Citation
Interview with Mr. Danny Lowry, August 29, 1971

Material Information

Title:
Interview with Mr. Danny Lowry, August 29, 1971
Creator:
Lowry, Danny ( Interviewee )
Publication Date:
Language:
English

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Florida History ( local )
Lumbee Oral History Collection ( local )
Spatial Coverage:
Lumbee County (Fla.)

Notes

Funding:
This text has been transcribed from an audio or video oral history. Digitization was funded by a gift from Caleb J. and Michele B. Grimes.

Record Information

Source Institution:
Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
Holding Location:
This interview is part of the 'Lumbee County' collection of interviews held by the Samuel Proctor Oral History Program of the Department of History at the University of Florida
Rights Management:
Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial 4.0 International license: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.
Resource Identifier:
LUM 220 ( SPOHP IDENTIFIER )

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77>//' &! /**>-'''--*-L~'' -, -/ I^*' -*'
LUM 220A
Page .
INTERVIEWEE: Danny Lowry
INTERVIEWER: Adolph Dial
August 29, 1971
D: Today is August the 29th, 1971. Adolph Dial is speaking. I am here
near Al-oes School, east of Lumberton. About how far from Lumberton?
L: Eight miles.
D: Eight miles, here at the home of Mr. Danny Leech Lowry, Mr. Danny
Leech Lowry and his wife. When I drove up Mr. Lowry was working in
the garden. It looks like he has about an acre of garden out here.
I understand he sells some produce and so forth. By the way, how old
are you, Mr. Lowry?
L: Eighty-four.
D: Eighty-four.years old. Are you in good health?
L: Good health.
D: I believe you stated that you've never been to a doctor or taken any
doctor medicine in your life?
L: That's right.
D: What do you contribute this long life to and good health?
L: Obeying the laws of health, nature and the laws of God.
D: Where were you born and reared, Mr. Lowry?
L: About a mile above Pace on the side of the Seaboard Railroad.
D: At the old Tommy Sanderson place?
L: That's right.
D: Did you spend your, who was your mother by the way?





LUXl 220A
Page A. dib
ge- ri 'P-
L: Riht name I believe is Neely Ann, but she's always been called Peiae,
Po\ll
known as ens.
D: Did your mother raise you or your grandmother?
L: My grandmother raised me.
D: at was, your grandmother's name?
L: Rhoda Lowr.
D: And are-you, do you mean the Rhoda who was Henry B/rry Lowr's widow?
L: Yes, sir.
D: Do you know how old you were when you started living with Miss Rhoda?
L: Well, I was born in the home there.
D: You was born in the home with Miss Rhoda.
L: Yes.
D: Uh huh, do you remember when Miss Rhoda died?
L: Well, I do. If my memory would serve'me right it was in 1907 or '08.
D: In 1907 or '08 'Miss Rhoda died. What are, what are some of the things
that you remember about Miss Rhoda? Could you tell me some of the things
that you remember about her?
L: Well, my being raised in that home she very often was in contact with
people from different parts of the country. Went in to see her and they
questioned her about her husband, Henry Barry Lowty, and at that time
some said he was living in New York. They knew about him. Some said
he was living in California and 'jh}.y- Ihotf seg hi>k and knew about .a-.
D: Did you ever convince yourself what happened to Henry B ry Lowr
L: No, sir, I haven't.
_TrD: if.cr t-?A' :/L:^wheth
D: _- e....^B.u--Mu.4- be afraid to say whether he went away or afraid to say





