Citation
Child's illustrated gift book

Material Information

Title:
Child's illustrated gift book
Spine title:
Child's gift book
Added title page title:
Pictorial gift for the little ones
Added title page title:
Boys and girls' book of songs & ballads
Added title page title:
Children's scrap book
Creator:
Walker, James P ( James Perkins ), 1829-1868
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Illustrator )
Evans, Edmund, 1826-1905 ( Engraver )
Avery, Samuel Putnam, 1822-1904 ( Engraver )
Jocelyn, Albert H ( Engraver )
Orr, Nathaniel ( Engraver )
Richardson & Cox ( Engraver )
Lossing & Barritt ( Engraver )
Leavitt & Allen ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Leavitt & Allen
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1866
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (various pagings) : col. ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Picture books for children ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's poetry -- 1866 ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes -- 1866 ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations -- 1866 ( local )
Bldn -- 1866
Genre:
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Nursery rhymes ( rbgenr )
Hand-colored illustrations ( local )
poetry ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Cover title.
General Note:
Three books with the same publisher and same publishing date bound together with a collective title on cover; each has independent t.p. and pagination with irregular page order.
General Note:
All p. have hand-colored ill. and text within triple-ruled border.
General Note:
Illustrations variously signed by Avery, Richardson & Cox, J.W. Orr, E. Evans, Lossing-Barritt, H. Weir, and Jocelyn.
General Note:
Illustrations are hand-colored.
General Note:
Without music.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA5902 ( LTQF )
ALG5363 ( NOTIS )
49230759 ( OCLC )
026662449 ( AlephBibNum )

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I’ve just returned from Milford Fair,
And I tell you, children, I saw there
Many things that would make you stare:
° Trumpets, flags, and guns,
Bats and balls, and sugar plums,
Horses of tin, and woolly sheep,
Little toy banks, your money to keep,
Punch and Judy, and Noah’s ark, | :
Pigs that would squeal, and dogs that could bark,
And more things else than I could tell,
Or you remember very well. |





Old Druid is so fierce and strong,

We keep him chained the whole day long ;
But when night comes we let him free,

To keep away the thieves, you see.

eee oO —

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—

These little puppies are trying hard How full of grace
To get up a frolic with the hens in the yard. Is this little vase !







Be off to your den, you thievish fox,
| Unless you wish to be pelted with rocks.







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| See the sea within the C!
| And a vessel, too, there seems man fell asleep !
to be. | He must be a useful servant to |
keep.
A}
ie understand this singular matter, While no one is nigh
The — is asking the pump for The mouse eats the pie.
water.





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‘Wonderful boy,”
With the gold of whose genius

Was base alloy.
More you shall know,

When you older grow.





Here died CHATTERTON,
ish to employ this man

To do a hard job, that no other can.

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This house, near the Lake, stands all alone,
A peaceful, quict mountain home.

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Rosa has just received a letter, This little boy has got a sword,
And nothing could have pleased her And thinks himself as errand as
better. | a lord.







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The arrival “at London of the Queen. of
Causes all this trouble and crowd. .

Oude







































I hope these boys were not hurt by their fall;
Only a little bruised, that’s all.












Nel hd 4,
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The treasures of ocean who can tell?

2 Tts stores of coral, pearls, and shell,
b Beautiful “ weeds,” that rival the flowers

Growing within our garden bowers!

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Though old, and feeble, and nearly blind,
This good man is cheerful, gentle, and kind.

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I hope they will do all



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He took excellent care of Lido.

A good old dog was Fido,
All who saw them sai





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That’s right, * > %
Fly your kite;
Let it sail away,
There’s a good breeze to-day.

G ily tripping, heel and toe,
errily round and round we go.



Don’t disturb those birds, my boy,
"Twill give them pain, and you no joy.





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The Ostrich is very strong and fleet, A dangerous neighbor, I should

But its head is about the size of its fect, | SAY,

So it doesn’t know much, as I suppose And wish myself safely out of
you ve heard, his way.

And is generally called “the stupid bird.”







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Uncle expends his ample means
In buying all sorts of queer machines ;

With which, when we go to spend the day,
He very kindly lets us play. 7

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A pavilion in Turkey is called a Avosk,
And a building like this above, a Mosque.













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Both stoled priest and mailed knight,
Possess much power for wrong or right.



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“Laugh, little baby, laugh and crow, This little woman looks so very sad,
Nothing like laughing to make you grow!”" I guess she wants something that
can’t be had.

ca Lah Se

18





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These wandering negroes and their African wives
Never saw a white face, before, in their lives.

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Ah! a regal crown is a olittering thing ;
*Tis said even Cromwell wished to be King.



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These travellers have stopped for refreshment and rest,
And the peasants kindly bring their best.



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The Chameleon this, and I believe I must mend my pen,
A homelier animal doesn’t breathe. I can’t write till then.







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Great delight these people take,
Sailing upon this beautiful lake.









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Jane reads and mother sews,
Thus happily the time goes.

a

Mercury—A messenger was he
Speeding over land and sea.

21

























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Come, children, come and choose,







Which you prefer of these Arctic |
views.

The Arctic regions, you don’t need
to be told,

Have a bitter climate, which is fear-
fully cold.

Iccbergs, these masses of ice they
call,



a As large as a mountain, and nearly

chy TUL WANN
\y if ny Na Sh i
\\\ \\ ‘\" \i gta iN \ ‘ \ We Ns AN iy as tall. G
Ny at weal Wi i i ay " \) nN Wh,

The days and nights are six months
long ;

There are huge polar bears, fierce
and strong.

I think we should be happy and,
glad, don't you?

We were not born there, but live

where we do.









This man is earnestly seeking for work ;

You see he is neither a beggar nor shirk.

\

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The fruit of the Palm is delicious

to eat,
While its leaves are useful to

shield from heat.









WWYGSL Ye
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PEEL,

! 25 OP RGB ERIE YR:
le rote iene grapes cove eee



a! — — oes aso eee —

The smallest child you see is undrest,
And goes to bed first, ’cause he needs

most rest.

| AOR RSE PE NEEL BEC








































































Ce



“Open the lattice and take in this plant;”
“T would, but you see it’s locked, and I
Came

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SNV.OBR. BS. VHS

——-

Niger to

ESET LE EG AAT OR, PLE COP SIRE CRO ue GE ED EAU LORRI WRG MST RETRE SMROE O7 OE SS FRA A RR Ee Pi ORE EER, Ciro BEL NR eI SB A RT EE AEE SLT BUREN REA TL ATLA al lth ES.

