c516ea4
'2012-05-01T20:40:33-04:00'
describe
'37345' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBR' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
2754a159ed45a489c7d16ba3326a75dc
87b7cc72ef8f1d54a416b6866016271ca51d9a95
'2012-05-01T20:44:46-04:00'
describe
'255944' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBS' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
06cd061e8a230ebbe797288d5653b2ba
6a35ceb87fa7179afd5054b6a489fe75cbc89df5
'2012-05-01T20:37:03-04:00'
describe
'212454' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBT' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
17f08fc966886b98eef2659a43d91309
fee69d73a1a83cae6832c496688f298cf9c045ea
describe
'42942' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBU' 'sip-files00151.pro'
110ec72c9f7404e98844f553f8b09a13
b8ca80010ecfe1b6e01c1ff831e77d4cc1f51113
'2012-05-01T20:30:15-04:00'
describe
'82540' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBV' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
068cbdf0e45aa6ef29d406177853b4a1
6aa5a542c27aefed521e128e104f64d0cf3dfcbc
'2012-05-01T20:45:09-04:00'
describe
'2070656' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBW' 'sip-files00151.tif'
afffac9bfec38960f56981ab52f4a4b7
d5417adcd621a67b6fe722f2ee718951a84bdc82
'2012-05-01T20:47:11-04:00'
describe
'1782' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBX' 'sip-files00151.txt'
78a6dd3c0e52c6e2da84a90631e3f5e9
df7bddd74cc42a77c125a94a8b02d196cd17d0bb
'2012-05-01T20:47:04-04:00'
describe
'37658' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBY' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
bd331fc831246ea1b086469f05385a28
61948d7a29c81d4aca492d3c9a0e2b4cfa1a7fb2
describe
'274047' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXBZ' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
114437fba6b470275103a0c66423b054
49d646ddea66c47762826f85b6b1b07aa11a9042
describe
'207083' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCA' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
13621510aacf0b4ae2c61675b71fd67a
6cc4e91127386f7d2d398637b1a1e58cf7afab5c
'2012-05-01T20:35:03-04:00'
describe
'78986' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCB' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
540d18562a4e0532587814d9eef1d0cd
5f9cc8e4f7442e2b4053446fdadb9bc05ee4071b
describe
'2215376' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCC' 'sip-files00152.tif'
cf664a7412d630992ad66bfeece03b76
8b794d8b5aed331c69ff134aa82d0437ac501832
'2012-05-01T20:38:27-04:00'
describe
'1768' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCD' 'sip-files00152.txt'
ee5c7bc4f76b249fb8ff6b9dff3d1747
8740a9dac7ecab7e3ac8a45c994ee4d078f2e5d8
describe
'36098' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCE' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
81ddf6330c0bf43a5d315e1fc9ac26b3
bba1c2eaa38ba53e61db1c0c03c950db7d71c070
describe
'245256' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCF' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
c1b4afe406485b943418bab637d33597
ea03874b45c3786063f36d5efa5cb24c2a1dbf61
'2012-05-01T20:47:05-04:00'
describe
'208296' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCG' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
1f97b356b196d96f86ebf706ac274322
d50bdb778c92d0ed20c2e980780be6f63d085fc1
describe
'40840' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCH' 'sip-files00153.pro'
2eb086c5c990d3da96e3cfbd601fc971
45e3acc6179fd170f59e3afa702bbd12242af91f
describe
'81281' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCI' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
9b5135d3b0e7e0e4b439e3954f3e0dc7
40a1d88d104aada636f1213b058834abfe5c57dc
describe
'1984820' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCJ' 'sip-files00153.tif'
1b0c7d277d59d9c86eb12a1e5e4f2e59
ad9a7ca3d68c6baa100ac942610edad0107b1fef
'2012-05-01T20:44:10-04:00'
describe
'1713' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCK' 'sip-files00153.txt'
ebb4c1501ac8e792c1755028f648108a
b6eb7ceb3a2b3e4a9fe70dc370b4ceac3da7d644
'2012-05-01T20:33:07-04:00'
describe
'37337' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCL' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
d24608c4fe0d596fd2aeae90b268388f
e30d9ae7cbb960c3f9961647fa40bdc22cbd9876
describe
'259364' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCM' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
5781ef633092ca6395ec09b13d7fedc6
68b187c7b306ac8795ea4d6a085e2fed6df0ef1b
'2012-05-01T20:30:01-04:00'
describe
'154621' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCN' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
d08f33c47cf475cb01b8c0497c1331f2
3503a6df0f749b17740ad196ba91c725e4504247
describe
'31152' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCO' 'sip-files00154.pro'
1f564e78aeebe69febffcca615c81667
aee4aea0e5d30f242b3a3dd9d94a399a22acff92
describe
'62573' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCP' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
5718a5c7f0a5a6f99dc4bc70a2a592ec
6d8ca4c2c69b50956e91457a3addb34b5fad9065
describe
'2096880' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCQ' 'sip-files00154.tif'
447d5a447e3270793c3db2a4fc7f2858
cb06c46327df80da693d05b118cfe342aa3eef45
'2012-05-01T20:46:39-04:00'
describe
'31571' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCR' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
5f318958e6b7499420674f6649fe6c62
f4aecd811cc6c2bd3147f5310a8ed5a06900b014
'2012-05-01T20:43:10-04:00'
describe
'947928' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCS' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
4149abb4c22f7814965fbd5fea3433c6
de79ee62447c891e9401bf14d74ffd5f84b623ec
'2012-05-01T20:47:13-04:00'
describe
'105792' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCT' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
07cbc003c6e285415d0a71ac7074113b
a1a554a49c54ff632a06d03ee0c9c8374ecd71fd
'2012-05-01T20:38:11-04:00'
describe
'46761' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCU' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
901cf9d52662816debf8f0afce9dd1a5
cc0fe8c1a9011ba9d0572c5772d9c09f455f3db0
'2012-05-01T20:38:57-04:00'
describe
'22771916' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCV' 'sip-files00157.tif'
aecdf9c8432e61425d5b671d39aa5d98
7be42f50341daefda29cd56d928b8f353f675960
describe
'30069' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCW' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
74635f3f3438ca85ce16327dcbc5504d
5cadb7c2ecb6bb9398ad9ba66148cdda81eacab4
describe
'243887' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCX' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
da33339d05a906a860aa83b62d2ac3a0
d6987d035f9418e45ec5e51ad72a641dbd117a02
'2012-05-01T20:37:32-04:00'
describe
'226355' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCY' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
847c17f89d859b3562017f5b80aa0075
54b1339add793f22b85f843b76b682c7857b84c3
'2012-05-01T20:30:05-04:00'
describe
'43626' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXCZ' 'sip-files00159.pro'
270f15208cfeb2278754c249e70b5984
5cf3d3cce814264b2248663cbb1d485aca23df0a
'2012-05-01T20:44:26-04:00'
describe
'85308' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDA' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
44f9d023327717c25ea478296e1c2239
60daa1f7c53115388a3e873b7a57a9f1d350c20e
'2012-05-01T20:33:28-04:00'
describe
'1973836' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDB' 'sip-files00159.tif'
382a8019fd7455c7c21f52ccbe067336
4f467416af8f0c6831600ea7ea09d4f9fc0f8126
'2012-05-01T20:40:57-04:00'
describe
'1813' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDC' 'sip-files00159.txt'
8eb28e4086494afa354813906a837143
197b4dc52a3bf5955230b1addf21d0ce87595cd7
describe
'38537' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDD' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
3e893e0ee15e40bda33b72a6a992db7b
dcd058f144f913c82646e8b0105d19f13c4cf143
describe
'259612' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDE' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
e8eb8c196adadc24ae312c13a22a3b0e
d3a147b0d953cacbd9dde6bc379aebdf69b66a2f
'2012-05-01T20:36:52-04:00'
describe
'203723' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDF' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
f7ef45777ad8365d7cc32bda918f4860
e82a8ea93e1863142302c7db341cd9fd53c53042
describe
'79446' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDG' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
1c67477fa41e6882d68da4e3c81bec90
062c31909b25c3eca709a968ce56d8d98b3dadf2
describe
'2099372' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDH' 'sip-files00160.tif'
0b9c7e8abc9040d99115e1bcc42461cb
b9055dc93b4c975b2d25e8effddb2ed0697878d8
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDI' 'sip-files00160.txt'
0b394dff3d628437f6b972a09329100b
3866216125ed04240dff81a24c14dbe671e0e9f3
'2012-05-01T20:37:57-04:00'
describe
'36159' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDJ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
1092c042b6878ee230aad03ca53d6cda
673525a590cbc9266472be85291887f30faee09d
describe
'251615' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDK' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
a2f0a1363f1909f3d4959015789c0e06
df952801d662919e68df76a44294278f173819a4
'2012-05-01T20:42:35-04:00'
describe
'212125' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDL' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
0e4e025d549f93cb266754f2b809dc32
f526ceafbf3242f0c9a7e35dd60041d689175453
describe
'42651' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDM' 'sip-files00161.pro'
e6b06bb4f6432067b3630d1876c402e0
300071300131d00550f779879459a3bbecdd817b
describe
'80694' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDN' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
2a69ca9d72e438e0d9e8e03a74af178b
2ed8a47a9e5be6affa300bdac77ab6522301e3a9
describe
'2035680' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDO' 'sip-files00161.tif'
ef7ceabab42a83c180180895e3e3b55c
f320809940cc9791f54faa3dc472efa0939e87f2
'2012-05-01T20:40:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDP' 'sip-files00161.txt'
3e7629c689f194f6333581fcd542a3cc
eab8d04eaea7482f91833aace9967224d5ae6b3d
'2012-05-01T20:31:08-04:00'
describe
'36891' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDQ' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
cfd398bb5e95faff6e436da14277d0fa
f6b79a00110e745c46991dc2206578a04fb58856
'2012-05-01T20:30:36-04:00'
describe
'261768' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDR' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
b5bd46247b983821fac429860f66a599
8274d8f67b509bc396d9d12956747680c4f57cb4
'2012-05-01T20:44:25-04:00'
describe
'194135' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDS' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
fd46ef775d00eca970108dcfb1f059c1
086f0468556dac7909636d5e3f86cae8a63f0651
'2012-05-01T20:46:43-04:00'
describe
'41003' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDT' 'sip-files00162.pro'
76088e210b6d6a16e00efee4ef15548b
bc1aec4cc4241989b65dbe460b04d4cc1ebd407a
'2012-05-01T20:37:56-04:00'
describe
'75634' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDU' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
993a8b655b186af9ea1651a94c43c9c0
f064bc0d3998cc8e6109832a8c1105c5d51d346f
describe
'2116464' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDV' 'sip-files00162.tif'
5a3bd9a8329c5740184d707c44883084
497b54d534409d137b067d2e2623b550e37d05fc
'2012-05-01T20:33:14-04:00'
describe
'35655' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDW' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
1714e0ff2cbc997dcf5adf5dbaa4efad
d57aeb1ffd77075c99c9722631130f258add28d8
'2012-05-01T20:41:43-04:00'
describe
'254397' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDX' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
b13fa21d1dc1623438e61fc164e76056
09255cd7d3134113f502bc9ad414254d900560f6
'2012-05-01T20:44:05-04:00'
describe
'98864' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDY' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
56bcd27178d7f28ef763a0bb93dc3e95
eb2e1dff85b282d47cd733d45e3585571f297415
describe
'14846' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXDZ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
443d3d05d534517a62027e2820627c76
dac24d06ddf3e75caacf4c798f3935297801e5fa
describe
'44961' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEA' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
fa8037d4e4dad5ad49e206b7987b294a
5a5ac775aa280113cf256926d3feaf75c7d920b4
describe
'2055480' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEB' 'sip-files00163.tif'
e4e951c9104506a0a29e25a12eeaa536
c1f8eac480af9eda8bcee8b6e6c1849ba1e88d9c
'2012-05-01T20:35:58-04:00'
describe
'664' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEC' 'sip-files00163.txt'
4bd83c429ecf5fdae9901fc45947dd76
47e09f7ed67831c844934206753899610ae8c2c8
describe
'27627' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXED' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
892c2f728c094fd1b2e87ce81bfdf87c
8599148f5005801c763973ec0b6f3f1a539483e9
describe
'248434' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEE' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
8d6afc7cc3a34e79c5815092471bf2eb
22171dac5cd9818e63314c76d64d117edba86a82
describe
'85628' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEF' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
f3e1fed43c101619f49a31f19b4708ce
2c0d99c5f6ac013ea80e784a7483b382075f8cd2
'2012-05-01T20:43:48-04:00'
describe
'12324' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEG' 'sip-files00164.pro'
190b7e2605af1dc834adbc7d7ef6f441
060bdb4144f59971bc04fe87c959080a1ec84709
'2012-05-01T20:34:57-04:00'
describe
'39771' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEH' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
781619c5dec1072c6fc4952ab5b6cb46
4f86d047d57293050a3d30b18413c0128caa3105
'2012-05-01T20:34:07-04:00'
describe
'2085196' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEI' 'sip-files00164.tif'
d620e4b5774780f8e5396c902577bb71
20fe9bb160e904f53af3ebc6c0ebd47255e7137b
'2012-05-01T20:44:09-04:00'
describe
'637' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEJ' 'sip-files00164.txt'
27cf08185f73b65ef9e4ef53e5fda774
30aeb7d993002c441632d963ef2d30212de63336
describe
'25727' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEK' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
42451442d09911e74bfa4e49d5f401e2
860b0090fb9cde2cd57a49c3fbab8283a02bda82
'2012-05-01T20:39:30-04:00'
describe
'138204' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEL' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
ca2bb83d8e88d9ebf8ecd267a6516f82
f9552fe4af1a54a45e6d8d50e4a703b0b5814cc8
describe
'23248' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEM' 'sip-files00165.pro'
571bddb0b0c05bc40a5e4d8e1b0eef0c
8ce42b54f3354ee0f0869be39c1b2b7d5dc4ac7b
'2012-05-01T20:43:11-04:00'
describe
'56916' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEN' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
48b485d68dd70e5da9d0be3177c36c64
7e31d7ef353d57fbf4d62d1d04bf23e415e68223
describe
'1992476' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEO' 'sip-files00165.tif'
6ac9e064dc844be821ac0d0e37cb6390
878f9b37114efd78c7797ff7b06d391114da5ab2
describe
'1003' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEP' 'sip-files00165.txt'
6596e79edcaf8ccfb40ce7ba2e69b256
4b39ea700a1e94af1d18d81bd14c8bf29c08ab85
'2012-05-01T20:43:51-04:00'
describe
'30447' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEQ' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
45f9435fad1a33c70b56b9ef844aedaf
7268c17668c8fa1f62ecc9b859b70b166d0c56df
describe
'272615' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXER' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
cb46c86453eb4eac7b02b9aec0f17fb1
9b0dc1725632b0e2bedf563e397dc970bbfe7dec
'2012-05-01T20:42:03-04:00'
describe
'191222' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXES' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
33efce1d6210c304bd985571671c752c
2611e97eb61b1e04d8cfe6a28bf2f629e27c8f59
describe
'38521' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXET' 'sip-files00166.pro'
d9e4740a6e048aceb45fbf69d0d28182
5dc0f0b082a303d19181c3b080840464b36faa87
describe
'76163' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEU' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
f72ce93ec5d0628d69f81d18e774efda
0fe667eb6bdb675bdbc27cd63a10c563ed6e5444
describe
'2204308' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEV' 'sip-files00166.tif'
fcffda9b48d9ddcc149af18eb84281b8
c00bc61d13187729122cf5948961e7e592ce8ec2
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEW' 'sip-files00166.txt'
c6c4da931ec7c6f566019b8d8bc2d0c4
f403f378d175cd75d994134ded232ecf65d5ca5c
'2012-05-01T20:33:12-04:00'
describe
'36045' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEX' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
7e6e607a450161968f8e252ccc6e7ac7
80fd2439054128c6a9f5b3897c9366a67e6b7bd8
describe
'255283' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEY' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
49feac05bbececbf12ccf185219ed8fd
b1eef317dc391c2cd01a6532a528584da80e9400
describe
'194890' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXEZ' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
1235968de7f84acfb0210b2af86a1d34
22e6a67315423478643f0f98d754609ef1568c2d
'2012-05-01T20:38:15-04:00'
describe
'38107' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFA' 'sip-files00167.pro'
33719fe9488605a35528b4ed5f8fc961
08075ecaea43154e634e99fe61b1fe28d6754231
describe
'2065656' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFB' 'sip-files00167.tif'
ab4296a611278d98ca42e2d2d795428a
05bd9bde4e0135fc8d4725f57cb2a6227e6c7b8c
'2012-05-01T20:41:38-04:00'
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFC' 'sip-files00167.txt'
700628cb11e3495239e6c5de8bd60a5e
3f322e04fee0081f17e025cc7522f3f71660e2d7
'2012-05-01T20:41:10-04:00'
describe
'36800' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFD' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
4399f09e0a14f144b4bae0ba8275673b
3f879527baa3663a3eed2e26a82825b22ebd4338
'2012-05-01T20:33:19-04:00'
describe
'248698' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFE' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
4e907a2559112418884ef0485d0af913
c0904eceb3ccb4ec547185b49d8e2b2463a56f9f
'2012-05-01T20:37:17-04:00'
describe
'164478' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFF' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
1038e1e0f3b8b5f9d354a52b131a7be9
37428a73c303ea8590c6ece5348d5c563d479413
describe
'33258' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFG' 'sip-files00168.pro'
ce4252356a88c652a1b790765bd07539
b648bd03df415f281cf661aaccc8cac5734b8a1e
'2012-05-01T20:41:59-04:00'
describe
'68039' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFH' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
25ee1685dbb7c2f0138738caedab9a74
f208835f0319b4ca003e3342861961553830700c
describe
'2011672' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFI' 'sip-files00168.tif'
6e9c416b3ef4f770510036083d1c41b6
16a9e865fe1e8b75c3676aa31f03d3866934c727
'2012-05-01T20:32:42-04:00'
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFJ' 'sip-files00168.txt'
d235cc731f0bb55323309e211cd41239
13b9a4ddae5102973bf46651a764fece94f78f7f
'2012-05-01T20:35:13-04:00'
describe
'35552' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFK' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
798bdcf83bc8b3f19d50bd6f727dae64
e59df8c6a3f56996ece3e58b1c2978b8fc8e3586
'2012-05-01T20:46:58-04:00'
describe
'252595' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFL' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
ff63e5c9b4a6a8c62265c9dc0c7db61f
8249f9e52c3cb0175e37dd3d0824159f4b7c7cef
describe
'184628' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFM' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
519d76e25bbee33c2e6024c35eae5b04
25ea977236085f431a581fd066e683fb0f1b9d70
'2012-05-01T20:47:18-04:00'
describe
'36809' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFN' 'sip-files00169.pro'
6e2f75fac4f8877215d5f4088f58aadf
b3ad970ba44bbb60cc1553a51575c78186095fe9
'2012-05-01T20:40:26-04:00'
describe
'74407' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFO' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
5fda74fe1c8064a3eb9bedb9caeff063
035c9a04f25cd99f880dfc49f76dd3387043efe0
describe
'2043344' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFP' 'sip-files00169.tif'
2e8ff78acc57e48dc2fd8e6b86980137
0f6d0753fd5f66e0e77fd3574b5168ca85cdd6ba
'2012-05-01T20:40:18-04:00'
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFQ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
c160fcb0c33904bd0ba7ca6ab99bba14
91a4c09f9b335b0abda458cb09f5afa81e028fa6
describe
'36184' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFR' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
26749f2124bf2cae922a6ffe08a06898
1c6bedb70afea486ec6d155d90b29ff82c4c4a2e
describe
'255888' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFS' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
10c14591cb34a311f7953534106bb5e1
0e472ada5251c317ecaa03eeef96844eeafe34e7
describe
'193395' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFT' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
38bd4427bffb03da286c3934296346bf
d22f775230475a0ae312c92b66f19fb99d438cc3
describe
'38883' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFU' 'sip-files00170.pro'
23de6f1b541011ac535e289ea8cae358
0893ae5cf78c1cadf25ba436b22e062a229f82b7
describe
'75559' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFV' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
c5b2c626f8183f3124ccc81751ec9fed
26d38c8e64b497f7079aaeb3acf5ed0f809d3f9b
describe
'2069504' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFW' 'sip-files00170.tif'
24034a422a55bf3ffa37be8bc2c1b05d
fc54af3706e57373bd58b543841ec40ec661c25e
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFX' 'sip-files00170.txt'
2ddd47305b69418811e50821885649c1
da40c32fa5c6553648eeb205843e204aa9f68649
describe
'36221' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFY' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
71139822d2ad16f1c1e607993f3d8902
154a087c9545636a1556087d15d3b27eb117feb8
describe
'262856' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXFZ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
e54a763585993361121ce302d6d5e47c
71c2fb438a1e8a95dc2f22e59f89abcb63772c0c
describe
'164288' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGA' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
e31946edc406402a302ba9e7f2b117e3
fbd607e0609f35b54991b124788a69efcd1453e1
describe
'40555' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGB' 'sip-files00171.pro'
4418bde0e987c132e810d8dcb8cd9d8a
f90de345a5ebcf72bd16a3092202800e15306456
describe
'68432' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGC' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
7576a262b8f1e0ae8544c1043c2096f8
b20193d70d21c8126dabd85b65acc5b3a1990f41
'2012-05-01T20:31:14-04:00'
describe
'2125536' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGD' 'sip-files00171.tif'
9be58df6d11c855f6db3db0433feb7d5
69a63ce5b308b71a7dc18bc061881e08bcec8de8
'2012-05-01T20:37:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGE' 'sip-files00171.txt'
6d23897499e6d2157ae09545d99f0cd0
2d064fc23e0dc612657a4b342a01f95880a6bd25
'2012-05-01T20:43:01-04:00'
describe
'33633' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGF' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
ecc281f3a3c7bc7e066c93b4d6888e79
72ca0fde22e01c531228ef18c70347fd01ded83e
'2012-05-01T20:33:23-04:00'
describe
'265044' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGG' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
f9443d1bf9be679baf89d4bd546f2b4f
272ece3bfba48aeb2a294ef9708c42e0252db786
describe
'40169' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGH' 'sip-files00172.pro'
9e4b0892ec338342ab2bad13f8f4b2f4
3c00938780668b670920427be979c9aee3b9500a
describe
'78851' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGI' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
f29ac251d7df7db4b5a393b433e17427
c7dabcca54e4ade6118f35c54d6e79bedd239bdd
describe
'2143324' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGJ' 'sip-files00172.tif'
e1ee4e95d53761c166cf16ff93659606
baed8fa66451e76ce889387c5c447ec3e8e93f7b
'2012-05-01T20:43:29-04:00'
describe
'1667' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGK' 'sip-files00172.txt'
a9890661dc28bdaf220d5ab80c35d946
b509414f3eb72d24de5169fc7f43fde2d605efb0
describe
'36881' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGL' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
c554bac24b5999770e337b8ce4faeb19
09ae11165fa7ffba4a8eea26ac7ae90739f9a74d
'2012-05-01T20:38:53-04:00'
describe
'251586' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGM' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
2ced91331924e4b73071c118207babe1
e830479af8954a27f5fbed955a0eff4a17088e93
describe
'198973' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGN' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
897c7efe4f35705b6605b80882287e41
905a8402360d5d598c83bce35f74955154cf1d01
describe
'39583' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGO' 'sip-files00173.pro'
48944ddbce79dc27e1d728c5818fe752
3b3a78eddb666bf48264af68142cf945237ec206
describe
'78924' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGP' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
1c8c6bb1708e538235e0c8e06c86db36
0641a924edb9f3f9cf0052550119b370bb23706c
'2012-05-01T20:45:44-04:00'
describe
'2035840' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGQ' 'sip-files00173.tif'
1b687aea5f730e12126f9ee20bcc20ce
4a58ea97bd8fe750d5786fb6cbfc691712adaa16
describe
'1660' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGR' 'sip-files00173.txt'
ed941efcde7d67598c1dfbefc3c63042
6746e3e7074adb31c37d6994da5956c96d5bbadc
'2012-05-01T20:42:16-04:00'
describe
'36910' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGS' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
1d6c6c03520414ceeaa3e0aac2c46219
8cee451e40465751035d29784a005a2f1fd8be67
describe
'268848' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGT' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
7ee51f0bc7eff26ab1da2aba2c05fa12
ecb02f1bc5c58105b02c635af5872f9c0404c066
describe
'168258' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGU' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
529d63296a6cccc1752b189bf1acd658
bb02eb7cb75b10cd35c06d1a928d9e937379deb0
'2012-05-01T20:37:18-04:00'
describe
'43349' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGV' 'sip-files00174.pro'
9bc25e41b817b4ac785ef36bef857e06
a872efa19e312bb89f10bd0aded91ae7426c1b12
describe
'67836' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGW' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
adca52a19b85a21dc3f05d9aedbf6ef8
21b05e7e159a6aef2a8b77f21ea7cff499b690de
describe
'1774' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGX' 'sip-files00174.txt'
cb4a8431084a65a9be2c1b5785e095fa
42d4b352ad94a8b20a03f1a0d2aca5d6c070bd38
'2012-05-01T20:46:15-04:00'
describe
'32848' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGY' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
2aae319857431b117f0ce0060527b4f8
783d55374afe2d8808826f1fba3a54ea4856431f
'2012-05-01T20:29:50-04:00'
describe
'240953' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXGZ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
f19fa343ccf92625d7add4da14e2e65a
4d51ad228f5e81d7521356e453eb200bcbf951da
'2012-05-01T20:38:08-04:00'
describe
'202343' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHA' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
5505c94047ae0b0300ebbe7695c81529
ac0253cd3af702bf77c7b35ea4f6d5154be8e3ee
'2012-05-01T20:34:13-04:00'
describe
'42338' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHB' 'sip-files00175.pro'
f45499d0a701d98aad6884776a33864a
1c1af3e4b315ccda5e2bc9f38c1171710ff77017
describe
'80517' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHC' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
9bbe849a0f91cff974e79f080cc7b5b7
75913a61aedeb4357fcde8f5036bb3eefd0082d7
describe
'1950100' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHD' 'sip-files00175.tif'
c7ec4630c762f165faa5205462f3d70c
b0a1489cbe395e449c2ec3d61f83a563ee963d73
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHE' 'sip-files00175.txt'
4094bd80b4db519f28fd602a439218f1
ade238817f93771f865ca614c22e944be572a8f4
'2012-05-01T20:36:17-04:00'
describe
'37665' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHF' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
23e40788b281924c3d70609e0905ead7
444a10f47f161010d7e38619976c538f37737ddb
'2012-05-01T20:32:16-04:00'
describe
'266617' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHG' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
286f3747c555120232f73c5e28a786dc
a30c370be925b666a3033b0dfd3f0e0dab308628
describe
'163602' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHH' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
4793f578a9938a66a18ada808c5e73b6
5b8ee62432fb4f8e90adb1652b54bfb16aa3036e
describe
'41036' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHI' 'sip-files00176.pro'
7203c1a2ad1e58058bc3862a95ff67d4
1dfdda92f2a36e35d908f15e7b2c4ee312c6d8f8
describe
'67269' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHJ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
f1184986e1f20a175c2dda486525d7a8
e3cd85dd1d8b161437ad422cd2b335e51cd6baf7
'2012-05-01T20:39:52-04:00'
describe
'2155708' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHK' 'sip-files00176.tif'
356fa50246f12b427a7db3ecde478e99
5b57e756f9eca5738b597498368474ad26a2d4cb
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHL' 'sip-files00176.txt'
13c06a09a07927ef91f2f3d27f88a2e0
61a16a2b6c76455d2c67fad3925e3a1c421452fd
describe
'252800' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHM' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
b6ca4ed1c9b2251c1cc93a3817cc0e02
605e4442d24c2008fe5ae31a36da302727281863
describe
'205600' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHN' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
a16c1bc2374c3c7c852c018a8dd478a7
a7f23fa072bd36e6b29956900370f05be639cb60
'2012-05-01T20:46:08-04:00'
describe
'40428' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHO' 'sip-files00177.pro'
a56ed6eb4aa9ab6e69bf21a1a20e5eb9
aaa00c9fe1ff7056349f63f246912ff6c1e3216f
'2012-05-01T20:42:54-04:00'
describe
'79395' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHP' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
f17bb5f9d5b518b79ef40fa754ca3585
3adb40e8bbfdcdb5d03afc652a3dc2f2748b2486
describe
'2045384' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHQ' 'sip-files00177.tif'
9a4874c9907698b97badbcbcc8a24dd2
dcd8cd9b4a8e05878fdc98ffba58d9199319ca08
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHR' 'sip-files00177.txt'
e348a72adb99ed404ea0a26f2b2bc3da
9e13656d8ec7dfbb701742fc929f83955089ff6a
'2012-05-01T20:30:16-04:00'
describe
'37200' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHS' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
3ab2b3a313ce78680304a441a53268ca
f96c3f54b1fbbae5854cd3af79a48fba5a659077
describe
'264829' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHT' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
e5c28c38a34e412eecf199eecd6b15e9
b5353e49db2b85df7f71eaabf92fe592c83ad3e7
describe
'190538' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHU' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
a6f98037860e65e9b6b20d84c1966176
ea925fb56ac5fb41087911178aaa21b5fed7e71d
describe
'40271' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHV' 'sip-files00178.pro'
2073ab30042c2f3046d0fa2882ac556e
16ac6218643f8d8747e4493a7453815b983ca8c6
describe
'74956' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHW' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
bb44ec5f1f5176f67459b17afa58234f
fe5c9f2b2269c4b1b6db8eab4e88bed2c1785a97
'2012-05-01T20:43:28-04:00'
describe
'2140940' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHX' 'sip-files00178.tif'
8bb24942ae8c9378e82786785b759799
ef1e31b37658b1891cf17119c0cae6856f8a284e
describe
'1663' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHY' 'sip-files00178.txt'
d86f2dbe23d5f4dc0f7c4f7bf8413e34
00e5ea4fd3868f2b0f7e24769bde894005ec93a5
describe
'35127' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXHZ' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
307a68cd5edb359985b509c33fd28fc1
9b7b8d0b4b1084e6b01590bac82d80043152e100
'2012-05-01T20:39:35-04:00'
describe
'254957' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIA' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
846e9e2c7d004eb7dc8b22b9c9c51cac
9cc4ca4a8a635cf8ff0711dd75d72e71b976535b
describe
'197309' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIB' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
03ac129e28137080334b4398faff475f
a983fd817c49655a3087b5b5f52ffd488cb00459
describe
'76249' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIC' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
aba7eb50ab493651fd1cb60f0db234f4
66041dca84196a777a6cbab04fd734067d3fc61e
'2012-05-01T20:38:50-04:00'
describe
'2062384' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXID' 'sip-files00179.tif'
7ef9936a328a49727402d1a1b7be7fa1
714d670113ef9289a8b77573cdb02f977a88373c
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIE' 'sip-files00179.txt'
802538c6ed6491a40fed2eb35321df2f
a5bc8e6b6399705622d6bed1ec3dda3e6a0071f6
describe
'36513' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIF' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
b7f87c39007b75f6ed27510c3019953e
9f147988307904743a7fbe7e2513e79cfe8a24d1
describe
'271703' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIG' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
789b8a30a75c56075a2774b95cab10ea
47a78a8f8a29db57bf81ac34a1e6958aebfb01d0
'2012-05-01T20:38:02-04:00'
describe
'192789' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIH' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
c2afb1cd9162e949dccbae0553b092b1
dfa9819de0f579447d200572410084354bfde38b
'2012-05-01T20:44:47-04:00'
describe
'38116' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXII' 'sip-files00180.pro'
3e9c9aabc353b681c2cd5ac8965b8110
2f013806f53466618b7dd2f571de03af93d33089
'2012-05-01T20:43:26-04:00'
describe
'75316' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIJ' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
ad78dbe9c5df81e576f5e0bf33ac49be
8272a0a1a634a7c99f260d106bfd60ff08129bd3
describe
'2196116' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIK' 'sip-files00180.tif'
760151a1e1dd0390c6233a7e68dae737
cb64c64cf7569bab12378e7ef9fbf8df2816eaa5
'2012-05-01T20:41:39-04:00'
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIL' 'sip-files00180.txt'
fccde145956ba52ae3ebd01d49aac6d7
1ca131cf35e58033b77f4fa435299e98bdcb965b
describe
'35790' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIM' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
41bcc1e50f17f57230557d38539e52f5
e3763d8db72b3be96b1bb571e31d97609c37e208
'2012-05-01T20:44:30-04:00'
describe
'240012' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIN' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
ca6ad56e1f71437c4dcf3804ef3a97f4
4808e5409e52706fa61ac83034eca08b84e6486c
describe
'185299' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIO' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
861296785dd92c689269cde041289d67
3cbb5c8a0c4b208b8f196c3aeb5d39f5a5d73f00
describe
'34658' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIP' 'sip-files00181.pro'
54f760a250d6c51d997dae4de8520288
0d66cbf76c6ff4ce149cd451d821f28a2e099797
describe
'74775' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIQ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
198e2f24c5c32a470312d32f3ec1ce86
f836459b04cc8420f76e0002e02c4e649f5e2152
describe
'1942452' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIR' 'sip-files00181.tif'
e95702353d2eb2ffa0b22d752d48f945
9a01b3eb830c3d87f62eddf36c9310571c98e113
'2012-05-01T20:41:52-04:00'
describe
'36812' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIS' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
09e980c09c12c5d72839389b3711af1b
8789949de53782a1729a64b46cb6b8b8ff4180d7
describe
'262278' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIT' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
d20915e260ca4bf21b4e9ccbf3d61db7
f4a65253b7b3c97fc39d10f92c857acaa7b8b6c7
describe
'192709' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIU' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
f9922482107c984d17669143f5324ce6
6d1f4d41a764ed7f7a32e09c1f2e8fd1e219f11f
describe
'40797' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIV' 'sip-files00182.pro'
230b8c73e6b46e1e3f3925e057e17c40
98e6e698ceccefdcc12924938fa838d9d19bc147
describe
'75813' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIW' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
5789cf5af5bc9b7c87cf7ccd7f8db380
4c34b5eacea1d09d0529dcb4769562b887a605bf
'2012-05-01T20:43:50-04:00'
describe
'2120480' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIX' 'sip-files00182.tif'
5bd234ed760374e406756ed053884891
38ee6e6214e4e398ef8aebebb640d69cf5cc38fd
describe
'1690' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIY' 'sip-files00182.txt'
cc46e0d62340614ce2cfd60b0b4df516
d11c421f04ab1b7ef971a29108ccc7f47333815c
'2012-05-01T20:38:19-04:00'
describe
'35624' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXIZ' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
2a43c0649cc3d062a09eb221c8072423
4a9bd272a0b66605ce55bec9d72b62f08060ee55
describe
'260051' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJA' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
4d2c5db5937bc0e585c2ffdd97cc9b7e
5e1800638704bde5dc44ef36a447081aff14adb8
describe
'198171' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJB' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
aa65b326d6726aa390617f2049618ca4
c32e1607ba7d936d08bf5782295d5cacff0641c6
'2012-05-01T20:41:56-04:00'
describe
'40312' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJC' 'sip-files00183.pro'
5f30a50da4e153fa7a6ef642fd5eefda
4325b44fdd9fc1afb7f616d3b02c7629edddcf55
describe
'77616' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJD' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
c36a3cf649444f500b81272dde925828
2445d55603d5afc809275bbdcce971180f44f4fb
describe
'2103196' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJE' 'sip-files00183.tif'
8d963c1999947f46d32cf7b7597af96b
e826f012902dc09449fd4e7a94e3f3f8da95d6ef
'2012-05-01T20:45:31-04:00'
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJF' 'sip-files00183.txt'
98a0caf98c8949036c038e3141b49946
421a8aef3600f06ae80ecea21c30e8ae8133745d
'2012-05-01T20:39:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJG' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
1772c5c953fb2a70a0af513389f65b8e
34749042e3ea879d7a5c3ff19feefaddc9fd97d2
describe
'199235' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJH' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
051e1d006a1e6c4e6fe2cdd6942620a5
1de3c6b1012d23d4457748478c3da43a47460254
'2012-05-01T20:33:46-04:00'
describe
'40603' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJI' 'sip-files00184.pro'
612f69c0401673dbcbac2ca642a958eb
ff85e6864a89294a432384453a6cc73c6556350d
describe
'76844' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJJ' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
e5a6ff7bd34c86179fda00d01f748ae9
ed9db7419b49bc3427f736e50250437d608f862d
'2012-05-01T20:34:53-04:00'
describe
'2133804' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJK' 'sip-files00184.tif'
52312de76be6dfeebe76cc8edb7cf3aa
959941711f1068614877dfea80fb99ddca3a7e93
describe
'1673' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJL' 'sip-files00184.txt'
8c1b3cb75b2e56f198d10c7cf947b441
4de8230e35c2c231aaa95e796662c631ffdd2bbf
'2012-05-01T20:35:25-04:00'
describe
'35348' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJM' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
ddcbf7255108272e4edf6402fbd85b78
5cfcc14fe7e78889ad446b110d04c2b6e026888d
describe
'254070' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJN' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
fad6773244e070a3762ba3a41aa66506
79cb86f6aed54fc587f65b4b3a5557c1440f675f
'2012-05-01T20:38:44-04:00'
describe
'203936' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJO' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
30a1dfafaaf6110fc7900ba62de17d35
b909e2ad6749589c360bd91eaa38af26d59f1229
'2012-05-01T20:47:30-04:00'
describe
'40982' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJP' 'sip-files00185.pro'
f66f01fdcb36532b5757d4e6d07059c0
338d7d6ac403e1ce61d61a2907e7e8a8ac0cfecf
describe
'78806' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJQ' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
cd9965b3df75d7b7fb9ef88711f52ca7
7094bbd3cfc06d519166bcb6f923212f67771b94
'2012-05-01T20:38:04-04:00'
describe
'2055668' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJR' 'sip-files00185.tif'
1e4b97e809fb16d4a40c504d16e2f2a3
d9cea2fca31bc3cebe038e8623a2d1a183f3b9f8
'2012-05-01T20:47:34-04:00'
describe
'1722' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJS' 'sip-files00185.txt'
84a47527480be24821900eda3fb3a659
76d6ba5a10634698cd9ceac608858b9f1c88e304
describe
'36746' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJT' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
4965a064ec5ed01d3ceb489e0cbae46c
1e0a3638adf38a8cb9c5ee6a533ebcb51e765f04
'2012-05-01T20:33:49-04:00'
describe
'249481' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJU' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
ea90730bc1341bc1199c971fd8636fc4
559dc29df28e5fdafabe47f8faf32f38b3d20b46
'2012-05-01T20:41:17-04:00'
describe
'198481' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJV' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
8d97b573c82711b1b922ee687ee4df6d
2bebd7074737a35c1baf19f1bab68ab11987ea7f
describe
'41726' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJW' 'sip-files00186.pro'
71aa7c41a4dbad496cebb62b7aa3dab4
6d8173b442823e1a508f5af77e91e37f93a0a3cd
'2012-05-01T20:33:29-04:00'
describe
'199604' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJX' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
c843455f006c8457edf0b3978c60e1b4
cd44a7fba26edaaf5821772d14ac8629c0073cf7
describe
'2068776' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJY' 'sip-files00147.tif'
8df016a3be9074d47b901c26308a7899
18b98b78c3ef33c76051f158f41acce570a8a068
describe
'33529' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXJZ' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
fa604128b1164689abca52570e310c4e
a8b7fc15593bca049931c809123f976e532f8991
describe
'43203' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKA' 'sip-files00152.pro'
8bd9b4eab47125b825a424fc7b130e10
ef6e832ef7b65e002ca0c23750411df88d610390
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKB' 'sip-files00154.txt'
9abeb302aabd7d466b66443148a91111
b69be7bde537a46db7afb8167ef0bc3e092949c7
'2012-05-01T20:42:55-04:00'
describe
'43599' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKC' 'sip-files00160.pro'
04fe7bd1dc76c69133aa2c10fecf07a3
e68e7a5bbb6be3f816374a77165456b5b824f0a6
describe
'1689' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKD' 'sip-files00162.txt'
9ae324ed913b1ca965ecf91f3ffcee75
64746e196f5a692d704d2d80b4545f611140458a
describe
'246438' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKE' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
68d81971eede1dfae7e4d86ab0bd5889
dd731764cab40b3206049a330802b2872a45c11a
'2012-05-01T20:43:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKF' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
261baa5403414757163fb4533bc87a5e
5f00a4df31749f63051dfa1a05c4de1b97ab1c88
'2012-05-01T20:43:30-04:00'
describe
'202001' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKG' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
d2bdc452bdd7007e232de8f72d9a74b0
f310d40389c24a0263d9a359b1304a02bc2149de
describe
'2173240' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKH' 'sip-files00174.tif'
f45314b34b0016ce0356b4d55ee4b386
57116a70f61199f7bf5277e73f916287b47c173e
'2012-05-01T20:47:00-04:00'
describe
'33034' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKI' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
f8b5e1c39f199b678937a53cc8ba1cda
192d33422b3e08384f0674e02b5b889c8ce61d03
'2012-05-01T20:44:04-04:00'
describe
'39930' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKJ' 'sip-files00179.pro'
a2a42e6998a92c082be1a7cb33c16fee
ce8ec35177bb6227c88b5edee9512097fafb2335
describe
'1483' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKK' 'sip-files00181.txt'
5a20148e5df452871987a6f68fe61310
547640fb380121e9c63dd035900692a99bbf8223
describe
'263892' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKL' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
16a878650b8d830353e04be6dddf6f7c
f06b2d77403692ddb9d9194b09a08144b785258a
describe
'2018176' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKM' 'sip-files00186.tif'
dca02bf43a3505302e52ae9b089e1189
ef7fb74118884be5ce1c4e080a27b20e84981732
'2012-05-01T20:47:25-04:00'
describe
'1756' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKN' 'sip-files00186.txt'
648bf6e2d95af2ea9e2f8179a46d940e
f81cf6422832b400b5c01b50b156a2de94b6a0f8
'2012-05-01T20:46:37-04:00'
describe
'35982' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKO' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
c877e07e7be7e5ffc487b8d4fa4a86d3
c0fafe2fc9118fd5035317300bbd2226696e9a0a
describe
'251771' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKP' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
d054e19d5c65685038ff551736a7b25b
4150edcb38856fe3d2b5f2004a439c437f57dafd
'2012-05-01T20:45:33-04:00'
describe
'183389' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKQ' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
ded86a803f94c080751c914ec08741fd
f1b25468863e2829fdd477a3dd5574d942f29852
'2012-05-01T20:44:58-04:00'
describe
'37133' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKR' 'sip-files00187.pro'
3c9cda045dca6195d97c3bc389b28f57
47344201556111a1a4bf9fd8738f2e44fa95bd34
describe
'75196' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKS' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
53d7825e53dfc969b8fbff0d1351d86b
8ce973aacd08087e7deefbb353ebe789438b529a
'2012-05-01T20:33:50-04:00'
describe
'2036708' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKT' 'sip-files00187.tif'
cd39979feddaf4d525eb34790dfeff87
cc75c9a40dbd5f1209d4d8f44d02ab02b013f4b4
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKU' 'sip-files00187.txt'
9a5c4458c3b748950f0e1f709a21f20f
b64b03292770cbcbb1e05bba34ab4d00e863af80
describe
'36560' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKV' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
b2f1275e9aea85f06969cd592ae1d9aa
0e7b9944d2144dc6739a048f4fc5bcc194dc32e2
'2012-05-01T20:46:02-04:00'
describe
'255434' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKW' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
58ab363ca045a1fbcb51a6ada8202edf
aa713a52d0b73c6cb3b7efbe7841e6bde9c9e22e
describe
'201225' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKX' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
3e264293287d8b5b55a0437b7ce2ab37
a7997ae844d143514fa2efa280debb0acad92e34
describe
'41186' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKY' 'sip-files00188.pro'
e8a122b597509a5d83459b2e5188f73f
1e12d68d0a006dcc9b163b72e64e8c4813e8330a
describe
'78446' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXKZ' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
243f6e449033eb2e5769fb9603e86003
9562920b4c7d3561d09332410dbdc0cf459403ac
describe
'2065928' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLA' 'sip-files00188.tif'
02fa3f7801b6d38d5f033cc6965c2879
a19dceff954af2d044d0076aaef5885b801ed751
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLB' 'sip-files00188.txt'
3db8dd511bff3091b7db284f477e2cd1
5d1483cf81e69f53d2aa7a05f0e572f7b68851aa
describe
'36224' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLC' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
aa5b841ac16c7fb43d2371978a8ed033
ddd9db7c222fd6aa9c89dbc8b41036f7586f8abd
describe
'255657' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLD' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
1c690b50758daaeb2942d63193e54cd1
e34b923e940c9506b22c9c93fe49d7997b0fe80d
'2012-05-01T20:38:47-04:00'
describe
'112760' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLE' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
2b1061b0cb0ecbfd50818acc944aae49
2e4221a27baa8e2bfb230dd829ccc5365f3dd9ff
'2012-05-01T20:41:34-04:00'
describe
'24643' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLF' 'sip-files00189.pro'
015080b3e37f51b8185b26fc19b645fa
cffba593f7bd85e99fe66ffaa8746ec5235259bf
describe
'49446' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLG' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
3c80b0108a8269f9df94c6a8f72e9356
d6051dfde099b4482eb90fcd938a16344148e3b7
'2012-05-01T20:42:41-04:00'
describe
'2066612' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLH' 'sip-files00189.tif'
bbe18b61fb153faf9f723b49cde22f2c
e1f4de94f3a8285fa39bf8e9220d6b71c579ba3f
'2012-05-01T20:31:38-04:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLI' 'sip-files00189.txt'
d80b1c5f83b0fa917d4d8004296cc6ac
94d6e39f732ab10e38410baecd6c1d3359e2c58d
describe
'28030' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLJ' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
3b11ae17f183008f271d7922c7b556b6
ba67d0756fca1a881d2bbf5b1650ae911a039d49
describe
'271111' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLK' 'sip-files00190a.jp2'
909ece7d2ee624763c0e9a6536480e6a
9592fce474951c412cc6a8c9605730ad22f95d44
describe
'194280' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLL' 'sip-files00190a.jpg'
dba0e306727ab2967d078d71b169ad4d
1427dc811a221a8783361ed2fdfd8c599e9e3166
describe
'45098' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLM' 'sip-files00190a.pro'
da2be93e53ddf41a382531b3dbe7543f
14cdcf082380c9ef08bf2b7f18d55485d7941531
describe
'73474' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLN' 'sip-files00190a.QC.jpg'
2c6ba4923f4c61ef2989c83094d3afbd
db33d74ec9914c8ec60933ed3883bb2d467b2f6a
describe
'2190416' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLO' 'sip-files00190a.tif'
288372c45c071885f111aca5104e3d88
1282823cde0126d16a98abab3346661ef349ff2a
'2012-05-01T20:36:21-04:00'
describe
'1866' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLP' 'sip-files00190a.txt'
e523a9203b6a3370477031c4b751e12c
e7992b5eedc5632b3b32820e97912a9ba037dc8e
describe
Invalid character
'33427' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLQ' 'sip-files00190athm.jpg'
415c8384f52abe8c65ef6c71b258a6fe
843a45017ecf7f9c2a02c644eff0d08ab317eced
describe
'195058' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLR' 'sip-files00190b.jpg'
ada8b3973188a0e44baf385440526adb
4547b54ba69eb134c8917bf4ff94f2849e4514f0
describe
'44601' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLS' 'sip-files00190b.pro'
39c826268f857c200146a71571ff52a9
ddfcdeca0bb70e08c84b1c1cdc41bcb3882c3b89
'2012-05-01T20:37:45-04:00'
describe
'74710' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLT' 'sip-files00190b.QC.jpg'
093fecbeaf2ff8829f77bb6340535b00
f24d7f6c4ec67a9588fe2afa7170a749de00f2b4
'2012-05-01T20:36:57-04:00'
describe
'2147560' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLU' 'sip-files00190b.tif'
1b098ac40f2900a1b4a94f99a7cd9585
01569adf53a3daa0724416ba2cc246e4afba9ff8
describe
'1822' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLV' 'sip-files00190b.txt'
80cd7d1d9cc1599f4b6609f4ea3b34b0
33e782994af117c4a56e7aea4751a4f904f1c59c
describe
'34857' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLW' 'sip-files00190bthm.jpg'
c7edb54dac71ef9297800731c252e4c0
757779ec4b828bea8e6bb4c3b6f63fe193d65f60
describe
'268227' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLX' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
f3ee05fd4e42cd093d16b6cc112e3dcb
61799604d8e6742cbdea270caef30ed39ca6bf8e
describe
'156877' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLY' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
6c3b5a907fd389d05fee473dcc5b1c41
428ce0d114ead11dbea4e08218ef9182cbcd18cd
describe
'29030' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXLZ' 'sip-files00191.pro'
6cd8bd0c184c15a71e549d3d4acef156
370bd84052b38d727b806e131c472cfa6cbff731
describe
'61406' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMA' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
648e619a690b0f4c190ba3c33846be03
187f0f3e72a9d6cd82f98812408bf4756558070b
'2012-05-01T20:32:10-04:00'
describe
'2167072' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMB' 'sip-files00191.tif'
283d4cbfa073e3a2089b3d3ba5d7b3c8
06d71215f8746df18ec6f7315d4582a07c86d37d
'2012-05-01T20:38:40-04:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMC' 'sip-files00191.txt'
feb23c4e96ad63b42858d02733b20ab7
87fa6b47cb378c3aafc4f04e5baa583277120edc
describe
'1092339' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMD' 'sip-files00191a.jp2'
232a450e2de5a32ae761721dfd81cf59
08bddf13f1241a90448f8958735e82d0363d15c7
describe
'86080' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXME' 'sip-files00191a.jpg'
4540ce874a7e6df6ad345f40102773e5
25193a33b3c8ac4d3d590983ff6a18cd8a8fbdf7
describe
'39341' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMF' 'sip-files00191a.QC.jpg'
8e193cef847450cfc01d39c7255f3bdf
7339b07daac4935a0e046f03510c7ede5b548b6e
describe
'26235716' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMG' 'sip-files00191a.tif'
ed8f207c0facbfc5609a6e5fe597682f
1798e5028d49b3cfb3178a311de7880140044337
describe
'31311' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMH' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
cbce36196ccdffbb528519c42ff6b706
6f26a65501ece7bd950c0a432f77b57f763519f5
describe
'247224' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMI' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
4b0924133ed4f0813a81aa5a842fba1b
da22593b96290456e6e7486ed5a108d172cfc0a2
describe
'199107' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMJ' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
a7b72c6817dc9971359ae1b81027414c
f838614762fa57abd7e5f53c46387a987c5a7c17
describe
'44271' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMK' 'sip-files00192.pro'
0de69ad56970258397de6de1f8e2a6d6
c1d81ef1102f6c384e28449c2f9881872e2bb9f7
describe
'78958' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXML' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
ff2d93589874d375889c7ae74361dc5f
ad8abbf14af55331940dee3ab6420862961dca7f
describe
'2000176' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMM' 'sip-files00192.tif'
62fc5e4da9299d314b3a0241b6bad906
acd03b772709ea099eccac1291851170bcb8917d
describe
'1859' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMN' 'sip-files00192.txt'
a146769c6d22fbc2d4f9c3ab14052ef7
91a1554eea5df4cf14fcea988f5c59a664271824
describe
'35405' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMO' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
8a4966a7730d6f6854cd8b70508b04b8
1cf010e5644ac52311bef1e1ffd2aff3beda8d8a
describe
'236872' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMP' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
6fcb07e6f55f9c8e41a86ec159897367
02fbce95f0614745166b3b6a2d7941541b492d1a
describe
'120407' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMQ' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
48e20fac02cefef56851702911615ac4
66527caf38dd055deb0d392cd809501729e47dee
describe
'22567' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMR' 'sip-files00193.pro'
d81babc969face134acdc04afe2f59f2
3e2ef13ac125f041a58e56faa87c1999e789dab6
describe
'53639' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMS' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
899833e6c40a8055a292a4c7d6bb3211
a4cea8bbf9fe866c111f3c51ca108b383d9cfa25
describe
'1916616' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMT' 'sip-files00193.tif'
b0473e3eff48ae1d6fb0c65af6674033
75747df95e05c9e103bb63c0c1d8dcea379f67a6
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMU' 'sip-files00193.txt'
b7b9706d1f7959ca3e70a79805976fee
10d16d4422bcbcee94306d67f00f31a66eee9e3d
describe
'30019' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMV' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
1df88d532b8a22075878c179245823a9
14c3cd368b89c47d05aa7556ead77719cea61918
'2012-05-01T20:45:50-04:00'
describe
'261517' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMW' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
70be77f474a12862116d26ae08e7b83a
ba91afe187b1811124f1a2c7236028da41ce7694
'2012-05-01T20:31:57-04:00'
describe
'181718' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMX' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
002376abb64517e487017cd6a65ebe9c
bbdcc53ba1a8bd2ef72e39ddd18a91f76ec290d9
describe
'42991' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMY' 'sip-files00194.pro'
63bc099b5a9ce570d55e59c8ef841142
1c6b68ad7323b13abef997e4a59516d10e51bfa1
describe
'71355' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXMZ' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
06edd0c04e9323bb99f8e714ea00e199
60355fb6c79726ed68d1a0ebb4ef906316e8b4d8
describe
'2113396' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNA' 'sip-files00194.tif'
6f761624ec9a894f6abf05be86717e02
3a8428eb5be9a8e815ec3bf895345c070a17a740
describe
'1806' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNB' 'sip-files00194.txt'
4a29f59d24a1fde1009a5861680b0f90
2c1b6be73e96d4a048e13769eac114e292ede7ad
describe
Invalid character
'33342' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNC' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
c6f2706b941933025513661c4a012c75
f99a506cece168be464fc4886bc4b19a2cba731a
describe
'213421' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXND' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
f899c375ec29625324159294d343e0c7
e8de03edb36ef98348eae984a3b8d3411b232066
'2012-05-01T20:47:06-04:00'
describe
'80116' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNE' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
7355dfdd6389d5ab831a65c3255944dd
e4d45ff6e0b3c8edd0d1faf0e9d757f4f019cf0d
describe
'13734' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNF' 'sip-files00195.pro'
f78f5236cf2c66fa4421960ae4369e5e
58fc270ce0c433e2bedf00062ff888f04e763cc7
describe
'39620' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNG' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
25443d1f8f72b7515556babf9e1d20a2
5393817610b64cd70355841fa3417e5572fd513d
describe
'2177324' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNH' 'sip-files00195.tif'
d3462b2ceb0e6c48f8c32d41f4c1e7ae
289c84d17b1993752c53eb0d11cf723af7fec8a5
'2012-05-01T20:34:26-04:00'
describe
'627' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNI' 'sip-files00195.txt'
418337b9f8d7d804e9dd292b9114ef37
2074c4d5eee759c8f8f768290601dce4528c64c9
describe
'25275' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNJ' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
f84f69d3e882c140d7bb82f47bbc8fc3
6ef4aa53fb201e249d41871705c7be9b7f764ee4
'2012-05-01T20:29:45-04:00'
describe
'264836' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNK' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
a2020d86727af227151798fe960bf042
f96b29a5b11e9c84e97f5e4e423dee42270afc3b
'2012-05-01T20:43:13-04:00'
describe
'32397' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNL' 'sip-files00196.pro'
8e458f709c00fee321476a004e1538d5
1262f1fe639725ddb317bfad558bcf3861d5eb43
describe
'62272' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNM' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
0e1376cfb785b05c1805a6a88a09834a
400ff71516b91ac8717a4ce9d99233f32a9a7cce
describe
'2140196' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNN' 'sip-files00196.tif'
88e1eeb40ab3489c20cb59cadb561628
ee2a7d060c7c9e2657d477b2585bf1c313211a63
describe
'1335' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNO' 'sip-files00196.txt'
09363873caa9e6a21fdabf012a3b1e79
d55c66119a531b76d817d3192af1c2f08610baf2
describe
'31410' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNP' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
f064339c6e7977888cb0a33145fcfb00
18ea328a6f7ae4e2b13959e852c1dc0a36ad4b77
describe
'275249' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNQ' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
e6ec70a2f9eacc2f86b1c5c70b30b0b4
f1b1ddb278b71c2036a7eed64270a723799e0fa6
describe
'141193' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNR' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
8d4d4242d6877e28295767ff5784f29b
bf77806f68c4f1c3e73ea1b02c5d4fe4878d19ac
describe
'31697' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNS' 'sip-files00197.pro'
aa57fd6e8b92a3f77e231038cf091409
469317a78e9dc4efa752f98dc21f3bba309e98bd
describe
'60556' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNT' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
b4fd4146ff1983767dc3d5bed53a001b
6432fc650c1a7fa932de10efa31f97f6786ca639
describe
'2223428' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNU' 'sip-files00197.tif'
b84ed368aca2096d06b8165a52913df2
fd8c5980b2de269222cabe7a26f54d43a8204423
'2012-05-01T20:40:21-04:00'
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNV' 'sip-files00197.txt'
031e0529ed623e089bab3fd639a0f486
87a526f29939de1abf87055c49061012d690b73b
describe
'30666' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNW' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
8df183c32cc6d9fcbf3bb560d24ccb2f
712566e96f820a700a92ee30f3519433dcb0c4e2
describe
'266091' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNX' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
ed214b592e76c1b5ef9d6ade95185d18
88de29572ff4836f896ef2335c96c17450b8dab4
'2012-05-01T20:31:44-04:00'
describe
'187661' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNY' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
d7b38894aca5ab73fea8b1eb222d1197
f9bed932c5c4cdbf6fd4106f7b83a11bf4dc23fa
describe
'42847' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXNZ' 'sip-files00198.pro'
65d8f7d57958ec8182fe08d90a840e22
1b101529a17f2a70504031c17e3c04ee14350535
describe
'74840' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOA' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
1a2c06868d7882494c9305aa590b9c1b
22cf964f0bdc38f23eb3900e2fe2cd01f549f0d3
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOB' 'sip-files00198.txt'
0f9ab143c8fd97c027f77fd83e13d398
63f5156376132c4653d69421963c8eee27bd5da4
describe
'34778' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOC' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
db02cf76915633e120714773fdabb5f0
9f12a2d9faa87d098f5fc369423f615d8009d738
describe
'239482' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOD' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
ab243bc41145b32460766e5663948047
5116190590267cd2b0fffb473da6d435268f18cc
'2012-05-01T20:40:22-04:00'
describe
'180703' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOE' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
0dde89e01333a94dd4abdbda09a8d2d9
dea6f92d02816891f6cc5caefb032111cc36fba7
describe
'40972' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOF' 'sip-files00199.pro'
b2f9c46e8ceb74ebbc8be0e6a97a2e82
6c88b5d9f9807da78ca807be052b96bbbff8a824
describe
'74273' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOG' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
fd2706a62dd68576a3603d7b4d03f6c7
8a3c3014738033534ecb7cd37abe0aa96effa673
describe
'1937676' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOH' 'sip-files00199.tif'
4216a8f87b25377015c8e3f16449092e
13da340f57d626f7f77543237a733b29c16715bf
describe
'1700' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOI' 'sip-files00199.txt'
924e64c41b85ed74b2dd71e7507139cd
2be531eabfc5daa6c9a3749a546b05941d8cb8ba
describe
'35529' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOJ' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
bb3c5e6909503866eb0fb8deae2dbb9d
563993310d3f391c96adf6c3e21276645ab628ab
describe
'264703' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOK' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
08a8132143ab30a1cd414e7406d39b7b
2a36b05bb52eeed817a73c12b12f73ae3ad983b3
'2012-05-01T20:30:08-04:00'
describe
'176764' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOL' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
d5a8348b51a78b0cf0b3d47a3ba49ea8
dd8b40ba19d4ee5ca05b45dadc8c0fe0163cfe95
'2012-05-01T20:44:14-04:00'
describe
'40118' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOM' 'sip-files00200.pro'
f22b6e610f23b698e578164294a27cfd
65443a06545115feb4e9bb227f7ccf8d89065739
describe
'71571' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXON' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
20c0673fee27e2f8ee8b98ad4df49a20
0b552893ddd8bb26ffc8e3875a42bc010c53fed8
'2012-05-01T20:43:06-04:00'
describe
'2139740' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOO' 'sip-files00200.tif'
130abdb27f6aeb4419e4ba7ec9d13e7a
bdfdedfd7110a0e5a18b1474f17a1face839cc13
'2012-05-01T20:39:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOP' 'sip-files00200.txt'
677c35056a95b32b7cf292414515f901
68dc4b8d494b6eb739b63dbe0a9236e61b1d44a1
describe
'262781' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOQ' 'sip-files00200a.jp2'
2ff064e95ff90e345fef03e425961785
0852486f423b895b49619b1407e517512d6c2aa6
'2012-05-01T20:44:32-04:00'
describe
'41101' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOR' 'sip-files00200a.pro'
88289b11ac426bc354310e51180dfb60
9c04c8124674a8b8ad608e844913c8927a9ec860
describe
'74198' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOS' 'sip-files00200a.QC.jpg'
6f5711c7f3d75cc996829fcf4e8cbd46
c351e52e58c9f6da13faf919b5a6cbf4d5432f8b
'2012-05-01T20:31:16-04:00'
describe
'2124724' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOT' 'sip-files00200a.tif'
8dbd6ac94b6b5d1d6c8576cc90b7b4a5
3dba41117cf0c46db0bd46c75ce0c9cd0c359b50
'2012-05-01T20:47:32-04:00'
describe
'1683' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOU' 'sip-files00200a.txt'
a0765d656800687812b88c3f7311992d
bda0bf8417ecb7f28e80592e9a2a9fef55004ac7
describe
'35775' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOV' 'sip-files00200athm.jpg'
bf411073228f9792cad3c8e99c8f5ac6
1d431b28a6a4ea789885a421bed789ceae1a85e3
describe
'270365' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOW' 'sip-files00200b.jp2'
ae8343f5ea54fe06c5c67947f9f06277
fc04a9170213b341b3f87fd0b16b8fba3d6161c9
describe
'190874' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOX' 'sip-files00200b.jpg'
72d276011c6a6d565d08d62b68cfcc5d
e6f9325de0c29169b15da24330d66672ac2c05fb
'2012-05-01T20:42:38-04:00'
describe
'40935' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOY' 'sip-files00200b.pro'
44248e3f3374b2d60f65e39dd0e6c4e1
057dd8fa5f9ddf2cfe0173c4bc90674d5ba6f227
describe
'74084' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXOZ' 'sip-files00200b.QC.jpg'
5c3f451fbda7c5d75631c9ae524c7ca4
8b9f1c02387632b3d07c48bdb70d7c7e74ce132f
'2012-05-01T20:44:29-04:00'
describe
'2185708' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPA' 'sip-files00200b.tif'
165d9fccf7cc81e899ff428713e70410
b88da1e2a4c1ab04bcb8dc9a13fc9b96ef9f18a3
'2012-05-01T20:46:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPB' 'sip-files00200b.txt'
cb19134d8cafc57b2a2f6ea918a674e9
7c1e2def96d060a7154b0b9e68148f92c7fbea99
describe
'34705' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPC' 'sip-files00200bthm.jpg'
ee9e176c32de8b9492bda80dd1ad26bc
c0da2fcac38dd525c5de68c49d395e238703a00e
describe
'34068' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPD' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
f8f2bb4b1d39e1ecbdde880d80aa567c
69e24e0d6afe02501a2ebc3679d382199cd9e0d8
describe
'163732' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPE' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
5c0533f3628745eb9c607ecd9738e0d1
4095605340182e2bfd2e6d94f2496e27d73f419a
'2012-05-01T20:30:33-04:00'
describe
'42629' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPF' 'sip-files00201.pro'
8ba9e395bb00ec9f8a5ccd6c36b3990e
70aa929601a80135d5c41e030a72656f2138ab98
describe
'65787' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPG' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
040304ec13ad83ecdb4f78c26250ddea
61b397232cd2f47992590f04e60fbde04a30ad71
'2012-05-01T20:47:14-04:00'
describe
'2187692' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPH' 'sip-files00201.tif'
40006b7e35b07053398e9fb7f5bf4199
6a51f4aa43adeac1b26c343eea5a39d33c0d24a0
'2012-05-01T20:43:20-04:00'
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPI' 'sip-files00201.txt'
0010b5c9aa98e52812958f9c4a8bf208
d4f15e8fdf3f017e9b902801e671f17dac687f87
'2012-05-01T20:34:19-04:00'
describe
'32387' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPJ' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
432a2f97340d9df255ad8bdcbe263e9f
64920b1d2d74374f8daf81b0c3dce64465ed59d3
describe
'265440' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPK' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
c874ff1b432eefb14da639c0b9669544
217350b397909db42bb766e16a685bc375fe5d78
describe
'159900' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPL' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
34446acc6c1edc29092bbd381b6e0750
e9e5c91c70d4f3a98ba294fbe0b02582c260149c
describe
'40374' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPM' 'sip-files00202.pro'
8fde88f04b3affdb0bed098c8479bbdd
e85dfc2625cac4bb2d941ccec55427d46d9eed94
'2012-05-01T20:36:09-04:00'
describe
'67488' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPN' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
494d0e8e8b7ef9da49f859be0d6b12a4
442e567566721ae293bf2f3ff160d3c5bacac669
describe
'2146412' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPO' 'sip-files00202.tif'
af437513aec4a2a5c9373af11f598b78
03ed158421ed1e34beaa9c919fb16fdbe54dcdb9
'2012-05-01T20:34:25-04:00'
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPP' 'sip-files00202.txt'
578f11271b798703c0d4553437e94083
3159aca73a2be1140c4d021753df71af23bca24e
describe
'33387' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPQ' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
524cff3924a02ac798d157649decca43
65d8669c7ca3a0c07b03666d0521b2d404db0f11
describe
'257011' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPR' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
3a9ee9c70de6479f3134f928d64e4900
e231ca9c4a2c1ea508182a18985040b6d38a6827
describe
'186587' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPS' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
083baa93342ff3218b2fa8d998c58b43
d5494aa668fdcb649c5e0d0dda4adb11d6dc9664
describe
'43486' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPT' 'sip-files00203.pro'
f09e5c42757a7d9e68e5352dcd211e42
9a2d3a3765d9a11d6794174bcf7c373406182119
'2012-05-01T20:44:33-04:00'
describe
'2077688' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPU' 'sip-files00203.tif'
d572cd488e3964491cbb96357ea479e2
1bbee36d437900b467bce781606795558e6ea682
'2012-05-01T20:36:00-04:00'
describe
'1778' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPV' 'sip-files00203.txt'
15bdfb5180909b32dcdd728354323c11
940bd91ccc3260a9aef899caa8d6b3c692f92bc2
'2012-05-01T20:40:45-04:00'
describe
'34467' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPW' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
7c394550e349aa68881dd0f0f0c718dc
fbe8402e8d3bf2260d34b76d929fe32499ad8d8a
'2012-05-01T20:41:14-04:00'
describe
'246115' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPX' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
7b5531b19f42e010f0e3049d0be24275
31b52a853faa151446a5172d8f65668dc6f56cb4
describe
'78800' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPY' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
2c6d03bbfd8c0ad55f87340967fe3695
3bb24e87dc7f005e06090eeaedf79de0d056415d
describe
'15920' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXPZ' 'sip-files00204.pro'
244c7dae866ac8418cb578a7813a4614
b6a4cc2ac230480312a49630110a0e6364486c24
describe
'38680' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQA' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
3914fa7e1b00bfe6b1785cb282905b58
637841e68faf1d37c209499967c78c5afcac8cc9
describe
'2123800' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQB' 'sip-files00204.tif'
5f0741002b1cea8c7636ceb3d340931b
cad3448028f9c4654c9f34069a7177c62b263df1
'2012-05-01T20:40:49-04:00'
describe
'780' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQC' 'sip-files00204.txt'
3b5fb861049934e244e4d2e3d9e3b716
50008a81a84650bcb6b50ea90be9e79b6cc2f12d
describe
'24950' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQD' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
6719ec3a6d816380540f4d79f4047eb4
809c952ec33d9c75388ba29db1ef18d38d95c9a4
describe
'264906' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQE' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
2b5c3a63c173c2079512bb7b3e9a6efc
1253ddaab40ffea0a64a95a5b099d2ccfa30a1c3
describe
'136709' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQF' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
fef138799d882cbf7414e42ea3e35378
b161f1f6db8874c0114cdf1d2225d7c8636b9815
describe
'29585' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQG' 'sip-files00205.pro'
755f8c44e1e30283a57a4ec77ce8275e
d0d6ff97b89b5e4c2ad07350e0354adb7e025145
describe
'57875' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQH' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
fd92d9b47bd9b94935e6676526a911ce
ecb2ab2110882d58a68ee28a38589586056131e0
describe
'2139988' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQI' 'sip-files00205.tif'
f698f5a2f7dd3b3fd164d62c86037645
d40673bbb3ce6c70048501135a411fa6c2c0bcc5
'2012-05-01T20:39:21-04:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQJ' 'sip-files00205.txt'
697e8cec309f4ae3fdc51303890a0162
9cba7b0b25cfe49bbdbfaf68ea7c67588ebd77ea
describe
'29973' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQK' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
096008958e51d2df06460772f7e0aeb8
6844cb75d6fd553d03f3208f9a475cc9ff33c53b
describe
'268218' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQL' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
9eb1579f9e658691208f5d72b0bee480
93bb032eff03d594979abb7af2a6ca75a3c2af50
'2012-05-01T20:41:19-04:00'
describe
'175113' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQM' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
fbb20285727f1719770bab21b228d35a
6141f4dbd0eeeaf404e44ba6dab318e7c238f4a8
describe
'40559' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQN' 'sip-files00206.pro'
a38057b9087f6776b6d4f181758379e1
9ae404586c9614f5e7fa9e51ac2fa31f5d502e55
describe
'72638' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQO' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
2b2587359d4ad83fa6def5b02dd7597a
7c3acead3b6699496691c3bb192ecc8bd2335747
describe
'2168296' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQP' 'sip-files00206.tif'
405366cca6b2e3c6f312e7317aef5220
0a698b5bda5a3018e5151182563846816c2553ad
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQQ' 'sip-files00206.txt'
b74d3b72dabcaa92a2fd60f72f27e4e5
0058baba13a71274c7d207d58c7cf9447bc566ba
'2012-05-01T20:32:20-04:00'
describe
'34033' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQR' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
efdfd8500bcf13b88a1d2b2a1c8fe78c
70a17b39c98d4a2e3372d38f1ffb703711e74fbf
describe
'266857' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQS' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
cdbc9596efa9541d06da653ea57b9747
7c019d5b8fca94683c9b4d50da2a0851c7c03be0
describe
'156817' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQT' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
c4881039484ecfad4985f241289227a4
2223a4c3b01f2682a7861dcad9a913560ab574e8
describe
'34597' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQU' 'sip-files00207.pro'
a2f929061187f10ed545481c29a0cf93
8d51e77605752cfdd40ba580fbe0efd91e48e831
describe
'63900' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQV' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
49d6716678fc4e3a108a63228fc2c44c
760dd674d0b6d296139320adb221e3a469d5f551
describe
'2156008' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQW' 'sip-files00207.tif'
eefc7dee3b9b30e326db63aa4ad26726
d163fbcab6c898797ce92aafe634b2c642982f9e
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQX' 'sip-files00207.txt'
98caa2ae442f2521d831e0947397699e
6bb06008f5cb279ffdbc32d17cb242648eda5457
'2012-05-01T20:32:49-04:00'
describe
'31817' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQY' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
31685a56407d5a7a385fc9f4489dbac2
77da8d2a7f0d50c6e62d77dbb3410424219c6cd9
describe
'1010507' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXQZ' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
7fc5529446afc8db93667394436d054d
c43139aac91851dd5a0113013d901c9a059bf7e6
describe
'45346' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRA' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
3300a366ce348b834cfe82f54511184e
a16a294b4049f69daac79f2190a691b7f66843cd
describe
'24276840' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRB' 'sip-files00209.tif'
b6a34460b29c8d641ba28df9ac2ab55f
3fd455adfee22a4939a04279d0e6f474ce392082
'2012-05-01T20:44:51-04:00'
describe
'29000' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRC' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
5164ef5aff473882816f306d6afca8e2
125b3ee2b06fda6922614ab5c00853728f94e565
'2012-05-01T20:42:01-04:00'
describe
'270943' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRD' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
4bda9e90a2373b9c577143c27c7ebd78
da2c9eab3bebafd2802aba5f1a896660168ed20d
describe
'125262' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRE' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
b12bc5cfd955f43f0301c06771aef7e9
c338e588c8e9fab033bf45b119283aff18186124
describe
'27947' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRF' 'sip-files00212.pro'
f400eaec58562ef85a8afcc54a0219f1
58fb990385dffd461d2d581ec355fbfbd7b958da
describe
'53886' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRG' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
cc5e5ef551f85e13e5bf9a95da218594
7402ef94d8946a8bace1cf5a90f631b9a34a04c1
'2012-05-01T20:47:01-04:00'
describe
'2187964' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRH' 'sip-files00212.tif'
1001cccee701ccc257eaa5889cb19a70
62381039e0be98dbfeff97681af3617db7732141
'2012-05-01T20:41:53-04:00'
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRI' 'sip-files00212.txt'
49d688f7dd3839dac836a7fbfe52ed1b
d552bb3b6a14e5130def83aaeacb8bc4b7667be3
describe
'29006' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRJ' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
9e301ad29ca8dd0fc1b81cff4883cd67
19961647909aff0a3842558b13661c629b5c6c89
describe
'262357' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRK' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
85253ee76f728fe19590d380a2404d3a
fcf2ed9d840b55bc26a9651d8cf79aca4914c687
describe
'176762' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRL' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
4f095da5d72ed46ae02d2a1ccd3aa4a5
11198fdc25e3c5f3dcc1c0a0c5f3a667a2971214
describe
'43354' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRM' 'sip-files00213.pro'
4ba50e47b0c57f95e47a91b284052358
0466be2c84233bb1fb7f8e75989a0f6a824599d8
'2012-05-01T20:34:18-04:00'
describe
'70866' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRN' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
eba8b95d11a3b041767217d732df3367
ada7abaaeb6335dfa439d0b9cfad114b19d5e231
describe
'2120884' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRO' 'sip-files00213.tif'
de6d741bf6ede6845624eb1481c3697b
949133f2601e6e7281b0190fceabdf1b6e54dfcc
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRP' 'sip-files00213.txt'
8a5a742802f1c50119a5f1dbb60a8d7b
1fa8bdb69a2f7c8518a41bd9a03941cc0814edab
describe
'33763' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRQ' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
3e25fa510d4875656dcd986f0618e8f7
870e0f68b0badcffe8485744b7a0717a84f9401e
describe
'255830' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRR' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
674e9d93e24860f17caa3ecead8b7e36
0997643dc46c488e2a4183349f9d0a51770c0ec5
describe
'181663' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRS' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
cbecfb78ffc55e97424817ecda6b65e4
aad930dcbd98c2f2fa622ec14732032e9c0130ac
describe
'44107' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRT' 'sip-files00214.pro'
e21019cff733ca0dccfba27fed7ee5b4
9c630aed04f0c245ab2dd6e618f812c977564c6c
'2012-05-01T20:31:34-04:00'
describe
'72548' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRU' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
bb6f380b9830dbd31e8d53c62172cd8d
a0b5103a11bb66d83fe8ce8b162afdf5c1ba8612
describe
'2069220' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRV' 'sip-files00214.tif'
829c97f4f85387b6b9ef61684428b265
7ccb01424fb403fd3818f2d753600b28ff3e4413
'2012-05-01T20:32:11-04:00'
describe
'1864' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRW' 'sip-files00214.txt'
3154d2c62374895c90317c595ddf2f54
1745081bdcbbad951d08f3acc5fc5711bd7ceff5
'2012-05-01T20:35:28-04:00'
describe
'34179' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRX' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
dfae46bb5d3aa66b2677ebd75e0e494c
8398204b5f4ccf5fecca1c6b7ce0384fc746e264
describe
'264689' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRY' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
645507048047b26151987407a309b663
1a950010ac05f27146c3dc04bd9d20aec70c393b
describe
'164520' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXRZ' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
c4f469e5073208b49e70f28a454c729a
f2ad0e16af1799be48771e78c04704bb1e746b86
describe
'39579' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSA' 'sip-files00215.pro'
32b4b127230c6b62ab63bc3feebaf493
6d7cc34ff124abec678f4457adde4356435d8a47
'2012-05-01T20:38:13-04:00'
describe
'67999' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSB' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
a4cc8f75e61c49dbef3770cb740657b1
d2486c5ac203267296ec1d21f69ae10cbd18837b
describe
'2139504' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSC' 'sip-files00215.tif'
6d1c891b19b8e99b37390505f1da84d8
6ce493b838525e6d7be23dbac6af3a360c239913
'2012-05-01T20:34:31-04:00'
describe
'1692' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSD' 'sip-files00215.txt'
84ad80036d5e0807993b565c2e50067d
f33a04991ad42f4342d34b5cd8ad91272bd220be
describe
'33845' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSE' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
f88edaa28cf6254da5a08b00f2908dc7
4d68b51dca5c2229713435f62479f0f9f881611d
'2012-05-01T20:43:42-04:00'
describe
'258715' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSF' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
62276b0eb38dce6fd55c138845c223b4
a102c8ad9a6797f2c1ba7837a02f145d19979e67
describe
'43264' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSG' 'sip-files00216.pro'
ea9c04935d71a4d922adeac8f5cbee8b
ce11d6398a32d282dcb8419bf852beb8e7046bfb
describe
'72697' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSH' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
0a69c2fb7f7a1ac4b3bab1a139a643b0
0042d1d5d05c2930568b08d629ae2714b7839b6a
describe
'2091328' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSI' 'sip-files00216.tif'
99f0de847b63dbe91ed18fd772ce4d75
3c44de6f62fee434c013960ad48f5a9a04f869ed
describe
'1805' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSJ' 'sip-files00216.txt'
bfc180228627a4603032ef6932e4393f
5c30f7c234a2ef948f8876287b31036d59fa8109
describe
'33923' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSK' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
737876cf9ad998d1e529b12d01133b0f
f49c1206d1357b1ab030a43310e638006f91e5a0
'2012-05-01T20:35:46-04:00'
describe
'224124' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSL' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
c5664f3b2af76371ae900cf992db3f07
03e03ff8a07ca9423f5a65dd4fc5d01e66fd0f5f
'2012-05-01T20:45:07-04:00'
describe
'82323' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSM' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
102a654a7ccdc8d2e1df788908272f78
4d6c37c4c60d9b26fcbc330ed272121668deb9cd
describe
'14702' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSN' 'sip-files00217.pro'
d2ba9c5e81c9d17ecaaf6bda3629505c
96353faae117d47ce51675deb27225d47957041d
'2012-05-01T20:42:58-04:00'
describe
'39915' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSO' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
338aea887c82a91a40f7938f95b39f0e
9d7a6cb4bf21892a8e40d386b62f05f691004874
describe
'2143664' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSP' 'sip-files00217.tif'
88f958b1afc8b3d1a75a43febc2c3e7f
04b345df15bb0b1f4951c24b8c6cfba50a0d141c
'2012-05-01T20:46:49-04:00'
describe
'658' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSQ' 'sip-files00217.txt'
28a4fa5c0af45b0690e63d60d598f5b3
ab4c2c2d4c369f9b566e8c95f396adad46d8616d
'2012-05-01T20:33:35-04:00'
describe
'25202' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSR' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
36c0326a2bd577f2c79883d870e33d20
92698e20ba34dcbc8c9786cf0d28ce8c7262d1ff
describe
'261524' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSS' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
38b7a6a834d823760b41878a4ad287eb
f0514ebaa22a99961851d2f0a011c96e63de3c1a
describe
'133467' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXST' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
83b49060e2d1afe29352d0d4e905ea8c
4b8644d1fa5d78ea0673dfa0ff3d6a7f3b83102e
'2012-05-01T20:47:12-04:00'
describe
'26532' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSU' 'sip-files00218.pro'
1cf985309dce9f7e5e5a1ddfe957ddaf
a0bcc0f8942b0698d55d7d4941465e83a4693db0
describe
'55962' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSV' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
5e1e93625d5d78bf36059acaa17e4f11
f39e3ed73bbb2c82580ba7d37cf3b19acb3df5b9
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSW' 'sip-files00218.txt'
271b2de8165ade26be9c7015604caa39
99ab70c0f329e68a68b3a1187bdb95e128974611
'2012-05-01T20:34:04-04:00'
describe
'29544' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSX' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
c6fbbd8f13358428842735d3fe4d662d
76f8c9dd8e2b249b89efa61344d79b2a52887226
describe
'1072345' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSY' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
d41c19d2d4a90cbf984a991506548b59
dca18627225d0bce11cde84beca3f72d1ddc61fb
describe
'148744' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXSZ' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
eb8d3893ea51f65796571874524cdba5
15b649a7187158186a4fa18d386b0a12907a98fb
'2012-05-01T20:36:07-04:00'
describe
'29120' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTA' 'sip-files00219.pro'
4fab4e97b7202ec0cb44545e36187f9b
b2ec454baa50e33b3a2be88a3015b63f492e2292
describe
'60344' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTB' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
ecc0092903b7bc13e37a0a7929419dc7
4cde52a2b649c9f43b255d0cce40f5f11b9fc572
describe
'8599716' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTC' 'sip-files00219.tif'
e87a62b421abc47ac6f2b46482e932d7
a9e9c13ec8088c1ce73bc7cb1f8bbb9c9585b269
'2012-05-01T20:36:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTD' 'sip-files00219.txt'
47db743fa032b61bf76ad9a538c4f410
b6e0736aa2821115f8041bb12640ee9dcad01fc0
describe
'31372' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTE' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
084ef1feca6d6c754dce30187bbf452b
7516d106452c30a18249ff40365cd77398cea8cf
'2012-05-01T20:31:04-04:00'
describe
'785138' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTF' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
40607c464b7d97ff6eacb0f571fe86da
8dae626e23e8d946183e4248cd5e7bf883f01956
'2012-05-01T20:37:02-04:00'
describe
'66950' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTG' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
fc04195a54fd55cebb54cec82726da6d
a1625b8f08c0aa0a57b92ac634d11e66ac21982e
describe
'7678' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTH' 'sip-files00220.pro'
3aa20c59f13ca3dfa3cc76d5880a334d
4eb3be779100ffdc506926b7f4552991be1e339b
describe
'33391' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTI' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
3e8cc999d55efd8476e84ff4d626ae5f
448fab90b5b09ea84fdea075a419839c0c0b0c74
'2012-05-01T20:43:02-04:00'
describe
'8531052' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTJ' 'sip-files00220.tif'
7b9dfec45c4451405c5c47ef21db86be
05fb8a42589b0157c6fccbd30e829d087747c38b
'2012-05-01T20:46:21-04:00'
describe
'379' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTK' 'sip-files00220.txt'
c414b1c1e088a3ef6a18f081ac3c0e99
98754a182e42d444815b58f1bc7eeb0ec74c4380
describe
'1081326' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTL' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
d2dad2185402d7c888f7a4160c6a553c
eed34f841ff4442b6ba16d0f18f4b45a680033c5
describe
