Citation
Never wrong, or, The young disputant

Material Information

Title:
Never wrong, or, The young disputant and, "It was only in fun" : tales for the young
Series Title:
Favourite library
Portion of title:
Young disputant
Uncontrolled:
It was only in fun
Creator:
Gilbert, John, 1817-1897 ( Illustrator )
Griffith and Farran ( Publisher )
Alabaster & Passmore ( Printer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Griffith and Farran
Manufacturer:
Alabaster & Passmore
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1869
Language:
English
Physical Description:
125 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 14 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Conflict management -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Certainty -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Humility -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Practical jokes -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1869 ( rbbin )
Onlays (Binding) -- 1869 ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1869 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1869
Genre:
novel ( marcgt )
Children's literature ( fast )
Pictorial cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Onlays ( rbbin )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Alabaster & Passmore was at this address from 1866-77 (cf Brown, P.A. London publishers and printers)
General Note:
Illustrations by John Gilbert.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements precede text.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALG8469 ( notis )
50254897 ( oclc )
002228162 ( alephbibnum )

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The Baldwin Library

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THE FAVOURITE LIBRARY.

A Series of Works for the Young complete in Twelve Volumes, each

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10.

11.

Pm 0 WO me

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with an Illustration by a well-known Artist, price 1s. cloth.

*,* The Twelve Volumes in an Elegant Box, price 15s.

. THE ESKDALE HERD-BOY. By Lapy Sroppart.
. MRS. LEICESTER’s SCHOOL. By Cuartes and Mary

LAMB.

. THE HISTORY OF THE ROBINS. By Mrs. Trrmmer.
. MEMOIR OF BOB, THE SHOTTED TERRIER.
. KEEPER'S TRAVELS IN SEARCH OF HIS MASTER.

THE SCOTTISH ORPHANS. By Lapy Sroppart.

. NEVER WRONG; or, THe Youne Dispurant.
. THE LIFE AND PERAMBULATIONS OF A MOUSE.
. TRIMMER’S INTRODUCTION TO THE KNOW-

LEDGE OF NATURE.

RIGHT AND WRONG. ae the Author of “ ALways
Happy ”

HARRY’S HOLIDAY; or, THE Dornes or Onn WHO
HAD NoTHING To DO. By JEFFERYS TAYLOR.

SHORT POEMS AND HYMNS For Cuimpren ro
comMIT TO Memory.

The above may be had, Two Volumes bound in One, 1s. 6d. each,
as follows :

_ LADY STODDART’S SCOTTISH TALES.

. ANIMAL HISTORIES. Tue Doge.

ANIMAL HISTORIES. Tuer Ropins anp Movsz.

. TALES FOR BOYS. Harry's Hoximay, and Never

W RONG.

. TALES FOR GIRLS. Lercestrser’s Scuoor, and Riaut

AND WRONG,

. POETRY AND NATURE. SuHorr Poems, and Trim-

MER’S INTRODUCTION.



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LONDON:
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SUCCESSORS TO NEWBERY AND HARRIS,
CORNER OF ST. PAUL’S CHURCHYARD.







ALABASTER & PASSMORE,
STEAM PRINTERS,
31, LITTLE BRITAIN, LONDON, E.G



CONTENTS.

PAGE
NEVER WRONG; OR, THE YOUNG DISPUTANT . @

“IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.” . P eri






NEVER WRONG, é&c.

CHAPTER IL

‘WHAT are you so busy about?” inquired Walter Sedley
of his cousin, Edmond Hargrave, whom he found sitting
alone in the school-room, a pencil in one hand, and with
the other turning over the leaves of a book nearly filled
with writing. “You know, Walter,” returned Edmond,
“that I, being the eldest_ boy in the school, have been
chosen by the rest to decide who is right and who is
wrong in any dispute or misconduct that may happen
out of school-hours, and this being the beginning of a
new year, I have been looking through my book of
trials and cases that have occurred during the last, that
I may make out a fair account of improvement or the
contrary.”

“Well, and which do you find the most of?” asked
Walter, impatiently, for the subject was anything but
agreeable to him, as my young readers will quickly



8 NEVER WRONG; OR,

discover. ‘I am sorry to say,” answered Edmond,
“that, with regard to yourself, there is little or no
improvement at all; for though in three cases out of
every four you, Walter, are the principal person con-
cerned, and proved to be in error, you have never, in
any one of them, signed your name as acknowledging
yourself to be in the wrong; I have the names oc-
casionally of all the other boys in the school, but you
have as yet never owned a judgment just that has been
given against you.” ‘That is, given by you, and set
down in your wise book,” said Walter contemptuously ;
“and pray, cousin Edmond, what does that prove?”
“ Only this,” returned Edmond, very coolly, ‘that you,
Walter, either are or believe yourself to be INFALLIBLE,
which word you will find, on looking in your Dictionary,
to mean ‘INCAPABLE OF MISTAKE.” “ Do you think I
don’t know that without your telling me?” again inter-
rupted Walter, petulantly; “considering how much
younger I am, I dare say I know the meaning of dic-
tionary words as well as you do.” “ You ought to do
so at least,” replied Edmond, “for, according to your
own account, you know everything, not only as well,
but a great deal better than other people do; and that
is the reason that it has been determined to give you
the name of ‘Never Wrong; or, The Young Disputant,’

oD)
till you prove you have no claim to it. You know we



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 9

do it all in good humour; it is only a sort of play: so
you need take no serious offence at all; and if by our
game of ‘Judge and Laws’ we cure one another of any
fault or folly, we are surely doing each other a service ;
you will own that to be correct, I suppose.” “Of
course I do,” returned Walter, “ but I can’t see that I
deserve to have a nickname, and I am determined that
‘I will never answer to it; it is not right of one boy to
make fun of another: I hate all such stuff.’ “So you
do when you are the boy to be made fun of, as you call
it,’ rephed Edmond; “but you did not say so, Walter,
when we named Master Willoughby, the other day,
Don Bompastes Furioso, because of his extravagant
way of speaking, such as calling his pens horrible,
wretched, and miserable, because they are a little too
soft or too hard for him; you thought nicknaming him
a good joke, and laughed as heartily as any of us.”

‘¢ And suppose I did, what does that prove?” asked
Walter, again. ‘I saw that he laughed himself, and
didn’t mind it, so there was no harm in making fun of
him ; besides, everybody could sce that he had the
fault, and that it would be a good job to cure him of
it.” “ And suppose, Walter,” said Edmond, “ that
everybody can see you have the fault of thinking your-
self always in the right, would it not be a good job to
~ cure you of it?” “To be sure it would, if I had it,







10 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

but I have not,” replied Walter, angrily. “Just prove
now, cousin Edmond, that I am never wrong, and you
may call me ‘Infallible,’ or anything else you please.”
“Tt is not my business now,” returned his companion,
“to prove that you are never wrong, but that you never
think yourself so.” “That’s not quitetrue, Edmond,” said
Walter, “for I have often declared that everybody that
ever lived must be wrong sometimes; so of course I
must be wrong occasionally, as well as the rest.”
“Aye, Walter,” replied his cousin, laughing, “but the
‘rest’ seem often to know when their ‘ sometimes’ take
place, but we never can find out when your ‘sometimes
wrong’ happen. If you break anything lent you, it
is sure to bean accident ; if you don’t keep to the rules
in or out of school, the poor rules are to blame, not
you of course,—they are bad ones; if you quarrel
with us, it is all our fault, and not yours,—-we ought to
know better than to say or do anything to offend you,
however unintentional; and added to all this, when
you make complaints of us to our master, you excuse
yourself by saying he has undertaken to educate us,
and if he don’t know our faults, how is he to cure
them? It is a good thing for us that he has more
sense and justice than to encourage idle tale-bearing
and misrepresentation even from you, who are his own
brother ; and I really believe, Walter, that you would



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 11

not make such foolish complaints to him as you do,
when you are cool, but only when you are ina passion.”
“No, to be sure I would not,” eagerly exclaimed Walter,
ever delighted to get rid of censure, and as constantly
insensible to its justice; ‘and of course, cousin
Edmond, when I am ina passion I ought not to be
blamed for anything I do, for then people scarcely -
know what they are about or what they say.”

“There again, Walter,” exclaimed Edmond, “ quite
right as usual, NEVER WRONG, of course; and yet there
is one thing you have mentioned that I think you will
hardly venture to defend.” “And what is that 2”
inquired Walter. “The being in a passion.” ‘“ And
so, cousin Judge,” cried Walter, in a great wrath, ‘I
am to put up with all manner of ill treatment without
being angry, just as though persons could help being
anery when they are offended.” “ Perhaps not always,”
said Edmond, ‘“ but then people ought to be sure they
have sufficient cause of offence before they get into
such a passion as you do, Walter, even supposing it to
be right to be in a passion at all.”

‘‘Tt is mighty easy to say; but I fancy it is a great
deal harder to do,” grumbled Walter; ‘but I can’t see
any reason, though you are my cousin, and older, for
your schooling and lecturing me in the way you do; if
I had not the best disposition and temper in the world,



12 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

I should never bear it, that I shouldn’t; you are
always trying to pick a quarrel with me. One does
not expect to find an enemy in one’s relation,” added
the perverse boy, becoming thoroughly excited ; ‘“ but
I don’t care for anything you can do or say; I know
that I hav’n’t any one of the faults you have told me
of, and the moment my brother comes home I will tell
him all about it.” ‘ Well done, ‘Never Wrong !’”
exclaimed Edmond, again laughing; “not one of the
faults I have been telling you of! and intend com-
plaining to your brother as soon as he returns from
his walk. But come, cousin Walter,” he added, more
seriously, ‘I cannot endure that you should call me
your enemy; you should recollect that it is your
brother’s wish, on account of our relationship and
difference of age, that I should assist, to the best of
my ability, in pointing out what may be of advantage
to you. You ought to know by this time, that, from
the circumstance of your being born so many, many
years after my cousin, Mr. Sedley, that you were a
great pet with both father and mother, who did their
best, with the help of grandmamma, to spoil you; so
that there has been not only a great deal to learn, but
a great deal to unlearn you; all you want is to have a
little more candour, more ingenuousness—I mean that
openness of temper which would incline you to believe



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 13

yourself wrong when told that you are so, without such
long arguments to prove it. You are always ready
enough to say that you must be sometimes wrong,
because no one is always right, as though such an
acknowledgment as that could be of any use. But
now, Walter, [ will make a bargain with you: the
first time, upon any occasion, you really seriously own.
yourself in error at the moment of being told so, I
will erase the name that so much offends you from my
book, and, what is more, will challenge the whole
school, one by one, (as your champion,) to single com-
bat with snowballs, if they should presume to again
call you ‘Never Wrong,’ ‘The Young Disputant,’ or
‘Infallible ;’ this is a capital opportunity for you, being
the Christmas holidays, which you and I, and some
others, are to spend at school; so let your reformation
take place before the time for snowballs goes over.”



14 NEVER WRONG} OR,

CHAPTER II.

AxouT an hour after the conversation between Edmond
and Walter, Mr. Sedley returned home. His first
inquiry was for his younger brother. ‘Do you want
me, Alfred?” asked Walter, somewhat impatiently, at
being interrupted in his play. ‘If I did not, I should
not have sent for you,” returned Mr. Sedley, mildly.
“Of course I knew you must have some reason in
sending for me, brother; but then, you know, I could
not tell that you wanted me particularly, so that I need
come to you directly,” said the young disputant. ‘We
will not argue that point, Walter,” rephed Mr. Sedley :
“whilst you are under my care, it will be better that
you should always come immediately, whatever may be
my motive in desiring to see you. I sent for you now
that you might bring me the book you promised to cut
open for me against my return. Where is it? I ex-
pected to find it here.” ‘’Tis on my desk, I believe,
where you placed it,” returned Walter, in some con-
fusion, “but I have not opened it.” And why did
you not?” inquired his brother. ‘ Because I forgot
it,’ returned Walter boldly. ‘“‘How many times more,”
said Mr. Sedley, “ am I to be told of this forgetting,



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 15

when I inquire, Walter, for what you have been desired
to do, or promised you would do?” ‘* Well, brother,
you needn’t be so angry,” answered Walter, who always
mistook admonition for severity and injustice; “if I
have a bad memory, it is my misfortune, and not my
fault; and I am ready to say again, as I have done
before, I am sorry my being unable to recollect should
put you to inconvenience; and what’s the use of my
saying more?” ‘There is certainly no use in saying
more, or so much either,” said Mr. Sedley, ‘if it is
mere words, as I think it is in your case, for I do not
believe your memory to be at all in fault; you were
inclined otherwise to dispose of your time, and so you
forgot what you had promised to do, and this you call
want of memory.” “It is not very kind of you to say
so,” answered Walter, much offended; you wouldn’t
speak to little Henry that way ; when he said he was
sorry about something the other day, you didn’t make
the same answers to him as you do to me.” ‘ Certainly
not,” returned his brother, ‘“‘because I have no occasion
to do so, for I have always found, when Henry has said
he is sorry, he has at the same time, been convinced
that he was in fault, and has, moreover, taken care to
avoid a repetition of it.”

“ But, perhaps, Henry, being such a little boy, is very
much afraid of you,’ observed Walter, unwilling to

B



16 NEVER WRONG; OR,

give up the point as long as he could maintain it.
“Which it is very clear that you are not,” said the
patient Mr. Sedley ; “but I must explain to you that
there are two kinds of fear: one, the fear of being in
the wrong, arising from a sincere desire to do rightly,
and engage the respect of ourselves as well as that of
others. The fear that you allude to, in speaking of my
little boy Henry, could only exist in a nature like his,
where the parent or teacher is of a tyrannical, severe, or
passionate temper and disposition. Now, as I am neither ~
of these, but have, I trust, proved myself to be an affec-
tionate father as well as brother, I can see no reason
for your suggesting such an inducement for the good
behaviour of Henry. My poor Walter,” he continued,
with great emotion, “what a pity it is that our parents
suffered you to reason, as you call it, where they ought
to have commanded and you to have obeyed; what a
hard task they have given me to correct this habit in
you, and the wrong judgment it has induced you to
form upon almost every point of conduct that interferes
with your inclination.” “And I am sure,” sobbed
Walter, “I have as much to bear with, for I am always
being scolded for something or another: and I know I
don’t deserve it, for I never had a cross word said to
me till I came here, and I feel just as good now as [
did then.” “TI have no doubt that you do,” returned



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 17

Mr. Sedley, ; “but the truth is this, Walter, you had
precisely the same faults then that you have now: the
only difference with regard to them is, that now you
are told of them, and then you were not ; but you make
a great mistake in saying you are scolded, for, in fact,
you are never scolded at all.” “ Well, brother, I don’t
know what you may call scolding,” exclaimed Walter,
with a look that said, as plain as look could speak, “I
think now, at any rate, I must know better than you
do.” “I will explain myself,” resumed Mr. Sedley,
‘“‘ for I see you have mistaken the meaning of the word.
Scolding signifies not only chiding, but quarrelling, and
is a vulgar expression, wholly misapplied in your case.
I undertake to teach you the difference between right
and wrong ; I endeavour to make you love the one and
shun the other. If you mistake admonition and
reasoning for scolding, the fault is yours.”

‘Poor me !” exclaimed Walter, catching at the last
words, without considering what preceded them : “the
fault is mine, as usual; but I do think it very hard to
have a long lecture all about such a trifle as forgetting
to cut open a book.” ‘“ There you mistake again,
Walter,” said his patient instructor ; “ your neglecting
to cut open the book began the lecture, as you term it;
but that circumstance has nothing to do with its con-
tinuation : all that has followed is owing to your habit

B 2



18 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

of arguing and defending, instead of acknowledging
and amending your faults.” ‘I am sure I don’t mean
to say I am never to blame,” replied Walter ; “I know,
of course, that I must be in the wrong sometimes.”
‘“‘ That useless and oft-repeated sometimes,” sighed Mr.
Sedley ; “‘and why not wrong now, Walter?” ‘QO!
not now, brother ; I am quite sure that I can prove that
I am not, though I did forget the book,” said Walter,
eagerly ; “‘it was all owing to cousin Edmond; he has
been lecturing me in.such a manner on what he calls
my faults.” ‘‘ And receiving a lecture on your faults,
you give as a reason for repeating one immediately—I
mean that of forgetting what you ought to have re-
membered,” said Mr. Sedley ; ‘‘ this is a curious argu-
ment, almost too ingenious even for you, Walter ; but
we will pursue this conversation no farther at present.
It was my intention to take you out with me for a ride
to-morrow ; but I hope, if your memory is really what
you declare it, it will shew its unfortunate deficiency
by forgetting to remind me of the engagement ; for,
to prove it capable of retaining what is agreeable to
yourself, and not what is useful and pleasing to your
friends, is an inconsistency that, with all your fancied
skill in argument, you will, I think, have some difficulty
in reconciling.”

Walter, however, was of a very different opinion.



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 19

He thought there would be no difficulty at all.” “ My
brother,” said he to himself, on reaching his own room,
“ig a good-hearted fellow, but he quite forgets that he
was once a boy, the same as I am; and, forgetting that,
he expects me to be just as thoughtful and serious as he
is. A precious stupid sort of a young-old figure I should
make of myself, going about all day thinking! thinking !
thinking! afraid to play, lest something I have to do
should escape my memory ; and then if I remind him
of his promise for to-morrow, he will say I can recollect
just as well as he can, as though it was not a great deal
more natural for me to remember that, than the cutting
open of a stupid book. He ought to know that it is,
instead of blaming me in the way that he does.
_ Such, and many more like them, were the wise re-
flections of Walter on what his brother had said to him.
Instead of profiting by the good advice he was in the
daily habit of receiving, he had long been inclined to
regard those who told him of his faults, as enemies
more than friends; and, by the same perverted mode
of reasoning and judging, he deemed those boys to be
hypocrites, whose uniform and steady good conduct set
him an example he greatly needed, and would have
done well to have followed.

Now, as Henry was a remarkably quiet child, and the
best behaved of all the little boys, he considered him



20 NEVER WRONG; OR,

to be more pretending and deceitful than any of the
others, and often suspected that the motive of his strict
obedience to Mr. Sedley was that that gentleman might
make comparisons in his favour against the rest, and
him (Walter) in particular. The consequence of this
unfounded and illiberal opinion was a secret ill will,
aud often an openly unkind and pettish behaviour to-
wards the child, who bore it with great patience, never
for a moment thinking it possible that so near a relation,
and one he had early been taught to love, could have
any worse inducement for his conduct than the mo-
mentary hasty feeling arising from some outward cause.
Young as he was, he had refrained from angry words or
unkind actions in return; practising the excellent and
pious principle early inculcated, of endeavouring to
overcome evil with good.

But to return to Walter. That ingenious reasoner
in his own favour, having come to the decision that he
was, as usual, blameless, instead of repairing his error,
ran the risk of again forgetting, by resolving first to in-
dulge a sudden fancy to draw a caricature resemblance
of what he chose to imagine little Henry would be at
his age, that is, if he did not become wearied of being
so amiable before that time, or rather, as Walter be-
lieved, so hypocritical. The figure of poor little Henry
was soon sketched, with an enormous wig on his head,



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 21

a beard down to his breast, and a pair of spectacles
across his nose; a large volume was under hisarm, on -
the outside of which was written “ An Abridgment of |
all the Learning in the World. By Master Henry
Sedley, aged twelve years.”

Walter was so much pleased with what he considered
to be his cleverness, that he sat chuckling over and
gazing on his picture, whilst his brother’s book, that he
ought to have been employed on, remained still on his
desk, in the far end of the second school-room. How
long he might have continued thus lost in self-admira-
tion, had nothing occurred to disturb him, it is im-
possible to say, for he was still contemplating his per-
formance when he heard two or three voices at once
calling him by his name of ‘ Never Wrong.” Walter,
exceedingly angry, started up, intending to leave the
room and avoid them; but before he could do so, four
or five boys entered, amongst whom was Edmond and
Willoughby. ‘‘O! here you are,” said one of them ;
‘but why didn’t you answer us? we have been calling
to you for an ‘eternity of time,’ as ‘ Bombastes’ here
would say.” ‘* You didn’t call me by my right name,”
replied Walter, indignantly ; “Cand I shall, of course,
never answer to any other.” “QO! but you must,
though,” said Pemberton, the boy who had spoken first ;
- “the laws and decrees of Judge Hargrave are never to



22 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

be disputed.” Then he should make them better,”
answered Walter, sullenly. “That’s what you always
say, when they are against yourself,” retorted Pemberton ;
“but you must learn to own them just, the same as we
do. I had a nickname last year, but I soon got rid of
it; and so may you, if you like to do so.” “I only
wish that grandmamma could hear you,” said the petted
- boy; “she would soon let you know what it is to treat
me in this abominable manner.” ‘To be sure she
would,” responded Pemberton ; “ she would first trim
our jackets, and then pin us together in a corner with
her knitting-needles, and tell us we should have no
sugar on our bread and butter, till we consented to
spoil her darling, and make him more disagreeable, as
a play and schoolmate, than he is already.”

‘Order, order, Master Pemberton,” said Edmond
Hargrave, who never suffered their joking or finding
fault with each other to be disgraced by ill-nature.” “TI
must have no rough speaking; we must recollect, in
our game of Laws, that we merely mean to break our-
selves of foolish or bad habits, so that we may live the
happier together, as well as grow up wiser; but this
must be done with perfect good-humour, or else it is no
longer play, and had, therefore, better be let alone.
You must apologise to Walter, for speaking disrespect-
fully of his grandmother, who has meant to be very



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 23

kind to him, though, perhaps, she has a little mistaken
the right way in showing it.” “IT own myself wrong,
and beg your pardon, Walter,” said Pemberton, with
great good-humour ; “but you must not mind being
laughed at a little, any more than ‘Don Bombastes’
does; if you do, you have only to make the greater
haste in getting your new name crossed out of Judge
Hargrave’s book.” “ T am in hopes,” said Willoughby,
“that I have already made TREMENDOUS !—O no, that
is a mistake, I mean to say great—progress in getting
mine of ‘Bombastes’ erased. I am sure everybody
who has heard me lately must perceive that I take care
to use only the prettiest little quiet words ; I expect,
when I go home for the Midsummer holidays, I shall
express myself as though [ had learnt to talk out of a
baby’s primer, something in this fashion, all in one
syllable :—

How are you, dear pa?P

And how is my ma?

And where is puss cat P

Can she catch a rat?

And Wasp, the old dog,

Does he bark at the hog ?

I now have left school

Where I kept to each rule ;
So can write, read, and spell,
And have learnt to speak well



24 NEVER WRONG; OR,

Tn all that I say,

As you hear me to-day ;
Which I did not do once,
But I now am no dunce.”’

“Tf that is the way you mean to express yourself,”
said Edmond, laughing, “ you will only exchange the
name you have at present for another you may not
like so well; therefore be warned in time.”

‘¢ You see now, Walter,” said one of his companions,
“how good-naturedly Willoughby takes our laughing
at him; that is just what we want you to do: and
here, too, is ‘ Valiant’ or ‘ Alexander the Great,’ as we
sometimes call him: he is as little offended at having
those names given to him as ‘ Bombastes’ is.” ‘TI see
no ‘Valiant’ here, or ‘Alexander’ either,” returned
Walter; “I only see a young gentleman whom J call
Master Melville, but whom you have thought proper
to affront, the same as you have me.” A loud peal of
merry laughter burst from the boys at this grave
speech, delivered too, as it was, with great dignity of |
manner. “I will bet you anything,” cried Pemberton,
‘‘that Melville, instead of being affronted, is as much
amused as any of us at the joke upon him, and, I dare
say, won't object to my telling you how he got his
title, for I don’t think you know, being on a visit at
the time.” ‘ With all my heart, Pemberton,” said



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 95

Melville, ‘you may tell Walter the whole particulars,
if you please.”

“ Well then, Walter,” began the narrator, ‘‘ you must
know tliat, once upon a time, (as the story books say,)
‘Valiant’ was seated at a table, on which was a green
' pbaize, and in this green baize was stuck a pin with the
point upwards ; now this terrible and deadly weapon,
being of the smallest kind, was quite unseen by poor
Melville, who in a very brave humour was descanting
on all the great heroes he had read or heard of, from
Alexander the Great down to Jack the Giant Killer ;
at length he became so animated with his subject,
that he suddenly raised his hand in an ecstacy, his
eyes looking as bright as the sword he imagined he
was grasping, and declared that he should like, of all
things, to be a great warrior, and die covered with
wounds on the field of battle! So far, so good; but
unfortunately for so heroic a spirit, these words were no
sooner uttered than, in order to testify his earnestness,
he gave the table a great thump with his uplifted
hand, just where the unseen pin was, upon which this
gallant candidate for glory hallooed out in a loud voice,
‘Murder! fire! fury! Ive pricked my little finger!’
and he has gone by the name of ‘ Valiant’ ever since,
and so he will, till he leaves off his sudden and violent
exclamations on meeting with such trifling hurts; for,



26 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

as we are not so brave as he is, we are afraid that he
will frighten us some day out of our wits; and we
shall call Willoughby ‘Bombastes’ till he gets rid of
his horribles, miserables, and abominables and such
like superlatives, all about nothing.” Here’s some
lines in character for ‘ Bombastes,’” said Melville,
against Twelfth-night, as his mother has promised him
acake. Shall I read them?” ‘ Not till I have seen
them,” interposed Judge Edmond, “for I must be
certain they will not offend before I give permission,
and not then, unless Willougby allows it too.” The
lines were accordingly handed over to Hargrave, who,
when he had looked them through, gave them to the
youth for whom they were intended, telling him to do
as he pleased about them.

“Q do let us hear them!” cried several voices at -
once; and Willoughby, after shaking his head in pre-
tended displeasure, and saying it was a great deal too
bad of them to expect it, read as follows :—

‘**T’m so TERRIBLY hungry, it’s so DRADFULLY late,
And what an IMMENSELY long time I must wait,
Before this ENORMOUS—this WONDERFUL cake
Will be made, and the HORRIBLE baker will bake:
And when it at last from the oven shall come,

It p’rhaps will be WRETCHEDLY—MIS’ RABLY done ;
Or Ma may forget, and with a great key
In the ABOMINABLE cupboard lock it from me ;



bo
“N

THE YOUNG DISPUTANT.

Or, if I should get it, the next HORRID news

Will be, ?ve a character HATEFUL to choose,

Yet no anger I'll feel, but of my cake nice

Give all the boys round a TREMENDOUS large slice.’

“Tam sure that will be very generous of me,” said
Willoughby, “after your making so much fun of my
favourite words, as you call them. What do you say,
Judge Hargrave?” “I say that I think so too,” re-
turned Edmond ; “ yet I give it as my further opinion,
that there is no offence to be taken against Melville,
for by shewing Willoughby how absurdly such ex-
pressions sound, as applied on common occasions, we
shall not only greatly help to break him of them, but
deter others who might, from his example, acquire the
same habit.” ‘And I think it a great affront,” chimed
in Walter, “to have such rubbish as that written upon
anybody, and I only wonder that Willoughby has not
more spirit than to put up with it; for my part, I am
glad that I have too much proper pride and good sense
to be so easily and so ill-naturedly amused ;” and so
saying, he turned to leave the room with a look of
great contempt at the other boys.

“O don’t stalk off in that way, like a tragedy king,”
exclaimed Pemberton, placing his back against the
door; “you know we came here on purpose to seek
you; we want you to tell us what sort of weather it



28 NEVER WRONG; OR,

will be the day after to-morrow.” “ ‘There’s a question
for people who think themselves wiser than everybody
else!” cried Walter, exultingly. ‘ Not than everybody,
only everybody but you, Walter,” said Hargrave ; “ you,
you know, are never wrong.” ‘ And, therefore, must
be always right,” interposed another of the boys;
“and, that being the case, we thought we could not: do
better than ask you what sort of weather it would be
the day after to-morrow, because of our settling our
skating party.”

‘“‘ What nonsense!” exclaimed Walter. ‘‘ Not at all
nonsense,” said the other; ‘for we have often heard
you say, when your walks over to your grandmother’s
have been put off for another week, that you knew it
would rain or snow on that particular day to which it
was put off; so we were thinking that, if you could tell
us on one Wednesday or Saturday what sort of weather
it would be on the Wednesday or Saturday following,
you would be still more certain as to what it will be
on the day after to-morrow ; this is what I was calling
to you for.” “And I wanted to tell you, Walter,”
said Melville, ‘that my ball which you lost the other
day, has been found in Farmer Blake’s kitchen; you
had thrown it through a pane in the window, which
he says you must have mended.” “I dare say, indeed !”
replied Walter, ever ready at self-justification, ‘as



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 29

though [ could see his window with all those ridiculous
shrubs about it.” ‘Those ridiculous shrubs, as you
observed Hargrave, “I have heard

’

now term. them,’
you say, were the prettiest group of evergreens you
had ever seen.” “ Well, and if I did,” answered the
young sophist, I never said it was right to hide a
window with them.” ‘But you knew that they did
hide a window,” rejoined Edmond. “ But if I did,”
replied the uncandid boy, “ how was I to know that he
had glazed it with such stupid thin glass, that such a
light ball would break it? Besides, after all, it is only
an accident, and who can help an accident? I neither
expect to pay for it, or to be blamed either.”

“To be sure you don’t,” said Melville ; “you never
do for anything. When you lost my ball, instead of
owning yourself in fault, you told me I made more fuss
about it than it was worth, and that was all the con-
solation I got; you answered my complaints by telling
me you couldn’t help it, it was an accident.” ‘ Well,
and so it was,” reiterated Walter; “and who, I should
like to know, can help meeting with an accident?”
“Those who bestow a little more care and thought
than you do on what they are about,” remarked Har.
grave. ‘Don’t say another word upon the subject,
Hargrave,” interrupted Pemberton ; “I am delighted
to hear ‘Never Wrong’s’ opinion concerning the



30 NEVER WRONG; OR,

excusable nature of an accident, and that nobody can
avoid meeting with them, for I have been distressing
myself very much about one that has happened to
the kite he lent me.”

Walter turned very pale on hearing this, for his kite
was a valuable one, and he wished he had not spoken
so decidedly. “ What has happened to it?” he faltered
out. “ Why, somehow,” replied Pemberton, “the tail
must have got loose after I had placed the kite upon
the desk and against the wall; I am afraid it attracted
the notice of my cat, who was playing in the room at the
time, for when I returned there an hour or two after-
wards, I found it on the ground with Mistress Puss
frisking over it, and three large holes made in the
middle of it.” Walter was for some time silent; he
was searching his mind, or more properly speaking, his
imagination, for arguments by which he might prove,
that though his own case of the ball and broken
window was an accident, that of his kite was not. To
do this he found a more difficult attempt at reasoning
than any he had yet made; but he had been so long
accustomed to consider himself in the right and others
in the wrong, that he felt no doubt as to the fact, and
trusted he should be able to prove that it was so to the
rest. Luckily for him in his present dilemma, Pember-
ton spoke again, before receiving an answer, and, by



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 31

what he now said, gave Walter an opportunity for his
false mode of reasoning. “I am very sorry that your
kite has got torn,” resumed Pemberton, “though I don’t
think I am much to blame about it, for you will re-
member being in the room at the time that I folded
the tail as it is usually done, and very carefully as I
thought; and”—“ As you thought!” interrupted
Walter ; “‘now I know how my poor kite became torn ;
the tail was not folded carefully, and so puss got hold
of it; you ought to have been sure that you placed it
safely, and not trusted to thinking that you had done
so.” “You speak,” replied Pemberton, “as though
you understood I was only thinking now that I had
secured it, and not at the time, which is what I meant:
it is then that I thought it was quite safe; but cats
are often ingenious in their play, as well as mischievous.”
“ And if you know that they are so,” rejoined Walter,
“T can’t think how you can call what has happened
to my kite an accident, and I see no excuse at all
for it.”

“ No more than there is,” interposed Hargrave, “ for
your carelessly playing at ball close to shrubs, behind
which you know there is a window.” “I don’t sce
any likeness at all between the two cases,” replied
Walter, impatiently. ‘I dare say that you do not,”
said his cousin, “ because in the case of the kite you

C



32 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

are the injured party, and in that of the ball the
injurer.”

“T have not yet finished what I was saying. When
Walter interrupted me,” said Pemberton, “I was going
to remind him that I placed his kite where I did at
his own desire. You will remember, Walter,” he added,
“that you said, ‘ Let it be there, Pemberton, and, when
I go up stairs, I will take it with me, and put it away.’ ”

Walter was not at all pleased with this finish of what
he had so exultingly broken in upon. Wilful falsehood
was not among his faults; and, perfectly recollecting
that he had thus spoken, he immediately acknowledged
that he had. ‘“‘ But,” added he, “I forgot it then, and
how could I help that? Pemberton is still to blame,
for he knows what a bad memory I have, and he ought,
therefore, to have reminded me to take my kite up-
stairs before he left the room, and not let me run the
risk of forgetting it.”

“Well done! ‘Never Wrong’ again,” shouted the
boys.

““T wonder, Walter,” said one of them, “if the bell
didn’t ring for our meals, and nobody called you,
whether you would remember in what order they came.
I should not be surprised to hear you ask for breakfast
at tea time, and fancy supper was dinner.” “ Or,” said
another, “ with such a dreadful bad memory as you make



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 33

yours out to be, that you should forget to take some of
your clothes off when you go to bed, and so lie down
with your boots on, as winter socks, and your hat,
instead of a night-cap, wondering all night what makes
you so uncomfortable. Perhaps, by and by, you will
be like the absent man, who, entirely forgetting what
he was about, put his wet umbrella into the bed and
himself in the corner.”

“JT am not going to answer any such nonsense as
that,” returned Walter, angrily; “and as for you,
Pemberton, I can’t think why you should be allowed
to have such a mishievous beast as a cat.”

‘You forget, in your displeasure about your kite,”
observed Hargrave, “that it was yourself who begged
Mr. Sedley to let Pemberton keep poor puss, when he
so humanely saved it from the cruel boys who were
going to destroy it.” “Then, as I did that,” replied the
young disputant, “‘it ought to have made the cat’s
master more careful that she shouldn’t do me a mischief,
whatever she might the others: it is very hard that’
what I meant as a kindness to him should be a vexa-
tion and a loss to me. I never saw anything like you
all,” he added passionately ; “let me reason ever so
well, there is no convincing you. I wish there was
not a cat in the whole world.” “And yet you are
afraid of rats, and dislike mice,” said Hargrave. “And

c 2



34 NEVER WRONG; OR,

I know that you like plenty of light,” observed
Willoughby.” “Yet, for all this,” rejoined Hargrave,
laughing, ‘‘ Walter would have windows glazed with
horn, that he might play near without danger of
breaking them, and have the house overrun with vermin,
because it is too much trouble for him to remember
and think of consequences, as other people do; and
this he calls reasoning well.” “You are all mighty
clever, I dare say,” cried Walter, with increasing dis-
pleasure ; “and you are, every one of you, ready enough
to blame me,—that I will say,—but I know better than
to mind you; for though, of course, I must be wrong
sometimes, the same as you and everybody else in the
world are, I am not wrong now, except, indeed, in being
too good-natured ; for there isn’t a boy anywhere would
bear such lecturing from his schoolfellows as I do;
but Pll take good care to mend that fault; and to
begin, I declare, from this moment, I will never lend
anything to anybody again, let them ask me ever so.”
‘Then, of course, you don’t mean to borrow,” said
Hargrave; “and in that case, cousin Walter, I fancy
you will be the greatest loser ; for where you lend one
thing, you generally borrow at least half a dozen.”
“Come, Walter,” said Pemberton, good-humouredly,
seeing he was about to leave the room much offended,
“don’t let us part in anger; you pay Farmer Blake



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. oo

for his broken window, and I will buy you a new
kite.”

“You may buy me a new kite,” answered the self-
sufficient boy, “if you think you ought to do so: I
don’t want it, unless you do; and when I feel certain
that it is right for me to have the window mended, I
will have it done, but not before.”

‘OQ! poor, poor Farmer Blake,” cried several voices.
“Tt he waits for ‘Never Wrong’ to glaze his broken
pane,” said one, “he won't have to complain of want
of air in his kitchen during the winter.” “ Or dust in
the summer,” observed another, “if that is any ad-
vantage to him.” “You may say whatever you please:
I don’t care,” replied Walter, going; “but I shall
remember you all, that you may depend upon.” “We
will hope, at least, Walter,” said Hargrave, “ that, as
you are so apt to forget, you will not remember any-
thing that has seemed unkind or ill-natured towards
you, and that, when you join us in the playground, as
we hope you will, we shall all meet again with the
good feeling that schoolboys should bear to each other.”



36 NEVER WRONG; OR,

CHAPTER III.

Water, dissatisfied with his companions, and alto-
gether in a very uncomfortable state of mind, went into
his own room. When there, he began, as soon as his
agitation subsided, to reflect on the loss of his kite, and
that, in all probability, he should have to pay Farmer
Blake forhis window, in spite of his recent determination
not to doso. Though in the heat of his anger he thought
he could justify himself, and avoid the consequences of
his thoughtlessness and pertinacity, yet, as he began to
cool, he could not help acknowledging to himself that
he was, perhaps, not always so entirely free from blame
as he had hitherto imagined. He, for the first time,
began to think that it might be taking too much credit
to himself to suppose that the whole school, with the
teachers, and his brother at the head of all, must be
wrong in their judgments, whenever faults were at-
tributed to him, and yet right, when they imputed
blame to others. He was aroused from these medita-
tions, so fortunately at last begun, by a gentle touch on
his arm, and, raising his eyes from the floor, to which
they had been directed, he beheld his little nephew
Henry.



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 37

‘Dear Walter,” he said, with great earnestness, “I
wanted so to see you when nobody was by.” “I wish
you wouldn’t come teasing me just now,” returned
Walter, with his usual pettishness, and forgetting at
the moment all the wise reflections he had been en-
gaged in.”

“Don’t be angry with me,” said the child, his eyes
filling with tears; ‘‘I have only come to tell you papa
has just desired me to go into the school-room, to see
if the book he gave you to cut open is still lying on
your desk undone, for if it is, he said I was to do it,
and bring it him afterwards.”

“Oh, dear, dear!” exclaimed Walter, “I have
quite forgot it again. I do think there’s a spell
set on me.” ‘A spell! what’s that?” inquired
Henry. “You won't understand me, even if I
take the trouble to explain it,” returned his un-
gracious young uncle; “it’s a fate,—a sort of power
that makes everything go wrong, and we can’t help
ourselves.” z

“T should think that couldn't be,” said Henry,
“only that, you being so much older thanI am, I
suppose you must know best.” ‘And why do you
think it can’t be?” inquired Walter. ‘‘ Because,”
replied the well-taught child, “I think if I was told
to do anything I was able to do, nothing would put



38 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

it out of my head, for two good reasons.” “ And—
what are they, pray?” asked Walter, with his usual
habit of disputation. “The first reason would be,”
answered Henry, ‘because I was desired to do it ; and
the second would be, if I had promised to do it,
that I ought to keep my word.” “But suppose you
were ever told to do what you thought a hard
task, or perhaps something wrong?” rejoined Walter,
in a true spirit of cavilling. ‘“ Why, then,” replied
the little boy, “I would’nt trust to my thinking so,
but I would ask papa, or somebody else wiser and
older than myself, whether it was wrong or not; but
as for spells and fates hindering me, I never heard
of them before, and I don’t know what they mean.”
“So much the better for you,” said Walter, with
a long-drawn sigh. “JI wish that I could say the
same ; but with me everything goes wrong.”

‘‘ Perhaps, Walter, that is because you don’t try hard
enough to make everything go right, but you will say,
as you have done before, that it is very impudent of
me to seem to teach you, who ought, of course, to
know so much better than I do.”

“ Ought, indeed!” repeated Walter to himself ; “but
do I?” This was the only time he had ever so ques-
tioned himself, and it led him into a long train of
thought, which the child again interrupted. ‘Instead



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 39

of cutting open the book,” he said, “TI have brought it
up to you under my pincloth, that, if I met anybody,
they might not see it. I thought you would feel vexed
at having it done for you, and perhaps, too, papa might
be angry, and it would then be too late to make amends
by remembering it.”

“ And are you so willing,” inquired Walter, as he
took the book, “to give up the praise 1 know my
brother would bestow on you, and, perhaps, reward,
too, for doing what he told you with once bidding ? ”
“T hope, Walter,” replied Henry, colouring, and with
a gravity beyond his age, “that you think | etter of
me than to suppose I can have any pleasure in
being praised for doing what you would be blamed for
leaving undone. I could not bear to be so ill-natured,
and to you, too, whom I could love so very much,
if you would let me.” The eye of Henry at that
moment resting on a piece of paper Walter had
unconsciously held half-folded in his hand, he asked
him to permit him to look at it, for he saw that it was
a drawing.

A blush of shame burnt on the cheek of Walter at
this request ; it was the first time so deep a colour had
appeared there, arising from such a cause. He looked
for a moment at the caricature, and then at little
Henry, and he thought that the right-minded, warm-_



40 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

hearted boy, and his sensible father, both deserved
something better of him than to be made subjects for
his ridicule and ill-humour, and that he would have
been more properly employed in doing what his brother
had requested of him than in wasting his time on the
performance that had, an hour ago, given him so much
satisfaction.

‘¢ Never mind,” said Henry, perceiving an unwilling-
ness in Walter to show the picture ; “ perhaps you had
rather not let me see it. And now I must go, for I
should not like papa to know I brought you that book,
and I shall be so pleased to tell him you are doing it ;
so pray begin at once, that I may say so with truth ;
there’s the paper-knife in it; and as your memory is
so bad, Walter, wouldn’t it be a good way for you to
do everything you are told directly, instead of trusting
to it? But don’t be angry with me for saying so.”
Henry now quitted him, and Walter was left again to
his own reflections, as he pursued his long-neglected
task.

It is said that Experience keeps both a very dear
and a very severe school as to discipline, yet, I am
sorry to say, there are many little folk who refuse to
learn in any other ; and so it was with Walter Sedley.
Precept, admonition, and example, had long been
thrown away upon him; but to-day seemed fated to



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 41

give him a lesson he could not mistake. He was re-
joiced at being saved the mortification of having the
book opened by Henry instead of himself, and his
heart, in consequence, warmed with a feeling of thank-
fulness and affection, all the unjust suspicions, and the
unkindness of his conduct to the generous and affec-
tionate child, rushed upon his mind, and inflicted a
severe pang of self-reproach. He could no longer
resist the conviction that he had at least judged
wrongly of his young nephew, and he asked himself
whether he might not also be mistaken in thinking his
brother severe, Hargrave his enemy, and the other
boys all disposed to treat him ill; he could not but
perceive that the rest of the school bore with perfect
good-hnmour the judgments and names awarded by
his cousin, and made them a sport amongst them-
selves, instead of a mortification or a punishment; in
addition to all this (for Walter was much humbled
in spirit) he felt that it would be shabby to expect
a new kite from Pemberton, and that he should, in all
probability, be obliged to have Farmer Blake’s window
mended.

He was ashamed to remind his brother of the en-
gagement for to-morrow, since he had again forgotten
the book, and he thought how false and mean-spirited
it would be to take any commendation from him for



42 NEVER WRONG; OR,

having done it at last. Such was the wholesome train
of thought that now passed through the mind of
Walter.

Had Pemberton, on the accident happening, supplied
him with a new kite,—had the Farmer not demanded
payment for his window, and, above all, had Henry
cut open the book, instead of bringing it to him, no
such ideas as those with which he was now impressed,
would have occurred to him, and he would still have
been the wrong-judging, disputatious, and petulant boy
we have hitherto seen him; yet, though such a change
had come over him, his reformation was by no means
complete ; old habits, especially bad ones, are not so
suddenly got rid of. Walter was still too anxious for
the promised ride, to act as he ought to have done;
that is, to have acknowledged his inattention to Mr.
Sedley, and to have told him of how much more Henry
deserved his commendation than he did; such a piece
of open and good conduct was more than he had
resolution for at present ; but he satisfied his conscience
for concealing the fact, in a better manner than he had
hitherto done in persuading himself that he was in the
right, though, in order to do so, he had affirmed all
those who gave judgment against him were wholly in
the wrong; he, on the contrary, this time, resolved

oD)

that the next praise he obtained should be fairly earned,



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 43

and that he would, in the meantime, endeavour to find
out whether his memory was in truth so bad as he
supposed it. Here was another step gained on the
road of improvement.

Mr. Sedley, in the course of the evening, discovered,
by Walter’s giving him much more than usual of his
company in the parlour, by his frequent allusions to
the weather, and other indications, what was passing
in his mind with regard to the ride for the morrow ;
but he resolved not to notice them openly, hoping that
the feeling of shame, which was so evidently struggling
with the fear of losing the promised indulgence, would
gain the victory.

It happened as he wished it should: Walter went to
bed, without reminding him of the engagement. It
was not Mr. Sedley’s intention to try his strength too
far ; satisfied with the progress he had made in one
day, he would not expose him to the temptation of
. breaking his good resolution on the next ; he, therefore,
at breakfast-time, spoke of the ride himself, and desired

him to get ready, and this, too, in a manner that
showed Walter it was meant to be considered as en-
couragement for further good behaviour. Walter,
delighted, not only spent a very pleasant day at the
house of one of Mrs. Sedley’s relations, but thought
proper to behave to that lady and his brother with



Ad NEVER WRONG ; OR,

something more like respect and humility than he
had hitherto dune; and, besides, treated Henry (who
accompanied them) with a show of affection and
kindness that made the good little boy perfectly
happy. But still, Walter’s reformation was, as yet,

only in progress, |



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. | 45.

CHAPTER IV.

Tur frost having now set in for some time, the follow-
ing day was fixed on by the young gentlemen of the
village for the skating party, and all the boys who were
spending their holidays at Mr. Sedley’s set off, under
the care of a trusty servant, who was directed to see
that they went into no danger, but kept to the one pond
they were accustomed to, the water of which was ex-
ceedingly shallow. All went on very well for the first
hour, but, at the end of that time, Walter proposed
trying another pond, of which there were many, and
much larger than the one they were on. “See,” he
said, “ how nicely those boys get on out yonder; this
is so narrow ; we shall have so much more room at the
next, and there is nobody there to interrupt us.” ‘All
ue is very true, to be sure,” replied Pemberton, to

hom he had been speaking; “ but, then, you know,
Mr. Sedley told us only to skate here, because the
water here is shallow, and there it may be very deep.”
‘Of course,” rejoined Walter, “it is very right of my
brother to be careful of us, but then there is sueh a
thing as being over careful, you know.” ‘ No doubt
there is,” returned Pemberton, “ but that, if a fault, is



46 NEVER WRONG; OR,

at least, one on the right side, so we will stay where
we are.”

Walter was in high spirits from the effects of
exercise in the open air. He was, though so young, a
good skater, and had received several compliments,
that had not only increased his exhilaration, but created
a strong desire to give a further display of. his clever-
ness. The wise reflections and good resolutions of
yesterday were alike forgotten, and his long-indulged
propensity to argue that he was right, because he
wanted to do what was wrong, again took possession
of his mind.

“My brother,” said he, “tells us to go to this pond,
as a general rule, without considering it sometimes
freezes so hard that it is as safe on another as it 1s on
this ; and that is the case to-day.” “That is very
likely,” replied Pemberton ; “ but for all that, as Mr.
Sedley desired us to skate here, in order to prevent even
the possibility of an accident, this is the pond for us ;
we ought certainly not to attempt any other; neither
do I think John would let us, if we designed to do so.”

“ That’s well thought of,” cried Walter: “if we go
we must give the old fellow the slip.” ‘ Indeed I shall
do no such thing, nor let you either,” said Pemberton.
“Is very hard indeed,” returned the wilful boy, ‘to
be always thwarted in one’s pleasures for nothing ; Tam



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 47

sure if my brother were here, he would make no objec-
tion, and therefore it is just the same as though he were
here.” ‘“ Not quite, I should think,” observed Har-
grave, who had been listening to the dialogue ; “ for in
one case we should have Mr. Sedley’s own word, and
in the other we have only Walter’s opinion of what
that word might be.” “I am sure of one thing, how-
ever,” cried Walter, angrily, “and that is, cousin
Edmond, that you are always willing to prevent my
having any pleasure that I set my mind on.” ‘TI must
still bear with your ill-will and pettishness,” returned
Hargrave, mildly, “for the sake of serving you, for I
shall continue to point out where you are wrong, to
the best of my ability, till you have the good sense to
perceive it yourself. A direction given to us by my
cousin Mr, Sedley ought not to be departed from,
unless he is on the spot to. sanction our doing so;
though all appears safe and right on the other ponds,
yet who can tell what may possibly happen should we
disobey the orders we received at setting out ?”

