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Interview with Kirby Storter, September 18, 1971

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Title:
Interview with Kirby Storter, September 18, 1971
Creator:
Storter, Kirby ( Interviewee )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

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Subjects / Keywords:
Seminole Indians
Seminoles -- Florida
Seminole Oral History Collection ( local )

Notes

Funding:
This text has been transcribed from an audio or video oral history. Digitization was funded by a gift from Caleb J. and Michele B. Grimes.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
Holding Location:
This interview is part of the 'Seminoles' collection of interviews held by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program of the Department of History at the University of Florida
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Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
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SEM 35 ( SPOHP IDENTIFIER )

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SOUTHEASTERN INDIAN ORAL HISTORY PROJECT
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
In cooperation with The Seminole Tribe of Florida
INTERVIEWEE: Mr. Kirby Storter
INTERVIEWER: Don Pullease
DATE: September 18, 1971















SUMMARY
Kirby Storter traces his family history leading to
the establishment by his father of the Storter Store in
Everglades City. His description of the store includes
Indian trading customs and the trade pattern of Storter
merchandise. The settlement of Everglades City at Allen's
River and its first post office and schools is discussed.
In rambling reminiscences, he mentions Indian habits of
dress, and moral traits, canoes, medical care, religion
and the Green Corn Dance.















INDEX
Allen, William, 9
Bayer Brothers (alligator merchants), 3
Collier, Baron G., 9, 10
Dixie, Charlie, 5-6
Everglades City (Allen's River)
early schools, 10
opening of Post Office, 9
settlement, 1, 9
Godden, Dr. William J., 6
Green Corn Dance (transmission of oral history), 6
Indian canoes (dugouts), 5
Indian deer hunting, 4
Indian dress and stature, 4-5
Billy Conapachee, 5
Josie Billy, 4
Tommy Billy, 4
Medical care, 7, 12
Elysium Spencer, 7
Religion (different effects of Christian and traditional), 6
Seminole moral traits, 10-11
Storter family history, 1-2, 7-10
George W. Storter, 1, 9
R. B. Storter, 1, 9
settlement at Allen's River, (Everglades City), 1, 9
stovewood market, 9
Storter Store, 1, 3, 5, 9
opening, 1, 9
source of supplies, 9
stock in store, 3
trade routes, 5






Tommy, Charlie (snakebite), 6-7
Trade with Indians
alligator hides, 3
beginnings at Storter Store, 2
egret feathers, 3
"make book" (buy on credit), 4
method of exchange, 2















P: Don Pullease, assistant to Dr. Harry A. Kersey, Florida
Atlantic University. Today we're going to interview Mr.
Kirby Storter, of the famous Storter Trading Post. I've
noted to Mr. Storter that this tape would eventually end up
for historians within the University of Florida. Mr. Storter,
would you give us some of your personal views of the history
of the time, please?
S: Personal views of the history?
P: Well, anything you have. What we were talking....
S: Well, you want me to go back and give you my background?
P: Please.
S: Well, I will just....suppose I start with the time my father
moved to Florida. My grandfather, George Storter, and two
sons came to Florida from Alabama about 1875. First settling
near Arcadia, Florida, in a settlement then known as Pine
Level, where they stayed for several years; and in 1880,
Grandfather left and moved on down to Allen's River, what is
now known as Everglades City. Around that Everglades City, a
Mr. William Allen, who had come to Florida after the Civil
War from the New England area, he had a home there, and em-
ployed several colored people and was trying to raise bananas
and various other tropical fruits. Along with my grandfather
was his youngest son, R. B. Storter. In 1887, after my father
had been married a year, he came on down with my mother and my
oldest sister. They settled somewhere up the river, approxi-
mate area of the bulge on Road 29. My father made his living
cutting buttonwood for the Key West market. There was quite
a demand for stove wood, since there are very few trees on
Key West.
After a few years, he began a farming operation there,
and the land is very rich and the truck crops grew in pro-
fusion. And, in 1894 about, he opened a store, and began
trading with the Indians and the other people who lived
around in the Ten Thousand Islands area. My father told me
that when he first arrived in the area that there were no






