Citation
Interview with Stephanie Sanders, November 27, 1971

Material Information

Title:
Interview with Stephanie Sanders, November 27, 1971
Creator:
Sanders, Stephanie ( Interviewee )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Catawba Indians -- Florida
Kataba Indians -- Florida
Catawba Oral History Collection ( local )

Notes

Funding:
This text has been transcribed from an audio or video oral history. Digitization was funded by a gift from Caleb J. and Michele B. Grimes.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
Holding Location:
This interview is part of the 'Catawba' collection of interviews held by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program of the Department of History at the University of Florida
Rights Management:
Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

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SOUTHEASTERN INDIAN ORAL HIS' )RY PROJECT


UNIVERSITY OF FLORII


In cooperation with the Catz 7ba Nation


INTERVIEWEE: Stephanie i hinders
INTERVIEWER: Emma Reid I :hols


DATE: November 27, ] )71























E: I am visiting in the home of John Idle Sanders and I'm going
to interview his granddaughter. I am recordingg the history
of the Catawba Indians. Will you tell me your full name?

S: Stephanie Nell Sanders.

E: I believe you were adopted into this f imily. Who is your
adopted father?

S: Fred Sanders.

E: How did he happen to adopt you?

S: Well, he was living out in Utah and S .t Lake City. I don't
know.

E: Were you just a small baby when he adc )ted you?

S: Yes, I was eleven days old.

E: Eleven days old. And then he brought rou back here to live
with him and with his family? You're, I believe you're living
in North Carolina now, is that right?

S: Yes.

E: Now your father was what kind of an I lian?

S: Catawba. I mean, Jute.

E: A Jute Indian. And your mother was a qhat?

S: I think a Jute, too.

. nuZu y.UL LtuuL=cuj mLnc- wo C uC6anter of Nelson Blue, is
that correct?

S: Oh, yes.

E: That's right. Your adopted mother is the daughter of Nelson
Blue. Now, where have you gone to school? Where'd you begin
at school?









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S: Leslie.

E: You remember your first teacher at Les .ie?

S: I don't think I do, nope.

E: Did you enjoy going to school at Lesli i?

S: Yes.

E: And then from there where did you go?

S: Let's see, to Elizabeth, up in North ( irolina.

E: Now, what is your address in North Cai )lina now?

S: Wako Roads Route 3, Box 57-D, I thin,

E: Do you have any brothers and sisters L[ving there now?

S: I have two sisters living up there anc that's all.

E: Now what grade are you in school?

S: Fifth.

E: Fifth, and what are you planning to dc ?

S: A nurse.

E: A nurse, that would be fine. How old ire you, Stephanie?

S: Eleven.

E: Oh you're, and such a pretty girl. Dc you know any of the
Indian songs and dances that so many c the ones around here
do?

D; PAU.

E: Have you learned to make any pottery like your grandmother
makes?

S: No.

E: You don't do those kind of things. What do you like to do in
the line of sports, like play ball or play basketball?









3








S: I like to race.

E: Like to race. I'll bet you're good. )n track meets,
you mean?

S: Yes.

E: Have you won any prizes in that?

S: I've won one blue ribbon.

E: One blue ribbon, oh, that's fine. Wh< i did you win that,
last year?

S: Yes.

E: Stephanie, do you enjoy coming down t( visit your adopted
father here?

S: Yes.

E: And do you like to cook?

S: Yes.

E: Tell me, have you ever cooked a Thank. giving dinner?

S: Yes.

E: For how many people?

S: Thirteen.

E: Thirteen. I'd like to know what you i oked that day. Do you
remember something that you cooked?

S: I cooked turkey and some spinach. An< I fixed some ground po-
tatoes and cooked cabbage and I can't remember no more. Oh yeah,
cranberries.

E: Cranberries, too! That was a good dinner. Did you have a pie
or anything like that for dessert?

S: Oh yes, I made a pumpkin pie.

E: A pumpkin pie, well now that sounds good. In your school where









4








you go to, are there lots of other In ians or just a few
Indians in that school?

S: I'm the only one.

E: The only one. Well, I'm interested ii knowing, how do the
other girls treat you? Do you have li ts of friends up there?

S: Yeah.

E: They're all good to you.

S: Yeah...

E: Now this is...

S: ...except some of the colored people.

E: You don't like the black ones so well Dr do they not like
you? Which is it?

S: They don't like me because I've got ii a lot of fights with
them.

E: You have. Well, I don't think you're the kind of girl that
ordinarily gets in fights. I expect 1 iey did something to
make you mad. What did they do to mal a you mad?

S: They called me names.

E: Uh oh, that's bad. What kind of names did they call you?

S: Negroes and blackie and everything lil a that.

E: Well, 'they shouldn't call you names ar 1 I'm sure you don't
call them that back. Stephanie, will 7ou tell me about your
brothers and sisters?

_. -----.- -.. .-...-- ,-ters. They're named
Sonny, Kay, Nona, Lamont, and Charles.

E: Are they older than you, working, or married?

S: Yes, all of them's married but me.

E: All of them married except you.









5








S: Yeah.

E: And you're the youngest one and still going to school?

S: Yes.

E: What sort of jobs do your brothers an sisters have?

S: Well, Lamont drives trucks. I don't now what Charles does.
He's in Miami. I haven't seen him in a long time. Nona, she's
a secretary. Kay, she's just a house' ife. My sister, other
sister, Sonny, she's just a housewife

E: Now, where do you go to church?

S: New Camp Creek Road Church.

E: Is that a...

S: Baptist.