“OQ, ‘ Never Wrong’ can tell, to be sure,” said Pem-
berton, laughing: ‘the next pond is as safe as this, of
course, if he wants to go on it.” ‘If I am to have
that stupid name, I may as well have it for something,”
cried Walter, reddening with passion, “‘and I'll go, if
it’s only to convince Pemberton that I am right now,

D~



48 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

at any rate, in reality.” ‘‘ Worth while, to be sure,”
replied Pemberton, “for you to risk incurring your
brother’s displeasure, and perhaps an accident, for
the sake of convincing me. Come, Walter, don’t be
wilful and foolish ; forgive and forget, you know.”
‘‘ You forget to call me by that foolish nickname, and
tlien, perhaps J may forgive your ill-behaviour,” replied
Walter, magnificently; “but, for all you can say, I
won’t believe that the next pond is less safe than this
is. What should make it so?” “I will tell you,”
said Hargrave: “this is more shaded by trees, and
that is more exposed to the sun.”

This was indeed the case, and, owing to that circum-
stance, some of the neighbouring cottagers had chosen
that pond in preference to the others, for the purpose
of supplying themselves with water, and had broken
the ice at the far end of it, so that they could throw a
pail in with a string to it, and pull it out again without
danger to themselves. This was of course unknown
to the little party from the school.

“ F[owever,” resumed Hargrave, again addressing
Walter, “as it seems impossible to convince you by
argument of either the propriety of doing as you are
bid, or that the other pond may be less safe than this,
we will, for your satisfaction, just go and try its
strength.” “ That’s right,” cried Walter, triumphantly ,



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 49

“T thought I should be able to show you the folly
of not doing so.” ‘Softly, Master Watty: not
quite so fast, if you please,” said Hargrave; “I may
perhaps be able to shew you that the folly is all your
own.”

He then called to the other boys and John, and
told them, that, to please Walter, he was going to try
the ice on the next pond with some long poles they
had with them, and stones,—not that he, or any of
them, he assured John, meant to go on it, however
firm it might be found. They then all proceeded
together. Walter had by this time not only worked
himself into a firm conviction that he was right, but
was bent on the triumph of proving that he was so;
_ therefore, the moment that they reached the edge of
the pond, he threw his skates upon the ground, and
before any one could be aware of his intention, he had
slid into the middle of it, when, waving his hand
exultingly as he turned his head towards the com-
panions he had left, instead of looking before him,
he gave another slide, and in the next moment
wholly disappeared, having slid into the hole already
mentioned.

Hargrave, only waiting to rid himself of his shoes,—
his worstead stockings enabling him, with the help
of a pole, to walk on the ice, lost not an instant in

D 2



<&

50 NEVER WRONG; OR,

hurrying to his assistance, regardless of danger to
himself. Fortunately for Walter, who might other-
wise have been drowned, some boys had early in the
morning amused themselves with throwing heavy
stones around the hole previously made, so that the
ice there was broken to a considerable extent, and was
floating about in large fragments. Walter had risen
near the same spot at which he had gone down, and
had instinctively caught at a long slip of ice, over
which he got his arm just as Edmond came up;
another moment and his brittle support might have
broken from the main body, to which it was still
attached, and have sunk with his weight. Hargrave
placed his pole across from the ice on which he stood,
to a firm piece opposite, and then, trusting his weight
to its support, let himself down into the water, moving
with his hands along the pole till he reached Walter,
whose grasp he directed to the same object. By this
time the rest had run round the pond, to the same
spot, and by their assistance, though not without
considerable difficulty, both Walter and his preserver
were extricated from their perilous situation, amid the
tears of joy and exclamations of thankfulness uttered
by the attached group that thronged around them ; for
Hargrave was, as he well deserved to be, a most
especial favourite, and Walter’s faults and ill-behaviour



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 51

were almost forgotten in their rejoicing at his safety.
More dead than alive, through terror and mortification,
the so lately exulting and self-sufficient boy was
almost carried home by John, one of the boys running
on first, to tell what had happened, in order to prevent
unnecessary alarm on their arrival. Both Edmond and
Walter were put into warm beds, and a medical man
directly sent for. On his arrival he gave it as his
opinion that a fever would be the consequence of
Walter’s folly and misconduct, owing to the state of
excitement he had been and was still in; Hargrave,
he said, was in no danger. Both judgments proved
correct ; for some days Walter’s life was nearly despaired
of ; but the skill of his physician, and the great attention

e received from everybody, even those he had in his
bes judgment called his enemies, at length re-
stored him, after a confinement of many weeks to a
sick chamber.

In the course of this tedious period, he had plenty
of leisure to reflect on his past conduct ; he shuddered
when he thought of how nearly he had lost his life,
by his habit of arguing falsely; he could no longer
conceal from himself, that in reasoning he had allowed
inclination rather than judgment to suggest what he
said ; he perceived, too, that he was equally in error
in the character and motives of conduct he had



o2 ' NEVER WRONG ; OR,

attributed to others; Hargrave, whom he had long
thought to have ill-treated him, had risked his own
life to save him; little Henry had clearly proved
himself to be his friend, even before that never-to-be-
forgotten day of the accident ; and, then, his brother!
his patient, sensible, and good brother! “How,”
said Walter, to himself, ‘shall I ever be able to make
up for my ungrateful conduct to him?” That brother
whose understanding he had often dared to treat as
inferior to his own, whom he had believed capable
of allowing himself to be prejudiced against him,
and whom he had often designated as harsh and
severe, and consequently unjust; that brother had
attended him through a long illness, with the patience
and solicitude of a parent, sitting up with him for
several nights, to the injury of his own health,
forbearing to reproach him with his misconduct and
disobedience, though he was so extremely culpable,
but, on the contrary, only kindly encouraging his
reformation.

The veil of self-deception was at length completely
withdrawn, and Walter, far more exalted by his
humility than he was in his arrogance, saw all his
conduct in its true light; nor was he backward in
acknowledging that he did so. |

More than two months elapsed before he was able



THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 53

to rejoin the boys in their pastimes, and when he did,
the first thing he observed in their play-room was
Hargrave’s book of cases and judgments, with the
offensive name completely erased, and a challenge
written, to fight with snowballs any boy who should
presume to again call Master Walter Sedley

“ NeveER Wronc ;” or, “ THE Youne Disputant.”






“TT WAS ONLY IN FUN.”






ye

“TT WAS ONLY IN FUN.”

CHAPTER I.

‘Do you know, Miss Vernon, whether any accident
occurred from the log of wood being thrown across the
railway yesterday?” inquired George Markham, as he
was walking with that lady and her pupil, his little

cousin Mary. “I hope, and, indeed, believe not, re-
plied Miss Vernon, “ for it is said that some one saw

it in time to remove it before the train came up ; other-
wise several of the carriages might have been over-

turned, and then, perhaps, even loss of lives might

have been the consequence.” ‘How lucky!” ex-
claimed George. ‘In speaking of so serious an event
as escaping such dreadful mischief,” rejoined Miss
Vernon, “you should call it providential.” “ Well,
perhaps I should,” said young Markham, carelessly,
‘but one can’t can’t always think of the right word.”

Miss Vernon looked grave, and even sad, for she



58 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

had frequently before remarked the light manner in
which this youth was inclined both to think and to
utter his thoughts. Referring to what he had said, she
replied, “‘ Perhaps not, Master Markham, when speak-
ing on trifling subjects; but on such a one as this,
where a number of persons might have been killed,
and whole families, in consequence, plunged into sorrow
and poverty, I should suppose that the right expression
would naturally arise in your mind, in preference to any
other. Let us imagine, fora moment, that Mr. J olliffe,
who you know lives with your uncle, instead of re-
turning from London a fortnight ago, had come yester-
day, as he had first intended, and had been overturned
in one of those carriages, and, at least, seriously injured,
how would you have felt then 2?”

“OQ! I should have been most dreadfully sorry,”
replied George, earnestly, “for if Mr. Jolliffe had been
laid up ill, or lamed, the house would have been dul]
indeed, he is always so good-humoured and merry. I
don’t know, I’m sure, how I should get on the whole
summer in this stupid village uncle has fixed on to
reside in, without Mr. Jolliffe.”

‘As you value that gentleman so much on account
of his being merry,” replied Miss Vernon, “TI hope
you have remarked and set some store on his being
WisE at the same time. ‘Merry and wise,’ you know,



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 59

should always go together.” ‘I dare say they should,”
returned George, in the same careless tone as before ;
“but as long as I can have the ‘ merry,’ I don’t care
over much about the ‘ wise.’” ‘ Perhaps that,” said
Miss Vernon, ‘‘ was the feeling of the wicked boy who
placed the log across the railway ; for, on being found
out, and asked why he did it, he said, ‘It was only in
fun.’” “Good gracious!” exclaimed George, indig-
nantly, “what a stupid and bad fellow he must be!
What fun could there possibly be in risking people’s
lives and limbs in that way?” ‘None at all, cer-
tainly,” replied Miss Vernon; ‘neither did he think
there was any. It is evident, from his examination,
on being found out yesterday, that he had no intention
of such serious mischief as might have happened, but
merely meant to frighten the people in the carriages
by a sudden jolt in crossing over the log. Like many
other persons who are foud of playing tricks, he did
not give himself the trouble or care to consider what
might really be the consequences of it.” “I can see
no joke in it at all,” persisted George. ‘As you said
before, only think how shocking it would have been
had Mr. Jolliffe been hurt by it. He must be a very
good-for-nothing boy, and ought to be well punished.”
‘Your indignation is very just, and I am pleased to
see it,” returned Miss Vernon ; “any person who, for



60 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

the sake of a jest, does that which may produce injury
to another, however unpremeditated the evil, is guilty
of a wicked act, and ought not to complain, even
should he be punished as though he had designed all
the mischief his thoughtlessness may lead to.”

“And yet,” said little Mary, who had listened
attentively, ‘‘ Cousin George will scarcely believe that ;
for I have often heard him say, when, by some trick or
rough play, he has frightened or hurt any of us, that
we shouldn’t make a fuss about it, for he only did it in
fun.” “Just the same as that boy,” said Miss Vernon.
“Yes,” cried George, “I know I have; but then I
never did, nor ever thought of doing anything so
stupid or wrong as throwing a log of wood across a
railroad.” ‘If it be wrong,” interposed Miss Vernon,
“‘to play off a trick that may end in mischief, on a
railway, 1s must be wrong to do anything in ‘fun,’ as
you call it, which may produce mischief, however
trifling, anywhere else. Besides, Master George, the
habit is a bad one; and, though begun at first ina
game of play, may, if indulged in, finish in something
very serious. J dare say the boy we have been speak-
ing of had played many pranks of a lesser kind, before
he became thoughtless and wicked enough to risk over-
turning a train of carriages at full speed. Few persons
arrive at a great height of vice or folly at once, but go



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 61 .

quietly and slowly on, step by step, though some much
faster than others.”

At this moment their attention was diverted from
the subject on which they were speaking, by the sound
of angry voices at no great distance. On turning
round a corner of the road, they saw two boys
struggling together; the biggest had got the head of
the other under his arm, and was cuffing him on the
back with hearty good-will.

George, forgetting in a moment what little gravity
Miss Vernon’s last address to him had occasioned,
burst into a loud laugh. Little Mary shrunk away
frightened, whilst Miss Vernon, going up to the boys,
desired the big one to let the other go, and then in-
quired what was the matter. “ Matter enough,” replied
Tom Hobbs, the big boy, angrily. ‘He left the gate
open of that field you see there, and, by doing so, has
let the horses, and cows, and donkeys out, that it was
meant to keep in.”

“ Well, and if I did, I only did as the gate told me,”
replied Soft Johnny,—for that was the name the very
simple younger lad was known by in the village ;
‘‘ mother can’t afford to pay my schooling for nothing,
and Dame says I must doas I’m bid.” “ What do you
mean by the gate telling you?” inquired Miss Vernon.
“Why, it’s writ on it,” returned Johnny, “ ‘ Please not



62 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

to shut this gate.’” “It’s no such thing,” eagerly
interrupted Tom Hobbs; “and if you will just take
the trouble, ma’am, to come and look, you will see, that,
instead of ‘Not,’ the words are ‘ Please to shut this
gate.’ It is done with a piece of red stuff, in great
letters, as big and as plain as the nose on his face.”
‘‘And nothing can be plainer than that, I’m sure,”
said George Markham, staring at the poor boy, and
looking as though he had some secret cause of merri-
ment besides.

Now, whether Tom Hobbs felt some shame for his
behaviour to Soft Johnny, or whether, though he had
no objection to treat him roughly himself, he did not
choose that any other boy should do so, I cannot tell ;
he was, perhaps, merely offended, and resentful at
George’s laughing when he was vexed. But, however
all this may be, he turned sharply round to that young
gentleman, saying, ‘I suppose, sir, he is as God made
him, and you are no better ;” adding in a muttering
tone, to himself, “and, very likely, a great deal
worse.”

Miss Vernon, though she heard these words, forbore
to notice them, aware that the reproof was well
merited ; and, in order to prevent an answer on the
part of George, that might lead to something more
angry from the young peasant, she immediately, with



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 63

the rest, crossed over to the field spoken of. She wished,
too, to gratify the lad, by seeing what was really written
on the gate. When there, to the great astonishment
of Tom Hobbs, she saw that Soft Johnny had read
aright ; there it was, in great red letters, ‘‘ Please Not
to shut this gate,” “It is very strange,” she said, “J.
think I have noticed this gate before, as having a
very different direction on it, indeed, quite a contrary
one; and, now that I look at it more particularly, I
can see that the word ‘Not,’ though done with the
same material and colour, is in another hand-writing.
I believe,” she added, after a pause, “I can guess all
about it. When the direction was first written, the
word ‘ Please’ having been placed a good way off the
word ‘to,’ some mischievous person has put ‘Not’
between; and this poor boy, knowing no better, but
thinking he was doing right, left it open, instead of
shutting it after him.”

‘Whoever it is that has done it,” said Tom Hobbs,
rubbing out the word as well as he could with the
sleeve of his jacket, and then scratching it over with a
stone, ‘“‘I only wish that I could come across him ; see
if I wouldn’t serve him as I did Soft Johnny here, only
a pretty deal worse.” ‘“ What a fuss about nothing !”
cried George Markham, contemptuously ; ‘‘and what
a stupid fellow you must be not to see, in a moment,

E



64 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

that, whoever has done it, has done it ‘ only in fun.’”
‘You may call me stupid, sir, if you please,” replied
Tom Hobbs, “‘ but whoever calls mischief ‘fun,’-is, I
think, a pretty deal stupider ; even Soft Johnny knows
better than that, and is too fond and proud of his
schooling not to have learnt it, if he didn’t.” “O, I’m
sure, Tom Hobbs, I didn’t do it,” cried Johnny; “I
don’t go to school for nothing; and Dame says, ‘We
mustn’t do evil, even though good may come of it ;’
so I'm sure [ ought not to do wrong that mischief
may.”

“This poor boy, with all his simplicity,” said Miss
Vernon, addressing Tom Hobbs, ‘is more truly wise
than many amongst you who call him by so offensive
a name; I hope you will leave off yourself, and persuade
others to do the same.” “I owe him a good turn for
having thrashed him for nothing,” replied Tom Hobbs;
“and that puts me in mind again of this trick. Whao-
ever has put that word in, has done mischief enough
for one morning: Farmer Hedges’ can’t find his best
cart-horse, and a cow and two donkeys have got into
mother’s garden, eat up her cabbages, and trampled
down her pease and beans, that were just getting
strong.” “It’s a great pity they were not a little
stronger,” observed George, looking still much more
amused than he ought to have been ; “ but I suppose



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 65

a rake and a hoe, and a shilling to buy more cabbage
plants, will soon set all to rights again.”

Tom Hobbs’s temper, not a little ruffled by his late
vexation, was still more annoyed by having his griev-
ances treated in this ight and unfeeling manner. ‘ A
lot of cows and donkeys getting into a garden may
seem very funny to you, sir,” he said; “and, if the
garden belonged to rich folk, it mightn’t be of much
matter; a loss of cabbages is not much to them ; but,
though you mayn’t know it, to lose anything that grows
in poor people’s ground is to lose great part of their
living. Such troubles as these may make young gentle-
men laugh, but they are serious enough to us, when
we are obliged, through them, to go with half a dinner.’
‘Besides thumping me, when I was only doing as I
was bid,” chimed in Johnny. ‘I,m sure, Johnny, I’m
very sorry for having done so,” replied Tom Hobbs ;
‘Sand, as I said before, only wish that I could catch
the right one to give it to.” And, whilst he spoke
these last words, he looked suspiciously at young
Markham. ‘ You can’t give him the same thumps you
gave me, if you did,” said Johnny, “so don’t mind
any more about it; Dame says folk should ‘forgive and
forget.’ ”

Tom Hobbs seemed not at all inclined to follow
this Christian precept, and Miss Vernon having noticed

EB 2



66 IT WAS ONLY IN. FUN,

the suspicious glance he had cast on George, hastened
to put an end to the dialogue. Taking two half-crowns
from her purse, she put them into Tom’s hand, saying,
she hoped that it would be sufficient to repair the
injury done to his mother’s garden.

The lad, with Johnny, then went away, still not very
well satisfied, though respectful to the lady, who, with
her young companions, passed on for some distance in
silence. Miss Vernon looked extremely grave, and
George was the first to speak. “I am Sorry, ma'am,”
he said, “that you should think it necessary to give
that fellow so much as five shillings ; it is a large sum
for you to lose.” “It is not my intention to lose it,”
replied Miss Vernon; “I gave the money on your
account, and, therefore, Master Markham, expect that
you will repay it me directly on reaching home.” “On
my account! and why?” exclaimed George, in a falter-
ing voice, and the colour forsaking his cheeks. “Simply
for this reason,’ she replied: ‘I feel certain that it
was you who occasioned the mischief those two half.
crowns are meant to repair, and you may consider
yourself fortunate should they prove to be a sufficient
sum for the purpose.” “Me! Miss Vernon?” ex-
claimed George, again in a tone he intended to sound
like surprise. “Yes, sir,” returned Miss Vernon ; “‘and
do not add to the fault already committed, by attempt-



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 67

ing to deny it. It was you who wrote in the word
‘not,’ filling up the space between the ‘Please’ and ‘to.’
I knew in a moment the particular kind of ‘t’ that
you make, looking more like a cross than a well-formed
letter ; but, even had I not known it, your manner
was enough of itself to convince me. I would not
of course, express my opinion before the two boys,
fearing the bigger one might tell it to the whole village
on account of his resentment, and the other through
his straightforward simplicity.”

George was, by this time, aware that whatever he
might say, to throw a doubt on the subject, would not
be believed, so he held his tongue; he was in hopes,
too, by thus silently admitting the truth, he should
prevent anything more being said about it now, and,
perhaps, athome. Judging Miss Vernon by the common
rules he had used on other occasions, he further thought,
that, if he repaid the money readily, it would be all -
right, and no more worry (as he termed admonition)
about it; and, having a purse unfortunately too well
filled for a boy of his thoughtless disposition, the loss
of five shillings was not so great a punishment as it
would otherwise have been. It was, at least, very far
from sufficient to break him of the bad habit he had
long indulged in of playing tricks, regardless of con-
sequences, excusirig himself, when found out, by saying,



68 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

“it was only in fun.” And this was the justification
he made in the present instance when pressed by Miss
Vernon to own the truth, on being asked why he had
altered the direction on the gate.

‘“‘T wonder, Master Markham,” she said, “that you,
who can see so clearly how wrong the boy was in
throwing the log across the railway for the sake of a
jest, do not perceive how blameable you are yourself.”
“TI don’t think,” returned George, “that what I have
done ought to be compared with what he did; my
putting the word ‘ not’ in could never cause such harm
as his tricks might.” “ Perhaps not,” said Miss Vernon ;
but, as I remarked to you before, we should avoid
doing anything, even in jest, that may end in mischief,
~ however slight; and you ought to have learnt, long
ago, that there is no true wit in either saying or doing
what may injure or give pain to any one.” “Well,
there’s no great harm done this time, at any rate,”
cried George, impatiently, and somewhat wearied of the
longest lecture he had ever received: “ ‘it was only in
fun’ that I put the word in; and that impudent boy,
and the old woman his mother, in having five shillings
given them, have got, I dare say, more than twice the
value of the damage done, so they’ll have a double
stock of cabbages and everything else ; I think I have
the most reason to complain this time, at least.” “If



iT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 69

so, that is just as it should be, replied Miss Vernon ;
‘¢ and I hope all persons who do things in fun, without
first considering consequences, will always find them-
selves the greatest sufferers by them.”

“Perhaps, Miss Vernon,” said George, as they drew
near the house, “you will be kind enough not to say
anything of this business at home ; I don’t want to be
teased about having lost five shillings. And I’m sure
dear little cousin Mary,” he added, to the child, coax-
ingly, ‘ wont speak of it. Some day I may, very likely,
tell Mr. Jolliffe, because he is so merry that I know it
will be just the thing to please him.” “I dare say
you think so, but I doubt it very much,” returned Miss
Vernon ; ‘I never can persuade you to believe that Mr.
Jolliffe is not only merry but wise, at the same time.”

‘“‘ How glad I am that the walk is over !” said George
to himself, as they entered the avenue leading to the
house. ‘“ Women have no fun in them: whilst they
are children, they eare for nothing but dolls and baby-
houses ; and when they grow older, they are always for
lecturing and heetoring over boys.”

George Markham had only very lately formed this
opinion, for he had had, unfortunately but few oppor-
tunities of female tuition, or, indeed, any instruction
at all fitted to correct his errors. His mother had died
whilst he was an infant, and his father, the captain ot



70 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

a merchant vessel, being scarcely ever at home, left him
to the care of his housekeeper, an ignorant old woman,
very ill qualified to instruct and manage him. ‘This
person, with a footboy to assist her, named Bob, com-
pleted Mr. Markham’s household. It is true that
George, when old enough, went to school, but then he
begged so hard to be only a day scholar, that his father,
more of a rough seaman than an educated and judicious
parent, granted his request. Thus he still continued
to pass the greater part of his time at home, with Bob
for his chief companion, practising between them
unnumbered pranks on old Betty, who, instead of
complaining, as she ought to have done, when Captain
Markham came home, generally bore their behaviour
very quietly, fearful, if she did not, she might lose her
place, which, being in it the greater part of the year
her own mistress, ‘‘ was a thing,” as she said to
herself, ‘not to be thought of.”

Thus was the love of mischief, disguised by the
name of fun, early created and encouraged by the ill-
judging and cunning old woman, who, however, con-
trived to avoid any very serious annoyance to herself,
by threatening Bob with dismissal if he didn’t mind
what he was about.

Mr. Ingram, the brother-in-law of Captain Markham,
whilst on a visit to him a few weeks before the present



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 71

s

period, noticed the familiar terms on which Bob seemed
to be with his young master, and, fearful of what
might be the result of such an improper intimacy, had,
in order to check it, invited George to spend the
summer with him in Hampshire, saying to his father
he thought, too, that a little better female society than
that of old Betty might be of service to him. Captain
Markham readily assented, and Master George left his
home at Greenwich, accompanying his uncle to the
retired, or as he called it, the stupid village in which
that gentleman had fixed his residence.

On reaching home, not a word was said by either
Miss Vernon or Mary of what had occurred during
their walk. Though he felt as though he was a good
deal ill-used, in being obliged to give so much, George
was anxious to repay the five shillinzs. ‘ Then,”
thought he, ‘she can’t pester me any more about it.
I only wish Miss Vernon was like old Betty ; but I
suppose governesses never are, and to be fault-finding
and lecturing is part of their trade; that may do,
perhaps, very well for girls, for they are all just as
stupid ; but it won’t do for boys, at least, not such
famous fellows as I have been used to at Greenwich.”

Miss Vernon made no hesitation in taking the bright
five-shilling piece offered her, though she could see that
Master George, on- presenting it, would have been



72 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

better pleased if she had. And now, that affair settled,
he went to the drawing-room, in which he found Mr.
Jolliffe, alone and reading a letter. “I have some
‘capital news for you, Georgy, my boy,” he said, rubbing
his hands, his cheerful, round face beaming with de-
light. “ The good ship ‘Hope,’ of Calcutta, has safely
arrived, and my man James, whom I left behind me in
London for the purpose, will be here with little Julian
and his Indian nurse, Mima, to-morrow.” “Is that
all?” inquired George, disappointedly. ‘Is that all?”
repeated Mr. Jolliffe ; “to be sure it is, and what more
would you have? But perhaps you would like him to
bring, instead of his nurse, a lion, or Bengal tiger, to
put in the forest here.” “I think I know better than
to have such a fancy as that,” replied George; “ but
what a famous sport those tiger hunts they have in
India must be, mustn’t they, Mr. Jolliffe?” “I think
hunt the slipper a much better game,” replied that
gentleman ; “for sometimes, in tiger hunting, the tiger
takes it into his head to hunt the man, and that, you
know, the slipper never does.” “Oh! but you are top
of an elephant,’ said George; “that’s the way in India.”
“Yes, I know that it is,” replied Mr. J olliffe, “at set-
ting out; but, perhaps, before your return, instead of
the elephant’s back, you may be on the tiger’s ; for I
believe they don’t expect you to walk to their dens



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 73
when they catch you, but are polite enough to carry you
there on their backs or between their jaws, whichever
may be most convenient to themselves. When little
Julian comes he will tell you all about it, and then we
will make a game of it. As I am bigger than any
body else here, I will be the elephant ; Julian shall be
the huntsman, mounted on my shoulders ; you shall
be the tiger, and we will hunt you all over the grounds,
and to make the play complete, lock you up in the
village cage afterwards, if you wish it.”

George considered himself rather above entering into
such a game of make-believe, and thought he should
really feel a little tiger-like, if expected to play it for
the child’s amusement. “I hope,” resumed Mr. Jolliffe,
after a pause, “that Julian is a brisk little fellow ; I
never could like a stupid milk-and-water sort of boy,
though, of course, I would do my duty, after having
promised his father to take charge of him.” “ What
- fun it will be, if he is one of that sort,” said young
Markham to himself,—‘‘a capital joke, indeed, for a
man like Mr. Jolliffe to have such a lad as that sent
him all the way from India ; but, if he is not, it will
be good sport to make him for a while, just a
little while, seem as though he was stupid and milk-
soppish. Mr. Jolliffe will know afterwards that 1t was
only done in fun, and then he will laugh at it himself.”



T4 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN,

Master George Markham, in thinking thus, only
proved how little he really knew of Mr. Jolliffe’s true
character ; for in wishing to find Julian a brisk, in-
telligent child, he had motives far deeper than the mere
desire of being amused by him. Possessing a large
fortune, and without relations to claim his assistance,
he had long devoted himself to purposes of benevolence.
Mr. Selby, Julian’s father, had been the dearest friend
of his boyhood, and he had afterwards, at his own
expense, fitted him out, and provided for him in India.
There Mr. Selby had married. Julian was the youngest
of several children, and the climate not agreeing with
his constitution, a change had been recommended,
Mr. Jolliffe no sooner knew this, than he determined
on adopting him, if his parents would consent ; and,
if the child proved capable of receiving it, he meant to
give him a first-rate education, thus fitting him to do
credit to some high profession, and to the fortune he
intended to bestow on him. Of this George was then,
of course, entirely ignorant.



~T
Cr

IT WAS ONLY IN FUN,

CHAPTER II.

Mr. and Mrs. Ingram had been chiefly induced, in the
choice of their present residence, by their long intimacy
with a family who had retired to the same village.
This family consisted of Mrs. Maitland, a widow lady,
with a grown-up son and daughter, and two or three
other younger children. They lived in a house called
the Priory, about a mile distant from Mr. Ingram’s.
On the morning following the incidents related in the
previous chapter, Miss Vernon and Mary intended
calling at the Priory ; and, as both his uncle and aunt
were from home, and Mr. Jolliffe engaged in writing,
they again invited young Markham to go with them,
as being the best method for keeping him out of the
stables, well knowing that he would much have pre-
ferred the companionship of the groom, or even the
stable boy, to theirs.

Arrived at the Priory, they were shown into a parlour,
in which they found Miss Maitland alone, sitting at
her desk, with two letters before her that she had just
written, put into their envelopes, and directed. “Iam
afraid,” said Miss Vernon, when the first words at
meeting had passed, “that we interrupt you.” ‘“O!



7G IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

not all,” she replied; ‘I had just finished as you came
in: and glad enough I was, for two such different kind
of letters, I don’t think any poor girl ever had to write
at the same time.” “Then, I suppose I ought to con-
gratulate you, not only on having completed a task,
but on your ingenuity,” said Miss Vernon. ‘ Well, I
think I almost deserve that you should,” replied the
young lady, laughing; ‘‘for one is all form and
ceremony, written from my poor head, and the other
all affection and nonsense, and that one comes from my
heart ; and, after saying so much, I certainly ought to
say a little more, and explain what I mean.” “Pray
do not think that necessary on the score of politeness,
my dear,” said her friend. ‘‘O no, not on that account ;
and now I must tell you; this letter,” holding it up
as she spoke, “is to one of the most precise old ladies
in all England, or anywhere else, I believe: it is to
my godmamma, Lady Strickland, and begins with
‘Most respected and honoured Madam ;’ whilst this,”
showing the other, ‘is to Nurse Higgins, and begins,
‘You dear, darling, old Nuzzy,’ for that is what I used
to call her before I could speak plain.” After a few
more minutes spent in conversation, Matilda—for that
was Miss Maitland’s name—observed to her lady
visitors, that they had not seen her sleeping room since
it had been newly fitted up; “‘and you can have no



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. hi

idea,” she added, “ of how pretty it now looks to what
it did. If this young gentleman will excuse being
left by himself, and you will take the trouble of walking
up stairs, I shall like to show it you.” George, in his
plain, rough way, said, he did not care at all about
being left, and his three companions then quitted the
room together.

At first he amused himself tolerably well, in looking
through the window into the garden ; but, soon tired
of that, he glanced round the room in search of some
better entertainment, and, in so doing, his eye rested
on the two letters already mentioned. thought, according to his own idea, immediately arose
in his mind, and, without pausing for a moment to
reflect before he acted on it, the two letters were taken
out of their envelopes, the one intended for Lady
Strickland put into the cover directed for Nurse Higgins,
and that for Nurse Higgins placed in Lady Strickland’s.
Using his favourite exclamation on such occasions,
‘What fun!” he cried, in great glee, ‘‘wouldn’t I give
more than five shillings, this time, if I could but see
that stiff old lady believing herself, even for.a moment,
to be called, ‘a dear, darling, old Nuzzy ;’ and then
the old nurse herself puzzling and spelling word by
word over the grand, formal letter. Matilda Maitland,
if she ever finds-it out, will think she has made the



78 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

mistake herself, and she is such a merry creature that
I know she will only laugh at it. If all girls were
like her, I shouldn’t care if I had happened to have a
sister or two.”

George had just come to this complimentary conclu-
sion of what he had been saying to himself, when
Matilda, with her two visitors, re-entered the room.
“JT ought to beg your pardon, Master Markham, for
having left you so long,” she said, “‘ but I hope you
you did not find the time tedious.” ‘O! not at all,”
replied George, with more sincerity than politeness :
“JT should have been sorry, if you had hurried your-
selves to come before.” This was said with a sort of
suppressed chuckle that did not escape the notice of
Miss Vernon, though she made no observation on it at
the time. “Shall I not have the pleasure of seeing
your mamma?” she inquired of Matilda. “I believe
you must excuse her this morning. In the first place,
I do not think she knows you are here; and in the
second, I must tell you, though it is at present a secret,
she is exceedingly busy in preparations for a grand féte,
to be given in honour of my eldest brother being of
age, and to which you must all come, for there is to be
an entertainment for little folks, as well as bigger ones ;
but though so intimate with you, and all dear Mrs.
Ingram’s family, you must expect to receive formal cards



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 79

of invitation in due time, the same as our other
acquaintances.” “I can only say, on my own part,”
replied Miss Vernon, ‘that I thank your mamma very
much for the invitation, let it come in whatever shape
it may, knowing that it is always a kind one.” ‘“ We
are to meet early in the day,” said Matilda, “and I
only hope it may be a fine one. There is to be archery
and cricket, and a great many other games for the boys.
So, Master Markham, as I understand you are very
clever at those sort of things, we shall particularly
depend upon you to conduct them.”

George was delighted at the promise of being made
of so much consequence, and the prospect, too, of such
a day’s pleasure. ‘ For,” said he to Miss Vernon, as
they returned home, “I suppose an entertainment like
what Mrs. Maitland is going to give, don’t come more
than once in fifty years in this stupidest of all stupid
places. Ah! Miss Vernon, you.should come and see
us at Greenwich in the fair-time.” “ And take a run
down the hill, I suppose,” she replied good-humouredly ;
“thank you, Master George, for the invitation, but I
would rather be excused, if you please.” “I can’t
think,” resumed young Markham, “‘ how the people
here can amuse themselves all the year round. I
wonder what such boys as I have been used to, would
say to such a dull place.” ‘Perhaps it would have

Â¥



S80 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

been better for those famous boys you so often speak
of,” replied Miss Vernon, quietly, “if they had been
born and bred in this stupid place, as you call it, and
never quitted it till they had been confirmed in good
habits, instead of bad ones.”

“Another lecture! so I'll say no more,” thought
George ; and the rest of their walk home was passed
in silence, little Mary amusing herself in gathering
wild flowers, and Miss Vernon feeling as disinclined to
speak as young Markham himself, though he entirely
occupied her thoughts. She was trying to find a
meaning for what his manner and countenance had
expressed upon her returning to the parlour at Mrs.
Maitland’s. It was impossible, without some very
plain evidence to judge by, that she could suspect he
would be guilty of so disgraceful a departure from
principle and good breeding, as even to touch a letter
written by another person, and that he knew was not
intended for him, much less could she imagine that he
would venture to do what he had done. She, therefore,
this time supposed she must have been wrong in
suspecting him, and on entering the house, dismissed
the subject from her mind.

It was rather late in the afternoon when Julian Selby
arrived with Nurse Mima and James. Mr. Jolliffe had
been for more than an hour looking anxiously out for



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. sl

them, and so had George Markham, though from very
different motives and jeelings. The wholly inexcusable
trick he had played Miss Maitland in the morning, in-
stead of satisfying him for one day at least, had only
increased his inclination for another ; so true it is that,
in the pursuit of EviL, the race is so much more rapid
than in that of coop. Therefore, I should advise, and,
indeed, earnestly entreat my young readers, if they
should ever be disposed to follow so bad an example
as that set by George Markham, to shrink with terror
from taking the first step, for they know not where it
may lead; but of this they may, at least, be certain,
that the more they advance the further they will go,
and consequently, the greater difficulty they will have
in returning to the path from which they stray, or, to
speak in plainer language, of regaining the love and
esteem of their friends, as well as their own self-respect,
without which their lives can never be deservedly
prosperous, or really happy.

“Well! here they are at last,” cried Mr. Jolliffe,
turning from the window and hastening down stairs,
to receive his little friend, as the carriage drew up to
the hall-door. George, eager for anything new, fol-
lowed, offering to assist in unloading the chaise.

Julian was the first to alight; he was a very deli-
cately formed small boy for his age, looking pale and

Â¥ 2



82 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

fatigued ; he spoke scarcely above his breath, and his
hand trembled as he put it into Mr. Jolliffe’s. After
desiring James to see that Nurse Mima was properly
attended to by Mr. Ingram’s servants, Mr. Jolliffe led
Julian up stairs to the drawing-room, where he was
warmly received by the kind, though till then unknown
friends awaiting him.

Julian Selby was one of those kind of children
whom it takes some time to thoroughly understand and
love, at least by persons who are hasty in forming
their opinions. He was not only an affectionate, but a
clever and high-minded boy ; incapable of misleading,
or telling a falsehood himself, he seldom or never sus-
pected it in another, and had, indeed, so great an
abhorrence of that vice, that he could scarcely believe
it, when found out in any one he had trusted ; he was
good-tempered, docile, and quick at learning, and
would, perhaps, have been more lively in his manners,
but that he was painfully shy and timid, this nervous
feeling always acting as a check upon him. His deli-
cate health, and the weakening nature of the climate
he had hitherto lived in, might, perhaps, in a great
measure account for this defect.

After Julian had partaken of some refreshment, Mr.
Jolliffe tried to draw him into conversation, but the
child shrunk from him as a stranger, and his thoughts



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 53

were in the home he had left; but, fearful of seeming
ungrateful if he said so, his manner was confused and
awkward, and his manners not so clear as they would
otherwise have been; thus Mr. Jolliffe’s first impression
of poor Julian was not very favourable. Never having
lived where there were children, excepting Mary, he
was more than usually slow at understanding them,
and he could not help wishing the little boy had been
more like George Markham ; for, only having spent
the last fortnight with that hopeful young gentleman,
and never having heard of any of his pranks at home
or elsewhere, he appeared to him as a fine spirited
youth, allowing for some occasional roughness or folly
in speech, by saying he perhaps was a little too merry
sometimes. George, too, was a handsome, well-grown
lad, such as he had pictured to himself his expected
pet ;—not that Mr. Jolliffe thought outward beauty of
any value, when compared with that of the mind and
disposition ; but Julian seemed to him very much the
reverse of even a manly boy, so that he could not help
feeling a little disappointed on that account too besides
the other. Mrs. Ingram saw that Julian’s eyes were
constantly turned towards the door, and, better able to
judge of what was passing in his mind than Mr.
Jolliffe could be, she asked him if he would like to be
taken to Mima, for perhaps he was tired, and would



84 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

like to go early to bed. The little boy, still fearful of
offending in saying what might be thought wrong,
answered, ‘‘ I will do as you please, Ma’am.” ‘Then,
my dear,” said Mrs. Ingram, a little puzzled by his
reply, “I think you had better go: Mima, too, will
perhaps be glad to have you with her, for all here must
be as strange to her as it is to you ; to-morrow, I hope,
we shall be better acquainted.”

The bell was then rung, and the servant who an-
swered it desired to take him to the rooms prepared
for his and Mima’s use, in which she was already com-
fortably seated, with no want of companions, curiosity
leading all the other servants to spend as much time as
they could spare with her; and when Julian entered,
there were wonderful stories being told about India,
and many questions being asked as to what sort of a
country England was; but there was a speedy stop
put to all this, upon his coming, for, running up to
Mima and throwing his arms round her neck, he eased
his over-charged heart by a flood of tears. This little
incident was told in the drawing-room on the servant’s
return when the bell was again rung. It chanced, soon
after, that no one was left there but young Markham
and Mr. Jolliffe, who had been walking to and fro for
some minutes, lost in thought.

‘Tam afraid,” said he at length, as though thinking



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 85

aloud, ‘I shall be disappointed in him, and that will
be a great pity ; for I intended to make him a clever
and a rich man.” And now Mr. Jolliffe suddenly
paused in his walk, opposite where George was sitting,
and looked at him for a few moments with evident
admiration. George easily understood the look; he
he had, besides, eagerly listened to the few words that
had been spoken, and, ever rapid in his conceptions, a
new idea suddenly darted into his mind. Hitherto he
had excused his tricks by saying they were mere pieces
or fun: he would have been very much offended, as
well as surprised, if anybody, in judging of them, had
accused him of lying, and yet they would have been
perfectly right in so doing. Thus, whilst he was de-
ceiving himself as to their true character, the first
great principle of Integrity, which is love of Truth,
was every day becoming weaker and weaker, whilst the
habit of making his inclinations the rule of his actions
strengthened in proportion. He perceived that Mr.
Jolliffe was wishing Julian had been such a boy as
himself, and that, on the contrary, the child had
appeared unfit for the good intentions he had in store
for him. “If Mr. Jolliffe likes me best,” reasoned
George within himself, ‘why should not I have my
fortune made instead of this baby, who don’t even
Jook as though he would live to be aman? He is no



86 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

more a relation of his than I am; besides, his father
is rich, and able to give him a fortune himself, (here
George was mistaken,) whilst mine is only captain of a
ship, that may go to the bottom of the sea any day
with everything in it, even my father and all, and then
what is to become of me?” At this selfish and un-
feeling conclusion of his meditations he looked up, and
saw that his unsuspecting friend was again gazing
earnestly at him. ‘‘ Why should not Mr. Jolliffe,” he
added, still speaking inwardly, “make a clever and
a rich man of me?” Had Mr. Jolliffe known the
real character of George Markham, he would have tried
to do even more for him than making him clever and
rich: he would have used his best endeavours to make
him good.

“Georgy, my boy,” said Mr. Jolliffe, at last, “Iam
afraid this little lad is not quite so brisk as I could
wish, and, as I suppose he will naturally like better to
be with you than anybody else here, I shall take it as
a favour if you will try to make him a little more like
—in fact—a little more like yourself.’ Poor Mr.
Jolliffe, so kind and confiding! could he at that
moment have known what Master George Markham
was really like, how shocked he would have been at
having made such a request: for, even had Julian been
the milk-and-water little fellow he thought him, how



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. S7

much to be preferred that would have been to the
hitherto thoughtless and unfeeling, but now wickedly
disposed youth before him. Some others of the family
entering the room, nothing further was said upon the
subject. George was glad of this: “for,” thought
he, “‘that prevented my giving any promise :” just as
though that could make his conduct less guilty, in the
deceit he meant to practise.



88 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

CHAPTER III.

JULIAN arose early on the following morning, refreshed
by a long sleep, and, with a natural curiosity to see
more of a place so new to him, was walking in the
garden, when George saw him from his bedroom win-
dow and ran down to join him. His first idea of
“what fun it would be” to make him appear, “just
for a little while,” different to what Mr. Jolliffe wished
to find him, was certainly uppermost in his thoughts ;
but then, the wicked idea of taking his place in that
gentleman’s favour was there too. He soon perceived
that Julian was only shy and fearful, instead of stupid ;
so, as a first step to what he intended, he set about
making him familiar with himself.

Little Julian had never told an untruth in his life,
and had, moreover, been taught that telling falsehoods
in fun, for the sake of a joke, was lying too. Having
so just a detestation of this disgraceful fault, he was,
as before stated, slow to suspect it in any one, and
therefore readily believed all that George Markham
thought proper to tell him.

After a little while he owned his fear of not behav-
ing properly where he was so great a stranger, and



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. : 89

begged George to direct him, particularly in what way
he could best please Mr. Jolliffe. ‘ For Papa told me,”
he added, ‘‘ that he had been such a kind friend to him,
he hoped I would do everything I could to make him
like me.” ‘That is, because, not contented with
being made a rich man himself, he wants to make his
son a rich man too,” thought George, who having no
generous or grateful feelings in his own mind, never
gave other people credit for possessing any. “O! Mr.
Jolliffe,” replied young Markham, “is a very good
man indeed ; but though he is very fond of laughing
and joking himself, I don’t think that he would like
little boys to do so; you had better, therefore, be very
quiet when you are where he is; he lets me doas I like,
because Iam a big boy: besides, I don’t belong to him,
as you do.” ‘The falsehood contained in the beginning
of this speech was exactly that he meant to make use
of in his first design of only deceiving in fun; but its
effect; was of so much importance, as he afterwards
found, that he was easily induced to follow it up, in
order to carry on his second and more culpable plan of
stepping into Julian’s place.

“T am sure,” said Julian, sighing, “I shall find it
very easy to be quiet and silent; if I feel at all merry,
I shall only have to think of my own dear home, so
far, far, away, and I shall be dull enough then to please



90 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

anybody.” This success in his first attempt was a
s'rong inducement for George to go on. “ That’s a
capital idea of yours,” he said, “ keep to it, and you'll
do very well; but as that must be a very dismal way
of spending time, you had better be out of the parlour
as much as you can; Mima, you know, will be glad
enough of your company, for she must feel even
stranger than do, and some of our servants, if you are
not with her to prevent it, will lead her a precious tor-
menting life of it; besides,” he added, after a pause,
“Mr. Jolliffe may think better of you for showing
great fondness and liking to be with her, instead of
staying with him and uncle and aunt.” George, in
uttering these words, felt his cheeks tingle with the
deepest glow of shame that had ever come into them.
It was impossible, though, misguided as he had been
all through life, that he should become so suddenly
bad as not to feel in some measure shocked at his own
conduct ; he had now told three or four barefaced false-
hoods, for a purpose for which he knew he could not
offer an excuse, even to himself, by saying “ It was only
in fun.” Such is the natural progress of error when
once begun. They now went to breakfast ; Mr. Jolliffe,
seeing the two boys together, felt assured that George
had attended to his request, and that all would go on
well, and, in order not to interfere in the task he had



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 9]

set him, he spoke but little to Julian; yet he noticed,
with great vexation, that he seemed the same kind of
boy that he done on the evening before.

It is not necessary that the occurrences of every day
should be detailed ; and a space of three weeks may be
passed lightly over. Little Julian acted on the advice
he had received, and Mr. Jolliffe, in consequence, was
confirmed in his first impressions. George Markham,
continuing as he had begun, sometimes indulged in
what he called fun, and sometimes in more intentional
mischief,—the one fault, as I have already endeavoured
to show, growing out of the other, that is, of telling
falsehoods in jest.

Although Mr. Jolliffe was still deceived by hin,
there was, however, one person in the family who was
not, and that person was Miss Vernon ; but as she did
not hint her suspicions, even to himself, George was
deceived in his turn, and spent his time in a manner
highly agreeable to his taste in the present, though not
in a way that was likely to produce him any good in
the future, at least such good as he had marked down
for himself, and that was to be admired for his talents,
and to be made a rich man by Mr. Jolliffe.

One morning, about this time, Matilda Maitland
called at Mr. Ingram’s, when the family were met to-
gether at luncheon : she looked pale, and out of spirits,



92 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

“T hope, my dear, you are not ill,” inquired Mrs.
Ingram. “Ono, Ma’am; but I am sadly vexed: you
remember those two letters I had been writing, when I
last saw you, Miss Vernon?” ‘“ Perfectly: one was
to Lady Strickland, and the other to Nurse Higgins.”
“ Just so,” said Matilda ; ‘‘ but, somehow or other, they
were sent in the wrong covers. I can’t think how it
could happen, for I am certain they were right when I
directed them. However, I had a terrible reprimand
last week from godmamma, who says the reason of my
not hearing from her before, is, that she was ill when
my letter arrived, and not sufficiently well till then to
answer me as I ought to be answered, for my disre-
spectful carelessness ; adding, as a punishment to make
me more thoughtful for the future, she should not send
me a very pretty present she had intended to surprise
me with, on our little festival on my brother’s birth-
day.” “That is very hard indeed,” said Mr. Jolliffe ;
‘but never mind, Matilda, other folk can make
presents as well as, Lady Starchington, (I beg pardon, )
I mean Lady Strickland ;” and the kind-hearted old
bachelor felt as grieved for Matilda’s disappointment
as though she had been his own daughter, and busied
his thoughts in suggesting what sort of a gift would
be most agreeable to her. Little Julian’s mind was the
same way occupied, and a curious small desk, of Indian



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 93

workmanship, intended for his own use, was speedily
fixed on.

“What I have already told you,” resumed Miss
Maitland, “is not the worst consequence of this strange
circumstance. Lady Strickland, not knowing that
Nurse Higgins had gone to live with her relations in
Scotland, but thinking she was still in Wiltshire, sent
her letter on there instead of back to me; so, when it
will find her, or whether it ever will, I can’t tell, there
being so many Higginses in that part of the country.
I should not care so much about this, because I could
write her another letter, but in the one I sent her I
had enclosed a five-pound note, hearing she was very
much in want of money. Not having had an answer,
I am afraid some dishonest person of the same name
may have had the letter, and been tempted by the
money to say nothing about it. JI have, however,
written to Nurse again.” ‘It was a most unfortunate
mistake that you made,” observed Mr. Ingram. “I
can scarcely believe that I did make it,” said Matilda ;
“vet I don’t know how I can otherwise account for it:
it’s very odd! You did not leave the room whilst I
went up stairs, Master Markham, did you?” Miss
Vernon’s eyes were immediately upon him.

“QO no,” said George, not venturing to look up, “I
was there all the time;” adding, (for he was now



94 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

wholly regardless of truth,) “‘I amused myself by
looking into the garden through the window, till you
came down.” Had he merely said ‘‘ No,” in answer,
it would have been better for his wish of avoiding
suspicion ; his desire to prove that he had been but in
one part of the room all the time, and that part the
farthest from where the desk was placed, convinced
Miss Vernon of the fact, especially as she had her
knowledge of his character to judge by, besides re-
membering his look and words when Matilda apologized
for having left him so long.

‘‘T asked you the question,” rejoined Miss Maitland,
— “because 1t suddenly occurred to me that one of the
children might have come into the room whilst we
were gone, and playing, as sometimes children will,
with what they ought not to touch, might have pulled
my two letters out of their covers, and then replaced
them each in the wrong one.”

George wished now that he had said he had left the
room, but it was too late.

The subject was dropped, and Matilda soon after left.
On returning home, she ran up to the nursery, Mrs.
Maitland being there. ‘‘ Dear mamma,” she said, “ I
am more than ever puzzled about my letters; George
Markham says he never 1@t the room whilst we were
gone, but stood at the window looking into the garden



IT WAS ONLY iN FUN. 95

the whole time.” ‘That I am sure he didn’t,” cried
one of the little Maitlands, a remarkably sharp-witted
child. ‘How do you know, Lizzie dear?” inquired
Matilda. ‘Because, when I knew Mary Ingram was
here, I ran down to gather her some of the flowers she
likes so much, and that grow under the parlour
window, and I looked into the room, and there I saw
him standing at the table where you had been writing ;
his back was to me, so I couldn’t see what he was
doing, but in a minute or two he cried out quite loud,
‘What fun!’ and then he burst out a-laughing.”

