Citation
The Trials of a village artist

Material Information

Title:
The Trials of a village artist
Creator:
Lamb, Ruth, b. 1829
Morgan, John, fl. 1862-1867 ( Publisher )
Burt, Robert K ( Printer )
Kronheim & Co ( Lithographer )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
John Morgan
Manufacturer:
Robert K. Burt
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1866
Language:
English
Physical Description:
140, <2> p., <1> leaf of plates : col. ill. ; 15 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Artists -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Diligence -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Country life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Parent and child -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1866 ( local )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) -- 1866 ( local )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1866 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1866
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Family stories ( local )
Gold stamped cloth (Binding) ( local )
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Frontispiece chromolithographed by J.M. Kronheim & Co.
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy inscribed date: 1866.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisements follow text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Ruth Buck.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
ALH3158 ( notis )
13366215 ( oclc )
026840457 ( alephbibnum )

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THE

TRIALS OF A VILLAGE ARTIST.

BY

RUTH BUOK.



For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have
abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken away even
that which he hath.”—St. Matthew xxv. 29.



LONDON:
JOHN MORGAN, 10, PATERNOSTER ROW.



LONDON
ROBERT K. BURT, PRINTER

HOLBORN HILL,



CONTENTS.

CHAP, PAGE

I.—Tue Burtep Ta.ent, orn “ Lost.” A wasteD
ENEE rn ee, Cees cea ee eel weel Ob

1Il.—Txe Youne Carver’s ExpeRIMEnrT, AND
HOW IT SPED: = sees sa See e oe D

TIl.—Tue Faruer’s Reasons, AND THE WAY IN
WHicH RICHARD KEPT HIS RESOLUTION. 49

TV.—Tue Heap or tue Famity cut orr. A New
Stone IN THE CHURCHYARD.. .. «. 73

V.—A LITTLE MonE FRUIT FROM THE HIDDENSEED 83

VI.—“ Ir av. FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED, TRY
AGAIN So ea oe ee ae ee 0%

VII.—Tus Work INTERRUPTED. FINISHED ATLAST 107

VIII.—Ricuarp at THE Exursition. Tue REwarD
OF PERSEVERANCE .. «+ «os of o- 120

IX.—Tusz Paro Open. Won .. «1 « op 18]







THE TRIALS OF A VILLAGE ARTIST.

—+—

CHAPTER I.

THE BURIED TALENT, OR ‘‘LOST.’’ A WASTED LIFE.

Onz sunny afternoon, a good many years
ago, a troop of boys might have been seen
rushing out at the door of a country school-
house. In their haste they almost forgot the
bow which was due to the teacher; and as they
poured forth, cap in hand, and scattered them-
selves across the favourite playground, they
looked very much like a swarm of bees issuing
from the hive and dispersing amid the flowers
of a garden.

The lads, rough fellows most of them, were
glad that their school hours were over, and
now prepared to enjoy a hearty game before
going home to tea and to prepare lessons for
the morrow,



8 THE TRIALS OF

But there was one exception to the rule.
He was not a very big lad, but he was much
looked up to by his companions, who boasted
of his cleverness in carving all sorts of things
out of bits of wood. They liked to tell what
wonders little Dick Fraser could do with no-
thing but a pocket-knife and the stray odds and
ends of hard wood which he picked up in his
father’s workshop. Lads who could do nothing
in that line themselves were proud of Richard’s
productions, and there was not one in the school
but could thrust his hand into his pocket and
bring out a sample of the boy’s handiwork.

‘What boats Dick could make to be sure!
Beautiful little delicate things, with the tiniest
of faces for figure-heads! And what dainty
boxes for small girls of his acquaintance to put
their thimbles and cotton into!

His little sisters had the most substantial and
prettiest of dinner services, all cut out in wood;
and even the very handle of his mother’s potato
bruiser was found decorated with a specimen of
carving, after that useful implement had been
missed and vainly sought for two or three days.



A VILLAGE ARTIST 9

The good dame was at first inclined to scold
when she thought of her long and fruitless
search. But the frown turned to a smile, as
she could not help owning that ‘‘the flowers.
and leaves were very pretty, for certain, but
the potatoes would have been mashed just as
well without all those fine things on the
handle.”

When Dick was gone to school, though, she
exhibited his work to all the neighbours, as she
‘had done many a time before after the comple-
tion of a new toy for his sisters. And all the
said gossips held up their hands in astonish-
ment and said, ‘‘ Wonderful!’’ ‘How ever
does he manage it?” and, ‘‘ Well, Mrs. Fra
ser, but you have a clever son! He beats all
our lads, and you may well be proud of him!”
—and so on.

There was one voice, and only one, raised in
disparagement of this new proof of little Dick’s
ingenuity, or rather, of the particular purpose
to which he had applied it. The speaker was
a somewhat slatternly dame, of whom good
Mrs. Fraser was in the habit of saying she



10 THE TRIALS OF

should not like to dine with her unless she her-
self acted as cook, and moreover quoted the old
proverb, “‘An egg and a nut you may eat with
a slut’’—in allusion to some of her neighbour’s
peculiarities.

This individual, then, suggested that little
Dick’s ingenuity was sadly misplaced as re-
garded the potato bruiser. ‘‘ For,” said she,
“the more crevices the more dirt. J like
things plain for my own part.”

Mrs. Fraser gave her a look of withering
scorn—in itself a sufficient reply—and answered,
“That people who kept plain things clean would
keep carved ones as they should be too. But it
mattered very little to herself, carved or Nor
carved, any person who found dirt on her
cooking utensils would have most uncom-
mon sharp eyes.” Then, without waiting for
further comment, the good woman marched off
home again, carrying in her hand the orna-
mented potato bruiser, with something of the
dignity and pride with which a queen might
bear a sceptre, and inwardly resolving to set
extra store upon that implement, and wage



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 11

additional war against dust in every shape,
because of the remark which had so offended
her ear, and which showed that her neighbour’s
notions of cleanliness were by no means what
they ought to be.

Mrs. Fraser met her husband, a rather
sickly looking man, on the threshold, and to
him she displayed the potato bruiser.

“Just look here, James,” she said, holding
it up for him to examine.

‘“What, you have found it,” he replied,
scarcely glancing that way. ‘‘I was going to
set one of the boys to make you another.”

‘But look, James, what our lad has done,”
remarked the mother, not willing that Dick’s
work should be so lightly passed over. ‘Our
lad will not always be a country joiner, as
you and his grandfather have been all your
lives.”

James Fraser shook his head. ‘I shall be
quite contented if he turns out a good hand at
a respectable business. A vast number of lads
have got it into their heads at one time or
another that they were artists, and geniuses,



12 “THE TRIALS OF

and I don’t know what beside, and grown dis-
satisfied with a good honest business they might
have lived by if they would have stuck to it.
Then, in the end, they have turned out good for
nothing at all, and been a plague and a drag to
everybody belonging to them. My lad shall be
a plain joiner.”

As he finished speaking, James Fraser went
back to the workshop, leaving his wife any-
thing but satisfied with his mode of treating
this new proof of little Dick’s talent, of which
she was so proud. ‘I can’t understand my
husband,” said she to herself, as she went
about her household work; ‘he always seems
to want to keep that lad back, and, if he were
not such a good, kind father in other things, I
should think it very hard. But he has some
reason that I don’t know, for James was of
rather a close disposition from a lad. Ah, well!
he is a good ‘ausband, and one can’t expect
people to be ah perfection.”

A little sigh ended this mental speech, and
then Mrs. Fraser dismissed the affair from her
mind, in order to consider whether the kitchen



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 13

walls should be whitewashed or whether she
should mix with the ready-prepared whitewash
a dash of yellow ochre, to make them of a pale
cream colour. By the time that she had
decided on pure white as the sweetest and
cleanest-looking, she had forgotten all about
little Dick’s handiwork in anxiety about the
completion of her own during the absence of
the children at school and her husband in the
workshop.

But James Fraser’s thoughts were oceupied
by his only son long after he returned to his
work. It is true that he always discouraged
the lad’s efforts to reproduce, in wood, various
objects that attracted his fancy. Yet he was
also aware that the lad possessed very con-
siderable talent, which showed itself more and
more every day; but, as his wife said, he had
his reasons.

In the first place, his own beloved younger
brother had shown similar tastes to those which
his son now displayed, but they had produced
no good results either to himself or others.

As a lad he had been flattered, and his



14 THE TRIALS OF

labours praised, until, dissatisfied with the
occupation by which he earned his bread, and
believing that he only needed to be known to be-
come famous, he left his country home and went
to London, to find—as he thought—the proper
field in which to labour. But he did not take
with him two things without which the brightest
genius will avail but little—industry and perse-
verance. He soon found, too, that the works
which were the admiration of a country town,
and of the simple people who judged them, as
things far better than anybody else in their
neighbourhood could do, were not to be com-
pared with those of many other wood carvers in
the great city. At home, he had been almost
worshipped as the one who could produce such
imitations of nature; in London he was only an
item in the great sum total of similar workers.

And yet this man—James Fraser’s brother—
possessed true genius, only he expected to
arrive at the summit of art, as the bird flies,
lightly, swiftly, and with little apparent effort,
to the top of a hill, leaving far behind the
plodding mortal who must ascend it with toil-



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 15

some steps. When the young man discovered
his error, and found that he must labour long
and steadily to arrive at eminence, he failed
utterly. The good people at home had spoiled
him by their kindly meant but injurious flat-
tery, and when he failed to obtain the same
meed. of praise elsewhere which had attended
all his efforts in his native village, he blamed
others—not his own want of perseverance—and
said that the talents of the humble stranger
could not obtain that recognition which birth
and money could always procure for their
owners.

He said that ‘Envy, not Justice, gave the
verdict against him.”

Yet the young man did not profit by his
want of success, or allow it to stimulate him to
new efforts. He did not recognise the truth
that we obtain experience by every failure, and that
at ts by oft-repeated failures, rightly used, we arrive
at last at perfection.

He brooded over his disappointments, joined
others in railing at the world for not giving
them unmerited credit, fell into evil habits, and



16 THE TRIALS OF
gradually sank lower and lower in weakness, |
both of mind and body.

Meanwhile, his good friends at home—the
father, mother, and elder brother—who had
sent out the young genius with so much pride,
never doubted that he was winning fame, and
would make them all exult at the thought of
being able to claim kindred with him. Perhaps
their disappointment at the real result was
greater than that of the youth who had by
ddleness and want of perseverance buried his talent.
They could not rail against those who con-
demned his works. They could only grieve,
though they knew not how much cause they
had for regret.

The young aspirant after a ‘royal road”
never let them know the full extent of his fall
until he could no longer keep it a secret. One
or two letters, written soon after he reached
London, told them a little, but the youth was
too proud to complain or to return to be the
village idol after having hoped to reign amongst
artists.

There was vague talk of his doings, and the



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 17

country folk spoke about ‘that young Fraser
that went to London,” as though he had been
removed to a higher world, For these things
happened before the world ran from place to
place in railway carriages as it does now.

At last a letter came to the brother at home.
It was written in such a poor feeble hand, that
it was almost a wonder it ever reached its des-
tination. It said, ‘‘Dear James, come to me.
I am dying, and in want of common necessaries.
T have utterly failed in the object for which I
came here; but time is so short for me now,
that it matters little, only I would fain see one
friendly face before I die.”

Then, in a postscript, a little of the old
lingering pride crept out; for, though it plainly
cost the writer a great effort to complete the
wretched scrawl, he added, ‘Do not let the old
neighbours know.”

With a heavy heart, James Fraser hastened
to London, and in a miserable lodging found
the much-loved brother, whom he had always
pictured as winning his way to fame and
honour. ‘With his own hands he ministered to

B



18 THE TRIALS OF

the wants of the dying man—dying while yet
in his first, fresh youth. He watched him with
unwearied eyes, until at last those of his brother
were closed in death. But before that hap-
pened he heard the sick youth say, ‘‘ I wish I
had been contented to stay at home and work



like you as a plain mechanic, My early life
was only a dream of happiness, and since I left
home each day has shown me that the vision
had no reality in it.”

‘‘But you may yet prove it real,” replied
James; ‘“‘orat any rate, you can be a plain
mechanic like me.”’ ie

Richard shook his head. ‘Too late, too
late,” he cried. “I am dying. I know that is
no dream, and you will find Death real enough
soon. And if I were likely to live, do you
think I could go back home for people to point
at me as the man who tried and failed miser-
ably? Icould never bear it. Far better that
I should die. My talent has paid me no interest,
why should I wish to live?”

It was no time for James to contradict him,
as he lay there so wan and changed, Besides,



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 19

he had nothing but his village experience to set
against his brother’s greater knowledge of the
world, so he was silent, though unconvinced.
But, after the poor remains of his brother
were buried, and tongues which had been silent
while Richard was still alive, were loosed, and
told what his actual mode of life had been, the
village joiner thanked God that he himself was
not tempted by the possession of superior
talents to neglect the common business and
duties of his position. |

And was it wonderful that he returned to his
country home to find it more precious than
ever, and that he thought those humble abilities
which made him a steady, hard-working
mechanic, were preferable to those higher
powers which had proved a snare to his erring
brother ?

But the village folk did not forget their
young genius. They lamented his early death,
and said what he might have done to make
them prouder still had he lived.

Only James Fraser knew all, and mourned
not so much his brother’s early death as his



20 THE TRIALS OF

wasted life. And when, in after days, he mar-
ried, and had children of his own—aye, even
when he called his only son ‘ Richard,”’ after
the dead artist youth, he trembled lest his boy
should display similar talents to produce similar
results.

No one could well understand why James
Fraser shook his head and turned away with a
look of annoyance when his little lad first
began to cut and carve with a pocket-knife, to
the delight and admiration of his mother and
his school-fellows. They could not feel the
spasm that wrung the poor man’s heart when a
neighbour who had been a boyish companion
of that other Richard said, ‘Fraser, your
lad will just be his uncle over again; look
how he is whittling away there, as though
there were no such things as balls or tops in
the world, or at least as if he cared only to cut
them out,”

“May God in mercy forbid,” replied James,
with a shudder, and then, seizing a plane, he
worked away with such good will that the big
drops of perspiration soon stood on his brow.



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 21

His neighbour looked on curiously, then
waited till the sound of the plane ceased, and
Fraser began to make an alteration in the posi-
tion of the plank, when he again spoke. “You
are a queer fellow,” said he. ‘‘Most people
would be proud of that lad, and try to bring
him out, instead of keeping him back. Your
poor brother would have made a grand carver
in wood, and may be in marble, if he had
lived.”

James had ever been too tender over the
memory of him that was gone to make his
faults and failures a subject for village gossip.
Even his own good wife knew them not; for
his mother, now dead, and he, while they min-
gled their tears for the departed, had resolved
that his very weaknesses should be respected.
“He said, ‘Do not let the old neighbours
know,’ and we will not,” was their determina-
tion, and it was faithfully kept.

James turned sharply round to the speaker
who had thus reminded him of the past, and
said, ‘Neither you nor I can tell what my
brother would have been; but, as for. my boy,



22 THE TRIALS OF

I watit him to be just what I am—in trade I
mean. God grant that in all elso he may be a
far better man than his father;’’ and James
lifted his paper cap reverently, and spoke in a
lower tone as he named that Holy Name.
“But I did not mean to speak sharply,” he
added, seeing that his neighbour looked hurt ;
“only I am not a strong man, and, if I should
be taken away from my wife and the little
girls, Richard, as a plain, hard-working lad,
would be a staff for them to lean on; and would
keep a home over their heads. Better be a
home-bird than go flitting the world over to
find a grave among foreigners in a strange
churchyard as the end of it all.”

James Fraser dashed his hand across his
eyes, and then swept the moisture from his
brow also with.his handkerchief. The tone-of
deep feeling with which he spoke moved his
listener far more than sharp words could have
done.

*T don’t wonder at your thinking as you
do, James,” he replied. ‘It was hard for
you. to go and find the lad we had been so



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 23

proud of dying in a strange place; and you
loved one another better than most brothers
do, James.”

‘Aye, lad, we did,” was the answer; and
then the plane moved faster and faster, as
though the worker would force the moisture
from his brow to keep it from flowing out
at his eyes.

“You wish to make your child happy,
James, and to choose that path in life for him
in which he will find the fewest rough places;
but don’t be too hard on the lad, or try to
crush the talent out of him. I take it these
gifts are all from God; and it is neither for
you nor me to presume to say that his was
not bestowed for a wise and good end.”

James looked thoughtful when his friend
made this last remark. ‘‘ Well,” said he, “T
didn’t exactly think of my little lad’s gift in
that light; but, to be sure, how it brings to
mind what I was reading only last night. It
was about the building of Solomon’s temple.
That sort of work seemed, in a way, to be
in my line, though a long way above, in



24 THE TRIALS OF

another sense. However, I have read that
description many a time about the walls of
‘the house carved round about with carved
figures of cherubims, and palm-trees, and
open flowers, within and without;’ and ‘the
doors of olive-tree,’ with carvings of the same
sort, in the wonderful place that was put
together without so much as the sound of
‘hammer, nor axe, nor any tool of iron heard
in the house while it was in building.’ I have
read about it; bit by bit, and then I have
shut my eyes and tried to fancy how the
parts lookedseparate, and then all together;
but I never could do it. I always got be-
wildered, and only came to the conclusion, that
though I call myself a master-man at my |
business, I am only a poor bungler in com-
parison with those men of old.”

James Fraser’s pale face was lighted up
with enthusiasm as he spoke, and, for the
moment, he looked a different individual from
the plodding mechanic who seemed to have
no soul beyond the present homely every-
day work in which he was constantly engaged.



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 25

His neighbour smiled, and gave him a good-
humoured slap across the shoulder. ‘‘ Why,
man,” said he, ‘I believe your boy is not
indebted to his uncle only for that talent of
his. You have the same sort of fire smoulder-
ing in you, only you never will let it break
out. You keep it down with sawdust and
shavings in your country workshop; but, mark
me! these talents are from God.”

“T can think of beautiful things, and love
to see them; but it is the truth that I have
no hand to execute such, and I am content.
I try to do my duty; and if you wish to be
kind, don’t praise and flatter my lad into
thinking he is cleverer than his neighbours.
I was going to say I would give my right
hand, but I want that to work for him and
the rest. Still I would make any sacrifice to
keep him in his own station.”

“Then you wouldn’t like to see your Dick
at work chipping and caiving in the old church
yonder a few years hence?”

“‘T daren’t say that exactly; but I believe
he will not have the chance. The old Squire



26 THE TRIALS OF

is no man to forward such a work, and the
young one has not the chance now.”

“Well, do you think it matters? The God
that heareth prayer will hear and answer
those who worship in sincerity, whether their
hymn of praise be sounded amid the lofty
aisles of a cathedral or under the low roof of
our old church, which is ready to tumble down
almost.”

James threw down his plane. ‘That’s all
right enough; but still it isn’t the only way
one should look at things. It seems to me
that we ought to offer of our best for God’s
service, and that there should be in us some-
thing of that spirit which moved David, as
soon as the Lord had given him rest from
his enemies round about, and made him say,
‘See, now I dwell in a house of cedar, and
the Ark of God dwelleth in curtains.’ I would
like to see rich and poor join together, thank-
ing God that they were esteemed worthy to
help in the adornment of His house; and yet,
when they had done their best to make it worthy
of its sacred purpose, to say in the spirit of the



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 27

builder of the temple, ‘But will God indeed
dwell on the earth? Behold, the heaven and
the heaven of heavens cannot contain Thee!
how much less this house that we have
builded ?’?”

James Fraser’s words, or rather his simple
and. earnest application of the words of Scrip-
ture, had a visible effect on his listener. The
man made a movement of assent, and added,
‘‘T believe you are right after all; but it isn’t
often that folks like us look at things in that
light; though, to be sure, all have the same
interest in them, or ought to have. But I
must go now. Good day; and don’t forget
what I have said about your lad.”

The friendly nod was returned, though no
answer was given to the concluding remark ;
and the man went his way, thinking to him-
self that Fraser was a queer, crotchety fellow,
and that if Dick were jis lad he would sa-
crifice anything to cultivate the boy’s natural
gifts.

And James Fraser was in some degree to
blame. There was no need to grieve that his



28 THE TRIALS OF

boy displayed talent of a peculiar kind, as his
uncle had done before him; it was only to be
reeretted that in the latter it had been buried
and lost.

Yet the father was earnest, very earnest,
in desiring the child’s welfare, and thought
that by discouraging him from exercising his
ingenuity, he was shielding him from tempta-
tion. Many a parent has erred in like manner
out of anxiety for a child’s good; and children
should be slow to think those measures harsh
which, though irksome to them, are never-
theless the fruit of a true regard for their
welfare.



A VILLAGE ARTIST, 29

CHAPTER IT.

THE YOUNG CARVER’S EXPERIMENT, AND HOW
IT SPED.

James Fraser and his neighbour had not
been alone in the workshop while conversing
on the subject mentioned in the last chapter.
Behind a number of flooring-boards, which
were propped: in a sloping position at the
farther end of the workshop, and in a line
with the door, crouched a lad of somewhat
delicate appearance, and with an earnest,
thoughtful countenance. He had not con-
cealed himself for the purpose of listening ;
but it was his fashion to hide behind the
flooring-boards in order that the companions
who came, marbles or ball in hand, to draw
him from his favourite pursuit, might not suc-
ceed in finding him. Busy as usual with his



30 THE TRIALS OF

pocket-knife, the only graving-tool he pos-
sessed, and a bit of hard wood, little Dick
Fraser heeded not what was passing outside
his retreat, until the allusion to his talent for
carving, and his father’s prayer that, it might
not be with him a ruling passion, caused him
to suspend his labours and listen for more.
And the two men, all unconscious of his pre-
sence, talked on.

James Fraser’s back was towards the row
of flooring-boards, or he might have seen a
little figure steal softly from behind them a
few moments after the sound of his neighbour’s
departing footsteps ceased to be heard. The
lad’s cheek had become pale and red by turns,
as his favourite occupation was in turn praised
or blamed. But high above all the rest came
the idea, ‘It is a gift from God. . This power
is a talent, and it ought to be used; even father
himself can’t deny that. The master at school
says our talents should be made to pay interest
to Him who gave them; and must I bury this
one of mine ?”

The lad began to consider from that moment



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 31

how he might use it, and that too with his
father’s consent; and he resolved to give such
a proof, both of his powers and perseverance,
as to win over his parent to sanction the appli-
cation of them as a means of earning a living
when he should be no longer a child.

Four months after Dick accidentally heard
this conversation, he formed the one exception
amongst the swarming schoolboys who rushed
off to play on the common on that afternoon
when I first gave a glimpse of him turning
homewards, instead of joining them in their
sports.

Richard’s companions were not, however,
inclined to let him off so easily. They crowded
round him, one protesting that he never did

‘play a single game now;”

another coaxing
him “just to have a round, instead of going
home directly,” and so on. But Dick made
a motion of refusal, and turned in an opposite
direction, though not until he. had stooped to
pick up something from the ground.

“He has got a new bit to carve,” cried one
of the boys, who was looking most regretfully



32 THE TRIALS OF

after Richard. ‘Il run and see what it is;”
and suiting the action to the word, he bounded
after his schoolfellow, and said, “‘ What
are you going to carve now, Dick? Show
me,”

The boy smiled, and without a word held
out a spray of oak, Such a beautiful piece,
with three or four acorns, and all the leaves
perfect except one, and that was only sufficiently
injured to show off the beauty of the rest more
fully,

‘Oh! what a pretty piece. When shall you
begin?”

“Just now, or at least as soon as I get
home, I have a bit of nice wood that will
just do.”

“YT should think you would always have
plenty of wood to choose from, as your father
has so much,” remarked the other.

“You are mistaken though; father only lets
me have bits that he can make no use of, for he
says I waste wood.”

‘“‘ 7 don’t call it waste though,” replied the
other, looking very wise, and as if he were lay-



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 83

down the law, and could convert Richard’s
father to his opinion with a word or two.

“Tt does not matter what we think, it is
what father thinks; and by his good will T
should never so much as carve a toy for one
of you again.”

‘Well, that is queer! Now I must go
back if you really will not come. Show me
that when you have done it.”

‘To be sure I will,” Richard answered, with
a nod. of the head; and he added, when his
friend was out of hearing, while a look of
satisfaction stole over his face, ‘I have two
or three more bits at home that no one has
seen yet.” :

When he reached home he found the work-
shop vacant; for the master and his workmen,
including the two apprentices, were up at the
Hall, making alterations before the arrival
of the Squire’s only son and heir, who, with
his young wife, was coming to the country for
the shooting season. Indeed, Mr. Frederick
Millman, the young Squire, had already come
down to give orders as to some alterations

o



34 THE TRIALS OF

which he wished to be completed before his
wife’s arrival. |

Little Dick felt pleased at the thought that
for some days to come his father would be so
constantly engaged at the Hall as to leave
him at liberty to pursue his carving unnoticed.
Resolved to make the most of this opportunity,
Richard at once chose from. his little hoard of
wood a piece suitable for his purpose, and set to
work. So intent was he upon reproducing, in an
enduring form, the beautiful spray of oak with
its acorn fruit, that he never heard his mother’s
summons to tea. And, as he sat screened from
view, in his old nook behind the deals, the
good dame never saw her busy son, but mentally
scolded him as a truant who could not leave
his playmates in time for the evening meal.

It was only when the boy heard the return-
ing footsteps of his father that he crept from
his hiding place, and, after surveying his
progress with much satisfaction, put away his
tools and entered the house. He guessed well
that his mother would say nothing about his
absence while his father was there; so, hastily



A VILLAGE ARTIST, 85

swallowing his meal he was soon deep in pre-
paring his lessons for the morrow. But, when
Richard went into his little bed-room that
night, the wood, which already began to bear
some resemblance to the model, was carried
thither also.

Country folk keep early hours, and little
country boys have not generally much chance
of sitting up late in order to indulge their
liking for study or handiwork of any kind.

Richard looked longingly at.the graceful
spray and then at the end of candle, and
wished he could increase the latter to an almost
indefinite length in order that he might have
light to pursue his work through the still hours
of the night. This was, however, impossible,
and a second thought warned him that even
had he the means of continuing his labour he
could not do so undiscovered. It was well for
him that he had not the means of turning the
hours set apart for rest into a time of labour,
for nature, when overtasked, takes revenge
both on mind and body sooner or later. So
Richard could only take one look at his box



36 THE TRIALS OF

of treasures, and was just handling them with
gentle touch and admiring glance when down
popped the end of wick into a pool of grease,
and he was left in darkness to replace his
precious property and grope into bed as best
he might. But with the early dawn he was up
and at work on his oaken spray.

There was a true love of the beautiful in
this lad, for he gazed upon his simple model
as though drinking in its loveliness with his
eager eyes. ‘If I can only copy it exactly,”
he murmured to himself, “the set will be
complete and father must be pleased this time, _
though he never was before.” ‘With renewed
energy he worked until he heard his father
astir and his mother’s voice calling, ‘ Richard,
Richard, it is time to get up.” Then after
briefly comparing his copy with the original,
he went down stairs to’ breakfast. For three
more days the lad laboured thus, devoting
every spare moment—stealing hours from
sleep, denying himself play, and scarcely
giving himself time for meals’ But on the
evening of the third day he looked’ at it with



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 37

beaming eyes and joyful face. It was finished.
And truly as he laid it and the original spray
side by side, it was hard to discover any very
great difference. He had thrown. his whole
soul into the work, and by zeal and patient
labour had attained success. His face was pale
and .his eyes weary, but they were lighted up
by a feeling of natural and entire satisfaction.
But Richard did not spend many moments
in gazing at his finished work. He had
laboured with a particular end in view, te
which this oaken spray was only an auxiliary.
He turned from it, and running quickly to his
bed-room brought down the treasure box
before alluded to, and then taking out its
contents, spread them in order upon his
- father’s bench, having first carefully cleared
away the stray curls of shavings and chisel-
ings of wood which were plentifully strewed
around. Richard’s heart beat loudly, and his
hand trembled as he did it, for this evening
would test the success of an experiment which
had occupied him for several months and cest
him an immense amount of self-denial and



38 THE TRIALS OF

painstaking. And truly Richard had cause to
be proud of his handiwork; for there, upon
the bench, were laid specimens of foliage in
wood, enough to delight any young lover of
art. There was a single leaf of the vast horse-
chestnut—the cone of flowers would have been
too delicate for his yet growing skill—there
was a little sprig of elm, and there were similar
sprays of birch and of walnut. There was the
fir-cone, wonderfully well carved, a sycamore
leaf, and a'sprig of beech, with a nut or two,
which made a pretty companion for his best and
crowning work, the spray of oak. Nor was a
bunch of filberts and its leaf forgotten. “With
true taste the lad grouped the several portions
together, so that they seemed to form one piece,
or rather cluster of foliage, in wood, and then,
hiding behind the flooring boards in his old
corner, he awaited the coming of his father.
Well, he had worked, and now he waited
with throbbing heart and prayerful lips, for
it seemed to him as though on the success of
this scheme would depend his future happi-
ness. But he was very young, and he could



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 39

not see far, or judge for the future, or guess
that just as adim and misty morning is often
the forerunner of a glorious noon, so might the
very clouding of his hopes in early youth be
the presage of a happy manhood. Our bless-
ings would oft lose their charm, and we should
fail to know their value, if we were not pre-
pared for them by previous trial and chastise-
ment, sent in love and mercy.

James Fraser was a first-rate judge of wood,
and possessed, though he was most careful to
hide it, something of that taste which had been
so marked in his unfortunate brother, and
which was now showing itself in his own
child. He was a great admirer of trees, not
merely because as a carpenter and joiner he
could cut them up and use them in his trade,
but because of their majestic beauty and varied
loveliness of form. He was especially fond of
marking their foliage, and many a time had he
unconsciously given little Richard a lesson in
grouping by the artistic way in which he
arranged a few green sprays brought from the
wood at his son’s request, or which he was



49 THE TRIALS OF

accustomed to reach for the lad when they
were out together in the fields during the
summer evenings. The lad had discovered
this hking in his father, and it was in the hope
of gratifying his taste, giving him pleasure and
obtaining leave to pursue his work unchecked,
that he had carved these specimens of foliage
as a surprise.

Richard was still waiting for the appearance
of his father, when he heard a light step ap-
proaching the door of the workshop. It was
that of his sister Margaret. He peeped from
his hiding-place hoping to see her turn back;
‘For,’ thought he, ‘it will spoil all if
Maggie sees the carving, and tells mother or
anybody about it.” But Maggie stepped into
the shop and began looking about for stray
bits of wood for fire-kindling purposes. It was
some consolation to Richard during this time
of suspense to observe that her eyes were
always turned floorwards, and that she
trudged round and round filling her pinafore
and singing as she moved without thinking of
anything but her employment. All at once



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 4]

Maggie found out that stooping continually
made her back ache, and she raised herself
into an erect posture close to the bench on
which lay the carving. Her quick eyes saw it
in a moment, and she exclaimed, ‘‘Oh, how
pretty ! mother, mother!’ she added, intending
to call her mother to look at the pretty things
she had discovered on ‘father’s’? bench.
Fortunately her cry was not heard, and before
she had time to utter another word, Richard
came from his hiding-place and stood before
her. The little girl was so startled at his
sudden appearance that she forgot everything
else for the moment, and thus he gained time
to tell her his project in a few hasty words.
“And now you won’t tell, Maggie, wil
you?” said he, ‘most likely you will all
know about the carving as soon as father
has seen it, and if you tell now you will spoil
everything.”

But Maggie wouldn’t tell. She would have
been very sorry. Quite alarmed at the sight of
her brother’s pale, anxious face, she left hold
of her pinafore and never heeding that all her



42 THE TRIALS OF

fire-wood fell to the ground, she threw her red,
chubby arms round Richard’s neck, gave him a
hearty kiss, and said, ‘‘Dick, don’t look so
frightened. I won’t tell. I wouldn’t for ever
so much.”

Richard heartily returned the little sistex’s
kiss, and said she was a dear, good Maggie.
Then, hearing her father’s step and voice, she
hastily snatched up the bits of wood she had
collected, and scampered off into the house,
while Richard went back to his hiding-place.
The sound of his father’s voice in conversation
was a disappointment to the lad, for it showed
that he was not returning alone. He had in-
tended to watch James Fraser’s face as he
caught sight of the carved foliage, and then to
run from his hiding-place and ask him to accept
it. ‘He must see how hard I have worked,”
said he to himself when he formed this plan.
But now this could not be done. His father
would not be alone when he first saw the fruit
of his son’s labour, and it would be useless for
him to remain concealed. The boy was on the
point of leaving his hiding-place when his



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 43

father entered the shop in company with Mr.
Frederick Millman, the young Squire.

James I'raser and his employer were talking
of the alterations going on at the Hall, and
the joiner, in order to make something plainer,
took up a piece of chalk and advanced to the
bench to make an outline on it in chalk for the
young gentleman’s information. The young
Squire was just at his heels, and both uttered
an exclamation of surprise at the sight which
met their eyes.

‘‘ Why, Fraser,’ exclaimed Mr. Frederick,
‘Cis this your work? What tasteful grouping
and well-executed foliage! Upon my word, it
does the artist credit, whoever he may be. I
had no idea any of our country hands could do
this sort of thing. Is it for sale?”

“Tike yourself, sir, I see it for the first
time,’’? replied Fraser, without showing any
very great satisfaction. Indeed, a sort of
pained expression crossed his face, for in this
new proof of his child’s talent he seemed to
see a fresh temptation to lure the lad from
the path in which he wished to keep him.



44 THE TRIALS OF

‘‘T presume you know whose work this is,
though, Fraser,’ returned the young Squire.
‘“You have, doubtless, a rustic genius among
your workmen.”’

‘‘T don’t think it was done by a man’s hand,
sir.” ;

‘What! is it a woman’s doing? I know
there are and have been female artists, but I
should never expect to find one here,’’ returned
the young man, interrupting the explanation
that Fraser was about to give.

Fraser could not restrain a smile as he replied,

‘‘O dear, no, sir.’ Then turning to his boy,
who stood just where he had been when they
entered, half afraid and altogether too shy to
advance, he said, ‘‘ Richard, come here and tell
us who carved this group of foliage.”
The lad’s voice was scarcely audible as he
answered, ‘‘I did, father,’? in a tone more like
that of a culprit before his judge than of one
who had achieved what was, for his years, a
ereat success, and felt proud of having done
80.

“You! impossible,”’

suid the young Squire,



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 45

‘Why these little sprays, especially the oak
leaves and acorns, are really beautiful. If you
have carved them I—, but no, it cannot be.”’

‘‘Indeed I did, every bit; some at nights
and some in morning's before father and mother
were up,” replied Richard. ‘I finished that
piece of oak this very day. If you don’t
believe me, sir—though father knows I would
not tell you a lie—you may set somebody to
watch me while I cut some more leaves and
things just like these.”’

‘Then all I can say is that your work does
you great credit, and, Fraser, you ought to be
proud of your son, for he has not only an
artist’s talent, but the industry which will enable
him to turn it to good account.”

‘“You are very kind to say so, sir,’’ replied
Fraser; and, in spite of himself, his own face
lighted up with the pride and pleasure he
could not help feeling at hearing his only son
so highly spoken of. He knew, too, that the
young Squire was no mean judge of art, and
that Wellesby Hall had been enriched by a
choice collection of beautiful objects which he



46 THE TRIALS OF

had gathered both in England and abroad.
But by a strong effort Fraser mastered that
first flush of pleasure, and, turning to his
employer, said, ‘‘I dare say you will think me
mistaken in my notions when I tell you that I
would rather see a model door, window, or
even washing-tub made by my son than this
group of foliage which you are pleased to
admire. A thorough workman at my own
honest trade is better than a vagabond ‘ artist,’
as too many call themselves, who are too idle
to work at a homely occupation, and therefore
pretend to be above it.”

Mr. Frederick smiled. ‘In one sense, Fraser,
you may be right. There are many lads who,
from being praised beyond their due and mado
to believe that they are too clever to live in an
every-day world, become fit for none at all.
For my own part I do think that we do as cruel
a thing when we over-praise as by over-censure.
But again, there are others who could succeed,
but fail for lack of the industry that would
have made them great men. Yet when there
is a real talent, no matter for what, so long as



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 47

it can be used for the good of our fellow-men,
I think we have no more right to try to crush
it than the man in the parable had to bury the
one entrusted to him, instead of using it for
the honour and benefit of his Master. Let me
persuade you to cherish the powers your boy
manifests. He who gave it gives nothing in
vain or to be useless.”

While the young gentleman spoke little Dick
listened with kindling eyes and glowing cheek.
Some such thoughts had been in his boyish
mind, though he could not have put them into
words. And he durst not have said them to
his father even had he been able to express
them. Indeed, had any other person spoken as
the Squire did, most likely James Fraser would
have refused to listen. But he being son to
the ‘creat man”’ of the village, owner of all
Wellesby, and the joiner’s landlord besides,
there was nothing for it but to wait patiently
until the young gentleman had said his say,
though he would gladly have sent his son out
of hearing. ‘‘ Now,” he replied, ‘ there’s no
doubt a deal of truth in what you say, sir;



48 THE TRIALS OF

but I stick to my first thought, and shall not
further any of Dick’s fancies about carving. I
wish from my heart he had never tried a thing
of the sort. I would give fifty pounds at this
minute, though I have no such sum to spare,
and should have to work early and late to
make it up again, if I could be quite sure he
would never carve another.”’

Young Millman shook his head. ‘ Well,
well, Fraser, I can only quote the old proverb,
‘A wilful man must have his way.’ Apply
it as you choose. I have no business to
interfere between a father and his child; only
I would gladly have served your son if you
would have let me. I wonder how the carved

’ of ‘cherubims and

work of ‘open flowers,
palm trees’ overlaid with gold, that you and
I have talked about, and which adorned Solo-
mon’s glorious temple, would ever have come
into existence if all fathers had been like you.
They would have sought in vain for ‘all
manner of cunning men for every manner of
work.’ And your lad might have been my
right hand man some day, to help me to restore



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 49

the old church and to execute oak carvings
which should not shame those beautiful frag-
ments which alone are left to tell us what
glorious things were there in bygone times.”’

‘‘T hope my lad will work for you, sir, as my
father laboured for yours before I was born,
and as I do now,” answered Fraser with a
respectful bend of the head.

‘Well, I must have a word with the lad
before we say any more about repairs and
alterations. Now, Richard,’ said he, ad-
dressing the child artist, ‘‘if you want to sell
this group of foliage tell me the price, and I
will buy it of you.”

The boy’s face worked as if moved by some
strong inward feeling, and for a few moments
he was silent, as though, try as he might, his
lips refused to utter a word.

“Do you not know its worth? Then I shall

have to fix it for you,”’

continued the young
gentleman in a pleasant tone, and taking out
his purse as he spoke.

“T don’t want money; I will not sell it,”
cried Richard in an agony of disappointment.

D



50 TUE TRIALS OF

‘IT worked so hard, I got up by daylight for
months and months to c.rve these things be-
cause I thought of surprising father, and pleas-
ing him too, with such a present. And now all
my work is of no use. He does not care for it,
so no one else shall have it.”

Without giving his father or the young
gentleman time to speak again or himself to
think, Richard swept the whole of the carved
foliage from the bench to the floor, and by
stamping upon it with his feet destroyed or
injured in a moment of passion a great part of
the labour of months. Then, bursting into an
agony of weeping, he was about to dart from
the shop without bestowing another glance on
the wreck of all his pains and labour, when he
was stopped by a kind but firm hand from
which he vainly struggled to escape. It was
young Mr. Millman who held him.

James Fraser stood still, but on his face was
a look of pain. In fact, the tears which rolled
in a torrent down litile Richard’s face and the
words which showed how very strong had been
his desire to please his father, had stirred the



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 51

current of paternal love in the man’s heart,
and caused it to well up to his very eyes.
Perhaps it would have been hard to tell which
suffered the most at that moment, the man or
his son.

Finding it was in vain to struggle against the
young gentleman’s firm hold, little Dick at
length ceased his efforts to escape, and stood
quite still, though he sobbed bitterly. For a
little time the sound of his weeping was the
only one that disturbed the quiet of the country
workshop.

Mr. Frederick Millman, though young, was
a sensible and right-minded man. He was far
above the petty feeling which would have been
wounded by Richard’s rejection of his offer, or
which would have sent him away offended on ac-
count of a child’s burst of passion and disrespect-
ful conduct towards himself. So far from con-
sidering himself at all in the matter, the young
man looked below the surface and grieved to
think how deeply both the filial affection and love
of art—so strong in this poor lad’s breast—were
wounded by his father’s harsh reception of his



52 THE TRIALS OF

beautiful offering. During that short pause
the young Squire was considering how he might
best promote a good understanding between
James Fraser and his son. When Richard’s
sobs became less violent he spoke to him in
that low, firm voice, which always commands
the most ready obedience, and desired him
to pick up the broken foliage and place it on
the bench.

The lad obeyed without hesitation. Perhaps,
now, the storm of his passion was over, he
might feel some regret for having so hastily
destroyed what had been with him, in a double
sense, a labour of love. There was even a
gleam of satisfaction on his face as he saw on
raising the oaken spray from the ground that
it had escaped uninjured, though it was the
only one. The young Squire marked this look,
and augured good from it.

When Richard had finished he turned an
imploring face towards him and said, ‘‘ Please,
sir, may I go now?” He was longing to rush
away to weep unseen and unchecked.

‘“Not just yet, Richard,” was the reply.



A VILLAGE ARTIST. D8

“Let us first talk a little as friends, we two,
you know.”

The boy gave an impatient movement, as
though he would escape if he could; but Mr.
Frederick passed his arm round him in a kindly
way, and, with a touch as gentle as a mother
might use when uttering words of advice to her
child, thus detained him. There was something
soothing to the wounded heart in this half-
caressing touch, especially as Richard could not
help bearing in mind the fact that it was the
young Squire, son of the greatest and richest
gentleman in all Wellesby, that thus treated
him. Tears came again, but they were tears of
regret for the passion and ingratitude which
had been his return for the young Squire’s kind
offer. :

‘“My poor boy,” said Mr. Frederick, ‘‘ you
have had a great trial to bear with in the last
half hour, and I feel much for your disappoint-
ment; but I am afraid if you go away without
our talking a little more, you will think I
blame your father and encourage you to do it
also. Then JZ should have more cause to be



54 THE TRIALS OF

sorry, for I should grieve if either word or act
of mine helped to build up a barrier between
father and son. So, before I go, let me tell
you that I believe your father acts in the way
that he thinks the best for you, that he wishes
to guard you from temptation, and has some
good reason for all, which I do not know any
more than you. And it is not always possible
for a father to tell his reasons to his children.
Yet, ef a child can feel that his parent loves him,
labours for him, and tries to make him happy, that
child should trust his parent, even though his own
inclinations are crossed and he knows not why.
You know what God’s Word says, Richard, I
mean about what is the duty of children?”

The young gentleman waited, and Richard
replied in a very low voice, ‘‘‘ Children, obey
your parents in the Lord, for that is right.’ ”’

‘¢ And you are a child, and there stands your
father. Obey and honour him if you would
claim a share in the blessings promised by the
Most High to dutiful children.”

Little Dick Fraser was a boy of noble
thoughts and generous impulses. Without a



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 30

moment’s hesitation he stepped up to his father
—for with him the being convinced that he was
wrong was ever followed by an acknowledgment
of the fault and a petition for forgiveness—and
said, ‘‘ Father, I know you love me. I grieved
you by being in such a passion just now. For-_
give me, father, I wiil try to do as you wish
me.”

Notasyllable about his own bitter disappoint-
ment, his lost labour in the work which lay
half-crushed and scattered on the bench. With
a delicacy that would have done honour to a
hero, the boy refrained from alluding to all his
strivings—vainly pursued—to win a father’s
favour. He simply owned the fault of which
he was conscious, and added to the confession a
promise—which it cost him a great effort to
make—that, for his father’s sake, he would try
to give up his own cherished hopes.

James Fraser dropped the chalk which he
held in his hand, and threw his arms round the
boy. ‘‘My son, my dear Dick,” he exclaimed,
‘‘if ever a father’s prayers deserved an answer
on account of their earnestness, mine will gain



56 THE TRIALS OF

one now as I pray God to bless you and make
your days ‘long in the land.’ ”’

Fraser tried to say more, but he could not.
Strong feeling, which sometimes gives the
power to speak with eloquence, as often takes
it away. |

The young Squire, rejoiced at the success of
his mediation, walked towards the door, and
thus placed the length of the workshop between
himself and the two Frasers, that his presence
might be no check upon them. Soon his atten-
tion was called by the voice of the boy, ‘I
want to beg your pardon now, sir, for having
behaved so badly when you spoke so kindly to
me. JI have nothing to say for myself, only I
hope you will forgive me. Iam sorry for my
anger now.”

‘‘Most freely and willingly, Richard,” re-
plied the young gentleman; ‘‘ but my dear lad,
do not forget who sees and hears us at all times
when you are again tempted to give way to
anger. Better offend all the people in the
world than grieve our Maker by giving way to
sinful passions.’’ Then shaking the boy.kindly



A VILLAGE ARTIST. Or

by the hand, he re-entered the shop and joined
its master.

Richard appeared very anxious to say some-
thing more, and at length, mustering courage,
he picked up the one uninjured bit of carving,
the beautiful spray of oak leaves and acorns,
and offering it to Mr. Frederick, said, ‘‘ Will
you accept this, sir, from me? It is the only
one left whole, and I think it is the best, for I
carved it last. I can’t offer to do you some
more instead of the broken ones, for’’—he tried
hard to say it frmly—‘‘I am going to be a
joiner now.”

“Thank you, Richard, I will keep it for
your sake. It shall lie under a little glass case
in the drawing-room at the Hall, and shall
remind me how much may be done in spite of
all obstacles by perseverance.”

