Citation
The Dream chintz

Material Information

Title:
The Dream chintz
Creator:
Mackarness, Henry S., 1826-1881
Wright, W. N ( Publisher )
Nicol, William, 1777-1857 ( Printer )
Godwin, James, d. 1876 ( Illustrator )
Jackson, Mason, 1819-1903 ( Engraver )
Measom, George S ( Engraver )
Dalziel, Edward, 1817-1905 ( Engraver )
Hammond, G ( Engraver )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
W. N. Wright
Manufacturer:
W. Nicol
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
118, <10> p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Courtship -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Fairies -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1851 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre:
Children's literature ( fast )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's catalogue: <10> p. at end.
General Note:
Ill. engraved by E. Dalziel, Mason Jackson, and G. Hammond, and G. Meason.
Statement of Responsibility:
by the author of "A trap to catch a sunbeam" ; with illustrations by James Godwin.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA4978 ( ltqf )
ALH3946 ( notis )
12728683 ( oclc )
026857965 ( alephbibnum )

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Full Text
E DREAM CHINTZ.













TP Pa





THE DREAM CHINTZ;

BY THE AUTHOR OF.
“A TRAP TO CATCH A SUNBEAM,”
“OLD JOLLIFFE,” &c.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY JAMES GODWIN.

LONDON:
W. N. WRIGHT, 60, PALL-MALL,

BOOKSELLER TO THE QUEEN,

1851.



Pind

-

PRINTED BY W. NICOL, 60, PALI. MALL.



TO
MY DEAR SISTER,
TO WHOSE KIND ENCOURAGEMENT
I AM DEEPLY INDEBTED,
THIS LITTLE STORY
IS AFFECTIONATELY AND GRATEFULLY

DEDICATED.






A CuintTz pattern having been designed
from the recollections of a dream, is a
fact. The circumstance was related to
the Author by an old and valued friend,
and the really so called “ Dream Chintz,”
which obtained an extraordinary popu-
larity, may probably yet live in the

memory of many an Octogenarian.






ILLUSTRATIONS BY JAMES GODWIN.

TITLE. ENGRAVER.

FRONTISPIECE. ; , . Dalziel.
HucGu anp WALTER . . . Mason Jackson.
FamILy AT PRAYERS . . Mason Jackson.
Firtinc Water's Basket . Dalziel,
Hucu’s Reverie. . . Daiziel.
BirtH or THE New YEAR , Dalziel.
MARGARET AND WALTER . Hammond.

. WALTER AND GRAVE-DIGGER . Mason Jackson.
MARGARET AND HER FATHER Mason Jackson.
WALTER ON HIS JOURNEY ; Dalziel.

TAIL-PIECE . . . Measom.






land glade is





9 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

minated by a stream of light from a moon
shining with all the lustre of a summer night,
though its rays glisten on the crystal gems,
which the frost has hung amongst the leafless
trees. There is a stillness round, “ Earth seems
hushed in an Angel’s lap into a breathless
sleep so still—that we can only say of things,
they be.”

Suddenly the silence is broken by footsteps
trampling on the fallen leaves, which, rendered
crisp by the frost, make a low crunching sound
and tell tales of intruders in that silent glade.
Voices murmur softly, and parting the branches
which have overgrown the path, two beings
emerge into the moonlight. One is a tall
gaunt lad of about fifteen, with long legs
which seem so weak and slender, that they
bend beneath his weight. His fair hair hangs
loose upon his shoulders, and in his large blue



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 3

eyes there is a strange wild expression, yet so
joyous, that his shuffling gait seems at variance
with the brightness of his face, and the buoy-
ancy of his manner. His companion is some
ten years his senior, and, though his counte-
nance beams with intelligence, there is such
deep sorrow and care in its every line, that it
forms a striking contrast to the«lad by his
side.

“ Hush!” said the latter, holding up his
finger, “talk very gently or we shall frighten
them away; do you see that ring there on the
grass, that’s where they dance, look Hugh.”

“T see,” answered Hugh, “ but,” he con-
tinued smiling, “it is very cold for Fairies, I
think they will scarcely come out such weather.”

“Pshaw!” answered the boy impatiently,

Fairies do not think about weather, they
will come I tell you;” he said, holding up his



4. THE DREAM CHINTZ.

finger and speaking in a decided manner, “ they
come on New Year’s Eve to tell what they
have all been doing during the past year, and
receive from their Queen fresh orders for the
next. Oh! they are such good little things,
so industrious, so kind, and they do help people
so —help them out of all their troubles, at least
those people who deserve it, such as try to get
on themselves, and to help one another, and
that are kind to birds and beasts and insects —
for do you know THEY are sometimes Fairies
themselves. I would not tread on a worm or
hurt, indeed, any insect for the world.”

‘*No poor boy,” said his companion kindly
patting him on the shoulder, —‘‘ you would
not harm anything I know.”

“Hush!” exclaimed the boy, interrupting
him, as the moon which had been shadowed by
a cloud broke forth again, “ don’t speak, there

they are!”



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 5

Again the same kind, yet sceptical smile stole
over the young man’s face; but he ceased
speaking in obedience to the boy’s command.
There was a moment’s pause, and then Walter
said in a low, eager whisper, with his large eyes
distended and fixed upon the Fairies’ ring —

“That's the Queen with her bright crown,
and see how she is giving diadems to all those
who have been at work all the long year; —
now wait, and you'll see all those go away, and
she will call others to her and tell them what
they must do. Some she sends to the sick,
some to the poor, some to the wretched, and
then on New Year’s day, if they have done
well and minded all her orders, she lets them
stay in Fairy land always, and gives them
jewelled crowns like her own, only not quite
so bright. Those outside the ring, with their
wings drooping and no crowns on their heads,



6 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

are such as have done mischief in the world in-
stead of good. They are all banished; she will
not have them in her bright land, do you see?
Now stay Hugh, in a moment you'll see all
those who are going on their different errands
fly away — look! look! there they go. Hark!
what a rushing sound their wings make.”

And, gazing up into the blue vault of
Heaven, he pointed to a light feathery cloud
which was scudding along, and then slightly
shuddering, he put his arm through his friend’s,
and said,

“We will go if you like now — it is cold.”

Hugh who had been standing by his side in
silent abstraction for some moments, roused by
the boy’s action answered,

“Yes, Walter, my boy, it is indeed cold, we
are very silly to stay here at all. Let us go.”

_And again they pushed their way through the



THE DREAM CHINTZ 7

branches, which had laced themselves toge-
ther in an almost impassable barrier across the
pathway, and walked on at a quick pace.

“You are not silly,” said the boy, as if
suddenly recollecting the last speech, “I am
silly, — people call me so, but do you know I
think they are much more so, for they often
cry and are miserable, and some of them
quarrel and fight, and spend all their money so
that they starve, but I don’t. I’m never miser-
able—I never cry, or quarrel or fight, and
keep all my money in a money box,” he added
in a whisper, and then bursting into a bright
musical laugh, said, “ that’s wise isn’t it — not
silly ?” |

“True, dear. Walter, true; would that you
could instil such wisdom into those who,
‘wise in their own conceit,’ call you silly, —

could make me, boy, amongst the rest, pos-



8 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

sessor of half your cheerful spirit — your pure
faith, which nothing doubting goes on its way
rejoicing, believing of good to come, however
dark and gloomy the present may be.”

Half in soliloquy had this been uttered, for
Hugh knew the entire sense of such a speech
could not reach the darkened understanding of
his half-witted companion— but in part he
was mistaken, for the boy replied immediately,
as'though the import of the words, at least, he
understood.

‘‘ It is the Fairies’ doing, they make Walter
such a merry boy, they used to rock my cradle
when I was a poor sick baby, and could not
sleep; and would come and scare away the
goblins that used to grin at me. Oh! I was
never frightened when the Fairies were with
me — and they used to whisper to me in the

still night, and promise me they would never



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 9

let me want, and never let me be miserable —
and have they not kept their word? Ain't I
a happy boy? Oh! they do take such care of
me.

“ Do you not think it is some One, higher
and mightier, who takes care of you, Wal-
ter ?”

“Eh?” said the boy staring vacantly at
him. ‘Oh! Yes, you mean God, whom Father
and Margaret kneel to, and say prayers to.
Yes, I know, Margaret says He lets me
see the Fairies to make me contented and
happy — for that she cannot see them; but
I don’t quite understand about that. Oh! did
you see that hare hop past,” he continued
with his voice restored to its usual gay tone,
“ what a pity they kill them isn’t it?— We are
just at home now, are we not ?”

They were descending a somewhat steep



10 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

hill, which led to the village, and the fires
were gleaming through some of the cottage
windows, looking a cheering welcome from the
sharp cold night. The tower of the Church
was illuminated by the moon till each pane of
glass looked like an opal; the old, old
Church, in which were monuments of noble
knights and high born ladies of centuries ago,
their effigies upon their tombs and their names
so effaced, by the ruthless hand of Time, as to
afford full scope for Antiquaries to suppose
them any one they pleased. There too was
recorded how “ beneath this stone’ lay some
wealthy lord —of later date; “and his lady
and infant son,” and by the side of their
tablet graven with care, and bearing above it
the arms of the noble family, was the plain
stone, which the village mason had chiselled
telling how death had laid low, “Thomas



THE DREAM CHINTZ. ll

Ditton, many years blacksmith of this parish,
also Ruth his wife.” In the churchyard
were tombstones mouldering away, and others
gleaming forth in the moonlight, just erected. —
And here and there the neatly kept graves of
some, whose friends were too poor to raise a
stone above their resting place — only a little
rustic cross planted in the low mound to mark
the spot ; their names and their good deeds
engraven alone on the hearts of those they had
left behind.

Hugh and his poor friend lived very near the
church. Hugh’s house came first and when
he approached it, he said, —

“Shall I go on with you, Walter, or can you
go by yourself ?”

“Qh! by myself— Margaret never shuts
the shutters till her Walter comes home, that
he may see the light twinkle, and when I get



12 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

just about here, I sing and she opens the door
her own dear se}f, and waits for me. Stay
now and you'll see” — he said, as they arrived
at Hugh’s cottage, and he began a low wild
air with an exquisite melody, which he sang
in that bright, beautiful voice peculiar to boys.
Truly as he said, he had uttered but a bar,
when the door opened quickly, and a figure
waiting, stood revealed by the red light of a
large fire, cold and keen though the wind
blew. The boy went on at a quick pace
still chaunting his wild song, and Hugh con-
tinued watching him, — for it was very touch-
ing that scene, the moon’ bathing the village
in its flood of cold, clear light—the open
cottage. door with that young girlish figure
standing there to welcome her poor simple
brother, —- and his sweet voice sounding in

the still night and fading gradually away —



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 13

was beautiful to see and hear, at any rate
Hugh seemed to think so, for he stood there
after the door was closed, and until the shutters
were closed too and the cottage hidden in
darkness ; — then with a heavy sigh he entered
his own dwelling.

We will follow Walter.— There was indeed
a cheering blaze to welcome and to warm him ;
a wood fire threw its ruddy glow over the
room, which was large, commodious, and com-
fortably furnished. It was carpeted all over
with a dark crimson drugget, a round table
stood in the centre of the room, of mahogany
with strange twisted legs, covered with Mar-
garet’s work and some books and papers;
against the wall, which was hung with a gaily
patterned paper stood another table, on which
was arranged some old china, several shells

and some stuffed birds in a glass case; this



14 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

too was of mahogany, with distorted limbs, ~
Over the mantel piece, which was loaded with
old china also, was a kind of panorama of
Windsor, and about the room were several
portraits of the Royal Family, — everything
being profusely decorated with mistletoe and
holly. An arm chair bearing the same date
as the tables stood close to the fire, — the
sides of the hearth were Dutch tiles, and
large iron dogs supported the logs of wood
which were blazing and crackling so cheerily,
the rug, was composed of coloured cloth sewn
together, and on it lay a large Persian cat, an
eight day clock filled one corner of the room,
and a corner cupboard the other, through the
glazed doors of which glittered a quantity of
glass and china. — Both these articles were
also of mahogany, and might have served the

most coquettish young lady for a mirror—



THE DREAM CHINTZ, 15

over the door which opened to the road, and
across the window, were drawn crimson cur-
tains, and another door partially open revealed
a bed-room, seemingly furnished with as much
comfort as the sitting room; beyond this was
the kitchen, divided from it only by a smalk
passage in which were the stairs leading to the
upper rooms.

As the boy entered and his sister closed
and barred the door after him, and drew over
it the curtain which completely excluded the
keen air; an old man came from the inner
room and seating himself in the arm-chair
held out his hand to Walter:—he took it
directly, and then sitting down on the floor at
his father’s feet, he lifted the cat into his lap
and began to fondle it.

“ Well, Walter, love,” said his sister coming
up to him, and removing the wraps she had



16 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

enveloped him in before he went out, “ did
you see them ?”

“Qh yes! Margaret— numbers and num-
bers — here listen,” and drawing down her
beautiful head to a level with his mouth, he
whispered something to her. She disengaged
herself hurriedly from him with a flushed face,
and left the room to “ put away his things,”
she said. She was soon back and on her
return the old man said, —

“ Prayers and bed, Margaret.”

“ Yes, Father.”

Quickly and neatly she folded and put away
her work, the books and papers, pushed the
table near her Father, lighted two candles in
massive plated candlesticks, extinguished a small
lamp at which she had been working, opened a
large Bible and rang a little hand bell on the

shelf; at its summons appeared an elderly



INTZ.

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18 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

pride in their honest service and liked to look
like a servant and not a would-be-lady.

Prayers, Hetty,” said Margaret.

‘Very well, Miss.”

She closed the inner door and seated herself
at a respectful distance from her master and
mistress. Margaret took a chair opposite to
her father and beckoned Walter to her, he
laid down the cat, and coming to her knelt
close beside her, nestling his head on her
bosom like a child.

This little family was a source of continual
gossip and conversation in the village. For old
Ford was as universally disliked, as his inte-
resting children were liked. He was feared too
by one and all, so that few visitors ever crossed
his threshold, to enliven the long winter, or
add to the enjoyment of the delicious summer.

He was very clever, very morose, spoke seldom,



THE DREAM CHINTZ, 19

always in short sentences, and always sternly,
save to his daughter. In her seemed centred
all the good in his disposition ; all tenderness,
all devotion, all affection in his nature, he
poured forth lavishly on this his idol. He was
kind to the boy, at least he tried to be, but
it always appeared an effort to him, not so his
love for his daughter that was his one absorb-
ing thought.

His youth had been devoted to obtaining
independence, so it was said at least,—as a
young man he had scarcely permitted himself
the necessaries of life, out of every penny he
got he saved a half-penny, and continued this
course of saving till by some extraordinary
chance he married. There was a mystery
about his marriage as there was about him
altogether, he was an enigma no one could

solve. And how his young and pretty wife



20 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

came to marry him no one could tell— at any
rate he was kind to her; he did not stint her,
though he continued his own system of ab-
stinence —that was a confirmed habit — he
went on the “even tenour” of his way, still
making and saving money (he was an opti-
cian by trade) until his wife’s death, — that
he took calmly, dispassionately as he did every
thing else—~wore mourning the accustomed
time, but was never seen to weep or heard to
lament ; — nor was he more moved when told
the infant she had left showed symptoms, when
two years old, of a weak intellect.

Every one said he must be made of stone —
that he loved nothing, was incapable of feeling
an earthly passion — but they were strangers.
They saw not how love, the deepest most
engrossing love, shone out of his pale grey

eyes upon the little fairy who played about his



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 21

dwelling, his lovely little girl, how tears — aye
tears — would roll down his cheek, tears of
admiration and of love as he watched her care
of her simple brother. For her he altered his
style of living and made his little dwelling as
comfortable as he could, too much he loved
her, for in the creature he forgot the Creator.
As she grew up she was good and dutiful to
him, but she had not that affection in her heart
for him, which would repay his unbounded love
— this had been his bane through life. He had
never inspired a responsive attachment; no, as
he loved her, she loved her brother. Oh! who
can doubt the One great power, who reflects
for an instant on the wonderful ordering of
events, the unerring wisdom and mercy with
which the back is fitted to the burden, the wind
tempered to the shorn lamb. The idiot boy
had no mother — but God had raised in his



22 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

sister’s heart a love as pure and strong, a
devotion as unselfish, as untiring. He had
sent him forth in the world without intellect,
but He had supplied its place with a happy
joyous spirit, which led him along a bright
and flowery path, where he neither knew nor
understood danger or sin. It was as extraor-
dinary as beautiful to witness the extreme care
with which Margaret managed, that nothing
sad or distressing should ruffle the happy
peaceful current of the boy’s life—to every
thing she gave a cheerful name, a pleasant
meaning. When he was restless and excited
she would tell him stories suited to his capa-
city, which always soothed and quieted him —
and they were about people good and happy —
never wicked or miserable — those were words
of which he only knew the name.

Indiscreet neighbours would sometimes



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 23

speak before him of some sad quarrel, or
some wretched poverty in the village, and
Margaret would instantly turn to him with
a bright smile to counteract the gloomy
impression, and say, “‘ that was because they
were unwise,” the word, she always sub-
stituted for wicked.

And at other times when he would ask her,
somewhat sadly, if he were “ silly,” she would
laugh out merrily and tell him, “no indeed,
wise, very wise, for he was good, and that
was true wisdom.”

Fondly, as I have said, were the brother and
sister loved in the village, and all were kind
to the poor gentle hearted boy, no one teased,
no one laughed at him, but kindly humoured
his belief in the Fairies he thought watched
over him; so much so indeed, that when

they found out that one of his fancies was,



94 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

that if he left a basket in the wood the Fairies

would fill it for him—dit never more came





| the children in
BY » the village em-
: ployed all their

Ie leisure time in



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 25

making things to put into “poor dear Walter’s
basket,” amply repaid for their trouble, by
the glee with which he would come running
home, and show the treasures the good Fairies
had given him.

I have said, few people ever crossed the
threshold of Mr. Ford’s dwelling; but
amongst those few, and seemingly a more
favoured one than any, was Hugh Ripley.
He had taken a great interest in Walter,
and the boy’s affectionate nature never for-
got a trifling act of kindness Hugh once
rendered him; and meeting him one after-
noon with his father he ran up to him, and
seizing his hand, said “Father, this is the
gentleman who was so kind to Walter — ask
him to come and see us.”

Unable to refuse this request in his pre-

sence, Ford tendered the invitation, and at the



96 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

first visit discovered a high intellect and an
agreeable companion in his new friend, and
one who took a great interest in science and
mechanism: from that moment he was a
constant inmate of their house, and Hugh
little thought that a simple service rendered to
a poor idiot boy, would prove one of the most
important events of his life.

But to return to the Fords, their accustomed
devotions ended, they all retired to rest; the
inhabitants of the primitive village had long
been in their first sleep, but there was one
waking, and on his solitude we will now
intrude.

Hugh Ripley rented a room in the small
cottage where we left him. It was kept by
a merry little old woman who called herself
Mrs. Hopwood —to the “ Mrs.” she had not
the least right but having arrived at the in-



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 27

teresting age of sixty, she thought it might
be considered “ odd” to let her rooms to single
young gentlemen; and so came to Wood-
cote and took this cottage, adding to her
name a title which implied that she had once
possessed a Mr. Hopwood. She was a good
hearted, happy tempered little body as ever
lived, very ignorant, so much so that she quite
provoked Hugh, for she dearly loved to chatter,
and would sit with the parlour door open lying
in wait for him as a spider for a fly, and then
she would pounce out and talk as he called it
“such awful nonsense” that she sadly disturbed
the serenity of his temper.

When he was in good spirits, which alas!
was very seldom, he hada very artful way of
getting rid of her—he had his suspicions
respecting that same Mr. Hopwood, so would

ask her some question relating to him, which



98 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

invariably sent the old lady back into her
parlour in double-quick time, and her excuses
for breaking off the conversation were very
ingenious.

On this night he had hoped by the lateness
of his return to escape her, but she was an old
fashioned body, and had sat up to see the old
year out. He was caught as usual; however,
a well-timed inquiry, respecting Mr. Hopwood,
occasioned Mrs. Hopwood to hear a noise,
which “sounded like the cat at the milk,”
and hastily wishing him good night, she
returned into her room,—and we now find
him ascending the staircase to his own room,
the only apartment his wretched means would
allow.

Hugh Ripley was the only son of his father,
who died when Hugh was very young, and left

him to bear the many annoyances occasioned



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 29

by an ill-tempered and miserly mother: and
wretched enough had been the youthful days of
poor Hugh, giving that melancholy tinge to his
feelings, which he exhibited in his riper years,
— the invariable effect of an unhappy child-
hood. All the amusements in which other
children delighted were denied him as too
expensive, and at a very early age, his mother
sent him forth to seek his own living in the
world, saying “she could not afford to keep
him in idleness.”

Poor boy his trials and rebuffs were many ;
he had been brought up to no profession, but
had a great taste for drawing, which he hoped
would serve him. He met however with
little encouragment, and had almost begun
to despair of gaining a livelihood, when he
fortunately found employment as a designer

to a large Calico Printer near a country



30 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

village, and taking the lodging above men-
tioned, he began to work with renewed energy,
for though the remuneration was small it
was better than idleness, better, far better than
his former home.

And now Hugh laid his hand gently on the
lock of the door, and turned it softly as though
he feared to awake some one within, and then,
peeping in before he entered, he whispered,

‘¢ Ah! there he is at his old work, now [’ll
have him.”

He crept into the room, and seizing a ruler
prepared to hurl it at a little mouse, who was
most busily engaged in gnawing the edges of a
large portfolio placed against the wall. Hugh’s
entrance disturbed the little animal, and it
raised its bright black eyes to his face with a
glance, which to Hugh’s fancy seemed im-
ploring mercy, so he laid down the ruler on the

table, saying,



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 31

“There poor little thing, I'll let you live, go
back to your hole, and if you are a Fairy as
poor Walter says, do mea good turn in ex-
change, that’s all.”

And flinging himself in a chair before the
fire he put one foot on the fender, and resting
his elbow on his knee ran his long thin fingers
through his hair, and gazed into the fire with
the earnestness of one who thought he could
therein read his fate.

“ Margaret,” he said at last, half aloud,
“ Margaret, fool that Iam to dare to love her
and yet—why not—the love of goodness is
implanted in our natures and takes the strongest
root in the best hearts —why then should I
call it daring, when I love and reverence it
clothed in an angel’s form. What could I not
bear if she were here, to lighten my toil, to
brighten the gloomiest dwelling—sometimes she

smiles on me so kindly — would she, could she,



32 THE DREAM CHINTZ.



love me? and if so to what end— to bring her

to such a home as this, one miserable room;
well, if she loved me that would not be

wretched to her.”



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 33

He paused, and raising his head looked
round the room, a strange one truly for the
home of a fair young bride. A striped calico
curtain concealed a small bedstead, and a three
cornered wash-hand stand, and converted the
rest of the apartment into a sitting room, in
which stood a table, covered with drawing paper
and pencils, a pewter pot and blue plate, an
inkstand, and a newspaper ; a chest of drawers
opposite the fireplace, was also covered with
various articles, such as a glass, a razor case,
a brush and comb, a velvet cap, a beautiful
little vase filled with chrysanthemums, holly
and laurustinus, and an alabaster figure; two
chairs completed the furniture. The room
was only partially carpeted, and a thin muslin
curtain hung across the window. On the man-
tel-piece stood some unfinished water-colour
drawings, —and a large canvas on the floor

D



34 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

leaning against the wall was covered with
female figures all exactly alike, —all bearing
the lineaments of the form that had waited
so patiently for Walter’s return. His inspec-
tion ended Hugh muttered an impatient,
‘‘Pshaw! what an idiot I am, and a selfish
one too, drag her down to this, no indeed, —
that proud old father, would he consent to
such a thing were even she content. No, I
must toil on, hopelessly, miserably, and to what
end? Again I say, to support an existence, I
would much rather was not prolonged — why
do I live? That is a grand mystery. I am
neither happy myself nor do I form the happi-
ness of another. I am of no use, only cumbering
the ground, and taking, from those who need it
so much more, the money my employers pay
me,—for work too which brings me neither

fortune nor fame. Night after night I lie down



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 35

on that wretched bed, and feel that another
day is passed and I have done nothing —
nothing to benefit myself or others: only
earned a few shillings to support a useless and
troublesome existence. Oh! Walter, my boy,
how are you to be envied — you with your light
heart and simple faith, by such as me whose
life is one long struggle between doubt and be-
lief. I see the Omnipotent wisdom which
formed the planets and guides them in their
course, which orders the changing seasons and
gives to the tiniest insects, instinct for their pre-
servation. I see the mighty Power which sets
bounds to the ocean, and bids the waves be still,
which from the insignificant seed, brings forth
beauteous flowers, and from the small acorn the
giant oak, and still 1 am ever weighed down
with the feeling of my own uselessness — and

the oft recurring question, why do I live?



36 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

‘‘ Heigho! poor Walter — he thought I saw
the Fairies to-night and could no longer doubt
HIS innocent belief. I’m sure, I wish his Fairies
would come to my aid. This offer for the
best design for a Chintz, shall I try that? it
will be my fortune if I succeed. Ah! if I
should — No, No! better not to try, than try
and fail.—JIt’s a pretty notion about Fairies.
Ah! another year, Hugh, over your head —
there are the bells. — God bless you, my gentle
Margaret, and send you many happy years.
The Fairies dance to those chimes I suppose,
how beautiful they sound. Fairies”? —

Loud and clear, and then fading away till
they could scarce be heard—the bells con-
tinued.

Hugh murmured a few more words; his
head dropped slightly forward, but he moved

not from his position.



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 37

The bells had

ceased, the last

chime had died
away on the still





38 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

air, leaving the echoes to slumber again,
when Hugh heard a slight rushing sound
like a soft summer breeze: he raised his
head, and his room seemed filled with
smoke or vapour, which emitted a power-
ful scent, like multitudes of flowers, — he
tried to move, but he felt bound to his chair,
and the dense vapour oppressed his chest so
that he could scarcely breathe. This painful
sensation lasted but a few moments, the film
seemed gradually and imperceptibly to vanish,
though the strong perfume of the flowers grew
even more powerful; and he heard a faint
sound, which, growing louder by degrees,
resembled the singing of numberless birds.
In another instant the vapour was gone. No
wonder he smelt flowers and heard singing
birds, for there—-in his room— stood count-

less little beings, some laden with baskets filled



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 39

with flowers, others bearing gold cages, con-
taining birds of every variety of plumage.
From the group before him advanced one
entirely clothed in brown, with a profusion of
long silky brown hair falling over her shoulders.
She came close to the astonished and speechless
Hugh, and in a bright voice, so clear that it
rang in his ear like the sound of many bells,
said : —

“Many thanks good Master Ripley, Fairies
are not mortals and never forget a kind act, be
it ever so trifling; we owe you gratitude for two,
and are come to pay the debt. First you
performed a service for our friend Walter, we
saw you, we were hidden amongst the trees
in the wood, and you may be sure would have
guided the boy home, but we wished to find
how far you deserved our aid. Oh! how glad
we were when you led him so kindly through



40 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

the mazes of the wood, — right glad, for we are
never so pleased as when we know a poor
mortal has won for himself a gleam of hap-
piness, by a kind action to a fellow creature.
This, your patient toil, your faithful love, and
finally your disinterested act of mercy to me —
the little mouse, who was destroying your
property, complete our determination to do
you good service in return, — but no one can
help those who do not help themselves, banish,
therefore, the unworthy tenants of your noble
heart, — Despair and Doubt, and remember,
Hugh Ripley, that it is better to TRY AND
FAIL, THAN NOT TO TRY AT ALL, — watch
well the Fairies work.”

‘The voice ceased and the Fairy vanished, —
still Hugh, spell-bound, gazed at the move-
ments of those tiny beings, who seemed to fill
and more than fill his room. Very busy they



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 4]

all were, flitting about backwards and forwards,
and seeming to talk together in musical strains,
which sounded to him like the constant repe-
tition of ‘“* Margaret” — at length their actions
appeared less confused, and Hugh observed
that they had erected a frame, in which, with
exquisite taste, several of the Fairies were
arranging the birds and flowers, which the
rest were handing to them. Nimbly their fin-
gers moved, and stronger grew the perfume of
the flowers—for the fanning of the Fairies’
wings wafted it to Hugh, till at last their
labour finished, they moved from before the
frame and grouped themselves on either side of
it, displaying to Hugh,—the wonderstruck
Hugh — a perfect and exquisite Chintz pattern !

For a moment a torrent of thoughts over-
powered him —the great prize for the best

Chintz was his—no mortal could devise one



42 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

like that; he was wealthy — famous — Mar-
garet was his bride — she loved him, was proud
of him — tears, hot tears, dimmed his eyes;
he gasped for breath— endeavoured to move
from his seat, the picture faded, the frame
alone remaining ~ and in its place was a win-
dow —a thin muslin curtain, and the faint
light of day-break—he started to his feet
trembling with agitation.

It was a dream, only a dream it is true, but
what a dream! vividly he remembered the
beautiful pattern he had seen, he could draw it,
he knew he could. With burning brow and
panting heart he lighted a candle, and eagerly
began his task, closing his eyes occasionally to
recal his vision, and as he found how well his
memory served him, and saw growing under
his pencil the exquisite groups of flowers and

birds, his excitement became alarming, and on



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 43

“its completion he uttered a low moan and fell

heavily from his chair.

“Many happy new years to you, my own
dear Walter,” said a sweet voice at the boy’s
bedside.

“Oh!” he said starting “time to get up —
many to you, Margery, many to you, and to
some one else, Margery — I am going to get up
quickly now and tell him how much I wish him
happy years, and then I am going in the wood
to fetch my New Year’s gifts, they are sure to
be there, Margaret.”

“Yes love, quite sure,” answered Margaret,
** you'll wait till after breakfast, though.”

Breakfast ! do I want breakfast ?”

“Qh! certainly, and I have something so
nice because it is New Year’s Day.”

“Ha! Ha! then,’ laughed the boy, “I



44 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

shall be sure to stay for breakfast, I wont be
long.”

Margaret went down stairs and busied herself
in making the tea, placed her father’s arm-chair
in its accustomed place, and then opening the
window which seemed made of ground glass
with the frost, she looked up the village. Cold
as it was, it was brilliantly fine, and Margaret
stood some moments at the window and was
just about to close it, when a young voice called
her name.

“Margaret, how do you do, a happy New
Year,— here’s a bunch of flowers out of our own
garden for Walter, and we are going up now,”
she said in a lower tone, “I and four or five
more, to fill his basket with lots of things.”

“Thank you, Susey dear, thank you so
much,I am glad I have seen you, for I have

something for the basket too,” and she took



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 45

from her pocket a Comforter, knitted for him by
herself, and gave it to the little girl; by this
time her little companions joined her, Margaret
closed the window, and listened with a pleased
smile to their merry voices as they died away in
the distance: she was soon joined by her father
and brother and they began their morning meal,
the boy talking and laughing gaily in his wild and
joyous manner, which Margaret kept encourag-
ing, while Ford sat by gloomily and sadly, but
occasionally giving a beaming look of love to his
daughter. The moment breakfast was over
Walter prepared to go out.

‘‘Where are you going boy?” asked his
father.

“To Hugh Ripley’s, and then to see my
friends.”

The boy went out, Margaret took her work,

her father began to write and there was a long



46 THE DREAM CHINTZ.



unbroken silence. It was disturbed at length



by a low knock at the door, which made the
blood rush to Margaret’s face, and hastily



arranging her hair, she opened the door and

admitted Hugh Ripley. She started when she

saw him,— why? because a change was in his



face, which she could not account for; he was
pale, deadly pale, but there was in every line of

his countenance a loftiness she had never




before witnessed, a radiance in his eyes, which
gave to them an expression they had before
wanted, the light of hope beamed in them now.
He did not speak to Margaret

shook her by the hand, : 4

wished him kindly “ Many happy years.”



ur wishes power,



CW You



they would bring me what I never kn
will dine with us to day.”

“ I shall be very happy —I have been very



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 47

foolish this morning,” he continued half
turning to Margaret, “ positively fainting away.”

Oh! how his heart beat, as Margaret laid
her hand on his arm in the impulse of the
moment, and looked anxiously in his face.

‘‘T am better now,” he said with a tender-
ness he had never before ventured to assume,
“much better and shall do justice to your
hospitality to-day.”

She hastily withdrew her hand, and mur-
muring something about dining at three, and
going to find Walter, hurried out of the room.

‘‘Then I will be here punctually at three,”
said Hugh to Ford.

“Do! do!” he answered, “you may never
dine with me again.” —

“On another New Year’s Day, Sir? no,
perhaps not, God knows where this time
twelvemonth may find us.”



48 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

‘‘ Nor this time twelve hours,” said Ford. —

“True Sir, true, that is a very proper reflec-
tion, but not one to indulge in gloomily —
wherever it finds us, so that our lamps are
trimmed, it cannot much signify.”

“The only happy moment, my friend, is
when our lamps are put out depend on it.”

Oh! do not say so, Sir, perhaps I might
have agreed with you yesterday, but to-day I
am an altered man, I have learnt a lesson—I
will tell you all about it after dinner.”

“Tell me now,’ said the old man more
eagerly than he ever spoke. —‘“‘ Tell me now,
I would gladly know what could make any one
- wish to live — what is life but one long yearn-
ing wish, one long hopeless struggle for a hap-
piness which we know we never shall obtain —
even pleasure exists but in anticipation; from

our earliest childhood we cry for a toy, which



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 49

when once in our possession becomes instantly
valueless and so on through life and unto
death.”

“Qh! come, Sir, life is not quite such a
desert,— there are some roses, so sweet that
we do not heed their thorns, Love, which makes
of Earth a Heaven, brightens the saddest
home, lightens the heaviest heart, surely once
to experience the happy knowledge that we
are loved, must be worth living for !”

“Hugh Ripley,” said the old man in a
strange and almost unearthly sound — “I
know not what that is,—I have never
been loved in my long life— my long weary
life has passed on, without one gleam of
such happiness as you speak of. It has been
a weary life and I am very tired of it—
no one will miss me, and the grave is a quiet

place.”



50 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

Hugh was astonished at the tone of
melancholy in which the old man spoke—
though always gloomy and austere, there
was more of sad feeling in his manner than
usual, and he knew not exactly how to reply
to him. There was an awkward silence, and
then Hugh saying he had some business,
and promising to be punctual at dinner,
departed.

In half an hour more, Walter returned with
his basket laden with presents, but not as
usual did his bright cheerful voice summon. his
sister to view his treasures. He placed his
basket down in a corner, and flinging himself
on the floor beside it, took out one thing at a
time, looked at each separately, and then list-
lessly stretched himself out at full length, and
threw his arms over his head as was his wont,

to sleep. His father was not in the room, nor



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 51

his sister, but she had heard the step for which
she always listened so anxiously and she came
to him directly.

“Tired, dear Walter? Where are your pre-
sents?” He rose and pointed to them,

“They are pretty,” he said, “but Walter
saw the Goblins coming home, Margaret, and
no Fairies.”

“Oh! nonsense, Walter was tired coming
home, that was it. Do you know, Mary Lane
at the old farm is going to be married, and
there will be such a gay wedding next Monday,
and you and I will go early in the morning to
the Nursery Ground, and get such a large
nosegay for her—for the children are going
to strew the path with flowers —and we will
help them, will we not ?”

The boy sprang from the ground with all his
cheerfulness restored.



52 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

“Oh! that we will—when is Monday?
how long ?”

“ Four days.”

“ Days,” he repeated.

‘Yes, love, darkness and light four times.”

«Oh, yes, I know—then we will get lovely
flowers, but Margaret how can we? Jack Frost
keeps all the flowers, old gardener says, till the
hot sun burns him and makes him let them
go. — How can we have them ?”

“* Oh, we shall have some, Jack Frost lends
us his until he gives up ours, he is very kind
and his are pretty flowers too, Walter,’’ she
said with such a sunny smile that Jack Frost
himself might have melted at it. “Now I
must help Hetty to-day to lay the cloth—it
must all be very nice because—it is New

Year’s Day.”

Any one but poor simple Walter, might



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 53

have assigned another reason for Margaret's
particularity —at any rate she did lay the
cloth very nicely, and placed the Christmas
roses and evergreens, which formed Walter's
bouquet, in a vase in the centre of the
table. But while she was thus busily and
cheerfully employed poor Walter was un-
quiet and unhappy; a most unusual occurrence
for him, — and which somewhat worried Mar-
garet. She looked at the clock, it wanted °
nearly an hour to dinner, she had been so
anxious to lay the cloth—there was time
to take Walter out for a little walk with her,
it would be a change and amuse him. She
proposed it and he assented gladly — for he
was so restless that any movement was agree-
able to him.

They were soon on their way down the

village, this loving couple. Margaret talking



54 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

to him so gently, so gaily —trying to divert
his mind — but still he seemed restless and
more wild
and flighty
| than usual
| — till Mar-

garet her-



self grew
nervous
and began
to feel a
strange pre-
sentiment
of comnig
evil.
They
had taken
no decided

=< =" route, but



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 55

oddly enough they found themselves passing
Hugh Ripley’s cottage. Mrs. Hopwood was
standing at the door.

“Ah! many happy new years to you young
folks,” she said, “how are you, young gentle-
man ?”

“ He is very well, thank you Mrs. Hopwood °
— and you?” asked Margaret.

