Citation
Interview with Lisa Canty Greenwood, January 13, 1975

Material Information

Title:
Interview with Lisa Canty Greenwood, January 13, 1975
Creator:
Greenwood, Lisa Canty ( Interviewee )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Catawba Indians -- Florida
Kataba Indians -- Florida
Catawba Oral History Collection ( local )

Notes

Funding:
This text has been transcribed from an audio or video oral history. Digitization was funded by a gift from Caleb J. and Michele B. Grimes.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
Holding Location:
This interview is part of the 'Catawba' collection of interviews held by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program of the Department of History at the University of Florida
Rights Management:
Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


ORAL HISTORY PROJECT




Interviewee: Lisa Canty Greenwood

Interviewer: Frances Wade

January 13, 1975











UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ORAL HISTORY PROJECT

Interviewee: Lisa Canty Greenwood
Interviewer: Frances Wade
January 13, 1975







Although Lisa Canty Greenwood is not old enough to remember
much about the reservation before it changed, she does have some
views about what it means to be an Indian today.







CAT111A
Interviewer: Frances Wade
Interviewee: Lisa Canty Greenwood
Date: January 13, 1975

W: This is Frances Wade. I live on Route 3, Box 304, Rock Hill,
South Carolina. Today is January 13, 1975. I am gathering oral
histories of the Catawba Indians for the University of Florida.
Today I am talking with Lisa Canty Greenwood. Lisa, what is your
full name?

G: Lisa Canty Greenwood.

W: What is your address?

G: Route 7, Box 32.

W: Who are your parents?

G: My father is William Harry Thompson. My mother is Thelma Canty.

W: Is your mother an Indian?

G: Yes, she is.

W: Is your father an Indian?

G: No.

W: What kind of work did your father do?

G: He was a policeman in the Rock Hill Police Department.

W: Is your father alive?

G: No, he is not.

W: Is your mother alive?

G: Yes.

W: What brothers and sisters do you have, Lisa?

G: I have two brothers and one sister.

W: What are their names and their birth dates?

G: Anthony Scott Canty, born June eighth, 1956. Lisa Glen Hendrix,
born May eighteenth, 1962 and Robert Floyd Hendrix, Jr., born May
nineteenth, 1964,

W: When were you born Lisa?

G: June second, 1958.



1







W: Lisa, how old are you?

G: I am 16.

W: You are already married, are you not?

G: Yes.

W: When did you get married?

G: June seventh, 1974.

W: Who did you marry?

G: Robert Leon Greenwood.

W: Is he an Indian?

G: No, he is not.

W: Lisa, where were you born?

G: I was born in Rock Hill, York General Hospital.

W: Did you live in Rock Hill, or did you live on the reservation?

G: When I was first born I lived on the reservation, the old
reservation. I lived with my Aunt Frances Wade and Gary Wade and
their family.

W: How long did you live there?

G: Oh, I do not know.

W: I think that you were about eight months old and I remember that
the Wades cried a lot when you and your brother were taken away.
Lisa, do you belong to any church?

G: I belong to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I
am a Mormon.

W: When were you baptized into the church?

G: I was baptized when I was eight years old. I cannot remember
what year that was.

W: Do you remember who baptized you?

G: Brother Ruskin.

W: Do you remember where you were baptized?

G: I was baptized up in Charlotte, at that church.




2







W: You were baptized in a font in Charlotte. Lisa, are you active
in church now?

G: No, I am not.

W: I know that since you have married you are not going to school.
Where did you attend school?

G: A boarding school at Northside Elementary. Then I went to Castle
Heights and I dropped out after the ninth grade.

W: Who were some of your teachers? Do you know?

G: The principal at Northside was Mr. Acott. Some of my teachers, I
do not know.

W: Miss Alan?

G: Yes, Miss Alan and Miss Eadie.

W: Of all the subjects you took at school, what subject did you like
best?

G: History.

W: Which subject did you like least?

G: Math.

W: I find that lots of Indians did not like math. Lisa, you always
went to school among the whites. Did they all know that you were
an Indian?

G: Well, most of them would say, "My you have got pretty skin." I
would say, "That is because I am an Indian." They did not know
that I was an Indian, once they knew I would say I am proud of it.