Richard’s face brightened again at these
kind words, far more precious than money
would have been, and with a respectful bow
turned to quit the shop. ‘‘ Another word,”
said Mr. Frederick, stopping him. ‘‘ You say
you are going to be a joiner now, and I com-



58 THE TRIALS OF

mend the self-denial which makes you give up
your own will to your father’s. At the same
time let me say, I think you ought not to bury
your talent; for remember the very rarest gifts
of mind, and the brightest artistic powers, are not
unsuited to pair with the homeliest in the per-
formance of our every-day duties. And Richard,
if you live to be an old man, you will look back
all the more happily on the days of your youth,
if you can reflect that you did not fail in duty
to your father. Good bye for the present.”

The young Squire shook the childish hand
once again, and then Richard left the work-
shop, his heart cheered and lighter that he
had owned his fault, and that in his trial he -
was sure at least of his father’s sympathy and
blessing.



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 59

CHAPTER ITT.

THE FATHER’S REASONS, AND THE WAY IN WHICIL
RICHARD KEPT HIS RESOLUTION.

Mr. Freperick Miriman finished his talk
with James Fraser, and little Dick saw him
start homeward; but he never observed his
father leave the shop. Still he thought he
must have gone out unperceived, for he went to
the door and listened, but heard no movement
within. And James Fraser was rarely within
his workshop without letting his busy hands
give token of his presence. Richard had taken
no small pains to elude his sister Maggie, for
he felt he could not bear any questioning. The
moon was shining in at the latticed windows,
and giving a glitter to the sharp-edged tools
that lay about on the benches, as little Dick
crept softly into the shop to execute a plan he



60 THE TRIALS OF

had formed. He went up to the bench on
which lay the broken carving, and was about
to sweep all the fragments into the empty box
_ that had contained them in their beauty, when
he was startled by seeing his father sitting
with his head leaning on his hands, and appa-
rently in deep thought. ‘I did not know you
were here, father,” said he. _

‘‘That need not frighten you away, Richard,”’
was the reply. ‘I want to talk to you, and so
come and sit beside me here in the moon-
hight.” | 3

Fraser made room for the boy by his side,
and as Richard looked in his face, its ashy
colour made him feel afraid. He had seen hig
father pale before, but never as he did just
then. He tried to think it was the silvery
moonlight which gave his father’s face that
ghastly hue, but in spite of this he felt uneasy,
and whispered, ‘‘ Father, are you ill?”

‘‘T have not been well, but I am better, and
I have a deal to say. You heard the young
Squire’s words about trusting your father, even
though he might cross your inclinations?”



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 61

The boy assented, though his words were
but a faint whisper.

‘And you showed yourself willing. "Well, I
think I understand better than I ever did
before the heart of my only son.” Richard
made no reply this time, but he laid his hand
in that of his father, and the mute pressure of
the two palms said more than speech. ‘ You
shall look into my heart, too, lad, now, and be
told my reasons for so dealing with you. You
have heard me talk about your uncle Richard,
who died young, and was buried among
strangers, but you cannot know how I loved
him. And people have said you are so like
him, as, indeed, you are. Well, the talents
that the folks praised as they now praise
yours, ruined my only brother, and I sought
to save my only son from falling into the same
temptations.”’

Then James Fraser repeated in his child’s
ears all his unfortunate brother’s history, and
ended by saying, ‘‘It is a terrible thing to die
and feel that we can only look back on a
wasted life and talents which have been given



62 THE TRIALS OF

to us in vain. Fearing you, my dear child,
might follow in your uncle’s footsteps, I dis-
couraged your love of carving, and I have now
told you his story which only my mother ever
knew the whole of before. Respect the
memory of your uncle, and do not speak of
the failings of the dead.”’

‘“T will not, father,’ said Richard, much
impressed by his father’s earnestness, and
the evident pain with which he recalled the
history of that dear, dead brother. ‘‘ But,
father,” he added, not quite convinced that
because one had wasted his talent the other
must needs do so, “if I were to labour
and persevere I might succeed, though my
uncle failed. You say that he was not in-
dustrious, and that without hard work no one
can succeed.”’

‘T expected this answer, Richard; but
listen, I have something to tell you about
myself. I amnotastrongman. I never have
been one, and lately I have suffered more than
I can make you understand. But I can tell
you what will be the end of this pain, Richard.



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 65

I shall never live to be old, I may die soon,
and’’—

Here Fraser was interrupted by a great
pitiful cry. He felt the lad’s arms round his
neck and his wet cheek pressed close to his
own while h sobbed out, “Oh, father, to
think I should ever have grieved you.”

“Hush! my boy, my dear boy. It goes
through my heart to tell you, because I know
how hard it is for you to hear. But it is better
that you who are willing to give up your
dearest wish to me should not think that I
cross your hopes because, as your father, I
have the power. You are my only boy, but
there are three girls in the house with your
mother, and Maggie is the eldest and eight
years old. Now, if I should die in a few
years, all these, as well as your mother, would
be left unprovided for, unless you will bend
your whole mind to learning a plain business,
so that you may fill my place and earn a living
for them when Iam gone. It would be a long
while before you could do that in the path you
would have chosen.”’



G-4 THE TRIALS OF

Tt was hard to say whether the lad or his

father was the paler as they sat in the white,
cold moonlight. But Richard’s voice was firm
when he answered, ‘‘I will give all my strength
and will, and try to learn the business for your
sake and theirs.”?’ He pointed to the house
in which were his mother and sisters, as he
spoke, to indicate who ‘‘they’” were. ‘ Thank
you, dear lad; now I shall have an easier mind,”’
was his father’s answer.

‘But, father, are you sure of what you told
me last ?”’? _‘* The doctors all say the same. I
may live a few years, or I may die soon; but
there is no hope of cure or of long life for
me.”

‘Does my mother know ?” inquired Richard,
with faltering voice. ‘No, my boy. No one
at home or near it. The secret is mine and
yours now, and we must keep it between us;
for how could we bear to see your mother
grieving, as she would grieve if she knew?
Better not to make her life a daily dread that
death is on the threshold. Now let us go into
the house.’



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 65

They turned to leave the place; and then —
only did Richard bethink himself of the object
which brought him there. By the light of the
moon he gathered up his broken carving and —
placed the pieces in the box. |

‘¢ Aye, keep them,” said his father; “I am
sorry they are broken.”

“Tf you like, father, but not without, I will
join the pieces together with glue and keep
them to remind me’’—

‘“Of your promise to me, Richard, eh ?”

‘‘ Not that, father,”’ said the boy sadly. ‘I
shall not need anything to remind me of it.
But when I have put these pieces together they
will teach me not to destroy by one moment’s
indulgence in sinful passion the work of
months.”

‘Good. Put it together, Richard, by all
means. Lock the door when you come out of
the shop.”

The father went into the house, and Richard
lingered behind. As soon as the sound of the
closing door told him that he was alone save
for the presence of Him ‘ who never slumbereth

Ei



66 TIE TRIALS OF

nor sleepeth,”’ the boy knelt in his accustomed
place and prayed for strength to perform the
promise he had made. He did not forget to
seek pardon also for his burst of angry passion.

When Richard, after much pains and labour,
had succeeded in joining all the broken frag-
ments of his carved work, he found there was
still something wanting. It was a small bit of
fir with a cone, on which, next to the spray of
oak, he had bestowed the greatest amount of
time and patience. He sought for it on the
bench in the shop, raked over the shavings,
examined all the odds and ends that were
lying about; but still in vain. Neither by
search nor inquiry could he discover the miss-
ing piece; so he was fain to arrange the rest
as well as he could upon a small mahogany
stand which his father made and gave to him
for the purpose.

Richard called his father’s attention to the
deficiency, saying as he did so, ‘It seems J
am to learn another lesson still, that the bad
effects of indulging in evil passion cannot be
quite erased.”



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 67

Years after Richard found that missing frag
ment.

Many visitors to James Fraser’s house saw
and admired the carving after it had been
repaired; but only the boy, his father, and
young Mr. Millman knew its whole history.
Even sister Maggie failed to obtain any in-
formation, though the inquisitive little maiden
tried hard to find out what father said when
he saw Dick’s carving.

But it was remarked that, from that mght,
the ycung carver laid aside his art. His mother
wondered what had come over the lad; his —
schoolfellows asked why he pleased them no
longer with specimens of his handiwork.
Richard’s only answer was, “I am going to
be a joiner; and I will never carve another
bit till I am master of my father’s trade.”

In accordance with this resolution, Richard
began to give up his spare hours to the work-
shop, as though he took as much pride in
using a joiner’s tool as he once did in re-
producing those beautiful objects in wood.
He would stand beside his father in the shop,



68 THE TRIALS OF

and ask him the meaning and purpose of all
he saw there; he would listen when Fraser
gave orders, and accompany him when he
went from home to execute others.

There were some, both boys and older per-
sons, who did not hesitate to taunt Richard,
and say, ‘‘ Well, we thought you were going
to turn out a clever fellow, and be a credit
to us Wellesby folks; and now you are going
to settle down and be a plain mechanic after
all.”

In time, Richard left school, and applied
all his waking hours to work. His mother
wondered at the way in which he and his
father ‘“‘hung together now-a-days ;’”’ for the
two were inseparable. She guessed not the
secret that he carried about with him, or that
any moment a sudden blow might make her
awidow. This knowledge was no light burthen
to lim who bore it. It made him cling more
and more closely to his father. Dreading that
he might not keep him long, Richard seemed
to grudge every moment spent away from him;
and besides, he was in constant terror lest the



A VILLAGE ARTIST. ~ 69

sudden death which threatened his parent
should come upon him when no one was near.

‘Who would have thought,” said a Wel-
lesby wife to her neighbour, as they saw James
Fraser and his son coming home in the evening,
side by side, and the lad bearing the weight of
both sets of tools,—‘‘ Who would have thought
that young Dick Fraser would play ‘shadow’
to his father in yon way. ‘They can’t be
parted.”

From this remark, people learned to call
Richard his father’s ‘‘shadow,”’ until the “sub-
stance”? was no longer left.

Time wore on. Almost before Richard ceased
to be a boy he became a thorough workman.
At seventeen years of age his father said that
Dick’s help was invaluable to him; that it
had improved his means and helped to ex-
tend his business. ‘You are my right hand,
lad,” he said to Richard himself. ‘“T can
trust to you as I would to myself.” And
Richard, when he heard his father say this,
felt rewarded for his daily and hourly sacrifice
offered to filial love.



70 THE TRIALS OF

But the youth had another still holier and
purer source of comfort and encouragement.
He had read about Him of whom the Jews
said, *‘Is not this the carpenter’s son?’ and
who, though He possessed all power and wis-
dom from on high, was yet willing to go down”
unto Nazareth with His reputed father and
lowly mother, and there be ‘subject unto
them’? until ripe manhood, that He might
leave an example to the young of all succeed-
ing ages; that sons might learn from Him,
who was ‘‘meek and lowly of heart,’’ how to
honour father and mother.

Richard Fraser not only read, but strove
to profit by the greatest of all examples, and
said to himself, “If I labour earnestly and
strive to do my duty in my present position,
if I am found faithful now, a time may come
and a way be opened for mo to use those
powers which are lying dormant. I do not
believe that any talent is given for nothing,
or that mine will produce no fruit, though I
cannot at present see how it will be made
fruitful.”



A VILLAGE ARTIST. i

Yet while Richard’s talent was lying still
it was not rusting. Like an article of fur-
niture, which the careful housewife puts aside,
because she deems it too good for every-day
use, yet keeps bright and spotless, and ready.
when wanted, was that talent of which Richard
Fraser denied himself the present exercise,
but kept in good working order. No beau-
tiful object met his view but he noted down
its peculiarities in his memory, with the intent
to turn this mental experience to account at
some future day. Thus he made his memory a
sort of storehouse of beauty, while his hands
fashioned the homeliest articles for domestic
and rustic use. Often, too, he gave these a grace
of form unknown before in his country home,
so that he got the character of being able
to combine usefulness with attractive appear-
ance; and thus he greatly increased the de-
mand for work from his father’s shop.

Many a time, too, did the young Squire,
when down at Wellesby Hall, put his head
in at the door of the joiner’s workshop and
give Richard an encouraging word. ‘It will



2 THE TRIALS OF

all come right some day,’’ he would say. ‘The
good God who gave you powers will bestow on
you the means to use them by-and-by.”’

‘‘Thank you, sir, for all you have said to
cheer and help me on in the path of duty,”
‘Richard would reply. “I am not unhappy
at my present work, for I never regret having
given up something for my father’s sake.”

‘‘T believe you, Richard. ‘A wise son
maketh a glad father;’ and there is true
wisdom in denying ourselves for our parents.”’

Richard had felt the truth of this daily for
years.



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 73

CHAPTER IV.

THE HEAD OF THE FAMILY CUT OFF. STONE IN THE CHURCIHIIYARD.

&

RicHArRD FRASER was just turned eighteen,
and a little brother had been added to his
father’s family when the blow came which
he had so long dreaded. Though himself
but a boy, he must be the prop on which
his. mother must henceforth lean, and stand
in his father’s place with respect to the other
children, the youngest of whom, little George,
was only four years old. The secret which
Richard had borne about with him from almost
childhood was not a secret now; but in place
of that burthen had come this other one cf
managing the business and providing for the
wants of a family.

it chanced that Richard made a most affect-



7% THE TRIALS OF

ing discovery at this time, which did much to
strengthen all his good resolutions with re-
gard to those whom a father had confided to
his care.

On the day of the funeral, the youth found
it would be necessary for him to look in the
desk that had been James Fraser’s, for some
paper of importance. There he found a
little packet, which he opened, and, to his
great surprise, saw the missing fragment of
his last carved work—the bit of fir with
the cone attached to it. There was a little
parchment label tied to the packet, on which
were written, in a tremulous hand, these
words: ‘‘In memory of a talent, which my
beloved son buried for his father’s sake. Sep-
tember 16th, 18—.”

He had long thought he could read that
father’s very heart, but he never before saw
so clearly all the tenderness that had been
in it as now, when the tears welled from his
eyes and hid outward objects from his sight.

Many amongst the villagers now began to
exclaim, ‘‘ What a good thing it is that James



A VILLAGE ARTIST, To

Fraser brought that lad up to his own business.
if he had followed his uncle’s example, he
might have been just beginning to work at
carving instead of being a first-rate joiner;
and then what would have become of the
family ?”

Mr. Frederick Millman, the Squire now,
for the old Squire was dead, called, with his
wife, to comfort Mrs. Fraser and her children.
He had a long quiet talk with Richard in
the workshop, and to him, as the one who
Knew the story of the broken carving, the
young man showed the sprig of fir so long
lost, and told him when and where it was
found. |
The kind Squire was not a little affected,
and as he read the words, ‘“‘In memory of
a talent, which my beloved son buried for
his father’s sake,’ he added aloud, ‘Aye,
buried it is, but not Jost. You will exhume
it, though it may be ‘after many days,’
Richard. In the meanwhile, bide your time
with patience, and work for those who are

ee 55
dee,



76 IEE TRIALS OF

‘It was a trial to me to bury the talent,
sir,’? returned Richard; ‘but who would not
feel rewarded now? I-wish I could make every
lad think as I do at this moment, that a parent’s
blessing and an approving conscience will repay
a child for any amount of self-denial.”

The Squire assented, and then said, ‘ Just
a word about business, Richard. Of course
you will have my work, both at the Hall and
on the estate, as before, and if at any time you
fall short of capital and find your hands tied
for want of money, come to me.”’

Richard thanked the speaker, but he never
had occasion to seek help of the last-named |
kind. God blessed his efforts; the Squire’s
example was followed by the farmers; work
was plentiful, and there was no bench in the
workshop without a busy pair of hands labour-
ing at it with hammer, plane, or chisel, in
young Fraser’s shop. 7

James I*raser had been dead about three
months when one day a block of stone was
brought end placed in a wooden shed that
Richard had built a little way from the larger



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 7

workshop. Then the shed was locked up, and
no person knew why it had been conveyed
thither. Only a workman, who came before
his time one bright summer’s morning, said
that he saw master Richard come out and lock
the door. But after a lapse of months the
block of stone, carefully covered, was. removed
thence again, and taken to the churchyard.

On the next Sabbath, when Mrs. Fraser went
to church, Richard led her to the spot where
his father was buried, and there she saw a
beautifully carved but simple monumental
stone erected to the memory of her husbaud.
Its only ornament was a group of foliage, the
same in outline, but far better executed, than
that boyish work. Only in this the spray of
oak was not wanting, and the fir with its cone
looked as though it had fallen from the rest,
and was lying at a little distance.

The boy had buried his talent for a time eut
of love for his father; the young man now
exhumed it to do honour to that father’s
memory by its exercise.

Mrs. Fraser trembled as she rested on



78 THE TRIALS OF

Richard’s arm, and her tears fell fast while
she looked at his work. She was a homely
body, and not the one to use many words,
except they concerned the spotless cleanliness
of her home and its belongings, or the want of
cleanliness in a neighbour. So even now she
said but little, though her heart was stirred
within her. She only pressed Richard’s arm the
closer and whispered, ‘‘ Hh, lad, thou’rt hee
Thou wert always good to him that’s gone.”’

‘‘And I shall try tobe the same to you,
mother.’’

‘‘But it’s hard, Richard, it’s hard for a lad
like you to have so many cares and to be
slaving for us all. I’m not blind, lad; D’ve
seen more than you thought.”

‘‘ Mother, it?s no slavery to do my best for
you.”?

She shook her head. ‘‘EKh, well. You're
a good lad to say so; but you might have been
something better than a country joiner. It
isn’t the hands that can cut out yon things
that should be making washing troughs for
old wives like me, and doors and windows. for
their husbands.”



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 79

Richard did not like to remind his mother
that it was through the profits of his plain
work that the whole family was supported, or
that in refusing to let him follow his natural
taste, his father had consulted her interests
and those of the younger children. And he
never could tell her that for five years he had
borne about with him the certain knowledge
that his poor father’s life could not be a long
one in the land. He knew that were he to
give her the history of his boyish resolution
she would weep and exclaim, ‘‘To think he
should have trusted a child, such as Dick was
then, with the secret he hid from me!” and
that it would be a cause of grief with her so
long as she lived. Good Mrs. Fraser, like
many another, would make a great trouble of
anything which she fancied showed want of
trust towards herself, and forget, or never
comprehend, that the very hiding of the matter
from her knowledge was done in kindness and
to save her pain of mind.

After Richard and his mother left the
churchyard a group of admiring Wellesby
folk gathered round the monument to examine



8C THE TRIALS OF

the carving. “It is pretty!’ cried one.
‘‘He’s clever to cut stone like that!” ‘He
hasw’t forgotten the old knack with all his
joinering work,” cried others.

Amongst the rest was an old grey-haired
man—the patriarch of the village—whose vene-
rable years and white locks caused him to be
much looked up to by the Wellesby youngsters.
But old Simon Lee did not generally choose to
give an opinion about anything until he was
asked; for he had a great idea of its value and
importance. And the young folks paid much
respect to Simon, who never wanted a staff to
support his aged limbs, because there were
always plenty of young arms ready for him to
lean upon as he walked to and from church
or elsewhere. ‘T'o old Simon, then, one of the
youngsters spoke. ‘¢ Don’t you think, Simon,”’
he said, ‘‘that this is a curious subject to carve
upon a grave-stone? We mostly see urns, or
crosses, or little angels, imstead of leaves and
such things.”

‘‘And then here’s this fir-apple, broken off
fike, and that’s queer, though it 7s pretty.”



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 81

Old Simon drew himself up as straight as he
could, and replied, ‘‘ You see, friends, there be
some things that say what they mean plainly,
and there be some that be signs with the
meaning part hidden. Wasn’t James Fraser a
jomer, eh?”

‘To be sure he was,’? was answered by
all.

‘And what did he use in his work ?”’

‘Why, wood, to be sure.”

‘‘ Ave, wood of different sorts. ‘The elm, the
fir, the beech, the chestnut, the oak, and so on.
And here they are on the stone. They’re the

types of the man’s calling, to be sure. And

5)
that bit of fir gives it a careless look. I expect
he put it down there just as the painters put in
an old tumble-down thatched barn or cottage
into their pictures; though for my part J think
if they copy things, they might as well draw
new houses as old barns.”

A murmur of admiration rose amongst the
little group, the different members of which
paid Simeon many compliments on the wisdom
which had discovered the hidden meaning of

BR



82 THE TRIALS OF

the carving. And ihe old man went homeward
leaning on the arm of one of his young sup-
porters, to whom he said, while a gratified
smile flitted across his aged face, ‘‘ Aye, lad,
they’ll miss old Simon when he’s gone, for all
his hands are past work, and his feet will
hardly support him to church and back.
They'll want the old man’s head sometimes
when it is laid low in the mould.”

But old Simon was not right this time,
though he felt so proud of having interpreted
the meaning of ‘those bits of imitation of
wood.” For though the old have gathered
wisdom as they journeyed through the world,
the best is not always right in his opinion.
And of all the Wellesby people there was only
the Squire who knew the real meaning of the
carving on James Traser’s tombstone, and of
its broken fragment of fir. He could read in it
the loving heart of a dutiful son——a sacred trust
fulfilled, a promise steadily kept.



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 83

CHAPTER Y.

A LITTLE MORE FRUIT FROM THE HIDDEN SEED,

THoven Richard Fraser’s business efforts
were so successful, he had but little leisure
time. His hands were always full, his head
ever at work. Youthful as he was, he held the
place of ‘‘ Master”? in the shop, and, unlike
those who have to labour as journeymen, he
had to think and plan for the morrow when
they had gone to their homes. Thus at twenty-
three years of age Richard had added nothing
to his early carvings. His last executed labour
in that line stood at the head of his father’s
erave. |

His brother, the little George, so young
when his father died, was now nine years old,
and the especial object of the young man’s
affection. One day the little fellow came to



84 THE TRIALS OF —

Richard in great trouble. In his hand lay a
dead canary, which, when living, had been his
only pet, the more precious as it was given by
his elder brother. ‘ Well, Georgy, my man,
what is the matter? Where do those tears
come from?’ asked his brother kindly, on
seeing his sorrowful face.

“Tittle Dick is dead. I found him just now
at the bottom of his cage. And he was not in
want of food or water, because he had plenty
of seed, and his trough was full.”

‘‘We must all die some time, George, and
poor little Dick is like the rest of us, only his
turn has come first. JI am very glad you have
not to reproach yourself for having neglected
or starved your favourite. After all, it is
better you should have to cry over little Dick
than brother Dick, isn’t it?’? returned Richard,
with an affectionate glance at the child who
stood by his side.

‘Yes, oh dear yes! What should we all do
without you, Richard?” replied George, his
round face lengthening at the bare idea of such
a calamity. “‘But I am sorry fer Jim, too,”



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 85

and he passed his hand caressingly over the
dead bird.

‘Let me look at him, and see if I can bring
him to hfe,” said Richard, laying down his
plane and taking up the body of the pretty
favourite.

“You cannot, I know that very well. I only
wish you could.”

Richard stood musingly for a few minutes,
as if considering what he could do to comfort
his little brother. The young man, like all
brave, warm-hearted people, was very tender
to children, and did not laugh at their sorrows,
because he as a grown-up person would have
deemed such a trial a light matter. He knew
that the death of this bird was a real cause of
erief to George, who for three years past had
fed ‘‘ Dick,” and been proud to call him his
own property.

“George,” said he, ‘I bought this bird for
you three years ago, when he was alive, and
now that he is dead I want you to give him
back to me.”

“You shall have him if you like, Richard.



86 THE TRIALS OF

Are you going to have him stuffed? for unless
you do you can’t keep him.”

“That's a good lad. Now, see, IL will put
Dick’s body in a little box, and perhaps you
may meet with him again yet. Don’t cry any
more, and now run away, for I am very busy.” |

The child obeyed, and left Richard to his
work. The young man’s hands moved fast,
but for once his mind did not go with them.
He was thinking how he might give a great
pleasure to his brother, and when he left the
shop that night he carried with him into his
chamber—the same old room in which he
carved the foliage—the small box containing
the body of the dead bird. But he carried
more still. Having carefully selected a piece
of wood and some tools, he took them to the
same place. When all other labours of mind
and body were ended for that night, he took
out the bird, and having suspended it by the
feet by a fine twine from a small nail, he began
to execute the project he had formed. And
this plan was to carve an exact copy of the bird
as it hung.



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 87

At first when Richard commenced, his sole
desire was to please his brother, but by degrees
his old love of art mastered his whole being.
He worked until his light went out,-as it had
done oft before under similar circumstances
during his boyish days. In the early morning
he was again at his self-imposed task, which,
however, he laid aside as soon as the sound of
feet under his window warned him of the
arrival of his workmen, and told him that
labour of a coarser kind awaited him else-
where. It was with just a little regret that he
relinquished the dainty carving, which had
grown so fast under his active fingers.

The work might have been deemed finished
by an uncultivated eye long before Richard
considered it so. He touched it carefully again
and again with his most delicate tools, until
even he was satisfied. Then he mounted it on
a background of ebony, surrounded by a gilded
and grooved rim, covered it with a case of
glass, and the thing was complete. This last
portion of the work was not, however, of iis
own doing. He had to call in the aid of



88 TIIE TRIALS OF

another hand to gild the rim of the wooden
picture. Thus it came to pass that the carved
bird stood for a few hours in the shop window
of the gilder in a large market town three
miles from Wellesby. It was market-day.
The shop was in a very conspicuous place,
and the glance of nearly every passer-by was
arrested by this simple specimen of carved
work. It looked so soft, so real, and yet as a
picture of death—though only that of a bird—
so touching, that the subject in its simplicity
was almost as attractive as the work of art.
Many a gazer entered the shop to ask if it were
for sale, and, if so, its price. But all received
the same answer, ‘‘ No, it is not for sale. It is
only here to have the frame gilded, and will be
sent home this evening.’? And the name of
the artist was revealed to none.

Amongst the gazers and inquirers was Squire
Millman. As he looked at the bird he thought
to himself, ‘‘ How Richard Fraser would like
to see this.’”? On the following day he called
at the joiner’s shop to tell him about this beau-
tiful bit of carving. Richard was in the house,
and thither his visitor followed him. ‘ Fraser,”



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 89

said he, “I saw a beautiful little thing in
Wharton’s shop yesterday. t would have
delighted you I am sure. It was a bit of
carving that would have done honour to any
man that ever handled a—. Why, I de-
clare!’’ exclaimed Mr. Millman, catching sight
of that very identical work standing on a pretty
bracket, also carved, ‘‘ here it is.”’

‘‘ And it is mine—my dead bird that brother
Richard carved, because I was so sorry when
little Dick died. Because he couldn’t bring
him to life again, he made me that beautiful
wooden one instead, and that will never die.”

These words proceeded from Richard’s young
brother, who was too full of delight to be at all
ceremonious, even about addressing the great
man of the village.

‘So itis yours, is it? And it appears your
brother carries out the principle which has
moved him for many a year past. He only
fosters his love for art when it is to make
some one happy who is dear to him, and
crushes it down when it would add to his own
pleasure.” |

“Aye, sir, that’s just it,’’ interposed Dame



90 THE TRIALS OF

Fraser, who stood behind. ‘That lad’s life
has been a constant fight against himself for
the sake of other people. And I’m sure I
often think what he has done for us and how
he is just like a father to the young ones; and
I grieve about it while I am thankful, because
it is such a load for a young man like him to be
saddled with. And Iam part of it, and every
meal I set out on the table I think to myself,
‘Ltichard has slaved for this, and if he hadn’t
been clogged with an old mother and a tribe
of children at her heels he might have been a
gentleman.’ ”’

‘‘Mother, if you would but believe me,”
said Richard.

‘‘ Ye is always telling me, sir, that he never
feels so happy as he does when he thinks he
has been enabled in some way to fill his poor
father’s place, and to be sure he has gained all
for us that poor James used to do, so far as
outside comforts go.”’

‘And don’t you believe him, Mrs. Fraser?
Ido. And TI believe that every one, whether child
or grown-up person, who makes a sacrifice of self



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 9]

for the good of others has his reward. We all
have some cross to bear; and if we endure
earthly trials cheerfully we imitate the best of
all patterns.”

‘Well, Mr. Millman, and I believe him;
and I know he has worked with a right good
will; but I don’t like to think that— But,
deary me, I daren’t say any more, for he won't
have it that he is out of his right place when
he is toiling for us.”

Mr. Millman did not think it well to answer
this speech, as he saw that Richard had no
wish to take praise to himself for having done
his duty. So, addressing little George, he said,
‘“T was going to offer to buy this bird, but as
it is yours I dare not mention such a thing.
However, you will let me bring Mrs. Millman
and her two boys to look at it, will you not?”

To be sure he would, and be very proud
indeed to show his brother’s work, his own
‘‘new little Dick,’ as he called the copy of his
dead canary. But sell it or give it away—
never! Not all the Squire’s sovereigns would
buy it.



Ve)
dD

THE TRIALS OF

Mrs. Millman and her children came in due
time; and not only praised the carved bird,
but presented George with a live canary to
occupy the perch left vacant by the death of
his old pet. And the Squire shook Richard
Iraser’s toil-hardened hand again, and said,
““T wait, feeling certain that your talent will
yet produce great interest, for you have in-
deed been faithful to the trust placed in your
hands.”

The next fruit of Richard Fraser’s skill
was no less beautiful than the one which
preceded it. This was also a dead bird, but
of a larger kind. Squire Millman’s game-
keeper shot a kingfisher, and called at the
joiner’s shop with it in his hand. ‘“ This
would make a pretty thing for you to carve,
Mr. Fraser,” said he; ‘‘ you may have it, if
you like, and either copy it or let it alone.”’

Richard chose to do the former, though it
was during a very busy season, and compelled
him to steal many hours from sleep. But this
time the bird was made pendant from a leafy
spray, Which as far surpassed Richard’s first



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 23

attempts at foliage as does the flowing hand-
writing of the master excel the first efforts at
making pothooks by his child pupil. This
bird called forth as much admiration as the
preceding one when displayed in the gilder’s
window. But Squire Millman did not see it
there. He found it, when quite finished, at
Wellesby Hall, and with it a note from Richard,
begging him to accept it as a token of respect
and gratitude from one who had never forgotten
the kind words and good advice spoken long
ago in the old workshop.

Both My. and Mrs. Millman were delighted
with Richard’s present, and heartily thanked
him for the pains and time he had spent upon
it. And amongst the Squire’s collected treasures
he valued none more than the gift of the
village joiner. Indeed for its own sake it
deserved to be valued, because it was such a
faithful imitation of nature.



94 THE TRIALS OF

CHAPTER: Vi,
‘IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED, TRY AGAIN.”

ANOTHER year passed; and during that
time Richard’s life went on in the old way.
He gave his whole attention to his homely
business; for he found that if he sat up late
and rose so early, his powers, both of mind
and body, were weakened, and he needed
them in their full vigour for his daily work.
Inclination and duty warred together some-
times, but duty proved the victor. When-
ever the young man felt this strife within
him, he looked at the home which held his
mother, and prayed for strength that he
might faithfully keep the promise made in
his boyhood to do the very best in his power
for her and hers.

Just at the end of that year many of the
great people of the county bestirred themselves



A VILLAGE ARTIST. 95

to get up an exhibition of works of art, to
which all England was invited to contribute.
Amongst those who took an active part in
this, was Squire Millman; and he gladly pro-
mised to send for exhibition all that was rare
and beautiful in Wellesby Hall. A number
of gentlemen came by his invitation to assist
him in selecting the most suitable objects.

More than one of these visitors cast his eye
admiringly on the carved kingfisher, and sug-
gested that it should go to the exhibition.
But the Squire demurred, saying he must
ask the artist’s leave first, and then he led
his guests to see the glorious oak carvings
in Wellesby Church. How they did exclaim,
to be sure! How they praised the beauty
of what were left, and grieved that profane
hands had destroyed so great a portion. And
then they told Squire Millman that he should
devote a part of his means to the restoration
of this old temple.

The Squire answered, with a smile, that
it had been one of his boyish dreams, and
that he hoped to see it a reality before long.