“Qh! [mas well as I can expect to be —
you know I ain’t quite so young as I was —
I’ve flying pains like all over me with the cold
weather, but there — that'll all go off—all go
off my dear, — 1 was looking out for Sweetman
to order a bottle of elder wine against my
young gentleman comes home to night— he
ain't over and above well—I don’t think he
takes victuals enough, and so I am just going
to coddle him up a bit—-why he fainted away

this morning—I heard such a bump over



56 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

head— woke me—I sat up and listened —
and then it come over me—well, perhaps
something’s the matter with Mr. Ripley — so
I got up and went up stairs and there he lay
in a dead faint—but I soon brought him
round, and he went out in such spirits I
scarcely knew him.”

“‘ He dines with us to-day,” said Margaret;
somewhat confusedly.

*‘T know that. Don’t let him stay too late,
for I shall have him ill again.”

** No,” said Margaret softly.

*‘ Look! Margaret look!” said Walter — “ I
see the Fairies! numbers and numbers going

into the wood. I must go after them, they
beckon me, look!” and staying for no reply, he
flew off in the direction of the wood, the
entrance of which could be distinctly seen from
Mrs. Hopwood’s cottage.



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 57

‘Poor boy,” said Mrs. Hopwood compassio-
nately — “he’s a great charge to you ain't he?”

“‘ A very dear one, Mrs. Hopwood. I know
not what I should do without him.”

“Ah! you’re a good gal, a very good gal;
there’s many a one would be for ever a grum-
bling at the trouble and the dulness of a home
like yours.” |

“ Perhaps I should if I found it dull and
troublesome —it is a little dull sometimes
when Walter, dear Walter is out; but he is
never troublesome —so happy tempered, so
affectionate.”

“Ah! poor child, it is a heavy affliction
certainly, now do you never go after him when
he runs away from you like this?”

‘No never, it would worry him—and I
know he will not go far from home, and I wish

him to feel he can take care of himself, so



58 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

I carefully avoid showing any anxiety about

him,” *

** Ah true! —there’s Sweetman! I must run
after him, good bye, my dear’—and Mrs.
Hupwood hurried away.

Margaret walked on to the entrance of the
wood and looked up its long vistas of tall
leafless tress to see if Walter were in sight —
but no—he had wandered further among
its tangled brushwood, and so she turned away,
and walked on, thinking he might return when
she passed again, and they could go home to
dinner together. —

Home to dinner! how incessantly that din-

ner haunted her—and how she hoped that
Hetty would cook it beautifully, better than
ever, and pictured to herself the neatness of

the room, the nice appointments of the dinner

—and wondered if it would be remarked



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 59

— if He liked neatness and was particular
—and whether it would strike him, that she
who could keep her father’s house so well
would make a good wife; and then her
thoughts wandered on, and she could see a
cottage-home with a neat garden filled with
flowers, and a room so comfortably furnished
and two occupants therein—one a fair being
her mirror told her was very lovely —and
another whom her heart told her was dearer to
her than all besides on earth —dearer even
than her poor simple brother.

Yes! her thoughts were full of such happy
visions and long she indulged them, and went so
far as to make conversations between herself and
another, such as she thought would take place
this very day after dinner by the fire light ; that
delicious dreamy light by which she had often
become lost in thought as now, with the mo-

ments flying by unheeded.



60 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

Moralists may call such reveries unprofitable
and bid the young beware of them, for that
they are but a milder term for idleness, — but
are they not some of the happiest moments of
our lives; does reality ever appear like those
highly coloured pictures young hearts draw of
the future, and if they are never realized, — still
it is something to be happy even in thought.

Margaret found herself at her own home
sooner than she expected; she stopped for a
moment to look up the village for Walter, but
not seeing him she tapped at the door, it was
opened by Hugh Ripley.

“Oh! Mr. Ripley am I late ?” she said blush-

ing brightly at his unexpected appearance.
« No, I am early fortunately.”

She entered the cottage, removed her bonnet,
and fondled the cat before either of them spoke

again.



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 61

‘‘ Margaret,” he said at length (he had never
called her so before) “ your father is not very
well, — lying down a little before dinner.”

Margaret looked up alarmed, there was
something in the tone of his voice unusual, and
her father not well, she had never in her life
heard him complain.

“Til?” she said, “my father, he was quite
well when I went out, I have not been gone
an hour.” —

‘¢QOh! he’s better now, don’t be alarmed, I
came in at a fortunate moment, and now I have
induced him to lie down until dinner.”

“Shall I go to him ?” she asked still wonder-
ingly.

“No, no, he is better quiet — has anything
occurred particularly to distress him this morn-
ing ?”

“No, Mr. Ripley, not that I am aware of,



62 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

you terrify me, you are not telling me all the
truth, Oh! I felt something would go wrong
to-day.” And she laid her hand on his arm,
and looked with trembling earnestness in his
face.

Hugh felt almost inclined to be cruel —to
pause ere he quieted her fears; it was so

delightful to have her sweet eyes gazing on

him,—to feel she was looking to him for .

comfort, but he was not selfish; and venturing
to lay his hand soothingly on her small trem-
bling one, he said —

“ Allis well now, I assure you; your father
was alone and had a fit of very deep depression,
which might have terminated seriously had not
I entered opportunely; we had a long, grave
conversation, and afterwards, being somewhat
agitated, I recommended the quiet of his own
room, and soon he will be quite himself.”



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 63

But a dim perception of the truth seemed to
have reached Margaret, as with a startled gaze
she continued to fix her eyes on Hugh’s face ;
she felt he had saved them from some weighty
sorrow, and thanked him cordially, asking no
more questions, from an instinctive feeling that
he had told her all it needed she should know.

And as those fervent words of gratitude fell
from her lips in those clear low accents, so dear
to him, the grand mystery of why he lived was
solved, and he blessed Heaven he had lived
for this; he was not useless, why had he dared
to think so? “Shall the thing formed say to
him, who formed it, why hast thou made me
thus ?”

Hugh Ripley had learnt a lesson he never
more forgot. A long while he and his com-
panion talked together; and he told her how
her father had said his life was burdensome to



64 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

him, from the knowledge or rather the impres-
sion that he was unloved, uncared for, — that
his wife had been forced into a marriage with
him by her parents, and had never loved him,
— that his children had loved her, not him, and
then he went on to tell her of her father’s
passionate love for her, of which till that
moment, Margaret had been unconscious, —
and how he had longed to see some return of
it from her, but that he found duty and not
love.

“IT never knew this, Mr. Ripley,” said
Margaret, with the tears filling her eyes, “I
never knew all this, indeed ; I have had so great
a charge in my poor brother, I have been blind
to all else; my father has always been to me
cold and reserved; there has always seemed
between us an icy chain” —

“Which a few sweet loving words from you



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 65

would have had power to melt,” answered
Hugh. “He says that often and often he
would have given all he possessed for one of
those words of tenderness you were lavishing
on Walter; that often and often he has spo-
ken angrily to the boy, in jealousy of him, as
he has watched you pillowing his head on your
bosom, fondly stroking his hair and showering
kisses on his face.”

Margaret blushed vividly, and answered in a
low voice, “ Walter has so much need of love
and pity; but I am so grateful to you,” she
continued, “ for telling me this, indeed I do
love my father, and am glad, Oh! so glad,
that he loves me; he shall never have cause to
be jealous of Walter again.”

As she spoke the inner room door opened,
and her father entered; she flew from her seat,
and rushing to him, flung her arms about him,

F ®



66 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

and raising her flushed and tearful face to his,
said, “‘ Father dear, dear Father, you have been
ill, and your Margaret away from you, but you
are better now, are you not?”

The old man could not answer, for the first
time since her unconscious babyhood, he
pressed his darling to his heart, and his tears
glistened amongst her glossy hair. For a few
moments, emotion impeded speech, and when
released from that fond embrace, Margaret
turned again to thank Hugh for all the good
he had done, he was gone.

With all the refined delicacy of his nature,
he had felt that but One eye should be the wit-
ness of such an interview. He soon returned
however, bringing with him Walter, quite
restored to his accustomed cheerfulness, for he
had seen such numbers of Fairies running up
and down the “ Sun’s ladders,” as he termed

the rays, which shot through the trees.



THE DREAM CHINTZ, 67

And Walter was the greatest talker at the
dinner to which they now sat down — the hearts
of the others were too full for words, and Mar-
garet’s day-dream was unfulfilled, for Hugh
left early, and they were still only friends.
Had she known his thoughts, her heart
that night would have been lighter.

When Walter was gone to bed, her father,
throwing his arm round her, kissed her affec-
tionately and said he had something curious to
tell her, that she must hear before she went to
rest ; he then recounted the history of Hugh’s
Fairy dream.

“Tt is curious Margery dear, is it not?”
he said after he had finished the narration.

“He is going to send the pattern in to-
morrow, and on Saturday the prize will be
given. I hope sincerely he will gain it, he

richly deserves it, and I, Heaven knows, ought



68 THE DREAM CHINTZ

to wish him well, and you too my poor child;
he has rendered us a service to-day indeed ;”
and once more kissing her fondly, he sent her
to her own room in the greatest excitement and
astonishment at all she had heard and witnessed.

Margaret counted the days until Saturday,
and how anxious and disappointed she felt
when it came at last, and the shades of evening
began to fall, and Hugh appeared not to tell
them if he had been successful ; how very trou-
blesome everything was that she had to do; how
unusually fidgetty her father was ; how tiresome
poor Walter,—she almost spoke crossly to
him at last, and finally unable longer to remain
in the house, she coaxed him to come out, and
of course turned her steps towards the Factory,
where the prizes were to be distributed. The
moment however she discerned it, and her eyes,

which had been strained in obtaining a glimpse



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 69

of the building, caught sight of a figure coming
out, she turned rapidly round and bidding Walter
try to overtake her, ran off quickly in the oppo-
site direction ; but she was soon out of breath,
and Walter ran on before her and left her far
behind, whilst she leant against a gate to rest,
through which a path led a nearer way to the
Factory.

Still with her eyes gazing up the road by
which she fancied Hugh would come, and her
thoughts wandering as they were wont, Mar-
garet stood; when a voice behind her pro-
nounced her name, she started, and turning
with a flushed face, saw Hugh Ripley. He
jumped over the gate, and Margaret stam-
mered out something about its being “ very
cold,” but simple as the words were, and
indifferent as the tone was she attempted to
assume, there was something to Hugh Ripley



70 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

unmistakeable in her manner, and in a low voice
he said, “ Margaret, I know you will be glad to
hear that I have been successful, the Prize is
mine,” and he held up a leather bag containing
the money. Thrown off her guard, she clasped
her hands together, and lifting her eyes to his
face, she said,

“Qh! indeed I am glad. I have been so
very very anxious I was afraid to ask you.”

The glance, the words were enough, — all
doubts he might have had, were gone. Men
are ready enough to interpret words and looks
in their favour when they are Nor meant, but
it is a rare case if they mistake them when they .
are.

The torrent of Hugh’s long pent-up feel-
ings now poured forth, and he told her of ©
his cherished love, — of all his many doubts
and fears,—of his Dream, and how it had



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 71

inspired him with Hope, and as it had gained
him one prize, how he had trusted it might
secure to him | another.

‘¢ But alas! dear Margaret, would my antici-
pations had been realized; I have gained the
Prize it is true, but the sum is too trifling to
admit of my longer entertaining the daring
hopes I had formed. I had hoped it might
be sufficient to set me up in some business,
and enable me to support you as you have
been accustomed to be; that hope is at an
end, and I have only to recommence my
tedious occupation.—I could not ask you
Margaret to share such a pittance.”

Margaret murmured a reply, inaudible to
any, but one listening as Hugh was, and rap-
turously he answered her;— but no matter
what he said or how he said it, suffice it that
ere they reached home, both had forgotten



72 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

that sorrow ever did or could exist — that in
this weary world there were such things as
bitter partings — heart-burnings — jealousies,
and all the train of human ills and sins, —
that clouds ever shadowed the glowing sun
light, — or storms ruffled the serene sky, —
nipping frosts and bitter winds blighted the
blooming flowers,— or indeed that any other
beings trod the earth, save Margaret Ford and
Hugh Ripley.

But they were awakened from this happy state
by their approach to the village, and the sight
of Margaret’s home with Walter standing at
the door: and then came a thousand nervous
fears as to her father’s consent, the neces-
sity for which until that moment both had
forgotten.

“Why, dearest Margaret, your father told
me he should ever consider himself my debtor,



THE DREAM CHINTZ. i2

for what he was pleased to call the service I
rendered him; let him pay me with this little
hand, and then Margaret, dear Margaret, the
obligation will be on my side, let us go in and
speak to him at once.”

Walter was leaning against the door-post
talking to himself or to his friends the Fairies,
as he thought, when they came up to the
house, he continued his conversation without
heeding them, but as Hetty opened the door
and they passed in, leaving it open for him to
follow, he burst into one of his wild, ringing
laughs, and said,

‘Ha! Ha! now I understand, Yes! yes!
another gay wedding, — bring HER flowers,
Fairies, heaps of flowers, for she is good — so
good ; and they must be flowers which
never fade, and have no thorns; not Jack

Frost’s cold scentless ones, but warm sunny



74 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

flowers, that smell sweetly — yes, she shall
you say—thanks, thanks, and you must
all—all come to the wedding, and no one
will see you but me. Ha! ha! that will be
fun. I shall be so busy, I must go and tell
Whitelock, must I not? the Church must be
ready and clean, so clean, no dust in it to soil
your wings, — hush! fly away, I’m going now.”

And away went the boy down the village at
a quick pace, and entered the churchyard ; near
the church he found the man he sought digging
‘a grave. Whitelock was the sexton.

“ Whitelock, I want you,” said the boy.

‘‘Eh;” answered the old man looking up
and resting on his spade “Oh! it be you,
master Ford.”

“Yes! what are you doing ?”

A question he had asked fifty times before,
and which the old man was always puzzled to



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 75

answer, remembering Miss Margaret’s injunc-

tion that nothing sad should be told him, and




how carefully she

me had always kept



76 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

him from the knowledge of Death; managing
that some engrossing amusement at home
should employ him, when the somewhat un-
usual circumstance of a funeral occurred in the
small village, so he hesitated a moment and
then scratching his head, said.

“Why, I be’s digging a flower bed —and
there aint no story there,” he said to himself,
“ for what can you call such a young thing as
this, but a little flower — I’m a going to trans-
plant a flower, my boy, that got in a soil as
wasn’t suited to it, and it will doa deal better
where it’s going to.”

“Flower, Oh! yes, and it will blow for
Margaret’s wedding. I’ve come to tell you
you must clean the church, the Fairies are all
coming and it must be very clean.”

“Yes, my boy, it shall be very clean, the

Fairies be coming be they ?”



THE DREAM CHINTZ. my

No one heeded what poor Walter said, but
answered him gently, and never contradicted
him.

“ What are those gray stones for Whitelock,
so many of them ?”

Again the old man scratched his head before
he answered, and then said,

“Why, a great many people out of this
village be gone into a far country, and their
friends put up these stones to remind them
of ’em, and of the day they went away. A
beautiful country it is, my boy, where we shall
all go I hope. I’m expecting to go every
day.”

“Don’t go then till after the wedding, the
gay wedding, — what fun we shall have.”

* Ah! indeed, and who is to be the bride-
groom ?” |

“Oh! I must not tell that, Margaret will



78 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

be angry, but you'll see, you'll see, a brave
wedding it will be, good bye, Whitelock, have
the Church clean, never mind about the flowers,
the Fairies will bring them,” and, sauntering
slowly out of the church-yard, the boy re-
turned home.

He found Margaret standing by her Father,
one arm thrown about his neck, and the other
hand pressed in Hugh Ripley’s. They scarcely
heeded his entrance, so engrossed were they
by their conversation.

‘“‘ And you would leave me, Margaret, now we
have just begun to understand one another,”
said the old man with a melancholy smile.

“Oh! Sir,” answered Hugh, “do not talk
of leaving yet, I cannot take my Margaret to
my present home, but I could not resist hear-
ing from her own lips whether she would ever

come to gladden a better.”



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 79

‘‘ Had she refused,” said Ford sighing, “ you
would have had no care to seek a better, I
suppose ?”

“Oh! yes, Sir, I am a changed man now, I
used to think so, but since my wonderful
Dream, I have reflected much and deeply —
I have felt that the thwarting of one’s hopes
here, should instead of causing a gloomy in-
difference, a useless despair, incite us to fresh
exertions for the attainment of our hopes
hereafter; that we have no right to bury our
‘one talent,’ because it has failed to purchase
what we in our short-sightedness call happi-
ness; but seek to increase its value tenfold,
that it may purchase for us at last an eternal
and perfect happiness. Dear Walter’s Fairies
have indeed rendered me a service” —he said,
holding out his hand to the boy.

“Have you seen them?” said Walter, ea-

gerly.



eo
80 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

“Yes, my boy; and look what they have
given me,” and he held up the purse of money.

‘Ha! ha! hurrah! now Margaret, don’t
you love the Fairies.”

“ Indeed I do Walter, almost as well as
you do.”

“Ha! ha! wont there be a gay wedding —
Mary Lane’s will be nothing to it.”

“Come with me, Walter, 1 want to speak
to you,” said Hugh —“ I must go dear Mar-
garet, but I may come again in the evening?”

“Oh, yes!” she answered, her eyes spark-
ling with joy, “take care of Walter, and don’t

keep him out too long, it is so cold.”
Cold as it was she stood at the door watch-
ing them out of sight.— At length her father
begged her to close it.

‘“‘ How strangely things come about, Father,”
she said, when she had done his bidding, and



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 8]

settled herself close beside him, — “ Hugh’s
kindness to poor Walter, when he lost himself,
has really and truly been the source of his
present good fortune.”
‘* Securing your hand and heart, Margaret ?”
“No, Father,” she answered, blushing and
smiling, “getting the prize, for if he had never
known Walter, he would never have dreamed of
Fairies, shewing him a pattern; now would he ?””
“Well, I am not prepared to say that; I
can only say I am glad of the prospect of
leaving my daughter in such good hands—
he is an excellent young man, Margaret.”
Margaret needed not this assurance, she had
thought so from their first interview, and each
day her love and esteem increased for him.
As they were now so much together, she
daily witnessed some fresh proof of his amiable
disposition, his generous and noble heart,

G



82 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

With his master Hugh had always been a
favourite, and since his success he had been
doubly kind to him; and at length without
assigning any particular reason, had doubled
his salary, so that now Hugh began seriously to
talk of a pretty cottage, which was to let at the
outskirts of the village, and in short to make
every preparation for the gay wedding, Walter
had been so long expecting.

But before the accomplishment of all this,
he said he must go to London, and at this their
first parting Margaret was very unhappy.
She had never been in London, and to her
it had an awful sound; but half her fears she
would not express to him for it was like doubt-
ing him; he would not forget her she was sure,
and yet she saw him depart with a very heavy
heart and tearful eye ; her father too was ill that
night — the wind blew in cold and heavy gusts,



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 83

and poor Margaret could scarcely assume a
cheerfulness before Walter, and was glad when
in the refuge of her own room she could weep
unrestrainedly.

The only thing now was to look forward to
his letters — her father was growing worse, and
Margaret longed for Hugh’s return for she felt
frightened and helpless.

We will transport ourselves now as Mar-
garet would fain have done to his side, and
shall find him in a small house near Dean
Street, Soho, of miserable exterior, and giving
an excellent notion of its inhabitant. She, for
it was a woman, was seated by a small table at
work mending a gown, which a maid of all
work would have scorned to wear; the carpet
which covered the room was threadbare ; there
were no curtains to the window, save across

the lower panes, a strip of what was meant to



84 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

be white muslin, but upon which rested the
dust of ages. There was a handful of fire in
the grate made of coke, and a saucepan on the
hob making strenuous exertions to boil, a feat
which seemed with such a fire a moral impos-
sibility.

Hugh was standing before her, his arm rest-
ing on the mantel-piece, his face looking
flushed and excited.

“ But, Mother, hear me once more, I have
at last thank God! become successful, and if
you still deny the possession of the income I
felt assured you enjoyed, share mine, and do
not I implore you continue to live in a manner
so unbefitting my father’s wife, and so painful
to yourself.”

_ Mrs. Ripley looked up from her work for
the first time.
“Share yours! can you help me?” she

asked, ‘* Have you got money ?”



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 85

“Yes, mother, I have at last established
myself in the world, and find my exertions
enable me to secure quite sufficient at least to
make you more comfortable than you appear
at present.”

A strange expression passed over the rigid
features of his mother, and she said, —

“ Did you come to London solely to see
after me? you were not wont to be so very
affectionate — it is some years since we met.”

“Tt is, Mother, those years have been spent
in long and arduous struggles for subsistence.
I knew, or rather I thought,” looking around
him, “ you needed not my aid. I could not
live dependent on you, but now I find you
in apparent want, ill, as you say you are and
as you look, alone and unfriended,— you
are my mother,” he continued with a slight

tinge of bitterness in his tone, for he felt her



86 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

conduct had been little like one, “and I offer
you the shelter of the home, I have at length
secured for myself, and the protection of a
son.”

While he spoke she rivetted her small black
eyes upon him, and again demanded, “ Did he
come to London purposely to seek her out,
and make this offer?” He paused a moment
and a look of pain passed over his face, and
he answered.

“TI came to seek you out, with what purpose
it matters not now. I did not expect to find
you thus; do you accept my offer ?”

“Of course I do, Hugh. I shall be very
glad to be helped I am sure; I have no money,
I tell you, the rent of this house is very heavy,
I thought of letting the upper part, but then
I must have bought the furniture; you know,

Hugh, your father had nothing to leave, his



THE DREAM CHINTZ. 87

income died with him—there is nothing
but the small, very small property I brought
your Father for me to exist upon.”

“Well, Mother,” said Hugh with a heavy
sigh, “we will say no more about it, it is
settled. I have to see a man on business
to-morrow, and then I will make any arrange-
ment you like.”

“T had better go back with you into the
country. I like the country, but every one says
London’s the cheapest place in the world, so I
staid here.”

“No! No! Mother,” he answered eagerly,
“we will live here, let the upper part of the
house as you proposed, I will have it furnished.
My occupation can be as well carried on here
as in the country. I am tired!” he said
abruptly, “can I sleep here to-night ?”

“ Yes, there’s a bed room for you, — but —



88 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

we’ve nothing in the house except that drop of
broth.”

Oh, I’m not hungry, Mother,” he answered
impatiently, “I only want rest, I'll go to
the hotel for something I left there, and come
back directly.”

“You'll be sure to come back,” she asked
eagerly.

*“‘ Oh, yes,” he answered, “ sure,” and he was
soon back; to his surprise he found something
like a decent meal prepared for him, and the
room looking somewhat more cheerful, for the
shutters were closed, the candle lighted, and
she actually held out her hand to him, as
though she were pleased to see him.

He went to his room early —the wretched
room where he was to sleep; but he noticed
not its desolate appearance and flinging him-
self on the one chair it contained, exclaimed
aloud —



