Citation
Florida citrus spray and dust schedule

Material Information

Title:
Florida citrus spray and dust schedule
Series Title:
Circular
Creator:
University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Annual
regular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
13 v. : ; 23 cm. (folded)

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Citrus -- Diseases and pests -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Spraying and dusting in agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida ( lcsh )
Pests -- Control -- Periodicals ( lcsh )
Genre:
serial ( sobekcm )
periodical ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
1967-197.
Issuing Body:
Issued by: Florida Citrus Commission Advisory Committee, 1967-1969; by the Florida Dept. of Citrus Advisory Committee, 1970-1973.
General Note:
Description based on: 1976 edition.
Statement of Responsibility:
University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
AAA6878 ( LTQF )
AJE8131 ( LTUF )
08265255 ( OCLC )
027501660 ( ALEPHBIBNUM )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Better fruit program.
Succeeded by:
Florida citrus spray guide.
Related Item:
PALMM Version

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text


January 1974 Circular 393

FLORIDA CITRUS

SPRAY

AND DUST

SCHEDULE

111W74

Effective and Safe Use of Agricultural Chemicals
in Citrus Production



Before using any pesticide:


Read the complete label
Read the Precautions in this
schedule

This program was compiled by the University of
Florida. lsitite.~nf ia &nces, and
U. S.,Departrltnt of rru Research
Service, .jtBJ~wyicetiC di rms|

F6r addition ip(rmratbn 'corsult your county Ex-
tensi n Director.

i...S. ilniv. of Florida|
Florida CooperatlextWExfM it S!eice
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
University of Florida, Gainesvllle







RESTRICTIONS ON PESTICIDE USE

The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency or authorized state agen-
cies have approved labels for the pesticides mentioned in this Schedule,
prescribing conditions for their safe use, and establishing waiting periods
between application and harvest that will ensure the residues on fresh fruit
grown will not exceed the federally established tolerance. If used prehar-
vest, no limiting tolerances have been set for sulfur, copper, zinc, man-
ganese, and oil.
The following table is extracted from the EPA Compendium of Regis-
tered Pesticides as of December 1, 1973, and from registered state labels.


Dosage
Pesticide Lb. actual/acre


Waiting days (wd)
And other limitations
(see footnote)


Carzol SP 4.6$ 7 wd; registered for oranges, lemons,
grapefruit and tangerines
Chlorobenzilate 3.75 NTL
Comite 7.5 7 wd; registered only for oranges,
grapefruit and lemons. Do not
apply more than twice per year
Delnav 12.5 NTL; on lemon and lime do not apply
more than twice in 1 year; do not
make second application within
4 months after first
On other citrus do not reapply
within 3 months if fruit is present
during first application
Diazinon 10.0 21 wd
Difolatan 80.0 Do not apply when mature fruit is on
tree
Dimethoate 15 wd. when used at dosage of 0.5 Ib.
actual/100 gal. water. Regis-
tered for oranges, grapefruit,
tangerines and lemons; do not
apply during bloom period. Make
no more than 2 applications to
mature fruit
Ethion 10.0 30 wd; on grapefruit and orange only
7.5 21 wd; on lemon and lime; do not
apply more than once per
season
7.5 NTL; on grapefruit, orange, tangelo,
tangerine do not repeat within 90
days and do not apply more than
twice per season on tangerines
Ferbam 40.0 NTL
Guthion 7.5 28 wd; where 2 applications per
season; do not apply more than 2
times per fruit year
7 wd; where 1 application per season
Kelthane 8.0 7 wd
Lead arsenate 5.4 NTL; white grapefruit only, 1 to 6
weeks after bloom
2.6 NTL; pink and red grapefruit only, 1
to 6 weeks after bloom
Malathion 25.0 7 wd; do not apply during full bloom
Meta Systox-R 7 wd; do not apply more than twice
per season. Registered for
oranges, grapefruit, and lemons
Parathion 10.0 30 wd
4.0 14 wd
Phosphamidon 15.0 15 wd. Registered for only grapefruit,
lemon, orange and tangerine







Plictran 2.8 NTL; registered for oranges,
grapefruit, tangerines, lemons,
and limes only
Systox 2.5 21 wd; on orange, grapefruit and
lemon only
Torak 10.0 7 wd; do not apply more than twice a
year. Do not make a second
application within 3 months if
fruits were present on the tree at
the time of the first application
Trithion 5.0 30 wd
3.75 14 wd; 30 days required between
applications
2.5 NTL; 30 days required between
applications

tAll pesticides listed are registered for use on orange, grapefruit, tangerine, lime,
lemon, and tangelo unless otherwise noted in table.
(Carzol is limited to 4.6 Ib. per acre per year.
NTL= No time limitation; i.e., no waiting days required between last application and
harvest unless otherwise specified in table.


PRECAUTIONS

All precautions on the labels of pesticide containers should be read and
observed at all times with all pesticides.
Pesticides should not be discharged in or near the immediate vicinity of
any body of water. Furthermore, due care should be exercised by anyone
adding pesticides to spray tanks or other pesticide application equipment
to preclude contamination of any body of water.
Protective canopies should be placed on tractors pulling airblast
sprayers in order to minimize the hazards of spray drift to the operator.
Florida regulations require labels to carry instructions for decon-
tamination and disposal of empty containers of highly toxic pesticides.
Read and heed these instructions. Do not reuse containers.
Wash spray equipment daily to avoid hazardous accumulations.
All highly toxic pesticides should be kept in locked storage and never
be removed from the spray job.
Do not use pesticide chemicals where drift may be a hazard to the
public.
Waiting periods established by EPA (See Panel 1) should be observed
to ensure that the residue tolerances will not be exceeded. Additional
waiting periods intended to safeguard workers in sprayed groves may soon
be announced under authority of the Occupational Safety and Health Act.
Everyone responsible for grove operations should become thoroughly
familiar with the regulations when announced.
Special Precautions when Using Parathion, Guthion, Phosphamidon,
Systox, Torak, or Carzol.
1. When mixing and applying sprays, use a chemical cartridge res-
pirator approved for the specific pesticide, and wear protective clothing,
long sleeves, a washable rain hat, and natural rubber boots and gloves.
2. Start with clean clothing each day, and change if garments become
wet with spray. If a liquid formulation is spilled on garments, remove them
at once and take a bath. Take a thorough bath as soon as the work day is
finished.
3. Wash hands before eating or smoking.
4. Spray crews regularly using these materials should receive
cholinesterase tests before spraying begins and at 10-day intervals
thereafter.

OTHER SOURCES OF INFORMATION

This Schedule does not include descriptions of or recommendations
for control of all minor pests or pests occurring infrequently. See "Florida
Guide to Citrus Insects, Diseases, and Nutritional Disorders"; Fla. Agr. Ext.

3






Cir. 137C, "Insects and Mites of Florida Citrus"; IFAS "Florida Insect
Control Guide"; and IFAS "Florida Plant Disease Control Guide"; quarterly
articles in "The Citrus Industry"; or consult your County Extension Direc-
tor.

PESTICIDE APPLICATION
Formulas in this schedule are for ground equipment only unless
otherwise specified.
For pesticides to be effective, thorough coverage of both inside and
outside foliage is essential. Although sulfur kills rust mite by fumigation as
well as by contact, all other recommended miticides and scalicides kill only
upon contact with the pest. Maximum control is possible only when sprays
contact the mites and scale insects by thoroughly wetting all fruit, leaf, and
twig surfaces before the pests can become numerous. Poor coverage
means poor control and costly failure.
Dilute sprays on mature citrus trees are greatly affected by insufficient
gallonage, poor distribution of spray, and increased ground speeds. Ma-
ture citrus trees of normal foliation require at least the height (in feet) of the
tree plus 5 gallons for adequate gallonage. Example: A 20-foot tree will
require 25 gallons. The sprayer should be nozzled to deliver two-thirds of
the volume of spray into the upper one-half of the tree. Airblast sprayers
should be pulled at 1 mph for maximum spray penetration. One mile per
hour is equivalent to 88 feet per minute.
Concentrate spray programs should be based on a dilute program that
has provided thorough coverage. Factors that make a concentrate spray
program successful include: (1) use only well-trained, competent spray
operators, (2) do not spray when the wind is above 8 mph in the grove, (3)
nozzle sprayer for two-thirds output in the upper one-half of the trees, (4)
reduce spray materials by 25% at 4X or higher concentrations to avoid
excessive residues, (5) do not exceed a ground speed of 1 mph, (6) use
concentrate oil sprays only upon recommendation of sprayer manufac-
turer, (7) shut sprayers off at the end of rows to avoid over-spraying, (8)
disconnect oscillators on dilute airblast machines at concentrations of 4X
or above.
Aerial applications are being made both commercially and
experimentally by helicopters and airplanes. Experimental data indicate
that citrus rust mites and aphids can be successfully controlled by aerial
applications, but scale insect control has not been demonstrated. The
following factors should be helpful in planning an aerial application: (1)
rates of material per acre should be equal to the quantity required for a
dilute spray (e.g. an acre requiring two 500-gallon tanks of dilute spray
should receive 2.5 pints of chlorobenzilate 4E), (2) materials should be
mixed with sufficient water to make 10 to 15 gallons of finished spray per
acre for mature groves and 5 to 10 gallons per acre in groves that require
one or less dilute tanks, (3) do not spray when wind is above 5 mph in the
grove, (4) spray only one row of trees per pass, (5) helicopter applications
are more effective at ground speeds of 20 to 25 mph between the tree rows,
(6) fixed wing aircraft should be operated at speeds specified by aircraft
manufacturers, and (7) use only materials having label approval for aerial
applications.

INSECTS AND THEIR CONTROL
SCALES, MEALYBUGS, AND WHITEFLIES
Citrus snow scale is the only armored scale insect that can be regarded
as a serious pest of Florida citrus. Citrus snow scale generally attacks the
woody portions of the tree but can at times overflow onto fruit and leaves.
Two dilute sprays per year, preferably at postbloom and summer, are
recommended. Thoroughness of application is more important than
selection of a scalicide. Complete coverage of all wood is essential.
Glover (long) scale, chaff scale, yellow scale, purple scale, and Florida
red scale are present in most groves. However, populations of these in-
sects should remain quite low unless parasite activity is seriously retarded.
Postbloom and summer scalicide sprays are recommended to prevent

4







persistent green spots on tangerines and other early varieties intended for
the fresh fruit market.
Black scale, brown soft scale, and green scale are only serious in
groves where parasite activity is retarded.
Mealybugs can best be controlled by applying a recommended
scalicide before the fruit becomes infested. Scalicides applied after the
fruit has set will kill mealybugs that are exposed but not those that have
settled under the button.
Whitefly larvae often become numerous on the lower leaf surfaces in
March, June, and September. A postbloom spray applied after the adult
females have deposited their eggs and followed by a summer scalicide
application, provides the best control of whiteflies.
Sooty mold forms a black film on the upper surfaces of leaves and fruit.
It grows on excretions from whiteflies, black scale, brown soft scale,
mealybugs, and aphids. It is prevented by controlling these insects. Sprays
containing oil loosen sooty mold and aid its removal by rain and wind.