2
Indians. However, after a few years, five families moved
back down into what we refer to as the Big Cypress area.
My father's theory regarding the actions of the Indians in
the area at that time was that they had moved back closer
to a source of supplies being known at that time in the
Ten Thousand Islands area. Around about 1894 or '95, the
post office department gave us a post office at Everglades,
and my father was the first postmaster and he continued as
postmaster until 1921, running the post office in conjunc-
tion with the store. The Indians came to the store period-
ically and they would bring in fresh meat, sometimes a wild
turkey, alligator hides, coon hides, otter hides. They
made sofkee spoons that we bought and sold, they made small
Indian canoes, they would make Indian dolls, and Indian
costumes--all of which we purchased and would sell to the
tourists who came in the winter time. They also would
locate bee trees and cut 'em down, and they would salvage
the bees' wax, which had a good market. There was a market
for rough lemon seeds, and there were several groves back
up near Immokalee, and they would render out the seed and
bring 'em in, and also the buckskin, made from the deer
hide, had a good market. We bought all of these items from
the Indians.
In the early days of this Storter store, there was not
too much cash available. And when the Indians would come
in, as many as four or five canoe loads, which represented
as a rule, four or five families, they would bring these
hides and various other items in, and we would buy, and we
would buy from one Indian at a time. We'd count 'em up,
figure out how much to pay him and give him the money, and
then he in turn would turn around and spend it. And proba-
bly that was one of the first self-help stores. They walked
behind your counters and they picked stuff out. And after
an hour or two, he'd spent all the money back, you'd have
his hide, and your money back, so you started in on another.
And it usually took about ten to twelve hours to complete
the transaction with the four or five canoe loads that came
in.
Of the items I mentioned awhile ago, alligator skins
were frequently brought in. Up until about the time we sold
out the store, I believe the price was about ten cents per
foot for alligators. They only took the lower part off of
the large alligators, what we would call the belly, and
they would salt it down and roll it up. And we had a table
about four and a half feet high, two feet wide, with the
foot marks marked off. We would unroll these gators and
measure 'em, and they were measured to the nearest foot.






3
A tally was kept. These skins were then packed in empty
sugar barrels and were shipped to a firm in New York, a
Bayer Brothers, the same name as the people who make the
aspirin tablet. Later, I'm sure that the price went up,
but to my memory, at the time we discontinued business, it
was about ten cents a foot. The smaller alligators were
skinned out in their entirety, like you were going to mount
'em. They were known as horn backs. They had a little bit
higher price per foot. My father expanded the store to
where we sold practically everything that was needed in
that country. Patent medicines, cloth, thread, nails,
cement, cow feed, all kinds of food stuffs, rope. Also, we
sold marine engines. We sold ammunition. We did not regu-
larly stock guns, but it was easy to get a gun from the
hardware company in Tampa on special order, that any time
anyone wanted one. The popular gun amongst the Indians is
a Winchester .38, I believe 1873 model. Lever action, and
.38 calibre, and with a lead ball. It was very effective
in shooting deer in that, when that lead ball hit 'em, it
usually knocked him down, and the Indian, of course, could
rush up and finish the deer off by puncturing an artery some-
where in his neck, which also would let the deer bleed. In
the early days of this store venture my father told me of
several canoe loads of Indians coming in with the first
egret feathers that he had ever seen. He didn't have the re-
motest idea of what they were worth; however, he knew there
was a market for them. So, he gave some thought, and finally
graded 'em into two piles--the poor ones and the better
ones, and seventy-five cents for the better ones. When
night come again, he had his money back, and the store was
about empty, and he had enough plumes to make a nice mattress.
So, he told my mother to pack his suitcase, that he was
going to Key West and ship these feathers to New York, which
he did. And, in about three weeks, he got his check back,
and he had made a very nice profit.
We continued doing business with these Indians; frequently
they would come in and would ask for credit. They called it
"make book". Some of 'em would pay you, but others wouldn't.
The Indians are somewhat like the white people. Some of 'em
are thrifty, hard workers, always came in with something to
sell, novelties and so on. while others came in only with an
appetite.
We always had a good supply of calico. The Indians
would buy a yard of this, a yard of that, and take it out
and with a small hand-cranked Singer sewing machine, they
would put together one of their multi-colored costumes, and
r __ ________________------------------






