Citation
Pictures of English history

Material Information

Title:
Pictures of English history from the earliest times to the present period : with ninety-three pictures, printed in colours by Kronheim
Creator:
Kronheim, Joseph Martin, 1810-1896 ( Printer of plates )
George Routledge and Sons ( Publisher )
J. Ogden and Co ( Printer )
Kronheim & Co ( Lithographer )
Place of Publication:
London ( Broadway Ludgate Hill )
New York ( 416 Broome Street )
Publisher:
George Routledge and Sons
Manufacturer:
J. Ogden and Co.
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1868
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill., genealogical tables ; 29 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
History -- Pictorial works -- Juvenile literature -- Great Britain ( lcsh )
Genre:
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Printed on one side of leaf only; blank leaves facing each plate.
General Note:
All (except frontispiece) chromolithographed plates signed: Kronheim & Co.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA6601 ( LTQF )
ALG0058 ( NOTIS )
07914208 ( OCLC )
026534768 ( AlephBibNum )

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LONDON:
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NEW YORK: 416, BROOME STREET.









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ENGLISH HISTORY.









LONDON :
PRINTED BY J. OGDEN AND CO.,

172, ST. JOHN STREET, E.C.







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XXVI.

XXVII.

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XXXVI.
XXXVII.

XXXVIII.

XXXIX.

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XLV.
XLVI,

CONTENTS

DRUIDS, OR BRITISH PRIESTS.

AN ANCIENT BRITON IN HIS BOAT,
THE ROMANS CONQUER BRITAIN.
BOADICEA AND HER ARMY.

SAINT AUGUSTINE AND THE SAXONS.

THE POPE AND THE SAXON CHILDREN.

KING ALFRED AND THE CAKES.
ALFRED IN THE DANISH CAMP.
THE WICKED QUEEN ELFRIDA.
CANUTE AND HIS COURTIERS.
THE BATTLE OF HASTINGS.
DOMESDAY BOOK.

THE CURFEW.

THE TOWER OF LONDON.

QUEEN MATILDA AND HER TAPESTRY.
DEATH OF WILLIAM THE SECOND.
DUKE ROBERT GOES TO PALESTINE.
WRECK OF THE “WHITE SHIP.”
FLIGHT OF THE EMPRESS MAUDE.
MURDER OF THOMAS A BECKET.
RICHARD THE FIRST AND A LION.
BLONDEL AT RICHARD’S PRISON.
DEATH OF RICHARD THE FIRST,
KING JOHN AND MAGNA CHARTA,
HENRY III. AND THE BARONS.
PRINCE EDWARD AND HIS WIFE.
EDWARD I. ATTACKS SCOTLAND.
WALLACE EXECUTED.

DEATH OF PIERS GAVESTON.
THE BLACK PRINCE AT CRECY.
AFTER THE BATTLE OF CRECY.
BATTLE AT POICTIERS.

RICHARD II. ABDICATES.

THE RED AND WHITE ROSES.
THE WARS OF THE ROSES.

THE BATTLE OF AGINCOURT.
MARRIAGE OF HENRY V.

BATTLE OF TEWKESBURY.

THE FIRST ENGLISH PRINTER.
MURDER OF THE LITTLE PRINCES.
DEATH OF RICHARD THE THIRD.
MARRIAGE OF HENRY SEVENTH.
FIELD OF THE CLOTH OF GOLD.
CARDINAL WOLSEY.

KING EDWARD THE SIXTH.
EXECUTION OF LADY JANE GREY.





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XLVIII.
XLIX.
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LVIII.
EDX,
LX.
LXI.
LXII.
LXIII.
LXIV.
IEXGVE

LXVI.

TexXavsiile
LXVIII.
LXIX,
LXX.
LXXI.
LXXII.
LXXIII.
LXXIV.
LXXV.
LXXVI.
LXXVII.
LXXVIII.
LXXIX.
LXXxX.
LXXXI.
LXXXII.
LXXXIII.
LXXXIV.
LXXXV.

LXXXVI.

LXXXVII.
LXXXVIII.
LXXXIX,

xe,
Dale
XCII.

DEATH OF RIDLEY AND LATIMER.
THE BURNING OF CRANMER.
QUEEN ELIZABETH’S ACCESSION.
EXECUTION OF MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS.
THE SPANISH ARMADA.

QUEEN ELIZABETH AND SHAKSPEARE.
THE CAPTURE OF GUY FAWKES.
THE MURDER OF BUCKINGHAM.
EXECUTION OF LORD STAFFORD.
THE DEATH OF JOHN HAMPDEN.
THE BATTLE OF NASEBY.
EXECUTION OF CHARLES I.
CROMWELL TURNS OUT PARLIAMENT.
DEFEAT OF THE DUTCH FLEET.
CHARLES II. AND GENERAL MONK.
THE GREAT PLAGUE OF 1665.
GREAT FIRE OF LONDON (1666).
LorpD W. RUSSELL CONDEMNED.
LANDING OF WILLIAM OF ORANGE.
THE BATTLE OF THE BOYNE.

THE DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH.
THE BATTLE OF CULLODEN.
CLIVE’S VICTORIES IN INDIA.
DEATH OF GENERAL WOLFE.
CORONATION OF GEORGE III.
BURKE, THE GREAT ORATOR.
Lorp HoweE’s VICTORY.

CAPTURE OF SERINGAPATAM.
ABERCROMBIE IN EGYPT.

THE BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR.
DEATH OF SIR JOHN MOORE.
WELLINGTON AT MADRID.

THE CHESAPEAKE AND SHANNON.
THE BATTLE OF WATERLOO.
NAPOLEON IN THE BELLEROPHON.
CORONATION OF GEORGE IV.

THE REFORM BILL.

CORONATION OF VICTORIA.
MARRIAGE OF QUEEN VICTORIA.
BAPTISM OF THE PRINCE OF WALES.
GREAT EXHIBITION OF 1851.
BATTLE OF THE ALMA.

THE SIEGE OF SEBASTOPOL.

THE BATTLE OF INKERMANN.

THE RELIEF OF LUCKNOW.

THE VOLUNTEER REVIEW.



I. Druips, or BritisH PRIEsTs.

The people who lived in England many
hundreds of years ago were called Britons.
They did not know the one true God,
but were heathens. They had priests
whom they called Druids. These Druids
wore long, white garments, and lived in
the forests. They also wore ornaments
of gold, and wreaths of oak-leaves on
their heads ; and the people treated them
with great respect, and believed what
they said; for they thought them very

wise.

II. An ANCIENT BRITON IN His Boar.

The old Britons were savage people.

' Many of them wore no clothes, but painted

their bodies blue, with the juice of a plant
called woad. They had little boats called
coracles, made of basket-work, covered
with skins. In these boats they went
out fishing on the broad rivers that ran
through their country. In some parts of
Britain the people were not so savage as
in the others, but wore clothes, kept
herds of cattle, and had good strong wea-

pons for battle.



III. THE Romans Conquer BrirTAin.

The Romans were a mighty nation. —

After fighting in many countries, their
army came to conquer Britain.
name of the leader was Julius Cesar.
It was from France the Roman ships
of war came to Britain.
vent the Romans from landing. They
were armed with swords, spears, and
shields ; and they had also war-chariots,
with sharp blades fastened to the wheels,

and fine horses to draw them.

ane.

The Britons
soon came together on the shore to pre- |

IV. BoADICEA AND HER ARMY.

Though the Britons fought bravely,
the Romans conquered them at last.
But the Britons wanted to be free. They
had a queen named Boadicea, who had
two daughters. The
Boadicea and her daughters very badly.

Romans treated

So Boadicea got together a great army
to. drive the Romans out of the country.
But the Romans beat her army, and
Boadicea killed herself, to avoid being
made a prisoner, and ill-treated by the

Roman conquerors.





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V. SAINT AUGUSTINE AND THE SAXONS,

After governing Britain for hundreds
of years, the Romans gave up the country
and went away. Then there came across
the sea some nations called Angles,
Jutes and Saxons. They founded seven
kingdoms in Britain. The Saxons were
heathens, until a good man, Saint Augus-
tine, came over to Kent, and taught
Ethelbert the king and his people to
know the Lord, and the Saviour, Jesus
Christ.

became Christians.

And in time all the Saxons

VII. Kinc ALFRED AND THE CAKES.

Alfred was a great and good Saxon
King. Inhis time fierce warriors, called
Danes, came to England in ships. Alfred
was obliged to hide from these enemies.
He lived for a time in a farmer’s house,
The farm-
er’s wife set him to watch some cakes
that were baking. Alfred let the cakes

burn; and the farmer’s wife, who did

and no one knew who he was.

not know he was the king, gave him a
good scolding. She said he could eat
cakes, but was too lazy to watch them.

VI.THE POPE AND THE SAXON CHILDREN.

Saint Augustine was sent to England
by a good Bishop of Rome. This Bishop
had seen some beautiful children who
came from England, standing in the
He had asked who they

were ; and on being told that they were

market-place.

Angles, he said that if they were Chris-
tians, they would be not Angles, but
Angels. So he sent Saint Augustine to
England, that the Angles and Saxons
might learn to be Christians, and pray

no more to false gods.

VIII. ALFRED IN THE DANISH CAmpP.

The Danes were masters of England;
but Alfred felt sure he could drive them
out. He dressed himself like a harper
Then he took a harp, and
‘Tlie
Danish leader and his men were glad to

or musician.

went into the camp of the Danes.

hear Alfred sing and play. They did not
know who he was, or why he came to
their camp. Alfred saw that the Danes
had grown careless,—and soon he col-
lected an army, and beat them in a great
battle.



