Citation
Interview with Mrs. Alonzo George Canty September 12 1972

Material Information

Title:
Interview with Mrs. Alonzo George Canty September 12 1972
Creator:
Canty, Mrs. Alonzo George ( Interviewee )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Catawba Indians -- Florida
Kataba Indians -- Florida
Catawba Oral History Collection ( local )

Notes

Funding:
This text has been transcribed from an audio or video oral history. Digitization was funded by a gift from Caleb J. and Michele B. Grimes.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
Holding Location:
This interview is part of the 'Catawba' collection of interviews held by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program of the Department of History at the University of Florida
Rights Management:
Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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SOUTHEASTERN INDIAN ORAL HISTORY PROJECT


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


In cooperation with the Catawba Nation


INTERVIEWEE: Mrs. Alonzo Canty
INTERVIEWER: Emma Echols


DATE: September 12, 1972




















E: This is Emma Echols, Route 6, Box 260, Rock Hill, South Carolina. I
am recording the oral history of the Catawba Indians. It is September
12, 1972. I am visiting in the home of Mrs. Canty. Mrs. Canty, tell
me your full name and your address.

C: Virginia.

E: Virginia Canty. Who were you before you married?

C: Moses.

E: You were Virginia Moses.

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: You didn't live here. Where were you from?

C: York.

E: York, South Carolina. You went to school, I suppose, in York, did you
not when you were a young girl?

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: At the high school in York?

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: Did you work after you finished school?

C: No, ma'am.

E: How did you happen to meet your husband?

C: He came to our house one Sunday afternoon with his brother. His brother
knew my brother. They worked together, got acquainted.

E: You got acquainted.

C: Yeah.

E: When were you married?

C: 1942.

E: Where did you live then?







2








C: In York.

E: In York?

C: Uh huh.

E: When did you move down here?

C: When Imoved down here it was 1942.

E: Your husband had work in York, the reason you lived in York?

C: No, ma'am.

E: Where did your husband begin to work?

C: He worked in Rock Hill.

E: So he grew up in Rock Hill to York....

C: No, he lived in Rock Hill. Lots of them lived on the reservation. I
stayed with my mother and brother.

E: When did you get together to establish a home and begin raising this
nice family of yours?

C: When we was married.

E: When you married. Where did you live when you first were married?

C: I stayed with his mother awhile.

E: That was on the old reservation?

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: Was this your first experience living with an Indian family?

C: That's right. It sure was.

E: Who was his mother and father?

C: His mother was Emma Brown. She had been married twice. His daddy was
Henry Canty.

E: Who all were in thehome when you came in as a young bride? Who all
else were in that Indian home, the Canty home?

C: Nobody but his stepfather and mother.







3








E: His stepfather and mother.

C: That's right.

E: His stepfather would be who?

C: Early Brown.

E: Early Brown. Now there's your connection with Mrs. Edith Brown you
were telling a moment ago.

C: That's right.

E: Well, I know lots about that connection and that family. Early Brown
operated a ferry for a number of years.

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: Was he operating the ferry when you married?

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: Mrs. Brown loved flowers and she was a good cook. Did she teach you some
of those things?

C: No. I wasn't interested then.

E: You weren't interested that time. You have six children. Will you tell
me the names of your children?

C: Alonzo, Jr.

E: That's your first one, and the next one?

C: Is Judy. Judy Canty.

E: She's now Mrs. Steve Driggers, is that correct?

C: That's right.

E: And your next one?

C: Edwin.

E: Edwin. He married last Sunday to Jeannie Rutherford, I believe.

C: That's right.
















E: Your next one?

C: Is Betty.

E: Is Betty married now?

C: Yes, ma'am. Married to Marvin Driggers.

E: Then you have two more home in school. Who are they?

C: Wallace Lee Canty and Eric.

E: One's in eleventh grade and one's in tenth grade, is that true?

C: That's right.

E: Your boys are working. Let's see what kind of jobs they have? Your
husband worked where?

C: Well, he worked at Industrial Cotton Mill.

E: Has he retired now?

C: Yes ma'am, he's retired, but he still working part-time.

E: He's on social security?

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: Edwin is working where?

C: Edwin's working with Rayfield Electric Company.

