Citation
Aunt Louisa's sparkling gems

Material Information

Title:
Aunt Louisa's sparkling gems comprising Little Red Riding Hood, Nellie's Christmas Eve, Aesop's fables, Three Christmas boxes : with twenty-four pages of illustrations : printed in colors
Uniform Title:
Aesop's fables
Added title page title:
Nellie's Christmas Eve
Added title page title:
Three Christmas boxes
Creator:
Valentine, L ( Laura ), d. 1899
McLoughlin Bros., inc ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
McLoughlin Bros.
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
1 v. (unpaged) : col. ill. ; 28 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Children -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile literature ( lcsh )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1866 ( lcsh )
Fables -- 1866 ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry -- 1866 ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1866 ( rbbin )
Onlays (Binding) -- 1866 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1866
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Fables ( rbgenr )
Children's poetry ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Onlays ( rbbin )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

Funding:
Brittle Books Program

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
Baldwin Library of Historical Children's Literature in the Department of Special Collections and Area Studies, George A. Smathers Libraries, University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026517391 ( aleph )
00592518 ( oclc )
ALF9224 ( notis )

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BUN! LOU TSA

SPARKLING GEMS:

CO Mer Kl S ieN G

Little Red Riding-Hood. | Aesop's Fables.
Nellies Christmas Eve.

‘Three Christmas Boxes.

VL ke ae

aviiNLY-FOUR PAGES OF ILLUSTRA TION..

PRINTED IN COLORS.

Or VS Sw Vw VS

MCMOUGH LIN Baws. Nw York.



LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.



LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD.

bn



NCE upon a time, in a pretty

village, stood a neat little cot-

tage, covered with roses and honey-
suckles, and shaded by large trees

In this cottage lived a good woman,

who had a very pretty daughter—a

- sweet, dear little girl, with bright eyes

and long hair, falling in golden curls
Her

cheeks were as rosy as two ripe peaches,

all over her neck and shoulders.

and her laugh was the merriest you
would hear on a Summer's day; and
_ what was better than all this was,
that that little girl was a kind, good
3 child, with a gentle heart and obliging
manners. She had a pleasant smile
and cheerful word for all, and would
do anything to give pleasure to
others. : Poe

So at 1s. tro eid she became the

—__.-——-en""

greatest favorite with all the villagers.
Every one who knew her liked her;
and when she called to see any poor
or sick neighbor, her presence was like
a ray of sunshine to them, so pleased
were they to see her.

Now, although she was greatly liked
by all the villagers, far and near, none
loved her so dearly as her mother

This little girl's

and grandmother.

- grandmother, to show how much she

appreciated her goodness, made her a~
beautiful riding-hood of scarlet cloth,
such as ladies wore in those days when
they went out riding.

The little girl looked quite caine
in this riding-hood, and she found it

so handy and convenient, she seldom

went abroad without it; hail, rain. or —

shine, she would wear it—in fact, it



eee
x NS es





Ee LE he DRI DIN G-HOOT.

was her favorite article of dress. She
wore it so frequently, and looked so
nice in it, that when she was seen
coming along the village, the neigh-
~ bors would say:—“ Here comes Little
Red Ruiding-Hood,” till at last she
was known by that name, and no
other; indeed, I have never been able
to learn her other name. |

Now, the good old grandmother
had been very sick for a long time,
and, although not so bad as she had
been, she was not yet sufficiently well
to leave her cottage. So the mother,
who had been making some cheese-
cakes, and churning some butter that
morning, said to her daughter: “You
may go, my child, to your grand-
mother’s, and take her some of these
nice cakes, and a pot of fresh butter,
for her breakfast.” |

Little Red Riding-Hood was highly
delighted at the thought of a run to

her grandmother's such a fine morn-

ing, so she went and brought a little
basket for the cakes and butter; and
you may be sure she did not forget
to put on the little scarlet hood which
became her so well. She was very
soon ready, and the cakes and butter
were put into the basket and covered
with a clean cloth.

Now, it was not very far from
Little Red Riding-Hood’s home to
the cottage in which her grandmother
lived, so her mother thought little of
sending her alone. Still, on parting
with her, she told her not to stop too
long on the way She also charged
her with many kind messages for the
good old grandmother.

Little Red Riding-Hood promised
not to forget, and giving her two
kisses, and saying “Good-bye,” trip-
ped off as gay and light-hearted as.
any of the little birds that were sing-
ing on the boughs of the trees.

_ Now, there were some woodmen —



PIA TIDLE RED RIDPGAG- ACCe.

at work in the forest, cutting down
trees for firewood, and singing as
they dealt their strokes with willing
hands and heavy axes.- There was
also something there that threatened
danger to the little girl, namely: a
great hungry wolf.

This cruel animal had paid a visit

to a sheep-fold, thinking he could steal —

a lamb for dinner, but was disap-

pointed, for the watch-dog had caught

him, and beaten him soundly.

The wolf knew Little Red Riding-
and had often
watched and plotted to carry her off,

Hood’ very well,
that he mrght devour her. He was
desperately hungry this morning, and
out of temper, for he felt very sore
from his recent beating; but the sight
of the little girl made him grin with
delight.

~ Now, the wolf would like to have

made one spring at Red Riding-Hood, |

and have eaten her up at once; but

uncomfortable

he was too cunning for that, for the
woodmen were near, and he was
afraid they would see him, which
would never do. So he resolved to
make her acquaintance, and pretend
to be her friend.

One of the woodmen saw both the
wolf and Little Red Riding-Hood,

and, suspecting Master Grizzly was —

bent upon some mischief, kept a

watch on him without seeming to

do so.

Master Wolf walked daintily up
to Little Red Riding-Hood, wagging
his tail, and tried his best to appear
as- amiable .as possible, ceeded very well; only his great green
eyes had a most treacherous look,
and glared in a hungry, and very
manner. When he
smiled, he showed a double row of
sharp, dangerous-looking white teeth.
But she felt not the slightest fear of

him. The wolf made a graceful bow,







PIFTLE REDPORIDING HOOD.

and said: ‘“Good-morning, Little Red

Riding-Hood.”

— “Good-morning, Master Wolf,” re-
plied Little Red Riding-Hood.

“And, pray, where are you going
so early, my darling?” continued the
wolf.

“Tam going to my grandmother's,”
answered the child.

“Your grandmother? how is the
dear old lady?” asked the wolf, pre-
_ tending to take the greatest interest

in her welfare.

ene has. been very sick, and.

is not. yet well;’ said Little Red
Riding-Hood.
some cakes, and a pot of nice fresh

butter.”

“i am taking her

-. Dear me! | am sorry to hear:my
respected friend, your grandmother,
is out of health. I will call upon
her; she will be glad to see me,
I have no doubt. Allow me to

carry your basket, my dear; I fear

will call and see her.

Atothe: same. tie
GIVING a. Shy, sniff, and
almost thrusting his nose into the

basket.

you are. tired.

hungry

Little Red Riding-Hood thought —

this was rather rude of him, his polite offer, but only said; 0
no, -I thank-you; I. am “neta oe
tired.” o
“Well,” said the wolf, “give my
love to your grandmother, and say I

Now, suppose

I take this path to the right, and you ~

follow that one, and well see which

of us gets there first.”

Now, this cunning old wolf knew —
very well he would get to the old
He had chosen

dame’s cottage first.

the shortest way, you may be sure;

and not only that, but as soon as
the child was out of sight, he set off
galloping as hard as he could go. :

Little Red Riding-Hood had no |

cause to hurry, it being yet early;



LITTLE RED RIDING HEU.

she loitered along the pleasant forest
path, to gather the pretty wild-flow-
ers that grew by the wayside, to
“ Grand-mamma

to herself,

make .a nosegay.
likes flowers,” she said
“and she will be pleased if I bring
her a handsome nosegay; and a few
wood-strawberries, to eat with her
cakes will, perhaps, please her too.”

The pace at which the wolf ran

soon brought him to the grandmoth-.

ers cottage.
Then he
giving two little taps, as Little Red
~ Riding-Hood might have done.
“Who's there?” cried the old dame.
| fais 1; .said the -wolf, imitating
Little Red Riding-Hood's voice.
The grandmother, as she lay in

knocked at the door,

bed, almost asleep, thought her grand-
child must have a bad cold to speak
in such a gruff way. Never suspect-
ing for a moment any one else was

there, “Pull the bobbin

she said:

and the latch will fly up, and come

% 9

In.

So the wolf took the bobbin in
his teeth, and gave it. a jerk; then,
putting his shoulder to the door,
pushed it open and went in—very
much to the old dame’s astonishment
and alarm, for she knew him to be
a eruek: dishonest fellow; and as she
was certain he had some evil design
in coming there, she was on_ her
guard against him. |

“Good-morning, Madam,” said the
trying
looking as if he meant to eat her
up.

“Good-morning to you, sir,” replied

wolf, to be agreeable, but

the dame, as she moved to the other
side of the bed. a
“Your. grandchild told me~ this
morning you had been unwell, so
i —_— I would call to see how
you were.

The oranddame saw the aut eked







LOTTO ei NST 1 ETT LB

i
es





LIP LER AEP REDDING OOD.

fierce and hungry, so she instantly
got off the bed, away from the wolf,
and moved toward the door of a
closet, or small room, saying: “ Pray,
excuse me a minute, Sir; I am not

_ dressed to receive company.”

* Dont mind. me, T beg, said the.

wolf, with a horrid grin, looking
savagely hungry, and made a spring
across the bed, and seized the wrap-
per she had on with his teeth. But
fright made the old dame active,
and, as quick as thought, she slipped
off her
wolf had hold. of, and darted into
the closet, and bolted the door, be-
fore he could recover himself; then
fell down in a fainting-fit through
fight. %

The wolf grinned horribly with
rage and disappointment, saying to
himself: “ Well,
safe enough; Little Red Riding-Hood

ll have her for

never mind, she is

will soon be here:

loose wrapper which the

breakfast, and finish the old womnad

: for dinner.”

With these ‘savage sicughie? ‘the |
wolf put on the dame’s wrapper and

night-cap, and got into bed, pulling —

_ the clothes well up to hide his hairy

face. Presently he heard Little Red

Riding-Hood coming to the door;

then came tap! tap! tap!
“Who's there?”

cried the wolf,

this time trying to imitate tie grand-

mother's voice.

Little Red Riding-Hood thought,
“what a bad cold grandmother has
got to make her speak so _hoarse;’
but suspecting nothing wrong, she —
replied, “Your grandchild, with some —
nice cakes, and a pot of ‘fresh butter.”
— Pull the bobbin, my dear,” said the
wolf, “and the latch will fly up.” 3

Little Red Riding-Hood did as |
she was told; and walked into the .
room, all fresh and. rosy with her 2

walk, her basket on one arm, and |



LaiLTLE REO ALOT Ga Oe ee

the wild flowers on the other. She
got up on the bed, and was greatly
surprised when she saw how strange
the old lady looked as she lay tucked
up in bed.

“Whatever can have made grand-
mothers eyes so green?” thought
she, as she employed herself in ar-
ranging the flowers she had brought
with her on the mantel-piece; and,
as she was a tasty little thing, she
soon made the place look quite fresh

When she had finished,
she turned her bright face to granny

and neat.

with a look of triumph, and bade
her see how pretty she had made
her room.

Now, the pretended ‘grandmother
appeared to be very ill indeed, and

said in a feeble voice, “Oh! my dear —

grandchild, will you not come into

_ bed with your poor old granny; I am

too ill to get up and talk to you?”
Little Red Ruiding-Hood obeyed

without hesitation, and so tired was

she with her long walk, that in a

moment she had fallen asleep.

Now, the wolf was so sure of hie
prey, that he felt quite pleased with
himself at the success of his plans.
He could not help admiring the
beautiful little girl as she lay there
sleeping, and thought what a nice
breakfast he would have presently.

But, like many wicked people, he
deceived himself, as we shall pres-
ently see.

You remember the wood-cutters,
who saw the wolf with Little Red
Riding-Hood when they met in the
forest. Vell | they
wolf had some evil design that made
So they thought
it ‘prudent to see that. Latte: ted

Riding-Hood came to no harm, and

suspected the

him so very civil.

hastened to the cottage to see that
all was right. But what was their |

surprise, on looking through the win-
Pp Sg Ss







B/T7TiEF RED RIPIA G-HOOD.

dow, to see Little Red Riding-Hood
in bed, and the wolf standing over
her. There she lay, with her rosy
cheeks and pretty mouth, and close
er the sreat hairy face of the
long
teeth. While they were looking at
them with astonishment, Little Red

wo, with green eyes. and

Riding-Hood awoke, and began to
tell her grandmother (as she supposed)
all that had occurred since she left
home, and how she had met the wolf.

“And, oh! grandmamma, he was
so polite, and offered to carry my

basket for me.’

e-Did he, mdeed, my dear,’ said

the wolf, and laughed.

UM ES and he asked me where I
was going. I told him you were
sick, and I was coming to see you,
and bring you the cakes and butter.
He was sorry to hear you were sick,
and he said he would call and see

you; and I rather expected to find

oe
sid

Do you think I shall see —

him before I leave, grandma ?”

him here.

“T should not wonder if you did,”
replied the wolf, and gave her a
loving hug.

“Grandmamma, cried the child,
in the greatest surprise, “what great
strong arms you have got.”

“The better to embrace you with,
my dear child,’ said the wolf.

“But, grandma, what long, stiff
ears you have got.’

“The better to hear what you say,
my darling,” said the wolf, and his
eyes glared greener than ever. |

“What large green eyes you have

got, grandma, said Little Red Rid-

ing-Hood, so frightened she knew not
what to say.