IX. THe WICKED QUEEN ELFRIDA.

After good King Alfred died, many

Saxon Kings ruled in England. At last
a youth named Edward was king. This
Edward had a wicked step-mother named
Elfrida, who hated him, because she
wanted her own son Ethelred to be King.
One day Edward came to see her at
Corfe Castle, where she lived. Then the
wicked Elfrida made one of her servants
stab Edward in the back with a dagger.
So he died; and the son of Elfrida be-
came King in his stead.

X. CANUTE AND HIS COURTIERS.

Canute was a wise King of England.
One day his Courtiers told him, to
flatter him, that he was Lord of the Land
and the Sea.
for speaking so foolishly, caused his chair

Canute, to reprove them

to be placed by the sea-shore, and told
But the

sea came up as usual and wetted him.

the waves not to wet his feet.

Then Canute reproved his foolish flat-
terers, and told them that no one but
God could say to the sea, “Thus far
shalt thou go, and no farther.”

—_——_ sss

XI. THE BatrLe or HAsTINGs.

After many years there were two men,
each of whom wished to be king of
England. One was a Saxon named
Harold, and the other was William, Duke
or ruler of Normandy, in France. Harold
made himself King. Then William came
to England with an army of Normans.
Near the town of Hastings a great battle
Harold was killed by an
arrow, and William became King of
He was called William the

was fought.

England.
First.

XII. Domespay Book.

When William the First became King
of England, he took away the lands of
the Saxons, and gave lands and houses
to his Norman soldiers, and many he
kept for himself. King William caused
a book to be written, called Domesday
Book.

estates in England, and the value of each

In it were the names of all the

was set down. The Saxons were very
angry at losing their lands; but William
punished them severely when they re-
belled.



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XIII. Tue CurFew.



King William was a hard man, and
treated his Saxon subjects unkindly. He
pulled down many houses to make a forest,
that he might hunt the deer; and he
was very cruel to all who offended him.
He made every one put out the fires in
the houses at eight o'clock at night.
This rule was called the Curfew law; and
at eight o'clock a bell was sounded, called
the curfew bell, and guards went round to
A curfew bell
is still rung in some villages.

see that all fires were out.

XIV. Tue Tower oF Lonpon.

William the First built many strong
castles. These castles had very thick
and heavy walls; and the King and his
barons lived in these castles, and were
guarded by many armed men, so that no
one could come in to hurt them. A very
strong castle was called the Tower of
London. It was built beside the river
Thames, and King William often lived
The Tower of London is still

standing, as strong as ever. Many kings

in it:

of England used it as a palace.

z

XV. QUEEN MATILDA AND HER TAPESTRY

William the Conqueror was married
to a princess named Matilda. In those
days ladies were very fond of working
and embroidering with the needle. The
work they made was called Tapestry ;
and they used to work not only patterns,
but pictures, which were hung up on the
walls of the rooms in the castles. Queen
Matilda and her ladies worked pictures,
showing the story of the Conquest of
England. ‘These pictures are still to be

seen at a town in France.

XVI. DeEatH oF WILLIAM THE SECOND.

When the Conqueror died, his second
son, who was also named William, be-
came king. This King William was
called Rufus or Red, because he had red
hair. He was a rough cruel king, and
was not kind to his people. He spent
most of his time in hunting. At last,
when he was one day chasing the deer,
he was killed by an arrow shot by a ser-
vant of his, named Walter Tyrrel.
Whether Tyrrel did this on purpose, or

by accident, is not known.



XVII. DUKE ROBERT GOES To PALESTINE

William the Second had no son. There-
fore, Duke Robert, his younger brother,
had the next right to be King of Eng-
land. But Robert had led a great army
to fight in Palestine, which is also called
the Holy Land, because our Saviour,
Jesus Christ, was born there; and Henry,
the youngest son of William the First,
took advantage of Robert’s being away to
make himself King of England. This
Henry ruled many years. He was called
Beauclerk, or ‘fine scholar.”

XVIII. WRECK OF THE “WHITE SHIP.”

Henry the First had a son named Wil-
liam, and Henry hoped this William
should be King after him. But once the
King was in Normandy, which also be-
longed to him, and the Prince was with
him. The King came back to England
ina ship; and the Prince, witha great
many friends, followed in another, called
the “White Ship.” The “White Ship”
ran on a rock, and the young Prince and
his friends were drowned. This was a

great grief to King Henry.



XIX. FLIGHT oF THE Empress MAUDE.

As Henry the First had no son except
the one who was drowned, he said that
his daughter, Maude, who had been mar-
ried to an Emperor of Germany, should
be Queen of England when he died. But
a nobleman, named Stephen, tried to
make himself King. He fought against
Maude, who once was taken prisoner.
But she managed to escape on a dark,
snowy night. At last, Stephen conquered,
and he kept the throne for himself till he
died.

XX. MurRpDER OF THOMAS A BECKET.

At last, Stephen died. “Then Tieniy,
the son of the Empress Maude, became
King of England. He was called Henry
the Second.
great man called Thomas a Becket. The
King made Becket Archbishop of Can-
terbury. But soon afterwards they quar-
relled.
please King Henry, went and murdered

In his time there lived a

Then some wicked nobles, to

Becket in the great church or cathedral at
Canterbury. The people were very angry
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XXI. RICHARD THE FIRST AND A LION.

King Richard the First, the son of
Henry the Second, wasa very brave man.
He went to the Holy Land with an army,
and showed great courage in many bat-
tles. At last, he wished to come home
to attend to affairs in England. Buta
German Duke caught him, and shut him
inadungeon. It is said that one daya
great lion was put into this dungeon, but
King Richard, who was a very strong

and powerful man, seized the lion boldly-

and killed him.

XXIII. DEATH oF RICHARD THE FIRST.

Richard the First was called the Lion-
hearted for his courage; but he was too
fond of war. He went to France, to fight
against a French noble who had offended
him ; and he was wounded by an arrow,
shot by an archer named Bertrand. The
father and brother of this Bertrand had
been killed by Richard.

trand was taken prisoner, Richard, who

So when Ber-

was dying from his wound, pardoned
him. But John, Richard’s brother, had
Bertrand killed.

XXII. BLONDEL AT RICHARD’S PRISON.

For a long time the people in England
did not know where King Richard was.
But, at last, a favourite musician of the
King’s, named Blondel, went from castle
to castle, playing and singing a song that
only he and the King knew. And when
he sang this song opposite the castle
where Richard was, the King answered
from his prison, and the English paid a
great deal of money to get their King
back. And when King Richard arrived,
there was great rejoicing in England.

XXIV. Kine JoHN AND MAGNA CHARTA.

John, Richard’s younger brother, was
the next King of England. He was a
very cruel man, and treated the English
badly. At last, the nobles would bear
John’s tyranny no longer. They wrote
down a number of rules, called the Magna
Charta, and made John put his name to
them, as a promise that he would keep
these rules and govern well. But soon he
was as bad as ever, and no one was sorry
when he died. Perhaps John was the

worst King who ever reigned in England.



XXV. Henry III. AND THE BARONS.

Henry the Third, the son of King
He did
not rule the kingdom of England well.

John, was a weak, foolish man.

His wife, a foreign Princess, brought
over many favourites from France, and
the King gave them much wealth. This
made the Barons very angry, and at last
many of them made war upon the King.
In the great battle of Evesham, King
and his
taken prisoners ; but Edward afterwards

Henry, son, Edward, were

escaped.

XXVI. PRINCE EDWARD AND HIS WIFE.

Prince Edward, Henry the Third’s
brave son, went to fight in the Holy
Land, as many valiant Knights were ac-
customed in those days todo. One day
he was wounded in the arm, with a dagger,
by a man who wanted to kill him. The
dagger had been dipped in poison; and
Edward would most likely have died if
his good wife, Eleanor, had not sucked
the poison from the wound in his arm,
This Prince Edward afterwards was a
very warlike King.



XXVII. Epwarp I. ATTACKS SCOTLAND.

After the weak King Henry was dead,
brave Prince Edward became King of
England. He conquered Wales, and
caused his son to be called Prince of
Wales.

Scotland also, and fought many battles

Afterwards he tried to conquer

there. But there was in Scotland a brave
Knight, named Sir William Wallace.
This Wallace fought so valiantly against
Edward, that for a long time he had the
advantage, and Scotland remained free, in
spite of the efforts of Edward.

XXVIII. WALLACE EXECUTED.

Edward the First was very angry that
Sir William Wallace should fight against
him, and determined to revenge himself.
At last, the brave Wallace was taken
And |
now Edward behaved very cruelly to him.

prisoner, and carried to London.

He caused Wallace to be condemned to
die as atraitor. And Wallace was dragged
on a hurdle to Smithfield, an open place
near London, and there hanged on a
gibbet.
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XXIX. DEATH oF PIERS GAVESTON.

Edward the Second, the son of Edward
the First, was not a warlike Prince. He
was foolish and slothful, and therefore
| the Barons despised him. He had a fa-
vourite,a Frenchman, named Piers Gave-
ston, who gave him bad advice. Gaveston
was sent out of England, but he returned,
and Edward was more fond of him than
ever. Then the Barons took up arms.
They made Gaveston prisoner, and cut
off his head on a hill near Warwick. At
last Edward was imprisoned and killed.