W: Did they treat you well, Lisa?

G: Most of them did. I mean, when I went to school my Aunt Frances
taught seminary and we would get up around five in the morning.
She would pick us up around six fifteen and there would be a
crowd of kids in the car. Sometimes we would sit on top of each
other. We would go on down to the old schoolhouse to go to
seminary early that morning.
Sometimes we would have a campout and we would all camp out
at the old schoolhouse and we would tell scary stories and
everybody would get real scared. We would have the best time
down there.

W: Lisa, since you are talking about seminary, what kind of things
did you learn in seminary?

G: Well, I learned about the church and about its leaders and learned
scriptures and how to scripture chase. That was fun.


3








W: Why did you quit school, Lisa?

G: I quit when I got married and I hope I will be going back to
finish up before long.

W: You are going under this new Indian Program, are you not?

G: Yes.

W: I am pleased that it started because I feel it will benefit lots
of young people. Lisa, you know hardly anything about the old
reservation. I am sure there have been changes from the time
that you were small. Can you make any comparison with what you
remember of it a while back and the way it is now?

G: I cannot remember much. I remember before the roads were paved
there was nothing but the old dirt road all the way through the
reservation. There were not many white people living down there.
Now there are too many white people living down there.

W: Right on the outskirts of the reservation, the roads are paved
like you said. Let us talk about something that you do know
about. What do you think about all the young people who are on
drugs? I am sure that you are not. You have got too healthy a
looking skin and too clear of eyes to be on anything like that.
What do you think about the people who take drugs?

G: Well, I do not know. People have their own life to live and they
know that it is wrong, yet they still do it. I think that if
the way they want to live their life, is on drugs, then there is
not much anyone can do.

W: Do you have any idea what causes the young people to take drugs?

G: I have been around and I would say that there are not as many
young kids as you think that are on it. The older people, from
the ages twenty-five down, get them started.

W: The older people they have a tendency to cause the young people
to take it. I am glad you brought that up. What do you think
about the situation today and the way our country is? What do
you think about unemployment and energy and food shortages. What
do you think about all of that?

G: I think it is terrible that the world is in such a bad situation
and people can do little about it.

W: What do you think, do you have any idea, if you had a voice in
it, what could be done?

G: If I had anything to do with it, you know how the President is
giving other countries food, such as Russia, they do not need our
food. I think they should keep our stuff right here, in the
United States where it belongs. I guess if he did not do that,


4







then we could not get oil from, what is it, Israel.

W: Egypt.

G: Egypt, yes.

W: What do you think about the energy crisis? Now you know just
last week, the president sold a lot of airplanes to one of those
oil countries where we are having trouble getting oil. What do
you think about that?

G: I think that was wrong. I think it was, because some people might
want to start some kind of war. They get all these planes from
the United States and we are in a bad situation.

W: What do you think we can do about the energy crisis that we have
here. They talk about us consuming too much electricity, we are
burning too much fuel. What do you think about that?

G: If it was left up to me, I would like to go back to the old
times, when they used oil lamps. I would like to have a wood
stove.

W: I would like to have a wood stove myself. We have a chief,
assistant chief, two councilmen, and a secretary. Do you think
it was a good idea to start this up again?

G: Yes, I think it is.

W: How do you think it will benefit us?

G: It is allowing people to speak up for what they want. It is
helping us out a good bit.

W: Do you think it is a good idea to keep the old part of the
reservation as it is?

G: Yes, I think so. I would like for it to stay like it is so we
can remember it.

W: That is good.

G: I would like to have new things done to it. Like they were
talking about, the museums, arts and crafts.

W: That is true. There is talk and it might be more than just talk
in a few months. We might get a building, a type of museum
building on the old reservation. It would be a place for the
older Indians to teach the younger Indians the art of making
Indian pottery. Catawbas were never a bead-making or a basket-
weaving group. Some of them did do that and they are talking
about reviving that also. If you wanted to really draw or paint,
there would be qualified people who would come down there and
teach us that. I think that would be good for the young people,
also. Lisa, were you one of the people who got pines to set out?


5







G: No.

W: You were not among that group. What can you remember about
Christmas when you were young?