- 6 Well, dear, and what next?” asked her sister, ver
) ) ’ y

much surprised, but feeling certain that the riddle
might now be easily guessed. “O then,” said Lizzie,
“T was afraid he would turn round and see me and
think me rude, so, having gathered my flowers, I ran
away up to Mary in your bedroom.”

Matilda knowing she could have perfect confidence
in Miss Vernon, and Mrs. Maitland thinking it right
that a boy who could be guilty of such disgraceful
conduct should have his friends informed of it, they
took the first opportunity that offered of repeating to
that lady what Lizzie had told them, leaving her to
act with regard to it as lg judgment might direct.
They, however determined, on their own part, to shew
him their knowledge and opinion of his. behaviour,

G



96 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

by not sending him a card of invitation to the birth-
day féte, hoping, by thus proving to him he was
thought unfit to be received into the company of
persons of integrity and respectability, they should
give him one of the best lessons for the future he
could possibly have.

George, finding more than a week pass by, and
hearing no more about the letters, felt safe with regard
to them, and caring but very little for anybody ex-
tepting himself, went on as usual; but Miss Vernon,
though he did not know it, was still silently watching
his conduct. Naturally fond of children, and easily
understanding their different characters, she soon found
out the excellent disposition and mind of Julian ; but
there was one thing about him still puzzled her, and
that was his always becoming silent and quiet in the
presence of Mr. Jolliffe, however cheerful or playful
he might have been, perhaps only a moment before,
when he was out of the room. ‘There must be some
cause of this,” she said to herself, “and I am afraid
George Markham has more to do with it than he would
like me or any one else to know.” ,

Impressed by this suspicion, she questioned Julian
upon the subject. It Waggso perfectly natural to this
truthful boy to answer every inquiry in a straight-
forward way, that Miss Vernon soon learnt all that

ve



IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. a
had passed between him and his pretended friend.
“Tt is, then,” thought she, “just as I expected to find
it, and that ill-educated and still more ill-disposed
youth, if something is not done to check him, will
finish in wickedness and ruin, what he has begun in
folly and in play.” She knew that Mr. Jolliffe,
through George’s artifice, was as much prejudiced in
his favour as he was against Julian ; but she saw both
the boys in their true light, and resolved that he
should do the same. Therefore, the first morning she
found him alone, she spoke to him upon the subject.

Mr. Jolliffe was delighted with her account of
Julian ; but when she told him her opinion of George,
and all she knew of his conduct and intentions, he was
too much shocked and surprised to readily believe she
was not mistaken. ‘‘ However, I will take the first
opportunity,” he said, ‘‘ of trying the selfishness and
want of principle you are so persuaded of ; for I agree
with you in thinking there is but little difference in
doing wrong in fun and in earnest, more especially as
the one is pretty sure to lead to the other, and truth
is always disregarded in both cases.”

In less than an hour afterwards, George himself fur-
nished Mr. Jolliffe with the opportunity he wished fer.
Young Markham had often’said how much he should
like to have a Newfoundland dog, ready trained to

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CONTENTS.

PAGE
NEVER WRONG; OR, THE YOUNG DISPUTANT . @

“IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.” . P eri
NEVER WRONG, é&c.

CHAPTER IL

‘WHAT are you so busy about?” inquired Walter Sedley
of his cousin, Edmond Hargrave, whom he found sitting
alone in the school-room, a pencil in one hand, and with
the other turning over the leaves of a book nearly filled
with writing. “You know, Walter,” returned Edmond,
“that I, being the eldest_ boy in the school, have been
chosen by the rest to decide who is right and who is
wrong in any dispute or misconduct that may happen
out of school-hours, and this being the beginning of a
new year, I have been looking through my book of
trials and cases that have occurred during the last, that
I may make out a fair account of improvement or the
contrary.”

“Well, and which do you find the most of?” asked
Walter, impatiently, for the subject was anything but
agreeable to him, as my young readers will quickly
8 NEVER WRONG; OR,

discover. ‘I am sorry to say,” answered Edmond,
“that, with regard to yourself, there is little or no
improvement at all; for though in three cases out of
every four you, Walter, are the principal person con-
cerned, and proved to be in error, you have never, in
any one of them, signed your name as acknowledging
yourself to be in the wrong; I have the names oc-
casionally of all the other boys in the school, but you
have as yet never owned a judgment just that has been
given against you.” ‘That is, given by you, and set
down in your wise book,” said Walter contemptuously ;
“and pray, cousin Edmond, what does that prove?”
“ Only this,” returned Edmond, very coolly, ‘that you,
Walter, either are or believe yourself to be INFALLIBLE,
which word you will find, on looking in your Dictionary,
to mean ‘INCAPABLE OF MISTAKE.” “ Do you think I
don’t know that without your telling me?” again inter-
rupted Walter, petulantly; “considering how much
younger I am, I dare say I know the meaning of dic-
tionary words as well as you do.” “ You ought to do
so at least,” replied Edmond, “for, according to your
own account, you know everything, not only as well,
but a great deal better than other people do; and that
is the reason that it has been determined to give you
the name of ‘Never Wrong; or, The Young Disputant,’

oD)
till you prove you have no claim to it. You know we
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 9

do it all in good humour; it is only a sort of play: so
you need take no serious offence at all; and if by our
game of ‘Judge and Laws’ we cure one another of any
fault or folly, we are surely doing each other a service ;
you will own that to be correct, I suppose.” “Of
course I do,” returned Walter, “ but I can’t see that I
deserve to have a nickname, and I am determined that
‘I will never answer to it; it is not right of one boy to
make fun of another: I hate all such stuff.’ “So you
do when you are the boy to be made fun of, as you call
it,’ rephed Edmond; “but you did not say so, Walter,
when we named Master Willoughby, the other day,
Don Bompastes Furioso, because of his extravagant
way of speaking, such as calling his pens horrible,
wretched, and miserable, because they are a little too
soft or too hard for him; you thought nicknaming him
a good joke, and laughed as heartily as any of us.”

‘¢ And suppose I did, what does that prove?” asked
Walter, again. ‘I saw that he laughed himself, and
didn’t mind it, so there was no harm in making fun of
him ; besides, everybody could sce that he had the
fault, and that it would be a good job to cure him of
it.” “ And suppose, Walter,” said Edmond, “ that
everybody can see you have the fault of thinking your-
self always in the right, would it not be a good job to
~ cure you of it?” “To be sure it would, if I had it,




10 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

but I have not,” replied Walter, angrily. “Just prove
now, cousin Edmond, that I am never wrong, and you
may call me ‘Infallible,’ or anything else you please.”
“Tt is not my business now,” returned his companion,
“to prove that you are never wrong, but that you never
think yourself so.” “That’s not quitetrue, Edmond,” said
Walter, “for I have often declared that everybody that
ever lived must be wrong sometimes; so of course I
must be wrong occasionally, as well as the rest.”
“Aye, Walter,” replied his cousin, laughing, “but the
‘rest’ seem often to know when their ‘ sometimes’ take
place, but we never can find out when your ‘sometimes
wrong’ happen. If you break anything lent you, it
is sure to bean accident ; if you don’t keep to the rules
in or out of school, the poor rules are to blame, not
you of course,—they are bad ones; if you quarrel
with us, it is all our fault, and not yours,—-we ought to
know better than to say or do anything to offend you,
however unintentional; and added to all this, when
you make complaints of us to our master, you excuse
yourself by saying he has undertaken to educate us,
and if he don’t know our faults, how is he to cure
them? It is a good thing for us that he has more
sense and justice than to encourage idle tale-bearing
and misrepresentation even from you, who are his own
brother ; and I really believe, Walter, that you would
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 11

not make such foolish complaints to him as you do,
when you are cool, but only when you are ina passion.”
“No, to be sure I would not,” eagerly exclaimed Walter,
ever delighted to get rid of censure, and as constantly
insensible to its justice; ‘and of course, cousin
Edmond, when I am ina passion I ought not to be
blamed for anything I do, for then people scarcely -
know what they are about or what they say.”

“There again, Walter,” exclaimed Edmond, “ quite
right as usual, NEVER WRONG, of course; and yet there
is one thing you have mentioned that I think you will
hardly venture to defend.” “And what is that 2”
inquired Walter. “The being in a passion.” ‘“ And
so, cousin Judge,” cried Walter, in a great wrath, ‘I
am to put up with all manner of ill treatment without
being angry, just as though persons could help being
anery when they are offended.” “ Perhaps not always,”
said Edmond, ‘“ but then people ought to be sure they
have sufficient cause of offence before they get into
such a passion as you do, Walter, even supposing it to
be right to be in a passion at all.”

‘‘Tt is mighty easy to say; but I fancy it is a great
deal harder to do,” grumbled Walter; ‘but I can’t see
any reason, though you are my cousin, and older, for
your schooling and lecturing me in the way you do; if
I had not the best disposition and temper in the world,
12 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

I should never bear it, that I shouldn’t; you are
always trying to pick a quarrel with me. One does
not expect to find an enemy in one’s relation,” added
the perverse boy, becoming thoroughly excited ; ‘“ but
I don’t care for anything you can do or say; I know
that I hav’n’t any one of the faults you have told me
of, and the moment my brother comes home I will tell
him all about it.” ‘ Well done, ‘Never Wrong !’”
exclaimed Edmond, again laughing; “not one of the
faults I have been telling you of! and intend com-
plaining to your brother as soon as he returns from
his walk. But come, cousin Walter,” he added, more
seriously, ‘I cannot endure that you should call me
your enemy; you should recollect that it is your
brother’s wish, on account of our relationship and
difference of age, that I should assist, to the best of
my ability, in pointing out what may be of advantage
to you. You ought to know by this time, that, from
the circumstance of your being born so many, many
years after my cousin, Mr. Sedley, that you were a
great pet with both father and mother, who did their
best, with the help of grandmamma, to spoil you; so
that there has been not only a great deal to learn, but
a great deal to unlearn you; all you want is to have a
little more candour, more ingenuousness—I mean that
openness of temper which would incline you to believe
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 13

yourself wrong when told that you are so, without such
long arguments to prove it. You are always ready
enough to say that you must be sometimes wrong,
because no one is always right, as though such an
acknowledgment as that could be of any use. But
now, Walter, [ will make a bargain with you: the
first time, upon any occasion, you really seriously own.
yourself in error at the moment of being told so, I
will erase the name that so much offends you from my
book, and, what is more, will challenge the whole
school, one by one, (as your champion,) to single com-
bat with snowballs, if they should presume to again
call you ‘Never Wrong,’ ‘The Young Disputant,’ or
‘Infallible ;’ this is a capital opportunity for you, being
the Christmas holidays, which you and I, and some
others, are to spend at school; so let your reformation
take place before the time for snowballs goes over.”
14 NEVER WRONG} OR,

CHAPTER II.

AxouT an hour after the conversation between Edmond
and Walter, Mr. Sedley returned home. His first
inquiry was for his younger brother. ‘Do you want
me, Alfred?” asked Walter, somewhat impatiently, at
being interrupted in his play. ‘If I did not, I should
not have sent for you,” returned Mr. Sedley, mildly.
“Of course I knew you must have some reason in
sending for me, brother; but then, you know, I could
not tell that you wanted me particularly, so that I need
come to you directly,” said the young disputant. ‘We
will not argue that point, Walter,” rephed Mr. Sedley :
“whilst you are under my care, it will be better that
you should always come immediately, whatever may be
my motive in desiring to see you. I sent for you now
that you might bring me the book you promised to cut
open for me against my return. Where is it? I ex-
pected to find it here.” ‘’Tis on my desk, I believe,
where you placed it,” returned Walter, in some con-
fusion, “but I have not opened it.” And why did
you not?” inquired his brother. ‘ Because I forgot
it,’ returned Walter boldly. ‘“‘How many times more,”
said Mr. Sedley, “ am I to be told of this forgetting,
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 15

when I inquire, Walter, for what you have been desired
to do, or promised you would do?” ‘* Well, brother,
you needn’t be so angry,” answered Walter, who always
mistook admonition for severity and injustice; “if I
have a bad memory, it is my misfortune, and not my
fault; and I am ready to say again, as I have done
before, I am sorry my being unable to recollect should
put you to inconvenience; and what’s the use of my
saying more?” ‘There is certainly no use in saying
more, or so much either,” said Mr. Sedley, ‘if it is
mere words, as I think it is in your case, for I do not
believe your memory to be at all in fault; you were
inclined otherwise to dispose of your time, and so you
forgot what you had promised to do, and this you call
want of memory.” “It is not very kind of you to say
so,” answered Walter, much offended; you wouldn’t
speak to little Henry that way ; when he said he was
sorry about something the other day, you didn’t make
the same answers to him as you do to me.” ‘ Certainly
not,” returned his brother, ‘“‘because I have no occasion
to do so, for I have always found, when Henry has said
he is sorry, he has at the same time, been convinced
that he was in fault, and has, moreover, taken care to
avoid a repetition of it.”

“ But, perhaps, Henry, being such a little boy, is very
much afraid of you,’ observed Walter, unwilling to

B
16 NEVER WRONG; OR,

give up the point as long as he could maintain it.
“Which it is very clear that you are not,” said the
patient Mr. Sedley ; “but I must explain to you that
there are two kinds of fear: one, the fear of being in
the wrong, arising from a sincere desire to do rightly,
and engage the respect of ourselves as well as that of
others. The fear that you allude to, in speaking of my
little boy Henry, could only exist in a nature like his,
where the parent or teacher is of a tyrannical, severe, or
passionate temper and disposition. Now, as I am neither ~
of these, but have, I trust, proved myself to be an affec-
tionate father as well as brother, I can see no reason
for your suggesting such an inducement for the good
behaviour of Henry. My poor Walter,” he continued,
with great emotion, “what a pity it is that our parents
suffered you to reason, as you call it, where they ought
to have commanded and you to have obeyed; what a
hard task they have given me to correct this habit in
you, and the wrong judgment it has induced you to
form upon almost every point of conduct that interferes
with your inclination.” “And I am sure,” sobbed
Walter, “I have as much to bear with, for I am always
being scolded for something or another: and I know I
don’t deserve it, for I never had a cross word said to
me till I came here, and I feel just as good now as [
did then.” “TI have no doubt that you do,” returned
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 17

Mr. Sedley, ; “but the truth is this, Walter, you had
precisely the same faults then that you have now: the
only difference with regard to them is, that now you
are told of them, and then you were not ; but you make
a great mistake in saying you are scolded, for, in fact,
you are never scolded at all.” “ Well, brother, I don’t
know what you may call scolding,” exclaimed Walter,
with a look that said, as plain as look could speak, “I
think now, at any rate, I must know better than you
do.” “I will explain myself,” resumed Mr. Sedley,
‘“‘ for I see you have mistaken the meaning of the word.
Scolding signifies not only chiding, but quarrelling, and
is a vulgar expression, wholly misapplied in your case.
I undertake to teach you the difference between right
and wrong ; I endeavour to make you love the one and
shun the other. If you mistake admonition and
reasoning for scolding, the fault is yours.”

‘Poor me !” exclaimed Walter, catching at the last
words, without considering what preceded them : “the
fault is mine, as usual; but I do think it very hard to
have a long lecture all about such a trifle as forgetting
to cut open a book.” ‘“ There you mistake again,
Walter,” said his patient instructor ; “ your neglecting
to cut open the book began the lecture, as you term it;
but that circumstance has nothing to do with its con-
tinuation : all that has followed is owing to your habit

B 2
18 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

of arguing and defending, instead of acknowledging
and amending your faults.” ‘I am sure I don’t mean
to say I am never to blame,” replied Walter ; “I know,
of course, that I must be in the wrong sometimes.”
‘“‘ That useless and oft-repeated sometimes,” sighed Mr.
Sedley ; “‘and why not wrong now, Walter?” ‘QO!
not now, brother ; I am quite sure that I can prove that
I am not, though I did forget the book,” said Walter,
eagerly ; “‘it was all owing to cousin Edmond; he has
been lecturing me in.such a manner on what he calls
my faults.” ‘‘ And receiving a lecture on your faults,
you give as a reason for repeating one immediately—I
mean that of forgetting what you ought to have re-
membered,” said Mr. Sedley ; ‘‘ this is a curious argu-
ment, almost too ingenious even for you, Walter ; but
we will pursue this conversation no farther at present.
It was my intention to take you out with me for a ride
to-morrow ; but I hope, if your memory is really what
you declare it, it will shew its unfortunate deficiency
by forgetting to remind me of the engagement ; for,
to prove it capable of retaining what is agreeable to
yourself, and not what is useful and pleasing to your
friends, is an inconsistency that, with all your fancied
skill in argument, you will, I think, have some difficulty
in reconciling.”

Walter, however, was of a very different opinion.
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 19

He thought there would be no difficulty at all.” “ My
brother,” said he to himself, on reaching his own room,
“ig a good-hearted fellow, but he quite forgets that he
was once a boy, the same as I am; and, forgetting that,
he expects me to be just as thoughtful and serious as he
is. A precious stupid sort of a young-old figure I should
make of myself, going about all day thinking! thinking !
thinking! afraid to play, lest something I have to do
should escape my memory ; and then if I remind him
of his promise for to-morrow, he will say I can recollect
just as well as he can, as though it was not a great deal
more natural for me to remember that, than the cutting
open of a stupid book. He ought to know that it is,
instead of blaming me in the way that he does.
_ Such, and many more like them, were the wise re-
flections of Walter on what his brother had said to him.
Instead of profiting by the good advice he was in the
daily habit of receiving, he had long been inclined to
regard those who told him of his faults, as enemies
more than friends; and, by the same perverted mode
of reasoning and judging, he deemed those boys to be
hypocrites, whose uniform and steady good conduct set
him an example he greatly needed, and would have
done well to have followed.

Now, as Henry was a remarkably quiet child, and the
best behaved of all the little boys, he considered him
20 NEVER WRONG; OR,

to be more pretending and deceitful than any of the
others, and often suspected that the motive of his strict
obedience to Mr. Sedley was that that gentleman might
make comparisons in his favour against the rest, and
him (Walter) in particular. The consequence of this
unfounded and illiberal opinion was a secret ill will,
aud often an openly unkind and pettish behaviour to-
wards the child, who bore it with great patience, never
for a moment thinking it possible that so near a relation,
and one he had early been taught to love, could have
any worse inducement for his conduct than the mo-
mentary hasty feeling arising from some outward cause.
Young as he was, he had refrained from angry words or
unkind actions in return; practising the excellent and
pious principle early inculcated, of endeavouring to
overcome evil with good.

But to return to Walter. That ingenious reasoner
in his own favour, having come to the decision that he
was, as usual, blameless, instead of repairing his error,
ran the risk of again forgetting, by resolving first to in-
dulge a sudden fancy to draw a caricature resemblance
of what he chose to imagine little Henry would be at
his age, that is, if he did not become wearied of being
so amiable before that time, or rather, as Walter be-
lieved, so hypocritical. The figure of poor little Henry
was soon sketched, with an enormous wig on his head,
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 21

a beard down to his breast, and a pair of spectacles
across his nose; a large volume was under hisarm, on -
the outside of which was written “ An Abridgment of |
all the Learning in the World. By Master Henry
Sedley, aged twelve years.”

Walter was so much pleased with what he considered
to be his cleverness, that he sat chuckling over and
gazing on his picture, whilst his brother’s book, that he
ought to have been employed on, remained still on his
desk, in the far end of the second school-room. How
long he might have continued thus lost in self-admira-
tion, had nothing occurred to disturb him, it is im-
possible to say, for he was still contemplating his per-
formance when he heard two or three voices at once
calling him by his name of ‘ Never Wrong.” Walter,
exceedingly angry, started up, intending to leave the
room and avoid them; but before he could do so, four
or five boys entered, amongst whom was Edmond and
Willoughby. ‘‘O! here you are,” said one of them ;
‘but why didn’t you answer us? we have been calling
to you for an ‘eternity of time,’ as ‘ Bombastes’ here
would say.” ‘* You didn’t call me by my right name,”
replied Walter, indignantly ; “Cand I shall, of course,
never answer to any other.” “QO! but you must,
though,” said Pemberton, the boy who had spoken first ;
- “the laws and decrees of Judge Hargrave are never to
22 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

be disputed.” Then he should make them better,”
answered Walter, sullenly. “That’s what you always
say, when they are against yourself,” retorted Pemberton ;
“but you must learn to own them just, the same as we
do. I had a nickname last year, but I soon got rid of
it; and so may you, if you like to do so.” “I only
wish that grandmamma could hear you,” said the petted
- boy; “she would soon let you know what it is to treat
me in this abominable manner.” ‘To be sure she
would,” responded Pemberton ; “ she would first trim
our jackets, and then pin us together in a corner with
her knitting-needles, and tell us we should have no
sugar on our bread and butter, till we consented to
spoil her darling, and make him more disagreeable, as
a play and schoolmate, than he is already.”

‘Order, order, Master Pemberton,” said Edmond
Hargrave, who never suffered their joking or finding
fault with each other to be disgraced by ill-nature.” “TI
must have no rough speaking; we must recollect, in
our game of Laws, that we merely mean to break our-
selves of foolish or bad habits, so that we may live the
happier together, as well as grow up wiser; but this
must be done with perfect good-humour, or else it is no
longer play, and had, therefore, better be let alone.
You must apologise to Walter, for speaking disrespect-
fully of his grandmother, who has meant to be very
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 23

kind to him, though, perhaps, she has a little mistaken
the right way in showing it.” “IT own myself wrong,
and beg your pardon, Walter,” said Pemberton, with
great good-humour ; “but you must not mind being
laughed at a little, any more than ‘Don Bombastes’
does; if you do, you have only to make the greater
haste in getting your new name crossed out of Judge
Hargrave’s book.” “ T am in hopes,” said Willoughby,
“that I have already made TREMENDOUS !—O no, that
is a mistake, I mean to say great—progress in getting
mine of ‘Bombastes’ erased. I am sure everybody
who has heard me lately must perceive that I take care
to use only the prettiest little quiet words ; I expect,
when I go home for the Midsummer holidays, I shall
express myself as though [ had learnt to talk out of a
baby’s primer, something in this fashion, all in one
syllable :—

How are you, dear pa?P

And how is my ma?

And where is puss cat P

Can she catch a rat?

And Wasp, the old dog,

Does he bark at the hog ?

I now have left school

Where I kept to each rule ;
So can write, read, and spell,
And have learnt to speak well
24 NEVER WRONG; OR,

Tn all that I say,

As you hear me to-day ;
Which I did not do once,
But I now am no dunce.”’

“Tf that is the way you mean to express yourself,”
said Edmond, laughing, “ you will only exchange the
name you have at present for another you may not
like so well; therefore be warned in time.”

‘¢ You see now, Walter,” said one of his companions,
“how good-naturedly Willoughby takes our laughing
at him; that is just what we want you to do: and
here, too, is ‘ Valiant’ or ‘ Alexander the Great,’ as we
sometimes call him: he is as little offended at having
those names given to him as ‘ Bombastes’ is.” ‘TI see
no ‘Valiant’ here, or ‘Alexander’ either,” returned
Walter; “I only see a young gentleman whom J call
Master Melville, but whom you have thought proper
to affront, the same as you have me.” A loud peal of
merry laughter burst from the boys at this grave
speech, delivered too, as it was, with great dignity of |
manner. “I will bet you anything,” cried Pemberton,
‘‘that Melville, instead of being affronted, is as much
amused as any of us at the joke upon him, and, I dare
say, won't object to my telling you how he got his
title, for I don’t think you know, being on a visit at
the time.” ‘ With all my heart, Pemberton,” said
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 95

Melville, ‘you may tell Walter the whole particulars,
if you please.”

“ Well then, Walter,” began the narrator, ‘‘ you must
know tliat, once upon a time, (as the story books say,)
‘Valiant’ was seated at a table, on which was a green
' pbaize, and in this green baize was stuck a pin with the
point upwards ; now this terrible and deadly weapon,
being of the smallest kind, was quite unseen by poor
Melville, who in a very brave humour was descanting
on all the great heroes he had read or heard of, from
Alexander the Great down to Jack the Giant Killer ;
at length he became so animated with his subject,
that he suddenly raised his hand in an ecstacy, his
eyes looking as bright as the sword he imagined he
was grasping, and declared that he should like, of all
things, to be a great warrior, and die covered with
wounds on the field of battle! So far, so good; but
unfortunately for so heroic a spirit, these words were no
sooner uttered than, in order to testify his earnestness,
he gave the table a great thump with his uplifted
hand, just where the unseen pin was, upon which this
gallant candidate for glory hallooed out in a loud voice,
‘Murder! fire! fury! Ive pricked my little finger!’
and he has gone by the name of ‘ Valiant’ ever since,
and so he will, till he leaves off his sudden and violent
exclamations on meeting with such trifling hurts; for,
26 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

as we are not so brave as he is, we are afraid that he
will frighten us some day out of our wits; and we
shall call Willoughby ‘Bombastes’ till he gets rid of
his horribles, miserables, and abominables and such
like superlatives, all about nothing.” Here’s some
lines in character for ‘ Bombastes,’” said Melville,
against Twelfth-night, as his mother has promised him
acake. Shall I read them?” ‘ Not till I have seen
them,” interposed Judge Edmond, “for I must be
certain they will not offend before I give permission,
and not then, unless Willougby allows it too.” The
lines were accordingly handed over to Hargrave, who,
when he had looked them through, gave them to the
youth for whom they were intended, telling him to do
as he pleased about them.

“Q do let us hear them!” cried several voices at -
once; and Willoughby, after shaking his head in pre-
tended displeasure, and saying it was a great deal too
bad of them to expect it, read as follows :—

‘**T’m so TERRIBLY hungry, it’s so DRADFULLY late,
And what an IMMENSELY long time I must wait,
Before this ENORMOUS—this WONDERFUL cake
Will be made, and the HORRIBLE baker will bake:
And when it at last from the oven shall come,

It p’rhaps will be WRETCHEDLY—MIS’ RABLY done ;
Or Ma may forget, and with a great key
In the ABOMINABLE cupboard lock it from me ;
bo
“N

THE YOUNG DISPUTANT.

Or, if I should get it, the next HORRID news

Will be, ?ve a character HATEFUL to choose,

Yet no anger I'll feel, but of my cake nice

Give all the boys round a TREMENDOUS large slice.’

“Tam sure that will be very generous of me,” said
Willoughby, “after your making so much fun of my
favourite words, as you call them. What do you say,
Judge Hargrave?” “I say that I think so too,” re-
turned Edmond ; “ yet I give it as my further opinion,
that there is no offence to be taken against Melville,
for by shewing Willoughby how absurdly such ex-
pressions sound, as applied on common occasions, we
shall not only greatly help to break him of them, but
deter others who might, from his example, acquire the
same habit.” ‘And I think it a great affront,” chimed
in Walter, “to have such rubbish as that written upon
anybody, and I only wonder that Willoughby has not
more spirit than to put up with it; for my part, I am
glad that I have too much proper pride and good sense
to be so easily and so ill-naturedly amused ;” and so
saying, he turned to leave the room with a look of
great contempt at the other boys.

“O don’t stalk off in that way, like a tragedy king,”
exclaimed Pemberton, placing his back against the
door; “you know we came here on purpose to seek
you; we want you to tell us what sort of weather it
28 NEVER WRONG; OR,

will be the day after to-morrow.” “ ‘There’s a question
for people who think themselves wiser than everybody
else!” cried Walter, exultingly. ‘ Not than everybody,
only everybody but you, Walter,” said Hargrave ; “ you,
you know, are never wrong.” ‘ And, therefore, must
be always right,” interposed another of the boys;
“and, that being the case, we thought we could not: do
better than ask you what sort of weather it would be
the day after to-morrow, because of our settling our
skating party.”

‘“‘ What nonsense!” exclaimed Walter. ‘‘ Not at all
nonsense,” said the other; ‘for we have often heard
you say, when your walks over to your grandmother’s
have been put off for another week, that you knew it
would rain or snow on that particular day to which it
was put off; so we were thinking that, if you could tell
us on one Wednesday or Saturday what sort of weather
it would be on the Wednesday or Saturday following,
you would be still more certain as to what it will be
on the day after to-morrow ; this is what I was calling
to you for.” “And I wanted to tell you, Walter,”
said Melville, ‘that my ball which you lost the other
day, has been found in Farmer Blake’s kitchen; you
had thrown it through a pane in the window, which
he says you must have mended.” “I dare say, indeed !”
replied Walter, ever ready at self-justification, ‘as
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 29

though [ could see his window with all those ridiculous
shrubs about it.” ‘Those ridiculous shrubs, as you
observed Hargrave, “I have heard

’

now term. them,’
you say, were the prettiest group of evergreens you
had ever seen.” “ Well, and if I did,” answered the
young sophist, I never said it was right to hide a
window with them.” ‘But you knew that they did
hide a window,” rejoined Edmond. “ But if I did,”
replied the uncandid boy, “ how was I to know that he
had glazed it with such stupid thin glass, that such a
light ball would break it? Besides, after all, it is only
an accident, and who can help an accident? I neither
expect to pay for it, or to be blamed either.”

“To be sure you don’t,” said Melville ; “you never
do for anything. When you lost my ball, instead of
owning yourself in fault, you told me I made more fuss
about it than it was worth, and that was all the con-
solation I got; you answered my complaints by telling
me you couldn’t help it, it was an accident.” ‘ Well,
and so it was,” reiterated Walter; “and who, I should
like to know, can help meeting with an accident?”
“Those who bestow a little more care and thought
than you do on what they are about,” remarked Har.
grave. ‘Don’t say another word upon the subject,
Hargrave,” interrupted Pemberton ; “I am delighted
to hear ‘Never Wrong’s’ opinion concerning the
30 NEVER WRONG; OR,

excusable nature of an accident, and that nobody can
avoid meeting with them, for I have been distressing
myself very much about one that has happened to
the kite he lent me.”

Walter turned very pale on hearing this, for his kite
was a valuable one, and he wished he had not spoken
so decidedly. “ What has happened to it?” he faltered
out. “ Why, somehow,” replied Pemberton, “the tail
must have got loose after I had placed the kite upon
the desk and against the wall; I am afraid it attracted
the notice of my cat, who was playing in the room at the
time, for when I returned there an hour or two after-
wards, I found it on the ground with Mistress Puss
frisking over it, and three large holes made in the
middle of it.” Walter was for some time silent; he
was searching his mind, or more properly speaking, his
imagination, for arguments by which he might prove,
that though his own case of the ball and broken
window was an accident, that of his kite was not. To
do this he found a more difficult attempt at reasoning
than any he had yet made; but he had been so long
accustomed to consider himself in the right and others
in the wrong, that he felt no doubt as to the fact, and
trusted he should be able to prove that it was so to the
rest. Luckily for him in his present dilemma, Pember-
ton spoke again, before receiving an answer, and, by
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 31

what he now said, gave Walter an opportunity for his
false mode of reasoning. “I am very sorry that your
kite has got torn,” resumed Pemberton, “though I don’t
think I am much to blame about it, for you will re-
member being in the room at the time that I folded
the tail as it is usually done, and very carefully as I
thought; and”—“ As you thought!” interrupted
Walter ; “‘now I know how my poor kite became torn ;
the tail was not folded carefully, and so puss got hold
of it; you ought to have been sure that you placed it
safely, and not trusted to thinking that you had done
so.” “You speak,” replied Pemberton, “as though
you understood I was only thinking now that I had
secured it, and not at the time, which is what I meant:
it is then that I thought it was quite safe; but cats
are often ingenious in their play, as well as mischievous.”
“ And if you know that they are so,” rejoined Walter,
“T can’t think how you can call what has happened
to my kite an accident, and I see no excuse at all
for it.”

“ No more than there is,” interposed Hargrave, “ for
your carelessly playing at ball close to shrubs, behind
which you know there is a window.” “I don’t sce
any likeness at all between the two cases,” replied
Walter, impatiently. ‘I dare say that you do not,”
said his cousin, “ because in the case of the kite you

C
32 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

are the injured party, and in that of the ball the
injurer.”

“T have not yet finished what I was saying. When
Walter interrupted me,” said Pemberton, “I was going
to remind him that I placed his kite where I did at
his own desire. You will remember, Walter,” he added,
“that you said, ‘ Let it be there, Pemberton, and, when
I go up stairs, I will take it with me, and put it away.’ ”

Walter was not at all pleased with this finish of what
he had so exultingly broken in upon. Wilful falsehood
was not among his faults; and, perfectly recollecting
that he had thus spoken, he immediately acknowledged
that he had. ‘“‘ But,” added he, “I forgot it then, and
how could I help that? Pemberton is still to blame,
for he knows what a bad memory I have, and he ought,
therefore, to have reminded me to take my kite up-
stairs before he left the room, and not let me run the
risk of forgetting it.”

“Well done! ‘Never Wrong’ again,” shouted the
boys.

““T wonder, Walter,” said one of them, “if the bell
didn’t ring for our meals, and nobody called you,
whether you would remember in what order they came.
I should not be surprised to hear you ask for breakfast
at tea time, and fancy supper was dinner.” “ Or,” said
another, “ with such a dreadful bad memory as you make
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 33

yours out to be, that you should forget to take some of
your clothes off when you go to bed, and so lie down
with your boots on, as winter socks, and your hat,
instead of a night-cap, wondering all night what makes
you so uncomfortable. Perhaps, by and by, you will
be like the absent man, who, entirely forgetting what
he was about, put his wet umbrella into the bed and
himself in the corner.”

“JT am not going to answer any such nonsense as
that,” returned Walter, angrily; “and as for you,
Pemberton, I can’t think why you should be allowed
to have such a mishievous beast as a cat.”

‘You forget, in your displeasure about your kite,”
observed Hargrave, “that it was yourself who begged
Mr. Sedley to let Pemberton keep poor puss, when he
so humanely saved it from the cruel boys who were
going to destroy it.” “Then, as I did that,” replied the
young disputant, “‘it ought to have made the cat’s
master more careful that she shouldn’t do me a mischief,
whatever she might the others: it is very hard that’
what I meant as a kindness to him should be a vexa-
tion and a loss to me. I never saw anything like you
all,” he added passionately ; “let me reason ever so
well, there is no convincing you. I wish there was
not a cat in the whole world.” “And yet you are
afraid of rats, and dislike mice,” said Hargrave. “And

c 2
34 NEVER WRONG; OR,

I know that you like plenty of light,” observed
Willoughby.” “Yet, for all this,” rejoined Hargrave,
laughing, ‘‘ Walter would have windows glazed with
horn, that he might play near without danger of
breaking them, and have the house overrun with vermin,
because it is too much trouble for him to remember
and think of consequences, as other people do; and
this he calls reasoning well.” “You are all mighty
clever, I dare say,” cried Walter, with increasing dis-
pleasure ; “and you are, every one of you, ready enough
to blame me,—that I will say,—but I know better than
to mind you; for though, of course, I must be wrong
sometimes, the same as you and everybody else in the
world are, I am not wrong now, except, indeed, in being
too good-natured ; for there isn’t a boy anywhere would
bear such lecturing from his schoolfellows as I do;
but Pll take good care to mend that fault; and to
begin, I declare, from this moment, I will never lend
anything to anybody again, let them ask me ever so.”
‘Then, of course, you don’t mean to borrow,” said
Hargrave; “and in that case, cousin Walter, I fancy
you will be the greatest loser ; for where you lend one
thing, you generally borrow at least half a dozen.”
“Come, Walter,” said Pemberton, good-humouredly,
seeing he was about to leave the room much offended,
“don’t let us part in anger; you pay Farmer Blake
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. oo

for his broken window, and I will buy you a new
kite.”

“You may buy me a new kite,” answered the self-
sufficient boy, “if you think you ought to do so: I
don’t want it, unless you do; and when I feel certain
that it is right for me to have the window mended, I
will have it done, but not before.”

‘OQ! poor, poor Farmer Blake,” cried several voices.
“Tt he waits for ‘Never Wrong’ to glaze his broken
pane,” said one, “he won't have to complain of want
of air in his kitchen during the winter.” “ Or dust in
the summer,” observed another, “if that is any ad-
vantage to him.” “You may say whatever you please:
I don’t care,” replied Walter, going; “but I shall
remember you all, that you may depend upon.” “We
will hope, at least, Walter,” said Hargrave, “ that, as
you are so apt to forget, you will not remember any-
thing that has seemed unkind or ill-natured towards
you, and that, when you join us in the playground, as
we hope you will, we shall all meet again with the
good feeling that schoolboys should bear to each other.”
36 NEVER WRONG; OR,

CHAPTER III.

Water, dissatisfied with his companions, and alto-
gether in a very uncomfortable state of mind, went into
his own room. When there, he began, as soon as his
agitation subsided, to reflect on the loss of his kite, and
that, in all probability, he should have to pay Farmer
Blake forhis window, in spite of his recent determination
not to doso. Though in the heat of his anger he thought
he could justify himself, and avoid the consequences of
his thoughtlessness and pertinacity, yet, as he began to
cool, he could not help acknowledging to himself that
he was, perhaps, not always so entirely free from blame
as he had hitherto imagined. He, for the first time,
began to think that it might be taking too much credit
to himself to suppose that the whole school, with the
teachers, and his brother at the head of all, must be
wrong in their judgments, whenever faults were at-
tributed to him, and yet right, when they imputed
blame to others. He was aroused from these medita-
tions, so fortunately at last begun, by a gentle touch on
his arm, and, raising his eyes from the floor, to which
they had been directed, he beheld his little nephew
Henry.
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 37

‘Dear Walter,” he said, with great earnestness, “I
wanted so to see you when nobody was by.” “I wish
you wouldn’t come teasing me just now,” returned
Walter, with his usual pettishness, and forgetting at
the moment all the wise reflections he had been en-
gaged in.”

“Don’t be angry with me,” said the child, his eyes
filling with tears; ‘‘I have only come to tell you papa
has just desired me to go into the school-room, to see
if the book he gave you to cut open is still lying on
your desk undone, for if it is, he said I was to do it,
and bring it him afterwards.”

“Oh, dear, dear!” exclaimed Walter, “I have
quite forgot it again. I do think there’s a spell
set on me.” ‘A spell! what’s that?” inquired
Henry. “You won't understand me, even if I
take the trouble to explain it,” returned his un-
gracious young uncle; “it’s a fate,—a sort of power
that makes everything go wrong, and we can’t help
ourselves.” z

“T should think that couldn't be,” said Henry,
“only that, you being so much older thanI am, I
suppose you must know best.” ‘And why do you
think it can’t be?” inquired Walter. ‘‘ Because,”
replied the well-taught child, “I think if I was told
to do anything I was able to do, nothing would put
38 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

it out of my head, for two good reasons.” “ And—
what are they, pray?” asked Walter, with his usual
habit of disputation. “The first reason would be,”
answered Henry, ‘because I was desired to do it ; and
the second would be, if I had promised to do it,
that I ought to keep my word.” “But suppose you
were ever told to do what you thought a hard
task, or perhaps something wrong?” rejoined Walter,
in a true spirit of cavilling. ‘“ Why, then,” replied
the little boy, “I would’nt trust to my thinking so,
but I would ask papa, or somebody else wiser and
older than myself, whether it was wrong or not; but
as for spells and fates hindering me, I never heard
of them before, and I don’t know what they mean.”
“So much the better for you,” said Walter, with
a long-drawn sigh. “JI wish that I could say the
same ; but with me everything goes wrong.”

‘‘ Perhaps, Walter, that is because you don’t try hard
enough to make everything go right, but you will say,
as you have done before, that it is very impudent of
me to seem to teach you, who ought, of course, to
know so much better than I do.”

“ Ought, indeed!” repeated Walter to himself ; “but
do I?” This was the only time he had ever so ques-
tioned himself, and it led him into a long train of
thought, which the child again interrupted. ‘Instead
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 39

of cutting open the book,” he said, “TI have brought it
up to you under my pincloth, that, if I met anybody,
they might not see it. I thought you would feel vexed
at having it done for you, and perhaps, too, papa might
be angry, and it would then be too late to make amends
by remembering it.”

“ And are you so willing,” inquired Walter, as he
took the book, “to give up the praise 1 know my
brother would bestow on you, and, perhaps, reward,
too, for doing what he told you with once bidding ? ”
“T hope, Walter,” replied Henry, colouring, and with
a gravity beyond his age, “that you think | etter of
me than to suppose I can have any pleasure in
being praised for doing what you would be blamed for
leaving undone. I could not bear to be so ill-natured,
and to you, too, whom I could love so very much,
if you would let me.” The eye of Henry at that
moment resting on a piece of paper Walter had
unconsciously held half-folded in his hand, he asked
him to permit him to look at it, for he saw that it was
a drawing.

A blush of shame burnt on the cheek of Walter at
this request ; it was the first time so deep a colour had
appeared there, arising from such a cause. He looked
for a moment at the caricature, and then at little
Henry, and he thought that the right-minded, warm-_
40 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

hearted boy, and his sensible father, both deserved
something better of him than to be made subjects for
his ridicule and ill-humour, and that he would have
been more properly employed in doing what his brother
had requested of him than in wasting his time on the
performance that had, an hour ago, given him so much
satisfaction.

‘¢ Never mind,” said Henry, perceiving an unwilling-
ness in Walter to show the picture ; “ perhaps you had
rather not let me see it. And now I must go, for I
should not like papa to know I brought you that book,
and I shall be so pleased to tell him you are doing it ;
so pray begin at once, that I may say so with truth ;
there’s the paper-knife in it; and as your memory is
so bad, Walter, wouldn’t it be a good way for you to
do everything you are told directly, instead of trusting
to it? But don’t be angry with me for saying so.”
Henry now quitted him, and Walter was left again to
his own reflections, as he pursued his long-neglected
task.

It is said that Experience keeps both a very dear
and a very severe school as to discipline, yet, I am
sorry to say, there are many little folk who refuse to
learn in any other ; and so it was with Walter Sedley.
Precept, admonition, and example, had long been
thrown away upon him; but to-day seemed fated to
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 41

give him a lesson he could not mistake. He was re-
joiced at being saved the mortification of having the
book opened by Henry instead of himself, and his
heart, in consequence, warmed with a feeling of thank-
fulness and affection, all the unjust suspicions, and the
unkindness of his conduct to the generous and affec-
tionate child, rushed upon his mind, and inflicted a
severe pang of self-reproach. He could no longer
resist the conviction that he had at least judged
wrongly of his young nephew, and he asked himself
whether he might not also be mistaken in thinking his
brother severe, Hargrave his enemy, and the other
boys all disposed to treat him ill; he could not but
perceive that the rest of the school bore with perfect
good-hnmour the judgments and names awarded by
his cousin, and made them a sport amongst them-
selves, instead of a mortification or a punishment; in
addition to all this (for Walter was much humbled
in spirit) he felt that it would be shabby to expect
a new kite from Pemberton, and that he should, in all
probability, be obliged to have Farmer Blake’s window
mended.

He was ashamed to remind his brother of the en-
gagement for to-morrow, since he had again forgotten
the book, and he thought how false and mean-spirited
it would be to take any commendation from him for
42 NEVER WRONG; OR,

having done it at last. Such was the wholesome train
of thought that now passed through the mind of
Walter.

Had Pemberton, on the accident happening, supplied
him with a new kite,—had the Farmer not demanded
payment for his window, and, above all, had Henry
cut open the book, instead of bringing it to him, no
such ideas as those with which he was now impressed,
would have occurred to him, and he would still have
been the wrong-judging, disputatious, and petulant boy
we have hitherto seen him; yet, though such a change
had come over him, his reformation was by no means
complete ; old habits, especially bad ones, are not so
suddenly got rid of. Walter was still too anxious for
the promised ride, to act as he ought to have done;
that is, to have acknowledged his inattention to Mr.
Sedley, and to have told him of how much more Henry
deserved his commendation than he did; such a piece
of open and good conduct was more than he had
resolution for at present ; but he satisfied his conscience
for concealing the fact, in a better manner than he had
hitherto done in persuading himself that he was in the
right, though, in order to do so, he had affirmed all
those who gave judgment against him were wholly in
the wrong; he, on the contrary, this time, resolved

oD)

that the next praise he obtained should be fairly earned,
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 43

and that he would, in the meantime, endeavour to find
out whether his memory was in truth so bad as he
supposed it. Here was another step gained on the
road of improvement.

Mr. Sedley, in the course of the evening, discovered,
by Walter’s giving him much more than usual of his
company in the parlour, by his frequent allusions to
the weather, and other indications, what was passing
in his mind with regard to the ride for the morrow ;
but he resolved not to notice them openly, hoping that
the feeling of shame, which was so evidently struggling
with the fear of losing the promised indulgence, would
gain the victory.

It happened as he wished it should: Walter went to
bed, without reminding him of the engagement. It
was not Mr. Sedley’s intention to try his strength too
far ; satisfied with the progress he had made in one
day, he would not expose him to the temptation of
. breaking his good resolution on the next ; he, therefore,
at breakfast-time, spoke of the ride himself, and desired

him to get ready, and this, too, in a manner that
showed Walter it was meant to be considered as en-
couragement for further good behaviour. Walter,
delighted, not only spent a very pleasant day at the
house of one of Mrs. Sedley’s relations, but thought
proper to behave to that lady and his brother with
Ad NEVER WRONG ; OR,

something more like respect and humility than he
had hitherto dune; and, besides, treated Henry (who
accompanied them) with a show of affection and
kindness that made the good little boy perfectly
happy. But still, Walter’s reformation was, as yet,

only in progress, |
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. | 45.

CHAPTER IV.

Tur frost having now set in for some time, the follow-
ing day was fixed on by the young gentlemen of the
village for the skating party, and all the boys who were
spending their holidays at Mr. Sedley’s set off, under
the care of a trusty servant, who was directed to see
that they went into no danger, but kept to the one pond
they were accustomed to, the water of which was ex-
ceedingly shallow. All went on very well for the first
hour, but, at the end of that time, Walter proposed
trying another pond, of which there were many, and
much larger than the one they were on. “See,” he
said, “ how nicely those boys get on out yonder; this
is so narrow ; we shall have so much more room at the
next, and there is nobody there to interrupt us.” ‘All
ue is very true, to be sure,” replied Pemberton, to

hom he had been speaking; “ but, then, you know,
Mr. Sedley told us only to skate here, because the
water here is shallow, and there it may be very deep.”
‘Of course,” rejoined Walter, “it is very right of my
brother to be careful of us, but then there is sueh a
thing as being over careful, you know.” ‘ No doubt
there is,” returned Pemberton, “ but that, if a fault, is
46 NEVER WRONG; OR,

at least, one on the right side, so we will stay where
we are.”

Walter was in high spirits from the effects of
exercise in the open air. He was, though so young, a
good skater, and had received several compliments,
that had not only increased his exhilaration, but created
a strong desire to give a further display of. his clever-
ness. The wise reflections and good resolutions of
yesterday were alike forgotten, and his long-indulged
propensity to argue that he was right, because he
wanted to do what was wrong, again took possession
of his mind.

“My brother,” said he, “tells us to go to this pond,
as a general rule, without considering it sometimes
freezes so hard that it is as safe on another as it 1s on
this ; and that is the case to-day.” “That is very
likely,” replied Pemberton ; “ but for all that, as Mr.
Sedley desired us to skate here, in order to prevent even
the possibility of an accident, this is the pond for us ;
we ought certainly not to attempt any other; neither
do I think John would let us, if we designed to do so.”

“ That’s well thought of,” cried Walter: “if we go
we must give the old fellow the slip.” ‘ Indeed I shall
do no such thing, nor let you either,” said Pemberton.
“Is very hard indeed,” returned the wilful boy, ‘to
be always thwarted in one’s pleasures for nothing ; Tam
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 47

sure if my brother were here, he would make no objec-
tion, and therefore it is just the same as though he were
here.” ‘“ Not quite, I should think,” observed Har-
grave, who had been listening to the dialogue ; “ for in
one case we should have Mr. Sedley’s own word, and
in the other we have only Walter’s opinion of what
that word might be.” “I am sure of one thing, how-
ever,” cried Walter, angrily, “and that is, cousin
Edmond, that you are always willing to prevent my
having any pleasure that I set my mind on.” ‘TI must
still bear with your ill-will and pettishness,” returned
Hargrave, mildly, “for the sake of serving you, for I
shall continue to point out where you are wrong, to
the best of my ability, till you have the good sense to
perceive it yourself. A direction given to us by my
cousin Mr, Sedley ought not to be departed from,
unless he is on the spot to. sanction our doing so;
though all appears safe and right on the other ponds,
yet who can tell what may possibly happen should we
disobey the orders we received at setting out ?”

