Citation
Interview with Buck George October 3 1992

Material Information

Title:
Interview with Buck George October 3 1992
Creator:
George, Buck ( Interviewee )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Catawba Indians -- Florida
Kataba Indians -- Florida
Catawba Oral History Collection ( local )

Notes

Funding:
This text has been transcribed from an audio or video oral history. Digitization was funded by a gift from Caleb J. and Michele B. Grimes.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
Holding Location:
This interview is part of the 'Catawba' collection of interviews held by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program of the Department of History at the University of Florida
Rights Management:
Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
















UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

SOUTHEASTERN INDIAN ORAL HISTORY PROJECT







Interviewee: Buck George

Interviewer: Emma Echols

October 3. 1992










E: This is Emma Echols from Charlotte, North Carolina, 5150 Sharon Road. I am
working on the oral history of the Catawba Indians with the University of Florida
[Oral History Project, which is directed by] Dr. Sam Proctor, and I am visiting in the
home of Buck George. [Today is October 3, 1992.] Some years ago I was teaching
school at Northside [School], and I had quite a number of Indian children in my
class. They could not wait for the bell to ring so they could go out on the bleachers
at Northside School and see Buck George play football. So here I am interviewing
Buck George today, and I am going to let him tell about himself. Give us your full
name and address.

G: My real name is Evans McClure George, and my nickname is Buck, so everybody
knows me as Buck--they do not really know me by my real name.

E: And your address.

G: 1119 McDowell Drive, Rock Hill, South Carolina.

E: Where are you working now?

G: I am working at Hirse Celanese Corporation. I have been there thirty-four years,
and in about another month I am going to retire, December 1.

E: I cannot imagine you retiring. You are going to find something else to do; I know
that.

G: Yes, I think there are plenty of things coming up now that I will be able to do.

E: Now, let's go back into your early days. When you were a little boy, where did you
go to school, and what do you remember about the reservation?

G: Well, I went to school at Northside School, which was right near the Industrial Mill
Village, and I was raised up on the Industrial Mill Village. We lived at 23 Barrel
Street, and I went to Northside School all the way through elementary school. Then
I went to Rock Hill High School. When I finished Rock Hill High School I went to
Clemson University.

E: Who do you remember of your teachers at Northside?

G: I remember a lot of them: Mrs. Sanders, and you, Mrs. Echols, and I remember Mr.
Riser and Mrs. Wilkinson.

E: Mrs. Sue Wayne? Did you go to school with her?

G: I do not remember Mrs. Wayne.

E: You had some others. You remember Mrs. Parker, I suppose.


-1-









G: Oh, yes.

E: And Miss Leslie?

G: Miss Leslie taught me in the seventh grade. She was always standing at the top of
the big fire escape at the end of the building, and the children marched down those
fire escapes to go home. One day I was the first person out of that room, and I was
in a hurry to get home so I could come back to the playground to play. Well, when
I was the first one out of the room, instead of walking down the flight of stairs, I
grabbed the banister and slid down, all the way to the ground, and there was about
thirty feet or more down to the ground. I took off running, and I was almost to the
edge of the school grounds when I heard all these people hollering. I looked around
to see who they were hollering at, and it was me! I looked back up there, and
standing at the top of the fire escape was Miss Leslie motioning for me to come
back. I went back, and she made me walk up and down those steps five times, and
every step I had to say: "Haste makes waste. An ounce of prevention is worth a
pound of cure." [laughter] So I always remember that.

E: And then you went to play football.

G: Yes.

E: Who was you coach at that time?

G: Well, the coach at high school was Walter Jenkins, and there was a Coach McCall
and [Coach] Avery. We had three coaches, and the head coach was Walter Jenkins.

E: Who was your principal at that time?

G: I cannot remember right now.

E: Well, that doesn't matter. We will think of it later. How did you happen to choose
Clemson for your college?

G: Well, there was a man here in Rock Hill [who is a good friend of mine by the name
of] Harper Gault [who had] had been talking to me a good bit about it, and I had
inquiries from Clemson about going to Clemson. So between Marshall Walker [who
is another good friend] and Harper Gault asking me about Clemson, [I decided I
wanted to go there]. I called Harper one day and told him that I had made up my
mind that I was going to Clemson. Before I knew it they had me over there; they
came by and got me and took me over there.