‘And the man that carved the bird yonder



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acf77defd3eaef8380ac1ed77f794bb2f59667ff
'2012-05-09T08:11:26-04:00'
describe
'21620' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWNV' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
90ee01fc485be1ce957275c2df2357b4
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describe
'192744' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWNW' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
8ba801fcee03f2afd695a930003bbacf
27a58f75b4b16485e81218cb064bdff20aada802
'2012-05-09T08:10:02-04:00'
describe
'53265' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWNX' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
98b5c11445786c891196961f811d969b
db274eb5bdf151d5f4c589030d17c17d4d04150c
'2012-05-09T08:08:48-04:00'
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWNY' 'sip-files00008.pro'
ff21015fa23c927bc34430c8a3fed0f8
258c775da8627629ec5e147eec8073bdf41469c0
'2012-05-09T08:11:36-04:00'
describe
'23054' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWNZ' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
f545f831b1d5302cf1b0e8329bf9567f
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'2012-05-09T08:09:57-04:00'
describe
'1559040' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOA' 'sip-files00008.tif'
0fd8f5b74ee8606d095a78401e1eb074
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'2012-05-09T08:07:26-04:00'
describe
'137' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOB' 'sip-files00008.txt'
1bece2f7510d006d0ba49d268c8b91b1
105372c7eb26b7f957062940ba75e472197310f4
'2012-05-09T08:09:29-04:00'
describe
'18728' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOC' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
1a3bc3682bebf5008cbd298a5febaab5
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'2012-05-09T08:10:43-04:00'
describe
'201071' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOD' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
6e42dec985ab351ccb284c6fcb238766
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'2012-05-09T08:10:15-04:00'
describe
'101183' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOE' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
f1c37eb8b2efb98b426947703fb9a94e
c7a7218f1b23dc4bc06b8616645c6b1e4fbf5575
'2012-05-09T08:10:53-04:00'
describe
'16512' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOF' 'sip-files00009.pro'
42f0602fe1cd179de6c25c93deeb4d29
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describe
'1626288' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOG' 'sip-files00009.tif'
ac94d6659a90b44a47ee9194eace142f
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'2012-05-09T08:08:03-04:00'
describe
'807' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOH' 'sip-files00009.txt'
7715285378ed40d44652ceec2c872777
015632d9f3bb1c8498e46870fa6230facafbc4cb
'2012-05-09T08:07:02-04:00'
describe
'24695' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOI' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
57801d78ee142bbe6f66a4b88b191910
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describe
'204726' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOJ' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
844c370e6dd2e80fb6e23b7b34844571
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'2012-05-09T08:07:44-04:00'
describe
'47251' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOK' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
45a320cfe8cb06ce7577837777b32c36
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'2012-05-09T08:11:06-04:00'
describe
'22136' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOL' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
cca443d4113d299fb56c6a276b72e9ff
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'2012-05-09T08:10:56-04:00'
describe
'1655984' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOM' 'sip-files00010.tif'
83e252394549d41307fbf085607ce67c
a47154e7193b8d502c7eda398e5671388893454e
'2012-05-09T08:12:18-04:00'
describe
'18498' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWON' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
f63f19508df594c4d49a8a4bf2486d88
c6070c6edca46d53ed8142f0d3ae33d87fdfb0d2
'2012-05-09T08:07:08-04:00'
describe
'203664' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOO' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
c758c25c1bad32bb494d2beab88d9ff6
cd9bbd3959a49161581e5be72fe505f16a332278
'2012-05-09T08:08:47-04:00'
describe
'140915' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOP' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
fd997228e520bf9947407d746ec184e6
150af590558342c64d5ea64395625ffbdf2dc8c6
'2012-05-09T08:09:35-04:00'
describe
'17575' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOQ' 'sip-files00011.pro'
05bd7977e26edebffaa0bd67cd8084d8
280a91bfdbe2f46415e9d7952af938d59bc26b50
'2012-05-09T08:07:29-04:00'
describe
'59513' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOR' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
548b076be26a2a287198fb9fdad38162
b46667c4a9bdb63697f19571945e985a0687c4ab
'2012-05-09T08:08:52-04:00'
describe
'1651616' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOS' 'sip-files00011.tif'
ff18559c1d6f7a59c488837feef15350
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describe
'757' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOT' 'sip-files00011.txt'
dc1b90d391d7ce3c20a7530832707ac5
2ed6c12f28f182368d4aa9a76f3fd2c052649905
describe
'31218' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOU' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
901f33146d7dd3de6cb17c93ef84d5f6
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'2012-05-09T08:06:49-04:00'
describe
'174705' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOV' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
457e8644dd06b00f0f985a7d6fcb0125
e03027603bafcc068372a56ad3e5a109b5fa58ff
'2012-05-09T08:11:54-04:00'
describe
'27869' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOW' 'sip-files00012.pro'
6544461649d3ab94179789297634aed7
c3246fc3f2131160151e0a7169321f0df0bdfbcf
'2012-05-09T08:09:58-04:00'
describe
'67074' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOX' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
9f8e98a5d411e81d7bfa22ee2fcf1cfb
50b5d7580a43a62aec1d30c2f6fbe43d8fd68d65
'2012-05-09T08:07:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOY' 'sip-files00012.tif'
241a69f3276bde094dc5e46d3ef75f33
33518e88ca09bcde2671bca64a77e6748ed6a31c
'2012-05-09T08:10:30-04:00'
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWOZ' 'sip-files00012.txt'
0ea29bdc619d1c766e3e73fdcd7040eb
cce0ce9cf732f861b8debe355744f381770dd715
'2012-05-09T08:07:45-04:00'
describe
'28961' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPA' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
6fbd6b4ebad0fb795f436de4ad470015
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'2012-05-09T08:09:24-04:00'
describe
'199111' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPB' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
6e0407f5b005d0ec6deb4351af3aaa7e
ce6e4467f5bc6efda34d1538e5b1a62dd55f2d6c
'2012-05-09T08:12:27-04:00'
describe
'171615' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPC' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
5f0433a98e2ab43f11d8480573d4c70f
327d2885e0e14aeb1ec0764fd82a6e834ef08c0b
'2012-05-09T08:12:10-04:00'
describe
'25669' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPD' 'sip-files00013.pro'
e601f8732c098eca6c85e3156dafccae
d05c74eca891903a54c40b4a75f0101c1d362ad7
'2012-05-09T08:07:27-04:00'
describe
'61500' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPE' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
7be3e76f6dacea6aa85b182c1e15bbf2
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'2012-05-09T08:08:46-04:00'
describe
'1609972' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPF' 'sip-files00013.tif'
8151cf67fa03c02332b6de51dc739458
2cd2848f31374185d6c52a3d7f244e8047e1331e
'2012-05-09T08:09:09-04:00'
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPG' 'sip-files00013.txt'
d408f2521d369b3082563aec098f1e0d
a74bae69ddfbfa3db9a082183e9a10a1609e3448
'2012-05-09T08:09:07-04:00'
describe
'29082' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPH' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
e549d757965ac1f28097465d80ecc1ce
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'2012-05-09T08:06:55-04:00'
describe
'208386' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPI' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
9487ec7be2c04020b34913e72a52d29e
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describe
'167387' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPJ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
5fe5c1bfb09516842be75c754949457b
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'2012-05-09T08:12:05-04:00'
describe
'26424' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPK' 'sip-files00014.pro'
b8759ed3f3a26d4e81e9cc99bf7d8788
934b2840bbe1268eb2eb950d0090076232bbf138
'2012-05-09T08:07:56-04:00'
describe
'1582248' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPL' 'sip-files00005.tif'
cb357e1ddae95f317a9586f2f332785c
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'2012-05-09T08:07:24-04:00'
describe
'197890' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPM' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
8dec55adce2463ee0d2b49ee3b9dfbdd
f1886bcfc48920337f76cbd1eb3abe051573e014
'2012-05-09T08:11:55-04:00'
describe
'41898' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPN' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
50081dcd00538926d62487d8c3c49b96
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'2012-05-09T08:08:25-04:00'
describe
'203586' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPO' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
3f7c07b8fbf6365ce9f6c64868f8278e
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'2012-05-09T08:09:56-04:00'
describe
'65305' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPP' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
5852663d0deabf72fb89709c7c5b5fde
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describe
'163126' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPQ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
9c12c5090e285265210dc1642a97f032
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describe
'1695512' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPR' 'sip-files00021.tif'
9a35a059965a2fc07362efdfb874acc7
2b33a225f17d0ba6463f02abb24d8bb318520bda
'2012-05-09T08:12:17-04:00'
describe
'28378' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPS' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
0b5c664c57911a4ac015ac52f7b7566f
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'2012-05-09T08:09:25-04:00'
describe
'25695' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPT' 'sip-files00026.pro'
4f7ce781f1efc0cd9a79cee9dd5d46a3
41adf1256c8bd48f7ba1916a7e38e1e008dcd0bf
'2012-05-09T08:10:25-04:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPU' 'sip-files00028.txt'
bb9882f89501d324ddc5c6dd1a4ca695
7941d80c118ab5346f09b3d25ff894e323c0d06c
'2012-05-09T08:12:20-04:00'
describe
'194929' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPV' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
d1c80c6b99a55f0f82fb0854dd04e362
3d0c1a92a0c09c5a8018019217f39fcac15c3414
'2012-05-09T08:09:20-04:00'
describe
'56170' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPW' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
109a689c7801632c984d013e32f02405
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'2012-05-09T08:09:06-04:00'
describe
'165888' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPX' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
2399c5c97560adf07c9ae05ca4f56c04
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describe
'1629064' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPY' 'sip-files00040.tif'
99340193bbd6693aab0144564cc247d8
7950fe631a1bcfc477572e3e01736221c1458399
describe
'30372' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWPZ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
e2b2af9f44483284c2eeb1a4425fe77b
c34c29e9efae09d71961f7930e427b653e92259f
describe
'1683868' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQA' 'sip-files00014.tif'
b43a497874a95a439496229b6db82abb
fff41f058640300ff1edec055ba48b3762f6e77c
'2012-05-09T08:08:44-04:00'
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQB' 'sip-files00014.txt'
cfedcec837dcbf04b724949b74aff453
6c184c1368d4a273273a01d98e39b4c09d014c87
'2012-05-09T08:11:18-04:00'
describe
'28809' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQC' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
839fee7ac27d5474432a80b9cb26ac0c
387a98b70c8e418f60878ced6867bfe0b4ee6d4e
'2012-05-09T08:11:58-04:00'
describe
'197310' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQD' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
d98f7c81d572d1b170fe5f253d04958e
c1752ece1f32212a65ca7cb84bc86f21a8812c06
'2012-05-09T08:11:41-04:00'
describe
'161283' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQE' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
4576b4a1b1b78d7287cd5ee348ab238b
073bae31507602f4a2048f41f3920a456c5a6ef4
describe
'24667' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQF' 'sip-files00015.pro'
ab6ae2918b83127309267f47615a305b
4fd269031977843f6efd66f2e661b6b3f7fcb21c
'2012-05-09T08:07:54-04:00'
describe
'68984' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQG' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
446182713f90bc81fd4c74afef87304f
0b7fe1222add4ced9c5b3d09a51f333a0dc20dfe
'2012-05-09T08:11:24-04:00'
describe
'1595644' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQH' 'sip-files00015.tif'
9d72b4b5c4de83bdffac96735db6240a
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'2012-05-09T08:09:51-04:00'
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQI' 'sip-files00015.txt'
d206e1842cebe12882791cb34663b619
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'2012-05-09T08:11:34-04:00'
describe
'28688' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQJ' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
5ed266e9cc334a492296ece88dabd904
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'2012-05-09T08:11:11-04:00'
describe
'206325' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQK' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
84fb49255526fdc0cd53ccea16745735
4172cb817e350b1b2c5cdb95e43a5f51ea07e6ee
'2012-05-09T08:06:52-04:00'
describe
'173958' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQL' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
0a41061bdf98d7173f7248d06cfc053d
e065754ca5c1d13528751b252c8c18e599935df1
'2012-05-09T08:10:17-04:00'
describe
'26936' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQM' 'sip-files00016.pro'
947c90ef73e93d4939583510cee22832
122cf4ce9bf3893d50898fd7685d6e82958f89de
'2012-05-09T08:12:21-04:00'
describe
'65687' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQN' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
0ae349a68c339e8ee397886ea116b1d7
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describe
'1668036' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQO' 'sip-files00016.tif'
a2b75906250f459bcd24de7d30e6c682
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'2012-05-09T08:10:42-04:00'
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQP' 'sip-files00016.txt'
027f7422c07aef33720f9dab28a13bc5
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'2012-05-09T08:09:44-04:00'
describe
'28984' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQQ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
3be52fc302384ed5a9bbd35ba3fa6adc
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'2012-05-09T08:09:36-04:00'
describe
'207144' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQR' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
a0da632494716e306430659c0d1794d2
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describe
'176483' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQS' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
2074cd29a69ec440d3dae3b9d9cdbefa
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'2012-05-09T08:11:32-04:00'
describe
'25803' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQT' 'sip-files00017.pro'
425085ae09264fc46ff03548be84d2fe
bf75a630c5b39bfc547d942aa495e8f316109ea6
'2012-05-09T08:08:35-04:00'
describe
'67146' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQU' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
bd488f6a0666d0220a186896fd4f917d
e5c72f77e90af4f3fde4b25b42743ac2b9769350
'2012-05-09T08:08:27-04:00'
describe
'1674476' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQV' 'sip-files00017.tif'
c0bdc21072742c86c53451e0899aef6f
6fea8a8ee5627a53a84357c244510cc4d3b2ae5c
'2012-05-09T08:11:35-04:00'
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQW' 'sip-files00017.txt'
0018ad2498c482951dcd9b4a110bd497
f2ccf5b7bfb5e6e815f3173999022a76bd37e7ae
describe
'29468' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQX' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
dc3174934606a2c0d04354e80378e4fe
c79ad604a0e00c522ccdf6dd22a998e69fbb91e3
'2012-05-09T08:08:14-04:00'
describe
'205388' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQY' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
59e6d4aac0a83fa06cde9d93b492c531
44de06ca3ed02aa75f36008cb4591c9e46ebffe8
'2012-05-09T08:07:19-04:00'
describe
'170613' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWQZ' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
f77314c00a7b1578823356ec5a1fe0f3
43bc7d6d7d5e623c98332fac6872a9e68f2025f6
'2012-05-09T08:08:39-04:00'
describe
'28183' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRA' 'sip-files00018.pro'
cfdb6f3fe3de6127ea67fe059254f3a3
07650d984b929d2e41b6dc8a58343a5f7138da08
'2012-05-09T08:12:13-04:00'
describe
'67317' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRB' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
6e38083159e70d958b17779960b11741
e2bac690961a38ca853945b95d50bacdad029a23
'2012-05-09T08:10:27-04:00'
describe
'1659904' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRC' 'sip-files00018.tif'
3ad8b2f0f36b4b842509d67604df214f
06ba971b1faa27579480da1e39099bc9f95c2a44
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRD' 'sip-files00018.txt'
d4f16a4e8ef9e2e2d7fb89e7182c4d08
7ecb8516f46d55c252980aeabb4485401f9aa77e
'2012-05-09T08:10:55-04:00'
describe
'29591' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRE' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
7e32e6ac682c8cae85ea422fd8edb3d4
530a439cabcbf6fc6b5baa1a69cdf536dc0470be
'2012-05-09T08:08:16-04:00'
describe
'206107' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRF' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
19ea02a248571ec4990f254d7309bd58
42df63f1f5dca14a16259acd133176ef86676b69
'2012-05-09T08:07:15-04:00'
describe
'25975' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRG' 'sip-files00019.pro'
183e634a4a0131e16b5ede1932e8cd13
dce9203801698fb9e624388edb8f11b0c6c9b4fe
'2012-05-09T08:08:09-04:00'
describe
'64163' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRH' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
c4596c84645c77364c95d758e9b26c7e
dc2d67d59436082c1e01a88b3e2edef439d72603
'2012-05-09T08:07:17-04:00'
describe
'1666284' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRI' 'sip-files00019.tif'
f43646f0a051274129a5734c15de476f
c871fb7472cabc1530dd3094fa7f83a5ae117a7e
'2012-05-09T08:11:19-04:00'
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRJ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
16d60dffaeb9f19a4bdf5f50e5e14d92
86c2fec62fbb55ec56b465508f6fd4ed08962d8e
'2012-05-09T08:09:08-04:00'
describe
'28654' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRK' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
04556ee0bdb9f4c524ca9dc3a044ef9c
063a11ec001f375e83fe827adbd4ebf22387e0cf
'2012-05-09T08:08:04-04:00'
describe
'202634' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRL' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
d130cda65e8a7d883092559a31b6f294
5cb14cf533b938233b0ff06dea88c1928e22cd36
'2012-05-09T08:11:57-04:00'
describe
'167739' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRM' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
5cb6e2e74fa8da44ee5d1e4be6199333
4b4d610a6b9eb54ebcf5fda6f83d90af91f27af9
'2012-05-09T08:11:52-04:00'
describe
'25256' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRN' 'sip-files00020.pro'
c3f4604ce7bdb3b501983b09757796de
0ae5f033945c7980557aa82640d35b6471bc0f42
'2012-05-09T08:12:11-04:00'
describe
'64986' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRO' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
98d218dea730cbb18bb09ccae309ac2d
3b77cf497c47f942df0a1a4e54f93673066e51d9
'2012-05-09T08:09:45-04:00'
describe
'1638220' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRP' 'sip-files00020.tif'
788014fc0c7efbff131fdc89acac6417
8f50ff2ae5e9eae031f066903480c79672df82f4
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRQ' 'sip-files00020.txt'
1f536ba2c7e348eb9ac3b414e3391afe
dc5abf30ce02772fcc08227ad8307860a5418e94
describe
'29772' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRR' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
07387f319a30884e9b476eede61c0b90
c9b1cc8badf35b20659259400b2635ee0b767480
'2012-05-09T08:06:53-04:00'
describe
'209817' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRS' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
87d6520e7def14fc7ab5c5c9ae1396ec
7f197d4e4677c38584dc5844f0ba9be2f2a5a6aa
'2012-05-09T08:09:21-04:00'
describe
'169466' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRT' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
8c311db5576a0385c7dd78cbdefb5cd3
7a113d305a42fc87f3d51b3f869a7291b12a7f8d
'2012-05-09T08:07:05-04:00'
describe
'26798' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRU' 'sip-files00021.pro'
7486f833adfdbdff97badc976b81d99d
0b73f41e9c9d918d6b820d5c3e6ddb4b20829936
'2012-05-09T08:08:30-04:00'
describe
'63156' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRV' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
6a5cd2596cd0b5d88d96ca92ff20ad2b
d6e580be38681f3d8e95b660692e21f4c474bc3a
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRW' 'sip-files00021.txt'
c8fdb7371bfd3c771f4e271efb89a1c9
92bde664cf1146693b673f65110faa333862884c
'2012-05-09T08:07:13-04:00'
describe
'28643' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRX' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
af819fa06f936da530e1cd77054fa487
5f28b7567eb70539e33872f7cb17dec839cfe5b9
'2012-05-09T08:11:23-04:00'
describe
'815648' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRY' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
0520f795e18ff6a440a85b9f6d0313dd
a52fcd1573efce1875e9924ca422735ba7083749
'2012-05-09T08:11:56-04:00'
describe
'162910' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWRZ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
4ef3d280ffbe4831d8b186fb4c8f166b
ebae48d0613f07d0c7008ba5f43323bc2802525e
'2012-05-09T08:11:01-04:00'
describe
'26246' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSA' 'sip-files00022.pro'
ac33724ea10289ea09514fd7016118c1
0057f2ef9e5ca23a79ce229b6e2bdef7489cbd6d
describe
'64305' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSB' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
6e3376ffca8f1b996be4eaf365dc4d8b
c1fa98abcf73e8304554d50f6cbe7ed468a38c83
describe
'6542156' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSC' 'sip-files00022.tif'
7d8ea07b24a6e16f36559e2650174b56
971d1f7e471f1afb14e55698f5f1ebb3639cdb40
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSD' 'sip-files00022.txt'
17d6c2289c7672c28f58c4a761fd6063
bf6e5211597074336517fbcab0998efbf666c32a
'2012-05-09T08:10:29-04:00'
describe
'29121' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSE' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
a32bd919d0610c7e52a2b180c8c2cfcf
8a247a4fae2a682b1fbd3fbb567f92519047ab48
describe
'827874' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSF' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
96d19307792f9975608868a12cc353f3
d4503d12da2286353c7d86ca0890a28d0a5da2d9
describe
'154396' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSG' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
bc91c601691c6e114b09b62267ff441a
5eeb3712da27b0ca895efffa9b57dda6700d2a80
'2012-05-09T08:10:08-04:00'
describe
'25932' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSH' 'sip-files00023.pro'
4ab69ca36aab637b7597bf167aca301c
f995d7a1fd8d60484a4cf412fadc4293ea256b24
'2012-05-09T08:08:12-04:00'
describe
'60841' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSI' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
300efb7c52e4a2030b64e67772cdd39c
b9625feb04e28f7ffbde6d35b144832b29273a90
'2012-05-09T08:12:02-04:00'
describe
'6639856' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSJ' 'sip-files00023.tif'
7dbc2e602b84ccc20c7da2e5a5ef833c
7d4269b244f9eda3b3aecbe62dea29ee46d87b24
'2012-05-09T08:07:07-04:00'
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSK' 'sip-files00023.txt'
0fbafcdac1f81b538f33b04c99610293
4c87fd2556747fce5dd1ff6ac785ba4bde0c9dbe
'2012-05-09T08:08:31-04:00'
describe
'208115' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSL' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
5dc76c43a1b931a4f6897c95fc305d0b
a72958cf8b984bbc18697f2754ee9e0ccedc04f9
'2012-05-09T08:10:20-04:00'
describe
'175185' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSM' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
0c6dd96f038f79561e6450a36c171464
bf66b9b032b030df83328a04b7a240273878411f
'2012-05-09T08:07:55-04:00'
describe
'25896' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSN' 'sip-files00024.pro'
1543f6989d8faf3222108d236e52916d
93def6a2caa075b7f8d5468173a523cf7d6af4e9
describe
'64611' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSO' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
d7480a55a5cc540a457c7d12dfc78bca
5d4a3d52de74510cbc529d69b05514bc7538a64c
describe
'1682076' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSP' 'sip-files00024.tif'
0114dca1fbb5059f2462e747fae9b440
178a3678fd3da50951282677aef4f65ecd76630f
'2012-05-09T08:07:34-04:00'
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSQ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
32ce0a688bb246dc99783cf02d7e0512
e8589ebbc88bf9585b37142dbdda2a743590c337
'2012-05-09T08:08:17-04:00'
describe
'28193' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSR' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
1dfe7ece4a8aad9dd00dd5dcf67d4965
d13c18712eaeeae94d989c6bd49e10b4dae46560
'2012-05-09T08:10:45-04:00'
describe
'203545' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSS' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
30432ba77af682373930f673fcf2bd20
dc9067ddf645f8cc3dd6795c0c8b2334d58d69de
'2012-05-09T08:10:09-04:00'
describe
'167483' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWST' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
7167f60d0a1306e3bc8d54e5e09f4c2a
4b7a11c3cb1d8876024d9f50cd4e3fafb1bdb10e
describe
'25905' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSU' 'sip-files00025.pro'
9fd8b54a00da0276a67e1399ee4cdcd7
f63f097c99fa6bce12e89840cd50e315a823d9f7
'2012-05-09T08:12:14-04:00'
describe
'63768' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSV' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
297e4f643a57df480fbc3254b71a6e9e
db9e8d32dfbd2396a36cfdfd1a0c88b10a1109e4
'2012-05-09T08:12:09-04:00'
describe
'1645524' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSW' 'sip-files00025.tif'
85a95d46f713d3c0b9d67948443b6ad7
40fe2603951db247c834e2f9f1ba63b32d3f679a
'2012-05-09T08:07:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSX' 'sip-files00025.txt'
f9b9c53220af48f16b6f48c6856770cd
6cc022eb3d6dc0337ad468e7119c5ba57bf731b4
'2012-05-09T08:07:35-04:00'
describe
'28023' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSY' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
e2eab2b7e3005f4f21d6de610cc57ee5
67f4120fbac6f33854fce68a91983ea6bf358793
'2012-05-09T08:08:38-04:00'
describe
'204378' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWSZ' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
6b0e8cfac1fc792fe79e3f6c6bf4739b
1bebf58dd1fba29b8c5707dfb0b4eabbe9a86333
'2012-05-09T08:09:03-04:00'
describe
'164880' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTA' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
0baae01129fbb0388010069c7778fef6
5aa86ee3ab4e1363fffa99c7ffafc45b37901428
'2012-05-09T08:12:31-04:00'
describe
'66121' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTB' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
aa1204b2bc50c24c03ec173c7d27275f
e697f3e98fe7e48ed9eee7eb584865a1c440feb3
describe
'1651824' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTC' 'sip-files00026.tif'
0118734f7f1cc69582cb5d27bb32ad82
4fab580c4eb368903744df16f657c8e7d36108a7
'2012-05-09T08:07:30-04:00'
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTD' 'sip-files00026.txt'
9b83507f579d92a2b4b2e95df481ae64
7612729751f6a71b444a21e39ba2714c0058ad6c
'2012-05-09T08:12:23-04:00'
describe
'28601' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTE' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
4f9cb4fd67251dea901123fc9abf3e54
6f0e55350e34755e7b3cac826c2da9e90c2a591d
describe
'203944' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTF' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
9c7ce5089e8f9f745399c8fb4b235079
905dfa06c353437e51c6c1e4fddadf8fe3cc11f0
'2012-05-09T08:08:07-04:00'
describe
'164882' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTG' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
904ad8c85c49a114fc1c70382aa36995
036917aab7578a0ed8c084516b02fbf3539d130a
'2012-05-09T08:07:58-04:00'
describe
'24954' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTH' 'sip-files00027.pro'
38a3273c602ec482f96f3f1a74ce6ccc
08a0a124a71b25cb50b40493051861bcfb5c572e
'2012-05-09T08:10:03-04:00'
describe
'64037' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTI' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
af1d436ecbeae2423de4f5d94d8096e2
8fd5db06c535d459c29a0e0353d72786ca28c71b
'2012-05-09T08:11:20-04:00'
describe
'1648588' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTJ' 'sip-files00027.tif'
6c3d75a6879190210ec018b237df8a25
04ba16576f6bc10e72f07a0c8c622304b2ce37d9
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTK' 'sip-files00027.txt'
7ff495c6343aa5a236685f59eb78cc11
53c41fb172cd4384d3b5167d0606da0e8fb9f9df
'2012-05-09T08:10:24-04:00'
describe
'28881' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTL' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
70e139abec16b94449b12a2aca2b3851
eea7c53a10889036fa38bc31ad0171e2f7206646
'2012-05-09T08:06:56-04:00'
describe
'199783' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTM' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
afb66eb5dd317caf0edb402dbcc6b129
bd6f96c77e29054fd82df9f5c14412cf2d5d62d7
describe
'176948' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTN' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
5821b9468cb2aadaae4814a0fd93b4c2
4aecf6eb4f3e409bb813dfedcf90bb4f1cbb2c37
describe
'26141' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTO' 'sip-files00028.pro'
046422571f51f113900cc580f5cd9ef7
e4aa48dd2bb6f3d00d7c6f1bbfd0d8cf10f761de
'2012-05-09T08:09:33-04:00'
describe
'61860' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTP' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
07e077d6fceb0e290765d40692a31cbe
d0c7f42c1afcaed886e4900a1626dc243c961dc0
'2012-05-09T08:10:37-04:00'
describe
'1615596' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTQ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
29bfa7db654be4d3127352bcf1031b1e
49da250dc4608c181c78789bf0493d486f145f79
'2012-05-09T08:11:12-04:00'
describe
'29366' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTR' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
2c114a1124a1afc4b030a88c980220bb
1223787aef88918d4573c001ce79920f44195b62
describe
'192272' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTS' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
52cc0180e56c1821d6aba5de4fb5c9de
b09ef495cce2fcff0794c342f9ded78b3c8f3e54
describe
'167436' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTT' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
80978fd76db26641f10ff6fb5755689e
b3f34f716effa237747f6c6b72c943a1d2ecc0b7
'2012-05-09T08:09:30-04:00'
describe
'25541' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTU' 'sip-files00029.pro'
fe60523cc5c2ad61144cdf5f9a67eb13
d4ac6ad82490ec6a7f66276838ad2c808abe6495
describe
'69182' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTV' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
0959407fd122dc1b0a94888257ad6473
20a9b75f7d76d2d55ef006fadb42ef03d1bdad66
describe
'1555852' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTW' 'sip-files00029.tif'
33290006cd5668e45746680b53e2eb71
4eba06c1b0182fb205097004ab0da0d867ee31b0
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTX' 'sip-files00029.txt'
bc214b2ee0d04c6a4fc6b912341d7135
23aaa23905551b81d27693060655950ebc2b6467
describe
'29187' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTY' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
9b0bdcc603d0e8ba057726872d6d8217
16c53a4622e6f23ed7da9339248ee63d0fe2b8ac
'2012-05-09T08:08:49-04:00'
describe
'200600' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWTZ' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
ffce093f06a41521ef7ac6a413493755
94977d76c82bb79bbdc521d57385e618617016ab
describe
'166093' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUA' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
46ded8c5d2ea6fe062674b3cfe869c8a
7a1102cbaf21162809915ba85b78e51ef4660da5
describe
'26032' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUB' 'sip-files00030.pro'
5a654c2e93670fa762c59815dfb2b5fb
60793c9eaa05bea6e26440de0c47bac400a47903
'2012-05-09T08:11:03-04:00'
describe
'60583' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUC' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
9ec0d670f3cab2fc53fb29a08e5f62a0
8f1905c57ade5596f1028de333ee42a84a123cf2
'2012-05-09T08:07:28-04:00'
describe
'1621624' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUD' 'sip-files00030.tif'
62d37fb267a02d0b12dea91341f59841
54118ddff0f99342800e095561b3f935a48e5634
'2012-05-09T08:09:52-04:00'
describe
'1074' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUE' 'sip-files00030.txt'
912b3eb4e1e55ba24c4b77bf5ab07ab5
dc7b3559d1ccd946b2af12a7b43256c27429ee47
'2012-05-09T08:12:34-04:00'
describe
'29095' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUF' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
7b226998041ce41a2847efeec454e79d
a5c19f5f5002686610c5edc5558f126c856c46ae
'2012-05-09T08:08:45-04:00'
describe
'155432' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUG' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
df64d204beec03774c65fb21ceaa403c
d7d509fd978d0816cf98ceedcfec39e5b8f7e4d4
describe
'24895' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUH' 'sip-files00031.pro'
02a4127c983fd02d6624be8c0ab95528
8fe06bb6e863bf5cc0fa254ae88f838089cae540
'2012-05-09T08:10:01-04:00'
describe
'57528' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUI' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
bcaeccd820804b15f38e6a696a5d8a2f
73d4e7b06ddb1f2909a11d2e4b2aae5242d7ac46
'2012-05-09T08:10:05-04:00'
describe
'1576432' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUJ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7594a93f4e61a98311b34223d3bdd897
58e32af2fa5b4c8bbeced523f4248bc3104c6c26
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUK' 'sip-files00031.txt'
c289f0996b6c0aec00f28335b893a0d9
98d50c2ba4233c0f507abab6adb32547927975eb
'2012-05-09T08:09:37-04:00'
describe
'29412' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUL' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
106bf13d8bdfa6604f6b4309b0306cab
5d371cefdcc930e719451304c92e44517f8f7a96
describe
'202053' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUM' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
1a89f81438039fc5956a666377667fcd
41a0cf14e270f7f2356232e522128a2d2b698ff6
'2012-05-09T08:12:06-04:00'
describe
'131054' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUN' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
53418a5fcf42bff59c99ce3baad10231
1cb007b678b2802b9c62e9cfa4992737ae226004
describe
'14811' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUO' 'sip-files00032.pro'
07f36bb53747d3762affbd358b35aabc
c001f65b131c2446c463c3be882f78a91a50d63f
'2012-05-09T08:07:03-04:00'
describe
'48941' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUP' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
e1e0c325287c14f6eba7ec2b38580195
69bbe2abce7bc5cf0ade32de6f3758a7ebe5e9f8
describe
'1633888' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUQ' 'sip-files00032.tif'
40f0106486969174d8c062e33b85df55
ce3e9c02f86d8ae0db636ba55875ad44e63002ef
describe
'620' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUR' 'sip-files00032.txt'
8b08d04074e9181beab078cc3ee1ecc3
dbdcea79e04774fadc7b00b64a4c2576d7db60b4
'2012-05-09T08:07:18-04:00'
describe
'24454' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUS' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
e1bdc633cedef06470e16c8a314dfb73
fe9384b35b692e67974a92b72939ed38206730dc
'2012-05-09T08:09:04-04:00'
describe
'195924' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUT' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
55307bda398b13bb94adc5cc325f0a9e
46297e332cb4d3416e0aac0b3312f884d2e51a87
'2012-05-09T08:06:57-04:00'
describe
'143987' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUU' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
266997508a70926662af4e3e9d67241e
d964ad364f7b3ed02bcdab98663be88b322a78ed
'2012-05-09T08:12:29-04:00'
describe
'18347' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUV' 'sip-files00033.pro'
e417ecbd1e1a4ac3f7236a6e708d9531
6707d74237577e585e22e774b395cf8fc227d45e
describe
'1584400' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUW' 'sip-files00033.tif'
0954f17b3d9a53cc40dab745f46977c4
acd087b8debe1f7fc7f39a44190c6f74dc8dd32e
describe
'800' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUX' 'sip-files00033.txt'
8d092dcb8ce69f6464d6b0a32d0b46b4
f0188013e5b963d8bf61ec266731e9936de197e8
describe
'26576' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUY' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
de3d538c1070551b61edd4abdc9d15a4
127734bc21b0b9093e07a9f8463380dcc8da9d7c
'2012-05-09T08:08:24-04:00'
describe
'206907' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWUZ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
2465e767a3fab5d99e4dce3de5f8f4e7
28f989b6d6bcd78e6700111d2d5577fe3ccfe489
describe
'168941' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVA' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
8d3329bf5f20e3d813e3792f776de577
3301d19ef6981fbac50986803be977a0e513d93c
'2012-05-09T08:07:51-04:00'
describe
'26378' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVB' 'sip-files00034.pro'
4f06f00040da51ebe5744416d869065b
3f9d3562305907f5f74d8d92d84ef089d5805d97
'2012-05-09T08:10:48-04:00'
describe
'64333' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVC' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
467bd8c430761a116a3512a70e56beec
e8bf19df562b962d91c6b80176f8711f8df08264
'2012-05-09T08:07:57-04:00'
describe
'1672908' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVD' 'sip-files00034.tif'
b88dc93a5874e338f09ac58c924b5f30
d94191e0ccdbed9be337de2105cd8ef0fa806c21
'2012-05-09T08:10:07-04:00'
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVE' 'sip-files00034.txt'
63aac8797a76ac6ea73478c7efebe46d
3f1530a4503dfe4955ff86d47ef95d6c4f0a07fa
describe
'29204' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVF' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
879e0086e221224f8b62bf98715b5181
89b5a7dda20b4a9b74219ff30299589fa5e2749b
'2012-05-09T08:12:08-04:00'
describe
'186995' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVG' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
6dbd075af2d530074de403d59fe2864b
f73bb4010053638a520387e42c83f8873595a550
describe
'169050' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVH' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
af68f9222ef33a3c783781ba550bcb00
88802f1d52c3471e71c10edfe70c69be84d601c9
describe
'25884' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVI' 'sip-files00035.pro'
22d0d4dc2efa26f92ffd10edaa96af5a
c981bfbf0f1d5bc52e4807f7d1e8d012741604d0
describe
'66446' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVJ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
3337fb621d51895ea3918d36ce1b49fb
259b7081cb9bde719d58c279077bb28efb4fd52b
'2012-05-09T08:08:50-04:00'
describe
'1513784' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVK' 'sip-files00035.tif'
6d0560e077f0f7d00bf4808906b2935b
f62804572986e9e7ad1072b794955229dfc0293e
'2012-05-09T08:10:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVL' 'sip-files00035.txt'
cb054b973050f6930577ed3316193fcf
52ce0f10a932a594e4f0e3a9714e55f1873c1adb
'2012-05-09T08:10:50-04:00'
describe
'29442' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVM' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
5110fab8cf2efc4db2e7d03b1a3f2151
68e2fc6d22ea5770d9289f7f65db75f9b2fe0ea5
'2012-05-09T08:07:38-04:00'
describe
'193969' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVN' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
c5a8852cb9082cfe1c2fa6b221df0ec3
c8909a75c4f67587de8ce8e66e43e678ec22841d
'2012-05-09T08:08:34-04:00'
describe
'163374' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVO' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
039a0c1711b9f1c513f72a03813d7ab5
3446895ceb6cce7492d65fcb12ab04f0220e39b6
describe
'22712' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVP' 'sip-files00036.pro'
88dc2d545b3601cbe21a5ee29c6a1c7d
dd3d2c5af81fc1a9f15554f5e5c6c396ccc52fa7
describe
'60461' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVQ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
15dd26fdf21cfebce631c53d43cd7060
0c112ed67281630ebd8a5bd4a99959c2dbf6c1b0
describe
'1568868' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVR' 'sip-files00036.tif'
e0622419be948836c23ce8db73b1c168
e208b7f1f501f3fa68011cd6bb7433eff7e32a62
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVS' 'sip-files00036.txt'
d3a533df647ce558ed506720933fb678
75381e9898602f9907871e1027f4d0a8ed1541e6
describe
'27913' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVT' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
a48868cb74534a2b016cca6f8e99db02
c6e73ce20b14bc3213ab3474604f2a68a630a9d9
'2012-05-09T08:10:40-04:00'
describe
'209334' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVU' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
1cf36594c695522d41fa186ccc61dd69
aa193a4dabbd8f4d0e8bff1789a74079cdb33e17
'2012-05-09T08:09:53-04:00'
describe
'147840' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVV' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
0595088922f2a593a268b11b47467926
21d583132c4bd0b533191b51832c0cb2173bc7a8
describe
'24640' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVW' 'sip-files00037.pro'
73d9191b9e756943d50fa89cdc6a81bf
926ca4f975752602246269948d009f73663d15f2
'2012-05-09T08:09:34-04:00'
describe
'61484' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVX' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
76ab8d7a06fcd835cc9b2a043999f317
50b105758e4f793c7705075d2d00230165d49aac
describe
'1691828' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVY' 'sip-files00037.tif'
ec37996c1dbd0481b86def1a333c1c1c
e7e7c73d8a0477dd48a5f3ae001df9264eb722bb
'2012-05-09T08:08:33-04:00'
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWVZ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
f41f6a7c8e1933ae473998e176b7a866
15ee9a14d6c221ab820797047c45163a22c05c8c
describe
'27863' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWA' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
6b0af72aea9f54592681a53ed5241ae6
972ee3b46f4ab4c20b5064dd3c6639d2cb6ddf4a
'2012-05-09T08:07:39-04:00'
describe
'817146' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWB' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
452b857e5135eb86a9551621c16d3457
5df07c762295794c11f48c6ddb4614684f277164
'2012-05-09T08:10:39-04:00'
describe
'27632' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWC' 'sip-files00038.pro'
edfc2ce3adb241fea9d245e8a7534a8d
4cebfa5202169d4d350e524d14245208f6b723e4
describe
'67535' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWD' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
d564161ee222cf529ca9dfaff8d27922
5b93834b21beecd13d710fccdc9e79c31684ba63
'2012-05-09T08:10:28-04:00'
describe
'6554380' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWE' 'sip-files00038.tif'
39d57840e2457a67b2743831ddd08b34
ee568b863e8424f46da1db5efce775b6db524fd9
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWF' 'sip-files00038.txt'
1b96f731fa92a04aa0c8fde0ed688e90
57df6971d168fb0814736384e6c5f2859c61cf03
describe
'28045' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWG' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
de87f69a0abdef3eed0ee3433e3af012
5b2a3969c8b9e482e7c320c67960c3e37861ca73
describe
'198470' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWH' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
a4b0749120dfe4815f61ebe06e759780
168f7b84dafe0f0205fa402dd6fac810916556ea
'2012-05-09T08:08:32-04:00'
describe
'178773' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWI' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
4e2fa1f203860cc1633667307d0a65ae
363dd471c209258eb14cb51797074ad321c85574
describe
'26315' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWJ' 'sip-files00039.pro'
60270233f7d19bb7e8dbdb8aea4ddadc
ca7d87dc3074fe2733647cdbf5664073e66d02f7
describe
'70760' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWK' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
df368f130c192292a2bd1b4aadb2e706
f8b879ffcde6d3f3075149ee8eb8bdf2781c0765
'2012-05-09T08:07:59-04:00'
describe
'1605224' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWL' 'sip-files00039.tif'
964c7040e442a0bfcbf3396aa0485ea4
ba07c76d5be865ad17fab509268021b82844dcd3
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWM' 'sip-files00039.txt'
3a372a229ca5f0f64c290c257c2d00d1
b6fb8abd754116abcec5524ab48256cdaba21277
describe
'29116' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWN' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
94ff7c7c74e86e132cde8eba111d2b34
239f05911f349a73314915bf94b496203acc9c07
describe
'201465' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWO' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
279ef1dc160b6396bfbfefb4c3fcd791
edd833e5d4e2771a4725fb85dd9c54f327e1889f
'2012-05-09T08:08:05-04:00'
describe
'155734' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWP' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
3c470126bb9feb3f327a8c3a9db411bc
75c106fc515ddcc353ce946db1e542ed857ac03f
'2012-05-09T08:11:08-04:00'
describe
'27049' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWQ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
40d05329f9028de74dad019dc7d1bd7b
2c4e2fad062a0914faf2ebc14711b297a86f1703
'2012-05-09T08:10:19-04:00'
describe
'63644' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWR' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
bbc0a8da48dd0bbe559cd85f88794f14
4435cb9da4bf63234365e2231adfdbc7954232f1
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWS' 'sip-files00040.txt'
e53432f8c7bca60b9ff8eb6eafb8b960
55d8efdc8c3335db40e99971751f7223976c126b
describe
'28489' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWT' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
e97d8e2106420ddc8459a13da7607bc8
6149a4f094828715e9f6cde7446bb49561851206
describe
'210134' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWU' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
814890b3e1df96dd114319df29c776b2
be887744b544ac05c2a972adbc95e116284bfac1
'2012-05-09T08:11:16-04:00'
describe
'154407' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWV' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
fca84a20b67c46be903a7f9920490080
c8c8a6683ad8c1b9178ebc5b44d06d2d157cac7e
describe
'27375' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWW' 'sip-files00041.pro'
613435be648e08ffc546e29ad1b1fe6b
caf5050194e001b4df81179c7f425df90d869497
describe
'65564' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWX' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
50ee9dc5ab36f89130380db6220cb024
3addb6b2b3cf17c411ede6948c4d75b0729e07be
describe
'1698624' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWY' 'sip-files00041.tif'
7e3bafc79af8e729911ff272e29636b8
58222dca3c94eb02ff3fc559b5840fccb412d9f4
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWWZ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
7cf424b8ea1179f7c09edd4f3c7d4ca0
2e855c20e2b2492ca408c366dbbfe43851bda293
describe
'28277' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXA' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
e98a9f91c65903e4eeb785e588022b64
c6d92b4a09160ad093014d0fc08ce93dad243241
'2012-05-09T08:11:27-04:00'
describe
'185491' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXB' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
6b779a0dd329822e075e0de097030c23
1a62ed9548bcb7c5c9f87ef2171e9a756a0a166f
describe
'169025' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXC' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
c9806ff21dfbf6d7aec89f541e5ccc9a
52771955f3b3db1743bb3d1b55f964f8df09ef3b
'2012-05-09T08:10:23-04:00'
describe
'27861' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXD' 'sip-files00042.pro'
0ef47a3ab9fca177b6d35959117c77e0
265d5552cf55f0e21da391d98f83ac94b29bc5b9
'2012-05-09T08:11:31-04:00'
describe
'70231' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXE' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
715ce8ad1e680e01f924c70b066e5503
f41719b34474400b89ced0c2c73bcdd65991f64d
describe
'1500848' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXF' 'sip-files00042.tif'
fabdbc4f773a45fb5596f199e68c7326
20a7d5de1893392f3fca0b38b9a004f203690e74
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXG' 'sip-files00042.txt'
5c1cd67f497068775c906ae9310ca2b9
9f130acc2b6d7430e7fe1105315cdd62d88b6adb
'2012-05-09T08:08:06-04:00'
describe
'203266' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXH' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
6f08ec17e541d6b811f75e1142e083f9
428eeab15ce608a47b61427913f7ffe98d2f51b5
'2012-05-09T08:07:37-04:00'
describe
'159061' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXI' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
ce4f085583c29bb74634752849d340dd
5a67ba34cd04c91e315a479a608acd1d0ac21246
describe
'27295' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXJ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
18cd0b0ade24760632c4cbb202d37ec1
0a1a7f1bd76a9b667b82ffa7147866daac5eb821
'2012-05-09T08:11:37-04:00'
describe
'65831' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXK' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
a60222594869cb05d22aeb36ee1311fe
56208c185d58991e716def82dbb90a3f03c17a53
describe
'1643512' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXL' 'sip-files00043.tif'
6628391ab40aeb3e773ea03449f33b02
721b6a27b3576cf5a4acf9ee58b336e8a7e131a6
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXM' 'sip-files00043.txt'
d6c58b096820dce2f9f946fa4f4ef05c
8f5fb38d62d02602583ef0f3a7d4ad419da1efef
'2012-05-09T08:07:33-04:00'
describe
'28950' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXN' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
aeec1988efa951f82358a839a481a5f3
c8e4608c8d08a298745a87f8f49393a4a62d9ff7
'2012-05-09T08:07:32-04:00'
describe
'825352' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXO' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
1937b5498f6200e15bf9ff2799778584
88217e8035ac3e1a57b416091eb9aed5396c6648
describe
'139949' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXP' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
7ffd173658339fe54af476e20a6bdc8b
424f43b15965424acb62bc3e87f143933d5add5c
'2012-05-09T08:07:04-04:00'
describe
'26625' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXQ' 'sip-files00044.pro'
5da34e17b12808769445f50b718a0f31
9e26fa6ee5291537f99500abb468c66e37d3a156
describe
'60329' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXR' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
b5e57e215545c2444b56024aca9ebd28
b0a8f16896f98a84c70ba09a0eca89c001fbfb9d
describe
'6619708' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXS' 'sip-files00044.tif'
c160fdd83d6b81b47f314616db551aae
1ee126ebe28d4081c6de94815132f3a7df555224
'2012-05-09T08:10:18-04:00'
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXT' 'sip-files00044.txt'
11022e72bccaa1b0e4a30a95896ae825
e61cb29c805746867d2560bf99c5c527a6349020
'2012-05-09T08:08:15-04:00'
describe
'26978' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXU' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
04aa911cf9958b36da8406252829d662
e46f7aa7ee35c78e7f2f0673b54c875a952dad00
'2012-05-09T08:09:26-04:00'
describe
'743483' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXV' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
02c05e217bad7340d50cd28d95a9b412
4faa56a53f4a96b6a27a32ed296cde9391d69d7a
'2012-05-09T08:09:40-04:00'
describe
'149980' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXW' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
77e76c7fbd41a18d0bd5bb66ef2a0ddd
5be6cdfa30b63ed37c88f8fd0d5c7d21fe8b5fb8
'2012-05-09T08:07:21-04:00'
describe
'64916' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXX' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
3d17d100a162b8ce00c03eedaf8a3909
d89434fdc735b9206a90dd4b289057534228f77c
describe
'5964628' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXY' 'sip-files00045.tif'
b577e27036a8ab9e078a60cc8032e027
11b34e9a1c247fbefff5277fa44f4072f36d148b
'2012-05-09T08:08:51-04:00'
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWXZ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
1be8df30d848e85b556fac0d5d49a210
22eacec3e1a6c7adcf935f9704d842ee56848611
describe
'28596' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYA' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
1db98dc25b7a4959d91acfe8d1c7b3ea
6ef403e342aeecd19c84ee75b9fad93913f7f58d
describe
'801238' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYB' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
b6f0510eb63212989b9cd4fb0cb0175a
f0da8d1684544fa4dcb908e025cda9663f58a8d6
describe
'153117' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYC' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
8dd6288e213e45c9ca6d77df39b75340
4bf3365109ed30d3ed24a189fb69e20b582bb292
'2012-05-09T08:09:18-04:00'
describe
'27125' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYD' 'sip-files00046.pro'
483111abbfa0d4275e37a822449d0ec0
c25ecb17e92e29f6759ebaef0e7789357af8e278
'2012-05-09T08:11:38-04:00'
describe
'59472' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYE' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
05bfd79af4f1d541d70d4afa0c21f0aa
09165a650edaf843d3098f1926fe9ef8a8b065ba
describe
'6426704' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYF' 'sip-files00046.tif'
927d0e6ad0ce6393b6d6ffc4b4ce0b4e
822887591dba6d1d2b7ee33441165364eff7a160
'2012-05-09T08:12:33-04:00'
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYG' 'sip-files00046.txt'
2aba1f7c625904c5b9fdd52a771837eb
93832caaf9071e9f56dacd9b5074302b424ddc7a
describe
'28404' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYH' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
1cdcc18d5d3b07054d308356445dc776
534e8c386a597fea11f61370637ace1dd2e330a4
describe
'799915' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYI' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
761a81fbee792adce7521417853932a7
34cc8f2b9b04f364cf935600cec9796fdbb8911e
'2012-05-09T08:11:49-04:00'
describe
'143145' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYJ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
88b8a44274a889483ed7fb44e4c2f9eb
ef385582d918f91909ae9121b88777d0d06efe3f
'2012-05-09T08:08:28-04:00'
describe
'26517' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYK' 'sip-files00047.pro'
ef2f96b86e059144b8833352dae81c48
f1753ad14f356239a15b93a98c91e633d81d81dd
'2012-05-09T08:08:00-04:00'
describe
'60067' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYL' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
b72c95b07210ffe808201844a047e3cf
5a0906ecd81ecae130eac6a114b4a5d2a133e575
describe
'6416132' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYM' 'sip-files00047.tif'
d2f0fd879b63f05c5ab6066c465ae6aa
4422986e7cd6c0bc0f0f9b18ef05c254589f9bdd
describe
'28259' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYN' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
fa64779d8f2e8d77e954a3e7bed1366c
5dd05c55ee48dcb024d746af76590f7a943e8a49
describe
'812311' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYO' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
5fef6e5984f5cda7fe43cadecb963538
f1314cc4463acde2328e8c692099bb4942fd386a
'2012-05-09T08:08:18-04:00'
describe
'130982' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYP' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
777f4d0132bb271b541458acb3cca0d0
642b4358397b0caad34123c3d0a59679e8a9b04b
describe
'24379' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYQ' 'sip-files00048.pro'
9cea9b13fe23b51960f0dc9d6510a09b
c3a08f1167b2a39c74115e462050748bfc5c7795
describe
'58250' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYR' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
f718fba5f6f10b988f94b56c38837c9a
b08a69704e4d8f63eee4a26d0ea2c8e22fcd1008
describe
'6515288' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYS' 'sip-files00048.tif'
c42bdc0696712e6aa888d2c5b9c4303a
f3a742309c12dc71fc2090e310972faa628a13bc
'2012-05-09T08:11:17-04:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYT' 'sip-files00048.txt'
8ba02d8ee754029afdc8bee4d0bf5548
fb57202611af0bee4cecd5752e073c28fd596262
'2012-05-09T08:11:22-04:00'
describe
'27270' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYU' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
4fc72a78771c4b48f2e1f671a7732ebd
433c139f0089253faadac56ec1bb911bb2161492
describe
'737771' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYV' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
82f6ac86ac23331da086a0691dad4fc5
43a6f12de048574ab124afa1c3471f51a1b65762
'2012-05-09T08:09:59-04:00'
describe
'147616' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYW' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
91c9033d17367e10639bf825b8848477
6f56e5114fc4b7219441df2e11e3323c127c2566
describe
'26523' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYX' 'sip-files00049.pro'
58ec42ccf8a8ebcfa5572fda57e708c9
64b648735c56ffeb21167efd86618b1e4aa9354d
describe
'63646' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYY' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
2ef4025428b621a430963390060db0b2
7a45521e4ce1162c1d1ebe05d729adf6659cb567
'2012-05-09T08:08:02-04:00'
describe
'5918940' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWYZ' 'sip-files00049.tif'
a42c26c43382c6aea9f166696bc906b0
1776a72c25622a95f317b70b5d989f0baf06e326
'2012-05-09T08:07:47-04:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZA' 'sip-files00049.txt'
0aee01ff21b6797a033a466cd4737b2e
dd84467b670b7090bda28c80ca60318ff3c3bbc5
describe
'29254' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZB' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
a52fe132949177274e1479c735849183
8b65b0b229f058dd33bf387d48c14c5e2265716e
'2012-05-09T08:08:21-04:00'
describe
'152088' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZC' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
39d9aa3831a6df078adecb5bd5544874
0dc32ac73d93589e674ca8354e76a8ac2a7fbbaf
describe
'26917' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZD' 'sip-files00050.pro'
5b991b72832756b6c072e887d52c0c40
de1bce7f32f05c3d43d1240680cf49ade50909af
'2012-05-09T08:11:53-04:00'
describe
'65764' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZE' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
b7f4511ffc3bdf7eae949dc3c6946a67
9fb128e86fe5efb922a350983e800648631635a3
describe
'6106216' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZF' 'sip-files00050.tif'
21824a03f515706f033e152b7010bb26
413653152e4899a24845295f9cd8577c20e37a63
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZG' 'sip-files00050.txt'
bb0b1e2e1d74838e841d29d1f8f475e0
ae3debe095b4a230703dca18ee41c9490aee98bb
describe
'28905' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZH' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
c7183e9eb3abc1ce7628bc051bf02071
929c9b72d4de7a506a4c8846aaed38d714e76b60
'2012-05-09T08:07:20-04:00'
describe
'821958' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZI' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
6f8100f924d278f9b172bc116dca93dd
98cf75f0a2d5680ac29a612e4f199ca4a427b801
'2012-05-09T08:07:46-04:00'
describe
'147044' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZJ' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
c27199b16311fe159e32c53aae6d365d
412d580e32435ea930d0bb2fed14ef2880efe004
'2012-05-09T08:10:22-04:00'
describe
'27189' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZK' 'sip-files00051.pro'
f657c6ffce6b627cc0b68dca0400e4cb
597e6f0a9680537c30388259a240684889ad2797
describe
'60921' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZL' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
8d10b67ab02034530bb1c736a49b1c1e
3b91cd6b389250e2afcadaca64aaf04af624c9de
'2012-05-09T08:11:51-04:00'
describe
'6592884' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZM' 'sip-files00051.tif'
d864a8a12bfa7359e1daa1fefa62589e
474d6aa72de764ee24e8e6ac73de49d905e8a92d
'2012-05-09T08:12:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZN' 'sip-files00051.txt'
1098d6b18db1bb8f2deb53074f97685a
655c335d13da6042339649e34612f0a301df460a
'2012-05-09T08:11:42-04:00'
describe
'27951' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZO' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
ac06e78cde0ace28a88dd698313f8483
f795ba01b924c73c84477e209ac81a379a009797
'2012-05-09T08:11:45-04:00'
describe
'814300' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZP' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
95513400d6fc6336fd79c47febb5f595
a6969f0ae61db66ac9729086ac1d4090e503d417
'2012-05-09T08:09:28-04:00'
describe
'141975' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZQ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
73031d549f2071a93faaf6677c4f4b9d
f9a64b3c80fd3cbbfa13ef305b96b6049bab5abc
describe
'26636' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZR' 'sip-files00052.pro'
490b80dc93e3b41127c228f2566ca963
339388f8eecd60fe20d8d476aac9867205606bfd
describe
'6531216' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZS' 'sip-files00052.tif'
84ca09534f3b474a0fb81416c483d1dd
29f2a40c58227e0d1d5076d8dba74de832dd0087
'2012-05-09T08:10:04-04:00'
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZT' 'sip-files00052.txt'
bd7f20bb926aac56b5b199ff4a8d0d80
afcd498af044869dced0f8d799efac394acc6b5e
describe
'27757' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZU' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
d7fa0bc57989bf07729529f03f512b16
d872cfa2dabf83681560b7b792cf1eec36082627
'2012-05-09T08:10:51-04:00'
describe
'791586' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZV' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
9e882c625acf53d9c5bbf403e0dee7ba
16c2c3ef9e9ab4c6752371026d145d42a67c18be
describe
'144415' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZW' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
fcafc3c709546b3316a4b4148b79fc50
e0a5cec46b121b91c753989fd958969aed54aec8
'2012-05-09T08:10:11-04:00'
describe
'25177' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZX' 'sip-files00053.pro'
c3b280110f8e9d163961ae45c4993a42
6431da17115de4065221c3193046c1e194719ca9
describe
'65504' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZY' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
c1515265e0491735fd6041ff1c686945
c02d56f7990094198305cc8e0dbee555ea7e68cb
describe
'6349644' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABWZZ' 'sip-files00053.tif'
911382c00c4f049ede3ebee85909e0b4
c2eda115b424989b3502ceaa5d40f8385b27308b
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAA' 'sip-files00053.txt'
80f9ab4a9732dd7d71dd1e43c75d6724
6d93de8b590f209047d66361f1e4d43c39fdcec5
describe
'28327' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAB' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
c24a7c4d5d6cc5eb646b83b20a9dc59a
00223a8a9b598ad2ef29beb71034e97eb242cfae
describe
'814936' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAC' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
85821d6c1eeb932d4538606a16604d26
2ada942daa27e16a9244c9a545547abce2970e9a
describe