4
they were excellent seamstresses. Indian costumes did not
seem to follow the same pattern, changing rather with the
individual Indian and due to his stature. They were several
Indians that I recall who were short, a little bit robust,
and they wore their dresses, as we call them, about knee
height. While some of the younger Indians wore 'em down
about mid-way between the knee and the ankle. And later
years, quite a few of the Indians began to buy white man's
britches. And he's continued to wear the Indian costume,
but tucked all of the lower part down inside the britches.
I imagine it was pretty warm in the summer time. There's
another thing that I used to notice. Frequently, an Indian
would come in with a brand new costume on, and the old one
would be underneath. It stayed until it simply rotted away
and fell off.
Okay. All right, I started out tellin' about the old,
Tom Billie. Okay.
P: Now you're on.
S: Oh. I recall a Tom Billie, and his family. He had three
sons and they were large, large people, big-framed, and
old Tom wore a turban made out of a wool plaid blanket.
And it lasted for a long time, and must have weighed several
pounds. However, some of the Indians were of smaller
stature. I recall the Josie Billie family. She had several
brothers and I knew his father, Billy Conapache. They were
all small, wouldn't run over five foot four, five inches,
and in their youth, they were not heavy. I haven't seen
any of 'em for a number of years.
...supplies for stocking up the store was from the
wholesalers in Tampa, first in Key West, and later in Tampa.
And then we were furnished a mail order catalog from one
or two large stores in New York. And once or twice a year
we would mail in an order, and it would be shipped down to
Tampa or Key West by ship, and thence on over to Everglades
by a small schooner, which was operated by my uncle for
quite a number of years.
These Indian canoes or dugouts that, at one time, was
their means of transportation, according to what I had been
told, are made in this manner: first, he picks out a nice
cypress tree and fells it, strips the bark off and lets it
age for a period of time, possibly a year. Then, he will
go with an ax and roughly hew, somewhat resembling the canoe,
and then there is another hewing period. And, I don't
know exactly how many, but eventually he gets it shaped up
to what we know as an Indian dugout. We used to sell them






5
various kinds of small axes for their chopping, and they
would buy a plane to smooth the sides with. They would
buy a brace and bit, and bore holes through the bottom and
the sides to get a uniform thickness and plug the holes.
Those that were a little thrifty would paint 'em and
they also used multi-colored paint on their canoes. I saw
one Indian by the name of Charlie Dixie, who was of a
mixed breed. He lived as an Indian; he lived with the
Indians, and his wife was a pure blood Indian. He was half
Negro and half Indian. I believe that he was the strongest
man I have ever seen in my life. They were cutting cypress
crossties for the original railroad out to Deep Lake Grove,
and there was two colored men handling' a single crosstie,
and Dixie went over and picked up one under each arm, and
walked over and dumped it--let 'em fall on the cracker
linemen--and he had a few choice words after that.
I never attended a Green Corn Dance. However, I have
heard my father discuss it quite a bit, and I don't know
where he got his information. But the story he gave me is
that on the little moon in June they meet at some appointed
place, at which time, if there is any rhubarbs or differ-
ences between various members of the tribe, they are in-
vestigated and if punishment is warranted, some kind of
punishment will be meted out. At this time, any young
Indian boys who have reached a certain age are taken to a
separate area from the main camp by an old Indian, possibly
a medicine man. And there they are given some kind of an
elixir that he has concocted, which purges 'em. Cleans 'em
thoroughly out, and they do not eat for this period that
they are with this medicine man. He gives 'em orally the
history of the world insofar as they know it. I suppose
being in the condition they're in physically possibly has
something to do with their retentive memory, because they
have no further education than that.
Over near Bill Brown's boat landing was at one time a
mission, ran by a Dr. Godden. I believe he was an Englishman,
however, I am not too sure. I have seen him, and it
is reported that he was having fair success in making
Christians out of the Indians as long as the food supply
was good. But that when the food got low, the Indians
usually went back into Cypress where they could kill some
game and have a little better fare. As I know, the teach-
ings of Dr. Godden to the Seminoles had no lasting effect.
However, I would not classify 'em as heathens, because they
recognize some supreme being that they refer to as the Great Spirit
or the Big Spirit. They mention that a good Indian
goes to the Happy Hunting Ground, which I suppose is






6
heaven to them.
I believe I mentioned earlier an Indian by the name
of Charlie Tommie. His feet showed scars of several snake
bites, by moccasins. He told me this personally--that
the first time he was bitten, by some kind of a water moccasin,
not a cottonmouth, that he was sick, sick, sick for
about three weeks. Later he was bitten a second time, and
he was sick about one week. Bitten a third time, he was
sick three days. In his own words, he says, next time,
"Next time, no sick."
I had the pleasure of knowing Lucien Spencer, who was
for a time some years ago, what we called an Indian agent,
stationed at Dania. He was a very nice man, and I believe
an ordained minister. He would at lease once or twice a
year make a trip over to Everglades and it was not easy
at that time. He did a very creditable job, to the best
of my knowledge, in caring for any Indians who were desitute
or seriously ill, that need hospitalization, and
without the lack of any program, or funds to finance it,
such as we know it today. On these reservations, I would
say that he did a very creditable job. He certainly was a
very humane type of man.
P: At this point, we will conclude the first part of many parts
of the [story of] George Storter's Trading Post.






