Citation
The Mayflower, or, Tales and pencilings

Material Information

Title:
The Mayflower, or, Tales and pencilings
Series Title:
Nelson's library for travellers and the fireside
Added title page title:
Tales and pencilings
Creator:
Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 1811-1896 ( Author, Primary )
Preston, R.W ( Binder )
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Edinburgh
Publisher:
T. Nelson & Sons
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
220 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Short stories, Romance ( lcsh )
Preston -- Binders' tickets (Binding) -- 1852 ( rbbin )
Inscriptions (Provenance) -- 1852 ( rbprov )
Baldwin -- 1852
Genre:
Binders' tickets (Binding) ( rbbin )
Inscriptions (Provenance) ( rbprov )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh

Notes

General Note:
Added title page, engraved.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by Harriet Beecher Stowe.

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University of Florida
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University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026973590 ( ALEPH )
07982388 ( OCLC )
ALH8536 ( NOTIS )

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THE MAYFLOWER;

BY

Firs. Warriet Beecher Stowe.

AUTHOR OF “‘ UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.”

Re ht BT” *

a ae PLR

aie
saat irre



MARION JONES,

i Master Joseph always took little Marion under his especial
; protection.—Page 122.





-_——<

Pelsun’s Library for’ Grauellers and the Fireside,



a |

THE MAYFLOWER;

oR,

Gales wnd Vencilings,

BY

MRS. HARRIET BEECHER STOWE,

AUTHOR OF “ UNCLE TOM’S CABIN,”



“ A welecme garland here is wreathed
Of the pleasant flowers of May ;
Of lesson, song, and story breathed,
And many a pleasant lay.”



Loniton:
T. NELSONS SONS, PATERNGOSTER ROW;
AND EDINBURGH,

MDCCCLIL.








PREFACE,



In the following pages the reader will find a series of
pleasing and instructive sketches, characterized by the
refinement and tenderness which mark with such peculiar
attractions the best productions of feminine taste, and
confer on them such admirable fitness for the family
circle. They are from the pen of the gifted American
authoress—Harriet Beecher Stowe ; and, in introducing
this volume to the English reader, the editor feels assured
that that sprightliness and happy humour, and still mora
the fine taste and high moral printiple displayed by the
authoress, will secure for her a hearty welcome to many

a fireside in the Homes of merry England.

Lonpon, October, 1852.





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CONTENTS,

Florence ]’Estrange; or, The Rose Tree

Cousin William .. oe oe
Frankness oe oe
Feeling oe oe ee
The Sempstress oe ve
Aunt Mary oe oe ee
Uncle Tim and his Daughter Grace
So Many Calls .. oe oe
Marion Jones; or, Love versus Law
Augusta Howard be ee
Old Pather Morris .. oe

The Canal-Boat ee ee
Trials of a Houskeeper ee
Little Edward, ee ee

PAGS

17
82
39
46
61

lll





igor amet ‘



THE MAYFLOWER.



FLORENCE L’ESTRANGE; OR, THE ROSE TREE,



Rose! what dost thou here ?
Bridal, royal rose ?
How midst grief and fear,
Canst thou thus disclose
That fervid hue of love, which to thy heart-leaf glows?
_ HEMANS..



HERE it stood, in its little green vase, on a light
ebony stand in the window of the drawing-room.
The rich satin curtains, with their costly fringes, swept
down on either side of it, and around it glittered every
rare and fanciful trifle which wealth can offer to luxury,
and yet that simple rose was the fairest of them all. So
pure it looked, its white leaves just touched with that
delicious creamy tint peculiar to its kind; its cup so full,
so perfect; its head bending as if dt were sinking and
melting away in its own richness—oh! when did ever
man make anything to equal the living, perfect flower!
But the sunlight that streamed through the window
revealed something fairer than the rose. Reclined on an
ottoman, in a deep recess, and intently engaged with
book, rested what seemed the counterpart of that so



8 FLORENCE L’ESTRANGE $
scrieinait tciiiiinicesapa int a at ct ack a eae

lovely flower. That cheek so pale, that fair forehead so
spiritual, that countenance so full of high thought, those
long, downcast lashes, and the expression of the beautiful
mouth, sorrowful, yet subdued and sweet—it seemed like
the picture of a dream.

“Florence! Florence!” echoed a merry and musical
voice, in a sweet, impatient tone. Turn your head,
reader, and you will see a light and sparkling maiden,
the very model of some little wilful elf, born of mischief
and motion, with a dancing eye, a foot that scarcely
seems to touch the carpet, and a smile so multiplied by
dimples, that it seems like a thousand smiles at once’
“Come, Florence, I say,” said the little sprite, “put down
that wise, good, and excellent volume, and descend from
your cloud, and talk with a poor little mortal.

“I have been thinking what you are to do with your
pet rose when you go away, as, to our consternation, you
are determined to do; you know it would be a sad pity
to leave it with such a scatterbrain as Iam. I do love
flowers, that is a fact; that is, I like a regular bouquet,
cut off and tied up, to carry to a party; but as to all this
tending and fussing, whieh is needful to ery then
growing, I have no gifts in that line.”

“ Make yourself gasy as to that, Kate,” said Florence,
with a smile; “I have no intention of calling upon your
talents: I have an asylum in view for my favourite.”

“Qh then, you know just what I was going to say.
Mrs. Marshall, I presume, has been speaking to you; she
was here yesterday, and I was quite pathetic upon the
subject, telling her the loss your favourite would sustain,



OR, THE ROSE TREE. 9

oe
easement,

and so forth; and she said how delighted she would be
to have it in her green-house, it is in such a fine state
now, 80 full of buds. I told her I knew you would like
to give it to-her, you are so fond of Mrs. Marshall, you
know.”

“Now, Kate, I am sorry, but I have otherwise engaged
it.”

“Who. can it be to? you have so few intimates here.”

“Oh, it is only one of my odd fancies,”

“But-do tell me, Florence.” .

“Well, cousin, you know the little pale girl to whom
we give sewing.”

“ What! little Mary Stephens? How absurd! Florence,
this is just another of your motherly, old-maidish ways—
dressing dolls for poor children, making bonnets and
knitting socks for all the little dirty babies in the region
round about....I do believe you have made more calls in
those two, vile, ill-smelling alleys back of our house, than
ever you have in Chesnut-street, though you know every-
body is half dying to see you; and now, to crown all, you
must. give this choice little bijou to a semptress-girl, when
one of your most intim&te friends, in your own class,
would value it so highly. What in the world can people
in their circumstances want of flowers ?”

“Just the same as I do,” replied Florence, calmly:
“Have you not noticed that the little girl never comes
here without looking wistfully at the opening buds?
And, don’t you remember, the other morning she asked
me so prettily if I would let her mother come and see it,
she was so fond of flowers?”



10 FLORENCE L’ESTRANGE ;

EE rethneennce ease eo



“ But, Florence, only think of this rare flower standing
on a table with ham, eggs, cheese, and flour, and stifled
in that close little room where Mrs. Stephens and her —
daughter manage to wash, iron, cook, and nobody knows ©
what besides.” |

‘Well, Kate, and if I were obliged to live in one

coarse room, and wash, and iron, and cook, as you say—
if I had to spend every moment of my time in toil, with
no prospect from my window but a brick wall and dirty
lane, such a flower as this would be untold enjoyment to
me.”
_ “Pshaw! Florence—all sentiment : poor people have
no time to be sentimental. Besides, I don’t believe it
will grow with them; it is a greenhouse flower, and
used to delicate living.”

“Oh, as to that, a flower never inquires whether its
owner is rich or poor ; and Mrs. Stephens, whatever else
she has not, has sunshine of as good quality as this that
streams through our window. The beautiful things that
God makes are his gift to all alike. You will see that
my fair rose will be as well and cheerful in Mrs. Ste-
phens’ room as in ours.” 2 |

“ Well, after all, how odd! When one gives to poor |
people, one wants to give them something useful—o |
bushel of potatoes, a ham, and such things.” |

“ Why, certainly, potatoes and ham must be supplied;
but, having ministered to the first and most craving

wants, why not add any other little pleasures or gratafi-
cations we may have it in our power to bestow? I know
there are many of the poor who have fine fecling and @








OR, THE ROSE TREE. ‘ 11



keen sense of the beautiful, which rusts out and dies
because they are too hard pressed to procure it any gra-
tification. Poor Mrs. Stephens, for example: I know
she would enjoy birds, and flowers, and music as much as
Ido. I have seen her eye light upas she looked on these
things in our drawing-room, and yet not one beautiful
thing can she command. From necessity, her room, her
clothing, all she has, must be coarse and plain. You
should have seen the almost veptime she and Mary felt
when I offered them my rose.’

“Dear me! all this may be true, but I never thought
of it before. I never thought that these hard-working
people had any ideas of taste/”

“Then why do you see the geranium or rose so care-
fully nursed in the old cracked teapot in the poorest
room, or the morning-glory planted in a box and twined
about the window ? Do not these show that the human
heart yearns for the beautiful in all ranks of life? You
remember, Kate, how our washerwoman sat up a whole
night, after a hard day’s work, to make her first baby. a
pretty dress to be baptized in.”

“Yes, and I remember how I laughed at you for
making such a tasteful little cap for it.”

“ Well, Katy, I think the look of perfect delight with
which the poor mother regarded her baby in its new
dress and cap, was something quite worth creating ; I do
believe she could not have felt more grateful if I had
sent her a barrel of flour.”

“Well, I never thought before of giving any thing to
the poor but what they really needed, and I have always



is « FLORENCE 1’ ESTRANGE ;





been willing to "7 that when I could without going far
out of my way.” |

Well, cousin, if our heavenly Father gave to us after
this mode, we should have only coarse, shapeless piles of
provisions lying about the world instead of all this
beautiful variety of trees, and fruits, and flowers.”

“Well, well, cousin, I suppose you are right—but
have mercy on my poor head; it is too small to oe
s0 many new ideas all at once—so go on your own way.”
And the little lady began practising a waltzing step be-
fore the glass with great satisfaction.

It was a very small room, lighted by only one window.
There was no carpet on the floor ; there was a clean, but
coarsely-covered bed in one corner; a cupboard, with a
few dishes and plates, in the other ; a chest of drawers ;
and before the window stood a small cherry stand, quite
new, and, indeed, it was the only article in the room
that seemed so.

-A pale, sickly-looking woman of about forty was lean-
ing back in her rocking-chair, her eyes closed and her
lips compressed as if in pain. She rocked backward and
forward a few minutes, pressed her hand hard upon her
eyes, and then languidly resumed her fine stitching, on
which she had been busy since morning. The door
opened, and a slender little girl of about twelve years of
age entered, her large blue eyes dilated and radiant
with delight as she bore in the vase with the rose-tree
in it. .

“Qh! see, mother, see! Here is one in full bloom,



OR, THE ROSE TREE. ’ 13



and two more half out, and ever so many more pretty
buds peeping out of the green leaves.”

The poor woman’s face brightened as she looked, first
on the rose and then on her sickly child, on whose face
she had not seen so bright a colour for months.

“God bless her !” she exclaimed, unconsciously.

“ Miss Florence—yes, I knew you would feel so, mo-
ther. Does it not make your head feel better to sce
such a beautiful flower? Now you will not look so long-
ingly at the flowers in the market, for we have a rose
that is handsomer than any of them, Why, it seems to
me it is worth as much to us as our whole little garden
used to be. Only see how many buds there are! Just
count, them, and only smell the flower! Now where
shall we set it up?” And Mary skipped about, placing
her flower first in one position and then in another, and
walking off to. see the effect, till her mother gently re-
minded her that the rose-tree could not preserve its
beauty without sunlight.

“Oh yes, truly,” said Mary; “well, then, it must
stand here on our new stand, How glad I am that we
have: such a handsome new stand for it; it will look so
much better.” And Mrs. Stephens laid down her work,
and folded a piece of newspaper, on which the treasure
was duly deposited. |

“There,” said Mary, watching the arrangement eagerly,
“that will do—no, for it does not show both the opening
buds ; a little farther round—a little more ; there, that
is right.” And then Mary walked around to view the
Tose in various positions, after which she urged. her



14 ' FLORENCE L’ESTRANGE 5

——— ee eee eee







mother to go with her to the outside, and see how it
Jooked there. “ How kind it was in Miss Florence to
think of giving this to us!” said Mary ; “though she
had done so much for us, and given us so many things,
yet this seems the best of all, because it seems as if she
thought of us, and knew just how we felt; and so few do
that, you know, mother.”

What a bright afternoon that little gift made in that
little room. How much faster Mary’s fingers flew the
livelong day as she sat sewing by her mother; and Mrs.
Stephens, in the happiness of her child, almost forgot
that she had a headache, and thought, as she sipped her
evening cup of tea, that she felt stronger than she had
done for some time.

That rose! its sweet influence died not with the first
day. Through all the long cold winter, the watching,
tending, cherishing that flower, awakened a thousand
pleasant trains of thought that beguiled the sameness
and weariness of their life. Every day the fair, growing
thing put forth some fresh beauty—a leaf, a bud, a new
shoot, and constantly awakened fresh enjoyment in its
possessors. As it stood in the window, the passer-by
would sometimes stop and gaze, attracted by its beauty,
and then proud and happy was Mary ; nor did even the
serious and careworn widow notice with indifference this
tribute to the beauty of their favourite.

But little did Florence think, when she bestowed the
gift, that there twined about it an invisible thread that
reached far and brightly into the web of her destiny.

One cold afternoon in early spring, a tall and graceful





On, THE ROSE TREE. 15





gentleman called at the lowly room to pay for the
making of some linen by the inmates. He was'a stranger
and wayfarer, recommended through the charity of some
of Mrs. Stephens’s patrons. As he turned to go, his eye
rested admiringly on the rose-tree, and he stopped to
gaze at it.

« How beautiful !” said he.

“Yes,” said little Mary, “and it was given to us by a
lady as sweet and beautiful as that is.”

“Ah,” said the stranger, turning upon her a pair of
bright dark eyes, pleased and rather struck by the com-
munication; “and how came she to give it to you, my
little girl ?”

“ Oh, because we are poor, and mother is sick, and we
can never have any thing pretty. We used to havea
garden once, and we loved flowers so much, and Miss
Florence found it out, and so she gave us this.”

“ Florence !” echoed the stranger.

“Yes—Miss Florence l’Estrange—a beautiful lady.
They say she was from foreign parts ; but she speaks
English just like other ladies, only sweeter.”

“Ts she here now? Is she in this city?” said the
gentleman, eagerly.

“No; she left some months ago,” said the widow,
noticing the shade of disappointment on his face ; “but,”
said she, “you can find out all about her at her aunt’s,
No. 10 —— Street.”

A short time after, Florence received a letter in a
hand-writing that made her tremble. During the many
early years of her life spent in France she had well



16 FLORENCE L’ ESTRANGE.

a

learned to know that writing—had loved as a woman
like her loves, only once—but there had been obstacles
of parents and friends, long separation, long suspense,
till, after anxious years, she believed the ocean had
closed over that hand and heart; and it was this that
had touched with such pensive sorrow the lines in her
lovely face.

But this letter told that he was living, that he had
traced her, even as a hidden streamlet may be traced, by
the freshness, the verdure of heart, which her deeds
of kindness had left wherever she had passed. Thus
much said, our readers need no help in finishing my
story for themselves,





COUSIN WILLIAM. 17

ae. ee teeta cision aaneeaeiasaebeniain see.

COUSIN WILLIAM,

ee ee

Oh! not when hopes are brightest,
Is all love’s sweet enchantment known ;
Oh! not when hearts are lightest,
Js all fond woman's favour shown.
PRINGLE,

1 howe house in which the heroine of our story lived

stood almost concealed amid a forest of apple-trees, in
spring blushing with blossoms,and in autumn golden with
fruit ; and near by miglft be seen the garden, surrounded
by a red picket-fence, enclosing all sorts of magnificence,
There, in autumn, might be seen luxuriant vines, which
seemed puzzled for room where to bestow themselves,
and bright golden squashes, and full-orbed yellow pump-
kins, looking as satisfied as the evening sun when he has
Just had his face washed in a shower, and is sinking
soberly to bed. There were superannuated seed-cucum-
bers, enjoying the pleasures of a contemplative old age ;
and Indian corn, nicely done up in green silk, with a
Specimen tassel hanging at the end of each ear. The
beams of the summer sun darted through rays of crim-
‘on currants, abounding on bushes by the fence, while a

3B



18 COUSIN WILLIAM.



— a ae



sulky black currant-bush sat scowling In one corner, &
sort of garden curiosity.

The father of our heroine belonged to that necessary
class of beings who, though remarkable for nothing at
all, are very useful in filling up the links of society. Far
otherwise was his sister-in-law, who, on the demise of
his wife, had assumed the reins of government in the
household.

This lady was of the same opinion that has animated
many illustrious philosophers, namely, that the affairs
of this world need a great deal of seeing to in order to
have them go on prosperously; and, although she did
not, like them, engage in the supervision of the uni-
verse, she made amends by unremitting diligence in the’
department under her care. In her mind there was an
evident necessity that every onc should be up and doing:
Monday, because it was washing -day ; Tuesday, because
it was ironing-day ; Wednesdayy because it was baking-
day ; Thursday, because to-morrow was Friday, and so
on to the end of the week. Then she had the care of
reminding all in the house of everything each was to do
from weck’s end to week’s end; and she was so faithful
in this respect, that scarcely an original act of volition
took place in the family. The poor deacon was reminded
when he went out and when he came in, when he sat
down and when he rose up, so that an act of omission
could only have been committed through sheer malice
prepense.

But the supervision of a whole family of children
afforded, to a lady of her active turn of mind, more



COUSIN WILLIAM. 19



abundant matter of exertion. To see that their faces
were washed, their clothes mended, and their catechism
learned ; to see that they did not pick the flowers, nor
throw stones at the chickens, nor sophisticate the great
house-dog, was an accumulation of care that devolved
almost entirely on Mrs. Abigail; so that, by her own
account, she lived and throve by a perpetual miracle.
The eldest of her charge, at the time this story begins,
was a girl just arrived at young-ladyhood, and her name
was Mary. Now we know that people very seldom have
stories written about them, who have not sylph-like .
forms, and glorious eyes, or, at least, “a certain inex-
pressible charm diffused over their whole person.” But
stories have of late so much abounded, that they actually
seem to have used up all the eyes, hair, teeth, lips, and
forms necessary for a heroine, so that no one can now
pretend to find an original collection wherewith to set
one forth. These things considered, I regard it as for-
tunate that my heroine was not a beauty. She looked
neither like a sylph, nor an oread, nor a fairy; she had
neither “Vair distingue” nor “Tair magnifique,” but
bore a great resemblance to a real mortal girl, such as
you might pass a dozen of without any particular com~-
ment: one of those appearances which, though common
as water, may, like that, be coloured any way by the
associations you connect with it. Accordingly, a fault-
less taste in dress, a perfect ease and gaiety of manner, a
constant flow of kindly feeling, seemed, in her case, to

produce all the effect of beauty. Her manners had just

dignity enough to repel impertinence, without destroying

?



20 COUSIN WILLIAM.



the careless freedom and sprightliness in which she com-

monly indulged. No person had a merrier run of stories,
songs, and village traditions, and all those odds and ends

of character which form the materials for animated con-

versation. She had read, too, everything she could find:
Rollin’s History, and Scott’s Family Bible, that stood in

the glass bookcase in the best room, and an odd volume

of Shakspeare, and now and then one of Scott’s novels,

borrowed from a somewhat literary family in the neigh-
bourhood. She also kept an album to write her thoughts
in, and was in a constant habit of cutting out all the
pretty poetry from the corners of the newspapers, be-

sides drying a number of forget-me-nots and rosebuds,

in memory of different particular friends, with a number
of other little sentimental practices to which young

ladies of sixteen and thereabout are addicted. She was

also endowed with great constructiveness ; so that, in
this day of ladies’ fairs, there was nothing, from bellows
needle-books down to web-footed pincushions, to which
she could not turn her hand, Her sewing certainly was

extraordinary (we think too little is made of this in the

accomplishments of heroines), her stitching was like rows
of pearls, and her cross-stitching was fairy-like ; and for

sewing over-and-over, as the village school ma’am hath

it, she had not her equal. And what shall we say of her

pies and puddings! They would have converted the

most reprobate old bachelor in the world. And then her

sweeping and dusting! “Many daughters have done

virtuously, but thou excellest them all!”
And now, what do you suppose is coming next ? Why,





GQOUSIN WILLIAM. 21

a young gentleman, of course; for about this time comes
to settle in the village, and take charge of the academy,
a certain William Barton. Mrs. Abigail denominated
him cousin, and he had not been boarded in the house
more than a week, and made sundry observations on
Miss Mary, before he determined to call her cousin too,
which he accomplished im the most natural way in the
world.

Mary was at first somewhat afraid of him, because
she had heard that he had studied through all that was
to be studied in Greek, and Latin, and German too; and
she saw a library of books in his room, that made her
sigh every time she looked at them, to think how much
there was to be learned of which she was ignorant. But
all this wore away, and presently they were the best
friends in the world. He gave her books to read, and
he gave her lessons in French, nothing puzzled by that
troublesome verb which must be first conjugated, whe-
ther in French, Latin, or English. Then he gave her a
deal of good advice about the cultivation of her mind
and the formation .of her character; all of which was
very improving, and tended greatly to consolidate their
friendship. But, unfortunately for Mary, William made
quite as favourable an impression on the female com-
munity generally as he did on her, having several times
distinguished himself on public occasions. He had been
known, also, to write poetry, and had a retired and ro-
mantic air greatly bewitching to those who read Bulwer’s
novels. In short, it was morally certain, according to
all rules of evidence, that if he had chosen to pay any



ns COUSIN WILLIAM.

AAT



lady of the village a dozen visits a-week, she would have
considered it ag her duty to entertain him.

William did visit: for, like many studious people, he
found a need for the excitement of society; but, whe-
ther it was party or singing-school, he walked home with
Mary, of course, in as steady and domestic a manner as
any raan who has been marri@l a twelvemonth. His air
in conversing with her was inevitably more confidential
than with any other one, and this was the cause for envy
in many a gentle breast, and an interesting diversity of
reports with regard to her manner of treating the young
gentleman went forth into the village.

« I wonder Mary Taylor will laugh and joke so much
with William Barton in company,” said one. “Her
manners are altogether too free/’ said another. “ It
is evident she has designs upon him,” remarked the
third ; “and she cannot even conceal it,” pursued a
fourth.

Some sayings of this kind at length reached the ears
of Mrs. Abigail, who had the best heart in the world,
and was so indignant that it might have done your heart
good to see her. Still, she thought it showed that “ the
girl needed advising,” and “she should talk to Mary
about the matter.”

But she first concluded to advise with William on the
subject, and therefore, after dinner, the same day, while
he was looking over a treatise on trigonometry or conic
sections, she commenced upon him :—

“Our Mary is growing up a fine girl.”

William was intent on solving a problem, and only



COUSIN WILLIAM. 93

~~



understanding that something had been said, mechani-
cally answered, “ Yes.”

“A little wild or so,” said Mrs. Abigail.

“J know it,” said William, fixing his eyes earnestly on
E, F, B, C.

“ Perhaps you think her a little too talkative and free
with you sometimes ; you know girls do not always
think what they do.”

“Certainly,” said William, going on with his pro-
blem.

“JT think you had better speak to her about it,” said
Mrs. Abigail.

“T think so too,” said William, musing over his com-
plete work, till at length he arose, put it in his pocket,
and went to school. |

Oh, this unlucky concentrativeness ! How many shock-
ing things a man may endorse by the simple habit of
saying “ Yes,” and “No,” when he is not hearing what
is said to him.

The next morning, wher William was gone to the -
academy, and Mary was washing the breakfast things,
Aunt Abigail introduced the subject with great tact and
delicacy, by remarking,

“ Mary, I guess you had better be rather less free
with William than you have been.”

“Free!” said Mary, starting, and nearly dropping the
cup from her hand ; “ why, aunt, what do you mean ?”

“ Why, Mary, you must not always be, around, so free
in talking with him at home, and in company, and every-
where. It won’t do.” ‘The colour started into Mary's



94 COUSIN WILLIAM.

cheek, and mounted even to her forehead, as she an-
swered with a dignified air:

“T have not been too free—I know what is right and
proper—I have not been doing any thing that was
improper.”

Now, when one is going to give advice, it is very trou-
blesome to have its necessity thus called in question, and
Mrs. Abigail, who was fond of her own opinion, felt
called upon to defend it.

“ Why, yes you have, Mary; every body in the vil-
lage notices it.” .

“T don't care what everybody in the village says—I
shall always do what I think proper,” retorted the young
lady ; “I know cousin William does not think so.”

“Well, Z think he does—from some things I have
heard him say.” .

“Oh, aunt! what have you heard him say?” said
Mary, nearly upsetting a chair in the eagerness with
which she turned to her aunt.

“ Mercy on us! you need not knock the house down,
Mary ; 1 don’t remember exactly about it, only that his
way of speaking made me think so.”

“Oh, aunt, do tell me what it was, and all about it,”
said Mary, following her aunt, who went around dusting
the furniture.

Mrs. Abigail, like most obstinate people, who feel that
they have gone too far, and yet are ashamed to go back,
took refuge in an obstinate generalization, and only
asserted that she had heard him say things, as if he did
not quite like her ways.



COUSIN WILLIAM. 95

This is the most consoling of all methods in which to
leave a matter of this kind for a person of active imagi-
nation. Of course, in five minutes Mary had settled in
her mind a string of remarks that would have been
suited to any of her village companions, as coming from
her cousin. All the improbability of the thing vanished
in the absorbing consideration of its possibility ; and,
after a moment’s reflection, she pressed her lips together
in a very firm way, and remarked that “ Mr. Barton
would have no occasion to say such things again.”

It was very evident, from her heightened colour and
dignified air, that her state of mind was very heroical,
As for poor Aunt Abigail, she felt sorry she had vexed
her, and addressed herself most earnestly to her consola-
tion, remarking, “ Mary, I don’t suppose William meant
anything. He knows you don’t mean anything wrong.”

“ Don’t mean anything wrong!” said Mary; indignantly.

“ Why, child, he thinks you don’t know much about
folks and things, and if you have been a little

“ But I have not been. It was he that talked with
me first ; it was he that did everything first; he called
me cousin—and he 7s my cousin.”

“No, child, you are mistaken ; for you remember his
grandfather was ——”



“T don’t care who his grandfather was; he has no
right to think of meas he does.”

“Now, Mary, don’t go to quarrelling with him; he
can’t help his thoughts, you know.”

“J don’t care what he thinks,” said Mary, flinging
out of the room with tears in her eyes,



26 COUSIN WILLIAM,

Now when a young lady is in such a state of affliction,
the first thing to be done is to sit down and cry for two
hours or more, which Mary accomplished in the most
thorough manner ; in the meanwhile making many re-
flections on the instability of human friendships, and
resolving never to trust any one again as long as she
lived, and thinking that this was a cold and hollow-
hearted world, together with many other things she had |
read in books, but never realized so forcibly as at pre-
sent. But what was to be done? Of course, she did
not wish to speak a word to William again, and wished
he did not board there; and finally, she pus on her
bonnet, and determined to go over to her other aunt’s”
in the neighbourhood, and spend the day, so that she
might not see him at dinner.

But it so happened that Mr. William, on coming home
to dinner, found himself unaccountably lonesome during
school recess for dinner, and, hearing where Mary was,
determined to call after school at night at her aunt’s,
and attend her home.

Accordingly, in the afternoon, as Mary was sitting in
the parlour with two or three cousins, Mr. William
entered.

Mary was so anxious to look just as if nothing was
the matter, that she turned away her head and began to
look out of the window just as the young gentleman
came up to speak to her. So, after he had twice in-
quired after her health, she drew up very coolly and
said ;

“Did you speak to me, sir ?”



COUSIN WILLIAM. o7

—_—_—



pes. di apie maa eca eet eee Se oe

William looked a little surprised at first, but seating
himself by her, “ To be sure,” said he ; “ and I came to
know why you ran away without leaving any message
for me ?”

“Tt did not occur to me,” said Mary, in ‘the dry tone
which, in a lady, means, “I will excuse you from any
farther conversation, if you please.” William felt as if
there was something different frorn common in all this,
but thought that perhaps he was mistaken, and so con-
tinued : ,

« What a pity, now, that you should be so careless of
me, when I was so thoughtful of you! I have come all
this distance to see how you do.”

“J am sorry to have given you the trouble,” said
Mary.

“ Cousin, are you unwell to-day ?” said William.

“No, sir ;” said Mary, going on with her sewing.

There was something so marked and decisive in all
this, that William could scarcely believe his cars. He
turned away, and commenced a conversation with a
young lady ; and Mary, to show that she could talk if
she chose, commenced relating a story to her cousins,
and presently they were all in a loud laugh.

“ Mary has been full of her knick-knacks to-day,” said
her old uncle, joining them.

William looked at her: she never seemed brighter or
in better spirits, and he began to think that even Cousin
Mary might puzzle a man sometimes.

He turned away and began a conversation with old
Mr. Harper on the raising of buckwheat, a subject which



28 COUSIN WILLIAM.

at ee



evidently required profound thought, for he never looked
more grave, not to say melancholy.

Mary glanced that way, and was struck with the sad
and almost severe expression with which he was listening
to the details of Mr. Harper, and was convinced that he
was no more thinking of buckwheat than she was.

“TI never thought of hurting his feelings so much,”
said she, relenting ; “ after all, he has been very kind to
me, But he might have told me about it, and not some-
body else.” And hereupon she cast another glance to-
wards him.

William was not talking, but sat with his eyes fixed
on the snuffer-tray, with an intense gravity of gaze that
quite troubled her, and she could not help again blam-
ing herself. .

“To be sure! Aunt was right; he could not help his
thoughts. I will try to forget it,’ thought she.

Now you must not think Mary was sitting still and
gazing during this soliloquy. No, she was talking and
laughing, apparently the most unconcerned spectator. in
the room. So passed the evening till the little company
broke up.

“T am‘ready to attend you home,” said William, in a
tone of cold and almost haughty deference.

“JT am obliged to you,” said the young lady, ina
similar tone, “but I shall stay all night ;” then, sud-
denly changing her tone, she said, “ No, I cannot keep
it up any longer, I will go home with you, Cousin
William.”

“ Keep up what ?” said William, with surprise.



COUSIN WILLIAM. 99
nome epee aera ean earapeenesetpnasmnamastanandayeeseteciseeuststisemimmens

Mary was going for her bonnet. She came out, took
his arm, and waiked on a little way.

“You have advised me always to be frank, cousin,”
said Mary, “and I must and will be ; so I shall tell you
all, though I dare say it is not according to rule.”

“ All what ?” said William.

“Cousin,” said she, not at all regarding what he said,
“I was very much vexed this afternoon.”

“So I perceived, Mary.”

“ Well, it is vexatious,” she continued, “ though, after
all, we cannot expect people to think us perfect ; but I
did not think it quite fair in you not to tell me.”

“Tell you what, Mary ?”

Here they came to a place where the road turned
through a small patch of woods. . It was green and
shady, and enlivened by a lively chatterbox of a brook,
There was a mossy trunk of a tree that had fallen be-
side it, and made a pretty seat. The moonlight lay in
little patches upon it, as it streamed down through the
branches of the trees. It was a fairy-looking place, and
Mary stopped and sat down, as if to collect her thoughts.
After picking up a stick, and playing a moment in the
water, she began,—

“ After all, cousin, it was very natural in you to say so
if you thought so; though I should not have supposed
you would think so.”

“Well, I should be glad if I could know what it is,”
said William, in a tone of patient resignation.

“Oh, I forgot that I had not told you,” said she, push-
ing back her hat, and speaking like one determined to



30 COUSIN WILLIAM.

=





go through with the thing. “ Why, cousin, I have been
told that you spoke of my manners towards yourself as
being freer—more —obtrusive than they should be. And
now,” said she, her eyes flashing, “ you see it was not
a very easy thing to tell you, but I began with being
frank, and I will be so, for the sake of satisfying myself.”

To this William simply replied, “Who told you this,
Mary ?”

“ My aunt.”

“ Did she say I said it to her ?”

“Yes; and I do not so much object to your saying it
as to your thinking it, for you know I did not force my-
self on your notice: it was you who sought my acquain-
tance and won my confidence ; and that you, above all
others, should think of me in this way!”

“T never did think so, Mary,” said William, quietly.

“ Nor ever said so ?”

“Never, I should think you might have known it,
* Mary.”

“ But—” said Mary.

“ But,” said William, firmly, “ Aunt Abigail is ccr-
taily mistaken.”

“Well, Iam glad of it,” said Mary, looking relieved,
and gazing in the brook. Then looking up with warmth,
“and, cousin, you never must think so. I am ardent, ©
and I express myself freely ; but I never meant, I am
sure I never should mean, anything more than a sister
might say.”

“ And are you sure you never could, if all my happi-
ness depended on it, Mary ?”





COUSIN WILLIAM. 31





She turned and locked up in his face, amd saw a look
that brought conviction. She rose to go on, and her
hand was taken and drawn into the arm of her cousin,
and that was the end of the first and the last diffi-
culty that ever arose between them.



32 FRANKNESS,

ee

_ FRANKNESS.

ee

Where then to find the spell that flings

His fetter on those way’ring wings?

’Tis in the native truth of heart

That scorns the thought of female art,

That, keenly thrill’d by joy or pain,

Disdains the thrill to hide or feign,
CROLY,



_ is one kind of frankness, which is the result of
perfect unsuspiciousness, and which requires a mea-
sure of ignorance of the world and of life; this kind
appeals to our generosity and tenderness. There is
another which is the frankness of a strong but pure mind,
acquainted with life, clear in its discrimination and
upright in its intention, yet above disguise or conceal-
ment: this kind excites respect. ‘The first seems to
proceed simply from impulse, the second from impulse
and reflection united; the first proceeds, in @ measure,
from ignorance, the second from knowledge; the first is
born from an undoubting confidence in others, the second
from a virtuous and well-grounded reliance on one’s self.
It was said of Alice H— that she had the mind of a
man, the heart of a woman, and the face of an angel: a



FRANXNESS. 33
teheetngtemeininmeemtansineammnnmmpin eet ita. ae
combination that all my readers will think peculiarly
happy. | .

There never was a woman who was so unlike the mass
of society in her modes of thinking and acting, yet so
generally popular. But the most remarkable thing about
her was her proud superiority to all disguise, in thought,
word, and deed. She pleased you; for she spoke out a
hundred things that you would conceal, and spoke them
with a dignified assurance that made you wonder that
you had ever hesitated to say them yourself. Nor did
this unreserve appear like the weakness of one who could
not conceal, or like a determination to make war on the
forma of society. It was rather a calm, well-guided in-
tegrity, regulated by a just sense of propriety ; knowing
when to be silent, but speaking the truth when it spoke
at all.

Her extraordinary frankness often beguiled superficial
observers into supposing themselves fully acquainted with
her real character long before they were, as the beautiful
transparency of some lakes is said to deceive the eye as
to their depth; yet the longer you knew her, the more
variety and compass of character appeared through the
same transparent medium. But you may just visit Miss
Alice for half-an-hour to-night and judge for yourselves.
You may walk into this little parlour. There sits Misa
Alice on that sofa, sewing a pair of lace sleeves tnto a
satin dress, in which peculiarly angelic employment she
may persevere till we have finished another sketch.

Do you see that pretty little lady, with sparkling eyes,
elastic form, beautiful hand and foot, that is sitting

-



a4 FRANKNESS.

opposite to her? She is a belle: the character is written
in her face—it sparkles from-her eye—it dimples in her
smile, and pervades the whole woman.

- But there—Alice has risen, and is gone to the mirror,
and is arranging the finest auburn hair in the world in
the most tasteful manner. The little lady watches every
motion as comically as a kitten watches a pin-ball.

“Tt is all in vain to deny it, Alice~you are really
anxious to look pretty this evening,” said she.

“I certainly am,” said Alice, quietly.

- AY and you hope you shall please Mr. A. and Mr.
B.,” said the little accusing angel.

“Certainly I do,” said Alice, as she twisted her dane
in a beautiful curl.

“Well, I would not tell of it, Alice, if I did.”

“Then you should not ask me,” said Alice.

“TI declare! Alice!”

“And what do you declare ?”

“T never saw such a girl as you are!”

“Very likely,” said Alice, stooping to pick up a pin.

“Well, for my part,” said the little lady, “I never
would take any pains to make anybody like me—parti-
cularly a gentleman.”

“JT would,” said Alice, “if they would not like me
without,”

“Why, Alice! I should not think you were so fond of
adimiration.”

“T like to be admired very much,” said Alice, return-
ing to the sofa, “and I suppose everybody else does,”

“JZ don’t care about admiration,” said the little lady,





FRANKNESS. 35
ie ee

“T would be as well satisfied that people shouldn’t like
me as that they should.”

“Then, cousin, I think it’s a pity we all like you so
well,” said Alice, with a good-humoured smile. If Miss
Alice had penetration, she never made a severe use of it.

“ But really, cousin,” said the little lady, “I should
not think such a girl as you would think anything about
dress, or admiration, and all that.”

“TI don’t know what sort of a girl you think I am,”
said Alice, “but, for my own part, J only pretend to be
a common human being, and am not ashamed of common
human feelings. If God has made us so that we love
admiration, why should we not honestly say so. J love
it—you love it—everybody loves it ; and why should not
everybody say it?”

“ Why, yes,” said the little lady, “I suppose everybody
has a—-has a—a general love for admiration. Iam willing
to acknowledge that J have; but—”

“But you have no love for it in particular,” said
Alice, “I suppose you mean to say ; that is just the way
the matter is commonly disposed of. Everybody is will-
ing to acknowledge a general wish for the good opinion
of others, but half the world are ashamed to own it when
it comes to a particular case. Now I have made up my
mind, that if it is correct in general, it is correct in par-
ticular, and I mean to own it both ways.”

“ But, somehow, it seems mean!” said the little lady.

“It is mean to live for it, to be selfishly engrossed in
it, but not mean to enjoy it when it comes, or even to
seek it, if we neglect no higher interest in doing so, All



36 FRANKNESS.



that God made us to feel is dignified and Bare, unless
we pervert it.”

“ But, Alice, I never heard any person aa out so
frankly as you do.”

* Almost all that is innocent and selene may be spoken
out ; and as for that which is not innocent and natural,
it ought not even to be thought.”

“ But can everything be spoken that may be thought?”
said the lady.

“No; we have an instinct which teaches us to be
silent sometimes: but, if we speak at all, let it be in
simplicity and sincerity.”

“Now, for instance, Alice,” said the lady, “ it is very
innocent and natural, as you say, to think this, that, and
the other good thing of yourself, especially when every-
body is telling you of it; now, would you speak the
truth if any one asked you on this point 2”

“Tf it were a person who had a right to ask, and if it
were a proper time and place, I would,” said Alice.

“ Well, then,” said the bright lady, “I ask you, Alice,
in this very proper time and place, do you think that you
are handsome ?”

“Now I suppose you expect me to make a courtesy to
every chair in the room before I answer,” said Alice ;
“but, dispensing with that ceremony, I will tell you
fairly, I think I am.”

* Do you think that you are good ?”

* Not entirely,” said Alice,

“ Well, but don’t you think you are better than most
people 7”



FRANKNESS. 37



“ As far as I can tell, I think I am better than some
people ; but really, cousin, I don’t trust my own judg-
ment in this matter,” said Alice.

“Well, Alice, one more question. Do you think
James Martyrs likes you or me best ?” :

“I do not know,” said Alice. |

“T did not ask you what you knew, but what you
thought,” said the lady; “you must have some thought
about it.”

“Well, then, I think he likes me best,” said Alice.

Just then the door opened, and in walked the identical
James Martyrs. Alice blushed, looked a little comical,
and went on with her none while the little lady
began,

“ Really, Mr. James, I wish you had coitie a mintité
sooner, to hear Alice’s confessions.”

“What has she confessed ?” said James.

“Why, that she is handsomer and better than most
folks.”

“That is nothing to be ashamed of,” said James.

“Oh, that’s not all; she wants to look pretty, and
loves to be admired, and all—”

‘* It sounds very much like her,” said James, looking
at Alice.

“Oh, but, besides that,” said the lady, “she has been
preaching a discourse in justification of vanity and self-
love—”

“ And next time you shall take notes when I preach,”
said Alice, “for I don’t think your memory is remark-
ably happy.”



38 - FRANKNESS.



“You see, James,” said the lady, “that Alice makes
it a point to say exactly the truth when she speaks at
all, and I’ve been puzzling her with questions. I really
wish you would ask her some, and see what she will say.
But mercy! there is Uncle C. come to take me to ride.
I must run.” And off flew the little humming-bird,
leaving James and Alice téte-d-téte.

“ There really is one question—” said James, clearing
his voice.

Alice looked up.

“ There is one question, Alice, which I wish you would
answer.”

Alice did not inquire what the question was, but
began to look very solemn ; and just then the door was
shut—and so I never knew what it was that Alice's
friend James wanted to be. enlightened about,



FECLING. 89.

LL



FEELING.



Some wander through a rugged way,
Forsaken and opprest ;
While others, cheer’d by Fortune's ray,
Through Pleasure’s laughing region stray,
In rainbow colours drest,
IF, HEMANS.

a is one way of studying human nature, which

surveys mankind only as a set of instruments for the
accomplishment of personal plans. There is another,
which regards them simply as a gallery of pictures, to
be admired or laughed at as the caricature or the beau
ideal predominates. A third way regards them as human
beings, having hearts that can suffer and enjoy, that can
be improved or be ruined; as those who are linked to us
by mysterious reciprocal influences, by the common dan-
gers of a present existence, and the uncertain ties of a
future one; as presenting, wherever we mect them,
claims on our sympathy and assistance.

Those who adopt the last method are interested in
human beings, not so much by present attractions as by
their capabilities as intelligent, immortal beings; by a
high belief of what every mind may attain in an im-



40 FEELING,



mortal existence ; by anxieties for its temptations and
dangers, and often by the perception of errors and faults
which threaten its ruin. The two first modes are adopted
by the great mass of society; the last is the office of
those few scattered stars in the sky of life, who look
down on its dark selfishness to remind us that there is a
. world of light and love.

To this class did He belong, whose rising and setting
on earth were for the “healing of the nations ;” and to
this class has belonged many a pure and devoted spirit
—like him, shining to cheer—like him, fading away
into the heavens. To this class many a one wishes to
belong, who has an eye to distinguish the divinity of
virtue, without the resolution to attain it; who, while
they sweep along with the selfish current of society, still
regret that society is not different—that they them-
selves are not different. If this train of thought has no
very particular application to what follows, it was never-
theless suggested by it, and of its relevancy others must
judge.

Look into this school-room. It is a warm, sleepy
afternoon in July; there is scarcely air enough to stir the
leaves of the tall buttonwood-tree before the door, or to
lift the loose leaves of the copybook in the window; the
sun has been diligently shining into those curtainless
west windows ever since three o’clock, upon those blotted
and mangled desks, and those decrepit and tottering
benches, and that great arm-chair, the high place of
authority.

You can faintly hear, about the door, the “craw,



FEELING. 4l

i
eraw,” of some neighbouring chickens, who have stepped
around to consider the dinner-baskets, and pick up the
crumbs of the noon’s repast. Fora marvel the busy
school is still, because, in truth, it is too warm to stir.
You will find nothing to disturb your meditation on
character, for you cannot hear the beat of those little
hearts, nor the bustle of all those busy thoughts.

Now look around. Who of these is the most interest-
ing? Is it that tall, slender, hazel.eyed boy, with a
glance like a falcon, whose elbows rest on his book as he
gazes out on the great buttonwood-tree, and is calcu-
lating how he shall fix his squirrel-trap when school is
out? Or is it that curly-headed little rogue, who is
shaking with repressed laughter at seeing a chicken roll
over in a dinner-basket? Or is it that arch boy with
black eyelashes, and deep, mischievous dimple in his
cheeks, who is slyly fixing a fishhook to the skirts of the
master’s coat, yet looking as abstracted as Archimedes
whenever the good man turns his head that way? No;
these are intelligent, bright, beautiful, but it is not these.

Perhaps, then, it is that sleepy little girl, with golden
curls and @ mouth like a half-blown rose-bud? See!
the small brass thimble has fallen to the floor, her patch-
work drops from her lap, her blue eyes close like two
sleepy violets, her little head is nodding, and she sinks
on her sister’s shoulder ; surely itis she. No, it is not.

But look in that corner: do you see that boy with
such a gloomy countenance—so vacant, yet so ill-na-
tured? He is doing nothing, and he very seldom does
anything. He is surly and gloomy in his looks and



42 PEELING. ;
SUEEIEEEEememeneeeeee ee
actions. He never showed any more aptitude for saying

or doing a pretty thing, than his straight white hair
does for curling. He is regularly blamed and punished
every day, and the more he is blamed and punished, the
worse he grows. None of the boys and girls in school
will play with him, or if they do, they will be sorry for
it. And every day the master assures him that “he
does not know what to do with him,” and that he
“makes him more trouble than any boy in school,” with
similar judicious information, that has a striking ten-
dency to promote improvement. That is the boy to
whom I apply the title of “the most interesting one.”

He is interesting because he is not pleasing ; because
he has bad habits ; because he does wrong ; because he
is always likely to do wrong. He is interesting because
. he has become what he is now by means of the very tem-
perament which often makes the noblest virtue. It is
feeling, acuteness of feeling,which has given that counte-
nance its expression, that character its moroseness.

He has no father, and that long-suffering friend, his
mother, is gone too. Yet he has relations, and kind
ones too ; and, in the compassionate language of worldly
charity, it may be said of him, “ He would have nothing
of which to complain, if he would only behave himself.”

His little sister is always bright, always pleasant and
cheerful; and his friends say, “ Why should not he be so
too ? he is in exactly the same circumstances.” No, he
is not. In one circumstance they differ. He has a mind
to feel and remember almost everything that can pain
him ; she can feel and remember but little. If you



FEELING, 43,

ani
blame him, he is exasperated, gloomy, and cannot forget
it. If you blame her, she can say she has done wrong in
a moment, and all is forgotten. Her mind cau no more
be wounded than the little brook: where she loves to play.
The bright waters close in a moment, and smileand prat-
tle as merry as before.

Which is the most desirable temperament ? It would
be hard to say.. The power of feeling is necessary for all
that is noble in man, and yet it involves the greatest
risks. They who catch at happiness on the bright sur-
face of things, secure a portion, such as it is, with more
certainty ; those who dive for it in the waters of deep
feeling, if they succeed, will bring up pearls and dia-
monds, but if they sink they are lost for ever!

But now comes Saturday, and school is just out. Can
any one of my readers remember the rapturous prospect
of a long, bright Saturday afternoon? “ Where are you
going 7” “ Will you come and seeme ?” “ We are going
a fishing!” “ Let us goa strawberrying !” may be heard
rising from the happy group. But no one comes near
the ill-humoured James, and the little party going to
visit his sister ‘ wish James was out of the way.” He
sees every motion, hears every whisper, knows, suspects,
feels it all, and turns to go home more sullen and ill-
tempered -than common. ‘The world looks dark—no-
body loves him—and he is told that it is “all his own
fault,” and that makes the matter still worse.

When the little party arrive, he is suspicious and irri-
table, and, of course, soon excommunicated. ‘Then, as
he stands in disconsolate anger, locking over the garden



44 FEELING.

eee
fence at the gay group making dandelion chains, and
playing baby-house under the trees, he wonders why he
is not like other children. He wishes he were different,
and yet he does not know what to do. He looks around,
and everything is blooming and bright. His little bed
of flowers is even brighter and sweeter than ever before,
and a new rose is just opening on his rose-bush.

There goes pussy too, racing and scampering, with
little Ellen after her, in among the alleys and flowers ;
and the birds are singing in the trees; and the soft
winds brush the blossoms of the sweet-pea against his
cheek ; and yet, though all nature looks on him so kindly,
he is wretched.

Let us now change the scene. Why is that crowded
assembly so attentive—so silent? Who is speaking ?
It is our old friend, the little disconsolate schoolboy.
But his eyes are flashing with intellect, his face fervent
with emotion, his voice breathes like music, and every
mind is enchained.

Again, it is a splendid sunset, and yonder enthusiast
meets it face to face, as a friend. He is silent—rapt—
happy. He feels the poetry which God has written ; he
is touched by it, as God meant that the feeling spirit
should be touched.

Again, he is watching by the bed of sickness, and it is
blessed to have such a watcher! anticipating every
want ; relieving, not in a cold, uninterested way, but
with the quick perceptions, the tenderness, the gentle-
ness of an angel.

Follow him into the circle of friendship, and why is



FEELING. 45

eee
he so loved and trusted ’ Why can you so easily tell to
him what you can say to no one else besides? Why is
it that all around him feel that he can understand,
appreciate, be touched by all that touches them ?

And when heaven uncloses its doors of light—when
all its knowledge, its purity, its bliss, rises on the eye
and passes into the soul, who then will be looked on as
the one who might be envied—he who can, or he who
cannot feel #



46 TIIE SEMPSTRESS.

Lt te ce



ee
——

THE SEMPSTRESS,

_

Tew, save the poor, feel for the poor;
The rich know not how hard

It is to be of needful food

And needful rest debarr’d.

Their paths are paths of plenteousness:
They sleep on silk and down;

They never think how wearily

The weary head lies down.

They never by the window sit,
And see the gay pass by,

Yet take their weary work again,
And with a mournful eye.

L. FE. B,



Fy or even fine and elevated, in a sentimental

point of view, may have been the poetry of this
gifted writer, we think we have never seen anything
from this source that ought to give a better opinion of
her than the little ballad from which the above verses
are taken,

They show that the accomplished authoress possessed,
not merely a knowledge of the dreamy ideal wants of
human beings, but the more pressing and homely ones,
which the fastidious and poetical are often the last to
appreciate, The sufferings of poverty are not confined





THE SEMPSTRESS, 47



to those of the common, squalid, every-day-inured to
hardships, and ready, with open Aa to teceive cha-
rity, let it come to them as it will. There is another
class on whom it presses with still heavier power:
the generous, the decent, the self-respecting, who have
struggled with their lot in silence, “ bearing all things,
hoping all things,” and willing to endure all things,
rather than breathe a word of complaint, or to acknow-
ledge, even to themselves, that their own efforts will not
be sufficient for their own necessities.

Pause with me a while at the door of yonder small
room, whose small window overlooks a little court below.
It is inhabited by a widow and her daughter, dependent
entirely on the labours of the needle, and those other
slight and precarious resources, which are all that remain
to woman when left to struggle her way “ through this
bleak world alone.” It contains all their small earthly
store, and there is scarce an article of its Jittle stock of
furniture that has not been thought of, and toiled for,
and its price calculated over and over again, before
everything could come right for its purchase. Every
article is arranged with the utmost neatness and care ;
nor is the most costly furniture of a fashionable parlour
more sedulously guarded from a scratch or a rub, than
is that brightly-varnished bureau, and that neat cherry
tea-table and bedstead. The floor, too, boasted once a
carpet; but old Time has been busy with it, picking a
hole here, and making a thin place there; and though
the old fellow has been followed up by the most indefa-
tigable zeal in darning, the marks of his mischievous



48 THE SEMPSTRESS,

eens

fingers are too plain to be mistaken. It is true, a kindly
neighbour has givema bit of faded baize, which has been
neatly clipped and bound, and spread down over an en-
tirely unmanageable hole in front of the fire-place ; and
other places have been repaired with pieces of different
colours; and yet, after all, it is evident that the poor
carpet is not long for this world,

But the best face is put upon everything. The little
cupboard in the corner, that contains a few china cups,
and one or two antiquated silver spoons, relics of better
days, is arranged with jealous neatness, and the white
muslin window-curtain, albeit the muslin be old, has been
carefully whitened, and starched, and smoothly ironed,
and put up with exact precision; and on the bureau,
covered by a snowy cloth, are arranged a few books and
other memorials of former times, and a faded miniature,
which, though it have little about it to interest a stranger,
is more precious to the poor widow than everything
besides,

Mrs, Ames is seated in her rocking-chair, supported by
a pillow, and busy cutting out work, while her daughter,
a slender, sickly-looking girl, is sitting by the window,
intent on some fine stitching,

Mrs. Ames, in former days, was the wife of.a respecta-
ble merchant, and the mother of an affectionate family,
But evil fortune had followed her with a steadiness that
seemed like the stern decree of some adverse fate rather
than the ordinary dealings of a merciful Providence,
First came a heavy run of losses in business; then long
and expensive sickness in the family, and the death of.



{HE SEMPSTRESS. 49

ee

children. Then there was the selling of the large house
and elegant furniture, to retire to a humbler style of
living; and, finally, the sale of all the property, with the
view of quitting the shores of a native land, and com-
mencing life again ina new one. But scarcely had the
exiled family found themselves in the port of a foreign
land, when the father was suddenly smitten down by the
hand of death, and his lonely grave made in a land of
strangers. The widow, broken-hearted and discouraged,
had still a wearisome journey before her ere she could
reach any whom she could consider as her friends. With
her two daughters, entirely unattended, and with her
finances impoverished by detention and sickness, she per-
formed the tedious journey.

Arrived at the place of her destination, she found her-
self not only without immediate resources, but consider-
ably in debt to one who had advanced money for her
travelling expenses. With silent endurance she met the
necessities of her situation. Her daughters, delicately
reared, and hitherto carefully educated, were placed out
to service, and Mrs. Ames sought for employment as a
nurse. The younger child fell sick, and the hard earn-
ings of the mother were all exhausted in the care of her;
and though she recovered in part, she was declared by
her physician to be the victim of a disease which would
never leave her till it terminated her life.

* As soon, however, as her daughter was so far restored
as not to need her immediate care, Mrs. Ames resumed
her laborious employment. Scarcely had she been able,
in this way, to discharge the debts for her journey, and
D



50. THE SEMPSTRESS,

—_—_—



to furnish the small room we have described, when the
hand of disease was laid heavily on herself. Too resolute
and persevering to give way to the first attacks of pain
and weakness, she still continued her fatiguing employ-
ment till her system was entirely prostrated. Thus all
possibility of pursuing her business was cut off, and no-
thing remained but what could be accomplished by her
own and her daughter’s dexterity at the needle. It is at
this time we ask you to look in upon the mother and
daughter.

Mrs. Ames is sitting up, the first time for a week, and
even to-day she is scarcely fit to do so; but she remem-
bers that the month is coming round, and her rent will
soon be due; and even in her feebleness she will stretch
every nerve to meet her engagements with punctilious
exactness,

Wearied at length with cutting out, and measuring,
and drawing threads, she leans back in her chair, and
her eye rests on the pale face of her daughter, who has
been sitting for two hours intent on her stitching.

“Ellen, my child, your head aches; don’t work so
steadily,”

“ Oh no, it don’t ache much,” said she, too conscious of
looking very much tired. Poor girl, had she remained
in the situation in which she was born, she would now
have been skipping about, and enjoying life as other
young girls of fifteen do; but now there is no choice of
employments forher—no youthful companions—no visit-
ing—no pleasant walks in the fresh air, Evening and
morning, it is all the same ; headache or sideache, it ig



THE SEMPSTRUSS. §1

—_—_—_

all one, She must hold on the same unvarying task ; a
wearisome thing for a girl of fifteen !

But see, the door opens, and Mrs. Ames’s face bright-
ens as her other daughter enters. Mary has become a
domestic in a neighbouring family, where her faithful-
ness and kindness of heart have caused her to be regard-
ed more as a daughter and a sister than as a servant.
“ Here, mother, is your rent-money,” she exclaimed, “ so
do put up your work and rest a while. I can get enough
to pay it next time before the month comes round
again.”

“ Dear child! I do wish you would ever think to get
anything for yourself,” said Mrs. Ames; “ I cannot con-
sent to use up all your earnings, as I have done lately,
and all Ellen’s too: you must have a new dress this
spring, and that bonnet of yours is not decent any
longer.”

“Oh no, mother; I have fixed over my blue calico,
and you will be surprised to see how well it looks ; and
my best frock, when it is washed and darned, will answer
some time longer. And then Mrs. Grant has given me a
riband, and when my bonnet is whitened and trimmed, it
will look very well. And so,” she added, “I brought
you some wine this afternoon ; you know the doctor says
you need wine.”

“Dear child! I want to see you take some comfort of
your money yourself.”

“Well, I do take comfort of it, mother. It is more

comfort to be able to help you than to wear all the finest
_ dresses in the world,”



52 THE SEMPSTRESS.



Two months from this dialogue found our little family
still more straitened and perplexed. Mrs. Ames had
been confined all the.time with sickness, and the greater
part of Ellen’s time and strength was occupied with
attending to her.

Very little sewing could the poor girl now do, in the
broken intervals that remained to her; and the wages
of Mary were not only used as fast as she earned, but
she anticipated two months in advance.

Mrs. Ames had been better fora day or two, and had
been sitting up, exerting all her strength to finish a set
of shirts which had been sent in to make. “The money
for them will just pay your rent,” sighed she ; “and if
we can do a little more this week —”

“ Dear mother, you are so tired,” said Ellen, “do lie
down, and not worry any more till I come back.”

Ellen went out and passed on till she came to the
door of an elegant house, whose damask and muslin
window-curtains indicated a fashionable residence.

Mrs. Elmore was sitting in her splendidly-furnished
parlour, and around her lay various fancy articles, which
two young girls were busily unrolling. “ What a lovely
pink scarf!” said one, throwing it over her shoulders and
skipping before a mirror; while the other exclaimed,
“Do look at these pocket-handkerchiefs, mother! what
elegant lace !” .

“Well, girls,” said Mrs, Elmore, “these handkerchiefs
are a shameful piece of extravagance, I wonder you will
insist on haying such things,”

“La! mamma, everybody has such now; Laura Sey-



THE SEMPSTRESS. . 53

mour has half a dozen that cost more than these, and her
father is no richer than ours.”

“ Well,” said Mrs. Elmore, “ rich or not rich, it seems
to make very little odds; we do not seem to have half as
much money to spare as we did when we lived in the lit-
tle house in Spring Street. What with new furnishing
the house, and getting everything you boys and girls say
you must have, we are poorer, if anything, than we were
then.”

“ Ma’am, here is Mrs. Ames’s girl come with some
sewing,” said the servant.

“ Show her in,” said Mrs, Elmore.

Ellen entered timidly, and handed her bundle of work
to Mrs. Elmore, who forthwith proceeded to a minute
scrutiny of the articles; for she prided herself on being
very particular as to her sewing. But, though the work
had been executed by feeble hands and aching eyes, even
Mrs. Elmore could detect no fault in it.”

“ Well, it is very prettily done,” said she; “ what docs
your mother charge ?”

Ellen handed a neatly-folded bill which she had drawn
for her mother. “I must say, I think your mother’s
prices are very high,” said Mrs. Elmore, examining her
nearly empty purse; “ every thing is getting so dear that
one hardly knows how to live.’ Ellen looked at the
fancy articles, and glanced around the room with an air
of innocent astonishment. “ Ah!’ said Mrs. Elmore, “I
dare say it seems to you as if persons in our situation
had no need of economy; but, for my part, I feel the
. need of it more and more every day.” As she spoke



54 THE SEMPSTRESS.



she handed Ellen the small sum, which, though it was
not a quarter the price of one of the handkerchiefs,
was all that she and her sick mother could claim in the
world.

“There,” said she; “tell your mother I like her work
very much, but I do not think I can afford to employ
her, if I can find any one to work cheaper.”

Now Mrs. Elmore was not a hard-hearted woman, and
if Ellen had come as a beggar to solicit help for her sick
mother, Mrs. Elmore would have fitted out a basket of
provisions, and sent a bottle of wine, and a bundle of old
clothes, and all the et cetera of such occasions; but the
sight of @ bil/ always aroused all the instinctive sharp-
ness of her business-like education. She never had the
dawning of an idea that it was her duty to pay anybody
any more than she could possibly help ; nay, she had an
indistinct notion that it was-her duty as an economist to
make everybody take as little as possible. When she and
her daughters lived in Spring Street, to which she had
alluded, they used to spend the greater part of their time
at home, and the family sewing was commonly done
among themselves; but since they had moved into a
large house, and set up a carriage, and addressed them-
selves to being gentecl, the girls found that they had
altogether too much to do to attend to their own sewing,
much less to perform any for their father and brothers.
And their mother found her hands abundantly full in
overlooking her large house, in taking care of expensive
furniture, and in superintending her increased train of
servants. The sewing, therefore, was put out; and Mrs.



THE SEMPSTRESS, 55

——— —_—

Elmore felt 2¢ a duty to get it done the cheapest way she
could. Nevertheless, Mrs. Elmore was too notable a lady,
and her sons and daughters were altogether too fastidious
as to the make and quality of their-clothing, to’admit the
_ idea of its bemg done in any but the most complete and
perfect manner. ;

Mrs. Elmore never accused herself of want of charity
for the poor; but she had never considered that the best
class of the poor are those who never ask charity. She
did not consider that, by paying liberally those who were
honestly and independently struggling for themselves,
she was really doing a greater charity than by giving in-
discriminately to a dozen applicants.

“ Don’t you think, mother, she says we charge too high
for this work!” said Ellen, when she returned. ‘Iam
sure she did not know how much work we put in those
shirts. She says she cannot give us any more work; she
must look out for somebody that will do it cheaper. I do
not see how it is that people who live in such houses, and
have so many beautiful things, can feel that they cannot
afford to pay for what costs us so much.”

“ Well, child, they are more apt to feel so than people
who live plainer.”

“Well, Iam sure,” said Ellen, “we cannot afford to
spend so much time, as we have over these shirts, for less
money.”

“ Never mind, my dear,” said the mother, soothingly ;
“here isa bundle of work that another lady has sent in,
and if we get it done we shall have enough for our rent,
and something over to buy bread with.”



56 THE SEMPSTRESS,
——nseeeeeeenensnssss hemasamsene i

It is needless to carry our readers over all the process
of cutting and fitting, and gathering and stitching, neces-
sary in making up six fine shirts. Suffice it to say, that
on Saturday evening all but one were finished, and Ellen
proceeded to carry them home, promising to bring the re- .
maining one on Tuesday morning. The lady examined
the work and gave Ellen the money; but on Tuesday,
when the child came with the remaining work, she found
her in great ill-humour, Upon re-examining the shirts,
she had discovered that in some important respects they
differed from directions she meant to have given, and
supposed she had given, and, accordingly, she vented her
displeasure on Ellen.

“Why didn’t you make these shirts as I told you ?”
said she, sharply.

“We did,” said Ellen, mildly ; “mother measured by
the pattern every part, and cut them herself.”

“Your mother must be a fool, then, to make such a
piece of work. I wish you would just take them back,
and alter them over;” and the lady proceeded with the
directions, of which neither Ellen nor her mother, till
then, had had any intimation. Unused to such language,
the frightened Ellen took up her work and slowly walked
homeward,

“Oh dear, how my head does ache!” thought she to
herself; “and poor mother, she said this morning she
was afraid another of her sick turns was coming on, and
we have all this work to pull out and do over.”

“See here, mother !” said she, with a disconsolate
air,as she entered the room; “Mrs, Rudd says, take



THE SEMPSTRESS. 57



TT LL ID

out all the bosoms, and rip off all the collars, and fix
them quite another way. She says they are not like the
pattern she sent ; but she must have forgotten, for here
it is. Look, mother! it is exactly as we made them.”

“Well, my child, carry back the pattern, and show
her that it is so.”

“Indeed, mother, she spoke so cross to me, and looked
at me so, that I do not feel as if I could go back.”

“J will go for you, then,” said the kind Maria Ste-
phens, who had been sitting with Mrs. Ames while Ellen
was out. “I will take the patterns and shirts, and tell
her the exact truth about it: Iam not afraid of her.”
Maria Stephens was a cheerful, resolute, go-forward
little ‘body, and ready always to give a helping hand to
a neighbour in trouble. So she took the pattern and
shirts, and set out on her mission.

But poor Mrs, Ames, though she professed to take a.
right view of the matter, and was very earnest in show-
ing Ellen why she ought not to distress herself about it,
still felt a shivering sense of the hardness and unkind-
ness of the world coming over her. The bitter tears
would spring to her eyes, in spite of every effort to sup-
press them, as she sat mournfully gazing on the little
faded miniature before mentioned. “ When he was alive,
I never knew what poverty or trouble was,” was the
thought that often passed through her mind ; and how
many a poor forlorn one has thought the same!

Poor Mrs. Ames was confined to her bed for most of
that weck. The doctor gave absolute directions that she
should do nothing, and keep entirely quiet,—a direction



58 TIE SEMPSTRESS.,
cnn
very sensible indeed in the chamber of ease and compe-

tence, but hard to be observed in poverty and want.

What pains the kind and dutiful Ellen took that week
to make her mother feel easy! How often she replied to
her anxious questions, “ that she was quite well, or that
her head did not ache much;” and by various other
evasive expedients the child tried to persuade herself that
she was speaking the truth. And during the times her
mother slept, in the day or evening, she accomplished
one or two pieces of plain work, with the price of which
she expected to surprise her mother,

It was towards evening when Ellen took her finished
work to the elegant dwelling of Mrs. Page. “TI shall
get for this,” said she, “enough to pay for midther’s
wine and medicine.”

“This work is done very neatly,” said Mrs. Page,
‘“and here is some more, I should like to haye finished
in the same way.” |

Ellen looked up wistfully, hoping Mrs. Page was
going to pay her for the last work. But Mrs. Page was
only searching a drawer for a pattern, which she put
into Ellen’s hands, and after explaining how she wanted
her work done, dismissed her without saying a word
about the expected payment.

Poor Ellen tried two or three times, as she was going
out, to turn round and ask for it, and before she could
decide what to say she found herself in the street,

Mrs. Page was an amiable, kind-hearted woman, but
one who was so used to large sums of money, that she
did not realize how great an affair a small sum might





THE SEMPSTRESS. 59

eer LLL

seem to other persons. For this reason, when Ellen had
worked incessantly at the new work put into her hands,
that she might get the money for all together, she again
disappointed her in the payment.

“Tl send the money round to- -morrow,” said she,
when Ellen at last found courage to ask for it. But to-
morrow came, and Ellen was forgotten; and it was not»
till after one or two applications more that the small
sum was paid.

But these sketches are already long enough, and let
us Lasten to close them. Mrs. Ames found liberal
friends, who could appreciate and honour her integrity
of principle and loveliness of character, and by their
assistance she was raised to sce more prosperous days;
and she, and the delicate Ellen, and warm-hearted Mary,
were enabled to have a home and fireside of their own,
and to enjoy something like the return of their former
prosperity.

We have given these sketches, drawn from real life,
because we think there is, in general, too little consider-
ation on the part of those who give employment to those
in situations like the widow here described. The giving
af employment is a very important branch of charity,
inasmuch as it assists that class of the poor who are the

most deserving. ‘It should be looked on in this light,
‘ and the arrangements of a family be so made that a
suitable compensation can be given, and prompt and
cheerful payment be made, without the dread of trans-
gressing the rules of economy.

It is better to teach oursdaughters to do without ex-



60 THE SEMPSTRESS,
Oye peacnsennsenensensumeteesatesistnteinenes
pensive ornaments or fashionable clegancies; better even

to deny ourselves the pleasure of large donations or direct
subscriptions to. public charities, rather than to curiail
the small stipend of her “ whose candle gocth not out by
night,” and who labours with her needle for herself
and the helpless dear ones dependent on her exertions.



AUNT MARY. C1

eo A A LED T

AUNT MARY.

wee eee

TTome is possession at the highest cost—
Keen edge the soonest lost,
Yet who would welcome dearth
For fear his plenty should be famine cross’d ?
- Be God beside my hearth!
TOWNSEND.



oo sketching character is the mode, I too take up
my pencil, not to make you laugh, though peradven-
ture it may be to get you to sleep.

Iam now a tolerable old gentleman—an old bachelor,
moreover—and, what is more to the point, an unpretend-
ing and sober-minded one. Lest, however, any of the
ladies should take exceptions against me in the very
outset, I will merely remark, en passant, that a man can
sometimes become an old bachelor because he has too
much heart as well as too little.

Years ago—before any of my readers were born—I
was a little good-for-naught of a boy, of precisely that
unlucky kind who are always in everybody's way, and
always in mischief. I had, to watch over my uprearing,
a father and mother, and a whole army of older brothers
and sisters, My relatives bore a very great resemblance

$



62 AUNT MARY.



to other human beings, neither good angels nor the oppo-
site class, but, as mathematicians say, “in the mean
proportion.”

As I have before insinuated, I was a sort of family
scapegrace among them, and one on whose head all the
domestic trespasses were regularly visited, either by real
actual desert, or by imputation.

For this order of things there was, I confess, a very
solid and serious foundation, in the constitution of my
mind. Whether I was born under some cross-eyed
planet, or whether I was fairy-smitten in my cradle,
certain it is that I was, from the dawn of existence, a
sort of “ Murad the Unlucky ;” an out-of-time, out-of-
place, out-of-form sort of a boy, with whom nothing
prospered,

Who always left open doors in cold weather? it was
Henry. Who was sure to upset his coffee-cup at break-
fast, or to knock over his tumbler at dinner, or to pros-
trate salt-cellar, pepper-box, and mustard-pot, if he only
happened to move his arm? why, Henry. Who was
plate-breaker general for the family? it was Henry.
Who tangled mamma's silks and cottons, and tore up the
last newspaper for papa, or threw down old Phahbe’s
clothes-horse, with all her clean ironing thereupon? why,
Henry.

Now all this was no malice prepense in me, for I
solemnly believe that I was the best-natured boy inthe
world; but something was the matter with the attraction
of cohesion, or the attraction of gravitation—with’ the
general dispensation of matter around me, that; Jef me



AUNT MARY. 63

ee TENS
do what.I would, things would fall down, and break, or
be torn. and damaged, if I only came near them; and
my unluckiness seemed in exact proportion to my care-
fulness in any matter.

If anybody in the room with me had a headache, or
any manner of nervous irritability, which made it parti-
cularly necessary for others to be quict, and if I was in
an especial desire unto the same, I was sure, while
stepping around on tiptoe, to fall headlong over a chair,
which would give an introductory push to the shovel,
which would fall upon the tongs, which would animate
the poker, and altogether would set in action two or
three sticks of wood, and down they would come, with
just that hearty, sociable sort of racket, which showed
that they were disposed to make as much of the oppor-
tunity as possible.

In the same manner, everything that came into my
hand, or was at all connected with me, was sure to lose
by it. If I rejoiced in a clean apron in the morning, I
was sure to make a full-length prostration thereupon on
my way to school, and come home nothing better, but
rather worse. If I was sent on an errand, I was sure
either to lose my money in going, or my purchases in re-
turning ; and on these occasions my mother would often
comfort me with the reflection, that it was well that my
cars were fastened to my head, or I should lose them too.
Of course, I was a fair mark for the constant rebukes
and admonitions, not only of my parents, but of uncles,
aunts, cousins, and officious friends of every degree, who
never failed of some troublesome reproof.



64 AUNT MARY.

re

All this would have been very well if Nature had
not gifted me with a very unnecessary and uncomfort-
able capacity of féding, which, like refined ear for
music, is undesirable, because, in this world, one meets
with discord ninety-nine times, where it meets with har-



mony once. Much, therefore, as I furnished occasion to
be scolded at, I never became used to scolding, so that I
was just as much galled by it the forty-first time as the
first. ‘There was no such thing as philosophy in me; I had
just that unreasonable heart which is neither conformed
nor reconciled to the nature of things. I was timid, and
shrinking, and proud ; Iwas nothing to any one around
me butan awkward, unlucky boy ; nothing to my parents
but one of a haf dozen children, whose faces were to be
washed and stockings mended on Saturday afternoon. If
I was very sick, I had medicine and the doctor ; if I was
a little sick, I was exhorted unto patience; and if I
was sick at heart, I was left to prescribe for myself.

Now all this was very well; what should a child need
but meat, and drink, and room to play, and a school to
teach him reading and writing, and somebody to take care
‘of him when sick ? certainly nothing.

But the feelings of grown-up children exist in the
sninds of little ones oftener than is supposed; and I had,
even at this early day, the same keen sense of all that
touched the heart wrong ; the same longing for somre-
thing which should touch it aright ; thesame discontent
with latent, matter-of-course affection, and the same
craving for sympathy, which has been the unprofitable
fashion of this world in all ages. Aud no human being



AUNT MARY. 65

ncecssaaapaniatantemmmamtamennsnsasiaaiaiiliinnminnnemin
possessing such constitutionals has a better chance of
being made unhappy by them than the backward, unin-
teresting, wrong-doing child. We can all sympathise
to some extent with men and women; but how few can
go back to the sympathies of childhood ; can understand
the desolate insignificance of not being one of the grown-
up people; of being sent to bed, to be out of the way in
the evening, and to school, to be out of the way in the
morning ; of manifold similar grievances and Mistresses
which the child has no elocution to set forth, and the
grown person no imagination to conceive.

When I was seven years old, I was told one morning,
with considerable domestic acclamation, that aunt Mary
was coming to make us a visit ; and so, when the carriage
that brought her stopped at our door, I pulled off my
dirty apron, and ran in among the crowd of brothers and
sisters to see what was coming. I shall not describe her
first appearance, foras I think of her, 1 begin to grow
somewhat sentimental, in spite of my spectacles, and
might, perhaps, talk a little nonsense.

Perhaps every man, whether married or unmarried,
who has lived to the age of fifty or thereabout, has seen
some woman who, in his mind, is the woman in distinc-
tion from all others. She may not have been a relative ;
she may not have been a wife; she may simply have
shone on him from afar ; she may be remembered in the
distance of yearsas a star that is set, as music that is hush-
ed, as beauty and loveliness faded for ever ; but remem-
bered she is with interest, with fervour, with enthusiasm;
with all that heart can feel, and more than words can tell.

EB



66 AUNT MARY.

ee

To me there has been but one such, and that is she
whom I describe. Was she beautiful? youask. I also
will ask you one question: If an angel from heaven
should dwell in human form, and animate any human
face, would not that face be lovely? It might not be
beautiful, but would it not be lovely? She was not beau-
tiful except after this fashion.

How well I remember her, as she used sometimes to
sit thinkfng, with her head resting on her hand, her face
mild and placid, with a quiet October sunshine in her
blue eyes, and an ever-present smile over her whole
countenance. I remember the sudden sweetness of look
when any one spoke to her; the prompt attention, the
quick comprehension of things before you uttered them;
the obliging readiness to leave for you whatever she was
doing.

T'o those who mistake occasional pensiveness for melan-
choly, it might seem strange to say that my Aunt Mary
was always happy. Yet she was so. Her spirits never
rose to buoyancy, and never sunk to despondency. I
know that it is an article in the sentimental confession
of faith that such a character cannot be interesting.
For this impression there is some ground. The placidity
of a medium common-place mind is uninteresting, but
the placidity of a strong and well-governed one borders
on the sublime. Mautability of emotion characterizes
inferior orders of being; but strong self-control, when
guided by the principles of virtue and true religion,
preserves an even temperament in the well-regulated
mind. And while we gaze with wonder and admiration



AUNT MARY. 67



on the great general or statesman, ever at leisure to bestow
all his thoughts on the wants of others, there is some-
what of the same sublimity in the character of that
human being who has so quieted and governed the world
within, that nothing is left to absorb sympathy or distract
attention from those around.

Such a woman was my Aunt Mary. Her placidity
was not so much the result of temperament as of choice.
She had every susceptibility of suffering incident to the
noblest and most delicate construction of mind; but they
‘had been so directed, that instead of concentrating
thought on self, they had prepared her to understand and
feel for others.

She was, beyond all things else, a sympathetic person,
and her character, like the green in a landscape, was less
remarkable for what it was in itself than for its perfect
and beautiful harmony with all the colouring and shad-
ing around it.

Other women have had talents, others have been good;
but no woman that ever I knew possessed goodness and
talent in union with such an intuitive perception of feel-
ings, and such a faculty of instantaneous adaptation to
them. The most troublesome thing in this world is to
be condemned to the society of a person who can never
understand anything you say without you say the whole
of it, making your commas and periods as you go along;
and the most desirable thing in the world is to live with
& person who saves you all the trouble of talking, by
knowing just what you mean to say before you begin.

Something of this kind of talent I began to feel, to



68 AUNT MARY.



my great relief, when Aunt Mary came into the family.
I remember the very first evening, as she sat by the
hearth, surrounded by all the family, her eye glanced on
me with an expression that let me know she saw me;
and when the clock struck eight, and my mother pro-
claimed that it was my bedtime, my countenance fell as
I moved sorrowfully from the back of her rocking: chair,
and’ thought how many beautiful stories Aunt Mary
would tell her after I was gone to bed. She turned
towards me with such a look of real understanding, such
an evident insight into the case, that I went into banish-
ment with a lighter heart than ever I did before. How
‘very contrary is the obstinate estimate of the heart to
the rational estimate of worldly wisdom. Ave there not
some who can remember when one word, one look, or
even the withholding of a word, has drawn their heart
more to a person than all the substantial favours in the
world? By ordinary acceptation, substantial kindness
respects the necessaries of animal existence; while those
wants which are peculiar to mind, and will exist with it
for ever, by equally correct classification, are designated
as sentimental ones, the supply of which, though it will
excite more gratitude in fact, ought not in theory.
Before Aunt Mary had lived with us a month, I loved
her beyond anybody in the world, and a utilitaridn would
have been amused in ciphering out the amount of favours
which produced this result. It was a look—a word—a
smile; it was that she seemed pleased with my new kite;
that she rejoiced with me when I learned to spin a top;
that she alone seemed to estimate my proficiency in play-



AUNT MARY. 69



ing ball and marbles; that she never looked at all vexed
when I upset her workbox upon the floor; that she re-
ceived all my awkward gallantry and mal-adrozt help-
fulness as if it had: been in the best taste in the world;
that when she was sick, she insisted on letting me wait
on her, though I made my customary havock among the
pitchers and tumblers of her room, and displayed, through
my zeal to please, a more than ordinary share of insuf-
ficiency for the station. She also was the only person
that ever I conversed with, and I used to wonder how any-
body who could talk all about matters and things with
grown-up persons, could talk so sensibly about marbles,
and hoops, and skates, and all sorts of little-boy matters;
and I will say, by-the-by, that the same sort of specula-
tion has often occurred to the minds of older people in
connexion with her. She-knew the value of varied infor-
mation in making a woman, not a pedant, but a sympa-
thetic, companionable being, and such she was to almost
every class of mind '

She had, too, the faculty of drawing others up to her
level in conversation, so that I would often find myself
going on in most profound style while talking with her,
and would wonder, when I was through, whether I was
really a little boy still.

When she had enlightened us many months, the time
came for her to take leave, and she besought my mother
to give me to her for company. Ail the family wondered
what she could find to like in Henry; but if she did like
me, it was no matter, and so was the case disposed of.

From that time I dived with her—and there are some



70 AUNT MARY.

mRNA REND
persons who can make the word Zive signify much more
than it commonly does—and she wrought on my character
all those miracles which benevolent genius can work,
She quieted my heart, directed my feelings, unfolded my
mind, and educated me, not harshly, or by force, but as
the blessed sunshine educates the flower, into full and
perfect life; and when all that was mortal of her died to
this world, her words and deeds of unutterable love shed
a twilight around her memory that will fade only in the
brightness of heaven,



UNCLE TIM AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 71h



UNCLE TIM AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE,

—_—_—_-—

A friend indeed, nor less because he claims
A homely bluntness, more than meed of praise
For his benevolent deeds, and by his aims
At other’s good, his own true worth displays.
BRYANT.

p” you ever see the little village of Newbury? I

dare say you never did; for it was just one of
those out-of-the-way places where nobody ever came un-
less they came on purpose: a green little hollow, wedged
like a bird’s nest between half-a-dozen high hills, that
kept off the wind and kept out foreigners; so that the
little place was as straitly “sui generis” as if there were
not another in the world. The inhabitants were all of
that respectable old standfast family who make it a point
to be born, bred, married, die, and be buried all in the
self-same spot. There were just so many houses, and
just so many people lived in them ; and nobody ever
seemed to be sick, or to die either—at least while I was
there. The natives grew old till they could not grow
any older, and then they stood still, and dasted from
generation to generation,



72 UNCLE TIM

aaa

As to manners, morals, arts, and sciences, the people
in Newbury always went to their parties at three o’clock
in the afternoon, and came home before dark; always
stopped all work the minute the sun was down on Satur-
day night; always went to church on Sunday; hada
school-house with all the ordinary inconveniences ; were
in neighbourly charity with each,other; and were con-
tent with such things as they had—the best philosophy,
after all. Such was the place into which Master James
Benton made an irruption in the year eighteen hundred
and no matter what. Now this James is to be our hero,
and he is just the hero for a sensation—at least so you
would have thought, if you had been in Newbury the
week after his arrival. Master James was one of those
whole-hearted, energetic men, who rise in the world as
naturally as cork does in water. He possessed a great
share of that characteristic national trait denominated
acuteness, which signifies an ability to do everything
without trying, and to know everything without learning,
and to make more use of one’s ignorance than other
people do of their knowledge. This quality in James
was mingled with a great elasticity of animal spirits
and a buoyant cheerfulness of mind.

As to the personal appearance of our hero, we have
not much to say of it. There was a saucy frankness of
countenance, a knowing roguery of eye, and a joviality
of demeanour, that was wonderfully captivating, espe-
cially to the ladies.