“The better to see you with, my

~ child,” chuckled the wolf, showing

his ugly teeth.
Little Red Riding-Hood now sat

-up in bed, in the greatest terror.





Biiihe- Re DIRLOIN Ga OUe.

“Grandmamma! what a_ large
mouth, and oh! what big teeth you
have got.”

“Ah! ah! ah!

You to pieces, and. eat you ‘with,’

The better to tear

said the wolf—throwing off his dis-

-guise, giving a hungry growl, and

opening his mouth to bite her throat
—when whack! came a spear on his

head, then two or three stabs, which

knocked him off the bed, howling

- frightfully.

The woodmen, who had seen and
heard what the wolf was at, rushed
in just in time to save the life of

dear Little Red Riding-Hood. The

wolf howled for mercy, but they

soon killed him.

They asked Little Red Riding-

-Hood where her grandmother was,

‘ but she could not tell, because she

supposed the wolf was her grand-
Mother. “She was like’ one ina

dream.

They feared at first that the wolf
must have carried her off, or else
eaten her up. But one of the wood-
men, hearing the dame in the closet,
burst open the door, and to thetr

great relief they found her safe.

Little Red Riding-Hood fell upon

her neck, kissing her and weeping

for joy.

One
Little Red Riding-Hood, in a kind,
friendly manner: “Don't you think

of “the: -~weodmen © said: to

it would have been better if you
had come straight to your grand-
mother, without stopping to gossip
with the wolf? You would then
Let this
be a warning to you through life.” |
Little Red Riding-Hood was too
much flurried to reply, but she kissed

have escaped this danger.

the woodman, and tears flowed down |
her ..cheeks ‘freely. . When sne had
become composed, she promised to

do better in future.



nenhatind en rte? yet r





PrP PLE Rep ARID, Ge Ce.

The grandmother soon recovered
from her terrible fright, and produced
what good things she had to regale
the woodmen with, of which they
eat heartily, making a breakfast and
Little Red Ruiding-

dinner in one.

Hood and her grandmother ate but

little, but they..did their utmost te
make their deliverers welcome. The
woodmen highly complimented the
grandmother at her outwitting the
cunning old wolf.
After the woodmen had _ feasted
F well, they escorted Little Red Riding-
Hood home, and took the grand-
mother along with them. —

When they got home, and told the
end of the wicked wolf, all the vil

lagers rejoiced to hear their enemy
had been destroyed. A great deal of
good advice was given to Little Red
Riding-Hood by her friends, which
is to be hoped was a benefit to her.

In the village that evening all the
neighbors assembled, and they had
much rejoicing.

But I must leave you to imagine
all that, and conclude ‘with =a
advice the woodmen gave to Little
Red Riding-Hood, and which I give

my readers by way of moral—

MORAL.

If in this world secure you’d be,
From danger, strife, and care;
Take heed with whom you keep company,

And how—and when—and where.



ELLIE'S CHRISTMAS EVE.



NELLIE'S CHRISTMAS EVE.

By MISS FANNY WIGHT.





It was just before Christmas---the fast coming night
Fell in darkness and storm, every object was white;
With the soft, drifting snow, falling steadily down

On the house-tops and streets of a New England town.
Underneath a stone archway, crouched in a small heap,
A little child nestled as though fast asleep ;

But her dark eyes looked out through the pitiless storm, ~
And she held her shawl closer, to keep herself warm. |
Thus for hours had she waited---cold, hungry, alone,
Sad at heart and forsaken---yet never a moan
Had escaped her pale lips, as her motionless form
Lay helpless, half-frozen, and drenched by the storm.
A kind watchman, at length, upon going his round,
Peering into the archway, the little one found ;
Gently lifted her up in his strong arms, and said,

“ Deary me, little Missy, why are n't you in bed ?”



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Weilzes Christmas. Eve.

“Why, because,” sobbed the child, “ I’ve not vot any bed,
For mamma, sir, you see, is what people call dead,
Though she told me herself, when she bade me good-bye,
She was going to Heaven, and said I must try

To be such a good girl, that perhaps by-and-by,

The dear angels would take me up into the sky!

Two long nights I have waited, and yet they don’t come;
Do you think that their wings with the cold are too numb
To fly down here and fetch me? Ah! then I must go,
All alone by myself, through the darkness and snow,

‘ Till I find dear mamma, and her home, for you see

I'm afraid she is crying and fretting for me! -

And to-morrow, they say, will be Christmas Eve:

If 1 only could start right away, I believe

We might spend it together. So, please put me down,
And show me the shortest way out of the town.”

“But, my child,” said the watchman, “I can’t let you go |
All alone on your errand through darkness and snow ;

I will keep you to-night, safely sheltered, and warm,

_ And if in the morning it ceases to storm,



Nellies Christmas Eve.

The right hour for return---will you go back with me?

For it’s time I was starting my horses, you see.”

“Oh, no, thank you,” said Nellie, “I’d rather stay here---
Can you tell me if Heaven is anywhere near ?”

The old man shook his head in a queer puzzled way,

And replied, “ Well, I really don ‘'t know what to say---

There’s some nice folks around here, if that’s what you mean,
But I guess, little young-one, that you ’re pretty green,

And that some one’s been fooling you---telling you lies.”
Then the sweet childish face flushed with sudden surprise,
As she gently replied, “ But I know it is true,

For that’s where mamma is---I ’m going there too.”

So without saying more the man lifted her down,

Then he whipped up his horses, and drove back to town. __
Once again, little Nellie trudged onward alone,

As the pale wintry beams of the setting sun shone

~On the snow, which extended for miles all around,
Clothing all things in white, from the sky to the ground
Soon she came to a place, where the road branched in three,

Then she seated herself on a fallen oak tree;



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mM elites Cuhrisfmas F.ve.

And the way was so long, that I did n't believe

I could possibly get here to keep Christmas Eve !”
Kindly succor at last to the orphan had come;
Gentle hands chafed the limbs that were helpless and numb
~ While a soft loving voice, whispered low in her ear,
“The dear Father in Heaven has suided you here;

You have come to our home on this blest Christmas Eve,
And you never again its protection shall leave !”

And the sweet Christmas bells bore these tidings afar,

Till the echoes passed in where the gates were ajar;
Bringing peace and great joy to one angel of light,

Who had watched, helped, and guided the footsteps aright,
Of the child she had once fondly clasped to her breast;
And who now, thanks to God, had found shelter and rest |!

Bin that day little Nellie was nurtured in love,

While her mother looked down from the mansions above,
Breathing blessings and peace on these children of earth,
Who had taken her child to their hearts and their hearth.

*
oa
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AESOPS FABLES.



THREE CHRISTMAS BOXES.



Dear children, gather round my knee,
A simple story, you shall hear;
In which I hope, you all will see,
How strong a brothers love appears;---
The joy that doing good imparts,
Where true forgiveness fills the heart.

Look at this howling, hunted dog!
All- wild with pain, and fear she flies;
These wicked boys are at her heels,
And vainly to escape she tries.
With blood, and bruises covered o’er,
Poor little Fan can run no more!

Some passer-by, with pitying heart, —
Has stopped the hail of cruel stones:
~ Foor Kan has. reached. her. masters door,
And there, with sad and plaintive moans;
With broken limbs, and piteous cries,
She licks his gentle hand, and dies!



Three Christmas Boxes.

one happy brothers, then looked round,
To know why Tom so quiet kept;
And saw, with wondering surprise,
That Tommy from the room had crept;
They saw his box, unopened there,
And heard him “i on the stair.

eee noble Frank, with pity moved,
Said, “Will, go send poor Tommy here;
But dont come back again yourself,
Until I've made this trouble clear;
Go, brother dear, and make him come,
To have his share of Christmas fun.

Now Frank, in looking through his box,
Had noticed with astonished eyes;

A. double share of books and toys,
Which filled him with a clad surprise ;
And quickly ran, at once to see,

If Tommy’s box could empty be.



tetsu





Nellies Christmas Eve.

So the poor little wayfarer started once more,
Never stopping to rest till she came to a store,
Where the windows were full of such bread, cake, and pies,
That to see them was really a treat for the eyes!

First she counted her treasure and to her delight

Found she owned fifteen coppers, all shining and bright;
Five of these she invested in one loaf of bread,

« And the others will help me to Heaven,” she said;
“For perhaps if I ride but a part of the way,

I may still reach mamma by the close of the day.”

When her bread was all eaten, she stopped a street car;
Crept up on to the platform, and said: “ Please how far
Shall I get if I ride till the end of the day ?”

“Well,” the driver replied, “I should certainly say,

Quite as far as a child of your age ought to go.’

“That will do,” answered she, in a voice sweet and low.
Then she curled herself up in a soft little heap,
And worn out with her journey was soon fast asleep.
But a touch on her shoulder awoke her at last,

And a kindly voice said, “ Little one, it 1s past



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1 hree Cle teiuens Boxes.

With cries of joy, then, Frank and Will,
Soon had their. boxes opened wide;
What store of precious toys were there,

With. many useful things beside. |
A piece of Fairy-land it seemed,
Or something, that the boys had dreamed.

But where was Tommy, all this time? |
A sad, unhappy boy was he!
With fear and pain, his heart was filled,
No gleam of hope, could Tommy see.
He seemed to feel the cruel stones,
And hear poor Fanny’s dying groans.

So, while his brothers, filled the house,-
With joyous shouts, and cries of clee ;
Poor Tommy dared not touch “zs box;
An emsty one, he feared to see.
With tears of shame, he stole away,
No joy for him that blessed day!



Nelltes Christmas Eve..

“Tor, she said, “I’m so tired, I think I ll wait here,
And perhaps Santa Claus, with his tiny reindeer,
May soon come into sight, take me into his sleigh,
And make sure of my getting to Heaven to-day.”
With hope in her heart, but with feet cold and numb,
In the twilight she waited. “Oh, why don’t he come!”
At last sobbed the child, in deep accents of woe
Then flung herself hopelessly down in the snow.
There she lay all alone, while the fast coming night —
Folded close in its shadow the pitiful sight.

When at length the poor wanderer lifted her head,
ind uncovered her eyes, with a feeling of dread.

She espied a bright light from a house shining out.
Then she rose with an effort, and turning about,

With her dim tearful eyes scarcely heeding the way,
She half consciously followed its welcoming ray.
Soon she found herself standing i in front of a gate,
Which she opened and entered. The hour being late,
All the windows were curtained and dark, except one,
And from that streamed a light like a ray of the sun.



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Three Christmas Boxes.

And now, with saddened steps and slow,
Poor Tommy creeps into the room;
His heavy eyes, are dim with. tears,
His boyish face, is dark with gloom;
For well he knew, that justice grim,
Would say, “no Christmas toys for him.’

He sees, that brother Frank is gone,
And only Willies dog 1s there;
(A sister, she---to luckless Fan.)
The sight is hard for Tom to bear.
It brings to mind his sin again,
And fills him with remorse and _ pain.

He turns away from Willie's pet,
Alas! he cannot bear the sight;
When suddenly, his face lights up,
He glows with wonder and delight.---
A moment stands, with eager eyes;
Then breathless, to his box he flies.



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THE
POX AND THE MASK



A Fox, walked round a Toy-man’s shop,
(How he came there, pray do not ask)
But soon he made a sudden stop,
To look, and wonder at a Mask,—
A thing he ne’er had seen before,
And so he marveled, more, and more.

The Mask was beautiful, and fair,

A perfect Mask, as e’er was made;
Such as a lovely Lady wears, ©

At party, ball, or masquerade.
A dainty toy, with silken strings,
And shining gay, with golden rings.

He turned it round, with much surprise,
To find it prove so hght and thin ;
“Tlow strange,” he cried, with puzzled eyes,

“Here’s mouth, and nose, and eyes, and chin;

— Yet not a single thing behind,
The perfect features, can I find.”

“How lovely, are the cheeks, and lips,

And yet, there something still remains,
To make it perfect—what a shame—

So fine a head, should lack for brains!”
Then, with a look of lofty scorn, |
Turned on his heel—and straight was gone.

Thus to some boy, or maiden fair,

Who neither sense, nor knowledge gains;
We say with pain, “ Ah, what a shame

So fine a head, should lack for brains.”
Dear children, learn this moral true,
Lest you should all be dunces too.

THE

MAN anv uis COAT.



A man beat his coat,
Now and then, with a cane ;—
And astonished, one morning,
He heard it complain.

“Tow badly, I’m treated !
My fortune, how hard!

To beat me, dear master ;
Is this my reward ?”

“ T beat you!” he answered,
“The charge is unjust ;

I but gently endeavor,
To take out the dust.”

“The means I make use of,
To you may seem hard;

But it does not diminish,
For you, my regard.”

“My boy, whom I dote on,

More fondly than you;

‘I beat him, now and then,

For the same reason too.”

Though this fable is good,

Yet I never will blush;
To say, / prefer dusting,
My coat with a brush.

And to most of my readers,
I need not explain ;

That advice, is the brush,

I prefer to the cane.



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Three Christmas Boxes.

Now Santa-Claus: at ‘Christmas tine
Can all the acts of children ‘see;
And as their deeds, are good or ill,
So will their Christmas presents be!
You see him in his easy chair,
His good-wife smiling on him there.

They talk of Tommy’s wicked work;

And Santa-Claus with angry frown,

Says, “wickedness like this, my love,
With punishment, must be put down;
‘His cruel play shall cost him dear,
No present will he get this year.”