Full Text

PAGE 1

SOUTHEASTERN INDIAN ORAL HISTORY PROJECT UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA In cooperation with The Seminole Tribe of Florida INTERVIEWEE: Mr. Kirby Storter INTERVIEWER: Don Pullease DATE: September 18, 1971

PAGE 2

SUMMARY Kirby Storter traces his family history leading to the establishment by his father of the Storter Store in Everglades City. His description of the store includes Indian trading customs and the trade pattern of Storter merchandise. The settlement of Everglades City at Allen's River and its first post office and schools is discussed. In rambling reminiscences, he mentions Indian habits of dress, and moral traits, canoes, medical care, religion and the Green Corn Dance.

PAGE 3

INDEX Allen, William, 9 Bayer Brothers (alligator merchants), 3 Collier, Baron G., 9, 10 Dixie, Charlie, 5-6 Everglades City (Allen's River) early schools, 10 opening of Post Office, 9 settlement, 1, 9 Godden, Dr. William J., 6 Green Corn Dance (transmission of oral history), 6 Indian canoes (dugouts), 5 Indian deer hunting, 4 Indian dress and stature, 4-5 Billy Conapachee, 5 Josie Billy, 4 Tommy Billy, 4 Medical care, 7, 12 Elysium Spencer, 7 Religion (different effects of Christian and traditional), 6 Seminole moral traits, 10-11 Starter family history, 1-2, 7-10 George W. Storter, 1, 9 R. B. Starter, 1, 9 settlement at Allen's River, (Everglades City), 1, 9 stovewood market, 9 Starter Store, 1, 3, 5, 9 opening, 1, 9 source of supplies, 9 stock in store, 3 trade routes, 5

PAGE 4

Tommy, Charlie (snakebite), 6-7 Trade with Indians alligator hides, 3 beginnings at Storter Store, 2 egret feathers, 3 "make book" (buy on credit) , 4 method of exchange, 2

PAGE 5

P: Don Pullease, assistant to Dr. Harry A. Kersey, Florida Atlantic University. Today we're going to interview Mr. Kirby Storter, of the famous Storter Trading Post. I've noted to Mr. Storter that this tape would eventually end up for historians within the University of Florida. Mr. Storter, would you give us some of your personal views of the history of the time, please? S: Personal views of the history? P: Well, anything you have. What we were talking S: Well, you want me to go back and give you my background? P: Please. S: Well, I will just suppose I start with the time my father moved to Florida. My grandfather, George Storter, and two sons came to Florida from Alabama about 1875. First settling near Arcadia, Florida, in a settlement then known as Pine Level, where they stayed for several years; and in 1880, Grandfather left and moved on down to Allen's River, what is now known as Everglades City. Around that Everglades City, a Mr. William Allen, who had come to Florida after the Civil War from the New England area, he had a home there, and em ployed several colored people and was trying to raise bananas and various other tropical fruits. Along with my grandfather was his youngest son, R. B. Storter. In 1887, after my father had been married a year, he came on down with my mother and my oldest sister. They settled somewhere up the river, approxi mate area of the bulge on Road 29. My father made his living cutting buttonwood for the Key West market. There was quite a demand for stove wood, since there are very few trees on Key West. After a few years, he began a farming operation there, and the land is very rich and the truck crops grew in pro fusion. And, in 1894 about, he opened a store, and began trading with the Indians and the other people who lived around in the Ten Thousand Islands area. My father told me that when he first arrived in the area that there were no