'142810' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAD' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
95c363e5b05b5cc236f12ff4ee506928
d69cdae035707e6dc83902be4d0728af68c038c9
'2012-05-09T08:07:48-04:00'
describe
'27444' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAE' 'sip-files00054.pro'
21cc2141aca94f4ccce79913c5d69af2
029d7eabe04d4300609b4dc66521c4cdcd95b329
describe
'59941' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAF' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
e4c82ec1ccc4e00453c3ca22fc9e33b5
8985dbf363af64fb892229d25c27dd1b92b626b3
describe
'6536440' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAG' 'sip-files00054.tif'
b50c56303c30d5a2c01c3a3b7d482e13
c9c4c3061432c2fb65bfd6118fcae1c807663260
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAH' 'sip-files00054.txt'
09087efd894eaacec597006634f3753e
1fd933ffa423449fdebf9c1cb3cf9d3f4dc9246d
'2012-05-09T08:11:29-04:00'
describe
'27260' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAI' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
394e40af6c83df9e09a45e38bcda8bd6
1c3485c863ab3a81a7d0a2966c4ed8e934d74d14
describe
'815861' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAJ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
714555d4b2923d731e937cd6c099c031
58daba42f03d49c2cef7e5615e9e3268b379691b
'2012-05-09T08:12:26-04:00'
describe
'140022' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAK' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
2592a5a878df6b2be44af2e80804ae54
75f4a3a0445f0a5ac195e5f238c001c4c93d3420
describe
'26828' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAL' 'sip-files00055.pro'
dca776ded47c1ce8c9b42e7970c7606c
012cf102ca40d7be1da04420519d617b3bcd76cd
'2012-05-09T08:07:00-04:00'
describe
'60893' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAM' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
02f5d94795a1d395a3da7b19bdd9f760
9144c404c669fed8b5310aa1558095c0260548df
describe
'6544096' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAN' 'sip-files00055.tif'
ae0132d45d0f86f43dd96d539ef01284
f28339d6e3ad2cd26a23d8a82eddcee7f40c67f5
'2012-05-09T08:07:53-04:00'
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAO' 'sip-files00055.txt'
1f5fbbb657670f9488e6808e22aabf22
5a5324de239fb30c8ba0459ad16c335aaba33cea
describe
'27711' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAP' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
f427ddc5bf2dff81ae7d483e3689cecf
304b712dd2ad12a21f8301d8617fb8db0be94b0c
describe
'808593' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAQ' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
29c50f0aed5c936a6e8c3d6db02d0004
bdb00b5a333f03c2cb43aef4cccb1653921f600a
'2012-05-09T08:11:39-04:00'
describe
'137571' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAR' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
c8205ab8c64064e70cddf1d37401081d
f1b4de0d0dde623222986153256842ec33063025
describe
'25560' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAS' 'sip-files00056.pro'
98f6f9d95ea767d538c4fb10f3823d9b
e7b69cc003275ae626bcb03b1ef3166ffecd8f61
'2012-05-09T08:10:21-04:00'
describe
'61083' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAT' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
67ef990f41d8e3ab5cb399984d5e8546
cdec3c5f2c4601ed8489664cf10ec5dff7238055
describe
'6485784' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAU' 'sip-files00056.tif'
850d478812a2d5e4de66bd48a5a4b90a
09db549a405edb352a8f5d259b93e27b06610b17
'2012-05-09T08:11:44-04:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAV' 'sip-files00056.txt'
44ceba234c4948acf8be7ea5c5d4854c
27b87775836b1c1375c89bc8713347ade3b60450
'2012-05-09T08:10:12-04:00'
describe
'27441' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAW' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
311a878751a1235fdee0459ec7ac524a
9cdc6c9d5ef8fb6fd23d069cba08e64d8e8b3106
'2012-05-09T08:08:26-04:00'
describe
'822791' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAX' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
99ca5abe343de903b375d7fced772161
d01912c621e969ed5771398c8f3396dd00274ccb
describe
'25992' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAY' 'sip-files00057.pro'
768658223259d81abec69e01a90e8d78
cd2e74fc5b3f309a478ad45974b0e59639e866af
describe
'63811' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXAZ' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
f6de2aa04702ed61d38fa8e463ae3188
23e3a252d81c81deb701e75ce177bf01765593ab
describe
'6599192' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBA' 'sip-files00057.tif'
830e79bf736bbd437272a617b41272b4
724ab59efed4a5a9ce1520026121916ad58b9378
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBB' 'sip-files00057.txt'
aeeb9594d65fdb27e7b737eed8ef185a
0b823a4490e08521efbaffc88a3bebc188152888
describe
'27750' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBC' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
f31561a968d10daf06d16df1a33ac32a
a81183aa523dab08ff4331aca284fbc039768613
'2012-05-09T08:08:23-04:00'
describe
'807199' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBD' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
d5af7fda87fd714f85910fccb34a0487
cd0c859a9d3446ed6d22b144299cd7d326a3a4a0
'2012-05-09T08:08:36-04:00'
describe
'144246' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBE' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
e644278fe77ace7760e48baf632a837e
8067f8ce24e19775aed71d0a35f69159e00cd73c
'2012-05-09T08:09:32-04:00'
describe
'27827' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBF' 'sip-files00058.pro'
f8f0fc0244286bbcc4cc08516e0dd3bf
9093e099177e5745acfba23c01d1d3eed73ce3fa
describe
'66117' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBG' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
a296f4c2c4a7c604033b8aad884c1118
7d02efd4000df54165ef4d1bd7cbc1ad6dfb9d21
describe
'6474508' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBH' 'sip-files00058.tif'
0d41301d4140cea7209888701a43d6ad
3f38706c1a8dd96e50c2eb6dd4a5abf5b0baf023
'2012-05-09T08:07:11-04:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBI' 'sip-files00058.txt'
f43f5bc172acc9ea9b1cb0a93f091328
32eb09e41d37b5175ca008306f05a7aabd82ae35
describe
'27791' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBJ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
b7b683d632221654180c4bf444dd1c61
e24c71f14f3ffdcbaabaf342739c14fdf709602f
describe
'761705' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBK' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
d5f961a5d3eb01c6f4c8b33fb92cc555
918ab3b2921601b26357a38d2424ba51ffd7070b
describe
'153378' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBL' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
986a81db77429aa52a22a09d81875966
35d06662ff81fa71715cc85adf57a2e484f40814
'2012-05-09T08:07:06-04:00'
describe
'28727' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBM' 'sip-files00059.pro'
5ce5822b0dadc34a987e649434c15784
06b5efa38e9f2de1ae7839423698d6e95f38313a
describe
'63322' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBN' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
4cd569e1135287b1656512e82c3e48d2
a359b3c3383df5d37ad782d8e649b85da9080f82
'2012-05-09T08:08:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBO' 'sip-files00059.txt'
17554d9c5ceb962a41e1fc6a9dee27a3
cb416bf3870792c18c929d861a2ba38d1989a1ce
'2012-05-09T08:09:10-04:00'
describe
'28739' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBP' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
016fb65a9f11dbf26d5a045d815a3a59
2fd3a4ef3be200c2112a2908b8b0b9a9095bea1c
describe
'776533' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBQ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
c8936765fbc9329e7ee8df54bb4e15d6
da94720754ae95075a9b57c345d30eb6af19fcfe
describe
'136329' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBR' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
e1f509cf14685b9164f5272517a8ecc3
efca422fee55bd7a768cbbf821fd73cafadee206
describe
'25557' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBS' 'sip-files00060.pro'
426bbef769e3087bc1176511357e3e8c
77be68341141f3828e76bb10512f961b12751e9f
'2012-05-09T08:08:53-04:00'
describe
'58835' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBT' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
29f8b9d77f414b1cb6404d4d2ce3bfda
71de1efd8fe37abf68daa277b359b30a53117471
'2012-05-09T08:12:01-04:00'
describe
'6229408' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBU' 'sip-files00060.tif'
a5e0268cfdbc67f3c0ef38a46910ec98
04f882ebb53345b5dc51242abff559d75ec7494f
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBV' 'sip-files00060.txt'
dd365aa93effc09cc5f761dd18ff0243
177aee3e684a237b21947f0eddda4c5854edf21a
'2012-05-09T08:07:52-04:00'
describe
'27133' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBW' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
c9101bdae4e754e64349aaeb6add4f7c
ba5b25fa8e2f41f939efedcee8ea913e9f88f556
describe
'773024' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBX' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
7bd2b03e1ed901ef47d72e424d6e9c11
85a7810b26378f9ed1916ae6ca1d442a229ac87a
describe
'142418' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBY' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
20fecdbb5b962ba317121abcd580156f
bc0f84087b78f1681fcaf7f32f2ad9add14915c0
describe
'25525' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXBZ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
17f1c0ccbd691bb5b6744f3ff32a0aa7
cb5321d115ea1a466692310c06b5dd5a26f4e85d
'2012-05-09T08:10:32-04:00'
describe
'65897' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCA' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
64379478e61f42fe8a5965fdca6e3f35
512918f8eb4f57238efcc618ab58579999c2e34e
describe
'6201096' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCB' 'sip-files00061.tif'
39aa907aaed7412df5dd3d9217f648c2
0be056bbe69c9536aa8ef34745829d9276391cb5
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCC' 'sip-files00061.txt'
5d7188923a6aa23de86a48ea6272b34b
4bf2749b21d10925884585daac07c5ed995be41f
describe
'814530' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCD' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
6881c7c96ec92840d1a171df6acf178a
20868e193abf1b18258d0ec788a15872f6255a71
describe
'109193' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCE' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
f94bdddb4efc240057a86a4ec78a0516
738be7be88724aee0629234f0cf5b9a70a4a1d9c
describe
'19551' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCF' 'sip-files00062.pro'
d6b0e091dd4cacdb008babd8abe52bef
832950d7e4d57cb55f39f5cfd0b392e106ea4cf6
describe
'49967' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCG' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
3e74f676df1e93f218064b29302c1ed3
ccff51a2da0c6fef7535f84c450abd3c862af42f
'2012-05-09T08:11:10-04:00'
describe
'6533272' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCH' 'sip-files00062.tif'
8802d839faf663bae844838e911ce630
0312ef8d403623dafb9f88d4b78758c4507c2d73
describe
'813' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCI' 'sip-files00062.txt'
dd320d29f3de395d6653c0ab5627ac37
5beb4da5cbd92de10c85ac2f1742b55f8b419ff9
describe
'24688' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCJ' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
6de152e5fb559f32e39ebb3dff28eb52
4f8a4b078cbf7623c805c84ee82c54411433735f
'2012-05-09T08:08:19-04:00'
describe
'758752' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCK' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
9739e2d56f1846e8d81ce918683042b5
c060ca270cda4301d7fae57cd1da41a175e1dd6e
'2012-05-09T08:07:41-04:00'
describe
'119588' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCL' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
55578e043f3c6e61cb01bbe2f337c075
e339e867b53a72462da7554ce67716aaaae38ec8
'2012-05-09T08:06:48-04:00'
describe
'19823' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCM' 'sip-files00063.pro'
ffd8330a636ea2ff331de6b22e569af0
08537f06c7aa8a52988a57a75d04e43f9099632c
describe
'54879' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCN' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
875f1f54ca0bf3eb0b91619b7befe386
eacddcfec851878fb8bf4f38d9901e6afa7abc79
'2012-05-09T08:11:43-04:00'
describe
'6086828' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCO' 'sip-files00063.tif'
51d2287335bf0461a04a4de00bcc7d80
d699897a719eeae644c366daf8b9359d208a2560
describe
'843' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCP' 'sip-files00063.txt'
68f9eb14c54b3f8b75b8f0a072df9bcc
e2ac00a2fd5b45dd96d7decf7f545b5f3bf05f3f
describe
'26059' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCQ' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
5c74c47a44be1ddb7f9a09136b295545
e967fbececcd2e8e97a4ff2fbdfe36c1200178bc
describe
'821218' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCR' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
6cbb7e6dc2097da21b18af9056edaf4d
efed30d4ce91756d61ad814440e6c5dd3bce2c75
'2012-05-09T08:11:28-04:00'
describe
'154596' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCS' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
eeaa80f8c69c7e59f470956cbfbdd350
84c909989412adb07008acd0c1ef5df4010c1460
'2012-05-09T08:06:50-04:00'
describe
'63827' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCT' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
d642161301584dae90d55d53f4df2f58
69bdf3fd823b3bfb64ecf9a516c8159ec7afcc8a
describe
'6586292' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCU' 'sip-files00064.tif'
34f6ddbd0715b726c5cc467300b4f6b9
fab6e6c532166ab5c077882d82a71b1814559849
'2012-05-09T08:10:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCV' 'sip-files00064.txt'
f042dbab11105dec7b2e4f04cc96a751
6b37c94a3ed556da8f657c0fffec4cf5cb1d5809
'2012-05-09T08:12:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCW' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
206d0e4e0bf61a892d222fd897b91ad3
9a1d72a76b01df4a20f8437a31283e5e0f4b2290
describe
'841699' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCX' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
59ec9455b2827705c12216ccb5e64093
7c2adef5390a1cd1586bc5197fd92338cfe0d2f0
describe
'142490' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCY' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
19ccaa708a71418262e7143de5713f31
f75a53b12b502e30eb5484e522420cdaa4a55d12
describe
'25837' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXCZ' 'sip-files00065.pro'
be98325a4823c9ac36761a498084f773
32461390a65e30b81a38d5c623b16d8563ce41d9
describe
'62767' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDA' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
4468613a981381085ef3b6238adf506d
43fd1c280bca7d22cde7d8c0e336954bd804f6bf
describe
'6750664' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDB' 'sip-files00065.tif'
5a60f88a4da275ea8012c4295bc28044
e1730944fc2d5d52226f3783c8f26fe24d01042d
'2012-05-09T08:11:15-04:00'
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDC' 'sip-files00065.txt'
843ba026bc24716d2dd9f8a3afea5684
d82950d4cb549f83fe5775885f8444c0d1f499c9
describe
'27964' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDD' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
dfc48a4e939fa0433d9ae2cf261270ab
06a0b6ec4909c14562cb4f9d83cbf741b94243d4
describe
'811567' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDE' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
249a9e25d2f59691e2aab244e2c82f08
86cacbf39934435248aab0e4e0c2a8f9c9cc0c06
describe
'136658' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDF' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
ff04c3f60fdc9f446e7333e9d9295bd6
1a9087e51e74639826de6ff278104d7728b8d824
describe
'25842' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDG' 'sip-files00066.pro'
75c249f8fb9096bdbd77275cf238d99f
1c66227b8e5e57653860cead45acc14305e27b47
'2012-05-09T08:08:40-04:00'
describe
'60066' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDH' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
007e9a1071b6bd666578e8c8e6f2a17b
cf64b591d5de24402ea23f2ff5cd93c518bc0cb0
describe
'6509564' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDI' 'sip-files00066.tif'
cf61487a2522380c02301cfeef3ae619
a810e2f92eead4a46b70a65780a19276c6bd4a91
'2012-05-09T08:10:58-04:00'
describe
'28036' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDJ' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
981744d3c8d2f44f13436edfa7b7c80e
36a40af4095fdd1a2a95dfe90e82b00ec6e00e18
describe
'791231' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDK' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
80d888ddfc41ae28f2b558ac82a4ae7b
5c2868b66f0cb958e5dd5f1bda1091d7b5237585
describe
'137196' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDL' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
b3ead5f91f08bb3a2cd6c463751a52d3
0f84871a4afcc4b77752ff0c3bf78eaf071bf36f
'2012-05-09T08:11:13-04:00'
describe
'25412' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDM' 'sip-files00067.pro'
3d6fcc3ef99867e600899c70ccbb2f61
1300ab200ffc066eb6ed2f26d0594c235fe70326
describe
'64283' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDN' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
c8a1c63c49f67d6b5932a82914e0c282
5ea92fd693b01a5bdc61cac756a4e5a34b21ff96
describe
'6346152' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDO' 'sip-files00067.tif'
3112495e81ed2dd6eda86bc9c04c29b1
e6d1f8bf7c307e149c16b39beb5479511e45c421
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDP' 'sip-files00067.txt'
752628291733ebe0ac2cf32de25e5731
2c5bd7fb14a89a46a05f56c3ccdf949b46bb8f5a
'2012-05-09T08:12:25-04:00'
describe
'27258' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDQ' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
66d072b65de0e080dc754d0c77c6003d
f60e81fc8fce6f1e842b72130193ef833010f8af
describe
'818456' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDR' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
acbfcbd18030c40258bc35217a32d834
a842ee74a6f5197883ebaf7efc8c8da74032031a
'2012-05-09T08:10:41-04:00'
describe
'134675' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDS' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
e9abc0285a781cf3a532ae53530ff9d8
657e1d2edaa1bee0182f14a770385a5307ac4a12
describe
'25298' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDT' 'sip-files00068.pro'
11cdf4ff01eebfbc2ec755896eaa0415
b51957cc74d4c7f9acfeb2bf8af44abe41ede86a
describe
'58888' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDU' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
c23fbffc1a60e35e7c5d9661de62647f
daee5cdd4641097eb2d15b82273b6df139d34fb2
describe
'6565100' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDV' 'sip-files00068.tif'
f0753a5c4cbbe2c57d636b53e27c2a40
56f89765705d857de9bb94c57339059bb6e89b7d
'2012-05-09T08:08:11-04:00'
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDW' 'sip-files00068.txt'
bb642430111718efbbd634e78c975f35
25d0fd5bff4df4446a73bd58841f2886ded05d8a
'2012-05-09T08:09:39-04:00'
describe
'27053' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDX' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
b91a2a01fbefafe074fc4c811e9f1c7f
35acddfb1b9c863e4bd3132bf5aab12fa1686329
describe
'138799' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDY' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
69169a77e958a8b058a0f1e1aed4274f
c5cb404e7b0a9401c5e35c731e76444bf657ce10
'2012-05-09T08:07:42-04:00'
describe
'23869' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXDZ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
dbb500689df192671312c865dbb99aec
29d24c6c31110f831034b50c1195a717b2c6d111
describe
'63070' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEA' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
899e02da567ddc90aecea58dc82eb8e7
a47bfb1654ec4b34baff871008f00c43d87c0799
describe
'6476484' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEB' 'sip-files00069.tif'
27b413f320c12c74e787b87a148bf822
fc4685fedd1a2894668c15347317a39e33f5fc9f
'2012-05-09T08:07:43-04:00'
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEC' 'sip-files00069.txt'
0b857190b4fd72a2db9df5b97e21cd8d
2980a05a8e0db570539b026f6d13003cc85c0ed5
describe
'27421' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXED' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b4a57de77383eba1b8b6194b550dc2f6
6a94073e00a817d5c7884e785863f359d3832098
describe
'699428' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEE' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
526affb727a1e7197fc2b2b5c8d0fda3
2384d18e7a8737ee8fcb355c266d02070433e94b
describe
'180402' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEF' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
3348f179ae35034e6a37ca2efda653a8
fa923ce0fd116129fc4e94bcec22bcaabfaff8e5
describe
'26178' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEG' 'sip-files00070.pro'
a31c192c60167a2cdde6170641e1fdf1
422a7a0f789b943f385b841feed88b086c3550d9
'2012-05-09T08:11:46-04:00'
describe
'69613' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEH' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
f9f771be9f099e111f43171945c41408
670f3c9f8d28e7ae23f40c42245f0eba18324523
describe
'5612324' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEI' 'sip-files00070.tif'
b9d314062fa24d0c65706651088f0d33
c42a5fd0a12fe6d6bde1fe2199a2b09ca2bf4eae
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEJ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
3d9e216bdf56cec1857977a5183ae398
3ff83b52f46ac38fb4cc7a476326304e38067a2f
describe
'29524' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEK' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
9893e999f2eba1b425a62f802fbf3d8a
0c9e20c2bf8513b0cd8e226f303f25d9ea44b8ce
describe
'733546' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEL' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
400eb8c04ff0dc2c0f009b694cc734c4
40076ca34a04b08f9c0fa465fbca4706d1dc2cfa
describe
'167748' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEM' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
adc0af421a95a2ed3a8f7dcf93fcf9b0
7bc7d9fe954abedc9257b91a636c2527c966691e
'2012-05-09T08:07:49-04:00'
describe
'25694' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEN' 'sip-files00071.pro'
ff38cc9fe7e4bdd161a531bb121c65b0
9892be7bcfbd387b3666cf1cc83475a7a545b078
describe
'5885136' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEO' 'sip-files00071.tif'
e039f90fabefb140048b52fc14403de6
11e20a69951428445027f0205e167fd8aeffe9de
'2012-05-09T08:10:31-04:00'
describe
'1078' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEP' 'sip-files00071.txt'
49896464a60042509cecec8fdcb45956
51ae3a6c0d9f446122859282ab1c0fe07f8a3a52
describe
'28940' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEQ' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
d8fc293ebb828aaf2d35f8c27934f10f
2e663f0b9ab4936f24b9af5d15cd11a630299ea4
describe
'702913' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXER' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
009cbdfe018570824df57a625f2603d7
a6f49ef0b146c65557dcf44d11affce9b3790af6
describe
'179754' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXES' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
c6b058f7baab773c6ed0a27d4be40c06
3e46c6bae940a9c600670b83039cd9a36e1da216
'2012-05-09T08:07:09-04:00'
describe
'25456' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXET' 'sip-files00072.pro'
07ff4b5bbca47b9e6f1bd50438f20c14
b79f01669309e44ce2aa6489a1978a1f64694551
describe
'68479' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEU' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
914d25ff196f8f4b64857a74ab377f71
e7210537c249ffaf9fae0db6fe8282d225a793aa
describe
'5640112' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEV' 'sip-files00072.tif'
cf7ce8d42c1cb60db2b95c57eaf58c29
413289a68bf5dbbd6d29847f71688c44d08281e9
'2012-05-09T08:09:46-04:00'
describe
'1055' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEW' 'sip-files00072.txt'
8be6f021d1a90c4cfb10be6089c9fdc7
9d1cb987746a9a401ea2e6f9580510a1c6188c4e
describe
'29916' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEX' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
1ccf470d9d52e5677a2460e44a0e92ca
8f5d5020d4aa93362188ebe9ea38968c7b021c82
'2012-05-09T08:11:47-04:00'
describe
'701841' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEY' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
3af32c56a635b8056975cf2e7c18b242
5790bd3900da9700748555bc5722fd90dbcf8b28
describe
'182958' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXEZ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
88f439e37881e392f270eb9f96585850
407e728bf23b6a0ba63f6c549650c9331543077b
describe
'24934' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFA' 'sip-files00073.pro'
cfc18019146c6f3c9246537699e570a8
e04bf5a12cefbf3250cab1a3545ac7e84987b55f
'2012-05-09T08:07:23-04:00'
describe
'69286' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFB' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
be2e69e5c4049c9092b54382d409043d
e4be20cad27020f4323c673f88b17d9faa9b6942
describe
'5631496' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFC' 'sip-files00073.tif'
66257fcacaae8c3889ffdc6578ddac5a
8a4ef92748825dd6665509ba0fde4729415905b4
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFD' 'sip-files00073.txt'
758bd54378c986c2ccfb386a0f58616e
cb3c7186c8bf427f9945d9e3afe326a5b414619a
describe
'29693' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFE' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
6f70caeec80f5564c17c4e81ae41d0fd
de3bd9f239c3283c0643d681c8071ab3ffaddce5
'2012-05-09T08:10:34-04:00'
describe
'713036' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFF' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
90d039abc572d82ae612bfca723a8d5e
8d9319e9fff50e01f113746e580aafd75f8df680
describe
'174140' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFG' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
6ea9e6c790dd8039e9f2c5760bcf2b3c
cdb3d21a4f70f0c4d4bb9ca6d7025d06d90d34bb
describe
'25426' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFH' 'sip-files00074.pro'
52e58419a78aef26e35d2bc514e8da1b
6c48f4c5d6e154fdb45bd6c5f124d89a8dc04302
describe
'67507' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFI' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
67bd83e5276e3854eab92dac3245a7c2
9c527ca2d5f63c0856d66314968a2a40babd6b29
'2012-05-09T08:10:47-04:00'
describe
'5721136' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFJ' 'sip-files00074.tif'
dc81733a63c92d95364c4db3e31fe6c5
b14a5d20ba068a258b67cc75d9d36f1b9672d725
'2012-05-09T08:12:30-04:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFK' 'sip-files00074.txt'
97f6fe950107d11e24a0202ef6516410
0398876a80b0665e8c7802ed49abbbd2f27e2bf0
'2012-05-09T08:10:46-04:00'
describe
'29073' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFL' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
8c9b0a1bfae75734d10cee3eec421c06
f378b4103a0bcdbb8b0defaa94a2ddeb53d809a7
'2012-05-09T08:09:19-04:00'
describe
'745895' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFM' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
08ec582adba16c173b890d9a255af4b9
e4786e4113d991c7479c1e52f0438accb63b9096
describe
'170446' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFN' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
50c470664336b8957998999a5f2b3f1a
eefddcb2fd056540bce49ae89bc04a247f81061b
describe
'27182' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFO' 'sip-files00075.pro'
7961cd41593721301b6fc0791ed37a7f
22efea9b77fecd94e79339f666c753014976d6a7
describe
'65884' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFP' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
4fc68d3d98e8f4315c1c2d33ba0d1c42
732f61dea2d4891001a5a8e5a69859290aed6dae
describe
'5983996' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFQ' 'sip-files00075.tif'
1d7ea54c5ede87ba76fa7b3adb86023d
ba4f4796e9a11e589ad0eb152f8f36208433c4db
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFR' 'sip-files00075.txt'
35b1a633873c54c3a7fb886ae35761d1
68bf876adbb95b61f7af2377ac3aa0139114f336
describe
'28733' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFS' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
7c95009d6b63ebc6ccd60debd67c466e
5b8cbb7fa2b206c56a131b9c57aef23b71cab06a
describe
'702950' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFT' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
22b5fcc9ed3cdde64e2cd1f518ea9872
22bd3a0b390cb2ffefcf782e19236ffb25cf9ad5
describe
'13850' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFU' 'sip-files00076.pro'
970d0de48a1817f9f239515b315414da
0f2a8aa58fed53b531d8216629e39fd552291534
describe
'51455' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFV' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
0496ff321da8f4e414451e281b40a234
8966c01c10da5ebff03b28afe371f4170a30622c
describe
'5640396' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFW' 'sip-files00076.tif'
55cf92762bf8b58b345801138ed94657
9ceb1a679ee500ae92edb2d03d07ce44aeddb327
describe
'581' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFX' 'sip-files00076.txt'
b61d87d0d8324e512853bbc0387cb897
b201c081bf2e8b9d3918c5b1a7a8c7eaf8bb3188
describe
'25466' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFY' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
c59b1e628ea7c0bccbef1544f548613f
3c8ff9c59bcdc2bfb86a2b1865bb3ac6bb20c98a
describe
'700795' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXFZ' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
30867dbd6a506201896c80b66f41ae05
3e1aaf4192ae723ba9df6f90f3653fb0d4d918c5
describe
'152007' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGA' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
d40c4105c7f268fa8116d3c6771ede14
32d8773736db5bb9c6691ba424e082efbada1dcb
describe
'18433' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGB' 'sip-files00077.pro'
74f2257f2c1c1112a6b3872148f1b6e5
5d3502bd074f1daf17778090c0891561e35d3362
describe
'57792' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGC' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
d69c94dce5721ddc885f9d71daae1383
520c0a14d26dafa01928eff4b26123a3facb01a8
describe
'5624652' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGD' 'sip-files00077.tif'
02ec34a9e06097b5dcb3598ba6032a93
e09d9582e4ed0f3d3952e88b860686cfd98dfe7d
'2012-05-09T08:11:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGE' 'sip-files00077.txt'
a913b9c4056e199b894ed1d5127a3aa9
8bc5ee23229e9c9b2c01a29cfc384a1a69df8463
describe
'27119' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGF' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
692f9375bf7bab50ddab07510c2e738c
7c7c3d64a2d569ab263b72d30e05bd0e17cc9576
describe
'671193' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGG' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
12838ad0657b888821bc170d3712fe81
9372c020d437d8356e5cde3365ae1c7c9a162c10
describe
'177979' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGH' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
64c5741d35c701389a7e65a66c0724ae
df9d7e8af10b8eef46aafa3b1116af72d324ba5e
describe
'25139' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGI' 'sip-files00078.pro'
016ad5a8362182fd4bcb20d12fc78bd2
50994c21748e65c6fafb8749d4b9562c645bcc2d
describe
'69115' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGJ' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
18f3657017a6c5229d0975410cfda8bd
094a8b076aa4d695a40b4519d72b1d27d605b790
'2012-05-09T08:11:04-04:00'
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGK' 'sip-files00078.txt'
79a2c39a25a4691f3c39f2ba062e0160
9e7497570bcfeef0c44bff9696d438a6da9c5dd9
describe
'30393' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGL' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
b94300c8e90a83d0ceb7bee25a030b4a
ebe532d5cf62f60e1e428c0e7f826f61e77fc75f
describe
'676970' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGM' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
9761d9605c9c62a16b6e64c639323d9e
ee216c47e0548822ec985ebfdc5afd142ef78ae5
describe
'162994' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGN' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
69d4574c120b3146030d878a6c979dd1
9a7e26b12c690a59662a55a23dedbc177abfa3de
'2012-05-09T08:09:41-04:00'
describe
'23988' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGO' 'sip-files00079.pro'
3ec780cfe058e5e14896f362e3aa1276
54047a1c88a35e331fd8c46ad8e784c7d297c114
describe
'62779' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGP' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
e8887a97a4688cb660ede2f6a6a9e948
58c42d91eefaa8d7677083b5d74fac252b1826e2
describe
'5432548' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGQ' 'sip-files00079.tif'
34ba0079fae30898443694687314346a
42bb078a0f6df0496afd85515e4ab60eb2e2f985
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGR' 'sip-files00079.txt'
40f0836b3e3d226f482eb25ee0b2ff2d
ffbe1663df2bb577d32beb2795ce733b99d05b3a
describe
'28294' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGS' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
0ab3b1124ed9994539307d4a6aaa02dd
12e0473fc01a24d6d5b9b29ca1d3bbfa6c4c0e91
'2012-05-09T08:12:07-04:00'
describe
'810318' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGT' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
9fdd65f6236574c2b308641b4cce1440
92500ceb829b0743df57f419f74c957a91a8cf13
describe
'167556' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGU' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
ca6f345c870a51e9ab7fb53c45fdfa06
1846d7397662ecc7b60beac5ad47e61795e733e6
'2012-05-09T08:10:16-04:00'
describe
'26401' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGV' 'sip-files00080.pro'
b058a9e5dded647a59d5ed83b5e634eb
9d949024b6130bbd6012f64a64fc29ee022d2850
'2012-05-09T08:06:58-04:00'
describe
'65372' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGW' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
f01c93d598cba6cad42840ecd8c24499
61b00ee7e338023884ed2c0b372e8b76dc82f976
'2012-05-09T08:11:33-04:00'
describe
'6499380' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGX' 'sip-files00080.tif'
51ed351636b8ab696471925d045b4f04
93fc203fc0939d4b58ec784f4600226a1e29ddfd
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGY' 'sip-files00080.txt'
3d48e9f1cb34c228a4d7fdb2c0885653
7884080db81c44c53ee61908ae8cd3a2d7f82272
describe
'767045' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXGZ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
cb4b124bcfe5d332ea968109fa76ea13
4f21926c44cc41d1ac325b194f31c34940f90a98
describe
'169463' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHA' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
53ff1f1a48bff0980b373dbad309c303
b5f4e3eb814faacd65870870a1dc43fefdf8198e
'2012-05-09T08:09:42-04:00'
describe
'26392' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHB' 'sip-files00081.pro'
0d1815ea15289ff21ff958b9f37ae705
b649a84102dcf6068a0bcb729dcc5fa042fe61df
describe
'65873' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHC' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
a10e9c1f216505b6680ce262dd85a0d1
a9be82551113faaa34d18014ecd224d74b4b4995
describe
'6153180' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHD' 'sip-files00081.tif'
dd3aac4009fb410a0897991a46818689
18b09981db9f0d22d87959567fd870bcd50e1e7e
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHE' 'sip-files00081.txt'
eb80020acc3307b0a86e112eca020d53
ed78c645f39cf15ed891bfd6e80459d930dc850b
describe
'28569' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHF' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
e991061dd7c6bf6882dd9050c3ee37c8
efdf66c0173e40112fb9e23efe8c68e0a670fafa
describe
'751774' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHG' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
a5fa9ac831c6f73f33901437f46298e1
ad2a679ac5a260b4982331dcfbaa72f36402cab1
describe
'167024' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHH' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
6f8a5d348e78cc37559dbc9ef1799a00
0ad89b72398f98082aee6884d9229cb7cf4fc68f
describe
'25059' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHI' 'sip-files00082.pro'
4cd08af701c1ba6abddb58862a55cfa1
5f3bc6f0b0771cd93fa3eb6ed3c861c5d5fee7c2
describe
'63758' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHJ' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
d93145e476e55ecad29d0d89a7555c46
e37e34429585d024c9f0d492dae84f268060513d
'2012-05-09T08:10:10-04:00'
describe
'6031076' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHK' 'sip-files00082.tif'
2d5b6bc37505d631690127368e84fe1e
4aa8b2ffc4833b46e3fcf3f3557ebae96c4f75e4
'2012-05-09T08:07:22-04:00'
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHL' 'sip-files00082.txt'
671ca7d3ba1260097b810ed728bd2772
3f4167debb59ffcc039b47c72f960c5dc25dd42a
describe
'29948' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHM' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
39efe12cfa71211cf5bfa4819b248552
d5821d973d9704425e16cd103ececcb598c7ec02
describe
'758821' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHN' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
ee8b64e8926df9a4caa8fb8462578705
b9f337c0d65bba7f129c8bfee676ded676b36149
describe
'180422' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHO' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
a05a10d02f35468a7e7f854bec4cc68e
41a82a04864ddaf90d835d0123f768d3e54caf19
'2012-05-09T08:06:59-04:00'
describe
'69030' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHP' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
5466504af3c23d449783b5c7975f11ec
59b0b5c6fa62e04ae7dab3955f3810998480b0b0
'2012-05-09T08:09:05-04:00'
describe
'6087568' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHQ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
16685be59ad76da361968c3e36e7d35d
5ba13b4d4ed892f1cdbca3da2adff536210821f9
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHR' 'sip-files00083.txt'
c2b8affb787ef4f8fc22f7c3a73e3f9e
fa809373655e9ef103d8b703dfd585d697bc3dfd
describe
'29754' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHS' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
3a07e4985bb39b1171d0e983acab4b1d
eb1d45e34eb14b11bacf30fde434c447befc389f
describe
'705221' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHT' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
f84d72edb6432d60ba74f52740bb492a
39dbb297ca210cd26969ad9736733cd2e9a7ec1c
describe
'151862' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHU' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
3e35176b5cb747de0be4b307c614c3cb
9418498045cbc611a38afe1dbd226a621f873300
describe
'26192' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHV' 'sip-files00084.pro'
15c4092d58a576c05cdb00fa3777cf25
d045c52e802f982b6f34753d02e83cd80cd9654c
describe
'65321' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHW' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
6c57aa995d96006a187f89da8c9ef3eb
3d893e833d8e3c76fa8c34a407f81388ba1e6e40
describe
'5658564' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHX' 'sip-files00084.tif'
fc0b8911839b81745001027d1e96fe8d
e7de60fa8391c302b31326dc525dabaf45acc7b3
'2012-05-09T08:10:57-04:00'
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHY' 'sip-files00084.txt'
7340201559323d1fab052f4b5ea07f8a
84c6c81ace0cd46e6911471253f815a145d6dc1a
describe
'29766' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXHZ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
0169a43827aa0930ac668846824692eb
2af512baf1465e4fc092c9e59e43905a26a92838
describe
'791917' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIA' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
853a4e3d60004a66d13b7b158726195b
225bae5ccdf90275bcd52f3f64d2aad608042a6a
describe
'130944' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIB' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
bb0ffb06e3475e7a3abd65134be2f3cb
585c8aaf2c8fa2aba1f7d77d1d53f5dd4c245747
describe
'24650' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIC' 'sip-files00085.pro'
ffdf6216effd7d45ffa151390fdc1dff
95aeffe439122aac2b6d944cf7ead2f724de8cb6
describe
'61881' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXID' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
3c5d9d9ee6f6a51156112dc15f828eff
97685df4f145ca125b9416e4700f1d087109d07b
describe
'6352296' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIE' 'sip-files00085.tif'
f04becc99980de549852082e6a044587
56696c9084eb128e4fb27516f1abedecad0383bf
describe
'26802' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIF' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
137aeb942316f589f4027e3b663d535f
0d793e3cde960398f1cdf0395c9a5e11f0628d16
describe
'686338' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIG' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
f7716db2edb154785fe524a70cc8a744
67eec90d9a6f3ce7a233e01350dec06fc35685dc
describe
'139453' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIH' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
e57da2228c2de6e6858e65631e7ccad3
e113e61a277b82e3c50f5dbbfb217698f3276113
describe
'23499' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXII' 'sip-files00086.pro'
ed7adc7bdff49542eba1b82b82fd1683
416c66f16e7751ed2c75f43c13255abd3d09e4de
describe
'61199' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIJ' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
aaa208e195440ff5b343a0e57bbfc5b7
641283cfd7f303a985646e20ba56cd4a84e439a3
describe
'5507480' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIK' 'sip-files00086.tif'
fca4fc1b360e17f49a6247665848fad9
ab70249d6106f41096323b87d6165fdc465afa02
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIL' 'sip-files00086.txt'
1d8950de22d21a418b12cb5171026af1
2e4922150433820b874b5dc77cd8bd014d33567a
describe
'28839' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIM' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
a85cffb32a3793afd8786367f6e9c870
e1d92d9ebbcc4e1016156f5ec98b6510aa391c8c
'2012-05-09T08:07:25-04:00'
describe
'738999' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIN' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
f9cbd9dbe9b568199c389394c0e8293e
405125681e08a7e00fc8487a70171cb199cba47a
describe
'116343' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIO' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
859e3fefe9ebc32126902a4b3045b4be
8f59523afc2d2cacce7d00a2a5ae528cc5e21e66
describe
'18959' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIP' 'sip-files00087.pro'
22b87c468377290d2f6ae020aa1365e6
686107159e5f1c5cd2df6a6929ae90d14f7641d7
describe
'51995' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIQ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
8713733d17e4cf1f0e3097011e1d981c
a9d53f789cdecc86d34b229a7f954e2f4710d9dc
describe
'5929092' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIR' 'sip-files00087.tif'
64b816109ea88315efbc5030c365f201
88bb07ff959101cd0eaec991ab926a9fd5514808
'2012-05-09T08:07:01-04:00'
describe
'806' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIS' 'sip-files00087.txt'
2d1f321caadf471ebe3669a53e9f0a06
5481483d0d69db54f29dab97657fd68fb4ff2850
describe
'26377' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIT' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
d9f88473d2cbc5c43c90d20a0b3fbed3
855a14231bcc135ea8060b913d56630dc81d891a
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIU' 'sip-files00047.txt'
233e64cad9bc62fd46834e001d5fc52d
638ff184aeef7fcec4bc25ce597249bbbbbeb73d
describe
'761173' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIV' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
e7fc719d8f9164c1f4c6ec99758c7afa
bd6e6786390aa3878b7bb92f58b8c4c5b56a98a6
describe
'61922' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIW' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
841ba9f4ac65c4b5c86620802c5380a4
2123b000dac2a54c8adbc5f5952c197d6d0832be
describe
'141231' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIX' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
f83c154cf6ea117ef01981f54c8a7d95
1389c0afbfc915b2136b89e077438da6f1f2153b
describe
'6110716' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIY' 'sip-files00059.tif'
b508ddf0b10a82a0dead53c9c88d7d2b
32d2e97764e5e2e612949bb2eff356253cfd8f06
describe
'28623' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXIZ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
dce9580a3a57b7131cf56560b7d0ba30
43ccab029840799a66c9a9d054a642dd0743067c
describe
'25968' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJA' 'sip-files00064.pro'
0f4b5df25575c720c852adbc4a938c12
14636f67bbb8cc8fe64e631e2f6fdef596b22132
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJB' 'sip-files00066.txt'
2d5157da8a346a9003a126031c6c83ff
e01c029fc43142050d0f28bac38053f6c938bf1c
describe
'807512' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJC' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
b110448a1b2d3ace45c82b1e7f8230bd
ee801f3975ae50b938e98dbec4d2de097c43a5e1
describe
'64649' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJD' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
686be09619ddc04e352e7e1a6f57b4f6
dd90c4e60e52e689cd336b7b0d76dacbb5ec8b97
describe
'133021' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJE' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
a530bc66bdd4c05a440aa5813f1ec091
a6df0a5ebd0572bb0f2163e9848bd4db7a96dbd9
describe
'5386444' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJF' 'sip-files00078.tif'
53942e15c3f708fbb99492895927dac9
e3ba453478198731b30afa1dbf2de755ad05459b
describe
'27904' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJG' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
ff330e47428c5dc0bf3ac67830e09265
03a2d404fc0906cba59a338746378f2bbdd69f41
describe
'27584' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJH' 'sip-files00083.pro'
da884caa8b53fbf9690046b9e5321fa6
3ac2b6aaa665f88bb363a41f268656f4729b9b15
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJI' 'sip-files00085.txt'
7dc8ac1eff1562bb99a5b47194d52667
14a825e6eb73e3d460ee63f1e28d0377ef7331a7
describe
'150685' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJJ' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
52c8f8d548475f6b3927c8394f49778c
a7c7573d7d6731c4f20c6cd2302fb24749e4c55a
'2012-05-09T08:12:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJK' 'sip-files00088.pro'
a7172f42ee90ff5cccdf64ac035ce0e0
c8b2448f99b9e02cc58aff5a1933e653bf38ea81
describe
'65548' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJL' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
d3c3a3c631c4ce533ef343a2ec553d2e
86f3de2e6a063833dd381ed027c521dbf9811e15
describe
'5774396' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJM' 'sip-files00088.tif'
a038e0213f370eeb000b5bfe53d9539d
c345394c29f5a57624be9a076559e98fe92dc27d
'2012-05-09T08:11:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJN' 'sip-files00088.txt'
f9dc1e728efd4989bf2cab53c3336ad1
857e848ebfac29059e18ebdcc9bb021523809c87
'2012-05-09T08:11:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJO' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
28f9afb99ac8f666bd6606aa39c9c5aa
60d9ccc4549a8d48343181d3c277a05d2fab1b7a
describe
'712017' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJP' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
9ead5833654f4f80a7e8429d9437a800
17a3cdd0464efa7415627da948f235f10d8e446a
describe
'138170' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJQ' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
f56cd6f3913c6e7e0f39fbf784cb8d43
bc14604fd6521c9965605386ff5577c21948eec1
'2012-05-09T08:08:08-04:00'
describe
'23294' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJR' 'sip-files00089.pro'
635ec4e30dfae354a822749a19ce300a
417ef577000fb49033d4bab639b36afd8703afe2
describe
'61638' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJS' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
0ff5bc3dd34dd2b600a0ff539e645419
72d21b9bc3f74dc381a9afc740ecd1a5c30e35a0
describe
'5712968' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJT' 'sip-files00089.tif'
7112f55e952a889702747da37d4d289c
21cfaaa4a55d4e3523955c02def33b3794a22e3f
'2012-05-09T08:09:23-04:00'
describe
'980' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJU' 'sip-files00089.txt'
1b0c83cbf1097d9cd708473c1ba28f2a
28efa3d9076b42b6cefbdc8fff114d56196637cd
describe
'29041' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJV' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
1638ebe288d69941cc4d1beaa11eac05
a1d840245a867b65546955561b9453ad15b45215
describe
'796793' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJW' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
0446a2fe7000a915390932b01d800e00
aee81420971085fe89d097d748656d9a8b4343ae
describe
'148956' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJX' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
91f5320423ff3fe789473f937a4f45e2
89adb34a3767c35bf472ceff44fdaac639111376
describe
'25995' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJY' 'sip-files00090.pro'
2cd4dcc65c56890c262d64e0e4bf78ef
4622bab54c166587cfc8c07df273b12bb8e51727
describe
'6391356' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXJZ' 'sip-files00090.tif'
46ae96ed42f8f8f9c453e00025d4f122
b1cd855df671362e08362677b2f0d46b3ef126a6
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKA' 'sip-files00090.txt'
87a4c9cf881a545496ecb356970d0fdc
3d8bb3a6a84de4e3b39936b917a18c8be1b0559e
describe
'28067' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKB' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
25fa1a62ec86ba2bb92626aa962e404e
5845910c096cd9a9983d59a9b1a22ce338c89c89
describe
'774661' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKC' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
53f84311cc551ea0cbb9515d1b89f501
31601a29426a03874cf4dd7c08102d38510b6f1a
describe
'152569' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKD' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
b246ae04c45b5c2df5c44a64a9fa0df6
a8652e7930ba4789dff245c94e4041b4f9e9c996
describe
'27537' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKE' 'sip-files00091.pro'
91fa1fa3e64cc46b3fbe7d3a6ece0d61
b0690e2d462605229f8347cd0ccf26b605ec7ebd
describe
'63723' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKF' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
5676568c291026b62c5ce2092d17551a
a48306a6654df66de21f69e0e752072300ebe15e
describe
'6214064' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKG' 'sip-files00091.tif'
c858293bdbf9d792164c5d4fba13221d
76bd7d9a51b02ec31a58b285d15e374d85aae5d1
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKH' 'sip-files00091.txt'
1e8ee280ca64f9a7b84d6936aa551b43
e8b140f683cdca437fc6d41f3e9a19f71f84b49b
describe
'28857' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKI' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
d71e5d39eab29df7fb0e3e1f89bc219c
ebbf6cc2d2ed96fff88078677c6a38afeefc466c
describe
'787550' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKJ' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
c6be6756aec3ad2ba2f99b3c98a72526
17ef2639b5da9cca8ea76a1b91439435efe06e42
describe
'152188' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKK' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
d50959e4312f052fd6809f5f09fd546c
796d1c7180e71e2598966b3b43780087b733df3e
describe
'28959' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKL' 'sip-files00092.pro'
c30f5a9a005c4eeb5838cba9599f251d
5a2901530d6e72e058c9b1d9a9ea2d9138d3dae3
describe
'61100' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKM' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
4ef4354f93645e8b55f8125fc58d9684
808b263b294a52b78675ec0126acc374b9cbc2c3
describe
'6317560' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKN' 'sip-files00092.tif'
d30db84a7a9f66979172d9115992fba1
7217f0365344b002db89edb7f1d8c41becb25538
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKO' 'sip-files00092.txt'
652f5319152ef852f8c0da0f515531de
cd166cc17f0e942a92a28b9894e815540b7165da
describe
'28111' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKP' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
cac17fdc0f4dfd80e331855648a8c531
abe5f147da15f0bf03584e0f9d017467c168d242
describe
'792820' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKQ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
e2947682bb00a4366da162ef57b7bd7b
fa125f33acf45125f65ce5929ba8ad4600db9bb7
describe
'145789' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKR' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
c198f9202e3f21edeba4fb66b8923f3e
529c8cb1c7c91a4f0007e545a00e9a610e0114ab
describe
'26660' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKS' 'sip-files00093.pro'
371ff3b95c80b1db3a5a02cab1fd3ab5
9c778f47efa583f8974c57000a1879909cc4e677
describe
'61992' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKT' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
5259fec17af224b189d2e5bb14c07fb9
8041c5ad459a0170d826b7be3693cfc08659e8e1
describe
'6359644' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKU' 'sip-files00093.tif'
4c434ae0f5e6f2289faaad5d184f2c5a
68b3fd865d86b215584ea349e0d97b96f708afe7
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKV' 'sip-files00093.txt'
66b0eea890784e0883b899d715f1d4ae
6fb2aad12306ee6be8f95015c176afd8109e769e
describe
'28163' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKW' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
4409ba32fca2d27c97b5e2391401f2a8
3cd804837e8d48a574983420d1d2201a129282ca
describe
'725325' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKX' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
bac6c185cf60d910e06e8bc965edd080
d06940fac247831a336d23d4997c3b5d7d82ad4b
describe
'148101' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKY' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
d2ed3514accb012c77f8036707aacbe2
8a00bc479ebdfbd83ba36b8c09bfad36aa3301b8
'2012-05-09T08:09:55-04:00'
describe
'25637' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXKZ' 'sip-files00094.pro'
3e7ed60c38e6e7b01b152870cef986d4
8ac5817a0ba9acd89a89c6668db7d578a8dea180
describe
'64219' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLA' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
810935b9a66b02dec16c6f71d49ce803
ed74a96630675a27ff81e141e6662b74b6fe38a6
describe
'5819508' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLB' 'sip-files00094.tif'
69d4343b70759d7c0b0993fcbb559e0a
5b3eb7ba585055ab6eda458e773b242eb7219396
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLC' 'sip-files00094.txt'
3aca150e360e3586d6106d56a10272d0
1a12f007e929a70335ba93c5f48f07e5abc24bce
describe
'29377' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLD' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
d01457b7304855900860212e5cd7419b
353dbc077daeedaa441350fa6acd6274cda50500
describe
'749814' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLE' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
e9f54b3efed8e9861342373c886fe630
dc24b49cc744a8972332e5034f4a1b98754e4a73
describe
'25336' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLF' 'sip-files00095.pro'
8a178cd045c19694cceeefae07105b6d
9be5032ab76832128e89060d015c503cae067ea8
describe
'63202' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLG' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
67a18b40b10cdb8d469c078cbb804beb
4b31957c577ee5dba18f3081b1f871d91c7647cd
describe
'6015480' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLH' 'sip-files00095.tif'
05674dde4b838e1d92c2d15246d23e33
9d62dfd32861be4fbdc4fa149c56e08d0899cb63
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLI' 'sip-files00095.txt'
97f2117fbc7a0db3120f00e1477964c0
b9938b87480c5bbcdb5693d3a1328eba2b479582
describe
'29399' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLJ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
4e7cc7a9e3f4d8b6b19ef23f049a5b54
0d8d7623fbbc630f056c90561619e863d9637d48
describe
'774643' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLK' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
e770ec2abe11928db0dae4699c3a1dc6
ff73dfcf0d031d939477e6067902eec02d7479a8
describe
'144808' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLL' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
b69d31369fcc4c93fcb045b3b4ec6db3
ec229abee4d2ab111a2eae02f0f304a504672f93
describe
'26261' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLM' 'sip-files00096.pro'
fa0c41c4c06eea527769809aaf448de2
45e7f7c58c0c4f41c9000b69804cc91cd47c090b
describe
'62907' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLN' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
53aa808bc460c8da8ba90b2e66949ba9
ad62804cda572ad5dabfdf5accd6449475d2c213
describe
'6214032' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLO' 'sip-files00096.tif'
33fcf55774b28047515a367b08a61fac
0fe96d14444a1ff7850a55b487e39eab681d3e7d
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLP' 'sip-files00096.txt'
646d827277c1fc3983e8f4674d0ecc60
c0b955ba89d084fa30a3439d2a0d5f110043358c
describe
'28078' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLQ' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
8a9e6309421c60dbd3a4c816098ab37f
ab141cf39757162c8e85ab082b6fd78bfdd8a5fb
'2012-05-09T08:10:44-04:00'
describe
'800673' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLR' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
ab47052c36430a9e90e8ed013f459d2f
eead45bc325a09427af1d64ccdd865e74cc6da39
describe
'128728' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLS' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
8fc1e496b865094c1b524388e474b95b
3fdc47bab54c36b74d71fc5cf65f79a85533eea0
describe
'22180' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLT' 'sip-files00097.pro'
2812b74b83343a1dfa7aaa5f1d99d52d
36d57904ca6c3ca81ec37615831f8ea4dfb76013
describe
'56432' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLU' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
a0c3bdd9bf2857260bca9e8b0b009c40
7d65e209c9a23435e6ef012a174215fb43271ea4
'2012-05-09T08:11:14-04:00'
describe
'921' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLV' 'sip-files00097.txt'
3242b15e723d483d67240473a5051056
7a867442377964ba3a2725829ff68ae31dd24dcf
describe
'27044' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLW' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
8c307945eb8b32fd69e600b41af3f753
f716bd951a050dcecc1cb352b96c8472001b8ced
'2012-05-09T08:10:36-04:00'
describe
'712137' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLX' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
535d2db05af1b3b5e7203a177f1bcaba
212a242a73631b31ac96e473e1c5b1f6b0dca0d3
describe
'123705' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLY' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
b27f9e020502465c329f3f59ec4cd5b8
ae4eb090a20fa302d2d4fae9183abcb5e40787d7
describe
'19763' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXLZ' 'sip-files00098.pro'
14a5aa2ab3997c6fbfa7dcbbf08230b4
39f1b9567251d3a11fab9df14c7c3548ddce7700
describe
'53767' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMA' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
bddc5d2cd5f7f257b48eb1b8bb49c3ac
32d9590cdd7dcd4b5702b40bd4d6fe56acf560ef
'2012-05-09T08:12:16-04:00'
describe
'5713864' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMB' 'sip-files00098.tif'
266a55397f23a92dfae5cf80944dc385
0a24630df6bee2465d449d27d960debc9e796449
'2012-05-09T08:10:38-04:00'
describe
'839' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMC' 'sip-files00098.txt'
76bea8a5e62b1e6c0ef3d37da69221e1
5da3247a249a17c53a029bb9b1d804115fcf42c2
describe
'27454' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMD' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
6ab676f7d90b0d4ade4940d8d25e9d6b
139cadfac33f28ed5019641cb76accd4fd15203d
describe
'737692' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXME' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
818d57653469268df2e14193ce24a4d5
86cb303e2e2a79adff01746702e0fef572afbe2f
describe
'156575' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMF' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
d5e665e0a46c08c4228cc49262f3d00f
11e7985788fdfd9a4a7799464e71f1deaac95093
describe
'27443' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMG' 'sip-files00099.pro'
adffe8fd36156c39a8cd3ea89d803b48
9120b13bf11cab300ee9d8189156286d6068b7b3
describe
'66316' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMH' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
b185a6cf87241e3242fbd5baf39e2663
449435ffcef7884fc4de6f46545f29780ce717dc
describe
'5918320' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMI' 'sip-files00099.tif'
2d6beaac6c5735e4612e0383e1481c3b
c769ce375ddbbe575c019bb5a61b6af1bde9408a
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMJ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
155e7f29747ec142eeb906e267770ce9
fc99d8514552bc814a121f8d0468e49619c33639
describe
'812532' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMK' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
c939975a3c259c5d6352aa6ba4458fdb
1e77cede892dad91607fc503bc3a2954e74bcc1e
describe
'141853' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXML' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
bffb7c5166159f00f6cbf33acf691a4f
24725fdf057e88fefc68be4ab6e80c8074363ea3
describe
'25379' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMM' 'sip-files00100.pro'
9de67402d577af07adf63365cb648c6e
f010f3609d28a0ae02a722b104908e7b3aa121fa
describe
'59793' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMN' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
0d6c05d3d42ec2142f7c9eb016af45c7
329031a77d568860d997af716750ac9c8cf43a4e
describe
'6517072' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMO' 'sip-files00100.tif'
c3baa9db9e2262c6b21bc3611242aa71
df942be6104b5772a3d5aadbca9fc14504b61376
'2012-05-09T08:07:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMP' 'sip-files00100.txt'
3bf1e402aaad7864db8a690f40f59d56
0e6e20b98e3726722359d85db08a4519cf3c403c
describe
'27550' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMQ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
43435f0cbd028c41bc4cb896e6620499
1dd6bfafde23585b2f3c04a323df68dfc1c2be09
describe
'793485' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMR' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
2c0984d0b8fd2e0a75cf570a715666d2
fad1e30c2cc780bbcf3ab4bb23b1912a9e8e5726
describe
'146295' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMS' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
6a0ba00f6a7921b7d6923a7270f02550
296dc0a5147697fc3d631fa5759b3ec9fb16d15e
describe
'23526' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMT' 'sip-files00101.pro'
a459581ec83fb5b53e0d3da16873cc19
8893d517b7e355a398e9b886e208114da1720daa
describe
'60846' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMU' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
f786bcd5c142d9f1ea528d77a8c225e1
4003d555194190ddcd6eec6ad44a1fdcab659b0f
describe
'6365328' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMV' 'sip-files00101.tif'
01a9a2d51e844d296faac38892820960
cccf5e6a376827525a9287100f6763bd19bc8941
'2012-05-09T08:11:40-04:00'
describe
'988' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMW' 'sip-files00101.txt'
5ec88ceb03eb52b253ec0228381befd6
61dd0687c72af419952ca70fc7e11a4e76e80fff
describe
'28491' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMX' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
b98c5a14c07ba0638f56e06ff31d40e3
40759193b4f340b22926155c00a8bda0dd79a3c0
describe
'815685' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMY' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
8d1518385aa901ca8a63702ee24c06d9
f491dbf34c58843e943da5d61931ca492ef2f156
describe
'146733' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXMZ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
adefe335258053bf23a78accddc0ca6a
ead0f4fc740dbcb318e8d5b864ee3edf5e1e3ec2
describe
'69298' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNA' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
ca91febf7cff49a7b42f3547daae6abe
59a3c59400d0c0dba7f9d4786ad4138f483db28d
describe
'6547528' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNB' 'sip-files00102.tif'
c3e39ad015f019cb0e879c7b89285ecf
2cd94832ee4a47427080990082bb7e01338e9ae9
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNC' 'sip-files00102.txt'
fb65bd88b620104351b2a77131964c39
947d65819b1d37df13dc28a5434e50fa7a5d48a1
describe
'33207' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXND' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
ede7f4fa910fe649201e004ae3f38476
ed64a9d7945ae8f742f991bc4ffe423796a5183c
'2012-05-09T08:09:38-04:00'
describe
'812015' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNE' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
a00369bb5529ccba7a622cc1929aed50
da8b2762242ee24b0f5d8a1cf72f2de20a125f33
describe
'150891' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNF' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
ada8062705c9924faad77f03b3ab179c
f74bf58349d87ed1428fcf14846736dab016be6a
describe
'27142' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNG' 'sip-files00103.pro'
f1c592a4c07b03a66de5b46a1f621533
9c54e652ed2ecb73a7f1e18451a26a27399c3922
describe
'63549' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNH' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
4fa63b3c32bb9c3f36c71edda176d570