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describe
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9811f4db63e12671ea07d831b7a1f09f
ca267d433e785381cda1a86cd0bfc6c6f800d94b
'2012-05-13T09:23:20-04:00'
describe
'688' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_004.pro'
565f6b8a3be30700f7e85d9f1e6c63b5
79825e2e187f67201aefeacb64aa48e1b1c70b0f
'2012-05-13T09:22:51-04:00'
describe
'28547' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_004.QC.jpg'
a061a4128c4a6bc142a9e6ff9e62e76d
682593c1eafce8e63b67ec8312f5d7a2c11f9fff
'2012-05-13T09:21:54-04:00'
describe
'10544164' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_004.tif'
7d76e4b95843471da44a24b34c3a289b
91a0ed8757dfff599377e6d7fd6cb651333bf948
'2012-05-13T09:20:28-04:00'
describe
'30' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_004.txt'
f270850d8427a1bbe30b0b32d0385bfa
979d78994da6b8e4b623f03252a823deb9d8865b
'2012-05-13T09:17:34-04:00'
describe
'22988' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_004thm.jpg'
46df639e8ea08c3c19b52c3d5d1f2def
9facd1de7ead22757e0754e10557dbc9a94fed10
'2012-05-13T09:23:24-04:00'
describe
'1252255' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_005.jp2'
1e69dbe1b5a313e49fc7878426dcbf81
0a1814dcf512dee990f5da7ec34d66f045992d63
describe
'250153' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_005.jpg'
a1e1b27ae00e205dea703d25069b346a
4619cc766d245f97bbff0ee0a016d1c75ad8431c
'2012-05-13T09:19:53-04:00'
describe
'95676' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_005.QC.jpg'
ce8ae828a4b8ddf7987a5755b33e57b5
5519223b7f08dc42c601d1c8d652f6892cadf169
'2012-05-13T09:21:28-04:00'
describe
'10042600' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_005.tif'
9ba91d3821a92e65026256d0697d3438
332c7c996adaadad5cf734c0c39aacf43c9dfd9f
'2012-05-13T09:23:27-04:00'
describe
'43581' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_005thm.jpg'
c3d95d7cbfd8f91a7f31758ca267ac56
e2fcc42fe1a63655ca56b6b0aaaad23715294ba7
'2012-05-13T09:21:58-04:00'
describe
'428667' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_006.jp2'
f4d63ab72aeb0ff5f0fcdc54b6d8cca0
ec49482ab527b5f1442f48b302bf7e79a646b0b8
'2012-05-13T09:19:03-04:00'
describe
'62201' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_006.jpg'
70588e6f959ba6fd1eb448a326e2abd7
3c1221b165a269b8a3f6a85c266b02f6dc684458
'2012-05-13T09:17:08-04:00'
describe
'5925' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_006.pro'
972629f6d2028d27071a1301b4341056
99937630f0d8ac7226ed66af40a57c1d4dccdbd0
'2012-05-13T09:19:21-04:00'
describe
'37593' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFPZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_006.QC.jpg'
1ed6a3abb665902799f9e9482a8e0abf
87550e341d57756fd8cf4f39fb0e77220535810c
'2012-05-13T09:18:35-04:00'
describe
'11005016' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_006.tif'
9bac70aae47f7c40b586252acc129e6b
ada086e5a1d04fb4f717155fe827ea5daca21b40
'2012-05-13T09:22:47-04:00'
describe
'287' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_006.txt'
0bc1763451e1679d3a3e7bdbbc95685c
0963f008948a3e15c635f902bb4a33fd79a29e3d
'2012-05-13T09:21:33-04:00'
describe
'26387' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_006thm.jpg'
cea4a298e5494e947980353b15875cc7
17792c3d5810c60ca7589c68d2f2a74e7ea59643
'2012-05-13T09:20:36-04:00'
describe
'65167' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_007.jp2'
fefd7f29f3ec9ab9dd7387e57c8a5ba7
1daddb31f4c7268e47132ddf46575361069bb732
'2012-05-13T09:17:46-04:00'
describe
'25094' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_007.jpg'
fc8034a6c4846f35564cb5d0fbcfbe6d
8af37f3a8901f99880983409c2a4c8e8c87b55c6
'2012-05-13T09:19:33-04:00'
describe
'1596' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_007.pro'
69f07fa7e6aee5147de7eb5efb619dfc
705c22d387024655316158743ef1bd73acf00174
'2012-05-13T09:21:01-04:00'
describe
'20349' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_007.QC.jpg'
9c3e3c4f2df7cc1fb8dab4cd7fde0d87
1223cacf992c689b5b65f114ac764f9be24e1b66
'2012-05-13T09:16:08-04:00'
describe
'11682808' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_007.tif'
cb3a4a6fc56bd3348202f8880a53f805
dea527b0d2590a53ccf73698c6844535842a0af4
'2012-05-13T09:17:54-04:00'
describe
'194' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_007.txt'
d5d690d2a9d8312eb5438bc680920e0f
ea7255516b70498f707320b85a7bf93b0468b4a3
'2012-05-13T09:18:47-04:00'
describe
'19359' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_007thm.jpg'
5753e76ea204b78a0e9a2c561f9d6272
de1c643d93992bfea4dd997c20c920ae121e5985
'2012-05-13T09:15:48-04:00'
describe
'240318' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_008.jp2'
cc0842db3f3fc458ca3c0ad2bbe57f47
b6115022f14ea4861ffff43d7d067f9d84751b8a
'2012-05-13T09:23:37-04:00'
describe
'44601' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_008.jpg'
aae3f1c8f97918c6a0238486b0d1da6b
3690f363145b2a1b95ae5ea47f153173e5858f70
'2012-05-13T09:21:00-04:00'
describe
'4344' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_008.pro'
be1b8e677e767203d734b5c018f32dbc
364bbca79efd7bebe749558bfa5a11810fdb8fac
'2012-05-13T09:21:02-04:00'
describe
'29272' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_008.QC.jpg'
0c786c0be2370e6c090d6e0f3d2e9ac2
9814db53c45d8673799a68668fcb4db39b11a67f
'2012-05-13T09:17:44-04:00'
describe
'10378576' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_008.tif'
d478a6512118efa4274289f48a6d3f6f
8ddd4458b91eb45350604d854cd3f38f53083575
'2012-05-13T09:18:11-04:00'
describe
'217' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_008.txt'
eae632c0850b14cb2e0a910b1434bbd8
fcc1294f350e5c389bb31c32f132d7df2426cc52
'2012-05-13T09:22:50-04:00'
describe
'23402' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_008thm.jpg'
b7220cfd76ac66fd51a687bab93a6213
c7f278a2cd52bf0903124fb6b1285b2ca5b192c2
'2012-05-13T09:18:10-04:00'
describe
'11843' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_009.jp2'
4b2a8c1a30ec41f13664810fce0f6bf2
f70cfa64562f3fd83360c0381bab7913f33ceaaa
'2012-05-13T09:15:37-04:00'
describe
'20475' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_009.jpg'
d917f04b38d2cd594055ce47091b33c4
defc6ea65cc47fa2af20da742fb4052facc6f00f
'2012-05-13T09:18:36-04:00'
describe
'18655' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_009.QC.jpg'
e8441f59b236ff082b2e687d89a2a498
d9461bf42370b746035baa1c12ffb465d49cbc66
describe
'11181932' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_009.tif'
19fd0fb578a563ef1860171149610ffa
2819cbeabdc404734a0e39d1b87aabb8e9f4b3e5
'2012-05-13T09:20:25-04:00'
describe
'18096' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_009thm.jpg'
49de2a507875b6eb9af8e9cc9f1aa551
1b80fc195e15604850f31cb26bdb70f572737255
'2012-05-13T09:21:31-04:00'
describe
'561080' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_010.jp2'
66eff8288f93ac6c308c9ef49b804d90
b2bec2387d3c50a8e73a9d8a0ed41b945e0c8118
'2012-05-13T09:20:01-04:00'
describe
'73315' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_010.jpg'
e52d98a8726c9efea058149aff721131
6f633d5e9b525b84378d40a78856adfda2bfafd3
'2012-05-13T09:23:29-04:00'
describe
'10488' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_010.pro'
3719d469953949de0285532ea253d322
57969d36f3e7dcbf0cba3c18d24f345fb572e4ac
'2012-05-13T09:23:02-04:00'
describe
'43470' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFQZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_010.QC.jpg'
5f7d47b170d080f531b10439cb4b19b0
570d39a63dcca87e5d5448cd446546ce8376ecdb
'2012-05-13T09:19:30-04:00'
describe
'10342460' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_010.tif'
1ac3486562158dd09ec18b1c0f0dc28d
b0afb086e23bc716845aba1fdad550c6da562aac
'2012-05-13T09:21:09-04:00'
describe
'467' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_010.txt'
942967fdc92294d65ea79bf7a42ebc7c
09dd71bca0e7b2c336d1932cbae8110407fc8900
'2012-05-13T09:20:22-04:00'
describe
'30344' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_010thm.jpg'
846cb4a4f6b5f1c87d2e5de0a891f155
1a147d72d0e5852d2ea4eae9a04b486ca67d4f8c
'2012-05-13T09:21:07-04:00'
describe
'16512' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_011.jp2'
a9653f861c69e4af75e3d8fe0a3c92ef
7a62e127ae244b02f40db890e1d781da493a4acc
'2012-05-13T09:23:19-04:00'
describe
'20770' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_011.jpg'
a5409ec3a00e6982661ffd49350e33e9
98b328e2ae04ace95770073241639c29ea915960
'2012-05-13T09:22:16-04:00'
describe
'18756' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_011.QC.jpg'
894ef61a65e75eb653f41e88895bb0b2
897243e28cafa8b2346580830f05356f5b57ae39
'2012-05-13T09:21:55-04:00'
describe
'11181948' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_011.tif'
68ea755b0c815c8f03d379338591f4ae
e98680b4e0a501f63c9e45da967157ab7418e7aa
'2012-05-13T09:21:19-04:00'
describe
'18161' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_011thm.jpg'
c1022c05c80dad43f5c11e71d698a9a9
7b92857bbdb493bfd268a08e1b83a39286f75eab
'2012-05-13T09:22:49-04:00'
describe
'580907' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_012.jp2'
01eded651abd1c07a5a0ef0344215c29
99c21202d33cebef34b40ae8a8b6a11e7c1e20da
'2012-05-13T09:20:08-04:00'
describe
'74462' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_012.jpg'
548b96a03aafcccd8d328f6610999927
45103fd6ae747aadff4ae1b9d47b207d83a176a9
describe
'10949' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_012.pro'
ba548fd3cb0b345a8e688961d7a78440
a9721cdca43013bddf5f49cf22edf8052a0ec3be
'2012-05-13T09:20:32-04:00'
describe
'43420' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_012.QC.jpg'
af5df1f62f66ce466c2058b9f191621f
cb229a3e1dd62f3dbee62f92f5bad852bb79b9a9
'2012-05-13T09:16:02-04:00'
describe
'10611372' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_012.tif'
0535f7a3941172107c14ba6878f09b0f
3e425a979831bbd41e693d09300b7eb3dd77abc6
'2012-05-13T09:22:38-04:00'
describe
'487' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_012.txt'
83dec7aa7264c3a82b89e11275053091
93cdafa388ef8c38e8574947f93451cde3e30007
'2012-05-13T09:15:29-04:00'
describe
'29051' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_012thm.jpg'
7a025e1b6bbd1dff5a20f4eb88be4895
64c7473b17e6bc91118666c574f5769beb14a2b8
'2012-05-13T09:19:09-04:00'
describe
'24052' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_013.jp2'
cea4e531dc77feb20414bbda5119e6f4
4c41db60705d1bbd9673031d9955441d73abe3a4
'2012-05-13T09:22:10-04:00'
describe
'21069' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_013.jpg'
e114e2ee17126bb102ae83381ecac2d8
fccdf17d53e72c8646cc5ab3d6214018157c2302
'2012-05-13T09:22:42-04:00'
describe
'18871' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_013.QC.jpg'
d56b2e1d4e396801d8b78ca6d6099a7e
521b0ba5a4daa3033bb3ff6f9a8b8a4578e82535
describe
'11181956' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_013.tif'
5c61e9fc630b8eecf14cacadfba7174e
7e4e7d87d67c9b57728190bca5b9a66575d03d1f
'2012-05-13T09:16:39-04:00'
describe
'18280' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_013thm.jpg'
3ab5ab03d30b4e51a201d0d2606d5316
995e6c9f88ab3e69826aafa8ae2fc477f686908e
'2012-05-13T09:18:50-04:00'
describe
'1395588' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_014.jp2'
109caeb5a4664a0e3247c34675563283
b3f4e65f9041ddc448a68aac5e1fb442bb206800
'2012-05-13T09:20:10-04:00'
describe
'171830' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_014.jpg'
02360d3eb96b1da3b5918544c74cb08d
faacd6e536c8ea1fa853a3bce33d8af19a38a46e
'2012-05-13T09:18:43-04:00'
describe
'2396' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_014.pro'
09157bc26f04e26c4ee63db2f1c479d2
c3f35c8f61cb790ec7c90aeb966b9a46b70f39b7
'2012-05-13T09:20:56-04:00'
describe
'65795' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_014.QC.jpg'
0fcb045a180a8205192cef92e3c9e077
e0d3495047b24cd732ddbd73a1844f5e69ab9124
'2012-05-13T09:17:48-04:00'
describe
'11186032' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_014.tif'
9af227744bea56fcd34cec51bb92ab8c
a6f49228a5120e443a59f51124848afd5aac76b2
'2012-05-13T09:22:35-04:00'
describe
'167' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFRZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_014.txt'
9ee5299934eb569c5de2189b69a862be
5f752fa3bb9f51684e8301df91bf82b62a10d211
'2012-05-13T09:20:38-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'36269' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_014thm.jpg'
25c330c6031648237b5cbfcd6b724ef2
71b7161e4ea24c572cbb14f6ef8f85011cba4557
'2012-05-13T09:16:18-04:00'
describe
'1388805' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_015.jp2'
528410c79480a1d8d263e9e13c746ce7
e9a2354758efb6079f41d9ef1380fdde0a8749e1
'2012-05-13T09:21:56-04:00'
describe
'137543' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_015.jpg'
ecd1bc60f5810fd7ab369ba7af3ecd61
f5934e40641340e01b6b968a75cc52b0530d0f55
describe
'23234' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_015.pro'
e7ce8887470f96d08357e5edf9c4589c
ed2730768229d8223745fcd9abb5583549ae4d13
'2012-05-13T09:17:10-04:00'
describe
'72011' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_015.QC.jpg'
0459c209d509485a229eee2de2334d7e
331b5d537a96175b5e6f5a5620ff86cd0f630725
describe
'11192364' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_015.tif'
e2d58ae76d5fc1293cae4f1a4c7fd153
6a962d721e61d013196002520e5bac7ffef49d02
'2012-05-13T09:20:26-04:00'
describe
'882' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_015.txt'
b8ec01f5b58684f46fee3646c374880b
23def670544c219eca71e549dc6ab7bf4ede366b
'2012-05-13T09:16:47-04:00'
describe
'43476' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_015thm.jpg'
f5a3710879c0d565c54aa9aabf23dbcd
57a6f7ea37a69652f61031ce3c6453bafb81d2b3
'2012-05-13T09:20:59-04:00'
describe
'1346802' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_016.jp2'
f4d91a6f31d33c988483d73a9ff78cd4
347aa35a6db2c03a47e11684e92ca041c7ca2d98
describe
'139713' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_016.jpg'
e2ae55b47d6732bd5609b58807065b4a
d75e30f4930704a53adc0f7d0fca5dc949f434d8
'2012-05-13T09:19:01-04:00'
describe
'23032' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_016.pro'
55b6e6f1ba4902db40816dcb39994b80
a37ff1591e0d1f8c38fc5f4b986e50db954f3270
'2012-05-13T09:16:33-04:00'
describe
'73862' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_016.QC.jpg'
de23cc751b059276b06a99cf6e995cb9
1da978fddd864922b6314cf9ced030e1594ed0a3
'2012-05-13T09:21:39-04:00'
describe
'10797680' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_016.tif'
5f0b6471079d509b5b4c53b97aa0e858
0e42c39cd95b79d303dfd11e7d01ceaf18de8f5e
'2012-05-13T09:17:29-04:00'
describe
'916' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_016.txt'
85da21f305bee1c37a42ef7d285b94a6
54cecf44f850f6e6a2258c1ee83998084b4e6ace
'2012-05-13T09:22:24-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'42797' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_016thm.jpg'
9fc37d3dec7e87ffb9c45ba5e2ccc042
bad95e2bb83e6c7b3fe115230dc9064e16b3eaa4
describe
'1307428' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_017.jp2'
af51a4787c70f0a5fe604b7303140ef8
eb8f4367c0c2f5dd417aa2dd5001deb9a161c89f
'2012-05-13T09:23:32-04:00'
describe
'132551' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_017.jpg'
d109f13603b8612266d8f72e07117dc1
b14bbff7acac60d99bfe787bb1c42e4a34965acf
'2012-05-13T09:22:15-04:00'
describe
'23780' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_017.pro'
a2e8c5234fcfb9edf6bc375e77e61280
e71b9bb7ec185b444baeb384cb9b56bfc54d47fc
'2012-05-13T09:16:00-04:00'
describe
'69487' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_017.QC.jpg'
9fb1fe08d2b3c6664d97be58db9ddb8f
fa08c2980ffdb41bc12d3435d7298136b9e50fb6
'2012-05-13T09:23:15-04:00'
describe
'11187040' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFST' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_017.tif'
854086c43e26761cb63a56e30d923e99
4faf3cf134e19234bd0c0e05f878581d2b235a2f
'2012-05-13T09:23:07-04:00'
describe
'904' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_017.txt'
83506e263a6e87f745d8a6aa82f9ac0f
5fe2aa2e0e1f0b06a32390cd5b4b401e7bd68b1d
'2012-05-13T09:19:17-04:00'
describe
'40765' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_017thm.jpg'
fb3ca6a1905c617602e5f2f4641cae29
6753c21a2b4166d86b6b0b6863d0e7e8c74d7145
describe
'1276624' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_018.jp2'
f1c52d2785efa088df1428a720cc3211
981f01d52e9629044e647630bd5bb42c8f8dcfdc
describe
'138312' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_018.jpg'
cce5e921cd2ae95462ddda7374091312
9026c59e8650d921b624c90ba405c9fb8d659eaf
describe
'24689' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_018.pro'
0e4cf0ba5f361a1be7fe846e21b82b1f
ae414e52115199d31b5ef498df7f900801d5c6a5
'2012-05-13T09:19:40-04:00'
describe
'73525' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFSZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_018.QC.jpg'
dc8f01540be469b1713f440c4a4aa39a
88c0387c788911c73e2470f28d7cd4ad47c67ae0
describe
'10530332' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_018.tif'
23a1908290514ab2835b2417418ae0b2
50adc1b2029bbd85b08abdf2554da512b2a61840
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_018.txt'
06ea24830ba246d1ef2cd2946244f8ea
5f38e2645e7624f0a3390ed3579b81d07da76a88
describe
'41318' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_018thm.jpg'
b9d6d8d9991673a61695928e62a0fb44
76dfffcdce578656801238de785c0f408c6a606f
'2012-05-13T09:20:24-04:00'
describe
'1380259' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_019.jp2'
f6ac495ae464dd375a4648213d1395ff
af5644c87716c3ce2ffcbea9525af971f5289444
'2012-05-13T09:20:50-04:00'
describe
'136706' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_019.jpg'
2465bc1edeca08d1bd851decadf01dbe
5665731b1b00606ac84d1a14a3d1c6ce364b1a22
'2012-05-13T09:23:35-04:00'
describe
'22339' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_019.pro'
6e5285e3661864d4737887b8bec6a5f6
929c21b3fea0674c004cd8880dafd493a9eb1fb6
'2012-05-13T09:20:43-04:00'
describe
'72244' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_019.QC.jpg'
1d7665188ac5e0db9b0f30aad223e381
aee99ef229ff3fe274265b471805f3ff3edf5d6c
'2012-05-13T09:22:26-04:00'
describe
'11194768' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_019.tif'
f5c04c5d8f333d94e5bb7e09ef4e05e8
076bbe427b6e181d1d32385b78c6027a68da1fc6
'2012-05-13T09:16:58-04:00'
describe
'862' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_019.txt'
efe6677be61821157759c3d3ca95a57a
ddda9632b1e8f1eeff74f22a64208203bcafb70c
'2012-05-13T09:19:31-04:00'
describe
'43588' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_019thm.jpg'
6bf9d3e1815dd4e53afa103a3d350fe2
5d949be89e222ce58a7bab84a9df0770044fae0d
'2012-05-13T09:22:14-04:00'
describe
'1212874' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_020.jp2'
cddf977d44ff8a88ef47656ef2827dab
0d76a325d31349f819d24458162ded00a7367739
'2012-05-13T09:23:10-04:00'
describe
'133672' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_020.jpg'
196616e5b4018e4128d741730ac225c7
64913fb19fd4f2d3bb21f6cc5f53a32e86e54170
'2012-05-13T09:21:04-04:00'
describe
'22699' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_020.pro'
0354e42b5b2f378a742b0cd5388bb9ae
81a51b7378320d209832c191f96158aaded1d3be
'2012-05-13T09:21:27-04:00'
describe
'71334' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_020.QC.jpg'
ae81c6520cee20a45ebb49e7a039f19a
132e5d7c131a7bc55a3ea222c5a5a9b682d8e48c
'2012-05-13T09:21:50-04:00'
describe
'10535524' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_020.tif'
77db83cfb03809b1ea50eb5737538a38
1e780890c3f2f0b6c366324d140ef117f979323f
'2012-05-13T09:17:58-04:00'
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_020.txt'
2368f6945e9dde3677413ca61c2b948f
be752af0750dab80aa8761a3cf75e60e8dacab93
describe
'41872' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_020thm.jpg'
c9aaae65951573605ffa150015b83c5e
90c94153abdb8be64f5221b52aba0193e5cd4c74
describe
'1353419' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_021.jp2'
3c40a47d5af8bcec816928423dbb17c5
4cfc7f14d0fa8f38595bcf2438c06a1a98727fdc
'2012-05-13T09:22:23-04:00'
describe
'135911' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_021.jpg'
b489843a226ae041e75ad491ec11fe3c
2a887f10890cbc3d5d82605dd765c53a03dbfc3c
'2012-05-13T09:22:20-04:00'
describe
'22829' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_021.pro'
e9d2e65e7248ae247b167e64429e963e
f95cf2b14ba1a49ecc785722e2af1aeb78686364
describe
'71500' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_021.QC.jpg'
df2d455be37a6ab0dc5a9c951350a998
a8a9ec183d49fae78f7103c3a656e45d58296713
describe
'11192152' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_021.tif'
0e0d9951443c6ac730611bfeb79092e8
03a56de234d3422aecdc91fdc213393e5726a0a0
'2012-05-13T09:15:46-04:00'
describe
'870' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_021.txt'
f4611e644a25005452a3781c56622509
534e34880823854400d226522ee0971dc27b070f
describe
'42311' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_021thm.jpg'
94889a8e3a652cb147a3bb0821898ece
6ce411dd99175fa47f37866ad7b48060f46c7210
'2012-05-13T09:22:34-04:00'
describe
'1127228' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_022.jp2'
87c9136902b4ec684a796bfb125bf115
d3449f1266481cdaaffb4804f90f79f3e860f10c
'2012-05-13T09:22:00-04:00'
describe
'122242' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFTZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_022.jpg'
8fb0cdeb8a467449f4a660a0c814a2b7
64918791cadfd261d5c60e1d463f4831cd1ade38
'2012-05-13T09:18:16-04:00'
describe
'20759' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_022.pro'
8c55f176f44f95f8fb06a125c271d01e
3ec118d55c7ff033f919d2cfc0feef9d0e6c8595
'2012-05-13T09:19:43-04:00'
describe
'66590' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_022.QC.jpg'
c5367b0f8477116b194124375189b463
f685bd766a2d39582c7adee8d5e8c549ee0a58e4
'2012-05-13T09:22:54-04:00'
describe
'10611712' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_022.tif'
aff2d6e19b9dec1a41605cca33a20b76
93a4a223257f6e5dfd11b7a83e7b942b4be15823
'2012-05-13T09:19:48-04:00'
describe
'809' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_022.txt'
c9626b9b0b7da5bb43d88a8793f354cb
1f171c705479caf3c86ec4ac694373aa133d11cd
'2012-05-13T09:22:11-04:00'
describe
'39958' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_022thm.jpg'
51dd9f707a71de2984dca6f22e0d008b
4d8ff1841e2d74b8fa46d9799a0addfc335614bb
'2012-05-13T09:16:40-04:00'
describe
'1395589' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_023.jp2'
2a66a332b70fce9ef216a07719695282
f00784fa15a21868157f9dbc0acd62c7dd35f500
'2012-05-13T09:18:32-04:00'
describe
'142365' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_023.jpg'
8292d8874b68248b1cd612e60a06e697
ad34b7cd15ae1d25353ea92483d585d7f728695d
'2012-05-13T09:17:26-04:00'
describe
'23498' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_023.pro'
af88775812bc59c6e3256d024d303374
be945a14dd171c5030859d9cd7a456f492807c3d
'2012-05-13T09:23:05-04:00'
describe
'75582' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_023.QC.jpg'
621c66241ae6c967039eda1f1f6dfbe2
710fd290e08c278e5130874425551cf835d0907e
'2012-05-13T09:19:36-04:00'
describe
'11188172' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_023.tif'
b39673e8fd9ba81fc360dd05f9344278
1232bdf20d9e8e1979c24b4424883a27d1b66d93
'2012-05-13T09:16:31-04:00'
describe
'888' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_023.txt'
0dbb6ccc7dadbb44d1b2141d04c5a8cb
f04ff10e00ec3f569dc7307f9e366b4458bb8122
'2012-05-13T09:23:09-04:00'
describe
'44468' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_023thm.jpg'
1710050ef6fb556b2bd6faae703bd65e
f2d95e7aabf1a3b00a54c489370d6e6cc9317cac
describe
'1218657' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_024.jp2'
7a1c2b5682fb01393e09e74b4133a0f0
2197431aa120c8ac0d0dd8c95a03d095b8d82720
'2012-05-13T09:22:04-04:00'
describe
'131465' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_024.jpg'
bfce0da50d0b85e0b7d337d6e92bb1d5
ae554167bd45bd7891ab6f8612165de9f57971dd
'2012-05-13T09:20:13-04:00'
describe
'21805' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_024.pro'
df63aa1c0d5a64046cefe346edd7a8ee
04e9df9f8ad6397a069d78b3c058b55ddd2d581f
'2012-05-13T09:22:36-04:00'
describe
'70676' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_024.QC.jpg'
b8c08d153c0048740e828abddf6be75a
925519a8ca71346e29268fc3f0c69c962369f0c2
describe
'10555196' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_024.tif'
c5ba6fc77cc83d033919031c5be4d8fb
d0e2090faea2535b4fff44576db4ba65fcca54eb
'2012-05-13T09:23:23-04:00'
describe
'838' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_024.txt'
63aae1473c8518b7b26130b212084bc2
66121dc3d205e898df3951a961315b51ad5d44b9
'2012-05-13T09:19:14-04:00'
describe
'41175' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_024thm.jpg'
2cb9d2ef0badb7ca5c929f5d92307614
3edc30c1c2724d6d7947b7beed1c7ab231bef46b
'2012-05-13T09:22:28-04:00'
describe
'1374526' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_025.jp2'
4c2e511b188adce071f4a034b04557ee
8309775d08e3cde09d1bb6fe7fce060f7d99d9ba
'2012-05-13T09:22:12-04:00'
describe
'140835' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_025.jpg'
bb2a4d293afca6b85248bca5208c25e7
79284d96fed9c3d212a7e197d4eea4fcaae9ac4a
'2012-05-13T09:17:39-04:00'
describe
'24421' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_025.pro'
8a5536f432accbbed239233423db4839
52626bdf95cb6cf13df659282f9dd2e724ba0d82
describe
'74413' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_025.QC.jpg'
c7b84cace2c9c253c1b80e0249067fbf
939e1fcf9b8719944b12fc4b0dbad18c354fba6c
'2012-05-13T09:20:37-04:00'
describe
'11188072' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_025.tif'
e4a254819f325af3edbee036179b702c
178963f61fd8213daf1b9a1bd7fb98fe4d975b92
'2012-05-13T09:16:20-04:00'
describe
'941' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_025.txt'
e9b39d9cbdbd9bba5ed7432563bff902
655b0968704f55690ab4984175cbb5bb6d4b2bea
'2012-05-13T09:19:52-04:00'
describe
'43598' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFUZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_025thm.jpg'
c84f6e75d37a9eb5896211de9e1a19b8
b2dbe14d1de62db1b9e53fdbb9d561526b0176de
describe
'1217709' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_026.jp2'
b677ddcf878bc0a8e3c9acc72fbcca5a
6954cb224ad3ad90eb1420b11285d9f9d4fbbb9a
'2012-05-13T09:19:47-04:00'
describe
'133148' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_026.jpg'
3eadcf807b694b476fe8126c563606c9
4021aebbd7374939ddae7e5054c4a787692aed4f
'2012-05-13T09:22:33-04:00'
describe
'23030' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_026.pro'
9126764538089c8233ed603528fd45bf
962dec81c64b3321d2326228c6b9c694c289c554
describe
'71452' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_026.QC.jpg'
cf57d8723e0f7a9dbdb7c1d9e652fd80
3b5ae57c6faa246f9996e0e584cfde4aaca927fe
'2012-05-13T09:20:45-04:00'
describe
'10492996' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_026.tif'
95bec9eaa9eb6b35f5281baf336bc2df
28c2653da96139e8aabcb2ad8e5a78222030054e
'2012-05-13T09:22:40-04:00'
describe
'875' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_026.txt'
370d81268e082b30c3eda05f3f515e27
27933462236c7348d33d81c8ee09e213eca68ef6
'2012-05-13T09:20:40-04:00'
describe
'40189' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_026thm.jpg'
8d14491c02c63e4cfcae01fc6b0176f3
4a83e7246f38f02c666bbb9e9a3c168772b7e4ae
describe
'1395608' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_027.jp2'
27a5a675ca8f92468345c9bf67119748
28725ed29cbf871d81f23ff681876f47544aa14e
'2012-05-13T09:18:17-04:00'
describe
'143511' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_027.jpg'
52dfe51066ee9a7c47885cf0a33742ac
0663140245ea7f1f3684b632923e2abf28b49829
describe
'23614' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_027.pro'
3b34f993b77dfc0b8a4dfd03daa757f0
47c78c2e7cf76e63b672c82651dab165cc1a15b2
'2012-05-13T09:21:47-04:00'
describe
'75890' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_027.QC.jpg'
24679421f8c853bf088388dccbb61273
5dc085147f9eb6a3b97f6053b52eee4f63324215
'2012-05-13T09:17:30-04:00'
describe
'11188260' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_027.tif'
f9d7cec6172c06b6921a5bffaf324b6d
2fae9d2b35e9fde934d0a8bfd94868f8670efdea
'2012-05-13T09:20:30-04:00'
describe
'892' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_027.txt'
0cf3d8127bd5e06aafa0349eb64c7373
885d3d0fb75aca52efbb60935c246dd089d79b5d
'2012-05-13T09:20:20-04:00'
describe
'44721' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_027thm.jpg'
773d64c93928dbf93cfb59ead8d8b608
77d92a5627a79b932ceb86300b362c4eb0944eb7
'2012-05-13T09:18:46-04:00'
describe
'1166788' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_028.jp2'
aef1d7f8ce7123f6a4b4aa095f93c01e
a912fa4c6d24407f1a6b4a922658c53d797abfcd
'2012-05-13T09:18:40-04:00'
describe
'130641' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_028.jpg'
b376afaa08377d07bd1f4f9dcd08e609
641bc902f9b55defb529ca35b1b87ab475eedc9d
describe
'22451' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_028.pro'
cc96e8e3a6d9d99bc961860704e3bcd2
00478159480926d17a0bc0892dee2d5aadf83387
'2012-05-13T09:21:40-04:00'
describe
'69930' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_028.QC.jpg'
24d9fd695c58f719e8bc4925766b9f9c
670b2d41dba0d072fbe821a9767a5711e72056b0
describe
'10194196' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_028.tif'
b19261fc0aada90edf73374df1bbc06b
1ada1cedb238f15b080e841e93767be63ae4155e
describe
'861' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_028.txt'
e320b3afdd4b0d10b4ab24651284a02f
cda1e2128e6b869d287881b60cecf6f498000365
'2012-05-13T09:15:38-04:00'
describe
'38595' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_028thm.jpg'
016c3a67dddd674fb6ae76bd1097dfb2
f76451c621ca653bec4cb7c00a22881b3b30e66b
'2012-05-13T09:22:53-04:00'
describe
'1273974' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_029.jp2'
edaa90c798a0e8ce13f07c32ea28f888
8d125f0f4b9dd6531ac1023a85f84b24b8d7e490
'2012-05-13T09:18:28-04:00'
describe
'128061' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_029.jpg'
3f1caebc92f265e5631f843a93fef94f
536d10591164befd336e710a269742faa32440c4
'2012-05-13T09:17:01-04:00'
describe
'21625' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_029.pro'
ec7ee8f823bd6b6cb25f049023b2e6f8
6e95811c641afacceccf87fcd99e920f2163eb27
'2012-05-13T09:18:24-04:00'
describe
'67268' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_029.QC.jpg'
9700a0200286f53791561986a38da753
11bec28d99475a87a868fa512e91f93651c3a5cf
'2012-05-13T09:19:44-04:00'
describe
'11187248' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFVZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_029.tif'
abe1efc3a1ac03beba0f86486aefeeaf
4f1724e2ff1d10f12dba1cc16365b93cb2de9771
'2012-05-13T09:21:42-04:00'
describe
'844' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_029.txt'
eafa5633c16fef93d85be49a333b1cf8
a2596c36541a7648dc1f9b730989b22ac6db66e8
'2012-05-13T09:18:15-04:00'
describe
'40147' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_029thm.jpg'
f97fae50668351db9aecbb1149b68710
63ae1d5e46dc0789c08b456c9a6a9b4ea1ee5449
'2012-05-13T09:19:29-04:00'
describe
'1326015' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_030.jp2'
5a2f0c9a8380ce16e9b2a36a2f383b19
5cbcfb1433f294f69dc10a096e40c6a8ef7cd888
'2012-05-13T09:19:19-04:00'
describe
'186515' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_030.jpg'
4de6f3b5ce61c12d39265db00e87cf32
b44539d5c5debc1253aba13179be848656ffeee2
'2012-05-13T09:21:20-04:00'
describe
'4327' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_030.pro'
69fa7e32266a9056a5e94f48aca4ee69
cc67955c78c9402a36a35068167a7200c7d3f4cc
describe
'71076' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_030.QC.jpg'
e7b0364e2b34848de318a6dd3da78944
879e5a75af9dea29afb5b39d49ec6bee0f2d9c8a
'2012-05-13T09:21:37-04:00'
describe
'10630416' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_030.tif'
48d28dfac2783586e09ba5e56780958a
e6a28f48294986836f6aa6f95859982dcc4e8238
'2012-05-13T09:19:46-04:00'
describe
'195' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_030.txt'
651677606e9bdce6e1aa35fe352dff69
b24ba5da67a18658931f2bb183e4a05dfd840686
'2012-05-13T09:19:54-04:00'
describe
'36918' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_030thm.jpg'
a183822d738c9c75fa1f00cb8fe58d79
240ff84a05d01fb6d253dde02737ec51142924ee
'2012-05-13T09:18:39-04:00'
describe
'1280552' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_031.jp2'
c6b77d75d2d68e05506a5e50ef5a0d55
c243722e887a9c70e510e1ef014d30a5863b1eea
'2012-05-13T09:21:12-04:00'
describe
'129660' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_031.jpg'
1a127ba4af299aac18bfda40d7ab25f8
2600f50373aee28d56a8ad46f479602ab94ca400
describe
'22667' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_031.pro'
f76deada828be461c73f1a19340008dc
3023a23638f2ac59ba9506a8f0e4e809424a7898
'2012-05-13T09:19:56-04:00'
describe
'69505' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_031.QC.jpg'
997dac4500a8636a3c5beca0cc635383
178df86f71f787a34c99310cbfdbdb4edce5d0f8
'2012-05-13T09:22:45-04:00'
describe
'11187448' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_031.tif'
8015ed0984b7cccca40cbd9f0757562a
592680672b065577f204b8522d08492ba88cc6fc
describe
'874' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_031.txt'
88c5e93973a16add09004ced83aa6061
454e64c3831023a46f6a9d92ace49a0fd55e5da7
'2012-05-13T09:17:17-04:00'
describe
'41256' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_031thm.jpg'
65c2f0d935e9f2aab499fdc507583cfb
ff3d77c7d28d0c3df586875ea0967c1f55888423
'2012-05-13T09:22:48-04:00'
describe
'1240766' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_032.jp2'
ed4119cb78ab893b53fd234451f44163
82465337c4a50464558e0705419a3b5aba33c893
'2012-05-13T09:23:13-04:00'
describe
'136485' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_032.jpg'
429db919cb7bdd0b526cf02cf90681f5
9cc0f0c9ead2aa0bbba9b26426ae0da246f0a804
describe
'23044' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_032.pro'
23a246103531ac6bf90d14e6c1ffeb3a
c3d5de1baedce7c26a145d7b8ba80bdf7a83cfc0
'2012-05-13T09:21:06-04:00'
describe
'72752' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_032.QC.jpg'
ae642bf3db07c81466bf1e361ac90418
b59343db283d9ca4b936413afc47db824c0b4236
'2012-05-13T09:20:55-04:00'
describe
'10476272' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_032.tif'
97673da5d0517272e668942a091be4b9
bfde1c2fc85744efc27d9bc1c147f289c94ecff9
'2012-05-13T09:17:47-04:00'
describe
'880' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_032.txt'
aef811cabb604690602d5ed99804a8c5
b6b4317f56abe8e50dba7512c3db8db6da8d2ffb
describe
'40779' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_032thm.jpg'
7fb0f18a777290bf141b7ad8ee42ac57
1592b724e31c7c1f533d50ae45b4440c2bdf2a1e
describe
'1338438' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_033.jp2'
73dd62c59560790293c4787b15ca803c
e40bfef9242fe054c102d8f627fc5fe085fd5854
'2012-05-13T09:16:32-04:00'
describe
'133695' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_033.jpg'
938aed8754884840ab3eb4db645e3a6a
3c5b97cf4bda8ec87f50c51c57a39cdf627953ce
'2012-05-13T09:18:00-04:00'
describe
'23591' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFWZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_033.pro'
4f0de5164b98f195112a704dc54b5e8b
3c6c93e9a82c2099eafc89e5c2b19a22970dcb41
describe
'69734' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_033.QC.jpg'
b4174f6f9405149395a936ea1fad54c8
6e11a48125b1bff6e6895e1c2333f39f11ef8038
'2012-05-13T09:15:04-04:00'
describe
'11189700' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_033.tif'
f87a4ee42a32b004da4edf99577092ef
ef35a6caf64ab660443d7f6e4c9b987596965cd7
describe
'905' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_033.txt'
6379c924f1d465efc7eb723d1cb72a50
c39b69c8dbb0d03df9882d41ee41299c4823d151
'2012-05-13T09:20:53-04:00'
describe
'41533' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_033thm.jpg'
dbf98115cecd7396076225e2e5c76373
d59231305b5afa38605334305938973d14099b88
'2012-05-13T09:21:34-04:00'
describe
'1288364' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_034.jp2'
db523197f12a7378181de5b55b89f0a4
26c2e84f3743f4645cd50fc5f25e8b29a50acf58
'2012-05-13T09:17:16-04:00'
describe
'141444' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_034.jpg'
5dfd7db1d13210911589be6b0a7c41f7
76cada4d6daf03a03d996453db6d454637ce57d6
'2012-05-13T09:21:45-04:00'
describe
'24258' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_034.pro'
16f09098f8fccd262035135143cb2107
b3384c5f5da7b04623688e87b0913a147cace284
describe
'74134' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_034.QC.jpg'
6ef32778bb7aea4d3675970a4b2e698c
ba157219f29a77ce1d2042d6d46d357824cf7c22
'2012-05-13T09:17:56-04:00'
describe
'10555220' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_034.tif'
b1f754edead335a6ee32e6e9fa412d13
62f3cdb17db44f1ec1706f422e6f5a1c7cae76b8
'2012-05-13T09:21:18-04:00'
describe
'922' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_034.txt'
ec8dc7f1d3236bbdf97c0ecb0e820c9e
3dd9147473bcf6b37c0ece1095b54a25c151efca
'2012-05-13T09:18:25-04:00'
describe
'41258' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_034thm.jpg'
8ca60781ccabe6f46764d5ce77e6344c
b176642f816888ce9c5d373231616f43ed2300ab
describe
'1319009' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_035.jp2'
f10b831b8ab0bc84eed548f8614171e7
ab9735abff80790b5ec23b6899291bc2664d0a00
'2012-05-13T09:21:25-04:00'
describe
'135485' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_035.jpg'
dc653b24c89bc1ae9c648626e6b23645
19957e1394bb9c34aba65d0aa5570a291defc477
'2012-05-13T09:17:49-04:00'
describe
'23197' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_035.pro'
181fa4787919b39d94eca2c8c2bd6abd
422f2449a1adb1e3c3dd889a4f6dfdb8dffd0eea
'2012-05-13T09:18:09-04:00'
describe
'71227' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_035.QC.jpg'
f96f20b06d1d8300374a4c51e4eed9f1
865eb5e62cfcccc6f1310840b7572a41d8c09fe8
'2012-05-13T09:18:20-04:00'
describe
'11187472' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_035.tif'
e2e30486b5088d38c643413a2610c0b2
7c576a8dd77035e216494564feb793f6d1d1c99a
'2012-05-13T09:19:37-04:00'
describe
'887' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_035.txt'
cd48096b36cf1dcda2b45b5cca29736b
2a28e9ba638d25e5da669411072fe576068b37d0
describe
'42139' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_035thm.jpg'
799cbc9f043f932164d5a887473a034e
0cfab0168456d345cdf2c5b4fbe24de07e695d04
describe
'1184081' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_036.jp2'
2243895e6b3d54674c38b64ff5b16e1e
c8c8dbd6b37504cf760e7272b9abe3cbad848712
'2012-05-13T09:15:49-04:00'
describe
'129094' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_036.jpg'
c1bc3b4aed13b687c7b6389427933fef
965bb9ed7049345724fc9f9704f9445e859db507
'2012-05-13T09:21:13-04:00'
describe
'21895' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_036.pro'
7046f18681adecbf762da6ffe213ca13
344d3c52d68a56b82c4dd29aa320c083e3c8d4c9
'2012-05-13T09:20:00-04:00'
describe
'70420' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_036.QC.jpg'
e4bb1b40a73720fc76622ff152aadfa8
bd8b28d70e6c13fb7553def97ce88507d285b989
'2012-05-13T09:15:00-04:00'
describe
'10532700' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_036.tif'
20594ead6211e749f7ba9913f55648dd
7c4c4b97ebc8d06ebce2a5193db43229d2087d2c
'2012-05-13T09:18:29-04:00'
describe
'847' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_036.txt'
1ae81edb7ee68f145e01233ab68358e3
ec6279ba736919237cfc171326591b8d01d45951
'2012-05-13T09:22:17-04:00'