It greatly delights this worthy-pair
To breathe the pure, sweet country air.



ae



Besides the tulips growing here, A little study every day, 4
There’s a greenhouse full of flowers A little work, a little play,
near. Plain hearty food and sleep enough,

Makes your mind clear, your body tough.





a a ee ee es ee Ea I a aT SS eS aE SE ETON SUE ELUNE
ad TNL eA OTS SRT PA RULE TLE ETI APT SBA SALEEM REN i RNY RI dh A OTT EY ATRL 2 SN ED ON RATT SIR DA ES TT ER Sa CNOA GD APE APSE EA MLS PEAT SL OA MP EIEN BEDE NASR GANS SONS SO ARE LT TE NT IT WEARER ERE IA,







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Uncle’s ex
That w
papa, though old and blind

Is fond of children and very k



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By reading,—when you o
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ill rarely see a handsomer face,
m more erect, and full of grace.

You w
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This speckled toad
Seems happy’s a lord;

And this hairy worm,



Though it can only squirm,



~.

And has not a cent,



Ts quite content.



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Good old Neptune chanced to pass,
And saw his image in the glass ;

He stopped, and growled, and tried to bite—
In vain, the mirror would not fight.


















s SS = SaaS 3
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i ae: So,

p We The man who stands here,
Tia Dressed so queer,
4 |, Has marbles rare,

| @ And pictures fair.

With such works of art,
So scarce and old,

He would not part
For their weight in gold.










“ |
. a oer ; * ee a —s 3 : q|
Perhaps it may s inoul hi wa °17..9? : |
Berane a4 y Seem a Singuiar thing, “Shamefaced Billy” was this mon-
1s 18 a famous African King. key’s name;

An intelligent monkey and very
tame. |



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The ship which this Japanese artist drew
Looked less like a ship than it did like a shoe.

It is not right for any to fight:
If we are strong, ’tis all the more wrong,

To use the strength that God bestows,
In dealing brutal, murderous blows.





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The Queen of Oude is mighty proud,
She lives in great state, as you see by this plate ;
One attendant hands her fruit,

While another is playing on the lute,

A third stands near her with a fan,

A fourth is ready to do what she can.

Sera

TiiiisspAGAieNT
WG
BAT

. «Don’t fall, hold fast, \.
, ~There, you've reached the cor- |
ner at last.

TAGARED SOA] GSES





Jack has a sweet tooth, so go where he will,
If candy’s to be had, he eats his fill—
He much amazed the Japanese, by eating fourteen sugar geese.










HAUL ul ilhiui
yA



4) Oh! how I like to look at the stars How musical, in wood or vale,
Through this long telescope of papa’s. The song of the thrush or night-
ingale.

TRTTTT
PITTI

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fe |

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Well! this is certainly a singular group,
Ox, ass, rooster, dog and man, in one coop.

31







. This little boy has been sick very long,
; But I trust he’il soon be well and strong.



an .

Bah! bah! bah! — Bow, wow, wow!
Oh! you're there! What’s the matter now ?



In storm and shine the shepherd doth a4
| keep 3
Watch and ward over his sheep ; SOs
Preserveth them from all alarms, :
And beareth the lambkins in his Sa
arms. |









Ft ant cael et mae eae



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5 a INS es pp ipo



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CONTUNTS:

LUCY GRAY. By W. Worpswortn. 6 Illustrations, Se ee ee m7
THE BATTLE OF BLENHEIM. Sovuruery. 4 Illustrations, - - Sel
THE FAIRIES OF CALDON LOW. Many Howrrr. 5 Ilustrations, - 15
CASABIANCA. By Mrs. Hemands. 2 Illustrations, — - os. - - 19
THE OLD MAN IN THE WOOD. -4 Ilustrations, ee SE
THE WRECK OF THE HESPERUS. Loneretrow. 3 Illustrations, — - - 24°
THE ‘SANDS O’ DEE. By Rev. Cuas. Kinestey. 5 Illustrations, - . 28
een OlKNwPMe ORE. 1 Mlustration, .-- 2-9-2 - . - . = =. Sil

THE OBSTINATE CHICKEN. 1 Illustration, = - - - - -- 9 on








FSO

Ort I had heard of Lucy Gray;
And, when I crossed the wild,

I chanced to see, at break of day,
The solitary child.



You yet may spy the fawn at play,
The hare upon the green,

But the sweet face of Lucy Gray _
Will never more be seen. -

oe



No mate, no comrade Lucy knew;
She dwelt on a wide moor—
The sweetest thing that ever grew

Beside a human door!



“To-night will be a stormy night—
You to the town must go,

And take a lantern, child, to light
Your mother through the snow.”





“That, father, will I gladly do;
Tis scarcely afternoon,

The minster-clock has just struck two,
And yonder is the moon !”

e 3

Not blither is the mountain roe—
With many a wanton stroke ~
Her feet disperse the powdery snow,

That rises up like smoke.



At this the father raised his hook,
And snapped a faggot-band ; |

He plied his work—and Lucy took
The lantern in her hand.



The storm came on before its time—
She wandered up and down;

And many a hill did Lucy climb,
But never reached the town.





The wretched parents all that night
Went shouting far and wide ;

But there was neither sound nor sight
To serve them for a guide.





They wept—and, turning homeward, cried,
“Tn heaven we all shall meet!”

When, in the snow, the mother spied
The print of Lucy’s feet.





At daybreak on the hill they stood
That overlooked the moor—

And thence they saw the bridge of wood,
A. furlong from their door.

x

~

Then downward, from the steep hill’s edge,
They tracked the footmarks small ;

And through the broken hawthorn hedge,
And by the long stone wall ;







a

BAN





This thievish fox has just come from his den,
And stolen, you see, a fine fat hen.



~ aa

Gathering flowers! see what a heap What’s this little girl doing under
The girls have plucked since John’s the tree? |
been asleep. : | She is fast asleep, it appears to me.