PAGE 6

2 Indians. However, after a few years, five families moved back down into what we refer to as the Big Cypress area. My father's theory regarding the actions of the Indians in the area at that time was that they had moved back closer to a source of supplies being known at that time in the Ten Thousand Islands area. Around about 1894 or 1 95, the post office department gave us a post office at Everglades, and my father was the first postmaster and he continued as postmaster until 1921, running the post office in conjunc tion with the store. The Indians came to the store period ically and they would bring in fresh meat, sometimes a wild turkey, alligator hides, coon hides, otter hides. They made sofkee spoons that we bought and sold, they made small Indian canoes, they would make Indian dolls, and Indian costumes--all of which we purchased and would sell to the tourists who came in the winter time. They also would locate bee trees and cut 'em down, and they would salvage the bees' wax, which had a good market. There was a market for rough lemon seeds, and there were several groves back up near Immokalee, and they would render out the seed and bring 'em in, and also the buckskin, made from the deer hide, had a good market. We bought all of these items from the Indians. In the early days of this Storter store, there was not too much cash available. And when the Indians would come in, as many as four or five canoe loads, which represented as a rule, four or five families, they would bring these hides and various other items in, and we would buy, and we would buy from one Indian at a time. We'd count 'em up, figure out how much to pay him and give him the money, and then he in turn would turn around and spend it. And proba bly that was one of the first self-help stores. They walked behind your counters and they picked stuff out. And after an hour or two, he'd spent all the money back, you'd have his hide, and your money back, so you started in on another. And it usually took about ten to twelve hours to complete the transaction with the four or five canoe loads that came in. Of the items I mentioned awhile ago, alligator skins were frequently brought in. Up until about the time we sold out the store, I believe the price was about ten cents per foot for alligators. They only took the lower part off of the large alligators, what we would call the belly, and they would salt it down and roll it up. And we had a table about four and a half feet high, two feet wide, with the foot marks marked off. We would unroll these gators and measure 'em, and they were measured to the nearest foot.

PAGE 7

3 A tally was kept. These skins were then packed in empty sugar barrels and were shipped to a firm in New York, a Bayer Brothers, the same name as the people who make the aspirin tablet. Later, I'm sure that the price went up, but to my memory, at the time we discontinued business, it was about ten cents a foot. The smaller alligators were skinned out in their entirety, like you were going to mount 'em. They were known as horn backs. They had a little bit higher price per foot. My father expanded the store to where we sold practically everything that was needed in that country. Patent medicines, cloth, thread, nails, cement, cow feed, all kinds of food stuffs, rope. Also, we sold marine engines. We sold ammunition. We did not regu larly stock guns, but it was easy to get a gun from the hardware company in Tampa on special order, that any time anyone wanted one. The popular gun amongst the Indians is a Winchester .38, I believe 1873 model. Lever action, and .38 calibre, and with a lead ball. It was very effective in shooting deer in that, when that lead ball hit 'em, it usually knocked him down, and the Indian, of course, could rush up and finish the deer off by puncturing an artery some where in his neck, which also would let the deer bleed. In the early days of this store venture my father told me of several canoe loads of Indians coming in with ~he first egret feathers that he had ever seen. He didn't have the re motest idea of what they were worth; however, he knew there was a market for them. So, he gave some thought, and finally graded 'em into two piles--the poor ones and the better ones, and seventy-five cents for the better ones. When night come again, he had his money back, and the store was about empty, and he had enough plumes to make a nice mattress. So, he told my mother to pack his suitcase, that he was going to Key West and ship these feathers to New York, which he did. And, in about three weeks, he got his check back, and he had made a very nice profit. We continued doing business with these Indians; frequently they would come in and would ask for credit. They called it "make book". Some of 'em would pay you, but others wouldn't. The Indians are somewhat like the white people. Some of 'em are thrifty, hard workers, always came in with something to sell, novelties and so on. while others came in only with an appetite. We always had a good supply of calico. The Indians would buy a yard of this, a yard of that, and take it out and with a small hand-cranked Singer sewing machine, they would put together one of their multi-colored costumes, and

