Citation
Interview with Calvin Gibson, December 4, 1973

Material Information

Title:
Interview with Calvin Gibson, December 4, 1973
Creator:
Gibson, Calvin ( Interviewee )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Mississippi Choctaw Oral History Collection ( local )
Mississippi Choctaw.

Notes

Funding:
This text has been transcribed from an audio or video oral history. Digitization was funded by a gift from Caleb J. and Michele B. Grimes.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
Holding Location:
This interview is part of the 'Mississippi Choctaw' collection of interviews held by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program of the Department of History at the University of Florida
Rights Management:
Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
Resource Identifier:
MC 6 ( SPOHP IDENTIFIER )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text





MISS CHOC 6A

Mr. Calvin Gibson (G)
Conehatta Community, Newton County, Mississippi

Interviewer: Dr. John K. Mahon (I)
December 4, 1973

Typed by: P. F. Williams



I: I'm John K. Mahon, and this is the fourth of December at

9:35 in the morning, in the principal's office of the Choc-

taw Central at the Choctaw Reservation, Philadelphia, Mis-

sissippi. I'm about to conduct an interview with Mr. Gib-

son. Mr. Gibson, will you just say your name?

G: My name is Calvin Gibson, and I'm a social worker for the

Choctaw Indian Agency.

I: And are you a full-blooded Choctaw?

G: Yes, I am. I'm a full-blooded Choctaw. My mother is full-

blooded Choctaw, my father is, too.

I: Which of the reservations.or whatever you call them around

here do you come from?

G: I belong to the Conehatta Community.

I: Right. How far is that? How far a trip.is'it?

G: It's forty miles from here. Forty miles from work every

day.

I: Do you live here and travel around?

G: No. No, I live in Conehatta, and I come up to work forty

miles every day to Philadelphia.

I: Because your work is mostly around here and not in the

Conehatta Community?










MISS CHOC 6A 2



G: Yes. The headquarters is Philadelphia, and I come to

Philadelphia and there I pick up my car. And my office

is there. And then I go to several other communities.

I go to Red Water Community, which is twenty-five miles

from here. And I go to Standing Pine Community, which

is approximately about the same distance, except it's

in a different area. And also Sandersville, which is

about ninety miles from here--I go one day out of the

month. So, I have to come in to my main office and

then from there go out to the field.

I: What'll happen to you if gas gets in short supply?

How many miles do you average in a day?

G: Oh, sometimes...right now, since the gas shortage,

we, uh...the GAC motorpool has sent us a statement on

it and-we're cutting down on our fieldwork days each

week. We're not going every day as like we used to.

We go two days out of the week now.

I: Only two.

G: Only two days. And try to cover these areas. And we

have other workers, too, in the office and try to utilize

all the people that works in the office and try to en-

courage the people to come in or meet us at some school

or meet us/at the reservation and use our workers that

they have in the reservation.

I: What's your age, Mr. Gibson, if you're not sensitive

about age?











MISS CHOC 6A 3



G: I'm age thirty-three.

I: Were you educated here at this Choctaw Central?

G: Uh, not mainly at Choctaw Central. Before, they had

a Pearl River Indian School. This is the Pearl River

Reservation, they named it Pearl River. And they had

a small school here and the school is not here anymore

because it's demolished, you know, and it just went

to the tenth grade. And I went as far as the tenth

grade, and then I went /4L se// Indian Institute

at Lawrence, Kansas, to finish my high school--last

two years, eleven and twelve. And when I finished

eleven and twelve, I went to junior college in New-

ton, which is below Conehattawhere I live, and finished

my junior college there. And I went to University of

Southern Mississippi at Hattiesburg, and finished my

last two years there.

I: Do you got a B. A. degree?

G: Yes.

I: Did you take special work in social, uh...

G: Yes, I did.

I: ...social work?

G: And I'm still taking courses in social work now. The

social work school in Athens, Georgia, is giving me

correspondence course now, now, so...so that I can finish

and probably get a Master's degree and be a regular.-

fledged social worker, because that was not my major

when I first started out, see. My major was in elementary










MISS CHOC 6A 4



education when I first started out, but I substitute

teached for four months in the fourth grade, and I kind

of didn't...I found out that teaching, you have to stay

in most of the time, and cooped up in the place. And

most.of the classrooms we had was a one-room classroom,

you know. That they don't switch classes for different

things and no P. E.'s and so forth, soat that time when

I was substituting. So I just changed my major over to

social work and then I get more extra courses to become

a social worker.

I: Um-hmm.

G: And since then, last semester, I took Introduction to

Social Work course here, which was taught at night here

at the school. They have different colleges now that

brings courses to the reservation.

I: How many colleges do it, and what are they?

G: Well, Tougaloo College from Jackson--that's T-o-u-g-a-

l-o-o--they bring courses up here. I don't know what

type of courses, but it's...they're here Tuesdays and

Thursday, I believe. And then, University of Southern

brings courses here...

I: That's Hattiesburg?

G: Hattiesburg. They bring courses here, and Mississippi

State at one time did, prior to this time. But I don't

believe they're here now. And then also Mississippi

State is AC dourses, not here, but to Meridian Junior










MISS CHOC 6A 5



College, where you can go to school, attend school there,

in the daytime or night, and get a degree there. You

don't have to go to Mississippi State at Starkville,

which is about sixty or seventy miles from here.

I: Will these courses you're getting work toward a Master's

degree?

G: Um-hmm, trying to.

I: You're aiming for that.

G: Right.

I: When you got a Master's degree, would you be entitled

to higher pay scales?

G: Yes, yes, I would. I would be...right now, my title is

Social Service Representative, not a regular social

worker, but you...the.social worker is just one social

worker there, at the position there. And we are represen-

tative from their working from the area. And when you

get to be a full-fledged social worker, you can get more

pay and a better grade position, see.

I: Who's youremployer?

G: Well, I work for the agency, that's under the agency.

But, then, we have different departments, we have about

twelve or thirteen departments in the agency itself, see.
Alu-
I: Well now, is that...you're working for the tribe orAyou

working for the BIA?

G: No, I'm working for the BIA.

I: I see.