describe
'39690' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_036thm.jpg'
cf5986aba1ecf1c7fb59eeb2ddba23fe
8b3ec3e2ad190fa0c533319401e55b48be161cd3
'2012-05-13T09:22:06-04:00'
describe
'1343922' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFXZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_037.jp2'
20d5776ce4f8bb6e34fb6110bd4a9c12
4f69fc3fe653a7bbd51b2ec424a39599e21e8fc0
'2012-05-13T09:19:12-04:00'
describe
'195943' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_037.jpg'
3a0f0ba432a3b70a1d1933600b2fc40a
b5db6b97b3c6fcb09cd604c596931121547476d3
'2012-05-13T09:18:19-04:00'
describe
'6912' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_037.pro'
6fecea6aea720157f1f9927561119941
a68716030bd94278dfd137a7b0a7ac083c8d0958
'2012-05-13T09:19:50-04:00'
describe
'77893' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_037.QC.jpg'
c51fa6c9f4e7e29c6e18d0adc85b10ea
abb692ab0cf08eb9b0996f11e5e4df9f55a1866a
describe
'10774648' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_037.tif'
c12755de6e420b952441aae66e2d1e7e
349b9faa384f976d8584a056f51779b763d01c73
'2012-05-13T09:16:38-04:00'
describe
'296' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_037.txt'
0b850d065b6f69b183b588b8cf5581b8
29e11a1a7b6644035b2d122179e7f38e28561fb5
'2012-05-13T09:18:26-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'39902' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_037thm.jpg'
16ea32d31b7e9ac6e162412876bcd172
584982f098641534aac307b1f28576e605902ffd
'2012-05-13T09:16:34-04:00'
describe
'1188333' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_038.jp2'
f9f487d370ff36e81162b48433b17096
fafa62ccc3f52b77f53a8e8be3f5769218785b27
describe
'131217' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_038.jpg'
4ed47ae92b21614faa1e373b28e4c0b8
f05728d4766d3ba980c269b850f1908068f1d584
describe
'21699' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_038.pro'
2bf1c60028e4e3eeb9667d4e0924f77f
a2fb22cd02f8da70f98b43247fdb3cf89f951dd8
'2012-05-13T09:21:35-04:00'
describe
'70140' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_038.QC.jpg'
455e273fb36254970b50e2d8b3cab4d7
e298bc0b88ae4a071926ec9ecc46834df5475f11
'2012-05-13T09:20:54-04:00'
describe
'10492968' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_038.tif'
02e024bbfc84a5b96703a5f3b007b9f3
90a835343c1a1666a1f8d4b51b540709c0b44025
'2012-05-13T09:16:06-04:00'
describe
'841' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_038.txt'
3a3fdd380f92aeaf488486646a957a1f
9973c7cb96ef8cb1ead18e347999c9cd5e35dcba
describe
'39945' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_038thm.jpg'
006ba6dfb837c4ab150d748c968d3034
c43788efc40837e84b7909ead2ba562560987e1c
describe
'1232510' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_039.jp2'
8e74817bab5182ac2b1aea5c6fa0f2a5
eabfda96771317d2c8889553c87398d40afa4568
describe
'129045' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_039.jpg'
1248f21fa36a725f476dad85f9f41be0
cc326a4b7e693801c2128b6576c1df18c6590afb
'2012-05-13T09:16:07-04:00'
describe
'22504' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_039.pro'
4ec90a260c63510e65473c045697dc46
4f4484dccd7b2a383163f30c81d862071db44263
describe
'67508' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_039.QC.jpg'
2cc0f2b1312187186833589bea5b8cf6
829c25b97696429df0495eea7880bea9f38e971c
describe
'11187584' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_039.tif'
0ea585052c6a1c1c60f5a6b59f16c300
22c73f5660fd74da1cfa361832f0d1616dd996c5
'2012-05-13T09:20:44-04:00'
describe
'872' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_039.txt'
1249677f4fc9287bbab496982e48fc3b
d9e153eab00f929cfb3048cdf027f3b9c61e0525
'2012-05-13T09:18:54-04:00'
describe
'41570' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_039thm.jpg'
495e1948268133787da5044057027ef9
566d034619e0dd272ec3084da36d69797d576462
'2012-05-13T09:18:03-04:00'
describe
'1229565' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_040.jp2'
ee70f656cbb483f1cdfe2cd4a2d55757
520cfec514381ed7e98b1e4ca1e6cbee71d0a3df
'2012-05-13T09:19:59-04:00'
describe
'135725' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_040.jpg'
3f934193de4b0bb4c744e29138d0363e
d0dc8293992e2e9e3008d7cf7baaecdbdf76060d
describe
'23278' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_040.pro'
5a7a09a3ed8e73d7a1e2e19fe00cb228
408ea3d016354fe556e50708864696179d7ca964
'2012-05-13T09:21:48-04:00'
describe
'71822' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_040.QC.jpg'
bbe8ea0ca42c95426a9924fd6d607c97
6a408ce127fa633aeb24b8cff769bd67c74ad3ca
describe
'10414016' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_040.tif'
0bf8f628a7816692bb2a00352081480c
243340654dc0c60f37e34da29333d22b16b2fee8
'2012-05-13T09:17:33-04:00'
describe
'903' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFYZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_040.txt'
cb78da6ea6212c0630eeadc364703176
76d061031c8c34414232d0d9a9ca69829f8067ac
'2012-05-13T09:22:05-04:00'
describe
'40047' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_040thm.jpg'
ccf95988d7ab88d8d4c0c5b5cb888a36
15b6088559d485f7235fbf0c8687f341f6999cc7
describe
'1162947' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_041.jp2'
0ce881dcbfcf1a16166a7d7f9c156736
e330fbb9f15e227f44796e88c24e6c6c6deb5d23
describe
'125379' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_041.jpg'
8f22c639f6b976cae3365664c9b71d8a
f0e31082569456d9bb50feec0fea437d7c40f4a4
'2012-05-13T09:18:31-04:00'
describe
'21518' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_041.pro'
b8e66b2a1f585cc89288f8276ec791d3
2db0de05383d5c7bbc8ca7e5ae64946646e9207f
'2012-05-13T09:23:22-04:00'
describe
'66380' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_041.QC.jpg'
15ef252a8e5debb4d58ffb9ef76f580f
d432149e6b9ae92c8f074c0896401b24c8f9013d
'2012-05-13T09:17:00-04:00'
describe
'10811264' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_041.tif'
0d0d61789a617f2cdfbc94062cc6f601
55770f97771966c9fb2e3d9093cb85c8967a352a
'2012-05-13T09:19:49-04:00'
describe
'823' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_041.txt'
ccc46517d4c156553367edba9ca958cd
200f451db3accc8e9e035ce7f91197d7fd6d578e
'2012-05-13T09:19:27-04:00'
describe
'39282' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_041thm.jpg'
09371869fc4dcc6d2ec3550fdcce1234
30b23179d2768fce8e5690aa922f8abc39ab6c06
describe
'1176970' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_042.jp2'
16e675d788e92ffc318e824dd8f09c8a
95256f832b0b44acd99bd3a92d310aa3f4ebaf68
describe
'133024' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_042.jpg'
40ef16154111abd847c49516a2ab5382
f69c5db5d0e7b1f3ec06a56f5282443dc5ffdffc
describe
'22749' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_042.pro'
db3305121e9112e8a9241e1c70ae5f5e
dc0b8c06dc6049f2b062f72f876693616c38298b
'2012-05-13T09:15:53-04:00'
describe
'70390' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_042.QC.jpg'
be994f59385695da881cd987f77407bf
c1822fb0e39d5fc24543f005f1a4dd99a247580b
'2012-05-13T09:23:03-04:00'
describe
'10376608' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_042.tif'
e270fb1fce286e627b1aeb1e6a5e9cfb
bce4c69f73951c7d750d4cc6b14981e7e41e359d
'2012-05-13T09:21:11-04:00'
describe
'877' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_042.txt'
0dcf3f82f5f4a78af9ab76d165b2bfdf
1bb6495379347557b634c229a8772410e92a476e
'2012-05-13T09:22:44-04:00'
describe
'38933' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_042thm.jpg'
9660f6f9fb46971003cb66b63f5e333c
a58bcd7d326461fe4c8d23e2da65a94ddc065c23
'2012-05-13T09:18:58-04:00'
describe
'1292979' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_043.jp2'
1e7a54aec67adfa87067eb958207138e
bff4187a46cb25c3c94e3073a0f388d37c67a1f4
describe
'131727' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_043.jpg'
ab67ce6b26bfa8e4a2145dc7a2c68d06
ad546a1da3774a3ea75e3f436c7eb272faea9264
'2012-05-13T09:17:13-04:00'
describe
'23034' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_043.pro'
a2f9400d3b56eed43e5795afabca8d10
d172ff65c37824eb98ce9f1344767c55d2d25bcf
describe
'69131' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_043.QC.jpg'
7eeba9ac18a80eae2f1333b9e9db4e01
40bb9351e8284c32a1bc5c9dfa79d668913c68a4
'2012-05-13T09:23:14-04:00'
describe
'11189516' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_043.tif'
e7fc72a19f8fec620a5c730b745bfaeb
7e63d0dea0ea8ebc870210357ff8658e3e9b1421
'2012-05-13T09:20:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_043.txt'
9f93e29579ef929858665fae27810ee1
5d07ecf4f065b15f9648923a3652f7f4e1894a18
'2012-05-13T09:19:22-04:00'
describe
'40528' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_043thm.jpg'
b05b2fb01f39374eca2c1834fa3c18f6
3c3bedb8dd79dbdae3b88f209173e6ae926f49c1
'2012-05-13T09:18:30-04:00'
describe
'1283148' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_044.jp2'
92a66b4677eaf4149fe82f68af69ebae
3ee3dd46b5119d827c292eac733661e184814ffb
'2012-05-13T09:16:41-04:00'
describe
'139507' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_044.jpg'
8c62a8f807b4ebe01c41a41e7d915475
f88d2c341eef0e6ed81ea4cafb4bffd915a104bb
'2012-05-13T09:20:18-04:00'
describe
'24244' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_044.pro'
0cd0d1fd2c2dbceb9622b21749ed573a
0e7786da3c462c985d3b78d224b3f97b5b2f7276
'2012-05-13T09:22:30-04:00'
describe
'73942' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACFZZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_044.QC.jpg'
007671da8047a02e0aac8059644403ab
66652b99a9ec66e7b1a98b29101ea92c39219a77
describe
'10557312' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_044.tif'
07cad1961bd1884a00907234d6361d96
2d85f22efe893b954cb0fb80674dce7f331cbf4d
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_044.txt'
bc02e79d09ab5903edaeb3aecf6147e4
f2fab7948421b1b7f0f50f6d4cecb0a1283d7af0
'2012-05-13T09:19:34-04:00'
describe
'42252' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_044thm.jpg'
84c095e835fcbe457d264819ad2c2046
af96df43e3619e0f936ee87da09df72dce564bc7
'2012-05-13T09:19:13-04:00'
describe
'1467793' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_045.jp2'
84f03d21e8daff0ff8c79afecf7b9070
479498477eb6455d7c9f464c93fcc5a025f5cd85
describe
'171208' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_045.jpg'
4d9a83e27c4c4aab470b71ef9765c2e4
008c8a547ccd4bcd43f488949a067bc33a5df2b5
'2012-05-13T09:21:44-04:00'
describe
'5975' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_045.pro'
06721fa88fa706812077388e8bb15c8f
aec9074ac99ad2d5dca5dd8644f8b5fb7ec6e8d1
'2012-05-13T09:22:29-04:00'
describe
'68387' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_045.QC.jpg'
25a2e6a3de0a2893766111bac4fc63b8
1dcedb0d668ff777b78266edebc29da907d2b24f
describe
'11765064' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_045.tif'
56d47d9fe4aafe38234fb389ee88d3bd
93bfa2a3e90f346fd3dab7ffee292c62edbb72bb
'2012-05-13T09:17:24-04:00'
describe
'241' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_045.txt'
afb501f465d44ef3963517393c73eada
44d1247419ba64a23881ee553f70ea3f76352bde
'2012-05-13T09:19:39-04:00'
describe
'37570' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_045thm.jpg'
a8be4a00904d39d072727fecb161d0f6
2c2e7b0f0d454e6c308fc61c4a5f686e7af9ed6c
'2012-05-13T09:17:31-04:00'
describe
'1309298' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_046.jp2'
de3b25d2b743e6c32ebd8494e3e83e9f
36afae9b6145e4cc9afb181bd011b610626174a9
'2012-05-13T09:17:25-04:00'
describe
'138340' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_046.jpg'
b22730a09bd0af447aa929276118ad84
3c01ad33e64630924ed2f418d53edad966619060
'2012-05-13T09:20:34-04:00'
describe
'24099' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_046.pro'
758777516fd62d0746be20d8bea79809
557fb1d7d722d75765fea0c44ff66efaea2a855b
describe
'73851' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_046.QC.jpg'
9b92518648a0c87aa564f8e54001cc55
2cccecb665ef9540eea0b802a63da50e215cae78
describe
'10594840' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_046.tif'
b1204dca95f9cc139d866d8184235074
adc9d7f9865e806e19843f0627014fb7bb131136
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_046.txt'
bb355466d4362585ed358ba0a4b38e18
28378398bbe0e573979cfbdfff2cda0810e4b6ae
describe
'41991' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_046thm.jpg'
45b2f72fc48ff0b6863880c70420bfa5
60ce1c1c66eebb0564ce86d2d7c49ebd32709148
describe
'1395906' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_047.jp2'
4e30c3f9803394dca3e46a5b27c83cef
dd228170de94d1f8dc9399cef6e4d1633773e6fd
'2012-05-13T09:23:28-04:00'
describe
'140563' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_047.jpg'
3ae979d8f3450e397c353873c4dabeb3
d0ff6d6f56317c7eb815dff45506f28303919ae8
'2012-05-13T09:21:59-04:00'
describe
'23512' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_047.pro'
597e31903cf5eaf2be6c8df487472c30
5febdf056b0dd4ac97b2ee53fe2ae6278f9662c2
describe
'74035' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_047.QC.jpg'
f75cac63a52460cb4558e6343f8e31d0
7ae71edc9fd26dbda25a2bf7f114e19d9486b668
describe
'11190136' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_047.tif'
573b7dcbc4bfb28751c1dd8d3573c7be
cb0c077d49f67bdf683c53f53e350b0e6d1618f6
'2012-05-13T09:23:18-04:00'
describe
'893' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_047.txt'
9b7f71bdbd0ae0e219a74127ba4dd507
4f187616d117fc85c8374b3c50a5050f90f31900
describe
'43527' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_047thm.jpg'
c9cf983e6ae1892af28e08dd9fa5313f
aa0fff4b2630055624ac9487ba8e320d44786c32
describe
'1269079' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_048.jp2'
5dcf703488889c0bc4b99074abaf03e1
0dd4788d2a7eaded5d4d3e3f884d62df25cc1251
'2012-05-13T09:21:57-04:00'
describe
'139279' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGAZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_048.jpg'
d589440102c6ff595eaa024a8fc44f59
eb8f401690909114f8b78d88fb4c6a54e0705d41
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_048.pro'
6dea603f18b7a8d00fa75538eba735f2
34f53ba6e6aa470a554f632b4b9ff76affd27d3a
'2012-05-13T09:20:11-04:00'
describe
'73461' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_048.QC.jpg'
1f420808469dd4261c433f4b00fd0cf2
a3e403c241cab698bfc54b75d1c2ab2202dc9701
'2012-05-13T09:19:20-04:00'
describe
'10417036' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_048.tif'
318b42af66909a8b3b1e0750d21c956d
9198bf3d730f8873b6745488edaa306b99f3b211
'2012-05-13T09:23:26-04:00'
describe
'923' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_048.txt'
113685e999b37fb7b66c82137ea53e1e
733ce490dbb70e902e7c0c6acaf6c9f04ee7d21e
'2012-05-13T09:23:08-04:00'
describe
'41000' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_048thm.jpg'
7d063b464257114bd7cce9f9670c916d
d8920d70f691c2ac10ac0ed950b8b458bea059af
'2012-05-13T09:15:08-04:00'
describe
'1249134' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_049.jp2'
3c0bf8e674912ade2a5a93ede9919b4a
8c6bc96f1cc6ba7a99a920aa7831056e6be9a4b6
'2012-05-13T09:16:27-04:00'
describe
'128702' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_049.jpg'
d9a666f31bbc366c2ecc52507af7e964
39d992f0b8c33c27d780a4b426c68b509a69c21b
describe
'22252' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_049.pro'
4ebca1b17c81bc7b259697a7c3c9927e
2b03c9241acc4f6c56410a44549749b4d00c31ee
describe
'69192' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_049.QC.jpg'
606bfda22790e1edb92635f93456a0ff
87edca055a1f608ef02292683a116eff87c2651b
describe
'11187228' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_049.tif'
01eccbaf073f8a73049067f40a181a56
9b8359ce176ed693d4ffd299cb436092cc293a4f
'2012-05-13T09:18:52-04:00'
describe
'864' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_049.txt'
63e3d8242dcac6f0ddd7392b42cb4c21
55fababd44a837f95bc3defabe4de14a2365242c
describe
'40912' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_049thm.jpg'
56ab06a3a47d544894b5bbdd35fbf581
399679dc1c32c4a7088d31ac65c7cf3426c0419c
'2012-05-13T09:19:57-04:00'
describe
'1311577' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_050.jp2'
04c4a5c648008efd782fe9d772a9b3cf
8c07b3aca49c981e21549fe8a60d2afe35392aaf
describe
'186161' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_050.jpg'
56a19a3d85d7219aa32ed7c296dc784a
82a8615e91b2ee7f3948be580504c053bd4746e0
'2012-05-13T09:18:18-04:00'
describe
'6090' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_050.pro'
e44ab38149c2c3edd834d7b14ce31f2a
93e5f89e48563daeac7dc5092dcc990ac739e0f4
describe
'76425' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_050.QC.jpg'
bef109d973c08fecef71016e25446536
e99a1162a2d60b50f67148a99cfa7d1ebd44c200
describe
'10515396' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_050.tif'
81ae845926ebbf5290aa3f069a4eedf2
c45884ffb7564183a49e1eeab4d09b3988deecc0
'2012-05-13T09:20:31-04:00'
describe
'261' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_050.txt'
513e6e52c9d7b07cd61bb2b4edf377ea
d2a148309f9acc2d45e8730be1fcd863d868f530
'2012-05-13T09:18:33-04:00'
describe
'39554' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_050thm.jpg'
94b1d3b304df65b4aa26a10a55ceeba1
dbeb442b6120bb9fbb2207fb30cfa8a86c4f1c65
describe
'1361809' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_051.jp2'
807b64612adfb87b8953076614213a0d
7f4708871b444412ee8edb934bf6f2aa8bf9d9ca
'2012-05-13T09:15:47-04:00'
describe
'137162' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_051.jpg'
72d555c539aa784d3b16237a9f7be830
115c9c5316ddd3c1cd7ff3b891e89e7fde87eb51
'2012-05-13T09:16:55-04:00'
describe
'23214' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_051.pro'
9b8033ddeb4eba3ae72834b1c4da07a0
77368444da9d405ca1e2c765bf6adf772e3728c4
'2012-05-13T09:16:49-04:00'
describe
'72395' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_051.QC.jpg'
906efe1035532e006a9429a543f8f674
bc2c3ba0da6fb4af63b3e4012ebe900a8d24ccf1
'2012-05-13T09:22:46-04:00'
describe
'11192320' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_051.tif'
37584d5e4b3e644fc9eca269efece114
e13d6ae53f0a7be27f9e0b6c0c789f1145a3809a
'2012-05-13T09:21:22-04:00'
describe
'885' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_051.txt'
6d560fe247658b597458ca2614827c91
864eed55547a341bd38e7d87b7e27d37daf83527
'2012-05-13T09:16:53-04:00'
describe
'42863' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGBZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_051thm.jpg'
961464f8a8fd838bfed138cfe72a31bb
ab1208f4d4a89849d1abb7240f0a343efe0d521a
'2012-05-13T09:15:10-04:00'
describe
'1213407' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_052.jp2'
56baa67ba3f8ff4c97a9741bbac4d60d
65d0c90ac103d4181fe0381515a95f884bd8a1ca
describe
'134733' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_052.jpg'
e2bc00ac1db4f7bce394271266d155d1
b1769f2c1b80399d64d2ef77d6d2224dd5cceda2
describe
'22933' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_052.pro'
bb2a0e668b0f4fffbcb7fc1580558888
b43f75a236096aec0e62004803e95d1814d33782
describe
'71913' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_052.QC.jpg'
a450a041271507ecba429525d0570223
54383bf882c0a1e0176efd8d9fee6192150f2b9b
'2012-05-13T09:22:19-04:00'
describe
'10377236' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_052.tif'
40dd7a92d20a3d734f6cfe5585576380
9d14885ed1a8b52b2bfc9a28222c3e0fe9073af8
'2012-05-13T09:20:33-04:00'
describe
'883' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_052.txt'
f7062d286508533b6394b740a1efacee
ee3599730a02813efd36ec50516de20e81be2f4e
describe
'40234' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_052thm.jpg'
8e190f45dcf48b525acc99a4629cd576
f3cf268f5e783b6d64fcf4d4d14df34cfa07926f
describe
'1257597' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_053.jp2'
5ef700070c552d157040b867f68f45e8
725de2de4f7dc5793da7d83a9b4f892a35b38014
'2012-05-13T09:16:52-04:00'
describe
'132046' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_053.jpg'
0ae6a7238a435a1d54767f4faf05fcfb
e31f89ec5de1cf8dd0cce9aa5fb7270dc8d1e26d
describe
'23121' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_053.pro'
f44ed1700f7bf4700ca157383bce7548
442413a16a23733fdc1764c73d8fc5a3f28e7373
'2012-05-13T09:18:38-04:00'
describe
'71983' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_053.QC.jpg'
cfb8c599636f97675725b21bbcf48589
856c35749d7cfc481b93905b3c1ffa7baa6bc02b
'2012-05-13T09:19:41-04:00'
describe
'11240272' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_053.tif'
d852d88fd24c3fa7e9e08a65b32a9c65
9130254c7d9d8b7eb9cca70591ccfe7eebf8010c
'2012-05-13T09:22:27-04:00'
describe
'878' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_053.txt'
7b6f55d0fe84509a22caada7ae596054
2befe3c79e42ab51a61654156628c5e62c9dbcf6
'2012-05-13T09:17:38-04:00'
describe
'41572' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_053thm.jpg'
1019b88112a63c006464afaa2b4aa3df
26724477b8d0f63ffafe704b6dd58568f495f82a
'2012-05-13T09:20:39-04:00'
describe
'1296522' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_054.jp2'
b25de661a68c4ea20c86f982be116d79
d81dc7a409f87b40c1ccdfbc6a2e65187fd8f013
'2012-05-13T09:18:07-04:00'
describe
'138701' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_054.jpg'
a2ffdaf04fbdb8b668fb6c131ea75faa
ed62521c9431ca86c33b369fc8dc32bb50af6e80
'2012-05-13T09:16:54-04:00'
describe
'24041' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_054.pro'
4cb231921fa2ee184901fa35663b3d61
32579f7c01e95db3ada4c0fd881e2697f1f94af8
'2012-05-13T09:18:53-04:00'
describe
'73944' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_054.QC.jpg'
d4cd3c4cb3019ad9ec01a6fa48cc569e
0c8e6bf7e6e01d70725eec058b10b58bf025da10
'2012-05-13T09:17:55-04:00'
describe
'10535684' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_054.tif'
37d2b662b6eade77db2d0addd8efa7e8
7649f4563766bfcc63d1e62fa3720e2ab1fb78ef
describe
'930' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_054.txt'
df9390159d5cfab8789660b41513ea6a
f8db28d8aa85d3cfd6b67be46220856d8a2f7706
'2012-05-13T09:15:32-04:00'
describe
'41694' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_054thm.jpg'
1730a3392c5c5332db922b3ea7135bb3
9778a98e76ddcbb4d2072608511683224c0da028
'2012-05-13T09:22:01-04:00'
describe
'1274381' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_055.jp2'
cfdc47b5c6ab9adae376f2387b65598d
c300b1e903462a8aeb44d32a75704fba0e3ee7cc
describe
'132808' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_055.jpg'
d20410e17629a567ff35c334643bf4f0
0d27b95740d32d850b920209f607528f58a4fbd8
'2012-05-13T09:17:14-04:00'
describe
'24546' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_055.pro'
2f6709d6ff26aabfda2476cd3308229f
550c4b94c94d4eea18ba1a592945c3fb64f60746
describe
'70631' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_055.QC.jpg'
a66ef0b61beded72fa9ef4eec73d4a71
49e5bb9c643d96cd4be5bee20faad77f09475e72
'2012-05-13T09:21:05-04:00'
describe
'10890320' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGCZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_055.tif'
b1ecfe10e554c704750887d3e2105a40
d0d64b48057c891fa24acc330aaa96011a82ac4c
'2012-05-13T09:17:43-04:00'
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_055.txt'
9afd1ced4d307795ab649d17a837fa75
60800d1de91b108532ec2737b95cf48d3ad1cbbc
'2012-05-13T09:22:02-04:00'
describe
'41174' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_055thm.jpg'
c415e769813815c3424f6ff88208c938
62216c739c6814f07df608eb6bea9c6624bea80e
describe
'1052318' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_056.jp2'
73f39d17b5c12b7dbf7c6d823eefb526
cfc60856dabb263278fa375bd1f068d474bc6e2f
describe
'119338' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_056.jpg'
3075992368e4f85627e7f12f01ed2314
ff7e3f86ccde9741c4a21b784cf4ae49a9adca1b
'2012-05-13T09:15:03-04:00'
describe
'19580' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_056.pro'
d678ec5de08ce861b1c31c32c8741c50
f6706ed23273c71794f43371d76c6b79ac27b834
'2012-05-13T09:23:33-04:00'
describe
'65452' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_056.QC.jpg'
7f86f58be350de444702ed2d81ae7d97
6087d6ff440c6da60ebcc0d1f185d682043b00bc
'2012-05-13T09:19:26-04:00'
describe
'10412996' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_056.tif'
04b401cd61f0511d222ce00079f537e6
11678ed296d609b82bd9d4f2e521f20e2c3e0822
'2012-05-13T09:17:36-04:00'
describe
'761' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_056.txt'
1a358c8620ab07cbf72921ed02934030
c62d2c73e3a5117a84dddd4bfc00405417639422
'2012-05-13T09:15:41-04:00'
describe
'37864' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_056thm.jpg'
649fe64d82394127ab1226e63f24cad1
998029401a3b10d2bb1d97740210017dfa06b6a1
describe
'1226754' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_057.jp2'
a164afcc5184cddfcb443530cb2c8c03
da9f1ca597d4f5e4654fae0f850eb752746b54d0
'2012-05-13T09:18:21-04:00'
describe
'128829' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_057.jpg'
fbe63e91c8ccce8640cbdb13f3781624
2bd8cb423eecd404b5fd38e5e91db27203e34dab
describe
'22316' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_057.pro'
f697c951faf472a3962ac9295bba9ddc
82596e134de6e066d757c565f8b83f9c82df7796
'2012-05-13T09:20:12-04:00'
describe
'68237' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_057.QC.jpg'
1e2a2166d51515c8216f81628ee0f1a0
a6b981a406bc10bc6e206db7d83db95765113059
'2012-05-13T09:17:12-04:00'
describe
'10959988' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_057.tif'
2f9882fe3f9a8a1e4969590d6ca818f9
8df5732293dc421176e64951f1026b287c9c177a
'2012-05-13T09:21:52-04:00'
describe
'853' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_057.txt'
f618ecfa9357515d3dec63664bdb642a
5a6569700abf6aef91f419c113d67e62d9117a55
'2012-05-13T09:20:06-04:00'
describe
'40328' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_057thm.jpg'
19dc2ab10901dc46954b9898cd05b61b
9bdbaab967d1872cea9b763de452defb074a884b
describe
'1192865' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_058.jp2'
22af9a7cb78e2307319c379b39cd1e1e
8eab4fbc503ba9b92f6cf88c7b077594642bba17
describe
'131564' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_058.jpg'
693e7caf9f4f15405d23da710df331aa
ce081f5259e2212193cae11f094ef31543498cdc
describe
'21807' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_058.pro'
7a4c05d0c058e9e7f5345df3dc378d77
e0e447c536f11af3e7601dedefb13136e92fd99d
describe
'68723' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_058.QC.jpg'
f850cd02735e88d92cf265675d3019dc
fcff6865180c59de1ea93edd01597c9415f37051
'2012-05-13T09:21:30-04:00'
describe
'10574692' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_058.tif'
e7d07b050ab45d4443e0c9887f67329b
4bdef2b486a5c4c31e71b431c8b9fb79bf52266e
'2012-05-13T09:17:41-04:00'
describe
'846' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_058.txt'
bd0dc54ef65d6925e96a18f179989efb
08a10b740dd35d672af78757c7d04e14d0d8f46f
'2012-05-13T09:20:05-04:00'
describe
'39486' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_058thm.jpg'
c206ba9ef3144f9b8ca4ba08d83eb3fb
1487206f30aa480cfb7bc921ebfe9d6286ed8d00
describe
'1434526' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_059.jp2'
9c244ed45e7844e6427d67e7c8c8f6ce
507971b515b3b2755ca19058c025818edf10add1
'2012-05-13T09:18:42-04:00'
describe
'136450' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_059.jpg'
3f8cbd7eeced171fe455868eb7603620
ada92f51c83140beee0ef6d82372b71f95d9dcec
describe
'22953' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGDZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_059.pro'
5e1b7fc8c5f1b126330dd5710a679327
f2cf9d989314787cdba3be1b8582a3d6630b1ba1
'2012-05-13T09:21:51-04:00'
describe
'72062' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_059.QC.jpg'
08cc39fd725ac8f7c8e31db229f030d3
a55a43017f24004ff9bb585c007a7a497a25bee4
describe
'11499192' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_059.tif'
b7ecbb041f7d089424c7290db32494e5
a7c6f50d94c0e5224b083f3dca6cc384fcec22d2
'2012-05-13T09:22:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_059.txt'
419dbc35c90d1aebc5aafcb29ccc4913
026b1780995ddfda30a1b2ea37c39e1bd7a0aaeb
'2012-05-13T09:20:41-04:00'
describe
'42725' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGED' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_059thm.jpg'
cceb64f31da8782f9bdc05c3c3d90211
c5229969c78fc31439ef6f7e1b896e2d14f48779
'2012-05-13T09:23:11-04:00'
describe
'1140914' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_060.jp2'
241df7de4f49e65a5f0b846b7ab3705d
cc00899a5510a3b3201c5bcf5d568255098a5894
describe
'126926' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_060.jpg'
53bb59d073e6b2db5db635cdfd4c4698
e0f16c88876bc7b1914913164b8b463ab756d29e
'2012-05-13T09:15:56-04:00'
describe
'20443' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_060.pro'
94a684920bce1bc9044b89af3bf0686e
c942ae0112513c4a6142382602cf8d96943f4261
'2012-05-13T09:19:38-04:00'
describe
'68254' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_060.QC.jpg'
dd62e62b7e2e0d5d362651cf2c91de7b
41b4b93daddaa5606507fcaf3a0528a2946a8688
'2012-05-13T09:15:42-04:00'
describe
'10382896' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_060.tif'
a9be74a1b786dca302b8193333de3863
fdd88bda00139be5cb33e13e8063e97e732b3856
'2012-05-13T09:22:52-04:00'
describe
'825' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_060.txt'
cc0e99f460b321a74cf145be506448c3
81d316778d607a61913c61298d4f4319d15c74d5
'2012-05-13T09:19:00-04:00'
describe
'39316' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_060thm.jpg'
025324b79cdbf5632aed4d3cdd05facb
56cb4d4b9c8e542c033ba15fda118b7f3ecd204c
describe
'1322247' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_061.jp2'
cbb57a830444a4140735db6d657bee9a
a3af4d7b976424acb12812c4e6b86ccf00894944
'2012-05-13T09:15:20-04:00'
describe
'134253' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_061.jpg'
45e22ce6e6544c086fdde8b1a92f6c3c
cc4b70c919a7a38f6ce23e9a406f877537b5f7f6
describe
'23374' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_061.pro'
95aaa00621d8ea4ac33cd4c420f8028e
badc42ad9ab602e0eac3e42631ec087075c96217
'2012-05-13T09:22:07-04:00'
describe
'71129' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_061.QC.jpg'
3929ba3bd12307e36e78896f02bb3f59
4b84029865df8824a2aa2dbb4a596d6132ffb451
'2012-05-13T09:17:02-04:00'
describe
'11187484' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_061.tif'
dfdfc54d49e3d5167133eeac34cf669f
bca8c625fff64a2327d787c2897e0861c065eef1
'2012-05-13T09:21:38-04:00'
describe
'895' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_061.txt'
3bed407574a8782f00bff49e60acd809
06cbe966456bb342cefe84b57abd6ffa158c99a3
describe
'41954' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGER' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_061thm.jpg'
df3d840d9b8935d91e4b3fe49d42563b
28a7dd34a0e92044c9b4dbf4c86f95bc166cea82
describe
'1137095' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGES' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_062.jp2'
071c8b11bdb240adfe45e0b035be26ce
701db6c920568198493cb34053fa4268478f2c24
describe
'125606' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGET' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_062.jpg'
5a213888349448baf9c49e5d1f3ab426
90e2ea10858a78f6cba5947e834f0d684488e557
'2012-05-13T09:16:56-04:00'
describe
'20895' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_062.pro'
490af7dee7703e9b80506274af36c54f
ae61078d8c9157e579a1a2e995b3206b6e62cca8
'2012-05-13T09:15:28-04:00'
describe
'68027' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_062.QC.jpg'
5f4d6fa96dbe95cfbb0d7a9ce0516250
7dce1a3e81d0ef83c1cdf329952da0888d06dc05
describe
'10609500' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_062.tif'
56321bc403f45a42264bf7a0cde1ca36
48e7f088711cb11ce2f98a15c36a7c0ced18bc5c
'2012-05-13T09:22:03-04:00'
describe
'804' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_062.txt'
77de00fe7015932601e9e61d838fbfb9
cb89f942fc23e94f372a0f56a759c487bb44d8c0
describe
'39975' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_062thm.jpg'
34a91ed897185d74f6afa9fe41089d8b
8bd07af68f6a1a34657b3c59dcf20b64ff274512
describe
'1180380' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGEZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_063.jp2'
49d82d027f524144ccec415dc94c8264
122777711dca617f9c899842b851746bfd0e7d42
describe
'125397' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_063.jpg'
3b0f19ec231f555821ea2b274a4d2eb7
fb1ad54df9c01143edd7caf9a76985179cd16a58
'2012-05-13T09:19:02-04:00'
describe
'22658' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_063.pro'
454a5ef47a9640f94947e60deb141464
5e3b5cfdf6579074b13c89f3c0f39de817ae0a0e
describe
'68578' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_063.QC.jpg'
e7b2f9795df626a9cee9be7754732b38
e5d709900ffd73efc062e7d797d2797a5f00f0ef
describe
'10875312' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_063.tif'
1847119f3c4d8ef003707dd8d6f66277
1cf7fd0137f4b1d6b6ec546f260ad04d57a274cf
'2012-05-13T09:18:44-04:00'
describe
'871' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_063.txt'
2971373bd72889a235537b9360b1b0b9
4bda03df66eac03371b9791e992fa2b496465d99
'2012-05-13T09:20:09-04:00'
describe
'39915' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_063thm.jpg'
92ca64fb72f8481afdd990e15962028e
16dda4cdc3da9182b0508c7f46828de448b69047
describe
'1131662' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_064.jp2'
af92afdcfa0fd0ab9df3533cab02791f
95e2b0446d765f2312f72f129089ca6c9548c1bb
'2012-05-13T09:20:04-04:00'
describe
'126043' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_064.jpg'
ea4b4456a970f9477ac558e22fea2c59
bdde3849eb9c52ed3c5f5a490c44f7d0d0849dba
describe
'20707' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_064.pro'
f0740e211e268d95c14f1b86e2297660
d820f8c73319bc2bb7621b706d4114b17a70d1fd
describe
'67442' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_064.QC.jpg'
5d711e37d06d90a48544fe1b38a912f9
f62c98b024ecd5b5e45de24f34c5e72fc2103276
'2012-05-13T09:22:18-04:00'
describe
'10399112' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_064.tif'
419d4dc1e40722f1c1b00c73e6f02d96
4a8c75a4d1c8ae4054129dd63e9cc82cdd0cca47
'2012-05-13T09:16:28-04:00'
describe
'816' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_064.txt'
94b4a864f89610262e89a2e24c53d204
f6a392388bff39a9ad095de837defe39b4efa36a
'2012-05-13T09:21:29-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'38798' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_064thm.jpg'
2045197671a6ebb2c78fcd8a3fc1006d
ecd5b90ecb2dd229c0332fac270078bacceaee81
describe
'1088058' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_065.jp2'
8b762eb083404e5a9013095ef494ae97
97a2f37a7fe59a16f9b4e078b5762237c3f5bc87
describe
'119580' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_065.jpg'
6cfefaad924a0fccdf6a7cc8ef325738
4210e2ea69d2ec278bf1b1ddcb6c8558ae88a123
'2012-05-13T09:21:03-04:00'
describe
'20755' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_065.pro'
5b55e390b8e331ec5a453155595485be
096684f65869ba06c0f3b441eb12cb892478828b
describe
'64049' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_065.QC.jpg'
acedd5d2e0361f83d708c718b3c24dc4
0124305a993dae7fbd192395fe76cbf68caa75ae
describe
'10811352' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_065.tif'
805c902cb17e471ed8d593a5ab23edaa
05738aeaf7296c3c27bd4731709123fb367bcfca
'2012-05-13T09:21:26-04:00'
describe
'834' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_065.txt'
ae5d6faab21be64a67d434538fced5d7
321cf3c7910c7fbb0be7cf4dc4efa1598271753e
'2012-05-13T09:21:10-04:00'
describe
'38699' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_065thm.jpg'
1fab212f5d76f6ebfcf3775173b6907d
bce11aa2113110d0c3a0ede3ecd014b9a94ca018
'2012-05-13T09:17:57-04:00'
describe
'1216685' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_066.jp2'
6782b65354cedd9a2c66e212c2a53caa
25917d556d51326440b5f5d0cd22af00d2f87d2a
'2012-05-13T09:22:57-04:00'
describe
'131553' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_066.jpg'
c805572daa7487ece0bc98221a8a85e2
60336fbb9946b90c22cf4cdde082a4ff63d5129f
describe
'22123' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_066.pro'
1b7864189f50d53fe371afd77ddb9752
ba3bc00e0fe587cec018b85e9b66fb2e23f440e3
describe
'70611' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_066.QC.jpg'
f878a332bcc5af3d50e15f9a6ab4da5b
fa09a3f17a67d3d1dd7de4b4156aa1e1cc5f5a82
describe
'10552576' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_066.tif'
003c4a5bd0baa34f11b079916e38f3a5
347127992daa15334ee08a2d87de24beb3483857
'2012-05-13T09:18:37-04:00'
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGFZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_066.txt'
0b71ddb341404a2c15fce9009c4cf402
39a4898c265a3bba668b45411e231ae064258df2
describe
'40851' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_066thm.jpg'
b92bfe9b4b38d0c860736deeba6af36b
35bd9fb9f17b7d85b4dd46a20205f4ba339cadef
'2012-05-13T09:22:56-04:00'
describe
'1395796' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_067.jp2'
da720c635a40d6c701e2032b2c668d47
860d3b61c45862015803d343b37886b024198f35
'2012-05-13T09:23:16-04:00'
describe
'159190' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_067.jpg'
1f5e3729ca89d7caab7617a54acf553d
28f56d38f9b0edf949c842538717164658797959
'2012-05-13T09:21:32-04:00'
describe
'8611' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_067.pro'
a1789c4d7cb1becfa6f85c128cf0d430
2e92eadc5cedb132581d5ac8a7d3c8e3896a51d4
describe
'70477' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_067.QC.jpg'
5108ea92d26f77b79d7d85bf21666597
85aefdd3adb1abf4b98000aebfc4fdc59271933a
describe
'11189804' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_067.tif'
174fd76edbaa61cdb28b8a966021a930
3a76d4efdee06b8721b8c1ab39868faa195e980e
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_067.txt'
2f60d071380b92e169228198ac0a6402
c2d6428f81eead8bba7041391ef5a1505abe083a
describe
'40755' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_067thm.jpg'
e64f00b2c0ff4fd927d594a3915df58f
607671024d8c354305aa8e6a21831d3ec0158c1a
describe
'1212803' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_068.jp2'
cba03cec9f149e4d1e6b920001e820ce
642b23f905e9e2c4a438a409b2b7ece4ec03d5ef
describe
'130123' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_068.jpg'
6cffd97395475ffa5de079cc4f1b7301
ecc52a113ae93e136a0949e9f1a4b3bdc31764c0
describe
'21203' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_068.pro'
e60dcd4b5057812667696dd1a510b8bf
d61ff244a8e1ed1dd3b309f22cf59ae67aeb03dc
describe
'70243' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_068.QC.jpg'
130b02291a18184e2dc4c3fc7616d437
65e6fa0d55b738e2e1677f5fe7eec917a44716f8
'2012-05-13T09:22:31-04:00'
describe
'10536996' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_068.tif'
6b7ac712b77bbaceacff1ff9ea9bba2e
e82e3b05da8eaa0ac360cbe4c1cbcac6c17e208c
'2012-05-13T09:17:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_068.txt'
dfcf4559a1e938f225fb105ff0152b07
f76e57cdfb0e5f6b7b84e128946f82d4f1558e41
describe
'40483' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_068thm.jpg'
5abafcd514ffb4f9e488a1509bf280f8
ef28cb66768a3be601ec790015579adcc06dd634
'2012-05-13T09:22:22-04:00'
describe
'1152352' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_069.jp2'
d39bd9c086f99020b024676147b50797
f2afe17f303240bf351b5f0ed1686f4eb7fe080c
describe
'124905' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_069.jpg'
b9bf9777ae0692b8c3a101c528c932e9
f6667d9028699e97709f66fa684b6a8498103a64
describe
'20682' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_069.pro'
f59114cefcf79dd19761338b9f88beb2
c58fce538637704a55b9b0901e203536feddac1b
describe
'67499' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_069.QC.jpg'
e52c1e41827ac7b78f8c08cc8bc3dcc9