E: And Alonzo's working where?

C: At the Rock Hill bleachery.

E: Is Judy working?

C:_

E: Is Betty working?

C: Winn-Dixie.

E: Which Winn-Dixie is she working at?

C: At the new one out at the mall.







5








E: You put your children, a number of them, through school. How many
of them?

C: Oh, yes ma'am. I had two to finish and two quit in high school. Junior
quit right in the middle of tenth grade. Judy quit in the tenth. The
rest of 'em's a'going. Edwin finished.

E: I know you're proud of Edwin finishing.

C: Oh, I am.

E: Edwin was at school under Mrs. Robinson. I believe you remember her
quite pleasantly, don't you?

C: Oh, I sure do. Very well.

E: What did your children think of the school in those days? Did they like
to go to school?

C: Yes, ma'am. They really did.

E: What other teachers do you remember they had?

C: Nobody but Mrs. Robinson and Mrs. Cornish on the reservation. When they
left from there, they went out to Leslie. From Leslie, Judy and Junior
E: went up here to Sullivan. I think Edwin did, too. Then they left from
here and went on out to Rock Hill High after they built this new Rock
Hill High School.

E: You're proud of their good records, aren't you?

C: I sure am proud of my kids too.

E: Edwin was going to school to Mrs. Robinson the year they had the big
parade in Rock Hill. We have a picture of him in that, leading the
dance in the parade.

C: That's right.

E: Will you tell me about that?

C: Edwin could really do the war dance. That's not no joke, he can really
do that. He was on this here great big old long....

E: What you call a float?

C: Yes, ma'am. He done the war dance going through town. Is that the
picture I gave you?







6







E: We have a wonderful picture of him doing that. Mrs. Robinson said that
he was never particularly interested in school until they put on this
big parade and the school furnished a big truck and built the platform
for them to have the big float on.

C: That's right.

E: They had an Indian tent and Edwin here is dressed up in an Indian costume.

C: That's right.

E: One day she said to the children, "We have everything ready for the float
and for the parade, except we don't have anyone to do the dance." Edwin
spoke up. Do you remember what he told her?

C: No.

E: She said he said, "Mrs. Robinson, I can do the dance. I can teach the
other boys to do the dance." So he did. After that he became interested
in school. Edwin told me that when he went on to high school he became
more interested in high school because of his girl friend, Jeannie.

C: That's right, he did. He was about to quit one time and go in the service.
I didn't want him to do that. I wanted him to go on to school.

E: Mrs. Canty, who helped to make some of the costumes your boys wore in
that dance?

C: Mary Ann Rogers made some of them and the parents.

E: Did you have any other sons dressed as Indians at that time?

C: No, ma'am.

E: After this he went on to high school, I believe. Did he finish high
school?

C: Oh, yes ma'am.

E: Mr. Sullivan was very much interested in him and he worked for awhile in
the school, is that right?

C: That's right. He worked with Rock Hill District Three for about a year
and a half.

E: What did he do after that?

C: He went from there to Charlotte. Electronics.







7








E: Electronics shop.

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: What did he do after that?

C: He left from there and he came back to Rock Hill. Went to work with
Rayfield Electric....

E: Rayfield Electrical Company. Is that right?

C: That's right. Yes, ma'am.

E: That's where he's working today?

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: I believe your son, Edward, was married this Sunday.

C: Sunday the tenth.

E: His wife is a student at Winthrop College, Ewho] will finish soon.

C: Yes, ma'am. That's right.

E: You're real proud of the record that your children have made and you have
a right to be proud.

C: I sure am. I'm proud of 'em all.

E: I'm interested in this nice little home that you have. You're here
on a paved highway, cars going past, you have trees around, you have
a little space for a small garden at the front. Your house is nicely
painted, it's attractive on the outside and inside. How did you come to
get this little house? Did you husband build it?

C: We had it built. Nationwide Company built it. We paid for it.

E: Is this a part of the land you all got from the...

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: ...when it was divided up?

C: Yes, ma'am. This is the land that my husband got.

E: Now how many acres are...?







8








C: He got six.

E: Do you have it fenced in?

C: No, ma'am. It's just marked off.