LUM 220A
Page dib
whether he died by accident from his gun?
L: I would.
D: In other words in your mind it's a mystery today.
L: Mystery today, yes, it is.
D: You never did hear Miss Rhoda discuss or tell what she thought happened
to him?
L: No, sir, I never did.
D: In other words it was a well-kept secret.
L: Yes, sir, well-kept.
D: Tell me about the money incident fi ^money that you told
me about a while ago.
L: Well, at that time ZC S 'l- there had been a bank at Lumberton
that had been robbed by her husband and others and I've heard her say
that there was a trunk full of money.' I don't know how large that
trunk might have been. But anyway she said there was a trunk full
of money and her husband, Henry Barry, when he geetit home he told
her, he says, "Now if you will watch where I'm burying this money
you will have it for your own good."
D: And did she watch where he buried it?
L: She said she did not.
D: Back in those days, the time of Miss Rhoda, did the people back in those
days drink a little more than they do today you think?
L: Well, no, sir, I don't think they drunk anymore in them days than
they do now.
D: Did she keep a little bit in the house?





LUM 220A
Page X dib
L: Yes, sir, she generally kept some around all the while, but she did
never sell it as I ever knew her.
D: In other words it was for her own use.
L: Yes.
D: Uh huh.
L; For her own use, yes.
D: Did you ever get your little bit of it back in those days?
L; Well, generally every morning we had a little dram as she called it.
She'd give me a little dram every morning.
D: A little dram of whisky.
L: .cs A
D: Maybe that's why you've lived so long.
L: Well, I couldn't say, but I wanted to add one more thing to it.
D: Yes.
L: When I was growing up she would give me a drop of spirits 0p O turpttne
.4^,... Wa0r every year that I was old. And from that day to this day
I hear men complain of back, having trouble with their backs, but I
never knew nothing about it until I lifted up the, until I lifted
up the_ SgM~4(heavy''' ,a sometime ago and pulled a muscle
in my back aLittle. Then I knew what it was for a little while to have
back trouble.
D: I see, and I believe you'd said yeo'-deeid you had never taken any
doctor medicine or been to the doctor, in good health. Do you still
take some of that spirit turpentine?
L; No, seldom now I ever take any of it.





LUM 22QA
Page 0 dib
D: How many children did Miss Rhoda have? Would you name the children,
the three children?
L: Well, I think the oldest one was a girl. I believe her name was
Sally Mag.
P: Sally Mag. Er.~
Li Yes,-and,then the next one was Henry Btrry, the son, and then the
third one was my mother, the one we call Polly.
D: And what was her right name?
L: Her right name was Neely Ann.
D: Neely Ann.
L: Yes.
D: Your mother lived to be quite old, didn't she?
L: Yes, sir, she lived to be ninety-one.
D: Ninety-one. .- k seems that Lowryj live a long time. Now you
don't know how old Henry B~rry was at the time he was killed in Mississippi?
L: No, sir, I don't.
D: What was the story that you'd always heard about Henry Barry Lowry., Jr.
in Mississippi?
L: Well, the story that was handed down to me about him was he run in that
day, he run a still and stilled turpentine with R.W. 1 ivr-OTi and
L^iverMor&
when he left that job there Mr. lmwvneh give him a recommendation
of everywhere he might go, as a good stiller, and if I understand it
right)he left and went somewhere in Mississippi --stitlger r and
owned his own turpentine still at the time of his death.
D: And it was reported that he and some man fell out over the still and
they killed each other. Is that the story you've always heard?





LUM 220A
Page b dib
L: That's the story that I've always heard about it.
D: In-Hattiesburg, Mississippi.
L: Yes, sir, Hattiesburg.
D: Mr. Lowry what is your idea, you know, as to the cause of the Lowry
ganjg and the justification of what they did?
L: You say tt A4' what I did m about it?
D: Yes, sir.
L: :.Well, I think that my grandfather was justified in what he did, and
he stood by and saw his father and his brother dig their own, their
own gravesland then they were killedland put into those graves and
buried. I think he was justifiable what he did.
D: Uh huh, Mr. Lowr did Miss Rhoda talk a lot about Henry Brry Lowr?
L: No, sir, very seldom I ever heard her call his name unless some visitor
would come there for the purpose of inquiring about something about
him.
e
D: What contribution do you feel that Henry BArry made? What, what do you
supposed it'd been like if he hadn't done what he did?
L: I feel like it would have been a dark day for the Indian people in
Robeson County if he hadn't a came on at the time he did. 5;n'lo a-
at that timewe had a movement here among us. e had a home guard
and it seemed like that they had mistreated our people and 5ir|lo~ -)_
they wanted X {(r-fD& tC r e l ff l- il uoithcM It, !tidout
his presence at that time, it would have been a much darker day for the
Lumbee Indians of Robeson County.
D: And in other words we might have owned less property, education would
have been slower and a whole lot of things would have been slower.