SCALICIDES
Oil.-Only oils with specific properties are now recommended for citrus.
These are designated FC 435-66 and FC 412-66. Growers should use only
oils which conform to those specifications. Spray oil meeting FC 435-66
specifications has the greatest pesticidal action without excessive adverse
effect on tree and fruit in mid-summer. It is intended for application in June
and July. Oil meeting FC 412-66 specifications is a lighter oil and has the
minimum adverse effect on tree and crop consistent with adequate pes-
ticidal effect. It is recommended for applications made after August or
where tree growth is less vigorous due to weather or season. Oil is applied
as an emulsion, diluted to a specified concentration of actual oil in the final
spray mixture. See Table II.
A 1% oil emulsion is effective for the control of Glover, purple, chaff,
yellow, Florida red, black, and brown soft scale. It also controls whiteflies
and protects against greasy spot. Lower concentrations are used for
spider mite control and for loosening sooty mold.
Precautions in the use of oil include: Do not apply oil spray when trees
are wilting or near wilting. Do not apply oil and sulfur within 3 weeks of
each other. Oil spray applied after October 1 may increase susceptibility of
trees to cold damage and may reduce the fruit crop the following year. Oil
sprays applied in the fall may inhibit solids formation in the juice and retard
coloring of fruit, and should not be applied within 60 days of anticipated
harvest.
Parathion is effective for the control of mealybugs and for Glover, chaff,
purple, yellow, Florida red, snow, black, and cottony cushion scale.
Parathion is only effective against black scale when applied in mid-May
when there is a peak hatch of crawlers. Do not use parathion for control of
brown soft scale. Parathion may be applied in any month. Normally, use 2.5
pt. of parathion 4 liquid* per 500 gal. See discussion under mealybugs.
Guthlon is effective for the control of black, yellow, snow, Florida red,
chaff, Glover, purple scale, mealybugs, and whitefly. Black scale is effec-
tively controlled with a postbloom application of Guthion. While Guthion
can be used in any month of the year, its use is restricted to 2 applications
per year to fruit. The recommended dosage is 5.0 pt. of Guthion LC 2
liquid* per 500 gal. See discussion under citrus rust mite, mealybugs, and
whitefly. Guthion should not be used in highly alkaline sprays.
Malathion is substantially less hazardous than parathion or Guthion
and may be used for the control of Glover, purple, yellow, red, snow, and
brown soft scale. Malathion may be applied in any month. Use 6.0 pt. of
malathion 5 liquid* per 500 gal. for light infestations, and 10.0 pt. for
moderate or heavy infestations. Use the higher rate for snow, Glover, and
yellow scale control.

* See Table III for other formulations. Whenever necessary, liquid formulations are
designated by numbers which are the pounds of active ingredient per gallon of for-
mulation. Thus parathion 4 liquid means a liquid formulation containing 4 Ib. of actual
parathion per gal.






Diazinon is also substantially less dangerous than parathion or
Guthion, and is recommended only for the control of citrus snow scale. Use
5.0 pt. of diazinon 4 liquid per 500 gal.
Dimethoate is also substantially less dangerous than parathion or
Guthion, and may be used for the control of Glover, purple, chaff, yellow,
and Florida red scales. Dimethoate is not effective against citrus snow
scale and black scale. Use 4.0 pt. of dimethoate 2.67 liquid per 500 gal.
Ethion or trithion at 3.75 pt. of the 4 liquid* is effective against citrus
snow scale when thoroughly applied as a dilute spray for mite control. See
discussion under "Miticides."
Parathion-Oil, Malathion-Oil, or Ethlon-Oil.-The combination of 0.5 to
0.7% oil with 1.25 pt. of parathion 4 liquid* or with 5.0 pt. of malathion 5
liquid*, or with 3.75 pt. ethion 4 liquid* (see Tables II and III) is excellent for
the combined control of spider mites and scale. See discussion of oil under
"Scalicides" and of ethion under "Miticides."

APHIDS
Aphids may occur in sufficient numbers to cause severe curling of new
foliage and stunting of twigs. While trees of all ages may be attacked,
control measures are generally warranted only for young trees or top-
worked trees since the proportion of new growth to old is much higher than
in mature trees. However, aphids should be controlled on Temple orange
trees of all ages.
Phosphamidon and dimethoate are highly toxic to honeybees and
should not be used when possibility exists of poisoning foraging
honeybees at time of treatment or within a few days thereafter. Meta Sys-
tox-R and Systox are moderately toxic to honeybees and should not be
applied directly on the bees at time of treatment. Late afternoon treatment
would avoid this hazard.

APHICIDES
Meta Systox-R 2 liquid at 5.0 pt. per 500 gallons or Systox 2 liquid at 5.0
pt. per 500 gallons will provide good control of aphids and may be used on
bearing trees.
Phosphamidon 8 liquid at 5.0 pt. per 500 gal. is an effective aphicide
and may be used on trees of all ages.
Dimethoate 2.67 liquid at 4.0 pt. per 500 gal. also is an effective
aphicide. See "Scalicide" section.

MITES AND THEIR CONTROL
Citrus Rust Mite.-Whether citrus is grown for the fresh fruit market or
for processing, rust mite should be controlled at all times to prevent rus-
seting of the fruit and excessive leaf drop. Periodic inspections of young as
well as old trees should be made throughout the year, including the rainy
season, as rust mite is not controlled by rain. During dry windy periods, rust
mite may cause leafdrop similar to that caused by spider mites.
Spider Mites (Red Spiders).-This group name includes the six-spotted
mite, the citrus red mite, and the Texas citrus mite. The six-spotted mite, a
spring pest, infests the underside of the leaves, causes yellow spotting,
distortion of leaves, and, in severe infestations, heavy leaf-drop. Six-spot-
ted mite can be controlled with any of the materials listed for citrus red mite
control. The citrus red mite and the Texas citrus mite feed on leaves, fruit,
and green twigs. Both mites cause a grayish sand-blasted appearance on
leaves. During periods of dry weather, heavy infestations may cause leaf-
drop and twig injury which, if occurring in the fall or early winter, results in
dead twigs. Throughout the winter, inspect twigs as well as leaves for
infestations on summer and fall growth.

MITICIDES
Chlorobenzllate is available as a liquid concentrate containing 4 lb. per
gal. It is effective against rust mite at 1.25 pt. per 500 gal. of spray, but is of

See Table III for other formulations.







little value against spider mites. Chlorobenzilate should not be used in
alkaline solutions.
Carzol SP is available as a 92% active water soluble powder. It is ef-
fective against citrus rust mite at 5 to 10 oz. per 500 gal. It may be used any
time rust mite control is needed. Carzol should not be used in alkaline
solutions.
Guthion is available as a liquid concentrate containing 2.0 Ib. per gal.
or as a 50% wettable powder. It is effective against citrus rust mite at the
dosage of 5.0 pt. of Guthion LC 2* per 500 gal. See discussion under
"Scalicides."
Sulfur applications often are followed by increases in citrus red mite
populations, and repeated applications or excessive amounts of sulfur
often are followed by increased populations of armored scales; however,
the dosage of 25.0 lb. of wettable sulfur per 500 gal. of spray is useful in the
postbloom spray and where supplemental rust mite control is needed
between the main sprays.
Do not use wettable sulfur in combination with oil emulsion. Any
application of sulfur should not be closer than 3 weeks to an oil application.
Sulfur dust users should note the following: Good coverage is just as
important in dusting as in spraying. Dust sites and tops of trees in two
directions, preferably when the air is calm and the leaves are covered with
dew. Night conditions usually are more favorable for dusting. Apply a total
of 0.5 to 1.5 Ib. per tree (depending on size) at each application.
Torak is an emulsifiable concentrate containing 4.0 lb. active ingredient
per gallon. It may be used at 4.0 pt. per 500 gal. to control rust mite and
spider mites in postbloom, or rust mite in summer sprays.
Trithion is available as a liquid concentrate containing 4.0 Ib. or 8.0 Ib.
per gal., as a 25% powder, and as a 2% dust. Although Trithion sprays can
be used at any time, the preferred application is late fall and winter for
combined control of rust mite and spider mites. Use 2.5 pt. of the 4.0 lb.
material per 500 gal. of spray for this purpose, but increase the dosage to
3.75 pt. at other times. Trithion can be used with oil on oranges, but
Trithion may injure grapefruit if combined with oil in the summer or if
applied alone in the fall before the fruit is fully colored.
Ethion is available as a liquid concentrate containing 4.0 Ib. per gal. and
as a 25% powder. Its preferred use is in the late fall and winter for com-
bined control of spider mites and rust mite at the dosage of 2.5 pt. per 500
gal. of spray. Increase the dosage to 3.75 pt. at other times. When used at
3.75 pt. in combination with oil, it is an excellent summer spray for scale
insects, rust mite, and spider mites. See discussion under ethion-oil under
"Scalicides."
Delnav is available as liquid concentrate containing 8.0 Ib. per gal. Its
preferred use is for the combined control of rust mite and spider mites
during the late fall and winter. Use 2.0 pt. of 8.0 lb. material per 500 gal. of
spray.
Kelthane MF is an emulsifiable concentrate containing 4.0 Ib. per gal. It
can be used as a miticide at any time at a dosage of 5.0 pt. per 500 gal., but
is best used during the late fall and winter months for combined control of
rust mite and the spider mites. Kelthane should preferably be confined to
groves where ethion, Trithion, and Delnav no longer control the spider
mites. Kelthane should not be used in groves infested with snow scale
unless a scalicide is also included. Kelthane should not be used in highly
alkaline sprays.
Comite is available as a liquid concentrate containing 6.75 Ibs. active
Comite per gallon and is used at a dosage of 25 oz. per 500-gal. tank. Its
preferred use is during the late fall and winter for the combined control of
rust mite and spider mites. Comite should not be used in highly alkaline
solutions (over pH 10), tank mixed with oil, or applied within 2 weeks prior
to or following an oil treatment.
Oil is effective against spider mites at dosages of 0.5% and higher. See
discussion about scalicides.


* See Table III for other formulations.






Plictran is available as a 50% wettable powder and is effective against
citrus rust mite at a dosage of 20-30 ounces per 500 gallons. Do not tank
mix with oil. Do not apply oil within 4 weeks before or after application of
Plictran. Do not apply to lemons when yellow fruit is present. If possible,
time applications on citrus to avoid new flush or 'feather' growth,
especially with concentrate sprays, since temporary foliar injury may occur
on such growth.
Dimethoate is effective against citrus red mite at the rate suggested
under "Scalicides."

FUNGUS DISEASES AND THEIR CONTROL

Melanose produces brownish, raised pustules on fruit, leaves, and
twigs of all varieties of citrus. A single copper spray containing 3.75 Ib. of
copper (metallic) per 500 gal. (see Table I) applied 1 to 3 weeks after
petal-fall usually controls melanose. Where the disease has been
troublesome in past years, or during very wet springs, or in the event of late
or scattered bloom, a second application should be made 4 weeks later.
See "Difolatan," below.
Scab, a wart-like growth on fruit, twigs, and leaves, may affect Temples,
Murcotts, Satsumas, grapefruit, tangelos, and lemons, particularly in
coastal and flatwoods areas. Either ferbam (at 7.5 Ib. of 76% wettable
powder or 6.0 Ib. of 95% wettable powder per 500 gal.) or copper (see
Table I) may be used. Two sprays must be applied, the first just before trees
begin to flush, and the second when 2/3 of the petals have fallen. Ferbam
is more effective than copper in the 2/3 petal-fall application. If scab is
likely to be severe, the copper concentration in the prebloom spray should
be 1.5 to 2.0 times that listed in Table I. Ferbam and copper should not be
mixed. See "Difolatan," below.
Where both melanose and scab control is necessary, use (1) ferbam
dormant and copper at 2/3 petal-fall if melanose is the primary disease, or
(2) copper dormant and ferbam at 2/3 petal-fall if scab is the primary
disease. For extra clean fruit, use copper dormant, ferbam at 2/3 petal-fall,
and copper at 2 to 3 weeks after bloom. Under conditions of high moisture,
summer and fall flushes may be protected by sprays applied when new
growth begins to appear.
Difolatan 4F at 4 to 5 gal. per 500 gal. may be used for scab and
melanose control in a single application as a delayed dormant spray in
groves where overhead irrigation is available to further distribute the fun-
gicide. Do not apply to mature fruit or postbloom to fresh market citrus, as
rind blemish, leaf burn, and premature defoliation may occur. Follow
directions on label carefully.
Greasy spot often causes serious premature defoliation during the fall
and winter. Infection occurs mostly in the summer, but symptoms do not
appear until 2 to 9 months later, the incubation period depending partly on
the variety affected. The greasy spot fungus also infects fruit rind, causing
specks to appear in areas between the oil glands. Living cells adjacent to
the specks retain a green color for longer than normal and such areas
often fail to respond to ethylene degreening treatment. On grapefruit, the
specks tend to be larger, giving rise to a condition that has been described
as "pink pitting." Rind infection is of economic importance only on fresh
market citrus.
Copper fungicides at 1.25 to 2.50 Ib. metallic copper per 500 gal. or oil
(FC 435-66 specifications) at 1.0%, applied in late June or July, will control
greasy spot on the spring flush and fruit rind and on any later flushes that
have grown out prior to spraying. Groves in which greasy spot is severe
may need an additional spray in August or September to control greasy
spot on the later flushes. Postbloom copper sprays applied for melanose
control also give some control of greasy spot on the spring flush, but they
are not as reliable as a June or July copper spray. Particularly on oranges,
copper sprays may blacken any existing corky areas on the rind and lead to
a further downgrading of fruit intended for the fresh market. To be weighed
against this possible disadvantage, is the fact that copper fungicides are
more effective than oil for greasy spot control when disease pressure is

8






heavy. Good spray coverage of the lower leaf surface is essential for sat-
isfactory greasy spot control.
Brown rot control can be obtained by spraying the lower 6 ft. of the tree
with neutral copper (1/2 the amount shown in Table I), applying the spray
around the middle of August in groves where the disease has been
troublesome in the past. Where brown rot is only an occasional problem,
spraying may be deferred until immediately after the first appearance of
affected fruit, when the entire tree should be sprayed. Chopping of cover
crops, hedging of trees, and pruning off low hanging branches will improve
ventilation and reduce the likelihood of infection.