E: And so Marshall and Harper Gault had been your friends all these years.

G: All these years.



-2-










E: And they are both still living and are still your friends; you have kept those
friendships. What did you like about Clemson after you got there?

G: Well, it was a hard school, all right. Coach Howard was a tough coach, and I saw
some things I had never seen before as far as being away from home. I got to do
some traveling that I never would have been able to do without that, and the football
enabled me to get the education without having to pay for it.

E: After four years at Clemson, then, you came back to Rock Hill to live and to work?

G: Yes, ma'am.

E: You have been here for all these years?

G: I have been here all those years.

E: You raised your family here. You have two daughters. Tell me what they are doing
and where they are living.

G: Wynona is a dentist, and she is practicing here in Rock Hill. She finished Clemson
University and then went to the medical university down at [the Medical University
of South Carolina at] Charleston. She finished there at the School of Dentistry and
came back to Rock Hill and is practicing dentistry here in Rock Hill.

The younger daughter, Wanda, went to Georgetown University in Washington, DC.
She finished Georgetown in the School of Foreign Service and then left there and
went to Clemson University and got a master's degree in economics. Then she left
there and went to Georgia State University in Atlanta and got a degree in law. She
is practicing law in Atlanta.

E: You have a dentist and a lawyer in your family. How many grandchildren?

G: I have four grandchildren--three girls and one boy.

E: Do you tell them that you are proud to be an Indian and some of the things you
remember?

G: I sure do.

E: Although you did not live on the reservation you spent a lot of time there. Tell me
about that.

G: I can remember my aunt that I went to visit a lot down there, and I can remember
going down to the spring. It was down the hill, behind the house, and we would go
to the spring--it was an open spring--and get our water from the spring in buckets
and carry it back to the kitchen and set it up on a shelf in the kitchen. That was the
way we got our water. The doors to the houses were very seldom locked. We had

-3-










the front porch area, and the yards were always swept clean. There was no grass in
the yard, and it was always swept clean. We never worried about anyone ever
coming into the house.

E: Did you go swimming or fishing in the river?

G: I can remember my dad when I was very, very young swimming in the Catawba River
with me on his back. I can distinctly remember that.

E: That would be something to see. What about the wild animals? Did you do any
hunting?

G: I did some hunting when I was a little bit older, about thirteen or fourteen years old.
When I was real young there were not very many real animals like deer and such
on the reservation because most of them had been run out of the area or killed.

E: Do you remember the birds? They tell me there are big owls across the river.

G: Oh, that is a real good feeling to be down in the bottom lands and the Catawba
River and hear one of those great horned owls call its mate up the river. You could
hear it for miles, and it echoes. It is just [a wonderful sound].

E: How did it sound? Do it like it sounds.

G: Hoo hoo hoo hoo hoo-ooh. You could hear it all the way up the river when it
comes off.

E: Are there any horned owls down there now?

G: There are a lot of them. There are some bald eagles on the river now; they have
come back. There are plenty of deer in the area, and there are coon, rabbits,
squirrels. All the wildlife has come back into the reservation area.

E: Do you go down on the reservation now often?

G: Yes, I go very often. In fact, I was down this morning.

E: You still have so many relatives and friends down there.

G: I have some relatives. Most of the Catawbas in some way or another are kin to me,
and I have a lot of friends down there too.

E: Did you ever hear your father or mother tell any old stories, old legends about the
people there or the animals?

G: I just know that they talked about when the old Indians would be on a trail and the
enemy would be after them that they would put poison along briers and things along

-4-










trail, and when they got scratched with the briers they would get sick. Then after
they got sick they would fall back on them and overcome their enemy by trickery,
so to speak. They often used animal hoofs and things on their feet either to get
away or to walk out through where some animals had been so that they would
disappear and you could not find them that way.

E: Did your family make any medicines that were made on the reservation?

G: They did have some medicines, and there are a few who still know some about it.
My daughter is trying to get together some facts about this and various herbs that
they still use down on the reservation.