E: It would be large enough for one of your boys to have a lot and build if
they want to?

C: Yes, ma'am. If they wanted to.

E: What do you think about the division of land? Are you glad the land was
divided?

C: Well, to my part I was, yes.

E: Why are you glad?

C: It gives them more rights to do things. It was good the way it was. But
still they had more privilege of doing things, you know?

E: That's right. Do you think the changes good since you first married
and you went to live in an Indian home, in Early Brown's home, is that
right?

C: That's right.

E: You have seen many, many changes. What do you think of the changes? Do
you think it's for the better?

C: I believe so. I believe it is.

E: Better education for your children?

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: Better opportunities for your children?

C: Yes, ma'am. Sure is.

E: Your husband still has part-time work and that helps out, does it not?

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: What about your church activities? Are all your family involved in the
church?

C: Oh, yes ma'am.
















E: What church do you attend?

C: Mormon.

E: That is a Church of the Latter Day Saints on the reservation?

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: What social activities do you have down there for the children or your
young people? Do you have any dances or musical programs?

C: Oh, yes ma'am, they have dances. They don't dance in the church, but
they do have dances down there. They've taken the old schoolhouse and
made them a place to go to have their parties, dances and things like
that.

E: That's good for young people. Who plays for the dances?

C: Oh, just different ones. Gilbert Blue, Jean Blue. They have some out-
siders come in and help them. Just different ones come in and help.

E: I'm interested in some of the older people. What outstanding people do
you remember? You mentioned the Nelson Blues, brought up your husband.
Tell me some of the older Indians that were outstanding leaders years
ago.

C: I couldn't very well tell you much about them, because there's not much
that I really do know. I've only been married less than thirty years and
that's all I know.

E: Yes.

C: I know a little bit about Chief Blue. I don't remember whether he worked
any or not. Tell you the truth, I don't know too much about them.

E: Well, you wouldn't, because you came from York to come here and live with
them.

C: That's right.

E: But you've made a home here among them and you seem to enjoy it.

C: Yes, I do. They were always kind to me.

E: Mrs. Canty, when you were first married and you and your husband lived
with Mr. and Mrs. Early Brown, did you ever cross the ferry that Early
Brown operated?

C: Yes, ma'am. I rode across it many a time.







10








E: What did the reservation look like then?

C: There were a good many houses down there and they were pretty well
close. There was lots of trees. Later on after the land was divided
up, well, they all got to scattering out then; some building new houses
here and there and so it pretty well got thinned out.

E: The water supply, where did you get your water?

C: From a spring.

E: Spring.

C: Yes, ma'am.

E: Some people got it from the well, I believe.

C: That's right. Well and spring.

E: Do you remember the schoolhouse?

C: Oh, yes. I used to live right beside the old schoolhouse.

E: What did the old schoolhouse look like?

C: It looked pretty good. They had school there, when I lived there.

E: Now was that...?

C: Mrs. Robinson teach school down there, you know.

E: Yes, I know her. Did your children have lunch in the school or did they
have to come home for lunch?

C: No, my children had lunch in school. It was twenty-five cents a week then
for their lunches at school, which is two dollars now.

E: That's right. That makes a big difference, doesn't it?

C: It sure does.

E: So you have two of them that buy lunches now at the high school?

C: Yes, ma'am. That's four dollars a week.

E: Mrs. Fay Cornwell was teaching when your children were there and later
Mrs. Robinson and Mrs. Cornish.






11







C: That's right.

E: So you remember, I'm sure, a lot of things about the school. Who was
the cook for the school when they began having lunches there?

C: The cook when my children was going to school, that's all I can tell
ya about. The lunchroom there, then, when they were going to school.
Mrs. Arzada Sanders was the cook.

E: I believe Mrs. Sanders not only cooked for them, but she sometimes came
in and made pottery in some of the classes and showed them how to make
pottery. She's a very talented pottery maker.

C: Well, she did. She cooked for them and done that too.

E: Your children must have gotten a very good start in that school to go
on ahead with their education.

C: They did, they really did.

E: Are you glad you live in this part of the community rather than down on
the old reservation?

C: Oh yes, ma'am. I'd rather live here anytime.