They kept this cow in the field too late, Each of these girls has got a dolly ;
And now she has broken down the gate. One is named Maggie, the other Polly.

=

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wo a RAR
SSE

S

yf
Za

SS
WV S

S



“'They’ve no mills to grind their corn in the Empire of Japan,
So they pound it to pieces as well as they can.



T stands for And hundreds
Trumpet, of things
Table, ' | Poe besides
and ° Leo) Rei fi M | these
Tree, eta ae three.

19 Ak







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ant ee ee =

Ifere we see a Christmas Tree,

Laden with toys, for good girls and boys,

And abundance of fruit, which I think may suit
The palates of all, both great and small.









i MY i \

ANG? hy

aay
bat ny, ¥
SONGS
ZIYI

P a w
eS

‘ HF mh

ALAN I is
HO ete
Su PREICTOLTE R
‘ - : ; ee eF?

“Oh! Sister Ma

-And see the pretty lambkins
[ feet.”

©



| play.



Let us stay all day,

“The air is so sweet,
To feel the soft turf under our



And’tis such a treat

A eS
is ——=4
wig TOR ey, vps

Herbert has brought Polly some food,



Which Polly declares is “very good.”



Tis very seldom you will see
A. happier party than this seems to be.

)



Children all
Should play ball
Besides the fun,
healthy to run.

20



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SS c= ©

jos So

a

oe @ >

mn oo al) al






This little girl is trying to read,
But she has been very sick indeed.



U/
P OCELYN. MY.



~

“This is the famous Benjamin West, |
An American Artist, and one of the best.

22

pS grep cere teresa ee eg



ay lio ee
a Fa sarees

This lamb, the children love him so,
Will follow them wherever they go.





——a_,





aioe"

f i a
Pi



Look out my man, there they go!
The whole lot, tipped off in the
snow.



m i Mire cake
ee ee is eis,
Ra a

Here is a sailor boy writing a letter,
With his trunk for a desk, wanting a better.

&



“Ss

“Turn round, Polly, don’t be afraid,
I’ve brought you sugar, and figs, and bread.”

28











“* And there,’ they said, ‘the merry winds
8°,
Away from every horn ;
And they shall clear the lela ite ,
From the blind, old widow’s corn.

‘“*Qh! the poor, blind widow,

_ Though she has been blind so long,

She'll be blithe enough when the mildew’s
gone,










And the corn stands tall and strong.’

“Oh! the poor, lame weaver,

~ How will he laugh outright
_ When he sees his dwindling flax-field
All full of flowers by night!’

<
“And some they brought the brown
lint seed,
And flung it down from the Low:
‘And this,’ they said, ‘ by the sunrise,
In the weaver’s croft shall grow.
“ And then outspoke a brownie, “¢Tve spun a piece of hempen cloth,
With a long beard on his chin: | And I want to spin another:
‘T have spun up all the tow,’ said he, A little sheet for Mary’s bed,

‘ And I want some more to spin. And an apron for her mother.’

De eaten eee asiiarctat ears cetoctoeepenectareahts » haw ; a NR. tenon ae Re aan Pte oe 7 we aE re Fe cece pe ba Rn AE a wena dah nk En a Apes ind ween yee to
~ > ~ - Pe * eo “ ~ a ~ - ene oe Tae OF wee one. ¢ to erleny = %. * Sat, sina anaes rar





And I laughed out loud and free—
And then, on the top of the Caldon Low
There was no one left but me.

‘‘ And all on the top of the Caldon Low,
The mists were cold and gray, .

And nothing I saw but the mossy stones
That round about me lay. :

“But coming down from the hill-top,
I heard, afar below, |
How busy the jolly miller was,

“With that I could not help but laugh,
| And how the wheel did go.

,

|

|



“ And I peeped into the widow’s field,
And, sure enough, were seen

The yellow ears of the mildewed corn,
All standing stout and green.

‘“And down by the weaver’s croft I stole,
To see if the flax were sprung—

But I met the weaver at his gate,
With the good news on his tongue.

“Now, this is all I heard, mother,
And all that I did see;

So, pr’ythee, make my bed, mother,
For I’m as tired as I can be.”









|

The boy* stood on the burning deck,

Whence all but him had fled ; :
The flame that ht the battle wreck,

Shone round him o’er the dead.

|

;

~

pte ge

Yet, beautiful and bright he stood,
As born to rule the storm ;

A creature of heroic blood, °
A proud, though childhke form. ©



cl Por

pos

The flames rolled on—he would not go

Without his father’s word; |
That father, faint in death below,

His voice no longer heard.

* Young Casabianca, a boy about thirteen years old, son to the admiral of the Orvent,
remained at his post (in the battle of the Nile) after the ship had taken fire, and all the
guns had been abandoned, and perished in the explosion of the vessel, when the flames
had reached the powder. |

| ; 19





He called aloud: ‘‘Say, father, say,
If yet my task be done?”

He knew not that the chicftain he
Unconscious of his son.

‘Speak, father!” once again he cried,
“If I may yet be gone!

And”—but the booming shots oe.
And fast the flames rolled on.

Upon his brow he felt theit on —
And in his waving hair, rah

And looked from that lone post of death: °
In still, yet brave despair.

And shouted but once more aloud:

“My father! must I stay.

4 feet cas
Ce



While o’er him fast, through sail and shroud,
The wreathing fires made way.

They wrapped the ship in splendor wild,
They caught the flag on high,

_ And streamed above the gallant child,

Like banners in the sky. » *

There came a burst of thunder uss
"The boy—oh where was he?

Ask of the winds that far around
With fragments strewed the sea.

“

‘With mast and helm, and pennon fair,

That well had borne their part ;
But the noblest thing that perished there,
Was that young gallant heart.





ih
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Peace
Pea

THE OLD MAN IN THE Woon.
Tuere was an old man who liv’d in a wood,

As you shall plainly see— ..
He thought

‘And you must milk the tiny cow,
Lest she should go dry;

And you must feed the little pigs
That are within the sty.

ral e
he could'do more work in one
day .