E: Some of the old ones, like Albert Sanders, know where those plants grow, don't they.

G: Yes. They use something called bear root down there on the reservation. They dig
it up and make a tea out of it; they use the sassafras for tea. There are several
different things. Most of that the younger people have kind of let it slip by, but
there is an interest now in reviving some of that, and they are trying to get together
some of the facts and do this. Just the other day I went to a class where they were
working on some baskets, and I saw some beautiful basket work being done there
on the reservation in one of the classes.

E: Oh, tell me who was doing that basket work?

G: Well, Fay George is the one teaching the class. My daughter Wynona got Fay to
teach the class to them, and my daughter is in that class taking the basket weaving
with them. Carson Blue's daughter is in there, and the Plyler man is in there. Oh,
I guess he is about forty-five years old, and I saw a beautiful basket that he was
making.

E: What Plyler was that?

G: This a Olam Plyler's younger brother. I cannot think of his first name right now.

E: But he is a Plyler.

G: He's a Plyler.

E: Some of them, of course, are making pottery, and some of them make baskets. That
is interesting. Now, after you started work here in Rock Hill, you still maintained
your connections with the reservation and the people there. What do you see in the
future for them when this new grant goes through?

G: Well, if the settlement of the claim comes through, I can see a lot of good things that
could come out of that if it is worked right and [if] we are able to get it written into
the agreement that we can progress and have industry come onto the reservation.
I see a lot of things coming out of it, very good things.

-5-











E: Did you help in the moving of the old schoolhouse down on the reservation?

G: No, ma'am. I did a few things for my daughter. She would call me to help her out
on some of the contacts that she made, but other than that she did most of it on her
own.

E: She is going to tell me more about that, because I have an appointment with her.
What about the celebration that is coming up in November? Are you going to be
there?

G: Yes, ma'am, I sure will.

E: What is the date?

G: I am not sure. We just voted on the date at the last meeting, but I really do not
have it now.

E: You will have pottery making and dancing and exhibitions of all kinds and a lot of
visitors.

G: Right. The year before last, which was the first one, somewhere in the neighborhood
of 5,000 people came to. One of the things I was doing was trying to serve some
refreshments and things for the people who were visiting, and I ran out three times
and had to make special trips to get some more refreshments for them. We had
about 5,000 the first year, and the second year I would say we had somewhere
between 5,000 and 6,000, and they are looking for an even bigger crowd this year.

E: I am interested in your relationship to white people, because you have made friends
everywhere. Tell me of some of the white people that you count your friends.

G: Well, there are many of them here in the city of Rock Hill and in Charlotte. Bradly
Clapam and Ann Clapam and I have had a relationship that goes all the way back
to high school, and most of my high school friends I still keep up with. I went to a
class reunion not too long ago and had some reacquaintance with most of them.
Harper Gault is a longtime friend, and he still lives here in Rock Hill. He is in a
nursing home, but he is still a very good friend. I have known Marshall Walker for
a long time, and he is a very good friend of mine.

E: I was interested to see downtown this morning the notebook that your daughter kept,
and in it the children were writing on how they were proud to be a Catawba Indian--
they were proud of their heritage, they were proud of their culture, they were proud
of the skin, they were proud of their accomplishments. It is a wonderful thing that
the children are being taught to be proud to be an Indian. What do you think of
that?



-6-










G: Yes, ma'am, I really think that they should be taught about their heritage and taught
that they can be proud of their heritage. Most of them that I know are. When I was
little and coming up as a young person there was a lot of prejudice, and some of the
Catawbas did not get to go to schools like they do today. In fact, my dad was raised
up on the reservation here and went to Cherokee, North Carolina, to school; he was
sent to Cherokee to go to school, so he finished high school in Cherokee, North
Carolina, and then went from Cherokee to Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas,
in order to get his education. His room mate was Arnold Chenute, who was later
the chief of the Cherokee in North Carolina.

E: What was your father's business when he got that education?

G: Well, he came back and was in textiles. He worked as a supervisor at J. P. Steven's
Company at the industrial cotton mill.

E: And that is the same place you are working at now.