- Then up, and spoke the buxom dame;
A kind, and feeling heart had she!
“Dear husband, though your judgment blame,

With mercy, let it tempered be;
Well try his heart, with grief and pain,
But lead him back to hope again.’



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Nellie's Christmas Eve.
With her brown curls all tangled, her face cold and pale,
And a look so like death, that a pitiful wail
Rent the air, as the children, with sorrow profound,
Knelt about the poor wayfarer, low on the ground.
Then away from the darkness, the cold, and the night, —
Little Nellie was borne to the warmth and the light,
Where the gay Christmas tapers shone bright overhead,
On what seemed like the face of the motionless dead!
And the voices were hushed of the frolicsome band, —
As they gathered round Nellie, while each little hand,
Held up some gay treasure from off the bright tree,
Saying, “ Look, little girl! Oh! please wake and see
What the dear Santa Claus, who was passing this way, |
And paid us a visit, brought here in his sleigh!
This sweet doll is for you, and this dear little cup,
And this book full of pictures---oh! please to wake up!”
At these words little Nellie unclosed her great eyes,
Gazed around her a moment, then said with surprise: ©
“So [I'm really in Heaven at last! Do you know,
I have traveled so far through the darkness and snow,



OEE Pe eel, |S een ae led eee









Nellies Christmas Eve.

She had spoken aloud, and her words reached the ear

Of a little girl passing, who turned round to hear.

She was dressed in rich velvet, and long golden hair

Fell about her sweet face, which shone loving and fair

On the poor little outcast that sat at her feet.

“Ts it true, little girl, that you ’ve nothing to eat?”

“ Yes, indeed,” answered Nellie, and looked at the child;

“Are you one of God's angels?” the little one smiled,

Shook her radiant tresses, and whispered, “Ah! no.”

“Then I spose you can’t tell me the way I must go

oOo get soonest to Heaven? I wish that I knew

Why mamma went alone, without taking me too.”
“And I wish I could show you,’ the stranger child said,
“ The pathway that leads to the home of the dead;

- But I don't know myself, and might lead you astray,

Though perhaps this may help you along by the way.”

And poor Nellie beheld, with great joy and delight,

A purse filled with coppers, all shining and bright,

Which her new friend bestowed, as she bade her good-day |

(Without waiting for thanks), and ran quickly away.

nae



wees CILY AND. COUNTRY BAPE.



A city Rat of great renown,
Of pretty wit, and manners fine ;
When “all the world” was out of town,
Went—with a country friend to dine.
A very pohshed Rat was he,
Of taste correct, as you shall see.

The country Rat was very proud, .

To see his cousin from the Town;
He welcomed him, in accents loud,

And brought his best provisions down.
Plied him with bacon, bread, and cheese,
And tried his very best to please.

The dinner done—our city friend,
Whose dainty soul was sorely tried ;
With many a bow, and courteous smile,

Declared himself quite satisfied.
A crumb or two, brushed from his face,
And picked his teeth, with easy grace.

Then, to his rustic host he said,—
‘“Kixcuse me, sir, but I must say,

_ That in this wretched country place ;
Your talents rare are thrown away.

I pray you, then, come home with me,

And how we live in town, you'll see.”

It was enough—so off they set, —

And by the time that night came down ;

All travel-stained, and hungry, they,
Were glad enough to see the town.

And then, with soft and stealthy fect,

Ran swiftly through the silent streets.

They reached a large and handsome house,
And creeping through the grand saloon ;

All breathless, found themselves at last,
Snug, in a well set dining room.

The guests were gone, no servants there—

But stores of rich, and dainty fare.

Then with a grave, and courtly grace,
The well-bred Rat began to dine;
And helped his hungry, rustic friend,
To fish and fowl, aud rarest wine.
“Drink deep,” he said, “and banish fear,
No Cat or Dog, can reach us here!”

“This is the way we always live,

With ev'ry comfort, free from pain;
I hardly think you'll wish to go,

And try your country life again.”
Just then with growls, and fearful din,
A savage dog, came bounding in!

He sprang upon the table straight,

And broke some precious china-ware ;
But he was just, a thought too late,

And didn’t catch the pretty pair!
They heard the monster’s warning cry,
And found a hole of refuge nigh.

Then, said the panting country Rat,

As soon as he, his breath could gain ;
“T’ve seen enough of city life,

I'll seek my country home again. °
Sweet peace of mind, awaits me there,
More wholesome than the richest fare.”



THE SICK LION.

A Lion, who for many a day,

Had caught, and gorged himself with prey ;

At last, was laid*up with the gout,
So ill, he could not venture out;

Nor stir about, without a crutch,
Which didn’t help his temper much.
The Fox, who heard this bad report,
With prudence, seldom came to court.
He didn’t care to trust his skin,

Too much, the Palace gates within!
And this, is what he heard one day,
The Wolf, unto the Monarch say :—
“Your Majesty, I grieve to find,

The Fox, to treason seems inclined ;
Whene’er I meet him, through the day
All silently he slinks away.

No more, your Highness, sees him here,
He’s hatching mischief, Sire, I fear.”
Then, said the Lion, with a groan,
‘They'd leave me here to die alone;
But now, [ll stop this kind of thing,
And let them know that 7 am King.
Go straightway, bring the Fox to me,
And what he’s at—we soon shall see.”
Off went the Wolf, with wicked joy,
To think upon some safe decoy ;
While Master Fox, to save his skin,

~ With many bows, came smiling in.
Then bent his knee, with easy grace,
_ While watching close the Lion’s face.
The Monarch shook his mighty mane,
And with a growl, of rage and pain;
Said, “Sir, ’ve noticed that of late,
You do not in our presence wait!



“Now, Sir, explain yourself, I pray,
We'll hear what you have got to say.”
The Fox, then bowing low, replhed—
“Great King, ve traveled far and wide,
Since last I stood within this place,
And gazed upon that august face.
Magicians, many, have I seen,

And much among the doctors been.

To bring your Highness back to health,
(The task to which I set myself;)

I’ve vowed beneath no roof to dwell,
Until I see your Highness well.”

_ Just then, the Wolf with staring eyes,

Came in, and saw, with great surprise ;
The Fox, who talked with courtly ease,
And seemed the Lion much to please.
“And so,” resumed the Fox, I bring,
A cure unto my lord, the King!
Which must be tried without delay,
For so the wisest doctors say.

A Wolf-skin, fresh to keep you warm
Must from a Wolf, be reeking torn!
And here.is one, now near at hand,
Who will not for a trifle stand ;

I'm sure he'll do so small a thing,

As give his fide, to cure his King.”
The wretched Wolf, found out too late,
The:tender mercies of the great.

The Lion, with a mighty roar,

Soon pinned him helpless to the floor ;
With eager haste, tore off his skin,
And soon was snugly wrapped within!
But Master Fox, ran off amain,

And never came to court again.



THE BOG IN THE MANGER.



An honest Bull, devoid of harm,
Once lived upon a pleasant farm.

He had a gentle, Cow for wife,

And led a peaceful, happy life.

One, little one, had blest the two,

As sweet a calf as ever grew.

And so they lived, in honest pride,
Beloved by all the country side.

An open-handed pair, were they,
And never turned the poor away.

No beggar passed the open door,
Without addition to his store.

One day, a dog of visage grim,

With stumpy tail, and twisted limbs;
All spent with thirst, and hunger sore,
Stopped panting, at the cottage-door.
The good old Cow, by pity led,

Gave him a bowl of milk and bread ;
Then bade him to the barn repair,
And rest his wearied body there.

He seeks the barn, without delay,
And in a manger, filled with hay ;
All fresh, and scented to his mind,

A sweet repose, he hopes to find.
Into the place, with eager leap,

He springs, and finds—a calf asleep !— -

Curled up, and breathing low, he lay,
Concealed among the fragrant hay.
And now, I mean to tell you, how—
This wicked dog, repaid the Cow.
With cudgel raised, and growling low,
He gave the calf a cruel blow!

“Get out,” he cried, “’twere best for you, —

There isn’t room enough for two.”

The calf, amazed, with noisy tongue,

Out of the manger quickly sprung ;

With bleeding face, and bruises sore,
Fell, groaning loudly to the floor!

The Cow, with not a thought of harm,
Just then, was milking near the barn;
She heard the groans, and filled with fear,
Could scarce believe, her startled ears ;

Rushed to the barn, and near the door,

Beheld her calf upon the floor!

The dog watched from the manger nigh,
With ready stick, and blazing eye.

She raised her calf, and soothed his pain,
And set him on his legs again ;

Then led him tenderly away,

And to the snarling dog, did say :—
“Are these the thanks, you wicked scamp.
I get, when I relieve a tramp?

My husband, sir, will teach you soon,

To sing another kind of tune;

I hear him in the yard outside,

No doubt, he'll treat you to a ride.”

Just then was heard a mighty roar,

And Father Bull looked in the door!

The wretched dog, with whine forlorn,
Tried hard to dodge, the horrid horns ;
But all in vain, the raging Bull—

With boiling wrath, and vengeance full ;

Straight, drove him from his stolen lair,
And tossed him, yelling in the air!
Then, when he fell to Earth again,

Trod out, at once, his hfe and pain.
And thus you see, the lesson rude,

That came to base ingratitude!

by



Three Christmas Boxes.

Just where he left it, there-it Stam.
But now, ‘tis full and running oer, ©
With books, and toys, and wondrous things; ~
Where he had nothing seen before!
He took them out, with trembling hands;
Then, all at once, amazed he stands.

What is it, that poor Tommy sees?
That dyes his cheeks with burning pain;
He finds, upon a cross-bow tied, >
A card, which bears his brother's name.
Frank meant, that Tommy should not know---
But Santa-Claus had willed it so!

‘Tis done! and Tommy’s stubborn heart,
Is broken down with honest shame;
He knows, that Frank has filled his box,
Without a single word of blame.
His tears are flowing, thick and fast, |
True penitence, he feels at last.





OLD FABLES IN A NEW DRESS

—





THE FOX AND THE STORK.



N ancient Greece, as fables tell,
A Stork and Fox did neighbors dwell.

They were good friends, as friendship goes;

Although upon each other’s toes
They often trod, yet I must say,
’Twas always in a friendly way,
One day, the Fox in language fine,
Invited Mistress Stork to dine.

Upon the grass, beneath the shade,
An overhanging [lex made ;

In delicate, and rich array,

The dinner hot, and smoking lay.
Then Master Fox, the cunning elf,
Bade Mistress Stork, “ to help herself.”
The Fox was hungry, and the Stork,
Could play a lively knife and fork ;
But now, to her intense dismay,
Could not exactly see the way ;

For soup, in shallow dishes there,
Composed alone the bill of fare!
And Mistress Stork with slender bill,
Had much ado, her beak to fill;
Could hardly get a single drop,

To ease her hungry, empty crop ;—
While Master Fox, snuffed up the breeze,

And lapped the toothsome soup with ease.
, Then with a sigh of deep content,
A look on Mistress Stork he bent;

Lay back upon the grass beneath,

And sweetly smiling, picked his teeth.

Now Mistress Stork was cunning too;
And did not make a great to-do,
But smiling at the Fox’s prank,

Arose, the wicked rogue to thank.

She said with look, and voice serene,
And all the grandeur of a Queen ;
“Dear Master Fox, politeness true,
I’m sure, is only found in you;
Thanks for your courtesy so rare,
And for your rich, and dainty fare.
To-morrow, will my birthday be,

And you must come, and dine with me.
To me, indeed, you’re like a brother,
And one good turn deserves another.”
Then pluming with a stately grace,
Her snowy feathers,—left the place.
The morrow came, a lovely day ;

‘|. And Master Fox, in grand array ;

Attired in many a gorgeous hue,

- With jacket red, and trousers blue ;

And dainty tread, and full of talk,
Arrived to dine, with Mistress Stork.

She led him to a sculptured stone,

Part of a temple overthrown ;
The fragment of an ancient shrine,

~ Where Gods of old, were wont: to dine.

And soon, a modest Rabbit maid,
Upon the stone, the dinner laid.

But what has come to Reynard now, -
And why that cloud upon his brow?
With haggard eyes—upon the stone,
He sees—all lovely—but alone!
With slender neck of wondrous grace,
A noble, pure Etruscan vase!

Then bending low her graceful head,
Sweet Mistress Stork, to Reynard said :
“Dear friend sit by, and eat I pray
Your appetite seems poor to-day.”



THE

-HOG AnD THE ACORNS.



One moonshiny night,

With great appetite ;
A Hog feasted on Acorns,

With all his might.

Well pleased with his prize,
Both in shape, and size ;

While he ate, he devoured,
The rest with his eyes.

Said the Oak, looking big,

“T should think, Mister Pig;
You might thank me, for sending

You, fruit from my twig.”

“But, you ill-behaved Hog,
You eat up all the prog;

And have no better manners,
It seems, than a dog.”

Said the Hog, looking up,
Though not ceasing to sup;

Till the acorns were eaten,
Aye, every cup.

“I acknowledge, to you
My thanks would be due;

If from feelings of kindness,
My supper you threw.”

“But I know that you drop,

Every year the same crop;
And that mighty Dame Nature,

Forbids you to stop!”

THE |
ASS ann THE SHEEP.



“How hard is my fate,

What sorrows await;”
Said the Ass, to the Sheep,

“My deplorable state!”

“Last night in a shed,
Cold, naked, ill-fed ;
The snow, wind, and rain,

Came in on my head.”

“While Master—he sat,

By the fire with the Cat;
And they both look, as you do,

Contented, and fat.”

“How can you pretend,”
Said her innocent friend ;
“To complain ?—let me, silence—

To you recommend.”