XXX, Tue Biack Prince at Crecy.

Edward the Third, the valiant son of
the weak Edward the Second, made war
against France. A great battle was fought
at a place in- France called Crécy. The
English King had a son, Edward, who
This Ed-
ward was quite young at the time of the
battle of Crécy. But he fought like a brave
Knight, and helped to gain the victory.
When the French had fled, the Prince came
and knelt to receive his father’s blessing.

was called the Black Prince.

Edward the Third was very proud of him.



XXXII. AFTER THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

At Crécy, the French army was much
greater in number than the English. The
victory was gained chiefly by the skill
and valour of the English archers. These
men had long bows of tough wood, and
shot their arrows with such force as to
drive them through the armour of their
foes. The English Knights and men-at-
arms pursued the French off the field,
and took as prisoners many great nobles
and dukes, who were afterwards obliged
to pay ransom. |

AX XII, BATTLE ar Porriers.

Ten years after the battle of Crécy,
another celebrated battle was fought in
France, at a place called Poitiers. At this
fight the Black Prince was the leader of
the English army. Here again the Eng-
lish were much fewer in number than the
French. But the Black Prince led them
so skilfully that they gained a complete
victory, and King John of France, who
led the French army, was obliged to yield
himself a prisoner to the Black Prince,
who brought him to England.



XXXIII. Ricuarp II. AppicaTEs.

The valiant Black Prince died before
his father. Therefore Richard, the son
of the Black Prince, became King of
England. He was foolish and weak. He
banished his cousin, Henry of Lancaster,
from England. But after a time Henry
returned, and managed to collect so many
friends in England, that he shut up
Richard in the Tower of London, and
compelled him to sign a parchment saying
that he would give up the throne. Then

Henry became King of England.

XXXIV. THE RED AND WHITE RosEs.

So Henry the Fourth reigned in Eng-
land; and after him his son and his grand-
son sat on the throne. But there were
many who said that Henry of Lancaster
and his descendants held the throne
wrongfully, for that the Duke of York's
family had the best right to it.

some Lords were quarrelling in a garden

One day

on this subject, and some who declared
they would serve the Duke of York took
white roses and wore them, and the friends
of the House of Lancaster wore red roses.



XXXV. THE WARS OF THE ROSES.

At a later time there was a great war in
England between the House of York and
the House of Lancaster; and this was
called the War of the Roses, because the
friends of the House of Lancaster were
known by the red roses they wore, and
those of the House of York by their
white roses. Many battles were fought,
and a great number of people were slain.
This was a civil war,—that is, a war in
which the people of a country fight on
opposite sides against each other.

XXXVI. THE BATTLE oF AGINCOURT.

King Henry the Fifth, the second mo-
narch of the House of Lancaster, was
very wild and headstrong in his youth ;
but when he became King he showed that
ie vled sam
army into France; for, like Edward the

he could be a great warrior.

Third, he declared he had a right to govern
that country. At Agincourt, not very far
from Crécy, a battle was fought. Before
the battle the English prayed for victory,
and they beat the French, and killed a

great number of them.



