Citation
The Magnet stories for summer days and winter nights

Material Information

Title:
The Magnet stories for summer days and winter nights
Creator:
Whimper, E ( Engraver )
Friston, David Henry ( Illustrator )
Kingston, William Henry Giles, 1814-1880 ( Author, Primary )
Webb-Peploe ( Annie ), 1805-1880 ( Author, Secondary )
Sargent, George E ( George Etell ), 1808 or 9-1883 ( Author, Secondary )
Hall, L. A, fl. 1860 ( Author, Secondary )
Broderip, Frances Freeling, 1830-1878 ( Author, Secondary )
Corner ( Julia ), 1798-1875 ( Author, Secondary )
Hood, Tom, 1835-1874 ( Author, Secondary )
Groombridge and Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London (Paternoster Row)
Publisher:
Groombridge and Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : ill. (some col.) ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1875 ( lcsh )
Baldwin -- 1875
Genre:
Children's stories ( lcsh )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Content Advice:
The boatswain's son / by W.H.G. Kingston -- My life in the prairie / by Mrs. Webb -- Willy and Lucy / by G.E. Sargent -- Prejudice lost and love won / by L.A. Hall -- Wee Maggie / by Frances F. Broderip -- Wallace, the hero of Scotland / by Julia Corner -- Rainbow's rest / by Thomas Hood.
General Note:
Date approximated from Brown, P.A. London publishers and printers c.1800-1870, p. 78: Groombridge and Sons, Paternoster Row, 1846-79, and the cover design indicates 1870's printing.
General Note:
Illustrations engraved by E. Whimper after D.H. Friston.
General Note:
Chromoxylographed frontispiece.
Funding:
Preservation and Access for American and British Children's Literature, 1870-1889 (NEH PA-50860-00).
Statement of Responsibility:
by W.H.G. Kingston, Mrs. Webb, L.A. Hall, G.E. Sargent, Frances F. Broderip, Julia Corner, [and] Thomas Hood.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026725345 ( ALEPH )
50544316 ( OCLC )
ALG8021 ( NOTIS )

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THE

MAGNET STORIES

SUMMER DAYS AND WINTER NIGHTS,

BI

W. H. G. KINGSTON. MRS. WEBB. ©
L, A. HALL. G. E, SARGENT,
FRANCES F. BRODERIP. JULIA CORNER.

THOMAS HOOD.



LONDON:

GROOMBRIDGE AND SONS,
PATERNOSTER ROW.



CONTENTS,

——————

THE BOATSWAIN’S SON. By W. H. G. Krveston.
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE. By Mrs. Wezs (Author

of “ Naomz”),
WILLY AND LUCY. By G. E. Sarcent.
PREJUDICE LOST AND LOVE WON. Br. A. Hat.
WEE MAGGIE. By Franozs F. Bropzrir.
WALLACE, THE HERO OF SCOTLAND. By Jura Corner.
RAINBOW’S REST. By Tuomas Hoop,

























































































































SAILOR.”

» WHO TRULY LOVED A

“THE GOOD OLD KING,
























































































































































































































































































































































































































A TALE OF THE SEA.
BY WILLIAM H. G, KINGSTON.

——_——s

t was the memorable Ist of June.
\\ A sea fight ever to be renowned
| in history was raging. between the
fleets of England and France. The
great guns were thundering and
roaring, musketry was rattling, round
shot, and chain shot, and grape, and
langridge, and missiles of every de-
scription, invented for carrying on
the bloody game of war, were hissing
through the air, crashing against the
sides of the ships, rending them
asunder, shattering the tall masts
and spars, sending their death-deal-
ing fragments flying around, and
hurling to the deck, mangled and
bleeding, the gallant seamen as they stood at their
quarters in all the pride of manhood, fighting for the

B*



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

honour and glory of their respective countries. A dark
canopy hung over thescene, every moment increasing in
density as the guns belched forth their flashes of flame
and clouds of smoke, filling the pure air of heaven with
sulphureous vapours, and almost concealing the fierce
zombatants from each other's gaze.

“Who is that brave youngster?” asked the captain
of the renowned ‘ Marlborough,’ a seventy-four, which
lay hotly engaged surrounded by foes in the thick of
the fight; “‘I never sawa cooler thing or better timed.”

“The son of Mr. Ripley the boatswain, sir,” was
the answer.

“T must have my eye on him, there is stuff in that
lad,” observed the captain. The deed which had called
forth this eulogium was certainly well worthy of praise.
The “ Marlborough” had for some time been furiously
engaged, almost broadside tc broadside, with the “ Im-
pétueux,” a French seventy-four, which ship had just
fallen aboard her, the Frenchman’s bowsprit becoming
entangled in her mizen rigging. To keep her an-
tagonist in that position was of the greatest consequence
to the “Marlborough,” as she might thus rake her fore
and aft, receiving but little damage in return. An
officer and two or three men sprang into the “ Marl-
borough’s mizen rigging to secure the bowsprit to it.
The French small-arm men rushed forward to prevent
this being done, by keeping up a fire of musketry. The
¢wo seamen fell. The lieutenant still hung in the
rigging, but the rope with which he was lashing the
bowsprit to it was shot from his hand; no other was
within reach. Having just delivered the powder he
had brought from below, young Ripley was watching
the proceeding. Seizing a rope he sprang into the



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

rigging unhurt amid a shower of bullets, and handed it:
_ to the brave officer. Together they made the required
- turns for lashing it fast, and descended to the deck in
safety. The young powder-boy then resuming his tub-
was speedily again seen at his station, composedly
sitting on the top of it as if he had performed no
unusual deed. The “ Marlborough” had soon another
antagonist, the ‘ Mucius,” seventy-four, which fell
aboard her on the bow, the three ships thus forming a
triangle, of which the British ship was the base. With
these two opponents, each more powerful than she was,
the “ Marlborough” continued the seemingly unequal
fight, but the stout arms and hearts of her erew
made amends for their inferiority in numbers. Her
mizenmast fell soon after the “ Mucius” engaged. her,
her fore and main masts followed, and the Frenchmen
began to hope that victory was to be theirs, but they
had not discovered at that time the stuff of which
British tars are made. Though dismasted herself, she
had her foes fast so that they could not escape. So
well did her crew work their guns, that they quickly
shot away the bowsprit and all the lower masts of the:
“ Tmpétueux,” those of the “ Mucius” soon sharing the
same fate. At this juncture another French ship, the
** Montagne,” passing mnder the ‘‘ Marlborough’s” stern,
Sred a broadside into her of round shot and langridge,
killing many of her brave crew, and wounding among
others her captain, though receiving but a few shots in
return. The first battle in that long, protracted, and
bloody war was over, and won by England’s veteran
admiral, Lord Howe; six of the enemy’s finest line of
battle ships forming the prize of victory, and among
them the “ Impétueux.”



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

The “Marlbcrough’s” captain had not forgot the pro-
mise he had made to himself in favour of Young Ripley.
As he lay wounded in his cabin he sent for the boat-
swain. The proud father had heard of his son’s gal-
lantry, and the captain’s words had been repeated to
him. It would have been difficult to find a finer speci-
men of the superior class of British seaman, the pith
and sinew of the navy, than the boatswain of the “Marl-
borough” presented, as, stillin the prime.of manhood, he
stood, hat in hand, before his captain. By his manner
and appearance he looked indeed well fitted for the
higher ranks of his profession, but it was his lot to be a
boatswain, and he did not complain. With unfeigned
satisfaction he heard the account of his son’s gallantry
and coolness rehearsed by the captain’s lips.

“You have always proved yourself to be a brave
man and a good officer, and although I have it not in
my power to reward you as you deserve, I can your
son,” said the captain. “ Would it be satisfactory to
you to see him placed on the quarterdeck ?”

The father’s heart beat quick ; the blush of gratified
pride rose to his cheeks as he answered, “It is the -
thing of all others I should prize. I trust that he
will not be found unfitted for the rank to which he
may attain if you thus put his foot on the lower
ratlins.”

“Tam glad to have hit the thing to please you,
Mr. Ripley,” said the captain. ‘Your son shall at
once be rated as a midshipman in the ship’s books ;”
and then he added, a shade of grief passing across his
countenance, “ He will have no difficulty in getting an
outfit from the kits of the four youngsters who were
killed on the 1st. By the by, what is he called ?”



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

“ Pearce, sir—Pearce Ripley is his name,” answered
the boatswain.

“Very well; send my clerk to me, and tell your
boy that he isa midshipman. The first lieutenant will
introduce him to his new messmates, and secure him a
favourable reception,” said the captain as the boat-
swain withdrew.

Pearce Ripley was a fine-looking lad of about four-
teen, with an ingenuous countenance and frank manner,
which spoke of an honest, brave heart. With the ship’s
company he had been a general favourite ; it was to be
proved how far he would recommend himself to the
officers.

In the afternoon the young gentlemen, as all the
members of the midshipmen’s mess were called, were
summoned on the quarterdeck, and briefly addressed by
Mr. Monckton, the first lieutenant. Pearce Ripley was
then sent for, and the boatswain’s son had no cause to
complain of his reception by those whose messmate he
was about to become. They, with one exception, came
forward and cordially shook him by the hand, and when
he entered the berth they all seemed to vie who should
pay him the most unobtrusive attention as forthwith to
place him at his ease. So surely will true bravery and
worth be rightly esteemed by the generous-hearted
officers of the British Navy. Pearce had gained the
respect of his messmates; he soon won their regard by
his readiness to oblige, his good temper, his evident
determination not to give or take offence, and his
general kind bearing towards all. On duty he showed
that he was resolved to merit the good opinion which
had been formed of him. The only person who differed
from the majority was Harry Verner, a midshipman of



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

about his own age. Though Verner had shaken hands
with him, it had been with reluctance and marked cold-
ness. His manner was now haughty and supercilious
in the extreme, and he took every opportunity of
making sneering remarks about men who had risen
from the lower orders always being out of place and
never doing any good. “If such were to become cus-
tomary in the service, it would drive all the gentlemen
out of it,” he remarked one day in Pearce’s hearing.
“Not if those who entered it knew how to behave as
gentlemen,” Pearce replied, quietly. Verner said nothing
in return, but he gave a look to show his intense dis-
pleasure. Generally Pearce walked away when Verner
spoke in that style, or when at table, and he could not
move, pretended not to hear what was said.

The fleet reached Portsmouth. Great was the satis-
faction of the British nation at the victory won. The
good King George the Third and the kind Queen
Charlotte went on board all the ships and visited the
wounded ; honours were awarded to the chiefs, and
those officers who had especially distinguished them-
selves were presented to their Sovereigns. Among
others was Pearce Ripley, as the midshipman who had
helped to take the “Impétueux.” The “ Marlborough’s”
crew declared on this that he was a marked man and
must get on in the service. The remark greatly excited
Harry Verner’s indignation and wrath. “It is high
time for me to quit the service after this,” he remarked,
when the King patted Pearce on the head, but did not
even glance towards him. Of memorable days in
English history, the Ist of June, 1794, stands justly
prominent,



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON,

Li

Tue “ Marlborough,” though victorious, had received so
tremendous a battering from her numerous opponents,
that it was very clear the stout craft could not again go
to sea without a thorough repair. Her officers and
crew were therefore distributed among other ships then
fitting out, and thus Pearce, for the first time in his life,
was separated from his father, to whom he had always
been accustomed to look up for guidance and advice.
In some respects this might have been an advantage to
the young midshipman, but the parting cost both more
pains than either confessed. “I am no great preacher,
my boy, but remember there’s One ever watching over
you, and He’ll be true to you if you try honestly to be
true to Him,” said the boatswain, as he wrung his son’s
hand, and stepped down the side of the fine frigate to
which Pearce through the interest of his late captain had
been appointed. The crew went tramping round the
capstan to the sound of the merry fife, the anchor was
away, and under a wide spread of snowy canvas the
dashing “ Blanche” of thirty-two guns, commanded by
the gallant Captain Faulkner, stood through the Needle
passage between the Isle of Wight and the main, on
her way down channel, bound out to the West Indies.
it was a station where hurricanes, yellow fever, and
sicknesses, and dangers of all sorts were to be en-
countered, but it was also one where enemies were to be
met with, battles to be fought, prizes to be captured,
and prize-money to be made, glory, honour, and pro-
motion to be obtained, and who on board for a moment
balanced one against the other ?



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

Several of Pearce’s old shipmates were on board the
“ Blanche,” and two of his messmates, from one of whom,
Harry Verner, he would rather have been separated ; the
other, David Bonham, he was very glad to see. Be-
tween Bonham and Verner the contrast was very great ;
for the former, though of excellent family, was the most
unpretending fellow possible, free from pride, vanity,
and selfishness, and kind-hearted, generous, good ten)-
pered, and the merriest of the merry. The first A. B.
who volunteered for the “ Blanche,” when he knew Mr.
Pearce had been appointed to her, was Dick Rogers, an
old friend of his father’s, with whom he had served
man and boy the best part of his life; and if there was
one thing more strongly impressed on Dick’s mind than
another, it was that John Ripley, the boatswain, ought
to have been a post captain. For his father’s sake Dick
had at first loved Pearce, and now loved him for his
own. “Though his father isn’t what he should be, he
shall be, that he shall, or it won’t be my fault,” he said
to himself. Dick was no scholar, and had not many ideas
beyond those connected with his profession, except that
particular one in favour of Pearce which might or might
not be of any service to him, and yet let us never despise
a friend, however humble. Pearce did not, though he
possibly had not read the fable of the lion and the mouse.

Dick Rogers was short and broad in the shoulders,
though not fat, with a huge, sandy beard, a clear blue
eye, and an honest smile on his lips, and saying that he
was 2 seaman every inch of him, he needs no further
description. Verner let it be known, among their new
messmates, that Pearce Ripley was only the boatswain’s
son; and hearing this, Bonham took great care to re-
count to them his gallant act on the Ist of June, and to



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

speak otherwise in his praise. Dick forward did not
fail to make the young midshipman his theme, and:
there the fact of his parentage was undoubtedly in his
favour. “We shall be, no doubt, alongside an enemy
some day soon, and then will be seen what stuff the
youngsters are made of,” was the remark of several on
board. They were not wrong in their prognostications.
The Island of Desiderade, near Guadeloupe, was in
sight to windward. “A sail on the weather bow!” was
shouted by the look-out at the mast’s head, always the
keenest sighted of the seamen on board in those days.
The frigate made all sail in pursuit of the stranger,
a large schooner under French colours. The chase stood
into a bay defended by a fort, where she was seen to
anchor with springs to her cables. Along the shore a
body of troops were also observed to be posted. The
drum beat to quarters as the “Blanche” worked up
towards the fort, when, the water shoaling, she anchored
and opened her fire in return for that which the fort,
the schooner, and the soldiers were pouring in on her.
Captain Faulkner’s first object was to silence the fort.
This was soon done. The schooner, which it was clear
was heavily armed, must be brought out. The boats
were called away, under command of the second lien-
tenant. Pearce leaped into the one to which he be-
longed. A master’s mate, Fitzgibbon, had charge of
her, and Dick Rogers formed one of her crew. Harry
Verner was in another. Away the boats dashed, at a
rate boats always do move pulled by British seamen
when a prize is to be taken. The Frenchmen worked
their guns bravely. A shot disabled the leading boat.
Pearce, sitting by Fitzgibbon’s side, heard a deep groan,
end before he could even look up the master’s mate fell



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

forward, shot through the head. His boat took the
lead. “‘ Now’s your time,” cried Dick Rogers; “we'll
be the first aboard, lads.” The crew were not slack to
follow the suggestion. In another moment they were
up to the schooner, and, leaping on her deck, led by
Pearce, laid on them so fiercely with their cutlasses that
the Frenchmen, deserting their guns, sprang over the
bulwarks into their boats on the other side nearest the
shore, and, before another boat reached: the vessel, pulled
away towards where the troops were marching down to
their support. The cables were quickly cut, and amid a
shower of bullets sail was made, and the prize carried
out. “TI said as how he’d do it—I said he wouldn’t
be wanting,” exclaimed Dick Rogers, as he gave his
account of the cutting out expedition to his chums on
board. ‘“He’ll do more too come another occasion.”
That occasion did occur before many days were over.
Two days afterwards the ‘“‘ Blanche’ was joined by the
“ Quebec” frigate, and together, when sailing by Guade-
loupe, they discovered the French thirty-six-gun frigate
“Pique” lying at anchor in the harbour of Pointe-a-
Pitre, ready for sea. Notto deprive his brother captain
of the honour he might obtain by engaging an anta-
gonist so worthy of him, Captain Carpenter parted
company, and the “Quebec,” steering westward, was
soon out of sight. The next thing to be done was tv
get the French frigate to come out from under her
protecting batteries to fight. This seemed no easy
matter, for prizes were captured and sent away under
her very nose, and still she did not venture ferth. At
length, however, on the memorable evening of the 4th
of January, the “ Blanche,” towing off another prize in
triumph, the “Pique” was seen to follow. The sun



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

went down. It was the last many a brave man was
destined to see. Darkness had come on, when the
French frigate was observed through the gloom astern.
The “ Blanche” tacked in chase.

In the solemn hour of midnight, while darkness
covered the face of the deep, the two vessels approached
each other, their relative positions clearly distinguished
by the light from the fighting lanterns which streamed
from their ports. The British crew, mostly stripped to
the waist, stood at their quarters, grim and determined,
with the gun-tackles in hand, eager for the moment to
open fire. Pearce was on the quarterdeck. Young as
he was, the whizzing of shots and the whistling of
bullets scarcely made his heart beat quicker than usual,
and yet, as in gloom and silence he waited for the signal
when the bloody strife must commence, he felt an awe
ereep over him he had never before experienced. Nearer
and nearer the combatants drew to each other. The
“Pique” commenced the fight. The “Blanche” returned
her distant fire; and, after various manceuvres, the two
frigates ranged up alongside each other and hotly en-
gaged, broadside to broadside, in the fashion in which
British tars have ever delighted. Fiercely the two
crews fought; the French, once having began, proved
themselves no unworthy antagonists. The main and
mizen masts of the ‘‘Blanche’’ fell, and the French, seiz-
ing the moment, ran alongside and attempted to board.
The British crew sprang up to repel them. Among the
foremost was Pearce, with Dick Rogers by his side.
With their sharp cutlasses they drove the Frenchmen
back. Again the guns roared as before. Once more
the French ship fell aboard the “Blanche,” her bowsprit
touching the latter’s capstan. Captain Faulkner hur.





THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

ried to secure it there, for the “Pique,” thus held, was
exposed to the raking fire of his frigate. Among those
who flew to assist him were Pearce Ripley and Dick
Rogers, the Frenchman’s musketry playing hotly on
them. “This is something like what you did in the old
‘Marlborough,’ sir,” said Dick to Pearce, so loud that all
might hear him—so many did, and noted the words.
Death was busy around them. While he was passing
the lashing the young and gallant Captain Faulkner
fell to the deck—a musket ball had pierced his heart.
That was no time for grieving, even for one well-beloved
as the captain. A hawser was being got up from below
to secure the enemy’s ship; but before it could be used
she broke adrift, to the disappointment of the British
tars. A cheer, however, burst from their throats as,
directly afterwards, the “Blanche,” paying off for want
of after-sail, the “Pique,” while attempting to cross
her stern, fell once more aboard her. This time they
took good care to secure the bowsprit to the stump of
their mainmast; and now, running before the wind, the
“Blanche” towing her opponent, the fight was continued
with greater fury than ever. In vain the Frenchmen
strove to free themselves by cutting the lashings—each
time they made the attempt the marines drove them
back with their musketry. Still it seemed doubtful
with whom victory would side. The “Blanche” had no
stern ports through which guns could be fought; the
carpenters were unable to aid them. A bold expedient
was proposed. The guns must make ports for them-
selves through the transome. Firemen with buckets
were stationed ready to extinguish the fire which the
discharge would create. With a thundering roar the
guns sent their shot through the stern, and, the fire



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

being extinguished, they began to play with terrific
effect into the bows of the French frigate. Her fore-mast
was immediately shot away ; her mizen-mast was seen
to fall. Still her crew, getting their quarter-deck guns
trained aft, fought on; but what were they to the
“ Blanche’s” heavy guns, which mercilessly raked her,
the shot entering her bow and tearing up her deck fore
and aft, sweeping away numbers of her crew at each
discharge. “If those Mounseers are not made of iron,
they'll not stand this battering much longer,” cried.
Dick Rogers, who was working one of the after-guns.
Pearce was standing near him. The space between the
decks was filled with smoke, through which the twinkling
light of the lanterns could scarcely penetrate, the flashes
at each discharge showing the men, begrimed with
powder, with sponge and rammers ready to load, or
with their tackles to run in their guns. A cheer from
the deck told them that the Frenchman’s remaining
mast had fallen, and now another and another that the
foe had struck. The “ Pique” was totally dismasted;
the “Blanche” had but her fore-mast standing. Every
boat was knocked to pieces, and how to get on board
the prize, still towed by the hawser, was the question.
“The hawser must form our bridge,” cried Mr. Milne,
the second lieutenant of the ship, springing on to it,
followed by Pearce, Rogers, and several men. Their
weight brought the rope down into the water. For
some distance they had to swim till they could climb
up by it on board. What havoc and destruction a few
short hours had wrought. Of a crew not far short of
three hundred men, one-third lay dead or wounded, the
deck covered with gore and the wrecks of the masts
and spars; guns lay dismounted, bulwarks knocked





THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

away, all telling the tale of the bravery and hardihood
of both the combatants. When the sun arose there lay
the victor and the conquered almost equally helpless.
Such was one of the scenes through which young Ripley
fought his way upwards, and gained a name and fame.

Jc

THE person who is constantly keeping his eye on the
reward he aims at is very likely to stumble and fall, and
never to reach it. He, on the contrary, who thinks
only how he can best perform his duty will be upheld
and encouraged, and very probably obtain a higher
reward than any at which he might have aspired. Pearce
Ripley found this to be true in his case. Duty was
his leading star. It never occurred to him to say, “ Will
this please my captain?’ ‘Will this advance me
in the service?” The “ Blanche” was soon refitted
and at sea again. Several prizes were made, and,
greatly to his satisfaction, he was appointed to the
command of one of them, with Bonham as his mate,
and Dick Rogers as boatswain. She was a richly-laden
West Indiaman, recaptured from the enemy. He was
ordered to take her to England, where, on his arrival,
he found his commission waiting for him.

Pearce received aright hearty welcome from his father,
and intense was the satisfaction of the brave seaman
when his son showed him his commission and appoint-
ment as second leutenant to the “ Vestal,” an eighteen
gun sloop of war, commanded by Captain Gale, and
destined for the North American station.

“You have got your first step up the ratlins, Pearce.
Go on as you have begun, and Heaven preserving your



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

life, there is no reason why you shouldn’t reach the
highest,” said the proud father, as he once more parted
from his son.

Those were days of pressgangs, and Dick Rogers
took good care to hide away till he ascertained the craft
Pearce was to join, when he at once volunteered for
her. Bonham, who had still a year to serve, was ap-
pointed to the same ship. The “ Vestal” had a quick
run across the Atlantic till within about five days’ sail
of Halifax, Nova Scotia, when a heavy gale sprang up,
which tried to the utmost her seaworthy qualities. The
sloop behaved beautifully, hove to, and rode buoyantly
over the raging seas. Well indeed was it for her that
she was properly handled, for the gale went on in-
creasing till the oldest seamen on board declared that
they had never met with such another. It continued
for a week, each day the wind blowing harder and
harder, or if there was a lull it seemed to come
only that the gale might gain greater strength. For
days not a glimpse of sun, or moon, or stars had
been obtained. It was the morning watch; the grey
cold dawn had just broke. Pearce was on deck, when
sweeping his eye round the horizon as the sloop rose to
the summit of a sea he perceived on the lee beam the
hull of a ship, rising and sinking amid the tumultuous
waters. At first he thought she was keel up, but as
the light increased he saw that she was a large ship
with the stump of the foremast alone remaining. That
she was in a bad plight was very clear. She was re-
markably low in the water he fancied, and who could
say how long even she might keep afloat.

The captain, being summoned, soon came on deck.
To bear sway for the stranger would be a work of



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

danger to the “Vestal.” Still who could tell how many
human beings might be on board that sinking ship!
With hatches battened down and men lashed to the
helm, the captain resolved to go to the rescue.

The seas came roaring up with furious rage, as the
sloop flew before them, some breaking aboard; and round-
ing to under the stern of the ship, she again hove to.
Many people appeared on the deck of the stranger who,
stretching out their arms, implored assistance. How
was it to be afforded? Would a boat live in such a
sea? Such appeals to British seamen are never made
in vain. Pearce Ripley offered to make the experiment
if men were found ready to go with him. There was
no want of volunteers. A boat was lowered. Itseemed
as if she must be engulfed before she left the sloop’s
side. Ripley’s progress was watched by eager eyes
from both ships. Now he is in the trough of the sea, a
watery mountain about to overwhelm him; now he is
on the summit surrounded by driving foam. A shout is
raised as he neared the sinking ship, but to get along-
side was even more dangerous than the passage from
one to the other. As the ship rolled and her deck was
exposed to view, he saw that there were women on
board, and other people besides the crew. Ropes were
hove tohim. He seized one, and sprang up the side.
A few hurried words told him what had occurred. The
ship was conveying troops and stores to Halifax, the
master and first mate had been washed overboard, the
second lay wounded by the falling of a spar. Many of .
the crew had been lost with the captain. There was no
sea officer who could enforce orders; the men were
mutinous. Ripley instantly assumed the command
There were several ladies. “They must first be placed





THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

In safety before a man enters the boat,” he cried ont,
presenting a pistol at some seamen who showed an
intention of leaping into her.

Sone entreated that their husbands mighi-accompany
then. “Oh, father, father, come with me,” exclaimed a
fair girl, who was being conveyed to the side to be













lowered into the boat; “I cannot, I will not leave you.”
She looked towards a fine, soldier-like man, who stood
with several officersaroundhim. ‘“‘ Impossible! Heaven
protect you, dearest. Even for your sake I cannot desert
my post. It is here with my men,” was the answer.
The boat had already nearly as many persons in her

:



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

as it would be safe to carry. This was no time for
delay. Pearce lifted the young lady in his arms, and
lowered. himself with her into the boat. The boat re-
turned to the “ Vestal,” and all those who had been
rescued were put on board. The young lady again and
again entreated him to save her father. Pearce pro-
mised to make every effort to bring off the colonel.
“But unless his men are rescued, I doubt that he will
leave the ship,” he added, as he returned to his boat.
Two other boats were now lowered, but it was too
evident that they could only save a part of the people
from the foundering ship. Those on her deck were now
seen forming a raft. It was their last hope of life should
the boats not take them off. Though several of the
people made a rush to the side, they were driven back
by the officers and soldiers who remained firm, and the
men were told off in order to allow of them to embark
as arranged by Pearce. Twice the boat returned with-
out an accident to the “ Vestal.” The young lady cast
a reproachful look at Ripley, when she saw that her
father was not among the saved. ‘ He would not come,
lady, but I willmake another effort,” he exclaimed, as he
prepared once more ¢o leave the corvette’s side. Just then
arose the fearful ery, “She is sinking! she is sinking !”
“Oh, save him! save him!” shrieked the poor girl
in an agony of terror, stretching out her hands towards
the spot where she fancied that she saw her beloved father
struggling in the waves. Pearce and his brave com-
panions needed not such an appeal to make them use
every effort to reach their drowning fellow-creatures.
Some had leaped on the half-finished raft as the ship
sunk beneath them, but many of these were speedily
washed off. Others were clinging to spars, and oars,











THE BualSWAIN’s SON.

and gratings, Pearce was soon in the midst of the
hapless beings, many with despair on their countenances,
unable to reach the boat, sinking as he neared them.
He looked round for the colonel. He could not dis-
tinguish him among the rest. Three people had been
hauled in, when as the boat rose to the summit of a sea
he saw below him a person clinging toa grating. A hand
was waved towardshim. ‘‘ Give way, lads,” he shouted,
and in another minute he had the satisfaction of hauling
on board the brave officer for whom he was searching.

The other boats took off the people from the raft.
He picked up several more, and returned in safety on
board. The meeting of the father and his daughter need
not be described. They were, he found, a colonel and
Miss Verner. He was struck by the name as that of
his former unamiable messmate. When the weather
moderated, and the colonel was sufficiently recovered to
appear on deck, he warmly expressed his gratitude to
Pearce, and his admiration of the gallantry he had dis-
played. His daughter Alice was not less grateful. A
calm succeeded the gale, and Pearce had frequent
opportunities of seeing her. He did not mention Harry
Verner to her, and indeed so great was the contrast he
perceived between the two in manners and behaviour,
that he could not suppose they were nearly related. .
Still there was at times an expression in Colonel
Verner’s countenance when he was annoyed which re-
minded him strongly of Harry.

There was a frank heartiness and sincerity about
the young lieutenant which at once gained Miss
Verner’s regard. It was very different to what she
had been accustomed, still his manner towards her was
gentle and deferential, as if he in no way presumed on



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

the service he had rendered her. Indeed, it never
entered his head that he had rendered her any especial
service, or that he had the slightest claim on her regard.
He felt, as he wrote to his father, “that he had had
the good fortune to command the boat which saved a
colonel and Miss Verner; that they were very nice
people ; that the colonel was to be stationed at Halifax,
and had invited him to his house whenever he could
get leave on shore.” He added, “ That will not be very
often during these stirring times, but I shall thoroughly
enjoy it when I do go, for Miss Alice. Verner is the
most beautiful and amiable girl I have ever seen or
expect to meet; without a bit of pride about her, and
she talks to me as if I were an old friend.”

At length the “Vestal” dropped her anchor in the fine
harbour of Halifax, and with a regret which surprised
him, Pearce saw the passengers depart for the shore.

“Remember, my dear Mr. Ripley, Miss Verner
and I shall at all times be glad to see you,” said
Colonel Verner as he was about to leave the ship.
Alice did not say as much as her father, but Pearce
believed from the expression of her countenance that
she willingly seconded her father’s invitation. Still he
knew that the familiar intercourse which had been so
delightful to him on board must come to an end.
“What can she ever be to me more than she is at
present ?” he exclaimed to himself. She says that I
saved her life and her father’s life; but then I saved
the lives of many other people. To be sure I have got
one step up the ratlins, but it may be very long before
I get another. No, no, Pll not think about it.”

The next day a special invitation to the governor’s
tabie, where he met Colonel and Miss Verner, and where



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

all the gentlemen from the governor downwards drank
wine with him, considerably altered his feelings. This was
the first of many attentions which he received from the
military officers and the principal inhabitants of Halifax.
His time on shore was indeed fully occupied in making
morning ealls and in attending the parties to which he
was invited. A portion of every morning he spent in
the society of Miss Verner. It was very delightful, and
he felt sure that he was welcome.

At length the “ Vestal”? was suddenly ordered to sea.
Pearce had the greatest difficulty in getting on shore to
wish his friends good-bye. Alice turned pale when he
told her that the ship was to sail that evening. “ You
will come back here surely, Mr. Ripley,” she said, in a
trembling voice ; “ you have been every thing to us since
that awful day when you saved our lives from the sink-
ite ship ; we shall miss you, indeed we shall, very much.”

Pearce could not frame a reply, at least, satisfactory
to himself. He scarcely knew what he said, as he
hurried away. The words might have made a vainer
man than he was much happier than they did him.

The “ Vestal” was bound for the West Indies. She
eruised for some time, making several rich prizes, which
she sent into Port Royal, Jamaica, and which filled the
purses of her officers and men in a very satisfactory
manner. Still, no honour or promotion was to be
obtained by the capture of honest merchantmen, At
length, however, there appeared a chance of falling in
with an antagonist worthy of her. One morning at
dawn a stranger was discovered on the lee beam. The
“Vestal” was kept away, andall sail madein chase. As
the “Vestal” gained on the chase, she was discovered ta
be a large ship, and pronounced to be flush-decked.



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

“Then we'll tackle her; never mind how many
guns she carries,” exclaimed the captain—a sentiment
to which his officers and men responded heartily.

The chase was accordingly continued, and as the
vessel came up with her on the weather quarter, it was
seen that she was a large flush-decked ship, carrying
twenty-two guns. The ensign of France flew out from
the stranger’s peak, and was saluted by a shot from
one of the corvette’s bow guns. The battle thus begun,
the “Vestal” keeping the weather gauge, was con-
tinued for half-an-hour with great fury, till the French-
man’s fore-mast went by the board. The enemy’s
guns were well handled, and the corvette began to
suffer accordingly. The first lieutenant and five men
were killed, and the captain, a midshipman, and several
men wounded. The captain was carried below, and the
command devolved on Pearce. The young lientenant’s
heart beat high. “Bonham,” he said, addressing his
friend who was standing near him, “we'll take that
ship, or go down with our colours flying.” The breeze
which had fallen returned, and as the corvette was still
under perfect command, he was able at length to obtain
a position by which he could pour several raking broad-
sides into the bows of the enemy. Her main-top mast
was shot away; her mizen-mast followed. The ensign
of France was again hoisted, but did not long remain
flying. Pearce poured in another broadside, and down
i# came, the cheers of the British crew giving notice of
what had occurred to their wounded shipmates below.
The prize, which proved to be the “ Désirée,” had lost a
considerable number of her crew, most of them killed
during the latter part of the action. Bonham was sent
on board to take command, and in two days the



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

** Vestal” and her prize entered in triumph the harbour
of Port Royal. Here the admiral with part of the fleet
were at anchor. Pearce went on board the flag-ship to
make his report. He was warmly received, and highly
complimented on his conduct. The next day he found
that he was to be first lieutenant of the corvette, and
Bonham received an acting order as second lieutenant.
The “ Vestal” had received so much damage, that she
was obliged to refit at Port Royal. This took several
weeks, and Captain Gale considered himself sufficiently
recovered, when she was ready, to go to sea in her.
Pearce had, however, virtually the command. Several
more prizes were taken. “That's young Ripley’s
doing,” exclaimed the admiral, “he deserves his pro-
motion, and he shall have it.”

1G

Once more the “ Vestal” was at anchor in Port Royal
harbour. In vain her brave captain had striven against
the effects of his wounds. He must return home if he
would save his life, he was told, so he applied to be
superseded. The admiral came on board the “ Vestal”
to inspect her. The next day he sent for Ripley, and
put a paper into his hand. Pearce’s heart beat quick
with proud satisfaction. The document was an order
to take the acting command of the corvette. “I have
written home by this post to ask for your commission,
and to recommend that you should be confirmed in the
eommand of the ‘ Vestal,’” added the admiral. “TI
am sure that you will take care she doesas good service
as she performed under Captain Gale.” Bonham, who



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

tad received his commission a few months before,
became first lieutenant, and a young protégé of the
admiral’s received an acting order as second; so that .
the united ages of the three principal officers of the
ship amounted to little more than fifty-five years. Old
heads were worn then on young shoulders. Many
prizes had been taken, and the time approached for
their return to Port Royal. The corvette lay becalmed.
A French store-ship was expected, which had been
separated from her convoy. The “Vestal” lay dis-
guised, as was usual in those days, looking very unlike
the smart sloop she was. A blue line was seen in the
horizon, the sign of an approaching breeze, and in the
midst of ita sail. The breeze brought up the stranger,
a fine brig, to within about a mile, when it died away.
She was an armed vessel, and showed by her colours
that she was French. Before long, two boats were
seen to put off from her. Three boats were instantly
lowered from the opposite side of the “ Vestal,’ and
manned. The Frenchmen pulled rapidly on, expecting
to make an easy prize of the “ Vestal.” Their look of
consternation was very great when they first perceived
the painted canvas which concealed the corvette’s guns.
Pearce had carefully watched for the first sign of
their wavering, and now ordered the three boats to
make chase. The Frenchmen, taken by surprise, made
but a slight show of resistance, and in ten minutes
the whole party found themselves prisoners on the deck
of the corvette. The “Vestal” was now towed up
towards the brig, which opened her fire at the boats,
but this did not deter them from placing the corvette
on her quarter, when a few rapidly delivered and
almost raking broadsides compelled her to haul down



























































IN ACTION,”



HE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

her colours, having had the chief officers left om
board and ten of her crew killed or wounded. The
privateer, which mounted fourteen guns, was on her
way to France, having a large amount of specie and valu-
able goods on board, the result of a successful cruise.

It was with no little pride that Captain Ripley
returned to Port Royal from his first cruise, with the
fine brig in company, the British ensign flying over
that of France. The admiral congratulated him on his
success, and at the same time put his commission and
appointment into his hand.

“You must be ready for sea again very soon
though,” said the admiral; “I have dispatches to send
to Halifax, and unless another cruiser comes in, I must
send you.”

Pearce, rather to the admiral’s surprise, replied
with animation, that he should be ready to sail that
evening if required, provided he could get water, fuel,
and fresh provisions on board. The admiral gave him
permission to make everybody exert themselves.

By noon the next day the young commander: had
got his ship ready for sea, and receiving his dispatches
with a joyous heart, he shaped a course for Halifax. A
bright look-out was kept, but on this occasion it was to
avoid strange sails. He was only to fight for the
purpose of escaping capture. Halifax was reached, and
Pearce having delivered his dispatches, hurried up to
Colonel Verner’s house.

Miss Verner was at home. She started, ana the
colour rose to her cheeks when Captain Ripley was
announced. She put out her hand, and did not with-
draw it, for Pearce forgot to let it go.

“ Ave you really a captain already ?” she asked.



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

“Yes; that is,a commander. I am captain of the
“Vestal,” he answered, and he told her how Captain
Gale had been compelled to go home, and that he had
been appointed in his steal. He mentioned also the
number of prizes he had taken—a matter which
interested Colonel Verner more than it did her.

“That young Ripley is a very fine fellow,” observed
the colonel to a brother officer.” Why, in one cruise
he must have made not far short of ten thousand
pounds as his own share of prize-money. haul for the admiral. Those naval men have better
chances than we have of filling their purses.”

If Pearce had received attentions when only a young
lieutenant, he was doubly courted now that he was
a commander, with an established name for gallantry
and energy. Alice Verner no longer hesitated acknow-
ledging to herself that she had given him her entire
heart. She felt honoured by his preference, and proud
of it among so many others who seemed anxious to
obtain it. Halifax was always a lively place. There
were a great number of resident families with young
people, and dances were therefore much in vogue. Con-
sequently naval officers were always welcome, lieu-
tenants and passed midshipmen were acceptable, but
young commanders were treated with especial favour.
A more experienced man than Pearce might have had
his head turned with the attentions he received. While,
however, he was grateful for them, he enjoyed to the
full the society in which he found himself, and became
neither conceited nor vain. He had also the oppor-
tunity of comparing Alice Verner with other girls, and
he became more than ever convinced of her superiority
to them all. His stay at Halifax was likely to be short,



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

He naturally wished to spend as much of his time as
possible in her society. She invariably received him so
frankly and cordially that all restraint was thrown
aside. He felt almost sure that she loved him; so he
took her hand and told her how much he loved her, and
that he believed he had made enough prize money
already to enable her to live as she had been accustomed
to; that he hoped to make more, and that he had good
reason to believe he should before long be a post captain,
when he should be her father’s equal in rank. Alice
was not very much surprised nor agitated, because she
was before sure that he loved her. Still it was very
pleasant to hear him sayso. Pearce also felt supremely
happy, and did not for a moment contemplate the
clouds and storms which might be ahead. Alice herself
might possibly have seen difficulties which he did not.
She loved her father, but she knew that he was a proud
man and weak on certain points, and that few men
thought more of family and connections. It had always
surprised her that he had not inquired more particularly
about Pearce’s parentage, but she concluded that he
was acquainted with the circumstances of the case, and
was satisfied. It was, at all events, her duty to tell her
father that Captain Ripley had declared himself. Pearce
was to dine with them that day. In the meantime he
had to go on board. He returned some time before the
dinner hour. Colonel Verner had not come in, so that
Alice had not had an opportunity of speaking to her
father. Pearce told her that a frigate had arrived that
morning direct from England. Everybody was eager
to hear the news she brought. Probably that kept the
colonel from home. While seated together, and in-
terested more in themselves than in the world at large,



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

the door was suddenly opened, and Lieutenant Harry
Verner was announced.

“Why, Cousin Harry, where have you dropped
from ?” said Alice, rising to welcome him, “I did not
even know that you werea lieutenant. You have grown
ap out of a little midshipman since I saw you last.”

“ve dropped from His Britannic Majesty’s Fri-
gate “ Hecate,” of which I have the honour of being
third lieutenant,” announced the young man, “And
as for changes, though you are lovely as ever, I shall
not know soon whether I am standing on my head or
my feet ;” he looked fixedly at Pearce as he spoke.

“JT beg your pardon, Captain Ripley,” said Alice,
recovering herself from the slight confusion into which
she had been thrown; “I should have introduced my
cousin to you.”

“Harry Verner and I are old shipmates I suspect,
unless there are two of the name very much like each
other,” said Pearce, rising and putting out his hand.

“Yes, as midshipmen we were together, I believe,”
answered Harry, superciliously ; “but really it is difficult
to remember all one’s old shipmates.”

Pearce under some circumstances would have been
inclined to laugh at Harry Verner’s impudence, but it
was very evident that the lieutenant wished to pick a
quarrel with him, which was by all means to be avoided.
Alice had thought her cousin a tiresome boy ; he now
appeared to have grown more. disagreeable than before.
Colonel Verner came in and welcomed his nephew, who
was the only son of his elder brother; other guests
arrived, and the conversation became general. Harry
at once assumed to be the person of most importance in
the house, and though he was laugling and talking



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

with every one, Alice discovered that he was constantly
watching her and Captain Ripley whenever they spoke.
Captain Ripley had to return on board. He never slept
out of his ship if he could avoid it.

“T suppose, colonel, that you can give me a shake
down,” said Harry; “I have got leave to remain on
shore.”

Her cousin’s remaining prevented Alice from speak-
ing to her father thatnight. Harry showed no intention
of going to bed till Pearce had taken his leave, and
Alice had retired. He then, jumping up from the sofa
on which he had thrown himself, exclaimed, “ My dear
uncle, where did you pick up that man ?”

“Whom do you mean, Harry ?” asked the colonel,
rather astonished at his nephew’s somewhat impertinent
manner.

“Why, Captain Ripley, who has just left this,”
answered the lieutenant. “He seems as much at home
with Alice as if he were engaged to her. Indeed, I am
half expecting you to tell me that he is.”

“ Really, Harry, you are speaking too fast,” said the
colonel ; “‘ Captain Ripley is one of the finest officers in
the navy, and having rendered the greatest possible
service to my daughter and me, I feel bound to treat
him with every consideration and kindness.”

“Which he repays by aspiring to my cousin’s
hand,” answered Harry. “Were he aman of family I
should say nothing, of course; but he is, sir, a mere
adventurer. His father is a common boatswain—a
warrant officer—not a gentleman even by courtesy, and
his mother, for what I know to the contrary, might have
been a bum-boat woman, and his relations, if he has
any, are probably all of the lowest order.”



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

The colonel walked up and down the room very
much annoyed. ‘Though what you say may be true,
Harry, that cannot detract from Captain Ripley’s fine
qualities nor relieve me of the obligations I owe him,”
he observed after atime. “Of course, were he to dream
of marrying Alice, that would alter the case, and i
should be compelled to put a stop to our present
friendly intercourse; but I do not believe that such an
idea enters his head. He is like you sailors generally,
here to-day and gone to-morrow. Probably when he
leaves this we may not see him again for years to
come.”

“Not so sure of that,” said Harry ; “Ripley was
always very determined when he made up his mind to
do a thing, and you will pardon me, uncle, but the way
in which he was speaking to her when I came into the
room was anything but that of an ordinary acquain-
tance.”

“Tl see about it, I'll see about it,” exclaimed the
colonel, now more than ever annoyed. ‘It is impossible
that a man of such low extraction should aspire to the
hand of my daughter. The idea is too absurd !”

Harry Verner retired to rest that night under the
comfortable belief that he had revenged himself on the
man whom he had always disliked, and now envied, for
his rapid promotion and success.

Mie

THE arrival of the “Hecate” relieved the “Vestal,” which
was ordered to proceed at once to sea. Poor Alice received
Captain Ripley with marks of sorrow in her counte-



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

nance which alarmed him. “My father will not hear
of it,” she exclaimed, giving way to a burst of grief;
“but I told him, and I promise you, that I will marry
no one else.” Z

“T know, I feel, and I am sure you will not,
dearest,” said Pearce, tenderly gazing at her. “And
be of good courage, I trust yet to do deeds and to gain
a name to which those who now scorn me for my
humble birth may be proud to ally themselves.”

Pearce had never before uttered anything like a
boast, but his swelling heart assured him of what he
could do, and his indignation at the contempt in which
his father was held made him speak in a vaunting tone
so different to his nature. The moment of parting
arrived; Alice, unasked, renewed her promise, and
Pearce hurried on board unwilling to encounter any
of his ordinary acquaintances in the town. It was
well for Harry Verner that he did not fall in with him.
Before night the corvette was far away from Halifax.
Pearce was not exactly unhappy, but he was in an ex-
cellent mood for undertaking any daring act which
might present itself. Once more he returned to
Jamaica, picking up a few prizes on the way. “ Always
welcome, Captain Ripley,” said the admiral, cordially
greeting Pearce when he appeared at the Penn to report
himself. ‘“ You've done so well in the sloop that we
must get you into a smart frigate; you'll not have to
wait long fora vacancy, I daresay.” This commenda-
tion was sufficient to restore Pearce’s spirits. He hoped
to do something before the corvette had to return
home. ‘There are two classes of people who hope to do
something—one waits for the opportunity to occur, the
other goes in search of it and seldom fails in the search.



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

Pearce Ripley belonged to the latter class. Several
more prizes were taken, and a considerable amount of
damage done to the commerce of the enemy; but
still the “ Vestal” had not fallen in with an enemy
the conquest of whom would bring glory as well as
profit. Week after week passed away. It had been
blowing hard. The wind dropped at sunset; the mght
was very dark and thick, an object could scarcely have
been discerned beyond the bowsprit end. The
island of Deserade, belonging to France, bore south-
east by south, six or seven leagues, when, as day broke
and the light increased, a ship was perceived close on
the weather-beam, which in a short time was made out
to be an enemy's frigate. The breeze had by this time
sprung up again and was blowing fresh.

“ We may fight her or try to escape,” said the cap-
tain to Bonham, eyeing the frigate as if he would rather
try fighting first.

“JT should say that the odds being so greatly against
us we ought to try to escape,’ answered the first leu-
tenant; “but I speak my own sentiments, and I am
sure that of all on board, if fight we must, we will all
be ready to stand by you to the last. Victory does not
always side with the biggest.”

Sail was accordingly made to the north-west, but no
sooner had she shaped a course than the frigate under a
cloud of canvas came tearing after her at a rate which
proved that the “ Vestal” had not @ chance of escaping.
The crew showed by unmistakeable signs that they ex-
pected to be captured, by going below and putting on
their best clothes. Pearce calied them aft, “‘ Lads, we
have served together for three years, and done many a
deed to be proud of. Do not let the Frepchmen hoast



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

that they took us without our having done our best to
prevent them. I purpose to fight that frigate if you
will stand by me, and that I am sure you will.”

“ Aye, aye, that we will, and would if she were twice
as big, and sink at our guns before we strike,” shouted
Dick Rogers, and their loud cheers expressed the senti-
ments of the rest. The corvette at once prepared for
action, and as soon as all was ready she shortened sail.
to allow the frigate to come up, greatly to the French-
men’s surprise probably. The latter began firing as
soon as her guns could reach the corvette. “Let nota
shot be returned till I give the order, lads,” cried
Ripley ; “we must throw none away.” He wuited till
his carronades would tell with effect. ‘Now give it
them, lads,” he shouted.

The heavy shot crashed against the side of the frigate
in a way which astonished the Frenchmen. With won-
derful rapidity the guns were run in, loaded, and again
sent forth their death-dealing shower of iron, this time
tearing through the frigate’s upper bulwarks, sweeping
across her quarter-deck and wounding her masts.
“Hurrah! we have knocked away her wheel,” cried Bon-
ham, who had sprung into the mizen rigging to ascertain
the effect of the last broadside ; “ she’s ours, if we are
smart with our guns.”

The Frenchmen had just fired a broadside which had
killed three of the “‘ Vestal’s” crew, knocked one of her
boats to pieces, and done other damage, but had not
materially injured her running rigging. Firing another
broadside in return, Pearce saw that by wearing sharp
round he could pass under the stern of the frigate, and
at the same time bring a fresh broadside to bear on her.
The manceuvre was rapidly executed, the effect was



THE BOATSWAIN’S SoN.

very great on board the enemy. ‘The crew were seen to
be hurrying to and fro as if in dread of some event
about to oceur. It was next seen that all sail was being
made on the frigate. The men had deserted their guns.
The British seamen plied the enemy with their car-
ronades with still greater energy. The great masses of
iron were hauled in and out as if they had been made
of wood. Their only fear was that their antagonist
would escape them. More sail was made on the corvette
to keep up with him. To prevent the corvette from
following, the Frenchmen again returned to their guns,
and the frigate suddenly hauling up let fly her broadside.

Pearce saw the manceuvre about to be executed, and
was just in time to haul up also to save the “ Vestal”
from being raked. The frigate’s shot, accompanied by
a shower of musketry, camé tearing on board. Hitherto
one officer and four men had been killed on board the
“Vestal,” and six wounded, including the master
slightly—a heavy loss eut of a sloop’s complement, but
Pearce saw victory within his grasp, and resolved to
persevere. The last broadside from the frigate told
with fearful effect on the corvette. Her spars and
rigging were much cut about; three more men were
struck, and the brave captain was seen to stagger back.
Had not Rogers sprang forward and caught him in his
arms he would have fallen to the deck. He was speech-
less, but he motioned to Bonham, who ran up to con-
tinue the fight. When an attempt was made to carry
him below, he signified that he would remain on deck
till the battle was won. The surgeon came up and
stanched the blood flowing from his shoulder. The
nervous system had received a violent shock, but he
could not tell whether the wound would prove mortal,



THE BOATSWALN’S SON.

the surgeon reported. Still the battle raged. The
French were again seen to quit their guns. The cor
vette followed up her success. It was observed that
buckets were being hauled up through the ports, the
frigate must be on fire; her foremast fell, the corvette
ranged up alongside, the French eusign was still flying.
Bonham was ordering another broadside to be poured
in, when down came the enemy’s flag, and at that
moment, Pearce recovering, joined in the cheer which
burst from the lips of the British crew.

“Go and help the poor fellows,” were the first words
the young captain spoke. The corvette’s boats which
could swim were lowered and armed with buckets, the
English seamen hurried up the sides of their late oppo-
nent. Her deck presented everywhere signs of their
prowess, covered with the bodies of the slain, and
the wreck of the foremast and rigging; the wheel
had been shot away and three men killed at it. As
@ security Bonham, who had gone on board and re-
ceived the commanding officer’s sword, the captain
haying been killed, sent him and three others on board
the corvette, while he and his men set to work to extin-
guish the flames. The magazine was happily drowned,
which was of itself a sufficient reason for the frigate to
have struck, though the state of her masts and spars,
and the number of her killed and wounded showed the
skill and courage of her comparatively tiny opponent.
The fire was at length got under, very much by the,
efforts of ths Englishmen, who had to hint to the French
that if they did not exert themselves they would be left
to perish, as it would be impossible to get them all on
board the corvette before the frigate would become
untenable. The corvette and her prize having been put



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

somewhat to rights, made sail for Jamaica. They had
a long passage up, and the greatest vigilance was ne-
cessary to keep the prisoners in order. A plot was
discovered for retaking the frigate, and Bonham had to
threaten the French officers with severe punishment
should anything of the sort be again attempted.

Pearce Ripley lay in his cabin unable to move. The
hearts of the officers and men were deeply grieved, for
the surgeon would not pronounce a favourable opinion.
He was young, and had a good constitution. He might
recover. The corvette succeeded in carrying her prize
to Jamaica. The admiral himself came on board to see
Ripley and to congratulate him on his achievement.
“Your promotion is certain, Captain Ripley,” he said
kindly ; “and I should think his Majesty, when he hears
of your gallantry, won’t forget to give a touch on your
shoulder with the flat of his sword, eh. You will find
a handle to your name convenient, and you deserve it,
that you do, my lad.”

The admiral’s kindness contributed much to restore
Pearce to health. While he remained on shore Bonham
received an acting order to take command of the
“Vestal.” Before Pearce had totally recovered he re-
ceived his post rank with a complimentary letter on his
gallantry. Bonham, at the same time, found that he
was made a commander; the “ Vestal,’ having been
upwards of four years in commission, was ordered home,
Captain Ripley taking a passage in her. She escaped
all the enemy’s cruisers, and arrived safely in Ports-
mouth harbour. She was, however, considered fit to go
to sea again after an ordinary repair, and was recom-
missioned by Captain Bonham. Pearce was sent for
by the First Lord of the Admiralty to attend the King’s



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

levee. He was presented to his Majesty, that good old
king who truly loved a sailor, and knew how to appre-
ciate honour and valour. On kneeling to kiss his sove-
reign’s hand he felt a touch on his shoulder, and with
astonishment, gratitude, and delight, heard the King say,
“ Rise, Sir Pearce Ripley; you are well deserving of
knighthood.”

Pearce felt very much inclined to shake the King
cordially by the hand, and to assure his Majesty that no
reward could be more satisfactory. He did not, how-
ever, nor did he say why he was so pleased with the
rank bestowed on him, but made the usual bow, and
moved off to allow others to present themselves. There
was one, however, waiting for him outside the palace,
as fine and officer-like looking man as any of those
present in admirals’ or post captains’ uniforms—his
father, and the knowledge of the intense delight his
promotion gave him, greatly added to the satisfaction .
Pearce felt on the occasion. Sir Pearce Ripley was
gazetted the next day to the command of a, fine frigate,
the name of which he soon made well known by the
gallant exploits he performed in her.

Bake

Two years had passed by. Colonel Verner, now a
general, with his daughter, had returned to England,
and they were spendmg some weeks during the summer
at the house of a friend, Admiral Sir J. B , in the
Isle of Wight, in the neighbourhood of the then pretty
little village of Ryde. Alice looked thinner and paler





THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

than formerly, but her beauty was in no way impaired;
and the sweet smile which lit up her countenance—one
ef its chief charms when she spoke, was still there.
She had accompanied her father and the admiral ona
walk into Ryde. When some little distance from the
village, they met a fine dignified-looking man, ~his
silvery hair showing that his age was greater than
would have been supposed from his florid, clear com-
plexion. An undress naval uniform set off his fine
figure to advantage. The admiral looked at him fora
moment, and then shaking him cordially by the hand,
inquired what brought him to Ryde.

“T have taken a cottage in the neighbourhood for
my son’s saxe when he comes home, for as I have
quitted the service I shall always be ready to receive
him,” was the answer.

“Oh, then we are near neighbours. Come over and
dine with me to-day. I like to talk over by-gone days
with an old shipmate,” said the admiral.

The stranger accepted the invitation, and after a
little more conversation, he walked on.

“A distinguished man,” observed General Verner,
when the admiral rejoined him.

“A right noble and brave man,” said the admiral,
but made no further remark.

The stranger was in the drawing-room when Miss
Verner entered, and was soon engaged in an animated
conversation with her. She thought him somewhat
eld-fashioned in his phraseology, perhaps, and mode of
pronunciation, but she had so frequently heard officers
of high rank speak in the same way, that she was not
surprised, and as he had seen a great deal of the world,
and described well what he had seen, she was much



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

muerested. As she listened, she felt her interest
increase, and became insensibly drawn towards the old
gentleman. As there were many married ladies present,
she was led out among the first, and so she did not see
when he left the room, which might have given her an
idea as to his rank, but she found herself sitting next to
him at dinner. Her father was opposite, and appeared
to be much interested in his conversation. According
to the good old custom, the admiral drank wine round
with all his guests. “ Mr. Ripley, will you take wine?”
he said, addressing her companion in his kind friendly
tone. She started, and she felt the blood rush to her
cheeks. She had not recovered from her confusion
before the ceremony of wine-taking was over, and the
old genileman again addressed her. Could he be the
father of Pearce? She had always understood that his
father was a boatswain, and this old gentleman could
not be that, or he would scarcely have been dining at
the admiral’s table. Her father would make the inquiry
probably of the admiral; if not, she must try to muster
courage to do so. Im the mean time she would
ask her companion if he knew Sir Pearce Ripley.
In a low and somewhat trembling voice she put the
question.

“Indeed I do, young lady, and am proud to own
him as my son,” answered the old seaman, fixing his
clear grey eyes on her, as if he would read her heart.
“have a hope that you know him too, and that no
two people love him better in the world,” he added in a
whisper.

Alice felt her cheeks glow, and yet she was not
annoyed. “Indeed you are right,” she said, in a low
tone, which she hoped no one else would hear, for



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

several people were speaking loudly, and there was a
clatter of knives and forks.

“He will be in England again soon to refit, for he
has allowed his frigate very little rest since he com-
manded her,” observed the old gentleman. ‘“ He, I
hope too, will then get a spell at home, for since he
went to sea at ten years of age, he has never once been
ten days on shore at a time, aye, I may say, not a month
altogether.”

Alice whispered.her hope that he would remain on
shore. After retiring to the drawing-room she looked
anxiously for the arrival of the gentlemen. Her father
and Mr. Ripley entered together. The general soon
came and sat down by her.

“A very agreeable old naval officer that is we’ve
been talking to,” he remarked; “I did not catch his
name, but the admiral tells me that he is a master in
the service.”

Alice was pleased to hear this, but much puzzled.
She managed to speak to the admiral when no one was
near. He put on a quizzical look. “Now, young lady,
if you had been inquiring about Sir Pearce Ripley, his
son, I should not have been surprised,” he answered.
“The fact is, my friend Ripley became a master late in
life. He had served in the lower grades of the pro-
fession, and if the rules of the service had allowed it, he
should have been made a post captain. I cannot tell
you all the brave things he has done. When in charge
of a prize, he fought a most gallant action ; he prevented
his ship’s company from joining the mutineers at the
Nore. On two several occasions, he saved the ship
from being wrecked, not to mertion his conduct on the
first of June, and on numerous previous occasions. I



HE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

placed his son on the quarter-deck, predicting that he
would be an honour to the service, and so he is, and 1
am proud of him.”

While the admiral was speaking, Alice was con-
sidering whether she should confide her case to him,
and beg him to intercede with her father, or rather to
speak to him of Mr. Ripley in a way which might over-
come his prejudices. She almost gasped for breath in
her agitation, but her resolution was taken, and with-
out loss of time she hurriedly told him of her engage-
ment to Sir Pearce Ripley.

“Tam heartily glad to hear of it, my dear young
lady,” exclaimed the admiral warmly ; “he is worthy of
you and you are of him, and that is saying a great deal
for you. MHoity toity! I wonder my friend General
Verner has not more sense ; the idea of dismissing one
of the finest cfficers in the service because he hasn’t a
rent-roll and cannot show a pedigree as many do a yard
long, and without a word of truth from beginning to end.
if a man is noble in himself what does it matter who his
father was? The best pedigree, in my opinion, is that
which a man’s grandson will have to show. Better to
have one noble fellow like old Ripley there for a father,
than a line of twenty indifferent progenitors, such as
nine-tenths of those who set such store by their ancestry
can boast of.”

Alice very naturally agreed with the admiral, who
was himself a man of much older family than her father.
He attacked the general the next morning. He hated
circumlocution and went directly to the point. ‘ You
object to your daughter marrying Sir Pearce Ripley
because his father was a boatswain. I tell you I was
for many years of inferior razk to a boatswain, I



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

entered the navy as captain’s servant. What do you
say to that? It does not signify what a man has been,
ibis what he is should be considered. Now, my dear
general, just clap all such nonsense under hatches, and
the next time young Ripley asks your daughter to
marry him, let her, and be thankful that you have
secured so fine a son-in-law and so excellent a husband
for the girl.”

General Verner had not a word of reply to his
friend’s remonstrance. The admiral, when he met Alice,
exclaimed, “I’ve been pouring my broadsides into your
father till I leit him without a stick standing and every
gun dismounted ; if you give him a shot depend on’t
he'll strike his flag.”



Vie

Tus admiral’s house commanded an extensive view of
the Solent, looking across to Portsmouth, down the
channel towards Cowes and up over Spithead. One
bright morning after breakfast, the admiral, as usual,
with his eye at the telescope, was watching the ever-
varying scene on the waters before him, when he ex-
claimed, “Two frigates standing in, and one is French,
a prize to the other. To my eye the Frenchman seems
the biggest of the two; I must send over and learn all
about it. He rang the bell, his old coxswain appeared.
“ Judson, take the. wherry and board that frigate, and
give my compliments and learn the particulars of the
action, and if her captain can spare time I shall be very
glad to see him.. Here, give this note if ”» The

!







THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

admiral spoke a few words in an under tone heard by no
one else. ;

Judson hurried off. There was a fair breeze to
‘Spithead, and back—a soldier’s wind. Alice watched
the progress of the boat with great interest. She
reached the English frigate, remained a short time, and
was speedily on her way back. Before she had long
left the frigate she was followed by another boat which
overtook her as she reached the shore.

A short time afterwards, Judson appeared, and put a
card into his master’s hand, “ Say that I shall be de-
lighted to see him when he can come up.”

“What about the action, Judson?” asked the
admiral.

“Just the finest, sir, that has been fought during
the war,’ answered Judson. “ He’ll be up here pre-
sently, and tell you more about it than I can.”

Scarcely ten minutes had passed by, when Judson
announced “Captain Sir Pearce Ripley!” . The
admiral received the young captain with every mark of
regard. “ And now let me introduce you to my guests,
General and Miss Verner; but, by the by, you know
them, I think.”

Alice, lost to all sense of decorum, sprang forward
to receive him. The general put out his hand in a
cordial manner, and with many compliments congratu-
ated him on his success. The admiral having listened
to an account of the action, dragged off the general to
see some improvements on the farm; the ladies of the
family left the room, and Pearce Ripley heard from
Alice’s own lips that her father fully sanctioned their
union. He claimed a sailor’s privilege, and before a
month had passed their marriage took place.



THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

Bonham obtained his post rank, and though he had
not the talent of his friead, he ever proved himself an
active efficient officer. Harry Verner quitted the service,
finding that, notwithstanding his ccnnections, his
merits were not appreciated, and that he was not likely
to obtain his promotion. He soon afterwards broke his
neck out hunting. Sir Pearce Ripley commanded several
line of battle ships, and took an active part in three of
England’s greatest naval victories. He in due course
became an admiral, and was created a baronet, and his
sons entering the navy rose to the highest rank in
their noble profession.

















ELK-HUNTING,







































































































BY MRS. WEBB.
—4+—

RIGHTLY blazed the fire, one
iS New Year’s Eve, in the cheer-
dining-room of Mr. and Mrs. Hustace’s hos-
pitable dwelling. The great dry log of wood that had
been reserved for the festive occasion, was crackling on
the hearth, and sending up volleys of sparks, and a
glowing blaze, that lighted up the bright faces of a party
of children, who, with their parents, and grandfather
and grandmother, sat around the fire.

Chesnuts had been roasted in the hot embers,
oranges and biscuits had been duly discussed, and the
juvenile members of the party began to intimate to their
grandfather—Mr. Eustace the elder—that they were im-
patient for the long-promised treat of the evening.

“Now, grandpapa,” said Alice, the eldest of the
children, as she drew her chair quite close to Mr.

B*



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

Bustace’s, “now we are all ready to listen to your story,
so pray begin, or it will be time for amy to go to bed
before you have finished.”

Little Amy drew a stool to her grandfather’s feet,
and sat down, looking up at him with curiosity and
interest in her large blue eyes.

Charley was all attention; but, being a boy, and
twelve-years of age, he was too manly to express all the
curiosity that he thought quite suitable to both his
younger and his elder sister, who were only girls.

Old Mr. Eustace laid his hand fondly on Amy’s
head, and said, “I was not older than you, my little
puss, when my trials and troubles began—those troubles
that led to all the adventures which I am going to
relate to you. My own dear mother died when I was
very young—so young that I never had more than a faint
recollection of her sweet face and loving words, and of
the bitter tears I shed when I was told that she was dead.

“My father was very kind tome. In the midst of
his own grief he tried to do all in his power to supply
the place of our lost parent to me and to my little sister,
Bertha. And we were very happy, for we soon forgot
our loss, and lived—as children do—in the pleasure of the
present day, looking neither to the past nor to the future.

“But years went on, and when I was Amy’s age—
just eight years old—my father took another wife. He
married a widow, a Mrs. Jameson, who hadason two
years older than I was. My new brother’s name was
Clement—not an appropriate name, by the by, as far
as I was concerned ; for he wasvery harsh and unkind
tome. His mother thought a great deal of him, and I
fancied she spoilt him, and was unjust to me.

“But my father was as kind as ever, and both our



EY LIFE EN THE PRAIRIE.

stepmother and Clement were good to my gentle little
sister; so I put up with my share of ill-usage, and
made no complaints for several years.

“You know, my children, that my parents lived in
America ; and it so happened that my father was obliged
to go to England on pressing business. Before he left
home he called me to his own room, and he gave me
much good and Christian advice. He charged me to
remember all the religious instruction which I had re-
ceived from him, and from my own sweet mother, and
to try always so to live that I might go to rejoin her in
heaven when I died. Much he said about the study of
God’s Word, and the importance of constancy in prayer ;
and then he prayed for me and my little sister, and I
shall never forget what I felt while he was praying.
Thank God, I never did forget it!

“Soon he left us, and we never saw him again. My
beloved father died in England, and Bertha and I were
orphans.

““ Our stepmother behaved well to us for a time; but
soon she seemed to be tired of us, and she allowed
Clement to treat me just as he pleased, and to assume
authority over me, which I could not submit to.

“A sister of my mother’s came to visit us, and she
took Bertha away with her, and I was left alone and sad.
I wanted to be sent to a public school, but my wish was
denied, and a tutor was engaged to instruct me and
Clement. I hated this man; I know it was wrong,
but at the time I fancied it was quite justifiable to
hate him. Certainly he was not a man to inspire either
respect or affection, but I ought to have obeyed him,
and I ought to have tried to conciliate my step-
mother.



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

‘ T did neither, and yet I went on reading my Bible,
and repeating my prayers, and believing that I was
acting like a Christian boy. But, dear children, re-
member that we must ‘show our faith by our works,’
and my actions were not at all in accordance with my
belief or my knowledge.

“Things grew worse and worse; and at length
Clement one day struck me violently for a small offence.
I returned the blow, and levelled him with the ground.
He made a false statement of the affair to his mother
and the tutor, and I was cruelly chastised and locked up
in my own room.”

“ And what did you do ?” cried Charley, with spark-
ling eyes and flushed cheeks. “I hope you never gave
in to any one of them again.”

“Well, Charley, I was much like other boys, head.
strong and proud. I brooded over my wrongs until
they seemed to be unbearable. Then I began to form
plans for delivering myself out of the hard bondage
which I thought I was enduring. I was very strong
and active. I had accustomed myself to violent exercise,
and I had acquired much skill in shooting and fishing
on my father’s property, and also in the wild country
which adjoined it. I therefore felt very independent,
and had a perfect confidence in my own powers.

“My resolution was formed. I put a few clothes,
and all the money and other valuables which I pos-
sessed —a miniature picture of my father being my
greatest treasure—into a knapsack. I made a hearty
meal of the food which was brought to me by a servant,
and then I waited impatiently for night. Very sincerely
I prayed for God’s blessing on an act which I atter-
wards knew to be an act of folly and wickedness, And



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

T read my usual portion of Scripture with all the atten-
tion which I could command, though my heart was
cherishing unholy feelings, and I was following my own
evil devices.

“My Bible was carefully packed in my knapsack,
and I repeated the promise which I had made to my
beloved father, that I would make it the guide of my
life. Was I doing so now? I fear not.

“ Night came, and witha beating heart and trembling
step I climbed out of my window. A luxuriant creeper
covered the wall, and, by means of the cord-like boughs,
I descended very easily to the ground. There was a
faint moonlight, and I stood to look at the dear home of
my childhood. Sad memories—sad and yet sweet—came
over my young heart. I thought of my gentle mother
and of my noble father, and I almost fancied their
blessed spirits were hovering over me at this crisis of
my life, and I wept bitterly.

“Soon all my courage and resolution returned, and
I left the spot. I had a dog—a faithful creature, which
Thad reared from its birth, and which loved me de-
votedly. I went to the place where Wolfgang was
chained up, andI unloosed him. His joy at seeing me
was so great—for my imprisonment had lasted for
several days—that I feared his barking would rouse the
inmates of the house. I therefore started at full speed,
and never stopped until I had reached a thick wood that
skirted my father’s clearing. There I stopped to recover
my breath, and to consider in what direction I should
turn my steps.

“T had a small pocket compass, and this was of
inestimable service to me in all my wanderings. By
the dim light of the moon I now took my bearings,



HY LIFE IN THE PRAIRE.

while Wolfgang stood silently by my side, lecking up
into my face with eager and inquiring eyes.

“My first object was to get beyond reach of any
pursuit that might be attempted the next morning, but
I also wished to make my way towards the less in-
habited part of the country, where I should have ne









chance of meeting any one whom I had ever seen at my
tather’s house, or at any of the neighbouring settle-
ments. I therefore steered my course nearly west, and
“ref ce the sun rose, | was far in the depths of what
seed to me a boundless forest.











MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“By this time I was hungry and exhausted, so I
made a scanty breakfast, in which Wolfgang shared, of
the remains of my last night’s supper; then we both
lay down to sleep on a bed of dry leaves.

“ After a few hours of rest, which I calculated by
the height of the sun above the horizon, as I caught its
bright beams through the thick foliage of the over-
hanging trees, I arose refreshed, and again pursued the
same course. Wolfgang had often made himself useful
on former occasions by carrying my fishing-basket, and
I now thought he might render me still more important
assistance. 1 therefore fastened my knapsack on his
back, and the good-tempered fellow trotted along with
his burden, which did not seem at all to incommode him.
This was a great relief to me, for I had still my fishing-
tackle to carry, and also a strong stick, which was my
only weapon of defence, except, indeed, a large pecket-
knife, which I fancied I could make available for that
purpose if I were to be attacked by either man or beast.

“Thus we journeyed all day, Wolfgang fasting, but
perfectly patient, and I endeavouring to satisfy my
hunger with a few berries and wild fruits, which I knew
to be wholesome.

“ Towards sunset an opening appeared in the forest,
a clearing had evidently been made ; and, to my great joy,
T saw a light smoke curling up above some low bushes.

“T was too hungry and weary to think of danger,
and I hurried forward. I longed to see some human
creature, who, being, therefore, ‘ a cooking animal,’ could
give me some food. I came upon a small hut, built of
boughs and turf, and evidently only a temporary re-
sidence for the white man, who sat on the ground
near the low entrance, carefully cleaning his gun.”



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“But suppose they had been savages—suppose they
had been Red Indians,” said Alice; “what should you
have done then, grandpapa ?”

“JT had seen some Red Indians when I had travelled
with my father, and also afew stragglers used to come
to our residence to barter furs and feather ornaments for
cloth, or printed calico, or gunpowder. I should not,
therefore, have feared to approach a native hut. But I
was well pleased to see a white man, especially as he
looked up on perceiving me, and I at once read kind-
ness in his plain, open countenance.”

‘¢ And was he good to you, grandy? and did he give
you food, and Wolfgang also ?” asked little Amy, with
much interest.

“Yes, my little puss; he gave us food and shelter,
and a hearty welcome; and his wife was as kind as he
was. But if I tell you all that they said, and all that
they did, I shall not get to my life m the Prairie for
many evenings to come.”

“Oh, so much the better,” exclaimed Charley, and
he even clapped his hands, like a child, ashe was. “ The
longer your story is, the better we shall like it.”

“ But I fear my elder children might not agree with
you,” said the grandfather, laughing, “so I shall con-
dense this part of my narrative. Suffice it to say that I
found my new friend, James Franklin, and his wife, had
come from Europe some months since, and were pro-
ceeding further west in search of a settlement where
they could take up their abode, and earn a living for
themselves and their two young children, Katie and
Harry.

“Here was an opening forme. I eagerly offered to
accompany them, and work with them in their pro-



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

jected clearing. I vaunted my own strength, and will-
ingness, and skill, and the good people cheerfully
accepted my offer.

“The next day we set out on our journey, leaving
the hut, which had only been. inhabited a few days, to
be a shelter to any wanderer who might require it.

“ Franklin had a strong cart and horse, which con-
veyed all his worldly goods, as well as the two children,
and in which his wife also was frequently obliged to
take her seat while we crossed the forest and the track-
less wilderness.

“ At length we reached the spot which had been
granted to Franklin, and I will not describe all the toil
and difficulty which we encountered before we had a
comfortable home. Time and patience, however, enabled
us to overcome all obstacles, and we dwelt for several
years in peace and tranquillity. I never regretted the
step I had taken in leaving my former home, for I was
then too young and too ignorant to know the value of all
that I had abandoned. Still I had an inquiring mind,
and it was a vast satisfaction to me to find that my new
friend had received a very respectable education, and
had brought with him into the wilderness a number of
useful books, as well as some on religious subjects. He
was indeed a pious, Christian man, and to him and to
his excellent wife I owe more than I have ever been able
to repay. They impressed upon my mind all the in-
struction which I had received in childhood, and they
taught me to love the faith which made them what
tney were.

“ So time fled by. Our fields became fruitful, and
our dwelling was enlarged and improved. The children
grew, and were as joyous as the birds that sang in the



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

tall trees around the clearing, and they were as lovely
and graceful too. Another little girl, who was named
Eustacia, after me, was added to the family, and we were
considered the happiest and most prosperous settlers in
all the district.

“We had some neighbours, but they were very
distant; and we seldom met, except occasionally to
transact some business of sale or barter. There were
also—far away across the Western Prairie—some lodges
of Indians, who sometimes visited us for the same
purpose, and from whom I acquired a certain know-
ledge of the native language, which sounded very
sweet from the lips of some of the graceful young
squaws.

“But I see,” said Mr. Hustace, suddenly interrupting
his narrative, “that it is time to break up our sitting.
Good night, Amy; your eyelids are dropping, in spite
of all your efforts to keep awake. You shall come with
me to the prairie to-morrow evening.”

Il.

Vury ready were the young people to take their places,
and equally willing was their kind grandfather to
gratify them.

“T told you,” he said, “that we would go to the
prairie this evening; but I must first tell you what it
was that broke up our quiet life in the clearing, and
sent me to seek another and still wilder home.

“Our house was built on a piece of ground sloping
towards the south. On that side the clearing had been



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

carried to some distance, and the land was tilled, and
had already made a good return for the labour which
we had expended upon it. But around the other sides
of our dwelling the forest remained in its natural state.
It was not very dense; but was composed of scattered
trees, and patches of prairie grass, some of which was
five or six feet high. The same kind of wilderness ex-
tended all round our clearing, for we had not been able
to cut down the trees, except upon the land we culti-
vated.

“Tt was the height of summer, and our crops were
ripe and dry—the prairie grass was in flower, and
waving in the breeze that blew from the east—even the
very trees seemed parched and dried up.

“Franklin and L were shooting behind the house,
and as he fired at a large squirrel near the foot of a tree,

‘some sparks fell among the withered grass, which
instantly ignited. We rushed to trample it out, if
possible, for we both saw the danger which threatened
us; but our efforts were useless. The flames spread
before the wind, and rapidly approached our dwelling,
which was entirely constructed of wood.

“One moment Franklin looked at me in agony, then
he darted towards the house, calling me to follow him.
Already the crackling and roaring of the flames was
audible, and showed how rapidly the work of destruc-
tion was going on. We reached the dwelling, which we
had no hope of saving, and, with a few hasty words,
Franklin made his wife aware of the peril to which she
and her children were exposed.

“She met the shock bravely ; she neither screamed
nor fainted ; but she instantly took the three children
to a distance from the house, and placed them in an



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

open spot inthe garden; and then she directed me what
to carry from the dwelling to the same place, while her
husband hastily harnessed the horse to the cart, and
brought him round.

“We loaded the cart, and set the children on the
bundles of clothes and bedding which we had secured,
and then we all waited in breathless expectation of the
coming peril, the intelligent Wolfgang panting by my
side. The wind might possibly, we thought, drive the
flames across our clearing and behind the house, which,
in that case, might escape; and very fervently we
prayed that God would so rule the elements for our
preservation. But such was not His will, The tall
grass and the trees were all in a blaze, and the advanc-
ing roar was fearful. Flakes of fire soon fell on the
thatched roof of our log-house, and the flames sprang
up high towards heaven.

“No hope remained of saving anything more except
our lives, and to that object we now turned all our
thoughts. The cries and sobs of the children which
broke forth lamentably when they saw their home
become a mass of fire, were very sad, and added much
to the distress of Mary Franklin. But now, in this
hour of heavy trial, I saw the worth of true religion,
and a firm trust in the goodness and the power of God.
No murmur escaped the lips of either Franklin or his
wife; no allusion to second causes as the origin of their
calamity was made.

“Tt is the Lord! seemed to be the only feeling of
their hearts ; and to His will they submitted, while they
used every means in their power to avert the still
greater evil which threatened them.

“


>»

MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE,

exclaimed Mary, ‘I will still bless the Lord for His
goodness!’

“¢He never failed those who trusted in Him, Mary,’
replied her husband, ‘and He never will. We must
leave our home to the flames, and hasten across the belt
of trees to the west before the flames have reached them.
You know there is open country beyond. There we
may yet be safe.’

“Time pressed; the cart was set in motion, and
Franklin kept hold of the horse’s head, for the animal
was now much terrified and excited. The western belt
of forest was nota wide one, and we made our way
through it in breathless haste, for the fire was pursuing
us. Already it was encircling our little clearing, and
we could see the flames between the stems of the trees
as we cast anxious glances behind. It was, indeed, a
race forlife. Not a word was spoken; even the children
ceased to cry, and only hid their faces and sobbed.

“ But there was not silence. Above the increasing
roar of the flames was heard the crashing of falling
boughs, the screams of the affrighted birds, and the
eries of the wild animals that were roused from their
lairs, and now came rushing past our little cavalcade.
We envied them their power of speed.”

“ And whatdid you do? Oh, what did you all do?”
exclaimed little Amy, grasping her grandfather’s knees,
and looking up into his face with eager, tearful eyes.
“ Did you save those three little children ?”

“You shall hear, dear Pussy. God was very good
tous. We passed through the belt of forest and got
out upon the open plain—the prairie. We looked back
and saw the flames shooting up above the loftiest trees,
while clouds of thick smoke came rolling over the sum-



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

mits, and showers of sparks were driven before the wind,
which had now increased to a gale.

“ We looked before us, and there stretched a bound-
less plain. But what was our horror at seeing that at
about sixty yards from the forest the prairie was covered
with a thick growth of tall grass, which waved in the
breeze, and was evidently as dry as tinder.

“'T'o remain where we were was to be suffocated by
the rapidly approaching smoke and flame, and yet to
proceed seemed hopeless; for we well knew that the
grass would be quickly ignited, and then an awful death
awaited us. Truly, 1 felt, as I know my friends did,
that there was ‘but a step between us and death,’ and
that none could save but One.

““We pressed on in silence. A herd of wild buffaloes
dashed past us, and trod down the tall grass, leaving a
broad path for us to follow. Again and again the fugi-
tives from the forest rushed by at full speed, leaving us
to toil laboriously after them.

“The flames burst forth from the trees, and the
prairie was on fire! What hoperemained? We looked
up at the blackened sky, and heaven itself seemed to be
shut out. But the Lord’s eye was piercing the deadly
cloud, and the Lord’s loving care was providing for us
a way of escape.

* Another headlong rush of animals—elks, buffaloes,
and antelopes—bounded by, nearly upsetting the cart
and jostling us all violently; and then was heard the
trampling of a troop of horses, and we expected to be
inevitably crushed beneath their hoofs.

“We glanced round to see if we could turn out of
their track, when we saw that each horse bore an
Indian, and that they were flying before the flames.





MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

We drew up, and we raised our voices in a loud cry te
attract their attention. Some of the troop passed by,
unheeding our distress; but all were not thus hard-
hearted. One, who seemed to be the chief, and who
brought up the rear of the flying band with a few
women, and two or three distinguished-looking warriors,
paused when he beheld us.

“Quick as thought he rode up to Mary Franklin,
and bent down to lift her on his powerful horse.

“¢Save my children,’ she cried, as she pointed to-
wards the cart, and attempted to rush to her little ones.
But the Indian raised her from the ground, and placed
her before him, while he gave rapid orders to those
around him. The females snatched the children, who
were now shrieking with terror, and bore them away
at a furious gallop. The Sagamore followed; and
Franklin and I were also taken up behind two of the
dark-skinned warriors. Another caught the rein of our
terrified horse, and led him at the same wild pace across
the prairie, with the lightened caré rattling at his heels
and urging him to a still more frantic speed.”

“That was a real good race,” exclaimed Charley,
looking very much as if he would have liked to take
part in it.

“Tf you had been there, Charley, I doubt whether
you would have thought it ‘a good race.’ It was an
awful crisis; and I shall never forget it. The smoke
at times almost blinded us, and we could see that the
roaring hissing flames were travelling at least as fast as
the fleet horses could carry us. How long they could
keep up their speed, and when the struggle for life
would be ended, we could not tell.

“ Hven in the excitement of that moment I could not



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

forget my faithful dog. He followed close behind me
gasping for breath, but lifting his head at every call that
T made to him, and making still more desperate efforts
to overtake us.

“Tpelieve the race had been one of many miles in
length; and the strength of some of the horses seemed
to be failing. The blinding effect of the smoke that
filled the air, the heavy, choking smell of the burnt
grass and trees, and the lurid glare of the red flames
that were speeding at our heels, were almost over-
powering, both to ourselves and our steeds; and still
we were far from a range of low hills that bounded the
plain, and where alone we could hope for safety and
rest.

“T was looking anxiously forward, endeavouring to
ascertain how poor Mary Franklin and her young chil-
dren endured the desperate race, when I was struck by
a black portentous gloom that extended along the
western horizon in front of us, and now almost hid the
range of mountains towards which we were fleeing. I
gazed at this strange, dark mist, and at its base I saw a
line of fire that quivered and played, and threw up
bright tongues of flame into the overhanging cloud.

“TI caught the arm of the Indian behind whom I
rode, and I pointed eagerly forward at the fearful sight,
exclaiming, ‘ Look there !’

“¢Qur brothers have done well,’ he replied to my
sign, and inquiring exclamation. ‘They have fired the
prairie.’

“Done well! Fired the prairie, I cried in despair.

Then we are between two fires, and all hope is gone.’

“ A low chuckling laugh escaped from the Indian,

and then he said in a calm voice, ‘Does not the pale-



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

face know that one fire is flying before the other, and
leaving behind it a desert that cannot burn? There
we shall be safe.’

“Then I remembered what I had heard of these
sagacious savages—that when they see a conflagration
coming towards them, and have no means of escaping
and saving their property, they will sometimes set fire
to the grass to the leeward of their camp, trusting that
the wind will drive it away, and all the combustible
vegetation will be consumed before the coming fire
reaches them. Thus the approaching flames die out for
want of fuel, and the Indians move forward on the hot
ashes of the fire which they themselves have kindled,
and which has been the means of their preservation.”

“Oh, how very clever!’ exclaimed Alice. ‘And
had the Indians really done so ? and were you saved by
that cunning contrivance? Dear grandpapa, we are all
very much obliged to the savages.”

“T.assure you, my dear girl, I felt extremely grate-
ful to them when at length we galloped out of the
wilderness of lofty grass and weeds, and found ourselves
on a clear open space, covered indeed with smouldering
herbage, but out of reach of the two fires that were
advancing and receding on either side.

“There were many huts, or wigwams of the natives,
on this space ; and the whole tribe were busily engaged
in removing their horses and other valuables to a safe
distance from the borders of the unconsumed grass.

“They had no time to lose, for the flames followed
rapidly on our steps; and before we had had time to
recover our breath, and to congratulate one another on
our providential escapefrom a fearful death, the whole
plain that we had traversed was a sheet of fire.



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE,

“The intense heat of the sun above our heads, of
the ground beneath our feet, and of the flames that
roared around us, and seemed to be striving to over-
take us, was really overpowering. But we were safe—
the fire could not reach us, and we gladly sought
shelter in a wigwam which was given to us by order of
the Sagamore. There our first act was to offer our
humble and hearty thanks to the Lord who had thus
graciously preserved us; and then Franklin and I left
the exhausted mother and her children to rest, while
we went to make inquiries as to the tribe among whom
we had fallen, and also as to our prospect of returning
to the spot which we had left so unwillingly, or to any
other place inhabited by white men.”

tte

“We found that our Indian friends were a branch of a
tribe called the Crees, who were on very amicable terms
with the white settlers in their neighbourhood ; and we
soon recognized some among them as the very individuals
who had occasionally visited our home in the forest, and
had carried on little mercantile transactions with the
Franklins.

The encampment where we had now found them
had been their summer residence for several years ; and
their favourite hunting grounds were in the neighbour-
ing plains and hills. On these grounds, which they
looked upon as their own territory, the Apache Indians
had several times encroached, and there was now open
war between the rival tribes. The Apaches were
located in the forest to the north-east—above the spot



“HY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

where our now ruined dwelling was situated—and they
would undoubtedly soon visit the place, and carry off
everything which the flames had spared, more especially
as they knew that the settlers had been on friendly
terms with their enemies the Crees. It was therefore
useless to think of returning to our desolated home; and
Franklin resolved to give up all idea of farming, and go
back to Toronto, where he hoped to be able to maintain
his family in some other way.”

“ And did he succeed, grandy ?” asked Alice; “ and
did you leave the prairie and go with him P”

“One question at a time, Alice,” replied Mr. Hustace,
laughing. ‘Tam happy to say that my good friend did
succeed in time; and I heard of his prosperity many
years afterwards. To your other query I reply in the
negative. I did not go to Toronto—as you shall hear.”

“Oh, I am so glad of that,” exclaimed Charley, “ for
then we shall hear more about the Indians!”

“My life in the prairie did not end with the burning
of our log-house. Indeed the wildest and most adven-
turous part of it only then commenced.

“Tt would not have been safe for the Franklins to
leave the protection of the Crees at that time, for if
they had attempted to travel in the direction which they
desired, they would in all probability have fallen into
the hands of the Apaches. It was therefore arranged
that we should accept their hospitality for a time, and
remain with them, at least until they broke up their
camp and moved further to the west.

“To this arrangement Mary Franklin very readily
agreed. She was weary and exhausted, and perfect
rest seemed necessary for her, and for the children
likewise. They met with the greatest kindness from





MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

all the Indian women, especially from Mahala, the
favourite wife of Squantv, the Sagamore or chief.

«The generous and grateful conduct of this uncivi-
lized woman was a proof of the truth of the old saying,
that no act of kindness ever falls fruitlessly to the ground.
One of her sons—Lincoya by name—had, about a year
ago, come to our dwelling with a bad wound in his leg,
which he had himself inflicted with his hatchet while
cutting a pole in the neighbouring forest. Mrs. Frank-
lin had dressed and bound up the wound, and given the
Tndian lad every assistance and refreshment that were
in her power to bestow. Lincoya had then left her with
few words of thanks—for the Indians are a very laconic
race—and the circumstance had nearly passed from her
mind.

“ But it had not been forgotten by the boy or by his
mother, to whom he had spoken of the white lady’s
gentle kindness; and now Mahala felt that she could
not do enough to show her gratitude; and Lincoya was
equally willing to do all in his power to render our stay
in his father’s camp agreeable.