'195306' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTM' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
222ce06841b243caa2586fad5878ac66
0bb571956069a0bffaff46e2600c4a29839b9857
describe
'41133' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTN' 'sip-files00221.pro'
f834fd6a626bcf97bb86ad76877677c6
e68a19b7ba29c69473136ef875edb61d570f76dc
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTO' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
b7cb85f970f1efeea8b1c638e37bad6e
5b8c858ceedeab8d9ccb2fe0b42300e90b8d0b7d
describe
'8672772' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTP' 'sip-files00221.tif'
1cc4271a64fa39334deca1b7ec0db9e4
93b08c703a4eb29f863567bdf59ce8db81b5b3b6
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTQ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
2c97a955aea19416e3f5756094a19580
132d283ac2186782825226d249d69162f9e9cb12
describe
'35189' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTR' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
c406f10840963c31010abc60623a2d4e
b481b15a8883dfb264a533d77d844b16d93c7fd7
describe
'1061560' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTS' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
40fe31858f6e9ba80c3df7cdd6388270
792e9e5d6e6e49a711d521d5d90fdb62fa74d193
describe
'183222' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTT' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
752ebe00a821fcea454377ea66350305
018414bc85b51317b28edef5da1e660d2ac9f5b6
'2012-05-01T20:44:59-04:00'
describe
'39576' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTU' 'sip-files00222.pro'
621c96b8525e51f76365ca65ecc9390e
b37dad08d2734d6ebda7349c748fb6233ec6026e
'2012-05-01T20:40:59-04:00'
describe
'72668' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTV' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
d61e444180ecbcf196d0482079c7d4fd
954cc6dcc0ab6013d03346ab2aea55e98b976a29
describe
'8514876' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTW' 'sip-files00222.tif'
315ba60074b402df55bbe6824725f8c8
097ab7edaee79f4474dae2c2ab4c1492c9f3d751
'2012-05-01T20:30:51-04:00'
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTX' 'sip-files00222.txt'
4a6edc84058001bc52b1ce4d3905951d
eb4cf03be3539b1545591e1a6ebd059b8251c370
'2012-05-01T20:43:23-04:00'
describe
'35523' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTY' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
78dacddc1d5ad581fe394a02e862d93f
8dd62cfa00781e39e56e4978fb329f41b81f1d18
describe
'1092995' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXTZ' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
1afd4f0d0558855eecf6d545f86a788c
265d55be34803bdc1c664f18c5f771527ea7a308
describe
'181825' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUA' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
fa29fbe4cf6bf7c36c952380dd567f1c
c78af3d9e459474e6c661243af3e81ee7d4adf90
describe
'71490' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUB' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
53fb82a83b2a434056104a60e069114c
0092ce9a9ee4bd8c276eae39eac82b08aee8d3fe
describe
'8765520' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUC' 'sip-files00223.tif'
1fd4d5a1154827732b4b15a242c4571a
f729eaa4ae37cee4b61422c8935b19be870a5483
'2012-05-01T20:41:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUD' 'sip-files00223.txt'
0fb3d9c1ec74cfc986a4073153896918
cd46145eb288c539db616c2c167f705b7720af21
describe
'34389' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUE' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
395c7f40e5eb50eede50152802051341
b87e77911c1946a7c829bf43f8e710f0fa60d4f6
describe
'1059194' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUF' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
c68849c344a3f6f68fc86189211c555a
b968c0fc593633ae579daafb114f8d28fef25b55
describe
'174946' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUG' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
ccb28de4b1b5d3c695671c4fbd9324cb
c366abeae5eedd46e4e67eb84c078364c39b88d1
describe
'35600' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUH' 'sip-files00224.pro'
36fdcdae7000271ee8b9e0e2ef722889
b047f92d906ee7d447ad9306d080801fb32faf96
'2012-05-01T20:33:09-04:00'
describe
'69229' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUI' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
46dcfe8cfdc60cbd123f0e8467ac5fa8
183bbb24de9f89c8a56f69955119a54177d67836
'2012-05-01T20:31:58-04:00'
describe
'8495376' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUJ' 'sip-files00224.tif'
f9aef5f551c722ccd0c72f8969cc3237
dd37042c4edebeefe9c4e2f18b83b0d8d0eb187a
'2012-05-01T20:36:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUK' 'sip-files00224.txt'
099b31ef8d83f58c70928bc3c6149f6e
37b6d925f32c2bfa7ab105b0e4cf5b973f3cd108
describe
'34607' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUL' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
5f5d0751d56be104939e3a02490c18f4
3de7a5691e3b98324f534d07da8c678e7a4187a5
describe
'1004993' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUM' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
b444337cb4b8ed39e09a5b1bc8c49890
adc4a0ad52e811c7216b0d7ea40aeeb51e5227d1
'2012-05-01T20:38:30-04:00'
describe
'197035' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUN' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
0cc87fd2ae89bcd61d1f558f479f5fea
2d427b504dea437ebdb096326254a86bb756afba
describe
'41202' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUO' 'sip-files00225.pro'
ad02990f1652ed73817e1e35ae84b2b3
5a10673a6b7ff1bd94e1970f54c8fa7835951dc0
describe
'77629' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUP' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
6cbb3d69eee5c1e800782d9b4b8f2b00
0fefde53a2736a50bc69649bbd0c0e394e712f90
describe
'8063172' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUQ' 'sip-files00225.tif'
fc8fd82e23050e11ca69ae4686cb5630
32d67614e2ca1f739bce83e03f1f6c6a04e18a44
'2012-05-01T20:47:20-04:00'
describe
'36978' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUR' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
03052b35d06678a373ea767a80f823ec
b28dfe13c7b93600a66297f33d7d87b734961de1
'2012-05-01T20:38:03-04:00'
describe
'1069144' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUS' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
068ef8ef7c22eb1edfdbd3e0bb6a9bec
4212fd36993687691c98529dd776b9e01138d802
describe
'144564' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUT' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
1a584557d5dc3e666d592f3fceb578a6
8d323bbb3d007d6bcc1d0f6e802041b00c288fe9
'2012-05-01T20:32:12-04:00'
describe
'36547' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUU' 'sip-files00226.pro'
7e14652bdda4192d4ba684bf40f6d98a
264f2265f49c9532389fb9ca9c8bd051a9997116
describe
'58796' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUV' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
3253fa035e3cdbd8fcc2e4b721f79dec
1d5d26798a5d1fd0c79567a122155955a4f30b61
'2012-05-01T20:39:29-04:00'
describe
'8574896' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUW' 'sip-files00226.tif'
7cb793acbdcf1df8828bcdd549d5a1f7
f9a7b75bed0a7714d46ba23d12a2dc5edf33aa36
'2012-05-01T20:41:41-04:00'
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUX' 'sip-files00226.txt'
d75f4e8d5cf150ccb361f8d19908b0c4
8a4d572c09f04ab7402c50795db65c1d29d19ddd
'2012-05-01T20:33:33-04:00'
describe
'31733' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUY' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
519096c37baf5f7d6b38d50cbebd7fe8
899ce2e5b1932e9a6c6cd76df397921e3f0d4622
describe
'1051807' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXUZ' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
16f15ff85bdea764a2984ff4adaf1ce9
d9bc57cc6bf00e7a5a7fe1fd5491aea0a3d8e257
describe
'190235' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVA' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
2b6c74de763fc774e9f547b79001c515
16e837b6967101b3e7c4019e61a6fe7c22495738
describe
'43258' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVB' 'sip-files00227.pro'
32fb199abed98c9605b1963eac88fde1
f3ccabf14889489c97064d8b8f76b36a5778e23a
describe
'73904' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVC' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
356adc153fbe37fbc04690ae5239a216
e9f72f290e3c0e35d51b76e2ca3b88c53d921f6b
describe
'8436320' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVD' 'sip-files00227.tif'
14a96d0afb333c153555bee9a8a316b2
23d45192d583d8da2f16045781e345d9e3ec50c5
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVE' 'sip-files00227.txt'
cffac795acaa5201744fa078847437b7
ab528bc440c376e2fa8ae52ab545b981f1c67c48
describe
'34637' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVF' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
2ff1fffeef75935fc562cf8a970c9d1f
8c2dd9695078b4d553649a00dc353645d3e6935c
describe
'265640' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVG' 'sip-files00190b.jp2'
7596577119433b9cf1aa9bc69b518c6a
1848f42d6e705045a6afb2eacc1c813961bd9136
describe
'26694' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVH' 'sip-files00191athm.jpg'
888f9a57cb29c059f31490eb8da4da91
ec37ce321067cb77ce6cbf165e4ed121555d58fd
'2012-05-01T20:34:05-04:00'
describe
'148899' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVI' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
b8783ceddc496eb312f759de575c51c9
36c52f6630117d206900d8bee6a2b783be0850df
describe
'2150696' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVJ' 'sip-files00198.tif'
8c81e6f5f9c5dab98cfb9142091f4ef5
87ff02e4852ce05b7c2970caad4ed452d4ebc309
'2012-05-01T20:43:16-04:00'
describe
'189042' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVK' 'sip-files00200a.jpg'
56461a797610e95424cfe19d617c87ef
bae0e8f1515d12364fd58cf876dd8b63c445ae24
describe
'270649' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVL' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
7ba169bf0304646e34b9db0e25ccbc25
0333a48f90f50a1ce255dba602d4711a7b1e447a
describe
'73864' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVM' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
bb74c8278f1b25a5af64b8cdc183cecb
dace881345b5651aeaa5d4af622a8afbb4edc179
describe
'102745' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVN' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
91c876bc75d07d5343be6208425cd70a
1b9b49e5f50020d554765216adbffcdabeed1b2c
describe
'186126' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVO' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
5f289ccef68e5dfa3a7e48c3be8f3adc
7370e6b3897163c9683f8b9d3e3e5b1928fe1c8a
describe
'2113488' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVP' 'sip-files00218.tif'
967edcebd1c7dda057d6dc9e0b313a4f
f781bc64dd3fff7a02480ad3a19eee44d3b695a1
describe
'23459' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVQ' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
0ba463dc04ff0a20c3ef03461a7d98d6
8803cd245b295c2c2de319353575462574f0e544
describe
'41403' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVR' 'sip-files00223.pro'
629faa5eeb1de9cf88a33de4ed296f92
49d5389a61cb7d103412c61d2cbf0863d7b4014b
'2012-05-01T20:38:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVS' 'sip-files00225.txt'
d3a9028a7b070b801513875b3f3943f2
977b7f7184879c0a04682677968d9ea5025bec25
'2012-05-01T20:31:56-04:00'
describe
'167210' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVT' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
99daa50dfe79f54e2d0556dfd7e4a900
b34f1af926d7d96c54f04911f6f240183a27dfa5
'2012-05-01T20:47:28-04:00'
describe
'43835' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVU' 'sip-files00228.pro'
d8a7117f4ed91d761b0119f922ad4adb
3a2bed8dfae4880bd78de87db42e8b580c789499
describe
'64659' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVV' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
63b32d5c80e20d13f2366fe224139d6b
f5c9dacd168d3445da2894a15b20cbc7aa312030
describe
'8821768' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVW' 'sip-files00228.tif'
210b70a886767f55dc1ac37f0d8381fc
b980aa51f5f4a71bf957fde8b2cfde0e007bde3f
'2012-05-01T20:35:08-04:00'
describe
'1796' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVX' 'sip-files00228.txt'
d5a06daf3683e3e0317862fccb0e7d9c
024866f2ba17b4dca899444a9444421e10b2cf57
'2012-05-01T20:29:57-04:00'
describe
'32495' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVY' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
1b5acdf352fd429d1b19d9cf381c5bac
d2421da784cbded5cf322eca10efaa93e2cc285d
'2012-05-01T20:44:20-04:00'
describe
'1000586' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXVZ' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
2c7dd7c150f336f8b130b9c670a090a0
e44407a90f51b66903782ae8e1e5bc98a456c923
describe
'201468' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWA' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
e0823769d43f21e81f857256aa2c7985
1f694e215d5bffb02c2d6bae85ba453f78a2b802
'2012-05-01T20:31:31-04:00'
describe
'42471' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWB' 'sip-files00229.pro'
c2257b56ab60bd130558a78398238d53
4b17240c49b8f48dded1a20fe7cfcd1abdd6a242
describe
'78912' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWC' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
31ef077cfbafd75a49666d6aa6821a2a
5b9b42f927fd6af24b8a62a06f5e1843cb574ad7
describe
'8026972' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWD' 'sip-files00229.tif'
6d0e0854c31abcb11533246758884da7
0d4b81a89ecc82d5b79b36bbe8ac989d79bcc6e8
describe
'1734' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWE' 'sip-files00229.txt'
7df3956c3429e680cf2f932edbc58ed6
a4fa0a4ee59c613edcff069e7512e401b3193a9a
'2012-05-01T20:45:22-04:00'
describe
'36748' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWF' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
966437e25a816e24a81bcffdd7f73693
a06d579af78e55fbda7793c9e0c0c98a01054219
'2012-05-01T20:32:35-04:00'
describe
'615386' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWG' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
74bb3f2193083c3c504cf6205b4c0623
01c8200a32f2a5182f562f13a52be78fc4828b17
describe
'63248' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWH' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
18fcf142743057c48993b3bf4040d274
9ad0b7245daf85fbed52594b18a73f6157f42c8d
describe
'8767' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWI' 'sip-files00230.pro'
359ab139074cdb45f8c961af2f325df0
21159c03083ed5f801b384ea50eb2948dcaf67f6
describe
'8227980' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWJ' 'sip-files00230.tif'
ad460493fa935580de85f51457e3108e
be16a18766e24977f8a93a436cdfdb19a6aeb1cc
'2012-05-01T20:40:13-04:00'
describe
'432' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWK' 'sip-files00230.txt'
416f560e1c338dba527e173d8b2d8e80
10e17043a5ece49692c2f054eeafac6aea001d5f
describe
'23418' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWL' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
4bcc449f6701451fcc32786576047b43
c8c67cc6a570158bd3917dc0c83a6d2d1bd0c28f
describe
'266433' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWM' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
1b0a970617e7f08fa6a6fa67e8cd96aa
dbe8c90b565ce821320ee3b68b99f745246406cc
describe
'138097' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWN' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
c384d63bd27298f6ae977edc0e346dd4
1b82c7ea210842c77d20bdc866c9dba26c9c9505
'2012-05-01T20:44:13-04:00'
describe
'33095' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWO' 'sip-files00231.pro'
c48c0f8b8dbacbdb592ff6849c782533
aaf71cf07b30e7e33230d56de06deb58614feeeb
describe
'57541' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWP' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
2e31b57c1dc01012bb7bf7cfb89b7c0e
9967d5ea53d2b5f48f1e8363e22b258d5316359e
describe
'2152384' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWQ' 'sip-files00231.tif'
e1c303ab6ed4f4abc141c7b64ec1cb07
05a363dbf78849e27bae78287a21657e5e0564d4
describe
'1393' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWR' 'sip-files00231.txt'
df07e32514c6f61e9122ca8f554e9879
46a1701a0e2b90cec289e13d75eb21796a3b6524
describe
'30329' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWS' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
7f17cf299ef92e74371849d3dd3fbf15
28af664412065c8b4e24cdeaf577fbd5b650348e
describe
'249044' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWT' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
79beb9e44ac9531fe099a5e7b0b94ef6
4b768cb379291552749e1f4040de8d45242cbd8f
describe
'183618' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWU' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
60f237c3d6b74842ca2e647980378498
682268260ba7863789df51f0d61df276c1e845d5
describe
'39532' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWV' 'sip-files00232.pro'
f0071f5bb8c43cc594e379e990b51df0
5f2b50aa979a585981b76105af68a48874c461f4
describe
'71720' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWW' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
b3f8625e3e5304ab3747777780198069
ba7dbfff6a401058c235cd58172d25be0393ee31
'2012-05-01T20:46:59-04:00'
describe
'2014128' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWX' 'sip-files00232.tif'
0712946674c24a295433a3c429069e03
d405ee418e75e4543bc3ca3a16986b86851f102a
describe
'1639' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWY' 'sip-files00232.txt'
e02a0ad403cb1a6c6c53f4086b9756e9
2f3c7ecbd517fe97da6579279cd09aefd67439f7
'2012-05-01T20:45:43-04:00'
describe
'35052' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXWZ' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
0e003eb068dda3b4cba7bc3a1b6474f0
96fee2c79b8cc7f4cbee16e5100b919e5d8843ae
describe
'259295' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXA' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
9320df2966844968138f6b6585d9a208
e73760ff1e3bb6c80ef03afba7442177b33c2275
describe
'199628' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXB' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
f529a2be9062167fb2dfa5957326992d
4ef022c7a8428298a96f6d4936da59fa6c5a9983
describe
'43720' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXC' 'sip-files00233.pro'
a27ad443ff187a014f4d15372a2e38c2
58c838b21210fac53a6e2f5f38a6a41f23ba0a78
describe
'75922' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXD' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
752276c2bc285c687e644e5b5add4b59
c6a20451d629c2e8763a05915baec0fcadf966ac
describe
'2096944' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXE' 'sip-files00233.tif'
25e7df9c6f61633c2c08f4a1e78721ba
ce487b8f2ab559ed676cb9530ffa1ca17a6b8966
'2012-05-01T20:32:08-04:00'
describe
'1792' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXF' 'sip-files00233.txt'
67ce3eb72611b83cb8c40ef5c6fb4aab
0cf83dfb1aaf6ded6767adc3ae81ba4d8366ae9a
describe
'36241' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXG' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
a1153cf134b428360d32b2ebc6245f72
132c83bd5988bc669b620087ed026aa0839bf0e6
describe
'265408' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXH' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
590e9b42307729567fba1348f23fbac0
904338949d8887057bfdd4637381bd3c44547acb
describe
'195514' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXI' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
13e9d6298f224ef0f54fdfe710c48265
16a2e1ed9acf3ad7483a6469f5ac651aa2fe61d0
describe
'42751' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXJ' 'sip-files00234.pro'
e6ef1cccfea8701dbbab27290eb87681
a58ac96747a26e03cdb98e13d2cb5bfa9c4fdc3b
describe
'74883' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXK' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
6048c5de77b59a9ba010960aad44a586
502e706bc09a5c73b287cd8efac7a63d3a5304c9
describe
'2145384' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXL' 'sip-files00234.tif'
0d3fbce9ae802728b7fb25d90d3c2aff
16b261cfe63e6455ee9e99a46edd702bc0dfbd9f
describe
'1766' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXM' 'sip-files00234.txt'
189d8af760a8528e0b8f4f4913f73502
66fb5026376350c2a828cbe7e10684de7b4b2a1a
'2012-05-01T20:33:21-04:00'
describe
'35630' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXN' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
64543b9900a556fb5d16373736d909f7
dd257d0c06272d48565469cf3b9339bf03b67e6c
describe
'263452' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXO' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
346cf6068953d71bae1e34e4a0c4c26a
4a1ec80ee8a9778db290196c450be8dce59ad4aa
'2012-05-01T20:32:19-04:00'
describe
'43501' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXP' 'sip-files00235.pro'
1aac8eca7bdeb6744ecfa35147c8d3ec
e8b5a15a7c62cefeb74adb96226d5039955651e7
describe
'75839' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXQ' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
c1bf282a3a69375dc1d25c1b5af05b9c
b5e6e4abff3f520b4494f56b0b44ad3d04678990
'2012-05-01T20:41:49-04:00'
describe
'2130308' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXR' 'sip-files00235.tif'
20f55e63bb4f9ee2468856658c5b76c2
6dbf54790553bea279929fe9af7b0e2c94f5e6e1
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXS' 'sip-files00235.txt'
93cbadd6afa3534a868c302644801997
accabaed87ce007a6445e4c145710858f37101b0
describe
'35270' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXT' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
514b6443656936abdb88f8aabb1a7550
ae6f0201b8bbfcfaa3e01647cbe1f79057e5da44
'2012-05-01T20:45:19-04:00'
describe
'263859' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXU' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
e89c0d794df3adab4e6ac21e2861b9fe
3b72deac7db3ae00da6193c6b8781e179b38648b
describe
'190222' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXV' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
234f89d661f5dc8f9ba661bb0bb1e51b
ffffb33ef8060051501bbef8cb76a3860e15f093
describe
'41563' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXW' 'sip-files00236.pro'
fcf857a3e8591c51e44bf77cd3337393
a17a230397fa093238f9492983e79a23139a00de
'2012-05-01T20:38:23-04:00'
describe
'72600' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXX' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
632381c4639226c29f553577b7935ee1
cacae4aa4853c99a181343c2b2666c945d374edb
describe
'2132708' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXY' 'sip-files00236.tif'
2fb4b7704fbe244054dd42cf27045448
6ddd4b1571d424b82aa6a3ad80823a4baa507003
describe
'1710' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXXZ' 'sip-files00236.txt'
e60896a613642a4ed5abb17f54625acd
b9e691018e568407fc9309e803e7dc374310b7a8
'2012-05-01T20:41:57-04:00'
describe
'34596' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYA' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
53e0c28318f7cfcefa06537c8ee0138a
41b7fb4f11a15b4c6c2a36754a1f881e0df096d9
'2012-05-01T20:43:47-04:00'
describe
'268995' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYB' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
2e69b7093ca25a7319d39294676d4c5e
257c04bf23ced8787316bad8021b140619959eba
describe
'199821' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYC' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
e9eff1fb19cd3f9bd31babf6ff1b7e81
20bc2f62663c786c34fa134918a880b97331fe67
describe
'43683' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYD' 'sip-files00237.pro'
8e500880fe0dda99a651b5570e6281c3
b0f7f31fe5ae4a8623b2b1eceada4a05e16c7d09
describe
'75826' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYE' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
c0a592d1ec7a8141d50cf4c8ed9207c9
49aa7d11f2ed182d55e31a73c85714bfe855287c
describe
'1786' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYF' 'sip-files00237.txt'
eeb9d0b3f53e3e71fc31d036e1b2cb1f
c7a70ad94c7078c11af533ec9fe2ca1b75aeaded
describe
'35086' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYG' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
31a1954a288635917e0efa9c81b25d50
6dab07c108c40de114f162f597f54a48d6aa8411
describe
'270481' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYH' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
22a2379a3326adc3e9c689d3c4bb935d
507a7a77a975c2087bcde79e84e01083b864f3c5
describe
'199985' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYI' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
2be4277a40346b3fe227b48036012ca4
fba69557db5a04d61a421564882b2eab868ce34c
describe
'44043' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYJ' 'sip-files00238.pro'
c117306740a6afc2253bd761a7e9d454
1e614ada208e6bb6367d3c519385738886cc7a56
'2012-05-01T20:31:47-04:00'
describe
'76010' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYK' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
36836317629f8c72c122ada200da3fc7
e611d580e4a592b74ceefe75156775e6ab86ddaa
describe
'2186512' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYL' 'sip-files00238.tif'
048d2f8a0d87c9d43cd46ac4fd0f88b9
8b2f15842585c4ec935e4b264ffa16371f38ee13
describe
'1826' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYM' 'sip-files00238.txt'
27cff7dafc5e29b85613932fe500a6da
d2dd429cbc4a328b81fa27ab5d9f60e51de3fbe9
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYN' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
d5fd0cc1bb5bbb69cfff7f984922b57e
0b97ef3fe3fd2a5df749c8fe1339b62d9b4b6633
describe
'271078' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYO' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
62fe329d0c4892aa5f7624e85ea503e3
1114448597f3a41ed316db072b887699b7f73c58
describe
'204954' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYP' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
fb973e203c91d80b6afb5b9b91beeae2
30f7a9d17b49421e41a8cd580d51e52e5a17b2b9
'2012-05-01T20:31:39-04:00'
describe
'44143' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYQ' 'sip-files00239.pro'
5386579d8314638764bc37a467664d34
8af66f88a699d04e86973c9677915c8d5f2b0538
describe
'77160' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYR' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
5810a8cf5a7414be795c3b99d3723f72
704909ed85a6b23a5fa1220f89f37329fc8535e4
describe
'2191272' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYS' 'sip-files00239.tif'
0d3b2229c1735d3ae70a9e8c1ed39ebf
dca819e6615543f3bb0243b6519cb9e74ce1e941
describe
'1807' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYT' 'sip-files00239.txt'
5483e7788f8b46b82110ea57b39e7f22
9047fd8722d02986273db74cb0cb78f09d9cc0a3
describe
'274094' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYU' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
93c17c984e9744f7a6339e386a33a3fa
6e94d9bf057e7912afbef47eb78060ac6dd77fe9
describe
'195559' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYV' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
13f618e2aa94d823c331341e95381dfd
ef68cecef3562f3fb7f435a70c534f7e409a639f
describe
'43485' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYW' 'sip-files00240.pro'
885193c41721fa0edfabf475ddd4a6ac
daaa6a7c7329381b6c5f91e7f221fced6166a8e2
'2012-05-01T20:46:16-04:00'
describe
'73346' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYX' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
b98e239cc2f7f4f2eb56c9692e8b43a7
85a63c370044a55ebdbee035c832120571ddaf6e
describe
'2215208' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYY' 'sip-files00240.tif'
debfb325db164e5150705699fe8aaefb
965c27f366776ab2fd7db08800d9201dc7e92985
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXYZ' 'sip-files00240.txt'
0640284aa42a957a36a9c9a3c55a11ff
304cc0d7def64bb7531822a6a12281d943e6e4c8
describe
'34923' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZA' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
3e0931f967156b636cb2ac784dfc3531
53ef2548dc4c2acdc3ec4173bb002e8228250976
describe
'267041' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZB' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
9e291a694428a7a65c1571ff7cbd0b47
66cbf5591277679467ef321ced5bd9d92cdebac4
'2012-05-01T20:31:22-04:00'
describe
'198239' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZC' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
a73e6230535c9069808afb0f5f3813b2
f45c57d2f5fb8f32e3fbfa0945c50c9e157a1bad
describe
'47081' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZD' 'sip-files00241.pro'
09b111d5d580e4d6d5d66e04db3c895f
72ec6e73ad9cd375b4081e7ebdbe30e521e70651
describe
'74946' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZE' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
8043ebf2854a17cbdf4dd37a2eed03d1
7553ca4bfc137d4b53b86533ea44f474717d1da0
describe
'2158564' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZF' 'sip-files00241.tif'
91f8282e918062b29a78e85795f31dff
de935a470267826d0328e714a1bca32f0368637a
describe
'1923' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZG' 'sip-files00241.txt'
97fb404705f930c93e56cab436d74b8c
08bb104b8a2a547b5c8a75123c76e904dfae8c68
describe
'35660' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZH' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
a5405fd9b75e7e35048e351f61ebc587
4819c8b7e269316e9d2a3fd3067c42eaf4162a76
describe
'269075' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZI' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
1a8ee2599f74608309b2911eaf4cc57e
4673386c8de6376e43fbd856868ca86628488a13
'2012-05-01T20:46:07-04:00'
describe
'211137' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZJ' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
dbc3ebf9d8f547dbc9b07450afd9e93e
b8cc7dc7ef3ee566b3e8bc31285f8dde22135271
describe
'75859' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZK' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
ceb7b58302e7eed1864cebdbc738d632
3dce6fade073f4db9b43114eb69e92b497c48236
'2012-05-01T20:44:45-04:00'
describe
'2174808' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZL' 'sip-files00242.tif'
172428f739d56e747e3234a04d99125f
fd37d85219ec3a98b723aea2c23547de0111c214
describe
'2326' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZM' 'sip-files00242.txt'
413df61fbfc54d50558ed5f855c5d8f4
c30a8d461c9b71204fa8a610a530b1636d2e101b
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZN' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
1752d6a146e0b4ed3f646fd4a96f74b5
58312b5ed26a103a2119f873e55cc420f31cfed2
describe
'269385' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZO' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
8a760fcf726d4d1679cfa925931490d1
e101623e7ccf3724b017344e282ca30277638804
'2012-05-01T20:45:41-04:00'
describe
'199049' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZP' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
7cff72433bc13cdcccda8006b217dd9a
9fa59932a70dea1a32c06869f8aaf4565fa67b41
describe
'42416' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZQ' 'sip-files00243.pro'
5ad2f8f904ef6854742ebc6c45f285dd
6f4dc6217ed564cdc02317926bb481fae01ff6a8
describe
'77086' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZR' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
6be43107989a74c6c132bbbdca9ff0e4
f4250b64b4385f47be9de8e36693878266fbd683
describe
'2177232' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZS' 'sip-files00243.tif'
99c7ec1d14e828a9a81e5e44cf096153
69ef43deeebbf0ced070be3e1e7d2ce4e37d2754
'2012-05-01T20:31:18-04:00'
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZT' 'sip-files00243.txt'
2a923e23fe861772ce4209ade7032f7c
d18902f3b275ad45378ce7f172dcf43bc8914f4b
describe
'36067' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZU' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
6694b20198b88951fd2696d7e5111206
4abdf1c1414569546aa2d0671ab49f320b324fa1
describe
'266630' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZV' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
fb9588c218cc9714b3878cc7c0e028f1
34fc8989fcfa84a1c108da62f84f68c71061bd98
describe
'194409' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZW' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
153f9db9cf8657825e5cb03914a1be75
60eaf87c5fb6ccede879298a1df7ef952ba4b181
describe
'42188' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZX' 'sip-files00244.pro'
533f7800f714f26fef2e5897fa962d17
dd224044774cb1793e9067a7aabf070cf80ecdff
describe
'74297' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZY' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
b855bf82fb38f3e00e0b398451f19884
129768d17cd4d8fc768d4f012e32398b9b621bd0
describe
'2155652' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACXZZ' 'sip-files00244.tif'
f40b11f983b312e2aaa689a62446ed4b
78c090e07f7654ab5c3a76a676c01a95b11362c8
'2012-05-01T20:46:30-04:00'
describe
'35916' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAA' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
ec81994cfceed0f03ad1c9f9faff9c4f
3b2606ee4a23cd90e4b42344fe4936fe4774802b
describe
'270980' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAB' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
e2d9b5c4e21f4a33de941f38b0324196
e6432e626dbc3b8ff1f0d2d23ee6088121e3dee9
describe
'135304' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAC' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
f158697fcd0e31c88ab61493923d0daa
6d196d285b600e110c76b9cad7b34003f1b7d8cb
describe
'29802' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAD' 'sip-files00245.pro'
83da02618d640b5a2b25de410ae257e4
d13da2aac48a231f05a43773d6678a68514d5b40
'2012-05-01T20:43:18-04:00'
describe
'54479' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAE' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
8dd640c76a2c08630cad895c0bf5d8ed
9e8c8c4d624ad5a706e2b483583f0c65b2249add
describe
'2189004' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAF' 'sip-files00245.tif'
ecebc6fc5a722fafb58dd329b2473190
abef54b37b2ed05f0bed8426c7931fc641ebbc5b
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAG' 'sip-files00245.txt'
b2bc0a43c6e92c27f39d79ccdaeedab0
ac1791279726920d869605a0193c34e6d042d376
'2012-05-01T20:46:38-04:00'
describe
'29388' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAH' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
c1a5eb2627e97ff3e739849d557d9ea0
3d5f8d8e5255b9a448e1ea6b71029018d3dfd23c
'2012-05-01T20:45:02-04:00'
describe
'265493' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAI' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
a05c83a76923e3acfffe94e09921a81c
f1289ad10df7ab1a9c56ad83be6c70a9879e2be7
describe
'107157' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAJ' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
4b668eae8da40a2a38c59bcea7d007a1
d69292e3c8a2e9e2fa640376e52c10c077ef19b1
'2012-05-01T20:32:18-04:00'
describe
'45040' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAK' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
afcc88ad2502b26fa524e46ff5a8a2c3
277ecdea3e328840a2aae39dd8796e4d0abaec1f
describe
'6394944' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAL' 'sip-files00247.tif'
7ab4f6b6c638baedabb73a20c4c01ebb
a5250475e638709ad736dbe4d7332fdf47770afd
'2012-05-01T20:36:19-04:00'
describe
'28674' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAM' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
05b88168ba12a46916bd2c4245432198
ae6687c206394d2c22ae6c19a226e34153006ee1
describe
'269990' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAN' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
b3cc0f0c96c6710473784c97d549f1ff
5ad591a1fd667405bebb334b243832e550ab8866
describe
'141751' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAO' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
6bb2a7197c4110a16587b4e6b1f886d8
c4e9fdc23e1b97153e20bbc6f61b5bb481e4634e
describe
'57997' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAP' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
8cd7f41dc2ec90074bce552284de8714
65044fead6a98387b59627ff4c848c3dbd53a307
describe
'2181248' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAQ' 'sip-files00250.tif'
5c2b31781ca35eeba911f2bdfa6cf82e
d0d228a7e35d838533856ea1682e557488f9d4ca
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAR' 'sip-files00250.txt'
3d38e18cdc7b72a0ea560cfe9024579d
8bc925f6ab95841b696462769d7eb9161c030951
describe
'30423' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAS' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
2cdce07fc119564419817789629adc3b
600e95558deb8758638d475dd0d15499069b0145
describe
'263599' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAT' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
09d7f116f740f6ced03ebaaa67334c24
dcafdd58ad1cb3b5fa7b9d42da2ebef91c916929
describe
'200218' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAU' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
43496af36ce7c02a500da270ac0a828a
af63916b157c3286f036e70bd03464ef82758f80
describe
'43187' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAV' 'sip-files00251.pro'
f009eb8948ebe65019c6002b8c78e127
e7999d354a3e9ecbb85ddb48dc90de3a5d034e27
'2012-05-01T20:35:41-04:00'
describe
'76575' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAW' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
145eee21e49187ae8c3139d317097cc4
c4645f98d7aab78ff3c156b727053bafd8944cc6
describe
'2131940' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAX' 'sip-files00251.tif'
eaaf2ab44b1c42d9e13e49c8a943c5fb
d7513bad0777a29fd476dba2775df0d035d836fd
'2012-05-01T20:43:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAY' 'sip-files00251.txt'
4a5f9b254e917c2f5a6c8541e24453e3
0a04e737fdc766f96b384b7f736e7ef320b04e10
describe
'35999' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYAZ' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
87a2dcbc398379ea17e78f7ebbeb3da5
1b76f78a6391e9904d77da56603987d929d24c07
describe
'268273' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBA' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
48c4b544e56e67d03facadb5cbb59428
80341d4f0323669bf2e8664896cf108d8465409c
describe
'195147' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBB' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
ef7f8ac3e8aa52f5df1c0d344eeab2c3
670c15b56f6ab1b0891e895ac6fc8dc29962a10a
'2012-05-01T20:44:53-04:00'
describe
'43388' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBC' 'sip-files00252.pro'
77871630e069ebedc7e81f51550286af
f7b904014c5b66ac911a5aff42d9677da52768f0
describe
'73802' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBD' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
fcc3fe61e85ec697df874521eb57eb40
87f3c8fd6121df0271dbe5c1ea35c7d57ac57fec
'2012-05-01T20:44:44-04:00'
describe
'2168728' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBE' 'sip-files00252.tif'
8a6b4d99e43d57658a5f2cfef6e512fd
1775e3dfcb0b4914f888eddef61942ff185e6f37
'2012-05-01T20:45:05-04:00'
describe
'35622' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBF' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
ad7da6d0d9f7842ac3f183e56531c6ed
df2bdce5bf19974306dce7c4af57d69734cce1b0
describe
'258492' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBG' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
558a8b14f2f44e4a58368ed0f8b86732
89ac27df9d99c86fd97182b1b44b5b3578849387
describe
'201309' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBH' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
3c643e976e4d10326d115c64aa8ead8a
9f8b8f440bc7fa659f68475e43ad0637b53b4644
describe
'43502' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBI' 'sip-files00253.pro'
e11cf7d3b603583712741e4255ac9f95
3e0b6f9f9448219d50f6f25b691d8c9026f34113
describe
'78461' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBJ' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
24b5c0421cddbdd3338b77440be2d322
ab09cab657df8f8bdd8263ada376e9faf0af7437
describe
'2090160' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBK' 'sip-files00253.tif'
cfc6a518af7ceea50d7aa7e83226ef54
7bc3c366d5b2482a16e9fa036b27cedf58de4d68
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBL' 'sip-files00253.txt'
2dd349aeebde3c3a096158e7912f9b13
5cdda6a8213073f5bc39c738763f7a0f6c733fd5
describe
'36498' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBM' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
4c8a5ebeebf3ecf0800ff73a4e0ced14
76f165bb4cecbda6454130c59d5b525ef0a118cb
describe
'267727' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBN' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
046aee2f8fd6536a1a991a5264ad7aff
3644937ead69f5b91b50dab387b29586a3a30378
describe
'191200' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBO' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
2424697b5b5ccb7a59657207dcdc33bf
ad4388658de5a86668fbf31de58c2ee498d12aa9
describe
'42483' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBP' 'sip-files00254.pro'
c398be4ba258798dcea5d86b80bd79fb
08fd0d85e2da406bb3748ef857fc0040189f0e98
'2012-05-01T20:46:06-04:00'
describe
'73081' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBQ' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
19d874a674c8e0217c174db22f9ce5eb
ed135a1285187f6463036b99d8788330d1969d0a
describe
'2163764' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBR' 'sip-files00254.tif'
e10d54af16443550143d5381d1e226f7
24338cb394d5785cf4f2a79165acfe413c7514b8
describe
'1753' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBS' 'sip-files00254.txt'
52f4cb76edcd3b8875f84dffaf103bbf
bbce4a8fbb951e5f110156f6ea648c9f53e1f877
'2012-05-01T20:47:16-04:00'
describe
'34880' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBT' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
6fca4926f70258ed6c1e8edec31cd5fd
ea28857c8d5f1e17583afd702593c30815ed96eb
describe
'142192' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBU' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
70626763b3b1bee4045f22a3a979e32d
329cd56b001bb58646e4ab679dfde2ada7d89d6c
describe
'28223' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBV' 'sip-files00255.pro'
f0f017574247e9f90c19eddfdf26d2c3
53aba5b4844b1fec9d7cfd176db31a20059c35be
'2012-05-01T20:45:38-04:00'
describe
'58325' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBW' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
632a45a1f85c1190e344fcc1477927af
ce0abb2583586337afec1c99cbd224322bbe7107
describe
'2167556' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBX' 'sip-files00255.tif'
61004b47cf6097d9918566c517c96b6e
3aedf667d6bb8c90b1f8168693a23c425de54bee
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBY' 'sip-files00255.txt'
87ae13d53a258d6ae6e843966b96b67f
8ab58b95ee633692476393278c90c2d84b96e2a7
describe
'30849' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYBZ' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
103a3039b2684da6153f4f90cf45a44b
65612f00d2679e11aebe6725434ec57596e83b07
describe
'272638' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCA' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
47a7d344d943d82760d8312faa149e3a
214317a67d16ad39f8d13b5128b3364718a7e31d
describe
'197250' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCB' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
f35a3c693fbb7a5199bca399513cbe0e
210317220e3d3d718d35e787faf4236015086152
describe
'43340' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCC' 'sip-files00256.pro'
24d025a7d51f808f4c75ebf1790970e3
9dfec2f167b661395f0cf7be2c92489cb800237b
describe
'74156' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCD' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
68818b34c3b6178e362dfab640e35ece
904d4b87a60f78f3ffda5e11ea3b57b1212a27ae
describe
'2203460' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCE' 'sip-files00256.tif'
a73d1a2f6d3345d9f9a1f006b8eca576
1b508e224575f60f7174a9bafefdfb99f77d7103
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCF' 'sip-files00256.txt'
03fbca76e35f59a7b18f39dc889c81f4
ea7501da10c401dc71709d2f7423fdff730ebc9d
describe
'35135' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCG' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
16db63b9982c3e165875e9fff7f0121c
15a6d01439e937e9de97a1d99a1272e03df1498c
describe
'262441' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCH' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
3d8686476d396ca9c0388777b8d9f934
5565fc04035763ee779cac96c7d163469b4cd34f
describe
'196547' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCI' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
7d72ec148a1e68426c6da09ab8b22610
9ab5306744393956ef8b12a32eeb916a314211d1
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCJ' 'sip-files00257.pro'
a4f7987a7f809b6ee5246d66ce0b4608
e13f5bd42fb9c1fbdd2b5b9d8def5e6eca66a9c5
'2012-05-01T20:44:40-04:00'
describe
'2122092' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCK' 'sip-files00257.tif'
f314008769a94663bb432ec8b18c5e8d
59cabe017c490ff5ffad242d33823bd720f7ffda
describe
'1755' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCL' 'sip-files00257.txt'
f95dca33f3234eeccbc2eb46c98d1472
6b3ee037c89c533c6f7f2ad611fbb2d92608554c
describe
'35777' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCM' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
2a2e55c7860aef473c8b4235700ef3ac
0d099ab6f94ed13c7f38fcecea7cc427029ccd61
'2012-05-01T20:30:28-04:00'
describe
'265259' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCN' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
91a5545e7924f129af89c51386c67324
c713f735dd6f5abb8afdf3c9c5f1cd9020913f37
describe
'186535' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCO' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
21d47544aabb9846324693c1cde36e07
734e12a63c3c070bcd01a7ec5b925aac20b94949
'2012-05-01T20:32:25-04:00'
describe
'41457' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCP' 'sip-files00258.pro'
b15c2a67c684903329d5b3c218a2b73c
a73ca76942a9631f7ccfdef55f5f765e3eb2a428
describe
'71440' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCQ' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
34bdd9588e60828d96672b3991121243
27e9ae8007fad1bd7bce061f4e67988866a2c4cf
describe
'2144580' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCR' 'sip-files00258.tif'
f9402eb66ed474ff9b5df9f5fcb5e347
4ff1a17192e0e329f16c9f1782c214ce53ef4b9f
describe
'1745' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCS' 'sip-files00258.txt'
297f4def796c2f9ffbc3165381ba1f32
17448e4523af2f7dd5e6a7f6b0402f090e6883b7
describe
'34094' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCT' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
f90f525fedd18a578df3e700867043da
f17d6187c26b36b2f17854d30639e8806128c55c
'2012-05-01T20:42:10-04:00'
describe
'264582' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCU' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
ce7fa0e97426f2639b0a64bf6340b504
c3b899be8dd68992103c6688901291c0d26b5d48
describe
'189155' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCV' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
8c6e6310d076492bf7d5ff5f46eb4e5f
68ec998343629978d8ed795dcb3bdae2114f7f5a
'2012-05-01T20:42:28-04:00'
describe
'41808' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCW' 'sip-files00259.pro'
17d6469c5d26ffddd10c4093903c338e
fc8967102de66d0a4573aa82bf65ed0c55fba14d
'2012-05-01T20:31:46-04:00'
describe
'72988' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCX' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
bdc6ad5630f237d9ccdb2bbe878e1924
cd01b0e2a29c083383189c2b66b421c8f9162349
describe
'2138648' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCY' 'sip-files00259.tif'
2c5a5fad90d281d1dbd9dce309ced681
8c65dd385b6ce14e2a47c1666dea3f8398e5a2e5
'2012-05-01T20:39:22-04:00'
describe
'1723' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYCZ' 'sip-files00259.txt'
56954cdcf5a69a5acd9471da7c0434bd
8d36b84f17438ace4f3e676ab1e83d8ff17b8a96
describe
Invalid character
'34734' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDA' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
f7d16b07010abfcfae7ccbd65d13f1cd
097e6547093e3cabe9e4ad0236fd4e9a5f1d51a9
describe
'267356' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDB' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
afb8cac8092e4fa97afe17512d7b8d08
b15ed12ea2343eda84be27e56f1e318d42238b8e
describe
'172528' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDC' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
8272a97151449b99fb3039f500f150fa
f52d0afab4d357eaf17d419dab633353b75ef339
describe
'37840' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDD' 'sip-files00260.pro'
873a606a916ee9804f81dfe825f099e5
a8db3ebbb837fba93bec74cb92a7449f40813415
'2012-05-01T20:46:18-04:00'
describe
'67924' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDE' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
d5fc0ff6f8b4bbb947d402c2608daabc
a8ff2139384337736aaed5bdb1c22184587b184d
describe
'2160188' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDF' 'sip-files00260.tif'
700bcfe106581706451fdc9715cd5ce5
6a41f7b9154863ce0bf00d950f5a91da0cb676f1
describe
'1650' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDG' 'sip-files00260.txt'
29599fe7c0a7288be404b21bf2ce8e00
d878605f44b300f5306610c292163701f6062151
describe
'33083' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDH' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
b7e7ab03d4175db6fb7e1fa1434d3724
ba13439fd1a698fdc8df06a70c6356a3ef767afc
describe
'265320' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDI' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
faf922624a1a6a77f4ece66e8b4ac1fe
2b31a302fbee31b8badffa022a30362827177743
describe
'106071' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDJ' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
cf541f97eba58af0d744d0c30a1763dd
6aa9dc47aaa8bd80ab7dfd82549270d027496621
describe
'20700' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDK' 'sip-files00261.pro'
eb39ad0a52d9d965cbc0957454c4211c
a18ffcd6493a886255281661104eb83efba183da
describe
'46134' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDL' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
eb20ffda177dbe6edb51c36fd68cb0a9
200e973f5c705bea2592b5972d56dc5cc5b2c950
describe
'2142508' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDM' 'sip-files00261.tif'
9be39d132abe989e8c93c6d2d9298351
9b205f1eb429eab39cd4b793bd390c7b718545d0
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDN' 'sip-files00261.txt'
f26ca983da9b64735fe5c93badd109da
84836c2cfc3359c4bb94c0cefe6dca0b735d23aa
describe
'27164' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDO' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
f60d24d125fc15cfc8c99e968bb2dd6f
c6403a5e0e30a2f500fa88ab52527a38c91a904e
describe
'275865' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDP' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
e784ee3d8a3a40e7cb55bab74945c95c
b03dc7e159a15e85940949fef38818721d3729c3
describe
'22649' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDQ' 'sip-files00262.pro'
3b7ee3b4553063116dbb88a5504a0f65
0d6da3be4fd2f1c145424b8f4871bde2095099d6
describe
'50278' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDR' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
5b1645588bbbd5c2eb553009b76756ca
904f9dbc79504fbce43f0d914220cdd943d95cd8
describe
'2228008' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDS' 'sip-files00262.tif'
6d7eb9c1dd68a117754e38e16dae7c98
234978666e9db43a5695c30e3429dc358f11ad1a
'2012-05-01T20:33:26-04:00'
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDT' 'sip-files00262.txt'
66bfa44302bf559615e812a7e0da2e99
543588269d89a4973b7f2a1d78d7ee321e88dab4
'2012-05-01T20:46:31-04:00'
describe
'28506' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDU' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
7ec3af13c78d14ea2514805da8e2e954
655885638f2200434709eb616c9a5d69f0a2f236
describe
'273046' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDV' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
04ca7991c370e0cda5a726f57f859404
faeaa1bd12f7e5cd5e6e40084a8fa09dd1573596
describe
'103150' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDW' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
68f7b0604e10dfc8195bddd518d6cca9
38370b6086e4cb332c97ff344c904fe7e927d03d
'2012-05-01T20:32:37-04:00'
describe
'19042' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDX' 'sip-files00263.pro'
7df0c3aed5569c34609f3c5e18080cff
af3a9703ecc37f99f84398a680b5cdfadd89b1a1
describe
'45512' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDY' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
9d6c5fd716ea1cecd4144eba72fe4832
012ab45eb4c70e5a1da89bf70d8cebb52a3ce635
describe
'2204136' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYDZ' 'sip-files00263.tif'
2e522f39c4bbc7166b5c18c48d4b01c5
97cfeff82bc395c7a17c83fea2146c2afbb01aa6
'2012-05-01T20:37:53-04:00'
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEA' 'sip-files00263.txt'
2133255e3041e2793fb1e56d5880615e
9fc744e9bbab4c76150d0a3b6a11a873efc05269
describe
'26807' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEB' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
f543c11c6151bd76d6822ad64517b614
4498f79dc0a7d9dfdde66e06546e836e7c4b8d62
describe
'272468' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEC' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
2ff67c8376c86aa0e1649f3b112ed4bf
dc58adc911587cba3930947d768417a55b2bbf31
describe
'140222' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYED' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
8a5f075bfa2b022c0ee6b9426200e56d
357a50652251eed54ce4899cbb2d7f16734cdb92
describe
'30344' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEE' 'sip-files00264.pro'
e8bab79bb933d42f6866aca2accb28ab
25b91bd5b8e8d3859c9649ac7a65e2a94f775516
describe
'56603' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEF' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
ff94780a85cc8125401d24fac903e028
2f1bfb28f61a5515fe8d9aa92020c948eec5cc33
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEG' 'sip-files00264.txt'
5fb7088707733427c47cd817cf278864
1dab077746f12f92fae57a1162460b17c7e494f3
'2012-05-01T20:45:35-04:00'
describe
'30004' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEH' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
1a7e0999df8fa80bce463e5637540ed8
b17162a65af0a54ba331eaa8031e6f2cbfe6afb8
describe
'273237' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEI' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
e0555b04b5d956d8064053f9423eb1bb
9c1d6ff7ec03a2beebfc9b56d3773bb45478e956
describe
'167015' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEJ' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
ff5f2b26ee652418d5cf68f4955d48a2
61dc37637c3a932352b581ea2fe3afe9a1af2967
describe
'42746' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEK' 'sip-files00265.pro'
bdb2729453d68f9c9955d4e816035584
94edac3d1fd1d8a6d3df3bfc06fdc0c8d31fcb53
describe
'65066' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEL' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
fe11f84a338a062157d035c95207ed96
5b4146fb31a54f86c7c2fcd191c71cdb528c5dcd
'2012-05-01T20:34:52-04:00'
describe
'2207844' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEM' 'sip-files00265.tif'
c276b06f2bb31ed8816810d4f74b176d
57e19d7f0c199794d6aec9d1eca6cbebf0a88b94
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEN' 'sip-files00265.txt'
f0dc891f76bd71016e6319ff29d02d99
ed070ee3c09790af062d57413c0b7a5b4dee0b78
describe
'32639' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEO' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
345dea8967fe554bd669c2036f3d608d
ad7c4572b05523c788b3a874fe72e70ebdf83519
'2012-05-01T20:45:06-04:00'
describe
'274806' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEP' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
8a4323f0b3bee4199018045151d5dc8b
5b5c89d114bb669eddeb5b9bb58bc96c657eccc4
'2012-05-01T20:44:42-04:00'
describe
'194360' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEQ' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
c3d6710ffe62ae0192837eca8c203c28
0c4b7e74b5c66d2aa2a8cd8f8611edd37815ab12
'2012-05-01T20:31:06-04:00'
describe
'44332' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYER' 'sip-files00266.pro'
09d4e5167e1a2506b69e37e6fbd6c5cb
13a30c0361e1935963cf19144a27e6d791fa3f93
describe
'73250' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYES' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
9992d2d275ae7c504470f363d663068c
93be373921d4138dd66ea97318bc049f24cb07d6
'2012-05-01T20:47:03-04:00'
describe
'2219964' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYET' 'sip-files00266.tif'
3bbc1313e5d8f96a8919afc2ccd0bf75
d7324f6b7291da8403724932cf2578ef92998975
describe
'1815' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEU' 'sip-files00266.txt'
71b5beb909ce822374ee04792a393a78
3c28ef9922e5a32a2c5991ec0d2602df28ed8af5
describe
'263301' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEV' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
57462b31b057788d399df9e1489aa605
21d47186b5fe1c71c9c7d5417dfe197013e6eeb5
describe
'164876' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEW' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
3a102e7ef3e962c0d9c6288c4f39f3c3
9ddc1c10ddcc72153018c68ca2191a1424e387f1
describe
'43492' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEX' 'sip-files00267.pro'
0382a70614f289e6ee5cb27e473d1a1a
34746c9a2c9e162d6d30338ca291ec7f82c34f00
describe
'65186' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEY' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
71bd02505a60d028a0994064720b8ade
3bfa051c5eb3f04d61719540ec3f3f3e7e29b911
describe
'2128324' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYEZ' 'sip-files00267.tif'
1098d0253c99019ca9ab6e16e612efc5
4edfa031e4dcba16ecdaee49a4b321c31227fcdf
'2012-05-01T20:41:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFA' 'sip-files00267.txt'
a0b74f90a83939433a1c247d76352a3e
fe98d93241aea785b7c6930839d37f9244e481d5
describe
'32211' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFB' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
07d710e2d9bc0c7e9d347c65b957b611
2998e091e0fc032e4f5ada9359cb3201a7991ee8
describe
'268562' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFC' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
4ee22b6cf8a93bc18f07c019769d007c
ff425164185a31e80efc3c5e8e9cca67a4df7ac1
describe
'190884' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFD' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
d68ebedd0980194b4dafe44a81ac55f8
6c2512ab50a266d8534dd27015adbeae7f8c8455
'2012-05-01T20:33:59-04:00'
describe
'43616' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFE' 'sip-files00268.pro'
f9c527faab070c0fd89806cce38bbea6
d806bb4be3b34659d9522e5d89e442a44a6e7c71
'2012-05-01T20:42:24-04:00'
describe
'73521' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFF' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
c0436f03fdb21745b32064cc8a074763
c9b8b547963ea42e0dc051848608eba4f530f4d6
describe
'2170536' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFG' 'sip-files00268.tif'
28c4480d517e87f2930ab8dcaf7c9c73
46b9153be8bb4a10b506b427b1f7ea5351e730ed
'2012-05-01T20:41:45-04:00'
describe
'1816' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFH' 'sip-files00268.txt'
35d00ce4c1109b3e9c7a35f37958480a
47fdbbbc8c7e69bd7ea274a90cf36d87664cc8b7
'2012-05-01T20:31:27-04:00'
describe
'34344' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFI' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
de31e03505abe91fbe8c572a9d54d5f4
3d28ebee87c85d8b1b8e5c7f74b600a55a33ebdf
describe
'228646' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFJ' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
9976b87e9385a874df86a32532564ffb
f62b58976a826f4b510c14dd4ab8e4dad2989318
describe
'193537' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFK' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
14990864a64b363ea2520737be9f3cc8
d804d39181dae0edd0708579b863fb624f514ba5
describe
'74793' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFL' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
f1f70b2f08336fc2cee07d048a60f6c8
9073edbb70ca3626d4bf945d6868e328ecd0f0de
describe
'1851336' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFM' 'sip-files00269.tif'
974f280c8d1cb17604a94625ff49075f
45cad9e5fcb2900f2219a1f46416a5a50cf5b0b9
'2012-05-01T20:45:40-04:00'
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFN' 'sip-files00269.txt'
26149f19c79bbb604539e20ed42d55a7
473cd07d3da90bb6f921b343f00de491743fca9e
describe
'38264' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFO' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
ccbaed0cc7200378a7b1e08403440426
c05da0566239094368e8655009e0807039041400
describe
'254540' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFP' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
56c056646ca3037e2fddef2206acee65
7007c18e9b5340ec15844c950cabe13c2f8fd8d2
describe
'163764' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFQ' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
243cfd993d85d75591039525eb42c3e4
bffca958293cb769a83c883a6f778fa2340f9476
describe
'41480' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFR' 'sip-files00270.pro'
40aad453c3c7b424145f2cc18c7ef5d1
81625dfb2d3a978353b27e1f5802abdd8787e7eb
describe
'65970' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFS' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
b52d97a562ecae762f86667635e7acb1
23d7c98d4f2db6f41da8ad6b4c073eedd613ce01
describe
'2058612' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFT' 'sip-files00270.tif'
3eee8c580cbf3b76158377023c3b7be2
6f7be503096984a83da530058bc84985267935c6
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFU' 'sip-files00270.txt'
6d6624a9053bd7dd00d5966c48315a21
f5901bc2c46162bacc6e1f37bddc6b5d66c1058f
'2012-05-01T20:46:53-04:00'
describe
'34976' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFV' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
a9f880959896da7c3921442668cb7960
fb921be0e4c108e946fe1d3602882b87d0681f54
describe
'262368' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFW' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
8ca3227a4b0ffa6e8a25cb9af3940595
2d0aac8399b73b8075fedcf7726ad2cdb84a4ddf
describe
'109498' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFX' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
9c9943fc3f001d7df76dea884603cef7
a7a5bfd214c2f0776c986b3de8e0ef08de2265f1
describe
'20456' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFY' 'sip-files00271.pro'
8c57c1bd2189d6c1bdb833ae4fafe95d
07bebffae77300408f60d251881f033fef96f28c
describe
'47584' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYFZ' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
efbd3b306a22ae7833085b20c94a4e87
1ca493ceacc3c7413932d0bd8253aefd4796a5c2
describe
'2119184' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGA' 'sip-files00271.tif'
a2bcc304aeaf542e7b20b82d6ef609b0
77cd87665d5b9c344c92d9ab00972512791972d0
'2012-05-01T20:30:54-04:00'
describe
'27459' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGB' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
85565805d29e05a897c4bc405cb70d48
5704bf199f6aaa523a86d23bfe54cdb83bb6f19d
describe
'273342' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGC' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
1d2014f2745bc9873bcc3e03780cd067
0fcb133101793c399abb89fe0d982f7365697803
describe
'96883' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGD' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
7e686796e8c3a4240b24ddd3d5a2bb6a
0b6ffdc5ba9d7372cc5114fd2e484096fc2e0158
'2012-05-01T20:30:26-04:00'
describe
'17755' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGE' 'sip-files00272.pro'
8b374687f63505163d2e07064fe250f6
c0765a116abbf2b62ba03c12fbf842870d412385
describe
'44092' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGF' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
a8b322c88ca6a4b1f8580cfc18fc9fce
c97ace95c8f89c298ff99883c78c32a64d11be2a
describe
'2206880' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGG' 'sip-files00272.tif'
b16c86ce56b9ff3c9155bb1091ea025d
c78ba234850d34e37c4e511a9d9c2f640d89ed34
describe
'782' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGH' 'sip-files00272.txt'
de98bd3d41323f806c3a5396b23a8ba7
facf232ffc4579213b07f18757ad3e69a4bec873
describe
'26505' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGI' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
c0dc3657e7ac3a74023e6d33d1df4de3
fed036743ccdfadeac144d24898cfa5bd3bb82cd
describe
'268653' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGJ' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
ea649988b313e227d7258346251fc8ab
0b291915c97a5bb4e539ad5a77a005de1686c764
describe
'99966' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGK' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
f530e055cc781fdfbd3e6077a4f6da2e
ef439a553d9d15ee3aad8a998745518f54d57a1a
describe
'16685' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGL' 'sip-files00273.pro'
93439a6792a24473becbae468e363347
eea53e568ec4b310ca868205d93b259de5920533
'2012-05-01T20:30:42-04:00'
describe
'44790' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGM' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
c04de782262a7e5fd107377c71d97442
a317dd6abca5db83be19b544229e96f4e5af8a9d
describe
'2169772' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGN' 'sip-files00273.tif'
e2a73ea0012d267b5416bfce6a74a951
2aa4cb44d6edfe6c8a88f719b05ede0d5bba0d81
'2012-05-01T20:42:40-04:00'
describe
'761' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGO' 'sip-files00273.txt'
652f6b43b59c76922711747696ebd0da
52465d23b1253ec8049df62146b3e7980c87ab66
describe
'27053' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGP' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
16433c4dc61d1740259a2fc447d19e34
928aa6ea4df4da05c278b90279be8aa62dcc40f5
'2012-05-01T20:43:19-04:00'
describe
'32899' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGQ' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
5618880d77e8861caf8620d78764d4ac
a550216e7635600c394596169d6ef7ae0a36e9ea
describe
'196652' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGR' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
daffd82698262da6b930a8188b8f676d
c6a7886d20843d57a88fb92995ff59bd9787a7bb
describe
'2174360' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGS' 'sip-files00237.tif'
fe43f2080a23a5952ff4c9f6d5f08700
9137eb259acb9e5fd3ae7da3f9f98c2804dff44f
'2012-05-01T20:32:44-04:00'
describe
'36043' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGT' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
489fab2b7a26151aa3d37587bafb0b08
e39338a8207cb30f530650a511db5d1934b0e07f
describe
'56025' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGU' 'sip-files00242.pro'
21fe8a23e28af94c562c6c69bf207476
f56d44ff09b431ada79c69d9b0f1b29ed24c9147
describe
'1730' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGV' 'sip-files00244.txt'
f3d549e695d577f56a82c041810600aa
91cc7081f595aeb5c58c608a2aee275fa15f6d95
describe
'28801' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGW' 'sip-files00250.pro'
1bd0603054a9fa8d5b7ab1413ddac870
2f12317c8be724d6bc4e738cbf585d58bd9625ec
'2012-05-01T20:30:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGX' 'sip-files00252.txt'
82a7a55f24ee95acf286914a445e19ac
c2ed11bf2a03132af360ab485569d526bacc02ed
describe
'268262' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGY' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
108138f39a2004a9ee2c98713f3d3d6a
7814e5801504c9e86748b076b2561b88ec973129
describe
'76468' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYGZ' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
ca84d64269e8dda70b37f445f6c7b89e
fbf8deba46694014fe795ea7f437634efbf1a6ce
describe
'116749' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHA' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
350ea39dca027efb18e3466a56bc20c0
4583f4e59ef4cb616f45c4264fbabd03150c59e1
describe
'2201620' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHB' 'sip-files00264.tif'
ecc43e30047716c2657c5d5d40c3706e
bd79ab5fa8637501f2da106b87954c532b8f0848
describe
'34385' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHC' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
7957aa08a37ba56bf60d6808e38414d9
105caae89a1c8030328ccaaf9c241e735dd6fe70
describe
'40849' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHD' 'sip-files00269.pro'
a0375d499c48e411303d1481755e833e
26d33f324e1bd32f556740063a6b9bc885cbf930
describe
'894' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHE' 'sip-files00271.txt'
4c67032c0f4629cbaceb145ea1dee8b3
4ce29a6203ad8ff76bfea002a33f39164daf1508
describe
'270494' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHF' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
65a6edfc2e5975a1dd62356c584e6e6a
4a2f93df4ee9777d3cd3953b1ecfe555eb95c2c3
describe
'73757' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHG' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
ce5250031a2f7b8e5c2989031c73102c
a352407cdf9c5f16ae85ab12bcdb53304e1c6c29
describe
'154610' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHH' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
7d5f184786aa82cc3abb85685057adfd
5f60c646eb4e785d27c033429ad4a3329a079ce5
'2012-05-01T20:38:37-04:00'
describe
'2288060' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHI' 'sip-files00283.tif'
4fdcfefee727355cbc1c31a291c2271e
e1b1ffd0661fd5c224c9d9d4e1b9c689794d71b0
describe
'30089' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHJ' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
e71150e70840c5ad55103fd55dc329ba
77de358c84f1147b7e827ec8860106a74f312672
describe
'137736' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHK' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
d8e86cef27cbee57ba64a5d648594ff1
1a2a6c0f4556b800e3ec681f6a3409bc23f2e66a
describe
'27555' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHL' 'sip-files00274.pro'
ed671a9bf45073b38901a1776b33fdc9
86a82c5b6ec29b4c9d53a7cc6cc84bb383334163
describe
'57305' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHM' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
e52a15705d2a689c8e4ffaf349c2d0fb
8d5f8f7a5d04bba776bf07e6bceb76ed641d5a52
'2012-05-01T20:32:01-04:00'
describe
'2184840' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHN' 'sip-files00274.tif'
c8efbc71c5857c4929b71034c1769cd6
5a7daf4dbe97d807acebea5f790cd5840e57fdfb
'2012-05-01T20:29:59-04:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHO' 'sip-files00274.txt'
9da8ef5f6346d76327cbb4b666e60910
01012b0d1ff4ba0c8d270b2802e172901883dd60
describe
'30527' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHP' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
93ee1a4bf7fcc6c7b18cb6a2126af4e4
a1dee0b9c7aa00e189fbdb75dd779902ff0957f5
describe
'266763' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHQ' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
6e10c90feb28e117eac8ec7c8440ad48
824cbb5a7254f02141355233548914c79eb347ae
describe
'195939' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHR' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
6ebae2b0d10e46af9ff805eafab5e950
de4f3784a4aeb3b0c234fdc2d96d56eac84301d7
describe
'41724' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHS' 'sip-files00275.pro'
ac1814d2493d6857574356c0e81b993e
624af20762ef98330b0451d6be444d9fb8f4c020
describe
'75280' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHT' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
993e7aacce31083cb2801bfe263d0db9
4303e3e1936c2950d070c221035652c81ff44772
'2012-05-01T20:30:06-04:00'
describe
'2156364' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHU' 'sip-files00275.tif'
b2b346cbbd2c7b1e0f6a3ca18944ef28
de2421a4ebdf3704c0a6052a3dae0251d2747659
describe
'1709' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHV' 'sip-files00275.txt'
8e4ae66fcbc68ff527ccda11a15ec1b5
fea0f3a9af30daa744099613acae716257e010fb
'2012-05-01T20:42:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHW' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
f66bf2b535ec633b5c3bdea6f09aeda4
3f3d0ea39432424ac4d6de659e8fa2491b1f7fc3
describe
'271069' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHX' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
82278810a0601140e0848701505c439a
6aa0fb607ccc932eba64d0ff6528a2a55ba2498a
describe
'192937' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHY' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
b4adadbc89f48a5acd9772e79b01bd36
f6599ab302016267509ffbd31c20793f98090b46
describe
'42966' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYHZ' 'sip-files00276.pro'
afb974c87d023fcf625a22a9cb1839fa
b701b6d1cc798a0fbac72eaea9e6999a4fdb49a0
describe
'2190700' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIA' 'sip-files00276.tif'
039aeda8374934b1cfaf18ae2dfa1dcf
b5cef05662deaa432680b516a43ae164d1ed318e
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIB' 'sip-files00276.txt'
601928b4bd955cfa264f36785b11c0c7
a0bcaba4311314f92e2d433820ffbe78e3752910
describe
'34846' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIC' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
ff909040fb571ca7ffb008757f693ba8
6259dbbf684bd8f56637ccf96f091ecb3823dabf
describe
'267991' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYID' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
9d7d636bd16be73b6f266928cabb61be
5ecb8c7f86cd1ea644a9e3120dbb56398683936b
describe
'169528' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIE' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
8ae1b2793c899366e3cfbd60d93756b6
ebaaeb60524f82fa70744c716cbfe53d902d3bb2
describe
'42511' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIF' 'sip-files00277.pro'
be4ccc369f4bfa9cd11f55343bee2c18
99f3185ed1a0a5ebca3cf347a823f06e73b96e27
describe
'66646' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIG' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
2d594c6268501b368a122eea1971346b
f7e39f1035ef1dfda2ad92a8fb53dd78dc765869
describe
'2166312' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIH' 'sip-files00277.tif'
31336fdb4acfe01a7e19d49f48d52a66
82e8f80d3c935af09d0d4148eceb77e096a6571f
'2012-05-01T20:44:12-04:00'
describe
'1736' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYII' 'sip-files00277.txt'
f39248abfa69b7517be652f830baab63
311c3d6af0b57aa6d2276928aa78a21c8410d5cd
'2012-05-01T20:34:02-04:00'
describe
'32778' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIJ' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
51647517d3d563434cc15955041e2cee
fd8446a478cb0d2f3923fdd1ff878304a76fb00a
describe
'272495' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIK' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
1655229feadedb367242dc83b0d36bf1
4ff6958b63bf7f6313d4868482818f44127c58cd
'2012-05-01T20:38:10-04:00'
describe
'192663' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIL' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
07d5b3b1c44d16ef09e7e9fb12903f53
829229f2d0ae25872aa3100079c5ba4c3f153aa7
'2012-05-01T20:44:16-04:00'
describe
'42571' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIM' 'sip-files00278.pro'
d59c815b1aa2c61afda2028e0c5bd4d7
67c951036538b5e5411a5979ca20548de13be7e7
describe
'73685' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIN' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
cf420b4b1951572eab0bc5224e71c2d3
c162a004f4d2a1f5351839967c8cb51abbd718ad
describe
'2202048' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIO' 'sip-files00278.tif'
aedbeea1c6117c2a577f04beb09b4d12
3e057aa71db822b997dd55d84ab5be09ae89207c
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIP' 'sip-files00278.txt'
4cb3f15b272c4d0285da56d684b90397
cefc4c74f2bb3bf6d6eddb83c2664d06b5d8dc4b
describe
'34639' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIQ' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
4e3e20f63eaf8177b7ec24ef04785a32
53dc995770f5cd435597d36db420816ed133eff5
describe
'260651' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIR' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
fe7aa5fc4155e6dc16ba9fe55a22d208
cd11c79b9817b55349e4942a715639eb9c388e06
describe
'164226' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIS' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
d392bc6862a59cf2da3a3f01a07c2f52
462314968b1ccd87b04faba7d0e928d321e062a8
describe
'40960' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIT' 'sip-files00279.pro'
4a36c98425d9ca1655d075d3745dbe6d
a64195ea9eeb208fe3674fb94193946b357c63d0
describe
'65769' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIU' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
ddf8ff98db20c7ecbfc22ac6ace0d124
5e74f18bac95ef4c308ab43252ab19d1eb49d763
describe
'2107288' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIV' 'sip-files00279.tif'
a8bb83258bbc0a1de340fdbe7865f7f4
4cd5c8c60fcd2623f0472536df5de32036ec32c0
describe
'1678' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIW' 'sip-files00279.txt'
819e9c0c5b112bce8edb71cd98148dab
4e2e3b1b5db5f22677c37bed4dc211e50832911e
describe
'33045' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIX' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
26fafeb71fe2c8c5e9224f5282fa5641
658014a40a726b3ee09633711f22c280904e7dc7
'2012-05-01T20:30:32-04:00'
describe
'274860' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIY' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
57d2a7f3418d6a9b8b63f61a961fef32
7d9f955bfeb2676e06847ea87f92f0599bc117f2
'2012-05-01T20:41:15-04:00'
describe
'133535' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYIZ' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
55b41aee79377e7244d483e8ddb63f40
7a42d346283634086a5753dab623db96de8439ef
describe
'28073' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJA' 'sip-files00280.pro'
eb41944d4f75058ef27f5d8fe2495bc5
61d80cf5dc3fb0b35826f68660d68308c85cdcf0
describe
'54730' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJB' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
c24acd827824f70e41e184c8cdef34ce
4caf9363c6faeafe2ed870e39b9bf53d45391993
'2012-05-01T20:42:27-04:00'
describe
'2219748' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJC' 'sip-files00280.tif'
e31e2f1afd9216d8223444283eeee22b
f57d89ec25e9944e9cbedc87d3b7909cebad34c2
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJD' 'sip-files00280.txt'
99ad098539645189bb1a87ab5f84a284
ddff0f9f6460db036d310e70e5c7e7ee5f6739ac
describe
'29282' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJE' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
b8dc72bdd2acf63188fc9b26a8792145
e0d9cd374e62a179766b721817c50f87f05198cf
describe
'266840' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJF' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
9fd0ce8ac2699eb1c1d7e9f8dd4913c9
13c77d1e078bcdea792ff928e86544a2e9b0b754
'2012-05-01T20:38:41-04:00'
describe
'36876' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJG' 'sip-files00281.pro'
01d3fa6b55d3f35cb457fc0104dff32d
b8d3dd15fb31376dbad5bf1553915089db577f26
describe
'63093' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJH' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
e368c7004ef500b3e1184863ccb4767e
feb509618ef9316461ba796b1fe84623b141a288
describe
'2157016' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJI' 'sip-files00281.tif'
e337997eb8b8e7526dd123d0a6ddeab3
f65b72c1164cb81cb50ad7f7dca14fd34972c3ea
describe
'1517' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJJ' 'sip-files00281.txt'
dcfc68243ed0bfceefde0e63abe7a5fe
d54049f484ebb6f1ee65e8877aab0ef0dd5742cf
describe
'31863' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJK' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
4d8c538e1f5ac61e378cf622a4c4d660
75dc8c14c213474c621b7243f2b7029228513b6d
'2012-05-01T20:41:44-04:00'
describe
'264105' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJL' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
3a0d01bcaab546340a844ee70a4113ce
cbc1b403dc21d5cc3419eab0bd62cfe7af51488d
describe
'173424' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJM' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
2c63d284b35acac949da455de006a13c
ee001e3dde9cf409cd8dec45a5c99a5131cbfd89
describe
'42263' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJN' 'sip-files00282.pro'
0888c12a5714b5f2e2113d1bbab5b63f
0161647406b5006efbfb375b43cdb1a49c7037ea
'2012-05-01T20:43:53-04:00'
describe
'69762' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJO' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
c7efbdd7c52bd7619a0ff5b2ff0d652d
75b146dee740582afa5bfe6aae38084a1223acec
describe
'2135608' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJP' 'sip-files00282.tif'
8258608d6c0f03a50ad299ddbb5b8f33
b4e754bdb8e7a9b2d19254acc725b0e699c2869f
describe
'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJQ' 'sip-files00282.txt'
ea04a6c227a7e6b5a1061ae5cfa243f9
c21f9d779035ebfa555b46b9c9e2a10a76f773b4
describe
'34329' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJR' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
717a4fdce6cd3430d27d679f96efbf6e
2b43fadc18c28c3f76e588ec94605b8c054b4b69
'2012-05-01T20:42:57-04:00'
describe
'283209' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJS' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
1c462ce1a634daf0bd41742b5707b40a
a95b4d7ee9d7d74650a2c43008a830d163e0f914
'2012-05-01T20:32:40-04:00'
describe
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8d01dd5d8d9b92bce455f9e0bf863ab4
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describe
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describe
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describe
'1811' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJW' 'sip-files00283.txt'
ccbd419d64ff807afe20d83ac6c99746
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describe
'32997' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJX' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
f626936e7ec5e86dfc878be3c73d8a31
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describe
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a0eaadec111745aecdce447e788e84dc
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describe
'175754' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYJZ' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
52c308272da65a767d2d1d1d81df74e2
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describe
'43937' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKA' 'sip-files00284.pro'
f68c2441fedac30f611e9c3de5276e13
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describe
'69131' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKB' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
2b97f86a6a22d1aef3ffbc3d99a649bd
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describe
'2177300' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKC' 'sip-files00284.tif'
b1cf1545afd786a83a8de65d36128ffc
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'2012-05-01T20:38:22-04:00'
describe
'1831' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKD' 'sip-files00284.txt'
0b76610abb655e6b28c55b67cfe17e4c
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describe
'34032' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKE' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
e1c91c5c0c3315feb92a0f840914bebe
1df4e144c4d92c0f79212d7439a0f5702481a36b
describe
'251301' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKF' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
d68ab0bcd7a9b924dfbd6ef1002a567e
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describe
'126023' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKG' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
6e64477de53c02def031e94a8f7ee66e
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describe
'20480' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKH' 'sip-files00285.pro'
8646638af44f081813999285a79efc38
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describe
'51990' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKI' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
9d7df0b0f00d33dbe89f8a1c0e50c0ef
0d10c9be2b59eb8cd85c716c43af44f33756581d
'2012-05-01T20:42:22-04:00'
describe
'2031924' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKJ' 'sip-files00285.tif'
95c29c51dbb9311c3c0589bb343e54a8
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describe
'937' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKK' 'sip-files00285.txt'
5da92b4ebb47446da6e91257061f5d50
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describe
'164890' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKL' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
0ce5e13943f250afc5f617fadf8a3b84
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describe
'42916' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKM' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
840f0d8eaa53fdd330451cfd827351ba
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'2012-05-01T20:32:54-04:00'
describe
'24713' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKN' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
4d9fa7251e89ced02cb5187667cca638
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describe
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describe
'20224' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKP' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
5698a53dd9ff891d8e9cc5e2f92beded
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describe
'246457' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKQ' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
b3223f111f6dd82c894bd34720d35dda
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describe
'65949' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKR' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
72c51a215f10f838b19d5a272a7f8e9d
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describe
'287' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKS' 'sip-files00287.pro'
ce587c4782baea4dadfb815a0d81c60c
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describe
'28472' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKT' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
6f16b3df3349f003a5d6be0781d9d80d
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describe
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describe
'162' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKV' 'sip-files00287.txt'
ab6fecc837f80e9b6e865855cfec849e
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describe
'21148' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKW' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
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describe
'269040' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKX' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
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describe
'54781' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKY' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
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describe
'27629' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYKZ' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
a5c516d31863d896cc668fdd78c75c9b
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'2012-05-01T20:46:14-04:00'
describe
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7e2d6a90983715b852c49c6de40c428c
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'2012-05-01T20:33:56-04:00'
describe
'21337' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLB' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
3ad9e140370de7e1bbdc403a6abbac86
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describe
'307560' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLC' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
4690cca5995f259fbb6f2ad66c49e5e7
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'2012-05-01T20:33:02-04:00'
describe
'350588' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLD' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
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describe
'85929' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLE' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
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describe
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'2012-05-01T20:39:01-04:00'
describe
'33789' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLG' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
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describe
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1fb2a236a56b3fc8dced3a08e6a44b0f
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describe
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describe
'220' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLJ' 'sip-files00290.pro'
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describe
'39374' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLK' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
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describe
'2047496' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLL' 'sip-files00290.tif'
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describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLM' 'sip-files00290.txt'
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'2012-05-01T20:34:11-04:00'
describe
'26117' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLN' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
e471fb22f07e11a14e7ad2aa86f28018
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describe
'129' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLO' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
7b7ff3d9f1ce4bd530d49c6643667ad0
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describe
'317138' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLP' 'sip-filesUF00015588_00001.mets'
f891e01ba7dc79adb3b2fcad23b11d1f
3da33fdc16186faaf025a8273c88dce932a1c40e
'2012-05-01T20:31:25-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T05:02:22-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'408381' 'info:fdaE20091123_AAAANZfileF20091123_AACYLS' 'sip-filesUF00015588_00001.xml'
7c3fc4086447706078aef4ba2b4e7221
c219f78dbe4a6d2e89bb9f2087177fb9e15b3219
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T05:02:26-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.