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FILE SIZE '50786' DFID 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDF' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files00001.pro'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' da5d0974918c7a07ecc49dd8ab13ffd4
'SHA-1' f717f0345014d7eedafdd898807551435c17a006
EVENT '2012-06-25T08:10:14-04:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'195' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDG' 'sip-filescover2.txt'
fb1ea8d58544fd5bfd2b3a8e196beb36
b027a4788bc0c986196cd2489dac7fc6233c3463
'2012-06-25T08:11:26-04:00'
describe
'8363324' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDH' 'sip-files00004.tif'
d74144ac7e3a5fa06be7092d7f142be0
a093e9c841ae5caaa444d0d89863867307eb45da
'2012-06-25T08:11:20-04:00'
describe
'132746' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDI' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
595a7255ca77d1242d666093c82e3456
9b2f68600b91bd91a1f5944c2faf0c6c402b444b
'2012-06-25T08:11:35-04:00'
describe
'2015' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDJ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
ed254090d6a2026276b4085bd6080025
646229bd00a66ff62014545212e458e6c2f47f19
'2012-06-25T08:10:37-04:00'
describe
'26515088' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDK' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
63f87e3591b08b03a5a544801923e7e6
cf5ee33606647362e9e4b81ae7da8f236dbbf82f
'2012-06-25T08:11:09-04:00'
describe
'49294' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDL' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
931f60dd35048c8ed853f9cb00842c5e
dad161ccca71977bad9ec22850d3b4aaf8d90d3e
'2012-06-25T08:10:03-04:00'
describe
'52374' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDM' 'sip-files00012.pro'
967a8cf4f6c62b346ef7cfdf02b32cdf
340d1a238464b506b2816796c06ec3b86bfbff0d
'2012-06-25T08:10:48-04:00'
describe
'377460' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDN' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
faabf140528d70d228c91e2ed5bdfb8b
a73de1217ce9d4d5df569da9a0fa80585fa27084
'2012-06-25T08:10:15-04:00'
describe
'1019136' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDO' 'sip-filesiv.jp2'
b50f49158a65a5e9a7abb4701f13370b
f6778fa17e41662041a363e94108c536ce4274a8
'2012-06-25T08:10:17-04:00'
describe
'367692' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDP' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
36043f4e54c189b7136f447c2a28e8cd
84d2d001d33c5bd5e5b1c608136def3d478c9171
'2012-06-25T08:11:41-04:00'
describe
'156052' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDQ' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
ab4b8d960dc4e4ce6408e3e13c942dcb
8dd0bafd93d21fa3b4252f8c3ca8f305c59d7d3f
'2012-06-25T08:10:07-04:00'
describe
'1032167' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDR' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
ddfc07ec1c975efa30c3198d699d826e
ca1cb8f23923c88e6029332ade6b148dd53791aa
'2012-06-25T08:10:28-04:00'
describe
'50180' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDS' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
f5ef4850b062c98bc1944b14c47be454
9a65ab3b3f42528a92c7fc9d066408127644e96f
'2012-06-25T08:11:25-04:00'
describe
'288310' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDT' 'sip-filescover3.jpg'
fb75aab31dacb57aa3961c58003b2011
9dfaa16e6c66e66c1dbe9d832f80be0ed03ed9ba
'2012-06-25T08:09:58-04:00'
describe
'626772' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDU' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
0f2758f2fa58bf3da22164fbba55ff48
1adf5a6f75ea62930b1cba956a523322f1dfd6bd
'2012-06-25T08:11:21-04:00'
describe
'1085818' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDV' 'sip-filescover4.jp2'
9d440e3504e324a8650ebc2da5dd6a68
779c18163c5c03cd4e1c562cf36779ca94f581e8
'2012-06-25T08:11:44-04:00'
describe
'1020517' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDW' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
4ac8ff69e6ec24a418238931482976a9
cf054d843643b4a4659f1de45d4391d5787b43f5
describe
'196' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDX' 'sip-filescover1.txt'
93d432c88464acc0eea9bb04b96fa059
a6fc44c45212c438df40becf33459022e8d9964f
'2012-06-25T08:11:40-04:00'
describe
'190998' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDY' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
737df2a1a6317b3449627bdfc3405957
251fe70f907a9a635dce6efb830d6bde04ec3ec6
'2012-06-25T08:10:59-04:00'
describe
'8260780' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCDZ' 'sip-files00005.tif'
ba626b87d3f0a97ace5e14e24be511ad
d8c7719e34b0785b1b01ba438e6c19ad7b1a98ba
'2012-06-25T08:11:22-04:00'
describe
'51149' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEA' 'sip-files00009.pro'
d074bdff0afdcb9758b62226c294c1fb
1979b6e7f4959ec47dc8141812ff8336b7f98927
'2012-06-25T08:11:45-04:00'
describe
'29069' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEB' 'sip-filesiithm.jpg'
dc084fbc67c3df774b8b43885f583d97
5f592465fb6c81e552d046a0e17e9c04c5b8c637
describe
'24949816' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEC' 'sip-files00002.tif'
32ad5e00d1bcd405418336216e71138e
1ea961dd3a63bfffcedaab0d32a307e2b010af9d
'2012-06-25T08:11:43-04:00'
describe
'8347456' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCED' 'sip-files00008.tif'
5e87f720c8824b0c4c1205a1750cdf34
c23fa029c0e72e1b9d30045547b2bf5ca9fa6ae1
'2012-06-25T08:11:46-04:00'
describe
'623977' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEE' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
99bbe3192cfd21aaac8077f5369bf199
d4b60645cf98b5573c5891504e8cfbddbfa56ae9
'2012-06-25T08:10:13-04:00'
describe
'51612' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEF' 'sip-files00008.pro'
4a57f97a40b1b3c82b467e72b13caa66
8c4cfb20064a6b52c96c56108d3e0850cfdead22
'2012-06-25T08:10:06-04:00'
describe
'1771' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEG' 'sip-filescover2.pro'
0d9626df911bf437c16068804b59438b
883230b5877206d5cac7e2dee6282fb9502df4ef
'2012-06-25T08:09:48-04:00'
describe
'18' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEH' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
e5a65c3b484b9b427c12592c5917f267
18a2eb6332b5ba3a5f257be2c451a47f4e2b43f4
describe
'1034387' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEI' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
db20ebfaf972c6d3b13593b4df007a2f
6743822eb857b75506aeaeaf37a02a85b52487ee
'2012-06-25T08:10:09-04:00'
describe
'77034' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEJ' 'sip-filesi.QC.jpg'
29ed0cb75898c4f14d285e9014a22d7b
5b57a3de934e1b0941eb30a60c2382c5e90b43ae
'2012-06-25T08:10:40-04:00'
describe
'1098353' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEK' 'sip-filescover2.jp2'
0f4f11f35878f1c91495bb4b26dd902b
558b8de1494e1b7e838dcd6bb52747fac9e93ff3
'2012-06-25T08:11:30-04:00'
describe
'793' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEL' 'sip-files00015.pro'
a81bc4b05ffccbd0e68fcc3c3fd9328e
816285ee1f6e80591545bf98ce89f24324d75118
describe
'623966' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEM' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
a3fdf014b3e82dbc8a8ace1ce5916694
4feee84c8a648fd58f5407e75815bf80ebbc900c
'2012-06-25T08:10:25-04:00'
describe
'132911' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEN' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
b6f69eb7ca65338b562ab3fe5e18fa1e
caa66a9dd9928ecd416c91db2c612953ff391a0b
'2012-06-25T08:11:04-04:00'
describe
'8160664' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEO' 'sip-filesv.tif'
d6ecd730f72e56a41d277e84967ed221
4bdb43b50c9e286bdfb353f14e0bc9960a915f3d
'2012-06-25T08:10:11-04:00'
describe
'423' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEP' 'sip-files00011.txt'
ad700024adb7663906741dc0a21a47ad
787fa0b3b3884ded88e2ad954d1fe2bb4df2f11f
'2012-06-25T08:09:57-04:00'
describe
'164792' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEQ' 'sip-filescover4.QC.jpg'
7c978f910527c55ad0dd22c94b5d505b
9c0dab31b40749b402506570c0f4aaca7d49c286
'2012-06-25T08:11:47-04:00'
describe
'26077656' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCER' 'sip-filescover4.tif'
58c9907a1f4ce618cd46c30fcd457bce
aac833d22d84ce7ace91e8445d647867a86bfd47
'2012-06-25T08:10:57-04:00'
describe
'368390' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCES' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
36667c5f13c0b54e443c55f9745790dc
c7230d6c5e16903655848f4c59184e4d5389428f
'2012-06-25T08:11:07-04:00'
describe
'24797920' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCET' 'sip-files00014.tif'
73698da432bd7237817c25db08c78c32
f37a8ef24188d0548f9a5a162a0add744e548353
'2012-06-25T08:09:54-04:00'
describe
'7787032' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEU' 'sip-filesii.tif'
31bce49c15f78ea2d95962387f2049ef
778996da85b235fbb147c0fd15102a4394b9805c
'2012-06-25T08:10:46-04:00'
describe
'104658' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEV' 'sip-filesv.QC.jpg'
def73d053c293574498de83685813b00
abc8696b5b7bf97b6b58bf5dd03da2b31eb9b87a
'2012-06-25T08:10:02-04:00'
describe
'630463' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEW' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
5758cf8345dac081360e258726454786
db08a1d92dbf60096c7d510299576d66b0b3bb6f
'2012-06-25T08:10:01-04:00'
describe
'50610' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEX' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
405529994c2e29fc62bf2c58f35a09e2
7c040edf9c99c13c1e5d3e71cbcec7705be686b1
'2012-06-25T08:10:51-04:00'
describe
'62' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEY' 'sip-files00002.txt'
9347f93b5db229f717665c18bed899a6
0ca6043e3be15b591fd8e237b0144654edcbb4bc
'2012-06-25T08:10:27-04:00'
describe
'39062' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCEZ' 'sip-filesUF00005253_00001.mets'
3bdb2d5db73fd988bd87c8ca03951a47
415361aac4f242f1b81e77ca7b2382d2ce2169b3
'2012-06-25T08:11:31-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'2013-12-09T23:52:29-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'529109' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFC' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
77ae3ec5d7dbafa3714ae68eaef815cb
8319657131361267cbd7b8777c60235ac0d38d9f
'2012-06-25T08:10:00-04:00'
describe
'307584' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFD' 'sip-filescover2.jpg'
d8e16beb717ed379d515dec4ef011910
38b6c30247a9cd6e93722f86952aae4e7603f28e
'2012-06-25T08:10:39-04:00'
describe
'573578' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFE' 'sip-filescover4.jpg'
99294d74cb5b2dae24ab66bf0fcc4cf4
ad8c88c87f0ee91721eec8c98372141c66903a28
describe
'215236' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFF' 'sip-filesi.jpg'
70855a9d231873205b3b1064355e9e1b
1b21b2a1d8c1adc546e13e1e76b3d2220143cf72
'2012-06-25T08:11:48-04:00'
describe
'156599' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFG' 'sip-filesii.jpg'
b1f00ca49c59193dcd80345238746065
9ccaa34d6f532a04d4ca06e53822c6784a1bfab0
'2012-06-25T08:10:26-04:00'
describe
'651413' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFH' 'sip-filesiii.jpg'
14dd4c9a40cae7afe654061f73a33a1e
0c47dc30ca744020972b890bfa131b14c444194d
describe
'177873' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFI' 'sip-filesiv.jpg'
6be4bcae31d8786d2bf2b9b0e98ee570
25ec201c636d1650ea049a2590f2e642eddca9a5
'2012-06-25T08:09:55-04:00'
describe
'330158' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFJ' 'sip-filesv.jpg'
5767d2af7a9ad18efaa6d66233ad19a4
ea857b83f48b298662c94cd95fa746cfc311a21e
'2012-06-25T08:10:36-04:00'
describe
'375193' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFK' 'sip-files00001.jpg'
88fcb4170dca23f04eef74a49e81fd83
079c11269f8a92897cb75da3c3eba0ddd1ffae60
'2012-06-25T08:10:33-04:00'
describe
'673233' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFL' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
d148a9a24f0eb6648ae3d278dbd5b8d1
3ca9a5a040e1446df6b097613ba50083731a4e9c
'2012-06-25T08:09:52-04:00'
describe
'373601' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFM' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
a9da154722b45e089b9712f89a0386d9
817c5e8ee5c52b8ee15a3f1a5f0a0c04b9086079
describe
'372534' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFN' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
9cb21a7b97206e96a298c072976d3d06
faa7fa2e99e1b70c143181af4afb3c2008678b82
'2012-06-25T08:10:35-04:00'
describe
'645411' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFO' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
902fa0b96598cfc2e95e1d48f2809164
fcd4e4e999de95bac97e541b4e913a15bcd0063b
describe
'643008' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
8aebbe11d91e7a5714e80c86d4105ce1
ba961d5a4cbf7fb3f3edf064797d9575b5772f83
'2012-06-25T08:11:32-04:00'
describe
'369973' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFQ' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
79c399c89c7b997bd8c2336c21e11635
5ab4c552005fdd9e85b90190e26151eed5fbed44
'2012-06-25T08:10:20-04:00'
describe
'615445' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFR' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
83659565dd0828e32d003c68240dc495
f4eec8496bde948adac537421c8c523e7d882a1d
'2012-06-25T08:10:08-04:00'
describe
'379921' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFS' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
ae6548f9a3ce46a53017d7546b946cfd
ecb1b2de604bd2f2f875833fcfd32857ea1a8d6d
'2012-06-25T08:11:37-04:00'
describe
'359368' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFT' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
2f7c1c4f14e4d2d3c558f16400cd1667
c4589367fee4f4cf6c7f36398934b314663eb743
'2012-06-25T08:11:10-04:00'
describe
'65773' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFU' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
16611d1af8c152e5e22d49ceceecdf55
ada710b691de3bfa898d7192b53f8dbdde4fd978
describe
'1103990' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFV' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
f333565874b52c1991a1b83c575844c9
989d9f406af750f736de1410c6ac418d89675139
'2012-06-25T08:10:50-04:00'
describe
'1099816' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFW' 'sip-filescover3.jp2'
916d33260a6c2c4c4821261b47babc5f
605e41959cc9ff38bc7259b225ba5c1be7aa3035
'2012-06-25T08:10:10-04:00'
describe
'967607' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFX' 'sip-filesi.jp2'
8569ad11bece9fe5cad881ce1ec543fc
fb49c81775247611595dbd65bea32e3459292a06
describe
'733007' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFY' 'sip-filesii.jp2'
48c7972276d99e904494f3656c7b6725
e20cd8bf6c8c841a88d810e9e740fe5227a1c9f5
'2012-06-25T08:10:24-04:00'
describe
'1000763' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCFZ' 'sip-filesiii.jp2'
d3f6cfc9f05e353788c1175caf00e1ed
0929e13750a67677e7aecb9144b71faa254882f6
describe
'1017538' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGA' 'sip-filesv.jp2'
bb7f29c947827db1b554425b337bb1fc
e8ee81ba87f09e4cbc8849b0882e4ecc098146b8
'2012-06-25T08:11:11-04:00'
describe
'1025623' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGB' 'sip-files00001.jp2'
650f682ee64368306bec4cdb1b65fcae
c4804968ea4231d5be9d2c39500ba7b9949f87d9
'2012-06-25T08:10:12-04:00'
describe
'1038552' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGC' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
41395e2119c17f3624c7dc267456c3e4
ea71d7d7973989d0df7da32abd944a3a8ef9257a