G: I cannot remember too much.

W: What do you remember about Christmas now?

G: Well, Christmas now just does not seem to mean much to anyone
anymore. People think that we have to give fancy gifts and they
must give something in return.

W: If you had your way, what kind of Christmas would you really
have?

G: I would like to have one like what I used to have. That would be
nice enough for me.

W: What kind did you used to have?

G: Just get fruit and candy and hand-me-downs.

W: All get together and just really have a good time.

G: Yes.

W: It was a good time. You are a young lady, so you have never been
in service. You are still to young to really work. You have
already talked about your heritage as an Indian. Do you want to
say anything else about being an Indian?

G: All I can say is I am proud of my heritage as an Indian.

W: Would you like to learn to make pottery?

G: Yes, I would. I would like to learn to make anything that
Indians used to make long ago.

W: That is really good. You will certainly be on the list to take
advantage of this pottery making business as soon as it gets
started. If you could leave any words for the people who will
come after you, what would you tell them?

G: I would tell them that they should be proud to be an Indian and
always stand up to them if anyone puts you down and always try to
do the best you can.

W: In describing Lisa, she is a very lovely young lady. She has
brown hair and it is so clean it glistens. It sort of has a
reddish tinge to it. She has brown eyes and thick eyelashes with
thick eyebrows. She has freckles on her face and is not dark-
skinned. She is not completely white. She has this lovely olive
complexion. She is a very lovely Indian girl, and I am sure that
under this new Indian program she is going to get her education


6







and if she desires, she can become a registered nurse. I had
forgotten to ask Lisa about the sports that she liked or that she
liked to take part in. Lisa, what sports do you like?

G: I like softball, but I especially like to ride horses. I
remember when Aunt Isabel would tell me about how she used
to ride the horses. The big old draft horses, down on the river
bottom, and just ride them up and down. I like to do that. I
like to ride a horse bare-backed and every time I see one I want
to ride one. I enjoy it. If left up to me, I would prefer horses
before I would cars.

W: Well, I know that you can ride because I have seen you. Lisa do
you like to fish?

G: Yes, I like to fish but usually I wind up getting mad because
I cannot catch anything. I get tired of sitting down and
waiting, I get mad and quit.

W: So you are not the patient kind where fish are concerned.

G: No.

W: Do you like to just look at sports, rather than take part in some
of them?

G: I like to watch football and basketball, if I am there, so I can
see it in person, but not on TV.

W: But you also like to play basketball, do you not?

G: I like softball better.

W: Well, it was softball, I guess, that I am thinking that you
played so hard in last year and you were practicing up at the
church.




















7





Full Text

PAGE 1

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ORAL HISTORY PROJECT Interviewee: Lisa Canty Greenwood Interviewer: Frances Wade January 13, 1975

PAGE 2

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ORAL HISTORY PROJECT Interviewee: Lisa Canty Greenwood Interviewer: Frances Wade January 13, 1975 Although Lisa Canty Greenwood is not old enough to remember much about the reservation before it changed, she does have some views about what it means to be an Indian today.

PAGE 3

CATlllA Interviewer: Frances Wade Interviewee: Lisa Canty Greenwood Date: January 13, 1975 W: This is Frances Wade. I live on Route 3, Box 304, Rock Hill, south Carolina. Today is January 13, 1975. I am gathering oral histories of the Catawba Indians for the University of Florida. Today I am talking with Lisa Canty Greenwood. Lisa, what is your full name? G: Lisa Canty Greenwood. W: What is your address? G: Route 7, Box 32. W: Who are your parents? G: My father is William Harry Thompson. My mother is Thelma Canty. W: Is your mother an Indian? G: Yes, she is. W: Is your father an Indian? G: No. W: What kind of work did your father do? G: He was a policeman in the Rock Hill Police Department. W: Is your father alive? G: No, he is not. W: Is your mother alive? G: Yes. W: What brothers and sisters do you have, Lisa? G: I have two brothers and one sister. W: What are their names and their birth dates? G: Anthony Scott Canty, born June eighth, 1956. Lisa Glen Hendrix, born May eighteenth, 1962 and Robert Floyd Hendrix, Jr., born May nineteenth, 1964, W: When were you born Lisa? G: June second, 1958. 1