E: 'Cause you own your property, you own your house.

C: Yes, ma'am. I couldn't own any myself down there. I couldn't claim any
myself. My children can, but I couldn't.

E: That's right. But your boys and your girls are getting out on their own.

C: Getting out on their own.

E: Do you think they'll ever go back to live on the old reservation?

C: No, ma'am. I don't think so.





Full Text

PAGE 1

SOUTHEASTERN INDIAN ORAL HISTORY PROJECT UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA In cooperation with the Catawba Nation INTERVIEWEE: Mrs. Alonzo Canty INTERVIEWER: Emma Echols DATE: September 12, 1972

PAGE 2

E: This is Emma Echols, Route 6, Box 260, Rock Hill, South Carolina. I am recording the oral history of the Catawba Indians. It is September 12, 1972. I am visiting in the home of Mrs. Canty. Mrs. Canty, tell me your full name and your address. C: Virginia. E: Virginia Canty. Who were you before you married? C: Moses. E: You were Virginia Moses. C: Yes, ma'am. E: You didn't live here. Where were you from? C: York. E: York, South Carolina. You went to school, I suppose, in York, did you not when you were a young girl? C: Yes, ma'am. E: At the high school in York? C: Yes, ma'am. E: Did you work after you finished school? C: No, ma'am. E: How did you happen to meet your husband? C: He came to our house one Sunday afternoon with his brother. His brother knew my brother. They worked together, got acquainted. E: You got acquainted. C: Yeah. E: When were you married? C: 1942. E: Where did you live then?

PAGE 3

C: In York. E: In York? C: Uh huh. E: When did you move down here? C: When I moved down here it was 1942. 2 E: Your husband had work in York, the reason you lived in York? C: No, ma'am. E: Where did your husband begin to work? C: He worked in Rock Hill. E: So he grew up in Rock Hill to York C: No, he lived in Rock Hill. Lots of them lived on the reservation. I stayed with my mother and brother. E: When did you get together to establish a home and begin raising this nice family of yours? C: When we was married. E: When you married. Where did you live when you ' first were married? C: I stayed with his mother awhile. E: That was on the old reservation? C: Yes, ma'am. E: Was this your first experience living with an Indian family? C: That's right. It sure was. E: Who was his mother and father? C: His mother was Emma Brown. She had been married twice. His daddy was Henry Canty. E: Who all were in the home when you came in as a young bride? Who all else were in that Indian home, the Canty home? C: Nobody but his stepfather and mother.

PAGE 4

E: His stepfather and mother. C: That's right. E: His stepfather would be who? C: Early Brown. 3 E: Early Brown. Now there's your connection with Mrs. Edith Brown you were telling a moment ago. C: That's right. E: Well, I know lots about that connection and that family. Early Brown operated a ferry for a.nu:inberof years. C: Yes, ma'am. E: Was he operating the ferry when you married? C: Yes, ma'am. E: Mrs. Brown loved flowers and she was a good cook. Did she teach you some of those things? C: No. I wasn't interested then. E: You weren't interested that time. You have six children. Will you tell me the names of your children? C: Alonzo, Jr. E: That's your first one, and the next one? C: Is Judy. Judy Canty. E: She's now Mrs. Steve Driggers, is that correct? C: That's right. E: And your next one? C: Edwin. E: Edwin. He married last Sunday to Jeannie Rutherford, I believe. C: That's right.

PAGE 5

E: Your next one? C: Is Betty. E: Is Betty married now? C: Yes, ma'am. Married to Marvin Driggers. E: Then you have two more home in school. Who are they? C: Wallace Lee Canty and Eric. 4 E: One's in eleventh grade and one's in tenth grade, is that true? C: That's right. E: Your boys are working. Let's see what kind of jobs they have.? Your husband worked where? C: Well, he worked at Industrial Cotton Mill. E: Has he retired now? C: Yes ma'am, he's retired, but he still working part-time. E: He's on social security? C: Yes , ma' am. E: Edwin is working where? C: Edwin's working with Rayfield Electric Company. E: And Alonzo's working where? C: At the Rock Hill bleachery. E: Is Judy working? c: E: Is Betty working? c: Winn-Dixie. E: Which Winn-Dixie is she working at? C: At the new one out at the mall.