It is true that Master James had an uncommonly com-
fortable opinion of himself, a full faith that there was



AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 73

—_--



nothing in creation that he could not learn and could
notdo; and this faith was maintained with an abound-
ing and triumphant joyfulness, that fairly carried your
sympathies along with him, and made you feel quite as
much delighted with his qualifications and prospects as
he felt himself. There are two kinds of self-sufficiency;
one is amusing, and the other is provoking. His was the
amusing kind. It seemed, in truth, to be only the buoy-=
ancy and overflow of a vivacious mind, delighted with
everything that is delightful, in himself or others. He
was always ready to magnify his own praise, but quite as
ready to exalt his neighbour, if the channel of discourse
‘yan that way: his own perfections being more completely
within his knowledge, he rejoiced in them more con-
stantly ; but, if those of any one else came within the
same range, he was quite as much astonished and edified
as if they had been his own.

Master James, at the time of his transit to the town
of Newbury, was only eighteen years of age, so that it
was difficult to say which predominated in him most,
the boy or the man. The belief that he could, and the
determination that he would be something in the world,
had caused him to abandon his home, and, with all his
worldly effects tied in a blue cotton pocket-hankerchief,
to proceed to seek his fortune in Newbury. And never
did stranger rise to promotion with more unparalleled
rapidity, or boast a greater plurality of employment.
He figured as schoolmaster all the week, and as chorister
on Sundays, and taught singing and reading in the
evenings, besides studying Latin and Greek with the



74 UNCLE TIM

minister, nobody knew when; thus fitting for college,
while he seemed to be doing everything else in the world
besides,

James understood every art and craft of popularity,
and made himself mightily at home in all the chimney
corners of the region round about ; knew the geography
of everybody’s cider-barrel and apple-bin, helping him-
self and every one else therefrom with all bountifulness;
rejoicing in the good things of this life, devouring the
old ladies’ doughnuts and apple-pies with most flattering
appetite, and appearing equally to relish everybody and
thing that came in his way.

The degree and versatility of his acquirements were
truly wonderful. Ie knew all about arithmetic and
history, and all about catching squirrels and planting
corn; made poetry and hoe handles with equal celerity;
wound yarn and took out grease spots for old ladies, and
made nosegays and knick-knacks for young ones. In

short, Master James moved on through the place
“ Victorious,
Happy and glorious,”

welcomed and privileged by everybody in every place;
and when he had told his last ghost-story, and fairly
flourished himself out of doors at the close of a long
winter’s evening, you might see the hard face of the
good man of the house still phosphorescent with his de-
parting radiance, and hear him exclaim, in a paroxysm
of admiration, that “ James really did beat all—that
he ‘was certainly a marvellous fellow!”

It was wonderfully contrary to the buoyant activity of
Master James’s mind to keepa school. He had, more-





AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 75



over, so much of the boy and the rogue in his composi-
tion, that he could not be strict with the iniquities of the
curly pates under his charge; and when he saw how de-
terminedly every little heart was boiling over with mis-
chief and motion, he felt in his soul more disposed to
join in and help them to a frolic, than to lay justice to the
line, as was meet. ‘This would have made a sad case,
had it not been that the activity of the master’s mind
communicated itself to his charge, just as the reaction of
one brisk little spring will fill a manufactory with mo-
tion; so that there was more of an impulse towards study
in the golden good-natured day of James Benton, than
in the time of all that went before or came after him.

But, when “school was out,” James’s spirits foamed
over as naturally as a tumbler of soda-water, and he
could jump over benches and burst out of doors with as
much rapture as the veriest little elf in his company.
Then you might have seen him stepping homeward with
a most felicitous expression of countenance, occasionally
reaching his hand through the fence for a bunch of cur-
rants, or over it after a flower, or stopping to pay his
devoirs to Aunt This or Mistress That—for James well
knew the importance of the “powers that be,” and
always kept the sunny side of the old ladies.

We shall not answer for James’s general flirtations,
which were sundry and manifold; for he had just the
kindly heart that fell in love with everything in feminine
shape that came in his way, and if he had not. been
blessed with an equal faculty for falling out again, we do
not know what ever would have become of him, But at



76 UNCLE TIM

length he came into an abiding captivity, and it is quite
time that he should; for, having devoted thus much ~
space to the illustration of our hero, it is fit we should do
something in behalf of our heroine; and, therefore, we
must beg the reader’s attention while we draw a dia-
gram or two that will assist him in gaining a right idea
of her.

Do you see yonder brown house, with its broad roof
sloping almost to the ground on one side, and a great,
unsupported, sun-bonnet of a piazza shooting out over
the front door? You must often have noticed it; you
have seen its tall well-sweep, relieved against the clear
evening sky, or observed the feather beds and bolsters
lounging out of its chamber-windows on a still summer
morning ; you recollect its gate, that swung with a chain
and a great stone; its pantry-window, latticed with little
brown slabs, and looking out upon a forest of bean-poles.
You remember the zephyrs that used to play among its
pea-brush, and shake the long tassels of its corn-patch,
and how vainly any zephyr might essay to perform simi-
lar flirtations with the considerate cabbages that were
solemnly vegetating near by. Then there was the whole
neighbourhood of purple-leaved beets and feathery pars-
nips; there were the billows of gooseberry bushes rolled
up by the fence, interspersed with rows of quince-trees ;
and far off in one corner was one little patch penuriously
devoted to ornament, which flamed with marigolds, pop-
pies, snappers, and four-o’clocks.

That is the dwelling of Uncle Timothy Griswold.
Uncle Tim, as he was commonly called, had a character



AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACKE. 77



LLL

that a painter would sketch for its lights and contrasts
rather than its symmetry. He was a chestnut burr,
abounding with briers without and with substantial
goodness within. He had the strong-grained practical
sense, the calculating worldly wisdom of his class of peo-
ple in New England : he had, too, a kindly heart, but the
whole strata of his character were crossed by a vein of
surly petulance, that, half-way between joke and earnest,
coloured everything that he said and did.

If you asked a favour of Uncle Tim, he generally kept
you arguing half-an-hour, to prove that you really
needed it, and to tell you that he could not all the while
be troubled with helping one body or another, all which
time you might observe him regularly making his prepa-
rations to grant your request, and see, by an odd glimmer
of his eye, that he was preparing to let you hear the cons
clusion of the whole matter, which was, “ Well, well—I
guess—I ’spose I must, at least ” so off he would go and
work while the day lasted, and then wind up with a fare-
well exhortation, “not to be callin’ on your neighbours
when you could get along without.” If any of Uncle
Tim’s neighbours were in any trouble, he was always at
hand to tell them “that they shouldn’t a’ done so;” that
“it was strange they couldn’t had more sense ;’ and then
to close his exhortations by labouring more diligently
than any to bring them out of their difficulties, groaning
in spirit, meanwhile, that folks would make people so
much trouble.

“Uncle Tim, father wants to know if you will lend
him your hoe to-day ?” says a little boy, making his way
across a corn-field.



78 UNCLE TIM



“ Why don’t your father use his own hoe ?”

“ Ours is broke.”

“Broke! How came it broke ?”

“T broke it yesterday, trying to hit a squirrel.”

“What business had you to be hittin’ squirrels with a
hoe? say?”

“ But father wants to borrow yours.”

“Why don’t he have that mended? It’s a great pester
to have everybody usin’ a body’s things.”

“ Well, I can borrow one somewhere else, I suppose,”
says the suppliant. After the boy has stumbled across
the ploughed ground and is fairly over the fence, Uncle
Tim calls,

“ Halloo, there, you little rascal! what are you goin’
off without the hoe for ?”’

“T didn’t know as you meant to lend it.”

“T did’nt say I wouldn’t, did I? Here, come and
take it—stay, ll bring it; and do tell your father not to
be a-lettin’ you hunt squirrels with his hoes next time.”

Uncle Tim’s household consisted ,of Aunt Sally, his
wife, and an only son and daughter; the former, at the
time our story begins, was at a neighbouring literary in-
stitution. Aunt Sally was precisely as clever, as easy to
be eutreated, and kindly in externals, as her helpmate
was the reverse. She was one of those respectable, plea-
sant old ladies whom you might often have met on the
way to church on a Sunday, equipped with a great fan
and a psalm-book, and carrying some dried orange-peel
or a staik of fennel, to give to the children if they were
sleepy in meeting. She was as cheerful and domestic as



AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 79

eee emanate tite:
the tea-kettle that sung by her kitchen fire, and slipped
along among Uncle Tim’s angles and peculiarities as if
there never was anything the matter in the world; and
the same mantle of sunshine seemed to have fallen on
Miss Grace, her only daughter.

Pretty in her person and pleasant in her ways, en-
dowed with native self-possession and address, lively and
chatty, having a mind and a will of her own, yet good-hu-
moured withal, Miss Grace was a universal favourite. It
would have puzzled a city lady to understand how Grace,
who never was out of Newbury in her life, knew the way
to speak, and act, and behave, on all occasions, exactly as
if she had been taught how. She was just one of those
wild flowers which you may sometimes see waving its
little head in the woods, and looking so civilized and gar-
den-like, that you wonder if it really did come up and
grow there by nature. She was an adept in all household
concerns, and there was something amazingly pretty in
her energetic way of bustling about, and “ putting things
to rights.” Like many other damsels, she had a longing
after the tree of knowledge, and having exhausted the
literary fountains of a district school, she fell to reading
whatsoever came in her way. True, she had but little to
read; but what she perused she had her own thoughts
upon, so that a person of information, in talking with
her, would feel a constant wondering pleasure to find
that she had so much more to say of this, that, and the
other thing, than he expected.

Uncle Tim, like every one else, felt the magical bright-
ness of his daughter, and was delighted with her praises,



80 UNCLE TIM

el

as might be discerned by his often finding occasion to
remark, that “he didn’t see why the boys need to be all
the time a’ comin’ to see Grace, for she was nothing so
extror’nary, after all.” About all matters and things at
home she generally had her own way, while Uncle Tim
would scold and give up with a regular good grace that
was quite creditable.

“ Father,” says Grace, “I want to have a party next
week.”

“ You sha’nt go to havin’ your parties, Grace. I always
have to eat bits and ends a fortnight after you have one,
and I won’t have it so.” And so Uncle Tim walked out,
and Aunt Sally and Miss Grace proceeded to make the
cake and pies for the party.

When Uncle Tim came home, he saw a long array of
pies and rows of cakes on the kitchen table.

“ Grace — Grace — Grace, I say! What is all this
here flummery for ?”

“Why, it is ¢o eat, father,” said Grace, with a good-
natured look of consciousness.

Uncle Tim tried his best to look sour; but his visage
began to wax comical as he looked at his merry daughter,
so he said nothing, but quietly sat down to his dinner.

“Father,” said Grace, after dinner, “we shall want
two more candlesticks next week.”

“Why! can’t you have your party with what you’ve
got ?”

“No, father, we want two more.”

“T can’t afford it, Ginee~tieee s no sort of use on’t—
and you sha’nt have any.’’



AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. §1

tae

“ Oh, father, now do,” said Grace.

«“ I won’t, neither,” said Uncle Tim, as he sallied out
of the house, and took the road to Robert Morris’s store.

In half-an-hour he returned again, and fumbling in
his pocket, and drawing forth a candlestick, levelled it at
Grace.

«“ There’s your candlestick.”

“ But, father, I said I wanted two.”

“Why ! can’t you make one do ?”

“No, I can’t ; I must have two.”

“ Well, then, there’s t’other ; and here's a fol. ave
for you to tie round your neck.” So saying, he bolted
for the door, and took himself off with all speed. It was
much after this fashion that matters commonly went on
in the brown house.

But, having tarried long on the way, we must proceed
with the main story.

James thought Miss Grace was a glorious girl, and as
to what Miss Grace thought of Master James, perhaps it
‘would not have been developed, had she not been called
to stand on the defensive for him with Uncle Tim. For,
from the time that the whole village of Newbury began
to be wholly given unto the praise of Master James,
Uncle Tim set his face as a flint against him, from the
laudable fear of following the multitude. He therefore
made conscience of stoutly gainsaying everything that
was said in his favour, which, as James was in high
favour with Aunt Sally, he had frequent opportunities
to do.

So, when Miss Grace perceived that Uncle Tim did not

| B



82 UNCLE TIM
setae
like our hero as much as he ought to do, she, of course,
was bound to like him well enough to make up for it.
Certain it is that they were remarkably happy in finding
opportunities of being acquainted; that James waited
on her, as a matter of course, from singing-school; that
he volunteered making a new box for her geranium on
an improved plan; and above all, that he was remarkably
particular in his attentions to Aunt Sally, a stroke of
policy which showed that James had a natural genius
for this sort of matters. James had a flute, and was par-
ticularly fond of it, because he had learned to play on it
by intuition ; and on the decease of the old pitchpipe,
which was slain by a fall from the gallery, he took the
liberty to introduce the flute in its place. For this and
other sins, and for the good reasons above named, Uncle
Tim’s countenance was not towards J ames, neither could
he be moved to him-ward by any manner of means.

To all Aunt Sally’s good words and kind speeches, he had
only to say that “he did’nt like him; that he hated to
see him a-manifesting and glorifying therein. the front
gallery Sundays, and a-acting everywhere as if he was
master of all; he didn’t like it, and he wouldn’t.” But
our hero was no whit cast down or discomfited by the
malcontent aspect of Uncle Tim.

“Why, James,” said his companion and chief coun-
sellor, “ do you think Grace likes you ?”

“I don’t know,” said our hero, with a comfortable
appearance of certainty.

“ But you can’t get her, James, if Uncle Tim is cross
about it,”





AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 83



“Fudge! I can make Uncle Tim like me, if I havea
mind to try.”

“ Well, then, Jim, you'll have to give up that flute of
yours, I tell you, now.”

“ Fa, sol, la—I can make him like me, and my flute
too.”

“ Why, how will you do it?”

“ Oh, I'll work it,” said our hero.

“ Well, Jim, I tell you, now, you don’t know Uncle
Tim if you say so.”

“T do know Uncle Tim, though, better than most
folks ; he is no more cross than I am; you have nothing
to do but make him think he is in his own way when he
is in yours,—that is all.”

“ Well,” said the other, “ but, you see, I don’t believe
it.”

“ And [ll bet you a gray squirrel that Pll go there
this very evening, and get him to like me and my flute
both,” said James.

Accordingly, the late sunshine of that afternoon shone
full on the yellow buttons of James as he proceeded to
the place of conflict. It was a bright, beautiful evening. |
A thunder-storm had just cleared away, and the silver
clouds lay rolled up in masses around the setting sun;
the rain-drops were sparkling and winking to each other
over the ends of the leaves, and all the bluebirds and
robins, breaking forth into song, made the little green
valley as merry as a musical box.

James’s soul was always overflowing with that kind of
poetry which consists in feeling unspeakably happy; and



84 UNCLE TIM

sans omseonoarramamnnsioemunoanigmonnianaammamanmmenae,

it is not to be wondered at, considering where he was
going, that he should feel in a double ecstacy on the
present occasion. He stepped gaily along, occasionally
springing over a fence to the right, to see whether the
rain had swollen the trout-brook, or to the left, to notice
the ripening of Mr. Somebody’s watermelons—for James
always had an eye on all his neighbours’ matters as well
as his own.

In this way he proceeded till he arrived at the picket-
fence that marked the commencement of Uncle Tim’s
ground. Here he stopped to consider. Just then, four
or five sheep walked up, and began also to consider a
loose picket, which was hanging just ready to drop off ;
and James began to look at the sheep. “ Well, mister,”
said he, as he observed the leader judiciously drawing
himself through the gap, “in with you—just what I
wanted ;” and, having waited a moment, to ascertain
that all the company were likely to follow, he ran with
all haste towards the house, and swinging open the gate,
pressed all breathless to the door.

“Uncle Tim, there are four or five sheep in your
garden.” Uncle Tim dropped his whetstone and scythe.

“T’ll drive them out,” said our hero ; and with that
he ran down the garden alley, and madea furious descent
on the enemy; bestirring himself, as Bunyan says,
“lustily and with good courage,” till every sheep had
skipped out much quicker than it skipped in; and then
springing over the fence, he seized a great stone, and
nailed on the picket so effectually that no sheep could
possibly encourage the hope of getting in again. This



AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE, 85
cennaeonceasisiiiitaiaatermemarapaaiciainanic es iano
was all the work of a minute; and he was back again,
but so exceedingly out of breath that it was necessary
for him to stop a moment and rest. himself. . Uncle Tim
looked ungraciously satisfied.

“ What under the canopy set you to scampering so?”
said he; “TI could a’ driv’ out them critturs myself!”

“Tf you are at all particular about driving them out
yourself, I can let them in again,” said James,

Uncle Tim looked at him with an odd sort of twinkle
in the corner of his eye.

“°Spose I must ask you to walk in,” said he.

“Much obliged,” said James, “but I am in a great
hurry.” So saying, he started in very business-like
fashion towards the gate.

“You'd better just stop a minute.”

“Can’t stay a minute.”

“T don’t see what possesses you to be all the while in
sich a hurry ; a body would think you had all creation
on your shoulders !”

“Just my situation, Uncle Tim,” said James, swing-
ing open the gate.

“Well, at any rate, have a drink of cider, can’t ye?”
said Uncle Tim, who was now quite engaged to have his
own way in the case.

James found it convenient to accept this invitation,
and Uncle Tim was twice as good-natured as if he had
stayed in the first of the matter.

Once fairly forced into the premises, James thought
fit to forget his long walk and excess of business, espe-
cially as about that moment Aunt Sally and Miss Grace



86 UNCLE TIM



returned from an afternoon call. You may be sure that
the last thing these respectable ladies looked for was to
find Uncle Tim and Master James téte-d-téte over a pit-
cher of cider; and when, as they entered, our hero
looked up with something of a mischievous air, Miss
Grace, in particular, was so puzzled that it took her at
least a quarter of an hour to untie her bonnet strings.
But James stayed and acted the agreeable to perfection.
First he must needs go down into the garden to look at
Uncle Tim’s wonderful cabbages,and then he promenaded
all round the corn-patch, stopping every few moments
and looking up with an appearance of great gratifica-
tion, as if he had never seen such corn in his life ; and
then he examined Uncle Tim’s favourite apple-tree with
an expression of wonderful interest.

“T never!” he broke forth, having stationed himself
against the fence opposite it; “ what kind of an apple-
tree is that ?”’

“It’s a bell-flower, or somethin’ another,” said Uncle
Tim.

“Why, where did you get it? I never saw such
apples!” said our hero, with his eyes still fixed on the
tree.

Uncle Tim pulled up a stalk or two of weeds and threw
them over the fence, just to show that he did not care
anything about the matter, and then he came up and
stood by James.

“ Nothin’ so remarkable, as I know on,” said he.

Just then, Grace came to say that supper was ready,
Once seated at a table, it was astonishing to see the per-



AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 87



een
fect and smiling assurance with which our hero continued
his addresses to Uncle Tim. It sometimes goes a great
way towards making people like us, to take it for granted
that they do already, and upon this principle James
proceeded. He talked, laughed, told stories, and joked
with the most fearless assurance, occasionally seconding
his words by looking Uncle Tim in the face with a coun-
tenance so full of good-will as would have melted any
snow-drift of prejudices in the world.

James also had one natural accomplishment, more
courtier-like than all the diplomacy in Europe, and that
was, the gift of feeling a real interest for anybody in five
nrinutes; so that if he began to please in jest, he gene-
rally ended in earnest. With great simplicity of mind,
he had a natural tact for seeing into others, and watched
their motions with the same delight with which a child
gazes at the wheels and springs of a watch, to “see what
it will do.”

The rough exterior and latent kindness of Uncle Tim
were quite a spirit-stirring study ; and when tea was
over, as he and Grace happened to be standing together
in the front door, he broke forth,

“I do really like your father, Grace 1”

“Do you?” said Grace.

“Yes, I do. He has something in him, and I like
him all the better for having to fish it out.”

“Well, I hope you will make him like you,” said
Grace, unconsciously ; and then she stopped, and looked
a little abashed.

James was too well bred to see this, or look.as if Grace



88 UNCLE TIM



meant any more than she said—a kind of breeding not
always attendant on more fashionable polish—so he only
answered,

“J think I shall, Grace! though I doubt whether I
can get him to own it.”

“He is the kindest man that ever was,” said Grace ;
“ and he always acts asif he was ashamed of it.”

James turned a little away, and looked at the bright
evening sky, which was glowing like a calm golden sea ;
and over it was the silver new moon, with one little star
to hold the candle for her. He shook some bright drops
off from a rosebush near by, and watched to see them
shine as they fell, while Grace stood very quietly waiting
for him to speak again. |

“ Grace,” said he, at last, “Iam going to college this
autumn.”

“So you told me yesterday,” said Grace.

James stooped down over Grace’s geranium, and began
to busy himself with pulling off all the dead leaves, re-
marking in the meanwhile,

“ And if I do get Aim to like me, Grace, will you like
me too ?”

“I like you now very well,” said Grace.

“Come, Grace, you know what I mean,” said James,
looking steadfastly at the top of the apple-tree.

“Well, I wish then you would understand what I mean,
without my saying any more about it,” said Grace.

“Oh! to be sure I will,” said our hero, looking up
with a very intelligent air; and so, as Aunt Sally would
say, the matter was settled, with “ no words about it.”

’



AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. &9







-—--—-

Now shall we narrate how our hero, as he saw Uncle
Tim approaching the door, had the impudence to take
out his flute, and put the parts together, screwing it
round and fixing it with great composure ?

“Uncle Tim,” said he, looking up, “this is the best
flute that ever I saw.”

“JT hate them tooting critturs,” said Uncle Tim,
snappishly.

“J declare! I wonder how you can!” said James,
“for I do think they exceed—”

So saying, he put the flute to his mouth, and ran up
and down a long flourish.

“here! what think you of that?” said he, looking
in Uncle Tim’s face with much delight.

Uncle Tim turned and marched into the house, but
soon faced to the right-about and came out again, for
James was fingering “ Yankee Doodle”—that appropriate
national air for the descendants of the Puritans.

Uncle Tim’s patriotism began to bestir itself ; and now,
if it had been anything, as he said, but “ that ‘ere flute”
—as it was, he looked more than once at James's fingers.

“ow under the sun cowld you learn to do that?”
said he.

“ Oh, it’s easy enough,” said James, proceeding with
another tune; and, having played it through, he stopped
2 moment to examine the joints of his flute, and in the
mean time addressed Uncle Tim; “ Yes, can’t think how
grand this is for pitching tunes—I always pitch the tunes
Sunday with it.”

“Yes, but I don’t think it’s a right and fit instrument
for the Lord’s house,” said Uncle Tim.



an UNCLS TIM

“ Why not? It is only a kind of a long pitchpipe,
you see,” said James; “ and, seeing the old one is broken,
and this will answer, I don’t see why it is not better than
nothing.”

“‘ Why, yes, it may be better than nothing,” said Uncle
Tim; “but, as 1 always tell Grace and my wife, it aint
the right kind of instrument, after all; it aint solemn.”

“Solemn!” said James; “that is according as you use
it : see here, now.”

So saying, he struck up Old Hundred, and proceeded
through it with great perseverance.

“ There, now !” said he.

“ Well, well, I don’t know but it is,’ said Uncle Tim;
* but, as I said at first, I don’t like the look of it in
meetin’.”

“ But yet you really think it is better than nothing,”
said James, “for you see I could’nt pitch my tunes
without it,”

“‘ May be ’tis,” said Uncle Tim; “ but that isn’t sayin’
much.”

This, however, was enough for Master James, who soon
after departed, with his flute in his pocket, and Grace’s
last words in his heart; soliloquizing as he shut the
gate, “ There, now, I hope Aunt Sally won't go to praising
me; for, just so sure as she does, I shall have it all to do
over again,”

James was right in his apprehension. Uncle Tim could
be privately converted, but not brought to open con-
fession; and when, the next morning, Aunt Sally re-
marked, in the kindness of her heart,

* Well, [always knew you would come to like James,”



AMD HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 91

canna
Uncle Tim only responded, “* Who said I did like him ?”

“ But I’m sure you seemed to like him last night.”

“ Why, I couldn’t turn him out 0’ doors, could1? I
don’t think nothin’ of him but what I always did.”

But it was to be remarked that Uncle Tim contented
himself at this time with the mere general avowal,
without running it into particulars, as was formerly his
wont. It was evident that the ice had begun to melt,
but it might have been a long time in dissolving, had not
collateral incidents assisted.

It so happened that, about this time, George Griswold,
the only son before referred to, returned to his native
village, after having completed his theological studies at
a neighbouring institution. It is interesting to mark the
gradual development of mind and heart, from the time
that the white-headed, bashful boy quits the country
village for college, to the period when he returns, a
formed and matured man, to notice how gradually the
rust of early prejudices begins to cleave from him—how
his opinions, like his handwriting, pass from the cramped
and limited forms of a country school into that confirmed
and characteristic style which is to mark the man for life.
In George this change was remarkably striking. He was
endowed by nature with uncommon acuteness of feeling
and fondness for reflection: qualities as likely as any to
render a child backward and uninteresting in early life.

When he left Newbury for college, he was a taciturn
and apparently phlegmatic boy, only evincing sensibility
by blushing, and looking particularly stupefied whenever
anybody spoke to him. Vacation after vacation passed,



92 UNCLE TIM

and he returned more and more an altered being ; and he
who once shrunk from the eye of the deacon, and was
ready to sink if he met the minister, now moved about
among the dignitaries of the piaae with all the composure
of a superior being.

It was only to be regretted that, while the mind im-
proved, the physical energies declined, and that every
visit to his home found him paler, thinner, and less pre-
pared in body for the sacred profession to which he had
devoted bimself. But now he was returned, a minister—
a real minister, with a right to stand in the pulpit and
preach ; and whata joy and glory to Aunt Sally—and to
Uncle Tim, if he were not ashamed to own it.

The first Sunday after he came, it was known far and
near that George Griswold was to preach; and never was
a more ready and expectant audience.

As the time for reading the first psalm approached,
you might see the white-headed men turning their faces
attentively towards the pulpit; the anxious and expect-
ant old women, with their little black bonnets, bent
forward to see him rise. ‘There were the children look-
ing, because everybody else looked ; there was Uncle Tim
in the front pew, his face considerately adjusted ; there
was Aunt Sally, seeming as pleased as a mother could
seem ; and Miss Grace, lifting her sweet face to her
brother, like a flower to the sun; there was our friend
James in the front gallery, his joyous countenance a littie
touched with sobriety and expectation: in short, a more
embarrassingly attentive audience never greeted the first
effort of a young minister. Under these circumstances,



AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 93



there was something touching in the fervent self-forget-
fulness which characterised the first exercises of this
morning—something which moved every onein the house.

The devout poetry of his prayer, rich with the oriental-
ism of Scripture, and eloquent with the expression of
strong yet chastened emotion, breathed over his audience
like music, hushing every one to silence, and beguiling
every one to feeling. Inthe sermon there was the strong
intellectual nerve, the constant occurrence of argument
and statement, which distinguishes 2 New-England dis-
course ; but it was touched with life by the intense, yet
half-subdued feeling with which he seemed to utter it.

When the services were over, the congregation dis-
persed with the air of people who had fel¢ rather than
heard ; and all the criticism that followed was similar to
that of old Deacon Hart—an upright, shrewd man—
who, as he lingered a moment at the church door, turned
and gazed with unwonted feeling at the young preacher.

“ He’s a blessed cre’tur !” said he, the tears actually
making their way to his eyes; “I han’t been so near
heaven this many a day. He’sa blessed cre’tur of the
Lord —that’s my mind about him!”

As for our friend James, he was at first sobered, then
deeply moved, and at last wholly absorbed by the dis-
course; and it was only when meeting was over that he
began to think where he really was.

With all his versatile activity, James had a greater
depth of mental capacity than he was himself aware of,
and he began to feel a sort of electric affinity for the
mind that had touched him in a way so new; and when



94 UNCLE TIM



he saw the mild minister standing at the foot of the
pulpit stairs, he made directly towards him.

“I do want to hear more from you,” said he, with a
face full of earnestness; “ may I walk home with you?”

“Tt isa long and warm walk,” said the young minister,
smiling.

“Qh, I don’t care for that, if it does not trouble you,”
said James; and leave being gained, you might have
seen them slowly passing along under the trees, James
pouring forth all the floods of inquiry which the sudden
impulse of his mind had brought out, and supplying his
guide with more questions and problems for solution
than he could have gone through with in a month.

“T cannot answer all your questions now,” said he, as
they stopped at Uncle Tim’s gate.

“Well, then, when will you?” said James, eagerly.
“ Let me come home with you to-night ?”

The minister smiled assent, and James departed so full
of new thoughts, that he passed Grace without even see-
ing her. From that time a friendship commenced be-
tween the two which was a beautiful illustration of the
affinities of opposites. It was like a friendship between
morning and evening—all freshness and sunshine on one
side, and all gentleness and peace on the other.

The young minister, worn by long-continued ill-health,
by the fervency of his own feelings, and the gravity of
his own reasonings, found pleasure in the healthful buoy-
ancy of a youthful, unexhausted mind, while James felt
himself sobered and made better by the moonlight trau-
quillivty of his friend. It is one mark of a superior mind





AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 95



to understand and be influenced by the superiority of
others, and this was the case with James. The ascen-
dency which his new friend acquired over him was un-
limited, and did more in a month towards consolidating
and developing his character, than all the four years
course of a college. Our religious habits are likely
always to retain the impression of the first seal which
stamped them, and in this case it was a peculiarly happy
one. ‘The calmness, the settled purpose, the mild deyo-
tion of his friend, formed a just alloy to the energetic
and reckless buoyancy of James’s character, and awakened
in him a set of feelings without which the most vigorous
mind must be incomplete.

The effect of the ministrations of the young pastor
in awaking attention to the subjects of his calling in the
village, was marked, and of a kind which brought plea-
sure to his own heart. But, like all other excitement, it
tends to exhaustion, and it was not long before he sen-
sibly felt the decline of the powers of life. To the best-
regulated mind there is something bitter in the relin-
quishment of projects for which we have been long and
laboriously preparing, and there is something far more
bitter in crossing the long-cherished expectations of
friends. All this George felt. He could not bear to look
on his mother, hanging on his words and following his
steps with eyes of almost childish delight—on his sin-
gular father, whose whole earthly ambition was bound
up' in his success, and think how soon the “candle of
their old age” must be put out. When he returned
from a successful effort, it was painful to see the old man,



96 UNCLE TIM



so evidently delighted, and yet so anxious to conceal his
triumph.

If George was engaged in argument with any one else,
he would sit by, with his head bowed down, looking out
from under his shaggy eye-brows with a shamefaccd satis-
faction very unusual withhim. Expressions of affection
from the naturally gentle are not half so touching as
those which are forced out from the hard-favoured and
severe; and George was affected, even to pain, by the
evident pride and regard of his father.

“ He never said so much to anybody before,” thought
he, “ and what will he do if I die?”

In such thoughts as these Grace found her brother
engaged one still autumn morning, as he stood leaning
against the garden fence.

What are you solemnizing here for, this bright day,
brother George ?”’ said she, as she bounded down the alley,

The young man turned, and looked on her happy face
with a sort of twilight smile.

“ How happy you are, Grace !”

“To be sure Iam! and you ought to be too, because
you are better.”

“Tam happy, Grace—that is, I hope I shall be.”

“ You are sick, I know you are,” said Grace; “ you
look worn out! Oh, I wish your heart could spring once,
as mine does,”

“Tam not well, dear Grace, and I fear I never shall
be,” said he, turning away, and fixing his eyes on the
fading trees opposite.

“ Oh, George ! dear George! don’t, don’t say that: you'll



AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE, 97

break all our hearts,” said Grace, with tears in her own
eyes.

“ Yes, but it is true, sister: I do not feel it on my own
account so much as—However,” he added, “it will all
be the same in heaven.”

It was but a week after this that a violent cold has-
tened the progress of debility into a confirmed malady.
He sunk very fast. Aunt Sally, with the self-deceit of
a fond and cheerful heart, thought every day that “he
would be better,” and Uncle Tim resisted conviction,
with all the obstinate pertinacity of his character, while
the sick man felt that he had not the heart to undeceive
them.

James was now at the house every day, exhausting all
his energy and invention in the case of his friend ; and
any one who had seen him in his hours of recklessness
and glee, could scarcely recognise him as the being
whose step was so careful, whose eye so watchful, whose
voice and touch were so gentle, as he moved around the
sick-bed. But the same quickness which makes a mind
buoyant in gladness, often makes it gentlest and most
sympathetic in sorrow.

It was now nearly morning in the sick-room. George
had been restless and feverish all night, but towards day
he fell into a light slumber, and James sat by his side,
almost holding his breath lest he should waken him. It
was yet dusk, but the sky was brightening with a so-
lemn glow, and the stars were beginning to disap-
pear; all, save the bright and morning one, which,
standing alone in the east, looked tenderly through

@



98 UNCLE TIM



the casement, like the eye of our heavenly Father,
watching over us when all earthly friendships are
fading.

George awgke with a placid expression of counte-.
nance, and fixing his eyes on the brightening sky, mur-
mured faintly,

“The sweet, immortal morning sheds
Its blushes round the spheres.”

A moment after, a shade passed over his face; he
pressed his fingers over his eyes, and the tears dropped
silently on his pillow.

“George! dear George!” said James, bending over him.

“It’s my friends—it’s my father—my mother,” said
he, faintly.

*‘ Jesus Christ will watch over them,” said James,
soothingly.

“ Oh, yes, I know He will; for He loved his own which
were in the world ; He loved them unto the end. But
I am dying—and before I have done any good.”

“ Oh, do not say so,” said James ; “ think, think what
you have done; if only for me/ God bless you for it!
God will bless you for it; it will follow you to heaven ;
it will bring me there. Yes, I will do as you have taught
me! I will give my life, my soul, my whole strength to
it; and then you will not have lived in vain.”

George smiled and looked upward; “his face was as
that of an angel ;” and James, in his warmth, continued:

“It is not J alone who can say this: we all bless you;
every one in this place blesses you; you will be had in
everlasting remembrance by some hearts here, I know.”