“ Brom him I learnt that the Sagamore had been on
a hunting expedition into the forest beyond our clearing,
accompanied by several of his chief warriors and most
- successful hunters, and also by Mahala and a few other
women of the tribe, on the day of the awful fire. He
had likewise been reconnoitring the position of the
hostile Apaches; and, under the pretence of merely
seeking for game, he had contrived to ascertain theix
numbers and the nature of their position with consider-
able accuracy.

“He had been absent from the wigwams for five
days, and on the day appointed for his return, Lincoya





M\ LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

went with some of the young hunters to try their skill,
both with guns and bows and arrows, on the game that
abounded on the sides of the range of hills which I have
mentioned. They mounted these hills to a considerable
height, and then turned to meet the wild animals
and birds that were leaving the jungle of grass and
bushes on the plain, to seek their food on the mountains.

“To their dismay they saw fire and smoke bursting
up from the forest on the other side of the plain. It
was evidently many miles from their village, but the
wind came from that quarter, and they well knew how
rapidly the flames would spread before it; and they
also knew that their friends in the wigwams would
not perceive the fire until perhaps escape would be
impossible.

“*T thought of my parents,’ said Lincoya, ‘and I
trusted that Mahneto (the good spirit) would protect
them; and I knew that my father was wise, and that
his horses were fleet. And I thought of you, and your
white friends, and the little pale-faced babies, and I
wished that I could save you. But that was impossible;
so I tried to forget you, and to think only of saving my
own people.’

“Then Lincoya went on to tell me how he and his
companions left their game, and even dropped their
weapons, and ran with the speed of antelopes down the
hill, and across the plain, often through grass and
tangled weeds and bushes that impeded their progress.

“At length they reached the camp; and, without
pausing to explain their object, they snatched burning
brands from the nearest hut, and set fire to the dry
grass to leeward.

“Soon no explanation was needed, for the smoke



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

and flame were advancing, and several wild animals
came bounding from the burning forest.

“The Indians immediately commenced the removal
of their goods beyond the reach of the coming fire;
and as I have already told you, my children, we found
them thus engaged when we burst at full speed into the
encampment.

“**T little expected,’ said Lincoya, ‘to see the white
settlers, who had been so good to me, thus saved by my
people; but so Mahneto watches over those who are
kind to his red children.’ ”

“Does Mahneto mean God ?” asked Amy, reverently.

“ Mahneto is the name which the Indians give to the
Great Spirit, who they believe to have made all men,
and to take care of all, more especially of the red men,
whom they call his children. They have a great fear of
offending Mahneto; and they hope to go into his presence
when they die; but they also both fear and reverence
the evil spirit, whom they call Hobbamock, and to whom
they make offerings, and even among the more savage
tribes, sacrifice the prisoners whom they have taken in
battle.”

“How dreadful, grandpapa!” exclaimed Amy. “I
do not like to think of such cruelty, so pray go on and
tell us of the kind Mahala and Lincoya.”

“They were indeed very kind to us, and so was the
Sagamore, Squanto; and therefore all the tribe acted
towards us in a friendly manner for fear of offending
their chief; but I often fancied that some of the warriors
regarded us with jealousy and susnicion, and in their
hearts resented our intimacy with Squanto and his
family, and the evident respect which he paid to the
white strangers.





MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“We remained with our new friends for a few
weeks, during which time Franklin and I accompanied
the chief on several hunting expeditions, both to the
hills and to the forest. Once we went in the direction
of our old home, and we rode through the belt of burnt
and blackened trees, which looked like melancholy
ghosts of their former beautiful selves. Many of them
had fallen to the ground, and lay across our pathway,
but the active Indian horses on which we were mounted
carried us over the prostrate stems in a manner that
quite delighted me, though it put my horsemanship to
the proof.”

“What glorious fun!” exclaimed Charley. “TI
wish I could have just such a ride.”

“You had better emigrate to America, and become
a settler in the backwoods,” said Mrs. Eustace,
smiling. “But I fancy, Charley, that you would
soon tire of the rough life, and long for your English
home, notwithstanding the charms of being burnt
out of a log-hut, and having charred *rees to leap
over.”

Charley laughed, but made no reply, and his grand-
father proceeded—

“The Sagamore praised my skill in the management
of my steed, and that gave me confidence. I rode by
him and my friend Franklin and Lincoya, and we soon
came to our once fertile enclosure. All was bare and
wasted. The fire had scorched up every particle of
vegetation. A few blackened logs and stones alone
told where the house had stood, and all around was
atter desolation !

“Franklin surveyed the ruin with a sad, but calm
expression, and then he turned away; and I saw that his





MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE,

eyes were lifted up to heaven with a look of so much
pious resignation as I shall never forget.

“We passed by the tree, at the foot of which the
squirrel had stood when Franklin fired the fatal shot
which had wrought such wide destruction.

“He pointed to the spot, and turning to me, he
said gravely, ‘“ Behold, how greata fire a little spark
kindleth.” Never forget that sentence, my dear Edgar,
nor the application which the Apostle makes of it.
This fruitful land become a desert may be a useful
lesson to you through life in things spiritual as well as
temporal.’

“On we rode to the place where Squanto had sent
some of his hunters forward at break of day to drive in
the game from the thick forest to a small open glade.
There we now saw several buffaloes, and some deer of
various kinds and sizes, besides many smaller animals.
Great was our excitement at the goodly spectacle. I
had never beheld such a sight before, and all the natu-
ral love of destruction which seems to belong to man-
kind was stirred up in my breast. I longed to kill one
of those noble creatures with my own hand.”

“T should think you did, grandfather,” said Charley,
decidedly ; “‘and I hope you accomplished it.”

“Well, my boy, I did my best certainly, but I was
very nearly killed myself.”

“ But not guite, erandy,” said little Amy, with a
playful glance at her grandfather.

“Not quite, my little Pussy ; but you shall hear how
T escaped, and lived to tell you my story. I carried a
gun, and also a light spear, and most of the hunters
were armed in a similar manner though some had also
bows and arrows.

























ANY













IMHIMIPER Se!







. '
“© BEHOLD HOW GREAT A FIRE A LITTLE SPARK KINDLETH.”



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“ The signal was given, and we all rode at a gallop
towards the herd of animals, that now saw their danger,
and tried to escape towards the forest. But the Indian
beaters met them, and generally succeeded in turning
them back, although several dashed past the red men,
or knocked them on the ground, and bounded over them.
Thad fixed my eyes, and my heart too, on a splendid
elk, with wide branching horns, which I thought would
be a grand trophy to bear away. I rode towards him,
accompanied by Lincoya, who knew my want cf expe-
rience in this kind of hunting, and kindly kept near me.

“The elk saw our rapid approach, and he stood a
moment at bay, pawing the ground with his hoofs.
‘Now fire! cried Lincoya; ‘send a ball into his fore-
heaid.’ I attempted to do so, but my aim was imperfect,
or my hand unsteady, and I only wounded the powerful
creature in the shoulder. With a wild ery of rage and
pain, he dashed towards us.

“* Poise your spear,’ shouted Lincoya, and, grasping
his own, he held it aloft, ready for action. I did not
lose my presence of mind; my spear was ready to meet
the infuriated animal, and, as he came within reach, 1
plunged it into his neck. It broke off short in the
wound, and scarcely checked the creature’s speed.
Heavily he came against my horse’s chest and shoulder,
and rolled him and his rider on the ground. One
moment the elk drew back to prepare for the fatal rush
which would inevitably have finished my earthly career.
Isaw the red and fiery eyes glaring at me, and the
strong horns aimed at my defenceless person, as I lay
partly under my fallen, struggling steed, without any
power of moving.

“Tn that extremity, I am thankful to say, I remem-



*

MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIS.

bered that there was One above who could, even then,
help me, and a fervent ejaculation escaped my lips.

“Tt was heard and answered. The brave and active
Lincoya was ready, and as the savage brute paused to
draw one breath, he drove his spear deep into the back
of his neck, close to the head, and he fell dead on the
ground beside me.

“J was soon released from my painful position, and
proceeded to pour forth my thanks to my preserver.
But the Indian checked me with a smile, and only
replied, ‘The pale-face will be a hunter yet. He had
better remain with us, and become a Cree.’

“T looked at the manly youth, and I felt that I
sympathized in his suggestion. It seemed to me a
happy and a noble life, to roam the forests and the
plains in perfect freedom, and to be a skilful hunter, and
a brave warrior.

“TJ did not, however, express my thoughts; I only
returned his kindly smile, and remounting my horse,
we rode to the other hunters. Much game had been
secured, and was now being placed on the backs of
some horses which had been brought for the purpose.
The skin and head of my elk were taken, and the horns,
which I had so greatly coveted, were presented to me
by the Sagamore, with a few words of approbation which
made my heart bound with joy and pride.

“You have seen those horns, Amy. They are the
very ones that now hang over the chimney-piece in
your father’s study. I gave them to Franklin when we
parted, and he promised to preserve them and restore
them to me if we ever met again. He kept his word,
and they remain as a memorial of my sport, my danger,
and my merciful preservation.”



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“Dear grandpapa, that is delightful!” exclaimed
Alice. “I have always admired those noble horns;
and now I shall almost love them. They will remind
me so much of that day’s hunting, and of all your
adventures among the Indians.”

Here Mrs. Eustace interrupted the narrative, which
she declared had proved so interesting to herself, as
well as to the children, that it had caused her to forget
time.

So the party broke up, to meet again the following
evening.

IY.

“T ronp you, my dear children,” said old Mr. Eustace,
“that as much of our game as was considered worth
carrying away to the camp, was packed upon spare
horses. These were sent off to the wigwams, and we
rode round by another way—not now so much in
pursuit of game, as that the Sagamore might observe
whether his enemies, the Apaches, had left their encamp-
ment; and, if so, in what direction they had gone.

“When we drew near to the place where their huts
had been erected, Squanto desired the whole party to
remain still and silent among the thick trees, while he
and his son, and two or three experienced warriors, rode
on to reconnoitre. They found the camping-ground
deserted, and Lincoya immediately returned to summon
us all to the spot, when a search was commenced by the
sagacious Indians for any traces by which they could
discover the way their enemies had taken.

“They were not long in finding the trail of the



MY LIFE iN THE PRAIRIE.

Apaches, although they had evidently tried to obliterate
all footmarks, both of men and horses, to a considerable
distance from the camp.

“ Franklin and I fancied that the countenance of the
chief did not express unmixed satisfaction, when he
ascertained that the Apaches had taken a north-westerly
course, and were probably skirting the open prairie in
the concealment of the forest boundary, intending to
take possession of a well-known hunting-ground beyond
the hills which we have already alluded to, and which
the Crees claimed as their own possession, and made
their usual quarters for the autumn and winter.

“This ground had already been contested more than
once by the rival tribes; and, as Lincoya informed me,
with varying success. Once the Crees had been com-
pelled to relinquish it to their foes, and this had added
bitterness to their enmity, though it had raised their
opinion of the skill and prowess of the Apaches.

“The Sagamore did not confess to any uneasiness.
He only said, with the usual Indian grunt—‘ Ugh!’—
‘Then we shall meet them beyond the hills. My
braves will repay them for the insult they offered to the
Crees.’

“He scarcely spoke another word during all our
long ride back to the camp. He was evidently in deep
thought; no doubt concocting plans, and devising
stratagems for the defeat of the Apaches.

“Franklin also was silent. He was, as he after-
wards told me, reflecting on his own present position,
and the perils to which his wife and children might
be exposed; and he was endeavouring to form some
plan for removing them to a place of safety and civili-
zation.



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE,

“Tn all his schemes my good and true friend included
me as part of his family. I believe he felt towards me
the affection of a father, or rather of an elder brother,
and his wife was to me as a kind and gentle sister.

“On our return to the camp, a council of the elders
of the tribe was held, to deliberate on the measures that
should be pursued.

“In the centre of the eamp there were two lodges
or huts of a larger size and more imposing appearance
than the rest. One of these was the residence of the
Sagamore, and the other was the council-chamber of the
tribe. In front of the latter was placed the Totem, ox
standard— being the distinctive badge of each tribe.
The Totem was a long staft, decorated with many gay-
coloured feathers; and in time of war it was the privi-
lege of the most distinguished warrior to carry it.

“The Calumet, or pipe of peace, was also placed
near the entrance of the palaver-house, or council-lodge.
This was a pipe with a tube of from four to six feet in
length, and a bowl of red or white marble neatly carved.
The tube was painted with the figures of different
animals—as the jaguar, the ellx, the buffalo, or the
antelope—each tribe selecting its own patron animal.
It was also adorned with hair, porcupines’ quills, and
gay birds. This pipe was deemed sacred. The Indians
considered it as a gift from the Sun to their favoured
race, and it was never allowed to touch the ground lest
it should be defiled. He who had the honour of bearing
it was also looked upon as sacred ; and, like the heralds
among civilized nations, his person was inviolable.

To the hut thus consecrated by the presence of these
sacred articles, the chief and his elder warriors repaired,
and. after a long palaver, we found that they had decided



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

on an immediate departure from the plain, and an
attempt to occupy the contested hunting-ground before
the Apaches could reach it by the more circuitous route
which they had taken.

“No time was to be lost; and orders were given for
the huts being instantly taken down, and the more
portable parts of them, with the scanty furniture
which they contained, being packed on the baggage-
horses.

“Tt seemed to be regarded by the chief and his family
as a matter of course that the white strangers should
remain under their protection, and share their dangers
or their safety. But Franklin would not hear of this.
He was resolved to take his wife and children to
Toronto, and the Crees were going to travel in a nearly
opposite direction, and would be exposed to dangers
and privations to which the ‘ white lady’ must not be
subjected.

“The fact of the Apaches having left the eastern
forest, rendered it safe for Franklin to bend his steps
towards the rising sun. He therefore declared his
resolution to Squanto, and at the same time expressed
his lively gratitude for the kindness and hospitality
which he and his family had experienced.

“The Sagamore did not urge him to remain with
his tribe; he knew that the Indian life was not suited
to those who had been brought up so differently.

““Go, my brother,’ he said, with true courtesy,
‘the red men have been glad to give you shelter and
rest. But the heart of the white lady is with her own
people, and she would pine in an Indian wigwam. Our
squaws can ride as well as our warriors; and, if danger
comes, they can take up their children and fly to a place



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

of safety. But the pale-faced woman would be terrified
at the sight of the Apache war-paint, and at the sound
of the Apache war-cry. Take her to the dwellings of
the white men.’

“Mahala and the other wives of the chief and his
warriors seemed quite grieved at parting with Mrs.
Franklin and her little children, whose white skins and
rosy cheeks they were never tired of admiring. From
their own scanty store of provisions, they contributed
liberally to the comfort of the strangers, and they
also provided them with buffalo and wolfskins to
shelter the children, and make a bed for them in the
cart.

“Very generously the Sagamore presented Franklin
with a horse, on which he could ride beside the cart,
while Mary and the children sat on the baggage.

“TI watched all these preparations with a beating
heart and a troubled spirit. I felt deeply pained at the
idea of parting with my kind friends, perhaps never
to meet again in this world. But I was perfectly
fascinated with the wild life of my new companions,
and I could not bear to relinquish it, and to go toa
great city, where I saw no prospect of gaining a
maintenance for myself, and yet where I would never
consent te be a burden on the Franklins. They had
friends at Toronto, and means of establishing themselves
respectably. I had none, and also I feared bemg dis-
covered by my relatives, and called to account for the
course I had pursued. I was now eighteen years of
age, and taller and more powerfully made than any of
my Indian associates, who were all rather small and
slender, but muscular and active to the highest degree.
I felt that I was a man, and I longed to take part in the



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

manly occupations of Lincoya and his red brethren. Oh,
my dear children, how often did I afterwards regret the
foolish pride and wilfulness that led me to turn a deaf
ear to all the remonstrances of my friends, and to the
voice of my own conscience, and to choose ignorance
and barbarism rather than submit to the wholesome
restraints of civilized life, with all its many advantages
both temporal and spiritual!

‘‘T have indeed had reason all my life to feel shame
and sorrow for the decision I then made. I have striven
to repair the evil, and to take my position among
cultivated men, but nothing could ever redeem the time
which I wasted in mere bodily exercises.”

“ Dear grandy,” said Alice, timidly taking hold of
Mr, Eustace’s hand, “I wish all the world were as
good, and clever, and agreeable as you are. There is
no one like you!”

“You are partial, Alice, darling,” said her grand-
father, kindly. “ But when you hear what a savage I
became, I fear you will think differently.

“Lincoya knew my wishes, and he begged his father
to plead my cause with the Franklins, and say for me
what I could not find courage to say myself; and as the
Sagamore had taken a great fancy to me, and also saw
the growing attachment between me and his son, he
readily became our spokesman.

“** My brother,’ he said, ‘you are going to leave us,
and may the Great Spirit watch over you wherever you
may turn your steps. You have a wife and little
children—it is well. But why should the young hunter
go with you? He is brave and strong; he will be a
great warrior. The soul of my son Lincoya is knit to
that of Edgar. Let him stay with us.’



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“Then I took courage to declare my determination
to try Indian life, at least for a time; and though Mary
and the children wept at parting from me, and Frank-
lin’s voice shook as he bade me farewell, my resolution
was not shaken.

“ An escort was sent by the Sagamore to attend the
Franklins through the forest, as far as the first white
settlement, after which it was hoped they might
encounter no dangers, and their guards could then
gallop back, and rejoin the tribe, which must necessarily
travel slowly, on account of the heavy baggage.

“ Must I confess that when the cart which contained
my friends was out of sight, and Franklin had waved
his hand to me for the last time, I felt my spirits sink ;
and tears—partly of sorrow, partly of self-reproach—
rose to my eyes. I had compelled Franklin to take all
the money which I possessed, and which could be of no
use to me, and also a few other valuables which might
not be safe in an Indian camp. He only consented to
this arrangement as a loan, but I knew it might be of
great service to him, and so it proved, and well did he
afterwards repay me. g

“Tt was a comfort to me to feel that I had done alll
could to assist him, and had retained nothing but my gun,
and my dog, and my Bible—that never left me,thank God,
in all my wanderings. But still my conscience smote me,
and whispered that I had deserted my friends. If Thad
possessed a horse, I believe I should have galloped
after them. But I was too proud to confess that I
repented, and I only turned aside to hide my feelings.

“¢ he heart of the pale-face is soft,’ said the voice
of Lincoya, as he followed me. ‘My brother must not
weep as women do!’



MY LIFE IN YHE PRAIULIE.

“In a moment I recovered myself, and Lincoya had
never again occasion to taunt me with soft-heartedness.
Alas! I became in time almost as unfeeling as an
Indian!”

YW.

“T vinp, my children,” resumed Mr. Eustace the next
evening, “that I must be more brief in my narrative, ot
I shall be obliged to leave it unfinished. I must only
tell you to-night of the chief events in this period of my
life—for I remained several years with the Crees, and
they were years of much adventure. When I visit you
again, I promise you some more stories.

“The war between my friends and the Apaches, as
it occurred directly after I jomed the former, and com-
menced my Indian life, left a most vivid impression on
my mind, and I will now tell you of it We made
what speed we could toward the debateable ground ;
and, when we were one day’s journey from it, Squanto
took his chief warriors with him, and went forward,
leaving Lincoya to conduct the rest of the cavalcade to
a spot which he had appointed.

“ By the time we reached that spot, which was a
narrow glade well sheltered by trees, the Sagamore
rejoined us. We were informed that the Apaches had
. reached the hunting-ground, and established themselves
comfortably in huts made of boughs cut from the trees
beneath which their camp was formed. They had
travelled without their families, and without baggage,
and had therefore been able to outstrip us in the march.



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

It was evident, Squanto said, that they were prepared
to contest the ground, for they were well armed, and
some of them already wore their war decorations.

“*Fow did the Sagamore obtain all this knowledge?”
I asked of Lincoya. ‘Surely he cannot have entered
the Apache camp!’

“‘Tincoya smiled. ‘My brother has much to learn,’
he said; ‘the red men can see and hear things that the
pale-faces would never find out; but to-morrow you
will be taught what Indians can do. My father allows
me to take you with the war-party that is to go forth at
break of day. My brother will be wary, and very
silent; I know that he is brave.’

“T promised all that was required, and impatiently
waited the coming events. Meanwhile we made a
temporary encampment in the valley, and Squanto
selected the warriors who were to accompany him, and
then appointed to the rest their respective duties as
guards and sentraes of the camp.

“As the first dim rays of light appeared in the
horizon, Lincoya awoke me, and soon the band of
warriors were in motion. We reached the skirts of the
dense forest within which our enemies were concealed,
and immediately the Indians placed themselves in a line,
and followed the chief step by step—the last of the file
carefully obliterating the traces of our feet in the dry
leaves.

“‘Squanto stopped under a wide-spreading tree, and
threw a long leather thong over one of the lower
boughs, which he drew down, with the assistance of
some of his people, until the end nearly touched the
ground. Then, while his warriors held it, he mounted
the hough, and walked as gravely and majestically

i



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

along it as if he were leadiag his braves to battle. The
whole troop followed, the last man being bound in the
thong which drew him up when the bough returned to
its place.

“T found some difficulty in keeping my balance, but
Lincoya assisted me, and we soon reached the stem of
the tree. Silently we all climbed nearly to the summit,
when, to my surprise, I found we were on a sort of
platform, sixty or seventy feet from the ground, and
composed of the wide-spreading horizontal branches,
twined so closely by anas, or creeping vines, that they
formed a natural floor. On these elevated platforms
the Indians sometimes proceed for a considerable dis-
tance without descending to the earth; and, as in the
present instance, they often find them of great service
as watch-towers.

“Slowly and cautiously we followed the Sagamore
in profound silence, until at length he stopped and sat
down cross-legged. We gathered round him, and did
the same, and then I understood why we had been
brought into this singular situation, for Lincoya very
gently drew aside some small boughs and made a sign
to me to look down. I did so, and I beheld the ground
strewed with the forms of sleeping Indians, grouped
around their expiring night-fires.

“The sun had now risen, and soon the camp of the
Apaches was in motion. We could watch their move-
ments, and hear their low guttural voices, as they
prepared their morning meal. Hitherto I had forgotten
that I was unprovided with food, but Lincoya had a
gourd of water and a small bag of parched corn slung

ound his waist, and these he shared with me, as we sat
he live-long day on our lofty perches.”











MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“ And had you nothing else to eat, grandpapa?”
asked Amy, very compassionately.

“No, my dear, nothing else. The Indians are great
gluttons at times; but, when food is scarce, or they are
on hunting or warlike expeditions, they can subsist on a
very meagre supply. You know I had determined to
become an Indian in my mode of life, and therefore it
was necessary for me to learn how to bear hunger, and
discomfort, and pain, without murmuring.

“So there we sat, and watched our enemies far
beneath us. A council was held about mid-day, which —
broke up with great signs of joy; and then prepara-
tions were made for some expedition, which was
evidently a warlike one, from the examination of
weapons that took place, and the hideous adornments
with which the savages sought to render themselves
more terrible.

“Red, black, and white paint were laid on their
faces, and breasts, and limbs, in the most grotesque
patterns; and the heads of the chief and his principal
warriors were decked with feathers, some being very
fine eagle-plumes, which hung down their backs.

“When all were prepared—bows and quivers on
their backs, muskets and spears in their hands—a war-
dance was performed ; and such was the violence of the
dancers, and so fearful were their cries and shonts, that
they seemed more like demons than men.

“T gazed on the scene with a sort of awe, but my
comrades appeared perfectly cool and indifferent, and
only anxious to ascertain in what direction the war-
party was bound.

“ By signs and sounds which were unintelligible to
me, the Sagamore formed an opinion on this point ; and



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

he told Lincoya in a low whisper that the Apaches were
going towards our old camp on the plain, no doubt
with the intention of intercepting our expected march.

“This discovery seemed to give great satisfaction to
the Crees, and many low grunts were emitted, to
express their approbation of this dividing of the Apache
forces.

“Towards evening, the hostile party set out, and the
Sagamore followed their course on his own elevated
platform, so far as to make sure that it did not move
toward the glen where his friends were concealed.
Then he returned to us, and immediately prepared for
action.

“‘ All our guns were loaded, and slung from our
shoulders; the last morsel of food was eaten, and we
were placed close to the trees by which we were to
descend into the enemies’ camp. Every warrior had a
torch of inflammable wood dipped in resin, and a flint
and steel to ignite it; and all were ready to obey the
signal of their chief.

“We watched the sun go down, and darkness fell
on the Apache camp while we were still in daylight.
A few fires were lighted on the outskirts of the enemies’
camp, where sentries were placed, and then the red-men
lay down to sleep.

“ As soon as all was still, Squanto gave the signal;
and swiftly and silently the whole party descended to
the lowest boughs of the trees, and dropped from them
to the ground, instantly lighting the torches which they
held in their left hands.

“The alarm and the attack were instantaneous.
The Crees were in the very centre of the camp, and the
astonished Apaches knew not from whence they had



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

come. The slaughter was terrible. It sickens me to
think of it now; but at the time I was so much excited,
that I fought like an Indian, and heeded not the blood
Ished. Neither did I heed a wound which I received
in my left arm, and of which I still have the deep scar.

“The Apaches were driven from the ground, leaving
many dead, who were instantly scalped, and the bloody
trophies were hung exultingly to the victors’ girdles
The wounded were carried away, and we could not
follow the fugitives owing to the darkness, but we per-
ceived that they fled in the direction in which the ware
party had gone.

“ Our chief then summoned his warriors around him.
He stood in the middle of the camp, and the light of
the burning torches that were still held by some of the
Crees, fell on his calm features and manly form. He
called over his men, and only one was missing. His
body was found by a heap of slain, but the scalp was
gone—the Apaches had borne away that one trophy.

“Many were wounded—some more severely than I
was; and to each the Sagamore spoke words of praise
and sympathy. It was only when he had performed
this duty, and placed his men in order of march, that
we discovered that he was himself wounded, and was
suffering acute pain from a musket-ball lodged in his
shoulder.

“He would not suffer his son to try to extract it,
but said he would go to the glen, and put himself inte
the hands of the Powow, or medicine-man—I should
rather say, the sorcerer—of the tribe; who, he said,
would also cure my wound.

“We repaired to the glen, and a regular camp was
formed, and huts were built. But the first care of all



MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

the Crees was to summon the aid of the Powow for
their beloved Sagamore.

“Iwas beside Squanto when the medicine-man was
brought into the tent of green boughs in which he lay
—for the wound was more serious than had been at
first supposed, and the chief was now greatly exhausted.

“The Powow was decked with feathers, and bones,
and shells, and smeared with paint and grease. He was
an awful figure, and his treatment of his patients was as
awful as his appearance. He administered to each of
us a powerful emetic, and then he applied a sort of
blister of hot ashes around the wound of Squanto, to
draws out the ball! My arm he bound up with some
herbs, which were, I believe, very healing. But both
he and the Crees expected more beneficial results from
his incantations than from his outward applications ;
and they were equally shocked and displeased when I
positively refused to take any part in them.

“T retired from the hut, and remained at some dis-
tance; but I could hear the voice of the Powow calling
frantically, first upon Mahneto for aid, and then exor-
cising the Spirit of Evil, who, he said, was interrupting
the progress of the cure.

“Happily for Squanto, one of his braves had
acquired a little skill in surgery from a white settler,
with whom he had been on intimate terms; and, after
the Powow was gone, he obtained the chief’s permission
to practise upon his shoulder. He soon drew forth the
ball, to the surprise and admiration of the beholders ;
but they all declared that he could never have done so
if the Powow had not driven Hobbamock away, and
placed the patient under the beneficent care of Mahneto.

“The Apaches did not return from their fruitless





BIY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

expedition to assail our new camp—probably they con-
sidered the Crees too strong to be driven away. We
occupied the ground until the following spring, when
we moved to the plain, where there was grass for the
horses, and plenty of game for the hunters. Thus we went
on for four summers and four winters—hunting some-
times buffaloes and deer, and sometimes wolves and bears.

“At length I became weary of this life of wild
adventure, and yet of monotony. I could not forget
that I belonged to a civilized race, and I yearned to
return to civilized life.

“We were encamped one summer on the eastern
border of the prairie, and Lincoya and I—attended by
my faithful Wolfgang—rode to a settlement in the
neighbourhood to procure some powder and shot. As
we approached the farm-house, which strongly re-
minded me of my former home, we saw a little giri
gathering wild-flowers. I called to her, but when she
looked up and saw Lincoya, she was alarmed, and would
have run to the house. I, however, intercepted her
course, and dismounting, I spoke to her gently, and
begged she would conduct us to her home.

“She consented, and led us on, casting furtive glances
at my red companion, and curiously inquiring ones at me,
and at my shaggy old follower.

“We entered the house, and the mistress of it
approached me. We both started and gazed eagerly in
each other’s faces.

“ Bertha!” I exclaimed.

“Tt is indeed my brother Edgar!” she cried; ana
instantly we were locked in each other’s arms.

“My sister had, I found, married, and had settled
with her husband and his young sister in that district,
and Providence had thus brought us together.





MY LIFE IN THY PRAIRIE.

“¥ need not tell you that I was at once cured of alll
my love of savage life. Iwentto take leave of my Cree
friends, for many of whom—especially Lincoya and the
chief—I had a sincere regard ; and then I and Wolfgang
joined my sister and her husband, Edward Ferguson.

“We did not long remain in this wilderness. I
found that my step-mother had died, and that her son
Clement was in possession of all my father’s property,
which rightfully belonged to me. We therefore
returned thither; and, as I found Clement a very
different person to what he had formerly been, I allowed
him to retain the estate, on his paying me a certain sum
of money.

“ Do you wish to know the name of the young girl who
led me to her sister-in-law ? It was Nora Ferguson; and
in due time she became Nora Eustace, and my wife.
And there she now sits, smiling at the oft-heard stories of
her old husband. I think that she is tired of them, in
spite of her smiles; so, good-night, my dear grand-
children ; and I hope you will none of you ever be tempied
to trv ‘a Life in the Prairie!”



Ve

MM hy






























aes











































































































































































Sq

=
{(D.AERIETON DE = SEMIN ee



“100K UP 1HERE,” SAID MRS. LARKIN, POINTING TO THE CEILING, AND JHENI SAW
FOR THE FIRST TIME A LARGE SQUARE TRAP-DCOR.























































































































































































































































































WILLY AND LUCY.

BY G. E, SARGENT.




——



|

1 vo not think I could have been

much over five years old; and
my sister was certainly under three
years, at the time that my story
must begin.

Ihave not avery distinct recol-
lection of all the circumstances of the event I am about
to record in this chapter; but I have heard the story
mentioned so often by others that I seem to have it all
ready to be written down, just as clearly as though it
had happened only yesterday, instead of fifty years ago.

It took place in a hop-garden in Kent. I mean, our
mother’s sudden illness and death took place there. It
was a fine, bright day, but rather cold, as was to be
expected at that season of the jar, for hop-picking was
B*



i”



WILLY AND LUCY.

nearly over. Our mother was standing at one end of a
long bin, picking the hops off the stalks; Lucy, my
sister, was seated on the ground beside her on a little
stool, and wrapped up in a warm but old and faded
shawl; and I had rambled away with a boy with whom
I had made acquaintance, and was looking for black-
berries in the hedge.

At first I was not so far away from my mother and
sister that I could not see them when I turned my face
that way; indeed, I had been told to keep near to them.
But presently my companion, who was older and bigger
than I, enticed me to the farther side of the hop-garden,
and them into an adjoining field; and there we rambied
about for more than an hour, as I suppose, until I re-
membered the charge my mother had given me. Then
ran back as fast as I could. Iwas not afraid of my
mother’s anger, but I knew she would be concerned at
my long absence.

When I got back to my mother’s bin she was uot
there, neither was my little sister. I did not notice
then, but I remembered afterwards, that there was a
good deal of confusion at that part of the garden, and
that two women who had been in the habit of standing
at the same bin with my mother were absent.

Nobody took any notice of me for a little while; but
presently, when I was staring about and ready to cry, a
young woman, whose name I knew to be Jenny, came
up to me, and took me by the hand.

“Are you looking for your mother, Willy?” she
said, kindly.

“Yes, and imcy. Where are they, please?” Iasked.

“Your mother has been took bad,” she said, “and
has had to be carried to the barn; and Lucy is along



WILLY AND LUCY.

with her. Suppose you stay with me a little while,
Willy.”

“No, Pll go to my mother,” said I. And, snatching
my hand away from Jenny’s, I ran off to the barn.

I may as well explain that Mr. Watson, the farmer,
had fitted up his large barn as a sleeping-place for the
people who came from a distance to pick hops for him.
I dare say there were seventy or eighty im all, includ-
ing children, who rested in that barn every night as long
as Lop-picking lasted. The men and great boys slept
at one end, and the women and children at the other—
a rough sort of a partition having been put up in the
middle of the barn, from side to side.

It was nota very luxurious sleeping-place, of course ;
but it was made as comfortable as possible; and as there
was plenty of clean, sweet straw, besides such bed-
clothes as the hop-pickers brought with them, there was
no cause for complaint.

I ran off to the barn, then, when I heard of my
mother’s having been carried there; and I soon found
my way to the bed on which she had been placed. The
two women whom I had missed were close by—indeed,
one of them was kneeling down and partly supportine
my poor mother in her arms, while the other was dab-
bling her face and hands with water. Little sister Lucy
was on the bed, nestling up to our mother, and erying a
little, as though half frightened.

I was frightened too when I saw my poor mother’s
face, it was so pale and ghastly; her eyes were half
closed; her lips were parted and quite white; her
features were sadly distorted; and her beautiful soft
brown hair was throtyn back, hanging tangled and wet
over the arm of the woman on whom she was reclining.



WILLY AND LUCY.

“What's the matter with mother, please?” I said
to the women.

“Go away, Willy, go away,” said the one who was
wetting my mother’s face. She said this hurriedly, but
not angrily. “Go away, there’s a good little boy, and
take your sister with you; your mother’s in a fit, like;
but she’ll come to presently.”

Idid as Iwas told, taking Lucy by the hand and
drawing her off the bed—that is to say, 1 did not go
quite away out of the barn with my sister, but withdrew
a little way off, and sat down on another bed, silently
watching and listening.

“* She’s terrible bad,” said one of the women.

“She’s getting worser and worser,” the other re-
marked; “I wish the doctor would make haste and
come,” she added.

“She was complaining only yesterday of feeling sc
queer and numby like; but I reckoned it was only with
being cold. Poor dear, how hard she breathes! is she
coming to, do you think, Mary ?”

The woman who was applying the water shook her
head, and whispered something that I did not hear; and
then the other gently laid my mother down, and both
stood silent, watching her. Then other women came
in, and a great deal of whispering passed, until pre-
sently the tramping of a horse outside the barn was
heard.

“ Here’s the doctor!” said one; “but it isn’t much
that he can do, I am afraid.”

It was not much that he could do. He looked
very grave when they took him to my mother’s bed-
side.