6e85cfc93af83166443277b67b54ff76bcbfd3d2
'2012-05-13T09:21:49-04:00'
describe
'10831548' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_069.tif'
2532a7e343ea28dc21c93af662d91012
557492d9c6e22649c7c5e28500d54d9662d6b941
describe
'802' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_069.txt'
bdad7af7b5a2039acee12ddc9368e765
bd3cbf51cd99d3d41886edf7eca3eb74c1111c8b
describe
'39783' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_069thm.jpg'
44b6b6f2701c6478ae37b6b78b217056
5cb34e68abfd6cb1c7914d9ff134bec206d92a2e
'2012-05-13T09:15:13-04:00'
describe
'1141384' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_070.jp2'
59c10ceb61c4f7495d7712b92709cddc
4e69e71ab8c173fd94f8799e5f49923b897623ba
'2012-05-13T09:17:35-04:00'
describe
'126124' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_070.jpg'
45c39885de4bc72899af82cffe1322ac
e8ef468e4db7cc308265d2fd635ace0ecb936b7c
describe
'21003' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_070.pro'
6a0ca55dd2c79932a6f573982a7f3811
05463ac6cd45dfcf9a75e75218dcdaaa59605f0d
describe
'68232' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGGZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_070.QC.jpg'
9a006831d4c4e5d54b9cba42ad147ddf
c0eb416f8cb90b260d2d1792f5d7430848af6df2
describe
'10475468' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_070.tif'
eba83e82d69084989d62d35fe0dbdeee
6b9e6c587f2380af1047c3712f7453f8b6b2c8e9
'2012-05-13T09:23:34-04:00'
describe
'832' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_070.txt'
8be1d542127a7d6979aedc2bd09322a5
21638ee0cb5564d8cf656e20dcf3bf10aba7ae61
'2012-05-13T09:21:36-04:00'
describe
'38790' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_070thm.jpg'
c4854f8b6cbbb088e57fcd77e90b713a
ea6411eb430c997a3ba6d28686e5de043ef52480
describe
'1191752' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_071.jp2'
cc0cf83f1ffe28f0d9623f37c25b847f
dd1645c0005436fc5663c948285f9e6ed1fa0c9f
'2012-05-13T09:15:23-04:00'
describe
'126802' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_071.jpg'
681958f180e67f5a91e3973062e929d3
d7dd71e8d46fd0fac69364297b714dac6984d189
'2012-05-13T09:17:59-04:00'
describe
'20879' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_071.pro'
89439411d01badcc308586587e54ed81
1b39e5dcfced831756f28f9723bac454f02a5d43
describe
'67887' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_071.QC.jpg'
de1fb10a5a1e6902a34e3f2ed305d957
c5444d812928ead7a20016671cc9fb3feecc8563
'2012-05-13T09:19:24-04:00'
describe
'10857944' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_071.tif'
3962a7c1bcc4a9bcbcde392a2848d701
7b57550df45bc85e24bcb61c961d3adc5bb1703d
'2012-05-13T09:19:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_071.txt'
a8bac51ff36e8566f08ca76342ca33ba
a5c1991744a7c477684bf68fa5e496cddb226a80
describe
'40007' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_071thm.jpg'
f39aeed86f64dabcfd95227416ad75f3
f37abf1962e551bfe71c746b838c71ee7095db75
'2012-05-13T09:16:48-04:00'
describe
'1297070' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_072.jp2'
1ce4699938d03e792ad9ca0c4fa9ac32
06632db68a8cb8adf9e66c6e94a4ee39eb9bedb0
describe
'139827' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_072.jpg'
6355bc4874caa920add425b78679a61b
cfd9416d8ba197602bd234988b9fd442f14be1b1
describe
'24033' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_072.pro'
4d9dce1353ad7f87f27178326f6c14ae
29b80a309a2a3629c3870a3cef871daebf83c737
describe
'74007' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_072.QC.jpg'
c26538fb0e2b658106152e66f0e8e02c
6eda144773e6a2f53fbec6429f705c531c6e5bac
describe
'10399716' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_072.tif'
2d2ca87e6e0f76b2f933fc7cd9899960
d531641c9ce1e3aee7c74d83efa387919cc610ba
describe
'914' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_072.txt'
cc32c1ef6fd166dfbbf83a5280f71672
22306258265dd603a3e41d6018a15f26e3e9f131
'2012-05-13T09:18:22-04:00'
describe
'41832' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_072thm.jpg'
c4336a38b8a9f33248e0f3aca3af1056
2d756c7cd18cb133c832207db095b8fe8fba1c51
'2012-05-13T09:20:07-04:00'
describe
'1261106' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_073.jp2'
fa002b68c082334c0b3c050010382ebb
77508ae243a5db77b524c339cfbbc4f1d5cf778e
describe
'132995' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_073.jpg'
6ddb443116be24b44031dd60535295e2
c3af3e5788060ae47464d038ff51986cd4506449
describe
'22190' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_073.pro'
dd02d2c84fd1dbc82b13fffb051ed199
5fcdd5650f0e096d7ab6042bbf271bdcb20c4467
describe
'68442' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_073.QC.jpg'
556b3bd778c483e554759feebd9e1d36
616f651128db3e2da65b10d1474759291ab672ea
describe
'10870892' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_073.tif'
28bc09fe75a9c2429ea239677588e200
56e503c45baabaca3c87fdae92683a83018c04ab
describe
'852' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_073.txt'
89336af68fb69c609483ab84edbe78a1
c61116a34737a508cf1d46ecfb3783e7d8399402
'2012-05-13T09:15:19-04:00'
describe
'40674' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_073thm.jpg'
c63f5c1a359c2c8fb4cd7b59cea4e1dd
0384a4b000c4bcc975c52f6fa88aef8d15608ce1
describe
'1088011' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_074.jp2'
982c627a7996b7581880f711d70839a1
cbaa506aaa84ca9f1b3c1424a07eeecd59949999
describe
'118599' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGHZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_074.jpg'
597c3c9ada24ad43635131760877c9f3
35fd88910708834eb905e9d5281baae452029449
describe
'20161' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_074.pro'
0fc5617417193f79a019adda78ad8068
779bb2282a8b4265b2bf20d2a7f7feba0064472c
describe
'64243' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_074.QC.jpg'
ec08cccda3d1b709939bda715585f720
4d54bc5f321e6ac95310f5a4de513d89b8a0f883
'2012-05-13T09:22:25-04:00'
describe
'10626172' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_074.tif'
ad9223090829d1d2c0d83af0db774b7d
783f465855ba717cf7474efa095f7309394e8a86
'2012-05-13T09:15:30-04:00'
describe
'812' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGID' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_074.txt'
ab7a8a414607238183cc06bee4373a96
caf9549eb6a0977e44ac4377f2b4a095eceaef37
'2012-05-13T09:16:46-04:00'
describe
'38504' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_074thm.jpg'
90c686c15be8a3c73d4420d0bbe41278
1dafede11af3527452831eeef0c09b423a3749cb
describe
'1297812' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_075.jp2'
5db5b4a9cc2723487cd178288974b415
631be82b8229bb9ee22a0103af59d8b392275295
describe
'132401' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_075.jpg'
168710a5fd7ccf7a28817fa3df4eb8ff
a8e58bcd346137e37fb81bf38a388def4076e045
describe
'22160' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_075.pro'
c98874a4d5a8ee3d0e19cef665682c2d
d83e21ee28158a900517a40bed42808340d58d0d
'2012-05-13T09:16:24-04:00'
describe
'70195' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGII' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_075.QC.jpg'
827ed82c7dc95abcd17f7c63c1dfeb2a
57032cbb84d9653049dc98be7f73985289e14d4f
describe
'11046808' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_075.tif'
a26cafebeb8eb5216c9ca0d433af7022
629505d7f2ebe2c7314f63711ca8ffb69b5740fd
'2012-05-13T09:22:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_075.txt'
4f70d51bb7887e81e44fb7a30bb8cdb1
24640c34132bc15332aad3aa2a063c44f9889d60
'2012-05-13T09:16:29-04:00'
describe
'41461' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_075thm.jpg'
4a403a1cc91e3f95f7c58739e6953b06
5048f6bc08e13dd7444bba55676073122342ef6a
'2012-05-13T09:21:16-04:00'
describe
'1276668' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_076.jp2'
d832394b147f89bbd0fb8dc63a7eca4a
b7acc913e6a89793f13f6630fd63266619ff6c36
describe
'137350' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_076.jpg'
8e90dfa701988cfb6b69305d79d55687
3a1d55a52a8dcdd2b7805086da27b972bc86c0ff
describe
'23206' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_076.pro'
8182829802e4a1361d940b0eade10048
c135e8749bc7047e1c147cac68d2b38961773c14
'2012-05-13T09:23:01-04:00'
describe
'71916' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_076.QC.jpg'
61640ed1d27c0bad59946e3d75049950
dea06f9243b9d21dfed42af62ee6bf8130e897a3
'2012-05-13T09:23:38-04:00'
describe
'10614460' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_076.tif'
1d8af0ee9e22ad793ecea5f47e9d28a1
ca35d482caed84218099fc0d0a597461a6596468
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_076.txt'
249735a188fb393ed5caa8dd55d364a8
ee266abb0f93d78e5d9b735674034b465f5ff885
describe
'40916' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_076thm.jpg'
13eefbca425756cbb4cc45dcbed08266
2a9e761b548efa470b94521f4c98aad670c1f5b5
describe
'1314500' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_077.jp2'
dbdff95b23b40f649839eaab7c203277
0a7b6c140d41cd5d9a60c350c154cda40118259c
describe
'131104' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_077.jpg'
f2b834c281ac21d0469bbc88b5d7bd0c
7f3095c7a942da751fff3e96909745a726f84b01
'2012-05-13T09:22:21-04:00'
describe
'22335' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_077.pro'
44ff596d1c52525f88dfdd7b8f2455f5
5be0b33cd857af999975b5669308d1d6134eed1e
describe
'71032' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_077.QC.jpg'
2a684b8f990f8d0fb437d10ebd9f87ec
b8ddf3e734d28b77364bbdc911dbc2c72d0d8901
describe
'11192400' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_077.tif'
c4bbc3ff3935bdfcd11cd6e0b57e89a8
5bfde38c3ac62b3d64593a4df1a8603e0d45262f
'2012-05-13T09:23:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_077.txt'
721df3109141e14b058527fae04c2ea9
d35ddd5fc8c9735fb13cf1e925ce84ed48407b74
describe
'43395' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGIZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_077thm.jpg'
e8a186f17b0e64a26f092749f102ffae
19118dfed3d14c1394ce5914c72cecbd9a09f04e
describe
'1271435' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_078.jp2'
67af67fab36f37e79f265fa90ca9fd9a
ea79cfae54a55c247e16998d0fe01c48e527849b
describe
'135595' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_078.jpg'
75bd190e263f4a2819050f5bfd057944
712987c6417333aab9380cc8c6800449343dcac3
describe
'22901' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_078.pro'
dc3b89f9393a64ecee3523bf810725b1
e1d19b2a6cf80c5c9facad5506e270d9d20e5961
describe
'72168' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_078.QC.jpg'
9e76852314c7c5eef10f15ae0c22c49e
2bad24e0adac4917ac884f320c4b25baabbdb095
describe
'10597136' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_078.tif'
a1aa8114c51340a8537b0952ec42e287
b0a489217e4e505068f7e58159d0a68cff033f8f
'2012-05-13T09:20:57-04:00'
describe
'925' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_078.txt'
aa5379156e711de0765d2d45af13a0bc
41f5d9076d1a3092c98b71818ffccc020dbeca53
describe
'40948' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_078thm.jpg'
fdb96d54b6c108ba938dac9c2acbef1f
1e9bcff3d8c8c48ecbcc281f2afa24d31116e427
'2012-05-13T09:16:10-04:00'
describe
'1395592' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_079.jp2'
f6b38eee384471c478cf56ee325c874b
238442cffc1df36be79a1ecf84a756f0ffde5e91
describe
'143153' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_079.jpg'
85d52d24216cb1627bd18a1554abe948
f7fe0571807941a2c1e98f8549d1052a5922732a
describe
'24194' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_079.pro'
8b3a60805083f5d32df7008a679b5ec0
13b1507295665313b8f51e49d13e163f91629ae4
describe
'74830' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_079.QC.jpg'
4d8570bf6f31ef02d27f50bf46ce4027
2568479bb64527f04f4825ead4371ff3a8513394
'2012-05-13T09:23:36-04:00'
describe
'11187904' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_079.tif'
2ae9c7f8654c332183c81aa0186f3f97
0432ef90ffd337e2e92fc2d312c4aaba6373efd8
'2012-05-13T09:23:00-04:00'
describe
'928' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_079.txt'
3fa1d15c550fba0d5d25a0fa4241763f
612df4e2618ded4046c04fe5019773334a2ed59a
describe
'43424' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_079thm.jpg'
18d83637f9f8a9c77b1091fddce1a40a
2e1aca14d70b6a29c22e1998a13ff2a1d0323e3b
describe
'1264654' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_080.jp2'
70ffe33895b83d8029104fb975661b34
0c47ff14cf17c6e454629a982d554ca6b8fe76be
'2012-05-13T09:18:49-04:00'
describe
'131139' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_080.jpg'
8098373a3dc6195f09dbbed258b305e4
6e5cd49b6b508d0032e0354faaa2ccd23a64f251
describe
'22566' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_080.pro'
6d74d72a8b1c4f330758d64c0b0c7381
8a0a5596338a148470e9dc489bee1c036396f0b5
describe
'70015' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_080.QC.jpg'
b8382be95dbf6fbec9d4d0326492bce1
68bf6286a59730beb543c6d2c42afda75b510ebb
describe
'10648456' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_080.tif'
07446e99043eb49ea0d99d5cfc02dedf
c68c42ad23f3efa12d8f8793ba26fe910ea0b822
describe
'881' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_080.txt'
fea5ea8496eed1740ed843cca7c07acd
39c477b5077b07f086ac3c9c79b6312b970f1a84
'2012-05-13T09:21:15-04:00'
describe
'39976' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_080thm.jpg'
77a6ebdf5242f338c28c7866a60838a6
c6c802b97c63a90cf9a9e82cd6f09b9648891e09
'2012-05-13T09:18:02-04:00'
describe
'1395601' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_081.jp2'
ffcc6e6dabfa114fe3a6ae94ee9ee50f
ed551273e81d3eb30615335bb2e378dea36bea2f
describe
'147494' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_081.jpg'
bbcd8a397facd0940d7722b3a6b5e5b0
611fed1d0a771566a336e1124e294fc23c47897d
describe
'24575' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_081.pro'
4d184c1b9b9de5fe8a975c54020e7f21
35a846d78c0aa46e2d3aee5f5da2ef585c68799f
describe
'76060' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_081.QC.jpg'
39eb3aa6c777cb05c3e0bba3ed6954ef
079d60098493bbd1cceff8ecc081cb7f1efc0559
describe
'11187972' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGJZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_081.tif'
6accd3ed3a6e3a09dc2e8437effb1e05
e6f8c88d7853bad1b112930a4729c2e6c8879d5e
'2012-05-13T09:16:35-04:00'
describe
'948' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_081.txt'
9cb10349f92d2331aaf43ee01246ff6a
001c1db7eba4996a21f5ec91d89f9ab4a66736aa
'2012-05-13T09:15:18-04:00'
describe
'43977' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_081thm.jpg'
7dba64f9f56fdf71fdea86ef519f35d3
e07559c35701699e2a7fc626593e548b6d38162f
describe
'1298988' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_082.jp2'
593e7e2e8b5e442a390c49b3c8ab04fc
ca82a2c45a02e00f9b373a8510e1d0fa95ceef38
describe
'139906' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_082.jpg'
aa06df9316123c0f2c580f77e5080ff0
cdd68651675d72d54d8db73c13528988ba4f557d
'2012-05-13T09:21:43-04:00'
describe
'23015' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_082.pro'
88c1d6127d40d0318d5b9491ee554e9a
20e6feff676f780831850e273b5f9335668e07de
describe
'73801' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_082.QC.jpg'
464d31bb5174018213922c3309cc06b7
960f334dcad1570c70fd393b3223fbcaceb97de0
'2012-05-13T09:21:17-04:00'
describe
'10444100' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_082.tif'
ab3bfd0cff61d78c2c3b895e345a6a88
2f3bd7ac40f5cf37e5154f3402e694d6f40b008a
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_082.txt'
088746aee49ebc40cc269a432003ead2
c16d2267ad95fd12e8705526a49cd7f3132ec3cd
'2012-05-13T09:19:23-04:00'
describe
'41281' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_082thm.jpg'
8cbbeef6cbe92cc081da8024dfd598d4
6ae305a4f3bee9ec9643a99fc2b7ac535475d2f1
describe
'1250235' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_083.jp2'
3005878bc8fe915b830cc224072c05d9
28126f0712dc86f09b38964405649a465c64e271
describe
'130708' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_083.jpg'
a6961e60dbf6f635a408d7991bd57b7e
61e34410b6aac25e5c72a5e1de5724ba3025afd6
describe
'22024' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_083.pro'
77bf85d2db78ea384626361da0461e22
7f578cfc3acae49f84741ff055310a52b50e0d60
describe
'69293' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_083.QC.jpg'
a3d462463415b5ce295c727f99f8d4cd
5026cdbdbfd487930d367545448a7f83eb5f73a5
describe
'11187700' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_083.tif'
06d4b60983360d207409796724dbbc40
55a9d69b05d0694cee5b13199e07b7080b41e2a3
'2012-05-13T09:17:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_083.txt'
4d6f17465507d1c2a10e383986436b53
a2dcd58e329b64b93a860f8b7cc5fffc31c55f0b
describe
'41494' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_083thm.jpg'
f96596fe92a284d05a4ce73a195daeee
32a4371bfbc7a2d50f22b4573a234e07f7266763
describe
'1205926' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_084.jp2'
e9aed1d4642cbd44e3a65637224ecc1b
bbf0db0ea38dac2332918c5bb66bfda4485ee13e
describe
'138322' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_084.jpg'
821b7777fdda1203018bfac54e325fd7
3472d23683567d91b673f0033b7f51e8fec8e927
'2012-05-13T09:23:25-04:00'
describe
'22371' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_084.pro'
3d4246aa2f4fe546cf1701f9184dc805
1989f70554024a3316032f08da6360018d7c8f86
'2012-05-13T09:16:25-04:00'
describe
'73789' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_084.QC.jpg'
695f0651bc3bce448a0062ea02e29ea5
644a1fb4315ac093705e056662fc999317fc3950
'2012-05-13T09:18:23-04:00'
describe
'10080796' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_084.tif'
d8a99bd505ea19e86b154b08a7036d48
f4c91203968f71b8894f0f0df6ec02425fae92a4
'2012-05-13T09:16:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_084.txt'
d41d69b76c3adba57b4615e572c32ef4
f6ba47177be2e525474f437f8f53441dabbb5eb8
describe
'40373' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_084thm.jpg'
c66394715c319080d48600f322b9ad61
2d2586481f623ca58c92545339fe7d0e5d0cd594
'2012-05-13T09:15:21-04:00'
describe
'1336129' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_085.jp2'
256e3de13aa33f797cd538e173324d44
d5d1708401c4846876e94a0e266d11c525995f4c
describe
'136121' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_085.jpg'
0b024dee7d6f154a86594b0e5e0b9d15
ab0993ac04c3c707cfcf02d69d9c0007f7c755cc
'2012-05-13T09:22:43-04:00'
describe
'22716' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGKZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_085.pro'
159e3d2092e673ae7243fd030452c526
2d21915a0fd5c2d400d04922b0c4c02ee02ae2e5
describe
'71829' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_085.QC.jpg'
13346fe15e309570fab405545340f3f5
be0642e652bf9b0f62cd4de10f86084d202054b7
'2012-05-13T09:15:09-04:00'
describe
'11187964' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_085.tif'
af14bd85d8a58eafb13ca948cd981946
6b1c50d00f34328aa03850b140518c7ddcb2d2b8
'2012-05-13T09:17:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_085.txt'
accb114e4909f9896f1a3e9b67067860
abed6e9af9b134029b66fb866a4b2596c4c48254
'2012-05-13T09:17:37-04:00'
describe
'41835' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_085thm.jpg'
2627c1cdbe7020aeb863434fd88efa63
bedae3faecc2e9210371879e5edb3c00059dc284
describe
'1225358' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_086.jp2'
87a687fcacdba7fa9ba79379fe28fa6f
00c63ef279aedc2f18a40a5f36f69c817ae3c442
describe
'132226' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_086.jpg'
4bfacda067cb1a8e646cd0946c73e6fe
fb3e77831129976fe91f301935558f62d0611904
describe
'22216' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_086.pro'
03ee5a7bd5deda423185962794fe0c44
d0a8dce7f45be279a595822fbd06aee333297499
describe
'70199' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_086.QC.jpg'
7ddc5b9eed0523d209e4988e3aac9363
f9e8e067398cb69f35d81e5daca59ed1569fa2a9
'2012-05-13T09:20:17-04:00'
describe
'10515348' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_086.tif'
5b8ba3a67888385cfd24885ea5775119
135c35e5ed97782b5f8c076d6fa66076b966316e
'2012-05-13T09:23:06-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_086.txt'
d8f28497f7e3c453f26df1c331356528
a34b3d4cddbde004d8c2d2ebe6eaade823860fb5
describe
'40379' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_086thm.jpg'
ecaf81dd34caa18ac4ee02af99f034f7
f47f325c7df043cba0ffa18757dcdc9c84b68eb4
'2012-05-13T09:16:57-04:00'
describe
'1301171' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_087.jp2'
c85b244aa5aa3da6a7ab79be5e75fac6
07bde5474ead5ad65f93d93e70f0318eb461738e
'2012-05-13T09:17:21-04:00'
describe
'134436' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_087.jpg'
1f3294e40ea26ac0332db9741bf5335a
32440611f22e4c2436dde24fa9f449b47b83ced2
describe
'22116' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_087.pro'
caf582e196db8a9fc1e06f0d08ca1c48
86e4d7aaee82acef536bc4e97a63d4a96f71f386
describe
'71623' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_087.QC.jpg'
404335839736770ce4a1dbdc93b4b064
d407e55a746f417d34fd12781c8a38f0c0394a60
describe
'11187760' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_087.tif'
7beeda826264afcb81e63172f52261ab
793e310fa3130e5d7051767c336132955a72e2c6
'2012-05-13T09:21:21-04:00'
describe
'867' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_087.txt'
789f25ee39a022ddf69f787566492f53
bcd728b15cb119f7a754fcaf712db7309b2293ad
'2012-05-13T09:18:34-04:00'
describe
'42871' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_087thm.jpg'
2873c202367f66d1834475e07ae2e649
bcc3e919db9326fc400a1cec414137568b40d001
'2012-05-13T09:19:25-04:00'
describe
'1273745' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_088.jp2'
27d838d16a219c9279c4e6d1b4688f6e
024ed37cb590cba5e4701c5a94b8c43bd76c3c34
'2012-05-13T09:20:49-04:00'
describe
'189493' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_088.jpg'
d0125a9d1e1ea8768e1d9429875507d2
efa7a6ee8cfe802c40affaf972f1457a0d9fd656
describe
'5866' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_088.pro'
159cb206db566ed1126505538714776a
8765752c6c5e0dff32f52f3c8b1d6ff7b9283a54
describe
'75570' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_088.QC.jpg'
77c47a49cc843fbe45104f98b16345f9
77cc6db4d72c3e9f24a7511f697f8765197653ea
'2012-05-13T09:15:02-04:00'
describe
'10213240' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_088.tif'
16a0323859aaf941a82759e282902c62
fdcfe498f8875868ca369f62a9f3d8969282e9d8
'2012-05-13T09:18:08-04:00'
describe
'260' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_088.txt'
5746a83cbb1f3a022324af05458b36b5
1d88dd601c6c75b5a143b1e9dedb5eafed051999
describe
Invalid character
'37413' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_088thm.jpg'
a7601ce0bea34d7c9ed944e184c736b4
c5ac5acf2455c5d0179e494a3cd3a7f5af6d9ebc
'2012-05-13T09:19:58-04:00'
describe
'1271372' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGLZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_089.jp2'
c5e6f970971c21753aac76fb32fdc4c6
7cb8d37e5625d7be6f52577d5e665b5790637f1b
describe
'130187' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_089.jpg'
aae47710670c192a2df9ecd7fa24cf1c
b7efda22207a66834ed3a324be3629c0a362f658
describe
'22061' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_089.pro'
d0a00cdc3803dd30bf2937c3d783a6ae
96b109ce9e2beb31d22f383ffb3496f6b7976b20
'2012-05-13T09:20:47-04:00'
describe
'69485' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_089.QC.jpg'
8ac5676eb743325306d615de6e3e6392
eea80707ffcbae899fcf7a77ef7579d2b93623e6
describe
'11187312' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_089.tif'
ab21ff9c35b3ea95783e7f4dac84ed29
f39b0d38312e17ce86b13955fe1845c610e29e2e
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGME' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_089.txt'
e5be2a0bcf508b75eaba20ba876c1f77
3aa5cfc79c33128d933cd3f23a05f139fc67ff41
'2012-05-13T09:17:23-04:00'
describe
'41653' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_089thm.jpg'
9699bdd7b8d882e5762aefff30d002b8
f6fb8a0f626fa7279cd15def13f087f043f77c72
'2012-05-13T09:19:32-04:00'
describe
'1032519' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_090.jp2'
c65e1046a4a094462003a2991107eb3a
a682e86def0a1ff9c72256878124e12572a7aa21
'2012-05-13T09:19:28-04:00'
describe
'116934' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_090.jpg'
505335bb1692af53f4da3378fa66e33a
03f94ebb592b391931d29d5034cfa1afbe4e5b49
describe
'18886' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_090.pro'
3eba1e92433c7300c3da8054207c785a
96023ccb602796e27645fdb58ac5b4313a808d6f
'2012-05-13T09:16:45-04:00'
describe
'64090' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_090.QC.jpg'
90663ff7e5708f9c4061bf579c9a8f5f
62cc25e2809296a2a8f5c0b1d2a3ec025ebeaa6e
'2012-05-13T09:19:18-04:00'
describe
'10418648' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_090.tif'
bb75e68d35b4c2a8731bdb73894445c9
561132674c6e3a9b130d74ff2792c24fddc2cd60
'2012-05-13T09:18:57-04:00'
describe
'753' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGML' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_090.txt'
6f0e40c0f15afc56539fceb2c729d257
a96e76cd13d936f31a522a28ea95d29b07a8c268
describe
'37689' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_090thm.jpg'
dc31b2cc5bc15b10d1209154a8ffa9bb
17beafc8d98444500ae019684574a41d4db0a5e3
describe
'1247630' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_091.jp2'
4a21b27f1fa20b2aa4de9a065840d391
1fd71b4b70b9f791388c71a302db2aaa73389192
'2012-05-13T09:21:08-04:00'
describe
'128410' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_091.jpg'
d7aee32c6eb17b840e0666a119129a12
5172bedcc1bbbe1eeb08c2ccbc2cfcd9fa66cd06
describe
'21846' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_091.pro'
1079d5a4e299c07b18155a226c845680
cf6804df8eb4cac8c1aca4d4219657605559d85b
'2012-05-13T09:22:39-04:00'
describe
'67075' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_091.QC.jpg'
2d3b0e5e4d3407527121d3aaef9dc880
c8bff376ba4102e4ee6f8220b2575c5eb9f6c7e3
describe
'11187136' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_091.tif'
de5d9fe05e87ec998a5086c34ac5c21f
8324479593c1ba80e1f9b1f4da288aab3dd00303
'2012-05-13T09:23:12-04:00'
describe
'835' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_091.txt'
80e858600ab73b1376133b7db7afa214
7b00bcb20b190a62646b6f0e824400ca2a3e6560
describe
'40284' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_091thm.jpg'
76d74008e156970eb8faa04d95b01f5d
798971ffe6c2d1b18a7289a15a331229604e17c7
describe
'1216800' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_092.jp2'
5897041b1db99cb5c26bf93d4a6b6061
9420b0adb578a2a9c5be9b550d847cb4f2a64f73
'2012-05-13T09:18:45-04:00'
describe
'131969' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_092.jpg'
eb3b18ea018a27a3d0b700ea0f1467b1
752900963f0f290aabd5e4ae972afee00cf878f8
describe
'22836' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_092.pro'
8ccd747002f8309e68ac1f9f76a2883b
4fa45bc958a4f31bc6077da631d771bf5f4882f9
describe
'69810' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_092.QC.jpg'
5899326876b4a24d98d0bba424f481bc
14353387ccf7def7a0f574d6e8da5188a2f537f0
describe
'10554760' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_092.tif'
ed61ef8ebdfa4d404fc9d48500fac59f
68289b9bb3dd2c6fa9d2b6ccb1852911341ddc38
'2012-05-13T09:21:41-04:00'
describe
'897' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGMZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_092.txt'
c8b8be281d1452e76e6bdee3d0026238
a1415e137703183e288b23eeed4affbf19318533
describe
'40163' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_092thm.jpg'
b074980c327550fd27805ced52ff7241
f9c801725732465c8cd9f9d602a35a189c0a5b49
describe
'1192289' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_093.jp2'
947a60ecc51e36e14e9e84a63aaec6c4
d5836bd5612aa596b6ad3df7f82f266aab3f283e
'2012-05-13T09:20:02-04:00'
describe
'124646' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_093.jpg'
e287abcc4886895130d79949f2bb85cf
f973904673baadb9224baecab891b3f4caaf27f2
describe
'20701' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGND' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_093.pro'
f3d5d37fca5d094aa0961a53e43db46d
e3aae3d66d12df2f99af5b5d3824aaea3ead2a4b
describe
'66230' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_093.QC.jpg'
08f677501d8624f42be89c1d7ddd0957
fa220177b8af07732927db503045579bd54015a6
describe
'11187380' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_093.tif'
a7ffe7c3fdc7e2f8d2aad15ae9fe290e
bdac54d76d04a4bf4db71000c48a1a0e8b5fe801
describe
'805' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_093.txt'
7560525c279f83e3923af1e826783d16
c80e4d2f8ad3381c02ca0513a8fc63f1bf4dbcb6
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_093thm.jpg'
93a2fa2c803c816dfa6b441b846c7e88
71a37e9ef7e8f7b7fc8a7ad01c230239aadb24e8
'2012-05-13T09:17:45-04:00'
describe
'1339957' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_094.jp2'
ac45cea753ac55f612d48d85beb46404
b68ed5d783811a4b6117198493f768e5538559ed
describe
'140365' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_094.jpg'
6481930d95478e5b979677162f34f790
243fb26eb03d478e10e66ecea8e3c5f9139a192f
describe
'23050' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_094.pro'
3c9afe7d0d5af9a9b2706fd54688e323
9efe4dd45f2c2e79496153c6cdedf6c5ecd18473
'2012-05-13T09:20:27-04:00'
describe
'73717' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_094.QC.jpg'
ce3298562865e3a588f375bbba1b65ee
9ec586a293b72e6de5963552579cddfb7124d01f
'2012-05-13T09:19:42-04:00'
describe
'10930948' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_094.tif'
1ef35b70b95005b40b1c9006965c7db8
9fee161b562e651bc311a8f3689b7576ce1e6773
'2012-05-13T09:20:52-04:00'
describe
'924' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_094.txt'
7bf7fd126548fadab148712c0352f387
ad1abf7714bfec36a78094fc3ea38d804d9fdb86
describe
'42824' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_094thm.jpg'
5a355d539d7ee85e493fd794b3b6035a
9ca63f61d6c9671c548c4bc569ec38ca09b82062
describe
'1365936' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_095.jp2'
0d9d731cb37abcf199f26a54cf06c336
482a5a356c43d71f6843d4eb4c530a28e8215257
describe
'141056' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_095.jpg'
8fa2ee2f01e41db70e0ff1662ed708f4
10b6faaf46c1e63b9517120e205afb7e1d36674f
describe
'23921' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_095.pro'
0cc36941b82ac10fa27a8925efa382de
43f9d874ddcfdd352a80aba165c3166f2b953110
describe
'73108' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_095.QC.jpg'
2238e0fa46573602109b27cfd3f28b45
91a3bd42290c036094d4cc9ab743ffd455aed49c
describe
'10950572' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_095.tif'
91e468f80ffede9aa548bff990b91d90
e332093a1593d4ebfea85ba240559d1733619635
describe
'911' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_095.txt'
566beb24bf616b9507a25ad71892c47c
8bfcb43420a9660dd5e36a82ae1507b5e48cdee0
'2012-05-13T09:21:14-04:00'
describe
'42821' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_095thm.jpg'
3e454a5baf718fa627b4d5f4960fa592
523810f48f12b56a8fc16b5357e4a9b9de62a1e5
describe
'1238595' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_096.jp2'
cd9f1b9263b8ef90399d42e807bc993d
2ce2b517770aee04af06373f353a65bb0949cd83
'2012-05-13T09:16:11-04:00'
describe
'130617' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_096.jpg'
dca0bd539e3ef78dce6bda9e87e9c1ab
9ddc88eec43f48cf332a9977c72b40310526b6bd
describe
'22782' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_096.pro'
80942974fa9b1ab979403bf940a4b6fb
ce3be66a3bb1772b93d8ebec5938fdc47fcb9ec4
describe
'69544' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGNZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_096.QC.jpg'
de6554e089dab69ec7a67d43502dc4ad
ad85eba3d0c6440dfb90bb26f68997c0b4701e49
describe
'10757124' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_096.tif'
8f2811661d1b3f66d1591fea04ab973a
ab686e0bcf416ce1137be1c82688962bc0bf119b
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_096.txt'
b2dbab1b9de23204c6f74815ebed21d7
c3cbe78a95d5215bfcd2f001c30ef54f33842081
'2012-05-13T09:18:06-04:00'
describe
'40128' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_096thm.jpg'
616e6dd198a722dd1e3f2c76b90ac53b
0a98e80d8ae6219d20197ad2a0edbbb7beab49ce
describe
'1282568' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_097.jp2'
f543a107f69a859720ba0f10c6a14638
e162c265ccbe2c99e51fad6665c4d77a5acd34a4
describe
'130402' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_097.jpg'
817690e3a805ee59317804860f0b5a20
195985a884c5480e0d551e8cc7b414bf0243f43e
describe
'21390' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_097.pro'
c14ed81d950e766fe169ce4cfc9320d6
c396c0f5a67fb059524ef4ace91b102eab24825e
describe
'69122' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_097.QC.jpg'
cd7b83ceb784b704c893b16044806e81
53613b4a14ecb76bb64e821bb34f1b0edd81d8d2
describe
'11187364' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_097.tif'
c8872ceb66aeba0305477ec420663970
7230c42821f2eaa0184c20145a1e37ef9bc12ccd
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_097.txt'
0c570e46a8e4b6013f7280c1ec3398d9
d3989721e2ef7588510e9c3a1aa830efa08b010c
describe
'41526' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_097thm.jpg'
8be47d14271910a706c02463fd91ed2b
6b7e2119a73b7cb75bca36bacaf79d908a29db2e
describe
'1230084' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_098.jp2'
cf8412ee518368a3764b38e6aee92c64
1c519ddacc65d5fc1e06f256cff6cc4b3fd2264e
describe
'134232' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_098.jpg'
e6d290a3880024c0f8b4e4943158cadc
1232f2bed02110a9d64d9fd594840fd62f2caf6c
describe
'22665' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_098.pro'
0f3fe5d0894458fbdb37665644556ae5
71e2e348c379ab6f2de87e4ef45e952b8752b043
describe
'71713' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGON' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_098.QC.jpg'
4ceb1535f8f9becb4e90fb9f31b28e42
dd5f95483685400126fbbd63570027c957b63314
describe
'10574828' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_098.tif'
3cd6a2604d10f71d929f8d97faf850bc
c7627a1fef5f72679ed338d219ea39c3d87066f9
'2012-05-13T09:15:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_098.txt'
afa825ed7fa9ced0320edff27dac09a9
b704456f1e72755e73365bb936363c48da7054de
describe
'40790' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_098thm.jpg'
50b388bf51f1ba4d66c38858d47f06da
6a79ad53cf08fa7e22ea50028c9056b6b1189653
describe
'1298239' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_099.jp2'
f79e08345fad80efc4910bdc983acb3b
7bc392b6d00638dc9c178cd69715115924cbbf90
'2012-05-13T09:18:51-04:00'
describe
'132368' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_099.jpg'
ddb15ec17224316dd54ae97484d30571
4ccf13b056cc82ebe6211650a48e6920f713a56e
'2012-05-13T09:23:39-04:00'
describe
'22164' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_099.pro'
9309f2f52df0e9118f737959c1b9047f
3108e03e79e55f4df6442c8707bc2c671df328d7
'2012-05-13T09:22:59-04:00'
describe
'70968' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_099.QC.jpg'
880effb9cf4ece3bacfe872ea0cd2886
b0deb670b2e85ad6bfadbe180efab7bd6abc3c0d
'2012-05-13T09:21:24-04:00'
describe
'11187948' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_099.tif'
f4d72cb9a006a16bddda9c4afbdc986e
e823c4880f3bfc43522e99118a72c67310fd7510
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_099.txt'
89b2915ce892967f3c6168386fa97b4e
668f5085c507c379fb2fad421c3918218ac72b46
describe
'42547' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_099thm.jpg'
05d21a25ed17b417fe6cf49d5323b303
0d4fa8ffa100fce98fb2bfc12775178b884b9284
describe
'1157794' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_100.jp2'
04bfd49a61edd7fb0502b33c8cd5aa84
a26d1f679e3ca31e335c2065dafecdceeabccce6
describe
'125555' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGOZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_100.jpg'
562be6f1fc9faa61abc695f98aaa7c8e
8f83cc474fd23978fc682cdb2bc193c4d42e7d7b
describe
'21450' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_100.pro'
a8e8c9f11b51263ae3dbc159e3c06776
f0ca7b142376aa83d3fcee24b237877a9b6932fb
describe
'67384' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_100.QC.jpg'
e2a2742f0ce004ac6e7af32e708ee34b
b020e6025c6c4fb378969d7cda3547b9f14a485d
describe
'10631316' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_100.tif'
2fc4acc989573f680983ced209ba4400
912a78921d632c9fbfcf68c2780ebdf6941d9e19
'2012-05-13T09:21:46-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_100.txt'
eb901d19886ad5e5681c20f2e0d31729
53ad2f6e94a5a008e421cd1906f32c2578caaeeb
describe
'39608' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_100thm.jpg'
57f620ad7f734a333684eaaca5a12305
8035b6ca426c3f08378bd386bbabd7fbc8548e56
describe
'1275366' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_101.jp2'
b9459c621764cfb6fe246ba1a78f5de6
02b53bc7f5bbe606eaf8076f041ea5e562a0ef8a
describe
'128726' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_101.jpg'
e3502f6c242f9d1d0d8d69e1248d71fa
2bb287f4025d09673f5b3961cc9d871c19369778
'2012-05-13T09:18:12-04:00'
describe
'21168' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_101.pro'
6f418b0300eba6dc485704990de0fe33
f7b50cac4664f3b6f806179bc9406a8521ada27d
describe
'68460' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_101.QC.jpg'
fe34436297e18cc2cb2df3f74b24a350
28321a75217eb1e5b3f1e4f3ce13c25b84b1842a
describe
'11187608' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_101.tif'
f12f41e9be49e8a395db50fb4430062f
4e87345bf36b43bc784a7bc6219d2a3cd4c49a4a
describe
'817' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_101.txt'
17e418bf33f769ef41d06c581a9990e3
0cdb75210380d2c133dab4711f97a0ef9f5b0230
describe
'42186' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_101thm.jpg'
461c345a8d894bc898940bba41edd19d
02309d3716dd3167a723370e7aa6e191c11567df
describe
'1235929' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_102.jp2'
bfc1e939c4ac0ec385deded0437dae5b
51f3b5bda57d767d90b78fdf74d718fa769affe0
describe
'134259' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_102.jpg'
8b417d51a0f4ef693472f313695bd7c4
85a97755c932e6146048fe936bfae94d27ce57c0
describe
'22952' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_102.pro'
ab76f88366a6ab7f70c4f7ac41eb4aee
e8777768b41b18a31489ecc257284cdde7e968a8
describe
'72584' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_102.QC.jpg'
f6ab73ac4ab28dbd30d854b428f25499
3d03b5f116d8db7e166db869fb755b97766ed589
'2012-05-13T09:15:22-04:00'
describe
'10498132' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_102.tif'
c248f889f5ae3d519c95534b42581cd6
1afb8b2d3b5f63e55de24ff87bb073b89dfc82d4
'2012-05-13T09:22:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_102.txt'
5beb22674ba477f74183139991bc8e65
e3368358d6a711e968abee0756a5f972740d18dd
describe
'40868' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_102thm.jpg'
d470eccdd214590e0b7c8c71b8338b5f
66c172404aa25e5318d1dc9b2facbb0b860588d6
'2012-05-13T09:20:51-04:00'
describe
'1329180' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_103.jp2'
64718e72d347bf39108b46573fc8b366
e823317ced3c83032f0202ad4daa8988df952106
describe
'140361' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_103.jpg'
44c71fa9600af133786436ff4d8c19ba
8032b528e19e23b5000ce403287078f6a04d3ae0
describe
'24500' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_103.pro'
c74f530ec736be56fadf4c8f716d3f00
d2f0dcf9d95db34f791302393322ecae266a4862
describe
'74199' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_103.QC.jpg'
6a6bedfc1e99d54987e0dce01c57e932