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THE

CHRISTIAN GARLAND;

OR, A

COMPANION FOR LEISURE HOURS:

CONSISTING OF

ORIGINAL AND SELECTED PIECES IN POETRY
AND PROSE.



A NEW EDITION.

LONDON:

THE RELIGIOUS TRACT SOCIETY :
Instituted 1799.
DEPOSITORY, 56, PATERNOSTER ROW, AND 65, ST. PAUL’S
. CHURCHYARD; AND SOLD BY
THE BOOKSELLERS.
CONTENTS.

Fiowrrs and Pants oF Sorrpturn, with an Engraving
Tur Litizs or THe Finny.

Tur Frencu Conscrirts .

Win FiLowsrs, with an Engraving

BEAUTINS OF THE FIELD

Tae FUNERAL at THE Gate or Narn ; .

A Mipyieur Vistr to Mount Vesuvius .
GaRDEN FLOWERS, with an Engraving .
MorwING. . 2 2 1 1 ew ew ew ec
Socrates, THE Citizen TEACHER

Wuy NorP 2. 2. 1 1 1 ew ee ew
Witp Fruits, with an Engraving .

Tur Unseen Hanp .

Faitu anp OBEDIENCE. . .

Exotic Frurrs, with an Engraving . . 2 1 0 ss
iv CONTENTS.

PAGE
Tue STARS 2 6 ee ew ee ee ee ee ee 185

“LirrLe Lorre” 6 Y f
Fresuwater SHELLS, with an Engraving . . . . . . 162
SEASONS OF PRAYER... 1 1 ee ee ee. 167
Tur Proprem Resonvep . . . . 2... 170
A Wrisn TomBsTONE . . ........ . . 180
Sea Snurus, with an Engraving «1... . 1 we. 188
Tne Sea-SHoRE 2... ee ee ee ee ee 189
CAN SHE BE SPAREDP . . . 1... ee es 91
Tue SPRING AS AN EMBLEM OF THE RESURRECTION . . 202

Sea Wrens, with an Engraving «2. 1 ww ww ee 217

Tur Mornine Revrn . . . . . 1. we ew ke 222
SENSIBILITY 2 6 6 ee we ee ee ew ws 229
AUTUMN 2. 2. ew ew eee ee ee ee 281

Yertow Leaves . 2. 1 we we ee ww ws 289
Otp Humpurey on Kinpness anp Discretion . . . 241
Tue Weit-spent Day . . . . .. 1 we ee. MS

THe MILLENNIAL SABBATH... ww we we. 252
FLOWERS AND PLANTS OF SCRIPTURE.

“ Flowers worthy of Paradise, which not nice art,
Tn beds and curious knots, but nature boon
Pour'd forth profuse, on hill, and dale, and plain,
Both where the morning sun first warmly smote
The open field, and where the unpierced shade
Embrown’d the noontide bowers.”

One striking feature in the poetry of the Bible is its
continual reference to. the imagery supplied by the
material world. Coming forth from the inmost heart
of the inspired writer, and destined to influence every
human faculty, the words of Holy Writ appeal to the
sentiments and affections, as well as to the under-
standing of man, in all ages. They call his attention
to the beauty of the world around him, and render all
outward loveliness subservient to holy and devout
emotions by the vividness with which it. depicts eternal
truth. The flowers of the field, fading so quickly; the —
grass, withering even before it grows up; the shadow
that declineth, are all remembrancers of man’s mortality.
The trees and high hills were not looked on carelessly
by the inspired writers. They understood all their
meanings, and from them, as from the voice of the
turtle, and the coming of the crane and the swallow,
they gathered thoughts of God.
B
2 FLOWERS AND PLANTS OF SCRIPTURE.

And so it is now, that when we walk abroad in fields
and gardens, by river side, or on mountain summit, the
reader, familiar with his Bible, is reminded of its truths
by innumerable associations. God never meant, when
he inspired these lessons, that we should be inattentive
to the objects whence they were drawn. Besides the
various references made, in the pages of Holy Writ, to
natural objects in general, there are more than three
hundred places in which plants are mentioned. Some-
times they occur in Scripture narratives, and tell us of
ancient usages; often they remind us of the character,
soil, and climate of the scenes of some of the most
solemn events of history; in some cases they serve to
identify the spots on which they once flourished, as
those on which they flourish still ; but more often they
are emblematic, and are types of persons or of events,
or serve as figures by which the feelings of the reader
shall be raised from things seen to those which are
unseen. But they were never intended to be regarded
merely as ornaments of poetry. They had all their
lessons, from the lily of the valleys and the rose of
Sharon, which foreshadowed a coming Lord, down to
the thorn and thistle, which tell us, even yet, of man’s
sin and sorrow.

We are not idly employed when secking to identify
with the descriptions of the sacred writers the various
trees and flowers to which they allude. In many
imstances this must be the labour of the learned man,
and requires patient thought and investigation, as well
as much skill in ancient languages, and in the botany
of eastern lands. But every patient study of God’s
word is sure to bring valuable results, and to show not
FLOWERS AND PLANTS OF SCRIPTURE. 3

only how well fitted for illustration were the: emblems
employed, but also how true to all that recent science
has discovered. are its statements; while the labour of
one man on the subject may serve to enlighten the
thousands whose time and toil must be otherwise em-
ployed.: A great deal has been discovered, during the
last few years, respecting the botany of Scripture; and
though much remains so uncertain that we wish we
could read the volume of the wise man, who spake of
them, from the cedar of Lebanon to the hyssop of the
wall, yet is our knowledge of the subject far more accu-
rate now than at any former period of modern. times.
Coming years and further study may teach us more ;
for that Bible in which the way of salvation is made so
plain as that a little child can understand it, has yet its
depths, to be explored. by the Christian philosopher and
the man of science.

The rose, the lily, and the vine, are Sete the most
interesting of all the plants of Scripture, for they have
all been given us as figures of Him who was not only
the Lord of nature, but the Lord and Saviour of im-
‘ mortal souls. Jn all times men have desired to know

which of the flowers of the Hast was the rose of Sharon.
Yet even now we are not certain of its identity... Older
writers thought it was a large and deeply-coloured rose.
| Later writers have thought it was the rose of Damascus.
The plain of Sharon is still beautiful, with its bright
grass and numerous wild flowers; but no thorny rose-
‘bush is there. All over its plains and grassy slopes,
however, may be found numerous clumps of the rose-
flowering cistus, whose rich pink blossoms, shaped like
those of our wild brier, are thought by some writers to
4 FLOWERS AND PLANTS OF SCRIPTURE.

be the rose of Sharon. But when we consider how,
from earliest ages, the true rose has been the favourite
flower of the Kast, and that in other parts of Palestine
wild roses are blooming still, we can hardly doubt that
the rose of Sharon, though it grows there no longer,
was some one of those lovely roses which yet grow
wild, or are cultivated, in the Holy Land.

Neither can we exactly tell which was the lily either
of the Old or New Testament, though, in the account of
Solomon’s temple, in the Canticles, and in the references
of the prophets, we find it frequently mentioned.
Dr. Royle thinks that the lily of the Old Testament
is not the same flower as that on which our Saviour
looked when he reminded the disciples of God’s un-
ceasing love and care, and of their duty of unwavering
faith and hope. The former flower has been thought
to be the violet, or the jessamine ; but the use of it, as
forming an ornament of molten brass for the pillars and
brazen sea, as well as the reference, in the Canticles,
to “feeding among the lilies,” induces Dr. Royle to
believe that the lily was the beautiful lotus once so
plentiful on the waters of the Nile, and still so common
on streams of the East. Amidst the many opinions
formed on the subject of the lily alluded to by the
Saviour, the most likely seems that which concludes it
to be the Martagon lily of our gardens.

But if we are not certain of these two flowers, there
are many plants of Scripture on which we can entertain
no doubt. The vine of Eshcol yet grows in the
neighbouring Hebron, and many of the hill-sides of
Palestine still resound to the shouts of the vintage.
The tall cedars of Lebanon are green as they might
FLOWERS AND PLANTS OF SCRIPTURE. 5

have been when David looked on them exultingly, and
compared them to.the righteous man; and these vege-
table monuments of past ages yet send forth, at eventide,
the “smell of Lebanon.” Sweet ‘valleys lying among
the hills of Judah are fragrant now with the myrtle-
bough, and far away over the spring landscape the
flowering almond-trees are beautiful to look upon. The
broad shadow of the sycamore flickers on the ground
_ of the wayside, and might serve to conceal the listener,
as once it hid Zaccheus; and the fig-tree, whose fruits
formed a chief source of the food of Israel, is there still
to shelter and to nourish the tribes who wander under
its shade. The rich blossom or fruit of the pomegranate
reddens among its verdant branches, and the rarer
bay-tree now occasionally reminds the traveller of the
moment of sadness in which the Psalmist once looked
upon it. The willow waves its grey-green foliage by
several streams of the Holy Land, and still fringes
the waters of the Euphrates and the Tigris, where
captive Israel once uttered their lament in strains
of sweet poetry. The garden has its rue, and anise,
and mint, and cummin; and the modern traveller yet
looks on the lodge of the garden of cucumbers, in which
the watcher dwells. The palm-tree, once so charac-
teristic of its scenery, is almost gone, but the wheat
and the barley are still in Israel’s land, but not in glory
and richness as in the day when his was the land of
corn and of wine. Pleasant now to the Christian’s
memory are the thoughts suggested by the olive hills,
yet scattered over with those old trees, on which David
looked when he went up the mountain sides in sorrow,
and which still cluster at the foot of the Mount of
6 FLOWERS AND PLANTS OF SCRIPTURE,

Olives, in the garden which witnessed the agonies of
spirit of the blessed Saviour. But more striking than
all are the thorns and thistles which abound in Palestine,
rendering some of her hills impassable, and entangling
the foot of the traveller on spots once rich in culture.
God was angry with that land, and he smiles not on it
as once he did; yet it still waits for the glorious time,
when, literally and figuratively, its deserts shall again
rejoice, and blossom like the rose.
A. P.
THE LILIES OF THE FIELD.

Marr, vi. 28, 29.

Frowzrs of. the field! *tis yours to preach
Lessons of truth, and humbly teach
The faithless and the proud :
Array’d in garb of lovely hue,
Our Fatuer’s care we trace in you;
And still to Him who made you, true,
Ye warn the thoughtless crowd.

Let those of feeble faith, whose breast

With doubts and fears can never rest,
Consider how ye grow:

Ye toil not with perplexing care:

Ye do not spin the coats ye wear,

Nor paint those colours bright and fair,
In which ye sweetly glow.

The hand of Him who built the skies,
. Adorns His flowers with varied dyes,

And clothes each beauteous plant ;
Th’ Eternal One, whose sovereign power
Can make earth’s haughtiest. despot cower,
Stoops to regard the humblest flower,

And tend each little want.

Rev. J. 8S. Broan, M.A.
THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

Tue burning sun of the South of France had just
gone down, and a weary soldier, who trod languidly
along the bare and dusty road that led from the great
sea-port of Marseilles to a small and pleasant town,
about a day’s journey from the former place, rejoiced in
the cooling air of evening. His aspect bore traces of
the hardship and fatigues of war in a forcign clime:
his face was browned by an African sun, and it seemed
as if his health had suffered by the same.

It was, in fact, the time when the French were at
war with the Algerines, and Eugéne Dupré had com-
pleted his term of seven years’ service in what is called
“the army of Africa.” His service had been performed
with credit to himself, and he had obtained his congé,
or dismissal, after having been rapidly advanced to the
rank of sergeant.

And now some hills, yet at a couple of hours’ distance,
rose to his sight, and close to them, Eugéne knew, was
the home of his youth, his father’s house, where he
hoped his mother’s arms would receive him, and his
fond little sister’s smiles make him forget his trials
and sufferings. Although he had been a good soldier,
and gained as such the regard of his superiors, Eugene
THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. 9

was glad to leave the army of Africa; while with it he
had beheld and shared in many a dreadful scene. The
fierce war in Algeria he was well satisfied no longer to
bear a part in. There are some minds which will perform
well whatever duty they undertake; and that of a soldier,
though well performed by Eugéne Dupré, was not that
which was most agreeable to his own disposition; the
law of conscription in France compels all men, after
eighteen years of age, to serve in the army for seven
years, should the state require it; and Hugéne had
entered the army against his own inclination, as a
conscript. This had been peculiarly trying to him just
then, for he had been long attached to a young female
who lived in his neighbourhood, and circumstances had
appeared to promise favourably for their marriage; but
when Eugéne was obliged to depart for the army, her
father would no longer listen to the proposal; he-even
made the young man promise not to attempt to form
any engagement with his daughter, or even to write to
her as long as he was a soldier.

Eugene kept both promises: he had never heard from
Annette during his long absence from his home; and
now, as he was returning, and drawing nearer to it, he
was thinking if he should find all his friends as he had
left them, and laying before himself some pictures of
happiness, peace, and quiet, which were very pleasant
to the weary soldier’s imagination. What busy thoughts
filled his mind as his native village came in view!
Would Annette be changed—was she already married
to another ?—had his father grown much older ?—was
his mother’s kind face the same as ever P—and his little
sister, who was only ten years of age at his departure,
10 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

was she as pleasing, as playful as she had been? Then
there was another old friend, though one much younger
than himself—Henry Vincent—who had made himself
so useful to his father during his absence, and had been
his little sister’s companion and friend: he thought of
him, too, and wondered if Henry had grown up to be as
good, as generous, as truthful, as he promised to be
when a boy, and as his fine open countenance had once
declared him to be.