Than his wife could do

in thfee. |

‘‘And you must watch the speckled hen,
Lest she should go astray,

Not forgetting the spool of yarn
That I spin every day.”

“With all my heart,” the-old woman said,
“Tf you will allow,

You shall stay at home to-day,
And [ll go follow the plough,




















The old woman took her stick in her hand,
And went to follow the plough;
The old man put the pail on his head,

And went to milk the cow.

But Tiny she winch’d, and Tiny she flinch’d,
2s ed Tiny she toss’d her nose ;
And Tiny gave him a kick on the shin,

- Till the blood ran down to his toes.



a ory
s > a

: , eo:
7 And a Ey Ho, Tiny !” and a “Lo, Tiny 1

i | And a “ Pretty little cow, stand still;”

} And “If ever I milk you again,” he said, ~

> “Tt shall be against my will.” |

Fe ee eet
a €
ber ae

* ks

And then he went to feed the pigs
That were within the sty ; |

He knocked his nose against the shed,
And’made the blood to fly.

* And then he watch’d the speckled hen,
| Lest she should go astray ;
But he quite forgot the spool of yarn
That his wife spun every day.







And when the old woman came home at And when he saw how well she plough’d,

night, 7 And made the furrows even,
He said he could plainly see Said his wife could do more work in a day
That his wife could do more work inaday ‘Than he could do in seven!

Than he could do in three.





Cet ee anes tata amet a







rs +
Re ay es _ :
erence ER es eae



ill,

In the woods, near the h

2

ae
Lid

M
In near,

Stands Matthew Grimes’

b

lves 1Nn a Ca

While he |

You see it there, just in the rear





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’t a clerical look in

thieve,
And the soldier assisted him to

This fellow entered the house to

on

ON

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TRaTeD RY









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28
fv el Sone p eas 5
ga a GO ee Po Ae”

Here’s a gay Butterfly arrayed in her best,
And a sweet little bird sitting snug in her nest.

0 ~ 4
Wn



cs
Ste ae
_
4

~

Black and white Rabbits, with red eyes and long ears ;
One—two—three—four—five, it appears.







ANH

“hee

:

Pp ae



How ruffled and startled this birdie So fond or daneiog j is Caroline E Hill,
appears, = Though all alone she can’t keep still.
I wonder what it can be he fears! »



HI
ae 4 Me dt i | ‘i Ht i i i



oe ‘ e m by a
ce :
a i .) 9
’ Jo:
Look here, Miss Jane, don’t ete a
word more
Till you have picked up these bk :
from off the floor, _ _ -_ Twelve miles I’ve walked since half past
: . three, ~

And am just as tired as I can be,
So down I'll sit beneath this tree,
And eat the apples that I see;

If afterwards I fall asleep,

Faithful Fido watch will keep.



Frank sits sonia his book in the
chair,

Ann sits on the floor pa Cross
as a bear.












| These two little children are lost in ~The little children here you see,
: the wood, | Have lain down to sleep under a tree.
/ Wouldn’t you show them the way

| out if you could?

|

: $; « Puss looks as if she would like very
a pi ; well 4
Sister Alice, open your eyes, To taste the bird that boy has to sell. |

Don’t you know it is time to rise?

B, for Button
Which M makes;

M, for Mutton |
Which B bakes.

| This creature lovks sad,
I guess he feels bad.







7 wes
te ee eee ae = rte . :







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SSS ESS SE TE OT ETE OEY
sa = Saas ERT OTS SSS











































SS “ aS
so St SSS a
That’s the smallest engine I ever saw,
Yet only look! what a load it can draw.
The watch is sick, fa = See
It will not tick. That’s the thing,
| Now give a good spring. | !
This curly-haired, fat-cheeked little Puck,
You see has got an orange to suck. |







HH}

/ MAR HATS
' Hiikt: iii ih

te



So careful has little Arthur grown, 7
2 His mother trusts him with a cup of his own. )



Se | There, I declare I’ve lost my cent,
“Speak, Tray,” says Fred, Here’s a hole in my pocket, and that’s
“ And Ill give you this bread.” _ how it went.





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Ae ite aS ~~



These three, as you can see,

Are having a pic-nic under the tree ;
The other's a Gipsey, I know very well,
And she has come their fortunes to tell.

Pane ae ~~ |



“Don’t go near the bull,” was my very last word,

And I am quite sure that Henry heard— |

But he did not obey me and you see where he is;

P’m sorry indeed, but the fault was his. oH
| |



WONG BROKEN PITCHER.

‘¢ ALAS, alas!” the little maiden cries,
As on the ground her pitcher broken lies—
The pitcher which so many times she bore,

Full from the well, back to the cottage door.

~
NS
XY ag
a .
Mee 2

Ah, Jessie! thou may’st learn a lesson sad,

And yet a lesson needful to be had;






All earthly things are sure to fall at last—

The things that are above alone stand fast.

ah



EES CR re a Pe

. tI
WATS NEY BE, R BSD LOE PET RE ES YY PEN ARES
4 \





THE OBSTINATE CHICKEN, ee

WHOSE PATE: 50° Gory,
MAKES THIS A MELANCHOLY STORY.

HEN.

‘Go not down that distant walk;
Yonder flies the savage hawk; ~

His sharp eyes will quickly meet you, ,
If you go I’m sure he'll eat. you.” 4

CHICKEN.

- “Nasty hawk is far away, So it skipped off in a trice,
I may safely go and play ; Scorning mother’s good advice;
If he comes, my legs will bring | And when it thought at home to sup,
Me beneath your sheltering wing.” Down came the hawk and gobbled it up.



/

|
|





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Bees List

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Full Text








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LEAVITT & ALIEN.

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SETS seca ES aaa SETAE MN APTN SIS. sila» Sik SDAA EOE PEIN SS PNn RNa ; A .
i





; 3 oh
CHAT SS
.
I’ve just returned from Milford Fair,
And I tell you, children, I saw there
Many things that would make you stare:
° Trumpets, flags, and guns,
Bats and balls, and sugar plums,
Horses of tin, and woolly sheep,
Little toy banks, your money to keep,
Punch and Judy, and Noah’s ark, | :
Pigs that would squeal, and dogs that could bark,
And more things else than I could tell,
Or you remember very well. |


Old Druid is so fierce and strong,

We keep him chained the whole day long ;
But when night comes we let him free,

To keep away the thieves, you see.

eee oO —

Wy |

—

These little puppies are trying hard How full of grace
To get up a frolic with the hens in the yard. Is this little vase !