'2012-06-25T08:10:21-04:00'
describe
'1031405' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGD' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
bb979e6ad39a284c5ec8037b08149bdd
df7452ca332816d4220b8bb8013a131229bbddfb
describe
'1042587' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGE' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
9bd064a34bbe2dca0a1c14cd2fd9665b
19836b1933f9b0c4557ed8ab719b38e9a5a30311
describe
'1029812' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGF' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
15724c01c88bcca58d84b07ef61c5aa5
aaeaa2c84516bd270a441388e23fbe815927a392
'2012-06-25T08:11:01-04:00'
describe
'1026094' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGG' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
6bd4084b968dd4e1834bfab642c59409
9847363feff4a292d75ad13c4c235be96e138d42
'2012-06-25T08:11:17-04:00'
describe
'1041193' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGH' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
8fcb792ce0e40bec1596e84dced3b589
a4e4127a3d222b10dae24f3595a89f6fa46d1cdb
'2012-06-25T08:11:16-04:00'
describe
'1040628' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGI' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
8229415a05d2d129944bb1803a92284c
038f13904f90b18d879b929a5b2232db08032198
'2012-06-25T08:10:47-04:00'
describe
'1036375' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGJ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
3a1ee99e9fd957c3b316cc5184f9fd4d
fd282aaa74c3b30a946603e4f119f17c6e53efdb
describe
'1041326' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGK' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
2c820954e03e800a558e797b77e048ff
28e4c112ac274d6a48119070e43d36ae500327e9
describe
'1020119' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGL' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
ee48757b250f10d4a3a3d3e856e80136
4e64cad24f10d1e0c86619b7f27775820b04620d
'2012-06-25T08:11:27-04:00'
describe
'1045324' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGM' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
9732f19c7df1a83e24497035df650ea5
b15344938cf490ae58ca5024b0ba51ddc9d00654
'2012-06-25T08:11:02-04:00'
describe
'1020348' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGN' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
dc05c09af3c7f38d3698cb994e142a60
a79782e24136f7e5956a3e5331c38a9b10388441
describe
'1042695' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGO' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
57a8ececdc1abe14c39dc65460d4a729
543a4f06a2fa923a2f4323f81406afc0dd5b5a25
'2012-06-25T08:11:39-04:00'
describe
'26382464' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGP' 'sip-filescover2.tif'
4f5aacb87cb96c4da219d9167a499c8b
ada6042ae03fe49d14d01bf9119926264d6a8938
describe
'26416048' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGQ' 'sip-filescover3.tif'
2769ef4c23c3b955b36bf7bf169f46de
1d1c5e08ef92aa282c41766f70f92aeff6cfaf4a
'2012-06-25T08:10:44-04:00'
describe
'7760380' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGR' 'sip-filesi.tif'
e9d6e6dbcbd2d49a24a491bf6d1e9e55
79522544d59a7a125da3d46fa86b41dd3e9991b1
describe
'24044000' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGS' 'sip-filesiii.tif'
4dcdcd77aced51a2332a9f101e1fe375
1887930d91ab8a895125b2d8d09bd9995b0fe2f3
'2012-06-25T08:11:24-04:00'
describe
'8173180' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGT' 'sip-filesiv.tif'
ed3058a339d309b4a4492fbb9fbbe3e2
ad149ab60732fc8545fbd82592111a0cd378473a
'2012-06-25T08:10:29-04:00'
describe
'8228124' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGU' 'sip-files00001.tif'
73ef9c668223700bf1f3f2298708261e
25f92c93fe14104f80d44857c673ae5cec07032e
'2012-06-25T08:11:29-04:00'
describe
'24779148' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGV' 'sip-files00003.tif'
b9a689f95eb3a3c760234686ffcd1524
3ea22efa8d2dd273e4644c0d17ba50d969d5b01e
describe
'24650676' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGW' 'sip-files00006.tif'
339e34d7cfc1a5890d4a76e561d0aa49
358cbdbf22035db7a5021ccc33f517a1df4383a1
describe
'25011864' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGX' 'sip-files00007.tif'
9f20fd82408af392d38f49ad58b78913
e7df992b298a2f2d1f5f139d67a18d8a572f4ca4
'2012-06-25T08:11:34-04:00'
describe
'8313448' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGY' 'sip-files00009.tif'
c7803d886628525d0c51bee909708ae5
2ef2f0bcd2ea08dcb0ff25133f06f28d1ce2b192
'2012-06-25T08:11:12-04:00'
describe
'24850172' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCGZ' 'sip-files00010.tif'
1b57837537c2afea4d595cf04bdc1238
adea5489bbcc00c0bbde3330668d0520557d6fde
'2012-06-25T08:09:50-04:00'
describe
'25015336' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHA' 'sip-files00011.tif'
340a2807ad4a28964e332ab522e0f6b7
cd3698339fc8d8e9680d1fb788956a9da026817e
describe
'8183276' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHB' 'sip-files00012.tif'
6a1189b5caaebcf39f6b597a2cc6a671
519b5076c754ba0ab12ba4c9c15aaf73841b2aa4
'2012-06-25T08:10:31-04:00'
describe
'8186656' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHC' 'sip-files00013.tif'
25b11c57ecaab326a25596fb01ddb013
c95a04605fa0cc5fb849320f1d75da8f9305c959
describe
'25112808' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHD' 'sip-files00015.tif'
7e145be9e35121f63921964448f7d641
c855b62e8dbbd1944ffd016dc0448d12149481eb
'2012-06-25T08:11:15-04:00'
describe
'8185068' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHE' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f1ce01231f6c05459fba9b15a14d3964
824f883f8188cc1bbd4c6cd07bcb819a07619d9e
'2012-06-25T08:11:33-04:00'
describe
'8363668' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHF' 'sip-files00017.tif'
78fdcb1c6afbbaffa2bdb6a0b49e266a
1cd6fdb339aebdfa995d3ccbf60e953f482f947e
'2012-06-25T08:10:38-04:00'
describe
'3202292' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHG' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
ebb026e5b29fc738f15c33e1306f43a3
f860a69f43ceaeb0e384d33b9a2d5b515e9f7c4b
describe
'697' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHH' 'sip-filescover1.pro'
ed306f6580b6f07aac9ecf92a323ebce
ad6f69a4849214fe95bc6be16428ddb3070c4f87
'2012-06-25T08:11:18-04:00'
describe
'7071' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHI' 'sip-filesi.pro'
82b5902be1ec1653058cce647339f449
b0d8d37de78b1edd99abff721ef6b72a63ed8636
'2012-06-25T08:10:52-04:00'
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHJ' 'sip-filesii.pro'
b398b32f40e8573b475717278d1e260d
41016f0cc2cf53cbbf06a117828338f6cbbe45d9
'2012-06-25T08:10:58-04:00'
describe
'3108' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHK' 'sip-filesiii.pro'
260cd7f0bd5064e4f6fc79d084b8b5b6
4a37a7c9c3ad71e8675184ad0da04b97c83bdb13
'2012-06-25T08:11:36-04:00'
describe
'1876' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHL' 'sip-filesiv.pro'
7b07c6bc15c48a8509e33f356180ce47
f3393fb365adafce38952f46a91b6127c58ad891
'2012-06-25T08:10:19-04:00'
describe
'77346' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHM' 'sip-filesv.pro'
f39c29e30ece6f298b98f075e33a4424
352af90cc757297168ed35d9b45bc6cc2700b049
'2012-06-25T08:10:22-04:00'
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHN' 'sip-files00002.pro'
b845fa74e750bfac3d6d4d54a00436f3
14112086f3acbdea33e8e83717ab735654af9a68
'2012-06-25T08:11:38-04:00'
describe
'1467' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHO' 'sip-files00003.pro'
71f5ab1a944562e6e7f613901c01733b
07b7c837d11f34858f5c04da3e88933e1c24e609
describe
'50713' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHP' 'sip-files00004.pro'
e8867dc90b0dbcbae952651965afdc29
577f09a2885f9dc2dc4b867674cedbac86a9a7cc
'2012-06-25T08:10:42-04:00'
describe
'49149' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHQ' 'sip-files00005.pro'
c70a65266152a0ae13291e96bc76a097
c337d26e5e61fd92f51f1fc5bb7b51a6080c6408
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHR' 'sip-files00006.pro'
58ed8b5d83301cd11029345ba76b62e9
b62feba2fea8f01fbad98095aaa3bba700e97627
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHS' 'sip-files00007.pro'
4476deb5c21a137ebf38a78564ac5c41
588936ec2797c94a7f99ecfa5e2e283b83c13827
describe
'535' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHT' 'sip-files00010.pro'
2695f6b53e3c4c67135f3d9a4c176da6
b49de590ff331f896182b727d47aebe27912c7e1
describe
'1571' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHU' 'sip-files00011.pro'
aafe906de95b6d60a62ea287edbfef02
b206e300b9014e5b389e304181cc9ccf91e93937
describe
'50241' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHV' 'sip-files00013.pro'
4c0a9dda28f1d6c748b5e0de4610e9f7
c355efbdbc231f074c77e7e4d9bebdad2cfba018
describe
'3066' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHW' 'sip-files00014.pro'
7ec36b7c53fe3cbc11e89cea7723ef9d
18fc06c78785420ffc75c815fabba1b695c7906a
describe
'53087' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHX' 'sip-files00016.pro'
44356aa1b3fceaa56ef9ecec51aeffc3
0331dedeeb4fae3b66f1d6a99c5b308430bdba28
'2012-06-25T08:09:51-04:00'
describe
'52864' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHY' 'sip-files00017.pro'
6395e6a8350979aca58a4e1227212492
6b86fa3ff1aa9984865faa42d28645998fc3e934
describe
'804' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCHZ' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
25d19b24b0456ff0816b473cdabd1cab
f4172b534216db2ea83d798d712af89dbca9c799
describe
'303' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIA' 'sip-filesi.txt'
84ec12f72a78b685bda04cd8a8b4c5f8
05a69fe7b22078b32ce82aae7a92668001e78f05
describe
'87' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIB' 'sip-filesii.txt'
351bf54b1cc993f062239b8bdd2b113f
a3b15c9917c74034ab87a39e7d5a23f62019b26e
describe
'144' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIC' 'sip-filesiii.txt'
27ee59825bf2788e21f8f89f8a75af21
f1addca458ea001998d1cb2a25ec1c88967900fd
describe
'211' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCID' 'sip-filesiv.txt'
4c589e9f28f73f06b03798eee52d20fc
a1bd6fcd06e24f837c3748785ac76116ee893e6f
describe
'3514' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIE' 'sip-filesv.txt'
c84ea47cc2781b558fd397fab279628a
6f5349cdfc62e57a17671400888a38ce4286a052
describe
'1993' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIF' 'sip-files00001.txt'
fbaf42b4c037c01871cc8ed03fbe650e
7cef3956bd47a1a78bce564a99a7735caa630f83
'2012-06-25T08:09:56-04:00'
describe
'163' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIG' 'sip-files00003.txt'
75d3127450ad5340b66020514af1c6b6
ac46e8461e13cb193433a190a931e58755c8472f
describe
Invalid character
'1988' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIH' 'sip-files00004.txt'
56ad0f659a9e59c89d85a081eb1cd128
b6e975c73b672676276b4b41b2509235c62407b2
'2012-06-25T08:11:08-04:00'
describe
'1944' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCII' 'sip-files00005.txt'
4a4aa672f0c8ea2788e3634cddf274d0
5f68338d7370b0e712c0d3c8b15c6122118486cc
describe
'224' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIJ' 'sip-files00006.txt'
95e7a101b5d157d3cdb8bab42841d7d4
558a6ad8d971f9c96df3cfaef11f0d9238d54973
describe
'65' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIK' 'sip-files00007.txt'
9d11147c2571d26f885c4fec920b6d47
917cdbf9636f3f4771a3d354a88d5f3034f58517
describe
'1999' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIL' 'sip-files00009.txt'
4de47be4adf9e3a2174618ea6c7f7903
ca357083ae91e6b81d58ffb6f88151693b0b98e1
describe
'236' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIM' 'sip-files00010.txt'
01e5003c8aea1d5d76b00e46fad5d00a
4a429d4926979d0e5345361a9ccaaff016180863
describe
'2044' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIN' 'sip-files00012.txt'
2bdf89d34dc349909dff970922c82468
f861d425cb4a9e85a88b55e6c3e9ea54dbf6c7a1
'2012-06-25T08:10:49-04:00'
describe
'1972' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIO' 'sip-files00013.txt'
5336942256f384f2b2f6c48cee9d7cea
7ff059c65db7f210d2cad2a2f178debb12b4153e
describe
'668' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIP' 'sip-files00014.txt'
383e31a280583c9563d57955ffa1e62a
1b9e247c1539544657acaa039bac69f0c49733df
describe
Invalid character
'122' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIQ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
376d084ac5dfe4c01fd1642623bc72ae
71b29e0404a0cdcbfb38cf30727140490ce6e9da
describe
Invalid character
'2081' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIR' 'sip-files00016.txt'
6009c2acdeefa898d1b94fbb9057b88c
04197086e9d1b8f58da925646ec73395dc9fb991
describe
'2067' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIS' 'sip-files00017.txt'
9251eab3e847f8cfa8fe3751317373bf
1e8dd8d23d5fa7f664f0ff467bad9f276cd71013
describe
'59' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIT' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
e5b8c8384f2ff726d4654eb662438577
52553b95f157786f17ab6492da90337bc81101f5
describe
Invalid character
'54221' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIU' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
79356d6403934512b678af816cbe1338
3c269e3659a87fdfda21d7cc8b1c2621b75283a1
'2012-06-25T08:10:18-04:00'
describe
'50181' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIV' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
afc225f52f195b6f468f8dca0791212b
f7768ac84192489fdfbf0dec58d959adfbe72476
describe
'194326' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIW' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
12d34406db3968b5db4a11f4586ed0b1
3897d492cd8059094436fec909272cf501a96e67
describe
'98302' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIX' 'sip-filescover2.QC.jpg'
f1172500cfba32265565e2d103fefa22
bfe49d022048741c7d853ccce23f3ddb9311f957
'2012-06-25T08:10:16-04:00'
describe
'48661' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIY' 'sip-filesUF00005253_00001.xml'
55d668a813e72f6b3091550350f6bfa8
01261bd8ac6d9eaac2c974331c52c9f3be298187
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/sobekcm.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/sobekcm/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/sobekcm/'.
'130967' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCIZ' 'sip-files00001.QC.jpg'
5f4b5d73f99ab2c01f0b3f1b2ab440ea
d361933c669e0b9a5d8e0268342e78d6ccc0cf59
'2012-06-25T08:11:05-04:00'
describe
'49002' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCJA' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
cf0ec255d60bc0b576f879d5d1fd2947
f2faa86ef5c86adfb9301b1092a541491c127f5b
describe
'189686' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCJB' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
52de9138c749435ec0799a6c78e13f1e
b1fb0a73a1f726499e1ee839486d2d7b0c58d5da
'2012-06-25T08:10:53-04:00'
describe
'67976' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCJC' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
1fb6130eb77df3e8eb2b3c08cab06db7
2df6f364fa59805610edae3aac91a32a07d49bd2
'2012-06-25T08:10:55-04:00'
describe
'204146' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCJD' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
46d1939fb2d1ebb85b257301835a2630
d6892af4f27a13168b4ac74d1ea9b1f67305e1fc
describe
'72627' 'info:fdaE20100609_AAAARLfileF20100609_AABCJE' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
8d7accbaa478cd6dadfc0ce9973f4d65
bac2fdcf9c5079723fef85bd2d6d48004dee794b
describe
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The Baldwin Library »