G: I am working in textiles, but I am with Hirse Celanese in Rock Hill, South Carolina.

E: Your great-grandfather made little pieces of pottery that you were telling me about.
Tell me a little about those little pieces of pottery. Who was your great-grandfather,
and what did he make?

G: My great-great-grandfather was Billy George, and I saw some pieces of pottery that
he had made. They were very small pipes, very small, and the color of it was black
with a kind of a grey smoke color going through the clay that made it very beautiful,
and it was very shiny. Elsie George still had some of that pottery just a few years
ago. In fact, she may still have it now.

I saw a double-barrel pistol, a very short pistol that belonged to [my great-great-
grandfather,] Billy George, and I was hoping that someday I might get a hold of that
pistol myself, but one of the granddaughters married a gun collector, and he has that
gun now. Billy's and some of the other Catawba's names are on the statue, the
memorial there in Fort Mill. It was where they were honored back at the turn of
the century. That statue is still in that memorial park in Fort Mill.

E: That is your great-great-grandfather.

G: Yes.









-7-





Full Text

PAGE 1

UNNERSITY OF FLORIDA SOUTHEASTERN INDIAN ORAL IDSTORY PROJECT Interviewee: Buck George Interviewer: Emma Echols October 3. 1992

PAGE 2

E: This is Emma Echols from Charlotte, North Carolina, 5150 Sharon Road. I am working on the oral history of the Catawba Indians with the University of Florida [Oral History Project, which is directed by] Dr. Sam Proctor, and I am visiting in the home of Buck George. [Today is October 3, 1992.] Some years ago I was teaching school at Northside [School], and I had quite a number of Indian children in my class. They could not wait for the bell to . ring so they could go out on the bleachers at Northside School and see Buck George play football. So here I am interviewing Buck George today, and I am going to let him tell about himself. Give us your full name and address. G: My real name is Evans McClure George, and my nickname is Buck, so everybody knows me as Buck--they do not really know me by my real name. E: And your address. G: 1119 McDowell Drive, Rock Hill, South Carolina. E: Where are you working now? G: I am working at Hirse Celanese Corporation. I have been there thirty-four years, and in about another month I am going to retire, December 1. E: I cannot imagine you retiring. You are going to find something else to do; I know that. G: Yes, I think there are plenty of things coming up now that I will be able to do. E: Now, let's go back into your early days. When you were a little boy, where did you go to school, and what do you remember about the reservation? G: Well, I went to school at Northside School, which was right near the Industrial Mill Village, and I was raised up on the Industrial Mill Village. We lived at 23 Barrel Street, and I went to Northside School all the way through elementary school. Then I went to Rock Hill High School. When I finished Rock Hill High School I went to Clemson University. E: Who do you remember of your teachers at Northside? G: I remember a lot of them: Mrs. Sanders, and you, Mrs. Echols, and I remember Mr. Riser and Mrs. Wilkinson. E: Mrs. Sue Wayne? Did you go to school with her? G: I do not remember Mrs. Wayne. E: You had some others. You remember Mrs. Parker, I suppose. 1

PAGE 3

G: Oh, yes. E: And Miss Leslie? G: Miss Leslie taught me in the seventh grade. She was always standing at the top of the big fire escape at the end of the building, and the children marched down those fire escapes to go home. One day I was the first person out of that room, and I was in a hurry to get home so I could come back to the playground to play. Well, when I was the first one out of the room, instead of walking down the flight of stairs, I grabbed the banister and slid down, all the way to the ground, and there was about thirty feet or more down to the ground. I took off running, and I was almost to the edge of the school grounds when I heard all these people hollering. I looked around to see who they were hollering at, and it was me! I looked back up there, and standing at the top of the fire escape was Miss Leslie motioning for me to come back. I went back, and she made me walk up and down those steps five times, and every step I had to say: "Haste makes waste. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." [laughter] So I always remember that. E: And then you went to play football. G: Yes. E: Who was you coach at that time? G: Well, the coach at high school was Walter Jenkins, and there was a Coach McCall and [Coach] Avery. We had three coaches, and the head coach was Walter Jenkins. E: Who was your principal at that time? G: I cannot remember right now. E: Well, that doesn't matter. We will think of it later. How did you happen to choose Clemson for your college? G: Well, there was a man here in Rock Hill [who is a good friend of mine by the name of] Harper Gault [who had] had been talking to me a good bit about it, and I had inquiries from Clemson about going to Clemson. So between Marshall Walker [who is another good friend] and Harper Gault asking me about Clemson, [I decided I wanted to go there]. I called Harper one day and told him that I had made up my mind that I was going to Clemson. Before I knew it they had me over there; they came by and got me and took me over there. E: And so Marshall and Harper Gault had been your friends all these years. G: All these years. 2