Be off to your den, you thievish fox,
| Unless you wish to be pelted with rocks.







{
|
| See the sea within the C!
| And a vessel, too, there seems man fell asleep !
to be. | He must be a useful servant to |
keep.
A}
ie understand this singular matter, While no one is nigh
The — is asking the pump for The mouse eats the pie.
water.


oe sha a &
PDE EAR PFE IR VERT PRE ERE EEN LL PL SER LEDS TET NP ENNIS BE SY LE AR TEST



eS

i
SSS BSE
———— = fe
Seam ay

-—

‘Wonderful boy,”
With the gold of whose genius

Was base alloy.
More you shall know,

When you older grow.





Here died CHATTERTON,
ish to employ this man

To do a hard job, that no other can.

im i iit

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These merchants w



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to eat;































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eee,

Reus SI

dai srory

























This house, near the Lake, stands all alone,
A peaceful, quict mountain home.

Hite

ON Gyr ase
ee
ed

=
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aistaet

aie

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i i, ah

A t a
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S



Rosa has just received a letter, This little boy has got a sword,
And nothing could have pleased her And thinks himself as errand as
better. | a lord.







ro

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WiLL










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ont

a ae - »
FF NGPA NVWAWABRBWUSA ASL. a

The arrival “at London of the Queen. of
Causes all this trouble and crowd. .

Oude







































I hope these boys were not hurt by their fall;
Only a little bruised, that’s all.









Nel hd 4,
i





—
=a
=a
ass

SS a ee
SSS ae

W.

The treasures of ocean who can tell?

2 Tts stores of coral, pearls, and shell,
b Beautiful “ weeds,” that rival the flowers

Growing within our garden bowers!

et
aan‘

pn




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ye SN Tae ed = Ze See PRON
a WAR ree 4 ne Agnardsaon Coa ote
a Sars

Though old, and feeble, and nearly blind,
This good man is cheerful, gentle, and kind.

13




2
they can.

“ed

a

poor man
for him

He iswery badly hurt,
I hope they will do all



ing crew,

-look
more than you.

is a singu

lar
Il know no

Well, this
Of whom

CATS ace






seater



g as your arm,





Are as lon

| That he was so pleased when she was near : a! ‘ar. |





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He took excellent care of Lido.

A good old dog was Fido,
All who saw them sai


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That’s right, * > %
Fly your kite;
Let it sail away,
There’s a good breeze to-day.

G ily tripping, heel and toe,
errily round and round we go.



Don’t disturb those birds, my boy,
"Twill give them pain, and you no joy.


===)

KN
WX \ A
\ AF i

\)



AVERY DS





The Ostrich is very strong and fleet, A dangerous neighbor, I should

But its head is about the size of its fect, | SAY,

So it doesn’t know much, as I suppose And wish myself safely out of
you ve heard, his way.

And is generally called “the stupid bird.”




4 it bi {Ns a ‘ ae.) J Mies \ i) ml ; : “ ire ‘ :
Hy it ne Ps ( i ig F, : “A
ea | ey x
| TH UN :
i Pe A :
TaN
Una







Uncle expends his ample means
In buying all sorts of queer machines ;

With which, when we go to spend the day,
He very kindly lets us play. 7

Arar Sag che
LE
]

paar i y HUW i
le ie ———e

—<———

AEF LEE aa
eer 23

PIA = ne

5 - - 2s F BT Fr Ne SS
. : ome = <= eae RY ye
- ott BS AN UREW . CEST. elo.



A pavilion in Turkey is called a Avosk,
And a building like this above, a Mosque.










SS,
SS
SN

SSN
WS

WN \\ ‘
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WY LAY
. \ A

by

i

ps

me 4),
LG

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Wy | f= "



Both stoled priest and mailed knight,
Possess much power for wrong or right.



CREE as iS ith Ea i a Ud FM SE I 8 TE









SEES

ALLAN
\ sy we

\

iB AG
N

i OE te

ie

“Laugh, little baby, laugh and crow, This little woman looks so very sad,
Nothing like laughing to make you grow!”" I guess she wants something that
can’t be had.

ca Lah Se

18





bP RLoeE


Rhy



a I TS TO

rR
a ~ r 3 5 py: ie 2 rs cd PR Te ATTA DB TESS Lalla eS oe ” NE ME ERI PME ETON LE OT EN AEP tM a rs ise pelt SR ERR GE Re EN OLE NIE 2 PO
———————————$—$_$_ $C







. a

These wandering negroes and their African wives
Never saw a white face, before, in their lives.

%

eee ee =<

Kew C=

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Wy i MIU Hii TceTUTUUeUANU UU LALUTO
iy | \ TTT
|

7

Lt
4

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A
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ee ee ee NERY.

Ah! a regal crown is a olittering thing ;
*Tis said even Cromwell wished to be King.



ee


_z3 =: es

These travellers have stopped for refreshment and rest,
And the peasants kindly bring their best.



YS
“Sega BAO, m=

The Chameleon this, and I believe I must mend my pen,
A homelier animal doesn’t breathe. I can’t write till then.




‘ 4 As CLM gece Ww



































































Great delight these people take,
Sailing upon this beautiful lake.









KI ta ' a)

Nit
an

a ay \ i |
: aun ee Wy)
1 yet & q\\ \ Zt ox SS



we





Jane reads and mother sews,
Thus happily the time goes.

a

Mercury—A messenger was he
Speeding over land and sea.

21






















a ih =
ati
ett

ct
ma

t





Come, children, come and choose,







Which you prefer of these Arctic |
views.

The Arctic regions, you don’t need
to be told,

Have a bitter climate, which is fear-
fully cold.

Iccbergs, these masses of ice they
call,



a As large as a mountain, and nearly

chy TUL WANN
\y if ny Na Sh i
\\\ \\ ‘\" \i gta iN \ ‘ \ We Ns AN iy as tall. G
Ny at weal Wi i i ay " \) nN Wh,

The days and nights are six months
long ;

There are huge polar bears, fierce
and strong.