“My sorrows are deep,”
Continued the Sheep ;
With her eyes flowing over,
And ready to weep.

“T expect—tis no fable,

To be—from the stable;
To-morrow, dragged out,

And cut up for the table!”

“Don’t, envy me, pray,

For I’m sure that some day ;
Youll be hitched up to drag me,

To Market away.”



THE. OX% AND THE FROGS.

cme cane nat ce

A cotony of croaking Frogs,

Who lived within a shaking bog;

Were much annoyed by cattle’s feet,
Which stamped about their snug retreat ;
And sometimes killed, a frog or two,—
They didn't like it, nor would you. —
And so, one day with solemn state,
They held a croaking, high debate ;
And after many pros, and cons,

A way, at last, they fixed upon.

Up spoke a grave, and ancient Frog,
Who sate upon a mouldy log—

“Tf this affair, you'll trust to me,

A better state of things you'll see ;—

I know the mighty Ox who owns,

The pond which joins our marshy homes ;
With your consent, to him [Il go,

And your proceedings let him know.”
So said—so done,—and swelling high,
With danger in his goggle eye ;

With breeches red, and coat of green ;
(For he had in the army. been)

And visage stern, and bearing high,
And clanging sabre on his thigh ;

He knocked at Farmer Ox’s door,

And soon his highness stood before.
The Ox sat in his easy chair,

His pot and pipe, beside him there ;
An aged mastiff, by his side,

With specs, upon his nose astride.
Then said the Ox, with accents slow ;
“Dear Master Frog, I fain would know,—
To what I owe, this honor rare ;

And why, you strut, so proudly there ?”

Then with a swell, which at its worst,
Seemed like, his leather belt to burst;
The Frog made answer, “Sir, I’m here,
For what, will very soon appear ;

Your cattle, sir—lI grieve to say,

A vicious lot—come every day,

And in the pond, they splash and swim,
Without regard for life or limb.

Now, Farmer Ox, I say to you,

This state of things, will never do;

So near our marsh, they must not roam,
And you must keep your cows at home.
If not—some other mode we'll find

To fix this matter to our mind!”

This said—the Frog with visage wise,
Swelled out to an enormous size ;

Then clanked his sword, as if to say,
“7 know for one—a speedy way.”

Then Farmer Ox, with humor grim,
And burning eye, replied to him ;
“Great Sir,” your eloquence so fine,

I would not dare to match with mine;
Your modest message shall not wait,
This honest dog shall answer straight.”
Then, at a wink—the growling dog,
Flew fiercely at the luckless Frog ;

And seizing him, with savage roar,

All lifeless, dashed him to the floor!

Then, to the marsh they quickly speed,
And slaughter all the croaking breed !
Who learned the bitter truth at length,
; That weakness, must not threaten strength ;
* And civil words will often gain,

_A point, that rudeness seeks in vain



Nelltes Christmas Eve.
We will talk of this journey to lands far away _
Which you ‘never can reach in the course of a day.”
So poor little Nellie consented, and soon the bright light
Of the station-house gleamed through the darkness of night;
_ And the little one slept (after being well fed),
~’ Till the daylight shone in on her tiny straw bed.
Then she sat up at once, and a look of surprise
Flitted over her face, while her beautiful eyes
Filled with tears for a moment, then out on the floor ‘
Sprung the two childish feet. Gently opening the door,
She noiselessly stole through the hall to the street,
In the hope that somewhere she should certainly meet
- With her good friend the watchman, who promised that day
He would start her for Heaven, and tell her the way!
But in vain did she gaze into each passing face--- -
He had disappeared utterly, leaving no trace! —
So she wandered, and wandered, till weary and worn
With threading the streets since the earliest dawn.
On a door-step she sank; cold, exhausted, half dead;
“Ol! I wish,” said the child, “ I'd a nice piece of bread!”





Lhree Christmas Boxes.

Quick as a flash, he leaves the room:
As quickly rushes back again---
Pie Own: pet dog, 1s in his arnis,
And seems to soothe his. bitter pain.
Dear Frank comes in the other door,
And smiling walks across the floor.

Then lommy, holding out his dog,
Said, “brother Frank, I've brought you here,
My own dear pet, for you to keep,” cs
(Here Tommy dropped a scalding tear.)
“And if youll take her now from me,

A better boy, [ll try to be.”

Frank's honest eyes, are full of tears:
He holds poor Tommy to his breast:
“Take “back your darling, brother dear,
And let me set your heart at rest.
Be kind, and good, in word and deed,
And that is all the pay I need.”



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FOX AND THE GRABES.



A Fox, one lovely Autumn day,
With thoughts of dinner in his mind ;
Went prowling forth, to look for prey,
And much to grapes, he felt inclined—
And soon, upon a trellis wide,
A rich, and fruitful vine, espied.

It grew upon a lofty wall,

O’er which the purple clusters hung;
And after many a grievous fall,

As upward to the fruit he sprung ;
He paused awhile, with lolling tongue ;
While high above, the bunches swung.

When suddenly, among the leaves,
Appears a mastiff, fierce and grim;
Who soon espies the thieving Fox,
And points a blunderbuss at him.
(The Farmer-dog, who owned the vine,
And meant to press the grapes for wine.)

“Get out,” he cried, “ you thieving rogue,
~ Or you shali have a taste of lead !”
Then Reynard sprang behind a tree,

And carefully concealed his head ;
And as the mastiff, left the wall,
In sneering tones, aloud did call;

“Your wretched grapes, are green and sour,
And only fit for stupid hogs ;

Henceforth, Pll carefully avoid,
All selfish, greedy, farmer-dogs.”

So saying, Reynard left the place,

With ears erect, but hungry face,

THE
FROG «ant tee Rav.



Once on a time, a foolish Frog,

Sick of the marsh, her native home ;
Vain, proud, and stupid as a log,

Made up her mind, that she would roam ;
And fix her habitation, where,
She’d breathe, at least, a purer air.

Away then, leaps the silly Frog,
Bent on a change, of any kind;
“Tt can’t be worse, than where I was,”
She said, “to travel, Pve a mind.”
A Rat, who saw her haste away, ©
Cried “Stop! you'll surely go astray !”

“Neer fear, I leave that filthy hole.
True talent now, will surely thrive ;

No longer, like the blinded Mole,
Will I be buried thus alive.

But, pray, (for I’m extremely dry),

Know you of any water nigh ?”

“None,” said the Rat, “you'll reach to-day,
Believe a friend, and take my word,

So slowly, do you make your way ;
This act of yours is quite absurd.

(xo to your native bog again,

And in your marshy home remain.”

“No!” on the journey, she was bent,
Although so weak, she scarce could hop ;
Her thirst increased, as on she went,
But nowhere, could she find a drop
Too late, she moaned, her folly past,
And soon she sunk, and breathed her last,



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SPPTTETTETT ARTY





THE |

belie y AND. THE RUSE.



Wirnin the Garden’s peaceful scene,
Appeared two lovely foes ;

Kach wished to be the reigning Queen,
The Lily, and the Rose.

The Rose, soon reddened into rage,
And swelling with disdain ;

Appealed to many a poet’s song,
To prove her right to reign.

The Lily’s height, bespoke command,
A fair imperial flower ;

She seemed designed, by Flora’s hand,

~ To deck her fairest bower.

And pointing to her graceful form,
She waved in envy vain;

The snowy petals of her crown,
To show her right to reign.

The Goddess Flora, chanced to hear,
This fierce, and high debate ;

And flew to part the rival Queens,

Ere yet, it was too late. — :

“You shine,” she said, unto the Rose, —

“With rich, and lovely sheen ;
While you”—unto the Lily fair,
“Surpass, in stately mien.”

“Until some flower, of richer hue,
Or rarer form be seen ;

That shall, in glory dim you both,
Let cach, be called a Queen.”

THE
BOY AND THE WASP.



Amona a garden’s lovely flowers,
A bright and active child ;
Knjoyed the briliant Summer hours,
And played with rapture wild.

And now, he sees a gilded Wasp,
Whose brilliant hues decoy ;

(As round, and round, he buzzing flies,)
The unsuspicious Boy.

He tries to catch the shining prize,
All eager for the chase;

With active wing, the cunning Wasp,
Still darts from place to place.

Till tired at last, the Insect sought,
To gain some slight repose ;

And soon he settled motionless,
Upon a blooming Rose.

And now the Boy, with cautious steps,
That not a sound disclose ;

Quick seizes, with an ardent grasp,
The Insect and the Rose.

The Wasp, amazed at this assault,
With rage began to sing;

And straight into the Infant's hand,
He plunged the poisoned sting!

The Boy, now dropped the angry Wasp,
And shrieking loud with pain ;

tan frightened home, and never chased,
A gilded Wasp again!



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lhree Christmas Boxes.

Ole Santa-C laus. then.--with a. kiss.
You might have heard a mile around:
The good old dame, with love embraced,
And chuckled low---a merry sound.
hen beth their heads, together laid:
To see what could, of Tom be made.

And, alter many doubts..and fears,
They hit at last upon a plan;
By which, they hoped the wicked boy,
Might grow to be an honest man.
And what the lesson proved to be,
And how it worked, youll shortly see.

And “Merry Christmas; now had..come, ;
And rank, and Will, were happy boys:
Three boxes, bearing each a name,
That ready seemed, to burst with toys;
Lay fair, before their eager sight,
And filled them with a wild delight.



. WELTTC STENTS UaS: EGE.
Then the child, in her wonder, forgot all her fright, |
And her long weary tramp through the cold and the night,
Crept up close to the window, and heard such a din
Of gay voices and laughter, she longed to peep in.

So she climbed up a trellis, and then such a sight

Was revealed to her eyes, that she shut them up tight,
Then unclosed them again. So unreal did it seem,
That she feared it would prove but a beautiful dream !
In the room she beheld a superb Christmas Tree,

All ablaze with bright tapers (and laughing with glee,

A frolicsome circle of gay girls and boys),

Laden down with rich treasures of candies and toys.
The dark eyes that looked in from the casement above,
On this bright blessed scene of contentment and love,
For a moment grew dim, the small hands lost their hold
(For the fingers were numb with the frost and the cold),
And the poor little child tumbled back in the snow,
With a sharp bitter cry full of desolate woe.

The door opened at once, and a broad cheerful ray

Fell across the -wide path where the little one lay,



-





Sap hV Ce PUN



Three Christmas Boxes.

So now, that brother Will had gone, —
He raised the lid, with gentle care; |
And saw, that not a toy or book,
Of any kind, was hiding there.---
Thought of poor Fan, with passing pain,
Then sighed, and, closed the lid again.

He stood a moment, deep in thought,
Then yielding to his genrous heart;
Filled Tommy’s box, up to the brim---
Of all his treasures, gave him part!
Then blushing, with the rosy glow,
That sweet forgiveness, can bestow ;---

Went softly from the quiet room,
That Tommy might be there alone;
And never need suspect the truth,
Of. what his brother's love had done. |
Ah! noble heart, so bright and_ fair
No angry hate could harbor there.

*



See POX
AND THE STORK.

(CONTINUED.)

“T’m sure, that what you eat with me;
With you can never disagree.

I know, ’tis modesty alone,

That makes you gnaw that nasty bone ;”
(A bone, the wretched Fox had found,
Picked clean, and bare, upon the ground.)
“Come now, be sociable and gay,

And eat as you did yesterday.”

This said—she dipped her slender bill,
_Deep in the vase, and ate her fill ;

One eye on Master Fox the while,

Who watched her with a hungry smile;
And licked the crumbs of meat that fell,
Where Mistress Stork had dined so well.
And now the Fox, with smile and bow,
And stomach void, and humble brow;
(rot up to take his leave at last,

And go where he could break his fast.

“Dear friend,” said he, “IT own with shame,

That I have sadly been to blame;

The silly joke, I thought to play,

You have repaid me well to-day.

All empty home, I justly go,

And how it feels, you’ve made me know.
When neat, you dine with me, you'll find,
The dinner strictly to your mind.

For every one, is like to mend,

Who gets as good, as he does send ;
And jokers, cannot well complain,

If jokes are played on them again.”

So saying—Reynard, faint and pale,
Went sadly off with drooping tail ;

And never more, whate’er his talk,
Attemped tricks, with Mistress Stork !

NIGHTINGALE
AND GLOW-WORM.

A NIGHTINGALE, Who all day long,

Had cheered the village with his song ;
Nor yet at eve, his note suspended,
Nor yet, when eventide was ended ;
Began to feel, as well he might,

The keen demands of appetite.

When looking eagerly around,

He spied far off upon the ground,

A something shining in the dark ;
And knew the Glow-worm by his spark.
So stooping down from Hawthorn top,
He thought to put him in his crop.
The Worm, aware of his intent,

Then spoke to him, right eloquent ;—
“Did you admire my lamp,” said he,
“As much as J, your minstrelsy ;

You would abhor to do me wrong,

As much as I, to spoil your song;

It was the self-same Power divine,
Made you to sing, and me to shine,
That you with music—I with light—
Might beautify, and cheer the night.
The songster heard his short oration,
And warbling out his approbation ;
Released him, as my story tells, —
And found a supper somewhere else.



~ From this short story, you may see,

How pleasant ’tis when friends agree ;
That brother, should not war with brother,
Nor worry, and oppress each other ;

But joined in unity, and peace,

Their happiness, with Love increase.
Pleased, when each others’ faults they hide
And grieved, if either yield to pride.









THREE CHRISTMAS BOXES.



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Three Christmas Boxes.

Frank was a noble, manly youth,
As frank by nature, as by name;
And when he saw poor Fan was gone,
_ The tears rolled down his face like rain!
He clasped her to his sobbing breast,
}men’ taid her tenderly to: rest.