“OQ, ‘ Never Wrong’ can tell, to be sure,” said Pem-
berton, laughing: ‘the next pond is as safe as this, of
course, if he wants to go on it.” ‘If I am to have
that stupid name, I may as well have it for something,”
cried Walter, reddening with passion, “‘and I'll go, if
it’s only to convince Pemberton that I am right now,

D~
48 NEVER WRONG ; OR,

at any rate, in reality.” ‘‘ Worth while, to be sure,”
replied Pemberton, “for you to risk incurring your
brother’s displeasure, and perhaps an accident, for
the sake of convincing me. Come, Walter, don’t be
wilful and foolish ; forgive and forget, you know.”
‘‘ You forget to call me by that foolish nickname, and
tlien, perhaps J may forgive your ill-behaviour,” replied
Walter, magnificently; “but, for all you can say, I
won’t believe that the next pond is less safe than this
is. What should make it so?” “I will tell you,”
said Hargrave: “this is more shaded by trees, and
that is more exposed to the sun.”

This was indeed the case, and, owing to that circum-
stance, some of the neighbouring cottagers had chosen
that pond in preference to the others, for the purpose
of supplying themselves with water, and had broken
the ice at the far end of it, so that they could throw a
pail in with a string to it, and pull it out again without
danger to themselves. This was of course unknown
to the little party from the school.

“ F[owever,” resumed Hargrave, again addressing
Walter, “as it seems impossible to convince you by
argument of either the propriety of doing as you are
bid, or that the other pond may be less safe than this,
we will, for your satisfaction, just go and try its
strength.” “ That’s right,” cried Walter, triumphantly ,
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 49

“T thought I should be able to show you the folly
of not doing so.” ‘Softly, Master Watty: not
quite so fast, if you please,” said Hargrave; “I may
perhaps be able to shew you that the folly is all your
own.”

He then called to the other boys and John, and
told them, that, to please Walter, he was going to try
the ice on the next pond with some long poles they
had with them, and stones,—not that he, or any of
them, he assured John, meant to go on it, however
firm it might be found. They then all proceeded
together. Walter had by this time not only worked
himself into a firm conviction that he was right, but
was bent on the triumph of proving that he was so;
_ therefore, the moment that they reached the edge of
the pond, he threw his skates upon the ground, and
before any one could be aware of his intention, he had
slid into the middle of it, when, waving his hand
exultingly as he turned his head towards the com-
panions he had left, instead of looking before him,
he gave another slide, and in the next moment
wholly disappeared, having slid into the hole already
mentioned.

Hargrave, only waiting to rid himself of his shoes,—
his worstead stockings enabling him, with the help
of a pole, to walk on the ice, lost not an instant in

D 2
<&

50 NEVER WRONG; OR,

hurrying to his assistance, regardless of danger to
himself. Fortunately for Walter, who might other-
wise have been drowned, some boys had early in the
morning amused themselves with throwing heavy
stones around the hole previously made, so that the
ice there was broken to a considerable extent, and was
floating about in large fragments. Walter had risen
near the same spot at which he had gone down, and
had instinctively caught at a long slip of ice, over
which he got his arm just as Edmond came up;
another moment and his brittle support might have
broken from the main body, to which it was still
attached, and have sunk with his weight. Hargrave
placed his pole across from the ice on which he stood,
to a firm piece opposite, and then, trusting his weight
to its support, let himself down into the water, moving
with his hands along the pole till he reached Walter,
whose grasp he directed to the same object. By this
time the rest had run round the pond, to the same
spot, and by their assistance, though not without
considerable difficulty, both Walter and his preserver
were extricated from their perilous situation, amid the
tears of joy and exclamations of thankfulness uttered
by the attached group that thronged around them ; for
Hargrave was, as he well deserved to be, a most
especial favourite, and Walter’s faults and ill-behaviour
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 51

were almost forgotten in their rejoicing at his safety.
More dead than alive, through terror and mortification,
the so lately exulting and self-sufficient boy was
almost carried home by John, one of the boys running
on first, to tell what had happened, in order to prevent
unnecessary alarm on their arrival. Both Edmond and
Walter were put into warm beds, and a medical man
directly sent for. On his arrival he gave it as his
opinion that a fever would be the consequence of
Walter’s folly and misconduct, owing to the state of
excitement he had been and was still in; Hargrave,
he said, was in no danger. Both judgments proved
correct ; for some days Walter’s life was nearly despaired
of ; but the skill of his physician, and the great attention

e received from everybody, even those he had in his
bes judgment called his enemies, at length re-
stored him, after a confinement of many weeks to a
sick chamber.

In the course of this tedious period, he had plenty
of leisure to reflect on his past conduct ; he shuddered
when he thought of how nearly he had lost his life,
by his habit of arguing falsely; he could no longer
conceal from himself, that in reasoning he had allowed
inclination rather than judgment to suggest what he
said ; he perceived, too, that he was equally in error
in the character and motives of conduct he had
o2 ' NEVER WRONG ; OR,

attributed to others; Hargrave, whom he had long
thought to have ill-treated him, had risked his own
life to save him; little Henry had clearly proved
himself to be his friend, even before that never-to-be-
forgotten day of the accident ; and, then, his brother!
his patient, sensible, and good brother! “How,”
said Walter, to himself, ‘shall I ever be able to make
up for my ungrateful conduct to him?” That brother
whose understanding he had often dared to treat as
inferior to his own, whom he had believed capable
of allowing himself to be prejudiced against him,
and whom he had often designated as harsh and
severe, and consequently unjust; that brother had
attended him through a long illness, with the patience
and solicitude of a parent, sitting up with him for
several nights, to the injury of his own health,
forbearing to reproach him with his misconduct and
disobedience, though he was so extremely culpable,
but, on the contrary, only kindly encouraging his
reformation.

The veil of self-deception was at length completely
withdrawn, and Walter, far more exalted by his
humility than he was in his arrogance, saw all his
conduct in its true light; nor was he backward in
acknowledging that he did so. |

More than two months elapsed before he was able
THE YOUNG DISPUTANT. 53

to rejoin the boys in their pastimes, and when he did,
the first thing he observed in their play-room was
Hargrave’s book of cases and judgments, with the
offensive name completely erased, and a challenge
written, to fight with snowballs any boy who should
presume to again call Master Walter Sedley

“ NeveER Wronc ;” or, “ THE Youne Disputant.”
“TT WAS ONLY IN FUN.”
ye

“TT WAS ONLY IN FUN.”

CHAPTER I.

‘Do you know, Miss Vernon, whether any accident
occurred from the log of wood being thrown across the
railway yesterday?” inquired George Markham, as he
was walking with that lady and her pupil, his little

cousin Mary. “I hope, and, indeed, believe not, re-
plied Miss Vernon, “ for it is said that some one saw

it in time to remove it before the train came up ; other-
wise several of the carriages might have been over-

turned, and then, perhaps, even loss of lives might

have been the consequence.” ‘How lucky!” ex-
claimed George. ‘In speaking of so serious an event
as escaping such dreadful mischief,” rejoined Miss
Vernon, “you should call it providential.” “ Well,
perhaps I should,” said young Markham, carelessly,
‘but one can’t can’t always think of the right word.”

Miss Vernon looked grave, and even sad, for she
58 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

had frequently before remarked the light manner in
which this youth was inclined both to think and to
utter his thoughts. Referring to what he had said, she
replied, “‘ Perhaps not, Master Markham, when speak-
ing on trifling subjects; but on such a one as this,
where a number of persons might have been killed,
and whole families, in consequence, plunged into sorrow
and poverty, I should suppose that the right expression
would naturally arise in your mind, in preference to any
other. Let us imagine, fora moment, that Mr. J olliffe,
who you know lives with your uncle, instead of re-
turning from London a fortnight ago, had come yester-
day, as he had first intended, and had been overturned
in one of those carriages, and, at least, seriously injured,
how would you have felt then 2?”

“OQ! I should have been most dreadfully sorry,”
replied George, earnestly, “for if Mr. Jolliffe had been
laid up ill, or lamed, the house would have been dul]
indeed, he is always so good-humoured and merry. I
don’t know, I’m sure, how I should get on the whole
summer in this stupid village uncle has fixed on to
reside in, without Mr. Jolliffe.”

‘As you value that gentleman so much on account
of his being merry,” replied Miss Vernon, “TI hope
you have remarked and set some store on his being
WisE at the same time. ‘Merry and wise,’ you know,
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 59

should always go together.” ‘I dare say they should,”
returned George, in the same careless tone as before ;
“but as long as I can have the ‘ merry,’ I don’t care
over much about the ‘ wise.’” ‘ Perhaps that,” said
Miss Vernon, ‘‘ was the feeling of the wicked boy who
placed the log across the railway ; for, on being found
out, and asked why he did it, he said, ‘It was only in
fun.’” “Good gracious!” exclaimed George, indig-
nantly, “what a stupid and bad fellow he must be!
What fun could there possibly be in risking people’s
lives and limbs in that way?” ‘None at all, cer-
tainly,” replied Miss Vernon; ‘neither did he think
there was any. It is evident, from his examination,
on being found out yesterday, that he had no intention
of such serious mischief as might have happened, but
merely meant to frighten the people in the carriages
by a sudden jolt in crossing over the log. Like many
other persons who are foud of playing tricks, he did
not give himself the trouble or care to consider what
might really be the consequences of it.” “I can see
no joke in it at all,” persisted George. ‘As you said
before, only think how shocking it would have been
had Mr. Jolliffe been hurt by it. He must be a very
good-for-nothing boy, and ought to be well punished.”
‘Your indignation is very just, and I am pleased to
see it,” returned Miss Vernon ; “any person who, for
60 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

the sake of a jest, does that which may produce injury
to another, however unpremeditated the evil, is guilty
of a wicked act, and ought not to complain, even
should he be punished as though he had designed all
the mischief his thoughtlessness may lead to.”

“And yet,” said little Mary, who had listened
attentively, ‘‘ Cousin George will scarcely believe that ;
for I have often heard him say, when, by some trick or
rough play, he has frightened or hurt any of us, that
we shouldn’t make a fuss about it, for he only did it in
fun.” “Just the same as that boy,” said Miss Vernon.
“Yes,” cried George, “I know I have; but then I
never did, nor ever thought of doing anything so
stupid or wrong as throwing a log of wood across a
railroad.” ‘If it be wrong,” interposed Miss Vernon,
“‘to play off a trick that may end in mischief, on a
railway, 1s must be wrong to do anything in ‘fun,’ as
you call it, which may produce mischief, however
trifling, anywhere else. Besides, Master George, the
habit is a bad one; and, though begun at first ina
game of play, may, if indulged in, finish in something
very serious. J dare say the boy we have been speak-
ing of had played many pranks of a lesser kind, before
he became thoughtless and wicked enough to risk over-
turning a train of carriages at full speed. Few persons
arrive at a great height of vice or folly at once, but go
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 61 .

quietly and slowly on, step by step, though some much
faster than others.”

At this moment their attention was diverted from
the subject on which they were speaking, by the sound
of angry voices at no great distance. On turning
round a corner of the road, they saw two boys
struggling together; the biggest had got the head of
the other under his arm, and was cuffing him on the
back with hearty good-will.

George, forgetting in a moment what little gravity
Miss Vernon’s last address to him had occasioned,
burst into a loud laugh. Little Mary shrunk away
frightened, whilst Miss Vernon, going up to the boys,
desired the big one to let the other go, and then in-
quired what was the matter. “ Matter enough,” replied
Tom Hobbs, the big boy, angrily. ‘He left the gate
open of that field you see there, and, by doing so, has
let the horses, and cows, and donkeys out, that it was
meant to keep in.”

“ Well, and if I did, I only did as the gate told me,”
replied Soft Johnny,—for that was the name the very
simple younger lad was known by in the village ;
‘‘ mother can’t afford to pay my schooling for nothing,
and Dame says I must doas I’m bid.” “ What do you
mean by the gate telling you?” inquired Miss Vernon.
“Why, it’s writ on it,” returned Johnny, “ ‘ Please not
62 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

to shut this gate.’” “It’s no such thing,” eagerly
interrupted Tom Hobbs; “and if you will just take
the trouble, ma’am, to come and look, you will see, that,
instead of ‘Not,’ the words are ‘ Please to shut this
gate.’ It is done with a piece of red stuff, in great
letters, as big and as plain as the nose on his face.”
‘‘And nothing can be plainer than that, I’m sure,”
said George Markham, staring at the poor boy, and
looking as though he had some secret cause of merri-
ment besides.

Now, whether Tom Hobbs felt some shame for his
behaviour to Soft Johnny, or whether, though he had
no objection to treat him roughly himself, he did not
choose that any other boy should do so, I cannot tell ;
he was, perhaps, merely offended, and resentful at
George’s laughing when he was vexed. But, however
all this may be, he turned sharply round to that young
gentleman, saying, ‘I suppose, sir, he is as God made
him, and you are no better ;” adding in a muttering
tone, to himself, “and, very likely, a great deal
worse.”

Miss Vernon, though she heard these words, forbore
to notice them, aware that the reproof was well
merited ; and, in order to prevent an answer on the
part of George, that might lead to something more
angry from the young peasant, she immediately, with
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 63

the rest, crossed over to the field spoken of. She wished,
too, to gratify the lad, by seeing what was really written
on the gate. When there, to the great astonishment
of Tom Hobbs, she saw that Soft Johnny had read
aright ; there it was, in great red letters, ‘‘ Please Not
to shut this gate,” “It is very strange,” she said, “J.
think I have noticed this gate before, as having a
very different direction on it, indeed, quite a contrary
one; and, now that I look at it more particularly, I
can see that the word ‘Not,’ though done with the
same material and colour, is in another hand-writing.
I believe,” she added, after a pause, “I can guess all
about it. When the direction was first written, the
word ‘ Please’ having been placed a good way off the
word ‘to,’ some mischievous person has put ‘Not’
between; and this poor boy, knowing no better, but
thinking he was doing right, left it open, instead of
shutting it after him.”

‘Whoever it is that has done it,” said Tom Hobbs,
rubbing out the word as well as he could with the
sleeve of his jacket, and then scratching it over with a
stone, ‘“‘I only wish that I could come across him ; see
if I wouldn’t serve him as I did Soft Johnny here, only
a pretty deal worse.” ‘“ What a fuss about nothing !”
cried George Markham, contemptuously ; ‘‘and what
a stupid fellow you must be not to see, in a moment,

E
64 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

that, whoever has done it, has done it ‘ only in fun.’”
‘You may call me stupid, sir, if you please,” replied
Tom Hobbs, “‘ but whoever calls mischief ‘fun,’-is, I
think, a pretty deal stupider ; even Soft Johnny knows
better than that, and is too fond and proud of his
schooling not to have learnt it, if he didn’t.” “O, I’m
sure, Tom Hobbs, I didn’t do it,” cried Johnny; “I
don’t go to school for nothing; and Dame says, ‘We
mustn’t do evil, even though good may come of it ;’
so I'm sure [ ought not to do wrong that mischief
may.”

“This poor boy, with all his simplicity,” said Miss
Vernon, addressing Tom Hobbs, ‘is more truly wise
than many amongst you who call him by so offensive
a name; I hope you will leave off yourself, and persuade
others to do the same.” “I owe him a good turn for
having thrashed him for nothing,” replied Tom Hobbs;
“and that puts me in mind again of this trick. Whao-
ever has put that word in, has done mischief enough
for one morning: Farmer Hedges’ can’t find his best
cart-horse, and a cow and two donkeys have got into
mother’s garden, eat up her cabbages, and trampled
down her pease and beans, that were just getting
strong.” “It’s a great pity they were not a little
stronger,” observed George, looking still much more
amused than he ought to have been ; “ but I suppose
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 65

a rake and a hoe, and a shilling to buy more cabbage
plants, will soon set all to rights again.”

Tom Hobbs’s temper, not a little ruffled by his late
vexation, was still more annoyed by having his griev-
ances treated in this ight and unfeeling manner. ‘ A
lot of cows and donkeys getting into a garden may
seem very funny to you, sir,” he said; “and, if the
garden belonged to rich folk, it mightn’t be of much
matter; a loss of cabbages is not much to them ; but,
though you mayn’t know it, to lose anything that grows
in poor people’s ground is to lose great part of their
living. Such troubles as these may make young gentle-
men laugh, but they are serious enough to us, when
we are obliged, through them, to go with half a dinner.’
‘Besides thumping me, when I was only doing as I
was bid,” chimed in Johnny. ‘I,m sure, Johnny, I’m
very sorry for having done so,” replied Tom Hobbs ;
‘Sand, as I said before, only wish that I could catch
the right one to give it to.” And, whilst he spoke
these last words, he looked suspiciously at young
Markham. ‘ You can’t give him the same thumps you
gave me, if you did,” said Johnny, “so don’t mind
any more about it; Dame says folk should ‘forgive and
forget.’ ”

Tom Hobbs seemed not at all inclined to follow
this Christian precept, and Miss Vernon having noticed

EB 2
66 IT WAS ONLY IN. FUN,

the suspicious glance he had cast on George, hastened
to put an end to the dialogue. Taking two half-crowns
from her purse, she put them into Tom’s hand, saying,
she hoped that it would be sufficient to repair the
injury done to his mother’s garden.

The lad, with Johnny, then went away, still not very
well satisfied, though respectful to the lady, who, with
her young companions, passed on for some distance in
silence. Miss Vernon looked extremely grave, and
George was the first to speak. “I am Sorry, ma'am,”
he said, “that you should think it necessary to give
that fellow so much as five shillings ; it is a large sum
for you to lose.” “It is not my intention to lose it,”
replied Miss Vernon; “I gave the money on your
account, and, therefore, Master Markham, expect that
you will repay it me directly on reaching home.” “On
my account! and why?” exclaimed George, in a falter-
ing voice, and the colour forsaking his cheeks. “Simply
for this reason,’ she replied: ‘I feel certain that it
was you who occasioned the mischief those two half.
crowns are meant to repair, and you may consider
yourself fortunate should they prove to be a sufficient
sum for the purpose.” “Me! Miss Vernon?” ex-
claimed George, again in a tone he intended to sound
like surprise. “Yes, sir,” returned Miss Vernon ; “‘and
do not add to the fault already committed, by attempt-
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 67

ing to deny it. It was you who wrote in the word
‘not,’ filling up the space between the ‘Please’ and ‘to.’
I knew in a moment the particular kind of ‘t’ that
you make, looking more like a cross than a well-formed
letter ; but, even had I not known it, your manner
was enough of itself to convince me. I would not
of course, express my opinion before the two boys,
fearing the bigger one might tell it to the whole village
on account of his resentment, and the other through
his straightforward simplicity.”

George was, by this time, aware that whatever he
might say, to throw a doubt on the subject, would not
be believed, so he held his tongue; he was in hopes,
too, by thus silently admitting the truth, he should
prevent anything more being said about it now, and,
perhaps, athome. Judging Miss Vernon by the common
rules he had used on other occasions, he further thought,
that, if he repaid the money readily, it would be all -
right, and no more worry (as he termed admonition)
about it; and, having a purse unfortunately too well
filled for a boy of his thoughtless disposition, the loss
of five shillings was not so great a punishment as it
would otherwise have been. It was, at least, very far
from sufficient to break him of the bad habit he had
long indulged in of playing tricks, regardless of con-
sequences, excusirig himself, when found out, by saying,
68 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

“it was only in fun.” And this was the justification
he made in the present instance when pressed by Miss
Vernon to own the truth, on being asked why he had
altered the direction on the gate.

‘“‘T wonder, Master Markham,” she said, “that you,
who can see so clearly how wrong the boy was in
throwing the log across the railway for the sake of a
jest, do not perceive how blameable you are yourself.”
“TI don’t think,” returned George, “that what I have
done ought to be compared with what he did; my
putting the word ‘ not’ in could never cause such harm
as his tricks might.” “ Perhaps not,” said Miss Vernon ;
but, as I remarked to you before, we should avoid
doing anything, even in jest, that may end in mischief,
~ however slight; and you ought to have learnt, long
ago, that there is no true wit in either saying or doing
what may injure or give pain to any one.” “Well,
there’s no great harm done this time, at any rate,”
cried George, impatiently, and somewhat wearied of the
longest lecture he had ever received: “ ‘it was only in
fun’ that I put the word in; and that impudent boy,
and the old woman his mother, in having five shillings
given them, have got, I dare say, more than twice the
value of the damage done, so they’ll have a double
stock of cabbages and everything else ; I think I have
the most reason to complain this time, at least.” “If
iT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 69

so, that is just as it should be, replied Miss Vernon ;
‘¢ and I hope all persons who do things in fun, without
first considering consequences, will always find them-
selves the greatest sufferers by them.”

“Perhaps, Miss Vernon,” said George, as they drew
near the house, “you will be kind enough not to say
anything of this business at home ; I don’t want to be
teased about having lost five shillings. And I’m sure
dear little cousin Mary,” he added, to the child, coax-
ingly, ‘ wont speak of it. Some day I may, very likely,
tell Mr. Jolliffe, because he is so merry that I know it
will be just the thing to please him.” “I dare say
you think so, but I doubt it very much,” returned Miss
Vernon ; ‘I never can persuade you to believe that Mr.
Jolliffe is not only merry but wise, at the same time.”

‘“‘ How glad I am that the walk is over !” said George
to himself, as they entered the avenue leading to the
house. ‘“ Women have no fun in them: whilst they
are children, they eare for nothing but dolls and baby-
houses ; and when they grow older, they are always for
lecturing and heetoring over boys.”

George Markham had only very lately formed this
opinion, for he had had, unfortunately but few oppor-
tunities of female tuition, or, indeed, any instruction
at all fitted to correct his errors. His mother had died
whilst he was an infant, and his father, the captain ot
70 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

a merchant vessel, being scarcely ever at home, left him
to the care of his housekeeper, an ignorant old woman,
very ill qualified to instruct and manage him. ‘This
person, with a footboy to assist her, named Bob, com-
pleted Mr. Markham’s household. It is true that
George, when old enough, went to school, but then he
begged so hard to be only a day scholar, that his father,
more of a rough seaman than an educated and judicious
parent, granted his request. Thus he still continued
to pass the greater part of his time at home, with Bob
for his chief companion, practising between them
unnumbered pranks on old Betty, who, instead of
complaining, as she ought to have done, when Captain
Markham came home, generally bore their behaviour
very quietly, fearful, if she did not, she might lose her
place, which, being in it the greater part of the year
her own mistress, ‘‘ was a thing,” as she said to
herself, ‘not to be thought of.”

Thus was the love of mischief, disguised by the
name of fun, early created and encouraged by the ill-
judging and cunning old woman, who, however, con-
trived to avoid any very serious annoyance to herself,
by threatening Bob with dismissal if he didn’t mind
what he was about.

Mr. Ingram, the brother-in-law of Captain Markham,
whilst on a visit to him a few weeks before the present
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 71

s

period, noticed the familiar terms on which Bob seemed
to be with his young master, and, fearful of what
might be the result of such an improper intimacy, had,
in order to check it, invited George to spend the
summer with him in Hampshire, saying to his father
he thought, too, that a little better female society than
that of old Betty might be of service to him. Captain
Markham readily assented, and Master George left his
home at Greenwich, accompanying his uncle to the
retired, or as he called it, the stupid village in which
that gentleman had fixed his residence.

On reaching home, not a word was said by either
Miss Vernon or Mary of what had occurred during
their walk. Though he felt as though he was a good
deal ill-used, in being obliged to give so much, George
was anxious to repay the five shillinzs. ‘ Then,”
thought he, ‘she can’t pester me any more about it.
I only wish Miss Vernon was like old Betty ; but I
suppose governesses never are, and to be fault-finding
and lecturing is part of their trade; that may do,
perhaps, very well for girls, for they are all just as
stupid ; but it won’t do for boys, at least, not such
famous fellows as I have been used to at Greenwich.”

Miss Vernon made no hesitation in taking the bright
five-shilling piece offered her, though she could see that
Master George, on- presenting it, would have been
72 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

better pleased if she had. And now, that affair settled,
he went to the drawing-room, in which he found Mr.
Jolliffe, alone and reading a letter. “I have some
‘capital news for you, Georgy, my boy,” he said, rubbing
his hands, his cheerful, round face beaming with de-
light. “ The good ship ‘Hope,’ of Calcutta, has safely
arrived, and my man James, whom I left behind me in
London for the purpose, will be here with little Julian
and his Indian nurse, Mima, to-morrow.” “Is that
all?” inquired George, disappointedly. ‘Is that all?”
repeated Mr. Jolliffe ; “to be sure it is, and what more
would you have? But perhaps you would like him to
bring, instead of his nurse, a lion, or Bengal tiger, to
put in the forest here.” “I think I know better than
to have such a fancy as that,” replied George; “ but
what a famous sport those tiger hunts they have in
India must be, mustn’t they, Mr. Jolliffe?” “I think
hunt the slipper a much better game,” replied that
gentleman ; “for sometimes, in tiger hunting, the tiger
takes it into his head to hunt the man, and that, you
know, the slipper never does.” “Oh! but you are top
of an elephant,’ said George; “that’s the way in India.”
“Yes, I know that it is,” replied Mr. J olliffe, “at set-
ting out; but, perhaps, before your return, instead of
the elephant’s back, you may be on the tiger’s ; for I
believe they don’t expect you to walk to their dens
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 73
when they catch you, but are polite enough to carry you
there on their backs or between their jaws, whichever
may be most convenient to themselves. When little
Julian comes he will tell you all about it, and then we
will make a game of it. As I am bigger than any
body else here, I will be the elephant ; Julian shall be
the huntsman, mounted on my shoulders ; you shall
be the tiger, and we will hunt you all over the grounds,
and to make the play complete, lock you up in the
village cage afterwards, if you wish it.”

George considered himself rather above entering into
such a game of make-believe, and thought he should
really feel a little tiger-like, if expected to play it for
the child’s amusement. “I hope,” resumed Mr. Jolliffe,
after a pause, “that Julian is a brisk little fellow ; I
never could like a stupid milk-and-water sort of boy,
though, of course, I would do my duty, after having
promised his father to take charge of him.” “ What
- fun it will be, if he is one of that sort,” said young
Markham to himself,—‘‘a capital joke, indeed, for a
man like Mr. Jolliffe to have such a lad as that sent
him all the way from India ; but, if he is not, it will
be good sport to make him for a while, just a
little while, seem as though he was stupid and milk-
soppish. Mr. Jolliffe will know afterwards that 1t was
only done in fun, and then he will laugh at it himself.”
T4 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN,

Master George Markham, in thinking thus, only
proved how little he really knew of Mr. Jolliffe’s true
character ; for in wishing to find Julian a brisk, in-
telligent child, he had motives far deeper than the mere
desire of being amused by him. Possessing a large
fortune, and without relations to claim his assistance,
he had long devoted himself to purposes of benevolence.
Mr. Selby, Julian’s father, had been the dearest friend
of his boyhood, and he had afterwards, at his own
expense, fitted him out, and provided for him in India.
There Mr. Selby had married. Julian was the youngest
of several children, and the climate not agreeing with
his constitution, a change had been recommended,
Mr. Jolliffe no sooner knew this, than he determined
on adopting him, if his parents would consent ; and,
if the child proved capable of receiving it, he meant to
give him a first-rate education, thus fitting him to do
credit to some high profession, and to the fortune he
intended to bestow on him. Of this George was then,
of course, entirely ignorant.
~T
Cr

IT WAS ONLY IN FUN,

CHAPTER II.

Mr. and Mrs. Ingram had been chiefly induced, in the
choice of their present residence, by their long intimacy
with a family who had retired to the same village.
This family consisted of Mrs. Maitland, a widow lady,
with a grown-up son and daughter, and two or three
other younger children. They lived in a house called
the Priory, about a mile distant from Mr. Ingram’s.
On the morning following the incidents related in the
previous chapter, Miss Vernon and Mary intended
calling at the Priory ; and, as both his uncle and aunt
were from home, and Mr. Jolliffe engaged in writing,
they again invited young Markham to go with them,
as being the best method for keeping him out of the
stables, well knowing that he would much have pre-
ferred the companionship of the groom, or even the
stable boy, to theirs.

Arrived at the Priory, they were shown into a parlour,
in which they found Miss Maitland alone, sitting at
her desk, with two letters before her that she had just
written, put into their envelopes, and directed. “Iam
afraid,” said Miss Vernon, when the first words at
meeting had passed, “that we interrupt you.” ‘“O!
7G IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

not all,” she replied; ‘I had just finished as you came
in: and glad enough I was, for two such different kind
of letters, I don’t think any poor girl ever had to write
at the same time.” “Then, I suppose I ought to con-
gratulate you, not only on having completed a task,
but on your ingenuity,” said Miss Vernon. ‘ Well, I
think I almost deserve that you should,” replied the
young lady, laughing; ‘‘for one is all form and
ceremony, written from my poor head, and the other
all affection and nonsense, and that one comes from my
heart ; and, after saying so much, I certainly ought to
say a little more, and explain what I mean.” “Pray
do not think that necessary on the score of politeness,
my dear,” said her friend. ‘‘O no, not on that account ;
and now I must tell you; this letter,” holding it up
as she spoke, “is to one of the most precise old ladies
in all England, or anywhere else, I believe: it is to
my godmamma, Lady Strickland, and begins with
‘Most respected and honoured Madam ;’ whilst this,”
showing the other, ‘is to Nurse Higgins, and begins,
‘You dear, darling, old Nuzzy,’ for that is what I used
to call her before I could speak plain.” After a few
more minutes spent in conversation, Matilda—for that
was Miss Maitland’s name—observed to her lady
visitors, that they had not seen her sleeping room since
it had been newly fitted up; “‘and you can have no
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. hi

idea,” she added, “ of how pretty it now looks to what
it did. If this young gentleman will excuse being
left by himself, and you will take the trouble of walking
up stairs, I shall like to show it you.” George, in his
plain, rough way, said, he did not care at all about
being left, and his three companions then quitted the
room together.

At first he amused himself tolerably well, in looking
through the window into the garden ; but, soon tired
of that, he glanced round the room in search of some
better entertainment, and, in so doing, his eye rested
on the two letters already mentioned. thought, according to his own idea, immediately arose
in his mind, and, without pausing for a moment to
reflect before he acted on it, the two letters were taken
out of their envelopes, the one intended for Lady
Strickland put into the cover directed for Nurse Higgins,
and that for Nurse Higgins placed in Lady Strickland’s.
Using his favourite exclamation on such occasions,
‘What fun!” he cried, in great glee, ‘‘wouldn’t I give
more than five shillings, this time, if I could but see
that stiff old lady believing herself, even for.a moment,
to be called, ‘a dear, darling, old Nuzzy ;’ and then
the old nurse herself puzzling and spelling word by
word over the grand, formal letter. Matilda Maitland,
if she ever finds-it out, will think she has made the
78 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

mistake herself, and she is such a merry creature that
I know she will only laugh at it. If all girls were
like her, I shouldn’t care if I had happened to have a
sister or two.”

George had just come to this complimentary conclu-
sion of what he had been saying to himself, when
Matilda, with her two visitors, re-entered the room.
“JT ought to beg your pardon, Master Markham, for
having left you so long,” she said, “‘ but I hope you
you did not find the time tedious.” ‘O! not at all,”
replied George, with more sincerity than politeness :
“JT should have been sorry, if you had hurried your-
selves to come before.” This was said with a sort of
suppressed chuckle that did not escape the notice of
Miss Vernon, though she made no observation on it at
the time. “Shall I not have the pleasure of seeing
your mamma?” she inquired of Matilda. “I believe
you must excuse her this morning. In the first place,
I do not think she knows you are here; and in the
second, I must tell you, though it is at present a secret,
she is exceedingly busy in preparations for a grand féte,
to be given in honour of my eldest brother being of
age, and to which you must all come, for there is to be
an entertainment for little folks, as well as bigger ones ;
but though so intimate with you, and all dear Mrs.
Ingram’s family, you must expect to receive formal cards
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 79

of invitation in due time, the same as our other
acquaintances.” “I can only say, on my own part,”
replied Miss Vernon, ‘that I thank your mamma very
much for the invitation, let it come in whatever shape
it may, knowing that it is always a kind one.” ‘“ We
are to meet early in the day,” said Matilda, “and I
only hope it may be a fine one. There is to be archery
and cricket, and a great many other games for the boys.
So, Master Markham, as I understand you are very
clever at those sort of things, we shall particularly
depend upon you to conduct them.”

George was delighted at the promise of being made
of so much consequence, and the prospect, too, of such
a day’s pleasure. ‘ For,” said he to Miss Vernon, as
they returned home, “I suppose an entertainment like
what Mrs. Maitland is going to give, don’t come more
than once in fifty years in this stupidest of all stupid
places. Ah! Miss Vernon, you.should come and see
us at Greenwich in the fair-time.” “ And take a run
down the hill, I suppose,” she replied good-humouredly ;
“thank you, Master George, for the invitation, but I
would rather be excused, if you please.” “I can’t
think,” resumed young Markham, “‘ how the people
here can amuse themselves all the year round. I
wonder what such boys as I have been used to, would
say to such a dull place.” ‘Perhaps it would have

Â¥
S80 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

been better for those famous boys you so often speak
of,” replied Miss Vernon, quietly, “if they had been
born and bred in this stupid place, as you call it, and
never quitted it till they had been confirmed in good
habits, instead of bad ones.”

“Another lecture! so I'll say no more,” thought
George ; and the rest of their walk home was passed
in silence, little Mary amusing herself in gathering
wild flowers, and Miss Vernon feeling as disinclined to
speak as young Markham himself, though he entirely
occupied her thoughts. She was trying to find a
meaning for what his manner and countenance had
expressed upon her returning to the parlour at Mrs.
Maitland’s. It was impossible, without some very
plain evidence to judge by, that she could suspect he
would be guilty of so disgraceful a departure from
principle and good breeding, as even to touch a letter
written by another person, and that he knew was not
intended for him, much less could she imagine that he
would venture to do what he had done. She, therefore,
this time supposed she must have been wrong in
suspecting him, and on entering the house, dismissed
the subject from her mind.

It was rather late in the afternoon when Julian Selby
arrived with Nurse Mima and James. Mr. Jolliffe had
been for more than an hour looking anxiously out for
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. sl

them, and so had George Markham, though from very
different motives and jeelings. The wholly inexcusable
trick he had played Miss Maitland in the morning, in-
stead of satisfying him for one day at least, had only
increased his inclination for another ; so true it is that,
in the pursuit of EviL, the race is so much more rapid
than in that of coop. Therefore, I should advise, and,
indeed, earnestly entreat my young readers, if they
should ever be disposed to follow so bad an example
as that set by George Markham, to shrink with terror
from taking the first step, for they know not where it
may lead; but of this they may, at least, be certain,
that the more they advance the further they will go,
and consequently, the greater difficulty they will have
in returning to the path from which they stray, or, to
speak in plainer language, of regaining the love and
esteem of their friends, as well as their own self-respect,
without which their lives can never be deservedly
prosperous, or really happy.

“Well! here they are at last,” cried Mr. Jolliffe,
turning from the window and hastening down stairs,
to receive his little friend, as the carriage drew up to
the hall-door. George, eager for anything new, fol-
lowed, offering to assist in unloading the chaise.

Julian was the first to alight; he was a very deli-
cately formed small boy for his age, looking pale and

Â¥ 2
82 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

fatigued ; he spoke scarcely above his breath, and his
hand trembled as he put it into Mr. Jolliffe’s. After
desiring James to see that Nurse Mima was properly
attended to by Mr. Ingram’s servants, Mr. Jolliffe led
Julian up stairs to the drawing-room, where he was
warmly received by the kind, though till then unknown
friends awaiting him.

Julian Selby was one of those kind of children
whom it takes some time to thoroughly understand and
love, at least by persons who are hasty in forming
their opinions. He was not only an affectionate, but a
clever and high-minded boy ; incapable of misleading,
or telling a falsehood himself, he seldom or never sus-
pected it in another, and had, indeed, so great an
abhorrence of that vice, that he could scarcely believe
it, when found out in any one he had trusted ; he was
good-tempered, docile, and quick at learning, and
would, perhaps, have been more lively in his manners,
but that he was painfully shy and timid, this nervous
feeling always acting as a check upon him. His deli-
cate health, and the weakening nature of the climate
he had hitherto lived in, might, perhaps, in a great
measure account for this defect.

After Julian had partaken of some refreshment, Mr.
Jolliffe tried to draw him into conversation, but the
child shrunk from him as a stranger, and his thoughts
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 53

were in the home he had left; but, fearful of seeming
ungrateful if he said so, his manner was confused and
awkward, and his manners not so clear as they would
otherwise have been; thus Mr. Jolliffe’s first impression
of poor Julian was not very favourable. Never having
lived where there were children, excepting Mary, he
was more than usually slow at understanding them,
and he could not help wishing the little boy had been
more like George Markham ; for, only having spent
the last fortnight with that hopeful young gentleman,
and never having heard of any of his pranks at home
or elsewhere, he appeared to him as a fine spirited
youth, allowing for some occasional roughness or folly
in speech, by saying he perhaps was a little too merry
sometimes. George, too, was a handsome, well-grown
lad, such as he had pictured to himself his expected
pet ;—not that Mr. Jolliffe thought outward beauty of
any value, when compared with that of the mind and
disposition ; but Julian seemed to him very much the
reverse of even a manly boy, so that he could not help
feeling a little disappointed on that account too besides
the other. Mrs. Ingram saw that Julian’s eyes were
constantly turned towards the door, and, better able to
judge of what was passing in his mind than Mr.
Jolliffe could be, she asked him if he would like to be
taken to Mima, for perhaps he was tired, and would
84 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

like to go early to bed. The little boy, still fearful of
offending in saying what might be thought wrong,
answered, ‘‘ I will do as you please, Ma’am.” ‘Then,
my dear,” said Mrs. Ingram, a little puzzled by his
reply, “I think you had better go: Mima, too, will
perhaps be glad to have you with her, for all here must
be as strange to her as it is to you ; to-morrow, I hope,
we shall be better acquainted.”

The bell was then rung, and the servant who an-
swered it desired to take him to the rooms prepared
for his and Mima’s use, in which she was already com-
fortably seated, with no want of companions, curiosity
leading all the other servants to spend as much time as
they could spare with her; and when Julian entered,
there were wonderful stories being told about India,
and many questions being asked as to what sort of a
country England was; but there was a speedy stop
put to all this, upon his coming, for, running up to
Mima and throwing his arms round her neck, he eased
his over-charged heart by a flood of tears. This little
incident was told in the drawing-room on the servant’s
return when the bell was again rung. It chanced, soon
after, that no one was left there but young Markham
and Mr. Jolliffe, who had been walking to and fro for
some minutes, lost in thought.

‘Tam afraid,” said he at length, as though thinking
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 85

aloud, ‘I shall be disappointed in him, and that will
be a great pity ; for I intended to make him a clever
and a rich man.” And now Mr. Jolliffe suddenly
paused in his walk, opposite where George was sitting,
and looked at him for a few moments with evident
admiration. George easily understood the look; he
he had, besides, eagerly listened to the few words that
had been spoken, and, ever rapid in his conceptions, a
new idea suddenly darted into his mind. Hitherto he
had excused his tricks by saying they were mere pieces
or fun: he would have been very much offended, as
well as surprised, if anybody, in judging of them, had
accused him of lying, and yet they would have been
perfectly right in so doing. Thus, whilst he was de-
ceiving himself as to their true character, the first
great principle of Integrity, which is love of Truth,
was every day becoming weaker and weaker, whilst the
habit of making his inclinations the rule of his actions
strengthened in proportion. He perceived that Mr.
Jolliffe was wishing Julian had been such a boy as
himself, and that, on the contrary, the child had
appeared unfit for the good intentions he had in store
for him. “If Mr. Jolliffe likes me best,” reasoned
George within himself, ‘why should not I have my
fortune made instead of this baby, who don’t even
Jook as though he would live to be aman? He is no
86 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

more a relation of his than I am; besides, his father
is rich, and able to give him a fortune himself, (here
George was mistaken,) whilst mine is only captain of a
ship, that may go to the bottom of the sea any day
with everything in it, even my father and all, and then
what is to become of me?” At this selfish and un-
feeling conclusion of his meditations he looked up, and
saw that his unsuspecting friend was again gazing
earnestly at him. ‘‘ Why should not Mr. Jolliffe,” he
added, still speaking inwardly, “make a clever and
a rich man of me?” Had Mr. Jolliffe known the
real character of George Markham, he would have tried
to do even more for him than making him clever and
rich: he would have used his best endeavours to make
him good.

“Georgy, my boy,” said Mr. Jolliffe, at last, “Iam
afraid this little lad is not quite so brisk as I could
wish, and, as I suppose he will naturally like better to
be with you than anybody else here, I shall take it as
a favour if you will try to make him a little more like
—in fact—a little more like yourself.’ Poor Mr.
Jolliffe, so kind and confiding! could he at that
moment have known what Master George Markham
was really like, how shocked he would have been at
having made such a request: for, even had Julian been
the milk-and-water little fellow he thought him, how
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. S7

much to be preferred that would have been to the
hitherto thoughtless and unfeeling, but now wickedly
disposed youth before him. Some others of the family
entering the room, nothing further was said upon the
subject. George was glad of this: “for,” thought
he, “‘that prevented my giving any promise :” just as
though that could make his conduct less guilty, in the
deceit he meant to practise.
88 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

CHAPTER III.

JULIAN arose early on the following morning, refreshed
by a long sleep, and, with a natural curiosity to see
more of a place so new to him, was walking in the
garden, when George saw him from his bedroom win-
dow and ran down to join him. His first idea of
“what fun it would be” to make him appear, “just
for a little while,” different to what Mr. Jolliffe wished
to find him, was certainly uppermost in his thoughts ;
but then, the wicked idea of taking his place in that
gentleman’s favour was there too. He soon perceived
that Julian was only shy and fearful, instead of stupid ;
so, as a first step to what he intended, he set about
making him familiar with himself.

Little Julian had never told an untruth in his life,
and had, moreover, been taught that telling falsehoods
in fun, for the sake of a joke, was lying too. Having
so just a detestation of this disgraceful fault, he was,
as before stated, slow to suspect it in any one, and
therefore readily believed all that George Markham
thought proper to tell him.

After a little while he owned his fear of not behav-
ing properly where he was so great a stranger, and
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. : 89

begged George to direct him, particularly in what way
he could best please Mr. Jolliffe. ‘ For Papa told me,”
he added, ‘‘ that he had been such a kind friend to him,
he hoped I would do everything I could to make him
like me.” ‘That is, because, not contented with
being made a rich man himself, he wants to make his
son a rich man too,” thought George, who having no
generous or grateful feelings in his own mind, never
gave other people credit for possessing any. “O! Mr.
Jolliffe,” replied young Markham, “is a very good
man indeed ; but though he is very fond of laughing
and joking himself, I don’t think that he would like
little boys to do so; you had better, therefore, be very
quiet when you are where he is; he lets me doas I like,
because Iam a big boy: besides, I don’t belong to him,
as you do.” ‘The falsehood contained in the beginning
of this speech was exactly that he meant to make use
of in his first design of only deceiving in fun; but its
effect; was of so much importance, as he afterwards
found, that he was easily induced to follow it up, in
order to carry on his second and more culpable plan of
stepping into Julian’s place.

“T am sure,” said Julian, sighing, “I shall find it
very easy to be quiet and silent; if I feel at all merry,
I shall only have to think of my own dear home, so
far, far, away, and I shall be dull enough then to please
90 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

anybody.” This success in his first attempt was a
s'rong inducement for George to go on. “ That’s a
capital idea of yours,” he said, “ keep to it, and you'll
do very well; but as that must be a very dismal way
of spending time, you had better be out of the parlour
as much as you can; Mima, you know, will be glad
enough of your company, for she must feel even
stranger than do, and some of our servants, if you are
not with her to prevent it, will lead her a precious tor-
menting life of it; besides,” he added, after a pause,
“Mr. Jolliffe may think better of you for showing
great fondness and liking to be with her, instead of
staying with him and uncle and aunt.” George, in
uttering these words, felt his cheeks tingle with the
deepest glow of shame that had ever come into them.
It was impossible, though, misguided as he had been
all through life, that he should become so suddenly
bad as not to feel in some measure shocked at his own
conduct ; he had now told three or four barefaced false-
hoods, for a purpose for which he knew he could not
offer an excuse, even to himself, by saying “ It was only
in fun.” Such is the natural progress of error when
once begun. They now went to breakfast ; Mr. Jolliffe,
seeing the two boys together, felt assured that George
had attended to his request, and that all would go on
well, and, in order not to interfere in the task he had
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 9]

set him, he spoke but little to Julian; yet he noticed,
with great vexation, that he seemed the same kind of
boy that he done on the evening before.

It is not necessary that the occurrences of every day
should be detailed ; and a space of three weeks may be
passed lightly over. Little Julian acted on the advice
he had received, and Mr. Jolliffe, in consequence, was
confirmed in his first impressions. George Markham,
continuing as he had begun, sometimes indulged in
what he called fun, and sometimes in more intentional
mischief,—the one fault, as I have already endeavoured
to show, growing out of the other, that is, of telling
falsehoods in jest.

Although Mr. Jolliffe was still deceived by hin,
there was, however, one person in the family who was
not, and that person was Miss Vernon ; but as she did
not hint her suspicions, even to himself, George was
deceived in his turn, and spent his time in a manner
highly agreeable to his taste in the present, though not
in a way that was likely to produce him any good in
the future, at least such good as he had marked down
for himself, and that was to be admired for his talents,
and to be made a rich man by Mr. Jolliffe.

One morning, about this time, Matilda Maitland
called at Mr. Ingram’s, when the family were met to-
gether at luncheon : she looked pale, and out of spirits,
92 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

“T hope, my dear, you are not ill,” inquired Mrs.
Ingram. “Ono, Ma’am; but I am sadly vexed: you
remember those two letters I had been writing, when I
last saw you, Miss Vernon?” ‘“ Perfectly: one was
to Lady Strickland, and the other to Nurse Higgins.”
“ Just so,” said Matilda ; ‘‘ but, somehow or other, they
were sent in the wrong covers. I can’t think how it
could happen, for I am certain they were right when I
directed them. However, I had a terrible reprimand
last week from godmamma, who says the reason of my
not hearing from her before, is, that she was ill when
my letter arrived, and not sufficiently well till then to
answer me as I ought to be answered, for my disre-
spectful carelessness ; adding, as a punishment to make
me more thoughtful for the future, she should not send
me a very pretty present she had intended to surprise
me with, on our little festival on my brother’s birth-
day.” “That is very hard indeed,” said Mr. Jolliffe ;
‘but never mind, Matilda, other folk can make
presents as well as, Lady Starchington, (I beg pardon, )
I mean Lady Strickland ;” and the kind-hearted old
bachelor felt as grieved for Matilda’s disappointment
as though she had been his own daughter, and busied
his thoughts in suggesting what sort of a gift would
be most agreeable to her. Little Julian’s mind was the
same way occupied, and a curious small desk, of Indian
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 93

workmanship, intended for his own use, was speedily
fixed on.

“What I have already told you,” resumed Miss
Maitland, “is not the worst consequence of this strange
circumstance. Lady Strickland, not knowing that
Nurse Higgins had gone to live with her relations in
Scotland, but thinking she was still in Wiltshire, sent
her letter on there instead of back to me; so, when it
will find her, or whether it ever will, I can’t tell, there
being so many Higginses in that part of the country.
I should not care so much about this, because I could
write her another letter, but in the one I sent her I
had enclosed a five-pound note, hearing she was very
much in want of money. Not having had an answer,
I am afraid some dishonest person of the same name
may have had the letter, and been tempted by the
money to say nothing about it. JI have, however,
written to Nurse again.” ‘It was a most unfortunate
mistake that you made,” observed Mr. Ingram. “I
can scarcely believe that I did make it,” said Matilda ;
“vet I don’t know how I can otherwise account for it:
it’s very odd! You did not leave the room whilst I
went up stairs, Master Markham, did you?” Miss
Vernon’s eyes were immediately upon him.

“QO no,” said George, not venturing to look up, “I
was there all the time;” adding, (for he was now
94 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

wholly regardless of truth,) “‘I amused myself by
looking into the garden through the window, till you
came down.” Had he merely said ‘‘ No,” in answer,
it would have been better for his wish of avoiding
suspicion ; his desire to prove that he had been but in
one part of the room all the time, and that part the
farthest from where the desk was placed, convinced
Miss Vernon of the fact, especially as she had her
knowledge of his character to judge by, besides re-
membering his look and words when Matilda apologized
for having left him so long.

‘‘T asked you the question,” rejoined Miss Maitland,
— “because 1t suddenly occurred to me that one of the
children might have come into the room whilst we
were gone, and playing, as sometimes children will,
with what they ought not to touch, might have pulled
my two letters out of their covers, and then replaced
them each in the wrong one.”

George wished now that he had said he had left the
room, but it was too late.

The subject was dropped, and Matilda soon after left.
On returning home, she ran up to the nursery, Mrs.
Maitland being there. ‘‘ Dear mamma,” she said, “ I
am more than ever puzzled about my letters; George
Markham says he never 1@t the room whilst we were
gone, but stood at the window looking into the garden
IT WAS ONLY iN FUN. 95

the whole time.” ‘That I am sure he didn’t,” cried
one of the little Maitlands, a remarkably sharp-witted
child. ‘How do you know, Lizzie dear?” inquired
Matilda. ‘Because, when I knew Mary Ingram was
here, I ran down to gather her some of the flowers she
likes so much, and that grow under the parlour
window, and I looked into the room, and there I saw
him standing at the table where you had been writing ;
his back was to me, so I couldn’t see what he was
doing, but in a minute or two he cried out quite loud,
‘What fun!’ and then he burst out a-laughing.”