University

of
Florida

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Ga Ci igiins

OF

RING terse tres? Or y

FROM THEABARLIEST JIMES IO THE

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Wig NINE CY a Reeeee TUNES.

RENE DIN COLOURS BY TKR ONEREAIMVE



LONDON:
GEORGE ROUMEEDGE AND. SONS,

THE BROADWAY, LUDGATE.

NEW YORK: 416, BROOME STREET.






nC he) heads

ENGLISH HISTORY.



LONDON :
PRINTED BY J. OGDEN AND CO.,

172, ST. JOHN STREET, E.C.




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Tele

Tele

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VI.
AVAITBTE,
IDK

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xr
XIII.
XIV.
Xai
XVI.
XVII.
XVIII.
XIX,

XX.

XXI.
XXII.
XOX Is
XXIV.
XXV,
XXVI.

XXVII.

xexaValilite
XXIX,
XXX.
XX XI.
XXXII.
XXXII.
XXXIV.
XXXV.
XXXVI.
XXXVII.

XXXVIII.

XXXIX.

».G103

ExaIeNlis
XLII.
XE TI:

XLV.
XLV.
XLVI,

CONTENTS

DRUIDS, OR BRITISH PRIESTS.

AN ANCIENT BRITON IN HIS BOAT,
THE ROMANS CONQUER BRITAIN.
BOADICEA AND HER ARMY.

SAINT AUGUSTINE AND THE SAXONS.

THE POPE AND THE SAXON CHILDREN.

KING ALFRED AND THE CAKES.
ALFRED IN THE DANISH CAMP.
THE WICKED QUEEN ELFRIDA.
CANUTE AND HIS COURTIERS.
THE BATTLE OF HASTINGS.
DOMESDAY BOOK.

THE CURFEW.

THE TOWER OF LONDON.

QUEEN MATILDA AND HER TAPESTRY.
DEATH OF WILLIAM THE SECOND.
DUKE ROBERT GOES TO PALESTINE.
WRECK OF THE “WHITE SHIP.”
FLIGHT OF THE EMPRESS MAUDE.
MURDER OF THOMAS A BECKET.
RICHARD THE FIRST AND A LION.
BLONDEL AT RICHARD’S PRISON.
DEATH OF RICHARD THE FIRST,
KING JOHN AND MAGNA CHARTA,
HENRY III. AND THE BARONS.
PRINCE EDWARD AND HIS WIFE.
EDWARD I. ATTACKS SCOTLAND.
WALLACE EXECUTED.

DEATH OF PIERS GAVESTON.
THE BLACK PRINCE AT CRECY.
AFTER THE BATTLE OF CRECY.
BATTLE AT POICTIERS.

RICHARD II. ABDICATES.

THE RED AND WHITE ROSES.
THE WARS OF THE ROSES.

THE BATTLE OF AGINCOURT.
MARRIAGE OF HENRY V.

BATTLE OF TEWKESBURY.

THE FIRST ENGLISH PRINTER.
MURDER OF THE LITTLE PRINCES.
DEATH OF RICHARD THE THIRD.
MARRIAGE OF HENRY SEVENTH.
FIELD OF THE CLOTH OF GOLD.
CARDINAL WOLSEY.