PAGE 4

E: And they are both still living and are still your friends; you have kept those friendships. What did you like about Clemson after you got there? G: Well, it was a hard school, all right. Coach Howard was a tough coach, and I saw some things I had never seen before as far as being away from home. I got to do some traveling that I never would have been able to do without that, and the football enabled me to get the education without having to pay for it. E: After four years at Clemson, then, you came back to Rock Hill to live and to work? G: Yes, ma'am. E: You have been here for all these years? G: I have been here all those years. E: You raised your family here. You have two daughters. Tell me what they are doing and where they are living. G: Wynona is a dentist, and she is practicing here in Rock Hill. She finished Clemson University and then went to the medical university down at [the Medical University of South Carolina at] Charleston. She finished there at the School of Dentistry and came back to Rock Hill and is practicing dentistry here in Rock Hill. The younger daughter, Wanda, went to Georgetown University in Washington, DC. She finished Georgetown in the School of Foreign Service and then left there and went to Clemson University and got a master's degree in economics. Then she left there and went to Georgia State University in Atlanta and got a degree in law. She is practicing law in Atlanta. E: You have a dentist and a lawyer in your family. How many grandchildren? G: I have four grandchildren--three girls and one boy. E: Do you tell them that you are proud to be an Indian and some of the things you remember? G: I sure do. E: Although you did not live on the reservation you spent a lot of time there. Tell me about that. G: I can remember my aunt that I went to visit a lot down there, and I can remember going down to the spring. It was down the hill, behind the house, and we would go to the spring--it was an open spring--and get our water from the spring in buckets and carry it back to the kitchen and set it up on a shelf in the kitchen. That was the way we got our water. The doors to the houses were very seldom locked. We had 3

PAGE 5

the front porch area, and the yards were always swept clean. There was no grass in the yard, and it was always swept clean. We never worried about anyone ever coming into the house. E: Did you go swimming or fishing in the river? G: I can remember my dad when I was very, very young swimming in the Catawba River with me on his back. I can distinctly remember that. E: That would be something to see. What about the wild animals? Did you do any hunting? G: I did some hunting when I was a little bit older, about thirteen or fourteen years old. When I was real young there were not very many real animals like deer and such on the reservation because most of them had been run out of the area or killed. E: Do you remember the birds? They tell me there are big owls across the river. G: Oh, that is a real good feeling to be down in the bottom lands and the Catawba River and hear one of those great horned owls call its mate up the river. You could hear it for miles, and it echoes. It is just [a wonderful sound]. E: How did it sound? Do it like it sounds. G: Hoo hoo hoo hoo hoo-ooh. You could hear it all the way up the river when it comes off. E: Are there any horned owls down there now? G: There are a lot of them. There are some bald eagles on the river now; they have come back. There are plenty of deer in the area, and there are coon, rabbits, squirrels. All the wildlife has come back into the reservation area. E: Do you go down on the reservation now often? G: Yes, I go very often. In fact, I was down this morning. E: You still have so many relatives and friends down there. G: I have some relatives. Most of the Catawbas in some way or another are kin to me, and I have a lot of friends down there too. E: Did you ever hear your father or mother tell any old stories, old legends about the people there or the animals? G: I just know that they talked about when the old Indians would be on a trail and the enemy would be after them that they would put poison along briers and things along 4