- 6 Well, dear, and what next?” asked her sister, ver
) ) ’ y

much surprised, but feeling certain that the riddle
might now be easily guessed. “O then,” said Lizzie,
“T was afraid he would turn round and see me and
think me rude, so, having gathered my flowers, I ran
away up to Mary in your bedroom.”

Matilda knowing she could have perfect confidence
in Miss Vernon, and Mrs. Maitland thinking it right
that a boy who could be guilty of such disgraceful
conduct should have his friends informed of it, they
took the first opportunity that offered of repeating to
that lady what Lizzie had told them, leaving her to
act with regard to it as lg judgment might direct.
They, however determined, on their own part, to shew
him their knowledge and opinion of his. behaviour,

G
96 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

by not sending him a card of invitation to the birth-
day féte, hoping, by thus proving to him he was
thought unfit to be received into the company of
persons of integrity and respectability, they should
give him one of the best lessons for the future he
could possibly have.

George, finding more than a week pass by, and
hearing no more about the letters, felt safe with regard
to them, and caring but very little for anybody ex-
tepting himself, went on as usual; but Miss Vernon,
though he did not know it, was still silently watching
his conduct. Naturally fond of children, and easily
understanding their different characters, she soon found
out the excellent disposition and mind of Julian ; but
there was one thing about him still puzzled her, and
that was his always becoming silent and quiet in the
presence of Mr. Jolliffe, however cheerful or playful
he might have been, perhaps only a moment before,
when he was out of the room. ‘There must be some
cause of this,” she said to herself, “and I am afraid
George Markham has more to do with it than he would
like me or any one else to know.” ,

Impressed by this suspicion, she questioned Julian
upon the subject. It Waggso perfectly natural to this
truthful boy to answer every inquiry in a straight-
forward way, that Miss Vernon soon learnt all that

ve
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. a
had passed between him and his pretended friend.
“Tt is, then,” thought she, “just as I expected to find
it, and that ill-educated and still more ill-disposed
youth, if something is not done to check him, will
finish in wickedness and ruin, what he has begun in
folly and in play.” She knew that Mr. Jolliffe,
through George’s artifice, was as much prejudiced in
his favour as he was against Julian ; but she saw both
the boys in their true light, and resolved that he
should do the same. Therefore, the first morning she
found him alone, she spoke to him upon the subject.

Mr. Jolliffe was delighted with her account of
Julian ; but when she told him her opinion of George,
and all she knew of his conduct and intentions, he was
too much shocked and surprised to readily believe she
was not mistaken. ‘‘ However, I will take the first
opportunity,” he said, ‘‘ of trying the selfishness and
want of principle you are so persuaded of ; for I agree
with you in thinking there is but little difference in
doing wrong in fun and in earnest, more especially as
the one is pretty sure to lead to the other, and truth
is always disregarded in both cases.”

In less than an hour afterwards, George himself fur-
nished Mr. Jolliffe with the opportunity he wished fer.
Young Markham had often’said how much he should
like to have a Newfoundland dog, ready trained to

G2 —
ve > IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

fetch and carry, and other accomplishments of the
same kind, but it was too expensive for him to think
of buying one. Mr. Jolliffe, ever ready to gratify his
young friends, had in consequence given one of the
villagers, named brown, who dealt in dogs, fancy
_ rabbits, and birds, an order to procure him such a
Newfoundland as George described, charging the man
- on no account to mention his name if asked whom the
dog was for, lest George should hear of it, and,
guessing it was for him, spoil the agreeable surprise
intended, on the animal being brought home.

Whilst Miss Vernon had been speaking to Mr. Jol-
liffe, George had, in strolling about the village, seen
the dog, without any suspicion of its being meant for
him, tied up in Brown’s front yard, he having just
returned with it from a neighbouring town, where he
had made the purchase.

As soon as he came in, he hastened to Mr. Jolliffe,
exclaiming, “ Brown, who lives down the village street,
has got amongst his dogs one of the finest Newfound-
lands I ever saw, just the sort I should like to have;
and you were kind enough one day, sir, to say you
would perhaps buy me one.” ‘Is this for sale, then ?’
inquired Mr. Jolliffe, knowing of course that it was
not, but he wanted to hear what George would say.
‘“‘T questioned him a good deal about it,” he replied,
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. | 99

“and all [ could get from him was, the dog was be-
spoke, and he was to keep it till sent for.” “If that
is the case,” said Mr. Jolliffe, “there is of course an
end of the matter.” “I don’t know that,” cried
George, eagerly, ; “ ‘bespoke’ does not exactly mean
‘bought.’ I dare say the dog is not yet paid for, and
if Brown was offered a few more shillings for it, he
would contrive somehow to get off the first bargain,
and be glad to make another.” “But if he is an
honest man, he will do no such thing,” replied Mr.
Jolliffe. “We can but try,’ cried George again,
thrown off his guard in his eagerness to obtain what
he wished ; for it seemed to him that there was not
such another dog to be had anywhere ; “ that is, if you,
sir, are willing.” “‘ But Tam not,” returned Mr. Jolliffe,
“for I consider the dog to be already purchased. Did
Brown tell you whom it was for?” “No, that he
would not, though I pressed him very hard ; he only
said it was for a young gentleman who didn’t live in
these parts.” ‘‘ Well, George, from what you tell me,
_ I think you must give it up,” rejoined Mr. Jolliffe ;
‘for even if Brown was willing to let you have it for
a better price, what excuse could he make to the first
purchaser?” ‘O!” cried George, “he would soon
think cf something to say.” “Or perhaps you could
for him,” observed Mr. Jolliffe. ‘“ Easy enough,” said
100 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

George; “he might tell him that, as he lived at a
distance, and the time was uncertain when the dog was
to be sent and paid for, he thought he might as well
oblige a customer nearer home, and get him another.”
“ Suppose,” said Mr. Jolliffe, “we have Julian’s
opinion on the subject.” “That will be of no use,”
cried George, impatiently, thinking he had nearly
brought his indulgent friend to the point he wanted ;
“T know exactly: what he will say ; he is such a spirit-
less little creature, if he wanted the dog ever so, he
would give it up directly.” ‘I suppose he would,”
replied Mr. Jolliffe, disguising his real thoughts and
feelings by a tone of indifference. ‘‘ Perhaps,” rejoined
George, still persevering in his aim, “that fine animal
is to have for a master such a boy as Julian, who won't
half care about him.” ‘Or one,” chimed in Mr.
Jolliffe, “who is fond of fun, and will play all manner
of tricks with him.”

“ As likely as not,” exclaimed George, persuaded he
was now making a great step in advance, “and that
would be a pity; would it not, sir?” “I think it
would,” he replied, gravely, ‘‘ and therefore I will take
some pains to find out the true character of the lad
for whom the dog is intended; and if I find he is
undeserving of him, I shall most likely be able to give
him a better master, and that, too, by fair and upright
i WAS ONLY IN FUN. 1:04

dealing, and not by the means that you propose, of
tempting the man to commit a dishonest act, and
being guilty of one myself.” So saying, Mr Jolliffe
quitted the room, leaving George both astonished and,
in some measure, alarmed, though he scarcely knew
what he had to fear, unless it was that he had given
offence by speaking so slightingly of Julian.

Mr. Jolliffe, in passing up stairs, met Julian coming
down with a large packet in his hands. ‘ Where are
you going, my boy?” he asked. “ George is to take
Mary and me for a walk till tea-time,” he replied.
“But what parcel is that?” ‘A desk, sir,” replied
Julian. ‘‘I should like, if you please, to give it to
Miss Maitland, because her godmamma disappointed
her; it is a very pretty one, and I thought, being
different from what is made in England, she might
like to have it, and I was taking it to Miss Vernon, to
send it for me by one of the’servants, with a letter she
has written about it. I hope,” he added, his natural
timidity and fear of displeasing returning, “I have not
done wrong.” “ Quite the contrary,” said Mr. Jolliffe,
patting his head, ‘‘ you have only shown that you are
a fine, warm-hearted little fellow, and I wish very
much that you and I could be better acquainted, for [
notice that you scarcely ever speak when I am in the
same room with you. Now, I should like you to talk,
102 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN,

and be as playful, and as much at ease with me, as
you are with any one else.” ‘Would you indeed,
sir?” exclaimed Julian, his whole look and manner
brightening up; “I am very, very glad of that.”
‘To be sure I would,” returned Mr. Jolliffe. ‘ What
made you think I should not?” “George Markham,”
said Julian, “has been kind enough to tell me what
to do, whenever I have asked him, and, believing you
would like me best to be very quiet when I was with
you, he told me so.” ‘Perhaps he did not believe
any such thing, but told you so ‘only in fun,’ as he
calls it.” “QO! no, I am sure he would not do that,”
cried Julian, “for that would be telling a falsehood.”
“For the future,” said Mr. Jolliffe, “when you want
to be told what is right, or what is wrong, ask me
or Miss Vernon, instead of George Markham. [I
suppose he knows your intention of giving the desk
to Miss Maitland? I, should like to hear what he
said about it.”

_ Now, what that young gentleman had said about it
was this: “He thought it great nonsense to make
presents to rich people, and, if Julian didn’t care
about keeping the desk for himself, he had better give
it to him!” The little boy, though so fearful of
judging wrong in what might be pleasing to his new
friends, with regard to manners, was never at a loss to
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 103

determine for himself in actions directed by good
feeling and right principle ; he had, therefore, resolved
to send the desk, in spite of what his selfish adviser
had said to the contrary ; but generously averse to
telling what he thought might make Mr. Jolliffe dis-
pleased with George, he remained silent, instead of
answering. That gentleman, easily guessing what was
passing in his mind, forebore to urge him, and after
again assuring him of his wish to see him cheerful and
happy, said he would no longer detain him ; so Julian
took up his desk, which he had placed on the stair-
head whilst talking, and then went down to Miss
Vernon, where he found Mary waiting, ready for the
promised walk. Young Markham soon after coming to
them, they set out together.

Mr Jolliffe, during their absence, expressed to Miss
Vernon the entire belief he now felt in all she had
said to him of the character and conduct of the two
boys. He then related to her the trial George had
brought on himself with regard to the dog, and
spoke with great approbation of Julian’s so promptly
parting with his desk on hearing of Matilda’s dis-
appointment.

Meanwhile, the two children, under the guidance of
their elder companion, went merrily on, for George
was, as usual, in a frolicsome mood, believing he should
104 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

soon be as‘ good friends as ever with Mr. Jolliffe, and
that he would really try to get him that one particular
dog; and this he judged from the readiness he had
always shown to oblige him on other occasions. They
had set off with the intention of going to some
meadows on the other side of the village, but George
had already been there in the morning, and, always
thinking of his own enjoyment, instead of other
people’s, he turned off towards some hills about half a
mile distant, on which was a very large wood. Mary
and Julian were disappointed, but they gave up their
wishes to his, as they had often done before.

““We must take care we don’t lose ourselves,” said
Mary, as they entered beneath the shade of the
thickly growing trees. “If we do,” cried George, a
sudden thought striking him under the usual impression
of its being “only in fun,” “ you and Julian will make
as pretty a pair of ‘Babes in the Wood’ as can be
found anywhere.” “We had better not go very far
in,” said Julian. ‘ But if we don’t,” returned George,
“we shall get none of the -wild strawberries that grow
amongst the ferns; and I have come here on purpose
to have a feast of them.”

After they had gone a little way farther, crossing
from one path into another, and occasionally passing
between the trees where there was no path at all, Mary
It WAS ONLY IN FUN. 105

became frightened, and begged George not to proceed.
‘Well, then,” said George, pointing to a stump
covered with moss, “you can sit down here with
Julian till I come back: I shan’t be gone long; but
some strawberries I must and will have.” “ Never
mind the strawberries,” cried Mary ; let us go out of
the wood at once.” “But, perhaps that is easier said
than done,” rephed George, his first idea of pretending
he did not know the way back, coming to his aid;
“we have been going in here and out there in such a
zigzag way, that I don’t feel at all sure of which path
to take ; but sit quietly down for a few minutes, and I
will climb up one of the trees, and then I shall soon
find out where we are.” And, without waiting for
another reply, he disappeared through the opening
that admitted them to the little plot of grass on which
they stood.

“Those two pretty babes,” said George, laughing to
himself, “ will know, of course, that I can’t get up and
down a tree in a minute; however, I won’t keep them
long waiting for me. I will just find out where some
strawberries grow, and then run back and fetch them ;
and, if that won’t make up for such a slight fear of
having been lost, they must be silly indeed ; besides,
they will be sure to guess that what I said about not
finding my way was ‘only in fun;’ they must know
106 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

that I can’t be such a stupid as to lose myself in a
wood I have been to so often, and at the beginning of
it, too.” George had just come to this conclusion,
when he heard voices on the opposite side of the path
he was in, and looking through the trees and under-
wood that skirted it, he saw, at a short distance, three
or four little boys stooping down gathering strawberries
into a basket. Thinking it would be good fun to
frighten them away, and so get what fruit might ky
left ungathered, he hid himself from their view, and
then began to bellow like a bull. The noise coming so
suddenly, and in such a lonely place, was more likely
to deceive than it would have been in the open fields ;
the children started up, and, in their hurry, upsetting
the basket, hastened out of the wood as fast as they
could go. Before he returned to Julian and Mary,
George stayed to pick up a handful or two of the
fruit that was dropped ; he then went back to the spot
where he had left them, but when he came there he
found they were gone. Having called several times
without receiving an answer, he supposed they had
been tired of waiting, and, by going out the same way
he had gone, had found, that, instead of being lost,
they were just near the broad path leading out of the
wood. “And I dare say,” said George to himself,
“thinking it would be a good joke to frighten me in
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN, 107

their turn, have gone home without me.” But in
this conjecture he was wholly mistaken ; they had sat
patiently where he had left them, till they heard the
horrible noise he had thought proper to make. Julian,
knowing that there were wild and dangerous animals
in the jungles of India, thought there might possibly
be the same in the woods of England, and seizing the
hand of Mary, he broke away through the underwood
into a path in a direction directly opposite to that
which would have led them home. Without knowing
whither they were go:ng, but only anxious to escape
the supposed danger, they ran on for a considerable
distance out of one path into another, till they were
completely bewildered, and little Mary obliged to stop
for want of breath. They now began to reflect a little
on what had so much alarmed them. ‘There are no
such animals here,’ said Mary, in answer to Julian ;
“and I shouldn’t wonder if it was only some rude
boys playing together, or trying to frighten one another.”
“J wish I had known that before,” replied Julian, “ for
now that we have run away in such a hurry and
fright, I am afraid we shall not find our way back
again. J am so sorry, dear Mary, on your account.”
“It was more my fault than yours,” returned the
good-natured child; “you were, of course, too much
frizhtened to think or ask questions at the moment,
108 Il WAS ONLY IN FUN.

but I ought to have known better.” “Let us stay
where we are for a little while,” said Julian, “ George,
will, of course, look for us, and the farther we go, the
longer he will be finding us.” Mary agreed, and they
passed the time in listening and calling as loud as they
were able, in hopes of being heard ; and so at last they
were. : .

George, meanwhile, believing he should find them
at home, went on at his leisure, eating the strawberries
the terrified children had dropped. He had not, how-
ever, left the wood many minutes before he almost
stumbled against Tom Hobbs, who was hurrying up
the hill in the same narrow path. ‘“ Why don’t you
look before you?” cried George, angrily. Tom Hobbs
might just as reasonably have asked him the same
question, but he did not, for he had another in his
mind of more consequence. ‘I have just met my
little brother, and two or three other children,’ he
said, ‘who had gone to the. wood to pick strawberries
for Madam Maitland, but some fellow there has been
bellowing like a bull, and they have run home fright-
ened, leaving all they had picked behind them. Per-
haps, sir, you saw or heard him?” “T certainly heard
him,” replied George, “though I can’t say that I saw
him; but perhaps you may, if you look sharp, and go
a good way in.” “I mean to do so,” returned Tom
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 109

Hobbs. ‘ What fun!” thought George, as he passed
on,—‘a capital joke, indeed! Wouldn’t Bob enjoy
it?—to send that great looby all through the woods
looking for what is not to be found.”

But Master George’s fun was drawing to a close.
On reaching home, he learnt that Mary and Julian had
not returned, and, being obliged to tell he had taken
them to the wood instead of the village, and had left
them though only for a few minutes (as he said) by
themselves, he received a severe reprimand from his
uncle, who had been informed by Mr. Jolliffe, in his
absence, of his disregard of truth, and the disgraceful
-and dangerous career he was running.

Mr. Ingram, with his friend, and two or three ser-
vants, now set out in search of the children, taking
George for their guide; but they had scarcely reached
the bottom of the hill, when they saw Tom Hobbs
leading Mary, and, followed by Julian, coming down
towards them. Anxious to get Mrs. Maitland the
strawberries she had ordered, he had gone farther into
the wood than he would otherwise have done, for he
had soon found out who it was that had frightened his
brother and the other little boys. Just on the spot
where they had described the sound to have come from,
he had picked up a pocket handkerchief having the name
marked at full length in the corner. After he had
110 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN,

told the two gentlemen why he had gone to the wood,
and how he had been guided by the children’s voices,
till he had come up with them, he turned to George
and said, “I think, sir, this is your handkerchief; but
I suppose if you had known where you had lost it, you
wouldn’t have tried to send me on the fool’s errand that
you did ; it’s pretty plain now who the bullis.” “ What
is the meaning of this?” inquired Mr. Ingram. Upon
which Tom Hobbs spoke again, and having heard
from Mary and Julian the cause of their losing them- |
selves, that story was told, too, as well as the one of
frightening the little strawberry-pickers, and the loss
they had met with in dropping their fruit.

George was now fairly caught, and that, too, in traps
laid by himself, and, having nothing better to say, he
ventured on the old excuse of its being “ only in fun;”
but it would not do, and his uncle told him so, ina
manner not to be mistaken.
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN, Lil

CHAPTER IV.

Next day, the whole story, with that of the gate, and
one or two others in which young Markham was con-
cerned, became known throughout the neighbourhood ;
in consequence of which, Farmer Hedges called on
Mr. Ingram, to tell him that the cart horse he had
lost, when Soft Johnny had left the gate open, had
strayed to a place six miles off, and there been pounded ;
so that, reckoning what he had to pay, and his loss of
time, he was not less than five-and-twenty shillings
out of pocket; and, as Dame Hobbs had been satisfied
for the damage done her garden, he hoped the young
gentleman would be made to do something for him.

Here, then, was a new complaint for Mr. Ingram to
hear, and a new lesson for Master George to receive ;
for, though his tncle did not ask him for the money,
but paid it himself, he gave him a lecture on his con-
duct that made him begin to wish he was anywhere
but where he was; for he was still a great deal more
vexed at being found out, than he was sorry for any
mischief his pranks had occasioned.

He soon after went down to the village to buy some-
thing he wanted. When he got there, he found he

H
112 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

was stared at and noticed by everybody, though not in
a manner at all flattering, and more than once heard
observations made on him that were anything but
agreeable. Passing by a cottage that stood a little way
back, in the thick of the place, there came out an ex-
ceedingly big woman, with an angry countenance, who,
seizing him by his two shoulders, gave him a shaking |
such as he had never had or expected to have in the
whole course of his life. ‘ So,” said she, “you are
the young gentleman, as you call yourself, who got my
Johnny the thumping he had for nothing from Tom
Hobbs. I'll soon let you know what it is to play your
monkey tricks upon him, that I will, because folk say
he is silly ; but, even if he was, he’d be a great deal
wiser than you are, for there is nothing in the whole
world half so foolish as wickedness.” George with
some difficulty, tore himself away from her grasp, for
he seemed a mere infant in her hands, and would have
gone quietly home, but a group of boys had collected
around, who were by no means disposed to let him do
so; for the little strawberry gatherers were amongst
them, and the bigger ones, taking up their cause,
followed him with taunts and laughter, for they had
been greatly diverted by the punishment he had re-
ceived from Johnny’s mother.

George entered his uncle’s house in a very sullen
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 113

humour, more disgusted with the village in a ferment
than he had been when he thought it merely stupid.
The first person he saw was Brown, standing in the
hall, with the Newfoundland dog by his side; on the
collar was tied a card of direction. George had no
doubt but that his name was upon it. ‘“ Well, here's
something, at least, to make up for all Dve gone
through,” said he, to himself. “I’m not going to stay
here to be hooted by a parcel of rabble, that don't
know what ‘fun’ is; you and I, old boy, will be off
to Greenwich in no time, see if we ain’t;” and he
stooped down to pat the dog’s head, and, in so doing,
read on the card, “ From Mr. Jolliffe, for Master J ulian
Selby.” “You seem surprised, sir,’ said the man ;
“and well you may be, for I suppose you know the
gentleman ordered me to buy him for you, though he
changed his mind afterwards ; but don't be downcast :
perhaps he means to give you a better one.” And
there was a grin on his countenance, as he spoke, that
mortified George, disappointed as he was, more than
anything he had yet met with.

What Brown had said was not owing to anything
‘Mr. Jolliffe had told him, but what George had him-
self expressed when he saw the dog on the morning
before ; for he had then stated, that, if he could get
off the first bargain, he thought he could bring him a

H 2
114 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN,

customer who would give him a higher price. On Mr.
Jolliffe directing the card to Julian instead of George,
Brown, being a sharp-witted fellow, guessed nearer the
truth than he would otherwise have done.

George now went up-stairs, intending to spend the
rest of the day in his own chamber, packing up his
clothes, meaning to return home on the morrow to old
Betty and Bob; but, on reaching the drawing-room,
the door was opened by his uncle, who was there with
Mr. Jolliffe, and he was desired to comein. The cards
of invitation from Mrs. Maitland were lying on the
table. “I am sorry, George,” said Mr. Ingram, “on
unclosing the packet containing these cards, to find
there is not one amongst them intended for you, though
even Julian and little Mary have been favoured with a
separate one; and I am still more sorry to think, from
what I have learnt of your conduct within the last two
days, that you must be fully aware of the reason for
leaving you out of the invitation.”

George perceived that he was again discovered, but
by what means he was puzzled to guess. His uncle
soon explained the riddle, by telling him what Lizzy
Maitland had seen and heard through the parlour
window. “I am willing,” he continued, “to make
what excuse I can for your disgraceful and ungentle-
manly conduct, in the circumstance of your having
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN, 115

been left so much to your own guidance and that of
your father’s servants, two persons wholly unfit to have
the care of you. I shall, therefore, as Captain Mark-
ham has just sailed on a long voyage, act as I am sure
he would approve of, if he were here to be consulted.
Your education has been too long neglected, both
morally and otherwise. I mean, therefore, to place
you, during his absence, at least, and at my own
expense, with a clergyman who lives about ten miles
from here, and who, taking but four pupils, will have
more time to attend to attend to your conduct as well
as instruction, than the master of a large school would.
You will there have the advantage of companions who
will set you a good example, instead of being, perhaps,
with boys of as bad and as dangerous habits as those
I trust you will now lay aside.”

Mr. Jolliffe then spoke to him kindly, though
seriously, pointing out the necessity of the step his
uncle was about to take for his future good. And
happy would it have been for him, if what they both
said had made a better impression on his mind; but
George, instead of taking pains to find out the truth,
which he might have done by asking a few questions,
chose to think his uncle meant to shut him up with
what he called a “lot of stupids,” and that there must
be an end in such a place to all liberty and enjoyment.
116 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

He made no reply, but in a moment determined
what he would do, and that was (as there was now no
ehance of being allowed to return to Greenwich) to
run away; though where he was to run to he could
not exactly tell. When he went up to bed, which he
did early, he had more time to think of where
he should go, for he was still resolved to trust to his
own guidance, instead of that of his uncle and Mr.
Jolliffe; and, recollecting the address of one of his
father’s friends, an old sea captain, who lived in a
small town on the coast of Sussex, and who was un-
known to Mr. Ingram, he determined ‘on going there,
hoping to persuade him, from the account he meant
to give, to let him stay at his house till the search for
him was over.

In pursuance of this plan he was up by daybreak,
and, only taking.a change of linen and what money he
had left, stole out of the house, and was some miles
on his foolish journey long before he was missed.
When he was, Mr. Ingram immediately prepared and
set off for London, and thence to Greenwich, having
no doubt but he had gone thither. This George had
expected and guarded against, so he went on his way
without fear of being overtaken, and by sometimes
getting a chance ride till he reached one of the rail-
ways, arrived at the end of his journey sooner than he
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 117

had calculated. But here a disappointment awaited
him : Captain Hardy, his father’s friend, had left the
place more than a year ago, and gone to live with a
married daughter in London, nobody knew where.
So here was George in a strange place, with scarcely
any money, and no one of whom he could ask
assistance. Hungry and tired, he went into a common-
looking alehouse near the beach, where he got some
coarse food for his supper, and a still coarser bed for
the night, not having the means of paying for any.
thing better. He rose early in the morning, unre-
freshed and spiritless ; taking his bundle in his hand
he went down stairs, paid his bill, and then strolled
out upon the sands in hopes the sea air would cure his
headache. The coast on this part of Sussex is very
lonely, and George continued to walk on for above an
hour without meeting any one.

He now came to a small bay, or rather inlet,
amongst the cliffs, which were here high and craggy ;
still spiritless and tired, he sat down on a fragment of
rock, and leaning his head back against another, began
to think of what he had best do; but as the idea of
the only thing he ought to do, which was to write or
return to his uncle, never entered his mind as being
the best, he could come to no determination, and at
last, wearied with useless thinking and want of rest in
118 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN,

the night, he closed his eyes and fell fast asleep.
When he awoke, the tide had risen so high that he
could neither go forward nor return by the way he
had come. He was not willing to remain till it turned,
so he set about climbing up the cliff to the open
country above. When he had got half way he stopped
to rest, and looking where next be should put his
foot, touched a stone that was loose; moving it aside,
he was surprised to see, by the light of a candle that
was burning at a great depth under it, a large cave, in
which was a number of casks, or tubs, as they are
called by the smugglers; presently he saw a boy, and
that accounted for the candle, the: place being other-
wise too dark to work in, and he was busy heaping
sand upon the already nearly hidden property.
“What luck!” thought George, brightening up; ‘‘this
is a smugglers’ hiding place. When I get back to the
town, I'll just let the magistrate know it, and I shall
get money enough to keep me for a long while to
come.” But George, as usual, was making himself too
sure. On looking round towards the sea, he saw a
man just landed from a boat, in which a lad was left
to take care of it, and in the distance, a small vessel at
anchor, he had not before noticed. The man, when
near enough to be heard, civilly begged him to come
down, telling him it would be dangerous to go farther
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 119

up, and that, seeing him there as he was passing by
in his boat, he had come to save him from breaking
his neck, and was willing to row him wherever he
wanted to go.

Young Markham was completely deceived by this
show of respect and kindness, and came down directly.
‘You seemed, sir,” said the man, “to be looking at
something very hard up there, for you never heard me
coming along. Is there anything very curious grows
there?”

George, being so much in want of a friend, thought
it would be a good thing to make one of this person,
by telling him of what he had really seen, and what
he meant to do in consequence ; for though, in that
case, he must share the money with him, yet knowing
better than he did how to set about the business, they
might, perhaps, get more. He therefore, in a whisper,
lest the lad in the cave should hear, told him all about
it. His new friend then asked him some questions
regarding himself, but in a manner so respectful and
kind that George stated exactly how he was situated,
only withholding his and his uncle’s names. The man
listened with more satisfaction to this part of the
communication than he had done to the other, for it
proved to him that George was entirely in his power,
instead of he being in in George’s.
120 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

“The secret of the cave is safe this bout, at any
rate,” he said to himself, as he followed him into the
boat and rowed towards the anchored vessel, which, as
may easily be guessed, was no other than the
smugglers’. ‘This young runaway by his folly has
put it out of the power of his friends to find him here,
even if they think him worth looking after. We will
just go on board that craft,” he added aloud, “and get
a bit of something to eat, and then, sir, we'll be off to
the town in less than no time.”

This proposal was very agreeable to George, who,
having had only a biscuit for breakfast, was beginning
to feel hungry, and a good meal at somebody else’s
expense was just what he wished for; so, in high good
humour with himself, thinking he had begun his new
career in a very clever manner, he sprung up the side,
and stood on the deck of the vessel he would of all
others, had he known the truth, have most wished to
avoid.

“So you thought to make money of us, did you?”
said the man who had tricked and brought him there,
speaking in a tone not quite so respectful as that he
had hitherto used. “Now if you had wanted to
betray us from an honest motive, such as serving her
Majesty, I shouldn’t think so bad of you; but that,
you know, you didn’t; so, as I don’t believe you are
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. tot

fit to be trusted, we must keep you snug till the
cargo’s disposed of, and we can find a new hiding-
place; though I don’t think, after this lesson, you
will want to come in our way again.” He then turned
round to the wondering crew and told them the whole
story, for they were looking as much astonished as
George did.

“What run!” exclaimed one of the listeners.

Poor George ! he never thought to hear his favourite
word sound so hatefully as it then did, followed up,
too, as it was, by a boisterous laugh from all present.
He knew it would be of no use to complain ; and,
having no offer of reward or threat of punishment to
make, that they would at all care about, in the friend-
less condition he had chosen to place himself, he tried
to awe them with a dignified look, which they treated
as a sullen one, and laughed the more. However, as
they only wanted to keep him out-of the way of
informing against them, they neither meant to ill-
treat nor starve him, so he was taken down into the
cabin, and shared at meal times with the rest.

Soon as the tide had turned, they had set sail for
the opposite coast, where, after a short voyage, they
arrived at an obscure fishing town. Here George
found himself in a worse condition than in the place
he had been taken from, for he was now across the sea
122 % IT WAS ONLY IN FUN.

in a foreign country, without any knowledge of the
language, and he began to have a pretty correct idea
of what running away was, without any certainty
where to run to. He soon felt the distress of his
situation so keenly that he bitterly repented the step
he had taken in leaving Hampshire; for how was he
to get back to England? Those who brought him
would not let him go with them, nor indeed with any
one else, if they could help it; he had only a few
shillings left, and if willing to beg his way to some
sea-port, knew not what to say, or how to find it; and
when there, if he should ever reach one, he might not
find a vessel for England; or if he did, his story
might be disbelieved, and, having no money to pay his
passage, he would perhaps be still left to take care of
himself.

Meanwhile, the smugglers, anxious to keep him out
of their way for some months to come, spoke to a
French captain with whom they did business, and who
wanted an English boy to sail with him to the West
Indies. This gentleman’s vessel was expected round
to call for him at the town they were then at, in a few
days, and the offer of the berth was made to George.

It was a roundabout way of getting home, but he
could think of no better, so he accepted it, further
induced to do so by finding that the merchantman,
we =
Se

IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 125

for such it was, traded to the same island as his father
did, and he hoped that he might possibly meet with
him there.

During this voyage he had to bear with a great deal
of rough treatment, as well as insults and tricks, from
those who understood the ways of a ship better than
he did, and were quite as fond of what is called “ Fun,”
as ever he was himself; but he being now the one
played upon, the sport appeared to him in a very
different ight to what it had done before.

The thought of all his troubles having been occa-
sioned by his misconduct, added greatly to his suffering,
and this conviction tended more than anything else to
reform his character. Had he not been so self-willed
as he had hitherto been, he might have gained all the
knowledge he was now acquiring, in a happy home,
instead of where he was, for such he would have
found the clergyman’s house, to which he was to have
been sent ; but he had chosen a school of his own,
and that was the Great School of the World! and very
dear and hard he found the lessons it taught him.

On landing in the Island of Jamaica, he heard that
his father’s ship had not yet arrived, though it was
expected; so he resolved to stay there till it came,
doing the best he could to maintain himself in the
meantime ; and a great many shifts and difficulties he
124 IT WAS ONLY IN FUN,

“iad to meet with in order to provide even the com-
monest food and lodging. When Captain Markham
did come, his surprise at finding his son there was
beyond all power of description, though he had
received a letter at another port, telling him of his
having left his uncle’s house, and that he had been
sought for in vain. George was now so altered a
character, that he readily owned the truth of all that
was brought against him, and made no attempt tv
excuse himself; he then gave a faithful relation of
what had since befallen him; and his father, feeling
that he too was to blame for the over indulgence that
had left the boy so much to his own guidance, was
very mild in his reproof.

The first thing George did on his return home was
to write a penitent letter to his uncle, and another to
Mr. Jolliffe, stating his sincere desire to do whatever
they and his father thought best for him. So he was
again taken into favour, and passed two or three years
with Julian, (now growing a fine healthy boy,) under
the care of the gentleman to avoid whom he had so
needlessly run away. In this new home he found no
want of either amusement or mirth, having at last
learnt the truth of what had been told him so long
before, that “‘ merry and wise” should go together.

And now, on taking leave of my young friends, let
IT WAS ONLY IN FUN. 125

me hope, that, in reading this little story of George
Markham, they will not, in seeking for amusement,
pass over without attention those parts designed to
convey useful instruction ; nor forget that more serious
mischief than that related in this tale, has often
happened from what was meant at first—

‘Onzty In Fun,”