PAGE 4

W: Lisa, how old are you? G: I am 16. W: You are already married, are you not? G: Yes. W: When did you get married? G: June seventh, 1974. W: Who did you marry? G: Robert Leon Greenwood. W: Is he an Indian? G: No, he is not. W: Lisa, where were you born? G: I was born in Rock Hill, York General Hospital. W: Did you live in Rock Hill, or did you live on the reservation? G: When I was first born I lived on the reservation, the old reservation. I lived with my Aunt Frances Wade and Gary Wade and their family. W: How long did you live there? G: Oh, I do not know. W: I think that you were about eight months old and I remember that the Wades cried a lot when you and your brother were taken away. Lisa, do you belong to any church? G: I belong to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. I am a Mormon. W: When were you baptized into the church? G: I was baptized when I was eight years old. I cannot remember what year that was. W: Do you remember who baptized you? G: Brother Ruskin. W: Do you remember where you were baptized? G: I was baptized up in Charlotte, at that church. 2

PAGE 5

W: You were baptized in a font in Charlotte. Lisa, are you active in church now? G: No, I am not. W: I know that since you have married you are not going to school. Where did you attend school? G: A boarding school at Northside Elementary. Then I went to Castle Heights and I dropped out after the ninth grade. W: Who were some of your teachers? Do you know? G: The principal at Northside was Mr. Acott. Some of my teachers, I do not know. W: Miss Alan? G: Yes, Miss Alan and Miss Eadie. W: Of all the subjects you took at school, what subject did you like best? G: History. W: Which subject did you like least? G: Math. W: I find that lots of Indians did not like math. Lisa, you always went to school among the whites. Did they all know that you were an Indian? G: Well, most of them would say, "My you have got pretty skin." I would say, "That is because I am an Indian." They did not know that I was an Indian, once they knew I would say I am proud of it. W: Did they treat you well, Lisa? G: Most of them did. I mean, when I went to school my Aunt Frances taught seminary and we would get up around five in the morning. She would pick us up around six fifteen and there would be a crowd of kids in the car. Sometimes we would sit on top of each other. We would go on down to the old schoolhouse to go to seminary early that morning. Sometimes we would have a campout and we would all camp out at the old schoolhouse and we would tell scary stories and everybody would get real scared. We would have the best time down there. W: Lisa, since you are talking about seminary, what kind of things did you learn in seminary? G: Well, I learned about the church and about its leaders and learned scriptures and how to scripture chase. That was fun. 3

PAGE 6

W: Why did you quit school, Lisa? G: I quit when I got married and I hope I will be going back to finish up before long. W: You are going under this new Indian Program, are you not? G: Yes. W: I am pleased that it started because I feel it will benefit lots of young people. Lisa, you know hardly anything about the old reservation. I am sure there have been changes from the time that you were small. Can you make any comparison with what you remember of it a while back and the way it is now? G: I cannot remember much. I remember before the roads were paved there was nothing but the old dirt road all the way through the reservation. There were not many white people living down there. Now there are too many white people living down there. W: Right on the outskirts of the reservation, the roads are paved like you said. Let us talk about something that you do know about. What do you think about all the young people who are on drugs? I am sure that you are not. You have got too healthy a looking skin and too clear of eyes to be on anything like that. What do you think about the people who take drugs? G: Well, I do not know. People have their own life to live and they know that it is wrong, yet they still do it. I think that if the way they want to live their life, is on drugs, then there is not much anyone can do. W: Do you have any idea what causes the young people to take drugs? G: I have been around and I would say that there are not as many young kids as you think that are on it. The older people, from the ages twenty-five down, get them started. W: The older people they have a tendency to cause the young people to take it. I am glad you brought that up. What do you think about the situation today and the way our country is? What do you think about unemployment and energy and food shortages. What do you think about all of that? G: I think it is terrible that the world is in such a bad situation and people can do little about it. W: What do you think, do you have any idea, if you had a voice in it, what could be done? G: If I had anything to do with it, you know how the President is giving other countries food, such as Russia, they do not need our food. I think they should keep our stuff right here, in the United States where it belongs. I guess if he did not do that, 4