d47a540899abf123d2ea95d9ef7c508a22e00d17
describe
'6512892' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNI' 'sip-files00103.tif'
4fda206f37a068ac736839d65a02e278
bc41b8869a43e67127ae0ea094554ac3c9dbf347
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNJ' 'sip-files00103.txt'
721b49d1ae1cf6c2cbb8959f6f708354
af3780694b398db38b4a89fbd112ee2114c359af
describe
'29248' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNK' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
8c399e89494eff88f829f55c68ae3e34
0b02ec4b3c14bbfbef4e95ffc0b005900207606d
describe
'751232' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNL' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
52237420983a53d28a312f3baf336156
19d2f662ab7440ca92ed975ff43b6ce0bdf82ede
describe
'152001' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNM' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
036db2d0f1042c123299ba2091491ae7
ba01561cb8a3e2adc88de4cb245cd5d7ee937ee5
describe
'25948' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNN' 'sip-files00104.pro'
0d092080f60a42e05426d881f77d9e09
ee6940a602586d74e00e106f26ca74a6afe5406d
describe
'66370' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNO' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
d26ee93b611bd213d805299c85e28bb6
5e1ad60d9e76f25d944b1d72875d517354eb38d7
describe
'6026764' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNP' 'sip-files00104.tif'
48e8e8425d502d2deca103358d4f5cff
d12c85c678a86a2d315363bfc2a5ebb937523d24
'2012-05-09T08:08:20-04:00'
describe
'30104' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNQ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
925f4ab416f33431b956ce485fa33a5f
f0cff543ca231f3cf6e82828eb86602e57009403
describe
'759020' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNR' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
23d1c995f22d79498d9746e196a66379
947cef3f4d61347b1a0b0a40eb2633d1d553c30c
describe
'154231' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNS' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
38b4cbb9483612b6b8ea8b0f0dda2ebe
3a3d17835b73fac8d5c44b53e6b5f2dc0c69dd22
describe
'26054' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNT' 'sip-files00105.pro'
25393d3f1cfb446b5d443ab9617773c1
135bf290ee949256033df19e121648f1e514d3a5
describe
'65373' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNU' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
7d3232c7ef7360e8f4c799d848147b06
01ac412abe45d378274bbd299de5eacffe3eb55c
describe
'6088940' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNV' 'sip-files00105.tif'
f4e6cebfa4dd5a2a99a8d98671e316db
026d341ac8e8a4dd3baaacf237afac63a395ddd2
'2012-05-09T08:08:41-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNW' 'sip-files00105.txt'
2792252d6d6b6d0ad9c9cd249ad350e6
b08ea18ad1864fc3a6d3c085a777101c88a1e592
describe
'29641' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNX' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
d3ca47e2223c371e4d344efbdbe1e603
8462b8792db3ec3634b4efb257cd0d0cf9690fe4
describe
'808679' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNY' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
e86e01a6cf2798dcdfd1dcc80c8311c9
0b3d4326e278fbcfd8c1eca124d0154a5031b251
describe
'137732' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXNZ' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
586f1f2da23f6d92dbb67e04863cca8d
7b8392823d436f05fdd14f93af735e495661808a
describe
'24584' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOA' 'sip-files00106.pro'
a03a920fc0da112a10da554d4a4018be
8b2875dc334b3b8b672fcb5b8cc730b5388c74d9
describe
'58302' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOB' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
3d0e0d5f5be4d974a37a2889b77c9668
2c358504b98656286e2ea93c0326fc60f411dfee
describe
'6486664' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOC' 'sip-files00106.tif'
1b635d916b2eb09c226b3f06d32a7d85
0d7a977004a0babbb31e8e67d77e6fa67031359f
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOD' 'sip-files00106.txt'
a5be921d2557cbf5682856fc574e578b
bcff38f6cf6b1d15dabe039325aa89ec74473348
describe
'28285' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOE' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
cd901bf2b5ec66782c32a95eb163fa74
5283fa0e2a65f0f942470b4112e29c4d61b2ae1d
describe
'146650' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOF' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
b7df3f7a764a9ea1d9064fcaa072bf87
3cf29dada8a86773adcb346928ab642b6f76c7c7
describe
'25153' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOG' 'sip-files00107.pro'
43e2e5627871488d80485611e054e790
e13597f2ce743090d79dec485510c3432d1346e0
describe
'64923' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOH' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
b9257648e49b9692d1af2aa4e9b7e90f
8224002087d45c569faf8f12a31742a737793726
'2012-05-09T08:09:02-04:00'
describe
'6184204' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOI' 'sip-files00107.tif'
79a7c08bafffd6a163fc0150705d133b
3e187e7ab4e9ece00f45b092d13f76661d0813d1
'2012-05-09T08:12:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOJ' 'sip-files00107.txt'
1771167ce0b472d7b6e057a02f20d0e9
ce006d7431c54b167486d945429413c5753f1873
describe
'28931' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOK' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
882e7c52c042b76d1f0de2d7ef4d8540
9fc987077a1aaf1c68ad15c78da0cde792fe8910
describe
'819406' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOL' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
2691c3a2801cb25b0982c7c19e15741a
785900db698e5d522ef614c63c6339dc01ba1e42
describe
'153111' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOM' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
74d394005700e9b114553fbaebac86fd
429fd4e252e9ad66de8fb86b6e7637584129041a
describe
'26952' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXON' 'sip-files00108.pro'
c0308dc6682d47253cc08a2f9048d759
bebd2bf640e8b2955bb2e80e9c462212f8985ce6
describe
'66483' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOO' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
2a87102ed3d2112cb281c42fc428a55f
0e2e0b2fdd51083382eea3b0e7b097196363eaba
describe
'6572036' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOP' 'sip-files00108.tif'
11119791d74bf5a0be8c59e61559b779
7846bf7b1e2057279553120f46003e956e54eeab
'2012-05-09T08:08:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOQ' 'sip-files00108.txt'
6cb0ddd7c7c1245e06cd6bea72ab302e
37403861e46ee7b6ffbc33faa6b864eb781ad78c
describe
'28655' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOR' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
74c43d828cda601fca385472f3966ecf
b56e0dd3987399568ff2220877a3e4b810e73dbc
describe
'785361' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOS' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
16be6eed0d06b2db152a3621511e68b8
3f959b5eae05a65e2822e2b49c56feb4475b7315
describe
'152541' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOT' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
6cc6ae39785bbd9f7b28ea1cf445bef4
42ba60b5eabe7109b580ef7d885877dbad390389
describe
'25245' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOU' 'sip-files00109.pro'
29d0fbcd9934fbdd04e7bf0e1eef8d99
0de436e6ceedb041db1b85cbf26e2a23898157c5
describe
'6299644' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOV' 'sip-files00109.tif'
163e3b88eca32665bda6691da2b0570c
414a6d08d92c94bf920a4f7e0c1bb5b59de37877
'2012-05-09T08:11:00-04:00'
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOW' 'sip-files00109.txt'
7428cea6e59c8ed204d5c23541ee0d27
4a12e5a8ae40680ee62cce49d1417b8fe0d85345
describe
'28858' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOX' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
1d82ff74cd5b0e79a246b0b48c9f4a27
b8d1367ee2beb1ea7db3597d933a9bc8b9f72d2d
describe
'821706' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOY' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
f3a37264858f5d2d298eba4ea5376715
749f1c415321c1b7920fbef1257899ea558f5ac8
describe
'51093' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXOZ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
962d16a3111274a8f3b5efa4bc0639a3
9a430097deeaf165975bfea8664878fc3b8980a9
'2012-05-09T08:12:04-04:00'
describe
'4741' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPA' 'sip-files00110.pro'
ba049b8c59b9f06c9b8c2de72a36b286
3cf5735981b31df693bb8d4960e2e15064aa4ade
describe
'29374' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPB' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
49829094eb0ec41798338e231a6e24f8
a2b0e0b4e42cb934c723ccef3880472e158bfeef
describe
'6590844' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPC' 'sip-files00110.tif'
2ec2ae54c26841b8705f333f4539f14d
003828491f0f8cb2c716d27e0824e729db68b75e
describe
'201' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPD' 'sip-files00110.txt'
3f9b344751084eaab1f74a987cbbd490
d2af969ecafb29d5e53ec132363b3206bf1403a7
describe
'20371' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPE' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
bd84661e1851203f9bb45f5b612898c9
954094a3d1608dad9254e82d8f8204d47f2744e5
'2012-05-09T08:10:49-04:00'
describe
'742502' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPF' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
4c30279b0081d76335b1a388c15076f9
d4af196b3fdac1c53b23c639a2781affeff89031
describe
'124905' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPG' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
149f9bfe9a9c36708d1bd9610871bc26
9e3242e4f192690d0b7349abc33e9f9a5f47cde8
describe
'20113' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPH' 'sip-files00111.pro'
862ee8a2b127cb5067496b6e0536cfc2
de9a91354badb4ae3e70e710145c13427ef01de2
describe
'55596' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPI' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
18da7cb1d5c971e9df2a64e58d60881f
c281c5b02b5b78f46993a9bb7aa3abb490e010a6
describe
'5957244' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPJ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
6e3c8ce5dc4655acc2999018608ef625
18afe32a4871853e5c3abf54a92d582d34b0a32e
describe
'859' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPK' 'sip-files00111.txt'
a90ad51977f9a9d753ec73152d81e286
0e12cdd4147363d0b61885bceb994cc550262999
describe
'26703' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPL' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
9d1a1632f69b0c17c0afcb66b23d735e
b20c084fd36280774f00c61e0f819e2cc48b4e1c
describe
'807573' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPM' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
d3e0e4c8d24a1bf49a93c72bc5e7cf75
1b54b04cbce9085821289a859ee74f61274a0137
describe
'151108' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPN' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
f5fd83c1519cece6a8f41f9aca90d89a
2984f86e95a7d194f43471f56ea8e0f9fb9bf827
describe
'25679' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPO' 'sip-files00112.pro'
96de03406cc84a79f67a1818be52eb67
9ab3d3721b41aa130cdc36995878f36e49a773dd
describe
'59932' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPP' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
f8835cdaee6bd40bc44d9206e2d62a6f
8ba32d22c6d682ab6abb329f5dac295aea108a2a
describe
'6477604' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPQ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
208522c3b283319d8f55adbd2059c3ba
50bae41a72fb38b6c7e123c663e5f5482e986016
'2012-05-09T08:08:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPR' 'sip-files00112.txt'
048270685cb0956c1eaffbe20bad5e16
cfb05bf904e772c37070166671e6358db4cd6977
describe
'28358' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPS' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
2195b4cb82ff0a196fc0802a01f43829
e6a58443c983e7c4565f3c27be964736f0fbf2c6
describe
'784519' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPT' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
dac08f3fb10d497afe216c9a0d8201a8
92d612bbfe20f1e901ff8387187dc9cd4808e53d
describe
'147843' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPU' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
dd85a79596d2e9e6bb4b04e23eee8341
e2e489acaa29632817c97fb10ec0cf479901069d
describe
'24840' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPV' 'sip-files00113.pro'
5d128823d25849ee91fa29e2fdb9f0ae
586ab9a933a49d419c60cc14a6289d9d2303cee1
describe
'59071' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPW' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
32b756107ca814f8ac93b6a9e0f81790
b2b6847755b104fd0411ad41f6cd623bb020c8d2
describe
'6293116' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPX' 'sip-files00113.tif'
6676ba36cb977985871627f29b449fc5
262ff5d8841df0ec966515a4700b959805f334bf
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPY' 'sip-files00113.txt'
bb5f8e14ba87d4a395e0de4b0d050944
dc55f24513bc07e06b6f5ad8ba40f45950aeb7d3
describe
'28917' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXPZ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
cfc549bd86fd64afd5f8fda75cb17b37
cc595a3ac241df50d47f75f3af199365ede02f4e
describe
'208228' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQA' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
a618c92ef896d4f887c714b259314167
c310cc0f3647a6f46f75f8ad9b1806a69e4a1f0d
describe
'23713' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQB' 'sip-files00114.pro'
ace81a18cc5b4f117416cb88e24edc57
84f889a27060415318af996a50840b0c213bc319
'2012-05-09T08:09:50-04:00'
describe
'61173' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQC' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
3089f70d241a3143b1f932bd0f84ab59
5adc933d9115a8b27c780e487e2d0d2242f2e8e5
describe
'1682668' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQD' 'sip-files00114.tif'
e915ab1795619bb5ab7b9f7e4ba7cae0
8032f56a04ea0431cda52d93e7606091a5d4dc63
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQE' 'sip-files00114.txt'
6f1a67a5dd7afd18dc43b3b0e8a2379c
94e04d717a8f38ec060d3015684652f2b3ba763d
describe
'28360' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQF' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
c421b58fdb11c7850e6a9a0a3ecbace7
4c66afecbe77119826cbe5ff35cdd07d58517c3d
describe
'202309' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQG' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
ed0ba481ec3044a51b7a040d77a9f13d
34d5f06d6a26277e98b504fb26b6e2a6c60e2fd7
describe
'177761' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQH' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
4b9bcbe9ad7094da207fbeabd05e3119
7122bac36075b72b2d80bc2b36e8b7d23f75a7b6
describe
'24217' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQI' 'sip-files00115.pro'
bbfd1e8b84f63f8bd898d0bb84b06ed3
8da7ea53dfebaf678cde1609431469a5d82b0d87
describe
'68665' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQJ' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
ecbf3d189e3f02c6d565dda795a2e8e4
5e8ff40ebacb4d87a5693d7c301fc7139046f817
describe
'1635244' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQK' 'sip-files00115.tif'
fac83069c03ae9d01c652628e272b532
c30352b377d46948ebc65cd0074c8fcf41dedb52
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQL' 'sip-files00115.txt'
75f1bd56c63133e4ac38b56a58258b88
f8235aa12a0e9a1753afb70c140f93e3f4b0e0fc
describe
'29255' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQM' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
c1ba9d6f4764538cb17a153bb85d2131
63fc61afd77216ca078f6ec2f9164c3dd2c90314
describe
'198661' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQN' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
d7e8944a7b1931a11817046c0464331c
1b28a049721b8fd36380126a99c9c2e26cbb3554
describe
'190625' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQO' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
34b491faf0cea0ca57590e76bcdf44ce
7e9d50d4a15c8a3084b59de28be85515224d38ce
describe
'25877' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQP' 'sip-files00116.pro'
5787737eb04491d908eaebb091473e01
4d8f60bb3193fd73fd153c7233f2d39797c27e1d
describe
'68708' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQQ' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
7e1b477f58f7071de33c838de4484597
ffa3b02bcb1176605c86833a5f3585476b37a218
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQR' 'sip-files00116.txt'
54af55b03832d237994d27e8b21e7cfb
709d9d2baada512d0f186d0648de1f9a62349b92
describe
'29905' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQS' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
5fb8ddad2751c9afa4932f5ccaf01071
12baadeeac8ad922c043cd1f7fd7d502c65ae659
describe
'203966' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQT' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
122ab65012a51c1627099611c52584dd
b7d67063cd74aefebdfbd2cf13537d46046d03ed
describe
'187674' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQU' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
bd38bcab4c2a6872669d1331afea34d3
3e8e16fd0c9426d306b0ec3e1c7ba8a1b0fe2f45
describe
'25626' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQV' 'sip-files00117.pro'
3f7249013aacda13e46a92fa3631800c
49d501b7c05c3dabcc25097f78d31d1fe186a780
describe
'70957' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQW' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
6cc9c28ffbba0c4171e27ca4cbdbec47
8be1105f00cb8554c572bd49ab9ea7f798a0147b
describe
'1648796' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQX' 'sip-files00117.tif'
40603cfefc8d9980261699e4745ed011
28459647be5970aa951c326a4ea3b82496b7378c
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQY' 'sip-files00117.txt'
87aac4f8eac305b4b1dedfd324f3c75b
18188c4629428d4f65cf1c4625133820f9836bd5
describe
'28910' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXQZ' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
87d6cc6f7136bf606113d1af2d447787
2c1cc60696025a76e09c5ec636335e0f06b339b4
describe
'201797' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRA' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
560c2ddabd1b9617e91611e6d4831e40
25f56bf19c2fd914a272f44860747c981657884c
describe
'190728' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRB' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
6ae393830094798479443236e957f3c8
72b62e05765b46e17d8af24a314616fbc566ed5b
describe
'26409' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRC' 'sip-files00118.pro'
45c78a23ea45ac11cc7de3b840e9b704
cad8d9e88cae33a8281e747447e7914678ea7ad7
describe
'66070' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRD' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
fcd6a1c2c6fc39443f6dbd65b4494539
b0977b6243bbc6f14cf758d5b95ce8bb275240f1
describe
'1631200' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRE' 'sip-files00118.tif'
71f1c0a5a788e730571e53d681f2751a
b62884904bd7860fe09df22fb0a544324c666f0e
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRF' 'sip-files00118.txt'
ca7a2ff39441381681568e09239c8c3d
5c4e980aa57c49099a9d147edaed3cbc8b1d43a1
describe
'206113' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRG' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
e804d55a603d4cdd94de7c33791f59ac
f1445912e155a4107d3925a8fcf246ebd0e91a58
describe
'171654' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRH' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
edc1a7563bc9fa8b659a81f490a66d35
a1d67b05ac6bbf6ae8a135659def3e3a9c2982c1
describe
'24561' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRI' 'sip-files00119.pro'
4f9d93ab62df73588dae346d7d249f9c
cc26dfea5dba0f6f21bb97c13af283b1d550cd31
describe
'64159' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRJ' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
8788d6b91631fa0630a58e099acd3b71
8c952f6092f0a23180bc6585754ff2224797bc81
describe
'1666560' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRK' 'sip-files00119.tif'
f04d8b94ae0c0a61dd3d973a24055ebe
5b2c454e50d1d9d903757279f9cc8527461f46a1
describe
'1020' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRL' 'sip-files00119.txt'
16881669aa816aac9a108b4c0a5014e0
c78bef07d5d6568d17fe881b2236ce724f60da83
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRM' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
5d08236ff58aa0f6cf740267a01a361d
ec6afdb92d194cec0b23ca0a31993d85eed2d481
describe
'195202' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRN' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
4da9ace60a5260b500974f72a030df8f
89a57a486ef4dc81e6c611f9d1406796599c5abd
describe
'187925' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRO' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
2b83090346cb79348c79e8473867eadd
b8f473f330bc4e60f556beb775de509a631b94cc
describe
'26451' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRP' 'sip-files00120.pro'
8548e1ec33c1b2708e8e88773d28470b
9ebb1f590559f20db1301019a9eee643623a3f86
describe
'74106' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRQ' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
a3308cef28216ae0ccd1e98f037cdbde
452e91bd6d2b942f0adc7afcc72c3b53d633fb04
describe
'1578760' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRR' 'sip-files00120.tif'
bb4d07490a5b257172cb468d8997bea7
d130a87a3529925a32465c75bef674129681fb33
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRS' 'sip-files00120.txt'
6c0044b8cae2b6308febd01a7858880b
326c57586c0070d75346cd5437025491b2a9461e
describe
'29433' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRT' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
32bab19fa10da93190dd7393b8b766a2
71f3ed221516b4aa73e699dd0e6a3bdfc7fac65b
describe
'197235' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRU' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
c27e194295ed70938a252b474076bdeb
e26632c12f6de8295b7a093afb85264e0dfd2f97
describe
'186579' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRV' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
6dde65a9fa2d61ffa4c11e10ace9c366
7167680bf3731f4da2aca689184da5461dc345cf
describe
'64512' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRW' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
bf97600f700dbc9c677777664cd41fd5
dad254b07fd5436e00eb8e5c9e3067005c31683b
describe
'1594804' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRX' 'sip-files00121.tif'
51b45befe52e1185cc908e9f782fc3e1
f6dc5616b2d622e974a5e025f0c4e216a6d13300
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRY' 'sip-files00121.txt'
87382edd64d3bb4a1595e370a08c4e82
a8a4ab4524c8b6728b512b089a90a2a8e466c4b4
describe
'29209' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXRZ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
5309c3756678c41ac381a3668dd7e7cc
2f66be236291c63a18c069757be8f93cded7d58b
describe
'188622' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSA' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
61cb83dc4adad9168f500c965c669625
5df55f0e7bc4e344e8981d07e430c4e616fb14ba
describe
'182430' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSB' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
0fe73c5a86365fe5c38c53b69b555bb1
b8eb8f8a0a5b0dcf492e872db9b9af0fe6da2938
describe
'24855' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSC' 'sip-files00122.pro'
0f6215831b065817d46b662a96c91198
c1a0bbcb603af6694478dd8cbdaad3db687de8cd
describe
'67307' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSD' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
0780d85146c103634e45d577f8924f17
85c9cc437b971692c7f093c9a2033b2eb41ea75e
describe
'1525996' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSE' 'sip-files00122.tif'
fec5d6085f765c022e59e47994558c46
b5f82ef86ebd0d41be1ce8e3c7a8d89de252fba0
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSF' 'sip-files00122.txt'
bb32f05e479a089ca51617a035ffc058
9084156a8f2903575956ed7dc5293ed249ef7e63
describe
'29534' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSG' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
1392ca123f8d1e465761f45ad5f877cb
a9e7a3810624e77fbe13391eb2a1004265c95bf2
describe
'189334' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSH' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
a1d280ae9383ed5a008809b7c900235c
a0240b1002c25181cc42925db0bae3eb6efc2fd0
describe
'159590' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSI' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
f589484e0af6fbaa26b3519110ab717f
36aeb108680e0c0efbde1d5254722b14edad5d5f
describe
'20685' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSJ' 'sip-files00123.pro'
2645f98bf62251837dbd92ead6611db4
9b0431eb33a385f2ca9a5e09f29a764bba4b8f94
describe
'60957' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSK' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
27f8cd3cca36d9a71be38065bcba363a
6318341abf8d05fd7eb346a1ac7e77cafc260a09
describe
'1531436' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSL' 'sip-files00123.tif'
9e46c8b16e66603e50115b6fc17ef6a1
59d4795201fe88391ff2e7f5ef19c289f08559fa
'2012-05-09T08:08:42-04:00'
describe
'27498' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSM' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
de9dc35ad406e078a59716e8364c9ef6
c396f15f4dd23099ee2db7462a5024ea90544f01
describe
'192442' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSN' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
e0ad723f303c9d1172510c3257367966
787babd1112ca5ba55aee911e8b6332db57a93bd
describe
'163677' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSO' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
36f852782f71be2a1805ed0625701103
c2bd875befd9fea268bf8c505b50d9bb92148037
describe
'19973' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSP' 'sip-files00124.pro'
bfde0eb70ba0db464c3a3dfe24d8b72a
e5108a323c6ab8bdb8cc8a105c31f636e574914a
describe
'56990' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSQ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
47d86c028d0b695cea299f9bc33ca007
a49c564e5d4b6c8e6f50b24ce9b523a7b96c1af8
describe
'1557012' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSR' 'sip-files00124.tif'
cff0958cdbd4bd41d7dc5228008fe361
5f3bbd741d22316d4a9ee10b2968ad6797d34a4e
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSS' 'sip-files00124.txt'
f9b015e2a5c056d92c8b91f8aeb7b2cb
119fc81b9b1a7ffe416be5be23c7cb5f4ee32d35
describe
'27304' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXST' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
669253b769df489cd075d2165a07e8d7
3174be6fdcbbe20d05aa6713ae1b4c2a4ee0a9df
describe
'195396' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSU' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
6788735f2832934cdebf0a242f5f7fb0
5fa4e28ceee676e7122dc326ffae458ab7d2a819
describe
'180859' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSV' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
6a28d4291e4fd1bf6cdd9f245e257528
3d4f8d2e25e0a2f35c3b1271637efa80146e7e50
describe
'26279' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSW' 'sip-files00125.pro'
33b8229bd0184f88e88781388ed44921
f9522781cb68a832050adad0c5f14f328e27290a
describe
'72207' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSX' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
ec58153e6c3aac89e1b0c2a558f4f801
6449d240ccf5636790e7cd87cf847284b1241c0a
describe
'1580116' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSY' 'sip-files00125.tif'
4f64e0a6c860297e066934cbee73a8f8
b2f3a6628c2f1c34babefe71bf10d2fea9fff3e5
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXSZ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
1c4c0b72ed884bbd0e5fe47aa54cda40
c1bc44acce541cc6f9fb47d7168cbb3f4297f452
describe
'28934' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTA' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
49059ef064737957c14a60ae97f9d345
9ca59222f063c2009c3c54bbc12fc63442a0045e
'2012-05-09T08:08:59-04:00'
describe
'187543' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTB' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
705db14f19251b3e380aecfb1197db25
25d101fd92011e7c7661b94ede4e293e823109a4
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTC' 'sip-files00126.pro'
2784b1c42682968949b68f1c47e9b5ca
50d8a9cb88ae02ee9a08087fff9ac84e4b6dc591
describe
'70670' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTD' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
2bb294fde34ef79e4fd5f21eaf3ad330
f0e0b4bb1d01b7cbdb6645520187fc8386a79723
describe
'1516876' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTE' 'sip-files00126.tif'
76710ac3f6b1d2544312b4bc5486ffd2
7c0974256b7c20441181c53b65fe117966aee29d
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTF' 'sip-files00126.txt'
f0e2cae9b1f7667ef1ab634e34712213
d155b6f2ff350f3ce04e572e4b0b88615def874c
describe
'30201' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTG' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
2656fa4fbbd7a008a86a4b11d998831e
59c51ec70385fb0ef2c7eaadf59d65072e99542c
describe
'196485' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTH' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
f1cd1e34478c14e9f09ddc13c1a53664
dd4282973f39b1fd83b22134ad2cb6f834507852
describe
'182060' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTI' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
a0beb68652c9dfd5d76b9748c441bf2a
0618e404196383a12626532deb7d0638ef9d8a41
describe
'26626' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTJ' 'sip-files00127.pro'
8218bcae754fb4df0ce18f166267f70c
92ff15bafdb5dbc93d6806cf88ee96c4efe48542
describe
'67228' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTK' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
6a0d58e0fdeec27e04fe47d3ed3c72ce
f2bb7cde704819369b8e7f4a312610b624750666
describe
'1588644' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTL' 'sip-files00127.tif'
f004dd1337391c3570a6a3cf565855ea
4f6ce6f7299bba2a7ea001ed665ae0fdcaeeb280
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTM' 'sip-files00127.txt'
e15bd6ab2ff3a713bbfeb53f8d4ba47e
aa471d761419bdf4f6b3fc765d76d230ba54e68c
describe
'29123' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTN' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
5716c7538acbc05eac122181bda87349
04c012ec685032fbd58fbdb421fa97666e742c6d
describe
'193117' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTO' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
7ad78acba5b8439546d079f74de4e6b6
45aa520dd37de00f10f7ab3e52c6766d40a956eb
describe
'185025' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTP' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
70a431d388996e66753b8f04e3e88125
64b20f89027b70acfa653795578a60c9a50317eb
describe
'25015' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTQ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
f490ad89ecf66aeb87200da346f9fe33
685a546fa2b3a4a2b1a3b0d38654f80fb8c1bd37
describe
'1561884' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTR' 'sip-files00128.tif'
1fae497a445e9e602f796599f46e7120
6698961f204b658ab090a66fed81575ef6836cee
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTS' 'sip-files00128.txt'
d3cf9176470098fe433495350f0bf710
d97c7fb2179278de27bab4f816c671ad880ad74f
describe
'29049' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTT' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
e9f07188c42e459abe4a742bcd91e46d
fb2595f24b51eb4b578e65e0195f4816b0ec9e21
describe
'198262' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTU' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
27eb343d81c83e7fc04db655ef105d71
44fe9b9456ac8c59fcdc092635133b2b064a63ad
describe
'180808' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTV' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
5f10e13bf02afe8da9eaefa1c6b27de3
704c9d6194714c4112dcd650a51f9871b2dbb947
describe
'25324' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTW' 'sip-files00129.pro'
f6a00ef22811551b13a59459b4aefe41
a2514c8f497ba33c2053033fc6ea2e98f391ed44
describe
'63913' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTX' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
8dd7033b0a63a955df26aeed905827ef
dc636b1058040c68a2251ec60e81dc4bf4a21245
describe
'1602892' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTY' 'sip-files00129.tif'
cf3783397080e4b1a3b5b919a1172ada
7b8b77923a249768b896ac5d0e7a5f1e8eeb0160
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXTZ' 'sip-files00129.txt'
3a70a85f2f336f726c01a746cb4bc59f
77c4cc0f2907c119bfc5dda92b463f1d38675ff5
describe
'28693' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUA' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
42b705ccb445975d5893bd2f14af4873
e8a239739bbc2af606787f804a13dcdadfa45f49
describe
'186974' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUB' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
cd39c271f7fc2789a33ab22bf1f987a9
519e057fa491e99e632ed114e2e71b98e4b2d785
describe
'185405' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUC' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
5012550e1bbe7aedcdb7f335013aa1a0
bfd35100742802302753a299092cced1407d393b
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUD' 'sip-files00130.pro'
42a13f06287a4783532b86eaa33eecf6
8d3ee1856c512203a52a35e0f4d648e65feb73dd
describe
'69587' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUE' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
e1d35f0563b59c95a2855d0d87692a0e
d4044b4428f7b11b9e9cfc0ac550975c4e932407
describe
'1512580' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUF' 'sip-files00130.tif'
3488061669404406bdf1b9c3d943eda4
b9dcaf5d0aa41907885c1ef1280784b4a231cc13
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUG' 'sip-files00130.txt'
43eb53514fb0e2c5d20fdb62f99f276e
7ab86da509d7bdebf9c590ef6ce9d2b545f0ef74
describe
'62986' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUH' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
32a92234db6cff9ecda3e2c8782d5287
fc31bdf30fd8e2d8a63382d88bdb14d44ca501fa
describe
'146604' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUI' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
1a2b41d63f44a959863c50727216a72a
490f2ea2b6b6611f02df80ae7c198de99edbdcb5
describe
'6422736' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUJ' 'sip-files00097.tif'
bdfaa5e142e98f723fd866e86aa6eb87
33578cb9d471875d5d9ff0683f68275da20ad765
describe
'30412' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUK' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
53522ef0347529542378ba422de87fec
093e4cada4d3540e2c62de17fe8a506d6912f9ad
describe
'25720' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUL' 'sip-files00102.pro'
561391915362a1299c0c8792a5f5b47e
f6577562fa68fccb678d718afb83a158afc35d54
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUM' 'sip-files00104.txt'
a91eead084f15aa72cbc95e94b62fd4e
abb9deff17c4b9572078031d0bcaa0929dd920d2
describe
'770893' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUN' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
e660fcf7e6002dca26fbef8e2030b22d
652cf8c80fcc83b6ca6c03b4f879169e7ae10fd3
describe
'65993' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUO' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
5ae178de1ba6db1054258a8f6f6cf13d
99e97f09bbba95425dceecc3388e575aa06f8618
describe
'171831' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUP' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
175ce7de7fdd6d6e505a83f2e5df4b27
b8ef83f471996e0f206fdda846088fe08d21a667
describe
'1607048' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUQ' 'sip-files00116.tif'
d4ea907aee4f8e7e15ccf869a02e684f
92748c982018b99a241549ff632b2a773d1c5080
describe
'29594' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUR' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
165a9380df0422e469fe368f999c9109
32e4dbcbdf9b9194b46fea1d6f896fc97cf13bee
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUS' 'sip-files00121.pro'
135b1d1133ea377bda437bdf575846b6
8d1a41f967ae6c6326ef6958f146964c3cffbde6
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUT' 'sip-files00123.txt'
2e233b28791bf2dc7efd89dd57b7d7f9
1c5b06055304c95ea0cb9e8b9f9be1f88af5b9aa
describe
'187469' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUU' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
0530b72e00a9e85f24a6e3cedfcea9f4
82879286c29124f96cacd3776f20c2202ee360aa
describe
'64395' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUV' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
727e650c68e624908bcc5ebe95d112e0
ec589d491c369251de77e150d9dda6e061281e08
describe
'177562' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUW' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
e560a5b6e372916844a577b261ccbe09
ed34fe301c3f19694602d0ee08d4123d16e32c19
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUX' 'sip-files00135.tif'
017b3ad774ed0515f6c290af770865fb
7b5ef96cc3a75e6772784578f15f17c67c21658a
describe
'28888' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUY' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
c3e479ebf0ba9f1fede379b9d57cf72b
b098c1f78f95156d732766f46ef5affa81eefa59
describe
'24633' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXUZ' 'sip-files00140.pro'
6c336450cac06389b00aa1136a157488
f451c88b22c1886ffff6a736e9d36db891bbb83b
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVA' 'sip-files00142.txt'
1174896397ec32de9d677470633888a7
63063b4639421cba99b032680101b7dd01129aaa
describe
'192007' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVB' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
8a7a6aeaff2f976192c8bcbb56b2e27d
fe408767a1b355543626a751a69cdfb71aae8d0a
describe
'1587244' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVC' 'sip-files00147.tif'
1c12e60f72d96a0e86c9c72f8e1bdd94
6b7d4812fe69acdea58530b2c15736dc59f5397c
describe
'30152' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVD' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
eb5253a2d4de103a7653e810cca5d8f0
1b99058dce9c9fc9d3e45a2e9cffb139364a92de
describe
'196591' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVE' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
88bc7960fed6e715f9781a37705af164
91e6a00a34e719ec191ed1178cfc54d453adf2e8
describe
'175201' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVF' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
5f448fe19890f5c59dd86174f4b4f21d
1eeac9d82321322c923781c2aa9e1e3fdb97754e
describe
'26075' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVG' 'sip-files00131.pro'
0257a9a7c10a1ce7a46353f6f8f6d6c9
9abfe05e5105b003fc80e5b149a25f133929a1c1
describe
'64495' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVH' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
2c39ab4340cae91530ec7b60cbc89f8e
7348d8d276b7d0b72f968e2489ae7def7aa48beb
describe
'1589752' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVI' 'sip-files00131.tif'
6ab1e2afd3b187bd9578343ee13a3279
4a7f47abb1cd1e682e843256b50b5a3669e552e2
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVJ' 'sip-files00131.txt'
d5048abb7148b3750527ef5e001e3964
5e7b217c479957cfc67433a351ccb782ac37873b
describe
'28772' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVK' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
8f96f808180e129a42d895db5f4f51d8
f5f2ebdb0cfc3ba0b4ef3fd68b5748df39893ccc
describe
'185230' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVL' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
b8c505da71b0b41740d36ed7019c43be
b8d316e99ec00789dbcc7bb235bcff7c08f4a1ed
describe
'186144' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVM' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
b342fa82cce9a011385938a7bdab381d
a3015bbffa71ec54fa7255e1cfb298ae61862a4e
describe
'24662' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVN' 'sip-files00132.pro'
e9dc566c45014a77740aed4e9c7613d1
66c11e84ada9dbc6852a04a43f27b7cdb0bcf5c3
describe
'69426' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVO' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
107229658c06138d6d523ad720006a39
a9b85c12df227ae74b3437a4e4488b1381788d71
describe
'1499480' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVP' 'sip-files00132.tif'
1b794ee1defa3a6a89d8624cc9896d7a
d0ce1e74b82d72f85fcc1be1435a2ebea8f185ed
describe
'1046' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVQ' 'sip-files00132.txt'
b2dd9345529474b81f119dec318e9a71
021179fad56d9f54616ad9799472df098d16acc1
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVR' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
84564769ab9931a9caa7bd67e4d09eaf
7d07ac0f62592930c954ef6c94f618aeef8ec8cb
describe
'197678' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVS' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
3a8867802b50f7d3d07040cab691358d
fb38def44a3bf8c2172c07e42d475fe9478d9691
describe
'25476' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVT' 'sip-files00133.pro'
b0ab54e9032dd3fc0a834413b4a1571d
ef45d2bc8b574352eecf34a201dee2326e38ce5c
describe
'70532' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVU' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
92390e9d241e967b7e456a4cec1b136e
ae82a9c2e45f4626bfa8af8815db784a651f871c
describe
'1599304' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVV' 'sip-files00133.tif'
a4954e5cf084b27091a655804d6ed43c
a607ce8ce93d57f3746df5045e491bff31b2447c
describe
'1063' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVW' 'sip-files00133.txt'
158ca58c27a99643daaac6f8c5314b6a
3710603a679f48cbe17a56e7fe2e551005ab1313
describe
'28986' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVX' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
3259c347122cc84a6bba6c148bb6a745
1ceb78ae2a5b6a14f3f93c4152665cffc9151e9b
describe
'191589' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVY' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
7404a3801b9fe3f6a722714235a9d517
b3aea9a90bf5497aac1f0f40a0f58fe72c5a6ed1
describe
'134270' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXVZ' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
ca2dcedd17d07944044aad2c02ca8963
a53ac537ef5e9bef10a5220f225250b0764e4690
describe
'14510' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWA' 'sip-files00134.pro'
e5a3fedb44688abd0404c216a14b60db
67d1337416b411bb0a4fbc264daee27070090b96
describe
'50268' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWB' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
18d777a91bec32a95163f74db8916b94
e93e98ff1b3670a6220701849766023f652f1184
describe
'1550320' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWC' 'sip-files00134.tif'
49fef78260fbcb7137d10b7d91085e3f
3ac48d26ced2967759a5504ee373e139d2a4dbf3
describe
'611' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWD' 'sip-files00134.txt'
35f9c15c68ad134aa170d90a12042a6f
5f06aba14d69adeb1b98de669dd2b82d6360f013
describe
'24973' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWE' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
2f4ff9e12d10fb5c8b4f4ab85efd885c
74da08d593551d68a44c03dd69242ab4c04eab66
'2012-05-09T08:11:05-04:00'
describe
'198198' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWF' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
21c3ea96b80c80bd371971d7c95f1442
b2617e76d7737fc8d258c78a62eaa82a7f71a107
describe
'144671' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWG' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
abb3ac5ac6919df85668528ca0bb7e1b
ac51de682024f12f521fc8236877375e72c2daeb
describe
'18722' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWH' 'sip-files00135.pro'
15b2385e50c52bde2b335464d95cfc0d
39a2f6ab4fcafbe53583f2f4c118f6465f505ddf
describe
'52289' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWI' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
a4c6b827ddaa1b55b2d6c87f973baa00
14cb44a5ec65df278719952e4154fe00d4c0e334
describe
'803' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWJ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
40a3083f92698930c24f4681e42b8aeb
130afb02c00d20f604c5a6ed3beadb0967be2ea6
describe
'26890' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWK' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
764e6d7672c06a2e51f8bd54b2020c71
dec133cd746989384cc6e3db3d2deb6c309ca2c9
describe
'192089' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWL' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
66279f19978be652071a167a7d6f69ff
3a16bd3513b6fa82e7818f434bb67fed146bec47
describe
'182854' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWM' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
b7fb7a3ea59369ce2f6f471201e0a9a9
bfe1dedb68f9edfb87db315ec93d27755cc4d251
describe
'26486' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWN' 'sip-files00136.pro'
ace866f17b8586e8e330f4a99985c6e3
da0dedcd6c70c4786e9d02ca8b11c01ca677d11b
describe
'69213' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWO' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
7b052e3c42cb88ad27b34992e9e9fcaa
f43c0042035907c3c5343c40964d9868b8e66447
describe
'1553856' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWP' 'sip-files00136.tif'
27bbf3609b33dcc059a131812c030f36
c2d76721a4f74aca51ba91a62beca9408cc9e42f
'2012-05-09T08:12:12-04:00'
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWQ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
2194dc922f36141ddd3e13ffa2557b18
0ae4ca9cf482629329a7ef0e45e10ded32d2f1e9
describe
'28726' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWR' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
4bb8f403ecc09ab90a4750a4b0446370
99be5723cea1b78160e146665b03218d9836fbf9
describe
'195583' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWS' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
5c00ebadc3f9bbd7a84401d52d25be5a
33cf890d016ce067679690d09ec8f0f155196897
describe
'187026' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWT' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
e61ffdcd59d2fb27706414424bc96fe6
5ccd3529289c0a55705f21004c3119ef15a54909
describe
'27598' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWU' 'sip-files00137.pro'
5bb1cf88355750c4a2786b420b1a130e
d859e1f3b04fce3bf3432645f027c8cda5a5c2a8
describe
'63851' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWV' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
8aa4599dd7cc2d3ad37f5a6f87063919
d35c042e023b9f176fc874f20d89109cb7cd0ca5
describe
'1581424' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWW' 'sip-files00137.tif'
f726a01eb614aed4c5c84dd09d11decd
265dcef67bb19d6a71573c4f8aafebc4bf4216c8
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWX' 'sip-files00137.txt'
7daa3d4cd981325cab85ba7360b4adb9
e1833e2083aae3e99ba7d444ad8e054ca5261221
describe
'184451' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWY' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
3f118521777c2170acc93571a1e1533b
af4853147e901e0c806959ea26a03636a40782bd
describe
'189975' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXWZ' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
7ca590bb2363f9e213b1682d85538e38
ddb9484993063db0284d3636f4d526c2be0e4a8a
describe
'27231' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXA' 'sip-files00138.pro'
68214d0b515e1daf3b18e0253ce67162
cabaacbb2811396c5feb1a2c7891d6136b63f034
'2012-05-09T08:09:11-04:00'
describe
'71261' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXB' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
91d9bf2260dd7e9dd5a2599b68352362
e2a2adfbd74ebfa06738ce33f6ffc1feb8a5068e
describe
'1492820' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXC' 'sip-files00138.tif'
22439840681a31e6f3931d641d10acd1
484842f2a6b129f3a85f206a779b4ce7796cc4bc
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXD' 'sip-files00138.txt'
d0e5ae88c9ae46232e772dec6635b838
7846220a907fa854f0e9a67832129747553a4b86
describe
'30021' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXE' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
ae20197b5c2d5f395274a65821391596
ee35da95bc4098aa853bbc8a74aaa74cea948a14
describe
'196682' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXF' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
541a960b00f8c29077d8b72acbedc9da
f17239372cd0e1d76c8975fb2cac791fa7c0aaed
describe
'189440' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXG' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
3aa29bccf49ecf53320bfa383182146c
4b3b547f68d430df18f78e4bd7e1a5649a3ea09a
describe
'27057' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXH' 'sip-files00139.pro'
837d2652515be6f51a3409a6a5a9d70a
52cdaa5daa6e9ebb2b1444187b240e146e8b0b3b
describe
'72577' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXI' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
cb59526b98442fd99e0eae8f86b42c0a
98c4b7aca9938ed298bbbc238d119e8cc6a897e9
describe
'1590640' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXJ' 'sip-files00139.tif'
29a942871d412878557cd7945f0b5eba
366b3e9da7e727d816c5fb7bc631ff997d7b66d2
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXK' 'sip-files00139.txt'
30233718f6a1ab3da9d43263827e469c
c1d4a08da4711d6bc5ff86aa188b719e5f391dac
describe
'29672' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXL' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
cc57ed2d3a387b1309adfa10f06c3a5c
a52f40644165e15d00b5cae915a9bac09f14de94
describe
'176703' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXM' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
1ad3a758a41b5d5f5537141bde3fc305
7eaec59d5ce0d70c55eec6a0f89844e2af69563e
describe
'183519' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXN' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
ef989584a2519ced03f1fa383465b7a9
6e5f393d672a53ce5eff01c6efbf49104a1add34
describe
'69234' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXO' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
a5fec8e2976aed86970e6256072845de
47251e3fdf8d6b68d3b3400031ba4a50e0f582c5
describe
'1430512' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXP' 'sip-files00140.tif'
bc24c7d2793543a77426598e5269831b
70e34fc1233203f3795ae700ed43448e1a36fd51
'2012-05-09T08:09:27-04:00'
describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXQ' 'sip-files00140.txt'
78bd68fedf56d577ee939d0c34f6a120
3cf2752c8209c6ea04a43d3315bf8bda4e2aa0e7
describe
'29692' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXR' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
b8caeb61b796689a9685532d4ea01cfe
831bab7545a7abc68d98f2a152e254a096e66601
describe
'190652' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXS' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
097bad8704636decd43ae70cd46b8752
ec82000a5f6a9d7c0ed75734d2cc6149b6ca0ac3
describe
'189160' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXT' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
d19ef642b6691ef04a2c0452d4e4b532
41bacb0360959a159c38cc1ee2ab336e9a0a8a6d
describe
'26473' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXU' 'sip-files00141.pro'
dc104d00a567c35cbbec4fc7d49e53de
89767b23bc7ad46ad76cb52724baa9a76041d146
describe
'66494' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXV' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
1b0bcf8875273b80d8dec4df86e65efb
f4b0dbe715acb36b902180ddb33ad0b6699eaaa7
describe
'1541992' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXW' 'sip-files00141.tif'
049fe2bdf22fbf02a6a3203b2e7026a6
25ce3417e4eb9966c2fbb35a58ff3383eb184a08
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXX' 'sip-files00141.txt'
740e20e55c410ca1ddf1e2e607bc1f9f
6ed06cef8bde5f89a142f120080902f8fd31227e
describe
'29999' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXY' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
9bd3fc19237c8769f530fa48790ecab5
5db7c819113f398c0680d90c7c5f2cc0dd3029b1
describe
'195041' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXXZ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
64347097bf69bce99f51f79c11e036b1
e068f24721ab851068964738afb472d5b7719772
describe
'177261' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYA' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
b98b9aff4a0d8e0f95b58afbf82dd3c1
685c40ab5809211629cb1eea37771ac29deab716
describe
'25916' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYB' 'sip-files00142.pro'
312f868c0b7f351fa86db12b70118189
f607776050d23696e24947dad3303ce821218256
describe
'66063' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYC' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
5b8a42cb377b7d5cd6233cdcde28adee
4ccd2df7d31f841928609a37909aa43fa4869ef9
describe
'1577724' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYD' 'sip-files00142.tif'
0d937427651e8173dbedcfb558707a94
57eea2607f72b7d1e493a1cb7d756f7c363d7c36
describe
'29519' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYE' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
a7da33a94160908426824b9ab30a323c
e3f0d9e9a5baef9defc3161ce47c81cfa714c482
describe
'186765' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYF' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
e426bb143201b415acbde506ebf40b96
c28ffffe7368b7859f25557c8d64c941d55860e3
describe
'177768' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYG' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
1453c72a8a2c458be6ba5b28e56031f1
0920a1c9b2c2b54c0ab81b7ab83f744df0503db0
describe
'25599' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYH' 'sip-files00143.pro'
71024bc099baff776022161f20e834c3
d50fd6489e316a8b724779769a7c6ebc4ecfda52
describe
'66739' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYI' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
2623e8c5fb3c12e8cb38de4826f4646c
fc576cf2e9625576eeaedd45f4620a6e4b5338e1
describe
'1510996' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYJ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
0d6a6971eb91335b98a42695f9f0c397
7d15c68e347f1c527b389b53df1b6cb205a01d01
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYK' 'sip-files00143.txt'
94f15b5c23885329cb2e2afc695fe795
5c31b69d3761e0cee6ced87e3f05fbc0484fcfee
describe
'30076' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYL' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
d073e3cf7dfb58d4fbec8654982fc61c
4fea01c2c2135917ca229b00480a4078f984cb8f
describe
'191099' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYM' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
697902e43548f9c03ddd74ce94d45488
2fff35c6e412e25f870ea731416d2274180e3c36
describe
'176206' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYN' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
18a68d1b5f9b4e8b8aacb39484db9bd9
891722bda7196bf2f03c3d553cb57f854d77b349
describe
'25293' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYO' 'sip-files00144.pro'
0a016f5eb55ed0263fac563320f7f351
15ece46c4d689f7734d01e6f6392acd02f5a35aa
describe
'59817' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYP' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
e161dd218afa57367749d5b10aae70ec
f50a901de6f0bdd346bf6abb1cb885d58cdafc46
describe
'1545776' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYQ' 'sip-files00144.tif'
3881ca5609ed1cb166026de64172d190
9a46952cd56055534f86ca6456f570c9be79662e
describe
'1051' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYR' 'sip-files00144.txt'
89c01eeaa4cf83a09bf9b640428778a0
04da6eb88cc21312ac8f611e2ca04b7bf134743e
describe
'28527' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYS' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
3ca761966efa526de3080e424ebcd2a6
e6e55a4caa1e4958a113dc9c508101243faa5087
describe
'194653' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYT' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
eafb2a7eb3cc9d62d1c4381de0824d9e
c7cde50803eec515769f7ce6a9f60c92129035b3
describe
'27618' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYU' 'sip-files00145.pro'
f82b4a4abb87d93ca9813f958391972a
21217ebee3c2781674c419640e6e14766fe9d731
describe
'70925' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYV' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
d05f3cd94dc356c9227ac5398b51b014
dfdbe36a5f2e683dee0a2ec02918c9421f9d4707
describe
'1552960' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYW' 'sip-files00145.tif'
01c28cc551ed267245d45406fc331c76
d87b6212a871c93fd688801c0e5531e3ac9b3152
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYX' 'sip-files00145.txt'
aca166d719e10cd20707ce2e26bf79c8
c2fdf4c1472e2f6c95585b59daad85041ee94730
describe
'31066' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYY' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
5222baaf9ebf20e02ec1f60771a66ab5
988879107559a6c06ece0212c27de987c8da13fe
describe
'185905' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXYZ' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
174456aba3543b06435c65dca10633e5
9444841bd7dfd1d20b8b9e1f5bac62182b6a8f04
describe
'195128' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZA' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
b744cbffc3cc7e9e161d6d2bfe7170d8
71c81d2bbdc8659d423fa9aaef424bbb640ba16f
describe
'34995' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZB' 'sip-files00146.pro'
962547e9523bb7887ac8dfb4c3927bdc
f0cb494685c4d5cf13928a89349bcd2993c0173b
describe
'72741' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZC' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
78a349d890b3f81ad0295f2b104965f0
7dbc0efc18aad860cf3f338ccf9e54a7f0895cf0
describe
'1504128' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZD' 'sip-files00146.tif'
531df4bbde2875eb7b21021458e07795
895a35990830e8136926ae01117cb4f8dad7cfb4
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZE' 'sip-files00146.txt'
3a724731e77ec11afd460894a7cadc52
243c6c9959698f99cc29cdbe10b982de778cdd48
describe
'31745' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZF' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
d6e7ff1f03422abf6a58e45c2011a765
64e67fcbc4cb8882dd85da3138664d115cb3b366
describe
'196301' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZG' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
9524fbbec69ae1045cb1991cfb5e2da4
09f18b8e6da7c57401c4db0ad01e412462b7fd35
describe
'61590' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZH' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
96d18752c4af32570be6b522ce0fc7b7
b4c3b0706cebdba255a2af6f8b2fae88039b08ca
describe
'23670' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZI' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
5ec55237fb4692530be971f7adadf88f
83628c2384be682dbda94a636049787e806b9454
describe
'18411' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZJ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
77a8fef8f76592f60bd629c178fa8ce8
385268aa40089f051951e84eb766c2fa98194bd7
describe
'193613' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZK' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
a09aeca384a020daea26a8802ec28ff1
ee7ece3578dc15bea4df939e7c01dfc5c72a06b3
describe
'50985' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZL' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
5e6f76806c09e7b2d58c10cf6b37bebe
ca83e3d13f863d0501447aea474d55ccdd7c18ce
describe
'22047' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZM' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
3a30129b10c799b7f9364c91f789b851
a5071bf359f1e31798e3e5bf9ef0df48daf99fa7
describe
'1567012' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZN' 'sip-files00148.tif'
3d92b5e5098dcf38612467fc7016e839
fb6f786fa6cb0298fa8c7419486653b69477bf3d
describe
'18063' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZO' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
f148faa861550d1fcf8c4807d6bd28f2
8dd9b5a4a1c3adbb1eacddcbf26b3b1bdfd46ba3
describe
'882834' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZP' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
8d7fdcc35f658374916380273043e631
f30530d2742b571757d83fcce676caf48dc3db63
describe
'64969' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZQ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
5d83d86d33a7eea02c677c440b5b942f
d6e758399eb65eb853ce4a6e38dcd480aea18ae9
'2012-05-09T08:07:12-04:00'
describe
'28468' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZR' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
009dc8bbc3c3863c7b76911cb471dff5
380b606b5888b6cc49da72d838f3fb28ed783af2
describe
'21203332' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZS' 'sip-files00149.tif'
2fcc3132755ebace52e48b2991e9158d
17a01f643b84742fb80a5b7bdc36878688f1993a
'2012-05-09T08:10:52-04:00'
describe
'20601' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZT' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
23eac2515c59b54ff945f3f25aaabbfe
03d1321255cf7ad5e73869b50b0109dbdfac44b2
describe
'901418' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZU' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
98a0f17345a67d859d91b5f18172d116
4dd49cc5831b58e39ad8905f4bf12af44b907827
describe
'221379' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZV' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
23bfe7020ca3b32e819173f340004100
53db22e6c994d9bafd476a200c458269dcb7417c
describe
'65267' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZW' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
254e0ed9b5d97291013feadb04523744
c4b7fbfe5d0ada228636ea876bfb84d753286e0c
describe
'21652780' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZX' 'sip-files00150.tif'
379a1a65f83a75785e2fd5839ee46702
a057c60404acb042e99d4d6660b63e7c7ade4c4b
'2012-05-09T08:12:28-04:00'
describe
'28540' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZY' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
4ad20358af01a270c0c5da558b956fe6
95eb91adb266bd63d633d5cd7af3f6f453510049
describe
'958197' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABXZZ' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
114a770fa75d7f8eb439d2cc6ee85710
47446121a34a423e8459ac476caf5c261ceafe05
describe
'212107' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAA' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
c76c147af6ee7bab8e2f5668ed32de13
ca029bbe9bd5e7c0d38aa2ea2d4773ea809c52f5
describe
'56627' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAB' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
9de0ca49a1310d9fa5d1170a1a4d3921
12cec42d57d8f9b8488e434d424681b38547fb0e
describe
'23017004' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAC' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
821852740468656e7d6fa1d1dd63a789
0b630296c3d8eb57e6ef5bff64f750a982e51efc
describe
'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAD' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
9e096d9d03cee8928e0a217dd09a5d1c
0b8d8cd8ff9301345f54377fea79b27a87683644
describe
'938618' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAE' 'sip-filescover2.jp2'
ac00a9a852ff61d239b6f0c8884530eb
c9cc139db3fe3fa35319bdcc97792f0c7d0ef6a1
describe
'75705' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAF' 'sip-filescover2.jpg'
639958421dd42e9dd1fe377749de8b24
3cd4d065dc439560fae65571f32de7a5edd3af70
describe
'2268' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAG' 'sip-filescover2.pro'
d1d18878a2f6407eea0c089c7b18d4a9
f0557ebbf730f5014af05568554b3c29995ff6a0
describe
'33932' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAH' 'sip-filescover2.QC.jpg'
28d7d8fdea16187790e1a3e2d288419e
4f3199058e5d83b92eaf54dd13f1feb0485da92c
describe
'22544708' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAI' 'sip-filescover2.tif'
684a7871c44fd8cd32c4ca27206d7f76
6117b893e458b59fb9179492a72e150e7880482a
'2012-05-09T08:07:16-04:00'
describe
'232' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAJ' 'sip-filescover2.txt'
b8d3c8fd1866820a5303f4af1798378a
a1909e12cac27c1c7395353e07663522e7b6ca4c
describe
'23898' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAK' 'sip-filescover2thm.jpg'
4cc0175c270e946678ba7b19d9a1a798
eda7595a3ba97b0b817618f063eeac4bee873433
describe
'74' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAL' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
3aea3c6a03b03ced6d3cfa9d13794ac9
4c0952da9290ef270f5fd5d13730acb44a14635e
describe
'203751' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAM' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
59c5331784ecbfa7cde17020da6f63f6
84061ac091875f67965f967b0f973eca1a09ad6f
describe
'71681' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAN' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
a738058433b964b11eebd123d1113957
c41d98e5736aedbec62ffcb2d56704753fa0a70c
describe
'31071' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAO' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
17b6800844da0d73da6f18e980496f5a
0c038fcd653608cb01824c20420e986b6c341346
describe
'4906812' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAP' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
84f744cfa8f7bf818577f409c340c90e
af0b53b91f0abcaa3e9fa9835c0592b213dfead4
describe
'23342' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAQ' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
68f462d9f5c64e7c3e5168060eec2383
5073483359d3e8409e33ea6c493664727ffad46a
describe
'178818' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAR' 'sip-filesUF00004058_00001.mets'
268568e6d5a9a26f43eed5c9f3be03ba
5ffa5d292ceb1a12aec000ce7fde14cfe8cecd62
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T23:22:09-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'229383' 'info:fdaE20091220_AAAAJKfileF20091220_AABYAU' 'sip-filesUF00004058_00001.xml'
b73fc9e5ef7601fe6bae790a30267e10
8bb4732016978f065b699c8080bca08ba1624696
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-10T23:22:11-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.