PAGE 6

5 E: You put your children, a number of them, through school. How many of them? C: Oh, yes ma'am. I had two to finish and two quit in high school. quit right in the middle of tenth grade. Judy quit in the tenth. rest of 'em's a'going. Edwin finished. E: I know you're proud of Edwin finishing. C: Oh, I am. Junior The E: Edwin was at school under Mrs. Robinson. I believe you remember her quite pleasantly, don't you? C: Oh, I sure do. Very well. E: What did your children think of the school in those days? Did they like to go to school? C: Yes, ma'am. They really did. E: What other teachers do you remember they had? C: Nobody but Mrs. Robinson and Mrs. Cornish on the reservation. When they left from there, they went out to Leslie. From Leslie, Judy and Junior E: went up here to Sullivan. I think Edwin did, too. Then they left from here and went on out to Rock Hill High after they built this new Rock Hill High School. E: You're proud of their good records, aren't you? C: I sure am proud of my kids too. E: Edwin was going to school to Mrs. Robinson the year they had the big parade in Rock Hill. We have a picture of him in that, leading the dance in the parade. C: That's right. E: Will you tell me about that? C: Edwin could really do the war dance. That's not no joke, he can really do that. He was on this here great big old long E: What you call a float? C: Yes, ma'am. He done the war dance going through town. Is that the picture I gave you?

PAGE 7

6 E: We have a wonderful picture of him doing that. Mrs. Robinson said that he was never particularly interested in school until they put on this big parade and the school furnished a big truck and built the platform for them to have the big float on. C: That's right. E: They had an Indian tent and Edwin here is dressed up inan Indian costume. C: That's right. E: One day she said to the children, "We have everything ready for the float and for the parade, except we don't have anyone to do the dance." Edwin spoke up. Do you remember what he told her? C: No. E: She said he said, "Mrs. Robinson, I can do the dance. I can teach the other boys to do the dance." So he did. After that he became interested in school. Edwin told me that when he went on to high school he became more interested in high school because of his girl friend, Jeannie. C: That's right, he did. He was about to quit one time and go in the service. I didn't want him to do that. I wanted him to go on to school. E: Mrs. Canty, who helped to make some of the costumes your boys wore in that dance? C: Mary Ann Rogers made some of them and the parents. E: Did you have any other sons dressed as Indians at that time? C: No, ma'am. E: After this he went on to high school, I believe. Did he finish , high school? C: Oh, yes ma'am. E: Mr. Sullivan was very much interested in him and he worked for awhile in the school, is that right? C: That's right. He worked with Rock Hill District Three for about a year and a half. E: What did he do after that? C: He went from there to Charlotte. Electronics.

PAGE 8

7 E: Electronics shop. C: Yes, ma'am. E: What did he do after that? C: He left from there and he came back to Rock Hill. Went to work with Rayfield Electric E: Rayfield Electrical Company. Is that right? C: That's right. Yes, ma'am. E: That's where he's working today? C: Yes, ma'am. E: I believe your son, Edward, was married this Sunday. C: Sunday the tenth. E: His wife is a student at Winthrop College, [who] will finish soon. C: Yes, ma'am. That's right. E: You're real proud of the record that your children have made andyou have a right to be proud. C: I sure am. I'm proud of 'em all. E: I'm interested in this nice little home that you hav.e. You're here on a paved highway, cars going past, you have trees around, you have a little space for a small garden at the front. Your house is nicely painted, it's attractive on the outside and inside. How did you come to get this little house? Did you husband build it? C: We had it built. Nationwide Company built it. We paid for it. E: Is this a part of the land you all got from the C: Yes, ma'am. E: when it was divided up? C: Yes, ma'am. This is the land that my husband got. E: Nowhow , IJlany acres , are ?