THE END,
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31a0fed98877cd2a8afdefe65719591b69e30c7b
'2012-05-01T07:05:15-04:00'
describe
'80951' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAABO' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
fd06d0a2ce20f423628b1fd2faff4b4e
dad4ad8488851811a62054c41645bf9119ded983
'2012-05-01T07:13:42-04:00'
describe
'4648' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAABP' 'sip-files00007.pro'
8dde2add92e35242f48b390fa5712aa7
2d56ca224c668fa98ddc01dfa538d5a97c929db4
'2012-05-01T07:08:07-04:00'
describe
'38369' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAABQ' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
20fa0e4345f35a1db109b244c143f967
5d5cf0b54480488c937dcf1f011e92d345c03657
'2012-05-01T07:05:10-04:00'
describe
'7250004' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAABR' 'sip-files00007.tif'
26dd43338e07169a6bb77ce550d7a0b8
ca67d7c611804c761703745497e941c3e1714aed
'2012-05-01T07:06:54-04:00'
describe
'294' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAABS' 'sip-files00007.txt'
da8a7fe1bc777f17d4c30d8c882f38b6
139b281fa486cabd5a1b3c9ac5436181c279ab4e
'2012-05-01T07:07:52-04:00'
describe
'22799' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAABT' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
434288988cc9cc9db08c9665ec186475
b6cef724f16b7b5ae0b21d86a450ef375cbb1812
'2012-05-01T07:13:39-04:00'
describe
'520336' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAABU' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
76425b640cbdab319811f53f69b0b1d9
a9ba1f1266957cc8b52f5366d030a52beb9a0d99
'2012-05-01T07:09:14-04:00'
describe
'30527' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAABV' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
c1d40b25d904b48c0086ce26a8f22aa0
eb079d68f33e5ff2f77f364c2517d132f5352c04
'2012-05-01T07:09:30-04:00'
describe
'2052' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAABW' 'sip-files00008.pro'
336733f1872ecb20c8e0be3f15b57cbd
aa1a34df519bd92b1483be7c33ed7cd23c0345fa
'2012-05-01T07:06:36-04:00'
describe
'21690' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAABX' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
6aa1b80774977fa2aefb049db9230643
2a9b3648fa2c33d5093f76e2708ee50fb3623e02
'2012-05-01T07:12:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAABY' 'sip-files00008.tif'
74578926fc4d45a03b26e1da87f5431a
65ef21145bb731efa7bf76e499b05e6dc452e2fc
'2012-05-01T07:13:44-04:00'
describe
'157' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAABZ' 'sip-files00008.txt'
e7fc719744de260e81155971ac7de4da
aa083b65d1d6a0ac5fdfa9eaef5bab7eb479cceb
'2012-05-01T07:06:25-04:00'
describe
'18595' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACA' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
e2aa76c4ddb61bbde4123188ae709ad7
a79fefafcc2fdd018f4c27447cb32f11fdfedcf9
'2012-05-01T07:10:17-04:00'
describe
'494030' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACB' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
944fd9fce79669d530e23cc6d5ea287a
f89a93f73c77d768ebfdc7c44db3dbfa925a6d59
'2012-05-01T07:12:41-04:00'
describe
'34248' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACC' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
70197caf4eeca3404f8b6b699ca27993
6b8b99233aaf8de4957d35fd8c5be43f92dc4e6c
'2012-05-01T07:12:39-04:00'
describe
'2695' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACD' 'sip-files00009.pro'
ca906528358c5faaa45afbb9e5b30126
2047d1cdb743dfa31e6ccf53ebc289f1111b4739
'2012-05-01T07:05:57-04:00'
describe
'22629' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACE' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
472a1e10160d4affe97925c0dd7732db
ad35e5b5c3d41e79224c83e4b4bd0577b015d6fe
'2012-05-01T07:07:06-04:00'
describe
'7361216' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACF' 'sip-files00009.tif'
dff6e879b36508197833aadc9ba45b66
5ea49f19018b31a994b48c9256592f29fb9dd3d1
'2012-05-01T07:12:12-04:00'
describe
'192' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACG' 'sip-files00009.txt'
952d45a4bafe63fa145084b84ec41b7e
4e2b7cf4cd315f23798db0ab3346f14eec60063d
'2012-05-01T07:07:19-04:00'
describe
'19306' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACH' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
4673d956f6dc2dfd62bd8a642267ff6b
ff5323029cdd9896004c32cdfdaaa50157c52cd7
'2012-05-01T07:11:31-04:00'
describe
'3698' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACI' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
d6e393cc8b2f976a52def8f35cdeb71f
61e0695036aed67e670e56ca579664114cb799e6
'2012-05-01T07:13:26-04:00'
describe
'19462' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACJ' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
f39fd832926329fea243ac4a4d1c18f2
4342623f4697f97f8600388c3470f036d9b90b84
'2012-05-01T07:10:13-04:00'
describe
'17928' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACK' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
3c2fcea161f3900d56401ea6e8ffe152
370d59cd007a1747f9ee6443326fdf0bf75e9e2a
'2012-05-01T07:12:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACL' 'sip-files00010.tif'
43b27a9a7cd107e6c008411d12d6c184
25d60ef78dc7cb8b52ef4c1eb0303456448379f8
'2012-05-01T07:05:00-04:00'
describe
'17526' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACM' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
31ebc2ab045d29d8c6f659b1e8bb806e
75855c567fab762e452d7a94c5d4facdaafc2471
'2012-05-01T07:09:02-04:00'
describe
'897790' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACN' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
9021f4959a4f6946da84e41b20ed28a5
c289ee10223f1dd92b77ec10e0267a0469da2d2f
'2012-05-01T07:08:17-04:00'
describe
'106963' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACO' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
6767f54060ad47c5ce5ac283f85a2c02
1d82cf6d9d41dc6cafaac556c28d7f40c5147afb
'2012-05-01T07:10:25-04:00'
describe
'21323' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACP' 'sip-files00011.pro'
9e59d9d380b36f073e79ef2f5863e800
7ff8311f8a7f8a8e02548fbcc796f33a192e2886
'2012-05-01T07:11:46-04:00'
describe
'46886' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACQ' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
8d319741af0bc95c2eca4b32d4ea3dd6
e3e3a8fd2b7d3c821e2d16167a074defbc401f30
'2012-05-01T07:08:56-04:00'
describe
'7199448' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACR' 'sip-files00011.tif'
f1a6b5274d41fcfa8d6f6a99b7621ab9
724e254fb55230b6a5e0a03f957edfec00d3b4f4
'2012-05-01T07:11:49-04:00'
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACS' 'sip-files00011.txt'
c8dc6e407ddc781645ed7efbd235a702
cc5248e47d2ef30d5a0f9e353f91cda5fdd087dd
'2012-05-01T07:11:02-04:00'
describe
'23926' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACT' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
8a25d8271692db4cba0717628f3ecbe4
73d237faa603e7b33d47b1493fe21e2d843107bf
'2012-05-01T07:08:11-04:00'
describe
'962538' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACU' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
52d3e43b82add9425490c41ac39ef4ea
d8ada4544cfa527461098da44793df934a0375b2
'2012-05-01T07:08:04-04:00'
describe
'144930' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACV' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
6b72b0eaf4c442da678532b11d1b92c4
32337cfdc9a009694aa4f0e0b861d69b32ac3016
'2012-05-01T07:07:24-04:00'
describe
'35121' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACW' 'sip-files00012.pro'
1720328302be59f6a8896d49d999a8d4
f6ed57e1e36993fa913a2edec0e65af6ee12098d
'2012-05-01T07:07:53-04:00'
describe
'59589' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACX' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
99631081b12afcd6bd80c73fd2d2319e
de6f395a001bc038f58c1764fc422bab06271af8
'2012-05-01T07:06:16-04:00'
describe
'7717096' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACY' 'sip-files00012.tif'
570037b326e6ca6040c60b9f14ba13f8
8b405689ff37f11ea8c615c55b2eed6c8a0512c0
'2012-05-01T07:06:03-04:00'
describe
'1434' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAACZ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
da885fa08f76a0dfbb0fb564933534b2
0fedd6fad63b3f7347fb930092dd30f823de0ae9
'2012-05-01T07:08:38-04:00'
describe
'26246' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADA' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
ab90d0c8df3563014c47a7624f9fb5d7
cfabac8d7885dae5359c114c0ae3535779f346da
describe
'938224' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADB' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
b9641b2345f9cc285c7c95c8a9bcbcae
74cadd7f2e6190534197ecd6df06ae0c1e22d984
'2012-05-01T07:08:20-04:00'
describe
'152727' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADC' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
ac49d0e9e53a0ad48272018c287eeb2c
b08994c3a6d3a59f7741169f116de387c5391ee1
'2012-05-01T07:06:33-04:00'
describe
'35398' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADD' 'sip-files00013.pro'
e3035240821d7a768770bf9cb820f3e4
589824b1c5808eb22a407fe7b5526c36cc6ea11c
'2012-05-01T07:13:31-04:00'
describe
'61591' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADE' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
b84987d2c5e38765a58ebf108c6c8ddd
a3710b8da5caeb9b18a092218fdec7e59c162f58
'2012-05-01T07:10:22-04:00'
describe
'7522552' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADF' 'sip-files00013.tif'
07aa9e3cabe1fea3d696786501147579
4f76ef3b7d58f5c7e1bcb308566f984235a508db
'2012-05-01T07:07:31-04:00'
describe
'1449' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADG' 'sip-files00013.txt'
7550a8b92fc494e85a6e1e1578245878
ebfc701f43493cb400c3cec0f21c5f661507d260
'2012-05-01T07:08:34-04:00'
describe
'26751' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADH' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
fb51d8ef3b203fe26900cd5e5ef177a7
e93b4ac04d2b54cbdfabc7be4674b71aa186afe1
'2012-05-01T07:13:38-04:00'
describe
'977133' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADI' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
6ba4d7cfc17be9bdc39819544033d52c
c1bbddd9dab9644a17719e49bd0a889c9daa157b
'2012-05-01T07:08:19-04:00'
describe
'146820' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADJ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
6a92676114586fca3f280dc5def21be0
14b8973c9a2b11a80595db2f39c0c73c0da83d21
'2012-05-01T07:10:51-04:00'
describe
'35686' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADK' 'sip-files00014.pro'
505b5d7d2664da5273674e97b7900dbb
cc49aad6b3a72d47a2531495479d58a0050d58dd
'2012-05-01T07:10:14-04:00'
describe
'59708' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADL' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
bd3450f671db94c82a30610e773b3826
287cb30515854cb2acc2c3dafb0ec9ccd0bdc8a4
'2012-05-01T07:07:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADM' 'sip-files00014.tif'
c7986ff8d82d3a21332b56d70cfe79ea
a9d7f47c86e1a3426de68699ec43955467a283b1
'2012-05-01T07:10:52-04:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADN' 'sip-files00014.txt'
b1560ec0f6fdd6b61736170db09c0bdc
1ecf85e47262d5c857d4f5904cd5b0b2afc2f466
'2012-05-01T07:12:56-04:00'
describe
'26511' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADO' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
5065511bdc5b9a39c73d1d6a7efd14ea
8a378acf857163f6b6f4628658692ba6fe4de0c3
describe
'909580' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADP' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
9dbc66621c048ce296e5f9adfbd3deb6
ad48107103ba047e93449de71bcbcb3de8da13f8
describe
'152739' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADQ' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
d8fd8d2db9b3bb04607de95772aea64d
20e919f1cfec5035fd8ae01c2bd43dc4138ef90c
'2012-05-01T07:11:18-04:00'
describe
'34915' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADR' 'sip-files00015.pro'
448392dd848e6fadaada952ece347afc
2ecbb3603a3b55453e8a6ef6b10ddd58b53f57ae
describe
'62112' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADS' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
9aa1d68671831043e47ef90cdd12dc03
411a2ab3f8f4e49995933f09a6f0075d647d0be9
'2012-05-01T07:12:57-04:00'
describe
'7293424' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADT' 'sip-files00015.tif'
d5b5b04de6b087f7f3ea45d6caae5dd0
61f40b9970bc2d7f3010e6e54762b3af720e184c
'2012-05-01T07:07:08-04:00'
describe
'1433' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADU' 'sip-files00015.txt'
f2edef5b8cc4d8d41c637c55c04d38e3
cb8a7477a6e326bb7cd860b8d51e6c48525af0cb
'2012-05-01T07:13:21-04:00'
describe
'27339' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADV' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
5961f9012d99b5c3e3181f25b01b976e
fac03f275bfe50e9a8720609d7ad389af4d7da8c
'2012-05-01T07:06:26-04:00'
describe
'948342' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADW' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
7b14e6c2b7d4eb3070458f53e957d5d5
398a0cc5c6a8f38ab7c8b25ce60c3779617ff23a
'2012-05-01T07:12:26-04:00'
describe
'152053' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADX' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
a54a5c689aeb4411ceb9e41d3ece01c3
9608af5c52cce514c1efc86366f2ecf376e6d284
'2012-05-01T07:07:20-04:00'
describe
'34637' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADY' 'sip-files00016.pro'
11f51e65baf46f7d07a126c76c5ccef8
d67ccdd13303b5b2b901ca09c39f5199dc5890f7
'2012-05-01T07:09:47-04:00'
describe
'61952' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAADZ' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
301ddbbb4cd8e25b3912a8a1fd486630
16bf0bbc6441bacc04444ea03431e9b12fe1ac2f
'2012-05-01T07:10:27-04:00'
describe
'7603424' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEA' 'sip-files00016.tif'
c07bba9166e0911c4cbf8b32d07e3435
ddf1289af43b63616dd6b3fca521b35727d694bc
'2012-05-01T07:05:12-04:00'
describe
'1421' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEB' 'sip-files00016.txt'
70a332628cae52bda962e7355a525251
ceb162d941ebb0bc04a28625426c55898717a56a
describe
'26891' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEC' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
7cbfd352a3de0c87a2d086be9f407860
d2089bd32ffe09099963b56146bf8a03099c6b03
'2012-05-01T07:12:24-04:00'
describe
'921887' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAED' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
2a7a7e5492a5f5a38d7fd814180108ca
df94e8a073cfb4c37f4fdd79cffb05fbcd315df1
'2012-05-01T07:06:05-04:00'
describe
'110135' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEE' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
89dad0151cbbe2fb3e68fa0c41e77e5c
62e755348ee384970061498e224e848dfb772f26
'2012-05-01T07:12:58-04:00'
describe
'23000' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEF' 'sip-files00017.pro'
59000368a042338c0d72f354ef183eae
67cc1e38eda7b892a949f4d4d293079a74e47e93
'2012-05-01T07:08:53-04:00'
describe
'47812' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEG' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
fd40ec2179fb131c4e3c8ec10e2e7af6
d6b140428ce722efa828bd2645d6b051d768f65b
'2012-05-01T07:07:07-04:00'
describe
'7391832' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEH' 'sip-files00017.tif'
220657739b7a42cb99d2f5683c93bbfa
17a56fba218c9a64dc3c5f0e3de8e94198385d31
'2012-05-01T07:07:10-04:00'
describe
'968' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEI' 'sip-files00017.txt'
a64d1470dded9787b45f88802fc9ad72
47813839a385f9dd3bac3d8f51432c28605ebf39
'2012-05-01T07:09:22-04:00'
describe
'24100' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEJ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
e17904a7aded2dcb44b81f8a119bb4e4
31231ab9b51459cff116d2a428cc2fc77e0bf481
'2012-05-01T07:11:58-04:00'
describe
'929633' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEK' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
0d5c39786797abc6c6ff3aa8ed8e66c0
8c87eef4f686d5ecdf53e4e43ada1b8f2b1dae39
describe
'136201' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEL' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
5fad02fc3f8675622d21854ecda1c267
c959fcf4a2dca9e758ca991e87749d6c0f83bd1b
'2012-05-01T07:06:47-04:00'
describe
'30216' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEM' 'sip-files00018.pro'
e90f44a75abbbdfe8d990692fb308cc4
f1339adb4c6232e66aab86eea32e50a4cf622a75
describe
'56730' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEN' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
d5497280d5d672ec22d0139a5253c03b
6761bae1dc924d1ebaac687c6e0a2f438cb36cc6
describe
'7453844' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEO' 'sip-files00018.tif'
4a499a73975ace3137b54195c06d4998
53adb57b980653fc4e6e106d747a265d4a86fb2a
'2012-05-01T07:05:19-04:00'
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEP' 'sip-files00018.txt'
29d1371cab86573d9dc2484e834e9859
f647eac9686d5f2a64e61ea4a754e4a11c36b19e
'2012-05-01T07:12:49-04:00'
describe
'25957' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEQ' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
5efd88482b9b62c38383e71ab0446524
8d2b5028b9f3a59d38825176578e8c7050b0e6cb
'2012-05-01T07:12:17-04:00'
describe
'913235' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAER' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
e9911ca791e4383c37a3e0ec5e7daffc
d59d84774aae34c8af92fc51418c78d4b439c51f
'2012-05-01T07:11:24-04:00'
describe
'153483' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAES' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
89b72bcb0065e1f48fb0ce17499f6066
c1520a484038ba6954d9eb69e6f17dc2c98a5716
'2012-05-01T07:10:07-04:00'
describe
'34899' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAET' 'sip-files00019.pro'
a5b3c392f8b54510c860a2a64abfdafe
39b71e813f4ef7cbbab90b177981ac70260fa25c
'2012-05-01T07:13:17-04:00'
describe
'62978' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEU' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
3d94979932513f972b7156cbb0fc3623
e4a920d20a692da884b5c6ba23924d1bd64c25f6
'2012-05-01T07:08:39-04:00'
describe
'7322632' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEV' 'sip-files00019.tif'
0872bd5f8717dd47dd2d90e2a5af9046
bcc9479a6263716dd07b36d63fb9d2b3b5b384ef
'2012-05-01T07:06:48-04:00'
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEW' 'sip-files00019.txt'
aa830a12a68ce87636199bd73b5cd5a4
f3f0396ab408f80d598df1052445682ba3c6e58e
'2012-05-01T07:10:29-04:00'
describe
'27399' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEX' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
e3d955b2c92e629e217b310cda6a10c6
8ada3cfebe16503a60d6e196f973ca9a38aad679
'2012-05-01T07:07:03-04:00'
describe
'939458' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEY' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
5dee19f72ef3e727740e63d0efb2c5e4
de1ec4b4a68ee82e0a998fd6c252a541ba9f98d6
'2012-05-01T07:12:35-04:00'
describe
'153566' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAEZ' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
3fcaba8264c1ba163d9b2e38a74bf1ea
61c0e73ad20b4274101bb02418f4d20f5a3fd472
describe
'36096' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFA' 'sip-files00020.pro'
4738045fad4019a6df4353e04e4e7102
c4990da9368862b763aa408c3c33f1e4df4f5acc
'2012-05-01T07:06:43-04:00'
describe
'63163' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFB' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
bed83f90379cf6daa231893e248ce891
4fde9d7d041462d7d09cc9ac552826b3b52c66f6
describe
'7532424' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFC' 'sip-files00020.tif'
c6ba69b6102fa8ca53bfe193e2399c38
f10bd2f37d5522438c5772154fc886553ee8cdbb
'2012-05-01T07:05:03-04:00'
describe
'1475' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFD' 'sip-files00020.txt'
2620503cc26825d4e9b8b590ab6aeb72
7e9e3b5f7c31965ddfcf2752462d600f9f11486c
'2012-05-01T07:08:26-04:00'
describe
'27184' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFE' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
a83b172c34c7581dda5eb2274c3abcaf
e575b32da62ce8d9cd184b7d4406cda0289fd18e
'2012-05-01T07:08:02-04:00'
describe
'915362' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFF' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
80cacd4ce386850d1ff89a60a72d0b19
3f472660926b5363e5b913942198152b52059587
'2012-05-01T07:08:46-04:00'
describe
'157717' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFG' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
81360f291dc371621b1ee78bfe5b9058
b2df938f7dcea4b1168b61ac0244955c75ee7e4d
'2012-05-01T07:11:47-04:00'
describe
'35803' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFH' 'sip-files00021.pro'
bbccfe07fe45b67af674dc9b8d038faf
3a8023851f4aa00e7654c65dab13a6e9190b0455
'2012-05-01T07:08:47-04:00'
describe
'64125' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFI' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
b91d835da5ddaba1144f13af72743be2
e6e68ad572fe4c6d0ec1cc002ef7c843402a59c3
'2012-05-01T07:10:19-04:00'
describe
'7339656' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFJ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
3c68b1f813abb1749e3def96ec5abde8
e9a29709d956222fe944731ab78f0d2df691da64
describe
'1515' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFK' 'sip-files00021.txt'
5906ff25feb79e1d6d1bf224ca606a34
b5244b3ed8af67bec316bafa8a5bdec5fe6695e2
'2012-05-01T07:10:41-04:00'
describe
'27540' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFL' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
c4c59b91b07167e61ed289c043dc2667
287a07bf264af8af74419093a89b6e336e15a067
'2012-05-01T07:06:40-04:00'
describe
'915676' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFM' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
f400dd72ecc1971a27afc04ae1a4abc7
aa0ac9c228974d810bfcb1e351b256ea75be93c3
'2012-05-01T07:12:50-04:00'
describe
'159037' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFN' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
505b847ceddcfda5a13bfcf966a96811
b90e09b69d7b3b1c39ac95f7839eea9d98cb7bf1
'2012-05-01T07:11:07-04:00'
describe
'34769' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFO' 'sip-files00022.pro'
09d677469755ca21653254edb5d9a0db
898916f84ba2c841c473bb758da57fd2b4003868
'2012-05-01T07:07:02-04:00'
describe
'64722' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFP' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
cdf116f2dd64b08649f929abfc3f0472
66edc86206c3fba2025df536facd7286206dfbc9
'2012-05-01T07:11:19-04:00'
describe
'7342220' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFQ' 'sip-files00022.tif'
54e9ee7d714920b7f44e196d3996317a
612c0afe26de762334f855617af586d435a67037
'2012-05-01T07:12:45-04:00'
describe
'1432' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFR' 'sip-files00022.txt'
e0af39e5773389944352f41ccfb1b0f6
4d1dc8365c0374ca4a0bf74e7cdd66a0ef886b9f
'2012-05-01T07:11:28-04:00'
describe
'28019' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFS' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
466252521a024de40c33952a963697ec
8f972050ee66f724f2f5d96c204692e887027100
'2012-05-01T07:13:25-04:00'
describe
'891747' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFT' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
80f8309fe9d3ce22312ef3489ddad58a
a0fd2860c48586f43bd0d23626715b72189122a1
'2012-05-01T07:06:44-04:00'
describe
'156805' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFU' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
3cdbf9db489b472d5bf074c0464d62e8
76925ec657f5d9c427665c2582e12c68ba7a4e94
'2012-05-01T07:11:56-04:00'
describe
'35262' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFV' 'sip-files00023.pro'
79f07af97239e60744e418436eb007ee
3ef70500777330de6154fa24116e08c9f93e7067
'2012-05-01T07:11:29-04:00'
describe
'64126' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFW' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
d343710e0199422860e3cafd726ec08e
1c32264ca9b512b5eaf4c414ae966b149bcd6942
'2012-05-01T07:08:08-04:00'
describe
'7151296' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFX' 'sip-files00023.tif'
3d5c4df919f994dd0ab09da67aa93dad
dd92cb0bfceff85dcd269e845aae3715c6dbf488
'2012-05-01T07:11:06-04:00'
describe
'1454' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFY' 'sip-files00023.txt'
e0c9d6d8970167383f14991458260f5f
1e074916824f1b99b0159270bda0e63580cc7c23
describe
'27269' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAFZ' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
9da8c029d3d9a29e481f4ae843ed7d85
38201da9478450cbffa1fda947eb610cf94a318b
'2012-05-01T07:05:01-04:00'
describe
'899674' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGA' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
9cd7d6bbc5bc635ebc61c6a310356f07
80983116195350f7fd6ddebfecec7044c4532035
'2012-05-01T07:06:00-04:00'
describe
'157621' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGB' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
604561fd1d5ce1e306c61f363a938f96
d2a8990bb6809fbe208e4a27977130384cee8dc6
'2012-05-01T07:08:52-04:00'
describe
'35455' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGC' 'sip-files00024.pro'
42df5c2e5d46d9b55d24667ee0d5cfc9
b30e626466bc4fe0596a0dec788aed95735b27ee
'2012-05-01T07:09:57-04:00'
describe
'64296' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGD' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
2d0f069bf4e60579e72d6b8404646952
8cb4ab2357e8db86ccd5be4300eb0a1e48e3655c
'2012-05-01T07:09:36-04:00'
describe
'7214176' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGE' 'sip-files00024.tif'
5ca17b5d13f887d7901f98526a74ae6d
eb4838c4e088137b791155b3219ddd1c16acf634
'2012-05-01T07:10:06-04:00'
describe
'1456' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGF' 'sip-files00024.txt'
49ad474bbfd1d549de8c4c8054497ade
3f45fe1cc401c23d5dc83279111e4ca16e0f8f85
'2012-05-01T07:08:36-04:00'
describe
'26872' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGG' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
4c02b296c20017f6eaf436879f02f5c3
9768b33ed6a3913661dd26d2208844765ab6eefa
'2012-05-01T07:10:31-04:00'
describe
'873500' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGH' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a0ca603f77bf1e4bb91ec06a4cf54f49
e44c7e634023507a6a4ebfce7b2c6e24fafe0d4c
'2012-05-01T07:11:26-04:00'
describe
'161360' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGI' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
6a120e110ed003c9606b00f7496bfc42
359296dea7d21bf9029bf46582bb5e3ea7d6eec3
'2012-05-01T07:05:31-04:00'
describe
'34492' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGJ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
5d360f0aafea423bf75c5a81f8d51255
bd2e0225752580ffaacbc15c9c3e88dc5b4c2406
'2012-05-01T07:06:13-04:00'
describe
'66559' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGK' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
da9fa8a03041ea75e4c3a0ef9b780f96
26adfeaab6528b1a763e13fd78f1be086fc5ecf6
'2012-05-01T07:12:42-04:00'
describe
'7004996' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGL' 'sip-files00025.tif'
bb106a45bb07034f78615f456d71b708
316d1d8e65ab95f8635a195faf7f39e74a48a089
'2012-05-01T07:11:34-04:00'
describe
'1423' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGM' 'sip-files00025.txt'
1fc210f25d4846b5f47e4871b3c9015d
c4a35025f66b3ed348ff08c1f1c7abd9c3143269
'2012-05-01T07:07:16-04:00'
describe
'27866' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGN' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
f5d6147d0cb563d36fbef93219dea445
51ca1e9c8684a3ace124f1422c9eb210f33bffd6
'2012-05-01T07:07:50-04:00'
describe
'880215' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGO' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
ba39e6581b5e0786c6d6d7e4e938b338
c9352b5ced6f76de5e47b9ea3c5354a7078fb628
'2012-05-01T07:08:32-04:00'
describe
'160611' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGP' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
e9f1146ccb4951a7c06e03ea0b13676d
6502cbcaba71ab5a61f854cb98e764897f1130d9
'2012-05-01T07:08:55-04:00'
describe
'35004' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGQ' 'sip-files00026.pro'
9def5be99a798798d16a9bbdc0e5aaaf
6f5ee6e40b760dc23b436845ace613e8034138e0
'2012-05-01T07:12:19-04:00'
describe
'66637' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGR' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
575ac453243bedecdf127435cb3ceb94
7bcef3eec3a5d91de9c432cc6bc38c52eeb900e2
'2012-05-01T07:12:30-04:00'
describe
'7058536' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGS' 'sip-files00026.tif'
9becf411ba8800d3d08af32bd92f25cf
ff521297c16cc752a08afb8d7a61395f8d99a833
'2012-05-01T07:08:03-04:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGT' 'sip-files00026.txt'
bc96a24bf4ad9fb73d24952119ecb486
8b6e739036b90825a3ed3053f037081ff0f444a2
'2012-05-01T07:04:50-04:00'
describe
'27650' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGU' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
3364c2f1a077c70f1391fee65e239f72
56e3f6f47c351f848838c71fac98098d3fea9b1f
describe
'914886' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGV' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
6dc1ff7889d7a10d0116a9465555272f
549b6521f9454807e4083788e662d1a3a313933c
'2012-05-01T07:07:04-04:00'
describe
'125325' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGW' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
f54bf2ebb2f92333719ca7a8dedebc54
1712ba1ed11865bb95a32632037d15e2c33496ec
'2012-05-01T07:10:02-04:00'
describe
'28532' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGX' 'sip-files00027.pro'
38ca11bb8af50acc8f0bb27d591e3219
7ea0bf0123c2896aac9fe2337ed48ba15aabef05
describe
'52584' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGY' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
f5b2ed2032291428d615ec038a089f0c
c811fcc9e33ff9f266cd81455eae6d03b1d14fa5
'2012-05-01T07:10:30-04:00'
describe
'7335836' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAGZ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
32720556aadc97d0e1d1d86e96060553
05c8a99e89f692a96403ecc3f175f05a6168e25e
'2012-05-01T07:10:55-04:00'
describe
'1326' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHA' 'sip-files00027.txt'
e0f5375d00fdb3d3391926dd81f4e4b4
7d0bbcb8b25288bcc95aa5b1a2483000970cd026
'2012-05-01T07:13:43-04:00'
describe
'25215' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHB' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
a7e871b74d61e115d764757a8f029bbd
7600e4e9c83b1a51c42c59e6fe33cf497f128171
'2012-05-01T07:09:17-04:00'
describe
'906743' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHC' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
b3cca06de32ff5045052fd597809a656
c79c1e8a9c547fec6b53a851e633242dad184fa8
'2012-05-01T07:07:11-04:00'
describe
'142143' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHD' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
a62668d408709215a1deea7083235817
12bc63f9c231faa163c9f5e5ed53bbbbea1929c1
'2012-05-01T07:06:56-04:00'
describe
'31720' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHE' 'sip-files00028.pro'
e5f72b1c6b15fa4a9fce9621240b02f8
d8b20a1f64621d8b20d6a1b137da31cde6d51698
describe
'59140' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHF' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
1f58e523afe1cbccf1f491f3fb7519d8
24e7030f28502ca2072b25082dbe2d8287494b7b
'2012-05-01T07:10:38-04:00'
describe
'7270904' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHG' 'sip-files00028.tif'
9b90d6a76874956613a93725c6304620
3e68a4642acfa5546282311c0e78bded3a5429eb
'2012-05-01T07:06:21-04:00'
describe
'1362' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHH' 'sip-files00028.txt'
355ac942f0149e7ae06fc62998c3a4ac
ce7c68dc64d206212e1621ace2c990eaa797ce4f
'2012-05-01T07:10:40-04:00'
describe
'26508' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHI' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
b399a75e05127e22896b544080bda3bf
bdf53e971b08247a42883b1fed52d28eda5b72a4
'2012-05-01T07:12:01-04:00'
describe
'901145' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHJ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
8bc594995aa0169826da4d5f6b7aebf0
4d1dbdf157b72cdc0e82f858e46fc26614b89cd4
describe
'154515' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHK' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
595895ec8083996116dbc69f3a670aa9
aa8c828ce5f5036db299d7f7f318adc763b16a09
describe
'34779' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHL' 'sip-files00029.pro'
8799f6a0d181eaa721767aac639352b6
aa7fd47cda70bdc2323163a4f90e4017acf6cd34
'2012-05-01T07:13:16-04:00'
describe
'63426' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHM' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
6e64e336a8a8f7463aced7646932dcfc
90f94a7abbc497b3e5a4ff70ac165231a470e6fb
'2012-05-01T07:09:55-04:00'
describe
'7225864' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHN' 'sip-files00029.tif'
5fb69c79315bcf265e56b2eba9f14a27
06b33794d766577d64a851f2b9abaab78da2e4df
'2012-05-01T07:05:58-04:00'
describe
'1427' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHO' 'sip-files00029.txt'
dbbc15ceb452af23fe9989dbb3802e34
06f9b38f0fa56497c08d13a722d288666d260220
'2012-05-01T07:13:11-04:00'
describe
'27006' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHP' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
73e65393ac0e1dd7a120198eebd56d93
a3c2bb26414085e638c480fe8c54ec7702c3c0f9
'2012-05-01T07:07:33-04:00'
describe
'905413' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHQ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
a8df52323e5d70077c37ca10d6b81bc9
e23b7c367e47cda83c386e353303c94f4efcb1e7
'2012-05-01T07:05:50-04:00'
describe
'142006' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHR' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
233b2707c9d24c11016e0b545478286f
33a8d68111b7ff369df106169a0fadb65732691d
'2012-05-01T07:11:39-04:00'
describe
'34251' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHS' 'sip-files00030.pro'
3dec570319aea31b19b0faa5bee10bf7
b158cea4251bd922a8de5359b1361be93c550ec6
'2012-05-01T07:11:52-04:00'
describe
'58169' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHT' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
aa3205b066bfb5c59e4a0771a17ccb3c
89a883a8ded23c1414765f1509b293e41a7f1eb9
describe
'7260000' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHU' 'sip-files00030.tif'
71d6d3f4d52fbceba24e24bc86928ccb
dcf3fa9b4fe5faf9dbc8abf9543a2b83961239f1
'2012-05-01T07:09:00-04:00'
describe
'1450' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHV' 'sip-files00030.txt'
e0a7576749196fc9010f13380932b96c
a5a9921f120dab13f2ffa6919d097bfca6cf1164
'2012-05-01T07:08:31-04:00'
describe
'26015' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHW' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
107875b75ae612a6fecca426d66d51d2
5ea3db8a2a70f382725e8741baad6a2b5755ca19
'2012-05-01T07:08:27-04:00'
describe
'884199' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHX' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
f9beba6b72ae28239bf879d4390c0d8c
c13df633977274140e5de977205a6bf8c6a4099b
'2012-05-01T07:13:36-04:00'
describe
'147859' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHY' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
8791bd3e9056827a77343050c6ec46fb
0ccadbc97feef06aee6fbd8af181b2af26c65344
'2012-05-01T07:09:39-04:00'
describe
'33832' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAHZ' 'sip-files00031.pro'
1e590352ee98c2d8e1dcd8de116b5569
dd91364fcab3d401454842a518e82e91afcc21d3
'2012-05-01T07:12:20-04:00'
describe
'61929' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIA' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
895b8cbcd1df25cf1b14bc38e7b72b27
373c0b623c34f82c061d15d9c5d120f83588e2df
'2012-05-01T07:13:03-04:00'
describe
'7090488' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIB' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7027dd618dcfa06ce01c2c589ad086d4
8e8992ba69401527a71ae096dd03071fb0eda531
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIC' 'sip-files00031.txt'
c17c91326a33cba24a1df8b8dee7c770
1ae09df880817a331993f3bc7c04ad094e78a03b
describe
'26728' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAID' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
d84b09489b25e220107d892d3d53b44c
514f5304b36f91adfc994c3145adf576d686b382
'2012-05-01T07:05:24-04:00'
describe
'897042' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIE' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
d4dca8343806f1a40e682763514edfa9
6e3e8061f2a4dbb633fa80789feaa9fc6e4ec59f
'2012-05-01T07:13:19-04:00'
describe
'156031' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIF' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
e2b40f0630f5e6c1bc203ecca96d7cb4
f91f44756204ea2a8995e4ea099741f0d1a3d206
describe
'34288' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIG' 'sip-files00032.pro'
405b53666e46116ad491b9ac01ffb008
c62d0aa1e94b80dffdb94ddc9a691d325cee73d9
'2012-05-01T07:10:15-04:00'
describe
'64766' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIH' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
0178eca474b45c58c72c9d8dac687f12
ec819c64023dbbe63667da6397f4fc17b0659e83
'2012-05-01T07:09:28-04:00'
describe
'7193028' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAII' 'sip-files00032.tif'
f12a5e28bd4f1faa2de1b06c04f21e59
aa501c4d7a879faed59ad5bdbb5146e6b9e452bd
'2012-05-01T07:05:46-04:00'
describe
'1410' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIJ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
d7e807948f2950565bcabeb55a239942
502b97020ddf1660b418efc3766ba1602b0a187a
'2012-05-01T07:07:54-04:00'
describe
'27495' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIK' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
96255015f05bf83ebaf006237c3e627b
c7835bed9b65c82f19199e2f982042ecd46e6661
'2012-05-01T07:05:54-04:00'
describe
'875245' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIL' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
df6d95c19b207a34f296e6c3b661611a
6ec868a71eda4abddec324098a467badb8a33e34
'2012-05-01T07:10:16-04:00'
describe
'162204' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIM' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
a4e6c2408319c4ace4014328ff4f3592
1ac8ae4bb0b25581a1dfefa70bb8bfd1380ef656
'2012-05-01T07:07:58-04:00'
describe
'34702' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIN' 'sip-files00033.pro'
8530699776d3fb713e172fd39332d4a6
17e20e4ae5abffd28efd1fd0ea42c200507331ea
describe
'65791' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIO' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
91936857e6f2c34f70eefafded1d3229
aa23938de85f4d1d25c00e28c8983f642677cdcc
'2012-05-01T07:05:59-04:00'
describe
'7018848' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIP' 'sip-files00033.tif'
c503cda2a515830dc05ead6b927a9594
876e0196f773d0bca544a28979d57762331abd9c
'2012-05-01T07:10:18-04:00'
describe
'1437' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIQ' 'sip-files00033.txt'
e7b68b3c2eaab7afd6d92719976ee3b3
9dc45097b656cbceb6f84309bcc0163f007e7238
describe
'28065' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIR' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
9504c1d6740b9225a1d425ebaf4c7624
3ad99b39682b408d7dada59ba2b76fde220e64ac
'2012-05-01T07:13:14-04:00'
describe
'897105' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIS' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
df969cf30e4cd613d04a6c7bc5fea9c3
a94d1e66940b607eafe1eff0a7eedffb4dea438b
'2012-05-01T07:06:51-04:00'
describe
'160341' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIT' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
c32e1268fa784526bfee4fac3e5828a9
e3346a30af8a058e5abbff1b5fd911a076c64f6e
'2012-05-01T07:11:44-04:00'
describe
'34591' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIU' 'sip-files00034.pro'
e72f30f590e802165515c6929d68b64f
de7490417e823c72e9106972b0fd28622819c2d9
'2012-05-01T07:10:59-04:00'
describe
'65140' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIV' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
8b19b2744861cb34db121a58610db415
126b8ea808845ebf7b01a7e7646c1da112f57d2d
'2012-05-01T07:08:12-04:00'
describe
'7193748' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIW' 'sip-files00034.tif'
59c0ab16f373a3f9d945e28a269ae5b5
31f4da711f08bb7c40742e025ef1ab72325fb558
'2012-05-01T07:10:39-04:00'
describe
'1420' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIX' 'sip-files00034.txt'
22a7607099b91ea95be5d7cd3c7221fa
e107ca9ac2ec7ac41e976bf7e8f71d3320410521
describe
'28058' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIY' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
203009192f561377189bfdacd73bbaee
1839e801afc74a4656473cd1fa832f8c2e09342a
'2012-05-01T07:07:23-04:00'
describe
'868270' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAIZ' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
6a407f7c91b7610f3c067e66db702d3e
a0bbf64337ec9fd94bd7ed410cb61671b7605311
'2012-05-01T07:11:54-04:00'
describe
'164693' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJA' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
bf69fd1995751b57c8e4a2f4b04ac3e4
8d361bf969fdbbee8831d6dcdc9968fb20483fcf
describe
'33851' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJB' 'sip-files00035.pro'
8c0a0f6c4c67f8f67e62641f5da65600
a5982bbf7edcdf3537693049c926b5ced83aafc8
'2012-05-01T07:08:22-04:00'
describe
'66839' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJC' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
9bc14e97cd112c7a59cac49d1fbbd5a3
b4544afe03e948e5191a8d61dbe320162aa6f2ed
'2012-05-01T07:10:37-04:00'
describe
'6962960' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJD' 'sip-files00035.tif'
2a561021608fdb4ea0e9fc63b3977cae
e1d5c1c29297bc48ff2240f513bc76e7d3bbd670
'2012-05-01T07:08:18-04:00'
describe
'1400' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJE' 'sip-files00035.txt'
85449893777a1434c4d8b462067afa05
84b108c521840319cbd76944d0aaf31b1962c46a
'2012-05-01T07:13:33-04:00'
describe
'28699' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJF' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
b01bce0ecec6637a199c5e1e0ea43935
cc6d439ba0f934bab405237d9991beebee675e86
'2012-05-01T07:08:28-04:00'
describe
'876654' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJG' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
ae0a1e580f833cf5a3e1f437ec6343ad
4a9f06d531239c937b6a9b6b4b06ea9f6036ed9a
'2012-05-01T07:09:09-04:00'
describe
'155840' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJH' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
800297d45b424271ecca41690a04e22f
4cd82b7b826046a26dee5cac180d0a59843b4a51
'2012-05-01T07:11:17-04:00'
describe
'32347' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJI' 'sip-files00036.pro'
e5163a4ae2c06ece7de913d583c5ef07
169cf01e51610cd11e156144a738763013b868d6
'2012-05-01T07:12:44-04:00'
describe
'64975' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJJ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
f8e98d941166289edb9cffb48771a2ef
db3ace9beb909032f2129b9fa546ef57eb702c8f
describe
'7030060' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJK' 'sip-files00036.tif'
3aa1e7a9cb4e2381edac0f25500a6a33
9e53128eb6587b79da7fe435cd2cd7db79511114
'2012-05-01T07:07:22-04:00'
describe
'1344' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJL' 'sip-files00036.txt'
75e0b23f41369a50628f57d36fe74678
2068c065fe437adedbf6bab86417e7f553903c2c
describe
'27863' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJM' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
a1382196f60b860262ad15d4f5424390
b343a29502cd19054566ff967a19aed50337e745
'2012-05-01T07:09:49-04:00'
describe
'920626' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJN' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
e85b822bb498e159d5effb251af0898a
b2979fdb5ada53be036889ae95cd6141577e4f24
'2012-05-01T07:13:48-04:00'
describe
'157412' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJO' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
eac7ec04c1c082aedd9242a4417d8465
359b37f2e0fded4989183fa2849aad410644b50a
'2012-05-01T07:08:13-04:00'
describe
'33905' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJP' 'sip-files00037.pro'
5da5c07365ec355abb436808b6aafda5
72a2bd0ca9948e07c7bd29c9be554f6befbf8e6b
'2012-05-01T07:09:56-04:00'
describe
'65595' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJQ' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
595f996da147f52521ab9acc82999f91
9834e3de8e52899437a35aa5ca034306dd0f05a2
describe
'7381836' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJR' 'sip-files00037.tif'
869b40d821856687699b49b9f14ee810
08f47cb32a9e5339eea0cd479b7a303b5e310168
'2012-05-01T07:11:51-04:00'
describe
'1436' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJS' 'sip-files00037.txt'
9d9628dabfe119a4f4c7c4712119ba78
8634213e06ac9354611fffc9c0895aacd00b76b6
'2012-05-01T07:11:23-04:00'
describe
'27728' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJT' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
35621a1bb0b8b55d43e368bfe49cd956
8afb3cc1bab72fc163e60b9d45862a8d45521ef4
'2012-05-01T07:11:16-04:00'
describe
'917439' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJU' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
4d37f6b7860a81dcfae8c08e87fdf09e
8ee9cc0c155e36c95fd57e844c90876e6714cfbd
describe
'161096' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJV' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
3acec97f7015642e36bb0adc5f97429e
493976b779e123f3778ae6c33348886a17577489
'2012-05-01T07:09:40-04:00'
describe
'34642' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJW' 'sip-files00038.pro'
042fc9dfabc287f2e89e4c6eadb90f06
69c0ad07cea0eea9f735f8077cc08f2aaa276fc4
'2012-05-01T07:09:06-04:00'
describe
'64955' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJX' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
67be234cb9d4212c0417436bc42d9b9c
39c1231f33d2485e216c01928e831ea4271ad926
'2012-05-01T07:07:36-04:00'
describe
'7356464' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJY' 'sip-files00038.tif'
5f550249b92f75dc857076dbb97b2f10
159fc03a799a18c22f58a1bd12e78dc60b5a75e6
'2012-05-01T07:12:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAJZ' 'sip-files00038.txt'
6b8a4bd9bafbd490da201634909b3752
4bcedfb6321d28806aaef53f4368268d50557c52
describe
'27970' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKA' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
91de0b165f3460574b40d0d92f7cae84
e5c76f40f055e44025f2201e0ad9f69e95ec081d
'2012-05-01T07:13:51-04:00'
describe
'894791' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKB' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
da2b07e863d9fc3c38699bbdec5e5686
ed31bb13c632a5f9d3addad050fb4fabe1dd87f0
describe
'132266' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKC' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
eeb0b872e2670e73e7dd696429c135df
8fc27e01505586a45343382ba07fcbf5767563e5
'2012-05-01T07:06:39-04:00'
describe
'26742' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKD' 'sip-files00039.pro'
7e0210cd4095cdd1db84d8f13245f232
15b973b393f5c346eeefd3fafa4997c726a98e79
'2012-05-01T07:06:07-04:00'
describe
'56238' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKE' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
f95f8ae15a0909b7b63b02ac1e0a98be
be6eae0430a79a3845968e6ae243ec20dcb12f56
'2012-05-01T07:05:38-04:00'
describe
'7175368' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKF' 'sip-files00039.tif'
b541a49e369a8035d5575ea291c1f261
cca7ee3fc7e60cc101afb183561941fea4d1ca3c
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKG' 'sip-files00039.txt'
a42f238a377399f12f44135ff586c67a
d8d93c1d1f1cf15143ae969cceddcd0c5b35623d
'2012-05-01T07:06:34-04:00'
describe
'26093' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKH' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
e0ef10049700a8fd074acdb7a0c916a0
7e215c435c7c49382d96634ae5887be15285379c
'2012-05-01T07:05:52-04:00'
describe
'931005' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKI' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
2d8c701ca6b924a1a0668fd3ea9b1256
b81846c22f8e1aa27b82f6824d4f700b91d90aa3
'2012-05-01T07:07:00-04:00'
describe
'141501' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKJ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
b9954dc7279af1f0cf03b377c7876c43
abcc5d449cfbc5ca8ac3f8366a99ae6b1048ba1e
'2012-05-01T07:10:49-04:00'
describe
'30239' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKK' 'sip-files00040.pro'
b10e3a6c548c85786d14124b9c271b61
32a04e079aeb52b657fa283af2a095f6f09309c8
'2012-05-01T07:10:21-04:00'
describe
'58383' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKL' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
6a56358eb67d0a0481e1b3ddb873a687
da7df105a6012ef58d2efa73b239712ceace497c
describe
'7464728' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKM' 'sip-files00040.tif'
d9dc6c23dcdab8495fa903c11fcf8c83
43072c2944fcd906afbb34a49ca21e4dd2be7a57
'2012-05-01T07:12:07-04:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKN' 'sip-files00040.txt'
046f361680057f5cfdf7a97f49557967
8dcacb34e62e334af3aa5145b8467be206908783
describe
'26318' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKO' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
bec4a9a195eaee3c2a4cac84c8e4fa41
fca63f30f3e365ce398e58b1df4555a42278498e
describe
'909451' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKP' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
0fcabfd82f4b437b43e07387184f4b0b
452f939b454dbd418eda4679bceb087c9aeab66f
'2012-05-01T07:07:32-04:00'
describe
'148131' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKQ' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
535ac7dde4d295d42356b377c0d62f4c
30e213eacc0e9edd78aeb660559d06e380e6f77e
'2012-05-01T07:05:20-04:00'
describe
'31588' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKR' 'sip-files00041.pro'
ec35bea45403018c9a404b97f860ca05
1c387305c273620206cdd78629c8863c4b205586
'2012-05-01T07:09:37-04:00'
describe
'62054' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKS' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
34db757334179e78d8453157013e0bfb
a8f3272a346008d394a8ca543ec0ea2a66e38fc1
'2012-05-01T07:05:45-04:00'
describe
'7292736' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKT' 'sip-files00041.tif'
2ff41425d19b9eedf441dd59fb20a8c1
e3545c5483151646977c8d56ef4a88ddf1d47940
'2012-05-01T07:09:11-04:00'
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKU' 'sip-files00041.txt'
ed0744335272da98fe01a8daa5e2a0a9
561a1a85d3d15f289c510157d6e6a5dcbb04fa02
'2012-05-01T07:04:55-04:00'
describe
'28116' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKV' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
2e16584fb1082f2073d134e6666da5c7
f26c7542fb1ad01738ff2fcb3c147aba4d02430c
'2012-05-01T07:05:49-04:00'
describe
'933391' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKW' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
f698f6c2284a6ab0f18624ebd0eabf97
4731e48aa4845e1111005482e1dd09940bd672cc
describe
'151634' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKX' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
cbe13bc0e891b2738824f30b58c1a2d0
085cd2e696383213a782af8bdf5d07da00bb105c
'2012-05-01T07:07:51-04:00'
describe
'33283' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKY' 'sip-files00042.pro'
5578546b2bbf4e4eccaf58b4446784a2
3aeccb3ba803261a788f1eed39854702d360be9f
'2012-05-01T07:09:48-04:00'
describe
'62759' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAKZ' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
fddf534cb0acb4c578c0cc91273dfa45
ef17afc47917b0f2ba3913c1d68a7b79d396791d
'2012-05-01T07:04:53-04:00'
describe
'7483856' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALA' 'sip-files00042.tif'
c403202bfa4ff0c85a4b90c0ed216329
84b12d0b8a92685aee284738066c76456b952915
'2012-05-01T07:10:09-04:00'
describe
'1377' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALB' 'sip-files00042.txt'
2c86da1987f5e674cb392facae390c9d
e8f675727db6f19962f7be683a37799b3737f364
'2012-05-01T07:06:31-04:00'
describe
'27361' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALC' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
d1a7f71367dac5b5e1856fc4cf73dd72
ce3ab6d272cca5fd6b42728d0f2736841cd31415
'2012-05-01T07:09:03-04:00'
describe
'912886' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALD' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
7419dafb2f86b78418751cd4e33bf4c9
b44d2949e4ad0899420bcb9f4b7b1820723b3f80
'2012-05-01T07:10:24-04:00'
describe
'150972' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALE' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
efc6eff388e0469b490796e9358d8c84
1b6cfa13068173ad752853a21536fc27dba6f3ae
describe
'32752' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALF' 'sip-files00043.pro'
c14493b6b9343f8e3bdcd401f5d8904b
3b099975ea32dd90f69b324f75a94aa36c492872
'2012-05-01T07:06:04-04:00'
describe
'62947' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALG' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
f4c5814032e8aded07e9189632708a3b
b7f661e17b7f63c5ad32088b52d5145299bf924d
describe
'7319908' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALH' 'sip-files00043.tif'
36445f92e5825d279e35c15fdc39601d
f5bc1312fb05c86a2c26e983b5c42c4c6988c2dc
'2012-05-01T07:11:20-04:00'
describe
'1360' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALI' 'sip-files00043.txt'
c7f71f8c55c3e50995fa09d65d14df87
fd81dd34508accef8c7cb042b6f664ae703d51f3
describe
'27861' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALJ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
256a8af8525bc2cb25ec3849c0dffd31
2a670c637a94612d4c41c2f530eae6bac3144caf
'2012-05-01T07:09:38-04:00'
describe
'887308' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALK' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
3b5c3627dfb882e04a3d88cc8bd2d353
fc795730025db0b290c7919b622de01671cea6f7
'2012-05-01T07:12:53-04:00'
describe
'153995' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALL' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
d591de5e941775606acb638b344335d3
44b5094fef8f3da0bb6ec2a092ff6204f701bb3c
describe
'32790' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALM' 'sip-files00044.pro'
517d05f2da841c078f11aa068bf04033
e5cabc0fcbfc503debfb49cdb5501f637f3f666a
describe
'63684' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALN' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
96fb14230573c043fa1fa33780f809f0
b81a0c7eeed6419869449a8743c4b8e74d7e7698
'2012-05-01T07:13:22-04:00'
describe
'7115196' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALO' 'sip-files00044.tif'
3adb1c823230c7e9f30bd77a66ccb130
0928080262632ead065ef1aa4d29bfd89b75974e
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALP' 'sip-files00044.txt'
2cf2959cfa027a6db04334d9f4c3b608
1622bbed48d706b04aabfce9c1c0a7e170a27f57
describe
'27845' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALQ' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
beb4717369200e1ea1350d456c8bb174
09f2f55c1f96013338aae80fab51949bf5db0765
'2012-05-01T07:05:28-04:00'
describe
'906289' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALR' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
ae4901513d9053818ee1045f1feef081
e0d4d8fba0a5e86b27c58b57dd18c3231e1c147c
'2012-05-01T07:05:56-04:00'
describe
'160497' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALS' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
de035710489fd1d1afe29174f36afeb1
8df0014c79c1deec8f3fcaf878922d7acfcd79fe
describe
'33529' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALT' 'sip-files00045.pro'
5c20b932fe006f9c72265d115a944d7f
51faf5df5319456b6bbb615a9b3edca7cf8bbb6d
'2012-05-01T07:09:23-04:00'
describe
'66890' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALU' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
f3f9bfa32726aabab71a7f406de24e8b
362d6f5bf520120380872ce42c504a50a650fc19
describe
'7267072' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALV' 'sip-files00045.tif'
f758a7af541ac226a78026a189ffa452
db8f1663398e4b46628d233696aa0b8047935516
describe
'1385' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALW' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d6e43590faff758bff782f38c82284b9
1b9b0e524630504de25e6a908f11f5ba6e966fb5
'2012-05-01T07:07:21-04:00'
describe
'28426' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALX' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
98e33674e239af5a071bc699ff80caa8
5e83e579919243096d2224426c4a7bf296bdea94
'2012-05-01T07:10:34-04:00'
describe
'869794' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALY' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
f50dbb9e70196449a4421ebed66dfcf6
1f31fb2bfeeb6220dca6706286035c7186cd7be4
'2012-05-01T07:10:26-04:00'
describe
'164338' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAALZ' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
c46aa4b895c8b34424d44cbad069f67d
d4622e0619842d6b2dc3f0df3f5ff939fdad4993
'2012-05-01T07:10:28-04:00'
describe
'33705' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMA' 'sip-files00046.pro'
08feca6874764fc8ae9dbf9dd505b049
4f5203c44e8ffd46152e74fbe14392eb9c7a063a
describe
'67913' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMB' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
7544ae45051ff138d7fe0400fd76c5dd
a0a718f54289cb181ea130841823c63e29617481
'2012-05-01T07:10:53-04:00'
describe
'6975136' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMC' 'sip-files00046.tif'
f96f767b3ffcb2e8d2b8764524266fea
a86334891e472beeb13f7560e1fe9e1fa3a9a4c7
'2012-05-01T07:06:15-04:00'
describe
'1390' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMD' 'sip-files00046.txt'
64ad21e45db6d988a10981c2a13931b2
d34a78e0a744706aa175d524d61385f47827799d
'2012-05-01T07:10:35-04:00'
describe
'28270' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAME' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
634c3ebe1b8016465b3750ca78fd8a29
50706906f378193d95fe4daeeaa8850ccc000d60
'2012-05-01T07:08:48-04:00'
describe
'931130' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMF' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
fe6e58254778b641c00f273d335e6871
eb2d3c000d437712de23c8d6f4b339ee03f40dc8
'2012-05-01T07:07:15-04:00'
describe
'151766' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMG' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
9d2312a6a938628d305b09dbd4c3020a
bed570fb2769a849b3756719c8a0b25713a8c79f
'2012-05-01T07:08:06-04:00'
describe
'33305' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMH' 'sip-files00047.pro'
da13d2a138a96723d79ad41184fb2215
55f1343325777b17d814753d73a635c0e6bb22e1
describe
'62041' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMI' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
6c5e2a46f216f4c5dbed3b6adf9dd2b4
61cd788b7cb07a59163def63baf1ed155c8c54aa