I think we should be happy and,
glad, don't you?

We were not born there, but live

where we do.






This man is earnestly seeking for work ;

You see he is neither a beggar nor shirk.

\

ani!
Y
vo



The fruit of the Palm is delicious

to eat,
While its leaves are useful to

shield from heat.









WWYGSL Ye
EE
nl i”

PEEL,

! 25 OP RGB ERIE YR:
le rote iene grapes cove eee



a! — — oes aso eee —

The smallest child you see is undrest,
And goes to bed first, ’cause he needs

most rest.

| AOR RSE PE NEEL BEC





































































Ce



“Open the lattice and take in this plant;”
“T would, but you see it’s locked, and I
Came

Sn




SNV.OBR. BS. VHS

——-

Niger to

ESET LE EG AAT OR, PLE COP SIRE CRO ue GE ED EAU LORRI WRG MST RETRE SMROE O7 OE SS FRA A RR Ee Pi ORE EER, Ciro BEL NR eI SB A RT EE AEE SLT BUREN REA TL ATLA al lth ES.

It greatly delights this worthy-pair
To breathe the pure, sweet country air.



ae



Besides the tulips growing here, A little study every day, 4
There’s a greenhouse full of flowers A little work, a little play,
near. Plain hearty food and sleep enough,

Makes your mind clear, your body tough.


a a ee ee es ee Ea I a aT SS eS aE SE ETON SUE ELUNE
ad TNL eA OTS SRT PA RULE TLE ETI APT SBA SALEEM REN i RNY RI dh A OTT EY ATRL 2 SN ED ON RATT SIR DA ES TT ER Sa CNOA GD APE APSE EA MLS PEAT SL OA MP EIEN BEDE NASR GANS SONS SO ARE LT TE NT IT WEARER ERE IA,







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Uncle’s ex
That w
papa, though old and blind

Is fond of children and very k



Grand




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This speckled toad
Seems happy’s a lord;

And this hairy worm,



Though it can only squirm,



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And has not a cent,



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Good old Neptune chanced to pass,
And saw his image in the glass ;

He stopped, and growled, and tried to bite—
In vain, the mirror would not fight.















s SS = SaaS 3
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i ae: So,

p We The man who stands here,
Tia Dressed so queer,
4 |, Has marbles rare,

| @ And pictures fair.

With such works of art,
So scarce and old,

He would not part
For their weight in gold.










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. a oer ; * ee a —s 3 : q|
Perhaps it may s inoul hi wa °17..9? : |
Berane a4 y Seem a Singuiar thing, “Shamefaced Billy” was this mon-
1s 18 a famous African King. key’s name;

An intelligent monkey and very
tame. |
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The ship which this Japanese artist drew
Looked less like a ship than it did like a shoe.

It is not right for any to fight:
If we are strong, ’tis all the more wrong,

To use the strength that God bestows,
In dealing brutal, murderous blows.


ill
i i it



























eS



eens eae a




The Queen of Oude is mighty proud,
She lives in great state, as you see by this plate ;
One attendant hands her fruit,

While another is playing on the lute,

A third stands near her with a fan,

A fourth is ready to do what she can.

Sera

TiiiisspAGAieNT
WG
BAT

. «Don’t fall, hold fast, \.
, ~There, you've reached the cor- |
ner at last.

TAGARED SOA] GSES





Jack has a sweet tooth, so go where he will,
If candy’s to be had, he eats his fill—
He much amazed the Japanese, by eating fourteen sugar geese.







HAUL ul ilhiui
yA



4) Oh! how I like to look at the stars How musical, in wood or vale,
Through this long telescope of papa’s. The song of the thrush or night-
ingale.

TRTTTT
PITTI

si |
fe |

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Well! this is certainly a singular group,
Ox, ass, rooster, dog and man, in one coop.

31




. This little boy has been sick very long,
; But I trust he’il soon be well and strong.



an .

Bah! bah! bah! — Bow, wow, wow!
Oh! you're there! What’s the matter now ?



In storm and shine the shepherd doth a4
| keep 3
Watch and ward over his sheep ; SOs
Preserveth them from all alarms, :
And beareth the lambkins in his Sa
arms. |






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5 a INS es pp ipo



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Veo eee se PF REAR AAA IAI IIL PRB AADOO—On—enn 0 OOO 0 00 2 800 EE eer re rrr eeu?








EW YORK:

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SS ASRS RC ERE SEE I DNA EN EL LASTED aE I BOE SES EERi Lae RIA ES ER SEES RRR OS SMITA KDC AT a SRN Ta BAIS LSE TA, SRL SE






CONTUNTS:

LUCY GRAY. By W. Worpswortn. 6 Illustrations, Se ee ee m7
THE BATTLE OF BLENHEIM. Sovuruery. 4 Illustrations, - - Sel
THE FAIRIES OF CALDON LOW. Many Howrrr. 5 Ilustrations, - 15
CASABIANCA. By Mrs. Hemands. 2 Illustrations, — - os. - - 19
THE OLD MAN IN THE WOOD. -4 Ilustrations, ee SE
THE WRECK OF THE HESPERUS. Loneretrow. 3 Illustrations, — - - 24°
THE ‘SANDS O’ DEE. By Rev. Cuas. Kinestey. 5 Illustrations, - . 28
een OlKNwPMe ORE. 1 Mlustration, .-- 2-9-2 - . - . = =. Sil

THE OBSTINATE CHICKEN. 1 Illustration, = - - - - -- 9 on


FSO

Ort I had heard of Lucy Gray;
And, when I crossed the wild,

I chanced to see, at break of day,
The solitary child.



You yet may spy the fawn at play,
The hare upon the green,

But the sweet face of Lucy Gray _
Will never more be seen. -

oe



No mate, no comrade Lucy knew;
She dwelt on a wide moor—
The sweetest thing that ever grew

Beside a human door!



“To-night will be a stormy night—
You to the town must go,

And take a lantern, child, to light
Your mother through the snow.”


“That, father, will I gladly do;
Tis scarcely afternoon,

The minster-clock has just struck two,
And yonder is the moon !”

e 3

Not blither is the mountain roe—
With many a wanton stroke ~
Her feet disperse the powdery snow,

That rises up like smoke.