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'2011-12-30T06:16:53-05:00'
describe
'7654' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFM' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
aaf90f5a7bce00632778f818fdd31fa9
d53f1ad92f6ab935facdff5a22acefe81120d5e9
'2011-12-30T06:15:20-05:00'
describe
'906839' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFN' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
2879b24930211e24429bcbd4afab0d16
5718fe809271fd0b016577c56277466598ac97a9
'2011-12-30T06:21:29-05:00'
describe
'44788' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFO' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
bc991ac2ece038edee0c08f04e407218
37650722008444900d3ec7c211aa306f83af61a7
'2011-12-30T06:12:40-05:00'
describe
'10413' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFP' 'sip-files00006.pro'
b0a8fe90db6af8eaa9a66ba8c2389eca
ae3e52c51098703bec54b5c356cb24a7a8bdf4e9
'2011-12-30T06:17:03-05:00'
describe
'15572' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFQ' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
56d26adbb05c9ae28f12f957300d634c
f7cade185ab00cca9da694867c8165eca77fd7fe
'2011-12-30T06:18:25-05:00'
describe
'7714567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFR' 'sip-files00006.tif'
915424902c320ce634b95295ed46d14a
31fa90debb3c71c47c60b3da2b4625140471c140
'2011-12-30T06:19:29-05:00'
describe
'574' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFS' 'sip-files00006.txt'
cae8c712d950a6f0917b863de444689a
66a6a1d909b91a8491d08dc4df04938de2dca103
'2011-12-30T06:16:46-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'5440' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFT' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
713c73c7886da538151d3747a4c3ffd1
182b8aa9a440ea0b44e410515a893f1af24dcd39
describe
'455721' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFU' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
f754626bbcae296833204b78d909b394
5545e941607cbe5cf93d726a8feeb8b68a492134
'2011-12-30T06:22:20-05:00'
describe
'13224' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFV' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
5f81b3a24938d0a6ac47901880e38ce9
39c2a015b5c3a87a5f3451887283182f25f040b5
'2011-12-30T06:16:41-05:00'
describe
'4031' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFW' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
e827046fcfe28be6fbea65aa35d49f12
689565478ce3f723ca6c285280992209aa473ca4
'2011-12-30T06:16:00-05:00'
describe
'7451939' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFX' 'sip-files00007.tif'
56782f91005ff21e421ba5a6c9204515
fd281405177217dd55acca6e3a5b3f91f6f2c836
describe
'1691' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFY' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
fda589b4972dd94ecee371827f19bf09
9853ca96f2adfb0257a5bc088a2e5217147db475
'2011-12-30T06:23:57-05:00'
describe
'809259' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAFZ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
09609ebd0978cbab990323c76f45e3cd
a4f526d5568deec72ba920280ab439b308be48df
'2011-12-30T06:16:37-05:00'
describe
'48055' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGA' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
a39f66f52edc01e128f2c43c71368705
6d28882e404265b8e1b8500b2d9aff1779ab5b90
'2011-12-30T06:12:42-05:00'
describe
'17379' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGB' 'sip-files00008.pro'
8667b7380bd474e4a961124cd7ca4347
30fd67965923652e093e87981650f7e5322f5454
'2011-12-30T06:22:03-05:00'
describe
'17864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGC' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
4756aedb677dd56e5392fbf44d95fd71
db0b05a9b4bd6408ea5a8b66a8e75e6744549ca1
'2011-12-30T06:14:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGD' 'sip-files00008.tif'
8d3b56c846d313f9b60baee809b5fc9a
f577a603350d74d5baa8a3542deec16b1ea26268
'2011-12-30T06:17:43-05:00'
describe
'752' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGE' 'sip-files00008.txt'
edbe7d31b1a740c3ef89d8855c52e135
817bff80387b3690b7b750d4aa5d66bc66fdb720
describe
'6023' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGF' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
477cda1e42ec94d48a6d54406b2f464c
a30e1f9c8e14cdabf36adbcbf9b7a890a7835acf
'2011-12-30T06:17:35-05:00'
describe
'410837' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGG' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
3b143755bd65d421590332dac791d74a
3c13694662560347dd7b994a90bc0379d7db4ca3
'2011-12-30T06:13:39-05:00'
describe
'11812' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGH' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
a5437ff1c4deae61d080b0e2032b941e
7dc88451adda39b71cc0db26fb96b66b7f600894
describe
'3532' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGI' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
c748442b7606756b1204df1ccb5f7ab5
5af5b8a4cade2309d8b334f5e1ad979e8516a9b6
'2011-12-30T06:17:55-05:00'
describe
'7406499' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGJ' 'sip-files00009.tif'
e3aa982e1d9861613dd9a7b90422c828
e6a11fe965a788834f38db947b71ee36bcc3d4ce
'2011-12-30T06:22:55-05:00'
describe
'1464' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGK' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
c51dd9c5478aecfe651a28dd5ddffbf4
faf35882d4912badb1e642477d33e2512e7085a9
'2011-12-30T06:12:57-05:00'
describe
'706656' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGL' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
cbe4b95c3543640ad7b73e0b3b7a8d42
5c987884327009196bf9b70d302caf19399f589d
'2011-12-30T06:15:14-05:00'
describe
'29832' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGM' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
0aaf345606f0e7c2dddf3e94745ba135
d73da7e2545fd6c14ca66a65c0dedaa7ac94bb23
'2011-12-30T06:17:32-05:00'
describe
'12973' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGN' 'sip-files00010.pro'
548b210726a5f9eaf8c4729b5f01a35a
e00b12a289d36638359fcf8ec2c386e682567db6
'2011-12-30T06:13:38-05:00'
describe
'11612' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGO' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
07161cd2316822994f9bc42e44cdc8db
20411a13b688bd04e74352a048e3a16ae8bbad15
'2011-12-30T06:13:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGP' 'sip-files00010.tif'
3769536ac943eb34eeef676c9ce3918f
8cdf65bf5876bfdd09ac51dc9b45489817b8ab76
'2011-12-30T06:16:48-05:00'
describe
'798' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGQ' 'sip-files00010.txt'
f2f74c3185dd5210c5f934dc3746cc6d
943e95c8c4defb0e4fd008b8c651c25ae0a3c923
'2011-12-30T06:13:25-05:00'
describe
'4371' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGR' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
45f0cda9f8211ddcd6eec359c4821778
d04b1752e215343ccc78c52d3b99b9e8cf8556f2
'2011-12-30T06:23:48-05:00'
describe
'535700' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGS' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
0f8afd196a9ccf5e8eb4ae92587ced55
92c8be858ec78b8b0a6a483503dd726ef077566b
'2011-12-30T06:18:11-05:00'
describe
'17092' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGT' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
27b585e89e9b33d3034f21813583fd65
7dadf1c16aee10efa87bd39a525dc33d9de78289
'2011-12-30T06:22:27-05:00'
describe
'5243' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGU' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
90175bffa13a9c3b48e7ea80f27f9544
9900f5f4838d4fe5c3f851666fd1dd7a7b4c8137
'2011-12-30T06:15:59-05:00'
describe
'7734299' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGV' 'sip-files00011.tif'
5d890ce4e930557b8ff17c2c812814fe
c798830a715f00195fbf2601296d6a8922dd156b
'2011-12-30T06:13:19-05:00'
describe
'2081' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGW' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
720110be49078c7e4f81ea2e215227e0
89033f130eb67ffe4f3de6dda4a6de99912fdedd
'2011-12-30T06:21:53-05:00'
describe
'963114' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGX' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
2b72c74c06cd9ba9c079450f8b624879
c6ec6744ca36691a48e48d50ad9d5e2dc6e1bdc2
'2011-12-30T06:23:37-05:00'
describe
'70858' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGY' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
c3398f9013bd608dbe865b116628b5fc
cc93232b8609f4ab3c9d98f59c67de64ee671cc2
'2011-12-30T06:22:08-05:00'
describe
'26382' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAGZ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
5bffb1704b8007cfcae7ab201ea060c4
20a91eb60f90b77c39c45a611d16e5d7ba8c7585
'2011-12-30T06:13:15-05:00'
describe
'26007' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHA' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
9721cd7e11be8a215317aa4b18d626a3
49084ce546ecac0d80b4a2809c30283660669475
'2011-12-30T06:14:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHB' 'sip-files00012.tif'
faa0081b3584f5c884dd07f70401ce06
fa75b09bdf223d426e1a2e2d6382e3945afc3e11
'2011-12-30T06:13:06-05:00'
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHC' 'sip-files00012.txt'
dc3a4c26b67f4902506386fe4bd4e3ce
7e8c1f66bb0410c7de6f6dcbe7060688b2838459
'2011-12-30T06:22:25-05:00'
describe
'8134' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHD' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
785094c39446d6436c845a632fc61fb3
ca48239f96f94d4f1954e2ce84bf55e2bb233d62
'2011-12-30T06:23:47-05:00'
describe
'927771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHE' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
172793d71da6db643e97e1c07721c8eb
0312460c45cca04e613c45ee36f58dfd790e70bd
'2011-12-30T06:15:43-05:00'
describe
'105219' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHF' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
9013b23216a8f99c08ad6d20aa30de9e
8439e354632767785d0c94bcb0c7e129b0b935a2
'2011-12-30T06:14:10-05:00'
describe
'40812' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHG' 'sip-files00013.pro'
1a0201e304f3f98b71470d8ca88e0fe4
4f776b9d9cf5a494d380d3bdcaeca0f7872b2bbe
'2011-12-30T06:14:03-05:00'
describe
'38393' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHH' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
8cce9b517772395613c8077adfa1812b
7ccb3ffd285fa3f8e16e0524702fe5c05139a0da
'2011-12-30T06:14:57-05:00'
describe
'7430955' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHI' 'sip-files00013.tif'
5085b8488cc102e6f966dce831bf8e08
2b01fa2899d35e804d61c5d6c50f027ce523551d
'2011-12-30T06:16:16-05:00'
describe
'1695' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHJ' 'sip-files00013.txt'
c2851e20490a101d7aece136f62b3b29
13cc9acecb06933f60d97b5fa3b1673cca668d3f
'2011-12-30T06:14:39-05:00'
describe
'12204' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHK' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
3e9434154fd1f8e61d54bbdf95e66fde
c6259643a814bc04b6beaa976ff453226bf9711b
'2011-12-30T06:12:55-05:00'
describe
'1058570' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHL' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
7c4dc2dba0d01b44e3f084ec7542d739
f94b9272b5e0cc51589bfaad6b0afbfb8e25a55c
'2011-12-30T06:22:54-05:00'
describe
'94770' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHM' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
f9db7aca757943551ddc189f84d00d70
6b910930d446150c481472d0c6506d770e6c8620
'2011-12-30T06:21:03-05:00'
describe
'37969' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHN' 'sip-files00014.pro'
e27be9b746e6977e242301fdf0315d87
097cdc20ccdffdf700cde13ba8fbec2cbf7b2941
'2011-12-30T06:15:04-05:00'
describe
'33630' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHO' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
bd3add3d551255919c96db04ff1fa11a
fc10d28fa715b333a317e906377998224bdf3179
'2011-12-30T06:14:32-05:00'
describe
'8474269' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHP' 'sip-files00014.tif'
fbb630b93a2cbfe539145e9759b86c5f
14c4cd1d8813dd66a7faa152fa827f3d32abf47f
'2011-12-30T06:23:51-05:00'
describe
'1538' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHQ' 'sip-files00014.txt'
6410e65f94ad0f1c2ba632b5d4aba538
1a2659192f465a280059a5f17afe1fe2a31d09e7
'2011-12-30T06:16:45-05:00'
describe
'10430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHR' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
2c482bec03913206e6c8e2c13be9a825
e716ed7f79e93c54ff773c112ef242180f42ee17
'2011-12-30T06:22:40-05:00'
describe
'965603' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHS' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
2b986083bbbd342cc29ae19e1eb72332
23313528e306a28ca1e597e5ee2ad4cd423034fe
describe
'97326' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHT' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
70b48a6092eac5c461052d15124434cd
1146b51dffb41d29d29a5efdac80b17f8ec51541
'2011-12-30T06:16:33-05:00'
describe
'37974' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHU' 'sip-files00015.pro'
db5bcdf4d2cf801ca7b26e37afe731bf
b3e75454380e2e598bd1da3156fd27552411572d
'2011-12-30T06:20:46-05:00'
describe
'35508' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHV' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
f902a97e78c4aacf307ed4c0d31588c1
b457a7a1783a1415883fbd98ee60917c87f9e712
'2011-12-30T06:23:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHW' 'sip-files00015.tif'
fe89f02649b911f08b2693d8c2c29e4c
069e9b9ee72710b02cd7745fb0212f01a83a4846
describe
'1647' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHX' 'sip-files00015.txt'
53c86873aaea2a36ec3c749da86aaef1
ad6f5c4d3e50f01acf5e79b1e98c4b4cd544b750
'2011-12-30T06:22:29-05:00'
describe
'10972' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHY' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
058e5815e5034ea54a86c9e4dd823f0a
62203fe3e528974d00818baca1530fc85b132d85
'2011-12-30T06:13:27-05:00'
describe
'963146' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAHZ' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
9be96dde5487ce3cbfd2909c7bae2f74
9d4ce4af85d70ad00014973f8c0545b7a9c5de42
'2011-12-30T06:14:11-05:00'
describe
'99239' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIA' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
3184873d4804a283b24619fbba691a60
390dea396736ab41f3ae96f9e5c4663547a55f8f
'2011-12-30T06:21:25-05:00'
describe
'38526' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIB' 'sip-files00016.pro'
346dd76e58416e790f48be653e663cd7
41131f355ac94d9e2249bee644db56dbf15c22bf
'2011-12-30T06:22:59-05:00'
describe
'36206' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIC' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
0ea4f5e06265b2c0bc71a7ea408454d4
2ce98a4ba570baa0d68fa2b380b917729e9c47fd
'2011-12-30T06:21:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAID' 'sip-files00016.tif'
f068f8a9165204d4804c00cd3addef95
5e461f2e575b887d0a4de498da4b73384406566a
'2011-12-30T06:14:44-05:00'
describe
'1605' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIE' 'sip-files00016.txt'
e39bb5fe4f00bb1348d77f4ccc11b141
90f5e20b881dc3dc25daf1157156bcef4bb611ae
describe
'11200' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIF' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
ac0723d0a7cf4404f96a75252d49eed2
61fa5efb47487342c2d5a5f778908baffc418fdc
'2011-12-30T06:22:00-05:00'
describe
'965623' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIG' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
154077ddb4f2a1c3b97e16f18d112a0c
9adf0742228b9bd2ddb68a7e1b1e9df8a2168b74
'2011-12-30T06:19:15-05:00'
describe
'103032' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIH' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
c69ddac3a486a250ef8f09de7b9aad3e
fc7b2f46cce345c1b4ab19ae0c360b47c4d56973
'2011-12-30T06:21:55-05:00'
describe
'36996' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAII' 'sip-files00017.pro'
9a5fa5ea156c5f431832f09acf9d789e
509de2df1ffcd3ad8dafa2591cc770ea1a01bf53
'2011-12-30T06:19:45-05:00'
describe
'36521' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIJ' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
6d16211ad21747e8edbd6feef60db2b1
def2b77cc1165c6244937018dafc8c63cf54cc9a
'2011-12-30T06:15:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIK' 'sip-files00017.tif'
ff4e2a193fde7e7714feb8022a313540
af363d35e059b93e003be464e32925aa113a61e5
'2011-12-30T06:14:27-05:00'
describe
'1561' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIL' 'sip-files00017.txt'
560671e9670e3a43102f9aceb5149cf2
d62dfdfa8908792e9a20f78f7fb144bcf9a60ca1
'2011-12-30T06:15:50-05:00'
describe
'10945' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIM' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
4f9b72ca2a7b99f55a0820ff23ae3a7a
9dcae6f27efc59c5557f4da91d942a45d5bb3d96
'2011-12-30T06:12:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIN' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
2cabdc915c7c62beb864744b86849da8
9c7a2a62405f64772db7c2adf5e226d336a65552
'2011-12-30T06:12:49-05:00'
describe
'105066' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIO' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
af009d26d28c3f3e6ba5423fdca3f6f5
959176bc4f089622d415c43492cd5d19647ff269
'2011-12-30T06:15:28-05:00'
describe
'38520' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIP' 'sip-files00018.pro'
c239477c843dd005bef7720a64103e79
b79de45e6a7860108206a2af11c73edc39ad03a8
'2011-12-30T06:22:35-05:00'
describe
'37109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIQ' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
c74e9eb2e6e062b619093dfbdcf9714b
ad4b01d7c56037a179659f8c4094246883e71ec2
'2011-12-30T06:17:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIR' 'sip-files00018.tif'
2b24a6a135f56edb04cd204d3a33cccf
651d0ec045a8bb65a5c19919af06d11fb118a92d
'2011-12-30T06:20:03-05:00'
describe
'1627' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIS' 'sip-files00018.txt'
30e1122f4bfc8318c27c4a46b6986784
576ad292dad4814db566aa124dddd94445c9a5f7
'2011-12-30T06:23:11-05:00'
describe
'11443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIT' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
7002322fbdac520fd8264cc73589f5b1
62589f0632029b7462b9b359040031c9a0ee2e7c
'2011-12-30T06:17:44-05:00'
describe
'965604' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIU' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
ef477b506791487f224b8f790c52f415
f9c48e22475e5700695cc1840220a1431f242bb0
'2011-12-30T06:13:55-05:00'
describe
'101517' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIV' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
ab56321cf41674621be9de118176f236
4a7366a1f88264aff2de2e0e869349e985691842
'2011-12-30T06:14:25-05:00'
describe
'39929' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIW' 'sip-files00019.pro'
aee60864d616a0e5e74274a0f8665a52
886ab83e3430a8134cf1f224203dcd3e06e3f73a
'2011-12-30T06:15:02-05:00'
describe
'36724' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIX' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
6f9f2b90dddeb22c0a43922299dee8c7
18f68ef0af1c392081e1edd6d2bf94d4c720a71b
'2011-12-30T06:23:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIY' 'sip-files00019.tif'
e7f392bd565f3bae88223ee74a2545a9
97881d3fd61c477a43238643612c051f4e054584
'2011-12-30T06:21:41-05:00'
describe
'1671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAIZ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
18dcda55e9f72713f0c4cfd764d1115f
3089c0fafea859a990134d1d774af2f8849064b5
describe
'11164' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJA' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
9dca1f1c646722bffc0a77db7f2b9acc
d086cf805a66ccd19cd971b47de01874359eb592
'2011-12-30T06:15:54-05:00'
describe
'1038427' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJB' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
8af8a7cd3299dcf4c4bc05f3afeb1908
88c308737c7a8ce268d2d7e2dba1d660e0cdbcf4
'2011-12-30T06:19:17-05:00'
describe
'89505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJC' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
19a99437db31b5c64ca5a5b603b719f0
f68b3c209e1b501e6f7f9f3fcb7bc48bc640c04d
'2011-12-30T06:23:32-05:00'
describe
'35022' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJD' 'sip-files00020.pro'
6e70ff18d4c53e4b28a928272248c97a
bf8f1bf9ce7833faa9b1330e4a2e06c314bbc120
'2011-12-30T06:16:31-05:00'
describe
'31896' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJE' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
8dbcf64a9f61e5b649ff4d4e2bba31bc
d3cab015979a32d613742d4e5e88161ccb0a8618
'2011-12-30T06:23:13-05:00'
describe
'8313683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJF' 'sip-files00020.tif'
90156151498119e00b4219c123b43390
d77788783b2336dbd40effa74d1d60c3e9d000cc
'2011-12-30T06:13:50-05:00'
describe
'1505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJG' 'sip-files00020.txt'
543a0503038ff1bfa0b69b4bea56060b
b990b405bd0af61a95b4cc1b3a5e1332fa43af8e
'2011-12-30T06:14:17-05:00'
describe
'10218' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJH' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
b982cdc06ff8d2fc4014528259389489
fdb157102642cb8150780beae5e5c5f514b53d93
describe
'926832' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJI' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
1d6663e31582f64dfd37858aebc6c52e
84944bd171b35c95c6c047f80436ec218535d2ca
'2011-12-30T06:23:35-05:00'
describe
'58077' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJJ' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
23728326abb8013c0920c10e93f01ddb
dde11d8e1fb4ffb6f1f5dc77a9564ea747dd0229
'2011-12-30T06:15:12-05:00'
describe
'16381' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJK' 'sip-files00021.pro'
85bbd8c783a71db55d27c7f3cbddcb32
57ef1d4bccd4c17e41eb43751ae218230bf7544e
'2011-12-30T06:14:19-05:00'
describe
'21100' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJL' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
d50b9c07e23847d83a99550a20f7535a
d37d1182e645d3902951050e3f9a783e0d28ab6b
'2011-12-30T06:23:04-05:00'
describe
'7423919' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJM' 'sip-files00021.tif'
f4e0ac91f8b4925c79621c0eb0633e93
505e78b7ff124ed02ca968c1a5d6e016accd3a98
'2011-12-30T06:17:47-05:00'
describe
'692' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJN' 'sip-files00021.txt'
ec09694b0faad2e9da614b0f63db5488
56cacf5c77bb28220d8aafd070fdd0b5974fd730
'2011-12-30T06:22:17-05:00'
describe
'6919' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJO' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
ba2091bbabac107da86a0fbf4d5706b8
43d419e8432bad20ed82034d051378fc138a538b
'2011-12-30T06:14:05-05:00'
describe
'963149' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJP' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
d0b420018cee4aa3efd871c0a9224399
168f585a6d191a20de1cfed598d2332c3b246615
'2011-12-30T06:13:01-05:00'
describe
'75255' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJQ' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
48eb9cef6deef1b69d244af46210c2a0
24c85bf3cfb67dab30cb4ffb005e84ad5532afb6
'2011-12-30T06:12:41-05:00'
describe
'27552' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJR' 'sip-files00022.pro'
41291c28f5aca1fe896e87354b01e539
5be809dc560a20b1ed6606d674f4d4618baa4607
describe
'26881' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJS' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
af13c724dcc8b1b0b90eb7a91bed7ec7
fe91b97932310e03369714a199e21a414a37cb63
'2011-12-30T06:14:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJT' 'sip-files00022.tif'
14e85b98ca0d10f87e9b00bd0ff52d5e
f4468f6fd7229bdec93c773661278f552b0254a6
'2011-12-30T06:15:39-05:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJU' 'sip-files00022.txt'
1c8850250c32abfd42f71e600cebe0df
6802c27fb480181afb0e0c68f2170ab2c5c4624b
describe
Invalid character
'8413' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJV' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
ca25266fa61e8a28ddb0341b8794f5b8
6665139222d41cbb638682f50399c807623ee97e
'2011-12-30T06:23:54-05:00'
describe
'933008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJW' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
f2e4b37c72a39281f1eb60a64f4fa0f7
bd1fff662f4c5b0152af9401985038fb6badba95
'2011-12-30T06:22:43-05:00'
describe
'97734' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJX' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
6dfbe3a87b7d9624155873515b3406f5
8702ea7a7fa507b0f52e42b764b8cf2481c25ec7
'2011-12-30T06:14:33-05:00'
describe
'38391' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJY' 'sip-files00023.pro'
c098dfc8ee7d1908263dfc88a36600e2
fef25f289891bd4f495da01e04413f20413999e8
'2011-12-30T06:21:58-05:00'
describe
'34437' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAJZ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
6e703c000d66877ea30157196827f16c
d675535982e20d4cb1c1a37fc5681bb716427eb5
describe
'7473363' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKA' 'sip-files00023.tif'
ffd2936697313999ae591133494437b4
dddbdac1f6524912e347bbe3159a5fe59af410be
describe
'1614' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKB' 'sip-files00023.txt'
195ae3f83f4dc3d0997cc57a0b83f5e6
02d487a96bc4d88267fc74abbcee3c69da727a32
'2011-12-30T06:18:26-05:00'
describe
'10668' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKC' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
f1138e532513500942a0a66856609a6d
3256559b77fbc009764b6d61d363c56a2da8e17d
'2011-12-30T06:16:40-05:00'
describe
'963156' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKD' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
6dac627bff3fe0461cdbaba80bc803ec
c5fb829f864b2291a081c3feda63dcf7c60e705e
'2011-12-30T06:14:12-05:00'
describe
'104610' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKE' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
ccc20ebd5c20b2ccc1ca7b7a2859f267
e8a05404f92567992ca92104898b7a5dc973a7aa
'2011-12-30T06:14:45-05:00'
describe
'41840' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKF' 'sip-files00024.pro'
243a1981d5b238bfa5ae6a15882d67b9
463efe108cc60c8a76b94b688cd6b567e641e90b
'2011-12-30T06:18:00-05:00'
describe
'36729' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKG' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
089f52eb5647e84711fbb9e99ea44ed7
6fea224d6d52a35a11e59b27a7398e7159af392d
'2011-12-30T06:16:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKH' 'sip-files00024.tif'
ca9ab37c447876d1a6446330ec815a74
b2836a13a91670a672ad6637fc8c23418669feaf
'2011-12-30T06:19:28-05:00'
describe
'1730' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKI' 'sip-files00024.txt'
3e9abe6e02b21f67d39cc039c3d6b928
0a7b2721b9aa0935bdcd3899ecd24e207db622da
'2011-12-30T06:21:32-05:00'
describe
'10925' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKJ' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
a8e41efbf68b17df03a5bac5f79196da
ac515bfcfccb8f8d1219aabb27c5e05608df8b88
describe
'965625' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKK' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
a1a6fafd39676a2f2f0ef1ba490a2c14
76f4045522e34798112f39dc0561760de4f69f77
describe
'106170' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKL' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
ebff1f8888fe7280e9d42a77bba6ea6b
08f599e7e69eb10e6c8dac839c8ae53f85c1a66e
describe
'41509' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKM' 'sip-files00025.pro'
cc3a809912e9ece7d0c0ac204f15bc6a
22d978e973f5cb0fa4f264a0d0be3be7d3257724
'2011-12-30T06:13:10-05:00'
describe
'37869' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKN' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
f86d6070bd48c06aa4696dc27379ec85
37c833f8ddcc6b68ee7ac60baa9bb71ff58ecf41
'2011-12-30T06:16:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKO' 'sip-files00025.tif'
b5ce8d692db28d75ccbf556130476294
3aff6c785b966adecc1fe9253f49019ee1f00e69
describe
'1712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKP' 'sip-files00025.txt'
a66c9718cb21f88f4742e07ef0db6da2
d4da21a80fe7562fc89024e0c59d37aa637621be
describe
'11445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKQ' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
57f1e95ab32f90f5ec2042aa240a83ea
58a9c3d0a6429340a7791545f5876a9131c6660c
'2011-12-30T06:12:59-05:00'
describe
'930812' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKR' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
83613a39d346f5ac342c813972403361
37f28efee7276fda7a613456627923fbf8607fd9
'2011-12-30T06:15:05-05:00'
describe
'106505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKS' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
8ddd3a97aefe06ed68dd3887a70a7d6d
5c31aa175fea9e508216a91ef9fe423af1181258
'2011-12-30T06:13:17-05:00'
describe
'40008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKT' 'sip-files00026.pro'
c5cf43e7d577b5b5d15289a4f72fd5a9
214eb103f82386835895aa2fad574c6a4c274790
describe
'37656' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKU' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
c27cc27fd5a042d405734ac590a14a4a
3b0c17273b4a987ca0a7ffaeeb5ed41654d3c918
'2011-12-30T06:21:43-05:00'
describe
'7453375' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKV' 'sip-files00026.tif'
fdf113dba7802f5261d9f9baf55fd1a2
66c8e2cf4acec9bd23a8f139c0923aabb7184684
'2011-12-30T06:17:58-05:00'
describe
'1680' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKW' 'sip-files00026.txt'
2b8bcb33599ef1d7b46cdbc14b5388bb
62951cca79811ceb11dc2375db108cf2b03027c0
'2011-12-30T06:17:00-05:00'
describe
'11898' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKX' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
05caf5801a92cc4dda8af510243a7207
758592666ac136c68e0a4e22b4cdd239329ab6e7
'2011-12-30T06:21:56-05:00'
describe
'924958' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKY' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
c66cf2c4ef797112e0cf19b054cded0d
d36f59ddbafdd1877c609779f19739d013155882
describe
'98658' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAKZ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
d7a20c1333cb4a33f9fe02e28e03f693
cff341915ebbaef420a91a52ea362e7e2a347af7
'2011-12-30T06:22:06-05:00'
describe
'37879' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALA' 'sip-files00027.pro'
bbeb0ca54883092664a45b9074efea7a
f847cb70237ad14f13cb5d96c4ad9e59512914f3
'2011-12-30T06:17:39-05:00'
describe
'35002' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALB' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
5bae1a5081b03e4dc86230fabecf49db
76c2015e1d313434c832a06b6710a827d667c82c
'2011-12-30T06:21:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALC' 'sip-files00027.tif'
04d32af36a758c664a35e0a2fa98e33c
53681cd78edc2c5e06d49274950e3645277f9495
'2011-12-30T06:22:48-05:00'
describe
'1607' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALD' 'sip-files00027.txt'
2571d51748e31b96414f05509303ddac
a1090ab835e0ecc507cf024969cd104736954e25
'2011-12-30T06:12:38-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'11168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALE' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
4e11c4ece83c54dc765b6b657ddd363c
5789fc0f6c9a3d20d6fd74a4e15b1e8f08b85736
describe
'963147' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALF' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
e68e1a7faeaedb6b912a63d882ad7480
8e117a41b6bd4840f2b442a271e335426773ecc0
'2011-12-30T06:22:57-05:00'
describe
'84077' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALG' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
4d10eb8d088bcaee60d5adfebbf5d7cf
69bdc698b9a7ad08606f88ed6847f9bc4f883c97
'2011-12-30T06:22:28-05:00'
describe
'32641' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALH' 'sip-files00028.pro'
1652560c515367bc1024320a2915717e
e4d40861b19cbcaaab5f7204be94fa93acea8a20
'2011-12-30T06:13:52-05:00'
describe
'30395' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALI' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
07c52f9d2e3b98012d9f78c336827cb8
4cf6a84f8447ebebb8b58138cd8d934d5c962827
'2011-12-30T06:22:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALJ' 'sip-files00028.tif'
6c563dc3511e05015d3b512eaf6b8d21
c10681adb1e4fb95aa7e060373d9abb76c24d0c9
'2011-12-30T06:17:53-05:00'
describe
'1417' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALK' 'sip-files00028.txt'
9514cd54b2ad66d0d7ad0a1fc40be61f
565288cef284edf0d7881b299821650b6d1048dd
'2011-12-30T06:14:30-05:00'
describe
'9993' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALL' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
2c4b5c0de6f7606e81f9672b829f5d89
99d0c6f46c35bbc1c78dde9ae10cd50158bae42e
'2011-12-30T06:17:05-05:00'
describe
'920537' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALM' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
d71a3de486d789b9bc3bf854fcb62626
84a7e96ab6cbd0c9774194acc380c1b2916bc321
'2011-12-30T06:14:51-05:00'
describe
'87966' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALN' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
e60638a19a7a75532be8ac63ecc113aa
6b564dc916d86e1d08a2c9cbe9dc545fb0ce8e43
'2011-12-30T06:20:06-05:00'
describe
'33565' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALO' 'sip-files00029.pro'
bd668b3467a38ec9e59a72014c6c3ecf
28dbeff212324fdfdd5e60200326a1ad0713c981
'2011-12-30T06:16:28-05:00'
describe
'32951' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALP' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
4ba658d311efc1a610cf37d0f14834c9
c1236d6192ffd06fd4eafdf50cc35770cd439871
'2011-12-30T06:22:34-05:00'
describe
'7372619' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALQ' 'sip-files00029.tif'
cb2ac17df76f656e7947951384a25d35
fe2b36f3ebcefb6fbb9568865a3a145dcc55c840
'2011-12-30T06:22:14-05:00'
describe
'1416' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALR' 'sip-files00029.txt'
fc75afa775811a8cbfbd849374feef9d
c39554d787838ff86062d3e43f5fe63b73622246
describe
'10960' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALS' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
0d7925dccbd8c3814cd18f64a0735eb2
5813bcca7e5e8a59cf6cf7464a78e9e41b4a7c37
describe
'963040' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALT' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
c87dd69c7af9afe3dc5dc2ce9727d601
a2d68b3d276531a0daefc87d4d05e5f04f067657
'2011-12-30T06:13:46-05:00'
describe
'98404' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALU' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
8468aae6a2b497304ace09cef984b0ba
337bc314d9b0873e4ef30d71a6e1d8b88db0fd92
'2011-12-30T06:16:17-05:00'
describe
'37678' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALV' 'sip-files00030.pro'
4210f98274ae01706cd1ac9d6de7f55d
f5a589d5a0bba6080a2899ab0b91668b5f45611b
describe
'35853' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALW' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
e61040f947f23d4bdcaf2133f2661727
d382fbcc4c140443be094fd16f6a0c726661b6c4
'2011-12-30T06:13:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALX' 'sip-files00030.tif'
4c6b16929529ce8d6577458feaf886e8
2514f69b8fe05515353e9e2d600f294a40db3a17
'2011-12-30T06:21:19-05:00'
describe
'1587' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALY' 'sip-files00030.txt'
6631a04d850646bfa701ae6fae30bef1
10c723ceb8881c16bea6139fd821adfe00fca7dd
describe
'10947' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACALZ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
a0ad402e9939fd0330a439798a8f9d65
eeebf0e2c48ad72627ccdf2fd4579aadf94146dc
describe
'932460' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMA' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
a6077ec7fd84f048110a0d7c3e282627
cc9ecc55bf423d17cbdd238885c8a86aa83aaa93
'2011-12-30T06:16:47-05:00'
describe
'94223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMB' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
a0338a000a13fbf440174ae8e00c87c5
1b0dae3f6f702bc5f591d3a8ae21fecb26ad0c82
'2011-12-30T06:21:35-05:00'
describe
'36506' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMC' 'sip-files00031.pro'
215ece4349f8de03e2c314cb9e93f179
d24c5ba4b1ffdae12442850f92a68f6439c71e2a
'2011-12-30T06:17:51-05:00'
describe
'34598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMD' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
fcc8914406ec6fcb8d051011cb4f8d01
1344e5ff5ca4b07950fb7755d602b623463294a0
'2011-12-30T06:17:45-05:00'
describe
'7466507' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAME' 'sip-files00031.tif'
1cbaa3b169896f49d3ddd91cb7590327
27d4167dbe5a87a667a565e983c0a21603900630
'2011-12-30T06:16:39-05:00'
describe
'1529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMF' 'sip-files00031.txt'
dbad5d17b9669571544c5e6e60693fbf
684a9dd20bf5978a0244fff252f22ad0df67b49d
describe
'10708' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMG' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
8893aae6f3f5f22f90d0695f15d435a2
f5aee22301d090a06156750d53ca6f7ac386a84d
'2011-12-30T06:21:23-05:00'
describe
'963098' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMH' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
a96d8b5b580c64e54645f272871eb59b
2c72a2fb784cdbfc94663653d2bffc6e4379fa36
'2011-12-30T06:19:47-05:00'
describe
'90430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMI' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
34f5cf60064b059e16dbf7ef98ff26fc
6c0e0677b46c4ce855d3d694d2653726558ccf68
'2011-12-30T06:18:43-05:00'
describe
'35273' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMJ' 'sip-files00032.pro'
614309fd8348c72acdce37af33440081
5f213036b65c621c78e96aae9ed6248d9da5d715
'2011-12-30T06:21:47-05:00'
describe
'33356' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMK' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
34f096fcced4c304bf33fa1cd939ebcd
c1113b30735812742d9711e21b0ecc7342a1f60f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAML' 'sip-files00032.tif'
b5ca42385b7496a6ab03045626c75269
a34c6664e1f38eea91b65f442e75440ac4b04cd7
'2011-12-30T06:14:07-05:00'
describe
'1502' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMM' 'sip-files00032.txt'
f648190f6b0f5d3bc56e0079ef18f72f
8804fb27a8e5aaf6a5b8fab68caa462ba53554f5
'2011-12-30T06:18:06-05:00'
describe
'10374' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMN' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
f7a74916d994c0658dcfb6a7035b7741
a792d3f9878acfddcfd877b4a34c90a958059118
describe
'1067966' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMO' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
23cdb421c54bc9d304041bd6f8d146cf
2ca16b73a4893c7960ec945b1d8820568dbc190d
'2011-12-30T06:19:49-05:00'
describe
'92324' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMP' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
52768fa40dce6a73f62fe2f10b723309
8368063943c8bd8bf18fc0edf28137fc3aa5fc66
'2011-12-30T06:17:04-05:00'
describe
'35823' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMQ' 'sip-files00033.pro'
a3627f377ff1722cb312b44bb0e4be18
e4449f016d6cbc8acb7ec260e8d4bb12d63e1776
describe
'32892' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMR' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
f098cd8a6da368e0741683a20953b15e
c5205569db95f18b06b194a500b9cc97ef2be7cb
describe
'8550193' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMS' 'sip-files00033.tif'
faf304cd7eda5e758368ade25b5719f7
3afb5a92927bcd44b176430256ccffb6b6dd34c6
describe
'1501' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMT' 'sip-files00033.txt'
cda278d18c79c3306cec9babc2950bb5
44525639f9baea7b19a27a54b2625f3c1d722261
'2011-12-30T06:16:19-05:00'
describe
'9858' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMU' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
838dbb4db5e67f535f7297b4726b97b9
bab5b3e1843164235c03963225d69f845aaf6afe
describe
'963011' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMV' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
3e3d2cb455b65ab7fb60500d1a1341ce
1f5b34498720f685d46d7b17b4def663d9d768d0
'2011-12-30T06:15:29-05:00'
describe
'94029' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMW' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
24ad2d628f2d42e45c4feb144470d0d7
0bbf5231a95e98e497e1716dc5079e2560352752
'2011-12-30T06:21:48-05:00'
describe
'36465' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMX' 'sip-files00034.pro'
965ea92f77e657d63773027ddd4ceef4
5287a4cf121234a2ef21c647dcff5d054b9ddf94
'2011-12-30T06:23:15-05:00'
describe
'34042' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMY' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
ef2af6ad92e1fb3928b343828f1ef6f5
adfe69b114c825e1c68af53dce4210bbc169a1fa
'2011-12-30T06:14:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAMZ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
2839f2848222f5035e7641d30619c7f0
98679df570fb6ddc5164d65ebd0fd65aa22ec371
'2011-12-30T06:15:25-05:00'
describe
'1585' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANA' 'sip-files00034.txt'
f9f6d63fe22cf77e35f468b2aae357da
1726891f0cfb687a109222b73b5082d52cc66e13
describe
'10508' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANB' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
43940412397cf7dca65f246deb89a080
9431370c8b62512e5931bfc7a960e79d3c5f543b
describe
'1022624' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANC' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
3ae471d1fdcd8f65d944b593983e14c8
7308790afdec313580cc6992512b7e30106758fe
describe
'78398' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAND' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
c1fd90be8e5f3b67c322196fbe84cfc8
61e40edf78b9d9e020238833484c5f360fccea97
'2011-12-30T06:21:18-05:00'
describe
'32637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANE' 'sip-files00035.pro'
fa93d630383e9b5f6de85a0d4d3d363b
a0851fa13776181c7df747a3a54d154657134b5c
describe
'27653' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANF' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
7ced526f43015c55ddacb9a6e8d9fe74
848bf2fcd7c9bf80b53d514e16d5be76c2a9fd24
'2011-12-30T06:16:14-05:00'
describe
'8191925' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANG' 'sip-files00035.tif'
0c999c64a9e091b648a0b3568fb672dd
af825f5d59208da5e5b4b8c8dc2eba067751ffb0
'2011-12-30T06:14:34-05:00'
describe
'1387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANH' 'sip-files00035.txt'
5439cace3de3876cd9bb14d4284e6936
c6b7ac519412d2be28b6fdcdeaacea2f0d0401c5
describe
'9094' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANI' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
b14c1009a96ed13ef79de2352635ebaa
a026e76931e80b423455120b2752835bfcc0bd19
describe
'831811' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANJ' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
a032ea566f78c67f86fe2ca04fa05763
9f40384afdc3fe0ce593bde3894c90ee32c6ab64
describe
'34512' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANK' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
fb339ed9a581965c1e5e672c45499c5e
c623cf8ae828c33e583826bb0d69dff7f4b0e87b
describe
'6956' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANL' 'sip-files00036.pro'
859a8c93374b64db631bc7165266aa7e
5749ccd2554c5a1297f603a077dbac7207a63c5f
'2011-12-30T06:23:01-05:00'
describe
'11701' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANM' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
057aaec09cb819559f6d3ca20b24485b
8e7eed1b0c71954508978c361f541522674173dc
'2011-12-30T06:13:47-05:00'
describe
'8123621' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANN' 'sip-files00036.tif'
c4ff2b7092259c82b275eea9d2ce8df1
e74c998e5cb610ca98072afc91517bf2e93c2b49
'2011-12-30T06:23:43-05:00'
describe
'322' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANO' 'sip-files00036.txt'
c188f3e591f837dad9e7c989503fb328
2e217d41e83db57927442aa214c265e7682f1d12
'2011-12-30T06:22:39-05:00'
describe
'3672' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANP' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
a145d4d9cac24f4f1c1e5d152daafa64
76350fdc88d1913f62e03a364edbc12d74e3cf01
'2011-12-30T06:14:31-05:00'
describe
'1022741' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANQ' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
10a60b2b0e1798e19e29b48111a4125b
6f8fa16b8cbee4f585126435fd7076fed7baf0b3
describe
'71193' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANR' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
f40ae068a0519a477f1558fe92ac6754
47cb3fcefb7b2c182f9113cd1ffbfa33dbbb775b
describe
'27961' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANS' 'sip-files00037.pro'
52a48330db809cbfeb17d4f4c1f03752
db3f02383e582268083037cc7763043c804f828d
describe
'24496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANT' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
3db94daeb9444f39b0cefa11e072455d
badb243861a2093d130cc7080d8a0c8001c14e73
'2011-12-30T06:13:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANU' 'sip-files00037.tif'
fc69672913659d4fae71208f840a325e
374e6e7fc840cb5e02b7931912378f1f29ea0943
'2011-12-30T06:12:56-05:00'
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANV' 'sip-files00037.txt'
dd6e3407fb4ccd840a7b0eee9efdf050
5070c3ca825f1ca0deabe0ad0310d6ab799db613
'2011-12-30T06:22:44-05:00'
describe
'7609' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANW' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
06e34b900be11f8ca98a4e876f37c2fb
81991663463cb422afe03e3dd0e67611da93519d
'2011-12-30T06:14:58-05:00'
describe
'1014264' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANX' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
69ffda918f47e4f3024a6ac5b730ce00
ca00fe7574e312b0d6e2311b070956f754ea23b8
'2011-12-30T06:22:04-05:00'
describe
'101126' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANY' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
e4808456d44cc37b3670fb4715cbb3d7
7fd717939b2b016e841674b210b35f85eab757ee
'2011-12-30T06:16:22-05:00'
describe
'41194' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACANZ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
c0307ade6acc032b2f6be373c0b26a95
39b2d4b208795c4ab45a76a8c2d6cbcee7da9494
'2011-12-30T06:15:45-05:00'
describe
'36880' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOA' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
e77e7b7df2c3d3698a4af1bb8f4ccc5d
10f714fee5d4348e47f68476296b4ec2951fe0c8
'2011-12-30T06:13:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOB' 'sip-files00038.tif'
c217e3521d604031932e868d8a96a4ef
35c96c5deb8faa55c26aeadf949494b60e8a37bc
'2011-12-30T06:20:47-05:00'
describe
'1675' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOC' 'sip-files00038.txt'
a98ae04c39a7a50e0b9714eae6dde63f
cd96ca3b627e01b12080769fd5e434a4c2721fc0
'2011-12-30T06:12:48-05:00'
describe
'11033' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOD' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
165a338072547f458ccfa40a6cdce582
20dd1e152ad5abcb9a594d1a854ce3487c531480
describe
'1022700' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOE' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
dffd895857a4e9b25a441cedec1e1e49
dcc3e115a97b2f1fee29ceaabcbe682ff694d881
'2011-12-30T06:16:12-05:00'
describe
'86570' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOF' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
487b85eb31ab0b9c08d2deb86d35a1ac
92d4be6b5ad5de2b7c0d0dbf95de33621ad0ecac
'2011-12-30T06:15:26-05:00'
describe
'33875' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOG' 'sip-files00039.pro'
eb01ec386280470bf0acea9c12727b1e
4faca1780765965b58f918e3461b5e848b8f375d
describe
'30435' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOH' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
e4d7e28f6bc3f469cb905e504e6ded9a
fc7b56c3eb75e9ddaee509ca4aa0880475dad490
'2011-12-30T06:18:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOI' 'sip-files00039.tif'
0b602d3c2c8b710f06f70a555f0ba2c2
a85027f8e03d2e4aff9880a802f825931ae5011d
describe
'1445' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOJ' 'sip-files00039.txt'
9e172e4676db299fe57dd7bf18cbccc9
16db0271e62789170c1ea0c905d46cf8548e5dae
'2011-12-30T06:16:57-05:00'
describe
'9805' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOK' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
31cf207ebe986b7706981c94c3a65352
4196cbb4afa7c0fd25cdd5a72c51475067d4cb99
'2011-12-30T06:15:34-05:00'
describe
'1014249' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOL' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
c70cd231ce07819ab2997136f8974565
66e076a04c16aaec489e22038bddf5be471426af
'2011-12-30T06:23:02-05:00'
describe
'97359' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOM' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
fa58cb0bf0707bf9547d3633b0b1c306
cf51ee39f27b2af3ddee95dce409524f5d3341d2
'2011-12-30T06:23:08-05:00'
describe
'39132' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAON' 'sip-files00040.pro'
1ea18c05051966db2c0dcf13f22caaaf
1e428224dadce598e68d0e9a6a392ad0e0f5c43e
'2011-12-30T06:15:03-05:00'
describe
'34716' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOO' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
1f71f6058579d51e19856769a1ad2dcf
5d807cec515d8a51b3983f384fcf45e5868dee6e
'2011-12-30T06:23:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOP' 'sip-files00040.tif'
e02451a482e3b82de0dc03177d4fc442
e42553b122981f6136801d8fd3b9197478508ab3
'2011-12-30T06:15:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOQ' 'sip-files00040.txt'
2d8974d5497f40391dae7aafde592801
dcd37af8c4d00b615c67c7fb0166bf1bfec93c4f
'2011-12-30T06:13:32-05:00'
describe
'10229' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOR' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
d12ce8f4eddcfd251d3ffa01c1d30b98
68d17d55aff2e06132cacf36f098c432dd6b656f
'2011-12-30T06:21:30-05:00'
describe
'1022651' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOS' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
1b67dc3efe1a8f96375a4b1ac4d67ba0
f62ef7547137cebe3753e3ecacf1cb10a4675996
'2011-12-30T06:23:20-05:00'
describe
'88916' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOT' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
8e1392fe1f7365b972856e9c9d1d3838
101edc781270bc95ed55da2e42e25986cc34479b
'2011-12-30T06:22:51-05:00'
describe
'34425' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOU' 'sip-files00041.pro'
cc4ed933da197c5c6d9a53ec3dc7de5d
d59390c103018a600627c89362ad2c2f4cb978c3
describe
'31377' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOV' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
ff87def58b247fef28697bad30751776
3c7a1b82a86c0fbbef1d848866a00814e6fce046
'2011-12-30T06:16:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOW' 'sip-files00041.tif'
fcefde79460199c1e66d51c49660d418
d4185307c50bb37d4b7ac61d9e13220d70286cf9
'2011-12-30T06:21:31-05:00'
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOX' 'sip-files00041.txt'
3b4f5402cb4910c2681737dd00a7c6ab
b67f1f8d7f4c3fdf4d115eec38fa03eb4a5c56c4
describe
'10176' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOY' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
498d0457cc15a73721e2c521099d45b9
4da49ae3725b04e3cd9e33df8549882ee58d220f
'2011-12-30T06:22:30-05:00'
describe
'1014043' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAOZ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
4ee606ea65cdfcac43cbe9c08852e566
49219bea7b649d571d9c159244df93d9c50d9868
describe
'85566' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPA' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
29097230cc197afc541d3169ce8be6e6
fc596435b8daa9df68c8427a78f093f3d3a6467d
'2011-12-30T06:23:03-05:00'
describe
'31448' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPB' 'sip-files00042.pro'
e0d1362473067b63773bc07f15c6c348
6d107ba9d44e56aa771ec81dd1bd2409b5edd7da
'2011-12-30T06:12:37-05:00'
describe
'30092' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPC' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
ec0c3eb6fc46e48d2f2ec44a7c586ec8
fee703f999d5009591095c1a34ea487628675764
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPD' 'sip-files00042.tif'
6b56e056f2320ba6bba7ce511087b6eb
e384adc280fe50660520a7fd9b9676b78e6c22fb
'2011-12-30T06:15:44-05:00'
describe
'1342' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPE' 'sip-files00042.txt'
80da72f89fff6c8d45e37cc480854e65
3aea6564260361427d738e5d9b6dc6214b82fcb5
describe
'9526' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPF' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
4af9a197a766abf42e0b806ba699cd08
411b9853d900863fae8dc5c8b4ececd3c2ca90d1
describe
'960915' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPG' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
d9ceabf9934a92eb3d0fe06a84666ec2
98fd58d3184d8480a69054d6624fc6399adde84f
'2011-12-30T06:13:53-05:00'
describe
'59112' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPH' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
93e3fac9148abc8d766e623915c8d4b4
427a514fddc67c5ea1e335e9df107adf02d58e65
describe
'18368' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPI' 'sip-files00043.pro'
7c88e39732e6e63b59988ba7a6b18a41
43af3ae0d840542a60a2fe8b1d47fa95c1a9aa32
'2011-12-30T06:13:31-05:00'
describe
'20416' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPJ' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
fc916ea2cc24e817e56c18ecf1b8ec63
33926e1004ae2ddb8642bcb2ea20f64e123312f6
'2011-12-30T06:22:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPK' 'sip-files00043.tif'
ed0345108f7723ab400291f0a10654c6
128c5377112f0c474bc10c54101bc0b32e6177ac
'2011-12-30T06:15:46-05:00'
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPL' 'sip-files00043.txt'
78296b29d3141d138fe102d6f4349e2f
0cac1a5ffd509f1a08e5e578cfb1e540b29d0910
describe
'6899' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPM' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
88cb6211f61351c207d5df9cb0ee8d01
0fec657dd8d2a809508421bf4f48deb5b1ada58e
'2011-12-30T06:12:47-05:00'
describe
'1014243' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPN' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
0a11f83366424aad5c3db1524d4374ac
d4dc46fc26498325b5602fe66164a0bca49d01a1
describe
'73858' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPO' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
25612fe60287a41e51dad88eadef260e
8565e9882f3854bc31d7b9860e71f0dbee65b32a
'2011-12-30T06:17:34-05:00'
describe
'27067' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPP' 'sip-files00044.pro'
9ed084f3c05b48fb02b632edeff82d3e
6f164717df7b8ac2fabba04148d445d5d9d8b30c
'2011-12-30T06:13:30-05:00'
describe
'25668' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPQ' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
2c40d9c50adce8eb441ea3f5dd40f407
842348e25666f4fcb9516b3d93698714836ac9f8
'2011-12-30T06:22:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPR' 'sip-files00044.tif'
a52543864e063be6e33c099393ca13f1
fb5c2eb5005af56d6b384c47ccc7049d45f9298b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPS' 'sip-files00044.txt'
f61fa336a986589feafcc58e6096ec83
010f5d12804d94b9c8665f6905cded271435c4e6
'2011-12-30T06:15:18-05:00'
describe
'7702' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPT' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
2469464066c02ffedb1293fbfd40bb69
7ce7ae38b73f1235e4a71c87d306a58b3ce552df
describe
'1022774' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPU' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
32549f1bb414bc0023da7e4a9aa9cc73
620456d2038a1aadd34f6e65cc60d7ceb186c8e0
describe
'95008' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPV' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
af8675bf3a4688078ce463ff77e19ba9
268c991f5f6890aaa976fd64221cae2fec30d361
'2011-12-30T06:15:49-05:00'
describe
'40571' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPW' 'sip-files00045.pro'
a1cee2daa6048ee2b0c04854fc720046
54342cc8ca1653ab50b1fe82e60f3cdefca6dc56
'2011-12-30T06:17:07-05:00'
describe
'34294' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPX' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
54b3b4aef5d8fb95621171a211b27b54
fb1e39b8d2481f82cf2f2ce21ddb9d7f8ce220c5
'2011-12-30T06:17:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPY' 'sip-files00045.tif'
62f6c05db60fcf5ff969fcdbf349a827
bac4b19bde6ce43139ced2f98a848652150a646e
describe
'1615' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAPZ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d504fce1566c7e9c5d10e519fbeea44c
b62a4d538ae74bfe20082fe17914b7621391a8f8
'2011-12-30T06:19:46-05:00'
describe
'10466' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQA' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
b700eaba223224a52c9485cafd5eef42
263e010dcc534ca4502cdac1b68dcf6ae9a3455e
describe
'1014245' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQB' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
d08ef36f13b8b7f89b8fac50dd6daede
abeeaeb9cf4fc9ac53453b24d6d90c2714206832
'2011-12-30T06:16:06-05:00'
describe
'102838' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQC' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
355a164fd5f84ca3b629f231b2118aa9
40e04e255fead57762bb903aa87bbb445ff5b220
'2011-12-30T06:17:12-05:00'
describe
'43430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQD' 'sip-files00046.pro'
0f5413cf3ee6d694f76ff6d2b95e64d7
94e7a5ca175a502e4b29d1228901c8df9d10b22a
describe
'37171' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQE' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e5e3bb71df636cd544eb302032150128
dfa505e770d34e5e2a36551d2a20b9cef818f35e
'2011-12-30T06:15:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQF' 'sip-files00046.tif'
b986e1569a729d7c510b2106a361dd92
9f690a1721612bba0ea31b51d9d2c261aeee54f6
'2011-12-30T06:13:14-05:00'
describe
'1749' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQG' 'sip-files00046.txt'
bf71a1e6f5b08b1d7a87e9e65acc53d1
40e043cbe39c84c863de62ea494cc0bbfe4f4f48
'2011-12-30T06:12:51-05:00'
describe
'10993' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQH' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
bddc3ebdb84f1e0aba37aa8513b1a57e
61a6359b94601bf51bc334b7170378d67ae9b40a
'2011-12-30T06:23:09-05:00'
describe
'1022783' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQI' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
0d4a356b3b2f62540e6c1219f5bca0dc
beb681261ad40d56ac33ec172c0adb637c145cd2
describe
'98723' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQJ' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
f67f8b0e5c63cee36833de81a0470fdc
9337e5c45a3369c7cac1a9676125303ac22784e6
describe
'41285' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQK' 'sip-files00047.pro'
01089f3f2e870a6318d9de8ba5999f3b
0a8e6381558af263744c8fa162630ffcd54481a5
'2011-12-30T06:13:07-05:00'
describe
'34965' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQL' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
5da2270155fb0d08e8b91902f2b8d549
49f5364ba9aa3f535320c80d772f218e2d347357
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQM' 'sip-files00047.tif'
3916fea63b20ee3cc9f20bbc5df47edc
2097739b4773144e7005494acd65afdf1e6242d9
'2011-12-30T06:18:28-05:00'
describe
'1705' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQN' 'sip-files00047.txt'
1db610d8b5e637a7c2f3fd15ddec872a
99070b59d133ecdfac99cafbf262d8dcc0c0d118
describe
'10571' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQO' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
a3661699f24faed4e10ad67910ab6fb3
8efb06ab22f622fdf50c8bbdbfa03332df7b55d9
'2011-12-30T06:16:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQP' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
2864eb46879a9aa596418b9c377300be
87f673295e3f507629308cc823649b1305d791ac
'2011-12-30T06:13:09-05:00'
describe
'99968' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQQ' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
7f75dfacf42a43f9ed1de92e43f247c4
970315234b86b1bdc56581ea507955f8f64ee503
'2011-12-30T06:13:56-05:00'
describe
'40267' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQR' 'sip-files00048.pro'
89423053cf7db794c71a7905580f123f
b8a176860766abefe4aa59ac782426804e02c30b
describe
'35605' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQS' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
c5eebd4826aa019931d3041afc8b2397
dd35c64298d8e5a0f9efb46ae6079dc30061161c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQT' 'sip-files00048.tif'
494160c9583953e2fc5a29d11e23b83e
f43389af7af3ccc6e389b99bb09e5312214c840c
'2011-12-30T06:15:22-05:00'
describe
'1690' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQU' 'sip-files00048.txt'
bc35682b6012be2d16c2fbc642eb8639
6ec0116459b1c5c01b101bae8aa12abd5b1e5e33
describe
'10143' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQV' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
05b10bf550b3da724ff2fd25d2c04124
d432a1007183a31b2928508907f94d7d823baba2
'2011-12-30T06:13:23-05:00'
describe
'1022784' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQW' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
990e91bb28890777c42fc39ddbf25f59
40506c165a44cc05988c553badbd8d2b4070b422
describe
'93720' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQX' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
2914be54ae322bb5d3ff00a02ebd90f0
1d4518af18a2ba1ea82f84c85520b2ec96c411d2
'2011-12-30T06:23:19-05:00'
describe
'37715' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQY' 'sip-files00049.pro'
50b7d88011ec70b1b3d43f06bb30a847
0e07bbcae0f32b3c3971f6dea0382d584fb36ad9
describe
'33836' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAQZ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
106148185695ae9c0a1214c18e82ae32
7cc0bacefbee63ffffda02b851f743aa1fca918a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARA' 'sip-files00049.tif'
5e72cfba05cd19129fe82b0dfac96b46
a5e5a88bee64c0fdb69f184ab741e8ac3858c693
describe
'1556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARB' 'sip-files00049.txt'
bd5643d8892929d0cdd20def76657c47
6773c4059d49e46f2c0ccbc798e380d7d58af9e9
describe
'10652' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARC' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
d9fbc96eeb70054d91389b3e9cabe9fb
fec386d88fbf263d9cc86e60d9f997c434f8e11a
describe
'940721' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARD' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
4909dbf36f130a12385753c57b22ea0e
43e4341ed9803133ade7c5914a28fcba76101f93
describe
'50927' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARE' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
abb5a6e33b481a877eb84425f09daec6
04b98955aed2cd2f9ca526b8a498d437fb770e47
'2011-12-30T06:23:56-05:00'
describe
'12047' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARF' 'sip-files00050.pro'
23b5f6f0f026110350b1d0550d0fb77d
f307a324b34b2f0c13f2addcafd54cc18a5e9ec4
'2011-12-30T06:17:30-05:00'
describe
'16848' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARG' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
1e1b5301f692d49c7e9d3fca04fb6966
dfcc75dbe4c25c71f6e1ee647c7fbd1e1f57bb4f
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARH' 'sip-files00050.tif'
903b1647732e84f57f4301d090700c3c
a8282e334b226bf742d9edc4cd61c8b6be663031
'2011-12-30T06:23:39-05:00'
describe
'523' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARI' 'sip-files00050.txt'
de87468c036112b7efcc25f5b899bcb7
7938d5c01b2c08b7b21cf7eeb9839d477b30c771
'2011-12-30T06:13:24-05:00'
describe
'5244' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARJ' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
640cf3fc03409c41d438a6fa53e00f17
0ee62cb79648e6d568193b97eec1e9a9744f14d2
'2011-12-30T06:17:49-05:00'
describe
'1022782' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARK' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
005110e1258faac18790dde29ad565e1
0b76766936d3cc485ad70c7af3d0855ea522c516
'2011-12-30T06:17:46-05:00'
describe
'67220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARL' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
80b3b3ed52725048bf905d7ffcba83fd
3c52701f2f0faca18bb6248817f237fac4de5f2e
describe
'24417' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARM' 'sip-files00051.pro'
110ed5cc8b19b9679a761e6b178bca7c
bad85a747c3cc9ec4b785097a1d53f2d49e93084
describe
'22691' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARN' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
3e0c40c5f065513b23a5844c1fe84475
3a805f519b8d2f89a9fbe208e0de4e6f1366693a
'2011-12-30T06:23:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARO' 'sip-files00051.tif'
2c756352057fe8b5fa8b32a10e4578f1
eabd62b36cb968e04967c206b7648a4517814962
'2011-12-30T06:14:41-05:00'
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARP' 'sip-files00051.txt'
45df467529aadd6820dcb6073829dd8b
c001c134bcc8477389af03f4ab8fb28cdd37ca0a
describe
'7098' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARQ' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
ed9d3fc58276ec64de8bee6afbe06d37
f4db7471bcee32852e47826dd4185fe89f9492ad
describe
'1014225' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARR' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
45c1eff78fd98a3c070d19f3ecb69fcd
0ab628490dde49137aa4cb614d3d658fbc2d9bfa
describe
'101042' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARS' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
8fa56accbd9ab486a1e90905768871c3
7532dc6e5e0be75acd6ad630c4012dc505c3d147
'2011-12-30T06:22:26-05:00'
describe
'41533' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACART' 'sip-files00052.pro'
5ed05591ffa26cf26f477f31ee5a6231
8a80cde18533566e2fb51a353cb32ff6fa27abec
'2011-12-30T06:15:07-05:00'
describe
'35928' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARU' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
10dae056a858126e368df6e88af524f4
b94f6bfbbfef8c03978dee463a674853701d7029
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARV' 'sip-files00052.tif'
7274c2c87eab1b136354b4f22a643f12
756ec7cb2cc1db73bf2293d973663b554144cec1
'2011-12-30T06:14:48-05:00'
describe
'1731' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARW' 'sip-files00052.txt'
8090007f07e06eaad50a698dff803b6a
175e8a55413fe6bf195c2d0691c0b3b7d0fc304a
'2011-12-30T06:13:03-05:00'
describe
'10438' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARX' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
e8bfeffb382f78e46c106cc3d1dfa955
892eee1168134d5baaeb4c5cdaee03c068876642
describe
'1022761' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARY' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
1708e38a71fb1c99b45db55543b18f2a
0bfdba745cf9a26bf2e1fab1f93747cfc5822712
describe
'102135' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACARZ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
b327a148519fa544617c6e4204056689
77d8d50c1b410f5d16556c1e58e3d4d9446d398c
'2011-12-30T06:15:52-05:00'
describe
'42092' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASA' 'sip-files00053.pro'
1a6f9e35abc560289eaf2528b3d63970
72d7abf8b582a389fb3262138fc76b8036f27bdd
'2011-12-30T06:15:40-05:00'
describe
'35980' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASB' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
95a02a792240a36c9b40011b9d29232c
5831ee52e8c66d656097e4feaf183f8247d50686
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASC' 'sip-files00053.tif'
329a2405f217c0b3f50c9b992f987c57
9694ae4100d29c7f7e5177e92264d39cc20e9fc6
describe
'1682' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASD' 'sip-files00053.txt'
3e5224d0256d18620436e0d19fff24ac
6308f01b7a470e425ac31ba8a7ae42a5ac8f465c
describe
Invalid character
'11148' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASE' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
00f97c5019226efc698cbbd7c46a4f8b
db6f67668e63cb9bcca8f77069bb454153696add
describe
'1014267' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASF' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
c06ec7eefa0d3cd333e753fe488e25c5
f20d5f74fb40d24e391050f15139c971bef32bc1
'2011-12-30T06:16:42-05:00'
describe
'101913' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASG' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
5aefdc38466e6547e01fb13d1aada824
35752fff7eda75c583ef1063ebe65d2d4674967c
describe
'41320' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASH' 'sip-files00054.pro'
60c97f4b434def2ff75ffcd196752256
3c5c996ed70859281f0f39c9cee56c0c15b1f155
'2011-12-30T06:21:44-05:00'
describe
'35921' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASI' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
56dfb02ad7b26163cee3b5effaf6b6ae
a96ccb0ed1a23b5b1928e16541603934f93e3f7e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASJ' 'sip-files00054.tif'
95b3b96a7cc5f188de97dd1acc074880
1d5270a1f8eab646daa97745fcb3cb15222718b0
'2011-12-30T06:13:48-05:00'
describe
'1765' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASK' 'sip-files00054.txt'
fb2f9895e5e9d7ec4eca3ff9c91fc996
bd183ddc757424339cb67e27ff563bb49f2fdaf9
'2011-12-30T06:13:57-05:00'
describe
'10478' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASL' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
ddd411298ff8540511242b8972fac2cf
20be94ac4da9ed13f5f3d2e4535664db45ac4b4e
describe
'1022727' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASM' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
0d42253014c7a9560091db5f9bad3401
86af2a4532517631946c0c7b30ac6dee6cdae97b
'2011-12-30T06:17:33-05:00'
describe
'91119' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASN' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
1cf33b16bdfbab16604a6ee7cc86e4a8
6512f5d3883d708578490f80bacdfc01faba4a78
'2011-12-30T06:16:35-05:00'
describe
'38559' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASO' 'sip-files00055.pro'
8158236d9ad6717117e8a4a2845b5b06
54c9e17eb5d3ec45e00dc5d89bef18cbbf318076
describe
'32337' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASP' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
fa8bf5695aef6c1e1ae2418d2803b382
2342346981902e21c4d9e6c951403142fdf2abd2
'2011-12-30T06:19:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASQ' 'sip-files00055.tif'
04e55e02818dcf858a20ade441489cf5
1be398bea87e9ce9f085db0645fd70ecdd3b1e8e
'2011-12-30T06:15:36-05:00'
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASR' 'sip-files00055.txt'
8839c46faf2d4b4bc0a22df4683f4d32
86f843da7bc9707082954f795a9fe27200e9c4e4
describe
'9923' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASS' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
923eeabec9b038474bc925df6a248cd8
47e9a01df8ae809084339cfbbc2c4fcb57f0e91b
describe
'1014060' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAST' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
05aa5682c23f229ec3a95acf569acdae
9951e986bbc568e312f2ab60143720b940ac0c5e
'2011-12-30T06:15:24-05:00'
describe
'90039' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASU' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
0c6753309e176da9568b83c019b363fa
9847244ca3d70f10b153c9398c8243639615db82
describe
'36143' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASV' 'sip-files00056.pro'
6feb949cdefd695a9f686d18ea74ee84
ce9171283430ac48f8c5061a0a24f571a5a6e97c
'2011-12-30T06:18:05-05:00'
describe
'32503' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASW' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
0978a07af05234c0ce7339d2f3b7810a
2ceb59132df27064d85e68a9d0ec9bb9409349da
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASX' 'sip-files00056.tif'
e9efdc02a59089a3bf1d6af0b266dca2
e1685eac84cf6c33ff91743db9b5ee9df324e7fc
describe
'1521' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASY' 'sip-files00056.txt'
d126ab665f6ec817dedde53b4c084f06
08a8c10e49c2d1f9d04ac1843b2f7d76dda0e0d5
'2011-12-30T06:21:27-05:00'
describe
'9728' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACASZ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
1493e9e9997ce3e990c8ee43aa055137
cf8cadceab77dc03599c84d9d3eb977e6f747553
'2011-12-30T06:22:31-05:00'
describe
'1007140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATA' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
ee9f1d6cfc1d899c126bf7e4eca79f7e
bc05f7b4c1e09787c3b59c74b57aa257be1b3bf1
'2011-12-30T06:16:30-05:00'
describe
'93490' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATB' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
55682d9dae3170aa4c75b6e09c6020ae
c3204bdd804445f428ccb776cbcbbf0b8eb43082
'2011-12-30T06:22:24-05:00'
describe
'37876' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATC' 'sip-files00057.pro'
a971050e95121a8bb23d2901bf0ab372
85e37a798a55f576d88769c2e378a501dc941d3d
describe
'33482' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATD' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
2f7b0823b05c645868055788db2838f9
a8a8d6c1b13d578498d3381284e3ef57b41b888e
'2011-12-30T06:17:14-05:00'
describe
'8066589' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATE' 'sip-files00057.tif'
0b9605941d5b1d3f6ac63189bfbecf99
5f5814b485c84f7aaf59ce6fe59c3a26c257fabf
describe
'1570' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATF' 'sip-files00057.txt'
eaec0440bed4790ebd6891db3ac1b897
88e7aafa2286e75b857028d9169325e3226327cf
'2011-12-30T06:14:21-05:00'
describe
'9924' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATG' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
0ca34cde7997538748d43f1ac711070a
0d87370273df610259026a2c47ea2088707ba8a7
describe
'986171' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATH' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
57aced5b325e9118631d4e6dd4d29ee0
bd82c4fd5b6f00ea1aa91bb142a2fc2cb77726ad
describe
'94816' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATI' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
2945ca33f5c7f5ff242c8b45b70363ef
1a37d7b40c18d997cbe569727ed943dbe9796d48
'2011-12-30T06:17:10-05:00'
describe
'37515' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATJ' 'sip-files00058.pro'
e3479f84a4eef682c3ced6c0774096f4
e9a819ad9e41bb4f55acfeff5d5e55fab47dcc3a
'2011-12-30T06:23:52-05:00'
describe
'34573' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATK' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
f588ac485993a7cacd4571d1feb2f7ed
e38ae05424ebaf00afbc29730ca7f89f8f2a6cba
'2011-12-30T06:15:23-05:00'
describe
'7898861' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATL' 'sip-files00058.tif'
aef285f58e67bb03f39e73721a8ac4fb
c7e977c5476e0d22f061497812ab4e67cf5d182c
'2011-12-30T06:23:05-05:00'
describe
'1565' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATM' 'sip-files00058.txt'
b0456b1ffff0e3d463583e59aa6c6189
3fa4702e41a27f142e908884773fdb0b7f6d6dd5
describe
'10291' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATN' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
4b2e6ccc79aae7f91f57c677611ae07c
b8c5b70c7609a69039b90c09954bdf0101a2e76c
'2011-12-30T06:22:32-05:00'
describe
'1007134' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATO' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
459afe8a1369f26fa2677c68ac45a59b
d2aa3d11eb3248c34113572f78e9766f227b105d
describe
'97611' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATP' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
e1c32c37a5e554ab12f44bc4a66c1920
25a0816c0b6f69b4fa7abeabb776fe04c5ff5194
describe
'40632' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATQ' 'sip-files00059.pro'
0f489ba3a7d021774faed81ea9f904c7
daef2e2106137c16b06b273f3cfdc20303f38f52
describe
'34822' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATR' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
76f74210f81c4689ddaf7600c8360c28
26aafbaeeb67727139ab2607c1c10620b4dea080
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATS' 'sip-files00059.tif'
c2df8b08a86a1e623700839c384d6e01
a46498431d054a43662b84ced7bd65857929fb0c
'2011-12-30T06:15:41-05:00'
describe
'1676' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATT' 'sip-files00059.txt'
8d0eb66881ba038e8efd3c6d29d0defa
e7dc2b260600cd3f81002cde6e438a5ff7fdce12
'2011-12-30T06:22:16-05:00'
describe
'10047' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATU' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
efe9d78d6c7302a9c4f91dfa521de466
164bd701ab4742bcad8071d59fbf66b4fae6e1a7
'2011-12-30T06:17:13-05:00'
describe
'986190' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATV' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
4605d9ba4b5a57b09af226a5a88386dc
196d759b067fe4e22ef647172a56913fc82c76f3
'2011-12-30T06:13:45-05:00'
describe
'94735' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATW' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
9ff8727c96b5614b21af8266ab6979eb
c52a468965b54ed8d703fe54b474b46e140692c6
describe
'38350' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATX' 'sip-files00060.pro'
71280461d36985b2efd1088261609f0b
5e3a63afcee60a79a3d7ff498cf421b7b2ea1283
'2011-12-30T06:16:21-05:00'
describe
'33318' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATY' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
758a19d99fe879a96ae194e27fe6a34e
db46c2937a22c55fc6b7bfc0949801c64d307462
'2011-12-30T06:18:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACATZ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
101e373a3ed3a10758d0d58abe2fb765
7d50c93943667d0dba08bdb20788e2ebaf0befe7
'2011-12-30T06:15:27-05:00'
describe
'1622' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUA' 'sip-files00060.txt'
96b7f0ae4f413dfd3650f131ca95ca0e
a83e51de3f4fac25a9783c740b5cb42480b67b30
'2011-12-30T06:14:36-05:00'
describe
'10368' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUB' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
e88dbaff802ca52b198a70f2367633f3
06bdbc3398e2f5bc14b6dc8ccec9c0f5d0de75e9
'2011-12-30T06:21:33-05:00'
describe
'1007083' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUC' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
d845d24404657e90ab665702a823a721
443797b90f38fe1c9c82a205399d325e33583cfc
'2011-12-30T06:23:22-05:00'
describe
'95168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUD' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
c13447614df180caeda4d84f5c372214
dce255e4c6c55f33a4936f77f2fc8461ac85b09e
'2011-12-30T06:15:37-05:00'
describe
'38363' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUE' 'sip-files00061.pro'
f708bf9518196d57293551b78e115684
d9f9ff8686829fb11693c56be554da3d1a593add
describe
'34478' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUF' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
2ce8a8dc5b1d0d9674d00c44c4ed1b9e
e5dbeaf6352f551d7b1d09a08eb56e90ffa73f5c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUG' 'sip-files00061.tif'
f4712f470188520d1528cb93525f5f18
4ea093ad9b7dbe47775f24779975547f7870bc92
'2011-12-30T06:21:28-05:00'
describe
'1609' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUH' 'sip-files00061.txt'
25098f06a2ea223f13ff50ffc63cc173
48b849335114e5f8dd5fd4aa196e4c0f187261b6
'2011-12-30T06:22:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUI' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
5b82c70ea945490f677c38272382e2f4
a395a1dff1b4b8b5c7f21a33cde432290d54f6c6
'2011-12-30T06:12:50-05:00'
describe
'986189' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUJ' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
5c020b7195317091923e939a9e719760
af7f579706ee3525be3bbbc6bb8436532ec3d75c
'2011-12-30T06:18:59-05:00'
describe
'98551' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUK' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
b6f4eaaca44826ea20b6c8a76d6672f3
06fe2ab64a67d57f358e441236e81d698b4fb2f2
'2011-12-30T06:13:28-05:00'
describe
'39772' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUL' 'sip-files00062.pro'
142421b9cc44f50bd45b7a90db2ede13
dfc143d2b5a90628ca483b069f5a107510aa94f0
'2011-12-30T06:22:19-05:00'
describe
'35950' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUM' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
e3f88ff03c49697fade8940fddd87729
a83ee84ef27e04ed1b79dade27e857feffeb587d
'2011-12-30T06:16:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUN' 'sip-files00062.tif'
f3b44dc55376f6bf042ebd01f0a5bc9b
1e18934e980a4c550c0a84fe9d7e7c74e8fe05a5
'2011-12-30T06:17:48-05:00'
describe
'1677' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUO' 'sip-files00062.txt'
f75a78bfa5de7111d5c91975acca3f46
419dafd063c5383a776137fb7adf198bd6682cfa
describe
'10348' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUP' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
b96dda0b923f5fde0934d22aa57f61e2
cd69d35d8b3df936ec02278f36bf7bdbe2c27793
'2011-12-30T06:15:19-05:00'
describe
'1007131' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUQ' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
08bba293ba09f46a835b0277601a161b
2acc4664f0bf4687a15c6e6ddf107add540554f6
'2011-12-30T06:16:05-05:00'
describe
'93325' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUR' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
483bee11c2f5f741b8738fcb601f2567
002c33afc5522e214283fcd923f3fcc419ec9812
describe
'38077' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUS' 'sip-files00063.pro'
9acaee4c9497134b2bcf0faa618cf9c3
717d6cbfca25445bbbd3f479f3895bb03f3d3205
describe
'33989' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUT' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
5b9168f810a3289515c8125a7e2fbb40
afb910fc6d269f1e37f625399a7ce973e401de49
'2011-12-30T06:22:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUU' 'sip-files00063.tif'
7241da39df2aaea524d96bcb4abf4e38
3a640f29c5d4800f2f261c33aa7b58d1984beda9
'2011-12-30T06:20:45-05:00'
describe
'1601' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUV' 'sip-files00063.txt'
b33549767b19082327052177d8a31c28
7b071d08c23d244d1864d13089dd6039b0e62258
'2011-12-30T06:15:35-05:00'
describe
'10001' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUW' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
2c27b4eb33ac7dbb12959b5935ef1207
869ca0e0b89a49e37e8af4d77aad33821b6c9ab5
describe
'986188' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUX' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
60f622905385feb64979940848290265
45e2df5ff743f5c20b164cd194487552b6b16566
'2011-12-30T06:14:08-05:00'
describe
'96831' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUY' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
05f29ca13a53d02527924de38fdd9fd8
14d767e8eea833f4f0fa0c04ced67e4895ac43d5
describe
'38087' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAUZ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
4ff46a8a58bf677b97841a2aefce5fa6
ee2680bd7607830a42f50e164cdd58a298c939b6
'2011-12-30T06:12:53-05:00'
describe
'35717' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVA' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
77205da0995336e13a29d5ad42d78e17
4f87c634bb89d00a743e0ad34c55fec2f674a65d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVB' 'sip-files00064.tif'
2627a3ae3c8a22d70fcf7318167af720
18134e22f17c51b4919e77b0d018603cda4b73c4
'2011-12-30T06:16:07-05:00'
describe
'1629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVC' 'sip-files00064.txt'
3b250bb501f9dc8206a30de107960ebe
9695aec51c7399e05878faad9e809aee4a38d5fc
'2011-12-30T06:21:20-05:00'
describe
'10591' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVD' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
ea6f9d7af971154543a4afe6e09052a5
57c69abf19e854a0f96286902e3cfdd31ba7054f
describe
'693122' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVE' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
134e5e93193ab593ebf8310cc3a2a620
18c18ddd21e603f61a6a84d4845021ed8cdf8a4e
'2011-12-30T06:12:45-05:00'
describe
'39637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVF' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
a69f72c68cb756cb82d996529907f5aa
7f880618a94b2ac55a9ba700276cc7377cd7217c
describe
'9245' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVG' 'sip-files00065.pro'
c538830e7fb619c700822eb3f1f0610e
29d33deb04f9c314daa3dbfef9916d8a3cc399b2
'2011-12-30T06:20:22-05:00'
describe
'13412' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVH' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
87d352245c902438248ae2abb3233b55
2cdf36d106126e51e669c4fbdeaf8bd7db1148e6
'2011-12-30T06:16:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVI' 'sip-files00065.tif'
997f38d0f04fb619147a372180e68110
49a1e57a254c93a9d23e179e3e6a0c361204e04d
'2011-12-30T06:14:23-05:00'
describe
'391' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVJ' 'sip-files00065.txt'
cfa7666d856d9e1496f1eec9eda9a59b
8892d8f18be43c8d078bb20b1457a3f97d69b268
'2011-12-30T06:23:50-05:00'
describe
'4221' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVK' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
3fa138068570b7de87dc5e75f1a70d8b
f66c349b25a3667b409469e6e0869852fcbcf14a
'2011-12-30T06:14:14-05:00'
describe
'965097' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVL' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
7071c3ca935fe44f9a501702228286e2
d4e7bc23d80943a385376624a784531edc29ff60
'2011-12-30T06:16:59-05:00'
describe
'69550' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVM' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
bd5aab28361fe9aba0c4ab17ac3a0592
e8fbb950f96bc909bba4c774cc1d1f8d8f745c0d
'2011-12-30T06:21:34-05:00'
describe
'26637' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVN' 'sip-files00066.pro'
c6c8078884adec9d807d87ef468dc65f
060d79a540ebeb7767f9a6780eb67f38e76a4755
describe
'24934' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVO' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
ff69efbc27a2eaaa083a61211035e73d
62720fcb4bc19be97f07d2e008c1ec9771f4b4c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVP' 'sip-files00066.tif'
5db1d16c4b8900de0a2c6a24a0dff56a
f412a627ef4e0e77f9d3cdea4081fc85bd03e86c
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVQ' 'sip-files00066.txt'
e79f4d74c954fdc2192522c0b764828e
3a80b69102383effc76c4860d0b7a61e5339f5a2
describe
'7658' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVR' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
37adb657c761e43cce6c0f98cb28620d
16cd72d57d9c847410a5db5348be117a7428257c
'2011-12-30T06:12:39-05:00'
describe
'1007122' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVS' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
8168093d70dd642afa9c5446c9d80251
c487dc6797fbcb08307f995716b8df9bf865e90d
'2011-12-30T06:14:06-05:00'
describe
'94516' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVT' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
6bcc6155674007a86cc5a1f7f2dc86cb
b60a4cbab9fbf838cb00f8f5b986848033bb12f1
'2011-12-30T06:15:16-05:00'
describe
'37467' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVU' 'sip-files00067.pro'
2cfe87276f5753ed00a0c4bf2f472a5d
cb61466ad1defd4b077bb919205b010bee7eba74
'2011-12-30T06:18:41-05:00'
describe
'33926' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVV' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
9007165d03bd74eccc065d65ef0d8622
07c3b3fc9d2efcf18fe2403b45d47195be590089
'2011-12-30T06:12:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVW' 'sip-files00067.tif'
ac2e08c891cbae2796f65bfbbb1b51a4
9f2271133c3d1f36b18655796c4e9d54408ba42a
'2011-12-30T06:13:49-05:00'
describe
'1544' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVX' 'sip-files00067.txt'
121c9f2aa930717d16ecb07f8d8ddef5
6b234c5c44a5645584955d893f7c8276536179a0
describe
'10275' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVY' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
f6fa655b0b20359d3920ca53a3d0cf38
63c665a288d0103a275c9a4fb5f5c45f813d1029
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAVZ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
a2950dcc547bd8b992a109b1f5a34718
e1dde2754363399dc95f0e3b8313d82d0ca892bc
describe
'100199' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWA' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
8114c53f8892a0a15a179e5658f9d21a
ced66ec2852129dc213a4c8ca8e1360473c0c314
'2011-12-30T06:19:16-05:00'
describe
'39283' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWB' 'sip-files00068.pro'
bbaf4c64ca14669f3ca3ecc455da2a7a
4cc300216041a895925ab398a6dcc2ccfd330683
'2011-12-30T06:13:29-05:00'
describe
'36396' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWC' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
63f8e0d0cb43e39b06c908daf8352d86
6c7a6986f9b554e7755cc5584c70ae5bc2d5008b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWD' 'sip-files00068.tif'
1b71cc35cf30f48b714d0e1ee60b5f4e
3d40c75513aa564a84d6aaccca8f4e9aad5ea2ba
'2011-12-30T06:13:02-05:00'
describe
'1644' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWE' 'sip-files00068.txt'
8617c95a08df1be901e4bca9c122c30f
e0d689124a5e83e913efcf1b61ff2af98911d57f
describe
'10763' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWF' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
2c2b9f9360eefad1932e0d47b0017105
0a0842c21595a474edb9985e5d99c2d42530515e
'2011-12-30T06:22:49-05:00'
describe
'1003349' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWG' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
1a1093927016e859f80759081474219e
06cff90973dbcdf681b35195182ff9dacf23626b
describe
'103408' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWH' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
d5d039ef6c96d42a681bb3f551d108e6
f92bc7296ee981f7b191dbb2d6b8967811775ab1
'2011-12-30T06:15:09-05:00'
describe
'41831' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWI' 'sip-files00069.pro'
617f8903e0604e9009b903b240fc6e75
646406d9ec640c78c7510fd53b4600f29e25c738
describe
'37064' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWJ' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
c3cf13e50ed1732aa83827d12bff51cb
01916af14aae51a35780394b6a00989d90457ec3
'2011-12-30T06:13:00-05:00'
describe
'8036197' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWK' 'sip-files00069.tif'
a9b8453048692e69074a1712a58f30ba
914fedc36dd333ef81c35de82a2535342afea5b1
describe
'1729' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWL' 'sip-files00069.txt'
70b6647f494c861cd93aceddce155c4a
1531a67fb668ee69b12249f8da88b05d56fbe92c
describe
'10521' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWM' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
fbd1d7e1e509884c9424c3c91d1b2045
73092524713632cf7114a2e92d2c9e8c08d004e5
'2011-12-30T06:14:04-05:00'
describe
'986170' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWN' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
fc99e8480b726d4e9301f85c71a26fd2
2e4a09af368f5131e0835f6fc3551185dd636c1a
describe
'104493' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWO' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
faa6cdb2a8026c01fd62e3ad93382105
8dc0c2d1dce4efc41017d4663344013b2d03cf5c
'2011-12-30T06:23:41-05:00'
describe
'41354' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWP' 'sip-files00070.pro'
482cb81d1a28bed57110d6c6f5b919d8
4b8d74a2e0408432066ee8cbb84ed1b75137dc73
describe
'37756' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWQ' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
4690b26cd77d89a79ca2878168b809cb
7dcafde545946af22f12d11520a98f9d3b08336e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWR' 'sip-files00070.tif'
1f535296e7101fc0f133b51545e065c8
9cf95c73dde8b997d25862a02ee3edcb8eefdf43
'2011-12-30T06:14:28-05:00'
describe
'1741' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWS' 'sip-files00070.txt'
b87693e4112250c7c105ecdf6d83cce4
82d501d7b98cca4f02b9f7c13b98b77394aae349
'2011-12-30T06:19:01-05:00'
describe
'11068' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWT' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
4518117d3b6877399905da79b3bc31bf
b66794fdd5e5d6d422b5f2638b906a9c9c600ff8
describe
'1003225' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWU' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
8a2fb6c29360e0c66a4be90fa7f8917e
5577580837f465146aaa723898a8a5965a60be41
'2011-12-30T06:21:05-05:00'
describe
'97544' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWV' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
717135f1de7ee7425ffd7b0fbf386547
720e7273fd7616924fbe45e89079b97918190303
'2011-12-30T06:14:22-05:00'
describe
'39154' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWW' 'sip-files00071.pro'
2b1c5342c6451699ec1287de04f14de5
3d491137457cad7bada27de94ab69842f9b235ac
'2011-12-30T06:16:11-05:00'
describe
'35873' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWX' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
178a29d01f11eae9c9072988e57b8256
8bb2a8d96f182430406e3c5595228492edc25653
'2011-12-30T06:21:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWY' 'sip-files00071.tif'
ef95643e6f5310c08450c9fd921b1cfc
60549fb4c83983664c26c32fc3ed43a4cc258bee
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAWZ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
a2c1de3cc555837569e75f4c770b7439
696f2e4588fbbecdf09c380de252cf17b4ad148a
describe
'10231' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXA' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
97b4becadd99d920eddb078dcc0c0881
a74172459a1b9ffd97fda2f33209d9bde7d4b582
'2011-12-30T06:16:25-05:00'
describe
'986184' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXB' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
ceeb8235f31f6f7aa50717202e798b59
44123d413d414ba9badd508d48209207db71000c
describe
'98571' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXC' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
438430bff30cb9920447f6e05374b86a
c91f0944bd905d688ba33ae403fba2407810bf47
'2011-12-30T06:13:08-05:00'
describe
'39357' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXD' 'sip-files00072.pro'
f599346a910a1adb5d43c790864dffa0
494e112a9a9c28d542d52c622c274a6a7c1f914d
describe
'35541' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXE' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
c7100646fc11c63e13f93676f9cc32c7
09cc4e4df403e32cce9b39aa12fe2a33f5b91f68
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXF' 'sip-files00072.tif'
2097566d4155b9b4c8302da567443a7d
eff8de25f9eaf592bb72e80ac2da1ea9d2c6c51b
'2011-12-30T06:23:31-05:00'
describe
'1684' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXG' 'sip-files00072.txt'
a41aa41f0a16c2a4c44440bdbed801de
d12d585f3a0f7c0bce0c6084efa93cb45aad800a
'2011-12-30T06:23:23-05:00'
describe
'10566' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXH' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
9a523ca59872ba70a2646b127d76381d
2e419be201ccf6c956400df76d03722c881bdd51
describe
'1003346' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXI' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
bc33f0dc692a829f02657f79404a0ed6
89c888022df3cccfdc44ffd1d2fc93d0caceb4c2
'2011-12-30T06:23:14-05:00'
describe
'105520' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXJ' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
ffd9a31f811883f66dad71d9f5c0fcbb
c8b5858848698f588443708d7076941640036993
describe
'41751' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXK' 'sip-files00073.pro'
c6601c8bbeaf212c0003e5b7d7d63420
38cd4884ddbed0bb9b1b62ce257e86a8fee13945
'2011-12-30T06:13:05-05:00'
describe
'37911' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXL' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
7167170d07a8b44f97530543f4efa2dc
ac536795ac07bf3506b3470cb604629f45245647
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXM' 'sip-files00073.tif'
4aa7cec393fd86cb8e75106857fc56b6
9a6b13fa4e7413685acdc1bd0e51afd3c83e7abe
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXN' 'sip-files00073.txt'
9840cceee0f6b76b0cd30d4f6c0ea186
8574bfbc6db9d4b485e4b68e7d6102a711fe3df5
describe
'10755' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXO' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
81317e5cf0b073f878c092348991bc33
886ebab63114f4ecd1f35ac0f11f5d05b609a50e
describe
'986181' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXP' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
4ad066362379289df41cce4b2b2c47f4
55937aef2ee8c71797ad7dcd3ed92c3835336a52
'2011-12-30T06:17:52-05:00'
describe
'103958' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXQ' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
150b713411f43920b92a83f4190b3609
b1e4282deee52ff63b608dc13756533583b346ba
'2011-12-30T06:19:18-05:00'
describe
'40447' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXR' 'sip-files00074.pro'
0ecba87ed1afcb9996b8a5958db6853d
bf6dff7ee07e585737ef40835fb10f6c17896af4
describe
'37178' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXS' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
d37f47a56befe70163334925bb5f6cc8
1975a3001f72902c616ce6f4d385bc994a9a4fff
'2011-12-30T06:22:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXT' 'sip-files00074.tif'
1b23a4fe6ee79b6adefac339c4103970
adf182475866cd44df4ea63963644a6d53643b83
'2011-12-30T06:23:07-05:00'
describe
'1713' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXU' 'sip-files00074.txt'
cdc0d38e4646a428fb2f7136032daebd
4a2137a0c76f5903e5e673d5773901de9eb95fe2
describe
'11137' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXV' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
fc19280812ba62b817bd3228bdc18f2c
5c4246813513becfc42dd95e19d3d8fea9eb8e4e
'2011-12-30T06:19:27-05:00'
describe
'840056' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXW' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
bad2c027e519c5efa421c258eedf4d9d
86dcc40b4e3e27e17a0083ff750b064ee75197f0
'2011-12-30T06:15:15-05:00'
describe
'53106' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXX' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
87d936f81a422ef14d4efc54a176f371
e48d24f8786d06741a5a86c9849f9c8e800fb872
describe
'13661' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXY' 'sip-files00075.pro'
91803940ef57fb882183823dd7d6681b
099a164873f40f8cbc64d88e3e13793923cbe52e
describe
'18392' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAXZ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
ebed39202e362e13ddac654e75f45a32
42cb84795a1fe1d99845f39abd219ec98b4a5353
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYA' 'sip-files00075.tif'
9a120bc2856771aa1e1ab7125083c6ba
74ebac596b1fac119ab5517d06d360c52bb20bc1
'2011-12-30T06:16:43-05:00'
describe
'575' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYB' 'sip-files00075.txt'
30f628a2a84b5129b814eedc74dd8792
8e1a07fa666ba143e18b14b1e2a794f3ff82c4b3
describe
'5561' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYC' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
6d7776767fd9bff8f88eefd616086bb6
f623292cf998f4bdd39e08adae8b5ef6c47e69af
'2011-12-30T06:16:52-05:00'
describe
'986149' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYD' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
f4340fd467925a0ae1deff13b454b36f
5f9766614227600e52cc960f8af2006f6fca1947
'2011-12-30T06:19:31-05:00'
describe
'84443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYE' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
3e0339d569e3747aeabbae01f3d45c89
a980e86cc57f6a05ed7e55e826dcc0d3cbea1629
describe
'28054' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYF' 'sip-files00076.pro'
22da4c446c04f1ecca86e5e870e73ce7
5b6d1f7a427f8f0b207077320d1a912e98f52c92
'2011-12-30T06:19:30-05:00'
describe
'29963' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYG' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
4a643470393ae0dd3507f4bae509d232
19294d7aca18f94a29d5abf71a205b91bc70c31f
describe
'7910776' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYH' 'sip-files00076.tif'
12db062f4f00272987f8aaa6f37803f9
18e162314280bc794d036c29b33a2f023970feb0
'2011-12-30T06:21:24-05:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYI' 'sip-files00076.txt'
d374419f313ffd4f02b828d23bea732d
ae6801102786e3cfe93ce5f5efa32420c181767e
describe
'9269' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYJ' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
59d4bbdae7de6b44e86dc9fd50991002
52c5903f5d0bf8513e474d2a9f951e399c882428
'2011-12-30T06:15:10-05:00'
describe
'1003352' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYK' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
e7e25ae11435b6d7460c493c5471b69c
2442163fd765c83d16ee7f22aeb091cd5876ae5f
describe
'101769' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYL' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
e914207b7ff98321a6862e9bd6e47217
8acfb50e95b8d63a507b1ae1583dbb026ea7d8ba
describe
'39852' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYM' 'sip-files00077.pro'
7275619f57bbf39e8e442afd6da3c4e3
10eb0657cb7c959f49f76c6f86c102315a7e1659
describe
'37211' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYN' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
e5c33ec8ca5738a050cd7436fc8d1387
9ff44bee894b037d2d26fd5d01df5f7722aa1c11
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYO' 'sip-files00077.tif'
41442478f29151d67cf63506e820c5f0
f771c93cb53a6b1a3f6d5256bb9b96bb9c67e2a0
'2011-12-30T06:22:18-05:00'
describe
'1659' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYP' 'sip-files00077.txt'
7bc12afa3e81a07c3d5f94d6b13a7894
ebf6bed0636d4423d8f4f4298a80bedeeaa44c2b
'2011-12-30T06:13:33-05:00'
describe
'10758' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYQ' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
8d74452e3244242cd0548ad935c4f113
35be27742a6245cfb4577d8299a01f1b750c69a5
'2011-12-30T06:23:06-05:00'
describe
'986166' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYR' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
6f0b6a3ba5c2c27ecde641e397416117
1d644d7692b694d8cc03a07b3804cfac3f82fa55
describe
'104076' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYS' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
31bbdaf80f3b12f515b4fc0afc763a1d
77d7358fc7d891cd1275caf119aea2a1c7c2c329
'2011-12-30T06:17:59-05:00'
describe
'41199' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYT' 'sip-files00078.pro'
18817d2656d0e263dec8b41f8513d755
92b0979dd34a0f299b91681227c712a65165f87b
describe
'37496' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYU' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
84a139160fea0eeaa653c257f1fb0edd
fd2231d23d9fd33d992a75d91abed215f38d289e
'2011-12-30T06:21:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYV' 'sip-files00078.tif'
d154067288efb96c60930db8b95de9e9
57101d6d90f6bb28b74bb973fff68b2e026b5161
'2011-12-30T06:15:56-05:00'
describe
'1711' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYW' 'sip-files00078.txt'
6a48e2791c0377b9923bbdb707b0855b
744fd64ed40001fb03ec21d488237d56d3932578
'2011-12-30T06:15:01-05:00'
describe
'11099' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYX' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
4c0059e45ecc5cdf54a0af427cdebd79
1dee35106e32cdf44c8d04e55220d13ed62d8857
'2011-12-30T06:23:21-05:00'
describe
'1003351' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYY' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
3089123575ad2c5f8ab516b0b042151a
1bacc91ff535b2f48c6a0ba6bbc46e5ef0481ab1
'2011-12-30T06:18:27-05:00'
describe
'100695' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAYZ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
0bf4acbeb0a65d3c9124b4ecdd747194
cda1fb4f47678e1744695336cdc19c9e0f9b697d
describe
'38692' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZA' 'sip-files00079.pro'
fc4188b9050713e17caf40952110bbbd
b3869472eb321b29e879c9de979b3659a5d3f2f6
describe
'36715' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZB' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
cb80fd0ce3bff250b6b94ad320abdc2e
85a55cf6f0e8bc3c48bbd1312f023d9ad479c988
'2011-12-30T06:18:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZC' 'sip-files00079.tif'
c25b478e501e126384de2d7f7d36a673
f1da740453fb05683b74b9ac2ab224ee38549e2f
describe
'1649' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZD' 'sip-files00079.txt'
7a46ca1ab652e9cb7e80a7609aaa33bf
0bf22b5e7126578c35466a9da7b278aaaf41fe66
describe
'10498' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZE' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
5295f66b7e659c7ef11c8dc2d1dc4a80
e204b8e3752f8073124420d625c59bf900db0133
describe
'986159' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZF' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
fd2ccf0aca3eafc79d289ffec30f26d4
36557f22b7c81eccd0dd306ae76505304e46c845
'2011-12-30T06:13:26-05:00'
describe
'106042' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZG' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
dcfe01f6f0a05a9c3d4c21b622cabd2b
a61703cafca72de73764a2f60928c4dfcf26cc79
'2011-12-30T06:13:12-05:00'
describe
'41749' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZH' 'sip-files00080.pro'
b76321e5a852e79db7b454e1175ac5d1
27d27f9402b78bf9273dd3b98a4e2d775912c4d9
describe
'38295' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZI' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
6c8a7b10b3fce485c98ef4474b95866c
d828775f6e162f4c6c7d896da34c2935cc4db7fb
'2011-12-30T06:15:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZJ' 'sip-files00080.tif'
8cfd8c373c268098e412b78fa4825718
572ab1cc0b43ba7536d79907a33f73e1dc93e7fe
'2011-12-30T06:15:58-05:00'
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZK' 'sip-files00080.txt'
4d1dfad2f33a8a3f97e7afb1644a8efa
9c1b399b0ba993896ed135d9e02115e506cd10a5
'2011-12-30T06:22:33-05:00'
describe
'11300' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZL' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
5932ba61ef72de8ae17392bf6dcfd77d
e8f47a470e6a05ea9194527ba9402cb883beb77b
describe
'1003328' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZM' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
1f5645a636447cbd7e2e3b8489d4f1bc
91e54190fffd876f4cee166e423c02070afa396e
describe
'100433' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZN' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
cbe8ae42a2d2fa97e2ad8705bea66888
2680a5088fad07ec57a8d6267aa6ab6a3c05e4d9
'2011-12-30T06:13:34-05:00'
describe
'40488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZO' 'sip-files00081.pro'
9b4a848da9009012daadbeb140f3e20d
1b4fa5b60d0f769c7888ccb942d63fa5ba94ccca
'2011-12-30T06:23:27-05:00'
describe
'37377' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZP' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
5e6b86d78494cc042c6b5970acd7dbbe
7a9e1221f7a4f65956b817fe3d15793b99f42699
'2011-12-30T06:17:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZQ' 'sip-files00081.tif'
40ccd885c1ccdf1c29fabe5257249419
4ead4bd1ea598ed70e3f2a9e528f4a6b8d35a16d
describe
'1674' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZR' 'sip-files00081.txt'
4f743fa55ccfb0056810079c3703d82f
f79e0f6a042948cac6a35cc63cc66efc2b5531e5
'2011-12-30T06:21:42-05:00'
describe
'10854' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZS' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
e50e5e89b909bf0b0e76681a1133f94d
0f7ccb856e06888bedcc0bb99d91a25abb61e4b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZT' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
2dee0338149378e51ac9a1230ae762a9
338b258f7c4c83f86f1594533939b5b459e839c3
'2011-12-30T06:15:32-05:00'
describe
'101806' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZU' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
a0c0283256733bf44d4e221b923ba869
8ba5436950374421a4381a8b4b268ec042d66b59
'2011-12-30T06:21:17-05:00'
describe
'41540' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZV' 'sip-files00082.pro'
4dec71f1df312d2153215ba9c2404738
d77955bc9ed4f0c0f5df4c173eea0a60bdad3330
describe
'36978' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZW' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
3d2ad19a4b95a7e036735d89bd31bdd7
7e7cdc48759fef1fb9abe566bf8dbf78a4f9179f
'2011-12-30T06:13:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZX' 'sip-files00082.tif'
81b4732c4e43e0172dff53903334b0b2
f24a394d2b26fe4ffcf7b0e51bb9dd528053d299
'2011-12-30T06:23:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZY' 'sip-files00082.txt'
565e5fbe3c067a15885dd5826f8cc865
9a89e332fdb4a0ffbfad8cc6fd7020842a9cb9d6
'2011-12-30T06:15:33-05:00'
describe
'10891' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACAZZ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
75b0edc34faabe2fdb09f0013ce4437c
239c214d08a766cb9c065b506b1afed89ed9bdb8
describe
'1003196' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAA' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
2f8d4d7ba18a75b447be5fea0d8e45c5
77939de72b964dca7b8bba4580ed9ba526c46ba4
describe
'90538' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAB' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
a1d21ac50303fa7b3d1fa8652f8b551a
3fce6438c250f32f65be6db48f1673ffbbec5e6f
describe
'36003' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAC' 'sip-files00083.pro'
ce47a841f29921ba354bb28f3a0f8e45
1d54a9f36bcac78aaae27ca11f336cd87dcdd41f
describe
'32807' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAD' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
abcd1e44656d0da1f9150eb3628b6930
7f02fc69c368cd4da119ff3554efdd1459802c27
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAE' 'sip-files00083.tif'
e5994a7504f9363201740f6ddd64bb2a
422606d6f1155257202273dda4e3afbaa6bc1e60
describe
'1509' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAF' 'sip-files00083.txt'
c7f660b790167f7a8f35422eff9e2ab6
ad6e43f36d2b8a0701f21799ffabb736bb89ef00
describe
'9558' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAG' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
fc84d27dfa884d15325f28c679655e1a
1b4a47d333d9a5d1ed01cae063a28ec7e49bc97d
'2011-12-30T06:23:33-05:00'
describe
'986187' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAH' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
332566edbe50aba4eade4c88fd5483d6
1f1abcd0c4e80aa1b717b76d1d176f34c21b1852
describe
'101259' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAI' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
e568c19500a8e2b3a63cd2dfec1aa330
5523ff3ed2cff42bbb5650b9b02e75d15e774faf
'2011-12-30T06:14:56-05:00'
describe
'41340' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAJ' 'sip-files00084.pro'
7842f9c335480adbea91683972fc5abe
4fec24658e8023edd5fbc2da2f013264e8a09ce8
describe
'36610' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAK' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
c0ad1e0278a554a8cb8ee300961f2081
e8c2b3f436560fccba3927708a1860b56e1ec206
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAL' 'sip-files00084.tif'
e6662c81bbd2ea26f36c053fd6cbdef5
e93f95249436e4b739705a1f68be28e7d683fdc1
'2011-12-30T06:16:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAM' 'sip-files00084.txt'
c5746012cf8d5543dab2a61a9753d3d8
bf7068be911945e2ff2cb439d2d4d90a8bbbc2b2
describe
'11086' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAN' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
f112c7f313cbe9de80bd17ddd03a85dd
d90e5f800f9a9d9e9111c26793f2be275275b0ac
'2011-12-30T06:23:26-05:00'
describe
'1003348' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAO' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
e47c3e5b4f31769fc8e2bb7d6549fb24
938bd90837fc35765b05ef9930a6dbbb34df6b06
describe
'86536' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAP' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
4e586f2f372ec4ed2c64366f9d2d2987
a6d0818ef4c5d2d7e49d491c1ef88fe8bfeb02e4
describe
'34148' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAQ' 'sip-files00085.pro'
b7842caf442af18149c5adfc0f80cf04
cbc748826441da421231eb5918e93f4325a6cd2c
describe
'32220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAR' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
a64f01e12ca2036484c0fbcdcc74fca7
5ad3cb65eec1cad4ea2981283a6f895a5d13a6b9
'2011-12-30T06:12:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAS' 'sip-files00085.tif'
3c09399a3b9346d97ccab3752a837971
a35b8497f32798a6e19fd341c31c187facf74241
'2011-12-30T06:15:48-05:00'
describe
'1466' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAT' 'sip-files00085.txt'
eb4bff3288d19681efe261f0775e9546
26b563257031a0df62816565684ab7421ded1357
describe
'9737' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAU' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
85d601fe1f6abe63696c4d501005fa25
067383c8e7c1e6dfda1e2cc511f43f9f4157d915
describe
'986045' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAV' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
0ef556641dd01e3d2b3573d1649d0741
3a4320bc64783c74e963d0c33b0f02abca63c321
describe
'90590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAW' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
90fcf211cd7c804b89ca78151e341833
d4c5d11381608deb2e5eecffadcc87ca0c305ec0
describe
'34962' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAX' 'sip-files00086.pro'
569c25f95e5ed5fab954206067652315
1db95b24736013860beaefbef4e62fccc2b0b51c
describe
'33056' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAY' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
fccf6ef186e32216033da9d6a9c00a08
8fa6e14e9455081f2bcab767b21c7f0ac6c49865
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBAZ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
fbee574dbcb8c882374aa039cf86d783
eaa119bcdc6629be914f7b049a71b61cf971c1b2
describe
'1514' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBA' 'sip-files00086.txt'
6abc307b26c76722e787cb656fd2625a
e19f8fefe2ebc0484fee114b5a61c9ea85eb5d2c
describe
'10281' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBB' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
cc2dc7fd301347680440ad9979fefd12
05221feaf53dd46cfcebb9370e87cb8b0c481023
describe
'1003236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBC' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
8676bda74931f3ba8158c8a9ac82f491
15d00bc37bcf3c2b6cb796426bd1e6a53f87f93e
describe
'99773' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBD' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
88a22e8e85a1b013a4a81ebc0fa1c777
0d300e75d324fe14829e117f851f664fce4e0d66
'2011-12-30T06:19:03-05:00'
describe
'38868' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBE' 'sip-files00087.pro'
11c1079dc246bce07aba8d8876190a73
758009cc5293ebc35e7c3299f34b9ddce280039a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBF' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
81a366351fb9d4a08c0afa8c369e847d
a03557de216255d910c288aa5e574a72e8275838
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBG' 'sip-files00087.tif'
e4a1a0a61ee1ba1adf60d23e40274320
27f814f6f2972722b0815d6332306225ca76b122
'2011-12-30T06:14:47-05:00'
describe
'1617' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBH' 'sip-files00087.txt'
161fc592d7015f592896cba118c01358
c0876499b7ceea4b51c321b1555c61f80337a9c4
describe
'10470' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBI' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
c2ef24d6c16353c36844126264a77cba
4959425cfadc2b0814f457a31de5275647892868
describe
'986179' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBJ' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
73cff7a4242296e7722839f28c54e41e
3d98ff7a7e2a43e1609ab526117acf35d56075b0
'2011-12-30T06:22:53-05:00'
describe
'89367' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBK' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
b83241137415b859fc0bc0220e0db3d8
a54ab4479c8ec66d980df1bda69f5f1485ea2209
describe
'33265' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBL' 'sip-files00088.pro'
dd684a4338a3376d9338fccc39d936ed
5702c44675018dd815345ed8c4ab5b4c17f73541
'2011-12-30T06:22:58-05:00'
describe
'32653' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBM' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
12ab85897588d3844da0233d7b739c9f
c02291ecf73da64b90acebb9abfedc8025c429e3
'2011-12-30T06:19:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBN' 'sip-files00088.tif'
3178b601390c306dc0233b3004c175be
ec0ff5037ba2fe1669f18be924b13cb85a779ea4
'2011-12-30T06:21:07-05:00'
describe
'1430' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBO' 'sip-files00088.txt'
7513da8a623600aaa52b77eaa1141b5f
7bb40f831db056d76c0ad4f88f660ef442a67211
'2011-12-30T06:14:24-05:00'
describe
'10206' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBP' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
96aeb44df70db7dd9873483d7e40a1b0
e40c268b42acc2fa0a7c0222faf46d82837f07f4
'2011-12-30T06:13:20-05:00'
describe
'1003335' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBQ' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
f6113221f8dc817aceb39eb34f0664de
24a852571e52ccb520339eab185f138fdf972880
describe
'101414' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBR' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
303f666878b1412e5552ef160d748db7
40c4d1785cc09a47f7c7aa35dcb0f4305f38417b
describe
'39687' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBS' 'sip-files00089.pro'
65d9a421e46595aff284f259badc79c7
43a43988b4e68063fab03939fd60d82c5eeaadc1
describe
'36702' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBT' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
27f408f99a212cfd939d0eacf47bf74a
4e0755d1f163321ec302cd52e37d40858106c969
'2011-12-30T06:22:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBU' 'sip-files00089.tif'
87e10691ab8a6c52471e32ec1e21fb74
95d174d7494021083084a3f59234cd85ba5d85dd
'2011-12-30T06:14:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBV' 'sip-files00089.txt'
9a90cea7531768f6da6aa3df57688f09
eb1b72ecafd68a9ac625c83ce35f01cd49b80b47
describe
'10823' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBW' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
6beed738ee48efd3a7c3529549704d9f
3c8d08306960c9c0eab97ced58eaaed22152fb0a
describe
'986065' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBX' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
658aa32bfaeaf34d406cebeb6ef88832
21a4d6eb6f896f3b55300e952d8ed79cbe10623e
'2011-12-30T06:22:23-05:00'
describe
'93914' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBY' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
a5c2931e71eef520bf46a23eec43b38e
3c64ea06afb4aefd4fe096b8d35dd518853cf0b3
describe
'34375' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBBZ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
ff9613cb7a3e35b687de3d57380408bf
19a56a02b19422b8a76372d5194c694ef33ea229
describe
'33197' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCA' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
970bb44ed977eecd1125a0438cf6bab9
755e0e812973600c2bcdb7741316f0b9ab04474c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCB' 'sip-files00090.tif'
0d8ef2ed11ad41cf486462e273c27a5d
22fde6a25cf66cead12e6c2895414cf5e1c589bb
'2011-12-30T06:17:06-05:00'
describe
'1443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCC' 'sip-files00090.txt'
10482f99fdfcc0d5cbcacf3051e71933
7ca8d2a265899cbdf63bbbab389f1f8d5eb3d820
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCD' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
d7ab5cbf4a966ccf0cd4bab79c24c4c6
e7f997b8da903f16b1059438ffdd6eec04841cd5
describe
'1003297' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCE' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
7606a48610872b40c7d74135b933be8f
19ee71be98f9a246586180009be840efae1fa50f
'2011-12-30T06:16:34-05:00'
describe
'95575' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCF' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
a8782b4bb26902f21c2bfe80d9574ed1
72c0421578a4da8c5394526bed91dc5d9a9ef8a3
describe
'36507' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCG' 'sip-files00091.pro'
f84f8eaf24495b618d3cff757ae4b23a
b86cb2bbfac280d032589a593cab4fae190a3074
describe
'34860' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCH' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
6ae50efbc00297d75740c40e33ca50de
d2bc2ebd8c48162e587716c4e480ff4012586797
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCI' 'sip-files00091.tif'
5f564eb569dd90a70fc11ba554b68b4a
71b2ef1bada69cc24a812ecda3088d99125ce83e
describe
'1532' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCJ' 'sip-files00091.txt'
bd5e8eca887956dde919b8556e9ee0fc
440f30bd70910a6785206763c9c4ba5352adc1c2
describe
'10575' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCK' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
29d7ba46dd2e74129342b621877bb270
67313c69f029dd02112493e6761740cc3b360f4f
'2011-12-30T06:16:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCL' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
7035eb44bd9412c088af7e49ea8a0d37
ab67894532a97ed8f3f100ea77d49e06e34b550c
'2011-12-30T06:14:35-05:00'
describe
'100868' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCM' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
a4b3288365d2ce99d672fb03510bd377
e99f2b17041e03b1b34f703ee3306aaf7be192a3
'2011-12-30T06:17:02-05:00'
describe
'39035' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCN' 'sip-files00092.pro'
cd7aa440069cea895efa383327ec2460
66f360ee8a8805660325d0423ae452e277b6bece
describe
'36759' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCO' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
2f765a4d8b8e31225915f1aa5340ab47
d44e74c9d5e4c0f3f8cbc88267a8dd3f4a8cddb2
'2011-12-30T06:17:38-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCP' 'sip-files00092.tif'
b1773ed6accfc99cf2a2f193aeaf1249
ab19b4854a1f875b69f7aaa623f8c1fe6f9385bf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCQ' 'sip-files00092.txt'
b92a660e60fa82edb488909aa8ec71b0
a9b3d803047c757ae4005f81150b53399924ecec
'2011-12-30T06:20:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCR' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
169684d7ce59f10635916ecf752a8b17
e6aef3b7476887ccbc27030f699b4b44fc12aa24
'2011-12-30T06:22:22-05:00'
describe
'1003316' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCS' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
2b239ec7270bd7a04be2eb977a118ba4
a6d135136c6b83c52df6289ee15de9919d9246a7
describe
'91511' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCT' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
01fcaf2b2b591295de8fcc9c14072d5d
9d172cf1fb7f22ea50c3043efbab952fb1ac82d2
'2011-12-30T06:15:51-05:00'
describe
'34718' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCU' 'sip-files00093.pro'
5f20a75505ae96ab7a36b06dd0580f0e
a29d72fdb82d384d4707f85887a7297d2696069b
'2011-12-30T06:16:23-05:00'
describe
'33201' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCV' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
3abf5184fc6496ccf30feb0530e79e7e
27ddeca000ea8bd40c502a14b3cec1fca01c3d8a
'2011-12-30T06:14:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCW' 'sip-files00093.tif'
e65cacbfb5b544fa73ed18d36d33de8b
6b157dda0b5472cf3a33c45a024721f364765ab6
'2011-12-30T06:16:15-05:00'
describe
'1460' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCX' 'sip-files00093.txt'
516e14c0313271e97180da80302048c6
9e5d59439e80a706a802e7afecf09892e097ee05
describe
'9952' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCY' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
67090de78ec398e31bd99716a171b459
452df4452dab82488a56e9332d7ebd7028f8b39f
describe
'986109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBCZ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
8e4a14d1902d34390823f73ffddbf9ff
5a09183499ede285d50b76b6dcd434b1d953d7d2
describe
'95743' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDA' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
3af0d5065e2cbb3b758feb4e893cc63a
d648ee4c73b9900127ac5d54cb0f893e63823d43
describe
'36170' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDB' 'sip-files00094.pro'
e1014173c7d32d6a43e4026da4f12a76
13c91df94f1546051bf020e0ca5c3e6d83dfa716
'2011-12-30T06:22:01-05:00'
describe
'35156' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDC' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
4e64874cc5eed95baacb60363d1414f5
4ae1b209d9a12fd5411bfd3ab0e45fe4b7608b79
'2011-12-30T06:20:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDD' 'sip-files00094.tif'
521ea60b6cda10e4d4dc0522d60d6e44
20c8af7cc88745c4d2c9df230a58ed7b4926acf9
describe
'1539' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDE' 'sip-files00094.txt'
92f351da47a3fd02f6a504a2eb82c98f
87ac8102450dfc29ca3191036edc2bbf66262a09
'2011-12-30T06:16:58-05:00'
describe
'10918' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDF' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
e57cf486dbc370ca7eeba660e2f53a5c
5f8550addd7d3115626501310e90377f09684d60
describe
'1003333' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDG' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
68c2ffbfd6c0ba1e0d941f0950d5f22a
96998f5fc9c124ce7e2eb4fee7c9b2a8fef33d70
describe
'94139' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDH' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
be9f616632200ac440e2cdad4b46e09c
4ce0e01e85198d86168619a1a2ecf6f3d11e38ba
describe
'35303' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDI' 'sip-files00095.pro'
6a583fe26d1a420adb20189efbb88924
2d8a5f610aed9ea49f0b0435fc639e7c946b8be4
describe
'34119' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDJ' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
2b650f69d3f6ca57de148b70c27bdaea
464a36f8ecf56739330bb5e5ab01c2da34cd7153
'2011-12-30T06:22:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDK' 'sip-files00095.tif'
874b04c394dc8e5014e3f4fb3ace7b77
8628d38b39faab81d16c99e8caaad0369d6d0adc
describe
'1481' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDL' 'sip-files00095.txt'
31f9363d31e96040843077c911f361e6
5474623756321ef6beb9eaf3da6e547bfa2930ee
describe
'10019' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDM' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
6d315112350262554eb99f776a3ef1c7
fdd865e3c1d0d6dc99e1f66e5c334fe0919e2fa7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDN' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
ff2309cad8f9084e2f6ed6f41595b9f1
50d63ec8e3cbdf26570967516893b213903fc04a
'2011-12-30T06:21:59-05:00'
describe
'107110' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDO' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
40398e0a11be5a1529c69d71a80ecef2
54c0bd90f2551122913ce142c9135488e6060967
describe
'41435' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDP' 'sip-files00096.pro'
2863aedc8d80a69db6ce5955f2e7483b
280cea628c35f305443386af10d44cc4dc57c0d3
describe
'38657' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDQ' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
f4549147b6e79a2cf956411ef0f5befc
1d52696482f922555ba1c91d8d32a0df3022d634
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDR' 'sip-files00096.tif'
7dea060c355053f7bd9fb9f3607574eb
b59b6806b727cbdadd3016ce401378e6d6037a6a
describe
'1734' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDS' 'sip-files00096.txt'
037175a964629b9135a21bde7ada2ceb
a736eb82fa826bd4190e18e3029dd60b6f6aa005
describe
'11388' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDT' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
4f77a27dd8638f0cdce3f138967cfc15
188130dae3a0eb20582453fb379325804ad3a73f
'2011-12-30T06:23:17-05:00'
describe
'1003343' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDU' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
940f36d6bd996cb507b5d90639f3c0ca
1ab57175f98851010c25c6c4a96fe1630cdb1068
'2011-12-30T06:22:07-05:00'
describe
'99726' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDV' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
c0c607693b78cf2b5e403a23f904dd23
e8c7fd0aed8ec43ae1b069a89e4381d3609a338d
'2011-12-30T06:17:57-05:00'
describe
'40416' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDW' 'sip-files00097.pro'
51ec7cb59b5b466ff1731f83ba812ab1
2698124bd34d6abe0bb55b3f4c6b1cc94c432c79
describe
'36794' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDX' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
5303efdaffd6bfc11d99e69b5b62a324
5b0c281ef6202e7cea8357ee4cacf8361c5a6257
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDY' 'sip-files00097.tif'
100f8097064faf0bf5ba5b39ef9fac50
29786a7a6064583d9c0ee552e4667f1e99617dbc
'2011-12-30T06:18:42-05:00'
describe
'1673' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBDZ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
d02315c56f31cf052ab1979ce55315dc
d1aeb107983bda29a771039075e246f37df6cea7
describe
'10679' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEA' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
565fae75220e93f081003ccb22c84c72
0cb32eb14c1462a1a4fa3f80f686c729e0f94e40
describe
'986180' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEB' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
2c60416e8c7d3de295a13787ccb5b8e8
aa51ff7c17babc9bb3a82abfc3783c745beee326
describe
'102154' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEC' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
80557874e323d4a61134750e79308088
06fcc60e5d2b51fad5fe3c6dfd0e1cd2b2579620
'2011-12-30T06:14:46-05:00'
describe
'40905' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBED' 'sip-files00098.pro'
079278c9d906c59cd10b3ca6a81a6de9
73ace77490393719c360c8a2335d5f693cd404a6
describe
'37567' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEE' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
9ce1c9a6d0691348853f693d8376f6e7
a9a0c63a5ad2b6bfcc7d13eb9ca336c6a877365c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEF' 'sip-files00098.tif'
0b4126fd20fccc29e05043d6fcced7bd
da3277c746b0fb85269b276caf1024ef1ff17c1b
describe
'1708' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEG' 'sip-files00098.txt'
b07fbf0527ac1f64a038dc8b2ba6489e
fe09828d080ab880a9a65f549b28d27732591a0a
'2011-12-30T06:15:11-05:00'
describe
'11287' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEH' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
0a5d3957a1c2dc6adb87a8a43177e8f8
05b34afe7faa8bafec2d8828f610ecc5b3923d58
'2011-12-30T06:16:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEI' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
888fae964e3b1dad1afe6e43f4964377
9b2951439ab28d70c1f4bab0a699cf95bf5c1c94
describe
'97875' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEJ' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
4dd8a20faa344848d95c0aa15ba7e50a
34d7066ba7e021e487cc8d3a407411c73ea895bb
describe
'39130' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEK' 'sip-files00099.pro'
106bcde59d1310f24a5275f86e5e6ab3
3563f75556e03b9999bd472c1fe6fde61d7026b5
describe
'35620' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEL' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
0a93e92ba3b44be38d3d919bd54cb033
c366c654550dd4453eb6ff307774cf420adfc131
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEM' 'sip-files00099.tif'
c67b61c25669ba6c0da98b7339e2297d
391d1ebbf5dc0c2eac0ed2fc951c75bff9551b40
'2011-12-30T06:21:26-05:00'
describe
'1665' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEN' 'sip-files00099.txt'
16f72be3dbcbaa03b65816123549aba8
9915bc86fb480783da780576c41f96bfdda87361
'2011-12-30T06:22:37-05:00'
describe
'10326' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEO' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
2ca7a88761d2a0e258f3bc3164bfc99d
b55a87f3fb3affb4ad657bf5fcf254e733ab25a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEP' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
292e185dcfedc70c172292740fada892
f9ba3ec44dd43cd626f925e8ae7f11890b59716c
'2011-12-30T06:18:09-05:00'
describe
'103669' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEQ' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
5d64390868e7277b1e354aad30e75b3b
2de37b80dc2748f9a715fe65ab08523f625b79c3
'2011-12-30T06:14:53-05:00'
describe
'41428' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBER' 'sip-files00100.pro'
8b4e1b8bbafc3b4579f16a5bce65fe92
13b0f7358af55ee8cc970bd2d93b12420673fc1d
describe
'38253' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBES' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
ce20a8662f3bb5d0d4cffac7a7537d87
fb25fb957986bebf831aa36e79b6b82bfc71e304
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBET' 'sip-files00100.tif'
07ba21302ed27f1cfaa033229c773f12
feb0942a5edab200a635f4e534c7b043de34fdb1
'2011-12-30T06:22:12-05:00'
describe
'1726' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEU' 'sip-files00100.txt'
ef7a6a175086e6c0a9c43ffc78627211
381afc8d7863ba6f93d41d77fa32a4605accea98
describe
'11207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEV' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
9bdf1c71723d30e2c64ef3123c83563a
a1b3a87afff16f40dfa859839aa6b9ab50b950ae
describe
'1003295' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEW' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
9aebbccd7387d31a1884fc6ed8589548
618f9a83d77de21c9e6757431457a483c04063a7
describe
'89543' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEX' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
616927b739554f2ff5b17f63ee307e7c
b0b25ef70641f45211a835287fbc9f41212fce62
describe
'34707' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEY' 'sip-files00101.pro'
145c70d525775437583fc928a6a0e60c
50040262227628e45d0494dfb50446ffafa9d019
describe
'32395' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBEZ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
7e689096307e4cee4017f84985e4620f
19e55399909bc0b45746935db9e991dd68ddb5b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFA' 'sip-files00101.tif'
9ec10c14f8c4ee12467ce7fff8828f05
f4ffbd54f94e1ab5ef98be4941059885699f1124
describe
'1486' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFB' 'sip-files00101.txt'
2cc9b73331de344e0880d5f4321f41e8
3697c871f86fac9bfadc811f2c469f6599897aa1
'2011-12-30T06:13:54-05:00'
describe
'9836' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFC' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
12d6283948eac89371eba610a7c32bf0
988b10e29354fe36157e8040405b2a588d9b0f7f
describe
'986174' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFD' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
2d2a410d79cb9eec4cc932a78c02969f
2fec995fabd3445e1cea87d28f979cc5a972adfe
'2011-12-30T06:16:36-05:00'
describe
'97016' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFE' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
0192e9845c56cea05a84a5a1ca4a7f32
6df4cc46e43f44099495781f75a0c156d751c831
describe
'37716' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFF' 'sip-files00102.pro'
c3f1d3cda42aef41d05ab2751664cf48
669aaccb2a705fa1b133df25ace155cbc520666a
describe
'35985' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFG' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
8d0c3d50de6a08f53111cf12bb5c27a7
20b14b2258ad2013c385d54ed3ec74f351920859
'2011-12-30T06:17:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFH' 'sip-files00102.tif'
9d49c04bbbfc45bd90a79e5d618f0822
ac3784fa12885a2c5adbffc3af0a518032f61769
describe
'1591' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFI' 'sip-files00102.txt'
de411a6758c0b5639a7a1772cca02f2d
62427a3ee2c178546967da279230a4643f278808
describe
'10408' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFJ' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
64d859e6bc31e28ead953a984fabcf43
308e450a9befda2990f3bbd747a5b4bbd3669765
describe
'1003339' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFK' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
40174f2c0edf6f87312f5d3938f14549
6d3cfa517943f74b9edc78f91d60128d23a2b6a7
describe
'91270' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFL' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
86ffba1d84e6832a719ec6bc29075dff
2a572d93f1015303d29c1877960059e5202768a6
'2011-12-30T06:18:45-05:00'
describe
'34521' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFM' 'sip-files00103.pro'
63f9c1daad39759087e5f5858e5c7328
391ce2698be04e74dcf0203b18e70d0198f126d4
'2011-12-30T06:14:18-05:00'
describe
'33682' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFN' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
398dc7c6b4eb043f2c4fdb5a33e7ecff
3ad9c6e704311a05d4e85beec7f24aa5c8444826
'2011-12-30T06:21:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFO' 'sip-files00103.tif'
061624d10b037b4b02e88b6f9b5799f9
6312e0635b4c5a56f9b747aeeccb62bba950e2d7
'2011-12-30T06:14:09-05:00'
describe
'1480' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFP' 'sip-files00103.txt'
088b676a41641d9314c60707178b1b2b
f600be31ed328457061c36e3084dc19112dd8675
describe
'9733' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFQ' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
e1bfdbbd26a29f52db93d4a06b0a0fd6
53e37537e037c909023f42078d412fb808c69e5a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFR' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d5bc7d9531e50c5b1dedbbde6c1b57e6
40cd111bdb171cddd93590a2c1aba9bd95c24633
describe
'93921' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFS' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
5682e48a3b62945de1bea25361bf6ef1
553f73bb0a060cc841f1105a8d9e7b56857cc44e
describe
'35597' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFT' 'sip-files00104.pro'
fe91a92c03e04e7e1a0923c6630716d3
0538cf30e12a3f56c81244ad094675195754bd71
describe
'34636' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFU' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
de927d2a9bb72a27098b91db49e06ffe
985428267e168350f045ba27ac5f9bbd536eac73
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFV' 'sip-files00104.tif'
e6637927740b65bb150d21e6e59c1ff9
7a8872fd4899e7e585a525c7751ac3c128f8f203
'2011-12-30T06:14:40-05:00'
describe
'1530' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFW' 'sip-files00104.txt'
a982bbebb423ff3fcbef1994ec7d2e1b
648aa0cd90b34b1225aa82f6d9936aff30d9de40
describe
'10331' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFX' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
c0a975f6e3efac9743db18d6cfe48883
aed6bd1e83228785ac18c60188b30441f01d792c
describe
'1003207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFY' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
926be6fc22c96fd6cc8e2e81e16edc72
514235b6a581527d43a18b99d25343705b3bb93f
describe
'98341' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBFZ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
bca69b1b159d8b559e266c8e98708e5e
f7a48d1f3b22d10870abee724a36899cf8d2887d
describe
'40338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGA' 'sip-files00105.pro'
13398461d05e8ab6b86ae1aaf970a2ae
12cb49428bff1a105128642809ab94ac934717e5
describe
'36184' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGB' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
82a7211af834bdde270079b8020464e3
0347bffaf052373bf01d2d31af2d273b2ac4fa6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGC' 'sip-files00105.tif'
5528512113ab8397240ee48c42379926
a8421c06472b931e869dc4412a23ce0aab532498
'2011-12-30T06:17:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGD' 'sip-files00105.txt'
ceb17ad2c45e487333eb9029c8afdccd
aa513866119f981c0235c6f26f74f9a7cee48a1c
describe
'10379' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGE' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
c3e01140fd96b2dff970c4b326aafb2d
5b3b0518fc95e8d44e5e2d6e244909cd17a94c24
describe
'986186' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGF' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
055df7db0e8b5d7e2003eb181f5523f7
f1875d8317f3f444502362a59399d677d42154d1
describe
'98139' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGG' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
9aec9591f7e369ac21cd12d8d4046e1a
262caf5e4bd165770354b4d73eaaa8f0d8602c07
'2011-12-30T06:13:51-05:00'
describe
'38601' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGH' 'sip-files00106.pro'
3dd13b3f0b628bed0d95095604d77338
6c82b06439f52913ead48f4fad99b751701950e3
describe
'36306' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGI' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
3a17ad19786f79b389d6401fd9f8e88a
d7336c8f4d9551e83d9881239077dc630feac7fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGJ' 'sip-files00106.tif'
4ee8497888bc735c5f2270f0a9c352a8
382af14acebe30254aceec915e92a2f4c3f07ff4
describe
'1640' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGK' 'sip-files00106.txt'
3409e69baff38152e68ff34024c5e684
ed16fc9dab49cd89e7599c44d0aeb396a3680b0d
describe
'11313' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGL' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
7a9f6f2c57f9ac62f3d7b1e6ab16ffaa
ee21c9da9fffdf3286a98ee16fffe4fe991504ca
'2011-12-30T06:22:36-05:00'
describe
'1003262' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGM' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
cda831acda0261000f065d0554cbcdf2
69563fd889ff8cef39089ae302b4c35853ea5b8d
describe
'91041' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGN' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
4c590c63729ebd49de2e275fa724b5eb
689410671f83b45112a7a650813c118179a275ee
describe
'34643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGO' 'sip-files00107.pro'
322b3d305ebad89bc1a21b708e8d5ef6
9ad0427692aea8fa8a3c6037752bb10b2ce634cc
describe
'33355' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGP' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
ba11e51261d158b15c2244fec9a8127f
55e0730ea2701905c6a1b2dd988ebc3da0916b71
'2011-12-30T06:12:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGQ' 'sip-files00107.tif'
dd292c49c5f50687b669ae489fcad643
cffdba61935f236e7ed3e485ab02db93929e5f7b
describe
'1463' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGR' 'sip-files00107.txt'
f02a188999f2dd69f4a010c217871e9a
5073ca2d34bcf694278f9c0cf1775567c4dd2e6f
'2011-12-30T06:22:13-05:00'
describe
'9629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGS' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
b7ba39fc558b33ba934b46f28157fbe3
67508518e452d2247fd2741e84d36abf2b2fdc9d
describe
'986105' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGT' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
cca722889389a38ff4c051e00a90eeaf
c56a0d31890aab1e96255813ffb35e4b0a3f6ba5
describe
'93095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGU' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
ba5b36343eb87e9db59d6a5ab80cf8d7
06d761b9bfd8578cd0e91aa0777f23762d4ae43c
describe
'33175' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGV' 'sip-files00108.pro'
798669672699baa6aa122e6eeaf847db
34f82d5cc8a0c88154deb2ce5ff3c9025142d1aa
describe
'33210' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGW' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
964a601f8681cc829518e4d402b339a8
08bac6bbe24c50431473a9e189e91dfede58987e
'2011-12-30T06:15:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGX' 'sip-files00108.tif'
2afd650730d98163abd43dfe7c09737e
2559b5666e9c8808106774e1717212180b7df57c
'2011-12-30T06:18:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGY' 'sip-files00108.txt'
369dc8a5e43f7ac9d3a27d701dc54d19
7907aab470c189cad88574f6c3bc191bb31136fc
describe
'10210' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBGZ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
8bf8ace7a104b4e41b04ec2057d1e51e
ad0b063f1103c1569275d299bc9670931d36f8ef
'2011-12-30T06:14:15-05:00'
describe
'1003353' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHA' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
1f24ebb715eadee20805664c6078f2e7
6929aabf7a304987196efadba841b02d000f0dde
describe
'95893' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHB' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
319f3e5f898bf54d356097ff0ba83dda
f3e49023ca3f4b6637a5e6510a10c7672875c422
'2011-12-30T06:23:36-05:00'
describe
'37174' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHC' 'sip-files00109.pro'
1146408ddb67057cfd24909ba9b48ca3
5b4420f4197183d2e4b9fc77c87ba14a5b2f5702
describe
'36161' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHD' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
81005812cf6e320ee939e8cc520fd618
90ec58acf4ff386c7c89221da3afe2b6675acafc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHE' 'sip-files00109.tif'
c027868bdd5b4e165480f08fce3f0b52
872acf791e5dda46c86acf13844934298bebb34e
'2011-12-30T06:15:08-05:00'
describe
'1572' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHF' 'sip-files00109.txt'
0e7b065ef85174bf77656ca01cf2a88e
20e4576c355155cf7e6c9184afe41257a754083a
describe
'10756' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHG' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
a36b24eb290d7bee247f62561161f845
573e7f0981e6a186c81b0bd8632132d0053537ae
describe
'959959' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHH' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
0e4f4fa5553c461ffca3259dddacb926
4a79ec61e4b7d423e89fb9a6e268fd4da2030607
'2011-12-30T06:19:04-05:00'
describe
'58322' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHI' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
b400ce7c78d20929cb04a6f1b3ae19a8
04d070bccd22d5cdb3f715cff1445ff92abaaa81
describe
'14632' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHJ' 'sip-files00110.pro'
742d0094fe8220ae609415fdba94664b
67de6beb5de1e71ca827ec2ba37ec24768ce2998
describe
'20308' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHK' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
a53a998474438fff80fdb395e6152fed
9233e4419aa1c2de820529ee5ea83a55c2fa6b46
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHL' 'sip-files00110.tif'
baaa3a06037c5e8e6333df3bb8d33bb3
d6be8d93cddba9f7a433357ca7165fc6b827ebbe
describe
'633' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHM' 'sip-files00110.txt'
0ef434dd481b191f9be7395d7de4c102
23ea82cf1526fad28756ec0d73835358a91b0148
describe
'6368' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHN' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
02b3d537bdb1147dc0a9ea2a0311ecf0
d1918c7bd89961c04a5024a868aafa41c6b8dbd2
'2011-12-30T06:15:47-05:00'
describe
'1003345' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHO' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
b5123928c1b90dac784b490e4df2437b
aab2c616b68d6a24c7867d1d179a6d2e041f75b3
describe
'73372' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHP' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
2e8931f133ea26dab8572c1908e98345
7f63fdd3ef931d0c56334dea60830b72189aa9ca
'2011-12-30T06:16:18-05:00'
describe
'26067' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHQ' 'sip-files00111.pro'
d9490faf59b60aaf4264156cf702749f
1ceb5cd43fd813b8f4d633a696b23a7ae0c20027
'2011-12-30T06:13:44-05:00'
describe
'26482' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHR' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
635ee00f2c81dd34fd0754e01d03829e
b9b243e3f4d44de118297c0e7c0d501df3e856ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHS' 'sip-files00111.tif'
eec284dc5e414d8f96ea3e1818e7ddb3
fd68cd4fee25b42a381503b957ea6aaf4a3224bd
'2011-12-30T06:23:34-05:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHT' 'sip-files00111.txt'
2cd4db2744147fee05f29c8a8bf397fb
eaae56bc6e789544673e2da5e6d99b2dfdcf60b2
describe
'8121' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHU' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
a8ea70a9b7419ac864bf91ef5eb7154f
47c8183dcbc2dc861166717bda15e05535b1cbd4