PHYSIOLOGICAL SPRAYS

Nutritional Sprays.-Applications of zinc in nutritional sprays are
recommended wherever zinc deficiency symptoms appear. Spray
applications of manganese are recommended for any grove having per-
sistent manganese deficiency symptoms, and particularly for groves on
alkaline soils. Copper is recommended in nutritional sprays only where a
deficiency actually exists and when this element is not used in a disease
control program. Where boron deficiency is suspected, use 1.25 Ib. of
soluble borate containing 58 or 66% B.O, equivalent or 1.67 lb. of 46%
soluble borate per 500 gal. Sodium molybdate sprays at 5.0 to 10.0 oz. per
500 gal. are recommended to control yellow spot.
For additional information on nutritional sprays and fertilization, see
Fla. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 536C.
Maturity Sprays.-Lead arsenate is the only arsenical compound
cleared for use on grapefruit to reduce acidity. Use of arsenic on other
citrus is illegal. To avoid excessive phytotoxicity, arsenic should not be
applied to trees less than 7 years of age. The most effective use of arsenic
is obtained by spraying within 1 to 6 weeks after bloom. Use 2.0 to 6.25 lb.
of lead arsenate per 500 gal. for white varieties and 2.0 to 3.0 Ib. for pink
and red grapefruit. The lower amount is used for a high ratio of solids to
acids in mid-season, and the higher amount for a high ratio in the early
season. (See Sprays I, II, and III.)
Preharvest-Drop Control Sprays.-2,4-D is effective for reducing
preharvest drop of Pineapple, seedling oranges, and Temple oranges. For
further information, see the 1973 Spray and Dust Schedule.


CAREFULLY NOTE INSTRUCTIONS ON MANUFACTURER'S LABEL
ON ALL SPRAY AND DUST MATERIALS


SCHEDULE

The main sprays in this program are the postbloom (I), summer (111),
and fall (V) sprays. These 3 will be adequate for most Florida groves. The
optional sprays are the spring citrus rust mite spray (II); the summer citrus
rust mite spray (IV); the dormant spray (VI) where mites and scab must be
controlled; and the delayed dormant (VII) for scab control. The grove
operator must check his trees regularly and be prepared to make
supplemental treatment If insect, mite, disease, or nutritional troubles are
not held under control.
I. Postbloom Sprays, March and April.
A. For melanose, scab, greasy spot, and rust mites-Use copper; plus
chlorobenzilate, Carzol, or wettable sulfur (Formula 1). Apply 1 to 3 weeks
after petal-fall for melanose control; or when 2/3 of the petals have fallen
for scab and melanose control. If scab is the primary disease, use ferbam
(Formula 11).
Supplements: For scale, mealybugs, and whitefly-Parathion or
malathion (Formula 1). For spider mites-Substitute Kelthane, ethion or
Trithion for chlorobenzilate or sulfur in Formula 1.
Nutritional-Zinc, manganese, borate (Formula 1).
Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only) (Formula 1).






B. For rust mite, spider mites, and scale-Use chlorobenzilate, or Car-
zol and oil (Formula 2), or ethion and oil (Formula 3); or Kelthane or
Trithion plus either parathion or malathion (Formula 4). Apply when mites
first appear.
Supplement: Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only). (Formulas 2 or 4)
C. For rust mite, scale, mealybug, and whitefly-Use Guthion (Formula
5); or combinations of chlorobenzilate, Carzol, or sulfur, with either
parathion or malathion (Formula 6).
Supplement: Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only). (Formulas 5 or 6)


II. Between Postbloom and Summer Sprays, if necessary.
A. If rust mite appears before time for summer spray, use wettable
sulfur, or chlorobenzilate, or Carzol (Formula 7), or dust with sulfur.
Supplement: For scale-Parathion or malathion (Formula 7).
Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only) (Formula 7).
B. For rust mite and spider mites-Use Kelthane, Trithion, ethion, or
Delnav (Formula 8).
Supplements: Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only) (Formula 8).
For scale-Parathion or malathion (Formula 8).


II. Summer Spray, June through August.
A. For rust mite, greasy spot, and scale-Use (1) chlorobenzilate or
Carzol with oil (Formula 2), or ethion with oil (Formula 3); or (2)
chlorobenzilate or Carzol with either oil plus parathion or oil plus malathion
(Formula 2). Time application for rust mite control. For greasy spot control,
oil should be applied in July.
Supplement: Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only) (Formula 2).
B. For scale, rust mite, and greasy spot-Use Guthion (Formula 5); or a
combination of either parathion or malathion with either chlorobenzilate,
Carzol, or sulfur; plus copper (Formula 7).
Supplement: Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only) (Formula 7).
C. For scab control on June bloom fruit-Use ferbam at 2/3 petal-fall
(Formula 11).


IV. Between Summer Spray and Fall Mite Spray, if necessary.
A. If rust mite becomes numerous before time for fall mite spray-Use
sulfur spray or dust, or chlorobenzilate or Carzol.
B. For scale and rust mite-Use Guthion (Formula 5) or combinations
of either parathion or malathion plus either chlorobenzilate, Carzol, or
sulfur (Formula 6, omitting lead arsenate).


V. Fall Mite Spray.
A. For spider mite control and rust mite control-Use Formula 9 in
September and October if population of spider mite is low. Formula 10 is
preferred in November and December. Do not use nutritional supplements
in the fall.
Supplement: For scale-Parathion or malathion (Formulas 9 or 10).


VI. Dormant Spray, January or February (if needed).
A. For spider mites, rust mite, and scab-Use a combination miticide
for spider mite and rust mite; for scab, use a copper fungicide and apply
before any appreciable spring growth (Formula 10).
Supplements: For scale-Parathion or malathion (Formula 10).
Nutritional-Zinc, manganese, borate (Formula 10).


VII. Delayed Dormant Spray.
A. For Scab-Use copper (Formula 10) or ferbam (Formula 11) when
pinpoint growth begins.
Supplements: For scale-Parathion or malathion (Formula 10).
Nutritional-Zinc, manganese, borate with copper (Formula 10).

10






SPRAY FORMULAS REFERRED TO IN SCHEDULE


,lead general instructions for further information on spray chemicals.)
Quantities of materials are for 500 gallons of dilute spray.
For concentrate spraying, see footnote*.


6 o
ormula 1


S Neutral coppers
Chlorobenzilatet 4 liquid
or Carzolt
r or wettable sulfur
SSupplements (if needed):
Zinc
Manganese
Borates (58-66% B20,)
Lead arsenate** (grapefruit
only)
02 Parathion 4 liquid
Z or malathion 5 liquid

rC Kelthane MFt
or Trithion 4 liquid
or ethion 4 liquid




Formula 2

Chlorobenzilate 4 liquid
.or Carzolt
Oil (See Table II)
or oil (See Table II) plus
parathion 4 liquid
or malathion 5 liquid
Supplement:
Lead arsenate** (grapefruit
only)


Amount per 500 gal.

(See Table I)
1.25 pt. (See Table III)
5.0 to 10.0 oz.
25.0 lb.

(See Table I)
(See Table I)
1.25 lb.
2.0 to 6.25 Ib.

2.5 pt. (See Table III)
6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table
III)
5.0 pt.
3.75 pt. (See Table III)
3.75 pt. (See Table III)




Amount per 500 gal.

1.25 pt. (See Table III)
5.0 to 10.0 oz.
1.0%
0.5 to 0.7%
1.25 pt. (See Table III)
5.0 pt. (See Table III)

2.0 to 6.25 lb.


Formula 3

Oil (See Table II)
plus ethion 4 liquid
Supplement (if needed):
Lead arsenate** (grapefruit
only)


Formula 4

Kelthane MF
or Trithion 4 liquid
or ethion 4 liquid
or Delnav 8 liquid
Parathion 4 liquid
or malathion 5 liquid


Amount per 500 gal.

0.5 to 0.7%
3.75 pt. (See Table III)

2.0 to 6.25 lb.


Amount per 500 gal.

5.0 pt.
3.75 pt. (See Table III)
3.75 pt. (See Table III)
2.0 pt.
2.5 pt. (See Table III)
6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table
Ill)







Supplement:
Lead arsenate** (grapefruit
only)




Formula 5

Guthiont LC
Supplements (if needed):
Lead arsenate** (grapefruit
only)
Neutral coppers


2.0 to 6.25 lb.


Amount per 500 gal.

5.0 pt. (See Table III)

2.0 to 6.25 lb.

(See Table I)


Formula 6 Amount per 500 gal.

Chlorobenzilatet 4 liquid 1.25 pt. (See Table III)
or Carzolt 5.0 to 10.0 oz.
or wettable sulfur 25.0 lb.
Parathion 4 liquid 2.5 pt. (See Table III)
or malathion 5 liquid 6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table
IIl)
Supplement (if needed):
Lead arsenate** (grapefruit 2.0 to 6.25 Ib.
only)


Formula 7

Parathion 4 liquid
or malathion 5 liquid

Chlorobenzilatet 4 liquid
or Carzolt
or wettable sulfur
or neutral coppers-Use 1/2 amount shown
In Table I
Supplement:
Lead arsenate** (grapefruit
only)


Formula 8


Kelthane MFt
or Trithion 4 liquid
or ethion 4 liquid
or Delnav 8 liquid
Supplements (if needed):
Parathion 4 liquid
or malathion 5 liquid

Lead arsenate** (grapefruit
only)



Formula 9

Chlorobenzilatet 4 liquid
or Carzolt
Supplements (if needed):
Parathion 4 liquid
or malathion 5 liquid


Amount per 500 gal.

2.5 pt. (See Table III)
6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table
Ill)
1.25 pt. (See Table III)
5.0 to 10.0 oz.
25.0 Ib.




2.0 to 6.25 lb.




Amount per 500 gal.

5.0 pt.
3.75 pt. (See Table III)
3.75 pt. (See Table III)
2.0 pt.

2.5 pt. (See Table III)
6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table
III)
2.0 to 6.25 lb.




Amount per 500 gal.

1.25 pt. (See Table III)
5.0 to 10.0 oz.

2.5 pt. (See Table III)
6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table
III)







Formula 10

Trithion 4 liquid
or ethion 4 liquid
or Kelthane MFt
or Delnav 8 liquid
Supplements (if needed):
Neutral coppers
Parathion 4 liquid
or malathion 5 liquid

Zinc
Manganese
Borates (58-66% BO,)


Amount per 500 gal.