PAGE 6

trail, and when they got scratched with the briers they would get sick. Then after they got sick they would fall back on them and overcome their enemy by trickery, so to speak. They often used animal hoofs and things on their feet either to get away or to walk out through where some animals had been so that they would disappear and you could not find them that way. E: Did your family make any medicines that were made on the reservation? G: They did have some medicines, and there are a few who still know some about it. My daughter is trying to get together some facts about this and various herbs that they still use down on the reservation. E: Some of the old ones, like Albert Sanders, know where those plants grow, don't they. G: Yes. They use something called bear root down there on the reservation. They dig it up and make a tea out of it; they use the sassafras for tea. There are several different things. Most of that the younger people have kind of let it slip by, but there is an interest now in reviving some of that, and they are trying to get together some of the facts and do this. Just the other day I went to a class where they were working on some baskets, and I saw some beautiful basket work being done there on the reservation in one of the classes. E: Oh, tell me who was doing that basket work? G: Well, Fay George is the one teaching the class. My daughter Wynona got Fay to teach the class to them, and my daughter is in that class taking the basket weaving with them. Carson Blue's daughter is in there, and the Plyler man is in there. Oh, I guess he is about forty-five years old, and I saw a beautiful basket that he was making. E: What Plyler was that? G: This a Olam Plyler's younger brother. I cannot think of his first name right now. E: But he is a Plyler. G: He's a Plyler. E: Some of them, of course, are making pottery, and some of them make baskets. That is interesting. Now, after you started work here in Rock Hill, you still maintained your connections with the reservation and the people there. What do you see in the future for them when this new grant goes through? G: Well, if the settlement of the claim comes through, I can see a lot of good things that could come out of that if it is worked right and [if) we are able to get it written into the agreement that we can progress and have industry come onto the reservation. I see a lot of things coming out of it, very good things. 5

PAGE 7

E: Did you help in the moving of the old schoolhouse down on the reservation? G: No, ma'am. I did a few things for my daughter. She would call me to help her out on some of the contacts that she made, but other than that she did most of it on her own. E: She is going to tell me more about that, because I have an appointment with her. What about the celebration that is coming up in November? Are you going to be there? G: Yes, ma'am, I sure will. E: What is the date? G: I am not sure. We just voted on the date at the last meeting , but I really do not have it now. E: You will have pottery making and dancing and exhibitions of all kinds and a lot of visitors. G: Right. The year before last, which was the first one, somewhere in the neighborhood of 5,000 people came to. One of the things I was doing was trying to serve some refreshments and things for the people who were visiting, and I ran out three times and had to make special trips to get some more refreshments for them. We had about 5,000 the first year, and the second year I would say we had somewhere between 5,000 and 6,000, and they are looking for an even bigger crowd this year. E: I am interested in your relationship to white people, because you have made friends everywhere. Tell me of some of the white people that you count your friends. G: Well, there are many of them here in the city of Rock Hill and in Charlotte. Bradly Clapam and Ann Clapam and I have had a relationship that goes all the way back to high school, and most of my high school friends I still keep up with. I went to a class reunion not too long ago and had some reacquaintance with most of them. Harper Gault is a longtime friend, and he still lives here in Rock Hill. He is in a nursing home, but he is still a very good friend. I have known Marshall Walker for a long time, and he is a very good friend of mine. E: I was interested to see downtown this morning the notebook that your daughter kept, and in it the children were writing on how they were proud to be a Catawba Indianthey were proud of their heritage, they were proud of their culture, they were proud of the skin, they were proud of their accomplishments. It is a wonderful thing that the children are being taught to be proud to be an Indian. What do you think of that? 6