MISS CHOC 6A 6



G: Yes, this is under the Bureau of Indian Affairs and

in-the Social Service Department. And we have other

departments like Employment Assistance, and Credit

Administration, and Home Economics, and Maintenance,

and programs and so forth, see. They have all depart-

ments in there to represent the people and try to work

with a relationship with the tribe program.

I: Now, were you...was Choctaw your native tongue? Did

the first language you ever spoke Choctaw, or...?

G: Yes. That's as far as I know, that's all we spoke in

the home when we grew up. And we have nine boys and

a girl in the home.

I: Good Heavens! This is your brothers and sisters?

G: Yes, my brothers and sisters, and we all spoke Choctaw

until we left home and went to school and learned how

to talk English, and...

I: You learned how to talk English in school.

G: Um-hmm. [affirmative]

I: That's interesting.

G: And well, when I went to school here, I spoke English

but not all that good, and I guess I still don't speak

it fluently enough where other people speaks it. But

I try my best. When I was in high school I didn't

speak it all that good, till I came to college, and

then, when I took English, I found out that English

course was the hardest course that I ever took! I











MISS CHOC 6A 7



took it two years in a row. I took English...first

English One and English Two, and I didn't make a good

grade. I made a D. So the second year, my sophomore

year, I took it over again. My advisor said that I

didn't have to take it.' He said, "You passed it."

I said, "Yes, but with a low grade." So I took it

over again to see if I could do better, and I made

one grade up, you know. But he said usually English

One and English Two is a hard course for even an

English-speaking people, he said. Even people who

spoke it all their lives can not major in English

or can not speak good English or whatever, he said.

But in the home, we don't...in my home we don't talk

English all that much. I speak Choctaw every day.

I: Well, you're married, I suppose...

G: Yes.

I: ...and have a family of your own.

G: Well, I don't have no kids of my own. I have two

foster children that I keep.

I: Oh, do you? Are they Choctaw kids?

G: Um-hmm, they're Choctaw kids. But we speak Choctaw

in the home all the time, and whatever we do. We go

to church, we speak in Choctaw, we sing in Choctaw,

read the Bible in Choctaw, we...it's not that I'm

against white English, it's just that that's what I'm

used to. If I'm used to English--just like at work.










MISS CHOC 6A 8



When I'm at work, I speak English every day.

I: But .your fullest expression, to really get down to

the nuts and bolts of it, would be Choctaw.

G: Right.

I: You'd feel you could get through better.

G: I could get through better.with Choctaw. Since we're

Choctaws here, we can talk Choctaw much better than

we can do English, I believe.

I: Have you got any idea what is so difficult about English

for a Choctaw speaker? You remember what hung you up,

as they say? Could you analyze that?

G: Well...

I: I don't know the mechanics of Choctaw language a'tall,

of course.

G: Well, but this is what I see, though. I've seen a white

man can speak Indian languages as good as I can. In fact,

there's a man in church. -He's named Mr. Parrish, Mr.

Bill Parrish. He's a preacher. He can talk Cherokee,

and he can...he taught it one time. Taught it and

taught the writings of it. When we was at his home

several years ago, he showed it to us about the lan-

guage. My brother--my youngest brother sort of, he's

eleven,now--when he was small...when a baby's small,

whether he's white, black, or Choctaw, whatever you

teach him when he's a little kid, that's what he'll

learn. My little brother, he spoke English from










MISS CHOC 6A 9



very little, and when he was born and ready to talk

they spoke EnglishAand all, and he didn't know any

Choctaw until he went to school. Till he went to

school and played with other Indian kids, and then

they talked Choctaw to him and that's where he picked

it up. And he...right now, if he talk2Choctaw to you,

he'll have this broken type that speaks English

so much that his Choctaw language does not come out

fluently.

I: Well, I mean, what are the critical differences?

When you're talking English, is it a problem remem-

bering the words, or thinking up the words...

G: Yeah...

I: ...or is it the verbs, the action words, or what?

G: ...trying to think it up, see. And another thing

is that if I read here, if I read a line, I read

it backwards sort of, see, in Choctaw. Like I

can say in English, "I go to work" but then, when

I speak in Choctaw, I say "work" first and bring

it back this way. See, when I speak English and

talk Choctaw...when I speak English I go this way,

and when I talk Choctaw I'm coming backwards.

I: The action words in Choctaw come first, what we

call English verbs?

G: Yes, uh-huh. That's right.

I: I see.










MISS CHOC 6A 10



G: That's right. You don't necessarily say it in a way

that we talk. Like if I'have to translate what they

said, I'm going to have to be saying it sort of back-

wards but still say the same thing, see.

I: Ccn you read Choctaw?

G: Well, the Bible I can.

I: Only the Bible?

G: The Bible and the songbook. I guess they have a Choc-

taw kind of a dictionary-book. It's called definer.

Somebody put that out and I can read that. I can read

most of it. But it's the writing part. I don't know

if there's a writing-letters for Choctaws. I haven't

seen it if it is. Some people do write it on their

own, you know, just...

I: But you can't. You know where the written language

came from?

G: No, sir.

I: The missionaries put it together.

G: Yes, sir.

I: Almost throughout the country they did. And it's

something they developed from(listening)I guess--what

you'd call phonetically ,lfIt ...

G: Yes, phonetically. That's what I was going to say.

Because some of this spelling don't seem to say the

words that you're saying, but then they use this long

"A" or long or short form, you know, the way you'say

it, and the way phonetically you put it together, you










MISS CHOC 6A 11



know. I'm pretty sure when I take phonetics in high

school--I mean, college--they'd show some of these

things. Like even your own name, you know. Like,

my name is Calvin, but you can read it with a "K"

and then K-a-i with a hyphen-type in between and

put v-i-n, and then you can have almost the same

things as the way you say it.

I: Have you got an Indian name?

G: No.

I: Just this name.

G: Just this name, and I always wondered, you know, way

back, like my father's time and his father's time and

his time...in other words,,my name, how did happen to

become a Gibson given to an Indian, you know. Things

like this, but I never...