2.5 pt. (See Table III)
2.5 pt. (See Table III)
5.0 pt.
2.0 pt.

(See Table I)
2.5 pt. (See Table III)
6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table
III)
(See Table I)
(See Table I)
1.25 lb.


Formula 11 Amount per 500 gal.

Ferbam 7.5 lb.
Supplements (if needed):
Wettable sulfur 25.0 lb.
or chlorobenzilatet 4 liquid 1.25 pt. (See Table ll)
or Carzolf 5.0 to 10.0 oz.
Parathion 4 liquid 2.5 pt. (See Table III)
or malathion 5 liquid 6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table
III)


*Most materials except oil and borax can be applied as concentrate mixtures. Con-
centrations of 6 times usually give good control at 1/8 dilute gallonage.
**For pink or red grapefruit, see note under Physiological Sprays.
tDo not use Guthion, Kelthane MF, chlorobenzilate, Comite or Carzol in highly alkaline
sprays.


USEFUL TABLES FOR MIXING SPRAY FORMULAS


TABLE 1. POUNDS OF COPPER, ZINC, AND MANGANESE COMPOUNDS
TO EQUAL THE STANDARD DOSAGEt PER 500 GAL. OF WATER:.

Metallic content shown on label (%)

34-36 48 52-56 75 80 85-90

Copper 11.0 8.5 7.0 5.0 4.5
Zinc 10.0 7.0 -
Manganese 8.5 6.5 4.5 -


tThe standard dosage required to correct deficiencies, based on the metal content per
500 gal. is 3.75 Ib. for copper, 5.0 Ib. for zinc, and 3.75 Ib. for manganese.
tFor concentrate sprays, multiply the pounds required by 0.75.
For information on use of soluble sulfates, see Fla. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 536C.


TABLE II. GALLONS OF OIL CONCENTRATES TO USE
FOR EACH 500 GAL. OF SPRAY


If % oil in the stock is and the percentage oil desired
in the spray tank is

0.5% 0.7% 1.0% 1.3%

97+ 2.55 3.55 5.10 6.60
90-92 2.75 3.85 5.50 7.15
83-84 3.00 4.20 6.00 7.80








TABLE III. EQUIVALENT AMOUNTS OF LIQUID AND POWDER
FORMULATIONS OF PESTICIDES

Formulations

Pesticide Wettable Powders Liquids
Percent active ingredient Pounds active Ingredient per gall
15 25 50 2 4 5 6 I

Pounds per 500 gal. Pints per 500 gal.
Parathion 4 2.5 2.5 1.25 0.625
5 3.0 3.0 1.5 0.75
8.5 5.0 5.0 2.5 1.25
Malathion 15.0 6.0 3.75
25.0 10.0 6.25
Ethion 5.0t 2.5t
7.5 3.75
Trithion 5.0t 2.5t 1.25
7.5 3.75 1.875
Guthion 2.50 5.0
Systox 5.0 1.67


tFor fall and winter use only.


THIS PUBLIC DOCUMENT WAS PROMULGATED AT AN
ANNUAL COST OF $1,191.49 OR A COST OF $.048 PER
COPY FOR THE PURPOSE OF ADVISING CITRUS
GROWERS ABOUT RECOMMENDED PRACTICES FOR
CONTROL OF PESTS ATTACKING CITRUS.


I University of Florida




Full Text

PAGE 1

RESTRICTIONS ON PESTICIDE USE The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency or authorized state agencies have approved labels for the pesticides mentioned in this Schedule, prescribing conditions for their safe use, and establishing waiting periods between application and harvest that will ensure the residues on fresh fruit grown will not exceed the federally established tolerance. If used preharvest, no limiting tolerances have been set for sulfur, copper, zinc, manganese, and oil. The following table is extracted from the EPA Compendium of Registered Pesticides as of December 1, 1973, and from registered state labels. Waiting days (wd) Dosage And other limitations Pesticide Lb. actual/acre (see footnote) Carzol SP 4.6$ 7 wd; registered for oranges, lemons, grapefruit and tangerines Chlorobenzilate 3.75 NTL Comite 7.5 7 wd; registered only for oranges, grapefruit and lemons. Do not apply more than twice per year Delnav 12.5 NTL; on lemon and lime do not apply more than twice in 1 year; do not make second application within 4 months after first On other citrus do not reapply within 3 months if fruit is present during first application Diazinon 10.0 21 wd Difolatan 80.0 Do not apply when mature fruit is on tree Dimethoate 15 wd. when used at dosage of 0.5 lb. actual/100 gal. water. Registered for oranges, grapefruit, tangerines and lemons; do not apply during bloom period. Make no more than 2 applications to mature fruit Ethion 10.0 30 wd; on grapefruit and orange only 7.5 21 wd; on lemon and lime; do not apply more than once per season 7.5 NTL; on grapefruit, orange, tangelo, tangerine do not repeat within 90 days and do not apply more than twice per season on tangerines Ferbam 40.0 NTL Guthion 7.5 28 wd; where 2 applications per season; do not apply more than 2 times per fruit year 7 wd; where 1 application per season Kelthane 8.0 7 wd Lead arsenate 5.4 NTL; white grapefruit only, 1 to 6 weeks after bloom 2.6 NTL; pink and red grapefruit only, 1 to 6 weeks after bloom Malathion 25.0 7 wd; do not apply during full bloom Meta Systox-R 7 wd; do not apply more than twice per season. Registered for oranges, grapefruit, and lemons Parathion 10.0 30 wd 4.0 14wd Phosphamidon 15.0 15 wd. Registered for only grapefruit, lemon, orange and tangerine 2



PAGE 1

Formula 10 Amount per 500 gal. Trithion 4 liquid 2.5 pt. (See Table III) or ethion 4 liquid 2.5 pt. (See Table III) or Kelthane MFt 5.0 pt. or Delnav 8 liquid 2.0 pt. Supplements (if needed): Neutral coppers (See Table I) Parathion 4 liquid 2.5 pt. (See Table III) or malathion 5 liquid 6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table 111) Zinc (See Table I) Manganese (See Table I) Borates (58-66% BO,) 1.25 lb. Formula 11 Amount per 500 gal. Ferbam 7.5 lb. Supplements (if needed): Wettable sulfur 25.0 lb. or chlorobenzilatet 4 liquid 1.25 pt. (See Table III) or Carzolt 5.0 to 10.0 oz. Parathion 4 liquid 2.5 pt. (See Table III) or malathion 5 liquid 6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table 111) *Most materials except oil and borax can be applied as concentrate mixtures. Concentrations of 6 times usually give good control at 1 /8 dilute gallonage. · *For pink or red grapefruit, see note under Physiological Sprays. tDo not use Guthion, Kelthane MF, chlorobenzilate, Comite or Carzol in highly alkaline sprays. USEFUL TABLES FOR MIXING SPRAY FORMULAS TABLE 1. POUNDS OF COPPER, ZINC, AND MANGANESE COMPOUNDS TO EQUAL THE STANDARD DOSAGEt PER 500 GAL. OF WATERt§. Metallic content shown on label (%) 34-36 48 52-56 75 80 85-90 Copper 11.0 8.5 7.0 5.0 4.5 Zinc 10.0 7.0 Manganese 8.5 6.5 4.5 tThe standard dosage required to correct deficiencies, based on the metal content per 500 gal. is 3.75 lb. for copper, 5.0 Ib. for zinc, and 3.75 lb. for manganese. tFor concentrate sprays, multiply the pounds required by 0.75. §For information on use of soluble sulfates, see Fla. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 536C. TABLE II. GALLONS OF OIL CONCENTRATES TO USE FOR EACH 500 GAL. OF SPRAY If % oil in the stock is and the percentage oil desired in the spray tank is 0.5% 0.7% 1.0% 1.3% 97+ 2.55 3.55 5.10 6.60 90-92 2.75 3.85 5.50 7.15 83-84 3.00 4.20 6.00 7.80 13



PAGE 1

heavy. Good spray coverage of the lower leaf surface is essential for satisfactory greasy spot control. Brown rot control can be obtained by spraying the lower 6 ft. of the tree with neutral copper (1/2 the amount shown in Table I), applying the spray around the middle of August in groves where the disease has been troublesome in the past. Where brown rot is only an occasional problem, spraying may be deferred until immediately after the first appearance of affected fruit, when the entire tree should be sprayed. Chopping of cover crops, hedging of trees, and pruning off low hanging branches will improve ventilation and reduce the likelihood of infection. PHYSIOLOGICAL SPRAYS Nutritional Sprays.-Applications of zinc in nutritional sprays are recommended wherever zinc deficiency symptoms appear. Spray applications of manganese are recommended for any grove having persistent manganese deficiency symptoms, and particularly for groves on alkaline soils. Copper is recommended in nutritional sprays only where a deficiency actually exists and when this element is not used in a disease control program. Where boron deficiency is suspected, use 1.25 lb. of soluble borate containing 58 or 66% B.O, equivalent or 1.67 lb. of 46% soluble borate per 500 gal. Sodium molybdate sprays at 5.0 to 10.0 oz. per 500 gal. are recommended to control yellow spot. For additional information on nutritional sprays and fertilization, see Fla. Agr. Expt. Sta. Bul. 536C. Maturity Sprays.-Lead arsenate is the only arsenical compound cleared for use on grapefruit to reduce acidity. Use of arsenic on other citrus is illegal. To avoid excessive phytotoxicity, arsenic should not be applied to trees less than 7 years of age. The most effective use of arsenic is obtained by spraying within 1 to 6 weeks after bloom. Use 2.0 to 6.25 lb. of lead arsenate per 500 gal. for white varieties and 2.0 to 3.0 Ib. for pink and red grapefruit. The lower amount is used for a high ratio of solids to acids in mid-season, and the higher amount for a high ratio in the early season. (See Sprays I, II, and III.) Preharvest-Drop Control Sprays.-2,4-D is effective for reducing preharvest drop of Pineapple, seedling oranges, and Temple oranges. For further information, see the 1973 Spray and Dust Schedule. CAREFULLY NOTE INSTRUCTIONS ON MANUFACTURER'S LABEL ON ALL SPRAY AND DUST MATERIALS SCHEDULE The main sprays in this program are the postbloom (I), summer (III), and fall (V) sprays. These 3 will be adequate for most Florida groves. The optional sprays are the spring citrus rust mite spray (II); the summer citrus rust mite spray (IV); the dormant spray (VI) where mites and scab must be controlled; and the delayed dormant (VII) for scab control. The grove operator must check his trees regularly and be prepared to make supplemental treatment If insect, mite, disease, or nutritional troubles are not held under control. I. Postbloom Sprays, March and April. A. For melanose, scab, greasy spot, and rust mites-Use copper; plus chlorobenzilate, Carzol, or wettable sulfur (Formula 1). Apply 1 to 3 weeks after petal-fall for melanose control; or when 2/3 of the petals have fallen for scab and melanose control. If scab is the primary disease, use ferbam (Formula 11). Supplements: For scale, mealybugs, and whitefly-Parathion or malathion (Formula 1). For spider mites-Substitute Kelthane, ethion or Trithion for chlorobenzilate or sulfur in Formula 1. Nutritional-Zinc, manganese, borate (Formula 1). Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only) (Formula 1). 9