At this the father raised his hook,
And snapped a faggot-band ; |

He plied his work—and Lucy took
The lantern in her hand.



The storm came on before its time—
She wandered up and down;

And many a hill did Lucy climb,
But never reached the town.


The wretched parents all that night
Went shouting far and wide ;

But there was neither sound nor sight
To serve them for a guide.





They wept—and, turning homeward, cried,
“Tn heaven we all shall meet!”

When, in the snow, the mother spied
The print of Lucy’s feet.





At daybreak on the hill they stood
That overlooked the moor—

And thence they saw the bridge of wood,
A. furlong from their door.

x

~

Then downward, from the steep hill’s edge,
They tracked the footmarks small ;

And through the broken hawthorn hedge,
And by the long stone wall ;




a

BAN





This thievish fox has just come from his den,
And stolen, you see, a fine fat hen.



~ aa

Gathering flowers! see what a heap What’s this little girl doing under
The girls have plucked since John’s the tree? |
been asleep. : | She is fast asleep, it appears to me.










They kept this cow in the field too late, Each of these girls has got a dolly ;
And now she has broken down the gate. One is named Maggie, the other Polly.

=

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“'They’ve no mills to grind their corn in the Empire of Japan,
So they pound it to pieces as well as they can.



T stands for And hundreds
Trumpet, of things
Table, ' | Poe besides
and ° Leo) Rei fi M | these
Tree, eta ae three.

19 Ak




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Ifere we see a Christmas Tree,

Laden with toys, for good girls and boys,

And abundance of fruit, which I think may suit
The palates of all, both great and small.






i MY i \

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SONGS
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ALAN I is
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Su PREICTOLTE R
‘ - : ; ee eF?

“Oh! Sister Ma

-And see the pretty lambkins
[ feet.”

©



| play.



Let us stay all day,

“The air is so sweet,
To feel the soft turf under our



And’tis such a treat

A eS
is ——=4
wig TOR ey, vps

Herbert has brought Polly some food,



Which Polly declares is “very good.”



Tis very seldom you will see
A. happier party than this seems to be.

)



Children all
Should play ball
Besides the fun,
healthy to run.

20



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This little girl is trying to read,
But she has been very sick indeed.



U/
P OCELYN. MY.



~

“This is the famous Benjamin West, |
An American Artist, and one of the best.

22

pS grep cere teresa ee eg



ay lio ee
a Fa sarees

This lamb, the children love him so,
Will follow them wherever they go.





——a_,


aioe"

f i a
Pi



Look out my man, there they go!
The whole lot, tipped off in the
snow.



m i Mire cake
ee ee is eis,
Ra a

Here is a sailor boy writing a letter,
With his trunk for a desk, wanting a better.

&



“Ss

“Turn round, Polly, don’t be afraid,
I’ve brought you sugar, and figs, and bread.”

28








“* And there,’ they said, ‘the merry winds
8°,
Away from every horn ;
And they shall clear the lela ite ,
From the blind, old widow’s corn.

‘“*Qh! the poor, blind widow,

_ Though she has been blind so long,

She'll be blithe enough when the mildew’s
gone,










And the corn stands tall and strong.’

“Oh! the poor, lame weaver,

~ How will he laugh outright
_ When he sees his dwindling flax-field
All full of flowers by night!’

<
“And some they brought the brown
lint seed,
And flung it down from the Low:
‘And this,’ they said, ‘ by the sunrise,
In the weaver’s croft shall grow.
“ And then outspoke a brownie, “¢Tve spun a piece of hempen cloth,
With a long beard on his chin: | And I want to spin another:
‘T have spun up all the tow,’ said he, A little sheet for Mary’s bed,

‘ And I want some more to spin. And an apron for her mother.’

De eaten eee asiiarctat ears cetoctoeepenectareahts » haw ; a NR. tenon ae Re aan Pte oe 7 we aE re Fe cece pe ba Rn AE a wena dah nk En a Apes ind ween yee to
~ > ~ - Pe * eo “ ~ a ~ - ene oe Tae OF wee one. ¢ to erleny = %. * Sat, sina anaes rar


And I laughed out loud and free—
And then, on the top of the Caldon Low
There was no one left but me.

‘‘ And all on the top of the Caldon Low,
The mists were cold and gray, .

And nothing I saw but the mossy stones
That round about me lay. :

“But coming down from the hill-top,
I heard, afar below, |
How busy the jolly miller was,

“With that I could not help but laugh,
| And how the wheel did go.

,

|

|



“ And I peeped into the widow’s field,
And, sure enough, were seen

The yellow ears of the mildewed corn,
All standing stout and green.

‘“And down by the weaver’s croft I stole,
To see if the flax were sprung—

But I met the weaver at his gate,
With the good news on his tongue.

“Now, this is all I heard, mother,
And all that I did see;

So, pr’ythee, make my bed, mother,
For I’m as tired as I can be.”






|

The boy* stood on the burning deck,

Whence all but him had fled ; :
The flame that ht the battle wreck,

Shone round him o’er the dead.

|

;

~

pte ge

Yet, beautiful and bright he stood,
As born to rule the storm ;

A creature of heroic blood, °
A proud, though childhke form. ©



cl Por

pos

The flames rolled on—he would not go

Without his father’s word; |
That father, faint in death below,

His voice no longer heard.

* Young Casabianca, a boy about thirteen years old, son to the admiral of the Orvent,
remained at his post (in the battle of the Nile) after the ship had taken fire, and all the
guns had been abandoned, and perished in the explosion of the vessel, when the flames
had reached the powder. |

| ; 19


He called aloud: ‘‘Say, father, say,
If yet my task be done?”

He knew not that the chicftain he
Unconscious of his son.

‘Speak, father!” once again he cried,
“If I may yet be gone!

And”—but the booming shots oe.
And fast the flames rolled on.

Upon his brow he felt theit on —
And in his waving hair, rah

And looked from that lone post of death: °
In still, yet brave despair.

And shouted but once more aloud:

“My father! must I stay.

4 feet cas
Ce



While o’er him fast, through sail and shroud,
The wreathing fires made way.