'2011-12-30T06:21:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHV' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
080922d938de16f122ca24e479903b33
e4ee740578266c7adb1bcdf98b1be707c60ab1b0
describe
'104084' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHW' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
b14b82a0df6cdde71801e28ce296f242
f60eaad3b366177a9860d9618a2ec87ad10a7280
'2011-12-30T06:17:08-05:00'
describe
'41796' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHX' 'sip-files00112.pro'
3d8b8c22c3fe2af797bfa68233503b1f
daf6c9100e94c520690a298d46d34051d5c0737a
describe
'38250' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHY' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
4188342afcbbb42eeb22c0454811e54d
f7732e13ca33c8599d55985a1e379e41db122df7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBHZ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
db631d45ad3b9c789f35622aa66569e0
065d4270a3ff648374b6c64ca7f4a47d1bdbb8b6
describe
'1747' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIA' 'sip-files00112.txt'
b2a19f214f736c49fd63da95af6f7916
3a34e29c65e4048db53dbc3c937dd41615c84caa
'2011-12-30T06:21:22-05:00'
describe
'11465' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIB' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
7693d637fbe48a3673cf2f63f218bde9
2cf20c8c509305670eae3ac30bf4aa9bbe0a005d
describe
'1003336' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIC' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
7da568bc3430991f92e9b0a834ac4c2c
2319abf28c62c95df1e8e05f7b14088115f8a50d
'2011-12-30T06:17:41-05:00'
describe
'98024' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBID' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
601cf2c69ae141a030e43433f0afe367
675601dd3e365400c3c6e6b4cfe748d9c9c35410
'2011-12-30T06:23:40-05:00'
describe
'38255' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIE' 'sip-files00113.pro'
5371093cc6829428f93687fa0f089439
88a4a2c932dc65a07566cbe91afa98b54784d87d
describe
'35984' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIF' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
db48555de9eb0906f6f2fe8df5abee11
742a58f9110d04ec0e3257cdbb9db8e24cbb4a3b
'2011-12-30T06:23:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIG' 'sip-files00113.tif'
907f53d8032a9953842540ca01bc3163
2c38acca18324b8d02da718bc540d60ed43faf70
describe
'1604' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIH' 'sip-files00113.txt'
43413b97d157b1439470fd36d152b49e
9f4c7ffd3388b3a9c4b46fc7d24cc4212a8ddc51
'2011-12-30T06:15:38-05:00'
describe
'10779' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBII' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
c200353c047f50e3266add63b6e1bde0
f1707dd30434f6b327ac244e61f1e4a2a84bf2d7
describe
'986178' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIJ' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
bfcc36c2a5467fa502172b2d549446a0
95397853603bf828432b285b48f978d5f05880f2
describe
'93157' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIK' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
9052240bb407bfabe636adb5f91382ac
3bf8f605ef6d5aa248ffa060e93a620726f13da6
describe
'35574' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIL' 'sip-files00114.pro'
0df0cc02ff27678a94f884a8ad00d659
91ace2dc6c2e572dd81188b2d3107da0240b3814
describe
'34027' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIM' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
5996f247b89898b55bec70b903af6f10
43839db7f98f746367ec6af2ffda2b770155c1a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIN' 'sip-files00114.tif'
d554b83182dd988de0fe52aa350e1a8c
b8046bc44e6a439ccef465a7c1fb649338923b23
'2011-12-30T06:14:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIO' 'sip-files00114.txt'
52d27ece5f719a8ebe7363ab02b30727
94231644fcc44cfb051aac1568e10f3e712a153c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIP' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
242515d68081a8ac390079d5de7dee06
ca4baa5dcaee0df469712673c00e1cc6d8eca2b7
describe
'930309' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIQ' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
d781d177b5692c3e942c182cf5c65547
73b49a730a98b37a2e0daa98e2c7b1b7f6564f6a
describe
'65463' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIR' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
e9638866ce39bd46df849627906c45cc
3917294f139808c32395b56db7444a01e266345b
'2011-12-30T06:22:56-05:00'
describe
'21210' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIS' 'sip-files00115.pro'
a701a2aa190e8734b4a442688577714b
c6ec436d23a30d53979feed94b74a1e30aa21c89
describe
'23885' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIT' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
c3364f30a8c56574503af8ba639214ca
b4722b4ce432612f41b2b17414ee6bd0a0b7f858
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIU' 'sip-files00115.tif'
8db2d4c6504de4d45cb21ef70f2bb3ce
829648fdd3c7d8a81acbd77413dd9f2b83589977
describe
'898' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIV' 'sip-files00115.txt'
dd477e4470d19ca027ec8f588dc9e495
8ccba6011ec7f97df2c8db8ba6abe3dff2fec186
describe
'7272' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIW' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
7c1fe33a106b9108fcb2bfefacbb403a
ca12b8aeffcc2a3431184af0f4398ea0387c8938
'2011-12-30T06:17:54-05:00'
describe
'986114' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIX' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
42a272dd678ab59e2550e4f69a8bf577
9eec7cac2b77834b39db4629e7b7ab0ef5b767e8
'2011-12-30T06:23:55-05:00'
describe
'76398' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIY' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
fc27bc0db51f7e403de58e038240e328
ee12bec02b7e8256d77f2193c0cda9fe68d1763a
describe
'27214' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBIZ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
8c093f13159fcd9eac98cafeccb22414
70d3e416bf471b5e0356e223694e92b8d1214e7f
'2011-12-30T06:22:21-05:00'
describe
'27700' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJA' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
38832858404cea51c5a84f8afae1dae2
e839ce22989e7ef032fd5056ce31144107f8baa7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJB' 'sip-files00116.tif'
2947ad53d06bd99ae53dc7654a01de4d
34443ce3648c1cbbcf833fca27505e0a0514249a
'2011-12-30T06:16:13-05:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJC' 'sip-files00116.txt'
c4c0193dab51974b9c077d4e4da07011
d4ee292ddf655d1eeda5b34dfd11e8a82fecd7b0
describe
'8385' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJD' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
3a9e2e4fe40ccc422f1cc85493d1bbe3
3b5dc22458d18ba9ccef43d44d529b04cf2eb1d1
describe
'1003341' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJE' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
3339d4ce24debb99d74af17f6ec79370
f31b801f704e78e50e52e87b81f11fc3e3c0d744
describe
'101059' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJF' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
404cf10642594bf1cbf0f8d4b7e99455
189a269c5e483d719dd850fb376e7e5e47d94df1
describe
'40127' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJG' 'sip-files00117.pro'
806e552a98f1bc9af1a6ec781d4e9c26
1a8f613bebfedd3216e3ae21c70d0e1a1ab3b603
describe
'36576' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJH' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
bd88b8b50b86370514097792cae134a8
ac08eeafdbc3040ffc204a7142878aecdf585915
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJI' 'sip-files00117.tif'
afce03d1780dc4e3078be08aa8148729
3bb2ceebd73bf294d7f2db80bd2255ec2c4f30f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJJ' 'sip-files00117.txt'
4a391cbec86d26ce416c36fc2667695b
edfe5c8ada5b0968a7ff99bb676370e31978ac81
describe
'10752' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJK' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
711378b2397d61788de88da09f10f21a
23760e2af1162b17fd63d950a02febade1b12a0a
describe
'986155' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJL' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
8956e00a533629071f058425555b131e
1e04c9d504cb786b02ea8e4d8f289adfdb928250
describe
'96255' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJM' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
c4cfd47a19a4d857e25ff7a772310019
48aaabe2cd0004df4556466f8097685c8f8c8f8c
'2011-12-30T06:20:07-05:00'
describe
'38846' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJN' 'sip-files00118.pro'
3d283e529facbe570c6cb8bb40456b74
632b0b514e7a9e3767172b00467f44b61857f86b
describe
'34297' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJO' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
d4738d0b9b96d49470164e63d5b8ab15
1d15840648d2b61946c01fbb1e154e84a1e1d6c5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJP' 'sip-files00118.tif'
24e976910e01a295cb1ffb81bf0cc21e
2757131bbc6edf435a0879b3ca1e12ea9b9152ab
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJQ' 'sip-files00118.txt'
dec33ec17747b68944d77e7d337e8e1c
650ef60af4be01397724bebcd804935bce35b178
describe
'10256' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJR' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
bdbb13977e5da1d6d77053776f476d3e
49c9a3f51f1a68ef02e294f18110c86c89dbd1dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJS' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
8bb0395db85757149a0705ed7f43bb06
461bddb222560305ed28cf54938168ff0ad2ddef
describe
'105309' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJT' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
d757c988be2058a075b548891c7e938e
9f6553da60ece7ea632ca41eb1bd640305626b1f
describe
'40397' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJU' 'sip-files00119.pro'
1926a0a56fead2ce144785ea1d242de3
ae6bc08f3ccfb02927b17ec436e77f085149b498
describe
'37831' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJV' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
2db5cb0fc788fa0b15a344bb99b58160
63af83f6651075379d4da310d22b43674cda6771
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJW' 'sip-files00119.tif'
3f7eac4ee6991f4afad9bba449d6df7d
7247f319540e4ab0849b06b7bef58809db3c0505
'2011-12-30T06:23:25-05:00'
describe
'1693' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJX' 'sip-files00119.txt'
23a7c1702b2cd0404b0b66341adc9a4c
79717c8203b05c643f9d0deedcf9e27fe0eb7228
describe
'11009' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJY' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
691165069149b64697829fe9dbb0858d
771c3ef849b5be5efe608e6a4e7ef4e103a55a2a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBJZ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
8f65055e0f06d78f27a810829ad9f9bb
7b98a92b76d723961c633d7185d0526d0543dc60
describe
'108910' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKA' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
77a25852a718f3ebe312e5910fecdd04
2d85f68596d2951b8bf25a72b953ec839722ac59
'2011-12-30T06:16:04-05:00'
describe
'42140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKB' 'sip-files00120.pro'
ec8931b22e40c06cc338eb109a2c70ad
efb04c4a052268b8c6b229024e9da19bfe673946
describe
'39749' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKC' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
8794557a92efea48e0055b1ef70a16d8
9f046b4ee2e47473b766bd50cc831da1b5a39bdb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKD' 'sip-files00120.tif'
8d5a275bdec75c8183f09cc80922ea1d
bfc83d2834b23f2ca6ca421565d0400959cc7319
describe
'1737' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKE' 'sip-files00120.txt'
dff7e4b7304ec85a966617a38827903f
47dd99a0371216bc3551c88bda5de13066142f9f
describe
'11759' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKF' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
0609246fabc5995df340b4d970bca680
c0d2e9522ba790554627ac808289d3b251c16aa4
'2011-12-30T06:17:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKG' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
a94c3c591835d148ad4f7a676c0b8e26
5dae8c91d8618626526990f9f1e432349ebee210
describe
'107529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKH' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
ce7e98821e4fca6cc2dc6dc19bfab164
6ea0652a2c1c6b784617b9f765dd68685a11f91b
describe
'41135' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKI' 'sip-files00121.pro'
8ae3964cb675e9c274e371483fb8d1d3
951e7773b4bfe78e7ae1f742e32e2b241dd8e6b9
describe
'37847' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKJ' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
c9aa0b400b4382f92f885227041486e2
d7102a7f71929fcbd985edd7839645fcc9793e32
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKK' 'sip-files00121.tif'
0a03ff56864fb416129d86af25e8e150
c9bbe302ae2b7404a705114b57fe499bdc45ebf2
'2011-12-30T06:16:50-05:00'
describe
'1745' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKL' 'sip-files00121.txt'
c40d8714b52a63e7ff471d0a739fb996
eac9e8eca2183af3de7ac88c994a5d32461b9361
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKM' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
92d8297425eaaca5499f80479fe24fba
3585289e629ab3068d7f5b742e33b6010895f8c3
describe
'986073' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKN' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
f69d39a99298b6301ddf1e4bdbcb802a
8bd2f8428214ef2d404d3a0ad415332b31e210ca
describe
'112236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKO' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
23c43d81a349b53b114052013d511a67
3900b28afadbede42a7bb463473db188d9a58062
describe
'43135' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKP' 'sip-files00122.pro'
90a4ea6679bd596988a62ae308924573
63714cea99e24f35e39de49eb0d46d09fd6eb6b0
'2011-12-30T06:21:46-05:00'
describe
'39159' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKQ' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
5a0d351e52a15d38c42f372d7504600b
7041e26d2c27422d47aee69953bed4527487218d
'2011-12-30T06:20:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKR' 'sip-files00122.tif'
a4250e33bcdb73b872165ecf4e043ea2
0daecc1fe810176836456cc15f3f850ef7133a7b
'2011-12-30T06:17:50-05:00'
describe
'1805' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKS' 'sip-files00122.txt'
4c5cb25c8b1526d075f2ad66976959fb
f93c890a2c1701ab9e97a1da7b7d1572933944ef
describe
'11422' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKT' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
c135ac22a05d49ca7868492ae0da247b
0e2713fbce3b5ad8d045448fbf7156373958e5e1
describe
'1003344' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKU' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
205b50bf97d23184a494b6f36abd9031
ddbb4cea6ae41053fe5fbb281ff2f41ba18bdeec
describe
'103412' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKV' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
4b2df1fbd4ffd796bc0308939227a51a
97fedff5ba550544f87c290265a9f75f76326ad0
describe
'41873' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKW' 'sip-files00123.pro'
2195e6a3d973d91328aaecae7b856a51
edf11978403c655e3ee5f86601bb0137812eae1c
describe
'38109' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKX' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
28b1046c076ec87c4cf7d6494432077b
f5d192aad2c7cec3c1d118718a72729987cb5acc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKY' 'sip-files00123.tif'
d84c8faa694fe6d728b9538d8c006f2c
c68f0dc6229856e05c3372cd0db9c0d6aa50b63a
describe
'1727' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBKZ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
77ada4a881890c8523008043ab91708f
c57b0f5022c5b754247085021a46fb6401bccd98
describe
'10620' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLA' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
c8283880ebff10f4f4e4e6c45e050e70
46a0510c6984bb82e01c1e04a4a9579b1abf928b
describe
'986185' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLB' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
51b68537eb05600eafe91ef32a476353
36c3e74c104b74d23e9fe4b24e6e845f2ed74e1e
'2011-12-30T06:15:21-05:00'
describe
'99914' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLC' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
ef486bc7f6ed6f4b26b11203235eb46e
f40684a31384ee04ebb9655f3faae93560fbe2a7
describe
'39777' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLD' 'sip-files00124.pro'
00aca6299f46aa19bb81e1613a71c904
006971b3ab61ce6e72193808182b799454c6b802
describe
'36811' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLE' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
c978495b093e2ad518dfa13c1726fd83
8b92871e1bb231307c72a92f187daf6c6fbae065
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLF' 'sip-files00124.tif'
b20fff87cd5bdb9cea0c327dfa885082
74d42847c4884e4ecb9420a2e040b7d165e4214b
describe
'1672' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLG' 'sip-files00124.txt'
03df12e68187401fb1ecbb1d727495cf
290803718d49dce5045e2bbedf7dfea43f685617
describe
'10822' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLH' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
b7e45b3d9e28aa3f95798a4f550c35fa
71f32a55c0e26f2d6a7930d66636e27a25b895bd
describe
'1003308' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLI' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
a1ecf5228ddf27b85d44727416ce8f85
ae5c401db233ecf2d6fd1c9074144ee0e72717d8
describe
'102744' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLJ' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
41c1075c7c86e6142e5e10447025d033
5c817b34cb942b0b110b21fda0d87f811aeb315d
describe
'40498' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLK' 'sip-files00125.pro'
6dec7d45a3409ed825cc93a8ce920141
4c4a8ac985e25be65f5180412e7b0e812137b3ce
describe
'36774' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLL' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
4bf20debe62e888f42a9adaa3989b81e
d526657c255ff3c10377daaa5ad54f47fc75447e
'2011-12-30T06:14:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLM' 'sip-files00125.tif'
62a4dd8422dfab835b688781825c77d8
6dfb20d91ca231fe0871ab7c815f4c71900c6bc6
describe
'1699' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLN' 'sip-files00125.txt'
f95246ce72d3e41456fa8849911ee51e
9c09fab6a8b341bc57a09f106b1634726b4f81ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLO' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
bfe46ade89c3ca40bf1197ee16bf5d1a
e64e2c5be97ea8b0482117bdd67df36bd5fedc80
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLP' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
71f4a9c3e2ebdc1d834d8dda463a513b
78db5dd9155322c059359311beecaf16c1b51560
describe
'99479' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLQ' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
e668cbf9832d8894a2f75e44d8608287
e03ed12b0eed04e813403f4492fab88ac882feef
'2011-12-30T06:23:12-05:00'
describe
'38642' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLR' 'sip-files00126.pro'
9b667b24b89a0f48fa8d3bcc8d6519f8
149eb6d14c3620800978b46746e59c0405864559
describe
'35935' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLS' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
6f49e1e2f6eb794eafe8c4e98e828f33
33eee4d15ff28de0107e38cd47931a8ab800a1d1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLT' 'sip-files00126.tif'
1ed1541e0eebb515ef4afd20f23f12c0
fd98c29c5bcfcc9acc6fe23106e2cebb7c800de9
'2011-12-30T06:23:42-05:00'
describe
'1623' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLU' 'sip-files00126.txt'
b9d7a19eed726dc99b0bc06dc0b35457
989aa2dc5165dd4f3e58198548620365d9c209a2
describe
'10460' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLV' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
8b581e9ed077b3b56d50bd97d6c1628c
db881e68e853aac13c6f338494f118ce663e6ee4
describe
'1003326' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLW' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
d7284d83d0094bce7b9aaa9fe1b3b16b
4ec13da05e94a25fe1f76723e97da2360ffb9cb9
describe
'95211' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLX' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
d938e82dfb725776723e6d0ab7f22530
1bb05bba41f815a27293c837c485d507e78479c9
'2011-12-30T06:13:13-05:00'
describe
'37659' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLY' 'sip-files00127.pro'
9f997da2075888e5153631703a6799a6
1575d7cf42897833d8068c12febc48652a4caa41
'2011-12-30T06:20:21-05:00'
describe
'35132' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBLZ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
52da7e15c99a390ea42194f3f5847432
77ab697112b9ece5615e1af8af3b0e9e3e9a356d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMA' 'sip-files00127.tif'
c3324be1afefa401536e79b8e5165be2
5d32db940fd05240be5f94c44a12ae0514d0a77b
describe
'1584' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMB' 'sip-files00127.txt'
6a7b3b5d1437d30fdee9f36318bfcfb9
e765fc134356279ee2b35b78818485e36f7e3179
describe
'10222' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMC' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
752abaa7dbfef2509e4e910d7c4fdddd
73bbd93d3f796f3590421ef1a3a7155a37948953
describe
'986176' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMD' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
c819717f3482350e3bcf589c8026b09e
3e8133a627b1d9101478de915da77d9919be6350
describe
'89984' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBME' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
fe930ba84382c61d5e3385c0d1a11b31
661893278d9f9809d688744171a95364c2e6241a
describe
'35201' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMF' 'sip-files00128.pro'
4c163af164becc0b1d76ec2e814d709b
fd3c5e782b0abbd4c76ed8297a96fd6db8c0c4ed
describe
'33378' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMG' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
2da2ea32a08ba9c6041b9c8190900374
eb57bbd4e5819905646a1b3648fc4f410bc20d60
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMH' 'sip-files00128.tif'
7cf1064f5824cc2f9debe1e67e353d63
ccf5a7b237676bc966fa3617ab23db25486dc714
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMI' 'sip-files00128.txt'
ec281b1a93c9f3c1ce4dfd86bd25fa42
9447c5de81538e651d17720a73501e782f92078f
describe
'10034' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMJ' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
5c4fc5c5d19e834b43a7d27e364b20a8
409bba02e42c53db0831083bb9c61d5f2ba5c17c
'2011-12-30T06:20:43-05:00'
describe
'1003263' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMK' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
25e644c54c1b3e93c434394b8a52e099
b71cc8b86d8cca08de1cd3e847b40ed1ab2dcc6a
'2011-12-30T06:23:53-05:00'
describe
'98691' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBML' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
5ec599ca576ec5970ca6b481e191cf1d
00e49e87c4a76add0c6b90f5c9018517c1e2f713
describe
'39213' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMM' 'sip-files00129.pro'
5c027acca651781f2c5d5a5dce073636
2557a6acbe2d72ae56657ed7273af247d88b20d4
describe
'35977' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMN' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
9be78fc3d73283c575a1a20417dc10ae
df4c824c215055fbe7eda9e78cb28fe669e4fa34
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMO' 'sip-files00129.tif'
6ceb17d0b4f83b0dd6265d8916cd813c
7df2936810684aa4e8fa662434684b61f0e68eac
describe
'1654' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMP' 'sip-files00129.txt'
d3c84ce8a128f427bd8bbd9fa4d525d9
eeaf64c8a4a311b5d1ef383127713199450f8bdd
describe
'10360' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMQ' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
5440ad03162c5fda534be3b6887f722a
dde5e21461f25bf04e2fd2a4bc6cb20da7ccb9b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMR' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
0a601449455d4aa60d876d78815ec42e
5725690eed83e4a8406445646bbbebd576afceb8
describe
'100057' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMS' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
3a5c6afdbef1ff5921a95b310acbf48a
01c69c9d56ce23f81f21aefb5f8af4e84e92658e
describe
'39094' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMT' 'sip-files00130.pro'
678f6c7f5a6cf3e8876ec1b919093a43
3a85b0f67c96091b41d28f1843a181ffb75963bd
describe
'36749' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMU' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
ab7df6b510d3ed72b54a54357ff8b09b
c0287cfc54643c9b365ad174b1dfa271b033439b
'2011-12-30T06:13:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMV' 'sip-files00130.tif'
0695d87dc919fba40439a1981cbcb9ab
9835093f979f4558a87d564ec2706b8231149900
describe
'1655' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMW' 'sip-files00130.txt'
fc8d97e252f0181f6a5ca529b39375d2
0fa65cf0c363753cc6312157bbbb53785b3f3a42
'2011-12-30T06:19:19-05:00'
describe
'10817' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMX' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
84b7450fec951e477ab959967504dd2e
e642ab17a31a79683e347855a59a4bc4d4b55e24
describe
'1003284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMY' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
e1395047c9805bd75410aa98963827b5
424c3cfb6d2c3a4971b76000b4c0480b341bd69b
'2011-12-30T06:15:31-05:00'
describe
'101118' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBMZ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
0abcb13d23dbe3cfd0802eb65c7f7c18
530daa1465c4816e0a671d82b6d7b7c74e0fc7c0
describe
'39720' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNA' 'sip-files00131.pro'
7b8e85d89eeedba13c0283f9c82bd7a4
334604314db652e8aa95d72105d37205dcc85571
describe
'37188' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNB' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
8859536754bcc9529154baad762ab511
51526c5f738776c4a3d01752b1250dc1f2b1ee7d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNC' 'sip-files00131.tif'
a54234bc36a7794f50e7c7d0669e659d
6ae439917730848a0558faeba6f88f308b2e8946
'2011-12-30T06:22:11-05:00'
describe
'1638' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBND' 'sip-files00131.txt'
4756116befd25dcda2501658a4dcdbf0
a74a97e831bd54f1d5460b1e0ffd550d1b9817c9
describe
'11036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNE' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
18be554594d161feddae376e04b6e01b
6349f199122982ac3dd4ce0ab20e9d3a8f05b61d
describe
'986141' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNF' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
3aba8c344ee4cc4d2e94b097bccb7133
b1c28ea6c1f34171d65d8f674979b00f7b4443a8
'2011-12-30T06:17:37-05:00'
describe
'101409' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNG' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
cb5a6b13d7942972854a192dcf336086
c679a06ed394b55e02eba08dc7d12f4047f44d97
describe
'39474' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNH' 'sip-files00132.pro'
683d1225cfcfa7aa27fe6d79bfc21a4c
69c9e9438c1a177a64a5b3b82ec0d2d6020d5ee4
describe
'36043' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNI' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
9966a882b4af54fadce7a7edd7a2c860
77ae51b5b55594bf1f816b68e6edd3b2d1b3462e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNJ' 'sip-files00132.tif'
c27115d9391cde86b53ef310c65ebf45
f5fba45f601edde2ddb7c7b2fb5eb265bc938232
'2011-12-30T06:23:00-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNK' 'sip-files00132.txt'
544dc0b587cf6eb2f9a5582be179b3ae
46d32f7b147f33c1d16343325a864e64d277b101
describe
'10802' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNL' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
1f8abd9448bb52984315533a3e91e334
689b9911ea2aaff21b497143101f23886fde8226
'2011-12-30T06:17:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNM' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
28be51e05caca1e6e2a3814822f7d91d
0d9bca1d34d4d10f7338e05219d94ace39876b30
'2011-12-30T06:17:29-05:00'
describe
'97763' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNN' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
47d1346614059ae6cfd14ab0a0f1ba04
dfa8f66f1f87d958ce6f7b86b462aa2263275e90
'2011-12-30T06:13:21-05:00'
describe
'39891' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNO' 'sip-files00133.pro'
8670758e09eeaecabc0eec7631b70657
d83357e76105cbc6f775d5ccf61da27850a4fabe
describe
'36533' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNP' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
8528173cc10907f63d8e24f949835703
f53715501faccd4df9e271c55bb8dd7b011d518d
'2011-12-30T06:23:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNQ' 'sip-files00133.tif'
ee05bc5fb3f08f3358fb08954ff3e011
7ad7c14aed4d2e2c799a973da1305d3e33b72c58
'2011-12-30T06:21:49-05:00'
describe
'1664' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNR' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d69fdef422108ea6aca4c788412a9502
124acaa45f24271a5f3e26a0bab3d7d33deb9043
describe
'10856' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNS' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
a264fc51450ab6bd1abd9e8eef598942
3782a24177fd594d8f3f3a2f89d38c5e8338c10f
describe
'986150' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNT' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
ba28288a51088627f8735564b8587141
839790278e19385a76e961b27b870d1d752e3571
describe
'101181' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNU' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
9ddfbac4b088f41be3049d4a917e8c66
f7692e054c12ebe91eb83dce86fd16a2c7bd3c90
describe
'38964' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNV' 'sip-files00134.pro'
59d1092078f551d6728af321240949fa
a7dffafb79ea5502b7dedf991bdea53446246dfe
describe
'35816' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNW' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
73fbfb7cf25b588d6886ea2ea2a2bc34
8bf9deefa81f2e6d7dc49b79d1f8b7e1991f8309
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNX' 'sip-files00134.tif'
ee9f96b8a279ee14d50ea4a65191fa7e
d97fc82170dc9d6ecd024871019b65f570fdd4f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNY' 'sip-files00134.txt'
a7787e2a9bca1623d13c3aa2e0ce3bcc
8ee7439d23d799b42c4ec49f3a922c04e714cfde
'2011-12-30T06:16:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBNZ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
fd23637e4e3843ef0252a3a774422e8a
67d0ed0e51eb4f3aa5d1066c15576256edb74cce
describe
'1003244' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOA' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
70630e9ba251d8a277d2fc2d4f3798be
7b6ba964914cfa517153ae5bb2df849ce3712e6e
describe
'101956' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOB' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
0dcacdc93f41351ffda7b9763c3c5002
9e8ba3615bde5720ab71e4fa095f304db00a4fda
describe
'40108' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOC' 'sip-files00135.pro'
e4e0ea0eb8f1f4a6a6e403171b8498ef
a1a5ef8b6f77ee553a7913244a11b1e749b46513
describe
'35837' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOD' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
4ed4071f483800615b0b8c0c8765f688
a72ac4d46928c811df8d66682ac5b2819f149036
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOE' 'sip-files00135.tif'
ade779d989eb9dc17294dccb1bde688d
f0c29809bba0d2d699b20eadaef85c877ab63095
describe
'1669' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOF' 'sip-files00135.txt'
4783cd1fda0d3d61ef0a33de79536f2b
2c087197edf4b96f07e0f752523a30599ab83c67
describe
'10075' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOG' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
5322b71c0c47a16f5fa845d2102d60ab
14ccdf044703db2bc0b3e67b00c2e38701a26ea9
describe
'986183' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOH' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
b6e8ade5e5317f96fa0fff60b56cb9a8
f3af77d1299d0e99cda666c539defcad7997ebb8
describe
'97477' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOI' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
c1b1dbfcf261d0bc31475f360bd13d66
c7e3afe18001bec024cfdd0da780178d54d311a1
describe
'39667' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOJ' 'sip-files00136.pro'
596d1faea9d2889aebd32a180a2ec0ee
585b4481c64223a03de8ffc1f46d4c0526a97c50
describe
'35448' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOK' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
bdd467a5ab84ebd0d4e71ca26d15f156
11534dbb1c168b37633c2041628a6aa145365709
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOL' 'sip-files00136.tif'
231e9b77296103e1ca7b41b8a7b021ac
55485bb9321a86ecbb961dd01cd7be2d7ebb1499
describe
'1645' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOM' 'sip-files00136.txt'
6ce0b67b7da1f80290c5770c36666a7e
788b1feb9b5fe69316bbf5f21b328a48494d185c
describe
'10446' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBON' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
06a7c03badec843f8e5a672acf70f1b2
d98445a899178789b2ea9cda9285990d28b53fa7
describe
'1003322' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOO' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
831f852d831ba9479f2b4777f8b6457e
3baed089f6db7e7979b5885c4811aaceadb796fd
describe
'88621' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOP' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
05d74918638bd574094d720e726ca03b
661a3ea5d748efb23d292f6ff4bee2c9cff8c8d6
describe
'35455' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOQ' 'sip-files00137.pro'
e3c883a6d3f054f461137cd500bf3548
6c7e391b1d5ef5c3eec577cc10b060cb16fc5d59
describe
'32796' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOR' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
d063c9263d8169b277282a3eb61b5b51
c1bb58dc1b27d2d351722e570277166c7ba6dcdb
'2011-12-30T06:19:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOS' 'sip-files00137.tif'
96d60034578b00a8140cba3bc019f42c
f263c916242575deb665322cf5ec44f5590b5d28
'2011-12-30T06:17:42-05:00'
describe
'1506' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOT' 'sip-files00137.txt'
88a9a4dd66e15c82218242f9c653149d
e0aebbfbf5881b3327d1d94ff779a07990d9cae3
describe
'9481' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOU' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
4c12bf03651e7e433b90333e8df8ba7d
18c58b34b4d93d22b3613158ef04a631f7d75678
describe
'986182' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOV' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
b90b8425b2b351a7d4213080a9ad1a4e
442f7becc51f2808125eae383f6f6fe2a603e502
describe
'99590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOW' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
b727bdd1aabe0c729d0cbf712a693651
0b4bfd853053ad614941c73f14ac8028450a3bc5
'2011-12-30T06:14:00-05:00'
describe
'41073' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOX' 'sip-files00138.pro'
6ecec5624c3b563f8a0e9ef67ba0e28b
0c7330bdd0827adae9201442bd1eea5a0fd683f0
describe
'36175' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOY' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
6b63084bedf87dc51a585aa8ec1aa581
7a2e663ac0a2845eea8ece601759a72e87bed928
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBOZ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
61f6f12c197d42e3f1238048cb5f5b83
e687a400fbe9f5dd7f5eb8707d8232e4626a3f60
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPA' 'sip-files00138.txt'
5d0b5abbb40a72741bb757a6d8d0585e
0d5b430e186e68a54ed05a424f1ba41e77bb2e1c
describe
'10524' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPB' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
d55d24b4df0954a4b8bc34e2286926f1
fcaebc19248a4dbcdbd3a1b4a12e13ade2b22ced
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPC' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
545185d33d953b1cdb985bc4286e8229
66afd8b13d134ba9992c16a4474d01f092691b15
describe
'99158' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPD' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
08a1254cda013364d021e182f90ba236
4c8784fdd139ed72ae6d0a58c33c8cb9d663e95d
describe
'40693' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPE' 'sip-files00139.pro'
f490d22be3d205b11cc1f2e73f6eb7ad
c19c56a1cfa1dec7ab903045aa66fceabcf081a1
describe
'35092' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPF' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
d1f84acfc6167153b2a7fc019fdfe2f0
d41bc73ac3c8f89539ccc0fa10ea427e2a8f56e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPG' 'sip-files00139.tif'
5486a0080e5c9bf24ebdd65a993d1164
4127439d7481e28103278d85d11b0631f3a44add
describe
'1697' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPH' 'sip-files00139.txt'
34725fca89e8ae27105b1ddbc7e94b77
3531fa5c1f4e817ab028e199f33180b5b54219c3
describe
'10088' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPI' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
ab746feeb5688a9cb5961884766ba354
8e30ef26f8d00e0803a341d17f1f30c1e00eabd3
describe
'986173' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPJ' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
399af1e93bb47c9aaec38b2f82a23780
0f4f143bad3cfd4ae0c0d57c5c1e5052679389cc
describe
'100643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPK' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
e55e5e4efe5b3b341daaa1e5bdf9666a
8c25cbf3f507c728794e5ce7326ed34dc4bc6c29
describe
'38836' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPL' 'sip-files00140.pro'
68d8117f7471efc2871f69fe3a4857f0
748f8e2cce6aef48f52688120b5d05a9273fb09a
describe
'35472' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPM' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
829304abb718a529a319025872ea2e30
7aa704175f52581c00fbc5539ac32d8b20fcc4b8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPN' 'sip-files00140.tif'
0525fe356820f3ad7cfba03a15952b91
49ec4a3326a5f8a380581f138a90b1b68680f891
'2011-12-30T06:20:05-05:00'
describe
'1626' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPO' 'sip-files00140.txt'
4798bc694f1bf51c9671feb4f177a81e
5ab8bbd95e1373939213d86c4cb82c8babb47574
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPP' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
fcbdb1885fbaaeceb9c929ad22bb3462
c724d57bbdcb15b7cb92876a608a6895935052c6
describe
'1003313' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPQ' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
6faaf072643aa9d87b77eddfa339ebda
5293f4856dd50c26ec1bcfbe543a52b6f5923739
'2011-12-30T06:14:50-05:00'
describe
'102025' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPR' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
125dcc36226f982b95e712523e4ecec5
668c62a506016e0c8c7f32ae009880b1b2608ec2
describe
'41150' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPS' 'sip-files00141.pro'
0f0dcdde415dce28a5a93f45008d3924
191dbac78363af08676aa48ec24951ef5f34b18b
describe
'36908' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPT' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
c7cd83e058c88e4d078ae7d5e51c819d
cc1b81bd3cd2f35ce10902fcd5f1e33a352ac8b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPU' 'sip-files00141.tif'
40aa1306e88e65198d6fb9438b74fd85
3de7573a351b9d7b4283345cd6a05402fa602348
describe
'1723' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPV' 'sip-files00141.txt'
61918ec74aff5a460515a67e1472aac1
6a68eefb47f4c58891d268944f27557574e2fac3
describe
'10735' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPW' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
f178e38d9fe1ccb5d4010d0750a0901d
5ce937fce4b8b7762392021b18d85706803a649d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPX' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
2780001bd7992a87295da1fd970860f6
5d88c70dee81cce360ac1ad9ca027af65a652ccd
describe
'105329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPY' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
d389cbe4708a513ce38c40a32f9564f9
f28a1c1d866afb95f1da80ffd3d5770b79d0eee9
'2011-12-30T06:13:42-05:00'
describe
'42289' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBPZ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
61ecabe58c0c6b36d9d3467a86771e58
76f1182b20a3e97de2ef5fd8acfb3504c773a3bd
describe
'38585' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQA' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
14ebea9b9a51f8be516de8b98b9568d5
3d7338bcf97e2590b0b50cf5c26151da504262ca
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQB' 'sip-files00142.tif'
79fce32004504eede0ad390047224bd7
3b87e1ac5993915625a1ce2ce2ca1261913cad8c
describe
'1782' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQC' 'sip-files00142.txt'
ae18d992f2a69e3174345fe4d6ec4801
fd89ff29ad9ca89fd5635bca2960578275d27e92
describe
'11436' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQD' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
7b4943f9d9e702f0a01d9c6683c4c930
0286450816cd6090552753d11dbde8a31057ed17
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQE' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
3ff80adf074858da3b0cd8a764299b3c
08e445d1a08f053ca3e29beeb42044def8722444
describe
'101178' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQF' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
edd19a45c9c76498c12298ed15593a12
0b51b708756a8feed1c2cc2c9d70fd6f5b86b5c3
describe
'40515' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQG' 'sip-files00143.pro'
b90e647fdb2def645d97b902b1e397d4
b4dc7979492380d246e94af1a75794af7c8dca31
describe
'36678' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQH' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
bd0386a64a5b51f6fac610553264c12b
7fadbece988c01c8b74e876c730dcc2731ea5b04
'2011-12-30T06:22:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQI' 'sip-files00143.tif'
9499d71210b8be87bbfd042ffd2430b8
3cf14f748e87c450020732d727699e51c9bbc942
'2011-12-30T06:14:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQJ' 'sip-files00143.txt'
0ac351c373b9e6e89a30b463f7b7fc43
f4aa54d9f49628a053098df7fc868ef5ecfd33a0
describe
'10419' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQK' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
daa118ed277dd587353af88352e078eb
48c691e5cd7d8b6f8fc7e915b405d135b60ca7b0
'2011-12-30T06:21:21-05:00'
describe
'986168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQL' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
5ca1194853637aebe0bcfc9b67d11fb5
bb8c0acccd637b8e701a80cb53ab2f2ca370b97a
describe
'93443' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQM' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
900b8bb06d3786dcc21aa926ce1af299
bc4a311650a0b88d08103d41fa5ebcefb49e0f8d
'2011-12-30T06:21:54-05:00'
describe
'36230' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQN' 'sip-files00144.pro'
5cc8e741dd61502e97e47ded7ff4fb6c
9ea7f08641117e22c7379ce274d800f79970cb54
describe
'33768' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQO' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
ca3d547c9e9124256b22a626199714ba
fbd5e680285838a747211fa05d44d8617e8c8150
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQP' 'sip-files00144.tif'
899ddd470b1794b2ec94a51c8b4738cd
ed54bfd08b3707ebb221ad3ddf109f01147874f9
'2011-12-30T06:23:28-05:00'
describe
'1541' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQQ' 'sip-files00144.txt'
54c55c1007e4d12fcbda16506765e9f9
74ce4505bca14cc7c7a628bb017512c08aa7b17e
'2011-12-30T06:17:28-05:00'
describe
'10262' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQR' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
0188e63f01d421f3b222240997d88bc2
83412186c4822cf21071167b362f30503be580cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQS' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
129b3134e3fa268ad02e902cc088bee7
b735001007fc00b78db61f44213bbd4b528325a5
describe
'87956' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQT' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
a5caaf95b76f37385ce845e6b63ef700
a5ab4237619c2cd3b23999f41200e9367d18a500
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQU' 'sip-files00145.pro'
8fb4f3ebc11e63ce50504ce1b945c843
7f1c3f71e8e93ebd0900b8efb0b4187325219149
describe
'32414' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQV' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
42f160e24c5b242e66b7e21f1fdb0220
266df67b7d3e98217e13233f44b4789a37d0dbc7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQW' 'sip-files00145.tif'
a97dbbea9bfd8f49f593c945dc40ceed
03e0db5ba8426ca7a176ecf206f87e38740ea960
describe
'1488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQX' 'sip-files00145.txt'
67090b4dde3445d48a7d432e00eadf3d
950e27c978fc47481de50e21452bf56738dff546
describe
'9723' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQY' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
0569a2e02d7bea5f5c98da20d8f433b8
9ecbb20943f6ebd6d634056ae0024ff6b846c447
describe
'936333' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBQZ' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
469f7021ddc14e718440879a010ebb46
c1b72cd47c3246c26564a759d333ac555f356576
describe
'91248' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRA' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
74c03b8d14d93b855e97fef794927343
0f16143dd27752be6fa14987be2faaccb1c7edf9
describe
'35931' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRB' 'sip-files00146.pro'
66435e9c9a2175026260ec9343db92a7
6c0461cbdd9e8c7ba52c39f34478d79071d5dcc2
describe
'33673' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRC' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
b95f261433f7b6ca9756f297296610ef
f168d0334ffbbe2a66bc41e1a6c3cc274dc86a3c
describe
'7499939' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRD' 'sip-files00146.tif'
440c4cc858a11c63804b8a8d75ab5ccd
58cd753bae5c072bdacb24e332c16c881c1768ae
'2011-12-30T06:20:26-05:00'
describe
'1537' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRE' 'sip-files00146.txt'
3a227d2afc158c333605505cb7163694
c8a539050dd715d13b23fb3864d9d3c47f0e11c5
describe
'10706' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRF' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
9caff30dea6ead349cf52545d3928514
1ddafb2eedabb9101ac344567eda836c84413b19
describe
'1003140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRG' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
247703738ed82634164b69465a767dfa
809946516064d84ec720b54b9f55c5dd6a8e8b21
describe
'85117' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRH' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
af2c6c37d551c346c9a5fcc87d76e638
bd791b71c530ea77efdc092ef3e5f8a16513146a
describe
'33604' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRI' 'sip-files00147.pro'
72aeeba57ade34d0775dfce75bb6ec73
e18c3cf08946e4531178f1aebd8bd8477aa36e3c
describe
'30683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRJ' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
32c65cb40aaea97b1af9002bcbd7d64f
86ee768a7b71c4077723ee93bae77ba7f16cdc05
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRK' 'sip-files00147.tif'
a4a1a22c688fa6750dfa532fdf14c483
fc4e8ad888cd79e3c295dcfaa47096f9e7b714db
describe
'1431' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRL' 'sip-files00147.txt'
5e788014330d5e256cc1dc57e708b94d
c17b92a915d672208eb24bbddcf8b917a944d679
describe
'9113' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRM' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
f419aa7d3117bc7c249c6f23912b0b72
b5ff94d44de12c6f5cf60007f9708f2c0d199f8a
describe
'935194' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRN' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
957d72bd2bc9d4e406a5d1b2badf459d
d41a16f9f635aecbd2e58152a1eacf944c3bd7cc
describe
'96609' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRO' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
f5cbc725eaec079fd194641892e11d64
8a8b4a646507a46582de810c2700c610855717bd
'2011-12-30T06:16:20-05:00'
describe
'37318' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRP' 'sip-files00148.pro'
bcc351af1f3bc9c3e283a38ec26d3851
29988cd46e0640ae22b7dc2ede15d1514d87f024
describe
'34977' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRQ' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
607b315f408968d143728c6515b1bed5
54a7f9554691ccc9df956af9b43a921563e19fd3
describe
'7488419' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRR' 'sip-files00148.tif'
1bd14604e3076b01d21784128ca553fd
cb367ae5ca316b3b18451ea247d977a154fc8fb9
describe
'1579' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRS' 'sip-files00148.txt'
aeec91529a7942cbf8dfc7f78c366d4e
0aca11ad1508faf897dabb878980040af404aa37
describe
'11205' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRT' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
832049d5b63c5a01d9320e12fb9eaa9f
7d09c35d7d798037a8bd5fdbf4bdb9c4aaed5868
'2011-12-30T06:21:38-05:00'
describe
'1003301' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRU' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
325b6ec69716cfd9671f8b72393e4349
34b5e5d3a866bfc3d44d3f9ce57d10f5e18d9e83
describe
'98552' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRV' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
760fce353d9e85f67a6afb6bc989dfea
0aa0234a95a13286f271d3cc224e3c6350ec34b4
describe
'39985' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRW' 'sip-files00149.pro'
26bbfa2af5d3aa8fc4bcfaf9f7938a3a
702fc083184a217677f1d2a0910c250f2e6c44d6
'2011-12-30T06:18:24-05:00'
describe
'35734' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRX' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
a8b08ea7301d387d3fb153b888b264b2
a346443aa13504ca6183c150768ef9b74a19acd9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRY' 'sip-files00149.tif'
229256ec5c1983c9848e07efee83afa3
3f9af4d5b579b4fd6b5ab6127b79f63045afa2e9
'2011-12-30T06:13:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBRZ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
60858ae3b6763af445b3452d84543ff2
fd38447fe4d214761354ac46192664bbbf097fa2
describe
'10436' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSA' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
fde340a31b5486929122e7b8fdf0a1d9
5098c8328624dd1f1a48a06e29979c8c57021348
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSB' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
604977e371c69b261e68a4afa4fa56ee
956fb8499f46257cb43b659be7344c819888e51c
describe
'94822' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSC' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
f893dc020e226185b6817d3c17dd0921
8c19012c437abd47c82f5db1b074a7eda07bce9e
describe
'37446' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSD' 'sip-files00150.pro'
90135438b3454ec2e8acaa8e08a307fb
319147f5a9cdd56aa2ba08e1a8fdfb0f8a1fdd8f
describe
'33967' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSE' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
5b99f992c36e8278079b5844975e9fd4
61fa2daf41cad0b0c0d5d8dff6969943d90cdae9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSF' 'sip-files00150.tif'
807ba2f25206287369d6b8b56da1c11d
88fe4c58efa234cfa26558a60243ad4f0e63a516
describe
'1612' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSG' 'sip-files00150.txt'
c3e8ad0d4b6c5a5d31f676824b0ce10b
e47c7993a1b2a2a2e14ce1f179b2a3e6708c7aa9
describe
'10163' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSH' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
0caab7b73f54dc626968be3136bdf180
1e76e80683aacbeec8ccdf37f9d1d20e08a404f0
describe
'1003350' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSI' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
4cd60dc044e8e899bf129c8feb4921fb
7f94da60941570d6c8d2dbe02c7263dfaae7e27d
describe
'101666' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSJ' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
adfd451b7dcc12ecc30522792f4d76eb
4b5b3a8ec562256e1702a08fd6ffe85529ff1510
describe
'39653' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSK' 'sip-files00151.pro'
6720a2c6b506a34e3bca1e44f0664e90
a78b6a2841a84e81d3ca0afdefd8f1fc64a1747a
describe
'36220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSL' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
baa86326586ddf4c43e29477da50c9d8
2283c38bb313d5c911fea10167d9e84c48a97ac1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSM' 'sip-files00151.tif'
4d5b2822578998f6d3350ff6c8269837
4da0bdf8a3ff4103ccbd94a344c0e7347ba96697
'2011-12-30T06:13:11-05:00'
describe
'1683' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSN' 'sip-files00151.txt'
3d3e82dd99b66c23f1232844ebf53d33
fe7f88831e1042ece58fa5c8a5e76676b762b744
describe
'10096' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSO' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
ae524698cc989a029083f7031f09a36d
2eaac971c3d6866e822ef379f7f3a04dcd53d743
describe
'941712' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSP' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
c1effe2b6957101bfc2792579d89080e
4463b1ccd0809e31f3a674b6be2ec3002b08ead1
'2011-12-30T06:14:16-05:00'
describe
'99928' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSQ' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
6e5f600adf350c376da1046feb85c746
75ca4ad8b52547114bb6ab23160bb67a21dac8e3
describe
'37641' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSR' 'sip-files00152.pro'
bc900fd067d1ad44c598049d8e4068b6
1676571055af79bc2ec9f81bbcad2ecb58302037
describe
'35610' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSS' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
5ab0b73cb9575aa959ce6956999e6de5
4b39e638aea9804116741adf6da7ed126f0449b0
describe
'7543087' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBST' 'sip-files00152.tif'
11893354143d0c6861216304ad00a05a
181f220ea80fd6c5ca0ea0fccd122e7ce36b91f6
describe
'1599' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSU' 'sip-files00152.txt'
c57feaf0f6b5e8e6ac0a54f50cd626e1
98387585a00e04ff5a031c89e5ead4d5d52f1354
describe
'11318' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSV' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
7bee349b9f7e6380d1b4c42e98fb13bc
44d442a83a67373e48646e2ec4c9a74a2a6d32d4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSW' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
83b2fb97706dc62e9c1bd07f84ca71e4
b0781ea030427decd15b0bdf94372ccfa19347a8
describe
'99005' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSX' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
24016e8e503f6037afdc55b4b24a4174
84131bdbc7790ff8e5add99bff7230faa095a4bd
describe
'38495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSY' 'sip-files00153.pro'
d0038e7e7297391f01fb119b93b66130
ac5ff81fa642469a431b3bcabf234d6eba3010d8
describe
'33760' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBSZ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
a36936b941259ff01e074fcee9eb730d
ab1cbc443e03ede5f115880c08b39bdc2f1220d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTA' 'sip-files00153.tif'
7095e53c908790b01fd2da3a4b41e456
5ead419160037f1fd1d522a63bf072139e879b1e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTB' 'sip-files00153.txt'
9cc3a66aa2c7dfac109c24f334a2d7ff
3e851a735f5ae5a510cad174926228f18b16e3c3
describe
'9628' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTC' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
119a8e5747dd614d5fe747ef1dbef036
0f2ff13bdc2c462ddf25dcc59111eacfffb99dc5
describe
'923721' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTD' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
8803e5e2274b0a915b51f328d761dede
3ad32477381323f4e6889404b8c546d993b6a9ca
describe
'102938' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTE' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
33e28cde96405fd91ff887a306b9a1fa
fb773f5592d0ef44918abbe5e379d9b87e26be91
describe
'39333' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTF' 'sip-files00154.pro'
6dbfa9ff3544b8c8340fe34df9ad875f
f5c66eb1336523c434fb84f16659e6acde28e146
describe
'35737' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTG' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
40044b8ec9edbbf816584ed3496acc13
2f4e0be6db23db9b2e3bb085101bd68cd645e94c
describe
'7396745' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTH' 'sip-files00154.tif'
7bc5424929e392be3022d25f174ab547
430c7a6d7aa582f71f11f62cb32d0a4833ae1403
'2011-12-30T06:19:02-05:00'
describe
'1653' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTI' 'sip-files00154.txt'
82343c5369963f3c8d2630ac026d0150
f4a1f9cd3104e37e0604882183b8bf29bea64fd8
describe
'11482' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTJ' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
27da2650ab7fa26d20da474ffee4861c
b23151bc12892665ae79de497de2a47f5c555600
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTK' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
8ad3bc7164ff87cf9ee28ae0ea736fae
63cfaea679229f013adf186dcc44536c10c00113
describe
'104748' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTL' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
3053577a2fca59df66fc0433184513c4
37d5b43ad39e1c109e6175c6ce80ddfd6e03c9f1
describe
'38685' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTM' 'sip-files00155.pro'
e4d03eb5e1b49129b2f4b2951d58a69f
39a78f229c4572455e5da09504be8b8bd26dfc18
describe
'36527' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTN' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
055ca81c9f2842ab8519bbb28690ddf6
c9c1175d4dc6c550204f98c91948eb219121695c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTO' 'sip-files00155.tif'
74175e0e2a5f785819f37f4a29b893d4
676ada652b306460fe7314eefae4025aa031fbc6
'2011-12-30T06:13:37-05:00'
describe
'1632' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTP' 'sip-files00155.txt'
65a69385d82bc2ca9d869919aa907eb8
2b1284ce687f36309108db5b2a454bc287722048
describe
'10453' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTQ' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
902be90e743383508e770eaa883f683c
e64b29cd66c3a06becc8805a01cfc4e27c1cef13
describe
'939886' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTR' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
88250d26fa4cc6e86785ef3d2a9bd622
5d9dd48c60b574f3d2a3d6837431e26b01cbc946
describe
'103642' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTS' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
389064efa4a7a3a0f3947496e3b3fe61
b8d0a58ce8f497990c1a4bed7b825b7264c50a26
'2011-12-30T06:16:44-05:00'
describe
'37944' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTT' 'sip-files00156.pro'
f2749c05528bad2f5c9db0745d2a0117
16fcb92a08e612d065f0133f06cd96ccd55dc076
describe
'36091' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTU' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
71b19ca776053eaaa311e58eb9c5ddaf
65964a1d414cd4421872f476d248a0bc0a4f123d
describe
'7525955' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTV' 'sip-files00156.tif'
d97f5aa14a2f2db0a17770a73ddda8c1
4c98168528acffc93b6af8062e962f7725b1c03a
describe
'1621' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTW' 'sip-files00156.txt'
c0810ac16b84107498751a56f272f5ce
c763e9da5673bbfb3e984885dbf2628395d217ce
describe
'11306' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTX' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
7d0f4433f70af910d4d5170baef1b4f3
2e76edd9d3a85499e193d9952ea5d47b783d1f4c
describe
'1003289' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTY' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
0803a7ceec7ff87a7dbc4d1464b83d1f
3d23f5226adc281d799e421d34256af36dc4934c
describe
'96900' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBTZ' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
652cb58001ba3b2f5b294cde3912fdd2
4e1b6c34d35be30e415daec36bbd5ba8f71133f0
describe
'40670' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUA' 'sip-files00157.pro'
e8be8b5de8b91f52237fbe5fb7bf887d
d9fc45430ffff0dfb9139b5394073f5d62d3790a
describe
'34459' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUB' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
a1feb68806a73d3469ae9f5fb948f19d
9ac5e4f158a3ea6fa5358e18d41fb06fd36c284b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUC' 'sip-files00157.tif'
b886a151637cbde781e75c29d43cc808
4bd617f0c96c7c36a9976c097fa77343c88de4d3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUD' 'sip-files00157.txt'
9656965bc62316027bba197d0051a830
574be36dfc75aea33e962de13ee8a259a085c9bd
describe
'9803' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUE' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
b1c29659c1c31fab005ab76428f37dd6
ddae69695b27475353cb5150a126fb6107eaabe7
describe
'940066' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUF' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
06dac78eaf838d2f4f3ff9a3ac82748a
70757ba6f2147c63448d5a13d9e7ae24e998b798
describe
'93079' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUG' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
df122f0a2212d7665b6ab21b6d6f0abf
2c157ee727f68c7d0617fdc0dc31c146f4e9dd86
describe
'37447' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUH' 'sip-files00158.pro'
eba2f3d93b82148f9066d89404e15474
218001a987d17d389c50bd8de71218377916418b
'2011-12-30T06:13:22-05:00'
describe
'33420' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUI' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
fbca062eb3f8b6b9fe62d3de010f489c
f8e919570568c7d07a4caad9d08dba167787d350
describe
'7527639' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUJ' 'sip-files00158.tif'
af2b489c95ae96513da915d2dcb4f1f2
8732b8521dd4c1fff563b88c78cedfae6a29a885
describe
'1600' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUK' 'sip-files00158.txt'
10341728280b0f6453924173124c007d
11b08711f972f7a6a0dfe57c27866a482558e354
describe
'10553' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUL' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
1bfcbea3695a52c8f2750007fe9d367f
606c8489bbf236dc41fdde5f78f80d5e4a349a7d
'2011-12-30T06:17:22-05:00'
describe
'1003334' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUM' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
d11f0e9893fdcc76a30464dd743a5bbd
6346cfe1824c79e3fda3268f492c28fbeb44ae08
describe
'98773' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUN' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
ad51ad2778c2b223746137b565750248
32ee8dcfd6321748adf84cff5ae46af33f6045d5
describe
'37505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUO' 'sip-files00159.pro'
8adc6819570e4e22687cd1f89f903d67
d529c0a92b80bb71a77a90722e99b4890a825b96
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUP' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
993fa06503b6376d65f8c49277b6e5b3
d8f1e6ad7e8d489869a8614689ea7baee711669c
'2011-12-30T06:16:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUQ' 'sip-files00159.tif'
7b4840050fe5a71b476c1bb64c8abfbb
e23914532709a4a1ef8e4011e1ba9e3efb6fb940
describe
'1577' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUR' 'sip-files00159.txt'
c6877dc86ddf04656edaef58d92c42a9
e3e466d1979141d0da7729e6c106447c3eafe1ad
describe
'10365' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUS' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
98171fca69c76938d037f054c2c17e50
dd7a3c8e777dff77833f4de9a75d03b52ad24900
describe
'942938' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUT' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
a0227d618eb0da6326dba036fb7c4c1d
61f144fa518c835c2f44218f5d2a1f235b1c2c92
describe
'96306' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUU' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
ed5acd569e1ba603a0ddda3f5548af5b
0bae6ea10fa02a91a94ffe7e3f96447d7f3f6320
describe
'35089' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUV' 'sip-files00160.pro'
842dde69adb5902daeb85b13db8956c8
d5756e939dd58602e91b84af3ea95bf82881726a
describe
'33656' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUW' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
3198db0752d93534e7bb59d6bf3ee6fe
71deda97ed0a5fda086c0d776fe6a14d9b1a42e1
describe
'7550555' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUX' 'sip-files00160.tif'
d38ad9a3fe8c80b3c677e1151f85c377
45bbd6984ba026bfc7593d1ee5c8aa373402f887
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUY' 'sip-files00160.txt'
e5a44f44312b40962bdf8279105d2d5d
4e35768911cdc9a7b2c2042da5a9933efe81074c
describe
'10629' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBUZ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
7ab78c9745e5992567cd6fae915285fc
c8fb5ad5340bcb84cef8945eb7d9f1680104cf72
'2011-12-30T06:12:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVA' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
e315256e0dd893fe1a9e9a208d42200e
4690443063b1793e3654438faa1aa71bacdff518
describe
'90512' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVB' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
38b831bc0967d7542b8817f8b56d7471
2f61c98082fad160afd274cd87813884f028f222
describe
'35488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVC' 'sip-files00161.pro'
7db761e50fb653f755266e7e47f0b115
178a564eb11395ff21c6ac99f9b784e94e9e8387
'2011-12-30T06:20:23-05:00'
describe
'32866' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVD' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
a8ba7690e2aa47485757f14b2f1d4d3e
6a8f6ec480941b8bb4b80838777097a5c0e3f097
'2011-12-30T06:23:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVE' 'sip-files00161.tif'
3c914ce296a6378117edf61481f9bb12
66890de76e0b827613248c13d51d935a73d89564
'2011-12-30T06:18:44-05:00'
describe
'1495' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVF' 'sip-files00161.txt'
a364d363b253e31be0b82688564332f4
5fd91e0715b728402cf5dea5042e081a7abf8cbc
describe
'9424' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVG' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
2169f227f97aef0d1e9d9f13f6b56903
cc4d98d527ad0c4f2e5130e082ccb8c2de9f41ec
describe
'943387' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVH' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
77ad91404abce5c4637c719a5c011a6e
9862790877c350b552953d8adfff9359417a6d0a
describe
'94593' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVI' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
b84a063fde8780f57c0ec464b1f18488
33dbaf9385996cf3df8abf5e066f4d1cda38da67
describe
'37668' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVJ' 'sip-files00162.pro'
da86a330211e20ee0a4c7563048b7e5e
141edd2ae23ac03edfca39740095ccd20b948848
describe
'34006' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVK' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
e4613275fc0b30828b979ab0af6a668c
cb5154e70a0603870ec70ff62eaf8891c52c8eb6
'2011-12-30T06:23:24-05:00'
describe
'7557771' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVL' 'sip-files00162.tif'
7574641d7dd8ddfc094ca45a952311e6
c6879af82649a4fbc669085dce3357a9aa79adb8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVM' 'sip-files00162.txt'
4b0256dfe509315b17511fc43a339216
520b6c542a62b1e7b0bcdba35d67aa34591f6d09
describe
'10599' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVN' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
5d231f5e6288801860e910e8c40c4e53
2a47f75a0363794c1e36aa709f733b0eb9638d56
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVO' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
51cb6706453b0ee3cb13bc6c58f18669
846dc72bfeac4c4e553186a213a67b2988e22bb6
'2011-12-30T06:12:46-05:00'
describe
'101243' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVP' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
e94082265ce2e359a18abe6b4a2dd58c
b9c272471faabc79601bce4b739b84f8d2336ee0
describe
'38672' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVQ' 'sip-files00163.pro'
a2d3fc65d933bcd71f32cdeb1367179f
f3915e4e2298949c6eab49ceab9f74650fd41db4
describe
'35900' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVR' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
ad686387b31007b5fc3944bdb63afc89
786016fa93745e4b667ef1888c347b66036723d3
'2011-12-30T06:15:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVS' 'sip-files00163.tif'
46f9a717918a2b3143e4961dce14b035
78d65f98d99b640af939cbab73af885d3334caaa
describe
'1620' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVT' 'sip-files00163.txt'
c3e010164f74a57e95b100fa0ab76894
fb31a0d3a3e33e04e2725c6d27ab9e6a788e16e5
describe
'10578' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVU' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
5844610794a87eec606970ba6912ec5c
6b2cd85ba850136e246006443808fa904d39f6f1
describe
'928389' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVV' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
663bfb9d49f4e1193098ea2e83711001
bab02fbbffc13b36dc03e1c0dbfab5291b58ca33
'2011-12-30T06:14:52-05:00'
describe
'61699' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVW' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
ba861f11922b5c84ba1e64ccfe9dc782
a0811a5b1f8b80f302a2b89f2cf70a37e3fd496b
describe
'15703' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVX' 'sip-files00164.pro'
79f7c76efa086ae39e2765e76e27274e
d5274f0b639b335b57c008b977b82450fa66f102
describe
'20736' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVY' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
23be018b1af16a9eec6a5972d7601eb3
27bfa52e7bc4a5de05226529c3dd0363f6d99b14
'2011-12-30T06:22:38-05:00'
describe
'7447028' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBVZ' 'sip-files00164.tif'
2a902175278d570cff0d3f678064e209
b6589b5a08e4f001844289f37cab20a7f3ccc99e
describe
'674' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWA' 'sip-files00164.txt'
8592064bda87ade6278670028fcaee80
559e97459963d8d785a58e13df194c2fa16872a7
describe
'6887' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWB' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
6885282d0a84aea1941fe389190fc945
cc773b3540df44fa93690a439f2765ebb450bb93
describe
'966763' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWC' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
39c3b2090283f8bf804feb6999b6186d
90f9b1ba9ffc3e138bb97c30b7797df7f6cc7c27
describe
'68318' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWD' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
c1ce830f8e79e88e597b7558729f6805
5bb94d361e731eae89ff749d42fdf61590f1a71d
describe
'26145' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWE' 'sip-files00165.pro'
5dba5e415ac71f08b4bcdbc034e1d814
22b3207841c70d234f3b9ab7d05474e28362874c
describe
'24226' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWF' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
1c3c6cad353683e84542ebe9a38cb8b7
1050e8f235856b174b9c9e7220aa652126368f35
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWG' 'sip-files00165.tif'
70b1a7f263f50f73648d729d15471549
3274ccc5da47078a8135ee3deaf897063a8af2d5
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWH' 'sip-files00165.txt'
b653252c8bdddd2d8c737cfbbcbc8b3e
868f4e55a7cc3da756ab315ba813cbc1b24cb4a8
'2011-12-30T06:17:27-05:00'
describe
'7386' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWI' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
cd70f50fe99f96ee76f17819ce5c53bb
611352364e0c583f9b818e13949e253e91573822
describe
'940655' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWJ' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
34318db21441d8e5a07016065a63e51b
162aeb54196783279c25411e9f5cac62b94af318
describe
'100809' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWK' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
7baa2530b45fcea1e7130df7fb30b24b
c82366a2ff276d5a5a87ab17914ec4b872602472
describe
'40537' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWL' 'sip-files00166.pro'
10ea85b9ddb9f8d75d9c4dfd45ef396a
9b1bdca89624b5b573866a59ae277c083ac46eb7
describe
'36562' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWM' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
3e5043d39392c73976f0444cb08a7119
c680673dcac739ee641064644536affdf376c19c
describe
'7534871' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWN' 'sip-files00166.tif'
ca3d7ab0a3ead15d3e2483fbfc3435f7
5f4e84fcd4e65fb2de174c04622cefea05a10889
'2011-12-30T06:21:52-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWO' 'sip-files00166.txt'
3a25a5b9bdaf6835207546750bade754
269ae96748426d44c69bdf93fd1129a897d59630
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWP' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
288e3b3d2bb9f853b5b0182ffe4dfd23
bf4db20730cd501fccad5c6ea84fcea4cc97c7e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWQ' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
4498aaa7940fe5400230f2271c8495de
f60a83cac887980ff72551bb48ff66537f339f59
describe
'105451' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWR' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
123338fd305ae63cc629fff222f6a096
78bbc7aee6f65045bf0c0f61555dd7d60f04bc27
describe
'41983' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWS' 'sip-files00167.pro'
feb9adedfee48a6a382ead7e1ef1c0fc
b0979b9e2f710a2ab9d8e2f31c80b7c0810aac28
describe
'36877' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWT' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
754521a57a30757fca96bc11d0ddbb83
ed7713ef2a1aa68ed988ef0c90a9f4d91eb97cd5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWU' 'sip-files00167.tif'
b52d041d159e0eff613ecc57e8369f2b
f7fa6f5511a1be63011b868459562a79a2a1a86e
describe
'1754' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWV' 'sip-files00167.txt'
4d5fc785652f8c67e963eb2726fc73c3
83bd32ca30238cdf322a4d4fec3c5b28bbb970b9
describe
'10282' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWW' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
f8835f42b9127c5187fbf7632c17dfd5
93655ea5c4786744d7efad553a1ede5b544ed289
describe
'923569' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWX' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
ebb0e91af0de645aa04a88c0a6b87cd7
c4f18013e6609d14268386027285dff6f299d3e7
describe
'103806' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWY' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
57ff87ba1536574634c2eda6bd628e35
9e35b66d9546f04f165cd395eef8260a3d45ac2b
describe
'40314' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBWZ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
082ac9aeae42d968165d45ac6a5a48dc
3113d07f61cb9dc257981df090a2d76a2dd1da56
describe
'36671' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXA' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
b05661c162f97ff80ceeda54fcb74e5a
bbbb5c7d71dbd288e8fef743f86637a05faf6a3d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXB' 'sip-files00168.tif'
45c7f320f948e57f4e9ed1b8879e9ba0
dc8b666920a19c00d2370c0b49224e9aa6e85e4e
'2011-12-30T06:15:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXC' 'sip-files00168.txt'
0414d1f2bffca844e423d9439e24f0f6
aa955c6f14c1a1f4d1e04c16761ce3b0f0c2b099
describe
'11824' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXD' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
482316761e0a8306be6de305ebcd28a3
c434e37fb35984a774f8ef8857e39cfd69fc2168
describe
'1003272' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXE' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
558ff2e759567d5c05256efd0cb5833a
df55cbf1a7bbd9df231a3c2b2ffb50e7ffe66d82
describe
'110606' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXF' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
9008b1fb5925974ef615e9cfd6ca9859
ece6595b913516e2f87b49d87ce776e03a59b084
describe
'41988' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXG' 'sip-files00169.pro'
dae02d7fe9b5a9fd1f6821d241b7d46f
21ecf7ccd3dd60a76f1bcc9756ee6e92961207b8
describe
'40304' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXH' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
c781e6283601299ef12e0e6d292680c3
00749524a820d21b43556fe6fb8432722e38e647
describe
'8049396' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXI' 'sip-files00169.tif'
7f70458797959528b7e2e77254459510
e84c2f943c9e783633ccca841fb8c83423d6efcc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXJ' 'sip-files00169.txt'
ee745377b7a2f2b9da316494df2bc186
901957703266875f23ad5c6290c3284c484b4fe7
describe
'11956' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXK' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
0c027bdd516f00b1f042e40dff98cddf
3b0b4dc6a3c66b80a08056a74e60217df66f8fdb
describe
'940585' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXL' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
3f49589a52ef2b2b94f15c1427cc672f
b9640acac7311ba9f774b5264f37f256d10083e7
describe
'103746' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXM' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
defd7f5e9a1c402950f07624efe2b1cd
f6838305391ca0e9a42f7537e23a1321e15bb73a
describe
'39239' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXN' 'sip-files00170.pro'
1582080d36c84116839a319d54630e9f
8b6001e70e5821b011b12e8239b7ba23e581691a
describe
'38117' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXO' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
d0852fa47de0affde60cc4012f9f4b50
446efb7a7b27993bddb9384f3b8b4077e1d12c94
describe
'7547776' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXP' 'sip-files00170.tif'
42b84b6be361a4bca35398d48b88af9c
e78fd7f9903fa182677c099cbdffef5ea8367b81
describe
'1650' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXQ' 'sip-files00170.txt'
24c1619cb9f3939a57ab35398a9a780a
e1117692062fff3ce24d48c301c5cd4c1ea14bc5
describe
'11951' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXR' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
a6a9066cbdcd463f7ba800936eb71517
9693b431e79cbe4e58aa46fffd40cb3324850c95
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXS' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
a1b84c6592b0ca609d7e9821a8dc74f4
83681c796e5a96f7972a3ccd50303fa9ea7c1f9d
describe
'100067' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXT' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
283c74fa2ac5e42bde33a9322745142e
5722ff8ba2fd80830bc456b317a751a194dd6d23
describe
'40487' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXU' 'sip-files00171.pro'
62add5367b606bd1d999ec5affec3adf
7dad7e693c6353cb9f2fd910d5b24e6886b64c02
describe
'36951' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXV' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
71f449fe04cf647eca2329ea1ab9e1ad
c271584d1dc41deeb3ad32e24d2c62891fadff2c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXW' 'sip-files00171.tif'
13ab9ace47ae15c1b1297e1930c1451c
7e3ed8739f7488c0bf78194d2bcc608dba30d688
describe
'1685' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXX' 'sip-files00171.txt'
1f15b51b80121d2f5f3b5d2810df401f
c05dc0f230da8baf8e0403e1b3a997f8090de4f6
describe
'10646' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXY' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
d060a772009490fad28d4938d8212ca3
d2bbcf50fa1d13cf4a8c91c6a27fb8de790f7dfd
describe
'932337' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBXZ' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
6d8c9bef737cb3e3256f664083e20a7c
b5dac7cc329a646be5a1621e55e4ac4bec87913d
describe
'100398' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYA' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
c38dc0dc06acfb21dcdfd9814450df20
89b63a18f8a55a20f9cd7962671cb59e8cd3895f
describe
'40966' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYB' 'sip-files00172.pro'
c4f09239c40636ed14dee111bdb1a904
64a4d632dbd6702e1707d2c8b8c4428b108d05cd
describe
'36352' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYC' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
5291d25b317df5a4e2b567205e7b5641
064098376fce26b4bbb1e072a72d24b67934c84b
describe
'7465599' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYD' 'sip-files00172.tif'
6c0ce2faa20738681e13a09d46c9314e
a19dde8bb39fa6aea30a705462af47a7b08eb9a3
describe
'1721' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYE' 'sip-files00172.txt'
4f2fcc3120fb738e910db97fd2df0403
4364f460420b9a34a14eaaf2d8e85a65a028b005
'2011-12-30T06:20:02-05:00'
describe
'11553' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYF' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
6a736dd9905be57b5559a2ff18e1c9e1
4799c7e17d3d494d38075750174b5b082b28084c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYG' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
2daba93e5a6d0b2228e5d4492010b865
e99cff653438c9ee67f6438807b454c45f369b80
describe
'95036' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYH' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
272fe089f496a7eb17ab699f1f0fb42d
8755973229895ee400ec257ae6b297d9ba38e255
describe
'38287' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYI' 'sip-files00173.pro'
9430a852df8bfcf74b4de6595e8577b6
c6301f5a3595c7a02f9120f10e6c4e2d236236c5
describe
'34613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYJ' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
e03d142e36133999fe55ed05bd256f0c
2a14927aa7a74c40ca8f959c4a1ea50baffa779d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYK' 'sip-files00173.tif'
b82f3630f835d3a603ebad7932001455
c1dead4c1bcf9501d3241a67235f9f1555b35848
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYL' 'sip-files00173.txt'
390a7a968e5730e45cb6160f52fd9405
dd890588f237c6b2094d3402a0c1074b7639d6d9
describe
'10151' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYM' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
39c0214f548b4559bdade12e588fdec2
19cb0c7ef978a67c9e82b393b5213aa14744b5aa
describe
'944354' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYN' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
a4b8251e09de5e6149f73cb639ce682f
ef822e1b3db768b0fe80b0ddc120ae5703ad1eb5
describe
'95360' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYO' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
efa072e0169c264f51737931afe309b7
95c70019af335c8229a1b52afc6af1022ad4fa3e
'2011-12-30T06:21:57-05:00'
describe
'37456' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYP' 'sip-files00174.pro'
ec72ac4ddf9a083eef7056191ec2a7e2
d8541507265bf9d95761effe24059b72456c26dc
describe
'34704' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYQ' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
0c7f08c248f5b9ec5aacabb581651ec0
767a6d53296da806cacea72c8eeb266b526d0292
describe
'7564207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYR' 'sip-files00174.tif'
ee1f77e24648e3d3a42c3cd5f86cd70d
3c47227baa3312604f6d15f367e1d0bdaeb182f6
'2011-12-30T06:16:03-05:00'
describe
'1598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYS' 'sip-files00174.txt'
1e20485b7ee7294a24f67b66019eb6d1
a230b474738e1e01f01d359410fb3184b52f9698
describe
'11103' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYT' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
22b0f6ecc904de10f99f1bc94df01549
15194f7c3675678a20d5c883a0bc713026d76d1a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYU' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
891c8bcddd7ebc127cd97ed38ee5ee7d
943cb11505bc45a4439956ac61eda13c5b46be6e
describe
'96853' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYV' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
0a2d99020116ed7c2047b6c8cc191cb1
3ac4423ec732f0cd65bd20b2e235c532614577cd
describe
'39230' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYW' 'sip-files00175.pro'
e718837eeeffcf2cbe8381b218913c3a
52e26265146461cd7230bc0ce2a932459d05e92f
describe
'35091' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYX' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
c49949c8285a628f6cc11209b31285b2
5d1aaf53af687c5e39a83352bba64f3b7d238d7d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYY' 'sip-files00175.tif'
48042ce3724c899f2699d971275dafd6
a0bfa49815fd67a2d73445e9c1237280e4823cac
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBYZ' 'sip-files00175.txt'
080357da5a860eb2a2d15c698e176ec4
bdd371ba307eafd47ee708961df05d1904f34c79
describe
'10155' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZA' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
1564b69b40d0cd9e7a953beb184a2722
35323af065b9b19acd4fe59b89b3e1acdadedf4a
describe
'950066' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZB' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
c0ae333571cfebc711604b19897c1a3c
7215e50331ae47bf64f066f567e6bf9f03e0ec16
describe
'100446' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZC' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
58b3a2124f0f2a15b24030adf6214408
45c3dec4c994e277dc9443bd5fcde9903884a67d
describe
'39864' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZD' 'sip-files00176.pro'
42cae994500611aeda4466e3dee009d0
b583e82207aba73986147d22a4dbea22cf9e76c3
'2011-12-30T06:13:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZE' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
b4ef402673647d2fbd6137c1dc6ad7bf
27fc6b62f099b7cb1e10bf4142bb9ff8a810db98
describe
'7609907' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZF' 'sip-files00176.tif'
4106ac4edb3006b335067e84dd64ea29
0af2d9ceb3a21c104207f5e7689bb3572171f45e
describe
'1698' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZG' 'sip-files00176.txt'
7d3d06cc29eda54725b2aa9b4715efdc
0e97004672b049f832d7f3fd69f3152e19da2d5c
describe
'11365' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZH' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
c2785c4a487d60d7f95e9b48f5d68567
3cb5bb9402c9ef34e48db003f764403aa07e6c9a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZI' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
5b49e8143a1d4064eceede1b2ebbeb80
de2fbeb10b7f4af6fb00af25d10dcb073e440e05
describe
'102691' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZJ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
6f461bf8760ddf86bd9ce93a038aca4c
c8f50e47efc1a3ef46aef3669dd1fd2e0bffb258
describe
'40475' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZK' 'sip-files00177.pro'
8b04dc6bf9f469763e3101abeb217699
46a13e0a05598b61eb94906dda8d77fad5db25ab
describe
'37407' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZL' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
d921734d5474619d2430c4911e8587ec
1bfcfa9e71852dd443fa640749d54e535b0c7b93
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZM' 'sip-files00177.tif'
836e98851e93a43f5a8a618747fbe976
e7f2ece640d18a2450890f1d7b3ad3e5f312a8b7
'2011-12-30T06:22:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZN' 'sip-files00177.txt'
5e6826e23b49a1b289c78d205f49b3de
6d2783fb56ca1cdeb02b22af73a0df98642a4025
describe
'10941' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZO' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
2cb25b03838f5682878aff02b0d46998
a0a53759f57b68ca8a5f096cada50889a8b22cba
'2011-12-30T06:13:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZP' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
785ac3f536c0e956bc60964c93227bbf
237397a36415b9515883f8bc467084adc9971f48
describe
'97505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZQ' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
c2e7d9a4e98d6315ea322553e7cb4816
ef093fc6adb092cab0c42e763ad3efebb4c0009f
describe
'38652' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZR' 'sip-files00178.pro'
c1c2095d8933998aa9fa427a7cb7f77f
5931e0ec946b170f92cb16f6b2c58899f0ebc40f
describe
'35133' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZS' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
f7329009fe059d65926e9e60db90dabe
cda151f640fb83cd374e6e7f1f1762f7d5b59180
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZT' 'sip-files00178.tif'
11401458b5166a60b56477fbb529152d
d7468c6409ec4ae0f131a884720996049389f0e6
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZU' 'sip-files00178.txt'
7994422bcdcf4153c1a9d7bdb670fbf1
325f083fb48c0b811bc1c487eeccd2bc66609d66
describe
'10514' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZV' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
95196dbddb0275165e77b65246d606b7
5bfe77f2f2e12b9cfdf0b4047a6426a2169ed81e
describe
'1003309' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZW' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
f15d9310b69b9e47401add30f937eb87
e9e569fe15e4ccbe80e613d6e05113ede64ea11d
describe
'100282' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZX' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
1130d8ffb6a34d27d0a62766451459f0
22a43ae15fcc36a9ceec39e8a19523fbcf588549
describe
'39269' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZY' 'sip-files00179.pro'
614a8b31839ede427a486f07d0c9b233
880b295015d1342624fb77866022d5607503f06e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACBZZ' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
6ed0473b1e9b43a04ab43a0419605d7d
4e3a8cc9710171a2644ddc1ec0e968f03a53ad4d
'2011-12-30T06:17:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAA' 'sip-files00179.tif'
ccdcc49d3e3a46858266bac9f11db067
c57268577c06c10072ee3760efd8c340b09119f0
describe
'1643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAB' 'sip-files00179.txt'
bf0826bdb0cf9dce3adb3d2ed5932ce3
7a04e736808466d04599bed14e220e686a8485bc
describe
'10618' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAC' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
35ca2cb293c41db9cee9f624d9ccc391
59a25c737d75b82471420fd3aac0d5b75aef19bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAD' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
243687acd27a8975da4961cf07f58c33
b614e4a940c85937e5575dbfb83eeea75f6613db
describe
'99378' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAE' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
9c13ab39b41b48ba519a9ddfe7708193
8bb5f66f7c67fc85f9a77c3375bde93b2b0142cd
describe
'38166' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAF' 'sip-files00180.pro'
773c85dc4a2329506fd72aba5e5096be
7694a382952e338d6f0d82bf005bbe472d2deae3
describe
'35583' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAG' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
93d3ddeb1fb717cd85e54df7004808ca
3f8847f810c0f4cd36fa1eb36b0893473c2b8e8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAH' 'sip-files00180.tif'
e7a0a27e303bcb9a2e79a70178364afa
4dcb6f385a93bb3a48b8dc626a2a50227481dd2e
'2011-12-30T06:21:37-05:00'
describe
'1597' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAI' 'sip-files00180.txt'
f85dfa6f4af6f1517e02e87fb17ea052
9b576f2cd9037a56306a8f8cfec221b858441888
describe
'10736' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAJ' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
436501ccaecc609e538ea32f3aa8ad3a
91d08de1740bfd160ca49e2ba03825460679b6e1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAK' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
ee5037d426ada467da12da0daefd76c4
22e593dd2440fefce72d28d1acef5ffdf9147456
describe
'97586' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAL' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
b64ce6d8ab6acab26dc4eacf9d39069d
4c027a6efcac1066b2f71d72655cd6372d864f99
describe
'38128' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAM' 'sip-files00181.pro'
e42bf4e601e114009d510253c6ccf5e3
c30c58ca2f6f7ada6c7e0189a5d922341c2b75e1
describe
'35794' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAN' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
b2bc1368640fadb154051330afd0b057
bd14051336c42f90a678dc8934af87c88efcd03b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAO' 'sip-files00181.tif'
6f8f35e3eae9fcab0360cf17fa5de959
a75060beaffe09139b345bc7f721af915b0acb44
'2011-12-30T06:16:01-05:00'
describe
'1590' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAP' 'sip-files00181.txt'
486b6a92a5af4d81f47b53d88f464ee0
0e06a5f72ea14afc2acab2368f8f4be4be6b5c5d
describe
'10522' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAQ' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
eb3b4051cbe9698b9032ff1fd126da0c
7c51f07d089c71e851d37dcedd3221454f292446
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAR' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
d9510c9950d84f66ae7aed074205925c
2b564c15d0ca392d9d6bb98d98b1c7c83c646f66
'2011-12-30T06:23:10-05:00'
describe
'101794' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAS' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
bf9930af725ae790eebdec34c5827220
19f8308a5dda02ecfbd34eef32011a9c31f9c0d6
'2011-12-30T06:23:38-05:00'
describe
'40949' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAT' 'sip-files00182.pro'
1d12629c80e70250c1c2120170bfaa3f
7d140f4128fef7ea16e81f1ce79d39978d0ab041
describe
'38243' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAU' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
1e489c5a76d1723fa32b40a6977d80bc
f0fd028912151282203353c6416cb4963f13f021
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAV' 'sip-files00182.tif'
81ccf6d50590e67c5e0dcc7883f8a5b4
bb3c5595999b0c7663a2991b55b820e24d73c4a1
describe
'1720' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAW' 'sip-files00182.txt'
1dbf7ae733dadde1cfc68e80d10829c9
6fb6a1988c79558100e00874beeab32509b7ac3a
describe
'11505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAX' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
6e723d95ecd66d4941f70817f2e620cf
455a22063745ea1e27fe4ea483af4c36a99a9a5f
'2011-12-30T06:18:29-05:00'
describe
'1003338' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAY' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
e5bec73acef2b2d56d6ace6b3ded3358
8f6b48afab2c1c67b4e545fd65fb778fc9716b8b
describe
'101930' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCAZ' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
fb53877617c31ef100d33b18da7256e0
68625b6bbb5299bb0beaa4a7d85cff2e7f0aaa21
describe
'39739' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBA' 'sip-files00183.pro'
294fae819b2b3a6a0cd48ad12ffec346
3ba2e605d8ecf20a3df4cf899041418520c743d8
describe
'35618' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBB' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
22df8fbb555bd6ac1b2b6fd64c8355d1
02d6966729f21e256f23919de6badbc615a4dd2d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBC' 'sip-files00183.tif'
6da653d846873706b871e32a4441b67d
6540f0ee02a9607264f0d96109a20e824f4886a6
describe
'1666' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBD' 'sip-files00183.txt'
10c46a1d2f5a5be75948ae89d801ccbe
574103e85b9a495b3cf5dd67c864548f3176703e
describe
'10154' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBE' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
f80c3e1ea1523a4028628c345a3f2708
193a5b9cfd13c22fd1890de4cf4db6aa1d7ffd02
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBF' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
b49637564f7924e74cd9e64a6817870e
c83ec39500a3999f525a65e55190e9187e71bb15
describe
'103223' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBG' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
da5df2d964f29da7314aec5d04259f0b
184f5a8a9ff6386b778ab400f8df36ba3ea9335c
describe
'37529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBH' 'sip-files00184.pro'
968d3d22136d77a4c2a098bd2bc0fd5e
b7eb708fc054962d45d251c153a4ae10f9520dce
describe
'35598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBI' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
9cd2503313d8878787a04d81c0ba0234
dec3c327c8bfb071c4f5131950287d0e4a16c32e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBJ' 'sip-files00184.tif'
086cb3541f8826353894f097c43d4e72
a516883b96206651652a56c7ddb31a8a43c75488
describe
'1608' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBK' 'sip-files00184.txt'
66c080f4ed878fe11cddd296bd58c276
c069ce39aba7d038a01d52202c848133356fd69e
describe
'10600' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBL' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
b25f2220bfa0a3905114cddf5dca6c68
9fd97b4d6db244ea7c97d51476cb61243e0c003e
describe
'1003347' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBM' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
d232ff8a69d4a4693f72035ae4169234
10ac7d97794ba491a69dd25cf43349803fb9b5f6
describe
'101437' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBN' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
e935f60936edc95c02cc2dafb0d5140d
f7b5188eccd6afdb2221e3f54f45be03d75d62f8
describe
'37565' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBO' 'sip-files00185.pro'
cb59f404f67775a80f4ae159008c6cb6
36f90e5189c1aa07932edba91b1b6f29af353750
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBP' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
c44a2f5b08f3e8454df2cebcc0bb86cb
1c1bdaacbd604a35ca58d273bebcb87ffbec8b74
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBQ' 'sip-files00185.tif'
325dcf4543cb364bbb302b35b5ff54c9
20e47f7e18bf768f9ba4aad500775438aedc0b18
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBR' 'sip-files00185.txt'
35934d132fcbc8ad791591a0a504d13c
dda53895510807ecb035f31194e8b9e61d44b967
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBS' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
12dbdcbb0beb3bc645a386edb62c8225
3cf7162e9f799e4a5729df36b310adbedcaf0ad0
describe
'986157' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBT' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
91626ef0d99161a5b080288d7e4deec6
33b3ec3d634e2989c24258e316bf341a171f119c
describe
'106148' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBU' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
4f68f3743600e293d9d4f8ae458daa63
faa70034a90af7b8b9f98d63b097a0ab91ef6e14
describe
'40330' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBV' 'sip-files00186.pro'
883fb9e9c07218f089826c934ced8532
470dac3fbaa2f64e26be9379716d4607723a33cb
describe
'37983' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBW' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
017d09daabfcd3938d3cb1ac808eaa6a
d0c7bffa1b382465d997bb07e94dc9cb9aae68db
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBX' 'sip-files00186.tif'
7320af80dcba866866b6eb307435c634
5c7c7135c6c300c1b59e08fa73134596139db5e7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBY' 'sip-files00186.txt'
f537d4c8aca24d940765e489f93fdd4e
81be6081e36fa815ce3f4db674b899d720ab29a1
describe
'11525' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCBZ' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
4dfb661b9606213b9d1f3fb69391b8f8
f3704d645034f3df90d807583997822e8052279d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCA' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
3aa8ed06a6e8a4fbe100d1b6677ffd20
62b4667fa7355b1b60702176491f027cbe080da6
describe
'98380' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCB' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
52027ebb95bc07ca30728c1e8666fbff
cff0492469978648212ff0416c54e077d1f92db5
describe
'39196' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCC' 'sip-files00187.pro'
ebedbeffad16be65420f6d8725d74c17
dc322017610a37fdae47bf69ea09acd66456d744
describe
'35929' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCD' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
54afc39d2168bdaeb90b33d90bb90ef8
3e1450fa6e9151d6e1a3efff2eecf3160c26cf22
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCE' 'sip-files00187.tif'
a6f59b00e736516ad84305af6f9e6004
eee163a71c29cc8f126be3c55c04acaa3cfd9b82
describe
'1582' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCF' 'sip-files00187.txt'
7635757009e12d0f34209da90fc8c1f3
9852796f30f0c9496653aa23f4bb03837b029770
describe
'10610' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCG' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
ca986fcd4fe058138ae089cbd9d68662
68fe7c9102fc165f131ef86a9f94b41b42105cb8
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCH' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
86caf4410dfb8c970860e7b3f69c5563
7e8a0849d89b74bbfae9242de2d9a48a378f4bf2
describe
'97427' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCI' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
808b2888e4b951dc013eaf242adda877
3f55044d0af55bf94b242d03bb5898f5bc892746
describe
'39764' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCJ' 'sip-files00188.pro'
a94a7e948877b8442dd4c1a358b2ac1a
07756828a33cded0240984604f593e9ea44c4937
'2011-12-30T06:22:15-05:00'
describe
'35724' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCK' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
8724c08fdd0f3701e1d54a0fd5ad8931
66be942c56f9e2beee5b35ede57a5e973ab47eee
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCL' 'sip-files00188.tif'
9dfdea842993cd0e648747140c50f7d1
a29457b1bc6a283d613f5fb343b3669897485c4f
describe
'1634' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCM' 'sip-files00188.txt'
bb8509f03178b73b280eb8c108741b25
b89304d6517f25465267ebffd394a71104ef04e3
describe
'10630' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCN' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
768dc8cc91c5e9c818585a81236d572e
5fbb7ce82ff9672a9101ab951a00cc1018465324
describe
'1003216' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCO' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
7c1a3db80d2e5f8ee760b34438f4b066
dc0d43b18a3cc93b78f47622ae44e245e2c5d865
describe
'93140' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCP' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
cd6f009175c9750ee997925a152fc7b9
c7808d7e4527c54bfd9015e4b38c61e0df04c608
describe
'36190' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCQ' 'sip-files00189.pro'
299bd1a7e1e6ee61d1cec0b65b32bd0e
a1b39e212d7bfe33ea9e704d344522a2e971a0b8
describe
'34529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCR' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
9fbcf439dd561ac17722d91d9976c1ea
918d0358efefc21c435be8140a8834e391cc03c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCS' 'sip-files00189.tif'
da874639dfe453364de593d90c256c95
cd8bba49ca84911dbb377b97eb02465d7d055348
describe
'1497' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCT' 'sip-files00189.txt'
ec298ea0df50440747fb2b1662ea1474
7593a7ea8c176fd2c5d8d69fca30041c6f7c183c
describe
'10259' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCU' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
3257f227a91980e9c4e77abedb5828fd
0b93367e2f61c255ca280df9534eb832fc5edfd2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCV' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
4373f253761c84e98f2867f8b72a9fc0
4c04aa3a02db47ea4426cceb784eb5c005a6a1ae
describe
'92669' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCW' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
cbcea6d212472e5dfaea6df604e9e046
ebfe8747694a2847df3ff21b36e52e9e7217d728
describe
'34943' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCX' 'sip-files00190.pro'
6200c67fe7194a9a33bc918adf881f7e
0d78158af7b1ca7de2f72271516691c80a3160c1
describe
'33982' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCY' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
70542a50dc34d39888b9b49c6faf799a
e12c48744b7c4aa51008a29a8dca5dcef5a05d8a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCCZ' 'sip-files00190.tif'
2673fac55c7ab0da084b4d6fcdcb17c5
26f79c06cc7ceb37142900dd1e23ce88774215ab
describe
'1491' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDA' 'sip-files00190.txt'
538b36de916bc5241b769d1bb85e4ad8
0a66e9df1afef12aa250077f0496da40a6c7b6ec
describe
'10471' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDB' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
398edb381a7128d9c25bef9427a9fa65
343b3c0bad22e64cbcaa66c61d5712346d7cb7d0
describe
'748613' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDC' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
5b799bd0977863159d13c46388cd08ba
bac729adc07a066a8f0988abeee8dc244a13829c
describe
'37444' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDD' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
cadb7378a2149b8bb914eeb84f4520a6
f63bca0550c4ac49674c6a5f900f32983b649c21
describe
'7927' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDE' 'sip-files00191.pro'
c761f666e30ca7f5d7ba51b45766fd79
337351efdd421550c18337807844955795f7ec39
describe
'12946' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDF' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
5155b26c0da2fc8955f736055b5d3f7d
57c6cf175b3468c324c7e1a6f0277d46c96f2cff
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDG' 'sip-files00191.tif'
d0a72eb50c870009479cc786e2c58762
1dd490b2a920acbec2d96dcc5f1e463743575c70
'2011-12-30T06:14:54-05:00'
describe
'329' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDH' 'sip-files00191.txt'
d77f10b8a78999205c6e3fd54aa12d0f
bb1ad97dc18b287cdf1a16f77b9c59ee38bf24a4
describe
'4266' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDI' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
f64fba0bab45e9bd15154ff64d3cbca8
50a68224acdab92271a922e62e477b2516ad69d6
describe
'986177' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDJ' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
676cd25b290b73379af2a9fbe59d200d
c885e8de1e5c213abce216c7cfbf8310e6ce8821
describe
'86038' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDK' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
2304395e7c010178eddbef9d4ba28b46
71e5feda591282777d23d5ab3a25957b45893c76
describe
'29283' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDL' 'sip-files00192.pro'
25a4368fdeb9c2ada22682dc23e7f516
da79d6325c766b7c4a75d158ccfa8fbdb5f35731
describe
'31574' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDM' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
58c45aa2be0df63f6c092dfe7f113645
af9d9f3c5bdce2f8ef6f6a595866f8a831b97936
describe
'7911172' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDN' 'sip-files00192.tif'
c2060094843f5b4d86325dbeb0212536
59b4b1ec2ef92316ed282532ddf58a34da0a1868
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDO' 'sip-files00192.txt'
c04eb7c33e0a61c3a219160d6df790c8
5c2837730e7049c9dc50a21708043966664677f5
describe
'9709' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDP' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
20a39f2161c2523ad07dabbfd4c03055
85862470e2ecb4cd2e7ab82973d8f62282e8c879
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDQ' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
8da9a3d333451cc37b33d40771ae18b0
7f4cc9c86594b4444d4a97917f7adb6d670d7ec7
describe
'107233' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDR' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
3ae9b4efd69920485278fc6995a089e5
136e060f733548708f45ef339a22550011e4ac25
describe
'42203' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDS' 'sip-files00193.pro'
a559235e6f97f288baf6e20260eec976
e55591ee1e9e706414477dd4f9b0aa2b6af4251f
describe
'38755' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDT' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
e54ce8c05ff4224470ce7254029166f4
98818bba223c071c77788e1ec09187fe0b47a56d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDU' 'sip-files00193.tif'
dc4af4c9843f459bfe6e81a37d18838b
c3b4fd8a92452d42a68f55f912378614100dbd3e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDV' 'sip-files00193.txt'
10c8b59cc939207c8877fa4b81b3a8b0
8d052985e40136e7178836b8b5a937e82277002f
describe
'11272' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDW' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
240e8f0bd76e022b46908b227e70ca4c
754225e51a493ed12cbbf627ec1c404bcb678c00
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDX' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
19d217f226a9b9ce7b8b810c0bc1361b
7dfa3972d70e725727d2ebb23dada95689e09737
describe
'107095' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDY' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
6b1d419dfcdcd36fe9421265b17e4a5f
ad0eff645e5e120f4c3e05a52448fd246034a1ed
describe
'41664' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCDZ' 'sip-files00194.pro'
d92f1fc2e8a0e98ad877e382e06671eb
f29bafc4f0c00b9f8ad40bf66e9c2e5c07583920
'2011-12-30T06:17:26-05:00'
describe
'38823' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEA' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
da9a42f05e8971fffe99ab5c14eb8fb0
41f2b9bc50f8bb3887103038aa342af111104a05
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEB' 'sip-files00194.tif'
7ab0540211b268688b816fcd47a8247b
3702e3b2fd28900b9939836b6b02edcf00c21af1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEC' 'sip-files00194.txt'
c7836fbf4b0bf2dcdfe6b5ad2dfe9113
b12077ababd64d8a722796a80c7cdcee390d27e4
describe
'11530' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCED' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
860e1d7f2360a4d04308ec15ca834383
995762574e47cf0bef74d0af9726314a92341812
describe
'1003331' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEE' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
b053deb154b19f2c70a4084241321e81
862a352d0a7ea3f67f6d0b0d3ab3e69452096827
describe
'96488' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEF' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
4a8c2120ab7ac5729eb1c465d1ad59a0
f90236f152f1e87d66925f618c817ff7650fd464
describe
'37909' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEG' 'sip-files00195.pro'
87884cf0e01f29d6b42598b4030686ff
aba93bf774071575530dd5322d4db2564eec22f0
describe
'34767' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEH' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
24d1011f05c8a3332afe32edb56d0201
f1eaaa07c40eb8f6a95b8bcf0ee34ecf1630052e
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEI' 'sip-files00195.tif'
6230e776bd9f927dd857d493ee7e09fa
d3fce207b082999007d13d15dc0ecbc2710e3f00
'2011-12-30T06:14:38-05:00'
describe
'1593' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEJ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
3b27e2d477cfb642d9fe1bdb350b6ce7
89866558d80bac99a11c80bd2a80fddc86af2ce1
describe
'10147' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEK' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
ba807a17e372cffea61daea2b236267a
d6519985cf0b7757ec34ea6a7ba91e0479c964ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEL' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
f1cca131a4d19268e24c65c34dab2bb7
2a32572b3c499b6425ceb1743980ef2a5bf83516
describe
'101373' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEM' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
cf4aed10429a55d189c26d4c08072886
7ef2718b5a2fdd79bafd1005d15f0e304fb006f9
describe
'39960' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEN' 'sip-files00196.pro'
e51fa2d0c3214edd9d44323fe82c7a48
d4720ec1b0f83f7c13eb24191ada66825752af58
describe
'36341' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEO' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
e4e497cad11946bb80230aa6614a6d5a
83335cc6cfcd4a0cf8f7cb4eef4b3f26a6a2b439
'2011-12-30T06:13:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEP' 'sip-files00196.tif'
9cacd16a71c0d60cb9560803cf0ba2df
660ca5808c17968f494cc8ca3a37fc527151b658
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEQ' 'sip-files00196.txt'
736d33bfa6e832ffae980d76846f7009
3ea41283a136dff357efad9035e9bb3afa8ca01d
describe
'10865' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCER' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
6e5f64a8a6a1f75d853f3a452b9f1c48
165c4f053e809886892520c62b8dd9afbcb7deb3
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCES' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
9e1fd4c99f2d46c2228c685df3133726
7bdfae0bbe5162721a21febd43aab433659fa03f
describe
'108178' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCET' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
39afb3c43e23e56965eec2265034692a
f6a0871e0690147929bf4e45476bcbd92698a469
describe
'42560' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEU' 'sip-files00197.pro'
be2461152277358506e77232a91cf42e
ba0337295a507fa36b486839b63740342d2859e7
describe
'39635' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEV' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
3bb789774a9c0d325a710ef3ad7d0a94
a18afcba1d2405e39c68623ccb0495a0293a1c2b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEW' 'sip-files00197.tif'
907891da03ab3cd281e06f02507884c8
ec43bdd08c1f82047d58d2ea84504a0254e2004b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEX' 'sip-files00197.txt'
2c637caea85d64ecef3921d557d9bbd8
6da495e4615646407e040c4f4ccca7b66a70148b
describe
'11808' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEY' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
26573f0f1733757d67cca270bc71ebba
5d1e7b5a34c07d4ea81403edb780628b299da6da
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCEZ' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
59a2fe23c5950c9596a6957ecc9c5f89
86263196a2086397ee96fb7e467b090db8a60a01
describe
'103878' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFA' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
95901259b25bbdbbfcc4c83796770a4e
50fbbc271b7690547b1b70972e7112ebe84cf54b
describe
'39504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFB' 'sip-files00198.pro'
374fcb766d70232e8464b6ba338234fa
bb3739c87fff1008551be3452a9f5cbc18e55181
describe
'36797' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFC' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
fd23f01d7b6eabee3eaf8cbf63a874ee
5ed734e1f30683c8a6a70bc7c56a5fb815268921
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFD' 'sip-files00198.tif'
e1cf74def794f668f123630ead754b6f
75379878f991563f8907bf5b8bc9d1f1a28a1067
describe
'1663' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFE' 'sip-files00198.txt'
21e304079d0728e720890f8810596b5e
a7f48cc0ec44a42fdc0409d76e530bfafd11cc26
describe
'10967' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFF' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
90a69b5305fdb06ece0922feab006edc
0858990a4704c3c82fd823e4674f53e957deb083
describe
'1003332' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFG' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
0438ff132ea67b613f828705063f7c6f
2a928206c1b46357b54243c919d6af33825bf3b0
describe
'98715' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFH' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
265a855869ad8436d742fabf4a0f0639
c8c680bee605495881e756a29bc6d44187127d0d
describe
'39598' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFI' 'sip-files00199.pro'
ebfc017a54882650a99875bae49d5937
f3a767ba90a93618344ab077714634310744a9d8
describe
'35462' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFJ' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
1da3dae8f8786436c791f1eeef283337
a13729f2bbe4a32b8e27d7abd5d0ed8f6e6261f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFK' 'sip-files00199.tif'
e83f57ff3b52cafae7eafa1370f12f4e
8a2766f6b8fea7cedbfbf84557a2eb61aa439dd5
'2011-12-30T06:18:07-05:00'
describe
'1660' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFL' 'sip-files00199.txt'
1ade6af18196d7bc3490875ee9f3efbc
86c63fe78e846a5a1fbc4dda864b9ff6e636da9f
describe
'10350' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFM' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
b3818254f1b9d36138f329e15d9b639d
af8eed27dcef5bfd27bb3728a7179382927f6dee
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFN' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
e658d006768dade0c212c60087179f8b
b197b72a4df410e98d04d6799c66b19c08f90560
describe
'99182' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFO' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
e0ed08091d818b2f097f43beec7eedf6
232ed462d9481b97b102a465b577cc418446d572
describe
'39924' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFP' 'sip-files00200.pro'
98cc41b670b53be53bb2595663ff79a1
45ff10dc27cedcfb6be44f214da3ecc8ab48225a
describe
'35861' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFQ' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
c342ec082f6110dcb6b4f02442431faa
87baad25769fd2254a94368455fbd575e5d0932d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFR' 'sip-files00200.tif'
b7d0e934a57af3e2c56a5aaa5ca3eba9
a382cd95d0c27ed7c94a43bfcc33d63517ff8791
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFS' 'sip-files00200.txt'
3084e9e5960ba8bb24f19bc732a718af
176e9362134844a241ef650995fb70271f1872fa
describe
'10556' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFT' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
89f060563a5393b4db3dac058727cd81
bc5b04f19b92d3166ed5541cbc38dc8e4d4162f7
describe
'702050' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFU' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
bb265eab4c849ddc6c3258072c24929b
324b54c1ca144475512badfd9f942e96b0ca7d3f
describe
'34193' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFV' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
7865f58f8c6b352eb5e3f210db6a01ac
a4d14a7c6b94bf81109b268e7b78ab0f0b2e53f8
describe
'5199' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFW' 'sip-files00201.pro'
48bd46635b64ecdbd8be653d4a8eaa95
f0acf19db8223ffdb1a300918583e4d8466d427a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFX' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
7313f969fba43a354b22e44b1e46d67b
c0dcbdff45adaf66de6d80ab59e0aa1e61714411
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFY' 'sip-files00201.tif'
c146c711dc796255c1b89efebba3a2b0
82e35e6abcce72d905bc8f954fa2d6dfe1053459
describe
'227' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCFZ' 'sip-files00201.txt'
6e6b22522ebe9dbce345200f225744f3
392b3e55ff4c6ee9efc7dcd23529b29aab4ec03d
describe
'3685' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGA' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
e1f64e93d60ab45d6a6b673837fee9b7
107560156678e85484fafc1eb930ffc95e6320cd
'2011-12-30T06:19:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGB' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
bb075f8e3405016d59b8b17c0ed8b442
a04d51706e8ab219ca2f1c9b7dc6177af3767ed6
describe
'86682' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGC' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
b786de48fab6607fc347513265e171ea
29717ee7b89e1f6fc815c975000f252b89bab15d
describe
'30737' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGD' 'sip-files00202.pro'
a7658981a13a688adca8dab4a7cae269
e15569c989a508f9fb1e615e01a115b9cf2144fa
'2011-12-30T06:17:18-05:00'
describe
'31644' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGE' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
86bf747c2e8d8bee4ed6601f1077ad77
632180465dc3085d6bfc91b315af23bd3332ae93
describe
'7911180' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGF' 'sip-files00202.tif'
9c6b781aa4e3a005b0354f0ac5ca7416
2bd9b0b975fc2b742985ca7fb43f83c7d27e41ab
'2011-12-30T06:16:32-05:00'
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGG' 'sip-files00202.txt'
8f5023299d0dca044b72d1aa855726ba
bcc594acbb62d618c7ab8f5945e6835f38d97b6d
describe
'9405' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGH' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
6be06df2a9de13c62794d3bcd73a9447
48849b82beab572b3f76c7f1684fb68dd5e27f66
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGI' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
c0209f7944628a29bec5a07da1137e7a
edc716344451fb65040eb5a0a6876aa37801ebfc
describe
'106028' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGJ' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
78b4709b39211b944442def190b26ae8
6ae0fca80834b5eac5a12c6928f0611a4b5175b3
describe
'41823' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGK' 'sip-files00203.pro'
8d85d23d96e7412db3c44257d630c420
eb88ddfd6785c732589f1f4c317101fa8a0f86fb
describe
'37884' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGL' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
4203eaa3dd7ee2983915d1fdd395f780
0a00268ca40bf2795ce786a22c38f6e8a51d5375
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGM' 'sip-files00203.tif'
f2e8e177b73a137586b44e54c3be1f55
47100089e48e4cd8cb0abcd4da4188a0bf685564
'2011-12-30T06:15:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGN' 'sip-files00203.txt'
df031deadc5c58a2fe3d6dc1c215f5a1
ad6350901c40e3821dac8c91c230efa898606097
describe
'10851' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGO' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
86cfaefb26ce408e0a0e33e257766208
e1c88ee407c3f291d88d4cba8e353e43e1097456
describe
'986081' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGP' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
276671b56b652db8410cfc0fad807248
a16315b80777415a6260dc4c826b7227aa8ebd8c
describe
'113621' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGQ' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
da2688c0ca7b0a6176b0ab57e5e24d10
b6357563520ed0506997308e87fc8a30836b9a11
describe
'41505' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGR' 'sip-files00204.pro'
3dc4cd92c0c26d951d3dc3df98d6e893
16d5235c2d325ea1a309f9c5dc9058cde9b9d8b3
describe
'39913' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGS' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
653ca6044fb18c09530eccec334a1d26
50abc18f6ff1ab83daf2c18554a78990a98298de
describe
'7912040' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGT' 'sip-files00204.tif'
8162fd85cfba5a925311792385767af0
f0141a42d80b7543fa927eef9ebe5810cbc71e2d
'2011-12-30T06:15:30-05:00'
describe
'1718' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGU' 'sip-files00204.txt'
ee3415f5f9fa6f98dbd7781fda658a34
45919d6007ef443155decf305fbe8bfa7489e328
describe
'11527' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGV' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
bc58869dbac493ae5fff1c51d373f924
1b931e73b13aaff67141cd142d2a6cb20a736b71
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGW' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
70393ef111b709376af2570d0b61733f
3bada48eb3285fcc1ced9bec3bab15468eddd22d
describe
'104253' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGX' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
35eb98d0727d41bb9c346eb0b9777929
3c332d1ce6c8386e8a91056ef4fb0eccb366c6c3
describe
'40768' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGY' 'sip-files00205.pro'
6a91b1418db531e56477998f1e98f148
e7b9d05b8b95ad91fa3c119c38ebfd4412447046
describe
'37645' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCGZ' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
3444ca769ecc137331c77e52060c59cc
c072a840efcaf6bb98aaa5e53f9e768eb6a0ecdf
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHA' 'sip-files00205.tif'
46400f50815b0ca036ef8206f2334ede
8e6a561d4e2e33bf733ab1f951e071865dcd1ed0
describe
'1688' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHB' 'sip-files00205.txt'
56d2a859bff86c471b83a77ad8f400c0
c49349c89b67e85953c4eb6dc3ae33bc47a52d70
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHC' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
11e45bff646aa995e1789196c4606f39
8f40b0a2d1999b58dd128687f7b3eeb89f760782
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHD' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
9163eb24a7a2cd3be00a3874251b36eb
3349c369c167b61cf609b6f131c9809fadf234d9
describe
'116801' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHE' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
4a388ec4046ad9b90107eb260ef825de
d437dd0148ae92138d9ded55aab08bb36292adf7
describe
'43608' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHF' 'sip-files00206.pro'
0e6d7b092ec586b5a1c882b8930b21e9
5bba69c0a9cebc9985d85d33300511d80de9511b
describe
'42274' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHG' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
33382875c5171b62a41e0dec105e42a1
30ec7924018d77dcd567ab40c7b91f1b6c5cb6e2
describe
'7912464' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHH' 'sip-files00206.tif'
b0241d509c641d7abdbc1c44289ae196
2caa74dd4a0626a6211b48297f7db6fb93bfad4a
describe
'1732' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHI' 'sip-files00206.txt'
72dee9145d255cbb313af34ed375afe5
d598db01423e560dcc529566deb35d71c9dc2ce0
describe
'12337' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHJ' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
443c4630ed9d663192bf67a950e00607
26bfd79c303aefdf1ef405051d73dc8d4ac90b01
describe
'1003311' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHK' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
c565b8dd6ef8cd733207209cc619636f
25e7fda8eda6ba9e0d1c8eb97e4fcdf813e3173c
describe
'100605' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHL' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
2f11008b7e66992d242fb37e23490a31
44f98ce164884b11531e0b44da3969f87e86a95f
describe
'40473' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHM' 'sip-files00207.pro'
f1c1a7cb0c27cb39f845fce4d58ee309
e8d1263b8dba52a7573c4bad52b2b12f7f14b775
describe
'36493' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHN' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
9006e9d111c9605d4d74cb06610e9db1
d83517d93d30c222f95dc3b88bf645fe5806869c
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHO' 'sip-files00207.tif'
eecb08cf73e4d56d12f74ad2192008c2
f745ee1ec0329405beefd8585f89912a1a447269
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHP' 'sip-files00207.txt'
d1549fbf7a426a45f37dd4784ccaf5a2
59deb2e40cf1cabf14427d78941fb82b77576b13
describe
'10847' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHQ' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
52042e955245f0d46ae456320661b4f2
89bce46e11cb6fa20c125f164afbe65de3266e2d
describe
'986143' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHR' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
71c1646022c44cf191a38b9ef55661f5
b8cc4eaeb9d1954bf72d913c09e51b741e78fbcf
describe
'103191' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHS' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
ac69f936371adb249e3a9450dda62a6e
0bce2bf70d71e4419596a4ad81196878736333c8
describe
'41477' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHT' 'sip-files00208.pro'
88a484160eeb151bccaf5a56a37b6f6f
ea4a622255dbbd85ec36345f72e95e747dda21b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHU' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
8fd3ebe77d7b465d5db089ec40ea3631
d0a8463e8fa968b69b8e3d6385d313743de458be
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHV' 'sip-files00208.tif'
1f5a2ac5a794ca8ab9d156db917cd62b
9c9d6f557c2c81c496aa0ad7ead072b699f9943d
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHW' 'sip-files00208.txt'
2c7221ee9b2e60c3159ecf30d2e8ec8c
454bb1c8b7cc55a6fb91e1acb5462915d2efdb2e
describe
'10796' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHX' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
ee9dc7cf4e774e26bab788494d0dd7a4
66a73578af6e85ab6ec59ef0b233306f3cfb7942
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHY' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
ebc7c4d18d4e226a935a2b48895e7e06
7dc4b79da75afbb00d4ae2adc70bc30fcfad3885
describe
'103521' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCHZ' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
ecdd86006ea6e52b963c262717c6b5a9
abaa415767235b71dc2769f3171e4692503bcd02
describe
'40529' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIA' 'sip-files00209.pro'
4c8f76ea60c79a1c55668f04e0fb0642
bd34ef697b8bcfd2996bcc450bd890f94089c46f
describe
'37079' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIB' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
227b65f4790e43a54edc706b1f56f336
d7ab24615912b86f1c2acdde9b9d2df83b1adb0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIC' 'sip-files00209.tif'
92f47f4c7dc75987c158710a4f2a9174
58b707dc244d725b71d94f47e5d4baecffee9210
describe
'1618' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCID' 'sip-files00209.txt'
7e219c5c2cb428f51cac18350b0d5543
7184c565377061a3a51c2074ce9645cb805aa967
describe
'10826' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIE' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
430539fa494c44b425c040961fdb7362
5b2dd59e9a24606a1696533c5aa4b63b54c66a15
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIF' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
384639176ba0fdccb7965c1aade6b557
aa72740d2d88cf486279367be90cc35ac3f63cfe
describe
'94958' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIG' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
ba198b64678bc1c858e217b05597009f
d7c1f20f36ae4e23de5d64df6201630c5c2db7f3
describe
'35514' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIH' 'sip-files00210.pro'
70201aed183ab2f03b10f95ac428f8a7
50bc46e7a83b48bd10af1901ed52750a16f70be0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCII' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
1cb449cafd3cc7c5f9a80a523e6dc615
a9aad94c98c79ae4de4b57d87ba131141363adc2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIJ' 'sip-files00210.tif'
fb96be3b5423d3309d29da7781c14cf5
5f7c432b35c600b1a6ad344fec9a54274dc0a0d0
describe
'1490' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIK' 'sip-files00210.txt'
580a5874795d5198089d44829d839f32
db5f5ab612ad0f198a8676896cea17b1bb2b7d98
describe
'9995' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIL' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
13ad6faf2d18826412f401cf5029e1fb
d76c4d87707754d70b99ef439d665e30e281a1ec
describe
'1003220' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIM' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
0d58603bd7683812e439ba085656e9f6
4d541c795ac96d3e7892b001a6c8a56974e55bd3
describe
'83207' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIN' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
8e566630fdc566c5e529a5e10d7be95f
ccc0cfdc3ee20df994717851d0a1a8f96a4c02c1
describe
'29420' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIO' 'sip-files00211.pro'
87c9afc41c4fc742faa308fe3ea1d63f
1baf7d91bf53b22e38985d5132d917205f0608be
describe
'29877' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIP' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
04a837dbcea7e2dd9fbb3bbfbf80c58c
ab0227bb3b9eed3c2f5bc30a364e2e8bd632bc36
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIQ' 'sip-files00211.tif'
bdeefa86981250c9e514938906cc482f
e48f8f79be0030d81e8e0bf04f79f7cd418f0e14
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIR' 'sip-files00211.txt'
2ffd3b3c2471d5ac523ef510f709e325
cb5745e5bb8a5141c8760553d2eabcc36e311a16
describe
'9080' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIS' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
e719e317867d8636e092ef44035393ce
b89787347d6a9dd68d827dda9a5c1d4084ce6bc1
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIT' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
cecf31ed9acdf44570d49c2cb7276958
d8f092dcaaacae2dd2f9ca55e8321ef9b673a286
describe
'103609' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIU' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
c8449e1a7e32b575d7895704a9da67c8
5e889105747ba0550d916ad334d45e5d1b30994c
describe
'42257' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIV' 'sip-files00212.pro'
c940c2927882501bc855bb355628db50
4c90a980a1018416e95ffbb5623bfec48fd04775
describe
'37750' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIW' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
b8aa55a8d06cfb3e21f9adb1e1709866
77153922c24eaa378ad09dcac31ec28e6135fdfc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIX' 'sip-files00212.tif'
81b0206ee3339addd7f7a2e41f9141fa
6b916aa1ef2795711d899062f91b52d8c730e464
describe
'1769' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIY' 'sip-files00212.txt'
e6a3a20c259df577d13d1c5272efea37
479134b3f7141aaac04e6926d0ac44fc10467efb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCIZ' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
ea21ee38464e919c416042fc576271a8
9b77162841e2f37b5f6a2d7e6162cc05687cf5bb
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJA' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
e063d389113a3abc82a9167820fe3cc2
35ac820fd1e51ada71a132ce66cc86c80ce0f959
describe
'96168' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJB' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
b274ede33ec7801023ce7e3f7c857c06
4ee999b46d20c45a469287b8fdf40142d0682f6a
describe
'39105' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJC' 'sip-files00213.pro'
72953bfda16b974f0e774a9ea97e585b
2c057cef456e9244e27c30a151c771d9902d35fd
describe
'36284' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJD' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
c4fe683d68f7830172311ae480185d9f
6bd66dc3335418c7ca072a6ab92675214613a711
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJE' 'sip-files00213.tif'
dae5b3a93b4982c9b6655ea0ac2fb6f1
3f46931fda6905cdc0085f4d53f3e1dcfd77d336
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJF' 'sip-files00213.txt'
cf648936a0886409304da920fb5bbba2
4851925f5f74454d5b119d18496bfacc2e9687cd
describe
'10643' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJG' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
da931a005c40081958bc288843593a74
f844da33a0bf4021730696820071cf2267c08d81
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJH' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
8ee777276a9de0ddea09b49813f577aa
dd12fb85aa3bc3ff6423723f72502fb96460cb1e
describe
'101755' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJI' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
24e7d2080f1d3bfaf6e1ffd40339f633
f136b9c42c5b37aed985f380d08be8cc28289a84
describe
'40000' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJJ' 'sip-files00214.pro'
c562e1ef0f806ddc2cffde07aa8700fa
4c9e96f746e49413ebefcc6297b26e5079a881d8
describe
'37260' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJK' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
e51a6174cfd9f77ad68fc40643da428e
69b4f751a1d345af88f260e2bdf6f70071f20ab7
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJL' 'sip-files00214.tif'
e6c4375b87322339358ba45376df9d86
b9b660da70fbbe3ff2d6b16b2acc27b4422e334a
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJM' 'sip-files00214.txt'
d9f342480f0ded3dada54e9419e468c8
adeb7e2cd53b24bb63807d60ae3960a6c088f2a9
describe
'10861' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJN' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
4a5d1d2f70b05855861a29f96a0205cc
8f195d478749b036c222ebb5043a23242177824f
describe
'1003259' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJO' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
18dbe4c65df65571f0fd13f463d276f9
2f6c42dd140adb06c2f646d68461213dc619bf99
describe
'102593' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJP' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
87c42df7a21709c77b220c9498bd88ea
ba6659aad7e72d817b9974eff75a1cb33a46e64f
describe
'41727' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJQ' 'sip-files00215.pro'
134a47ca42836d3b75ec965d2e295962
9c3b27fa43e7c6268380f85b94cf3f6075d3bbd3
describe
'37636' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJR' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
c85c1b097825d6eac4d4dfbfb25ec3ef
cb051e32c4597783632de88d01c23a4017defa4b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJS' 'sip-files00215.tif'
56354ab3f8a26229f0d26baf4afb7230
5796cc2b9584aeed15528ec4d1472b0d24f031d0
describe
'1738' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJT' 'sip-files00215.txt'
1a7f2cc8ab286f3f052b742dfbd97b0f
b73c68a112d06860535961218421e5f1bf8a1ea0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJU' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
de8048fd0163acbb4fdad1bddab00e8b
058225c2829e9795927aa5d911add9896d93d7c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJV' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
c02bde3d64d0643dd3d841437c150373
1872046c0013530817341387d8947210a0f21b1f
describe
'100550' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJW' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
63ced60f0973620a3f9914e78aeb4e65
4d82677c35c26eafe6746645770171b1b4f8fede
describe
'40325' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJX' 'sip-files00216.pro'
4705bdbc6b3acdbe9eab8eb9d1ef92b5
a4f28f8824980f281a64b049e89b7b290f3e6f63
describe
'36719' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJY' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
15b80431a668be2be61e68d710a4e294
0fd928f4866eeaf4bbf4d786296618c6d9e489a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCJZ' 'sip-files00216.tif'
250bb42572da87cd397487c3e517739b
ec09bd39b848215aeb6d4a63a2536de6842ecb87
describe
'1678' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKA' 'sip-files00216.txt'
fb8a7037ce2185e753e797410f10bbca
40ece7341b95acf7b6ea6d8866990c68ab9840fb
describe
'10839' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKB' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
be84710b42cf7bbddc735aa0cd5fe0c5
d92b7c0bb14532bbdc3c7deab4d3a0404e1d81dd
describe
'961525' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKC' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
bad67e9b93969eea7d866d86d36b2b14
0a4f5f27757aec9352eb972b4c2a1ebea846a5ee
describe
'93167' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKD' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
b48fea6743c7a617c263937ef9b5194c
149ad920800b230ae47110de22086a1d9df06572
describe
'35638' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKE' 'sip-files00217.pro'
84504f1ecb0879643a40629e259304a1
a71bb992826cb192e26d06278cc4f39110a7e9e7
describe
'34342' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKF' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
167e9fe09d91688fb1f91c4ab05ba61f
9e302d2848304b7de753fa7b6e5347f4d25cc615
describe
'7701809' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKG' 'sip-files00217.tif'
ff5a4a9cb932324670b67608ffbf1dd3
e826cd57f251cd4f565b592eff1cb02bce2c8d2b
describe
'1504' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKH' 'sip-files00217.txt'
7c47967be73c4e0929150e0e827a5876
f7fed934e153a854365814436361e528d4e02596
describe
'10997' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKI' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
5cb3020bb027ded8e07d12b84fd93eab
a83e7d8bbd0d69e6abc1cf2313e2c6ba2113daf2
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKJ' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
5b099ec7b6c5d53cac8edf18b7dbd51c
fb9ad977e4e2a3d55f596ba7c2a7ad6feb86bb9d
describe
'78075' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKK' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
abc12c7636cbebc98051baf6dfa610be
ed3870f40703f7436501de4990a3db87e924a672
describe
'28397' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKL' 'sip-files00218.pro'
ab4c82ba5c3e90804093727751cd6875
a83e583167e1f61e6d05802fa5d109d9723107ea
describe
'28369' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKM' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
7640bc1a15d031ae227f7fc229c59985
94721cac7cd14cef8d1724832609d0ef2f423b91
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKN' 'sip-files00218.tif'
87a00703e970ee449095ca3594b38026
11fe43796f93850bb358e3dd5539e73bed9f302e
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKO' 'sip-files00218.txt'
d3e59d5a5a604cc719d3211fffebf05f
546a4f9b668ef49b4a9ac7bff0a29b88f6bd15d9
describe
'8627' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKP' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
b782b8e7f35da8ca9e9ab8b95d335e5c
7950ee1ef8749b9ffd2b611a8d554d48bd5056a5
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKQ' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
79cfd906381e5d153c9b91d0c3059e34
1c44373953f36b1343336632e0287249a552b665
describe
'94788' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKR' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
6fe679dad6b705cad6bf06f275521681
8cba657a456e9d3157e22466895143c81a964460
describe
'37392' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKS' 'sip-files00219.pro'
99cb0597bb01aa3b3b863d3b95143dc3
570659ee5592775170cf206fa12c0aa6f16ada60
describe
'34454' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKT' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
a993bff8d3804bfcc3b894272d0b2b11
9cf8c430e45318f8c0bbbf3a3179b43d25b4743b
'2011-12-30T06:14:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKU' 'sip-files00219.tif'
3849ad88780b8b4251739cfb11253657
eab55ec25cd8999b3b597299ee5e0337986e4ced
describe
'1574' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKV' 'sip-files00219.txt'
9d9a098497f4a85f2b2295a9ca348456
6de7e6c8dc34faacc74222b4bf736256052e8001
describe
'9899' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKW' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
d61d5214549d91851a7f390e03d74427
ff19f00e2211019f1cff637591af64592377a426
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKX' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
f66b27152e8dffc0ccb744cb0b359b72
cf82f89b54085831accc40348edcd7b0aff3505d
describe
'100149' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKY' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
ecefb9ded85eda0dc6bd2eca17137648
e4b166ff851efaa14a19b64ac70befe98073cc95
describe
'41113' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCKZ' 'sip-files00220.pro'
b3ca9068f90fd66f298c38af288d78e8
8bb3ae036536cc2e05cd15d6d72e3431f9b3180b
describe
'36551' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLA' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
b317f16940e09ac9f6b5af026d505f9f
e6cecacc3265d71167851d983742384f692ee144
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLB' 'sip-files00220.tif'
169c310498456baadbf64d0a76dd093e
bf3111746afd4068fffee69d3dd34211b0f8c599
'2011-12-30T06:17:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLC' 'sip-files00220.txt'
990b9794aa6dfb7eb0192d85c2fe7d09
27c0bedcf6cad37d19537aa54e15e2905ec5fbe5
describe
'10690' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLD' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
9677fbb15fd850e293331c55a05f1d98
e6191097b8b16f4dc39faae4d16547185860336d
describe
'938580' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLE' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
0dae507ca0d08d8311df3b6637cd558e
02a3148f8f37c302eefa1627ffb943c573b31cf3
describe
'104959' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLF' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
8d8c3308d81f81e48ad1d001fa2d09cd
0d960a3feb18e4f1c7103f89f0523f21f1df8a17
describe
'40936' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLG' 'sip-files00221.pro'
d95e45898e138f5f8b76897a67ac1b5d
f5d4b75f4d8c71b96a98aab3feb2bfd3e88d04d1
describe
'39331' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLH' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
d73cce7d415c9989b97e402618e7638c
8eda716f17ec863722fdc9a93ff676d5fb10974e
describe
'7516135' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLI' 'sip-files00221.tif'
765ecd7ec54eb3dd6c128e42281dfa37
7666f540ee994052656d4da3b1ef112f794795fc
describe
'1702' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLJ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
cec77ce86adc299be355b2f31921f430
6ea9f4c31472979669305dde3128bc78a3376c77
describe
'12086' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLK' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
bbdba52baea51b097539122a6326f756
e1f70f129debb33dd80d16430c7a35c6eb69554b
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLL' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
7aa793f1e8b7480db4fea167ded94984
12e4246c7cd17d253d0ceafe6a7f62e042a4e8b6
describe
'104190' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLM' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
43997a71fd9462482f9b26e28b7a9e9c
2d939bd6c1620171148e4b21252f7507c355417b
describe
'40272' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLN' 'sip-files00222.pro'
0833d44c6c176517960be5f9f761f6a4
2463733af75c439eeda41673c2e22b70232456f0
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLO' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
7a691534e7eb63159712571305d5a79e
77d35c925f59ae7c96aca130f41629b95d481b24
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLP' 'sip-files00222.tif'
0182fe3886875d12ce63b3a35ae51cad
5d6b415b7337a1224955ba6c4805946e9ec5d7b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLQ' 'sip-files00222.txt'
c8a8bad8c2e8018018004515b09ff25b
52c1f0cc5bd54cfb9d6da3d688821e76abcc59ee
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLR' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
00dadf8a506768c0d1b68a0140569330
6322deeaf2717086c3a334c7eb8e533fe6bebe71
describe
'967873' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLS' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
e6d95cdecd980a7e02d9a12cf33116a4
a616f83ea1382cdda87ffd046639b84fa02ea2ea
describe
'94762' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLT' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
ac7fe3ae4fa2c814f9f061e1f7a62809
74614bba59c66c8671ee2ef2e52228458864c0cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLU' 'sip-files00223.pro'
719b73a3d0cb9390cbd5202dce5c6a27
ab255d76b5488616cc7ff0e4794b65eacdf3da21
describe
'35047' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLV' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
c8f1e56099b8d2541b68c42c86fe4344
2bc0ee98ef045ea5d8535da4592fa25abd4ac61a
describe
'7752421' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLW' 'sip-files00223.tif'
14071f69f0abbaa08b4ccbf511339489
14d9e22ef8627c85a53b4395e820188a2efc752a
describe
'1566' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLX' 'sip-files00223.txt'
04e9f2d7f6ebe90ae8c4f4528b062e2e
5c878862b4dac23cfa5118202874dea502c612e8
describe
'10786' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLY' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
3030373219b8780b1928af91f9e5c219
889ac7614e4549a371db1e15137e283b3e426521
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCLZ' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
3cdef2fbc664f338ac7cc5999d162b50
6f4d9f280678714da7185e31f167ed09f472d98f
describe
'97141' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCMA' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
0d18e617b2d56e8b65d361f5d25e7e84
38947bda5b4664e7e442e5f9b520b539f26d6020
describe
'39102' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCMB' 'sip-files00224.pro'
5f0dc71b61cfb4fde60db7f3c39920f8
010ec4922aac122b1aa879caa353f468d48dbc6b
describe
'34974' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCMC' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
8139354fdfd4f9a2bbcd5da965783cf6
298efa71bfab9c82bcb019427a62ae001350e3d9
'2011-12-30T06:20:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCMD' 'sip-files00224.tif'
30eccc9a5e977f04b4317a8a0014904c
b843943b354ac0f26ef584216783a5eec2a8efae
describe
'1656' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCME' 'sip-files00224.txt'
f9b3b6e835dcda34c944db39ed32a6b1
3387da306b8a6b8d59bf700404ae5bc6879cb299
describe
'10235' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCMF' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
e4b5d48501486ac0d9162166d96ef522
9513085f01869960588993027fc27f01005527d4
describe
'940411' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCMG' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
4b46cb59d2992cd81265165562093f35
4c587cbe0e97022cd3813f6c1c3e27379d21698b
describe
'73386' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCMH' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
449c0c3966ad0311d21c938fd2ca6692
03a13b771c5042b659b026e76081a62ec7ebe555
describe
'28843' 'info:fdaE20090116_AAAAUAfileF20090118_AACCMI' 'sip-files00225.pro'
4b0dfee033a149f4bdcf3b88216ca4bd
7045101f74467027361c573b2b8e146e9f1c8839
describe
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THE MAYFLOWER;