PAGE 8

G: Yes, ma'am, I really think that they should be taught about their heritage and taught that they can be proud of their heritage. Most of them that I know are. When I was little and coming up as a young person there was a lot of prejudice, and some of the Catawbas did not get to go to schools like they do today. In fact, my dad was raised up on the reservation here and went to Cherokee, North Carolina, to school; he was sent to Cherokee to go to school, so he finished high school in Cherokee, North Carolina, and then went from Cherokee to Haskell Institute in Lawrence, Kansas, in order to get his education. His room mate was Arnold Chenute, who was later the chief of the Cherokee in North Carolina. E: What was your father's business when he got that education? G: Well, he came back and was in textiles. He worked as a supervisor at J.P. Steven's Company at the industrial cotton mill. E: And that is the same place you are working at now. G: I am working in textiles, but I am with Hirse Celanese in Rock Hill, South Carolina. E: Your great-grandfather made little pieces of pottery that you were telling me about. Tell me a little about those little pieces of pottery. Who was your great-grandfather, and what did he make? G: My great-great-grandfather was Billy George, and I saw some pieces of pottery that he had made. They were very small pipes, very small, and the color of it was black with a kind of a grey smoke color going through the clay that made it very beautiful, and it was very shiny. Elsie George still had some of that pottery just a few years ago. In fact, she may still have it now. I saw a double-barrel pistol, a very short pistol that belonged to [my great-great grandfather,] Billy George, and I was hoping that someday I might get a hold of that pistol myself, but one of the granddaughters married a gun collector, and he has that gun now. Billy's and some of the other Catawba's names are on the statue, the memorial there in Fort Mill. It was where they were honored back at the turn of the century. That statue is still in that memorial park in Fort Mill. E: That is your great-great-grandfather. G: Yes. 7


xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- Interview with Buck George October 3 1992 ( Book ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00007388_00001
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:oral http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadataoral
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadataoraloral.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2020-08-13T22:29:53Z ID LASTMODDATE 2020-08-13T09:39:07Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC - FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:accessCondition Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
mods:language
mods:languageTerm type text English
code authority iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation This interview is part of the 'Catawba' collection of interviews held by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program of the Department of History at the University of Florida
UFSPOHP
mods:url access object in context https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00007388/00001
mods:name personal
mods:namePart George, Buck
mods:role
mods:roleTerm marcrelator ive
Interviewee
mods:note funding This text has been transcribed from an audio or video oral history. Digitization was funded by a gift from Caleb J. and Michele B. Grimes.
mods:originInfo
mods:dateIssued October 3, 1992
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source sobekcm UF00007388_00001
mods:recordContentSource Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
mods:subject
mods:topic Catawba Indians
mods:geographic Florida
Kataba Indians
Florida
local
Catawba Oral History Collection
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Interview with Buck George October 3 1992
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation ALL
ORAL
OH4
IUF
IUFSPOHP
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 00001thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark SPOHP
UFCLASHIST
GRIMES
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00007388
sobekcm:VID 00001
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 727473
oral:interview
oral:Interviewee Buck George
oral:Interviewer Emma Echols
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
sobekcm:File fileid JPEG1 width 630 height 818
JP21 2543 3303
JPEG2 816
JP22 2541 3291
JPEG3 815
JP23 3289
JPEG4
JP24
JPEG5
JP25 3293
JPEG6
JP26
JPEG7
JP27
JPEG8
JP28
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 imagejpeg CHECKSUM 0b4e51681d0e2f1073cfa3fe644bfb4f CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 34958
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 00001.jpg
JPEG1.2 007fc626086d264310caae2bcc8f60e5 25321
00001.QC.jpg
G2 2ef5d40f90fe458de107dd472c0db6e4 171085
00002.jpg
JPEG2.2 f3bd61e5af9a486e3f7355c3e42a2e5b 59449
00002.QC.jpg
G3 4897b7e0dc5a385f294569034591be8e 170766
00003.jpg
JPEG3.2 9d915f415c675c16e9b333425b32fdc5 56895
00003.QC.jpg
G4 fc68ae86ff544db24935495c7f54c886 179275
00004.jpg
JPEG4.2 4a9773dff588d017c7ffa28971a5492e 61460
00004.QC.jpg
G5 c86f160ef6ff9c4f70181b3cff1c8a48 172660
00005.jpg
JPEG5.2 b12a5953229975ac6de3f59af460d79a 60957
00005.QC.jpg
G6 d107b8893e5ced6fdc82787dc7453ff4 192252
00006.jpg
JPEG6.2 833f39c148f5a67feeea578d71647e0c 63847
00006.QC.jpg
G7 3646b902079150b5282654abdecaf764 183230
00007.jpg
JPEG7.2 7ef8f2246ddf056783a24fe833214e9d 60254
00007.QC.jpg
G8 b37712cc33f0e3a7a62661785174d2a7 174995
00008.jpg
JPEG8.2 49de226781855240ffc2adf2db65faac 56732
00008.QC.jpg
THUMB1 imagejpeg-thumbnails 1bd4128568e798572983ee22cf505099 20354
00001thm.jpg
THUMB2 880ba11064b1d3ce1607399e78a10336 31720
00002thm.jpg
THUMB3 17d90c859d7b73142b155faa6c5c4e60 30663
00003thm.jpg
THUMB4 b73f39f08a9775d2312b8075f9f66b7d 32624
00004thm.jpg
THUMB5 adef102b772bafa5836c77738b5c1936 32982
00005thm.jpg
THUMB6 4716cc27f731f17908235ad6d353beab 32938
00006thm.jpg
THUMB7 fbfd4d853be7e8f47cc8165c89436fda 32054
00007thm.jpg
THUMB8 5a5d7a2d419557bec93c7fa93ed75327 30477
00008thm.jpg
imagejp2 837a5fcb8da6bd9a25f36130b40302ce 151080
00001.jp2
95202c7bd9416ff9cbae9eb1069bf9b5 1045413
00002.jp2
02fa52e13b9bf9e161c3821152e91795 1045583
00003.jp2
edb2bd9cc1d6e121cf36429eef93f67e 1045410
00004.jp2
4492572395d699560d592ee03983072e 1046865
00005.jp2
4455dff9875c6c56e7f855da5f1e34d0 1046825
00006.jp2
ec9525d47988df1c38c9ea2c747a1dd0 1046198
00007.jp2
9a2ebbfee89432cd2f8c6589fc59324f 1044768
00008.jp2
archive
TIF1 imagetiff c45590f5f3aa4278507ead9bb07ae448 8418284
00001.tif
TIF2 9d57afc9160f99f3be394a1feb64c6c7 8385032
00002.tif
TIF3 ddc31d2b5a3d91da7798bc2f3487accf 8386204
00003.tif
TIF4 a0acee2b5dd8722f2704cf0c3e1a63b1 8385568
00004.tif
TIF5 0265f457a81f5852b8f66472b0b2c3a1 8397200
00005.tif
TIF6 e7e616894667003d52de93c8f370458c 8397184
00006.tif
TIF7 fb40d000b670f54877d4093f9a3fa521 8391984
00007.tif
TIF8 487063b9c111ed03c8fb1ae0dd15cfc3 8379704
00008.tif
TXT1 textplain c8aa70e00c19eaf688f6e52d5393f966 196
00001.txt
TXT2 79e10a8c16798a511241c838780f3b7b 2151
00002.txt
TXT3 c0375b5533f83028873d126c3f0678b2 2228
00003.txt
TXT4 f54b001f23aad0c2d2c6cfdda6582ae0 2281
00004.txt
TXT5 7e59c1bbec8e0f5abb07c0ee1233beb9 2108
00005.txt
TXT6 7bb64f0cf191e002bb4e60d55bdea879 2538
00006.txt
TXT7 85f29d8ae61090e5a794b094d5357528 2395
00007.txt
TXT8 ddc37ffbf6b00c181d63c385905dc501 2258
00008.txt
TXT1.2
TXT2.2
TXT3.2
TXT4.2
TXT5.2
TXT6.2
TXT7.2
TXT8.2
G10 TXT10
UF00007388_pdf.txt
G9 PDF9 applicationpdf 417c0f272f67d545ab620ab393ae52f5 3936497
UF00007388.pdf
G11 METS11 unknownx-mets 5986afc140da2b7f45864e2fa7c63a74 16143
UF00007388_00001.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Front Cover 1
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PDIV2 2 Chapter
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4
PAGE5 4
PAGE6 5
PAGE7 6
PAGE8 7
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1 Main
FILES1 00001
FILES2 00002
FILES3 00003
FILES4 00004
FILES5 00005
FILES6 00006
FILES7 00007
FILES8 00008 8
FILES9 UF00007388 9
FILES10 10
FILES11 11