But while thus thinking, some weary, yet more hasty
steps led him into the village street, and he stood before
the draper’s shop which his father kept. The shades of
evening fall suddenly ina southern clime ; it was almost
dark when he paused at the well-remembered door.
And then he recollected how, in former days, he used
to dislike to stand behind that counter, waiting for
customers, and how Henry would take his place, and
make himself so useful; and though he did not feel
more disposed to like shop-keeping now than he had
done formerly, he felt he had been wrong then, and
owned in his heart that it is both wiser and happier
to be content with that state of life to which it has
pleased God to call us, not knowing but that to which
we should prefer to call ourselves would be found still
more unsuitable to us, Then, suddenly entering the
house, he crossed the passage, and there, assembled
round the wide kitchen hearth,—for the evening had
grown chill,—he beheld all the objects of his thoughts,
with the exception of Annette, to be sure: she was
not present. But there, at opposite corners of the wide
hearth, sat an elderly man and woman, silent, with their
figures bent forward, their arms on their knees, their eyes
THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. AL

fixed on the fire before them. Between them, in the
middle space, was a pale but interesting young girl, with
tears upon her cheeks; and «young man, of a kind and
open countenance, the pleasant expression of which was
darkened by some sorrow, and whose attempts to console
the girl at his side only seemed to increase her grief.

In surprise Hugéne, gazed at the scene before him.
But his step was heard, and his father, thinking a cus-
tomer had entered, rose to attend the shop: Henry
sprang up to save him the trouble.

“ Leave him, my son,” said the old woman to Henry,
“leave him to attend to his business himself: he must
soon do so without assistance.” Eugéne, seeing he was
not recognised, requested permission to rest himself.
Even his voice was changed, and the father, saluting him
as a stranger and traveller, pulled off his cap, and politely
requested him to be seated at their hearth. But the
mother looked at the war-changed soldier, and with a
cry, opened her arms, and fell on the bosom of her son.
Then Eugéne was clasped to his father’s breast, and
then his loving sister’s tears ceased to flow, or their
cause was forgotten in wonder and joy.. And Henry
stood with ‘smiling eyes and countenance, waiting for
his embrace to come. And now how happy was Eugéne
Dupré! All that had passed, vexations, and hardships,
and dangers, were quite forgotten: or actually converted,
in retrospect, into pleasures. It was pleasant to tell of
them; pleasant to see the interest with which they were
listened to; pleasant, above all, to give God thanks for
deliverance from them—to hear his parents do so.

Then he was rested and refreshed; his mother and
sister relieved his aching feet, and set out the neat
12 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

reviving supper, consisting partly of the fine rich grapes
of Southern France. Oh! how happy was the soldier’s
return; how devout his thankfulness !

However tired a traveller may be, yet if he returns
to an affectionate family, it is usually late before he
retires to rest; there is so much to be told, and when
all is told, there is so much to hear.

Eugéne, unlike most returned travellers, wished to
hear first; so when the supper was over, he asked his
sister Violette, whom he was surprised to find grown
into a young woman, to tell him of all the changes
that had taken place among their old friends.

“Oh! there have been many changes since you left
us, my brother,” said Violette ; “old Menon, whom you
remember so well, is dead, and your friend André
married his daughter Elise, and keeps the house now;
and my old companion Julie has left this place, and
gone to live with a lady who travels very far, so they
say Julie will be likely to see even Paris before she
comes back.”

“That is surprising,’ said Hugéne, smiling; “but
have you no more interesting news to tell me ?”

“Why, yes; there is poor Antony and his lame
mother.”

“Oh!” cried Kugéne, interrupting her, “ that may
be all very interesting, I confess; but then—in short,
why do you not mention those who are most interesting
to me ?—Annette, for instance, my old friend: you have
said nothing of her.”

“No, indeed, nor is it likely I should have done so;
you asked me to tell you of changes, brother ;—now no
change has taken place with regard to Annette.”

>
THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. 138

« Ah! [thought she might: be married! Well, I must
go and see her to-morrow morning,” said Eugéne.

* No, sheis not married,” his sister replied, “ and
whenever she makes some purchase at the shop, she
always asks about you—and oh! brother, when we got
that dreadful letter to tell us how youhad been wounded,
and nearly killed by the Arabs, and how you suffered
from the climate—ah!”—hissister looked at Henry, who
was listening to her, and stopping short in her speech,
put her hand over her eyes and burst into tears.

Eugéne, thinking it was the recollection of his suffer-
ings that caused these tears, began to laugh at them, and
then, to divert her, commenced telling of many greater
hazards he had run, of wild scenes he had witnessed,
and fearful perils he had passed.

He was interrupted by his sister’s sobs, and by a
request from Henry that he would not alarm her more.

“ Ah!” said Hugéne, “it cannot be on my account
she is alarmed, else she would smile now that I am
safe. Look atme, my sister,” he said, trying to remove
her hands; “ tell me what is the matter.”

Violette could not speak, and Eugéne, turning to his
father and mother, said, “I saw Violette in tears when
I came in, but I forgot that in the general joy; I am
sure something is wrong; tell me, I pray you, what
it is.”

* Not till to-morrow, my son,” said the mother;
“ you require repose.”

“ Bugéne will not sleep while he is in doubt,” said
the father ; “itis better he should know all now.” Then
turning towards his son, the old man continued :-—

“ You see Henry, my son, who sits beside you ; well,
14 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

when you had left us, Henry supplied your place ; only
less dear than our own son, he was asa son to us. I had
no need in the morning to regulate the shop, for Henry
was there, and all was done before I appeared. In the
evening, I had no trouble with my accounts, my books
were settled for me. His only amusement was to take
out Violette sometimes for a walk in the country. You
will not marvel that he became very dear to us; and
when he asked us for our daughter in marriage, we were
glad, for we thought we should live with our children
and children’s children, and go down to the grave in
peace with their love and blessing.”

“Then are these tears of joy and happiness?” asked
Eugene, kissing his sister’s cheek: but her head drop-
ped on his shoulder, and she looked pale and faint.

“No, my son; you must hear the rest ;” said the
old man. “ Henry’s name was enrolled in the con-
scription list, for men wanted for the army of Africa,—
the army you have left. Only yesterday, he drew a bad
number,—Henry is a conscript,—he must leave us for
Africa.”

A silence followed.

« But a substitute,” cried Eugéne,—“ he can buy
one,—I have money, if you have not.”

“A substitute for Africa cannot be got,” said his
father; “ the time, too, is short; Henry must go.”

« But I will return, father Dupré,” cried the young
man, Henry: “ we must hope and trust :—courage, dear
Violette,” he added, but his voice was broken, and his
eyes dim with tears.

Eugéne sat silent, his eyes bent down, and a look of
painful thought upon his brow. ‘“ Mother, I am very
THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. 15

weary,” he said at last, “I wish to repose.” He kissed
his sister’s youthful brow, and whispering the word
“Hope,” was conducted by his mother to the chamber
that had been his in boyhood. ‘There, as soon.as he was
alone, the returned soldier fell on his knees, and prayed
long to God,—he wanted help and courage,—wanted
them more than in the hour of battle. He wanted
to form a resolution which he believed to be virtuous
and right, but which most strangely and unexpectedly
crossed all his expectations, all his hopes and plans.

He rose strengthened. in it, for those who seek shall
find ; and Kugéne Dupré had sought for grace and power
to conquer the natural selfishness of the human. heart,
and to follow the. example which Christ left us, when
he loved us and gave himself for us.

But during that wakeful night,—for not even bodily
fatigue could prevent it from being wakeful,—some
painful thoughts would dart across the mind of the
released soldier.

“ Ah!” he would say to himself, as he impatiently
tossed on his pillow, “ I was so happy ; I believed myself
so free; I was thankful to Providence for leading me
back in peace to my home, my family, my friends; why
am I then thus tried, why so sorely disappointed ? Why
is the cup of mortal happiness just.presented to us, and
dashed away almost before we can taste it?”

- Eugene could not answer these questions then; but
he remembered some words spoken by Christ to his
apostle Peter; “ What I do thou knowest not now,
but thou shalt know hereafter ;” and saying to himself,
“ Perhaps even I, insignificant as I may well judge my
concerns to be in the view of the Almighty, even I may
16 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

one day know the meaning of all this, and find it has
been for my good. At all events, as a soldier, when I
knew my duty I was bound to do it; as a Christian,
I can do no less.”

Tired as he was, Eugéne rose soon after the sun, and
went out. He walked through the village, and turned
towards a neat and comfortable looking house, with a
vineyard and garden around it, standing on the slope
of a hill, just beyond its outskirts. He looked at it,
but did not go there, as he had told Violette the night
before he would do. That house belonged to Annette’s
father; Eugéne would not now go to see her, “ there
would be no use, but perhaps mutual pain in doing so,”
he said to himself, as he passed it. “I want to be
strengthened, not made weaker.”

So he went on a little further, until he came to a
humble dwelling, occupied by the good old pastor, who
had been his teacher and guide in childhood, whose
lessons of piety had preserved him, by God’s blessing,
from many of the temptations of the ungodly, from
many of the sins to which his life had peculiarly
exposed him.

He met the old pastor up, and, early as it was,
walking abroad, after the custom of France, with a
book in his hand. The conversation which passed
between the pastor and the soldier might be inte-
resting, but as we shall find its results in the scene
which followed, we shall pass over the recital of
their discourse. On his return from the pastor’s
- house, Eugéne called on the authorities of thé town,
or village, and having made all his arrangements
without announcing his intentions to his family,
THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. 1%

he went back to meet them at their simple morning
meal.

The mother was preparing the breakfast; Violette,
pale as death, but having taken a strong resolution to
be ealm in her newly arrived brother’s presence, was
endeavouring to assist her, but in reality did what her
more active mother had toundo. Henry was arranging
some bills for Father Dupré, as the old man was called ;
and Father Dupré himself was sitting in his large
chair, doing nothing, but looking as if he thought a
great deal. Into such an assembled party came the
returned soldier; his knapsack, which he had carried
the day before, once more packed up, and his cloak
strapped on it. He flung it on a chair as he entered,
laid his stout stick beside it, and having pulled off his
cap, and saluted the whole family round, beginning with
the mother, he inquired, in a manner too evidently
careless to be quite natural, if breakfast would be ready
ere the sun were much higher.

“Tt is ready, my son,” said the mother.

“One would think, brother, you were going on the
high road again to-day,”’ said Violette.

“And they would think rightly, my sister,” said
Hugene, seizing, as if in haste, on some of the pro-
visions of the table, but only to divert or conceal a
rising agitation. '

“Tow—why? the first day of your return? where
are you going ?” said both father and mother.

“Yes, tell us where you are going,” said Violette,
trying to smile, “you said you would go to see Annette
to-day; it is not so far, you will not require your
knapsack or walking stick.”

c

-
18 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

“Tam not going to see Annette, my little sister, I
do not intend to go to see her. If you see her, tell her
I think the same of her as ever—that is all.”

“Where then are you going ? is it a secret ?”

“No; I go to Marseilles first, then to Africa—to
Algeria, where I came from.”

No voice echoed his words; they seemed to have
struck the whole party dumb and motionless. With
lips apart, yet moveless, and eyes fixed in wonder and
almost in fear upon the speaker, sat father, mother,
sister, and the young conscript Henry. Eugene
coughed to clear his own voice, and after a moment’s
effort, spoke calm and firmly.

“Yes, my dear parents,” he said, “all the arrange-
ments are made; you must not be left without Henry ;
he is more useful to you than I ever was, or now ever
could be, for I know nothing of your business. Yes,
Violette, you must not be deprived of your betrothed
husband; his is not a constitution to stand the fatigues
or the climate of Africa. Yes, Henry, you shall not lose
the reward dueto your love and attentions toour parents.
Tam your substitute, only too happy that I arrived in
timeto make myself such, and to saveus all such sorrow.”

Still for a moment there was no voice to reply, but
the silence was broken by a cry from Violette. Springing
from her seat, she threw her arms around her brother,
and held him convulsively embraced, as if such a restraint
must be sufficient to retain him amongst them. Henry
then came forward.

“This is well, Eugéne, on your part,” he said, “but
if you think me capable of accepting such a sacrifice,
you are mistaken.”
THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS, 19

“Forbear, young man, to prevent it,” said a mild,
yet solemn voice from the door: they turned and saw
the old pastor. “Young man,” he repeated, “beware
how you tempt the goodness of a gracious Providence,
who in so singular a manner appears to have interposed
to save you, perhaps, from death, this young girl from
a life of piming sorrow, your aged father and mother
from years of anxiety, toil and grief. Would you
have them left to mourn over the blighted life of their
only daughter, daily to witness her fears, and to have
their latter days harassed by cares which they hoped
now would devolve upon you?”

Henry bent his head before the pastor; the eyes
which had sparkled with a pride that refused to accept
so noble a sacrifice on his account, now filled with
tears, as he felt the truth of what was said.

“These considerations,” the pastor continued, “ in-
fluence Eugéne ; his constitution is prepared, his duty
is known, and a return to it will be both less irksome
and less dangerous. He feels that his departure from
the army left a vacancy, and that he might thus
look upon it as the means of your being a conscript.
He would suffer if he were to witness the sufferings of
those he loved. These are considerations to induce
you all to submit to lose again him who so lately was
found; but if they are not sufliclent—still I say, beware
—beware how you interfere to stop the performance
of a good and noble purpose. My friends, your son and
your brother is a Christian; Christ is his great com-
mander; he would follow where Christ has led; the
Saviour loved us and gave himself for us, He was our
substitute, our. sacrifice. In an inferior manner let his
20 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

servant follow our Divine Leader ; God will bless this
brother’s sacrifice—”

‘And you too will bless me, my parents,” cried the
soldier, sinking on his knees before his father and
mother. ‘Let me take your blessing with me, for I
must be gone—by making speed I can regain my place
in my old regiment, where my loss was regretted ; my
former rank will I doubt not be restored to me.”

But the parents could not speak ; they threw them-
selves sobbing on his neck. At that moment an excla-
mation of terror from Henry drew all their attention to
poor Violette, who had fallen from her chair in a faint.

“This is well,” said the pastor, in a low voice to
Eugene, “let Henry carry her to another room, and
leave the domestic and him to attend her. She will
soon recover.”

“ And I meantime may depart,” said Hugtne ; but a
pang shot to his heart, even as he saw his wished-for
departure expedited. “Give me then thy blessing,
sir,’ he added. “Let my father’s, my mother’s, my
sister’s, and her husband’s, follow me where Igo. Give
me thy blessing, and pray that the blessing of God may
go with me.”

The old Pastor blessed the young soldier in the name
of God.

‘And thou shalt be blessed, my son,” he added:
“whatever be the temptations, trials, perils that beset
thee, the grace and blessing of God will be a shield for
thee; he can cover thy head in the day of battle.
Jacob served seven years for a wife, and they seemed
but as a few days from the love he bore her: thou
wilt serve a few years for a sister, a father, a mother.
THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. 2]

I know thy sacrifice is great, but should it ever appear
painful, think of the sacrifice that was made for thee
when the Son of God left the glory he had with the
Father, and suffered banishment, toil, pain, and death in
our miserable world, for us men and for our salvation.’”’
Then the Pastor saying, “Let us pray,” the parents and
son knelt, and peace came to their hearts. They rose,
and tottered with outstretched arms to their noble son;
they pressed him to their hearts; they wet his head
with their tears; and while they lifted up their voice
and wept, they found words to bid him go and do as
his brave and unselfish heart dictated. Soothed by
their consent, the soldier departed as he had come,
from his home and native place.

When Henry heard he had gone, he muttered, almost
angrily, “No matter, I shall get to Africa almost as
soon as he.” '

Tt was at first his resolution to start off, and super-
sede the necessity of his brother’s sacrifice. But this
resolution soon became less firm, and gradually melted
away, when he found himself called upon to comfort
Violette, and assist her father.

Well, years passed away: long years— perhaps
longer in the judgment of Eugéne Dupré than in that
of either Henry or Violette. Time, however we may
seem to reckon it, moves, notwithstanding, in the same
equal pace, in joy or in sorrow, in pleasure or pain. It
passed on, and more than the term of service passed.
away. One summer, in the south of France, was ex.
cessively hot ; ‘even the vines and olives that cover the
22 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

fields, much as they love the sun, looked as if they had
had too much of its beams.

Most people preferred travelling at night, and indeed
it was at night, and very early in the morning, that
people most went abroad. On one of this summer’s
bright mornings a traveller entered the village, where
the family of Dupré resided, at a very early hour; it
was not yet five o’clock, but the Place—as the planted
piece of ground, allotted for the recreation of the inha-
bitants of French towns, is usually called—was already
occupied by early risers, enjoying the cool of the
morning by walking, or sitting on the seats beneath
the shade.

A young happy mother occupied a large chair on
this Place; a child, of about a year old, was creeping
round her knees, with one hand leaning on them, the
other ‘stretched to a little urchin of about double its
age, who was tempting the little sister to trust her
tottering steps, and run to catch the delicious bunch of
grapes he held provokingly to her and withdrew again.

The traveller had dismounted from his tired horse,
and led by the bridle a fine animal, which would have
been coal black, except for streaks of foam plenti-
fully scattered over its shining coat. Pitying its heat
and fatigue, ‘the traveller stopped to loosen the saddle
girth, and the animal suddenly shaking itself, scattered
a shower of foam over a fine boy of perhaps five years
old, who stood admiring and wondering beside it.

‘Come here, Eugéne, come here directly, my son,”
cried the young woman, who sat with the two younger
children. The traveller, who wore the military undress
of an officer, turned, and throwing loose the bridle of
THE. FRENCH CONSCRIPTS. 93

his horse, which was too well trained to stir, caught up
the little boy, and kissed him warmly, then running to
the young mother, cried aloud, “ Violette, Violette, my
sister—is it not?”

The voice was the voice of Eugéne Dupré; but the
face, the figure—ah! both were changed: the one was
sallow and sharp, the other was wasted. Violette at
first doubted; doubt soon gave way; but joy, grief, and
gratitude strangely mingled, as she clung to her restored
brother, weeping and laughing, pressing her little chil-
dren into his arms, and calling him to look at Eugéne,
his namesake, whom she flattered herself would be like
him ; her firstborn, whom she called after the brother
who had sacrificed his own happiness to her’s.

“Not sacrificed, I trust, my sister—only delayed,”
said Hugéne, as holding his little nephew’s hand in-one
of his, and leading his horse with the other, he walked
with Violette and her children to his father’s house :
the boy touching his sword, gazing into his face,
admiring his horse, and wondering if this tall, grave-
looking officer were the uncle whom his grandfather
and grandmother, and his own parents, had always told
him he must try to be like, because he was so good,
and loved the good of others.

And now Eugéne Dupré was at home again; the
soldier had become an officer, for such an event is not
uncommon in the French army; and in his home he
found that all was peace, and comfort, and happiness :
there he had been the means of promoting these bless-
ings, and there he now returned to enjoy them. And
who can tell what joy and wonder, love and exultation,
filled the humble abode of father and mother Dupré,
24 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

when it was inhabited by their always loved, and now
honoured son. But before the mother had done ad-
miring, and pitying, and caressing him, Violette drew
near, and whispered,

“ Dear brother, in your last unhappy visit——”

Oh! do not call it unhappy, sister; say, rather, my
last blessed visit: look at your children, your husband,
our dear parents——”

“ God, indeed, has blessed a brother’s sacrifice!”
said Violette, as her tearful eyes wandered round the
group he named.

“But, brother, I only wanted to tell you that in your
last—yes, I will call it, blessed visit,—you left me a
message for Annette—poor, dear Annette! TI gave it
to her, and Annctte is not changed.”

* And I am not changed,” said Eugtne smiling.

Scarcely more than an hour afterwards, Eugine Dupré
stood leaning his arms on a small wooden gate, which
opened into a sort of yard at the side of that farm-house
in the vineyard, on the slope of the hill, just outside his
native village. A neat and modest-looking woman came
out, with a flat basket in her hand, containing food for
a variety of fowls which were kept there. They flew
fluttering about her. She was not young—thirty years
is considered a good age in France—and she was not
remarkably pretty, but her countenance was very sweet,
and gave the beholder an idea of one that might he
trusted in.

She was surprised to see an officer leaning against
her father’s gate; but, perceiving that he looked ill,
she supposed he was fatigued with walking up the hill,
and, advancing to the gate, politely asked him to walk
THE FRENCH. CONSCRIPTS. 25

in and rest. Eugene perceived that he was not known;
he almost feared that he himself was forgotten, although
he knew well his person was greatly changed. He
wished to know this.

“There was a soldier in my regiment,’ te said,
‘who knew you, Mademoiselle.”

“ Ah! was it Hugtne Dupré?” said Annette.

“ You have not forgotten him, then, Mademoiselle,”
said Hugéne, rather slyly, “he has not forgotten you.”

“T have never heard from him,” said Annette, pong
surprised.

“ Because he promised your “father never to write to
you while he was a soldier ;—but he promised you, too,
never to forget you. He has kept both promises for
many long years :——dear Annette, do you not know
me? Eugéne Dupré is a soldier no longer.”

And Eugéne was happy, and Annette was happy.;
the whole family of Dupré were happy; and, last of
all, the good old pastor was happy,

The brother’s sacrifice was ended; the old man felt
that his prayers had been heard, and the blessing he
asked for had been given. He was soon called to assist
at a happier scene than that of Hugéne’s departure for
Africa: he married him to Annette, and saw them
established, with her father’s full approbation, in the
pleasant farm-house which he thenceforth resigned to
them.

Eugéne’s father and mother, brother and sister, re-
joiced in the joy of him who had sacrificed his happiness
to theirs. Little Hugéne loved to sit at his uncle’s side,
26 THE FRENCH CONSCRIPTS.

and listen to tales about wild Arabs, and tried to re-
member that his mother constantly told him, it was
far better to try to imitate his uncle’s virtues, than to
wish to share his adventures.

Was there ever a selfish heart made so happy as that
of Eugéne Dupré? No, a purely selfish heart is a
miserable, a barren, a forlorn one. Selfishness is the
characteristic of our nature—a fallen nature. Christ
came to raise and restore that nature: his character
was the only entirely unselfish one ever seen or known
in this world :—He became poor, that we might become
rich—He died, that we might live.

It is wrong to believe that any human virtues, any
self-denying actions, can entitle us to the favour of
God, for that favour is procured to us through his well-
beloved Son alone; but it would be wrong, also, to
think that these are not acceptable in his sight; and
that his blessing is not sure to come upon those who
set Christ Jesus the Lord alway before them, and
endeavour to follow in the steps of his most godly
life. 8. B.

WILD FLOWERS.

“ Beautiful things ye are, where’er ye grow,
The wild red-rose, the speedwell’s peeping eyes,
Our own blue-bell, the daisy, that doth rise
Wherever sunbeams fall or winds do blow,
And thousands more of blessed forms and dyes.
T love you all.”

Win flowers, how much do we owe them! Scattered
by millions on our pathway, they are little heeded
by some who tread them down without one look at
their beauty, without one thought of the skill by which
they are fashioned. And yet to many hearts what a
tale of blessing do they bring! The busy man is
toiling onwards; the curse pronounced in Eden when
man fell, that by labour he should eat bread, falls
heavily upon him. His heart is full of cares, not for
to-day only, but for to-morrow; but some little wild
flower catches his eye, and he remembers that, like the
lily of the field, he should walk hopefully and trustingly
on the ways of life. The wanderer travels on alone
and cheerless, but a wild moss is springing at his foot,
and he feels that God is everywhere. The stranger in
some strange land sees a daisy, and home and its sweet
28 WILD FLOWERS.

remembrances come vividly before him, and the voices
of those who loved him in childhood, and who love
him still, seem there to cheer him. And the sick man,
as he looks out upon the green blades of the spring
cornfield, likens it, with the apostle, to that glorious
body which shall arise from the seed about to be sown
in God’s garden, when he too must lay him down to die.
Thoughts of sweet scenes and sweeter voices; of
childhood, and its innocent delights; of the sounds of
trees, and the rippling of waters, and the rustling
corn; of the noonday sun and the evening twilight,
are often brought before us by the sight of a wild
flower.

Truly God gave us a source of great enjoyment
when he made them so plentiful, when he gave them to
man as common things. If we wander by the stream,
listening to its soft music, there we find them clustering
on its surface, or crowding among the verdant sedges and
grassy banks through which it flows. And white crow-
foots lie in patches, and rich blue forget-me-nots peep
up from the waters, and the tall yellow iris waves like
a banner, and brooklimes, and water-violets, and water-
cresses, show their blue, and lilac, and snowy blossoms.
On the banks the yellow flowers of the silver-weed
glisten among the grey green leaves, and the sweet
odour of the queen-of-the-meadows is wafted far away
over the land, like a sweet strain of melody; and, as
we linger, looking on the beauties of the crystal
streamlet, we see that we are not the only beings who
delight in its flowers, though to man alone has God given
the intellect and the imagination fully to enjoy them.
Yet among these pond-weeds and duck-weeds which lie
WILD FLOWERS. 29

on the stream, and among the crowding leaves of those
alders and willows which throw their shadow over it,
are countless living creatures, revelling in activity and
joy; and little shell-fish lie hid there, and birds and
winged insects stoop there for their meal; and the stately
swan or moorfowl glide calmly among the plants to
satiate their longings.

We turn away from the stream to look on the green
meadow, only to see the abundance of Nature. Grasses
of many kinds, each well marked to the botanist by its
form of leaf, and stem, and flower, so constant in the
most minute particulars as never to mislead him, are
erowded there? Who shall count the number of those
blades of grass which form the green carpet? which
are not alone delightful to our tread, and soothing to
our sight in all their variations of sun and shadow,
but on which the flocks and herds find herbage and
resting-places. They are bright and beautiful, in mass
as well as in detail, as, speckled in spring by their
millions of daisies, and buttercups, and speedwells, and,
in the later year, by the golden hawkweeds, they lie
stretched out before us; while not one of all those
erasses or flowers, beautiful as it seems to us there,
has not also an unseen beauty,—a beauty which it
needs the most powerful microscope to reveal to us.
We gather it and examine it minutely, and we may
perhaps see its delicate ‘petals, as well as its green
leaves, fringed and studded with minute hairs, which
serve to keep them warm and to collect the dews from
the atmosphere; and little glands which we saw not
before, disclose where its scent lies hid; and the won-
drous contrivances of its pistils and stamens show
30 WILD FLOWERS.

how its seed is perfected; and the very seed-vessel
which holds those seeds is, in its form, fitness, and
arrangement for the dispersion of its contents, in
itself a history,—a history of power and exquisite skill,
compared to which man’s ablest invention seems poor
indeed. And when the heat of the sun bids us seek
the woodland shadow, we find there the flowers fitted
forthe shade, and which would grow there only. That
sunny meadow would not have suited the sweet lily of
the valley, which, enwrapped in its broad green leaves,
hides beneath the bough of the tree, any more than the
crowds of buttercups could have flourished without the
full rays of the sun, and amidst the frequent drippings
and moisture of the trees.

The cornfield, so rich with its bending grain, has, too,
its own wreath of blossoms. The scarlet poppies tower
amidst it, and rich purple thistles, and bright blue suc-
cory, and pale lilac scabious, and deeper-coloured corn-
cockle, and azure blue cornflowers, and many a blossom
of the cultured field are there, to delight the lover of
wild flowers, though they please not the cultivator.
Even the sandy plain has the sandwort and spurry-
flower, and rich gorses and brooms lend their golden
beauty to the heath, with blossoms that seem like
butterflies ready for a flight; while a sweet perfume
rises from the heather-bells which are swinging in
multitudes among their dark and delicate foliage, now
in richest tints of purple, now arrayed in fainter rose
colour. The tall and bushy ling, elegant both in flowers
and leaves, serves, too, to shelter from the burning sun
the little yellow tormentils and the graceful bluebells,
which, on light stem, are bending beneath its shadow ;
WILD FLOWERS. 81

while the bee is telling amidst them all a tale of
summer airs and blue heavens :

“ He speaks to the ear, and they to the eye.”

The very. cliff by the sea has its own blossoms, and
pale sea-lavender, and pink thrift can find a home
among its crevices; and the samphire, smiling’ far above
the reach of the wave, looks down on the yellow poppy
which gladdens the sand or shingle. Even the salt
marshes have their flowers, from the tall lilac starwort
and pale green southernwood, down to the lowly sea-
side pearlwort. The bog on which our foot can scarcely
tread has a whole store of wealth for the botanist ; and
amid the large mosses, whose decay shall, in the course
of centuries, form a firmer soil, the richly fringed bog
bean, and the glittering sun-dew, and the yellow
asphodel, and the orchis, and the large pimpernel, and
the spearwort, and many another flower rises up before
his view. -The old castle frowns down from the height,
but the snapdragon, and the ivy, and the gay wall-
flowers, have found a way to reach to its very summit :
and the mountain peak glitters with snow, and yet, near
to the eternal ice and frost, the blue gentian and the
saxifrage lift their heads in fearless beauty; while all
the way downwards on those heights wave pinks, and
stonecrops, and other flowers, until we reach the green
and luxuriant valley beneath. Nota spot is there on
earth on which the plant can take root, but there God has
sown it in beauty, as if to bid us learn everywhere, in
all places, and in all times, a lesson of “the flower of
the field.” - A. P.
BEAUTIES OF THE FIELD.

Ye Field Flowers! the gardens eclipse you, ’tis true,
Yet, wildlings of Nature, I doat upon you,
For ye waft me to summers of old,
When the earth teem’d around me with fairy delight,
And when daisies and buttercups gladden’d my sight,
Like treasures of silver and gold.

I love you for lulling me back into dreams

Of the blue Highland mountains and echoing streams,
And of broken glades breathing their balm ;

While the deer was scen glancing in sunshine remote,

And the deep mellow crush of the wood-pigeon’s note,
Made music that sweeten’d the calm.

Not a pastoral song has a pleasanter tune

Than ye speak to my heart, little wildlings of June ;
Of old ruinous castles ye tell ;

Where I thought it delightful your beauties to find,

When the magic of Nature first breathed on my mind,
And your blossoms were part of her spell.

Ev’n now what affections the violet awakes !

What loved little islands, twice seen in their lakes,
Can the wild water-lily restore !

What landscapes I read in the primrose’s looks,

And what pictures of pebbled and minnowy brooks
In the vetches that tangled their shore!
BEAUTIES OF THE FIELD. 33

Earth’s cultureless buds, to my heart ye were dear,
Ere the fever of passion, or ague of fear,
Had scathed my existence’s bloom ;
Once I welcome you more, in life’s passionless stage,
With the visions of youth to revisit my age,
And I wish you to grow near my tomb.
CAMPBELL,
THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN.

It is hardly necessary to advert to the manner in
which the circumstances connected with this incident
have been recorded by the pen of inspiration. He
who wrote a narrative so brief and expressive, emphatic
in its conciseness, and most touching in its simplicity,
must himself have been deeply affected; nor could he
have been the man to impose on credulity. No
fictitious scene is here-—We know that the young are
not too young to die; that the nearest relations are
not too close to be sundered; that the happiest heart is
not secure against the pangs of sorrow. We have
heard the lamentations of the widowed heart; we have
sat down and wept by the side of the mother as she
mourned in bitterness of soul over the corpse of her
child; we have seen death making its resistless way
into the mansion of health and peace—sparing not
even the only son—until that once so happy wife and
doating mother was left alone to tell the tale of woe.
What an idea of sorrow is compressed in these few
words ; “ There was a dead man carried out, the only
son of his mother, and she was a widow!” Tt is all told
as it happened: the gate of every city has furnished
many a parallel to the funeral at the gate of Nain.
THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN. 35

The door of the sepulchre has not yet closed. over the
human family—ere long we may be carried out and
borne to the house appointed for all the living. Hence
the interest we necessarily take in a narrative attested
by every day’s observation of human life; embodying
no indistinct idea of the toils and trials and issues
of our common humanity; recalling to many a grief-
stricken heart the facts in its own bitter experience,
and teaching lessons of urgent moment to every dweller
in this vale of tears.

Whatever diversity there may be in outward circum:
stances, as the social affections of our nature open an
equal source of pleasure to all, we may suppose that
this woman, to whom our subject in part refers, had -
vested her happiness in the domestic relation. But
when her dream of conjugal bliss had vanished, so far
from. realizing that she herself had become a living
witness of the instability of all earthly happiness, her
heart turned with a warmer grasp to her only son.
With what intense affection does she scan those
features, which image to her mind, as in a mirror, the
face now shrouded from her view! How do his ex-
panding faculties and budding promise elate her heart!
He is to cheer the gloom of her loneliness—to support
the feebleness of her declining steps; and when she
herself shall be laid upon a dying bed, he will be by
her side to perform each little act of filial kindness,
and to attend to her last request; to see her body
consigned to the selected spot, and to water her grave
with his tears. Such was the dreaming language of
the widow’s heart. Though we may see the approach
of death toward others, we have little apprehension
86 THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN.

of its invading our own circle. The more we love,
the less can we admit the thought of being severed
from the objects of our affection. The child, for
example, is so entwined in the mother’s heart—so
blended with all she either proudly hopes for or fondly
anticipates—that she cannot realize its mortality. Even
when the breath has parted from its lips, she cannot
feel that the clay-cold form she presses to her bosom
no more contains the living spirit of her child. Long
is it before we come to realize the sad breach which
has been made in the circle of our affections ; and then,
awaking as for the first time to the perishable nature
of all our earthly comforts, we feel that at any moment
another object of affection may be cut down—that the
morrow may again summon us to entomb the cherished
hopes and joys of years—that we may yet be found at
the very hearth where now so many endearments
cluster, solitary and forlorn. Thus is it also in our
relation to riches and honours: though we may have
been often told that honour is a bubble, and that riches
take to themselves wings, yet in the time of our pro-
sperity we virtually say, “I shall not be moved.” But
how slight the circumstance which may strip us of our
riches, and leave us shorn of our honours! Oh, the
vanity of the world and the creature! How many
monitions have we that these are fading honours—
perishing riches—dying comforts! Even the more
secure we may feel in our possessions, the greater our
danger—the more we love, the stronger, I had almost
said, the probability of our speedy bereavement. God
does not take from us what we can most readily spare.
He knows that often no means short of a blecding
THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN. 37

heart can wean us from a soul-destroying world.
Hence, the source of our securest income sometimes
fails; the greenest wreath oftimes withers; the most
beloved, the only son may be taken away. Such is the
lot of mortals; our deepest afflictions are nurtured in
the bosom of our warmest affections. We love, as it
were, only to grieve—joy but to sorrow—hope but to
despair. Shall we impeach the goodness of our
Maker? The fault is not in God, but in ourselves: we
enshrine an idol in the heart where God alone should
reign; we seek for perfect happiness where it is not
to be found. The troubles in which our earthborn
affections involve us—the sorrows in which our earthily-
joys terminate—the graves that open for our loves
almost as soon as they ravish our hearts, all are ordered
in mercy, to teach us that no gift. may exclude the
homage due to the Giver; to remind us, as we are so
apt to lose sight of our deathless interest, that the
creature is not owr God—the world not our final
home.

If we are ever disposed to mourn over out siiis, it
is when we see in our lost comforts, in our buried
loves, the evidence of a sin-offended God. If ever
disposed to give our hearts to God, it is when he has
cut the cords which bind us to earth; when the voice-
less lips of him with whom we were linked in bonds
of love, are speaking to us as it were from the other
world, bidding us to prepare for death and eternity.
How does God illustrate the riches of his grace; what
glory does he gather to his own name, when though
stripped of our creature comforts we feel that our
essential interest is undisturbed; though the rod has
38 THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN.

bruised us, we are enabled to bless the chastening
hand of our Heavenly Father !
«Tis over now—and oh; I bless thee, Lord,
For making me thus desolate below ;
For severing, one by one, the ties that bind me
To this cold world; for whither can earth’s outcast
Flee—but to heaven ?”

It is the Christian’s prerogative to triumph over
losses which desolate the worldly heart ; to rejoice in
hope amidst the darkest ills of life. Herein may be
seen the beneficent adaptation of Christianity to the
wants of our nature. No religion, for a being so
constituted and conditioned as man, were worth a
moment’s thought, which does not come to him with
such bright discoveries of God and immortality, and
convey to him such precious promises.

Return we now to the “ gate of the city.” Affecting
scene! He who bade so fair to live, is now stretched
upon that bier, a wan corpse, borne along by strong
men to its bed of dust. And there follows the widowed
mother, slowly, sadly; her heart still yearning in its
bitter agony over the remains of her only son. Ah,
what grief is hers; such as no other earthly ill could
have caused! She would have toiled through sleepless
nights, or groaned in bondage, or gone down herself
to the cold grave, to save her boy. And now, in less
than one brief hour she may not even look upon that
face so beautiful in its quiet sleep ; the damp, dark sod
will press upon it, and she must go back to a lone
hearth. What is life now to thee, poor, broken-hearted
woman ? Who can share thy sorrows, or will heed thy
woe? See how many pass by without one sigh of pity,
THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN. 39

so bent are they on their cold, selfish ends. The
rich and the powerful may not deign to notice the
lowly procession, much less pause to sympathize: so
little do they reflect in their prosperity what life in its
shanges may bring about for them. But there, where
the dead man was carried out, is One who could not
have turned away in cold indifference. It is Jusus,
the Friend of suffering humanity; he might have been
a stranger to her, but she is no stranger to him. Oh
what love was blended with authority when he came
and touched the bier! What tenderness beamed from
his face as he said unto the afflicted mother, “ Weep
not!” Jf no other instance of the kind had been
recorded of our Lord, this alone would serve to prove
that his was a tender, feeling heart—a well-spring of
sympathy and love. Most remarkable is it, while
serving to reveal to us in an attractive light the depth
and tenderness of his sensibilities, that the power by
which he could raise the dead was never exercised save
in behalf of an only brother, an only daughter, and an
only son. It was not that he lamented the dead; he
felt for the living. He could not see misery without
atear. He could not pass by suffering without tendering
relief : such was the heart of Jesus. No wonder that
our misery touched his heart, and brought him down
from heaven to earth, and rendered him willing to
suffer the humiliating death of the cross, that man
might be saved from the bitter pains of death eternal.
There can be no scriptural ground for either error or
doubt as to the beneficent object of his mission: This
is he who, before taking on himself our nature, gave
that gracious charge to his evangelic prophet, “ Comfort,
40 THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN,

ye, comfort ye my people ;” who affirmed as he entered
on his self-denying ministry of love, “The Spirit of
the Lord God is upon me; because the Lord hath
anointed me to preach the gospel to the poor ;” whose
last command to his disciples was, that they should
proclaim the glad tidings of great joy to every creature;
who has himself gone to prepare a place for us, and
who will come again “and receive us to himself, that
where he is there we may be also.”

In a world like this, where trouble and trial inevitably
await us at some stage of our pilgrimage, and sin
mingles its sad ingredients in every cup of earthly joy,
what do we need so much, yet so seldom find, as
sympathy and succour? “ The heart knoweth its own
bitterness :” it may be the cold grasp of want, or the
sharp anguish of calumny—the pangs of neglected
love, or of bereaved affection—the struggles with some
besetting sin, or the forebodings of unrepented guilt.
But why turn to man, who, by your tale of sorrow,
may be only awakened to a sense of his own deeper
woes? We call it sympathy when the ear kindly listens,
and the eye moistens into tears; and so it is. In the
hour of trial, any one is welcome who brings not with
him the heartless laugh or frigid apathy of the selfish
worldling ; but what can sympathy avail, except to tell
us that some other, from his own sad trials or boding
cares, knows how to feel for us?—powerless is it to
console, though it may afford a momentary relief to
the aching heart. What, then, do we not owe to God
for such a Friend as Christ ?—one who “bore our grief,
and carried our sorrows.” Go tell Aim of your griefs,
for he was the Man of sorrows; go lean your aching
THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN.” 4t

head on his bosom, for it is full of compassion. Oh
that you could be induced to take him at his word!
Weary ‘and heavy laden, I know that he would give
thee rest. Poor stricken one! I know that he pities
thee, and waits to bind up thy wounds. So great is
his compassion, not only would he heal the broken.
‘heart, but cleanse the polluted soul; not only console
the mourner, but save the sinner.

“ Weep not /”’—those words, uttered in the accents
of Divime benevolence, methinks must have made their
way to the heart of that sad, solitary woman, and
stayed her tears. But, wonderful to relate! he who
thus spake to the mother, said to the corpse of her
son, “ Young man, I say unto thee, arrse!”—*“ And
he that was dead sat up, and began to speak, and he
delivered him to his mother.”

We can image to our eye scenes more captivating
to the fancy, or recal historic scenes of more thrilling
interest to the earth-bound vision ; but none surpassing
this in its influence over the mind, which, while sympa-
thizing with the woes of humanity, pants after deliver-
ance from the power of death. Even the resurrection
scene at the mouth of the cave, though bespeaking the
same Divine energy, and revealing the tenderness of
the same sympathizing heart, is wanting in one element
of pathetic interest: she who bare him is not there
when Lazarus comes forth, to disclose the depths of
a mother’s joyous love. But here—and yet we may
not attempt to describe what can only be realized in an
interval of serious, susceptible thought—a mother, but
a moment since weeping over the bier of her only son,
now clasping to her bosom that son brought back to
42 THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN.

life—the multitude filled with awe and wonder; and
there in the midst of them, Hz who had wrought this
miracle, oblivious of self, in his calm enjoyment of
others’ happiness. Tell us, sceptics! is not a greater
than Socrates here? or if you cannot withhold a
tribute to his wonder-working beneficence, will you
dare to class him with the prophets of old? Alas!
that sunlight evidence, such as never irradiated the
person of a mere prophet, can be rejected through
man’s proud reluctance to bow to Him whose right
alone it is to reign. What prophet ever exercised
independent power ? It is worthy of emphatic remark,
that in every recorded instance of restoration to life
through human agency, the prophet or the apostle
recognised his dependence, and invoked Almighty aid.
Thus Elijah “cried unto the Lord,” before the dead
man was raised through his agency. Elisha “ prayed
unto the Lord” that the Shunamite’s son might be
restored ; and, in like manner, as became a mortal,
Peter, before accosting Tabitha, “ kneeled down and
prayed.” But Christ, as became the Arbiter of quick
and dead, spoke in his own name; he relied on his own
power; he uttered but a word, and it was done.
« Arise,” said he; “ and he that was dead sat up, and
began to speak !”

To accredit the record, except so far as it embodies
the supernatural, were to do violence to all the rules of
historic criticism; and especially as it preserves the
same lucid brevity and serene simplicity in reporting
the most astounding with the most familiar occur-
rences ; but to admit its authenticity, and nevertheless
to deny the Divinity of the Mighty Actor in this
THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN. 43

miraculous scene, is an inconsistency too egregiously
palpable not to be intuitively detected, save by a mind
which prejudice has blinded, or error hopelessly per-
verted. Evidently no doctrine of Christianity is
at once so interesting and elevating as that which
reveals its founder in the twofold aspect of both God
andman. I love to contemplate him in the mysterious
constitution of his person—the blending of all that is
lowly with all that is dignified ; all that is sympathizing
with all that is commanding—tenderness without
weakness, authority without sternness, stainless virtue,
weeping benevolence, superhuman power—yes, God
manifest in the flesh. If I am attracted by his tones
of mingled softness and majesty, so am I awed by the
sublimity of his deeds of mercy. If there is some-
thing in those accents of love that wins my confidence,
there is more in that mighty voice of his which
commands my homage. I see in such a miracle not
less the power than the compassion of God; not less
the authority of a Sovereign Lawgiver, than the bene-
volence of a Divine Saviour. I cannot doubt that
he is not only willing, but able to give me the consola-
tions I need; not only willing, but able to forgive my
sins, to sanctify my heart, to save my soul, to rescue
my body from the power of death, and make it like
unto his own glorious body. Let me but know that
I have a place in his heart, and I cannot doubt his
infinite ability to relieve the wants and woes of my
poor fallen nature. He who in the exercise of his own
independent authority could cleanse the leper, open
the eyes of the blind, stop the raging of the sea, and
raise the dead, might without infrmgement on the
Ad THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN.

rights of Deity say, “Thy sins are forgiven thee ! ”—
without arrogance declare, “ Without me ye can do
nothing ! ’—without any feigned or impotent sympathy,
invite “ the weary and heavy-laden to come unto him
for rest ;”—without any mockery of the woes of our
nature, say unto us, “ Weep not?’ All power has been
given unto him. He is the Consolation of Israel—the
only Mediator between God and man—the Great
Deliverer from the power of death and hell.

But though we need relicf as well as sympathy, the
scepticism of the natural heart may be at times de-
tected even in its hour of trial. The bereaved think
only of their loss—their heart is in the grave; even
there, where others have been laid never more to
return—where the earth-worm preys on the remains of
their loved ones, and no miracle will now be wrought
to restore their dead to life. Be it so; but why dis-
turb that dust which sleeps so gently in the hope of
a glorious resurrection at the last day? or why call
back again to a life of sin and sorrow the already sancti-
fied spirit of your friend? THe who afflicted you cer-
tainly knows best what is most for your good. He
who fills heaven with his gracious presence can fill the
void in your heart. And what are a few more years
of communion with an earthly friend, compared with
preparation for a world of final reunion with the loved
and lost on earth? Other and higher ends had Christ
when he approached that bier, than merely to restore
a son to his mother, or to furnish another proof that
he was the Messiah sent of God: it was to proclaim
to a dying world that death is not the end of man;
that there is a life beyond the grave—another world,
THE FUNERAL AT THE GATE OF NAIN. - 45

far above the sins and sufferings of this, where all his
followers shall meet at last—parents restored to their
children, and children to their parents, who here fall
asleep in Jesus, there reunited in love and peace, never
more to part!

But, solemn, affecting thought, there may be an
end even to the compassion of. Jesus Christ! -The day
approaches when mercy will give place to vengeance—
compassion to “the wrath of the Lamb.” He who so
often said to the sons and the daughters of afflicted
humanity, “Weep not,” will then say, “Depart, ye
cursed!” Fearful truth !—there is power in Christ to
destroy as well as to save; there is to be an exhibition
of his power, transcendantly magnificent—infinitely
greater than any this earth has witnessed. At his
‘command, “ Time shall be no longer”—the dead, both
small and great, shall rise and stand before: God—
“the elements shall melt with fervent heat; and at
the word of this same Being, the righteous shall enter
into life eternal, and the wicked go away into everlast-
ing punishment. Alas! for those who will not accept
as their Saviour Him who will be their final Judge! I
know that men in their devotion to the world are prone
to ascribe all Christian solicitude in their behalf to
ascetic views; but He who sympathized with a poor
afflicted woman, could have had no heart to occasion
unnecessary alarm; much less could he have made
such tremendous announcements of coming wrath, un:
less he uttered the “true sayings of God.”—Even so:
every unbeliever is in danger of the judgment of the
last great day.

BR. W. DICKINSON.
A MIDNIGHT VISIT TO MOUNT VESUVIUS.

“Great and glorious are thy works, O Lord God
Almighty!” said the psalmist; and never have I been
more impressed with all the feeling which the excla-
_ mation indicates, than when I stood in the calm of the
midnight hour in the desolate and singular region of
Mount Vesuvius.

Familiar as we all are from childhood with descrip-
tions of that often visited volcano, my own view of
it far exceeded any ideas I had formed of it; for my
companions and myself did not see Vesuvius in that
quiescent state in which so many travellers have ascended
its cone, and even descended a portion of its crater. We
saw it in a remarkable and splendid state of activity.

When ‘first approaching Naples in the road from
Rome, we beheld a white column of smoke rising high
up into the pure and sunny atmosphere. “See,” said a
gentleman who accompanied us from Rome; “there is
Vesuvius.”

We regarded it with curiosity, but with a strong
sense of disappointment. It was curious, indeed, to
see the smoke when we knew it proceeded from internal
fire; but without that knowledge it would not have
presented any extraordinary spectacle.

The day had been intensely hot, and tired of so long
A MIDNIGHT VISIT TO MOUNT VESUVIUS. 47

a journey, we longed, on our arrival at Naples, for the
shades of evening to refresh us. They came, and I
went out upon a stone platform, on which opened the
window of my room at the top of the house, to enjoy
the freshening air and lovely view of the Bay, over
which the softened light of retiring day was yet lingering,
and blending gradually with the clearer one of the
rising moon. Then first I beheld the fire of Vesuvius ;
a dark red spot on the mountain side, issuing from an
orifice near to the crater, but not from the crater itself.
It was not a blaze, but a deep burning light, seen
through and behind the mists which followed the depar-
ture of the sun.

I went to call my friends to see it: some delay took
place in finding them, and when I came back to the
platform, an exclamation of wonder and delight broke
from us all. That dark red spot of light had, appa-
rently, spread out, or flowed on into a long wide
stream, to have descended the entire length of the
great cone, and reached the plain below. It was only
the increasing gloom that rendered it visible.

LT afterwards watched it many a time, as it appeared
gradually to unfold, lengthening, and widening, and
brightening as the strong sunlight faded, until I saw its
long, deep, fiery shadow rest over the clear blue waters
of the bay. Instead of a white column of smoke, we
then saw a pillar of fire rising up from the crater high
into the quiet air, through which shot up innumerable
sparkles, presenting a singular display of natural fire-
works, dispersing as by the force of an internal explosion,
and falling in a glowing shower on the outer sides of
the crater, which soon presented the aspect of a heap of
48 A MIDNIGHT VISIT

fire. From time to time large stones, red-hot, were
flung up from the burning and unquiet centre; we saw
them fall, roll down the sides of the crater, and lose
their brightness.

It was a source of pleasure and interest which I can
scarcely express, to sit on that pleasant platform, and
watch the workings of that ever-burning mountain; and
in the stillness of the warm moonlight nights Lhave lain
upon my bed, and gazed upon it from my window,
ever at work, yet ever varying, while the deep coppery
red of its shadow seemed almost to form a bridge of
fire across the unbroken water which lay between.

The beautiful aspect of Vesuvius by night, as well
as the intense heat of the weather, determined us to
choose that time for its ascent; indeed, we could have
attempted it at no other. That night was one which I
shall not forget, and I bless God who gave me the
capacity in my mind, as well as body, to enjoy it.

The form of Vesuvius is remarkable: it has two
summits, and rises in a gentle swell from the sea-shore.
The lower region or base of the mountain presents a
strong contrast to the upper. At five o’clock on a
charming afternoon we left Naples in a carriage, hoping
to traverse this lower region in time to see the sun set
from the more elevated one. We engaged the carriage
to carry us to the Hermitage, situated at that part of
the mountain from whence the real difficulty of the
ascent begins ; for it is an instance of the rare facilities
which our times afford to exploring travellers, that a
carriage-road, rather difficult, but perfectly practicable,
has been made upon Mount Vesuvius; a circumstance
which produces much indignation, and meets with great
TO MOUNT VESUVIUS. 49

opposition, from the numerous guides and conductors
whose business it was to supply mules and ponies for
that purpose.

The road has not been formed solely for the con-
venience of curious travellers; an observatory has
been erected on Mount Vesuvius, and a carriage road
on this account has been made up to the Hermitage,
which may be said to terminate the first of the two
distinct regions into which the mountain is divided.

This lower region, which we thus traversed, is one of
the most fertile, populous, and lovely that can be con-
‘ ceived; the higher is the most awful, stern, and
singular that is commonly to be seen. The first region,
both on the side of the coast and inland, is covered
with towns and villages, the sites of which have been
swept over by the destroying lava, and again built on by
their persevering inhabitants. Portici, the most consi-
derable of these, is about six miles from Naples, and
at the foot of Vesuvius. Underneath this town, and
below its royal palace, lies buried, at the depth of
seventy feet, the ancient city of Herculaneum, the first
town known to be destroyed by the eruptions of
Vesuvius.

We entered its buried, but partly re-opened theatre,
still underground, and in darkness. How strange and
interesting asight! Its passages, choked up with lava,
tell a fearful tale. The seats for the spectators are yet
to be seen, but awful is the recollection of the fate of
those who filled them. The stage, too, is visible, but
nearly two thousand years have passed since its actors
were swept away. Of the whole city little more than
this half-excavated theatre is re-opened. The safety of

E
50 A MIDNIGHT VISIT ©

the town above it would be endangered by further
excavations; and Herculaneum, which tradition says
was founded by the hero Hercules, remains entirely
covered by lava, cemented by a mixture of water,
and beneath the weight of the shower of ashes that
destroyed it. “It is choked up as completely as if
molten lead had been poured into it.”

Pompeii, which has been so beautifully brought to
light, was destroyed by cinders, with which so much
water did not mingle, and which, being less cemented,
were more easily removed. The town was discovered
only twelve feet below the surface of the ground.

In the smaller town of Torre del Greco, the lava which
in later eruptions nearly overwhelmed it is still to be
seen, but the love of the inhabitants for their homes, or
the inconvenience of a remove, causes them to rebuild
or repair the dwellings which the volcano destroys or
injures. The whole road from Naples is indeed almost
a continuous town.

Even when these towns are passed, the whole base of
.the mountain presents scenery of the richest and most
luxuriant, as well as cultivated nature. The productive
vines, orange-trees, figs, pomegranates, and numerous
plants and trees which are exotics to our clime, bor-
dered the road, and gave it additional interest, while
every advancing step opened to us a more charming
prospect, as the lovely plain from which we ascended,
the bay with its islands of historic and classic celebrity,
and the busy town of Naples with its villas and gar-
dens, became more revealed to us, bathed in the rich-
ness of a rapidly sinking sun.

What a contrast was this to the upper region of the
TO MOUNT VESUVIUS. 51

same mountain! A scene of perfect desolation: an
immense cone, flat on the top, and formed almost
entirely of ashes and cinders, which in the ascent yield
to the foot that toils up it, traced on all sides by broad
black lines, the marks which the burning lava has left,
and which can be distinctly seen at a considerable
distance. There is here no vegetation, no trace of life :
nothing but the ceaseless volcano appears to be in
movement.

Vesuvius has not always been ascended by travellers
when in the excited state in which we visited it. Many
persons have recorded their entrance into the crater,
or at least their inspection of it, and the common
feat of throwing stones into it. An approach to that
erater in the night I describe, would probably have
been death.

One of the travellers who relates an ascent of this
voleano when in a tranquil state, speaks as follows :—
«When we reached the summit, we found ourselves on
a narrow ledge of burnt earth or cinders, with the
crater of the voleano open before us. This orifice, in
its present form, (for it varies at almost every eruption,)
is about a mile and a half in circumference, and may be
about three hundred and fifty feet in depth. Its
eastern border is considerably higher. than the western.
Its sides are formed of ashes and cinders, with some
rock and masses of lava intermingled. They shelve in
a steep declivity, enclosing at the bottom a flat space of
about three quarters of a mile in circumference. We
descended some way, but observing that the slightest
movement brought great quantities of stones and
ashes rolling together from the sides, and being called
52 A MIDNIGHT VISIT

back by our guides, who assured us we could not go
lower with safety, nor even remain in our station, we
re-ascended. We were near enough to the bottom,
however, to observe that it seemed to bea sort of crust
of brown, burnt earth, and that a little on one side there
were three orifices, like funnels, from whence ascended
a vapour, so thin as to be scarcely perceptible.”’*

Such was the state of the crater in the year 1802.
A later, though in these travelling days, not a modern
traveller, has left us his description also.

«When you arrive at the top, it is an awful sight. . .
As you approach the great crater, the crust on which
you tread becomes so hot that you cannot stand long on
one spot: if you push your stick an inch below the
surface, it takes fire, and you may light paper by
thrusting it into any of the cracks of the crust... .
Altogether it was amost sublime and impressive scene.
The look down into the great crater is frightfully grand,
and when you turn from the contemplation of this
fearful abyss, you are presented with the most forcible
contrast, in the rich and luxuriant prospect of Naples
and the surrounding country, where all is soft and
smiling as far as the eye can see.”-f

But now the crater presented to our eyes a glowing
mass, over which a fiery shower was almost constantly
descending, forming a spectacle which, in the gloom
and stillness of night, was at once grand and terrific.
My anxious desire was to get to the lava stream, which
Thad watched from my window, and the representations
and, I am almost ashamed to say, entreaties of some of
our party could not dissuade me from the attempt. We

* Bustace’s Classical Tour in Italy. + Diary of an Invalid.
TO MOUNT VESUVIUS, 53

left our carriage at the Hermitage, singularly miscalled,
and I was mounted on a mule, which took me along a
path about three quarters of a mile further on, while the
gentlemen proceeded on foot. The guides were pro-
vided with large torches, perhaps eight feet long; at
the spot where I dismounted, these were lighted, and
the glare they flung around revealed the most singular
scene I ever beheld.

A field of blocks of lava, of that dark colour it
assumes when cold, lay stretched beside us; ashes,
cinders, and those sharp, hard masses, covered the whole
space, up to the cone, from whose red summit the pillar
of flame shot out in fitful variations, while fiery stones
descended from the skies they had been thrown to, and
fell, sometimes back into the burning crater, some-
times beyond it; glowing ashes, more like sparkles from
blazing wood, dispersing around, diffused a fiery light
on the midnight sky, and red-hot cinders made the out-
side of the crater one brilliant, and apparently burning,
though not blazing mass.

It was over this field of lava I was to walk : our guide
said it was impossible I could do it, and offered to
remain with me while the stronger members of our
society visited the living lava in my stead. But, as I
saw the man would be glad of any excuse to get off the
toil of an expedition for which he was paid, but which
he had to make too often, I would not yield to his per-
suasions, but, on the contrary, persuaded myself that
interested motives induced him to influence my friends
against my accomplishing my desire. I set out on the
blocks of lava with a good heart, for I firmly believed
that a path had been made through them, and would
54 A MIDNIGHT VISIT

soon be found; a delusion which, I believe, enabled me
to effect my object ; for had I known that I was really
to walk for more than a mile on the sharp, hard, un-
steady blocks, almost like pointed irons to the feet, up
ridges and into furrows, guided only by the fitful light
of torches, for the moon had not then risen—had I
known this from the beginning, I fear I should not
have persisted, but turned back with the less reluctant
guide, as I had promised to do if weary. How like is
this to the pathway of life! How many would shrink
from tracing all its steps, if they knew the end from the
beginning! Better is it to be led on im ignorance,
trusting that as our day is, so shall our strength be.
Weary, indeed, I was, and several times ready to give
up; but some little assistance, some kind solicitude, or
some encouraging words, again cheered me to go
onward.