KING EDWARD THE SIXTH.
EXECUTION OF LADY JANE GREY.





XLVII.

XLVIII.
XLIX.
L.

HENE

TET
eel
TET

1D

LVI.

Te Alelis
LVIII.
EDX,
LX.
LXI.
LXII.
LXIII.
LXIV.
IEXGVE

LXVI.

TexXavsiile
LXVIII.
LXIX,
LXX.
LXXI.
LXXII.
LXXIII.
LXXIV.
LXXV.
LXXVI.
LXXVII.
LXXVIII.
LXXIX.
LXXxX.
LXXXI.
LXXXII.
LXXXIII.
LXXXIV.
LXXXV.

LXXXVI.

LXXXVII.
LXXXVIII.
LXXXIX,

xe,
Dale
XCII.

DEATH OF RIDLEY AND LATIMER.
THE BURNING OF CRANMER.
QUEEN ELIZABETH’S ACCESSION.
EXECUTION OF MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS.
THE SPANISH ARMADA.

QUEEN ELIZABETH AND SHAKSPEARE.
THE CAPTURE OF GUY FAWKES.
THE MURDER OF BUCKINGHAM.
EXECUTION OF LORD STAFFORD.
THE DEATH OF JOHN HAMPDEN.
THE BATTLE OF NASEBY.
EXECUTION OF CHARLES I.
CROMWELL TURNS OUT PARLIAMENT.
DEFEAT OF THE DUTCH FLEET.
CHARLES II. AND GENERAL MONK.
THE GREAT PLAGUE OF 1665.
GREAT FIRE OF LONDON (1666).
LorpD W. RUSSELL CONDEMNED.
LANDING OF WILLIAM OF ORANGE.
THE BATTLE OF THE BOYNE.

THE DUKE OF MARLBOROUGH.
THE BATTLE OF CULLODEN.
CLIVE’S VICTORIES IN INDIA.
DEATH OF GENERAL WOLFE.
CORONATION OF GEORGE III.
BURKE, THE GREAT ORATOR.
Lorp HoweE’s VICTORY.

CAPTURE OF SERINGAPATAM.
ABERCROMBIE IN EGYPT.

THE BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR.
DEATH OF SIR JOHN MOORE.
WELLINGTON AT MADRID.

THE CHESAPEAKE AND SHANNON.
THE BATTLE OF WATERLOO.
NAPOLEON IN THE BELLEROPHON.
CORONATION OF GEORGE IV.

THE REFORM BILL.

CORONATION OF VICTORIA.
MARRIAGE OF QUEEN VICTORIA.
BAPTISM OF THE PRINCE OF WALES.
GREAT EXHIBITION OF 1851.
BATTLE OF THE ALMA.

THE SIEGE OF SEBASTOPOL.

THE BATTLE OF INKERMANN.

THE RELIEF OF LUCKNOW.

THE VOLUNTEER REVIEW.
I. Druips, or BritisH PRIEsTs.

The people who lived in England many
hundreds of years ago were called Britons.
They did not know the one true God,
but were heathens. They had priests
whom they called Druids. These Druids
wore long, white garments, and lived in
the forests. They also wore ornaments
of gold, and wreaths of oak-leaves on
their heads ; and the people treated them
with great respect, and believed what
they said; for they thought them very

wise.

II. An ANCIENT BRITON IN His Boar.

The old Britons were savage people.

' Many of them wore no clothes, but painted

their bodies blue, with the juice of a plant
called woad. They had little boats called
coracles, made of basket-work, covered
with skins. In these boats they went
out fishing on the broad rivers that ran
through their country. In some parts of
Britain the people were not so savage as
in the others, but wore clothes, kept
herds of cattle, and had good strong wea-

pons for battle.



III. THE Romans Conquer BrirTAin.

The Romans were a mighty nation. —

After fighting in many countries, their
army came to conquer Britain.
name of the leader was Julius Cesar.
It was from France the Roman ships
of war came to Britain.
vent the Romans from landing. They
were armed with swords, spears, and
shields ; and they had also war-chariots,
with sharp blades fastened to the wheels,

and fine horses to draw them.

ane.

The Britons
soon came together on the shore to pre- |

IV. BoADICEA AND HER ARMY.

Though the Britons fought bravely,
the Romans conquered them at last.
But the Britons wanted to be free. They
had a queen named Boadicea, who had
two daughters. The
Boadicea and her daughters very badly.

Romans treated

So Boadicea got together a great army
to. drive the Romans out of the country.
But the Romans beat her army, and
Boadicea killed herself, to avoid being
made a prisoner, and ill-treated by the

Roman conquerors.


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V. SAINT AUGUSTINE AND THE SAXONS,

After governing Britain for hundreds
of years, the Romans gave up the country
and went away. Then there came across
the sea some nations called Angles,
Jutes and Saxons. They founded seven
kingdoms in Britain. The Saxons were
heathens, until a good man, Saint Augus-
tine, came over to Kent, and taught
Ethelbert the king and his people to
know the Lord, and the Saviour, Jesus
Christ.

became Christians.

And in time all the Saxons

VII. Kinc ALFRED AND THE CAKES.

Alfred was a great and good Saxon
King. Inhis time fierce warriors, called
Danes, came to England in ships. Alfred
was obliged to hide from these enemies.
He lived for a time in a farmer’s house,
The farm-
er’s wife set him to watch some cakes
that were baking. Alfred let the cakes

burn; and the farmer’s wife, who did

and no one knew who he was.

not know he was the king, gave him a
good scolding. She said he could eat
cakes, but was too lazy to watch them.

VI.THE POPE AND THE SAXON CHILDREN.

Saint Augustine was sent to England
by a good Bishop of Rome. This Bishop
had seen some beautiful children who
came from England, standing in the
He had asked who they

were ; and on being told that they were

market-place.

Angles, he said that if they were Chris-
tians, they would be not Angles, but
Angels. So he sent Saint Augustine to
England, that the Angles and Saxons
might learn to be Christians, and pray

no more to false gods.

VIII. ALFRED IN THE DANISH CAmpP.

The Danes were masters of England;
but Alfred felt sure he could drive them
out. He dressed himself like a harper
Then he took a harp, and
‘Tlie
Danish leader and his men were glad to

or musician.

went into the camp of the Danes.

hear Alfred sing and play. They did not
know who he was, or why he came to
their camp. Alfred saw that the Danes
had grown careless,—and soon he col-
lected an army, and beat them in a great
battle.
IX. THe WICKED QUEEN ELFRIDA.

After good King Alfred died, many

Saxon Kings ruled in England. At last
a youth named Edward was king. This
Edward had a wicked step-mother named
Elfrida, who hated him, because she
wanted her own son Ethelred to be King.
One day Edward came to see her at
Corfe Castle, where she lived. Then the
wicked Elfrida made one of her servants
stab Edward in the back with a dagger.
So he died; and the son of Elfrida be-
came King in his stead.

X. CANUTE AND HIS COURTIERS.

Canute was a wise King of England.
One day his Courtiers told him, to
flatter him, that he was Lord of the Land
and the Sea.
for speaking so foolishly, caused his chair

Canute, to reprove them

to be placed by the sea-shore, and told
But the

sea came up as usual and wetted him.

the waves not to wet his feet.

Then Canute reproved his foolish flat-
terers, and told them that no one but
God could say to the sea, “Thus far
shalt thou go, and no farther.”

—_——_ sss

XI. THE BatrLe or HAsTINGs.

After many years there were two men,
each of whom wished to be king of
England. One was a Saxon named
Harold, and the other was William, Duke
or ruler of Normandy, in France. Harold
made himself King. Then William came
to England with an army of Normans.
Near the town of Hastings a great battle
Harold was killed by an
arrow, and William became King of
He was called William the

was fought.

England.
First.

XII. Domespay Book.

When William the First became King
of England, he took away the lands of
the Saxons, and gave lands and houses
to his Norman soldiers, and many he
kept for himself. King William caused
a book to be written, called Domesday
Book.

estates in England, and the value of each

In it were the names of all the

was set down. The Saxons were very
angry at losing their lands; but William
punished them severely when they re-
belled.
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London.


XIII. Tue CurFew.



King William was a hard man, and
treated his Saxon subjects unkindly. He
pulled down many houses to make a forest,
that he might hunt the deer; and he
was very cruel to all who offended him.
He made every one put out the fires in
the houses at eight o'clock at night.
This rule was called the Curfew law; and
at eight o'clock a bell was sounded, called
the curfew bell, and guards went round to
A curfew bell
is still rung in some villages.

see that all fires were out.

XIV. Tue Tower oF Lonpon.

William the First built many strong
castles. These castles had very thick
and heavy walls; and the King and his
barons lived in these castles, and were
guarded by many armed men, so that no
one could come in to hurt them. A very
strong castle was called the Tower of
London. It was built beside the river
Thames, and King William often lived
The Tower of London is still

standing, as strong as ever. Many kings

in it:

of England used it as a palace.

z

XV. QUEEN MATILDA AND HER TAPESTRY

William the Conqueror was married
to a princess named Matilda. In those
days ladies were very fond of working
and embroidering with the needle. The
work they made was called Tapestry ;
and they used to work not only patterns,
but pictures, which were hung up on the
walls of the rooms in the castles. Queen
Matilda and her ladies worked pictures,
showing the story of the Conquest of
England. ‘These pictures are still to be

seen at a town in France.