6e71678fcf8de870de6aab1794c9dbac2d86bfad
describe
'10693724' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_103.tif'
f7ce34deec91c52fe941353d198d5323
d31feaf775046d3dc72854d10642e107b3a62a30
'2012-05-13T09:15:36-04:00'
describe
'935' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_103.txt'
af9b85e8f810edff595974ecd2bf6453
132275ec481357603ebc89f9c0f80073ceda4df2
describe
'42479' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGPZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_103thm.jpg'
2fc1fc4b812c99af37838c31f6b43a0a
7e4bee5d344ac99886efa39fbd83fa3348ea5dec
describe
'1325709' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_104.jp2'
3969e98f16783344e8538113ff83e5f6
c52f366e01adc9e56d974fd1dbd41e462a4bcf2d
describe
'139942' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_104.jpg'
107a618c241a91b404b674f321dda042
1445ab4c608e077676098b84ae9d35760e273260
describe
'23676' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_104.pro'
f4e24d0bf57cdca4f5c0a5ad630fe93e
670f2c0d9b9900e2510e37ca9812e63c9e6cd029
describe
'75936' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_104.QC.jpg'
6e186e6cd07fa621270b08770b278ab6
0f0cdfd19daba9963d0a32814ef987defe90b9e7
describe
'10812480' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_104.tif'
0456a925e171aab294196a0cab6d9177
97e1063e1038433459cdcfd26e1a7b1428e37938
'2012-05-13T09:21:23-04:00'
describe
'934' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_104.txt'
dc4268e7a99b7c6233a8f78852f3bb45
b0d6bb421ea0c1d07074221966d03d3e1a7c3d57
describe
'43614' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_104thm.jpg'
a7c1cbf9356478619a64d3a5ca09fc69
2efcf0e7d1ec4210271402f952c09f4f61e4b080
describe
'1314629' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_105.jp2'
252042d34badd49707c2446aec6f8ee6
291d61b677fa496156354e58d2f5d3ee8c8c8663
describe
'137357' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_105.jpg'
ace10feb907995b1af747c17c3cb4ca6
a90d7155eaadc31bd1c1fe17aae6827dd7912b5c
describe
'23835' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_105.pro'
d94d0da845e60c9bf98f76a7aafce624
0873e8f24e32ed4d812b52fda89526114ebb837c
describe
'72907' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_105.QC.jpg'
f8086e0287ab3fb4d642d69aeb1cce3d
4440e5f720c0e48bbb34c3d33fd26b4a40613c01
'2012-05-13T09:15:24-04:00'
describe
'10791672' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_105.tif'
ce80f9023e0df57cdaee45d6112732b5
bbd1ca4d856c855b738a84399d07d5720be5cfec
'2012-05-13T09:22:41-04:00'
describe
'902' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_105.txt'
761b5bb1fb71bf22c755afc84610b7d3
9cf3c11ecbdf34c6ae6d1bbfd41a3b856d68668b
describe
'42638' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_105thm.jpg'
b56c4f9257a1d767aa5ec6f279063a0c
b47ebd68dc40e1939265284f298fff2e65222d38
describe
'1231964' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_106.jp2'
9d2d862f84362907d5fbc6d953ae9c92
9b98c74e03ce379a5e39670bbce4dc4023f9ff9f
describe
'128926' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_106.jpg'
673dc82eb2764d8374f1e669f011f864
fb8be488213b8dbc50f10a4878eedc9393f02c39
'2012-05-13T09:18:41-04:00'
describe
'22360' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_106.pro'
42bf00712f023aad4b6550236f8dc6c7
05c767f6847f4d45721f7443df181e3b766e5ac0
'2012-05-13T09:19:10-04:00'
describe
'69323' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_106.QC.jpg'
97cf8e406b29d92d4f255344311013d4
3c20d17e87ee15c5fd5e8dfb9dfc7e62f010a284
describe
'10740372' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_106.tif'
79c934e573cb7d5e19a7b80036ac1615
783c1605d78ad29ab3ddf50cd3ac122b32621295
'2012-05-13T09:22:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_106.txt'
e07b01bcea9013ad93e11e222d14edbc
8d0d15f66c8ca3585162669381ad56f19c057271
describe
'40817' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_106thm.jpg'
64f072b09b5ab2b8d98ead79d49893c5
c97d6ffe8758c55a0ef626ce169831d695549af5
describe
'1180196' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_107.jp2'
0ef0f7685eda282fdb801e13bbc6bb8c
0dcd02433fc224d7cf2c467d1a4a96373ae50f5b
'2012-05-13T09:15:14-04:00'
describe
'124389' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_107.jpg'
117caea768b7ffb957acabd55df28488
a219bad78a9120e88a00091bed65ac727f307d6a
describe
'21751' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_107.pro'
94cf5e78891052cb146138336758a4bb
4edaf0a74e96c0bcfce0a951d4959bcbd4c8d21a
'2012-05-13T09:16:42-04:00'
describe
'66564' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_107.QC.jpg'
17ac706a4574b2e12b3aae69755cdb6a
499e553c4907ad74e511076114e385a2b27a152f
describe
'10833460' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGQZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_107.tif'
8d8de8528f3ab5541d9bf372bdc799b0
05f8adf7ff4b72edde9ec9fbf5d0aa1531e28178
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_107.txt'
755118f4e74d972cdf49243c21924bed
0abf95b2e6d1347b3b4d59ac7cf39dc500e94b31
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_107thm.jpg'
199809fe17539a186519e3cc3e30d3c5
a971e6e7cfdf6f36f98e9339da2e4b5f5a09ef49
describe
'1165951' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_108.jp2'
c70ca3c48511f82c60c0c180d0964602
215b49b7b2f8fbc4c77ecb2f5a93c34841fb78d5
describe
'127568' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_108.jpg'
51b2e76a086dca000197457707c18bfc
b49bacee3ea463ce6d9f387dd24011bd91803eff
'2012-05-13T09:16:19-04:00'
describe
'21867' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_108.pro'
b2d2d1e4380a0a07f1db711f844033e0
6e2b1be53933fd3872464543a0fcaea20d8b2287
'2012-05-13T09:18:27-04:00'
describe
'68167' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_108.QC.jpg'
e7f67bea051c79759a7eeb48bf055c0a
6477ddf3c5c03a0ba7949eb254c7c64f47892ed7
describe
'10707464' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_108.tif'
9f2b8298c75099a52c353587d9b62786
8e98985044397e76eddb20dc5939db496a3c3015
'2012-05-13T09:20:35-04:00'
describe
'851' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_108.txt'
a7db7e8272ca086d8781f09fdd2e58c2
8ccfd5573e9973877cf99bd24d3cda4dbd7bfb26
describe
'39823' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_108thm.jpg'
5255e0bce6a9c5d77eeabb0335d543c0
9bb311b75fc28876ef5a6124e77795e2a0a3e706
'2012-05-13T09:19:11-04:00'
describe
'1321456' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_109.jp2'
4f958d7e24027f7a064ae1aa1f268d6d
77554420abe7d8f88cd686e30f4df73a221685e3
describe
'171742' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_109.jpg'
2fa34813bc527ff72c324375042ab57c
8359822f8f862efeb1ca44b8fa9ea8a381031456
describe
'2866' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_109.pro'
35499bd6e0fe53e9805eaa9158b243cb
df7079204f778a06352a971daa38ba1bd842baf1
describe
'71174' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_109.QC.jpg'
60666c7784378187e1b70cc14801ebd8
97c7e8f7d3a72f6b525c4251428b9756c2a72227
describe
'10594020' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_109.tif'
471a9189bfa999cea90602b52fe107e4
2b58c9f4caa23f8848856acf0e8b2daa816ef397
'2012-05-13T09:19:15-04:00'
describe
'125' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_109.txt'
05f68a3fc2532e49523bd6520c7beaa7
1b508c57ab46f5cd8f4ee37fed2e59b8e2ffcf67
describe
'37592' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_109thm.jpg'
75575f081a975783fb132a3d9e5aae04
b459c8549a6cc1817eea71c1055a5ba7d6aa0c29
describe
'1235972' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_110.jp2'
81d126db66a356f2953e938563b85ecd
eeaaa6a343c6d56c4ef64487dce4e78ccd00d955
describe
'136342' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_110.jpg'
7b0303b326e77d7943bbe2626271d6ed
431382b2fa099de29be282385a3e50f4a474ef61
describe
'23967' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_110.pro'
46148c05dbb1eb90d22754ee3baad6e7
ac07f20364d7fb443be8a603578ce43d065ba357
describe
'72409' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_110.QC.jpg'
55739e5e75d9783e7e262e184145cd0d
3b008457585d1a02af6ad572fc8c688490878c24
'2012-05-13T09:19:06-04:00'
describe
'10515256' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_110.tif'
e97cfddfa02a9f583e264c845e593bbd
9a65e37ec1034d638944cbfab736cc49fa99a385
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_110.txt'
fab44cce3e103fd23dd1ebac673a8a23
77bed6438dbbefd8d91553361050f70f7c6f8106
describe
'40591' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_110thm.jpg'
dd86f97e9519eab11399142cfee03f1d
7e2ebcd3c6501fb9d7b77f38f656df802383dbb4
'2012-05-13T09:23:31-04:00'
describe
'1104248' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_111.jp2'
7853e8008284776ae2984564a019133e
4266284836b5dae9e56ede259e4adc48000b98c4
describe
'123420' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_111.jpg'
1183715b64c3c6dc054b55796b328f7a
18c1e3c0674b6423951a83b2a8f46d6634627570
describe
'21224' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGRZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_111.pro'
5941b2d99ac8ec03c81ef6a62e87faca
ebe29be44edb31f99038b8bdf58449fd3f83418f
describe
'66595' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_111.QC.jpg'
a67562d2c5e31dbbf578a2ec03b77f9c
541ba4a8c1e73ad270c3055289f28abe85e7145e
describe
'10571628' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_111.tif'
e1c1b4c67d57ff5ac315b3123c1a45e0
864d999da51da03bdf914930182bdab7a6fa8b88
'2012-05-13T09:19:16-04:00'
describe
'810' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_111.txt'
992313e261151215230ca3c026d025da
f9a953b4484fe486d8e717ab9a78c520ce705895
describe
'38343' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_111thm.jpg'
a921a9ddf91f46df7b2fd898c04f21ee
77f9d5f218456f5ba6db268ea8404c5802156ec0
describe
'1226311' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_112.jp2'
3dfb7c41026e8a4de9d6757b72280420
a1b94bd59683ec23821221d9b288979b2580d9fc
describe
'130811' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_112.jpg'
a45f7f6e4b9d7caa595a6b7b4eddbcc5
401cee8c9250b3dd984890819a8d77a015ae5c47
describe
'21248' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_112.pro'
a3e64327222a003750d85fe4235b8133
0ef6f7d77d624ae0e8361b330a398e7b37d7f203
describe
'70509' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_112.QC.jpg'
2825c13aa2af8b096ad46f36bdb64686
4a676028432e0e7ba055ba87aa90592512f6c648
'2012-05-13T09:17:28-04:00'
describe
'10732412' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_112.tif'
3fb9a503bd51a4865c7583c4989a77c6
ba576ddd5a610f1dad0da537f57d43b4b5a0d875
describe
'821' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_112.txt'
30307ff40615df85e9b5baccd87a5c28
0493615c75e413cb1324ca3ab6751964cbc65a7e
describe
'41201' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_112thm.jpg'
41b5626f98b3764160171c5e156629cd
b4199cad9622de54566a4233afd498749d973948
describe
'1040346' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_113.jp2'
7f47851ed2d506c5fda458c2938e7e2a
bc80e5ebab7095979f5e006864ae7b0451918689
describe
'115873' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_113.jpg'
eef58ed892f90dae15dc5e3652535156
d245c63f7a603e4eedbb816e7b8d4d2926ef0f4f
describe
'19019' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_113.pro'
9577e5e2f3b60d5c330a9c4e8d8de3cf
a4a211a0c3161863bfb65bb2699199b5219d5b15
describe
'62293' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_113.QC.jpg'
ce2d09730b5979e467095ad524048f7d
47cbba30c103cae2908f1a8d5199eb7eb2158c79
describe
'10771852' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_113.tif'
9fb6255387d95b127902ea5c447743f0
477852891eca39c24f06c70041e81310985618a4
'2012-05-13T09:18:55-04:00'
describe
'748' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_113.txt'
bda45d3ca1be2ccb0cfbfc8daee489be
45de2beca44334bed06d33087420ade8a5bb36c4
'2012-05-13T09:16:36-04:00'
describe
'37972' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_113thm.jpg'
78658c07b346cda145d8041bf8c1d4b5
5f5c6b088a6e47a827629cf3f43176e8b46172a9
describe
'1238133' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_114.jp2'
9e62edcf80f601b221d9d0cdef766113
5729423468d2ba84088fcd108913e7ba660005f8
describe
'133913' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGST' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_114.jpg'
18a680e1b91eb55c99eb0c4dc7cc1881
443bf57af8f0c7bc8a9c365fb09d9eb9117fd003
describe
'22251' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_114.pro'
377485fc945459a73dad95c8b5af0e03
9c6814e73d10ce84cfc3f53eb3c922f7ba4e7a65
describe
'70439' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_114.QC.jpg'
e4b3426e074fab4bd89e2706626f6dda
fab1d4ad78a633bd5208ce546aeaee141b2867b5
'2012-05-13T09:20:14-04:00'
describe
'10886048' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_114.tif'
6e15bbda2a5780e40314f9a2405c3d1e
38e7800ca79e248e238d9917dc4294164bc2c8de
'2012-05-13T09:20:42-04:00'
describe
'854' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_114.txt'
055561db37eff159571d13bf387ec2e5
fac159720e635c11aa58410a59ec6cb3b2c7ec77
describe
'40835' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_114thm.jpg'
5d06a1ba919c18af3ee250188bfd7d10
00222ed2a4988284afd6d66b80de42a5bb0a62d4
describe
'1475359' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGSZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_115.jp2'
569e820d8de470b30e0386c8eaa83fc6
29b234e21fcd6e30237728ddce0d341fc270ae73
describe
'146516' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_115.jpg'
bee1f3bacb9094750441ec0b2978514d
2a05be10a7229d7b8477e15c119d4d490cbfa2df
describe
'8012' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_115.pro'
70ea9fc51126df992a79a6e4dd340137
eab5027f3a6bd793f4f041f42421b0d281760981
describe
'64903' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_115.QC.jpg'
62dec018387684b3b452c70780fadb6e
2d46a7def9496004d0fff08f0e9a484fd27cf6c7
describe
'11824488' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_115.tif'
d3f54c6f56177f883e3411096f59faad
3fe330125a8c48c7e5bbfacec236fb52dfa49250
'2012-05-13T09:23:17-04:00'
describe
'398' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_115.txt'
b42677a605bf6b4eabcfba165fe04b45
dc02011bb8a4b4fd4316d14f850d3c1ddce6c0e0
describe
'35620' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_115thm.jpg'
f746ff29806c96e52a8370ab9bea493e
053f87c58c47d80f58a921b33c989846150d9137
describe
'1235493' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_116.jp2'
99db998af8e78cec4ed10dfab00ad269
20e26854d99aadc9c29988603f37b2de90da0bed
describe
'132926' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_116.jpg'
c1ce12756f56ea6958e0fd296ea3e2a2
9a831a1f69a54a07766403df5bac32a991a7f2a1
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_116.pro'
5549012a5933335a34325593f3fe2ffb
3569f8a94cc46f35c0dde74bac2470bdce2444d0
describe
'71584' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_116.QC.jpg'
746ce95c50d4cee0442466159e2f4723
ca23dac919fbc774477da6e229534f449484547b
describe
'10614244' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_116.tif'
58cce07b6e079627d1439fde43b00c9e
9a5cb7040722e1e876236469b5783e60431d88fd
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_116.txt'
cd99cc7ac7b31258e92670a0b0d28742
a50ff94179220984c14572e9a00609bcf74da9eb
describe
'41230' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_116thm.jpg'
3e03bb74fdcbc3c6ba87dd94ccb2942e
2861e99cb3bd54596dcd8dba6358c6483e4565c1
describe
'1167752' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_117.jp2'
99af0f16f5c30ec54a6577fa043d99aa
132b50a105cdc6e3276b0f7fbae8257dbefd48fa
describe
'128086' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_117.jpg'
e5c2df8fdf62e39e849a1f354df58892
ad62f7662b0ca7c2e5099fb69cdfd3569852f280
describe
'22051' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_117.pro'
e9f7a590d78be893b9ad8130378a70f7
956fa6dd58615c27853940b5e55c37524da7c95d
describe
'68837' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_117.QC.jpg'
7ad1b879e49d3e22537511afa1f00b97
67462f7b3827357dc97a2a54d68427fe5985d649
describe
'10752516' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_117.tif'
21583c504a1dade2b230888d657cbe7d
18511c47b16c542e19f52d0f2ab157b34f168fa2
'2012-05-13T09:16:50-04:00'
describe
'849' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_117.txt'
4fbec9bef3b40f65a5b3846861817a83
ca82cd2bf2e3d6fe5eb36f3f60c0b96de7eead98
describe
'40782' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_117thm.jpg'
1acd69f774155a4ba717fa74d2298e24
c2aa750c89db35c2add0c6adf35fc6945c23051b
describe
'1214188' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_118.jp2'
66e8f2d4d16f8e88915af38276375344
dd79f7945a563f1547f3922391ab5be4092fca92
describe
'134975' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_118.jpg'
bd8dee55336686410a24ccd2418030d5
02487be739bd679025a6daccf6688f2a910fff37
describe
'22826' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_118.pro'
a49ce87d212c32145bd48d1c7c099e76
06021a3acc524f0ef543d2d648775102de99dfc5
describe
'71151' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_118.QC.jpg'
222d915b518da78024746a1fac9fac6d
bf48728c8968da886bdba774c8aef9b1dd567956
describe
'10416448' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_118.tif'
d285e66a26543c90fde5eb03e5c40a3c
dceeca9fa9dacbb8c952ab179d484309c51f42a8
describe
'869' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGTZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_118.txt'
7c0d4abe8254fcd8d4946aed0ad03504
47650c827ea73f555d9856608dfd50933daead64
describe
'40004' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_118thm.jpg'
2b4f83f3d68353c37777c70b74e0697f
2ec65e7b10b7b7f25004642f53affb36094305a0
'2012-05-13T09:16:26-04:00'
describe
'1295776' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_119.jp2'
355d5c2bcbedd99b6d04aa82c3c70ba2
af44c067519b437e3fae598d5bbb37d571ae6558
describe
'132469' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_119.jpg'
854082f4a664eba9f5401d3309d645b7
1d8eb388783b15f0c67fb3d4fc85c15fb84c5ed1
'2012-05-13T09:16:09-04:00'
describe
'23196' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_119.pro'
a55a4be448e7e69d643392a3c040fe7a
14df10b460fd4d6eb70f90567cd7104e7c0f5792
describe
'70343' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_119.QC.jpg'
1d0805e980582b4c01b1f8a40b714de9
989a647806539401b813cb82fe7650bfab25cd0f
describe
'11187396' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_119.tif'
b04f7274eafe21c3b85a4b532868f11c
b1be97c22ebe0d86ffe8b5e10800db0be72b0676
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_119.txt'
75caffcfd95ef7c596c2ed52a57e78e9
47a85440776026b2d56b18e129c3134748273fae
describe
'41679' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_119thm.jpg'
300186915bf97959c67bb2199094741a
8813760fab8f57364ad79ac5ce7d58f265e78741
describe
'1290383' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_120.jp2'
534dcf751ca90402c35fe088f44d7b81
3571e96062f6c05ac368475d78fd26596a71435b
describe
'132090' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_120.jpg'
2fe9fbe6ac7427940e61bea89982748e
957f0d7db80b5e29a90b178647d919f1e7aeffc3
describe
'22376' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_120.pro'
c575f6247a5a1b1159aa7181bbdde3c7
f22df4121328e8b9f9d901db2e40407a8187171a
describe
'69686' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_120.QC.jpg'
e361cab1837c2031c19eeada0719c1e5
38a109eb3ff826cc206eccef1f8294b259974571
describe
'11187676' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_120.tif'
8866091b77a513fc3428aef62f17863e
d79cd817c03fab2f94a061f4b51bb8f0e22bce62
'2012-05-13T09:17:22-04:00'
describe
'886' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_120.txt'
0a65e406bc700a7799f8be4f33c1c17f
789f26cea277e0e51c5b2e9bffd4850ac2ddb89c
describe
'42254' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_120thm.jpg'
c3dcb6e81346506bbc714086a838b9e4
d436a26c16bbc4ae90b9b19d74bf5486d06c3b60
describe
'1213646' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_121.jp2'
82e1e5d934df2684ca7fb581cc4505f2
db55c45bcfb7d66a73e00ba8705f2d9feb45c4a7
describe
'131891' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_121.jpg'
f60621e4beb5a97026a07c9584b7996e
32831b4479c21fd9b60365ae4ca5869fbd811cff
describe
'22439' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_121.pro'
b258e5c0af4e805c988988362eb94d01
451fd1b60634d4cefc9cf54d889eb4c708ff9ee9
describe
'69245' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_121.QC.jpg'
668126c9295d6cd97e71ffd11f4d62a8
915fbbbe118d7662826536d6df50eb5e7ca2d026
'2012-05-13T09:15:50-04:00'
describe
'10752196' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_121.tif'
963e3e3190c6f923fe0e5d5f24bfc854
00a376d9ea59ce2402c032071acaeae5c2eefff2
describe
'857' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_121.txt'
944a5438f9399bc7bfa0b95aa2fefff3
8f8bf7eb315e8b34156beb456dcd397a44b30ffa
describe
'40446' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_121thm.jpg'
3991d6f671e518c2942f4e57bfdacfbc
94f1b787362b318fb18e8505d742a047211475f7
'2012-05-13T09:16:23-04:00'
describe
'1294693' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_122.jp2'
86c0a5c35b13443307b2771269fb52f7
a37a68d97ba812c922dc5f5f209feb1c19e2164a
describe
'138980' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_122.jpg'
4f81a51c4782c36defb27d04365d42d3
af867d9cf722dada06f86b58a8fc64c0e1adf383
describe
'23352' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_122.pro'
0d45b86725411792501d567a2dc44288
72c83e1973e74974afeee4255f223db5e0894f42
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGUZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_122.QC.jpg'
9177a8d2d3e72da1820b728afd5ae6ad
9bb74bdf5b5a8ffb38f5506f3121ed4c64461f67
describe
'10713136' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_122.tif'
6c7827d24c34939a2fd1323e123e36d0
1097bf96fa4b5045e6f6e943dad1876505684176
'2012-05-13T09:20:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_122.txt'
c415fb6c7e7c490e11b57279504dc7d1
0529104982e30dfa0f9813cf5d368b43ef0ad191
'2012-05-13T09:15:31-04:00'
describe
'41790' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_122thm.jpg'
0b0df424270c23ae84671ce520db3000
9b52db07bd89c53532d227e0d45e38562920775e
describe
'1345180' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_123.jp2'
cdac4baa0b5119cc41f9f5e6dfa68d33
2f6c9048df9ddac4ad2f24f2845c80718e3495d5
describe
'139395' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_123.jpg'
ab9ed4e103363cd41bec3c0837d5bbe9
71ae1c203260ffa194dc855bc107108cd48e7802
describe
'23472' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_123.pro'
fe76583981c79bfd103d9c23463d80dd
f744bbbda66285185dc9789f157af3a818840fdc
'2012-05-13T09:15:17-04:00'
describe
'73813' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_123.QC.jpg'
d8ce960e22f0503bedf758e17b5f7596
6115f6cf9365a7bf9b2f8e1070c1e308d1434400
'2012-05-13T09:17:32-04:00'
describe
'11187832' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_123.tif'
2f37136ef34d36e2d46f86cd12ad1fb3
5c04ffe97ace69bc04d206f05772cbccb3c66b68
describe
'896' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_123.txt'
cd94f7a22322698ae03f1adc2e1c19de
01eb271fdf3234a2583c4258dc44a09841cc9068
describe
'43006' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_123thm.jpg'
11e919efdd061596a9ff6100858e9d12
11a4722d85243c1c11658fea4f083ab8daeafabb
describe
'1033517' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_124.jp2'
7428ef20114ba29633f54fc98f634694
91fd34cdca8ec159ef16730905f7b93b7f1bb254
describe
'118874' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_124.jpg'
1316f6218c18eae3ad5e8e19ce694752
59a4858edb2a0292036afa2d9969d12ae9a26611
describe
'19952' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_124.pro'
524ec70cf99578a79e701a02245ecc2e
ed645b43f731441935abaca229ba7f60668d1ecb
describe
'63974' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_124.QC.jpg'
17c735b763f97237aac6bee051e29a46
ab393937dcc8bb201b3ec52e1a3ddd502986cdb1
describe
'10435660' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_124.tif'
56a74206e7f04e2d440cc3cfeacdac56
142e3b9a22376ea4474dde6c23d48243151183ab
describe
'779' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_124.txt'
746860e668ccca8ae3965709404deb2d
3a10754e6ace5623e89e905ac33986de990bfae8
describe
'37435' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_124thm.jpg'
93297b2b3f3f5caf9f5f365b88487243
631e9b79b3cda39c1a46835a5e7ffb19e22bb5bf
describe
'1238089' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_125.jp2'
c82db9b87fa05f7832bd39dbc9c672e4
9c1d406c97992078aa8542dbe0747559f0b59020
describe
'134011' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_125.jpg'
325c40a09ba2fdcbed55a68196d1d924
3b08a7148aa934172d18b0c89225f9b13556435d
describe
'22418' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_125.pro'
02db7d4bd0ed90db1536d4a869cd5c7c
91cd049bfdd5dd01a0251fd9e7900276ab6f2955
describe
'70277' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_125.QC.jpg'
f3c367816b326d1afd644262222f1f8f
edd41ba3b079aeeb68669e6b2ff4f301c458584b
describe
'10851144' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_125.tif'
5d3532e99a80944641a9c296a28ecb70
fd48a16b185406d0f88e0b4fef8776c431c4a024
'2012-05-13T09:19:35-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_125.txt'
f0c80d9977c50e9694c979ae2afb94f1
d2c8dad453e32d738daf24f412fe8272c5bd4ee1
describe
'40830' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_125thm.jpg'
3df60cec2a977a9c64c04c4a96da6b53
dd5e7abc51123f78e12b332a51bb0af0c0ba10b2
describe
'1248917' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_126.jp2'
7f5e1737b3d2a93f4b51b05f05f12793
c8c88a288074353bfb17cc05c1efa70f343e6ae1
describe
'131202' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGVZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_126.jpg'
946a64fee5d1973da611ef15571509ba
ba38acc6718813ca70eadf9ed12af84eb5940ab8
describe
'21810' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_126.pro'
9c72841872b3522ba866f9dd561d742c
2239783f01f9177c2f257690eb63dcb3ef98dff2
describe
'68798' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_126.QC.jpg'
f40e7239089582dd90a6ae46b5a875b2
3dc665d23fe14b13dbabf4a8a05241a721b6220c
describe
'11066208' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_126.tif'
b96a26f4e5a69f45085b9f815e3fd207
666ba9931154bbec3ae8ff3cc300dc95c1a13732
describe
'900' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_126.txt'
911ef24880c2eb2ee35b6feaa7a73e56
1216248da8c328f335e2d0a36c8d2b280f55f914
'2012-05-13T09:15:57-04:00'
describe
'41328' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_126thm.jpg'
2a9ee9c578c15722429a5b8120c6c702
c5118cc7cf629038b2c8d9551ef2a64040716f2a
describe
'1186172' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_127.jp2'
744cede76d77b7d86625aa3226a91e34
ab814167f1db55011c4225e084c1aa2769da65b4
describe
'129431' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_127.jpg'
da1a233157c3892e8947425f82ff639f
fb4284bb0a78157a22d1b1fce6df07f16df1b775
describe
'21354' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_127.pro'
619bfd1e7ba8df82001c53534050e81a
78663f1f07712a52aac246295ff63743b4fb2087
describe
'68942' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_127.QC.jpg'
ab0fd089e039f08437aa96534c568ad9
642983b5cd722d0976b6cae1bd5997c71c5a3c00
'2012-05-13T09:23:04-04:00'
describe
'10757088' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_127.tif'
acc975857a26f1782ead542fd95b7b33
a26a1143160c44d60844020f1b75440871a09587
'2012-05-13T09:16:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_127.txt'
bad5f395b577dc1c0df19b09e7b284f2
b4f3df6e746f7815cd98caf017871d1f01ef7454
describe
'39863' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_127thm.jpg'
d03572d13ebed00258f4bc13cec5c2c9
51e016904a5ce4ada3856fe77b42ee4ba8d4e0bd
describe
'1191739' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_128.jp2'
f4f4636ae05470057bcc31c3b97cbb7f
0a5c253162a48a603b62a71261d1b1d9b85be0bc
describe
'131743' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_128.jpg'
7d83cae739647979496227a40ec0634f
9f6bb1ccf53506b1f157b03d17cc8fde47b46b89
describe
'22092' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_128.pro'
a74c883e477a04f48a1ece9e9b48b719
ee59bff74a62f9ce8131fbd6acdaee8b0d8b3a15
describe
'70618' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_128.QC.jpg'
0bf5a3fb9471fef9929f84be15feb8a3
a6df247f611f14d813001768ba127e75391cde38
describe
'10495136' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_128.tif'
5038f0bade891fcf660846e1d02b392e
98c5a7ae162d20ebe5ed8118d33fff438aca5120
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_128.txt'
451c0061e19fca71bdb03f9bcef7983d
06c1ec6880c1c60858d823085a07e8f2c8f6b1f6
describe
'39687' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_128thm.jpg'
17b8ef1dc15379ac74df00ecb3759eca
a09c152dd6404556784fefa4ba5c3037c673bcbb
describe
'1066439' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_129.jp2'
fa2c4291aedf8b6dce4c23b87dc92dcf
398d945f9d8cbf3ed8be69973546bdbccb1d922d
describe
'116404' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_129.jpg'
c1d6c398f61f7a259fbb6b6f64412f24
3639e2e0f64f97205ba05dda9bce249bf30ed122
describe
'18485' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_129.pro'
e21cbdd9e524c679f2382d790ed588d8
012a068c597e525d33dc2af561b81e65d51e675c
'2012-05-13T09:20:48-04:00'
describe
'62648' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_129.QC.jpg'
4fa1f7ff8a2b1e6665a9e5d290f97165
e73d703081c5b15c6c8b098640337a40479791cf
describe
'10830556' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_129.tif'
621d54cfe5f11cf2ceb1d1a7f572aeea
c4873d862f286193dd470a4d3e9e60977b83faf9
'2012-05-13T09:20:03-04:00'
describe
'727' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_129.txt'
b16f4ee89bd1effc8c9dfb6008c852c7
f80b16613aab529e44ba6c317cd1b1c7f25b7fc1
'2012-05-13T09:17:11-04:00'
describe
'37750' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGWZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_129thm.jpg'
e8260fc00d989c3c324397e1081d0036
69779d3a9b2938e3661dad30c29e7f7cf13789e3
describe
'1175041' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_130.jp2'
abd0956c0f045473447ab568398fc91d
b68c3b2d783f597505cd5a8f2018d619e1a65b0a
'2012-05-13T09:16:17-04:00'
describe
'129936' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_130.jpg'
e9956a23526b3160a7dfd5387a301bbb
78376d0f99a0166e5d9bd87f2d66863b18ba2d82
describe
'21871' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_130.pro'
7d22d50674cc42749b8b259106364c61
358495d84e7d63ad3c066ace9b87b274f9f65f60
describe
'70610' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_130.QC.jpg'
2f67651a9e5178662dc26dcd9692fc2d
3004fc78c5591fdd5df85f7ac84dc2c7fc880e9c
describe
'10418944' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_130.tif'
1d49d17c6fb44e60575f96d02959f38b
09c41609a8daf14e85af57c6503a59d4c9a09ec9
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_130.txt'
1a0df7c1ad7ce944a3232abcd2311040
6070af47a54afbe76900db8b03b8239e1c05c749
'2012-05-13T09:17:53-04:00'
describe
'39770' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_130thm.jpg'
0c5b67d2b5ea3c3f63fdc4487d5049e1
fd7a37af5507fabd8ca51f59d59f090678f1f525
describe
'1360676' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_131.jp2'
2903324c096576ac44c5a4ca2e25e4d4
384a1224d953e26fed2fe75b580920718080fefd
describe
'147951' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_131.jpg'
b6b707a43f7ba6decad7ff36ab32402a
d5b4e83daedaebdeae1122b7bd6da40d5408d502
describe
'4638' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_131.pro'
9a772236c2508552d30aac0b7b72b915
dd5f3515a7ba23867881ed6281ee4c3ef90d31c1
describe
'63177' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_131.QC.jpg'
79811fd5e86f290334949f4deca03d8a
42c59e2b10d35addfea97bfd4325b4eeda2cda16
describe
'10907324' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_131.tif'
ccf4ddfd1fb0e5429b985f48352f9596
133e4106bc7a9092dae1a287448c3e16484600d0
describe
'185' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_131.txt'
387711bfbea7500311870ccad028f2f4
6fee3e139f146a0076a595ef5916ba9376b3aaf8
describe
'34748' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_131thm.jpg'
bd887c42c45ca46d0dc75c89d3219db2
3da3638faf2ba0fd136359fabf3496c1c5c15c84
describe
'726778' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_132.jp2'
35082a4490807ead41b2a8fa87022488
380b72c628a759a6f7c6ca2012302c8d9fb9eac3
describe
'100745' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_132.jpg'
29a7d1d57198a9626ccdc299188afe39
e46743005636fabedf9f18bcb8d36c0a56c80339
describe
'14678' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_132.pro'
b992a62c7b20453527e1720b51d0be03
a37de49971b5f75a31bec9629ccf59d944cc05e8
describe
'49772' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_132.QC.jpg'
746082478d3dfd5b93e3181856261fb4
9c7d8dfd3277ce371696e03615e96ff79d8f5c31
describe
'8098124' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_132.tif'
b14f2c6809baf923e8e2e7a82c417def
496606f5cfffd8de4f7ae8061e19b2e1790c4784
'2012-05-13T09:18:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_132.txt'
14be876d07525da3a33d653538ada019
06aefbd20b3256814e5154c64157f05d5dd4a2ba
describe
'30782' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_132thm.jpg'
8e4f0813b035d448598f63a5b354aeb2
15f47a11f02afef7b180526f93ed4c3716b497de
describe
'1009709' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_133.jp2'
ff74a27954421ac8daea71f8870a13ea
842a18c03ba1360dbe3a69c0cb9e015ea3729cb4
describe
'219359' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_133.jpg'
e2bd3aba7a6c78c6d0cba6a39b34c16a
704c8a3b8f4981e8a2a6bb786fdbd02ff64a7cec
describe
'52760' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_133.pro'
ee90f58e21f58767f339905da1f58cae
53c0ac4243a448bd06686aaff8b6d8c50d9ea4f0
describe
'83171' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_133.QC.jpg'
f49aa796a3ef7a6dea1e38608bb03506
4a9fc3ad76519d3e1bb51ecdbed9c3d4a1a90170
describe
'8099856' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGXZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_133.tif'
40aef7abcddae4146831b747fa39f7f6
c0469b01f663e2e3829bdae40fd01bd012d04b52
describe
'2342' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_133.txt'
ec7587e8f21ff273bd01d07a0201d89b
d9c07a89243d4e21e6eae70f0b1cc9793d974281
describe
'39719' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYB' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_133thm.jpg'
d9b4627d99faf6678c2ca8058b841d1d
bbbdb0fc69701d4462ef832e4f554f0fc4fdb564
describe
'1009683' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYC' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_134.jp2'
6f92e169411c3030ab6e4cdcc4c2463b
8a82346c98ac0752412a2c771341ac359b24b46c
describe
'240487' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYD' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_134.jpg'
6b3803e15be74277ffb728193f909429
371b1508dbb03b22ce8008e90d0a68c495cb3a5d
'2012-05-13T09:16:14-04:00'
describe
'59425' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYE' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_134.pro'
584fc65fbd004897841d4b7330e98e1c
81cb9e1cdf763818f2f9245fb4cdb39a192fc34c
describe
'88201' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYF' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_134.QC.jpg'
09d32473205bca3347c51d5416688620
04589bbf0016b5f5843557e62c731f02af0916e0
describe
'8100760' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYG' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_134.tif'
89510185ba4db4a0093423b6851650a8
a15bd5378f63d8fbf40063bf43dd5da93cf7d77a
describe
'2548' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYH' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_134.txt'
8a81698a69533b021179a177ec3d4229
3411344f3b1a66e17094adec569aa2432c1f2e14
describe
'41051' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYI' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_134thm.jpg'
b146ca8557cc3c3e5d2fdf7f2e0b1861
87ad3caddbd859d7103775dda55f6ab5b5f69838
describe
'1009701' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYJ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_135.jp2'
95ffac6526f1a7fd2d105561b7689898
241283c5d496b99443045de1ba1c28e5ccf26e72
describe
'162231' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYK' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_135.jpg'
1f717f89603de7ec5d2d5eee3370c4f9
3a02d72b71bc9edeb06f6ab41a20a1f83cda9cfc
describe
'34106' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYL' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_135.pro'
0137afda08bb9a96965c3f166db72d45
d329a75bf78e83bd030da5baca74fdc972845b4e
describe
'68831' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYM' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_135.QC.jpg'
1d8e631b17d17804c1a475205c6eb0c8
1a057338281e05a49ae0d6ae79b1c8dfd75ea7a1
describe
'8099384' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYN' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_135.tif'
6ed94ca8bfda4fca564576435ded455e
20124ca4b76b57210dea5a6b0522650a16156c35
describe
'1602' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYO' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_135.txt'
743915132b321bc0295a77955a82ca68
d58f53ed1f940077ec6ad85dd90fe62a35beaaa8
describe
'37471' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYP' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_135thm.jpg'
59f02bd9a5249d569ac586c31d43eb75
de9d3d8272d85e38d6a92e78f39f7881ee9fbbc0
describe
'1009719' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYQ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_136.jp2'
aa25e2b7f1ade12379527e594ef45eea
980f27f1b44faf811e28cf0620e9f078e55a976e
describe
'199721' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYR' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_136.jpg'
bcfcdb094e8f81a2fcc11e72fe787e1d
34f572cd92d8db768f1868aaf66a2be6aa4a3b2e
describe
'46758' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYS' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_136.pro'
b3e55341d9413b0b4b1a68c7c74202b9
a11d59715e2c7d610575205f5155cf918e5fc52f
describe
'77713' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYT' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_136.QC.jpg'
8a9c8518a8fb9f74ba0deb0aca938dc0
ad35cd327c163f563eaf359d62dc73e36102c226
describe
'8099616' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYU' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_136.tif'
73f8101a71564eb9d442b6c296c917a5
ecd52b51c7df1d76dcddfd3905e41968095d68ec
describe
'2059' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYV' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_136.txt'
11b013efe41f014f2fa15cfdf339389d
680cc066a833434512419313e0d56a2f63e05015
describe
'38572' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYW' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_136thm.jpg'
3091ba853acadda1c69b6141f3d07f33
3969dd73c227137a0b6ff058bf3a7d5b015568b2
describe
'1009136' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYX' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_137.jp2'
ebb0401c14c2316386098c568a7689ee
1f8239921c2127ed0f67348a3d0fad5ac0a9dcfe
describe
'203008' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYY' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_137.jpg'
de069163daab4e4d9bf794085a5b015c
694b4bab4915f090a70c7133b678ca11ccc36865
describe
'47789' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGYZ' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_137.pro'
adc66823b681c63ba41ad56c710076cb
3f01b634b66cdfc5a733c9f280ee19fae3f5cb61
describe
'79528' 'info:fdaE20091225_AAAAPNfileF20091225_AACGZA' 'sip-filesBinder1_Page_137.QC.jpg'
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E DREAM CHINTZ.