LUg 220A
Page 1 dib
L: Yes, I feel like at that day we had been allowed to go to school
some with the whites, but when we was denied that privilege I be-
lieve ;t j1g 1 t hat i; was about fifty years we were
denied an education.
D: Of course, our people didn't go to school during that time, during
those fifty years. Most of them stayed at home. Where did you attend
your first school?
L: I attended my first school up there at Pace at what was known as the
old college at that time.
D: Was W.L. Moore your first teacher?
L: No, sir, he was not my first teacher. If my memory would serve me right
Mr. Arthur Sampson was my first teacher.
D: Mr. Arthur Sampson at Old Hope..,.
L: Yes.
D: ...where the Hope CIFch is now. Uh huh. After you grew up and married
and were say around in your early twenties and so forth, what did you
do for a living?
L: I started on the farm in 19-, 1904 and I have been on the. farm and have
lived on it from then on up until now, and depended on it for my support}
- ivt<-W,6oo{ -
D; Are you engaged in farming now?
L: Yes, sir, I'm engaged at it now.
D: Do.you own: this farm here?
L; Yes, air, I own it.





LUM 220A
Page ? dib
D: How many acres do you have here, woodland and all?
shkreet
L: There was sixty-tee acres when I bought it and I have sold three
acres off of it and give one acre to one of my sons, Clarence Lowry.
D: YVu like the soil, do you?
L: Yes, sir, I do because God's work says I come from itand I'm going
back to it.
D: That's right. Do you feel that the farm has made your health better
than if you had not been on the farm?
L: Yes, sir, I feel that because I've always prOittiQlc in the early
morning to get up suvew4ime the winter at four o'clock and go out and
get some of the Pct)i^ s' -
D: So you rise at four o'clock. What about on Sunday morning, same way?
L: Well, on Sunday morning it's the same way because of ,ilC'fkA 5
! t A^+--r I-V A kAve <
en to [t0k o ~ and feed and water, cows to milk, and I-ee
+;lX 4 is Wf^; Co F f I $
~~mules af >1 F otA gd out. Now I have a tractor.
D: You have some cows you say? What do you do with these cows?
L: Well, I milk them twice a day.
D: How many you have?
L: I have but one just now.
D: Do you, now you get up at four o'clock. Has this always been your practice?
L: Yes, sir, I practice that.
D: And when do you go to bed at night usually?
L: Well, in generally)not later than nine o'clock.
D: Not later than nine. What do you do if you go off to a program or to
church something at night? -'You have to rush in and go to bed do you?





LUM 220A
Page dib
L: Well, at my age now-I don't drive any at night. excepting on Saturday
nights I go down to P'r~ck( serve at Vfy~ r#A church h on
Saturday night and I'm generally back here about ten o'clock.
D: Still up at four.
L: Yes, sir, generally get up at four o'clock on Sunday morning as well
as Monday morning.
D: Do you set an alarm clock?
6
L: No, sir, I"ve always been onywithin myself.
D: An alarm clock within yourself.