BY

Firs. Warriet Beecher Stowe.

AUTHOR OF “‘ UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.”

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saat irre



MARION JONES,

i Master Joseph always took little Marion under his especial
; protection.—Page 122.


-_——<

Pelsun’s Library for’ Grauellers and the Fireside,



a |

THE MAYFLOWER;

oR,

Gales wnd Vencilings,

BY

MRS. HARRIET BEECHER STOWE,

AUTHOR OF “ UNCLE TOM’S CABIN,”



“ A welecme garland here is wreathed
Of the pleasant flowers of May ;
Of lesson, song, and story breathed,
And many a pleasant lay.”



Loniton:
T. NELSONS SONS, PATERNGOSTER ROW;
AND EDINBURGH,

MDCCCLIL.


PREFACE,



In the following pages the reader will find a series of
pleasing and instructive sketches, characterized by the
refinement and tenderness which mark with such peculiar
attractions the best productions of feminine taste, and
confer on them such admirable fitness for the family
circle. They are from the pen of the gifted American
authoress—Harriet Beecher Stowe ; and, in introducing
this volume to the English reader, the editor feels assured
that that sprightliness and happy humour, and still mora
the fine taste and high moral printiple displayed by the
authoress, will secure for her a hearty welcome to many

a fireside in the Homes of merry England.

Lonpon, October, 1852.


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CONTENTS,

Florence ]’Estrange; or, The Rose Tree

Cousin William .. oe oe
Frankness oe oe
Feeling oe oe ee
The Sempstress oe ve
Aunt Mary oe oe ee
Uncle Tim and his Daughter Grace
So Many Calls .. oe oe
Marion Jones; or, Love versus Law
Augusta Howard be ee
Old Pather Morris .. oe

The Canal-Boat ee ee
Trials of a Houskeeper ee
Little Edward, ee ee

PAGS

17
82
39
46
61

lll


igor amet ‘
THE MAYFLOWER.



FLORENCE L’ESTRANGE; OR, THE ROSE TREE,



Rose! what dost thou here ?
Bridal, royal rose ?
How midst grief and fear,
Canst thou thus disclose
That fervid hue of love, which to thy heart-leaf glows?
_ HEMANS..



HERE it stood, in its little green vase, on a light
ebony stand in the window of the drawing-room.
The rich satin curtains, with their costly fringes, swept
down on either side of it, and around it glittered every
rare and fanciful trifle which wealth can offer to luxury,
and yet that simple rose was the fairest of them all. So
pure it looked, its white leaves just touched with that
delicious creamy tint peculiar to its kind; its cup so full,
so perfect; its head bending as if dt were sinking and
melting away in its own richness—oh! when did ever
man make anything to equal the living, perfect flower!
But the sunlight that streamed through the window
revealed something fairer than the rose. Reclined on an
ottoman, in a deep recess, and intently engaged with
book, rested what seemed the counterpart of that so
8 FLORENCE L’ESTRANGE $
scrieinait tciiiiinicesapa int a at ct ack a eae

lovely flower. That cheek so pale, that fair forehead so
spiritual, that countenance so full of high thought, those
long, downcast lashes, and the expression of the beautiful
mouth, sorrowful, yet subdued and sweet—it seemed like
the picture of a dream.

“Florence! Florence!” echoed a merry and musical
voice, in a sweet, impatient tone. Turn your head,
reader, and you will see a light and sparkling maiden,
the very model of some little wilful elf, born of mischief
and motion, with a dancing eye, a foot that scarcely
seems to touch the carpet, and a smile so multiplied by
dimples, that it seems like a thousand smiles at once’
“Come, Florence, I say,” said the little sprite, “put down
that wise, good, and excellent volume, and descend from
your cloud, and talk with a poor little mortal.

“I have been thinking what you are to do with your
pet rose when you go away, as, to our consternation, you
are determined to do; you know it would be a sad pity
to leave it with such a scatterbrain as Iam. I do love
flowers, that is a fact; that is, I like a regular bouquet,
cut off and tied up, to carry to a party; but as to all this
tending and fussing, whieh is needful to ery then
growing, I have no gifts in that line.”

“ Make yourself gasy as to that, Kate,” said Florence,
with a smile; “I have no intention of calling upon your
talents: I have an asylum in view for my favourite.”

“Qh then, you know just what I was going to say.
Mrs. Marshall, I presume, has been speaking to you; she
was here yesterday, and I was quite pathetic upon the
subject, telling her the loss your favourite would sustain,
OR, THE ROSE TREE. 9

oe
easement,

and so forth; and she said how delighted she would be
to have it in her green-house, it is in such a fine state
now, 80 full of buds. I told her I knew you would like
to give it to-her, you are so fond of Mrs. Marshall, you
know.”

“Now, Kate, I am sorry, but I have otherwise engaged
it.”

“Who. can it be to? you have so few intimates here.”

“Oh, it is only one of my odd fancies,”

“But-do tell me, Florence.” .

“Well, cousin, you know the little pale girl to whom
we give sewing.”

“ What! little Mary Stephens? How absurd! Florence,
this is just another of your motherly, old-maidish ways—
dressing dolls for poor children, making bonnets and
knitting socks for all the little dirty babies in the region
round about....I do believe you have made more calls in
those two, vile, ill-smelling alleys back of our house, than
ever you have in Chesnut-street, though you know every-
body is half dying to see you; and now, to crown all, you
must. give this choice little bijou to a semptress-girl, when
one of your most intim&te friends, in your own class,
would value it so highly. What in the world can people
in their circumstances want of flowers ?”

“Just the same as I do,” replied Florence, calmly:
“Have you not noticed that the little girl never comes
here without looking wistfully at the opening buds?
And, don’t you remember, the other morning she asked
me so prettily if I would let her mother come and see it,
she was so fond of flowers?”
10 FLORENCE L’ESTRANGE ;

EE rethneennce ease eo



“ But, Florence, only think of this rare flower standing
on a table with ham, eggs, cheese, and flour, and stifled
in that close little room where Mrs. Stephens and her —
daughter manage to wash, iron, cook, and nobody knows ©
what besides.” |

‘Well, Kate, and if I were obliged to live in one

coarse room, and wash, and iron, and cook, as you say—
if I had to spend every moment of my time in toil, with
no prospect from my window but a brick wall and dirty
lane, such a flower as this would be untold enjoyment to
me.”
_ “Pshaw! Florence—all sentiment : poor people have
no time to be sentimental. Besides, I don’t believe it
will grow with them; it is a greenhouse flower, and
used to delicate living.”

“Oh, as to that, a flower never inquires whether its
owner is rich or poor ; and Mrs. Stephens, whatever else
she has not, has sunshine of as good quality as this that
streams through our window. The beautiful things that
God makes are his gift to all alike. You will see that
my fair rose will be as well and cheerful in Mrs. Ste-
phens’ room as in ours.” 2 |

“ Well, after all, how odd! When one gives to poor |
people, one wants to give them something useful—o |
bushel of potatoes, a ham, and such things.” |

“ Why, certainly, potatoes and ham must be supplied;
but, having ministered to the first and most craving

wants, why not add any other little pleasures or gratafi-
cations we may have it in our power to bestow? I know
there are many of the poor who have fine fecling and @





OR, THE ROSE TREE. ‘ 11



keen sense of the beautiful, which rusts out and dies
because they are too hard pressed to procure it any gra-
tification. Poor Mrs. Stephens, for example: I know
she would enjoy birds, and flowers, and music as much as
Ido. I have seen her eye light upas she looked on these
things in our drawing-room, and yet not one beautiful
thing can she command. From necessity, her room, her
clothing, all she has, must be coarse and plain. You
should have seen the almost veptime she and Mary felt
when I offered them my rose.’

“Dear me! all this may be true, but I never thought
of it before. I never thought that these hard-working
people had any ideas of taste/”

“Then why do you see the geranium or rose so care-
fully nursed in the old cracked teapot in the poorest
room, or the morning-glory planted in a box and twined
about the window ? Do not these show that the human
heart yearns for the beautiful in all ranks of life? You
remember, Kate, how our washerwoman sat up a whole
night, after a hard day’s work, to make her first baby. a
pretty dress to be baptized in.”

“Yes, and I remember how I laughed at you for
making such a tasteful little cap for it.”

“ Well, Katy, I think the look of perfect delight with
which the poor mother regarded her baby in its new
dress and cap, was something quite worth creating ; I do
believe she could not have felt more grateful if I had
sent her a barrel of flour.”

“Well, I never thought before of giving any thing to
the poor but what they really needed, and I have always
is « FLORENCE 1’ ESTRANGE ;





been willing to "7 that when I could without going far
out of my way.” |

Well, cousin, if our heavenly Father gave to us after
this mode, we should have only coarse, shapeless piles of
provisions lying about the world instead of all this
beautiful variety of trees, and fruits, and flowers.”

“Well, well, cousin, I suppose you are right—but
have mercy on my poor head; it is too small to oe
s0 many new ideas all at once—so go on your own way.”
And the little lady began practising a waltzing step be-
fore the glass with great satisfaction.

It was a very small room, lighted by only one window.
There was no carpet on the floor ; there was a clean, but
coarsely-covered bed in one corner; a cupboard, with a
few dishes and plates, in the other ; a chest of drawers ;
and before the window stood a small cherry stand, quite
new, and, indeed, it was the only article in the room
that seemed so.

-A pale, sickly-looking woman of about forty was lean-
ing back in her rocking-chair, her eyes closed and her
lips compressed as if in pain. She rocked backward and
forward a few minutes, pressed her hand hard upon her
eyes, and then languidly resumed her fine stitching, on
which she had been busy since morning. The door
opened, and a slender little girl of about twelve years of
age entered, her large blue eyes dilated and radiant
with delight as she bore in the vase with the rose-tree
in it. .

“Qh! see, mother, see! Here is one in full bloom,
OR, THE ROSE TREE. ’ 13



and two more half out, and ever so many more pretty
buds peeping out of the green leaves.”

The poor woman’s face brightened as she looked, first
on the rose and then on her sickly child, on whose face
she had not seen so bright a colour for months.

“God bless her !” she exclaimed, unconsciously.

“ Miss Florence—yes, I knew you would feel so, mo-
ther. Does it not make your head feel better to sce
such a beautiful flower? Now you will not look so long-
ingly at the flowers in the market, for we have a rose
that is handsomer than any of them, Why, it seems to
me it is worth as much to us as our whole little garden
used to be. Only see how many buds there are! Just
count, them, and only smell the flower! Now where
shall we set it up?” And Mary skipped about, placing
her flower first in one position and then in another, and
walking off to. see the effect, till her mother gently re-
minded her that the rose-tree could not preserve its
beauty without sunlight.

“Oh yes, truly,” said Mary; “well, then, it must
stand here on our new stand, How glad I am that we
have: such a handsome new stand for it; it will look so
much better.” And Mrs. Stephens laid down her work,
and folded a piece of newspaper, on which the treasure
was duly deposited. |

“There,” said Mary, watching the arrangement eagerly,
“that will do—no, for it does not show both the opening
buds ; a little farther round—a little more ; there, that
is right.” And then Mary walked around to view the
Tose in various positions, after which she urged. her
14 ' FLORENCE L’ESTRANGE 5

——— ee eee eee







mother to go with her to the outside, and see how it
Jooked there. “ How kind it was in Miss Florence to
think of giving this to us!” said Mary ; “though she
had done so much for us, and given us so many things,
yet this seems the best of all, because it seems as if she
thought of us, and knew just how we felt; and so few do
that, you know, mother.”

What a bright afternoon that little gift made in that
little room. How much faster Mary’s fingers flew the
livelong day as she sat sewing by her mother; and Mrs.
Stephens, in the happiness of her child, almost forgot
that she had a headache, and thought, as she sipped her
evening cup of tea, that she felt stronger than she had
done for some time.

That rose! its sweet influence died not with the first
day. Through all the long cold winter, the watching,
tending, cherishing that flower, awakened a thousand
pleasant trains of thought that beguiled the sameness
and weariness of their life. Every day the fair, growing
thing put forth some fresh beauty—a leaf, a bud, a new
shoot, and constantly awakened fresh enjoyment in its
possessors. As it stood in the window, the passer-by
would sometimes stop and gaze, attracted by its beauty,
and then proud and happy was Mary ; nor did even the
serious and careworn widow notice with indifference this
tribute to the beauty of their favourite.

But little did Florence think, when she bestowed the
gift, that there twined about it an invisible thread that
reached far and brightly into the web of her destiny.

One cold afternoon in early spring, a tall and graceful


On, THE ROSE TREE. 15





gentleman called at the lowly room to pay for the
making of some linen by the inmates. He was'a stranger
and wayfarer, recommended through the charity of some
of Mrs. Stephens’s patrons. As he turned to go, his eye
rested admiringly on the rose-tree, and he stopped to
gaze at it.

« How beautiful !” said he.

“Yes,” said little Mary, “and it was given to us by a
lady as sweet and beautiful as that is.”

“Ah,” said the stranger, turning upon her a pair of
bright dark eyes, pleased and rather struck by the com-
munication; “and how came she to give it to you, my
little girl ?”

“ Oh, because we are poor, and mother is sick, and we
can never have any thing pretty. We used to havea
garden once, and we loved flowers so much, and Miss
Florence found it out, and so she gave us this.”

“ Florence !” echoed the stranger.

“Yes—Miss Florence l’Estrange—a beautiful lady.
They say she was from foreign parts ; but she speaks
English just like other ladies, only sweeter.”

“Ts she here now? Is she in this city?” said the
gentleman, eagerly.

“No; she left some months ago,” said the widow,
noticing the shade of disappointment on his face ; “but,”
said she, “you can find out all about her at her aunt’s,
No. 10 —— Street.”

A short time after, Florence received a letter in a
hand-writing that made her tremble. During the many
early years of her life spent in France she had well
16 FLORENCE L’ ESTRANGE.

a

learned to know that writing—had loved as a woman
like her loves, only once—but there had been obstacles
of parents and friends, long separation, long suspense,
till, after anxious years, she believed the ocean had
closed over that hand and heart; and it was this that
had touched with such pensive sorrow the lines in her
lovely face.

But this letter told that he was living, that he had
traced her, even as a hidden streamlet may be traced, by
the freshness, the verdure of heart, which her deeds
of kindness had left wherever she had passed. Thus
much said, our readers need no help in finishing my
story for themselves,


COUSIN WILLIAM. 17

ae. ee teeta cision aaneeaeiasaebeniain see.

COUSIN WILLIAM,

ee ee

Oh! not when hopes are brightest,
Is all love’s sweet enchantment known ;
Oh! not when hearts are lightest,
Js all fond woman's favour shown.
PRINGLE,

1 howe house in which the heroine of our story lived

stood almost concealed amid a forest of apple-trees, in
spring blushing with blossoms,and in autumn golden with
fruit ; and near by miglft be seen the garden, surrounded
by a red picket-fence, enclosing all sorts of magnificence,
There, in autumn, might be seen luxuriant vines, which
seemed puzzled for room where to bestow themselves,
and bright golden squashes, and full-orbed yellow pump-
kins, looking as satisfied as the evening sun when he has
Just had his face washed in a shower, and is sinking
soberly to bed. There were superannuated seed-cucum-
bers, enjoying the pleasures of a contemplative old age ;
and Indian corn, nicely done up in green silk, with a
Specimen tassel hanging at the end of each ear. The
beams of the summer sun darted through rays of crim-
‘on currants, abounding on bushes by the fence, while a

3B
18 COUSIN WILLIAM.



— a ae



sulky black currant-bush sat scowling In one corner, &
sort of garden curiosity.

The father of our heroine belonged to that necessary
class of beings who, though remarkable for nothing at
all, are very useful in filling up the links of society. Far
otherwise was his sister-in-law, who, on the demise of
his wife, had assumed the reins of government in the
household.

This lady was of the same opinion that has animated
many illustrious philosophers, namely, that the affairs
of this world need a great deal of seeing to in order to
have them go on prosperously; and, although she did
not, like them, engage in the supervision of the uni-
verse, she made amends by unremitting diligence in the’
department under her care. In her mind there was an
evident necessity that every onc should be up and doing:
Monday, because it was washing -day ; Tuesday, because
it was ironing-day ; Wednesdayy because it was baking-
day ; Thursday, because to-morrow was Friday, and so
on to the end of the week. Then she had the care of
reminding all in the house of everything each was to do
from weck’s end to week’s end; and she was so faithful
in this respect, that scarcely an original act of volition
took place in the family. The poor deacon was reminded
when he went out and when he came in, when he sat
down and when he rose up, so that an act of omission
could only have been committed through sheer malice
prepense.

But the supervision of a whole family of children
afforded, to a lady of her active turn of mind, more
COUSIN WILLIAM. 19



abundant matter of exertion. To see that their faces
were washed, their clothes mended, and their catechism
learned ; to see that they did not pick the flowers, nor
throw stones at the chickens, nor sophisticate the great
house-dog, was an accumulation of care that devolved
almost entirely on Mrs. Abigail; so that, by her own
account, she lived and throve by a perpetual miracle.
The eldest of her charge, at the time this story begins,
was a girl just arrived at young-ladyhood, and her name
was Mary. Now we know that people very seldom have
stories written about them, who have not sylph-like .
forms, and glorious eyes, or, at least, “a certain inex-
pressible charm diffused over their whole person.” But
stories have of late so much abounded, that they actually
seem to have used up all the eyes, hair, teeth, lips, and
forms necessary for a heroine, so that no one can now
pretend to find an original collection wherewith to set
one forth. These things considered, I regard it as for-
tunate that my heroine was not a beauty. She looked
neither like a sylph, nor an oread, nor a fairy; she had
neither “Vair distingue” nor “Tair magnifique,” but
bore a great resemblance to a real mortal girl, such as
you might pass a dozen of without any particular com~-
ment: one of those appearances which, though common
as water, may, like that, be coloured any way by the
associations you connect with it. Accordingly, a fault-
less taste in dress, a perfect ease and gaiety of manner, a
constant flow of kindly feeling, seemed, in her case, to

produce all the effect of beauty. Her manners had just

dignity enough to repel impertinence, without destroying

?
20 COUSIN WILLIAM.



the careless freedom and sprightliness in which she com-

monly indulged. No person had a merrier run of stories,
songs, and village traditions, and all those odds and ends

of character which form the materials for animated con-

versation. She had read, too, everything she could find:
Rollin’s History, and Scott’s Family Bible, that stood in

the glass bookcase in the best room, and an odd volume

of Shakspeare, and now and then one of Scott’s novels,

borrowed from a somewhat literary family in the neigh-
bourhood. She also kept an album to write her thoughts
in, and was in a constant habit of cutting out all the
pretty poetry from the corners of the newspapers, be-

sides drying a number of forget-me-nots and rosebuds,

in memory of different particular friends, with a number
of other little sentimental practices to which young

ladies of sixteen and thereabout are addicted. She was

also endowed with great constructiveness ; so that, in
this day of ladies’ fairs, there was nothing, from bellows
needle-books down to web-footed pincushions, to which
she could not turn her hand, Her sewing certainly was

extraordinary (we think too little is made of this in the

accomplishments of heroines), her stitching was like rows
of pearls, and her cross-stitching was fairy-like ; and for

sewing over-and-over, as the village school ma’am hath

it, she had not her equal. And what shall we say of her

pies and puddings! They would have converted the

most reprobate old bachelor in the world. And then her

sweeping and dusting! “Many daughters have done

virtuously, but thou excellest them all!”
And now, what do you suppose is coming next ? Why,


GQOUSIN WILLIAM. 21

a young gentleman, of course; for about this time comes
to settle in the village, and take charge of the academy,
a certain William Barton. Mrs. Abigail denominated
him cousin, and he had not been boarded in the house
more than a week, and made sundry observations on
Miss Mary, before he determined to call her cousin too,
which he accomplished im the most natural way in the
world.

Mary was at first somewhat afraid of him, because
she had heard that he had studied through all that was
to be studied in Greek, and Latin, and German too; and
she saw a library of books in his room, that made her
sigh every time she looked at them, to think how much
there was to be learned of which she was ignorant. But
all this wore away, and presently they were the best
friends in the world. He gave her books to read, and
he gave her lessons in French, nothing puzzled by that
troublesome verb which must be first conjugated, whe-
ther in French, Latin, or English. Then he gave her a
deal of good advice about the cultivation of her mind
and the formation .of her character; all of which was
very improving, and tended greatly to consolidate their
friendship. But, unfortunately for Mary, William made
quite as favourable an impression on the female com-
munity generally as he did on her, having several times
distinguished himself on public occasions. He had been
known, also, to write poetry, and had a retired and ro-
mantic air greatly bewitching to those who read Bulwer’s
novels. In short, it was morally certain, according to
all rules of evidence, that if he had chosen to pay any
ns COUSIN WILLIAM.

AAT



lady of the village a dozen visits a-week, she would have
considered it ag her duty to entertain him.

William did visit: for, like many studious people, he
found a need for the excitement of society; but, whe-
ther it was party or singing-school, he walked home with
Mary, of course, in as steady and domestic a manner as
any raan who has been marri@l a twelvemonth. His air
in conversing with her was inevitably more confidential
than with any other one, and this was the cause for envy
in many a gentle breast, and an interesting diversity of
reports with regard to her manner of treating the young
gentleman went forth into the village.

« I wonder Mary Taylor will laugh and joke so much
with William Barton in company,” said one. “Her
manners are altogether too free/’ said another. “ It
is evident she has designs upon him,” remarked the
third ; “and she cannot even conceal it,” pursued a
fourth.

Some sayings of this kind at length reached the ears
of Mrs. Abigail, who had the best heart in the world,
and was so indignant that it might have done your heart
good to see her. Still, she thought it showed that “ the
girl needed advising,” and “she should talk to Mary
about the matter.”

But she first concluded to advise with William on the
subject, and therefore, after dinner, the same day, while
he was looking over a treatise on trigonometry or conic
sections, she commenced upon him :—

“Our Mary is growing up a fine girl.”

William was intent on solving a problem, and only
COUSIN WILLIAM. 93

~~



understanding that something had been said, mechani-
cally answered, “ Yes.”

“A little wild or so,” said Mrs. Abigail.

“J know it,” said William, fixing his eyes earnestly on
E, F, B, C.

“ Perhaps you think her a little too talkative and free
with you sometimes ; you know girls do not always
think what they do.”

“Certainly,” said William, going on with his pro-
blem.

“JT think you had better speak to her about it,” said
Mrs. Abigail.

“T think so too,” said William, musing over his com-
plete work, till at length he arose, put it in his pocket,
and went to school. |

Oh, this unlucky concentrativeness ! How many shock-
ing things a man may endorse by the simple habit of
saying “ Yes,” and “No,” when he is not hearing what
is said to him.

The next morning, wher William was gone to the -
academy, and Mary was washing the breakfast things,
Aunt Abigail introduced the subject with great tact and
delicacy, by remarking,

“ Mary, I guess you had better be rather less free
with William than you have been.”

“Free!” said Mary, starting, and nearly dropping the
cup from her hand ; “ why, aunt, what do you mean ?”

“ Why, Mary, you must not always be, around, so free
in talking with him at home, and in company, and every-
where. It won’t do.” ‘The colour started into Mary's
94 COUSIN WILLIAM.

cheek, and mounted even to her forehead, as she an-
swered with a dignified air:

“T have not been too free—I know what is right and
proper—I have not been doing any thing that was
improper.”

Now, when one is going to give advice, it is very trou-
blesome to have its necessity thus called in question, and
Mrs. Abigail, who was fond of her own opinion, felt
called upon to defend it.

“ Why, yes you have, Mary; every body in the vil-
lage notices it.” .

“T don't care what everybody in the village says—I
shall always do what I think proper,” retorted the young
lady ; “I know cousin William does not think so.”

“Well, Z think he does—from some things I have
heard him say.” .

“Oh, aunt! what have you heard him say?” said
Mary, nearly upsetting a chair in the eagerness with
which she turned to her aunt.

“ Mercy on us! you need not knock the house down,
Mary ; 1 don’t remember exactly about it, only that his
way of speaking made me think so.”

“Oh, aunt, do tell me what it was, and all about it,”
said Mary, following her aunt, who went around dusting
the furniture.

Mrs. Abigail, like most obstinate people, who feel that
they have gone too far, and yet are ashamed to go back,
took refuge in an obstinate generalization, and only
asserted that she had heard him say things, as if he did
not quite like her ways.
COUSIN WILLIAM. 95

This is the most consoling of all methods in which to
leave a matter of this kind for a person of active imagi-
nation. Of course, in five minutes Mary had settled in
her mind a string of remarks that would have been
suited to any of her village companions, as coming from
her cousin. All the improbability of the thing vanished
in the absorbing consideration of its possibility ; and,
after a moment’s reflection, she pressed her lips together
in a very firm way, and remarked that “ Mr. Barton
would have no occasion to say such things again.”

It was very evident, from her heightened colour and
dignified air, that her state of mind was very heroical,
As for poor Aunt Abigail, she felt sorry she had vexed
her, and addressed herself most earnestly to her consola-
tion, remarking, “ Mary, I don’t suppose William meant
anything. He knows you don’t mean anything wrong.”

“ Don’t mean anything wrong!” said Mary; indignantly.

“ Why, child, he thinks you don’t know much about
folks and things, and if you have been a little

“ But I have not been. It was he that talked with
me first ; it was he that did everything first; he called
me cousin—and he 7s my cousin.”

“No, child, you are mistaken ; for you remember his
grandfather was ——”



“T don’t care who his grandfather was; he has no
right to think of meas he does.”

“Now, Mary, don’t go to quarrelling with him; he
can’t help his thoughts, you know.”

“J don’t care what he thinks,” said Mary, flinging
out of the room with tears in her eyes,
26 COUSIN WILLIAM,

Now when a young lady is in such a state of affliction,
the first thing to be done is to sit down and cry for two
hours or more, which Mary accomplished in the most
thorough manner ; in the meanwhile making many re-
flections on the instability of human friendships, and
resolving never to trust any one again as long as she
lived, and thinking that this was a cold and hollow-
hearted world, together with many other things she had |
read in books, but never realized so forcibly as at pre-
sent. But what was to be done? Of course, she did
not wish to speak a word to William again, and wished
he did not board there; and finally, she pus on her
bonnet, and determined to go over to her other aunt’s”
in the neighbourhood, and spend the day, so that she
might not see him at dinner.

But it so happened that Mr. William, on coming home
to dinner, found himself unaccountably lonesome during
school recess for dinner, and, hearing where Mary was,
determined to call after school at night at her aunt’s,
and attend her home.

Accordingly, in the afternoon, as Mary was sitting in
the parlour with two or three cousins, Mr. William
entered.

Mary was so anxious to look just as if nothing was
the matter, that she turned away her head and began to
look out of the window just as the young gentleman
came up to speak to her. So, after he had twice in-
quired after her health, she drew up very coolly and
said ;

“Did you speak to me, sir ?”
COUSIN WILLIAM. o7

—_—_—



pes. di apie maa eca eet eee Se oe

William looked a little surprised at first, but seating
himself by her, “ To be sure,” said he ; “ and I came to
know why you ran away without leaving any message
for me ?”

“Tt did not occur to me,” said Mary, in ‘the dry tone
which, in a lady, means, “I will excuse you from any
farther conversation, if you please.” William felt as if
there was something different frorn common in all this,
but thought that perhaps he was mistaken, and so con-
tinued : ,

« What a pity, now, that you should be so careless of
me, when I was so thoughtful of you! I have come all
this distance to see how you do.”

“J am sorry to have given you the trouble,” said
Mary.

“ Cousin, are you unwell to-day ?” said William.

“No, sir ;” said Mary, going on with her sewing.

There was something so marked and decisive in all
this, that William could scarcely believe his cars. He
turned away, and commenced a conversation with a
young lady ; and Mary, to show that she could talk if
she chose, commenced relating a story to her cousins,
and presently they were all in a loud laugh.

“ Mary has been full of her knick-knacks to-day,” said
her old uncle, joining them.

William looked at her: she never seemed brighter or
in better spirits, and he began to think that even Cousin
Mary might puzzle a man sometimes.

He turned away and began a conversation with old
Mr. Harper on the raising of buckwheat, a subject which
28 COUSIN WILLIAM.

at ee



evidently required profound thought, for he never looked
more grave, not to say melancholy.