PAGE 9

8 C: He got six. E: Do you have it fenced in? C: No, ma' am. It's jus . t marked off. E: It would be large enough for one of your boys to have a lot and build if they want to? C: Yes, ma'am. If they wanted to. E: What do you think about the division of land? Are you glad the land was divided? C: Well, to my part I was, yes. E: Why are you glad? C: It gives them more rights to do things. It was good the way it was. But still they had more privilege of doing things, you know? E: That's right. Do you think the changes good since you first married and you went to live in an Indian home, in Early Brown's home, is that right? C: That's right. E: You have seen many, many changes. What do you think of the changes? Do you think it's for the better? C: I believe so. I believe it is. E: Better education for your children? C: Yes, ma'am. E: Better opportunities for your children? C: Yes, ma'am. Sure is. E: Your husband still has part-time work and that helps out, does . it not? C: Yes, ma'am. E: What about your church activities? Are all your family involved in the church? C: Oh, yes ma'am.

PAGE 10

9 E: What church do you attend? C: Mormon. E: That is a Church of the Latter Day Saints on the reservation? C: Yes, ma'am. E: What social activities do you have down there for the children or your young people? Do you have any dances or musical programs? C: Oh, i yes ma'am, they have dances. They don't dance in the church, but they do have dances down there. They've taken the old schoolhouse and made them a place to go to have their parties, dances and things like tha ' t. I E: That's good for young people. Who plays for the dances? C: Oh, i just different ones. Gilbert Blue, Jean Blue. They have some out siders come in and help them. Just different ones come in and help. E: I'm i interested in some of the older people . What outstanding people do you i remember? You mentioned the Nelson Blues, brought up your husband. Tell me some of the older Indians that were outstanding leaders years agol C: I c6uln't very well tell you much about them, because there's not much that I really do know. I've only been married less than thirty years and that's all I know. E: Yes. C: I know a little bit about Chief Blue. I don't remember whether he worked any or not. Tell you the truth, I don't know too much about them. E: Well, you wouldn't, because you came from York to come here and live with them. C: That's right. E: But you've made a home here among them and you seem to enjoy it. C: Yes, I do. They were always kind to me. E: Mrs. Canty, when you were first married and you and your husband lived with Mr. and Mrs. Early Brown, did you ever cross the ferry that Early Brown operated? C: Yes, ma'am. I rode across it many a time.

PAGE 11

10 E: What did the reservation look like then? C: There wer.e . a good many houses down there and they were pretty well close. There was lots of trees. Later on after the land was divided 1 1 up, well, they all got to scattering out then; some building new houses here and there and so it pretty well got thinned out. E: The water supply, where did you get your water? C: From a spring. E: Spring. C: Yes, ma'am. E: Some people got it from the well, I believe. C: That's right. Well and spring. E: Do you remember the schoolhouse? C: Oh, yes. I used to live right beside the old schoolhouse. E: What did the old schoolhouse look like? C: It looked pretty good. They had school there, when I iived there. E: Now was that ? C: Mrs. Robinson teach school down there, you know. E: Yes, I know her. Did your children have lunch in the school or did they have to come home for lunch? C: No, my children had lunch in school. It was twenty-five cents a week then for their lunches at school, which is two dollars now. E: That's right. That makes a big difference, doesn't it? C: It sure does. E: So you have two of them that buy lunches now at the high school? C: Yes, ma'am. That's four dollars a week. E: Mrs. Fay Cornwell was teaching when your children were there and later Mrs. Robinson and Mrs. Cornish.

PAGE 12

11 C: That's right. E: So you remember, I'm sure, a lot of things about the school. Who was the cook for the school when they began having lunches there? C: The cook when my children was going to school, that's all I can tell ya about. The lunchroom there, then, when they were going to school. Mrs. Arzada Sanders was the cook. E: I believe Mrs. Sanders not only cooked for them; but she sometimes came in and made pottery in some of the classes and showed them how to make pottery. She's a very talented pottery maker. C: Well, she did. She cooked for them and done that too. E: Your children must have gotten a very good start in that school to go on ahead with their education. C: They did, they really did. E: Are you glad you live in this part of the connnunity rather than down on the old reservation? C: Oh yes, ma'am. I'd rather live here anytime. E: 'Cause you own your property, you own your house. C: Yes, ma'am. I couldn't own any myself down there. I couldn't claim any myself. My children can, but I couldn't. E: That's right. But your boys and your girls are getting out on their own. C: Getting out on their own. E: Do you think they'll ever go back to live on the old reservation? C: No, ma'am. I don't think so.