I: That's interesting about the Florida Indians. Their

names sound more Indian. I mean, your name could be

Scotch or English or anything else, but you know,

the chairman of the Miccosukee tribe is Buffalo Tiger,

and it wouldn't anybody mistake that.

G: That's right.

I: But then you've got a lot of family names here like

Seminole. I mean, I've met some people named Jim

around here--last name.

G: Yes, sir.

I: And Billy, a last name. Those are Seminole names.










MISS CHOC 6A 12



G: Um-hmm, Seminole.- But when you get out West, in the

West, you really go to Indian names.

I: Yeah.

G: Like Broke Shoulder and White Head, and so forth.

I: Yeah, that type of thing.

G: Yes.

I: Well, I knew how you feel about you and...you had to

go out to the Haskell Institute to complete your educa-

tion. I guess because they didn't admit the Indians

to white schools here.

G: Well, then, I don't know if that was really necessary

or not,.because some kids--just some--went to public

school in Meridian, I guess...

I: From your generation?

G: Yes, ,at the time that I went to Haskell. But it was

just that my father and mother, you know, strongly

wanted us to get an education, and if we went to a

boarding school,1we would get it. See, we stayed at

the school, at the boarding school, and you could

take the type of education you wanted,-and if you

wanted...and also, these schools had vocations with

it. And what my father had said wasA "If you're not

college material, then you can take some of this vo-

cation and learn some skill so you can fall back on

that skill."

I: Did you do it?










MISS CHOC 6A 13



G: Well, I took a vocations; and I use it once in a while.

I: What was it?

G: Baking.

I: Oh?

G: Bakery. I took welding for a while, but my eye...when

I was thirteen years old, I was fixing a fence, and I

took that nail out, you know--this U-type nail?--and I

wasn't holding the wire, and it popped out and it hit mV

eye on this side, this right eye. Ever since then, I

can't use it very well. I mean, I use it pretty good

sometimes, but then, like welding, when I was welding--

the sparks and all?--my eye got affected on it, and I

couldn't see as well in order to weld. So, I had to

change vocation and when I did, I just took bakery.

I didn't think I'd ever use it, but...when I took my

achievement test, I made high enough to go to college.

So I said, well, I probably won't use it. But any-

way, I took bakery and then I worked...I took bakery

for about six weeks and a part-time job opened up in

Lawrence, Kansas, for a night position. My boss asked

me if I wanted to go. I said, I'm not doing well enough

to take the job. He said, "Yeah, you can learn." So

that's how I paid...my father and my mother...my mother

didn't work at that time. My father was the only person

that worked and didn't make all that much, either, so

I worked at school. And me and my brothr--my younger

brother went to Haskell--and we kind of bought our










MISS CHOC 6A 14



own clothes and spending money. Then we didn't depend

on him for two years, see, through Haskell. And then

during the summer I stayed there and worked in the

bakery. And then when I came here and went to school,

finished my. last two years at Hattiesburg, I worked

at bakeries'at night. So...so the vocational that I
SC1.5 1 took in -hrgtr-sctrh helped me to finish my schooling.

I didn't have to borrow any money from Student Loan

br whatever, see. I just worked, and since then, several

times since I been out of school, if I'm out of work

or at Christmastime or Thanksgiving time, the bakery

S lOf*v-i. might call me, says, "I need you to

come and help me a little bit, if you want to moon-

light a little bit," says. So I go and do that some-

times, you know. And I feel that I been blessed with

the skill that I've got, that I-use it to help myself

and use it to help other people, too.

I: Sure. That's a very interesting thing to have picked

up.

G: And I don't feel badly about going away to school. I'm

not saying that...I wouldn't say that just because In-

dians couldn't go to white schools you went to Haskell.

I mean, I don't think it's necessary to say that, because

a person, even though what you can do here at home, if

you want to go somewhere bad enough, no one's going to

keep you here. Even if you want to go to public school,










MISS CHOC 6A 15



or even if you can do anything "(AA/L 7 ti^ /C,

people can do here, if you want to go out west nobody's

going to keep you here.

I: How'd you feel about the boarding school experience

as a way of living?

G: I believe it helped me. I believe it did. You learn

to rely on yourself--responsibility, another thing. But

most of the time you're home, your mother takes care of

your clothing, irons for you, wash for you, and all of

that. Wake you up every morning and say go...you eat

breakfast in time to go to school. But this way, at

boarding school, you did your own thing. You washed

your own clothes, you ironed your own clothes. And

then you eat at the time they eat. You got up on

your own--shoulder a little responsibility for your-

self. And WvJthv'r school starts, you're supposed

to be there so you go on your own. Nobody have to

push you there at school time, you got to go to school,

things like that.

I: Don't they send some Indian kids to boarding schools

who are more or less incorrigible at home?

G: Um-hmm. [affirmative]

I: There were four or five Seminole boys around here who'd

been sent here because their folks couldn't handle them.

G: That's true.

I: Are there any still here?









MISS CHOC 6A 16



G: Uh, yes, there's some that's here.

I: How do they get along? Do you know?

G: I think they get along pretty good. The other day

we was talking to one in our office. Financially, his

folks wasn't able to help him, so he asked us if we

could help him. And we're gonna put him to work for

a couple of hours every evening to earn spending money.

He's a senior so he...his ring and so forth-whatever

seniors need to graduate, you know, they have to buy it

on their own. So we help kids, and this Osceola boy's

still here that we know of. And he played football

for a couple of years--___ good football players.

I: Yeah, a lot of them are very good football players.

Well, are many of your people that you know of have

gone and got a college degree as you have?

G: Quite a few of them.

I: Have?

G: Quite a few of them did before I did. I was...that's

sort of...that's why a lot of people wants to finish,

I believe. Someone else went and finished. Someone

else got a Master's degree. Someone gotza Doctor's

degree. Stuff like that that kind of puts you in your

mind that if this Choctaw can do it, you can do it.

The principal of the school here, Choctaw Central, is

my brother, and he went...

I: Oh, yeah. What's his...what are his first names?










MISS CHOC 6A 17



G: Jimmy. Jimmy Gibson.

I: He's got a middle name, too. Jimmy...

G: Jimmy Lee.