In ascending Vesuvius, I am aware that ladies and
even gentlemen need not, unless they wish it, undergo
any fatigue, or make any exertion. A little money
obviates all this, and they may be carried up in a chair,
or pulled up by guides, and satisfy their own curiosity
at the expense only of other men’s labours. Mine,
however, was a different expedition, and in this place
no such assistance could be given. Yet was I not well
repaid? and would not the friends who had patience
with me, and helped me in my difficulties, be repaid’
too, if they knew the lasting enjoyment which the
memory of that night afforded ?

At length the increasing heat told of our approach
to the fiery region; the air was sulphureous, and gave
a choking sensation; it was also loaded with smoke.
TO MOUNT VESUVIUS. 55

The ground grew hotter and hotter; we mounted a
ridge of cinders, and there, at the other side, I heheld
my lava stream. I stood beside it, on the brink of the
bed it had tracked for itself. It was a river of fire,
about thirty feet broad, slowly moving on; over the
top was heard a slight fizzing sound, just such as
cinders make. A light smoke rose from it, but much
less than might be expected.

The ground was so hot, and my feet so sore, that I
found it impossible to stand for a moment on one
spot ; my shoes were almost entirely burnt off. One
of my friends, catching my hand, caused me to bend
over the stream to see the lava in motion; I could
only compare it to a thick muddy stream on fire, and
moving through masses of matter spread over the
surface. But as I bent over it, the oppressive atmo-
sphere suddenly overcame me; I felt a dizziness and
sense of faintness, and catching the arm of the guide,
precipitately descended the ridge of cinders that
bounded my lava stream, and hid myself from it with
still more eagerness than I had sought it.

It required, indeed, some fortitude to conceal my
state, or to struggle against yielding to it; but, aware
of the consternation which I should occasion, I was
enabled to do both, and sat quietly on a block of lava
out of sight, till the effect of the heat and suffocation
passed away. After a walk of equal toil, occupying
at least an hour in returning, as it had done in going,
we once more arrived on smooth ground, and when I
saw my mule patiently awaiting my return, I was too
glad to mount to my former seat, leaving the gentlemen
to continue their way alone to the summit of the cone,
56 A MIDNIGHT VISIT

where several parties, both of ladies and gentlemen,
had preceded them, attended by chairs and porters,
and guides with leathern straps round their waists, in

_ which a feebler traveller being enclosed, he or she is
pulled up by the stronger animal. I did not covet
either mode of ascent, and as they could not approach
the crater, I knew they could not have so good a view
of it as I had from a lower station: at least self-love
comforted itself with such conclusions, as I wandered
back alone to the Hermitage.

The moon had risen in all its brightness; it was
about half-past one o’clock in the morning, and its
unclouded presence more than supplied the absence of
the milder light of the uncertain torches which the
party had taken with them. As their voices died away,
and the shouts of the guides calling to their fellows
became fewer and more distant, I was glad to find the
Italian youth who was my cicerone, noisy as all natives
of Naples are, had loitered behind with some chance
comrade; for I enjoyed the silence of the hour and
strange splendour of the scene too much to wish to
have it broken by such nonsense as he had been
addressing to his mule, to which he gave the favourite
title of Macaroni.

In quiet musing I rode along, and might have gone
too far ; for the mule, deserted by its master, and left by
me to its own guidance, took a wrong path; the shouts
of the noisy Italian, as he missed me from the right one,
apprised me of the fact; he came running after his
Macaroni, and guided both wanderers back. I began
to think that meditation and musing, at midnight, were
not suitable to Mount Vesuvius; an idea that was not
TO MOUNT VESUVIUS. 57

removed on my entrance into the court of the Hermit-
age, which was filled with donkeys, ponies, guides,
carriages, and servants. There I was joined by two of
the gentlemen whom I had left, and who, finding
themselves sufiiciently fatigued by their walk to the
lava stream, had followed me back.

Thirsty and tired, we entered the Hermitage, thinking
it to be, as in fact it is, an inn which went by that
name. I was, however, rather surprised to find the
owner of the house to be a calm, respectable-looking
monk; his grave countenance, brown frock, cord,
rosary, crucifix, agreeing ill with the aspect of the
place, which was incessantly filled with parties going
to, and coming from the scene we had left.

At a table in the scantily furnished room sat a
comfortable-looking priest, with some bread, cheese,
apples, and a bottle of common wine before him. We
were glad to join in his supper: he informed us that
he was the chaplain who said mass in the adjoining
chapel, and he smiled good-humouredly when I asked
if that house were really a hermitage.

“ Certainly,” he replied, “and there is the hermit,”
nodding his head to where the monk sat at a distance.

“ A solitary?” I persisted.

“Yes,” he answered with a laugh, “a solitary who
is in society.”

It was a singular scene and a singular place. There:
were some young Germans and Italians present, and
the conversation that ensued was only broken up by
the advance of the grave and silent hermit, whose voice
I did not hear, and who now in silence, and with
gravity, approached the table, removed the bottle of
58 A MIDNIGHT VISIT

wine, and replaced it by another, adding, also, a fresh
supply of the bread, cheese, and apples. This movement
we took as a hint that our part of the repast was over,
and the table prepared for other guests. The priest
withdrew, and the party separated. For my part I re-
tired to the carriage, fell asleep, and forgot that I was
on Mount Vesuvius, until awakened by the voices of our
absent friends, whose fatigue scarcely allowed them
power to mount into the carriage: it was then three
o'clock, and that last exertion made, it was at once put
in motion, and preceded by our guide, carrying a flaming
torch, we began to descend on our return to Naples.
Before we reached it, the sun had risen on our heavy
and dazzled eyes.

I have put this little sketch on paper while its
subject is still fresh on my mind, and shall I not add
a few lines drawn from the reflections to which my
midnight excursion gave rise? A scene so grand and
terrific must, one would think, fill every mind with
solemn thoughts. The destruction of Sodom and
Gomorrah was brought before me, as I viewed the
gloomy vestiges of what was once the ancient city of
Herculaneum ; and perhaps there is no other scene more
calculated to convey an idea of the doom which the
Scriptures either describe or predict. Some authors
conjecture that not more than 20,000 persons have
perished in the several eruptions—about forty—which
are known to have taken place of Mount Vesuvius.
This number is probably greatly underrated; yet the
very idea of one of these fiery devastations, of the
overthrow of a single town or village, fills us with
horror; we wonder at the hardihood, or indifference,
TO MOUNT VESUVIUS. 59
that suffers people to dwell happily and at ease just
beneath that burning crater. Yet what is our own
position in this world? What is it to the careless and
godless dwellers therein, but a vast volcano, their
resting-place whereon is a thousand times more inse-
cure than that of the dweller on Vesuvius? There an
earthquake may prove the signal for flight, the groans
of the working mountain may give a timely warning ;
but of a more awful destruction we are told that it
shall come suddenly, in a moment, as a thief in the
night, even when men are saying, Peace and safety!

“Peace and safety!” these are sweet words, but
applicable only to the Christian, to the man, woman, or
even child, who has found peace and safety in the
salvation of Jesus Christ. ‘The Redeemer is the ark
of refuge. Oh! it is well if we are hid in him when
the “blast of the terrible ones is as a storm against the
wall.” There is no salvation in any other. Happy
is it to know that such is the case, else we might be
weary in seeking, and disappointed in finding that peace
and safety which he offers. But there is salvation in
Jesus Christ; and trembling in fear, hardened with sin,
or overwhelmed with sorrow, we can hear his voice
saying, “ Come unto me,” and hope, that kept by his
love and power, we shall find peace and safety even in
that hour which shall try all them that dwell upon
the earth.

B.
GARDEN FLOWERS.

“ And in yon mingled wilderness of flowers,
Fair-handed Spring unbosoms every grace,
Throws out the snowdrop and the crocus first ;
The daisy, primrose, violet darkly blue,

And polyanthus of unnumber’d dyes ;

The yellow wall-flower, stain’d with iron brown;
And lavish stock that scents the garden round,
From the soft wing of vernal breezes shed.
Anemonies ; auriculas enrich’d

With shining meal o’er all their verdant leaves ;
And full ranunculus of glowing red :

No gradual bloom is wanting ; from the bud
First-born of Spring, to Summer’s musky tribes,”

Tr wild flowers have their own claim to our regard, so
that we would seek to cherish, both in ourselves and
others, a love of these beautiful objects of God’s care,
so too have the flowers of the garden their own
peculiar advantages. Many of them have brighter
tints than any which chequer the green landscapes of
our native land, for they have been brought from the
sunny regions of Southern Europe, or of Asia, or
Africa, or from those lands of tropical America in
which vegetation revels in full luxuriance. They were
wild flowers once, decking with beauty the countries
in which skies, and birds, and insects, and flowers, have
deeper and more glowing colours. In some cases the
care and skill of man has rendered them larger and
fuller of petals than they were in their native haunts.
In some even their tint has been brightened by the

GARDEN FLOWERS, 61

appliances of art; but often they bloom on our parterres
with far fainter lustre than that which ornamented them
in more congenial climes, while in some instances, they
will not bloom at all in our gardens or hothouses, and.
still oftener, though we may have the blossom, yet we can
afterwards procure from the plant no ripened fruit.

Sweet as are our wild flowers with their soft breath-
ings borne to us upon the breezes; lovely in all their
associations with deep recesses, dark glens and woods,
and mountain streams, and sunny meadows, yet they
can neither rival the garden flowers in their perfumes,
nor in their longer continuance. Frail as are all
flowers, yet those of the field are especially so, for the
garden flower is often fuller of petals, and double
blossoms are usually less fragile than single ones. We
can have them too at all seasons of the year, and when
the cold autumnal, and winter, and spring winds have
swept before them all the: ornaments of our country
scenes, save some solitary daisy, or some little chick-
weed whose starry flowers fear neither cold nor heat,
there then are blossoms which grace the gardens ; and
Christmas roses, and aconites, and laurustinus, and the
snowdrop, and the crocus, and other bright flowers,
can bloom amid wind and snow.

Garden flowers often interest too by the care which
we bestow on them, and are

“ Prized for surpassing beauty, and no less
For the peculiar pains they have required ;”

for it is a blessed thing in our nature, that the object
which has most needed our love, is almost sure to get
a fuller share of it than that which needed it not. Few
can watch the gradual development of a garden flower,
62 - GARDEN FLOWERS.

clearing away from its leaves and stems the caterpillar
or snail, or slug, which would fain make a meal of it;
supplying the absence of the summer shower, by the
mimic rain; teaching its tendrils to twine about some-
thing stronger than itself, or sheltering it with care
from sunshine or from cold, without some additional
interest derived from that sense of appropriation which
makes it peculiarly their own. And the God who made
the love uf flowers and the pleasure in rearing them so
natural to us, who has thus linked our hearts to nature,
has bid them whisper to us of a more unworldly life,
calling us away from the earth and its cares and joys,
to finer and more elevated tastes and sympathies, and
often to holy thoughts of Him.

Though sin soon expelled our first parents from the
garden in which God had placed them, yet the love of
the garden remained in man, and we find traces of it in
earliest history. Doubtless the necessity of cultivating
herbs and fruits for food led men in remote ages to
the formation of gardens, but as civilization extended
itself, flowers would be reared as a source of refined
enjoyment. The orchards and gardens which Solomon
planted, had evidently sweet-smelling flowers and trees.
The ancient Persian gardens have been renowned from
the oldest times by Xenophon and other writers; and the
garden of Alcinous, described. in the Odyssey, had its
shadowy trees and its luxuriant fruits, its clear foun-
tains and its flowers, and some of the latter bloomed
in every season of the year. The Athenians had their
flower gardens, and at their flower markets, even in
winter, the nosegay of sweet violets was not wanting ;
while men were there, whose profession it was to make
GARDEN FLOWERS. 63

garlands of flowers, which should convey sentiments of
love and friendship to those skilled in their language.
In the later ages of Rome, when flowers came to be
used at banquets, many were doubtless cultivated for
this purpose. The Roman gardens had also shady walks,
and fountains and statues. Philosophers of old talked
with their disciples amid the walks of the garden,
while the citizens of ancient Rome had too, like the
modern artizan of London, a mimic garden in the culti-
vated flowers of the boxes which graced their balco-
nies. In their clearer climate, the flowers bloomed
more brightly than with us; but though those of our
great city are sometimes sadly disfigured, and rendered
pale by smoke and dust, yet they have their blessings
too, and the scent of the box of mignonette in the
street window is often most welcome to the passer-by,
bringing with it memories even sweeter than itself.

It is well that the practice is so general in our
country places, of cultivating the little garden of the
cottage: it is pleasant to think that the little plot,
well filled with pinks, roses, and columbines, belongs
to a home of comfort; for we know well, that neither
the careless nor the wretched will cultivate flowers.
The honeysuckle, the jessamine, and the China rose,
which are peeping in at the casement, are giving their
own sweets and home delights to the man of toil. It
is pleasing to think, that in the gardens of larger
houses, the culture of flowers affords recreation to some
whose leisure is but little, and furnishes a good and
healthful employment to many whose lot is not one of
labour. Though fashion has her influence on the choice
of the flowers which are to be reared, and tulips, pinks,
64 GARDEN FLOWERS.

auriculas, and dahlias, have each had their reign of ad-
miration and culture, and though many flowers once
admitted to the select garden are left now but to the
humblest, still in some cases taste will prevail over
fashion, and flowers of commanding beauty and sweet
odour will be the delight of all times and places.
Pliny ranked the rose as first of all flowers, and the lily
as second, and even to the present age there are few
who would dispute their claims. In our time so many
varieties of the rose are cultivated, that he who should
to-day tell their number, would perhaps have to alter
it to-morrow, as some new variety should be presented
to him. It is still the queen of flowers, as it was in
the time of the Romans. With them its early blossoms
were in so great demand for garlands on festive occa-
sions, that the rose was procured from Egypt, until the
gardeners of the ancient city found a method of forcing
it by placing plates of tale over the bushes, and
sprinkling them with warm water. Cleopatra, when she
wished to deck her banquet with roses, paid a sum equal
to two hundred pounds for the supply of these flowers.

The Persians have long held their celebrated “Feast
of Roses;” and Hafiz makes his hero say, “ Call for wine,
and scatter roses round ;” while we find one mentioned
in the Apocrypha, who said, “ Let us crown ourselves
with roses, before they are withered.” The Scripture
makes frequent mention of the rose, and the old Jewish
writers say, that Jerusalem was distinguished from all
the other towns in Judea, as by several other parti-
culars, so in this especially, that no gardens nor trees
were planted within its walls, save rose-bushes.

AP:
MORNING.

IN IMITATION OF “NIGHT,” BY MONTGOMERY.

Morn is the time to wake—
The eyelids to unclose—

Spring from the arms of sleep, and break
The fetters of repose ;

Walk at the dewy dawn abroad,

And hold sweet fellowship with God.

Morn is the time to pray—
How lovely and how meet

To send our earliest thoughts away,
Up to the mercy-seat !

Ambassadors, for us to claim

A blessing in our Master’s name.

Morn is the time to siag—
How charming ’tis to hear
The mingling notes of nature ring
In the delighted ear !
And with that swelling anthem raise
The soul’s fresh matin-song of praise !
F
66

MORNING.

Morn is the time to sow

The seeds of heavenly truth,
While balmy breezes softly blow

Upon the soil of youth ;
And look to thee, nor look in vain,
Our God, for sunshine and for rain.

Morn is the time to love—

As tendrils of the vine,
The young affections fondly rove,

And seek them where to twine;
Around thyself, in thine embrace,
Lord, let them find their resting-place.

Morn is the time to shine,
When skies are clear and blue—
Reflect the rays of light divine,
As morning dew-drops do;
Like early stars be early bright,
And melt away like them in light.

Morn is the time to think,

While thoughts are fresh and free,
Of life, just balanced on the brink

Of dark eternity ;
And ask our souls if they are meet
To stand before the judgment-seat ?

Morn is the time to die,

Just at the dawn of day,
When stars are fading in the sky,

To fade like them away—
But lost in light more brilliant far
Than ever merged the morning star.
MORNING. 67

Morn is the time to rise,

The resurrection morn—
Upspringing to the glorious skies,

On new-found pinions borne,
To meet a Saviour’s smile divine—
Be such ecstatic rising mine !

J. L. G.
SOCRATES, THE CITIZEN TEACHER.

In seems but yesterday, though many years have
elapsed; when for the first time I entered the chapel
of ——— College, on a sabbath morning, in the
company of some three hundred fellow students, all
clad in scarlet gowns. Every thing around told of
former days. The windows, the walls covered with
ancient paintings of the apostles, the carved roof and
the carved stalls, all carried us back to the age of
another faith, and of other manners. In the centre of
the chapel, conspicuous to every eye, lay the tombstone
of bishop Elphinstone, the founder of the college, and
beside it, beneath our feet, lay the tombstone of Hector
Boethius, its first principal. Every thing was strange
and striking, but nothing so strange and striking as the
sermon we heard that day. In seats of their own,
elevated above those of the students, on the right and
left of the preacher, sat our professors, in Genevan
gowns. The text has vanished from memory. One
characteristic of the sermon alone remains, and that can
never be forgotten. The name of Jesus Christ did not
once occur init. But of Socrates we heard much. The
beauty and dignity of virtue were painted gorgeously
and sentimentally. The immortality of the soul was
THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 69

spoken of, probably discussed, and all in connexion
with the names of Socrates and Plato. To me stich
preaching was novel and mysterious. But the remem-
brance still imparts interest to every inquiry into the
life and opinions of the great Athenian who forms the
subject of this sketch.

To understand any man’s position in relation to the
history of mind and of the world, we must acquaint
ourselves with his age and circumstances. The death of
Socrates took place 400 years B.c. At what stage of its
history and progress has the world at this date arrived?
Turn to Judea. The series of ancient prophets has
ceased; the ministry of Malachi has termimated some
twenty years before; Rome is 350 years old; the Tar-
quins have been expelled from the throne one hundred
years ; and the republic is full of ambition and vigour ;
but her days of greatest power, and, as men will have it,
of greatest glory, are still far in the future. Alexander
too, and the revolution which he is destined to effect,
are yet to come; the great Macedonian is born half a
century after the death of Socrates. Demosthenes,
being the contemporary of Alexander, belongs of course
likewise to the then future; but the days of Cyrus are
past, and the glory of the eastern empires is fading. The
philosophy of Greece is not in its dawn and infancy, but

_has worn itself out, when Socrates appears to rescue it,
and give it a new direction. Nearly 200 years have
passed since Thales asked, “ Whence are all things ?”
and concluded, “ Water is the beginning of all things.”
All attempts towards the solution of the problem of
existence have ended in the production of a class of
philosophers, whose name was chosen in pride, but is
70 SOCRATES,

now the synonym for an unsound and fallacious rea-
soner,—the Sophists. They are the reigning wise men of
Athens at the appearance of Socrates. And some will
have us to believe that they are a much calumniated
race. We know them only from their adversaries, and
the descriptions which Plato gives of them are
probably exaggerated.

The philosophy of the Sophists, such as it was, sprang
from the manifest failures of their predecessors. Their
father, Protagoras, was a porter of Abdera, and attracted
the notice of his countryman Democritus, who taught
that self-existent and eternal, but invisible atoms, were
the rudiments and first principles of all things. The
doctrines of Protagoras ended in scepticism, in a con-
viction of the vanity of all endeavour to penetrate the
mysteries of the universe. But, while many sceptics
contented themselves with this conviction, Protagoras
and his followers turned their attention in another di-
rection. “If there were no possibility of truth, there
only remained the possibility of persuasion. If one
opinion were as true as another,—that is, if neither were
true,—it was nevertheless desirable, for the sake of
society, that certain opinions should prevail; and, if
logic was powerless, rhetoric was efficient.” Having
discarded all essential difference between truth and
falsehood, the next step was, to discard all essential
difference between right and wrong. The variety of
laws and ordinances which they observed to prevail in
different states, impressed them with the conviction,
that there are no such things as right and wrong by
nature. This therefore became a fundamental precept
with them. “For men, there was no eternal right,
THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 7

because there was no eternal truth.” “That which
appears just and honourable to each city,” said Prota-
goras, “is so for that city, so long as the opinion is
entertained.”

Whether the Sophists carried out these dogmas,
either theoretically or practically, to all the wicked and
shameless consequences which flow from them logically
and legitimately, may well be questioned. But their
own boast was, that they could make the worse appear
the better reason. To teach this art, they demanded
enormous sums, and, to learn it, enormous sums were
readily given, and given by many. It is said, that
Protagoras made ten times the gain by his profession
of Sophist that his contemporary Phidias, the greatest
of statuaries, could make by his. Asa body, the Sophists
were wealthy and powerful. They were dazzling,
rhetorical, and shallow. They professed to teach every-
thing; and both themselves and their disciples were
filled with vain conceit, pride, and arrogance. Their
popularity is easily accounted for in a state like Athens,
where every man was a lawyer, every man a politician,
and every man a speaker, and where everything de-
pended on argument and popular declamation.

The Sophists were the philosophers of Athens when
Socrates appeared. The great battle of his life was
with them. In this city, the home of freedom, of art,
of civilization, of poetry, of philosophy, and of eloquence,
Socrates was born, taught, and died.

He was the son of a sculptor, and learned his father’s
profession. Some accounts represent him as having
attained such eminence as a sculptor, as to have some of
the Graces which he executed placed on the walls of
72 SOCRATES,

the Acropolis, close beside the Minerva of Phidias. A
wealthy Athenian, named Crito, who afterwards became
his most reverential disciple, is said to have withdrawn
him from the workshop, and to have educated him. In
early life he indulged in the speculations of philosophy,
- but relinquished them, on finding that they led to no
satisfactory result, and ended only in scepticism.

Socrates had attained middle age before he appeared
in the character of a teacher, and we know little of his
previous life. He performed military service in three
battles, and distinguished’ himself in each. In the first,
the prize of bravery was awarded to him. Various
anecdotes are told of him during his campaigns. In
spite of the severity of winter, when the ice and snow
were thick upon the ground, he went barefoot and
lightly clad. On one occasion itis said, that he stood
before the camp for four and twenty hours on the same
spot, absorbed in meditation.

The conduct of Socrates in civil life has been a sub-
ject of much dispute. Some would make him a bad
citizen, and an abettor of tyranny; while others can see
in his entire course nothing but virtue of the highest
order. His bravery as a soldier, his admirers say, was
surpassed by his bravery as a senator. He had that
high moral courage, which can brave not only death but
opinion, which can defy a tyrant, and also defy a tyran-
nical mob. The only state office he ever held was
that of Senator. The Athenian senate consisted of the
500 who were elected from the ten tribes; every 35th
or 36th day, one tribe had the presidency; these were
called Prytanes. Of the fifty Prytanes, ten had the
presidency every seven days; each day, one of these ten
THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 73

enjoyed the highest dignity, with the name of Epistates.
He laid everything before the assembly of the people,
put the question to the vote, examined the votes, and,
in short, conducted the whole business of the assembly.
He enjoyed this power, however, only for a single day.
For that day he was invested with the keys of the
citadel, and the treasury of the Republic.

“Socrates was Epistates, on the day when the unjust
sentence was to be passed on the admirals, who had
neglected to bury the dead after the battle of Arginusee.
.... The Prytanes, with Socrates at their head, re-
fused to put the illegal question to the vote. The
people became furious, and loudly demanded that those
who resisted their pleasure should themselves — be
brought to trial The Prytanes wavered—yielded ;
Socrates alone remained firm, defying the threats of the
mob. He stood there to administer justice, he would
not administer injustice. In consequence of his refusal,
the question could not be put to the vote, and the as-
sembly was again adjourned. The next day, a new
Epistates and other presidents were chosen, and the
admirals were condemned.”

There is one relation in which there is no doubt that
Socrates acted with indomitable courage and patience.
Who has not heard of Xantippe, his wife ? Lamprocles,
his son, on hearing his father descant on the anxieties
of parents, and all their efforts to care for their
children, is reported to have said: “ Although my
mother had done this and a thousand times more, no
man could bear with so much ill-humour.” “Do you
not think it easier,” said Socrates, “to bear the anger of
a mother than that of a wild beast?” “No, not of such
74 SOCRATES,

a mother,” was the son’s reply. “ But what harm
has she done you? Hath she kicked you, or bit you,
as wild beasts do when they are angry?” “No, but
she utters such things as no one can bear from any-
body.” Socrates reasoned, but the son rebelled. The
wise man’s imperturbable patience has become pro-
verbial, “Ido with Xantippe,” he said on one occasion,
“like those who would learn horsemanship : they do not
choose easy tame horses, or such as are manageable
at pleasure, but the highest mettled and the hardest
mouthed; believing if they can tame the natural heat
and impetuosity of these, there can be none too hard
for them to manage.”

But it is especially as a philosopher and teacher that
Socrates is remembered and admired. And yet he
never delivered a lecture in his life, wrote no books,
opened{no school, convened no assemblies. He was
a citizen who had certain notions in his head, and who
resolutely and untiringly talked out those notions
wherever he had an opportunity. From early morn
till late eve, it was his custom to wander about and
talk and dispute with everybody. He is now in the
market-place, and now in his friend’s house—now in
the workshop of the’ artizan, and now in earnest dis-
cussion with the senator or magistrate—here with the
statuary and painter, and there with the sophist—
questioning everybody, and provoking everybody. He
was what a historian has more correctly than politely
called him, a universal bore—a bore to the multitude who
believed themselves very wise, but whom he laboured
to convince that they knew nothing.

You could not be many days in Athens without
THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 75

seeing Socrates, for no man was more in the streets
than he. And having once seen him you could never
forget him. Were history silent, imagination would
delight to embody in our notion of his -person, those
ideas of the dignity and beauty of virtue which we are
traditionally taught to associate with his name. We
should paint to ourselves a large commanding form,
with symmetry in every limb and dignity in every
feature. But alas! history has been too minute and
specific to allow us to fashion a Socrates for ourselves.
And yet, we should not say alas / forit only teaches us
by another example that the mind is the measure of
the man. It is not the testimony of enemies we have
on this subject, but of friends, and of his own reputed
conversations as recorded by his admirer Xenophon.
The frequent comparison to which his appearance is
subjected is with Silenus, a demigod, who was repre-
sented as a fat and jolly old man, ridmg on an ass.
The fauns and satyrs in general were called Sileni
from their partial but imperfect approximation to the
human figure. Socrates had a flattened nose, with
wide and upturned nostrils, projecting eyeballs, thick
lips, with a squat and unwieldy figure.

Now, imagine Socrates wandering barefoot through
the streets of Athens. He has no philosopher’s cloak.
He is a simple citizen, of most ungainly figure, but of
most fascinating tongue. A citizen, who compels his
neighbours to listen to him, and yet they seldom listen
without being ashamed or humbled. The Athenians
are not a nation of sculptors and painters, of poets and
philosophers merely, but of men, with all the passions
and sensibilities of men. And the habits and teachings
76 SOCRATES,

of Socrates, while they draw around him admirers and
devotees, come into frequent and ungrateful collision
with their passions and prepossessions.

The manner of this Citizen-Teacher was very peculiar.
As we have said already, he delivered no lectures and
taught no classes. But he met on the street, it may
be, some one whom he supposed to be in error, or whom
he supposed to be unduly self-complacent, or ambitious,
or profligate. It may be a wild youth, or an aspiring
democrat, or a pretending Sophist. Socrates asks a
question. The question is simple and inoffensive. It
is answered. A second question arises out of the
answer; and a third, anda fourth. And the questioned
party is led on unconsciously to conclusions the most
adverse to himself. And the crooked and crabbed old
man (as the tortured citizen is disposed to call him),
who has thus entrapped his neighbour, leaves him to
writhe in the agony of self-confusion, or sends him
away with the mortifying impression, that he has made
a fool of himself.

With these questionings, Socrates mingled more or
less argument of his own, according to circumstances.
But we are compelled to acknowledge, that much of
his argument, as preserved by Plato and Xenophon, is
sophistical, in the now common sense of that word,
and so much so, that it must have been by design;
such argument often serving the purpose he had in view
as well as any other, namely, to convince the man that
he was not the wise and great man he took himself for.

This mode of questioning and argumentation, leading
men to unexpected conclusions from their own admis-
sions, has been called the Socratic Method, or the
THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 77

Socratic Dialogue. In the hands of most men, it is an
unsafe and unfair weapon. It presents too strong
temptations to a man.to exhibit his skill and tact, at
the expense of his honesty and simplicity ; while it is
scarcely possible for the most honest man to escape the
logical meshes, into which a skilful and dishonest
questioner seeks to draw him.

But in the hands of Socrates, this method accom-
plished important purposes. Philosophy, we have seen,
had exhausted itself in speculations regarding the origin
and nature of things. The Sophists were ascendant,
and though their fundamental principles were, that
truth and error, right and wrong, were not essentially
diverse, they professed to communicate all kinds of
knowledge, and to fit men for all high and important
stations in life and in the state. In labouring to con-
found such pretensions, Socrates might have done no
good, he might have left his fellow-citizens in the con-
fusion of feeling, that they knew nothing. But he
laboured at the same time to divert them from vain
speculations and empty pretensions, to what was
practical and intelligible. It is on this account he is
said to have brought philosophy down from heaven to
earth.

One example of Socrates’ method, will enable the
reader to enter into the life of this great man, though
it must be given in a very abbreviated form.

Euthydemus, surnamed the Fair, is a young man.
He has collected many of the writings of the most
celebrated poets and Sophists ; is much elated, and fan-
cies himself superior to any other of the same age, both
in knowledge and abilities; and does not doubt to see
78 SOCRATES,

himself the very first man in Athens, whether to manage
the affairs of the state or to harangue the people. He
is too young to be admitted into the public assemblies ;
and it is his custom to go into a bridle-cutter’s shop
near the Forum. Socrates, accompanied by some of his
friends, follows him one day into the bridle-cutter’s ;
aremark is made about Themistocles; and Socrates, to
pique Euthydemus, says, “It is monstrous folly for any
one to imagine, that whilst the knowledge of the very
lowest mechanic art is not to be attained without a
master, the science of governing the republic, which
requires for the right discharge of it all that human
prudence can perform, is to be had by intuition.”

Enthydemus hears the remark, but seems as if he did
not hear it, and takes care to avoid the company of
Socrates as much as possible. Circumstances, however,
bring them together again ere long. Socrates says to
some of his friends present, that no doubt Euthydemus
will speak his mind the very first time he is in the
assembly, if there should happen to be any business of
importance in debate; and that his first speech must.
resemble that of a man who should solicit the voices of
the people by saying, “It is true, gentlemen, I never
once thought of making physic my study ; I never once
applied to any one for instruction; and so far was I
from desiring to be well versed in this science, I even
wished not to have the reputation of it; but, gentlemen,
be so kind as to choose me for your physician, and
I will gain knowledge by making experiments upon
you.”

The laugh is immediately turned against Euthydemus,
and, though he no longer avoids the company and
THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 79

presence of Socrates, he affects themost profound silence.
At last Socrates succeeds in drawing him into conver-
sation. They have met in the bridle-cutter’s shop, and
are alone. “Is it true, Huthydemus,” said Socrates,
“that you have collected so many of the writings of
those men whom we call wise ?”

“ Most undoubtedly it is true; neither shall I give
over collecting till I have gained as many of them as I
well can.”

“ Truly,” said Socrates, “I admire you much for
thus endeavouriug to accumulate wisdom rather than
wealth; for by this, Euthydemus, you plainly discover
it to be your opinion that gold and silver cannot add
to our merit; whereas we furnish ourselves with an
inexhaustible fund of virtue, when we thus treasure up
the writings of these great men.”

Euthydemus is delighted. He has gained the appro-
bation of the universal fault-finder. But his joy is of
short duration.

“What employment do you intend to excel in, Euthy-
demus,” said Socrates, “that you collect so many
books ?”

The young man is now inextricably in the meshes of
the questioner. He is carried on in spite of himself
through a long conversation, in which as in a mirror,
he sees himself a child and a, fool.

“QO Socrates,” he exclaimed, “I will not deny to
you that I have hitherto believed I was no stranger to
philosophy, but had already gained that knowledge so
necessary for the man who aspires after virtue. What
then must be my concern to find, after all my labour, I
am not able to answer those questions which it most
80 SOCRATES,

imports me to know; and the more, as I see not what
method to pursue whereby I may render myself more
capable.”

“ Have you ever been at Delphos ?”

“T have been there twice.”

* Did you observe this inscription somewhere on the
front of the temple—‘ Know tHysExr ?’”

“ Yes, I read it.”

“ But it seems scarcely sufficient to have read it,
Euthydemus: did you consider it? and in consequence
of the admonition, set yourself diligently to find out
what you are?”

“T certainly did not,” said Euthydemus; “for I
imagined I must know this sufficiently already; and
indeed it will be difficult for us to know anything, if we
can be supposed to be at a loss here.”

“ But for a man to know himself properly,” said
Socrates, “it is scarcely enough that he knows his
own name. He who has purchased a horse, does not
imagine he has made the proper trial of his merit, till
by mounting him he has found out whether’ he is
tractable or unruly, strong or weak, fleet or heavy, with
everything else, either good or bad, in him: so likewise
we should not say, He knows himself as he ought, who
is ignorant of his own powers, or those duties which,
as a maui, it is incumbent on him to perform.”

The youth is then compelled to listen to many beau-
tiful sentiments on the nature and importance of self-
knowledge, till he professes himself fully convinced of
its excellence.

* You know what things are good, and what evil ?”
said Socrates, resuming the conversation.








THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 81

“Certainly,” replied Euthydemus ; “for otherwise I
should know less than the very lowest of our slaves.”

Show me then, I pray you, what you think good,
what evil.”

The poor youth is again entrapped and humbled.
He is drawn into a discussion, in which he flounders
miserably, and at last he rushes out of the bridle-cutter’s
shop, “full of confusion and contempt of himself, as
beginning to perceive his own insignificancy.” Unlike
many, however, whom Socrates only disgusted, Euthy-
demus courted his society, became attached to him, and
sat at his feet to be taught, says Xenophon, “those
things which it most imported him to know.”

The opinions of the Citizen-Teacher on the most
important subjects will appear in the two following
extracts.

Aristodemus, surnamed the Little, is a sophist and
a sceptic. He neither prays nor sacrifices to the gods,
nor yet consults any oracle; but, on the contrary,
ridicules and Jaughs at those who do. Socrates has
many arguments with him, and reasons thus: “ Which
seems to you most worthy of admiration, Aristodemus ?
—the artist who forms images void of motion and
intelligence; or one who has the skill to produce
animals that are endued, not only with activity, but
understanding? ....He who at the beginning made
man, endued him with senses because they were good
for him; eyes wherewith to behold whatever was
visible ; and ears to hear whatever was to be heard.
For say, Aristodemus, for what purpose should odours
be prepared if the sense of smelling had been denied ?
and why the distinctions of bitter and sweet, of savoury

G
82 SOCRATES,

and unsavoury, unless a palate had likewise been given,
conveniently placed, to arbitrate between them, and
declare the difference? Is not that providence, Aristo-
demus, in a most eminent manner conspicuous, which,
because the eye of man is so delicate in its contexture,
hath therefore prepared eyelids like doors, whereby to
secure it, which extend of themselves whenever it is
needful, and again close when sleep approaches? Are
not those eyelids provided, as it were, with a fence on
the edge of them to keep off the wind and guard the
eye? Even the eyebrow itself is not without its office,
but, as a penthouse, is prepared to turn off the sweat,
which, falling from the forehead, might enter and annoy
that no less tender than astonishing part of us......
And canst thou doubt, Aristodemus, whether a dispo-
sition of parts like this should be the work of chance, or
of wisdom and contrivance ?” Aristodemus professes to
be satisfied in the end that “man must be the master-
piece of some great artificer.”

In a conversation with Huthydemus, Socrates is
represented by Xenophon as saying: “ Even among all
those deities who so liberally bestow on us good things,
not one of them maketh himself an object of our sight.
And He who raised this whole universe, and still up-
holds the mighty frame, who perfected every part of it
in beauty and goodness, suffering none of these parts to
decay through age, but renewing them daily with un-
fading vigour, whereby they are able to execute what-
ever he ordains, with that readiness and precision which
surpass man’s imagination, even he, the Supreme God,
who performs all these wonders, still holds himself
invisible, and it is only in his works that we are capable
THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 83

of admiring him. But consider, my Euthydemus, the
sun, which seemeth as it were set forth to the view of
all men, yet suffereth not itself to be too curiously
examined, punishing those with blindness who too
rashly venture so todo. And those ministers of the
gods, whom they employ to execute their bidding,
remain to us invisible: for though the thunderbolt is
shot from on high, and breaks in pieces whatever it
finds in its way, yet no one sees it when it falls, when
it strikes, or when it retires. Neither are the winds
discoverable to our sight, though we plainly behold the
ravages they everywhere make, and with ease perceive
what time they are rising. But if there be anything in
man, my Euthydemus, partaking of the Divine nature, it
must surely be the soul which governs and directs him;
yet no one considers this as an object of his sight.
Learn, therefore, not to despise those things which you
cannot see. Judge of the greatness of the power by the
effects which are produced, and reverence the Spirit
which has produced them.”

These extracts present as favourable a specimen as
may be found of the theology of Socrates. It is very
obvious that this philosopher had some very beautiful
conceptions of God. It is equally obvious that he
believed in inferior deities. This remark does not
depend on inference. We have express statements on
the subject from himself and from his admirers. “It
was ever his practice,” says Xenophon, “to approve
himself a strict observer of the answer the Pythian
priestess gives to all who inquire the proper manner
of sacrificing to the gods, or paying honours to their
deceased ancestors: ‘Follow,’ saith the god, ‘the
84 SOCRATES,

custom of your country ;’ and therefore Socrates, in all
those exercises of his devotion and piety, confined him-
self altogether to what he saw practised by the republic ;
and to his friends he constantly advised the same thing,
saying it only savoured of vanity and superstition in
all those who did otherwise.” The statement will be
confirmed by his own defence on his trial.

How long Socrates moved about as a teacher in the
streets and in the shops of Athens, we have not the
means of knowing. The general statement is, that he
began to teach about the middle of his career.

In bis 72d year he was brought to trial, on the
following indictment : “Socrates is criminal ; iasmuch
as he acknowledges not the gods whom the republic
holds saéred, but introduces other and new deities. He
is likewise criminal because he corrupts the youth.”

From this accusation it has been erroneously inferred
that Socrates was a martyr to his faith in one Supreme
God. But all who are acquainted with the history of
Greece are agreed that his trial was a political one.
He had created for himself many enemies, who only
availed themselves of a popular accusation to get rid of
him. And there were some things in his teaching, no
doubt, which afforded some shadow of evidence in sup-
port of it. He despised the fables in which the poets
recounted the deeds of the popular deities, and on this
ground might be charged with denying the gods which
the republic held sacred. He spoke in a mysterious
style of a demon, or genius, or spirit, which revealed
many things to him, which commanded him to do this,
or forbade him to do that, and-on this ground might
plausibly be charged with introducing new deities.
THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 85

What Socrates meant by his demon is still a ques-
tion with the historians of philosophy. Some think
that he only meant his conscience. But if he meant
nothing more, he certainly threw an air of needless
mystery around a very simple matter, and ascribed to
it things which do not well correspond with the attri-
butes and functions of conscience. According to
others, Socrates believed implicitly in supernatural
communications, and that these proceed from a peculiar
demon, who, according to the doctrine of Plato, “is
allotted to every man, who is a witness and guardian of
his conduct in life, who, without being visible to any
one, is always present, and who is an arbitrator not
only of his deeds, but also of his thoughts. This
demon presides over the man inquisitively, participates
of all that concerns him, sees all things, understands
all things, and dwells in the most profound recesses of
the mind.” If this was the belief of Socrates, it was
natural for him to regard all strong impressions and
convictions of duty, all sudden thoughts, and all vivid
presentiments, as the voice of his demon.

As to the charge of corrupting youth, it was indig-
nantly repelled by Socrates, and is likewise by Xenophon
and Plato. Nor are we aware of any evidence by which
it was supported.

As to the main charge, Socrates himself is reported
to have said: “What I chiefly marvel at, O ye judges!
is this; whence Melitus infers, that I esteem not
those as gods whom the city holds sacred. For that
I sacrifice at the appointed festivals, on our common
altars, was evident to all others, and might have been
to Melitus had he been so minded.” After his con-
86 SOCRATES,

demnation, he said, “That I, in anywise, should be
more troubled and cast down than before my condem-
nation, I see not; since I stand here unconvicted of
any of the crimes whereof I was accused: for no one
has proved against me that I sacrificed to any new
deity; or by oath appealed to, or even made mention
of the names of any other than Jupiter, Juno, and the
rest of the deities, which, together with these, our city
holds sacred; neither have they once shown what were
the means I made use of to corrupt the youth, at the
very time that I was inuring them to a life of patience
and frugality.”

Though found guilty, the likelihood is that his
judges would not have condemned him to death, had he
humbled and submitted himself to their mercy, and
sued for pardon, in the style common to persons in his
position. But he was bold, undaunted, and self-com-
placent, and exasperated his adversaries. “Somewhat
haughty, perhaps,” says an admirer, “but the hanghti-
ness of a brave soul fighting for the truth!” The
injustice of his sentence is granted, but what ¢rath he
was fighting for we find it difficult to ascertain. Four
hundred years after, another, a stranger, was charged
on the same Mars’ Hill, with being a setter forth of
strange gods. But instead of labouring to wash him-
self from the charge of unbelief in Jupiter and Juno,
and the other deities of the Athenians, he boldly denied
the divinity of every one of them, and proclaimed the
unity, spirituality, and government of One Living and
True God, and that in sublimer terms than any orator or
philosopher of Athens had ever attained. He had truth
to contend for, and the God of truth was with him.
THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 87

“It is now time that we depart,” were the last
words of Socrates to his judges. “I to die, you to live;
but which has the better destiny is unknown to all
except God.” How lame the conclusion! It has
never been a question with the confessors of Christi-
anity which has the better destiny—the dying martyr,
or the living persecutor.

Socrates would have been executed the next day, but it
happened that the next day was the first of the festival
of Theoria, during which no criminal could beputtodeath.
This festival lasted thirty days. Socrates, though in
chains and awaiting his end, is said to have spent the
interval in cheerful conversation with his friends. On
one occasion he might have escaped, but declined to
avail himself of the opportunity which his friends
created for him. On the last day he held a con-
versation with his friends on the immortality of the
soul. After the poison was administered to him, he
said to his earliest and most constant friend, Crito,
“Crito, we owe a cock to Esculapius. Discharge this
debt for me, and do not neglect it.”

Such was the end of Socrates. The reader has
before him the means of forming some idea of his
opinions and character. No name has come down to
us with so many circumstances favourable to its repu-
tation and honour. Plato and Xenophon have covered
it with eulogy, and have employed their great powers
of description and argument to defend and praise him.
We know him almost exclusively as the hero of their
idolatrous admiration. But even accept the portrait, as
a likeness, true to the very life—we dare not place his
name where it is too often placed, beside the name of
88 SOCRATES,

the Great Teacher sent from God. He was an idolater.
His own best arguments failed to give him unwavering
confidence in a future state. His anticipations of the
future were rendered pleasant and cheerful only by
the proud self-complacency with which he regarded his
own virtue. He occupies an important place, however,
in the history of the human mind. Athens was not
regenerated by his labours, but philosophy received
fresh life, and the thinking power of Greece, which
seemed exhausted, was restored to more health and
vigour than it had ever acquired before.

The impressions of a witness who will not be sus-
pected of partiality to the Christian faith, the French
Rousseau, are very striking: “What prepossession,
what blindness must it be, to compare (Socrates) the
son of Sophroniscus, to (Jesus) the son of Mary!
What an infinite disproportion is there between them !
Socrates, dying without pain or ignominy, easily sup-
ported his character to the last; and if his death, how-
ever easy, had not crowned his life, it might have been
doubted whether Socrates, with all his wisdom, was
anything more than a vain sophist. He invented, it is
said, the theory of morals. Others, however, had
before put them in practice. He had only to say,
therefore, what they had done, and to reduce their
examples to precept. But where could Jesus learn,
among his competitors, that pure and sublime morality,
of which he only has given us precept and example?
The death of Socrates, peaceably philosophizing with
his friends, appears the most agreeable that could be
wished for; that of Jesus, expiring in the midst of
agnonizing pains, abused, insulted, and accused by a
THE CITIZEN TEACHER. 89

whole nation, is the most horrible that could be feared.
Socrates, in receiving the cup of poison, blessed the
weeping executioner who administered it; but Jesus, in
the midst of excruciating tortures, prayed for his merci-
less tormentors. Yes! if the life and death of Socrates
were those of a sage, the life and death of Jesus were
those of a God. Shall we suppose the evangelic
history a mere fiction? Indeed, my friend, it bears
not the marks of fiction: on the contrary, the history
of Socrates, which nobody presumes to doubt, is not so
well attested as that of Jesus Christ. Such a supposi-
tion, in fact, only shifts the difficulty without obviating
it ; it is more inconceivable, that a number of persons
should agree to write such a history, than that one only
should furnish the subject of it. The Jewish authors
were incapable of the diction, and strangers to the
morality contained in the gospel, the marks of whose
~ truth are so striking and inimitable, that the inventor
would be a more astonishing character than the
hero.”
J. K.
WHY NOT?

“The words of the wise are as goads, and as a nail in a sure
place; long retained, and often serving a useful purpose.”

A pzaR old friend of my childhood, a short time
before his death, said to me, “There is a short
question, consisting only of two words, with three letters
in each, to which if we could accustom ourselves always
to give a sound and conscientious reply, we should
possess a most powerful preservative from doing the
things that we ought not to do, and leaving undone
the things that we ought to do. It is this—‘ Why not ?”

How frequently is the observation verified in common
life! and how important are the results attending the
simple, difference of having, or not having, a good
answer to this significant question !

Arthur and William were alike exposed to tempta-
tion. Indeed what youth was ever removed from the
immediate sphere of parental inspection, admonition, and
restraint, and thrown into the mixed society of a gay
and busy world, without being tempted in one way or
another ?

“Scott,” said one of the young men in the large
Wy not? 91

establishment in which Arthur Scott and William
Moore were placed, “what are you going to do with
yourself to-morrow ?”

“We are to spend the day with our friends at
Clapton.”

“Oh, you always go there on Sundays—don’t you?”

“Not always. We have friends at Tottenham too,
and sometimes we go there.”

“Don’t you find it terribly dull?”

Oh no. They are all very kind to us.”

“Kind! Yes. Idon’t suppose they are unkind. But
what pleasure can it be to go week after week, to see
the same people, and they one’s own relations? You
shall go with me some day, and see what pleasure is.”

“Where do you go, then ?”

“Oh, just where I please-—where I and my party
agree to go. To-morrow we are going to Richmond.
Should you not like to go with us ?”

. “T do not think I should.”

“Why not?”

“No particular reason that I know of.”

“ Well then, if you have no particular reason against
it, shirk your friends for once, and try how you like it.”

«No, I cannot do that.”

«Why not ?”

“Why, because, you know, we are expected, and it
would seem odd if we did not come; and our friends
would ask us where we went instead—but I will speak
to William about it.”

“You may as well let it alone. It is of nouse to
speak to that stiff old fellow. If you are forced to move
about where he pleases, just as if you were the
92 WHY NOT?

Siamese twins, and to tell your friends all about
where you go, and what you do, you may live
seven years in London and see no pleasure at all.
Thank my stars, I have no such clogs. I go where I
like, and ask nobody’s leave. All I have to look to is,
to be in before the street-door shuts at night, and to
write my name in the book in proper time in the morn-
ing; and who has a right to ask me any questions ?”

“Be quick, Arthur,” said his cousin William, “it is
a beautiful morning: we have just time to enjoy the
walk, and be ready to join our’ friends at the breakfast
table.”

Somehow, Arthur did not move so briskly that
morning as he was wont to do. He was less prompt
in starting, less interested in the flowers of the field,
the singing of the birds, the humming of the bees, and
less concerned about reaching the house of their friends
in good time for family worship,—which was always
attended to immediately before breakfast. To more
than one question or remark of his cousin, Arthur
returned an abrupt or an inappropriate answer, and
sometimes, when spoken to, he seemed lost in moody
silence. His mind was on a different track. It was
not until he started his own subject that he recovered
anything like his usual vivacity. “It és a beautiful
morning,” he said, as if in reply to William’s first obser-
vation,—all the intermediate time and conversation
being sunk in one general hiatus,—“a delightful day
for the water,—Clark and his party are going to
Richmond.”

“So he told me.”
WHY NOT? ~ 93

© Did he indeed? did he ask you to go with them >”

Yes.”

Well, what excuse did you make ?”

“There was no occasion to make any excuse, I told
him T could not go.”

“ Did he ask you why not ?”

“Yes he did.”

“ Well, what reason did you give him? for he asked
me, and I hardly knew what to say.”

“ There were plenty of reasons to give, more than he
would have liked to hear. It was enough to tell him
that I was otherwise engaged.”

“ Well, I told him that, and then he asked me if
I could not get off the engagement,—and why I could
not.”

“ He asked me the same. I said that my parents
desired me to spend my sabbaths with one or other of
the families of their friends, who had been so kind as to
invite me, and that I spent them so happily I had no
wish to go elsewhere.”

“ What did he say to that ?”

“ He set up a laugh, and made some sneering remark
about parents, and leading-strings, and keeping the
sabbath; so I turned away, and went on with my
duties.”

“TJ dare say he thought that very odd.”

* Perhaps he did, but I thought it was better not to
stand arguing with him. There was more likelihood of
his leading me wrong, than of my leading him right.”
Arthur sighed, and mused,—then rousing himself,

“ Well, we have got off for this time, and I am glad
we have, for after all, I do not know that I should have
94 WHY Nor?

liked to join Clark and his party; and yet it is not
pleasant always to refuse to do as other people do. It
looks stiff and uncivil. Don’t you think so, William ?”

There is no need always to refuse to do as other
people do, or as they wish us to do. If what they pro-
pose is right, we should’ be willing to comply, and try
to make ourselves agreeable ; and even when it is right
to refuse, we may be firm without being stiff or
uncivil.”

“ Then, another time, if Clark should ask us to go
with him, and there was no particular reason against it,
you would not object? Suppose, for example, there
was a general holiday on a week-day, and we had not
engaged to go elsewhere?”

“TJ am not sure that it would be right to join him
and his party even then; as we are thrown together in
the way of business, and in our master’s house, we have
no choice; we are sure it must be right to act uprightly
and kindly towards Clark and all the rest. But we are
not bound to any further connexion. We may choose
with whom to spend our leisure, and I do not think
Clark would be one to do us good at any time.”

“ Why not? Do you know any harm of him?”

“ Only what he told me himself.”

« What was that?”

“ He sneered at obeying our parents, and observing
the sabbath,—and for that reason I cannot think he
would be at all a safe and good companion.”

“ Well, he may not invite us again, but if he should,
you would hardly give that as a reason for declining his
company. It would seem as if you set yourself up for
being better than every body else.”
WHY nor? 95

.

“Then it would seem very different from the truth,
Arthur. It is not that I think myself better than others,
but because I feel myself weak, and prone to be led
away by evil, that I am afraid to expose myself to
temptations.”

“Tf you are afraid, I am sure I have more reason to
be so. Well, I will have nothing to do with Clark, so
there is an end of it.”

Poor Arthur! The end was not so soon or so safely
attained. Impressible and unstable, he had already in
some degree yielded to the fascinating influence of the
tempter; as yet, he thought no harm, and intended no
harm, and apprehended no difficulty in retreating—like
the moth in its first distant eddyings round the taper ;
but like the silly insect, he continued to flutter near,—or
if induced for a moment to retreat, soon returned, and
at each evolution drew nearer and nearer to the scene
of attraction and danger. Happily, he was ultimately
rescued, but it was not—to carry on the allusion—until
he had severely scorched his wings. How many a youth,
well instructed as Arthur was, has begun venturing as
Arthur did, and fluttered on to utter destruction! -
Arthur yet lives to bless and to exemplify the grace that
interposed to save him; but he can never cease to re-
member, with shame and sorrow, the follies, and sins,
and miseries in which he was involved, for want of
having put a decided weil-principled no on the first
questionable proposal. William was enabled to stand
firm against temptation, being “ strong in the grace
that is in Christ Jesus.” His course has been one of
consistency and honour; and “as the shining light,
that shineth more and more unto the perfect day.” '
96 WHY NoT?

Does any young person really desire to furnish
himself with valid answers to the little question—
“Why not?” In reference to things that are wrong
or doubtful, the following may be mentioned, as some
good reasons for not complying with what is
proposed :—

1. The wishes of good parents —Let no young person
imagine himself degraded by saying, “I do not think my
parents would approve of it.” A sneer and a challenge
to judge for yourself cannot disprove the wisdom of
your appeal. “My parents,” you may justly reason,
“are my best friends ; they love me,.and seek my good.
They have had more experience than I. I have seldom
erred when I have followed their judgment, but often
when I have followed my own. Besides, it is my duty
to obey them.”

2. The value of time.—* What is proposed would
take time that is not my own, or that ought to be
otherwise employed. I have not time to comply.”

3. Proper caution in expense-— If I form expensive habits, I am exposing myself to
the misery of needless straits, perhaps to the temptation
of in some way appropriating what is not my own.
Many frauds and forgeries have originated in expensive
habits, and if I venture on the occasion of evil, I can
have no security that I shall stand where others have
fallen.”

4. Conscientious hesitation.—*“T am not sure that it
is right.” And do not suffer yourself to be beaten off
from a safe position by the appeal, “ What harm—what
danger is there in it ?” or even the assertion that there
is xo harm, zo danger. You may ask in return, what
WHY NOT? 97

good is there in the proposed step? what need or occasion
for taking it? If your own couscience is not satisfied
that a thing is certainly right, you are not at all
bound to prove to the tempter that it is absolutely
wrong.

5. A perception of positive evil It is certainly
wrong.’ That one word is answer enough. When we
have an express command or prohibition, no room
remains for amoment’s speculation. When first temp-
tation presents itself, whether in its more startling or
its more insidious forms, the feeling that meets it
generally is, “ I cannot comply—I must not comply.”
“Why not?” asks the tempter—not with a view to
elicit a reasonable answer, but in order to throw dust
in the eyes of both reason and conscience, by meeting
with sophistical arguments any difficulties that may be
started. If the objection be but dimly perceived, or
but feebly held, he is encouraged to prosecute his efforts,
and in all probability will ultimately succeed. There
are few objections that HE cannot explain away to the
satisfaction of a person half inclined to yield. But
when one whom he would seduce resolutely refuses all
parley, the tempter is driven back abashed. It is
better than a brazen shield, to have the soul imbued
with the principle, “How can I do this great wickedness,
and sin against God?” “It is good,” says a valuable
commentator, “to shut out sin with the strongest bar,
even that of an impossibility.” Eve ventured to parley
with the tempter about an express command of God,
and we know the sad result. Agthur, and too many
more, have gone into the same error, and have found it
“ bitterness in the end.”

H
98 WHY Not?

6. Fear of progress.—‘ If not itself necessarily evil,
it might lead to evil; it might be a dangerous begin-
ning, the commencement of a bad habit.” Oh, how
much sin and misery might have been avoided, if this
consideration had in every instance been allowed. its
full weight; when, of the first glass, the first cigar,
the first entrance into doubtful company, the voice of
conscience whispered, “ Better not!”

7. Regard to consistency and appearance.—lIt is a
duty not only to avoid evil, but to “abstam from
all appearance of evil,’ 1 Thess..v. 22. Christians
ought to do “more than others,” (Matt. v. 47 ;) and no
Christian should hesitate firmly to refuse compliance in
a matter which is not “lovely and of good report,”
Phil. iv. 8. Those who would always have a good
answer ready to repel the enticements of evil, should
study the Scriptures, and yield to their guidance. “ By
the words of Tuy lips I have kept me from the paths of
the destroyer.” Happy they whose refusals can be
justified by sound reason ; who, when they have settled
a good reason, abide by it, and are not driven about and
tossed like a wave of the sea; and whose conduct
uniformly corresponds with their convictions. “ Con-
scientious,” said my aged friend, as well as “sound” be
the answer to the appeal, “Why not?” It is not
enough to see the better, and then choose the worse,
or perceiving the truth, sophistically to argue away
its practical application; but “ happy is he that con-
demneth not himself in that thing which he alloweth,”
or in the thing which he censures.

But let my old friend’s question be applied to things
good or unavoidable, and it cannot receive “a sound
WHY Not? 99

and conscientious reply” without suggesting valuable
practical considerations. It is easy to furnish specimens.

A bad habit has gained the ascendency; time is
wasted and duties are neglected through morning sloth
and indolence, or some low and pernicious, or at least
questionable gratification is daily indulged in. The
remonstrances of friends and the rebukes of conscience
are met with the lame excuse, the imbecile reply, “I
cannot help it ; I have been so long used to it, that it
cannot now be broken through.” Way nor? Slave
of habit, does this simple question startle and perplex
you? Do not dismiss it from your consideration till
you can give it a “sound and conscientious answer,”
and—the fetters of habit will be broken, There is no
habit so inveterate that it will not yield to honest
persevering effort, made in humble dependence on
Divine assistance; and that assistance is promised,
Isa. i. 16—18; Ezek. xxxvi. 25.

A change in outward circumstances may deprive of
many innocent and rational enjoyments, which, from
long use, have come to be considered essential to well-
being ; or rather, the thought that they might be done
without had never presented itself to the mind, till
circumstances rendered it imperative that they must
be given up. How many things there are of which
we allow ourselves to feel, if not to say, “I cannot
do without it!” Wy nor? Let this question have
‘a sound and conscientious” consideration, and we
shall come to the conclusion that very few things are
essential to our well-being.