Mary glanced that way, and was struck with the sad
and almost severe expression with which he was listening
to the details of Mr. Harper, and was convinced that he
was no more thinking of buckwheat than she was.

“TI never thought of hurting his feelings so much,”
said she, relenting ; “ after all, he has been very kind to
me, But he might have told me about it, and not some-
body else.” And hereupon she cast another glance to-
wards him.

William was not talking, but sat with his eyes fixed
on the snuffer-tray, with an intense gravity of gaze that
quite troubled her, and she could not help again blam-
ing herself. .

“To be sure! Aunt was right; he could not help his
thoughts. I will try to forget it,’ thought she.

Now you must not think Mary was sitting still and
gazing during this soliloquy. No, she was talking and
laughing, apparently the most unconcerned spectator. in
the room. So passed the evening till the little company
broke up.

“T am‘ready to attend you home,” said William, in a
tone of cold and almost haughty deference.

“JT am obliged to you,” said the young lady, ina
similar tone, “but I shall stay all night ;” then, sud-
denly changing her tone, she said, “ No, I cannot keep
it up any longer, I will go home with you, Cousin
William.”

“ Keep up what ?” said William, with surprise.
COUSIN WILLIAM. 99
nome epee aera ean earapeenesetpnasmnamastanandayeeseteciseeuststisemimmens

Mary was going for her bonnet. She came out, took
his arm, and waiked on a little way.

“You have advised me always to be frank, cousin,”
said Mary, “and I must and will be ; so I shall tell you
all, though I dare say it is not according to rule.”

“ All what ?” said William.

“Cousin,” said she, not at all regarding what he said,
“I was very much vexed this afternoon.”

“So I perceived, Mary.”

“ Well, it is vexatious,” she continued, “ though, after
all, we cannot expect people to think us perfect ; but I
did not think it quite fair in you not to tell me.”

“Tell you what, Mary ?”

Here they came to a place where the road turned
through a small patch of woods. . It was green and
shady, and enlivened by a lively chatterbox of a brook,
There was a mossy trunk of a tree that had fallen be-
side it, and made a pretty seat. The moonlight lay in
little patches upon it, as it streamed down through the
branches of the trees. It was a fairy-looking place, and
Mary stopped and sat down, as if to collect her thoughts.
After picking up a stick, and playing a moment in the
water, she began,—

“ After all, cousin, it was very natural in you to say so
if you thought so; though I should not have supposed
you would think so.”

“Well, I should be glad if I could know what it is,”
said William, in a tone of patient resignation.

“Oh, I forgot that I had not told you,” said she, push-
ing back her hat, and speaking like one determined to
30 COUSIN WILLIAM.

=





go through with the thing. “ Why, cousin, I have been
told that you spoke of my manners towards yourself as
being freer—more —obtrusive than they should be. And
now,” said she, her eyes flashing, “ you see it was not
a very easy thing to tell you, but I began with being
frank, and I will be so, for the sake of satisfying myself.”

To this William simply replied, “Who told you this,
Mary ?”

“ My aunt.”

“ Did she say I said it to her ?”

“Yes; and I do not so much object to your saying it
as to your thinking it, for you know I did not force my-
self on your notice: it was you who sought my acquain-
tance and won my confidence ; and that you, above all
others, should think of me in this way!”

“T never did think so, Mary,” said William, quietly.

“ Nor ever said so ?”

“Never, I should think you might have known it,
* Mary.”

“ But—” said Mary.

“ But,” said William, firmly, “ Aunt Abigail is ccr-
taily mistaken.”

“Well, Iam glad of it,” said Mary, looking relieved,
and gazing in the brook. Then looking up with warmth,
“and, cousin, you never must think so. I am ardent, ©
and I express myself freely ; but I never meant, I am
sure I never should mean, anything more than a sister
might say.”

“ And are you sure you never could, if all my happi-
ness depended on it, Mary ?”


COUSIN WILLIAM. 31





She turned and locked up in his face, amd saw a look
that brought conviction. She rose to go on, and her
hand was taken and drawn into the arm of her cousin,
and that was the end of the first and the last diffi-
culty that ever arose between them.
32 FRANKNESS,

ee

_ FRANKNESS.

ee

Where then to find the spell that flings

His fetter on those way’ring wings?

’Tis in the native truth of heart

That scorns the thought of female art,

That, keenly thrill’d by joy or pain,

Disdains the thrill to hide or feign,
CROLY,



_ is one kind of frankness, which is the result of
perfect unsuspiciousness, and which requires a mea-
sure of ignorance of the world and of life; this kind
appeals to our generosity and tenderness. There is
another which is the frankness of a strong but pure mind,
acquainted with life, clear in its discrimination and
upright in its intention, yet above disguise or conceal-
ment: this kind excites respect. ‘The first seems to
proceed simply from impulse, the second from impulse
and reflection united; the first proceeds, in @ measure,
from ignorance, the second from knowledge; the first is
born from an undoubting confidence in others, the second
from a virtuous and well-grounded reliance on one’s self.
It was said of Alice H— that she had the mind of a
man, the heart of a woman, and the face of an angel: a
FRANXNESS. 33
teheetngtemeininmeemtansineammnnmmpin eet ita. ae
combination that all my readers will think peculiarly
happy. | .

There never was a woman who was so unlike the mass
of society in her modes of thinking and acting, yet so
generally popular. But the most remarkable thing about
her was her proud superiority to all disguise, in thought,
word, and deed. She pleased you; for she spoke out a
hundred things that you would conceal, and spoke them
with a dignified assurance that made you wonder that
you had ever hesitated to say them yourself. Nor did
this unreserve appear like the weakness of one who could
not conceal, or like a determination to make war on the
forma of society. It was rather a calm, well-guided in-
tegrity, regulated by a just sense of propriety ; knowing
when to be silent, but speaking the truth when it spoke
at all.

Her extraordinary frankness often beguiled superficial
observers into supposing themselves fully acquainted with
her real character long before they were, as the beautiful
transparency of some lakes is said to deceive the eye as
to their depth; yet the longer you knew her, the more
variety and compass of character appeared through the
same transparent medium. But you may just visit Miss
Alice for half-an-hour to-night and judge for yourselves.
You may walk into this little parlour. There sits Misa
Alice on that sofa, sewing a pair of lace sleeves tnto a
satin dress, in which peculiarly angelic employment she
may persevere till we have finished another sketch.

Do you see that pretty little lady, with sparkling eyes,
elastic form, beautiful hand and foot, that is sitting

-
a4 FRANKNESS.

opposite to her? She is a belle: the character is written
in her face—it sparkles from-her eye—it dimples in her
smile, and pervades the whole woman.

- But there—Alice has risen, and is gone to the mirror,
and is arranging the finest auburn hair in the world in
the most tasteful manner. The little lady watches every
motion as comically as a kitten watches a pin-ball.

“Tt is all in vain to deny it, Alice~you are really
anxious to look pretty this evening,” said she.

“I certainly am,” said Alice, quietly.

- AY and you hope you shall please Mr. A. and Mr.
B.,” said the little accusing angel.

“Certainly I do,” said Alice, as she twisted her dane
in a beautiful curl.

“Well, I would not tell of it, Alice, if I did.”

“Then you should not ask me,” said Alice.

“TI declare! Alice!”

“And what do you declare ?”

“T never saw such a girl as you are!”

“Very likely,” said Alice, stooping to pick up a pin.

“Well, for my part,” said the little lady, “I never
would take any pains to make anybody like me—parti-
cularly a gentleman.”

“JT would,” said Alice, “if they would not like me
without,”

“Why, Alice! I should not think you were so fond of
adimiration.”

“T like to be admired very much,” said Alice, return-
ing to the sofa, “and I suppose everybody else does,”

“JZ don’t care about admiration,” said the little lady,


FRANKNESS. 35
ie ee

“T would be as well satisfied that people shouldn’t like
me as that they should.”

“Then, cousin, I think it’s a pity we all like you so
well,” said Alice, with a good-humoured smile. If Miss
Alice had penetration, she never made a severe use of it.

“ But really, cousin,” said the little lady, “I should
not think such a girl as you would think anything about
dress, or admiration, and all that.”

“TI don’t know what sort of a girl you think I am,”
said Alice, “but, for my own part, J only pretend to be
a common human being, and am not ashamed of common
human feelings. If God has made us so that we love
admiration, why should we not honestly say so. J love
it—you love it—everybody loves it ; and why should not
everybody say it?”

“ Why, yes,” said the little lady, “I suppose everybody
has a—-has a—a general love for admiration. Iam willing
to acknowledge that J have; but—”

“But you have no love for it in particular,” said
Alice, “I suppose you mean to say ; that is just the way
the matter is commonly disposed of. Everybody is will-
ing to acknowledge a general wish for the good opinion
of others, but half the world are ashamed to own it when
it comes to a particular case. Now I have made up my
mind, that if it is correct in general, it is correct in par-
ticular, and I mean to own it both ways.”

“ But, somehow, it seems mean!” said the little lady.

“It is mean to live for it, to be selfishly engrossed in
it, but not mean to enjoy it when it comes, or even to
seek it, if we neglect no higher interest in doing so, All
36 FRANKNESS.



that God made us to feel is dignified and Bare, unless
we pervert it.”

“ But, Alice, I never heard any person aa out so
frankly as you do.”

* Almost all that is innocent and selene may be spoken
out ; and as for that which is not innocent and natural,
it ought not even to be thought.”

“ But can everything be spoken that may be thought?”
said the lady.

“No; we have an instinct which teaches us to be
silent sometimes: but, if we speak at all, let it be in
simplicity and sincerity.”

“Now, for instance, Alice,” said the lady, “ it is very
innocent and natural, as you say, to think this, that, and
the other good thing of yourself, especially when every-
body is telling you of it; now, would you speak the
truth if any one asked you on this point 2”

“Tf it were a person who had a right to ask, and if it
were a proper time and place, I would,” said Alice.

“ Well, then,” said the bright lady, “I ask you, Alice,
in this very proper time and place, do you think that you
are handsome ?”

“Now I suppose you expect me to make a courtesy to
every chair in the room before I answer,” said Alice ;
“but, dispensing with that ceremony, I will tell you
fairly, I think I am.”

* Do you think that you are good ?”

* Not entirely,” said Alice,

“ Well, but don’t you think you are better than most
people 7”
FRANKNESS. 37



“ As far as I can tell, I think I am better than some
people ; but really, cousin, I don’t trust my own judg-
ment in this matter,” said Alice.

“Well, Alice, one more question. Do you think
James Martyrs likes you or me best ?” :

“I do not know,” said Alice. |

“T did not ask you what you knew, but what you
thought,” said the lady; “you must have some thought
about it.”

“Well, then, I think he likes me best,” said Alice.

Just then the door opened, and in walked the identical
James Martyrs. Alice blushed, looked a little comical,
and went on with her none while the little lady
began,

“ Really, Mr. James, I wish you had coitie a mintité
sooner, to hear Alice’s confessions.”

“What has she confessed ?” said James.

“Why, that she is handsomer and better than most
folks.”

“That is nothing to be ashamed of,” said James.

“Oh, that’s not all; she wants to look pretty, and
loves to be admired, and all—”

‘* It sounds very much like her,” said James, looking
at Alice.

“Oh, but, besides that,” said the lady, “she has been
preaching a discourse in justification of vanity and self-
love—”

“ And next time you shall take notes when I preach,”
said Alice, “for I don’t think your memory is remark-
ably happy.”
38 - FRANKNESS.



“You see, James,” said the lady, “that Alice makes
it a point to say exactly the truth when she speaks at
all, and I’ve been puzzling her with questions. I really
wish you would ask her some, and see what she will say.
But mercy! there is Uncle C. come to take me to ride.
I must run.” And off flew the little humming-bird,
leaving James and Alice téte-d-téte.

“ There really is one question—” said James, clearing
his voice.

Alice looked up.

“ There is one question, Alice, which I wish you would
answer.”

Alice did not inquire what the question was, but
began to look very solemn ; and just then the door was
shut—and so I never knew what it was that Alice's
friend James wanted to be. enlightened about,
FECLING. 89.

LL



FEELING.



Some wander through a rugged way,
Forsaken and opprest ;
While others, cheer’d by Fortune's ray,
Through Pleasure’s laughing region stray,
In rainbow colours drest,
IF, HEMANS.

a is one way of studying human nature, which

surveys mankind only as a set of instruments for the
accomplishment of personal plans. There is another,
which regards them simply as a gallery of pictures, to
be admired or laughed at as the caricature or the beau
ideal predominates. A third way regards them as human
beings, having hearts that can suffer and enjoy, that can
be improved or be ruined; as those who are linked to us
by mysterious reciprocal influences, by the common dan-
gers of a present existence, and the uncertain ties of a
future one; as presenting, wherever we mect them,
claims on our sympathy and assistance.

Those who adopt the last method are interested in
human beings, not so much by present attractions as by
their capabilities as intelligent, immortal beings; by a
high belief of what every mind may attain in an im-
40 FEELING,



mortal existence ; by anxieties for its temptations and
dangers, and often by the perception of errors and faults
which threaten its ruin. The two first modes are adopted
by the great mass of society; the last is the office of
those few scattered stars in the sky of life, who look
down on its dark selfishness to remind us that there is a
. world of light and love.

To this class did He belong, whose rising and setting
on earth were for the “healing of the nations ;” and to
this class has belonged many a pure and devoted spirit
—like him, shining to cheer—like him, fading away
into the heavens. To this class many a one wishes to
belong, who has an eye to distinguish the divinity of
virtue, without the resolution to attain it; who, while
they sweep along with the selfish current of society, still
regret that society is not different—that they them-
selves are not different. If this train of thought has no
very particular application to what follows, it was never-
theless suggested by it, and of its relevancy others must
judge.

Look into this school-room. It is a warm, sleepy
afternoon in July; there is scarcely air enough to stir the
leaves of the tall buttonwood-tree before the door, or to
lift the loose leaves of the copybook in the window; the
sun has been diligently shining into those curtainless
west windows ever since three o’clock, upon those blotted
and mangled desks, and those decrepit and tottering
benches, and that great arm-chair, the high place of
authority.

You can faintly hear, about the door, the “craw,
FEELING. 4l

i
eraw,” of some neighbouring chickens, who have stepped
around to consider the dinner-baskets, and pick up the
crumbs of the noon’s repast. Fora marvel the busy
school is still, because, in truth, it is too warm to stir.
You will find nothing to disturb your meditation on
character, for you cannot hear the beat of those little
hearts, nor the bustle of all those busy thoughts.

Now look around. Who of these is the most interest-
ing? Is it that tall, slender, hazel.eyed boy, with a
glance like a falcon, whose elbows rest on his book as he
gazes out on the great buttonwood-tree, and is calcu-
lating how he shall fix his squirrel-trap when school is
out? Or is it that curly-headed little rogue, who is
shaking with repressed laughter at seeing a chicken roll
over in a dinner-basket? Or is it that arch boy with
black eyelashes, and deep, mischievous dimple in his
cheeks, who is slyly fixing a fishhook to the skirts of the
master’s coat, yet looking as abstracted as Archimedes
whenever the good man turns his head that way? No;
these are intelligent, bright, beautiful, but it is not these.

Perhaps, then, it is that sleepy little girl, with golden
curls and @ mouth like a half-blown rose-bud? See!
the small brass thimble has fallen to the floor, her patch-
work drops from her lap, her blue eyes close like two
sleepy violets, her little head is nodding, and she sinks
on her sister’s shoulder ; surely itis she. No, it is not.

But look in that corner: do you see that boy with
such a gloomy countenance—so vacant, yet so ill-na-
tured? He is doing nothing, and he very seldom does
anything. He is surly and gloomy in his looks and
42 PEELING. ;
SUEEIEEEEememeneeeeee ee
actions. He never showed any more aptitude for saying

or doing a pretty thing, than his straight white hair
does for curling. He is regularly blamed and punished
every day, and the more he is blamed and punished, the
worse he grows. None of the boys and girls in school
will play with him, or if they do, they will be sorry for
it. And every day the master assures him that “he
does not know what to do with him,” and that he
“makes him more trouble than any boy in school,” with
similar judicious information, that has a striking ten-
dency to promote improvement. That is the boy to
whom I apply the title of “the most interesting one.”

He is interesting because he is not pleasing ; because
he has bad habits ; because he does wrong ; because he
is always likely to do wrong. He is interesting because
. he has become what he is now by means of the very tem-
perament which often makes the noblest virtue. It is
feeling, acuteness of feeling,which has given that counte-
nance its expression, that character its moroseness.

He has no father, and that long-suffering friend, his
mother, is gone too. Yet he has relations, and kind
ones too ; and, in the compassionate language of worldly
charity, it may be said of him, “ He would have nothing
of which to complain, if he would only behave himself.”

His little sister is always bright, always pleasant and
cheerful; and his friends say, “ Why should not he be so
too ? he is in exactly the same circumstances.” No, he
is not. In one circumstance they differ. He has a mind
to feel and remember almost everything that can pain
him ; she can feel and remember but little. If you
FEELING, 43,

ani
blame him, he is exasperated, gloomy, and cannot forget
it. If you blame her, she can say she has done wrong in
a moment, and all is forgotten. Her mind cau no more
be wounded than the little brook: where she loves to play.
The bright waters close in a moment, and smileand prat-
tle as merry as before.

Which is the most desirable temperament ? It would
be hard to say.. The power of feeling is necessary for all
that is noble in man, and yet it involves the greatest
risks. They who catch at happiness on the bright sur-
face of things, secure a portion, such as it is, with more
certainty ; those who dive for it in the waters of deep
feeling, if they succeed, will bring up pearls and dia-
monds, but if they sink they are lost for ever!

But now comes Saturday, and school is just out. Can
any one of my readers remember the rapturous prospect
of a long, bright Saturday afternoon? “ Where are you
going 7” “ Will you come and seeme ?” “ We are going
a fishing!” “ Let us goa strawberrying !” may be heard
rising from the happy group. But no one comes near
the ill-humoured James, and the little party going to
visit his sister ‘ wish James was out of the way.” He
sees every motion, hears every whisper, knows, suspects,
feels it all, and turns to go home more sullen and ill-
tempered -than common. ‘The world looks dark—no-
body loves him—and he is told that it is “all his own
fault,” and that makes the matter still worse.

When the little party arrive, he is suspicious and irri-
table, and, of course, soon excommunicated. ‘Then, as
he stands in disconsolate anger, locking over the garden
44 FEELING.

eee
fence at the gay group making dandelion chains, and
playing baby-house under the trees, he wonders why he
is not like other children. He wishes he were different,
and yet he does not know what to do. He looks around,
and everything is blooming and bright. His little bed
of flowers is even brighter and sweeter than ever before,
and a new rose is just opening on his rose-bush.

There goes pussy too, racing and scampering, with
little Ellen after her, in among the alleys and flowers ;
and the birds are singing in the trees; and the soft
winds brush the blossoms of the sweet-pea against his
cheek ; and yet, though all nature looks on him so kindly,
he is wretched.

Let us now change the scene. Why is that crowded
assembly so attentive—so silent? Who is speaking ?
It is our old friend, the little disconsolate schoolboy.
But his eyes are flashing with intellect, his face fervent
with emotion, his voice breathes like music, and every
mind is enchained.

Again, it is a splendid sunset, and yonder enthusiast
meets it face to face, as a friend. He is silent—rapt—
happy. He feels the poetry which God has written ; he
is touched by it, as God meant that the feeling spirit
should be touched.

Again, he is watching by the bed of sickness, and it is
blessed to have such a watcher! anticipating every
want ; relieving, not in a cold, uninterested way, but
with the quick perceptions, the tenderness, the gentle-
ness of an angel.

Follow him into the circle of friendship, and why is
FEELING. 45

eee
he so loved and trusted ’ Why can you so easily tell to
him what you can say to no one else besides? Why is
it that all around him feel that he can understand,
appreciate, be touched by all that touches them ?

And when heaven uncloses its doors of light—when
all its knowledge, its purity, its bliss, rises on the eye
and passes into the soul, who then will be looked on as
the one who might be envied—he who can, or he who
cannot feel #
46 TIIE SEMPSTRESS.

Lt te ce



ee
——

THE SEMPSTRESS,

_

Tew, save the poor, feel for the poor;
The rich know not how hard

It is to be of needful food

And needful rest debarr’d.

Their paths are paths of plenteousness:
They sleep on silk and down;

They never think how wearily

The weary head lies down.

They never by the window sit,
And see the gay pass by,

Yet take their weary work again,
And with a mournful eye.

L. FE. B,



Fy or even fine and elevated, in a sentimental

point of view, may have been the poetry of this
gifted writer, we think we have never seen anything
from this source that ought to give a better opinion of
her than the little ballad from which the above verses
are taken,

They show that the accomplished authoress possessed,
not merely a knowledge of the dreamy ideal wants of
human beings, but the more pressing and homely ones,
which the fastidious and poetical are often the last to
appreciate, The sufferings of poverty are not confined


THE SEMPSTRESS, 47



to those of the common, squalid, every-day-inured to
hardships, and ready, with open Aa to teceive cha-
rity, let it come to them as it will. There is another
class on whom it presses with still heavier power:
the generous, the decent, the self-respecting, who have
struggled with their lot in silence, “ bearing all things,
hoping all things,” and willing to endure all things,
rather than breathe a word of complaint, or to acknow-
ledge, even to themselves, that their own efforts will not
be sufficient for their own necessities.

Pause with me a while at the door of yonder small
room, whose small window overlooks a little court below.
It is inhabited by a widow and her daughter, dependent
entirely on the labours of the needle, and those other
slight and precarious resources, which are all that remain
to woman when left to struggle her way “ through this
bleak world alone.” It contains all their small earthly
store, and there is scarce an article of its Jittle stock of
furniture that has not been thought of, and toiled for,
and its price calculated over and over again, before
everything could come right for its purchase. Every
article is arranged with the utmost neatness and care ;
nor is the most costly furniture of a fashionable parlour
more sedulously guarded from a scratch or a rub, than
is that brightly-varnished bureau, and that neat cherry
tea-table and bedstead. The floor, too, boasted once a
carpet; but old Time has been busy with it, picking a
hole here, and making a thin place there; and though
the old fellow has been followed up by the most indefa-
tigable zeal in darning, the marks of his mischievous
48 THE SEMPSTRESS,

eens

fingers are too plain to be mistaken. It is true, a kindly
neighbour has givema bit of faded baize, which has been
neatly clipped and bound, and spread down over an en-
tirely unmanageable hole in front of the fire-place ; and
other places have been repaired with pieces of different
colours; and yet, after all, it is evident that the poor
carpet is not long for this world,

But the best face is put upon everything. The little
cupboard in the corner, that contains a few china cups,
and one or two antiquated silver spoons, relics of better
days, is arranged with jealous neatness, and the white
muslin window-curtain, albeit the muslin be old, has been
carefully whitened, and starched, and smoothly ironed,
and put up with exact precision; and on the bureau,
covered by a snowy cloth, are arranged a few books and
other memorials of former times, and a faded miniature,
which, though it have little about it to interest a stranger,
is more precious to the poor widow than everything
besides,

Mrs, Ames is seated in her rocking-chair, supported by
a pillow, and busy cutting out work, while her daughter,
a slender, sickly-looking girl, is sitting by the window,
intent on some fine stitching,

Mrs. Ames, in former days, was the wife of.a respecta-
ble merchant, and the mother of an affectionate family,
But evil fortune had followed her with a steadiness that
seemed like the stern decree of some adverse fate rather
than the ordinary dealings of a merciful Providence,
First came a heavy run of losses in business; then long
and expensive sickness in the family, and the death of.
{HE SEMPSTRESS. 49

ee

children. Then there was the selling of the large house
and elegant furniture, to retire to a humbler style of
living; and, finally, the sale of all the property, with the
view of quitting the shores of a native land, and com-
mencing life again ina new one. But scarcely had the
exiled family found themselves in the port of a foreign
land, when the father was suddenly smitten down by the
hand of death, and his lonely grave made in a land of
strangers. The widow, broken-hearted and discouraged,
had still a wearisome journey before her ere she could
reach any whom she could consider as her friends. With
her two daughters, entirely unattended, and with her
finances impoverished by detention and sickness, she per-
formed the tedious journey.

Arrived at the place of her destination, she found her-
self not only without immediate resources, but consider-
ably in debt to one who had advanced money for her
travelling expenses. With silent endurance she met the
necessities of her situation. Her daughters, delicately
reared, and hitherto carefully educated, were placed out
to service, and Mrs. Ames sought for employment as a
nurse. The younger child fell sick, and the hard earn-
ings of the mother were all exhausted in the care of her;
and though she recovered in part, she was declared by
her physician to be the victim of a disease which would
never leave her till it terminated her life.

* As soon, however, as her daughter was so far restored
as not to need her immediate care, Mrs. Ames resumed
her laborious employment. Scarcely had she been able,
in this way, to discharge the debts for her journey, and
D
50. THE SEMPSTRESS,

—_—_—



to furnish the small room we have described, when the
hand of disease was laid heavily on herself. Too resolute
and persevering to give way to the first attacks of pain
and weakness, she still continued her fatiguing employ-
ment till her system was entirely prostrated. Thus all
possibility of pursuing her business was cut off, and no-
thing remained but what could be accomplished by her
own and her daughter’s dexterity at the needle. It is at
this time we ask you to look in upon the mother and
daughter.

Mrs. Ames is sitting up, the first time for a week, and
even to-day she is scarcely fit to do so; but she remem-
bers that the month is coming round, and her rent will
soon be due; and even in her feebleness she will stretch
every nerve to meet her engagements with punctilious
exactness,

Wearied at length with cutting out, and measuring,
and drawing threads, she leans back in her chair, and
her eye rests on the pale face of her daughter, who has
been sitting for two hours intent on her stitching.

“Ellen, my child, your head aches; don’t work so
steadily,”

“ Oh no, it don’t ache much,” said she, too conscious of
looking very much tired. Poor girl, had she remained
in the situation in which she was born, she would now
have been skipping about, and enjoying life as other
young girls of fifteen do; but now there is no choice of
employments forher—no youthful companions—no visit-
ing—no pleasant walks in the fresh air, Evening and
morning, it is all the same ; headache or sideache, it ig
THE SEMPSTRUSS. §1

—_—_—_

all one, She must hold on the same unvarying task ; a
wearisome thing for a girl of fifteen !

But see, the door opens, and Mrs. Ames’s face bright-
ens as her other daughter enters. Mary has become a
domestic in a neighbouring family, where her faithful-
ness and kindness of heart have caused her to be regard-
ed more as a daughter and a sister than as a servant.
“ Here, mother, is your rent-money,” she exclaimed, “ so
do put up your work and rest a while. I can get enough
to pay it next time before the month comes round
again.”

“ Dear child! I do wish you would ever think to get
anything for yourself,” said Mrs. Ames; “ I cannot con-
sent to use up all your earnings, as I have done lately,
and all Ellen’s too: you must have a new dress this
spring, and that bonnet of yours is not decent any
longer.”

“Oh no, mother; I have fixed over my blue calico,
and you will be surprised to see how well it looks ; and
my best frock, when it is washed and darned, will answer
some time longer. And then Mrs. Grant has given me a
riband, and when my bonnet is whitened and trimmed, it
will look very well. And so,” she added, “I brought
you some wine this afternoon ; you know the doctor says
you need wine.”

“Dear child! I want to see you take some comfort of
your money yourself.”

“Well, I do take comfort of it, mother. It is more

comfort to be able to help you than to wear all the finest
_ dresses in the world,”
52 THE SEMPSTRESS.



Two months from this dialogue found our little family
still more straitened and perplexed. Mrs. Ames had
been confined all the.time with sickness, and the greater
part of Ellen’s time and strength was occupied with
attending to her.

Very little sewing could the poor girl now do, in the
broken intervals that remained to her; and the wages
of Mary were not only used as fast as she earned, but
she anticipated two months in advance.

Mrs. Ames had been better fora day or two, and had
been sitting up, exerting all her strength to finish a set
of shirts which had been sent in to make. “The money
for them will just pay your rent,” sighed she ; “and if
we can do a little more this week —”

“ Dear mother, you are so tired,” said Ellen, “do lie
down, and not worry any more till I come back.”

Ellen went out and passed on till she came to the
door of an elegant house, whose damask and muslin
window-curtains indicated a fashionable residence.

Mrs. Elmore was sitting in her splendidly-furnished
parlour, and around her lay various fancy articles, which
two young girls were busily unrolling. “ What a lovely
pink scarf!” said one, throwing it over her shoulders and
skipping before a mirror; while the other exclaimed,
“Do look at these pocket-handkerchiefs, mother! what
elegant lace !” .

“Well, girls,” said Mrs, Elmore, “these handkerchiefs
are a shameful piece of extravagance, I wonder you will
insist on haying such things,”

“La! mamma, everybody has such now; Laura Sey-
THE SEMPSTRESS. . 53

mour has half a dozen that cost more than these, and her
father is no richer than ours.”

“ Well,” said Mrs. Elmore, “ rich or not rich, it seems
to make very little odds; we do not seem to have half as
much money to spare as we did when we lived in the lit-
tle house in Spring Street. What with new furnishing
the house, and getting everything you boys and girls say
you must have, we are poorer, if anything, than we were
then.”

“ Ma’am, here is Mrs. Ames’s girl come with some
sewing,” said the servant.

“ Show her in,” said Mrs, Elmore.

Ellen entered timidly, and handed her bundle of work
to Mrs. Elmore, who forthwith proceeded to a minute
scrutiny of the articles; for she prided herself on being
very particular as to her sewing. But, though the work
had been executed by feeble hands and aching eyes, even
Mrs. Elmore could detect no fault in it.”

“ Well, it is very prettily done,” said she; “ what docs
your mother charge ?”

Ellen handed a neatly-folded bill which she had drawn
for her mother. “I must say, I think your mother’s
prices are very high,” said Mrs. Elmore, examining her
nearly empty purse; “ every thing is getting so dear that
one hardly knows how to live.’ Ellen looked at the
fancy articles, and glanced around the room with an air
of innocent astonishment. “ Ah!’ said Mrs. Elmore, “I
dare say it seems to you as if persons in our situation
had no need of economy; but, for my part, I feel the
. need of it more and more every day.” As she spoke
54 THE SEMPSTRESS.



she handed Ellen the small sum, which, though it was
not a quarter the price of one of the handkerchiefs,
was all that she and her sick mother could claim in the
world.

“There,” said she; “tell your mother I like her work
very much, but I do not think I can afford to employ
her, if I can find any one to work cheaper.”

Now Mrs. Elmore was not a hard-hearted woman, and
if Ellen had come as a beggar to solicit help for her sick
mother, Mrs. Elmore would have fitted out a basket of
provisions, and sent a bottle of wine, and a bundle of old
clothes, and all the et cetera of such occasions; but the
sight of @ bil/ always aroused all the instinctive sharp-
ness of her business-like education. She never had the
dawning of an idea that it was her duty to pay anybody
any more than she could possibly help ; nay, she had an
indistinct notion that it was-her duty as an economist to
make everybody take as little as possible. When she and
her daughters lived in Spring Street, to which she had
alluded, they used to spend the greater part of their time
at home, and the family sewing was commonly done
among themselves; but since they had moved into a
large house, and set up a carriage, and addressed them-
selves to being gentecl, the girls found that they had
altogether too much to do to attend to their own sewing,
much less to perform any for their father and brothers.
And their mother found her hands abundantly full in
overlooking her large house, in taking care of expensive
furniture, and in superintending her increased train of
servants. The sewing, therefore, was put out; and Mrs.
THE SEMPSTRESS, 55

——— —_—

Elmore felt 2¢ a duty to get it done the cheapest way she
could. Nevertheless, Mrs. Elmore was too notable a lady,
and her sons and daughters were altogether too fastidious
as to the make and quality of their-clothing, to’admit the
_ idea of its bemg done in any but the most complete and
perfect manner. ;

Mrs. Elmore never accused herself of want of charity
for the poor; but she had never considered that the best
class of the poor are those who never ask charity. She
did not consider that, by paying liberally those who were
honestly and independently struggling for themselves,
she was really doing a greater charity than by giving in-
discriminately to a dozen applicants.

“ Don’t you think, mother, she says we charge too high
for this work!” said Ellen, when she returned. ‘Iam
sure she did not know how much work we put in those
shirts. She says she cannot give us any more work; she
must look out for somebody that will do it cheaper. I do
not see how it is that people who live in such houses, and
have so many beautiful things, can feel that they cannot
afford to pay for what costs us so much.”

“ Well, child, they are more apt to feel so than people
who live plainer.”

“Well, Iam sure,” said Ellen, “we cannot afford to
spend so much time, as we have over these shirts, for less
money.”

“ Never mind, my dear,” said the mother, soothingly ;
“here isa bundle of work that another lady has sent in,
and if we get it done we shall have enough for our rent,
and something over to buy bread with.”
56 THE SEMPSTRESS,
——nseeeeeeenensnssss hemasamsene i

It is needless to carry our readers over all the process
of cutting and fitting, and gathering and stitching, neces-
sary in making up six fine shirts. Suffice it to say, that
on Saturday evening all but one were finished, and Ellen
proceeded to carry them home, promising to bring the re- .
maining one on Tuesday morning. The lady examined
the work and gave Ellen the money; but on Tuesday,
when the child came with the remaining work, she found
her in great ill-humour, Upon re-examining the shirts,
she had discovered that in some important respects they
differed from directions she meant to have given, and
supposed she had given, and, accordingly, she vented her
displeasure on Ellen.

“Why didn’t you make these shirts as I told you ?”
said she, sharply.

“We did,” said Ellen, mildly ; “mother measured by
the pattern every part, and cut them herself.”

“Your mother must be a fool, then, to make such a
piece of work. I wish you would just take them back,
and alter them over;” and the lady proceeded with the
directions, of which neither Ellen nor her mother, till
then, had had any intimation. Unused to such language,
the frightened Ellen took up her work and slowly walked
homeward,

“Oh dear, how my head does ache!” thought she to
herself; “and poor mother, she said this morning she
was afraid another of her sick turns was coming on, and
we have all this work to pull out and do over.”

“See here, mother !” said she, with a disconsolate
air,as she entered the room; “Mrs, Rudd says, take
THE SEMPSTRESS. 57



TT LL ID

out all the bosoms, and rip off all the collars, and fix
them quite another way. She says they are not like the
pattern she sent ; but she must have forgotten, for here
it is. Look, mother! it is exactly as we made them.”

“Well, my child, carry back the pattern, and show
her that it is so.”

“Indeed, mother, she spoke so cross to me, and looked
at me so, that I do not feel as if I could go back.”

“J will go for you, then,” said the kind Maria Ste-
phens, who had been sitting with Mrs. Ames while Ellen
was out. “I will take the patterns and shirts, and tell
her the exact truth about it: Iam not afraid of her.”
Maria Stephens was a cheerful, resolute, go-forward
little ‘body, and ready always to give a helping hand to
a neighbour in trouble. So she took the pattern and
shirts, and set out on her mission.

But poor Mrs, Ames, though she professed to take a.
right view of the matter, and was very earnest in show-
ing Ellen why she ought not to distress herself about it,
still felt a shivering sense of the hardness and unkind-
ness of the world coming over her. The bitter tears
would spring to her eyes, in spite of every effort to sup-
press them, as she sat mournfully gazing on the little
faded miniature before mentioned. “ When he was alive,
I never knew what poverty or trouble was,” was the
thought that often passed through her mind ; and how
many a poor forlorn one has thought the same!

Poor Mrs. Ames was confined to her bed for most of
that weck. The doctor gave absolute directions that she
should do nothing, and keep entirely quiet,—a direction
58 TIE SEMPSTRESS.,
cnn
very sensible indeed in the chamber of ease and compe-

tence, but hard to be observed in poverty and want.

What pains the kind and dutiful Ellen took that week
to make her mother feel easy! How often she replied to
her anxious questions, “ that she was quite well, or that
her head did not ache much;” and by various other
evasive expedients the child tried to persuade herself that
she was speaking the truth. And during the times her
mother slept, in the day or evening, she accomplished
one or two pieces of plain work, with the price of which
she expected to surprise her mother,

It was towards evening when Ellen took her finished
work to the elegant dwelling of Mrs. Page. “TI shall
get for this,” said she, “enough to pay for midther’s
wine and medicine.”

“This work is done very neatly,” said Mrs. Page,
‘“and here is some more, I should like to haye finished
in the same way.” |

Ellen looked up wistfully, hoping Mrs. Page was
going to pay her for the last work. But Mrs. Page was
only searching a drawer for a pattern, which she put
into Ellen’s hands, and after explaining how she wanted
her work done, dismissed her without saying a word
about the expected payment.

Poor Ellen tried two or three times, as she was going
out, to turn round and ask for it, and before she could
decide what to say she found herself in the street,

Mrs. Page was an amiable, kind-hearted woman, but
one who was so used to large sums of money, that she
did not realize how great an affair a small sum might


THE SEMPSTRESS. 59

eer LLL

seem to other persons. For this reason, when Ellen had
worked incessantly at the new work put into her hands,
that she might get the money for all together, she again
disappointed her in the payment.

“Tl send the money round to- -morrow,” said she,
when Ellen at last found courage to ask for it. But to-
morrow came, and Ellen was forgotten; and it was not»
till after one or two applications more that the small
sum was paid.

But these sketches are already long enough, and let
us Lasten to close them. Mrs. Ames found liberal
friends, who could appreciate and honour her integrity
of principle and loveliness of character, and by their
assistance she was raised to sce more prosperous days;
and she, and the delicate Ellen, and warm-hearted Mary,
were enabled to have a home and fireside of their own,
and to enjoy something like the return of their former
prosperity.

We have given these sketches, drawn from real life,
because we think there is, in general, too little consider-
ation on the part of those who give employment to those
in situations like the widow here described. The giving
af employment is a very important branch of charity,
inasmuch as it assists that class of the poor who are the

most deserving. ‘It should be looked on in this light,
‘ and the arrangements of a family be so made that a
suitable compensation can be given, and prompt and
cheerful payment be made, without the dread of trans-
gressing the rules of economy.

It is better to teach oursdaughters to do without ex-
60 THE SEMPSTRESS,
Oye peacnsennsenensensumeteesatesistnteinenes
pensive ornaments or fashionable clegancies; better even

to deny ourselves the pleasure of large donations or direct
subscriptions to. public charities, rather than to curiail
the small stipend of her “ whose candle gocth not out by
night,” and who labours with her needle for herself
and the helpless dear ones dependent on her exertions.
AUNT MARY. C1

eo A A LED T

AUNT MARY.

wee eee

TTome is possession at the highest cost—
Keen edge the soonest lost,
Yet who would welcome dearth
For fear his plenty should be famine cross’d ?
- Be God beside my hearth!
TOWNSEND.



oo sketching character is the mode, I too take up
my pencil, not to make you laugh, though peradven-
ture it may be to get you to sleep.

Iam now a tolerable old gentleman—an old bachelor,
moreover—and, what is more to the point, an unpretend-
ing and sober-minded one. Lest, however, any of the
ladies should take exceptions against me in the very
outset, I will merely remark, en passant, that a man can
sometimes become an old bachelor because he has too
much heart as well as too little.

Years ago—before any of my readers were born—I
was a little good-for-naught of a boy, of precisely that
unlucky kind who are always in everybody's way, and
always in mischief. I had, to watch over my uprearing,
a father and mother, and a whole army of older brothers
and sisters, My relatives bore a very great resemblance

$
62 AUNT MARY.



to other human beings, neither good angels nor the oppo-
site class, but, as mathematicians say, “in the mean
proportion.”

As I have before insinuated, I was a sort of family
scapegrace among them, and one on whose head all the
domestic trespasses were regularly visited, either by real
actual desert, or by imputation.

For this order of things there was, I confess, a very
solid and serious foundation, in the constitution of my
mind. Whether I was born under some cross-eyed
planet, or whether I was fairy-smitten in my cradle,
certain it is that I was, from the dawn of existence, a
sort of “ Murad the Unlucky ;” an out-of-time, out-of-
place, out-of-form sort of a boy, with whom nothing
prospered,

Who always left open doors in cold weather? it was
Henry. Who was sure to upset his coffee-cup at break-
fast, or to knock over his tumbler at dinner, or to pros-
trate salt-cellar, pepper-box, and mustard-pot, if he only
happened to move his arm? why, Henry. Who was
plate-breaker general for the family? it was Henry.
Who tangled mamma's silks and cottons, and tore up the
last newspaper for papa, or threw down old Phahbe’s
clothes-horse, with all her clean ironing thereupon? why,
Henry.

Now all this was no malice prepense in me, for I
solemnly believe that I was the best-natured boy inthe
world; but something was the matter with the attraction
of cohesion, or the attraction of gravitation—with’ the
general dispensation of matter around me, that; Jef me
AUNT MARY. 63

ee TENS
do what.I would, things would fall down, and break, or
be torn. and damaged, if I only came near them; and
my unluckiness seemed in exact proportion to my care-
fulness in any matter.

If anybody in the room with me had a headache, or
any manner of nervous irritability, which made it parti-
cularly necessary for others to be quict, and if I was in
an especial desire unto the same, I was sure, while
stepping around on tiptoe, to fall headlong over a chair,
which would give an introductory push to the shovel,
which would fall upon the tongs, which would animate
the poker, and altogether would set in action two or
three sticks of wood, and down they would come, with
just that hearty, sociable sort of racket, which showed
that they were disposed to make as much of the oppor-
tunity as possible.

In the same manner, everything that came into my
hand, or was at all connected with me, was sure to lose
by it. If I rejoiced in a clean apron in the morning, I
was sure to make a full-length prostration thereupon on
my way to school, and come home nothing better, but
rather worse. If I was sent on an errand, I was sure
either to lose my money in going, or my purchases in re-
turning ; and on these occasions my mother would often
comfort me with the reflection, that it was well that my
cars were fastened to my head, or I should lose them too.
Of course, I was a fair mark for the constant rebukes
and admonitions, not only of my parents, but of uncles,
aunts, cousins, and officious friends of every degree, who
never failed of some troublesome reproof.
64 AUNT MARY.

re

All this would have been very well if Nature had
not gifted me with a very unnecessary and uncomfort-
able capacity of féding, which, like refined ear for
music, is undesirable, because, in this world, one meets
with discord ninety-nine times, where it meets with har-



mony once. Much, therefore, as I furnished occasion to
be scolded at, I never became used to scolding, so that I
was just as much galled by it the forty-first time as the
first. ‘There was no such thing as philosophy in me; I had
just that unreasonable heart which is neither conformed
nor reconciled to the nature of things. I was timid, and
shrinking, and proud ; Iwas nothing to any one around
me butan awkward, unlucky boy ; nothing to my parents
but one of a haf dozen children, whose faces were to be
washed and stockings mended on Saturday afternoon. If
I was very sick, I had medicine and the doctor ; if I was
a little sick, I was exhorted unto patience; and if I
was sick at heart, I was left to prescribe for myself.

Now all this was very well; what should a child need
but meat, and drink, and room to play, and a school to
teach him reading and writing, and somebody to take care
‘of him when sick ? certainly nothing.

But the feelings of grown-up children exist in the
sninds of little ones oftener than is supposed; and I had,
even at this early day, the same keen sense of all that
touched the heart wrong ; the same longing for somre-
thing which should touch it aright ; thesame discontent
with latent, matter-of-course affection, and the same
craving for sympathy, which has been the unprofitable
fashion of this world in all ages. Aud no human being
AUNT MARY. 65

ncecssaaapaniatantemmmamtamennsnsasiaaiaiiliinnminnnemin
possessing such constitutionals has a better chance of
being made unhappy by them than the backward, unin-
teresting, wrong-doing child. We can all sympathise
to some extent with men and women; but how few can
go back to the sympathies of childhood ; can understand
the desolate insignificance of not being one of the grown-
up people; of being sent to bed, to be out of the way in
the evening, and to school, to be out of the way in the
morning ; of manifold similar grievances and Mistresses
which the child has no elocution to set forth, and the
grown person no imagination to conceive.

When I was seven years old, I was told one morning,
with considerable domestic acclamation, that aunt Mary
was coming to make us a visit ; and so, when the carriage
that brought her stopped at our door, I pulled off my
dirty apron, and ran in among the crowd of brothers and
sisters to see what was coming. I shall not describe her
first appearance, foras I think of her, 1 begin to grow
somewhat sentimental, in spite of my spectacles, and
might, perhaps, talk a little nonsense.

Perhaps every man, whether married or unmarried,
who has lived to the age of fifty or thereabout, has seen
some woman who, in his mind, is the woman in distinc-
tion from all others. She may not have been a relative ;
she may not have been a wife; she may simply have
shone on him from afar ; she may be remembered in the
distance of yearsas a star that is set, as music that is hush-
ed, as beauty and loveliness faded for ever ; but remem-
bered she is with interest, with fervour, with enthusiasm;
with all that heart can feel, and more than words can tell.

EB
66 AUNT MARY.

ee

To me there has been but one such, and that is she
whom I describe. Was she beautiful? youask. I also
will ask you one question: If an angel from heaven
should dwell in human form, and animate any human
face, would not that face be lovely? It might not be
beautiful, but would it not be lovely? She was not beau-
tiful except after this fashion.

How well I remember her, as she used sometimes to
sit thinkfng, with her head resting on her hand, her face
mild and placid, with a quiet October sunshine in her
blue eyes, and an ever-present smile over her whole
countenance. I remember the sudden sweetness of look
when any one spoke to her; the prompt attention, the
quick comprehension of things before you uttered them;
the obliging readiness to leave for you whatever she was
doing.

T'o those who mistake occasional pensiveness for melan-
choly, it might seem strange to say that my Aunt Mary
was always happy. Yet she was so. Her spirits never
rose to buoyancy, and never sunk to despondency. I
know that it is an article in the sentimental confession
of faith that such a character cannot be interesting.
For this impression there is some ground. The placidity
of a medium common-place mind is uninteresting, but
the placidity of a strong and well-governed one borders
on the sublime. Mautability of emotion characterizes
inferior orders of being; but strong self-control, when
guided by the principles of virtue and true religion,
preserves an even temperament in the well-regulated
mind. And while we gaze with wonder and admiration
AUNT MARY. 67



on the great general or statesman, ever at leisure to bestow
all his thoughts on the wants of others, there is some-
what of the same sublimity in the character of that
human being who has so quieted and governed the world
within, that nothing is left to absorb sympathy or distract
attention from those around.

Such a woman was my Aunt Mary. Her placidity
was not so much the result of temperament as of choice.
She had every susceptibility of suffering incident to the
noblest and most delicate construction of mind; but they
‘had been so directed, that instead of concentrating
thought on self, they had prepared her to understand and
feel for others.

She was, beyond all things else, a sympathetic person,
and her character, like the green in a landscape, was less
remarkable for what it was in itself than for its perfect
and beautiful harmony with all the colouring and shad-
ing around it.

Other women have had talents, others have been good;
but no woman that ever I knew possessed goodness and
talent in union with such an intuitive perception of feel-
ings, and such a faculty of instantaneous adaptation to
them. The most troublesome thing in this world is to
be condemned to the society of a person who can never
understand anything you say without you say the whole
of it, making your commas and periods as you go along;
and the most desirable thing in the world is to live with
& person who saves you all the trouble of talking, by
knowing just what you mean to say before you begin.

Something of this kind of talent I began to feel, to
68 AUNT MARY.



my great relief, when Aunt Mary came into the family.
I remember the very first evening, as she sat by the
hearth, surrounded by all the family, her eye glanced on
me with an expression that let me know she saw me;
and when the clock struck eight, and my mother pro-
claimed that it was my bedtime, my countenance fell as
I moved sorrowfully from the back of her rocking: chair,
and’ thought how many beautiful stories Aunt Mary
would tell her after I was gone to bed. She turned
towards me with such a look of real understanding, such
an evident insight into the case, that I went into banish-
ment with a lighter heart than ever I did before. How
‘very contrary is the obstinate estimate of the heart to
the rational estimate of worldly wisdom. Ave there not
some who can remember when one word, one look, or
even the withholding of a word, has drawn their heart
more to a person than all the substantial favours in the
world? By ordinary acceptation, substantial kindness
respects the necessaries of animal existence; while those
wants which are peculiar to mind, and will exist with it
for ever, by equally correct classification, are designated
as sentimental ones, the supply of which, though it will
excite more gratitude in fact, ought not in theory.
Before Aunt Mary had lived with us a month, I loved
her beyond anybody in the world, and a utilitaridn would
have been amused in ciphering out the amount of favours
which produced this result. It was a look—a word—a
smile; it was that she seemed pleased with my new kite;
that she rejoiced with me when I learned to spin a top;
that she alone seemed to estimate my proficiency in play-
AUNT MARY. 69



ing ball and marbles; that she never looked at all vexed
when I upset her workbox upon the floor; that she re-
ceived all my awkward gallantry and mal-adrozt help-
fulness as if it had: been in the best taste in the world;
that when she was sick, she insisted on letting me wait
on her, though I made my customary havock among the
pitchers and tumblers of her room, and displayed, through
my zeal to please, a more than ordinary share of insuf-
ficiency for the station. She also was the only person
that ever I conversed with, and I used to wonder how any-
body who could talk all about matters and things with
grown-up persons, could talk so sensibly about marbles,
and hoops, and skates, and all sorts of little-boy matters;
and I will say, by-the-by, that the same sort of specula-
tion has often occurred to the minds of older people in
connexion with her. She-knew the value of varied infor-
mation in making a woman, not a pedant, but a sympa-
thetic, companionable being, and such she was to almost
every class of mind '

She had, too, the faculty of drawing others up to her
level in conversation, so that I would often find myself
going on in most profound style while talking with her,
and would wonder, when I was through, whether I was
really a little boy still.

When she had enlightened us many months, the time
came for her to take leave, and she besought my mother
to give me to her for company. Ail the family wondered
what she could find to like in Henry; but if she did like
me, it was no matter, and so was the case disposed of.

From that time I dived with her—and there are some
70 AUNT MARY.

mRNA REND
persons who can make the word Zive signify much more
than it commonly does—and she wrought on my character
all those miracles which benevolent genius can work,
She quieted my heart, directed my feelings, unfolded my
mind, and educated me, not harshly, or by force, but as
the blessed sunshine educates the flower, into full and
perfect life; and when all that was mortal of her died to
this world, her words and deeds of unutterable love shed
a twilight around her memory that will fade only in the
brightness of heaven,
UNCLE TIM AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 71h



UNCLE TIM AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE,

—_—_—_-—

A friend indeed, nor less because he claims
A homely bluntness, more than meed of praise
For his benevolent deeds, and by his aims
At other’s good, his own true worth displays.
BRYANT.

p” you ever see the little village of Newbury? I

dare say you never did; for it was just one of
those out-of-the-way places where nobody ever came un-
less they came on purpose: a green little hollow, wedged
like a bird’s nest between half-a-dozen high hills, that
kept off the wind and kept out foreigners; so that the
little place was as straitly “sui generis” as if there were
not another in the world. The inhabitants were all of
that respectable old standfast family who make it a point
to be born, bred, married, die, and be buried all in the
self-same spot. There were just so many houses, and
just so many people lived in them ; and nobody ever
seemed to be sick, or to die either—at least while I was
there. The natives grew old till they could not grow
any older, and then they stood still, and dasted from
generation to generation,
72 UNCLE TIM

aaa

As to manners, morals, arts, and sciences, the people
in Newbury always went to their parties at three o’clock
in the afternoon, and came home before dark; always
stopped all work the minute the sun was down on Satur-
day night; always went to church on Sunday; hada
school-house with all the ordinary inconveniences ; were
in neighbourly charity with each,other; and were con-
tent with such things as they had—the best philosophy,
after all. Such was the place into which Master James
Benton made an irruption in the year eighteen hundred
and no matter what. Now this James is to be our hero,
and he is just the hero for a sensation—at least so you
would have thought, if you had been in Newbury the
week after his arrival. Master James was one of those
whole-hearted, energetic men, who rise in the world as
naturally as cork does in water. He possessed a great
share of that characteristic national trait denominated
acuteness, which signifies an ability to do everything
without trying, and to know everything without learning,
and to make more use of one’s ignorance than other
people do of their knowledge. This quality in James
was mingled with a great elasticity of animal spirits
and a buoyant cheerfulness of mind.

As to the personal appearance of our hero, we have
not much to say of it. There was a saucy frankness of
countenance, a knowing roguery of eye, and a joviality
of demeanour, that was wonderfully captivating, espe-
cially to the ladies.

It is true that Master James had an uncommonly com-
fortable opinion of himself, a full faith that there was
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 73

—_--



nothing in creation that he could not learn and could
notdo; and this faith was maintained with an abound-
ing and triumphant joyfulness, that fairly carried your
sympathies along with him, and made you feel quite as
much delighted with his qualifications and prospects as
he felt himself. There are two kinds of self-sufficiency;
one is amusing, and the other is provoking. His was the
amusing kind. It seemed, in truth, to be only the buoy-=
ancy and overflow of a vivacious mind, delighted with
everything that is delightful, in himself or others. He
was always ready to magnify his own praise, but quite as
ready to exalt his neighbour, if the channel of discourse
‘yan that way: his own perfections being more completely
within his knowledge, he rejoiced in them more con-
stantly ; but, if those of any one else came within the
same range, he was quite as much astonished and edified
as if they had been his own.

Master James, at the time of his transit to the town
of Newbury, was only eighteen years of age, so that it
was difficult to say which predominated in him most,
the boy or the man. The belief that he could, and the
determination that he would be something in the world,
had caused him to abandon his home, and, with all his
worldly effects tied in a blue cotton pocket-hankerchief,
to proceed to seek his fortune in Newbury. And never
did stranger rise to promotion with more unparalleled
rapidity, or boast a greater plurality of employment.
He figured as schoolmaster all the week, and as chorister
on Sundays, and taught singing and reading in the
evenings, besides studying Latin and Greek with the
74 UNCLE TIM

minister, nobody knew when; thus fitting for college,
while he seemed to be doing everything else in the world
besides,

James understood every art and craft of popularity,
and made himself mightily at home in all the chimney
corners of the region round about ; knew the geography
of everybody’s cider-barrel and apple-bin, helping him-
self and every one else therefrom with all bountifulness;
rejoicing in the good things of this life, devouring the
old ladies’ doughnuts and apple-pies with most flattering
appetite, and appearing equally to relish everybody and
thing that came in his way.

The degree and versatility of his acquirements were
truly wonderful. Ie knew all about arithmetic and
history, and all about catching squirrels and planting
corn; made poetry and hoe handles with equal celerity;
wound yarn and took out grease spots for old ladies, and
made nosegays and knick-knacks for young ones. In

short, Master James moved on through the place
“ Victorious,
Happy and glorious,”

welcomed and privileged by everybody in every place;
and when he had told his last ghost-story, and fairly
flourished himself out of doors at the close of a long
winter’s evening, you might see the hard face of the
good man of the house still phosphorescent with his de-
parting radiance, and hear him exclaim, in a paroxysm
of admiration, that “ James really did beat all—that
he ‘was certainly a marvellous fellow!”

It was wonderfully contrary to the buoyant activity of
Master James’s mind to keepa school. He had, more-


AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 75



over, so much of the boy and the rogue in his composi-
tion, that he could not be strict with the iniquities of the
curly pates under his charge; and when he saw how de-
terminedly every little heart was boiling over with mis-
chief and motion, he felt in his soul more disposed to
join in and help them to a frolic, than to lay justice to the
line, as was meet. ‘This would have made a sad case,
had it not been that the activity of the master’s mind
communicated itself to his charge, just as the reaction of
one brisk little spring will fill a manufactory with mo-
tion; so that there was more of an impulse towards study
in the golden good-natured day of James Benton, than
in the time of all that went before or came after him.

But, when “school was out,” James’s spirits foamed
over as naturally as a tumbler of soda-water, and he
could jump over benches and burst out of doors with as
much rapture as the veriest little elf in his company.
Then you might have seen him stepping homeward with
a most felicitous expression of countenance, occasionally
reaching his hand through the fence for a bunch of cur-
rants, or over it after a flower, or stopping to pay his
devoirs to Aunt This or Mistress That—for James well
knew the importance of the “powers that be,” and
always kept the sunny side of the old ladies.

We shall not answer for James’s general flirtations,
which were sundry and manifold; for he had just the
kindly heart that fell in love with everything in feminine
shape that came in his way, and if he had not. been
blessed with an equal faculty for falling out again, we do
not know what ever would have become of him, But at
76 UNCLE TIM

length he came into an abiding captivity, and it is quite
time that he should; for, having devoted thus much ~
space to the illustration of our hero, it is fit we should do
something in behalf of our heroine; and, therefore, we
must beg the reader’s attention while we draw a dia-
gram or two that will assist him in gaining a right idea
of her.

Do you see yonder brown house, with its broad roof
sloping almost to the ground on one side, and a great,
unsupported, sun-bonnet of a piazza shooting out over
the front door? You must often have noticed it; you
have seen its tall well-sweep, relieved against the clear
evening sky, or observed the feather beds and bolsters
lounging out of its chamber-windows on a still summer
morning ; you recollect its gate, that swung with a chain
and a great stone; its pantry-window, latticed with little
brown slabs, and looking out upon a forest of bean-poles.
You remember the zephyrs that used to play among its
pea-brush, and shake the long tassels of its corn-patch,
and how vainly any zephyr might essay to perform simi-
lar flirtations with the considerate cabbages that were
solemnly vegetating near by. Then there was the whole
neighbourhood of purple-leaved beets and feathery pars-
nips; there were the billows of gooseberry bushes rolled
up by the fence, interspersed with rows of quince-trees ;
and far off in one corner was one little patch penuriously
devoted to ornament, which flamed with marigolds, pop-
pies, snappers, and four-o’clocks.

That is the dwelling of Uncle Timothy Griswold.
Uncle Tim, as he was commonly called, had a character
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACKE. 77



LLL

that a painter would sketch for its lights and contrasts
rather than its symmetry. He was a chestnut burr,
abounding with briers without and with substantial
goodness within. He had the strong-grained practical
sense, the calculating worldly wisdom of his class of peo-
ple in New England : he had, too, a kindly heart, but the
whole strata of his character were crossed by a vein of
surly petulance, that, half-way between joke and earnest,
coloured everything that he said and did.

If you asked a favour of Uncle Tim, he generally kept
you arguing half-an-hour, to prove that you really
needed it, and to tell you that he could not all the while
be troubled with helping one body or another, all which
time you might observe him regularly making his prepa-
rations to grant your request, and see, by an odd glimmer
of his eye, that he was preparing to let you hear the cons
clusion of the whole matter, which was, “ Well, well—I
guess—I ’spose I must, at least ” so off he would go and
work while the day lasted, and then wind up with a fare-
well exhortation, “not to be callin’ on your neighbours
when you could get along without.” If any of Uncle
Tim’s neighbours were in any trouble, he was always at
hand to tell them “that they shouldn’t a’ done so;” that
“it was strange they couldn’t had more sense ;’ and then
to close his exhortations by labouring more diligently
than any to bring them out of their difficulties, groaning
in spirit, meanwhile, that folks would make people so
much trouble.

“Uncle Tim, father wants to know if you will lend
him your hoe to-day ?” says a little boy, making his way
across a corn-field.
78 UNCLE TIM



“ Why don’t your father use his own hoe ?”

“ Ours is broke.”

“Broke! How came it broke ?”

“T broke it yesterday, trying to hit a squirrel.”

“What business had you to be hittin’ squirrels with a
hoe? say?”

“ But father wants to borrow yours.”

“Why don’t he have that mended? It’s a great pester
to have everybody usin’ a body’s things.”

“ Well, I can borrow one somewhere else, I suppose,”
says the suppliant. After the boy has stumbled across
the ploughed ground and is fairly over the fence, Uncle
Tim calls,

“ Halloo, there, you little rascal! what are you goin’
off without the hoe for ?”’

“T didn’t know as you meant to lend it.”

“T did’nt say I wouldn’t, did I? Here, come and
take it—stay, ll bring it; and do tell your father not to
be a-lettin’ you hunt squirrels with his hoes next time.”

Uncle Tim’s household consisted ,of Aunt Sally, his
wife, and an only son and daughter; the former, at the
time our story begins, was at a neighbouring literary in-
stitution. Aunt Sally was precisely as clever, as easy to
be eutreated, and kindly in externals, as her helpmate
was the reverse. She was one of those respectable, plea-
sant old ladies whom you might often have met on the
way to church on a Sunday, equipped with a great fan
and a psalm-book, and carrying some dried orange-peel
or a staik of fennel, to give to the children if they were
sleepy in meeting. She was as cheerful and domestic as
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 79

eee emanate tite:
the tea-kettle that sung by her kitchen fire, and slipped
along among Uncle Tim’s angles and peculiarities as if
there never was anything the matter in the world; and
the same mantle of sunshine seemed to have fallen on
Miss Grace, her only daughter.

Pretty in her person and pleasant in her ways, en-
dowed with native self-possession and address, lively and
chatty, having a mind and a will of her own, yet good-hu-
moured withal, Miss Grace was a universal favourite. It
would have puzzled a city lady to understand how Grace,
who never was out of Newbury in her life, knew the way
to speak, and act, and behave, on all occasions, exactly as
if she had been taught how. She was just one of those
wild flowers which you may sometimes see waving its
little head in the woods, and looking so civilized and gar-
den-like, that you wonder if it really did come up and
grow there by nature. She was an adept in all household
concerns, and there was something amazingly pretty in
her energetic way of bustling about, and “ putting things
to rights.” Like many other damsels, she had a longing
after the tree of knowledge, and having exhausted the
literary fountains of a district school, she fell to reading
whatsoever came in her way. True, she had but little to
read; but what she perused she had her own thoughts
upon, so that a person of information, in talking with
her, would feel a constant wondering pleasure to find
that she had so much more to say of this, that, and the
other thing, than he expected.

Uncle Tim, like every one else, felt the magical bright-
ness of his daughter, and was delighted with her praises,
80 UNCLE TIM

el

as might be discerned by his often finding occasion to
remark, that “he didn’t see why the boys need to be all
the time a’ comin’ to see Grace, for she was nothing so
extror’nary, after all.” About all matters and things at
home she generally had her own way, while Uncle Tim
would scold and give up with a regular good grace that
was quite creditable.

“ Father,” says Grace, “I want to have a party next
week.”

“ You sha’nt go to havin’ your parties, Grace. I always
have to eat bits and ends a fortnight after you have one,
and I won’t have it so.” And so Uncle Tim walked out,
and Aunt Sally and Miss Grace proceeded to make the
cake and pies for the party.

When Uncle Tim came home, he saw a long array of
pies and rows of cakes on the kitchen table.

“ Grace — Grace — Grace, I say! What is all this
here flummery for ?”

“Why, it is ¢o eat, father,” said Grace, with a good-
natured look of consciousness.

Uncle Tim tried his best to look sour; but his visage
began to wax comical as he looked at his merry daughter,
so he said nothing, but quietly sat down to his dinner.

“Father,” said Grace, after dinner, “we shall want
two more candlesticks next week.”

“Why! can’t you have your party with what you’ve
got ?”

“No, father, we want two more.”

“T can’t afford it, Ginee~tieee s no sort of use on’t—
and you sha’nt have any.’’
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. §1

tae

“ Oh, father, now do,” said Grace.

«“ I won’t, neither,” said Uncle Tim, as he sallied out
of the house, and took the road to Robert Morris’s store.

In half-an-hour he returned again, and fumbling in
his pocket, and drawing forth a candlestick, levelled it at
Grace.

«“ There’s your candlestick.”

“ But, father, I said I wanted two.”

“Why ! can’t you make one do ?”

“No, I can’t ; I must have two.”

“ Well, then, there’s t’other ; and here's a fol. ave
for you to tie round your neck.” So saying, he bolted
for the door, and took himself off with all speed. It was
much after this fashion that matters commonly went on
in the brown house.

But, having tarried long on the way, we must proceed
with the main story.

James thought Miss Grace was a glorious girl, and as
to what Miss Grace thought of Master James, perhaps it
‘would not have been developed, had she not been called
to stand on the defensive for him with Uncle Tim. For,
from the time that the whole village of Newbury began
to be wholly given unto the praise of Master James,
Uncle Tim set his face as a flint against him, from the
laudable fear of following the multitude. He therefore
made conscience of stoutly gainsaying everything that
was said in his favour, which, as James was in high
favour with Aunt Sally, he had frequent opportunities
to do.

So, when Miss Grace perceived that Uncle Tim did not

| B
82 UNCLE TIM
setae
like our hero as much as he ought to do, she, of course,
was bound to like him well enough to make up for it.
Certain it is that they were remarkably happy in finding
opportunities of being acquainted; that James waited
on her, as a matter of course, from singing-school; that
he volunteered making a new box for her geranium on
an improved plan; and above all, that he was remarkably
particular in his attentions to Aunt Sally, a stroke of
policy which showed that James had a natural genius
for this sort of matters. James had a flute, and was par-
ticularly fond of it, because he had learned to play on it
by intuition ; and on the decease of the old pitchpipe,
which was slain by a fall from the gallery, he took the
liberty to introduce the flute in its place. For this and
other sins, and for the good reasons above named, Uncle
Tim’s countenance was not towards J ames, neither could
he be moved to him-ward by any manner of means.

To all Aunt Sally’s good words and kind speeches, he had
only to say that “he did’nt like him; that he hated to
see him a-manifesting and glorifying therein. the front
gallery Sundays, and a-acting everywhere as if he was
master of all; he didn’t like it, and he wouldn’t.” But
our hero was no whit cast down or discomfited by the
malcontent aspect of Uncle Tim.

“Why, James,” said his companion and chief coun-
sellor, “ do you think Grace likes you ?”

“I don’t know,” said our hero, with a comfortable
appearance of certainty.

“ But you can’t get her, James, if Uncle Tim is cross
about it,”


AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 83



“Fudge! I can make Uncle Tim like me, if I havea
mind to try.”

“ Well, then, Jim, you'll have to give up that flute of
yours, I tell you, now.”

“ Fa, sol, la—I can make him like me, and my flute
too.”

“ Why, how will you do it?”

“ Oh, I'll work it,” said our hero.

“ Well, Jim, I tell you, now, you don’t know Uncle
Tim if you say so.”

“T do know Uncle Tim, though, better than most
folks ; he is no more cross than I am; you have nothing
to do but make him think he is in his own way when he
is in yours,—that is all.”

“ Well,” said the other, “ but, you see, I don’t believe
it.”

“ And [ll bet you a gray squirrel that Pll go there
this very evening, and get him to like me and my flute
both,” said James.

Accordingly, the late sunshine of that afternoon shone
full on the yellow buttons of James as he proceeded to
the place of conflict. It was a bright, beautiful evening. |
A thunder-storm had just cleared away, and the silver
clouds lay rolled up in masses around the setting sun;
the rain-drops were sparkling and winking to each other
over the ends of the leaves, and all the bluebirds and
robins, breaking forth into song, made the little green
valley as merry as a musical box.

James’s soul was always overflowing with that kind of
poetry which consists in feeling unspeakably happy; and
84 UNCLE TIM

sans omseonoarramamnnsioemunoanigmonnianaammamanmmenae,

it is not to be wondered at, considering where he was
going, that he should feel in a double ecstacy on the
present occasion. He stepped gaily along, occasionally
springing over a fence to the right, to see whether the
rain had swollen the trout-brook, or to the left, to notice
the ripening of Mr. Somebody’s watermelons—for James
always had an eye on all his neighbours’ matters as well
as his own.

In this way he proceeded till he arrived at the picket-
fence that marked the commencement of Uncle Tim’s
ground. Here he stopped to consider. Just then, four
or five sheep walked up, and began also to consider a
loose picket, which was hanging just ready to drop off ;
and James began to look at the sheep. “ Well, mister,”
said he, as he observed the leader judiciously drawing
himself through the gap, “in with you—just what I
wanted ;” and, having waited a moment, to ascertain
that all the company were likely to follow, he ran with
all haste towards the house, and swinging open the gate,
pressed all breathless to the door.

“Uncle Tim, there are four or five sheep in your
garden.” Uncle Tim dropped his whetstone and scythe.

“T’ll drive them out,” said our hero ; and with that
he ran down the garden alley, and madea furious descent
on the enemy; bestirring himself, as Bunyan says,
“lustily and with good courage,” till every sheep had
skipped out much quicker than it skipped in; and then
springing over the fence, he seized a great stone, and
nailed on the picket so effectually that no sheep could
possibly encourage the hope of getting in again. This
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE, 85
cennaeonceasisiiiitaiaatermemarapaaiciainanic es iano
was all the work of a minute; and he was back again,
but so exceedingly out of breath that it was necessary
for him to stop a moment and rest. himself. . Uncle Tim
looked ungraciously satisfied.

“ What under the canopy set you to scampering so?”
said he; “TI could a’ driv’ out them critturs myself!”

“Tf you are at all particular about driving them out
yourself, I can let them in again,” said James,

Uncle Tim looked at him with an odd sort of twinkle
in the corner of his eye.

“°Spose I must ask you to walk in,” said he.

“Much obliged,” said James, “but I am in a great
hurry.” So saying, he started in very business-like
fashion towards the gate.

“You'd better just stop a minute.”

“Can’t stay a minute.”

“T don’t see what possesses you to be all the while in
sich a hurry ; a body would think you had all creation
on your shoulders !”

“Just my situation, Uncle Tim,” said James, swing-
ing open the gate.

“Well, at any rate, have a drink of cider, can’t ye?”
said Uncle Tim, who was now quite engaged to have his
own way in the case.

James found it convenient to accept this invitation,
and Uncle Tim was twice as good-natured as if he had
stayed in the first of the matter.

Once fairly forced into the premises, James thought
fit to forget his long walk and excess of business, espe-
cially as about that moment Aunt Sally and Miss Grace
86 UNCLE TIM



returned from an afternoon call. You may be sure that
the last thing these respectable ladies looked for was to
find Uncle Tim and Master James téte-d-téte over a pit-
cher of cider; and when, as they entered, our hero
looked up with something of a mischievous air, Miss
Grace, in particular, was so puzzled that it took her at
least a quarter of an hour to untie her bonnet strings.
But James stayed and acted the agreeable to perfection.
First he must needs go down into the garden to look at
Uncle Tim’s wonderful cabbages,and then he promenaded
all round the corn-patch, stopping every few moments
and looking up with an appearance of great gratifica-
tion, as if he had never seen such corn in his life ; and
then he examined Uncle Tim’s favourite apple-tree with
an expression of wonderful interest.

“T never!” he broke forth, having stationed himself
against the fence opposite it; “ what kind of an apple-
tree is that ?”’

“It’s a bell-flower, or somethin’ another,” said Uncle
Tim.

“Why, where did you get it? I never saw such
apples!” said our hero, with his eyes still fixed on the
tree.

Uncle Tim pulled up a stalk or two of weeds and threw
them over the fence, just to show that he did not care
anything about the matter, and then he came up and
stood by James.

“ Nothin’ so remarkable, as I know on,” said he.

Just then, Grace came to say that supper was ready,
Once seated at a table, it was astonishing to see the per-
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 87



een
fect and smiling assurance with which our hero continued
his addresses to Uncle Tim. It sometimes goes a great
way towards making people like us, to take it for granted
that they do already, and upon this principle James
proceeded. He talked, laughed, told stories, and joked
with the most fearless assurance, occasionally seconding
his words by looking Uncle Tim in the face with a coun-
tenance so full of good-will as would have melted any
snow-drift of prejudices in the world.

James also had one natural accomplishment, more
courtier-like than all the diplomacy in Europe, and that
was, the gift of feeling a real interest for anybody in five
nrinutes; so that if he began to please in jest, he gene-
rally ended in earnest. With great simplicity of mind,
he had a natural tact for seeing into others, and watched
their motions with the same delight with which a child
gazes at the wheels and springs of a watch, to “see what
it will do.”

The rough exterior and latent kindness of Uncle Tim
were quite a spirit-stirring study ; and when tea was
over, as he and Grace happened to be standing together
in the front door, he broke forth,

“I do really like your father, Grace 1”

“Do you?” said Grace.

“Yes, I do. He has something in him, and I like
him all the better for having to fish it out.”

“Well, I hope you will make him like you,” said
Grace, unconsciously ; and then she stopped, and looked
a little abashed.

James was too well bred to see this, or look.as if Grace
88 UNCLE TIM



meant any more than she said—a kind of breeding not
always attendant on more fashionable polish—so he only
answered,

“J think I shall, Grace! though I doubt whether I
can get him to own it.”

“He is the kindest man that ever was,” said Grace ;
“ and he always acts asif he was ashamed of it.”

James turned a little away, and looked at the bright
evening sky, which was glowing like a calm golden sea ;
and over it was the silver new moon, with one little star
to hold the candle for her. He shook some bright drops
off from a rosebush near by, and watched to see them
shine as they fell, while Grace stood very quietly waiting
for him to speak again. |

“ Grace,” said he, at last, “Iam going to college this
autumn.”

“So you told me yesterday,” said Grace.

James stooped down over Grace’s geranium, and began
to busy himself with pulling off all the dead leaves, re-
marking in the meanwhile,

“ And if I do get Aim to like me, Grace, will you like
me too ?”

“I like you now very well,” said Grace.

“Come, Grace, you know what I mean,” said James,
looking steadfastly at the top of the apple-tree.

“Well, I wish then you would understand what I mean,
without my saying any more about it,” said Grace.

“Oh! to be sure I will,” said our hero, looking up
with a very intelligent air; and so, as Aunt Sally would
say, the matter was settled, with “ no words about it.”

’
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. &9







-—--—-

Now shall we narrate how our hero, as he saw Uncle
Tim approaching the door, had the impudence to take
out his flute, and put the parts together, screwing it
round and fixing it with great composure ?

“Uncle Tim,” said he, looking up, “this is the best
flute that ever I saw.”

“JT hate them tooting critturs,” said Uncle Tim,
snappishly.

“J declare! I wonder how you can!” said James,
“for I do think they exceed—”

So saying, he put the flute to his mouth, and ran up
and down a long flourish.

“here! what think you of that?” said he, looking
in Uncle Tim’s face with much delight.

Uncle Tim turned and marched into the house, but
soon faced to the right-about and came out again, for
James was fingering “ Yankee Doodle”—that appropriate
national air for the descendants of the Puritans.

Uncle Tim’s patriotism began to bestir itself ; and now,
if it had been anything, as he said, but “ that ‘ere flute”
—as it was, he looked more than once at James's fingers.

“ow under the sun cowld you learn to do that?”
said he.

“ Oh, it’s easy enough,” said James, proceeding with
another tune; and, having played it through, he stopped
2 moment to examine the joints of his flute, and in the
mean time addressed Uncle Tim; “ Yes, can’t think how
grand this is for pitching tunes—I always pitch the tunes
Sunday with it.”

“Yes, but I don’t think it’s a right and fit instrument
for the Lord’s house,” said Uncle Tim.
an UNCLS TIM

“ Why not? It is only a kind of a long pitchpipe,
you see,” said James; “ and, seeing the old one is broken,
and this will answer, I don’t see why it is not better than
nothing.”

“‘ Why, yes, it may be better than nothing,” said Uncle
Tim; “but, as 1 always tell Grace and my wife, it aint
the right kind of instrument, after all; it aint solemn.”

“Solemn!” said James; “that is according as you use
it : see here, now.”

So saying, he struck up Old Hundred, and proceeded
through it with great perseverance.

“ There, now !” said he.

“ Well, well, I don’t know but it is,’ said Uncle Tim;
* but, as I said at first, I don’t like the look of it in
meetin’.”

“ But yet you really think it is better than nothing,”
said James, “for you see I could’nt pitch my tunes
without it,”

“‘ May be ’tis,” said Uncle Tim; “ but that isn’t sayin’
much.”

This, however, was enough for Master James, who soon
after departed, with his flute in his pocket, and Grace’s
last words in his heart; soliloquizing as he shut the
gate, “ There, now, I hope Aunt Sally won't go to praising
me; for, just so sure as she does, I shall have it all to do
over again,”

James was right in his apprehension. Uncle Tim could
be privately converted, but not brought to open con-
fession; and when, the next morning, Aunt Sally re-
marked, in the kindness of her heart,

* Well, [always knew you would come to like James,”
AMD HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 91

canna
Uncle Tim only responded, “* Who said I did like him ?”

“ But I’m sure you seemed to like him last night.”

“ Why, I couldn’t turn him out 0’ doors, could1? I
don’t think nothin’ of him but what I always did.”

But it was to be remarked that Uncle Tim contented
himself at this time with the mere general avowal,
without running it into particulars, as was formerly his
wont. It was evident that the ice had begun to melt,
but it might have been a long time in dissolving, had not
collateral incidents assisted.

It so happened that, about this time, George Griswold,
the only son before referred to, returned to his native
village, after having completed his theological studies at
a neighbouring institution. It is interesting to mark the
gradual development of mind and heart, from the time
that the white-headed, bashful boy quits the country
village for college, to the period when he returns, a
formed and matured man, to notice how gradually the
rust of early prejudices begins to cleave from him—how
his opinions, like his handwriting, pass from the cramped
and limited forms of a country school into that confirmed
and characteristic style which is to mark the man for life.
In George this change was remarkably striking. He was
endowed by nature with uncommon acuteness of feeling
and fondness for reflection: qualities as likely as any to
render a child backward and uninteresting in early life.

When he left Newbury for college, he was a taciturn
and apparently phlegmatic boy, only evincing sensibility
by blushing, and looking particularly stupefied whenever
anybody spoke to him. Vacation after vacation passed,
92 UNCLE TIM

and he returned more and more an altered being ; and he
who once shrunk from the eye of the deacon, and was
ready to sink if he met the minister, now moved about
among the dignitaries of the piaae with all the composure
of a superior being.

It was only to be regretted that, while the mind im-
proved, the physical energies declined, and that every
visit to his home found him paler, thinner, and less pre-
pared in body for the sacred profession to which he had
devoted bimself. But now he was returned, a minister—
a real minister, with a right to stand in the pulpit and
preach ; and whata joy and glory to Aunt Sally—and to
Uncle Tim, if he were not ashamed to own it.

The first Sunday after he came, it was known far and
near that George Griswold was to preach; and never was
a more ready and expectant audience.

As the time for reading the first psalm approached,
you might see the white-headed men turning their faces
attentively towards the pulpit; the anxious and expect-
ant old women, with their little black bonnets, bent
forward to see him rise. ‘There were the children look-
ing, because everybody else looked ; there was Uncle Tim
in the front pew, his face considerately adjusted ; there
was Aunt Sally, seeming as pleased as a mother could
seem ; and Miss Grace, lifting her sweet face to her
brother, like a flower to the sun; there was our friend
James in the front gallery, his joyous countenance a littie
touched with sobriety and expectation: in short, a more
embarrassingly attentive audience never greeted the first
effort of a young minister. Under these circumstances,
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 93



there was something touching in the fervent self-forget-
fulness which characterised the first exercises of this
morning—something which moved every onein the house.

The devout poetry of his prayer, rich with the oriental-
ism of Scripture, and eloquent with the expression of
strong yet chastened emotion, breathed over his audience
like music, hushing every one to silence, and beguiling
every one to feeling. Inthe sermon there was the strong
intellectual nerve, the constant occurrence of argument
and statement, which distinguishes 2 New-England dis-
course ; but it was touched with life by the intense, yet
half-subdued feeling with which he seemed to utter it.

When the services were over, the congregation dis-
persed with the air of people who had fel¢ rather than
heard ; and all the criticism that followed was similar to
that of old Deacon Hart—an upright, shrewd man—
who, as he lingered a moment at the church door, turned
and gazed with unwonted feeling at the young preacher.

“ He’s a blessed cre’tur !” said he, the tears actually
making their way to his eyes; “I han’t been so near
heaven this many a day. He’sa blessed cre’tur of the
Lord —that’s my mind about him!”

As for our friend James, he was at first sobered, then
deeply moved, and at last wholly absorbed by the dis-
course; and it was only when meeting was over that he
began to think where he really was.

With all his versatile activity, James had a greater
depth of mental capacity than he was himself aware of,
and he began to feel a sort of electric affinity for the
mind that had touched him in a way so new; and when
94 UNCLE TIM



he saw the mild minister standing at the foot of the
pulpit stairs, he made directly towards him.

“I do want to hear more from you,” said he, with a
face full of earnestness; “ may I walk home with you?”

“Tt isa long and warm walk,” said the young minister,
smiling.

“Qh, I don’t care for that, if it does not trouble you,”
said James; and leave being gained, you might have
seen them slowly passing along under the trees, James
pouring forth all the floods of inquiry which the sudden
impulse of his mind had brought out, and supplying his
guide with more questions and problems for solution
than he could have gone through with in a month.

“T cannot answer all your questions now,” said he, as
they stopped at Uncle Tim’s gate.

“Well, then, when will you?” said James, eagerly.
“ Let me come home with you to-night ?”

The minister smiled assent, and James departed so full
of new thoughts, that he passed Grace without even see-
ing her. From that time a friendship commenced be-
tween the two which was a beautiful illustration of the
affinities of opposites. It was like a friendship between
morning and evening—all freshness and sunshine on one
side, and all gentleness and peace on the other.

The young minister, worn by long-continued ill-health,
by the fervency of his own feelings, and the gravity of
his own reasonings, found pleasure in the healthful buoy-
ancy of a youthful, unexhausted mind, while James felt
himself sobered and made better by the moonlight trau-
quillivty of his friend. It is one mark of a superior mind


AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 95



to understand and be influenced by the superiority of
others, and this was the case with James. The ascen-
dency which his new friend acquired over him was un-
limited, and did more in a month towards consolidating
and developing his character, than all the four years
course of a college. Our religious habits are likely
always to retain the impression of the first seal which
stamped them, and in this case it was a peculiarly happy
one. ‘The calmness, the settled purpose, the mild deyo-
tion of his friend, formed a just alloy to the energetic
and reckless buoyancy of James’s character, and awakened
in him a set of feelings without which the most vigorous
mind must be incomplete.