I: Now, I met him when we were here in March, you see, when

we first put the proposition to them whether they wanted

to accept this as a tribal business, yeah. Oh, he's

your brother.

G: Um-hmm, yeah.

I: I see. Well, have you known many people of your genera-

tion that left the reservatiorwent off and got embedded

in the white society?

G: I really...

I: You know any?

G: No. No, I don't.

I: They mostly come back.

G: Yes, some come back, and some stay away. But I don't know

if they embedded in the white society. That's not...I don't

know if that's the reason they're not back or what.

I: Do they come back to visit?

G: Yes, they come back to visit. They come back to visit at

least once a year oq maybe a couple of years later or what-

ever. I have another brother that lives in Denver, Colo-

rado--actually Colorado Springs. He works for the Army as

a civilian. He's a safety instructor, and'he finished col-

lege at Southeastern State Teacher's College i ( i /

Oklahoma. Majored in mathematics, I believe it was, and

he...










MISS CHOC 6A 18



I: How long's he lived out there?

G: Oh, three or four years now.

I: Um-hmm. You think he'll eventually come back to the

reservation?

G: He might. He's had chances to come back to teach here,

but he just...he just wants to stay out there, I believe.

Kind of less complicated, probably, I don't know.

I: What draws'em back? So many Indians that have been brought

up on reservations do come back sooner or later. What

would you say does it?

G: To answer your question...

I: It's okay.

G: To answer your question, I do not...I couldn't quite

specifically say why they come back. Sometimes because

quite a few people has lived in Chicago or Memphis, Ten-

nessee, or somewhere for several years--like say, ten

years or something. Then they come back and live here.

And I don't know, it's because maybe they've lived away

so long that they...for the last few years or how many

years that they'll live, they got left to live, they'll

probably just come back to their home town and stay with

the people...whatever happens...I do not know. I can't

specifically say why, because, if it's for jobs, we don't

have good jobs like Chicago or Tennessee or whatever.

And if they don't have no education or whatever, then we...

actually we don't have nothing too much to offer to peo-

ple like that that has been in a good position elsewhere,











MISS CHOC 6A 19



see. And then they come back here and have to get a

lower paying job.

I: Well now, you live on the Conehatta reservation, is

that right?

G: That's right.

I: And nobody on a reservation can own the ground, can

they?

G: No.

I: I mean, you can't own real estate.

G: I lease mine.

I: You lease what? The house?

G: I lease a twenty-five acre piece and for twenty-five

years optional.

I: From whom? The tribe?

G: From the tribe.

I: And how about the house?

G: The house I built on it and I'm paying for the house

myself. And they said that...and they said as long as

I pay the lease, and I've paid up my twenty-five year

lease, so I can live on there twenty-five years.

I: You'mean you've paid that clear?

G: Um-hmm. [affirmative]

I: You don't owe anything?

G: No. No, I don't, because I...

I: But you're having to pay on the house.

G: On the house, I do. On the house, I still do. I still










MISS CHOC 6A 20



got about nine more years and I'll have it paid.

I: Well, what happens to the house at the end of twenty-

five years? I mean...

G: Well, I can lease it...well, it's a twenty-five year

optional, and you get twenty-five and you actually can

live there fifty, see, twenty-five more years optional

on it.

I: Could you leave it to...

G: Yes.

I: ...a descendant?

G: Yes, sir.

I: You could will the house?

G: Um-hmm. [affirmative]

I: And so that little piece of land could really stay under

the control of your family...

G: Right.

I: ...for...

G: For a period of fifty years, maybe. And then after that,

then you re-lease it if...one reason I wanted to do a

twenty-five year optional deal on it was that, you know,

we had this tribal council thing--representatives from

each community.

I: I know.

G: And if I did it one year at a time, maybe...and I'm

buying a house, I built a house on it myself. The tribe

didn't build it for me, the other special programs that

they have, HUD program or whatever, didn't build it for











MISS CHOC 6A 21



me. I built it on my own, you see. And one thing I

did that was that this tribal council representative

is every two years. This year/tribal council might

sign my two-year lease. But then, if a new man comes

in and he decides he didn't like me, he could turn my

lease down.

I: And there you'd be.

G: And there I'd be with a house and no land, see.

I: Did that ever happen, in your knowledge?

G: Not that I know of, not that I know of.

I: That's a.;.theoretically it could.

G: That's a theoretically, in my mind-that I...when I took

that house, built that house and paid some on it. I had

some money and borrowed some money with it, too, and it

was going to take me ten years to pay it out. And I

just saidAif this might could happen--it may not hap-

pen at all--but I want to take safety precautions on

it just in case.

I: Well, I'll tell you. I'd like to ask you something and

then probably we'd better end it because there'd be other'

waiting. But, uh, tell me what a social worker does in

a community like this. Just give me some idea what...the

things you do.

G: Well, our program consists of general assistance program.

When we say "general assistance" that's assisting people

that are needy in general, not in certain, uh, not in

certain categories, but if they are needy. And we help











MISS CHOC 6A 22



them because...first maybe because of death in the family.

Maybe the husband is dead and the wife never worked and

has kids to feed, and we have to come in get resources for

them. But, actually, first we help them for a month or

two, then we get the county to help, the state to help.

If the husband worked, we try to get Social Security for

them. If he was a veteran, we try to find veteran com-

pensation for them. We're sort of a resource agent-type,

you know. We don't actually help. Our agency does not

directly help the people all the time, but we get resources

for them, -Like Social Security is one that a lot of people

don't know about that you can get when the husband dies--

has been working, if he has enough quotas--that he can get

help. Lot of people don't know that, so we got to come in

and help them. Tell the wife, "This is what you can do,

and we'll help you fill out those papers and work them

out." If he was a veteran, we try to work VA compensation

out for the kids. But the main thing, sort of, all these

resources--I like to bring this out first--is that whether

he's veteran or Social Security or whatever they can get,

if they weren't legally married, the kids can not get help.