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THE

TRIALS OF A VILLAGE ARTIST.

BY

RUTH BUOK.



For unto every one that hath shall be given, and he shall have
abundance: but from him that hath not shall be taken away even
that which he hath.”—St. Matthew xxv. 29.



LONDON:
JOHN MORGAN, 10, PATERNOSTER ROW.
LONDON
ROBERT K. BURT, PRINTER

HOLBORN HILL,
CONTENTS.

CHAP, PAGE

I.—Tue Burtep Ta.ent, orn “ Lost.” A wasteD
ENEE rn ee, Cees cea ee eel weel Ob

1Il.—Txe Youne Carver’s ExpeRIMEnrT, AND
HOW IT SPED: = sees sa See e oe D

TIl.—Tue Faruer’s Reasons, AND THE WAY IN
WHicH RICHARD KEPT HIS RESOLUTION. 49

TV.—Tue Heap or tue Famity cut orr. A New
Stone IN THE CHURCHYARD.. .. «. 73

V.—A LITTLE MonE FRUIT FROM THE HIDDENSEED 83

VI.—“ Ir av. FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED, TRY
AGAIN So ea oe ee ae ee 0%

VII.—Tus Work INTERRUPTED. FINISHED ATLAST 107

VIII.—Ricuarp at THE Exursition. Tue REwarD
OF PERSEVERANCE .. «+ «os of o- 120

IX.—Tusz Paro Open. Won .. «1 « op 18]

THE TRIALS OF A VILLAGE ARTIST.

—+—

CHAPTER I.

THE BURIED TALENT, OR ‘‘LOST.’’ A WASTED LIFE.

Onz sunny afternoon, a good many years
ago, a troop of boys might have been seen
rushing out at the door of a country school-
house. In their haste they almost forgot the
bow which was due to the teacher; and as they
poured forth, cap in hand, and scattered them-
selves across the favourite playground, they
looked very much like a swarm of bees issuing
from the hive and dispersing amid the flowers
of a garden.

The lads, rough fellows most of them, were
glad that their school hours were over, and
now prepared to enjoy a hearty game before
going home to tea and to prepare lessons for
the morrow,
8 THE TRIALS OF

But there was one exception to the rule.
He was not a very big lad, but he was much
looked up to by his companions, who boasted
of his cleverness in carving all sorts of things
out of bits of wood. They liked to tell what
wonders little Dick Fraser could do with no-
thing but a pocket-knife and the stray odds and
ends of hard wood which he picked up in his
father’s workshop. Lads who could do nothing
in that line themselves were proud of Richard’s
productions, and there was not one in the school
but could thrust his hand into his pocket and
bring out a sample of the boy’s handiwork.

‘What boats Dick could make to be sure!
Beautiful little delicate things, with the tiniest
of faces for figure-heads! And what dainty
boxes for small girls of his acquaintance to put
their thimbles and cotton into!

His little sisters had the most substantial and
prettiest of dinner services, all cut out in wood;
and even the very handle of his mother’s potato
bruiser was found decorated with a specimen of
carving, after that useful implement had been
missed and vainly sought for two or three days.
A VILLAGE ARTIST 9

The good dame was at first inclined to scold
when she thought of her long and fruitless
search. But the frown turned to a smile, as
she could not help owning that ‘‘the flowers.
and leaves were very pretty, for certain, but
the potatoes would have been mashed just as
well without all those fine things on the
handle.”

When Dick was gone to school, though, she
exhibited his work to all the neighbours, as she
‘had done many a time before after the comple-
tion of a new toy for his sisters. And all the
said gossips held up their hands in astonish-
ment and said, ‘‘ Wonderful!’’ ‘How ever
does he manage it?” and, ‘‘ Well, Mrs. Fra
ser, but you have a clever son! He beats all
our lads, and you may well be proud of him!”
—and so on.

There was one voice, and only one, raised in
disparagement of this new proof of little Dick’s
ingenuity, or rather, of the particular purpose
to which he had applied it. The speaker was
a somewhat slatternly dame, of whom good
Mrs. Fraser was in the habit of saying she
10 THE TRIALS OF

should not like to dine with her unless she her-
self acted as cook, and moreover quoted the old
proverb, “‘An egg and a nut you may eat with
a slut’’—in allusion to some of her neighbour’s
peculiarities.

This individual, then, suggested that little
Dick’s ingenuity was sadly misplaced as re-
garded the potato bruiser. ‘‘ For,” said she,
“the more crevices the more dirt. J like
things plain for my own part.”

Mrs. Fraser gave her a look of withering
scorn—in itself a sufficient reply—and answered,
“That people who kept plain things clean would
keep carved ones as they should be too. But it
mattered very little to herself, carved or Nor
carved, any person who found dirt on her
cooking utensils would have most uncom-
mon sharp eyes.” Then, without waiting for
further comment, the good woman marched off
home again, carrying in her hand the orna-
mented potato bruiser, with something of the
dignity and pride with which a queen might
bear a sceptre, and inwardly resolving to set
extra store upon that implement, and wage
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 11

additional war against dust in every shape,
because of the remark which had so offended
her ear, and which showed that her neighbour’s
notions of cleanliness were by no means what
they ought to be.

Mrs. Fraser met her husband, a rather
sickly looking man, on the threshold, and to
him she displayed the potato bruiser.

“Just look here, James,” she said, holding
it up for him to examine.

‘“What, you have found it,” he replied,
scarcely glancing that way. ‘‘I was going to
set one of the boys to make you another.”

‘But look, James, what our lad has done,”
remarked the mother, not willing that Dick’s
work should be so lightly passed over. ‘Our
lad will not always be a country joiner, as
you and his grandfather have been all your
lives.”

James Fraser shook his head. ‘I shall be
quite contented if he turns out a good hand at
a respectable business. A vast number of lads
have got it into their heads at one time or
another that they were artists, and geniuses,
12 “THE TRIALS OF

and I don’t know what beside, and grown dis-
satisfied with a good honest business they might
have lived by if they would have stuck to it.
Then, in the end, they have turned out good for
nothing at all, and been a plague and a drag to
everybody belonging to them. My lad shall be
a plain joiner.”

As he finished speaking, James Fraser went
back to the workshop, leaving his wife any-
thing but satisfied with his mode of treating
this new proof of little Dick’s talent, of which
she was so proud. ‘I can’t understand my
husband,” said she to herself, as she went
about her household work; ‘he always seems
to want to keep that lad back, and, if he were
not such a good, kind father in other things, I
should think it very hard. But he has some
reason that I don’t know, for James was of
rather a close disposition from a lad. Ah, well!
he is a good ‘ausband, and one can’t expect
people to be ah perfection.”

A little sigh ended this mental speech, and
then Mrs. Fraser dismissed the affair from her
mind, in order to consider whether the kitchen
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 13

walls should be whitewashed or whether she
should mix with the ready-prepared whitewash
a dash of yellow ochre, to make them of a pale
cream colour. By the time that she had
decided on pure white as the sweetest and
cleanest-looking, she had forgotten all about
little Dick’s handiwork in anxiety about the
completion of her own during the absence of
the children at school and her husband in the
workshop.

But James Fraser’s thoughts were oceupied
by his only son long after he returned to his
work. It is true that he always discouraged
the lad’s efforts to reproduce, in wood, various
objects that attracted his fancy. Yet he was
also aware that the lad possessed very con-
siderable talent, which showed itself more and
more every day; but, as his wife said, he had
his reasons.

In the first place, his own beloved younger
brother had shown similar tastes to those which
his son now displayed, but they had produced
no good results either to himself or others.

As a lad he had been flattered, and his
14 THE TRIALS OF

labours praised, until, dissatisfied with the
occupation by which he earned his bread, and
believing that he only needed to be known to be-
come famous, he left his country home and went
to London, to find—as he thought—the proper
field in which to labour. But he did not take
with him two things without which the brightest
genius will avail but little—industry and perse-
verance. He soon found, too, that the works
which were the admiration of a country town,
and of the simple people who judged them, as
things far better than anybody else in their
neighbourhood could do, were not to be com-
pared with those of many other wood carvers in
the great city. At home, he had been almost
worshipped as the one who could produce such
imitations of nature; in London he was only an
item in the great sum total of similar workers.

And yet this man—James Fraser’s brother—
possessed true genius, only he expected to
arrive at the summit of art, as the bird flies,
lightly, swiftly, and with little apparent effort,
to the top of a hill, leaving far behind the
plodding mortal who must ascend it with toil-
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 15

some steps. When the young man discovered
his error, and found that he must labour long
and steadily to arrive at eminence, he failed
utterly. The good people at home had spoiled
him by their kindly meant but injurious flat-
tery, and when he failed to obtain the same
meed. of praise elsewhere which had attended
all his efforts in his native village, he blamed
others—not his own want of perseverance—and
said that the talents of the humble stranger
could not obtain that recognition which birth
and money could always procure for their
owners.

He said that ‘Envy, not Justice, gave the
verdict against him.”

Yet the young man did not profit by his
want of success, or allow it to stimulate him to
new efforts. He did not recognise the truth
that we obtain experience by every failure, and that
at ts by oft-repeated failures, rightly used, we arrive
at last at perfection.

He brooded over his disappointments, joined
others in railing at the world for not giving
them unmerited credit, fell into evil habits, and
16 THE TRIALS OF
gradually sank lower and lower in weakness, |
both of mind and body.

Meanwhile, his good friends at home—the
father, mother, and elder brother—who had
sent out the young genius with so much pride,
never doubted that he was winning fame, and
would make them all exult at the thought of
being able to claim kindred with him. Perhaps
their disappointment at the real result was
greater than that of the youth who had by
ddleness and want of perseverance buried his talent.
They could not rail against those who con-
demned his works. They could only grieve,
though they knew not how much cause they
had for regret.

The young aspirant after a ‘royal road”
never let them know the full extent of his fall
until he could no longer keep it a secret. One
or two letters, written soon after he reached
London, told them a little, but the youth was
too proud to complain or to return to be the
village idol after having hoped to reign amongst
artists.

There was vague talk of his doings, and the
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 17

country folk spoke about ‘that young Fraser
that went to London,” as though he had been
removed to a higher world, For these things
happened before the world ran from place to
place in railway carriages as it does now.

At last a letter came to the brother at home.
It was written in such a poor feeble hand, that
it was almost a wonder it ever reached its des-
tination. It said, ‘‘Dear James, come to me.
I am dying, and in want of common necessaries.
T have utterly failed in the object for which I
came here; but time is so short for me now,
that it matters little, only I would fain see one
friendly face before I die.”

Then, in a postscript, a little of the old
lingering pride crept out; for, though it plainly
cost the writer a great effort to complete the
wretched scrawl, he added, ‘Do not let the old
neighbours know.”

With a heavy heart, James Fraser hastened
to London, and in a miserable lodging found
the much-loved brother, whom he had always
pictured as winning his way to fame and
honour. ‘With his own hands he ministered to

B
18 THE TRIALS OF

the wants of the dying man—dying while yet
in his first, fresh youth. He watched him with
unwearied eyes, until at last those of his brother
were closed in death. But before that hap-
pened he heard the sick youth say, ‘‘ I wish I
had been contented to stay at home and work



like you as a plain mechanic, My early life
was only a dream of happiness, and since I left
home each day has shown me that the vision
had no reality in it.”

‘‘But you may yet prove it real,” replied
James; ‘“‘orat any rate, you can be a plain
mechanic like me.”’ ie

Richard shook his head. ‘Too late, too
late,” he cried. “I am dying. I know that is
no dream, and you will find Death real enough
soon. And if I were likely to live, do you
think I could go back home for people to point
at me as the man who tried and failed miser-
ably? Icould never bear it. Far better that
I should die. My talent has paid me no interest,
why should I wish to live?”

It was no time for James to contradict him,
as he lay there so wan and changed, Besides,
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 19

he had nothing but his village experience to set
against his brother’s greater knowledge of the
world, so he was silent, though unconvinced.
But, after the poor remains of his brother
were buried, and tongues which had been silent
while Richard was still alive, were loosed, and
told what his actual mode of life had been, the
village joiner thanked God that he himself was
not tempted by the possession of superior
talents to neglect the common business and
duties of his position. |

And was it wonderful that he returned to his
country home to find it more precious than
ever, and that he thought those humble abilities
which made him a steady, hard-working
mechanic, were preferable to those higher
powers which had proved a snare to his erring
brother ?

But the village folk did not forget their
young genius. They lamented his early death,
and said what he might have done to make
them prouder still had he lived.

Only James Fraser knew all, and mourned
not so much his brother’s early death as his
20 THE TRIALS OF

wasted life. And when, in after days, he mar-
ried, and had children of his own—aye, even
when he called his only son ‘ Richard,”’ after
the dead artist youth, he trembled lest his boy
should display similar talents to produce similar
results.

No one could well understand why James
Fraser shook his head and turned away with a
look of annoyance when his little lad first
began to cut and carve with a pocket-knife, to
the delight and admiration of his mother and
his school-fellows. They could not feel the
spasm that wrung the poor man’s heart when a
neighbour who had been a boyish companion
of that other Richard said, ‘Fraser, your
lad will just be his uncle over again; look
how he is whittling away there, as though
there were no such things as balls or tops in
the world, or at least as if he cared only to cut
them out,”

“May God in mercy forbid,” replied James,
with a shudder, and then, seizing a plane, he
worked away with such good will that the big
drops of perspiration soon stood on his brow.
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 21

His neighbour looked on curiously, then
waited till the sound of the plane ceased, and
Fraser began to make an alteration in the posi-
tion of the plank, when he again spoke. “You
are a queer fellow,” said he. ‘‘Most people
would be proud of that lad, and try to bring
him out, instead of keeping him back. Your
poor brother would have made a grand carver
in wood, and may be in marble, if he had
lived.”

James had ever been too tender over the
memory of him that was gone to make his
faults and failures a subject for village gossip.
Even his own good wife knew them not; for
his mother, now dead, and he, while they min-
gled their tears for the departed, had resolved
that his very weaknesses should be respected.
“He said, ‘Do not let the old neighbours
know,’ and we will not,” was their determina-
tion, and it was faithfully kept.

James turned sharply round to the speaker
who had thus reminded him of the past, and
said, ‘Neither you nor I can tell what my
brother would have been; but, as for. my boy,
22 THE TRIALS OF

I watit him to be just what I am—in trade I
mean. God grant that in all elso he may be a
far better man than his father;’’ and James
lifted his paper cap reverently, and spoke in a
lower tone as he named that Holy Name.
“But I did not mean to speak sharply,” he
added, seeing that his neighbour looked hurt ;
“only I am not a strong man, and, if I should
be taken away from my wife and the little
girls, Richard, as a plain, hard-working lad,
would be a staff for them to lean on; and would
keep a home over their heads. Better be a
home-bird than go flitting the world over to
find a grave among foreigners in a strange
churchyard as the end of it all.”

James Fraser dashed his hand across his
eyes, and then swept the moisture from his
brow also with.his handkerchief. The tone-of
deep feeling with which he spoke moved his
listener far more than sharp words could have
done.

*T don’t wonder at your thinking as you
do, James,” he replied. ‘It was hard for
you. to go and find the lad we had been so
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 23

proud of dying in a strange place; and you
loved one another better than most brothers
do, James.”

‘Aye, lad, we did,” was the answer; and
then the plane moved faster and faster, as
though the worker would force the moisture
from his brow to keep it from flowing out
at his eyes.

“You wish to make your child happy,
James, and to choose that path in life for him
in which he will find the fewest rough places;
but don’t be too hard on the lad, or try to
crush the talent out of him. I take it these
gifts are all from God; and it is neither for
you nor me to presume to say that his was
not bestowed for a wise and good end.”

James looked thoughtful when his friend
made this last remark. ‘‘ Well,” said he, “T
didn’t exactly think of my little lad’s gift in
that light; but, to be sure, how it brings to
mind what I was reading only last night. It
was about the building of Solomon’s temple.
That sort of work seemed, in a way, to be
in my line, though a long way above, in
24 THE TRIALS OF

another sense. However, I have read that
description many a time about the walls of
‘the house carved round about with carved
figures of cherubims, and palm-trees, and
open flowers, within and without;’ and ‘the
doors of olive-tree,’ with carvings of the same
sort, in the wonderful place that was put
together without so much as the sound of
‘hammer, nor axe, nor any tool of iron heard
in the house while it was in building.’ I have
read about it; bit by bit, and then I have
shut my eyes and tried to fancy how the
parts lookedseparate, and then all together;
but I never could do it. I always got be-
wildered, and only came to the conclusion, that
though I call myself a master-man at my |
business, I am only a poor bungler in com-
parison with those men of old.”

James Fraser’s pale face was lighted up
with enthusiasm as he spoke, and, for the
moment, he looked a different individual from
the plodding mechanic who seemed to have
no soul beyond the present homely every-
day work in which he was constantly engaged.
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 25

His neighbour smiled, and gave him a good-
humoured slap across the shoulder. ‘‘ Why,
man,” said he, ‘I believe your boy is not
indebted to his uncle only for that talent of
his. You have the same sort of fire smoulder-
ing in you, only you never will let it break
out. You keep it down with sawdust and
shavings in your country workshop; but, mark
me! these talents are from God.”

“T can think of beautiful things, and love
to see them; but it is the truth that I have
no hand to execute such, and I am content.
I try to do my duty; and if you wish to be
kind, don’t praise and flatter my lad into
thinking he is cleverer than his neighbours.
I was going to say I would give my right
hand, but I want that to work for him and
the rest. Still I would make any sacrifice to
keep him in his own station.”

“Then you wouldn’t like to see your Dick
at work chipping and caiving in the old church
yonder a few years hence?”

“‘T daren’t say that exactly; but I believe
he will not have the chance. The old Squire
26 THE TRIALS OF

is no man to forward such a work, and the
young one has not the chance now.”

“Well, do you think it matters? The God
that heareth prayer will hear and answer
those who worship in sincerity, whether their
hymn of praise be sounded amid the lofty
aisles of a cathedral or under the low roof of
our old church, which is ready to tumble down
almost.”

James threw down his plane. ‘That’s all
right enough; but still it isn’t the only way
one should look at things. It seems to me
that we ought to offer of our best for God’s
service, and that there should be in us some-
thing of that spirit which moved David, as
soon as the Lord had given him rest from
his enemies round about, and made him say,
‘See, now I dwell in a house of cedar, and
the Ark of God dwelleth in curtains.’ I would
like to see rich and poor join together, thank-
ing God that they were esteemed worthy to
help in the adornment of His house; and yet,
when they had done their best to make it worthy
of its sacred purpose, to say in the spirit of the
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 27

builder of the temple, ‘But will God indeed
dwell on the earth? Behold, the heaven and
the heaven of heavens cannot contain Thee!
how much less this house that we have
builded ?’?”

James Fraser’s words, or rather his simple
and. earnest application of the words of Scrip-
ture, had a visible effect on his listener. The
man made a movement of assent, and added,
‘‘T believe you are right after all; but it isn’t
often that folks like us look at things in that
light; though, to be sure, all have the same
interest in them, or ought to have. But I
must go now. Good day; and don’t forget
what I have said about your lad.”

The friendly nod was returned, though no
answer was given to the concluding remark ;
and the man went his way, thinking to him-
self that Fraser was a queer, crotchety fellow,
and that if Dick were jis lad he would sa-
crifice anything to cultivate the boy’s natural
gifts.

And James Fraser was in some degree to
blame. There was no need to grieve that his
28 THE TRIALS OF

boy displayed talent of a peculiar kind, as his
uncle had done before him; it was only to be
reeretted that in the latter it had been buried
and lost.

Yet the father was earnest, very earnest,
in desiring the child’s welfare, and thought
that by discouraging him from exercising his
ingenuity, he was shielding him from tempta-
tion. Many a parent has erred in like manner
out of anxiety for a child’s good; and children
should be slow to think those measures harsh
which, though irksome to them, are never-
theless the fruit of a true regard for their
welfare.
A VILLAGE ARTIST, 29

CHAPTER IT.

THE YOUNG CARVER’S EXPERIMENT, AND HOW
IT SPED.

James Fraser and his neighbour had not
been alone in the workshop while conversing
on the subject mentioned in the last chapter.
Behind a number of flooring-boards, which
were propped: in a sloping position at the
farther end of the workshop, and in a line
with the door, crouched a lad of somewhat
delicate appearance, and with an earnest,
thoughtful countenance. He had not con-
cealed himself for the purpose of listening ;
but it was his fashion to hide behind the
flooring-boards in order that the companions
who came, marbles or ball in hand, to draw
him from his favourite pursuit, might not suc-
ceed in finding him. Busy as usual with his
30 THE TRIALS OF

pocket-knife, the only graving-tool he pos-
sessed, and a bit of hard wood, little Dick
Fraser heeded not what was passing outside
his retreat, until the allusion to his talent for
carving, and his father’s prayer that, it might
not be with him a ruling passion, caused him
to suspend his labours and listen for more.
And the two men, all unconscious of his pre-
sence, talked on.

James Fraser’s back was towards the row
of flooring-boards, or he might have seen a
little figure steal softly from behind them a
few moments after the sound of his neighbour’s
departing footsteps ceased to be heard. The
lad’s cheek had become pale and red by turns,
as his favourite occupation was in turn praised
or blamed. But high above all the rest came
the idea, ‘It is a gift from God. . This power
is a talent, and it ought to be used; even father
himself can’t deny that. The master at school
says our talents should be made to pay interest
to Him who gave them; and must I bury this
one of mine ?”

The lad began to consider from that moment
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 31

how he might use it, and that too with his
father’s consent; and he resolved to give such
a proof, both of his powers and perseverance,
as to win over his parent to sanction the appli-
cation of them as a means of earning a living
when he should be no longer a child.

Four months after Dick accidentally heard
this conversation, he formed the one exception
amongst the swarming schoolboys who rushed
off to play on the common on that afternoon
when I first gave a glimpse of him turning
homewards, instead of joining them in their
sports.

Richard’s companions were not, however,
inclined to let him off so easily. They crowded
round him, one protesting that he never did

‘play a single game now;”

another coaxing
him “just to have a round, instead of going
home directly,” and so on. But Dick made
a motion of refusal, and turned in an opposite
direction, though not until he. had stooped to
pick up something from the ground.

“He has got a new bit to carve,” cried one
of the boys, who was looking most regretfully
32 THE TRIALS OF

after Richard. ‘Il run and see what it is;”
and suiting the action to the word, he bounded
after his schoolfellow, and said, “‘ What
are you going to carve now, Dick? Show
me,”

The boy smiled, and without a word held
out a spray of oak, Such a beautiful piece,
with three or four acorns, and all the leaves
perfect except one, and that was only sufficiently
injured to show off the beauty of the rest more
fully,

‘Oh! what a pretty piece. When shall you
begin?”

“Just now, or at least as soon as I get
home, I have a bit of nice wood that will
just do.”

“YT should think you would always have
plenty of wood to choose from, as your father
has so much,” remarked the other.

“You are mistaken though; father only lets
me have bits that he can make no use of, for he
says I waste wood.”

‘“‘ 7 don’t call it waste though,” replied the
other, looking very wise, and as if he were lay-
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 83

down the law, and could convert Richard’s
father to his opinion with a word or two.

“Tt does not matter what we think, it is
what father thinks; and by his good will T
should never so much as carve a toy for one
of you again.”

‘Well, that is queer! Now I must go
back if you really will not come. Show me
that when you have done it.”

‘To be sure I will,” Richard answered, with
a nod. of the head; and he added, when his
friend was out of hearing, while a look of
satisfaction stole over his face, ‘I have two
or three more bits at home that no one has
seen yet.” :

When he reached home he found the work-
shop vacant; for the master and his workmen,
including the two apprentices, were up at the
Hall, making alterations before the arrival
of the Squire’s only son and heir, who, with
his young wife, was coming to the country for
the shooting season. Indeed, Mr. Frederick
Millman, the young Squire, had already come
down to give orders as to some alterations

o
34 THE TRIALS OF

which he wished to be completed before his
wife’s arrival. |

Little Dick felt pleased at the thought that
for some days to come his father would be so
constantly engaged at the Hall as to leave
him at liberty to pursue his carving unnoticed.
Resolved to make the most of this opportunity,
Richard at once chose from. his little hoard of
wood a piece suitable for his purpose, and set to
work. So intent was he upon reproducing, in an
enduring form, the beautiful spray of oak with
its acorn fruit, that he never heard his mother’s
summons to tea. And, as he sat screened from
view, in his old nook behind the deals, the
good dame never saw her busy son, but mentally
scolded him as a truant who could not leave
his playmates in time for the evening meal.