The effect of the ministrations of the young pastor
in awaking attention to the subjects of his calling in the
village, was marked, and of a kind which brought plea-
sure to his own heart. But, like all other excitement, it
tends to exhaustion, and it was not long before he sen-
sibly felt the decline of the powers of life. To the best-
regulated mind there is something bitter in the relin-
quishment of projects for which we have been long and
laboriously preparing, and there is something far more
bitter in crossing the long-cherished expectations of
friends. All this George felt. He could not bear to look
on his mother, hanging on his words and following his
steps with eyes of almost childish delight—on his sin-
gular father, whose whole earthly ambition was bound
up' in his success, and think how soon the “candle of
their old age” must be put out. When he returned
from a successful effort, it was painful to see the old man,
96 UNCLE TIM



so evidently delighted, and yet so anxious to conceal his
triumph.

If George was engaged in argument with any one else,
he would sit by, with his head bowed down, looking out
from under his shaggy eye-brows with a shamefaccd satis-
faction very unusual withhim. Expressions of affection
from the naturally gentle are not half so touching as
those which are forced out from the hard-favoured and
severe; and George was affected, even to pain, by the
evident pride and regard of his father.

“ He never said so much to anybody before,” thought
he, “ and what will he do if I die?”

In such thoughts as these Grace found her brother
engaged one still autumn morning, as he stood leaning
against the garden fence.

What are you solemnizing here for, this bright day,
brother George ?”’ said she, as she bounded down the alley,

The young man turned, and looked on her happy face
with a sort of twilight smile.

“ How happy you are, Grace !”

“To be sure Iam! and you ought to be too, because
you are better.”

“Tam happy, Grace—that is, I hope I shall be.”

“ You are sick, I know you are,” said Grace; “ you
look worn out! Oh, I wish your heart could spring once,
as mine does,”

“Tam not well, dear Grace, and I fear I never shall
be,” said he, turning away, and fixing his eyes on the
fading trees opposite.

“ Oh, George ! dear George! don’t, don’t say that: you'll
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE, 97

break all our hearts,” said Grace, with tears in her own
eyes.

“ Yes, but it is true, sister: I do not feel it on my own
account so much as—However,” he added, “it will all
be the same in heaven.”

It was but a week after this that a violent cold has-
tened the progress of debility into a confirmed malady.
He sunk very fast. Aunt Sally, with the self-deceit of
a fond and cheerful heart, thought every day that “he
would be better,” and Uncle Tim resisted conviction,
with all the obstinate pertinacity of his character, while
the sick man felt that he had not the heart to undeceive
them.

James was now at the house every day, exhausting all
his energy and invention in the case of his friend ; and
any one who had seen him in his hours of recklessness
and glee, could scarcely recognise him as the being
whose step was so careful, whose eye so watchful, whose
voice and touch were so gentle, as he moved around the
sick-bed. But the same quickness which makes a mind
buoyant in gladness, often makes it gentlest and most
sympathetic in sorrow.

It was now nearly morning in the sick-room. George
had been restless and feverish all night, but towards day
he fell into a light slumber, and James sat by his side,
almost holding his breath lest he should waken him. It
was yet dusk, but the sky was brightening with a so-
lemn glow, and the stars were beginning to disap-
pear; all, save the bright and morning one, which,
standing alone in the east, looked tenderly through

@
98 UNCLE TIM



the casement, like the eye of our heavenly Father,
watching over us when all earthly friendships are
fading.

George awgke with a placid expression of counte-.
nance, and fixing his eyes on the brightening sky, mur-
mured faintly,

“The sweet, immortal morning sheds
Its blushes round the spheres.”

A moment after, a shade passed over his face; he
pressed his fingers over his eyes, and the tears dropped
silently on his pillow.

“George! dear George!” said James, bending over him.

“It’s my friends—it’s my father—my mother,” said
he, faintly.

*‘ Jesus Christ will watch over them,” said James,
soothingly.

“ Oh, yes, I know He will; for He loved his own which
were in the world ; He loved them unto the end. But
I am dying—and before I have done any good.”

“ Oh, do not say so,” said James ; “ think, think what
you have done; if only for me/ God bless you for it!
God will bless you for it; it will follow you to heaven ;
it will bring me there. Yes, I will do as you have taught
me! I will give my life, my soul, my whole strength to
it; and then you will not have lived in vain.”

George smiled and looked upward; “his face was as
that of an angel ;” and James, in his warmth, continued:

“It is not J alone who can say this: we all bless you;
every one in this place blesses you; you will be had in
everlasting remembrance by some hearts here, I know.”
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE, 99

“ Bless God!” said George.

“We do,” said James. “I bless him that I ever
knew you; we all bless him, and we love you, and shall
_ for ever.”

The glow that had kindled over the pale face of the
invalid again faded as he said,

“But, James, I must, I ought to tell my father and
mother ; I ought to, and how can I?”

At that moment the door opened, and Uncle Tim made
his appearance. He seemed struck with the paleness of
George’s face; and, coming to the side of the bed, he
felt his pulse, and laid his hand anxiously on his fore-
head, and clearing his voice several times, inquired “ if
he didn’t feel a little better.”

“ No, father,” said George ; then taking his hand, he
looked anxiously in his face, and seemed to hesitate a
moment, “ Father,’ he began, “you know that we
ought to submit to God.”

There was something in his expression at this moment
which flashed the truth into the old man’s-mind; he
dropped his son’s hand with an exclamation of agony,
and, turning quickly, left the room.

“Father! father!” said Grace, trying to rouse him, as
he stood with his arms folded by the kitchen window,

“Get away, my child!” said he, roughly..

“ Father, mother says breakfast is ready.”

“T don’t want any breakfast,” said he, as he plunged
out of the door, and shut it after him,

It is well for man that the ways of God are not as his
ways, and that he manifests his greatness not less in his
100 UNCLE TIM





mighty works, than in his condescension to the weakness
of our fallen nature, and his long-suffering forbearance
with the provocations of our rebellious hearts. With all
his singularities, however, there was in the heart of
Uncle Tim a depth of religious feeling; but there are
few indeed whose faith and resignation to the divine will
can bear so keen a test as that under which his had thus
appeared to fail.

In this hour of trial all the native obstinacy and per-
tinacity of the old man’s character rose, and while he
felt the necessity of submission, it seemed impossible to
submit; and thus, reproaching himself, struggling in
vain to repress the murmurs of nature, repulsing from
him all external sympathy, his mind was “ tempest-
toss’d and not comforted.”

It was on the still afternoon of the following Sabbath
that he was sent for, in haste, to the chamber of his son.
He entered, and saw that the hour was come. The
family were all there; Grace and James, side by side,
bent over the dying one, and his mother sat afar off,
with her face hid in her apron, “ that she might not see
the death of the child.’ The aged minister was there,
and the Bible lay open before him. The father walked
to the side of the bed. He stood still, and gazed on the
face now brightening with “life and immortality.” The
son lifted up his eyes: he saw his father, smiled, and put
out his hand. “Iam glad you are come,” said he. “Oh,
George, to the pity, don’t! don’t smile on me so! I know
what is coming ; I have tried and tried, and I can’t, I
can’t have it so; and his frame shook, and he sebbed
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 101

i saiemcthnietteiteiamiaemasagenneaeainnasaianiiaanmineimuimaetinn
audibly. The room was still as death; there was none
that seemed able to comfort him. At last the son re-
peated, in a sweet but interrupted voice, those words of
man’s best Friend: “ Let not your heart be troubled ; in
my Father’s house are many mansions.”

“Yes, but I can’t help being troubled ; I suppose the
Lord’s will must be done, but itll 427 me.”

- “Qh, father, don’t break my heart,” said the son,
much agitated. “I shall see you again in heaven, and
you shall see me again; and then ‘ your heart shall re-
joice, and your joy no man taketh from you.’ ” |

“T never shall get to heaven, if I feel as I do now,”
said the old man. “I cannot have it so.”

The mild face of the sufferer was overcast, “I wish
he saw all that J do,” said he, in a low voice; then look-
ing towards the minister, he articulated, “ Pray for us.”

They knelt in prayer. It was soothing, as real prayer
always must be; and when they rose, every one seemed
more calm. But the sufferer was exhausted; his coun-
tenance changed ; he looked on his friends ; there was a
faint whisper, “ Peace I leave with you,” and he was in
heaven.

We need not dwell on what followed. The seed sown
by the righteous often blossoms over their grave; and so
was it with this good man: the words of peace which he
spake unto his friends while he was yet with them, came
into remembrance after he was gone; and though he was
laid in the grave with many tears, yet it was with sof-
tened and submissive hearts.

“The Lord bless him!” said Uncle Tim, as he and
102 UNCLE TIM



James were standing, last of all, over the grave. “I be-
lieve my heart is gone to heaven with him; and I think
the Lord really did know what was best, after all.”

Our friend James seemed now to become the support
of the family, and the bereaved old man unconsciously
began to transfer to him the affections that had been left
vacant.

“ James,” said he to him one day, “ I suppose you
know that you are about the same to me as a son.”

“T hope so,” said James, kindly.

“ Well, well, you'll go to college next week, and none
o’ yr keepin’ school to get along. I’ve got enough to
bring you safe out—that is, if you'll be car’ful and -
studdy.” ?

James knew the heart too well to refuse a favour in
which the poor old man’s mind was comforting itself; he
had the self-command to abstain from any extraordinary
expressions of gratitude, but took it kindly, as a matter
of course.

“Dear Grace,” said he to her, the last evening before
he left home, “ I am changed ; we both are altered since
we first knew each other; and now I am going to be
gone a long time, but I am sure —”

He stopped to arrange his thoughts.

“Yes, you may be sure of all those things that you
wish to say, and cannot,” said Grace.

“Thank you,” said James ; then, looking thoughtfully,
he added,

“@od help me. I believe I have mind enough to be
what I mean to; but whatever I am or have shall be
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 103

SRR cares mn ener
given to God and my fellow-men ; and then, Grace, your
prother in heaven will rejoice over me.” |

« [believe he does now,” said Grace. “ God bless you,
James; I don’t know what would have become of us if
you had not been here.”

“ Yes, you will live to be like him, and to do even more
good,” she added, her face brightening as she spoke, till
James thought she really must be right.

* *

* * *

It was five years after this that James was spoken of
as an eloquent and successful minister. Late one autumn
evening, a tall, bony, hard-favoured man was observed
making his way into the outskirts of the village of |
Farmington. )

“ Halloa, there!” he called to a man over the other
side of a fence; “what town is this “ere ?”

«“Tt’s Farmington, sir.”

“ Well, I want to know if you know anything of a boy
of mine that lives here ?”

« A boy of yours— who ”

« Why, I’ve got a boy here, and I thought I’d jest look
him up.”

“ And pray, what’s his name ?

« Why,” said the old man, pushing his hat off from his
forehead, “I believe they call him James Benton.”

« James Benton ! why, that is our minister's name.”

“Oh, wal, I believe he is the minister, come to think
on’t. He’s a boy o’ mine, though. Where does he live?”

“In that white house that you see set back from the
road theres with all those trees round it,”
104 UNCLE TIM

rere perenne
At this instant a tall, manly-looking person approached

from behind. Have we not seen that face before? It is
a touch graver than of old, and its lines have a more
thoughtful significance; but all the vivacity of James
Benton sparkles in that quick smile as his eye falls on
the old man.

“I thought you could not keep away from us long,”
said he, with the prompt cheerfulness of his boyhood,
and laying hold of both of Uncle Tim’s hard hands.

They approached the gate ; a bright face glances past
the window, and in a moment Grace is at the door.

“Father ! dear father !”

“You'd better make believe be so glad,” said Uncle
Tim, his eyes glistening as he spoke.

“Come, come, father, I have authority in these days,”
said Grace, drawing him towards the house, “so no dis.
respectful speeches ; away with your hat and coat, and
sit down in this great chair.”

“So, ho! Miss Grace,” said Uncle Tim, “you are at
your old tricks, ordering round as usual. Well, if I
~ must, I must ;” so down he sat.

“Father,” said Grace, as he was leaving them, after a
few days’ stay, “it is thanksgiving-day next month, and
you and mother must come and stay with us.”

Accordingly, the following month found Aunt Sally
and Uncle Tim by the minister’s fireside, delighted wit-
nesses of the thanksgiving presents which a willing
people were pouring in, and the next day they had
once more the pleasure of seeing a son of theirs in the
sacred desk, and hearing a sermon that everybody said
AND HIS DAUGHTER GRACE. 105

en

was the “best he ever preached ;” and it is to be re-
marked, by-the-by, that this was the standing comment-
ary on all James’s discourses, 80 it was evident that he
was “ going on unto perfection.”

«There's a great deal that’s worth havin’ in this ’ere
life, after all,” said Uncle Tim, as he sat musing over the
coals of the bright evening fire of that day ; “ that is, if
we'd only take it when the Lord lays it in our way.”

“ Yes,” said James, “and let us only take it as we
should, and this life will be cheerfulness, and the next
fulness of joy.”
1N6 SO MANY CALLS.

te



CA OS St ie eg ee

SO MANY CALLS.

A SKETCH.



O ignorant poor man! what dost thou bear,
Locked up within the casket of thy breast ?
What jewels, and what riches hast thou there ?
What heavenly treasures in so weak a chest.

DAVIEs.

[' was a brisk clear evening in the latter part of

December, when Mr. Aubrey returned from his
counting-house to the comforts of a bright coal fire and
warm arm-chair in his parlour at home. He changed
his heavy boots for slippers, drew around him the folds
of his evening gown, and then, lounging back in the
chair, looked up to the ceiling and about with an air of
satisfaction. Still there was a cloud on his brow: what
could be the ,matter with Mr. Aubrey? To tell the
truth, he had ‘that. afternoon received in his counting-
room the agent of one of the principal religious charities
of the day, and had been warmly urged to double
his last year’s subscription, and the urging had been
pressed by statements and arguments to which he did
not know well how to reply. “ People think,” solilo-
SO MANY CALLS. 107

aici EA

quized he to himself, “that Iam made of money, I be-
lieve; this is the fourth object this year for which I have
been requested to double my subscription, and this year
has been one of heavy family expenses—building and
fitting up this house—carpets, curtains—no end to the
new things to be bought—I really do not see how I am
to give any thing more in charity; then there are the
bills for the girls and the boys—they all say that they
must have twice as much now as before we came into
this house: wonder if I.did right in building it ” And
Mr. Aubrey glanced up and down the ceiling, and around
on the costly furniture, and looked into the fire in silence.
He was tired, harassed, and drowsy; his head began to
swim, and his eyes closed—he was asleep. In his sleep
he thought he heard a tap at the door; he opened it, and
there stood a plain, poor-looking map, who, in a voice
singularly low and sweet, asked for a few moments’ con-
versation with him. Mr. Aubrey asked him into the
parlour, and drew him a chair near the fire. The stranger
looked attentively around, and then, turning to Mr.
Aubrey, presented him with a paper. “It is your last
year’s subscription to missions,” said he; “ you know all
the wants of that cause that can be told’ you; I called
to see if you had any thing more to add to it.”

This was said in the same low and quiet voice as before;
but, for some reason unaccountable to himself, Mr. Aubrey
was more embarrassed by the plain, poor, unpretending
man, than he had been in the presence of any one before.
He was for some moments silent before he could reply at
all, and then, in a hurried and embarrassed manner, he
108 S0 MANY CALLS,

Le



began the same excuses which had appeared so satisfac-
tory to him the afternoon before—the hardness of the
times, the difficulty of collecting money, family ex-
penses, dc. |

The stranger quietly surveyed the spacious apartment,
with its many elegancies and luxuries, and without any
comment took from the merchant the paper he had given,
but immediately presented him with another.

“ This is your subscription to the Tract Society: have
you anything to add to it; you know how much it has
been doing, and how much more it now desires to do, if
Christians would only furnish means: do you not feel
called upon to add something to it?”

Mr. Aubrey was very uneasy under this appeal, but
there was something in the mild manner of the stranger
that restrained him; but he answered that, although he
regretted it exceedingly, his circumstances were such
that he could not this year conveniently add to any of
his charities.

The stranger received back the paper without any re-
ply, but immediately presented in its place the subscrip-
tion to the Bible Society, and in a few clear and forcible
words, reminded him of its well-known claims, and again
requested him to add something to his donations. Mr.
Aubrey became impatient.

“ Have I not said,” he replied, “that I can do nothing
more for any charity than I did last year? There seems
to be no end to the calls upon us in these days. At first
there were only three or four objects presented, and the
sums required were moderate; now the objects increase
80 MANY CALLS. 109

ecciiciitiiii asa ELD

every day; all call upon us for money, and all, after we
give once, want us to double and treble our subscriptions;
there is no end to the thing; we may as well stop in one
place as another.”

The stranger took back the paper, rose, and fixing his
eye on his companion, said, in a voice that thrilled to his
soul,

“One year ago to-night, you thought that your daugh-
ter lay dying; you could not sleep for agony; upon
_whom did you call all that night ” ‘

The merchant started and looked up; there seemed a
change to have passed over the whole form of his visitor,
whose eye was fixed on him with a calm, intense, pene-
trating expression, that awed and subdued him; he drew
back, covered his face, and made no reply.

“ Rive years ago,” said the stranger, “ when you lay
at the brink of the grave, and thought that if you died
then you should leave a family of helpless children en-
tirely unprovided for, do you remember how you prayed ?
who saved you then?”

The stranger paused for an answer, but there was a
dead silence. The merchant only bent forward as one
entirely overcome, and rested his head on the seat before
him. |

The stranger drew yet nearer, and said, in a still lower
and more impressive tone, “Do you remember, fifteen
years since, that time when you felt yourself so lost, 80
helpless, so hopeless; when you spent days and nights
in prayer; when you thought you would give the whole
110 SO MANY CALLS.

» caschavatenieasihetaiamipasinapmsinaiuinsniaimsusamanianigsiiciasinmiaaisniiilins
world for one hour’s assurance that your sins were for-
given you !—who listened to you then e

“It was my God and Saviour!” said the merchant,
with a sudden burst of remorseful feeling ; “oh, yes, it
was he.”

“ And has He eyer complained of being called on too
often?” inquired the stranger, in a voice of reproachful
sweetness ; “say,” he added, “are you willing to begin
this night, and ask no more of Him, if he, from this
night, will ask no more from you ?”

“ Oh, never, never !” said the merchant, throwing him-
self at his feet ; but, as he spake these words, the figure
seemed to vanish, and he awoke with his whole soul
stirred within him.

“Oh, my Saviour! what have I been saying? what
have I been doing?” he exclaimed. “Take all, take
everything! what is all that I have to what thou hast
done for me!”
MARION JONES 3 OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. Til



—

MARION JONES; OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW.

ee

“Banish, oh! banish grief, and then
Our joys will bring our hopes again.”

“ Pains of love be sweeter far
‘han all other pleasures are.”



Ho” many kinds of beauty there are! How mapy

even in the human form! There is the bloom and
motion of childhood, the freshness and ripe perfection of
youth, the dignity of manhood, the softness of woman—
all different, yet each in its kind perfect.

But there is none so peculiar, none that bears more the
image of the heavenly, than the beauty of Christian old
age. It is like the loveliness of those calm autumn days,
when the heats of summer are past, when the harvest is
gathered into the garner, and the sun shines over the
placid fields and fading woods, which stand waiting for
their last change. It is a beauty more strictly moral,
more belonging to the soul, than that of any other period
of life. Poetic fiction always paints the old man as a
Christian ; nor is there any period where the virtues of
Christianity seem to find a more harmonious develop-
112 MARION JONES}

ment. The aged man, who has outlived the hurry of
passion—who has withstood the urgency of temptation—
who has concentrated the religious impulses of youth
into habits of obedience and love—who, having served
his generation by the will of God, now leans in helpless-
ness on Him whom once he served, is, perhaps, one of —
the most faultless representations of the beauty of holi-
ness that this world affords.

Thoughts something like these arose in my mind as I
slowly turned my footsteps from the grave-yard of my
native village, where I had been wandering, after years
of absence. It was a lovely spot—a soft slope of ground
close by a little stream, that ran sparkling through the
cedars and junipers beyond it, while on the other side
arose a green hill, with the white village laid like a
necklace of pearls upon its bosom.

There is no feature of the landscape more picturesque
and peculiar than that of the graveyard—that “ city of
the silent,” as it is beautifully expressed by the Orien-
tals—standing amid the bloom and rejoicing of Nature,
its white stones glittering in the Sun, a memorial of
decay, a link between the living and the dead.

As I moved slowly from mound to mound, and read
the inscriptions, which purported that many a money-
saving man, and many a busy, anxious housewife, and
many a prattling, half-blossomed child, had done with
care or mirth, I was struck with a plain slab, bearing the |
inscription, “To the memory of Howard Dudley, who
died in his hundredth year.” My eye was caught by
this inscription, for in other years I had well known the
OR, LOVE ‘VERSUS LAW. 113





person it recorded. At this instant, his mild and vene-
rable form arose before me, and I recollect his quiet and
lowly coming into meeting, precisely ten minutes before
the time, every Sabbath—his tall form a little stooping
—his best suit of butternut-coloured clothes, with long
flaps and wide cuffs, on one of which two pins were
always to be seen stuck in with the most reverent preci-
sion. When seated, the top of the pew came just to his
chin, so that his silvery, placid head rose above it like
the moon above the horizon. His head was one that
might have been sketched for a St. John—bald at the
top, and around the temples adorned with a soft flow of
bright fine hair,
“ That down his shoulders reverently spread,

As hoary frost with spangles doth attire
The naked branches of an oak half-dead.”

He was then of great age, and every line of his patient
face seemed to say, “And now, Lord, what wait I for?”
Yet still, year after year, was he to be seen in the same
place, with the same dutiful punctuality.

He was known far and near as a very proverb for
peacefulness of demeanour and unbounded charitable-
ness in covering and excusing the faults of others. As
long as there was any doubt in a case of alleged evil-
doing, he would say, “ the man did not mean any harm,
after all; and when transgression became too bare-
faced for this excuse, he always guessed “it was best not
to say much about it ; nobody could tell what they might
be left to.”

Some incidents in his life will show more clearly these

H
114 MARION JONES 3

EES

traits. A certain shrewd landholder, by the name of
Jones, who was not well reported of in the matter of
honesty, sold to Mr. Dudley a valuable lot of land, and
received the money for it; but, under various pretences,
deferred giving the deed. Soon after, he died ; and the
deed was nowhere to be found, while this very lot of
land was left by will to one of his daughters.

Old Mr. Dudley said “it was very extraordinary; he
always knew that Seth Jones was considerably sharp
about money, but he did not think he would do such a
downright wicked thing.” So the old man repaired to
Squire Abel to state the case and see if there was any
redress. “I do not like to tell of it,” said he; “buts
Squire Abel, you know Mr. Jones was—was—what he
was, even if he 7s dead and gone!” This was the nearest
approach the old gentleman could make to specifying a
heavy charge against the dead. On being told that the
case admitted of no redress, he comforted himself with
half soliloquizing, “ Well, at any rate, the land has gone
to those two girls, poor creatures—I hope it will do them
some good. There is Silence—we won't say much about —
her; but Marion is a nice, pretty girl.” And so the
old man departed, leaving it as his opinion that, since
the matter could not be mended, it was just as well not
to say anything about it.

Now the two girls here mentioned (to wit, Silence
and Marion) were the eldest and the youngest of a
numerous family, the offspring of three wives of Seth
Jones, of whom these two were the sole survivors. The
elder, Silence, was a tall, strong, black-eyed, hard-fea-
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 115



tured girl, verging upon forty, with a good, loud, resolute
yoice, and what the Irishman would call “a dacent
notion of using it.’ Why she was called Silence was a
standing problem to the neighbourhood, for she had
more faculty and inclination for making a noise than any
person in the whole village. Miss Silence was one of
those persons who have no disposition to yield any of
their own rights. She marched up to all controverted
matters, faced down all opposition, held her way lustily
and with good courage, making men, women, and chil-
dren turn out for her, as they would for a mailcoach.
So evident was her innate determination to be free and
independent, that, though she was the daughter of a
rich man, and well portioned, only one swain was ever
heard of who ventured to solicit her hand in marriage,
and he was sent off with the assurance that, if he ever
showed his face about the house again, she would set the
dogs on him.

But Marion Jones was as different from her sister as
the little graceful convolvulus from the great rough stick
that supports it. At the time of which we speak she
was just eighteen, a modest, slender, blushing girl, as
timid and shrinking as her sister was bold and hardy.
Indeed, the education of poor Marion had cost Miss
Silence much painstaking and trouble, and, after all, she
said, the girl would make a fool of herself, she never could
teach her to be up and down with people, as she was,

When the report came to Miss Silence’s ears that Mr.
Dudley considered himself as aggrieved by her father’s
will, she held forth upon the subject with great strength
of courage and of lungs, “Mr, Dudley might be in
116 MARION JONES}

eee eT OED

better business than in trying to cheat orphans out of their
rights—she hoped he would go to law about it, and see
what good he would get by it—a pretty church member
and deacon, to be sure! getting up such a story about
her poor father, dead and gone!”

“ But,” said Marion, “ Mr. Dudley is a good man: I
do not think he means to injure any one ; there must be
some mistake about it.”

“Marion, you are a little fool, as I have always told
you,” replied Silence; “ you would be cheated out of
your eye-teeth if you had not me to take care of you.”

But subsequent events brought the affairs of these two
damsels in closer connexion with those of Mr. Dudley,
as we shall proceed to show.

It happened that the next-door neighbour of Mr.
Dudley was a certain old farmer, whose crabbedness of
demeanour had procured for him the name of Uncle Jaw.
This agreeable surname accorded very well with the gene-
ral characteristics both of the person and manner of its
possessor. He was tall and hard-favoured, with an ex-
pression of countenance much resembling a north-east
rain-storm—a drizzling, settled sulkiness, that seemed to
defy all prospect of clearing off, and to take comfort in
its own disagreeableness. His voice seemed to have
taken lessons of his face, in such admirable keeping was
its sawing, deliberate grow], with the pleasing physiog-
nomy before indicated. By nature he was endowed with
one of those active, acute, hair-splitting minds, which
can raise forty questions for dispute on any point of the
compass; and had he been an educated man, he might
have proved as clever a metaphysician as ever threw
Oh, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 117

I



dust in the eyes of succeeding generations. But, being
deprived of these advantages, he nevertheless exerted’
himself to quite as useful a purpose in puzzling and mys-
tifying whomsoever came in his way. But his activity
particularly exercised itself in the line of the law, as it
was his meat, and drink, and daily meditation, either
to find something to go to law about, or go to law
about something he had found. There was always some
question about an old rail fence that used to run “ a leetle
more to the left hand,” or that was built up “a leeile
more to the right hand,” and so cut off a strip of his
“ medder land,” or else there was some outrage of Peter
Somebody’s turkeys, getting into his mowing, or Squire
Moses’s geese were to be shut up in the town pond, or
something equally important kept him busy from year’s
end to year’s end. Now, as a matter of private amuse.
ment, this might have answered very well; but then
Uncle Jaw was not satisfied to fight his own battles, but
must needs go from house to house, narrating the whole
length and breadth of the case, with all the says he’s and
says I’s, and the J tell’d him’s and he tell’d me’s, which do
either accompany or flow therefrom. Moreover, he had
such a marvellous facility of finding out matters to quarrel
about, and of letting every one else know where they
too could muster a quarrel, that he generally succeeded
in keeping the whole neighbourhood by the ears.

And as good Mr. Dudley assumed the office of peace-
maker for the village, Uncle Jaw’s efficiency rendered
‘tno sinecure. He always followed the steps of Uncle
Jaw, smoothing, hushing up, and puting matters aright
with an assiduity that was truly wonderful,
118 MARION JONES ¢



Uncle Jaw himself had a great respect for the good
man, and, in common with all the neighbourhood, sought
unto him for counsel, though, like other seekers of advice,
he appropriated only so much as seemed good in his own
eyes.

Still he took a kind of pleasure in dropping in of an
evening to Mr. Dudley’s fireside, to recount the various
matters which he had taken or was to take in hand.

But the grand “ matter of matters,” and the one that
took up the most of Uncle Jaw’s spare time, lay in a dis-
pute between him and Squire Jones, the father of Marion
and Silence; for it so happened that his lands and those
of Uncle Jaw were contiguous. Now the matter of dis-
pute was on this wise: on Squire Jones’s land there was
a mill, which mill Uncle Jaw averred was “always a-
flooding his medder land.” As Uncle Jaw’s “medder
land” was by nature half bog and bulrushes, and there-
fore liable to be found in a wet condition, there was
always a happy obscurity where the water came from,
and whether there was at any time more there than be-
longed to his share. So, when all other subject matters
of dispute failed, Uncle Jaw recreated himself with
getting up a lawsuit about his “ medder land,” and one
of these cases was in pendency, when, by the death of
the Squire, the estate was left to Marion and Silence, his
daughters. When, therefore, the report reached him that
Mr. Dudley had been cheated out of his dues, Uncle Jaw
prepared forthwith to go and compare notes. Therefore,
one evening, as Mr. Dudley was sitting quietly by the
fire, musing and reading with his big Bible open before
him, he heard the premonitory symptoms of a visitation
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 119

a TE
from Uncle Jaw on his door scraper, and soon the man
made his appearance. After seating himself directly in
front of the fire, with his elbows on his knees, and his
hands spread out over the coals, he looked up in Mr.
Dudley’s mild face with his little inquisitive grey eyes,
and remarked, by way of opening the subject, “ Well,
well, old Squire Jones is gone at last. I wonder how
much good all his land will do him now ”

“Yes,” replied Mr. Dudley, “it just shows how all
these things are not worth striving after. We brought
nothing into the world, and it is certain we can carry
nothing out.”

“Why, yes,” replied Uncle Jaw, “ that’s all very right,
but it was strange how that old Squire Jones did hang
on to things. Now that mill of his, that was always
soaking off water into these medders of mine, I took and
tell’d Squire Jones just how it was, pretty nigh twenty
times, and yet he would keep it just so; and now he’s
dead and gone, there is that old girl Silence is full as
bad, and makes more noise ; and she and Marion have
got the land; but, you see, I mean to work it yet!”

Here Uncle Jaw paused to see whether he had pro-
duced any sympathetic excitement in Mr. Dudley; but
the old man sat without the least emotion, quietly con-
templating the top of the long kitchen shovel. Uncle
Jaw fidgeted in his chair, and changed his mode of
attack for one more direct. “I heard ’m tell, Mr. Dud-
ley, that the Squire served you something of an unhandye
sort of trick about that ere lot of land.”

Still Mr. Dudley made no reply; but Uncle Jaw’s per-
120 MARION JONES;



severance was not so to be put off, and he recommenced,
“Squire Abel, you see, he tell’d me how the matter was,
and he said he did not see as it could be mended; but I
took and tell’d him, ‘ Squire Abel,’ says I, ‘I’d bet pretty
nigh ’most anything, if Mr. Dudley would tell the mat-
ter to me, that I could find a hole for him to creep out
at; for,’ says I, ‘I’ve seen daylight through more twis-
tical cases than that afore now.’ ”

Still Mr. Dudley remained mute; and Uncle Jaw,
after waiting a while, recommenced with, “ But, railly,
Mr. Dudley, I should like to hear the particulars!”

“T have made up my mind not to say anything more
about that business,” said Mr. Dudley, in a tone which,
though mild, was so exceedingly definite, that Uncle
Jaw felt that the case was hopeless in that quarter; he
therefore betook himself to the statement of his own
grievances.

“Why, you see,” he began, at the same time taking the
tongs, and picking up all the little brands, and disposing
them in the middle of the fire, “ you see, two days after
the funeral (for I did’nt like to go any sooner), I stepped
up to speak over the matter with old Silence; for as to
Marion, she ha’n’t no more to do with such things than
our white kitten. Now, you see, Squire Jones, just afore
he died, he took away an old rail fence of his that lay
between his land and mine, and began to build a new
stone wall, and when I come to measure, I found he had

*took and put almost the whole width of the stone wall
on to my land, when there ought not to have been more
than half of it come there. Now, you see, I could not:
OR, LUVE VERSUS LAW. 121

ee
say a word to Squire Jones, because, just before I found
it out, he took ill and died; and so I thought I'd speak
to old Silence, and see if she meant to do anything about
it, cause I knew pretty well she would’nt; and I tell
you, if she didn’t put it om me! we had a regular
pitched battle—I thought she would have screamed her-
self to death! I don’t know but she would, but just
then poor Marion came in, and looked so frightened—
Marion is a pretty girl, and looks so trembling and deli-
cate, that it’s a shame to plague her, and so I took and
come away for that time.” _

Here Uncle Jaw perceived a brightening in the face of
the good man, and felt exceedingly comforted that at
last he was about to interest him in his story.

But all this while Mr. Dudley had been in a profound
meditation concerning the ways and means of putting a
stop to a quarrel that had been his torment from time
immemorial, and just at this moment a plan had struck
his mind which our story will proceed to unfold.

The mode of settling differences which had occurred
to the good man was one which has been considered a
specific in reconciling contending sovereigns and states
from early antiquity, and he hoped it might have a paci-
fying influence even in so unpromising a case as that of
Miss Silence and Uncle Jaw.

In former days, Mr. Dudley had kept the district
school for several successive winters, and among his
scholars was the gentle Marion Jones, then a plump,
rosy little girl, with blue eyes, curly hair, and the sweet-
122 MARION JONES;

Se nn reeeesseereensinenuneseestinnnsommnsamnmnserempese,

est disposition in the world. There was also little Joseph
Adams, the only son of Uncle J aw, a fine, healthy, robust
boy, who used to spell the longest words, make the best
snowballs and poplar whistles, and read the loudest and
fastest of any boy at school.

Little Joe inherited all his father’s sharpness, with a
double share of good humour, so that, though he was
for ever effervescing in the way of one funny trick or
another, he was a universal favourite, not only with Mr.
Dudley, but with the whole school.

Master Joseph always took little Marion Jones under
his especial protection, drew her to school on his sled,
helped her out with all the long sums in her arithmetic,
saw to it that nobody pillaged her dinner-basket or
knocked down her bonnet, and resolutely whipped or
snowballed any other boy who attempted the same gal-
lantries. Years passed on, and Uncle Jaw had sent his
son to college. He sent him because, as he said, he had
“a right to send him; just as good a right as Squire
Abel or anybody else to send their boys, and so he would
send him.” It was the remembrance of his old favourite
Joseph, and his little pet Marion, that came across the
mind of Mr. Dudley, and which seemed to open a gleam
of light in regard to the future. So, when Uncle Jaw
had finished his prelection, Mr. Dudley, after some medi-
tation, came out with,

“Well, they say that your son is going to have the
valedictory in college.”

Though somewhat startled at the abrupt transition,
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 123

i caeeeneeenlneeetetet te

Uncle Jaw found the suggestion too flattering to his
pride to be dropped: so, with a countenance grimly ex-
pressive of his satisfaction, he replied,

“ Why yes—yes—I don’t see no reason why a poor
man’s son han’t as much right as any one to be at the
top, if he can get there.”

“ Just so,” replied Mr. Dudley.

“ Te was always the boy for learning, and for nothing
else,” continued Uncle Jaw; “put him to farming,
couldn’t make nothing of him. If I set him to hoeing
corn or hilling potatoes, I'd always find him stopping to
chase hoptoads, or off after chip-squirrels. But set him
down toa book, and there he was! That boy larnt read-
ing the quickest of any boy that ever I saw: it wasn’t @
month after he began his a 8, abs, before he could read in
the ‘Fox and the Brambles,’ and in a month more he
could clatter off his chapter in the Testament as fast as
any of them; and you see, in college, it’s just so—he has
risen right up to be first.” :

“ And he is coming home week after next,” said Mr.
Dudley, meditatively.

The next morning, as Mr. Dudley was eating his
breakfast, he quietly remarked to his wife, “ Sally, I be-
lieve it was week after next you were meaning to have
your quilting?”

« Why, I never told you so: what makes you think
that?”

“TJ thought that was your calculation,” said the good
man, quietly.

«“ Why no—to be sure, I can have it, and may be it’s
124 MARION JONES $
eens eeetineeeeeeereeeeg
the best of any time, if we can get old Susan to come
and help about the cakes and pies.”

“T think you had better,” replicd Mr. Dudley, “and
we will have all the young folks here.”

And now let us pass over all the intermediate pound -
ing, and grinding, and chopping, which for the next
week foretold approaching festivity in the kitchen of Mr.
Dudley. Let us forbear to provoke the appetite of a
hungry reader by setting in order before him the minced
pies, the cranberry tarts, the pumpkin pies, the dough-
nuts, the cookies, and other sweet cakes of every descrip-
tion, that sprung into being at the magic touch of old
Susan, the village priestess on all these solemnities.
Suffice it to say, that the day had arrived, and the auspi-
cious quilt was spread.

The invitation had not failed te include the Mizses
Silence and Marion J ones—nay, good Mr. Dudley had
pressed gallantry into the matter so far as to be the
bearer of the message himself; for which he was duly
rewarded by a broadside from Miss Silence, giving him
what she termed a piece of her mind in the matter of
the rights of widows and orphans; to all which the good
old man listened with great benignity from the begin-
ning to the end, and replied with, 3

“ Well, well, Miss Silence, I expect you will think
better of this before long; there had best not be any
hard words about it.” So saying, he took up his hat
and walked off, while Miss Silence, who felt extremely
relieved by having blown off steam, declared that “ It
was of no more use to hector old Mr. Dudley than to
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 125

— eeetneneetliinatemmmicnn eee
fire a gun at a bag of cotton-wool. For all that, though,
she shouldn’t go to the quilting; nor, more, should
Marion.”

“But, sister, why not?” said the little maiden; “I
think I shall go.” And Marion said this in a tone so
mildly positive, that Silence was amazed.

“ What ails you, Marion?” said she, opening her eyes
with astonishment; “ haven’t you any more spirit than
to go to there when he is doing all he can to ruin us ”

«J like Mr. Dudley,” replied Marion; “ he was always
kind to me when I was a little girl, and I am not going
to believe that he is a bad man now.”

When a young lady states that she is not going to believe
a thing, good judges of human nature generally give up
the case; but Miss Silence, to whom the language of
opposition and argument was entirely new, could scarcely
give her ears credit for veracity in the case ; she there-
fore repeated over exactly what she said before, only in
a much louder tone of voice, and with much more vehe-
ment forms of asseveration: a mode of reasoning which,
if not strictly logical, has at least the sanction of very
respectable authorities among the enlightened and
learned.

“ Silence,” replied Marion, when the storm had spent
itself, “if it did not look like being angry with Mr. Dud-
ley, I would stay away to oblige you; but it would seem
to every one to be taking sides in a quarrel, and I never
did, and never will, have any part or lot in such things.”

« Then you'll just be trod and trampled on all your
days,” replied Silence ; “ but, however, if you choose to
126 — MARION JONES;



make a fool of yourself, 7 don’t;” and so saying, she
flounced out of the room in great wrath. It so hap-
pened, however, that Miss Silence was one of those
who have so little economy in disposing of a fit of
anger, that it was all used up before the time of execu-
tion arrived. It followed, of consequence, that having
unburdened her mind freely both to Mr. Dudley and to
Marion, she began to feel very much more comfortable and
good-natured ; and consequent upon that came divers
reflections upon the many gossiping opportunities and
comforts of a quilting; and then the intrusive little re-
flection, “ What if she should go—after all, what harm
would be done?” and then the inquiry, “ Whether it was
not her duty to go and look after Marion, poor child,
who had no mother to watch over her?” In short, before
the time of preparation arrived, Miss Silence had fully
worked herself up to the magnanimous determination of
going to the quilting. Accordingly, the next day, while
Marion was standing before her mirror, braiding up her
pretty hair, she was startled by the apparition of Miss
Silence coming into the room as stiff as a changeable
silk and a high horn comb could make her; and “ grimly
determined was her look.”

“Well, Marion,” said she, “if you will go to the
quilting this afternoon, I think it is my duty to go and
see to you.”

What would people do if this convenient shelter of
duty did not afford them a retreat in cases when they
are disposed to change their minds? Marion suppressed
the arch smile that, in spite of herself, laughed out at
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 127

a iieaeeeeinanliaiaiiaiaasiatammenaiaidiniiduiiiiiediainanaan
the corners of her eyes, and told her sister that she was
much obliged to her for her care. So off they went
together.

Silence in the mean time held forth largely on the im-
portance of standing up for one’s rights, and not letting
one’s self be trampled on.

The afternoon passed on, the elderly ladies quilted and
talked scandal, and the younger ones discussed the merits
of the various beaux who were expected to give vivacity
to the evening entertainment. Among these, the newly-
arrived Joseph Adams, just from college, with all his
literary honours thick about him, became a prominent
subject of conversation.

It was duly canvassed whether the young gentleman
might be called handsome, and the affirmative was carried
by a large majority, although there were some variations
and exceptions; one of the party declaring his whiskers
to be in too high astate of cultivation, another maintain-
ing that they were in the exact line of beauty, while a
third vigorously disputed the point whether he wore
whiskers at all. It was allowed by all, however, that he
had been a great beau in the town where he had passed
his college days. It was also inquired into whether he
were matrimonially engaged; and the negative being
understood, they diverted themselves with predicting to
one another the capture of such a prize; each prophecy
being received with such disclaimers as “ Come now
“Do be still!’ “ Hush your nonsense!” and the like.

At length the long-wished-for hour arrived, and one
py one the lords of the creation began to make their ap-

©
128 MARION JONES }

—_—

pearance, and one of the last was this much-admired
youth. -

“That is Joe Adams!” “ That is he!” was the busy
whisper, as a tall, well-looking young man came into the
room, with the easy air of one who had seen several
things before, and was not to be abashed by the combined
blaze of all the village beauties.

In truth, our friend Joseph had made the most of his
residence in N , paying his court no less to the
Graces than the Muses. His fine person, his frank, manly
air, his ready conversation, and his faculty of universal
adaptation, had made his society much coveted among
the beau monde of N——, and though the place was
small, he had become familiar with much good society.

We hardly know whether we may venture to tell our
fair readers the whole truth in regard to our hero. We
will merely hint, in the gentlest manner in the world,
that Mr. Joseph Adams, being undeniably first in the
classics and first in the drawing-room, having been



gravely commended in his class by his venerable presi-
dent, and gaily flattered in the drawing-room by the
elegant Miss This and That, was rather inclining to the
opinion that he was an uncommonly fine fellow, and even
had the assurance to think that, under present circum-
stances, he could please without making any great effort;
a thing which, however true it were in point of fact, is
obviously improper to be thought of by a young man.
Be that as it may, he moved about from one to another,
shaking hands with all the old ladies, and listening with
the greatest affability to the various comments on his
oR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 129

caesarean rt eet EELS
growth and personal appearance, his points of resemblance
to his father, mother, grandfather, and grandmother,
which are always detected by the superior acumen of
elderly females.

Among the younger ones, he at once, and with full
frankness, recognised old schoolmates, and partners in
various whortleberry, chestnut, and strawberry excursions
and thus called out an abundant flow of conversation,
Nevertheless, his eye wandered occasionally around the
room, as if in search of something not there. What
could itbe ? It kindled, however, with an expression of
sudden brightness as he perceived the tall and spare
figure of Miss Silence ; whether owing to the personal
fascinations of that lady, or to other causes, we leave the
reader to determine.

Miss Silence had predetermined never to speak a word
again to Uncle Jaw or any of his race; but she was taken
by surprise at the frank, extended hand, and friendly
“ how d’ye do?” It was not in woman to resist so cordial
an address from a handsome young man, and Miss Silence
gave her hand and replied with a graciousness that
amazed herself. At this moment, also, certain soft blue
eyes peeped forth from a corner, just “ to see if he looked
as he used to do.” Yes, there he was! the same dark
mirthful eyes that used to peer on her from behind the
corners of the spelling-book at the district school; and
Marion Jones gave a half sigh to those times, and then
wondered why she happened to think of such nonsense.

“ How is your sister, little Miss Marion ?” said J oseph,

I
130 MARION JONES;



“Why, she is here—have you not seen her?” said
Silence; “there she is, in that corner.”

Joseph looked, but could scarcely recognise her. There
stood a tall, slender, blooming girl, that might have been
selected as a specimen of that union of perfect health
with delicate fairness so characteristic of the young New-
England beauty.

She was engaged in telling some merry story to a knot
of young girls, and the rich colour that, like a bright
spirit, constantly went and came in her cheeks; the
dimples, quick and varying as those of a little brook ;
the clear, mild eye; the clustering curls, and, above all,
the happy, rejoicing smile, and the transparent frankness
and simplicity of expression which beamed like sunshine
about her, all formed a combination of charms that took
our hero quite by surprise; and when Silence, who had
a remarkable degree of directness in all her dealings,
called out, “Here, Marion, is Joe Adams, inquiring after
you !” our practised young gentleman felt himself colour
to the roots of his hair, and for a moment he could scarce
recollect that first rudiment of manners, “to make his
bow like a good boy.” Marion coloured also ; but, per-
ceiving the confusion of our hero, her countenanze
assumed an expression of mischievous drollery, which,
helped on by the titter of her companions, added nota
little to his confusion.

“What’s the matter with me ?” thought he, and calling
up his courage, he dashed into the formidable circle of
fair ones, and began chattering with one and another,
calling by name with or without introduction, remember.
oR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. | 131



————



ing things that never happened with a freedom that was
perfectly fascinating.

“Really, how handsome he has grown 1% thought
Marion ; and she coloured deeply when once or twice the
dark eyes of our hero made the same observation with
regard to herself, in that quick, intelligible dialect which
eyes alone can speak. And when the little party dis-
persed, as they did very punctually at nine o’clock, our
hero requested of Miss Silence the honour of attending
her home, an evidence of discriminating taste which
materially raised him in the estimation of that lady. It
was true, to be sure, that Marion walked on the other
side of him, her little white hand just within his arm
and there was something in that light touch that puzzled
him unaccountably, as might be inferred from the fre-
quency with which Miss Silence was obliged to bring up
the ends of conversation with “What did you say ”
“ What were you going to say f” and other persevering
forms of inquiry, with which a reguiar-trained matter-
of fact talker will hunt down a poor fellow-mortai who is
in danger of sinking into a comfortable revery.

When they parted at the gate, however, Silence gave
our hero a hearty invitation to “come and see them ary
time,” which he mentally regarded as more to the point
than anything else that had been said.

As Joseph soberly retraced his way homeward, his
thoughts, by some unaccountable association, began to
revert to such topics as the loneliness of man by himself;
the need of kindred spirits, the solaces of sympathy, and
other like matters,
132 MARION JONES ;

ne





That night Joseph dreamed of trotting along with
his dinner-basket to the old brown school-house, and
vainly endeavouring to overtake Marion Jones, whom he
saw with her little sun-bonnet a few yards in front of
him; then he was ¢efering with her on a lone board, her
bright little face glancing up and down, while every curl
around it seemed to be living with delight; and then he
was snow-balling Tom Williams for knocking down
Marion’s doll’s house, or he sat by her on a bench, helping
her out with a long sum in arithmetic ; but, with the
mischievous fatality of dreams, the more he ciphered
and expounded, the longer and more hopeless grew the
sum ; and he awoke in the morning pshawing at his ill
* Juck, after having donea sum over half a dozen of times,
while Marion seemed to be looking on with the same air
of arch-drollery that he saw on her face the evening
before.

“Joseph,” said Uncle Jaw, the next morning at
breakfast, “I s’pose Squire Jones’s daughters were not
at the quilting ?”

“Yes, sir, they were,” said our hero ; “ they were both
there.”

“Why, you don’t say so ?”

«They certainly were,” persisted the son.

“Well, I thought the old gal had too much spirit for
that: you see there is a quarrel between Mr. Dudley and
those gals.”

“Indeed!” said Joseph. “I thought the deacon never
quarrelled with anybody.”

« But, you see, old Silence there, she will quarrel with
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 133

i

him: raily, that creatur’ is a tough one;” and. Uncle
Jaw leaned back in his chair, and contemplated the
quarrelsome propensities of Miss Silence with the satis-
faction of a kindred spirit. “ But Pll fix her yet,” he
continued; “I see how to work it.”

“ Indeed, father, I did not know that you had anything
to.do with their affairs.”

“Ta’n’t 12 I should like to know if I ha’n't 1” re-
plied Uncle Jaw, triumphantly. “ Now see here, Joseph:
you see I mean you shall be a lawyer: I’m pretty consi-
derable of a lawyer myself—that is, for one not college
larn’t, and I’ll tell you how it is” —and thereupon Uncle
Jaw launched forth into the case of the medder land
and the mill, and concluded with, “ Now, Joseph, this
‘ore is a whetstone for you to hone up your wits on.”

In pursuance, therefore, of this plan of sharpening his
wits in the manner aforesaid, our hero, after breakfast,
went, like a dutiful son, directly towards Squire J ones’s,
doubtless for the purpose of taking ocular survey of the
meadow land, mill, and stone wall, but, by some unac-
countable mistake, lost his way, and found himself stand-
ing before the door of Squire Jones’s house.

The old Squire had been among the aristocracy of the
village, and his house had been the ultimate standard of
comparison in all matters of style and garniture. Their
big front room, instead of being strewn with lumps of
sand, duly streaked over twice a-week, was resplendent
with a carpet of red, yellow, and black stripes, while a
towering pair of long-legged brass andirons, scoured to @
silvery white, gave an air of magnificence to the chim-
134 MARION JONES ;

caren LEAL AAD



ney, Which was materially increased by the tall brass-
headed shovel and tongs, which, like a decorous, starched
“married couple, stood bolt upright in their places on
either side. The sanctity of the place was still further
maintained by keeping the window-shutters always
closed, admitting only so much light as could come in
bya round hole at the top of the shutter, and it was only
on oecasionsof extraordinary magnificence that the room
was thrown open to profane eyes.

Our hero was surprised, therefore, to tind both the
doors and windows of this apartment open, and symp-
toms evident of its being in daily occupation. The fur-
niture still retained its massive, clumsy stiffness, but
there were various tokens that lighter fingers had been
at work there since the notable days of good Dame Jones.
here was a vase of flowers on the table, two or three
books of poetry, and a little fairy work-basket, from
which peeped forth the edges of some worked ruffling ;
there was a small writing-desk, and last, not least, in a
lady’s collection, an album, with leaves of every colour
of the rainbow, containing inscriptions, in sundry strong
masculine hands, “To Marion,” indicating that other
people had had their eyes open as well as Mr. Joseph
Adams. “So,” said he to himself, “this quiet littie
beauty has had admirers after all ;” and consequent upon
this came another question, (which was none of his con-
cern, to be sure,) whether the little lady were or were not
engaged ; and from these speculations he was aroused
ty a light footstep, and anon the neat form of Marion
made its appearance.
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 135
ne ereeeemeemmnennn aC te an

«“ Good-morning, Miss Jones,’ said he, bowing.

Now there is something very comical in the feeling
when little boys and girls, who have always known each
other as plain Marion or J oseph, first. meet as “ Mr.” or
“Miss” So-and-So. Each one feels half-disposed, half
afraid, to return to the old familiar form, and awkwardly
fettered by the recollection that they are no longer chil-
dren. Both parties had felt this the evening before,
when they met in company, but, now that they were
alone together, the feeling became still stronger; and
when Marion had requested Mr. Adams to take a chair,
and Mr. Adams had inquired after Miss Marion’s health,
there ensued a pause, which, the longer it continued,
seemed the more difficult to preak, and during which
Marion’s pretty face slowly assumed an expression of the
judicrous, till she was as near laughing as propriety
would admit; and Mr. Adams, having looked out at the
window, and up at the mantelpiece, and down at the car-
pet, at last looked at Marion; their eyes met: the efiect
was electrical ; they both smiled, and then laughed out-
right, after which the whole difficulty of conversation
vanished.

“Marion,” said Joseph, “do you remember the old
school-house ?”

“J thought that was what you were thinking of,” said
Marion; “but, really, you have grown and altered so
that I could hardly believe my eyes last night.”

“ Nor I mine,” said Joseph, with a glance that gave a
yery complimentary turn to the expression.

Our readers may imagine that after this the conver-
136 MARION JONES 5

nena
sation proceeded to grow increasingly confidential and
interesting ; that, from the account of early life, each
proceeded to let the other know something of intervening
history, in the course of which each discovered a number
of new and admirable traits in the other, “such things
being matters of very common occurrence. In the course
of the conversation, Joseph discovered that it was neces-
sary that Marion should have two or three books then in
his possession, and, as promptitude is a great matter in
such cases, he promised to bring them “ to-morrow.”

For some time our young friends pursued their acquain-
tance, without a distinct consciousness of anything
except that it was a very pleasant thing to be together.
During the long, still afternoons, they rambled among
the fading woods, now illuminated with the radiance of
the dying year, and sentimentalized and quoted poetry;
and almost every evening Joseph found some errand to
bring him to the house; a book for Miss Marion, or a
bevy of roots and herbs for Miss Silence, or some re-
markably fine yarn for her to knit ; attentions which
retained our hero in the good graces of the latter lady,
and gained him the credit of being “a young man that,
knew how to behave himself.”

It cannot be supposed that all these things passed un-
noticed by those wakeful eyes that are ever upon the
motions of such “bright particular stars,” and, as is
usual in such cases, many things were known to a cer-
tainty which were not yet known to the parties them-
selves. The young belles and beaux whispered and tit-
tered, and passed the original jokes and Witticisms com-
on, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 137

ie eto ONT
mon in such cases, while the old ladies soberly took the
matter in hand when they went out with their knitting
to make afternoon visits, considering how much money
Uncle Jaw had, how much his son would have, and how
much Marion would have, and what altogether would
come to, and whether Joseph would bea “smart man,”
and Marion a good house-keeper, with all the “ ifs, ands,
and buts” of married life. 3

But the most fearful wonders and prognostics crowded
around the point “ what Uncle Jaw would have to say to
the matter.’ His lawsuit with the sisters being well
understood, as there was every reason it should be, it was
surmised what two such vigorous belligerents as himself
and Miss Silence would say to the prospect of a matrimo-
nial conjunction. It was also reported that Mr. Dudley
had a claim to the land which constituted the finest part
of Marion’s portion, the loss of which would render the
consent of Uncle Jaw still more doubtful. But all this
while Miss Silence knew nothing of the matter, for her
habit of considering and treating Marion as a child
seemed to gain strength with time. Marion was always
to be seen to, and watched, instructed, and taught; and
Miss Silence could not conceive that one who could
not even make pickles without her to oversee, could
think of such a matter as setting up house-keeping her-
sclf, To be sure, she began to observe an extraordinary
change in her sister ; remarked that lately Marion seem-
ed to be getting sort 0’ crazy-headed ; that she seemed
not to have any “faculty” for anything ; that she
had made ginger-bread twice, and forgot the ginget
one time, and put in mustard the other; that she tcok
138 MARION JONES;



the saltcellar out in the table-cloth, and let the cat
into the pantry half a dozen times; and that, when scol-
ded for these sins of omission or commission, she had
a fit of crying, and did a little worse than before.
Silence was of opinion that Marion was getting to be
“weakly and narvy,” and actually concocted an un-
merciful pitcher of wormwood and boneset, which she
said was to keep off the “shaking weakness” that was
coming over her, In vain poor Marion protested that
she was well enough—Miss Silence ‘new better; and one
evening she entertained Mr. Joseph Adams with a long
statement of the case in all its bearings, and ended
with demanding his opinion, as a candid listener, whe-
ther the wormwood and boneset sentence should not be
executed.

Poor Marion had that very afternoon parted from a
knot of young friends who had teased her most unmerci-
fully on the score of attentions received, till she began
to think the very leaves and stones were so many eyes to
pry into her secret feelings, and then to have the whole
case set in order before the very person, too, whom she
most dreaded. “Certainly he would think she was acting
like a fool ; perhaps he did not mean anything more than
friendship after all, and she would not, for the world,
have him suppose that she cared more for him than for
any other friend, or that she was i love, of all things.”
So she sat very busy with her knitting-work, scarcely
knowing what she was about, till Silence called out—

“ Why, Marion, what a piece of work you are making
of that stocking heel! What in the world are you doing
to it?”
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 139

ee ssuesnenetemmeenmmmmmameiaains

Marion dropped her knitting, and, making some pettish
answer, escaped out of the room.

“ Now, did you ever!” said Silence, laying down the
seam she had been cross-stitching ; “what zs the matter
with her, Mr. Adams ?”

«“ Miss Marion is certainly indisposed,” replied our hero,
gravely; “I must get her to take your advice, Miss
Silence.” :

Our hero followed Marion to the front door, where she
stood looking out at the moon, and begged to know what
distressed her.

Of course it was “nothing,” the young lady’s usual
complaint when in low spirits; and to show that she was
perfectly easy, she began an unsparing attack on a white
rose-bush near by.

“Marion!” said Joseph, laying his hand on hers, and
in a tone that made her start. She shook back her curls’
and looked up to him with such an innocent, confiding”
face—

Ah, my good reader, you may go on with this part of
the story for yourself. We are principled against un-
veiling the “sacred mysteries,” the “ thoughts that
breathe and words that burn,” in such little moonlight
interviews as these. You may fancy all that followed ;
and we can only assure all who are doubtful, that, under
judicious management, cases of this kind may be dispesed
of without wormwood or boneset. Our hero and heroine
were called to sublunary realities by the voice of Miss
Silence, who came into the passage to see what upon
earth they were doing. That lady was satisfied by the


140 MARION JONES }

OD
representations of so friendly and learned a young man
as Joseph, that nothing immediately alarming was to be
apprehended in the case of Marion, and she retired.
From that evening Marion stepped about with a heart
many pounds lighter than before.

“T’ll tell you what, Joseph,” said Uncle Jaw, “Til
tell you what, now, I hear ‘em tell that you’ve took and
courted that ’ere Marion Jones. Now I just want to
know if it’s true ?”

There was an explicitness about this mode of inquiry
that took our hero quite by surprise, so that he could
only reply,

“ Why, sir, supposing I had, would tnere be any ob-
jection to it in your mind ?”

“Don’t talk to me,” said Uncle Jaw ; “I just want to
know if it’s true ?”

Our hero put his hands in his pockets, walked to the
window, and whistled.

“ Cause if you have,” said Uncie Jaw, “ you may jest
uncourt as fast as you can; for Squire Jones’s daughter
won’t get asingle penny of my money, I can tell you
that.”

“ Why, father, Marion Jones is not to blame for any-
thing that her father did, and I’m sure she is a pretty
girl enough.”

“I don’t care if she is pretty; what’s that to me?
I’ve got you through college, J oseph, and a hard time
I’ve had of it, a delving and slaving, and here you come,
and the very first thing you do, you must take and court
that ’ere Squire Jones’s daughter, who was always putting
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 141

eee SETA AA
himself up above me ; besides, I mean to have the law
on that estate yet, and Mr. Dudley, he will have the law
too, and it will cut off the best piece of land the girl has;
and when you get married, I mean you shall have some-
thing. It’s just a trick of them gals at me; but I guess
I'll come up with ’em yet. I’m just a goin’ down to
have a ‘regular hash’ with old Silence, to let her know
she can’t come round me that way.”

“ Silence,” said Marion, drawing her head into the
window, and looking apprehensive, “ there is Mr. Adams
coming here.”

“@Vhat, Joe Adams? Well, and what if he is?”

“No, no, sister, but it is his father—it is Uncle
Jaw.”

“ Well, s’pose ’tis, child—what scares you? s’pose I’m
afraid of him? If he wants more than I gave him last
time, I’ll put it on.” So saying, Miss Silence took her
knitting-work and marched down into the sitting-room,
and set herself bolt upright in an attitude of defiance,
while poor Marion, feeling her heart beat unaccountably
fast, glided out of the room.

“ Well, good-morning, Miss Silence,” said Uncle Jaw,
after having scraped his feet on the scraper, and scrub-
bed them on the mat nearly ten minutes in silent de-
liberation.

“ Morning, sir,” said Silence, abbreviating the “ good.”

Uncle Jaw helped himself to a chair directly in front
of the enemy, dropped his hat on the floor, and surveyed
Miss Silence with a dogged air of satisfaction, like one
142 MARION JONES;



who is sitting down to a regular, comfortable quarrel,
and means to make the most of it.

Miss Silence tossed her head disdainfully, but scorned
to commence hostilities. ,

“So, Miss Silence,” said Uncle Jaw, deliberately,
“you don’t think youll do anything about that ’ere
matter.” .

“ What matter?” said Silence, with an intonation re-
sembling that of a roasted chestnut when it bursts from
the fire.

“J yailly thought, Miss Silence, in that ’ere talk I
had with you about Squire Jones’s cheatin’ about that
"ere —” |

‘Myr, Adams,” said Silence, “1 tell you, to begin
with, I’m not going to be sauced in this ere way by you.
You haven’t got common decency, nor common sense,
nor common anytning else, to talk so to me about my
father: I won’t bear it, I tell you.”

“ Why, Miss Jones,” said Uncle Jaw, “how you talk !
Well to be sure, Squire Jones is dead and gone, and it’s
as well not to call it cheatin’, as I was tellin’ Mr. Dudley
when he was talkin’ about that ’ere lot—that ’ere lot,
you know, that he sold him and never let him have the
deed on’t.”

‘That's a lie,” said Silence, starting on her feet ;
“ that’s an up and down black lie! I tell you that, now,
before you say another word.”

* Miss Silence, railly you seem te be getting touchy.”
exid Uncle Jaw ; “ well, to be sure, if he can let tha’
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 143

pass, other folks can, and may-be he will, because Squire
Jones was a church-member, and Mr. Dwdley is tender
about bringing out anything against professors; but railly,
now, Miss Silence, I didn’t think you and Marion were
going to work it so cunning in this here way.”

“T don’t know what you mean, and, what’s more, I
don’t care,” said Silence, resuming her work, and calling
back the bolt upright dignity with which she began.

There was a pause of some moments, during which the
features of Silence worked with suppressed rage, which
was contemplated by Uncle Jaw with undisguised satis-
faction.

“ You see, I s’pose, I shouldn’t a minded your Marion’s
setting out to court my Joe, if it hadn’t a been for those
things.”

“Qourting your son! Mr, Adams, I should like to
know what you mean by that. I’m sure nobody wants
your son, though he’s a civil, likely fellow enough; yct
with such an old dragon for a father, Pll warrant he
won’t get anybody to court him, nor be courted by him
neither.”

“ Railly, Miss Silence, you an’t hardly civil, now.”

“Civil! I should like to know who could be civil?
You know, now, as well as I do, that you are saying all
this out of clear, sheer ugliness; and that’s what you
keep a doing all round the neighbourhood.”

“Miss Silence,” said Uncle Jaw, “I don’t want no
hard words with you. It’s pretty much known round
the neighbourhood that your Marion thinks she'll get
my Joe,and I s’pose you was thinking that perhaps it
144 MARION JONES$





schnoresceeeesiaiaeieaitstammmecmmnaeepenccecnncsmmsniitatitii
svould be the best way of settling up matters; but ycu
see now, I took and tell’d my son I railly didn’t see as I
could afford it; I took and tell’d him that young folks
must have something considerable to start with; and
that, if Marion lost that ‘ere piece of ground, as is
likely she will, it would be cutting off quite too much of
a piece; so, you see, I don’t want you to take no encour-
agement about that.”

“ Well, I think this is pretty weil!” exclaimed Silence,
provoked beyond measure or endurance; “you old tor-
ment! think I don’t know what you're at? I and
Marion courting your son! I wonder if you an’t ashamed.
of yourself, now ! I should like to know what I or she
have done, now, to get that notion into your head?”

“JT didn’t s’pose you spected to get him yourself,”
said Uncle Jaw, “ for I guess by this time you've pretty
much gin up trying, ha’n’t ye? But Marioo does, I’m
pretty sure.”

“Here, Marion! Marion! you—come down !” called
Miss Silence, in great wrath, throwing open the chamber
door. ‘Mr. Adams wants to speak with you.” Marion,
fluttering and agitated, slowly descended into the room,
where she stopped, and looked hesitatingly, first at
Uncle Jaw and then at her sister, who, without cere-
mony, proposed the subject-matter of the interview as
follows:—

“ Now, Marion, here’s this man pretends to say that
you’ve been a courting and snaring to get his son, and I
just want you to tell him that you ha’n’t never had nq
thought of him, and that you won't have, neither,”
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 145

ee

_ This considerate way of announcing the subject had
the effect of bringing the burning colour into Marion’s
face, as she stood like a convicted culprit with her eyes
bent on the floor. ;

Uncle Jaw, savage as he was, was always moved by
female loveliness, as wild beasts are said to be myste-
riously swayed by music, and looked on the beautiful,
downcast face with more softening than Miss Silence,
who, provoked that Marion did not immediately respond
to the question, scized her by the arm and eagerly
reiterated,

“ Marion! why don’t you speak, child?”

Gathering desperate courage, Marion shook off the
hand of Silence, and straightened herself up with as
much dignity as some little flower lifts up its head when
it has been bent down by raindrops.

“Silence,” she said, “I never would have come down
if I had thought it was to hear such things as this. Mr.
Adams, all I have to say to you is, that your son has
sought me, and not I your son. If you wish to know any
more, he can tell you better than I.”

“Well, I vow! she is a pretty girl,” said Uncle Jaw,
as Marion shut the door.

This exclamation was involuntary; then recollecting
himself, he picked up his hat, and saying, “ Well, I
guess I may as well get along,” he began to depart; but,
turning round before he shut the door, he said, “ Miss
Silence, if you should conclude to do anything about
that ’ere fence, just send word over and let me know.”

Silence, without deigning any reply, marched up into

K
146 MARION JONES;

ct LAE

Marion’s litt’s chamber, where our heroine was treating
resolution to a good fit of crying.

“ Marion, I did not think you had been such a fool,”
said the lady. “Ido not want to know, now, if you've
railly been thinking of getting married, and to that Joe
Adams of all folks!”

Poor Marion! such an interlude in all her pretty
romantic little dreams about kindred feelings and a hun-
dred other delightful ideas, that flutter like singing-birds
through the fairy-land of first love. Such an interlude!
to be called on by gruff human voices to give up all the
cherished secrets that she had trembled to whisper even
to herself. She felt as if love itself had been defiled by
the coarse, rough hands that had been meddling with it:
so to her sister’s soothing address Marion made no answer,
only to cry and sob still more bitterly than before.

Miss Silence, if she had a great stout heart, had no
less a kind one, and seeing Marion take the matter so
bitterly to heart, she began gradually to subside.

“Marion, you poor little fool, you,” said she, at the
same time giving her a hearty slap, as expressive of
earnest sympathy, “I really do feel for you; that good-
for-nothing fellow has been a cheatin’ you, I do believe.”

“ Qh, don’t talk any more about it, for mercy’s sake,”
said Marion; “I am sick of the whole of it.”

“That's you, Marion! Glad to hear you sayso! T'll
stand up for you, Marion; if I catch Joe Adams coming
here again with his palavering face, I'll let him know!”

“No! no! don’t, for mercy’s sake, say anything to Mr.
Adams—don’t !”
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 147

ere et

“ Well, at any rate, Pll just let Joe Adams know that
we ha’n’t nothing more to say to him.” Sd

« But I don’t wish to say that—that is—I don’t know |
—jndeed, sister Silence, don’t say anything about it.”

“Why not? You an’tsuch a natural, now, as to want
to marry him after all, hey ?”

“J don’t know what I want nor what I don’t want ;
only, Silence, do now, if you love me, do promise not to
say anything at all to Mr. Adams—don’t.”

“ Well, then, I won’t,” said Silence ; “ but, Marion, if
you railly was in love all this while, why ha’n’t you been
and told me? Don’t you know that I’m as much as a
mother to’ you, and you ought to have told me in the
beginning ?”

“ I don’t know, Silence! I couldn’t—I don’t want to
talk about it.”

“ Well, Marion, you an’t a bit like me,” said Silence;
a remark evincing great discrimination, certainly, and
with which the conversation terminated.

That very evening our friend Joseph walked down
towards the dwelling of the sisters, not without some
anxiety for the result, for he knew by his father’s satisfied
appearance that war had been declared. He walked into
the family room, and found nobody there but Miss
Silence, who was sitting, grim as an Egyptian sphinx,
stitching very vigorously on a meal-bag, in which in-
teresting employment she thought proper to be so much
engaged as not to remark the entrance of our hero. To
Joseph’s accustomed “ Good-evening, Miss Silence,” she
replied merely by looking up with a cold nod, and went
148 MARION JONES $

cee OA





on with her sewing. It appeared that she had determined
on a literal version of her promise not to say anything to
Mr. Adams.

Our hero, as we have before stated, was familiar with
the crooks and turns of the female mind, and mentally
resolved to put a bold face on the matter, and give Miss
Silence no encouragement in her attempt to make him
feel himself unwelcome. It was rather a frosty autumnal
evening, and the fire on the hearth was decaying. Mr.
Joseph bustled about most energetically, throwing down
the tongs, and shovel, and bellows, while he pulled the
fire to pieces, raked out ashes and brands, and then in a
twinkling, was at the woodpile, from whence he selected
a massive backlog and forestick, with accompaniments,
which were soon roaring and crackling in the chimney.

“There, now, that does look something like comfort,”
said our hero; and drawing forward the big rocking-chair,
he seated himself in it, and rubbed his hands with an air
of great complacency. Miss Silence looked not up, but
stitched so much the faster that one might distinctly
hear the crack of the needle and the whistle of the
thread all over the apartment.

“ Have you a headache to-night, Miss Silence ?”

“No;” was the gruff answer.

« Are you in a hurry about those bags ?”” said he,
glancing at a pile of unmade ones which lay by her side.

No reply. “ Well!” said our hero to himself, “ I'll
make her speak.”

Miss Silence’s needle-book and brown thread lay on a
chair beside her. Our friend helped himself to a needle
Oh, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 149



aralipuannianneaciiimanemanientions colcmmaamiteal
and thread, and taking one of the bags, planted himself
bolt upright opposite to Miss Silence, and pinning his
work to his knee, commenced stitching at a rate fully
equal to her own.

Miss Silence looked up and fidgeted, but went on with
her work faster than before: but the faster she worked,
the faster and steadier worked our hero, all in “ mar-
vellous silence.” There began to be an odd twitching
about the muscles of Miss Silence’s face ; our hero took
no notice, having pursed his features into an expression
of unexampled gravity, which only grew more intense as
he perceived, by certain uneasy movements, that the
adversary was beginning to waver.

As they were sitting, stitching away, their needles
whizzing at each other like a couple of locomotives
engaged in conversation, Marion opened the door.

The poor child had been crying for the greater part of
her spare time during the day,and was in no very merry
humour ; but the moment that her astonished eyes com-
prehended the scene, she burst into a fit of almost in-
extinguishable merriment, while Silence laid down her
needle, and looked half amused and half angry. Our
hero, however, continued his business with inflexible per-
severance, unpinning his work and moving the seam
along, and going on with increased velocity.

Poor Miss Silence was at length vanquished, and joined
in the loud laugh which seemed to convulse her sister.
Whereupon our hero unpinned his work, and folding it
up, looked up at her with all the assurance of impudence
triumphant, and remarked to Marion—
150 MARION JONES ;
nn

“Your sister had such a pile of these pillow-cases to
make, that she was quite discouraged, and engaged me to
do half a dozen of them: when I first came in she was
so busy she could not even speak to me.” |

“Well, if you an’t the beater for impudence !” said
Miss Silence.

«he beater for industry—so I thought,” rejoined our
hero. |

Marion, who had been in a highly tragical state of
mind all day, and who was meditating on nothing less
sublime than an eternal separation from her lover, which
she imagined, with all the affecting attendants and con-
sequents, was entirely revolutionized by the unexpected
turn thus given to her ideas, while our hero pursued the
opportunity he had made for himself, and exerted his
powers of entertainment to thie utmost, till Miss Silence
declared that if she had been washing all day she should
not have been more tired than she was with laughing,
took up her candle, and good-naturedly left our young
people to settle matters between themselves. There was
a grave pause of some length when she had departed,
which was broken by our hero, who seating himself by
Marion, inquired very seriously if his father had made
proposals of marriage to Miss Silence that morning.

“No, you provoking creature !” said Marion, at the
same time laughing at the absurdity of the idea.

« Well, now, don’t draw on your long face again,
Marion,” said Joseph; “ you have been trying to leng-
then it down all the evening, if I would have let you.
Seriously, now, I know that something painful passed
OR; LOVE VERSUS LAW. 151

——
between my father and you this morning, but I shall not
inquire what it was. I only tell you frankly, that he has
expressed his disapprobation of our engagement, forbid-
den me to go on with it, and—”

“ Avid, consequently, I release you from all engage-
ments and obligations to me, even before you ask it,”
said Marion.

“ Yoti are extremely accommodating,” replied Joseph;
«but I cannot promise to be so obliging in giving up
certain promises made to me, unless, indeed, the feelings
that dictated them should have changed.” |

“ Oh, no—no, indeed,” said Marion, earnestly ; “ you
know it is not that; but if your father objects to me —”

“Tf my father objects to you, he is welcome not to
marry you,” said Joseph. :

“ Now, Joseph, do be serious,” said Marion.

«“ Well, then, seriously, Marion, I know my obligation
to my father, and in all that relates to his comfort I will
ever be dutiful and submissive, for I have no college-boy
pride on the subject of submission ; but in a matter so
individually my own as the choice of a wife—in a mat-
ter that will most likely affect my happiness years and
years after he has ceased to be, I hold that I have a
right to consult my own inclinations, and, by your leave,
my dear little lady, I shall take that liberty.”

“ But, then, if your father is made angry, you know
what sort of a man he is; and how could I stand in the
way of all your prospects ”

“Why, my dear Marion, do you think I count myself
dependant upon my father, like the heir of an English
152 MARION JONES }

ee et lt



estate, who has nothing to do but sit still and wait for
money to come to him? No! I have energy and edu-
cation to start with, and if I cannot take care of myself,
and you too, then cast me off and welcome ;” and, as
Joseph spoke, his fine face glowed with conscious power.
He paused a moment, and resumed: “ Nevertheless,
Marion, I respect my father: whatever others may say
of him, I shall never forget that I owe to his hard earn-
ings the education that enables me to do or be anything,
and I shall not wantonly or rudely cross him. I do not
despair of gaining his consent ; my father has a great
partiality for pretty girls, and if his love of contradiction
is not kept awake by open argument, I will trust to time
and you to bring him round; but, whatever comes, rest
assured, my dearest one, I have chosen for life, and can-
not change.”

The conversation, after this, took a turn which may
readily be imagined by all who have been in the same
situation, and will, therefore, need no farther illustration.

“ Well, Mr. Dudley, railly I don’t know what to think
now : there’s my Joe, he’s took and been a courting that
’ere Marion,” said Uncle Jaw.

This was the introduction to one of Uncle Jaw’s per-
sodical visits to Mr. Dudley, who was sitting with his
usual air of mild abstraction, looking into the coals of a
bright November fire, while his busy helpmate was indus-
triously rattling her knitting-needles by his side.

A close observer might have suspected that this was
no news to the good man, who had given a great deal of ©
good advice, in private, to Master Joseph of late ; but
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 153

—_——





ees iE ane aRnne ea naneereaaamaants

he only relaxed his features into a quiet smile, and eja-
culated, “I want to know!”

“Yes; and railly, that ’ere girl is a rail pretty un. I
was a tellin’ my folks ‘that our new minister’s wife was @
fool to her.”

“ And so your son is going to marry her?” said the good
lady; “I knew that long ago.”

< Well—no—not so fast; ye see there’s two to that
bargain yet. You see, Joe, he never said a word to me,
but took and courted the girl out of his own head; and
when I come to know, says I, ‘Joe,’ says I, ‘that ’ere
girl won’t do‘for me » and I took and tell’d him, then,
about that ’ere old fence, and all about that old mill, and
them medders of mine; and I tell’d him too about that
‘ore lot of Marion’s; and I should like to know now, how
that lot of business is a going to turn out.”

« Judge Smith and Squire Moseley say that my claim
to it will stand,” said the deacon.

“They do?” said Uncle Jaw, with much satisfaction ;
“spose then you'll sue, won't you!”

«T don’t know,” replied he, meditatively.

Uncle Jaw was thoroughly amazed : that any one
should have doubts about entering suit for a fine piece
of land, when sure of obtaining it, was a problem quite .
beyond his powers of solving. |

“You say your son has courted the girl,” said the
deacon, after a long pause; “ that strip of land is the
best part of Marion’s share; I paid down five hundred
dollars for it; I’ve got papers here that Judge Smith and
Squire Moseley say will stand good in any court of law.”
154 MARION JONES;
Oe

Unclé Jaw pricked up his ears and was all attention,
eyeing with eager looks the packet ; but, to his disap-
pointment, the deacon deliberately laid it into his desk,
shut and locked it, and resumed his seat. |

“ Now, railly,” said Uncle Jaw, “1 should like to kno
the particulars.”

“ Well, well,” said Mr. Dudley, “ the lawyers will be
at my house to-morrow evening, and if you have any
concern about it, you may as well come along.”

Uncle Jaw wondeted all the way home at what he
could have done to get himself into the confidence of the
old man, who, he rejoiced to think, was a going to “ take,”
and go to law like other folks.

The next day there was an appearance of some bustle
and preparation about Mr. Dudley’s house; the best
room was opened and aired; an ovenful of cake was
baked, and our friend Joseph, with a face full of business,
was seen passing to and fro, in and out of the house,
from various closetings with Mr. Dudley, whose lady
bustled about the house with an air of wonderful mys-
tery, and even gave her directions about eggs and raisins
in a whisper, lest they should possibly let out some event-
ful secret.

The afternoon of that day Joseph appeared at the
house of the sisters, stating that there was to be company
it Mr. Dudley’s that evening, and he was sent to invite
them.

“ Why, what’s got into these folks lately,” said Silence,
to have company 80 often? Joe Adams, this ‘ere is
some ‘cut up’ of yours, Come, what are you up to now?”
on, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 155.

ste A

«Come, come, dress yourselves and pet ready,” said
Joseph; and, stepping up to Marion, as she was follow-
ing Silence out of the room, he whispered something
into her ear, at which she stopped short and coloured
violently.

“ Why, Joseph, what do you mean ”

“Tt is so,” said he.

« No, no, Joseph; no, I can’t, indeed I caii’t.”

« But you can, Marion.”

“Oh, Joseph, don’t.”

“Oh, Marion, do.”

“Why, how strange, J oseph !” |

“ Come, come, my dear, you keep me waiting. If you
have any objections on the score of propriety, we will
talk about them to-morrow ;” and our hero looked so
saucy and so resolute that there was no disputing farther;
so, after a little more lingering and blushing on Marion’s
part, and a few kisses and persuasions on the part of the
suiter, Miss Marion seemed to be brought to a state of
resignation. Ss

At a table in tlie whiddle of Mr. Dudley’s north front
room were seated the two lawyers, whose legal opinion
was that evening to be fully made up. The younger of
these, Squire Moseley, was a rosy, portly, laughing little
bachelor, who boasted that he had offered himself, in
rotation, to every pretty girl within twenty miles round,
and, among others, to Marion Jones, notwithstanding
which he still remained a bachelor, with a fair prospect
of béing an old one; but none of these things disturbed
the boundless flow of good nature and complacency with
156 MARION JONES!

LE





which he seemed at all times full to overflowing. On the
present occasion he seemed to be particularly in his ele-
ment, as if he had some law business in hand remarkably
suited to his turn of mind; for, on finishing the inspec-
tion of the papers, he started up, slapped his graver
brother on the back, made two or three flourishes round
the room, and then seizing Mr. Dudley’s hand, shook it
violently, exclaiming,

“ All’s right, all’s right ! hurrah !”

When Uncle Jaw entered, Mr. Dudley, without pre-
face, handed him a chair and the papers, saying,

“These papers are what you wanted to see. I just
wish you would read them over.”

Uncle Jaw read them deliberately over. “Didn't I
tell ye so? The case is as clear as a bell: now ye will
go to law, won’t you ?”

“Took here, Mr. Adams; now you have seen these
papers, and heard what's to be said, I'll make you an
offer. Let your son marry Marion Jones, and I'll burn
these papers and say no more about it, and there won’t
be a girl in the parish with a finer portion.”

Uncle Jaw opened his eyes with amazement, and
looked at the old man, his mouth gradually expanding
wider and wider, as if he hoped, in time, to swallow the
idea.

“ Well, now,” at length he ejaculated.

“I mean just as I say,” said the deacon.

“ Why, that’s the same as giving the girl five hundred
dollars out of your own pocket, and she an’t no relation
neither,”
»

On, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 157

een AC LTT

“ T know it,” said the deacon; “but I have said I will
do it.” i180 )

« What upon ’arth for?” said Uncle Jaw.

“To make peace,’ said the good man, “and to let



~



you know that when I say it is better to give up one’s
rights than to quarrel, I mean so. Iam an old man;
my children are dead” —his voice faltered,—“ my trea-
sures are laid up in heaven ; if I can make the children
happy, why, I will. When I thought I had lost the land,
I made up my mind to lose it, and so I can now.”

Uncle Jaw looked fixedly onthe old man and said,

“ Well, well, I believe you. I vow, if you ha’n't got
something ahead in t’other world, I’d like to know who
has, that’s all ; so, if Joe has no objections, and I rather
guess he won't have —”

“The short of the matter is,” said the Squire, “ we'll
have a wedding; so come on;” and with that he threw
open the parlour door, where stood Marion and Joseph in
a recess by the window, while Silence and the Rey. Mr.
Bissel were drawn up by the fire, and the lady of the
house was sweeping up the hearth, as she had been doing
ever since the party arrived.