And that's one of the main things around here, that people

cohabit together and won't realize or can not realize or

doesn't realize that the kids, in the end, are gonna be

the one'who's neglected or can not get the help. Because

we've e so many cases like that, lately. Like if the man










MISS CHOC 6A 23



and woman lived together for ten or fifteen years, then

all of a sudden he dies. But the kids, they actually put

it in his name but the man wasn't legally married to her

and regulations say that they got to be legally married

before they can get VA compensation or they can get Social

Security. And this is one problem that we have, that we

do. And then we take care of child welfare programs, that

is, putting kids in foster homes that's taken by the court

or parent's consent or whatever. And then we work with

juvenile delinquency program. We have a Choctaw Youth

Development Center here, and it's sort of a prevention

program for the younger kids so that they will not go

to the state training school. But if the Youth Center

could not control these kids and they keep on being un-

controllable, then they will eventually end up in the

state training school. And we provide program for sort

of...we're not an adoption agency. We can not do that,

the state has to do that. But we help in a way for that

type of program. But those are our programs that we cover

the whole area where there's Indians lives, that's where

we're at, really. Supposed to have jurisdiction limit

but usually we don't. We serve this area, Choctaw

""^A'C- then we also serve an area in Louisiana, the
"CI A, / L A Indian .

I: Yes. I've called on the head man of the c4_ _r __ __

last month.










MISS CHOC 6A 24



G: You did.

I: Yeah. LeRoy Burgess.

G: Um-hmm.

I: Have you met him?

G: I haven't. My boss....

I: You don't go down there, do you? ee i

G: My boss went down there, and he...Mr. Harry __, he's

a nice young man, too. He...

I: I haven't met him.

G: No, he's my boss,Social Service Center. He supervises the

whole area of the Social Service Department. He's a nice

young man. I like to work for him, very good man.

I: Well, why do they send the social work out of here? Why

don't the Ghitea.e.as-z pick it up themselves? They're

federally recognized.

G: Yeah. I do not know. I mean, actually social working all

together. We're not working problems case by case there.

All we do is sort of an advising agency, I believe. It's

under this agency.

I: Yeah.

G: ChittaLLicha's under this agency.

I: I noticed that in the National Congress of American Indians,

the handbook they put out. They're official.

G: Yes, sir. They're officially under this agency...

I: But you know, they've got a little headquarters. I've been

in it. And they have a reservation of something like two










MISS CHOC 6A 25



hundred and eighty-two acres. They got...

G: Is that right?

I: Yeah, three hundred and fifty people or something like

that. They got a nice little place. It's a real, real

attractive little reservation.

G: Yeah, Mr. .112. took pictures of the office build-

ing and so forth, and we saw them.

I: They're building a new craft shop and so on. It's gonna

be a beaut. And the headquarters go in there. Well, but

you're a field worker, so in this process you're describing

you go out and talk to the people.

G: Yes, we set up field days in, communities. Like, you know,

we have seven communities and most of the communities, they

have school...and like the area that I go, they have a

school and I have an office space there where I say I'll

be there. Say, like Red Water I go to Wednesdays and I

say I'll be there at ten o'clock, between ten and twelve.

And so the Outreach worker over there / announces

that the social worker will be here between ten and twelve

at the school and you can come meet him. And then I have

already set up some people that I want to see myself, that

I have records up there. After ten to twelve, then I go

make a home visit to the homes that I'm supposed to visit

for that day. And then some people, if they got a way to

come up here to the office, then they come up to the office.

Practically every day we got people-in the office all the

time.










MISS CHOC 6A 26



I: Well now, you say sometimes you run a little tape recorder

on -M--J-^/

G: Um-hmm. [affirmative]

I: What is the object?

G: Well, the object of that is we got to keep sort of a report

on what we do each day, or what the man said to me and I

said to him, or whatever. Like his age, he doesn't know

his birthdate or whatever, then we take sources from him

so...that man knew.-a long time ago, ;7J( : -f('A. I lived

for so .f9. I take it in tape and then I have to get
O J

it typed to have it in the records so that I can follow

this up, see. I tape the case reviews just to sort of

a narrative I got to put in the report, uh, in his record

so that I can keep this. I got to make a narrative any-

way, so I want to tape it so I want to know what he says,

see.

I: But now, you get out into the field, if I remember what

you told me earlier, two days a week. And what do you

do the rest of the time?

G: I stay in the office and take care of records.

I: Put the cases in order and all.

G: Right. And most of the time when we're there, we're not

there all the time. We have like this school, they might

have a kid, a student here at this school might have a

problem and wants to talk to a social worker. Well, they










MISS CHOC 6A 27



call us and we say well, we'll come over there and talk

with him. And we come over here and talk to the kids here.

And I try to understand their problems, whatever problem

they have, you know. So actually, we don't...we're kind

of spread out thin right now. We have three workers in

the field and our boss and two secretaries. But we ac-

tually don't stay there all the time. We have work all

the time. If some marriage counseling has to be done,

we go. Family counseling...just practically almost every-

thing that we do.

I: Have the other field workers got traininggsuch as you've

got?

G: Yes. We try to...well, individual education, that's up

to the individual whether if he wants to go on and further

his education. That's up to them. That's mainly a thing

if they want to get more training, then...if the training

is under the social service, then we all do the same type

of program.

I: Right. Well, I expect we'd better end, Mr. Gibson, because

Mr. Wilson's waiting to talk to me.

G: All right.

I: Switch it off, will you please...?