TP Pa


THE DREAM CHINTZ;

BY THE AUTHOR OF.
“A TRAP TO CATCH A SUNBEAM,”
“OLD JOLLIFFE,” &c.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY JAMES GODWIN.

LONDON:
W. N. WRIGHT, 60, PALL-MALL,

BOOKSELLER TO THE QUEEN,

1851.
Pind

-

PRINTED BY W. NICOL, 60, PALI. MALL.
TO
MY DEAR SISTER,
TO WHOSE KIND ENCOURAGEMENT
I AM DEEPLY INDEBTED,
THIS LITTLE STORY
IS AFFECTIONATELY AND GRATEFULLY

DEDICATED.
A CuintTz pattern having been designed
from the recollections of a dream, is a
fact. The circumstance was related to
the Author by an old and valued friend,
and the really so called “ Dream Chintz,”
which obtained an extraordinary popu-
larity, may probably yet live in the

memory of many an Octogenarian.
ILLUSTRATIONS BY JAMES GODWIN.

TITLE. ENGRAVER.

FRONTISPIECE. ; , . Dalziel.
HucGu anp WALTER . . . Mason Jackson.
FamILy AT PRAYERS . . Mason Jackson.
Firtinc Water's Basket . Dalziel,
Hucu’s Reverie. . . Daiziel.
BirtH or THE New YEAR , Dalziel.
MARGARET AND WALTER . Hammond.

. WALTER AND GRAVE-DIGGER . Mason Jackson.
MARGARET AND HER FATHER Mason Jackson.
WALTER ON HIS JOURNEY ; Dalziel.

TAIL-PIECE . . . Measom.
land glade is


9 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

minated by a stream of light from a moon
shining with all the lustre of a summer night,
though its rays glisten on the crystal gems,
which the frost has hung amongst the leafless
trees. There is a stillness round, “ Earth seems
hushed in an Angel’s lap into a breathless
sleep so still—that we can only say of things,
they be.”

Suddenly the silence is broken by footsteps
trampling on the fallen leaves, which, rendered
crisp by the frost, make a low crunching sound
and tell tales of intruders in that silent glade.
Voices murmur softly, and parting the branches
which have overgrown the path, two beings
emerge into the moonlight. One is a tall
gaunt lad of about fifteen, with long legs
which seem so weak and slender, that they
bend beneath his weight. His fair hair hangs
loose upon his shoulders, and in his large blue
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 3

eyes there is a strange wild expression, yet so
joyous, that his shuffling gait seems at variance
with the brightness of his face, and the buoy-
ancy of his manner. His companion is some
ten years his senior, and, though his counte-
nance beams with intelligence, there is such
deep sorrow and care in its every line, that it
forms a striking contrast to the«lad by his
side.

“ Hush!” said the latter, holding up his
finger, “talk very gently or we shall frighten
them away; do you see that ring there on the
grass, that’s where they dance, look Hugh.”

“T see,” answered Hugh, “ but,” he con-
tinued smiling, “it is very cold for Fairies, I
think they will scarcely come out such weather.”

“Pshaw!” answered the boy impatiently,

Fairies do not think about weather, they
will come I tell you;” he said, holding up his
4. THE DREAM CHINTZ.

finger and speaking in a decided manner, “ they
come on New Year’s Eve to tell what they
have all been doing during the past year, and
receive from their Queen fresh orders for the
next. Oh! they are such good little things,
so industrious, so kind, and they do help people
so —help them out of all their troubles, at least
those people who deserve it, such as try to get
on themselves, and to help one another, and
that are kind to birds and beasts and insects —
for do you know THEY are sometimes Fairies
themselves. I would not tread on a worm or
hurt, indeed, any insect for the world.”

‘*No poor boy,” said his companion kindly
patting him on the shoulder, —‘‘ you would
not harm anything I know.”

“Hush!” exclaimed the boy, interrupting
him, as the moon which had been shadowed by
a cloud broke forth again, “ don’t speak, there

they are!”
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 5

Again the same kind, yet sceptical smile stole
over the young man’s face; but he ceased
speaking in obedience to the boy’s command.
There was a moment’s pause, and then Walter
said in a low, eager whisper, with his large eyes
distended and fixed upon the Fairies’ ring —

“That's the Queen with her bright crown,
and see how she is giving diadems to all those
who have been at work all the long year; —
now wait, and you'll see all those go away, and
she will call others to her and tell them what
they must do. Some she sends to the sick,
some to the poor, some to the wretched, and
then on New Year’s day, if they have done
well and minded all her orders, she lets them
stay in Fairy land always, and gives them
jewelled crowns like her own, only not quite
so bright. Those outside the ring, with their
wings drooping and no crowns on their heads,
6 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

are such as have done mischief in the world in-
stead of good. They are all banished; she will
not have them in her bright land, do you see?
Now stay Hugh, in a moment you'll see all
those who are going on their different errands
fly away — look! look! there they go. Hark!
what a rushing sound their wings make.”

And, gazing up into the blue vault of
Heaven, he pointed to a light feathery cloud
which was scudding along, and then slightly
shuddering, he put his arm through his friend’s,
and said,

“We will go if you like now — it is cold.”

Hugh who had been standing by his side in
silent abstraction for some moments, roused by
the boy’s action answered,

“Yes, Walter, my boy, it is indeed cold, we
are very silly to stay here at all. Let us go.”

_And again they pushed their way through the
THE DREAM CHINTZ 7

branches, which had laced themselves toge-
ther in an almost impassable barrier across the
pathway, and walked on at a quick pace.

“You are not silly,” said the boy, as if
suddenly recollecting the last speech, “I am
silly, — people call me so, but do you know I
think they are much more so, for they often
cry and are miserable, and some of them
quarrel and fight, and spend all their money so
that they starve, but I don’t. I’m never miser-
able—I never cry, or quarrel or fight, and
keep all my money in a money box,” he added
in a whisper, and then bursting into a bright
musical laugh, said, “ that’s wise isn’t it — not
silly ?” |

“True, dear. Walter, true; would that you
could instil such wisdom into those who,
‘wise in their own conceit,’ call you silly, —

could make me, boy, amongst the rest, pos-
8 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

sessor of half your cheerful spirit — your pure
faith, which nothing doubting goes on its way
rejoicing, believing of good to come, however
dark and gloomy the present may be.”

Half in soliloquy had this been uttered, for
Hugh knew the entire sense of such a speech
could not reach the darkened understanding of
his half-witted companion— but in part he
was mistaken, for the boy replied immediately,
as'though the import of the words, at least, he
understood.

‘‘ It is the Fairies’ doing, they make Walter
such a merry boy, they used to rock my cradle
when I was a poor sick baby, and could not
sleep; and would come and scare away the
goblins that used to grin at me. Oh! I was
never frightened when the Fairies were with
me — and they used to whisper to me in the

still night, and promise me they would never
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 9

let me want, and never let me be miserable —
and have they not kept their word? Ain't I
a happy boy? Oh! they do take such care of
me.

“ Do you not think it is some One, higher
and mightier, who takes care of you, Wal-
ter ?”

“Eh?” said the boy staring vacantly at
him. ‘Oh! Yes, you mean God, whom Father
and Margaret kneel to, and say prayers to.
Yes, I know, Margaret says He lets me
see the Fairies to make me contented and
happy — for that she cannot see them; but
I don’t quite understand about that. Oh! did
you see that hare hop past,” he continued
with his voice restored to its usual gay tone,
“ what a pity they kill them isn’t it?— We are
just at home now, are we not ?”

They were descending a somewhat steep
10 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

hill, which led to the village, and the fires
were gleaming through some of the cottage
windows, looking a cheering welcome from the
sharp cold night. The tower of the Church
was illuminated by the moon till each pane of
glass looked like an opal; the old, old
Church, in which were monuments of noble
knights and high born ladies of centuries ago,
their effigies upon their tombs and their names
so effaced, by the ruthless hand of Time, as to
afford full scope for Antiquaries to suppose
them any one they pleased. There too was
recorded how “ beneath this stone’ lay some
wealthy lord —of later date; “and his lady
and infant son,” and by the side of their
tablet graven with care, and bearing above it
the arms of the noble family, was the plain
stone, which the village mason had chiselled
telling how death had laid low, “Thomas
THE DREAM CHINTZ. ll

Ditton, many years blacksmith of this parish,
also Ruth his wife.” In the churchyard
were tombstones mouldering away, and others
gleaming forth in the moonlight, just erected. —
And here and there the neatly kept graves of
some, whose friends were too poor to raise a
stone above their resting place — only a little
rustic cross planted in the low mound to mark
the spot ; their names and their good deeds
engraven alone on the hearts of those they had
left behind.

Hugh and his poor friend lived very near the
church. Hugh’s house came first and when
he approached it, he said, —

“Shall I go on with you, Walter, or can you
go by yourself ?”

“Qh! by myself— Margaret never shuts
the shutters till her Walter comes home, that
he may see the light twinkle, and when I get
12 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

just about here, I sing and she opens the door
her own dear se}f, and waits for me. Stay
now and you'll see” — he said, as they arrived
at Hugh’s cottage, and he began a low wild
air with an exquisite melody, which he sang
in that bright, beautiful voice peculiar to boys.
Truly as he said, he had uttered but a bar,
when the door opened quickly, and a figure
waiting, stood revealed by the red light of a
large fire, cold and keen though the wind
blew. The boy went on at a quick pace
still chaunting his wild song, and Hugh con-
tinued watching him, — for it was very touch-
ing that scene, the moon’ bathing the village
in its flood of cold, clear light—the open
cottage. door with that young girlish figure
standing there to welcome her poor simple
brother, —- and his sweet voice sounding in

the still night and fading gradually away —
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 13

was beautiful to see and hear, at any rate
Hugh seemed to think so, for he stood there
after the door was closed, and until the shutters
were closed too and the cottage hidden in
darkness ; — then with a heavy sigh he entered
his own dwelling.

We will follow Walter.— There was indeed
a cheering blaze to welcome and to warm him ;
a wood fire threw its ruddy glow over the
room, which was large, commodious, and com-
fortably furnished. It was carpeted all over
with a dark crimson drugget, a round table
stood in the centre of the room, of mahogany
with strange twisted legs, covered with Mar-
garet’s work and some books and papers;
against the wall, which was hung with a gaily
patterned paper stood another table, on which
was arranged some old china, several shells

and some stuffed birds in a glass case; this
14 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

too was of mahogany, with distorted limbs, ~
Over the mantel piece, which was loaded with
old china also, was a kind of panorama of
Windsor, and about the room were several
portraits of the Royal Family, — everything
being profusely decorated with mistletoe and
holly. An arm chair bearing the same date
as the tables stood close to the fire, — the
sides of the hearth were Dutch tiles, and
large iron dogs supported the logs of wood
which were blazing and crackling so cheerily,
the rug, was composed of coloured cloth sewn
together, and on it lay a large Persian cat, an
eight day clock filled one corner of the room,
and a corner cupboard the other, through the
glazed doors of which glittered a quantity of
glass and china. — Both these articles were
also of mahogany, and might have served the

most coquettish young lady for a mirror—
THE DREAM CHINTZ, 15

over the door which opened to the road, and
across the window, were drawn crimson cur-
tains, and another door partially open revealed
a bed-room, seemingly furnished with as much
comfort as the sitting room; beyond this was
the kitchen, divided from it only by a smalk
passage in which were the stairs leading to the
upper rooms.

As the boy entered and his sister closed
and barred the door after him, and drew over
it the curtain which completely excluded the
keen air; an old man came from the inner
room and seating himself in the arm-chair
held out his hand to Walter:—he took it
directly, and then sitting down on the floor at
his father’s feet, he lifted the cat into his lap
and began to fondle it.

“ Well, Walter, love,” said his sister coming
up to him, and removing the wraps she had
16 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

enveloped him in before he went out, “ did
you see them ?”

“Qh yes! Margaret— numbers and num-
bers — here listen,” and drawing down her
beautiful head to a level with his mouth, he
whispered something to her. She disengaged
herself hurriedly from him with a flushed face,
and left the room to “ put away his things,”
she said. She was soon back and on her
return the old man said, —

“ Prayers and bed, Margaret.”

“ Yes, Father.”

Quickly and neatly she folded and put away
her work, the books and papers, pushed the
table near her Father, lighted two candles in
massive plated candlesticks, extinguished a small
lamp at which she had been working, opened a
large Bible and rang a little hand bell on the

shelf; at its summons appeared an elderly
INTZ.

=
a
<

THE DR

In-

ess and pla

in

h the cleanl

it

woman dressed w

times, when servants took a

se old

!

of tho

ness


18 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

pride in their honest service and liked to look
like a servant and not a would-be-lady.

Prayers, Hetty,” said Margaret.

‘Very well, Miss.”

She closed the inner door and seated herself
at a respectful distance from her master and
mistress. Margaret took a chair opposite to
her father and beckoned Walter to her, he
laid down the cat, and coming to her knelt
close beside her, nestling his head on her
bosom like a child.

This little family was a source of continual
gossip and conversation in the village. For old
Ford was as universally disliked, as his inte-
resting children were liked. He was feared too
by one and all, so that few visitors ever crossed
his threshold, to enliven the long winter, or
add to the enjoyment of the delicious summer.

He was very clever, very morose, spoke seldom,
THE DREAM CHINTZ, 19

always in short sentences, and always sternly,
save to his daughter. In her seemed centred
all the good in his disposition ; all tenderness,
all devotion, all affection in his nature, he
poured forth lavishly on this his idol. He was
kind to the boy, at least he tried to be, but
it always appeared an effort to him, not so his
love for his daughter that was his one absorb-
ing thought.

His youth had been devoted to obtaining
independence, so it was said at least,—as a
young man he had scarcely permitted himself
the necessaries of life, out of every penny he
got he saved a half-penny, and continued this
course of saving till by some extraordinary
chance he married. There was a mystery
about his marriage as there was about him
altogether, he was an enigma no one could

solve. And how his young and pretty wife
20 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

came to marry him no one could tell— at any
rate he was kind to her; he did not stint her,
though he continued his own system of ab-
stinence —that was a confirmed habit — he
went on the “even tenour” of his way, still
making and saving money (he was an opti-
cian by trade) until his wife’s death, — that
he took calmly, dispassionately as he did every
thing else—~wore mourning the accustomed
time, but was never seen to weep or heard to
lament ; — nor was he more moved when told
the infant she had left showed symptoms, when
two years old, of a weak intellect.

Every one said he must be made of stone —
that he loved nothing, was incapable of feeling
an earthly passion — but they were strangers.
They saw not how love, the deepest most
engrossing love, shone out of his pale grey

eyes upon the little fairy who played about his
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 21

dwelling, his lovely little girl, how tears — aye
tears — would roll down his cheek, tears of
admiration and of love as he watched her care
of her simple brother. For her he altered his
style of living and made his little dwelling as
comfortable as he could, too much he loved
her, for in the creature he forgot the Creator.
As she grew up she was good and dutiful to
him, but she had not that affection in her heart
for him, which would repay his unbounded love
— this had been his bane through life. He had
never inspired a responsive attachment; no, as
he loved her, she loved her brother. Oh! who
can doubt the One great power, who reflects
for an instant on the wonderful ordering of
events, the unerring wisdom and mercy with
which the back is fitted to the burden, the wind
tempered to the shorn lamb. The idiot boy
had no mother — but God had raised in his
22 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

sister’s heart a love as pure and strong, a
devotion as unselfish, as untiring. He had
sent him forth in the world without intellect,
but He had supplied its place with a happy
joyous spirit, which led him along a bright
and flowery path, where he neither knew nor
understood danger or sin. It was as extraor-
dinary as beautiful to witness the extreme care
with which Margaret managed, that nothing
sad or distressing should ruffle the happy
peaceful current of the boy’s life—to every
thing she gave a cheerful name, a pleasant
meaning. When he was restless and excited
she would tell him stories suited to his capa-
city, which always soothed and quieted him —
and they were about people good and happy —
never wicked or miserable — those were words
of which he only knew the name.

Indiscreet neighbours would sometimes
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 23

speak before him of some sad quarrel, or
some wretched poverty in the village, and
Margaret would instantly turn to him with
a bright smile to counteract the gloomy
impression, and say, “‘ that was because they
were unwise,” the word, she always sub-
stituted for wicked.

And at other times when he would ask her,
somewhat sadly, if he were “ silly,” she would
laugh out merrily and tell him, “no indeed,
wise, very wise, for he was good, and that
was true wisdom.”

Fondly, as I have said, were the brother and
sister loved in the village, and all were kind
to the poor gentle hearted boy, no one teased,
no one laughed at him, but kindly humoured
his belief in the Fairies he thought watched
over him; so much so indeed, that when

they found out that one of his fancies was,
94 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

that if he left a basket in the wood the Fairies

would fill it for him—dit never more came





| the children in
BY » the village em-
: ployed all their

Ie leisure time in
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 25

making things to put into “poor dear Walter’s
basket,” amply repaid for their trouble, by
the glee with which he would come running
home, and show the treasures the good Fairies
had given him.

I have said, few people ever crossed the
threshold of Mr. Ford’s dwelling; but
amongst those few, and seemingly a more
favoured one than any, was Hugh Ripley.
He had taken a great interest in Walter,
and the boy’s affectionate nature never for-
got a trifling act of kindness Hugh once
rendered him; and meeting him one after-
noon with his father he ran up to him, and
seizing his hand, said “Father, this is the
gentleman who was so kind to Walter — ask
him to come and see us.”

Unable to refuse this request in his pre-

sence, Ford tendered the invitation, and at the
96 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

first visit discovered a high intellect and an
agreeable companion in his new friend, and
one who took a great interest in science and
mechanism: from that moment he was a
constant inmate of their house, and Hugh
little thought that a simple service rendered to
a poor idiot boy, would prove one of the most
important events of his life.

But to return to the Fords, their accustomed
devotions ended, they all retired to rest; the
inhabitants of the primitive village had long
been in their first sleep, but there was one
waking, and on his solitude we will now
intrude.

Hugh Ripley rented a room in the small
cottage where we left him. It was kept by
a merry little old woman who called herself
Mrs. Hopwood —to the “ Mrs.” she had not
the least right but having arrived at the in-
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 27

teresting age of sixty, she thought it might
be considered “ odd” to let her rooms to single
young gentlemen; and so came to Wood-
cote and took this cottage, adding to her
name a title which implied that she had once
possessed a Mr. Hopwood. She was a good
hearted, happy tempered little body as ever
lived, very ignorant, so much so that she quite
provoked Hugh, for she dearly loved to chatter,
and would sit with the parlour door open lying
in wait for him as a spider for a fly, and then
she would pounce out and talk as he called it
“such awful nonsense” that she sadly disturbed
the serenity of his temper.

When he was in good spirits, which alas!
was very seldom, he hada very artful way of
getting rid of her—he had his suspicions
respecting that same Mr. Hopwood, so would

ask her some question relating to him, which
98 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

invariably sent the old lady back into her
parlour in double-quick time, and her excuses
for breaking off the conversation were very
ingenious.

On this night he had hoped by the lateness
of his return to escape her, but she was an old
fashioned body, and had sat up to see the old
year out. He was caught as usual; however,
a well-timed inquiry, respecting Mr. Hopwood,
occasioned Mrs. Hopwood to hear a noise,
which “sounded like the cat at the milk,”
and hastily wishing him good night, she
returned into her room,—and we now find
him ascending the staircase to his own room,
the only apartment his wretched means would
allow.

Hugh Ripley was the only son of his father,
who died when Hugh was very young, and left

him to bear the many annoyances occasioned
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 29

by an ill-tempered and miserly mother: and
wretched enough had been the youthful days of
poor Hugh, giving that melancholy tinge to his
feelings, which he exhibited in his riper years,
— the invariable effect of an unhappy child-
hood. All the amusements in which other
children delighted were denied him as too
expensive, and at a very early age, his mother
sent him forth to seek his own living in the
world, saying “she could not afford to keep
him in idleness.”

Poor boy his trials and rebuffs were many ;
he had been brought up to no profession, but
had a great taste for drawing, which he hoped
would serve him. He met however with
little encouragment, and had almost begun
to despair of gaining a livelihood, when he
fortunately found employment as a designer

to a large Calico Printer near a country
30 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

village, and taking the lodging above men-
tioned, he began to work with renewed energy,
for though the remuneration was small it
was better than idleness, better, far better than
his former home.

And now Hugh laid his hand gently on the
lock of the door, and turned it softly as though
he feared to awake some one within, and then,
peeping in before he entered, he whispered,

‘¢ Ah! there he is at his old work, now [’ll
have him.”

He crept into the room, and seizing a ruler
prepared to hurl it at a little mouse, who was
most busily engaged in gnawing the edges of a
large portfolio placed against the wall. Hugh’s
entrance disturbed the little animal, and it
raised its bright black eyes to his face with a
glance, which to Hugh’s fancy seemed im-
ploring mercy, so he laid down the ruler on the

table, saying,
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 31

“There poor little thing, I'll let you live, go
back to your hole, and if you are a Fairy as
poor Walter says, do mea good turn in ex-
change, that’s all.”

And flinging himself in a chair before the
fire he put one foot on the fender, and resting
his elbow on his knee ran his long thin fingers
through his hair, and gazed into the fire with
the earnestness of one who thought he could
therein read his fate.

“ Margaret,” he said at last, half aloud,
“ Margaret, fool that Iam to dare to love her
and yet—why not—the love of goodness is
implanted in our natures and takes the strongest
root in the best hearts —why then should I
call it daring, when I love and reverence it
clothed in an angel’s form. What could I not
bear if she were here, to lighten my toil, to
brighten the gloomiest dwelling—sometimes she

smiles on me so kindly — would she, could she,
32 THE DREAM CHINTZ.



love me? and if so to what end— to bring her

to such a home as this, one miserable room;
well, if she loved me that would not be

wretched to her.”
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 33

He paused, and raising his head looked
round the room, a strange one truly for the
home of a fair young bride. A striped calico
curtain concealed a small bedstead, and a three
cornered wash-hand stand, and converted the
rest of the apartment into a sitting room, in
which stood a table, covered with drawing paper
and pencils, a pewter pot and blue plate, an
inkstand, and a newspaper ; a chest of drawers
opposite the fireplace, was also covered with
various articles, such as a glass, a razor case,
a brush and comb, a velvet cap, a beautiful
little vase filled with chrysanthemums, holly
and laurustinus, and an alabaster figure; two
chairs completed the furniture. The room
was only partially carpeted, and a thin muslin
curtain hung across the window. On the man-
tel-piece stood some unfinished water-colour
drawings, —and a large canvas on the floor

D
34 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

leaning against the wall was covered with
female figures all exactly alike, —all bearing
the lineaments of the form that had waited
so patiently for Walter’s return. His inspec-
tion ended Hugh muttered an impatient,
‘‘Pshaw! what an idiot I am, and a selfish
one too, drag her down to this, no indeed, —
that proud old father, would he consent to
such a thing were even she content. No, I
must toil on, hopelessly, miserably, and to what
end? Again I say, to support an existence, I
would much rather was not prolonged — why
do I live? That is a grand mystery. I am
neither happy myself nor do I form the happi-
ness of another. I am of no use, only cumbering
the ground, and taking, from those who need it
so much more, the money my employers pay
me,—for work too which brings me neither

fortune nor fame. Night after night I lie down
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 35

on that wretched bed, and feel that another
day is passed and I have done nothing —
nothing to benefit myself or others: only
earned a few shillings to support a useless and
troublesome existence. Oh! Walter, my boy,
how are you to be envied — you with your light
heart and simple faith, by such as me whose
life is one long struggle between doubt and be-
lief. I see the Omnipotent wisdom which
formed the planets and guides them in their
course, which orders the changing seasons and
gives to the tiniest insects, instinct for their pre-
servation. I see the mighty Power which sets
bounds to the ocean, and bids the waves be still,
which from the insignificant seed, brings forth
beauteous flowers, and from the small acorn the
giant oak, and still 1 am ever weighed down
with the feeling of my own uselessness — and

the oft recurring question, why do I live?
36 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

‘‘ Heigho! poor Walter — he thought I saw
the Fairies to-night and could no longer doubt
HIS innocent belief. I’m sure, I wish his Fairies
would come to my aid. This offer for the
best design for a Chintz, shall I try that? it
will be my fortune if I succeed. Ah! if I
should — No, No! better not to try, than try
and fail.—JIt’s a pretty notion about Fairies.
Ah! another year, Hugh, over your head —
there are the bells. — God bless you, my gentle
Margaret, and send you many happy years.
The Fairies dance to those chimes I suppose,
how beautiful they sound. Fairies”? —

Loud and clear, and then fading away till
they could scarce be heard—the bells con-
tinued.

Hugh murmured a few more words; his
head dropped slightly forward, but he moved

not from his position.
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 37

The bells had

ceased, the last

chime had died
away on the still


38 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

air, leaving the echoes to slumber again,
when Hugh heard a slight rushing sound
like a soft summer breeze: he raised his
head, and his room seemed filled with
smoke or vapour, which emitted a power-
ful scent, like multitudes of flowers, — he
tried to move, but he felt bound to his chair,
and the dense vapour oppressed his chest so
that he could scarcely breathe. This painful
sensation lasted but a few moments, the film
seemed gradually and imperceptibly to vanish,
though the strong perfume of the flowers grew
even more powerful; and he heard a faint
sound, which, growing louder by degrees,
resembled the singing of numberless birds.
In another instant the vapour was gone. No
wonder he smelt flowers and heard singing
birds, for there—-in his room— stood count-

less little beings, some laden with baskets filled
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 39

with flowers, others bearing gold cages, con-
taining birds of every variety of plumage.
From the group before him advanced one
entirely clothed in brown, with a profusion of
long silky brown hair falling over her shoulders.
She came close to the astonished and speechless
Hugh, and in a bright voice, so clear that it
rang in his ear like the sound of many bells,
said : —

“Many thanks good Master Ripley, Fairies
are not mortals and never forget a kind act, be
it ever so trifling; we owe you gratitude for two,
and are come to pay the debt. First you
performed a service for our friend Walter, we
saw you, we were hidden amongst the trees
in the wood, and you may be sure would have
guided the boy home, but we wished to find
how far you deserved our aid. Oh! how glad
we were when you led him so kindly through
40 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

the mazes of the wood, — right glad, for we are
never so pleased as when we know a poor
mortal has won for himself a gleam of hap-
piness, by a kind action to a fellow creature.
This, your patient toil, your faithful love, and
finally your disinterested act of mercy to me —
the little mouse, who was destroying your
property, complete our determination to do
you good service in return, — but no one can
help those who do not help themselves, banish,
therefore, the unworthy tenants of your noble
heart, — Despair and Doubt, and remember,
Hugh Ripley, that it is better to TRY AND
FAIL, THAN NOT TO TRY AT ALL, — watch
well the Fairies work.”

‘The voice ceased and the Fairy vanished, —
still Hugh, spell-bound, gazed at the move-
ments of those tiny beings, who seemed to fill
and more than fill his room. Very busy they
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 4]

all were, flitting about backwards and forwards,
and seeming to talk together in musical strains,
which sounded to him like the constant repe-
tition of ‘“* Margaret” — at length their actions
appeared less confused, and Hugh observed
that they had erected a frame, in which, with
exquisite taste, several of the Fairies were
arranging the birds and flowers, which the
rest were handing to them. Nimbly their fin-
gers moved, and stronger grew the perfume of
the flowers—for the fanning of the Fairies’
wings wafted it to Hugh, till at last their
labour finished, they moved from before the
frame and grouped themselves on either side of
it, displaying to Hugh,—the wonderstruck
Hugh — a perfect and exquisite Chintz pattern !

For a moment a torrent of thoughts over-
powered him —the great prize for the best

Chintz was his—no mortal could devise one
42 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

like that; he was wealthy — famous — Mar-
garet was his bride — she loved him, was proud
of him — tears, hot tears, dimmed his eyes;
he gasped for breath— endeavoured to move
from his seat, the picture faded, the frame
alone remaining ~ and in its place was a win-
dow —a thin muslin curtain, and the faint
light of day-break—he started to his feet
trembling with agitation.

It was a dream, only a dream it is true, but
what a dream! vividly he remembered the
beautiful pattern he had seen, he could draw it,
he knew he could. With burning brow and
panting heart he lighted a candle, and eagerly
began his task, closing his eyes occasionally to
recal his vision, and as he found how well his
memory served him, and saw growing under
his pencil the exquisite groups of flowers and

birds, his excitement became alarming, and on
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 43

“its completion he uttered a low moan and fell

heavily from his chair.

“Many happy new years to you, my own
dear Walter,” said a sweet voice at the boy’s
bedside.

“Oh!” he said starting “time to get up —
many to you, Margery, many to you, and to
some one else, Margery — I am going to get up
quickly now and tell him how much I wish him
happy years, and then I am going in the wood
to fetch my New Year’s gifts, they are sure to
be there, Margaret.”

“Yes love, quite sure,” answered Margaret,
** you'll wait till after breakfast, though.”

Breakfast ! do I want breakfast ?”

“Qh! certainly, and I have something so
nice because it is New Year’s Day.”

“Ha! Ha! then,’ laughed the boy, “I
44 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

shall be sure to stay for breakfast, I wont be
long.”

Margaret went down stairs and busied herself
in making the tea, placed her father’s arm-chair
in its accustomed place, and then opening the
window which seemed made of ground glass
with the frost, she looked up the village. Cold
as it was, it was brilliantly fine, and Margaret
stood some moments at the window and was
just about to close it, when a young voice called
her name.

“Margaret, how do you do, a happy New
Year,— here’s a bunch of flowers out of our own
garden for Walter, and we are going up now,”
she said in a lower tone, “I and four or five
more, to fill his basket with lots of things.”

“Thank you, Susey dear, thank you so
much,I am glad I have seen you, for I have

something for the basket too,” and she took
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 45

from her pocket a Comforter, knitted for him by
herself, and gave it to the little girl; by this
time her little companions joined her, Margaret
closed the window, and listened with a pleased
smile to their merry voices as they died away in
the distance: she was soon joined by her father
and brother and they began their morning meal,
the boy talking and laughing gaily in his wild and
joyous manner, which Margaret kept encourag-
ing, while Ford sat by gloomily and sadly, but
occasionally giving a beaming look of love to his
daughter. The moment breakfast was over
Walter prepared to go out.

‘‘Where are you going boy?” asked his
father.

“To Hugh Ripley’s, and then to see my
friends.”

The boy went out, Margaret took her work,

her father began to write and there was a long
46 THE DREAM CHINTZ.



unbroken silence. It was disturbed at length



by a low knock at the door, which made the
blood rush to Margaret’s face, and hastily



arranging her hair, she opened the door and

admitted Hugh Ripley. She started when she

saw him,— why? because a change was in his



face, which she could not account for; he was
pale, deadly pale, but there was in every line of

his countenance a loftiness she had never




before witnessed, a radiance in his eyes, which
gave to them an expression they had before
wanted, the light of hope beamed in them now.
He did not speak to Margaret

shook her by the hand, : 4

wished him kindly “ Many happy years.”



ur wishes power,



CW You



they would bring me what I never kn
will dine with us to day.”

“ I shall be very happy —I have been very
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 47

foolish this morning,” he continued half
turning to Margaret, “ positively fainting away.”

Oh! how his heart beat, as Margaret laid
her hand on his arm in the impulse of the
moment, and looked anxiously in his face.

‘‘T am better now,” he said with a tender-
ness he had never before ventured to assume,
“much better and shall do justice to your
hospitality to-day.”

She hastily withdrew her hand, and mur-
muring something about dining at three, and
going to find Walter, hurried out of the room.

‘‘Then I will be here punctually at three,”
said Hugh to Ford.

“Do! do!” he answered, “you may never
dine with me again.” —

“On another New Year’s Day, Sir? no,
perhaps not, God knows where this time
twelvemonth may find us.”
48 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

‘‘ Nor this time twelve hours,” said Ford. —

“True Sir, true, that is a very proper reflec-
tion, but not one to indulge in gloomily —
wherever it finds us, so that our lamps are
trimmed, it cannot much signify.”

“The only happy moment, my friend, is
when our lamps are put out depend on it.”

Oh! do not say so, Sir, perhaps I might
have agreed with you yesterday, but to-day I
am an altered man, I have learnt a lesson—I
will tell you all about it after dinner.”

“Tell me now,’ said the old man more
eagerly than he ever spoke. —‘“‘ Tell me now,
I would gladly know what could make any one
- wish to live — what is life but one long yearn-
ing wish, one long hopeless struggle for a hap-
piness which we know we never shall obtain —
even pleasure exists but in anticipation; from

our earliest childhood we cry for a toy, which
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 49

when once in our possession becomes instantly
valueless and so on through life and unto
death.”

“Qh! come, Sir, life is not quite such a
desert,— there are some roses, so sweet that
we do not heed their thorns, Love, which makes
of Earth a Heaven, brightens the saddest
home, lightens the heaviest heart, surely once
to experience the happy knowledge that we
are loved, must be worth living for !”

“Hugh Ripley,” said the old man in a
strange and almost unearthly sound — “I
know not what that is,—I have never
been loved in my long life— my long weary
life has passed on, without one gleam of
such happiness as you speak of. It has been
a weary life and I am very tired of it—
no one will miss me, and the grave is a quiet

place.”
50 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

Hugh was astonished at the tone of
melancholy in which the old man spoke—
though always gloomy and austere, there
was more of sad feeling in his manner than
usual, and he knew not exactly how to reply
to him. There was an awkward silence, and
then Hugh saying he had some business,
and promising to be punctual at dinner,
departed.