This was a bitter blow to Frank:
bur ween he knew; ‘a bvo/Zerys hand.
Had played this cruel, wicked prank:
~lTwas almost more, than love could stand.
For Tom had tied to Fanny's tail--
The horrid, clanging, fatal pail!

And now again, the happy time,
Of Christmas bells, is drawing near;
And soon will greet, with merry chimes,
The crowning day of all the year; :
When songs of gladness, fill the land,
And love, and joy, go hand in hand.



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SPARKLING GEMS:

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Little Red Riding-Hood. | Aesop's Fables.
Nellies Christmas Eve.

‘Three Christmas Boxes.

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PRINTED IN COLORS.

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MCMOUGH LIN Baws. Nw York.
LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD.
LITTLE RED RIDING-HOOD.

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NCE upon a time, in a pretty

village, stood a neat little cot-

tage, covered with roses and honey-
suckles, and shaded by large trees

In this cottage lived a good woman,

who had a very pretty daughter—a

- sweet, dear little girl, with bright eyes

and long hair, falling in golden curls
Her

cheeks were as rosy as two ripe peaches,

all over her neck and shoulders.

and her laugh was the merriest you
would hear on a Summer's day; and
_ what was better than all this was,
that that little girl was a kind, good
3 child, with a gentle heart and obliging
manners. She had a pleasant smile
and cheerful word for all, and would
do anything to give pleasure to
others. : Poe

So at 1s. tro eid she became the

—__.-——-en""

greatest favorite with all the villagers.
Every one who knew her liked her;
and when she called to see any poor
or sick neighbor, her presence was like
a ray of sunshine to them, so pleased
were they to see her.

Now, although she was greatly liked
by all the villagers, far and near, none
loved her so dearly as her mother

This little girl's

and grandmother.

- grandmother, to show how much she

appreciated her goodness, made her a~
beautiful riding-hood of scarlet cloth,
such as ladies wore in those days when
they went out riding.

The little girl looked quite caine
in this riding-hood, and she found it

so handy and convenient, she seldom

went abroad without it; hail, rain. or —

shine, she would wear it—in fact, it
eee
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Ee LE he DRI DIN G-HOOT.

was her favorite article of dress. She
wore it so frequently, and looked so
nice in it, that when she was seen
coming along the village, the neigh-
~ bors would say:—“ Here comes Little
Red Ruiding-Hood,” till at last she
was known by that name, and no
other; indeed, I have never been able
to learn her other name. |

Now, the good old grandmother
had been very sick for a long time,
and, although not so bad as she had
been, she was not yet sufficiently well
to leave her cottage. So the mother,
who had been making some cheese-
cakes, and churning some butter that
morning, said to her daughter: “You
may go, my child, to your grand-
mother’s, and take her some of these
nice cakes, and a pot of fresh butter,
for her breakfast.” |

Little Red Riding-Hood was highly
delighted at the thought of a run to

her grandmother's such a fine morn-

ing, so she went and brought a little
basket for the cakes and butter; and
you may be sure she did not forget
to put on the little scarlet hood which
became her so well. She was very
soon ready, and the cakes and butter
were put into the basket and covered
with a clean cloth.

Now, it was not very far from
Little Red Riding-Hood’s home to
the cottage in which her grandmother
lived, so her mother thought little of
sending her alone. Still, on parting
with her, she told her not to stop too
long on the way She also charged
her with many kind messages for the
good old grandmother.

Little Red Riding-Hood promised
not to forget, and giving her two
kisses, and saying “Good-bye,” trip-
ped off as gay and light-hearted as.
any of the little birds that were sing-
ing on the boughs of the trees.

_ Now, there were some woodmen —
PIA TIDLE RED RIDPGAG- ACCe.

at work in the forest, cutting down
trees for firewood, and singing as
they dealt their strokes with willing
hands and heavy axes.- There was
also something there that threatened
danger to the little girl, namely: a
great hungry wolf.

This cruel animal had paid a visit

to a sheep-fold, thinking he could steal —

a lamb for dinner, but was disap-

pointed, for the watch-dog had caught

him, and beaten him soundly.

The wolf knew Little Red Riding-
and had often
watched and plotted to carry her off,

Hood’ very well,
that he mrght devour her. He was
desperately hungry this morning, and
out of temper, for he felt very sore
from his recent beating; but the sight
of the little girl made him grin with
delight.

~ Now, the wolf would like to have

made one spring at Red Riding-Hood, |

and have eaten her up at once; but

uncomfortable

he was too cunning for that, for the
woodmen were near, and he was
afraid they would see him, which
would never do. So he resolved to
make her acquaintance, and pretend
to be her friend.

One of the woodmen saw both the
wolf and Little Red Riding-Hood,

and, suspecting Master Grizzly was —

bent upon some mischief, kept a

watch on him without seeming to

do so.

Master Wolf walked daintily up
to Little Red Riding-Hood, wagging
his tail, and tried his best to appear
as- amiable .as possible, ceeded very well; only his great green
eyes had a most treacherous look,
and glared in a hungry, and very
manner. When he
smiled, he showed a double row of
sharp, dangerous-looking white teeth.
But she felt not the slightest fear of

him. The wolf made a graceful bow,

PIFTLE REDPORIDING HOOD.

and said: ‘“Good-morning, Little Red

Riding-Hood.”

— “Good-morning, Master Wolf,” re-
plied Little Red Riding-Hood.

“And, pray, where are you going
so early, my darling?” continued the
wolf.

“Tam going to my grandmother's,”
answered the child.

“Your grandmother? how is the
dear old lady?” asked the wolf, pre-
_ tending to take the greatest interest

in her welfare.

ene has. been very sick, and.

is not. yet well;’ said Little Red
Riding-Hood.
some cakes, and a pot of nice fresh

butter.”

“i am taking her

-. Dear me! | am sorry to hear:my
respected friend, your grandmother,
is out of health. I will call upon
her; she will be glad to see me,
I have no doubt. Allow me to

carry your basket, my dear; I fear

will call and see her.

Atothe: same. tie
GIVING a. Shy, sniff, and
almost thrusting his nose into the

basket.

you are. tired.

hungry

Little Red Riding-Hood thought —

this was rather rude of him, his polite offer, but only said; 0
no, -I thank-you; I. am “neta oe
tired.” o
“Well,” said the wolf, “give my
love to your grandmother, and say I

Now, suppose

I take this path to the right, and you ~

follow that one, and well see which

of us gets there first.”

Now, this cunning old wolf knew —
very well he would get to the old
He had chosen

dame’s cottage first.

the shortest way, you may be sure;

and not only that, but as soon as
the child was out of sight, he set off
galloping as hard as he could go. :

Little Red Riding-Hood had no |

cause to hurry, it being yet early;
LITTLE RED RIDING HEU.

she loitered along the pleasant forest
path, to gather the pretty wild-flow-
ers that grew by the wayside, to
“ Grand-mamma

to herself,

make .a nosegay.
likes flowers,” she said
“and she will be pleased if I bring
her a handsome nosegay; and a few
wood-strawberries, to eat with her
cakes will, perhaps, please her too.”

The pace at which the wolf ran

soon brought him to the grandmoth-.

ers cottage.
Then he
giving two little taps, as Little Red
~ Riding-Hood might have done.
“Who's there?” cried the old dame.
| fais 1; .said the -wolf, imitating
Little Red Riding-Hood's voice.
The grandmother, as she lay in

knocked at the door,

bed, almost asleep, thought her grand-
child must have a bad cold to speak
in such a gruff way. Never suspect-
ing for a moment any one else was

there, “Pull the bobbin

she said:

and the latch will fly up, and come

% 9

In.

So the wolf took the bobbin in
his teeth, and gave it. a jerk; then,
putting his shoulder to the door,
pushed it open and went in—very
much to the old dame’s astonishment
and alarm, for she knew him to be
a eruek: dishonest fellow; and as she
was certain he had some evil design
in coming there, she was on_ her
guard against him. |

“Good-morning, Madam,” said the
trying
looking as if he meant to eat her
up.

“Good-morning to you, sir,” replied

wolf, to be agreeable, but

the dame, as she moved to the other
side of the bed. a
“Your. grandchild told me~ this
morning you had been unwell, so
i —_— I would call to see how
you were.

The oranddame saw the aut eked

LOTTO ei NST 1 ETT LB

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es


LIP LER AEP REDDING OOD.

fierce and hungry, so she instantly
got off the bed, away from the wolf,
and moved toward the door of a
closet, or small room, saying: “ Pray,
excuse me a minute, Sir; I am not

_ dressed to receive company.”

* Dont mind. me, T beg, said the.

wolf, with a horrid grin, looking
savagely hungry, and made a spring
across the bed, and seized the wrap-
per she had on with his teeth. But
fright made the old dame active,
and, as quick as thought, she slipped
off her
wolf had hold. of, and darted into
the closet, and bolted the door, be-
fore he could recover himself; then
fell down in a fainting-fit through
fight. %

The wolf grinned horribly with
rage and disappointment, saying to
himself: “ Well,
safe enough; Little Red Riding-Hood

ll have her for

never mind, she is

will soon be here:

loose wrapper which the

breakfast, and finish the old womnad

: for dinner.”

With these ‘savage sicughie? ‘the |
wolf put on the dame’s wrapper and

night-cap, and got into bed, pulling —

_ the clothes well up to hide his hairy

face. Presently he heard Little Red

Riding-Hood coming to the door;

then came tap! tap! tap!
“Who's there?”

cried the wolf,

this time trying to imitate tie grand-

mother's voice.

Little Red Riding-Hood thought,
“what a bad cold grandmother has
got to make her speak so _hoarse;’
but suspecting nothing wrong, she —
replied, “Your grandchild, with some —
nice cakes, and a pot of ‘fresh butter.”
— Pull the bobbin, my dear,” said the
wolf, “and the latch will fly up.” 3

Little Red Riding-Hood did as |
she was told; and walked into the .
room, all fresh and. rosy with her 2

walk, her basket on one arm, and |
LaiLTLE REO ALOT Ga Oe ee

the wild flowers on the other. She
got up on the bed, and was greatly
surprised when she saw how strange
the old lady looked as she lay tucked
up in bed.

“Whatever can have made grand-
mothers eyes so green?” thought
she, as she employed herself in ar-
ranging the flowers she had brought
with her on the mantel-piece; and,
as she was a tasty little thing, she
soon made the place look quite fresh

When she had finished,
she turned her bright face to granny

and neat.

with a look of triumph, and bade
her see how pretty she had made
her room.

Now, the pretended ‘grandmother
appeared to be very ill indeed, and

said in a feeble voice, “Oh! my dear —

grandchild, will you not come into

_ bed with your poor old granny; I am

too ill to get up and talk to you?”
Little Red Ruiding-Hood obeyed

without hesitation, and so tired was

she with her long walk, that in a

moment she had fallen asleep.

Now, the wolf was so sure of hie
prey, that he felt quite pleased with
himself at the success of his plans.
He could not help admiring the
beautiful little girl as she lay there
sleeping, and thought what a nice
breakfast he would have presently.

But, like many wicked people, he
deceived himself, as we shall pres-
ently see.

You remember the wood-cutters,
who saw the wolf with Little Red
Riding-Hood when they met in the
forest. Vell | they
wolf had some evil design that made
So they thought
it ‘prudent to see that. Latte: ted

Riding-Hood came to no harm, and

suspected the

him so very civil.

hastened to the cottage to see that
all was right. But what was their |

surprise, on looking through the win-
Pp Sg Ss

B/T7TiEF RED RIPIA G-HOOD.

dow, to see Little Red Riding-Hood
in bed, and the wolf standing over
her. There she lay, with her rosy
cheeks and pretty mouth, and close
er the sreat hairy face of the
long
teeth. While they were looking at
them with astonishment, Little Red

wo, with green eyes. and

Riding-Hood awoke, and began to
tell her grandmother (as she supposed)
all that had occurred since she left
home, and how she had met the wolf.

“And, oh! grandmamma, he was
so polite, and offered to carry my

basket for me.’

e-Did he, mdeed, my dear,’ said

the wolf, and laughed.

UM ES and he asked me where I
was going. I told him you were
sick, and I was coming to see you,
and bring you the cakes and butter.
He was sorry to hear you were sick,
and he said he would call and see

you; and I rather expected to find

oe
sid

Do you think I shall see —

him before I leave, grandma ?”

him here.

“T should not wonder if you did,”
replied the wolf, and gave her a
loving hug.

“Grandmamma, cried the child,
in the greatest surprise, “what great
strong arms you have got.”

“The better to embrace you with,
my dear child,’ said the wolf.

“But, grandma, what long, stiff
ears you have got.’

“The better to hear what you say,
my darling,” said the wolf, and his
eyes glared greener than ever. |

“What large green eyes you have

got, grandma, said Little Red Rid-

ing-Hood, so frightened she knew not
what to say.

“The better to see you with, my

~ child,” chuckled the wolf, showing

his ugly teeth.
Little Red Riding-Hood now sat

-up in bed, in the greatest terror.


Biiihe- Re DIRLOIN Ga OUe.

“Grandmamma! what a_ large
mouth, and oh! what big teeth you
have got.”

“Ah! ah! ah!

You to pieces, and. eat you ‘with,’

The better to tear

said the wolf—throwing off his dis-

-guise, giving a hungry growl, and

opening his mouth to bite her throat
—when whack! came a spear on his

head, then two or three stabs, which

knocked him off the bed, howling

- frightfully.