'2012-05-01T07:12:13-04:00'
describe
'7465780' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMJ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
24ef5dd9222d877a6819fb7f3f99a5aa
5288828fa7f5fd0b28fc30cc5912bcf56dc25898
'2012-05-01T07:13:02-04:00'
describe
'1375' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMK' 'sip-files00047.txt'
345fffef2334dbd911dc1ea9655ec192
11ac88acf0cb8fabffebd8ace89ccd7674faa455
'2012-05-01T07:05:02-04:00'
describe
'27423' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAML' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
659463e159654fef50d37339f191d6ec
f999d5831fc93af8a2b573641bd4f6bc711a410b
'2012-05-01T07:12:27-04:00'
describe
'681805' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMM' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
f19eeb7e3fb3279813c0ed1c63bbe48e
09d3ba5e823f7eb612e3f09be40f17f7a85b0610
'2012-05-01T07:11:38-04:00'
describe
'59053' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMN' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
e95217ba4cea0c1746126177f02ba85a
44e0488f23792721ddd0349d8fdbc115fe0346d7
'2012-05-01T07:05:06-04:00'
describe
'7282' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMO' 'sip-files00048.pro'
eb619a177116a40be470505f31ac125d
12a307a512186c178663bff3761a1dd08f2943d7
'2012-05-01T07:12:28-04:00'
describe
'31277' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMP' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
4d5aa75644c3a4f934a193760b885341
2a588909515aa201ab993c5f6d636d98b6757fd2
describe
'6396400' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMQ' 'sip-files00048.tif'
6b7c65532d2976827cb29bd5c0719ad1
53effc29e430bf0ef5f2229aa693bbf7d6954939
'2012-05-01T07:13:07-04:00'
describe
'315' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMR' 'sip-files00048.txt'
4740b85da965697c95c75b9e1a1014a0
abfec5d5ae7aeaedf793733bdd7ca9dc0a6f6edf
'2012-05-01T07:13:00-04:00'
describe
'20924' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMS' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
77fb55d63205b04c29179f0d39fe662a
04dd8dc28e5b82cd7a403f87ec885ce3c11f715c
describe
'877788' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMT' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
22d807b23f0406244574db0ff2848b26
4d85e10bcb95d6efe4239eb8cda3187e2416d29a
'2012-05-01T07:09:27-04:00'
describe
'147042' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMU' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
40c3db484292ff350e2732d7411e33e0
c949dbd75dd81fe6991742a3edd387a07553853e
'2012-05-01T07:11:45-04:00'
describe
'30552' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMV' 'sip-files00049.pro'
290f2d0ea08053b30dfa014403858256
3f262c40a7931fc0337d6b897a786b5acd7820e6
describe
'62028' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMW' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
9965028c3f04018076c291b1f458b26b
6fd8dbee6655d623aaf97299c0f24b6f21bb6f77
describe
'7039036' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMX' 'sip-files00049.tif'
00633c6f7176ab4560fabf092a6df887
b01bfa2f3f05c20ce71bda880b0f346239a31977
'2012-05-01T07:08:33-04:00'
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMY' 'sip-files00049.txt'
604c200c48a037149722e5a904c47edf
ad51e721725d26b8617ec04815f761e283323538
'2012-05-01T07:09:58-04:00'
describe
'27666' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAMZ' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
061964003700aebb4f1e317faa3fbaf4
310486fd6cc916c00e7878e25850dd40531c4578
'2012-05-01T07:11:14-04:00'
describe
'940564' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANA' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
acf2904533be26560aee4d65ebb4f1af
f4dc3510d8709969f5c5e38d9f96c5810a018a31
describe
'144004' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANB' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
49d394b436186d1e760a19b68a31ff20
a8cbd6c01c635454ebc053b37003f7e3170d9948
'2012-05-01T07:07:38-04:00'
describe
'33778' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANC' 'sip-files00050.pro'
20743fbd77ca8ffe5f2c08ab05604fbd
4415bdedabf68b250b50ae5b78ef24ea0bc2aba6
describe
'60314' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAND' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
7db6fc36bf5e7e3d4682c3bdbe2dc718
49ce2178e38538249218186f959330c1269c24e5
'2012-05-01T07:11:37-04:00'
describe
'7541240' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANE' 'sip-files00050.tif'
2b0aeb0519ba115badd7405b856837e1
18aab53eab49ff47425fb53b42928e639fedaaf4
'2012-05-01T07:07:56-04:00'
describe
'1389' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANF' 'sip-files00050.txt'
e9169b2755b7e1f7bf8a591e7ec27eb2
600bad78d1f2e8189d2359343ae9c9ffa73e5fae
'2012-05-01T07:09:01-04:00'
describe
'26703' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANG' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
e1455db7cce7e09d6594beefdd72a4c3
ea22e7c208b1a1542b53a1cc33cf5848bfba64e8
'2012-05-01T07:07:27-04:00'
describe
'892580' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANH' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
97bec756be170e5fc0edc52fd82bb051
e582b3a67da0dc8c10c6c627af43138eeb9dd3fa
describe
'161747' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANI' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
241f4668bc3622d08857cb1538e4fef7
5a5728dd2f97fc1a6a68b3a464bb4bfb21beb68e
describe
'35252' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANJ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
1b0a6f3c1a9aecf7008b1ac9c603f954
64e3791e94ab9bd18c2f8caef2ccc81d4e2f08fc
'2012-05-01T07:10:11-04:00'
describe
'67046' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANK' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
2139f5a9b705550df3b552323d59ce07
250d01a4f30c369c72eb16d0c94c049a73670eeb
'2012-05-01T07:10:08-04:00'
describe
'7157356' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANL' 'sip-files00051.tif'
4f37d86615f463b46a5dbd3f77d4ba1b
828c11f5301597d1359aa222aeaea001359cd37b
'2012-05-01T07:12:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANM' 'sip-files00051.txt'
1e5af6e01c3e79828e0c1283d5f85b82
9df9487f370611a02365e86936a936887d1cf52a
'2012-05-01T07:05:42-04:00'
describe
'28122' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANN' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
011e6d6e8a4f55381f0339e26e974433
9800b3100a5b7eedba468210fa3a85acc4f64904
describe
'956890' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANO' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
ae512ba442a174074607b294ccf796ec
952e08320baa2cae60e90c11cddb46206ac5180e
describe
'147073' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANP' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
22ec2090d4e42edd401c846826e477cd
cbf6bd78bfbd40449400cd10bd678ca14daae16b
describe
'34424' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANQ' 'sip-files00052.pro'
c5145ec111c8b42de0fb1f7eff4acaef
ee6af7588223918efb655a494c0f7914ba81c64a
describe
'60924' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANR' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
38a3fa8e7dc0aeb6a8b0b326585a6a6c
85d417e8c29b5bbc097cbe2f93cc9623abd8e083
describe
'7671948' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANS' 'sip-files00052.tif'
0728e3c357a3c05615c553a3611a6827
6d2ce29cd6809c83bb0ca55c69e9230cbc51d258
'2012-05-01T07:13:27-04:00'
describe
'1419' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANT' 'sip-files00052.txt'
08fc75499ac217378124acb35c85e08b
f3bc1030dffd779e70815bdef9b384782c744414
describe
'26822' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANU' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
9bf53a9715c00bb39bf1c4896571ca65
80409ffb94a1114a224584aa42e233231f6b25d0
'2012-05-01T07:13:34-04:00'
describe
'918254' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANV' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
47e7bca1c3db30815678f4c815f05fe0
f5a430afa816902d1a39da7d9b9d8be996fe9e48
'2012-05-01T07:05:41-04:00'
describe
'148066' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANW' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
0c8b9a2468c85b05fa69539a3fc076a5
04a3786223e8a088c2c9668d34ec3554a78f1d52
describe
'32133' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANX' 'sip-files00053.pro'
3b03b225fa65b29b0afb791a583587ca
756f947c37c46f2224f856d21325062ecdd8e44f
describe
'61946' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANY' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
ace9a2c4507f76535a20a16e31b5b754
5e54c23156d6b765ef672af3f8c96661b60d89f8
'2012-05-01T07:12:22-04:00'
describe
'7362712' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAANZ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
eb72fe161de5d629a270fdd7f532b98d
740c10fd6b05a318566bd19f34d1d9929dfcf6b0
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOA' 'sip-files00053.txt'
2b8655922ec82b9da0796d3ed7dc46ac
adcbd0317a91c5b756897573c971b5b2f7b4e506
describe
'27433' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOB' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
911b6e78a9a776a1b372dc445fce0d96
3bae20d9532953727ca0fe948a302a03c89f7889
'2012-05-01T07:08:58-04:00'
describe
'934677' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOC' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
32a25d6e891af062de1b97da87b29cba
c912c030f68242edda2f8466c49a67da8688e4ec
describe
'154168' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOD' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
d79e1d8a046bd8cfc31e86190ec74661
5146dd77cb2357de351ee126f526daf227d72574
'2012-05-01T07:11:05-04:00'
describe
'34863' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOE' 'sip-files00054.pro'
5006abceeacfcf3d17118d6565dfef07
29b19ac33ce5ea376b133ea86a105b9c07245d84
describe
'63033' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOF' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
db09ee139151b9196260acd4092dbd7f
991b91998d22209da99258423db83562a3a9fe4b
'2012-05-01T07:11:11-04:00'
describe
'7494120' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOG' 'sip-files00054.tif'
8a5b91405dde2b337b21c964dcfb31ef
1628a38d1c419c25237937c153f255da4bb289e9
'2012-05-01T07:05:29-04:00'
describe
'1438' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOH' 'sip-files00054.txt'
cdb50db856bbc596d256e676cebdd07f
41d03e96b698c58d88507a4834bc3cce5b3da6bb
describe
'27315' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOI' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
9ab47cf919154fa3349bc5431252e380
f5fe798e5d926c7c38c123000547bebc0b4cf536
'2012-05-01T07:11:43-04:00'
describe
'932575' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOJ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
edaac61f6386e186e2eba520d272513e
f9644771046b8afa284192e3e3af436488e5ea46
'2012-05-01T07:09:13-04:00'
describe
'155504' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOK' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
fc43f016217ee8ae22c68e43fbd7f218
08e12f4a8162514cdd9fa43895a5ad1a73a7b234
describe
'34401' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOL' 'sip-files00055.pro'
979e54354437a3997df18c71fa860b0c
f6c19d569a8883c6da7ea709b110557aa582e2db
describe
'63231' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOM' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
c5174e6b6ce68aac39294c4e0f90907f
654d868ae8a69d64db98f1fe05794df0544dc01f
'2012-05-01T07:09:15-04:00'
describe
'7477480' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAON' 'sip-files00055.tif'
fd2c7839f37ef4f1b8ca24c33e2c173c
454301d43a0acd496693069acd84c6c2761c4a4c
'2012-05-01T07:07:17-04:00'
describe
'1412' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOO' 'sip-files00055.txt'
b3a370c04f5c18b7e5ada449cff7462d
221a4d067b536c91f0140ba4cedee936a99a5b4b
describe
'27113' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOP' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
dcb28b57a21eeeebd98e3d4a91d9debc
97286686b6ef6bee42b56c628a48121302fd3040
'2012-05-01T07:07:55-04:00'
describe
'956909' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOQ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
8a2a5ab72d932faf604e963fee4ffd55
5b27830c2e4bf24bcb310bda1cae4ba65092deb5
'2012-05-01T07:09:43-04:00'
describe
'146522' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOR' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
20a9ea7e01852a2d2181de13d0931d64
06adb5b6de68e71126ed0a63fb836e7c8b5e8a96
'2012-05-01T07:09:54-04:00'
describe
'32644' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOS' 'sip-files00056.pro'
dfcf791d3bfc82087459ebb9dbf88a35
b26f016a465cf9653a0483d4498d66fc48f4c66a
describe
'61292' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOT' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
0ad862bd67e0bb7f56bcd23b299ed103
7fb2c662e197f0263fe17359aeccac046e8eeac5
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
d06fe73891b3bcf3998630584e5383a7
a5385cb2753ee29ca6a771e3aad1e91faad35075
'2012-05-01T07:07:46-04:00'
describe
'1347' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOV' 'sip-files00056.txt'
d1800b08563633ae33c2a9c127c1c566
50d262c8461f13e39312853c64896bf4e0ddb9d5
'2012-05-01T07:05:07-04:00'
describe
'27138' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOW' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
705e78b93724d7ad2267106506486bcd
baf1bed84311e754c9ccf14108a2a1c0ab552628
describe
'779524' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOX' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
0fa6fbee6447b78c8448f1434c6d6f28
aa8a9017347dd63ddef4118d95844062765d70cd
describe
'63347' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOY' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
346d0f6f9efa9aa107948ea65fb8822c
05c4c4eba1250acf03560f80b4c77d056da9a50b
'2012-05-01T07:07:28-04:00'
describe
'9399' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAOZ' 'sip-files00057.pro'
625c0eb8f776c1568516334b52cf346e
ba276f36483cf418102d5dcf080eba475a2a366d
'2012-05-01T07:13:49-04:00'
describe
'33234' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPA' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
a1c6b26edadc30d36f3c3b9b2cb69964
ab0e34823bf75710cf257881618ca56c3f3c7574
'2012-05-01T07:13:18-04:00'
describe
'7015060' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPB' 'sip-files00057.tif'
c74e4a49742d0463272ee8c903866d96
1955eaf2c18324faa383e4fea890b384b9fb48f0
'2012-05-01T07:09:45-04:00'
describe
'417' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPC' 'sip-files00057.txt'
d40901686f589219132cdcf9fa327205
a0d5b2b5f907d70b132e8f519e28610ab9935bb9
'2012-05-01T07:05:48-04:00'
describe
'21159' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPD' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
61014d1c081e9e35d54e649f7180a9e6
c9b1c00b7098aac363d345f1d8ec5699e938c870
'2012-05-01T07:06:41-04:00'
describe
'375556' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPE' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
f8a810df5b4a071116977a6701bc63de
9b696e6df6fea009aa169ef1ae91884a6cff2cd4
'2012-05-01T07:11:12-04:00'
describe
'23331' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPF' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
57f18c46c76eceb6df4752bbd2293f59
8c14aa7022d2ad231f8dfa339b1debd9bb0e4f07
'2012-05-01T07:12:33-04:00'
describe
'19070' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPG' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
627f76eafdb148102ceae8a4cb0dc996
3b4fd324000eb030a26407c73a27d4add7a3f772
'2012-05-01T07:06:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPH' 'sip-files00058.tif'
8e9835a685d427101553dd477b7cd204
a76f7fb429cf6bc5f520e0c912f010bd905ecbe6
'2012-05-01T07:09:32-04:00'
describe
'17878' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPI' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
091d1b6584fd0dd02518290b48d102c1
8a261ce365d3e0a7bb41ba06d7b52569da17a3f8
'2012-05-01T07:13:50-04:00'
describe
'77138' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPJ' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
69555672621d2a79ec73f6ee651c49de
248bf9afab63941d0204c2a9b54eb29c601148af
'2012-05-01T07:13:09-04:00'
describe
'25673' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPK' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
3fb05b9aa003d7b22d12be1c912ceab6
d8d8a2f46006f7f20d2006fca12b7bf182e124c2
describe
'816' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPL' 'sip-files00059.pro'
2be33f384236e8447c18455870b50a07
d56908c5e9140f144b80750857b3703c21e29baa
'2012-05-01T07:11:36-04:00'
describe
'20539' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPM' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
c04948bf4163247285e83c687bfc609f
d0f06cc05cf8410ce6585dbe75a11e4a2a423941
'2012-05-01T07:07:09-04:00'
describe
'7420096' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPN' 'sip-files00059.tif'
c879d5eed9832b7886f7802c7adea6bd
c89ad1acfaf0a310570bc327e909abd848aea114
describe
'50' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPO' 'sip-files00059.txt'
bf52c6195e0947353023bb7162623102
17b77e210c59514192c426e41e0ec07a101254f6
describe
'18481' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPP' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
695caa145abc7fb69985c3f9869343af
314440348992e212f76419f724d07a42d9943822
'2012-05-01T07:09:51-04:00'
describe
'3669' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPQ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
29520c55bdcd0431b5d6c99c82779a52
0a96e4665613d676af22a88a43e1b3ea01b66426
'2012-05-01T07:05:35-04:00'
describe
'19481' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPR' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
1180cd52b3a012c0192fc29567ec9260
f0a81b796f17e60febd8b89189b90275eabdd968
describe
'17938' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPS' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
6b685b19ce27a87620ae30380ad55dcd
ba0ed2fca71d269a69004a82d80d4df4644407e6
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPT' 'sip-files00060.tif'
fd903a1fd1095789c96e49a425b52f0a
71d3b828ec6eda03cc3865e528de007ed3a7ed44
'2012-05-01T07:10:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPU' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
0e185a1296c7ca19a69161a01dbb5fba
18f29940feb23f8041974e2ac811c599ec57f59a
describe
'918198' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPV' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
d0ce3df2d642d7aa6524e989f893b14c
b2cd4ba323f07b92024b16073d4ba78cac591364
describe
'111928' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPW' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
926c00d7d2a04aebbe34f95aaefa0539
99374fe812c7d1fcdc8bb409dd42ec26555ea4b4
describe
'22010' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPX' 'sip-files00061.pro'
463ae08543cd2d6cbb48d9c6366be1b6
d39ee2c807991387024c2e11a11dddd2595e8eda
describe
'49629' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPY' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
c6dcf0faf6c96af396bb4eaf5091a7cb
874729a7246e0e269d8ea94a786ad1e407ad783e
'2012-05-01T07:06:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAPZ' 'sip-files00061.tif'
c385d0d29c18fc2ed1a37f6070e9641d
519b534006429435446bf65db8b62c48c9e7b825
describe
'944' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQA' 'sip-files00061.txt'
118c18ea4486ccdf4115d3c6ef541ecd
012639721cfe5e5aa6948dec1461f68181c2cfab
describe
'24868' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQB' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
5867409fe2a4feec1df6422cc14890ff
37dc0ffe9aa6c0d85163ccb03aaec026001d9641
'2012-05-01T07:13:23-04:00'
describe
'928556' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQC' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
3636cca15a03764859cdfd11095ac85f
6637d91143f97c238d42345771c541b9d7102ecd
'2012-05-01T07:12:38-04:00'
describe
'153912' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQD' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
0292b09b63ee04cc1a65ba27b25054ce
6571d2b6c91055dab4677dfe297c95999a1e2c14
describe
'34223' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQE' 'sip-files00062.pro'
9a9af2d03cd6bb3dec67b6464443ab80
9a8648b41bf62d732ff09b5153cb18708e861cda
'2012-05-01T07:08:50-04:00'
describe
'62670' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQF' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
fdf24465cf998c4800927d0e93034952
65e72e71a2d1b1d2f11388b31f35c17b890ad98e
describe
'7445600' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQG' 'sip-files00062.tif'
43af47798e3fd845ad8c2d24c9c1f413
a4a66cb7254185e16afa20dbcf3c3c3ba0147651
describe
'1408' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQH' 'sip-files00062.txt'
ccb6111982e2c1d1837142e571812b17
2e5c200291f050e8a2dd180f123b0e06f1fcfe86
describe
'27129' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQI' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
5f2b4c3873c49c9aee4af4f56beb27af
b5880e5317738af326e389092e190f3c784ae3d9
'2012-05-01T07:06:37-04:00'
describe
'913441' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQJ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
dc13e7a8a73e4f78c8004ad7bb6dcda5
fc7fb1f630076a4e55cfce60bef473eb91bb3919
describe
'159759' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQK' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
feccdbf0173ae016b4a84b1333b54240
18569334244fd0e8934b868061bd9c99f0b4f109
'2012-05-01T07:06:24-04:00'
describe
'35111' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQL' 'sip-files00063.pro'
e8466558c2b938df5844bc7fd945c6df
111f855b119c39c155cc2c790c53860bdd15ae94
'2012-05-01T07:10:33-04:00'
describe
'65681' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQM' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
f21227d4ebe81c53dbd419d1976060b8
5a729d97e426b90d96ac4f6c3a2c0404771a47de
'2012-05-01T07:12:34-04:00'
describe
'7324456' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQN' 'sip-files00063.tif'
3d0353f70bc9507481dad0421890490f
f6ba912135e39416e6b3d20090a7e3b08f9935b9
'2012-05-01T07:08:00-04:00'
describe
'1446' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQO' 'sip-files00063.txt'
63809a8ad5a114642d66e88e0d5b3d75
555dcfd973e3fa6728a5569e3fe3491953a23eab
describe
'28108' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQP' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
bda1333cbb2a61418a10acaa1a3ef838
6d7fc9f349f70e87daa536b75c85452b66ffe19f
'2012-05-01T07:07:12-04:00'
describe
'937401' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQQ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
55cba395e2772c1ed10b9b4e655578f0
c4313d7bb74f13bf73e17cfd935f0daa1388dd03
'2012-05-01T07:08:25-04:00'
describe
'151273' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQR' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
d11dc2b9fb0e5471a54ede71070e0d5b
a35cf640983dae7ac09ad81f39b6a879d8b4b337
'2012-05-01T07:06:17-04:00'
describe
'35201' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQS' 'sip-files00064.pro'
13b0b2b3cef90cb24ee44afa2959a955
1d4487cb17a47cb7816e78de30055fd9b0982938
describe
'61912' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQT' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
cae563376ac19fcedd4d2bfb7cb73aac
d72b26a02e805931457dd4536f7bc85fd2c1436d
describe
'7515884' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQU' 'sip-files00064.tif'
1d232996ed63131a77b892b031ae1a5d
033770eb974703d22197b5eb6eebc220893bc5b2
describe
'1444' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQV' 'sip-files00064.txt'
5aef928284fee97c80814821b0391433
6cde965d18d6693ad8f2266fa72cb62a72684606
describe
'27178' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQW' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
ec1b8c8dbd6414bf7f894623b53d4501
105ed1f224a560d6600de2949a0d75245d1dc436
'2012-05-01T07:10:12-04:00'
describe
'911067' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQX' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
5ed79e1a18e399fb646c7086f2c20ccc
9e22315e42202b04738960e5d46145c6c2b9ca51
'2012-05-01T07:11:01-04:00'
describe
'151588' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQY' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
17f60cee8215605a0db624f9ac2dba34
a41c27742cc88a13b5be701e93fef418dac9d5e1
'2012-05-01T07:10:48-04:00'
describe
'32598' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAQZ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
8a8011b5ae26a819c6ff17c7fc3c0940
410d23931df3c7feabb411066277f31ba4142f1a
describe
'62430' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARA' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
4d076998e5abdacc09712bddc8e58eda
97e4e171dfaeda1725911b6e80fdafe97c36b7bb
describe
'7305328' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARB' 'sip-files00065.tif'
150db14ed18fdcd7413961c71eb80a1c
a80b0aa4d97b4640663084bef6c71a6b22a47dfc
'2012-05-01T07:10:23-04:00'
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARC' 'sip-files00065.txt'
93ddc0b4ee475b284ed6500c99e3677e
09ecee13fd78bde713a52b2136f5508d58a0252d
describe
'27562' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARD' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
30e7cc78ca4fee18599f9b7d608a041a
a4a95c1feaf0bafda46812bd895d9dfad79ac1aa
'2012-05-01T07:07:40-04:00'
describe
'956882' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARE' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
6a2d9ba12f591fe309c9c30f9098f6c2
d98cf32ea5fc1acd39441c4aa3f3f2a8118cf8ec
describe
'143161' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARF' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
011e14e0775a9af30902c87b68484097
b2c173dcdb676533f4d50e2040e24995c20167a1
'2012-05-01T07:10:03-04:00'
describe
'32704' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARG' 'sip-files00066.pro'
511579ebb6bee22fe7e294c9ef0e2a61
84177e0896dd0f24d2751e890fad76bcee0b68bf
'2012-05-01T07:09:29-04:00'
describe
'59362' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARH' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
affaec7169454892dd7a2094e008343c
b3bd7f27873917ac8b6d7aa8fa148775f5512bc6
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARI' 'sip-files00066.tif'
62d8e5a1e5875790415892366ae30256
7f5e9e8f4e4567fd5180a5dca1f317014d5e0fd6
'2012-05-01T07:10:20-04:00'
describe
'1345' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARJ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
3f31fae82623dd4d08b75f4274693012
db181c8cd03e33f9600ed1757c2fa4e995937f3a
describe
'26908' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARK' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
d84deca98cf5fb0d827e171a9bcb032c
c48ce80a68ee107bc125fe6bc01eb2b89de110df
'2012-05-01T07:06:18-04:00'
describe
'900786' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARL' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
33e6da82c5e0e1d3e17c84e75148e032
66bc9b7c8799a425d938ef88d550bc1b9d345fe4
describe
'161116' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARM' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
0c17a3eb7a93f7b8580bfe0376ecbdc8
a291d296c749b33626de8d490826c2647ea6b030
'2012-05-01T07:06:28-04:00'
describe
'34633' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARN' 'sip-files00067.pro'
c5f2a6f48d808e0f43075c847c634b7b
6620175cc569d6119c9217f74432e1da43a94d16
'2012-05-01T07:06:42-04:00'
describe
'65687' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARO' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
8c6760975e09ffccb50d3e248df078a9
afb37686463bc43061bc80db9a2c9305ed469b17
'2012-05-01T07:12:51-04:00'
describe
'7222996' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARP' 'sip-files00067.tif'
f05c53f31ddb851b93321cd847f1fbe3
05a7c9787daf163d5510164004734bc8050ae52d
describe
'1426' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARQ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
a917a3b242478fff21d07bd410e4369c
7ead7cb9ac29eb97258ee5244207c00cc6534198
describe
'28260' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARR' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
05398e17d1ff6d786908ae8bc27403ba
13534ea9ccd023b160b4a388574540799c9cbbb7
describe
'878642' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARS' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
d80048035d33f910a12718e399bf9330
e94929864d5db39deea0a55016fef1e01ba3bf0a
'2012-05-01T07:12:09-04:00'
describe
'152890' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAART' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
d0e8a72fcc46a57a839e25244165e7f0
104d06bfc62bed9b9b3402d823557c5b91ecdc4c
describe
'33655' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARU' 'sip-files00068.pro'
6daf5580d9e698e1cbc819b1e72a24a9
4fdc9d32d094641003101645f54652e59e504206
describe
'62260' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARV' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
b77fd12eb09816cae99647b8d022e41d
6cb77a766972670cb467ba7538646b29865d58e6
'2012-05-01T07:08:49-04:00'
describe
'7046360' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARW' 'sip-files00068.tif'
50ded5ae6184bd68719867a0b6813c09
8f33774e01ccd773819d71c0017e20fa53959630
'2012-05-01T07:05:05-04:00'
describe
'1388' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARX' 'sip-files00068.txt'
fa0b5470756434b8cc773a0a53826c23
96c97a722d397466e796fadc93eca4d9f8eaf879
'2012-05-01T07:12:32-04:00'
describe
'27155' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARY' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
2b855c56153ae32bf32ff760d7547e1e
4f233da6cf15010727b487a795e1a8111c64aff3
describe
'886741' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAARZ' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
334e80e507690f0c46347664a50b74df
ad2aa877dd67a8e3beb1df848c618bdb314fa1b7
describe
'154302' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASA' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
864d59c3810c2061ff81287a95455967
b62215ad03a273edc915726d15057ae538f41d37
'2012-05-01T07:12:21-04:00'
describe
'33673' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASB' 'sip-files00069.pro'
91ea95636589723b336a76b01d428f69
7dabec6d9b25e87beacfabc576ed50d69893007e
'2012-05-01T07:12:02-04:00'
describe
'64097' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASC' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
a1aa5c61cea8d7db7747c39a64792c9b
376f8914fd8007422c9107fec8ad907b362a3118
'2012-05-01T07:12:15-04:00'
describe
'7110640' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASD' 'sip-files00069.tif'
6dfd81d35944595d6d47a386b5943f96
fbedd707910ab9843d2f024f8a168814da07ab7e
'2012-05-01T07:08:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASE' 'sip-files00069.txt'
c7989ff3f5bad7ca402d274e9d495f75
adae577325d589565db031b5c6c9ca3179929cd1
describe
'27262' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASF' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
8c52bb70436b208d5538a522e6f08c30
aabfc250d3485a68f29f882ce5468fb5d1d12d8f
'2012-05-01T07:05:27-04:00'
describe
'936341' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASG' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
39802055487aeb12f563294f031f5e0a
fac44c58abb5ebfe652ca8cd7a23431a56d1b301
'2012-05-01T07:05:17-04:00'
describe
'155623' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASH' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
235429df4be4f1626eb1b49484124d16
b151b3941b0fd16e12cc6b358058d947982fb1dd
'2012-05-01T07:13:30-04:00'
describe
'35167' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASI' 'sip-files00070.pro'
4b5c7bb55289b06b3d9af572b93ada96
a88f66f84514b8169388615c490f6068c223b805
describe
'63420' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASJ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
6080db0ddccbadd03af5fde7607291ae
0fcbaea5b311247eba2f681dec08420f8be77cb6
'2012-05-01T07:09:50-04:00'
describe
'7507488' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASK' 'sip-files00070.tif'
55901623ad714d29d8e68bbf522fe0eb
76caf9898990be1d7496ea54ac580492eb84d8ea
describe
'1442' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASL' 'sip-files00070.txt'
86031f09695c24d93440313d97b19f04
b63099907b1fc3d1c3759fd66d8d8d6d69703c1d
'2012-05-01T07:11:59-04:00'
describe
'27013' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASM' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
10e02c0ead8a5d4f100ec19505d52ce4
01e4703931e37a661be44c572e1e619425782e8f
'2012-05-01T07:08:57-04:00'
describe
'921948' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASN' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
0eff88292e54e8ca144b1d5359a9090a
e19f24bfba5f2ad0d79b28665c2c8932ba10c6d7
'2012-05-01T07:06:19-04:00'
describe
'155015' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASO' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
0f735b45788d0708e8174e197691b0a5
4ff05557b6d5156e7164505f0fc1cea7ec8f1311
'2012-05-01T07:13:04-04:00'
describe
'35003' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASP' 'sip-files00071.pro'
724e0b658d593032cf04a167b313372b
9422eb413c17fae8abfb0e40415084b073241ec5
describe
'63237' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASQ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
6d2a0c6f2efff50a7cac4b11f709d000
0b0f8b09f71ca71408ce7ef4cc7152a1614d15ad
describe
'7392312' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASR' 'sip-files00071.tif'
0c0e2897579958fb2c67fd0d4e6f2ef3
c638b25832fbf5c6001ce006164c44b87ff695d6
'2012-05-01T07:08:41-04:00'
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASS' 'sip-files00071.txt'
9a5dfafcdd2b479b4c595e9702277795
c0eef1739f3a394087fd657fce841185f5e131a7
describe
'27245' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAST' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
06c274755993b00a0d3ce29c69e33106
fad13c0ecb77ebd8148929807e5f86c91dba71e8
describe
'919047' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASU' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
6788165457dab560a33296da4fb33af5
523d3c36ab41e0b48e6d4996b0951e00c51d7ad7
'2012-05-01T07:13:37-04:00'
describe
'156034' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASV' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
e49e8215f62fb8236bccc7612b1defd7
e0dfcedb6aa0c078935d669a467cae519d571e3b
'2012-05-01T07:07:13-04:00'
describe
'34431' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASW' 'sip-files00072.pro'
72f3d316aa3832b087ba7a2ac6e33d0a
5caaa01f3981199e505582a52e0bfdd587e6c8bd
'2012-05-01T07:06:55-04:00'
describe
'63089' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASX' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
4f98315afe4e73ced9525a7c55ad1437
ca4e24e07a53fa996f4bf02a69283486aa8b4d07
describe
'7369088' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASY' 'sip-files00072.tif'
a580fddb73d20beb0087055126bec505
9fa7a0d9e519e89e195a4d98ef3ec55089f8b84c
'2012-05-01T07:13:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAASZ' 'sip-files00072.txt'
6cedb247cf04ac30e7f470085d8d1249
bea6df96e800724a9c188e2706fc5c67fac38b12
'2012-05-01T07:10:50-04:00'
describe
'27142' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATA' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
23ccf110f4eeafd539184f7c394c78b8
24ead983e9631a1c77a5789541ec49ee83219671
describe
'933286' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATB' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
a5eb0b0048ceba54f158a3a217ed5438
e274e84aeef67757f980c368c49ab4a302882469
describe
'149101' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATC' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
adb11c1ed6c234ec9b3107868fc37aed
0ea1004cf2bcaabd32adf29c81ff7abfae1bd50b
'2012-05-01T07:07:49-04:00'
describe
'35336' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATD' 'sip-files00073.pro'
2013d0782a5f62247c9f34855f330c5c
798ab00c5eedf66dcf8133068f12a6e313656d11
'2012-05-01T07:07:41-04:00'
describe
'60641' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATE' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
e0bf174480b8ccd9d3a9f252ca266df5
2ded0d271cf29fe9ee3ea63376092f6cb4ad2b89
'2012-05-01T07:09:25-04:00'
describe
'7482988' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATF' 'sip-files00073.tif'
04a99e146715c4f7bda12596cec92069
3a3ad1a61c00b2da51c0d0dff3d36ef9480edc7a
'2012-05-01T07:12:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATG' 'sip-files00073.txt'
c7a34b65fa35972e3f36d61a6f9f7e4e
5ed43e18d87e4af0f01491ed57a67b0f87503a68
'2012-05-01T07:11:55-04:00'
describe
'26717' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATH' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
9231afc9cc380adfa22e2e5e4a998c46
beff9ad99fec0a07bce1832a12b8ec6a61db6a26
'2012-05-01T07:05:34-04:00'
describe
'920983' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATI' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
93340b24bb9c220280c1bac312e3d4a8
77c8b5ddd484fc66fed782982b777a7d2c1e0c04
describe
'150154' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATJ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
09267e53090ff8d33854a4381fdf2f97
8f7f2d9904a8b4364725e9ce124782e11946ffb7
'2012-05-01T07:13:29-04:00'
describe
'33845' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATK' 'sip-files00074.pro'
698a93c801bb2bd5a615f23870540b13
8d0dd779c7c92dbc92296f2e04d5722a0ea74cbc
'2012-05-01T07:04:54-04:00'
describe
'61421' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATL' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
acdb63970280c45f714c0a6e4037f495
e9556de3541db412b311df7258d0568bbaa77f44
describe
'7384752' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATM' 'sip-files00074.tif'
cd2dc8fdcf3959f59bb7611ef9628eb4
f2e370a70a52c25324bb453ba83221c4fc385a6e
'2012-05-01T07:09:34-04:00'
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATN' 'sip-files00074.txt'
1b4871e1fecb15fd742334e876d3b7c6
b9381fc45d95fa80a45b1d9d6cf1b38932a434b7
'2012-05-01T07:05:33-04:00'
describe
'27023' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATO' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
15c0932e9fed05db6fd839d52e8ce067
90162d932f7b3ff950807019b73f175e9d45a58f
'2012-05-01T07:10:32-04:00'
describe
'889499' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATP' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
e7f19e71cc0d531bf6fe861a5efd2154
6b88eee18a3b1afb7ffc8efd3568cabc4001d406
describe
'159439' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATQ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
91d4168d584a4dc55770d3953dff0168
f8c06d3792a0c37b8afc46439097f02b679d61dc
describe
'34768' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATR' 'sip-files00075.pro'
3fbc5e4bda71327866a6f8ae531414d1
ca2de4a415ed096ff7c4098bc5d73ac74d76ab70
describe
'64008' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATS' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
24ac1913a5a591b75d53b0fc4b31b374
6bb9df31673f0aa3ed2571ac839e5ae41520499d
describe
'7132904' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATT' 'sip-files00075.tif'
c3534c83884a48bf6e4e53eb90cc9b04
075edb6e2da45adecb50e4344a454ec97265083c
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATU' 'sip-files00075.txt'
bde9f33103a1a164d8f8cff1d4c5e7dd
a4557689d3bec9af070fd737f31ed1d089ed07ff
'2012-05-01T07:05:53-04:00'
describe
'27732' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATV' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
4954d1a0e5dd244349cb4f3915c7062a
b9681480bfea1e16521725c1e6b55c0d1d7b28c3
'2012-05-01T07:05:43-04:00'
describe
'956905' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATW' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
20f0a9406014b7b082b084b7e1ea9db7
8f040e759d0881801f94b021555c383f2e329629
describe
'153133' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATX' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
2223e34362591079af49ba81f99522a1
3b9358819ebeaadad71bfdf7e579987c46948fca
describe
'35947' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATY' 'sip-files00076.pro'
f1bd1478020e3bce368a68310a76d8c1
781be7d8f5605a632b603fad8a999474788a4dde
describe
'61563' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAATZ' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
6cde7445b387b2da58caa6ad89536001
756d961b28eced8698d229230b77d4007672aec6
'2012-05-01T07:10:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUA' 'sip-files00076.tif'
03d68767e3d77026188040937d9c0615
08902e3abb1f379fa765e1a74cc0bfcdc7aaa042
'2012-05-01T07:07:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUB' 'sip-files00076.txt'
92272b4eb3c96af1c8ff67f158fe70be
1565825f28a1f945f734d8d4b855ff6e1cf52358
describe
'26947' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUC' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
a4fa3b200d8a4a66c41735d269467576
eb0532e0b97e94af18eb5b74b5f845872cddbb27
describe
'891938' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUD' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
3d2bc656b8e1ebab8313a3772951022c
499f62562db32869cafbb580c26c0c4006cb7b17
describe
'162688' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUE' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
94fdbb4cde31d3e520b7bf7b86cafdf7
d0f8484100da5e4ec1694482d1349970f3ab75d9
'2012-05-01T07:05:08-04:00'
describe
'35120' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUF' 'sip-files00077.pro'
f00ffc36eb55ac083def16ca17099069
497bc8bfeda51ab7899ddcc3d3574ca80719b260
describe
'66316' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUG' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
9adad1dc820422c23e22fc0dffd6be80
bf04814f81266cdd191050a15baefb98c5e69344
describe
'7152304' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUH' 'sip-files00077.tif'
26c8ca909f4b6b64411550f2b09aef5e
9a4b2f87ec3a75930d1f6de20ae6bb9463557949
'2012-05-01T07:13:13-04:00'
describe
'1453' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUI' 'sip-files00077.txt'
e01056535b39048e522ecbce5881e2e1
b3094b49bf973696fa6a7f2e208abfb0ca26478d
'2012-05-01T07:09:53-04:00'
describe
'27893' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUJ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
0d4b11ac4fb507b10afa758bf36c0981
38e99945cd60266b7ef786658bf0062d80703325
'2012-05-01T07:11:40-04:00'
describe
'956903' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUK' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
86078aba3e6b7dcbd4ebc7b7e7d97ceb
418f865292c6922869814d9ed48960996b538421
describe
'124511' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUL' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
3304413879c72175dcd8b799201ba3f9
c05bbd7adf2e6a9424bbfbd150751413cee73977
'2012-05-01T07:09:18-04:00'
describe
'27101' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUM' 'sip-files00078.pro'
6ea66609258da12c19fed04e4136981b
034e2adbb0c21136bfb9f3649cdf885ae3a2a20e
'2012-05-01T07:08:05-04:00'
describe
'52400' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUN' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
9bd42b72dabc88d036ae502ab2af9572
1b8fa261a40f7fb0ea92f295559555d655bf51bb
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUO' 'sip-files00078.tif'
a4cf4e3895e5cf8a963f62e3c84813b0
e2f58568c5ae464ed4502b61ff30bbfd8c41a7d4
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUP' 'sip-files00078.txt'
3c32a7c6028b9c32a797faa001b1be92
d3ad06de73429d23c56565bcaad9db778ea81bc8
describe
'25021' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUQ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
0c4b4e77a050ff5a50d91c03040fadfe
6b267a4e4dfbcfb3e399b538834c1c7aecb33108
'2012-05-01T07:04:52-04:00'
describe
'890265' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUR' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
b245110107838d6ece4d9cfe7537ef6f
b6b00201adb9f26a26f154b4abddcd74a7016767
describe
'142990' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUS' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
e59e4e97839865bb1f2c04d34eedb0da
545c36b066afb9736fd67148088e90072b638c01
'2012-05-01T07:10:10-04:00'
describe
'29565' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUT' 'sip-files00079.pro'
c3c01bf76bbcccbc8b4f43974646cf15
926d6315bcaec6e8f9039a1530bd086a7f975f0b
describe
'59882' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUU' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
c423ec4bff3085f4e9372dd05c5aef89
3c5e8afefa83f07f4b1bd634d342579b7a36ed1c
describe
'7139164' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUV' 'sip-files00079.tif'
c248883b1a19db5d915c49fd806d99b4
02cde40d7e9451c5b6d618c77497df43ac847813
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUW' 'sip-files00079.txt'
1440599d42df10fd74e24fec79df6714
e266b0a1f43ffc98ce3b57ad97b530e84ca882c9
describe
'26792' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUX' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
643b0c20aeb2d804a027441002b700b7
6d9920c7b61ffd35c896f6f7a20dfb39f2fca1d9
'2012-05-01T07:11:32-04:00'
describe
'908040' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUY' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
f1d6f352e4d1a478018b7b87493b3059
c681d8cbcbd0aaf578c6b89dd39f669be98fce4f
'2012-05-01T07:11:10-04:00'
describe
'156158' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAUZ' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
b9b91912090707b2597308f1729e6ca2
04d3a407148991a8a2fca4d0fa3719a28844b485
'2012-05-01T07:12:04-04:00'
describe
'35564' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVA' 'sip-files00080.pro'
9668d02f65a88e46a71e75aacfd70f04
54c678ffd9a2c0dc10c33a3beff8362203595542
describe
'63395' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVB' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
15bdabb6de2d0ee5b5a753c310e7bb35
e3d71e32da5282c2d80baad5d1986acd417767c8
'2012-05-01T07:09:33-04:00'
describe
'7281580' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVC' 'sip-files00080.tif'
5c753b1a18f2870820d7f120b745bafe
dd560352b99ad0ef6a81aafd033008cbb735287c
'2012-05-01T07:12:54-04:00'
describe
'1458' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVD' 'sip-files00080.txt'
e00e177774a90b0c7d25724d905a0ce7
6eaeca06c3928f7c55fa3bedf506896f0ac49abe
'2012-05-01T07:08:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVE' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
bd298f9edfb789c3116fc02db793db2a
e26e90b0a13c1029771210de484ba5fbce041f3d
describe
'918143' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVF' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
ed8abae7c70c4323eabd90de35fb0172
dcde80175f0f4c116c7205e85523f8915d5c9ae8
describe
'154873' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVG' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
3201d419e1d87ec699ef2a8986575001
d9e332b56b489ba79b86ed0300e75f4708806ad1
'2012-05-01T07:12:59-04:00'
describe
'34985' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVH' 'sip-files00081.pro'
911200d4c46a76b4015d88b3c175702c
e971942c9caba5d25910d357eea5e110d3fb5634
describe
'62527' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVI' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
dd8bdc3aec7d8691fe7cda85eebe66de
9585e4c81994e761bbe2b29cd70a2212994b2590
describe
'7362044' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVJ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
7879814a5cd62923300237790ced1973
db60e043be9d1b6f6acdbd6eb02501ae302509cd
'2012-05-01T07:11:03-04:00'
describe
'1440' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVK' 'sip-files00081.txt'
539d10ff2b54203cc248ca035f798533
5d07bbb029488bc3e631fb0c7c9ef902026d0a02
'2012-05-01T07:07:35-04:00'
describe
'27191' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVL' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
91a6a3e8033a7a80c2ed8d34ad5c1eee
5cbfa4e4963af80bc8a21007319e59005d18d0b9
describe
'898942' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVM' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
7c4c9d97bcb8e16d8dc97f255a5753c5
54cf9fbb53dae4497f2ff31763f58f101f7d2d95
describe
'157162' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVN' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
3829b4e6667275472694d986ccc42bca
cfd827a03c02a6a861058732acb265f39a9941e2
describe
'34673' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVO' 'sip-files00082.pro'
e548dc3ffb6180b5e161d64b4def8125
d7593a02899fc6cb566e7b612ec24bac201b132c
describe
'63532' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVP' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
753b8daadc9d6474cd2aaa41a5e122a4
819d6b2cc113f6a23b2be183575f2dab7757f15c
'2012-05-01T07:09:21-04:00'
describe
'7208632' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVQ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
a723643806317e5fd5cbe0cf52c6dfca
fc7b746a04e299787ee518691e63a673d7a235a3
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVR' 'sip-files00082.txt'
8085fc539dbcad387c692a240be88a04
af9a53cb5802c84a8f967442d0fb238212aa9f92
describe
'27733' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVS' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
c87f24d485c7fd607a57569db5078f28
d05b13c124413ff9eafceeec8e6272d390e5dd64
describe
'921112' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVT' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
df0c5f67a28899be156c0f886bf43528
072d7e9798f6f647574e08c8f466c45a5ef172c2
describe
'154064' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVU' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
f142ffac198d46fef3f200d20cf1cc43
635dc55dbf6e3cc3eec8316a492b1e405115d771
describe
'34380' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVV' 'sip-files00083.pro'
f1323d4a6cfd4d6239d1aeb20f1a0153
d322a2912960b440759cbbffef5a5e9b907c4eed
describe
'62418' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVW' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
01efff27858aee4be4f77a4df55c90cc
6b1da528686a4e3e9f34fb5b0948ee735f7c8384
describe
'7385680' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVX' 'sip-files00083.tif'
86056b28c000151700073d4339bd31c6
2e0055f3033f428f4618cbb249e78cee3a0ea4ea
describe
'1413' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVY' 'sip-files00083.txt'
bd5ec1a344ce00c64ce252df76cfa4e4
d7207d59cfbf67181bca843a3120aaf5d2b32d9c
describe
'27112' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAVZ' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
babc7eb6cc0a952fc6b76658b0434670
3992db0d09371d0fe4ac8f5243fb2999d25a0c69
describe
'900889' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWA' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
28157f3f9af5482db6d1f83a02e0edcd
7b30fef29886659a20bc54dfe7721d4db51d9b66
'2012-05-01T07:05:44-04:00'
describe
'157081' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWB' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
005aa165b24bc3af1d2ab13c3501b0a7
addf92d62b270166510dd4d00aa32f11aa5968a5
describe
'33581' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWC' 'sip-files00084.pro'
6346a5116eee512c02ced3501f995d25
ae81d2dbfce90eff9b3d3722756a3cc76f1260a0
describe
'64884' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWD' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
4ff683a1364a7ebe6eb274cc11da6131
8b8303999b6371b9a4a6771e614b2775274d2525
'2012-05-01T07:05:04-04:00'
describe
'7223896' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWE' 'sip-files00084.tif'
7274913ac4c9a36a8d05e7a7ac450664
d7013aab19ae5d5bb15ffab6bc677d27d0c2de44
'2012-05-01T07:08:43-04:00'
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWF' 'sip-files00084.txt'
a037e19cfe5422c4c51e64afe8876452
626a6ee2d2bde268477cd7691c35155cfa22070a
describe
'27820' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWG' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
37e1de772b3ca6b9caa17c9c5dd0f277
941e68b1a72c0ac844e3ca7aa6b855651725d4c3
describe
'894511' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWH' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
e1f32ec91be46b48670711e459951637
34c14bc447a6d85cb749f93039468ed8405e13ec
'2012-05-01T07:13:08-04:00'
describe
'158213' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWI' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
c7badf5c278b32b728a8283ccaad60e0
5bbef78abfb6c5341fd0a023dd80e4e2b0178a3b
describe
'35270' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWJ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
53102f9d18d401fccf59fb8b4fda2e58
f9cc685db9c0c805937df692c4d482b55d739019
describe
'63716' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWK' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
9fa249f2ede33b4c20434ff67d3af0e5
8dedb60191cba3439541f4e97cf0a4a11794bc2b
'2012-05-01T07:05:09-04:00'
describe
'7173332' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWL' 'sip-files00085.tif'
c1ac10c0c2c66ecc80fa81703b90beb7
07f50ec912a30784e17a918188a7fa33dbef17a9
'2012-05-01T07:11:04-04:00'
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWM' 'sip-files00085.txt'
d5c668fa73929de224eb3e6f71e0c588
f260e1144b1ee44b315606058e63ad7f0a025d4d
describe
'27680' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWN' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
dc00df1dd8251bbd7ba577551bbaa242
22bdaecd61d5342b36c9f01fb14a2322704fd6ef
'2012-05-01T07:06:10-04:00'
describe
'890662' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWO' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
357f99e8a5b6aa7f92a075026554b6c9
5474d392bdbfb58291ac5133ae54f2e79aaf0eda
describe
'156212' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWP' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
ea18cafba290c9f04ce16db4fc2fafce
157e26700628bb319a3ecbd77a8523df47a9819e
describe
'33929' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWQ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
453b545443cd251b1f395672eed6c231
b176c88eb6d1c6430b9aee31b5cae381ae4d72f3
describe
'63650' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWR' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
9111afaa9edebc47a2201dba7e167c15
198eaa09c180e7068b405b5cc6f7d58ad677dc0d
describe
'7142188' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWS' 'sip-files00086.tif'
213b1561b47a6d92fae1e0b2bfcb3649
9b876b7189dfcffe574f445fb2e9291f13566639
'2012-05-01T07:09:19-04:00'
describe
'1395' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWT' 'sip-files00086.txt'
3765de58660fcd17e050520d5f866eac
4d8180bd980dce59c00a4445a79c7427d4822e6f
describe
'27400' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWU' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
93cbb25e3cfbf488e5ac166f46c55758
77e9ac0748b83f5c28e0ee9ccf77dc9df576c8d5
describe
'908249' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWV' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
01e7b9fe9d25c9a0b44f5b7dd396f474
2cc91b12659de0d28ed4a003cdb4f731f1f716c0
'2012-05-01T07:11:48-04:00'
describe
'157464' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWW' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
721c81755334bb1f4fd8b58afac02244
0c0d54762cc043ff1742e384c498b5c51d5a664c
'2012-05-01T07:05:51-04:00'
describe
'35389' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWX' 'sip-files00087.pro'
99e871665d129f6a16e3352fa27fb6f7
600923a1fa245c954171e4a1f639df8abaed2292
describe
'63845' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWY' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
c4c405acde2371319a80fdd5cfab720d
5a8022560dd6b4ca7df2b503d857acb6540a217d
'2012-05-01T07:11:25-04:00'
describe
'7282852' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAWZ' 'sip-files00087.tif'
4aa561a5e735ff81bf274f5f2b2334df
4c4b76e30640636aa7c728a622c65e8f8cdc74b4
'2012-05-01T07:11:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXA' 'sip-files00087.txt'
7b750cc556c3cf748203cdf7316a525e
a78b3d628e57575ab0108bf2458532911acc22f6
describe
'27065' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXB' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
51d8df499ad53566d8704d7ee9b89a60
200456ecb7ee9e451e7805d3f88455e6e8df37e7
describe
'901297' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXC' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
744a15b740ce479f3e2572241f8eb592
267352a97bf4bf8754ff479e9f7a68f39d1971b5
describe
'152981' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXD' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
0195ba1c5bf09f368606fc5cbeea1455
f18577502e6b8ef7eb09d9363205416d9b50b824
'2012-05-01T07:06:52-04:00'
describe
'34297' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXE' 'sip-files00088.pro'
cc5e56bff263c2fad0c8c8733327d76f
6639269b9ff3e0570c4621cc88a7d522067fb0c7
describe
'62000' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXF' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
4a72376098ee4540a122a3584172da50
2f066f904df289fc806bd6cf4eb6238ae0f163a2
describe
'7227268' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXG' 'sip-files00088.tif'
8842ca355c8dde60e660c813f63cc7b1
df5895bc7f86fb1d34b02437e16118cbf44d7679
'2012-05-01T07:04:57-04:00'
describe
'1411' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXH' 'sip-files00088.txt'
488052fd72ca94db410c202384ff87a8
20bd7a83603feae1938a3eb0e43b3416087b6dfe
describe
'26979' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXI' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
45d19afe5197d48aacab3f044be98248
e59ba2b84a8bdc22eef67ed6ea98474cc484c6aa
describe
'900140' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXJ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
50ea1e92c44798877d7b4d2b10dc6217
16ca64b21f451799bf06e29a2d0601d59d2e54c5
describe
'159394' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXK' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
9918af5d88c4c1e0cc1d1e13690598ab
85f6316ff5bb85b6bf31163d0de38d5c05de184c
'2012-05-01T07:05:36-04:00'
describe
'34957' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXL' 'sip-files00089.pro'
0d2a75341acd2a3aa1259de655f4e7e1
3132df6155e03a1a0106acb54baff672f718c0d4
'2012-05-01T07:08:15-04:00'
describe
'63941' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXM' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
53b06fa59ab1a5029cb7f29cab33c699
3a65334f9df42a2ffe893d25af04dfd7a9664a7c
'2012-05-01T07:13:47-04:00'
describe
'7217816' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXN' 'sip-files00089.tif'
71286d6417b78a0d0e176f5bf0ae57cf
dc2ba035148d96518d91c06c8da523eebc630027
'2012-05-01T07:09:24-04:00'
describe
'1441' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXO' 'sip-files00089.txt'
7205e17e3f7da90b00895d459a7865b9
d8c77991533976cae7f3fc1536f3fae9a0afe77f
'2012-05-01T07:10:56-04:00'
describe
'27450' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXP' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
8eb0c0d6646f8daacf1a7a55df14765a
6f91f94e339a0c320f5ea60bcaf28a5c5a123045
'2012-05-01T07:05:32-04:00'
describe
'846486' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXQ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
d1b46e9c70113873894c36cfc9bd025a