Full Text

PAGE 1

LUM 220A Page. INTERVIEWEE: Danny Lowry INTERVIEWER: Adolph Dial August 29, 1971 D: Today is August the 2th, 1971. Adolph Dial is speaking. I am here Arl ,s,,11 near~ School, east of Lumberton. Ab-0ut how far from Lumberton? L: Eight miles. D: Eight miles, here a.t the home of Mr. Danny Leech Lowry, Mr. Danny Leech Lowry and his wife. When I drove up Mr. Lowry was working in the garden. It looks like he has about an acre of garden out here. I understand he sells some produce and so forth. By the way, how old are you, Mr. Lowry? L: Eighty-four. D: Eighty-four.years old. Are you in good health? L: Good health. -....._ D: I believe you stated that you've never been to a doctor or taken any doctor medicine in your life? L: That's right. D: What do you contribute this long life to and good health? L: Obeying the laws of health, nature and the laws of God. D: Where were you born and reared, Mr. Lowry? L: About a mile above Pace.on the side of the Seaboard Railroad. D: At the old Tommy Sanderson place? L: That's right. D: Did you spend your, who was your mother by the way?

PAGE 2

LUM 220A 7,,.. J?age I. d:lb t'o\\~ L: nall\e I believe ;is Neely Ann, but she's always been called ~, D: L: D: D: L: D: L: D: L: D: L: C \~U known asE:a:ttb,. D:td your mother raise you or your grandmother? 'My grandmother rafsed me. w . r;rat wa,s~ur grandmother's 81''. name? Rhoda Lowr~ And are 0 you, do you ,nean the Rhoda who was Henry B;rry L~~' widow? Yes, s:t.r. Do you know how old you were when you started living with Miss Rhoda? Well, I was born :tn the home there. You was born in the home with Miss Rhoda. Yes. Uh huh, do you remember when Miss Rhoda died? Well, :r do. I:f my memory would serve'me right it was in 1907 or '08. D: In 1907 or '08 Miss Rhoda died. What are, what are some of the things that you remember about Miss Rhoda? Could you tell me some of the things that you remembe.r about her? L: Well, ,my being raised in that home she very often was in contact with people from different parts of the country. Went in to see her and they nv questioned her about her husband, Henry Bfrry Lo~ and at that time some sa.id he was living in New York. They knew about him. Some said ... . he w~s l:r:vin,g ~n Cal~;t;orn~a and +11~.t! hod sect'\ hnr-.. and knew about -4-eD: ._; .P rcif 7 Did you everconvi.nce yourself what happened to Henry BJr'ry Lowr"'o/,.1 L: No, sir; T haven ''t ..I" o-f h'.'r w,:-rt-1:: ,1:.,'.t~l D: -Ht Lt Lala be afraid to say whether he went away or afraid to say

PAGE 3

L~ 220A Pagel? dib whether he died by accident from his gun? L: I would. D: In other words in your mind it's a mystery today. L: Mystery today, yes, it is. D: You never did hear Miss Rhoda discuss or tell what she thought happened to him? L: No, sr, I never did. D: In other words it wasa well-kept secret. L: D: L: :::: ::r:b:~ 1 :::P:ney fncident/fb{ frn~,~'~LY that you told -me about a while ago. Well, at that time ~S /\ke.,. there had been a bank at Lumberton that had been robbed by her husband and others and I've heard her say that there was a trunk full of money.' I don't know how large that trunk might have been. But anyway she e,, said there was a trunk full of money and her husband, Henry Bfrry, when l:.rouqhT he gEH,~it home he told her, he says, "Now if you will watch where I'm burying this money you will have it for your own good." D: And did she watch where he buried it? L: She said she did not. D: Back in those days, the time of Miss Rhoda, did the people back in those days drink a li.ttle more than they do today 1 you think? L: Well, no, sir, I don't think they drunk anymore in them days than they do now. D: Did she keep a little bit in the house?