The woodmen, who had seen and
heard what the wolf was at, rushed
in just in time to save the life of

dear Little Red Riding-Hood. The

wolf howled for mercy, but they

soon killed him.

They asked Little Red Riding-

-Hood where her grandmother was,

‘ but she could not tell, because she

supposed the wolf was her grand-
Mother. “She was like’ one ina

dream.

They feared at first that the wolf
must have carried her off, or else
eaten her up. But one of the wood-
men, hearing the dame in the closet,
burst open the door, and to thetr

great relief they found her safe.

Little Red Riding-Hood fell upon

her neck, kissing her and weeping

for joy.

One
Little Red Riding-Hood, in a kind,
friendly manner: “Don't you think

of “the: -~weodmen © said: to

it would have been better if you
had come straight to your grand-
mother, without stopping to gossip
with the wolf? You would then
Let this
be a warning to you through life.” |
Little Red Riding-Hood was too
much flurried to reply, but she kissed

have escaped this danger.

the woodman, and tears flowed down |
her ..cheeks ‘freely. . When sne had
become composed, she promised to

do better in future.
nenhatind en rte? yet r


PrP PLE Rep ARID, Ge Ce.

The grandmother soon recovered
from her terrible fright, and produced
what good things she had to regale
the woodmen with, of which they
eat heartily, making a breakfast and
Little Red Ruiding-

dinner in one.

Hood and her grandmother ate but

little, but they..did their utmost te
make their deliverers welcome. The
woodmen highly complimented the
grandmother at her outwitting the
cunning old wolf.
After the woodmen had _ feasted
F well, they escorted Little Red Riding-
Hood home, and took the grand-
mother along with them. —

When they got home, and told the
end of the wicked wolf, all the vil

lagers rejoiced to hear their enemy
had been destroyed. A great deal of
good advice was given to Little Red
Riding-Hood by her friends, which
is to be hoped was a benefit to her.

In the village that evening all the
neighbors assembled, and they had
much rejoicing.

But I must leave you to imagine
all that, and conclude ‘with =a
advice the woodmen gave to Little
Red Riding-Hood, and which I give

my readers by way of moral—

MORAL.

If in this world secure you’d be,
From danger, strife, and care;
Take heed with whom you keep company,

And how—and when—and where.
ELLIE'S CHRISTMAS EVE.
NELLIE'S CHRISTMAS EVE.

By MISS FANNY WIGHT.





It was just before Christmas---the fast coming night
Fell in darkness and storm, every object was white;
With the soft, drifting snow, falling steadily down

On the house-tops and streets of a New England town.
Underneath a stone archway, crouched in a small heap,
A little child nestled as though fast asleep ;

But her dark eyes looked out through the pitiless storm, ~
And she held her shawl closer, to keep herself warm. |
Thus for hours had she waited---cold, hungry, alone,
Sad at heart and forsaken---yet never a moan
Had escaped her pale lips, as her motionless form
Lay helpless, half-frozen, and drenched by the storm.
A kind watchman, at length, upon going his round,
Peering into the archway, the little one found ;
Gently lifted her up in his strong arms, and said,

“ Deary me, little Missy, why are n't you in bed ?”
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Weilzes Christmas. Eve.

“Why, because,” sobbed the child, “ I’ve not vot any bed,
For mamma, sir, you see, is what people call dead,
Though she told me herself, when she bade me good-bye,
She was going to Heaven, and said I must try

To be such a good girl, that perhaps by-and-by,

The dear angels would take me up into the sky!

Two long nights I have waited, and yet they don’t come;
Do you think that their wings with the cold are too numb
To fly down here and fetch me? Ah! then I must go,
All alone by myself, through the darkness and snow,

‘ Till I find dear mamma, and her home, for you see

I'm afraid she is crying and fretting for me! -

And to-morrow, they say, will be Christmas Eve:

If 1 only could start right away, I believe

We might spend it together. So, please put me down,
And show me the shortest way out of the town.”

“But, my child,” said the watchman, “I can’t let you go |
All alone on your errand through darkness and snow ;

I will keep you to-night, safely sheltered, and warm,

_ And if in the morning it ceases to storm,
Nellies Christmas Eve.

The right hour for return---will you go back with me?

For it’s time I was starting my horses, you see.”

“Oh, no, thank you,” said Nellie, “I’d rather stay here---
Can you tell me if Heaven is anywhere near ?”

The old man shook his head in a queer puzzled way,

And replied, “ Well, I really don ‘'t know what to say---

There’s some nice folks around here, if that’s what you mean,
But I guess, little young-one, that you ’re pretty green,

And that some one’s been fooling you---telling you lies.”
Then the sweet childish face flushed with sudden surprise,
As she gently replied, “ But I know it is true,

For that’s where mamma is---I ’m going there too.”

So without saying more the man lifted her down,

Then he whipped up his horses, and drove back to town. __
Once again, little Nellie trudged onward alone,

As the pale wintry beams of the setting sun shone

~On the snow, which extended for miles all around,
Clothing all things in white, from the sky to the ground
Soon she came to a place, where the road branched in three,

Then she seated herself on a fallen oak tree;
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mM elites Cuhrisfmas F.ve.

And the way was so long, that I did n't believe

I could possibly get here to keep Christmas Eve !”
Kindly succor at last to the orphan had come;
Gentle hands chafed the limbs that were helpless and numb
~ While a soft loving voice, whispered low in her ear,
“The dear Father in Heaven has suided you here;

You have come to our home on this blest Christmas Eve,
And you never again its protection shall leave !”

And the sweet Christmas bells bore these tidings afar,

Till the echoes passed in where the gates were ajar;
Bringing peace and great joy to one angel of light,

Who had watched, helped, and guided the footsteps aright,
Of the child she had once fondly clasped to her breast;
And who now, thanks to God, had found shelter and rest |!

Bin that day little Nellie was nurtured in love,

While her mother looked down from the mansions above,
Breathing blessings and peace on these children of earth,
Who had taken her child to their hearts and their hearth.

*
oa
ae
AESOPS FABLES.
THREE CHRISTMAS BOXES.



Dear children, gather round my knee,
A simple story, you shall hear;
In which I hope, you all will see,
How strong a brothers love appears;---
The joy that doing good imparts,
Where true forgiveness fills the heart.

Look at this howling, hunted dog!
All- wild with pain, and fear she flies;
These wicked boys are at her heels,
And vainly to escape she tries.
With blood, and bruises covered o’er,
Poor little Fan can run no more!

Some passer-by, with pitying heart, —
Has stopped the hail of cruel stones:
~ Foor Kan has. reached. her. masters door,
And there, with sad and plaintive moans;
With broken limbs, and piteous cries,
She licks his gentle hand, and dies!
Three Christmas Boxes.

one happy brothers, then looked round,
To know why Tom so quiet kept;
And saw, with wondering surprise,
That Tommy from the room had crept;
They saw his box, unopened there,
And heard him “i on the stair.

eee noble Frank, with pity moved,
Said, “Will, go send poor Tommy here;
But dont come back again yourself,
Until I've made this trouble clear;
Go, brother dear, and make him come,
To have his share of Christmas fun.

Now Frank, in looking through his box,
Had noticed with astonished eyes;

A. double share of books and toys,
Which filled him with a clad surprise ;
And quickly ran, at once to see,

If Tommy’s box could empty be.
tetsu


Nellies Christmas Eve.

So the poor little wayfarer started once more,
Never stopping to rest till she came to a store,
Where the windows were full of such bread, cake, and pies,
That to see them was really a treat for the eyes!

First she counted her treasure and to her delight

Found she owned fifteen coppers, all shining and bright;
Five of these she invested in one loaf of bread,

« And the others will help me to Heaven,” she said;
“For perhaps if I ride but a part of the way,

I may still reach mamma by the close of the day.”

When her bread was all eaten, she stopped a street car;
Crept up on to the platform, and said: “ Please how far
Shall I get if I ride till the end of the day ?”

“Well,” the driver replied, “I should certainly say,

Quite as far as a child of your age ought to go.’

“That will do,” answered she, in a voice sweet and low.
Then she curled herself up in a soft little heap,
And worn out with her journey was soon fast asleep.
But a touch on her shoulder awoke her at last,

And a kindly voice said, “ Little one, it 1s past
"

as
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1 hree Cle teiuens Boxes.

With cries of joy, then, Frank and Will,
Soon had their. boxes opened wide;
What store of precious toys were there,

With. many useful things beside. |
A piece of Fairy-land it seemed,
Or something, that the boys had dreamed.

But where was Tommy, all this time? |
A sad, unhappy boy was he!
With fear and pain, his heart was filled,
No gleam of hope, could Tommy see.
He seemed to feel the cruel stones,
And hear poor Fanny’s dying groans.

So, while his brothers, filled the house,-
With joyous shouts, and cries of clee ;
Poor Tommy dared not touch “zs box;
An emsty one, he feared to see.
With tears of shame, he stole away,
No joy for him that blessed day!
Nelltes Christmas Eve..

“Tor, she said, “I’m so tired, I think I ll wait here,
And perhaps Santa Claus, with his tiny reindeer,
May soon come into sight, take me into his sleigh,
And make sure of my getting to Heaven to-day.”
With hope in her heart, but with feet cold and numb,
In the twilight she waited. “Oh, why don’t he come!”
At last sobbed the child, in deep accents of woe
Then flung herself hopelessly down in the snow.
There she lay all alone, while the fast coming night —
Folded close in its shadow the pitiful sight.

When at length the poor wanderer lifted her head,
ind uncovered her eyes, with a feeling of dread.

She espied a bright light from a house shining out.
Then she rose with an effort, and turning about,

With her dim tearful eyes scarcely heeding the way,
She half consciously followed its welcoming ray.
Soon she found herself standing i in front of a gate,
Which she opened and entered. The hour being late,
All the windows were curtained and dark, except one,
And from that streamed a light like a ray of the sun.
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Three Christmas Boxes.

And now, with saddened steps and slow,
Poor Tommy creeps into the room;
His heavy eyes, are dim with. tears,
His boyish face, is dark with gloom;
For well he knew, that justice grim,
Would say, “no Christmas toys for him.’

He sees, that brother Frank is gone,
And only Willies dog 1s there;
(A sister, she---to luckless Fan.)
The sight is hard for Tom to bear.
It brings to mind his sin again,
And fills him with remorse and _ pain.

He turns away from Willie's pet,
Alas! he cannot bear the sight;
When suddenly, his face lights up,
He glows with wonder and delight.---
A moment stands, with eager eyes;
Then breathless, to his box he flies.
aber

areas eetette


THE
POX AND THE MASK



A Fox, walked round a Toy-man’s shop,
(How he came there, pray do not ask)
But soon he made a sudden stop,
To look, and wonder at a Mask,—
A thing he ne’er had seen before,
And so he marveled, more, and more.

The Mask was beautiful, and fair,

A perfect Mask, as e’er was made;
Such as a lovely Lady wears, ©

At party, ball, or masquerade.
A dainty toy, with silken strings,
And shining gay, with golden rings.

He turned it round, with much surprise,
To find it prove so hght and thin ;
“Tlow strange,” he cried, with puzzled eyes,

“Here’s mouth, and nose, and eyes, and chin;

— Yet not a single thing behind,
The perfect features, can I find.”

“How lovely, are the cheeks, and lips,

And yet, there something still remains,
To make it perfect—what a shame—

So fine a head, should lack for brains!”
Then, with a look of lofty scorn, |
Turned on his heel—and straight was gone.

Thus to some boy, or maiden fair,

Who neither sense, nor knowledge gains;
We say with pain, “ Ah, what a shame

So fine a head, should lack for brains.”
Dear children, learn this moral true,
Lest you should all be dunces too.

THE

MAN anv uis COAT.



A man beat his coat,
Now and then, with a cane ;—
And astonished, one morning,
He heard it complain.

“Tow badly, I’m treated !
My fortune, how hard!

To beat me, dear master ;
Is this my reward ?”

“ T beat you!” he answered,
“The charge is unjust ;

I but gently endeavor,
To take out the dust.”

“The means I make use of,
To you may seem hard;

But it does not diminish,
For you, my regard.”

“My boy, whom I dote on,

More fondly than you;

‘I beat him, now and then,

For the same reason too.”

Though this fable is good,

Yet I never will blush;
To say, / prefer dusting,
My coat with a brush.

And to most of my readers,
I need not explain ;

That advice, is the brush,

I prefer to the cane.
TOPO en canoe rae than se easne hbbetnma’

SAS
OO
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Three Christmas Boxes.

Now Santa-Claus: at ‘Christmas tine
Can all the acts of children ‘see;
And as their deeds, are good or ill,
So will their Christmas presents be!
You see him in his easy chair,
His good-wife smiling on him there.

They talk of Tommy’s wicked work;

And Santa-Claus with angry frown,

Says, “wickedness like this, my love,
With punishment, must be put down;
‘His cruel play shall cost him dear,
No present will he get this year.”

- Then up, and spoke the buxom dame;
A kind, and feeling heart had she!
“Dear husband, though your judgment blame,

With mercy, let it tempered be;
Well try his heart, with grief and pain,
But lead him back to hope again.’
SbADADISID AD AA IAS

<=
Retastece let
cee


Nellie's Christmas Eve.
With her brown curls all tangled, her face cold and pale,
And a look so like death, that a pitiful wail
Rent the air, as the children, with sorrow profound,
Knelt about the poor wayfarer, low on the ground.
Then away from the darkness, the cold, and the night, —
Little Nellie was borne to the warmth and the light,
Where the gay Christmas tapers shone bright overhead,
On what seemed like the face of the motionless dead!
And the voices were hushed of the frolicsome band, —
As they gathered round Nellie, while each little hand,
Held up some gay treasure from off the bright tree,
Saying, “ Look, little girl! Oh! please wake and see
What the dear Santa Claus, who was passing this way, |
And paid us a visit, brought here in his sleigh!
This sweet doll is for you, and this dear little cup,
And this book full of pictures---oh! please to wake up!”
At these words little Nellie unclosed her great eyes,
Gazed around her a moment, then said with surprise: ©
“So [I'm really in Heaven at last! Do you know,
I have traveled so far through the darkness and snow,
OEE Pe eel, |S een ae led eee



Nellies Christmas Eve.