“Have you got any brandy here, any of you?” he



Full Text


xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20080816_AAAAAF' PACKAGE 'UF00015497_00001' INGEST_TIME '2008-08-16T02:18:38-04:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
REQUEST_EVENTS TITLE Disseminate Event
REQUEST_EVENT NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-04T15:06:25-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 297524; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2014-01-08T08:55:13-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '642605' DFID 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTI' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-filesUF00015497_00001.xml'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' 5f9314d1d73e07e2cd2d8d51198e3687
'SHA-1' 467d12bb1fe3cf4494dcf5171159d631d023f8ef
EVENT '2011-11-15T03:55:16-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'2014-01-08T08:31:07-05:00'
xml resolution
'1171' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTK' 'sip-files00000.txt'
5e17d931fdef6d16494e28ad4ee7b402
2b7dadf267dded3fb0651856fa1cde3e52cb22ae
'2011-11-15T04:01:36-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'405' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTL' 'sip-files00007.txt'
7a7e5b8ab820e2b451844a30f230a964
a03107fc1145aa417bfaa0bb0df181eb4b364654
'2011-11-15T03:54:39-05:00'
describe
'412' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTM' 'sip-files00009.txt'
e4394361aca83660368a9d6a00368fa5
a91df911f87dd3cc205614d6fc57124dbc5383f1
'2011-11-15T03:58:20-05:00'
describe
'92' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTN' 'sip-files00012.txt'
0f04dae12db1e798055d1c303985225a
1e8b1f1cea5a61dd1b3dc2e29c4c640d3fde365d
'2011-11-15T03:55:58-05:00'
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTO' 'sip-files00013.txt'
67bc830b7ed9fd45f025a4ba2541e34a
467c783e7fc3caea6fcdda89cbc9bc3bc7780016
'2011-11-15T03:57:39-05:00'
describe
'1779' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTP' 'sip-files00014.txt'
53b0cf9e21347fdfa06a5242085b3729
0b8dc019bd35c4ca7346561fd5205783de756f63
'2011-11-15T03:57:09-05:00'
describe
'1821' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTQ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
6b2ca78404424701dfeebcfba26c93af
96c179e9bf03d71a9fada1fdb752bd63a55830ab
'2011-11-15T03:55:10-05:00'
describe
'1816' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTR' 'sip-files00016.txt'
7a137bddf25d1cc029a09edc2a8b3f87
9d60ca00fa6a54eb5cf0384ffeec2543817e9ee0
'2011-11-15T03:55:37-05:00'
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTS' 'sip-files00017.txt'
33b6b7e6b4ce88f5c5dd5a5ef045bdea
b4aab93ed50230f92248fa761dd716459b81343d
'2011-11-15T04:01:30-05:00'
describe
'1723' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTT' 'sip-files00018.txt'
911d23c9b275e391cc46bf45f6e41c5d
56219c923741c2575d7a1c213e9a77a7875d50fd
'2011-11-15T03:55:09-05:00'
describe
'1691' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTU' 'sip-files00019.txt'
06a18745f554dbe3356979eaebb12c39
6d6fa469b9ffdf517218bdb3ab90a0f064af1571
'2011-11-15T03:59:57-05:00'
describe
'1878' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTV' 'sip-files00020.txt'
962093097f8abd661f040bd70f66f1a3
e5d90fc0357334b21df4d0f5c1f6a1f81d5acc3d
'2011-11-15T03:58:02-05:00'
describe
'1824' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTW' 'sip-files00021.txt'
81753cf258a221406e48cf23b9e790ae
179e09d4d0699d5f23e1767d0162f5bb7336fafc
'2011-11-15T03:58:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTX' 'sip-files00022.txt'
01e22470439e28552118162afc77ff04
4d7abf7289bb023672828aaeaa667e0513be721f
'2011-11-15T03:59:33-05:00'
describe
'1832' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTY' 'sip-files00023.txt'
5ad1c1a101c5d4f37b78cd7ca4c17f55
93ccdccda1d753f402a4ba5b50554306e3872b1b
'2011-11-15T03:57:33-05:00'
describe
'1823' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANTZ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
68656c20e2815527ae0a5b69528e1a9a
2ab264b172ede9af7778d535798ab9e4018cfb00
'2011-11-15T03:56:31-05:00'
describe
'1814' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUA' 'sip-files00025.txt'
89b80a3731de54862b33b3589dbab3a0
a67552b68e3c2b400d12f7f750f0dbbbd5310fb7
'2011-11-15T03:57:34-05:00'
describe
'1704' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUB' 'sip-files00026.txt'
59a7304ab36118187a86cbc80a3760c3
71d927941fc927d597c09555ac584b8517914dd2
'2011-11-15T03:58:46-05:00'
describe
'1755' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUC' 'sip-files00027.txt'
6746d6f06d9f0a676a13df223b714f60
6e3bf96eb80e0409fc546d2a82bebc56aee26cca
'2011-11-15T04:01:19-05:00'
describe
'1827' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUD' 'sip-files00028.txt'
2c440ff6bd331dc8eeb496ae5366831a
7e0f5f4b9a92e27f7d91b0d403dc8a3762e37c5f
'2011-11-15T03:58:57-05:00'
describe
'763' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUE' 'sip-files00029.txt'
1610d389a5e440031ca69c4e12773bb1
30af2489449a0e20f2b8c067aee59789f7faa76e
'2011-11-15T03:59:10-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'1864' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUF' 'sip-files00030.txt'
cfcd87e0d1e9ee84be3842d0ad0d177a
28e5a6affa764352be153939011e6f2982ef6fc3
'2011-11-15T03:59:23-05:00'
describe
'1797' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUG' 'sip-files00031.txt'
3dae52b31c8e96eb4c581fedd0a9f8db
29edff75fd5b55fcab44f2126342c0eb33f06de1
'2011-11-15T03:57:45-05:00'
describe
'1809' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUH' 'sip-files00032.txt'
2db9afc6ac886387557c8e0238732335
0c0d168e6882ffe0c33da88e0d211dfbc7ac9a59
'2011-11-15T03:58:54-05:00'
describe
'1839' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUI' 'sip-files00033.txt'
9383c9a2ace249a22f71f11debad23ad
1d1b6cfb6fcda4b65e12ee63e0eb28eca324837d
'2011-11-15T03:57:08-05:00'
describe
'1813' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUJ' 'sip-files00034.txt'
03d165aac2447e6659953f10dc645546
c866b722891fd9c8023e8f51bc70dc5eabf47111
'2011-11-15T04:00:14-05:00'
describe
'1617' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUK' 'sip-files00035.txt'
49969d7a9f0e5e10164fa74462431b4f
e50a401db365c052e6a1ba4e2694e057ee44dae8
'2011-11-15T03:54:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUL' 'sip-files00036.txt'
76252a2155070cb2808c80cdb7ce38c7
e305b53228a4c8f8e81b746f91e3e08933b8a63b
'2011-11-15T03:59:19-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'107' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUM' 'sip-files00037.txt'
3cf1ce55de5d30cd7a9680084355b978
fc42195d69cc7d173bdd4afaf6bcaa23b8f15240
'2011-11-15T03:55:08-05:00'
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUN' 'sip-files00039.txt'
8ab2715b6c84975f70084f2efbc58eac
5fd973dd963af8030cb7f87269a639070e81f66c
'2011-11-15T04:01:16-05:00'
describe
'1817' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUO' 'sip-files00040.txt'
7e6e5c064d7ab047caba5086b4984181
1785a8f40b83ba36826ee86f9b8a0a9cae5d345b
'2011-11-15T03:56:39-05:00'
describe
'1874' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUP' 'sip-files00041.txt'
f108d2d3c642e22ad8d3a59b94f387f9
79a22ca5abe4a77013958bcd2e85834b343c87a3
'2011-11-15T03:57:53-05:00'
describe
'1732' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUQ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
31578842c761268f295f83dda0900160
926299ba693e46cfe511b7b2b66ee6ef877aa50d
'2011-11-15T03:56:17-05:00'
describe
'1705' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUR' 'sip-files00043.txt'
175dcebff1cd4d595f14c7fd1c9783eb
83cb088e28c79b95e6842575db0d8c1b6a74ad61
'2011-11-15T04:03:56-05:00'
describe
'1551' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUS' 'sip-files00044.txt'
024bdaf46107778e3ad11a07378aa6ed
3b07551a6f4f01726b4c51776b59fe3380b3bcea
'2011-11-15T03:58:18-05:00'
describe
'1769' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUT' 'sip-files00045.txt'
3629e56b0874c29b855aeb0ac0bd6b7f
43b08f61ae078700b79fde887b1e75d5d1e7f1e7
'2011-11-15T03:57:26-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUU' 'sip-files00046.txt'
b6f5115c8b319c34ea74896eb9263f5d
e7d466ddc221cf625939e4129dc058bfd95ba759
'2011-11-15T03:57:14-05:00'
describe
'1835' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUV' 'sip-files00047.txt'
fb149b7d619e54f4bb0c36940a91a874
fcc7149cacf6465d8981438273592091b872e8dc
'2011-11-15T03:56:44-05:00'
describe
'1833' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUW' 'sip-files00048.txt'
eb7ca9eee1cba8f4688a779c770be278
189b084a44f6c4db8c9982cfe76095133680075c
'2011-11-15T03:57:42-05:00'
describe
'1906' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUX' 'sip-files00049.txt'
557fc3343eaf28ed48ffa8ac66e87a8c
c7516c3456964b726e9778b8e5f84915d5b8e2be
'2011-11-15T03:58:13-05:00'
describe
'1844' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUY' 'sip-files00050.txt'
1a02d2d52abcf2a474cde41a76155012
5e0a7f12a4ef65ac0a1b70a0e3820b2abce717ac
'2011-11-15T04:01:47-05:00'
describe
'1536' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANUZ' 'sip-files00051.txt'
8b63cea561470dfb8cf65f25d4ceb54d
01849fec95c7c2d1e6682b0d87d19d9f95d34ab2
'2011-11-15T03:58:11-05:00'
describe
'1683' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
601ad9612a47bcabfff19e167bea87ff
fd877958c9e9710e7e9c741761fc4c58b3702d0b
'2011-11-15T04:03:46-05:00'
describe
'1722' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVB' 'sip-files00053.txt'
f2039740f69cef94c5b1353af2b42ebd
4a79286c0bd85daf59a06bb583f6a5f66034e516
'2011-11-15T03:55:23-05:00'
describe
'1709' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVC' 'sip-files00054.txt'
7fba360a051cf98a659cd4f0e1a35d78
cfd660628aef9acac2e845792658218708d9728e
describe
'1767' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVD' 'sip-files00055.txt'
7a84f862a05af8e6b72be87c444df081
66d8077c3fec938854d5a6df0c976bc50c68b923
'2011-11-15T04:01:35-05:00'
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVE' 'sip-files00056.txt'
55c86d0456bc8bcb8667c590e9d66342
16d46ed5d701a5efe62e3220b2e2301d9205e8b4
'2011-11-15T03:57:55-05:00'
describe
'1687' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVF' 'sip-files00057.txt'
0bc3dd5a0159274126931687475b6bc9
fbffa4217b313aba96c1a704c066deae695ca70e
'2011-11-15T03:56:58-05:00'
describe
'704' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVG' 'sip-files00058.txt'
0f48935309f6c385ebd467bf09696a01
cace05176e3c96c28a7bf51e06892b11ac29fd50
'2011-11-15T04:01:00-05:00'
describe
'137' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVH' 'sip-files00060.txt'
9a2e98c914e8fdd63f0835f88302fd08
c0716ef55f97d6fed7740680178b79dd919f997d
describe
Invalid character
'956' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVI' 'sip-files00061.txt'
c3eef5607fec9863459200910f9172a1
4a736e902739c9829adf74c484f044cc98120bdc
describe
'1790' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVJ' 'sip-files00062.txt'
dd955ee6250427c06a6ca0e52eb7b971
85bbfdd0af5948e6c5f4cb1aea716b035d16af3b
'2011-11-15T04:01:20-05:00'
describe
'1698' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVK' 'sip-files00063.txt'
829b2e90c6f7750f7a752967b7b6f7ec
a556f84e1879a031625e3579e86c9ef012d72688
'2011-11-15T03:55:57-05:00'
describe
'1780' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVL' 'sip-files00064.txt'
99bca0bf054c02e0672d5ef4be267323
91f29fbdc0f6037ff26a71f611ae4cf02d899a61
'2011-11-15T03:59:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVM' 'sip-files00065.txt'
f5b4aab4ad06d7ed4545d68ffffa8207
8d9eee6789a6d4cd77cb809c54307fde2844bf64
'2011-11-15T03:54:53-05:00'
describe
'606' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVN' 'sip-files00066.txt'
ec1258d9f7ab4689912c53ab653aa94d
2784f8451545de081290f95a718d987c12804ff0
'2011-11-15T03:56:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVO' 'sip-files00067.txt'
6d899e6221d791ffc179630b59350ee6
07a79c713f190d833cdc5286cb632beadc4f5413
'2011-11-15T03:55:35-05:00'
describe
'1700' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVP' 'sip-files00068.txt'
c0db47433817e6d6b72e570c4f9e93cb
bfc2af84362fc1b67db6df570848c625df3e5abe
'2011-11-15T04:01:02-05:00'
describe
'1743' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVQ' 'sip-files00069.txt'
2b67ec5eecd1bb6632d40bef99784372
a2a1688dc63c10cdee1fcb5eeae2935cb524a980
'2011-11-15T03:57:28-05:00'
describe
'1459' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVR' 'sip-files00070.txt'
e86c1925c5f740c7e864a585ce2c7d76
4b8d89ed5e76426e6e04e3132dff206eab94c14b
'2011-11-15T03:59:15-05:00'
describe
'1760' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVS' 'sip-files00071.txt'
b378875d7c85e587de3e5513e566b726
018b0ea3b1c182ca0b979700aacf84eb6899b87a
'2011-11-15T03:55:20-05:00'
describe
'1726' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVT' 'sip-files00072.txt'
bf119584143b5333082617038a75902d
1b37907ebb270a061f2af89eae4d4c228d9d14c3
'2011-11-15T03:54:46-05:00'
describe
'1745' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVU' 'sip-files00073.txt'
f11b7ca5d4ec2268be8fb30bee8267be
8fc05c59c0acc1b547df2512706d6b7820db0297
'2011-11-15T03:57:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVV' 'sip-files00074.txt'
6cae16cc7851e17f3eaa6da09930d8dc
60284cb25593dd3b151b774cbf86947f509f37b0
'2011-11-15T03:58:42-05:00'
describe
'1740' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVW' 'sip-files00075.txt'
d76f467bfa1c8b345abb2e0005fd761f
d8eafe506f6fbf7fd7dac17589af7f82ba8ed96c
'2011-11-15T03:58:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVX' 'sip-files00076.txt'
27f05546a57d4f3e565af1ca27ab65fc
cb52bc0026945b2f6cdfde64ab2c2e7d17d2904a
'2011-11-15T04:01:23-05:00'
describe
'1785' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVY' 'sip-files00077.txt'
8a24d5c797a568eaf3dc212dc2ec9ef4
94455e19e16f424d025917e8c0c5e721319e23cc
'2011-11-15T04:00:42-05:00'
describe
'1594' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANVZ' 'sip-files00078.txt'
44f3f4abeda6410004b326e0198ace93
7e3e86d08e89576e26554df775116d2c8b8e064a
'2011-11-15T03:59:22-05:00'
describe
'1778' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWA' 'sip-files00079.txt'
05539d96b27e43a80f4b51615d9896e0
424719a438636a9a1494e55edb3ae0f217eec333
'2011-11-15T04:01:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWB' 'sip-files00080.txt'
c34b07243c69112effc1a44bd3ba9b63
bb7b8b1fa8adce9e98b80246fa04d6e5b27c678b
describe
'1717' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWC' 'sip-files00081.txt'
971e55cd8c0a54aa300fa1b1dac1313a
412623329977ccfd5698bea36f5bdd9c70ff3424
'2011-11-15T03:58:37-05:00'
describe
'1690' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWD' 'sip-files00082.txt'
24b14acc0a9a8db8e6d3e91761a70677
fbcab5eb3cd6e048b145dd242716baffc974cdc5
'2011-11-15T03:58:59-05:00'
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWE' 'sip-files00083.txt'
94810d7f19ce266fe49850357409240a
f3ef5da59a29c1d9c9867282cdba64c7ceb6d399
'2011-11-15T03:54:43-05:00'
describe
'1686' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWF' 'sip-files00084.txt'
1629dfc553dd5149bb0d41148fb448b2
e1d585d898bfb8e0c4777e70df59acc6bd02390e
'2011-11-15T03:54:42-05:00'
describe
'523' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWG' 'sip-files00085.txt'
95d38b5daefd0163797eccc97f02e422
a11c2d233ae2b418440913262c662f1ffb9dd9a3
'2011-11-15T03:56:09-05:00'
describe
'1786' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWH' 'sip-files00087.txt'
acd359910c9afb38542f9a4aac652d90
8e16e5578cc43ff6fdac5d5e0f4eb2902ed56431
'2011-11-15T03:57:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWI' 'sip-files00088.txt'
a4ae22a97a073972e1a3052984602ada
412e5a6eb8de38710abd41e86d1272a3d199064b
'2011-11-15T03:58:56-05:00'
describe
'1511' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWJ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
d3f69baec8b6bab584aa59e55aa2c5d2
d77aac2a13cd9a0c8d518b237af022593ee62a50
'2011-11-15T04:03:01-05:00'
describe
'1744' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWK' 'sip-files00090.txt'
d48b70304711b71f0a4503923079c7ad
c9a053e2ee35876989eddb2a203eb7d6066ef19e
describe
'1882' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWL' 'sip-files00091.txt'
5918618cbe1d54cb875d26ec69197aae
810a9dac98b0babc21ec1fd63bf1bf370e7ae5f2
'2011-11-15T03:59:29-05:00'
describe
'1706' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWM' 'sip-files00092.txt'
abfd16d56ecbd4dbf6befbefbe3504ef
58b8cb0b2419024d6e81bb9da4357e6027505265
'2011-11-15T04:02:34-05:00'
describe
'1741' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWN' 'sip-files00093.txt'
b6fc864197a74f6e9b8c570d2eccb1e5
6380cc1ff50f1dc7697f7196884b9c4e80c404c4
'2011-11-15T03:59:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWO' 'sip-files00094.txt'
b98b6ec2f865531c3cc167b450154bd8
0241075fd3e1d30e25c65d69c40ff1ae8a0e7f3e
'2011-11-15T03:57:21-05:00'
describe
'1754' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWP' 'sip-files00095.txt'
3dde2bfb837f0886115f39d903685af5
26d37efe9f202f237eeace8b299885b84aacec8e
'2011-11-15T04:02:49-05:00'
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWQ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
73d95821ac8676359cdf75d1dd7e6495
6485696d062aaccfc0c88825e78e86ffe29d7f42
'2011-11-15T03:57:12-05:00'
describe
'1694' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWR' 'sip-files00097.txt'
fc01612863587190b79d07334fadfe27
82355fbacb2aa755cd376692965618e080073703
'2011-11-15T03:58:24-05:00'
describe
'1749' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWS' 'sip-files00098.txt'
620062295fed47b8608ef30a6dc631ff
fd83a53f12761f92c23af15a8b8b8bf63cde5270
'2011-11-15T03:57:43-05:00'
describe
'1680' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWT' 'sip-files00099.txt'
5930a50d4e74b26cd6a4a2ad612b02a7
284f7c37488b7a6c1eee1aad724e84b8fc69f56a
describe
'1649' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWU' 'sip-files00100.txt'
87ef1e2aa14ce8375996053772a17ce3
d9abf909d3db4b0b78b86c603d164bf973db1ec1
'2011-11-15T04:02:50-05:00'
describe
'1710' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWV' 'sip-files00101.txt'
f97add81b8a35c4674fbe800b7043f91
a7de1865f2a03e5653b36c4f47f42c4a0e737eb2
'2011-11-15T03:55:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWW' 'sip-files00102.txt'
21c7425099867f17734f6363ff15c67a
79ff35f55db13f537d44dfa6a5c125d29c389209
'2011-11-15T03:58:04-05:00'
describe
'1733' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWX' 'sip-files00103.txt'
340e12a9981109e4afd336b7ba95056c
472b2d16e2ecdb45cd7b627bdfd214f002673e21
'2011-11-15T04:02:43-05:00'
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWY' 'sip-files00104.txt'
6ec0058d17c3c5ca7b4f623e787f7983
3f8f142aacf5577dd08f91b697ffb4c88c21874d
'2011-11-15T03:56:22-05:00'
describe
'303' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANWZ' 'sip-files00106.txt'
27e742247b76c79866bc93e02f96ed0b
fa305c36d23dcb475ce0a3f02950d8e71b2b4985
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXA' 'sip-files00107.txt'
fc103257debe81c996d47546e757222c
b16681957ed7463e492e0ebe061efc8efbfa7e80
'2011-11-15T03:59:49-05:00'
describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXB' 'sip-files00108.txt'
631af722054d65358fb7d3dfcaa2c46a
483cb541f5c1d8136693c22bb0457b95e0dc7625
'2011-11-15T04:02:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXC' 'sip-files00109.txt'
68df1114b41673f614ea8911960ad2ab
fafe3564bbff1c986258bf0b0e61851f8c711235
'2011-11-15T04:00:37-05:00'
describe
'1564' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXD' 'sip-files00110.txt'
dd8151d397a6d93c7141b24113230d70
67edf8a682cfc7e25ce2f8dc69470da8dd6ee581
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXE' 'sip-files00111.txt'
fecc50389a5aac0f51f8d23c571e00d4
7f59aec513df18416c0b4117ab126323020428b3
'2011-11-15T04:00:20-05:00'
describe
'1586' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXF' 'sip-files00112.txt'
b1ea9819f84eb4da3f259517f666f50d
fc5b643c1287dcf3478f589b5a60d67c6e609a6e
'2011-11-15T03:55:12-05:00'
describe
'1645' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXG' 'sip-files00113.txt'
c515596c0368eea16bee9660f75fbbad
02efd5bf50ae7d78f918e42986f59cf9b8c8f820
describe
'1659' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXH' 'sip-files00114.txt'
22a1e05769965d5e2922cd5194c1d290
4dc882985545695178cb69c868e93b7ddd0659bc
'2011-11-15T03:56:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXI' 'sip-files00115.txt'
a6794955efe6d4579ea727be89b5cd06
601be5d36dae001b353b8935932cae9fa6f6d46d
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXJ' 'sip-files00116.txt'
2620f51d199264b0cf9e13f8d6494197
6f29409bca31a5eda27f15e59d6206291a003dae
'2011-11-15T03:57:31-05:00'
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXK' 'sip-files00117.txt'
ff683a4a1768459a44456d3e3e55c015
1eebad975c1a304a03c33ff0b260081e03dcea22
'2011-11-15T03:59:27-05:00'
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXL' 'sip-files00118.txt'
f4ddd42072775a464b6ece2cd9362dfc
cac4565046119ee6738bf3e37ab288f0421124ff
'2011-11-15T03:57:18-05:00'
describe
'1652' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXM' 'sip-files00119.txt'
57c5aefb1fb50fa6fa2b96690d417091
232ea59deec2398f9bb2bc931bf0e4298e08c571
'2011-11-15T04:00:22-05:00'
describe
'1764' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXN' 'sip-files00120.txt'
9c245aa217c87fc776a2c02714cc6ff9
92e92f54cfab83a1c99852d161e90a64d7b76b3d
'2011-11-15T03:54:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXO' 'sip-files00121.txt'
a85b9aaad28e10f0e5d05baad051e53d
ae5deb006aa9141b3159cad26c6120f2dc89cb88
'2011-11-15T04:00:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXP' 'sip-files00122.txt'
2331835e8aede227f1bcc05c51fcd874
23e3683efaf89fc40c50af62213608884499aa9c
'2011-11-15T03:57:01-05:00'
describe
'682' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXQ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
c4cf73f6ae8488e9fc2fb7646ce2d142
c866c9475ddcd8acecfac8d14a97bf68bf853529
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXR' 'sip-files00124.txt'
5af21d642dfd4c0802aeaa985a900abc
e1ca867f8e562a3f64c565f8f2c97e2970715880
'2011-11-15T03:59:24-05:00'
describe
'1479' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXS' 'sip-files00125.txt'
7be54e2071a6ea3eb05a13456939d1a3
2f8e554eb2c1e72d4defa5c9b16b77d4081477aa
'2011-11-15T03:57:46-05:00'
describe
'1644' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXT' 'sip-files00126.txt'
f2e339a15124434f0dba92e59216e76c
ad8ef469fb3e7d952bbbbf8f331f0b1514fd77d3
'2011-11-15T03:58:30-05:00'
describe
'1768' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXU' 'sip-files00127.txt'
d7df455c5a32b1fcf5b265593af8cf12
d173010d13c30e01e41d2d22e8707e99cbbc28a0
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXV' 'sip-files00128.txt'
5c6866b725f0e40f2c85fede60fffcdf
a2488e7afd9cc75e70c8009ea2f7eb4253f0b083
'2011-11-15T03:59:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXW' 'sip-files00129.txt'
c3d736482842ce77af2920b50fcc3aa5
6b44c0c03dff19aecbf21703feafc9f0763626fb
'2011-11-15T03:57:25-05:00'
describe
'1799' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXX' 'sip-files00130.txt'
273afaf8ce7dc1a613f7c37562e5dd96
a1727f0d1a4568d8dae1962b25d0a09bfef95add
'2011-11-15T04:01:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXY' 'sip-files00131.txt'
228b9499f9719f32eb5dbdd62f81768a
503a4b2a50ef90b4fb49ce83ddd8c3119549fe5a
describe
'1621' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANXZ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
62e4ba2d3b7bbcef604f18d0c307a3ec
dde160bedb1a81f8c41c102e89c8316bf8cae4ee
'2011-11-15T04:02:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYA' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d997e825232b5ee0d92eb266d639a67b
27ab3a7a64a231d232c3ed2be91b9cacdd673699
describe
'1643' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYB' 'sip-files00134.txt'
7e70106e86af0363652eff1efb387f38
75e17259f5f5870b82d25a83deb96a11c58b4acd
'2011-11-15T03:56:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYC' 'sip-files00135.txt'
7faae6759b02aa33d916be59c9c3c39c
0075c87cec54cdf639acb0e461d102f53dad1213
'2011-11-15T03:58:16-05:00'
describe
'1578' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYD' 'sip-files00136.txt'
173eaf535863d29af2cda238d3facbdd
41372731a500cb1b029d0ff6c6564e17eeb47fab
'2011-11-15T03:57:06-05:00'
describe
'1774' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYE' 'sip-files00137.txt'
478f9c622f4c6ac2793fa6053781581e
f80135c846e07555b13c079db4d0beeda22f6c9d
'2011-11-15T03:58:58-05:00'
describe
'1696' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYF' 'sip-files00138.txt'
184235698364ff1f9d00992d665befad
4428e8bb6f70bb105802b5067d95609d4639be4a
'2011-11-15T04:02:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYG' 'sip-files00139.txt'
7e18646279717e53853e86a3cccd2d5f
f64d4419cb458b4d0a1e9bba5b46ede88b577082
'2011-11-15T04:01:31-05:00'
describe
'1523' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYH' 'sip-files00140.txt'
3c1514d99e7c80606f4f0686e9e8fd4b
4630509420aa8397d7c3a43dac0b75df8a72722a
'2011-11-15T04:02:53-05:00'
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYI' 'sip-files00141.txt'
9dec0a813c2d17ce0907421e07c74339
3edc696374b1359fa9baabc9ebc826a2f1447a56
'2011-11-15T04:03:35-05:00'
describe
'1638' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYJ' 'sip-files00142.txt'
4f6b52cc0b59e718e3f31f1918d955bc
8fef0b5c759db3ae549e2afd51ad2be95adeee1b
'2011-11-15T04:03:24-05:00'
describe
'1409' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYK' 'sip-files00143.txt'
d5fa3ada631d2bcf3b3352fe4460dccb
8dddde8a1846785295e6201a0fb73f1535beb24e
'2011-11-15T03:55:49-05:00'
describe
'1773' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYL' 'sip-files00144.txt'
8cdd3e819a14674ab388d63990a76f62
4f20d53456a1a8abb8437920b0c10808ada4cdaa
describe
'1753' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYM' 'sip-files00145.txt'
327855c0a42af2ab873a8de11a1ea58a
c9a9f84003d7d5bdfcf851257979c813d4e04df0
'2011-11-15T03:57:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYN' 'sip-files00146.txt'
9d62a9384dffa8303ccc6fb93a92c5bf
2c1f2d88ea0e9a0c438445918713337171b1cc08
'2011-11-15T04:03:15-05:00'
describe
'1808' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYO' 'sip-files00147.txt'
d3cf5ffe29aa246f0238785f0122be97
bf04c1b9b2878b22483063e752a1b0e05b218bcd
'2011-11-15T04:01:42-05:00'
describe
'97' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYP' 'sip-files00148.txt'
0a01b7f5b766b5696b18ce3b2dc9af82
a8454f4ec12efaf833a827b5dc58a43a6ac5b1a1
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYQ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
cac1813e9a9add59d4dd7819038bbec1
bdf81fd88629d883b4513b4840b49151490b9d47
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYR' 'sip-files00150.txt'
099eeef2e2aa0299a348b808ad1e6966
e1fcd21211bed5592ab55f87be57d7b5bbd62b92
'2011-11-15T04:01:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYS' 'sip-files00151.txt'
7d83b87b5a91703b20b8279235a262b8
cf0945dfe2c739914cfa4a58ddcecd9552708139
'2011-11-15T04:03:03-05:00'
describe
'257' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYT' 'sip-files00152.txt'
fba9cb7a76722192f6000402d283979e
50729a706d6d1759f3d215d927eca38539913c4b
'2011-11-15T04:01:38-05:00'
describe
'82' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYU' 'sip-files00154.txt'
0a4c2d224c1cc797a511c2b16105fd39
cf9e8ab4bd8a15a170982d042ab1bc36ab6e8980
'2011-11-15T03:54:58-05:00'
describe
'726' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYV' 'sip-files00155.txt'
7400fb46eb0765632f8e38e26df088c4
ba4084511e0c113c51ab258574e695945280b8df
'2011-11-15T03:58:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYW' 'sip-files00156.txt'
52c25abadcd10c075da9773d3bcccb7b
05e82214768612b5330afd09bcd4d53291842b12
describe
'1675' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYX' 'sip-files00157.txt'
225cb6558a33a5aeed977b8f1fdb1bb9
ec3e9b17e490be5f17428dad62d80aab1c3b385f
'2011-11-15T03:56:49-05:00'
describe
'1742' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYY' 'sip-files00158.txt'
599e19df86e4afc8da42c977270bccfa
9662cfc44e98e16adf5eff759f07d45e936f25c7
'2011-11-15T04:02:54-05:00'
describe
'1854' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANYZ' 'sip-files00159.txt'
ec7829bbc63c3e075d38a587b751e5fd
1d060bbed3ade76a62582ac25c67582891089186
'2011-11-15T03:55:44-05:00'
describe
'1783' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZA' 'sip-files00160.txt'
e5c9a1e53c4904ac60226b82fe0b2541
b2d2aec5a0c39107e8406dafdf56fb652aec8c4d
'2011-11-15T03:59:30-05:00'
describe
'1528' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZB' 'sip-files00161.txt'
e0cb3954b9e7081a5b34859fd2cb8d98
180f5e64d63e652098a229533ed710563109a89b
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZC' 'sip-files00162.txt'
7fc84de5e406e998b3d1eac870185fa7
ec78bc27d1cfaf3453628964eedcab8f32415146
'2011-11-15T04:03:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZD' 'sip-files00163.txt'
aa3c85e73f53a75dac4efadbf2b7ada6
ded906470f229e2e9211fe1fc5ea84d940f1848a
'2011-11-15T04:03:54-05:00'
describe
'1499' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZE' 'sip-files00164.txt'
bac926316e0a9a68ea176a9405c0a92e
9f2c388cc674e598b605ac2273c7695a8d1daebb
describe
'1676' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZF' 'sip-files00165.txt'
53dde518b82278fd45ef59706b09584f
5dbefd464275f869fec28fa6f1b0bbdc34942f3f
describe
'1757' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZG' 'sip-files00166.txt'
747e9ecacb861977d535f62f20748cbc
38bedb0d3c22cdb79dd2354ec05997f6fbfd5024
describe
'1762' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZH' 'sip-files00167.txt'
9f0763aea157d82ae2b592550ba6e2d5
d76172c915817b6be2cc48c70effca43ee1435b0
'2011-11-15T03:58:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZI' 'sip-files00168.txt'
0b2229d2253865986bb5e489c8872ea2
bbc10d349f7d1c3bc79971e640f5c2af0074958d
'2011-11-15T03:59:05-05:00'
describe
'1750' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZJ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
2ea85acba2a675ee565fc31180919010
e9c10c1124b1f0791186ecc522cdd7b7ce99f005
'2011-11-15T04:00:54-05:00'
describe
'1630' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZK' 'sip-files00170.txt'
5f1905dc1c3aa5d87307446f487db046
59836a491948a968bc38723ce5009e6db70a2ab5
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZL' 'sip-files00171.txt'
100b31ad3e31111eeba615d71e0a406c
031ed7734e6196805a4f5303b33c23ae186f2c57
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZM' 'sip-files00172.txt'
15ff2a37cfe5cbbc102979e51e038d15
09fb7432468342e2b7c718186f8b4b70aa2e6279
'2011-11-15T04:03:47-05:00'
describe
'1673' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZN' 'sip-files00173.txt'
f6d531bf21567cbb5a060967a8d4743b
8c6e50aa70919f51b138163499472ed17ab541b7
'2011-11-15T04:02:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZO' 'sip-files00174.txt'
e4f45a679d7e11a8a27e1733df9cb9f6
d87af1b45fc70664f77451062a936375e3979766
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZP' 'sip-files00175.txt'
ac9731312a2a5c12f04b323b6ad09b71
d627972c0fc1248c82ebc7d9679742fc69424c14
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZQ' 'sip-files00176.txt'
e2df27b45433acceeb5971c367736005
682a3274ec61c5cd8ee7af4924edc244bb9bae28
'2011-11-15T03:58:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZR' 'sip-files00177.txt'
949dd30131cbee0c951fa76b5d233e5e
ac9259cfa587ffd4a68065c90ec66434d914181b
'2011-11-15T03:59:35-05:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZS' 'sip-files00178.txt'
1db2f3576e8a9821b0100bd3c226a15f
32d27296f12b0447c2b978178f4bbc5cd922422d
'2011-11-15T03:57:38-05:00'
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZT' 'sip-files00179.txt'
da99c6caa1999f85888d597a46089215
7b30f4f489320e800be86c5404ed7333175174b9
'2011-11-15T03:56:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZU' 'sip-files00180.txt'
c95b02d04deaf71b767ab7b4a47ebe9f
869593f5f988d3bc2d660b7ed6516c3c790bb50c
'2011-11-15T03:58:21-05:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZV' 'sip-files00181.txt'
8a59e43a16fe6f57e19d30e2b1c4f08c
d49599b12072101421c353902682dd0236c34902
'2011-11-15T04:00:07-05:00'
describe
'1793' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZW' 'sip-files00182.txt'
9b50af177d21515b1eeae5bd313d15e4
bbb41d85adb6cb96bcdb1c2d901aaf92e2404226
'2011-11-15T03:56:02-05:00'
describe
'1761' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZX' 'sip-files00183.txt'
94e9a93c7cc8d55a8c217e77459fa053
ed448b05f319f0c16c863da1ddc9e91c044c6ea3
'2011-11-15T03:58:17-05:00'
describe
'1812' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZY' 'sip-files00184.txt'
77657e93a128137832303feec64776b9
7bdc3a9d0376bad0dff669b75f0866ab0535141e
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAANZZ' 'sip-files00185.txt'
b30c23079d05fcd42018a265b4524fd0
e9290b737aee2c6ec0c06482b22831c6426caf7d
'2011-11-15T03:57:05-05:00'
describe
'1775' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAA' 'sip-files00186.txt'
7f287910939c8aa83fc06e8c935e1f6c
7debf19229ef11716be228b578fabe9f07f94435
'2011-11-15T04:02:08-05:00'
describe
'1662' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAB' 'sip-files00187.txt'
1eb376c0b47cd00e2a01dc2ed60e01fd
c7320902c287a571ad409cfce18da548cb96547d
'2011-11-15T03:55:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAC' 'sip-files00188.txt'
52decadf78d616205c59a8ad7517944f
8cfb9025c287a5a26cd7712aec25a08b0ad495f6
'2011-11-15T03:59:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAD' 'sip-files00189.txt'
566cdbb24a4fc48d7404cd7d47933c8f
28d02d5bdd9a21b6752e51a6c097b90cb334a345
'2011-11-15T04:01:11-05:00'
describe
'1807' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAE' 'sip-files00190.txt'
083e299d08cbcb360d5da11ae5acaf77
99f4df0c32100bc893ecfa7852e1ef7b5dbff3e8
'2011-11-15T04:01:21-05:00'
describe
'156' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAF' 'sip-files00191.txt'
3e4bb1973c3f05cece50e392340ef67d
55bd3b9b7337dd679a2a808cf9939c8ea2be2852
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAG' 'sip-files00192.txt'
342e509a6c7cddd6e4dc1edda623149c
985b0b8934ed2a37295f9e18bb5cdc277332dc59
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAH' 'sip-files00193.txt'
920002d2bfa2f8f394586a89215c08fa
0ae8721516a7e8cfb4d3a2ab2ff31a18de74b6d8
'2011-11-15T04:01:33-05:00'
describe
'1791' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAI' 'sip-files00194.txt'
6cbee0a33ad0a5e3dbdccdd36ec843a3
a8dee35d433fd5444b533ac4276b65cac8a47c8f
'2011-11-15T04:03:19-05:00'
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAJ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
50b29e6a1bf986bb4d9e43bbe5fe1c24
f5c359060f8ee5a6ae5cf031c058a4ca9bdf7ab2
describe
'1829' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAK' 'sip-files00196.txt'
a35b30ec3b973448b434fd7b470cdf31
a2f4bc96bdde112007aa16bbdf4efe1495a0a805
'2011-11-15T03:58:40-05:00'
describe
'1886' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAL' 'sip-files00197.txt'
e63e92de407f55c76217cacdc87a05a4
6a55a08dff82e0c60aed02867f43522d023105a1
'2011-11-15T03:57:30-05:00'
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAM' 'sip-files00198.txt'
46dc2378295009e72d0c2fe71388f33b
ff82017c166fb3fd7880899f8d56f8d62f204b96
'2011-11-15T04:00:13-05:00'
describe
'1703' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAN' 'sip-files00199.txt'
911195260fa77126ac5d94768b4e5f94
f2d42c9e8fffe0889c97086fbfae1a4db05d15c0
'2011-11-15T04:03:33-05:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAO' 'sip-files00200.txt'
05a8e6db3c44a22c65651f1964903713
7ce063cd26237050c60ee3c57e83a5923ffb0e67
'2011-11-15T04:01:54-05:00'
describe
'182' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAP' 'sip-files00202.txt'
9466265622ec71c19065096ac829d373
7c903c6cb578a26bbcf7e7562bc72c4923de59fd
describe
'872' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAQ' 'sip-files00203.txt'
2d07239bf7e2320fbd32e1937e1ef3b2
677b492a4b0b883c0c07fe7d970ce9b9e72593df
'2011-11-15T03:58:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAR' 'sip-files00204.txt'
c27511aa44362e8d415c84779c4d454c
f83887abc0c159698b04ae36b872bababb6cb693
'2011-11-15T03:58:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAS' 'sip-files00205.txt'
aeb601fc4072fbdb035b9ee560bceacb
0eb3f7595c6c4374a3241f8f10f78342b1d712e5
'2011-11-15T03:55:30-05:00'
describe
'1688' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAT' 'sip-files00206.txt'
b2ae052e062b6bfa4a45d4602d756a22
79159f088b1cfd5309de23d2cfff1ec61346067c
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAU' 'sip-files00207.txt'
46a4297be6e7e2951ae5b843c63b65f5
7fbc4876dd1777daf1f67be76f75b27dc8a9fa45
'2011-11-15T04:02:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAV' 'sip-files00208.txt'
40a6fd5aa9ed37fef4f4c5c8e27d62c6
47a3b2124899bae701be2dc27d43525ef35ddd2b
describe
'1678' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAW' 'sip-files00209.txt'
c1151a4e68cbe26e61709bbc4ec83a6d
388de8b1a370ad5cd945ffd6b57f0c0f92fdb3d9
'2011-11-15T03:55:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAX' 'sip-files00210.txt'
a319a212bdab823dc02c0e3312ed3541
323cc8b48b62e3e6a756fe6ac4677bf4383eb564
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAY' 'sip-files00211.txt'
beaf9bc87d9426b064add4081bd50105
3525b7a7d7cdbf562908d8d4ffdbd161bf1d5a87
'2011-11-15T03:55:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOAZ' 'sip-files00212.txt'
949de84d6acb18fce9a254a1108414de
5ac9f1d7e43ab556e4c900f2ecb9b427f82a8566
'2011-11-15T03:55:47-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBA' 'sip-files00213.txt'
bf0805e991f7d5cbe4166a42e82bd372
a62d123d8e38bc5710e4d996acf0188f3d5cbb44
'2011-11-15T04:01:17-05:00'
describe
'1725' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBB' 'sip-files00214.txt'
3bb8bc974991311ade1e97d082f8b2bc
4698d4b1d652c061b736120e0f60af76245f79b9
'2011-11-15T04:01:06-05:00'
describe
'1838' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBC' 'sip-files00215.txt'
84f1f3a180f9a280330f0f19e2cae082
efb4d3a87185b3658491c4c24beb97111e17ca08
'2011-11-15T03:56:51-05:00'
describe
'561' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBD' 'sip-files00216.txt'
a1af6b9ed8b81ca1cbedbf727b5f5a68
ba3a212c53f96603be90ed365deccbec5216846f
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBE' 'sip-files00217.txt'
ba505adbe4f8d276a0709178c554b819
b1c6cdb6273e11a3480c7c9e5c104f29a10db680
'2011-11-15T03:58:52-05:00'
describe
'1716' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBF' 'sip-files00218.txt'
edbb9a8fb20853817dc7b809dee550b6
dfd4987cdf5da8169b499ab11573865cc94a1e25
'2011-11-15T03:59:52-05:00'
describe
'1805' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBG' 'sip-files00219.txt'
2e5adfad571839d1a7b37e117af4db9b
c27ee9a98172ca86a4cb7171fbe949612172fa06
'2011-11-15T03:59:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBH' 'sip-files00220.txt'
a008af172a6a289919dbe04b3f93e08c
e76adbe4d00bbe66fb0f06a0e8401ebd6615ffa0
'2011-11-15T03:59:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBI' 'sip-files00221.txt'
306ec54ac1dc4d670820a8ad1689ed02
2d1b2f2b4579645e9318e55eb798aba570fea862
'2011-11-15T03:56:47-05:00'
describe
'1836' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBJ' 'sip-files00222.txt'
d69f6fbcf7cc49af95fe9b5042c912d6
228db5ffdfcddef16971fb58ee66ca2ca36ef5b2
'2011-11-15T04:03:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBK' 'sip-files00223.txt'
906f7f00a3b4ec11f0deaf10cd925de2
3d7ae99fabf849e4866aa0390546e3ed7de75da1
'2011-11-15T04:02:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBL' 'sip-files00224.txt'
2a1478539b537a4cb3eb0ef2c8926a7c
902eb2af271dbf81968acba5960d9ee2b0b42986
describe
'1859' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBM' 'sip-files00225.txt'
fefe2c4d683761ef41d2d4e42e32b30e
f5a7219b568b3cd13d08d25f98117b999909cf97
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBN' 'sip-files00226.txt'
f9bd78308732f0f1bca611c1f3821295
9f35163f8b56cacf3ae42ff5a7ad6268fd9609f7
describe
'1788' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBO' 'sip-files00227.txt'
65d6c8109d87435129f7b1e5153a3b63
ad390143958f16c7884d2df3b57d427ff0e642cf
'2011-11-15T03:57:49-05:00'
describe
'1729' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBP' 'sip-files00228.txt'
1d89841de3a768877ecd2a9699c71657
a19c1c4e1a95e962659e5bf7ca978c3e78612503
describe
'1728' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBQ' 'sip-files00229.txt'
9c5b72aa66c0e5c1f36b996a22324566
4ff0d7804130cfb3b4dcbe64a5419f6092d5b274
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBR' 'sip-files00230.txt'
9d920f5c2aa637354c1fa93f6245e9a0
5bf6616880a83fb339029a1cb9ef5aaaa221011b
'2011-11-15T04:01:25-05:00'
describe
'1781' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBS' 'sip-files00231.txt'
c9c0668797a74b23510d34ae2ab39d72
6f24cd537566c540bb710eb63a65ed139ae94416
describe
'1765' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBT' 'sip-files00232.txt'
7e595878ec8c58f8d681a85a6f1060b2
e28d0a9b0d686bee979a91b84b1969220885488d
'2011-11-15T03:58:55-05:00'
describe
'1748' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBU' 'sip-files00233.txt'
e402dd25badb8bff37756936fae0680e
973fdbe7b46604b30d9323224bd1c77f42368c45
'2011-11-15T04:01:22-05:00'
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBV' 'sip-files00234.txt'
35e05a6396d8dc2c3b93065877684e3a
1cc3b4894b1828acb7a1e59b38a95063fe6986c9
'2011-11-15T03:57:35-05:00'
describe
'225' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBW' 'sip-files00235.txt'
f80a52ede17482fd1f86853f26875bcf
e2517a06d07943233000a373f3991f15e37503d1
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBX' 'sip-files00237.txt'
c9c810a0d21f889ae69bffa0bef849d6
aea21f705d6737dae7105d6751bdf0352987c738
'2011-11-15T03:55:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBY' 'sip-files00238.txt'
628c6c5ff94ab7a201daef79ba3a77bb
dd7e9666efd991d0bb6e9158d65c6715ddcaa436
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOBZ' 'sip-files00239.txt'
48719bd50a0fc786fd604434349e22ae
110efb0a5d61715cb11771c3c8f0919f93bd771c
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCA' 'sip-files00240.txt'
961a62f6d2f9119473a71c7a3e062d3f
1c4ad4f54add3f2bcbe19b3b0e5550fc908507e4
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCB' 'sip-files00241.txt'
f97859bef40d1f7adec58000433ad0bf
5a2cc57803e6ce01be281b65b25ab3bb1dd8f00c
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCC' 'sip-files00242.txt'
4b78d16f55a3ebf8076938fe1bd939a8
1774c5c04e3419778a76ebc3044c007ee8573bb8
'2011-11-15T03:56:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCD' 'sip-files00243.txt'
7e1af1f5bfae03710b0a9fe4f5094cba
86d194fe56002781c1e4b452b034f569d9e6727c
'2011-11-15T03:57:44-05:00'
describe
'452' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCE' 'sip-files00244.txt'
d523b8652672351821fb789d47ce83c1
b64ff70401aa07746f6a123171fc04335bea38ae
'2011-11-15T04:00:58-05:00'
describe
'232' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCF' 'sip-files00246.txt'
e4649d26c7f1435cc6745c96f1641cc4
891070a291fe25d9de05305301843d47b4d1cdd1
'2011-11-15T04:01:04-05:00'
describe
'938' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCG' 'sip-files00247.txt'
a55f7b18d13be00576d4662925cefb6a
b57f4322e3fa822415346687c9d6f9eaf9316cfb
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCH' 'sip-files00248.txt'
0bf70bb1a6c138852fee4df4617b647d
05d777aacc91d10916304696dc69c7c6f5ed3753
'2011-11-15T03:58:28-05:00'
describe
'1763' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCI' 'sip-files00249.txt'
3c3d7422b123b5132761569b49cf97c5
550ad328179d7780aa724e03b881c8dbe25785c4
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCJ' 'sip-files00250.txt'
74cfabde133ef98d18d34cb6227ea8a1
d793e8aa93d665b0c19dc8296f89cd3b8f560773
'2011-11-15T03:55:11-05:00'
describe
'1888' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCK' 'sip-files00251.txt'
5f3ba871b815804dfaac0c021461418c
4e873c86061376cd35f5d30c283212ae0ae1aac3
'2011-11-15T03:58:10-05:00'
describe
'1858' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCL' 'sip-files00252.txt'
9b1e6d86ef03e1b408d2832d6d2cf037
b81c06355941f1562adada1f9f39e2f30b992fba
describe
'1589' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCM' 'sip-files00253.txt'
42063ffdc5a95709fc3b82cf576c5967
95ab2f90e86e9cf12aa55e3038ea09e17e08b27c
'2011-11-15T04:02:21-05:00'
describe
'1845' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCN' 'sip-files00254.txt'
7f733b2103b69217732616abd5d1c5fd
eec06a2b4ab7678bf9c18ea13c7807c47740a1ff
'2011-11-15T03:55:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCO' 'sip-files00255.txt'
0e86a5bc0bc33c7aad075981fc88803c
1f9145220f2ae2ec8f86ff3e121005cbf069f155
'2011-11-15T04:00:05-05:00'
describe
'1801' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCP' 'sip-files00256.txt'
3122ca0fa608d159b972dc7dd06607f0
69376d98462be8cdaadade7ada82edea0264ddb8
'2011-11-15T04:00:09-05:00'
describe
'1803' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCQ' 'sip-files00257.txt'
e885a8823b1ac00713233a644cb9470a
ac9b53d923c6ffb55a94c58fcd350d71cdd58f52
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCR' 'sip-files00258.txt'
d1c42b3751c4c1b174750d145e1b5d00
de69c2fc6613e7950eeab4a5d72bb37125ad5046
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCS' 'sip-files00259.txt'
2933627109e952af7e3f4372ff678a75
168736cab064751cfbed67c538447e4bb5769693
'2011-11-15T03:55:53-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCT' 'sip-files00260.txt'
ff9d7a42f90270813bbb44cf6b476bee
886abb5d35b55153ff03f2d095a2b21e1ba3fbc1
'2011-11-15T03:58:01-05:00'
describe
'1885' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCU' 'sip-files00261.txt'
c06f066f0e8979dbaf4d0848b9b24da7
2862b3b996413a47aed4eab96dfd87cf8ab9bab7
describe
'1613' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCV' 'sip-files00262.txt'
5a84e40dfb8af638d0d0b0f443cfc4ae
7ad562d76e31086160bd8cb6832caa2a70a1d441
'2011-11-15T03:57:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCW' 'sip-files00263.txt'
1528ccc1aac2061b08b444dcd4615238
75a60b098ae543aa138e81d824a9828211df5939
describe
'1852' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCX' 'sip-files00264.txt'
f745d6e19b2432e3acc4c1c1b1ac7867
046af740b6f46fe81321a16b1ad08d7603a72889
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCY' 'sip-files00265.txt'
6020e279c483197943630fc39604ebbe
d902bc16e574464ef76b88a1a7cc8ec2f0188f21
describe
'1806' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOCZ' 'sip-files00266.txt'
7283e476a158b9db4f1f215d1610b24c
4bad8bcfe20fcc7b15fdc42795b8bfdd4e76dafd
describe
'1875' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODA' 'sip-files00267.txt'
f9a15a2f0ddb6906b58c18e12ac9e5d3
e37769148dc1c1236ab6653625bb38bb8b94c5d5
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODB' 'sip-files00268.txt'
f20da7f0cfdceabaf5e7b2e54513f075
148d0f0249bebee55f3e0823053a5491582f1ea9
'2011-11-15T04:02:23-05:00'
describe
'1787' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODC' 'sip-files00269.txt'
4804c438ff54bb41248a00abce0a8c91
13d0876c1a8a681bbe7c9e8634f9d0b8aa3b3789
describe
'1527' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODD' 'sip-files00270.txt'
c4a85b9992e8f6b5845f6d3c7ddfa9d8
24a62ef13104934973230c54d2f2d49bbadc0781
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODE' 'sip-files00271.txt'
1fe17505ee90de777ee6ba5b5ecbdb61
e81312fa076553b599b0dcc06a1b2cfcb7f23174
'2011-11-15T03:58:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODF' 'sip-files00272.txt'
afa23359db9e4a5ecfbc936520b94d6d
4ba477050d0f223224d1f3910c15d81e074823ad
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODG' 'sip-files00273.txt'
5d0a2e702366103e3bd74c1d2f293fb6
66169ccf77dd4ca722292487bcb0a483bc75c829
'2011-11-15T04:01:41-05:00'
describe
'1526' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODH' 'sip-files00274.txt'
13e12ca1fec877e99931889f4d567294
3b276cdb2255f9a48cea3f37f105953c819a042b
'2011-11-15T03:58:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODI' 'sip-files00275.txt'
53e85dbf91567f584994e18558be7200
102b50dc2dc7515fe7e67898468e42a591f167f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODJ' 'sip-files00276.txt'
b982b1b3446df9ef296052880a271648
c8a102cfe475431d40ddab4dee5e268a769d7f85
'2011-11-15T04:03:04-05:00'
describe
'1800' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODK' 'sip-files00277.txt'
8587db6ddc536aa376aba82a8db8d49b
2ab83ed45cac1106e5608ec79b997c2d2fe27602
'2011-11-15T04:01:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODL' 'sip-files00278.txt'
9835cb869e6e059ba1a203de5c53a835
d6990978e5db917dfb7723dfb8f6718edb87018e
describe
'180' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODM' 'sip-files00279.txt'
822accfbcb2780b6167d72d9eee20f6e
bc047e9a76da962a996734c5c464cbe584b66c34
describe
'1796' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODN' 'sip-files00281.txt'
226fda6244eb8c59eb2e664a3f6c8c0c
f5e3a73bbd00920caa7638ee913e5dd54a83a2d0
'2011-11-15T04:02:55-05:00'
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODO' 'sip-files00282.txt'
33ce835a6b3f9c2b3f153cc13c53c08f
730a82bb2b7cceb95a96e10e6acff3ebf958b342
'2011-11-15T04:03:27-05:00'
describe
'1660' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODP' 'sip-files00283.txt'
035a0fa3335ee4244572e4ac6336213e
dc38cc29d00fa60e262f90f7dcdd62710d12168b
'2011-11-15T03:59:39-05:00'
describe
'1772' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODQ' 'sip-files00284.txt'
17f48f4b33a5729b1a8e74d89f1acb43
dc297b71d197fba10a75100e3c5eeb3afd622b0e
describe
'1810' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODR' 'sip-files00285.txt'
cef494f9a6af7197a7e670b5c7e16855
599979e16fb8ac2135dc7c45ed659969b9b85429
'2011-11-15T03:59:48-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'886' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODS' 'sip-files00286.txt'
1c93f33068585dc03ff9eaf00157280b
f110ad539f6d43cb6e622015f476b3ff257810c3
'2011-11-15T04:03:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODT' 'sip-files00287.txt'
2731b3a79c2d92561bb98ffcd30c41a6
3dea44e5771ac2908c7902af882e74f2ab19884b
'2011-11-15T03:57:37-05:00'
describe
'601' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODU' 'sip-files00288.txt'
54ec7881e58b43c3759ef94f53024048
ca110ed06cad51b0ae7b8590ca1f977513b36444
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODV' 'sip-files00290.txt'
0bc326b44701ba7e8f7fced05eb0c130
9ca80347fdcd18f93ef0ea5375f265e33b863343
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODW' 'sip-files00291.txt'
38d7f8dae333dd9c229a7ddd9d8db9e5
c30796e2a9c8790c0e266acf011d42abf2a20f7f
'2011-11-15T03:59:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODX' 'sip-files00292.txt'
bb11a011ee1ec487169f0f2fa7bc0225
ba944a04589160375b8f3f6f264af20fc971c990
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODY' 'sip-files00293.txt'
28c18ff632a94c7b8bf3c781f74a2108
540f576ed9d9c1a0835b9ff00fb2c77b5dd54cc9
describe
'1692' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAODZ' 'sip-files00294.txt'
95a01537fa5ba7761fce9cc9d6ca6b04
8523d6d692efa398a39f5ccc7782f02a9befbe0f
'2011-11-15T03:56:20-05:00'
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEA' 'sip-files00295.txt'
6ecc8659f85efc1b4c5bb4fe0b871544
70fd740b4d46d5ec5eb2779814db2299825427ed
'2011-11-15T04:03:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEB' 'sip-files00296.txt'
3576bd92d17349576cc30048e1ac7acd
f2922a8b971500be9317edb31d4443511a85c593
'2011-11-15T04:00:39-05:00'
describe
'1670' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEC' 'sip-files00297.txt'
3abf06b9b237c48c78726a433085eec9
db6b318fe2a7e5df6fea8c13d51b99b336154691
'2011-11-15T03:56:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOED' 'sip-files00298.txt'
a81984a6388846edcb1d78e8a9b2afb0
5527b911fa468513ac4113d4b872c0102377d709
'2011-11-15T03:56:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEE' 'sip-files00299.txt'
7cf0ae2182dd29bdab70e51fd385e4bc
4f167f9443e99686614c79a228f8cbc6b8309136
describe
'1818' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEF' 'sip-files00300.txt'
81f59552159c37ea2520e6f1a40141d9
33c03b11a093eb3557ee62fb54f37d7981c4ad92
'2011-11-15T03:55:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEG' 'sip-files00301.txt'
fde7482f6876a40885fc7ccb729736dc
7debbc1b6357c864cdaa25ef1af8ddf2c25faff6
describe
'1720' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEH' 'sip-files00302.txt'
27f633568a67bd6272bc49f358c21f73
8f246ae6718845c0abf54c2659f82abd4bd6f3e4
describe
'1804' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEI' 'sip-files00303.txt'
ab1b9bf38a4272e3a20c54b91b97015b
1a385c4eacf31f9d75d494780481bb888bc038a0
'2011-11-15T03:54:38-05:00'
describe
'1373' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEJ' 'sip-files00304.txt'
c287d7c580323613c56bdd7790ad4219
9254632295b40e8906eeed815144162c99790108
describe
'1736' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEK' 'sip-files00305.txt'
1d20e4193e08fae32064536dc63cd591
1615c7f5e0aa0622cee5b5c2946704aba3908e0c
'2011-11-15T03:54:52-05:00'
describe
'1798' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEL' 'sip-files00306.txt'
59786636c6a24a924199bb8b4131b30e
a9b1b4cd71f457427ea71ee0cf7362bdeb3232b5
'2011-11-15T04:00:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEM' 'sip-files00307.txt'
861de2121c14c427afc7e76676d0929e
01af875cd15424e600fd9808aac8344d570aaf61
'2011-11-15T04:04:08-05:00'
describe
'1681' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEN' 'sip-files00308.txt'
0b62d03d2058508d000bc9cde6ddf2ff
9764cfa81c76b6f7c0513acf06b8346b6b2f3e33
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEO' 'sip-files00309.txt'
15ab4f1fa766fbf414904d981a725d5a
fdc73f0af16edd602e023a31fb81a3269da488b2
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEP' 'sip-files00310.txt'
521c1d89192579a67f596f0e5c4f507e
9c821e08ec487fc9471605bf7343f0830b655460
'2011-11-15T03:55:05-05:00'
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEQ' 'sip-files00311.txt'
62aa33621f3613f252b04ec41b07e466
45fa7459f3b6ae309c2497d0f5493fdeb1638ddf
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOER' 'sip-files00312.txt'
7cb458c3f2ea1f7a311f6335b53521e4
82b1fc549c6451e3be7e7844cdde82b46f78947a
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOES' 'sip-files00313.txt'
77e399e3b930f9b47ec5cc47beed346c
2211043335182ff49c90f2b60362aba5e7b819d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOET' 'sip-files00314.txt'
f08ab75078c048a3d2000e026a5d818c
8737c2e71fb7c978b728407889caddf066456c55
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEU' 'sip-files00315.txt'
69dc36ac49a28a24ac7cbaabd9544c3d
b8a191c3ddd2711383bf955d04900aa5ac20a193
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEV' 'sip-files00316.txt'
7ce2074a75c4ba53c236feebfe182681
7837940977163cc20bca5358e6fe236880fff279
'2011-11-15T04:03:39-05:00'
describe
'1828' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEW' 'sip-files00317.txt'
a5a64098c5ed30ad8016e5c1b921f071
11aec838d550f108cf49a8c2a5cf18becaaa77d8
'2011-11-15T03:57:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEX' 'sip-files00318.txt'
e058923645c0e8a6567581835d65dd52
7010320971b5c228e27dacd79a8dcb1bb7a6fa54
'2011-11-15T03:55:45-05:00'
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEY' 'sip-files00319.txt'
862f10f9979e914748af0be34e39adc0
7fbbeeff13cfc8a5cf037f2435a07dafa3e2f02b
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOEZ' 'sip-files00322.txt'
2ddc6df372cf789fc58e19f2caa41519
cab7cc1739acda79f513463e140e7ab5d2244494
'2011-11-15T03:56:11-05:00'
describe
'1771' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFA' 'sip-files00323.txt'
f3aea05cb8b524c9be40c5dde7e3c4a9
e159fef58d1a24fd17f67458f8b336113d892486
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFB' 'sip-files00324.txt'
4669becb54850341034d641a90ba38ac
e04f6901f1fc3c1e109831f760860038681c853b
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFC' 'sip-files00325.txt'
36c80c3b4ef8a1931b334fabb31816a5
01bbb6b388c12214056b2bfe234917a17f805650
'2011-11-15T04:03:28-05:00'
describe
'158' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFD' 'sip-files00326.txt'
ba76ca0908d9e41e50b18b7e5bdbfde8
2fee54d076feef07267ea1817cb9ebd5f264bb00
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFE' 'sip-files00327.txt'
f7c1383d2bae390ef7447f2e844d40d4
fb95c0f5a0cdd29df771ecc16ff48a536ae46a9d
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFF' 'sip-files00329.txt'
73314dda88e066be2972cac0bfcbd7f8
f76dfad53de5814bd847d03c6e76de9fe1ec435c
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFG' 'sip-files00330.txt'
4f118ca731a5d4599d466a0d003df6cb
79cbecd5046d48df4d7b5beae5909e2c579a457e
'2011-11-15T03:58:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFH' 'sip-files00331.txt'
83aa54c1cec8740966374fbe443809f9
d70347b7cf3db42b20032341d4aaa35b10b0ce49
describe
'1550' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFI' 'sip-files00332.txt'
5b0bf303f07a2c12ca272f5c90c3bf17
91bdd029ca1743ecb2e3c1b49355158b81d60cad
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFJ' 'sip-files00333.txt'
32f21bfb066d44598ba2e919eecc9bf4
08a4b7f46ddaa17d1f8355b42c5ed0ffc6f2f2e7
describe
'1735' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFK' 'sip-files00334.txt'
dc0a55dd268bf1428c8470e248bfaebd
9da6a307d10c8dcfd40442d1f8f4fbb746678784
'2011-11-15T04:00:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFL' 'sip-files00335.txt'
5b55d7e8028a4aca135411d8da00b861
2149097ba35238e02542b3ec468c9a8419139f55
'2011-11-15T03:59:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFM' 'sip-files00336.txt'
a7976afee9eea3d5ee16d7ca1999589e
6dcf665dfe945e3bdc41c61be5b2c68c1c517323
'2011-11-15T04:01:59-05:00'
describe
'1758' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFN' 'sip-files00337.txt'
19b58c0b01de6cfef5cee1b2e904f536
87bce74f9a79bc291a7328c2724b811bd96dee62
'2011-11-15T03:56:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFO' 'sip-files00338.txt'
849e16b6a0433c8bb129ceff1b2fa40b
f90046e9aab18367583a1eebe0cde1ff962cc7ca
describe
'1520' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFP' 'sip-files00339.txt'
5aa0acd5fe6c4201b1bab4f3491f1b73
7a0ea8a943d1c1337b1acdaa0097901152876137
'2011-11-15T03:55:55-05:00'
describe
'1851' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFQ' 'sip-files00340.txt'
d8920e4176ac7c73fe98b0d89ac44bcc
383123ab89f40d8f5c32a63b74590257e2f324d0
describe
'810' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFR' 'sip-files00341.txt'
873dbbb65e17d139eee97b2bb38eb791
b28180ea0961fa4bbff6ff7efa2ab89e111e56a3
'2011-11-15T03:57:20-05:00'
describe
'1719' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFS' 'sip-files00342.txt'
cf113d53a21932aa894ed7f919bcf819
d2e63ae122830a490c5798a33ac5c70e5f23bcdc
'2011-11-15T03:58:31-05:00'
describe
'1553' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFT' 'sip-files00343.txt'
83b626a24e106c9e62825875200b39b6
b9499a35cfb2581fc4fd9b1ad68e9c16c871c861
'2011-11-15T04:03:07-05:00'
describe
'1588' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFU' 'sip-files00344.txt'
b6e4df230cdf0a6926fe13273e525e84
875458292e2d91fb8139cc31985dfeb55b299041
'2011-11-15T03:54:48-05:00'
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFV' 'sip-files00345.txt'
ca0b0d6b16b551cf818bb4b0a2bdf1fd
8766569455e832b33b4ae5cd83e5ae0bbc7cead6
'2011-11-15T03:59:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFW' 'sip-files00346.txt'
04b713497a72d1c0196d4be22cc5d9cb
35b5be17042b52efe326f2cd241246f558e4d5e6
'2011-11-15T03:56:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFX' 'sip-files00347.txt'
495c76a380e9a7230ca8cdbe94b2dee2
672d4f2c7153d986166c65c4f7fad6afbc82fac8
'2011-11-15T04:00:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFY' 'sip-files00348.txt'
3eb2add31cdccfed43302cefc676dd70
14f32b2a4aca5f2698f809d195b9a1c763fc84b2
'2011-11-15T04:01:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOFZ' 'sip-files00349.txt'
56f98321613f96cd944c330f3dfc39e5
2c725c21086d85c94326818bf536d06d4fd9a7af
'2011-11-15T04:04:05-05:00'
describe
'1759' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGA' 'sip-files00350.txt'
8a61330afdafe9f54e596a882e8a3f62
70f2c886aa98de855a8d79ba45dc634f4c92b879
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGB' 'sip-files00351.txt'
8866b8ecb0555d3714e6101068eb25a2
01135f616403c85381a2798584f1aa8671ab8eb5
describe
'1713' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGC' 'sip-files00352.txt'
537359fc2859e849972b209ed35b6376
6405e3502b539a3a86501c8e78aee43321e9ade9
'2011-11-15T04:00:57-05:00'
describe
'1739' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGD' 'sip-files00353.txt'
e309fc4e789c75ae6e55d8598ea5708d
3af2ffb71f1755fa53d7296214760503d4924aac
'2011-11-15T04:04:09-05:00'
describe
'658' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGE' 'sip-files00354.txt'
6ea85397431e4ea1111b4e3b57244ae9
04d0ca6ba27ea3248ab815775427a9c9351bac53
'2011-11-15T03:56:16-05:00'
describe
'41' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGF' 'sip-files00359.txt'
69754f39e21b35cc06285b42da1baf15
95750293dc87fce13ec24f10b9a2eb008f110e2b
'2011-11-15T03:59:25-05:00'
describe
'8325' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGG' 'sip-files00000.pro'
ad18885a839139f35378d81c88a60009
b11cfc8193309e72fa3cf34ad3048cebdc20cb32
describe
'6474' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGH' 'sip-files00007.pro'
85b0e3e70e7778b0d54199aca0e0fcfc
a8d7cb750abbf5b6df316b9a2ac312a884ea4e0a
'2011-11-15T04:01:12-05:00'
describe
'8044' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGI' 'sip-files00009.pro'
02b75477af6c3541c4172613201abc45
e28c86e3d5e5b47bb66f689d42746478bbe69f3d
'2011-11-15T03:56:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGJ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
736f0d846ba3b22ba9c39a7ee7bc7a2b
881bd9a38687eb15e34429424b02b93dbeced4a0
'2011-11-15T03:58:15-05:00'
describe
'19389' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGK' 'sip-files00013.pro'
0a6e17fe3803a1494573d43e1934c67d
ad22a72de6e8204bd2a67a2f043e30226929bf4a
describe
'43322' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGL' 'sip-files00014.pro'
3de95f637c3d5ea7792a52595498aca5
4638bd2a65bd2c9e125d15650e3e8cd724400942
'2011-11-15T03:58:23-05:00'
describe
'43341' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGM' 'sip-files00015.pro'
2c2ef07e618ea3693edcf757d40c7fc8
a4826641437bd5b15fe50300e63dbf7dc3b1996a
describe
'43280' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGN' 'sip-files00016.pro'
2430b447e235f1617ce86058e57d73ce
7049faafadde7a0cd9ed7527b6ab311e42318acf
'2011-11-15T03:57:15-05:00'
describe
'41146' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGO' 'sip-files00017.pro'
ab1106278337e306dba349cdd0766764
5b4e68a6034c281f2cf435290bbd57b34014a905
describe
'41276' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGP' 'sip-files00018.pro'
80f4b04e6c535697bcb871fd3eb04c26
d28f733e5cb1bc0711186b7e16466c2d5877c15d
describe
'40703' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGQ' 'sip-files00019.pro'
5f27375da1c40d087f2732ae1c0066bf
2c3416462e35147e91361d27e87e36eea1cac444
'2011-11-15T04:03:02-05:00'
describe
'45967' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGR' 'sip-files00020.pro'
f121498e309555a09e2db3d0725218be
71a83918d44d3832ffdbcff5acec58a24b84b166
'2011-11-15T03:57:04-05:00'
describe
'44338' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGS' 'sip-files00021.pro'
394bd3dcc6120e411ae4645d47bfe573
bb38305092c64cfb5ed759097f319aa3b1fd0aeb
'2011-11-15T03:56:18-05:00'
describe
'44704' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGT' 'sip-files00022.pro'
cb8755d261ba1a881ab890da3b8199a6
376d2bfbcd0e0ed46f04a39478cf75ed212a233c
describe
'44397' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGU' 'sip-files00023.pro'
46110a29130515bff0551cccace647a7
2e7d6fb2bbfa784a08c5258c46016d7d717e3af8
describe
'44605' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGV' 'sip-files00024.pro'
8ea89f23bcf76b35aff0a9480567fdb4
e66859ea850dfaf3baef15d961511ce7cd8ed7d5
describe
'44296' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGW' 'sip-files00025.pro'
d7f5c1c63a960966e207a16dfada3f32
85ea48bdf41f617f5dfd241d47679dcefd48f99a
describe
'39677' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
67643f2b1e2c236247c9eafee39fae63
1b9f54590b8f4f8a27d7705e675f92fc323b46a8
describe
'42607' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGY' 'sip-files00027.pro'
17b49021701c52f6d4a600af165c702d
7e41f1cbe211ae5c2168f9b9ca66c1124d832fce
describe
'43831' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOGZ' 'sip-files00028.pro'
f57385c1a3a8cd899de61fe9a824dcd3
a2469b5eb03c368058b3cfd5c59a8f262f484c48
describe
'16834' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHA' 'sip-files00029.pro'
05be8c485910e0cc5d159a82b7255830
b71e728b8ab8b585bc421bb2d520a7f552a59877
describe
'44848' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHB' 'sip-files00030.pro'
12a94ee99dc39583f8165c3c79fceace
3349ba2ab6a9ccc8a1ee4b249165637e2ee19847
'2011-11-15T03:59:02-05:00'
describe
'43620' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHC' 'sip-files00031.pro'
ba1dca1b6dafcbf9fc773922e00b21b3
4257b68db4978e3b1e93c9e1cd300213024ef1f1
describe
'43785' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHD' 'sip-files00032.pro'
46bd577d0dcb75933bd8740958b713df
07385e04b71fbabaffbd46d46cc1de62d38acda8
'2011-11-15T04:03:50-05:00'
describe
'44629' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHE' 'sip-files00033.pro'
2b2fdc80a7535b4250f8e452461f52b8
fe049a03edefc0ede20c1c17b4467a07d2f61542
'2011-11-15T03:59:28-05:00'
describe
'44126' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHF' 'sip-files00034.pro'
c751c37d48b13ede2ed61433d36e2f99
1f82f491063f76e9ba62e015192af1cde042f07c
'2011-11-15T03:57:19-05:00'
describe
'38765' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHG' 'sip-files00035.pro'
64aec2204af0f1f65fa8cab5b80c806a
dad15dae9d19c96ae9fe6a72975cde2897a2a372
describe
'44362' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHH' 'sip-files00036.pro'
d97bbe613c3be5e0b5b9e73a8864486b
1b80327527fb8ca25161fa0784d46adea85652cb
'2011-11-15T03:59:36-05:00'
describe
'555' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHI' 'sip-files00037.pro'
0b53e51ab89c50513454701a1b40a28b
27a942ff3fcee1914851a918940dfa2ecd427d5d
'2011-11-15T03:58:27-05:00'
describe
'40975' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHJ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
dccb509313c4fbc7a826508dde1d5a16
e0bfee522b736b15659897cc32eede256db72a19
describe
'43466' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHK' 'sip-files00040.pro'
548e289b860198f597ca3488146d0094
3fa7e87f92ce36bf8a7f3f65b0103ed3a7a8b3c9
describe
'44884' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHL' 'sip-files00041.pro'
89018d0d3afe79f66c9a00d759d8495b
54a2be843b983c7e56414fabd54f55fd560e6601
'2011-11-15T04:01:49-05:00'
describe
'41759' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHM' 'sip-files00042.pro'
90a67f9ad95782a0ca882244637b3c71
6b6c3b35c39b4037d35c971634c2039b57c16d70
describe
'39940' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHN' 'sip-files00043.pro'
871478f10af548778120e61e72f0ec56
1198b2e1046ea442c06be2a04e759e4aa7dbdf29
'2011-11-15T03:58:41-05:00'
describe
'36307' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHO' 'sip-files00044.pro'
ade3b98e8c7576bb8fa8e812430fab2e
c984210b3458f1ae1837520a500bb2103c7726f3
'2011-11-15T04:04:18-05:00'
describe
'40255' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHP' 'sip-files00045.pro'
14120cd157b172314a82079bd776cb01
40cbf6cf0407ef803e05694cd99a22e5c37d5b35
'2011-11-15T03:54:57-05:00'
describe
'42985' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHQ' 'sip-files00046.pro'
ae1706fdc904e65a6071d74974cd1c75
4d7a8270b8a6701019304d165ee3addd3b31253d
'2011-11-15T03:55:17-05:00'
describe
'42540' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHR' 'sip-files00047.pro'
5c1d68b1ab6c23b7d51949540f7168c6
0285f525de08673138f679f5833d4d53b06efa00
'2011-11-15T04:04:04-05:00'
describe
'44502' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHS' 'sip-files00048.pro'
c750b39680e2aa99937a864253a4a5bd
8737b413cb289e4589df2b7f1fdd6a36181cc1d1
'2011-11-15T03:58:51-05:00'
describe
'44159' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHT' 'sip-files00049.pro'
049e0f14ad7a4fc915e6d437f008ca60
47612fec467caf7dbd8d3dbb3698b1e03e24979b
describe
'44727' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHU' 'sip-files00050.pro'
74530c8c4aae897f0df345f3b9500964
bdd4468483c3563c1e33f5e25433bed0fb063dca
'2011-11-15T03:56:25-05:00'
describe
'35935' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHV' 'sip-files00051.pro'
9a3d7cb57bb72ab3a5d6f386a38c43fc
357fab0e5db0b08c7748ec9d66a260125506fb44
describe
'40799' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHW' 'sip-files00052.pro'
385e4cff4cd15877526e25147c381d19
e3a510655ac1dc0c6dfc0d8dfe8875d06a712d81
describe
'41305' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHX' 'sip-files00053.pro'
5bfc00a4f3536325cbbfa0f85cd97ac3
d977bee0cd25eee5595dc391a1a8b823adf7197d
describe
'41438' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHY' 'sip-files00054.pro'
0f22e83ef71a21894f5b71784dc88455
2c9551b51d811ab3fc45de238c6c1bfc0d0a198d
'2011-11-15T04:00:59-05:00'
describe
'41410' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOHZ' 'sip-files00055.pro'
1a2f1bedd7117b4a63844411fa71f1e4
ee3f20b4e69ba34a9de02744126cca3c1da56ff3
'2011-11-15T03:54:55-05:00'
describe
'36506' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIA' 'sip-files00056.pro'
54ea4502a6d6c226cbe21cdc2f0f6085
6d16b05b130d3c7f5a02205b353253220aad7cd5
'2011-11-15T04:04:20-05:00'
describe
'39523' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIB' 'sip-files00057.pro'
558e82000b2fe228ba93dc06a14513d5
2a0e6b2c1bbfde8f52098778fa985a204ab15723
'2011-11-15T03:58:26-05:00'
describe
'16656' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIC' 'sip-files00058.pro'
1571f1cef0d2d6658201d10b2cacd270
7e41f8160f0bc16f8c60ea8c33aa23feca279dfa
describe
'863' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOID' 'sip-files00060.pro'
568234ea4ea71549dc7e36c62ac9e505
aaceade28617fcf66748513ea518c7e8ec2ae37b
describe
'21373' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIE' 'sip-files00061.pro'
e4b7a4d9aeb5df566df8f7422a2e4a60
f1873ff9f0423e0ef74fb9836506f69e4ff3b731
describe
'43299' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
33abcc738740bfbffa14b20a97f96e74
67791cfa663b36ab5613e848ba4d0759e89b701b
'2011-11-15T03:59:34-05:00'
describe
'41030' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIG' 'sip-files00063.pro'
46bc99ff14d9e18d724cc9bb9511e297
fe5c69a0beb2f44dd0a7d00f83489b5e704082f9
'2011-11-15T03:56:38-05:00'
describe
'42351' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIH' 'sip-files00064.pro'
87c102c77e888df9632ee2979f0121ae
d4bc3207b96d85c2d1b42b1410f55efff95da1ba
'2011-11-15T03:56:53-05:00'
describe
'41430' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOII' 'sip-files00065.pro'
4776f2eb39b4c5bb5eeb7b70355f3678
8522aba0516e36636511c1eef34fe759c7c8a71b
'2011-11-15T04:03:40-05:00'
describe
'14559' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIJ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
4f421ddeca0c62cefe34ea6b8af9719d
50ec2276cbd94399537148539a05133d72c59cfe
'2011-11-15T03:59:44-05:00'
describe
'43969' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIK' 'sip-files00067.pro'
1f5ad8a9a8cb3dc6a218f9b303f434b0
409bb6614e07ff658c58bd7396cb1afa90f5b587
describe
'40865' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIL' 'sip-files00068.pro'
1937de0a8dea36eb1a6c84105a5b6bad
7a03e124b7d18b35c765addf457b2b2fd3415887
describe
'42213' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIM' 'sip-files00069.pro'
c3e9f3bd1c833e9184cf149dcd2538be
cfa0b7b3d6660cb3e8adb9ee2f8fd0f7d9119017
describe
'34353' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIN' 'sip-files00070.pro'
20c548b7c42feb4d08fb5d55e3eb4a9f
5b1d682d8bed4dfafc2b2cab6d62d23828b75650
describe
'42267' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIO' 'sip-files00071.pro'
66af71779c54a6ce474381ac589af804
beb52dcd918073bd2969da4ba33657821c64d444
'2011-11-15T04:00:17-05:00'
describe
'41751' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIP' 'sip-files00072.pro'
d9e9ac3330fdf120dbf34a330fc128fe
c0e0317beacc14b4bd74521c955ca90f548e65a5
'2011-11-15T04:04:15-05:00'
describe
'42129' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIQ' 'sip-files00073.pro'
396b96846e206679a8d79c336ae34ce8
aca1378bca90438187189b33ab9ec3aaf650287a
describe
'41733' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIR' 'sip-files00074.pro'
b6a90a17d461ebbf68d8587c1a79d23f
92debb0e113214f1326a2c976236533134f7b155
describe
'41936' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIS' 'sip-files00075.pro'
5d8116724ccd1fabf7902a1e6d4f41e8
c819daa3a8b0cbb8451454128c1c34f00ea033a3
describe
'40854' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIT' 'sip-files00076.pro'
3834313ce0abf5c3b34ff2c2d161269f
9a0a300d0d6aa9a6c5599f13a9db7e1f98d433d1
'2011-11-15T03:57:41-05:00'
describe
'42550' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIU' 'sip-files00077.pro'
7154f13e6f148b1a512eeb887ea6b197
cbfe11477c0591cc126108ffe600d9d1598573a4
'2011-11-15T04:03:09-05:00'
describe
'38105' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIV' 'sip-files00078.pro'
ac3b53ce150c42538524de7c1e52bda1
8852007784516acb3c8e23595adbf97a78f3576b
'2011-11-15T03:55:25-05:00'
describe
'42958' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIW' 'sip-files00079.pro'
698b2004c9b588a0c0687bbf7fe73b20
bf24a91f6a6f03af29fdae1a59c31d3ded7175ef
'2011-11-15T03:59:54-05:00'
describe
'42406' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIX' 'sip-files00080.pro'
004bd0c5098f8e83f54107b5b4147f7e
84b9c6799d415430c8d3c1ce086cda28a04fb8a5
describe
'41031' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIY' 'sip-files00081.pro'
fd094c3620cb9906eeb12f876b85f9bd
8f444ac6c63695c44f56aee194f86c8c0c471ca5
describe
'40845' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOIZ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
62fadc423de8334f191bccb302f14d0c
d456008980209de6b90d39ac132d5e328e60e396
'2011-11-15T03:59:40-05:00'
describe
'38934' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJA' 'sip-files00083.pro'
1d9e0ef0b06a42d6113e0dd32328c514
7f4373d6e6eefa5e8bff1c63993ba30d380ed088
describe
'40775' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJB' 'sip-files00084.pro'
e874e2a0a1c9924d74c7e4665426a7b7
f799635a8191366ba99784cbb92a5b7bcb84d658
'2011-11-15T04:02:56-05:00'
describe
'3516' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJC' 'sip-files00085.pro'
5786afe72ce11a0e79230f2ec364062c
85dcafd3ca6e0fddf66fc1ee618e14ca36b07e78
'2011-11-15T04:03:53-05:00'
describe
'43021' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJD' 'sip-files00087.pro'
bba162574d496a23084e95097d60f4a0
beb4f91f1cee6c615972b2e41795e6a05dca675f
'2011-11-15T03:59:41-05:00'
describe
'41770' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJE' 'sip-files00088.pro'
733c65f4dd037e26a06cc8d71d09a62f
47240da71e22a654b75547605de736bcef07a7b9
describe
'35387' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJF' 'sip-files00089.pro'
a1057f8ad5cd4fef33f78d752602b675
d0ac383094a8f8067d76ac0e1b2a176bab79144a
'2011-11-15T03:57:50-05:00'
describe
'41361' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJG' 'sip-files00090.pro'
2f315960236d159081b6b5756a4b598b
68ca02f575d1c41d6783bd8cf84a26b910844215
'2011-11-15T04:01:48-05:00'
describe
'44699' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJH' 'sip-files00091.pro'
342bb5b4450ac29f893a6d1a019366ba
3ce69f6a2c48ee4231ff9eb4e74127836f3857fb
'2011-11-15T04:00:29-05:00'
describe
'41195' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJI' 'sip-files00092.pro'
dfe04f084665d5ac046e77643fdbb6ff
88addc17c722d80dda857ab6a533ca83a30ca7ec
'2011-11-15T03:56:19-05:00'
describe
'42059' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJJ' 'sip-files00093.pro'
53cc3666ca9130b8e5ea4f62d535f85b
89612136357a31efc1a81f111fb0b74c866840d5
describe
'41695' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJK' 'sip-files00094.pro'
ee548c01709d44d4ec492ebaedc2b65d
ed195c7f97366e6c01c9d50f3d3a51bda7481d89
'2011-11-15T03:56:45-05:00'
describe
'42257' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJL' 'sip-files00095.pro'
9d3a55384dcde550508b34933d05b444
275cfc40856943879d3af7c17464cd821fed6683
describe
'35872' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJM' 'sip-files00096.pro'
db558964f9f56a8538cd044fc128cc24
b36525bb8cfcbe4b8d15ee1ed2eda635c2d33e5b
describe
'40821' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJN' 'sip-files00097.pro'
7a634dcae5f0a139a5dae87d90169be8
11032e28f3173e791733ba7f68bd4407ef925f13
'2011-11-15T03:57:52-05:00'
describe
'41745' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJO' 'sip-files00098.pro'
17b345ad75085e553db6a40b3e0fce85
525cc7515e0dfdd2a40906dc9214dd7ae3ce8c31
describe
'40445' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJP' 'sip-files00099.pro'
1ba194cfbf1e5eabdb792ab9bbf99d39
f28d902d5aac193da67ad3e4722d4230a34ab9e0
describe
'39801' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJQ' 'sip-files00100.pro'
1636741a7d27da405a23133b082f8f54
00465be8d309de66a4fab4aea2842018de0373a4
describe
'41338' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJR' 'sip-files00101.pro'
6439c6a18c4b433ca16f19d5b02e36b9
6ab7b40a4d34cf0ed03d4acb28ae4d797cbc8266
'2011-11-15T03:58:39-05:00'
describe
'42870' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJS' 'sip-files00102.pro'
529511e49be9ca613e378c3d739cfe23
7ec4d3a229d4a9795a6f16714f645920db33286f
describe
'41545' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJT' 'sip-files00103.pro'
b0389d129d2b292d33097275f6d70f9d
02ab68aef6af989fbb8d0df0afa7cddbc6c681ee
describe
'27322' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJU' 'sip-files00104.pro'
bd3ed634a62b07522990922e01273937
a692694234b54f1bb8feebecfdd71564fc6743fc
describe
'6045' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJV' 'sip-files00106.pro'
9bce0b6717bdb4f500011ed0018bc2e1
98266b6a24d156c0cf127ebe2bb4443a6e8ae5d3
describe
'18303' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJW' 'sip-files00107.pro'
8765e86bec658d3e3d923fbf1a302ce8
d358674b60d053743ae5109276d8081a0d1ae08d
describe
'40776' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJX' 'sip-files00108.pro'
a67232aea1a5888d988ac4d3cf229d3c
be19c3261faa8caec667b1f4879878d5050abdb8
describe
'41774' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJY' 'sip-files00109.pro'
297fa4edab48a5ec2e85fffe4c3e758b
a49e0af751dae27b64ae08d93af243a6ba6ab1eb
describe
'36914' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOJZ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
6ff0c696c051402f0a03c3fdf3e83fe3
77489de5875ebd97f6255c3f6665051e87c5b1be
describe
'36870' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKA' 'sip-files00111.pro'
e707aec46f06682613ab6e78d3b31bd7
4f9c11f3aed103ce4b9c2aec45280fa550136a37
describe
'38075' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKB' 'sip-files00112.pro'
e189d6d889c45e9511cfe776df0ab3bd
bbe3b1c43a979cbeb271cc04e2bf4de792064656
'2011-11-15T03:56:34-05:00'
describe
'38993' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKC' 'sip-files00113.pro'
7ae6b13d9ba312e5dff3d1cf055b275d
5e131a4ab426acf5e6bc50ff4ce99983be997207
describe
'40266' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKD' 'sip-files00114.pro'
70e1f70c8bbe21f8828fb7c5a064dfbe
1f3a8bc38b96b66749bf2c8b94dc0fb808d6cdc7
describe
'42618' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKE' 'sip-files00115.pro'
598c3f3071c470aec6f2fcee1abafef5
78ea6c2d43094ff95fd69caddb82d2ba0b3e19f7
describe
'42160' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKF' 'sip-files00116.pro'
3cb38a2b693023ba9fd2f8ab7077509b
0713ddea801a28479f15ca98f48e73d288757b6e
'2011-11-15T03:56:41-05:00'
describe
'41937' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKG' 'sip-files00117.pro'
bf1cdecf682012e80d9dd6eba4f21e43
df96d63bf3b7daec03a1a093622cdc3089552b39
describe
'35736' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKH' 'sip-files00118.pro'
093d8a2a7e927dc8c877f0a6c0a1153a
7f8a27f5f4929e7f36fb09322aa68856342d6baf
describe
'39655' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKI' 'sip-files00119.pro'
e7d2ea53b0a0e116ad896994883839fa
d3bdc39bbdaba27582447fe8065726364495e8f6
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKJ' 'sip-files00120.pro'
5df9cef849dfba758a3be2a00df27424
185574e43f740be3a03353cb691f62ee71e48f7b
describe
'40485' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKK' 'sip-files00121.pro'
8fc6d2f037784143630dc4c6f688b4ff
8e42dc2f9088a6cc28a78c4394995bad477c2ad9
describe
'39568' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKL' 'sip-files00122.pro'
7114740ec832da2d7414c9d4bd4f25eb
c7d24359ef9da83fcf97ef1cd7325fab07fac182
'2011-11-15T03:55:26-05:00'
describe
'16301' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKM' 'sip-files00123.pro'
9708c935bab73a0ee7831e68989cdea2
5a845ae80b67e38624fe6268be94b9962c3a5724
'2011-11-15T04:02:46-05:00'
describe
'35943' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKN' 'sip-files00124.pro'
bc9ec2044e3c97b804d672a2a264bf52
9158f80265ac204c5c97d3123909efd019ee112b
describe
'35166' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKO' 'sip-files00125.pro'
77b97bef6e44466e8c75706d0d58730b
7d1745bf1b3dc82bb406e7a1eb44465dd7277816
'2011-11-15T03:58:32-05:00'
describe
'39420' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKP' 'sip-files00126.pro'
fc73aab4f456cac82225e2fce71b5005
95d52213994ae689aba88ae6cfc2e47521b12631
'2011-11-15T03:54:41-05:00'
describe
'42998' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKQ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
99fcfe3d73b84baefc128a29d7280561
7e1a38e083357db3647c77639cf021b92110f465
describe
'39372' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKR' 'sip-files00128.pro'
1821a7547130d1d783fa801b23ef7bb0
208b618e1b175cf9f5ab67b9b555cae05c98cd3f
describe
'38285' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKS' 'sip-files00129.pro'
f79e2235838e13313e5162e6d15c32b1
0540415e16f2372258625807abed6395a4191e16
'2011-11-15T03:59:21-05:00'
describe
'43081' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKT' 'sip-files00130.pro'
75a6e872f68f902b5ecabe9254fc825d
026d550285e9e70e9a85596591a38d9a84421ce5
describe
'39245' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKU' 'sip-files00131.pro'
0bbdcc43e3dec13ac7a9c21e7bd1ac3b
73150f756fb693081e33949878416f7679fa2dbd
'2011-11-15T03:57:32-05:00'
describe
'38493' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKV' 'sip-files00132.pro'
8256a6bd3651580ff539674d0fd650f4
bb7084812c9562f39d297e250a4c6cb03496e4cd
'2011-11-15T03:55:19-05:00'
describe
'41958' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKW' 'sip-files00133.pro'
c56ca9e0c8e4bc16feb98b2cb49ce207
bc3a3b282a864563a66fa564614c5307a842d4d8
describe
'38752' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKX' 'sip-files00134.pro'
41ee14c71f8fea14494881d0d6072179
29e6befc453b337b88ddc4013b353eebc9c77955
'2011-11-15T03:54:50-05:00'
describe
'41829' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKY' 'sip-files00135.pro'
efc6b4c3e8ad9add25e53da136539d9b
e1836522ab4c6ab32c35cc7065e7ee0c46dbb210
'2011-11-15T03:55:50-05:00'
describe
'37442' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOKZ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
e0aa0a445fec1efdd7645d8da8118904
592ac0e2a8f2e93c32a169e7ba94cec01663336a
describe
'42965' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLA' 'sip-files00137.pro'
944112d668617a694069de7f18d3d9b2
54d43bfbdc1787779bbe87fbc9654a50776c5b0c
'2011-11-15T03:55:56-05:00'
describe
'40109' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLB' 'sip-files00138.pro'
5af513cc731b5b33ea5a4da2f850d862
defee8af9f844596208a1e87c3f6c3feb49106f6
describe
'40831' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLC' 'sip-files00139.pro'
9f31933a0f865a29713a86e5c6217dcf
16ac46f6ebb9916d79fd9ff676c4fee7737aae63
'2011-11-15T04:01:18-05:00'
describe
'36073' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLD' 'sip-files00140.pro'
6c6e046628bb54b5ce61d843aa41144e
2855fe63dd901ac187bbf5f881ace257e65b5b67
'2011-11-15T03:55:07-05:00'
describe
'38975' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLE' 'sip-files00141.pro'
801e5db18de858e5eb8ae61420dbabc7
914ddbf592a3373c56847f0e69163c05ba57eebe
describe
'39512' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLF' 'sip-files00142.pro'
f6260501b2b8510c843ceb72659d7d5c
7df54be7346eba57d504a4b2a174d2d2620b7f00
describe
'33188' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLG' 'sip-files00143.pro'
a368050ca3e02fff678b41dd0eb614a5
2e056abd708d47be663d3edee9625bdf06d3b298
describe
'43014' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLH' 'sip-files00144.pro'
081c45f7f5294fa391720bd12f32eb66
976f465f972a95b993a3040c685e918ddc5a0b8d
describe
'42553' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLI' 'sip-files00145.pro'
6f2330c8bc7b0a942f4bbe51d08f0d27
afca36fc904274ca0f0841c26ea6f59d28634dee
describe
'42210' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLJ' 'sip-files00146.pro'
72752173a2901d58418347be47893b5c
37ca694d036ba7d8faee76095577eefa79e6b822
'2011-11-15T03:57:02-05:00'
describe
'43880' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLK' 'sip-files00147.pro'
0b169f43ad71373e403779ee78df7adb
2c26dc4dee081417fb585235429066388199aa3b
'2011-11-15T04:00:19-05:00'
describe
'1841' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLL' 'sip-files00148.pro'
87fb255ecd91b0df1c9be69a6e402b38
682834eeabe9966c65dbd071a95667147c38e37a
describe
'40726' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLM' 'sip-files00149.pro'
86e7d30db8a50c254053ca28db2027fd
00a057e76dfdb6c81211a789d29dd63098d381ba
'2011-11-15T04:01:10-05:00'
describe
'42795' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLN' 'sip-files00150.pro'
b169bb1c2cd51589d0a58ed0545993ef
d6afe658ee0e72e99cb21079c6c2d0ca4b9f0cad
'2011-11-15T04:03:08-05:00'
describe
'40976' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLO' 'sip-files00151.pro'
d358f196142747f1de92efb549fba934
9780fe7537c39f225b2b1aaa22b5ea1ccc9f27a0
describe
'4688' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLP' 'sip-files00152.pro'
1171e6fe13aebae3a5cd907360a4b9e8
6a0355596c4ef5caa792dd590e7b7d3cde0a38f0
'2011-11-15T04:00:15-05:00'
describe
'835' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLQ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
52340f5c26e25d003d3d5a6a453857e5
e393061af895a56852ed52585cef848943942b35
describe
'14987' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLR' 'sip-files00155.pro'
9e51de0ce49259bf80a71b9899e7249b
a7f0b95015a021e5275e6e35488f0d4448f5f169
'2011-11-15T03:54:59-05:00'
describe
'35843' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLS' 'sip-files00156.pro'
3a0c15c4e1e7e155c3b5473847a96654
bb0a775cee099cb731c1408b7132fa313b6128c3
describe
'39863' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLT' 'sip-files00157.pro'
ef8e848e58fa6be29f21a9e80c8fd4a1
77769ced31beb38a34688bb8c5d61257b14f95b2
'2011-11-15T03:56:08-05:00'
describe
'41182' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLU' 'sip-files00158.pro'
4cfe85d256b4fa6953d5f83644ae97d1
b4b9a172d1f5b77ff23e948960e69ead197214e5
describe
'44718' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLV' 'sip-files00159.pro'
f16770964231831fda036d9c20d1f418
8e5585ef661846d83c1b9b618b8ca538817a1ca7
describe
'42927' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLW' 'sip-files00160.pro'
d87bb23f9db08f7a82c39c778ac98ce8
81d145799d34d1bd6a26b596e91b1ad4574cfec5
describe
'35476' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLX' 'sip-files00161.pro'
56b7d8c8b3bffa60825aeb48b02aa68c
2bba35cf6ac723b1de83003861d860b60ce3b4f9
describe
'36240' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLY' 'sip-files00162.pro'
3599e68f7090852244e00183147513f2
aa0da4b4ed8c04b6648e6c59861f1c866d5dc83c
describe
'37925' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOLZ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
f37890c51c7dc1eee14b81e553760246
02f52aea034d1fa623f979b1de66e2274613a3ee
'2011-11-15T04:04:19-05:00'
describe
'34809' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMA' 'sip-files00164.pro'
24715c6b250ab1aad8d9c727d9100b63
d006d38480afd8c6bc2a77c13e36f349e51ec038
describe
'40130' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMB' 'sip-files00165.pro'
2ce4d6d66d4b19e0e2a75193cdbe61ae
cb11f7db44b6fffa44a190a75c6eb4a513a452e7
describe
'42151' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMC' 'sip-files00166.pro'
c9d91e4317ff7b617eaedb1186d07207
be55bb0eabb16544c88acb32639c490e71c134ea
describe
'42730' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMD' 'sip-files00167.pro'
eeb3928885501d2bc3266e7061f5fd7d
1cc88516c8e79b26f3fc247d5c28675b8db0ce15
describe
'42529' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOME' 'sip-files00168.pro'
fcd665db90d131735b9dd9a927ea6471
4134429d661a0af7fdef6285075157ee30e763c3
describe
'42433' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMF' 'sip-files00169.pro'
af7c143716064f5f3f32e6f43daa451f
c15617e52ef8500bc2b0d7d317226fecad48b270
describe
'39085' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMG' 'sip-files00170.pro'
d1b61f415d878d7658b00d977eceaed1
fb6d4daae0327288d231d224b1a75406602483df
'2011-11-15T03:54:37-05:00'
describe
'34244' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMH' 'sip-files00171.pro'
62276b4bd1be3e20ddce9e2b0d2f23ad
383c89a9bc8d89f3aa7e312d9aa82c2f2fdf69e0
'2011-11-15T04:03:20-05:00'
describe
'42546' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMI' 'sip-files00172.pro'
d14a2c23e9be1c3ec1d9410723e0b6dd
0bb3cd9a4ecd326efd3799f313184947f95926be
describe
'39910' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMJ' 'sip-files00173.pro'
d70073dcf596b6ea2bc47845121e7655
6250a6d480fc35218e016e7596cc37325bb2c949
'2011-11-15T04:01:24-05:00'
describe
'41709' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMK' 'sip-files00174.pro'
a9a953bf82b140566da580d973ea4b00
351a83e7b8c51aa059544646da0fc1fdf7113b49
describe
'39540' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOML' 'sip-files00175.pro'
b1908c64c81f2a376e2111b21b1ed64c
077ff59457acbcf1504f581d3e97d17c2f1ec5cb
describe
'42909' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMM' 'sip-files00176.pro'
bf6438526f08c8d3fdad5a23884f2c86
1d22631f621683c91438bf4e0cfc1578f6c7f0a4
'2011-11-15T03:58:06-05:00'
describe
'41181' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMN' 'sip-files00177.pro'
c065ee0d531e335daa645410b5c98dcd
d81a23b80bf732241f8507388615875194b7cf0a
'2011-11-15T03:56:42-05:00'
describe
'24646' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMO' 'sip-files00178.pro'
cbd06f1ceda98a054301ab76f47a0c23
92ae20375db4681414aa3f62567cb39b8c74bc07
describe
'40377' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMP' 'sip-files00179.pro'
4ec198a3c1a64a0d40a771efa9232ac2
b2d1595fd582349f604b002365996a9465c0cc8a
'2011-11-15T04:00:52-05:00'
describe
'38779' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMQ' 'sip-files00180.pro'
705dc55206a519a40efc9467581bf5e7
e36e48baa6d34069d1fb99037b63f06ea54d16af
'2011-11-15T04:04:07-05:00'
describe
'33161' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMR' 'sip-files00181.pro'
2ed9df94893148210ebbfc505f1ed1b0
1abec19e6fde46da8a1458c1f44a3ac225e8e9c7
'2011-11-15T03:57:51-05:00'
describe
'42468' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMS' 'sip-files00182.pro'
e39939e6f08dc4e51388cc377d36aa3c
cfdc810cd5064cdd9a5bf3669e230af0b0dbd570
'2011-11-15T03:56:48-05:00'
describe
'42346' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMT' 'sip-files00183.pro'
f115918d96631b3ced9edad9b6f3b19d
050e85396eb54473b3cbceec8b9cdcbbc0d3bb13
'2011-11-15T04:01:03-05:00'
describe
'42804' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMU' 'sip-files00184.pro'
150f81b4a5169dcef5f9e8279936da19
32c6fe0438710957c5247842c6c844667eb5397d
describe
'33027' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMV' 'sip-files00185.pro'
e41cd45a1c2d27ef871d8d88bcd7d31c
74b98986338668c267184869f51a8d90b5443a6b
describe
'42596' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMW' 'sip-files00186.pro'
2aff03baa49d8c429800080f17449354
4fd8ea9252fa10e451fa53e1997fc821852115f1
describe
'39125' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMX' 'sip-files00187.pro'
ea7458fbd1bcfc192d6b889986a1fdfe
277bd3a64eb9e55fea20c7645681df60b00d462f
describe
'41574' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMY' 'sip-files00188.pro'
3c64f361e1b888c19749ca44e90abc89
1db877a158e4a92bccb008070daf5e634f3bf6cc
describe
'37208' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOMZ' 'sip-files00189.pro'
d7435a20791f578a638980afd7324513
1548faed242002626ac17255cd9ede548256a647
describe
'42982' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONA' 'sip-files00190.pro'
2169112316c1a12c865301b514d9fc38
3305a509b78935f26fe5ae968e801affd468c1b5
describe
'1357' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONB' 'sip-files00191.pro'
8c1280fb21f6f92d2fda4ad563d36bd2
f9e7f9d232de28ac86bc92fda889867c8bbe696c
describe
'40990' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONC' 'sip-files00192.pro'
55779b7a745cd8571bed5465ffbf4fac
cd619aa57b55ab3d7ba63d5748967840cebe4571
'2011-11-15T03:55:01-05:00'
describe
'43320' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOND' 'sip-files00193.pro'
8edf09f83500178b3803161ab9886630
9a7e16398faec8f72833dd3409bda3c66bd5845f
describe
'42729' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONE' 'sip-files00194.pro'
77389e4a0a604239029a1aaa4de91b81
9d56e3f7c78dacde7409b59b66cba90a0482e098
'2011-11-15T04:01:50-05:00'
describe
'32979' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONF' 'sip-files00195.pro'
ec79fd427f61fa69c222a28845baf174
87bbdbf994370cd2925e1a8ee26a5e3f099674b2
describe
'44306' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONG' 'sip-files00196.pro'
5133dc76c68355971159ad12dee134f4
3c628dd7e603d6ae7bcf5a2d6a283c16fecd0344
'2011-11-15T03:56:00-05:00'
describe
'45665' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONH' 'sip-files00197.pro'
2eaa3260ad0f38253bedace568e4fdc3
ef8b7ac6fb071e5fd782b3e60afffcc4196df57a
'2011-11-15T03:58:03-05:00'
describe
'37697' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONI' 'sip-files00198.pro'
8dcef1696aeb7780965351b26317da6d
c1e711bd14db16b13007d78db38674b82eed43c6
'2011-11-15T03:56:46-05:00'
describe
'40494' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONJ' 'sip-files00199.pro'
539538890e20a0f66fffa7ce6c4ac5a3
823024bed274a36b5aa6278611bf659082a5b386
'2011-11-15T04:01:52-05:00'
describe
'25475' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONK' 'sip-files00200.pro'
b131934971958550ad25da919c1cfaac
6824944fd4703c584230a95a269cecb312a6165e
describe
'1435' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONL' 'sip-files00202.pro'
820e4eaf8664efbf71ed93fdac122e85
d698376e3222a3f445f6ad0e26c1666f8a17e989
describe
'18450' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONM' 'sip-files00203.pro'
7cc171367fb768ec4194770445a61df4
854378263bbf7e5e8d92d4734ad507cf6cbbc50f
describe
'39725' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONN' 'sip-files00204.pro'
eded8990b143df6bfc5c87a27443bc2e
93c1e5b900034f3d38a93c0a73064a5b0fe340f6
describe
'41147' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONO' 'sip-files00205.pro'
06d42cbd864de86b35012281236c4c0e
23f8716544868748f95149f1462ff2d2a740fb1a
describe
'40738' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONP' 'sip-files00206.pro'
28af95b7e5cfe0c7702b19eabe2f6567
85c4d8d82ab9374812c896759f44d94d70c3da16
describe
'37765' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONQ' 'sip-files00207.pro'
b6fdc43acba4b450710da8e0aed0cf61
396b3676f466e8e5a369c0e3d831334df6c2ecfc
'2011-11-15T03:59:55-05:00'
describe
'40296' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONR' 'sip-files00208.pro'
dc8a61c1eda35a0dbf7342ccb2d8580f
b083b511fe75b9f270152a9908e0c0dd89c45b18
describe
'40214' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONS' 'sip-files00209.pro'
3ac51e572bc8e2461666bf6113980575
8f57237e0b3d1c02c89bd6fe2c16f7d7ef8cf6b2
describe
'43629' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONT' 'sip-files00210.pro'
c0423e129cbd63313a5dfaf991b2b506
19054013f5fc503bb699fa63b4cd34e6b715e5fe
'2011-11-15T03:57:07-05:00'
describe
'38668' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONU' 'sip-files00211.pro'
a8e9b1d575cbd74792568836bf044a46
2e4d5f59bc40606dac8e7aa501b8de848d0736a0
'2011-11-15T03:55:33-05:00'
describe
'41924' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONV' 'sip-files00212.pro'
6a04218907c28ecab6ee7729efbe3115
c5dd53a2227d409754f3963ff005e0515dcdf8a4
describe
'43229' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONW' 'sip-files00213.pro'
9462dd15836992f1646d0197374f3abb
cf0d0b781b6c41477154fde459dc5af13fd91477
describe
'41798' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONX' 'sip-files00214.pro'
038cf5be42f7cffd6835e93f89e782cf
a17218c819a2e1cba52520522c88979e4e92075e
describe
'44693' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONY' 'sip-files00215.pro'
5e1d29d3770d5c0bb663655829b0bcc8
8fec12db42efb62bfc7c1d081c9dc125bd7796af
describe
'13411' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAONZ' 'sip-files00216.pro'
d58bc4bbd77d8409b92a34b404991045
b1845e08d7732a51dc0ac2b86f26930b1387b8b3
'2011-11-15T03:55:02-05:00'
describe
'42197' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOA' 'sip-files00217.pro'
284285bec3a77e09c6b846cc4140adbf
99a697e7748e90ae0547c998edff29d1b2cd6f1f
describe
'41426' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOB' 'sip-files00218.pro'
641e18d30295dbedb65d97a135e223d5
fe1f3ece80171711a5c924a9b0d6093eb5e953f7
'2011-11-15T04:00:24-05:00'
describe
'43535' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOC' 'sip-files00219.pro'
6e5584ab96e30c2bdaa63dfa270848c6
0776c8c7d35bd37c5a7ba74ce4b7c158ea6c3934
describe
'43324' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOD' 'sip-files00220.pro'
ae6fc1deaf75851d76b1552864e807ab
b3b61fc681066b7be83723911fcf48bb9d812cab
'2011-11-15T03:58:14-05:00'
describe
'44705' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOE' 'sip-files00221.pro'
23ac593c5f95eb5bdb7fbca3c87c7369
5ad1b553edda2ad4f769a455c508a085eb6d45b2
describe
'44811' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOF' 'sip-files00222.pro'
b06e04526778cf46b564819482797600
b1770e26225c32f84314743fb67ac28b2cc31e8c
describe
'43208' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOG' 'sip-files00223.pro'
f481b73a349a1c51ab38c4a846735a8e
acfd9f78b505ba01c3d59b1b78776faf050dc1e4
describe
'42112' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOH' 'sip-files00224.pro'
270f79d505102d8c5bda9ded07101529
426dd3f02036fcab4a9a96bc4f340dc52926fe18
describe
'44068' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOI' 'sip-files00225.pro'
77270bfc31bf8d41d18e9f65bc58e7da
4066bdf92746542c0cb76276f5e653a026b25b67
'2011-11-15T03:55:15-05:00'
describe
'44094' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOJ' 'sip-files00226.pro'
897a5ed281520f70fe1cc9d0c806c1e5
4a61de4e3821155207158bc36670d18b2987564f
'2011-11-15T03:56:33-05:00'
describe
'43158' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOK' 'sip-files00227.pro'
aebb39b7363f79983212b5df6afdb7b8
8202bcd38592bf03031758383bd6ff735482f85e
describe
'42090' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOL' 'sip-files00228.pro'
b38311edc498b22234890cd29b3c4f7e
d7aa4cc468bdc40e46a10f2c75bccce3109bd7bb
describe
'41495' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOM' 'sip-files00229.pro'
4168442576308e3588277cfc7941eb51
d83aca999c8cd92eb967c4d203fa61c915df07d3
describe
'42399' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOON' 'sip-files00230.pro'
a9071115a49bf27c829e0651cfd232bc
7337d998fd3b7587f3e011ba9372176e6f274c0a
'2011-11-15T03:54:40-05:00'
describe
'41485' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOO' 'sip-files00231.pro'
0355d0aa9dc6871ba9533d66b62ddc88
2c5bb63118bec01dd2d57887c691030e92ca859c
'2011-11-15T03:59:50-05:00'
describe
'42852' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOP' 'sip-files00232.pro'
9a43eaa14b8951f3cc6bb0e52e1e2650
cc85960ae3502d5aeb0f7979f5039d1e5a0b6806
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOQ' 'sip-files00233.pro'
ebdbcae320a6943e51a349e75d75a189
b6d58e3454648356d046dcb304e6e5f2bea6e830
describe
'42341' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOR' 'sip-files00234.pro'
5e5486f492690a4cf9d1d80815650fa4
ca9a9b8200016fd22ddac737a185e05b35819cc6
describe
'2055' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOS' 'sip-files00235.pro'
dbe189dda9e4bc331a686b5dadc209d0
029c25eb510a6bc65e2c040fb1e1a9813b6314dc
describe
'40606' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOT' 'sip-files00237.pro'
6c8ea96049e9fc5ca6f63f4940be15cb
29e4be50132f767443a9d7fd3155ecd2e9e04374
'2011-11-15T03:58:35-05:00'
describe
'43076' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOU' 'sip-files00238.pro'
f475eeabd6ae777ccc70b14571125d69
e59a0df78954a13baacf9571f860ff132f84768c
describe
'42282' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOV' 'sip-files00239.pro'
66b1e5f90b4e643c3b301b9bd23c9407
79bb15eb04ce5728bface1bcecd2fe625d7585d9
describe
'41411' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOW' 'sip-files00240.pro'
361341a3f34f6fddb920a85c6a36fcda
e8439bdbf41d6e14f9b606b96b46e688ea76ebae
'2011-11-15T03:56:37-05:00'
describe
'44153' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOX' 'sip-files00241.pro'
201e43705316b4719ceb5e4463b50159
c2a3fd80ac1946cdf76b8027378f3975aad1be7a
describe
'38447' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOY' 'sip-files00242.pro'
0a7066eeb889d1b7f7ee98ba39381f00
25c76fc90cb44b0b64ceaa23eda13992fdb5879e
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOOZ' 'sip-files00243.pro'
afb6359d397ae76d5b7da4cdc3adbef5
6b3088b807203bbe4025667353f6151ee80bd348
describe
'10364' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPA' 'sip-files00244.pro'
ecb32ccb68019b35e9b6449d708030f1
02040cd6fae42540beffb42c3c1b3a4eca13d44f
describe
'2196' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPB' 'sip-files00246.pro'
90152c986eee2925d18265658ea3d3ef
a90e80e011497c9cb98a07a94ed6124a7d889d25
describe
'20046' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPC' 'sip-files00247.pro'
8c72ac4c39b99a847aad399858e7ffc9
8d0b24b27e7683ddb5a795c5b471f2a7f9296e01
'2011-11-15T03:56:43-05:00'
describe
'40880' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPD' 'sip-files00248.pro'
5bee5fe6b496429ce1971a61cd8bfaa4
27c73c2add93b8274ad658fb82427d671e8a1dd4
describe
'42146' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPE' 'sip-files00249.pro'
dd78d24cbad9475351061215bf293b47
5deeb49d51a5646520c69b61ac7e9d886f615de1
describe
'42315' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPF' 'sip-files00250.pro'
9c5461b84545b0514da64218d0065d89
66113f643fc7a0134669f5b9ef8c1ca8a28c9b81
describe
'45743' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPG' 'sip-files00251.pro'
428f6e62c523e62189ed99caa1ea1cd5
71daa3598513e6316f0c58222bd60a8f1bd78e24
describe
'45493' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPH' 'sip-files00252.pro'
7cc54e642beb059412563f6a192a4496
45b50cdc057b255e314928141ddcc863a5bef5ea
describe
'37373' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPI' 'sip-files00253.pro'
19de12b400de2b1d87330d9d0ea0ab68
307c7181c24df2842381465be4bbe75ce26e9cad
'2011-11-15T03:54:51-05:00'
describe
'45006' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPJ' 'sip-files00254.pro'
7fd7ac228906c31c888ce9bcbf0844b0
3cf3991b4fc84749c18672e289a3f6195290a553
'2011-11-15T03:58:29-05:00'
describe
'41852' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPK' 'sip-files00255.pro'
027c9f5dc283e08ffefca73e89729375
37a2c1dcf3fd8ce3cffc064f187cb04f05787d56
describe
'43471' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPL' 'sip-files00256.pro'
1981bbbc2ae041cd034573b18852a8f9
a0e660d382a12d88fc368f3664f2b3faccd377b3
describe
'42899' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPM' 'sip-files00257.pro'
ab35c346da47fc110cf9a7085bb566e8
917f9067032046db39ca72931139c4ae212bd12d
'2011-11-15T04:01:51-05:00'
describe
'42697' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPN' 'sip-files00258.pro'
b1a2fbdfaf12aad7c8e6f47a5a43cfdd
004d836c5044179e5d266f12408cd565356f8984
describe
'44056' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPO' 'sip-files00259.pro'
a4545bf63b5d975e4bbe69e33798d6dc
b21f0549fbad1a8d5e6a6af868e827198a9df3d3
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPP' 'sip-files00260.pro'
5b0a1fab1e41bcddacff561187c601c8
5335b8c2846f522be5a702ae5f6f8f0b6d7091b3
describe
'44825' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPQ' 'sip-files00261.pro'
872ac2d07d8a52254f72d8d1d3d96887
72330a13374b1c158ac48f314417a74b840a3a39
describe
'38112' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPR' 'sip-files00262.pro'
8eeca675ef2c57bec947cd7320d0f078
3659524483b7e3268f43cdeb4a234e1227a6386f
'2011-11-15T03:58:47-05:00'
describe
'44090' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPS' 'sip-files00263.pro'
5290161a48f669714cc9ebb55da42598
27f4eb2d2939d3f864160f8e621a4009bcbd2d5e
describe
'45240' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPT' 'sip-files00264.pro'
fe06126ced3581e4a6e094f773405789
aaf713e4afbfc9ce004072c9b91831300429f02b
describe
'45423' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPU' 'sip-files00265.pro'
742c9ba6fab6c105f0411b0e11845450
d74c0d80c1f8f4db3d5ba1ade8a1d2c9fc1b46ec
'2011-11-15T04:01:27-05:00'
describe
'44012' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPV' 'sip-files00266.pro'
c26a2e5464985bc68853c0c2dbe7b55b
bcedcb828976bab4f52856ecbe49458c2e8e3ad1
describe
'45523' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPW' 'sip-files00267.pro'
15f62d383985f69ffee7c2f32a06b469
31cb726abc75f5ca07fa987b77a9e4bd12bab44d
describe
'42617' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPX' 'sip-files00268.pro'
6fe3b57838b7ada21a7f9785e19406a5
78d082fb57bcd2e9a593bd616883ebb94c93a3ea
describe
'42423' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPY' 'sip-files00269.pro'
4c276d441c05cb6d0b25878b414857ea
cf4ef45a6e8baf3bf196bedc1e7065b2f9fa1b39
'2011-11-15T04:00:16-05:00'
describe
'36023' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOPZ' 'sip-files00270.pro'
18ef4494f22e9d7da1c34d6b5e1701b4
2387b93b9a66d8ddab8868b735d84ba185e26ed6
'2011-11-15T04:00:55-05:00'
describe
'41187' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQA' 'sip-files00271.pro'
daeb866a7f25c5765e9cddd00fcc0819
385266ae29eacbd77503fb82c4dba0c582ad0826
describe
'42981' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQB' 'sip-files00272.pro'
8e9a674e0e32b222911e9b29e67589bb
eec22bcb2a85b9f68feba8b610004bb65c47491c
describe
'40282' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQC' 'sip-files00273.pro'
260c1cb49b1ef9c751b21f181b922337
614ce5432a38fade2fe9e7f1fa7b8586c7a796b9
describe
'36222' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQD' 'sip-files00274.pro'
68b5f268fbf46d102c2875a4eef5197e
0642705aef7f4fed31bcc400ba8ff073245863a1
describe
'43430' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQE' 'sip-files00275.pro'
ef7fc94581857e6ff65b7ec6c28a0f21
9c1660dd9127cc522ff1a38063b0a5b17ecd8ce9
describe
'42838' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQF' 'sip-files00276.pro'
fee839b3fdc10bf836f5cd8354da89bf
7e47577009973a099736c0f33d4b3bed2d512cf0
describe
'43346' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQG' 'sip-files00277.pro'
7f672d8f45e2d70d87489eb3b798aff0
ba47fef0408c441c06caf4f50e42269817bab7ce
describe
'42644' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQH' 'sip-files00278.pro'
cd9932e4fa486d5af22cc7823d2122ff
b768ffa44187e1fc202cfcd3448f4e1218416eea
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQI' 'sip-files00279.pro'
8efe962780bf4f516db7635dc06a23bc
3b683b70039fc629769632c5174d12496b4b1095
'2011-11-15T03:56:10-05:00'
describe
'43092' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQJ' 'sip-files00281.pro'
7dd9471fe61e4509993fcf614b1d6c9a
754a14fa91619650b6265aaf0cdaffab928490c0
describe
'35467' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQK' 'sip-files00282.pro'
9edcef15f8c7c0e04ab6921ba31810ea
69837eea285f46125b46109a26383bb5b3dc5c99
'2011-11-15T03:59:42-05:00'
describe
'39957' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQL' 'sip-files00283.pro'
76af50124c703fb5128ec29152f9444c
93d525eecb2c39bf16f294d69740900679aea8a5
'2011-11-15T04:00:01-05:00'
describe
'43086' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQM' 'sip-files00284.pro'
501854fbea195f6942db476f773617ae
1b7095959724dd62829e3cc02488ef662a7c473b
describe
'43690' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQN' 'sip-files00285.pro'
bfc7b90a48fde2557775c41e43b33458
007d4b86f929f023b8b68b6bacc366dfcf4fb414
describe
'21134' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQO' 'sip-files00286.pro'
2d5e02a29d3d4fe842af874c2e8ccb7f
01f167320f1d2bbbd759b2df626b11a1c7e2f2fc
describe
'43408' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQP' 'sip-files00287.pro'
3d59fa127db243a7d01760570f549b88
9420e345f32c0f6d199a941df9789c56ab54e040
'2011-11-15T03:59:14-05:00'
describe
'14295' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQQ' 'sip-files00288.pro'
6500e6dd4c7d4e5d33718a8fe060e3c2
c35510722fd2ac326aae5f9c5c42ac464fe4b85c
describe
'3718' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQR' 'sip-files00290.pro'
d32d4b639deee802535f66ebcc41a30c
3ac2a20e814d149f7fd3c21607075e5d19d452c4
describe
'16051' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQS' 'sip-files00291.pro'
80f51499e225c4be2c7d9ce512f2a768
e415791c8e38f254067592e438aadced2ea69c0d
describe
'43839' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQT' 'sip-files00292.pro'
52b7c9ccc4cdc32e81ec70538b348f47
139bd002542c1917a844cde2718637dbf2836cda
describe
'38844' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQU' 'sip-files00293.pro'
c8c5a68b98edf361620a7ffc04f3dd13
bf75f4fa218f734effa4e1eacf6c126c544b25ad
'2011-11-15T04:02:17-05:00'
describe
'40709' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQV' 'sip-files00294.pro'
1374d1b7cd5f61e5cfe6a71d246fada1
e05fcd604e652faa943a946c91617eec41ad533f
describe
'33232' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQW' 'sip-files00295.pro'
216438eec9905d4b45f2b3737824f31b
da2a7c6f373c5f0252bf7c12063f668651fa0857
describe
'43031' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQX' 'sip-files00296.pro'
db730cad25ebd447cb8c680b84ba3ee9
2244c9daa5b126cc73e08a36e95285219e7c41d2
describe
'40373' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQY' 'sip-files00297.pro'
39554f679b4763ffc451e92ece582190
8f9eecc16964f14c86a593d48f640b8db832b958
describe
'44313' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOQZ' 'sip-files00298.pro'
6e11881aa0acaa5eef4c85423da54bc1
0ed39502680fa7b406aa001cb0fe79afff94ed4d
describe
'44596' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORA' 'sip-files00299.pro'
393110ea038e6dc1367c3674e868a8fc
b12097e03e35d5745697cb8452723d437ea18670
describe
'44465' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORB' 'sip-files00300.pro'
a1d2c1bbec8519ac3f3a71eac1e596ce
4e83a41b155ed950f4a1734c7b3f780764855746
describe
'40840' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORC' 'sip-files00301.pro'
92f5ea7f8fcc33ac662cf7fe03e43ff3
af5df0b6bf770c94452ce4acea9f67b2f04faa66
'2011-11-15T04:03:21-05:00'
describe
'41508' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORD' 'sip-files00302.pro'
30b3080000cbad7b806a2eac707ec2b2
6aceb6092c770c9c9eeea14e014410cac3c1de53
'2011-11-15T04:03:11-05:00'
describe
'45566' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORE' 'sip-files00303.pro'
ee73388055b888e53e130fe6ed27bd12
4f91fb9c5c58ec1d5120efe02ff713e1fbd06af9
describe
'32490' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORF' 'sip-files00304.pro'
25ea943ac4e4fae36d2e90b734e32243
815f497f29468b724c0c0956c225dd05da919d93
describe
'41927' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORG' 'sip-files00305.pro'
3f2e485f2708d81a509e85be5e94acd1
5e3ea23f2f084c2dbb7112bbdccf5037a3021e35
describe
'43674' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORH' 'sip-files00306.pro'
fe420867e015c15fa7be1d8e9106575e
4d7dcf60ee844f7c6ad5eaa4f2682a4a07cc9e82
describe
'44763' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORI' 'sip-files00307.pro'
0f394101f519f2361d18a03c6aca10ba
fd53adc1dc880b1987e0ed63568567233e76526c
'2011-11-15T03:55:54-05:00'
describe
'40431' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORJ' 'sip-files00308.pro'
b16334379bc69d9634f82b3a7dcbaa39
b7003c419c48557a13572e77bd051d8ff86cbd8c
'2011-11-15T03:55:40-05:00'
describe
'44452' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORK' 'sip-files00309.pro'
10b3cde0cecec58faf76146989f799cb
af35fa5a9d6fcc126c0198b08dad2a137833288d
describe
'43131' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORL' 'sip-files00310.pro'
3c1b032c78e282951467a09b824a6f6d
982f747cf22f1549a3398247748438214ab6934d
'2011-11-15T04:01:14-05:00'
describe
'37188' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORM' 'sip-files00311.pro'
9a2ea8597a1f3c20bc3b7428ba508374
12b1a4ee5456e5afa66142aaba896402bf38024c
'2011-11-15T03:59:06-05:00'
describe
'37777' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORN' 'sip-files00312.pro'
b585f7cc144d7baff10a48e2da08e30e
488341fb861d0ca70bc7ca55839cba17c85d85f9
describe
'43537' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORO' 'sip-files00313.pro'
01cc5d4185c1e983b0082a396253c3fc
2eee931f2e5d7bb2a6b8e1f10d6c86044ebb5f9d
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORP' 'sip-files00314.pro'
1bddc28964b2e2ff2d147717727391d3
19abcf42215858621aeda96c36b02edf84848482
describe
'41493' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORQ' 'sip-files00315.pro'
731e067ce16d9f82bc9a9d9dbb4f7d43
cd252420da25c50879b58a8650063619740668aa
describe
'41961' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORR' 'sip-files00316.pro'
3a8937ec72d0acbf4ccc9d9f070a022f
d2288e0e1bb2f43642b73ce2d632dd1778a642a0
describe
'44179' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORS' 'sip-files00317.pro'
a78d687c7e32e0851f0f0dc318bcd7ab
6fd79d713d8ad97b506b593717ce904098a393a4
describe
'43722' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORT' 'sip-files00318.pro'
b5bece0a43fc8b800d6d70c532d06977
ad6cab6f57f0e146a500e22a36fb15d4229d1f31
describe
'35036' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORU' 'sip-files00319.pro'
4bdf5b7b932f46f4b9ef86dc5f37a589
a871726f947854f4764d31a46fa14fe5922fc202
describe
'44891' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORV' 'sip-files00322.pro'
65b5d4b6b16fcba51edfdf1b70b4ddcf
55752ee95331c59b963d665c25d87e5434a9b8cc
'2011-11-15T03:55:13-05:00'
describe
'42929' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORW' 'sip-files00323.pro'
a8359269c530a9d5787b15f0e73d0f64
49171db6589a4a0504a050df53fca66c2bd4c1f0
describe
'42664' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORX' 'sip-files00324.pro'
953a5d8a77a1bbc67e5d419b9db19614
4cbfb19aca7eade99a4fdcdce2f31c302b3e8def
'2011-11-15T04:00:03-05:00'
describe
'40763' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORY' 'sip-files00325.pro'
eb422df4ac187c8dcad01834361b8e1d
98cd616b72f2986cdc9515db33f73cf6738f0fc9
describe
'486' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAORZ' 'sip-files00326.pro'
f669327b231b81af7e7670c25e3c481e
cdef84c6773b0098e13c38e246aab68ae57a2fe6
describe
'41079' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSA' 'sip-files00327.pro'
19484a3c2798578bce1ce5bcc746e062
8933910e9a6f5f726ea6a4fe7726e0f1055900c8
describe
'37156' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSB' 'sip-files00329.pro'
a13bdd82efdb609d47f4dfc35cd188ee
b15372852247e7b072cadb73d82445479b86d3d3
describe
'35528' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSC' 'sip-files00330.pro'
3be4a5e7307afc9cf2a98be3d0b05d9b
d19551c3e873922784e419f30e0ed270c501b221
'2011-11-15T03:57:27-05:00'
describe
'41327' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSD' 'sip-files00331.pro'
b0f64ab52734e6b3495ffd13c3be29b2
3ec7b0958f4ebaf6c5d6581003b81955dfb52c11
describe
'36666' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSE' 'sip-files00332.pro'
c34277304c6583d9fcfbf0685f21c37c
d3d4e3a24af213da42d1e1b0a1d9a713b27aa20e
describe
'43752' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSF' 'sip-files00333.pro'
e61cdf882dc01fd12f3dc3b2173e3041
72608a0dc10a73004912b03a349a191701eda670
describe
'42131' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSG' 'sip-files00334.pro'
f5fd9f43ba73a7a7653eee1e8ff632fd
1db4e31fa41f668f95c26efdc2e995ce16eaf505
'2011-11-15T03:57:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSH' 'sip-files00335.pro'
7334cb98a0ce51b86a793da759d01756
5571d32cedbabdb070d622d5369d3a152d1a28c9
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSI' 'sip-files00336.pro'
325cf96a76b6738a4c13445130ec4367
9247a825c1e88a1d270ee18e0fd99a63d64078cf
describe
'41895' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSJ' 'sip-files00337.pro'
8fa2bdde9793516d7f6441e6a79a028d
ad98feb3978646d3d1316867df543f859a695714
describe
'42901' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSK' 'sip-files00338.pro'
7e8f3c18b10407ed3bb53d5ff79b3c25
20f925eaa275ff7686c14e202bbae7bca73814bd
'2011-11-15T03:55:00-05:00'
describe
'34092' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSL' 'sip-files00339.pro'
e4ec99c39f8372160b025d8ef5419fca
06c8ae561acb1f8c309630a80afe90a9ca9c1e30
describe
'42955' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSM' 'sip-files00340.pro'
6ede453a8095acff100304d526de6efa
638a7d3c5c6e4518d7fc864d9175651e9136d1dc
describe
'19488' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSN' 'sip-files00341.pro'
7eb90b09e2f94fe3a7c0b071c6cf8ecd
c7657a9af620d742acde2c86e62c38f65d84a66a
describe
'41721' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSO' 'sip-files00342.pro'
224a62ce475583a821d74610c466d04f
c722c497278fd592265b636ad10b798eeeb17315
'2011-11-15T03:59:26-05:00'
describe
'35844' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSP' 'sip-files00343.pro'
133af0aed9890060077b3b022192023b
a1ef6790ca4482296e57b54fbc1ffb7db15adc56
'2011-11-15T04:00:40-05:00'
describe
'37600' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSQ' 'sip-files00344.pro'
65622a746f3672165523d84d8930f2a3
1fa895bce3f584cd9053ce32e02310f24d1d29d7
'2011-11-15T03:59:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSR' 'sip-files00345.pro'
7368bfff3413e2c6456ae19c7b3ba3a9
db47a62a8a7cff8c83d275805a898bc3341a7d7a
describe
'42768' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSS' 'sip-files00346.pro'
8f014f86d438c97f30eff4d8af63bb98
a6b03689f0483cd3088c229c63c8aa5b71572dac
describe
'43889' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOST' 'sip-files00347.pro'
adef24346ca4e742d83acf2a7f914f9e
38aa27b2dfac7eb2a9bceb29f0654644e5d3c5b7
describe
'45904' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSU' 'sip-files00348.pro'
fd366f556dfbb58142815908fb50fdfa
a95e7df6cd149a0b06ea144e8a4bef8143b8eea3
describe
'43614' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSV' 'sip-files00349.pro'
1d14ac5cb69278522b86b9841c289c77
56a25e3d95709b038a48c5b635f05cc786f3c788
describe
'42809' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSW' 'sip-files00350.pro'
aaf96079deb56401f21010877e47bcc9
0641655fb87333f2f931cce3de4b2806897b860e
describe
'43489' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSX' 'sip-files00351.pro'
028afad821b9a7592e15a19608d773dd
39eb20c247b0beabf910a4014f778b6b69e77adf
describe
'41465' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSY' 'sip-files00352.pro'
1f2bac001c2323898e6b4da421b74238
4c0c74c455453007d83e17058ecef0c07b9d8350
describe
'40945' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOSZ' 'sip-files00353.pro'
7dbc0bace17b890541359d167e5c3798
63e136cb310173a63665526cc456fff4b8ea948c
'2011-11-15T04:00:43-05:00'
describe
'15303' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTA' 'sip-files00354.pro'
11136498e397776edc3898c2888a8e27
3d262248ac90d3c7adc5b5eb0edaf3b98c8045f6
describe
'619' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTB' 'sip-files00359.pro'
dafb6720e5bf341c43513b84153194ed
526d67c1aad6e895ec6d7fb13d21622190076287
describe
'1334539' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTC' 'sip-files00000.jp2'
51a0554274813f15a2b98b89269115e4
17cdd7ec2eeb21d33f40855ae9900913c2bd7690
describe
'313685' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTD' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
515db558f81cf2d6d3939a17ee96fef1
dc32e3d6608a686a1519314f767419a63701fd7f
'2011-11-15T04:01:28-05:00'
describe
'1169850' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTE' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
728e504626365dc7c1333d187e810af6
981e416ef7f556889d64d27abdd47d048e495012
describe
'292080' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTF' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
cba491efff3e1badbe570045a5a56371
b296e2354c508e8ad403007265f0726239aee1f8
describe
'291582' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTG' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
e48d80abbe502f2f4a53fd9473fc6e4d
c530e661867fe51ca949f7757af3e11e88814fc6
'2011-11-15T03:55:46-05:00'
describe
'293955' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTH' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
0deb87d31f4cd552bf83b5fed8207d8e
137a9fce3e3bf57853353d889dd46c07b7b73ca4
describe
'293320' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTI' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
6ff0c6e8448ef7f1697de8844a31d2bd
0ad594f277c2965bf93c109c8bfaa7fdca56f887
describe
'298059' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTJ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
09caae9e0ad5fd4da93d33e72c1abab5
0d8b3c09bacd1887ccf388d6643b48f673a846a5
'2011-11-15T04:02:28-05:00'
describe
'283247' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTK' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
692a268643ff0254ca7a78126ded5ecd
ff4931861984d32ad2e9d7ad94cbe24d94b728d7
describe
'285418' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTL' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
18521bc3604b9d189691521aa0fe8a9e
1dfc0b46abe3191df4087decc12b2b15e3045349
describe
'272173' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTM' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
541b2e22247d8c03606f059fa58309f2
a9257ab21b2c0970c1a6a7a4c7c229571a4272ed
describe
'286317' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTN' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
86f3035a240623354d189ce3e4859fc0
09f33f89ef30dcbe3a6bd8978dd73e2dddca45ac
describe
'293301' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTO' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
af4583fdc89ffb52f755f681ca1ba5f6
b88902d3c0968ae33c08f6d2bf766e82467acce6
describe
'291643' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTP' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
b780b207fdaa48ac05fef70940237407
9e195d6574c79975fb42055408aba79f1f35a7f6
'2011-11-15T03:57:58-05:00'
describe
'292748' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTQ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
ec8f2c038e1adb4181130d0a4267e1ab
21827d6bf4e28f9eec232ff4acd9c411edda5b5a
describe
'286451' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTR' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
77933ef4569c7404c498286865213188
b23e018dc5bd886e64e269a6467454e6502c63b1
describe
'293186' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTS' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
2e4d091468e033729693963ea4e0e6e1
b371017ce85aa7db8ecfea763998e5354300a156
'2011-11-15T04:03:26-05:00'
describe
'286704' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTT' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
8100904fed7a24fe39d9b3649c7c553c
4034f6959c29d4b3d1cf302287994d4c6e5cf508
describe
'293282' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTU' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a4ecca21312d1b7aa525bff7eda9a49d
957bc3ebcfe9365e1ef2b5a7c61766c9e4c8ac16
describe
'265119' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTV' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
d21141188f91553bf1f54b5d4f27d52a
887d77a11e6d490ff5535c7ad36d6bd54e3d1651
describe
'284130' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTW' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
06c20e5cec81e627758c18add27747f3
a1ca8cfd884ae62a217bcfb35543fdc3318494cc
describe
'292422' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTX' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
4cd5f328ff706219e221729eefe0c2ba
b7c574ee69364a1b954bfe47afad8efebbc82bcc
describe
'262970' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTY' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
8a2ba913539a733315342137ee3ece2e
71c83ec58afabc23696769f8bf1f935b1f2df609
'2011-11-15T03:57:13-05:00'
describe
'259552' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOTZ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
a27b82054aaf39c5c14f00353169ac00
6bb65197bd219c3ece64bef8f9dfb362e1f74e15
describe
'284235' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUA' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
1ea431bd2b0c9b5059b5d2d4aa825326
2b492a80f02c0c0a1008a53ea6b5f3d6e8f003bb
describe
'275280' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUB' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
87120575f347bb7d6c3e3483388cd79b
f8d93b3a3e2853967d2704fd97771e3ad9a1010d
describe
'283721' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUC' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
033975a03a8383aeb0a170b1a5b7c1d6
aa5eb482565cc4f6c99ce4ce6801418b98f6cd7a
describe
'293263' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUD' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
ffa2c19cc682bf5a359138ffba329406
03035020acc253b612dbb0e0ee4866f56e083295
describe
'286371' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUE' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
7adb0a21340d00e7ab599182e543f7a0
8f9a540b4ff05cc13248ecbfd55d50f7ac45fe61
describe
'288422' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUF' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
238008c05181968b2467965d8e209c76
2544eea7fb951f33bb1c5e683cfc428d0f5edee0
describe
'293284' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUG' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e4bfb04c5a15929b72b86aef5e41ac02
dd8bb980e3930d9448f4bf9afee7760fc55d65a1
describe
'293315' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUH' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
2acf6a14d3649eafc1e695fc79d03e7c
5772341d795bac06b4f34ebd88869c9cbc5a91a7
'2011-11-15T04:02:00-05:00'
describe
'294882' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUI' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
44c7441608a5879ca68c6b765bce069f
2e8eeac75b3992ea2c213e2a8ada65fb36d8a02d
'2011-11-15T04:03:14-05:00'
describe
'281882' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUJ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b8e9d976568c6b3941abcdca0a4499f5
de66585a3980adf59adc938962dba2355f3961a8
describe
'279571' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUK' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
8c51edf94aa10532f0923026fa0e5ae0
03c9bec4936f0bace4b800ac8dfd32977a2f74a7
describe
'278319' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUL' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
44b10e3cf486c1092b19697749d5c8e0
0656c86ea8ab4e43ed24cec097740b938729b6ea
describe
'272227' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUM' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
31f66f8ad68a9fe444f9911606e5a6a8
8a31c465b73d7a7d022370f2691cd9773750ccee
describe
'281876' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUN' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
4d841324898a97553dc56e42db5f71e5
be1e53f81735379afac9ef44276081996318d010
describe
'271978' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUO' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
0204b21d63a4f7f928d59541cbe2430b
96b4b591d576eb8338456af1e797e05b8cd3f15f
'2011-11-15T04:03:22-05:00'
describe
'286270' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUP' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
9ed9d6f75dfb30b37b6aa24a6641981f
f501f6d6284b2700503fc08af0a7a6ee9d2132ab
'2011-11-15T04:00:38-05:00'
describe
'282624' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUQ' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
9ea29cc4cc0cd420bd236aa24d35069e
54cee75bbe5ac9d623abd265878312c65269e9be
describe
'283040' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUR' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
eba4d707c472b9fe0aac75488f93b987
4cf361f23abefa4c993110a0ea9b80128869de11
describe
'277839' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUS' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
aeec84923daa04eae1e6079980d0ccf0
7fde8e84d165113fad2db143686df28dea6afb3a
describe
'287286' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUT' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
15dd7a798bc64bbb3cfdd115031def34
44a157e656be82f03bbf1d35229e5ddc1eaaba89
describe
'286113' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUU' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
15b698935ca707ea0302d4befba42af6
36ebeaf171a633276da42ce7d13e0b8c27ad492d
'2011-11-15T04:01:08-05:00'
describe
'287181' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUV' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
d8ad634e5c5c0926c7a26062c32dd7b9
af4c24afa4a7f5c373089b83feae94952131f1e6
describe
'286815' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUW' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
4a8ffc68426214a076d5335ad9bcc59d
86dee9db98938c5c397d611fbca3aaaeedc6a324
describe
'283095' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUX' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
08dcc27503b80ea740b912e04853fcb6
1a8833936f9cf4e649e2e5be79243f7597d05cbc
describe
'287781' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUY' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
3b56c4cad2042ad9b8ad2b632a873db6
437767b2e8d389e37c0712d5a89a4512413e13fc
describe
'263482' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOUZ' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
0e7dc41dcaa3b633b7bc89f23d0109ca
45cc7ccd8ddfa761d36c6898fc4e173d474570b7
describe
'285352' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVA' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
8cc21d3b55fa23eff1987097a52dad0b
6a15e43261f80a8767bd2b9ccdb806d5f12cf3f7
describe
'303021' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVB' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
ac209483255cf3bc0115b6374410b77f
c25d360e0a02fc92af12bb2a2a59a1993c9d3d0e
describe
'293344' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVC' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
91d251bcbbae5b4a438e05069c30cd1d
b44908f104928952fffc860bb27aa66da1a9a2ea
describe
'291092' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
1c1a00b44820a3de3679b3e9280b8948
5d376699da886a9b07cba0f6e87bfb31e75ef6c9
describe
'286560' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVE' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
d222b865cc55f64f6edc11297c5835f7
469f578a689e5c2869dd27f46b49176fcf39ca08
describe
'293780' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVF' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
ef23299cf09845b406a891d46d5b241d
94727428477990584134a392f626881c64f6dc72
'2011-11-15T03:58:38-05:00'
describe
'293237' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVG' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
5d48381aaffbf68a8473304014be9ec5
401795a6ffb91ad4b99d60672c51f20b08eb3a84
'2011-11-15T03:59:12-05:00'
describe
'290917' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVH' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
425205f42b351e59bb4ed0223534dde3
03cbab4e68d8e5704c81d8cd24591f0ac2129214
'2011-11-15T04:02:18-05:00'
describe
'293245' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVI' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
f1cc4a11a85e0b258cd704f94b397baf
94100ec2ace50ec55c0c25dc4b10d2cc7540b1f3
describe
'290890' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVJ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
e0ae7588b2564bef7c74a21f94a05032
048ee2879e63272daac570b0e88c4cc92d0d4b33
describe
'293334' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVK' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
d117c42741ab138fea0b2f240e908302
822d084f01b4d54895626222a6f09b3b14cf09ed
describe
'288753' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVL' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
74c489f08ca43c00e11356e159fa2382
cb627f301d3fbf89fe61e03cbfb498cf91c424d8
describe
'290587' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVM' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
c44eaf44d18d081c979d0208a53826da
de55aeaacc27cfbea90298cc08a44debc6f3b7fc
describe
'290913' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVN' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
d197e5e7ee54f2d0136d45e5b0894b35
a42283cae75d2077a8f5de6be07448bead1b869a
describe
'282810' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVO' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
d298be4b65f67a504d740ee496c2ffd5
7795f16d899b55662af76e2049ee77273c72b23f
describe
'290906' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVP' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
fe05f55f2b385765bfb0d63fadefa0fe
9a13e0094fa8b7b333b0702cbce5136ab3456597
'2011-11-15T04:02:10-05:00'
describe
'293350' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVQ' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
c4b20e1948b30f486208c3c285b10628
4ed2998d4ffa9ace8eff21b43032eefba69d0097
describe
'290873' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVR' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
c23c1e4d27cda4e78045fb55fe81d1e0
ab54a184cbe8eb67e1de3a5fbc76012a10c42f11
'2011-11-15T04:04:13-05:00'
describe
'260458' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVS' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
9fdced8d65414380c740b40ce30a78b9
e8b5d71a5e0e3bbba81d5a918363b6b169cadcb3
describe
'290907' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVT' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
b69cb8d2faa0882d0c8a42551bdf354b
7fc8fa4f97cd290aaa498513a4a09a93204e8418
describe
'293325' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVU' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
7530ec5d17d9913790f2bf184c4de52f
bcf01c397814c6e92df0150e6efeff5f2552d29a
describe
'290930' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVV' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
226b026c7b5e44d8e88f54aa0f68137e
22c0331ed6dd9d5829ffe98945d3ca6762d379de
describe
'271172' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVW' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
623cf3a51bba296dd8f95ea0f1b695b1
baf8417582d55dcc530307117252e4b4c5aed846
describe
'290821' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVX' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
f9f725e6a8bfd6b6fef8f9de1b0b0a41
c3fa0860ef68ce5769c31d870a5f882d31f674ce
describe
'293338' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVY' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
9912e92586862420f5aa170b46a1c70d
0ff70087379a88c6068a8e9b0186863869cb2603
'2011-11-15T03:57:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOVZ' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
5481ee2fef6988c64de6f48fbbcbd8c8
2219102164b1099bc3f514cc796619ea6b93699b
describe
'293314' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWA' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
86208881fb59ae77f73d564dc0039744
4692a98f8925032c0f4150bae7d6ad9b11d5ba17
describe
'293229' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWB' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