PAGE 7

then we could not get oil from, what is it, Israel. W: Egypt. G: Egypt, yes. W: What do you think about the energy crisis? Now you know just last week, the president sold a lot of airplanes to one of those oil countries where we are having trouble getting oil. What do you think about that? G: I think that was wrong. I think it was, because some people might want to start some kind of war. They get all these planes from the United States and we are in a bad situation. W: What do you think we can do about the energy crisis that we have here. They talk about us consuming too much electricity, we are burning too much fuel. What do you think about that? G: If it was left up to me, I would like to go back to the old times, when they used oil lamps. I would like to have a wood stove. W: I would like to have a wood stove myself. We have a chief, assistant chief, two councilmen, and a secretary. Do you think it was a good idea to start this up again? G: Yes, I think it is. W: How do you think it will benefit us? G: It is allowing people to speak up for what they want. It is helping us out a good bit. W: Do you think it is a good idea to keep the old part of the reservation as it is? G: Yes, I think so. I would like for it to stay like it is so we can remember it. W: That is good. G: I would like to have new things done to it. Like they were talking about, the museums, arts and crafts. W: That is true. There is talk and it might be more than just talk in a few months. We might get a building, a type of museum building on the old reservation. It would be a place for the older Indians to teach the younger Indians the art of making Indian pottery. Catawbas were never a bead-making or a basket weaving group. Some of them did do that and they are talking about reviving that also. If you wanted to really draw or paint, there would be qualified people who would come down there and teach us that. I think that would be good for the young people, also. Lisa, were you one of the people who got pines to set out? 5

PAGE 8

G: No. W: You were not among that group. What can you remember about Christmas when you were young? G: I cannot remember too much. W: What do you remember about Christmas now? G: Well, Christmas now just does not seem to mean much to anyone anymore. People think that we have to give fancy gifts and they must give something in return. W: If you had your way, what kind of Christmas would you really have? G: I would like to have one like what I used to have. That would be nice enough for me. W: What kind did you used to have? G: Just get fruit and candy and hand-me-downs. W: All get together and just really have a good time. G: Yes. W: It was a good time. You are a young lady, so you have never been in service. You are still to young to really work. You have already talked about your heritage as an Indian. Do you want to say anything else about being an Indian? G: All I can say is I am proud of my heritage as an Indian. W: Would you like to learn to make pottery? G: Yes, I would. I would like to learn to make anything that Indians used to make long ago. W: That is really good. You will certainly be on the list to take advantage of this pottery making business as soon as it gets started. If you could leave any words for the people who will come after you, what would you tell them? G: I would tell them that they should be proud to be an Indian and always stand up to them if anyone puts you down and always try to do the best you can. W: In describing Lisa, she is a very lovely young lady. She has brown hair and it is so clean it glistens. It sort of has a reddish tinge to it. She has brown eyes and thick eyelashes with thick eyebrows. She has freckles on her face and is not dark skinned. She is not completely white. She has this lovely olive complexion. She is a very lovely Indian girl, and I am sure that under this new Indian program she is going to get her education 6

PAGE 9

and if she desires, she can become a registered nurse. I had forgotten to ask Lisa about the sports that she liked or that she liked to take part in. Lisa, what sports do you like? G: I like softball, but I especially like to ride horses. I remember when Aunt Isabel would tell me about how she used to ride the horses. The big old draft horses, down on the river bottom, and just ride them up and down. I like to do that. I like to ride a horse bare-backed and every time I see one I want to ride one. I enjoy it. If left up to me, I would prefer horses before I would cars. W: Well, I know that you can ride because I have seen you. Lisa do you like to fish? G: Yes, I like to fish but usually I wind up getting mad because I cannot catch anything. I get tired of sitting down and waiting, I get mad and quit. W: So you are not the patient kind where fish are concerned. G: No. W: Do you like to just look at sports, rather than take part in some of them? G: I like to watch football and basketball, if I am there, so I can see it in person, but not on TV. W: But you also like to play basketball, do you not? G: I like softball better. W: Well, it was softball, I guess, that I am thinking that you played so hard in last -year and you were practicing up at the church. 7