PAGE 1

Plictran is available as a 50% wettable powder and is effective against citrus rust mite at a dosage of 20-30 ounces per 500 gallons. Do not tank mix with oil. Do not apply oil within 4 weeks before or after application of Plictran. Do not apply to lemons when yellow fruit is present. If possible, time applications on citrus to avoid new flush or 'feather' growth, especially with concentrate sprays, since temporary foliar injury may occur on such growth. Dimethoate is effective against citrus red mite at the rate suggested under "Scalicides." FUNGUS DISEASES AND THEIR CONTROL Melanose produces brownish, raised pustules on fruit, leaves, and twigs of all varieties of citrus. A single copper spray containing 3.75 lb. of copper (metallic) per 500 gal. (see Table I) applied 1 to 3 weeks after petal-fall usually controls melanose. Where the disease has been troublesome in past years, or during very wet springs, or in the event of late or scattered bloom, a second application should be made 4 weeks later. See "Difolatan," below. Scab, a wart-like growth on fruit, twigs, and leaves, may affect Temples, Murcotts, Satsumas, grapefruit, tangelos, and lemons, particularly in coastal and flatwoods areas. Either ferbam (at 7.5 lb. of 76% wettable powder or 6.0 lb. of 95% wettable powder per 500 gal.) or copper (see Table I) may be used. Two sprays must be applied, the first just before trees begin to flush, and the second when 2/3 of the petals have fallen. Ferbam is more effective than copper in the 2/3 petal-fall application. If scab is likely to be severe, the copper concentration in the prebloom spray should be 1.5 to 2.0 times that listed in Table I. Ferbam and copper should not be mixed. See "Difolatan," below. Where both melanose and scab control is necessary, use (1) ferbam dormant and copper at 2/3 petal-fall if melanose is the primary disease, or (2) copper dormant and ferbam at 2/3 petal-fall if scab is the primary disease. For extra clean fruit, use copper dormant, ferbam at 2/3 petal-fall, and copper at 2 to 3 weeks after bloom. Under conditions of high moisture, summer and fall flushes may be protected by sprays applied when new growth begins to appear. Difolatan 4F at 4 to 5 gal. per 500 gal. may be used for scab and melanose control in a single application as a delayed dormant spray in groves where overhead irrigation is available to further distribute the fungicide. Do not apply to mature fruit or postbloom to fresh market citrus, as rind blemish, leaf burn, and premature defoliation may occur. Follow directions on label carefully. Greasy spot often causes serious premature defoliation during the fall and winter. Infection occurs mostly in the summer, but symptoms do not appear until 2 to 9 months later, the incubation period depending partly on the variety affected. The greasy spot fungus also infects fruit rind, causing specks to appear in areas between the oil glands. Living cells adjacent to the specks retain a green color for longer than normal and such areas often fail to respond to ethylene degreening treatment. On grapefruit, the specks tend to be larger, giving rise to a condition that has been described as "pink pitting." Rind infection is of economic importance only on fresh market citrus. Copper fungicides at 1.25 to 2.50 lb. metallic copper per 500 gal. or oil (FC 435-66 specifications) at 1.0%, applied in late June or July, will control greasy spot on the spring flush and fruit rind and on any later flushes that have grown out prior to spraying. Groves in which greasy spot is severe may need an additional spray in August or September to control greasy spot on the later flushes. Postbloom copper sprays applied for melanose control also give some control of greasy spot on the spring flush, but they are not as reliable as a June or July copper spray. Particularly on oranges, copper sprays may blacken any existing corky areas on the rind and lead to a further downgrading of fruit intended for the fresh market. To be weighed against this possible disadvantage, is the fact that copper fungicides are more effective than oil for greasy spot control when disease pressure is 8



PAGE 1

B. For rust mite, spider mites, and scale-Use chlorobenzilate, or Carzol and oil (Formula 2), or ethion and oil (Formula 3); or Kelthane or Trithion plus either parathion or malathion (Formula 4). Apply when mites first appear. Supplement: Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only). (Formulas 2 or 4) C. For rust mite, scale, mealybug, and whitefly-Use Guthion (Formula 5); or combinations of chlorobenzilate, Carzol, or sulfur, with either parathion or malathion (Formula 6). Supplement: Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only). (Formulas 5 or 6) II. Between Postbloom and Summer Sprays, if necessary. A. If rust mite appears before time for summer spray, use wettable sulfur, or chlorobenzilate, or Carzol (Formula 7), or dust with sulfur. Supplement: For scale-Parathion or malathion (Formula 7). Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only) (Formula 7). B. For rust mite and spider mites-Use Kelthane, Trithion, ethion, or Delnav (Formula 8). Supplements: Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only) (Formula 8). For scale-Parathion or malathion (Formula 8). Ill. Summer Spray, June through August. A. For rust mite, greasy spot, and scale-Use (1) chlorobenzilate or Carzol with oil (Formula 2), or ethion with oil (Formula 3); or (2) chlorobenzilate or Carzol with either oil plus parathion or oil plus malathion (Formula 2). Time application for rust mite control. For greasy spot control, oil should be applied in July. Supplement: Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only) (Formula 2). B. For scale, rust mite, and greasy spot-Use Guthion (Formula 5); or a combination of either parathion or malathion with either chlorobenzilate, Carzol, or sulfur; plus copper (Formula 7). Supplement: Maturity-Arsenic (on grapefruit only) (Formula 7). C. For scab control on June bloom fruit-Use ferbam at 2/3 petal-fall (Formula 11). IV. Between Summer Spray and Fall Mite Spray, if necessary. A. If rust mite becomes numerous before time for fall mite spray-Use sulfur spray or dust, or chlorobenzilate or Carzol. B. For scale and rust mite-Use Guthion (Formula 5) or combinations of either parathion or malathion plus either chlorobenzilate, Carzol, or sulfur (Formula 6, omitting lead arsenate). V. Fall Mite Spray. A. For spider mite control and rust mite control-Use Formula 9 in September and October if population of spider mite is low. Formula 10 is preferred in November and December. Do not use nutritional supplements in the fall. Supplement: For scale-Parathion or malathion (Formulas 9 or 10). VI. Dormant Spray, January or February (if needed). A. For spider mites, rust mite, and scab-Use a combination miticide for spider mite and rust mite; for scab, use a copper fungicide and apply before any appreciable spring growth (Formula 10). Supplements: For scale-Parathion or malathion (Formula 10). Nutritional-Zinc, manganese, borate (Formula 10). VII. Delayed Dormant Spray. A. For Scab-Use copper (Formula 10) or ferbam (Formula 11) when pinpoint growth begins. Supplements: For scale-Parathion or malathion (Formula 10). Nutritional-Zinc, manganese, borate with copper (Formula 10). 10



PAGE 1

SPRAY FORMULAS REFERRED TO IN SCHEDULE lead general instructions for further information on spray chemicals.) Quantities of materials are for 500 gallons of dilute spray. For concentrate spraying, see footnote*. 0o6 ormula 1 Amount per 500 gal. C( Neutral coppers (See Table I) Chlorobenzilatet 4 liquid 1.25 pt. (See Table III) or Carzolt 5.0 to 10.0 oz. /' or wettable sulfur 25.0 lb. Supplements (if needed): Zinc (See Table I) Manganese (See Table I) Borates (58-66% BO,) 1.25 lb. Lead arsenate** (grapefruit 2.0 to 6.25 lb. only) CQ Parathion 4 liquid 2.5 pt. (See Table III) or malathion 5 liquid 6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table V) Kelthane MFt 5.0 pt. or Trithion 4 liquid 3.75 pt. (See Table III) or ethion 4 liquid 3.75 pt. (See Table III) Formula 2 Amount per 500 gal. Chlorobenzilate 4 liquid 1.25 pt. (See Table III) .or Carzolt 5.0 to 10.0 oz. Oil (See Table II) 1.0% or oil (See Table II) plus 0.5 to 0.7% parathion 4 liquid 1.25 pt. (See Table III) or malathion 5 liquid 5.0 pt. (See Table III) Supplement: Lead arsenate* (grapefruit 2.0 to 6.25 lb. only) Formula 3 Amount per 500 gal. Oil (See Table II) 0.5 to 0.7% plus ethion 4 liquid 3.75 pt. (See Table III) Supplement (if needed): Lead arsenate** (grapefruit 2.0 to 6.25 lb. only) Formula 4 Amount per 500 gal. Kelthane MF 5.0 pt. or Trithion 4 liquid 3.75 pt. (See Table III) or ethion 4 liquid 3.75 pt. (See Table III) or Delnav 8 liquid 2.0 pt. Parathion 4 liquid 2.5 pt. (See Table III) or malathion 5 liquid 6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table 111) 11



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Plictran 2.8 NTL; registered for oranges, grapefruit, tangerines, lemons, and limes only Systox 2.5 21 wd; on orange, grapefruit and lemon only Torak 10.0 7 wd; do not apply more than twice a year. Do not make a second application within 3 months if fruits were present on the tree at the time of the first application Trithion 5.0 30 wd 3.75 14 wd; 30 days required between applications 2.5 NTL; 30 days required between applications tAll pesticides listed are registered for use on orange, grapefruit, tangerine, lime, lemon, and tangelo unless otherwise noted in table. tCarzol is limited to 4.6 lb. per acre per year. NTL =No time limitation; i.e., no waiting days required between last application and harvest unless otherwise specified in table. PRECAUTIONS All precautions on the labels of pesticide containers should be read and observed at all times with all pesticides. Pesticides should not be discharged in or near the immediate vicinity of any body of water. Furthermore, due care should be exercised by anyone adding pesticides to spray tanks or other pesticide application equipment to preclude contamination of any body of water. Protective canopies should be placed on tractors pulling airblast sprayers in order to minimize the hazards of spray drift to the operator. Florida regulations require labels to carry instructions for decontamination and disposal of empty containers of highly toxic pesticides. Read and heed these instructions. Do not reuse containers. Wash spray equipment daily to avoid hazardous accumulations. All highly toxic pesticides should be kept in locked storage and never be removed from the spray job. Do not use pesticide chemicals where drift may be a hazard to the public. Waiting periods established by EPA (See Panel 1) should be observed to ensure that the residue tolerances will not be exceeded. Additional waiting periods intended to safeguard workers in sprayed groves may soon be announced under authority of the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Everyone responsible for grove operations should become thoroughly familiar with the regulations when announced. Special Precautions when Using Parathion, Guthion, Phosphamidon, Systox, Torak, or Carzol. 1. When mixing and applying sprays, use a chemical cartridge respirator approved for the specific pesticide, and wear protective clothing, long sleeves, a washable rain hat, and natural rubber boots and gloves. 2. Start with clean clothing each day, and change if garments become wet with spray. If a liquid formulation is spilled on garments, remove them at once and take a bath. Take a thorough bath as soon as the work day is finished. 3. Wash hands before eating or smoking. 4. Spray crews regularly using these materials should receive cholinesterase tests before spraying begins and at 10-day intervals thereafter. OTHER SOURCES OF INFORMATION This Schedule does not include descriptions of or recommendations for control of all minor pests or pests occurring infrequently. See "Florida Guide to Citrus Insects, Diseases, and Nutritional Disorders"; Fla. Agr. Ext. 3