060ca896570f9725c6a9b55f0fd74756
ad382d6fbdfbfb99662f711ef52c8875a2cf3539
describe
'290910' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWC' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
852605117097d951f6955b9f04b3ba20
57571528570f2701e232fecf658d3b02d8881998
describe
'287806' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWD' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
ca17e27dbfeeb90734761e111ffff08e
425014c111d6a1aaa88c03d0f4d7a59022792804
describe
'295927' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWE' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
6ba0b8281cfba7d25e7dda91bb659918
33c4ea033e162be1d6d9e1b953ec514a1609f550
'2011-11-15T04:00:12-05:00'
describe
'287925' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWF' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
881bea334d8f3b58a46245ee718575eb
432aa86da04f09316bf23797825bd801b8017478
describe
'290681' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWG' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
5fbdff0f05359e1520a25206d36cf22a
409842e5c40fe781ca04648e9509cdc1b0f10503
describe
'287898' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWH' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
1d6088e4942e760c28fa1c28d8705501
7629874ef3dea993fcc67b294a1143de0fee8bc6
describe
'299617' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWI' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
4048210adfa51fad9fbbac70889ad4e1
d6dc6b40d090f168a8438c06310d7c8430529c1d
'2011-11-15T03:58:53-05:00'
describe
'287896' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWJ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
589966e90305b97b5a1304944de58223
6e7bf5e23ade6cf4f953f2f248e7b24a10390216
'2011-11-15T03:55:21-05:00'
describe
'267532' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWK' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
8c02016419be71173f6488f6a39f8c88
16b98f8b6e3c63b675532f692af727104f70e5a7
describe
'287814' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWL' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
db8d2a5b32404beb74937d66491819d0
540476ebc096dbce098e0806ebccfbc7b1a52458
describe
'277249' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWM' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
ac73dbdc60d08c3da7a40b4238ee40b6
b81a2f7303a7284fcf3a2eb556affb9b2473f4e0
describe
'287871' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWN' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
5636aaed1db5d8651899bae7c7906783
cf35fce1dc013ad94a9f2b66787c2badeb38e2f9
'2011-11-15T03:55:03-05:00'
describe
'291185' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWO' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
8c1e36904a78f9a4cd9199351a4a6ab7
c19036ec98cdd31c486020af2a8898b164fa9eb3
describe
'298039' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWP' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
8a7880333cd6115c19217efc643047ca
db24bf24700b9666a9665dae957e885d2b444209
describe
'288731' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWQ' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
ba6f26c73cf19b67232aceb8cad5d1f4
54df89ecea5396edb600bb2db874c62689e31291
'2011-11-15T03:59:00-05:00'
describe
'296135' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWR' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
4a6871c264fbd430a3ce1c96d1af828a
d032a0623303c348e87139d2917772bdafb3244d
'2011-11-15T04:01:15-05:00'
describe
'288797' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWS' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
db82f320627e79a89be35540900ea9a5
3eaefef772a755fdb9a919920ba89d8bb005a360
'2011-11-15T04:02:12-05:00'
describe
'288671' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWT' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
bd123b754fac641628b57bdec61c4050
bbfb3b7052718755d83aa33f9a01c41e64309c44
describe
'301433' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWU' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
0c8cd423f899677214ef23246ef87a81
1f01f3b8a6b378a7a63cf90c6cf651c307cbdbfe
describe
'288766' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWV' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
66970ef8d4d4e75c41ffc309db5953da
33f1e39494f9c8098c49ff33773fc3851569d4e1
'2011-11-15T04:02:14-05:00'
describe
'301445' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWW' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
8a8abed08e2d4bae0adb6c21d7d11831
b74652a9a4b5075223e45ea9c7baf96af512076b
describe
'288788' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWX' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
8732ea9eb4f578cff8c538b2554ea4e0
810d7406531eb916e2ab737af8fdbda466a51376
describe
'301400' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWY' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
d0fba54ef76356ed2118865fde2bc15c
b92875b55ea0000a86e90351b83976e0ec77d39d
'2011-11-15T03:59:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOWZ' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
b16ea8128db2ce241d8676e6caa27c5a
14db2f1a806a8f770429ce0d2fb708291e207efb
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXA' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
6acb6de35c4a9562b8e5cc967ede42eb
1ae4fd4755382dc8a5a20c2b62c9fe8840f5822c
describe
'288693' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXB' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
1c09c525e905aa1a43a1396d895691bb
4664fca703d9a2dc72e389a37f47638b4cbcceae
describe
'299052' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXC' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
4be772b5b561dd5887ca1c95b27518ef
c37c8a994dbe0518a8be18e97998b52abc23ef43
'2011-11-15T03:55:41-05:00'
describe
'288801' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXD' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
a57f2ffc3067db2756c070ec03252dbf
fde639162aadef8eaf66b765b85bc2f2bb0390a0
describe
'301333' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXE' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
01a4cf1fa89f6ceb18e55ae5ffe977f0
cc31f624502aeefb94194eccd9e4d9c818f2fbcd
describe
'275118' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXF' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
ea9302abd2545484dcbc22736d115af0
4dba34861e0aef6b675495a8d842060d6a1340c4
describe
'301408' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXG' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
aabb83229a65f5fb2cd03b0c4902db8d
e202e7d6764006d86200e2dffc7e3f43bb1c33c2
describe
'288698' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXH' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
ed0b1605cfb701d75acced2aefc9c951
cfddb1e40bae9512bd11703fc30558c0ba72bbf0
describe
'297037' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXI' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
186f58a6867033e52ecad0e0a5570201
e0a22af84b2900c7acf1e93b7a5a56a018fc5ec9
describe
'288795' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXJ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
eb7de7e198a502212798147a1c3c09c9
fef35ebf03bd88b9a38b570ce50994f4ffe2fe74
describe
'294991' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXK' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
0cde272173f6054fb5a3fe58215094ad
fc51dc90f331d1cafcddf1803264196aaa0a6d13
describe
'288786' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXL' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
38c11b90b23185bbd1876c6a0d82925d
af11da13d1ed0dc39d36a2e5e9b8f03d2f975fab
describe
'299047' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXM' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
98da842eaaf84d76e4c7b843095033fe
d494d77b7817841982388ecc39a5043aafd42ef0
describe
'288676' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXN' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
9e14837b7f11fdbfaf2a5717d8164e25
b9fde54abc544f92da8a55d3e679c47839de74ce
describe
'293251' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXO' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
fc5f3b4e3cf3866848c22885b267c5bf
da48e9e98f8528c0b4d3fb2925ac2b068af6953c
describe
'293561' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXP' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
38d8a7c5fad7e9afce51a625e29c3ee1
1d9a1771173de374ba3181e33cbcde5d7d87beb9
describe
'291881' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXQ' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
bdabfb3b5b81e66fe3a9f3a1541d5410
77a128e62a3709763f8d3fec03f0d32d5b4d9bfe
describe
'266218' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXR' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
990540f4a74b16193c45eb50907128e1
e1b54f3c0baed234cfadc9040e63cde6d463de49
describe
'294927' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXS' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
ec4dc23aee0bb6d02bb051df84e617fc
c9eacf9c6018a4b3ebaa54882ec3b05362edf1ca
describe
'293481' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXT' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
8ae74fb578a03826afc4ba8eb48b4d1e
96151ad4c60d4ffd7f16b1fe475265163b5c6257
'2011-11-15T03:55:29-05:00'
describe
'291397' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXU' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
604bd3b20b2386520c071c8ca484458d
53803bfb93c139429bfef23603f67215fc8a6e86
describe
'265502' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXV' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
4f9665b43b1b51376cb8b33684166df2
b3b6e75c96d52283957ddb2a9d04aa8d0cbab08c
'2011-11-15T03:56:06-05:00'
describe
'272439' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXW' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
3e6fddbd35fac83a1086ca2983c1a623
4dc8ad0c7d8e0044466a23c49838b55cee65a5fd
describe
'284745' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXX' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
aa7c0da3439bc7a28674304b117dc4c9
0545edc8b767ef24b2ef086d5fb15e50efef6760
'2011-11-15T03:56:05-05:00'
describe
'282314' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXY' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
283ad95e12c7834253431347b3f2d57d
65ba1684be40c044f925414ea144555e5b76000e
'2011-11-15T04:03:05-05:00'
describe
'292120' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOXZ' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
a4ae576e96d0de68c889e6c8641b0b3c
f299b01589e85fe7570b5f9ab5488e3fa54c6135
describe
'269113' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYA' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
2ea1ca7638fda2c66529bdd306727fc5
093d3b10623deee4c2c67ae562996a34f274fb34
describe
'284028' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYB' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
6c394d62525510d1a6fad71a851c5170
6d757830e28a07e44044c5564117c31ce5d57255
describe
'298957' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYC' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
a4789bb9e478cac6b409da8c490a470d
d024c6b4cbd593b3897689df1e063449dd66f71d
'2011-11-15T04:00:49-05:00'
describe
'293522' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYD' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
35c7484f8736a4ce01b9e5e003518ab9
189b29deae7493e0a63a5080f516142601022860
describe
'271175' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYE' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
24842a763b268d39f9d36229a6a0bc42
5cb2d6404d3b8cc9ab9a1daa82044dc63d263a37
describe
'260467' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYF' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
07cb8388eafa17e300d62410d3442a51
9f47d21bb3616286295169742e1b3e9dd3f9edc2
describe
'287383' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYG' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
70c0d6aae12947e043c0de33df481869
5aca103565c7824a2055f175c5bce2eb5e4f989e
describe
'279652' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYH' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
fd26afdabb431e70797d76c8b3bc1def
fa567bd78f55a8de8f7a3bd69b011311f91d87b8
describe
'274004' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYI' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
7c0a3d42af63f58f6ad1f98f12a72acf
b89f154769375f50350612ff3660fede47402b0b
describe
'293433' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYJ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
f129fae5fc536c2eb6c658ea756a29e4
db7348220fad1ed1041f7eea01550dd9b5ce85e3
describe
'273398' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYK' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
ec44c1a153b77b041781b9fdc2d9b7fd
c4c9669c382b7555ad74a0bc6eb05de478d5152b
describe
'287192' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYL' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
d1ccf0f0dcfc4e619c8c1a258d57bb72
0c6575f058d3f2fd66fd34ec69ed0b468db70c61
describe
'264152' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYM' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
aff0162dfd3904fe090787e8e8a50320
01c774c52c909d0189d368c87688d5fefe55d64b
'2011-11-15T03:56:35-05:00'
describe
'293548' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYN' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
0986b82a17842591ff1cfb0fc06babd8
2f74dde51c050e904bd35baf6d24ce227f0ed9fc
describe
'273631' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYO' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
24672b6806e719a5dda0ad43d1df5b65
275c6e2e9de03c7f63759c9a7191b184ebdc2e03
describe
'301353' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYP' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
f19c73f078894a209d5ec34a1e8dd791
6d39d748367d27fb2c6639963976bb310676504d
'2011-11-15T04:01:26-05:00'
describe
'283999' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYQ' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
44656fcf6e3dcda5d358bd160b58dfd7
ba87cd8973cc8de23be3335c6390a2de528280b6
describe
'301389' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYR' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
7b7cf778ea314d27d5abb02703440cac
d3610129cd427a1900ad7476f7aa7290025c4bf1
describe
'284042' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYS' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
f33d6939ce0e9a6e7efe33f62b7cb08e
8bb551cd305ebb73431025828baef949a36098a9
'2011-11-15T04:01:45-05:00'
describe
'270734' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYT' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
2b0240f12466517df6098501abbb2f35
48057b748206f4899ba3f5bf9710989a0dfa89df
describe
'273376' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYU' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
27b5149264183a2b10dfc585f61f13d2
fb82b70689ac29453d3aabaf184fef3fe85cc11e
describe
'301428' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYV' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
43d32abf200f8fb591c2346562553c77
5706ad9b12ada66994f485068f83d04250835001
describe
'284023' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYW' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
1bde0167fc275d45e4cd8d06177f80e5
e9796ef14e1cb0a4268181601e1f52338296b627
describe
'272510' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYX' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
306356b9a9219fc18b70b32eeadf1122
27a77124a170b2c8ccec6e5b45a142e7ebbaa1f0
'2011-11-15T03:59:43-05:00'
describe
'258067' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYY' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
3265de5cda17ce5a66ec1f4527d90bf7
ef41d74c72a34e625e80a4fbe2aafd8de31f1456
describe
'283679' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOYZ' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
78115ce52f485661b65ae25278c73621
29923f3fac5be18cadc783284acd0906d904f1a1
describe
'259211' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZA' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
4bbb29f6aafd0f01f8e975aeaeed2fbb
eb9a89b37db3417d7756536fdf5abe283f9f0f94
describe
'290129' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZB' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
06f582767f77da9d48daa10c7b30097b
2ad9e195761f7c9d2319012336c5a31a5cea01c1
'2011-11-15T03:59:45-05:00'
describe
'271049' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZC' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
7e9c7ef695a43c6dd423f9fd0debf955
e15fb85dff3349dc8f36e8ff815c87fa45a95cde
describe
'295737' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZD' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
5ed8f826aee229850e1a6fb764d778bf
806e5e15d612ec6f519f54be5a8b078a3dbf4e5b
describe
'283963' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZE' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
6624bb7c3728284d37f8ddc8971fdbe7
a0b02c1a407b31fb2ce3a57102e8b42d5817e13d
describe
'271674' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZF' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
ad0b99a62e3a89fe7a2f4995319832b1
b4b457b9b3d6291d38cc561e2036125598cbb6f3
describe
'258264' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZG' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
8b07668a3750e8dcbf6899a40d72fbe2
9b6d8835bbb84bf00acf3bc50b6a012147eaa25d
describe
'294315' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZH' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
896f1f7b6c83ae16a1d6e61ece179ba7
44bc99a47bd082cca527d24e83a67fa106ddfe1d
describe
'258423' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZI' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
e13eeb8dc53a5213fe43a2dd2c0d458d
76367fba8bf0373ad71eae6443be912e0f84f984
describe
'296032' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZJ' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
0656e1b34bc652c4828d2bfcea86b429
4236b731fa4bd6c909de0c218b6a04a9101590b3
describe
'284036' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZK' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
f3a35b926289f0b2a6467789eb3d6e82
e62612cee83de83d552cecb396399718f492b0f0
describe
'298053' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZL' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
5d581b1f4d51b950d66c302754906b82
25d6a329b86bc8ec2f95b5b733ea943306defa6b
describe
'283815' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZM' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
3cdccf1544ecc12b89f283fe2a67efc3
54a1f946522b9874e53d43612d916f1db38faddc
describe
'292048' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZN' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
136710e7ecf5fbb37e188887986fdc14
d0120084a27e6ed6af24e96ba37c6ac10c5b83a8
describe
'284014' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZO' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
3e131449dcfe6836189b97dc5a53acb6
f09e8e859437a6e3b7a6132590f098f2df2ecf32
describe
'290140' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZP' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
91db901626811b0d0275a67a94d69c20
063ffec1ecaf92d926428705c215f6468b73b270
describe
'283953' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZQ' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
d03d0c74f52fea4cd8f68aa770eceeff
0a26cecf557b0f3fbff345ca36ea028638933580
describe
'294222' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZR' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
0b34f073295d24b36c546110b377ebf0
5031cda50715b0f3481753f8631f1f0858c9aa57
describe
'1149464' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZS' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
df77472557c2d3fd95b765d29a607bb3
0847a35c9d2c9fdcba6aa8cdee9fee782f9adc5d
describe
'1095023' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZT' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
49b0e53de63c4a8666bb7d2d612307e0
82af48033d8b269ff7484e820f9c2afcce20584e
describe
'1167896' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZU' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
6661bbd42942f1676a6491c119444241
b41e8ee24079a8277f94d11c0dc3928a8fd43468
'2011-11-15T04:00:25-05:00'
describe
'1167340' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZV' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
b81f3062cbe5630bef5ec5cfd3e4deb0
b51877efc67f1ed24d33ab646fbe7af4e6a232e1
describe
'1155610' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZW' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
ba46c9409b25342759bcb469931f1628
43d33ba92e7779d7c5b7a2cbb395f28b401d3643
'2011-11-15T04:03:45-05:00'
describe
'1098047' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZX' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
932dd66f4f3c9bc02d9c45cbc30d4cc2
d21c31d9b862d1df4c33514dcc965b7bf26545f5
describe
'1144256' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZY' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
b945566e7c98968ec4f102d75f974ab5
35f0c44281aa861694922706388383f15b1cb7cc
describe
'1156311' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAOZZ' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
18ca441c0cb3f3ca4dcdf79f3765be6d
379d5df61aaa625d29f5869a1e74c065d58e598f
'2011-11-15T03:56:21-05:00'
describe
'1061943' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAA' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
b32f64925ebf5ac64f4d9b5aa007492c
e9a0fd385e4d01a686d93e83114e380c10d2f36a
describe
'1068177' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAB' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
2a2479c2048729a304be26713fdc841a
1a74e9fea9ae41508c5fcddedb93558ad8a79c9a
describe
'1049995' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAC' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
5c5826f9037aadbea2ac424b46ad8313
e22996999d8c5ca0ae16a8911bced9fb881730a9
describe
'1063534' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAD' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
316e798c5fe4e87ab464cc1544228c78
1ab0e532c93eeb7bb8d450b6a15cc0d1dd3b1cf9
'2011-11-15T04:00:47-05:00'
describe
'1028897' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAE' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
717e6b1741ffdb81b47140d259b4fe80
893df06fd42f9175c33578b8a6f1acabfde4ed50
'2011-11-15T04:02:29-05:00'
describe
'1067150' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAF' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
32091b3913ed639dd7453085de05e3b9
4e9d05b2d49d1c0f89aaa378e42e116e792b6f72
describe
'1061289' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAG' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
002629d8e07d6d2a745bf710010b8d6a
645e50024f92bcf0aadf4bb02437f42a9d05f0ec
describe
'1058344' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAH' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
9e577bf3509e292df9d998cd8c58d19c
2c41ee875e03a4622c5b3422bcc443bfafee5fd4
describe
'1019127' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAI' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
615b9d4be870f0375d4d7cfe68388b0e
f484514897c5c069fde299cd46c74adc7ae8e6fe
describe
'1167876' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAJ' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
3c0a7de1fc277d71d51f7e17e87b684e
c188b13a0cd7bd529e680a680aed121d9ef6858e
describe
'1189824' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAK' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
d380b5a583c43a1e597210d4f58304fd
97140130ae57c590254f01276a22b3ead13c12c7
describe
'1062497' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAL' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
e4249aa4a4f76d88ada0515c37587220
91ad0d24f7e10c4a7df0c3abc05c98e3872eecab
'2011-11-15T03:59:01-05:00'
describe
'1139156' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAM' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
c72a980b263351206d0a4a547bddcbc0
f722f11bfdc8e3cf58b0b337d41807d2897f65c5
describe
'1167874' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAN' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
0b41b7b9ddc3d340a6d01d850c2ea3fd
72b7fcf056d7733d3a43b1f9bb939ac16b6fe0a3
'2011-11-15T03:59:07-05:00'
describe
'1189816' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAO' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
a4ad8b37c4b5fa94b6ccc53a5f66ead0
c84321443c6d205a54eb67ef353dd76408d1ef3c
describe
'1163155' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAP' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
5b53a0c0e5f1e2294ce1cab32c1b547d
41d949952caa0a1d908dcec104beea550a2e7f28
'2011-11-15T04:03:48-05:00'
describe
'1066205' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAQ' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
b5e0127188059a646cd9f48f02a25abd
1f03fff7c6dc8c097632748a619308cbd8ce084a
'2011-11-15T03:58:19-05:00'
describe
'1167911' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAR' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
9cf2478b19e1e579919b8d09922dd93d
1438c315221f65a2467b9578b4ba9fe1fb8e0219
describe
'1189786' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAS' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
1d46c5ff310fc1a5cf327bb6d1ccbd43
babefae6cde7e6fb436da5446cc46796e6c46086
'2011-11-15T03:55:06-05:00'
describe
'1126543' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAT' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
4f2332ecd91f311e80f0a85952b24406
cc6e22bc892b8894d2d3a06be7ce8ee190e99f56
describe
'1146050' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAU' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
55e949208e4b080f7f717d4b67932679
59dfb782b5bd011d65ad0749176abc48b5a74f1d
describe
'1149465' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAV' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
75eb0755ab18985abd5ac4307e01798e
cec35fc754fd98052d00069123d63c9b467e2e2e
describe
'1140556' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAW' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
38f4164a69c546da24be7f8c776d3c0e
75cc506202e4af21a5febd009e4a252a86326c7c
describe
'1167894' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAX' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
ca643a539b008b17d8b2aba620965dd4
4a6f69bb80c1f076b45ea7771312fa89786f70b5
describe
'1144163' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAY' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
7f14149293773833990dddd3d5ef7d4f
3a45ec3f833b51244acdfb469203e4254692dc2b
'2011-11-15T03:57:48-05:00'
describe
'1052043' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPAZ' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
9ac3a1056d82754c49d8951022c3779c
916a40a2f3e70be8f35f0c941ae46d5ea2f382dd
describe
'1063560' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBA' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
9958adcdcb03c5259a58c7056695a8d9
2320d84bae0c3f5462021da47afb76e36dd66a6c
describe
'1167922' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBB' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
14d2bb249cfd9b855b61a963ffb2ca8e
d3f636c776a3457d92f5c46ff8bfca5ad2d80055
describe
'1177376' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBC' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
707e8458dd9bc4a6ed9639cafbea3749
61601786a7a2c0656443e82d2e92964c0911adc5
describe
'1167904' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBD' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
d5ddb4f9e9135207d573cd81b9cda808
6edc9f85ac30fec91ecf8b42d5df02cc0174bb97
'2011-11-15T04:01:58-05:00'
describe
'1177374' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBE' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
bcb3a5b8f51de641e8c00733893d1f65
72f8bc63110c14b4100ed128e2ff0f2f13ec2e31
describe
'1167895' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBF' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
e92b61f86d71a8f2aaa03cbc30a32f4b
b967e57438551befe077b255b50a7fc6499a57d6
describe
'1181202' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBG' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
a0a1211e40d758d8958a3f1c636aaa58
89872f5e41272d0fc61259b9ec390267327c9ed6
describe
'1167919' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBH' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
863a2ca2ae24e844bebeb8f2e41fa6c9
94b18ff164b28a7088fa56e631e3980d28fb3d97
'2011-11-15T03:58:08-05:00'
describe
'1177363' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBI' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
708dac8094c79b05a13c836b506fe695
67d12d4805b20cc0576be7713d8840f4dd05c3a2
describe
'1167903' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBJ' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
a5e479ed6e459998385034e0fd650cfe
d71451bbe09f1442763222c3b9ebc16d4437ef49
describe
'1129073' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBK' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
8d867aab10bace90577db6ad94fbcad9
28f83918e9e1910aeea0aaf9aa92b3752ab2f739
'2011-11-15T04:01:37-05:00'
describe
'1027432' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBL' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
a53a89ba90eb170a6896a776a18cd174
a5b8d81ee8c00f31126650dd5c3782d393f4476d
'2011-11-15T03:56:23-05:00'
describe
'1069682' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBM' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
1e3b9a22cdb5c45a99e0ab4010366153
af50347ca144df2c7e9ac6d7d12024f3eaaf98ad
'2011-11-15T04:02:47-05:00'
describe
'1167926' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBN' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
612a1e23bd52f5b33771b3bf16fd8c80
130b38899b2fae3b4e1aca8b7a0445e69f55a44f
'2011-11-15T04:00:48-05:00'
describe
'1089336' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBO' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
81960aa5c168670e516eb5e0c5bbdd0f
eeaad194151ccc1bdc78f4a34cc407d8627418cb
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBP' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
772178872083a6da479b30b1b35c20d9
8133a3e602e944e2d274c798bd5c1daee00927a0
describe
'1125396' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBQ' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
c876a8a44114e72499676861fa8ca3c5
6ad3c35b2d081be6e56e1de77b388befb5a5d289
describe
'1177383' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBR' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
2d3951c3317a8a91f1135f159a299b0c
4566578617e9829ca38105c6c7d942d71085e27e
describe
'1105049' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBS' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
d5d5e785f27629da9f8e274056536972
d8099e478a0535a49c4f93ff6be7d17104241616
describe
'1132874' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBT' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
eb7ec6ed8669694f2ecd7b7d38192fa4
d99baa429034830c932beab76779a1e07d392b13
'2011-11-15T04:00:27-05:00'
describe
'1081352' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBU' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
70d74d29ad505ab6a760670bbf10411d
29481920c31d8bd4c2db11f57663e49fa870365a
describe
'1052028' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBV' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
e51b7383ba3fb1b0fd0bb64dda16b2db
f81327f063550510ac96c574fa696896bc8b5909
describe
'1167913' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBW' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
c7264fe47106dd02d2c817ce6b905ab4
f562655c23f73f069ecb609a177b9e6f1079ea4e
describe
'1189817' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBX' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
14c618dacaa2a3c351f1b649b64ebc7c
b68e8fb14c10da34f5467f30cb4fb711e8c9ce70
describe
'1167700' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBY' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
ca6c34a765df5b2d0f484bf6f2fc129b
636638d8594522f3a554e7da2dac838699820614
describe
'1167912' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPBZ' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
e89f9b331598423cb70b11dc0e54e5f3
2d3f0b6216254cbbebc21caa5022a0f07ae89a21
describe
'1100133' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCA' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
a16b7ce369eebf18d68f14bcb9d371b3
209e71c0e02bab9a58ff0207869878920035ea3b
describe
'1167925' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCB' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
892053b9142802f99c409f9ac2d0c827
1b3b7471042c764094d787e9e30351155bf9e63f
describe
'1062289' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCC' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
40b00e9ee85cb5948416f51fb2c7fbf8
d2a14f7263abd3e2921a8114e5456d2d3d5ee15e
'2011-11-15T03:55:28-05:00'
describe
'1049658' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCD' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
626147f636fa29641c141f9e98128f12
29469d6b0152fe27041de7be4098f355a117f6ad
describe
'1046893' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCE' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
488933f9b78652a3b53f057b3f27df9e
b28cd97baf523b055aa1af375bd4384e114c3d67
describe
'1167927' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCF' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
ed249109e131aec0a7103def6d47e499
20f2146f88a8c99e673275888454b49fb5b1b1d0
describe
'1079745' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCG' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
f014b196832eeb65fee225aef4b10a13
1dedb3f3b03a99fc9d6939d364813c66104365c0
describe
'1068585' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCH' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
b3b4eb611fd0be3937ae5dea97c03cf6
21f6556042bfbc4b034b79415b85ca44e7b063d7
describe
'1169382' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCI' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
7455e7a644a210f0d4409466f1fc0d90
ff3c672cfcf7076f27e598b5e2761660f09c9ea4
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCJ' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
4e20ab98f72f8f649f985ac22036489a
ac1aa1d20934c07e38f0931c14f6c92ce510c5a4
describe
'1083576' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCK' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
657cc968d66912fce5f81f2cfd1f7979
5d2cc364174d4f33adae67f5a268a0e32c537bc6
describe
'1167921' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCL' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
a6bee30f52bf8e0d2eb169e3bd2f9ee3
f4683c1f09722a29885d5e43b9a14943ee9b569c
describe
'1061319' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCM' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
e4be687aaf52578c567d39b3d0e4bf95
4816ec1cf87a5eadfbfe587e15523301fd5bbd47
describe
'1167914' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCN' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
7f68abe8d09814c2df9266c162b0f941
d68f53565093f1f7728972edfb62835571ff728c
describe
'1081937' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCO' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
9b3534f3b73ac667a4209a60a6ff951d
dc75423fa4f0935f3542982fd9cbaae511a78bf5
'2011-11-15T04:03:29-05:00'
describe
'1167924' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCP' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
825b982818749a8970b49b06840b0099
aef32907f389c20e22013107134c85589ced0101
describe
'1177696' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCQ' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
8ea13266396e600881d7ebf8596cd8ad
800b66e14b960012a14d71acf393cc0b8f38fc99
describe
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCR' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
b37d5f5141123f386c316406ff54bece
b5ce402f5174c40fe92500a1a1b471c8d3ed3b0b
describe
'1189774' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCS' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
45561f49ec02992056f12f8703ef7cbb
cb7aa32c6091ed5e6a65b8029b20aa4fa66ddfec
describe
'1133706' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCT' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
80ca996ed2712e680072dba17554dad9
35554bd799e6ef11d61b0130a03ac62eca735d20
'2011-11-15T04:04:03-05:00'
describe
'1067141' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCU' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
0b7b1f41da998e9cfe62e6b329547409
66e2d9b8e9f5239efab856fa64c2b9c583740ebf
describe
'1036366' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCV' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
441d5e029fef9a07cab0a6027df3c923
1dae506390f8715f707437309474cab1819cc934
describe
'1169712' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCW' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
9072f8fdcc44d72cef76eeb5eb4225c3
d7fbf5dae2c9d9266e552634518e3ef98dbdd864
describe
'1167897' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCX' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
6b07e79cd952d1de0c2f48a20bd65b29
ceaf425bc0938d8df6d356eecc84acf84a159be6
describe
'1086168' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCY' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
33d07f17412920b37f9a5fbb721c5a76
70249382978364239ef4ed7e863dc50e952300ab
describe
'1155603' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPCZ' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
25873cdb59ed5e5a4c5649e1404b0951
96518da6d0d6a45d4aef9a9aaccbeeaa6bf4e79a
describe
'1136343' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDA' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
7c9248b790d2056c8f2ea50bbaa675e3
a53589a7b0af806b0be52de602d0eb3daa70f869
'2011-11-15T03:56:50-05:00'
describe
'1118050' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDB' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
ece66abf7428183fb2c8c105decbfe16
3a4cf35d6f5d4ab428daeee6ce22932212a95a9f
describe
'1165401' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDC' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
1221af67a55eed70dc2fc6a5d5761a58
9d37732166047133c0950ac4c1789d03180892d4
describe
'1055159' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDD' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
9e9e6d91b889ee4110500b548da2257b
0e5a4dbef2953fd4f41d64fe6a49a57ae3b521fc
'2011-11-15T04:01:29-05:00'
describe
'1075913' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDE' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
2ba97c7b1acf5710535954baf7466b34
3ac62f0f6f3432574abf50c9d9fa2197218a82d4
describe
'1180191' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDF' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
a75df579bf4d3550802fb9f8cb14ab7c
ec846e82f0ddfebb03e157cb6a050fc309a47e72
describe
'1170678' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDG' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
6393aea505858d0a707472ead0c5761a
4bc057af8a502e8bfaa26d281bdda28cdd16a963
describe
'1080106' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDH' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
a81320556bd8451528d70d1f06cbcc96
da3fddfb8c969559dff3959c81df2455ac3b075e
'2011-11-15T04:00:04-05:00'
describe
'1160649' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDI' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
b868730bee6f3022f5d78c1c83b2f0e4
f4bbb0f617eec662adb7fc506773efd36d687711
describe
'1206922' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDJ' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
3de366f51a626c7cdd420257e460b79b
6b09d7dc806994d66e15566d35122fcb6d0cdfc9
describe
'1200741' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDK' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
420bd8b6fe1f31b308c034bb2967e75b
b7ef6219682d90e6a2f669bbd60daae819054e7c
describe
'1181863' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDL' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
be78a9c0e280bb120a87ef65d37fc503
c8f61b0f9e958060a1c0ef25145799cf552d51d5
describe
'992442' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDM' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
1599f9f19340ae262fdd8e77ba316e47
afe00a9fa7bb37e85dd34b16e1150cc05ba55599
describe
'1133735' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDN' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
ae726645df6451ddfadcd9d2625dc0ba
b58f14b38e53776a65b1a7713d03cd365f76598a
describe
'1181475' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDO' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
2a96dd601431628ca46a544706404776
53c1aa1240f1814b6c50426b47d2105072af60e0
describe
'1145676' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDP' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
02aba9fea5f17f75c7402efa0af56118
60e1fa7eac80f7f923fd7d04f5546fc9af65423c
describe
'1121051' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDQ' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
3e5b8e219d6852b48d597879881644d4
df30237e1e7c924a168ab7d64df78d904c2d5883
describe
'1052958' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDR' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
171a41614412504f6d99d2db46e37c16
30dadeb7f8af884cd98e79f6703e00b06c9bf3ba
describe
'1109538' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDS' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
97307d83d68da94d4a4d99e8feb2671d
d8c8187ddfe344e7ba8b4560c70c9eb9a1d6950d
describe
'1100202' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDT' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
c0613ab884af2f0b8443d900d63d9b35
4cdd4598d74ef7998f648d032a4fd9ee7b3ba71e
describe
'1120806' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDU' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
af218911c096bf6af37567c8482452af
a51e5c8f2ea9af5a2a3eb75fafbf0533b028670f
describe
'1110628' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDV' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
2af552922d314edefdaa951e8bba0af2
018073648fbafb69f99d2ab51ee8a68737840667
describe
'1126269' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDW' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
5df17818b0da86337f552e77eead7613
d1f5c67388a83c60f471d8b34aee2f93a852fc31
describe
'1188448' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDX' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
2bbf4211ce46817f34e6b48bcd63cf4e
f3684ed081be92448c981d7718683b1c8c18ce2f
describe
'1175521' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDY' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
c8478dc8daa88c12ab6cbc81a401855f
ecbfe067d0cf71bedfc21f7be25f1af021d0b407
describe
'1102551' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPDZ' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
311cd20d88b0e38b9b237d92b82d16bc
67f638bbd1cbc84b78b4aebd5135497d060266bc
'2011-11-15T03:56:55-05:00'
describe
'1121434' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEA' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
ba7ed443bdc6e930e159f554f24ec7b3
1ff9acca227e775a39c22536f6faa098283e5e36
'2011-11-15T04:02:09-05:00'
describe
'1188478' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEB' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
3930d5946c4e6608adb73d13533944fb
294c04c77eb19d36cffcd3c49530b2bc05518f42
describe
'1098285' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEC' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
22f04fcc0415f7d366fc478e4d45d0f1
727fb8c827c9530a2c089ea860f123f2cfd27bd0
describe
'1105855' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPED' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
e3a06def306d7ca1f2ffd075da516a82
383367727d16e3f8d55b70d385fe9c5d8bfc1e38
describe
'1114203' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEE' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
0efbc60bb3d386290b8b7bc4c160b7af
a7dbd3ccc38e2ee712cbd65ff9945c339581f6bc
describe
'1054783' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEF' 'sip-files00306.jp2'
cde959dde1f7a263f5c81f3523f2ebe2
0a854c111bcf04cb2be3ac1081b6a20acb2d45ef
'2011-11-15T04:02:26-05:00'
describe
'1179343' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEG' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
e9347ceb70092c62b911fc2b89c1d3ae
b583719afc271aa7453a492563e95b2ad7edcaee
describe
'1072385' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEH' 'sip-files00308.jp2'
7381999e2b55abbe7b3bbffc1c850acd
651f4ff447571fd9c8dabb655675d96e0dd611eb
describe
'1137623' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEI' 'sip-files00309.jp2'
1c968b31a7e2a2881dd612619ab7dd3a
e7c56b477f8b930a1257bc672315078f3d68e3fa
describe
'1096122' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEJ' 'sip-files00310.jp2'
70aa0911609cad2dfb6f9dabbc9f6c43
c699087e9d04c99e0c204aae8b1a593d7168aa96
describe
'1175485' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEK' 'sip-files00311.jp2'
c17f6f4e873e3b48a34061001d5bc932
5487c8809cfe5eb0292e671de7c20bfaca211c13
describe
'1084732' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEL' 'sip-files00312.jp2'
f15c450fc36ad4efb1fe392d3a51e82d
7b777bda867a5815a9254953bc91ca8284b62f98
describe
'1082949' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEM' 'sip-files00313.jp2'
1a51f714bfa7cfadfe4d06a93f142476
505ce36698445a5220cff884e40bb5ecd9975fd5
describe
'1064258' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEN' 'sip-files00314.jp2'
014eeabe8b784c70d479c10cca133227
87fcc583a9b9c2cf409555bf408c7b76169b4806
describe
'1071179' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEO' 'sip-files00315.jp2'
d8fb927e7b23de733bb4e2797145f5b7
ad0f2c72562c25dfbdd2f721aa4d452051245a64
describe
'1177547' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEP' 'sip-files00316.jp2'
3103d9055bd895ca47b22755f7016f48
da9016f163df107a5928e474276f4654cdf52786
describe
'1111315' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEQ' 'sip-files00317.jp2'
86d82b948185c49f3d823b27a1a18f99
6161c92c2f622deb0e3e5dd0498c4c5027791eea
describe
'1037406' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPER' 'sip-files00318.jp2'
6da34c5197c4d30e664da2d15a347028
554e1d91283e56cdc3a8646c8939b99dc98a23cb
describe
'1074676' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPES' 'sip-files00319.jp2'
2f35d5995999929c37fa3375c2d66f85
bbfd83c44213769c610519ddc99690cf0a3e8118
describe
'1147704' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPET' 'sip-files00322.jp2'
bef0daa6dd2e981b378fce5a3afff58e
2e19b49e3ac2300d446922b59322c100da73961f
describe
'1134834' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEU' 'sip-files00323.jp2'
e012a386276a468da5c2a865f54ccb96
3c23aacd0b89185c75fce97576fa202d11eba5ab
describe
'1047490' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEV' 'sip-files00324.jp2'
48c85501057f022934a1f654dfbe6221
eb62a9a9886cf102b216b79e2c0227a3abf0aa76
describe
'1106538' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEW' 'sip-files00325.jp2'
c0af498e4c06250add0fcd73f78e30da
1bc9d1f3133a36e72b75f56a7d54b456bc098061
describe
'1088751' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEX' 'sip-files00326.jp2'
f39bd1f8531c9392ebf9e6e167abd6d0
7beb29b4817220ee556075b78576d59c262b6415
describe
'1040678' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEY' 'sip-files00327.jp2'
a736e8b523d4f0c2a370a26caea027b9
d5f0b11403745eee983413f14c579dfc6a1db1ac
'2011-11-15T03:58:05-05:00'
describe
'1191100' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPEZ' 'sip-files00329.jp2'
22f462e8cce2e0383fdb7f89c7daa3b2
318ef5487787c4038e19585854086a9cdbbc45ca
describe
'1106377' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFA' 'sip-files00330.jp2'
e1b95d0401cbed437e068668b7fc00d6
8e589bcc0f155ea2b8c1f480b6669f5aa1ae71a5
'2011-11-15T03:57:57-05:00'
describe
'1084624' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFB' 'sip-files00331.jp2'
1661cee0d3eacefd6d6865a1cfc65f36
2710005f728bb03564b9011a9ac10b24e374bb98
describe
'1174443' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFC' 'sip-files00332.jp2'
edc1f90f58efeebafb38ceb990b6e9bb
772129652fbfae7387a70630a7e478eddfe2a82e
describe
'1141106' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFD' 'sip-files00333.jp2'
4287336821b330e5efcaccc314c705cb
81d0265726d64501056b46bde8de19eed9df1473
describe
'1081996' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFE' 'sip-files00334.jp2'
b0dea9b4ab85d4faa95bc64783abf359
85b83c5f76d689affe01a674f9fe49cf17ea4426
describe
'1066497' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFF' 'sip-files00335.jp2'
bb2ac37eb30ef115dda1bcdcf50854b7
2d8164468dcbc0550ca90b7a078bbaa961bac8ef
describe
'1091356' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFG' 'sip-files00336.jp2'
4f8a1afb688f375698f07890f660b0ea
cfd61f8150936accc46b25cab3137413413d7536
'2011-11-15T04:02:36-05:00'
describe
'1161846' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFH' 'sip-files00337.jp2'
210db8c84df1c2a877f7c7fd1a37762c
81455965bb823a520ca97a841035e27b3cbba0d7
'2011-11-15T04:02:38-05:00'
describe
'1117375' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFI' 'sip-files00338.jp2'
ec71fdd7fdde988dabcc93b8c4aeb65c
43a940c75c0bac64ce6ea800a9f4fb7981fb774d
describe
'1115249' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFJ' 'sip-files00339.jp2'
4f9fc16b6dce725a375eee44d6feda45
263ad3c1d0255b568c30eb5eaa856d17420a2d36
describe
'1103612' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFK' 'sip-files00340.jp2'
bc256e0dc33d0b81678d688de90eee92
a132eba2ace9209d47b4c0e08be27c68d9e5d1a7
describe
'1136742' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFL' 'sip-files00341.jp2'
3dd6f4b141e9e9916581da565b20cf77
abe8c969ad5f1b10efc3d857c692a43e037d1461
describe
'1123877' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFM' 'sip-files00342.jp2'
9995c5d0d3e2caf5e0c92f31394502db
75dfd67830dbe7bd015ec91c78ce36e0719c6aa8
describe
'1105465' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFN' 'sip-files00343.jp2'
3924c161e7fb0e73a6345d0720edd0a9
0ce53ddada68c27553e646c2d6f0839e13931f50
describe
'1111969' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFO' 'sip-files00344.jp2'
c42710e6d29f85be670eafe66d22a471
cc2ad8f54a9802a314ca3983832c499fa2fbbd8e
'2011-11-15T04:03:23-05:00'
describe
'1097270' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFP' 'sip-files00345.jp2'
5211ac6fbe67139bb14c9a404f236ef8
54de1daa65fd914defcb0213f61ec35f12c9b982
describe
'1105153' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFQ' 'sip-files00346.jp2'
b7388dc0c3133da3d7e8c3ea403f5b76
6027545e93d89ff4b0dc75e48bcae2570db74c61
'2011-11-15T03:55:31-05:00'
describe
'1136031' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFR' 'sip-files00347.jp2'
e9fb8109054c54ce7893fd78925c6cf7
e7b060f2f28d939b407bc91d596a37a3d40edeb3
describe
'1183126' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFS' 'sip-files00348.jp2'
45d99603c1d4801ee523b86d16d615c6
c27b191cf767909dc9aefe055470db2b21298264
'2011-11-15T04:03:18-05:00'
describe
'1177409' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFT' 'sip-files00349.jp2'
b89b1da3e5905b998d738ce395f6eb4f
75aed960242f9aa0f67c6c6d454310bd7bf38c3c
describe
'1176394' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFU' 'sip-files00350.jp2'
e00765f8c7e13f871add7c4eed07706d
2a5538067d2a66a0dbfa0f834debcb62dcf5df07
describe
'1181828' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFV' 'sip-files00351.jp2'
269a15652600c7274312f35be9b1124f
dced9dbd4cc17126c1e9b72894d7ee57a3bde5a1
'2011-11-15T03:57:16-05:00'
describe
'1195150' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFW' 'sip-files00352.jp2'
7efdc523d4bb444456f479db9aebc693
16d69d0a1971ac71e4cd768003cfcc0d72275f14
describe
'1104332' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFX' 'sip-files00353.jp2'
41479125a6107175c2eb3ff88ff3193f
55382369b0ced87c71f5812943770fa34ba06a46
describe
'1119558' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFY' 'sip-files00354.jp2'
7da172d232feeb9ac4a6c5722e01fc22
0ed8096ec4cd80a5e73073236088e44ac91e6e82
'2011-11-15T03:55:48-05:00'
describe
'1237674' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPFZ' 'sip-files00357.jp2'
19fad7e8ee350dab5016afac263c95e4
d2a0dfb78cfb66106a2d7bd0c2c640634b83a6ac
describe
'1275359' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGA' 'sip-files00358.jp2'
8beaa0e9fb132eaafa3b76d1c0ed29e8
b584a70e698b59fb928b96df16c9b5bf493dae56
'2011-11-15T03:59:32-05:00'
describe
'429600' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGB' 'sip-files00359.jp2'
59cc44dc36b86e63c77387860488fdf4
e108e908cabbbac7781e413f81f162d174ea7060
describe
'32050632' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGC' 'sip-files00000.tif'
3dc0f28d5e92f6fcb16da9cee8616ab1
4d2797a26a92af0642ce7a74793c4f5199e8ad92
'2011-11-15T04:04:02-05:00'
describe
'2516668' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGD' 'sip-files00002.tif'
c5ad13c1699d8525ece8cf1be1687f62
673fdd99369f03ec117ef78e782081dffd48d4ef
describe
'28096456' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGE' 'sip-files00006.tif'
8ffe27f778bc46d168e9b2f3004225a6
ffd9b810772cde178b4fe9de3c5bb701a09f182e
describe
'2344832' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGF' 'sip-files00007.tif'
313fc692b68abbd9c061b1cf2afa7228
b8c918318fa1488564727052cb39ba02ee7b0cd5
describe
'2340588' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGG' 'sip-files00009.tif'
29def68ffde78555445901801a4ff4ab
94480f7282c3b7c01ef705b9a5b040ffe35edcfd
'2011-11-15T03:57:10-05:00'
describe
'2361732' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGH' 'sip-files00012.tif'
a0d380fe7fbb6e23f84163f0226086d2
49e4a36acdf00270498b2157d75b2f6c85fbb30c
describe
'2356216' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGI' 'sip-files00013.tif'
c071a24e982e77954b144b9ca36aa297
c34e8a4784a73c098dbe4f0cfaea1ea8105de2ee
describe
'2398212' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGJ' 'sip-files00014.tif'
e5959d611b791bd963c7a865b71000fd
ff78d4a7030475cbc4045fe1244be4ff490fcc71
describe
'2275620' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGK' 'sip-files00015.tif'
9724b2f599d6f429d58ce2bc2b9eb00a
154ee4b014fce0e825d526740d73734d10346ab5
describe
'2293488' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGL' 'sip-files00016.tif'
eea848ba1a79f23671667b53e265f0fd
7f6c5f9b9d40a5370d65714c8053e8e5c09d7643
describe
'2190388' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGM' 'sip-files00017.tif'
e5759434fe9480f6f9f488ea069dc0a8
39965ba90e032423999da94d2680823181dc7d69
'2011-11-15T03:59:20-05:00'
describe
'2304148' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGN' 'sip-files00018.tif'
9df9c9a79d259d95ad24a426e2fbb024
15ea2e6111635e490499cb6effb17743278b540b
describe
'2355824' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGO' 'sip-files00019.tif'
67d33def67fa87024637c441bf6fc5e7
f55d62253050fc9ec7da4b58026c251f95ffd3bc
'2011-11-15T03:56:59-05:00'
describe
'2343160' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGP' 'sip-files00020.tif'
3cc4ac4bf3362162521ee59d793b6954
bdf48a2d6d482b5a895b69ebce37304828567c12
describe
'2356056' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGQ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
48038c049ba5f8e3361635aec40cab6c
16537389c1be1cec1a8caa9736a70a9ccf239c35
describe
'2304868' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGR' 'sip-files00022.tif'
ff3ad2c31ec3b9a794209925c7a7fce7
c70968d9ef2935557c4f596f236d3225422a0fa0
describe
'2356112' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGS' 'sip-files00023.tif'
6c97d3633c9b495a8cbc54f9870627fb
488ee7910c0b51f0474d18b2ec41433e32d42595
describe
'2307988' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGT' 'sip-files00024.tif'
1ee1500c3abae4730275d7c6034fa844
2eaf6841b72e91c6fd00be281426a5db7ea7fffc
describe
'2356280' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGU' 'sip-files00025.tif'
e75a085d13fb6b3e8f7ab76c2ea1b084
cfba6385091b56523f87f262e9d1c8122598cbab
describe
'2130692' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGV' 'sip-files00026.tif'
7391c39c056b807f6bb3f2e41cfc50ba
b5d5c0017ce59df5e7a4deeae8143227fb9e9649
describe
'2282440' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGW' 'sip-files00027.tif'
4ebb2f00510d494877aba3d620a48381
af5a2ac88e62eb0aa22a88734638aac229d81b12
describe
'2348924' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGX' 'sip-files00028.tif'
ce4d7b663a3101e2c76bad6f5203dca6
6f25daf04943e1b944682bb9478877a98afdf469
'2011-11-15T04:03:12-05:00'
describe
'2112852' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGY' 'sip-files00029.tif'
dcdae1e6787e57933aef00a1ca97f7c7
4fcd2701e53c540d5ec18206ec2abf20aca69982
'2011-11-15T03:54:49-05:00'
describe
'2086452' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPGZ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
dadd36291f5e56443538d5f3314b14a4
b4c530297dfda5fb7f1441af314710b163214376
describe
'2287204' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHA' 'sip-files00031.tif'
e5703e642977a2f7da96c5dabe4b8a3d
f9999cc7f76abb76756942d38c649b1ad52c546a
describe
'2212052' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHB' 'sip-files00032.tif'
225a4a538691bbfd58b2754237bc845e
6f3d997f620eff4fe526670eedbafdaa57536b7e
describe
'2283052' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHC' 'sip-files00033.tif'
03677ded41ccb4c68d5eee5015bce888
2d3a9296a842e529e4ada47c821d0dd88692e151
describe
'2356080' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHD' 'sip-files00034.tif'
ac7faa7fd256c47c6a66e8c4c8cff091
86f1d41f87b9fdffba25ca8ccc4d0902382eb0c5
describe
'2303880' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHE' 'sip-files00035.tif'
dc05ed31f8a042400cdadc0ed5702ce7
d8aeeb68c3353c2952903c25a0211efd39f118fa
describe
'2320944' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHF' 'sip-files00036.tif'
4d4a007c0b38964c6afc6bf4fa50258b
66cfe45ad8994eb7900081026bbcbf0e5997fa8d
describe
'2355996' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHG' 'sip-files00037.tif'
ea03363131e5bdb5b027e1f7831d13d3
f92636f6cddcb176fc8cae55917d8f0bc61eb3c7
describe
'2356092' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHH' 'sip-files00039.tif'
8f31289caa0f0847539d952d20918372
bba09f5314a880dc959ed84165b28a45e9e921ac
describe
'2372584' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHI' 'sip-files00040.tif'
3a080e4353132e1a55c7c080d5576f81
48f5d03497de469826af54f466a192152223abe8
'2011-11-15T04:03:00-05:00'
describe
'2268956' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHJ' 'sip-files00041.tif'
4c9d7366987e5fd97c34170daa820e37
235c7dd6e66c6b6ab0abaa15975334ec83c73251
describe
'2246100' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHK' 'sip-files00042.tif'
c8f2218efa4c5b7888157e36b11fb977
bb14835367febe1b9aa2821b83b391f8ead17417
'2011-11-15T03:59:08-05:00'
describe
'2236432' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHL' 'sip-files00043.tif'
1d5bb47ff0787b4a86172ffcc5d51d0d
021289e19420e3fc9fc1975c0f6f993a196c9aad
describe
'2188436' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHM' 'sip-files00044.tif'
c886a6a3ea1dc608c211d1bf088d2ede
ffa48d4d795e075f88b9969f14e91bbff782e2ce
describe
'2267784' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHN' 'sip-files00045.tif'
d4d560fd27b925ad6a7c81adacd9db3c
0d330947e232370692ffde40c20297cfe0040bf4
describe
'2189636' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHO' 'sip-files00046.tif'
617f95e4f367c5f54cf0cfe3d5633325
93cdcea1a1f3269bc479a7517e582572e234ee6d
describe
'2300728' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHP' 'sip-files00047.tif'
7bb6f7cdb7d837def670d6201143b6c0
5811b882260ab1ab24f67146f1f72f2286754046
'2011-11-15T03:59:09-05:00'
describe
'2274444' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHQ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
2572a33227ccbbd239dee4f1392b52e6
e7536172aa23f368592d7e2a75012fa86379fb08
describe
'2277092' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHR' 'sip-files00049.tif'
230c1e1e147cfbb121066cdfbe93ed7c
53c9ea5c2ff116a84cb1d2d26fc0af515ebcc5d3
describe
'2236532' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHS' 'sip-files00050.tif'
74a9e6f0f269f3f4dd0c263c1cabca76
a175a7cbe5f1da0f106da8f61cfe1be6bc3a2f2c
describe
'2310932' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHT' 'sip-files00051.tif'
bf3d387fd59727bb51a5380743882440
d8d7ea45b7bd6b3023f4b086308cc96b66c567ac
'2011-11-15T03:55:27-05:00'
describe
'2298436' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHU' 'sip-files00052.tif'
8699011e47f4277e8db8395f9082cbce
d1fb0e777af1c489a6dc37d5dc9e42b1f33da59b
describe
'2310184' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHV' 'sip-files00053.tif'
98fb1858acdef41fc9a92c68cc64963f
4d8a6ca44c446e96b2c47476e6d6d5bf9632fb96
describe
'2304464' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHW' 'sip-files00054.tif'
183ffae6b94287c98ec08a331ae6585b
2a2309682a77760df58f125ec69e0590de31e106
describe
'2275096' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHX' 'sip-files00055.tif'
01266050ed82794716e28dd30693d969
f9a43cf144bde211a434c49e1e9102af43b4653d
describe
'2311544' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHY' 'sip-files00056.tif'
409d5f98e01a18422ca7b0cd5ed7e7ee
bef64f02a5d7e2cc8d7b76adce767e2fd8fe8c73
describe
'2117184' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPHZ' 'sip-files00057.tif'
15dd025bd4ef6c454237ae74f355f29d
27069fe764f5d8932da263ccc1e00b52f4b0fa6b
'2011-11-15T04:03:51-05:00'
describe
'2294164' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIA' 'sip-files00058.tif'
9be7f9699ffd2ef45ed3a3d6c13b2aa8
6e1d38fa61e83b1617596dcc704d4945697971e6
describe
'2433924' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIB' 'sip-files00060.tif'
e5bef0165a05afc33f5384ccf1ec298d
bf66f14c8baa3ab1c5c8567b171b9ddb103e7f9e
'2011-11-15T04:02:04-05:00'
describe
'2356076' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIC' 'sip-files00061.tif'
e4c842c9ff67eb0c0006783e160db1c7
74ce71dbf2dcf84fa16b29126609ecf566f93f31
describe
'2342668' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPID' 'sip-files00062.tif'
2c69ab2fc3719ab78113c150bb0660bb
dee8a5e0fd8b3bb14dedec6e1273ec5083d259ec
describe
'2305352' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIE' 'sip-files00063.tif'
a23b5b5c4b9aaac0542b932dca42952d
9f54f582784890d4070f7f1e6b19834561a35018
describe
'2363768' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIF' 'sip-files00064.tif'
dcffe8317299938d2913800523b411d8
13cffb89be9f8b539e163ae2e721c44aa1b672c2
'2011-11-15T04:00:26-05:00'
describe
'2356588' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIG' 'sip-files00065.tif'
bfdcd5c1f5755f0ef9538d70a44302a3
faa689bba8e096bdb7950bda47b255781bd84871
'2011-11-15T03:55:22-05:00'
describe
'2336660' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIH' 'sip-files00066.tif'
b9745df8f0516d55bf58b3d8025208d9
2517b996868004b68d8eade2e0316122269abecd
describe
'2356248' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPII' 'sip-files00067.tif'
abeb9bd6f2ebdcb5aaa14c0d16eedb75
9a8518b692e461077dd20877a00ba68d3c6f34b1
describe
'2336808' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIJ' 'sip-files00068.tif'
13523d7f6f4d5b2ee9d090a1a8c7f3cd
830b95e75e9c3fd9f4c6c9fd35f1b8ab62aec470
describe
'2356296' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIK' 'sip-files00069.tif'
34f7628fca8c6d0510c2969fce82ccd1
7df0a791f8180f3cb6ef1639bb92c79682d5173c
'2011-11-15T04:00:56-05:00'
describe
'2322752' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIL' 'sip-files00070.tif'
a0a84822eed601359d8458672ac43089
6ac4d6e351fa040c74f28d3faa4e5c36fc69aeb7
describe
'2337800' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIM' 'sip-files00071.tif'
0dcac396aed8b87f7193697d20923b85
2bef4596d9b1b02f6a5bc9c5f2f7f9d522ae27b7
describe
'2337136' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIN' 'sip-files00072.tif'
9db4ec548cc83481ba9bb38d46052710
2d4b922d7404d1700fb0ec31ea1ca6044302aec9
'2011-11-15T04:03:06-05:00'
describe
'2275776' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIO' 'sip-files00073.tif'
8ec9ae3468db089c3575faf13e3982fa
e77f75435fda63ffa5eb5b847a2696adfc0aef05
'2011-11-15T03:58:48-05:00'
describe
'2336636' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIP' 'sip-files00074.tif'
5967e41f91a395b53b2abdf8c77cc432
cfca2d67f5dfbc704e633574b1cfb0ce88c28332
'2011-11-15T03:54:56-05:00'
describe
'2355924' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIQ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
a8f004f547e86ab62bece8d54aed612a
0c0c96b70aecfa5a919fec4d86544be1f56b126b
describe
'2336856' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIR' 'sip-files00076.tif'
abb36669913836d661f992ecf9e2883f
6b416cce73d4fcb016f4566d62901192c9455b81
describe
'2093616' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIS' 'sip-files00077.tif'
7f1a74e50d4b89c5338342ec063133a7
21fa4dcec1cc2de7d94b60fcf33f59d8feb7aa83
describe
'2336676' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIT' 'sip-files00078.tif'
fd1821f81490cc1a47365a39d9132e67
9b7ce0661e9f56f73625b4aa812ea60df07c48a5
describe
'2356124' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIU' 'sip-files00079.tif'
df9508213d39763ce0fab0d9a30b830d
3ed660a55254c878572fb2f4db3e5ed5d85ea216
describe
'2336940' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIV' 'sip-files00080.tif'
64d721848ffe009500c491a129bf5510
0304e32e35a3391a1fdb2e08d00c65569998704b
describe
'2179028' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIW' 'sip-files00081.tif'
89c156dd599ec6dc843fb8b438012045
cfa4bf16e555eea215531cf30689fbd7782cac1d
'2011-11-15T04:00:32-05:00'
describe
'2336876' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIX' 'sip-files00082.tif'
d82c8aa04b7f065aa96fa8fbc71d887d
e7be2cc85c9fbf59d4c7dbae7ea3ee61e42e3204
describe
'2356352' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIY' 'sip-files00083.tif'
be719c42f05fe066c8aab7d6fcfaaae9
dcc3c6c9679e8aec044a2f6cbf91db1c757d2dd2
describe
'2337144' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPIZ' 'sip-files00084.tif'
b5af031a2da01e76b5868f3afa1ecba9
5ad0249c658760c4afb2bd1fbfd499785a003dd5
'2011-11-15T04:03:34-05:00'
describe
'2356412' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJA' 'sip-files00085.tif'
6cb2d2d742e4342ed8dab2a228cd747e
10e5a6ee8f7e09a92b1c16188d77fcd8dd173fc0
describe
'2356140' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJB' 'sip-files00087.tif'
a8c12246814800446aac52d4cf83ddda
41a31d63d38b2a363f86f11ff3854782d7d98dba
'2011-11-15T04:01:01-05:00'
describe
'2337044' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJC' 'sip-files00088.tif'
44d7e8891124db8547176baf2d1007b9
7fd3b60086a7b145fda512eac6af20526969ae6e
describe
'2312852' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJD' 'sip-files00089.tif'
4a1feac28d57151bd64b12fb5480071b
a2c42cbacab5b766ff4d8c79dbd729853ba9d922
describe
'2377072' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJE' 'sip-files00090.tif'
a9bec1e3c5c15e4d2c022b7e076b729c
fe8c7cea64a7826d92d098b4199d88f805924858
describe
'2312656' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJF' 'sip-files00091.tif'
c2370d818566f9a71605e67f98cf8dc1
bac3371dbdab57a6be52a092111e579477039697
describe
'2340020' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJG' 'sip-files00092.tif'
8a9819c074c22e0cf05ea5d9bfbbc5df
1863baeed81e539aebbae833cd919ad61affae8c
describe
'2313092' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJH' 'sip-files00093.tif'
ffa8ce38188533fea12b2868b27155ed
86cb47075e44a5009d33d0c6ac45c86ec6634227
describe
'2410080' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJI' 'sip-files00094.tif'
391865d1506b40c5dac5a5dd903b4862
bfa0336c8a9069105ba3f7cd50bab5e2c8e66b46
'2011-11-15T04:00:30-05:00'
describe
'2312448' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJJ' 'sip-files00095.tif'
22a686bef9d441f7cb5c73f498637e48
03acb77dde937145c4e0893357a560e9181f49e7
describe
'2150192' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJK' 'sip-files00096.tif'
43c6a5ac6f1fbfa6ee5561c6ec9f65fe
e67da130560a46c1a7d0eb7e9e5457a5adcd8368
describe
'2312840' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJL' 'sip-files00097.tif'
097ad43a1b6b2cdc56d336b0817902f5
c65f5901c0eb98ab04e19a1c482dc8e7fe78cc00
describe
'2227816' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJM' 'sip-files00098.tif'
39052dad0f3a282bfbd5fa83f486a5e4
781a88070c55e8702e5d649d790568083e22b277
describe
'2312760' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJN' 'sip-files00099.tif'
4f8b97336f14d34432058d70d20d19bd
16ee4c50e121355e1e86c459529196828421b7e0
describe
'2339144' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJO' 'sip-files00100.tif'
88ff195ae6b5e2c1f09cf9a6b5168d23
bd1e5e2929de5a6477113ce17f5de1be45452db4
describe
'2398032' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJP' 'sip-files00101.tif'
ffc84386bdb910aae0a21dde93b86a04
6382271a5f501c2ad95fef805c9c04332513a124
describe
'2319832' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJQ' 'sip-files00102.tif'
86f5e519cc0dcfd84755df413572d232
f87593a92bcae2068a3fed090cc755fa80b3f952
'2011-11-15T04:03:25-05:00'
describe
'2381928' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJR' 'sip-files00103.tif'
85b1416613fe95779dfc81d5f3188bb8
a130451b72dbe849c9e05a9809d63099f92a87a6
'2011-11-15T03:58:50-05:00'
describe
'2320124' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJS' 'sip-files00104.tif'
7b264d72e0797aaa46abc4e1655e4eca
b5c2ffcfa83e4c039233bc492c7f7054156491cc
'2011-11-15T04:02:42-05:00'
describe
'2320184' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJT' 'sip-files00106.tif'
735a642244e03a6d4eed59a2c2d0a43e
7a532ffbcd33d328ec2e661f8d18365dae500fab
describe
'2420756' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJU' 'sip-files00107.tif'
d0bdbf8ad23c7c53979a60e6157654b1
6c2bfe612182db04be16f19b5816f3e179c0b584
describe
'2319844' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJV' 'sip-files00108.tif'
bc6623a0b280d5bc9cc13285e81c2d34
52f545efa5139c2a14afbfa983698d82c83a4c6f
describe
'2420828' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJW' 'sip-files00109.tif'
8099879a22ba29d04817e731becaa029
22824e968e654e777014df94d52d981e552faa5e
describe
'2319780' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJX' 'sip-files00110.tif'
f652c792574f9f0d06d7e345084165a9
ff84b4b42db106da25639e30070205a20c394311
describe
'2420852' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJY' 'sip-files00111.tif'
dc827a9a28bb852dd84532e423a85157
0109554c43b8b00a1ab59c9d6c24616d34a85290
'2011-11-15T04:01:46-05:00'
describe
'2319652' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPJZ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
c11ed10f5667c5f4d83ed236fee70a92
cf2e33daa79e48de33573997546f08fe0a1116eb
describe
'2420788' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKA' 'sip-files00113.tif'
394198c4aae3c6da82ebdbc49dfdfcb7
f1e5fb749de595849e61177962a07cb11d4fa699
describe
'2319876' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKB' 'sip-files00114.tif'
d6d4444b24068ce2837b7f1b0ca913df
37c50537e0da3a4d8f50ad5d75c530d5f1e06f3a
describe
'2404968' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKC' 'sip-files00115.tif'
112a059d907645e2b53f3c798923baad
89132c5495b150926a3d5310e6d761a1a9d3c7a8
describe
'2319924' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKD' 'sip-files00116.tif'
e962e8afab3de674731907d68e74e3cf
8243a91f261d3dc79a795c579ea3f5a907198166
describe
'2421360' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKE' 'sip-files00117.tif'
736c739f35e22cc7e627f9cd1b8dd1cb
4ecd15c81253351115d6ddb8d18736da88a02213
describe
'2214072' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKF' 'sip-files00118.tif'
e269ce48446b2134c77cdc0c0d4d3bdd
36699d5ec68ab7b328c975bdfe8836ad219a470d
describe
'2421004' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKG' 'sip-files00119.tif'
518db39d86c99b690675b91b898336bc
9b02c608e27a03df6b0490067646547b5bccfb41
describe
'2319916' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKH' 'sip-files00120.tif'
262d235cce429f13c944899688b38919
2ea88c4d2de0bddebf109e890cf72a31d99105fc
describe
'2390044' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKI' 'sip-files00121.tif'
12de1341278e46f5e4fc8f3982fbaae1
67c282064f353e51bf215a77f9f3e647f950095f
describe
'2319836' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKJ' 'sip-files00122.tif'
6268bf59566e1c4fed434f1157fb2e63
c38cd56f2ea9e3d06cd970f14baddc5d35659d54
describe
'2373916' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKK' 'sip-files00123.tif'
a4c72d361e01e3257d680fc2e621b046
d160c9ceb9370c31b09dfc865ccef18b621a9e46
describe
'2319800' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKL' 'sip-files00124.tif'
c5eaee035fb34e413d5431d9392f5db9
882c8da0c9ee66b790a277dd15b4427dc7dafde9
'2011-11-15T03:56:04-05:00'
describe
'2405192' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKM' 'sip-files00125.tif'
07a0cd51174d3ebe78dc0e86ef37c283
00141d9f366013013c4d01d76f311bac841d7fac
describe
'2319656' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKN' 'sip-files00126.tif'
6597fc5e9134c120e575919bbff36be3
3bb6d09107567d3583e5eaafa2e65951051b453b
describe
'2355552' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKO' 'sip-files00127.tif'
b51a7660d27864062825557799956c6e
32f5aa87cfc5a22596f6b80ea4e788effc390aff
describe
'2357860' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKP' 'sip-files00128.tif'
c63adaf5cf3d923ff04cc465ff4e3b00
e4172b2c38d756184009ac67a8754d833e87070f
describe
'2348136' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKQ' 'sip-files00129.tif'
2bddf0ffd11121e822f173df0d31ee36
5f680678db3d490d437a6738aa59fef00dba7b90
describe
'2139436' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKR' 'sip-files00130.tif'
93e262b1d4c5469c98e2fa6c1c9ea863
4a7e8344c9189482e1009ad2b8cce8f7196957fd
describe
'2368852' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKS' 'sip-files00131.tif'
d20cf104cfe421378d5deda9ca7edbc5
1aeaedec8c3219a1572274ad2ca6780ac19149c0
describe
'2357880' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKT' 'sip-files00132.tif'
f6abc5fbf3448c9adc6a036a6d542976
55ed0568aa1783ef936dd8a94f153e19a69eba89
describe
'2344488' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKU' 'sip-files00133.tif'
18cd29b20ad4ac197f973f644ab7ba4a
ebc49417ed446546941c0522e48dd9a2c8b08204
describe
'2133628' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKV' 'sip-files00134.tif'
8b5b96d3a97667a9a7181295d19ad124
209f6fec4857db32a97fc57126e43c8512fdfc3c
'2011-11-15T04:04:06-05:00'
describe
'2189268' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKW' 'sip-files00135.tif'
536deca802d5424349bce6ac8c59a5c5
783662cf43fdc5ab6a7de1c3704344c18109f22c
describe
'2287856' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKX' 'sip-files00136.tif'
768d4b352a7d00f0f4af127a14c55e2f
6eeb9387ece43f99cdb26bf3a4021acbac570860
'2011-11-15T03:56:24-05:00'
describe
'2267920' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKY' 'sip-files00137.tif'
06b8ac42817455d29c5512e73075ebaf
b487dfa3a236288130132350cce319892ef366f5
'2011-11-15T04:02:07-05:00'
describe
'2349784' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPKZ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
1050e5bc5e4156d6210d88e03821e7b4
ba4797ce724a4d8f2fcf8772aceaebde3b1d0d1b
describe
'2162580' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLA' 'sip-files00139.tif'
5df8f6009f70ea2011dfac08d47f129d
b5336f081738bf2511d02e69a4641cc0b4a174e4
describe
'2281604' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLB' 'sip-files00140.tif'
bb9a7fe9f8bf7511e8a6e013657ba5cb
fc79988493a4b4998fff3c5adb01a0019a512fdd
describe
'2405224' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLC' 'sip-files00141.tif'
723831f37accae15aa00a119fae76c65
0a4c6ee2b4e252356cb773c803ea8c6acd5090e5
'2011-11-15T04:00:23-05:00'
describe
'2358032' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLD' 'sip-files00142.tif'
5647dee7c67e003b39e187bc7f397fc7
b1ea9a6b9ecd49a3a9fa7d9c1d6abbd04d848d55
describe
'2178856' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLE' 'sip-files00143.tif'
94e8f09447a602601a704d7615618b59
462d5a45f708da90c31d3388bd15d7314a5555bb
describe
'2094412' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLF' 'sip-files00144.tif'
b8f6de6f3791db009a494bfde17d7e48
4ae21203c17104f08b0746ed81746ee18fa73cd9
'2011-11-15T04:00:28-05:00'
describe
'2312112' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLG' 'sip-files00145.tif'
5449f050108088e1b4a690f0a4d9706a
9b21e08b29bdbda6dc40dc2125d259eb47632b7a
describe
'2250256' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLH' 'sip-files00146.tif'
12c798b0b9b2f4711b03803ff08599ce
2ac608ad34a75cc2bc851bf21eb55c1a457ccf90
describe
'2201436' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLI' 'sip-files00147.tif'
24e660d4593dc63df02c28fe7281dc17
b46beee6ce6d33d2fdf23a0681e3d9ae571ef8d1
describe
'2357256' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLJ' 'sip-files00148.tif'
667ad714a19eb34707b309665af8b56f
ca233201accf2ddc7ba16bb90bf1f46dd34c7b8a
describe
'2196592' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLK' 'sip-files00149.tif'
e39ae8b8c90a2f996f96665d10760e2b
92f74b636794666537d6297013d055c5f3921447
describe
'2309804' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLL' 'sip-files00150.tif'
6f3e389abb769d6bc8c5286b4914e95d
470bcb992dfb83aa04f0c90f221e7c039d4ed87e
describe
'2122728' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLM' 'sip-files00151.tif'
52e6f6a3f2b2129114f9c4eec15ebc3f
6e42a25f8cadc61f2493d72f3a6032511e93ff1a
describe
'2356300' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLN' 'sip-files00152.tif'
30df4b7589ad0190ff0c0a29d9a8d332
28e08473726715264e13ff28216cb274c439504d
describe
'2201668' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLO' 'sip-files00154.tif'
adedb0d1bf26a6ed0404742bccd1fc59
a7e8c696e4433adddfaaa69d834a94de1a01d88f
describe
'2420860' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLP' 'sip-files00155.tif'
d8cba3a967e2a5a7874c1961a816bbee
f0ebc9dd1158d9991ebd5b4cd6b7a3b8d3393092
describe
'2281740' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLQ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
abf8c96a16754d58a9fa2253eaa7a567
43a33ec61e593b37b7f7e17518810b1f34027599
describe
'2420932' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLR' 'sip-files00157.tif'
72928657267ba424bd0f7d5245057c6a
f310217bfd40502477c1835f54dbfa8583a3fcef
describe
'2281792' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLS' 'sip-files00158.tif'
6e0e5c6335b980c5571649e4d46313f5
49e73e808c126038e1391f0eb5bf74948875214b
'2011-11-15T04:03:32-05:00'
describe
'2176336' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLT' 'sip-files00159.tif'
1d7760f258c6901103c170dcb479298a
95d4f31a16f3fde7ce1be5da54803b6da0debe45
'2011-11-15T04:00:53-05:00'
describe
'2200584' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLU' 'sip-files00160.tif'
43bc1923656bd3e2a9e170df4cea06ed
cd42476a64fe065f83c208d82a7a1bc5e5fe9af8
describe
'2420928' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLV' 'sip-files00161.tif'
1b95a8515af00bc86e153da5c8f6c720
4b108931d299cdc5b186778f776cb17b2a22bbe4
describe
'2281444' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLW' 'sip-files00162.tif'
35eb05402fa0ea2a19a86d37b30b0e54
3c648606c79804a648c196583f55940503ca466e
describe
'2189444' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLX' 'sip-files00163.tif'
18653bfabd4c126cc773b1d1a95a2602
46fb8425b61b645e54f8a9bc271165a3e80fc945
describe
'2073944' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLY' 'sip-files00164.tif'
a01e710aac93371fc2332e0bc09f45f3
6ea89fc17564adc9b4a078fdc383fd6cb0c7883d
describe
'2279752' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPLZ' 'sip-files00165.tif'
cf77b4d7dc254efb1cf43f54a8f112b3
0d9632f90e81570a8ab4502d9e9654b0e0bbb500
describe
'2084276' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMA' 'sip-files00166.tif'
57d25e482033dcf2ecfc8db215e6d91c
70f66ee792a54abbbe81ca0eba547318e9fdc7cc
describe
'2330588' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMB' 'sip-files00167.tif'
075d21a5cf7b82877b7c9409d6a309ee
168acd6a0662275bbb2d3df73833681ce07d10d4
'2011-11-15T04:02:02-05:00'
describe
'2181964' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMC' 'sip-files00168.tif'
4ee663b99c54227dac74c3e6938dc0c8
7726c7ff2a6a26c1b18ffb011232bb5308fba1bc
describe
'2378772' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMD' 'sip-files00169.tif'
06194c6a3a7194c9784ef62a29469b4d
5d9dd2551f2d99fe48cf915e51766de50c6d1f6e
describe
'2281780' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPME' 'sip-files00170.tif'
c1fb29bf38bd3151f2e85daba6adf103
3cafd7af277260a3da6100f5f7a8eb571169dc22
describe
'2183124' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMF' 'sip-files00171.tif'
360d869f4431b6f40f42f2415462810d
be3eed58892a7c1ca0ab19deff660fe3210c002a
describe
'2075976' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMG' 'sip-files00172.tif'
ad6de87be6812d1ca9b1bb390a954dae
4e044d4a9c23d7c007b9d41a47dc1a2f3b45d2ed
describe
'2364168' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMH' 'sip-files00173.tif'
dba6479609fdbcfc67f0f6fc571dc59b
49a28fab92c5e75068d60550c45ca1e3b5d3d51f
describe
'2077532' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMI' 'sip-files00174.tif'
6702200cb9adb102f57acb90077366c6
3175a7f0d204a5c2eb9707ccd9273b3cff749c07
describe
'2381456' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMJ' 'sip-files00175.tif'
059da2d3b46d6ac8c2728b2dd33a732f
cb05ae4f0dfc03082ab10d8ef4ea55cdec0f3f70
'2011-11-15T04:02:57-05:00'
describe
'2281524' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMK' 'sip-files00176.tif'
88a07af3d2aa45cb9b0155de9cea9966
25dc36f93e33e466424ed4da7f98ec5b086053eb
describe
'2397416' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPML' 'sip-files00177.tif'
98c1fc164778d9f2b8ed00524fd1de45
80bf675e95496e6a32e6f23cc8794f6e60c0bacc
describe
'2281760' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMM' 'sip-files00178.tif'
475a46010f4e0f33bc54a753e14d75bf
cfb3a6de28da767f34e9343296b182407af80afc
describe
'2346164' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMN' 'sip-files00179.tif'
013a9b55e25f50191582f6ce8a4264b6
fb6704666e2c925a486e1ba89806476845014fa7
describe
'2281484' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMO' 'sip-files00180.tif'
1fd1f8056e76eaedfe0fa1f5eb91f7cd
cc2cfabd3a8960c215346afc73cfd34c5addb182
'2011-11-15T03:54:54-05:00'
describe
'2330028' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMP' 'sip-files00181.tif'
38f8ac345cfc65499f5c4d98461f5b16
acac635f7fe3c52ffcd4b57e19903040beca7ff3
describe
'2281964' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMQ' 'sip-files00182.tif'
171f801f988554bbbd7792852c407bb2
840ea54467f42bab597eb1d5b5a7786cc0cf398e
'2011-11-15T03:59:03-05:00'
describe
'2363188' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMR' 'sip-files00183.tif'
76d6fde31d399249855198449bc1d222
96bba6a621967d987dc56be4885d7686afaf21e5
describe
'9216308' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMS' 'sip-files00184.tif'
b58309f8393e98b7d47bb6db44ad56b7
e7a283a01863afec0776cd3fefbd841572008040
describe
'8779260' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMT' 'sip-files00185.tif'
37430a1185b3d2926a0cc9b2d6ab12ab
7fbe9715b3cd71f79713770ee50790fd9eeaada1
'2011-11-15T04:04:10-05:00'
describe
'9365600' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMU' 'sip-files00186.tif'
37794ef94dcbca2ebc0b0f6a0d3d5a3b
71cf7d8ca080a852c8e5eccea55c149c4ae2d0cb
describe
'9359012' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMV' 'sip-files00187.tif'
ce082ce2d9dc5ed892e0fbf70adb285d
17e11b20aef04ed8b578a0fbe4a20dff5a5f6ebd
'2011-11-15T03:59:18-05:00'
describe
'9257836' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMW' 'sip-files00188.tif'
5dc79e587de84c3ef8224719b21ff17b
c26722db7696df0d5351366082f8a37e6eeabe52
describe
'8804048' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMX' 'sip-files00189.tif'
21c957a079c5a8232b58dbd455cde1f1
41db4210f8413949ca63edce63fbd0b3ab0ac9f0
describe
'9166788' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMY' 'sip-files00190.tif'
239e6b0bed582ef5c3767ea816866cfc
15c4c7c207f9638421cc6a879b875716923024fe
describe
'9267936' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPMZ' 'sip-files00191.tif'
9ab315412d3c2bbb15aadb45ed49afe2
7212bb5583e6baa0f180f0f68615fd7bcf190e2d
describe
'8516764' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNA' 'sip-files00192.tif'
9c6e9b5b28d945865a4bd6c904fde1a6
49bca523b7a442a82fb7dd47bb7fb460365f8ae7
describe
'8567240' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNB' 'sip-files00193.tif'
a1e22dd5fb6f76e66281d624dec6c6cb
e2b1acb35a934fe98f8289704c4377088101d557
describe
'8422228' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNC' 'sip-files00194.tif'
395ea954ef6bce7abf721454edc234b7
ca282ce5fc0da11cb2b61b13ad8de1bf96ce73d3
describe
'8528552' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPND' 'sip-files00195.tif'
fb9f8d641ac4d25bbcf5a68c14126956
44266aaa53e856658238dff7e5b0f368dedad8af
describe
'8253500' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNE' 'sip-files00196.tif'
b4ae92c9cae41fa0ad483b8d9953afed
dd630a43a8871a6a6e0823e8e22d554c3a268c66
describe
'8558860' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNF' 'sip-files00197.tif'
1823724fe0315f937836ac313159fdef
3abe418d4bb69329ce89827395c048596626f0fd
describe
'8512184' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNG' 'sip-files00198.tif'
ec2d4c85daaf8c26b1ab898038992af1
73ce71265517b8f3df656b83674aa407efc2e6fa
'2011-11-15T04:01:56-05:00'
describe
'8488160' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNH' 'sip-files00199.tif'
fcc38e2e1aa111b53366130ed260c954
526a320076888dea9db61a616925e02620b81d0f
describe
'8174508' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNI' 'sip-files00200.tif'
01248052469f73def6b14086d3494a40
0569a175df0269be5552313d9e537a62e7d0e34c
describe
'9363428' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNJ' 'sip-files00202.tif'
f32bb647f7530596eeaba242f1c759fe
4543893efba700e16269be32197f19260c8e4e5e
'2011-11-15T03:57:24-05:00'
describe
'9539912' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNK' 'sip-files00203.tif'
a4cfe1da3c712095334dd692269bcf46
0cf1a5823b1d4db9c8d4661c7b999742b93b9fe9
describe
'8520496' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNL' 'sip-files00204.tif'
d1d1da765b4c5ae6110dcb03f066488d
a70c68fbda74b3df182f4afbb7cd318cdb747abb
describe
'9126332' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNM' 'sip-files00205.tif'
35ab4b7356574617c3198c53cb26bf10
8c53b117836f248f7bf4bd249e3cceb9b8238d1a
'2011-11-15T03:57:23-05:00'
describe
'9363976' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNN' 'sip-files00206.tif'
e4f4a1aca790d43dd77d86cdca931ec9
52ec9d22d448eac7784cdda31597fb0f480c220a
'2011-11-15T03:55:51-05:00'
describe
'9537660' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNO' 'sip-files00207.tif'
6b9fae824e2a0d3a1fbec40ea580cc3d
e819301f0c35881e424d6e95d0bf2e3756113e0a
describe
'9318284' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNP' 'sip-files00208.tif'
ca60fb16b481c995343ddf13cfa106f2
9941e0650d10b2355441622fb78a7cf4fa5e88ea
describe
'8550884' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNQ' 'sip-files00209.tif'
3c85e28f8fdbabfe7a7adf594a370d18
ff13f8c488d1f849db99de7b04427db9b67cc9a7
'2011-11-15T04:04:17-05:00'
describe
'9363996' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNR' 'sip-files00210.tif'
333cd093654e80329b90d93ce311df5d
d92a499996389a95d31b80b531b16f554cfe59f3
describe
'9537560' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNS' 'sip-files00211.tif'
b894565744a48163a6e0dcde8bbe4d63
ab759d6405bf4e3a534e3802786e0460d65aba0d
describe
'9025520' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNT' 'sip-files00212.tif'
0c5732ad8543bf457167d8bca6ef14bf
c8eca15aa95d1b2ac9efda8f5b090be1f1b8bab7
describe
'9181396' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNU' 'sip-files00213.tif'
4f22dfdabd0e05a290b09e0ade670a19
9f9843bd6051884687e85d3153b091bfafa02f77
describe
'9215864' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNV' 'sip-files00214.tif'
1c14f45d0e7673c129842b7629292fc8
9464bfaa51875f07964349967d858f77f25378e8
describe
'9144320' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNW' 'sip-files00215.tif'
ece9a781c38138031968877e38594338
81045667b46ad587586e8c695cabc70075d9f923
'2011-11-15T03:57:17-05:00'
describe
'9363136' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNX' 'sip-files00216.tif'
bee5bf3f237fe1de4b875f41e03e9760
098d10300856456a2ae66927964daffaa315c3cb
'2011-11-15T04:03:59-05:00'
describe
'9166168' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNY' 'sip-files00217.tif'
2dd8fb128159306e3b23933b794dd154
943d3bfb8acd0e079ea07df0406eac7afbbc5366
describe
'8438392' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPNZ' 'sip-files00218.tif'
fb294c8c35b2b03695223bf4fe0dd688
ecfe836d680e97025da8b8e43d6ef7c6490c99c1
'2011-11-15T04:01:32-05:00'
describe
'8530516' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOA' 'sip-files00219.tif'
81858680cfa8e032b851acbbf24d0629
f02da879f1a34c4e5257b4226040f01550e63f1f
'2011-11-15T03:58:43-05:00'
describe
'9363832' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOB' 'sip-files00220.tif'
4a11a52d8e0c628f90b0d78dd26ce282
0ce0dcb47f4308d5c7ea57d9aa5c567f9ce53d80
'2011-11-15T04:00:11-05:00'
describe
'9432148' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOC' 'sip-files00221.tif'
fb133f17356ac2f8478fac1382863788
484a1fdeade63e35e12764c567739e40f0373e7a
'2011-11-15T03:54:35-05:00'
describe
'9364500' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOD' 'sip-files00222.tif'
7f8cc65052eb08d27d183c6a7f68c3ee
bca4947f2943dfb1195f1f6ca5e3c55ffdb2b818
describe
'9432248' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOE' 'sip-files00223.tif'
07001f5bf2f1fe29f331699bae3ce446
c442118a78189d36d35300182f66e9d8d888a9dc
describe
'9362568' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOF' 'sip-files00224.tif'
1f0687527dc6bd52c5ced427484b1691
163e66ab983bed984edc1efa4f7a1de3ae44a11a
describe
'9462596' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOG' 'sip-files00225.tif'
683af38d5fc0431ecbde241878bc6573
56afa84d19b4eaa70ccc8e8e3f7aeafb3921c90e
'2011-11-15T03:55:38-05:00'
describe
'9364356' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOH' 'sip-files00226.tif'
4f19707ed18817ca739de52439e513c0
09f67e942625037ac2c94c0a7e99d21a120db3ed
describe
'9432008' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOI' 'sip-files00227.tif'
efd5193d5c49e23c9144a5e4f90e7164
182d877ae47360553f1252b8c71ed735a61a863a
'2011-11-15T04:02:52-05:00'
describe
'9363456' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOJ' 'sip-files00228.tif'
cd42e9aa5a3e2439b0c7a2f0484a9499
0150674fa8cc0361ad76a41f60e66c5739652094
describe
'9051708' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOK' 'sip-files00229.tif'
31118a40a17d946196d58984059fc196
ca33a383b67c01be5d6de9d2dc3daf36fbc22729
describe
'8241924' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOL' 'sip-files00230.tif'
f55ecc546f8059e60545948312ba95e6
634bc9c92b15ef60859c111465a8a09a09adfb68
describe
'8578704' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOM' 'sip-files00231.tif'
c0b09a1baea94f161034d41edeb9f8f3
77dc672336048c817d548e4da22bfc8281983999
describe
'9363444' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPON' 'sip-files00232.tif'
3995dfc8f934e8f2729837c78f4f07f0
9ed9b796de22ba00be67d90465e86ca90fad87e0
describe
'8734964' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOO' 'sip-files00233.tif'
ad3e6af3b7a6cd9662f52a3c352606ff
6cc2278b4aedaa42b61020512a22cc5668ff69c9
describe
'9364508' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOP' 'sip-files00234.tif'
d2d210395c680bc45e8723f8f0383167
57930f8358cd1969a0478101cf903d59e769b25c
describe
'9015552' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOQ' 'sip-files00235.tif'
bb71e9c59fd3682998cb4cd3b297e749
caa8225874dda73e5d7a9f6dabd1fe72f9674c0d
'2011-11-15T04:00:44-05:00'
describe
'9431800' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOR' 'sip-files00237.tif'
74043e9c55fbfd5a3999a767ba6b26c0
cf8b9b70f8995c3902db6cf18861459a30956273
'2011-11-15T04:02:41-05:00'
describe
'8853796' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOS' 'sip-files00238.tif'
0ccb0d04adc6ef09130ed46a40b0d7dc
119392d892d28e08eabd55f82b56226188ded894
describe
'9083348' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOT' 'sip-files00239.tif'
a8ea0a317fbf1a6343bf459d38edc7db
4d0f1960aac26f7ca7d2717322ce826d6bffc32f
describe
'8671348' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOU' 'sip-files00240.tif'
5065dd8328444b1853da1e892927f326
b4a282d16e8450c4709155f87c8dc044b53fe24e
describe
'8437276' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOV' 'sip-files00241.tif'
65d34be27f16e2361da074df4230a23d
aeb2bd9ba33c9e46898aa9cfd13cb1a17cf5ab48
describe
'9363896' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOW' 'sip-files00242.tif'
22ed064b80ec9e14ac9b411ba630e7d6
e272a4e4eb2cdb9e5ebe4f1fab688aed461a7631
'2011-11-15T04:00:51-05:00'
describe
'9538928' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOX' 'sip-files00243.tif'
667d140951eef97babf64677b2027968
cdb6271b05e6ef4cbd85d20e7d715fbfc3b60815
describe
'9357064' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOY' 'sip-files00244.tif'
82fed84f297a2f941c07fe8a529f2682
d7f259bc917cfbae82639065a710e116b635c16a
describe
'9365736' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPOZ' 'sip-files00246.tif'
e86bf527394a3b00fb3899a875063e29
1bd0ae8673c042a2da0bcc77ad1375126d86defd
describe
'8822076' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPA' 'sip-files00247.tif'
5b3a65fb7da8f2e520d91f5483fa67c9
ba1bb2c0f0de2dd9057e5e5c22961bf08f0a2a5f
'2011-11-15T04:02:31-05:00'
describe
'9365612' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPB' 'sip-files00248.tif'
1a2086c197fa07e54f8b3a8eb40e4be9
a9116e553543c59dbef43b5fc2d29b53f95fe2f7
'2011-11-15T03:59:16-05:00'
describe
'8520324' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPC' 'sip-files00249.tif'
d92979173df08b0fbcc08ed9fb4b7f5d
14532566c29af383cefc44d473c53d5c46ebbdfe
describe
'8420144' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPD' 'sip-files00250.tif'
6a8eecb1dd9282a732fefabe0d1c1a33
3dec00c92af82603b6ba274dd519fdf98a20359f
'2011-11-15T03:55:39-05:00'
describe
'8398188' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPE' 'sip-files00251.tif'
196256c765745db96fbd0876ac7ac1b7
f4042472f3cdcaa2b0f08706447074c94e7f1da0
describe
'9364964' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPF' 'sip-files00252.tif'
296974fc7882a5e7db5a105c9ed7e7e2
0dbe4f07329d79edb60c9afc1f86290fbac44821
describe
'8658076' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPG' 'sip-files00253.tif'
c0f09fae84bcdb608479a9c3216b2fc6
af64b4bbc369d0a130aa489bb1e148475a7e73b9
'2011-11-15T04:02:45-05:00'
describe
'8571120' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPH' 'sip-files00254.tif'
ee61d49fe9577dd357dcef0e959471f2
9975cc86477282b453c465fd6a50ddea363e8603
describe
'9368288' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPI' 'sip-files00255.tif'
edb9e3f29be7152d88ae0f17cb7b4741
8948d0ccb2032917cac3b0d0ec39b9a1ba3de397
describe
'9364376' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPJ' 'sip-files00256.tif'
77ea6ec68be597cadd33301b4dcbb168
c1ad6b49fd9d3528798e667660d689270876123c
describe
'8690776' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPK' 'sip-files00257.tif'
7cdba1782cbd6b4577530b5bbd5b4073
4ed4132e6921723e390c3ee522f7a5bc70cad21c
'2011-11-15T04:01:57-05:00'
describe
'9365412' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPL' 'sip-files00258.tif'
d3352650be33252baf875d998e9744cd
4988826e8ab2a85740b5ddb7abc06a2d2b8eb818
'2011-11-15T03:56:36-05:00'
describe
'8513160' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPM' 'sip-files00259.tif'
55499a66682184436a7e5c5a84f056f5
9b10252a4f68b1901676543185af33d5ed960a22
'2011-11-15T04:01:05-05:00'
describe
'9365108' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPN' 'sip-files00260.tif'
891675a0ffb4cee02ecd4f3e3cadd94d
4c8b024b659b0f3173267a5ec4da6072fd740b0b
describe
'8677880' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPO' 'sip-files00261.tif'
14e7a50fe1e0a78b3d3ee10c8e86d065
e611949e9ba20dc52c8872f116a56f79f2ba03a2
describe
'9363856' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPP' 'sip-files00262.tif'
4d816c4d8cf3db53ce8fbfc1c0e8bffa
059cceb22430d3ee9ededdb055d29d9ee36a263f
'2011-11-15T03:56:13-05:00'
describe
'9443768' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPQ' 'sip-files00263.tif'
407a83de55969c650303a05cd005f2a6
ad74f1e79667ff991ba8285f2f0797da61873c16
describe
'9364728' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPR' 'sip-files00264.tif'
221a570673edf26f8b7d9043ffa3629c
04612f38ecf01f6955a2f22c21c1fc0a4ec42159
'2011-11-15T03:56:07-05:00'
describe
'9539608' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPS' 'sip-files00265.tif'
627e974b7bd512e6aa1cfbbfa35e2859
5c8fcdb26972cdd2061aefdae9edc0865e1d3af0
describe
'9083480' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPT' 'sip-files00266.tif'
28d2c4c7eb92bc6567be77c4a03aa141
629df019a80811b0c3e363e3425124997577e57b
'2011-11-15T03:58:49-05:00'
describe
'8559800' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPU' 'sip-files00267.tif'
5ce3166ef8bebce1026ceaefe5c904c2
3e1d16152272a28532454666b12c16849bb7a32c
describe
'8313384' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPV' 'sip-files00268.tif'
db876d6bd71c7ee2a5852435b0241c65
7ccdb5845bb9128f830d2beb01d4ac854c4e359a
describe
'9371300' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPW' 'sip-files00269.tif'
2dfd8df347667baeef94fe1d9ee2ac3a
c6f4caa4c1349a105e78f57aad31c6b2d02dcd64
'2011-11-15T04:00:02-05:00'
describe
'9363244' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPX' 'sip-files00270.tif'
63949e18df974311558bc92d0b2d8ea2
6367fa42303748d7ecdc751ad9d832d5d261b2ed
describe
'8710088' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPY' 'sip-files00271.tif'
221429cc01f43f8f9e00252ffd160b47
0a411994fbeb309ea54aea96cb4ae8c6a7be8b97
'2011-11-15T03:57:56-05:00'
describe
'9257924' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPPZ' 'sip-files00272.tif'
939f4b7806013b0a55f46f63f16a0827
d4184bc6b860668dc0431021a11872506934a34d
'2011-11-15T03:56:26-05:00'
describe
'9104060' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQA' 'sip-files00273.tif'
87b98f25633892f94ff36edac5e6aace
34c9ed572977500414919f9645386f924b23f2f5
'2011-11-15T03:57:03-05:00'
describe
'8957036' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQB' 'sip-files00274.tif'
edc92c93fa3b5cb1d8fa17f245699e48
7ae9c80fdf75db88cd9c3cb44388dc7955b85c3a
describe
'9345636' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQC' 'sip-files00275.tif'
3e064b1cfbf1846c3600f8f8e7338808
128c0420e3acae3896923065d8392a71983bd2f8
'2011-11-15T03:59:46-05:00'
describe
'8462660' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQD' 'sip-files00276.tif'
999331e73c434f7de3cb350da18984f3
9fc84f3f04308916758b320393d8bdf99638d81d
describe
'8629064' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQE' 'sip-files00277.tif'
321a29719856f6a97b782ac05e3d07e7
93f15f3c5a82d91cca531c87f5c292c4578c8e7b
describe
'9462780' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQF' 'sip-files00278.tif'
98d1756f85a7d2daab2747a7b27ff7ed
731b891873d409537c60b2b730ab63f8c054674d
'2011-11-15T03:58:00-05:00'
describe
'9383536' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQG' 'sip-files00279.tif'
9e1d251c0af108828c73a537ffa49ed7
d6f76f8fa6b09c34e11d9b6072af4bf7cc9f1b9c
describe
'8661724' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQH' 'sip-files00281.tif'
7ab7e272354a8ac0620fe24a527e8d94
b6013ba57026a17bd305a628dbeb96e052d2b7e4
describe
'9303904' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQI' 'sip-files00282.tif'
c8536c50b6a4e45406ddd4a7136af301
1a81761f627007a35db3ba953511fd0829f26643
describe
'9667580' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQJ' 'sip-files00283.tif'
df5b09085359a4813d66d90b3f26d4f5
5f8cf9df5fc01acc5d4032d599d535ef877316b0
describe
'9618648' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQK' 'sip-files00284.tif'
5fcff46b8710dd9bbf1581eec4c75f46
344ffd0d5958692d65ce6a52213b2731459fc043
describe
'9467364' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQL' 'sip-files00285.tif'
c6ed72743b878ae9be6136cdacfeadce
28b2e80a7cba98abb7fd4a75fa1a58615f80222e
describe
'7961080' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQM' 'sip-files00286.tif'
4d05a2a6690b621feac42598ff098dbd
52d4f64ad871393d75ec8748dff3ea5206108407
describe
'9089632' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQN' 'sip-files00287.tif'
db386456723e78330178ebc5362966be
8eaa578e7ac76b35d4b2ebdd26df9249e7695c24
'2011-11-15T03:59:11-05:00'
describe
'9467388' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQO' 'sip-files00288.tif'
60532efd6d2cfdfe41f6c1f6dbb0cabc
44b68c18808593dc25aa622c6abf76281ecbd8fc
describe
'9185712' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQP' 'sip-files00290.tif'
82f9c97a77c797acfd8b77f5c72ebf35
e2a9f8cfa627181272dc44ce5829b348078cce7a
describe
'8988068' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQQ' 'sip-files00291.tif'
65638593b7e3734e643a927e0d4b5252
ef4555caeb26813afdd0d79ce4227924833071b5
describe
'8443660' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQR' 'sip-files00292.tif'
2f8da4e9ddf8b9744484a25fed377c9b
1644be3f055e32aabc5ae384eb52583ac38bfc29
'2011-11-15T04:03:36-05:00'
describe
'8896000' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQS' 'sip-files00293.tif'
2516c286d7a4c5ec7a2930f54e1cd31c
8e5ba6bb06339923039f86454d93cfd7477c776d
'2011-11-15T03:55:24-05:00'
describe
'8820900' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQT' 'sip-files00294.tif'
ea2c0e642e5bf5dd0305f67a8eecb55c
e880d7fc85112c97b7e767ebb44de70d7310cc3f
describe
'8984120' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQU' 'sip-files00295.tif'
7b3d13440b674c690fab3fdeb2e915b8
a32cd31a4c0c2804bde00b16d97b1a483a78b476
describe
'8904916' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQV' 'sip-files00296.tif'
aa3ffbea4c38a1738bd33adccc1106c0
357cfc3c5523df94ca37d363caad336eddf0668b
'2011-11-15T04:02:03-05:00'
describe
'9028548' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQW' 'sip-files00297.tif'
dcbe165599cbaee4d4259227f903a8a5
d5ae9e640f34afc95cc843ece17adfe0a079947e
describe
'9527280' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQX' 'sip-files00298.tif'
2328da192faeee598a6f4bfdf2dacfab
0a807e4480589ca143d829eb23dce5ba4fa7295a
describe
'9422888' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQY' 'sip-files00299.tif'
5ece368e33f7850d6ba1ad783952b5c1
3529c24025dd648bf3952e82c14756b6283a4b05
describe
'8839740' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPQZ' 'sip-files00300.tif'
7e08ec3e9ddaf4bdb8fac200cc0a3b9f
81af70443e9550879289681fed659101f84d9150
describe
'8990424' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRA' 'sip-files00301.tif'
6ebc78371be3499e5447aab3fd0f1a0f
987adc0d58b8124de74c611d77af7173fa0ec50a
'2011-11-15T04:02:40-05:00'
describe
'9527120' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRB' 'sip-files00302.tif'
f0101810865b17fd65ba84267ff15248
8994a4fd3961f998d4df8b9cd52ba1067c0820a4
'2011-11-15T04:03:44-05:00'
describe
'8806764' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRC' 'sip-files00303.tif'
210cdd40472477f8b534532808a0d28f
750ab3fa5817d2a1a8d6afc4521db085e0acc226
describe
'8864096' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRD' 'sip-files00304.tif'
1f64187e3527660ae870bbd195b02f9d
7dd1516933e64333937ecf0c9f254a79733cfcb7
'2011-11-15T04:02:59-05:00'
describe
'8933888' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRE' 'sip-files00305.tif'
a44acc6a598a710086c409a030628363
11ab6ee997515e581d45d0b7203580bdef061aae
describe
'8459172' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRF' 'sip-files00306.tif'
768b6bceca6fa3854921893c2f66cca2
ea75fd7edf482f2b2ee12daf832debc5bcdcb28e
describe
'9453916' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRG' 'sip-files00307.tif'
7d382ed19a253e0bba9bbfabd98aabdb
d70c0c77c9e7973ae48dcf16289ff4923ad2235d
describe
'8597864' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRH' 'sip-files00308.tif'
cec14607ecf5779870b71a2450faba48
76fce4ded235cd42ef079385cff2dbcc7be50df6
'2011-11-15T04:02:37-05:00'
describe
'9120512' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRI' 'sip-files00309.tif'
904d8db4addcc4a71fce4396fe101285
83f26b961714b167e575b566aa23094a1f957d0f
describe
'8788524' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRJ' 'sip-files00310.tif'
f257a158de315acee43a54d757522aaf
33e74aff590dac7b015e9c0aed645379be9acbc1
describe
'9421748' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRK' 'sip-files00311.tif'
14d18868aeac787128a190bd68c13e81
001e28069e5e0c157c339d941ee9b9b65104abca
describe
'8694904' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRL' 'sip-files00312.tif'
4112fef7270879155b196128fd1dc13e
8e7c26be740aff90b44c9163be67407ff2588cad
describe
'8684100' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRM' 'sip-files00313.tif'
1d535e954921d7bf01654e5a5e0ea84b
16c8a59314d438fa126f8903280efaec50a9f7cb
describe
'8534260' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRN' 'sip-files00314.tif'
ce6c37c6cd229ebc2e79e9aa4d1b4f8a
2d9f17fc6a8a94be95d6d55a1ce12dc194d860f7
describe
'8588808' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRO' 'sip-files00315.tif'
86f58dba5cde4f26ef78fa3227af947f
a25f4291062b456e5a412bed5b28e5b54849548e
describe
'9439424' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRP' 'sip-files00316.tif'
ea3de3f9409ffb7bdf492d5fbea8a5bf
ea5c6547a4d81baf7e259674df3d33a5feeb3217
describe
'8903320' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRQ' 'sip-files00317.tif'
f5713fd3a73e9130160e06006ca12c0d
8da3014e9b44392f64c46f4be08f5ce0a458cc92
describe
'8319672' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRR' 'sip-files00318.tif'
b6509f5236d3cc2b730833d0a95eda67
67d7b3d63827a29f9a29805f2f727caeba580151
describe
'8615424' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRS' 'sip-files00319.tif'
f69b47ea15d4c69aa670e423638b9eea
35441369d0b3ddc8e3edf6f9a3d7e19bb7b8a037
describe
'9201132' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRT' 'sip-files00322.tif'
65dcc2a3da98c3602a19e5c4b72229e2
da574d7bc826b71da21dc8677b92a81073d05082
describe
'9091616' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRU' 'sip-files00323.tif'
dd024e44717f1fdf3b3d369ca0a71243
3bb260c71fc4c13978ae8a2f8c4b3ea374032702
describe
'8398368' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRV' 'sip-files00324.tif'
cd2d93107be62772249e8b518aaf96c3
f8c02c6acfd3d26706b5604e6f7848dde1d4750c
'2011-11-15T03:54:47-05:00'
describe
'8870852' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRW' 'sip-files00325.tif'
ddf38b204eef884ac60b928d3040abae
09d07a5b6d6bee244658d21941dde7f39e15d6c3
describe
'8729744' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRX' 'sip-files00326.tif'
2af18aea401c3677b774b1ba4e4626e8
e48781ff1d9b66785dfe4c98bfdec1bb7829a356
'2011-11-15T04:01:07-05:00'
describe
'8344624' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRY' 'sip-files00327.tif'
1c44d9a733137c256f169b29dc619ba4
2081f7731eb3f523f5eb72529ab8b9dd5910a5a3
describe
'9540476' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPRZ' 'sip-files00329.tif'
2379b0e8ae3f0ac7d7b9d41353a93754
fff7321dcd26a90269e9c5c8dff8399507bf45ea
describe
'8863060' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSA' 'sip-files00330.tif'
fe2e3ae90f729193767703728b9a29f2
91f213d335bab37fc6de4aad2c629de3fbe8ae02
describe
'8690200' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSB' 'sip-files00331.tif'
92d5a6a6680c4c92d34772912245b288
0dece92a6eaa15bb4f686f3b93f3cfb60ad89d80
describe
'9414308' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSC' 'sip-files00332.tif'
bd2ebf6024ee6069efd09d430586119c
2d12fa2b326f786f69339d6baa0c5901deaebf4a
describe
'9141232' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSD' 'sip-files00333.tif'
24026e59492409ef6564fefed65c9e5a
1738cd80393db3abbaa2693350ed83fb50a5af69
describe
'8676152' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSE' 'sip-files00334.tif'
80feb6154c44156334bb2a3782cda34b
ef89244aedf9c3e793cbf1dee809f354198d74d8
describe
'8553012' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSF' 'sip-files00335.tif'
62f8747fcefb2e3a5886548026c6b46c
c8bbe0ca2303cb4a2a758af7147973ebead979f6
describe
'8749820' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSG' 'sip-files00336.tif'
4215ff77e7d88933659913da997ea108
1aa5575ea2650ae2e66426711b779d878d3fd7da
describe
'9307196' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSH' 'sip-files00337.tif'
ff291069dd82e68dc4178ffff63001f7
7363c3adccc687ff07435edc09b28a8a47226c0c
describe
'8953672' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSI' 'sip-files00338.tif'
a3cff49b1a465bb5cde2abdd2e33437b
f75b09eb472131f21f0e439ca9cf97b9c652e7c0
'2011-11-15T04:01:40-05:00'
describe
'8942636' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSJ' 'sip-files00339.tif'
755313ad65581913511c7c983f9be750
496008cc0792300bb44f50b3ca1fb6bb50a64c76
describe
'8852668' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSK' 'sip-files00340.tif'
21050607ad9e50fedb18c97510967b77
9e63837f80c6f9c808aafe090a15e5eb3f9538b1
describe
'9114120' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSL' 'sip-files00341.tif'
ca60e10772fbc7df6afdfdbedb626af5
c90b070d2d562a2761684c1dc4fe65d616aea7ae
describe
'9013700' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSM' 'sip-files00342.tif'
bbdcc2716750055bfb2dca9498a168e4
e7f93609f6806cc675fe8a6332560d0b552b0abc
describe
'8865376' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSN' 'sip-files00343.tif'
f56a14cf312b4f279aa74ab07a0764b7
8d9a5c7565a0a7fd1d6fc086f319654f2f75cc8a
describe
'8917920' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSO' 'sip-files00344.tif'
59cfb1362650d6909f554d0b9ff2b8c3
803deb2e04577296d31fa7da99a4260268146e91
describe
'8801056' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSP' 'sip-files00345.tif'
ae338245a44a19bc48a896f1604d3929
5c17600a1cde8dfe9a003904dfcfa3abc818aa50
'2011-11-15T03:54:45-05:00'
describe
'8864264' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSQ' 'sip-files00346.tif'
2f78de95d1ea9fc46630bc107c655c81
a130e9651bc19f87ddfb5e320d16bbd16ab05e2c
'2011-11-15T04:01:44-05:00'
describe
'9102008' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSR' 'sip-files00347.tif'
3a153847048ec59915ef8254b1cfb0e8
abcd5599e9aa902aa8bf186b109e6244eb44e0d8
'2011-11-15T04:02:35-05:00'
describe
'9478860' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSS' 'sip-files00348.tif'
9a795b62d7676744e984c47502c01950
380c7a51c5d5cc8b39cef6f00a730065b2508ece
describe
'9432296' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPST' 'sip-files00349.tif'
6cf76e36258cd1bc04770441973ceba6
07a0e760ac331475cd9a5dd53e6d476857cbba95
'2011-11-15T03:55:14-05:00'
describe
'9424620' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSU' 'sip-files00350.tif'
ae3adc5aaa7e9d99ba297d49254bab01
65bebb16c1c25f129aea6494178fa664ded0e10b
describe
'9467736' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSV' 'sip-files00351.tif'
07a574187eade3992afa14b136a22385
386267e401cb5c992c00b9e16fa13cde77b02f50
describe
'9574428' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSW' 'sip-files00352.tif'
409c552177026abff7a10f2b799e9314
bec96897cc426fede6d5b2cfae718496aca25897
describe
'8848268' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSX' 'sip-files00353.tif'
227270f28baec006926614b5f9db7628
911443d7a61726455bac8b79b53c99761809f631
describe
'8975592' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSY' 'sip-files00354.tif'
106825789fbcbca2f99269d6dcb15141
1007dd25603eecd9c5ffd2c27cd3ba9656555b86
describe
'9909840' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPSZ' 'sip-files00357.tif'
091e2886dfb22b5d5c9879810be1a449
47ecdb4060f9ee0269b4d4b55618ce56f6273776
describe
'30623160' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTA' 'sip-files00358.tif'
e732bc15502276f54b18a4a0d57cd499
f68ad74aa6cac3cf16f7a044997d64bfa332c630
describe
'10319492' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTB' 'sip-files00359.tif'
22aaeefbc1426ead67b5e039b4b83e1f
786f169faf52719303cab808101e36ea9d392720
describe
'467933' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTC' 'sip-files00000.jpg'
1d1b6a7e06128f6958b0368a43ef3ebe
b2aafce3808e3b2b743b915cf379ae20caa98e21
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'127899' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTD' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
9dca397d5349f69e4646b5298573328f
be8b06f576fe881b94c4764beefc41b8c333038e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'440034' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTE' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
a8e7cd91f7e49370861c7ae404b5fe20
5c65e0ef8fda5993930250b05f6daad2d47d74ac
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'173198' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTF' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
46ea040f223e2bde73560cee9c6706bb
f70264b18d143964291ce4321f1e4f0da1993e05
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'148475' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTG' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
594de64bac89f12bb2af552b7ca8bfa2
51ee766caae4d9e65a2482cda49a438377f0c831
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'369798' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTH' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
838c379cff6279ad158e3c6762be9b40
9e225f16065a2842b5f2e6036802501edc34dc05
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'313384' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTI' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
ab170074adcf697837ee3cb1a8d9a7cc
7cf54bc8daed214ae66662d62d4b98fbae43a42f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'314506' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTJ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
d7e7fc355104f91fc1af26cce8bbe8b0
5199bb36068f2136f60d276f175f977003a2a5df
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'312180' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTK' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
9c536e9ab04ed862f9012ed267b7146e
d2e1fd173d1eaa8c9ed9e0dfc135f316ff17d91b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'312381' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
d10b0212715fa908c906b3a4d03b6fb9
c5c80bdee02dccf5eaa1e43e18444e10abe19ec7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298332' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTM' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
dcfb11667da0ee0b8b856690c539729a
cfd484ccc3cfffb0a5207dd6a6b453b196cd8c23
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'309273' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTN' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
b1a35e0f51321a62f87588f9c7163fc5
eed87384bcde34b9c6fc108154ac56ef3ed0dac0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298972' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTO' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
2a6805bdb82a64acd5973243613cf1b1
74da756a32f122320cc9c48e9150862e74ec3a7a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'318351' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTP' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
eeb4df0e6b98a43e6bad04004b4c73f8
e0957d75edbf520627a1df94858d5e4588389817
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'309329' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTQ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
d8e1fe4fcd866dbc26d25a85ceb9cb8f
7c03414fa3363a9b19d9996709a90189351d855d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'317086' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTR' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
37681d364f057e3886788c4209d2c6c7
7d8d0541de17b33a468b94d670d3f9c447818385
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'314728' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTS' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
623e2045edc4886a6ed2c679d63b4dfe
8f35a3024ff1b38ad841addb02cd31da36cdfffe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'318285' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTT' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
0af320a539a4124584a75b9f9974e122
68e3b4235dd68134ffc5210f94e3c6e860b58ab2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'313011' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTU' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
d28159e5684cc8c1a9d73a2e3e3cf90d
c07ae03b4a88f3759432f3272fdc1a1b1134c110
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'295009' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTV' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
663de271cc63ce885b9d1ea046123280
7ef13d9fbd748762e5038f8a333a75f30d22209e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'305234' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTW' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
358d40bc4888d11d3ff95ad281e26e04
bf1ced9e03bb9a8104b1363312454374466aa88d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'308076' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTX' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
1be6a05cb19edaf3fa7fb6186282afdd
76742c042404a7447c2f0b0adc8fea1f0ed9e95c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'296997' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTY' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
026547c1e9373ba375c6561f8784de79
3d723ea8b9da8d588de37a09a1b72be951e88e2d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'317335' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPTZ' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
dc9344145a56283c2ab2d48c8ae9850c
4d17798e9b29daddfd6b712baf066425ba49f9d6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'316492' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUA' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
6923442e18640696ad642ec5d05105e6
5b8f9bdc81fc94ea6694ec2390321af373f6b5c0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'309430' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUB' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
2872f7afe7332ffe846312b1ee319154
ccc89f05a403f1475b14d9a633024d7328eeac9a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'310396' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUC' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
05b3b3da90eba2a86fbd53347481e90c
4b0ba39097125c6d5158c107dc2082fdb3fb3455
'2011-11-15T04:00:36-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'317798' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUD' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
17eb076f5446585084c58f3e4bbcf0b3
076ec3a71178a6be4946bffa9765bc090dc226a0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'297339' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUE' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
206e2f07036f9f1e56dd7d791ad1c606
45c24b01cd139414ba9bb04511bcd80c09a8d460
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'316244' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUF' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
eda1b70aac38ad9413b4e6744f9350ad
6a4cb0603d7913eb48cc38c0608a3a42a4422e1a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'132813' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUG' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
87315a7a1273d4d95c388295421a1125
00605042ab0a3813d2dfae480beb549f93a6c1db
'2011-11-15T03:55:18-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'302776' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUH' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
40c85af55be1f533174649d25a0cd8f1
88f9e4564e58c09aa466251af27ff3d4c9577dd4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'307170' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUI' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
6d651218edb809e2ff9b6067a7240382
5b2db6dbc001cca51409af707bd8f1c9ad3ccd9a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'313802' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUJ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
bdfa5e6a8800bd1e902d34393d983490
30398301af60c189382d730800e326d5d06224f0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'304880' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUK' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
36891312aa92de5d64da41ba32e956ba
8d8852bafc1ef8d2f05f831e91afa20f71a35c29
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'290095' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUL' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
901afc0faea353099e84edc150eec07d
27d694a217eccfe1feb29ae7b899be920cf4412a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'291768' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUM' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
b45ec4e94b574a44fa781a3cf46f04e2
38004344f92a77db21baff96885038fbc57b68b0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'301075' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUN' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
e4348f534692798ec582ff81d80b6698
8a0794cf8009c82bc12cef471fdd9da66db095b9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'301200' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUO' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
9eba7c393471a461ec920762c06b9e5c
ca0c08173630791d821d5b06d05e60c990002ddf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'303997' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUP' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
6332c95d8d1952717e01db02beae0020
440ce604b1cee65ec6d19995e169dd6675fbd6ac
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'316181' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUQ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
d83a987ff0bf7a24198f23048f44a395
8f592429f2b1033aec31013f142e5c0f2b02ae4a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'310867' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUR' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
c8fc17c6ae800b8059eeaee7e706d98e
36f36dfc0414865e6b8b4a905649ab6d46709bbd
'2011-11-15T03:59:37-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'306974' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUS' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
d1c72773270085a229f5f274a90a90e3
4755dd7664e292c78f6881a38571d7893b083815
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'276078' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUT' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
85c18e36541d9de504bd1c92ef7f596b
f7c7d413e49752eb35b05cca6c4eab511dd82d6c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'295756' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUU' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
21e7c6f1556a1d556ba02f72961ec568
eff86c9691613ac711bfcd4b389b254461fd02eb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'293289' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUV' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
97d90497f057e5b769cef7d7ba6cc48e
2977dec16c0946fe296ba22e3e4893f6dd383512
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298190' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUW' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
843cc71f6399e6a6d6c855c3ada1b3ca
d97a3ba520258241ecc451a8c026d3921d17d3bc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'294242' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUX' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
d40ccf87b49178072fd488728af75800
239f38e441e6662426a92ae424a3e84e963e921b
'2011-11-15T04:00:33-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'285617' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c1cbbcd6b962dc60d190f5cfff13eb23
dce87a68948e8f059384231ea7fb716eeafc698b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'296732' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPUZ' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
8033c5edb5d1b0af2faa101995a8baef
1940ae9a3364c6c57a91c9dfc865f83e2a9edf56
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'230956' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVA' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
c5ec1d0ab305857e596e9234d2e1f4fe
2e0758d0be38254cb21a0f4d78496a3e3940e069
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'354046' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVB' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
f7cbe7bcb6de0efb1d2f191a120b3164
8ad9ec3faf766ca3306e291f077a9a44c427a83a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'324107' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVC' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
b031818736fdb3df1064fc96683ec4ab
ba8aba5ac3e7669c5c3bc9a8d6ba4212f871db95
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'301851' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVD' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
427e6c8d6d5f72df9a9b69f035343e36
dd02abe986430eb00a195406f0a43326ee181bc3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'288755' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVE' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
de90591e6527793c34d1591534a72da7
b469dd1404ce17fa9721e0e9fc517942f549024c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'296110' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVF' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
3195c9307f0bb4607ec91f9b03f19a18
5efce45f965292f5ca5d1419e37a49627dd74c2f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'302907' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVG' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
736316c9287c047ef8c599b5c1d709eb
06bbfa72fa2f91fd03a120ba5c2a12de13c0709a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'309189' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVH' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
4c97fef5d117c4f3890e096e92b56b16
ec597e0b72b655f2fbd5759f65147b0d5a747ec3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'304865' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVI' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
47b9568c43a1a62040f0c3bc6b01ddf7
7aec9f89bca37a4a2399f225ed0079b6fada62b9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'289672' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVJ' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
5a0f4811bfd0b0de27ecf32c1466ac49
b49610c9686dce39137941a219f70c023f50da96
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'295220' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVK' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
191cdf0da8be9889c407547f9c729db5
be69b7403a33909c23fbdef92e6376cd6c6606aa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'263770' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVL' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
ad2ae610defc17b0a57e0a8442f97675
2f2c57cc9209db608accb3f9892d929081cb5828
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'296480' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVM' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
25ca315f503da1e0afc1b955f01cee20
fc4b139977cd35087c2c57c19292c2db8ad8a798
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298427' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVN' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
a9614ad54160e66f510ae146c9d9c68b
b30e5e79ac685e83034d92a66e6788b7a426fe5a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'301466' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVO' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
f0608d27cfa379477298cc6a8d10a5e2
e8b3e12f71c88cf8f3beaca0f607bc7b221bdbd9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'294445' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVP' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
b6d0b7685c051be9694ecbf9038ad009
f7dfa707089f541dcbd2c7626b3bad0882d2f1d8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'293303' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVQ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
25e481eaf3d924b9c4421e3a90ac6092
5ace896e5336b1eb5c0b082e7e161541bc629832
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'290912' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVR' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
7bce9412723bffa9eefc81b533bb6a3d
5eca29e4726f632d93572e14346c95c7c7b4b44d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'306773' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVS' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
c0c3348c802538da1527f35a9a02db6f
91928287aaa1d7ff367a5714ddbc7b9d8a35f423
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'277837' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVT' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
6fc65f94191a5ad1fdc4a9e43417ce2c
12e78d9abb11bd3979e8184d1e9bcb1ff5407c4b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'303761' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVU' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
31a9f0d2ca4ca323a75b3ed650bd5b52
760461caba5d406fc6726c65480e6d4d82cdf247
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'297195' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVV' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
0b004794ff9e71fa0f1e7b88a1120816
77d56a7042e60072a965235b0ad4544312d8a0b8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'300750' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVW' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
f5951827c658342b3977c2bd48aa39de
3bfcc1e1c2776d0368e7de3ba30d9c5effbcc01a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'289247' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVX' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
df5b415eb7869dfca9a2430b44484b58
4c0cad7de395d935945bd9e9e1169fcd3398db33
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'292874' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVY' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
1f8c21c164cbe590a89b4cefe4b1cbbd
bc241f8fc6d41723640d8e20d5c7b6ad9f00be4d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'293061' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPVZ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
83040ab253585e040d94243c0d41ea58
45d9b05ccd87ba2e3225edd63400f5bbc154110d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'140958' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWA' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
9199604b9d0efed4300cdbfa1222bf24
e538ddefe0cca56936c7b49b190909cf7b0e4a85
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'299668' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWB' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
053138e1a7232b267c282f5e0d430ab4
d95c32b15ff49c831481cec39d6a942add73e9a3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'292855' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWC' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
7f8de30ccedc3f430127d88f6b26c309
3ab5abb2b7478ef59034b86b40108fd3593adc51
'2011-11-15T04:02:05-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'283394' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWD' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
e9fd9af90d20b5516c680e81fb3de256
57ed81bb38a303ae56528f12ac75e9e4dcb53c74
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'288849' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWE' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
5863cd2af902dca8a16256665d4aeb8d
019c5dc206e0c7fa0bc4ec555be50eefde93de69
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'309154' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWF' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
c4f286ad2b3912deedb16ae570b0da76
5dd9da52654d75b9c53a5e73d9bd894b36ed0d74
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'300551' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWG' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
cc72049de3efcd16ec8a4d20ed7a8745
ca26c422465ba9a8cf875bea4ce3efdeeb9eebdf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'307121' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWH' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
cf5b225ca661c2faaef4119fc7552f05
fb382c0ee66e9f1938fe2992ccc2b5cb2294caee
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'288777' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWI' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
bf73b041376167ba562776da19861a15
2dfbb4398d34137907be65ebbb851a994c11a1bb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'297502' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWJ' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
63f906cb3838f7741cb81c75fb4c8958
c6b7356a1f75197906834daba1d7a3e0da705f4e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'287915' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWK' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
eface052d361893b341d4c7af720582b
d986292e36817fe64416c0fad2c219e5429cbe51
'2011-11-15T04:03:57-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'297436' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWL' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
0848140a94f18ce1bfb109d6a8670524
843fb011033c70bb6044f9f1d97bf6fc548cd674
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'309964' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWM' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
4743f74acfa5c3fc247d95cde930366b
2d7591d4217c9a23453e447fb3485196ac874f7d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'304437' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWN' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
c6bf6e7411c827ab97f9f33990224ece
3c1572148ed2869b67b0824026359848e6f187e9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'290329' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWO' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
3c3d3473b04a29f9e898f173021156ac
c9857f2522cc24ce80ce2a0e5c795283ffcd36b5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'295980' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWP' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
341b6d88c85a6cbaa979c75fe6fca33c
0e8194c344ff26b4030b8dea94a12e214f383e76
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'300034' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWQ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
778c390e2cb62f8e7cf06fb2814fe4bb
3e9f0700566a36ff1f4e4895f1aea0a89defbbf3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'297254' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWR' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
9be9e437bf747a3e12d622914e5bff1c
d3b51fc28520931a59981421eee5887cae00d62b
'2011-11-15T04:00:50-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'284716' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWS' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
258186dbb74ebae06b95006ac201fab3
12fdffeb05c86c869d09991dc0defb736a7478b0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'375982' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWT' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
0f0aae681d4889c3080e978388747b28
6d3b913f0281034408f49bc4a6b7b0ac646cef46
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'294370' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWU' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
9e31eb7a90466793c7145abfabc875ca
7b2080901072e8794f7d99a873b3346edc717f1a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'303892' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWV' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
e5fc71c2ee0d8261d1a11703fde5b68d
e028e2c6c858ce0cabd37fe031723dc996df235f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'295233' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWW' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
748e5bb49f26cb58b10cd050e029966b
35b99cf7200421269bbc6570eb0d1831bf52b24f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'277599' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWX' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