-END OF TAPE-





Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- Interview with Calvin Gibson, December 4, 1973 ( Book ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00007831_00001
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:oral http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadataoral
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadataoraloral.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2020-08-13T22:30:08Z ID LASTMODDATE 2020-08-11T05:50:38Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC - FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:accessCondition Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
mods:identifier type SPOHP IDENTIFIER MC 6
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code authority iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation This interview is part of the 'Mississippi Choctaw' collection of interviews held by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program of the Department of History at the University of Florida
UFSPOHP
mods:url access object in context https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00007831/00001
mods:name personal
mods:namePart Gibson, Calvin
mods:role
mods:roleTerm marcrelator ive
Interviewee
mods:note funding This text has been transcribed from an audio or video oral history. Digitization was funded by a gift from Caleb J. and Michele B. Grimes.
mods:originInfo
mods:dateIssued December 4, 1973
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source sobekcm UF00007831_00001
mods:recordContentSource Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
mods:subject local
mods:topic Mississippi Choctaw Oral History Collection
Mississippi Choctaw.
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Interview with Calvin Gibson, December 4, 1973
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation ALL
ORAL
OH4
IUF
IUFSPOHP
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 00001thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark SPOHP
UFCLASHIST
GRIMES
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00007831
sobekcm:VID 00001
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 720595
oral:interview
oral:Interviewee Calvin Gibson
oral:Interviewer Dr. John K. Mahon
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
sobekcm:File fileid JP21 width 2539 height 3297
JPEG1 630 818
JPEG2 816
JP22 2543 3293
JPEG3
JP23 2541
JPEG4
JP24 3295
JPEG5 817
JP25 3299
JPEG6
JP26
JPEG7
JP27 3303
JPEG8
JP28
JPEG9
JP29
JPEG10 819
JP210 3305
JPEG11
JP211
JPEG12
JP212 3291
JPEG13
JP213 3301
JPEG14
JP214
JPEG15
JP215
JPEG16
JP216
JPEG17
JP217
JPEG18
JP218
JPEG19
JP219
JPEG20
JP220
JPEG21
JP221
JPEG22 815
JP222
JPEG23
JP223
JPEG24
JP224
JPEG25
JP225
JPEG26
JP226
JP227
JPEG27
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE archive
METS:file GROUPID G1 TIF1 imagetiff CHECKSUM 369e8f9bd49cc0d3d87b2c475f016aa8 CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 8392564
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 00001.tif
G2 TIF2 4098c9f2412f53f36bc81fcc03288d12 8395500
00002.tif
G3 TIF3 5d0abfd200f0e517d37b119af0e9c119 8388780
00003.tif
G4 TIF4 03c7db65ccc6e8a4899ce8c7bc5f1c2c 8400532
00004.tif
G5 TIF5 c94d822a827b74ce1005ee1cdac53e81 8410528
00005.tif
G6 TIF6 d4f5454b4676f6a6522fd508c335e70e 8400644
00006.tif
G7 TIF7 0521812d5a0bc59edeb976c4d69fc49c 8420944
00007.tif
G8 TIF8 895d10fb3dad162dc674ab0850260579 8395332
00008.tif
G9 TIF9 a1bd2ed39f4e56d9ecb1d1d272bf7372 8395188
00009.tif
G10 TIF10 9cab0e5dd848cd1d2cda0eefff18eb61 8425980
00010.tif
G11 TIF11 9430a5e4c1533656f5a56227f24550fb 8393676
00011.tif
G12 TIF12 263f7197f2324349117f5f5405cf7ca1 8383504
00012.tif
G13 TIF13 08cfeadfb8d21a15acaf96a5d1abbdc1 8416120
00013.tif
G14 TIF14 249518d241c346912eefb9a81f5a48ec 8406024
00014.tif
G15 TIF15 6650ba72ed512460dc9e51a9d015e8e2 8393884
00015.tif
G16 TIF16 77b22af042c095c5c30f073bdd2bb4f0 8400620
00016.tif
G17 TIF17 2c45b3f825d8d0d91b3b1591278d78cf 8405612
00017.tif
G18 TIF18 e32308743abfd45658d7337b81f3c3f9 8395708
00018.tif
G19 TIF19 6cfaed16102686a97edeadb089af0a6c 8405184
00019.tif
G20 TIF20 a1bdf3ce59e9b74c4740281f9cf4cc3d 8392060
00020.tif
G21 TIF21 8ba64e8f35c9510b222cc59c077f3301 8395564
00021.tif
G22 TIF22 bdf3aa3e6fb2e220db16f95bbceb2980 8390704
00022.tif