It was only when the boy heard the return-
ing footsteps of his father that he crept from
his hiding place, and, after surveying his
progress with much satisfaction, put away his
tools and entered the house. He guessed well
that his mother would say nothing about his
absence while his father was there; so, hastily
A VILLAGE ARTIST, 85

swallowing his meal he was soon deep in pre-
paring his lessons for the morrow. But, when
Richard went into his little bed-room that
night, the wood, which already began to bear
some resemblance to the model, was carried
thither also.

Country folk keep early hours, and little
country boys have not generally much chance
of sitting up late in order to indulge their
liking for study or handiwork of any kind.

Richard looked longingly at.the graceful
spray and then at the end of candle, and
wished he could increase the latter to an almost
indefinite length in order that he might have
light to pursue his work through the still hours
of the night. This was, however, impossible,
and a second thought warned him that even
had he the means of continuing his labour he
could not do so undiscovered. It was well for
him that he had not the means of turning the
hours set apart for rest into a time of labour,
for nature, when overtasked, takes revenge
both on mind and body sooner or later. So
Richard could only take one look at his box
36 THE TRIALS OF

of treasures, and was just handling them with
gentle touch and admiring glance when down
popped the end of wick into a pool of grease,
and he was left in darkness to replace his
precious property and grope into bed as best
he might. But with the early dawn he was up
and at work on his oaken spray.

There was a true love of the beautiful in
this lad, for he gazed upon his simple model
as though drinking in its loveliness with his
eager eyes. ‘If I can only copy it exactly,”
he murmured to himself, “the set will be
complete and father must be pleased this time, _
though he never was before.” ‘With renewed
energy he worked until he heard his father
astir and his mother’s voice calling, ‘ Richard,
Richard, it is time to get up.” Then after
briefly comparing his copy with the original,
he went down stairs to’ breakfast. For three
more days the lad laboured thus, devoting
every spare moment—stealing hours from
sleep, denying himself play, and scarcely
giving himself time for meals’ But on the
evening of the third day he looked’ at it with
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 37

beaming eyes and joyful face. It was finished.
And truly as he laid it and the original spray
side by side, it was hard to discover any very
great difference. He had thrown. his whole
soul into the work, and by zeal and patient
labour had attained success. His face was pale
and .his eyes weary, but they were lighted up
by a feeling of natural and entire satisfaction.
But Richard did not spend many moments
in gazing at his finished work. He had
laboured with a particular end in view, te
which this oaken spray was only an auxiliary.
He turned from it, and running quickly to his
bed-room brought down the treasure box
before alluded to, and then taking out its
contents, spread them in order upon his
- father’s bench, having first carefully cleared
away the stray curls of shavings and chisel-
ings of wood which were plentifully strewed
around. Richard’s heart beat loudly, and his
hand trembled as he did it, for this evening
would test the success of an experiment which
had occupied him for several months and cest
him an immense amount of self-denial and
38 THE TRIALS OF

painstaking. And truly Richard had cause to
be proud of his handiwork; for there, upon
the bench, were laid specimens of foliage in
wood, enough to delight any young lover of
art. There was a single leaf of the vast horse-
chestnut—the cone of flowers would have been
too delicate for his yet growing skill—there
was a little sprig of elm, and there were similar
sprays of birch and of walnut. There was the
fir-cone, wonderfully well carved, a sycamore
leaf, and a'sprig of beech, with a nut or two,
which made a pretty companion for his best and
crowning work, the spray of oak. Nor was a
bunch of filberts and its leaf forgotten. “With
true taste the lad grouped the several portions
together, so that they seemed to form one piece,
or rather cluster of foliage, in wood, and then,
hiding behind the flooring boards in his old
corner, he awaited the coming of his father.
Well, he had worked, and now he waited
with throbbing heart and prayerful lips, for
it seemed to him as though on the success of
this scheme would depend his future happi-
ness. But he was very young, and he could
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 39

not see far, or judge for the future, or guess
that just as adim and misty morning is often
the forerunner of a glorious noon, so might the
very clouding of his hopes in early youth be
the presage of a happy manhood. Our bless-
ings would oft lose their charm, and we should
fail to know their value, if we were not pre-
pared for them by previous trial and chastise-
ment, sent in love and mercy.

James Fraser was a first-rate judge of wood,
and possessed, though he was most careful to
hide it, something of that taste which had been
so marked in his unfortunate brother, and
which was now showing itself in his own
child. He was a great admirer of trees, not
merely because as a carpenter and joiner he
could cut them up and use them in his trade,
but because of their majestic beauty and varied
loveliness of form. He was especially fond of
marking their foliage, and many a time had he
unconsciously given little Richard a lesson in
grouping by the artistic way in which he
arranged a few green sprays brought from the
wood at his son’s request, or which he was
49 THE TRIALS OF

accustomed to reach for the lad when they
were out together in the fields during the
summer evenings. The lad had discovered
this hking in his father, and it was in the hope
of gratifying his taste, giving him pleasure and
obtaining leave to pursue his work unchecked,
that he had carved these specimens of foliage
as a surprise.

Richard was still waiting for the appearance
of his father, when he heard a light step ap-
proaching the door of the workshop. It was
that of his sister Margaret. He peeped from
his hiding-place hoping to see her turn back;
‘For,’ thought he, ‘it will spoil all if
Maggie sees the carving, and tells mother or
anybody about it.” But Maggie stepped into
the shop and began looking about for stray
bits of wood for fire-kindling purposes. It was
some consolation to Richard during this time
of suspense to observe that her eyes were
always turned floorwards, and that she
trudged round and round filling her pinafore
and singing as she moved without thinking of
anything but her employment. All at once
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 4]

Maggie found out that stooping continually
made her back ache, and she raised herself
into an erect posture close to the bench on
which lay the carving. Her quick eyes saw it
in a moment, and she exclaimed, ‘‘Oh, how
pretty ! mother, mother!’ she added, intending
to call her mother to look at the pretty things
she had discovered on ‘father’s’? bench.
Fortunately her cry was not heard, and before
she had time to utter another word, Richard
came from his hiding-place and stood before
her. The little girl was so startled at his
sudden appearance that she forgot everything
else for the moment, and thus he gained time
to tell her his project in a few hasty words.
“And now you won’t tell, Maggie, wil
you?” said he, ‘most likely you will all
know about the carving as soon as father
has seen it, and if you tell now you will spoil
everything.”

But Maggie wouldn’t tell. She would have
been very sorry. Quite alarmed at the sight of
her brother’s pale, anxious face, she left hold
of her pinafore and never heeding that all her
42 THE TRIALS OF

fire-wood fell to the ground, she threw her red,
chubby arms round Richard’s neck, gave him a
hearty kiss, and said, ‘‘Dick, don’t look so
frightened. I won’t tell. I wouldn’t for ever
so much.”

Richard heartily returned the little sistex’s
kiss, and said she was a dear, good Maggie.
Then, hearing her father’s step and voice, she
hastily snatched up the bits of wood she had
collected, and scampered off into the house,
while Richard went back to his hiding-place.
The sound of his father’s voice in conversation
was a disappointment to the lad, for it showed
that he was not returning alone. He had in-
tended to watch James Fraser’s face as he
caught sight of the carved foliage, and then to
run from his hiding-place and ask him to accept
it. ‘He must see how hard I have worked,”
said he to himself when he formed this plan.
But now this could not be done. His father
would not be alone when he first saw the fruit
of his son’s labour, and it would be useless for
him to remain concealed. The boy was on the
point of leaving his hiding-place when his
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 43

father entered the shop in company with Mr.
Frederick Millman, the young Squire.

James I'raser and his employer were talking
of the alterations going on at the Hall, and
the joiner, in order to make something plainer,
took up a piece of chalk and advanced to the
bench to make an outline on it in chalk for the
young gentleman’s information. The young
Squire was just at his heels, and both uttered
an exclamation of surprise at the sight which
met their eyes.

‘‘ Why, Fraser,’ exclaimed Mr. Frederick,
‘Cis this your work? What tasteful grouping
and well-executed foliage! Upon my word, it
does the artist credit, whoever he may be. I
had no idea any of our country hands could do
this sort of thing. Is it for sale?”

“Tike yourself, sir, I see it for the first
time,’’? replied Fraser, without showing any
very great satisfaction. Indeed, a sort of
pained expression crossed his face, for in this
new proof of his child’s talent he seemed to
see a fresh temptation to lure the lad from
the path in which he wished to keep him.
44 THE TRIALS OF

‘‘T presume you know whose work this is,
though, Fraser,’ returned the young Squire.
‘“You have, doubtless, a rustic genius among
your workmen.”’

‘‘T don’t think it was done by a man’s hand,
sir.” ;

‘What! is it a woman’s doing? I know
there are and have been female artists, but I
should never expect to find one here,’’ returned
the young man, interrupting the explanation
that Fraser was about to give.

Fraser could not restrain a smile as he replied,

‘‘O dear, no, sir.’ Then turning to his boy,
who stood just where he had been when they
entered, half afraid and altogether too shy to
advance, he said, ‘‘ Richard, come here and tell
us who carved this group of foliage.”
The lad’s voice was scarcely audible as he
answered, ‘‘I did, father,’? in a tone more like
that of a culprit before his judge than of one
who had achieved what was, for his years, a
ereat success, and felt proud of having done
80.

“You! impossible,”’

suid the young Squire,
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 45

‘Why these little sprays, especially the oak
leaves and acorns, are really beautiful. If you
have carved them I—, but no, it cannot be.”’

‘‘Indeed I did, every bit; some at nights
and some in morning's before father and mother
were up,” replied Richard. ‘I finished that
piece of oak this very day. If you don’t
believe me, sir—though father knows I would
not tell you a lie—you may set somebody to
watch me while I cut some more leaves and
things just like these.”’

‘Then all I can say is that your work does
you great credit, and, Fraser, you ought to be
proud of your son, for he has not only an
artist’s talent, but the industry which will enable
him to turn it to good account.”

‘“You are very kind to say so, sir,’’ replied
Fraser; and, in spite of himself, his own face
lighted up with the pride and pleasure he
could not help feeling at hearing his only son
so highly spoken of. He knew, too, that the
young Squire was no mean judge of art, and
that Wellesby Hall had been enriched by a
choice collection of beautiful objects which he
46 THE TRIALS OF

had gathered both in England and abroad.
But by a strong effort Fraser mastered that
first flush of pleasure, and, turning to his
employer, said, ‘‘I dare say you will think me
mistaken in my notions when I tell you that I
would rather see a model door, window, or
even washing-tub made by my son than this
group of foliage which you are pleased to
admire. A thorough workman at my own
honest trade is better than a vagabond ‘ artist,’
as too many call themselves, who are too idle
to work at a homely occupation, and therefore
pretend to be above it.”

Mr. Frederick smiled. ‘In one sense, Fraser,
you may be right. There are many lads who,
from being praised beyond their due and mado
to believe that they are too clever to live in an
every-day world, become fit for none at all.
For my own part I do think that we do as cruel
a thing when we over-praise as by over-censure.
But again, there are others who could succeed,
but fail for lack of the industry that would
have made them great men. Yet when there
is a real talent, no matter for what, so long as
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 47

it can be used for the good of our fellow-men,
I think we have no more right to try to crush
it than the man in the parable had to bury the
one entrusted to him, instead of using it for
the honour and benefit of his Master. Let me
persuade you to cherish the powers your boy
manifests. He who gave it gives nothing in
vain or to be useless.”

While the young gentleman spoke little Dick
listened with kindling eyes and glowing cheek.
Some such thoughts had been in his boyish
mind, though he could not have put them into
words. And he durst not have said them to
his father even had he been able to express
them. Indeed, had any other person spoken as
the Squire did, most likely James Fraser would
have refused to listen. But he being son to
the ‘creat man”’ of the village, owner of all
Wellesby, and the joiner’s landlord besides,
there was nothing for it but to wait patiently
until the young gentleman had said his say,
though he would gladly have sent his son out
of hearing. ‘‘ Now,” he replied, ‘ there’s no
doubt a deal of truth in what you say, sir;
48 THE TRIALS OF

but I stick to my first thought, and shall not
further any of Dick’s fancies about carving. I
wish from my heart he had never tried a thing
of the sort. I would give fifty pounds at this
minute, though I have no such sum to spare,
and should have to work early and late to
make it up again, if I could be quite sure he
would never carve another.”’

Young Millman shook his head. ‘ Well,
well, Fraser, I can only quote the old proverb,
‘A wilful man must have his way.’ Apply
it as you choose. I have no business to
interfere between a father and his child; only
I would gladly have served your son if you
would have let me. I wonder how the carved

’ of ‘cherubims and

work of ‘open flowers,
palm trees’ overlaid with gold, that you and
I have talked about, and which adorned Solo-
mon’s glorious temple, would ever have come
into existence if all fathers had been like you.
They would have sought in vain for ‘all
manner of cunning men for every manner of
work.’ And your lad might have been my
right hand man some day, to help me to restore
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 49

the old church and to execute oak carvings
which should not shame those beautiful frag-
ments which alone are left to tell us what
glorious things were there in bygone times.”’

‘‘T hope my lad will work for you, sir, as my
father laboured for yours before I was born,
and as I do now,” answered Fraser with a
respectful bend of the head.

‘Well, I must have a word with the lad
before we say any more about repairs and
alterations. Now, Richard,’ said he, ad-
dressing the child artist, ‘‘if you want to sell
this group of foliage tell me the price, and I
will buy it of you.”

The boy’s face worked as if moved by some
strong inward feeling, and for a few moments
he was silent, as though, try as he might, his
lips refused to utter a word.

“Do you not know its worth? Then I shall

have to fix it for you,”’

continued the young
gentleman in a pleasant tone, and taking out
his purse as he spoke.

“T don’t want money; I will not sell it,”
cried Richard in an agony of disappointment.

D
50 TUE TRIALS OF

‘IT worked so hard, I got up by daylight for
months and months to c.rve these things be-
cause I thought of surprising father, and pleas-
ing him too, with such a present. And now all
my work is of no use. He does not care for it,
so no one else shall have it.”

Without giving his father or the young
gentleman time to speak again or himself to
think, Richard swept the whole of the carved
foliage from the bench to the floor, and by
stamping upon it with his feet destroyed or
injured in a moment of passion a great part of
the labour of months. Then, bursting into an
agony of weeping, he was about to dart from
the shop without bestowing another glance on
the wreck of all his pains and labour, when he
was stopped by a kind but firm hand from
which he vainly struggled to escape. It was
young Mr. Millman who held him.

James Fraser stood still, but on his face was
a look of pain. In fact, the tears which rolled
in a torrent down litile Richard’s face and the
words which showed how very strong had been
his desire to please his father, had stirred the
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 51

current of paternal love in the man’s heart,
and caused it to well up to his very eyes.
Perhaps it would have been hard to tell which
suffered the most at that moment, the man or
his son.

Finding it was in vain to struggle against the
young gentleman’s firm hold, little Dick at
length ceased his efforts to escape, and stood
quite still, though he sobbed bitterly. For a
little time the sound of his weeping was the
only one that disturbed the quiet of the country
workshop.

Mr. Frederick Millman, though young, was
a sensible and right-minded man. He was far
above the petty feeling which would have been
wounded by Richard’s rejection of his offer, or
which would have sent him away offended on ac-
count of a child’s burst of passion and disrespect-
ful conduct towards himself. So far from con-
sidering himself at all in the matter, the young
man looked below the surface and grieved to
think how deeply both the filial affection and love
of art—so strong in this poor lad’s breast—were
wounded by his father’s harsh reception of his
52 THE TRIALS OF

beautiful offering. During that short pause
the young Squire was considering how he might
best promote a good understanding between
James Fraser and his son. When Richard’s
sobs became less violent he spoke to him in
that low, firm voice, which always commands
the most ready obedience, and desired him
to pick up the broken foliage and place it on
the bench.

The lad obeyed without hesitation. Perhaps,
now, the storm of his passion was over, he
might feel some regret for having so hastily
destroyed what had been with him, in a double
sense, a labour of love. There was even a
gleam of satisfaction on his face as he saw on
raising the oaken spray from the ground that
it had escaped uninjured, though it was the
only one. The young Squire marked this look,
and augured good from it.

When Richard had finished he turned an
imploring face towards him and said, ‘‘ Please,
sir, may I go now?” He was longing to rush
away to weep unseen and unchecked.

‘“Not just yet, Richard,” was the reply.
A VILLAGE ARTIST. D8

“Let us first talk a little as friends, we two,
you know.”

The boy gave an impatient movement, as
though he would escape if he could; but Mr.
Frederick passed his arm round him in a kindly
way, and, with a touch as gentle as a mother
might use when uttering words of advice to her
child, thus detained him. There was something
soothing to the wounded heart in this half-
caressing touch, especially as Richard could not
help bearing in mind the fact that it was the
young Squire, son of the greatest and richest
gentleman in all Wellesby, that thus treated
him. Tears came again, but they were tears of
regret for the passion and ingratitude which
had been his return for the young Squire’s kind
offer. :

‘“My poor boy,” said Mr. Frederick, ‘‘ you
have had a great trial to bear with in the last
half hour, and I feel much for your disappoint-
ment; but I am afraid if you go away without
our talking a little more, you will think I
blame your father and encourage you to do it
also. Then JZ should have more cause to be
54 THE TRIALS OF

sorry, for I should grieve if either word or act
of mine helped to build up a barrier between
father and son. So, before I go, let me tell
you that I believe your father acts in the way
that he thinks the best for you, that he wishes
to guard you from temptation, and has some
good reason for all, which I do not know any
more than you. And it is not always possible
for a father to tell his reasons to his children.
Yet, ef a child can feel that his parent loves him,
labours for him, and tries to make him happy, that
child should trust his parent, even though his own
inclinations are crossed and he knows not why.
You know what God’s Word says, Richard, I
mean about what is the duty of children?”

The young gentleman waited, and Richard
replied in a very low voice, ‘‘‘ Children, obey
your parents in the Lord, for that is right.’ ”’

‘¢ And you are a child, and there stands your
father. Obey and honour him if you would
claim a share in the blessings promised by the
Most High to dutiful children.”

Little Dick Fraser was a boy of noble
thoughts and generous impulses. Without a
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 30

moment’s hesitation he stepped up to his father
—for with him the being convinced that he was
wrong was ever followed by an acknowledgment
of the fault and a petition for forgiveness—and
said, ‘‘ Father, I know you love me. I grieved
you by being in such a passion just now. For-_
give me, father, I wiil try to do as you wish
me.”

Notasyllable about his own bitter disappoint-
ment, his lost labour in the work which lay
half-crushed and scattered on the bench. With
a delicacy that would have done honour to a
hero, the boy refrained from alluding to all his
strivings—vainly pursued—to win a father’s
favour. He simply owned the fault of which
he was conscious, and added to the confession a
promise—which it cost him a great effort to
make—that, for his father’s sake, he would try
to give up his own cherished hopes.

James Fraser dropped the chalk which he
held in his hand, and threw his arms round the
boy. ‘‘My son, my dear Dick,” he exclaimed,
‘‘if ever a father’s prayers deserved an answer
on account of their earnestness, mine will gain
56 THE TRIALS OF

one now as I pray God to bless you and make
your days ‘long in the land.’ ”’

Fraser tried to say more, but he could not.
Strong feeling, which sometimes gives the
power to speak with eloquence, as often takes
it away. |

The young Squire, rejoiced at the success of
his mediation, walked towards the door, and
thus placed the length of the workshop between
himself and the two Frasers, that his presence
might be no check upon them. Soon his atten-
tion was called by the voice of the boy, ‘I
want to beg your pardon now, sir, for having
behaved so badly when you spoke so kindly to
me. JI have nothing to say for myself, only I
hope you will forgive me. Iam sorry for my
anger now.”

‘‘Most freely and willingly, Richard,” re-
plied the young gentleman; ‘‘ but my dear lad,
do not forget who sees and hears us at all times
when you are again tempted to give way to
anger. Better offend all the people in the
world than grieve our Maker by giving way to
sinful passions.’’ Then shaking the boy.kindly
A VILLAGE ARTIST. Or

by the hand, he re-entered the shop and joined
its master.

Richard appeared very anxious to say some-
thing more, and at length, mustering courage,
he picked up the one uninjured bit of carving,
the beautiful spray of oak leaves and acorns,
and offering it to Mr. Frederick, said, ‘‘ Will
you accept this, sir, from me? It is the only
one left whole, and I think it is the best, for I
carved it last. I can’t offer to do you some
more instead of the broken ones, for’’—he tried
hard to say it frmly—‘‘I am going to be a
joiner now.”

“Thank you, Richard, I will keep it for
your sake. It shall lie under a little glass case
in the drawing-room at the Hall, and shall
remind me how much may be done in spite of
all obstacles by perseverance.”

Richard’s face brightened again at these
kind words, far more precious than money
would have been, and with a respectful bow
turned to quit the shop. ‘‘ Another word,”
said Mr. Frederick, stopping him. ‘‘ You say
you are going to be a joiner now, and I com-
58 THE TRIALS OF

mend the self-denial which makes you give up
your own will to your father’s. At the same
time let me say, I think you ought not to bury
your talent; for remember the very rarest gifts
of mind, and the brightest artistic powers, are not
unsuited to pair with the homeliest in the per-
formance of our every-day duties. And Richard,
if you live to be an old man, you will look back
all the more happily on the days of your youth,
if you can reflect that you did not fail in duty
to your father. Good bye for the present.”

The young Squire shook the childish hand
once again, and then Richard left the work-
shop, his heart cheered and lighter that he
had owned his fault, and that in his trial he -
was sure at least of his father’s sympathy and
blessing.
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 59

CHAPTER ITT.

THE FATHER’S REASONS, AND THE WAY IN WHICIL
RICHARD KEPT HIS RESOLUTION.

Mr. Freperick Miriman finished his talk
with James Fraser, and little Dick saw him
start homeward; but he never observed his
father leave the shop. Still he thought he
must have gone out unperceived, for he went to
the door and listened, but heard no movement
within. And James Fraser was rarely within
his workshop without letting his busy hands
give token of his presence. Richard had taken
no small pains to elude his sister Maggie, for
he felt he could not bear any questioning. The
moon was shining in at the latticed windows,
and giving a glitter to the sharp-edged tools
that lay about on the benches, as little Dick
crept softly into the shop to execute a plan he
60 THE TRIALS OF

had formed. He went up to the bench on
which lay the broken carving, and was about
to sweep all the fragments into the empty box
_ that had contained them in their beauty, when
he was startled by seeing his father sitting
with his head leaning on his hands, and appa-
rently in deep thought. ‘I did not know you
were here, father,” said he. _

‘‘That need not frighten you away, Richard,”’
was the reply. ‘I want to talk to you, and so
come and sit beside me here in the moon-
hight.” | 3

Fraser made room for the boy by his side,
and as Richard looked in his face, its ashy
colour made him feel afraid. He had seen hig
father pale before, but never as he did just
then. He tried to think it was the silvery
moonlight which gave his father’s face that
ghastly hue, but in spite of this he felt uneasy,
and whispered, ‘‘ Father, are you ill?”

‘‘T have not been well, but I am better, and
I have a deal to say. You heard the young
Squire’s words about trusting your father, even
though he might cross your inclinations?”
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 61

The boy assented, though his words were
but a faint whisper.

‘And you showed yourself willing. "Well, I
think I understand better than I ever did
before the heart of my only son.” Richard
made no reply this time, but he laid his hand
in that of his father, and the mute pressure of
the two palms said more than speech. ‘ You
shall look into my heart, too, lad, now, and be
told my reasons for so dealing with you. You
have heard me talk about your uncle Richard,
who died young, and was buried among
strangers, but you cannot know how I loved
him. And people have said you are so like
him, as, indeed, you are. Well, the talents
that the folks praised as they now praise
yours, ruined my only brother, and I sought
to save my only son from falling into the same
temptations.”’

Then James Fraser repeated in his child’s
ears all his unfortunate brother’s history, and
ended by saying, ‘‘It is a terrible thing to die
and feel that we can only look back on a
wasted life and talents which have been given
62 THE TRIALS OF

to us in vain. Fearing you, my dear child,
might follow in your uncle’s footsteps, I dis-
couraged your love of carving, and I have now
told you his story which only my mother ever
knew the whole of before. Respect the
memory of your uncle, and do not speak of
the failings of the dead.”’

‘“T will not, father,’ said Richard, much
impressed by his father’s earnestness, and
the evident pain with which he recalled the
history of that dear, dead brother. ‘‘ But,
father,” he added, not quite convinced that
because one had wasted his talent the other
must needs do so, “if I were to labour
and persevere I might succeed, though my
uncle failed. You say that he was not in-
dustrious, and that without hard work no one
can succeed.”’

‘T expected this answer, Richard; but
listen, I have something to tell you about
myself. I amnotastrongman. I never have
been one, and lately I have suffered more than
I can make you understand. But I can tell
you what will be the end of this pain, Richard.
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 65

I shall never live to be old, I may die soon,
and’’—

Here Fraser was interrupted by a great
pitiful cry. He felt the lad’s arms round his
neck and his wet cheek pressed close to his
own while h sobbed out, “Oh, father, to
think I should ever have grieved you.”

“Hush! my boy, my dear boy. It goes
through my heart to tell you, because I know
how hard it is for you to hear. But it is better
that you who are willing to give up your
dearest wish to me should not think that I
cross your hopes because, as your father, I
have the power. You are my only boy, but
there are three girls in the house with your
mother, and Maggie is the eldest and eight
years old. Now, if I should die in a few
years, all these, as well as your mother, would
be left unprovided for, unless you will bend
your whole mind to learning a plain business,
so that you may fill my place and earn a living
for them when Iam gone. It would be a long
while before you could do that in the path you
would have chosen.”’
G-4 THE TRIALS OF

Tt was hard to say whether the lad or his

father was the paler as they sat in the white,
cold moonlight. But Richard’s voice was firm
when he answered, ‘‘I will give all my strength
and will, and try to learn the business for your
sake and theirs.”?’ He pointed to the house
in which were his mother and sisters, as he
spoke, to indicate who ‘‘they’” were. ‘ Thank
you, dear lad; now I shall have an easier mind,”’
was his father’s answer.

‘But, father, are you sure of what you told
me last ?”’? _‘* The doctors all say the same. I
may live a few years, or I may die soon; but
there is no hope of cure or of long life for
me.”

‘Does my mother know ?” inquired Richard,
with faltering voice. ‘No, my boy. No one
at home or near it. The secret is mine and
yours now, and we must keep it between us;
for how could we bear to see your mother
grieving, as she would grieve if she knew?
Better not to make her life a daily dread that
death is on the threshold. Now let us go into
the house.’
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 65

They turned to leave the place; and then —
only did Richard bethink himself of the object
which brought him there. By the light of the
moon he gathered up his broken carving and —
placed the pieces in the box. |

‘¢ Aye, keep them,” said his father; “I am
sorry they are broken.”

“Tf you like, father, but not without, I will
join the pieces together with glue and keep
them to remind me’’—

‘“Of your promise to me, Richard, eh ?”

‘‘ Not that, father,”’ said the boy sadly. ‘I
shall not need anything to remind me of it.
But when I have put these pieces together they
will teach me not to destroy by one moment’s
indulgence in sinful passion the work of
months.”

‘Good. Put it together, Richard, by all
means. Lock the door when you come out of
the shop.”

The father went into the house, and Richard
lingered behind. As soon as the sound of the
closing door told him that he was alone save
for the presence of Him ‘ who never slumbereth

Ei
66 TIE TRIALS OF

nor sleepeth,”’ the boy knelt in his accustomed
place and prayed for strength to perform the
promise he had made. He did not forget to
seek pardon also for his burst of angry passion.

When Richard, after much pains and labour,
had succeeded in joining all the broken frag-
ments of his carved work, he found there was
still something wanting. It was a small bit of
fir with a cone, on which, next to the spray of
oak, he had bestowed the greatest amount of
time and patience. He sought for it on the
bench in the shop, raked over the shavings,
examined all the odds and ends that were
lying about; but still in vain. Neither by
search nor inquiry could he discover the miss-
ing piece; so he was fain to arrange the rest
as well as he could upon a small mahogany
stand which his father made and gave to him
for the purpose.

Richard called his father’s attention to the
deficiency, saying as he did so, ‘It seems J
am to learn another lesson still, that the bad
effects of indulging in evil passion cannot be
quite erased.”
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 67

Years after Richard found that missing frag
ment.

Many visitors to James Fraser’s house saw
and admired the carving after it had been
repaired; but only the boy, his father, and
young Mr. Millman knew its whole history.
Even sister Maggie failed to obtain any in-
formation, though the inquisitive little maiden
tried hard to find out what father said when
he saw Dick’s carving.

But it was remarked that, from that mght,
the ycung carver laid aside his art. His mother
wondered what had come over the lad; his —
schoolfellows asked why he pleased them no
longer with specimens of his handiwork.
Richard’s only answer was, “I am going to
be a joiner; and I will never carve another
bit till I am master of my father’s trade.”

In accordance with this resolution, Richard
began to give up his spare hours to the work-
shop, as though he took as much pride in
using a joiner’s tool as he once did in re-
producing those beautiful objects in wood.
He would stand beside his father in the shop,
68 THE TRIALS OF

and ask him the meaning and purpose of all
he saw there; he would listen when Fraser
gave orders, and accompany him when he
went from home to execute others.

There were some, both boys and older per-
sons, who did not hesitate to taunt Richard,
and say, ‘‘ Well, we thought you were going
to turn out a clever fellow, and be a credit
to us Wellesby folks; and now you are going
to settle down and be a plain mechanic after
all.”

In time, Richard left school, and applied
all his waking hours to work. His mother
wondered at the way in which he and his
father ‘“‘hung together now-a-days ;’”’ for the
two were inseparable. She guessed not the
secret that he carried about with him, or that
any moment a sudden blow might make her
awidow. This knowledge was no light burthen
to lim who bore it. It made him cling more
and more closely to his father. Dreading that
he might not keep him long, Richard seemed
to grudge every moment spent away from him;
and besides, he was in constant terror lest the
A VILLAGE ARTIST. ~ 69

sudden death which threatened his parent
should come upon him when no one was near.

‘Who would have thought,” said a Wel-
lesby wife to her neighbour, as they saw James
Fraser and his son coming home in the evening,
side by side, and the lad bearing the weight of
both sets of tools,—‘‘ Who would have thought
that young Dick Fraser would play ‘shadow’
to his father in yon way. ‘They can’t be
parted.”

From this remark, people learned to call
Richard his father’s ‘‘shadow,”’ until the “sub-
stance”? was no longer left.

Time wore on. Almost before Richard ceased
to be a boy he became a thorough workman.
At seventeen years of age his father said that
Dick’s help was invaluable to him; that it
had improved his means and helped to ex-
tend his business. ‘You are my right hand,
lad,” he said to Richard himself. ‘“T can
trust to you as I would to myself.” And
Richard, when he heard his father say this,
felt rewarded for his daily and hourly sacrifice
offered to filial love.
70 THE TRIALS OF

But the youth had another still holier and
purer source of comfort and encouragement.
He had read about Him of whom the Jews
said, *‘Is not this the carpenter’s son?’ and
who, though He possessed all power and wis-
dom from on high, was yet willing to go down”
unto Nazareth with His reputed father and
lowly mother, and there be ‘subject unto
them’? until ripe manhood, that He might
leave an example to the young of all succeed-
ing ages; that sons might learn from Him,
who was ‘‘meek and lowly of heart,’’ how to
honour father and mother.

Richard Fraser not only read, but strove
to profit by the greatest of all examples, and
said to himself, “If I labour earnestly and
strive to do my duty in my present position,
if I am found faithful now, a time may come
and a way be opened for mo to use those
powers which are lying dormant. I do not
believe that any talent is given for nothing,
or that mine will produce no fruit, though I
cannot at present see how it will be made
fruitful.”
A VILLAGE ARTIST. i

Yet while Richard’s talent was lying still
it was not rusting. Like an article of fur-
niture, which the careful housewife puts aside,
because she deems it too good for every-day
use, yet keeps bright and spotless, and ready.
when wanted, was that talent of which Richard
Fraser denied himself the present exercise,
but kept in good working order. No beau-
tiful object met his view but he noted down
its peculiarities in his memory, with the intent
to turn this mental experience to account at
some future day. Thus he made his memory a
sort of storehouse of beauty, while his hands
fashioned the homeliest articles for domestic
and rustic use. Often, too, he gave these a grace
of form unknown before in his country home,
so that he got the character of being able
to combine usefulness with attractive appear-
ance; and thus he greatly increased the de-
mand for work from his father’s shop.

Many a time, too, did the young Squire,
when down at Wellesby Hall, put his head
in at the door of the joiner’s workshop and
give Richard an encouraging word. ‘It will
2 THE TRIALS OF

all come right some day,’’ he would say. ‘The
good God who gave you powers will bestow on
you the means to use them by-and-by.”’

‘‘Thank you, sir, for all you have said to
cheer and help me on in the path of duty,”
‘Richard would reply. “I am not unhappy
at my present work, for I never regret having
given up something for my father’s sake.”

‘‘T believe you, Richard. ‘A wise son
maketh a glad father;’ and there is true
wisdom in denying ourselves for our parents.”’

Richard had felt the truth of this daily for
years.
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 73

CHAPTER IV.

THE HEAD OF THE FAMILY CUT OFF. STONE IN THE CHURCIHIIYARD.

&

RicHArRD FRASER was just turned eighteen,
and a little brother had been added to his
father’s family when the blow came which
he had so long dreaded. Though himself
but a boy, he must be the prop on which
his. mother must henceforth lean, and stand
in his father’s place with respect to the other
children, the youngest of whom, little George,
was only four years old. The secret which
Richard had borne about with him from almost
childhood was not a secret now; but in place
of that burthen had come this other one cf
managing the business and providing for the
wants of a family.

it chanced that Richard made a most affect-
7% THE TRIALS OF

ing discovery at this time, which did much to
strengthen all his good resolutions with re-
gard to those whom a father had confided to
his care.

On the day of the funeral, the youth found
it would be necessary for him to look in the
desk that had been James Fraser’s, for some
paper of importance. There he found a
little packet, which he opened, and, to his
great surprise, saw the missing fragment of
his last carved work—the bit of fir with
the cone attached to it. There was a little
parchment label tied to the packet, on which
were written, in a tremulous hand, these
words: ‘‘In memory of a talent, which my
beloved son buried for his father’s sake. Sep-
tember 16th, 18—.”

He had long thought he could read that
father’s very heart, but he never before saw
so clearly all the tenderness that had been
in it as now, when the tears welled from his
eyes and hid outward objects from his sight.

Many amongst the villagers now began to
exclaim, ‘‘ What a good thing it is that James
A VILLAGE ARTIST, To

Fraser brought that lad up to his own business.
if he had followed his uncle’s example, he
might have been just beginning to work at
carving instead of being a first-rate joiner;
and then what would have become of the
family ?”

Mr. Frederick Millman, the Squire now,
for the old Squire was dead, called, with his
wife, to comfort Mrs. Fraser and her children.
He had a long quiet talk with Richard in
the workshop, and to him, as the one who
Knew the story of the broken carving, the
young man showed the sprig of fir so long
lost, and told him when and where it was
found. |
The kind Squire was not a little affected,
and as he read the words, ‘“‘In memory of
a talent, which my beloved son buried for
his father’s sake,’ he added aloud, ‘Aye,
buried it is, but not Jost. You will exhume
it, though it may be ‘after many days,’
Richard. In the meanwhile, bide your time
with patience, and work for those who are

ee 55
dee,
76 IEE TRIALS OF

‘It was a trial to me to bury the talent,
sir,’? returned Richard; ‘but who would not
feel rewarded now? I-wish I could make every
lad think as I do at this moment, that a parent’s
blessing and an approving conscience will repay
a child for any amount of self-denial.”

The Squire assented, and then said, ‘ Just
a word about business, Richard. Of course
you will have my work, both at the Hall and
on the estate, as before, and if at any time you
fall short of capital and find your hands tied
for want of money, come to me.”’

Richard thanked the speaker, but he never
had occasion to seek help of the last-named |
kind. God blessed his efforts; the Squire’s
example was followed by the farmers; work
was plentiful, and there was no bench in the
workshop without a busy pair of hands labour-
ing at it with hammer, plane, or chisel, in
young Fraser’s shop. 7

James I*raser had been dead about three
months when one day a block of stone was
brought end placed in a wooden shed that
Richard had built a little way from the larger
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 7

workshop. Then the shed was locked up, and
no person knew why it had been conveyed
thither. Only a workman, who came before
his time one bright summer’s morning, said
that he saw master Richard come out and lock
the door. But after a lapse of months the
block of stone, carefully covered, was. removed
thence again, and taken to the churchyard.

On the next Sabbath, when Mrs. Fraser went
to church, Richard led her to the spot where
his father was buried, and there she saw a
beautifully carved but simple monumental
stone erected to the memory of her husbaud.
Its only ornament was a group of foliage, the
same in outline, but far better executed, than
that boyish work. Only in this the spray of
oak was not wanting, and the fir with its cone
looked as though it had fallen from the rest,
and was lying at a little distance.

The boy had buried his talent for a time eut
of love for his father; the young man now
exhumed it to do honour to that father’s
memory by its exercise.

Mrs. Fraser trembled as she rested on
78 THE TRIALS OF

Richard’s arm, and her tears fell fast while
she looked at his work. She was a homely
body, and not the one to use many words,
except they concerned the spotless cleanliness
of her home and its belongings, or the want of
cleanliness in a neighbour. So even now she
said but little, though her heart was stirred
within her. She only pressed Richard’s arm the
closer and whispered, ‘‘ Hh, lad, thou’rt hee
Thou wert always good to him that’s gone.”’

‘‘And I shall try tobe the same to you,
mother.’’

‘‘But it’s hard, Richard, it’s hard for a lad
like you to have so many cares and to be
slaving for us all. I’m not blind, lad; D’ve
seen more than you thought.”

‘‘ Mother, it?s no slavery to do my best for
you.”?

She shook her head. ‘‘EKh, well. You're
a good lad to say so; but you might have been
something better than a country joiner. It
isn’t the hands that can cut out yon things
that should be making washing troughs for
old wives like me, and doors and windows. for
their husbands.”
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 79

Richard did not like to remind his mother
that it was through the profits of his plain
work that the whole family was supported, or
that in refusing to let him follow his natural
taste, his father had consulted her interests
and those of the younger children. And he
never could tell her that for five years he had
borne about with him the certain knowledge
that his poor father’s life could not be a long
one in the land. He knew that were he to
give her the history of his boyish resolution
she would weep and exclaim, ‘‘To think he
should have trusted a child, such as Dick was
then, with the secret he hid from me!” and
that it would be a cause of grief with her so
long as she lived. Good Mrs. Fraser, like
many another, would make a great trouble of
anything which she fancied showed want of
trust towards herself, and forget, or never
comprehend, that the very hiding of the matter
from her knowledge was done in kindness and
to save her pain of mind.

After Richard and his mother left the
churchyard a group of admiring Wellesby
folk gathered round the monument to examine
8C THE TRIALS OF

the carving. “It is pretty!’ cried one.
‘‘He’s clever to cut stone like that!” ‘He
hasw’t forgotten the old knack with all his
joinering work,” cried others.

Amongst the rest was an old grey-haired
man—the patriarch of the village—whose vene-
rable years and white locks caused him to be
much looked up to by the Wellesby youngsters.
But old Simon Lee did not generally choose to
give an opinion about anything until he was
asked; for he had a great idea of its value and
importance. And the young folks paid much
respect to Simon, who never wanted a staff to
support his aged limbs, because there were
always plenty of young arms ready for him to
lean upon as he walked to and from church
or elsewhere. ‘T'o old Simon, then, one of the
youngsters spoke. ‘¢ Don’t you think, Simon,”’
he said, ‘‘that this is a curious subject to carve
upon a grave-stone? We mostly see urns, or
crosses, or little angels, imstead of leaves and
such things.”

‘‘And then here’s this fir-apple, broken off
fike, and that’s queer, though it 7s pretty.”
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 81

Old Simon drew himself up as straight as he
could, and replied, ‘‘ You see, friends, there be
some things that say what they mean plainly,
and there be some that be signs with the
meaning part hidden. Wasn’t James Fraser a
jomer, eh?”

‘To be sure he was,’? was answered by
all.

‘And what did he use in his work ?”’

‘Why, wood, to be sure.”

‘‘ Ave, wood of different sorts. ‘The elm, the
fir, the beech, the chestnut, the oak, and so on.
And here they are on the stone. They’re the

types of the man’s calling, to be sure. And

5)
that bit of fir gives it a careless look. I expect
he put it down there just as the painters put in
an old tumble-down thatched barn or cottage
into their pictures; though for my part J think
if they copy things, they might as well draw
new houses as old barns.”

A murmur of admiration rose amongst the
little group, the different members of which
paid Simeon many compliments on the wisdom
which had discovered the hidden meaning of

BR
82 THE TRIALS OF

the carving. And ihe old man went homeward
leaning on the arm of one of his young sup-
porters, to whom he said, while a gratified
smile flitted across his aged face, ‘‘ Aye, lad,
they’ll miss old Simon when he’s gone, for all
his hands are past work, and his feet will
hardly support him to church and back.
They'll want the old man’s head sometimes
when it is laid low in the mould.”

But old Simon was not right this time,
though he felt so proud of having interpreted
the meaning of ‘those bits of imitation of
wood.” For though the old have gathered
wisdom as they journeyed through the world,
the best is not always right in his opinion.
And of all the Wellesby people there was only
the Squire who knew the real meaning of the
carving on James Traser’s tombstone, and of
its broken fragment of fir. He could read in it
the loving heart of a dutiful son——a sacred trust
fulfilled, a promise steadily kept.
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 83

CHAPTER Y.

A LITTLE MORE FRUIT FROM THE HIDDEN SEED,

THoven Richard Fraser’s business efforts
were so successful, he had but little leisure
time. His hands were always full, his head
ever at work. Youthful as he was, he held the
place of ‘‘ Master”? in the shop, and, unlike
those who have to labour as journeymen, he
had to think and plan for the morrow when
they had gone to their homes. Thus at twenty-
three years of age Richard had added nothing
to his early carvings. His last executed labour
in that line stood at the head of his father’s
erave. |

His brother, the little George, so young
when his father died, was now nine years old,
and the especial object of the young man’s
affection. One day the little fellow came to
84 THE TRIALS OF —

Richard in great trouble. In his hand lay a
dead canary, which, when living, had been his
only pet, the more precious as it was given by
his elder brother. ‘ Well, Georgy, my man,
what is the matter? Where do those tears
come from?’ asked his brother kindly, on
seeing his sorrowful face.

“Tittle Dick is dead. I found him just now
at the bottom of his cage. And he was not in
want of food or water, because he had plenty
of seed, and his trough was full.”

‘‘We must all die some time, George, and
poor little Dick is like the rest of us, only his
turn has come first. JI am very glad you have
not to reproach yourself for having neglected
or starved your favourite. After all, it is
better you should have to cry over little Dick
than brother Dick, isn’t it?’? returned Richard,
with an affectionate glance at the child who
stood by his side.

‘Yes, oh dear yes! What should we all do
without you, Richard?” replied George, his
round face lengthening at the bare idea of such
a calamity. “‘But I am sorry fer Jim, too,”
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 85

and he passed his hand caressingly over the
dead bird.

‘Let me look at him, and see if I can bring
him to hfe,” said Richard, laying down his
plane and taking up the body of the pretty
favourite.

“You cannot, I know that very well. I only
wish you could.”

Richard stood musingly for a few minutes,
as if considering what he could do to comfort
his little brother. The young man, like all
brave, warm-hearted people, was very tender
to children, and did not laugh at their sorrows,
because he as a grown-up person would have
deemed such a trial a light matter. He knew
that the death of this bird was a real cause of
erief to George, who for three years past had
fed ‘‘ Dick,” and been proud to call him his
own property.

“George,” said he, ‘I bought this bird for
you three years ago, when he was alive, and
now that he is dead I want you to give him
back to me.”

“You shall have him if you like, Richard.
86 THE TRIALS OF

Are you going to have him stuffed? for unless
you do you can’t keep him.”

“That's a good lad. Now, see, IL will put
Dick’s body in a little box, and perhaps you
may meet with him again yet. Don’t cry any
more, and now run away, for I am very busy.” |

The child obeyed, and left Richard to his
work. The young man’s hands moved fast,
but for once his mind did not go with them.
He was thinking how he might give a great
pleasure to his brother, and when he left the
shop that night he carried with him into his
chamber—the same old room in which he
carved the foliage—the small box containing
the body of the dead bird. But he carried
more still. Having carefully selected a piece
of wood and some tools, he took them to the
same place. When all other labours of mind
and body were ended for that night, he took
out the bird, and having suspended it by the
feet by a fine twine from a small nail, he began
to execute the project he had formed. And
this plan was to carve an exact copy of the bird
as it hung.
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 87

At first when Richard commenced, his sole
desire was to please his brother, but by degrees
his old love of art mastered his whole being.
He worked until his light went out,-as it had
done oft before under similar circumstances
during his boyish days. In the early morning
he was again at his self-imposed task, which,
however, he laid aside as soon as the sound of
feet under his window warned him of the
arrival of his workmen, and told him that
labour of a coarser kind awaited him else-
where. It was with just a little regret that he
relinquished the dainty carving, which had
grown so fast under his active fingers.