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little value against spider mites. Chlorobenzilate should not be used in alkaline solutions. Carzol SP is available as a 92% active water soluble powder. It is effective against citrus rust mite at 5 to 10 oz. per 500 gal. It may be used any time rust mite control is needed. Carzol should not be used in alkaline solutions. Guthion is available as a liquid concentrate containing 2.0 lb. per gal. or as a 50% wettable powder. It is effective against citrus rust mite at the dosage of 5.0 pt. of Guthion LC 2* per 500 gal. See discussion under "Scalicides." Sulfur applications often are followed by increases in citrus red mite populations, and repeated applications or excessive amounts of sulfur often are followed by increased populations of armored scales; however, the dosage of 25.0 lb. of wettable sulfur per 500 gal. of spray is useful in the postbloom spray and where supplemental rust mite control is needed between the main sprays. Do not use wettable sulfur in combination with oil emulsion. Any application of sulfur should not be closer than 3 weeks to an oil application. Sulfur dust users should note the following: Good coverage is just as important in dusting as in spraying. Dust sites and tops of trees in two directions, preferably when the air is calm and the leaves are covered with dew. Night conditions usually are more favorable for dusting. Apply a total of 0.5 to 1.5 lb. per tree (depending on size) at each application. Torak is an emulsifiable concentrate containing 4.0 lb. active ingredient per gallon. It may be used at 4.0 pt. per 500 gal. to control rust mite and spider mites in postbloom, or rust mite in summer sprays. Trithion is available as a liquid concentrate containing 4.0 lb. or 8.0 lb. per gal., as a 25% powder, and as a 2% dust. Although Trithion sprays can be used at any time, the preferred application is late fall and winter for combined control of rust mite and spider mites. Use 2.5 pt. of the 4.0 lb. material per 500 gal. of spray for this purpose, but increase the dosage to 3.75 pt. at other times. Trithion can be used with oil on oranges, but Trithion may injure grapefruit if combined with oil in the summer or if applied alone in the fall before the fruit is fully colored. Ethion is available as a liquid concentrate containing 4.0 lb. per gal. and as a 25% powder. Its preferred use is in the late fall and winter for combined control of spider mites and rust mite at the dosage of 2.5 pt. per 500 gal. of spray. Increase the dosage to 3.75 pt. at other times. When used at 3.75 pt. in combination with oil, it is an excellent summer spray for scale insects, rust mite, and spider mites. See discussion under ethion-oil under "Scalicides." Delnav is available as liquid concentrate containing 8.0 lb. per gal. Its preferred use is for the combined control of rust mite and spider mites during the late fall and winter. Use 2.0 pt. of 8.0 lb. material per 500 gal. of spray. Kelthane MF is an emulsifiable concentrate containing 4.0 lb. per gal. It can be used as a miticide at any time at a dosage of 5.0 pt. per 500 gal., but is best used during the late fall and winter months for combined control of rust mite and the spider mites. Kelthane should preferably be confined to groves where ethion, Trithion, and Delnav no longer control the spider mites. Kelthane should not be used in groves infested with snow scale unless a scalicide is also included. Kelthane should not be used in highly alkaline sprays. Comite is available as a liquid concentrate containing 6.75 Ibs. active Comite per gallon and is used at a dosage of 25 oz. per 500-gal. tank. Its preferred use is during the late fall and winter for the combined control of rust mite and spider mites. Comite should not be used in highly alkaline solutions (over pH 10), tank mixed with oil, or applied within 2 weeks prior to or following an oil treatment. Oil is effective against spider mites at dosages of 0.5% and higher. See discussion about scalicides. * See Table III for other formulations. 7



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persistent green spots on tangerines and other early varieties intended for the fresh fruit market. Black scale, brown soft scale, and green scale are only serious in groves where parasite activity is retarded. Mealybugs can best be controlled by applying a recommended scalicide before the fruit becomes infested. Scalicides applied after the fruit has set will kill mealybugs that are exposed but not those that have settled under the button. Whitefly larvae often become numerous on the lower leaf surfaces in March, June, and September. A postbloom spray applied after the adult females have deposited their eggs and followed by a summer scalicide application, provides the best control of whiteflies. Sooty mold forms a black film on the upper surfaces of leaves and fruit. It grows on excretions from whiteflies, black scale, brown soft scale, mealybugs, and aphids. It is prevented by controlling these insects. Sprays containing oil loosen sooty mold and aid its removal by rain and wind. SCALICIDES Oil.-Only oils with specific properties are now recommended for citrus. These are designated FC 435-66 and FC 412-66. Growers should use only oils which conform to those specifications. Spray oil meeting FC 435-66 specifications has the greatest pesticidal action without excessive adverse effect on tree and fruit in mid-summer. It is intended for application in June and July. Oil meeting FC 412-66 specifications is a lighter oil and has the minimum adverse effect on tree and crop consistent with adequate pesticidal effect. It is recommended for applications made after August or where tree growth is less vigorous due to weather or season. Oil is applied as an emulsion, diluted to a specified concentration of actual oil in the final spray mixture. See Table II. A 1% oil emulsion is effective for the control of Glover, purple, chaff, yellow, Florida red, black, and brown soft scale. It also controls whiteflies and protects against greasy spot. Lower concentrations are used for spider mite control and for loosening sooty mold. Precautions in the use of oil include: Do not apply oil spray when trees are wilting or near wilting. Do not apply oil and sulfur within 3 weeks of each other. Oil spray applied after October 1 may increase susceptibility of trees to cold damage and may reduce the fruit crop the following year. Oil sprays applied in the fall may inhibit solids formation in the juice and retard coloring of fruit, and should not be applied within 60 days of anticipated harvest. Parathion is effective for the control of mealybugs and for Glover, chaff, purple, yellow, Florida red, snow, black, and cottony cushion scale. Parathion is only effective against black scale when applied in mid-May when there is a peak hatch of crawlers. Do not use parathion for control of brown soft scale. Parathion may be applied in any month. Normally, use 2.5 pt. of parathion 4 liquid* per 500 gal. See discussion under mealybugs. Guthion is effective for the control of black, yellow, snow, Florida red, chaff, Glover, purple scale, mealybugs, and whitefly. Black scale is effectively controlled with a postbloom application of Guthion. While Guthion can be used in any month of the year, its use is restricted to 2 applications per year to fruit. The recommended dosage is 5.0 pt. of Guthion LC 2 liquid* per 500 gal. See discussion under citrus rust mite, mealybugs, and whitefly. Guthion should not be used in highly alkaline sprays. Malathion is substantially less hazardous than parathion or Guthion and may be used for the control of Glover, purple, yellow, red, snow, and brown soft scale. Malathion may be applied in any month. Use 6.0 pt. of malathion 5 liquid* per 500 gal. for light infestations, and 10.0 pt. for moderate or heavy infestations. Use the higher rate for snow, Glover, and yellow scale control. * See Table III for other formulations. Whenever necessary, liquid formulations are designated by numbers which are the pounds of active ingredient per gallon of formulation. Thus parathion 4 liquid means a liquid formulation containing 4 lb. of actual parathion per gal. 5