“Man wants but little here below,
Nor wants that little long.”
100 WHY nor?

We shall be convinced that “a man’s life, (the enjoy-
ment of life,) consisteth not'in the abundance of the
things which he possesseth.’ In the school of Christ
we shall be instructed “both to be full and to be
hungry, both to abound and to suffer need ;” and learn
in whatsoever state we are, therewith to be content,
Luke xii. 15 ; Phil. iv. 11, 12.

Our little question is often a good answer to ridicule.
It is no uncommon thing for people who do not choose
to make exertions or sacrifices in a good cause, to
ridicule as enthusiasts those who do; and there are some
good people who can bear labour and suffering, yet
shrink from ridicule. To them it seems a formidable
argument to say, “ You will surely never do such a
thing as ¢hat ; you will never connect yourself with
that enterprise.” Now, if the act or the enterprise be
really objectionable, it may be fitly reasoned against,
but ridicule is often resorted to for want of reason,
and the simple question “ Why not?” will often con-
found and put to silence the ridiculing but ignorant
opponent, and confirm the sincere and well-meaning,
though timid advocate. Nothing that is really good
can be contemptible.

The wholesome stimulus of this little question will
often dissipate the excuses of sloth and the hesitations
of timidity. “TI cannot,” says the sluggard, when
urged to prompt and decided effort in the affairs of: life.
The spiritual sluggard in effect says the same in regard
to the concerns of his soul. But way nor? Let
both honestly set themselves to find a true answer to
this question, and the “hedge of thorns,” and the
“lion in the way,” and the “cold” that hindered








WHY not ? 101

ploughing, and all the host of sluggish excuses and
imaginary difficulties will disappear; and the way of
the righteous will be made plain, and show that what
is required, is a thorough purpose of heart to pursue
it.—Prov. xv. 19; xix. 24; xx. 4; xxii. 13.

But there are real difficulties and obstacles in the
way of Christian enterprise. The work is great, the
opposition formidable, the instruments weak. “We
dare not venture to attempt it!” Wuy nor? If the
thing is unquestionably right, set about it, and expect
to succeed. ‘ Whatever man has done, man may do.”
Search the records for precedent, showing what has
been accomplished in a good cause by seemingly
inadequate means.

Moral heroism may weil consist with the full con-
sciousness of personal weakness, and with a perception
of surrounding difficulties and dangers. It requires
that we act under orders, that we have no selfish
reserves, and that we rely for aid and success on the
promises of God. These conditions existing, what
dares not a Christian attempt ?

“Try,” was the noble motto of Raikes, when he
attempted to draw together a number of rude, vicious
children on the sabbath day, that they might be kept
out of mischief and taught to read the Bible; and the
principle embodied inthose three letters, proved the germ
of Sunday schools throughout the world. “ Expect
great things from God, and attempt great things for
God,” was the sentiment with which Carey aroused
British Christians to a sense of the duties devolving
upon them, in regard to the heathen world; and it
became a watchword of the church.
102 WHY NOT?P

- “Tt is a vain attempt, an enthusiastic scheme; it
never can be accomplished,” said many, when first
the subject was brought before them; but they could
not give “a sound and conscientious answer” to
the question, Wuy nor? And they were convinced
that the enterprise was of God; they yielded to their
convictions, and became helpers in the work; and
whereunto has this grown ?

“ Tf they think they are conquering,” said the heathen
oracle, “they shall conquer.” And assuredly Christian
courage is the way to success. “Should such a man
as I flee?” said the patriotic and pious Nehemiah; no,
my life is second to my duty. How noble was the
retort of the apostle, when weeping friends besought
him not to go to Jerusalem, where bonds awaited him!
Way nor? “ What mean ye to weep and to break
mine heart ? for I am ready not to be bound only, but
to die. at Jerusalem for the name of the Lord Jesus,”
Acts xxi. 13.

And it was not as an apostle but as a Christian
that he said, (and every true Christian may adopt the
animating sentiment,) “I can do all things through
Christ which strengtheneth me.” “We are more than
conquerors through him that loved us,” Phil. iv. 13;
Rom. vii. 37. E. C.

WILD FRUITS.

“ For I have loved the rural walk, through lanes
Of grassy swarth, close cropp’d by nibbling sheep,
And skirted thick with intertexture firm
Of thorny boughs; have loved the rural walk,
O’er hills, through valleys, and by river’s brink,
Per since, a truant boy, I pass’d my bounds
To enjoy a ramble on the banks of Thames;
And still remember, nor without regret,

Of hours that sorrow since has much endear’d,
How oft, my slice of pocket store consumed,
Still hungering, penniless, and far from home,
I fed on scarlet hips, or stony haws,

Or blushing crabs, or berries that emboss

The bramble, black as jet, or sloes austere.”

Tuere are few of our wild fruits which would please
the taste of any but the child, though to children they
often afford much pleasure. As we travel through some
parts of our island, and see the landscape all bright
with the flowering trees, which, in Herefordshire,
Devonshire, Kent, and other counties, are making the
spring orchard gay, and giving promise of fruits for the
autumn ; or as we see the grape-vine mantling over the
cottage door, or the golden apricot hanging on the
wall, we almost forget that our native land can boast of
few fruits save those which have been brought from
104 WILD FRUITS.

afar. Many are of opinion that before the invasion
of the Romans our island fruits were few indeed, and
that the crab apple, the sloe, the hazel, and the acorn
are all that are indigenous. The last, indeed, we scarcely,
when using the word in a popular sense, include among
fruits, especially as we have no record that in this
country acorns were ever used as food for man; though
in the time of the ancient Britons they were important
as food for swine.

During the course of centuries, however, some other
fruits have become so naturalized as to be quite wild
in our woodlands and hedges. The crab apple-tree is
common in our woods, and is very ornamental to them
during May, by its beautiful pink blossoms ; and though
its harsh fruits are of little use, save to the school-boy
and the bird, and for the verjuice which is procured
from them, yet they have too a beauty of their own.
This crab is the origin of our apple, the fruit so useful
to us, both for the table, and for the cider which, in
some counties, is expressed from it; and it is superior
to any of the stone fruits of the English orchard, because
it retains its freshness for months, while they are
injured if kept for a few days only. The Romans,
according to Pliny, had twenty-two varieties: but we
have now under culture several hundreds. The pear-
tree, which is in bloom a month earlier, yet whose
white flowers remain on the bough long enough to con-
trast in our woods with the rose-like blooms of the
apple, has a small harsh fruit, but this is the origin of
the garden pears.

Nor are there wanting in the woods, during spring,
other wild blossoms of fruit-trees. The hawthorn bears
WILD FRUITS. 105

its white flowers, and though its fruits are, like the
hips of the rose-tree, useful to birds only, yet many
as well as Cowper have made a meal of them in early
days. The bird cherry, with its small jetty fruits, called
gaskins by the cottager, and the wild cherry, whose
fruits, though small, are thought to have originated the
cultivated fruit, are common in woods and copses.
There is no doubt, however, that the cherry was intro-
duced by the Romans, who received it from Pontus,
when Lucullus, having conquered Mithridates, carried
in his triumphal procession the tree, bearing its ruddy
cherries. This was in the year 73 B.c., and it was
introduced into Britain a hundred and twenty years
afterwards. Some writers consider that the cherry,
which the Romans had planted in our island, was after-
wards lost; but an old song of Lydgate’s, written about
the year 1415, describes the cherry as sold then about
the streets of London, as it is now.

The plum-tree, with its small fruits, is found some-
times in woods, but has probably been the outcast of
some garden. Who, however, that has ever rambled
among the woods and hedges of our land has not seen
the sloe, whose white blossoms, without the contrast of
a single leaf, come so early in the year, and amidst the
‘black winds” of spring, that country people have
named the shrub the blackthorn? Its dark purple
fruits, covered with a whitish bloom, are used to adul-
terate port wine ; and the leaves are said to be sometimes
mingled with those of the tea. The wild bullace, too,
has dark plum-like fruits, though they are sometimes of
a waxy yellow; and there is, in some of our hedges,
a thorny medlar-tree, but its fruits are of little worth.

on
106 WILD FRUITS.

The berries of the rowan, or of the mountain ash,
and the coral fruits of the yew, are sometimes eaten ;
and the buckthorn of our sea-shores has yellow acid
berries, agreeable to the taste. The fruits of the
service-tree, too, are perfectly wholesome, and those of
the more rare true service-tree, are shaped like a pear,
and an inch long. The dark berries of the elder are
used to make a wine often drunk around the Christmas
fire of many a village home; and the sharp scarlet
berries of the barberry-tree are a pleasant fruit, and
are sometimes made into a preserve. Far more agree-
able in flavour are the strawberry-like berries of the
arbutus, which, though growing truly wild about the
Lake of Killarney, and in some woods of other parts
of Ireland, is supposed by some to have been originally
introduced there by the monks of Mucruss Abbey.

In roaming over our country landscapes, we may
sometimes discover the gooseberry-bush, but if it ever
grows truly wild in this land, it is very rare. Some
of the different species of currant are found in places
where no cultured garden can have been. We have
the black currant in many of our woods, and by river
sides, and the rock and mountain currants grow in
several copses in the north of England; though the
common red species is probably not truly wild in those
alpine woods in which it has been occasionally found.
The scarlet fruits of the wild raspberry, too, are plen-
tiful in some of these northern woodlands.

But of more value, because more frequent, are the
fruits of some other of the bramble tribe. Their gauzy
flowers are beautiful in summer, and the blackberries,
cloudberries, and dewberries afford much delight to
WILD FRUITS. 107

the young ramblers in lanes and woodlands. Whortle-
berries and cowberries are very abundant in many
mountainous districts both of England and Scotland,
while cranberries grow more rarely among the peat
bogs of various parts of England, Scotland and Ireland.
These fruits are all welcomed in neighbourhoods where
they are plentiful, and serve for many domestic uses.
Whortleberries are used for tarts, and are eaten also
with clotted cream. Our native cranberry is a delicious
fruit for tarts, and is far superior in flavour to the exotic
species so largely introduced into this country. At
Longtown, on the borders of Cumberland, this fruit
forms no inconsiderable article of trade.

In many of our woods, too, and on many a pleasant
hedge-bank, the wild strawberry glistens in beauty
among its large and handsome foliage; and this whole-
some fruit, though small, has a finer flavour than the
cultivated species. All who love the woodland walk,
rejoice to see its white spring blossom, and the ruddy
fruit which it bears in summer. And if the nuts which
grow in the hazel-bough above it can be praised less
for their wholesome nature, yet, like the strawberry,
they give birth to many a happy thought, and invite
to many a pleasant stroll among the green trees of the
wood; while the fruits of the tall and handsome chest-
nut have not so much sweetness in flavour as they.
The chestnut-tree seems wild in some woods, in the
south and south-west of England, but is more often
seen in plantations, where it is cultivated for its timber.
The fruit is more eaten on the Continent than with us,
and is sometimes, in France, boiled with milk for
breakfast. A. P.
THE UNSEEN HAND.

Loxpoy Bripex is not exactly the most convenient
place in the world for recognitions, greetings, friendly
inquiries, and the deliberate narration of personal
histories. It has happened to me, however, twice in
ray life, during occasional visits to the metropolis, to
be thrown, most unexpectedly, in the way of old friends
on London Bridge. In the first instance, which
happened many years ago, I was hurrying rapidly along
the crowded thoroughfare, when the sight of a once-
familiar face suddenly arrested my steps. It was the
countenance of a middle-aged man, who was leaning
over the balustrade, and pensively contemplating the
busy scene below, and in that countenance I recognised
an old school-fellow and companion. But, how changed!
The man was stamped with marks of premature age.
Care, anxiety, and despondency, betrayed themselves in
every line of his formerly joyous features. Poverty
was visible in every seam of his threadbare garments.

For a moment I hesitated whether to address my
former friend, or to pass on unnoticing and unnoticed.
If shame to be seen in friendly contact with evident
destitution had anything to do with this hesitation,
THE UNSEEN HAND. 109

may my God forgive the pride of my heart! But
whether this, or some more justifiable feeling caused me
to pause, the pause was of short duration. I approached
the unconscious and vacant gazer, and touched his
shoulder. He turned sharply round, seemingly with
trembling apprehension, and had stammered out, “ What
do you want?” before he recognised the intrudey.
Then, suddenly recollecting me, he grasped my hand
and burst into tears.

In a short space of time we were seated together in
the box of a neighbouring coffee-room; and I was in
possession of the outlines of George Harford’s history.

It was a mournful story. Poor George could with
sad propriety adopt the language, “Lover and friend
hast thou put far from me, and mine acquaintance into
darkness.” The greater part of his family connexions
had been removed by death ; and by those who remained
he had been neglected or forsaken, as his circumstances
became impaired and his prospects darkened.

He had first entered into business with a moderate
capital, and for a short time had succeeded. Then a
reverse had taken place, on his own showing, unfore-
seen and unavoidable, by which he was nearly ruined,
and his establishment broken up. Dejected, but not
quite despairing, George Harford had striven to retrieve
his losses, by engaging in partnership with a plausible
rogue, who first contrived to rob him of what little
he had left, and then to get rid of him as an en-
cumbrance.

Once more, George set himself to the task of working
upwards from the pit.into which he had fallen. With
some trifling assistance from a distant relation, he
110 THE UNSEEN HAND.

established a very humble business in the outskirts of
London, which promised to yield him, at least, a mere
subsistence. “But,” said my poor, almost heart-broken
old friend, “just as I was striving my hardest, and
had hopes of repaying the loan, and of having, at length,
a comfortable though humble home, a fire broke out at
the next door to mine. It spread—my dwelling was
consumed, and my stock in trade with it, while I
escaped only with my life. Would to God,” he ex-
claimed, with a sudden burst of impatience, “that I
had died then—if it had but been his will,” he added,
contritely ; “had I died then, I should have been
taken away from the evil to come.”

“JT was uninsured,” he continued, “and I had to
bear the bitter reproaches of my relative for this un-
wise neglect. I could not ask him for further assist-
ance, and he did not offer it. He left me to take my
chance for the future.”

I will not weary and distress you, reader, by recount-
ing every fresh disaster of my poor friend. It is
enough to say, that when I encountered his faded form
on London Bridge, he was homeless and moneyless,
without employment, and without hope. I know not
what temptation might have been, at that moment,
busily at work in his heart, while he stood watching
the dark stream which flowed beneath him; but he
spoke of his life having been saved by the unexpected
meeting.

Well, we parted; and George Harford yet lives.
Admonished and sanctified by past trials, and not
unthoughtful of past mercies, he has learnt to feel,
and adopt as his own, the sentiments of some exquisitely
THE UNSEEN HAND. 111

beautiful stanzas, which, as illustrative of my subject,
I may be permitted to quote :—

“Through all the various shifting scene
Of life’s mistaken ill or good,
Thy hand, O God! conducts unseen
The beautiful vicissitude.

“Thou givest with paternal care,
Howe’er unjustly we complain,
To each, his necessary share
Of joy and sorrow, health and pain.

“ When lowest sunk with grief and shame,
Filld with afiliction’s bitter cup,
Lost to relations, friends, and fame,
Thy powerful hand can raise us up.

“ All things on earth, and all in heaven,
On thy eternal will depend ;
And all for greater good were given,
While all shall in thy glory end.”

Many years after my meeting with George
Harford, I was again walking over London Bridge,
when, in the crowd of passers-by, a young man hastily
moved on, with whose features I fancied I had once
been familiar, though I could not recall the how, or the
when. As we were passing each other, our eyes met,
and after a momentary hesitation, the stranger or the
friend, whichever or whoever he might be, smiled, held
out his hand, and, addressing me by name, gave mine
a hearty and cordial pressure, while he expressed at
once his surprise and his pleasure in having thus met
me. While he was speaking, I vainly endeavoured
to disentangle my memory ; at length I was obliged to
confess, that though the face, manner and voice, were
112 THE UNSEEN HAND.

those of a former acquaintance, I could not remember
more. *

“You will not have forgotten Frederic Heath,
surely ?” said-he.

The name was enough.

No, certainly, I had not forgotten Frederic Heath,
whom I had known ten years before as an ardent,
active, persevering youth, and whose father, while he
lived, was my old friend and correspondent. I apolo-
gized for my lapse of memory, which was justly
to be attributed to Frederic’s advance from youth to
manhood, with the natural changes which this advance
had brought about. Having thus, as I hoped, cleared
myself from the charge of wilful forgetfulness, I con-
gratulated my young friend on his good looks, and
ventured to inquire into his present pursuits.

“T am pressed for time now,” he answered, “having
an engagement in the city, but you will come and see
me to-night ? Here is my address,” and he put a card.
into my hand. “TI shall be home at eight,—or stop, I
will make it seven, and you will spend the evening with
me: I have a spare bed,’’—and so on.

The card indicated that Mr. Frederic Heath was, at
that time, the inhabitant of a certain house in a certain
terrace at Clapham. For a moment or two I hesitated
whether or not to accept the invitation. There was an
air of brisk self-satisfaction, and a trifle of assumption
in my new-old acquaintance, which did not entirely
harmonize with my feelings ; and I was about to express
my regret that I could not conveniently take up my
abode with him that night, when he added,

“My, mother lives with me, and so does my sister
THE UNSEEN HAND. 113

Catherine—dear Kate, you remember her, sir; and
they willbe so glad to see you. We often talk of you;
do come, if you can.”

“T will,” I replied.

“That?s right; thank you; not later than seven,
mind,” said Frederic, once more cordially shaking me
by the hand; he then hurried away, to keep, as I pre-
sumed, his city engagement, leaving me to fulfil mine,
if had any; or, in the absence of other occupations,
to weary myself with guesses about Mr. Frederic
Heath, his mother and his sister; and to recall the
memory of my old friend, his father.

I was at number this and terrace that, in the parish
of Clapham, soon after seven, and found that Mr.
Frederic, punctual as he might be to his city engage-
ments, had not on this occasion so punctually kept his
social obligation. I was well-remembered, however, by
his widowed mother and his sister; and I was not
altogether sorry for the delay, which gave me half-an-
hour’s pleasant chat with the ladies before my young
friend made his appearance. From them I learned his
history, as much of which as is needful to my purpose
may be told in a few words.

At the death of my old friend, his widow and children
were left in straitened circumstances; alleviated, how-
ever, by the firm assurance that the husband and father
was “ asleep in Jesus; ” by humble trust in the Father
of the fatherless and the Friend of the widow, and
by the fact that both son and daughter had been pre-
viously prepared for personal exertion in the world.

I
114 THE UNSEEN HAND.

Before the first. pangs of sorrowing affection had well
subsided, Kate sought and obtained employment as a
daily governess ; while Frederic, two or three years her
junior, received an advance of salary in the counting
house of his employer.

After a few years of unwearied application, joined
with business tact, Frederic had received overtures of
partnership from a citizen, who set the young man’s
valuable qualifications against his want of capital. The
offer was accepted; the concern prospered, and, at the
time of our meeting, Frederic Heath was a successful
and a still rismg man.

“He has been a good son and brother,’ said his
mother, with affectionate emotion. “He insisted upon
our sharing in the fruits of his industry. Last year he
took this house for us, that we might be nearer the
country than we were, and he has furnished it with a
view far more to our convenience and comfort than his
own. There is one thing, however, which gives me
many anxious thoughts——”

At this moment, the knocker at the door announced
the. approach of Mr. Frederic, and our conversation
was, of course, broken off.

My young friend apologized—sincerely, I believe—for
his unintentional delay, welcomed me as his father’s
friend to his abode, and, after a few words of affection
to his mother and sister, he retired for a few minutes,
to wash away, as he said, the smoke of the city.

We were soon seated around the ‘tea-table, and
talking of days long past. At the same time, I had
leisure to look around me; and though I was not, I
trust, impertinently curious, I could scarcely fail to
THE UNSEEN HAND. 115

observe many indications of prosperity, which certainly
gave me some surprise. The useful and necessary
furniture of the room in which we sat was expensive,
and many luxuries were scattered about, which showed
that money was, in one way or other, readily at the
command of my young friend. He talked largely, too,
and somewhat boastingly, I thought, of what he
intended to do in the way of fresh purchases, as soon
as he could afford it; and when reminded by his mother
that already they enjoyed as much as could be desired
of the good things of this life, and much more than
could have been hoped for at a period not long gone
by, the young man listened impatiently, and seemed
desirous of changing the subject. He was evidently
ashamed of the honourable poverty from which he had
so rapidly.emerged.

All at once, I thought of George Harford, and, to
give a turn to the conversation, gave the history of my
meeting with him on London Bridge; and contrasted
his experience of life with that of my young friend
Frederic, whom I had, singularly enough, encountered
on nearly the same spot that morning. I ventured to
add that God, in his providence, sees fit to deal with
his creatures in a variety of ways. To some he gives
the power to get wealth, every project appears to pro-
sper in their hands; and they know but little of the
vexations and struggles of adversity: while to others,
their equals in talent, enterprise, and industry, every
avenue to prosperity is apparently closed, and their
lives present nothing but a series of disappointments
and worldly sorrows.

It was easy to be seen that my old friend, Mrs.
116: THE UNSEEN HAND.

Heath, sympathised with my feelings, and approved of
my homily. Not so, however, her son. He heard me
patiently, but when I had ended, he, with more petu-
lance, I thought, than the occasion demanded, challenged
the correctness and propriety of my views.

“T do not believe,” he said, ‘in these notions about
Providence.”

“You do not believe in a God, perhaps?” I re-
sponded.

“ Oh yes, I do,” he replied; “and I think that He
has given to all natural powers to improve, and that it
is our own fault if we do not improve them.”

“ True, my friend; and what then?”

“Why, that every man’s well-being is almost en-
tirely in his own power; and that riches even are at
the command of all who will but exert their energies
to obtain them.”

“ For instance,” I said; “ you think that my old
friend Harford might have been as prosperous as your-
self, had he but been as painstaking and industrious ?”

“T have no doubt of it;” the young man confidently
answered. ‘The fact is, I have no patience with those
who lay the blame of their own want of success upon
Providence. There was only to-day, a fellow came to
me with a long story, about being ruined by Providence.
I soon cut it short, though.”

“ You do not take either side of the argument, Miss
Heath,” I said, after a long discussion, of which I
have ventured to give only the beginning, and in which
her brother had warmly maintained his point, against
the united forces of his mother and myself,
THE UNSEEN HAND. 117

“Kate is a sensible girl,” said Frederic, good-
humouredly. “ You think as I do, don’t you, Kate?”

“ Do not be too sure of that, Fred,” she answered.
“The fact is, your conversation has put me in mind
of a fanciful tale, written some years ago by an old
schoolfellow; and I am almost resolved to inflict upon
you the penalty of reading it, as a punishment for your
heresy.””

“No, no,” replied her brother; “read it yourself,
and welcome; that is, if our friend here is willing to
listen.”’

Of course, I expressed my wish to hear the story,
and——here it is. ;

Tue Unseen Hann.

Eli Ben Amram was one of the richest of his tribe.
He had risen from humble circumstances to high honour,
from poverty to great wealth. His ships floated on
many seas, his merchandize was the produce of nume-
rous lands; his fame resounded through all his nation.
Yet did not the fortunes of Eli Ben Amram cause him
to forget the God of his fathers: he was learned in the
law of Moses, and in the traditions of the elders. He
observed every feast and every fast; he paid tithes
and gave alms: moreover, he built a synagogue. Rich
was the smoke of his morning and evening sacrifices,
and frequent were his devotions.

But where is the perfect man? One precept did
Eli Ben Amram forget to cherish in his memory: ‘ Be-
ware lest thou say in thine heart, My power and the
might of mine hand hath gotten me this wealth’ He


118 THE UNSEEN HAND.

had sustained his aged parents in comfort; he had given
his sister Keturah in marriage, with a princely por-
tion; he had bestowed on his younger brother Jorah
a thousand pieces of silver, wherewith to traffic; many
had he befriended, and he thought himself better than
they, inasmuch as he had wisdom to amass riches. He
praised his God for blessings bestowed, while vet his
soul vaunted itself in that he had turned those blessings
to his own advantage,—not remembering that the Lord
his God had given him the power to get wealth.

When Jotham, Ben Amram’s eldest son, had attained
the age of manhood, his father gave him a purse of
gold, and bade him go, and make merchandize there-
with. “Be diligent, my son,” he said; “ be prudent,
and be fortunate.. A man’s success depends on himself;
the blessing of God follows the hand of the diligent.”

While he was yet speaking with his son, a messenger
arrived from a distant city,—the bearer of a letter from
his brother Jorah. Distress, sudden and severe, had
fallen upon him: the hand of God was pressing him
sore. Fire and flood had devoured his possessions ;
sickness had weakened his strength by the way. He,
therefore, entreated his brother Eli to lend him fifty
pieces of silver, to preserve him and the wife and chil-
dren of his bosom from ruin.

Ben Amram was angry because his brother had
become poor; and he said to his son Jotham, “I will
send him six times as much as he asks, but, withal, I
will rebuke him sharply; for he hath been negligent.

. A wise and prudent man will guard against evil, or,

foreseeing it, he will hide himself. It is the fool alone
who, passing on, is punished. He will thrive well who
THE UNSEEN HAND. 119

looketh to his own affairs. Go, my son, entertain the
messenger until I have written to my brother.”

So Ben Amram wrote a letter to his brother, full of
bitter words ; and putting into a bag three hundred
pieces of silver, which afterwards he secured with his
own signet, he sat down to await the return of the
messenger.

Suddenly, the spirit of slumber fell upon Ben Amram ;
and glimpses of the invisible were revealed to him in
visions. Before him stood a youth, of noble and com-
manding form, and clothed in foreign garb. In his
hand he held a wand of ivory. A strange awe oppressed
the mind of Ben Amram as he gazed on the visitant.
Nevertheless, though subdued, his spirit sank not in
utter dismay.

“ Hli Ben Amram,” said the stranger, “canst thou
avoid the poverty into which thy brother Jorah hath
fallen ?”

Ben Amram smiled proudly as he replied, “I have
avoided it.”

* Hitherto thou hast,” said the stranger : “or rather,
hitherto God hath prospered the work of thy hands, and
given thee wealth: he may also withdraw it.”

“ The blessing of God,” answered Ben Amram, “is
on the diligent and prudent man.”

“ Wealth is not always a blessing,” replied the
stranger, “inasmuch as mortals sometimes use it to
their own hurt. Yet, it is one of the good gifts of
God, which he bestoweth on one, and withholdeth from
another. Eli Ben Amram! look on the past!”

The visitor waved his wand, and passed his hand
over the eyes of Ben Amram. Then did a thick mist
120 THE UNSEEN HAND.

fill the apartment, while a cold thrill agitated for a
moment the frame of the boastful merchant. The mist
divided, and Ben Amram saw in distant perspective the
home of his childhood. Youthful forms were sporting
round the well-remembered hearth. He knew them to’
be his brother Jorah and his sister Keturah, while with
another shadowy form he felt himself to be identified.
The thoughts and feelings of childhood returned, and he
lived, as it were, a double life :—a grave and thoughtful
man, and a simple, reckless boy. In that mysterious
moment, not only did his actual life pass in review
before him, but, shadowed on that mist were the good
and evil influences by which, in those earlier stages of
existence, he had been surrounded.

He saw that boy environed by perils and temptations ;
heedless and unconscious of them all, yet escaping
them. Another step in that course would have brought
him within the grasp of death, when suddenly it was
abandoned. Another movement in this direction would
have plunged him into errors as fatal to the spirit,
when, without adequate apparent cause, he stopped and
turned aside.

“Why doth the child avoid the dangers he knoweth
not of ?” asked Ben Amram. *

“ Look more closely,” said the stranger. And when
Ben Amram looked, he saw, hovering above and around
the boy, dim and shadowy, yet becoming more distinct
the longer it was gazed on, the form of a hand. It was
this HAND, he now saw, which guided and upheld, inter-
posed when danger was near, and averted the threatened
stroke.

The boy became a man; and THE HaND was still
THE UNSEEN HAND. 121

near him, protecting, restraining, controlling, support-
ing, directing. In the intricate paths of youth, in
the rougher ways of manhood, its powerful yet gentle
influence was alike felt. Ben Amram remembered
circumstances of perplexity, in which he thought he had
been guided by his own wisdom, but in which, as he
now saw, the shadowy HanpD had pointed to a right
decision. Sometimes he had spurned its influence, and
had fallen. Then tHE Hann had raised him, succoured
him, and continued its unwearied task. Sometimes its
movements were involved in mystery; the mist would ©
gather round, and he could see neither its operations
nor its object.

Ben Amram saw that wanp pouring wealth at his
feet, which he might gather at will. It prospered his
traffic, and removed his rivals from his path. It gave
him ships, and sped them safely and prosperously over
the ocean. It defended him from losses, and assisted
his schemes. It guided him in the choice of a residence,
and directed him to the partner of his life. It gave him
the desire of his heart. It raised him to honour and
fame.

He saw tHe HAND beckoning as his brother’s mes-
senger drew near; and then the scene was obscured,—
the mist again filled the apartment.

«ili Ben Amram,” said the visitor, “thou hast seen
the sign of the Invisible, upholding the hand of the
diligent through the past. Look now upon the future!”

Again he waved the wand, and placed, for an instant,
his hand upon the eyes of Ben Amram. The mist once
more divided.

He saw his brother, worn with poverty, and wasted
122 THE UNSEEN HAND.

by sickness. He marked the anguish of his spirit as he
read the reproachful letter. He saw the shadowy HAND
over him also; but again the scene changed.

A ship sailed on a distant sea. That HAND raised
the waves and winds to a storm, and impelled the
vessel to destruction. The owner was impoverished ;
—and he was indebted to Ben Amram for the sum of
four thousand pieces of silver.

And now the shiftings of the scene increased in
rapidity; yet still rHz HanD was there. Jorah repaid
the three hundred pieces of money ; while Ben Amram’s
eldest daughter Rachel returned a destitute and mourn-
ing widow to her father’s house. The ship in which -
Jotham sailed was attacked, the passengers were robbed
and taken captive, and an exorbitant ransom was de-
manded. Ben Amram paid the sum, and Jotham re-
turned in nakedness and want. Fire devoured the
possessions of one debtor ; blight and mildew destroyed
those of another. Famine and pestilence wasted the
land; the sources of commerce failed. Ben Amram’s
boasted sagacity seemed to forsake him: perplexed and
bewildered, he felt himself unable to stem the current
of adverse circumstances. His younger son Eliab
risked Acs patrimony in a commercial adventure: it
failed, and he lost all. His daughter Miriam was
sought in marriage by one whose character and prospects
appeared promising. The influences of the warning
HAND were disregarded, and Ben Amram discovered
too late that he had bestowed the darling of his heart
on an unprincipled adventurer.

In all these changes, that HaND was seen mingling,
more shadowy and mysterious, yet still visible. Ben
THE UNSEEN HAND. 123

‘Amram saw himself, notwithstanding all his efforts,
reduced to utter poverty; and then, through the mist,
he perceived approaching him his brother Jorah. He
shrank from him, for he feared to have retorted upon
him his own reproaches.

“My brother,” said Jorah, “the good hand of God
has been with me, and has given me competence.
Come, and share it with me; I have enough for thee
and me.”

Then did Eli Ben Amram exclaim, “The Lord gave,
and the Lord hath taken away; blessed be the name of
the Lord.”

At this instant the door of the apartmert opened,
and with his son Jotham entered the messenger of his
brother. Ben Amram looked around him; the stranger
was gone, and the mist had vanished. The letter he
had written was before him. He consumed it in the
flame of the lamp that burned in the hearth, and in its
stead he penned a kind and sympathising message to
his brother.

From that hour was Eli Ben Amram never heard to
vaunt himself in his wisdom or his wealth; and if one .
praised his skill and success,—‘“‘and men will praise thee
when thou doest well to thyself,’—he would reply,
“ Nay, but it was the good hand of my God upon me.”
And when he admonished his children to attend dili-
gently and circumspectly to their affairs, he added this
caution, “Above all things, seek the guidance and
protection of THE UNSEEN HAND.”

“T am not to have you on my side, Kate, I see,”
said Frederic, when his sister had finished reading the
124 THE UNSEEN HAND.

manuscript, “but for all that, and in spite of your
pretty story, I am not converted, mind.”

Not long ago I met Frederic Heath under other
circumstances. His self-sufficiency had disappeared :
his tone was subdued and humbled. He had learned
by experience that “the race is not” always “to the
swift, nor the battle to the strong.”

8.
FAITH AND OBEDIENCE.

_ Ir is not enough that you receive Christ for the
single object of forgiveness, or as a priest who has
wrought out an atonement for you; for Christ offers
himself in more capacities than this one, and you do
not receive him truly unless you receive him just as he
offers himself. Again, itis not enough that you receive
Christ only as a priest and a prophet; for all that he
teaches will be to you a dead letter unless you are
qualified to understand and to obey it; andif you think
that you are qualified by nature, you, in fact, refuse his
teaching at the very time you profess him to be your
teacher, for he says, “ Without me ye can do nothing.”
You must receive him for strength as well as for for-
giveness and direction; or, in other words, you must
submit to him as your King, not merely to rule over
you by his law, but to rule in you by his Spirit. You
must live in constant dependence on the influences of
his grace, and if you do so, you never will stop short at
-any one point of obedience, but knowing that the grace
of God is all-powerful, you will suffer no difficulties to
stop your progress; you will suffer no paltry limit of
what unaided human nature can do, to bound your
ambition after the glories of a purer and a better
126 FAITH AND OBEDIENCE.

character than any earthly principle can accomplish; you
will enter a career, of which you at this moment see
not the end;. you will try an ascent of which the lofty
eminence is hid in the darkness of futurity; the chilling
sentiment, that no higher obedience is expected of you
than of yourself you can yield, will have no influence
upon you, for the mighty stretch of attainment that
you look forward to, is not what you can do, but what
Christ can do in you; and with the all-subduing instru-
ment of his grace to help you through every difficulty,
and to carry you in triumph over every opposition, you
will press forward conquering and to conquer; and
while the world knoweth not the power of those great
and animating hopes which sustain you, you will be
making daily progress in a field of discipline and
acquirement which they have never entered; and in
patience and forgiveness, and gentleness and charity,
and the love of God, and the love of your neighbour—
which is like unto the love of God, you will prove that
a work of grace is going on in your hearts, even that
work by which the image you lost at the fall is repaired
and brought back again—the empire of sin within you
is overthrown—the subjection of your hearts to what
is visible and earthly is exchanged for the power of the
unseen world over its every affection—and you are
filled with such a faith, and such a love, and such a
superiority to perishable things, as will shed a glory
over the whole of your daily walk, and give to every
one of your domgs the high character of a candidate
for eternity.

Christ is offered to all for forgiveness. The man who
takes him for this single object must be looking at him

|
FAITH AND OBEDIENCE. 127

with an eye half-shut upon the revelation he makes of
himself. ‘Look at him with an open and a steadfast
eye, and then I will call you a true believer; and sure
T am, that if you do so, you cannot avoid seeing him in
the earnestness of his desire that you should give up
all sin, and enter from this moment into all obe-
dience. True, and most true, that faith will save
you; but it must be a whole faith in a whole Bible.
True, and most true, that they who keep the command-
ments of Jesus shall enter into life; but you are not
to shrink from any one of these commandments, or to
say, because they are so much above the power of
humanity, that you must give up the task of attempting
them. ‘True, and most true, that he who trusteth to
his obedience as a saviour, is shifting his confidence
from the alone foundation it can rest upon. Christ is
your Saviour; and when I call upon you to rejoice in
that reconciliation which is through him, I call upon
you not to leave him for a single moment, when you
engage in the work of doing those things which if left
undone, will exclude us from the kingdom of heaven.
Take him along with you into all your services. Let
this sentiment ever be upon you,—What I am now
doing I may do in my own strength to the satisfaction
of man; but I must have the power of Christ resting
upon the performance, if I wish to do it in the way
that is acceptable to God. Let this be your habitual
sentiment, and then the supposed opposition between
faith and works vanishes into nothing. The life of a
believer is made up of good works; and faith is the
animating and the power-working principle of every
one ofthem. The Spirit of Christ actuates and sustains
128 FAITH AND OBEDIENCE.

the whole course of your obedience. You walk not
away from him, but you “ walk in him;” andas there is
not one of your doings in which he does not feel a con-
cern, and prescribe for you a duty, so there is not one
of them in which his grace is not in readiness to put
the right principle into your heart, and to bring it out
into your conduct, and to make your walk accord with
your profession, so as to let the world see upon you
without, the power and the efficacy of the sentiment
within; and thus, while Christ has the whole merit of
your forgiveness, he has also the whole merit of your
sanctification; and the humble and deeply-felt con-
sciousness of “yet not I, but the grace of God which
was with me,” restores to Jesus Christ all the credit
and all the glory which belong to him, by making hin
your only, and your perfect, and your entire, and your
altogether Saviour.

Choose him as the Captain of your salvation. Let
him enter into your hearts by faith, and let him dwell
continually there. Cultivate a daily intercourse and a
growing acquaintance with him. Oh, you are in safe
company, indeed, when your fellowship is with him!
The shield of his protecting mediatorship is ever be-
tween you and the justice of God; and out of his ful-
ness there goeth a constant stream, to nourish, and to
animate, and to strengthen every believer. Why should
the shifting of human instruments so oppress and so
discourage you, when he is your willing friend; when
he is ever present, and is at all times in readiness ;
when he, the same to-day, yesterday, and for ever, is to
be met with in every place; and while his disciples
here, giving way to the power of sight, are sorrowful,
FAITH AND OBEDIENCE. 129

and in great heaviness, because they are to move
at a distance from one another, he has his eye upon
all neighbourhoods and all countries, and will at
length gather his disciples into one eternal family ?
With such a Master let us quit ourselves like men.
With the magnificence of eternity before us, let time,
with all its fluctuations, dwindle into its own littleness.
If God is pleased to spare me, I trust I shall often meet
with you in person, even on this side of the grave; but
if not, let us often meet in prayer at the mercy-seat of
God. While we occupy different places on earth, let
our mutual intercessions for each other go to one place
in heaven. Let the Saviour put our supplications
into one censer; and be assured, that after the dear
and the much-loved scenery of this peaceful vale has
disappeared from my eye, the people who live in it
shall retain a warm and an ever-during place in my
memory ;—and this mortal body must be stretched on
the bed of death, ere the heart which now animates it
can resign its exercise of longing after you, and praying
for you, that you may so receive Christ Jesus, and so
walk in him, and so hold fast the things you have gotten,
and so prove that the labour I have had amongst you
has not been in vain; that when the sound of the last
trumpet awakens us, these eyes which are now bathed
in tears may open upon a scene of eternal blessedness ;
we, whom the providence of God has withdrawn for
a little while from one another, may on that day be
found side by side at the right hand of the everlasting
throne.—Dr. Chalmers? Farewell Discourse at Kilmany.
EXOTIC FRUITS.

“ Wilt thou, to the isles
Atlantic, to the rich Hesperian clime,
Fly in the train of Autumn; and look on
And learn from him: while, as he roves around,
Where’er his fingers touch the fruitful grove
The branches bloom with gold? Where’er his foot
Imprints the soil, the ripening clusters swell,
Turning aside the foliage, and come forth
In purple lights, till every hillock glows
As with the blushes of an evening sky.”

Some of the most beautiful objects in nature are the
fruits which hang among the leaves of trees, in some
cases, as the orange, shining there in ripened lustre,
at the same time that some of the boughs are laden
with the fragrant blossoms ; but more often succeeding
the bloom of the early year, with a beauty scarcely
inferior to it. Many of our fruits, though foreign,
need little care, and can bear exposure to the air
of temperate climates, being so adapted to our gardens
and orchards, that they seem to us as our own. The
rich grape, with its purple or green cluster, depends
not alone from the roof of the greenhouse, but hangs
among the broad’ vine-leaves which enrich the humble
dwelling, ripening in our sunshine to so mellow a
flavour, that we scarcely remember that it is of Asiatic

EXOTIC FRUITS, 131

origin. It has been ours too for many centuries, for
vineyards, as well as orchards and gardens, are men-
tioned in the earliest Saxon charters. The almond
blooms with us, as it does in the isles of Greece, or in
the lands of Syria; and downy peaches and yellow
apricots from Asia have become common fruits of our
gardens; and the broad spreading walnut-tree casts its
shadow around many a homestead, and yields as good a
fruit as in its native Persia. The skill which enables
man to adapt the fruits of various countries to his own
use, has taught us to rear in our hot-houses the pine-
apple and the melon, and other productions of hot
climates ; whilst the bright orange and the paler lemon
mingle their boughs and fruits beneath its roof.

It is interesting to consider how God has suited the
fruits of different lands to the wants of their inhabi-
tants. In temperate and cold countries, fruits, however
pleasing to the palate, are not necessary to health and
comfort, as in the hotter regions of the globe. We
find, accordingly, that the fruits of temperate, and
especially of cold climates, are not large and luscious,
neither are they so varied and abundant as those of
warmer latitudes. Berries abound chiefly in northern
regions, and strawberries, cranberries, raspberries,
gooseberries, and currants, and rich bramble-berries,
grow even among the snows of Siberia; and cold
Finland has, on rocks where little else will grow, its
gooseberries and cherries, while the woods in the north
of Sweden, where no culture will produce the apple, the
pear, or the plum, are yet full of delicious gooseberries,
and currants, and raspberries, and whortleberries, far
larger than those which we have in this land.
182 EXOTIC FRUITS.

Very different, however, from these, are the mag-
nificent fruits of lands in which the sun has greater
power. The large mango, sometimes weighing more
than two pounds, and coloured with tints of purple or
green, is said to have a flavour as sweet as can be ima-
gined, and hangs in bunches of eight, ten, or twelve
from a single twig. So juicy, too, is the mangostan of
Sumatra, that it refreshes the thirsty people of those
hot lands, with a flavour which is said to unite those of
the strawberry and the finest grape; and rose-apples,
and rich red pomegranates, and figs, and large clusters
of dates and bananas, and the plattain, called in
Sierra Leone the “ Negro’s staff of life,’ and similar
fruits, are provided for the people of countries in
which thirst renders fruit so needful, and in which
a large amount of animal food would be injurious to
health. The guava, whose fruit will ripen in our hot-
houses, is plentiful in the wild woods of warmer regions;
and the fruit of the custard-apple, larger than the
orange, hangs in purple and green beauty in abundance
among the boughs. The pine-apple of the tropical
garden is far different from that which we see at our
table, or in our hot-houses. A brilliant purple blossom,
resembling the tube of a hyacinth, opens from each of
the diamond-shaped divisions of the fruit itself. This,
when young, is of the same rich colour, surmounted
by a crest of pink corded leaves, and protected all
round by others much larger and broader. As it ripens,
however, the fruit loses its beautiful and fresh appear-
ance, the purple, in most species, becomes straw-
coloured, and the leaves assume the green tint.

Wherever man has come. with the spirit of activity
EXOTIC FRUITS. 133

and intelligence, he has dispersed the fruits of one land
into another. Our country owes many of its fruits to
the invasion of the Romans. They in their turn had
derived the fig from Syria, the orange or citron from
Media, the peach from Persia, the pomegranate from
Africa, the pear, the apple, and the cherry from
Armenia. Wherever their conquests were made, the
land was made to yield to them its vegetable products ;
and thus war, in the earlier ages of society, became the
means of dispersing plants to countries remote from
those in which they grew. The monks, too, cultivated
herbs and fruits, as the old pear and mulberry-trees of
many an abbey garden yet remain to show; and many of
those which they prized most highly were brought into
our country by the ecclesiastics who had accompanied
the crusaders to the Holy Land. Hollinshed tells how
Ely Place in Holborn, the original site of the once
‘magnificent residence of the Bishops of Ely, had in
early times its garden of strawberries, as well as its
vineyards and green meadows. In a.p. 1488, on the
morning of the execution of Lord Hastings, when
Richard 11, then Duke of Gloucester, came among
the lords who sat in council respecting his coming
coronation, he said to Morton, at that time bishop of
Ely, “‘My lord, you have verie good strawberries in
your garden in Holborne. I require you let us have
a messe of them. ‘ Gladly, my lord,’ quoth he; ‘would
God I had some better things as ready to your pleasure
as that!’ and therewithal, in all haste he sent his
servant for a mess of strawberries.”

As commerce extended itself, and the merchant and
the colonist went over wide seas and traversed continents
1384 EXOTIC FRUITS.

hitherto unexplored, a large number of vegetable pro-
ductions were introduced from distant lands, and the
monasteries having been now destroyed, the culture of
fruit-trees, in the gardens of private houses, became
more general. In the reign of Henry viu, the cherry-
orchards in Kent were first planted. During the reign
of queen Elizabeth, Gerarde wrote his Herball. In
Gerarde’s garden at Holborn, we find that in 1596 he
had growing eleven hundred plants. James 1 had
afterwards a beautiful garden at Theobald’s, near Walt-
ham Abbey ; and in the reign of Charles 11, Parkinson
published his work called “ A garden of all sortes of
pleasant flowers, with a kitchen garden of all manner
of herbs and roots, and an orchard of all sortes of fruit-
bearing trees.” In this book he {describes fifty-eight
sorts of apples, sixty-four pears, sixty-one plums,
twenty-one peaches, five nectarines, six apricots, no
less than thirty-six cherries, twenty-three vines, three
figs, and various other smaller fruits which we have yet
under culture in our gardens.

It was shortly after this period that commerce began
to put forth its unbounded energies, ever progressing to
the present day, and to go forwards yet to future times.
For the last century and a half, we have been gathering
from every land on the globe, bringing home their fruits
to flourish amid our changing skies, or furnishing them
with a temperature equal to that of torrid regions, so
that we can look onan island rich now in its fruits, and
forget that once its rude wilds bore only the crab, the
sloe, and the acorn. A. P.
THE STARS.

No cloud obscures the summer sky,
The moon in brightness walks on high;
And, set in azure, every star

Shines like a gem of heaven afar.

Child of the earth! oh! lift thy glance
To yon bright firmament’s expanse ;
The glory of its realm explore,

And gaze, and wonder, and adore!

Doth it not speak to every sense

The marvels of Omnipotence ?

Seest thou not there th’ Almighty Name,
Inscribed in characters of flame ?

Count o’er those lamps of quenchless light,
That sparkle through the shades of night ;
Behold them !—can a mortal boast

_ Yo number that celestial host ?
136

THE STARS.

For what art thou, weak child of clay,
Amidst ereation’s grandeur ?—say.
F’en as an insect on the breeze,

Fen as a dew-drop lost in seas.

Yet fear thou not ;—the Sovereign Hand
Which spread the ocean and the land,
And hung the rolling spheres in air,
Hath, e’en for thee, a Father’s care.

Be thou at peace ;—the all-seeing Eye,
Pervading earth, and air, and sky,
The searching glance which none may flee,
Is still, in mercy, turn’d on thee.
Mrs. Hemays.
“ LITTLE LOTTE.”

A Lecenp or Dayzica.

Tux word legend is generally understood to signify
an unauthenticated narrative. Although derived from
the Latin term leyendum—a thing to be read—legends
are, for the most part, unwritten chronicles, repeated
from one generation to another, and to which litle
credit is attached. Itis pleasant nevertheless to listen
to them, especially when related—as was the case with
the one we are about to write—among the very scenes
in which it was actually believed by the narrator to have
taken place. After all, it is a simple and touching
history, founded at least upon indisputable facts, and
which might have been true, although we have thought
it right to be thus careful in not vouching for its
authenticity, while offering it for the amusement and
instruction of the reader.

It was drawing towards the close of a dull, rainy
day, when an aged man, led by a little fair-haired child,
138 LITTLE LOTTE.

entered the city of Danzig, the strange, grotesque-
looking buildings of which appeared gloomy enough in
the gathering twilight. They bath looked weary and
exhausted, as though they had travelled a great way—
which, indeed, was the case.

* At last !”? murmured the old man, as if speaking to
himself, a thing which he was in the habit of doing ; so
much so that the child had ceased to think it strange,
although other people did. “At last! Ah, they never
thought that I should have found my way back again
in the dark!”

“ Have we friends at Danzig, grandfather?” asked
his young companion.

“No, nor anywhere else on earth, poor child! ”

“ Well, well, we have God and one another,” was
the cheerful reply. “ And now what amI to do next?”

“Inquire our nearest way to the dlé Stadt (Old
Town); and then you must look out for some quiet
lodging, where we can rest a little while. You need
rest, Lottchen.”

“Yes, I am very tired, grandfather.” |

“ Your task is nearly over, my child. But quick!
we are wasting time. I ought to know the way, blind
as I am; but I have forgotten.”

The little girl did as she was desired, but it rained
fast, and many hurried by without stopping to answer
her; while the vague directions of those who did pause
for a moment were so unsatisfactory that she often
mistook them, and wandered a great deal out of her
way. As they proceeded thus slowly, the streets
narrowed, and became close, and dirty, and ill-con-
structed, with so many crooked turnings and windings,
LITTLE LOTTE. 139

that Lottchen was quite in despair. But when she
told her grandfather, he said :

“ Ah, we are right at last; this then is the Alt
Stadt.”

By this time it was quite dusk. A cold, drizzling
rain continued to fall, but there were cheerful lights
burning in many a humble dwelling, and gleaming and
flickering upon the wet pavement without. Sometimes
Lottchen peeped in upon some happy family group
assembled at their evening meal, and felt half inclined
to envy them; but the feeling soon passed away, and
she prayed to God to forgive it, and to take care of her
and her poor grandfather, as He had done a hundred
times before, and lead them to some place of shelter.
While she still prayed, they came to the house of a
widow woman, who was standing by the open door,
looking out into the twilight as if her thoughts were far
away. She started when Léttchen and her grandfather
went past, aud gazed after them with tears in her eyes.

** My poor Greta!” murmured the bereaved mother,
* she had just such hair as that little girl, and was
about her size too. My poor, lost Greta! And yet
“not lost, but gone before.’ ‘Even so, Father: for
so it seemed good in thy sight.’ ”

Won by that kind glance, Lottchen turned back in-
stinctively—or shall we not rather say—providentially ?
The widow advanced a few steps to meet her.

“ Can I do anything for you, my poor child ?” asked
she compassionately.

“Oh, yes! if you could only tell me where we
might get a night’s lodging. Perhaps you let lodg-
140 LITTLE LOTTE.

ings?” added Lottchen, timidly; “I should like to
live with you.”

The widow was touched by her confiding simplicity,
as well as by the resemblance which she had discovered,
or fancied, between her and the little child who was no
more.

“Do you come from far?” asked she, turning to
the old man.

“Yes, hundreds and hundreds of miles away.—
I cannot tell where.”

“But surely you must know the name of the
place ?”

“ How should I, when I never heard it ?”

“Hush!” whispered Lottchen, gently, “he is
blind.”

The good woman asked no more questions; and
without waiting to ascertain whether or not she was
likely to be remuncrated for her trouble, immediately
led the way to her humble dwelling, where she was soon
busily employed in preparing for the accommodation
of her unexpected guests. Lottchen was half asleep
before she had finished; but when she had eaten her
supper, she appeared to be quite refreshed, and her
grateful thanks and blessings made their kind hostess
already deem herself more than repaid for what she had
done.

The old man was lodged in a little room by himself,
refusing all assistance, as was his wont, notwithstanding
his great age and feebleness. And then Margaret—for
that was the widow’s name—would insist upon undress-
ing Littchen herself, bathing her swollen feet, and
LITTLE LOTTE. 141

smoothing out her long, tangled hair, with a mother’s
tenderness. When the child had knelt down and said
her simple prayers, not forgetting to thank God, through
Jesus Christ, for all his loving care, and for the new
friend whom he had given her in the good Margaret,
she lay down in her neat little bed, with its snowy
hangings, feeling far too happy to sleep.

“Do not go away yet,” said she to the widow,
“unless you are tired.”

“No, I have done nothing to tire me. I will stay
with you willingly, my child; but you must lie still, and
try and rest, even if you cannot sleep.”

Léttchen obeyed her with a smile.

“T am so happy!” exclaimed she—“so thankful!
My dear Saviour!”

“Yes, Jesus is the source of all our happiness—the
Giver of all good. I am glad that your grandfather has
taught you this.”

“Tt was my mother who taught me,” answered
Lottchen. “My grandfather never speaks of these
things. I often wish that he would. It seems so natural
to talk of what we love.”

“ And you love your Saviour, my child?”

“TI oughttolove Him. He hasdoneeverything for me.”

“And for every one of us,” repeated Margaret.
“Truly we can do nothing for ourselves. We are all
as an unclean thing, and all our righteousnesses are as
filthy rags, and we all do fade as a leaf; and our
iniquities, like the wind, have taken us away.”

“Stay,” murmured the child, putting her hand to
her forehead. “I have heard those words before, but I
cannot remember where.”
142 LITTLE LOTTE.

“They are in the Bible.”

* My mother had a Bible,” said Lottchen. “I was
to have learned to read it—but she died.”

“Poor child!” exclaimed the widow, compassionately.
“T would that we might be always together—that you
might supply the place of my little Greta; and then
I would teach you to read that blessed book.”

“Yes, I should like it very much. But what would
my grandfather do without me ?—I must not leave my
grandfather.”

“ But could you not both remain here ?”

“T fear not. We seldom stay long in one place.—
And yet, now I remember, he said that I needed rest ;
and that my task was nearly over. I will ask him to-
morrow.”

Margaret would fain have persuaded Léttchen to try
and sleep now, but she begged so earnestly she would
stay with her a little longer, that she could not resist
her entreaties. That night, Lottchen related the
simple and touching history of her young life, as far
as she knew it herself.

The only home she could remember was a lonely hut,
not far from the sea-shore, with a dense wood behind,
where she used to go and look for flowers—but these
were not many—or listen to the singing of the birds,
or watch the flying squirrels as they leapt from tree to
tree. She never ventured far into the wood, for there
were stories told among the peasantry, of persons being
lost there, or eaten up by the wild beasts: and it was
very gloomy by reason of the thick trees that would not
suffer the sunbeams to penetrate, even when the sun
did shine, which was not often there. Probably the
LITTLE LOTTE. . 143

summers did not last long in that far land of her early
childhood.

Sometimes she went with her mother to search for
amber. It was frequently many days before they met
with any success, but she liked being with her mother,
and hearing her talk. The fishermen trading on the
coast were always willing to purchase the amber when
they were fortunate enough to find any. She recol-
lected once finding a piece as large as an egg, which
sold for a great deal, or what seemed, perhaps, a great
deal to her. She remembered thinking the amber
much prettier than the coins received in exchange, and
wondering what should make her mother so eager to
part with it.

_ Liéttchen called those her “happy days!” She
used to like to sit on the wild sea-shore, or by the
warm stove in the winter, and listen to the low voice
of her mother, as she read or talked to her about the
Lord Jesus Christ; and how, when he was on earth, he
commanded the little children to be brought to him,
and laid his hands upon them, and blessed them; and
how he would bless and watch over them still in
heaven, if they would only come to him and make
him their sole trust. It may be, that this poor
Christian woman felt that her days were numbered, and
eagerly availed herself of every opportunity of im-
pressing on the youthful mind of her child those
divine truths which were to be her support and con-
solation in after years. Certain it is, from Lottchen’s
account, that she spoke of little else. And that she
prayed, also, for the influences of the Holy Spirit, may
be gathered from the same childish statement, which
144 LITTLE LOTTE. *

describes her as being often found upon her knees in
solitary places, when she thought herself unobserved,
with clasped hands and streaming eyes, and sometimes,
with a beautiful smile upon her face, “talking to
God.”

Lottchen never saw her father. She understood
that he died soon after she was born, and that her
mother, finding it lonely without him, had gone home
to reside with her aged parent. She never heard her
mother called anything but Lotte; she was called
Lottchen, or “Little Lotte,” to distinguish them.
The poor woman was seldom well long together; and
latterly the child could almost see her growing paler
and paler, and thinner and thinner, day by day; but
she never complained. She became too weak, at length,
to go out and search for amber, and was afraid to
suffer Léttchen to go alone; but the child ventured,
nevertheless, into the dreary woods to gather the few
flowers of which her mother always appeared to be so
fond. Sometimes she brought home her little apron
full of the green, bright moss which grew there in
profusion.

All the year long the old man sat by the stove,
seldom speaking unless first addressed, and then
answering only in monosyllables. There were periods,
however, when he appeared strangely restless and
excited, but the low, soothing voice of his daughter
never failed to succeed in restoring him to his usual
tranquillity. She was very gentle with him, and seemed
to possess great influence over him, but there was
one thing she could not do—persuade him to listen to
the word of God. Whenever it was read, he rose up,
LITTLE LOTTE. 145

and went silently out of the hut; and then Lottchen
and her mother used to kneel and pray for him, gene-
rally using the same words—that the Lord would be
pleased to take away his stony heart, and give him a
heart of flesh, and help him to forgive his enemies.

Just before she died, the poor woman called Léttchen
to her bed-side, and earnestly entreated her to supply
her place, as far as possible, to her aged grandfather,
and to love and bear with him, for he had suffered
much, and was an injured man.

Are you going away, mother?” asked the child.

“Yes, my Lottchen, I am going home—home to
Jesus! How I wish that we might all go together! But
he knoweth best. His will be done. Do not weep
for me, dear one. A few short years, and we shall
be united again—thanks to that Divine Redeemer
who loved and gave himself for us. Truly it is a
wilderness world, and the only way to pass through it
safely is to keep very near to Christ. His grace is
sufficient for us, his strength is made perfect in weak-
ness; and, sweet thought, he will never leave us nor
forsake us.”

The dying woman said a great deal more, but Léttchen
could not remember the exact words she used; and
then, meekly commending her child to the care of Him
who has promised to be the Father of the fatherless,
passed away with a smile upon her face, and slept in
Jesus.

After her death, a change came over the old man, and
he grew peevish and irritable; but Lottchen remembered
her promise, and watched over, and loved, and bore
with him with unceasing tenderness. She no longer

L
146 LITTLE LOTTE.

went to seek for flowers, and look at the bright-eyed
squirrels, and listen to the singing of the birds. She
was afraid to leave her grandfather, lest any harm
should happen to him in her absence, for he had
become very feeble and restless, and used to walk to
and fro their little chamber, muttering wildly to himself,
by the hour together. At such times Léttchen would
kneel down unperceived, and repeat the prayer which
her mother had taught her, asking God to take away
his stony heart, and help him to forgive his enemies ;
who those enemies were, the child knew not.