PAGE 4

LUM 220A Page~~ dib L: Yes, sir, she generally kept some around all the while, but she did never sell ft as r ever knew her. D: In ctn.er words it was for her own use. t: Yes. D: Uh. huh. L; -For tier own use, yes. D: Did you ever get your little bit of it back in those days? L; Well, generally ey,ery morning we had a little dram as she called it. She'd give me a little dram every morning. D: A little dram of whisky. D: Maybe tha,tls why you've lived so long. L: Well, r couldn't say, but I wanted to add one more thing to it. D: Yes. L: When I was growing up she would give me a drop of sp.irits o+!, -iu.:r-p er.-cifle.... I j ..,AJ~ for every year that I was old. And from that day to this day. I hear men complain of back, having trouble with their backs, but I never knew nothing about it until I lifted up the, until I lifted '-' J.,~, ,e.. up the S"t>M&rki !'.heavy ,. __ . -., sometime ago and pulled a muscle 1 ..., ' . in my back ~iittle. Then I knew what it was for a little while to have \ back trouble. D: I see, and I believe you'd said ye-t!'& eeia you had never taken any doctor medicine or been to the doctor, in good health. Do you still take some of that spirit turpentine? L: No, seldom now I ever take any of it.

PAGE 5

Lw,1 220A Page~? dib D: How many children did M.iss Rhoda have? Would you name the children, the three children? L: Well, I think th.e oldest one was a girl. 1 believe her name was Sally '}!ag. p: Sally 'Mag. e, V Yes,,and 0 :,tlien the next one was Henry B;rry, the son~ and then the thrd 0ne was my mother, the one we call Polly. D: And what was her r:tght name? L: Her rfght name was Neely Ann. D : Neely Ann. L: Yes. D: Your mother lived to be quite old, didn't she? L: D: L: D: L: Yes, sir, she lived to be ninety-one. \t, (:) Ninety-one. ,c~• :t+ seems that Low~ live a long time. Now you (I [:-;rr-;J don't know how old Henry B~rryAwas at the time he was killed in Mississippi? No, sir, I don't. (; ("\~ What was the story that you'd always heard about Henry B~rry Lo~, Jr. in Mississ:lppi? Well, the story that was handed down to me about him h~ run) in that l, V ,~l'rlifr-e. day, he run a still and stilled turpentine wit.h R.W. -I,,9ucr1mreband li',i-t..r More_ wh_en he left that job there Mr. ~tl:l give him a recommendation of everywhere he might go, as a good stiller, and if I understand it right)he left and went somewhere in Mississippi) -tt.-std(er ) and owned his own turpentine still at the time of his death. D: And it was reported that he and some man fell out over the still and they killed each other. Is that the story you've always heard?

PAGE 6

Lill1 220A Page t! dib L: That's the story that I~ve always heard about it. D: Inilla.tt;iesburg, M:i:ss;i'.ssippi. L: Yes, s:i:r, Hattiesburg. D: \(:' Mr. Lowr~twhat is your idea, you know, as to the cause of the Lowry (ianm and the justification of what they did? -,. . L ~ow -e:-1 You say~ W'W-"1'l1 what I did about it? L: D: Yes, sir. L: .;. Well, I' think that my grandfather was justified in what he did, and he stood by and saw his father and his brother dig their own, their put into those graves and he did. D: own graves; and then they were killed .land , V'\ buried. I thin~ he was justifiableAwhat Uh huh, Mr. Lowr~~ did Miss Rhoda talk a '1. e/ ,•,,e, I lot about Henry Blrry Lowey.? L: No, sir, 'V'ery seldom I ever heard her call his name unless some visitor would come there for the purpose of inquiring about sqmething about e D: What contribution do you feel that Henry Bprry made? What, what do you supposed it'd been like if he hadn't done what he did? L: r feel like it would have been a dark day for the Indian people in Robeson County if he hadn't a came on at the time he did. 5;miia...--) . "fkt at that time}we had a movement here among us. had a home guard and it seemed like that they had mistreated our people and 5il"hdo..r, ) they wanted"'tO (,c.~ If) e..v~ ~rn1.tak k,a.re .. :c fe:e. I witJ.oHt ',t' u;rtV1Dtt his presence at that time, it would have been a much darker day for the Lumbee Indians of Robeson County. D: And in other words we might have owned less property, education would have been slower and a whole lot of things would have been slower.