E: ...Baptist church? When you come dowT to visit your grandmother
and grandfather, do you, and your fatal er, do you go to the
Mormon church here?

S: No.

E: Do you enjoy the Baptist church there'

S: Yeah.

E: What are you planning for Christmas?

S: Not much. I'm gonna come down here fc the Christmas holidays.

E: That would be fine.





Full Text

PAGE 1

SOUTHEASTERN INDIAN ORAL HIS~ )RY PROJECT UNIVERSITY OF FLORII \ In cooperation with the Catf ~ba Nation INTERVIEWEE: INTERVIEWER: Stephanie~ 1nders Emma Reid I ::hols DATE: November 27, J ~71

PAGE 2

E: I am visiting in the home of John Idle Sanders and I'm going to interview his granddaughter. I am ~ecording the history of the Catawba Indians. Will you tell me your full name? S: Stephanie Nell Sanders. E: I believe you were adopted into this f 1mily. Who is your adopted father? S: Fred Sanders. E: How did he happen to adopt you? S: Well, he was living out in Utah and Sc .t Lake City. I don't know. E: Were you just a small baby when he adc >ted you? S: Yes, I was eleven days old. E: Eleven days old. And then he brought rou back here to live with him and with his family? You're, I believe you're living in North Carolina now, is that right? S: Yes. E: Now your father was what kind of an Ir lian? S: Catawba. I mean, Jute. E: A Jute Indian. And your mother was a 11hat? S: I think a Jute, too .c,. fil.lU .YVU.L LO.UVpL..CUJ WVL..UCJ. wa..:, L..UC ua.u5.1ter of Nelson Blue, is that correct? S: Oh, yes. E: That's right. Your adopted mother is the daughter of Nelson Blue. Now, where have you gone to school? Where'd you begin at school?

PAGE 3

2 S: Leslie. E: You remember your first teacher at Les .ie? S: I don't think Ido, nope. E: Did you enjoy going to school at Leslj i? S: Yes. E: And then from there where did you go? S: Let's see, to Elizabeth, up in North C trolina. E: Now, what is your address in North Ca1 >lina now? S: Wako Road, . Route 3, Box 57-D, I thin~ , E: Do you have any brothers and sisters J Lving there now? S: I have two sisters living up there anc that's all. E: Now what grade are you in school? S: Fifth. E: Fifth, and what are you planning to de S: A nurse. E: A nurse, that would be fine. How old ire you, Stephanie? S: Eleven. E: Oh you're, and such a pretty girl. De you know any of the Indian songs and dances that so many e f the ones around here do? E: Have you learned to make any pottery like your grandmother makes? S: No. E: You don't do those kind of things. What do you like to do in the line of sports, like play ball or play basketball?

PAGE 4

S : I 1 ike to race E: Like to race. I'll bet you're good. )n track meets, you mean? S: Yes. E: Have you won any prizes in that? S: I've won one blue ribbon. 3 E: One blue ribbon, oh, that's fine. WhE 1 did you win that, last year? S: Yes. E: Stephanie, do you enjoy coming down t< visit your adopted father here? S: Yes. E: And do you like to cook? S: Yes. E: Tell me, have you ever cooked a Thank: ~iving dinner? S: Yes. E: For how many people? S: Thirteen. E: Thirteen. I'd like to know what you I ooked that day. Do you remember something that you cooked? S: I cooked turkey and some spinach. Anc I fixed some ground po tatoes and cooked cabbage and I can't ~emember no more. Oh yeah, cranoerries. E: Cranberries, too! That was a good dinner. Did you have a pie or anything like that for dessert? S: Oh yes, I made a pumpkin pie. E: A pumpkin pie, well now that sounds good. In your school where

PAGE 5

4 you go to, are there lots of other In , ians or just a few Indians in that school? S: I'm the only one. E: The only one. Well, I'm interested i1 knowing, how do the other girls treat you? Do you have 1, ts of friends up there? S: Yeah. E: They're all good to you. S: Yeah E: Now this is S: except some of the colored people. E: You don't like the black ones so well :>r do they not like you? Which is it? S: They don't like me because I've got i1 a lot of fights with them. E: You have. Well, I don't think you're the kind of girl that ordinarily gets in fights. I expect 1 a ey did something to make you mad. What did they do to ma]~ you mad? S: They called me names. E: Uh oh, that's bad. What kind of name1 did they call you? S: Negroes and blackie and everything lil that. E: Well, they shouldn't call you names ar l I'm sure you don't call them that back. Stephanie, will fou tell me about your brothers and sisters? ---, _ ---_________ _ _______ 3ters. They're named Sonny, Kay, Nona, Lamont, and Charles. E: Are they older than you, working, or married? S: Yes, all of them's married but : me. E: All of them married except you.

PAGE 6

5 S: Yeah. E: And you're the youngest one and still going to school? S: Yes. E: What sort of jobs do your brothers ani sisters have? S: Well, Lamont drives trucks. I don't i now what Charles does. He's in Miami. I haven't seen him in a long time. Nona, she's a secretary. Kay, she's just a house 1 ife. My sister, other sister, Sonny, she's just a housewife E: Now, where do you go to church? S : New Camp Creek Road Church. E: Is that a S: Baptist. E: . •. Baptist church? When you come dowi to visit your grandmother and grandfather, do you, and your fat] er, do you go to the Mormon church here? S: No. E: Do you enjoy the Baptist church there' S: Yeah. E: What are you planning for Christmas? S: Not much. I'm gonna come down here f< r the Christmas holidays. E: That would be fine.