One day he told her that they were going a long
journey, and that she must pack up what little things
she thought might be useful, and not too heavy, and he
would dispose of the rest among his neighbours ; which
was accordingly done, those who could afford it paying
him for what they took, while the rest sought to make
it up by numberless kind offices, and sage advice to the
little motherless child. Léttchen wanted to take the
Bible with them, but her grandfather would not permit
it, and indeed it was too large for her to have carried
far ; so she left it with an old woman, who promised to
take care of it for her until their return, for she did not
know then how far they were going. The place looked
so desolate, at length, that Lottchen was glad to quit
it, having first knelt and prayed beside her mother’s
grave, but not sadly, for she knew that she was not
there, but with her God and Saviour.

For many days they walked straight on by the sea-
shore, resting at night in some lonely hovel; until at
length, by her grandfather’s desire, Lottchen began to
ask the nearest way to Danzig. A great many persons
LITTLE LOTTE. 147

of whom she inquired had never heard of such a place,
while others looked compassionately upon the blind man
and his little guide, and thought it improbable that
either would ever live to reach the far-off city to which
they were journeying. From constant exposure to the
open air, Léttchen was much stronger than she looked,
while a stern determination of purpose lent fresh
energy to the feeble frame of her aged grandfather.

Sometimes their road lay over large tracts of swamps,
into which their feet sank every moment; while at
others, they were sadly cut and wounded with the
stones. Lottchen often felt thankful that her grand-
father could not see how much she suffered. Not-
withstanding the pains she took to recollect and follow
the various directions which she was constantly re-
ceiving, they had frequently the mortification of hearing
that they had come many and many a weary mile out
of the right road. Whole days were lost thus; while
her grandfather’s impatience at the delay broke wildly
forth. Their little store of bread and dried fruits was
soon exhausted ; but, as Lottchen said, “* God never let
them want.”

The old man often fell ill, and was laid up for weeks
together, his own restlessness retarding the recovery
for which he was so anxious; or else he would insist
upon starting before he was strong enough to travel.
Once Lottchen feared that she should have lost him.
A violent ague shook his feeble frame so, that she
expected every moment to be his last ; but he struggled
through it, and they again pursued their weary pilgrim-
age. Sometimes they travelled in sledges or canal-
boats ; sometimes on foot, or assisted by an occasional
148 LITTLE LOTTE.

lift in an empty cart or wagon. “ Every one,”
Léttchen said, “ was kind to them, and doubtless God
put it into their hearts to help her and her poor grand-
father.”

Sometimes, but very rarely, Léttchen found an old
Bible at the places where they stopped. She knew it
by its resemblance to her mother’s, and would plead so
earnestly to hear a chapter read, that it was almost
impossible to resist her entreaties, and she used to
endeavour to recall to mind what she had heard as they
journeyed on the following day. Where there was no
Bible, Lottchen often found courage to ask the simple
inhabitants if they had ever heard of the Lord Jesus
Christ. When they answered in the affirmative, she
felt very happy; but if they said “No,” which not un-
frequently happened, she pitied them, and would tell
them all that her mother had told her of his love to
poor sinners, and how he left his bright home in heaven
to suffer and die for them upon the cross, and what a
happy thing it was to believe in Jesus.

It must have been a strange sight to see that little
child, with her bare feet and tattered dress, and hear
her talking thus, or singing her simple hymns in return
for the hospitality which they had received.

Lottchen told her new friend that the cold was often
so intense that she could scarcely endure it. Sometimes
her grandfather would say wearily, “Let us rest, my
child, I feel strangely sleepy; let us lie down and rest
a little.”

But Loéttchen knew well that if she listened to him
he would never wake up again. And yet she felt the
same longing to lie down and rest upon the soft, white
LITTLE LOTTE. 149

snow; but she strove against it, and encouraged the
old man to proceed. Sometimes they crossed frozen
lakes; or went over bleak, desolate places; or through
thick forests, that reminded Lottchen of the old sunless
wood athome. And it not unfrequently happened that
all of a.sudden the wind would arise, and moan, and
rage so fearfully that they were obliged to throw them-
selves with their face on the ground until its violence
had abated. Even large trees were uprooted and
thrown down by its might, or hurled to a considerable
distance; but the blind man and the child escaped
unharmed.

“How frightened you must have been !” interrupted
Margaret.

“Yes, I was frightened; but the memory of my
mother’s dying words always came back to me at those
times, and seemed to whisper, ‘Fear not; I am with
thee. I will never leave thee, nor forsake thee; I will
keep thee in all places whither thou goest. Be strong
and of good courage ;’ and I knew that they were the
words of the Book—God’s words.”

Léttchen never heard the name of the country from
which she came, and she did not think that her grand-
father knew it either. Neither had she the slightest
idea what made him undertake.so long and perilous a
journey; or what he proposed doing now that they had
at length reached the place of their destination, for he
had told her only that very evening, in answer to her
inquiries, that they had no friends at Danzig, or any-
where else on earth. During their journey they had
subsisted almost entirely upon charity; although that
need not have been, Lottchen said, for she knew that
150 LITTLE LOTTE.

her grandfather had much gold concealed about his
person, which she had often seen him count over when
he thought himself unobserved.

Margaret trembled as she listened to the innocent
revealings of her young companion; and felt thankful
to God for having led them beneath the shelter of her
humble roof. There were many in the J// Stadt who
would not have scrupled to rob, and perhaps even kill
the old man for the sake of that gold of which she spoke
with such fearless confidence.

And now Loéttchen began to wander in her little
history ; and to talk dreamily of the old woods, where
people were lost, and where the sun never penetrated ;
and of her gentle, ever-sorrowing mother, who lay
buried there, hundreds and hundreds of miles away ;
and who yet—thanks be to God through Jesus Christ—
might be even now looking down upon her poor,
weary child; and so, smiling, and folding her hands
prayerfully together, she fell asleep.

The following morning the blind man made arrange-
ments with his kind hostess to remain with her for
some weeks, in order to recover from the fatigue of their
late journey; and truly they both needed rest badly
enough. Margaret, whose heart yearned towards the
little stranger with all a mother’s tenderness, felt very
glad that they were not to be separated, at least, for
the present.

A few days’ quiet and careful nursing made Lottchen
look quite a different being. Her clear blue eyes
sparkled with animation; while a faint clear colour began
to steal into her pale cheeks. Sometimes the widow
took her for a walk in*the Langgarten, under the
LITTLE LOTTE. 151

shadow of the linden-trees: or sat and read, or talked
with her on that one subject which they both so loved,
and which, the longer we dwell upon, the more beautiful
and glorious it appears—which angels desire to look
into, and wonderingly adore—the redemption of sinners
through our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ.

The blind man never went beyond the little garden
which was attached to the residence of his hostess. He
spent the greater part of the day in the opey air, lived
well, and gave Margaret money to procure him wines
and strengthening medicines. His sole object appeared
to be to recruit his shattered health, which age and
constant fatigue had greatly weakened and exhausted.

“Tt would be hard,” muttered he, as he tottered,
rather than walked, up and down the narrow gravel
path, talking to himself, after his usual custom—“ it
would be hard to die now, when I am so near the
accomplishment of my purpose.”

As he spoke, he paused feebly, and sat down to rest
a moment beneath the open window, where Margaret
sat reading the Scriptures to his little grandchild. Her
low voice fell clearly and distinctly upon his ears :—

«Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather
give place unto wrath; for it is written, Vengeance is
mine; I will repay, saith the Lord, ”

The old man moved hurriedly away; but his legs
trembled under him, and he was obliged to sit down
again. Margaret was still reading :— -

*« good.’”

“Wark!” interrupted Lottchen. “Surely I heard
a groan; it must be my grandfather.” A moment


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152 ' LITTLE LOTTE.

afterwards she had bounded into the garden, and stood
by his side. “Are you ill, dear grandfather?” she
tenderly inquired.

“No; it is nothing. Go away, child! I would
rather be alone.”

Léttchen obeyed him sorrowfully.

“What a strange old man your grandfather is!” said
Margaret, when she went back.

“Yes, he is strange; people say that he is mad,”
said the child in a whisper. “I do not know what
that means. He was always very kind to me.”

One evening, about a month after their arrival at
Danzig, the blind man, feeling somewhat stronger,
proposed walking with Léttchen as far as the cathedral.
Margaret’s suggestion, that it was almost too late, was
unheeded, and her offer of accompanying them impa-
tiently refused. But her heart misgave her when she
saw them depart.

Having been there before with Margaret, Lottchen
would have found her way to the cathedral easily enough;
but she was puzzled by being desired to go by the back
streets, where there were not so many people; her
grandfather meanwhile keeping his face carefully con-
cealed by his cloak, as though he feared being recog-
nised. Owing to those narrow, crooked streets, Lottchen
lost her way more than once, and had to stop and make
fresh inquiries, at which the old man grew impatient,
and then forgetting his anger, as they got once again
upon the right track, he began telling her about the
wonderful astronomical clock they were about to see.

“What a clever man the maker must have been!”
said Léttchen.
LITTLE LOTTE. 153

* Tt was the work of a life-time.”

“ His fellow-citizens were doubtless very proud of
him,” continued the child, ‘and rewarded him hand-
somely for his skill.”

« Yes, truly, he had his reward!” and the old man
laughed aloud, so that many turned back and gazed
wonderingly at him. Lottchen feared to speak again,
and they proceeded in silence, while the evening twilight
gathered over the city.

“ Here we are at the cathedral, grandfather,” said
Lottchen, at length.

“ Hark! was not that the clock struck. It must be
getting dusk !”

' © Yes, quite fast. We had better not stay any longer,
or Margaret will be uneasy. We can come again some
other time.”

“ Just about here,” said the old man, without attend-
ing to her, “should be a low arched door.”

“ Here it is, grandfather.”

“Let us knock, then, and ask for the keys; and
remember that I am no longer blind—I can see as well
as you, or any one else—Lottchen, do you hear me, my
child ?”

“ Yes, grandfather, I hear you,” replied his little
companion, feeling like one in a dream; and so confused
by his knowledge of the place, as to be scarcely sure
herself whether he was blind or not.

The sacristan opened the door, but refused to admit
them on account of the lateness of the hour; nor could
all the old man’s entreaties induce him to alter his re-
solution.

« You must come again,” said he, “ by daylight.”
154 . LITTLE LOTTE.

“ Ah, that is impossible. Iam no sight-seeker, but
one who has made mechanics the study of his life. It is
notthe cathedral, buttheastronomical clock, I wish to see;
that wonderful clock of which I have heard so much.”

“ Then you must see it outside.”

* No, no,” exclaimed the old man; “it is the works,
the mechanism, I would behold, and I will give you
a broad golden piece for every five minutes that I am
permitted to gaze upon it.” He drew out a purse as
he spoke, the contents of which glittered temptingly in
the fading light.

* He must be mad,” thought the sacristan.

“ Well, what say you? But we must be quick, for
it grows darker and darker every moment.” Léttchen
wondered how her grandfather could know that, and her
little heart beat fast with terror and excitement.

“ After all,” thought the sacristan, “there can be no
harm in gratifying the old man, who is doubtless some
half-crazy artist; and there is little fear that he will
ever be able to rival our great master-piece, even if he
has genius enough for the attempt.” :

* Be it so,” answered he, aloud; “you shall have
your wish ; but you must promise not to betray me, or
the gratification of your curiosity may be the means of
my losing my place.”

“ Fear not,” said the old man eagerly.

Léttchen, unmindful of his injunction, was about to
take her grandfather’s hand, to lead him, as usual; but
he passed on with a rapid step, as if he had been there
before, while the sacristan and the child followed breath- -
lessly. For several moments after they had ascended,
nothing was heard but the quick beating of their own
LITTLE LOTTE. 155

hearts, together with the monotonous ticking of the
great clock. It was well that the sacristan had thought
to bring his lamp, for it was very dark. Poor Léttchen
felt chilled and frightened, and wished herself safe back
by Margaret’s warm and cheerful stove.

« A wonderful piece of mechanism!” exclaimed the
sacristan, rubbing his hands, and reckoning up the
minutes which had already elapsed, while the old man
stood motionless beforethe object of his strange curiosity.

« Wonderful ! ”

« Ah! you may go all over the world without finding
another.”

« And yet the artist who made one could surely have
made more had he chosen.”

“Yes, certainly, if he had lived. But no sooner had
he finished his master-piece of skill, in which was con-
centrated the study of a life-time, than the artist and
his family suddenly disappeared from Danzig, and have
never been heard of since. There were strange stories
told abcut it at the time; and the mystery has never
been solved from that day to this.”

“ Shall I tell it to you?” asked the old maz, still
keeping his face carefully averted, and speaking in a
whisper; while the trembling Léttchen drew closer to
him. “The house where the artist dwelt was a lonely
place, standing apart by itself, far from the busy hum
of the city; but there was no loneliness within, where
his widowed daughter and her infant made the sunshine
of his life. The very night of the mysterious disappear-
ance to which you have alluded, it happened, strangely
enough, that his two domestics were absent—the one
at the bed-side of a dying parent, and the other on a
156 LITTLE LOTTE.

commission to a distant city, from whence it was im-
possible he could return before the following day; so
that there was no one left in the house but an old
woman, who was stone deaf, and half-witted beside.
The time was well chosen. The artist slept, and dreamt
of fame and honour; when suddenly, four men, with
black crape upon their faces—he remembers that, for it
was the last thing he ever saw—gathered round the bed,
and two held him, while the other two put out his eyes !”

“Horrible!” exclaimed the sacristan; while Lottchen
fell upon her knees, and buried her face in her hands.
«What crime could he have committed to deserve so
fearful a punishment ?”

“None ;—his genius alone was the cause. They
feared his making a similar clock for the rival town of
Hamburg. But, not content with this cruelty—or in
order to prevent its discovery—they bore away the
shrieking artist, mad with pain, together with his
daughter and her infant, to a vehicle which stood in
readiness; and for weeks afterwards travelled day and
night without intermission. God knows where they
left them at last; the blind man never did.”

“ And does Duringer yet live?” questioned the
sacristan.

“ He does. After the death of his daughter, whose
gentle heart broke in witnessing his sufferings, an irre-
sistible longing seized upon him to return to his native
city; and, old and feeble, and half mad, accompanied
only by his little grandchild, he begged his way back
to Danzig. Iam Duringer!”

The sacristan tuned shudderingly away from that
pale and sightless countenance, now fully revealed to
LITTLE LOTTE. 157

him for the first time; and letting fall in his terror the
lamp which he carried, they were left in total darkness.
But the darkness and the light were all the same to
Duringer, who hastily drew forth a pair of scissors,
which he had hitherto kept concealed in his bosom, and,
severing a single small wire, a dead silence ensued.

“‘ Hark !” exclaimed he, in a wild, excited tone; “it
has stopped!—the wonderful clock !—and will never
move again until they give back the old man his eye-
sight! Ha! ha!—the wonderful clock of Danzig!”

“ Grandfather! dear grandfather!’ said Léttchen,
elinging to him, and weeping. “Come, let us go
home—it is so cold and dark here!”

Duringer put his hand into hers, and went with her
without a word. His purpose was accomplished—he
had had his revenge, which in the sinfulness of an
unrenewed soul he had cherished so long; and now it
appeared to recoil upon himself. He had mutilated his
own work; and as the mighty heart of that great clock
ceased to beat, the heart of the inventor broke. The
cutting of that single wire seemed to sever the thread
of his own feeble life.

At Lottchen’s request, for she was afraid to go alone,
the sacristan accompanied them back to the lodging in
the Alt Stadt; and, having seen them safe under
Margaret’s care, departed, without even remembering
to claim his promised reward.

Duringer was never heard to utter a word after that
night, but wasted away, and died shortly afterwards,
while they thought him sleeping. Margaret laid aside
the purse of gold for the use of his little grandchild,
and buried him decently at her own expense. Poor
158 LITTLE LOTTE.

Lottchen! she lay stricken with a burning fever, and
would never want anything else on earth.

Somehow, the story which we have been relating
got abroad, and was whispered fearfully from one to
another, corroborated by the testimony of the sacristan,
as well as by the sudden stopping of the clock, which,
it is said, no after skill has ever been able to repair. A
great many believed it at the time, although some
doubted, and said that it was too terrible to be true.
A few were admitted to the death-bed of poor Léttchen,
and listened with a deep interest to her childish ravings.
When they asked her any question, she answered at
random; or smiled vacantly, evidently not understanding
what was said.

Sometimes she spoke of the dreary wood, as though
she were still there looking for flowers, or listening to
the singing of the birds ; and then her mind wandered
to the wild forests and desolate plains, through which
they had passed in their weary pilgrimage: and she
would look up gently into the faces of those who ga-
thered around the bed, and ask her nearest way to
Danzig! But there was another land of which Léttchen
was continually speaking. A beautiful land, with golden
streets, and pearly gates, and rivers of living water:
and where there was no night, and neither heat nor
cold, nor sorrow nor weariness, nor hunger nor thirst ;
and no more tears; and where the inhabitants walk
about in long white robes, with harps in their hands,
and crowns upon their heads, singing a new song, and
saying, “Blessing, and honour, and glory, and power,
be unto Him that sitteth upon the throne, and unto the
Lamb for ever.”
LITTLE LOTTE. 159

After many days the fever left her, and Lottchen
sank into a quiet sleep.

“Who knows,” thought Margaret, as she watched
by the bed-side, “ but what it- may please God to spare
her to me?”

Towards evening the child opened her eyes, and
smiled upon her kind friend, who was bending over her.

“You are better, my darling!” said Margaret, kiss-
ing her.

“ Yes, much better; I shall soon be well now.”
Margaret understood that upward glance, and her heart
said meekly—“ Thy will, O God, not mine, be done.
Take this little weary lamb into thy fold.”

Léttchen was too weak to talk much. Just before
her death, Margaret observed how happy and peaceful
she looked.

« Yes, I am very happy,” answered she. “I know that
I am onlya poor sinful child; but Jesus died for me.
It is that which makes me so happy.”

She never spoke again, but passed away with a smile
upon her lips, to receive the white robes and the golden
crown.

No clue has ever been discovered to the far-off place
of Duringer’s exile, although traces of the blind artist
and his little guide have been met with, from time to
time, at a distance so remote from Danzig, that it
seems almost impossible for them to have travelled so
many miles alone and unprotected; but then, as Lott-
chen said, God was with them, and put it into the
hearts of the people to be kind to them, and help them
on their way. The mystery is one which will, in all
probability, never be solved on earth; but though the
160 LITTLE LOTTE.

grave of the broken-hearted mother may be hundreds
and hundreds of miles away, mouldering beneath the
shadow of that dreary wood, where the sun never shines,
and the birds keep up a perpetual hymning, it is sweet
to think, that, through His merits who loved and died for
them, the mother and the child will meet again in heaven.

Many years after the events above recorded, an aged
fisherman, living on the wild shores of the Baltic Sea,
was heard to speak of an old man, and a little fair-
haired child, who tarried for a night at his father’s hut,
when he was a boy; and of the latter’s telling them a
great deal about the Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ,
which he never afterwards forgot. His own impression
was, that she was more like an angel than a child, who
had visited them.

So ends the history of Lottchen, or “ Little Lotte.”
We know nothing of the far land from which she came,
and, in all probability, never shall. But surely we all
know, and have heard of that beautiful country to
which she is gone. There is but one way to that land—
through faith in our Lord Jesus Christ. Jesus alon
can cleanse us from our sins, and give us the white
robes of his own spotless righteousness, and the crown
of glory that fadeth not away, and lead us through the
trials and temptations of this wilderness world, to the
golden streets of the heavenly Jerusalem.

Dear reader, have you come to Jesus like that little
child of whom we have been writing, and made him
your sole trust? ‘Do you love to hear, and read, and
talk about him? Do you ask him to take care of
you, and guide you in the right way? Do you feel; as
LITTLE LOTTE. 161

Léottchen felt, that Jesus has done everything for you?
that you are weak and sinful, but that he is strong
and mighty, and all-sufficient ? If so, you have reason
to be very happy and thankful. If you have never
come to Jesus, come now. He is waiting to receive
you. He is waiting to be gracious. Delay not. The
young die, as well as the aged. The graves of little
children abound in all our churchyards. Happy chil-
dren, if they died in Christ! Before another year, you
too may have passed away. You may never live to.see
another Christmas. Come, then, with all your sins,
and fears, and sorrows, to Jesus. You need not fear.
« Him that cometh to me,” said the Saviour, “I will in
no wise cast out.” May Léttchen’s dying testimony,
by the grace of the Holy Spirit, be that of every reader
of this little narrative! “I am only a poor sinful child,”
said she, “but Jesus died for me. It is that which
makes me so happy!” Hers was true happiness.
Y,



SEASONS OF PRAYER.

To prayer, to prayer ;—for the morning breaks,
And earth in her Maker’s smiles awakes.

His light is on all below and above,

The light of gladness, and life, and love.

Oh then, on the breath of this early air, °

Send up the incense of grateful prayer.

To prayer ;—for the glorious sun is gone,

And the gathering darkness of night comes on;

Like a curtain from God’s kind hand it flows,

To shade the couch where his children repose.

Then kneel, while the watching stars are bright,

And give your last thoughts tothe Guardian of night.

To prayer ;—for the day that God has bless’d
Comes tranquilly on with its welcome rest :
It speaks of creation’s early bloom ;

If speaks of the Prince who burst the tomb.
Then summon the spirit’s exalted powers,
And devote to Heaven the hallow’d hours.

There are smiles and tears in the mother’s eyes,
For her new-born infant beside her lics.
168 SEASONS OF PRAYER,

Oh, hour of bliss! when the heart o’erflows
With rapture a mother only knows.

Let it gush forth in words of fervent prayer ;
Let it swell up to heaven for her precious care.

There are smiles and tears in that gathering band,
Where the heart is pledged with the trembling hand.
What trying thoughts in her bosom swell,

As the bride bids parents and home farewell!

kneel down by the side of the tearful fair,

And strengthen the perilous hour with prayer.

kneel down by the dying sinner’s side,

And pray for his soul through Him who died.
Large drops of anguish are thick on his brow—
Oh! what is earth and its pleasures now ?

And what shall assuage his dark despair,

But the penitent ery of humble prayer?

Kneel down at the couch of departing faith,

And hear the last words the believer saith.

Ile has bidden adicu to his carthly friends ;

There is peace in his eye that upward bends :

There is peace in his calm, confiding air ;

Vor his last thoughts are God’s, his last words prayer.

The voice of prayer at the sable bier !

A voice to sustain, to soothe, and to cheer.

It commends the spirit to God who gave ;

It lifts the thoughts from the cold, dark grave ;
[t points to the glory where He shall reign
Who whisper’d, “Thy brother shall rise again.”
SEASONS OF PRAYER. 169

The voice of prayer in the world of bliss!

But gladder, purez than rose from this.

The ransom’d shout to their glorious King,
Where no sorrow shades the soul as they sing ;
But a sinless and joyous song they raise ;

And their voice of prayer is eternal praise.

Awake, awake, and gird up thy strength

To join that holy band at length.

To Him who unceasing love displays,

Whom the powers of nature unceasingly praise,

To Him thy heart and thy hours be given ;

For a life of prayer is the life of heaven.
: tt. Warn.




FRESHWATER SHELLS.

“The pearl
Shines in the concave of its purple bed,
And painted shells, along some winding shore,
Catch, with indented folds, the glancing sun.”

We all ought to know something of shells, for ramble
where we will, in country places, we find them scattered
about us. Presenting an infinite variety of form,
marked, in some cases, with beautiful colours, forming
the dwellings of multitudes of God’s creation, to whom
he has given power to become the architects of their
own homes, surely we do well to pause and consider
them. The sea-shore is strewed with the empty shells
whence the animal has perished, and the marl and
calcareous rock is full not only of sea shells, but often
with layers of those of the common inhabitants of our
stagnant waters, the coil and the mud-shells. They
offer us thousands of these familiar objects, quite entire,
or in various stages of fracture; or the whole mass has,
in the course of ages, become so solid, that no remains
of the form of the shell is now discoverable. Land
shells cluster in our woods, and hedges, and gardens,
hiding under the hollows of trees, or in the clefts of
FRESHWATER SHELLS. 163



yocks, beneath the heap of stones, or on the moss-covered
bank, and sending forth their inmates at eventide, or on
the rainy days, to commit their depredations on the fairest
flowers, and greenest leaves, and mellowing fruits.
There are a few shelly animals, which, like the testa-
cella, are to be found during the greater part of their
lives under the ground, only rising to the surface to
make some change in their locality. There are some,
which are In some measure amphibious, like the coil
and mud-shells (Plaxorbes and Limuee). These live
in the fresh water, and seldom quit it, crawling on the
surface of the stream, with the foot upwards, and the
shell downwards, and raising the pulmonary aperture
to emit the vitiated air, and to receive a fresh supply of
pure air, sometimes making a loud crackling noise as
they do so. In some cases, however, the inhabitants of
the delicate mud-shells cluster on the aquatic plant
altogether out of the water, though always very near to
it. Scareely a ditch or freshwater river is to be found,
in which some species or other, both of this and the
coil-shell, are not to be found; their small foot taking
hold of the water, however, so lightly, as that the
slightest wind drifts numbers of them to the opposite
side from which it arises. On the least danger they
can withdraw themselves thoroughly within their shells,
make themselves heavier, and fall to the bottom of the
stream; rising soon again to the surface, by the help of
some green stem or leaf of the aquatic vegetation. Some
shell-fish are found even in thermal waters, and one
species of valve-shell lives in the waters of Abano, the
temperature of which is 40° of Réaumur. Others scem
almost confined to peculiar rivers; thus there are some
164 FRESHWATER SHELLS.

species found only in the Thames. Others, like the
triangular olive-shell, (Dreissexa polymorpha,) have gradu-
ally become naturalized in our rivers; this having been
first introduced into the Commercial Docks at Rother-
hithe, where it was attached to some Baltic timber.
The freshwater shells are fewer than those either of
the sea or land, and yet the clear lakes, and rivulets,
and stagnant ditches, have all some testaccous creatures,
finding their home and food among the water wildflowers,
and the duck-weeds, and pond-weeds, and other orna-
ments of their margins or surface. Nor are they useless
there. They are the scavengers of the waters, devour-
ing the remains of either animal or vegetable matters
in various stages of putridity ; coming forth, chiefly at
evening, and during night, with such eager appetite, as
shall enable them to devour much food in a short time.
When other means of supplying hunger are wanting,
the mud-shell fish will even devour its fellow, piercing
the shell near to its apex, and eating away the upper
folds of the animal. Hungry, however, as are these
aquatic tribes, many of them, like the land snails, can
exist for a long period without food; and some of the
common species of our ponds and rivers have been kept
for months on such only as they could extract from the
air or water. Many of them also remain for a long
period in a state of torpidity. Thus a writer in the
Magazine of Natural History, remarks of one of the
limne, the ditch mud-shell: “I have, more than once,
found it to abound in small pools of water, which
were dried up as the season advanced; and, after a
careful search, the little snails were found in a torpid
condition, concealed in the cracks made by the drought,
FRESHWATER SHELLS. 165

or under small clods of carth, where they awaited a
happier season to refill the pools, and to permit them
to resume the functions of active life.”

Several of our freshwater shelled animals become
thus lethargic during winter, and beautifully has the
Great Creator adapted them to their circumstances, for
without this provision their lives could last but one
summer. And yet were weto take from the pool the little
mud-snail during the active period of its life, and cover
it with water but for one day, it would certainly die ;
while that same animal can live beneath the frozen sur-
face of the pond for three or four months, having been
gradually fitted for the change which it was to undergo.

River shells, though often very beautiful in form,
and looking almost as delicate as the bubbles of the
element which they inhabit, have little brightness of
colour. Those which are found in the waters of our
own land are mostly of horn colour, or white, or olive
green, or of brownish purple. They are not only much
thinner than sca shells generally, but they have none of
those hard ridges, or thick spines, with which many of
these are invested. They occupy a gentler element, and
need no protection from waves or rocks, for the gentle
ripple of the pond will but float them softly onwards.
Most of our native kinds are univalves, but there are a
few bivalyes—double shells, as they are popularly called.
Thesg are usually pearly on the inside, and covered, on
the exterior, with a thick greenish skin. The shell may
be seen surrounding the young animal in the egg,
before it has yet acquired all its organs. This shell is
formed by the hardening of the animal matter, which is
secreted by glands on the surface of the body, by means
166 FRESHWATER SITELLS.

of chalky particles, which it also secretes from the waters.
After the animal is hatched, it deposits, on the edge of
the mouth of the little shell which covered its body in
the egg, a small portion of this mucous sceretion. This
dries, and is then lined with some mucous matter, inter-
mixed with the caleareous particles ; and as the animal
inereases in size, the process is continued, and a larger
shell is made and moulded upon the body. Many of the
aquatic spiral shaped shells are furnished with an oper-
culum or kind of lid, which is attached to that fleshy
expansion of the animal called its foot, and which serves
to close up the dwelling at its will.

The flesh of the freshwater mollusks is insipid, but
though useless as food, it is sometimes serviceable as
bait for fishing. The fragile shells arc not often avail-
able for domestic uses, though the large valves of the
swan anodonta are occasionally used as milk skimmers.
It is, however, from a river fish of our own country
that we obtain those pearls commonly called the Union
pearls, which, though very inferior to the Oriental kinds,
are yet in pretty good estimation. These are procured
from the pearlanussel (vaio margaritifera). Very fine ones
have been found in the river Tay, and it is said that the
pearls procured from its waters, from the year 1761 to
1764, were worth 10,0007. The Welsh call these shell-
fish, eregin y dylw, “shells of the flood.” Some good
pearls have been found in the rivers of the counties of
Tyrone and Donegal, in Ireland; anda pearl, taken from
one of the Scottish lakes, a few years since, besides
being of good form and colour, was half an inch in
diameter.

Aes
THE PROBLEM SOLVED.

“ Wire shall I find peace ?” I exclaimed, as tossed
and buffeted amidst the eares.and trials and disappoint-
ments of the world, my spirit groaned under an insup-
portable load, such as I fancied no human being had
ever endured before me. A. chafed temper, anger at
every cross, murmurings at every disappointment, a
notion of ill-usage from every one, though undeserved
from any one, were the “ miserable comforters” with
which I fled for a season of rest from the busy haunts
of men. “Who, and what shall disturb, or deceive, or
trouble me here ?” was the exulting thought, as I took
up my abode in a quiet spot, on a rocky coast that
seemed formed to be the nursery of all sublime and
soul-soothing meditations. The favourite scat was a
ledge of rock overhanging the sea, and there I could
lie and contrast the peaceful loveliness of nature, with
the odious world and its ill-usage which had disgusted
me. “Yes, here is peace ; it is in the contemplation of
scencs like this that peace is to be found. Nature is
peace.’ And I wondered whether any one had ever
made such a discovery before. It was in truth a
beautiful scene : the waters swelled gently up the beach,
sparkling here and there like diamonds ; the air was soft
THE PROBLEM SOLVED. 71

and still; a few fishing-boats floated lazily in the
distance, and fishermen sat on the rocks mending their
nets, or were spreading them below, so innocent, so
happy in the pursuit of their simple craft, and so
ignorant of the noise and din and trouble of the stormy
world! And far away in the distance lay the majestic
ocean, sleeping beneath the sunshine, and enticing the
wish for a voyage of pleasure on the instant. Thus I
gazed and mused, unconscious of the lapse of time,
until I became aware that the sun had gone down in
clouds. A little longer, and the sea, lately so bright
and placid, began to look dark, and to roar with a
strange angry sound, and the waves dashed in foam
and fury against the very rock on which I lay. The
wind was rising, sea-birds darted about overhead, the
fishermen had disappeared, and the few vessels were
hurrying in as if some sudden alarm had scizcd their
crews, while I, totally forgetting my meditations upon
the peace-bestowing attributes of nature, scrambled
home drenched and discontented.

A terrific storm came on. I could not rest, but,
guarded as securely as possible against the weather,
I sallied forth again to see what was going on. A
crowd had gathered on the beach, and men were in
earnest consultation. It was almost midnight—the
winds and waves raged in concert, like tyrants on an
errand of destruction, and between the wild gusts came
the sad, the startling sound of a signal gun, while far
away across the foaming breakers twinkled occasionally
the lights of a ship in distress. Presently twelve brave
fellows pushed off in a life-boat, amidst the warnings,

cautions, and blessings of their friends on shore. They


172 THE PROBLEM SOLVED.

tossed like a feather on the furious sea; but on they
went. We saw them no more. The gun boomed again,
and again, and ccased—the light twinkled once more,
and then seemed extinguished, leaving victory to the
revels of the deep. m

“Tt is all over,” said an old fisherman by my side.
“She must be gone to picces.”

The next day lifeless bodies and broken remnants of
the wreck strewed the shore. Friends recognised some
of the dead, and wept in bitter anguish, and all the while
the treachcrous sea looked again as calm, and smiling,
and beautiful, as if it had borne no part in the havoe
of the night.

“Peace!” thought I, “ what peace, in sea or sunbeam
that can yicld to tempests, and hide in clouds, to bring
misery and death upon helpless man? There is no
peace in nature after all’? An idea suddenly flitted
across my mind, that the scene before me bore some
resemblance to my own temper, which was most
amiable when all things were just to my liking ; but let
anything arise to vex or disappoint me, and, like the sca
in a storm, I could dash and foam and threaten (if I did
not execute) some fearful mischief. But it was not a
pleasant subject for meditation.

In aday or two the little churchyard was crowded,
and the bell tolled for the funeral of the drowned. The
clergyman led the melancholy procession to the grave-
side, and committed ashes to ashes, dust to dust, as the
coffins were lowered, and dust rattled with a dismal
sound upon the lids, amidst stifled sobs and flowing
tears. “ Ah,” said I, “ peace is revealed to me now; but
it is not for the living, it is buried there with the quict
THE PROBLEM SOLVED. 173

dead. We shall all find peace in our graves.” Then,
quick as lightuing, up sprang a second thought, as the
hawk darts upon the dove. “How do I know that
they were fit to die ? it is only the body that lies there.
The soul, the immortal, conscious, sensitive soul, is not
dead; it is somewhere—Where ? Then peace is not
necessarily the companion of death.”

I fled from sea and rock and shipwreck, to country
haunts and rustic life, in hills and vales and ivied
cottages; but I saw a fight in the loveliest gem of
scenery that ever adorned a world. I heard a virago
voice and screaming wrehins in the prettiest retreat
that human hands could build. J saw hosts of noisy
sight-seers from factory towns, scouring the country by
steam, and drinking themselves drunk by the murmur-
ing waterfall, or singing rude songs to scare the nightin-
gale from the woods.

So, my holiday over, I gave up my fruitless search,
and returned, complaining that peace is not for any
man, since I could not find it for myself, and wondering
what the swect word was invented to express.

“There is no peace, saith my God, to the wicked,”
gently replied a friend, to whom I lamented my dis-
appointments, and told my adventures.

“The wicked!” saidI; “and pray who are they?”
for surely the remark could have no application to me.

“ All who are not ‘the righteous,’ ”’ was the laconic
reply.

“But you must describe further, for I stand on some
other ground—I am neither wicked, nor, I suspect, very
righteous, and yet I cannot find peace.”

«There is no other ground,” said my friend; “ mankind








174 THE PROBLEM SOLVED.

is in fact divided into two classes. The righteous
are they who, feeling that in them dwelleth no good
thing, and made conscious by the Holy Spirit of God
that they are poor and miserable and helpless, doomed
to exist for all eternity, and yet under the just dis-
pleasure of a holy God, go to the Lord Jesus Christ
for pardon of their sins, for riches and blessing and
strength, and supplies for all their necessities, and who
believe that ‘he who knew no sin was made sin for
them, that they might be made the righteousness of
God in him.’ These are the only ‘righteous,’ and these
have peace.”

“Do you mean,” I asked, “that they never have
trials and vexations like other people?”

“ Assuredly not; they have often many more; but
in Christ, trial, instead of coming in wrath and ven-
geance, comes as paternal chastisement to correct and
improve the child. Sorrow does not destroy their
peace, and the only interruption to its flowing ‘as a
river’? is sin. ‘My peace I leave with you, my peace
I give unto you,’ said our Lord; not outward comfort
and enjoyment and pleasure, but something far better.
‘In the world ye shall have tribulation : but be of good
cheer, I have overcome the world’ ‘Let not your
heart be troubled; ye believe in God, believe also in
me. ‘Therefore being justified by faith, we have
peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.’ This
is the characteristic of true religion, or ‘ wisdom,’ as
described in the proverb,—‘her paths are peace.’
Our Lord came, ‘to guide our feet into the way of
peace ’—for, ‘ the kingdom of God is righteousness and
peace and joy in the Holy Ghost.’”
THE PROBLEM SOLVED. 175

“Then,” said I, “peace has nothing to do with this
world at all. I have been seeking a flower that cannot
bloom on earth.”

“Yes, it may and does bloom on earth; but it is not
indigenous to its fallen soil. It withered in paradise
when sin came there; but it blooms again where the
hand of God implants it, and only there. You have
been mistaken in your idea of peace. It is a communi-
cation by the eternal Spirit from a forgiving God, for
the sake of a crucified Saviour, to the heart that trusts
in him. It derives no portion of its influence from
things that vanish away, and is often realized in scenes
and places that would seem to your superficial glance
most fatal to its existence; but therein is faith tried,
and thereby is God glorified. You have sought it as a
comforter, to be imparted by external objects, or shared
with you by those who possess it ;—and no wonder that
you are disappointed.”

“Pray give me an unquestionable example of its
existence in this present world.” :

“Let us take one from the history of the early
church. Two of the apostles of the Lord Jesus
Christ preached his gospel in the city of Thyatira, and
thus gave offence. They were dragged before the
rulers by a furious mob, false charges were preferred
against them, and magistrates and people united to
insult and punish them, until, bleeding from many
stripes, they were cast into prison, and their feet
secured inthe stocks. At midnight, what sounds filled
the prison? groans of pain, complaints of injustice,
threats of revenge? No; but prayer and praise ;—
songs of praise unto Him who loved them, and for whose
176 TUE PROBLEM SOLVED.

dear sake they rejoiced in tribulation. Scourging, and
imprisonment, and stocks, are not very suggestive of
patience, and peace, and melody, to the natural feelings
and tempers of men; but the root on which they grew
was faith. The followers of Jesus knew in whom they
believed, and by whom the hairs of their heads were
numbered. They were content to fulfil appointed duty,
and to leave events to him. Their hearts were at peace.

“ Another example occurred in the midst of a storm
and shipwreck, when neither sun by day nor stars by
night appeared to cheer or guide the crew. All was
confusion and terror, no hope of being saved remained,
and fearful apprehension of the last’ shock stamped
despair on every brow but onc. That one was the
calm countenance of a despised prisoncr, who amidst
the tumult of the elements had enjoyed communion
with Him who ‘rides upon the whirlwind, and directs
the storm ;’ and thus he told the secret of his peace :—
‘Sirs, be of good cheer; for I believe God, that it shall
be even as it was told me.” What a majestic principle
is faith! How it stills the throbbings of alarm—how
it quicts the wayward will—how it elevates its happy
possessor above everything that torments and overturns
the minds of other men! It is the strong root of peace.
‘Thou wilt keep him in perfect peace whose mind is
stayed on thee.’ ”

“Well, but these examples are from the history of
men who were inspired of God for a great work. Are
such to be found among God’s people now ?”

“Undoubtedly ; for ‘Christ is the same yesterday, to-
day, and for ever ;’ but his apostles, though inspired to
speak infallible truth, were not thereby protected from
THE PROBLEM SOLVED. 177

sensitiveness to pain and sorrow. A scourge, an
insult, was as painful te them as to us; a shipwreck
was in itself as awful to Paul as to you. There is not
one faith for an apostle and another for this convert ;
but one of them says that he writes to them that have
obtained ‘like precious faith with us, through the
righteousness of God and our Saviour Jesus Christ :’ a
faith which is able to save from the same condemnation,
and to sustain in the same temptations. But 1 can
give you an example from one of those scenes in which
you declared peace could not be found. You do not
forget the wreck off the —— coast ?”

“No, I shall never forget it; I was dreaming of
having found peace and calmness, too, when the storm
arose.”

“T was onthe same spot shortly after, and among the
rocks I found a little dwelling, with its only window
looking out upon the sea. It was the abode of poverty,
but also of peace. A poor widow lived there, whose
husband, a fisherman, had been drowned at sea in the
pursuit of his calling, and whose only son was one of
those lost from the life-boat in the vain effort to afford
assistance to the wreck.”

“And do you mean to tell me,” I impatiently ex-
claimed, “that she could live in peace, ever looking
upon the treacherous waters that had robbed her of all
she loved ?”

“JT do; she lived, or still lives, in peace, resting by
faith on the Everlasting Arm, to whose embrace she
clings the more earnestly, having none on earth to share
her love. But she can look up to the sky as well as
down upon the billows, aud she believes God, that it

N
17s THE PROBLEM SOLVED.

shall be to her even as he hath said. She is satisfied
that her husband and her son knew and trusted in the
Lord Jesus ; and when she looks down she remembers
that ‘the sea shall give up its dead;’ and again she looks
up, and remembers that believers, when ‘absent from
the body, are present with the Lord,’ and that ‘when the
trumpet shall sound, and the Lord himself shall come,
and all his saints with him, then she, and they whose
loss she mourns with true affection, shall meet in glory,
according to the word. Thus faith and hope amidst all
that scems desolate and wretched in this life, checr the
poor widow’s lonely lot, and minister ‘peace that pass-
eth understanding.’ She would not exchange places
with the richest, or most thoughtless worldling that flits
along the path of life, undisturbed by care or sorrow ;
and she would not, like you, begin to search for peace
in the sunshine of nature, for she has it in her own soul,
where the world can neither give it nor take it away,
and where her bright unfading light is a beam from ‘the
Lord her righteousness.’ ”

“T cannot understand it. Such misery would drive
me to despair, or deprive me of reason.”

“My dear friend, ‘the natural man receiveth not the
things of the Spirit of God;’ but this poor widow has
‘received, not the spirit of the world, but the spirit
which is of God; that she might know the things
that are freely given to us of God’ One of those
things is peace with God by the blood of Christ, and
that is always followed by peace in the dispensations
of his providence. She, too, might have been over-
whelmed by sorrow: but God’s child has an assurance
that the world’s child has not, ‘As thy day, so shall
THE PROBLEM SOLVED. 179

thy strength be.” Man, whether he likes it or not,
and whether he knows it or not, ‘is born to trouble
as the sparks fly upward ;’ and wise unto salvation are
those who, by the grace of God, acknowledge his hand,
recognise the ‘needs be,’ and kiss with meckness the
chastening rod. This is the secret of true peace, in the
midst of a vexing and troublesome world; and the man
who has it not within the little arena of his own heart,
scarches for it in vain amidst scenes and objects on
which the seal of inspiration has stamped the motto of
the fall, ‘ Vanity of vanities, all is vanity.’ ”
G.
A WELSIT TOMPSTONE,

Tr was my lot to spend a few days last summer in a
quict and beautiful retreat among the mountains of
Wales. In my solitary walks there was much to in-
terest and delight, scenes of cxquisite beauty which
could not fail to give intense enjoyment to any one who
had an eye and heart for such things. But nothing
affected me so much as a visit to a lonely churchyard.
Tt was situated on the banks of a beautiful stream.
Behind it rose a richly wooded hill, and whichever way
one looked, he found himself surrounded with hills of
the same character. In this lonely dwelling of the
dead, there were not twelve tombstones altogether,
other graves having only a covering of green turf. The
epitaphs were beautifully simple, and simply christian,
and, as such, imparted a higher interest to the neigh-
bourhood than any which its natural beauties could
impart. The epitaph which struck me most consisted
of these words: “WEN Cirrist, Wo IS OUR LIFE,
SHALL APPEAR, THEN SHALL WE ALSO APPEAR WIT
nim IN GLORY.” From high-sounding praises of human
virtue I should have turned away with loathing, but
these words awakened within me a sentiment of
A WELSH TOMBSTONE. 181

exulting joy, the recollection of which will, I trust, go
with me, not into the grave, but into a better world.
The sun shone brilliantly on wood, and hill, and stream.
All nature was clad in her gayest green. The air was
vocal with the songs of many birds. Human being,
there was none within the range of my sight. And
the voice which came to me from that grave was
solemn but triumphant.

Methought it spoke after this wise :—I trod those
hills on which you now gaze. I wandered over those
valleys. The place which knew me knows me no more.
But though forgotten, I sti/d am, and when He who is
my life shall appear, then, then shall even I also appear
with him in glory.”

Methought I heard it say likewise :—“ Fame never
echoed my name beyond these valleys. It was never
pronounced on the streets of the great and crowded
city whence you come. Obscure, I lived; obscure, I
died; and obscure, I sleep in this secluded grave. But
Thad a name elsewhere. It was written in the Lamb’s
book of life. I was entailed there as the heir of a
glorious inheritance. Already I possess a large earnest
of it, the larger and better part of it, in the purity and
joy of my spirit; and when Ile who is my life shall
appear, then shall I, in ‘a spiritual body,’ appear with
him in glory.”

Again said the voice to me:—“It was my lot to
dwell amidst the purest charms of nature, to gaze on
them, and inhale their beauties throngh every sense.
But they neither gave me immortal health nor taught
me where to find it; and, so far as they could bless me,
I might have died a heathen, and without hope. But
182 A WELSIL TOMBSTONE.

what nature could not do, Christ did for me. He was
my life. He is my life. And when he shall appear,
then shall I also appear with him in glory.”

The last utterance which this voice seemed to pour
into my ear was one of triumph :—* Before I was, those
hills raised their heads to heaven, and heaved their swell-
ing sides with abundance and beauty. And now that I
moulder here, they are indifferent to my low estate, and
magnify themselves as they have ever done. But the
hour of change is on the wing. The mountains shall
depart and the hiils shall be removed. The sun itself
shall grow dim, and those heavens shall pass away with
a great noise. But then shall be the day of my re-
demption. My mouldering dust shall be fashioned like
unto the glorious body of my Divine Lord. And when
he shall appear to claim his purchased possession, I,
even I, shall appear with him in glory.”

How transcendent, I thought, the religion which in-
spires hopes like these, and makes the poor child of
the dust lift his head with joy and exultation amid the
sorrows. and the deaths of a ruined world! And while
I mused, the fire burned, and I carried it to God’s
altar to present an offering of devout adoration to the
ever blessed Incarnate One, ‘my Lord and my God,’
mingled with the prayer that when he shall appear, T
also may appear with him in glory.

J.K.

SEA SHELLS.

‘The delicate shells lay on the shore,
The bubbles of the latest wave
Fresh pearls to their enamel gave ;
And the bellowing of the savage sea
Greeted their safe escape to me ;
I wiped away the weeds and foam,
And fetch’d my sea-born treasures home.”

Never are shells so beautiful as on the sands on
which the Almighty hand has strewn them, where sea
and sky, and the pearls which the wave has left, add
to their loveliness. Yet have the symmetry of their
forms, the brilliance of their colours, their various
flutings and convolutions, and their exquisite polish,
ever won for them the admiration of mankind. Large
sums, too, have been expended in their purchase by
conchologists who have eared to procure rather what
was rare, than that which had the greatest natural
grace. But whether we gather them from the shores,
or keep them in our cabinets, they well deserve our
careful regard. We may trace their fitness to their
inhabitants, or recall their various services to man;
and when we place one of them to the ear, to listen to
the music of the sea shell, its tones bring to many


184 SEA SHELLS.

reminiscences of rolling tides, and murmuring winds,
and all the sweet harmonies of ocean.

Althongh among the rocks or sands of our shores,
we find multitudes of shells, yet they are neither so
numerous nor so richly coloured as are the products
of the tropical seas. Some indeed, like the different
common species of donax and tellina, are of bright or
pale rose colour, or of delicate lilac, or yellow tint.
Shells of rich violet hue, like the mussel, sometimes
are to be found in ourrambles; others, like the nautica
or sea snail, have a glossy brown surface ; and the sand
is often plentifully adorned with different varieties of
the scallop shell, which, with their varied markings of
rich brown, and white, and lilac, well deserve the name
once given to them, of the butterflies of occan. Lovely
little shells, with pearly linings, hang about the tufts
of tangle or other sea weeds; and some few, like the
common anomia, are of mother-of-pearl, and glisten
with all the tints of the rainbow. But if we look at any
cabinet of foreign shells, we see how the rich hues of
green and red and violet eclipse the fainter tints of
those of the British seas.

Besides the pleasure which it affords us by its beauty,
a pleasure which God has provided for in the bright-
ness and grace of nature generally, the shell has many
uses. Shells are the dwelling-places of countless
living creatures, all of which exhibit in their structure
the most exquisite mechanism, and many even, in their
colours, the richest tints. Some mollusks have gills
resembling little bunches of delicate flowers, others
have them formed like tiny plumes of feathers. In
some cases the inmate of the sea shell is of delicate
SEA SHELLS. 185

pink hue, or of deep crimson, or marked with rich tints
of brown or yellow, or of a blue bright as that of the
summer heaven. On the uses of the shell-fish to man,
and beast, and bird, we may not linger, nor tell how,
from earliest ages, the oyster has delighted alike the
polished epicure and the rude savage; or how the
mussel, and the limpet, and the periwinkle, are often
the only food of thousands. We, in our land, have
comparatively but few uses for the shclls themselves.
Their rich mother-of-pearl linings serve, however, as an
excellent material for the purposes of ingenuity and
art, and from the shell we gather, too, the pearl for
ornament. But in former days, even in our land, the
flat valve of the scallop-shell served for the dishes and
plates of daily use, and the heat of the food left them
uninjured, while the hollow valve was used for the
drinking-eup, when in the words of Ossian, “ the joy
of the shell went round.’ The progress of art has
banished them from our tables, but they still supply
domestic utensils to large tribes of man. In the south
of India and China, the thin inner layers of some flat
shells are polished and used instead of glass for the
window-pane. In India, the. beautiful shell of a species
of nautilus is a common drinking vessel, and it is
rendered, if not more lovely, yet more costly, by having
various pictures painted on its surface. Knives, spoons,
fishing-hooks, even razors, have found their substitutes
in the sea shell; and in Zetland, the shell called the
antique fusus is suspended by a cord from the roof,
and having a wick and oil placed in it, is used as a
household lamp. The large shells of the scallop, once
worn in the hat as the badge of pilgrimage to the Holy
186 SEA SHELLS.

Land, serve us as mantel ornaments, and landscapes
are sometimes painted on their inner sides; while in
many countries they are commonly used as milk-skim-
mers. The native Americans are described by an old
writer, as hanging shells loosely on small cords, which
made a kind of music as the wind swept in among them.
Southey alludes to this practice :—

“ Not a sound is heard
But of the crackling brand or mouldering fire,
Or when among yon pendant string of shells,

The slow wind makes a shrill and feeble sound,
A sound of sorrow to the mind attuned
By sights of woe.”

In China some shells are prized highly, because they
are devoted to religious uses, and kept in pagodas hy
priests. They are taken out at the accession of a new
emperor to the throne, when they are uscd to contain
the anointing oil employed at his coronation. In almost
all barbarous nations, strings of shells form the neck-
laces, bracelets, and head ornaments of the people.
Among the Indians of North America, pieces of mussel-
shells serve as public records; and in many parts of
India, in Siam, and on the coast of Guinea, a species of
cowry is so much used for current coin, as to have
obtained the name, even among men of science, of the
money cowry.

Shells consist of carbonate of lime, mingled with
animal matter; hence, when crushed, they form an
excellent manure for land, and they have been found
to act even more beneficially than quicklime on turf
soils. In China, India, Ceylon, and some parts of
Africa, where stone cannot be procured for lime burn-
SEA SHELLS. 187

ing, the shells, so abundant on the coasts, are used
instead, and they furnish a pure lime.

But useful as are many individual shells, and service-
able as are their masses for manure, yet they have a
far higher purpose to perform in the economy of nature
than those yet named. By means of accumulated
heaps of shells, the bed of ocean is continually rising ;
and when we consider that some strata of chalk, lime-
stone, and marl consist chiefly of the shells of mol-
luscous animals, corals, madrepores, and sea urchins,
we can form some idea of the importance of this class
of objects. Well have they been called the “ Medals
of Creation.” By means of fossil shells we trace the
records of the world in its older ages, and see that
immense numbers of living creatures which have passed
away from earth, had once an existence and a home
in its watery depths. Large beds composed of these
remains, extending for many miles bencath the carth’s
surface, are to be met with im various regions of our
globe; and enormous chains of mountains are but, as
Parkinson describes them, “ vast monuments in which
these remains of former ages are entombed.” - Strata
of limestone rocks, stretching for miles over the land-
scape, and green here and there with clumps of grasses
or bright with their own peculiar flowers, are composed
of myriads of shells, many of them so perfect as that
the conchologist can arrange them in their respective
classes; while so regular are the works of God, that
even the species of the fossil sea egg may be identified,
if the geologist can only examine one single spine from
its surface. Many shells lie powdered together in con-
fused heaps, centuries pass over them, and chemical
188 SEA SHELLS.

changes affect them, until they come to form the marble
which we value for its uses, and the gems which we
prize for their lustre. And that little mollusk which
glided among the waters, and made its meal of the
animalcules contained in them, or of the tree-like weeds
which float among them, has thus aided in originating
some of those wondrous hills and rocks which deck the
earth. There seemed little of carbonate of lime in such
materials; but God gave him skill to gather it, and by
the help of the living principle, to make it into a shell.

A. P.
THE SEA-SHORE.

I rovep to walk where none had walk’d before,
About the rocks that ran along the shore ;

Or far beyond the sight of men to stray,

And take my pleasure when I lost my way.

For then ’twas mine to trace the hilly heath,
And all the mossy moor that lies beneath.

Here had I favourite stations where I stood,
And heard the murmurs of the ocean-flood,
With not a sound beside, except when flew
Aloft the lapwing, or the grey curlew,

Who with wild notes my fancied power defied,
And mock’d the dreams of solitary pride.

T loved to stop at every creek and bay

Made by the river in its winding way,

And call to memory—not by marks they bare,
But by the thoughts that were created there.
Pleasant it was to view the sea-gulls strive
Against the storm, or in the ocean dive,

With eager scream; or when they dropping gave
Their closing wings to sail upon the wave :
Then as the winds and waters raged around,
And breaking billows mix’d their deafening sound,
They on the rolling deep securely hung,

And calmly rode the restless waves among.
190 THE SEA-SHORE.

Nor pleased it less around me to behold,
Far up the beach, the yeasty sea-foam roll’d ;
Or from the shore upborne, to see on high
Its frothy flakes in wild confusion fly :
While the salt spray that clashing billows form,
Gave to the taste a feeling of the storm.
CRABBE.
CAN SHH BE SPARED?

A PARTY was arranged among the Heaths and their
visiting friends, for a day’s pleasure at ——-—, the
spacious park and noble mansion of the Duke of ;
As Mrs. Heath and her daughter, “on hospitable



thoughts intent,” were busily engaged in preparation

for the comfortable refreshment of the party, Mr.
Heath, accompanied by his friend Mr. Finch, undertook
the service of beating up for recruits, and providing
suitable carriages.

Among the friends whose company they were desirous
of securing, were Mr. and Mrs. Wade. Mr. Wade, it
was found, could not jom the party for the day, as
official duty required him to attend a sitting of magis-
trates at the town hall; but he engaged, if the mecting
were not unusually protracted, to ride over afterwards
and spend an hour or two with his friends in the park.—
And Mrs. Wade—might they hope for the pleasure of
her company ?

“My good wife must answer for herself,’ replied
Mr. Wade; “she is one of the careful Marthas, and
can rarely be induced to leave home. I wish she may
be able to arrange matters on this occasion ; I know she
would enjoy the society of her friends; and the little
192 CAN SHE BE SPARED ?

change and recreation would be beneficial to one who
is habitually so closely confined. Do, my dear, make
an effort, and give yourself a holiday for once.”

“ Do not say for once,” replied Mrs. Wade, with a
smile. “I could remind you of giving me many holi-
days. I really wish I could see it right to accept the
kind invitation of our friends on this occasion; but
circumstances preclude my leaving home at present.
My nurse has been ill, and is not strong enough to take
charge of the children.”

It was with sincere regret that Mrs. Wade’s friends
yielded to the validity of her reasons. A young female
was present. Mr. Finch supposing her to be a daughter
of his friends, good-naturedly said, ‘“ Perhaps we may
be favoured with the company of Miss Wade—can she
be spared ?”

This proposal was promptly acceded to—the little
misapprehension corrected—the young lady duly an-
nounced as Miss Bennet, a niece of Mr. Wade—and
the visitors took their departure.

Now, if Mr. Finch’s appeal had received a true, full,
and particular answer, it might have been something
like this :—‘ Oh yes, she can be spared. She is of no
use at home, and will never be missed, or only by the
absence of the trouble she occasions. She requires
more waiting upon than any other person in the house;
and during a period of family sickness she has never
once offered to alleviate the fatigues of mistress or
servants, either by endeavouring to make herself use-
ful, or by dispensing with needless attendance.” The
relatives of Miss Bennet were far too kind and generous
to bear any such testimony concerning her, though
CAN SHE BE SPARED ? 193

they could not but observe with regret the sad defi-
ciencies and defects in her character.

Through the whole of that day and the next, the
young lady was very busily employed. It was observed
in the kitchen (servants 7/7 make their own observa-
tions) that the parlour bell had not been so still any
two days since Miss Bennet came. This was not very
extraordinary ; when people are really employed they do
not require half so much waiting upon as when they
are idle. They have not time themselves to think of
giving trouble to others. Well, Miss Bennet eagerly
yet perseveringly pursued her task. She was preparing
some ornamental articles of dress for herself, which she
intended to wear on the day of the party; and her
patience and energy were sustained by the animating
consideration, how well these things would become “er.
Asmall portion of the same energy and aptitude, had
they been with good-will devoted to the service of
others, would have rendered this young lady far more
amiable and useful than she was, would have secured
to her the love and gratitude of those around her, and
caused her presence to be desired, and her absence
to be regarded as areal loss. Such is the difference
between selfishness and benevolence.