PAGE 7

L"CJl1 220.A Page '8.': dib L: Yes, I feel like at that day we had been allowed to go to school some with the whites, but when we was denied that privilege I beI I r .. --fh.... ~+. lieve , w~ I 75 ,ve. that it was about fifty years we were denied an education. D: Of course, our people didn't go to school during that time, during those f:;i:.fty years. Most of them stayed at home. Where did you attend your first school? L: T attended my first school up there at Pace at what was known as the old college at that time. D: Was W.L. Moore your first teacher? L: No, sir, he was not my first teacher~ Tf -my 1ll.emory would serve 1ll.e right Mr. Arthu,::, Sampson was my first teache;:.~ D: Mr. Arthur Sampson at ~d Hope.•'• I.: Yes. D: where the Hope cl{te,ch is now. Uh huh. After you grew up and -marr::L.ed and were say around in your early twenties and so forth, what d!d you do for a living? L: I started on the farm n 19-, 1904 and I !iave been on the farm and have lnveq on it from then on up until now, and depended on it for my support 1 .... ::1iv~l,~~~J.: .. P: Are you engaged in farniing now? L: Yes, sr, I:'m, engaged at i.t now.

PAGE 8

LUM. 220A, :,?age~:" dib D: How many acres do you have here, woodland and all? -\'" f"t: ('!. L: There was s:txty-@ioil0 acres when I bought it and I have sold three acres off of t and give one acre to one of -my sons, Clarence Lowry. D: S you 1:i:ke th_e so;U, do you? L: Yes, s-:i:r, I' do because God's work says T come from it, and I'm going back to t. D: That's right. Do you feel that the farm has made your health better th.an if you had not been on the farm? L: Yes,.sir, I feel that because I've always _ _.,p .... r .... o .... e ... ,,.t ___ ;~_/Q ___ c ___ ! ___ in the early u:rv, Mt;.r C\..r,C\ -morning to get up s0111eeim0s winter at four o'clock and go out and get some of the J:rcs~ !'c4'S~ f(iof('I',~'-; &_,w+lJ","1r,f'11irJ.t ... J ,~ (,) D: So you rise at four o'clock. What about on Sunday morning, same way? L: Well, on Sunday morning it's the same way because of __ (!.,_/_1~'~=----J<~e-.A.__..S ___ _ -["te J.,'rl..h'-W!-~ to 00k "'-'"\" 4 and feed and water: cows ti o milk, and ,B'ilt eut eltez J.{ , w~s. ,1)~.;. .... u ,..~f mule "mm" Ut\+; f -tr...t. M\.tltS ,,;\ out. Now I have a tractor. , ( D: You have some cows you say? What do you do with these cows? L: Well, I milk them twice a day. D: How many you have? L: r have but one just now. D: Po you, now you get up at four o'clock. Has this always been your practice? L: Yes, sir, I p:racti_ce that. D: And when do you go to bed at night usually? L: Well, in gene.rally)not later than nine o'clock. D: Not later than nine. What do you do if you go off to a program or to church something at night? ,:. ~ou , have to rush in and go to bed do you?

PAGE 9

LUM 220A .. .. , Page~ dib t L: Well, at my age now;I don't drive any at night epting on Saturday ,,, ' nights I go down to r-r-c:.Je1. se,,,-v1 CL. at r-f\A. •'1hurch on Saturday night and T'-m gene:t:'ally back here about ten o'clock. D: Still up at four. L: Yes, sir, generally get up at four o'clock on Sunday morning as well as Monday -morning. D: Do you set an alarm clock? e., L: No, sir, r•ve always been ont,. within myself. D: An alarm clock within yourself.


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mods:recordContentSource Samuel Proctor Oral History Program, Department of History, University of Florida
mods:subject local
mods:topic Florida History
Lumbee Oral History Collection
SUBJ662
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mods:area Lumbee County (Fla.)
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Interview with Mr. Danny Lowry, August 29, 1971
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