48111e82abb1690ae3e49860390855a25559a6b7
'2012-05-01T07:11:13-04:00'
describe
'161654' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXR' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
2837fc29831c886945b59b7f8125eb77
533f0b74fcfece8438bf6c68b177ec9694d3f1cb
'2012-05-01T07:09:59-04:00'
describe
'34045' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXS' 'sip-files00090.pro'
c81c308888edb52a933adf863fa1bf45
7346803d7b8ecbfe3c0c3b4c676151e8cbfd6c0f
describe
'66685' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXT' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
186c7ea76af67b44b07973662b9cc1aa
7b963008c6e25e445d5c40a9358feb1e7bfaf76e
describe
'6788708' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXU' 'sip-files00090.tif'
01bc3ce61674958c25e07e946c5b12f9
e7a6e8bca05e7e3c3ae1bc6c8af15009316d0f65
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXV' 'sip-files00090.txt'
ba4759ee4f16bdb4b3c10a264439a9b9
e5cb9bc98698c67fff883d9a3cf7800989a90354
'2012-05-01T07:06:45-04:00'
describe
'28074' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXW' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
e046d61c0a2dcda22cdf1725ad181147
dbbc6206f68beffde11ae6ac2d4f7897dbd3e261
describe
'768899' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXX' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
ba4648b730a4cb1574d6810d4ab01ae1
226a890aab668632e79d070b5209b30efc1bc6d8
describe
'65871' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXY' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
bce650b3c69fa1f0c47b680fb18f0a04
75a567fdd6a20000835b4993f94ddbfb52501b37
'2012-05-01T07:06:49-04:00'
describe
'10710' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAXZ' 'sip-files00091.pro'
714434fdd8e5bc2259ce8bf53fe3dd68
5b6c1f035faea5c81170d85bffd3acbe82271046
describe
'33247' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYA' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
c469a05dca6005876c33a2a7eaea0c70
473e921d134e12014301fc557bd5105be03b34e1
'2012-05-01T07:12:25-04:00'
describe
'7237804' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYB' 'sip-files00091.tif'
2c9497c16903334de82a9b368ed2838c
cb504c1c4ce2005f9c484b191e1fccca952e5aa4
describe
'466' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYC' 'sip-files00091.txt'
28f02cc501dea058dd02b6b38a713e04
f40520e56e11611329f1a3d6714fc98bdb947809
'2012-05-01T07:05:47-04:00'
describe
'20968' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYD' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
a381bb95b44ec0b5fbe5621bdb086af7
d185274af1d3523063cae4402c7e991f2fd19f2e
'2012-05-01T07:06:46-04:00'
describe
'867126' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYE' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
b46fcc34c10e9f6ca60c2c86fac19575
e9e98b406a364a07a542bc3afdec36c593cd83af
'2012-05-01T07:08:09-04:00'
describe
'140145' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYF' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
7c1be9722933616ce6d978043ae04924
31200b8dd2f500d7cc7198fe004233da71a35550
describe
'29571' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYG' 'sip-files00092.pro'
a2b833b744b361306f7e722b853dd92c
1c771fb11c194db646e0a49ed2a0dc4cb4eb4fcd
'2012-05-01T07:11:08-04:00'
describe
'59066' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYH' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
e2341db937c3dca15cdedd2d3631dba1
cdf0e69bebaafbfc3822273b85b114c2d298ed29
describe
'6954136' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYI' 'sip-files00092.tif'
04c15ca476f27d35d44ab7261397b9e6
49993304bc71bd58e29f9f06e201b1eab5232407
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYJ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
344f214711abdea4c6ff6c69af7ad9ba
f9f79f56d72a61d294182a2e933430b97816b2b2
describe
'26649' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYK' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
294183d428ab9e6109eeead143c810a8
76f13a7bbb2fca5aaff07fc5b78c61953f05a703
describe
'901824' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYL' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
c923b9b209a398fef4f90e2e165dea54
81b0585c351de3dfd972ec9f8858575ddb53ace9
describe
'160776' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYM' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
5788a894de230c795b3655651a595c13
cf8701ed8b05e7428b733c014325397db7d196a5
'2012-05-01T07:10:43-04:00'
describe
'35060' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYN' 'sip-files00093.pro'
f201807622b99d8378e82554614b8533
cfb3323a3c4860090f4c47d8e60129054657f22a
'2012-05-01T07:07:25-04:00'
describe
'65368' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYO' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
1fd4cdcbe6c76b3b13f12f8fa8dbdcef
809bf375a0cca0ed9ea3b02bb92caf546543c6fa
describe
'7231624' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYP' 'sip-files00093.tif'
fd2b8645aead175f1d55bab2766bc3a5
dfe25d8cbd9ea34bcf6df074c382f5641d4708c0
describe
'1447' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYQ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
c843f3ac5381d143e095dd7bf1cfd1cd
2cbcb18daa876a8ae0d64c26417002769d10aaa7
describe
'27896' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYR' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
b5c310034e132ac5a8cde4f33bde4342
224fa1a6a9e1337760eabd5a56ce19f91677e809
describe
'915390' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYS' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
809ae01acb4ca8ae6f67b2fb7efe7acd
0ba9a622f44dc2323127d8628e4bf38cf247caff
describe
'153546' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYT' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
d3711b5623a76b945cdda7698f7b9396
de2a87e0a59fb67770f8a1c94aed1e10e455e845
describe
'35578' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYU' 'sip-files00094.pro'
e14867ef0910333fade9e8d01b688f2c
c5976749d12346d52d63e71dc0565f96979a2335
describe
'62425' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYV' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
b610075dfd88743fd2aa067c08581660
ec16ee1d44fe4a3f788e5ff3a20c1d2f5b19b023
describe
'7340120' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYW' 'sip-files00094.tif'
314c8110cc65365daa24a9c46fbb2143
778d9fc48b955d2906b57390d2582ff8fc8aa5ae
'2012-05-01T07:10:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYX' 'sip-files00094.txt'
86dce0f21eb63168708caa94054afe11
c901938681fe370de77be5125a870d3df665093c
describe
'26992' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYY' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
d99424ede0695ae67d39e1a7d39b7b20
48b4637e4baea8a608c7ff730a4454dd0a3c4f40
'2012-05-01T07:10:36-04:00'
describe
'817735' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAYZ' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
9c415e4cece98cd6633d08f53eb9a57b
7fdd9f23992ad86396776de1d0d6b944975a24d3
'2012-05-01T07:12:03-04:00'
describe
'167375' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZA' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
25a5fdaafc6df513fe67c7bdedd29fc4
93f83622304c1e6d03023785a266bdb8a8baff09
describe
'33955' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZB' 'sip-files00095.pro'
a956facf22439cb7f08f01a372552fa3
1e515593b199a286c19de57773c691ec155eaf82
describe
'66757' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZC' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
bcf88a330d85d9267c7f3325bbbed626
f6b86f25e9d07d62f5b05477d55dbe668767ec36
describe
'6558568' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZD' 'sip-files00095.tif'
1ba1a8d006af3ea700b79b8712df24e9
1f77ddc2dd78fc511739c26298ef04fe96067cb3
'2012-05-01T07:13:15-04:00'
describe
'1407' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZE' 'sip-files00095.txt'
1c0dd5a32162409455aa5b006ba2de6d
52ee957f13baabe0095b736f2783dd582b314888
'2012-05-01T07:11:27-04:00'
describe
'28427' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZF' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
659217522cc2ebd6b06cc562389903fa
57ef23728d558346efad6b1225d120c17aa540f5
describe
'869455' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZG' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
ccbce14d193f2b05ccb238f651fafd15
d3729a74eb8504f9a68a7d47efdc8e5ca5d9e1c8
'2012-05-01T07:10:57-04:00'
describe
'162670' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZH' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
67e7adbaaf30d3cbf4457ea48687e6bb
7172d7bd4df4e2792f3f03440c3e4109a806805a
describe
'35391' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZI' 'sip-files00096.pro'
1799391b2d7296ad33c94e6b37c20450
e574ebdb2e2284e585e184d5f599345593f283ec
describe
'66043' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZJ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
b61d1e519d151d4034175795984e501f
dc9142da3bebe78d9838131c91d6882a14dd9deb
describe
'6972328' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZK' 'sip-files00096.tif'
9387e4b8d2ef62f0d0d0da277484c5fd
08a1edcb314c7caf36fb836904ce94297524a812
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZL' 'sip-files00096.txt'
4a962123a02a599927f8123a65b58d27
68a189a6ce6d34d997893b9f3fd62d6ed93d5806
describe
'27639' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZM' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
3c96563ee94e5f145a2bbfe4fd404ace
18471e2a37a8fd9f9b6dbd58e841236016a55ef1
describe
'851617' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZN' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
52463816f5074d5a0745b04b1d6c5a8d
a305a2accd47c0548263bfd795b1d097c9ddf847
'2012-05-01T07:06:38-04:00'
describe
'164766' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZO' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
81a00493971af1e2f94b570925a0a069
1a2307aa09414743fe9fb89cc522ac1290194ce9
'2012-05-01T07:05:21-04:00'
describe
'33326' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZP' 'sip-files00097.pro'
504edf63d3e2b07b777eb473ba3e64e8
cff8ed6cdc5d2dfbd91827516eabeba2b9a8ecae
describe
'67352' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZQ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
a81e21bd3c4ebdb4e440c8bcc08cd8f7
c3c20711244ccdf231d98edfbf976995794afeed
describe
'6829660' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZR' 'sip-files00097.tif'
ec990809ec4db8b4a7d5ace51d64d815
8bd772df00b6c22fcfef3a06e1b930ee7f84c46b
describe
'1378' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZS' 'sip-files00097.txt'
a6e726f5f0a0cc07d4d69fa68638984f
11b3b5e5cadaa4bafcc8c1aadc3f36d0d4422d37
'2012-05-01T07:05:55-04:00'
describe
'28601' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZT' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
985c8b12d0c70358a5e5955f85b21b50
8eda3632ad35aee82ff4391571f37af289cc5fa6
describe
'857682' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZU' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
b20ceb29cc1d3c826c11fa8ff10f8844
6ed4fa438ac308a1d695e28de0ed7fc0fe26ab9a
describe
'166335' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZV' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
3aa15ab9721c3627fcb71f6d503a25fc
468d0320b972c8d6750377b339a088151e93a3d7
describe
'32523' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZW' 'sip-files00098.pro'
5e4a93353b041b864292b1371107f197
ff27b98e4664a34a584490385f0d648076ca319e
'2012-05-01T07:11:35-04:00'
describe
'69001' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZX' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
15672a5e3383252676aa6925bce71191
112db0a3fb2343998d40744646dce924f35f7810
'2012-05-01T07:13:12-04:00'
describe
'6878136' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZY' 'sip-files00098.tif'
63d182bac51bc15f99fae4812bd49907
4a95417d119964a5228bdf30fc6d4d4417e1bc6c
'2012-05-01T07:09:52-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAAAZZ' 'sip-files00098.txt'
b1d3dd91d237e325dcdcfc2b5b621bad
8da97f13a9c4df1b572d99c017e9d2c0516e61de
describe
'29011' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAA' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
54f3f1aaf868bd33a9730bd7f662bd4e
519d26b66de405ccfa8fbd58c64a4ece6092fca1
describe
'908743' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAB' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
758416a96db72ae89b4cbda215d11765
a9876b142665482ca30540388807d7b3c3fbc9d1
'2012-05-01T07:07:34-04:00'
describe
'156045' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAC' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
e9db848a02513486850ecd3da9a5a585
1af90697e58eafd722c01287b40f57a7d435582d
'2012-05-01T07:06:58-04:00'
describe
'34011' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAD' 'sip-files00099.pro'
6b6e504293bca2d09b4cdea422afefd1
a203d05fac9698faaec086c151c9918a1874862d
describe
'64353' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAE' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
1c3a7d16eab7c2cec5d9ad168c1ba550
edc3314758070810e7696e4b7d60aa0138f9bca5
describe
'7286680' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAF' 'sip-files00099.tif'
df823296d29db25b7f74e4e0c87e02c0
3a22d4f9ff1acaeebdd251ddef537f68132d363d
describe
'1403' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAG' 'sip-files00099.txt'
a3134b20e77eb744aa8ba2f74ce7bdc0
78056d278d9683cf1a5aee1cde9f89d46e69e57b
describe
'27868' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAH' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
50866f99ade8e09122a89a264bcf6670
e12658db8df0ba93da3915d5a31870a186291ff8
describe
'849634' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAI' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
a38f33981c035626f8ba46f9201e6496
dbc01bdcbfe500a58c82d4832dda6fa3e9ef6d6d
describe
'161674' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAJ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
439b0131574b659f59ec87211621d68e
2fbd8e5206fca2ac840867ea2691cb289044fc29
describe
'33431' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAK' 'sip-files00100.pro'
ba53eb7eb0f1762278be51de6f1acc08
19184a595eb0c9914af82b07617abe5eb4d2232e
describe
'66997' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAL' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
276c4c3d25eb58278cfb548cda09054e
7bc0815c89414d83973d0f793d9dcf7f9d4dd42c
describe
'6813820' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAM' 'sip-files00100.tif'
fdf07f928f8b41463a2b3d46bbd92937
061f16c0fba754b8fe83e7c2934bc0fb2e7d793e
'2012-05-01T07:13:32-04:00'
describe
'1394' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAN' 'sip-files00100.txt'
8e4115205f26710b044add378e1c809f
484e84b11dac42645575d75b610fb52e3398d5cd
describe
'28403' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAO' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
5c6220bf5b633c54d000a144ab8c69d5
2e3c1b98d5ae34f5fa37b856c6d6c13b9fd6e192
describe
'830565' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAP' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
ba63d5f16e38a530490e0d55debc4416
e4c80f5f5c9281e24673ff317d8317ec3c4ba7f2
describe
'167949' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAQ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
699d2734fa5b70aa66dc0910f7a90a86
9f9378ca5484f918063afaccff63083835cb1d97
describe
'34705' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAR' 'sip-files00101.pro'
fbd2f4390e79c88c58074d3a06c0f040
2b2f206909cf0eef55906169b4062033215122aa
'2012-05-01T07:13:45-04:00'
describe
'68528' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAS' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
43bdfdd2c5342c7b2eb7e13f8939de35
d6440e617702282aacaff8e1964bc0357c060b0b
'2012-05-01T07:06:57-04:00'
describe
'6661288' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAT' 'sip-files00101.tif'
f3acaf9697d1a873947a453a46c23cce
6dfe27b0e4bd6632accfb9f65473c3cf7ed2c468
'2012-05-01T07:08:10-04:00'
describe
'1477' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAU' 'sip-files00101.txt'
119bafae2c80626e092cd98471308086
e9da9ea35854082c317705cf270169f022fb29d0
describe
'28456' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAV' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
4d1d26a852afa8baf7324ae95f721eec
8ab295a68f22bbef7f0fca98496492f7335191da
describe
'894550' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAW' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
6f8f50af75b1a011e45fa5e301a3a010
293672e99c0a3071a346e6c41837713617e9e16e
'2012-05-01T07:11:15-04:00'
describe
'154149' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAX' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
df8510b9ae66c56413ed73811bc4250d
2e3e063d14878c92207b47f176a8f5f98b6c8577
describe
'33954' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAY' 'sip-files00102.pro'
b6fa003e636a8647b6e897896b918fe1
327a5e99a8e0a3d24afe4dae274e14fb127ed457
describe
'63191' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABAZ' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
a6e9e22059245a046a8a2f21e674e71c
e291af44b574a3ff299936cb35e8bbe62ef9a729
'2012-05-01T07:08:51-04:00'
describe
'7173152' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBA' 'sip-files00102.tif'
10e5a49530b3c60ff7f1ad5777a8a704
9b3020de459887c9cd6471ce79f5f751fe8bff42
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBB' 'sip-files00102.txt'
de39aa96e9891691f35bec34b4d6ea05
957e14405c092363e8a02fc06b93d7e6f032cd8f
describe
'27559' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBC' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
1008f50e29a7d1623046d0a62dac52f6
49a8214cf20a5e970fa0a809f11aebb82c3a7969
'2012-05-01T07:09:35-04:00'
describe
'861887' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBD' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
d85cdc6d9f94cb5861ca2a9dc5192e93
380cbf655f1484076b3e6f79aa240ec97df76405
describe
'157962' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBE' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
97414a2e9196f22ab45036d6cdeff0d3
a29390884cafe98188222be2ecfc71606052230d
'2012-05-01T07:09:10-04:00'
describe
'34896' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBF' 'sip-files00103.pro'
d66a2567f60d924810de4ac2f698154f
43d6f0a8dd7c380ac7b4c9305ff3b8fc4c38c168
describe
'64614' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBG' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
e579661eba461f1f52e5bb41579a5da8
82982525115d92f203a3812373ef4af74e448954
describe
'6911896' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBH' 'sip-files00103.tif'
3f25166d5021c52731af196c4f0f122a
4a106bf688db920d98296b0721548c8bc0bba634
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBI' 'sip-files00103.txt'
b5d3ea68b1c407483ae29dadf8e9c994
f59d26c40b3094f20b435b460e50f977b1830838
describe
'28176' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBJ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
26e3d562c3d52a8300377251644553d4
3c42dbf4c84067bbc6342a746ef6ae15663d07b1
describe
'844653' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBK' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
7af7ebf631f463ce3719399ebe9ed01b
a61a21a11b2c91cc30771bd7a8a7dfd02155e4d0
'2012-05-01T07:09:41-04:00'
describe
'160018' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBL' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
541f80b77fa5a53b5a4c769d73aec70b
d890e6a9451a8c6425a7da3b7b4e8e1c595a3211
describe
'34598' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBM' 'sip-files00104.pro'
9543a57cbd0380ae64a63403b39d6484
7d3e10bf6b68aa576d642b76e7aca4d362438175
describe
'65571' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBN' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
d570d1bd06d1ea3da1de7cdcc70473e0
e7403906939af6b66af3f895c7c62fd18fed29f1
'2012-05-01T07:07:43-04:00'
describe
'6774080' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBO' 'sip-files00104.tif'
574dae70a34751bbfdb2b89a97d37526
38c74b9aa2acb2e1d60cdf200cc7abbc7dd4cf3e
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBP' 'sip-files00104.txt'
e752f28ce2a1046e14f7a226d9fcac90
267e354a0e497fac5732ed6f79cf3d32b78ffb60
describe
'28124' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBQ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
a06d288ba55096051703df6bfc45d07b
30dcbd145ea5872d38679137db9f002437d01e3d
describe
'863033' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBR' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
19148e07696a9ab65490654f5446eb13
7ceee241d2df8316ca6b270081d68677435dc22a
describe
'160105' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBS' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
6dc43bfac7b4c9ffa96e7cacabe3b330
da64781a887410096b47103e63c631f8b6667603
describe
'34855' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBT' 'sip-files00105.pro'
db02905b373f40e5b7dab9d314d29f73
f961b62510faa872dc2bd6293315e4361e9a5121
describe
'65274' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBU' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
4c9575f3c8a9c277ab523489442c80a7
01868f4be3959d37203a5e7121bf2175dc5ed028
describe
'6921476' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBV' 'sip-files00105.tif'
2abe6ae4fa814bacc00b1ee296142a64
c83b3eba60c0445e0b1a4b5cbfd61d11cc11b3af
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBW' 'sip-files00105.txt'
7dcc4db7e27b5a001d78ae637dd4a9a4
037a490c0b9b28a83de6e3d05991252ca5e11613
describe
'28095' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBX' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
069cac8810636c7cc59ca94e0052724e
d7d89fb7c6df6538139a68e7d1072235dd8400a5
'2012-05-01T07:08:23-04:00'
describe
'882692' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBY' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
aaa294b64e680dabdee91546822ba5ab
5f11f5b56ec6d965894aec6a4723aa8e137ec3e3
'2012-05-01T07:07:42-04:00'
describe
'153967' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABBZ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
da43fc5af03da4c6cf6a3362a170ea94
d0d541f194b2e635bc200365df409fdc1227f938
describe
'33267' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCA' 'sip-files00106.pro'
62c04dabf1cc7cc5891eb953d730ec6d
f0005d3e6266a6f63e51e7a719982cc50a1295cb
describe
'62956' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCB' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
28ab51a4f6fda95fe2a9794eb5255604
39db929b7c24923bac1f4e8516456f97c0ae3886
describe
'7078208' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCC' 'sip-files00106.tif'
c6ac6f9f866f7c1c73f59f20cc93123d
be14fac0a086efdb0a37149705cf8c5cb9a0d810
'2012-05-01T07:09:08-04:00'
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCD' 'sip-files00106.txt'
c12af223d9bcaa8b487bb384e8019a95
ec33e5444d252d892b6e707ee563837756971233
describe
'27731' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCE' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
3021cf2e0d4d77aabcaa361e791cd886
6e0fae0644f878931b0ebef580a85d553ef6c7ef
describe
'934934' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCF' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
f2066daefa141041329c211018b8adb8
f64129fabb285f483faf902f9b251197131e2dc3
describe
'148465' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCG' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
1225d56ac03cc35ba4bbd8b7926adfef
da2de3daef2feb1f6e2ff9ba8744d2e2ef2939b3
describe
'33109' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCH' 'sip-files00107.pro'
24f26c0fee900e2afe3edd3d5ee33d5d
9a459308e6c4ab3476fb8bf85041dc051f3710aa
describe
'61418' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCI' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
971299c8edcd4851cab99e65217c0f05
7d2892d56d0184efe6eb6df9bf8fb40c8d8ae0d9
describe
'7496452' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCJ' 'sip-files00107.tif'
cb8aa373573159b21177d9bd5b148e5e
b61f20772a17d36ff87ce71c95d6c9f72a4c882e
describe
'1366' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCK' 'sip-files00107.txt'
ebfbf8b9c1054f8f3501c499fd0dafa1
733d51a97831ae506021af495f6a75dd5c5f7553
'2012-05-01T07:12:55-04:00'
describe
'26901' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCL' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
69d24632d662e1f87ff9bbb00a40b636
0c71670ad3f7bdfd80e96712c1e62db1bc1dcb52
'2012-05-01T07:06:22-04:00'
describe
'889772' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCM' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
0617d87241055af62be89f627665d93a
190e61f6987995a083b16c9770fb81e7c8e61ef8
describe
'154277' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCN' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
2c7f7a3eca5bb509f5a401097c70c0ea
b33b02cb39260a75c2f428eefac22bf6bd328df4
describe
'33936' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCO' 'sip-files00108.pro'
e42c0bc5f1acc2c34cfc2bb1e05faf8d
c89a4c4c4552a02126ae14a9a7af000bd0335b5c
describe
'64171' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCP' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
04941bd220f03433235f736d2b72a8a1
67215f3ded8fa654f936cc3e71803abf1b827ada
describe
'7135264' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCQ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
75ce350b17bc1bd5c39a716967f12997
7fb6f9dd5777db6ccb8ed09a9da7a76f971b2976
'2012-05-01T07:08:37-04:00'
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCR' 'sip-files00108.txt'
849741e039f8241b59277bf8061f49c1
17f0436f8a52f40015ee5c49b6e875bd83e75dd3
describe
'27475' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCS' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
efd412151aa66f39186655c15c5ca811
98a14efc6bff43377b9a989197785225e39594bb
describe
'868575' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCT' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
0f5129e33ccf9d7491f3ba81ab9f0d37
60c5e5653f533480173ae1a61b9c523fd464428c
describe
'158927' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCU' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
92579ce681f8d2c320da65aad874004d
f3b73502f80880649f2ae2e46180e169773bf18a
describe
'33953' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCV' 'sip-files00109.pro'
a1048b323bc2fe9407a23adb76701bb3
fecea24327d2aec9c0c0f5c089eaa40b82568360
describe
'64603' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCW' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
7fe8321d63925835dd2a7cd0d696f862
52fa6c0466332c94d46f8d89d95c9ec369b0343b
describe
'6965336' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCX' 'sip-files00109.tif'
5b0055a918c2b8a8980a5ea29c9ec993
23b8f93a6e61af6a6db21f4c9793da5ab69e70e1
'2012-05-01T07:12:14-04:00'
describe
'1398' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCY' 'sip-files00109.txt'
79d3a4d687a8ecd921da480120fe6145
375df42c5ee9dcc8359b5c75fb36f4f15ecd963c
describe
'27525' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABCZ' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
3a3082037e052440e08a438740f47126
ba5c78282446d34494f9f3b3814fe67fecc2c8ff
'2012-05-01T07:13:01-04:00'
describe
'917456' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDA' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
865ea804479d742f53f73613c249af02
3615bc3c2bd41d087b880e83f4598df215fc3a48
describe
'154108' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDB' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
8b812bf3e971d5d579e7e5c7e055111f
8266823581870fbcc47c2531a196effe7ee8aee8
describe
'35148' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDC' 'sip-files00110.pro'
76d4e6e0c67f5956e4d02abd67362b63
a276fed8649da379c2566f5d79ee61dc31e6afac
describe
'63403' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDD' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
0af53e2cc72f3edcbd13b740e3ed36a5
58fbd8a6ac9e7132414ce3cbfeb44c583001d2d4
'2012-05-01T07:07:29-04:00'
describe
'7356624' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDE' 'sip-files00110.tif'
13d58f538159bace48834ef527740617
a81e2c3c12accd24dfef5f1dd0ed2e1474363a58
'2012-05-01T07:13:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDF' 'sip-files00110.txt'
ed4a484f779684d72fb06004280d268a
b9ecc102352a6ac92ef4bff7be61f19282f94af8
'2012-05-01T07:05:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDG' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
95bb0e02de19339d4f9b1cddb515681f
7867219ef7de4347959f1ebbbe2d2a3c8b154ba9
describe
'859426' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDH' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
9145381bac6530b489d67ee8b6b9eb49
b00a5f668167517acefe48a4cdc33cf80d6f2d11
describe
'161466' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDI' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
f2770c129bee37893ec075e7588c4d96
5b5d0ca7a823289158786cde221d8fb56a83c420
describe
'34636' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDJ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
c4992f8d1d3b5a4169cac45d5b899327
cec15b2661382c0cd541af0511ed3a7587d0caed
'2012-05-01T07:06:01-04:00'
describe
'66848' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDK' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
ab9963f644f4178cf1296037c99b439f
5da86089ea900e9d53b08025a7d31fda87a04cc7
describe
'6892356' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDL' 'sip-files00111.tif'
51c291138414d251c29151d25cec41bb
efefbb534cffc90d4b1250c87c70c43139f0ab0d
'2012-05-01T07:05:16-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDM' 'sip-files00111.txt'
6ec428641aba77f26943d4dfe9774a76
06e8f4b6cf0a91f67eb7852775a8c35e25438b90
describe
'28076' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDN' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
5571866f07a7ccd3fb8ed056b00040d1
867924b414e99707fa153b8cbf0d7ad03d7b0b4f
'2012-05-01T07:11:30-04:00'
describe
'917458' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDO' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
dfa222d9311bfa6aca1a461f5bea0a94
aa7edb2f8e14a201eb7c298a43c90342dd9c8f2c
'2012-05-01T07:11:41-04:00'
describe
'149260' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDP' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
538df87d7071027a43d86c7415135aaf
56ff95ebb617d566f614c440a64e72d53c52b405
'2012-05-01T07:12:05-04:00'
describe
'33674' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDQ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
fbb3f1eb27ede29b87f0055f150d15ab
e3c515381939be297b9effbf76274c63b5ea73d4
'2012-05-01T07:09:16-04:00'
describe
'61864' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDR' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
c11dc21fb03fa608f6320d23e11362c3
04be99f0ff5f76302f8fd1692d36e7f2fd909dd6
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDS' 'sip-files00112.tif'
9d8426578e081da964486d7e91413138
62b2b70187b7253cdee3f96a7362ac96880bf3a6
'2012-05-01T07:05:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDT' 'sip-files00112.txt'
a84ca326a42ceafcf60c77949e6f12a3
0bbc86768fad48a343891fde566e3bd17c1762c7
'2012-05-01T07:08:24-04:00'
describe
'27352' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDU' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
ff6c656eff8d6f56d8cfb6c33dfc7857
9e0877c965ef3afa292f5bbc14d48a538d607f07
describe
'890504' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDV' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
1b090d63dc06252c1e3ba22706db11aa
0cf220ae6a2632e594c79d1a0be7d05f016f3b4f
describe
'159303' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDW' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
ba06e9186819844ed04828d4fb21afc0
0ce36ccacb228b8114e95833727018e2da713c5c
'2012-05-01T07:12:10-04:00'
describe
'33901' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDX' 'sip-files00113.pro'
ba8ad4ca549cd90785630c972cf2fd25
765611b6a5fca227aeea6b0d836b5a9acc9303e1
describe
'65081' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDY' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
6933732e29790f69dfa0a74a63d19a9c
1553e0c77e8d90f9944ca35108cb3e2073fcc0c9
'2012-05-01T07:09:26-04:00'
describe
'7140792' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABDZ' 'sip-files00113.tif'
b0ac5f13b1679734dd9bea7bf1279601
75d8081a0ef92e484c594d0927814ffbb93e48df
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEA' 'sip-files00113.txt'
fd012c53874b827b925cdca0ba8c6081
166e39fb1b5b69d7a7300e8d467fb91950f00429
describe
'27700' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEB' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
427c9dd24cd49293bbb7220286c6c9d3
abc93cb620b3641355798f6e272ccc9201c0e9bf
describe
'917446' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEC' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
9c5e430b3c8e133bcf51a70685e25f10
e27339fd5e31175003d6ea12d14b8de88bc4acbd
describe
'115433' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABED' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
c4ca437f1fb87752e79328e0d7d17933
ba46ce8bebcdfadc1db12bdbe9229d298798923c
describe
'24137' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEE' 'sip-files00114.pro'
d4cfe5c24c1b21435915d3e1737d2349
0d86caef50765c13102ebee7b225c1dc4a78e0c3
'2012-05-01T07:07:45-04:00'
describe
'49949' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEF' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
9c3a9091456d5a7d74c879baf4e685a1
00141d7e95f9ed2fd2786083f99cb0192dbdeece
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEG' 'sip-files00114.tif'
fa6c2af1678e6c780e2dbad434ffcebe
275ed594eb182eda011d271283780f1428ac9387
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEH' 'sip-files00114.txt'
146484a50216c7c8cb8cf1afc04478f7
de05cdff61d781b3a0e20fcd1b0eb18d88448510
describe
'24298' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEI' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
9172416badde30a05d88e30f685baff0
d05cc0f82c54856f4139c98dbe8b5448ffc1b960
describe
'885375' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEJ' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
ad607d53ccda4d6ada96cefbf3eb4200
88c1ad13bd50b724e580be3a28fcaf8fa77129ac
'2012-05-01T07:06:02-04:00'
describe
'142081' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEK' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
b8da00fe5617cfb08dde3be0228681a5
35be1ef734c8e368797bd81e475803469b198458
'2012-05-01T07:12:11-04:00'
describe
'29539' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEL' 'sip-files00115.pro'
22be68c74cf29a2c2f8fc5ba8f5925c9
deb9ca4f979a40ded2d69590627b6baf72533c61
'2012-05-01T07:05:40-04:00'
describe
'59010' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEM' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
2ab32ce4ce48213485690bfc32a54da5
91417c0ecabdd309a01b27b9cffffb99adc4e943
describe
'7099928' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEN' 'sip-files00115.tif'
401f586ccf0499b47e505601c741687f
1cdc00daa04edcca6ef971c4b2ffa5f6a874f8d7
'2012-05-01T07:07:18-04:00'
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEO' 'sip-files00115.txt'
f41856aebd8fa4161f9fffae1b18fa1b
95e46c8902c362dded77cddbed0f7166ee7fd5f5
describe
'26360' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEP' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
35e6e1715241e22336a59b10a12bff5a
586603d14eec9128438f1a16b53583616ee4ad82
describe
'923070' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEQ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
a08665990636382ba05c3bb3bc394f7c
2a7fc89b0a6b69da7623d013cfa035d2ad529beb
describe
'151789' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABER' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
b63e6be61101b61fa00585f618c7a5f5
1d957c9f4a6ddc907e6d1349ecd9949305d1ad4e
describe
'34440' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABES' 'sip-files00116.pro'
a2ee066709e28ef686154337f9fe55ca
5285011020df544de7e3b87a7b36e9dd5ca4f50f
describe
'63336' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABET' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
57e2b08c16d3bde304c27ec8ea353a2c
40aecb9c7764885ad775301408d230d266477145
describe
'7401272' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEU' 'sip-files00116.tif'
69c8670d5b7d35352c8346f851983503
0f8cd91a332f731e41aeeb2d4e3ed892a9b5a08e
'2012-05-01T07:08:42-04:00'
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEV' 'sip-files00116.txt'
6a90b2d8be385ad3d961612ec3266ef3
32004c136484a8d3b6be0bcf9940416d51f8da03
describe
'27028' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEW' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
d5457e5f9390081046ee7c205658a204
b28e002db0ca25cc65016aa5737f3c73e0fc3e4b
describe
'925146' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEX' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
fd1046d0c2fb4902e2d49a869ad7a71b
8826585bc009682158479d4507c1c52964178381
'2012-05-01T07:13:10-04:00'
describe
'150710' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEY' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
ab9f6894757f6e4efff193782b773e29
8d5493f4eace6213387e7f4cabf35cd3b4d20836
describe
'34095' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABEZ' 'sip-files00117.pro'
75f21315c759b8b6407a306c2acc5b02
37e74fa63acfacbc099ba49e14f2824e162cb58b
describe
'63060' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFA' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
b456f315e376a1e0b5dd7c79a6937331
90dee82394304ba735de7a4173e4be9f5f37ff9e
'2012-05-01T07:12:31-04:00'
describe
'7418476' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFB' 'sip-files00117.tif'
0669f52ee50d2ddfb2b8c213ca122d00
4e40de97cafc9a83910ee47407cd2fd451069834
'2012-05-01T07:11:21-04:00'
describe
'1448' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFC' 'sip-files00117.txt'
a6db8362063d9e6b42fff31817b18e9d
25f50954ed6d58bba7e7dcb244b4437c137a6414
'2012-05-01T07:07:26-04:00'
describe
'27136' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFD' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
5c4a85cd443334760e45b13264aa0a3b
dbfea1a60f232f0f41099cc9bd4381212b310684
'2012-05-01T07:08:59-04:00'
describe
'917443' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFE' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
adc18859ce83ac229ae0136287f81c43
01f6352703df8bb416e0112b8fdc6491ceff30a8
'2012-05-01T07:10:58-04:00'
describe
'153743' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFF' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
d447eed429aade659e321e7740121904
9c74254ebf8d34a646f70770e842c5797a09009e
describe
'34041' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFG' 'sip-files00118.pro'
11a80470e15417a899fcdba2bda923f6
cc6f9234732bd628670254a8d9809bdb732efc90
describe
'63162' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFH' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
12897d44cad08370600f13ccbd31532b
2bb4a2b76f822d6bd84635a6f64d173ba4990f14
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFI' 'sip-files00118.tif'
05dc4e9b18304ed95424837be1830be3
276e59213e00ca9da37cf5c0b25e1c0d6a4dfb37
'2012-05-01T07:09:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFJ' 'sip-files00118.txt'
19b3c5a2a52df8858b9f8625eaafe263
7572d0995b033793063dfb4a9fe26eb12e42c0e8
describe
'27436' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFK' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
017bd8ceb2d25f79e062a1eac7f63a23
5faf988dc7eafb2f7a713f8798b0fdc21a9e776d
describe
'890990' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFL' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
c87ec9eafaa1895ef247eb6013ab92f8
fc2a451da25656f9c72101835428f911f413b936
'2012-05-01T07:09:04-04:00'
describe
'156254' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFM' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
0f90cad614b6d1615a1676eb949446d8
5c73fe048160b0a88cfc547388f2bd7ee9ce10f4
describe
'34740' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFN' 'sip-files00119.pro'
a89aa3adcd1a03bdaddf64842df504de
e3b3903b14e0be8052d5d612b4536ebfe5a5b4ef
describe
'64261' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFO' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
12eb84c930620e2efe4c4bc84850dcaa
59fdde7e662769e01dad2b768d9ee99c8fe60d6f
describe
'7144620' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFP' 'sip-files00119.tif'
e9648b5bf0b726221b7fe805751504e2
25be00378c501adc7d67ffb595bb9436f99241bb
describe
'1428' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFQ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
02f734bee7f847029db5e7f78328dce2
13ad668d630fd6ce3d3bb6e30286c3764d8e5e87
describe
'27237' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFR' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
6318ca3f404d6b9af669637334a7b7b2
c4ad34578868fde0b677d997db0317d89dffb6c3
describe
'917452' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFS' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
aef7ee0f2289d77b65d958096774d3c3
326a901bcd43d7d9ff4f5e58cd613f13a90bd441
describe
'150819' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFT' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
a8a4eaa81340c94079e3c93c9d1cbdf8
6a19ae905eec3a18ab0719377d9bf49259e153da
describe
'33265' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFU' 'sip-files00120.pro'
a99aee40bf0fb32440abc16f7d060684
b623a258f8232619d43b05dfbb221097c4fd8cb0
'2012-05-01T07:08:54-04:00'
describe
'61953' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFV' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
12ad02c888e066f29e129f55fa04b5ad
8117ee341d7084eaa58161dc0a7ec11c9452ce01
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFW' 'sip-files00120.tif'
083ce053789859b00284f7855a2379eb
3668f8df5df526f03221f25a2fcae24d9cbff906
'2012-05-01T07:10:46-04:00'
describe
'1371' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFX' 'sip-files00120.txt'
2ae1afc4c5c07ffc132ec03cdf3777c8
b30a7de2030734cc6f6011dd08a0e3a3c3069190
describe
'27346' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFY' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
b39f50b0e504f56a01598b81a2c9c1c8
6e4197b573a1f58d0ac513532f13fec9507d3fcf
describe
'875522' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABFZ' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
6344def2bd3ec59cbe35882a892110bc
b8d78e9601c4d1c1a4418b24024110ca01e5b9d9
describe
'162088' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGA' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
0d6af171e9c5c76e4ccb63b44682453c
3c2ff33b10dc710a32c94b9a826407703e22998e
'2012-05-01T07:06:14-04:00'
describe
'34127' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGB' 'sip-files00121.pro'
0033d65e34b72420ba2a6db391bad28d
5d67d4ff68a9bfba244db7460b298a437b69bc68
describe
'65597' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGC' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
c24f8a481b6a8ac9b1ecbaf154a77c6b
ee93b58eebff1510cf0efec464a51da31ae596ca
describe
'7020928' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGD' 'sip-files00121.tif'
c25ad99fc8da5df896731a9c950fabf8
c41f4bddd02fa55c650d82c9439a177e39fac1e2
describe
'1404' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGE' 'sip-files00121.txt'
0be3a97fb6a2338174f9d40e438a4a7a
f31f761be2302ee1751f570d42473f86ff5267c9
describe
'27460' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGF' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
1f96ec1adb517c7ff311f2826780f475
4772c0202b6aaf129e9a14a3dda9f692c184876c
describe
'940941' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGG' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
a61161bb4fee3f7ffe2c3b82879be7cf
7c36daea82388ec2d754269c7770a8ab9562464e
describe
'150425' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGH' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
cde1573275fdae55410d63a9e8a09f48
2fe02f18b3687e18d4fbdb51ad1dbc0c657bc456
describe
'34721' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGI' 'sip-files00122.pro'
37e18182f6f0c507a987bdcb703d65ae
2b3ad5f2604a33e4a97a4fdd01a5c14d63a888c6
'2012-05-01T07:05:25-04:00'
describe
'62219' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGJ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
760309b7f329dea95d8034456bd172ac
d25ac75f2b56b9c2ba6b4ea706862115f4d9e299
describe
'7544680' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGK' 'sip-files00122.tif'
4140ae7d21977d493fc8f8d3141a4a1d
8cd96b54188850dcdddd2eeb536cce28f53c7014
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGL' 'sip-files00122.txt'
7b32d053d516ce9d94dd810747c4e4c2
6cc1eab77d31b3ad6989e94f098308d62d234846
describe
'26916' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGM' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
9350adc8cb4ef66c52c68ba22d26cbfe
1cf3f7ea3335986a9942fcddc474fe3d4ce793db
describe
'925217' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGN' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
094867d7ce9643e8d037268e65793d78
ece2f4b04483db9cfbd9147636470bf1026da3f1
describe
'144726' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGO' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
76765523fa38a762afaf877c9484b732
394f3e7cb621aaf90522efb60e8950ee3a11f412
'2012-05-01T07:07:01-04:00'
describe
'32300' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGP' 'sip-files00123.pro'
60ea93f459f8027c84cd7f7733514d4e
8662dc3fe11949a4d072f075e95bd133f6085af8
'2012-05-01T07:12:06-04:00'
describe
'58827' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGQ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
67469465ab0a4dc2f340225e5207cea1
d43155723571155ea64fe70f75712b151d39f511
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGR' 'sip-files00123.tif'
adb104c8c64061f1c7446c839c40221b
478e4bc9775f45fe9b0eedfddf87d1282729ae4e
describe
'1329' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGS' 'sip-files00123.txt'
d69b6713366742f38afeea5d60e9df9a
e999df89c11a39bdc74586db89fed8bedb2a04d2
describe
'26918' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGT' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
36788c57541a061ad5b1cecb446920c8
b4c7bf98d87642bda84b823c5270d699dc635f06
'2012-05-01T07:11:57-04:00'
describe
'917466' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGU' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
8b08dfdade7a99e53abe825738a05d9a
e4bd91cc45fc1de6732a23d94e8b2ce6d8d6a91b
'2012-05-01T07:10:44-04:00'
describe
'148659' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGV' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
8728ac0912de6bd20648ad00dcea1dfc
d1f5d4ab6e86aaf8a723f57c28cb2db1f899385b
describe
'33201' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGW' 'sip-files00124.pro'
cb2bd28dd86c74f8d227a5ba33b1157b
b8050d0e9a20e562abb2642faad621ae65ddf446
describe
'61272' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGX' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
38a9ca65946c04682ca5533c64d932ef
5c0fd21071f909fdc8385b70ded31a9b87d5e133
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGY' 'sip-files00124.tif'
61bf7e19584833f6fcbac7729f013926
75506d1010c0c50f6c26ea093550ab006d61bc98
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABGZ' 'sip-files00124.txt'
0dffe578d631cf2d3fedf01152304ffa
749f1668ba21a0f69a8489dc4665b271309b1678
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHA' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
64716094d29855261cce386bbcb81da6
0600b914919c3bc065b424602c6ef99920787f06
describe
'891271' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHB' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
d8b007aecc2ae790176549ee49a011e7
c9029e64f6c773fbae79e281c469b4d02cc4ca4b
'2012-05-01T07:07:47-04:00'
describe
'151369' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHC' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
bc7e992fbcb10a2fb1d7eb8156f65d37
3392ec5e2892c4b2cfcd79ad85f31b13613242f6
describe
'33402' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHD' 'sip-files00125.pro'
b4c47e2684f381549312cc9ec20daa72
5f147d3c004e45ed705ad9178ee366ea6061015d
'2012-05-01T07:08:45-04:00'
describe
'63328' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHE' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
bd2a52ffa404da89353328c0920a718d
55a4a5cdd4bc7b78006f037c0b0eb811dd678970
describe
'7146972' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHF' 'sip-files00125.tif'
74ad2cdd3ffad41de4e349b6398d7bf5
446b52bf0144adcd2f86318abe59b64821738b9a
'2012-05-01T07:07:30-04:00'
describe
'1386' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHG' 'sip-files00125.txt'
8a8dadd832af07e5e1d7dc44d785eb39
4f048fdadeac03b22fdc88cc298cc7162d7f8010
describe
'27163' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHH' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
f73bf5f7162b3415b4e2442df2113e81
587fa59fbcb1a384df3072b9fb856be371fe8690
'2012-05-01T07:06:35-04:00'
describe
'917477' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHI' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
2b43489f6c6aa6b4e02fdf55564ee8d1
cff722cae15c59a35f622ff5d80306cb42b4ccdc
describe
'148550' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHJ' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
50eadbcbbd8929e80e3165b59322c08f
78337faffdd558f3bd8651ae7d993d5a9befb685
'2012-05-01T07:12:08-04:00'
describe
'33378' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHK' 'sip-files00126.pro'
a444adc20ee847122d4ed4318b1c44f0
226ca4673d45706dcace8c2f4ccbb0c32850ba67
describe
'61381' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHL' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
47460d82c2fe6643b1d92b01cfc9aba5
3abde7b0f3b2cda3eb1c793e77e66104190fe875
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHM' 'sip-files00126.tif'
37365f3fb0d602b5a65c19d4844294c4
bf16691a8d70ed262e8b997d79c97f0b26d9de28
'2012-05-01T07:12:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHN' 'sip-files00126.txt'
5ff83574087f9d429c599e07c5c12c19
aa6844d1c7f6beda7bbcf4cf96a4c58437418653
describe
'27342' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHO' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
91bf92abcdda671e31448675f0232899
1d64c7e9a573e5d3377a463bdf48ec13e526ecb4
describe
'890683' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHP' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
958c944f44c9eadd44d931597e736fca
88fd04c772420e0c5fea9b8fb46c7a85e8bbca92
describe
'156525' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHQ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
d8057083f6955c4634c6e056e1eef75b
307c83a4edfed13df2427462d1d740023dc0919e
describe
'33590' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHR' 'sip-files00127.pro'
b96571ef15d560cb7706bc7571288d46
52e27a1969b93e758ad122d3d2b80c9b548709bf
describe
'63196' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHS' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
777773d8df43ab4dc19e7e464429d5aa
93a0a2dcabc225fbb6fa75f7f0b146ab3eaa0fa8
'2012-05-01T07:13:40-04:00'
describe
'7142316' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHT' 'sip-files00127.tif'
4949bb8c81bbcf5d30373bd90422ed3d
c1a69dca161116b96831aaaba83f672ec75c4e6a
'2012-05-01T07:13:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHU' 'sip-files00127.txt'
b6341ca3152649ccea5b5eb8646a4507
22e6c8fa57e709b05cee6b2b28a04ff2f612f261
describe
'27578' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHV' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
195f9fedcc625882df2a476afebbff6c
8a0f17b28b80857447fa6b183cb17595095feffc
describe
'874546' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHW' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
b574687ffc78e48004090915728f5702
1d375727ddc852a21def190c5de3cf939376c8fa
'2012-05-01T07:09:42-04:00'
describe
'156511' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHX' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
a7898a006ee3e2ac5078f173b626e6d0
433581d53d17c5843dbf6b4c80819ed5e9c538d9
describe
'33766' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHY' 'sip-files00128.pro'
8846f1c0f6c39ff8322f7ac56b27f90b
76f57b5f43614f3376eb1b1cc5458d9d6ab2135b
describe
'64293' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABHZ' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
c24494f6ca0b9f5366f335c569683b00
e8fa7bd4a4452dd0a5060034c451a113179a49c7
'2012-05-01T07:06:59-04:00'
describe
'7013048' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIA' 'sip-files00128.tif'
73ebe41a3640be023d636c09ad685159
e0c67fcf0eb3835408aa7067fa5d9df90e1ba209
describe
'1406' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIB' 'sip-files00128.txt'
1422f35a58c63cf31970373b83b8f44f
a8392a8c999a7a667c16006288f49075d98c2a05
describe
'27900' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIC' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
2b3a8700d6b341053604dcd05004cfa8
2f1d1d3146c8eef6e4283a6ebcd727bbf5388a0b
describe
'740077' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABID' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
efb81a2a250d48626cadc8ae89c1a4b2
43e4fbf863d06d41b13073ea06ff5305aba7df72
describe
'58925' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIE' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
8ae71ef4de3ef256eccf483b2b5569c3
f8aa5c6f2225fbabd2209d94f35b98377640f7ec
describe
'9105' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIF' 'sip-files00129.pro'
ea71720e65b6579b2213c1979b660ab1
f86fc4155036ecf50acc464526ec2cd4f4383541
describe
'31392' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIG' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
d97265704ebbbbc32bc05f9c5635e5ae
36d48c33bcfc36454800d9c84e88b222b0d2e36f
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIH' 'sip-files00129.tif'
d15350b8667e67d0200e23803448c47b
280055cad442a413390f5823fd6c377c9e24f19c
describe
'461' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABII' 'sip-files00129.txt'
d7a18f26d10748f1285f2a8999430f89
b052c1d269af6bf9c9d7f89226f959c99e7188b2
describe
'20657' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIJ' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
90261523cd7f56f16709547721457baa
4b8bda034ae643a77469522b99a33cfb8368ddf6
'2012-05-01T07:10:01-04:00'
describe
'683832' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIK' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
b781f8ad63cefe1141edac04f02dd97f
25caa06f585b2fcc9474ac5bd0e0e5fcac95e90e
describe
'30753' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIL' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
3ea16eef36a6f1a9685f971a3971d40f
ca179f9e040942bf16f78f8fb3b366ff6a8437d2
describe
'21224' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIM' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
f07b31896f3b2276062b092d3aae2378
51be708b41a899acd21490b361ee011d01b8522f
describe
'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIN' 'sip-files00130.tif'
204c9d2e84bde6bb4e6714c034ea024d
f2eb18ae9058797e370cc80040d4ce609699ed6d
describe
'18382' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIO' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
ff29da3c5961084ab7958b13e380e655
c3c478054261cfd50076f19ece0b25014576b5c9
describe
'1054133' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIP' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
3b160801c50fcfd7ad3801b01adeb28b
ce59fd75bbad97be2a7774a51703baf62f23e733
'2012-05-01T07:05:30-04:00'
describe
'45208' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIQ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
418ca1b12fe82e694c3215648fddaf74
8f665c3a4e1aa14ac7ec9e93729befa29339e68e
describe
'18986' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIR' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
b7f77e491e03922ea9731741c1e66fe1
1a710cf5d93d8fb975f55df7f9c8cb0bd328c3c1
describe
'25306600' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIS' 'sip-files00133.tif'
354ecea1fe2bad21ed35422650e0b6f9
7e01759f63ff0f4125c4c86736db5d2427df14f1
'2012-05-01T07:04:59-04:00'
describe
'12537' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIT' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
992e93f625f945fb1f28208fa15478e3
62713b3089ed0623d6aeccdd161e508d3d4c3631
describe
'1048204' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIU' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
2dbfd175671cad52ccb534e0e66d369c
e36f98016ca118aa8e38c346f44832ec8f3303b1
describe
'134661' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIV' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
518744e14d7849bc87321bdbbfac1b23
70c4538b94d8cef7a5f0f12a19fd6afc66f7042b
describe
'31600' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIW' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
f81fa14d7e2439d31324ef0c68f600d2
de82679542e5c207a643155dd229625e6cb22a28
describe
'25173368' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIX' 'sip-files00134.tif'
f4f39efe1dad5491ad2b5cc148a09098
e61a9a5535079a000eb4d06a60d502c7bd7957ad
'2012-05-01T07:10:05-04:00'
describe
'14607' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIY' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
c378abb644c42aa2beee1f6eb1f729b5
c0312944385a12bd9e59120e7e6569ec82a0fa5f
describe
'180250' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABIZ' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
6600937693f1c4b8f24f32e013d49ec8
3171192a16c36b3166217990182e076d70fd5bba
'2012-05-01T07:09:05-04:00'
describe
'44881' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABJA' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
d0f4abc511208299d07cfeaf66754c8b
aad6c9c9acba97ba47631bf81f859235a5bef77f
describe
'218' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABJB' 'sip-files00135.pro'
de7f92d02cb514b1fbda07753ecede51
422c88e6aaf8433e76b4321ef23910846ace46cc
describe
'18137' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABJC' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
781ef8720eb3602f8917d5a1bd6d4184
e80302fe77204a52fab9fb1b5be510c67318b02c
describe
'4335176' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABJD' 'sip-files00135.tif'
a63b76e80929d81e17b124cb3422d1c5
e126bac7eb3d3100412738955b670f065e1cc442
'2012-05-01T07:07:44-04:00'
describe
'3' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABJE' 'sip-files00135.txt'
bc949ea893a9384070c31f083ccefd26
cbb8391cb65c20e2c05a2f29211e55c49939c3db
describe
'12066' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABJF' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
e37c695ea936f7cb06d347e467b5de36
62f1d0944be5214e7058acc9cfb9f9d66167a0da
'2012-05-01T07:11:53-04:00'
describe
'155524' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABJG' 'sip-filesUF00004068_00001.mets'
9f1dcbf2dec2b2e2bd8c55aa27012b06
83e1052d3494a73b46f84398b8500350a939cf8c
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T04:14:38-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'199544' 'info:fdaE20091122_AAAAABfileF20091122_AAABJJ' 'sip-filesUF00004068_00001.xml'
4e2dffa7a5e6aa9378917f7331402b71
4e393458d5319b8bdcccb820cb4195a096c9943d
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T04:14:36-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.