35bd05c88021f7a62e334a3041817a8b
7a28c8e3715551de4a0a769d158de03dac777565
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'281441' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWY' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
42e93cad17f12dba0643fed22921040b
2e5c3103aeac824668207e1061a0d019a871c621
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298376' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPWZ' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
7f706e9baf769f66c68c3a93997f42e4
53d745d8cdc35661741d9508750a1e653a910840
'2011-11-15T04:04:11-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'284185' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXA' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
7fbb52f07901e4fbee764ac1f2ed1f30
5a33507d3f353583fc9a00ed792c39bbb0ce3c06
'2011-11-15T03:57:47-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'295461' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXB' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
1dcb95f731f1a7d1ca269431e2b7a446
50ae613fb91e8d1e2954080787c4e04f57cd4020
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'292835' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXC' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
bd575f805b60c02bdc548489981ede4e
5751ac42c7036ea7ab47b55554fb5e288401d120
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'304781' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXD' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
b72c708ab760f7de4b316a6d5de13bb6
6a405228da4c750b6dad713d5606bb607d408eb6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'303245' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXE' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
ec604542e0e69dd6e597cd950eebc707
cc7f3b89c6f5965913ee7bbd9cc56b3f2f84d513
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282568' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXF' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
b84be661df09031e85e12afd570d7128
205e48cfe6865cdb8378dfe567bc4afbf548a61a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'289128' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXG' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
79fe5898d59145038b5801e82868418c
d3223f7eba2488e9854a9062aa0750f2936ddf1e
'2011-11-15T04:00:31-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'314049' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXH' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
02d2933eea0c306d64011661a0328e3d
f91d52b72bfe2a02d0ec7df7e443b86cba05fce1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'296896' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXI' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
c5cbaf92590dada4a1f3fae472ddcf7e
95cba2d664858ebf13f00d8a597901ef77dcc527
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'292779' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXJ' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
17526672c2fcc04f3ffce17f0104b75e
841374db63f0823dca08cec4e1fb0dd2ada71623
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'286678' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXK' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
88ba9153174ee09080989608d6485bf5
2fd9e4a9d3a70c3fbca6bcf0cb366acd085eb240
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'288961' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXL' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
da0a591b5cba489839228c46e61a7092
02a0c109f12390108de45680cb47f97acbfe093c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'277741' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXM' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
86f3e90388e5c0c7cfe537e097752b77
c4cfae755d15db5af78bdb044ccd1b761fbb84e6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'285904' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXN' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
b05c7142dfdc03b712066075207f1091
d3c1be2b316a77c4e67be2ccf012434ae24b7392
'2011-11-15T04:00:06-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'301056' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXO' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
e8bd4dfeab6e568ddc00bba7205c654d
6813e2682101f369087ea3b191f3d11398b38801
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'290328' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXP' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
d62cb2145605bf2210664675090054b5
ca1d37323be12b201a64f31652c77728a270fcb5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'293841' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXQ' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
a675dd017f13e0b868e5bebae465d734
c75933d8ab2c44d23a4a548dba82625296774f15
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'327041' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXR' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
fbd46b48bacf476de2440a8578fb0288
05ed6e8842baf79d27a31471230a853a944a9261
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'288806' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXS' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
0ea74e665046e06b25c483aae0e0e6eb
b654b5c8506b70ebc1d6a0068cfc9a3f9b2324ba
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'289634' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXT' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
ba5a4437cd20a8d8eed395c0a2417e6d
44e28bbe19eedf3175352f6abbee982410255cbc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'306659' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXU' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
1ef54b61ed66fe42f5b0cf025976c477
74b384dfe11483a3e04706bc3c8dabb832b721d5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'297940' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXV' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
d34fcad4b484546d4e663e8853eb9579
d6f8845b92adafe9e9b943d396da54cf26fa4578
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'314874' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXW' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
65233b3af1b40e8f7fa545889f3ce6b3
ea93a67093d82647507a02f4e7bd3da55db60df5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'297879' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXX' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
09daa2a6835c611c2c89286e9f44144b
7229f39fec8f2e25f141c0e339faae8a3ad952b0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'306004' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXY' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
977a5009327fb909969083dc5d1bf4e9
e6f52da00a460b0cb04b1f493ca1b73aaed75a1d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'292737' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPXZ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
689916d8020e3991255a858ac162cbd8
84491171cc795beeab3e23894f705f2455f64d28
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'305522' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYA' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
05e4f8c5ecab368c1c1bdc43bc72a5b9
8c0c18198f0333d9297d0543a6cdde23ddcc0ae4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'276499' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYB' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
f456eaead57e9b48a36cd916234385d7
97bcce56160a8894d3c4654f8839c127c3284b12
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282649' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYC' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
5c2bd3f11d128129a65d3a3e24991be0
d64813a69e42c5081eff41603a39a4854db58fbc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'293361' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYD' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
a76b679fa0d6d009ef5847b73fba53cd
d3d4dfc182da2b38a964a5a3ac9e68285929e805
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'276832' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYE' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
9ef038053c99fdec11676bf4c3e62b4c
9e2e0204a7bdf6884bf53a2b816a032e4a358329
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'321486' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYF' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
f393f9e71cd5f09b04844e7d320babed
ded131378af0d7c43113cc32b08675e6144248ac
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'306195' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYG' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
d244ed98e8f4dbfea89e813651fc7040
918b45647036d5035cba7a244d45f2c7943bd206
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'313260' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYH' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
105080917daf7aeb06e7336dd0094980
fa244d49b70f7642683753d4c4967107c7d2952b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'326534' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYI' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
4e455fd064e40f436f790892e40e5641
dd2f54dee63de24f2d3b18e6a1dec0e6dfefc04b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'275499' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYJ' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
22d4532d927f275d130158f681c6aed4
ab53f9c28d6ee3840a8da1eefe0442ac6166efdc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'302600' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYK' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
1243a212c38164a5e8330107316c4e2c
8e1f91f1f245702e13e007e8a53c8ba09d2d3a5c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'304420' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYL' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
396d1472f781edab9ad2da9649d3e29f
5cec2d43beefd6f2b47fca94a3a4859a560f01af
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'306508' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYM' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
567ca931191f2c20aff998acf7d52ad6
fc1504b1742c0034f4aa3676dd4099325c9fa6c6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'200648' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYN' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
c2daab56e7c6b02f7f3a19dbea0ae7b9
934989d73d017fe2ae9f0e906637391c7eb76065
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'349123' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYO' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
6773f6403ef4d22329f6dedddcf0a026
7fe034adb9090327d41d8119c3b575f1ee2c47ac
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'275354' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYP' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
1f968529f5a0079cdb5b55faa96d3e4c
165f173d53a8ccaf16caebc679de2e212a71ac19
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'291067' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYQ' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
b7e2fe80f62c4eabc5c71b877f925eba
aa655b9cf327ab9106b885af64c9c0a37d4e8182
'2011-11-15T04:02:11-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'284268' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYR' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
a888c1dfe5ad987b0dfa2d0d141195a6
da730336fc4fb5a2370068c186f9114589f0f41d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'301151' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYS' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
e89991b4de107e0efedc0e86673f8c0b
b621b43034cb7eee73cb4af5dc12297595f54844
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'325238' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYT' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
bd425f67e111830165faa2cd1d3f365e
7dec97445b2d0a957332fa02a3f50649d3e5056c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'311447' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYU' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
520c2473475a2f3d2c7be69d0ddc7a5b
83b4e006de85ec0ffd9a9d425d8213b6c353c4ea
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'279634' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYV' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
6c0b2244ba64a8255bf6437d470d0b28
97b8ba9fa3bf02287576fc85e7ef1bc2eee9e315
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'276330' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYW' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
ee7c4fd1770e06d65c8b58f21cb18b09
106a64d9bc409cc2cc161887cfbd5d5bcc716c91
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262450' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYX' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
1bcbd7671315f26fb9a02fd13e75cee0
fba01fd48d8775302c5729e23d79cf211ad76b49
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'285261' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYY' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
1ecaf1132dc3a0022d414a188ccec930
0fecff8d87907dcc714b4e0fc0723eda02fe9897
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'307244' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPYZ' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
dd51ec1587833c1f8e3fdb0f89dc5810
a4eb3ce3d01c7aa3bda4b262450b8d4a88143b40
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'319012' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZA' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
743f956541a95872d849f1db2b69c7e4
e8a09ce967b65e8d066f8355e96da799ebfdc3e2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'304766' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZB' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
fb3311673168cac47c2b53af635ab035
7db1c6c27f13662672fcd35715fbd05d6fee54e1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'319947' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZC' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
2c26d8ad488c5bfdece8020b1ddc8105
c12abf3be10860e09ad02eb4f21ec4c0e6cd07f9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'307506' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZD' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
fccf6323d4deee1c70af23ccf5426566
7af5a43a44a0bdee94aac17bae19146298ad18bb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298901' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZE' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
18f83eafc5bc2892bc7bf6c7d4b29f49
b41e4cb5001c8e260d7c6806e7355ab540194772
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'281379' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZF' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
929395e92f6cf60348d5470dafdef690
d3739553d0124d87e371400f45b5558aa9882ce7
'2011-11-15T03:56:01-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'320254' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZG' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
43e1e329e326092f8a5288b6c48ed797
2c06456cd40ab090a5ee52e6dfc98e9acc6a019b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'292500' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZH' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
1cc7a835746089db0334bf397179bb2b
9021b5f7fe2974aec019bdadce08bac1aee4d271
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'312592' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZI' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
eb66105088946973db5b7fc4e1939227
1c6ccd90ba1461a2ea7fd6da577e17ebe64d68bb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'283753' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZJ' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
1a842cecd0d91e9fd250d9147715fc73
8b4a7cb81677d78b4f5eae8c5bbe7351b4103167
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'313771' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZK' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
8ebef4cf513e14f66516586a26c00615
a63243ba27cb1984bf0c3bf91cb2260dadea7bde
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298434' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZL' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
2962983bec30f644f9452263695bca42
2656b20c7f1abf3629bd724b6e7e4ab478012604
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'321513' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZM' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
df1a30baab8b6242403f6b9faeba9652
9640e7e6340d4f2126c44fe78aeed8e3fd2a15a8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'299473' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZN' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
80692412350d93935126d9db62522e05
2089fc2962bba03e39eff0690b2e0138526b9866
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'296884' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZO' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
7f60746625bb5cf85c86f23016ca4f5b
cd9ab7b8973c2dd7c1c11d88b6b994eb85199683
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'278353' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZP' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
d62405c75774b352fe2745565939cef6
37028c972cf11dd4c99ca7126f62551b1d26179e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'308943' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZQ' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
891acc63751578dd46ac040724a7ccaa
f6fe9253713754ff67aa338ea80ab116da70f0dd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298936' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZR' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
7080715f1c5563909531daa009e1ef2b
58f58762974acf0018e6842ce4dade7ae20a6799
'2011-11-15T04:01:53-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'310013' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZS' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
4f688396f79df06c02d6664a3ea5de4b
57a01474ec2ab7f731bb67d3b0241bb6fa20ed4b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'289202' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZT' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
a75ccdbd980253bddec5cca2fb84f540
751dd68020e0fa51a46f0b163461965901610de1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'305277' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZU' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
c9f56cd86c57c178dd9323a2489c4c2d
a9fe1f93d2e3a3585097dbba6c3588fb539acc23
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'290264' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZV' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
c4a9251f31c9f61c9ffb6445825b15f2
9a3a504f80969c1727bdf2896531c72e6d59afe8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'303614' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZW' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
5bff80b88eeb12019f82321812953629
f0a48ebbe3998b99b6969fa6a250ecf260e1f467
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'289790' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZX' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
975a56713e138ec5370c495184962126
b2c0467f73d433606048df2e460343cec9317bd0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'299912' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZY' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
c953cf9c0e3ead6b757a68d972919b0f
78fd375366db7ac084fb77446407031c74a59866
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'316603' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAPZZ' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
25b78a0e380acbc76670e5cd5d61ccf1
bf6066eb6fa5b6ee31a08517e865dc6a162e8989
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'312803' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAA' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
36652fb0092d36a9acadfd61f48a34c8
da9b5932cd66c0a0336fcf255bfcdf66c12f54b9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'322972' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAB' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
d5441a5896fb077612e2b54117c5c7d6
43fc4bec1bb5b238b0fcbe5fe2128fe6e1a12b18
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'319530' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAC' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
65015b48b2721e20168ac975a495a80c
e42ed0b81476e98470a73e626b72b8359c677ad5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'278094' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAD' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
c01956934dad7d9ae95e327ef29e465c
cfbcdbdc08e56852a559929e9d9b7c696f815c60
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'337257' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAE' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
13daa50662300bbdff76013a22f142fa
4039c1f4078d35f6d63a1d6f465a6729addd1145
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'330308' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAF' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
d2a22da76c8022098965b669e40821cc
b94314d32441fcf8e182063cc919c0e7ac4c0077
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'304611' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAG' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
644ecd4b7dc55a36e769d26229ea42d3
690c2759164f8377111e47eb6ac43270934de9b1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'306769' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAH' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
8295db55b8200b4111b505194a5725ac
491dd0fba2e4cca0150f9804b88b8c8fe50a34f4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'312644' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAI' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
98a3b170e817f2ddbf3271caa170a50d
df261149d183a7c3450c3f587fdfd5f3025e85e4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'341200' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAJ' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
567408e7a4058f570758736572fbe5b7
d714e8cbd2d111c994f99dff5a403c6a6712dfc3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'325087' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAK' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
f82e72e0581d214b5dfac9237ebe010d
6cdd8b51f807bdb7171fbf089fb3ef0f513557cb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'307105' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAL' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
f01a3da1bb4a23d9d92d542109c8922e
4f8a8db8872fb391aa7432f2c0ea7a42e6a0ca60
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'305579' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAM' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
cc34dae15c18b2dbad961350e1f33e1f
1828a13d8a6211cb3c21f897f617d1b3b53c4f96
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'285877' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAN' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
881d433c17deb518d4f7d7dbec4d2c31
95b6dc3cd07ef08e3f50efefdf22de53aa19426b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'267267' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAO' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
33ef03196cc3e9c5dfa255e009753a55
a3086bcfb0198006d8703d2cd693b8d7f06d2ac4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'294502' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAP' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
d18fc0fdf78176d5e56329212ab84311
31598f068f0efed4275e988ee2d87c7ff50b8140
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'313945' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAQ' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
e6615ad56969ad11dbf20861efdf3fb4
efaac0a3ebf53a879ae90aef80dc90aa5dbb5a93
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'297165' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAR' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
315d8eb519baa591159813a60bc8dccf
c6446ec9cc928d7d61914bac7ef13478872c5530
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'269420' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAS' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
b4923744da334be090497e2b903508ba
a3f9ca58ca3a67c693c84404f2fc963851bee325
'2011-11-15T03:56:30-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'313518' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAT' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
5475671f34f39cb68acc0f2354d0e07a
576ba401e402c454603ae18ded250818434f90bf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'311003' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAU' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
6137025302dec17abccd7758ac309a9e
9d2c8ad5c21f49d6210c98ffd3958847562071b7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'299680' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAV' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
a2c1818a3dd4a92adf5a23317734fdb1
321c2bb250767ec092f93fabd96925a4451244a3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'304044' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAW' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
4bf7449a37f887bf38debde83955ecf9
ecbfbb34c8babfdb53e16602375adfbc49f372d6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'321775' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAX' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
227dc7640839cfc2e30f947279d448f2
e642e07ade9d4fa95d488fa2a7df988fb051303c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'303594' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAY' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
2583c8c7c06aaaf9cf3ad8ca90afa8c7
e83059db9d4f3fded1c413767d07ad4fc58f71d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'312779' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQAZ' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
159ca360059b12c0dc0abf81ca0ff8e5
ad7b93c3fab949b62259df425d16429df5422178
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'318319' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBA' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
0c6556d390d80123a300ee95bb3c2633
81712b969a3c15b1d8944e590c3c35460f819c3b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'302660' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBB' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
c8d9344138bb049b57f37bad333a02c7
ab74a472c1a181835f6f6fe5320655848a469847
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'307214' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBC' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
00fe4f42794852967b0e8b78f39ad3bb
28f09b2b7ea1a311292706bba909d1e52916f52e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'302509' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBD' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
46c63a3d1e013d915e6dcd9cee93d1fe
6eaf680c7efc25ede3191a70ffc0fe8a3f860890
'2011-11-15T04:02:30-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298860' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBE' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
9d47fb81b0a771d6c4208364cbb55de1
61377b79fbac5c8229ce0066595a5fb078b17e89
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'284502' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBF' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
cd8f9bd6c72e19e820c997e0d5cb3bd4
93f6c0d5f27c876056d5c5fb912b987a0df98855
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'302456' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBG' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
751336bbe7591993f72e69667bef3525
d4c1f316fda5508923cf7789547b4b987f5e79ed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298440' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBH' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
865d69f8599ab2dbbfa31a5689df522c
579a6ca68c4dcf2e8640d706868551cc88679c07
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'293838' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBI' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
6edf739e751b585b74db4b51f1665777
bb0e85df97cb54167189891376cdbb9beab4465e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'294469' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBJ' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
d37b95fc73032a667f75ecaa8cb658ee
04145a9267b574a83a8c4f4bd146564636af8d61
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'295746' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBK' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
a3272a584f7759f3ad9397ce71eb4b57
94493b586d559d050c9361d4345a38ddbfb15f15
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'317744' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBL' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
bf4f1c376502c8a4e8c641ac293c56d0
1acf735dbcc01e3e65203e50e62821025bf1e1c8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'308984' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBM' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
d8dcb7c1cdbe0caaf3126241ab25abc0
f27cd49da6dc36becf2e593bbd51d5bba9c58e05
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'300125' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBN' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
241c09db674f6bea1211f2436af13fbf
105fc3f26b24043c12b35bf1a3d0f4d0697f19d6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'312773' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBO' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
fde9e5f281d074ef8714f0e858881986
160d808366d4640de4382bd0e1ecd897fb1046db
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298211' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBP' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
dad593ec6dfa660c3fc5c7c5a0753a56
d63bbc5374714f58c7154b93ff98cfaed3e27233
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'340662' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBQ' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
cc604bb7ea72a2559d6d0bbabdcfc120
f8bc09c198f2e35211d359d4d778112cd7886bb9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'297397' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBR' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
46cea19e477baddfc1bc67d40f3bc790
bbaaa8024ffed8aa86508860746ab5bbfee4d21a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'311973' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBS' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
0afe4831acd0315cd97d22bd04c42db8
113b816608aa0768501826a85eca0f89a545a9bd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'294705' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBT' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
5cc1685bcd389c4d0ec475a31af5d9a7
302354c44666aa124b3f21f75a847de54d5d9dde
'2011-11-15T04:03:37-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'317348' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBU' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
5c2897843d1333aabb7d4ab683586d40
1e5db69e03b6244d5a6c6643ef80ea2863c00a13
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'329120' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBV' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
16c8c5c30dcf83d0528665e835569c12
e6c0224d2aed980a7e062b3c81ea6b1026539c77
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'281949' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBW' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
0239f904d6eeb0ec8dda14decb31f62e
db16862e4587443ab5ee54bd6ea68ca5a2b05d09
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'286762' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBX' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
86b08dfba10258d13ca505a951f6fa47
c1b1783ac099a746c72b77934822aa88d416853b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'225796' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBY' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
475bdbe15cc3209354578ecf80d4036d
1a306f4cd0990ac60f1ffeb2116e4bc9aa3267fa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'362344' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQBZ' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
ba0efab9f2acc1e589c19f9108f4bdef
9cb8166d4a093a76423b3a01a74109232f4a5d70
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'325351' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCA' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
256ebf34c507765ecce40f635d761b3e
e73c4298d38424a59c23fd5c67083113bc1ee34b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'287810' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCB' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
52324a29e291edc132b03c65f1711690
fffe8f27c3bdf76fe32d4a0652357a8fdd69c832
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'304195' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCC' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
671bd4fdb245ed2d18de06271599a0ba
c45c713301f13fe8fc5bbad1d8c42ef87f1965a5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'315284' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCD' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
bd36064905b7c96c4fa68817cecf6863
75bce21d9ad461a992d4418bc88687a428e06dac
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'321606' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCE' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
c16d838eb525ce37990695caa35839a6
0917245eabbee3560ea6d0bf7d8e826a9fe68de9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'303876' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCF' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
8704263c2ebc7218c52647fbd0f462a8
5425452de86d6bcd2af63fe6b18ec1af0e4af3b8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282479' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCG' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
576d3c155ec1557ca57901c0a7a3182c
7076ced54e752eee24927bc14ceb1963aa19bf31
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'313705' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCH' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
0c3f205023397a07da072807aa73d391
25cab9d68b869a6d7b63c393cd219c676292a33d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'281996' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCI' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
2479b9cbc75d30a32dfdc2647f24be07
686d5b5df4e80fd691d4c4881d80de32f21d6afe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'294407' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCJ' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
011de94e2b2fd43db817576adb102be3
8f267de7deb066bf5a05686ae506006632f9cf4d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'305633' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCK' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
c78aa72f5df76bb9085d34fa051876d1
fd3ef9c588d378439f377253369fb086695d9b6d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'289667' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCL' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
eb2e4fc0a58b1883295317d9815886a0
addd6ef9a14091f9a60fee271da9aea78e851739
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'313097' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCM' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
b1a0646e958613ddfed1c5a9778bd4b9
d7d539af2826d59384d458241402f32af9f89e64
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298999' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCN' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
fe4cd2151b7e4542ea41f190c425eec6
19b1a7e595c897ef47e3e3bc79d8e94f589e4af7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'319361' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCO' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
d99ea2c3a52ea28ed7d3739fcded9442
c50314bd46ceb0363d09b09d892778d6f93701d2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'270393' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCP' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
1b701188abb417125245f9b4e38501a1
3f8dc9330b26237084525392e2f47d5a91f3a23e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'290235' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCQ' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
3af8425ba947fb4f75c8362b41cc04da
61846950f99080ba4d064f92ec13ac833b435d5f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'296923' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCR' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
4347d0406f053285ae15f463ab643025
fbe42e79d15be538cbeaa2150cad8ad6865b015b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'295623' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCS' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
cdd1fddbf4db8319f22e59a8474c84e0
1c6c6791f4082b2733136f0a2d8fdabe4beaef2e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'299554' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCT' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
157056ac0d1d642443297d9683a74474
b34deed4ce02811ab1969fc59ae7659855cd3cab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'322472' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCU' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
a4c8cb34d1106e1aae5403d7cdebd69a
bdc2cb0be57cc23976f8ac88b24061280c3348d8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'319432' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCV' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
798bd27a6061933b13afd41fe4787dfb
aa43c34c3a9d81e90e7308f1e0b4d6fa18804eba
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'294833' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCW' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
325074d5c6542609f2a4dee4fc434e99
65df93a88cdf7eebad0a99ded6b4f89f2673c55f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'259970' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCX' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
d7c9b3ae39bebce3907bba578f35ec03
7ff4522d85daf9e959af10ae0e17e686db3a2831
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'291439' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCY' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
75276947ee60fa0417e3518912c50d99
b23be5a9198ab24bcf9fc80c64fb5b805251d71e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'295000' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQCZ' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
9b67a1f3f60b8e6b124c45033d018b27
866344075cd8735d16cbf457b5215843bf3730a2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'286370' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDA' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
508bcc9ed71a1395df018e1dceb2e2a7
639e09646c754001c4f5f1143c1ba3aaf02d4e03
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'277050' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDB' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
a26528a6309e6be04f8e01dbb3c526cc
011f7e806f805b5abdceb7081d37e36f9c7e6dc2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'298646' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDC' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
9646daf762bea5cae9e9ad216750e8a0
b02275fedc062329fd2465d72ab5023cdaeea945
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'310610' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDD' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
52fa538e85183ff0db0a20ef2e358c1f
b36efc5ceb2e96e3984408718419a9120ac9f072
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'318765' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDE' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
68fd5e41b1f2dbb54d7ecb99749c0ba8
b638f0f31cfbba5deae32c85b7c9479333550f1b
'2011-11-15T04:02:48-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDF' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
12b6d21d9b540ed326ec684e1bc51685
6e3870904f0ba84be28858e5fe2eacacca88a99a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'295979' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDG' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
85925f4b11432584c80bdc23cae0479d
e1b14b07c0701cd33b26a1866d4f6aea02b58868
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'309382' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDH' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
8c83affd8115dc9213adb5857dadd14b
d9c875c0f7ffd8dd53ae9e5daef4a38e0cfe04e2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'246060' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDI' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
d622b357767365efc882df7816b1cb64
1ec7c66a722eead655cf9ceaf22ea3e8eb6e9e5f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'259848' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDJ' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
191cdddc0f8708d7ce4df62bd0838fe6
9ea4d5b9a93298c6823ca4788ca539361e9d5140
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'257237' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDK' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
e43744af5e60eb9697e5e6a2c8c77467
378b6139845db8d01df0ebf60fa7034ce8d9a267
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'268164' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDL' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
150b07dc27a83e4ea077e66e10a45cdd
b398c3d73129388f7ecdf005375bd1acb88b96e2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'322633' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDM' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
97ec439967b948696df5d5c8e307e2c2
c47e718a07879e545d55ad642f540fb6bf4efbdf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'277783' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDN' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
9b4de73a9037d2b2e56bfc74bca20b56
8ea9d46038bc5b006f1538ad5b60154a855ad529
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'229397' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDO' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
7983a7bbbfff3d94b687b6b5025ab4ec
92d9e03c079c01994d48070ab60079e82eecb44c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'346717' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDP' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
0c77c054d0d702fc2bebe4e013ecd0d6
9107f1dc9ae8cd17d4f1a128c201c232351c8441
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'269746' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDQ' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
10cf51d2e3ae424411b5cb2bd6a9d92d
6e2098bd2aea40cf10c8c527e45c11e774b4728a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'276920' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDR' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
7ad08c8f32c9362bb62ed1a0c1bbd20f
26a9b343cd9713702eddb702b7521516d3222ad9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'251673' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDS' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
adb986b2ead42632b474a06557362071
975a3965f4212b742b7048c8dcb03d1f858cd998
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'240556' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDT' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
9559ae93fb84327e2f99366581aefa6d
b1da784f41dd926527e23bb81022fe12fbe472ef
'2011-11-15T04:03:41-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'228949' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDU' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
8c85716e191bdc053f14251a8303503b
c4e1dcf3d7be7f1d007ec2a32a11c9f88c6c7e61
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265532' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDV' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
16b2b8bbaab154e62020ef689606921c
33f4916d298227f516b39214d570297722c3a5e1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'245557' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDW' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
1042d22b6d16aa8c338f8d01241525ed
ba8cea556c8c7924571fee0b760def8b1c03dbfc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'247674' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDX' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
c711b0c40a372edf9d2143c1ef3ccced
25ce728539392f868b5b310c7e526b86675bc3bb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'260326' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDY' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
703243622d2b74e8103593829372ad42
38a2fca1ba70b5d4004fda3fd35546f682955032
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'256296' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQDZ' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
e2027d352a9714f49d0cca14dfe39846
2dad4121aeb9641ec51d9005f36107a03454082b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'248869' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEA' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
fdd7b5315ab93e7be23be655f8e19cec
30fe46860a0933b2136fbe8b9616b9d558f16934
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'238482' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEB' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
8e0a6935a8e95760f2f5ad1431e49779
febb589b78dc27eb8c6801d1ac67dd7646ad6fa7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'271532' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEC' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
bf947d7946271f09a26d752c244cbf2f
2a7c3ce3aa01c509abb143eb17119d2959d1a3f6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'219639' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQED' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
9d8a3ecdd572c3a0a885073414b6bc11
e30e675b1c719a537f1dc9fd3e87bcd316cdaceb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'252476' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEE' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
f32cf0884ba17a6e0949d4a22dbeb95f
f86e58c02c3a4cc5aade610e2da01f5c7134d263
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262470' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEF' 'sip-files00306.jpg'
0ed7ecf3b63d423bc6b180f5c456d35a
953b8d9d740806a417b3a20b12177d5e32b7e4f5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'261938' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEG' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
7bb909a86fe11a7eaeb0e1a4324fd660
6f8592e077f70df1086dfa9b48233266fbeaaea9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'250327' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEH' 'sip-files00308.jpg'
0dc94fcb83309854130c36077b5d1cb1
67e3b8912c0c74a5fa1e8ac6c7909428faeaeb6c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262244' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEI' 'sip-files00309.jpg'
4a397f5ff10de504aed3c5ebcbfd9cc7
57d7d8ead2322c269661e192f34518aba1fbec6e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'246050' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEJ' 'sip-files00310.jpg'
24f7fc24f41810224d7079f8015f6873
f7fe0f99647e6dc2063567700a949f86d7842aeb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'231949' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEK' 'sip-files00311.jpg'
d1ac4c3a1ea96647c795486e2b87311a
340b9aa5be4a004fb0530e3e5667d59d632b0d1a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'223205' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEL' 'sip-files00312.jpg'
88eea7e9a253a44094baaa83d876ed17
b9032a8cc33874b58e0d9f7e6f81b03ca3c2a775
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282136' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEM' 'sip-files00313.jpg'
4cb4e11650617b6ce25320de9949e11f
f626798cc56e135d5dd39529d65ef1c4435803cf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'264885' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEN' 'sip-files00314.jpg'
05a0134676f19a8b5255613ae7ffeeb9
c50ae5cf44f80120d3f552ecb2a93d6eb9ec5695
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'265123' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEO' 'sip-files00315.jpg'
2e57f2d81bdc704ad1128d184f87a4c9
db74c03065a77a7748c240707aa0ff40b40740d7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'246872' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEP' 'sip-files00316.jpg'
c2f2ce293437b649fe9fc99735f0ad22
cd2eb785979c19d71aae376c9566fe2c4a3d7941
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'274137' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEQ' 'sip-files00317.jpg'
0bec3ad091c04e13365b709dbcf27671
bf3459af72b3eb20a19a359f80104affdb2d462b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'260607' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQER' 'sip-files00318.jpg'
8a0e59d639531bdd6275073c7fab1f71
a8684d910a808ae23ee38770c1b546c59764a954
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'238143' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQES' 'sip-files00319.jpg'
26e5cae4aa2966c58943ddcc7966339b
0b6a2bc7d363de4b3838173cf2b127e2917597f0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262616' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQET' 'sip-files00322.jpg'
96a074284f98523b3b1e1950d4027f01
4988a85cc2b42e022af995e4beffc869bae001c6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'262666' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEU' 'sip-files00323.jpg'
a132af98198b73e1dad8d50c99d9d9d0
440118750d04cae7c7996759d3772386672b26fb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'247851' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEV' 'sip-files00324.jpg'
b9c4e5ad4e4f7eb60efa5ced2025d3cf
4140d44cf64cb5c8ec96fb54f7f2abacc4230740
'2011-11-15T04:04:14-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'248330' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEW' 'sip-files00325.jpg'
6a77e4a9cb4fcbb5325dfd87d1997766
1281fe117e733180b3be8bb74a7ac22a2ede6ea4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'322405' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEX' 'sip-files00326.jpg'
0a1db346121509a45c5f79af04eb80a3
fca9ef3e2758a79ef618bfc632cb96bd7ade0a94
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'247929' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEY' 'sip-files00327.jpg'
62d678e6d3836398db1e9832fe2135aa
097e43bbdf7e4dc8efc39a38a938a3fc1e04203f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'238574' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQEZ' 'sip-files00329.jpg'
6d3a3509553e5ca2ac487f822f3738a5
dd767dc0309f1b5bf93dda16356ccd0dc6df0b43
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'234407' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFA' 'sip-files00330.jpg'
1da1624a7f99ee0ae099c246550f516d
44250ab67b4cff5eece2e2cdba80d89d46d9fe32
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'277159' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFB' 'sip-files00331.jpg'
e61552492e83460b98817bd35000b59a
82a39f57012dae5813bbee42840864c0244cf2a2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'244781' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFC' 'sip-files00332.jpg'
520d2b4fb0592f594e823d706ac9208d
cf18e9a2b570f4449739a99f0acfa1ee729f3d13
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'256261' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFD' 'sip-files00333.jpg'
06fcf9801584ee3084381423a86f226f
4c3d6deaf0ad49456e27fea315e3604f3ef54779
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'271942' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFE' 'sip-files00334.jpg'
c3fe1c70e177dd01bc72e1dc8700fd18
0b29c4d5d29e88f346b998bd42332bf040dd49d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'284756' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFF' 'sip-files00335.jpg'
9160e49d32d90d935af4809bd87edc13
79591dd6beb4786f2734b5d2765bf1b783776067
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'253287' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFG' 'sip-files00336.jpg'
36250b66635d30f1a1e904c05b98b645
755f97080ff907c83d6e49734ddf5c729a775455
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'259407' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFH' 'sip-files00337.jpg'
e854444dc5b2bfd087ee2dd3ea2a6743
3006b3b3745c32d442dbfd088a4e9ab6329b90a9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'310940' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFI' 'sip-files00338.jpg'
f0ef308d26f2ccb51934df10dd6de502
c892f438f9b81ba191183b86c987fe8fe0973eb5
'2011-11-15T04:02:15-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'288497' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFJ' 'sip-files00339.jpg'
1abb3c2c512c7006fecb4974b69efddf
b7311608a73191c876dacace3324480432247bf0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'312735' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFK' 'sip-files00340.jpg'
7c3f834adef27531734d553193ab55e5
1fb9178cb465a9bae3328c9c3d5244cc5d4d1326
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'311913' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFL' 'sip-files00341.jpg'
258ef784bc84f9ad4247d3bee47947d8
d80a124d074b954c797aa31c70c07326ac407dd1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'316948' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFM' 'sip-files00342.jpg'
35164bbd28b9e15cd535e7c1d400ffef
c2fea06e1fbcf1496f9b1fb6c9b1a89bc7245821
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'291362' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFN' 'sip-files00343.jpg'
a5703022d9c11f1fb2dbf7dc82aa5713
89664e1a02da059c8da2c68b569beaa51c5fd095
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'303010' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFO' 'sip-files00344.jpg'
5bc2274eeeddf03cfecf6b53c479daef
cfc8e5a5389eb7195e09a7fe262480befafd2293
'2011-11-15T04:03:30-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'306343' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFP' 'sip-files00345.jpg'
79269420b55e20fdefccb8f5793be6e3
fd4a542302b1646fab08a8dd657aa84dd7eab9aa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'312139' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFQ' 'sip-files00346.jpg'
5af01a38eb295cc5248db16a9e8229e5
ae691598f6cf821749c7e9f68e32acdac831a397
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'293512' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFR' 'sip-files00347.jpg'
23f54c9b730b327af89e6a444458b5d1
0de989bf885ea60b61891710c5db27a6c9a5c475
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'300653' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFS' 'sip-files00348.jpg'
e43e07f1a7b576cf5f173c99ec859910
4d2d76af92a18c950b1895d38b5234f8aa41c5e9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'286014' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFT' 'sip-files00349.jpg'
0572946eb3b8ba5cd758016623cf0c9d
8af16d26bbd3aca27956f59c30b22e19b93b8f40
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'288053' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFU' 'sip-files00350.jpg'
6384b95a7b3795d0c76b99e8d30613ea
32ec55072c545e81668f63915221ddc5daee540a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'290361' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFV' 'sip-files00351.jpg'
60559ef85ddf52d6931b318a0f496fb3
77659af8c86d0a0a6f175e2ce3b1f53760abef67
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282317' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFW' 'sip-files00352.jpg'
a6e4e02df7808d4e89d2ea0d5fcd794e
3f5aecf073c152994647a2c7901f16495e431199
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'316380' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFX' 'sip-files00353.jpg'
96b6215106ee92f0f4c53ae7024e9df9
8cc077f95d48b6e073cda2ec74d1cdcb6a03dc1b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'287844' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFY' 'sip-files00354.jpg'
138cc43418d8c862211540a59e7f7de8
d7270ffda4a85b2269fd0892b26a708b2cb1de2b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93702' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQFZ' 'sip-files00357.jpg'
f8eaf6aea0b8c692e412087af1e1c577
848e5ea9935a20fa2d443eb21598acc5b5baebac
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'282606' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGA' 'sip-files00358.jpg'
8b1bdf2fc84fc08c74d63df9ddf04c59
8ab32d975c71523a39527f0d3f8e89f688dff549
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'147580' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGB' 'sip-files00359.jpg'
9beec09f9d6e7e202846d782792c83e1
545ac2817bad7028508e84831b80fd112b18628a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'129735' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGC' 'sip-files00000.QC.jpg'
1700e70add6d965a8c03705533f7f9ab
0cfceb0e13f1c6aca93d4a9ada5de6258a114730
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'48792' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGD' 'sip-files00000thm.jpg'
ead1b450a21fcc7fbea5870981b5ffa3
d3956b6861d9d80b9829413cd6a0a7088172aa27
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'38943' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGE' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
f95bafaa53aa34bc6e8bea4301c6df3d
b438fefd407b94686c1ea0fa8a888e61f41c4dab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'125519' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGF' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
4ae3040fbad28a48bc19f6d8057fb1c8
7af538d4400ab7972f03a4bec1e091e4e7a12c16
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'54329' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGG' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
81c1383efce0b2de356efbd74670fa6e
68743493e4eb6b77432d666e0ebcded3c9d66a83
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'48006' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGH' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
094828abe53755ed3abceb2c0b1dc31a
ba31df02b355ecd5799aece4a827165fa229b262
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101070' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGI' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
7f6df47624aaeda718d5b99661897717
c60f995bb630279d9dfc542986bf761761181ec4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94971' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGJ' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
5206195019bef51037c10a85ca224c3a
9784f33ebbba801319fb1a837ddad8a3c62bba3f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101585' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGK' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
15695937883313d82918304ff6bd41a2
b8c7f873b470e48c2f52622d1789262da8d4f880
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100750' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGL' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
b4433e3701f594efeada3f7604f8cdbb
575027fe8e7985b643856dad85608e599beae0c1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103680' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGM' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
b8066922ae3c9c9188971d5e439c023e
a15ebabfc86f2bdafe05579c1800a6a91119241f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101125' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGN' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
e9c38aa5005dcd5e52c3381aa6c7a482
650ff131652954fb8cc0ce69565b0e54cabd87f1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99858' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGO' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
aa6354b9a05b62a3a6f2b0300933035f
23a42d229ddf46b6d715ce228dc380a873732b49
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96121' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGP' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
98a71315a670628f8fa65803aecddc5e
668ac7502f8e6f50d753e31da1ef2f0812e66b34
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103974' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGQ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
991092f2f0dc1ce2d8fd35ec81d9053a
414f21408bdb151042c12b5455e38894f3472d69
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103057' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGR' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
3dad9f1cb4beaee9c8f42fdc70c8e2bd
b71ab3649b370d84b5eea7b8233b971d1177c39c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102489' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGS' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
e214059b247e0f25f848847a68737254
66d46e63c00dec0a9cfb00e78951f7266c430b12
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102425' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGT' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
56e53b03d6fde5b0c6ab3355a7a0adfa
79e5a5465925f2dc4e124c174c8bd069d745ba20
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'106534' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGU' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
390f58ef0c65221977fd40f2b2015073
837f74361578049b894175e39e1b8d01097eb538
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104916' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGV' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
f5c14168b326646d7bc8f98e04be058a
8d5da82fe5280bb01960b3da32e6c834de89bef9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96682' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGW' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
377aab3e7feedad136851100c711d219
a0d4c03afe086e5000dfbf316aa7ec886ddab7e6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100052' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGX' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
6743a933e7e4ac637c25279c919978a9
28089d8fee51b81d3f3a214767963266a0c6473a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103041' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGY' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
7dc7eef98c2f788fd395976737f0efea
32db625b2620f91fc4a21575f5effe4b47caedab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88490' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQGZ' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
2d9e14346ab91a9c0730c090307ef834
ff49805db15de33546c4661855c19e5b0ee3512d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104880' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHA' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
1470ed326d22bd7c9d4aca07f021358c
299d435c57facf2197455163f2cca829a7c01d1b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103023' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHB' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
0d210f50ff69dda57112e54194cac423
fd70ef9c69b4bb6b6be45e4d0b59354e9ab2465f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104691' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHC' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
4203ca0b555323204e5b1ae6b90d7f2a
7c5ecd8680e82fdf68066b3e4610fbe14aff0253
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103060' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHD' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
ff7baed13e37a52337dbd5c747ef2fec
877900bb0d7c4e4428d32c206135a5166237d813
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102825' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHE' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
65ae057120c05f6945af41489706132f
46ced986e71fb78f0531c1bb5117dd430d7aae8b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97071' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHF' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
3e9dce880610eb7386fc74fcb82a7d0e
5423dc4c8bb68ff7c110f6f88e503803697ceb77
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104926' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHG' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
ab8588116378a5e79369a81e6e145c8b
471e58de69e5e03574504c68bf904bf54ab2d1bd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'45838' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHH' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
742d7a46de5117b81df93c5a05fe5344
565cd8de43f4e0ac3904246bc4ea7f484d250ab0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98549' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHI' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
d6fb81e4f90f93f88d48b9f3b8f506e0
3ff416edfbfe2842416eeb17175be2196af669f2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101839' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHJ' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
848f72962af3363a94430c74e793d659
496277910bd2c5069b290a923de0a80749408004
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'106731' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHK' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
4b6795d4eca7ec47c146bfe898b2c889
1212d2cd45ebee67ee69b47a7cc550f964c78169
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100329' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHL' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
2f8f8f75649cd0d3b2bbec1de284efe4
67a57e46093df90716d8576aee584cfdcc54ee8e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100210' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHM' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
3099a504f9564b2692f01d665e9a214b
6e8ece5d3c34063a8c7541a3b91001e61a266aca
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94941' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHN' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
2ca9599f3150ece9ea2b3f8a268d80ed
71facd0c3d385d93c7085ce69f6f962622c991a6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99249' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHO' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
65f1c3a62d43b4c1cb71cc68055ba7d4
83e42377104ade7a8bacdd5a7926552d51814d68
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101213' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHP' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
42f32342562dc84dccdb7a0c230f7e4c
c469d3bc6ebaa268db75168be96b32e8b7bba95e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102098' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHQ' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4d0c8cd4a0039bed20dc2d0028093fd8
6214af56e0c6c5effdb8e4aaa185fba56dc597c4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101828' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHR' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
0ac34c8d62f2372733fac3aee27d7030
e674340e82191538de6b38022eeac0066f30b1da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101852' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHS' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
2e968f660329ef2c37579820aa9512ca
a51a33fade003062ee147a7a30ced30f5860cac8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103677' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHT' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
7ef0e04be05212b6bd336dfc25177148
ac3384397e9b9e0e16a87a9bb3cebcbf358830bd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92550' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHU' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
92747ef26acc46c410689f82f3af6e89
767d1fcc6a55d7dab24067ce89325cb22740b6a0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95252' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHV' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
8f378d7de8af694d0501e4a8ee19249b
f62d54b974acf1da168aba7ee073c53e49994320
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95960' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHW' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
06b92d55d5014e57b772ba6092819708
f67f56367cb5aa7878bfdca9fa3a71866ddced06
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100948' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHX' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
4121b25ff9bb428e71049f04df9a8375
44ac905d7ba4193cb4f1607827dd5410fbaf07d3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100102' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHY' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
7b564a8c12c680ac4985e07bc2700519
79b11bf238ce165e36657660003cbbbd051fc3b2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92053' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQHZ' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
210d98f32e10712c497d258ca901c42e
34a44b8998229360df624c6d89198656fc88073b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96741' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIA' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
7ca84f6289d0007da8ed90eddbd79301
f7cd9216c0a34deaedc96343263a3372a11b86d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'71685' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIB' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
12af39e74db7ad7511d2e312897715b0
1bed67958104502b9d7b5d760d0911c1898c3a54
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95907' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIC' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
92c9895d7b017b6a54bea42f420034da
cdc82b379769b4785c6e93a5ab364533f182b298
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95163' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQID' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
3927dec441d52fc9d410681bfa74f91d
68eb832a526f7b306eddd66fd05c44a591f1fb68
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99471' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIE' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
b8e3a7b9412268653f1b51a1f46b3c81
1263d7ed2937f5dbd8e5cc6c5d3fe436488fa947
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95053' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIF' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
dd455259108e12dd9df49f784fd2d0f3
f0e81ef76d909e41d6054801196401629d3fe013
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98624' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIG' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
330cb75501e9b7045a0030bf4932f255
02c7b64c4ecf3110d862713326190759fd37e5ab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102734' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIH' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
96ef232386fcefa375c8f0e3a59f8902
6f49665850e7a3e924f493600250f7a6e9bbf9f1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89710' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQII' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
caf2dc18f44e91517463e76654afdbd5
6db3548b3e9c8f95d0fd708192b2367216273e2d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99976' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIJ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
4db1f13994eebf29f359069b8cc29df4
91d25e105f69d9c3c4bb4c33e63045fb1b982bb3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96983' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIK' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
981347c7ac8d2399faa7d60268bf948f
fea2d2e3f704eaa6f753a1e7fbfe3030c9c498e2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100093' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIL' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
22b3190fd87e2c4ea8b6440775b3ca6c
a7da5dd6ba488d56d4c4430bfb24e367cef9685b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85545' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIM' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
9b906bc6119baee4f0523d062372cc13
284901a173693244c8035fac71067296f6bdddec
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96566' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIN' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
2e8a435b90998a4620271e0997bb4f56
cda0e8c9f3e9c175ac3bf2c6478e81cc4e027f42
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99613' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIO' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
15968c02aa5ac9feb4e6fac39692b048
609a2364f5a15ce879a800cd517e9f25f8e1157e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102127' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIP' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
dd0b73edda365c857744e893e4c67fa8
f65b6e510dba4f03427713995a6d25cd6feb417f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95732' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIQ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
88516e112943f9b0c36a5fcb025e6c72
2c067f02e319567a2b20efb5a975980f99202534
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95306' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIR' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
75a2113d1a7c547d6d57967600266cf5
bc47ef53d7d164b74f81265922ab85fbfdeac2c9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98554' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIS' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
acc6bf45146b20929bf4fb56b5006772
1e4dfb778f968bfd59994e164c57f31f1651a2af
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103391' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIT' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
432b7b5780e577b406d6d6f88641c9ea
4f5272198dbf0c77db161a24440a72666cfb51c6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91768' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIU' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
0b3ea516a300b18c12582808aaf0adfa
ea8ea21135f4b65f27a1d3fc132fcb3904039e63
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99153' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIV' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
56d4a58169d0b61bfba1e409acf6b824
dee4b6acdbf036a10cd5c4105006ec91c7aa6600
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99040' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIW' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
175c66ce71c6620d1873361c6bc929f9
693c39591e7442759b0cbfad82514c97863cbd31
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101071' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIX' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
b1857d243945d5c4418bc68c36fcc682
75beddba30b840150e8f42741acb733958af6dbc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94145' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIY' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
da42408151c2e0d6d01ac69894d5a3c8
331e1cbad0bd0af20d0ba6b158934a71f1549ee6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96960' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQIZ' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
cee3f133fde88c9226862400872ee195
ce908b716adcadd62bcf00347ef5abb7704e706c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97660' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJA' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
1be769a1ecf1e714604da09ae81a0a22
627d39604f9131ea990baf9c864ddd11d8626fcb
'2011-11-15T04:04:12-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'49947' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJB' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
54087e083214e4af88fc40fd4d3b00f6
d52473dbdea76cefc689a76b62624f117798cec7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97755' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJC' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
2652a38beefc3ddb0948c0ea0591cfb9
e8e8146a3553b199a8414ba3d5cf72f5ad23109f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97840' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJD' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
48e60903d796300e3dafa3045ccc73bf
78da369229a99e459a48799c86c7cd4bfa5b601b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96595' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJE' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
aae7c60f8c33a1292346c8bf46baa535
8ce1705207ab9e80d6851e4ccae6bb3dbbdb1a00
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93655' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJF' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
ab6b7e60ff458bff6662f8232041deef
f7166320f85444e2cb312c431ed53598d8875009
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99864' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJG' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
6100d2b376996403207ff91946cfdabb
5154608577d51f50a592cffe5b9f5249527ed887
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99730' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJH' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
2e25ec32c02caaaebe57f32714671a1e
91c3b18a602376168d2614477e79419afb25395e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103798' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJI' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
3b8ad12728887f13f17dbc6e5fa77246
cb3ff691fc3307897a7f04d39951ac53dd512c13
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94637' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJJ' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
d33da1929ec6111b1668c833c9d4b33f
bcf73546a76962575747c08aac627e5e382cb755
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96710' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJK' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
d01df9c50db88e235c8cd1b275c0e016
e06925c7a0a6b724ea37a583ea2265fbe1cc051d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96826' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJL' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
103d37cb6b4f75291faaf67bec9474e7
3d6f47ee1f12d1364cfa2af9a3158f614bee22da
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99824' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJM' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
0b52c1dfe933899cfa30737b11369dcd
feebcaf6d8970c872dfaccef3186a48cdcbae69a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101422' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJN' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
5a56b7bef7690d153d52ee391c69352c
383267dc97e851ea626c3f63925a9c7673e3d83d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101446' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJO' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
13a404ea0e81f023c98150a49e3b3a94
21051d3d484dc7411a3f61195d41d112be12c3e5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99793' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJP' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
5ce89b5f19306a01f1fe168226420f95
bfbd1f16fc25d2d626350104f2c013a979be64d3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99895' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJQ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
e661fbc304512979f21cb93a86bd43c1
ef6b00b52d5ecf601c1ce19be2f98679b4f30ed7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97712' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJR' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
17cad725f75a4212801762949664f139
0fc6e9d8887f023438a01e8c696a2beb9c8f4421
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96706' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJS' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
4e2f0b5d52162578652de23d5775b7b8
25e0ba5839753055f1ac23a59b323dce9c12c85b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93365' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJT' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
064435b7c97feac438828b2a1e30841c
74805b23caf060b5d47ec61289e11cb35c6c9b5f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100377' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJU' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
e30e3d8271eb8ddd47d0808e087fd81e
60a0ec7161451ba215389924522467d7793bbb89
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87199' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJV' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
50f9f075d74e286daf9e21dc57b2e643
ed31f9adf5d00f5200338964a4a44cd29c60d487
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98106' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJW' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
4cd5b5622f5d5ac59c46c88776a8bfbf
e5e42a6aee2fb654abb06a92ce5603c499dec7b6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95358' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJX' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
c4f10adf26eccf458f492db5ba0ecca9
20851949b639353c49b79515e17032510d7fffc6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93250' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJY' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
5d4067e51e889285a8d3344d1f46ae1c
8b604ceade529c26da948e051bbd9ed705968770
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92119' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQJZ' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
d10dead26ce4a51e9314bf95730ccdad
20b0c76bb93f94d3b8797c2ca588c5cda6e4e640
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96266' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKA' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
75f730951763050a5c1c4bab5e8685f8
c793243bdade5fc12d65e8def162567a77d36c68
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92983' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKB' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
328a3bfa6007c1e079b82011262e92e4
eb4d48128e6402aa162f8fcf6d05d4327ae28ab9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98409' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKC' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
644a674ae080e4d67f4f6ba67d23d71b
8b1339d61582fc1fcc05447dcea108d7a95515a6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93882' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKD' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
e7d8b275f841ccb49ba4be2c1632fa25
c36566e75a2a15df50e027820e68e4c8339dfebe
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98586' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKE' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
a2fbc7c5f9ca53d94632da9397e1df3f
a311b3a9332ee5afa8a323f76455e92fa2b6cfd2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99295' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKF' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
d9d103f687a74d441466c31a3a57c055
017aedecab426146fc6111e0890b0487b08ba9ad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96091' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKG' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
065135483a231590cd158e3fd2dcef09
f5bdf2918faaa6eb3136aed1c53a81bb3c4b7a26
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94605' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKH' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
f3021e8c17ea6848bec3ec721ebf85e0
d81ec144e34fffddf2e17fc6ee404f6f2f01f7d6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100850' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKI' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
1f88826884279543feb9e66480e38c78
15ce490c84829651aecbfd4fcf296daf28d05bcc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95902' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKJ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
ed1b91d0e22866299dc9dbaeecb87b8d
e97a65ce8af6df00ea9bbd579fecf2ca206fe895
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96733' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKK' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
84ceffb3c67da9012f59879024548043
99e9419db782beaa786907ca35b6e03fb1251602
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84886' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKL' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
028f68297de64aa30f604c18222b237d
b3eef8b0e65fe51467f8dc67dededf723b373eba
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92779' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKM' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
9794b4bba1ec61f8f452ffe021af9132
19421f9d1283e5a11912d1e9e802e76e9ee7edf1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91758' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKN' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
40f1b5806418878398cdf3806a31e98f
9dc470ef2991ca61078794095c1391c3043df812
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93880' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKO' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
9c3d2ab7eefa6c4e092210fc83cfba33
f2dc3ceab67f5ffa942798dbbe2c971377097ed2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99083' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKP' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
0c21bea59057ff88b24e349aa736fa2e
9add8229bba86be38cfb18c72fbae67462d0c312
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94615' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKQ' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
c2d7546134f77a28259ce468e99ba6eb
b2251fda2f8aafd682730aa89d8929846451a9e8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKR' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
8cd5014e445f64d24e26dddba261de4f
e71797434c058a0e1bf79cbed1cbf7f1430d73e4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'109843' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKS' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
20623598d70284edebd293dbec1a0e10
2ce07936bb5b27de3c1b2d2d32ac9fbf651f586c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95457' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKT' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
10bb4c9ed78aed8e983cf46c19a1dc27
3cdb6f7ecda096dab20937f796b42f93d880805c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94298' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKU' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
a2a93be55fe3c95bb8f648962b127dd5
5d3c000620ae6789399859e4f750af5f5e040100
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99498' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKV' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
d05e0589c999ac3861c04cb4e093584c
c45c432009936dbf777989b221fd74a5e7cf6ac7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99197' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKW' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
13d4a75c2253352f9528bef250f5a730
b0f1c202d0c12c6190939538d6bca2086fbb424a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104625' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKX' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
0af8c72196fc1a5f0e746e9c50b6d32b
6808b5fba47355b83876351a039eea382567bd2c
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96154' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKY' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
7f4899b369c07c05a388604a48094758
928bf3969933982373bb9041b16be31cd9a438ae
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100170' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQKZ' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
2b2215e6a4ea1fe144357aa35db5f59d
e983b2a058f17ef4043f744dbbaf922f229f7e44
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93087' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLA' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
f3bfc451af2aaced28c7237b23fab57f
3698b1424972ef5b216b94d78967c19e2667f3a5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99244' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLB' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
ce7f2624ccd60d1e4b276fdbc3094b63
fea27cd9174537c463443f57907ba23fe6f2f5ff
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92571' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLC' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
40064f3181550a0a5d266820102a24aa
a2cb1c9074ac9e66756428ff830606bef34c0ca5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94089' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLD' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
809c3ea65dfbff9426d0d31f0b5ef81f
34cb05b57444dc5466a75beeeec63410b0420d61
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95031' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLE' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
f4d93f8677a4b13fee29554fb25ea348
db7045b47e43a91ab5f6ad7eec1617fef40ccde8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89268' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLF' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
757ad1d107ba3fbd4895703b948e26e4
2b005c18e88ad2de6059cad1adb9a46c3f515682
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'108396' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLG' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
6f66d0e303ff8aadce7f39cbcd099543
97472338ed32069c559668f315f32ef0b8ea672e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101500' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLH' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
e96399eaad0e0b94bc2a4eee4cb5ce81
a3abeba0fc65a5a56b0f3d2c178ff9b2a5c9be38
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100259' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLI' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
9298c74b95f550a1cdde275d5a1db81d
2e1c0321c707fff3aff13eb54b8f60894ed263f4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'105039' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLJ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
f51484558bc27293d330c5b8ae959432
6dfc83a412bbed8b759b85e0bd620ce6c9ae8ac3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'77596' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLK' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
3aabba1426fb2a69b57c2834c25c45a1
ec440f1662d296eda2b1e08f10cc6d6e526f351a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99352' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLL' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
b0c44157fdfc32d804677164f209bbd8
6cf5ea5c43782bc659c703c9c12787ea8346eb2a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95949' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLM' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
78b2e347d77abcf4c89891c8732455ed
9e6515e01aac8339eebcb8d3cd2b002bec93ba3f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97717' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLN' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
05a51eeeb1dab578b4ef06d22fa0a1a4
0c1defdd2f47e81172afda015cf0498134a5f6b2
'2011-11-15T04:03:52-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'59103' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLO' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
38c4694757e3eddb8247a54291836dc4
234ee727fc3fa51e926e64216dc4463f2014e202
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91623' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLP' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
16e437bbff8e58ba9ed6dd8062581bb8
b85b165822dc889645850e81d17560e4ebafdc04
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84179' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLQ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
4243c91b9b662d6a7b0b66d45b78444f
0977d4d491d94f98c774b38358a372b60ab57080
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95001' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLR' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
68d7d1bd8da4689783f43f0f8f8cf578
92211191f9460c024a15fab28099f62f2a39a97b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92102' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLS' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
159762d4116f95b799773a8fe7854750
fb06d93696120194151050f8db97b5987199484d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100709' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLT' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
ae167bd03e24d49ab142522a58e5ea54
75d7715cb2827b86d3cb6094b613dafa403174aa
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'107419' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLU' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
b48c35080173852422e70393a87c6ff4
b01eecfb9edd65cf112d62aa133364f7392c77f4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100001' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLV' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
557344108cbb491de5770dc06da75017
ecded9c981640b24818a77026e9137f38f8168e2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'90076' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLW' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
a73ed554d824879db63c7b6aefec52fc
674760d3fbb2b0c7bb0067da5a86a17253f391e7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91767' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLX' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
b41a799a6b6e6d433bc70006fd90d154
d1d920322ec6bf10d5b292d682c422fb63442ac9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84706' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLY' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
9b753b3ababf7f8af2c2c7ceb8c60f0e
444856bc2e01e2a8f23159dba624044d0a5faac0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92942' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQLZ' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
12046426e05892fa4af6b670462f9d25
f444d1145baeedb7708fd481e4efbaa6aff50973
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99502' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMA' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
7459ee4bb0a0eaf73e04b9312b22c356
58f2242b1f7a731b75a8bbc020f95dbce1a906cc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'106877' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMB' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
207e38aeb72690ec7a2eb99f23a9e3bf
fc93fee49c7f01ca9151d0a18af206ca077188dd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMC' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
d6462eec56c38b756b9a8729fa4536b6
f105664b08a85ed640a12257a65f90d78df74751
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103417' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMD' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
e8e41d689af32020e5eca2077ae3f2a7
60dcd06f526df4ab2b8d084062a52c57d8f56274
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98364' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQME' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
e317a0c1378fe537cc1ae263c3a68908
21120b266ba3c6b35ffbef95b3d474ca630545b4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97555' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMF' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
1a6cbb60ee3bc2c4bba613d1be79a38e
eb4e4fd6bafd85775cb8ecd7854f81e57cbe35b7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93322' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMG' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
89e0113ff64c19e26e8a69f67f111864
e2332d8864a99a8b8a077eed8699e92390f0d85a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104437' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMH' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
e241ca6ef64d229436d37ba10ca94fcd
159f87b71755eee5a0b5dfa9fcf4595f7b1d1426
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94294' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMI' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
acf92a7cb96d6f49882fcf32c1dc7e3f
7ae66f74c66b0c4471d7bdbd029ade3dd0ce460e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104256' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMJ' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
ae680d7864f79bc68d3fee7e6a121232
f437738496bb8af581f25ba6afa39ba78777f679
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94759' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMK' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
ee2f071b8717c3b395ade70715460eef
05fea8bda24d2bf8f54a7a3647f19dc24f3c2db3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100957' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQML' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
bdd392c2555df166d290ba12eb63ad69
3cc10cf4d1618c84626f6ce92ed9cb2bc1adde2e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95098' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMM' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
75780858a8948cb755c75bc9e5547633
a81979430925bec7342e208f63698d63da90790e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97323' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMN' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
067fee8fb333cd85d24eaeb663e00de9
3b988620f75fa272b4d0f6b1f7207236e157f869
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99811' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMO' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
4bd724dd041834341e79c25860ae35f5
cc6047d017433ed9f36e3385f5c88d31fbb317e2
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97894' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMP' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
4f5351c6c95272b618d79c1a529a53d2
7a038ea765cb9b70456f193634414c4fe0f34aeb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88628' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMQ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
18b75370a0b422b9b1c8f31c54411493
e2c993fd34802dfc931d3782e43fe66d95384efc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102624' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMR' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
dd0a401dcfbfb8ca462de9328c4bafa2
050b4bf37be578481afd15217b10a0a25194faa4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97791' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMS' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
5f1fabfc6b442f8c1733f79528de9637
3ecd59b60d354e1ff05ab43abb91744d83b4811a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101396' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMT' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
78c661e34efbce29fac46d8f072b272e
9c7f487a0e3623b178ea1e065725447e0f92c99b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93004' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMU' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
9691e2838ff61fcb1045cb6cd1e9b0d1
de6ce043d387b03f7b09a766489f6bc000a9d4b0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102703' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMV' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
31f6d3fba1060fe98f47fe43d782eb8e
18402ecfb186b4257c1d07ebf91a549443074cab
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97800' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMW' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
fc65aeb3accaf7f6ca88b397e4b0cb16
a740339f0f4900427710e3b9c6293ef522dfbdc8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99668' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMX' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
9c97aa3c0c21dab6c608d83ae6512ee0
74ff9ff8209c3270aceb5ac4d06d5677374147dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93574' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMY' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
0ab70b2ece51f3c87db7635a0d315e07
01a5a4b01b7941a09bfe9223541b7bcdf61dfd09
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99412' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQMZ' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
0158be92d8cf56c5d84581b33f0e79e6
7494fbea88c394b16efea4f8370dbe135d7293a8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84003' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNA' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
fdedf775bb7aee09720f18ac532e8a6f
32187880fdcb4d02f77ae5b9ea1ad632021beb73
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103777' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNB' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
c1aac74e44017c216f564328ed338bdb
8aa73f1a2700871e5e5e2255fdf4186107246f32
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'107378' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNC' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
d550c8f75af6d77363729cc160a6a6b0
4d5a65eacb0bf219b81b31e19124817824ea33bb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'108098' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQND' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
8e2077f59591b5e1bd45fa7310b7cf3f
bd2c97f327ef45ea3d47cff2d2392f75f4f09c85
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93657' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNE' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
2fc66070811c974530a98b956dff6569
2d6cfade2afd35b590f56eb269d59d5ea32e4d04
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'110746' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNF' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
7f55f357e0125010b674e95104a45051
abfb17d3597c07797aae9fea1eb5225364927337
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'108563' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNG' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
2c54578ae2358a4933ea3dd8c758d283
c11c6aadff0fb60f2df42172c3b412d2cf8ae824
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103622' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNH' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
84d55e87295260e52dfea57f46be2d43
6c27e59be4ff6621aa789836aba57b18ed9349b6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103466' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNI' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
25f4ff5fcd79d244b74a36b4f5c8e5bc
02e26bfb6de8e0c0a3976e1237dda0024ad6e5f9
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98001' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNJ' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
b8387681b28e8ec417ad153b2dfa462f
3115a645050ab03680fba3627712aafcfd83a427
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94677' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNK' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
3df269761de1c57f410ca2a8df39f42a
0380516d7fb1cf31390f58707cb1ad8624785123
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97990' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNL' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
c363bb8221dcb3989d92b7c91b5072b1
7eb717fb7519ad1b0cf412f7a612d6cd9d1ae7f7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99624' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNM' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
475a0b93076145f4978cff57a4f9bccc
cb804af9c6babfe50893aad86b83642b83f74edf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98935' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNN' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
047f55c5ea96e7efe6be99108ab3ab2a
e29aa17a89cb6c6207a2e659707244a4e920f806
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95421' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNO' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
dfe25069012d2f8dc8ed368d18f34dd8
19a42024946f7d5467790cb51d32e0d0e02bb327
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88333' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNP' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
a3b85e8e8eb954e6b7041fc494134a87
1f3d9b8766af465e4748679ffa8b412ea02a3849
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94586' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNQ' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
df5022354df73b235f5db06d14465c91
4a27821299d52be7a3304cdd553c0f24f6d2834b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103020' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNR' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
012b4fec62f182f638d352f299391e28
461ad5c93880a7c1c1f389690c7fff871648bb74
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99455' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNS' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
694a7f798657fdb9fd623af3d189121c
24bda8bf875b2b861fa752b49a2b16cdc0d45a0d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88538' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNT' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
9b04057695387c0c1cd2a369248920e8
974fcc8c8013e1d2652c8b2338a053b6016749ed
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100801' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNU' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
7928c779ca42f4b7d8bd3eb5309f7631
eb561d928e0fb24bbe70cb651eca9bf79e95c7ec
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100986' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNV' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
8a7823223de0845df83b8166737ef1e5
b8f7339155067e75c2358b69c470e9df978e1bf0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98257' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNW' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
2e25ecdb59f9b201d75eb69231a8650f
ff55462dfa9815c75cca4be42c44030fee663854
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100288' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNX' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
5f42e1f1acf08229b46d98ae9ef48434
69c8dfa276eff2dc9677f685c833ba2df3443105
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92085' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNY' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
95f1ef188803ac138dadc2ac349ae36d
aadca7e00a9e15dcf80f06cba815d3506e5de5b6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97745' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQNZ' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
fd41cd5b9577936cdea040dc6a8f5f56
91a70b464c7809b0b68fa8d71637f4ae6c5585a5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'105239' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOA' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
6fe317748084746747d4c5cec677db99
b01980bc4cf4a93f035d63eac7878ae8cea1bbeb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'107816' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOB' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
8ba92bedceaf1b7be91366aee89b7797
33743803e99b2297529a0da34fe7e8277491b177
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98137' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOC' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
bf003ec0da188d61fb9443b96684bbd5
2982700a1098b4601d17b19e44444c72a19e3973
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100400' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOD' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
36cb164d71c6594f6dc835968dddc50b
1ae7a207d1b2708f49fa96c73e743475392788b1
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101159' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOE' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
7020dbf5c5fbdf31021efae8442abf50
b3582986c05af81e3aba5b8034c1ac737fab509d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100589' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOF' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
99e496e43c4848a3b9f612a7e641f4a6
09cea2eafa2a0e5d77d800b6d38eef46261ac2ba
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'90116' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOG' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
913c17896623a906d6c262b2538f3957
e264d5642e86c1075cd749115c6c5c192ad4c1f7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99035' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOH' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
daa6a028ba9c1eb767ddad7e534f443a
3a7291289e0f9014155c2e2ef5e2567ecc57cac6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99212' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOI' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
324b52b6abfa2271129cef774307dfc0
89dcec656c0c8f3a79655ee150a703dbc4e2fa96
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98332' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOJ' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
f48c52bbbddf8fc144d8c6f2a7b8b9f4
d12fe1d728644c360d18ae259c8af7acc11d6510
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95338' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOK' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
d6dacf111e1c8b88299e1615bad560e2
ed02dc4d294549776779a6dfc5a32af220bc6759
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96557' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOL' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
1a1919a6853b1261dc1d853817b0d02a
b564eab83e126cf5febbe65e0a356a8c7599e114
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'107401' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOM' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
e2929b5301b0f38989c179091c466446
2cb29010e27a2d8ddfefc02ead59dd0cbb141c7b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQON' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
01fb1aab0fc1cc00aefd11f89b4f94a3
c540bc69eddbfdd54ad17928f284bb3cdd98258e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95864' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOO' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
f4644b3d756a961ffa5203c126c3687e
8d1b1e45691b5e082192b9c2fc6fe1157fcafbad
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100020' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOP' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
5c2fa1e60812be9db42e5f93463d19a0
75b4b3d1ff477695d4c1b178cdbcb23e09bcc4fc
'2011-11-15T04:00:21-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99201' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOQ' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
809643fe7fe2511cdd9ff82b9d2461ab
25c7af60e2fd3e20bfd58c87d94db1977dfa8023
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91475' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOR' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
7c16b805e84e09aca86d9426955423e0
5f70f0c409e2568d705a8e2e22bb14243a86dd9e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94401' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOS' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
d829ac6915bf6a5d8f47c21861be3dd7
36c3cdde2b74f5b2059f99fef4678ca91ff0a303
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104747' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOT' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
de87d48c6a6206cc4492cbc68ec0aa92
ed53adc2e6b2f9714f29b3c7b9a1f9ba591ba2ef
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97906' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOU' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
74d183a07ed630dd4f09fcda5a938628
ef5f29830a6a493d4c0a17a1b7bd3acbee734959
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101287' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOV' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
3638e3501cc4abd75fa17727c054cc35
3582c98fbdd38444af8acaf160381fa83ec76c2b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'105961' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOW' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
9ed0bdb36cec204c64016d6b5f11d5b1
51bdb0b3c03e4174640ab96fb87ff1b070bfa1dc
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92681' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOX' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
bb3cba7ab8abf657baab2f83ebed93f0
437dccf06032ce221193f4e1c00e6f7100f7e0f8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96241' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOY' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
822a831919c14a8af5bd17b92936c1bf
d771f3ac2a4e3a217485e41a16f4397b00f24cf6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'64614' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQOZ' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
3984e8bf295db67d389e16ba5aec7e10
c0465b1ab59b833cf566c91d8f332bf50c030ffd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102998' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPA' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
db1c78c6802b6e0dbfc0526bd2910f93
df66fb27bf82c6a784751308f1825354c33f3c90
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98353' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPB' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
3f864e9aded479fc46ae488ed2e4468a
7c9488664b6950eac1551f0e25ecd01ba9ab139e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98944' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPC' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
dee186b12afa7243d3b06341d2827af4
16b4a6c62b21387a537439dd53ddb7b949eb580e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104427' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPD' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
f7789389beb13afb6b75734e182d7997
645bb4f7a594c1cfa5f9b92b70367e06d09c3b37
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'108141' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPE' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
2208b86c5209de72bfcc13f679da7196
116c416ae6e9ac0d5ecae1821005dc87f8e94cd3
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'110284' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPF' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
ddcdb4b7d96e03cc6421f846953e955a
a4ac8b5c7a06f8a4dac8a644a0b8f9224517ec4a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102186' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPG' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
72c5e5e3516f58f8e20f5edb75005208
9f24faffd7c5b23eaeac7b0b11b0e5b2882ed167
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93106' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPH' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
f811d97288667a9cc9461b29f642f821
def25b6d5731d9cc114eeb15240dd8440bd68fea
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'108279' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPI' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
d46608facad6fd127c43ec9dd7e9c9b9
f4e01fc39c20194af684808f90e855f27e0d424f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97288' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPJ' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
5fe2d7f3caa00d66d7c29b5a43bfea92
f172a8a5ac492efed3de30f287c7e079c20c8c76
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97931' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPK' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
8de869037ea024e8d4aa502bbc8784b2
a070871c418e5ebabddaa060059aa75d051a293d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102743' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPL' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
ecfcb1cd4a762af561e23ff070515dcf
acd6a9a1e611b42a652c523865c79afe6b2cf951
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99618' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPM' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
031d4b058db407809b6500888ac7922f
380f8c5ada7d5174a97a999401d7829f0cf64222
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'109932' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPN' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
2ddcb2b081f372389eb50b44deb13230
767ed3155fd709100aa567cf87cfc310bc579252
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101658' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPO' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
b81fb0c88f916a4a56cfae0d7a9fdb39
bc6192aa5d4095c62580c491c6326986fa4bbac6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'108610' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPP' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
340103c04ab3ba25da5086200557406f
34430c505189e5f5b966c8544247de6e3ce434db
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92954' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPQ' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
d9bceb031f66afbdfa63061ce3b17783
430c5e3850d5a4bf8baafc24e63772bafeaa6169
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99666' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPR' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
27cc79c147a7685c56438db49ae781ff
f67531a74f0784da2bb59106e73fd14ed0dc9934
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100088' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPS' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
c0ca48da02cd80d1a7af26885e461076
e07f3a1a8b9c829f6ed2f528f8793619ad5e6e81
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98634' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPT' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
248cd7b1f3c508776bdda5f4cd5736ca
8808d79dd587203e9e1afcaec3d56f1c65550d37
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103140' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPU' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
0bd03ac57aed1b31726c383a495f458b
373258138497a7b52e18c04f3e5ba7ee0f55543d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'111059' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPV' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
afcd8ab70b3a3dffd1dec2a5249d34a2
3e2ff26a4f6a97a2980f95faa843979414b8ba80
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'107744' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPW' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
f6639249d6ad432dd7364051efa68ab2
61d7592e4486d555fabc7ac727699c9c1b056870
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99776' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPX' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
5921c8a52753a45d29e416b921201acb
76907e2cbdadf6a62c3ffdc18067acad3547ae87
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89457' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPY' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
772a1a7a86ce01fd41ab708defd315ee
5401ce9dd103c2256e784d0fdd047aab45a818c8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99947' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQPZ' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
060f55a078af929bec1a0b509f2f137e
c64b35918ffd24face52d5fca4123a8ba30ebf7b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97930' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQA' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
a9d6ed8dd427fbdd3755eeb215bb4481
e2f5ab8e9192ea4322a4bf106727c5d19ca79083
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96859' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQB' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
d4fd8291cf8297243e0769b662f04108
e86dfe1c724603a65a9211c3c5dd9dc195c49182
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92489' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQC' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
a5bfd926ad6eb52a25df93e063243e60
fb158dde23f95299716bf9a19a52840bc24f45db
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102979' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQD' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
359c894063da64d90b3c5e54971471ec
3429c340d1ee758fe0dab55ec9bb441ec9a87943
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'105419' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQE' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
b79c8f4d53d6127a2c3d56edfd14218e
ef57762b4f0f31c2f4358204db89301d0c31ffb5
'2011-11-15T03:54:34-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'106362' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQF' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
5b627db281bc9d4dfec45abf20abe433
23db2a9f632c96429376498f207eb7d3c9a9700f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99617' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQG' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
ff490042cbd4019d1f53f42c1f80b305
bc0f2a31aa7cef48359fb13f9225b7d3dbc7f1b4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84057' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQH' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
2f269c18396b95e8122104e3ab966735
c6e0575a319c11c86b3fa4685a1c6d24fb7b7374
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103213' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQI' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
2f0639060e9f62b8f7cfa8d396251b3c
3147e58b9b1d24ce97ab5ec5ebc7b3ef0bde4542
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87534' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQJ' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
4c4bf58a1f579b2d2b0d193d18140126
307c8c187935e359874bacf3eacf4e240b61d59b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88919' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQK' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
a014d9df8bac5c740b3d37ad9f11c5ff
e1cb78e1066b3f1e93ed0f17715f29b33f6bb687
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89562' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQL' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
c5f81a358ebdcd56dc5e4eadf2b522c4
3ccf0a46da3c18d014373fb7b589ef054491fa41
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92016' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQM' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
a83acd7141c84d4e7dba3816595e0cfe
5c8dc7da541b941dc3e6c2a24289ad65a72f2a76
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'102754' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQN' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
4b46c3bccf8d744f84a0fd6e1d5d3ecc
85b6c83ef00e1fc7017efd9139ae39df36e5079e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96708' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQO' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
f44c4fc50cecf2910834550208bdb180
7cf564686f2db2dacca025e5053f9549b5b5f0d7
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'72026' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQP' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
43ecc3cfd4a06349813351d569e412bc
c4c55a8e01e7561c0cc8c792c44fecb9a8251973
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94664' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQQ' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
33aa9ae524fe80613ad3f09e810c1550
9096ce6f2632ad9ec6a6dcb0e19b20786284121e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'87573' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQR' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
2cb0a4b55aa5a58aeadadcfb90acd40e
096df8bb25a9564014f1e1fe3f7f4c7b8cae0fc4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'98250' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQS' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
e479d646cdf5e9186b931b90b85cebc5
8893322fbe7cef5b6f84425971a3e097a8229df8
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89619' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQT' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
f69661e63ff91121f080c07a47ff066b
3500c26bf25ff931226e29cfbc74622a8c4834bf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88438' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQU' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
4dd4a024724b671451502342bfb6b7df
b5c040bfc121e4a8ab4b81ee01acdd2435b56c78
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81164' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQV' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
10e91841dbff21574aef01ee217ad8c5
9a348fcbee71f0cf00a9864a0fc120e04ad3853a
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96994' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQW' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
e61baa8a95e7e6130d1e13f1f9aabd07
a4f7a3e9129a7a2b7b144e1a8696b9583c5a0fbb
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86792' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQX' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
f39fc62a2c5e44a3375bf2e9ab849f20
f898f394f3343e9915ef0c474d50707f8f4e8974
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'90637' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQY' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
8624ccacaaea6573b3f297b9561de590
7a276784f81f368d760761cedeca21504355a80b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'90314' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQQZ' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
0a5334ac0fad8a676b8fd87c9fb46071
58c05b31b1b91e63fe9292e7698719b6265fa586
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92574' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRA' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
7aca117ccda7602c0f939d3afb02293a
591f67b5e396b5e2e7372cc930bef7705b1b8abd
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'86814' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRB' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
ebe6e1f6b3f95ce6a56e8ba0fd8bde53
15295cb618f8b11cb17959c309018f4d50ab167e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88635' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRC' 'sip-files00302.QC.jpg'
65eb2140a44eda567b8ac6c3b2c5dc9a
e1eecd7053a6f69ac4c32204b0d0ff29699492d4
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96550' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRD' 'sip-files00303.QC.jpg'
c8710f8609020d7ab2ecc37afea0436e
854729bc5e16d73d8962e923038a13f3b0b8a3d6
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79842' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRE' 'sip-files00304.QC.jpg'
82fb49e80243ff1624a5667d6ef375d0
3a801038cd8443ed7a963e53149eedbe0e588658
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88456' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRF' 'sip-files00305.QC.jpg'
4bcebb1786ff41631e7a2ab63daf35c3
c427daedc7f2b3165e5022e87c4a8a1f605d3a63
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97029' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRG' 'sip-files00306.QC.jpg'
46758802ea17f657fe51eb6aa05df1b0
d0cb1f0213f5940a4c93395e090416f50b48e899
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91817' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRH' 'sip-files00307.QC.jpg'
ba751ea91f8c237cdc7ca55f731eaad4
c501a5efff83f4b62185f8ac62ba08e46555fe72
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'90711' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRI' 'sip-files00308.QC.jpg'
cc30cab366996d024bde90c36e81e873
8105070dd244fa374197c0bd6296bf16fa2c6cef
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92473' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRJ' 'sip-files00309.QC.jpg'
1277b2d03b856a8ef0c13d9f59e84830
f960b4e31e421e58845cd1cd02d7b9440438c655
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'90453' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRK' 'sip-files00310.QC.jpg'
cabb999167d5de6a628f22460df799cb
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'81698' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRL' 'sip-files00311.QC.jpg'
53eafa6094e9a3e85577f33ead4befba
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'79625' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRM' 'sip-files00312.QC.jpg'
3a1b2d33745962499097964ee8b1eeb8
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99152' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRN' 'sip-files00313.QC.jpg'
1324c75861e37e8d6bf0129033f1e791
232fefcae05b31083929f0d5fbe223ecf1b79edf
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96441' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRO' 'sip-files00314.QC.jpg'
06587878c866337a9df04df108d44d7e
ec6cdd80e1aeb9cab69b4e1db860a6a2e30d8923
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94125' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRP' 'sip-files00315.QC.jpg'
2f6c72dea7ef2861fa9fa7abdc6ab0f5
0a3b1f90f8fa11930d67c95a240afe37def29e06
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89993' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRQ' 'sip-files00316.QC.jpg'
f3652baa8ed907292a1b822f9fa0a2b0
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'94191' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRR' 'sip-files00317.QC.jpg'
574dc0ff279e3cd9498a75222ddfb6d6
2e202860b41f79b6b9678592207852c03196cc2b
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93890' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRS' 'sip-files00318.QC.jpg'
3896ced7b0ee37b79536a1a77542f5fa
003506e4c5cd4666bcf9ed2b3797aa2aeda2a788
'2011-11-15T04:00:45-05:00'
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'85932' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRT' 'sip-files00319.QC.jpg'
7d4912ec6e2db0cfd2ee6f856c1a5e3c
2ef3ba2b37ba69ac8e6c83f13d274ef8d1fb9c6f
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93802' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRU' 'sip-files00322.QC.jpg'
f8c2c66cc672a91e6d6473e48e0ea90a
3b58e6c00e5587030d0c3ed86cd77c465eec358e
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92442' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRV' 'sip-files00323.QC.jpg'
d904d602d03c0e1cc3bf63ab36fd224e
bad38fa6a57902dae8fffb52baa35749968c16b5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'90949' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRW' 'sip-files00324.QC.jpg'
d0fa2df79db2f0d2ea85f7279d29f132
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88371' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRX' 'sip-files00325.QC.jpg'
6a47576c28c9f1791c982e922011fa9d
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88785' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRY' 'sip-files00326.QC.jpg'
acd82b98f6a4c6c8b0928cfc2295649f
6eba4e490243f57ecaac862c5326d354d8571a66
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91520' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQRZ' 'sip-files00327.QC.jpg'
399610f94aec2b59f8d97d86c4d9dee3
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'82466' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSA' 'sip-files00329.QC.jpg'
9ba590206af61fd184e7b3944e064a8b
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'83322' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSB' 'sip-files00330.QC.jpg'
948211dabee7aa1d0acf67c4924fd9fd
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'95973' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSC' 'sip-files00331.QC.jpg'
1bd9cf94bcb89db236c0eaad47d71081
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'88154' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSD' 'sip-files00332.QC.jpg'
55a2932406d65cee2df49a8405ce04d8
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'89962' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSE' 'sip-files00333.QC.jpg'
2a77afe8866fe3a28efbd3f7ffdd9d5d
aad7ec596b648de11597227c0722aaa596d558d0
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'96461' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSF' 'sip-files00334.QC.jpg'
fa1222f7999cf1334a4d317be26fd15d
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'101000' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSG' 'sip-files00335.QC.jpg'
f7d95fbd29935c0fa61c868c076c5b00
be69d901e86894f1a5a2802325d81b89f8a5fc2d
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'91603' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSH' 'sip-files00336.QC.jpg'
8ca8ff3aa619e2300d3dd36b8eb9655f
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'90935' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSI' 'sip-files00337.QC.jpg'
bbc03a89e0993d3131899aeafd6fa279
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104218' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSJ' 'sip-files00338.QC.jpg'
8ee98db4e16e3f7911240ebb628a9958
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'93647' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSK' 'sip-files00339.QC.jpg'
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104124' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSL' 'sip-files00340.QC.jpg'
0d14d6f48b90f9c7639e505137f48d63
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'92498' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSM' 'sip-files00341.QC.jpg'
2bfb5f0ad831a903490e3026fdc61160
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103882' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSN' 'sip-files00342.QC.jpg'
3718f32c090e58faf05a71db473c1d2b
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'97487' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSO' 'sip-files00343.QC.jpg'
ad9992ba9c5685b0d6530833217c304a
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99740' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSP' 'sip-files00344.QC.jpg'
09d4c960b06b8166a5863273b4b3de36
1d9ee28a3ad435234140acf9832474f7e06f0de5
describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104698' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSQ' 'sip-files00345.QC.jpg'
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103128' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSR' 'sip-files00346.QC.jpg'
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'104415' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSS' 'sip-files00347.QC.jpg'
3f9faaa47bc0c98499476c84945e85a5
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'108662' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQST' 'sip-files00348.QC.jpg'
bc58e127e48f811e57a8e24268bfa67a
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99642' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSU' 'sip-files00349.QC.jpg'
22a00cc259d9f750826d30d72a6bae46
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'103752' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSV' 'sip-files00350.QC.jpg'
22c3cf78f1e346b3695f7664f76f3156
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'99796' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSW' 'sip-files00351.QC.jpg'
facdeaf2f1e0923c3d34ebf5ae1ddde7
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'100173' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSX' 'sip-files00352.QC.jpg'
2c1765694960b42e815d3f985997f343
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'105695' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSY' 'sip-files00353.QC.jpg'
f2adca929e8e868b666a303b854e5e92
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'84544' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQSZ' 'sip-files00354.QC.jpg'
4ab5dd7a33ca80494bf6957c5285a45d
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'30248' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQTA' 'sip-files00357.QC.jpg'
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'62266' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQTB' 'sip-files00358.QC.jpg'
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'49289' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQTC' 'sip-files00359.QC.jpg'
c0a8adab8ac80b5e045798a87eb3f680
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describe
Value offset not word-aligned: 141
Value offset not word-aligned
Value offset not word-aligned
'32' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQTD' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
e3029978525b9e050d3311092aaaeda0
879115ab91b823d648c2b1eead0e1c3b16250be3
describe
'559738' 'info:fdaE20080816_AAAAAFfileF20080816_AAAQTE' 'sip-filesUF00015497_00001.mets'
b6eb7c319d3e84a266d742c229cdb6d7
d28cbe1aeefa02006bc303bfbc85050fcd16b4eb
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2014-01-08T08:31:14-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.