PAGE 8

4 they were excellent seamstresses. Indian costumes did not seem to follow the same pattern, changing rather with the individual Indian and due to his stature. They were several Indians that I recall who were short, a little bit robust, and they wore their dresses, as we call them, about knee height. While some of the younger Indians wore 'em down about mid-way between the knee and the ankle. And later years, quite a few of the Indians began to buy white man's britches. And he's continued to wear the Indian costume, but tucked all of the lower part down inside the britches. I imagine it was pretty warm in the summer time. There's another thing that I used to notice. Frequently, an Indian would come in with a brand new costume on, and the old one would be underneath. It stayed until it simply rotted away and fell off. Okay. All right, I started out tellin' about the old, Tom Billie. Okay. P: Now you're on. S: Oh., I recall a Tom Billie, and his family. He had three sons and they were large, large people, big-framed, and old Tom wore a turban made out of a wool plaid blanket. And it lasted for a long time, and must have weighed several pounds. However, some of the Indians were of smaller stature. I recall the Josie Billie family. She had several brothers and I knew his father, Billy Conapache. They were all small, wouldn't run over five foot four, five inches, and in their youth, they were not heavy. I haven't seen any of 'em for a number of years supplies for stocking up the store was from the wholesalers in Tampa, first in Key West, and later in Tampa. And then we were furnished a mail order catalog from one or two large stores in New York. And once or twice a year we would mail in an order, and it would be shipped down to Tampa or Key West by ship, and thence on over to Everglades by a small schooner, which was operated by my uncle for quite a number of years. These Indian canoes or dugouts that, at one time, was their means of transportation, according to what I had been told, are made in this manner: first, he picks out a nice cypress tree and fells it, strips the bark off and lets it age for a period of time, possibly a year. Then, he will go with an ax and roughly hew, somewhat resembling the canoe, and then there is another hewing period. And, I don't know exactly how many, but eventually he gets it shaped up to what we know as an Indian dugout. We used to sell them

PAGE 9

5 various kinds of small axes for their chopping, and they would buy a plane to smooth the sides with. They would buy a brace and bit, and bore holes through the bottom and the sides to get a uniform thickness and plug the holes. Those that were a little thrifty would paint 'em and they also used multi-colored paint on their canoes. I saw one Indian by the name of Charlie Dixie, who was of a mixed breed. He lived as an Indian; he lived with the Indians, and his wife was a pure blood Indian. He was half Negro and half Indian. I believe that he was the strongest man I have ever seen in my life. They were cutting cypress crossties for the original railroad out to Deep Lake Grove, and there was two colored men handlin' a single crosstie, and Dixie went over and picked up one under each arm, and walked over and dmnped it--let 'em fall on the cracker linemen--and he had a few choice words after that. I never attended a Green Corn Dance. However, I have heard my father discuss it quite a bit, and I don't know where he got his information. But the story he gave me is that on the little moon in June they meet at some appointed place, at which time, if there is any rhubarbs or differ ences between various members of the tribe, they are in vestigated and if punishment is warranted, some kind of punishment will be meted out. At this time, any young Indian boys who have reached a certain age are taken to a separate area from the main camp by an old Indian, possibly a medicine man. And there they are given some kind of an elixir that he has concocted, which purges 'em. Cleans 'em thoroughly out, and they do not eat for this period that they are with this medicine man. He gives 'em orally the history of the world insofar as they know it. I suppose being in the condition they're in physically possibly has something to do with their retentive memory, because they have no further education than that. Over near Bill Brown's boat landing was at one time a mission, ran by a Dr. Godden. I believe he was an English man, however, I am not too .sure. I have seen him, and it is reported that he was having fair success in making Christians out of the Indians as long as the food supply was good. But that when the food got low, the Indians usually went back into Cypress where they could kill some game and have a little better fare. As I know, the teach ings of Dr. Godden to the Seminoles had no lasting effect. However, I would not classify 'em as heathens, because they recognize some supreme being that they refer to as the Great Spirit or the Big Spirit. They mention that a good Indian goes to the Happy Hunting Ground, which I suppose is

PAGE 10

6 heaven to them. I believe I mentioned earlier an Indian by the name of Charlie Tommie. His feet showed scars of several snake bites, by moccasins. He told me this personally--that the first time he was bitten, by some kind of a water moc casin, not a cottonmouth, that he was sick, sick, sick for about three weeks. Later he was bitten a second time, and he was sick about one week. Bitten a third time, he was sick three days. In his own words, he says, next time, "Next time, no sick." I had the pleasure of knowing Lucien Spencer, who was for a time some years ago, what we called an Indian agent, stationed at Dania. He was a very nice man, and I believe an ordained minister. He would at lease once or twice a year make a trip over to Everglades and it was not easy at that time. He did a very creditable job, to the best of my knowledge, in caring for any Indians who were desi tute or seriously ill, that need hospitalization, and without the lack of any program, or funds to finance it, such as we know it today. On these reservations, I would say that he did a very creditable job. He certainly was a very humane type of man. P: At this point, we will conclude the first part of many parts of the [story of] George Starter's Trading Post.