The work might have been deemed finished
by an uncultivated eye long before Richard
considered it so. He touched it carefully again
and again with his most delicate tools, until
even he was satisfied. Then he mounted it on
a background of ebony, surrounded by a gilded
and grooved rim, covered it with a case of
glass, and the thing was complete. This last
portion of the work was not, however, of iis
own doing. He had to call in the aid of
88 TIIE TRIALS OF

another hand to gild the rim of the wooden
picture. Thus it came to pass that the carved
bird stood for a few hours in the shop window
of the gilder in a large market town three
miles from Wellesby. It was market-day.
The shop was in a very conspicuous place,
and the glance of nearly every passer-by was
arrested by this simple specimen of carved
work. It looked so soft, so real, and yet as a
picture of death—though only that of a bird—
so touching, that the subject in its simplicity
was almost as attractive as the work of art.
Many a gazer entered the shop to ask if it were
for sale, and, if so, its price. But all received
the same answer, ‘‘ No, it is not for sale. It is
only here to have the frame gilded, and will be
sent home this evening.’? And the name of
the artist was revealed to none.

Amongst the gazers and inquirers was Squire
Millman. As he looked at the bird he thought
to himself, ‘‘ How Richard Fraser would like
to see this.’”? On the following day he called
at the joiner’s shop to tell him about this beau-
tiful bit of carving. Richard was in the house,
and thither his visitor followed him. ‘ Fraser,”
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 89

said he, “I saw a beautiful little thing in
Wharton’s shop yesterday. t would have
delighted you I am sure. It was a bit of
carving that would have done honour to any
man that ever handled a—. Why, I de-
clare!’’ exclaimed Mr. Millman, catching sight
of that very identical work standing on a pretty
bracket, also carved, ‘‘ here it is.”’

‘‘ And it is mine—my dead bird that brother
Richard carved, because I was so sorry when
little Dick died. Because he couldn’t bring
him to life again, he made me that beautiful
wooden one instead, and that will never die.”

These words proceeded from Richard’s young
brother, who was too full of delight to be at all
ceremonious, even about addressing the great
man of the village.

‘So itis yours, is it? And it appears your
brother carries out the principle which has
moved him for many a year past. He only
fosters his love for art when it is to make
some one happy who is dear to him, and
crushes it down when it would add to his own
pleasure.” |

“Aye, sir, that’s just it,’’ interposed Dame
90 THE TRIALS OF

Fraser, who stood behind. ‘That lad’s life
has been a constant fight against himself for
the sake of other people. And I’m sure I
often think what he has done for us and how
he is just like a father to the young ones; and
I grieve about it while I am thankful, because
it is such a load for a young man like him to be
saddled with. And Iam part of it, and every
meal I set out on the table I think to myself,
‘Ltichard has slaved for this, and if he hadn’t
been clogged with an old mother and a tribe
of children at her heels he might have been a
gentleman.’ ”’

‘‘Mother, if you would but believe me,”
said Richard.

‘‘ Ye is always telling me, sir, that he never
feels so happy as he does when he thinks he
has been enabled in some way to fill his poor
father’s place, and to be sure he has gained all
for us that poor James used to do, so far as
outside comforts go.”’

‘And don’t you believe him, Mrs. Fraser?
Ido. And TI believe that every one, whether child
or grown-up person, who makes a sacrifice of self
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 9]

for the good of others has his reward. We all
have some cross to bear; and if we endure
earthly trials cheerfully we imitate the best of
all patterns.”

‘Well, Mr. Millman, and I believe him;
and I know he has worked with a right good
will; but I don’t like to think that— But,
deary me, I daren’t say any more, for he won't
have it that he is out of his right place when
he is toiling for us.”

Mr. Millman did not think it well to answer
this speech, as he saw that Richard had no
wish to take praise to himself for having done
his duty. So, addressing little George, he said,
‘“T was going to offer to buy this bird, but as
it is yours I dare not mention such a thing.
However, you will let me bring Mrs. Millman
and her two boys to look at it, will you not?”

To be sure he would, and be very proud
indeed to show his brother’s work, his own
‘‘new little Dick,’ as he called the copy of his
dead canary. But sell it or give it away—
never! Not all the Squire’s sovereigns would
buy it.
Ve)
dD

THE TRIALS OF

Mrs. Millman and her children came in due
time; and not only praised the carved bird,
but presented George with a live canary to
occupy the perch left vacant by the death of
his old pet. And the Squire shook Richard
Iraser’s toil-hardened hand again, and said,
““T wait, feeling certain that your talent will
yet produce great interest, for you have in-
deed been faithful to the trust placed in your
hands.”

The next fruit of Richard Fraser’s skill
was no less beautiful than the one which
preceded it. This was also a dead bird, but
of a larger kind. Squire Millman’s game-
keeper shot a kingfisher, and called at the
joiner’s shop with it in his hand. ‘“ This
would make a pretty thing for you to carve,
Mr. Fraser,” said he; ‘‘ you may have it, if
you like, and either copy it or let it alone.”’

Richard chose to do the former, though it
was during a very busy season, and compelled
him to steal many hours from sleep. But this
time the bird was made pendant from a leafy
spray, Which as far surpassed Richard’s first
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 23

attempts at foliage as does the flowing hand-
writing of the master excel the first efforts at
making pothooks by his child pupil. This
bird called forth as much admiration as the
preceding one when displayed in the gilder’s
window. But Squire Millman did not see it
there. He found it, when quite finished, at
Wellesby Hall, and with it a note from Richard,
begging him to accept it as a token of respect
and gratitude from one who had never forgotten
the kind words and good advice spoken long
ago in the old workshop.

Both My. and Mrs. Millman were delighted
with Richard’s present, and heartily thanked
him for the pains and time he had spent upon
it. And amongst the Squire’s collected treasures
he valued none more than the gift of the
village joiner. Indeed for its own sake it
deserved to be valued, because it was such a
faithful imitation of nature.
94 THE TRIALS OF

CHAPTER: Vi,
‘IF AT FIRST YOU DON’T SUCCEED, TRY AGAIN.”

ANOTHER year passed; and during that
time Richard’s life went on in the old way.
He gave his whole attention to his homely
business; for he found that if he sat up late
and rose so early, his powers, both of mind
and body, were weakened, and he needed
them in their full vigour for his daily work.
Inclination and duty warred together some-
times, but duty proved the victor. When-
ever the young man felt this strife within
him, he looked at the home which held his
mother, and prayed for strength that he
might faithfully keep the promise made in
his boyhood to do the very best in his power
for her and hers.

Just at the end of that year many of the
great people of the county bestirred themselves
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 95

to get up an exhibition of works of art, to
which all England was invited to contribute.
Amongst those who took an active part in
this, was Squire Millman; and he gladly pro-
mised to send for exhibition all that was rare
and beautiful in Wellesby Hall. A number
of gentlemen came by his invitation to assist
him in selecting the most suitable objects.

More than one of these visitors cast his eye
admiringly on the carved kingfisher, and sug-
gested that it should go to the exhibition.
But the Squire demurred, saying he must
ask the artist’s leave first, and then he led
his guests to see the glorious oak carvings
in Wellesby Church. How they did exclaim,
to be sure! How they praised the beauty
of what were left, and grieved that profane
hands had destroyed so great a portion. And
then they told Squire Millman that he should
devote a part of his means to the restoration
of this old temple.

The Squire answered, with a smile, that
it had been one of his boyish dreams, and
that he hoped to see it a reality before long.

‘And the man that carved the bird yonder
96 THE TRIALS OF

should be employed to replace the mutilated
carving here,”’ said one.

At that moment Richard Fraser was within
hearmg. He was fixing a little drawer to
hold books in one of the pews, and he could
not help lifting his eyes when these words
were spoken.

Squire Millman returned his glance, and
said, ‘‘IT am waiting until the man that carved
the bird can execute this work for me. When-
ever our old church is restored, and I hope
it will be at no distant time, I wish to offer of
my best to the Sanctuary, and means shall not
be wanting to complete the work.”

‘That is well said; and that carver you
speak of is worth waiting for. I don’t wonder
though that he who executed the kingfisher
has his hands full of commissions.”’

Richard’s smile grew into a laugh, for he
thought to himself, ‘‘ How droll it is for that
gentleman to imagine that I am overwhelmed
with orders for carved work, and here I am,
within a few feet of him, fixing up a book-
drawer.” But the young man’s heart leaped
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 97

within him at the thought that such judges
as these owned him to be an artist, and
thought his were fitting hands to imitate those
beautiful oaken fragments which were the
delight of antiquaries and the glory of the
county.

To Richard was to be entrusted the task of
packing the Squire’s art-treasures, and the
young man went to measure for the cases that
would be required. .

‘And what shall you send?” asked the
Squire.

‘“T wish I had anything worth sending,
sir. But you are contributing for all the
neighbourhood.”’

‘We shall send our mite,’ said Mr. Mill-
man, casting a gratified glance at the articles
ticketed for going; but here are no specimens
of native art. For the credit of our native
town, you should show that there is one man
in the place who has such a thing as an
original idea in his head. It will be some
months before the exhibition is opened, and
IT am only selecting these things in order to

Ga
98 THE TRIALS OF

say what space will be wanted to show them
in. So think about it now, do.”

Richard did think about it; for to him the
wish of his early friend was almost law. He
thought about it while his hands were busy,
as he walked with his workmen, with satchel
on his back, and as he lay upon his bed.

At last he fixed upon a subject, and with
that perseverance which ever marked his
character, he set himself to turn his thought
into a visible reality for others to look upon
and to be glad at the sight of it.

He did not, however, wish that any eye
should see it, save his own, until he should
be able to show it all complete; and so he
laboured in silence, after «his old fashion;
and at last he looked upon it as a finished
work.

It was very beautiful; and this was its
subject: First, there hung from a nail, as it
seemed, driven into a dark background, a net
full of shells. There were whelk-shells, whole
and broken, the oyster, the cockle, muscle,
and, indeed, all those which form common
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 99

objects on our English shore; and fast to
these, as though endued with life, were the
beard-like and ribbony sea-weeds which be-
longed to each. A breath of wind would have
set the pendent weeds in motion; they were
so delicate and pliable; so like nature. Below,
again, hung the carved semblance of a pair of
sea-birds, which agreed in character with the
rest of the work, and were larger than those
in former carvings. The wing of one was
broken; and in carving that and some ruffled
and loose feathers on the breast of the other,
the artist’s whole skill had been called forth.
These loose feathers were held by such a slight
tether, that the daintiest finger would have
shrunk from touthing, lest it should bring them
to the ground.

Richard stood before his work, and his heart
fairly swelled with pleasure. All these various
parts were carved in a single block, and there
was such a mixture of fairy-like delicacy with
strength, that they formed a charming whole.
‘The work 7s beautiful,” Richard murmured;
and he rejoiced in the labour of his hands,
100 _ THE TRIALS OF

He thanked God for the successful termina-
tion of it; and then he felt he must have
some one to share his pleasure and rejoice
with him.

With a light step, and a still lighter heart,
he went to call his mother, that she might
be that one; and he thought to himself, ‘‘ How
glad she will be to think that I have lost
nothing of my power while working for
her.”

Meanwhile, two pairs of curious eyes, whose
owners had long been very anxious to know
what Richard was doing, approached the room,
and began to feast on the forbidden picture.
These eyes belonged to George and _ his
youngest sister, Alice; and as Richard re-
turned with his mother, he found them stand-
ing before the carving, and making remarks
on it. Indeed, forgetful that they might be
discovered, they were disputing respecting
some part of it. Richard placed his finger
on his lips, as a sign to his mother not to
speak, and listened, at first, with an amused
face to the young critics.

‘“T say that net is meant to imitate twine,”
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 10]

said George. ‘It is exactly like twine, for I
can see the very threads.”

‘And J say,’ retorted Alice, “that it must
be meant for wire. See it stands stiffly off the
shells, and twine would fall closer to them and
show that it was soft.”

Richard’s mother turned towards him at this
moment, with an admiring smile on her counte-
nance, but was shocked to see that his face
was as pale as ashes, and that his hands shook
visibly. Poor fellow! He had received a
terrible shock, and he was trembling under
its effects. His work was beautiful; but it
had a great defect which he had never dis-
covered, but which his young sister’s quick
eye had detected in a moment. The net was
carved in imitation of twine, but he had
given it the stiff position that wire would
assume.

It was hard work for Richard to smile as
he said, ‘‘Mother, my carvings are always
to be a bitter source of disappointment to me.
To think how I threw my whole heart into this,
and after all it is spoiled.”

‘Dear lad,” returned Mrs. Fraser, ‘‘ how
102 . THE TRIALS OF

can you say so? These carved things are as
natural as the real ones; and people are sure
to praise them. Look at the shells, sea-weeds,
and the birds. What fault can be found
with them? I could stand and gaze at them
for hours, and then come back to have another
look.”

‘‘Aye, mother, those are all right enough.
But that net: to think I should never find
out a fault which Alice discovered in a moment.
And here am I, after years and years of
patient study—for I have studied daily, even
while my hands were producing nothing—
here am I, taught a lesson by a girl.”

‘‘ Hundreds of people will never notice it.
Richard, say nothing, and let the carving go as
it is. Where there is so much beauty, who
would condemn for a single fault?”

‘‘T should, mother,” replied Richard. ‘It
matters not; if I knew that no one else would.
find it out, I would not send my work out
of my hands with a blemish of which I was
conscious.”

“Can you alter it, Richard?”
A VILLAGE ARTIST. ° 103.

‘¢ Yes, mother; that I can.”

““T am so glad; but how shall you do it?
Will the alteration take you much time ?”

‘Why, mother dear, as the old saying has
it, I shall mend this with a new one. I could
cut away the net and replace it here; but I
see that a still greater improvement may be
made by a change of position.”

‘You cannot do it in the time that is left
before the opening of the exhibition. You
are growing thin and pale with over-work,
and with toiling for us. You have been
borne down with anxiety ever since you
were a boy.”

Richard’s face brightened again now as he
answered, ‘‘ Yes, mother; and in spite of all
failures Iam a happy man, because, by God’s
help, I have been enabled to fulfil my duty ;
so I always have pleasant memories to look
back upon when the present brings disappoint-
ment. And this 7s a disappointment, mother,’’
he added, with a rather mournful glance at
the beautiful work which had but that one
fault. ‘But I must try again ‘for the credit
104 TITE TRIALS OF

of the place,’ as the Squire said, and not only
for that, but to show that I can persevere.”

‘‘Promise me something, Richard. You say
you mean to try again at this carving, and I
should not like to say you nay. Butif you go.
on working in the shop all day, and then go on
at it through half the night, you will do your-
self harm. You must let Allan King look after
the regular business. He knows all about it,
for he was apprenticed in your poor father’s
time, and has worked here ever since. Besides,
he is fond of you, Richard, and will be proud
to be trusted with the management of the
regular work, while you do this carving.”

Richard looked slyly at his mother, and
pointed to the window, saying, as he did so,
‘For my sake, or Maggie’s ?”

The good dame laughed, for there, coming
along the field-path and full in view, was her
eldest daughter Maggie, now the most tasteful
of Wellesby dressmakers. And by her -side
stepped Allan King, who, somehow, always
happened to meet Maggie as she was leaving
work in the evening, though from her bemg
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 10d

much employed she rarely came on two suc-
cessive evenings by the same road.

‘There is nothing against it, is there,
Richard ?” inquired Mrs. Fraser.

Richard understood what ‘‘ 7¢’? meant, and he
answered, ‘‘ Nothing, mother. Allan is a
steady, good-principled fellow, and I shall be
glad to call him ‘brother’ some day, and give
him my dear sister, just as father would have
done if he had been spared.”

‘‘ And you will let Allan manage for a little
while. You will be here to speak to if there
should be anything very particular.”’

Richard looked at the faulty carving, and
thought of his hopes, then simply replied,
‘Yes, Allan shall be master for a week or
two.”

So when Allan King sauntered up to the
door with Maggie he was called in and told
that Richard wanted him to reign in his stead,
and be king, in reality, over benches and planes,
saws, chisels, and gimlets, as well as over those
who used them. Allan was delighted, and said
he would try his very best to manage as
106 THE TRIALS OF

though Richard were there at his elbow; and
Maggie’s bright eyes sparkled with pleasure
to think that her brother placed such trust
and confidence in him.
A VILLAGE ARTIST, 107

CHAPTER VII.
THE WORK INTERRUPTED. FINISIIED AT LAST.

HivERYBODY knows how wearisome it is to
have a thing to do a second time on account of
a first failure. The little school-girl who has
her seam to unpick because of faulty stitches,
the boy whose imperfect lesson is returned on
his hands because of a few missing words, or
the sum to do over again on account of that
single wrong figure almost at the beginning ;
each and all feel that it is far harder work to
go over the old ground again than it would be
to perform a fresh task even of a more difficult
nature. The feeling is a natural one, for
under such circumstances who can help think-
ing that labour and time have been wasted,
and that an error can only be repaired by ex-
pending as much more of both as would have
108 | THE TRIALS OF

served first, if rightly applied, to complete the
task. |

Though Richard Fraser was a man and not
a child, he felt it hard to fight against de-
pressing thoughts and to persevere in his
resolution to produce a masterpiece of carving.
Often was he encouraged by calling to mind
the words, ‘‘ Whatsoever thy hand findeth to
do, do it with thy might;” and ever after
this remembrance the chisel moved faster and
with greater certainty. Gradually, too, love
for the work itself mastered other discouraging
recollections, and at length he had the pleasure
of seeing that one more day’s labour would
complete it, and this was three days before the
time sinpotdited for the Squire’s collection to be
sent away for exhibition.

My. Millman had been absent fy om . Wellesby
for several weeks; now he came back to the
Hall, and his first visit was paid to Richard
Fraser. ‘‘ Well, Fraser,’ said he, ‘‘I am
come to arrange about those things. I suppose
_ the packing-cases are ready.”

‘ Quite ready, I believe,.sir.”’
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 109

“That is the first time you ever expressed
a doubt about any bit of joiner’s work intrusted
to you.” |

Richard smiled. ‘I have no doubt they are
ready, sir, but I must go and see. I have not
been in the shop for several days.”

‘Been ill, eh? I hope not. Ah! I believe
you have been carving something. ‘Let me see
it,’’ said the Squire quickly.

_ Richard led the way to the place —— the
imperfect carving was, and, without a word,
pointed it out to the Squire. .
‘ Beautiful, very beautiful! But, oh,
Fraser, I am so sorry!” | ,

The kind Squire seemed afraid to speak ; but
Richard said, ‘‘I am not showing you the work
which I hope you will think good enough to
exhibit. It is here, though not quite finished,”
and he drew off a covering which concealed his
last and nearly completed piece.

‘‘And you failed in this one point,’ said
‘Mr. Millman, indicating the unnatural position
in the net, yet you had courage to begin again
and introduce further improvements, I honour
110 THE TRIALS OF

you for your persevering industry. I think I.
can see the way opening before you now, and

that you will no longer need to be tied to the

home business.

“Did that idea strike you as you passed
Allan King and my sister Margaret in the
lane, sir ?’’ inquired Richard, archly.

“Something of that sort, I confess. And
now, Eraser, have you any of your very
early carvings? I mean those you did when
you were a little schoolboy; because, if you
have, I have a notion how your last group
might be exhibited in a very attractive
form.”

Mrs. Fraser, who was listening to the con-
versation, forthwith replied, “I have, Mr.
Millman ;” and, hastening away, she returned
in a minute with the memorable potato bruiser,
on the handle of which were displayed the
twining stems and leaves cut upon it a the
juvenile artist.

How the Squire did laugh when he saw it.
“Capital! The:very thing!’ he said; “but
have you nothing more?”
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 111

“Yes,” Mrs. Fraser answered, that she
thought she could find more; and with the
help of her daughter Alice she rummaged out
two or three toys, a box with carved lid, and a
miniature boat with tiny figure-head, all
childish work of Richard’s executing in by-
gone years.

The sight of these long-hoarded treasures
brought smiles to the young man’s face anda
moisture te his eyes, and he exclaimed, ‘‘ What
a collection! Pray, mother, do you think Mr.
Millman means to eend your potato bruiser to
the exhibition ?”

“T don’t know what Mr. Millman means to
do, my dear, only I’m sure it will be some-
thing kind and right. He asked me for.some
things carved when you were a child, and I
have just brought what I have in my pos-
session.”

‘And you have done perfectly right, Mrs.
Fraser, and I am very much obliged to you
for judging my intentions so justly and
kindly. Moreover, I am going to take away ~
with me the potato bruiser, the toys, &¢.;
112 THE TRIALS OF

and I promise to restore them in safety. I
should like also to borrow Georgy’s canary,
and even that old carved foliage, if the owners.
thereof dare trust me with them for a time.”

Richard looked not a little puzzled; but
there was no withstanding Squire Millman,
and these various articles were all conveyed to
Wellesby Hall that very evening, to aid in
carrying out a plan that its master had in
view.

After Squire Millman’s departure, Richard
and the rest of the family, Allan King included,
took another peep at the beautiful work which
a few hours’ labour would finish, and then the
master and foreman went into the joiner’s shop
to see that the packing-cases were complete.
Richard read over the list containing memo-
randums of numbers and sizes. ‘All right,
King,” said he, “‘as I have found everything
else of your managing.”

Richard’s hand was on the door latch, and
King was passing some heavy masses of wood,
when he accidentally stumbled and dislodged
one of these. In an instant it fell, and caught
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 1138

Richard’s right hand in such a manner as to
jam it between itself and the door. This un-
expected blow caused the young man to utter
a cry of pain, and King saw the mischief he
had unintentionally done. He hastened to re-
move the wood, which he could only just lift;
and as he did so he bethought himself of the
unfinished carving. The right hand which
should complete it was, he feared, rendered
useless by the hurt it had just received.

Poor King turned pale as he exclaimed,
‘“‘How sorry I am you are hurt! You will
never forgive me, I think; though I would
bear the pain twenty times over, if I could, to
save you.”

“You did not do it on purpose, King, and
you must not reproach yourself. I am in pain
though. If it had but been to-morrow instead
of to-day!”

Aye, that was the great trouble! How
would the carving be finished now?

They went into the house, and, amid many
cries of regret and unavailing’ lamentations,
the bruised hand was fomented by Richard’s

H
114 THE TRIALS OF

mother, while George ran for the doctor, who
soon. arrived, and gladdened them all by saying
that no bone was broken. ‘ But,’ he added,
“‘T doubt your hand will be of little use for a
few days to come, as it will be very stiff and
painful, owing to these severe bruises. In fact,
‘you will feel it more so to-morrow than you do
now, I fear.”

This was bad news, and the little group felt
it sadly, on account of the mental uneasiness
which they knew Richard was trying to hide
for Allan’s sake. Allan himself looked like a
condemned criminal, though only self-con-
demned; for, indeed, he had done nothing to
deserve censure, the fall of the wood having
been purely accidental.

Richard first broke silence. ‘ King,” said
he, ‘‘don’t look so miserable. I have still a
hand left to shake yours with ;” and, extending
his left, he grasped Allan’s and shook it
heartily. ‘And now listen, mother; I must
jinish that carving, though you will think I
cannot. You heard what the doctor said, that
my hand will be worse to-morrow, 80 I shall
A VILLAGH ARTIST. 115

set to work just now, before it gets stiff and
helpless.”

“But, Richard, it will pain you, and you
will never be able to hold your hand steady!”
exclaimed they all.

“As for the pain, I must try to bear it; and
the left hand must do its part towards steady-
ing the right. I shall put myself under your
orders, mother, for you were always so clever
at mending our cuts and bruises when we were
children.”

Very tenderly did Mrs. Fraser foment the
hand which for years had worked so hard, and
in an hour Richard said it did not tremble
much, though the pain continued. ‘But I shall
bear that, if I can only make it work,’’ he added.

It made the mother unhappy to think of the
painful vigil that Richard had resolved to
keep, and she would fain have shared it with
him; but to this he would not agree. So she
and. the rest lay down as usual, though not, in
her case, to sleep; while he was striving to
subdue his injured, trembling hand, to his
stedfast will.
116 . THE TRIALS OF

Tt was hard work., Often and often through .
that long night was Richard tempted to re-
linquish his self-appointed task. Often, too,
the pain in his hand caused the big drops of
perspiration to stand on his brow, and he
found it difficult to execute those light touches
which were wanting to complete his work.
But he persevered. Through the dark hours
and after the dawning light began to gleam
upon him he fought with pain, weariness, and
disinclination, until, when his mother’s light
tap was heard at the door, he could say, “I
have conquered. My task is ended.”

Ah! there was no flaw this time. Richard’s
heart swelled with gladness, and weariness and
pain were forgotten as he now gazed upon the
beautiful carving and felt that he might with-
out fear challenge the sharp eyes of his young
sister Alice, as well as the more experienced
ones of Squire Millman, to detect a flaw in it
if they could.

And now, with what tender, motherly care,
did good Mrs. Fraser apply fomeéntations and
healing aids to the hand that, in spite of suf-
7TLAG? A VILLAGE ARTIST. 117

fering, had so well performed its task. Then
Richard, fairly worn out “in body, but very
happy in mind, first returned thanks to God
because he had been enabled to endure, and
afterwards went to rest and to recover the
mental and bodily powers on which he had laid
so severe a strain.

Late in the afternoon the young man rose,
and he was but just down stairs when Squire
Millman called. He had been told of the
‘accident to Richard’s hand by the workman
who conveyed the packing-cases to the Hall,
but not that in spite of this great hindrance
the village artist had completed his carving.
What, then, was his surprise on beholding it
in all its beauty, with the net in its proper
position over the shells, the sea weeds as
fragile as ever, the loose feathers on the birds
just as delicate as in the former, only without
that one faulty part, and greatly improved in
the re-arrangement of the several parts. Mr.
Millman was delighted at the sight. ‘But,
Fraser,” said he, “last night this was un-
finished, and you received a hurt directly after
118 THE TRIALS OF

I left you: Your hand is now bandaged and
inasling. Did some other than it add these
dainty touches?”

Richard smiled and shook his head, and his
mother, with a glowing face and tearful eyes,
told. of his long vigil and midnight labours.

Mr. Millman’s face expressed all the kindly
feelings conveyed by his words as he said,
“Tf ever a young man merited success, you,
Richard Fraser, deserve it now. I hardly
know another man who would have had
courage to recommence such a work as this
after having taken such pains only to find that
he had failed.”

“‘T did it for the credit of the place, you
know, sir,” returned Richard.

“But not for that alone, my friend. The
imperfect work would have sufficed to show
talent of no common order, the perfect one
shows that the artist loves his art for its own
sake, and would scorn to mislead the taste of a
single person by showing what he knew to be
false to nature.”

‘¢ How you seem to read my very thoughts,
sir,” said Richard, simply.
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 119

‘Do you not remember that you let me look
into your heart while you were but a child.
It is the same true, honest, affectionate heart
ag ever, joined also to the same industrious
hands and persevering spirit. And now,
Fraser, when may I have this up at the Hall?
I should like you to trust me with the mode of
arranging your work: dare youdo so?”

“Tt shall come now, Mr. Millman, and
thank you very heartily for all the interest you
show in my well doing. I should never have
carved anything again after that first great
disappointment, in those old childish days, if it
had not been for the words you spoke then.
After all, I think,” he added, while a flush of
honest pride brightened his face, ‘I have not
altogether buried my talent. I have ‘some
interest to show for what was intrusted to me.”
120 THE TRIALS OF

CHAPTER VIII.

RICHARD AT THE EXHIBITION. THE REWARD OF
PERSEVERANCE,

Richarp Frasrr did not see his work again
until after the opening of the exhibition.
Owing to the injury his hand had received,
and the increased pain caused by using it to
complete the carving, he was unable to pack
the art treasures at Wellesby Hall. Allan
King took his place, and executed his task
much to the Squire’s satisfaction; but even he
could not say how or when Richard’s contribu-
tion was sent. However, the artist was right
well contented to leave all to Mr. Millman.

It was the eve of the opening day, and cnce
more the Squire went te the carpenter’s work-
shop. ‘Well, Richard, how is the lame hand
getting on? As you cannot use it much, I
think you ought to take a trip to the exhibi-
A VILLAGE ARTIST, 121

‘tion now, while you have so good an excuse for

“not being at work. You can take a day or
two to look about you. Beside, I want you to
hear what people say about the things we have
sent from Wellesby.”’

Richard wanted to see and hear too, and
when his mother said, ‘Aye, do go, Richard,”
he thought he ought to be obedient this time
also. Accordingly he went. He heard with
delight the sound of the inauguration music,
and amongst many of the great of the land he
saw his friend the Squire, and—honest country
lad that he was—felt as though Wellesby folk
had sent a worthy contribution to that day’s
brilliant gathering in the person of Mr. Mill-
man. And first. and foremost amongst those
who went to grace that assemblage Richard
saw the good Prince, whose place death has
now rendered vacant, to our sorrow.

The young man’s heart was full as he gazed
on such a crowd, distinguished by all that
wealth and rank could give, met to render
honour to those, the productions of whose heads
and hands had done so much to refine mankind
122 THE TRIALS OF

and to place beautiful things within reach of
the poor as well as of the rich.

When the opening ceremony was over, he
strolled slowly through the building, fairly lost
in wonder at the many attractions that sur-
rounded him. He felt—how could he help it?
—intensely anxious to see how the work of his
own hands would look amid so many treasures
of beauty and skill; and he was ready to own
that if he could have known what wonders of
genius would be assembled within those four
walls, he should never have dared to think the
labours of a self-taught rustic like himself
worthy of a place there.

After a good deal of searching, Richard at
length discovered the space allotted to speci-
mens of wood carving, and when he came
before one case, his heart beat fast and his eyes
grew dim. There were his own carvings in
three divisions. First came those early efforts—
the toys, the potato bruiser, and the group of
foliage. These were surmounted by a scroll
bearing the words, ‘The Childish Hand.”
Next were the dead canary and kingfisher, and
A VILLAGE ARTIST, 123

the faulty group on which he had spent so
much labour; and over these were the words,
“The Apprentice Hand.” And last of all was
the work of which even he could not help feel-
ing proud, and over it was the inscription,
‘The Master Hand.”

The sight of this simple arrangement seemed
to please many, for even as Richard, approach-
' ing slowly, first noticed the fruit of his handi-
work, an admiring group had gathered around
it, and were exclaiming, ‘How beautiful!
How true to nature is this last portion! It is,
indeed, the work of a master hand!”

‘“« What pleases me,” said one of the lookers-
on, ‘is, that while this work is so beautifully
complete, that it seems another touch would
spoil it, the subject is simple enough to attract
and please a child.”

‘Aye, and more,’’ added another, ‘this case
of carvings tells a tale apart from the subjects
of the various divisions. It tells of a talent
given in childhood and not suffered to rust for
want of industry. It tells of a spirit that
could persevere in spite of failure, and proves
124 SME TRIALS OF

success to be possible even when it has not
been attained at once. I should like my
children to read and learn a lesson from these
collected works done by the “Child,” ‘ Ap-
prentice,”’ and ‘“‘ Master Hand ;” for truly there
breathes through them the spirit of a man who
would do with his might whatsoever his hand
might find to do.”

And Richard stood and listened while these
spoke, as if spell-bound, until at length a
friendly hand touched his shoulder, and a kind
voice said, ‘I thought I should find you here,
Fraser. How do you like my way of showing
the works of the Wellesby artist-in-wood?”

There was no mistaking the voice. It was
that of kind, hearty Squire Millman, who,
with his wife on his arm, had just re-entered
the exhibition building.

“Indeed, sir, nothing could. be better;
though I should never have dreamed of pro-
ducing such an effect out of such materials ;”
and he pointed to those childish works in the
first compartment. :

“T dare say not. You would have been
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 125

much too modest; but I felt satisfied of the
propriety of showing the gradual development
of talent in spite of obstacles. And do you
know, Fraser, that people have already been
wondering if this carving is for sale. I don’t
know whether it is or not;. but, remember, if
you do part with it, [must be the purchaser.
I have twice vainly offered to buy your
carvings, and I think this should not go out
of the place wherein it was wrought. It must
ornament the Old Hall when our children fill
our places.”

“Tt shall, sir, if you wish it. When it
leaves the exhibition I know of no place I
should so well like to see it in as Wellesby
Hall.”

Thus it was settled, and when the carving
was removed it formed another of the many
attractions at Wellesby Hall; but while it
remained in the exhibition it was always the
centre of a group of admirers. The subject
was so simple that all could understand it,
while the execution called forth the praise of
the very best judges. It was the most
126 THE TRIALS OF

beautiful wood-carving shown, and Squire
Millman had the pleasure of telling Richard
that it would take the first prize, and that it
might have been sold again and again. It was
a proud day for the country youth when, in
the presence of his mother, sisters, and young
brother, Mr. Millman was able to communicate
the good tidings.

‘Eh, lad,” said kind dame Fraser, as she
wiped the tears of gladness from her eyes,
‘“‘T always knew thou wert too good and clever
to be a village joiner all thy days.”

‘And yet, mother, I would have worked on
patiently at the old trade if it had seemed
best; but I do believe that the talent that my
Heavenly Father gave me so long ago will come
into use at last, and that I shall be able to
earn more with the chisel than I ever did with
saw and. plane.”

And Richard was right: a way was opened
for the employment of his talent; and the
effects of his perseverance did not end with
that one success. Amongst the many who
had stood to gaze admiringly at the prize-
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 127

carving was a little group, composed parily
of architects and partly of clergymen. These
seemed to make it their chief business to
examine all the carved work in the exhibition,
and to ascertain by whom the various groups
were executed. They were, indeed, looking
out for a suitable person to assist in the adorn-
ment of an old cathedral, then in course of
restoration; and they, like all the rest of the
judges, were best pleased with the handiwork
of the young villager. To Richard, therefore,
they wrote, and offered employment and a high
rate of remuneration for his labour.

“You must not refuse this,” said Squire
Millman, to whom Richard showed the letter.
“It was sure to come. I always felt that it
would be so.”

“But the business here must not be given
ip, six.”

“Nor need it. You can still give an eye
to it, and make Allan King your foreman.
He has worked in the old shop almost as
long as you have; and you know he is looking
forward to a partnership with one of the
128 ; THE TRIALS OF

family,” added he, with a merry glance at
- Margaret Fraser, whose face turned as deep
a colour as that of the scarlet rose on the
window-sill when the Squire made this re-
mark.

“And Allan is a neighbour’s son and a
worthy lad,’ chimed in Dame Fraser. ‘‘ Now
that a way is opened for you, Richard, I don’t
see that you ought to turn your back upon it.
You can give the help of your head sometimes ;
for I’m not going to say that Allan is your
match in head-work, though he may be a
clever joiner. So now, dear son, I hope you
will take what I look on asthe very gift of
God.”

But, mother, I should have to be the most
of my time away from Wellesby and you?”

‘Weil, Richard, and I don’t say but what it
will be a trial to me to look round and miss you
from amongst us. But there are railways
enough now, and the telegraph if you should be
wanted in a hurry; and, Richard, if it cost
me ever so much I should say, go. You have
always been thinking of me; and, somehow,
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 129

it will be pleasant to bear a little crossing
for your sake.” ,

When his mother thus joined in seconding
the Squire’s argument, and even Richard’s own
clear judgment showed him that there could
be no risk, while there must be much credit
in store for him, how could he refuse the offer
made ?

So it was accepted; only the young man
made it a condition that he should execute
at home all the work that could be done there.
So there, with his mother and sisters around
him, he often wrought hard at his delicate
employment, and was ready to give his aid
and counsel in the carrying out of the more
homely business... And thus he proved the
truth of the Squire’s saying, ‘that the rarest
gifts ore not unsuited to pair with the homeliest
an the performance of our every-day duties.”

The Squire promised, too, that Richard’s
next commission should be given by himself.
And,” said he, ‘you will be able to execute
the whole of it here; for, God willing, by
the time you have finished this more distant

I
1380 THE TRIALS OF

work my school-houses will be quite completed,
and I shall have time to think about restor-
ing the church to something like its original
beauty.”

Richard’s eyes brightened when he heard
this, for he had not forgotten the conversa-
tion he had overheard long before, when he
was putting up a book-drawer in one of the
pews, ‘I shall never work anywhere with
a better will than I shall in the old church
where I first worshipped,” he answered; and
the Squire said, ‘‘I believe you, Fraser, for
everything connected with home lies very close
to your heart,”
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 131.

CHAPTER IX.

THE PATH OPEN. WON.

THERE was a good deal to be done before
Richard could leave Wellesby; for he tried
to make arrangements with respect to the
home business, so that it might be carried
on after a creditable fashion during his ab-
sence. At length he started on his journey
for the old cathedral city wherein he was to
labour, accompanied by the prayers and good
wishes of his friends at home and Wellesby
folk in general. There was an understand-
ing between him and Allan King, that if he
were successful abroad and Allan at home,
the latter should become a partner in the
country business; while it was also under-
stood, that the day on which this arrange-
ment should be carried out would see King
1382 THE TRIALS OF

furnished with a fairer partner, even sweet,
modest Margaret Fraser herself. Is it need-
ful to tell that Allan did his very best to fill
Richard’s place worthily ?

And Richard in the distant city found, after
a time, that it would not be easy for him to
leave the scene of his labours; and as he con-
stantly received cheerful letters from home, in
which were no news but good, he threw himself
with his whole heart into what he was about.
At last, when his task was only half ended,
there came a coaxing epistle from Margaret,
begging that he would take a holiday, to be
present at what would be in the eyes of
Wellesby natives a grand festival. So grand
did it seem to dame Fraser and her young
people at home, that they could not endure
the idea of their darling son and brother
taking no part in it. And. this event was
neither more nor less than the opening of the.
new schools at Wellesby—the Squire’s new
schools. In old times it had been thought
sufficient if the children of the poor were
taught to read, and many of them were sent
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 133

into the fields so early, that they might help
to éarn bread, that even this limited amount of
learning was denied them. But now, Young
Squire Millman and the new vicar were full
of plans for the good of the poor. The Squire
dipped his hand deep down into his pocket and
brought thence a sum which would half build
the schools. Moreover, he gave a piece of
land for them to be built upon, not forgetting
that the master would want a little garden and
the mistress a flower-plot also. The vicar, too,
added something, and a portion was bestowed,
by the government; and so, with but little help
from those who would have gladly given little
sums, the buildings were set about and com-
pleted. And, in the meanwhile, by way of
making a start, a sweet-looking young woman
came to Wellesby and began to teach in a
large room fitted up by the Squire. At first
the old village people were not inclined to view
the young stranger with kindly eyes, because
she came from a far-away place, and they knew
mone of her kith and kin. But soon the
gentle-mannered, well-informed young school-
184 THE TRIALS OF

mistress won the hearts of the children by her
kindness, and, of course, the parents learned to
love her who was so kind to their little ones.

Then she astonished both old and young by
the variety and extent of her knowledge, and
became a welcome visitor at every fireside in
Wellesby. These things happened while
Richard Fraser was absent; but the girls had
told him not only about the progress of the
schools, but also of the way in which every-
body had become attached to the young
stranger.

Nay, there was one exception. The clerk,
who had been accustomed to have the music
all his own way, and a very queer way too,
and disttessing to those who knew anything
about harmony, was greatly annoyed at the
young schoolmistress’s presumption in forming
a choir and training the sweet voices of her
little pupils to sing the praise of their Maker.
But as the Squire and the vicar openly espouse
her cause, it is thought he will be obliged to
yield and help the young singers with his deep
bass voice, instead of being obstinately silent,
as he has been of late.
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 135

Richard Fraser’s sisters told him all this,
and they talked to Annie Freeman, the school-
mistress, about their artist-brother and all he
had done for them, from boyhood upwards.
Then Richard, whose heart was ever filled with
thoughts of home, determined to steal a day
or two just to have a look at it and its inmates,
and then back to work again. He did not
write to say that he would come, and so it
happened that on the eve of the school-open-
ing; when everybody had given up expecting
him, Richard made his appearance. How glad
they all were to see him! How his mother
hung round his neck and left the trace of her
joyful tears on his cheek when she kissed him,
and how the girls exulted over ‘brother
Richard’’ is not to be told! But when the
first greetings were past, the young wood-
carver became conscious of a_ stranger’s
presence, and guessed that the girl with the
kindly face, so nicely framed by the glossy-
brown hair, must be no other than Annie
Freeman.

Sure enough it was the new schoolmistress,
and Richard did not wonder that she had
136 THE TRIALS OF

found favour at Wellesby. He had little more
than a peep at her fresh, young face, for
Annie, guessing that the new comer would
have many things to say to mother and sisters,
which were not likely to be said while she was
present, quietly stole away to her own home.

Then Richard, after having refreshed him-
self a little, was fain to listen to an account
of Allan King’s doings during his absence,
and to tell of his own.

“So they are well pleased with your work,
Richard?” remarked his mother, as she sur-
veyed him proudly, and thought, ‘‘What a
gentleman my Dick looks, to be sure!”

“Yes, mother, they are well contented, and
already I have the offer of work for many a
month; but the old church here must come
in next. I shall bring quite a little fortune
home in my pocket.”

“You will never have more than you de-
serve,’ returned the mother with a look of
proud affection.

The school-opening was a pretty scene.
There was the band of little scholars, dressed
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 137

in their best, and led by the young school-
mistress; there were the villagers, old and
middle-aged; there were the Squire, his wife,
and their children; in fact, nearly everybody
went to church that morning to join in asking
a blessing on the work which they hoped
would prove to be for ‘‘the glory of God,”
for which end we should strive ‘“ to do all.”

Old Simon Lee, who now required two sup-
porters to enable him to reach the house of
God, was not absent; though he shook his
head, and “doubted, whether with all their
learning, the young folks would be any wiser
than the old ones.”

Old Simon considered that as he had done
very well, and even supported the character
of village patriarch, with scanty knowledge
of letters, and in total ignorance of such new-
fangled things as geography and grammar,
other people might do the same. Still, after
a little talk with the Squire, he owned that
he should not like Wellesby youngsters to be
behind those of other places, even in matterd of
which he had never possessed any knowledge.
138 THE TRIALS OF

After church there was a feast for the
children in the new schoolrooms, which were
beautifully decorated; and then the Squire, the
Vicar, and other friends spoke to the little
ones, and told them how needful it is for the
young to use their childhood in acquiring
knowledge which may be useful to them in
after years. The Squire told them tales of
several boys who, though born of humble
_ parents, had become famous men by dint of
industry and perseverance, even against many
obstacles. ‘And I should not wonder,”
he added, ‘‘if, some years after this, we
were to hear of one Wellesby lad who had
made himself known to the world by the
work of his hands. I hope many more will
follow the example he has set in regard to
industry and dutiful conduct; and then, when
I look round, I shall feel proud to say, I
was once a Wellesby lad myself.”

Most people knew that the Squire spoke
of Richard Fraser, and they felt not a little
proud to think that a Wellesby young man
should have taken a prize for his handiwork,
A VILLAGE ARTIST. 139

and been thought worthy to execute such
delicate work as he was then employed on
in a far-away city.

When. Richard went back to his labours
again he did not forget the Wellesby School
opening; but more frequently than the thought
of the little scholars, or the Squire himself,
came to his mind’s eye the sweet face of Annie
Freeman. And when his first commission was
executed, to the satisfaction of his employers,
and he came back to do the carvings for the
old church at home, there was a wedding in
the family; not Richard’s yet. It was that
of his sister Margaret and Allan King; for
Allan had proved himself worthy of all trust ;
and now the joiner’s business is carried on
under the joint names of Fraser and King.
Richard is still at the head of the firm; but
it is well understood that when George is
big enough he will be thé Fraser whose name
will be on the sign-board. over the joiner’s shop
at Wellesby.

Richard is likely to have plenty more work
when the old church is finished, from what
140 THE TRIALS OF A VILLAGE ARTIST.

we hear. He has lately been modelling a
figure, which is meant to represent ‘ Truth ;”
and those who have seen it do say that the
face is very like Annie Freeman’s. Nay,
more; it is whispered that the first wedding
which will take place in Wellesby Church,
after it is re-opened, will be that of the young
artist and the gentle schoolmistress. The
little children will be sorry to lose her; but
they will all pray for a blessing on her head,
and wish for another like her to guide their
young feet in the ways of peace.

So with happy prospects to look forward
to and pleasant memories of duties done, of
willing work, of patient waiting, we will .
leave our village artist; for have we not
proved, by his example, that, though we
may have to wait, we shall obtain the reward
of industry and perseverance, and that when
God bestows a talent upon us He will also,
in His own good time, open for us a way
wherein to use it?

LONDON: ROBERT EK. BUET, HOLBORN HILL,
ONE SHILLING
JUVENILE BOOKS,

' Suitable for Prizes or Presents, as well as for Sunday School
and Parochial Libraries.

ALL BOUND UNIFORM, CLOTH BOARDS.

LITTLE POEMS for LITTLE READERS:
a Selection of Poetry for the Young. With Sixteen
Illustrations.

* A good selection of poems for young people, culled from many of
the best authors.” —Church of England Sunday School Magazine.

LITTLE FABLES for LITTLE FOLKS,
which Great Ones may Read. With Nineteen Illustra-
tions. 5

"One of the pleasantest ways of teaching useful lessons and moral
truths is by means of fables, and we will venture to say that these
before us will he welcomed heartily by the little folks for whom they are
intended.” — Church of England Sunday School Magazine,

With CoLourED FRONTISPIECES,
RPABES IN THE BASKET,
MEGGIE OF THE PINES.
HATTY AND MARCUS,
OCRANGEH SHED.
PLEASANT PATHS FOR LITTLE FEET.
GOODLY CEDARS. A Sunday Book.
FELEN MORTON’S TRIAL.
BREAD CAST UPON THE WATERS.
JEM MORRISON, THE FISHER BOY.
THER TRIALS OF A VILLAGH ARTIST.
CHILDHOOD OF ADA GREY.
TIMID LUCY.



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Tt contains some pleasing allegories, some thoughtful verses, and
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