ma




RmB

The Baldwin Library



University
of
Florida





THE

MAGNET STORIES

SUMMER DAYS AND WINTER NIGHTS,

BI

W. H. G. KINGSTON. MRS. WEBB. ©
L, A. HALL. G. E, SARGENT,
FRANCES F. BRODERIP. JULIA CORNER.

THOMAS HOOD.



LONDON:

GROOMBRIDGE AND SONS,
PATERNOSTER ROW.
CONTENTS,

——————

THE BOATSWAIN’S SON. By W. H. G. Krveston.
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE. By Mrs. Wezs (Author

of “ Naomz”),
WILLY AND LUCY. By G. E. Sarcent.
PREJUDICE LOST AND LOVE WON. Br. A. Hat.
WEE MAGGIE. By Franozs F. Bropzrir.
WALLACE, THE HERO OF SCOTLAND. By Jura Corner.
RAINBOW’S REST. By Tuomas Hoop,






















































































































SAILOR.”

» WHO TRULY LOVED A

“THE GOOD OLD KING,





















































































































































































































































































































































































































A TALE OF THE SEA.
BY WILLIAM H. G, KINGSTON.

——_——s

t was the memorable Ist of June.
\\ A sea fight ever to be renowned
| in history was raging. between the
fleets of England and France. The
great guns were thundering and
roaring, musketry was rattling, round
shot, and chain shot, and grape, and
langridge, and missiles of every de-
scription, invented for carrying on
the bloody game of war, were hissing
through the air, crashing against the
sides of the ships, rending them
asunder, shattering the tall masts
and spars, sending their death-deal-
ing fragments flying around, and
hurling to the deck, mangled and
bleeding, the gallant seamen as they stood at their
quarters in all the pride of manhood, fighting for the

B*
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

honour and glory of their respective countries. A dark
canopy hung over thescene, every moment increasing in
density as the guns belched forth their flashes of flame
and clouds of smoke, filling the pure air of heaven with
sulphureous vapours, and almost concealing the fierce
zombatants from each other's gaze.

“Who is that brave youngster?” asked the captain
of the renowned ‘ Marlborough,’ a seventy-four, which
lay hotly engaged surrounded by foes in the thick of
the fight; “‘I never sawa cooler thing or better timed.”

“The son of Mr. Ripley the boatswain, sir,” was
the answer.

“T must have my eye on him, there is stuff in that
lad,” observed the captain. The deed which had called
forth this eulogium was certainly well worthy of praise.
The “ Marlborough” had for some time been furiously
engaged, almost broadside tc broadside, with the “ Im-
pétueux,” a French seventy-four, which ship had just
fallen aboard her, the Frenchman’s bowsprit becoming
entangled in her mizen rigging. To keep her an-
tagonist in that position was of the greatest consequence
to the “Marlborough,” as she might thus rake her fore
and aft, receiving but little damage in return. An
officer and two or three men sprang into the “ Marl-
borough’s mizen rigging to secure the bowsprit to it.
The French small-arm men rushed forward to prevent
this being done, by keeping up a fire of musketry. The
¢wo seamen fell. The lieutenant still hung in the
rigging, but the rope with which he was lashing the
bowsprit to it was shot from his hand; no other was
within reach. Having just delivered the powder he
had brought from below, young Ripley was watching
the proceeding. Seizing a rope he sprang into the
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

rigging unhurt amid a shower of bullets, and handed it:
_ to the brave officer. Together they made the required
- turns for lashing it fast, and descended to the deck in
safety. The young powder-boy then resuming his tub-
was speedily again seen at his station, composedly
sitting on the top of it as if he had performed no
unusual deed. The “ Marlborough” had soon another
antagonist, the ‘ Mucius,” seventy-four, which fell
aboard her on the bow, the three ships thus forming a
triangle, of which the British ship was the base. With
these two opponents, each more powerful than she was,
the “ Marlborough” continued the seemingly unequal
fight, but the stout arms and hearts of her erew
made amends for their inferiority in numbers. Her
mizenmast fell soon after the “ Mucius” engaged. her,
her fore and main masts followed, and the Frenchmen
began to hope that victory was to be theirs, but they
had not discovered at that time the stuff of which
British tars are made. Though dismasted herself, she
had her foes fast so that they could not escape. So
well did her crew work their guns, that they quickly
shot away the bowsprit and all the lower masts of the:
“ Tmpétueux,” those of the “ Mucius” soon sharing the
same fate. At this juncture another French ship, the
** Montagne,” passing mnder the ‘‘ Marlborough’s” stern,
Sred a broadside into her of round shot and langridge,
killing many of her brave crew, and wounding among
others her captain, though receiving but a few shots in
return. The first battle in that long, protracted, and
bloody war was over, and won by England’s veteran
admiral, Lord Howe; six of the enemy’s finest line of
battle ships forming the prize of victory, and among
them the “ Impétueux.”
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

The “Marlbcrough’s” captain had not forgot the pro-
mise he had made to himself in favour of Young Ripley.
As he lay wounded in his cabin he sent for the boat-
swain. The proud father had heard of his son’s gal-
lantry, and the captain’s words had been repeated to
him. It would have been difficult to find a finer speci-
men of the superior class of British seaman, the pith
and sinew of the navy, than the boatswain of the “Marl-
borough” presented, as, stillin the prime.of manhood, he
stood, hat in hand, before his captain. By his manner
and appearance he looked indeed well fitted for the
higher ranks of his profession, but it was his lot to be a
boatswain, and he did not complain. With unfeigned
satisfaction he heard the account of his son’s gallantry
and coolness rehearsed by the captain’s lips.

“You have always proved yourself to be a brave
man and a good officer, and although I have it not in
my power to reward you as you deserve, I can your
son,” said the captain. “ Would it be satisfactory to
you to see him placed on the quarterdeck ?”

The father’s heart beat quick ; the blush of gratified
pride rose to his cheeks as he answered, “It is the -
thing of all others I should prize. I trust that he
will not be found unfitted for the rank to which he
may attain if you thus put his foot on the lower
ratlins.”

“Tam glad to have hit the thing to please you,
Mr. Ripley,” said the captain. ‘Your son shall at
once be rated as a midshipman in the ship’s books ;”
and then he added, a shade of grief passing across his
countenance, “ He will have no difficulty in getting an
outfit from the kits of the four youngsters who were
killed on the 1st. By the by, what is he called ?”
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

“ Pearce, sir—Pearce Ripley is his name,” answered
the boatswain.

“Very well; send my clerk to me, and tell your
boy that he isa midshipman. The first lieutenant will
introduce him to his new messmates, and secure him a
favourable reception,” said the captain as the boat-
swain withdrew.

Pearce Ripley was a fine-looking lad of about four-
teen, with an ingenuous countenance and frank manner,
which spoke of an honest, brave heart. With the ship’s
company he had been a general favourite ; it was to be
proved how far he would recommend himself to the
officers.

In the afternoon the young gentlemen, as all the
members of the midshipmen’s mess were called, were
summoned on the quarterdeck, and briefly addressed by
Mr. Monckton, the first lieutenant. Pearce Ripley was
then sent for, and the boatswain’s son had no cause to
complain of his reception by those whose messmate he
was about to become. They, with one exception, came
forward and cordially shook him by the hand, and when
he entered the berth they all seemed to vie who should
pay him the most unobtrusive attention as forthwith to
place him at his ease. So surely will true bravery and
worth be rightly esteemed by the generous-hearted
officers of the British Navy. Pearce had gained the
respect of his messmates; he soon won their regard by
his readiness to oblige, his good temper, his evident
determination not to give or take offence, and his
general kind bearing towards all. On duty he showed
that he was resolved to merit the good opinion which
had been formed of him. The only person who differed
from the majority was Harry Verner, a midshipman of
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

about his own age. Though Verner had shaken hands
with him, it had been with reluctance and marked cold-
ness. His manner was now haughty and supercilious
in the extreme, and he took every opportunity of
making sneering remarks about men who had risen
from the lower orders always being out of place and
never doing any good. “If such were to become cus-
tomary in the service, it would drive all the gentlemen
out of it,” he remarked one day in Pearce’s hearing.
“Not if those who entered it knew how to behave as
gentlemen,” Pearce replied, quietly. Verner said nothing
in return, but he gave a look to show his intense dis-
pleasure. Generally Pearce walked away when Verner
spoke in that style, or when at table, and he could not
move, pretended not to hear what was said.

The fleet reached Portsmouth. Great was the satis-
faction of the British nation at the victory won. The
good King George the Third and the kind Queen
Charlotte went on board all the ships and visited the
wounded ; honours were awarded to the chiefs, and
those officers who had especially distinguished them-
selves were presented to their Sovereigns. Among
others was Pearce Ripley, as the midshipman who had
helped to take the “Impétueux.” The “ Marlborough’s”
crew declared on this that he was a marked man and
must get on in the service. The remark greatly excited
Harry Verner’s indignation and wrath. “It is high
time for me to quit the service after this,” he remarked,
when the King patted Pearce on the head, but did not
even glance towards him. Of memorable days in
English history, the Ist of June, 1794, stands justly
prominent,
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON,

Li

Tue “ Marlborough,” though victorious, had received so
tremendous a battering from her numerous opponents,
that it was very clear the stout craft could not again go
to sea without a thorough repair. Her officers and
crew were therefore distributed among other ships then
fitting out, and thus Pearce, for the first time in his life,
was separated from his father, to whom he had always
been accustomed to look up for guidance and advice.
In some respects this might have been an advantage to
the young midshipman, but the parting cost both more
pains than either confessed. “I am no great preacher,
my boy, but remember there’s One ever watching over
you, and He’ll be true to you if you try honestly to be
true to Him,” said the boatswain, as he wrung his son’s
hand, and stepped down the side of the fine frigate to
which Pearce through the interest of his late captain had
been appointed. The crew went tramping round the
capstan to the sound of the merry fife, the anchor was
away, and under a wide spread of snowy canvas the
dashing “ Blanche” of thirty-two guns, commanded by
the gallant Captain Faulkner, stood through the Needle
passage between the Isle of Wight and the main, on
her way down channel, bound out to the West Indies.
it was a station where hurricanes, yellow fever, and
sicknesses, and dangers of all sorts were to be en-
countered, but it was also one where enemies were to be
met with, battles to be fought, prizes to be captured,
and prize-money to be made, glory, honour, and pro-
motion to be obtained, and who on board for a moment
balanced one against the other ?
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

Several of Pearce’s old shipmates were on board the
“ Blanche,” and two of his messmates, from one of whom,
Harry Verner, he would rather have been separated ; the
other, David Bonham, he was very glad to see. Be-
tween Bonham and Verner the contrast was very great ;
for the former, though of excellent family, was the most
unpretending fellow possible, free from pride, vanity,
and selfishness, and kind-hearted, generous, good ten)-
pered, and the merriest of the merry. The first A. B.
who volunteered for the “ Blanche,” when he knew Mr.
Pearce had been appointed to her, was Dick Rogers, an
old friend of his father’s, with whom he had served
man and boy the best part of his life; and if there was
one thing more strongly impressed on Dick’s mind than
another, it was that John Ripley, the boatswain, ought
to have been a post captain. For his father’s sake Dick
had at first loved Pearce, and now loved him for his
own. “Though his father isn’t what he should be, he
shall be, that he shall, or it won’t be my fault,” he said
to himself. Dick was no scholar, and had not many ideas
beyond those connected with his profession, except that
particular one in favour of Pearce which might or might
not be of any service to him, and yet let us never despise
a friend, however humble. Pearce did not, though he
possibly had not read the fable of the lion and the mouse.

Dick Rogers was short and broad in the shoulders,
though not fat, with a huge, sandy beard, a clear blue
eye, and an honest smile on his lips, and saying that he
was 2 seaman every inch of him, he needs no further
description. Verner let it be known, among their new
messmates, that Pearce Ripley was only the boatswain’s
son; and hearing this, Bonham took great care to re-
count to them his gallant act on the Ist of June, and to
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

speak otherwise in his praise. Dick forward did not
fail to make the young midshipman his theme, and:
there the fact of his parentage was undoubtedly in his
favour. “We shall be, no doubt, alongside an enemy
some day soon, and then will be seen what stuff the
youngsters are made of,” was the remark of several on
board. They were not wrong in their prognostications.
The Island of Desiderade, near Guadeloupe, was in
sight to windward. “A sail on the weather bow!” was
shouted by the look-out at the mast’s head, always the
keenest sighted of the seamen on board in those days.
The frigate made all sail in pursuit of the stranger,
a large schooner under French colours. The chase stood
into a bay defended by a fort, where she was seen to
anchor with springs to her cables. Along the shore a
body of troops were also observed to be posted. The
drum beat to quarters as the “Blanche” worked up
towards the fort, when, the water shoaling, she anchored
and opened her fire in return for that which the fort,
the schooner, and the soldiers were pouring in on her.
Captain Faulkner’s first object was to silence the fort.
This was soon done. The schooner, which it was clear
was heavily armed, must be brought out. The boats
were called away, under command of the second lien-
tenant. Pearce leaped into the one to which he be-
longed. A master’s mate, Fitzgibbon, had charge of
her, and Dick Rogers formed one of her crew. Harry
Verner was in another. Away the boats dashed, at a
rate boats always do move pulled by British seamen
when a prize is to be taken. The Frenchmen worked
their guns bravely. A shot disabled the leading boat.
Pearce, sitting by Fitzgibbon’s side, heard a deep groan,
end before he could even look up the master’s mate fell
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

forward, shot through the head. His boat took the
lead. “‘ Now’s your time,” cried Dick Rogers; “we'll
be the first aboard, lads.” The crew were not slack to
follow the suggestion. In another moment they were
up to the schooner, and, leaping on her deck, led by
Pearce, laid on them so fiercely with their cutlasses that
the Frenchmen, deserting their guns, sprang over the
bulwarks into their boats on the other side nearest the
shore, and, before another boat reached: the vessel, pulled
away towards where the troops were marching down to
their support. The cables were quickly cut, and amid a
shower of bullets sail was made, and the prize carried
out. “TI said as how he’d do it—I said he wouldn’t
be wanting,” exclaimed Dick Rogers, as he gave his
account of the cutting out expedition to his chums on
board. ‘“He’ll do more too come another occasion.”
That occasion did occur before many days were over.
Two days afterwards the ‘“‘ Blanche’ was joined by the
“ Quebec” frigate, and together, when sailing by Guade-
loupe, they discovered the French thirty-six-gun frigate
“Pique” lying at anchor in the harbour of Pointe-a-
Pitre, ready for sea. Notto deprive his brother captain
of the honour he might obtain by engaging an anta-
gonist so worthy of him, Captain Carpenter parted
company, and the “Quebec,” steering westward, was
soon out of sight. The next thing to be done was tv
get the French frigate to come out from under her
protecting batteries to fight. This seemed no easy
matter, for prizes were captured and sent away under
her very nose, and still she did not venture ferth. At
length, however, on the memorable evening of the 4th
of January, the “ Blanche,” towing off another prize in
triumph, the “Pique” was seen to follow. The sun
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

went down. It was the last many a brave man was
destined to see. Darkness had come on, when the
French frigate was observed through the gloom astern.
The “ Blanche” tacked in chase.

In the solemn hour of midnight, while darkness
covered the face of the deep, the two vessels approached
each other, their relative positions clearly distinguished
by the light from the fighting lanterns which streamed
from their ports. The British crew, mostly stripped to
the waist, stood at their quarters, grim and determined,
with the gun-tackles in hand, eager for the moment to
open fire. Pearce was on the quarterdeck. Young as
he was, the whizzing of shots and the whistling of
bullets scarcely made his heart beat quicker than usual,
and yet, as in gloom and silence he waited for the signal
when the bloody strife must commence, he felt an awe
ereep over him he had never before experienced. Nearer
and nearer the combatants drew to each other. The
“Pique” commenced the fight. The “Blanche” returned
her distant fire; and, after various manceuvres, the two
frigates ranged up alongside each other and hotly en-
gaged, broadside to broadside, in the fashion in which
British tars have ever delighted. Fiercely the two
crews fought; the French, once having began, proved
themselves no unworthy antagonists. The main and
mizen masts of the ‘‘Blanche’’ fell, and the French, seiz-
ing the moment, ran alongside and attempted to board.
The British crew sprang up to repel them. Among the
foremost was Pearce, with Dick Rogers by his side.
With their sharp cutlasses they drove the Frenchmen
back. Again the guns roared as before. Once more
the French ship fell aboard the “Blanche,” her bowsprit
touching the latter’s capstan. Captain Faulkner hur.


THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

ried to secure it there, for the “Pique,” thus held, was
exposed to the raking fire of his frigate. Among those
who flew to assist him were Pearce Ripley and Dick
Rogers, the Frenchman’s musketry playing hotly on
them. “This is something like what you did in the old
‘Marlborough,’ sir,” said Dick to Pearce, so loud that all
might hear him—so many did, and noted the words.
Death was busy around them. While he was passing
the lashing the young and gallant Captain Faulkner
fell to the deck—a musket ball had pierced his heart.
That was no time for grieving, even for one well-beloved
as the captain. A hawser was being got up from below
to secure the enemy’s ship; but before it could be used
she broke adrift, to the disappointment of the British
tars. A cheer, however, burst from their throats as,
directly afterwards, the “Blanche,” paying off for want
of after-sail, the “Pique,” while attempting to cross
her stern, fell once more aboard her. This time they
took good care to secure the bowsprit to the stump of
their mainmast; and now, running before the wind, the
“Blanche” towing her opponent, the fight was continued
with greater fury than ever. In vain the Frenchmen
strove to free themselves by cutting the lashings—each
time they made the attempt the marines drove them
back with their musketry. Still it seemed doubtful
with whom victory would side. The “Blanche” had no
stern ports through which guns could be fought; the
carpenters were unable to aid them. A bold expedient
was proposed. The guns must make ports for them-
selves through the transome. Firemen with buckets
were stationed ready to extinguish the fire which the
discharge would create. With a thundering roar the
guns sent their shot through the stern, and, the fire
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

being extinguished, they began to play with terrific
effect into the bows of the French frigate. Her fore-mast
was immediately shot away ; her mizen-mast was seen
to fall. Still her crew, getting their quarter-deck guns
trained aft, fought on; but what were they to the
“ Blanche’s” heavy guns, which mercilessly raked her,
the shot entering her bow and tearing up her deck fore
and aft, sweeping away numbers of her crew at each
discharge. “If those Mounseers are not made of iron,
they'll not stand this battering much longer,” cried.
Dick Rogers, who was working one of the after-guns.
Pearce was standing near him. The space between the
decks was filled with smoke, through which the twinkling
light of the lanterns could scarcely penetrate, the flashes
at each discharge showing the men, begrimed with
powder, with sponge and rammers ready to load, or
with their tackles to run in their guns. A cheer from
the deck told them that the Frenchman’s remaining
mast had fallen, and now another and another that the
foe had struck. The “ Pique” was totally dismasted;
the “Blanche” had but her fore-mast standing. Every
boat was knocked to pieces, and how to get on board
the prize, still towed by the hawser, was the question.
“The hawser must form our bridge,” cried Mr. Milne,
the second lieutenant of the ship, springing on to it,
followed by Pearce, Rogers, and several men. Their
weight brought the rope down into the water. For
some distance they had to swim till they could climb
up by it on board. What havoc and destruction a few
short hours had wrought. Of a crew not far short of
three hundred men, one-third lay dead or wounded, the
deck covered with gore and the wrecks of the masts
and spars; guns lay dismounted, bulwarks knocked


THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

away, all telling the tale of the bravery and hardihood
of both the combatants. When the sun arose there lay
the victor and the conquered almost equally helpless.
Such was one of the scenes through which young Ripley
fought his way upwards, and gained a name and fame.

Jc

THE person who is constantly keeping his eye on the
reward he aims at is very likely to stumble and fall, and
never to reach it. He, on the contrary, who thinks
only how he can best perform his duty will be upheld
and encouraged, and very probably obtain a higher
reward than any at which he might have aspired. Pearce
Ripley found this to be true in his case. Duty was
his leading star. It never occurred to him to say, “ Will
this please my captain?’ ‘Will this advance me
in the service?” The “ Blanche” was soon refitted
and at sea again. Several prizes were made, and,
greatly to his satisfaction, he was appointed to the
command of one of them, with Bonham as his mate,
and Dick Rogers as boatswain. She was a richly-laden
West Indiaman, recaptured from the enemy. He was
ordered to take her to England, where, on his arrival,
he found his commission waiting for him.

Pearce received aright hearty welcome from his father,
and intense was the satisfaction of the brave seaman
when his son showed him his commission and appoint-
ment as second leutenant to the “ Vestal,” an eighteen
gun sloop of war, commanded by Captain Gale, and
destined for the North American station.

“You have got your first step up the ratlins, Pearce.
Go on as you have begun, and Heaven preserving your
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

life, there is no reason why you shouldn’t reach the
highest,” said the proud father, as he once more parted
from his son.

Those were days of pressgangs, and Dick Rogers
took good care to hide away till he ascertained the craft
Pearce was to join, when he at once volunteered for
her. Bonham, who had still a year to serve, was ap-
pointed to the same ship. The “ Vestal” had a quick
run across the Atlantic till within about five days’ sail
of Halifax, Nova Scotia, when a heavy gale sprang up,
which tried to the utmost her seaworthy qualities. The
sloop behaved beautifully, hove to, and rode buoyantly
over the raging seas. Well indeed was it for her that
she was properly handled, for the gale went on in-
creasing till the oldest seamen on board declared that
they had never met with such another. It continued
for a week, each day the wind blowing harder and
harder, or if there was a lull it seemed to come
only that the gale might gain greater strength. For
days not a glimpse of sun, or moon, or stars had
been obtained. It was the morning watch; the grey
cold dawn had just broke. Pearce was on deck, when
sweeping his eye round the horizon as the sloop rose to
the summit of a sea he perceived on the lee beam the
hull of a ship, rising and sinking amid the tumultuous
waters. At first he thought she was keel up, but as
the light increased he saw that she was a large ship
with the stump of the foremast alone remaining. That
she was in a bad plight was very clear. She was re-
markably low in the water he fancied, and who could
say how long even she might keep afloat.

The captain, being summoned, soon came on deck.
To bear sway for the stranger would be a work of
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

danger to the “Vestal.” Still who could tell how many
human beings might be on board that sinking ship!
With hatches battened down and men lashed to the
helm, the captain resolved to go to the rescue.

The seas came roaring up with furious rage, as the
sloop flew before them, some breaking aboard; and round-
ing to under the stern of the ship, she again hove to.
Many people appeared on the deck of the stranger who,
stretching out their arms, implored assistance. How
was it to be afforded? Would a boat live in such a
sea? Such appeals to British seamen are never made
in vain. Pearce Ripley offered to make the experiment
if men were found ready to go with him. There was
no want of volunteers. A boat was lowered. Itseemed
as if she must be engulfed before she left the sloop’s
side. Ripley’s progress was watched by eager eyes
from both ships. Now he is in the trough of the sea, a
watery mountain about to overwhelm him; now he is
on the summit surrounded by driving foam. A shout is
raised as he neared the sinking ship, but to get along-
side was even more dangerous than the passage from
one to the other. As the ship rolled and her deck was
exposed to view, he saw that there were women on
board, and other people besides the crew. Ropes were
hove tohim. He seized one, and sprang up the side.
A few hurried words told him what had occurred. The
ship was conveying troops and stores to Halifax, the
master and first mate had been washed overboard, the
second lay wounded by the falling of a spar. Many of .
the crew had been lost with the captain. There was no
sea officer who could enforce orders; the men were
mutinous. Ripley instantly assumed the command
There were several ladies. “They must first be placed


THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

In safety before a man enters the boat,” he cried ont,
presenting a pistol at some seamen who showed an
intention of leaping into her.

Sone entreated that their husbands mighi-accompany
then. “Oh, father, father, come with me,” exclaimed a
fair girl, who was being conveyed to the side to be













lowered into the boat; “I cannot, I will not leave you.”
She looked towards a fine, soldier-like man, who stood
with several officersaroundhim. ‘“‘ Impossible! Heaven
protect you, dearest. Even for your sake I cannot desert
my post. It is here with my men,” was the answer.
The boat had already nearly as many persons in her

:
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

as it would be safe to carry. This was no time for
delay. Pearce lifted the young lady in his arms, and
lowered. himself with her into the boat. The boat re-
turned to the “ Vestal,” and all those who had been
rescued were put on board. The young lady again and
again entreated him to save her father. Pearce pro-
mised to make every effort to bring off the colonel.
“But unless his men are rescued, I doubt that he will
leave the ship,” he added, as he returned to his boat.
Two other boats were now lowered, but it was too
evident that they could only save a part of the people
from the foundering ship. Those on her deck were now
seen forming a raft. It was their last hope of life should
the boats not take them off. Though several of the
people made a rush to the side, they were driven back
by the officers and soldiers who remained firm, and the
men were told off in order to allow of them to embark
as arranged by Pearce. Twice the boat returned with-
out an accident to the “ Vestal.” The young lady cast
a reproachful look at Ripley, when she saw that her
father was not among the saved. ‘ He would not come,
lady, but I willmake another effort,” he exclaimed, as he
prepared once more ¢o leave the corvette’s side. Just then
arose the fearful ery, “She is sinking! she is sinking !”
“Oh, save him! save him!” shrieked the poor girl
in an agony of terror, stretching out her hands towards
the spot where she fancied that she saw her beloved father
struggling in the waves. Pearce and his brave com-
panions needed not such an appeal to make them use
every effort to reach their drowning fellow-creatures.
Some had leaped on the half-finished raft as the ship
sunk beneath them, but many of these were speedily
washed off. Others were clinging to spars, and oars,








THE BualSWAIN’s SON.

and gratings, Pearce was soon in the midst of the
hapless beings, many with despair on their countenances,
unable to reach the boat, sinking as he neared them.
He looked round for the colonel. He could not dis-
tinguish him among the rest. Three people had been
hauled in, when as the boat rose to the summit of a sea
he saw below him a person clinging toa grating. A hand
was waved towardshim. ‘‘ Give way, lads,” he shouted,
and in another minute he had the satisfaction of hauling
on board the brave officer for whom he was searching.

The other boats took off the people from the raft.
He picked up several more, and returned in safety on
board. The meeting of the father and his daughter need
not be described. They were, he found, a colonel and
Miss Verner. He was struck by the name as that of
his former unamiable messmate. When the weather
moderated, and the colonel was sufficiently recovered to
appear on deck, he warmly expressed his gratitude to
Pearce, and his admiration of the gallantry he had dis-
played. His daughter Alice was not less grateful. A
calm succeeded the gale, and Pearce had frequent
opportunities of seeing her. He did not mention Harry
Verner to her, and indeed so great was the contrast he
perceived between the two in manners and behaviour,
that he could not suppose they were nearly related. .
Still there was at times an expression in Colonel
Verner’s countenance when he was annoyed which re-
minded him strongly of Harry.

There was a frank heartiness and sincerity about
the young lieutenant which at once gained Miss
Verner’s regard. It was very different to what she
had been accustomed, still his manner towards her was
gentle and deferential, as if he in no way presumed on
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

the service he had rendered her. Indeed, it never
entered his head that he had rendered her any especial
service, or that he had the slightest claim on her regard.
He felt, as he wrote to his father, “that he had had
the good fortune to command the boat which saved a
colonel and Miss Verner; that they were very nice
people ; that the colonel was to be stationed at Halifax,
and had invited him to his house whenever he could
get leave on shore.” He added, “ That will not be very
often during these stirring times, but I shall thoroughly
enjoy it when I do go, for Miss Alice. Verner is the
most beautiful and amiable girl I have ever seen or
expect to meet; without a bit of pride about her, and
she talks to me as if I were an old friend.”

At length the “Vestal” dropped her anchor in the fine
harbour of Halifax, and with a regret which surprised
him, Pearce saw the passengers depart for the shore.

“Remember, my dear Mr. Ripley, Miss Verner
and I shall at all times be glad to see you,” said
Colonel Verner as he was about to leave the ship.
Alice did not say as much as her father, but Pearce
believed from the expression of her countenance that
she willingly seconded her father’s invitation. Still he
knew that the familiar intercourse which had been so
delightful to him on board must come to an end.
“What can she ever be to me more than she is at
present ?” he exclaimed to himself. She says that I
saved her life and her father’s life; but then I saved
the lives of many other people. To be sure I have got
one step up the ratlins, but it may be very long before
I get another. No, no, Pll not think about it.”

The next day a special invitation to the governor’s
tabie, where he met Colonel and Miss Verner, and where
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

all the gentlemen from the governor downwards drank
wine with him, considerably altered his feelings. This was
the first of many attentions which he received from the
military officers and the principal inhabitants of Halifax.
His time on shore was indeed fully occupied in making
morning ealls and in attending the parties to which he
was invited. A portion of every morning he spent in
the society of Miss Verner. It was very delightful, and
he felt sure that he was welcome.

At length the “ Vestal”? was suddenly ordered to sea.
Pearce had the greatest difficulty in getting on shore to
wish his friends good-bye. Alice turned pale when he
told her that the ship was to sail that evening. “ You
will come back here surely, Mr. Ripley,” she said, in a
trembling voice ; “ you have been every thing to us since
that awful day when you saved our lives from the sink-
ite ship ; we shall miss you, indeed we shall, very much.”

Pearce could not frame a reply, at least, satisfactory
to himself. He scarcely knew what he said, as he
hurried away. The words might have made a vainer
man than he was much happier than they did him.

The “ Vestal” was bound for the West Indies. She
eruised for some time, making several rich prizes, which
she sent into Port Royal, Jamaica, and which filled the
purses of her officers and men in a very satisfactory
manner. Still, no honour or promotion was to be
obtained by the capture of honest merchantmen, At
length, however, there appeared a chance of falling in
with an antagonist worthy of her. One morning at
dawn a stranger was discovered on the lee beam. The
“Vestal” was kept away, andall sail madein chase. As
the “Vestal” gained on the chase, she was discovered ta
be a large ship, and pronounced to be flush-decked.
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

“Then we'll tackle her; never mind how many
guns she carries,” exclaimed the captain—a sentiment
to which his officers and men responded heartily.

The chase was accordingly continued, and as the
vessel came up with her on the weather quarter, it was
seen that she was a large flush-decked ship, carrying
twenty-two guns. The ensign of France flew out from
the stranger’s peak, and was saluted by a shot from
one of the corvette’s bow guns. The battle thus begun,
the “Vestal” keeping the weather gauge, was con-
tinued for half-an-hour with great fury, till the French-
man’s fore-mast went by the board. The enemy’s
guns were well handled, and the corvette began to
suffer accordingly. The first lieutenant and five men
were killed, and the captain, a midshipman, and several
men wounded. The captain was carried below, and the
command devolved on Pearce. The young lientenant’s
heart beat high. “Bonham,” he said, addressing his
friend who was standing near him, “we'll take that
ship, or go down with our colours flying.” The breeze
which had fallen returned, and as the corvette was still
under perfect command, he was able at length to obtain
a position by which he could pour several raking broad-
sides into the bows of the enemy. Her main-top mast
was shot away; her mizen-mast followed. The ensign
of France was again hoisted, but did not long remain
flying. Pearce poured in another broadside, and down
i# came, the cheers of the British crew giving notice of
what had occurred to their wounded shipmates below.
The prize, which proved to be the “ Désirée,” had lost a
considerable number of her crew, most of them killed
during the latter part of the action. Bonham was sent
on board to take command, and in two days the
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

** Vestal” and her prize entered in triumph the harbour
of Port Royal. Here the admiral with part of the fleet
were at anchor. Pearce went on board the flag-ship to
make his report. He was warmly received, and highly
complimented on his conduct. The next day he found
that he was to be first lieutenant of the corvette, and
Bonham received an acting order as second lieutenant.
The “ Vestal” had received so much damage, that she
was obliged to refit at Port Royal. This took several
weeks, and Captain Gale considered himself sufficiently
recovered, when she was ready, to go to sea in her.
Pearce had, however, virtually the command. Several
more prizes were taken. “That's young Ripley’s
doing,” exclaimed the admiral, “he deserves his pro-
motion, and he shall have it.”

1G

Once more the “ Vestal” was at anchor in Port Royal
harbour. In vain her brave captain had striven against
the effects of his wounds. He must return home if he
would save his life, he was told, so he applied to be
superseded. The admiral came on board the “ Vestal”
to inspect her. The next day he sent for Ripley, and
put a paper into his hand. Pearce’s heart beat quick
with proud satisfaction. The document was an order
to take the acting command of the corvette. “I have
written home by this post to ask for your commission,
and to recommend that you should be confirmed in the
eommand of the ‘ Vestal,’” added the admiral. “TI
am sure that you will take care she doesas good service
as she performed under Captain Gale.” Bonham, who
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

tad received his commission a few months before,
became first lieutenant, and a young protégé of the
admiral’s received an acting order as second; so that .
the united ages of the three principal officers of the
ship amounted to little more than fifty-five years. Old
heads were worn then on young shoulders. Many
prizes had been taken, and the time approached for
their return to Port Royal. The corvette lay becalmed.
A French store-ship was expected, which had been
separated from her convoy. The “Vestal” lay dis-
guised, as was usual in those days, looking very unlike
the smart sloop she was. A blue line was seen in the
horizon, the sign of an approaching breeze, and in the
midst of ita sail. The breeze brought up the stranger,
a fine brig, to within about a mile, when it died away.
She was an armed vessel, and showed by her colours
that she was French. Before long, two boats were
seen to put off from her. Three boats were instantly
lowered from the opposite side of the “ Vestal,’ and
manned. The Frenchmen pulled rapidly on, expecting
to make an easy prize of the “ Vestal.” Their look of
consternation was very great when they first perceived
the painted canvas which concealed the corvette’s guns.
Pearce had carefully watched for the first sign of
their wavering, and now ordered the three boats to
make chase. The Frenchmen, taken by surprise, made
but a slight show of resistance, and in ten minutes
the whole party found themselves prisoners on the deck
of the corvette. The “Vestal” was now towed up
towards the brig, which opened her fire at the boats,
but this did not deter them from placing the corvette
on her quarter, when a few rapidly delivered and
almost raking broadsides compelled her to haul down
























































IN ACTION,”
HE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

her colours, having had the chief officers left om
board and ten of her crew killed or wounded. The
privateer, which mounted fourteen guns, was on her
way to France, having a large amount of specie and valu-
able goods on board, the result of a successful cruise.

It was with no little pride that Captain Ripley
returned to Port Royal from his first cruise, with the
fine brig in company, the British ensign flying over
that of France. The admiral congratulated him on his
success, and at the same time put his commission and
appointment into his hand.

“You must be ready for sea again very soon
though,” said the admiral; “I have dispatches to send
to Halifax, and unless another cruiser comes in, I must
send you.”

Pearce, rather to the admiral’s surprise, replied
with animation, that he should be ready to sail that
evening if required, provided he could get water, fuel,
and fresh provisions on board. The admiral gave him
permission to make everybody exert themselves.

By noon the next day the young commander: had
got his ship ready for sea, and receiving his dispatches
with a joyous heart, he shaped a course for Halifax. A
bright look-out was kept, but on this occasion it was to
avoid strange sails. He was only to fight for the
purpose of escaping capture. Halifax was reached, and
Pearce having delivered his dispatches, hurried up to
Colonel Verner’s house.

Miss Verner was at home. She started, ana the
colour rose to her cheeks when Captain Ripley was
announced. She put out her hand, and did not with-
draw it, for Pearce forgot to let it go.

“ Ave you really a captain already ?” she asked.
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

“Yes; that is,a commander. I am captain of the
“Vestal,” he answered, and he told her how Captain
Gale had been compelled to go home, and that he had
been appointed in his steal. He mentioned also the
number of prizes he had taken—a matter which
interested Colonel Verner more than it did her.

“That young Ripley is a very fine fellow,” observed
the colonel to a brother officer.” Why, in one cruise
he must have made not far short of ten thousand
pounds as his own share of prize-money. haul for the admiral. Those naval men have better
chances than we have of filling their purses.”

If Pearce had received attentions when only a young
lieutenant, he was doubly courted now that he was
a commander, with an established name for gallantry
and energy. Alice Verner no longer hesitated acknow-
ledging to herself that she had given him her entire
heart. She felt honoured by his preference, and proud
of it among so many others who seemed anxious to
obtain it. Halifax was always a lively place. There
were a great number of resident families with young
people, and dances were therefore much in vogue. Con-
sequently naval officers were always welcome, lieu-
tenants and passed midshipmen were acceptable, but
young commanders were treated with especial favour.
A more experienced man than Pearce might have had
his head turned with the attentions he received. While,
however, he was grateful for them, he enjoyed to the
full the society in which he found himself, and became
neither conceited nor vain. He had also the oppor-
tunity of comparing Alice Verner with other girls, and
he became more than ever convinced of her superiority
to them all. His stay at Halifax was likely to be short,
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

He naturally wished to spend as much of his time as
possible in her society. She invariably received him so
frankly and cordially that all restraint was thrown
aside. He felt almost sure that she loved him; so he
took her hand and told her how much he loved her, and
that he believed he had made enough prize money
already to enable her to live as she had been accustomed
to; that he hoped to make more, and that he had good
reason to believe he should before long be a post captain,
when he should be her father’s equal in rank. Alice
was not very much surprised nor agitated, because she
was before sure that he loved her. Still it was very
pleasant to hear him sayso. Pearce also felt supremely
happy, and did not for a moment contemplate the
clouds and storms which might be ahead. Alice herself
might possibly have seen difficulties which he did not.
She loved her father, but she knew that he was a proud
man and weak on certain points, and that few men
thought more of family and connections. It had always
surprised her that he had not inquired more particularly
about Pearce’s parentage, but she concluded that he
was acquainted with the circumstances of the case, and
was satisfied. It was, at all events, her duty to tell her
father that Captain Ripley had declared himself. Pearce
was to dine with them that day. In the meantime he
had to go on board. He returned some time before the
dinner hour. Colonel Verner had not come in, so that
Alice had not had an opportunity of speaking to her
father. Pearce told her that a frigate had arrived that
morning direct from England. Everybody was eager
to hear the news she brought. Probably that kept the
colonel from home. While seated together, and in-
terested more in themselves than in the world at large,
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

the door was suddenly opened, and Lieutenant Harry
Verner was announced.

“Why, Cousin Harry, where have you dropped
from ?” said Alice, rising to welcome him, “I did not
even know that you werea lieutenant. You have grown
ap out of a little midshipman since I saw you last.”

“ve dropped from His Britannic Majesty’s Fri-
gate “ Hecate,” of which I have the honour of being
third lieutenant,” announced the young man, “And
as for changes, though you are lovely as ever, I shall
not know soon whether I am standing on my head or
my feet ;” he looked fixedly at Pearce as he spoke.

“JT beg your pardon, Captain Ripley,” said Alice,
recovering herself from the slight confusion into which
she had been thrown; “I should have introduced my
cousin to you.”

“Harry Verner and I are old shipmates I suspect,
unless there are two of the name very much like each
other,” said Pearce, rising and putting out his hand.

“Yes, as midshipmen we were together, I believe,”
answered Harry, superciliously ; “but really it is difficult
to remember all one’s old shipmates.”

Pearce under some circumstances would have been
inclined to laugh at Harry Verner’s impudence, but it
was very evident that the lieutenant wished to pick a
quarrel with him, which was by all means to be avoided.
Alice had thought her cousin a tiresome boy ; he now
appeared to have grown more. disagreeable than before.
Colonel Verner came in and welcomed his nephew, who
was the only son of his elder brother; other guests
arrived, and the conversation became general. Harry
at once assumed to be the person of most importance in
the house, and though he was laugling and talking
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

with every one, Alice discovered that he was constantly
watching her and Captain Ripley whenever they spoke.
Captain Ripley had to return on board. He never slept
out of his ship if he could avoid it.

“T suppose, colonel, that you can give me a shake
down,” said Harry; “I have got leave to remain on
shore.”

Her cousin’s remaining prevented Alice from speak-
ing to her father thatnight. Harry showed no intention
of going to bed till Pearce had taken his leave, and
Alice had retired. He then, jumping up from the sofa
on which he had thrown himself, exclaimed, “ My dear
uncle, where did you pick up that man ?”

“Whom do you mean, Harry ?” asked the colonel,
rather astonished at his nephew’s somewhat impertinent
manner.

“Why, Captain Ripley, who has just left this,”
answered the lieutenant. “He seems as much at home
with Alice as if he were engaged to her. Indeed, I am
half expecting you to tell me that he is.”

“ Really, Harry, you are speaking too fast,” said the
colonel ; “‘ Captain Ripley is one of the finest officers in
the navy, and having rendered the greatest possible
service to my daughter and me, I feel bound to treat
him with every consideration and kindness.”

“Which he repays by aspiring to my cousin’s
hand,” answered Harry. “Were he aman of family I
should say nothing, of course; but he is, sir, a mere
adventurer. His father is a common boatswain—a
warrant officer—not a gentleman even by courtesy, and
his mother, for what I know to the contrary, might have
been a bum-boat woman, and his relations, if he has
any, are probably all of the lowest order.”
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

The colonel walked up and down the room very
much annoyed. ‘Though what you say may be true,
Harry, that cannot detract from Captain Ripley’s fine
qualities nor relieve me of the obligations I owe him,”
he observed after atime. “Of course, were he to dream
of marrying Alice, that would alter the case, and i
should be compelled to put a stop to our present
friendly intercourse; but I do not believe that such an
idea enters his head. He is like you sailors generally,
here to-day and gone to-morrow. Probably when he
leaves this we may not see him again for years to
come.”

“Not so sure of that,” said Harry ; “Ripley was
always very determined when he made up his mind to
do a thing, and you will pardon me, uncle, but the way
in which he was speaking to her when I came into the
room was anything but that of an ordinary acquain-
tance.”

“Tl see about it, I'll see about it,” exclaimed the
colonel, now more than ever annoyed. ‘It is impossible
that a man of such low extraction should aspire to the
hand of my daughter. The idea is too absurd !”

Harry Verner retired to rest that night under the
comfortable belief that he had revenged himself on the
man whom he had always disliked, and now envied, for
his rapid promotion and success.

Mie

THE arrival of the “Hecate” relieved the “Vestal,” which
was ordered to proceed at once to sea. Poor Alice received
Captain Ripley with marks of sorrow in her counte-
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

nance which alarmed him. “My father will not hear
of it,” she exclaimed, giving way to a burst of grief;
“but I told him, and I promise you, that I will marry
no one else.” Z

“T know, I feel, and I am sure you will not,
dearest,” said Pearce, tenderly gazing at her. “And
be of good courage, I trust yet to do deeds and to gain
a name to which those who now scorn me for my
humble birth may be proud to ally themselves.”

Pearce had never before uttered anything like a
boast, but his swelling heart assured him of what he
could do, and his indignation at the contempt in which
his father was held made him speak in a vaunting tone
so different to his nature. The moment of parting
arrived; Alice, unasked, renewed her promise, and
Pearce hurried on board unwilling to encounter any
of his ordinary acquaintances in the town. It was
well for Harry Verner that he did not fall in with him.
Before night the corvette was far away from Halifax.
Pearce was not exactly unhappy, but he was in an ex-
cellent mood for undertaking any daring act which
might present itself. Once more he returned to
Jamaica, picking up a few prizes on the way. “ Always
welcome, Captain Ripley,” said the admiral, cordially
greeting Pearce when he appeared at the Penn to report
himself. ‘“ You've done so well in the sloop that we
must get you into a smart frigate; you'll not have to
wait long fora vacancy, I daresay.” This commenda-
tion was sufficient to restore Pearce’s spirits. He hoped
to do something before the corvette had to return
home. ‘There are two classes of people who hope to do
something—one waits for the opportunity to occur, the
other goes in search of it and seldom fails in the search.
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

Pearce Ripley belonged to the latter class. Several
more prizes were taken, and a considerable amount of
damage done to the commerce of the enemy; but
still the “ Vestal” had not fallen in with an enemy
the conquest of whom would bring glory as well as
profit. Week after week passed away. It had been
blowing hard. The wind dropped at sunset; the mght
was very dark and thick, an object could scarcely have
been discerned beyond the bowsprit end. The
island of Deserade, belonging to France, bore south-
east by south, six or seven leagues, when, as day broke
and the light increased, a ship was perceived close on
the weather-beam, which in a short time was made out
to be an enemy's frigate. The breeze had by this time
sprung up again and was blowing fresh.

“ We may fight her or try to escape,” said the cap-
tain to Bonham, eyeing the frigate as if he would rather
try fighting first.

“JT should say that the odds being so greatly against
us we ought to try to escape,’ answered the first leu-
tenant; “but I speak my own sentiments, and I am
sure that of all on board, if fight we must, we will all
be ready to stand by you to the last. Victory does not
always side with the biggest.”

Sail was accordingly made to the north-west, but no
sooner had she shaped a course than the frigate under a
cloud of canvas came tearing after her at a rate which
proved that the “ Vestal” had not @ chance of escaping.
The crew showed by unmistakeable signs that they ex-
pected to be captured, by going below and putting on
their best clothes. Pearce calied them aft, “‘ Lads, we
have served together for three years, and done many a
deed to be proud of. Do not let the Frepchmen hoast
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

that they took us without our having done our best to
prevent them. I purpose to fight that frigate if you
will stand by me, and that I am sure you will.”

“ Aye, aye, that we will, and would if she were twice
as big, and sink at our guns before we strike,” shouted
Dick Rogers, and their loud cheers expressed the senti-
ments of the rest. The corvette at once prepared for
action, and as soon as all was ready she shortened sail.
to allow the frigate to come up, greatly to the French-
men’s surprise probably. The latter began firing as
soon as her guns could reach the corvette. “Let nota
shot be returned till I give the order, lads,” cried
Ripley ; “we must throw none away.” He wuited till
his carronades would tell with effect. ‘Now give it
them, lads,” he shouted.

The heavy shot crashed against the side of the frigate
in a way which astonished the Frenchmen. With won-
derful rapidity the guns were run in, loaded, and again
sent forth their death-dealing shower of iron, this time
tearing through the frigate’s upper bulwarks, sweeping
across her quarter-deck and wounding her masts.
“Hurrah! we have knocked away her wheel,” cried Bon-
ham, who had sprung into the mizen rigging to ascertain
the effect of the last broadside ; “ she’s ours, if we are
smart with our guns.”

The Frenchmen had just fired a broadside which had
killed three of the “‘ Vestal’s” crew, knocked one of her
boats to pieces, and done other damage, but had not
materially injured her running rigging. Firing another
broadside in return, Pearce saw that by wearing sharp
round he could pass under the stern of the frigate, and
at the same time bring a fresh broadside to bear on her.
The manceuvre was rapidly executed, the effect was
THE BOATSWAIN’S SoN.

very great on board the enemy. ‘The crew were seen to
be hurrying to and fro as if in dread of some event
about to oceur. It was next seen that all sail was being
made on the frigate. The men had deserted their guns.
The British seamen plied the enemy with their car-
ronades with still greater energy. The great masses of
iron were hauled in and out as if they had been made
of wood. Their only fear was that their antagonist
would escape them. More sail was made on the corvette
to keep up with him. To prevent the corvette from
following, the Frenchmen again returned to their guns,
and the frigate suddenly hauling up let fly her broadside.

Pearce saw the manceuvre about to be executed, and
was just in time to haul up also to save the “ Vestal”
from being raked. The frigate’s shot, accompanied by
a shower of musketry, camé tearing on board. Hitherto
one officer and four men had been killed on board the
“Vestal,” and six wounded, including the master
slightly—a heavy loss eut of a sloop’s complement, but
Pearce saw victory within his grasp, and resolved to
persevere. The last broadside from the frigate told
with fearful effect on the corvette. Her spars and
rigging were much cut about; three more men were
struck, and the brave captain was seen to stagger back.
Had not Rogers sprang forward and caught him in his
arms he would have fallen to the deck. He was speech-
less, but he motioned to Bonham, who ran up to con-
tinue the fight. When an attempt was made to carry
him below, he signified that he would remain on deck
till the battle was won. The surgeon came up and
stanched the blood flowing from his shoulder. The
nervous system had received a violent shock, but he
could not tell whether the wound would prove mortal,
THE BOATSWALN’S SON.

the surgeon reported. Still the battle raged. The
French were again seen to quit their guns. The cor
vette followed up her success. It was observed that
buckets were being hauled up through the ports, the
frigate must be on fire; her foremast fell, the corvette
ranged up alongside, the French eusign was still flying.
Bonham was ordering another broadside to be poured
in, when down came the enemy’s flag, and at that
moment, Pearce recovering, joined in the cheer which
burst from the lips of the British crew.

“Go and help the poor fellows,” were the first words
the young captain spoke. The corvette’s boats which
could swim were lowered and armed with buckets, the
English seamen hurried up the sides of their late oppo-
nent. Her deck presented everywhere signs of their
prowess, covered with the bodies of the slain, and
the wreck of the foremast and rigging; the wheel
had been shot away and three men killed at it. As
@ security Bonham, who had gone on board and re-
ceived the commanding officer’s sword, the captain
haying been killed, sent him and three others on board
the corvette, while he and his men set to work to extin-
guish the flames. The magazine was happily drowned,
which was of itself a sufficient reason for the frigate to
have struck, though the state of her masts and spars,
and the number of her killed and wounded showed the
skill and courage of her comparatively tiny opponent.
The fire was at length got under, very much by the,
efforts of ths Englishmen, who had to hint to the French
that if they did not exert themselves they would be left
to perish, as it would be impossible to get them all on
board the corvette before the frigate would become
untenable. The corvette and her prize having been put
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

somewhat to rights, made sail for Jamaica. They had
a long passage up, and the greatest vigilance was ne-
cessary to keep the prisoners in order. A plot was
discovered for retaking the frigate, and Bonham had to
threaten the French officers with severe punishment
should anything of the sort be again attempted.

Pearce Ripley lay in his cabin unable to move. The
hearts of the officers and men were deeply grieved, for
the surgeon would not pronounce a favourable opinion.
He was young, and had a good constitution. He might
recover. The corvette succeeded in carrying her prize
to Jamaica. The admiral himself came on board to see
Ripley and to congratulate him on his achievement.
“Your promotion is certain, Captain Ripley,” he said
kindly ; “and I should think his Majesty, when he hears
of your gallantry, won’t forget to give a touch on your
shoulder with the flat of his sword, eh. You will find
a handle to your name convenient, and you deserve it,
that you do, my lad.”

The admiral’s kindness contributed much to restore
Pearce to health. While he remained on shore Bonham
received an acting order to take command of the
“Vestal.” Before Pearce had totally recovered he re-
ceived his post rank with a complimentary letter on his
gallantry. Bonham, at the same time, found that he
was made a commander; the “ Vestal,’ having been
upwards of four years in commission, was ordered home,
Captain Ripley taking a passage in her. She escaped
all the enemy’s cruisers, and arrived safely in Ports-
mouth harbour. She was, however, considered fit to go
to sea again after an ordinary repair, and was recom-
missioned by Captain Bonham. Pearce was sent for
by the First Lord of the Admiralty to attend the King’s
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

levee. He was presented to his Majesty, that good old
king who truly loved a sailor, and knew how to appre-
ciate honour and valour. On kneeling to kiss his sove-
reign’s hand he felt a touch on his shoulder, and with
astonishment, gratitude, and delight, heard the King say,
“ Rise, Sir Pearce Ripley; you are well deserving of
knighthood.”