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13069376244746f5cccb98556e3e5570
6ee40cda781cf40c1999bb10c946a1d847f00c99
'2012-04-06T11:02:44-04:00'
describe
'395853' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACP' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
278a8dab405c9deb317f1a802bc3fb22
4aa77850bfa55345932fe2bb7dfca0241647e7bd
'2012-04-06T11:01:44-04:00'
describe
'170414' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACQ' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
3613927fd386d6f21c1da58f35a9105b
9e7b0afbc9d2a7930c21b6e0ba9a74ced2c68457
'2012-04-06T11:01:06-04:00'
describe
'776086' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACR' 'sip-files00005.pdf'
b9df0cf290717325b43ac4fffda0e78d
cbad0251055d3954fc437d1003874c3d0c4a8efc
'2012-04-06T11:01:38-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACR-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20090919_AAEACR-norm-0.pdf'
48c279620392bcf49e367d81b9512286
1d5e440b611127d699bf9932b2b9060ff387b025
describe
'2015-05-15T18:20:23-04:00'
normalize
'110317' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACS' 'sip-files00005.pro'
420522bc51b2e46c141181f4a7ada686
218f3b914086935c1566aa6e8b9bac4e15d8494d
describe
'49433' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACT' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
66f0824f51eae2fcc483103463c47926
0f8c7416cac70fcee08f9accd4ed7e025ae3365e
'2012-04-06T11:01:57-04:00'
describe
'3175228' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACU' 'sip-files00005.tif'
ece849fb71b48ba51e943bf7a1c4d41e
a00d2548a9a61d831e9586dc1820aa676f72aaa9
'2012-04-06T11:00:58-04:00'
describe
'4262' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACV' 'sip-files00005.txt'
2624b89fc5d42d3c210a008f00c7f059
d60d300f60288ea4810bd9b21ebf352b143b08eb
describe
'22917' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACW' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
55a8db9d35b4422a276c010fbb851301
53b810323773a4029322ec2b5545f5331e4bea07
'2012-04-06T11:01:29-04:00'
describe
'366790' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACX' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
edc695f10ed45dcdd13529a6339f4e81
b78c06609e9325833606f0dc01dfd4e7099f903f
'2012-04-06T11:03:16-04:00'
describe
'156906' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACY' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
f8785d525af976d3a3617718dd9d66fc
4a433d22fca4a0113d810c9dfdc9a4fd91084b20
'2012-04-06T11:03:00-04:00'
describe
'853291' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACZ' 'sip-files00006.pdf'
d937b3051b634048892175e8384bff27
21b3e588c44e03018454f2eb204b81d4787c092d
'2012-04-06T11:02:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEACZ-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20090919_AAEACZ-norm-0.pdf'
48c279620392bcf49e367d81b9512286
1d5e440b611127d699bf9932b2b9060ff387b025
describe
'2015-05-15T18:20:29-04:00'
normalize
'96421' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADA' 'sip-files00006.pro'
a5ad4a20197eb6a8bdb04f0c76b54a7b
bc913cfaf5a44e797baa23892d73569d3c047e15
'2012-04-06T11:02:04-04:00'
describe
'47113' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADB' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
9bbce4fe5adda298a349167a918b8d16
8b2729cd4f7b1100aec9a2882056e80c06022e81
'2012-04-06T11:03:10-04:00'
describe
'2942860' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADC' 'sip-files00006.tif'
fffc40c25e7a9a5bda3bd7bd5197a76f
8d4fa3d1c8d6f3b74b01a6fd766de9d755e8de4f
describe
'3849' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADD' 'sip-files00006.txt'
04d17e4525ea62c124113972bed4683d
7d877be183a05a9420d9c1734275dc0e54062c3c
'2012-04-06T11:02:27-04:00'
describe
'22664' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADE' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
307c0689269cc050f4f15e49f9a26e78
b4a685b761bca2810e3cacb359b5ca3f67251718
'2012-04-06T11:02:01-04:00'
describe
'384426' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADF' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
3fca352dce94bb7463b8f6481dded584
6183569ba8b42f085142b53794b898ca0cc15ae3
'2012-04-06T11:02:29-04:00'
describe
'167869' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADG' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
375c2542afa3d04ebfaa414c21c5c378
5be52edc96f2db04d6c8e3aea00d3a841c077596
'2012-04-06T11:02:40-04:00'
describe
'752472' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADH' 'sip-files00007.pdf'
134446f2de5a9e005919c5e47e6b042c
803c67d209777c420bc34e72954b7d9c27171249
'2012-04-06T11:03:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADH-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20090919_AAEADH-norm-0.pdf'
48c279620392bcf49e367d81b9512286
1d5e440b611127d699bf9932b2b9060ff387b025
describe
'2015-05-15T18:20:49-04:00'
normalize
'107867' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADI' 'sip-files00007.pro'
06e50613d34c2dbeb3f2a6da25027076
364909dbe5a2fa16ceb8f04c82d10e5be53dd52c
'2012-04-06T11:00:53-04:00'
describe
'49621' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADJ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
44457cf17f09790698fa65bf6f1aa247
6a458ebdd4aa53e5be67253e36374a9da4055c97
describe
'3083992' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADK' 'sip-files00007.tif'
ba280c7491302fd718388e61c1ac7621
48b465ae044272637799fe2ebf7e351a813f8ca0
'2012-04-06T11:02:32-04:00'
describe
'4144' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADL' 'sip-files00007.txt'
8fd3bd3118359b632a9855bc386cbfe3
2ce5177c6e021f6c8fd97cc210fcdb8b2576b1c6
describe
'22547' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADM' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
8da04b037c494a7e5251e84215234f0f
4108ed74c68b0850360d35514cb3d14a37bb4026
'2012-04-06T11:00:52-04:00'
describe
'383761' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADN' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
8f0da9bf2e7640ccc66956212cccb496
e6a616a7db4f684fe86ab294050e785224e40fa0
'2012-04-06T11:03:14-04:00'
describe
'177766' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADO' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
a4f346d2dcf72208b5ad2c8707ceb9b6
92549b40144d58fbae400999d1ad7d38a1a8489a
'2012-04-06T11:00:41-04:00'
describe
'817987' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADP' 'sip-files00008.pdf'
18c2c36a63177d5884979694f68c71db
d9395c2b43cacaea6cee7743dda2ddaccd0ff090
'2012-04-06T11:02:43-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADP-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20090919_AAEADP-norm-0.pdf'
48c279620392bcf49e367d81b9512286
1d5e440b611127d699bf9932b2b9060ff387b025
describe
'2015-05-15T18:20:42-04:00'
normalize
'111331' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADQ' 'sip-files00008.pro'
a08db4b632daba3a49521ed654df0427
586fff0b106d851265b6f2ebf6f2518f8200481a
describe
'51861' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADR' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
0ffafd6796a9130bf54a638f1a139a25
cca4f9c0c932f2f553342ccc8bc3f147c976aafa
'2012-04-06T11:01:56-04:00'
describe
'3078652' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADS' 'sip-files00008.tif'
71a828b03211d26012f5446369b6a108
89e75d058411a8abb40d0f542bfd3a484884d5b7
'2012-04-06T11:01:17-04:00'
describe
'4311' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADT' 'sip-files00008.txt'
4845b82620ce8d8fe6c12d127d263576
95df599f376d74f557cba9ca4014c0b10260dee6
'2012-04-06T11:02:41-04:00'
describe
'23921' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADU' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
b8b1d912da0ba86f0a0416b5554e0e9e
6f1f9659621a71592b51c6ceea880d609c622482
describe
'379419' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADV' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
e8b622ba799d947ba0fe1505974fa34c
510a6898185f734c28c6632e8e09bddcd10cbcb7
'2012-04-06T11:02:38-04:00'
describe
'154426' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADW' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
aa3123ca96e912b23e867f12886ff739
1e55df051526cb43968d9f70380284d20067ed90
'2012-04-06T11:00:56-04:00'
describe
'698872' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADX' 'sip-files00009.pdf'
9667ed6bf87487ed4fb84de0420aa0a2
d86fcf6a9340957392f302bc2c6835b22073941f
describe
'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADX-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20090919_AAEADX-norm-0.pdf'
48c279620392bcf49e367d81b9512286
1d5e440b611127d699bf9932b2b9060ff387b025
describe
'2015-05-15T18:20:12-04:00'
normalize
'94662' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADY' 'sip-files00009.pro'
830571c84f38ded193fe070ed173013d
07562ce35247a4303c0a494d3343c37a9bc5f158
'2012-04-06T11:03:02-04:00'
describe
'46268' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEADZ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
fcc207300f576f064c9a21ca490bd8bf
71535508fd90e9c52b06591b6268c59b6bcf2830
describe
'3044004' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEA' 'sip-files00009.tif'
6dd25d7074b7a0ada4ec39ffda924e94
f2b58864f3ec80836ac31c093c65f75d99127a91
describe
'3723' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEB' 'sip-files00009.txt'
c5dc6c01dfcd33dd2122d0b45c9d1a21
0c8d60268441ddd1d4b69dcd449d64caf7246acc
'2012-04-06T11:01:18-04:00'
describe
'22158' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEC' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
a130d3955c696e6937593c5aa68ebadb
b90f1c3ceaf6defbf841bd52b646393706943837
describe
'391581' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAED' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
5e9254567c7bb5b0d7d6e38cc5318b2e
5cbf4023399367e55746856bb05909d4b19660cc
describe
'142429' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEE' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
fc50078a27d397abba5493fbb5105b6f
af55c317e2c5c13bb28676fc93c21e6d60c86f3f
'2012-04-06T11:01:27-04:00'
describe
'629218' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEF' 'sip-files00010.pdf'
63e672b1f19a7f9b83a44ed761528374
152f2a76e4645375671e8639f0594d23569f825b
describe
'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEF-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20090919_AAEAEF-norm-0.pdf'
48c279620392bcf49e367d81b9512286
1d5e440b611127d699bf9932b2b9060ff387b025
describe
'2015-05-15T18:20:21-04:00'
normalize
'82573' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEG' 'sip-files00010.pro'
57c1faf61b5f8bdc37bd556d0bae2366
3f6f2b77ec99ec913c7c9d9919303a2e5bc18d2e
describe
'45165' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEH' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
c540aad3d9a776f1385e91be0ddfaf08
47ed5fe1cfee325665bdd78b1b6b15c42a78f7d7
'2012-04-06T11:02:33-04:00'
describe
'3141792' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEI' 'sip-files00010.tif'
e6ea57a8407e1b53b2134fd7557c0736
3babd21903f367214fcc95cb8d4fad4bc9781c42
'2012-04-06T11:02:55-04:00'
describe
'3280' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEJ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
55fc1ac47b6c4a14710c78f17b73ff99
16197647fcbda79acdbc9813e5485cdd507ad59a
'2012-04-06T11:01:46-04:00'
describe
'22703' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEK' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
96da265bc79d7d6b1095e613b34a3d90
3bb34eed9423b481f1e9683767bc3ad788b271f9
describe
'390994' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEL' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
bf80f9d55a323ac3e93105782db8ed4c
24212414916ad25fd1220c645c79923afbe91e96
'2012-04-06T11:02:14-04:00'
describe
'85100' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEM' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
55646ed85c2d5a3288ea33c939e5c2bd
5920aa780a0f61509fb60385a8cdc907140cfbef
'2012-04-06T11:01:52-04:00'
describe
'406423' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEN' 'sip-files00011.pdf'
16e3ec7b99da4f5cd046a8c6166e3da2
b8ffbafd8fd459e4a5985d3de1fdddeee6918a47
describe
'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEN-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20090919_AAEAEN-norm-0.pdf'
48c279620392bcf49e367d81b9512286
1d5e440b611127d699bf9932b2b9060ff387b025
describe
'2015-05-15T18:20:09-04:00'
normalize
'42168' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEO' 'sip-files00011.pro'
134df8c8d6e9cd02b800fa7448a45f82
735037a67a6d0047a6a896698dc3a0fee3196948
'2012-04-06T11:01:53-04:00'
describe
'30604' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEP' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
a7badfe13db33b1ee0fe00e3b9fb5412
2b24a11872204ffa6c04e5d34a78a1e0d27cc9c5
'2012-04-06T11:02:18-04:00'
describe
'3135876' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEQ' 'sip-files00011.tif'
2777d2ce97e5f49238c3ea1f3f40ea18
2b540c1eefbbc1749478588e917772dd246574fe
'2012-04-06T11:02:00-04:00'
describe
'1959' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAER' 'sip-files00011.txt'
213c5cb49334e0466c5aaff4e4076593
cb6612cff15553193e31611c7fc4f222335d06b4
'2012-04-06T11:02:59-04:00'
describe
'17449' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAES' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
344579c6259cf46e3c524da0ee8e2f67
229cf44b887d8cd040f90bec600e06b49ca7e2a9
'2012-04-06T11:01:35-04:00'
describe
'383910' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAET' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
d6b57fd67d46e3c43bc472bdbba72a15
949aa6e067287b54682d19d76b409b51fdc1aedc
'2012-04-06T11:01:58-04:00'
describe
'78407' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEU' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
dc235fc13a6609416ba26b1696ca35c3
3343bacbf85703638e6983602327acca0e7de135
'2012-04-06T11:02:34-04:00'
describe
'424046' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEV' 'sip-files00012.pdf'
00fc71444f5c4ca68ba4fac95053579e
7e0fa3c6d3f31364709f6cacfe74509d641975b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEV-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20090919_AAEAEV-norm-0.pdf'
48c279620392bcf49e367d81b9512286
1d5e440b611127d699bf9932b2b9060ff387b025
describe
'2015-05-15T18:20:44-04:00'
normalize
'41937' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEW' 'sip-files00012.pro'
2982be4639a07088858cb0e8ccfaa0a9
b214b0f9bbc65c0b6cd742590dae979c2e180895
'2012-04-06T11:01:05-04:00'
describe
'29408' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEX' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
3c4e9bb5c22a0bf8019c6fdcbc31c0bd
39871781fdd8269b1072b1d38d3e24534c3d20de
'2012-04-06T11:03:01-04:00'
describe
'3079204' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEY' 'sip-files00012.tif'
672496de0dabf8f57c505bcd192b16ea
81848c256ccc6e24c06bd66459f0ec663aca1151
'2012-04-06T11:02:36-04:00'
describe
'1970' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAEZ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
709ea0a197234366da9dbe0df70f019e
bc76a7b612666988b57890bea8e02984877cdb85
'2012-04-06T11:01:45-04:00'
describe
'17265' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFA' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
d3b46e587e1f0404a35082cfccc3d199
64719d0f7350ed9fde6ad2e5bd492857456ccbee
describe
'393691' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFB' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
cd983fe1990e11a8a54f2d52b21b6d48
276ad1c7e85b1b9e709425d36b03cb173eb2c8e8
describe
'91040' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFC' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
d861e71711b6b3ab04ba9d14a0bf7af0
1f3ce97e8054cfeb6df4ad286c068421ebff8070
describe
'499031' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFD' 'sip-files00013.pdf'
bab730a4f2dd84f0d9f22ee1373162ec
276fd8966dc66c072d45dd68c9354e9de4a06589
describe
'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFD-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20090919_AAEAFD-norm-0.pdf'
48c279620392bcf49e367d81b9512286
1d5e440b611127d699bf9932b2b9060ff387b025
describe
'2015-05-15T18:20:35-04:00'
normalize
'55480' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFE' 'sip-files00013.pro'
c744f68fe2aa936d769ef85d7954fb0a
c1b4a8ba739a3adc30259f14945c32dabcba74e9
'2012-04-06T11:01:47-04:00'
describe
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ded59ff4560eb5a7e5c6c36214f9041c
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describe
'3158040' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFG' 'sip-files00013.tif'
5310130d99971b4bbc67a512b9cac022
38e78313305bd64f25a3b9efaa5def6a3bd93825
'2012-04-06T11:01:02-04:00'
describe
'2690' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFH' 'sip-files00013.txt'
3018c60bd229b39dae36294015fd92da
dfd2b28591e17bb45dfade384a1a9a868cfdb3df
'2012-04-06T11:01:23-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'19395' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFI' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
a3834ef7ec3669d826f1dfada14e8d2c
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describe
'394652' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFJ' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
bda5c7b39071d7e2fbb375419c8dcd4c
69ab2fbcd3a4f4e53f10ca7093b74b3a3f99cd5c
'2012-04-06T11:03:11-04:00'
describe
'67552' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFK' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
fc723968b0d52061ae07053d4d894217
54e2b3b61c4013e4b0c2e93670f054edbe47d641
'2012-04-06T11:01:15-04:00'
describe
'513788' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFL' 'sip-files00014.pdf'
37198bba94d727e7a17d996ffe244928
df0d1bbf9d8359ab61f8b58ec8d3543883cbe047
'2012-04-06T11:02:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFL-norm-0' 'aip-filesF20090919_AAEAFL-norm-0.pdf'
48c279620392bcf49e367d81b9512286
1d5e440b611127d699bf9932b2b9060ff387b025
describe
'2015-05-15T18:20:33-04:00'
normalize
'24406' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFM' 'sip-files00014.pro'
830a80aa89a252684588304cd0da695d
ca42477f9887a5b3aeadbf3092deef1fe3c8268e
'2012-04-06T11:00:50-04:00'
describe
'26724' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFN' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
8960cdc034351b7603f8788aa162d0fe
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describe
'3165132' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFO' 'sip-files00014.tif'
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'2012-04-06T11:03:07-04:00'
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFP' 'sip-files00014.txt'
865799f171aad5e11eca7c21598cae43
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describe
'16158' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFQ' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
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describe
'19435' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFR' 'sip-filesUF00014478.xml'
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'2012-04-06T11:03:12-04:00'
describe
File not found
'2015-05-15T18:20:54-04:00'
xml resolution
File not found
File not found
'32653' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFS' 'sip-filesUF00014478_00001.mets'
74834d19c3652fab1d5090ee34ed6ee1
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describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
BROKEN_LINK schema http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'40289' 'info:fdaE20090919_AAABYLfileF20090919_AAEAFV' 'sip-filesUF00014478_00001.xml'
6270dda4ec2b537d53b7b9e71b54def4
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'2012-04-06T11:01:13-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.