She had spoken aloud, and her words reached the ear

Of a little girl passing, who turned round to hear.

She was dressed in rich velvet, and long golden hair

Fell about her sweet face, which shone loving and fair

On the poor little outcast that sat at her feet.

“Ts it true, little girl, that you ’ve nothing to eat?”

“ Yes, indeed,” answered Nellie, and looked at the child;

“Are you one of God's angels?” the little one smiled,

Shook her radiant tresses, and whispered, “Ah! no.”

“Then I spose you can’t tell me the way I must go

oOo get soonest to Heaven? I wish that I knew

Why mamma went alone, without taking me too.”
“And I wish I could show you,’ the stranger child said,
“ The pathway that leads to the home of the dead;

- But I don't know myself, and might lead you astray,

Though perhaps this may help you along by the way.”

And poor Nellie beheld, with great joy and delight,

A purse filled with coppers, all shining and bright,

Which her new friend bestowed, as she bade her good-day |

(Without waiting for thanks), and ran quickly away.

nae
wees CILY AND. COUNTRY BAPE.



A city Rat of great renown,
Of pretty wit, and manners fine ;
When “all the world” was out of town,
Went—with a country friend to dine.
A very pohshed Rat was he,
Of taste correct, as you shall see.

The country Rat was very proud, .

To see his cousin from the Town;
He welcomed him, in accents loud,

And brought his best provisions down.
Plied him with bacon, bread, and cheese,
And tried his very best to please.

The dinner done—our city friend,
Whose dainty soul was sorely tried ;
With many a bow, and courteous smile,

Declared himself quite satisfied.
A crumb or two, brushed from his face,
And picked his teeth, with easy grace.

Then, to his rustic host he said,—
‘“Kixcuse me, sir, but I must say,

_ That in this wretched country place ;
Your talents rare are thrown away.

I pray you, then, come home with me,

And how we live in town, you'll see.”

It was enough—so off they set, —

And by the time that night came down ;

All travel-stained, and hungry, they,
Were glad enough to see the town.

And then, with soft and stealthy fect,

Ran swiftly through the silent streets.

They reached a large and handsome house,
And creeping through the grand saloon ;

All breathless, found themselves at last,
Snug, in a well set dining room.

The guests were gone, no servants there—

But stores of rich, and dainty fare.

Then with a grave, and courtly grace,
The well-bred Rat began to dine;
And helped his hungry, rustic friend,
To fish and fowl, aud rarest wine.
“Drink deep,” he said, “and banish fear,
No Cat or Dog, can reach us here!”

“This is the way we always live,

With ev'ry comfort, free from pain;
I hardly think you'll wish to go,

And try your country life again.”
Just then with growls, and fearful din,
A savage dog, came bounding in!

He sprang upon the table straight,

And broke some precious china-ware ;
But he was just, a thought too late,

And didn’t catch the pretty pair!
They heard the monster’s warning cry,
And found a hole of refuge nigh.

Then, said the panting country Rat,

As soon as he, his breath could gain ;
“T’ve seen enough of city life,

I'll seek my country home again. °
Sweet peace of mind, awaits me there,
More wholesome than the richest fare.”
THE SICK LION.

A Lion, who for many a day,

Had caught, and gorged himself with prey ;

At last, was laid*up with the gout,
So ill, he could not venture out;

Nor stir about, without a crutch,
Which didn’t help his temper much.
The Fox, who heard this bad report,
With prudence, seldom came to court.
He didn’t care to trust his skin,

Too much, the Palace gates within!
And this, is what he heard one day,
The Wolf, unto the Monarch say :—
“Your Majesty, I grieve to find,

The Fox, to treason seems inclined ;
Whene’er I meet him, through the day
All silently he slinks away.

No more, your Highness, sees him here,
He’s hatching mischief, Sire, I fear.”
Then, said the Lion, with a groan,
‘They'd leave me here to die alone;
But now, [ll stop this kind of thing,
And let them know that 7 am King.
Go straightway, bring the Fox to me,
And what he’s at—we soon shall see.”
Off went the Wolf, with wicked joy,
To think upon some safe decoy ;
While Master Fox, to save his skin,

~ With many bows, came smiling in.
Then bent his knee, with easy grace,
_ While watching close the Lion’s face.
The Monarch shook his mighty mane,
And with a growl, of rage and pain;
Said, “Sir, ’ve noticed that of late,
You do not in our presence wait!



“Now, Sir, explain yourself, I pray,
We'll hear what you have got to say.”
The Fox, then bowing low, replhed—
“Great King, ve traveled far and wide,
Since last I stood within this place,
And gazed upon that august face.
Magicians, many, have I seen,

And much among the doctors been.

To bring your Highness back to health,
(The task to which I set myself;)

I’ve vowed beneath no roof to dwell,
Until I see your Highness well.”

_ Just then, the Wolf with staring eyes,

Came in, and saw, with great surprise ;
The Fox, who talked with courtly ease,
And seemed the Lion much to please.
“And so,” resumed the Fox, I bring,
A cure unto my lord, the King!
Which must be tried without delay,
For so the wisest doctors say.

A Wolf-skin, fresh to keep you warm
Must from a Wolf, be reeking torn!
And here.is one, now near at hand,
Who will not for a trifle stand ;

I'm sure he'll do so small a thing,

As give his fide, to cure his King.”
The wretched Wolf, found out too late,
The:tender mercies of the great.

The Lion, with a mighty roar,

Soon pinned him helpless to the floor ;
With eager haste, tore off his skin,
And soon was snugly wrapped within!
But Master Fox, ran off amain,

And never came to court again.
THE BOG IN THE MANGER.



An honest Bull, devoid of harm,
Once lived upon a pleasant farm.

He had a gentle, Cow for wife,

And led a peaceful, happy life.

One, little one, had blest the two,

As sweet a calf as ever grew.

And so they lived, in honest pride,
Beloved by all the country side.

An open-handed pair, were they,
And never turned the poor away.

No beggar passed the open door,
Without addition to his store.

One day, a dog of visage grim,

With stumpy tail, and twisted limbs;
All spent with thirst, and hunger sore,
Stopped panting, at the cottage-door.
The good old Cow, by pity led,

Gave him a bowl of milk and bread ;
Then bade him to the barn repair,
And rest his wearied body there.

He seeks the barn, without delay,
And in a manger, filled with hay ;
All fresh, and scented to his mind,

A sweet repose, he hopes to find.
Into the place, with eager leap,

He springs, and finds—a calf asleep !— -

Curled up, and breathing low, he lay,
Concealed among the fragrant hay.
And now, I mean to tell you, how—
This wicked dog, repaid the Cow.
With cudgel raised, and growling low,
He gave the calf a cruel blow!

“Get out,” he cried, “’twere best for you, —

There isn’t room enough for two.”

The calf, amazed, with noisy tongue,

Out of the manger quickly sprung ;

With bleeding face, and bruises sore,
Fell, groaning loudly to the floor!

The Cow, with not a thought of harm,
Just then, was milking near the barn;
She heard the groans, and filled with fear,
Could scarce believe, her startled ears ;

Rushed to the barn, and near the door,

Beheld her calf upon the floor!

The dog watched from the manger nigh,
With ready stick, and blazing eye.

She raised her calf, and soothed his pain,
And set him on his legs again ;

Then led him tenderly away,

And to the snarling dog, did say :—
“Are these the thanks, you wicked scamp.
I get, when I relieve a tramp?

My husband, sir, will teach you soon,

To sing another kind of tune;

I hear him in the yard outside,

No doubt, he'll treat you to a ride.”

Just then was heard a mighty roar,

And Father Bull looked in the door!

The wretched dog, with whine forlorn,
Tried hard to dodge, the horrid horns ;
But all in vain, the raging Bull—

With boiling wrath, and vengeance full ;

Straight, drove him from his stolen lair,
And tossed him, yelling in the air!
Then, when he fell to Earth again,

Trod out, at once, his hfe and pain.
And thus you see, the lesson rude,

That came to base ingratitude!

by
Three Christmas Boxes.

Just where he left it, there-it Stam.
But now, ‘tis full and running oer, ©
With books, and toys, and wondrous things; ~
Where he had nothing seen before!
He took them out, with trembling hands;
Then, all at once, amazed he stands.

What is it, that poor Tommy sees?
That dyes his cheeks with burning pain;
He finds, upon a cross-bow tied, >
A card, which bears his brother's name.
Frank meant, that Tommy should not know---
But Santa-Claus had willed it so!

‘Tis done! and Tommy’s stubborn heart,
Is broken down with honest shame;
He knows, that Frank has filled his box,
Without a single word of blame.
His tears are flowing, thick and fast, |
True penitence, he feels at last.


OLD FABLES IN A NEW DRESS

—





THE FOX AND THE STORK.



N ancient Greece, as fables tell,
A Stork and Fox did neighbors dwell.

They were good friends, as friendship goes;

Although upon each other’s toes
They often trod, yet I must say,
’Twas always in a friendly way,
One day, the Fox in language fine,
Invited Mistress Stork to dine.

Upon the grass, beneath the shade,
An overhanging [lex made ;

In delicate, and rich array,

The dinner hot, and smoking lay.
Then Master Fox, the cunning elf,
Bade Mistress Stork, “ to help herself.”
The Fox was hungry, and the Stork,
Could play a lively knife and fork ;
But now, to her intense dismay,
Could not exactly see the way ;

For soup, in shallow dishes there,
Composed alone the bill of fare!
And Mistress Stork with slender bill,
Had much ado, her beak to fill;
Could hardly get a single drop,

To ease her hungry, empty crop ;—
While Master Fox, snuffed up the breeze,

And lapped the toothsome soup with ease.
, Then with a sigh of deep content,
A look on Mistress Stork he bent;

Lay back upon the grass beneath,

And sweetly smiling, picked his teeth.

Now Mistress Stork was cunning too;
And did not make a great to-do,
But smiling at the Fox’s prank,

Arose, the wicked rogue to thank.

She said with look, and voice serene,
And all the grandeur of a Queen ;
“Dear Master Fox, politeness true,
I’m sure, is only found in you;
Thanks for your courtesy so rare,
And for your rich, and dainty fare.
To-morrow, will my birthday be,

And you must come, and dine with me.
To me, indeed, you’re like a brother,
And one good turn deserves another.”
Then pluming with a stately grace,
Her snowy feathers,—left the place.
The morrow came, a lovely day ;

‘|. And Master Fox, in grand array ;

Attired in many a gorgeous hue,

- With jacket red, and trousers blue ;

And dainty tread, and full of talk,
Arrived to dine, with Mistress Stork.

She led him to a sculptured stone,

Part of a temple overthrown ;
The fragment of an ancient shrine,

~ Where Gods of old, were wont: to dine.

And soon, a modest Rabbit maid,
Upon the stone, the dinner laid.

But what has come to Reynard now, -
And why that cloud upon his brow?
With haggard eyes—upon the stone,
He sees—all lovely—but alone!
With slender neck of wondrous grace,
A noble, pure Etruscan vase!

Then bending low her graceful head,
Sweet Mistress Stork, to Reynard said :
“Dear friend sit by, and eat I pray
Your appetite seems poor to-day.”
THE

-HOG AnD THE ACORNS.



One moonshiny night,

With great appetite ;
A Hog feasted on Acorns,

With all his might.

Well pleased with his prize,
Both in shape, and size ;

While he ate, he devoured,
The rest with his eyes.

Said the Oak, looking big,

“T should think, Mister Pig;
You might thank me, for sending

You, fruit from my twig.”

“But, you ill-behaved Hog,
You eat up all the prog;

And have no better manners,
It seems, than a dog.”

Said the Hog, looking up,
Though not ceasing to sup;

Till the acorns were eaten,
Aye, every cup.

“I acknowledge, to you
My thanks would be due;

If from feelings of kindness,
My supper you threw.”

“But I know that you drop,

Every year the same crop;
And that mighty Dame Nature,

Forbids you to stop!”

THE |
ASS ann THE SHEEP.



“How hard is my fate,

What sorrows await;”
Said the Ass, to the Sheep,

“My deplorable state!”

“Last night in a shed,
Cold, naked, ill-fed ;
The snow, wind, and rain,

Came in on my head.”

“While Master—he sat,

By the fire with the Cat;
And they both look, as you do,

Contented, and fat.”

“How can you pretend,”
Said her innocent friend ;
“To complain ?—let me, silence—

To you recommend.”

“My sorrows are deep,”
Continued the Sheep ;
With her eyes flowing over,
And ready to weep.

“T expect—tis no fable,

To be—from the stable;
To-morrow, dragged out,

And cut up for the table!”

“Don’t, envy me, pray,

For I’m sure that some day ;
Youll be hitched up to drag me,

To Market away.”
THE. OX% AND THE FROGS.

cme cane nat ce

A cotony of croaking Frogs,

Who lived within a shaking bog;

Were much annoyed by cattle’s feet,
Which stamped about their snug retreat ;
And sometimes killed, a frog or two,—
They didn't like it, nor would you. —
And so, one day with solemn state,
They held a croaking, high debate ;
And after many pros, and cons,

A way, at last, they fixed upon.