G23 TIF23 36b728566a1b8d0e222c883a503c4907 8395788
00023.tif
G24 TIF24 94e2cc6237839a0a9f6c1390180cf186 8381972
00024.tif
G25 TIF25 bc7a65b39e431a8fbdb8fd417c594d2e 8400872
00025.tif
G26 TIF26 1032e1ba5632cf6856db6c34289ac774 8400708
00026.tif
G27 TIF27 42e7e7952c7562f7935e27e7e443258f 8405264
00027.tif
reference
imagejp2 0e4715f07c755bba829bc71bac14a637 961837
00001.jp2
ba6f7508415752cd0b053d05727b5e8f 1018432
00002.jp2
6c00e38cff7f410ef89f803763cdbfd5 997251
00003.jp2
d8193d2c6871473c7c6a6871b8b96986 1019872
00004.jp2
6572334356e05719ace4cfe51123876b 930617
00005.jp2
865f09b1341460db007b2149a8f9ebfe 1018265
00006.jp2
e5d64d55b1fdb6d7495bdd61531be93c 992933
00007.jp2
642af3c95e9ac339646a28501af0e227 970818
00008.jp2
8b5ec6c510591975be3695f8480385d1 935926
00009.jp2
e6ebfa92ec3b7e4724e4285f57218df5 958207
00010.jp2
ab3acf9e8cc74a868b1a3805694008fd 899137
00011.jp2
1faa53caf943e27711579a8deb5aaf43 916638
00012.jp2
ae8423b61987d62ac93e1de29c61a29c 1049416
00013.jp2
adfed29fa595db2081fc0e6c77cb27b9 1048144
00014.jp2
bdf4b92977f3810191a69c445f4c29be 983217
00015.jp2
0b8c239e2ad9c46b2a221548819f664b 1009729
00016.jp2
2ffa64fdd8b5cf4dfc649f2ff8ef0b12 935911
00017.jp2
c34f0f64e25fdaf0976e747156161d78 1046079
00018.jp2
9f3f059fac962b64846550c971aa5730 772248
00019.jp2
4cfe5fc5dac640709a45ec485c7cf525 849588
00020.jp2
83a0997209aaab287aab23c325e7503c 1036609
00021.jp2
50201460c9158d6bebf1262b77c7e8a7 1046144
00022.jp2
654dfc79df94fcd1c6d6f593982c2ff3 1046861
00023.jp2
efa1c1d6e9a113b2c84c29696344fa2d 918144
00024.jp2
c29efffcdef35a7b5397fb8b0141f858 1047505
00025.jp2
e88d8893b8a2d1d3f89590845d0a4d42 991579
00026.jp2
204e555b5c160720f02040ac3fe2fc48 876372
00027.jp2
imagejpeg 643ff018efebf2057fa54ef8d1c1e942 112098
00001.jpg
JPEG1.2 318b996a03d4bc16962a61daf59534b7 51296
00001.QC.jpg
3ca2d17822aabe93b23e64523b3e4346 120505
00002.jpg
JPEG2.2 4d4d586e10ab4e5ccff2b0932e3af466 53964
00002.QC.jpg
a8cb1c6516d79a3754523122c7a426c5 115464
00003.jpg
JPEG3.2 cd9b82f9f95b0eb0e7968159230e4b6e 52311
00003.QC.jpg
aa96bb3bf09add7c3ab8c524f2b58c61 120544
00004.jpg
JPEG4.2 30b526abd1c0df18eff36bb33c43c4c1 53618
00004.QC.jpg
d6613180bc5c8157c1a2c6bc4a7d007b 109977
00005.jpg
JPEG5.2 f22364ec4fc5dd3f15db10ae9681778c 50684
00005.QC.jpg
a7fc4ac912a17482876f5d00d87a8d9e 120872
00006.jpg
JPEG6.2 3f89d24b2628dfc8eb76cabef6096b02 53996
00006.QC.jpg
27f5cd28d41e23747ac83e35e98aedf4 117915
00007.jpg
JPEG7.2 9ffc6f21e22690c362ac51186a65fa5f 53273
00007.QC.jpg
7a5b4871c22fa8f3e76be79b11a62636 114358
00008.jpg
JPEG8.2 ff9fb07cfb70800b3494c1b9219742a4 52271
00008.QC.jpg
d4d255d307408611af87fc286fc24487 110018
00009.jpg
JPEG9.2 f6892bfc88f4be1f9ee57a65a02aa72a 49921
00009.QC.jpg
27736f9fe1faff6d7ebfd0b4116abd07 113880
00010.jpg
JPEG10.2 95224a7813e23ad744b12ca591bc2359 51276
00010.QC.jpg
6b93879382520acc540c2fdc5c843c97 106942
00011.jpg
JPEG11.2 0ab6f2fee8e4880d313bc1b19915c77d 48900
00011.QC.jpg
abd258f132c35f255d3a67c4ae045c9c 110464
00012.jpg
JPEG12.2 7b5df47cd76677d2af18cb499a4e6c13 49829
00012.QC.jpg
bfd11488ce0eea514e85e9093f54009b 123615
00013.jpg
JPEG13.2 346a09b5a84189eede8ba48f05d3587f 55342
00013.QC.jpg
23c528adaf825198914eef4404c63c46 124233
00014.jpg
JPEG14.2 7c8fd2ec3971777f36df2ea0cf5f5bb9 55030
00014.QC.jpg
093316b2e788d7c09a8ae831b105b7c4 116251
00015.jpg
JPEG15.2 72133fbe92fed23a66508a9553bd3973 51808
00015.QC.jpg
cb35c579bfdddcfe13d6264845bbf456 119949
00016.jpg
JPEG16.2 1327c9d6743956e1aaaaa5a6d2c016d0 53925
00016.QC.jpg
42351447b8c734de06b8d2b2ff37f539 109777
00017.jpg
JPEG17.2 7b7a028fa9ac3ce937498ebf1edcc407 49675
00017.QC.jpg
d2046a0da0ec1f921225f3b97d867e1c 123234
00018.jpg
JPEG18.2 354e2c8a9f73824b0e9de6fb8ce567de 55421
00018.QC.jpg
d9aa6e2190355f93b23a2b32b2d66e16 95814
00019.jpg
JPEG19.2 c84311b86b50a650ae67c6ac0b1711eb 45843
00019.QC.jpg
4312fd726b6cd8cf032af343c404cd21 104424
00020.jpg
JPEG20.2 c3bf426a378b9580e8f2548f8205150d 46861
00020.QC.jpg
c463a5fee6ee76cc88513a17326fe2af 121146
00021.jpg
JPEG21.2 553b615452d8053bc1f5d081c14020aa 54250
00021.QC.jpg
d888644bf15afa900b820883f6282a3e 131003
00022.jpg
JPEG22.2 f58979c898564ba15f72d8d83d858f18 58352
00022.QC.jpg
c27030a700d547335728bccbcbe17c62 129663
00023.jpg
JPEG23.2 da4c3bfcb26c0c8e7a83b5bf3c95f26c 57340
00023.QC.jpg
1142a0ca57433e23e51efd4319ac4e12 108828
00024.jpg
JPEG24.2 e4603bdc8baf2cbe2b6b0ac7c76b9fda 49040
00024.QC.jpg