PAGE 1

January 1974 Circular 393 FLORIDA CITRUS SPRAY AND DUST SCHEDULE 74 Effective and Safe Use of Agricultural Chemicals in Citrus Production Before using any pesticide: Read the complete label Read the Precautions in this schedule This program was compiled by the University of Florida lqstit..ten ioat ' nces, and U. S.!Deparct nt of A riqqtJ, r riqlJura Research Service, [With tB§iyicy elnit l ai frms F6r addition iormratini ' consult your county ExtensiQn Director. 'i.F.. ;. itir;v. of Florida) Florida CooperatWExfEMtI&h Swe-ice Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences University of Florida, Gainesville


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0001447800001datestamp 2009-04-02setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Florida citrus spray and dust schedule Circular dc:creator University of Florida -- Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciencesdc:subject Citrus -- Diseases and pests -- Periodicals ( lcsh )Spraying and dusting in agriculture -- Periodicals -- Florida ( lcsh )Pests -- Control -- Periodicals ( lcsh )dc:description b Statement of Responsibility University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.Dates or Sequential Designation 1967-197.Issuing Body Issued by: Florida Citrus Commission Advisory Committee, 1967-1969; by the Florida Dept. of Citrus Advisory Committee, 1970-1973.Description based on: 1976 edition.dc:publisher Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Floridadc:type Serialdc:format 13 v. : ; 23 cm. (folded)dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00014478&v=00001AAA6878 (LTQF)AJE8131 (LTUF)08265255 (OCLC)001735447 (ALEPHBIBNUM)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English



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. Supplement: Lead arsenate** (grapefruit 2.0 to 6.25 lb. only) Formula 5 Amount per 500 gal. Guthiont LC 5.0 pt. (See Table III) Supplements (if needed): Lead arsenate** (grapefruit 2.0 to 6.25 lb. only) Neutral coppers (See Table I) Formula 6 Amount per 500 gal. Chlorobenzilatet 4 liquid 1.25 pt. (See Table III) or Carzolt 5.0 to 10.0 oz. or wettable sulfur 25.0 lb. Parathion 4 liquid 2.5 pt. (See Table III) or malathion 5 liquid 6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table 111) Supplement (if needed): Lead arsenate** (grapefruit 2.0 to 6.25 lb. only) Formula 7 Amount per 500 gal. Parathion 4 liquid 2.5 pt. (See Table III) or malathion 5 liquid 6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table 111) Chlorobenzilatet 4 liquid 1.25 pt. (See Table III) or Carzolt 5.0 to 10.0 oz. or wettable sulfur 25.0 lb. or neutral coppers-Use 1/2 amount shown In Table I Supplement: Lead arsenate** (grapefruit 2.0 to 6.25 lb. only) Formula 8 Amount per 500 gal. Kelthane MFt 5.0 pt. or Trithion 4 liquid 3.75 pt. (See Table III) or ethion 4 liquid 3.75 pt. (See Table III) or Delnav 8 liquid 2.0 pt. Supplements (if needed): Parathion 4 liquid 2.5 pt. (See Table III) or malathion 5 liquid 6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table III) Lead arsenate** (grapefruit 2.0 to 6.25 lb. only) Formula 9 Amount per 500 gal. Chlorobenzilatet 4 liquid 1.25 pt. (See Table III) or Carzolt 5.0 to 10.0 oz. Supplements (if needed): Parathion 4 liquid 2.5 pt. (See Table III) or malathion 5 liquid 6.0 to 10.0 pt. (See Table 111) 12



PAGE 1

Diazinon is also substantially less dangerous than parathion or Guthion, and is recommended only for the control of citrus snow scale. Use 5.0 pt. of diazinon 4 liquid per 500 gal. Dimethoate is also substantially less dangerous than parathion or Guthion, and may be used for the control of Glover, purple, chaff, yellow, and Florida red scales. Dimethoate is not effective against citrus snow scale and black scale. Use 4.0 pt. of dimethoate 2.67 liquid per 500 gal. Ethion or trithion at 3.75 pt. of the 4 liquid* is effective against citrus snow scale when thoroughly applied as a dilute spray for mite control. See discussion under "Miticides." Parathion-Oil, Malathion-Oil, or Ethion-Oil.-The combination of 0.5 to 0.7% oil with 1.25 pt. of parathion 4 liquid* or with 5.0 pt. of malathion 5 liquid*, or with 3.75 pt. ethion 4 liquid* (see Tables II and III) is excellent for the combined control of spider mites and scale. See discussion of oil under "Scalicides" and of ethion under "Miticides." APHIDS Aphids may occur in sufficient numbers to cause severe curling of new foliage and stunting of twigs. While trees of all ages may be attacked, control measures are generally warranted only for young trees or topworked trees since the proportion of new growth to old is much higher than in mature trees. However, aphids should be controlled on Temple orange trees of all ages. Phosphamidon and dimethoate are highly toxic to honeybees and should not be used when possibility exists of poisoning foraging honeybees at time of treatment or within a few days thereafter. Meta Systox-R and Systox are moderately toxic to honeybees and should not be applied directly on the bees at time of treatment. Late afternoon treatment would avoid this hazard. APHICIDES Meta Systox-R 2 liquid at 5.0 pt. per 500 gallons or Systox 2 liquid at 5.0 pt. per 500 gallons will provide good control of aphids and may be used on bearing trees. Phosphamidon 8 liquid at 5.0 pt. per 500 gal. is an effective aphicide and may be used on trees of all ages. Dimethoate 2.67 liquid at 4.0 pt. per 500 gal. also is an effective aphicide. See "Scalicide" section. MITES AND THEIR CONTROL Citrus Rust Mite.-Whether citrus is grown for the fresh fruit market or for processing, rust mite should be controlled at all times to prevent russeting of the fruit and excessive leaf drop. Periodic inspections of young as well as old trees should be made throughout the year, including the rainy season, as rust mite is not controlled by rain. During dry windy periods, rust mite may cause leafdrop similar to that caused by spider mites. Spider Mites (Red Spiders).-This group name includes the six-spotted mite, the citrus red mite, and the Texas citrus mite. The six-spotted mite, a spring pest, infests the underside of the leaves, causes yellow spotting, distortion of leaves, and, in severe infestations, heavy leaf-drop. Six-spotted mite can be controlled with any of the materials listed for citrus red mite control. The citrus red mite and the Texas citrus mite feed on leaves, fruit, and green twigs. Both mites cause a grayish sand-blasted appearance on L leaves. During periods of dry weather, heavy infestations may cause leafdrop and twig injury which, if occurring in the fall or early winter, results in dead twigs. Throughout the winter, inspect twigs as well as leaves for infestations on summer and fall growth. MITICIDES Chlorobenzilate is available as a liquid concentrate containing 4 lb. per gal. It is effective against rust mite at 1.25 pt. per 500 gal. of spray, but is of See Table III for other formulations. 6



PAGE 1

TABLE III. EQUIVALENT AMOUNTS OF LIQUID AND POWDER FORMULATIONS OF PESTICIDES Formulations Pesticide Wettable Powders Liquids Percent active ingredient Pounds active ingredient per gall 15 25 50 2 4 5 6 I Pounds per 500 gal. Pints per 500 gal. Parathion 4 2.5 2.5 1.25 0.625 5 3.0 3.0 1.5 0.75 8.5 5.0 5.0 2.5 1.25 Malathion 15.0 6.0 3.75 25.0 10.0 6.25 Ethion 5.0t 2.5t 7.5 3.75 Trithion 5.0t 2.5t 1.25 7.5 3.75 1.875 Guthion 2.50 5.0 Systox 5.0 1.67 tFor fall and winter use only. Institute of Food and Agncultural Sciences TEACHING I FAS RESEARCH EXTENSION THIS PUBLIC DOCUMENT WAS PROMULGATED AT AN ANNUAL COST OF $1,191.49 OR A COST OF $.048 PER COPY FOR THE PURPOSE OF ADVISING CITRUS GROWERS ABOUT RECOMMENDED PRACTICES FOR CONTROL OF PESTS ATTACKING CITRUS.



PAGE 1

Cir. 137C, "Insects and Mites of Florida Citrus"; IFAS "Florida Insect Control Guide"; and IFAS "Florida Plant Disease Control Guide"; quarterly articles in "The Citrus Industry"; or consult your County Extension Director. PESTICIDE APPLICATION Formulas in this schedule are for ground equipment only unless otherwise specified. For pesticides to be effective, thorough coverage of both inside and outside foliage is essential. Although sulfur kills rust mite by fumigation as well as by contact, all other recommended miticides and scalicides kill only upon contact with the pest. Maximum control is possible only when sprays contact the mites and scale insects by thoroughly wetting all fruit, leaf, and twig surfaces before the pests can become numerous. Poor coverage means poor control and costly failure. Dilute sprays on mature citrus trees are greatly affected by insufficient gallonage, poor distribution of spray, and increased ground speeds. Mature citrus trees of normal foliation require at least the height (in feet) of the tree plus 5 gallons for adequate gallonage. Example: A 20-foot tree will require 25 gallons. The sprayer should be nozzled to deliver two-thirds of the volume of spray into the upper one-half of the tree. Airblast sprayers should be pulled at 1 mph for maximum spray penetration. One mile per hour is equivalent to 88 feet per minute. Concentrate spray programs should be based on a dilute program that has provided thorough coverage. Factors that make a concentrate spray program successful include: (1) use only well-trained, competent spray operators, (2) do not spray when the wind is above 8 mph in the grove, (3) nozzle sprayer for two-thirds output in the upper one-half of the trees, (4) reduce spray materials by 25% at 4X or higher concentrations to avoid excessive residues, (5) do not exceed a ground speed of 1 mph, (6) use concentrate oil sprays only upon recommendation of sprayer manufacturer, (7) shut sprayers off at the end of rows to avoid over-spraying, (8) disconnect oscillators on dilute airblast machines at concentrations of 4X or above. Aerial applications are being made both commercially and experimentally by helicopters and airplanes. Experimental data indicate that citrus rust mites and aphids can be successfully controlled by aerial applications, but scale insect control has not been demonstrated. The following factors should be helpful in planning an aerial application: (1) rates of material per acre should be equal to the quantity required for a dilute spray (e.g. an acre requiring two 500-gallon tanks of dilute spray should receive 2.5 pints of chlorobenzilate 4E), (2) materials should be mixed with sufficient water to make 10 to 15 gallons of finished spray per acre for mature groves and 5 to 10 gallons per acre in groves that require one or less dilute tanks, (3) do not spray when wind is above 5 mph in the grove, (4) spray only one row of trees per pass, (5) helicopter applications are more effective at ground speeds of 20 to 25 mph between the tree rows, (6) fixed wing aircraft should be operated at speeds specified by aircraft manufacturers, and (7) use only materials having label approval for aerial applications. INSECTS AND THEIR CONTROL SCALES, MEALYBUGS, AND WHITEFLIES Citrus snow scale is the only armored scale insect that can be regarded as a serious pest of Florida citrus. Citrus snow scale generally attacks the woody portions of the tree but can at times overflow onto fruit and leaves. Two dilute sprays per year, preferably at postbloom and summer, are recommended. Thoroughness of application is more important than selection of a scalicide. Complete coverage of all wood is essential. Glover (long) scale, chaff scale, yellow scale, purple scale, and Florida red scale are present in most groves. However, populations of these insects should remain quite low unless parasite activity is seriously retarded. Postbloom and summer scalicide sprays are recommended to prevent 4