Up spoke a grave, and ancient Frog,
Who sate upon a mouldy log—

“Tf this affair, you'll trust to me,

A better state of things you'll see ;—

I know the mighty Ox who owns,

The pond which joins our marshy homes ;
With your consent, to him [Il go,

And your proceedings let him know.”
So said—so done,—and swelling high,
With danger in his goggle eye ;

With breeches red, and coat of green ;
(For he had in the army. been)

And visage stern, and bearing high,
And clanging sabre on his thigh ;

He knocked at Farmer Ox’s door,

And soon his highness stood before.
The Ox sat in his easy chair,

His pot and pipe, beside him there ;
An aged mastiff, by his side,

With specs, upon his nose astride.
Then said the Ox, with accents slow ;
“Dear Master Frog, I fain would know,—
To what I owe, this honor rare ;

And why, you strut, so proudly there ?”

Then with a swell, which at its worst,
Seemed like, his leather belt to burst;
The Frog made answer, “Sir, I’m here,
For what, will very soon appear ;

Your cattle, sir—lI grieve to say,

A vicious lot—come every day,

And in the pond, they splash and swim,
Without regard for life or limb.

Now, Farmer Ox, I say to you,

This state of things, will never do;

So near our marsh, they must not roam,
And you must keep your cows at home.
If not—some other mode we'll find

To fix this matter to our mind!”

This said—the Frog with visage wise,
Swelled out to an enormous size ;

Then clanked his sword, as if to say,
“7 know for one—a speedy way.”

Then Farmer Ox, with humor grim,
And burning eye, replied to him ;
“Great Sir,” your eloquence so fine,

I would not dare to match with mine;
Your modest message shall not wait,
This honest dog shall answer straight.”
Then, at a wink—the growling dog,
Flew fiercely at the luckless Frog ;

And seizing him, with savage roar,

All lifeless, dashed him to the floor!

Then, to the marsh they quickly speed,
And slaughter all the croaking breed !
Who learned the bitter truth at length,
; That weakness, must not threaten strength ;
* And civil words will often gain,

_A point, that rudeness seeks in vain
Nelltes Christmas Eve.
We will talk of this journey to lands far away _
Which you ‘never can reach in the course of a day.”
So poor little Nellie consented, and soon the bright light
Of the station-house gleamed through the darkness of night;
_ And the little one slept (after being well fed),
~’ Till the daylight shone in on her tiny straw bed.
Then she sat up at once, and a look of surprise
Flitted over her face, while her beautiful eyes
Filled with tears for a moment, then out on the floor ‘
Sprung the two childish feet. Gently opening the door,
She noiselessly stole through the hall to the street,
In the hope that somewhere she should certainly meet
- With her good friend the watchman, who promised that day
He would start her for Heaven, and tell her the way!
But in vain did she gaze into each passing face--- -
He had disappeared utterly, leaving no trace! —
So she wandered, and wandered, till weary and worn
With threading the streets since the earliest dawn.
On a door-step she sank; cold, exhausted, half dead;
“Ol! I wish,” said the child, “ I'd a nice piece of bread!”


Lhree Christmas Boxes.

Quick as a flash, he leaves the room:
As quickly rushes back again---
Pie Own: pet dog, 1s in his arnis,
And seems to soothe his. bitter pain.
Dear Frank comes in the other door,
And smiling walks across the floor.

Then lommy, holding out his dog,
Said, “brother Frank, I've brought you here,
My own dear pet, for you to keep,” cs
(Here Tommy dropped a scalding tear.)
“And if youll take her now from me,

A better boy, [ll try to be.”

Frank's honest eyes, are full of tears:
He holds poor Tommy to his breast:
“Take “back your darling, brother dear,
And let me set your heart at rest.
Be kind, and good, in word and deed,
And that is all the pay I need.”
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FOX AND THE GRABES.



A Fox, one lovely Autumn day,
With thoughts of dinner in his mind ;
Went prowling forth, to look for prey,
And much to grapes, he felt inclined—
And soon, upon a trellis wide,
A rich, and fruitful vine, espied.

It grew upon a lofty wall,

O’er which the purple clusters hung;
And after many a grievous fall,

As upward to the fruit he sprung ;
He paused awhile, with lolling tongue ;
While high above, the bunches swung.

When suddenly, among the leaves,
Appears a mastiff, fierce and grim;
Who soon espies the thieving Fox,
And points a blunderbuss at him.
(The Farmer-dog, who owned the vine,
And meant to press the grapes for wine.)

“Get out,” he cried, “ you thieving rogue,
~ Or you shali have a taste of lead !”
Then Reynard sprang behind a tree,

And carefully concealed his head ;
And as the mastiff, left the wall,
In sneering tones, aloud did call;

“Your wretched grapes, are green and sour,
And only fit for stupid hogs ;

Henceforth, Pll carefully avoid,
All selfish, greedy, farmer-dogs.”

So saying, Reynard left the place,

With ears erect, but hungry face,

THE
FROG «ant tee Rav.



Once on a time, a foolish Frog,

Sick of the marsh, her native home ;
Vain, proud, and stupid as a log,

Made up her mind, that she would roam ;
And fix her habitation, where,
She’d breathe, at least, a purer air.

Away then, leaps the silly Frog,
Bent on a change, of any kind;
“Tt can’t be worse, than where I was,”
She said, “to travel, Pve a mind.”
A Rat, who saw her haste away, ©
Cried “Stop! you'll surely go astray !”

“Neer fear, I leave that filthy hole.
True talent now, will surely thrive ;

No longer, like the blinded Mole,
Will I be buried thus alive.

But, pray, (for I’m extremely dry),

Know you of any water nigh ?”

“None,” said the Rat, “you'll reach to-day,
Believe a friend, and take my word,

So slowly, do you make your way ;
This act of yours is quite absurd.

(xo to your native bog again,

And in your marshy home remain.”

“No!” on the journey, she was bent,
Although so weak, she scarce could hop ;
Her thirst increased, as on she went,
But nowhere, could she find a drop
Too late, she moaned, her folly past,
And soon she sunk, and breathed her last,
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THE |

belie y AND. THE RUSE.



Wirnin the Garden’s peaceful scene,
Appeared two lovely foes ;

Kach wished to be the reigning Queen,
The Lily, and the Rose.

The Rose, soon reddened into rage,
And swelling with disdain ;

Appealed to many a poet’s song,
To prove her right to reign.

The Lily’s height, bespoke command,
A fair imperial flower ;

She seemed designed, by Flora’s hand,

~ To deck her fairest bower.

And pointing to her graceful form,
She waved in envy vain;

The snowy petals of her crown,
To show her right to reign.

The Goddess Flora, chanced to hear,
This fierce, and high debate ;

And flew to part the rival Queens,

Ere yet, it was too late. — :

“You shine,” she said, unto the Rose, —

“With rich, and lovely sheen ;
While you”—unto the Lily fair,
“Surpass, in stately mien.”

“Until some flower, of richer hue,
Or rarer form be seen ;

That shall, in glory dim you both,
Let cach, be called a Queen.”

THE
BOY AND THE WASP.



Amona a garden’s lovely flowers,
A bright and active child ;
Knjoyed the briliant Summer hours,
And played with rapture wild.

And now, he sees a gilded Wasp,
Whose brilliant hues decoy ;

(As round, and round, he buzzing flies,)
The unsuspicious Boy.

He tries to catch the shining prize,
All eager for the chase;

With active wing, the cunning Wasp,
Still darts from place to place.

Till tired at last, the Insect sought,
To gain some slight repose ;

And soon he settled motionless,
Upon a blooming Rose.

And now the Boy, with cautious steps,
That not a sound disclose ;

Quick seizes, with an ardent grasp,
The Insect and the Rose.

The Wasp, amazed at this assault,
With rage began to sing;

And straight into the Infant's hand,
He plunged the poisoned sting!

The Boy, now dropped the angry Wasp,
And shrieking loud with pain ;

tan frightened home, and never chased,
A gilded Wasp again!
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lhree Christmas Boxes.

Ole Santa-C laus. then.--with a. kiss.
You might have heard a mile around:
The good old dame, with love embraced,
And chuckled low---a merry sound.
hen beth their heads, together laid:
To see what could, of Tom be made.

And, alter many doubts..and fears,
They hit at last upon a plan;
By which, they hoped the wicked boy,
Might grow to be an honest man.
And what the lesson proved to be,
And how it worked, youll shortly see.

And “Merry Christmas; now had..come, ;
And rank, and Will, were happy boys:
Three boxes, bearing each a name,
That ready seemed, to burst with toys;
Lay fair, before their eager sight,
And filled them with a wild delight.
. WELTTC STENTS UaS: EGE.
Then the child, in her wonder, forgot all her fright, |
And her long weary tramp through the cold and the night,
Crept up close to the window, and heard such a din
Of gay voices and laughter, she longed to peep in.

So she climbed up a trellis, and then such a sight

Was revealed to her eyes, that she shut them up tight,
Then unclosed them again. So unreal did it seem,
That she feared it would prove but a beautiful dream !
In the room she beheld a superb Christmas Tree,

All ablaze with bright tapers (and laughing with glee,

A frolicsome circle of gay girls and boys),

Laden down with rich treasures of candies and toys.
The dark eyes that looked in from the casement above,
On this bright blessed scene of contentment and love,
For a moment grew dim, the small hands lost their hold
(For the fingers were numb with the frost and the cold),
And the poor little child tumbled back in the snow,
With a sharp bitter cry full of desolate woe.

The door opened at once, and a broad cheerful ray

Fell across the -wide path where the little one lay,
-





Sap hV Ce PUN
Three Christmas Boxes.

So now, that brother Will had gone, —
He raised the lid, with gentle care; |
And saw, that not a toy or book,
Of any kind, was hiding there.---
Thought of poor Fan, with passing pain,
Then sighed, and, closed the lid again.

He stood a moment, deep in thought,
Then yielding to his genrous heart;
Filled Tommy’s box, up to the brim---
Of all his treasures, gave him part!
Then blushing, with the rosy glow,
That sweet forgiveness, can bestow ;---

Went softly from the quiet room,
That Tommy might be there alone;
And never need suspect the truth,
Of. what his brother's love had done. |
Ah! noble heart, so bright and_ fair
No angry hate could harbor there.

*
See POX
AND THE STORK.

(CONTINUED.)

“T’m sure, that what you eat with me;
With you can never disagree.

I know, ’tis modesty alone,

That makes you gnaw that nasty bone ;”
(A bone, the wretched Fox had found,
Picked clean, and bare, upon the ground.)
“Come now, be sociable and gay,

And eat as you did yesterday.”

This said—she dipped her slender bill,
_Deep in the vase, and ate her fill ;

One eye on Master Fox the while,

Who watched her with a hungry smile;
And licked the crumbs of meat that fell,
Where Mistress Stork had dined so well.
And now the Fox, with smile and bow,
And stomach void, and humble brow;
(rot up to take his leave at last,

And go where he could break his fast.

“Dear friend,” said he, “IT own with shame,

That I have sadly been to blame;

The silly joke, I thought to play,

You have repaid me well to-day.

All empty home, I justly go,

And how it feels, you’ve made me know.
When neat, you dine with me, you'll find,
The dinner strictly to your mind.

For every one, is like to mend,

Who gets as good, as he does send ;
And jokers, cannot well complain,

If jokes are played on them again.”

So saying—Reynard, faint and pale,
Went sadly off with drooping tail ;

And never more, whate’er his talk,
Attemped tricks, with Mistress Stork !

NIGHTINGALE
AND GLOW-WORM.

A NIGHTINGALE, Who all day long,

Had cheered the village with his song ;
Nor yet at eve, his note suspended,
Nor yet, when eventide was ended ;
Began to feel, as well he might,

The keen demands of appetite.

When looking eagerly around,

He spied far off upon the ground,

A something shining in the dark ;
And knew the Glow-worm by his spark.
So stooping down from Hawthorn top,
He thought to put him in his crop.
The Worm, aware of his intent,

Then spoke to him, right eloquent ;—
“Did you admire my lamp,” said he,
“As much as J, your minstrelsy ;

You would abhor to do me wrong,

As much as I, to spoil your song;

It was the self-same Power divine,
Made you to sing, and me to shine,
That you with music—I with light—
Might beautify, and cheer the night.
The songster heard his short oration,
And warbling out his approbation ;
Released him, as my story tells, —
And found a supper somewhere else.



~ From this short story, you may see,

How pleasant ’tis when friends agree ;
That brother, should not war with brother,
Nor worry, and oppress each other ;

But joined in unity, and peace,

Their happiness, with Love increase.
Pleased, when each others’ faults they hide
And grieved, if either yield to pride.



THREE CHRISTMAS BOXES.
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Three Christmas Boxes.

Frank was a noble, manly youth,
As frank by nature, as by name;
And when he saw poor Fan was gone,
_ The tears rolled down his face like rain!
He clasped her to his sobbing breast,
}men’ taid her tenderly to: rest.

This was a bitter blow to Frank:
bur ween he knew; ‘a bvo/Zerys hand.
Had played this cruel, wicked prank:
~lTwas almost more, than love could stand.
For Tom had tied to Fanny's tail--
The horrid, clanging, fatal pail!

And now again, the happy time,
Of Christmas bells, is drawing near;
And soon will greet, with merry chimes,
The crowning day of all the year; :
When songs of gladness, fill the land,
And love, and joy, go hand in hand.
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