Instantly Joseph took the hand of Marion, and led
her to the middle of the roam ; the merry Squire seized
the hand of Miss Silence and placed her as bridesmaid,
and before any one could open their mouths, the cere-
mony was in actual progress, and the minister, having
been previously instructed, made the two one with extra-
ordinary celerity.

“What! what! what!” said Uncle Jaw. “ Joseph!
Mr. Dudley !”
158 MARION JONES;





“Fair bargain, sir,” said the Squire, “ and over
your papers, Mr. Dudley.” |

He handed them, and the Squire, having read them
aloud, proceeded, with much ceremony, to throw them
into the fire ; after which, in a mock solemn oration, he
gave a statement of the whole affair, and concluded with
a grave exhortation to the new couple on the duties of
wedlock, which unbent the risibles even of the minister
himself.

Uncle Jaw looked at his pretty daughter-in-law, who
stood half smiling, half blushing, receiving the congra-
tulations of the party, ard then at Miss Silence, who ap-
peared full as much taken by surprise as himself.

“ Well, well, Miss Silence, these ‘ere young folks have
come round us smart enough,” said he. “I don’t see
but we must shake hands upon it.” And the warlike
powers shook hands accordingly, which was a signal for
general merriment.

As the company were dispersing, Miss Silence laid
hold of good Mr. Dudley, and by main strength dragged
him aside: “Mr. Dudley,” said she, “I take back all
that e’er I said about you, every word on’t.”

“Don’t say any more about it, Miss Silence,” said the.
good man; “it’s gone by, and let it go.”

“ Joseph!” said his father, the next morning, as he
was sitting at breakfast with Joseph and Marion, “I cal-
culate I shall feel proud of this girl yet: and Ill tell you
what, I'll give you that nice little place that I took on
Stanton’s mortgage: it’s a nice little place with green
blinds, and flowers, and all them things, just right for
Marion.”
OR, LOVE VERSUS LAW. 159



And, accordingly, many happy years flew over the
heads of the young couple in the Stanton place, long
after the hoary hairs of their kind benefactor, the deacon,
were laid with reverence in the dust. Joseph’s father
was so far wrought upon by the magnanimity of the good
old man, as to be very materially changed for the better.
Instead of quarrelling in real earnest all around the
neighbourhood, he confined himself merely to battling
the opposite side of every question with his son, which,
as the latter was somewhat of a logician, afforded a
pretty good field for the exercise of his powers.
460 AUGUSTA HOWARD,

eal ltt nleietinenmealal



quar EEE EEE =

AUGUSTA HOWARD.

—_—
In business diligent, in spirit pure

And fervent ’gainst the ills of life secure,

By the fidelity that wins success,

By unrepining sense of happiness.
ANON,

“ 4 ND so you will not sign this paper?” said Alfred
Melton to his cousin, a fine-looking young man,
who was lounging by the centre table.

“ NotI,indeed. What in life have I to do with these
decidedly vulgar temperance pledges ?”

“Come, come, Cousin Melton,” said a brilliant, dark-
eyed girl, who had been lolling on the sofa during the
conference, “I beg of you to give over attempting to
_ evangelize Edward. You see, as Falstaff has it, ‘he is
little better than one of the wicked.’ You must not
waste such valuable temperance documents on him.”

‘But, seriously, Melton, my good fellow,” resumed
Edward, “this signing, and sealing, and pledging, is al-
together an unnecessary affair for me. My past and
present habits, my situation in life,—in short, everything
that can be mentioned with regard to me, goes against
AUGUSTA TIOWARD. 161

a yy
the supposition of my ever becoming the slave of a vice

so debasing; and this pledging myself to avoid it is
something altogether needless—nay, by implication, it is
degrading. As to what you say of my influence, I am
inclined to the opinion, that if every man will look to
himself, every man will be looked to. This modern no-
tion of tacking the whole responsibility of society on to
every individygl, is one Iam not at all inclined to adopt ;
for, first, I know it is a troublesome doctrine; and, se-
condly, I doubt if it be a true one. For both which rea-
sons, I shall decline extending it my patronage.”

“ Well, positively,” exclaimed the lady, “ you gentle-
men have the gift of continuance in an uncommon de-
gree. You have discussed this matter backward and
forward till I am ready to perish. I will take the matter
in hand myself, and sign a temperance pledge for Ed-
ward, and see that he gets into none of those naughty
courses upon which you have been so pathetic.”

“T dare say,” said Melton, glancing on her brilliant
face with evident admiration, “ that you will be the best
temperance pledge he could have. But every man, cou-
sin, may not be so fortunate.”

“But, Melton,” said Edward, “ seeing my steady ha-
bits are so well provided for, you must carry your logic

EE Oe

and eloquence to some poor fellow less favoured.” And
thus the conference ended.
“ What a good, disinterested fellow Melton is!” said
Edward, after he had left.
“Yes, good as the day is long,” said Augusta, “ but
rather prosy, after all. This tiresome temperance busi-
L
162 AUGUSTA HOWARD.

: .







ness! One never hears the end of it now-a-days. Tem-
perance papers—temperance tracts—temperance hotels—
temperance this, that, and the other thing, even down to
temperance pocket-handkerchiefs for little boys! Really,
the world is getting intemperately temperate.”

“ Ah, well! with the security you have offered, Au-
gusta, I shall dread no temptation.”

Though there was nothing peculiar in these words, yet
there was a certain earnestness of tone that called the
colour into the face of Augusta, and set her to sewing
with uncommon assiduity. And thereupon Edward pro-
ceeded with some remark about “ guardian angels,” to-
gether with many other things of the kind, which, though
they contain no more that is new than a temperance lec-
ture, always seem to have a peculiar freshness to people
in certain circumstances. In fact, before the hour was
at an end, Edward and Augusta had forgotten where they
began, and had wandered far into that land of anticipa-
tions and bright dreams, which surrounds the young and
loving before they eat of the tree of experience, and gain
the fatal knowledge of good and evil.

But here, stopping our sketching pencil, let us throw
_in a little back ground and perspective that will enablo
our readers to preceive more readily the entire picture.

Edward Howard was a young man whose brilliant
talents and captivating manners had placed him first in
the society in which he moved. Though without pro-
perty or weight of family connexions, he had become a
leader in the circles where these appendages are most
considered, and there were none of their immunitics and
privileges that were not freely at his disposal,
AUGUSTA HOWARD. 163

——



Augusta Elmore was conspicuous in all that lies with-
in the sphere of feminine attainment. She was an orphan,
and accustomed from a very early age to the free enjoy-
ment and control of an independent property. This cir-
cumstance, doubtless, added to the magic of her per-
sonal graces in procuring for her that flattering deference
which beauty and wealth secure.

Her mental powers were naturally superior, although,
from want of motive, they had received no development,
except such as would secure success in society. Native
good sense, with great strength of feeling and indepen-
dence of mind, had saved her from becoming heartless
and frivolous. She was better fitted to lead and to in-
fluence than to be influenced or led. And hence, though
not swayed by any habitual sense of moral responsibility,
the tone of her character scemed altogether more ele-
vated than the average of fashionable society.

General expectation had united the destiny of two
persons who seemed every way fitted for each other, and,
for once, general expectation did not err. A few months
after the interview mentioned were witnessed the fes-
tivities and congratulations of their brilliant and happy
marriage.

Never did two young persons commence life under
happier auspices. “ What an exact match!” “ What a
beautiful couple !” said all the gossips. “They scem
made for each other,” said every one ; ard 80 thought
the happy lovers themselves.

Love, which, with persons of strong character, is always
an earnest and sobering principle, had made them
thoughtful and considerate; and as they looked forward
164 AUGUSTA INOWARD.

to future life, and talked of the days before them, their
plans and ideas were as rational as any plans can be,
when formed entirely with reference to this life, with-
. out any regard to another.

For a while their absorbing attachment to each other
tended to withdraw them from the temptations and allure-
ments of company, and many a long winter evening
passed delightfully in the elegant quietude of home, as
they read, and sang, and talked of the past, and dream-
ed of the future in each other’s society. But, contra-
dictory as it may appear to the theory of the sentimen-
talist, it is nevertheless a fact, that two persons cannot
always find sufficient excitement in talking to each other
merely; and this is specially true of those to whom high
excitement has been a necessary of life. After a while,
the young couple, though loving each other none the
less, began to respond to the many calls which invited
them again into society, and the pride they felt in each
other added zest to the pleasures of their return.

As the gaze of admiration followed the graceful
motions of the beautiful wife, and the whispered tribute
went round the circle whenever she entered, Edward felt
a pride beyond all that flattery, addressed to himself,
had ever excited; and Augusta, when told of the con-
vivial talents and powers of entertainment which distin-
guished her husband, could not resist the temptation of
urging him into society even oftener than his own wishes
would have led him. | |

Alas! neither of them knew the perils of constant
excitement, nor supposed that, in thus alienating them-
AUGUSTA HOWARD. 165



selves from the pure and simple pleasures of home, they
were risking their whole capital of happiness. It is in
indulging the first desire for extra stimulus that the first
and deepest danger to domestic peace lies. Let that
stimulus be either bodily or mental, its effects are alike
to be dreaded.

The man or the woman to whom habitual excitement
of any kind has become essential, has taken the first step
towards ruin. In the case of a woman, it leads to dis-
content, fretfulness, and dissatisfaction with the quiet
duties of domestic life; in the case of a man, it leads
almost invariably to animal stimulus, ruinous alike to
the powers of body and mind.

Augusta, fondly trusting to the virtue of her husband,
saw no danger in the constant round of engagements
which were gradually drawing his attention from the
graver cares of business, from the pursuit of self-improve-
ment, and from the love of herself. - Already there was in
her horizon the cloud “as big as a man’s hand”—the pre-
cursor of future darkness and tempest; but, too confi-
dent and buoyant, she saw it not.

It was not until the cares and duties of a mother
began to confine her at home, that she first felt, with a
startling sensation of fear, that there was an alteration in
her husband, though even then the change was so shadowy
and indefinite that it could not be defined by words.

It was known by that quick, prophetic sense, which
reveals to the heart of woman the first variation in the
pulse of affection, though it be so slight that no other
touch can detect it. ,
166 AUGUSTA HOWARD.

ER
Edward was still fond, affectionate, admiring; and
when he tendered her all the little attentions demanded
by her situation, or caressed and praised his beautiful
son, she felt satisfied and happy. But when she saw
that, even without her, the convivial circle had its attrac-
tions, and that he could leave her to join it, she sighed,
she scarce knew why. “Surely,” she said, “ I am not so
selfish as to wish to rob him of pleasure because I can-
not enjoy it with him, But yet, once he told me there
was no pleasure where I was not. Alas! is it true, what
I have so often heard, that such feelings cannot always
last?” ‘

Poor Augusta ! she knew not how deep reason she had
to fear. She saw not the temptations that surrounded
her husband in the circles where, to all the stimulus of
wit and intellect was often added the zest of wine, used
far too freely for safety.

Already had Edward become familiar with a degree of
physical excitement which touches the very verge of in-
toxication; yet, strong in self-confidence, and deluded
by the customs of society, he dreamed not of danger.
The traveller who has passed above the rapids of Niagara
may have noticed the spot where the first white spark-
ling ripple announces the downward tendency of the
waters. Ali here is brilliancy and beauty; and as the
waters ripple and dance in the sunbeam, they seem only
as if inspired by a spirit of new life, and not as hasten-
ing to a dreadful fall. So the first approach to intem-
perance, that ruins both body and soul, seems only like
the buoyancy and exulting freshness of a new life, and
AUGUSTA HOWARD. J87

a ne

the unconscious voyager feels his bark undulating with
a thrill of delight, ignorant of the inexorable hurry, the ©
tremendous sweep, with which the laughing waters urge
him on beyond the reach of hope or recovery.

It was at this period in the life of Edward that one
judicious and manly friend, who would have had the
courage to point out to him the danger that every one
else perceived, might have saved him. But among the
circle of his acquaintances there was none such, “ Let
every man mind his own business” was the universal
maxim. True, heads were gravely shaken, and Mr. A,
regretted to Mr. B. that so promising a young man seem-
ed about to ruin himself. But one was “no relation” of
Edward’s, and the other “ felt a delicacy in speaking on
such a subject,” and therefore, according to a very
ancient precedent, they “ passed by on the other side.”
Yet it was at Mr. A.’s sideboard, always sparkling with
the choicest wine, that he had felt the first excitement of
extra stimulus; it was at Mr. B.’s house that the convivial
club began to hold their meetings, which, after a time,
found a more appropriate place in a public hotel. It is
thus that the sober, the regular, and the discreet, whose
constitution saves them from liabilities to excess, will
accompany the ardent and excitable to the very verge of
danger, and then wonder at their want of self-control.

It was a cold winter evening, and the wind whistled
drearily around the closed shutters of the parlour in
which Augusta was sitting. Everything around her bore
the marks of elegance and comfort.

Splendid books and engravings lay about in every
168 AUGUSTA HOWARD.

me ED

direction. Vases of rare and costly flowers exhaled per-
fume, and magnificent mirrors multiplied every object.
All spoke of luxury and repose, save the anxious and
sad countenance of its mistress.

It was late, and she had watched anxiously for her
husband for many long hours. . She drew out her gold
and diamond repeater, and looked at it. It was long
past midnight. She sighed as she remembered the
pleasant evenings they had passed together, as her eye
fell on the books they had read together, and on her
piano and harp, now silent, and thought of all he had
said and looked in those days when each was all to the
other.

She was aroused from this melancholy reverie by a
loud knocking at the street door. She hastened to open
it, but started back at the sight it disclosed—her hus-
band borne by four men.

“Dead! is he dead ?” she screamed, in agony.

“ No, ma’am,” said one of the men, “ but he might as
well be dead as in such a fix as this.”

The whole truth, in all its degradation, flashed on the
mind of Augusta. Without a question or comment, she
motioned to the sofa in the parlour, and her husband
was laid there. She locked the street door, and when the
last retreating footstep had died away, she turned to the
sofa, and stood gazing in fixed and almost stupefied
silence on the face of her senseless husband.

At once she realized the whole of her fearful lot. She
saw before her the blight of her own affections, the ruin
of her helpless children, the disgrace and misery of her
AUGUSTA HOWARD. 169

aoe
husband. She looked around her in helpless despair, for
she well knew the power of the vice whose deadly seal
was set upon her husband. As one who is struggling
and sinking in the waters casts a last dizzy glance at the
green sunny banks and distant trees which seem sliding
from his view, so did all the scenes of her happy days »
pass in a moment before her, and she groaned aloud in
bitterness of spirit. “Great God! help me—help me !”
she prayed. ‘Save him—oh, save my husband!”

Augusta was a woman of no common energy of spirit,
and when the first wild burst of anguish was over, she
resolved not to be wanting to her husband and children
in a crisis so dreadful.

“ When he wakes,” she mentally exclaimed, “ I will
warn and implore ; I will pour out my whole soul to save
him. My poor husband, you have been misled—be-
trayed. But you are too good—too generous—too noble
to be sacrificed without a struggle.”

It was late the next morning before the stupor in
which Edward was plunged began to pass off. He slowly
opened his eyes, started up wildly, gazed hurriedly
around the room, till his eye met the fixed and sor-
rowful gaze of his wife. The past instantly flashed upon
him, and a deep flush passed over his countenance.
There was a dead, a solemn silence, until Augusta, yield-
ing to her agony, threw herself into his arms, and wept.

“Then you do not hate me, Augusta?” said he, sor-
rowfully.

“Hate you—never! but oh, Edward— Edward, what
has beguiled you ?”
178 AUGUSTA HOWARD.



“ My wife, you once promised to be my guardian in
virtue—such you are, and will be. Oh, Augusta! you
have looked on what you shall never see again—never—
never—so help me God !” said he, looking up with solemn
earnestness.

And Augusta, as she gazed on the noble face, the ar-
dent expression of sincerity and remorse, could not doubt
that her husband was saved. But Edward’s. plan of re-
formation had one grand defect. It was merely modifi-
cation and retrenchment, and not entire abandonment.
Ile could not feel it necessary to cut himself off entirely
from the scenes and associations where temptation had
met him. He considered not that, when the temperate
flow of the blood and the even balance of the nerves have
once been destroyed, there is, ever after, a double and
fourfold liability, which often makes a man the sport of
the first untoward chance.

He still contrived to stimulate sufficiently to prevent
the return of a calm and healthy state of the mind and
body, and to make constant self-control and watchfulness
necessary. |

It is a great mistake to call nothing intemperance but
that degree of physical excitement which completely
overthrows the mental powers, There is a state of
nervous excitability, resulting from what is often called
moderate stimulation, which often long precedes this,
and is, in regard to it, like the premonitory warnings of
the fatal cholera, an unsuspected draught on the vital
powers, from which, at any moment, they may sink into
irremediable collapse. It is in this state, often, that the
AUGUSTA HOWARD. 171

eT
spirit of gambling or of wild speculation is induced by
the morbid cravings of an overstimulated system. Un-
satisfied with the healthy and regular routine of busi-
ness, and the laws of gradual and solid prosperity, the
excited and unsteady imagination leads its subjects to
daring risks, with the alternative of unbounded gain on
the one side, or of utter ruin on the other. And when,
as is too often the case, that ruin comes, unrestrained
and desperate intemperance is the wretched resort to
allay the ravings of disappointment and despair.

Such was the case with Edward. He had lost his in-
terest in his regular business, and he embarked the bulk
of his property in a brilliant scheme then in vogue; and
when he found a crisis coming, threatening ruin and
beggary, he had recourse to the fatal stimulus, which,
alas! he had never wholly abandoned.

At this time he spent some months in a distant city,
separated from his wife and family, while the insidious
power of temptation daily increased, as he kept up, by
artificial stimulus, the flagging vigour of his mind and
nervous system.

It came at last—the blow which shattered alike his
brilliant dreams and his real prosperity. The large for-
tune brought by his wife vanished in a moment, so that
scarcely a pittance remained in his hands. From the
distant city where he had been to superintend his
schemes, he thus wrote to his too confiding wife :

“ Augusta, all is over! expect no more from your
hushand—believe no more of his promises—for he is lost
to you and to him, Augusta, our property is gene; your
172 AUGUSTA HOWARD.

ee aaa



——



property, which I have blindly risked, is all swallowed
up. But isthat the worst ? No, no, Augusta, I am lost
—lost, body and soul, and as irretrievably as the perish-
ing riches I have squandered. Once I had energy—
health—nerve—resolution ; but all are gone: yes, yes, I
have yielded—I do yield daily to what is at once my
tormentor and my temporary refuge from intolerable
misery. You remember the sad hour you first knew your
husband was a drunkard. Your look on that morning of
misery—shall I ever forget it! Yet, blind and confiding
as you were, how soon did your ill-judged confidence in
me return. Vain hopes! I was even then past recovery
—even then sealed over to blackness of darkness for
ever.

“ Alas! my wife, my peerless wife, why am I your
husband? why the father of such children as you have
given me? Is there nothing in your unequalled loveli-
ness—nothing in the innocence of our helpless babes,
that is powerful enough to recall me ?—no, there is not.

“ Augusta, you know not the dreadful gnawing, the
intolerable agony of this master passion. I walk the
floor—-I think of my own dear home, my high hopes, my
proud expectations, my children, my treasured wife, my
own immortal spirit—I feel that I am sacrificing all—
feel it till I am withered with agony ; but the hour comes
—the burning hour, and all is in vain. I shall return to
you no more, Augusta. All the little wreck I have saved,
I send ; you have friends, relatives—above all, you have
an energy of mind, a capacity of resolute action, beyond
that of ordinary women, and you shall never be bouritd—
AUGUSTA HOWARD. 173

eeepc et TT



the living to the dead. True, you will suffer, thus to
burst the bonds that unite us; but be resolute, for you
will suffer more to watch from day to day the slow work-
ings of death and ruin in your husband. Would you
stay with me, to see every vestige of what you once
loved passing away; to endure the caprice, the morose-
ness, the delirious anger of one no longer master of
himself? Would you make your children victims and
fellow-sufferers with you? No! dark and dreadful is
my path; I will walk it alone ; no one shall go with me.

“In some peaceful retirement you may concentrate
your strong feelings upon your children, and bring them
up to fill a place in your heart which a worthless husband
has abandoned. If I leave you now, you will remember
me as I have been—you will love me and weep for me
when dead ; but if you stay with me your love will be
worn out; I shall become the object of disgust and
loathing. Therefore farewell, my wife—my first, best
love, farewell ! with you I part with hope,

‘ And, with hope, farewell fear,
Farewell remorse: all good to me is lost:
Evil, be thou my good.’
This isa wild strain, but fit for me : do not seck for me,
do not write: nothing can save me.”

Thus abruptly began and ended the letter that con-
veyed to Augusta the death-doom of her hopes. There
are moments of agony when the most worldly heart is
pressed upward to God, even as @ weight will force
upward the reluctant water. Augusta had been a gene-
rous, a high-minded, an affectionate woman, but she had
174 AUGUSTA . HOWARD.



lived entirely for this world. Her chief good had been
her husband and her. children. These had been her
pride, her reliance, her dependance. Strong in her own
resources, she had never felt the need of looking to a
highcr power for assistance and happiness. But when
this letter fell from her trembling hand, her heart died
within her at its wild and reckless bitterness.

In her desperation she looked up to God. “ What
have I tolive for now ?” was the first feeling of her heart.

But she repressed this iniquity of selfish agony, and
besought Almighty assistance to nerve her weakness ;
and here first began that practical acquaintance with the
truths and hopes of religion which changed her whole
character.

The possibility of blind, confiding idolatry of any
earthly object was swept away by the fall of hcr husband,
and with the full energy of a decided and desolate spirit,
she threw herself on the protection of an Almighty
helper. She followed her husband to the city whither
he had gone, found him, and vainly attempted to save.

There were the usual alternations of short-lived reform-
ations, exciting hopes only to be destroyed. There was
the gradual sinking of the body, the decay of moral
feeling and principle—the slow but sure approach of
disgusting animalism, which marks the progress of the
drunkard. |

It was some years after that a small and partly ruinous
tenement in the outskirts of A——received a new family.
The group consisted of four children, whose wan and
‘wistful countenances, and still, unchildlike deportment,
AUGUSTA HOWARD. 175

seen aa me
testified an early acquaintance with want and sorrow.
There was the mother, faded and care-worn, whose dark
and melancholy eyes, pale cheeks, and compressed lips,
told of years of anxiety and endurance. There was the
father, with haggard face, unsteady step, and that callous,
reckless air, that betrayed long familiarity with degrada-
tion and crime. Who that had seen Edward Howard in
the morning and freshness of his days, could have recog-
nised him in this miserable husband and father ; or who,
in this worn and wo-stricken woman, would have known
the beautiful, brilliant, and accomplished Augusta? Yet
such changes are not fancy, as many a bitter and broken
heart can testify.

Augusta had come with her husband to a city where
they were wholly unknown, that she might at least
escape the degradation of their lot in the presence of
those who had known them in better days. The long
and dreadful struggle that annihilated the hopes of this
life, had raised her feelings to rest upon the next, and
the habit of communion with God, induced by sorrows
which nothing else could console, had given a tender
dignity to her character such as nothing else could
bestow.

Poverty, deep poverty, had followed their steps, but
yet she had not fainted, Talents, which in her happier
days had been nourished merely as luxuries, were now

stretched to the utmost to furnish a support ; while from

the resources of her own reading she drew that which
laid the foundation for carly mental cufture in her
children, |
176 AUGUSTA HOWARD.



Augusta had been here but a few weeks before her
footsteps were traced by her only brother, who had lately
discovered her situation, and urged her to forsake her
unworthy husband and find refuge with him.

“ Augusta, my sister, I have found you !” he exclaimed,
as he suddenly entered one day, while she was busied
with the work of her family.
“ Henry, my dear brother!’ There was a momentary
illumination of countenance accompanying these words,
which soon faded into a mournful quietness as she cast
her eyes around on the scanty accommodations and mean
apartment,

“T see how it is, Augusta; step by step, you are
sinking—dragged down by a vain sense of duty to one
no longer worthy. I cannot bear it any longer; 1 have
come to take you away.”

Augusta turned from him, and looked abstractedly out
of the window. Her features settled in thought. Their
expression gradually deepened from their usual tone of
mild, resigned sorrow to one of keen anguish.

“ Henry,” said she, turning towards him, “ never was
mortal woman so blessed in another as I was once in him.
How can I forget it ? Who knew him in those days that
did not admire and love him? They tempted and
ensnared him; and even I urged him into the path of
danger. He fell, and there was none to help. I urged
reformation, and he again and again promised, resolved,
and began. But again they tempted him—even his very
best friends; yes, and that, too, when they knew his

danger. They led him on as far as it was safe for them
AUGUSTA HOWARD. 177

to go, and when the sweep of his more excitable tem-
perament took him past the point of safety and decency,
they stood by and coolly wondered and lamented. How
often was he led on by such heartless friends to humili-
ating falls, and then driven to desperation by the cold
look, averted faces, and cruel sneers of those whose
medium temperament and cooler blood saved them from
the snares which they saw were enslaving him. What if
[had forsaken him then ? What account should I have
yendered to God ? Every time a friend has been alienated
by his comrades, it has seemed to seal him with another
seal. Iam his wife—and mine will be the last. Henry,
when I leave him, I know his eternal ruin is sealed. I
cannot do it now; a little longer—a little longer ; the _
hour, I see, must come. I know my duty to my children
forbids me to keep them here ; take them—they are my
last earthly comforts, Henry—but you must take them
away. It may be—oh God—perhaps it must be, that I
shall soon follow, but not till I have tried once more.
What is this present life to one who has suffered as I
have? Nothing. But eternity. Oh, Henry! eternity—
how can I abandon him to everlasting despair? Under
the breaking of my heart I have borne up. I have borne
up under al/ that can try a woman ; but this thought—”
She stopped, and seemed struggling with herself ; but at
last, borne down by a tide of agony, she leaned her head
on her hands; the tears streamed through her fingers,
and her whole frame shook with convulsive sobs.

Her brother wept with her; nor dared he again to
touch the point so solemnly guarded. The next day

M
178 AUGUSTA HOWARD.

ee LAAT





Augusta parted from her children, hoping something
from feelings that possibly might be stirred by their ab-
sence in the bosom of their father.

It was about a week after this that Augusta one even-
ing presented herself at the door of a rich Mr. L——,
whose princely mansion was one of the ornaments of the
city of A——. It was not till she reached the sumptuous
drawing-room that she recognised in Mr. L—— one
whom she and her husband had frequently met in the
gay circles of their early life. Altered as she was, Mr.
L.—— did not recognise her, but compassionately handed
her a chair, and requested her to wait the return of his
lady, who was out; and then turning, he resumed his
conversation with another gentleman.

“ Now, Dallas,” said he, “ you are altogether excessive
and intemperate in this matter. Society is not to be re-
formed by every man directing his efforts towards his
neighbour, but by every man taking care of himself. It
is you and I, my dear sir, who must begin with ourselves,
and every other man must do the same; and then socicty
will be effectually reformed. Now this modern way, by
which every man considers it his duty to attend to the
spiritual matters of his next-door neighbour, is taking
the business at the wrong end altogether. It makes a
vast deal of appearance, but it does very little good.”

“But suppose your neighbour feels no disposition to
attend to his own improvement—what then?”

“Why, then it is his own concern, and not mine.
What my Maker requires is, that I do my duty, aud not
fret about my neighbour's,”
AUGUSTA HOWARD. 179





“ But, my friend, that is the very question. What is
the duty your Maker requires? Does it not include
some regard to your neighbour, some care and thought
for his interest and improvement ?”

“Well, well, I do that by setting a good example. I
do not mean by example what you do— that is, that Iam
to stop drinking wine because it may lead him to drink
brandy, any more than that I must stop eating because
he may eat too much and become a dyspeptic—but that
I am to use my wine, and everythivg else, temperately
and decently, and thus set him a good example.”

The conversation was here interrupted by the return
of Mrs. L It recalled, in all its freshness, to the
mind of Augusta the days when both she and her hus-
band had thus spoken and thought.

Ah! how did these sentiments appear to her now,
lonely, helpless, forlorn—the wife of a ruined husband—
the mother of more than orphan children. How different
from what they seemed, when, secure in ease, in wealth,
in gratified affections, she thoughtlessly echoed the
common phraseology, “ Why must people concern them/
selves so much in their neighbours’ affairs? Let every
man mind his own business.”

Augusta received in silence from Mrs, L —— the fine
sewing for which she came, and left the room.

“Ellen,” said Mr. L—— to his wife, “that poor
woman must be in trouble of some kind or other. You



must go some time, and see if anything can be done for
her.”
“ How singular!” said Mrs. L-—; “she reminds me
180 AUGUSTA HOWARD.

AL LS OCT nnn



all the time of Augusta Howard. You remember her,
my dear?”

“ Yes, poor thing! and her husband too, That was a
shocking affair of Edward Howard's. I hear that he be-
came an intemperate, worthless fellow. Who could have
thought it!”

‘But you recollect, my dear,” said Mrs, L——, “I pre-
dicted it six months before it was talked of. You re-
member, at the wine-party which you gave after Mary’s
wedding, he was so excited that he was hardly decent.
I mentioned then that he was getting into dangerous
ways. But he was such an excitable creature, that two
or three glasses would put him quite beside himself.
And there is George Eldon, who takes off his ten or
twelve glasses, and no one suspects it.”

“Well, it was a great pity,” replied Mr. L——;
“TIoward was worth a dozen George Eldons.”

“Do you suppose,” said Dallas, who had listened thus
far in silence, “ that if he had moved in a circle where
it was the universal custom to banish all stimulating
drinks, he would thus have fallen ?”

“JT cannot say,” said Mr. L——; “ perhaps not.”

Mr. Dallas was a gentleman of fortune and leisure,
and of an ardent and enthusiastic temperament. What-
ever engaged him absorbed his whole soul; and, of late
years, his mind had become deeply engaged in schemes
of philanthropy for the improvement of his fellow-men.
He had, in his benevolent ministrations, often passed the
dwelling of Edward, and was deeply interested in the
pale and patient wife and mother. He made acquain-
AUGUSTA HOWARD. 181



———

tance with her through the aid of her children, and, in
one way and another, learned particulars of their his-
tory that awakened the deepest interest and concern.
None but a mind as sanguine as his would have dreamed
of attempting to remedy such hopeless misery by the re-
formation of him who was its cause. But such a plan
had actually occurred to him. The remarks of Mr. and
Mrs. L—— recalled the idea, and he soon found that his
projected protegé was the very Edward Howard whose
early history was thus disclosed. Ife learned all the
minutixe from these his early associates without disclos-
ing his aim, and left them still more resolved upon his
benevolent plan. |

He watched his opportunity when Edward was free
from the influence of stimulus, and it was just after the
loss of his children had called forth some remains of his
better nature. Gradually and kindly he tried to touch
the springs of his mind, and awaken some of its buried
sensibilities.

“Tt is in vain, Mr. Dallas, to talk thus to me,” said
Edward, when one day, with the strong eloquence of
excited feeling, he painted the motives for attempting
veformation; “you might as well try to reclaim the lost
in hell, Do you think,” he continued, in a wild, deter-
mined manner, “ do you think I do not know all youcan
tell me? I have it all by heart, sir; no one can preach
such discourses as I can on this subject: I know all—
believe all—as the devils believe and tremble.”

« Ay, but,” said Dallas, “ to you there is hope ; you are
not to ruin yourself for ever.”

And who are you, to speak to me in this way?” said
189, AUGUSTA IIOWARD.

ON
Edward, looking up from his sullen despair with a gleam
of curiosity, if not of hope.

“ God’s messenger to you, Edward Howard,” said
Dallas, fixing his keen eye upon him solemnly, ‘to you,
Edward Howard, who have thrown away talents, hope,
and health—who have blasted the heart of your wife,
and beggared your suffering children. T'o you I am the
messenger of your God—by me he offers health, and
hope, and self-respect, and the regard of your fellow-
men. You may heal the broken heart of your wife,
and give back a father to your helpless children. Think
of it, Howard: what if it where possible? only suppose
it. What would it be again to feel yourself a man, be-
loved and respected as you once were, with a happy
home, a cheerful wife, and smiling little ones? Think
how you could repay your poor wife for all her tears!
What hinders you from gaining all this?

“ Just what hindered the rich man in hell— between
us there is a great gulf fixed ;’ it lies between me and all
that is good; my wife, my children, my hope of heaven’
are all on the other side.”

“Ay, but this gulf can be passed: Howard, what
would you give to be a temperate man?” ,

« What would I give?” said Howard—he thought for
a moment, and burst into tears.

«“ Ah, I see how it is,” said Dallas; “you need a friend,
and God has sent you one,”

“What can you do for me, Mr. Dallas?” said Edward,
in a tone of wonder at the confidence of his assurances.

I will tell you what I can do; I can take you to my
AUGUSTA HOWARD. 183



house, and give you a room, and watch over you until
the strongest temptations are past. I can give you busi-
ness again. I can do all for you that needs to be done,
if you will give yourself to my care.”

“Oh God of mercy!” exclaimed the unhappy man,
“is there hope for me? I cannot believe it possi-
ble; but take me where you choose—I will follow and
obey.”

A few hours witnessed the transfer of the lost husband
to one of the retired apartments in the elegant mansion
of Dallas, where he found his anxious and grateful wife
still stationed as his watchful guardian.

Medical treatment, healthful exercise, useful employ-
ment, simple food, and pure water, were connected with
a personal supervision by Dallas, which, while gently
and politely sustained, at first amounted to actual im-
prisonment.

For a time the reaction from the sudden suspension of
habitual stimulus was dreadful, and even with tears did
the unhappy man entreat to be permitted to abandon
the undertaking. But the resolute steadiness of Dallas
and the tender entreaties of his wife prevailed. It is
true that he might be said to be saved “so as by fire ;”
for a fever, and a long and fierce delirium, wasted him
almost to the borders of the grave.

But, at length, the struggle between life and death was
over, and though it left him stretched on the bed of sick-
ness, emaciated and weak, yet he was restored to his
right mind, and was conscious of returning health. Let
any one who has laid a friend in the grave, and known
184 AUGUSTA HOWARD.





-—- —_

what it is to have the heart fail with longing for them
day by day, imagine the dreamy and unreal joy of Au-
gusta when she began again to see in Edward the hus-
band so long lost to her. It was as if the grave had
given back the dead !

“ Augusta!” said he, faintly, as, after a long and
quiet sleep, he awoke free from delirium. She bent over
him. “ Augusta, I am redeemed—I am saved—I feel in
myself that I am made whole.”

The high heart of Augusta melted at these words.
She trembled and wept. Her husband wept also, and
after a pause he continued:

“Tt is more than being restored to this life—I fcel
that it is the beginning of eternal life. It is the Saviour
who sought me out, and I know that he is able to keep
me from falling.”

But we will draw a veil over a scene which words
have little power to paint.

“ Pray, Dallas,” said Mr. L——, one day, “who is
that fine-looking young man whom I met in your office
this morning? I thought his face seemed familiar.”

“Tt isa Mr. Howard—a young lawyer whom I have
lately taken into business with me.”

“Strange! impossible!” said Mr. l-—. “Surely
this cannot be the Howard. that I once knew ?”

“T believe he is,” said Mr. Dallas.

“ Why, I thought he was gone—dead and done over,
long ago, with intemperance.”

“ He was so; few have ever sunk lower; but he now
promises eyen to outdo all that was hoped of him,”
AUGUSTA HOWALD. 185

Snr

“ Strange! Why, Dallas, what did bring about this.
change ?” |

“T feel a delicacy in mentioning how it came: about,
to you, Mr. L——, as there undoubtedly was a great
deal of ‘interference with other men’s matters’ in the
business. In short, the young man fell in the way of
one of those meddlesome fellows, who go prowling about,
distributing tracts, forming temperance societies, and all
that sort of stuff.”

«Come, come, Dallas,” said Mr. L—, smiling, “1
must hear the story, for all that.”

“ First call with me at this house,” said Dallas,
stopping before the door of a neat little mansion. They
were soon in the parlour. The first sight that met their
eyes was Edward Howard, who, with a cheek glowing
with exercise, was tossing aloft a blooming *boy, while
Augusta was watching his motions, her face radiant
with smiles.

“Mr. and Mrs. Howard, this is Mr. L——, an old
acquaintance, I believe.”

There was a moment of mutual embarrassment and
surprise, soon dispelled, however, by the frank cordiality
of Edward. Mr. L—— sat down, but could scarce
withdraw his eyes from the countenance of Augusta, in
whose eloquent face he recognised a beauty of a higher
caste than even in her earlier days.

He glanced about the apartment. It was simply, but
tastefully furnished, and wore an air of retired, domestic
comfort. There were books, engravings, aud musical
186 AUGUSTA HOWARD.



instruments. Above all, there were four happy, healthy-
looking children, pursuing studies or sports at the far-
ther end of the room.

After a short call they regained the street.

“Dallas, you are a happy man,” said Mr. L——;
“ that family will be a mine of jewels to you”
OLD FATHER MORRIS 187

2 ee rr rr re rr FE SE re re + eet

Â¥

OLD FATHER MORRIS,
A SKETCH FROM NATURE.

I all the marvels that astonished my childhood, there
is none I remember to this day with so much inter-
est as the old man whose name forms my caption. When
I knew him he was an aged clergyman, settled over an
obscure village in New England. He had enjoyed the
advantages of a liberal education, had a strong original
power of thought, an omnipotent imagination, and much
general information; but so early and so deeply had the
habits and associations of the plough, the farm, and
country life wrought themselves into his mind, that his
after acquirements could only mingle with them, forming
an unexampled amalgam, like unto nothing but itself.
It is in vain to attempt to give a full picture of such
a genuine unique; but some slight and imperfect dashes
may help the imagination to a faint idea of what none
can fully conceive but those who have seen and heard old
Father Morris.
Suppose yourself one of half a dozen children, and you
hear the cry, “Father Morris is coming !’’ You run to
the window, or door, and you see a tall, bulky old man,
188 OLD FATHER MORRIS.





with a pair of. saddle-bags on one arm, hitching his old
horse with a fumbling carefulness, and then deliberately
stumping towards the house. You notice his tranquil,
florid, full-moon face, enlightened by a pair of great,
round blue eyes, that roll with dreamy inattentiveness
on all the objects around ; and as he takes off his hat,
you see the white curling wig that sets off his round
head. He comes towards you, and as you stand staring
with all the children around, he deliberately puts his
great hand on your head, and with a deep, rumbling
voice inquires, “How d’ye do, my darter? Is your
daddy at home?” “My darter” usually makes off as
fast as possible in an unconquerable giggle. Father
Morris goes into the house, and we watch him at every
turn, as, with the most liberal simplicity, he makes him-
self at home, takes off his wig, wipes down his great face
with his handkerchief, helps himself hither and thither
to whatever he wants, and asks for such things as he
cannot lay his hands on.

I remember to this day how we used to peep through
the crack of the door, or hold it half ajar and peep in,
to watch his motions; and how mightily diverted we
were with his deep, protracted a-hem-em, which was like
nothing else that ever I heard; and when once, as he
was in the midst of one of these indulgences, the parlour
door suddenly happened to swing open, I heard one of
my roguish brothers calling, in a suppressed tone,
“ Charles! Charles! Father Morris has hemmed the door
open !” and then followed the signs of a long and de-
sperate titter, in which I sincerely sympathized.
OLD FATHER MORRIS. 189 .

qt wr? ND

Se rm

But the morrow is Sunday. The old man rises in the
pulpit. He is not now in his own humble little parish,
preaching simply to the hoers of corn and planters of
potatoes, but there sits Governor qG——, and there is
Judge R—-, and Councillor P——, and Judge D—-
In short, he is before @ refined and literary audience.
But Father Morris rises : he thinks nothing of this—he
cares nothing—he knows nothing, as he himself would
say, but “ Jesus Christ, and him crucified.” He takes a
passage of Scripture to explain ; perhaps it is the walk
to Emmaus, and the conversation of Jesus with his dis-
ciples. Immediately the whole start out before you, liv-
ing and picturesque - the road. to Emmaus is a New
England turnpike ; you can see its milestones—its mul-
len-stalks—its toll-gates. Next the disciples rise, and
you have before you all their anguish, and hesitation,
and dismay, talked out to you in the language of your
own fireside. You smile—you are amused—yet you are
touched, and the illusion grows every moment. You see
the approaching stranger, and the mysterious conversa-
tion grows more and more interesting. Emmaus rises in
the distance, in the likeness of a New England village,
with a white meeting-house and spire. You follow the
travellers--you enter the house with them 5, nor do you
wake from your trance until, with streaming eves, the
preacher tells you that “ they saw it was the Lord Jesus!
and what a pity it was they could not have known it
before !”

It was after a sermon on this very chapter of Scrip-
ture history that Governor Griswold, in passing out of
190 OLD FATHER MORRIS.

A ALLL LLL LAID ALLL



the house, laid hold on the sleeve of his first acquaint-
ance: “ Pray tell me,” said he, “ who is this minister ?”

“ Why, it is old Father Morris.”

“Well, he is an oddity—and a genius too! I de-
clare!” he continued, “I have been wondering all the
morning how I could have read the Bible to so little
purpose as not to see all these particulars he has pre-



sented.”

I once heard him narrate in this picturesque way the
story of Lazarus. The great bustling city of Jerusalem
first rises to view, and we were told, with great simpli-
city, how the Lord Jesus “ used to get tired of the
noise ;” and how he was “ tired of preaching again and
again to people who would not mind a word he said ;”
and how, “ when it came evening, he used to go out and
see his friends in Bethany.” ‘Then he told us about the
house of Martha and Mary: “a little white house among
the trees,” he said ; “ you could just see it from Jerusa-
lem.” And there the Lord Jesus and his disciples used
to go and sit in the evenings, with Martha, and Mary,
aud Lazarus.

Then he went on to tell how Lazarus died, describing,
with tears and a choking voice, the distress they were in,
and how they sent a message to the Lord Jesus, and he
did not come, and how they wondered and wondered ;
and thus on he went, winding up the interest by the
graphié minutie of an eye-witness, till he woke you
from the dream by his triumphant joy at the resurrec-
tion scene.

On another occasion, as he was sitting at a tea-table
OLD FATHER MORRIS. 191

tic a aD

unusually supplied with cakes and sweetmeats, he found
an opportunity to make a practical allusion to the same
family story. He spoke of Mary as quiet and humble,
sitting at her Saviour’s feet to hear his words; but
Martha thought more of what was to be got for tea.
Martha could not find time to listen to Christ; no; she
was “‘cumbered with much serving’—around the house,
frying fritters and making gingerbread.”

Among his own simple people, his style of Scripture
painting was listened to with breathless interest. But it
was particularly in those circles, called, in New-England,
«“ Conference-meetings,” that his whole warm soul un-
folded, and the Bible in his hands became a gallery of
New-England paintings.

He particularly loved, the Evangelists, following the
footsteps of Jesus Christ, dwelling upon his words, re-
peating over and over again the stories of what he did,
with all the fond veneration of an old and favoured
servant.

Sonietimes, too, he would give the narration an ex-
ceedingly practical turn, as one example will illustrate’
Ile had noticed a falling off in his little circle that met
for social prayer, and took occasion, the first time he col-
lected a tolerable audience, to tell concerning “ the con-
ference-meeting that the disciples attended” after the
resurrection.

«“¢ But Thomas was not with them.’ Thomas not with
them!’ said the old man, in a sorrowful voice; “ why!
what could keep Thomas away? Perhaps,” said he,
glancing at some of his backward auditors, “ ‘Yhomas had
192 OLD FATUER MORRIS.

a
got cold-hearted, and was afraid they would ask him to
make the first prayer; or perhaps,” he continued, look-
ing at some of the farmers, “Thomas was afraid the
roads were bad; or perhaps,” he added, after a pause»
“Thomas had got proud, and thought he could not come
in his old clothes.” Thus he went on, significantly sum-
ming up the common excuses of his people ; and then,
with great simplicity and emotion, he added, “ But only
think what Thomas lost! for in the middle of the meet-
ing, the Lord Jesus came and stood among them! How
sorry Thomas must have been!” This representation
served to fill the vacant seats for some time to come.

At another time, Father Morris gave the details of the
anointing of David to be king. He told them how
Samuel went to Bethlehem, to Jesse’s house, and went
in with a “ How d’ye do, Jesse?” and how, when Jesse
asked him to take a seat, he said he could not stay a
minute; that the Lord had sent him to anoint one of his
sons for a king; and how, when Jesse called in the
tallest and handsomest, Samuel said, “ He would not do;”
and how all the rest passed the same test; and at last
how Samuel says, “ Why, haven’t you any more sons,
Jesse?” and Jesse says, “ Why, yes, there is little David
down in the lot;” and how, as soon as ever Samuel saw
David, “he poured the oil right on to him ;” and how
Jesse said, “he never was so out in all his life!”

Father Morris sometimes used his illustrative talent
to very good purpose in the way of rebuke. He had on
his farm a fine orchard of peaches, from which some of
the ten and twelve-year-old gentlemen helped them-
OLD FATHER MORRIS. 193

A ELE LOLS

selves more liberally than even the old man’s kindness
thought expedient.

Accordingly, he took occasion to introduce into his
sermon one Sunday, in his little parish, an account of a
journey he took; and how he was very warm and very
dry; and how he saw a fine orchard of peaches that made
his mouth water to look at them. “So,” says he, “I
came up to the fence and looked all around, for I would
not have touched one of them without leave for all the
world. At last I espied a man, and says I, ‘Mister,
won't you give me some of your peaches?’ So the man
came and gave me nigh about a hat full. And while I
stood there eating, I said, ‘ Mister, how do you manage
to keep your peaches?’ ‘ Keep them!’ said he, ‘what
do you mean?’ ‘ Yes, sir,’ said I; ‘don’t the boys steal
them?’ ‘Boys steal them! no, indeed!’ ‘ Why, sir,’
said I, *I have a whole garden full of peaches, and I
cannot get half of them’ ”—here the old man’s voice
grew tremulous—“ ‘ because the boys in my parish steal
them so.” ‘Why, sir,’ said he, ‘ don’t their parents
teach them not to steal? At this 1 grew all over ina
cold sweat, and I told him ‘1 feared they did not.’
‘Why, how you talk!’ said the man; ‘do tell me where
you live?’ Then,” said Father Morris, the tears running
down his cheeks, “I was obliged to tell him I lived in
the town of G——.” After this Father Morris kept his
peaches.

Our old friend was not less original in the logical than
in the illustrative portions of his discourses. His logic was"
of that familiar, colloquial kind, which shakes hands with.

N
194 OLD FATHER MORRIS.

ee

common sense like an old friend. Sometimes, too, his
great mind and great heart would be poured out on the
vast themes of religion, in language which, though
homely, produced all the effects of the sublime. He
once preached a discourse on the text, “the High and
Holy One that inhabiteth eternity;” and from the be-
ginning to the end it was a train of lofty and solemn
thought. With his usual simple earnestness, and his
great rolling voice, he told about “ the great God—the
great Jehovah—and how the people in this world were
flustering and worrying, and afraid they should not get
time to do this, and that, and the other. But,” he added,
with full-hearted satisfaction, “the Lord is never ina
hurry: he has it all to do, but he has time enough, for he
inhabiteth eternity.” And the grand idea of infinite
Icisure and almighty resources was carried through the
sermon with equal strength and simplicity.

Although the old man never seemed to be sensible of
anything tending to the ludicrous in his own mode of
expressing himself, yet he had considerable relish for
humour, and some shrewdness of repartee. One time,
as he was walking through a neighbouring parish,
famous for its profanity, he was stopped by a whole flock
of the youthful reprobates of the place:—

“ Father Morris! Father Morris! the devil’s dead!”

“Ts he?” said the old man, benignly laying his hand on
the head of the nearest urchin, “you poor fatherless
children !”

But the sayings and doings of this good old man, as
reported in the legends of the neighbourhood, are more
, OLD FATHER MORRIS. 195

a
than can be gathered or reported. He lived far beyond
the common age of man, and continued, when age had
impaired his powers, to repeat the same Bible stories
that he had told so often before.

I recollect hearing of the joy that almost broke the
old man’s heart, when, after many years’ diligent watch-
ing and nurture of the good seed in his parish, it began
to spring into vegetation, sudden and beautiful as that
which answers the patient watching of the husbandman.
Many a hard, worldly-hearted man—many a sleepy, in-
attentive hearer—many a listless, idle young person,
began to give car to words that had long fallen un-
heeded. A neighbouring minister, who had been sent
for to see and rejoice in these results, describes the scene,
when, on entering the little church, he found an anxious,
crowded auditory assembled around their venerable tea-
cher, waiting for direction and instruction. The old
man was sitting in his pulpit, almost choking with ful-
ness of emotion as he gazed around. “Father,” said
the youthful minister, “J suppose you are ready to say
with old Simeon, ‘Now, Lord, lettest thou thy servant
depart in peace, for mine eyes have seen thy salvation.’ ””
“ Sartin, sartin,” said the old man, while the tears
streamed down his cheeks, and his whole frame shook
with emotion, |

It was not many years after that this simple and
loving servant of Christ was gathered in peace unto
Him whom he loved. His name is fast passing from
remembrance; and in a few years, his memory, like
his humble gxave, will be entirely grown over and
196 OLD FATHER MORRIS.

———— ———————————?
forgotten among men, though it will be had in ever-
lasting remembrance by Him who “forgetteth not his
servants,” and in whose sight the death of his saints is
precious.
THE CANAL-BOAT. 197

Rt CCC CCL OL LL LLL LL ALLL LLG -
~~ -——-—- ----- - es

THE CANAL-BOAT.

(O* all the ways of travelling which obtain among our

locomotive nation, the canal-boat is the most abso-
lutely prosaic and inglorious. There is something pic-
turesque, nay, almost sublime, in the lordly march of
your well-built, high-bred steamboat. Go take your
stand on some overhanging bluff, where the blue Ohio
winds its thread of silver, or the sturdy Mississippi
makes its path through unbroken forests, and it will do
your heart good to see the gallant boat walking the
waters with unbroken and powerful tread, like some
fabled monster of the wave, breathing fire, and making
the shores resound with its deep respirations. Then
there is something mysterious, even awful, in the power
of steam. See it curling up against a blue sky some rosy
morning—graceful, fleeting, intangible, and to all ap-
pearance the softest and gentlest of all spiritual things—
and then think that it is this fairy spirit that keeps half
the world alive and hot with motion; think how excel-
lent a servant it is, doing all sorts of gigantic works,
like the genii of old; and yet, if you let slip the talis-
man only for a moment, what terrible advantage it will
198 . THE CANAL-BOAT.
take of you! and you will confess that steam has some
claims both to the beautiful and the terrible. But in a
canal-boat there is no power, no mystery, no danger; one
cannot blow up, one cannot be drowned, unless by some
special effort: one sees clearly all there is in the case—a
horse, arope, anda muddy strip of water—and that isall.
Did you ever try it, reader? If not, take an imaginary
trip with us, just for experiment. “ There’s the boat!”
exclaims a passenger in the omnibus, as we are rolling
down from the Pittsburgh Mansion House to the canal.
“ Where?” exclaim a dozen voices, and forthwith a dozen
heads go out of the windows. “ Why, down there, under
that bridge; don’t you see those lights?” ‘ What, that
little thing ?” exclaims an inexperienced traveller: “ dear
me! we can’t half of us get into it!” “We, indeed !”
says some old hand in the business; “I think you'll find
it will hold us and a dozen more loads like wy” “Im-
possible!” say some. “ You will see, replies the old tra-
yveller; ahd, as soon as you get out, you do see, and hear
too, what seems like a general breaking loose from the
Tower of Babel, amid a perfect hailstorm of trunks,
boxes, valises, carpet-bags, and every describable and in-
describable form of what a Westerner calls “plunder.”
“That's my trunk!” barks out a big, round man.
“That's my bandbox!” screams a heart-stricken old
lady, in terror for her immaculate Sunday caps. “ Where’s
my little red box? I had two carpet-bags and a—”
“My trunk had a scarle—” “ Halloo! where are you
going with that portmanteau?” “Husband, husband !
do see after the large basket and the little hair trunk--
THE CANAL BOAT. 199

oh! and the baby’s little chair!” “Go below—go below,
for mercy’s sake, my dear; I'll see to the baggage.” At
last, the feminine part of creation, perceiving that, in
this particular instance, they gain nothing by public
speaking, are content to be led quietly under hatches,
and amusing is the look of dismay which each new-
comer gives to the confined quarters that present them

selves. Those who were so ignorant of the power of
compression as to suppose the boat scarce large enough
to contain them and theirs, find, with dismay, a respec-
table colony of old ladies, babies, mothers, big baskets,
and carpet-bags, already established. “ Mercy on us!”
says one, after surveying the little room, about ten feet
long and six high, “‘ Where are we all to sleep to-night ?”
“OQ dear me! what a sight of children!” says a young
lady, in a despairing tone. “Poh!” says an initiated
traveller, “children! scarce any here; let’s see: one—
the woman in the corner, two—that child with the bread
and butter, three—and then there’s that other woman
with two—really, it’s quite moderate for a canal-boat:
however, we can’t tell till they have all come.”

“ All! for mercy’s sake, you don’t say there are any
more coming!” exclaim two or three in a breath ; “ they
can’t come ; there is not room !”

Notwithstanding the impressive utterance of this sen-
tence, the contrary is imme¢:atel7 demonstrated by the
appearance of a very corpulent elderly lady, with three
well-grown daughters, who come down looking about
them most complacently, regardless of the unchristian
looks of the company. What a mercy it is that fat
people are always good-natured |
200 THE CANAL BOAT,

After this follows an indiscriminate raining down of
all shapes, sizes, sexes, and ages—men, women, children,
babies, and nurses. The state of feeling becomes per-
fectly desperate. Darkness gathers on all faces. ‘“ We
shall be smothered! we shall be crowded to death! we
can’t stay here!’ are heard faintly from one and another ;
and yet, though the boat grows no wider, the walls no
higher, they do live, and do bear it, in spite of repeated
protestations to the contrary. ‘Truly, as Sam Slick says,
“ there’s a sight of wear in human natur.”

“ But, meanwhile, the children grow sleepy, and Sinis
interesting little duets and trios arise from one part or
another of the cabin. ‘Mamma, I’m tired!” bawls a
child. “ Where’s the baby’s night-gown ?” calls a nurse.
“Do take Peter up in your lap, and keep him still,”
“Pray get out some biscuits to stop their mouths.”
Meanwhile, sundry babies strike in “ con spirito,” as the
music-books have it, and execute various flourishes ; the
disconsolate mothers sigh, and look as if all was over
with them ; and the young ladies appear extremely dis-
gusted, and wonder “what business women have to be
travelling round with babies!’

To these troubles, succeeds the turning-out scene,
when the whole caravan is ejected into the gentlemen’s
cabin, that the beds may be made. The red curtains are
put down, and in solemn silence all, the last mysterious
preparations begin. At length it is announced that all
is ready, Forthwith the whole company rush back, and
find the walls embellished by a series of little shelves,
about a foot wide, each furnished with a mattress and
THE CANAL-BOAT. 201

bedding, and hooked to the ceiling by a very suspici-
ously slender cord. Direful are the ruminations and
exclamations of inexperienced travellers, particularly
young ones, as they eye these very equivocal accommo-
dations. “ What! sleep up there! J won’t sleep on one
of those top shelves, J know. The cords will certainly
break.”” The chambermaid here takes up the conversa-
tion, and solemnly assures them that such an accident is
not to be thought of at all; that it is a natural impossi-
bility—a thing that could not happen without an actual
miracle ; and since it becomes increasingly evident that
thirty ladies cannot all sleep on the lowest shelf, there is
some effort made to exercise faith in this doctrine; never-
theless, all look on their neighbours with fear and trem-
bling ; and when the stout lady talks of taking a top
shelf, she is urgently pressed to change places with her
alarmed neighbour below. Points of location being after —
a while adjusted, comes the last struggle. Everybody
wants to take off their bonnet, to look for their shawl,
to find their cloak, to get their carpet-bag, and all set
about it with such zeal that nothing can be done.
“ Ma’am, you're on my foot!” says one. “ Will you please
to move, ma’am?” says somebody, who is gasping and
struggling behind you. “ Move!” you echo; “indeed,
I should be very glad to, but I don’t see much prospect
of it.” “ Chambermaid !” calls a lady, who is struggling
among a heap of carpet-bags and children at one end of.
the cabin. “Ma’am!” replics the poor chambermaid,
who is wedged fast, in a similar situation, at the other.
* Where’s my cloak, chambermaid?” “I would find it
202 TIIE CANAL-BOAT.

—_—_



ma’am, if I could move.” “ Chambermaid, my basket !”
“ Ohambermaid, my parasol is lost!” “ Chambermaid,
my carpet-bag !” “ Mamma, they push me so!” “ Hush,
child ; crawl under there, and lie still till I can undress
you.” At last, however, the various distresses are over,
the babies sink to sleep, and even that much-enduring
being, the chambermaid, seeks out some corner for repose.
Tired and drowsy, you are just sinking into a doze, when
bang! goes the boat against the sides of a lock; ropes
scrape, men run and shout, and up fly the heads of all
the top-shelf-ites, who are generally the more juvenile
and airy part of the company.

“‘ What's that! what’s that!” flies from mouth to
mouth; and forthwith they proceed to awaken their re-
spective relations. “Mother! Aunt Hannah! do wake
up; what is this awful noise?” “Oh, only a lock!”
Pray be still,” groan out the sleepy members from
below.

“A lock!” exclaim the vivacious creatures, ever on
the alert for*information ; “and what is a lock, pray ?”

“Don’t you know what a lock is, you silly creatures?
Do lie down and go to sleep.”

“ But say, there is not any danger in a lock, is there ?”
respond the querists, “Danger!” exclaims a deaf old
lady, poking up her head, “ what’s the matter? There
ha’n't nothin’ burst, has there ?” “ No, no, no!” exclaim
the provoked and despairing opposition party, who find
that there is no such thing as going to sleep till they
have made the old lady below and the young ladies
above understand exactly the philosophy of a lock.
Mim CANAL-BOAT. 903

Ee
After a while the conversation again subsides ; again all
is still; you hear only the trampling of horses and the
rippling of the rope in the water, and sleep again is
stealing over you. You doze, you dream, and all of a
sudden you are started by a ery, “ Chambermaid ! wake
up the lady that wants to be set ashore.” Up jumps
chambermaid, and up jumps the lady and two children,
and forthwith form a committee of inquiry as to ways and
means. “ Where’s my bonnet?” says the lady, half
awake, and fumbling among the various articles of that
name. “I thought I hung it up behind the door.”
“ Qan’t you find it?” says the poor chambermaid, yawn-
ing and rubbing her eyes. “ Oh, yes, here it is,” says
the lady ; and then the cloak, the shawl, the gloves, the
shoes, receive each @ separate discussion. At last all
seems ready, and they begin to move off, when, lot
Peter’s cap is missing. “Now where can it be ?” solilo-
quizes the lady, “ I put it right here by the table-leg ;
maybe it has got into some of the berths.” At this sug-
gestion, the chambermaid takes the candle, and goes
round deliberately to every berth, poking the light di-
rectly in the face of every sleeper. “ Here it is,’ she
exclaims, pulling at something black under one pillow.
“ No, indeed, those are my shoes,” says the vexed sleeper.
«“ Maybe it’s here,” she resumes, darting upon something
dark in another berth. “No, that’s my bag,” responds
the occupant. The chambermaid then proceeds to turn
over all the children on the floor, to see if it is not under
them, in the course of which process they are most
agreeably waked up and enlivened ; and, when every-
204 THE CANAL-BOAT,

body is broad awake, and most uncharitably wishing the
cap, and Peter too, at the bottom of the canal, the good
lady exclaims, “ Well, if this isn’t lucky! here I had it
safe in my basket all the time!” and she departs amid
the—what shall I say ?—execrations ?!—of the whole
company, ladies though they be.

Well, after this follows a hushing up and wiping up
among the juvenile population; and a series of remarks
commences from the various shelves, of a very edifying
and instructive tendency. One says that the woman did
not seem to know where anything was ; another says
that she has waked them all up; a third adds, that
she has waked up all the children too; and the elderly
ladies make moral reflections ‘on the importance of
putting your things where you can find them—being
always ready ; which observations, being delivered in an
exceedingly doleful and drowsy tone, form a sort of sub-
bass to the lively chattering of the upper-shelf-ites, who
declare that they feel quite wide awake—that they don’t
think that they shall go to sleep again to-night—and
discourse over everything in creation, until you heartily
wish you were enough related to them to give them a
scolding. |

At last, however, voice after voice drops off; you fall
into a most refreshing slumber ; it seems to you that you
sleep about a quarter of an hour, when the chambermaid
pulls you by the sleeve: “ Will you please to get up,
ma’am; we want to make the beds.” You start and
stare. Sure enough, the night is gone. So much for
sleeping on board canal-boats.
TIE CANAL-BOAT. £05

Let us not enumerate the manifold perplexities of the
morning toilet in a place where every lady realizes most
forcibly the condition of the old woman who lived under
a broom: “All she wanted was elbow room.” Let us
not tell how one glass is made to answer for thirty fair
faces, one basin and jug for thirty lavations ; and, tell it
not in Gath! one towel for a company ! Let us not inti-
mate how ladies’ shoes have, in the night, clandestinely
slid into the gentlemen’s cabin, and gentlemen’s boots
elbowed, or, rather, toed their way among lady’s gear, nor
recite the exclamations after runaway property that are
heard. “I can’t find nothing of Johnny’s shoe.” “Here’s
a shoe in tlfe water pitcher—is this it?” “My side-
comhs are gone,” exclaims a nymph with dishevelled
curls. “Massy! do look at my bonnet !” exclaims an
old lady, elevating an article crushed into as many
angles as there are pieces in a minced pie. “T never
did sleep so much together in my life,” echoes a poor little
French lady, whom despair has driven into talking
English.

But our shortening paper warns us not to prolong our
catalogue of distresses beyond reasonable bounds, and
therefore we will close with advising all our friends who
intend to try this way of travelling for pleasure, to take
a good stock, both of patience and clean towels, with
them, for we think that they will find abundant need
for both.
206 TRIALS OF A HOUSEKEEPER.

I Lh

TRIALS OF A HOUSEKEEPER,

Semel

“ POH!” says one of the lords of creation, taking his

cigar out of his mouth, and twirling it between
his two first fingers, “ what a fuss women make of this
simple matter of managing a family / I can’t see as
there is anything so extraordinary to be done in this
matter of housekeeping: only three meals a day to be
got and cleared off, and it really seems to take up the
whole of their mind from morning till night. I could
keep house without so much of a flurry, I know.”

Now prithee, good brother, listen to my story, and see
how much you know about it. I came to this enlightened
West about a year since, and was duly established in a
comfortable country residence within a mile and a half
of the city. I had been married about three months.
My family consisted of myself and husband, a female
friend as a visitor, and two brothers of my good man,
who were engaged with him in business.

I pass over the first two or three days spent in that
process of hammering boxes, breaking crockery, knocking
things down and picking them up again, which is com-
monly called getting to housekeeping. As usual, carpets
TRIALS OF A HOUSEKEEPER. 207

— ae



oo

were sewed and stretched, laid down, and taken up to be
sewed over; things were reformed, transformed, and con-
formed, till at last a settled order began to appear. But
now came the great point of all. During our confusion,
we had cooked and eaten our meals in a very miscella-
neous and pastoral manner, eating now from the top of a
barrel, and now from a fireboard laid on two chairs; and
drinking, some from teacups, and some from saucers, and
some from tumblers, and some from a pitcher big enough
to be drowned in; and sleeping, some on sofas, and some
on straggling beds and mattresses, thrown down here and
there, wherever there was room. - All these pleasant bar-
barities were now at an end: the house was in order ; the
dishes put up in their places ; three regular meals were
to be administered in one day, all in an orderly, civilized
form ; beds were to be made; rooms swept and dusted ;
_ dishes washed ; knives scoured, and all the et cetera to be
attended to. Now for getting “help,” as Mrs. Trollope
says; and where and how were we to get it? We knew
very few persons in the city, and how were we to accom-
plish the matter? At length the “ house of employment”
was mentioned, and my husband was despatched thither
regularly every day for a week; while I, in the mean
time, was very nearly despatched by the abundance of
work at home. One evening, as I was sitting completely
exhausted, my husband made his appearance at the door:
“ There Margaret, I have got you a couple at last—cook
and chambermaid!” So saying, he ushered ina little,
snuffy-looking old woman, and a great staring Dutch
girl, in a green bonnet with red ribands, with her mouth
208 TRIALS OF A HOUSEKEEPER.





wide open. I however addressed a few words of encou-
ragement to each, and proceeded to ask their names,
when the old woman began to snuffle and to wipe her
face with what was left of an old silk pocket -handker-
chief, preparatory to speaking; while the young lady
opened her mouth wider, and looked around with a
frightened air, as if meditating an escape. After some
preliminaries I found out that my old woman was Mrs.
Tibbins, and my Hebe’s name was Kotterin ; also, that
she knew more Dutch than English, and not any too
much of either. The old woman was the cook. I ven-
tured a few inquiries: “‘ Had she ever cooked ?”

“Yes, ma’am, sartin; she had lived at two or three
places in the city!”

I said no more, but determined to wait till morning.
The breakfast, to be sure, did not do much honour to the
talents of my official, but it was the first time, and the
place was new toher. After breakfast was cleared away,
I proceeded to give directions for dinner: it was merely
a plain joint of meat, I said, to be roasted in the tin
oven. The experienced cook looked at me with a stare of
entire vacuity. “The tin oven,” I repeated, “stands
there,” pointing to it.

She walked up to it, and touched it with such an ap-
pearance of suspicion as if it had been an electrical bat-
tery, and then looked round at me with a look of such
helpless ignorance, that my soul was moved: “I never
see one of them things before,” said she.

“Never saw a tin oven!” I exclaimed. “I thought
you said you had cooked in two or three families,”
TRIALS OF A HOUSEKEEPER. 209

_——

“They does not have such things as them, though,”
rejoined my old lady. Having spitted the joint myself,
and given numberless’ directions, I walked off to see after
Kotterin, to whom I had committed the up-stairs work,
it never having come into my head that there could be
a wrong way of making a bed, and to this day it is a mar-
vel to me how any one could arrange pillows and quilts
to make such a nondescript appearance as mine now pre-
sented. One glance showed me that Kotterin also was
“ just caught,” and that I had as much to do in her de-
partment as in that of my old lady.

Just then the door-bell rang: “Oh, there is the door-
bell!” I exclaimed; “run, Kotterin, and show them into
the parlour.”

Kotterin started to run, as directed, and then stopped,
and stood looking round on all the doors, and on me,
with a wofully puzzled air: “The street-door,” said I,
pointing towards the entry. Kotterin blundered into
the entry, and stood gazing with a look of stupid wonder
at the bell ringing without hands, while I went to the
door and let in the company before she could be fairly
made to understand the connexion between the ringing
and the phenomenon of admission.

As dinner-time approached, I sent word into my kit-
chen to have it set on; but, recollecting the state of the
heads of department there, I soon followed my own or-
ders. I found the tin oven standing out in the middle
of the kitchen, and my cook seated & la Turk in front of
it, contemplating the roast meat with full as puzzled an
air as in the morning. I once more explained the mys-

Q
210 RIALS OF A HOUSEKEEPER.

——

tery of taking it off, and assisted her to get it on the
platter, though somewhat cooled by having been so long
set out for inspection. I was standing holding the spit
in my hands, when Kotterin, who had heard the door-bell
ring, and was determined this time to be in season, ran
into the hall, and soon returning, opened the kitchen
door, and politely ushered in three or four fashionable-
looking ladies, exclaiming, “ Here she is!” As these
were strangers from the city, who had come to make
their first call, this introduction was far from proving an
" eligible one: the look of thunderstruck astonishment
with which I greeted theiy first appearance, as I stood
brandishing the spit, and the terrified snuffling and
starting of poor Mrs. Tibbins, who again had recourse to
her old pocket-handkerchief, almost entirely vanquished
their gravity, and it was evident that they were on the
point of a broad laugh; so, recovering my self-possession,
I apologized, and led the way to the parlour.

Let these few incidents be a specimen of the four
mortal weeks that I spent with these “helps,” during
which time I did almost as much work, with twice ag
much anxiety, as when there was nobody there; and yet
everything went wrong besides. The young gentlemen
complained of the patches of starch grimed to their col-
lars, and the streaks of black coal ironed into the shirt
fronts, while one week every pocket-handkerchief in the
house was starched so stiff that you might as well have
carried a sheet of brown paper in your pocket. The
tumblers looked muddy; the plates were never washed
clean, nor wiped dry, unless I atte»ded to each one; and
TRIALS OF A HOUSEKEEPER. 211

as to eating and drinking, we experienced a variety that
we had not before considered possible.

At length the old woman vanished from the stage,
and was succeeded by a knowing, active, capable damsel,
with a temper like a steel-trap, who remained with me
just one week, and then went off in a fit of spite. To her
succeeded a rosy, good-natured, merry lass, who broke
the crockery, burned the dinner, tore the clothes in iron-
ing, and knocked down everything that stood in her way
about the house, without at all discomposing herself
about the matter. One night she took the stopper from
a barrel of molasses, and came singing up stairs, while
the molasses ran soberly out into the cellar all night, till
by morning it was in a state of wniversal emancipation.
Having done this, and also despatched an entire set of
tea-things by letting the waiter fall, she one day made
her disappearance.

Then, for a wonder, there fell to my lot a tidy,
efficient-trained, pretty-looking girl, knowing how to do
everything, and with the sweetest temper in the world.
“Now,” said I to myself, “ I shall rest from my labours.”
Everything about the house began to go right, and
looked as clean and genteel as Mary’s own self. But,
alas! this period of repose was interrupted by a clever,
trim-looking young man, who for some weeks could be
heard scraping his boots at the kitchen door every Sunday
night; and at last Miss Mary, with some smiling and
blushing, gave me to understand that she must leave in
two weeks.

“Why, Mary,” said I, feeling a little ne eee
“don’t you like the place ?”
212 TRIALS OF A HOUSEKEEPER.



“ Oh, yes, ma’am.”

“Then why do you look for another?”

“T am not going to another place.”

“ What, Mary, are you going to learn a trade ?”

“No, ma’am.”

“ Why, then, what do you mean to do?”

“T expect to keep house myself, ma’am,” said she,
laughing and blushing.

“Oh ho!” said I, “that is it ;’ and so, in two weeks,
I lost the best little girl in the world: peace to her
memory.

After this came an interregnum, which put me in
mind of the chapter in Chronicles that I used to read
with great delight when a child, where Baasha, and
Elah, and Tibni, and Zimri, and Omri, one after the
other, came to the throne of Israel, all in the compass of
half a dozen verses. We had one old woman who stayed
a week, and went away with the misery in her tooth; one
young woman who ran away and got married; one cook,
who came at night, and went off before light in the
morning; one very clever girl, who stayed a month, and
then went away because her mother was sick; another,
who stayed six weeks, and was taken with the fever her-
self ; and during all this time, who can speak the damage
and destruction wrought in the domestic paraphernalia
by passing through these multiplied hands ?

What shall we do? Shall we give up houses, have no
furniture to take care of ; keep merely a bag of meal, a
porridge-pot, and a pudding-stick, and sit in our tent-
door in real patriarchal independence ? What shall
we do ?
LITTLE EDWARD. 213

LLL LALO LO A ee ee ee



LITTLE EDWARD.

————

yo any. of you born in New England, in the

good old catechising, church-going, school-going,
orderly times? If so, you may have seen my Uncle
Abel; the most perpendicular, rectangular, upright,
downright good man that ever laboured six days, and
rested on the seventh.

You remember his hard, weather-beaten countenance,
where every line seemed drawn with “a pen of iron and
the point of a diamond ;” his considerate grey eyes, that
moved over objects as if it were not best to be in a hurry
about seeing; the circumspect opening and shutting of
his mouth; his down-sitting and uprising, all performed
with conviction aforethought—in short, the whole order-
ing of his life and conversation, which was, according to
the tenor of the military order, “io the right about
face—forward, march!”

Now if you supposed, from all this triangularism of
exterior, that this good man had nothing kindly within,
you were much mistaken. You often find the greenest
grass under a snow-drift; and though my uncle’s mind
was not exactly of the flower-garden kind, still there
214 LITTLE EDWARD.

LL

was an abundance of wholesome and kindly vegetation
there.

It is true, he seldom laughed, and never joked himself,
but no man had a more serious and weighty conviction
of what a good joke was in another; and when some ex-
ceeding witticism was dispensed in his presence, you
might see Uncle Abel’s face slowly relax into an expres-
sion of solemn satisfaction, and he would look at the
author with a sort of quiet wonder, as if it were past his
comprehension how such a thing could ever come into a
man’s head. -

Uncle Abel, too, had some relish for the fine arts; in
proof of which, I might adduce the pleasure with which
he gazed at the plates in his family Bible, the likeness
whereof is neither in heaven, nor on earth, nor under
the earth. And he was also such an eminent musician,
that he could go through the singing-book at one sitting
without the least fatigue, beating time like a windmill
all the way.

He had, too, a liberal hand, though his liberality was
all by the rule of three. He did to his neighbour exactly
as he would be done by; he loved some things in this
world yery sincerely; he loved his God much; but he
honoured and feared him more; he was exact with
others, he was more exact with himself, and he expected
his God to be more exact still.

Everything in Uncle Abel’s house was in the same
time, place, manner, and form, from year’s end to year’s
end. There was old Master Bose, a dog after my uncle’s
own heart who always walked as if he were studying
LITTLY EDWARD. 215

nee
the multiplication-table. There was the old clock, for
ever ticking in the kitchen corner, with a picture on its
face of the sun, for ever setting behind a perpendicular
row of poplar trees. There was the never-failing supply
of red-peppers and onions hanging over the chimney.
There, too, were the yearly hollyhocks and morning-
glories blooming about the windows. There was the
“best room,” with its sanded floor, the cupboard in one
corner with its glass doors, the evergreen asparagus-
bushes in the chimney, and there was the stand with
the Bible and Almanac on it in another corner. There,
too, was Aunt Betsey, who never looked any older, be-
cause she always looked as old as she could; who always
dried her catnip and wormwood the last of September,
and began to clean the house the first of May. In short,
this was the land of continuance. Old Time never took
it into his head to practise either addition, or subtrac-
tion, or multiplication on its sum total.

This Aunt Betsey afore-named was the neatest and
most efficient piece of hurhan machinery that ever ope-
rated in forty places at once. She was always every-
where, predominating over, and seeing to everything ;
and though my uncle had been twice married, Aunt
Betsey’s rule and authority had never been broken. She
reigned over his wives when living, and reigned after
them when dead, and so seemed likely to reign on tothe
end of the chapter. But my uncle’s latest wife left Aunt
Betsey a much less tractable subject than ever before
had fallen to her lot. Little Edward was the child of my
uncle’s old age, and a brighter, merrier little blossom
216 LITTLE EDWARD.



never grew on the verge of an avalanche. He had been
committed to the nursing of his grandmamma till he
had arrived at the age of cndiscretion, and then my old
uncle’s heart so yearned for him that he was sent for
home.

His introduction into the family excited a terrible sen-
sation. Never was there such a contemner of dignities,
such a violator of high places and sanctities as this very
Master Edward. It was all in vain to try to teach him
decorum. He was the most outrageously merry elf that
ever shook a head of curls; and it was all the same to
him whether it were “Sabba’ day” or any other day.
He laughed and frolicked with everybody and every-
thing that came in his way, not even excepting his
solemn old father ; and when you saw him with his fair
arms around the old man’s neck, and his bright blue
eyes and blooming cheek peering out beside the bleak
face of Uncle Abel, you might fancy you saw Spring ca-
ressing winter. Uncle Abel’s metaphysics were sorely
puzzled by this sparkling, dahcing compound of spirit
and matter ; nor could he devise any method of bringing
it into any reasonable shape, for he did mischief with an
energy and perseverance that was truly astonishing.
Once he scoured the floor with Aunt Betsey’s very Scotch
snuff; once he washed up the hearth with Uncle Abel’s
most immaculate clothes-brush; and once he was found
tryang to make Bose wear his father’s spectacles. In
short, there was no use, except the right one, to which he
did not put everything that came in his way.

But Uncle Abel was most of all puzzled to know what
to do with him on the Sabbath, for on that day Master
LITTLE EDWARD. 217

re
Edward seemed to exert himself to be particularly dili-
gent and entertaining.

“ Edward! Edward must not play on Sunday!” his
father would call out ; and then Edward would hold up
his curly head, and look as grave as the catechism ; but
in three minutes you would see “ pussy” scampering
through the “ best room,” with Edward at her heels, to
the entire discomposure of all devotion in Aunt Betsey
and all others in authority.

At length my uncle came to the conclusion that “it
wasn’t in natur’ to teach him any better,” and that “he
could no more keep Sunday than the brook down in the
lot.” My poor uncle! he did not know what was the
matter with his heart; but certain it was he lost all
faculty of scolding when little Edward was in the case,
and he would rub his spectacles a quarter of an hour
longer than common when Aunt Betsey was detailing his
witticisms and clever doings.

In process of time our hero had compassed his third
year, and arrived at the dignity of going to school. He
went illustriously through the spelling-book, and then
attacked the catechism ; went from “man’s chief end”
to the “requirin’s and forbiddin’s”’ in a fortnight, and
at last came home inordinately merry, to tell his father
that he had got to “ Amen.” After this, he made a re-
gular business of saying over the whole every Sunday
evening, standing with his hands behind him and his
checked pinafore folded down, occasionally glancing
round to see if pussy gave due attention. And, being of
a practically benevolent turn of mind, he made several

commendable efforts to teach Bose the catechism, in
218 LITTLE EDWARD.

Ree



+

which he succeeded as well as might be expected. In
short, without farther detail, Master Edward bade fair
to become a literary wonder.

But alas for poor little Edward! his merry dance was
soon over, A day came when he sickened. Aunt Betsey
tried her whole herbarium, but in vain: he grew rapidly
worse and worse. His father sickened in heart, but said
nothing ; he only stayed by his bedside day and night,
trying all means to save, with affecting pertinacity,

“ Can’t you. think of anything more, doctor?” said he
to the physician, when all had been tried in vain.

“ Nothing,” answered the physician.

A momentary convulsion passed over my uncle’s face.
“The willof the Lord be done,” said he, almost with a
groan of anguish.

Just at that moment a ray of the setting sun pierced
the checked curtains, and gleamed like an angel’s smile
across the face of the little sufferer. He awoke from
troubled sleep.

“Oh, dear! I am so sick!” he gasped, feebly. is
father raised him in his arms; he breathed easier, and
looked up with a grateful smile. Just then his old play-
mate, the cat, crossed the room. “There goes pussy,”
said he; “oh, dear! I shall never play with pussy any
more,”

At that moment a deadly change passed over his face.
He looked up in his father’s face with an imploring ex-
pression, and put out his hand asif for help. There
was one moment of agony, and then the sweet features
all settled into a smile of peace, and “mortality was
swallowed up of life.”
LITTLE EDWARD. 219

se ell

My uncle laid him down, and looked one moment at
his beautiful face. It was too much for his principles,
too much for his consistency, and “ he lifted up his voice
and wept.”

A few days after was the Sabbath—the funeral day—
and it rose with “ breath all Incense and with cheek all
bloom.” Uncle Abel was as calm and collected as ever,
but in his face there was a sorrow-stricken appearance
touching to behold. I remember him at family prayers,
as he bent over the great Bible and began the psalm,
“ Lord, thou hast been our dwelling-place in all gener-
ations.” Apparently he was touched by the melancholy
splendour of the poetry, for after reading a few verses
he stopped. There was a dead silence, interrupted only
by the tick of the clock. He cleared his voice repeatedly,
and tried to goon, but in vain. He closed the book, and
kneeled down to prayer. The energy of sorrow broke
through his usual formal reverence, and his language
flowed forth with a deep and sorrowful pathos which I
shall never forget. The God so much reverenced, so
much feared, seemed to draw near to him as a friend
and comforter, his refuge and strength, “a very present
help in time of trouble.”

My uncle rose, and I saw him walk to the room of the
departed one. He uncovered the face. It was set with
the seal of death, but oh! how surpassingly lovely! The
brilliancy of life was gone, but that pure, transparent
fce was touched with a mysterious, triumphant bright-
ness, which seemed like the dawning of Heaven.

My uncle looked long and earnestly. He feit the


220 LITTLE EDWARD.
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beauty of what he gazed on; his heart was softened, but
he had no words for his feelings. He left the room un-
consciously, and stood in the front door. The morning
was bright, the bells were ringing for church, the birds
were singing merrily, and the pet squirrel of little
Edward was frolicking about the door. My uncle watched
him as he ran first up one tree and then down and up
another, and then over the fence, whisking his brush and
chattering just as if nothing werethe matter.

With a deep sigh Uncle Abel broke forth: “How
happy that creature is! Well, the Lord’s will be done!”

That day the dust was committed to dust, amid the
lamentations of all who had known little Edward:
Years have passed since then, and all that is mortal of my
uncle has long since been gathered to his fathers, but his
just and upright spirit has entered the glorious liberty
of the sons of God. Yes; the good man may have had
opinions which the philosophical scorn, weakness at
which the thoughtless smile; but death shall change
him into all that is enlightened, wise, and refined; for
he shall awake in Mis likcness, and be satisfied.



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