Pearce felt very much inclined to shake the King
cordially by the hand, and to assure his Majesty that no
reward could be more satisfactory. He did not, how-
ever, nor did he say why he was so pleased with the
rank bestowed on him, but made the usual bow, and
moved off to allow others to present themselves. There
was one, however, waiting for him outside the palace,
as fine and officer-like looking man as any of those
present in admirals’ or post captains’ uniforms—his
father, and the knowledge of the intense delight his
promotion gave him, greatly added to the satisfaction .
Pearce felt on the occasion. Sir Pearce Ripley was
gazetted the next day to the command of a, fine frigate,
the name of which he soon made well known by the
gallant exploits he performed in her.

Bake

Two years had passed by. Colonel Verner, now a
general, with his daughter, had returned to England,
and they were spendmg some weeks during the summer
at the house of a friend, Admiral Sir J. B , in the
Isle of Wight, in the neighbourhood of the then pretty
little village of Ryde. Alice looked thinner and paler


THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

than formerly, but her beauty was in no way impaired;
and the sweet smile which lit up her countenance—one
ef its chief charms when she spoke, was still there.
She had accompanied her father and the admiral ona
walk into Ryde. When some little distance from the
village, they met a fine dignified-looking man, ~his
silvery hair showing that his age was greater than
would have been supposed from his florid, clear com-
plexion. An undress naval uniform set off his fine
figure to advantage. The admiral looked at him fora
moment, and then shaking him cordially by the hand,
inquired what brought him to Ryde.

“T have taken a cottage in the neighbourhood for
my son’s saxe when he comes home, for as I have
quitted the service I shall always be ready to receive
him,” was the answer.

“Oh, then we are near neighbours. Come over and
dine with me to-day. I like to talk over by-gone days
with an old shipmate,” said the admiral.

The stranger accepted the invitation, and after a
little more conversation, he walked on.

“A distinguished man,” observed General Verner,
when the admiral rejoined him.

“A right noble and brave man,” said the admiral,
but made no further remark.

The stranger was in the drawing-room when Miss
Verner entered, and was soon engaged in an animated
conversation with her. She thought him somewhat
eld-fashioned in his phraseology, perhaps, and mode of
pronunciation, but she had so frequently heard officers
of high rank speak in the same way, that she was not
surprised, and as he had seen a great deal of the world,
and described well what he had seen, she was much
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

muerested. As she listened, she felt her interest
increase, and became insensibly drawn towards the old
gentleman. As there were many married ladies present,
she was led out among the first, and so she did not see
when he left the room, which might have given her an
idea as to his rank, but she found herself sitting next to
him at dinner. Her father was opposite, and appeared
to be much interested in his conversation. According
to the good old custom, the admiral drank wine round
with all his guests. “ Mr. Ripley, will you take wine?”
he said, addressing her companion in his kind friendly
tone. She started, and she felt the blood rush to her
cheeks. She had not recovered from her confusion
before the ceremony of wine-taking was over, and the
old genileman again addressed her. Could he be the
father of Pearce? She had always understood that his
father was a boatswain, and this old gentleman could
not be that, or he would scarcely have been dining at
the admiral’s table. Her father would make the inquiry
probably of the admiral; if not, she must try to muster
courage to do so. Im the mean time she would
ask her companion if he knew Sir Pearce Ripley.
In a low and somewhat trembling voice she put the
question.

“Indeed I do, young lady, and am proud to own
him as my son,” answered the old seaman, fixing his
clear grey eyes on her, as if he would read her heart.
“have a hope that you know him too, and that no
two people love him better in the world,” he added in a
whisper.

Alice felt her cheeks glow, and yet she was not
annoyed. “Indeed you are right,” she said, in a low
tone, which she hoped no one else would hear, for
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

several people were speaking loudly, and there was a
clatter of knives and forks.

“He will be in England again soon to refit, for he
has allowed his frigate very little rest since he com-
manded her,” observed the old gentleman. ‘“ He, I
hope too, will then get a spell at home, for since he
went to sea at ten years of age, he has never once been
ten days on shore at a time, aye, I may say, not a month
altogether.”

Alice whispered.her hope that he would remain on
shore. After retiring to the drawing-room she looked
anxiously for the arrival of the gentlemen. Her father
and Mr. Ripley entered together. The general soon
came and sat down by her.

“A very agreeable old naval officer that is we’ve
been talking to,” he remarked; “I did not catch his
name, but the admiral tells me that he is a master in
the service.”

Alice was pleased to hear this, but much puzzled.
She managed to speak to the admiral when no one was
near. He put on a quizzical look. “Now, young lady,
if you had been inquiring about Sir Pearce Ripley, his
son, I should not have been surprised,” he answered.
“The fact is, my friend Ripley became a master late in
life. He had served in the lower grades of the pro-
fession, and if the rules of the service had allowed it, he
should have been made a post captain. I cannot tell
you all the brave things he has done. When in charge
of a prize, he fought a most gallant action ; he prevented
his ship’s company from joining the mutineers at the
Nore. On two several occasions, he saved the ship
from being wrecked, not to mertion his conduct on the
first of June, and on numerous previous occasions. I
HE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

placed his son on the quarter-deck, predicting that he
would be an honour to the service, and so he is, and 1
am proud of him.”

While the admiral was speaking, Alice was con-
sidering whether she should confide her case to him,
and beg him to intercede with her father, or rather to
speak to him of Mr. Ripley in a way which might over-
come his prejudices. She almost gasped for breath in
her agitation, but her resolution was taken, and with-
out loss of time she hurriedly told him of her engage-
ment to Sir Pearce Ripley.

“Tam heartily glad to hear of it, my dear young
lady,” exclaimed the admiral warmly ; “he is worthy of
you and you are of him, and that is saying a great deal
for you. MHoity toity! I wonder my friend General
Verner has not more sense ; the idea of dismissing one
of the finest cfficers in the service because he hasn’t a
rent-roll and cannot show a pedigree as many do a yard
long, and without a word of truth from beginning to end.
if a man is noble in himself what does it matter who his
father was? The best pedigree, in my opinion, is that
which a man’s grandson will have to show. Better to
have one noble fellow like old Ripley there for a father,
than a line of twenty indifferent progenitors, such as
nine-tenths of those who set such store by their ancestry
can boast of.”

Alice very naturally agreed with the admiral, who
was himself a man of much older family than her father.
He attacked the general the next morning. He hated
circumlocution and went directly to the point. ‘ You
object to your daughter marrying Sir Pearce Ripley
because his father was a boatswain. I tell you I was
for many years of inferior razk to a boatswain, I
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

entered the navy as captain’s servant. What do you
say to that? It does not signify what a man has been,
ibis what he is should be considered. Now, my dear
general, just clap all such nonsense under hatches, and
the next time young Ripley asks your daughter to
marry him, let her, and be thankful that you have
secured so fine a son-in-law and so excellent a husband
for the girl.”

General Verner had not a word of reply to his
friend’s remonstrance. The admiral, when he met Alice,
exclaimed, “I’ve been pouring my broadsides into your
father till I leit him without a stick standing and every
gun dismounted ; if you give him a shot depend on’t
he'll strike his flag.”



Vie

Tus admiral’s house commanded an extensive view of
the Solent, looking across to Portsmouth, down the
channel towards Cowes and up over Spithead. One
bright morning after breakfast, the admiral, as usual,
with his eye at the telescope, was watching the ever-
varying scene on the waters before him, when he ex-
claimed, “Two frigates standing in, and one is French,
a prize to the other. To my eye the Frenchman seems
the biggest of the two; I must send over and learn all
about it. He rang the bell, his old coxswain appeared.
“ Judson, take the. wherry and board that frigate, and
give my compliments and learn the particulars of the
action, and if her captain can spare time I shall be very
glad to see him.. Here, give this note if ”» The

!




THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

admiral spoke a few words in an under tone heard by no
one else. ;

Judson hurried off. There was a fair breeze to
‘Spithead, and back—a soldier’s wind. Alice watched
the progress of the boat with great interest. She
reached the English frigate, remained a short time, and
was speedily on her way back. Before she had long
left the frigate she was followed by another boat which
overtook her as she reached the shore.

A short time afterwards, Judson appeared, and put a
card into his master’s hand, “ Say that I shall be de-
lighted to see him when he can come up.”

“What about the action, Judson?” asked the
admiral.

“Just the finest, sir, that has been fought during
the war,’ answered Judson. “ He’ll be up here pre-
sently, and tell you more about it than I can.”

Scarcely ten minutes had passed by, when Judson
announced “Captain Sir Pearce Ripley!” . The
admiral received the young captain with every mark of
regard. “ And now let me introduce you to my guests,
General and Miss Verner; but, by the by, you know
them, I think.”

Alice, lost to all sense of decorum, sprang forward
to receive him. The general put out his hand in a
cordial manner, and with many compliments congratu-
ated him on his success. The admiral having listened
to an account of the action, dragged off the general to
see some improvements on the farm; the ladies of the
family left the room, and Pearce Ripley heard from
Alice’s own lips that her father fully sanctioned their
union. He claimed a sailor’s privilege, and before a
month had passed their marriage took place.
THE BOATSWAIN’S SON.

Bonham obtained his post rank, and though he had
not the talent of his friead, he ever proved himself an
active efficient officer. Harry Verner quitted the service,
finding that, notwithstanding his ccnnections, his
merits were not appreciated, and that he was not likely
to obtain his promotion. He soon afterwards broke his
neck out hunting. Sir Pearce Ripley commanded several
line of battle ships, and took an active part in three of
England’s greatest naval victories. He in due course
became an admiral, and was created a baronet, and his
sons entering the navy rose to the highest rank in
their noble profession.














ELK-HUNTING,




































































































BY MRS. WEBB.
—4+—

RIGHTLY blazed the fire, one
iS New Year’s Eve, in the cheer-
dining-room of Mr. and Mrs. Hustace’s hos-
pitable dwelling. The great dry log of wood that had
been reserved for the festive occasion, was crackling on
the hearth, and sending up volleys of sparks, and a
glowing blaze, that lighted up the bright faces of a party
of children, who, with their parents, and grandfather
and grandmother, sat around the fire.

Chesnuts had been roasted in the hot embers,
oranges and biscuits had been duly discussed, and the
juvenile members of the party began to intimate to their
grandfather—Mr. Eustace the elder—that they were im-
patient for the long-promised treat of the evening.

“Now, grandpapa,” said Alice, the eldest of the
children, as she drew her chair quite close to Mr.

B*
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

Bustace’s, “now we are all ready to listen to your story,
so pray begin, or it will be time for amy to go to bed
before you have finished.”

Little Amy drew a stool to her grandfather’s feet,
and sat down, looking up at him with curiosity and
interest in her large blue eyes.

Charley was all attention; but, being a boy, and
twelve-years of age, he was too manly to express all the
curiosity that he thought quite suitable to both his
younger and his elder sister, who were only girls.

Old Mr. Eustace laid his hand fondly on Amy’s
head, and said, “I was not older than you, my little
puss, when my trials and troubles began—those troubles
that led to all the adventures which I am going to
relate to you. My own dear mother died when I was
very young—so young that I never had more than a faint
recollection of her sweet face and loving words, and of
the bitter tears I shed when I was told that she was dead.

“My father was very kind tome. In the midst of
his own grief he tried to do all in his power to supply
the place of our lost parent to me and to my little sister,
Bertha. And we were very happy, for we soon forgot
our loss, and lived—as children do—in the pleasure of the
present day, looking neither to the past nor to the future.

“But years went on, and when I was Amy’s age—
just eight years old—my father took another wife. He
married a widow, a Mrs. Jameson, who hadason two
years older than I was. My new brother’s name was
Clement—not an appropriate name, by the by, as far
as I was concerned ; for he wasvery harsh and unkind
tome. His mother thought a great deal of him, and I
fancied she spoilt him, and was unjust to me.

“But my father was as kind as ever, and both our
EY LIFE EN THE PRAIRIE.

stepmother and Clement were good to my gentle little
sister; so I put up with my share of ill-usage, and
made no complaints for several years.

“You know, my children, that my parents lived in
America ; and it so happened that my father was obliged
to go to England on pressing business. Before he left
home he called me to his own room, and he gave me
much good and Christian advice. He charged me to
remember all the religious instruction which I had re-
ceived from him, and from my own sweet mother, and
to try always so to live that I might go to rejoin her in
heaven when I died. Much he said about the study of
God’s Word, and the importance of constancy in prayer ;
and then he prayed for me and my little sister, and I
shall never forget what I felt while he was praying.
Thank God, I never did forget it!

“Soon he left us, and we never saw him again. My
beloved father died in England, and Bertha and I were
orphans.

““ Our stepmother behaved well to us for a time; but
soon she seemed to be tired of us, and she allowed
Clement to treat me just as he pleased, and to assume
authority over me, which I could not submit to.

“A sister of my mother’s came to visit us, and she
took Bertha away with her, and I was left alone and sad.
I wanted to be sent to a public school, but my wish was
denied, and a tutor was engaged to instruct me and
Clement. I hated this man; I know it was wrong,
but at the time I fancied it was quite justifiable to
hate him. Certainly he was not a man to inspire either
respect or affection, but I ought to have obeyed him,
and I ought to have tried to conciliate my step-
mother.
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

‘ T did neither, and yet I went on reading my Bible,
and repeating my prayers, and believing that I was
acting like a Christian boy. But, dear children, re-
member that we must ‘show our faith by our works,’
and my actions were not at all in accordance with my
belief or my knowledge.

“Things grew worse and worse; and at length
Clement one day struck me violently for a small offence.
I returned the blow, and levelled him with the ground.
He made a false statement of the affair to his mother
and the tutor, and I was cruelly chastised and locked up
in my own room.”

“ And what did you do ?” cried Charley, with spark-
ling eyes and flushed cheeks. “I hope you never gave
in to any one of them again.”

“Well, Charley, I was much like other boys, head.
strong and proud. I brooded over my wrongs until
they seemed to be unbearable. Then I began to form
plans for delivering myself out of the hard bondage
which I thought I was enduring. I was very strong
and active. I had accustomed myself to violent exercise,
and I had acquired much skill in shooting and fishing
on my father’s property, and also in the wild country
which adjoined it. I therefore felt very independent,
and had a perfect confidence in my own powers.

“My resolution was formed. I put a few clothes,
and all the money and other valuables which I pos-
sessed —a miniature picture of my father being my
greatest treasure—into a knapsack. I made a hearty
meal of the food which was brought to me by a servant,
and then I waited impatiently for night. Very sincerely
I prayed for God’s blessing on an act which I atter-
wards knew to be an act of folly and wickedness, And
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

T read my usual portion of Scripture with all the atten-
tion which I could command, though my heart was
cherishing unholy feelings, and I was following my own
evil devices.

“My Bible was carefully packed in my knapsack,
and I repeated the promise which I had made to my
beloved father, that I would make it the guide of my
life. Was I doing so now? I fear not.

“ Night came, and witha beating heart and trembling
step I climbed out of my window. A luxuriant creeper
covered the wall, and, by means of the cord-like boughs,
I descended very easily to the ground. There was a
faint moonlight, and I stood to look at the dear home of
my childhood. Sad memories—sad and yet sweet—came
over my young heart. I thought of my gentle mother
and of my noble father, and I almost fancied their
blessed spirits were hovering over me at this crisis of
my life, and I wept bitterly.

“Soon all my courage and resolution returned, and
I left the spot. I had a dog—a faithful creature, which
Thad reared from its birth, and which loved me de-
votedly. I went to the place where Wolfgang was
chained up, andI unloosed him. His joy at seeing me
was so great—for my imprisonment had lasted for
several days—that I feared his barking would rouse the
inmates of the house. I therefore started at full speed,
and never stopped until I had reached a thick wood that
skirted my father’s clearing. There I stopped to recover
my breath, and to consider in what direction I should
turn my steps.

“T had a small pocket compass, and this was of
inestimable service to me in all my wanderings. By
the dim light of the moon I now took my bearings,
HY LIFE IN THE PRAIRE.

while Wolfgang stood silently by my side, lecking up
into my face with eager and inquiring eyes.

“My first object was to get beyond reach of any
pursuit that might be attempted the next morning, but
I also wished to make my way towards the less in-
habited part of the country, where I should have ne









chance of meeting any one whom I had ever seen at my
tather’s house, or at any of the neighbouring settle-
ments. I therefore steered my course nearly west, and
“ref ce the sun rose, | was far in the depths of what
seed to me a boundless forest.








MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“By this time I was hungry and exhausted, so I
made a scanty breakfast, in which Wolfgang shared, of
the remains of my last night’s supper; then we both
lay down to sleep on a bed of dry leaves.

“ After a few hours of rest, which I calculated by
the height of the sun above the horizon, as I caught its
bright beams through the thick foliage of the over-
hanging trees, I arose refreshed, and again pursued the
same course. Wolfgang had often made himself useful
on former occasions by carrying my fishing-basket, and
I now thought he might render me still more important
assistance. 1 therefore fastened my knapsack on his
back, and the good-tempered fellow trotted along with
his burden, which did not seem at all to incommode him.
This was a great relief to me, for I had still my fishing-
tackle to carry, and also a strong stick, which was my
only weapon of defence, except, indeed, a large pecket-
knife, which I fancied I could make available for that
purpose if I were to be attacked by either man or beast.

“Thus we journeyed all day, Wolfgang fasting, but
perfectly patient, and I endeavouring to satisfy my
hunger with a few berries and wild fruits, which I knew
to be wholesome.

“ Towards sunset an opening appeared in the forest,
a clearing had evidently been made ; and, to my great joy,
T saw a light smoke curling up above some low bushes.

“T was too hungry and weary to think of danger,
and I hurried forward. I longed to see some human
creature, who, being, therefore, ‘ a cooking animal,’ could
give me some food. I came upon a small hut, built of
boughs and turf, and evidently only a temporary re-
sidence for the white man, who sat on the ground
near the low entrance, carefully cleaning his gun.”
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“But suppose they had been savages—suppose they
had been Red Indians,” said Alice; “what should you
have done then, grandpapa ?”

“JT had seen some Red Indians when I had travelled
with my father, and also afew stragglers used to come
to our residence to barter furs and feather ornaments for
cloth, or printed calico, or gunpowder. I should not,
therefore, have feared to approach a native hut. But I
was well pleased to see a white man, especially as he
looked up on perceiving me, and I at once read kind-
ness in his plain, open countenance.”

‘¢ And was he good to you, grandy? and did he give
you food, and Wolfgang also ?” asked little Amy, with
much interest.

“Yes, my little puss; he gave us food and shelter,
and a hearty welcome; and his wife was as kind as he
was. But if I tell you all that they said, and all that
they did, I shall not get to my life m the Prairie for
many evenings to come.”

“Oh, so much the better,” exclaimed Charley, and
he even clapped his hands, like a child, ashe was. “ The
longer your story is, the better we shall like it.”

“ But I fear my elder children might not agree with
you,” said the grandfather, laughing, “so I shall con-
dense this part of my narrative. Suffice it to say that I
found my new friend, James Franklin, and his wife, had
come from Europe some months since, and were pro-
ceeding further west in search of a settlement where
they could take up their abode, and earn a living for
themselves and their two young children, Katie and
Harry.

“Here was an opening forme. I eagerly offered to
accompany them, and work with them in their pro-
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

jected clearing. I vaunted my own strength, and will-
ingness, and skill, and the good people cheerfully
accepted my offer.

“The next day we set out on our journey, leaving
the hut, which had only been. inhabited a few days, to
be a shelter to any wanderer who might require it.

“ Franklin had a strong cart and horse, which con-
veyed all his worldly goods, as well as the two children,
and in which his wife also was frequently obliged to
take her seat while we crossed the forest and the track-
less wilderness.

“ At length we reached the spot which had been
granted to Franklin, and I will not describe all the toil
and difficulty which we encountered before we had a
comfortable home. Time and patience, however, enabled
us to overcome all obstacles, and we dwelt for several
years in peace and tranquillity. I never regretted the
step I had taken in leaving my former home, for I was
then too young and too ignorant to know the value of all
that I had abandoned. Still I had an inquiring mind,
and it was a vast satisfaction to me to find that my new
friend had received a very respectable education, and
had brought with him into the wilderness a number of
useful books, as well as some on religious subjects. He
was indeed a pious, Christian man, and to him and to
his excellent wife I owe more than I have ever been able
to repay. They impressed upon my mind all the in-
struction which I had received in childhood, and they
taught me to love the faith which made them what
tney were.

“ So time fled by. Our fields became fruitful, and
our dwelling was enlarged and improved. The children
grew, and were as joyous as the birds that sang in the
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

tall trees around the clearing, and they were as lovely
and graceful too. Another little girl, who was named
Eustacia, after me, was added to the family, and we were
considered the happiest and most prosperous settlers in
all the district.

“We had some neighbours, but they were very
distant; and we seldom met, except occasionally to
transact some business of sale or barter. There were
also—far away across the Western Prairie—some lodges
of Indians, who sometimes visited us for the same
purpose, and from whom I acquired a certain know-
ledge of the native language, which sounded very
sweet from the lips of some of the graceful young
squaws.

“But I see,” said Mr. Hustace, suddenly interrupting
his narrative, “that it is time to break up our sitting.
Good night, Amy; your eyelids are dropping, in spite
of all your efforts to keep awake. You shall come with
me to the prairie to-morrow evening.”

Il.

Vury ready were the young people to take their places,
and equally willing was their kind grandfather to
gratify them.

“T told you,” he said, “that we would go to the
prairie this evening; but I must first tell you what it
was that broke up our quiet life in the clearing, and
sent me to seek another and still wilder home.

“Our house was built on a piece of ground sloping
towards the south. On that side the clearing had been
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

carried to some distance, and the land was tilled, and
had already made a good return for the labour which
we had expended upon it. But around the other sides
of our dwelling the forest remained in its natural state.
It was not very dense; but was composed of scattered
trees, and patches of prairie grass, some of which was
five or six feet high. The same kind of wilderness ex-
tended all round our clearing, for we had not been able
to cut down the trees, except upon the land we culti-
vated.

“Tt was the height of summer, and our crops were
ripe and dry—the prairie grass was in flower, and
waving in the breeze that blew from the east—even the
very trees seemed parched and dried up.

“Franklin and L were shooting behind the house,
and as he fired at a large squirrel near the foot of a tree,

‘some sparks fell among the withered grass, which
instantly ignited. We rushed to trample it out, if
possible, for we both saw the danger which threatened
us; but our efforts were useless. The flames spread
before the wind, and rapidly approached our dwelling,
which was entirely constructed of wood.

“One moment Franklin looked at me in agony, then
he darted towards the house, calling me to follow him.
Already the crackling and roaring of the flames was
audible, and showed how rapidly the work of destruc-
tion was going on. We reached the dwelling, which we
had no hope of saving, and, with a few hasty words,
Franklin made his wife aware of the peril to which she
and her children were exposed.

“She met the shock bravely ; she neither screamed
nor fainted ; but she instantly took the three children
to a distance from the house, and placed them in an
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

open spot inthe garden; and then she directed me what
to carry from the dwelling to the same place, while her
husband hastily harnessed the horse to the cart, and
brought him round.

“We loaded the cart, and set the children on the
bundles of clothes and bedding which we had secured,
and then we all waited in breathless expectation of the
coming peril, the intelligent Wolfgang panting by my
side. The wind might possibly, we thought, drive the
flames across our clearing and behind the house, which,
in that case, might escape; and very fervently we
prayed that God would so rule the elements for our
preservation. But such was not His will, The tall
grass and the trees were all in a blaze, and the advanc-
ing roar was fearful. Flakes of fire soon fell on the
thatched roof of our log-house, and the flames sprang
up high towards heaven.

“No hope remained of saving anything more except
our lives, and to that object we now turned all our
thoughts. The cries and sobs of the children which
broke forth lamentably when they saw their home
become a mass of fire, were very sad, and added much
to the distress of Mary Franklin. But now, in this
hour of heavy trial, I saw the worth of true religion,
and a firm trust in the goodness and the power of God.
No murmur escaped the lips of either Franklin or his
wife; no allusion to second causes as the origin of their
calamity was made.

“Tt is the Lord! seemed to be the only feeling of
their hearts ; and to His will they submitted, while they
used every means in their power to avert the still
greater evil which threatened them.

“ >»

MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE,

exclaimed Mary, ‘I will still bless the Lord for His
goodness!’

“¢He never failed those who trusted in Him, Mary,’
replied her husband, ‘and He never will. We must
leave our home to the flames, and hasten across the belt
of trees to the west before the flames have reached them.
You know there is open country beyond. There we
may yet be safe.’

“Time pressed; the cart was set in motion, and
Franklin kept hold of the horse’s head, for the animal
was now much terrified and excited. The western belt
of forest was nota wide one, and we made our way
through it in breathless haste, for the fire was pursuing
us. Already it was encircling our little clearing, and
we could see the flames between the stems of the trees
as we cast anxious glances behind. It was, indeed, a
race forlife. Not a word was spoken; even the children
ceased to cry, and only hid their faces and sobbed.

“ But there was not silence. Above the increasing
roar of the flames was heard the crashing of falling
boughs, the screams of the affrighted birds, and the
eries of the wild animals that were roused from their
lairs, and now came rushing past our little cavalcade.
We envied them their power of speed.”

“ And whatdid you do? Oh, what did you all do?”
exclaimed little Amy, grasping her grandfather’s knees,
and looking up into his face with eager, tearful eyes.
“ Did you save those three little children ?”

“You shall hear, dear Pussy. God was very good
tous. We passed through the belt of forest and got
out upon the open plain—the prairie. We looked back
and saw the flames shooting up above the loftiest trees,
while clouds of thick smoke came rolling over the sum-
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

mits, and showers of sparks were driven before the wind,
which had now increased to a gale.

“ We looked before us, and there stretched a bound-
less plain. But what was our horror at seeing that at
about sixty yards from the forest the prairie was covered
with a thick growth of tall grass, which waved in the
breeze, and was evidently as dry as tinder.

“'T'o remain where we were was to be suffocated by
the rapidly approaching smoke and flame, and yet to
proceed seemed hopeless; for we well knew that the
grass would be quickly ignited, and then an awful death
awaited us. Truly, 1 felt, as I know my friends did,
that there was ‘but a step between us and death,’ and
that none could save but One.

““We pressed on in silence. A herd of wild buffaloes
dashed past us, and trod down the tall grass, leaving a
broad path for us to follow. Again and again the fugi-
tives from the forest rushed by at full speed, leaving us
to toil laboriously after them.

“The flames burst forth from the trees, and the
prairie was on fire! What hoperemained? We looked
up at the blackened sky, and heaven itself seemed to be
shut out. But the Lord’s eye was piercing the deadly
cloud, and the Lord’s loving care was providing for us
a way of escape.

* Another headlong rush of animals—elks, buffaloes,
and antelopes—bounded by, nearly upsetting the cart
and jostling us all violently; and then was heard the
trampling of a troop of horses, and we expected to be
inevitably crushed beneath their hoofs.

“We glanced round to see if we could turn out of
their track, when we saw that each horse bore an
Indian, and that they were flying before the flames.


MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

We drew up, and we raised our voices in a loud cry te
attract their attention. Some of the troop passed by,
unheeding our distress; but all were not thus hard-
hearted. One, who seemed to be the chief, and who
brought up the rear of the flying band with a few
women, and two or three distinguished-looking warriors,
paused when he beheld us.

“Quick as thought he rode up to Mary Franklin,
and bent down to lift her on his powerful horse.

“¢Save my children,’ she cried, as she pointed to-
wards the cart, and attempted to rush to her little ones.
But the Indian raised her from the ground, and placed
her before him, while he gave rapid orders to those
around him. The females snatched the children, who
were now shrieking with terror, and bore them away
at a furious gallop. The Sagamore followed; and
Franklin and I were also taken up behind two of the
dark-skinned warriors. Another caught the rein of our
terrified horse, and led him at the same wild pace across
the prairie, with the lightened caré rattling at his heels
and urging him to a still more frantic speed.”

“That was a real good race,” exclaimed Charley,
looking very much as if he would have liked to take
part in it.

“Tf you had been there, Charley, I doubt whether
you would have thought it ‘a good race.’ It was an
awful crisis; and I shall never forget it. The smoke
at times almost blinded us, and we could see that the
roaring hissing flames were travelling at least as fast as
the fleet horses could carry us. How long they could
keep up their speed, and when the struggle for life
would be ended, we could not tell.

“ Hven in the excitement of that moment I could not
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

forget my faithful dog. He followed close behind me
gasping for breath, but lifting his head at every call that
T made to him, and making still more desperate efforts
to overtake us.

“Tpelieve the race had been one of many miles in
length; and the strength of some of the horses seemed
to be failing. The blinding effect of the smoke that
filled the air, the heavy, choking smell of the burnt
grass and trees, and the lurid glare of the red flames
that were speeding at our heels, were almost over-
powering, both to ourselves and our steeds; and still
we were far from a range of low hills that bounded the
plain, and where alone we could hope for safety and
rest.

“T was looking anxiously forward, endeavouring to
ascertain how poor Mary Franklin and her young chil-
dren endured the desperate race, when I was struck by
a black portentous gloom that extended along the
western horizon in front of us, and now almost hid the
range of mountains towards which we were fleeing. I
gazed at this strange, dark mist, and at its base I saw a
line of fire that quivered and played, and threw up
bright tongues of flame into the overhanging cloud.

“TI caught the arm of the Indian behind whom I
rode, and I pointed eagerly forward at the fearful sight,
exclaiming, ‘ Look there !’

“¢Qur brothers have done well,’ he replied to my
sign, and inquiring exclamation. ‘They have fired the
prairie.’

“Done well! Fired the prairie, I cried in despair.

Then we are between two fires, and all hope is gone.’

“ A low chuckling laugh escaped from the Indian,

and then he said in a calm voice, ‘Does not the pale-
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

face know that one fire is flying before the other, and
leaving behind it a desert that cannot burn? There
we shall be safe.’

“Then I remembered what I had heard of these
sagacious savages—that when they see a conflagration
coming towards them, and have no means of escaping
and saving their property, they will sometimes set fire
to the grass to the leeward of their camp, trusting that
the wind will drive it away, and all the combustible
vegetation will be consumed before the coming fire
reaches them. Thus the approaching flames die out for
want of fuel, and the Indians move forward on the hot
ashes of the fire which they themselves have kindled,
and which has been the means of their preservation.”

“Oh, how very clever!’ exclaimed Alice. ‘And
had the Indians really done so ? and were you saved by
that cunning contrivance? Dear grandpapa, we are all
very much obliged to the savages.”

“T.assure you, my dear girl, I felt extremely grate-
ful to them when at length we galloped out of the
wilderness of lofty grass and weeds, and found ourselves
on a clear open space, covered indeed with smouldering
herbage, but out of reach of the two fires that were
advancing and receding on either side.

“There were many huts, or wigwams of the natives,
on this space ; and the whole tribe were busily engaged
in removing their horses and other valuables to a safe
distance from the borders of the unconsumed grass.

“They had no time to lose, for the flames followed
rapidly on our steps; and before we had had time to
recover our breath, and to congratulate one another on
our providential escapefrom a fearful death, the whole
plain that we had traversed was a sheet of fire.
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE,

“The intense heat of the sun above our heads, of
the ground beneath our feet, and of the flames that
roared around us, and seemed to be striving to over-
take us, was really overpowering. But we were safe—
the fire could not reach us, and we gladly sought
shelter in a wigwam which was given to us by order of
the Sagamore. There our first act was to offer our
humble and hearty thanks to the Lord who had thus
graciously preserved us; and then Franklin and I left
the exhausted mother and her children to rest, while
we went to make inquiries as to the tribe among whom
we had fallen, and also as to our prospect of returning
to the spot which we had left so unwillingly, or to any
other place inhabited by white men.”

tte

“We found that our Indian friends were a branch of a
tribe called the Crees, who were on very amicable terms
with the white settlers in their neighbourhood ; and we
soon recognized some among them as the very individuals
who had occasionally visited our home in the forest, and
had carried on little mercantile transactions with the
Franklins.

The encampment where we had now found them
had been their summer residence for several years ; and
their favourite hunting grounds were in the neighbour-
ing plains and hills. On these grounds, which they
looked upon as their own territory, the Apache Indians
had several times encroached, and there was now open
war between the rival tribes. The Apaches were
located in the forest to the north-east—above the spot
“HY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

where our now ruined dwelling was situated—and they
would undoubtedly soon visit the place, and carry off
everything which the flames had spared, more especially
as they knew that the settlers had been on friendly
terms with their enemies the Crees. It was therefore
useless to think of returning to our desolated home; and
Franklin resolved to give up all idea of farming, and go
back to Toronto, where he hoped to be able to maintain
his family in some other way.”

“ And did he succeed, grandy ?” asked Alice; “ and
did you leave the prairie and go with him P”

“One question at a time, Alice,” replied Mr. Hustace,
laughing. ‘Tam happy to say that my good friend did
succeed in time; and I heard of his prosperity many
years afterwards. To your other query I reply in the
negative. I did not go to Toronto—as you shall hear.”

“Oh, I am so glad of that,” exclaimed Charley, “ for
then we shall hear more about the Indians!”

“My life in the prairie did not end with the burning
of our log-house. Indeed the wildest and most adven-
turous part of it only then commenced.

“Tt would not have been safe for the Franklins to
leave the protection of the Crees at that time, for if
they had attempted to travel in the direction which they
desired, they would in all probability have fallen into
the hands of the Apaches. It was therefore arranged
that we should accept their hospitality for a time, and
remain with them, at least until they broke up their
camp and moved further to the west.

“To this arrangement Mary Franklin very readily
agreed. She was weary and exhausted, and perfect
rest seemed necessary for her, and for the children
likewise. They met with the greatest kindness from


MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

all the Indian women, especially from Mahala, the
favourite wife of Squantv, the Sagamore or chief.

«The generous and grateful conduct of this uncivi-
lized woman was a proof of the truth of the old saying,
that no act of kindness ever falls fruitlessly to the ground.
One of her sons—Lincoya by name—had, about a year
ago, come to our dwelling with a bad wound in his leg,
which he had himself inflicted with his hatchet while
cutting a pole in the neighbouring forest. Mrs. Frank-
lin had dressed and bound up the wound, and given the
Tndian lad every assistance and refreshment that were
in her power to bestow. Lincoya had then left her with
few words of thanks—for the Indians are a very laconic
race—and the circumstance had nearly passed from her
mind.

“ But it had not been forgotten by the boy or by his
mother, to whom he had spoken of the white lady’s
gentle kindness; and now Mahala felt that she could
not do enough to show her gratitude; and Lincoya was
equally willing to do all in his power to render our stay
in his father’s camp agreeable.

“ Brom him I learnt that the Sagamore had been on
a hunting expedition into the forest beyond our clearing,
accompanied by several of his chief warriors and most
- successful hunters, and also by Mahala and a few other
women of the tribe, on the day of the awful fire. He
had likewise been reconnoitring the position of the
hostile Apaches; and, under the pretence of merely
seeking for game, he had contrived to ascertain theix
numbers and the nature of their position with consider-
able accuracy.

“He had been absent from the wigwams for five
days, and on the day appointed for his return, Lincoya


M\ LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

went with some of the young hunters to try their skill,
both with guns and bows and arrows, on the game that
abounded on the sides of the range of hills which I have
mentioned. They mounted these hills to a considerable
height, and then turned to meet the wild animals
and birds that were leaving the jungle of grass and
bushes on the plain, to seek their food on the mountains.

“To their dismay they saw fire and smoke bursting
up from the forest on the other side of the plain. It
was evidently many miles from their village, but the
wind came from that quarter, and they well knew how
rapidly the flames would spread before it; and they
also knew that their friends in the wigwams would
not perceive the fire until perhaps escape would be
impossible.

“*T thought of my parents,’ said Lincoya, ‘and I
trusted that Mahneto (the good spirit) would protect
them; and I knew that my father was wise, and that
his horses were fleet. And I thought of you, and your
white friends, and the little pale-faced babies, and I
wished that I could save you. But that was impossible;
so I tried to forget you, and to think only of saving my
own people.’

“Then Lincoya went on to tell me how he and his
companions left their game, and even dropped their
weapons, and ran with the speed of antelopes down the
hill, and across the plain, often through grass and
tangled weeds and bushes that impeded their progress.

“At length they reached the camp; and, without
pausing to explain their object, they snatched burning
brands from the nearest hut, and set fire to the dry
grass to leeward.

“Soon no explanation was needed, for the smoke
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

and flame were advancing, and several wild animals
came bounding from the burning forest.

“The Indians immediately commenced the removal
of their goods beyond the reach of the coming fire;
and as I have already told you, my children, we found
them thus engaged when we burst at full speed into the
encampment.

“**T little expected,’ said Lincoya, ‘to see the white
settlers, who had been so good to me, thus saved by my
people; but so Mahneto watches over those who are
kind to his red children.’ ”

“Does Mahneto mean God ?” asked Amy, reverently.

“ Mahneto is the name which the Indians give to the
Great Spirit, who they believe to have made all men,
and to take care of all, more especially of the red men,
whom they call his children. They have a great fear of
offending Mahneto; and they hope to go into his presence
when they die; but they also both fear and reverence
the evil spirit, whom they call Hobbamock, and to whom
they make offerings, and even among the more savage
tribes, sacrifice the prisoners whom they have taken in
battle.”

“How dreadful, grandpapa!” exclaimed Amy. “I
do not like to think of such cruelty, so pray go on and
tell us of the kind Mahala and Lincoya.”

“They were indeed very kind to us, and so was the
Sagamore, Squanto; and therefore all the tribe acted
towards us in a friendly manner for fear of offending
their chief; but I often fancied that some of the warriors
regarded us with jealousy and susnicion, and in their
hearts resented our intimacy with Squanto and his
family, and the evident respect which he paid to the
white strangers.


MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“We remained with our new friends for a few
weeks, during which time Franklin and I accompanied
the chief on several hunting expeditions, both to the
hills and to the forest. Once we went in the direction
of our old home, and we rode through the belt of burnt
and blackened trees, which looked like melancholy
ghosts of their former beautiful selves. Many of them
had fallen to the ground, and lay across our pathway,
but the active Indian horses on which we were mounted
carried us over the prostrate stems in a manner that
quite delighted me, though it put my horsemanship to
the proof.”

“What glorious fun!” exclaimed Charley. “TI
wish I could have just such a ride.”

“You had better emigrate to America, and become
a settler in the backwoods,” said Mrs. Eustace,
smiling. “But I fancy, Charley, that you would
soon tire of the rough life, and long for your English
home, notwithstanding the charms of being burnt
out of a log-hut, and having charred *rees to leap
over.”

Charley laughed, but made no reply, and his grand-
father proceeded—

“The Sagamore praised my skill in the management
of my steed, and that gave me confidence. I rode by
him and my friend Franklin and Lincoya, and we soon
came to our once fertile enclosure. All was bare and
wasted. The fire had scorched up every particle of
vegetation. A few blackened logs and stones alone
told where the house had stood, and all around was
atter desolation !

“Franklin surveyed the ruin with a sad, but calm
expression, and then he turned away; and I saw that his


MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE,

eyes were lifted up to heaven with a look of so much
pious resignation as I shall never forget.

“We passed by the tree, at the foot of which the
squirrel had stood when Franklin fired the fatal shot
which had wrought such wide destruction.

“He pointed to the spot, and turning to me, he
said gravely, ‘“ Behold, how greata fire a little spark
kindleth.” Never forget that sentence, my dear Edgar,
nor the application which the Apostle makes of it.
This fruitful land become a desert may be a useful
lesson to you through life in things spiritual as well as
temporal.’

“On we rode to the place where Squanto had sent
some of his hunters forward at break of day to drive in
the game from the thick forest to a small open glade.
There we now saw several buffaloes, and some deer of
various kinds and sizes, besides many smaller animals.
Great was our excitement at the goodly spectacle. I
had never beheld such a sight before, and all the natu-
ral love of destruction which seems to belong to man-
kind was stirred up in my breast. I longed to kill one
of those noble creatures with my own hand.”

“T should think you did, grandfather,” said Charley,
decidedly ; “‘and I hope you accomplished it.”

“Well, my boy, I did my best certainly, but I was
very nearly killed myself.”

“ But not guite, erandy,” said little Amy, with a
playful glance at her grandfather.

“Not quite, my little Pussy ; but you shall hear how
T escaped, and lived to tell you my story. I carried a
gun, and also a light spear, and most of the hunters
were armed in a similar manner though some had also
bows and arrows.






















ANY













IMHIMIPER Se!







. '
“© BEHOLD HOW GREAT A FIRE A LITTLE SPARK KINDLETH.”
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“ The signal was given, and we all rode at a gallop
towards the herd of animals, that now saw their danger,
and tried to escape towards the forest. But the Indian
beaters met them, and generally succeeded in turning
them back, although several dashed past the red men,
or knocked them on the ground, and bounded over them.
Thad fixed my eyes, and my heart too, on a splendid
elk, with wide branching horns, which I thought would
be a grand trophy to bear away. I rode towards him,
accompanied by Lincoya, who knew my want cf expe-
rience in this kind of hunting, and kindly kept near me.

“The elk saw our rapid approach, and he stood a
moment at bay, pawing the ground with his hoofs.
‘Now fire! cried Lincoya; ‘send a ball into his fore-
heaid.’ I attempted to do so, but my aim was imperfect,
or my hand unsteady, and I only wounded the powerful
creature in the shoulder. With a wild ery of rage and
pain, he dashed towards us.

“* Poise your spear,’ shouted Lincoya, and, grasping
his own, he held it aloft, ready for action. I did not
lose my presence of mind; my spear was ready to meet
the infuriated animal, and, as he came within reach, 1
plunged it into his neck. It broke off short in the
wound, and scarcely checked the creature’s speed.
Heavily he came against my horse’s chest and shoulder,
and rolled him and his rider on the ground. One
moment the elk drew back to prepare for the fatal rush
which would inevitably have finished my earthly career.
Isaw the red and fiery eyes glaring at me, and the
strong horns aimed at my defenceless person, as I lay
partly under my fallen, struggling steed, without any
power of moving.

“Tn that extremity, I am thankful to say, I remem-
*

MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIS.

bered that there was One above who could, even then,
help me, and a fervent ejaculation escaped my lips.

“Tt was heard and answered. The brave and active
Lincoya was ready, and as the savage brute paused to
draw one breath, he drove his spear deep into the back
of his neck, close to the head, and he fell dead on the
ground beside me.

“J was soon released from my painful position, and
proceeded to pour forth my thanks to my preserver.
But the Indian checked me with a smile, and only
replied, ‘The pale-face will be a hunter yet. He had
better remain with us, and become a Cree.’

“T looked at the manly youth, and I felt that I
sympathized in his suggestion. It seemed to me a
happy and a noble life, to roam the forests and the
plains in perfect freedom, and to be a skilful hunter, and
a brave warrior.

“TJ did not, however, express my thoughts; I only
returned his kindly smile, and remounting my horse,
we rode to the other hunters. Much game had been
secured, and was now being placed on the backs of
some horses which had been brought for the purpose.
The skin and head of my elk were taken, and the horns,
which I had so greatly coveted, were presented to me
by the Sagamore, with a few words of approbation which
made my heart bound with joy and pride.

“You have seen those horns, Amy. They are the
very ones that now hang over the chimney-piece in
your father’s study. I gave them to Franklin when we
parted, and he promised to preserve them and restore
them to me if we ever met again. He kept his word,
and they remain as a memorial of my sport, my danger,
and my merciful preservation.”
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“Dear grandpapa, that is delightful!” exclaimed
Alice. “I have always admired those noble horns;
and now I shall almost love them. They will remind
me so much of that day’s hunting, and of all your
adventures among the Indians.”

Here Mrs. Eustace interrupted the narrative, which
she declared had proved so interesting to herself, as
well as to the children, that it had caused her to forget
time.

So the party broke up, to meet again the following
evening.

IY.

“T ronp you, my dear children,” said old Mr. Eustace,
“that as much of our game as was considered worth
carrying away to the camp, was packed upon spare
horses. These were sent off to the wigwams, and we
rode round by another way—not now so much in
pursuit of game, as that the Sagamore might observe
whether his enemies, the Apaches, had left their encamp-
ment; and, if so, in what direction they had gone.

“When we drew near to the place where their huts
had been erected, Squanto desired the whole party to
remain still and silent among the thick trees, while he
and his son, and two or three experienced warriors, rode
on to reconnoitre. They found the camping-ground
deserted, and Lincoya immediately returned to summon
us all to the spot, when a search was commenced by the
sagacious Indians for any traces by which they could
discover the way their enemies had taken.

“They were not long in finding the trail of the
MY LIFE iN THE PRAIRIE.

Apaches, although they had evidently tried to obliterate
all footmarks, both of men and horses, to a considerable
distance from the camp.

“ Franklin and I fancied that the countenance of the
chief did not express unmixed satisfaction, when he
ascertained that the Apaches had taken a north-westerly
course, and were probably skirting the open prairie in
the concealment of the forest boundary, intending to
take possession of a well-known hunting-ground beyond
the hills which we have already alluded to, and which
the Crees claimed as their own possession, and made
their usual quarters for the autumn and winter.

“This ground had already been contested more than
once by the rival tribes; and, as Lincoya informed me,
with varying success. Once the Crees had been com-
pelled to relinquish it to their foes, and this had added
bitterness to their enmity, though it had raised their
opinion of the skill and prowess of the Apaches.

“The Sagamore did not confess to any uneasiness.
He only said, with the usual Indian grunt—‘ Ugh!’—
‘Then we shall meet them beyond the hills. My
braves will repay them for the insult they offered to the
Crees.’

“He scarcely spoke another word during all our
long ride back to the camp. He was evidently in deep
thought; no doubt concocting plans, and devising
stratagems for the defeat of the Apaches.

“Franklin also was silent. He was, as he after-
wards told me, reflecting on his own present position,
and the perils to which his wife and children might
be exposed; and he was endeavouring to form some
plan for removing them to a place of safety and civili-
zation.
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE,

“Tn all his schemes my good and true friend included
me as part of his family. I believe he felt towards me
the affection of a father, or rather of an elder brother,
and his wife was to me as a kind and gentle sister.

“On our return to the camp, a council of the elders
of the tribe was held, to deliberate on the measures that
should be pursued.

“In the centre of the eamp there were two lodges
or huts of a larger size and more imposing appearance
than the rest. One of these was the residence of the
Sagamore, and the other was the council-chamber of the
tribe. In front of the latter was placed the Totem, ox
standard— being the distinctive badge of each tribe.
The Totem was a long staft, decorated with many gay-
coloured feathers; and in time of war it was the privi-
lege of the most distinguished warrior to carry it.

“The Calumet, or pipe of peace, was also placed
near the entrance of the palaver-house, or council-lodge.
This was a pipe with a tube of from four to six feet in
length, and a bowl of red or white marble neatly carved.
The tube was painted with the figures of different
animals—as the jaguar, the ellx, the buffalo, or the
antelope—each tribe selecting its own patron animal.
It was also adorned with hair, porcupines’ quills, and
gay birds. This pipe was deemed sacred. The Indians
considered it as a gift from the Sun to their favoured
race, and it was never allowed to touch the ground lest
it should be defiled. He who had the honour of bearing
it was also looked upon as sacred ; and, like the heralds
among civilized nations, his person was inviolable.

To the hut thus consecrated by the presence of these
sacred articles, the chief and his elder warriors repaired,
and. after a long palaver, we found that they had decided
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

on an immediate departure from the plain, and an
attempt to occupy the contested hunting-ground before
the Apaches could reach it by the more circuitous route
which they had taken.

“No time was to be lost; and orders were given for
the huts being instantly taken down, and the more
portable parts of them, with the scanty furniture
which they contained, being packed on the baggage-
horses.

“Tt seemed to be regarded by the chief and his family
as a matter of course that the white strangers should
remain under their protection, and share their dangers
or their safety. But Franklin would not hear of this.
He was resolved to take his wife and children to
Toronto, and the Crees were going to travel in a nearly
opposite direction, and would be exposed to dangers
and privations to which the ‘ white lady’ must not be
subjected.

“The fact of the Apaches having left the eastern
forest, rendered it safe for Franklin to bend his steps
towards the rising sun. He therefore declared his
resolution to Squanto, and at the same time expressed
his lively gratitude for the kindness and hospitality
which he and his family had experienced.

“The Sagamore did not urge him to remain with
his tribe; he knew that the Indian life was not suited
to those who had been brought up so differently.

““Go, my brother,’ he said, with true courtesy,
‘the red men have been glad to give you shelter and
rest. But the heart of the white lady is with her own
people, and she would pine in an Indian wigwam. Our
squaws can ride as well as our warriors; and, if danger
comes, they can take up their children and fly to a place
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

of safety. But the pale-faced woman would be terrified
at the sight of the Apache war-paint, and at the sound
of the Apache war-cry. Take her to the dwellings of
the white men.’

“Mahala and the other wives of the chief and his
warriors seemed quite grieved at parting with Mrs.
Franklin and her little children, whose white skins and
rosy cheeks they were never tired of admiring. From
their own scanty store of provisions, they contributed
liberally to the comfort of the strangers, and they
also provided them with buffalo and wolfskins to
shelter the children, and make a bed for them in the
cart.

“Very generously the Sagamore presented Franklin
with a horse, on which he could ride beside the cart,
while Mary and the children sat on the baggage.

“TI watched all these preparations with a beating
heart and a troubled spirit. I felt deeply pained at the
idea of parting with my kind friends, perhaps never
to meet again in this world. But I was perfectly
fascinated with the wild life of my new companions,
and I could not bear to relinquish it, and to go toa
great city, where I saw no prospect of gaining a
maintenance for myself, and yet where I would never
consent te be a burden on the Franklins. They had
friends at Toronto, and means of establishing themselves
respectably. I had none, and also I feared bemg dis-
covered by my relatives, and called to account for the
course I had pursued. I was now eighteen years of
age, and taller and more powerfully made than any of
my Indian associates, who were all rather small and
slender, but muscular and active to the highest degree.
I felt that I was a man, and I longed to take part in the
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

manly occupations of Lincoya and his red brethren. Oh,
my dear children, how often did I afterwards regret the
foolish pride and wilfulness that led me to turn a deaf
ear to all the remonstrances of my friends, and to the
voice of my own conscience, and to choose ignorance
and barbarism rather than submit to the wholesome
restraints of civilized life, with all its many advantages
both temporal and spiritual!

‘‘T have indeed had reason all my life to feel shame
and sorrow for the decision I then made. I have striven
to repair the evil, and to take my position among
cultivated men, but nothing could ever redeem the time
which I wasted in mere bodily exercises.”

“ Dear grandy,” said Alice, timidly taking hold of
Mr, Eustace’s hand, “I wish all the world were as
good, and clever, and agreeable as you are. There is
no one like you!”

“You are partial, Alice, darling,” said her grand-
father, kindly. “ But when you hear what a savage I
became, I fear you will think differently.

“Lincoya knew my wishes, and he begged his father
to plead my cause with the Franklins, and say for me
what I could not find courage to say myself; and as the
Sagamore had taken a great fancy to me, and also saw
the growing attachment between me and his son, he
readily became our spokesman.

“** My brother,’ he said, ‘you are going to leave us,
and may the Great Spirit watch over you wherever you
may turn your steps. You have a wife and little
children—it is well. But why should the young hunter
go with you? He is brave and strong; he will be a
great warrior. The soul of my son Lincoya is knit to
that of Edgar. Let him stay with us.’
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“Then I took courage to declare my determination
to try Indian life, at least for a time; and though Mary
and the children wept at parting from me, and Frank-
lin’s voice shook as he bade me farewell, my resolution
was not shaken.

“ An escort was sent by the Sagamore to attend the
Franklins through the forest, as far as the first white
settlement, after which it was hoped they might
encounter no dangers, and their guards could then
gallop back, and rejoin the tribe, which must necessarily
travel slowly, on account of the heavy baggage.

“ Must I confess that when the cart which contained
my friends was out of sight, and Franklin had waved
his hand to me for the last time, I felt my spirits sink ;
and tears—partly of sorrow, partly of self-reproach—
rose to my eyes. I had compelled Franklin to take all
the money which I possessed, and which could be of no
use to me, and also a few other valuables which might
not be safe in an Indian camp. He only consented to
this arrangement as a loan, but I knew it might be of
great service to him, and so it proved, and well did he
afterwards repay me. g

“Tt was a comfort to me to feel that I had done alll
could to assist him, and had retained nothing but my gun,
and my dog, and my Bible—that never left me,thank God,
in all my wanderings. But still my conscience smote me,
and whispered that I had deserted my friends. If Thad
possessed a horse, I believe I should have galloped
after them. But I was too proud to confess that I
repented, and I only turned aside to hide my feelings.

“¢ he heart of the pale-face is soft,’ said the voice
of Lincoya, as he followed me. ‘My brother must not
weep as women do!’
MY LIFE IN YHE PRAIULIE.

“In a moment I recovered myself, and Lincoya had
never again occasion to taunt me with soft-heartedness.
Alas! I became in time almost as unfeeling as an
Indian!”

YW.

“T vinp, my children,” resumed Mr. Eustace the next
evening, “that I must be more brief in my narrative, ot
I shall be obliged to leave it unfinished. I must only
tell you to-night of the chief events in this period of my
life—for I remained several years with the Crees, and
they were years of much adventure. When I visit you
again, I promise you some more stories.

“The war between my friends and the Apaches, as
it occurred directly after I jomed the former, and com-
menced my Indian life, left a most vivid impression on
my mind, and I will now tell you of it We made
what speed we could toward the debateable ground ;
and, when we were one day’s journey from it, Squanto
took his chief warriors with him, and went forward,
leaving Lincoya to conduct the rest of the cavalcade to
a spot which he had appointed.

“ By the time we reached that spot, which was a
narrow glade well sheltered by trees, the Sagamore
rejoined us. We were informed that the Apaches had
. reached the hunting-ground, and established themselves
comfortably in huts made of boughs cut from the trees
beneath which their camp was formed. They had
travelled without their families, and without baggage,
and had therefore been able to outstrip us in the march.
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

It was evident, Squanto said, that they were prepared
to contest the ground, for they were well armed, and
some of them already wore their war decorations.

“*Fow did the Sagamore obtain all this knowledge?”
I asked of Lincoya. ‘Surely he cannot have entered
the Apache camp!’

“‘Tincoya smiled. ‘My brother has much to learn,’
he said; ‘the red men can see and hear things that the
pale-faces would never find out; but to-morrow you
will be taught what Indians can do. My father allows
me to take you with the war-party that is to go forth at
break of day. My brother will be wary, and very
silent; I know that he is brave.’

“T promised all that was required, and impatiently
waited the coming events. Meanwhile we made a
temporary encampment in the valley, and Squanto
selected the warriors who were to accompany him, and
then appointed to the rest their respective duties as
guards and sentraes of the camp.

“As the first dim rays of light appeared in the
horizon, Lincoya awoke me, and soon the band of
warriors were in motion. We reached the skirts of the
dense forest within which our enemies were concealed,
and immediately the Indians placed themselves in a line,
and followed the chief step by step—the last of the file
carefully obliterating the traces of our feet in the dry
leaves.

“‘Squanto stopped under a wide-spreading tree, and
threw a long leather thong over one of the lower
boughs, which he drew down, with the assistance of
some of his people, until the end nearly touched the
ground. Then, while his warriors held it, he mounted
the hough, and walked as gravely and majestically

i
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

along it as if he were leadiag his braves to battle. The
whole troop followed, the last man being bound in the
thong which drew him up when the bough returned to
its place.

“T found some difficulty in keeping my balance, but
Lincoya assisted me, and we soon reached the stem of
the tree. Silently we all climbed nearly to the summit,
when, to my surprise, I found we were on a sort of
platform, sixty or seventy feet from the ground, and
composed of the wide-spreading horizontal branches,
twined so closely by anas, or creeping vines, that they
formed a natural floor. On these elevated platforms
the Indians sometimes proceed for a considerable dis-
tance without descending to the earth; and, as in the
present instance, they often find them of great service
as watch-towers.

“Slowly and cautiously we followed the Sagamore
in profound silence, until at length he stopped and sat
down cross-legged. We gathered round him, and did
the same, and then I understood why we had been
brought into this singular situation, for Lincoya very
gently drew aside some small boughs and made a sign
to me to look down. I did so, and I beheld the ground
strewed with the forms of sleeping Indians, grouped
around their expiring night-fires.

“The sun had now risen, and soon the camp of the
Apaches was in motion. We could watch their move-
ments, and hear their low guttural voices, as they
prepared their morning meal. Hitherto I had forgotten
that I was unprovided with food, but Lincoya had a
gourd of water and a small bag of parched corn slung

ound his waist, and these he shared with me, as we sat
he live-long day on our lofty perches.”








MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

“ And had you nothing else to eat, grandpapa?”
asked Amy, very compassionately.

“No, my dear, nothing else. The Indians are great
gluttons at times; but, when food is scarce, or they are
on hunting or warlike expeditions, they can subsist on a
very meagre supply. You know I had determined to
become an Indian in my mode of life, and therefore it
was necessary for me to learn how to bear hunger, and
discomfort, and pain, without murmuring.

“So there we sat, and watched our enemies far
beneath us. A council was held about mid-day, which —
broke up with great signs of joy; and then prepara-
tions were made for some expedition, which was
evidently a warlike one, from the examination of
weapons that took place, and the hideous adornments
with which the savages sought to render themselves
more terrible.

“Red, black, and white paint were laid on their
faces, and breasts, and limbs, in the most grotesque
patterns; and the heads of the chief and his principal
warriors were decked with feathers, some being very
fine eagle-plumes, which hung down their backs.

“When all were prepared—bows and quivers on
their backs, muskets and spears in their hands—a war-
dance was performed ; and such was the violence of the
dancers, and so fearful were their cries and shonts, that
they seemed more like demons than men.

“T gazed on the scene with a sort of awe, but my
comrades appeared perfectly cool and indifferent, and
only anxious to ascertain in what direction the war-
party was bound.

“ By signs and sounds which were unintelligible to
me, the Sagamore formed an opinion on this point ; and
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

he told Lincoya in a low whisper that the Apaches were
going towards our old camp on the plain, no doubt
with the intention of intercepting our expected march.

“This discovery seemed to give great satisfaction to
the Crees, and many low grunts were emitted, to
express their approbation of this dividing of the Apache
forces.

“Towards evening, the hostile party set out, and the
Sagamore followed their course on his own elevated
platform, so far as to make sure that it did not move
toward the glen where his friends were concealed.
Then he returned to us, and immediately prepared for
action.

“‘ All our guns were loaded, and slung from our
shoulders; the last morsel of food was eaten, and we
were placed close to the trees by which we were to
descend into the enemies’ camp. Every warrior had a
torch of inflammable wood dipped in resin, and a flint
and steel to ignite it; and all were ready to obey the
signal of their chief.

“We watched the sun go down, and darkness fell
on the Apache camp while we were still in daylight.
A few fires were lighted on the outskirts of the enemies’
camp, where sentries were placed, and then the red-men
lay down to sleep.

“ As soon as all was still, Squanto gave the signal;
and swiftly and silently the whole party descended to
the lowest boughs of the trees, and dropped from them
to the ground, instantly lighting the torches which they
held in their left hands.

“The alarm and the attack were instantaneous.
The Crees were in the very centre of the camp, and the
astonished Apaches knew not from whence they had
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

come. The slaughter was terrible. It sickens me to
think of it now; but at the time I was so much excited,
that I fought like an Indian, and heeded not the blood
Ished. Neither did I heed a wound which I received
in my left arm, and of which I still have the deep scar.

“The Apaches were driven from the ground, leaving
many dead, who were instantly scalped, and the bloody
trophies were hung exultingly to the victors’ girdles
The wounded were carried away, and we could not
follow the fugitives owing to the darkness, but we per-
ceived that they fled in the direction in which the ware
party had gone.

“ Our chief then summoned his warriors around him.
He stood in the middle of the camp, and the light of
the burning torches that were still held by some of the
Crees, fell on his calm features and manly form. He
called over his men, and only one was missing. His
body was found by a heap of slain, but the scalp was
gone—the Apaches had borne away that one trophy.

“Many were wounded—some more severely than I
was; and to each the Sagamore spoke words of praise
and sympathy. It was only when he had performed
this duty, and placed his men in order of march, that
we discovered that he was himself wounded, and was
suffering acute pain from a musket-ball lodged in his
shoulder.

“He would not suffer his son to try to extract it,
but said he would go to the glen, and put himself inte
the hands of the Powow, or medicine-man—I should
rather say, the sorcerer—of the tribe; who, he said,
would also cure my wound.

“We repaired to the glen, and a regular camp was
formed, and huts were built. But the first care of all
MY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

the Crees was to summon the aid of the Powow for
their beloved Sagamore.

“Iwas beside Squanto when the medicine-man was
brought into the tent of green boughs in which he lay
—for the wound was more serious than had been at
first supposed, and the chief was now greatly exhausted.

“The Powow was decked with feathers, and bones,
and shells, and smeared with paint and grease. He was
an awful figure, and his treatment of his patients was as
awful as his appearance. He administered to each of
us a powerful emetic, and then he applied a sort of
blister of hot ashes around the wound of Squanto, to
draws out the ball! My arm he bound up with some
herbs, which were, I believe, very healing. But both
he and the Crees expected more beneficial results from
his incantations than from his outward applications ;
and they were equally shocked and displeased when I
positively refused to take any part in them.

“T retired from the hut, and remained at some dis-
tance; but I could hear the voice of the Powow calling
frantically, first upon Mahneto for aid, and then exor-
cising the Spirit of Evil, who, he said, was interrupting
the progress of the cure.

“Happily for Squanto, one of his braves had
acquired a little skill in surgery from a white settler,
with whom he had been on intimate terms; and, after
the Powow was gone, he obtained the chief’s permission
to practise upon his shoulder. He soon drew forth the
ball, to the surprise and admiration of the beholders ;
but they all declared that he could never have done so
if the Powow had not driven Hobbamock away, and
placed the patient under the beneficent care of Mahneto.

“The Apaches did not return from their fruitless


BIY LIFE IN THE PRAIRIE.

expedition to assail our new camp—probably they con-
sidered the Crees too strong to be driven away. We
occupied the ground until the following spring, when
we moved to the plain, where there was grass for the
horses, and plenty of game for the hunters. Thus we went
on for four summers and four winters—hunting some-
times buffaloes and deer, and sometimes wolves and bears.

“At length I became weary of this life of wild
adventure, and yet of monotony. I could not forget
that I belonged to a civilized race, and I yearned to
return to civilized life.

“We were encamped one summer on the eastern
border of the prairie, and Lincoya and I—attended by
my faithful Wolfgang—rode to a settlement in the
neighbourhood to procure some powder and shot. As
we approached the farm-house, which strongly re-
minded me of my former home, we saw a little giri
gathering wild-flowers. I called to her, but when she
looked up and saw Lincoya, she was alarmed, and would
have run to the house. I, however, intercepted her
course, and dismounting, I spoke to her gently, and
begged she would conduct us to her home.

“She consented, and led us on, casting furtive glances
at my red companion, and curiously inquiring ones at me,
and at my shaggy old follower.

“We entered the house, and the mistress of it
approached me. We both started and gazed eagerly in
each other’s faces.

“ Bertha!” I exclaimed.

“Tt is indeed my brother Edgar!” she cried; ana
instantly we were locked in each other’s arms.

“My sister had, I found, married, and had settled
with her husband and his young sister in that district,
and Providence had thus brought us together.


MY LIFE IN THY PRAIRIE.

“¥ need not tell you that I was at once cured of alll
my love of savage life. Iwentto take leave of my Cree
friends, for many of whom—especially Lincoya and the
chief—I had a sincere regard ; and then I and Wolfgang
joined my sister and her husband, Edward Ferguson.

“We did not long remain in this wilderness. I
found that my step-mother had died, and that her son
Clement was in possession of all my father’s property,
which rightfully belonged to me. We therefore
returned thither; and, as I found Clement a very
different person to what he had formerly been, I allowed
him to retain the estate, on his paying me a certain sum
of money.

“ Do you wish to know the name of the young girl who
led me to her sister-in-law ? It was Nora Ferguson; and
in due time she became Nora Eustace, and my wife.
And there she now sits, smiling at the oft-heard stories of
her old husband. I think that she is tired of them, in
spite of her smiles; so, good-night, my dear grand-
children ; and I hope you will none of you ever be tempied
to trv ‘a Life in the Prairie!”



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{(D.AERIETON DE = SEMIN ee



“100K UP 1HERE,” SAID MRS. LARKIN, POINTING TO THE CEILING, AND JHENI SAW
FOR THE FIRST TIME A LARGE SQUARE TRAP-DCOR.




















































































































































































































































































WILLY AND LUCY.

BY G. E, SARGENT.




——



|

1 vo not think I could have been

much over five years old; and
my sister was certainly under three
years, at the time that my story
must begin.

Ihave not avery distinct recol-
lection of all the circumstances of the event I am about
to record in this chapter; but I have heard the story
mentioned so often by others that I seem to have it all
ready to be written down, just as clearly as though it
had happened only yesterday, instead of fifty years ago.

It took place in a hop-garden in Kent. I mean, our
mother’s sudden illness and death took place there. It
was a fine, bright day, but rather cold, as was to be
expected at that season of the jar, for hop-picking was
B*



i”
WILLY AND LUCY.

nearly over. Our mother was standing at one end of a
long bin, picking the hops off the stalks; Lucy, my
sister, was seated on the ground beside her on a little
stool, and wrapped up in a warm but old and faded
shawl; and I had rambled away with a boy with whom
I had made acquaintance, and was looking for black-
berries in the hedge.

At first I was not so far away from my mother and
sister that I could not see them when I turned my face
that way; indeed, I had been told to keep near to them.
But presently my companion, who was older and bigger
than I, enticed me to the farther side of the hop-garden,
and them into an adjoining field; and there we rambied
about for more than an hour, as I suppose, until I re-
membered the charge my mother had given me. Then
ran back as fast as I could. Iwas not afraid of my
mother’s anger, but I knew she would be concerned at
my long absence.

When I got back to my mother’s bin she was uot
there, neither was my little sister. I did not notice
then, but I remembered afterwards, that there was a
good deal of confusion at that part of the garden, and
that two women who had been in the habit of standing
at the same bin with my mother were absent.

Nobody took any notice of me for a little while; but
presently, when I was staring about and ready to cry, a
young woman, whose name I knew to be Jenny, came
up to me, and took me by the hand.

“Are you looking for your mother, Willy?” she
said, kindly.

“Yes, and imcy. Where are they, please?” Iasked.

“Your mother has been took bad,” she said, “and
has had to be carried to the barn; and Lucy is along
WILLY AND LUCY.

with her. Suppose you stay with me a little while,
Willy.”

“No, Pll go to my mother,” said I. And, snatching
my hand away from Jenny’s, I ran off to the barn.

I may as well explain that Mr. Watson, the farmer,
had fitted up his large barn as a sleeping-place for the
people who came from a distance to pick hops for him.
I dare say there were seventy or eighty im all, includ-
ing children, who rested in that barn every night as long
as Lop-picking lasted. The men and great boys slept
at one end, and the women and children at the other—
a rough sort of a partition having been put up in the
middle of the barn, from side to side.

It was nota very luxurious sleeping-place, of course ;
but it was made as comfortable as possible; and as there
was plenty of clean, sweet straw, besides such bed-
clothes as the hop-pickers brought with them, there was
no cause for complaint.

I ran off to the barn, then, when I heard of my
mother’s having been carried there; and I soon found
my way to the bed on which she had been placed. The
two women whom I had missed were close by—indeed,
one of them was kneeling down and partly supportine
my poor mother in her arms, while the other was dab-
bling her face and hands with water. Little sister Lucy
was on the bed, nestling up to our mother, and erying a
little, as though half frightened.

I was frightened too when I saw my poor mother’s
face, it was so pale and ghastly; her eyes were half
closed; her lips were parted and quite white; her
features were sadly distorted; and her beautiful soft
brown hair was throtyn back, hanging tangled and wet
over the arm of the woman on whom she was reclining.
WILLY AND LUCY.

“What's the matter with mother, please?” I said
to the women.

“Go away, Willy, go away,” said the one who was
wetting my mother’s face. She said this hurriedly, but
not angrily. “Go away, there’s a good little boy, and
take your sister with you; your mother’s in a fit, like;
but she’ll come to presently.”

Idid as Iwas told, taking Lucy by the hand and
drawing her off the bed—that is to say, 1 did not go
quite away out of the barn with my sister, but withdrew
a little way off, and sat down on another bed, silently
watching and listening.

“* She’s terrible bad,” said one of the women.

“She’s getting worser and worser,” the other re-
marked; “I wish the doctor would make haste and
come,” she added.

“She was complaining only yesterday of feeling sc
queer and numby like; but I reckoned it was only with
being cold. Poor dear, how hard she breathes! is she
coming to, do you think, Mary ?”

The woman who was applying the water shook her
head, and whispered something that I did not hear; and
then the other gently laid my mother down, and both
stood silent, watching her. Then other women came
in, and a great deal of whispering passed, until pre-
sently the tramping of a horse outside the barn was
heard.

“ Here’s the doctor!” said one; “but it isn’t much
that he can do, I am afraid.”

It was not much that he could do. He looked
very grave when they took him to my mother’s bed-
side.

“Have you got any brandy here, any of you?” he
WILLY AND LUCY.

said, quickly, as he stooped down, and placed his hand
on my mother’s breast.

Nobody had any brandy. It wasn’t likely they
would have. But one ran and told Mr. Watson, who
was in the hop-garden, that some brandy was wanted
for one of his hop-pickers who was taken very bad ; and
he kindly sent a boy to his house with a message to his
wife, and presently the brandy came. Meanwhile the
doctor had taken out his lancet, and had opened a vein,
but almost without effect.

I will not lengthen this part of my story. I shall
only say that the good doctor was very attentive, and
did all he could to save my poor mother’s life; and that
the women were kind, too, after their fashion. But all
was of no avail—my mother died that evening.

She “came to” a little while before she died. She
was unable to speak, so as to be understood; and she
could not move herself at all, only to roll her head un-
easily on the rough pillow. But by some means she
made it known to her nurses that she wanted Lucy and
me; so we were brought to her, and placed, side by
side, close to her couch.

At first she looked very mournfully towards us, and
big tears rolled down her cheeks, which the good
woman who was attending on her gently wiped away as
fast as they came. But presently a pleasant happy
smile spread over her countenance, and her lips moved
slightly. Then her eyelids gently and slowly closed, so
that I thought she was going to sleep.

Our dear mother was dead.


WILLY AND LUCY.

ie

“ Any what’s to be done with these children ?” A short
stout, red-faced person in a pepper-and-salt coloured
coat said this. I knew him afterwards as the villege
shopkeeper, and also the parish overseer.

Mr. Watson, the farmer, shook hishead. “That
queers me,” he replied.

There were three other persons present. One of
them was the clergyman who had officiated at my poor
mother’s funeral. Another was the parish clerk, who
stood at a humble distance from his superior, with the
white surplice which had been worn at the funeral ser-
vice thrown over hisarm. It had been sciled at the
grave ; and the clerk was taking it home to be washed,
ready for the next Sunday. The third person was the
village carpenter, who had made my mother’s coffin, and
furnished the shabby, threadbare pall which was past
being used excepting at paupers’ funerals. The con-
versation was held at the churchyard gate, and I heard
it, because the men talked loud, and I stood not very
far off, holding on by one of her hands to Mary, the
woman who had attended my mother on her death-bed,
and who, with the other hand, was leading my little
sister Lucy. We could not leave the churchyard be-
cause the clergyman and the rest were stopping the
way.

“Have you no idea where the poor creature came
from, Mr. Watson ?” the clergyman asked.

“She came from London, that’s all I know,” said
Mr. Watson; “and I don’t know that for certain, only
that she said so when I took her on for the hop-picking,
WILLY AND LUCY.

and the boy there”—pointing to me—‘ says so too.
That’s all I know about the poor woman.”

“And do none of your other people know anything
of her?” said the clergyman.

“Not a word, sir. I have been asking them all
round, and nobody knew her. She has not even men-
tioned her name to any one all the hopping time. She
came by herself and the two children, the second day
of picking, and begged to be taken on, saying she had
had a long tramp from London after work; and should
be broken down if she had to go further. So I did
take her on, and there’s the end on’t.”

“And the boy—have you asked the boy any ques-
tions P”

“ots,” said the farmer; and so indeed he had;
“but, bless your heart, sir, look at him. A little shaver
like that! What’s to be expected that he could say ?
All he knows is that London was his last home, but that
he hadn’t lived there long; but where he came from
before, goodness knows, the boy doesn’t.” The farmer
said this with some vexation, I thought.

“He knows his own and his mother’s name, per
haps?” interposed the overseer.

“Not a bit of it, Mr. Chivers; nothing beyond that
his name is Willy, and his sister’s is Lucy, and that hig
mother was his mother; and you can’t make much out
of that, I think,” said the farmer.

“ Has he got never a father, do you think, Mr. Wat-
son?”
a step or two forward to ask the question, and then fall.
ing quickly back again.

chimed in the parish clerk submissively, making

“Tis a wise son that knows his own father,”
said Mr. Watson, halflaughing; “but this boy
WILLY AND LUCY.

doesn’t know that he ever had one. So he
says.”

“°Tis a hackard job,” said Mr. Chivers, the over-
seer (he meant “an awkward job,” but it amounted to
the same thing), “’tis a hackard job; hadn’t the
woman’s clothes any marks on ’em? or, wasn’t there
anything about her, to tell of her name and settlement ?”

“Not a shred; so my wife says. Her gown is a
common print, and one of the commonest patterns
going. There’s marks on her under-clothing to be sure,
and very good fine stuff they are made of—so my wife
says—though thin and pretty well worn out. And her
shoes—bless you, worn out they are too, though they
may have been good ’uns in their time. Howsoever,
my wife has had the clothes and all washed and cleaned
up, and laid ’em aside, in case anybody should turn up
to claim ’em.”

“But the marks, Mr. Watson; you said some of the
garments were marked,” said the clergyman.

“With an M and an N, sir” (the farmer said a Hem
anda Hen) ; “but bless your heart, Mr. Merton, what’s a
Hem anda Hen. Them letters mayn’t stand for more
on them clothes than they doin the Church Cathechiz.”

“No, no, the marks on the clothing mean something
more than that. The poor woman’s name doubtless
began with those letters; Mary, for instance, or Mar-
garet, or Maria, or Martha, for the first letter; and
Norris, or Nugent, or Needham ——”

“Or Nobody, or Nothing,” said Mr. Chivers, in a
dissatisfied tone, interrupting his minister. “I beg your
pardon, Mr. Merton,” he said, “ but you may make lots
of names out of them two letters, and not one of them the
right one.”


WILLY AND LUCY.

“Very true, friend,” said the gentleman, quietly,
“but they will do to hang an advertisement upon, if the
parish sees fit to advertise. But was nothing found or
the poor woman’s person? Had she nothing with he.
except the clothes she had on, Mr. Watson ?”

° There was a plain wedding-ring on her finger, sir,
and a pocket-comb and a silver thimble, and a, little
housewife, and a shilling or two and a few coppers, and
a bit of sealing-wax in her pocket; also a common hair-
brush and some soap and a towel, along with a change
of under-clothes, in a bundle that she brought with her.
That is all, Mr. Merton.”

“Not much to identify the poor creature and her
children by, certainly; though the housewife might be
recognized perhaps by any one who was in search of the
missing woman. At any rate you have taken care of
these articles, Mr. Watson ?”

“My wife has got ’em all laid up in store, sir,” said
the farmer, “readyto behanded over toanybody the parish
may appoint, when it takes charge of them youngsters.”

“Oh, I don’t know about taking charge,” said the
overseer, hurriedly. “It isn’t settled yet that the
parish has anything to do with ’em.”

“Nonsense, Mr. Chivers,” said the clergyman,
mildly, “the parish must take charge of the poor
orphans until their natural guardians can be found.
There’s no question about that.”

“ And if they never should be found, sir ? which seems
the most likely thing, byall appearance,” said the overseer,
at which the parish clerk nodded his head energetically.

“ Why, then, the parish must continue to take charge
ofthem. Any magistrate will tell you that this is good
Jaw; and any Christian will say that it is good gospel.”


WILLY AND LUCY.

“ Rather hard upon the parish, though, sir,” said Mr.
Chivers, discontentedly; “and I reckon the vestry os
(westry, he said) “won't like it. And I must say, “tis
hagerawating for strange people to be brought into the
parish to die and put us to the expense of burying, and
then leaving brats behind to be took care of. Poors-
rates are high enough already, Mr. Watson, as you know,
without such hextrar pulls.”

“Hush, hush, Mr. Chivers; this is rather uncha-
ritable, isn’t it?” said Mr. Merton, who perhaps saw
that Mr. Watson looked angry. “It may be that the
poor woman's relatives—if she has any, which I dare
say she has—will make some inquiries after her. At
any rate, our duty is plain, as a parish, 1 mean, to pro-
vide, for the present, for this boy and girl. They won’t
be much expense yet awhile.”

“Which puts me in mind,” added the farmer, “that
there’s some money due to the poor woman—leastways
there was—for hop-picking. It isn’t much, for she was
a poorish hand, not much used to such work I reckon,
and she drawed pretty near all she earned, from day to
day ; but whatever balance there is shall be paid over to
Mr. Chivers when ’tis settled what’s to be done.”

“That can’t be settled till a parish meeting has been
called,” said Mr. Chivers, still sulkily.

“But meanwhile, something must be done with these
children,”’ said the clergyman, pointing to my sister and
me. “They have been kindly taken care of by Mr. Wat-
son while their poor mother was unburied; but, of
course, he ought not to be burdened with them any
longer.” ‘

“ As to that, sir, I don’t so much mind their going
back with the woman there to the hop-garden, they
wmLY AND LUCY.

won't be in the way there, and the women folks have
agreed to take care of them as long as the hopping lasts,
and they can sleep in the barn with the women, and my
wife will find them im victuals. But that isn’t to say
we do it because we are obliged, Mr. Chivers ; and as to
taking in people to hop-picking that we know nothing
about, I should like you to tell me how we are to get
our hops picked at all if we didn’t do that.”

“Well, well; what you say is quite true and reason-
able, Mr. Watson,” interposed the clergyman, who
seemed anxious to prevent sharp words between his
parishioners, “and it is very kind of you to offer to
have the poor children looked after for a few days or a
week. Perhaps some inquiries may be made for them
before then. If we could only find out where the poor
woman last came from a

“If you please, sir—if you please, gentlemen.”

It was Mary, the poor woman who had led my
sister and me to the churchyard, that said this. She,
as well as I, had unavoidably heard the conversation I
have recorded, and at that moment stepped forward
and stood before the group, making a profound curtsy
to each and all, not omitting the parish clerk.

“ What is it, my good woman ?” asked Mr. Merton.

“The letter, if you please, sir. The dear soul as
has just been put in the ground——”

“Her body you mean. Well?”

“Yes, sir, she wrote a letter only was a little more
than a week ago. I went and bought a sheet of
writing-paper and a pen, and a penn’orth of ink, at
Mr.. Chiverses shop, as he very well knows, he having
sarved me with the same; and I wouldn’t tell a story,
gentlemen, standmg in this place as I do at this time,


WILLY AND LUCY.

and these precious babes alongside of me, as hasn’t a
mother, poor dears.”

Having delivered herself of this mysterious speech,
my conductress made another series of curtsies, and
wiped her eyes with the corner of her apron.

‘Oh, she wrote a letter, you say. Perhaps some-
thing may come of that, Mr. Watson. What did she do
with the letter when she had written it ?”

“ She folded it up, sir, and iy

“Yes, yes, and directed it and sealed it, I dare say;
and what then?”

“lis the real truth I am telling of you, sir’—
another curtsy—“‘she did them very things as you
say, as true as if you had seen the dear angel a-domg
on ’em.”

“But what became of the letter? What did she do
with it when she had written it?”

“JT took it to Maidstone my own self, and with this
very hand I took it into the shop where the post-office
is kept, and paid a sixpence for carriage; which I did
honest, sir.”

“ It was very kind of you,” said Mr. Merton. “ But
do you know what was in the letter—what it was
about ?”

“No, sir, not if I was to be whipped with scorpions I
eouldn’t tell, sir.”

“We won't put you to that test, my good woman,”
returned the clergyman, who seemed a little impatient
and a good deal amused, “and I suppose you don’t
know to whom the letter was directed ?”

“Not if I was to be whip a

“ But we are not going to do any such thing,” said
the clergyman; “on the other hand, I think you de-




WILLY AND LUCY.

serve to be rewarded for your kindness to the stranger
and her children. But listen now: itis of importance
that we—that is, the parish—should know something
about the friends of the poor woman we have just
buried ; for the sake of these children we are anxious
to know this. Now, if you could but recollect—think
now—didn’t you read the direction on that letter?”

“Dear bless me! I can’t read print, let alone such
scritch-scratch writing, sir,’ said she.

“And you did not show it to anybody, to ask them,
out of pure and simple curiosity, mind, where the letter
was going ?””

“Not if I was—— I beg your pardon, sir, for
saying such a thing; but I didn’t ask anybody, and ’tis
only the truth I am a-saying, sir.”

“Then we shall not get any further with the letter,
I am afraid,” said the clergyman, “unless the post-
master at Maidstone can enlighten us as to the direc-
tion. I am going there to-morrow, and I will ask
him; and then — thank you, good woman, for your

information, and please to accept this” —he put a
shilling into her hand—“for your kindness to the
children.”

“ And take ’em down to the hop-garden, dame, and
take care of ’em there; I’ll see to paying you for loss
of time,” added the farmer.

*« And here’s som’at for you to suck, young uns,”
said the shopkeeper, putting a peppermint lozenge into
my sister’s little hand and mine.

At the same time room was made for us to pass.

In the few days that followed while the hop-picking
lasted, my sister and I were made much of by the poor
nop-pickers. We were carefully watched and sheltered
WILLY AND LUCY.

from the weather through the day, and plentifully fed ;
and at night we were taken care of in the barn.

Then came the last day of hop-picking, and the
removal of the bins, the packing up of the hop-pickers’
bundles, the gathering together of families, the final
settlement of all balances due, and the saying good bye
till another year came round. Some went east and
some west, some north and some south, while my sister
and I remained in the deserted barn.

Not for long, however. Almost as soon as the last
of the hop-pickers had departed, the good-natured
farmer took Lucy and me by the hand, and led us away
to his house, where he left us with Mrs. Watson, who
had previously taken notice of us in the hop-gardens.
She was a little, thin, elderly lady, I remember, with
quick bright eyes and a rather sharp voice, that made
me almost afraid of her. But, in spite of keen eyes
and sharp voice, the farmer’s wife treated us pleasantly,
taking Lucy on her lap, and smoothing down her hair,
while she talked to her and to me.

I have reason to remember that time ; for ib was then
that Iwas parted from my sister. And I may as well
say here as anywhere that Lucy’s pretty face and en-
gaging manners, as a child, had much to do with this
separation. I have spoken of my poor mother’s beauti-
ful soft brown hair. Well, Lucy’s was just like it. Be-
sides this, my sister had gentle, blue eyes, and a pretty
little mouth and chin. She does not wish me to men-
tion these things, I know; but I must tell my story (and
hers) in my own way.

What means had been used after the day of my
mother’s funeral for finding out my mother’s friends, I
can only guess; but it is certain that they had been
WILLY AND LUCY.

ineffectual, and that the time was come for us to “ fall
upon the parish,” in spite of Mr. Chivers’s reluctance
to admit our claim. I suppose there had been a parish
meeting called to decide upon this important question ;
but all I can be quite sure of is, that Mrs. Watson pre-
sently asked my little sister, whom she was fondling, as
Ihave just said, whether she would like to stay and
live with her?

“T want my mother,’ said Lucy, sadly, and lifting
her soft blue eyes, which were swimming with tears, to
the good woman’s face.

“ Pretty little darling,” said the farmer’s wife, sooth-
ingly; “your mother is gone to heaven, and you will
never see her again in this world. But I will be a
mother to you if you will be a good child. You shall
stay with me, and I will take care of you.”

“ And Willy too?” said Lucy.

“ Willy shall come and see you sometimes, child,”
returned Mrs. Watson; “but he is going to live where
there are more little boys.”

“T don’t want to go away from Lucy,” I said.

“But you will have to do it whether you like it or
not,” said the little lady, sharply. “Children are not
to have everything they want. It is a good thing for
you that there is somebody to take care of you.”

I was quite astounded by this sudden change in the
lady’s tone, and began to cry, so did Lucy, which seemed
quite to surprise my sister’s patroness.

“Dear me! What can all this be about? There,
you needn’t cry, child,” she said, giving Lucy a kiss;
“TJ didn’t mean to scold. Dry your eyes, my little man,
and you shall have a cake.”

She gave me a cake, and she gave my sister a cake
WILLY AND LUCY.

too, and we ate them; but mine was seasoned with bitter
anticipations. What were they going to do with me?
and why was I to be separated from Lucy ?

It was almost a relief to me when the good-natured
farmer came back again, and offered to take me for a
walk.

“ Sha’n’t Lucy go too?” I asked.

No, Lucy wasn’t to go. Her little legs were tired.
She might stay and play with the kitten (there was one
in the room); and she should be taken care of while I
was gone. All this and more I was told; and being
obliged to submit, I took the farmer’s big hand, and
trotted away by his side. I remember, however, that
when I had reached the door, and was just going out,
Lucy ran after me, and put her little arm round my
neck, and kissed me two or three times.

Norz, sy Lucy.—I remember that too. Itis strange
that though I cannot recollect anything about my poor
mother and her death, nor about her funeral, I have
a distinct remembrance of the scene in Mrs. Watson’s
little parlour, and of almost all that passed there to the
time of my kissing Willy. Iremember, too, what passed
afterwards, which I will write down here.

The door was no sooner closed on Mr. Watson and
my brother than the little lady (as Willy has written)
rang a silver hand-bell which was on the table. This
brought in a country-looking servant by another door.

“YT want you to bring me a birch-broom, Sally; one
of the new ones out of the store.”

“Laws, missus; what can you be wanting such a
thing for ?” said Sally, opening wide her eyes.

“Do what I tell you, and don’t ask any questions,”
WILLY AND LUCY.

said the mistress, rather angrily; and the servant dis.
appeared. She soon returned, however, bringing with
her the household implement, which Mrs. Watson care-
fully unbound, and from which she selected about half a
dozen long and slender branchy twigs. These she put
together, and tied round at the thickest ends with s
piece of new tape out of her work-basket.







“Laws, missus; if you beant making a Rop!” ex-
claimed Sally, horror-stricken,

“ Wherever there’s a child there ought to be a rod,”
said the lady, calmly ; “and as I have engaged to bring
up this chil v3

“ Poor misfortunate thing! ” ejaculated the servant.


WILLY AND LUCY.

“Hold your tongue, Sally; as lam going to bring
up this child till her friends are found, I mean to do
my duty to her; and if she deserves to be whipped, she
shall be whipped.”

I had a very imperfect understanding of this curious
by-play at the time; but I had wit enough—baby as [
was—to suspect that I was concerned init. Nothing,
however, came of it, at that time at any rate, for the
rod was put away in a cupboard, the broken besom was
removed, Sally disappeared again, and the farmer’s
wife, taking me in her arms, half-smothered me with
kisses.

The history and mystery of the whole affair was, that
kind Mrs. Watson, having no children of her own, and
never having had any, and taking compassion on my
motherless condition, had boldly proposed to her hus-
band to adopt me as her own. My brother attributes
this generous wish to my infantile prettiness, such as it
was at that time; but I think it arose from real kind-
ness of disposition. But whatever was the cause, Mr.
Watson willingly acceded to his wife's proposal; and
that is how I became an inmate of Beechwood farm.

I.

% Hern’s the boy,” said Farmer Watson to an elderly
man in a white smock-frock, who was leaning over a
wooden railing which separated the road from a good-
sized flower-garden, beyond which was a long, low,
rustic-looking house, with whitewashed walls and a high
tiled roof.