e408532b044682bc6125492ee880a4d5 126548
00025.jpg
JPEG25.2 97e22f62b006ab2aac7c7af5005cf08e 56050
00025.QC.jpg
80db77ac274e98667ad7b513c61a1f33 116937
00026.jpg
JPEG26.2 e87b790ed6fca4626e78723c5a589071 52534
00026.QC.jpg
e2f463d571cae8fd3b8a46d1b18f07a6 106469
00027.jpg
JPEG27.2 cd8371d37c70a81f169441327f6e15e9 49799
00027.QC.jpg
THUMB1 imagejpeg-thumbnails 3fb2481271b076b58d0c49baa478b356 29227
00001thm.jpg
THUMB2 c1bd8befe80d6c2d1e78148e8ab8daf2 29529
00002thm.jpg
THUMB3 ce5e23ec00d7a94797e478a66955c1b1 28911
00003thm.jpg
THUMB4 a7fa11b3bfb6f173c37a58f39cad6129 29259
00004thm.jpg
THUMB5 fc0a2d428df36d67d2212308188ad705 28388
00005thm.jpg
THUMB6 9cb24c7b8a7cd4c32f9789395be677d9 29645
00006thm.jpg
THUMB7 89c2eb4fd24e3d0b00b46403819470fc 29484
00007thm.jpg
THUMB8 cd78a4e32ad525fc36aee2d56d6909b4 29164
00008thm.jpg
THUMB9 ffb2d81a5e2574a55f3379378aa5fbce 28422
00009thm.jpg
THUMB10 d0f0b1e729ceb7f03e3fc87f00854cc4 29242
00010thm.jpg
THUMB11 8a897e2b9bbf398591d44724c9febe55 28489
00011thm.jpg
THUMB12 bf99dc8ad9a693de620431a734453ea5 28236
00012thm.jpg
THUMB13 be669635499be0eb7932a3ca9bddb651 30168
00013thm.jpg
THUMB14 27c1279561d7712cdf917c81d8648d8d 30267
00014thm.jpg
THUMB15 87bd6272c76859c5865d65ba5f451641 29244
00015thm.jpg
THUMB16 68d509711e0493f6fc5afa0feead42d5 29359
00016thm.jpg
THUMB17 2d1018a798c37554eb499a9e106e92be 29110
00017thm.jpg
THUMB18 7ea3e729c1ed40f792961922e3ac88b1
00018thm.jpg
THUMB19 4df38229a7e71abd3dbce92a6a5327f1 27772
00019thm.jpg
THUMB20 4ec19ba5b492e6499a83c930bd3424a8 28116
00020thm.jpg
THUMB21 9971cace7610b903dd894f242f0efc64 29542
00021thm.jpg
THUMB22 6dadcede751999e663c02680b190cf03 30643
00022thm.jpg
THUMB23 abcd3af13e58d2e852382c502e66be87 30435
00023thm.jpg
THUMB24 5ea00a96bf9189ef2e63d8a9e975281e 28371
00024thm.jpg
THUMB25 4807c43a2aadfccc7fa9cffa556cb716 30126
00025thm.jpg
THUMB26 bf3e527e5c80098b70842a2b0779be68 29452
00026thm.jpg
THUMB27 b1d355b11e30c405e3a2c1e49e62fd88 28237
00027thm.jpg
TXT1 textplain 73d5adbcf00ffd54b96ba57a2ef6fda6 1226
00001.txt
TXT2 f1a35e7c19dbad0bd886d8e34a27da66 1390
00002.txt
TXT3 f3b4dc5b0cf821e5d3b4db07de5f36eb 1368
00003.txt
TXT4 4470ced1297f337ea718aec6042d98d7 1389
00004.txt
TXT5 7a6abe611bd2a42e5bea72c2ba65268a 1241
00005.txt
TXT6 f29c96db4c4c45ff7561b5161c250a46 1379
00006.txt
TXT7 c85bcd6f90ed71e2f97cf2152086e05e
00007.txt
TXT8 6dc65602d3b317fa4fe1a396f8fb8989 1335
00008.txt
TXT9 396e4d5c09aeecedc3ec13659fadcd5c 1270
00009.txt
TXT10 69ebf91fa90631e7c02459a64d78e1bd 1288
00010.txt
TXT11 557df554a2436aff17842aea89967fd9 1224
00011.txt
TXT12 9b17fb1f424abe5d1e04b7b5d93c3392
00012.txt
TXT13 a8f1ebebde09a267942346c786ce341d 1473
00013.txt
TXT14 389c5d6bdaddfa784d745e42a4bceb20 1491
00014.txt
TXT15 f9c2f5f42883d07efbcb2396219e76ed 1333
00015.txt
TXT16 06ade91709350ec619c5a18af98ad1ca 1373
00016.txt
TXT17 8f844c8fbab222bb2e5f8bcbb0f03dec 1239
00017.txt
TXT18 f6e397e34e145fc75e42d9020659b9de 1463
00018.txt
TXT19 6c43979763569dfdb1004901ceb67b41 1009
00019.txt
TXT20 e3dafe4f31ea0029f83532e6475db608 1153
00020.txt
TXT21 05526ae3d4b0d05506ad4328b0d4fe9e 1430
00021.txt
TXT22 a4bcfc88c6eaceec913424de11a71041 1635
00022.txt
TXT23 4e8561b6281b7004ef042079ecd4c478 1507
00023.txt
TXT24 7fb952af6ef731979321d14cef24d715 1194
00024.txt
TXT25 83c53cf7201bca04a3808074922832ad 1510
00025.txt
TXT26 d2e1ae5bb0256ad8792e6beb15879402 1344
00026.txt
TXT27 9dd34eca580850bd143020191aa58e7c 1181
00027.txt
TXT1.2
TXT2.2
TXT3.2
TXT4.2
TXT5.2
TXT6.2
TXT7.2
TXT8.2
TXT9.2
TXT10.2
TXT11.2
TXT12.2
TXT13.2
TXT14.2
TXT15.2
TXT16.2
TXT17.2
TXT18.2
TXT19.2
TXT21.2
TXT22.2
TXT23.2
TXT24.2
TXT25.2
TXT26.2
TXT27.2
G28 TXT28
PDF20 applicationpdf 7240bab21b1178ec5977bfd6eb3fd5db 9648252
UF00007831.pdf
G29 METS29 unknownx-mets b3a17951b1741155617334e2d7f5bea8 37986
UF00007831_00001.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2 2
PAGE3 3
PAGE4 4
PAGE5 5
PAGE6 6
PAGE7 7
PAGE8 8
PAGE9 9
PAGE10 10
PAGE11 11
PAGE12 12
PAGE13 13
PAGE14 14
PAGE15 15
PAGE16 16
PAGE17 17
PAGE18 18
PAGE19 19
PAGE20 20
PAGE21 21
PAGE22 22
PAGE23 23
PAGE24 24
PAGE25 25
PAGE26 26
PAGE27 27
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1
FILES2
FILES3
FILES4
FILES5
FILES6
FILES7
FILES8
FILES9
FILES10
FILES11
FILES12
FILES13
FILES14
FILES15
FILES16
FILES17
FILES18
FILES19
FILES20
FILES21
FILES22
FILES23
FILES24
FILES25
FILES26
FILES27
FILES28 28
FILES29 29