They wrapped the ship in splendor wild,
They caught the flag on high,

_ And streamed above the gallant child,

Like banners in the sky. » *

There came a burst of thunder uss
"The boy—oh where was he?

Ask of the winds that far around
With fragments strewed the sea.

“

‘With mast and helm, and pennon fair,

That well had borne their part ;
But the noblest thing that perished there,
Was that young gallant heart.


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Pea

THE OLD MAN IN THE Woon.
Tuere was an old man who liv’d in a wood,

As you shall plainly see— ..
He thought

‘And you must milk the tiny cow,
Lest she should go dry;

And you must feed the little pigs
That are within the sty.

ral e
he could'do more work in one
day .

Than his wife could do

in thfee. |

‘‘And you must watch the speckled hen,
Lest she should go astray,

Not forgetting the spool of yarn
That I spin every day.”

“With all my heart,” the-old woman said,
“Tf you will allow,

You shall stay at home to-day,
And [ll go follow the plough,

















The old woman took her stick in her hand,
And went to follow the plough;
The old man put the pail on his head,

And went to milk the cow.

But Tiny she winch’d, and Tiny she flinch’d,
2s ed Tiny she toss’d her nose ;
And Tiny gave him a kick on the shin,

- Till the blood ran down to his toes.



a ory
s > a

: , eo:
7 And a Ey Ho, Tiny !” and a “Lo, Tiny 1

i | And a “ Pretty little cow, stand still;”

} And “If ever I milk you again,” he said, ~

> “Tt shall be against my will.” |

Fe ee eet
a €
ber ae

* ks

And then he went to feed the pigs
That were within the sty ; |

He knocked his nose against the shed,
And’made the blood to fly.

* And then he watch’d the speckled hen,
| Lest she should go astray ;
But he quite forgot the spool of yarn
That his wife spun every day.




And when the old woman came home at And when he saw how well she plough’d,

night, 7 And made the furrows even,
He said he could plainly see Said his wife could do more work in a day
That his wife could do more work inaday ‘Than he could do in seven!

Than he could do in three.





Cet ee anes tata amet a




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Re ay es _ :
erence ER es eae



ill,

In the woods, near the h

2

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Lid

M
In near,

Stands Matthew Grimes’

b

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While he |

You see it there, just in the rear





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28
fv el Sone p eas 5
ga a GO ee Po Ae”

Here’s a gay Butterfly arrayed in her best,
And a sweet little bird sitting snug in her nest.

0 ~ 4
Wn



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Ste ae
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Black and white Rabbits, with red eyes and long ears ;
One—two—three—four—five, it appears.




ANH

“hee

:

Pp ae



How ruffled and startled this birdie So fond or daneiog j is Caroline E Hill,
appears, = Though all alone she can’t keep still.
I wonder what it can be he fears! »



HI
ae 4 Me dt i | ‘i Ht i i i



oe ‘ e m by a
ce :
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’ Jo:
Look here, Miss Jane, don’t ete a
word more
Till you have picked up these bk :
from off the floor, _ _ -_ Twelve miles I’ve walked since half past
: . three, ~

And am just as tired as I can be,
So down I'll sit beneath this tree,
And eat the apples that I see;

If afterwards I fall asleep,

Faithful Fido watch will keep.



Frank sits sonia his book in the
chair,

Ann sits on the floor pa Cross
as a bear.









| These two little children are lost in ~The little children here you see,
: the wood, | Have lain down to sleep under a tree.
/ Wouldn’t you show them the way

| out if you could?

|

: $; « Puss looks as if she would like very
a pi ; well 4
Sister Alice, open your eyes, To taste the bird that boy has to sell. |

Don’t you know it is time to rise?

B, for Button
Which M makes;

M, for Mutton |
Which B bakes.

| This creature lovks sad,
I guess he feels bad.







7 wes
te ee eee ae = rte . :




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SSS ESS SE TE OT ETE OEY
sa = Saas ERT OTS SSS











































SS “ aS
so St SSS a
That’s the smallest engine I ever saw,
Yet only look! what a load it can draw.
The watch is sick, fa = See
It will not tick. That’s the thing,
| Now give a good spring. | !
This curly-haired, fat-cheeked little Puck,
You see has got an orange to suck. |




HH}

/ MAR HATS
' Hiikt: iii ih

te



So careful has little Arthur grown, 7
2 His mother trusts him with a cup of his own. )



Se | There, I declare I’ve lost my cent,
“Speak, Tray,” says Fred, Here’s a hole in my pocket, and that’s
“ And Ill give you this bread.” _ how it went.


3 _— n awn

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a

Pa tj; 3 SS p
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PIPE

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SSS

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Ae ite aS ~~



These three, as you can see,

Are having a pic-nic under the tree ;
The other's a Gipsey, I know very well,
And she has come their fortunes to tell.

Pane ae ~~ |



“Don’t go near the bull,” was my very last word,

And I am quite sure that Henry heard— |

But he did not obey me and you see where he is;

P’m sorry indeed, but the fault was his. oH
| |
WONG BROKEN PITCHER.

‘¢ ALAS, alas!” the little maiden cries,
As on the ground her pitcher broken lies—
The pitcher which so many times she bore,

Full from the well, back to the cottage door.

~
NS
XY ag
a .
Mee 2

Ah, Jessie! thou may’st learn a lesson sad,

And yet a lesson needful to be had;






All earthly things are sure to fall at last—

The things that are above alone stand fast.

ah



EES CR re a Pe

. tI
WATS NEY BE, R BSD LOE PET RE ES YY PEN ARES
4 \


THE OBSTINATE CHICKEN, ee

WHOSE PATE: 50° Gory,
MAKES THIS A MELANCHOLY STORY.

HEN.

‘Go not down that distant walk;
Yonder flies the savage hawk; ~

His sharp eyes will quickly meet you, ,
If you go I’m sure he'll eat. you.” 4

CHICKEN.

- “Nasty hawk is far away, So it skipped off in a trice,
I may safely go and play ; Scorning mother’s good advice;
If he comes, my legs will bring | And when it thought at home to sup,
Me beneath your sheltering wing.” Down came the hawk and gobbled it up.



/

|
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