XVI. DeEatH oF WILLIAM THE SECOND.

When the Conqueror died, his second
son, who was also named William, be-
came king. This King William was
called Rufus or Red, because he had red
hair. He was a rough cruel king, and
was not kind to his people. He spent
most of his time in hunting. At last,
when he was one day chasing the deer,
he was killed by an arrow shot by a ser-
vant of his, named Walter Tyrrel.
Whether Tyrrel did this on purpose, or

by accident, is not known.
XVII. DUKE ROBERT GOES To PALESTINE

William the Second had no son. There-
fore, Duke Robert, his younger brother,
had the next right to be King of Eng-
land. But Robert had led a great army
to fight in Palestine, which is also called
the Holy Land, because our Saviour,
Jesus Christ, was born there; and Henry,
the youngest son of William the First,
took advantage of Robert’s being away to
make himself King of England. This
Henry ruled many years. He was called
Beauclerk, or ‘fine scholar.”

XVIII. WRECK OF THE “WHITE SHIP.”

Henry the First had a son named Wil-
liam, and Henry hoped this William
should be King after him. But once the
King was in Normandy, which also be-
longed to him, and the Prince was with
him. The King came back to England
ina ship; and the Prince, witha great
many friends, followed in another, called
the “White Ship.” The “White Ship”
ran on a rock, and the young Prince and
his friends were drowned. This was a

great grief to King Henry.



XIX. FLIGHT oF THE Empress MAUDE.

As Henry the First had no son except
the one who was drowned, he said that
his daughter, Maude, who had been mar-
ried to an Emperor of Germany, should
be Queen of England when he died. But
a nobleman, named Stephen, tried to
make himself King. He fought against
Maude, who once was taken prisoner.
But she managed to escape on a dark,
snowy night. At last, Stephen conquered,
and he kept the throne for himself till he
died.

XX. MurRpDER OF THOMAS A BECKET.

At last, Stephen died. “Then Tieniy,
the son of the Empress Maude, became
King of England. He was called Henry
the Second.
great man called Thomas a Becket. The
King made Becket Archbishop of Can-
terbury. But soon afterwards they quar-
relled.
please King Henry, went and murdered

In his time there lived a

Then some wicked nobles, to

Becket in the great church or cathedral at
Canterbury. The people were very angry
at the murder of Becket.












FÂ¥ronheim & Cain

London,
3
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XXI. RICHARD THE FIRST AND A LION.

King Richard the First, the son of
Henry the Second, wasa very brave man.
He went to the Holy Land with an army,
and showed great courage in many bat-
tles. At last, he wished to come home
to attend to affairs in England. Buta
German Duke caught him, and shut him
inadungeon. It is said that one daya
great lion was put into this dungeon, but
King Richard, who was a very strong

and powerful man, seized the lion boldly-

and killed him.

XXIII. DEATH oF RICHARD THE FIRST.

Richard the First was called the Lion-
hearted for his courage; but he was too
fond of war. He went to France, to fight
against a French noble who had offended
him ; and he was wounded by an arrow,
shot by an archer named Bertrand. The
father and brother of this Bertrand had
been killed by Richard.

trand was taken prisoner, Richard, who

So when Ber-

was dying from his wound, pardoned
him. But John, Richard’s brother, had
Bertrand killed.

XXII. BLONDEL AT RICHARD’S PRISON.

For a long time the people in England
did not know where King Richard was.
But, at last, a favourite musician of the
King’s, named Blondel, went from castle
to castle, playing and singing a song that
only he and the King knew. And when
he sang this song opposite the castle
where Richard was, the King answered
from his prison, and the English paid a
great deal of money to get their King
back. And when King Richard arrived,
there was great rejoicing in England.

XXIV. Kine JoHN AND MAGNA CHARTA.

John, Richard’s younger brother, was
the next King of England. He was a
very cruel man, and treated the English
badly. At last, the nobles would bear
John’s tyranny no longer. They wrote
down a number of rules, called the Magna
Charta, and made John put his name to
them, as a promise that he would keep
these rules and govern well. But soon he
was as bad as ever, and no one was sorry
when he died. Perhaps John was the

worst King who ever reigned in England.
XXV. Henry III. AND THE BARONS.

Henry the Third, the son of King
He did
not rule the kingdom of England well.

John, was a weak, foolish man.

His wife, a foreign Princess, brought
over many favourites from France, and
the King gave them much wealth. This
made the Barons very angry, and at last
many of them made war upon the King.
In the great battle of Evesham, King
and his
taken prisoners ; but Edward afterwards

Henry, son, Edward, were

escaped.

XXVI. PRINCE EDWARD AND HIS WIFE.

Prince Edward, Henry the Third’s
brave son, went to fight in the Holy
Land, as many valiant Knights were ac-
customed in those days todo. One day
he was wounded in the arm, with a dagger,
by a man who wanted to kill him. The
dagger had been dipped in poison; and
Edward would most likely have died if
his good wife, Eleanor, had not sucked
the poison from the wound in his arm,
This Prince Edward afterwards was a
very warlike King.



XXVII. Epwarp I. ATTACKS SCOTLAND.

After the weak King Henry was dead,
brave Prince Edward became King of
England. He conquered Wales, and
caused his son to be called Prince of
Wales.

Scotland also, and fought many battles

Afterwards he tried to conquer

there. But there was in Scotland a brave
Knight, named Sir William Wallace.
This Wallace fought so valiantly against
Edward, that for a long time he had the
advantage, and Scotland remained free, in
spite of the efforts of Edward.

XXVIII. WALLACE EXECUTED.

Edward the First was very angry that
Sir William Wallace should fight against
him, and determined to revenge himself.
At last, the brave Wallace was taken
And |
now Edward behaved very cruelly to him.

prisoner, and carried to London.

He caused Wallace to be condemned to
die as atraitor. And Wallace was dragged
on a hurdle to Smithfield, an open place
near London, and there hanged on a
gibbet.
bered as a hero.

But he will always be remem-




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XXIX. DEATH oF PIERS GAVESTON.

Edward the Second, the son of Edward
the First, was not a warlike Prince. He
was foolish and slothful, and therefore
| the Barons despised him. He had a fa-
vourite,a Frenchman, named Piers Gave-
ston, who gave him bad advice. Gaveston
was sent out of England, but he returned,
and Edward was more fond of him than
ever. Then the Barons took up arms.
They made Gaveston prisoner, and cut
off his head on a hill near Warwick. At
last Edward was imprisoned and killed.

XXX, Tue Biack Prince at Crecy.

Edward the Third, the valiant son of
the weak Edward the Second, made war
against France. A great battle was fought
at a place in- France called Crécy. The
English King had a son, Edward, who
This Ed-
ward was quite young at the time of the
battle of Crécy. But he fought like a brave
Knight, and helped to gain the victory.
When the French had fled, the Prince came
and knelt to receive his father’s blessing.

was called the Black Prince.

Edward the Third was very proud of him.



XXXII. AFTER THE BATTLE OF CRECY.

At Crécy, the French army was much
greater in number than the English. The
victory was gained chiefly by the skill
and valour of the English archers. These
men had long bows of tough wood, and
shot their arrows with such force as to
drive them through the armour of their
foes. The English Knights and men-at-
arms pursued the French off the field,
and took as prisoners many great nobles
and dukes, who were afterwards obliged
to pay ransom. |

AX XII, BATTLE ar Porriers.

Ten years after the battle of Crécy,
another celebrated battle was fought in
France, at a place called Poitiers. At this
fight the Black Prince was the leader of
the English army. Here again the Eng-
lish were much fewer in number than the
French. But the Black Prince led them
so skilfully that they gained a complete
victory, and King John of France, who
led the French army, was obliged to yield
himself a prisoner to the Black Prince,
who brought him to England.
XXXIII. Ricuarp II. AppicaTEs.

The valiant Black Prince died before
his father. Therefore Richard, the son
of the Black Prince, became King of
England. He was foolish and weak. He
banished his cousin, Henry of Lancaster,
from England. But after a time Henry
returned, and managed to collect so many
friends in England, that he shut up
Richard in the Tower of London, and
compelled him to sign a parchment saying
that he would give up the throne. Then

Henry became King of England.

XXXIV. THE RED AND WHITE RosEs.

So Henry the Fourth reigned in Eng-
land; and after him his son and his grand-
son sat on the throne. But there were
many who said that Henry of Lancaster
and his descendants held the throne
wrongfully, for that the Duke of York's
family had the best right to it.

some Lords were quarrelling in a garden

One day

on this subject, and some who declared
they would serve the Duke of York took
white roses and wore them, and the friends
of the House of Lancaster wore red roses.



XXXV. THE WARS OF THE ROSES.

At a later time there was a great war in
England between the House of York and
the House of Lancaster; and this was
called the War of the Roses, because the
friends of the House of Lancaster were
known by the red roses they wore, and
those of the House of York by their
white roses. Many battles were fought,
and a great number of people were slain.
This was a civil war,—that is, a war in
which the people of a country fight on
opposite sides against each other.

XXXVI. THE BATTLE oF AGINCOURT.

King Henry the Fifth, the second mo-
narch of the House of Lancaster, was
very wild and headstrong in his youth ;
but when he became King he showed that
ie vled sam
army into France; for, like Edward the

he could be a great warrior.

Third, he declared he had a right to govern
that country. At Agincourt, not very far
from Crécy, a battle was fought. Before
the battle the English prayed for victory,
and they beat the French, and killed a

great number of them.
t
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we ae.

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