* Oh, that’s him, is it, Mr, Watson?” said the man,
WILLY AND LUCY.

moving slowly, and opening a gate for us to enter the
premises. “ Very good, sir,” he added, when this was
accomplished.

“He isn’t a very big fellow, you see,” observed Mr.
Watson.

“No, he isn’t very big,” repeated the man.

“You can make room for him without much trouble,
Mr. Larkin,” said the farmer.

“Yes, Mr. Watson, I can make room for him, and
should have to if he was twice as big, I suppose,” re-
marked Mr. Larkin.

“ Well, then, I’ll give him up to you here.”

“Il take care of him, Mr. Watson,” replied Mr.
Larkin; “but won’t you go in and see the missus,
sir P”

“Not now; 1 am busy. I'll call another time and
see how the boy gets on.”

“ Oh, he'll get on, sir; he’ll be plump as a patrick
(partridge, I believe, he meant) in a week’s time ; you'll
see if he isn’t. We don’t starve ’em in owr house, Mr.
Watson.”

Mr. Larkin did not look as though he were starved,
at all events. He was very plump indeed.

I had not done wondering what this conversation be-
tokened, when Mr, Watson slipped out at the gate and
disappeared, and Mr. Larkin told me to follow him into
the house.

Mr. Larkin led the way first into a large hall or pas-
sage into which some doors opened, right and lett.
Opening one of these, he ushered me into a neat car.
peted parlour.

“Here, missus ; here’s the boy,” he said, and moving
his stout frame on one side, I had a full view of a most
WILLY AND LUCY.

extraordinary. personage; the very fattest woman
whom my eyes had ever, or have since then ever,
beheld. I have spoken of Mr. Larkin as being stout,
bat compared with Mrs. Larkin, he seemed as thin as a
lath.

This fat woman (who was also large-limbed and tall)
was seated in a huge arm-chair, which was strengthened
with various appliances of stout timbers, else it must
have collapsed beneath her weight; and was making
wonderful efforts with a set of knitting-needles, to
manufacture a stocking, I believe. She laid this work
down, however, when she saw me, and beckoned me to
draw near to her chair, which I did with fear and
trembling.

Mrs. Larkin’s throat must have been as fat within as
it was without, for her voice wheezed and guregled as
though it had some difficulty in finding a passage.

“Come closer, I want to look at you, child,” rum-
bled out of her mouth somehow. And obeying the
command, I crept up close to her knees. Dear me! I
never knew till now what a little insignificant mite of a
thing I was. I remember thinking, some time after-
wards, when I first read “ Gulliver’s Travels,” that I
must have borne no distant resemblance to that gentle-
man when under the inspection of his Brogdignagian
nurse, Glum—what was her name ?

“So you have lost your mother, have you, child?”
said fat Mrs. Larkin.

I began to cry, not so much at the sense of my loss
at that moment, as from bodily fear of this very enor-
mous old lady.

“Poor child!” she said, compassionately, and to my
great astonishment, I may almost say alarm, good Mrs.
WILLY AND LUCY.

arkin began to cry too. I saw two or three big tears
run down each cheek. She did not know this herself
1 believe, till they began to tickle the corners of her
mouth, and then she wiped them away hastily.

I must not indulge myself by writing down all that
was said in this private interview (for Mr. Larkin
silently walked away as soon as he had introduced me),
{ shall only say that this elephantine lady told me that
she was the mistress, and that her husband (Larkin, she
called him, without a Mr.) was the master, of the parish
workhouse—that the house in which I then was, was the
parish workhouse—that there were a few old men and a
few old women whose home it was, and a limited num-
ber of boys and girls of all ages, who were being
brought up there because, for one reason or other, they
had no other home. Also, that there was a poor crazy
woman, who lived there because she could not live any-
where else ; and that besides all these, there was a shifting
company of occasional inmates, some young and some
old, who made a convenience of the parish workhouse
when it suited them, and came and went pretty much at
their pleasure. All this I learned in that half-hour’s
chat.

Talso was informed on what days I might expect to
have boiled beef and greens for dinner; and on what
other days suet puddings and potatoes; and on what
other days good strong soup. And how I should soon
grow big and fat. Here I broke in—with a comic look
of affright, I suppose—— ‘‘As big and fat as you,
ma’am?” which made Mrs. Larkin laugh till her
whole frame shook like a rich jelly, and tears again rolled
down her cheeks because they couldn’t help it.

“What a funny boy itis!’ she gurgled out, when
WILLY AND LUCY,

she could find her voice. “As big and fat as me in-
deed! Ihope not, for a good fifty years to come. I
Suppose you wouldn’t like to be served as they serve me
every night and morning, would you ?”

“What do they do to you, ma’am?” I wished to
know—for the old lady’s kindly way had banished my
reserve.

“ Look up there,” said Mrs. Larkin, pointing to the
ceiling, and then I saw for the first time a large square
trap-door.

“They open that trap,” she continued, “and then
they wheel my chair under that great opening, and let
down ropes, and hook them on with iron hooks to these
rings in my chair, and then they draw me up, chair and
all, to my bed room above, with strong pulleys. That’s
what they do at night when I want to goto bed. And
in the morning they let me down inthe same way. I
haven’t been able to walk upstairs these ten years.
Why, the staircase isn’t half wide enough. And how
should you like that?” Mrs. Larkin asked.

I thought it must be very nice to have such an easy
way of going to bed; but as Mrs. Larkin seemed to
expect me to pity her, I did so.

“Ob well, it doesn’t matter,” said she. “I can
manage to hobble about a little, only give me plenty of
time; and now I think yow had better goalong with the
other boys.”

“Where shall I go, ma’am ?”

Instead of replying to me verbally, Mrs. Larkin put
to her lips a silver whistle, which I had before observed
to be hung round her neck by a broad ribbon, and blew
such a shrill, loud, prolonged note upon it, that I was
quite startled. It had the intended effect, however, of
WILLY AND LUCY.

bripging into the room a very slatternly woman, in a
grey grogram gown, who grinned and made a, succession
ot comic curtsies to the mistress.

“Here’s a poor little boy for you to take care of,
Nancy,” said Mrs. Larkin.

Nancy turned half round, and honoured me with a
stare, and another erin.

“You must take very great care of him, Nancy, and
be very good to him. He hasn’t got a mother.”

Nancy left off grinning, and screwed her mouth into
a round O.

“Don’t let him be put upon by the big boys,” said
Mrs. Larkin, continuing her instructions.

Nancy shook her head violently from side to side,
till I thought she must be giddy.

“ And see that he gets enough 4o eat at meal-times,
Nancy.”

Nancy altered the motion of her head to a succession
of nods, which made me think that it must have been
set very loosely upon her body. And then, without
waiting any further commands, she seized me by the
hand, and dragged me away.

I very soon learned that this new acquaintance of
mine was the crazy woman of whom I had been told;
and that the particular form taken by her craze was to
be obstinately silent, sometimes for weeks together.
She was a poor, harmless, faithful creature, and I do
not think she was altogether unhappy. I am sure I
hope she was not, for I respect poor crazy Nancy’s me-
mory very much. She was always very good to me.

I shall not make a long story of my early life in the
parish workhouse. I may say, however, that I was not
badly treated. I had plenty to eat, as had been promised
WILLY AND LUCY.

ty Mrs. Larkin; and if my bed, in the long room with
the other boys of the establishment, was rather hard,
at any rate it was clean; and as I had never, in my
remembrance, known the luxury of a soft couch, I did
not feel the miss of it.

Mr. Larkin, the master, was an easy-going, indolent,
good-natured sort of man; and I am afraid the discipline
of the workhouse was rather lax and defective; but
crazy Nancy was faithful to the charge she had received
concerning me, and was always ready to protect and
take my part if she thought I was being “put upon.”
{n short, I soon became reconciled to my new home.

I have reason to suppose that good, fat Mrs. Larkin
took a fancy to me from my first introduction to her.
Perhaps her compassion was roused by the circumstances
which had made me a workhouse child. At any rate,
she very often sent for me into her parlour; and some-
times I had the high privilege of partaking of her tea
and toast. What was far better than this, she under-
took to give me some little education. I am rather
uncertain now whether I had learned more than the
alphabet from my poor mother. Under Mrs. Larkin’s
instructions, however, I rapidly learned to read.

There was one indulgence granted me which made
my first years at the workhouse pass almost happily.
Nearly every Sunday afternoon I was made as smart as
crazy Nancy could make me, and despatched to Beech-
wood Farm, to see my sister Imcy. I was in general
well received by little Mrs. Watson (what a contrast
she was to my fat Mrs. Larkin, to be sure!) and I was
permitted, when the weather was fine, to ramble about
the garden and fields with my darling: if it was tov
cold or wet, we were allowed to play, or sit and talk, as
WILLY AND LUCY.

we pleased, in the large stone kitchen, where there was
always a good fire. On these weekly holidays, I was
always feasted on plum-cake and apples, with a class of
home-made wine; and when I returned to my home, it
was with the anticipation of seeing Lucy again on the
following Sunday.

Thus things went on, in this smooth way, as far as
I was concerned, until I was, as I suppose, about ten
years of age, and Lucy not quite eight.

Nore sy Lucy. I have not much to add to this
chapter of Willy’s history, except that I have always
thought that my brother was very fortunate in falling
in with so good a friend as Mrs. Larkin. I remember
going to see her once or twice in these early days; and
how astonished I was at her grvat size.

My own history during the five years Willy has
passed over in this chapter is soon told. Mr. and Mrs.
Watson were good to me, and I was taught to call them
“father” and ‘‘ mother.” The little lady (as my brother
calls Mrs. Watson) had no mind that I should be
spoiled ; and I very soon had demonstrated to me what
she intended to do with the rod. We were very good
friends, however; and after I had learned necessary
obedience and docility, I was not often punished.

Sundays were very pleasant days to me, because of
my receiving Willy’s visits.

I may as well add, what of course will have been
understood, that in all the five years of our history down
to this chapter, no intelligence had been gained respect-
ing our mother’s friends, and that the expectation of our
ever being claimed was almost entirely abandoned.
WILLY AND LUCY.

IY
Wuen I. was abont ten years old, the workhouse
opened its doors to a new inhabitant—a pauper, of
course. His name was Lawrence Brisco; and, when I
first knew him, he was, I suppose, sixty years of age,
and a tall, feeble, thin, broken down old man.

For fifteen years he had been the village school-
master, until his health gave way, so that he was no
longer able to fulfil its duties; and then he had no re-
source left but to take refuge for the remainder of his
life in the parish workhouse.

One day, soon after Lawrence Brisco’s first appear-
ance at the workhouse as his home, he was seated on a
bench on the sunny side of the yard in which the boys
were sometimes permitted to play. Presently the old
man caught my eye, and beckoned me to him.

“T want to talk to you,” he said, in feeble tones,
when I had obeyed his call. “I have heard all about
you,” he added, “and I want to make a friend of you.
Will you let me?”

I told him that I was quite willing to be his friend
if that would do him any good.

“Tt will do me good,” he said, with a sigh; “for I
feel very lonely.” Then he began to tell me some of his
past history, which was a very sad and melancholy one;
for he was born to a large estate, and had received a
college education in his youth ; but had come to poverty
and disgrace by his own misdoings. This was his story,
and he ended by saying that he wished he had died
when he was a child.

“Oh, please don’t say so, Mr. Brisco,” I said ; for it
seemed to me to be a terrible wish.
WILLY AND LUCY.

“TI do wish so,” continued he, “because I should
not have had the sins to answer for that Ihave now. I
have never done any good in the world,” he added,
bitterly, “but a great deal of mischief.” And then he
bowed his head, and was silent.

“You did good when you were a schoolmaster, didn’t
you, sir?” I did not know what else to say, and I
wanted to comfort the poor old fellow if I could.

“Do you think so?” ke asked, looking up again.
“T don’t know about that. I did it for bread. I
shouldn’t have done it if 1 could have helped it. SoI
am afraid that does not tell much in my favour.”

This was pretty nearly all the conversation we had
‘at that time; but every day after that, when he was
seated on the bench, I went to him; and, not to make
a long story of it, he drew me on to talk about myself,
and my own prospects.

And now, for the first time, I began to perceive that
my position as a workhouse boy, living upon charity,
was not a desirable one.

This discovery was very painful to me, the more so
that I fancied my dear little sister must despise me in
her heart for being a parish pauper. I recalled to
mind many little circumstances which half convinced me
that she “looked down” upon me, and was half ashamed
of having a workhouse boy for a brother; and this so
preyed on my mind that I dreaded the approach of each
successive Sunday, because then I should have to appear
before Lucy in my degraded condition. I did not care
so much about being despised by other people; but I
could not bear the thought of being despised by her.

Happily, this depression of spirits did not last long.
I think that Lawrence Brisco saw what impression his
WILLY AND LUCY.

conversations had made upon me; and he exerted him-
self to rouse my energies.

“You are here through no fault of your own, Willy,”
he said to me one day; “and you have nothing to re-
proach yourself with, as I have. But you will have to
reproach yourself hereafter if you don’t try to overcome
your disadvantages, and make your way upwards. You
can do itif you will.”

“Do you think so, sir?” said I.

“Tam sure of it,” he said.

* How can I do it, sir?” I wanted to know.

“By good conduct and good principles. These ara
indispensable; but this is not all, A man may have
good principles, and behave well in a low sphere, and
yet never rise out of it. Now you want to rise out of
this sphere of yours, do you not?”

“Yes, sir, Ido,” said I, with a swelling heart.

“Very well; then you must prepare yourself, or be
prepared fora higher. You have got good sense and
intelligence, and abilities, or I should not trouble myseif
about you, verhaps,” Brisco went on; “but you want
something else. You must have more education than
you have got. Ha! I know what you may be thinking
about my education, and how little use it ever has been
to me.”

“TI was not thinking of that, sir,” I said, deprecatingly.

“Well, I should not blame you for thinking so; but
education is like a sharp sword. Take it by the handle
and use it rightly, and you may carve your way in the
world; but take it by the blade, as I have done, and it
cuts—it cuts the hand that holds it. You must have
education; and when you have got it, you must put it
to good use.”
WILLY AND LUCY.

“How am I to get it, sir?” I asked, despondingly.

“Tl give it you,” said the old man, lifting up his
head. ‘It will be doing something beforeI die. T’'ll
give it you.”

And he was as good as his word. He had a few old
school-books with him, and by some means or other he
obtained more as they were wanted; and he set to in
earnest to “ make a man” of me, ashesaid. I amafraid
I was a dull scholar at first ; but my ambition was fired,
and I was determined not to be daunted by difficulties.

Nore sy Lucy.—It is very good of Willy not to
write harshly of me in this chapter. I have to reproach
myself for having given him reason to think that I had
learned almost to despise my poor brother, only because
he was a workhouse boy, not choosing to remember that
I was as much living on charity as he was.

And though Willy is so forbearing as not to mention
it, there is no reason why I should keep the same silence;
and I will say that, on one occasion especially, I behaved
so haughtily to my poor brother, when he came as usual
to see me, that he went away from Beechwood Farm quite
broken-hearted. He did not mind others sneering at
him, he said, but he could not bear it from me.

My own little history, down to the time to which
Willy has brought his, may be told in a few words. No
near relations could have been kinder to me than were
Mr. and Mrs. Watson. I was never made painfully to
feel my dependence, while I was given to understand
that they charged themselves with my future welfare.
They did not mean that I should grow up to be a fine
lady, they said, any more than they wished me to look
forward to getting a living by common service. I was
WILLY AND LUCY.

taught everything useful, therefore, and Mrs. Watson,
who had had a higher kind of education than most
farmers’ wives of those days, undertook to teach me
what her plainer husband laughingly called “fallals and
fillagrees.” It might be, she said, that I should be glad
to go out into the world as a governess when I was old
enough, and it should not be her fault if I were not fit
for such a situation.

WY.

Onz day, when I was supposed to be about fourteen
years old, I was told that I was wanted in the parlour,
and was accordingly brought in from the garden, where
Thad been at work since early morning.

When I reached the parlour, I found there (besides
the master and mistress of the workhouse) my old
acquaintance Mr. Merton, the clergyman, Mr. Chivers,
the overseer, and the little shaky parish clerk. There
was also another person whom I did not know—a queer-
‘ooking man, with rough grizzled hair, a beard of two or
three days’ growth, a pale, cadaverous countenance, and
very rough discoloured hands. The discolouration was
not from dirt, however, but the consequence of his trade.
He was evidently a shoemaker.

I understood it all. As a general rule, and very
properly too, the children brought up in the workhouse
were not allowed to remain there after fourteen years of
age. The girls were put out to domestic service, and
the boys were disposed of, some to farm service, and
some to ordinary mechanical trades.

I had previously been told that I should have to
WILLY AND LUCY.

2

“oo a-prentice;’ and now I saw before me my fature
master.

I cannot say that I was very much prepossessed in
favour of Mr. Shillibeer, this being, as I afterwards
knew, the name of the shoemaker whose home, I soor
found, was in a back lanein the town of Maidstone. He
was not a pleasant man to look at; and his voice was
harsh and grating, though, in the presence of Mrs.
Larkin’s parlour guests, he evidently tried to modulate it.
He had also an unpleasant habit of not looking any per-
son in the face. However, it was not for me to make
objections which I knew very well would not, and ought
not, to be listened to; and I expressed my willingness
to go to Maidstone with Mr. Shillibeer on trial.

My little bundle of clothing was soon tied up, there-
fore, and I went over the house and round the premises
to say good-bye to my fellow paupers and companions.
First of all I shook hands with all the boys and girls,
and I am glad to reflect now that, though by this time
I had grown up to be the biggest and strongest, as well as
the oldest, of that young tribe—those who had been my
elders having, in the course of years, slipped off one by
one—there was real sorrow felt and expressed when it
was known that I was leaving the house. Ido not wish
to sound my own praises, and indeed the fact is, I never
had had the inclination to domineer over the weak and
comparatively helpless, so there is no credit due to me
for not having done this.

After bidding good-bye to the young, I went round
to the old, who did not seem to care much whether I
went or stayed. My parting with Crazy Nancy was
rather pathetic, however, for the poor thing had grown
to be very fond of me because I never teazed her, she
WILLY AND LUCY.

said, like some of the rest of them. Last of all I went
into the infirmary, as a certain room in the house was
called, to take leave of poor Lawrence Brisco, who had
by this time so sadly failed in bodily strength as to be
searcely able to leave his bed. He was sitting up in it,
however, propped with pillows, and reading the Bible;
for I am glad to say that he had of late taken to that
study, and found more comfort in it than in anything
or all things else.

“T am come to say good-bye to you, sir?” I said, as
I stood by his bedside.

“Ah! you are going away then, Willy?” he an-
swered, with a trembling voice.

T told him I was, and also where Iwas going, and
for what purpose.

He seemed very much troubled at the thought of my
leaving, and he did not appear to look on my immediate
prospects with much favour.

“Tt is not quite what I had hoped for you, Willy,”
he said ; “it is foolish of me to say it, and especially to
say ib to you, perhaps, but it must come out; and I
can’t help it. It isn’t just what I have hoped for you;
Tthink you are made for something different—I don’t
say better, but different. You'll never be a good shoe
maker, lam afraid. But I may be wrong, and I don’t
want to dishearten you at starting. And anyway, it
will be something to staré upon; better than being here
any longer, though I am sorry to lose you. TI shall
never see you again, my boy, I think,” he added, and
tears ran down his cheeks. He did not try to check
them.

“T hope I shall see you again often, sir,” I said, as
cheerfully as I could, but the old man shook his head.


WILLY AND LUCY.

“You'll be away a month on trial,” he said, mourn-
fully ; “‘and by that time all my troubles in life will be
over. ButI am not going to speak about myself,” he
continued, interrupting and preventing me from answer-
ing him. “Sit down for a minute or two, and let me
talk a little.”

I sat down, as he told me, and he went on—“ You
have something to begin with, Willy. You have the
-sword; take care how you use it. Remember what I
told you once—Hducation is a sword; if taken by the
handle it will do good service; but if taken by the
blade it will cut the hand that holds it. You may think,
perhaps, that the little learning you have picked up
won't be of much service to you where you are going.
But it may be, and will be, so don’t letit go, but increase
it as much as you can by adding to it. It may be my
fancy ; but you won’t always be a shoemaker, that’s my
opinion. But don’t take a distaste to your trade, I do
not wish you to do that; it is a good honest one, and a
respectable one. Still you may turn to something else,
where your learning may be of more use to you. So
don’t let it go, Willy.”

TI promised my old teacher that I would not.

“ And whatever you are besides,’ he continued,
“vou may always be respectable, and even a gentle-
man if you will—a gentleman in the true sense of
the word—such a one as I never have been, with all
my lost advantages. What is more important still,
I hope you will be a. Christian, Willy, [6 is bad
enough to live without religion, but.to die without
i?

Here my poor old teacher paused for a little while,
and his countenance showed such distress that I could
WILLY AND LUCY.

scarcely bear to look at him. Presently, however, ke
resumed.

“ Have they given you a Bible, Willy 2”

I told him that they had, that is to say, Mr. Merton
had. It was customary for the clergyman to give a
Bible to the boys and girls on leaving the workhouse
for service.

“Tam glad of that. Read it, Willy, and attend to
it. If I had done so——. But I won’t speak of my-
self; only I was going to say I must give you some-
thing to remember me by. There are three books I
should like you to have; they are on the shelf there;
bring them.”

I did as I was told. The three books were a tat-
tered Latin “Virgil,” a French “Telemachus,” and a
volume of Euclid.

“Take them with you, Willy , they are yours; I
shall never want them again. I must turn to this
book”—he laid his hand on the open Bible on his
bed—“for all the help and comfort I can get now.
And now God bless you, Willy. Be a good boy; be a
good man. God bless you! Kiss me, Willy, before
you go.”

I knelt down by his side, put my arm round the
dear old man’s neck, and kissed his forehead, his cheeks,
his lips, again and again.

Tam glad to think I did; I am glad to think I did.
fam not ashamed now that I did it, and that I broke
out into a flood of tears and a tempest of sobs as I did
it. It comforted the old man. I never saw him
again.

When I went down to Mrs. Larkin’s parlour, all
the visitors were gone excepting Mr. Shillibeer, and he
WILLY AND LUCY.

was feasting on workhouse cold beef and beer; so he
was in no hurry, and I had time to untie my bundle
and put in the three books. They, together with the
Bible, made the bundle bulky and heavy; but had it
been twice as weighty, I could not have left the books
behind.

Presently I bade Mr. and Mrs. Larkin good-bye, and
I was on the road, trudging beside my new master, who
did not offer to help me with my load. The world was
all before me.

Do you think it strange that I felt sorrowful on
leaving that parish workhouse? I did feel sorrowful.
Thad received kindness and consideration there, and it
was the only home I had ever known. Others, I am
aware, have written about the hardships and cruelty
practised on poor children in similar establishments, as
they were formerly conducted under the old poor law.
I do not dispute their experiences, I have only given
my own.

I obtained leave from Mr. Shillibeer,—whose heart,
or stomach, which does duty for the heart with some
people, was warmed with beef and beer,—I say I obtained
his leave to call at Beechwood Farm, and say good-bye
to Lucy.

The darling was sorry I was going away; but she
had not much time to speak to me, for she was taking
her lessons, and Mrs. Watson did not like her to be inter-
rupted. So she kissed me very kindly, and went back
again, after telling me that I must manage to get over
to see her very often.

Mr. Watson came in just then too, and shook me
heartily by the hand, and gave me a great many en-
couraging words which did me good, and which T am
WILLY AND LUCY.

glad to remember after the lapse of forty years, because
T know they were genuine. He also put his hand in
his pocket, and took out two half-crowns, which he
gave me, telling me that I might be glad of them
before long.

Having thanked the good-natured farmer, I rejoined
ny master that was to be, and we went on together to
Maidstone. It took us a long time to get there though,
tor Mr. Shillibeer had several calls to make at different
houses on the road,—to “take measures,” he conde-
scended to tell me, as he left me to wait for him ont-
side. It curiously happened that these houses had all
of them signs over their doors. Ihave no doubt that
Mr. Shillibeer did go in to “take measures ;” but as i
occupied a long time, and he came out of each house
wiping his mouth and looking red about the eyes, and
making irregular steps, I believe I am right in sup.
posing that the “measures” he referred to were not
measures for shoes.

We reached Maidstone at last, however.

Nore sy Lucy.—All I have to say at the end of this
chapter is, that I am ashamed of my past self—ashamed
to think how I imposed on my dear Willy, so as to
make him think I was sorry he was going away. I was
selfishly glad he was going; not glad for his sake,
which might have been natural and right, but glad to
be rid of the disgrace, as I thought of it, of having a
brother in the workhouse. I had grown up to be missy
and proud, forgetting my own position, and fancying
myself to be a person of importance,—conceited child
that I was. The truth is, I was half spoiled by the
WILLY AND LUCY.

kindness I constantly received from my good protector
and protectress at the farm; and if Mrs. Watson could
but have known how haughtily I felt towards my
brother in parting with him that day, the best thing
she could have done, as I honestly believe, would have
been to give me a good sound whipping with her ever-
memorable rod.

And yet I loved my brother; it is some consolation
to me to believe this; but it was after a poor fashion.

Vi,

Wuen I had been a month at Maidstone, I returned
with Mr. Shillibeer to the workhouse—my home no
longer—to be bound apprentice to him for seven years,
and he received the premium from the hands of
Mr. Chivers, who will not appear any more in my
story. Itisas much arelief to me to get rid of him,
as it was to him to get rid of me.

To my great grief I found poor Lawrence Brisco’s
bed in the infirmary vacant. His anticipations had
proved true; he died about a week after I bade him
farewell.

I have learned in the course of my life, that it is
right and wise to “engrave benefits on marble and to
write injuries on water.” I shall say nothing, there-
fore, of the wretchedness I was made to sufler at the
hands of my master, the shoemaker, and at those of his
slatternly wife, after they had secured my premium.
Indeed, I have received so many more benefits than
WILLY AND LUCY.

injuries all through life, that it would be worse than
ungrateful to dwell upon the latter. Let them pass.

I served only two years of the seven with Mr.
Shillibeer, for, at the end of that shorter period, his
business, such as it was, was broken up, bailiffs took
possession of his house, his furniture was sold, and I
was told that I might go about my business, for he had
nothing further for me to do.

This happened very suddenly and unexpectedly, to
me at least. Had I been wiser I might have known:
sooner what would be the upshot of Mr. Shillibeer’s
so constantly “taking measures; but I did not antici-
pate so speedy a release from my thraldom.

I could not help being glad. I hope I was not glad
that my master was ruined, but I was rejoiced at being
free. It was a poor sort of freedom certaiuly, for I had
no money and no home; for as to going back to the
workhouse, that was out of the question; I would not
have done it. It was equally out of the question my
thinking of getting work at my trade; I knew scarcely
anything of my trade, and that is the truth. Whether
this was my fault or Mr. Shillibeer’s may remain an
open question. I sometimes think, however, that my
kind old teacher was not far from the truth when he
told me that I should never make a good shoemaker.

And speaking about Mr. Brisco, I may mention
that his last words to me, as well as the whole scope of
his previous instructions, made a great and lasting
impression on my mind. He had reminded me that
education was a sharp sword, good if well used, mis-
chievous if abused. I never forgot this; and, together
with his sad example, it wrought in me a salutary
dread of misusing what little learning I had acquired.
WILLY AND LUCY.

He had told me, too, that I might be respectable, and
even a gentleman if I would. I a gentleman! work-
house bred, if not workhouse born, as I was—a gentle-
man! I never lost,the hope those words had inspired,
and from the time they were uttered I determined that
I would be, in the best and only right sense of the
word, a gentleman—a gentle man. It is not for me to
decide whether I have fulfilled this determination, but I
know I have honestly tried to do so.

To return to my story.

It was on a winter’s morning that I received from
Mr. Shillibeer an intimation that he had no longer a
home for me, and that I had better look out for myself.
Accordingly I lost no time in packing up my box—after
putting on my best suit of clothes, which were shabby
enough, no doubt—and removing it from my master’s
house to that of an acquaintance of mine, where I hoped
it would be safe; and then I started off to see Lucy.

It was afternoon when I arrived at Beechwood
Farm, and I had the good fortune to obtain a long
interview with my sister alone, for I really did not wish
Mr. Watson to know just then what had happened to
me. I knew—at least I believed—that he would be
angry with my late master, which I did not wish him
to be, the poor man having sorrow and trouble enough
on his hands already, without having a parish squab-
bling to gothrough. I knew too—at least I believea—
that Mr. Watson would invite me to stay at his house,
till he could find something for me to do, and I shrunk
from this. My sister and I were already under such
great obligations to him, that I could not bear to think
of increasing them. Besides, I had by this time formed
my own plans, such as they were.
WILLY AND LUCY.

So, as I have just said, I had a good long conversa-
tion with Lucy, who behaved very affectionately towards
me, and gave me all the encouragement she could.
She did more than this, she put her purse into my
hands, with all it contained; and as Mrs. Watson had
always been very generous and liberal with regard
to pocket-money, as in all other matters, my darling
had a good sum in her purse; I would not take it all,
you may be sure; but I borrowed ten shillings of Lucy,
and asked her to let me keep the purse as a remembrance
of her, which she did.

Poor dear, she cried a good deal when we parted
after our long talk, and put her arms round my neck
and kissed me so fondly that I could scarcely drag my-
self away. I did this at last, however, and I did not see
my darling again till many, many years had passed
over both of us.

I returned to Maidstone that same evening, and
begged a night’s lodging there of the acquaintance in
whose care I had placed my box. The next morning, I
started off on the road to Dover, with a bundle slung at
my back, containing two clean shirts (my whole stock
besides what was on my back), my best shoes, three
pairs of stockings, a coarse towel, and my Bible.

The plan I had formed was a foolish and desperate
one, now I come gravely to think of it; and it was one
which I would not advise any other boy to try: neverthe-
less, strange to say, and I am astonished at it now, it
did not prove a total failure. I had made up my mind
to seek my fortune on the sea.

I had been knocking about Dover some two or three
days, and getting well laughed at, or else growled at
and told to go about my business, by captains and mates
WILLY AND LUCY..

of vessels in the harbour to whom I made application,
till I was utterly dispirited, and my little stock of money
was almost all gone, when a very fortunate thing hap-
pened tome. I need not mention particulars; but I
had it in my power to help in rescuing a French lad,
about my own age, and respectably dressed in a sort of
naval uniform, from a number of rough English sailor
lads who were ill-treating him in one of the back streets
of the town. Iam afraid my French friend, who could
speak no Hnglish, had been imprudent, and had been
drinking too freely of English beer, and had somehow
provoked the youths with whom he had met in the
public-house. But let this be as it may, I was able to
take him under my charge, and, having French enough
to understand him—thanks to my poor old teacher—I
discovered that he belonged to a large French vessel
which, only the day before, had put into the harbour
from stress of weather. Yielding to his fears and his
entreaties not to be left to the mercy of “ces polissons
Anglaises,” 1 accompanied the French lad to his ship,
and then I found that he was the son of the captain,
who kept me on board to dinner, and had some conver-
sation with me, which ended in his offering (out of gra-
titude to me for my kindness to his son, he said) to give
me a berth in the ship.

This was the beginning of my rise in life, for the
captain was ever afterwards my firm and kind friend,
and when he found that I was (as he was pleased to say)
too well educated for a common sailor, and also that the
sea was not, after all, my proper element, he exerted
himself so strongly in my favour, that he procured
me a situation in his own country, where my educa-
tion was really of great use to me, because (as I
































































»

“THIS WAS THE BEGINNING OF MY RISE IN LIFE,
WILLY AND LUCY.

hope) I laid hold of it by the handle, and not by the
blade.

As it has not been my intention in this story to go
beyond the days of my childhood and boyhood, I shall
only say that by the kindness and honourable dealings
of my friends and patrons in France, and by tke over-
ruling blessing of Providence, I was enabled to return
to my native land, when I was between forty and fifty
years of age, with a sufficient competence for life. In
all that time, I had corresponded with my darling
sister, and knew all that happened at Beechwood; but
that I shall leave for her to tell. I had also paid several
visits to England, and had enjoyed the hospitality of
good Mi. and Mrs. Watson, who, for Lucy’s sake,
treated me as though I were a near relative, and a dear
friend.

Conctupinc Nore sy Lucy.—I very well remember
that winter afternoon, of which my brother has written,
when he came to bid me farewell; and I am glad to
think that, at that parting time, all my old fondness for
him returned with such an overflowing tide that I for-
got, for the time, my foolish vanity. I remember, too,
that when I told Mr. Watson what had passed with my
brother, he was vexed that I had not detained him ; and
the next day my kind friend rode over to Maidstone to
find Willy and to exert himself in his favour. But by
the time he reached the town Willy was gone, no one
knew whither; and we could not find out what had
become of him until I received a letter to say that he
was on board the French ship, learning to be a sailor.

After my brother was gone quite away from the
neighbourhood, I felt very dull for a time, and indeed I
WILLY AND LUCY.

fad a rather severe illness. I soon recovered, however,
and all things went on as before, only that the disin-
terested kindness of my excellent friends increased
more and more.

And now I must reveal so much of my own weak-
ness and folly as to say that I had always indulged a
secret notion that our poor mother had been a great
lady, and that when she made her appearance in Mr.
Waitson’s hop-garden, ske was under some temporary
cloud of misfortune which would soon have passed
away but for her sudden death; also that our father,
whom not even Willie, who was older than I, had ever
known, was a grand personage, who would some day
make his appearance in much magnificence, to re-claim
his children, and to bountifully reward their benefactors,
T cannot tell how many romances I had woven at one
time or another, in my mind, but all tending to the same
desirable consummation—that of our being raised from
our lowly condition to one of great wealth and grandeur,
by the unexpected turning up of our father, who was to
be perhaps an earl, or a viscount, or a baronet at least;
nothing short of this would suffice for my imagination.
I believe that these foolish thoughts were first of all put
into my mind by Sally, Mrs. Watson’s servant; and that
their having taken root there will very much account
for the disgust and impatience I felt at my brother being
a workhouse boy.

And my day dreams came true, in part; our father
did make his appearance, and (through the medium of
the letter which my poor mother wrote the week before
she died, and the little personalities which she left behind,
especially her housewife) satisfactorily, to himself,
proved our relationship to him,
WILLY AND LUCY.

Bat alas, alas! no rich, and magnificent, and gloriovs
retinue attended him; and no grand gilded coach
whisked me away to his baronial halls. It was asad
story he had to reveal, and a humiliating story I had to
hear when he found me, which was about two years
after my parting with Willy.

Our father was a returned convict, who, after a
dreary banishment of fourteen years, had come home to
England, broken in health, but penitent I trust and
think, to make up as he best could for the misery he had
caused to the poor wife and children whom first his mis-
conduct and then his crime had ruined. It is true he
and our poor mother had once been in a respectable
position in life, and he yet retained soms traces of
superior breeding ; but he, like Willy’s old teacher, had
taken hold of the sword by the blade and not by the
handle.

Twill not write any more on this painful subject,
except to say that my dear friends Mr. and Mrs. Watson
received the penitent kindly, and gave him a home (for
my sake, they said) as long as he lived, which was only
a few months after his return. He did not live to see
Willy.

As to myself, the shock was very painful, but it was
very salutary, for it called my mind down from the high
regions of fanciful imagination to the stern and sober
duties of life, and otherwise taught me lessons which I
hope I never forgot.

I have only to add that my kind Mr. and Mrs. Wat-
son would never part with me, so I did not go out as a
governess after all, I lived with them till they died at
a good old age; and then, as they had no near relatives,
they left me their farm. When. a few years afterwards,
WILLY AND LUCY.

my brother family returned to England, as conformed an
old bachelor as I was an old maid, he took up his abode
with me, and here we still live.














































































































































BULLY’S ESCAPE.













































































PREJUDICE LOST









LOVE WON, NSS

BY L. A. HALL,



—+—

A PEEP INTO THE FAMILY CIRCLE AT HOMEHURST.

“Ts that my own darling?” inquired Mrs. Osborne,
as she rested languidly in her arm-chair by the fireside,
and heard the door of the drawing-room opened gently
behind her.

“No, mamma, it is only me,” replied a young girl of
about fourteen or fifteen, as she entered the room and
approached her mother’s chair.

“Are your studies already ended?” asked Mrs.
Osborne.

“ Yes, mamma; and, before going out, I came in to
see you for a moment, and to ask whether I could do

anything for you.”
Bt
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

“No, thank you, my dear,” replied Mrs. Osborne,
coldly, and taking up a volume which had been lying
on her lap, as if she was about to read it.

“Will you give me one kiss, mamma?” said Mary
Osborne, in a low, timid voice, as if she were asking a
favour of her mother.

“To be sure I will. Have I ever refused to kiss
you, Mary ?”

“No, mamma ; but

“But what?” inquired Mrs. Osborne, glancing
round somewhat authoritatively at the now frightened
Mary.

“But I was afraid you might be displeased at my
interrupting you.”

“No, not displeased; but you know how small a
matter discomposes me now my health is so broken up;
you must not, therefore, take fancies into your head,
my dear, they will only make you troublesome and
disagreeable. There, like a good girl, let us have no
more of this,” added she in a softened tone, as she
perceived a tear stealing into her daughter's eye. “ Give
me a kiss, and then go and take your walk while the
day is fine. But where is Edith?”

“T will send her to you, mamma,” replied Mary,
leaving the room in quest of her sister, who was two or
three years younger than herself. She found her in the
school-room, looking rather disconsolate, as she had
been reproved by her governess for idleness and in-
attention.

“ Mamma is asking for you, Edith,” said Mary to her
on entering the room.

Hdith looked up doubtfully at Miss Barter: ‘‘ May I
go to mamma ?”

99


PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

“Yes; but I cannot send a good report of you to-
day ; not such a one as I sent of your sister just now.
Did you convey my message of satisfaction at your
attention and progress to your mother?” added she,
turning to Mary.

“No, ma’am,” replied Mary, colouring ; “ for mamma.
did not ask me if you were satisfied with me.”

“T dare say she took it for granted,” observed Miss
Barter, smiling.

Mary remained silent; an unconscious sigh escaped
her lips. Meanwhile, Hdith had flown off to the draw-
ing-room, and had recovered on the way all her elastic
gaiety. She threw herself into her mother’s arms,
which were fondly opened to receive her. Mrs. Osborne
gently pushed back her fair waving ringlets, and looking
into her eyes observed the traces of bygone tears.

“Has any one been vexing you, my own darling ?”
inquired she, in an anxious tone.

“Oh! Miss Barter is so strict sometimes with me
that she is quite angry if I miss a word or two of my
lesson. She is quite different with Mary, and scarcely
ever finds any fault with her.”

“Twon’t suffer it,” said her fond wiféther: “* She
must be kind to you, or it will not do for her to remain
long here.”

Now Hdith, though wilful and impetuous as spoiled
children are often wont to be, was not of an untrue or
ungenerous nature. She felt instinctively that she had
given her mother a false impression of the matter.

“Ah, mamma,” said she, “you must not be angry
with her; she often forgives me ;” and then hiding her
face on her mother’s shoulder, she added, “and Mary
learns her lessons far better than I do.”
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

“So she ought, my love,” rejoined the indulgent
mother; “she is older than you. But I don’t choose to
have any patterns of goodness set up in the school-
room. Ishall have a talk about it some day with Miss
Barter. Meanwhile, my darling, give me one more
kiss, and then go out for your afternoon walk; other-
wise these roses,” added she, smiling, as she patted
Edith’s cheeks, “ will quickly fade away.”

One more fond embrace and Edith was away on the
staircase to join her sister and governess in their after-
noon walk. Before many minutes were past, the two
young girls and their governess had begun their ramble
in some of the pleasant lanes near Malvern, where they
goon filled their fairy baskets with primroses and.
violets, twined in their own fresh leaves, mixed with
soft, emerald-hued moss. More than once the skylark
lured them from too near an approach to her nest by
her sweet, soaring song :—

«Type of the wise, who soar but never roam;
True to the kindred points of heav’n and home.”

While they are thus enjoying the balmy breezes of a
pleasant spring day, we shall give our readers some
account of the family party who have just been in-
troduced to them.

Mrs. Osborne had been united in early youth to a
wealthy Calcutta banker, to whom she was much
attached, and whom she accompanied to the East, from
whence, after many years of residence, she had returned.
in ill health a few months previous to the time at which
our story opens. Mr. Osborne had remained behind
her, hoping at the expiration of another year to join his
family in England, and to seek for a settled home in his
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

native country. Meanwhile Mrs. Osborne was residing
at a pretty villa near Malvern, whose bracing air had
been recommended as the most suitable to her debi-
litated constitution. Her three children, Mary, Cecil,
and Edith, had long since been sent home to the care of
their grandmother, who had confided the two little girls
chiefly to the care of Miss Barter, a kind and ex-
perienced governess, who soon grew warmly attached
to her young pupils. Immediately on Mrs. Osborne’s
return she hastened to her mother’s home, where she
had the happiness of once more embracing her two
daughters, whom she had not seen since the time of
their early childhood. She was instantly attracted by
the pretty, playful Hdith, on whom she lavished all her
fondness, and without being conscious of it, treated her
eldest daughter with coldness and neglect. Mary, un-
like her younger sister, was not gifted with beanty ; but
there was a charm in her sweet smile, a tenderness of
expression in her dark intelligent eyes, and a gentle
gracefulness in her form and movements, which would
have won the heart of a less impulsive mother than was
Mrs. Osborne. Mary’s heart had long been yearning
for her mother’s return, but, partly from timidity, partly
from self-distrust, she gave but little outward expres-
sion to her joy on meeting her mother; and with
that intuition which is so strong in early life, she
quickly became aware that the leve she had so earnestly
longed for, was chiefly bestowed upon her youngest
sister. We will not pretend to deny that some feeling
of envy at first crept unknowingly into her heart, for
she was human, and therefore accessible to the sins
and infirmities of humanity; but she did not suffer it
to rest there, for she had been already taught that pre-
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

cious as is the gift of affection, and especially to woman,
it is a far higher blessing to love unselfishly, than to
seek too earnestly for a fond return. Happily for her,
too, she knew where to seek for a far surer strength
than her own ; nor was the task now allotted to her ‘so
difficult to her as it might have proved to many others,
for she dearly loved her sister; and, perhaps, partly
from the strong contrast between their natural cha-
racters, partly owing to the absence of their parents, she
had come to regard her with that sort of protective
fondness which could scarcely be expected from the
slight disparity in their years. Mary’s disappointment
at her mother’s seeming coldness was deepened by a
latent fear that it might haply be occasioned by some
deficiency in herself. Mrs. Osborne, whose life had,
heretofore, been one of indolent and luxurious ease, was
not wont to analyze the feelings of those around her;
otherwise, perhaps, she might have guessed somewhat
of the feelings of her eldest daughter, and her mother’s
heart might have been touched by the depth of her
quiet tender affection.

We have left Mary and Hdith enjoying a country
ramble, from whence they returned laden with sweet
spring blossoms. Edith ran straight into the drawing-
room to display to her mother all her treasures.

“‘ Are you not coming in to show your pretty flowers
to mamma?” asked she of Mary, who passed by the
open door of the drawing-room on her way up-stairs.

“T know that mamma does not like me to go into
the drawing-room till I have changed my boots,” was
Mary’s reply.

“How particular you are!’ said Hdith, laughing.
“T always go in just as lam, and mamma never finds
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

any fault with me for doing so; do you, my own dear
little mamma?” said she, throwing herself in her
mother’s arms.

“What are you talking about?” inquired Mrs.
Osborne, who was just waking up from her afternoon
siesta.

“T am only scolding Mary for not bringing in her
flowers to show you, but she is afraid of coming in with
her soiled boots on.”

“ T hate my children being afraid of me,” said Mrs.
Osborne. ‘It looks as if I were cross to them, which I
am sure is not the case. Yow are not afraid of me, my
darling ?””

“Not a bit,” said Edith, gaily; I am not afraid of
any one, except now and then, a little, a very little, of
Miss Barter.”

“That is right, my love; I will not suffer any one
to frighten you.”

Mary now entered the room, bearing in her hand a
small open basket of violets and wood-anemones, taste-
fully arranged amid their own leaves, and presenting
the loveliest image of freshness and repose. “Are
they not sweet?” asked she of her mother, as she placed
the basket on a small table by her side.

“Yes, very sweet, thank you, my dear,” replied
Mrs. Osborne, the intonation of her voice changing
from its previous fond inflection to a more measured
metre.

“Don’t they look like children resting in their
mother’s arms?” said Mary, whose still yet ardent
temperament was ever kindled by the silent poetry of
nature.

“You are quite poetic to-day,” observed Mrs. Os-
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

borne, with a slightly sarcastic emphasis on the word
“poetic.”

Mary coloured deeply, while with difficulty she
checked a rising tear, for she felt but too truly that
she was neither understood nor beloved by her mother,
the being for whose presence she had most longed a
little while ago.

“Poetic! that is a grand word,” exclaimed Edith,
laughing ; “but I can tell you that Mary does write
verses, for I saw some in her writing-case along time
ago, but she never gave them to me to read.”

“No doubt they were very fine,” replied Mrs. Os-
borne, “and we shall have a Hemans or a Barrett
Browning in our family by and by; but,” turning to
Mary, “I should like to see those verses of which Edith
speaks, unless they are on some mysterious theme, not
to be exposed to my ‘ vulgar gaze.’ ”

“Indeed they are not worth your reading,” replied
Mary, colouring even more deeply than before.

“You may at least allow me to be the judge of
that,” said her mother, whose curiosity began to be
excited.

“Well, mamma, you shall be obliged ;” and Mary,
leaving the room, returned in a few moments with a
sheet of paper, which she placed in her mother’s hands,
trembling with emotion as she did so. Mrs. Osborne
read aloud the following lines :—

“ON MY DEAREST MAMM4A’S PICTURE.

“* My mother! oh how sweet her smile!
How kind and beaming are her eyes!
Not all the treasures upon earth
Like that lny’d image do I prize.
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON,

& My mother ! ifon thy likeness
To gaze I find e’en now so sweet,
How joyous, oh how joyous then,
Thine own lov’d self once more to meet}

3¢ My mother ! seas betwixt us roll;
Far from thy children now thou art;
And yet I feel thee near to me—
Yes, ever near mine inmost heart,

s¢ My mother! oh may many a year
Of cloudless joy and peace be thine;
And may the bliss of pleasing thee,
And doing all thy will, be mine !

$¢ Mother! should sorrow ever come
To overcloud thy life’s bright day,
Ob be it mine with duteous love
To soothe each care, each grief allay!

s¢ My mother! sweetest name on earth,

Soon may I all its sweetness know!
Then shall my heart with joy and praise
To Him, the Fount of love, o’erflow.”

As Mrs. Osborne went on reading, her voice lost its
measured tone of indifference, for those silent breathings
of her daughter’s love stirred the truer feelings of a
mother’s heart within her, and she became painfully
conscious how utterly she had failed to realize the hopes
which had been thus fondly cherished.

“These are, indeed, very pretty verses,” said she,
drawing Mary to her side, and imprinting on her cheek
a fonder kiss than had been given since the first day of
their meeting in England.

But had the whole tide of her feelings thus rapidly
turned to their natural channel, or was this sudden gush
of affection a merely evanescent feeling, destined to
fade away as quickly as it had seemed to blossom ?
Time will show. Meanwhile, it was so new a thing to
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

Mary to receive any mark of fondness from her mother,

that Mrs. Osborne’s moment of tenderness seemed to

fill her heart with sunshine for many an hour after.
This was a golden day in Mary’s life.

Us

LIFE IN THE SCHOOL-ROOM.

Ir was the hour appointed by Miss Barter for the re-
creation of her pupils, a time when they might pursue
their own little plans or amusements, unfettered by her
presence or her regulations. She was in her own
chamber writing a letter, when the sound of a scream
drew her back into the school-room, a pleasant apart.
ment opening out through a glass door into the garden.
She found Hdith sobbing violently, and at the same
time scolding, in no measured terms, the housemaid for
some supposed delinquency, while Mary was vainly
attempting to soothe and reason with her excited sister.

“She did it on purpose, Iam sure sue did; just to
revenge herself on me because mamma was displeased
with her for not folding up my things when I left them
about. She is a spiteful creature, and I tell her so to
her face.”

The poor young housemaid looked aghast at these
fierce accusations, but it seemed impossible for her to
speak a word in her own defence while the torrent of
Hdith’s invectives were being so passionately poured
forth.

Miss Barter quietly, but decidedly, insisted on
Hdith’s immediate silence, and the angry little girl,
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

overawed by her strong calm will, became perfevtly
still.

“Tell me, Anne, if you please, what you have been
doing to displease Miss Edith so much.”

“You are going to listen to that girl—you would
not listen to me,’ muttered Hdith, in a low sullen
tone.

“T have already heard you say much—only too
much,” replied Miss Barter; “and now I wish to hear
what Anne has to say for herself.”

Anne then informed Miss Barter that her mistress
having lately been displeased with her for having neg-
lected Miss Edith’s bullfinch, while at the same time
Miss Edith had ordered her never to touch its cage, she
felt perplexed what to do this morning when she per-
ceived that the cage was very dirty, and the poor little
creature left without water or seeds. ‘So I was be-
tween two minds about it,” added she, “but thought
my mistress was the first to be minded; so I cleaned
the tray and put fresh seeds into the drawer. Then I
slipped my hand into the cage to take out the empty
cup, when, as ill luck would have it, Miss Edith opened
the door and called out pretty sharply to me to go
directly to her mamma. While my head was turned
towards her—for I felt all in a fluster, ma’am—Bully
darted out of his cage and escaped through the open
door into the garden, where you may hear him singing
away in the branches of that lilac tree yonder.”

Here Hdith’s sobs were renewed : “ My own darling
Bully! I shall never hear him sing again, and I loved
him so dearly! and she knew it too, and she ought to
have taken better care of him.”

“My dear Edith, would you like to be judged as
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

severely as you are judging your fellow-creature?”
asked Miss Barter, gravely. “It seems sometimes
to escape your recollection that ‘with the same mea-
sure that we mete withal shall it be measured to us
again.’ Besides, the account Anne has given of the
matter seems very natural, and I hope she would
be far from wishing to pain you by the loss of your
bird; that is a wickedness I would be sorry to suspect
her of.”

“No, indeed, ma’am; for I am very fond of Bully,”
replied Anne, “and would miss his pretty warbling,
which has often lightened my heart when I was at
work.”

Edith’s only reply was a renewal of her convulsive
sobs. Mary gently placed her arm around her sister,
and sought to soothe her into stillness. “ Let me try,”
said she, “whether I cannot lure back Bully into his
cage. Perhaps I may succeed in doing so.”

Saying thus, she took the cage, and putting into it a
plentiful supply of his favourite hemp-seed, placed it on
a green bank beneath the tree on which he was then
joyously chanting his song of liberty. Before many mo-
ments were passed, Bully had entered the cage, ana
was feasting on his favourite food. He cast some furtive
glances around to see if there were any foes at hand, and
Edith was onthe point of darting out to close the door
of his cage, when Mary, who had placed herself at a
little distance behind a bush, signalled to her to remain.
quiet. A moment or two later Bully had gained confi-
dence, and was devouring the luscious seed without any
fear of detection. Mary quietly approached the cage,
and closed the door behind him. The little captive flut-
tered against the wires of his cage, but vain were his
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

attempts to escape; he was once more a prisoner.
Mary brought the cage in to her sister, who threw her
arms round her neck, and called her her “‘ own dear good
sister,” and then took the cage, and with half-endearing,
half-angry words, expostulated with Bully for having
thus attempted to escape from her.

“No one but my own self shall ever meddle with
you again, that I am determined on,” said she, in a
somewhat imperious tone.

“T hope, miss,’’ observed Anne, “that you will be so
kind as to tell my mistress so; as otherwise she might
be displeased with me for leaving the cage dirty.”

“Never fear,” replied Edith. “Mamma will like
me to have my own way about it. I know that,” con-
tinued she, laughing.

Ah! well might it have been for Hdith if she had
not known it so well; for though possessing a warm,
affectionate heart, she was gradually hardening into
selfishness under the influence of a mother who loved
this attractive child, “not wisely, but too well.”

Miss Barter returned to her apartment to finish her
letter. She felt perplexed at the growing difficulties of
her position ; for it was often impossible to check the
passionate impulses of her younger pupil without seem-
ing to place herself in opposition to Mrs. Osborne,
and she had too deep a conviction of the paramount
authority of a parent to have recourse to this alternative.
On returning to the duties of the school-room, she found
Mary, who had a great talent for painting, seated at her
easel, and doing in water-colours a small landscape
wherein was depicted a cottage home overshadowed by
two or three old ash-trees, beneath whose branches
meandered a shining rivulet, A wreath of curling
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

smoke rose from the gable-end chimney of the cottage,
while before the door lay an outstretched dog which
even in its slumbers seemed to be basking contentedly
in the midday sunshine. It was a pleasing and sugges-
tive scene, for it shadowed forth the ever-present activity
of nature, mingled with the peaceful stillness of home
life.

Mary sighed as she rose from her easel, and prepared
to lay aside her brushes.

“That is a very pretty picture you are doing,” said
Miss Barter to her pupil, “and I am sorry to take you
away from it, but your music-master is expected every
moment, and you are to take your lesson first to-day, as
Edith is engaged just now with her mamma.”

“Yes,” replied Mary, “she told me that mamma
was taking her out to pay some visits, but that she
would be back before the end of my lesson. Oh, how I
wish,’ continued she, with another half-suppressed sigh,
“that I had as much talent as Hdith has for music!”

“ Why should you desire it so much P” inquired Miss
Barter, with evident surprise; for she had never ob-
served in Mary any tendency to jealousy or envy.
“You have each been gifted in a different way, and your
talent for painting is one that might be envied by many
a young girl. Hdith’s may doubtless be the more popu-
lar gift of the two, but I have long thought that no
talent can be rightly or fully enjoyed except so far as we
cultivate it thankfully—not with any view of exciting ad-
miration in the world, but for the quiet home enjoyment
of others as well as of ourselves.”

Indeed, I don’t want to excite admiration in the
world,” replied Mary, as the tears rolled down her
cheeks, “but I would like to play and sing so as to
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

please my dear mamma; for I perceive how much she
delights in listening to Hdith, but she does not care to
see my drawings.”

Miss Barter was of too kind a nature not to sympa-
thize truly with the feelings of a young and sensitive
being; but she knew how important it was for Mary,
under her present circumstances, to check the morbid
regrets that might imbitter her whole existence, and
also to strengthen her character so as to bear cheerfully
the daily trials that might be appointed to her.

“T can well understand your regrets, my dear young
friend,” replied she, in a gentle tone, “and happily for
you, there is One who understands them far better than
I do, and who, doubtless, measures out his gifts to you
most lovingly and wisely too. But what I want you to
aim at is to cultivate every talent committed to you, be
it small or great; not so much with a view to present
results as because it is right and fitting you should do
so, and also with the assured belief that each gift thus
rightly used will in due season bring its destined blessing
and enjoyment. Only one word more and I have done.
Remember what I have often told you, that no woman
is thoroughly prepared for the events of life who has not
learned that afar higher and purer bliss is comprised in
loving than in being loved.”

“ Ah, but I would like to be loved too,” murmured
poor Mary, as the door opened, and her teacher was
announced.

Miss Barter, who knew well what was passing in her
heart, could only say, ‘‘ Wait and hope.”

Mary began her music lesson rather dispiritedly,
but quickly turned her whole attention to it, and re-
ceived from her master the qualified praise that her
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

performance had been very creditable to her. Just as
the hour’s lesson was over, Mrs. Osborne entered the
room with Hdith, who was welcomed with evident
pleasure by Mr. Hayes.

Mrs. Osborne said she hoped he was satisfied with
his pupils.

“Yes,” replied he, “I am perfectly satisfied with
both of them. It is impossible for any young lady to
be more attentive and painstaking than Miss Osborne :
and as for Miss Edith, though she may occasionally be
a little less careful about her time and so on,” said he,
smiling, “yet Ihave no doubt she will do me great
credit by andby.”

The compliment which was thus implied in Mr,
Hayes’ observation, was by no means thrown away upon
Hdith ; but, lest there might be any doubt of her
breathing in the sweet incense of flattery, her mother
rejoined :—“ Yes, Hdith has a decided talent for music,
and one grain of genius is worth all the plodding in the
world.”

Mary was not slow to comprehend this allusion te
herself, and trembled with emotion as she rose from the
piano.

Mrs. Osborne caught the meaning of her daughter’s
heightened colour and timid glance, and, remembering
the verses by which she had been so deeply moved only
a few days before, she reproached herself for having
thus inconsiderately wounded Mary’s feelings; for Mrs.
Osborne was not deliberately selfish or unkind. She
was only impulsive and inconsiderate; and how much
misery, alas! often springs from these negative faults
in the daily course of domestic life!

As she was about to leave the room, she approached
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

Mary’s easel, and, noticing her sketch, observed that it
was a very pleasing one, and that when finished it must
be framed and hung up in her dressing-room, for that
it was a sort of scene she liked to look upon.

“T shall be delighted to place it there if you think
it worthy of your acceptance, dear mamma,” replied
Mary, her countenance beaming with pleasure at her
mother’s approbation.

Mrs. Osborne pressed her lips upon her daughter’s
forchead, and left the room. That one kiss was a balm
to Mary’s loving heart. Often, too, did Miss Barter’s
words recur with pleasure to her thoughts, imparting
to her strength for the present, and hope for the time
to come.

Words! how lavish—oftentimes, heedlessly lavish—
are we all of them! and yet, when wisely and lovingly
spoken, how full of might are they to the weak, of
music to the sorrowful, and of teaching to the tempted
and the ignorant! Let us then take heed to our
words, lest we pain those unawares whom it ought te
be our aim to cheer and comfort along the chequered
pathway of life.

IX,

A SEASON OF EXPECTATION,

Crcrt’s Midsummer holidays were begun, and he now
formed part of the family circle at Homehurst. Gladly
was he welcomed both by his mother and sisters, who
were, as yet, but imperfectly acquainted with him; for
previous to Mrs. Osborne’s return home, his vacations
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

were usually spent at the house of an uncle, because his
grandmother’s health was too infirm to admit of her
having so many youthful guests around her. Cecil was
a merry, light-hearted boy, possessing good abilities and
but little application ; apt to get into scrapes, and often,
from mere heedlessness, annoying those whom he loved
best. He was, in short, one of those whose future
course seemed to depend much upon the influences by
which he was surrounded,

On first coming home he was at once drawn to his
pretty, playful sister Edith, who was ever ready to
share in his frolics and to join in his merriment. Mary
he regarded as a “‘ phenomenon of prudence,” and his
usual appellation of her was “Old Wisdom ;” a title
which was not pleasing to the young girl, especially as
she felt within herself the capability of appreciating
fun and humour, whenever her heart was suffered to
expand a little beneath the genial influence of kindness
and of love. But she bore her brother’s bantering
well, and gladly helped him, when, as was usually the
ease, he came to seek her aid in any boyish difficulty or
trouble. Mrs. Osborne was proud of her handsome
son ; but she was by no means pleased at his engrossing
so much of Hdith’s company, and hinted to her more
than once, that she seemed to care much less about
being in the drawing-room since Cecil’s return home.

“Where are Cecil and Hdith P” inquired Mrs. Os-
borne of her eldest daughter one morning when the
breakfast table was prepared, and neither of her younger
children appeared.

“They have just run out into the garden,” replied
Mary, “but Iam sure they will be here immediately.
Shall I go and call them, mamma?”
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

“No, my dear, you need not be so officious,” said
Mrs. Osborne, who was out of humour at Hdith’s
seeming neglect of her.

Mary coloured up and remained silent. A few
moments later, Cecil and Edith entered the room.
Edith, as usual, threw herself in her mother’s arms,
but did not meet quite so warm a response as she was
accustomed to receive.

“Where have you been?” asked Mrs. Osborne.
“‘ Breakfast has been ready these five minutes, and I
cannot be kept waiting for my children.”

“T went to take a race in the garden with Cecil,”
was Hdith’s prompt reply.

“ Ah! I thought it was Cecil’s fault,” observed Mrs.
Osborne, glancing towards her son.

“ No, indeed,” cried out Cecil, in a tone of indigna-
tion. ‘“ Hdith knows that it was she who called me
out just as I was on my way to the breakfast-parlour.”

“T said nothing to the contrary,” replied Hdith.
“ But I think, at all events, that Mary might have told
us that breakfast was ready,” added she, pouting, for
she was quite unused to the slightest expression of
displeasure from her mother’s lips, and consequently
felt out of humour with everybody around her. Mary
remained silent, fearing to irritate her mother by the
slightest attempt at self-exculpation.

“T would not allow her to do so,” said Mrs. Osborne,
who was not unobservant of her silence, nor altcgether
unconscious of the feeling that caused it.

Breakfast over, the two young girls retired with
Miss Barter to their usual course of morning studies.
Cecil, taking up a newspaper, threw himself into an
easy chair, and yawned aloud.
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

“Tam afraid you already begin to find it dull at
home,” observed his mother.

“Oh, no, ’tis quite jolly to be with you all again,”
replied he ; “and many a time have I longed to have my
mother and sisters to care a little about me; but one
misses at first the lot of young fellows who are always
ready fora lark. Girls are not up to that sort of thing,
you know; although,” added he, with an air of incipient
manly superiority, “they are very well in their own
way.”

His mother could not refrain from smiling, but she
said, in reply, that she hoped before long he might have
some companions better suited to him, and that mean-
while she would indulge him now and then with a
pony to take a ride over the hills.

“You are areal trump,” cried out Cecil, springing
up from his lounging attitude, “‘and by way of crowning
the matter, do let me have a scamper to-day.”

“Yes, the weather is so fine that it is a pity you
should not fully enjoy it,” replied Mrs. Osborne, looking
pleasantly at her son; “but,” added she more gravely,
“don’t teach Hdith any of those strange words you are
so fond of using. She is so quick and clever that she
would pick them up immediately, and it would displease
me much if, for instance, I heard her calling me ‘a
trump’ as you have just done.”

“‘Oh, she has picked up a score of them already,”
replied Cecil, laughing, “but I shall endeavour to speak
for the future in the most approved school-room fashion.
And now Iam off to look for a pony, a spanking one
he must be to suit my taste. Good-bye.” And off ran
the merry boy in pursuit of a fitting steed.

On the evening of this same day, when the young
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

people were gathered together around their mother’s
tea-table, she communicated to them the joyful news that
by a letter just received from their father, he might be
expected home in the course of a few weeks, as he had
written from Calcutta to say that he meant to return
home on pressing business by the next overland mail,
and that immediately on reaching England he would
hasten to Malvern to embrace his wife and children.
“We may, perhaps, at first feel a little strange to each
other,” wrote he, “but I hope that my children will
quickly learn to love their father.”

“We shall not need to learn it,” observed Mary
to her mother, “for I am sure we love papa dearly
already.”

* Oh, how jolly it will be to have him amongst us !”
cried out Hdith, as she danced round the table with
pleasure.

“ Jolly !” exclaimed Mrs. Osborne; “I must beg of
you never to let me hear you use again any slang of
that sort; it may do very well for schoolboys perhaps,
but a more refined language is suitable for young ladies.
I wonder that Miss Barter has allowed you to adopt
such words as that.”

“Oh, I take care not to say anything of that sort
before her; she is so precise.”

“A perfect Argus,’ exclaimed Cecil, laughing.
“But she is one of the right sort after all, for she has
a good opinion of me.”

“A good opinion of you! Pray, how did you learn
that ?” asked Mrs. Osborne, with a smile.

“T know it perfectly by the kind way that she
jooks and talks to me. She does not say, ‘ Master
Cecil, be quiet ;’ ‘Master Cecil, you are a perfect nui-
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

sance in the school-room,” as my cousin’s governess
used often to do, an old quiz as she was; so I say, ‘ Bar-
ter for ever!’ tossing up his cap in the air just at the same
moment that Miss Barter entered the room to join the
family party at tea. A half-suppressed smile was ex-
changed between the young people. Mrs. Osborne was
too well bred to betray any sign of confusion.

“ Cecil, go and put away your cap,” said she, “this
is no place for it;” and on turning to Miss Barter, in-
formed her of the news that had been just received, and
which was listened to by Miss Barter with evident plea-
sure, for she knew how to sympathize in the gladness of
those around her.

The ensuing month was one of longing expectation
at Homehurst, and many were the discussions that took
place among the younger members of the circle as to
what might be the result of their father’s return home.

At length it was announced by the telegraph that
the Indian mail steamer had reached Marseilles, and the
days began to be counted up to the: time of Mr.
Osborne’s expected arrival. Mrs. Osborne’s anxiety to
see him again made her more nervous than usual; a
small matter sufficed to irritate or excite her. “‘ Will
you never learn to shut the door quietly ?” said she to
Cecil, as he came briskly into the room to tell her of
some plan he had formed for the day. The boy looked
rather crestfallen at this reproof, which was uttered in
a sharp tone of voice. Immediately afterwards Edith
rushed into the room, and throwing her arms round her
mother’s neck, besought leave to ride up the Worces-
tershire beacon on a pony with Cecil.

“Tt will be so jolly for us two to scamper over the
hills together.”
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

“ Jolly again! Ihave already desired you not to use
those schoolboy expressions, and as for allowing you to
ride alone with Cecil, that is quite out of the question ;
you are both too young and giddy to be trusted
together.”

“ Giddy!” re-echoed they both together. “I consi-
der myself a model of steadiness,” said Cecil, “only a
very little inferior to Old Wisdom herself.”

“Pray, who is this Old Wisdom with whom you are
comparing yourself?” inquired Mrs. Osborne.

“That is the name he has given Mary,” said Edith,
laughing.

Atanother time Mrs. Osborne would only have smiled
at the nickname bestowed upon her eldest daughter, but
just now she was a little jealous of Edith, who since her
brother’s arrival had been much less assiduous in her
attendance on her mother. Therefore, she observed that
it wasa bad habit to give nicknames to others, and then
reiterated her refusal for the reasons already assigned.

“ Besides,’ added she, addressing Ndith, “ you seem
quite to have forgotten that I had promised to take you
a, drive to-day to Cowley Park. I remember the time
when nothing seemed so pleasant to you as being with
your mother; but matters are changed now, and I am
favoured with much less of your company than a little
while ago. Not thatit makes much difference to me,
but for your own sake, I wish you to be a little more
consistent in your conduct. Mary will be my com-
panion to-day, so I do not require you to accompany
me.”

The poisoned barb of jealousy entered, alas! but
too easily into Edith’s heart, for she could not endure a
rival in her mother’s fondness, even though it might be


PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

found in the person of a loving sister. She threw her-
self passionately into her mother’s arms, calling her by
many an endearing name, and saying that no one else
could love her ‘darling mamma as she did.

“Imust and will_go with you to-day,” said she,
“no one shall prevent mie.’

Mrs. Osborne gave way to this outburst of im-
petuosity ; and so she was accompanied by both her



























daughters in her afternoon drive to Cowley Park,
whose peaceful rural beauty might fittingly have dis-
pelled each passing cloud in the human heart; but
Edith gave no heed to the still sweet voice of Nature
that breathed around. She sat sullenly opposite to her
mother, who, by way of piquing her a little, addressed
her conversation chiefly to Mary, and showed unwonted
regard to her opinions and feelings. Mary, who knew
nothing of what had so recently passed, was full of
happiness on finding herself thus kindly treated by her
mother. The hidden poetry of her nature was called
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

forth by the scenes around her, and Irs. Osborne was
surprised to find herself both cheered and elevated by
the society of her eldest daughter.

On reaching home, she said, “ You have really made
my drive very pleasant to-day, but I cannot say as
much for Edith; she has taken care not to contribute
much to our amusement.”

Edith looked sullen and downcast. As soon as Mary
was alone with her, she inquired, in a kind tone,
whether she was unwell. No reply was vouchsafed to
her.

“Do tell me, dearest Hdith. I cannot bear to think
you may have some suffering that J know not of.”

So saying, Mary placed her arm tenderly round her
sister’s neck. Hdith started back from her touch as if
it had been the fang of a viper.

“You are a hypocrite, Mary. You know very weil
what is the matter with me; and you want to worm
yourself into mamma’s good graces. But you never can
take my place, do what you will; nor will she ever care
for you half as much as she does for me, that I can tell
you; for she thinks you too grave and too plain. I
heard her say so myself.”

Never before had Edith allowed such cruel words to
escape her lips, nor would she have done so now if the
darker side of her nature had not been suffered to gain
a passionate ascendancy over her. Oh! when shall we
all learn to check the tide of evil at its very source,
before the downward torrent rushes on so as to defy
our own unaided efforts to resist it?

Scarcely had Edith uttered these words, when, in
spite of all her inconsiderateness, she bitterly repented
having spoken them, But the arrow had sped its way
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

to Mary’s heart. Despite her habit of self-coutrol, she
burst into tears.

“Oh, Edith! I am no hypocrite,” said she, “ and
as for wishing to supplant you in any way, I love you
too dearly for that. Are you not my own darling
sister, whose happiness is dearer to me than that of
any other being on earth, save one?”

Edith was now overwhelmed with shame .and sor-
row. She threw herself into Mary’s arms, entreated
her forgiveness, spoke of herself in the most humi-
liating terms, and even confessed that she had exagge-
rated her mother’s words concerning Mary’s appearance.

“Indeed, you are worth a hundred of me every
way ; | know it well. Do love me and forgive me, my
own dear sister.”

Words like these were interrupted by sobs so violent
and convulsive, that Mary, even by the tenderest as-
surances and warmest caresses, could scarcely still the
evief of her impulsive sister. She at length drew her
into the garden, where the silent beauty of the fragrant
shrubs, and the sweet song of birds, helped to allay
Hdith’s agitation. But one word of Mary’s contributed,
perhaps, more than aught else to quiet her excited
spirit.

“Have I so much to be forgiven?” asked she
glancing upwards to the cloudless sky, which seemed
to look down upon them with a serene aspect; “have
Iso much to be forgiven? and can I fail to forgive
what is so little, so very little, in comparison ?”

“Ah!” replied Edith, “you are much better than
Lam.”

“Hush, hush! interposed Mary, quickly, “or you
will now really offend me.”
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

“Will you pray for me, Mary ?”

“Yes, now and ever, dearest Hdith.”

The sisters were at this moment called in to th
studies. One gentle kiss sealed their reconciliatior
Edith was more softened and subdued than usual in
her manner, and Mary, though still retaining a painful
impression of the words which had been so heedlessly
uttered by her sister, yet enjoyed that calm peacefulness
of spirit which cannot be destroyed by aught of earth,
for it is a plant of heavenly growth.



iY.
JOY IN THE HOME.

Iris a warm summer evening, and the whole family
party are gathered together on a grassy plot in the
garden, beneath the shade of an outspreading mulberry
tree: chairs and tables have been brought out, and tea
is laid there by desire of Mrs. Osborne, and in compli-
ance with the wishes of her son, who helps to lay out
all sorts of good things on the table, and says it will
turn out quite a jolly affair. A servant approaches Mrs.
Osborne, and presents her with a telegraphic message,
which she unfolds with a trembling hand, for her heart
misgives her lest it should prove the bearer of some
unwelcome tidings.

“Arrived at Southampton. Off immediately to
Malvern.—H. C. 0.”

Mrs. Osborne’s emotion was so great that the mes-
sage dropped from her hand. Cecil picked it up and
read it aloud.
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

“Hurrah! Papa will be here immediately. Look
here! It is dated 6 a.m, and by the carelessness of
some rascally official, it has been delayed on the road.”

Scarcely had he said this when the sound of car-
riage wheels were heard outside the garden wall. All
sprang to their feet. Cecil rushed to the garden door,
and there, at the entrance of the house, stood acab laden
with luggage, and a gentleman inquiring whether this
was the residence of Mrs. Osborne. One glance passed
between them. No introduction was required. “My
father !” “My son.” A moment or two later and Mr.
Osborne found himself clasped in the arms of his wife,
with his children clinging around him—one of those
happy moments in life which more than compensate
for years of anxiety and care.

Miss Barter had the good taste and discretion to
withdraw from this family meeting. She felt that no
stranger’s eye should rest upon a scene in which all were
bound together by the dearest and closest ties.

Mr. Osborne looked round upon his children, and
seemed lovingly to scan their countenances. “ Mary's
eyes are very like yours, my love,” said he, addressing
his wife. Mary coloured up with pleasure at this ob-
servation, for she had feared in her inmost heart that
her father too might be prejudiced against her by the
““plainness” of her looks.

“Edith is generally thought to be most like me,”
replied Mrs. Osborne.

“Her features are so, perhaps,” rejoined her hus-
band ; “but they will both be all the dearer to me for
bearing some resemblance to their mother. And Cecil,
my boy, let me see who you are like, You remind me
of my own father, and you could not be like a worthier
PREJUDICH LOST, AND LOVE WON.

man. But where is Miss Barter? I had a glimpse of
her on first coming in here, and I wish to thank her for
her good care of our children in our absence.”

Edith ran to call Miss Barter, who quickly made
her appearance, and received gratefully the expression
of Mr. Osborne’s thankfulness to her.

The evening sun glimmered through the branches
of the fruit-bearing mulberry tree, so that both sky and
earth seemed to harmonize with the joy of this reunited
family.

Mr. Osborne was in most respects as different as
possible from his wife, to whom he was not the less
devotedly attached ; a plain, intelligent man of business,
upright in his dealings, acute in observation, and yet
unsuspicious in his temper, caring but little for the
pomps or pleasures of life, and yet anxious that
his wife should enjoy them all. Before many hours
were gone by, he seemed to have read clearly the cha-
racters and dispositions of his children. His eye rested
with peculiar complacency on Mary, whose countenance
gained a new charm from the consciousness she felt of
her father’s preference. He overheard a pettish reply
of Hdith’s to some wish expressed to her by Miss Bar-
ter, and the next time he was alone with his wife he
asked her whether Edith was not a little spoiled.

“Oh no,” replied her fond mother ; ‘‘ but she is very
sensitive, and the poor darling cannot bear being found
fault with. Don’t you think that she promises to be a
lovely creature ?”

“Yes, she is very pretty, and knows it, perhaps, a
little too well. Mary’s eyes are much finer, and though
her features are not regular they are far more expres-
sive than Hdith’s; but,” added he, on perceiving a light
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

cloud flitting across his wife’s countenance, “th ney are
both very nice creatures, and will, I hope, prove a great
comfort to us when they area little older. Cecil, too, is
a fine-spirited boy, but will require a little manage-
ment.

After a few days spent most Nana: in the bosom of
his family, Mr. Osborne went upto London on business,
and wrote shortly afterwards to acquaint his wife that

a large speculation in which he had been engaged pro-
mised to turn out so advantageously that he had re-
solved not to return to India, but to settle at once at
home, and that he was now in treaty for a mansion in
Belgravia. “ There, ” he continued, ‘you will enjoy all
the comforts and luxuries of. life, and our daughters will
_have the advantage of the best masters; and when they
are old enough to be introduced into dai, they will
be so under the most favourable circumstances.”

Cecil had already returned to school; but the young
girls were informed of the arrang ie their father
had made for a residence i in town. ‘The idea was fall of
novelty to them, and they were both alike pleased with
: the anticipation. Many were the questions asked of

' Miss Barter, who had long lived in London, and who

opened out to them a vista of unbounded promise—so
rich and varied are the sources of interest to all ages
and all minds in our British metropolis.

‘ But we shall have no. pretty lanes and ereen fields
-to walk in,” said Mary, inquiringly. ~

_ “And no hills to climb, or ponies to ride upon,”

exclainred Hdith, xe

“Tb only results in one plain fact that meets us in
every passage of our life,” replied Miss Barter, “that
as no landscape is without shadow, so no position of life
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON,

but must have its drawbacks. The great secret: of
enjoyment is to look rather at the sunshine of our daily
path than at the darker spots that may be in view.” _

Now came a time of bustle and of packing—a time
which has always many charms for very young people
whose imaginations teem with images of some fairy
land of brightness and of beauty which looms in the
unknown future that lies before them; nor would we
wish to. disenchant them of their dreams, The graver
realities of life come soon enough to all. 7

y.

LIFE IN LONDON, —

A MANSION in Belgravia, furnished with almost Eastern
magnificence; a long train of servants waiting to supply
every want, and attend on every caprice; a handsome
equipage for out-of-door recreation and exercise—such
were the aspects of the new home to which Mr.
Osborne conducted his family in the winter of 185—.
Mrs. Osborne enjoyed her position with that languid
sort of satisfaction felt by ladies who have been used to
a life of luxurious ease in India.

Mary was by no means indifferent to all the charm- >
ing novelties by which she was surrounded, and spent
much time in examining the treasures of Hastern art
which her parents had brought home with them.

_ dith was enchanted with everything about her, and it

was long before she could bo persuaded to settle down
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

to any sort of occupation. Fortunately for her, Miss
‘Barter was absent for a while visiting her friends; and
so Edith was allowed a long holiday. But the longest
holiday must have an end, and the last day of Miss
Barter’s absence had now arrived.

Edith ran restlessly from the conservatory to the
drawing-room; bestowing her admiration anew upon
fragrant hot-house plants, Indian pagodas of delicately
carved ivory, rich stuffs embroidered with gold and
beeties’ wings, quaint antique cabinets, filled with ob-

jects of rare and costly workmanship, until she was
- fairly exhausted by her efforts to be amused, and threw
herself into’an arm-chair in her mother’s boudoir, where
Mrs. Osborne was resting on a chaise longue by the
fireside. Mary stood by her side with the small paint-
ing which has already been described, but which was
now set ina plain but handsome frame, suited to its
intended place in her mother’s dressing-room. Mrs.
Osborne seemed pleased with her daughter’s gift, and
Mary looked supremely happy.

Just then her father entered the room, and, looking
-at the picture, “Is this your work?” asked he of Mary,
On being answered in the affirmative; “There is a
great deal of talent both in the composition and
colouring,” said he, “‘and I hope you will do one for
my dressing-room too. I shall like much to have it
ere, ’

Mary blushed with pleasure at her father’s praise,
‘but she observed with pain a cloud passing over her
mother’s brow, as Mr. Osborne inquired whether Edith
had any talent for drawing. Though Mrs. Osborne had
of late been somewhat soln in her feelings towards
Mary, yet she could not endure that there should, even —
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

by implication, be any comparison unfavourable to her
darling Edith.

“No,” replied she, “but she ag a. delightfal talent
for music, and has the promise ‘of a charming voice.
You must remember that she is a mere child yet, and
we must not expect too much from her.” 3

“Tam afraid she is an idle little puss,” said Mr.
Osborne, smiling good-naturedly at her, “and likes play
better than work.”

“Tam going to take you both out for a drive in the
park,” said Mrs. Osborne to her daughters, “and you
may go and put on your things.”

Scarcely had they left the room when she observed
to her husband, that he must take care not to spoil
Mary by praising her too much, as she was just at an
age when it was es to bring Fone girls too
forward.

“There does not seem to me much peril in that
quarter,” replied Mr. Osborne, “ for Mary is rather shy
and timid. Hdith is far more likely to be easily spoiled,
as she seems pretty well satisfied with herself, and never
hesitates to give her oe on any matter that may
be discussed before her.” |
_. “You must not be hard upon that poor child,” said
Mrs. Osborne. “She is so much admired by every
one, that it is natural, perhaps, that she should be a
little Bers but that will all wear off when she gets |
- more sense.’

“Well, my dear, you, of course, must know best;
but I have always understood that vanity does 3,
diminish as a young lady advances in her teens. Lhope
that whatever personal advantages they may either lack —
or possess, they will both turn out amiable, sensible —
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

women, and then they will prove a comfort to us in
our advancing years.” :

Life went on for about a couple of years in an easy
course at the mansion in Haton Square. Mary and
Hdith were busily engaged with the best masters under
Miss Barter’s kind superintendence, and they each
made rapid progress in their favourite accomplish-
ments.. Mary devoted much of her time, also, to the
more solid branches of education. But the pretty
light-hearted Edith gave but little attention to any

study beside that of music, in which she became such a

proficient, that her talent was often exhibited and
applauded at the matinées musicales given by her
mother. Her father having asked her one evening to
sing for him the simple melody of ‘* Home, Sweet
Home,” she excused herself by saying that she had
been taught only German and Italian music. Hdith
had not yet learned the happiness of contributing to
the charm of her own domestic circle.

Mrs. Osborne became gradually more and more en-
grossed in a round of dinner and evening parties, in
which her husband often reluctantly shared, as his
time and thoughts were fully occupied by the grave
business of making money. Had Mrs. Osborne been
gifted with a common share of observation, his often-
times clouded brow and absent manner might have
awakened her anxiety. The more thoughtful Mary,
now verging on womanhood, was not unmindful of the
change in her father’s aspect, and more than once he
caught her eye resting on him with a look of affection-
ate anxiety. Atsuch times he would begin to talk in
an unconcerned tene on some ordinary topic, so as to
disarm her suspicions.
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON,

' Mrs. Osborne, herself, was startled one day by the
sternness of his manner, when, in réply to. Cecil, who
petitioned for some boyish indulgence, enjoyed by many
of his comrades, he replied, that he must learn to con-
tract rather than increase his expenses; adding that
the youths of the present day were all men before —
their time, and that he would have none of that sort of
extravagance in his family. ‘The tone in which he
said this differed so much from his usual manner that
his wife looked at him with surprise. He observed her
glance, and hastily left the room. Cecil said that there
were storms brewing in the higher atmosphere, and that
he would retreat as fast as possible from their nearer
approach. Mrs. Osborne, who loved her husband too
well to suffer even a covert allusion that was unfavour-
able to him, desired Cecil to remember that his father
had always a good reason for his decisions, and that he
must not presume to question them. Cecil whistled
and left the room. Inttle did Mrs. Osborne surmise
how full of serious reality was the metaphor which had
been so lightly made use of by her son!



VI,

ADVERSE DAYS.

A rnw days subsequent to the conversation that has just
been related, Mr. Osborne was sitting in his study with |
a pile of papers before him, some of which he was in-
vestigating with an anxious perplexed look, when a gentle
tap was heard at his door. ‘Come in,” he cried out.
Mary entered the room, bearing in her handsa small
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

picture. ‘You asked me long ago,” she said, “to doa
painting for your dressing-room; but until now, I have
failed in my attempts to accomplish anything that in the
least satisfied me. My master said yesterday that this
was my very best; and so I hope you will kindly give
it a place in your room. I wish I had been able to do
something more worthy ofa place there.”

“Come, let me look at it,.my child,” said Mr.
Osborne, drawing her gently towards him. ‘More
worthy!” he exclaimed; “it is quite a chef-d'wuvre, and
ought to be placed in a public exhibition rather than
be hidden in my room. And the subject is so fresh and
pleasing! Let me see. ‘There is a cottager’s wife
standing at her door, with an infant in her arms, while
with one hand she shades her eyes from the evening
sun that she may the better disccrn hor husband, who
is returning home from his work, with a spade over his
shoulder—a pleasing subjeet, and poctically rendered
too; all bespeaks peace and contentment. The house-
ee is, I perceive, already wagging his tail with canine
delight ; and the overshadowing ash-trec is tinged with
golden hues by the setting sun. The sight of such
simple happiness will help to cheer me when I am
overdone with the cares and toils of business. But,
Mary, you seem to have a great liking for cottages; how
would you like to live in one P”’

‘Mary was struck by the seriousness of her father’s
face as he asxed this question.

‘““T love the country very much,” she replied, “ and
could live happily in the nee house, where I had
oe and mamma with me.’

>, Osborne gazed earnestly at her fora moment.
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PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

dear mother—she is so ill able to bear it; and yet it
must be broken to her, before long, that she will have
to give up her house, carriage, and retinue of servants,
and live in a quiet humble way to which she has never
been accustomed. I do not wish the public prints to
acquaint her first that her husband is likely to be a
bankrupt.”

“A bankrupt!” re-echoed Mary, Icoking pale and
startled, for she had no experience in matters of busi-
ness; and the idea of bankruptcy was associated in her
mind with guilt and disgrace.

Mr. Osborne quickly read her fears, and allayed
them by saying, “ Thank God, however, I have done
nothing to disgrace my family or tarnish my own good
name. If I amruined, it is owing chiefly to the un-
principled recklessness of others whom I trusted too
implicitly.”

‘Ah, dearest papa! shall we not still be happy, since
we are all left to each other?” asked Mary; and then
added, in a lower and more timid voice, “ Other and far
higher treasures are still within our reach, such as no
evil man can rob us of now, or for ever and ever.”

“You are right, my child,” replied he; “ but amid
the turmoil of business I have almost forgotten this
treasure. Perhaps my present misfortune may teach
me to value it more. But what are we to do about your
mother? Who shall break this sad affair to her ?”’

“ You, papa,” replied Mary, in a tone of decision not
habitual to her; “she loves you so dearly that it is best
she should hear it from your own lips. It would not
do for me,” added she, colouring, “to speak to her of |
it; otherwise, I would gladly save you the trial of doing
50.”
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

“You are right,” said Mr. Osborne; “and I will do
so at once.”. Then pressing his lips on his daughter’s
fair open brow, he smiled sadly as he said, ‘‘ Wherever
may be my home, your painting shall be my daily com-
fort. It will remind me of what you have been now
saying. God bless you, my child,” said he, gravely, as
Mary left the room. —

The task of acquainting his wife with their reverse
of fortune proved in some respects less painful than Mr.
Osborne had anticipated. Mrs. Osborne was, in many
respects, a weak woman, but she was devotedly attached
to her husband; and a true wifely affection 1s a marvel-
lous strengthener and refiner in times of sorrow or dis-
appointment. After the first shock was over, she
thought chiefly of her husband’s trials, nor did she
yet realize the many privations and mortifications that
must await her in so total a change of circumstances.

The mansion in Haton Square, with its costly furni-
ture, was sold; Mary employing some pocket-money
she had treasured up for other purposes, in preserving,
through Miss Barter’s agency, her mother’s pretty work-
table and a couple of easy chairs which her parents were
wont to occupy by their evening fireside.

Mrs. Osborne was much pained by the passionate
regrets expressed by Hdith at the change in their cir-
cumstances; and yet, with all her wonted fondness, she
made excuses for her when she overheard Mr. Osborne
reprove her for her selfish sorrow. The peaceful con-
tentedness of her sister spoke, however, more powerfully
to her heart than his well-merited rebuke.

Unclouded prosperity had not been favourable to
Hdith’s character. Perhaps the hour of adversity may
have some happier and wiser lesson in store for her.
PREJUDICE LOST, AND LOVE WON.

Mr. Osborne had engaged a small house in the
neighbourhood of London, from whence he could reach
the city daily by railway. And now the day arrived
when they had to remove to their new home. It
was a trying moment for all, when a cab drove up
to the door for the purpose of conveying them to the
railway station. Mary was pale, but perfectly calm.
Tears sped their silent way down Mrs. Osborne’s cheeks,
though she sought to conceal them from her husband’s
anxious eyes; Hdith was convulsed with sobs which she
vainly strived to check. Mary put her arm gently
around her, and whispered to her, ‘‘ Dearest Edith, you
have us all still to love, and won’t you help me to cheer
mamma ?”

* Yes, I will try to do so,” murmured out Hdith,
as she received Bully’s cage, which Anne had handed
into the carriage, and then seemed intent on taking care
of her little favourite. A very brief railway journey
brought them close to their new home, one of a row of
small houses, rejoicing in the name of Prospect Terrace.
although the only view they afforded was a small patch
of flower garden in front, and a few dusty shrubs which
partially concealed the road outside. Mrs. Osborne
smiled faintly as her husband