* * * *

“Tf all be well, we purpose on the 25th leaving
home for the Isle of Wight. We hope the change may
tend to the re-establishment of health. Your brother
also is anxious to send us out of the way while the
- house is painted and papered. We take with us nurse
and housemaid; leaving our trusty old Betty in charge

O
194 CAN SHE BE SPARED?

of the house, and to wait upon her master when he is
at home. We hope he will be able to come down on
Saturday afternoons ; pass the sabbaths with us, and
return to business on Monday mornings. What a real
comfort and advantage does railway travelling afford !
Tt is a pity it should ever be abysed. And now, my
dear sister, I can scarcely venture to ask such a favour,
for I know how truly valuable she is to you—but could
you and brother spare your dear Lucy to accompany us?
Tt would be a great accession of pleasure to the young
people—indeed, to all of us—and I need not say we
should endeavour to make it agreeable to her. The
children caught a word about it at breakfast time,
when your brother proposed my writing to you on the
subject; and they have ever since been full of the idea
of having dear cousin Lucy with them. I tell them
not to set their minds too much upon it; for it is very
uncertain whether she can be spared. However, I sin-
cerely hope it may be practicable. It is our intention
not to exceed a month,” etc.

Such is a fragment of the letter over which Mr. and
Mrs. Neville sat in close consultation.

“* Well, my dear, what do you think of it?”

“ What do you think? is the question. I should
very much like to let her go—but how can you possibly
spare her?”

“ That is not easily answered—it requires considera-
tion. My first impression is, that if possible she ought
to be spared. She deserves pleasure, and this is an
opportunity so unexceptionable and altogethercongenial,
that I quite wish she may be permitted to enjoy it.
As to sparing her, to be sure she will be very much
CAN SHE BE SPARED? 195 -

missed both in the house and out of it; but she is so
much beloved, and always so willing to help others,
that no doubt one and another wil! be willing to take
a share in her duties during her absence.”

It wil require not a few to fill up her place. Dear
child, what a mercy it is to see her an active humbie
follower of Him who went about doing good!”

“Oh, yes; infinitely beyond any earthly distinction.
Truly may we say of her, ‘Thy father and thy mother
shall be glad, and she that bare thee shall rejoice.’
Oh, that each of the younger children may copy her
example !”

“ Here she comes, we shall hear what she says of it
herself. Well, Lucy, here is an invitation for you—
read it, and tell us what you think about it.”

“What do you and mamma think ?”

“ We both think it would be a nice holiday for you,
and that we should like you to enjoy it.”

“ Tt is very kind of uncle and aunt to invite me, and
very kind of you to be willing to spare me; but—
T hardly think I cin go. Mamma ought not to have
more fatigue thrown wpon her; and—it is not much
that I can do—but many little things require atten-
tion, and I ought not to neglect them for my own
pleasure.”

“ Well, think about it, love. It will be time enough
to answer your aunt’s letter to-morrow. Meanwhile
we must look round and try to find some efficient
substitute.”

€ sk * *

“Well, how is it settled about Lucy’s expedition ?”
196 CAN SHE BE SPARED?

was the question of her papa, as he took his seat at
the tea-table.

T think we shall manage to spare her. Mary has
just been in to say that if Miss Lucy goes out, she
shall be happy to attend to the children morning and
evening; and this she can very well do in addition to
her regular work, by rising a little earlier. ‘ Anyhow,’
she says, ‘Miss Lucy may depend upon it, her mamma
shall not be over-fatigued.’”

“That is very kind and gratifying; Mary is a well-
principled young woman, and manifests much of that
real attachment, good-will, and fellow-feeling by which
service is rendered acceptable, and domestic comfort
greatly promoted. The nursery school, I suppose, must
break up for a month’s vacation,—or are you to become
deputy governess P”

“You are not right this time in either of your
guesses. Lucy called on Ellen Moore to consult about
a substitute for her Sunday school class, not at all
expecting to find one there, but wishing, in case of her
going out, to make such arrangements as would be quite
satisfactory to Miss Moore as superintendent; when a
young lady who had just arrived there on a visit, and
who is constantly engaged in the work of Sunday school
teaching, kindly proposed to take Lucy’s class during
her absence. Not only so; the two young ladies
knowing Lucy’s engagements at home, have volunteered
their services, one or other of them daily, to fill her
place as nursery governess. Then Frank Moore has
undertaken the tract distribution, and that steady little
girl, Betsy Smith, will go round and collect the Bible
and Missionary pence, and bring them to me to take
CAN SHE BE SPARED ?~ — 197

account of. So that settles the business both out of
doors and at home.”

“Not quite, mamma; there is one thing more.”

“Oh, you mean the shirts for your brothers to take
to school. I think we must put them out to be done.”

“Ob no, mamma, there is no occasion to put them
out. I intend, if you please, to take them with me;
I shall surely have time to do some needlework. ‘The
other thing that I was thinking about was poor old
Mrs. West; she does so depend on having a chapter
or two to read to her on a sabbath evening.”

“ Well, Lucy, I think I must undertake that service.
The distance is too great for mamma, and perhaps the
poor woman would like an old acquaintance better than
a stranger. If all be well you may depend on me for
that.”

“Thank you, dear papa, that will be a treat to her;
and if you and mamma think proper, I shall be satisfied
and happy in going out. But oh, how often I shall
think of you all, and how glad I shall be to come home
again !?”

“Well, I fancy we shall not forget you, and that we
shall all be as glad as yourself to welcome you home
again. May you, my dear child, through life be humble
and useful, then you will be beloved and happy.”

“How can she be spared? our only daughter, the
delight of our eyes, the comfort of our lives.”

So said the fond parents of Emily Ward, when a
young minister of the gospel, just fixed in an important
station of labour and usefulness, sought her as the
198 CAN SHE BE SPARED ?

companion of his life. And the dutiful girl clung to her
parents, and declined the overtures of one whom she
nevertheless honoured and loved. The young man,
however, did not withdraw his attentions, or relinquish
his hopes, and im process of time the parents became
reconciled to the prospect of the union. That they
might not be altogether deprived of the society of their
child, they made arrangements for removing their
abede and settling near the young people. A house |
was taken, and most of the furniture removed; the day
of the marriage was fixed, and the expectant bride-
groom arrived two days previously. He found his Emily
_ slightly indisposed, so slightly as to awaken no solici-
tude. She passed the evening in the society of her
parents, her beloved, and a few friends who met to
take a Christian farewell of a family so long respected
in the town. But “at midnight there was a cry made,”
and the approach of another Bridegroom announced.
In a few hours the blooming Emily was a corpse; and
under such circumstances could she be spared? Yes;
vain is all remonstrance when Death presents his com-
mission ; more than that, she was spared, not merely
snatched away, but submissively yielded up. “To de-
part, and to be with Christ, which is far better,” was her
own blessed conviction ; and the bereaved were enabled
to say, “It is the Lord, let him do what seemeth him
good.” “We sorrow not as those who have no hope.
She shall not return to us, but we shall go to her,
‘and so shall we be for ever with the Lord;’” and they
comforted one another with these words.
% # # ‘

And the active, the benevolent, the useful, those who
CAN SHE BE SPARED ? 199

are not only the strength and ornament of families, but
the life and soul of benevolence and pious enterprise,
the benefactors of mankind, can they be spared? Yes ;
if the message comes, “The Lord hath need of them.”
Else would not the weeping church have surrounded
the bier of that disciple who “ was full of good works
and almsdeeds which she did,’ Acts ix. 36—39; else
would Howard have been preserved from infection
while labourmg for the relief of human misery; else
would not the devoted Harriet Newell have been cut off
in the bud of her missionary consecration, nor her
beloved associate and friend, Ann Judson, when, after
thirteen years of unparalleled exertions and sufferings in
the missionary cause, she thought her trials were past,
the horizon around brightening, and she anticipated
along and uninterrupted course of toil for the con-
version of the heathen ; else would the stroke of death
be confined to those useless triflers whose loss is not
greatly felt nor lamented, while a mark of immortality,
or at least of continuance to old age, would be set upon
the foreheads of those whose life is a blessing to the
world, and their death a public loss. But “My thoughts
are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways,
saith the Lord. For as the heavens are higher than
the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and
my thoughts than your thoughts,” Isa. lv. 8, 9.

Often are the most beloved and cherished friends
snatched from the fond embraces of those whose lives
seem bound up in theirs. Yet so far from sinking
under the loss, the bereaved mourner is enabled to live,
and to live happily, in realizing the presence and com-
munications of Him whose favour is life, and whose
200 CAN SHE BE SPARED?

loving-kindness is better than life, Ps. xxx. 5;
Ixiti. 8. Often the most valuable and efficient instru-
ments are removed at the moment that they seemed
most essential to the prosecution of the work. Yet
the work is not abandoned, or given up im despair.
Our tendency to idolatry receives a check; we are
taught to rely less upon instruments, and more upon
the Divine Agent. With him is the residue of the
Spirit: when he removes some, he raises up others, and
endows them with the needful qualifications for carrying
on his work ; and by all his dispensations he makes his
people know that “without Him they can do nothing;”
but that there is no human instrumentality so valuable
or so essential as that it cannot be spared, while his
church can say: God is with us, God is for us, God
in Christ is ours.

And of all who have been hardly spared and deeply
lamented, it may be said they are not altogether lost.
Their works survive. They have laid the foundation,
and others build thereon. They have ploughed and
sowed with tears, others reap with joy. Their example
continues to operate, their spirit diffuses itself around.
How many have been stimulated to acts of useful
charity, by remembering “the coats and garments
which Dorcas made!” How many, by reading of the
zeal, and consecration, and self-denying and successful
labours of others, have been found to look around and
ask, “‘ Lord, what wilt thou have me to do?” Thus, as
one labourer falls others advance to take his place, and
the work of the Lord goes on; and when at length it
is completed, in triumph it will appear, that each indi-
vidual employed in that blessed service, was endowed
CAN SHE BE SPARED ? 201

with exactly the capabilities, and continued just as long
in the exercise of them as was needful for the accom-
plishment of the service to which he was appointed.
There will be no deficiency, no redundancy. Not one
will be found that could be spared, nor one be wanting
to complete the universal symmetry.

H.C.
THE SPRING AS AN EMBLEM OF TITHE
RESURRECTION.*

Tuar is a beautiful thought of the Israelites of our
days; when they enter their cemetery to deposit there
one of their number, it is said, they bow together three
times to the ground; then seizing the grass of the
tomb which they are about to open, and casting it
behind them, they utter in chorus these words of the
prophet ; “Thy ‘bones shall flourish like the grass,’—
O my brother, thy ‘bones shall flourish like the grass.’ ”

My brethren, T come here to do something of a similar
kind to-day. I take, as it were, handfuls of the grass
and flowers with which the spring has covered our
fields, and amidst the concerts of gratitude and joy
heard everywhere around us at this season of miracles,
T exclaim, Resurrection! Resuirection! I declare to
you that your bones, though laid in the very dust, shall
flourish like the grass, with the whole of nature, which

* By Dr. Ganssen, addressed to his parishioners, while pastor in
Satigny, to illustrate the teachings of spring; furnishing a fine
specimen of the simple and beantiful style in which the Swiss
pastors, in the rural districts, frequently address their flocks. Dr.
Gaussen is now Professor of Systematic Theology, in connexion
with Dr. Merle @Aubigné, in the Evangelical School at Geneva.
SPRING AS AN EMBLEM OF THE RESURRECTION. 203

lives again. I preach to you the resurrection of the
just.

O my parishioners and brethren, what a thought !
When I come amongst this flock, committed to my
tender care, and read in these beloved countenances
the expression of a spiritual and immortal nature, I
think that all these children of men will soon fall and
disappear, as last autumn the leaves of the woods fell
and disappeared; and oh! with what emotion does my
whole soul then spring forward to that resurrection
which I am charged to announce to you! How sweet,
at such a time, the thought that God enables us every
year, by the renewal of all the plants, grains, and insects
around us in the country, to ery to all from the midst
of. these changes: Child of mortality, thou shalt rise
again from the dust, and thy bones shall flourish like
the grass.

* % * %

I proceed, in the first place, to show you how the
marvellous renewals which take place in the spring, now
recall to our imagination the great doctrine of the resur-
rection of our body at the last day. I shall speak to
youas if you were all Christians; but at the close,
I shall remind you—as it is the duty of a faithful minis-
ter to distinguish, though without judging, who among
his hearers are converted, and who are not converted—
I shall remind you of what such symbols say to our
conscience, and how they urge us to examine ourselves
whether we be in the faith.

And oh! may the God of all grace, who repeats to
us in such varied forms the doctrines of life, and who
speaks to.us in the wonders of the season with such
204 THE SPRING AS AN EMBLEM

tenderness and power, condescend to address himself
more intimately to our souls, and explain to us “apart”
the import of all these lessons and parables.

A few months ago, and the earth was a desert of ice ;
all was silent and lifeless. The plants were dry, their
beauty was gone; everywhere they presented to us only
the aspect of death. The trees stripped of their foliage,
like dry bones, rattled their bare branches against each
other; the brooks and torrents were arrested in their
course; their motion was suspended; instead of the
breath of life which animates every thing to-day, the
north wind, like the breath of destruction, swept alone
over that vast cemetery.

Who of us, if custom had not rendered us familiar
with the prodigies of spring, would not, at the sight-of
all that death, have been tempted to exclaim, “ Lord,
can all these things live again?” And yet what have
we seen? From the first days of spring the Almighty
has prophesied upon these dry bones; they have
appeared to move, to be covered, as it were, with the
nerves of life. Now they live, they breathe; adorned
with verdure and flowers, lo! they seem to stand up,
forming an exceeding great army to the praise of God.
To-day, motion, progress, joy, life, appear in every place,
where but lately we saw nothing but silence, sadness,
and death. Has not a spirit of resurrection, a living
soul entered into nature? Has not the breath of God,
from “the four winds, breathed upon these dry bones ?
Have not myriads of creatures come to life in the air,
the earth and the waters, just as the elect shall come to
life on the happy day of the resurrection of the just ?
What were these flowers everywhere springing from the
OF THE RESURRECTION. 205

ground, as from their tombs, fresh as the morning dew,
numerous as the sands of the sea, and more beautiful
by far than the robe of an emperor in the day of his
glory; what were they a few months ago but dull and
unsightly roots, or seeds, resembling the vile dust which
we trample under our foot? But look now: these roots
and grains lately buried, like the human body in the
grave, which is only an object of horror; these roots
and seeds which were corrupting and decomposing in
our furrows before their renovation, are to-day become
the ornament of the country and the delight of our eyes.
Admire how each succeeding day these miracles of re-
surrection, so far from ceasing, increase and spread with
as much rapidity as splendour; how myriads of plants
and insects, by an incomprehensible operation of God,
rise continually from the earth to praise, in concert, the
Almighty Creator who has delivered them from death,
and brought them into the light of our most beautiful
days. See how the whole creation, as if raised from
a tomb, is penetrated with life, and pulsates with
joy!

And can you, happy cultivators of these charming
plains, be insensible to so many prodigies? Have you
not this morning beheld scenes the most magnificent, as
you ascended and descended these smiling hills? And
will you not, on your return from this place, find them
again in all their royal pomp? Will you not learn that
God preaches to you by this means with a clearness of
import and an exuberance of goodness the great doctrine
of the resurrection both of the just and of the unjust ?
And will you not receive the lesson with tenderness and
gratitude, and say, “Speak, O my God, God of the
206 THE SPRING AS AN EMBLEM

Bible, God of the resurrection, God of salvation!
Speak, O my God, thy servant heareth.”

What then do all these marvels preach to you, if not
the truth and certainty of the Divine promises? They
are given to reproduce them to you, so to speak, in the
persons of the trees, tic flowers, the insects, and indeed

in the whole of nature. They repeat to you in a manner
the most impressive, that the day is coming when the
earth, hitherto cursed, shall see rismg upon it the
sun of an eternal spring. Then, as the Bible says,
all that are in their graves shall hear the voice of
the Son of God, and they that hear shall live. Then
the Lord, clothed with light and glory, shall descend
from heaven with his mighty angels, and myriads of his
holy ones. He will come with a shout, with the voice
of the archangel, and the trump of God,—for the
trumpet shall sound. Then a scene, if possible more
imposing than that of the creation, shall be displayed.
The voice of the Son of man piercing the tombs of the
dead, shall be heard by them all, and “their bones shall
flourish like the grass.” Then shall the sea give up
the dead which are in it, and all the graves the dead
which are in them! Then the children of God of all
conditions, of all places and times, shall stand upon the
earth. Light and life shall be restored; a new heaven
shall be revealed, and a new earth prepared for them ;
they shall chant the songs of the resurrection; sorrow
shall be no more, for sin shall be no more: swallowed
up in victory, death shall be no more!

All this is. as certain as the return of spring after
winter. It is as certain as the entire word of God,
which cannot lie; as sure as the faithfulness of the
OF THE RESURRECTION. 207

Being who reveals to us all the laws of nature. Then
shall men flourish in the cities as the dust of the earth.
Then shall be fulfilled the promise, “Thy dead men
shall live, together with my dead body shall they arise.”
They shall rise again. “ Awake and sing, ye that dwell
in dust, for thy dew is as the dew of herbs, and the
earth shall cast out the dead.”

But these are not only illustrations but proofs of the
resurrection; and this brings us to the second part of
our subject.

My brethren, beholding these prodigies of Divine
power, can you conceive how one living among the
innumerable resurrections of spring, can say with the
sceptics of Corinth of whom the apostle Paul speaks,
“How are the dead raised up, and with what body do
they come?” Ought we not to reply to them, as our
Lord to the Saddueces who denied the resurrection,
“Ye know not the Seriptures, neither the power of
God?” Or rather, as St. Paul—“Thou fool!” Is not
thy Creator omnipotent? Does he not call things
which are not, as though they were? Are not his
invisible perfections, “his eternal power and Godhcad,”
discovered “by the things that are made?” Is not the
God of the spring also the God of the promises? Can
he not exercise his power in the sepulchres of men, as
you see it exercised each spring, in the numberless
sepulchres of plants which renew their life, and of
winged insects which spring from the tomb? Cannot
that God who from the earth of our furrows causes to
spring up anemones, lilies, rich fruits and clusters of
grapes, also cause to rise from the dust, a man, a child
of God, a friend of Jesus, whom we have laid there
208 THE SPRING AS AN EMBLEM

with so many prayers and tears? Cannot that God
who perhaps a hundred years ago, from a simple acorn
which a child might have concealed in his hand, caused
that magnificent tree to grow which covers our church
with its shadow, and all the fruits which it has borne,
also cause the body of a child of Adam to spring up
from the silence of the tomb? Insensate ones ! ye
know neither the Scriptures, nor the power of God.
Will that God, think you, who each hour changes the
water into sap in the trees of our vineyards and in the
stems of our corm; who will soon change that sap into
grapes and ears of corn; who condescends: finally to
change those grapes and ears, eaten as food, into quick-
ening blood, circulating through our veins and arteries ;
who each instant causes to rise from the earth millions
upon millions of winged insects; who on the sixth day
of creation formed from dust the body of our first
parent ;—will that God find more difficulty in raising
the same body a second time from the same dust, on
the day of the resurrection? “Thou fool,” says the
apostle, “that which thou sowest is not quickened
except it die; and that which thou sowest thou sowest
not that body that shall be, but bare grain, it may
chance of wheat or of some other grain. But God
giveth it a body as it hath pleased him, and to every
seed his own body.” So shall it be in the resurrection.
“Tt is sown in corruption, it is raised in incorruption ;
it is sown in dishonour, it is raised in glory; itis sown
in weakness, it is raised in power.”
But before goimg further, let me point out two sym-
bols furnished by spring, which reveal to us with stronger
evidence and greater precision this important truth.
OF THE RESURRECTION. 209

This is the season when all the winged insects, the
bees, the cochineals, the butterflies, the grasshoppers,
the May-bugs, the beautiful silk-worms, and. the,
voracious locusts, issue in myriads from their: cells,
their aurelias, their cocoons, and their chrysalises.

Behold that wonderful insect, that light and graceful
inhabitant of the air, which in our gardens resembles a
flying flower, and by the elegance of its shape, and the
splendour of its colours, forms the delight of our eyes !
What was it at first, and what has it become? It was
at first a crawling insect, an unsightly caterpillar. Some
weeks or some months ago it seemed to die. It was
seen to grow pale, to change colour; then to stop eating
and moving, and afterwards to shut itself in a kind of
sepulchre, to get rid of some of its members, and
become like a corpse wrapped in a winding-sheet or
a mummy in the catacombs, which had been plunged
in bitumen, and rolled up in bands. Nay, more, before
yielding to death, it buried itself in the earth, where
it took the precaution even to lay itself out upon a
bier; and ¢here it might have been seen in its follicle,
as the bodies of embalmed Egyptians have been dis-
covered in their coffins of sycamore. ' But as soon as
it has felt the quickening breath of spring, how sur-
prising the change which it undergoes by the power
of God! Would it be said that it is the same creature?
Yes, it is the same; and yet it is not the same. It has
torn asunder its winding-sheet, it has broken its bier ;
and it has been seen rising up to newness of life;
a creature, aérial, winged, glorious, radiant with
beauty, endued with new senses and new faculties, to
seek in a higher element purer food and nobler enjoy-

P
210 THE SPRING AS AN EMBLEM

ments. This new creature appears to have retained
none of the humiliations and miseries of its old condition.
The abject caterpillar which was buried, and the happy
winged animal seen rising from it, seem to you entirely
different; the living one reminds you of that which
was dead only by contrast. The first crawled upon the
ground, like us, unceasingly exposed to a thousand
accidents ; the other soars into the air, and disdains, as
it were, to light upon the earth from which it sprang.
The first shocked our sight by its disgusting appearance ;
the second, adorned with the richest colours, is the
delight of our eyes. The first was blind; the second
is furnished with the most marvellous eyes, resembling,
by their innumerable and brilliant facets, richly cut
diamonds. It has even acquired, as some suppose, a
new sense in its axtenne ; it enjoys a thousand sensa-
tions of which it formerly knew nothing. The first
nourished itself on gross and common aliment ; but this,
since its resurrection, is seen flying from flower to
flower, living upon honey and dew, rejoicing in the
freedom of nature, forming even its ornament, and
gladdened by the purest joys.

But there is another symbol of spring which I cannot
suppress. [refer to the singular preservation of the num-
berless germs which come to light, at this glad season,
in all parts of the earth, the air, and the waters.

The seed is to the plant what the egg is to the insect
or the bird which proceeds from it. In each egg there
is a germ, containing the lineaments of a little animal,
which needs only the heat to develop it. In each seed
also is a germ from which the plant issues. And as no
vegetable is produced without a seed, to which it owes
OF THE RESURRECTION, 211

its. first existence, so no animal can come to the light
which has not been prepared in an egg.

But science has already numbered upon the globe
ten thousand species of insects, and eighty thousand
different species of plants, each of which proceeds from
a germ peculiar to itself. And yet, my brethren, it is sur-
prising that all these seeds of plants and eggs of insects,
scattered everywhere, by millions upon millions, are
never mistaken by the spring in its innumerable resur-
rections ; the cochineal never arising where we expected.
the ant, or the tamarind in the place of the sycamore,
or the mint and the cummin in the place of the hyssop
or the mustard. But it is especially surprising how all
these germs can, previous to their renewal, brave the
power of the elements, the moisture of the night, the
rigour of the winter, frequently long years, and some-
times also ages, without losing anything of their germi-
nating virtue, or of that mysterious life which lies
concealed in their interior.

You have doubtless heard the tradition that the
Greek missionaries, thirteen hundred years ago, secretly
conveyed from China to Europe, in the hollow of a
pilgrim’s staff, the first eggs of those marvellous worms
which at this day supply us with silk, and which, by
their labours year after year, enrich so many countries.
You know also how in European markets people trade
in these germs under the name of seed, as you would
do with the seed of poppies or wheat.

The illustrious Bonnet mentions some little animals
whose germs sustain, without perishing, the heat of boil-
ing water; while others, still more remarkable—those,
for example, of the eels in rickety corn, or of polypi in
212 THE SPRING AS AN EMBLEM

rain-water—are preserved dry, and in a state of apparent
death, for many years, the one in the corn and the other
in the dust. Corn has been discovered both in Europe
and in Africa which had been buried for several ages in
cavities, or subterranean hollows, whose germs came to
light as soon as one of our springs shed upon them its
quickening breath.

And to mention still one thing more, have you not
heard of those Celtic tombs, and of the skeletons and
seeds lately discovered near Bergerac, in France?
Under the head of each of these skeletons, buried, it is
said, two thousand years ago, the superstition of the
Druid priests had placed a block, and under each of
these blocks, in a little circular cavity covered with
cement, a small quantity of seeds. Well, these seeds of
two thousand years’ duration, being collected and sown
with particular care, have rapidly germinated ; and the
heliotrope, the trefoil, and the blue-bell have been seen
springing, in resurrection of life, after twenty centuries
of burial; so that last year you might have beheld, with
your own eyes, those marvellous plants blossoming in
beauty, under the light of our own spring, after their
germs had slept two thousand years under the heads of
the dead, and in the dust of the tombs.*

* These are striking illustrations, beautiful analogies of the
resurrection of the dead. But as we cannot prove the existence of
any germ in the bodies of the dead, we cannot urge them as
proofs.—They are rather mute promises of what may be, striking
resemblances, and perhaps premonitions, of the resurrection
of the dead. Still it cannot be shown that no such germ,
nucleus, or principle does exist, hidden, so to speak, in the
grosser particles of the body, preserved by the power of God, and
in due time “ germinating like the grass.” Be this, however, as it

#
OF THE RESURRECTION. 213

O my beloved brethren, my companions in the journey
to the tomb, what may we not anticipate? Are not
these sublime and imposing symbols; and am I not
right in saying that they are rich in instruction and
consolation? Do they not justify us in affirming that
those very dead, whose dried skulls preserved the germs
of the sun-flower, the blue-bell, and the clover, shall also
rise from their own dust in the last great day; that
their germs shall be preserved, in spite of all the powers
of the elements and the duration, of ages; that then
Jesus will come in the clouds of heaven; that there will

may, we are assured by inspiration, that a body will arise identical
with the body that has perished. God it is who provides it,
just as he created the world at first, and brought light and life
from darkness and death. “The dead shall hear his voice.”
Moreover, identity of person, nay more, identity of body, does
not depend upon identity of particles. Our bodies are changing
perpetually even now, but they preserve their identity. The
body of a full-grown man is the same that he had when a little
child; changed indeed, but essentially the same. So the spiritual
body of the resurrection will be very unlike the body we have
now, and yet the same; another, as the corn which springs from
the seed, or the flower from the root, and yet not another. “It
is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body.” All that is
gross and perishable is gone; only the ethereal and immortal
remains, The old root has perished, but the flower blossoms in
the paradise of God. The garments of the flesh have rotted and
fallen off, but the garment of the spirit is discovered in imperish-
able splendour. :

Is there nothing in the body but what meets the eye? Is there
nothing in it essential, indivisible, indestructible? Whence came
it? What is its basis or substratum? Does nothing remain when.
its outward form has passed away? Moreover, must every thing
be measured by our senses, or even by our reason, limited and im-
perfect as itisP Shall we set bounds to the Almighty, and say to
him, “Hither shalt thou come, and no further?” No, true phi-
losophy and true religion equally forbid the presumption.—T.

’
214 THE SPRING AS AN EMBLEM

be a resurrection of the just and of the unjust; thatali
the dead that are in their graves shall hear his voice,
and that he will quicken their bodies by his Spirit
that dwells in them ?

What inexpressible peace truly has the Christian who
thus relies upon the promises of God, recalled and con-
firmed every moment in the scenes of nature! He
does not see a plant, a seed, a flower, an insect, an egg,
ora blade of grass, which does not repeat to him,
“ Here thy God once more speaks to thee! Here Jesus
calls to thee as to Mary of Bethany : Thy brother shall
rise again; thy bones shall flourish like the grass; thou
hast a heritage in thy Father’s house; thou shalt not
be unclothed, but clothed upon; and if the tabernacle
in which thou now lodgest is about to dissolve, thy God
is preparing for thee in heaven a mansion unchangeable
and everlasting.” Godis love. He is thy God, as he
was the God of Abraham. He is not the God of the
dead, the God of the dust; and in giving thee faith, he
has marked thee for the great day of the resurrection
- of the just. ?

Ah! then, if Jesus dwells in your hearts by faith,
take courage. Look around you. Everywhere in these
smiling fields you behold miracles which cry to you,
Resurrection! Resurrection! Do not fear if age or
sickness has invaded that mortal frame. Rather trans-
port your vision to that day when the glorious resur-
rection shall adorn it with celestial beauty and im-
perishable grace. Yes, redeemed spirit, take off without
regret that soiled and rent garment with which thou
art now burdened, that body exhausted by sickness,
and worn out by time; for on awaking at the sound of
OF THE RESURRECTION. 215

the avchangel’s trumpet, thou shalt find a robe whiter
than the snow, more radiant than the light. Thou
shalt spring again from the earth, like the sun-flower,
the blue-bell, and the clover; like the rose of Sharon,
and the lily of the valley. Thou shalt be transported
into the garden of the last Eden, the radiant home of
eternal holiness. Then with thy renovated eyes shalt
thou contemplate the face of God, with thine ear shalt
thou hear the melody of angels, with thy tongue shalt
thou sing the happy songs of the resurrection, and
with thy hands shalt thou take the cup of deliverance
and the palms of glory.

Happy day for the children of God! As soon as
Jesus has appeared in the clouds of heaven, they will
cast aside the veil that covers them. They will rise
from all our cemeteries, from the very tombs beneath
this roof, and from those which we have opened hard
by, and but yesterday perhaps at the gate of this
church. They shall flourish like the grass. They shall
hear the piercing trump of God; for the trumpet shall
sound. They shall come together to meet the Lord in
the air, and then shall they be for ever with the Lord.

Then shalt thou rise from thy grave to meet our
common Saviour, O my brother, my wife, my son, my
daughter, my father, if in Christ thou hast fallen
asleep; and thou dear little child, whom we have
dedicated to thy service! No! no! God will forget
none. He, the King of glory, will not forget thee,
poor beggar lying at the rich man’s door; nor thee,
humble publican, that didst return in penitence to thy
God; nor thee, lowly widow, unknown to men, but well
known to Jesus; nor thee, miserable thief, converted on
216 THE SPRING AS AN EMBLEM.

the cross.of thy just punishment. Ye shall rise all of
you; ye shall flourish like the grass. The Lord your
Shepherd will give rest to your souls, and wipe away
all tears from your eyes. He will clothe you in white
robes, washed in the blood of the Lamb! He will give
you life, yea, more than life. O day of resurrection!
day of holiness and felicity! day of consolations in-
effable, of hopes eternal !

But in the day of the final judgment there will be
a fearful distinction revealed between the righteous
and the wicked. Some shall rise “to everlasting life,
and some to shame and everlasting contempt.” Ah!
then, let us inquire whether Christ be formed in us the
hope of glory, and whether we shall have part in the
resurrection of the just.

May we, brethren, all find mercy in that day; and
may “the God of peace, who brought again from the
dead our Lord Jesus, that great Shepherd of the sheep,
through the blood of the everlasting covenant, make
you perfect in every good work to do his will, working
in you that which is wellpleasing i his sight, through
Jesus Christ, to whom be glory” throughout all ages,
world without end. Amen.



SEA WEEDS.

* iver drifting, drifting, drifting,
On the shifting
Currents of the restless main ;
Till, in shelter’d caves, and reaches
Of sandy beaches,
All have found repose again.”

Ir is scarcely possible, for one familiar with the
words of Scripture, to look long at the bright glancing
waters, or the rolling waves, without thinking of those
words of the psalmist, “This great and wide sea,
wherein are things creeping innumerable, both small
and great.” Every sea weed which the wave throws
up to our feet tells of this, for it is crowded with
living creatures. Tiny shells fall out as we shake it;
its surface is encrusted with the sand-coloured mass of
cells, in which living polyps are clustering; pretty
little spray-like corallines are growing on it; and
creatures small as the eye can discern, and some which
need the microscope to discover them, are revelling
among its folds in all the fulness of life and youth.

The ancient poet might speak of the “worthless
alge ;”? we, in modern times, have learned something
of their value. Sea weeds raise the soil of ocean’s bed.
By their presence in the waters—waters full of masses
218 SEA WEEDS.

of animals in a state of putrescence, full of all un-
sightly and corrupting things washed in by the tide
from populous cities—the sea weeds purify the ocean ;
and making these very masses of putridity subservient
to their nutriment, they convert the poison into whole-
someness, so that the inhabitant of the sea-coast is
blessed with healthful and invigorating breezes.

What large masses of marine plants lie near the
shore, hanging on every pier, floating up and down as
the wave reaches them, or drying in the sunshine into
sprays of ebony, and making the rocks at low tide look
black and dreary as we see them from afar. These
belong to the large class called the olive sea weeds,
Tough, leathery things they are, now branching out
into flat sprays, like the bladder fucus, the sea-oak of
the old writers, and which is strewed over all our
coasts; now full of large bladder-like knobs, as the
knobbed fucus, whose strings of bladders float in pro-
fusion upon the waves which wash our island shores,
and look like necklaces of ebony beads. Now we see.
their long leaves puckered as a frill, like that of the
sweet laminaria, dancing up and down; or we find them
crackling beneath our feet; now cut into ribbons, like
the shreds which hang from the tough stems of the
fingered oar-weed, which we hang up in our houses to
serve as a natural barometer. Some, as the sea thongs,
lie in flat strings about the waters; others, like the
round. cords of the sea whiplash, entangle the feet of
the bather. These and many more cover our shores,
and are well known to all who ramble there. Many
of them are gathered up for the purpose of manure ;
some are ground into powder to serve as a dentifrice ;
SEA WEEDS. : 219

some, for the iodine which they contain, are moistened
with warm water, and bound about the diseased limb ;
and in former times, many of them were reduced to
ashes for the use of the manufacturer, and thousands of
poor people then gained a livelihood by kelp-burning.
But the class of red sea weeds contains the prettiest
species of our common marine plants; these are the
sea weeds which most delight the visitor of the coast.
They are not stout and strong weeds, but are mostly
thin, and so fragile and delicate, that we wonder how
they can ever reach us untorn by the wave. They
form no masses on the rocks, and give no colour to the
landscape of the coast. They love not the sun or air,
but lie sheltered among the masses of dark sea weeds,
or float in beauty beneath the shadow of some rock,
whose shelving projection saves them from the sun.
Some of them rival the rose itself in the richness of
their colouring ; others decpen into crimson or brighten
into scarlet. Some of them are of purplish-red or
quite purple, or, growing in places much exposed to
light and air, become of a sickly white or dingy green.
They are glutinous in their nature, and will, if properly
prepared, adhere to the paper on which they are laid.
There are few who visit the coast for a lengthened
period, who return home without some specimen of this
class of marine plants. And though some of them
cannot be fully studied but by the aid of the micro-
scope, and some, of lovely structure, are never seen
save by those who search for them diligently, yet many
are well known. ‘There is that common red sea weed,
the Hair Flag, (Plocamium coccineum,) which lies on
every border of sand or shingle, with its main stems no
220 SEA WEEDS.

larger than a packthread, and diverging branches still
more slender, looking, when spread on paper, like a
little pink tree. It is a very elegant sea weed, and it
is to the sea what the daisy is to the mead, and the
robin to the garden—to be seen everywhere. ‘ Then
there is that sea weed, smelling like violets, and of
purplish-red in tint, very common too; the dulse, “the
leaf of the waters,” as the Highlander calls it, the
Rhodomenia pulmata of the botanist, lying on the strand,
or floating on the wave, or hanging on the dark tangle
leaf on which it so often grows, and branching out its
flat sprays so as to resemble in form the fingers and
palm of the hand. Dear it is to Icelanders, and
hardly less so to the Highlander, who gathers it from
his shores, and eats it at early morning in ,the assured
conviction that it will strengthen his frame and purify
his blood. Nor does the Lowlander of Scotland reject
it either, for even until recently, the cry of “Buy my
dulse and tangle” might be heard in the streets of
Edinburgh. Like a spray of leaves on a leaf-stalk, is
that pretty pink sea weed, the red dock-leaved deles-
seria, which, when laid out on paper, looks clear and
thin as gauze, while its frequent companion in the
rocky pool, the oak-leaved :delesseria, has leaflets
shaped like those of England’s oak. But space ds
wanting to describe how some of the beautiful
red sea weeds, fine as tufts of hair, or delicate as
cobwebs, offering to the unassisted eye no trace of
organization, are seen under the microscope to have
various articulations and dilations, and to possess a
most wonderfully complicated structure. Nor,must we
linger to enumerate some species useful to man as food,
SEA WEEDS. 921

or in the arts and manufactures; nor to describe that
well-known sea weed, the carrageen moss, so plentifully
strewed around our coast, often converted into size for
the use of the house-painter, entering into the compo-
sition of blane-mange and other dishes, and boiled often
into a jelly for the invalid.

The remaining division of marine plants, called the
green sea weeds, comprehends all those beautiful grass-
green delicate leaves and shreds which fringe the
stones and rocky pools, covering them as with a verdant
meadow; there too we find those common species of
dark or yellow green conferve, which crowd over the
stones with their tufts of threads, so as well to deserve
the name given, by old French writers, to sea weeds
generally, mousses de mer, sea moss; and those delicate
feather-like species which wave like plumes amid the
still waters of the pool. Some of the broad lettuce-like
leaves of the lavers, so common on the rocks, are
cooked and eaten; while the thin fragile leaf of the
porphyra is the true laver, considered so great a deli-
cacy, and so often cooked under the name of sloke
green. Though its colour is of a pale amethyst, yet
it belongs to the green sea weeds, both by its texture,
general habits, and peculiarities. The little narrow
ribbons of the enteromorpha, to be seen on all our
coasts, and looking like blades of grass, serve the
Sandwich islander for food. Wondrous things, too,
are exhibited by some of these green sea weeds, when
beheld under the microscope, and strange startings,
and coilings, and other movements, lead the observer to
ask if it be an animal or a vegetable which is now the
object of his notice. A. P.
THE MORNING REVEL.

Tus morning I enjoyed a real revel, and am, even.
now, under the full influence of my pleasurable ex-
citement. There was nothing in the day itself at all
calculated to quicken the beating of my heart, or the
throbbing of my pulse, for long before I arose I had
listened to the gusty wind, and to the descending shower
pattering against the panes of my chamber window;
but the immediate cause of my gratification was the
receiving of a casket of jewels from a kind and talented
friend. To confess a truth, my casket was composed
of neither ivory nor the precious metals; nor were the
jewels it contained either rubies, sapphires, amethysts,
topazes, or emeralds.

Before I had tasted either *tea or coffee at the
breakfast-table, the double rap of the postman an-
nounced the arrival of letters, and with them came a
two-pound tin canister, surrounded with a row of
thirteen blue stamps, which, like a line of policemen,
defended the portal of the packet. What could the
canister contain !

Most of us have known in our, youthful days the
agreeable uncertainty, the interesting suspense, that
THE MORNING REVEL. 998

occupies the mind of a schoolboy in untying the knotted
string of the packet just received from home. Con-
jecture, anticipation, and the certainty of its turning
out to be a treasure, make up a moment of delight.
No doubt there is a cake in it; indeed the bright eyes
of fancy see the plums even through the paper; and if
the heart of the young scholar is in the right place, he
calculates on the pleasure of sharing his feast liberally
among the more favoured of his playmates. He knows
his parcel will contain a ball, a new pocket-knife, and
the promised humming-top; there will be in it some-
thing from his father, something tied round with red
riband from his sister, and screwed up in paper a piece
. of silver, that neither his father, his sister, nor any one
else in the world knows anything of but his mother.
There is nothing so like the happiness of receiving such
a packet, as the pleasure of sending it. It is an offering
of the heart, tied up by the hands of affection, to be
untied by the fingers of joy.

Something very like these youthful emotions was
felt by me as I took up the tin canister, poising it in
my hand to ascertain its weight. It was too light to
be filled with anything much heavier than paper. It
might be a parchment deed, or an appointment; but
having little to do with the court of chancery, and no
immediate expectation of being appointed laureate, my
speculations took another turn. It clearly did not
come from Government, having on it the post-mark
of Weston-super-mare, Somersetshire. Nor did it bear
the impress of authority, setting forth that it was
sent “on her majesty’s service;” so, by degrees, I
settled down into the not unreasonable supposition
224 THE MORNING REVEL.

that it was no more nor less than one of the numerous
manuscripts which find their way to me for the sup-
posed. benefit of “a friendly opinion.”

With no small trouble,—for it was most carefully
sealed with gum and wax,—lI liberated the canister from
its surrounding folds of paper. The scent on opening
it was delightful, for it was full, even to repletion, of
beautiful fresh and fragrant flowers: hardly would any
one have believed that so limited a space could have
contained so great a profusion. Moss, carnation, and
other roses, white, pale pink, florid pink, and dark
crimson; white and crimson fuchsias ; scarlet and other
geraniums; mountain pinks, pansies, and sweet peas.
While I write this, a bossy gem of a flower of deep
cobalt blue, rich to intensity, is stuck in the button-
hole of the black coat of Old Humphrey. Besides
these there were a score other kinds of attractive
flowers, mingled with the lemon-scented plant, myrtle,
mignonette, heath flower, and sweet-scented TIilac-
coloured cherry-pie.

The moss roses, I am given to understand, grew
around the whitewashed cottage of “Old Jenny,” an
aged widow, now in her ninety-first year; poor enough
in estate, but rich in faith, Old Jenny is a great
favourite in the village, being visited by high and low;
but those are most welcome to her who most delight in
prayer and praise. For forty years has she been the
tenant of her present abode, and even now, at this
advanced stage of her pilgrimage to a better world, she
is seen, bent with age but cheerful in spirit, wending
her steps, assisted by two sticks, with a little basket
tied to her apron string, for her weekly pay, that she
THE MORNING REVEL. 295

may spend it at the village shops. Nor is it at all an
unusual thing for the passer-by to catch the sound of
her tremulous voice “hymning her great Creator’s
praise,” or chanting the glories of the Redeemer. “TI
have lost my voice now,” she says, “but by-and-by,
when I have got if, oh! how loud I shall sing!”
My kind correspondent has set forth the anticipated
hallelujahs of Old Jenny in a few stanzas, which may
be said or sung by a Christian reader, with as much
propriety as by Old Jenny herself. They begin thus :—
“ By-and-by, when I have my new voice,
An anthem of praise I will sing,
And my heart and my tongue shall rejoice
In praising my God and my King.”

So busy was I in spreading out my flowers in little
groups on the table-cloth, and so absorbed in my occu-
pation, that T absolutely forgot I had not breakfasted.
There they lay before me, calixes, corollas, stamens,
pistils, pericarps, and receptacles, claiming and receiving
my attention. Here were a few broken stems, and
there a few scattered petals of flowers, unconscious
moralizers,. setting forth the frail tenure of earthly
things ; while the intense crimsons, the scarlets, the
yellows, the purples, the blues, with the more delicate-
tinted petals, blended with the fresh green leaves, made.
a glorious show, so that amid the abundance, the profu-
sion, and the prodigality, I fancifully regarded myself as
a conqueror just returned from the spoiling of a parterre,
the pillage of a garden, the sacking of a second Eden.
Truly this was a morning revel.

There was more than one person in the friendly
conspiracy of sending me my casket of jewels, and so,

Q
226 THE MORNING REVEL.

when my treasures were all made manifest, I called my
kind donors to mind, earnestly desiring for them that
they might be, at the very least, as happy as they had
made me; and that long after the flowers they had sent
me had faded, with all earthly things, they themselves
might flourish in the paradise of God. The pleasant
sight and agreeable scent of the fair things before me,
with the associations they called up in my mind, rendered
my breakfast a delightful meal. Again I say, it was
a morning revel.

But while IT remember my friends and my flowers,
T must not forget my readers. I must not forget that
they may not be quite so much interested in this
occurrence as myself, and therefore, it will be wise to
conclude with a remark or two that they may turn to
their own advantage.

Flowers are variously represented by different people ;
for myself I cannot but regard jewels as mineral flowers,
and flowers as vegetable jewels; but whatever else
flowers may be, it is certain that they are the gifts of
God, sent, among other merciful designs, to beautify
the dwelling-place of man. Surely, then, though I
know that many truly Christian-hearted men do not
think so, they may lawfully and advantageously be held
in high estimation. The works of our Heavenly Father
can. never, I conceive, be too highly estimated so long
as they proportionately elevate him in our love, our
admiration, and our reverence.

Taking away the flowers of earth would, as a matter
of feeling, be, perhaps, a greater loss to us, than blotting
out the stars of heaven; for where one human being
derives pleasure from the latter, a hundred obtain
THE MORNING REVEL: 997

it from the former. Still have we reason to call to
mind the often repeated lines,
“ Oh could I trace each herb and flower
That sips the morning dew,
Did I not own Jehovah’s power,
How vain were all I knew!”

Accustomed as I am to indulge in the reveries of
my fancy, no wonder that by a train of associations
I should be led away from the fair flowers which had
afforded me so much pleasure. The flowers reminded
me of bees, and bees of an honoured clerical uncle long
since mouldering in the grave. In the latter part of
his life he was very deaf, so that the humming of
a bee, that might be annoying to another, was not even
heard by him. It happened that a swarm of bees
formed their nest bencath the flooring of one of his
up-stairs rooms, and again and again have I seen him
in his study preparing his sermon for the approaching
sabbath with a score or two bees buzzing around him.
Never was a man of a kinder heart. Killa bee! Such
a thought could not be harboured by him. The bees
did not hurt him, good man! why should he hurt the
bees?

In the burying-ground of my uncle’s church were
those who had died in the Lord, and a pleasant thing
it was to regard the flowers that grew upon their
graves _as emblems of the heavenly hopes of those that
slept there. Would that it might be said of every
young tenant of the tomb,—he remembered his
Creator in the days of his youth; and would that it
might be said with truth of every aged man after he
had left the world,
THE MORNING REVEL.

a
wo
fe)

“ He pass’d a life of mingled cares—
Such is the lot of man below—
Till age’s grey and silvery hairs
Were thinly scatter’d on his brow.

He lived through many a grief to prove
That God could guard and guide him well ;
He died to find that Christ is love,
And with him evermore to dwell.”

You perceive that I was led by the flowers to the bees,
by the bees to my uncle, by my uncle to the grave-
yard, and by the graveyard to the hopes of the pious
dead, and the mansions of the blest. The habit of
association, the custom of connecting earthly things
with heavenly expectations, is a source of much satis-
faction; and should my remarks dispose you to attain
it, you may connect pleasant and profitable reflections,
both at noon and night, with the Morning Revel of—
OLp Humrargy.


SENSIBILITY.

Since trifles make the sum of human things,
And half our misery from our foibles springs ;
Since life’s best joys consist in peace and ease,
And few can save or serve, but all may please,
Oh! let th’ ungentle spirit learn from hence,
A small unkindness isa great offence.

Large bounties to bestow, we wish in vain ;

But all may shun the guilt of giving pain.

To bless mankind with tides of flowing wealth,
‘With power to grace them, or to crown with health,
Our little lot denies; but Heaven decrees

To all the gift of ministering to ease.

The gentle offices of patient love,

Beyond all flattery and all price above ;

The mild forbearance at another's fault,

The taunting word suppress’d as soon as thought,
On these Heaven bade the bliss of life depend,
And crush’d ill fortune when it made a friend.

A solitary blessing few can find ;
Our joys with those we love are intertwined ;
230 SENSIBILITY.

And he whose helpful tenderness removes ©

The obstructing thorn which wounds the breast he loves,
Smooths not another’s rugged path alone,

But scatters roses to adorn his. own.

The hint malevolent, the look oblique,

The obvious satire or implied dislike ;

The sneer equivocal, the harsh reply,

And all the cruel language of the eye;

The artful injury whose venom’d dart

Scarce wounds the hearing, while it stabs the heart ;

The guarded phrase whose meaning kills; yet told,
The listener wonders how you thought it cold;
Small slights, contempt, neglect, unmix’d with hate,
Make up in number what they want in weight.
These, and a thousand griefs minute as these,
Corrode our comfort and destroy our ease.

Mrs. Hanyan Mops.
AUTUMN.

Or those instructions which God is continually giving
to us, in the operations of his material universe, there
are none more impressive, though commonly lost upon
us by their familiarity, than those which are afforded by
the progress of the seasons.

“These, as they change, Almighty Father, these
Are but the varied God. The rolling year
Is full of Thee.”

It is wise, then, it is an incumbent duty, to learn the
true import of these lessons which are given for our
instruction in the peculiarities of those successive
changes which fill up the year.

If we will cast abroad our eyes on an autumnal day,
we shall perceive that a striking change has recently
taken place, and is now in progress, in all external
nature. The sun, since he left the equal line, at the
close of the last month, is sunk, and is daily narrowing
his circle in the southern sky. His beams have lost
nothing of their brightness, indeed, but they fall upon
us with a more subdued and gentle influence. The
overarching canopy of the sky seems to have gained a
greater depth, and to be dyed with a deeper and serener
blue. The morning and evening chills are gradually
encroaching on the heat of noon. The cold moon, and
232 AUTUMN.

constellations with broad disks but feeble light, struggle
upward through the “doubling mists” and fogs that fill
up the valleys, but shed, when they reach mid-heaven,
a peculiar brightness. The flowers of the summer are
faded or gone. The treasures of autumn are gathered,
or are ripe for the garner. The dense green of the
woods is changed into a thousand bright, yet chastened
hues. The great variety of trees, and the gradual
access of the frosts, which lead on by slow degrees the
stern winter, render this autumnal change peculiarly
gorgeous and sublime. Nor should these saddened,
though rich, hues be considered as the funeral dress of
the woods, and as vestiges of decease and decay. On
the contrary, they indicate the completion of vegetable
life, and are in truth a most beautiful illustration of the
methods which our heavenly Father takes to variegate
and beautify his lower world, and thus, as throughout
his works, to add a superabundant beauty to use. As
the season advances, the leaves are seen one by
one gently disengaging themselves from their parent
branches, and falling, without a breath of air, and by
the silent impulse of the rays of light alone, to the
ground; or they are thrown into wild eddies, by the
gusty wind.
The beautiful birds,. which, like summer friends,
desert us in our altered condition, have long since
finished their brief visit to us—have sought elsewhere a
milder climate, and a kindlier home. Those hardier
animals which remain with us, to brave and to share the
rigours of the winter, are seen to be busily engaged,
with instinctive foresight and with quickened industry,
im preparing for their long and dreary seclusion. A calm
AUTUMN. 233

and sabbath-like serenity and repose prevail around, or
else give place to peculiarly lowering and gloomy clouds,
or fitful showers, or dreary sounding winds, or sweeping
storms. The night approaches, with stealthy, but sure
steps, upon the day; the hoar-frost spreads itself more
and more over the landscape, in the apparent work of
decay, and thus the whole face of nature is saddened.
But amidst these striking, and it may seem mournful,
changes, are interspersed those mild, serene, and yet
glorious days, peculiar to the season, which seem to be
“the very bridal of the earth and sky,” when the whole
atmosphere is filled with a golden light, which lends an
unearthly radiance to the mellow tints of autumn, and
when the sweet and balmy breezes from the south-west
seem to realize the beautiful tradition of the native sons
of the American forest, that they come from the spirit
land, where the departed have gone. These days,—call
them not “the saddest of the year,” call them not melan-
choly,—thoughtful and suggestive days, indeed, they are,
but yet the serenest and most peaceful of the year.
The solemn serenity which now pervades the works
of nature, united with those signs of apparent decay
and dissolution which everywhere appear, naturally
disposes the serious mind to reflection. The promise
and beauty of spring have fled,—the glow and splendour
of summer are gone,—sceming dissolution is written on
every thing around us ;—and can we stand amidst these
ruins of nature, in the evening twilight of the year, and
not think of the transitoriness of human enjoyments and
pursuits, of the shortening span of human life? Do
we not associate with these fading and transient scenes
the rapid vicissitudes we have been called to experience,
234: AUTUMN.

—the decisive turns in our individual history; the
changes in the whole aspect of public affairs ; in almost
every thing with which we have been conversant; in our
own. persons, feelings, views, and prospects? Do they
not bring into vivid remembrance the departed,—the
parents, associates and friends of our early years,—
whose strength God has withered by the way? Do we
not involuntarily recur to the afllictive discipline we
have been summoned to endure in the onward pilgrimage
of life, and read, in the withering influences of the
declining year, expressive emblems of our disappointed
expectations and of our blighted hopes ?

Such are some of those impressions which the autum-
nal season is fitted to make upon us. Let us now inquire
into their religious uses. If they tended only to inspire
us with a thoughtful or even a prophetic sadness, if they
operated no further than this on the mind and heart, if
they terminated in mere barren emotions, they would be
of little worth. But they need not be, nor should they
be, thus unproductive. They are fraught with salutary
influences. Let us, then, consider some of the uses of
these reflections.

The solemn closing of the year, with all those appear-
ances of desolation which attend it, while it warns us of
the fleeting nature of earthly things, should serve to
cool the ardour of our passions, and qualify a too eager
pursuit of present objects. When the voice of the
dying year is singing, as it were, requiems in every
wind, when the earth is strown with the faded beauties
of the spring and summer, when the shortened day
reminds us of that night of death which is impending
over us, shall we still cling to the present life as to an
AUTUMN. 935

enduring substance? Shall our thoughts still be en-
grossed by mere earthly designs? Shall not those pas-
sions which have been excited by the intercourse of
busy life lose something of their heat and force? Shall
-not the apparent blight that reigns around remind us
of that blight of death which will soon settle upon all our
earthly hopes and affections ? Shall we not hear in the
sighing breeze of autumn an unearthly voice, reminding
us of that common grave, where we, with all our loves and
hatreds, our rivalries and strifes, will soon be buried ?
If the reflections which the autumn of the year inspires
extended no further than thus to solemnize the mind,
and call it off from an over-engrossment in present
objects, they would yet be valuable. But there are
other sentiments suggested by this season which are
still more important. It is the peculiar effect of all
the works of God to lead the reflecting mind to God
himself. This is the great end of all the mute
eloquence of his creation, We look around us, and see
nothing but indications of decay. We feel that there
is nothing on earth in which we can securely trust.
“The harvest is past, the summer is ended.” All
the inanimate creation seems to be fading and perishing,
as if stricken bya death-blight. Amid these mementos
of dissolution, our thoughts are irresistibly borne
beyond the present world, where all is transitory, to
that ineffable Being who sustains the whole. We
instinctively turn from the changes by which we are
surrounded, to Him who changeth not, “neither is
weary ;” we look for solace and support to the “Lord
God Almighty, which was, and is, and is to come;”
who is ever the same, and of whose years there is no end,








236 AUTUMN.

We turn from the changes of this transitory state, to
Him with whom there is “no variableness neither
shadow of turning,” and feel, that, though nature
seems urging to dissolution, yet by his almighty power
a new and fresher life will arise from apparent decay,—
that a new spring will flourish over the ruins of
autumn,—that “while the earth remaineth, seed-time
and harvest, and cold and heat, and summer and winter,
and day and night, shall not cease,” until He who
appointed their beautiful, glorious, and instructive suc-
cession shall declare “that time shall be no longer.”
And do not thoughts like these lead us to anticipate
with elevated joy and confidence that promised spring
which shall dawn upon the winter of the grave,—from
which there shall be no further changes but those from
glory to glory ?

Such are some of the reflections which are suggested
to the serious mind by the autumnal season of the
year,—such are the results to which they tend.
They are solemn, indeed, but in their effects most
salutary. They sadden our hearts, but to make them
better. They show us the transitoriness of this life,
that they may lead us to aspire to a life everlasting.
They begin in melancholy, but end in hope and trust.
Let not, then, thoughts like these be considered
visionary or useless by any. They are not so. They
speak in a universal language. They are addressed to
the human heart. They are ever understood by the
devout and the contemplative; and if they be not felt
by all, it is because the comparatively vain, or low, or
grovelling concerns of the world have rendered the
mind dull and the heart cold.
AUTUMN. 937

Let all, then, of every age, pause over the solemn
scenery of autumn, and be thoughtful. Let the young
reflect that their spring of being cannot last for ever,
and that the autumn of life, should they be spared to
reach it, is near; and let them use all diligence to
render it productive and serene. Let those in middle
life pause in their heated pursuit of mere temporal
objects, and observe, in the desolation that has settled
upon the summer which has just closed, a most
emphatic emblem of the result of all their anxious,
heated and engrossing labours. And especially may
those honoured friends, who by the providence of God
have reached the autumn of their lives, mark the
instruction which he is giving them by the autumn
of the year. Their spring is over, their summer is
ended, their harvest is past, but there may yet be
a season of stillness and serenity granted them, in
which they may prepare for that winter which is fast
approaching.

And let all, in every ‘stage of life, attend to the
solemn thought which is suggested by the prophet,
speaking of this season. “The harvest,” he says,
“is past, the summer is ended;” and then comes
the startling admonition,—“we are not saved.’ This
expression, indeed, as used here by him, had, probably,
only a reference to temporary evils then felt or im-
pending. But it suggests to us a weightier meaning.
The harvest of life is past or passing,—the summer of
our moral probation is ended or ending; but are we
saved or safe in those interests which lay hold upon an
eternal life of retribution? Are we saved or safe from
the infirmities and sins of thought, feeling, temper, will,
338 AUTUMN.

heart, practice, and life? Have we reaped the fruits
of the great redemption by Jesus Christ? Have the
spring, summer, and autumn of this fleeting, earthly
existence been devoted to this great work? Have
the priceless opportunities of moral culture been
suffered to lie fallow? Has God been cailing us to his
service, by the works of his hand, by the events of his
providence, and by the more express messages of his
grace, and do we still remain heedless and undevout ?
Does the great labour of life, in this view of it, remain
unfinished? Is our harvest, in this sense, past, and
our summer ended, and we not saved? ‘Then let us
think, and think before it is too late, of that winter of
death which is near, and of that night of the gra