In half an hour more, Walter returned with
his basket laden with presents, but not as
usual did his bright cheerful voice summon. his
sister to view his treasures. He placed his
basket down in a corner, and flinging himself
on the floor beside it, took out one thing at a
time, looked at each separately, and then list-
lessly stretched himself out at full length, and
threw his arms over his head as was his wont,

to sleep. His father was not in the room, nor
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 51

his sister, but she had heard the step for which
she always listened so anxiously and she came
to him directly.

“Tired, dear Walter? Where are your pre-
sents?” He rose and pointed to them,

“They are pretty,” he said, “but Walter
saw the Goblins coming home, Margaret, and
no Fairies.”

“Oh! nonsense, Walter was tired coming
home, that was it. Do you know, Mary Lane
at the old farm is going to be married, and
there will be such a gay wedding next Monday,
and you and I will go early in the morning to
the Nursery Ground, and get such a large
nosegay for her—for the children are going
to strew the path with flowers —and we will
help them, will we not ?”

The boy sprang from the ground with all his
cheerfulness restored.
52 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

“Oh! that we will—when is Monday?
how long ?”

“ Four days.”

“ Days,” he repeated.

‘Yes, love, darkness and light four times.”

«Oh, yes, I know—then we will get lovely
flowers, but Margaret how can we? Jack Frost
keeps all the flowers, old gardener says, till the
hot sun burns him and makes him let them
go. — How can we have them ?”

“* Oh, we shall have some, Jack Frost lends
us his until he gives up ours, he is very kind
and his are pretty flowers too, Walter,’’ she
said with such a sunny smile that Jack Frost
himself might have melted at it. “Now I
must help Hetty to-day to lay the cloth—it
must all be very nice because—it is New

Year’s Day.”

Any one but poor simple Walter, might
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 53

have assigned another reason for Margaret's
particularity —at any rate she did lay the
cloth very nicely, and placed the Christmas
roses and evergreens, which formed Walter's
bouquet, in a vase in the centre of the
table. But while she was thus busily and
cheerfully employed poor Walter was un-
quiet and unhappy; a most unusual occurrence
for him, — and which somewhat worried Mar-
garet. She looked at the clock, it wanted °
nearly an hour to dinner, she had been so
anxious to lay the cloth—there was time
to take Walter out for a little walk with her,
it would be a change and amuse him. She
proposed it and he assented gladly — for he
was so restless that any movement was agree-
able to him.

They were soon on their way down the

village, this loving couple. Margaret talking
54 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

to him so gently, so gaily —trying to divert
his mind — but still he seemed restless and
more wild
and flighty
| than usual
| — till Mar-

garet her-



self grew
nervous
and began
to feel a
strange pre-
sentiment
of comnig
evil.
They
had taken
no decided

=< =" route, but
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 55

oddly enough they found themselves passing
Hugh Ripley’s cottage. Mrs. Hopwood was
standing at the door.

“Ah! many happy new years to you young
folks,” she said, “how are you, young gentle-
man ?”

“ He is very well, thank you Mrs. Hopwood °
— and you?” asked Margaret.

“Qh! [mas well as I can expect to be —
you know I ain’t quite so young as I was —
I’ve flying pains like all over me with the cold
weather, but there — that'll all go off—all go
off my dear, — 1 was looking out for Sweetman
to order a bottle of elder wine against my
young gentleman comes home to night— he
ain't over and above well—I don’t think he
takes victuals enough, and so I am just going
to coddle him up a bit—-why he fainted away

this morning—I heard such a bump over
56 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

head— woke me—I sat up and listened —
and then it come over me—well, perhaps
something’s the matter with Mr. Ripley — so
I got up and went up stairs and there he lay
in a dead faint—but I soon brought him
round, and he went out in such spirits I
scarcely knew him.”

“‘ He dines with us to-day,” said Margaret;
somewhat confusedly.

*‘T know that. Don’t let him stay too late,
for I shall have him ill again.”

** No,” said Margaret softly.

*‘ Look! Margaret look!” said Walter — “ I
see the Fairies! numbers and numbers going

into the wood. I must go after them, they
beckon me, look!” and staying for no reply, he
flew off in the direction of the wood, the
entrance of which could be distinctly seen from
Mrs. Hopwood’s cottage.
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 57

‘Poor boy,” said Mrs. Hopwood compassio-
nately — “he’s a great charge to you ain't he?”

“‘ A very dear one, Mrs. Hopwood. I know
not what I should do without him.”

“Ah! you’re a good gal, a very good gal;
there’s many a one would be for ever a grum-
bling at the trouble and the dulness of a home
like yours.” |

“ Perhaps I should if I found it dull and
troublesome —it is a little dull sometimes
when Walter, dear Walter is out; but he is
never troublesome —so happy tempered, so
affectionate.”

“Ah! poor child, it is a heavy affliction
certainly, now do you never go after him when
he runs away from you like this?”

‘No never, it would worry him—and I
know he will not go far from home, and I wish

him to feel he can take care of himself, so
58 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

I carefully avoid showing any anxiety about

him,” *

** Ah true! —there’s Sweetman! I must run
after him, good bye, my dear’—and Mrs.
Hupwood hurried away.

Margaret walked on to the entrance of the
wood and looked up its long vistas of tall
leafless tress to see if Walter were in sight —
but no—he had wandered further among
its tangled brushwood, and so she turned away,
and walked on, thinking he might return when
she passed again, and they could go home to
dinner together. —

Home to dinner! how incessantly that din-

ner haunted her—and how she hoped that
Hetty would cook it beautifully, better than
ever, and pictured to herself the neatness of

the room, the nice appointments of the dinner

—and wondered if it would be remarked
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 59

— if He liked neatness and was particular
—and whether it would strike him, that she
who could keep her father’s house so well
would make a good wife; and then her
thoughts wandered on, and she could see a
cottage-home with a neat garden filled with
flowers, and a room so comfortably furnished
and two occupants therein—one a fair being
her mirror told her was very lovely —and
another whom her heart told her was dearer to
her than all besides on earth —dearer even
than her poor simple brother.

Yes! her thoughts were full of such happy
visions and long she indulged them, and went so
far as to make conversations between herself and
another, such as she thought would take place
this very day after dinner by the fire light ; that
delicious dreamy light by which she had often
become lost in thought as now, with the mo-

ments flying by unheeded.
60 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

Moralists may call such reveries unprofitable
and bid the young beware of them, for that
they are but a milder term for idleness, — but
are they not some of the happiest moments of
our lives; does reality ever appear like those
highly coloured pictures young hearts draw of
the future, and if they are never realized, — still
it is something to be happy even in thought.

Margaret found herself at her own home
sooner than she expected; she stopped for a
moment to look up the village for Walter, but
not seeing him she tapped at the door, it was
opened by Hugh Ripley.

“Oh! Mr. Ripley am I late ?” she said blush-

ing brightly at his unexpected appearance.
« No, I am early fortunately.”

She entered the cottage, removed her bonnet,
and fondled the cat before either of them spoke

again.
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 61

‘‘ Margaret,” he said at length (he had never
called her so before) “ your father is not very
well, — lying down a little before dinner.”

Margaret looked up alarmed, there was
something in the tone of his voice unusual, and
her father not well, she had never in her life
heard him complain.

“Til?” she said, “my father, he was quite
well when I went out, I have not been gone
an hour.” —

‘¢QOh! he’s better now, don’t be alarmed, I
came in at a fortunate moment, and now I have
induced him to lie down until dinner.”

“Shall I go to him ?” she asked still wonder-
ingly.

“No, no, he is better quiet — has anything
occurred particularly to distress him this morn-
ing ?”

“No, Mr. Ripley, not that I am aware of,
62 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

you terrify me, you are not telling me all the
truth, Oh! I felt something would go wrong
to-day.” And she laid her hand on his arm,
and looked with trembling earnestness in his
face.

Hugh felt almost inclined to be cruel —to
pause ere he quieted her fears; it was so

delightful to have her sweet eyes gazing on

him,—to feel she was looking to him for .

comfort, but he was not selfish; and venturing
to lay his hand soothingly on her small trem-
bling one, he said —

“ Allis well now, I assure you; your father
was alone and had a fit of very deep depression,
which might have terminated seriously had not
I entered opportunely; we had a long, grave
conversation, and afterwards, being somewhat
agitated, I recommended the quiet of his own
room, and soon he will be quite himself.”
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 63

But a dim perception of the truth seemed to
have reached Margaret, as with a startled gaze
she continued to fix her eyes on Hugh’s face ;
she felt he had saved them from some weighty
sorrow, and thanked him cordially, asking no
more questions, from an instinctive feeling that
he had told her all it needed she should know.

And as those fervent words of gratitude fell
from her lips in those clear low accents, so dear
to him, the grand mystery of why he lived was
solved, and he blessed Heaven he had lived
for this; he was not useless, why had he dared
to think so? “Shall the thing formed say to
him, who formed it, why hast thou made me
thus ?”

Hugh Ripley had learnt a lesson he never
more forgot. A long while he and his com-
panion talked together; and he told her how
her father had said his life was burdensome to
64 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

him, from the knowledge or rather the impres-
sion that he was unloved, uncared for, — that
his wife had been forced into a marriage with
him by her parents, and had never loved him,
— that his children had loved her, not him, and
then he went on to tell her of her father’s
passionate love for her, of which till that
moment, Margaret had been unconscious, —
and how he had longed to see some return of
it from her, but that he found duty and not
love.

“IT never knew this, Mr. Ripley,” said
Margaret, with the tears filling her eyes, “I
never knew all this, indeed ; I have had so great
a charge in my poor brother, I have been blind
to all else; my father has always been to me
cold and reserved; there has always seemed
between us an icy chain” —

“Which a few sweet loving words from you
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 65

would have had power to melt,” answered
Hugh. “He says that often and often he
would have given all he possessed for one of
those words of tenderness you were lavishing
on Walter; that often and often he has spo-
ken angrily to the boy, in jealousy of him, as
he has watched you pillowing his head on your
bosom, fondly stroking his hair and showering
kisses on his face.”

Margaret blushed vividly, and answered in a
low voice, “ Walter has so much need of love
and pity; but I am so grateful to you,” she
continued, “ for telling me this, indeed I do
love my father, and am glad, Oh! so glad,
that he loves me; he shall never have cause to
be jealous of Walter again.”

As she spoke the inner room door opened,
and her father entered; she flew from her seat,
and rushing to him, flung her arms about him,

F ®
66 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

and raising her flushed and tearful face to his,
said, “‘ Father dear, dear Father, you have been
ill, and your Margaret away from you, but you
are better now, are you not?”

The old man could not answer, for the first
time since her unconscious babyhood, he
pressed his darling to his heart, and his tears
glistened amongst her glossy hair. For a few
moments, emotion impeded speech, and when
released from that fond embrace, Margaret
turned again to thank Hugh for all the good
he had done, he was gone.

With all the refined delicacy of his nature,
he had felt that but One eye should be the wit-
ness of such an interview. He soon returned
however, bringing with him Walter, quite
restored to his accustomed cheerfulness, for he
had seen such numbers of Fairies running up
and down the “ Sun’s ladders,” as he termed

the rays, which shot through the trees.
THE DREAM CHINTZ, 67

And Walter was the greatest talker at the
dinner to which they now sat down — the hearts
of the others were too full for words, and Mar-
garet’s day-dream was unfulfilled, for Hugh
left early, and they were still only friends.
Had she known his thoughts, her heart
that night would have been lighter.

When Walter was gone to bed, her father,
throwing his arm round her, kissed her affec-
tionately and said he had something curious to
tell her, that she must hear before she went to
rest ; he then recounted the history of Hugh’s
Fairy dream.

“Tt is curious Margery dear, is it not?”
he said after he had finished the narration.

“He is going to send the pattern in to-
morrow, and on Saturday the prize will be
given. I hope sincerely he will gain it, he

richly deserves it, and I, Heaven knows, ought
68 THE DREAM CHINTZ

to wish him well, and you too my poor child;
he has rendered us a service to-day indeed ;”
and once more kissing her fondly, he sent her
to her own room in the greatest excitement and
astonishment at all she had heard and witnessed.

Margaret counted the days until Saturday,
and how anxious and disappointed she felt
when it came at last, and the shades of evening
began to fall, and Hugh appeared not to tell
them if he had been successful ; how very trou-
blesome everything was that she had to do; how
unusually fidgetty her father was ; how tiresome
poor Walter,—she almost spoke crossly to
him at last, and finally unable longer to remain
in the house, she coaxed him to come out, and
of course turned her steps towards the Factory,
where the prizes were to be distributed. The
moment however she discerned it, and her eyes,

which had been strained in obtaining a glimpse
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 69

of the building, caught sight of a figure coming
out, she turned rapidly round and bidding Walter
try to overtake her, ran off quickly in the oppo-
site direction ; but she was soon out of breath,
and Walter ran on before her and left her far
behind, whilst she leant against a gate to rest,
through which a path led a nearer way to the
Factory.

Still with her eyes gazing up the road by
which she fancied Hugh would come, and her
thoughts wandering as they were wont, Mar-
garet stood; when a voice behind her pro-
nounced her name, she started, and turning
with a flushed face, saw Hugh Ripley. He
jumped over the gate, and Margaret stam-
mered out something about its being “ very
cold,” but simple as the words were, and
indifferent as the tone was she attempted to
assume, there was something to Hugh Ripley
70 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

unmistakeable in her manner, and in a low voice
he said, “ Margaret, I know you will be glad to
hear that I have been successful, the Prize is
mine,” and he held up a leather bag containing
the money. Thrown off her guard, she clasped
her hands together, and lifting her eyes to his
face, she said,

“Qh! indeed I am glad. I have been so
very very anxious I was afraid to ask you.”

The glance, the words were enough, — all
doubts he might have had, were gone. Men
are ready enough to interpret words and looks
in their favour when they are Nor meant, but
it is a rare case if they mistake them when they .
are.

The torrent of Hugh’s long pent-up feel-
ings now poured forth, and he told her of ©
his cherished love, — of all his many doubts
and fears,—of his Dream, and how it had
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 71

inspired him with Hope, and as it had gained
him one prize, how he had trusted it might
secure to him | another.

‘¢ But alas! dear Margaret, would my antici-
pations had been realized; I have gained the
Prize it is true, but the sum is too trifling to
admit of my longer entertaining the daring
hopes I had formed. I had hoped it might
be sufficient to set me up in some business,
and enable me to support you as you have
been accustomed to be; that hope is at an
end, and I have only to recommence my
tedious occupation.—I could not ask you
Margaret to share such a pittance.”

Margaret murmured a reply, inaudible to
any, but one listening as Hugh was, and rap-
turously he answered her;— but no matter
what he said or how he said it, suffice it that
ere they reached home, both had forgotten
72 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

that sorrow ever did or could exist — that in
this weary world there were such things as
bitter partings — heart-burnings — jealousies,
and all the train of human ills and sins, —
that clouds ever shadowed the glowing sun
light, — or storms ruffled the serene sky, —
nipping frosts and bitter winds blighted the
blooming flowers,— or indeed that any other
beings trod the earth, save Margaret Ford and
Hugh Ripley.

But they were awakened from this happy state
by their approach to the village, and the sight
of Margaret’s home with Walter standing at
the door: and then came a thousand nervous
fears as to her father’s consent, the neces-
sity for which until that moment both had
forgotten.

“Why, dearest Margaret, your father told
me he should ever consider himself my debtor,
THE DREAM CHINTZ. i2

for what he was pleased to call the service I
rendered him; let him pay me with this little
hand, and then Margaret, dear Margaret, the
obligation will be on my side, let us go in and
speak to him at once.”

Walter was leaning against the door-post
talking to himself or to his friends the Fairies,
as he thought, when they came up to the
house, he continued his conversation without
heeding them, but as Hetty opened the door
and they passed in, leaving it open for him to
follow, he burst into one of his wild, ringing
laughs, and said,

‘Ha! Ha! now I understand, Yes! yes!
another gay wedding, — bring HER flowers,
Fairies, heaps of flowers, for she is good — so
good ; and they must be flowers which
never fade, and have no thorns; not Jack

Frost’s cold scentless ones, but warm sunny
74 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

flowers, that smell sweetly — yes, she shall
you say—thanks, thanks, and you must
all—all come to the wedding, and no one
will see you but me. Ha! ha! that will be
fun. I shall be so busy, I must go and tell
Whitelock, must I not? the Church must be
ready and clean, so clean, no dust in it to soil
your wings, — hush! fly away, I’m going now.”

And away went the boy down the village at
a quick pace, and entered the churchyard ; near
the church he found the man he sought digging
‘a grave. Whitelock was the sexton.

“ Whitelock, I want you,” said the boy.

‘‘Eh;” answered the old man looking up
and resting on his spade “Oh! it be you,
master Ford.”

“Yes! what are you doing ?”

A question he had asked fifty times before,
and which the old man was always puzzled to
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 75

answer, remembering Miss Margaret’s injunc-

tion that nothing sad should be told him, and




how carefully she

me had always kept
76 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

him from the knowledge of Death; managing
that some engrossing amusement at home
should employ him, when the somewhat un-
usual circumstance of a funeral occurred in the
small village, so he hesitated a moment and
then scratching his head, said.

“Why, I be’s digging a flower bed —and
there aint no story there,” he said to himself,
“ for what can you call such a young thing as
this, but a little flower — I’m a going to trans-
plant a flower, my boy, that got in a soil as
wasn’t suited to it, and it will doa deal better
where it’s going to.”

“Flower, Oh! yes, and it will blow for
Margaret’s wedding. I’ve come to tell you
you must clean the church, the Fairies are all
coming and it must be very clean.”

“Yes, my boy, it shall be very clean, the

Fairies be coming be they ?”
THE DREAM CHINTZ. my

No one heeded what poor Walter said, but
answered him gently, and never contradicted
him.

“ What are those gray stones for Whitelock,
so many of them ?”

Again the old man scratched his head before
he answered, and then said,

“Why, a great many people out of this
village be gone into a far country, and their
friends put up these stones to remind them
of ’em, and of the day they went away. A
beautiful country it is, my boy, where we shall
all go I hope. I’m expecting to go every
day.”

“Don’t go then till after the wedding, the
gay wedding, — what fun we shall have.”

* Ah! indeed, and who is to be the bride-
groom ?” |

“Oh! I must not tell that, Margaret will
78 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

be angry, but you'll see, you'll see, a brave
wedding it will be, good bye, Whitelock, have
the Church clean, never mind about the flowers,
the Fairies will bring them,” and, sauntering
slowly out of the church-yard, the boy re-
turned home.

He found Margaret standing by her Father,
one arm thrown about his neck, and the other
hand pressed in Hugh Ripley’s. They scarcely
heeded his entrance, so engrossed were they
by their conversation.

‘“‘ And you would leave me, Margaret, now we
have just begun to understand one another,”
said the old man with a melancholy smile.

“Oh! Sir,” answered Hugh, “do not talk
of leaving yet, I cannot take my Margaret to
my present home, but I could not resist hear-
ing from her own lips whether she would ever

come to gladden a better.”
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 79

‘‘ Had she refused,” said Ford sighing, “ you
would have had no care to seek a better, I
suppose ?”

“Oh! yes, Sir, I am a changed man now, I
used to think so, but since my wonderful
Dream, I have reflected much and deeply —
I have felt that the thwarting of one’s hopes
here, should instead of causing a gloomy in-
difference, a useless despair, incite us to fresh
exertions for the attainment of our hopes
hereafter; that we have no right to bury our
‘one talent,’ because it has failed to purchase
what we in our short-sightedness call happi-
ness; but seek to increase its value tenfold,
that it may purchase for us at last an eternal
and perfect happiness. Dear Walter’s Fairies
have indeed rendered me a service” —he said,
holding out his hand to the boy.

“Have you seen them?” said Walter, ea-

gerly.
eo
80 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

“Yes, my boy; and look what they have
given me,” and he held up the purse of money.

‘Ha! ha! hurrah! now Margaret, don’t
you love the Fairies.”

“ Indeed I do Walter, almost as well as
you do.”

“Ha! ha! wont there be a gay wedding —
Mary Lane’s will be nothing to it.”

“Come with me, Walter, 1 want to speak
to you,” said Hugh —“ I must go dear Mar-
garet, but I may come again in the evening?”

“Oh, yes!” she answered, her eyes spark-
ling with joy, “take care of Walter, and don’t

keep him out too long, it is so cold.”
Cold as it was she stood at the door watch-
ing them out of sight.— At length her father
begged her to close it.

‘“‘ How strangely things come about, Father,”
she said, when she had done his bidding, and
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 8]

settled herself close beside him, — “ Hugh’s
kindness to poor Walter, when he lost himself,
has really and truly been the source of his
present good fortune.”
‘* Securing your hand and heart, Margaret ?”
“No, Father,” she answered, blushing and
smiling, “getting the prize, for if he had never
known Walter, he would never have dreamed of
Fairies, shewing him a pattern; now would he ?””
“Well, I am not prepared to say that; I
can only say I am glad of the prospect of
leaving my daughter in such good hands—
he is an excellent young man, Margaret.”
Margaret needed not this assurance, she had
thought so from their first interview, and each
day her love and esteem increased for him.
As they were now so much together, she
daily witnessed some fresh proof of his amiable
disposition, his generous and noble heart,

G
82 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

With his master Hugh had always been a
favourite, and since his success he had been
doubly kind to him; and at length without
assigning any particular reason, had doubled
his salary, so that now Hugh began seriously to
talk of a pretty cottage, which was to let at the
outskirts of the village, and in short to make
every preparation for the gay wedding, Walter
had been so long expecting.

But before the accomplishment of all this,
he said he must go to London, and at this their
first parting Margaret was very unhappy.
She had never been in London, and to her
it had an awful sound; but half her fears she
would not express to him for it was like doubt-
ing him; he would not forget her she was sure,
and yet she saw him depart with a very heavy
heart and tearful eye ; her father too was ill that
night — the wind blew in cold and heavy gusts,
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 83

and poor Margaret could scarcely assume a
cheerfulness before Walter, and was glad when
in the refuge of her own room she could weep
unrestrainedly.

The only thing now was to look forward to
his letters — her father was growing worse, and
Margaret longed for Hugh’s return for she felt
frightened and helpless.

We will transport ourselves now as Mar-
garet would fain have done to his side, and
shall find him in a small house near Dean
Street, Soho, of miserable exterior, and giving
an excellent notion of its inhabitant. She, for
it was a woman, was seated by a small table at
work mending a gown, which a maid of all
work would have scorned to wear; the carpet
which covered the room was threadbare ; there
were no curtains to the window, save across

the lower panes, a strip of what was meant to
84 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

be white muslin, but upon which rested the
dust of ages. There was a handful of fire in
the grate made of coke, and a saucepan on the
hob making strenuous exertions to boil, a feat
which seemed with such a fire a moral impos-
sibility.

Hugh was standing before her, his arm rest-
ing on the mantel-piece, his face looking
flushed and excited.

“ But, Mother, hear me once more, I have
at last thank God! become successful, and if
you still deny the possession of the income I
felt assured you enjoyed, share mine, and do
not I implore you continue to live in a manner
so unbefitting my father’s wife, and so painful
to yourself.”

_ Mrs. Ripley looked up from her work for
the first time.
“Share yours! can you help me?” she

asked, ‘* Have you got money ?”
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 85

“Yes, mother, I have at last established
myself in the world, and find my exertions
enable me to secure quite sufficient at least to
make you more comfortable than you appear
at present.”

A strange expression passed over the rigid
features of his mother, and she said, —

“ Did you come to London solely to see
after me? you were not wont to be so very
affectionate — it is some years since we met.”

“Tt is, Mother, those years have been spent
in long and arduous struggles for subsistence.
I knew, or rather I thought,” looking around
him, “ you needed not my aid. I could not
live dependent on you, but now I find you
in apparent want, ill, as you say you are and
as you look, alone and unfriended,— you
are my mother,” he continued with a slight

tinge of bitterness in his tone, for he felt her
86 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

conduct had been little like one, “and I offer
you the shelter of the home, I have at length
secured for myself, and the protection of a
son.”

While he spoke she rivetted her small black
eyes upon him, and again demanded, “ Did he
come to London purposely to seek her out,
and make this offer?” He paused a moment
and a look of pain passed over his face, and
he answered.

“TI came to seek you out, with what purpose
it matters not now. I did not expect to find
you thus; do you accept my offer ?”

“Of course I do, Hugh. I shall be very
glad to be helped I am sure; I have no money,
I tell you, the rent of this house is very heavy,
I thought of letting the upper part, but then
I must have bought the furniture; you know,

Hugh, your father had nothing to leave, his
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 87

income died with him—there is nothing
but the small, very small property I brought
your Father for me to exist upon.”

“Well, Mother,” said Hugh with a heavy
sigh, “we will say no more about it, it is
settled. I have to see a man on business
to-morrow, and then I will make any arrange-
ment you like.”

“T had better go back with you into the
country. I like the country, but every one says
London’s the cheapest place in the world, so I
staid here.”

“No! No! Mother,” he answered eagerly,
“we will live here, let the upper part of the
house as you proposed, I will have it furnished.
My occupation can be as well carried on here
as in the country. I am tired!” he said
abruptly, “can I sleep here to-night ?”

“ Yes, there’s a bed room for you, — but —
88 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

we’ve nothing in the house except that drop of
broth.”

Oh, I’m not hungry, Mother,” he answered
impatiently, “I only want rest, I'll go to
the hotel for something I left there, and come
back directly.”

“You'll be sure to come back,” she asked
eagerly.

*“‘ Oh, yes,” he answered, “ sure,” and he was
soon back; to his surprise he found something
like a decent meal prepared for him, and the
room looking somewhat more cheerful, for the
shutters were closed, the candle lighted, and
she actually held out her hand to him, as
though she were pleased to see him.

He went to his room early —the wretched
room where he was to sleep; but he noticed
not its desolate appearance and flinging him-
self on the one chair it contained, exclaimed
aloud —
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 89

** Again every light of hope extinguished
after this long struggle, — with happiness in
my grasp. Oh! Margaret, my darling Mar-
garet, this is hard to bear—even were my
means sufficient, could I ask her to share a
home with my Mother.— No, no, my dream
is over, we had better go on waiting, and
hoping, than subject her to the repeated annoy-
ances, which would be the inevitable effect of
such an arrangement.”

«‘ And how to tell her, what will she say to
me; will she credit the story? I must not see
her or my resolution would fail; well, I have
done right —at least, I have acted with that
intention. I shall be helped to bear the
trial, and good will come of it, I feel.” So
poor Hugh sat down before the ricketty little
table in his room, and wrote to Margaret.

He had not told her his reasons for coming
90 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

to London, for he had never anticipated such a
termination to his visit. He had considered on
reflection, that he had not behaved quite well
to his mother, and at this important epoch of
his life—about to marry, and with such
brightened prospects —he felt he ought to go
and see her —hold out the hand of recon-
ciliation, and bid her consider herself a welcome
guest at his new home; but to find her thus
poor and friendless he had never dreamed ; and
though he could not but suspect her apparent
penury originated in her miserly disposition, his
warm and generous heart would not allow him
to abandon her; and as his means would not
permit him to secure both he chose between her
happiness and his own, and nobly, and unself-
ishly decided for hers. He could not, there-
fore, avoid feeling that Margaret might scarcely
credit his story, so perfectly unprepared as
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 91

she was for any such changes in his plans,
and he wrote several letters to her during
that long night ere he could determine on one
to send her; at length he satisfied himself,
for banishing all his own despondency, he
wrote to her cheerfully bidding her hope for
brighter days, and in the meanwhile to trust
to him, and love him. He told her that dur-
ing his short sojourn in town, he had heard
everywhere of his Chintz, and of the enor-
mous sale it had, which he thought must be
the reason of his increase of salary; that this
encouraged him to future efforts, and that for
her dear sake no toil should be spared. It
was a great effort to him to write thus hope-
fully, for it was far from what he felt; and his
painful task ended, he flung himself on his
bed to rest, but not to sleep.

The next day worked great changes beneath
92 THE DREAM CHINTZ,

Mrs. Ripley’s roof. Hugh felt active occu-
pation was the only chance of escape from the
misery of thought, and busied himself in mak-
ing the house more comfortable, and as she
had not to pay for it, Mrs. Ripley was well
content to enjoy the improved state of affairs ;
while the one poor half-starved servant, poured
blessings on the good young man who had
worked such a happy change. Poor thing!
she, with her dirty haggard face and squalid
figure, was a heroine in her way, for she had
clung to her hard mistress for many years,
standing by her, because all else forsook her,
losing the countenance of all her friends be-
cause she would stay in such a place, her only
answer being, ‘‘ what would She do if I left
her, poor creature? no one else could stay
with her, I’ve got used to her.” And now her

reward was come, and tears of joy actually
THE DREAM CHINTZ: 93

followed each other down her withered cheeks,
as she watched the improvement in the house.
And Hugh had a narrow escape of those long
arms being flung about his neck, when he
placed in her hand a small sum to be ex-
pended on the improvement of her own per-
sonal appearance.

In a week’s time no one would have
recognised the inmates of that once dreary
looking house. And Hugh contemplated with
real satisfaction his good work: poor fellow,
he needed some payment for his self
denial— more especially as the days went
by and no letter from Margaret. Hugh was
very proud, and feeling that Margaret ought
to have appreciated his sacrifice, and have —
endeavoured to console him by the assur-
ance of her approbation — was hurt and

somewhat angry at her silence, and when he
94 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

felt inclined to write again, his pride prevented
him, and so the time went on.

And what of Margaret, — had she so soon
forgotten the love which she had once so
valued ? or loving still, could she doubt? No,
Margaret’s trial was as heavy and hard to
bear as his.

On the receipt of Hugh’s letter, her
father, whose illness and feebleness seemed
daily increasing, was angry and excited, more
than Margaret had ever seen him, and as she
sat with the open letter in her hand, and the
tears coursing each other down her cheeks,
he sternly forbade her replying, or indeed
ever writing to him again.

“He felt how it would be,” he said, “ when
he went to London. It was a paltry subter-
fuge! No man, who had really loved her,

would have resigned his happiness and de-
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 95

stroyed hers, for such overstrained notions of
duty.

“ But, Father,’ remonstrated the weeping
girl, “it is only for a time, he cannot now sup-
port us both, but eventually —”

“Don’t talk to me, child, I have learnt by
experience how to believe such got-up stories ;
no, no, think of him no more Margaret, he is
not worthy of you, — speak of him no more.”

Think of him no more,” aye, how much
easier said than done;— but she could cease
to speak of him,— no more did that still trea-
sured name pass her lips.

One evening they were sitting together,
Margaret and the old man in the twilight,
he had been very ill all day and very weak;
she held his hand, and her sad tearful eye was
raised to that Heaven, to which she was

always appealing for consolation and support.
96 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

“‘ Margaret,” at length he said breaking a long

7 a Ta HH 1) rn i
| ral Mom ei wl ‘ Het fl i ie

ee ‘
| ~ a


THE DREAM CHINTZ. 97

pause, “it is not because people offend
us, that we must be ungrateful to them. I
have not forgotten New Year’s Day, nor the
fact that Hugh Ripley’— (poor Margaret,
how she started at the forbidden name) “ then
saved me from the commission of a great sin,
and now that with time for reflection and
repentance, I am being led gently away, I
thank and bless him for the deed. I believe
he was inspired, for he spoke well and wisely ;
he destroyed with the few words he said, all
the arguments I had heaped up in favour of
the mad act I was about to commit, and
the awful presumption of which I should have
been guilty I felt forcibly, —for this I thank
him, —I hope the remaining time so mercifully
spared me, I have not wasted. Now, Mar-
gery, dear child, should you ever hear or see
anything of this young man, and I have judged

H
98 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

him harshly, you must tell him, to the last
I was grateful for this one act, but for my
child’s happiness, I could not do other than
I have done; and let me, my girl, now I am
on the subject, point out to you that my
opinion of him is carried out by his silence;
would he have borne yours so patiently if he
did not wish to be rid of you? —I trust you
have too much honest pride to seek him now.”

She could not speak, poor Margaret, or
she could have asked her father, if it was grate-
ful thus to doubt one on whom no reproach
had ever before rested; if gratitude ought
not to have made him sacrifice every proud
rebellious feeling, and alone cherish that
holy one, “Which thinketh no evil,” but

she spoke not then,—and the morrow was

too late.
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 99

Months elapsed, and one bright day in June
when Hugh had not been home since morning,
Sarah told him when she let him in, a boy
was with his mother, who had asked for him,
and was waiting to see him. He opened the
parlour door, and there pale and weary, covered
with dust, and with a large bunch of dead
flowers in his bosom, sat Walter; in his
hand he held his dusty hat trimmed with
black crape.

Margaret’s long silence struck to Hugh’s
heart with a cold chill,—he could not speak,
as the boy with a cry of joy sprang forward
to meet him. Tears were glistening in his
mother’s eyes, but Hugh noticed them not,
as she rose and in a gentle tremulous voice
said, —

“Hugh, my dear boy, I will leave you alone
with your friend, though with a darkened
100 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

understanding himself, poor lad, he has enlight-
ened mine,” and she walked slowly out of
the room.

Hugh heeded not his mother’s words, but
gasped forth ‘* Margaret.”

“Qh! she’s quite well,” said Walter.

‘Thank God! but this,?— and Hugh
pointed to the boy’s hat.

‘Dusty, yes, isnt it, and I’m afraid it’s
spoilt this new stuff Margaret put round it.
My father you knowhas gone a long journey,
and she said I must wear this till he comes
back.”

Hugh understood it all now; the old man
was dead; he must say no more to him on the
subject, and he saw too the boy was weary,
and asked him kindly if he would take some
refreshment.

““T do not know, but I’m tired.”
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 101

“Yes, my boy, you must have something,
I will order it, and now tell me, how did you
get here ?”

“Well I do not know, the Fairies brought
me I think, but I have been a long, long while
coming; these flowers little Susey gave me the
day I came away, and now see how faded they
are, poor flowers, but they'll blow again in the
spring will they not?”

“Qh, yes, yes, dear Walter; but tell me
how you came; think, did Margaret send you ?”
asked Hugh, as he saw by the manner the boy
gazed at the flowers, that his attention was di-
verted from the subject.

“Margaret, eh! oh! no, she doesn’t know
I’m come, but I knew why she sobbed and
cried all the long night — I heard her when she
thought I slept — and the Fairies told me it was
for you, they whispered, ‘follow him, follow
102 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

him, and so I came; a strange place, — such
noise, — she came a long way with me.”
“She, who, Margaret?” said Hugh eagerly.
“No, no, one of the Fairies! she changed
herself to a butterfly,” he
whispered, “and flew

~ on before me guiding

me all the way.”


THE DREAM CHINTZ. 103

**But have you walked, Walter, — walked
all this distance ?”

“Yes, Margaret told me the name of the
place you lived in, and I said it over and over
again, that I might remember it, and I asked
people when I came to houses, if it was Dean
Street, Soho, and if Hugh Ripley lived theret
some of them laughed and gave me food, and
told me to go home, but Margaret was crying
for you, so Walter went on. Id often
wished I knew how to please her, for she is
so good to me, and when I’ve brought her
flowers she’s looked pleased, how will she look
when I bring you? Ha! ha!” and he laughed
one of his wild laughs.

“But, Walter, you have not told me how
you found me at last? you say you walked
along the London road till you came to houses,
and then you asked your way, and they told
104 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

you to go home,—how came you to come
on then all this distance ?”

“I don’t know, I followed the Fairy, she
went on, she never turned, and I knew she
would lead me right at last; it was a long, long
way, sometimes I slept under the trees, some-
times in streets, and then I came to a place
all houses, no trees, and I knew that was
like where you lived, and I asked again if
you lodged there, if it was — I’ve forgotten
now.”

“ Dean Street, Soho,” prompted Hugh.

‘Yes, and they told me ‘a little farther on;’
I was very tired, and my feet were very sore,
but on I went, and I met an old man, and he
stopped me to know what I wanted, — and he
brought me here; Oh! how glad I was when
they said ‘yes’ this time, and I have found you
at last; Oh! I’m always such a lucky boy!
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 105

Margery will smile again — come back now,”
and springing from his seat he seized Hugh’s
arm.

Deeply affected by this recital, Hugh unable
to speak, shook him warmly by the hand ; his
simple devotion to his sister, evident by this
long and weary journey in her behalf would
never be forgotten by him, whose love for
Margaret could alone exceed her brother’s.

Hugh’s reply was interrupted by the en-
trance of Sarah with a tray of refreshments for
Walter, which in answer to Hugh’s astonished
gaze, she said, her mistress had ordered, and
that she, Mrs. Ripley, wished to speak to him a
few moments in her own room. Bidding Sarah
remain with Walter, and persuade him to take
the sustenance, which his weariness rendered
so necessary, Hugh went to his mother; she

had been evidently weeping —at this unusual
106 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

proof of feeling, Hugh’s astonishment was
great, but before he could enquire its cause,
she spoke.

‘Hugh, my dear, good son, how can I thank
you, what a lesson you have taught me. I
have learnt from that poor boy the sacrifice
you have made for me, and I will not, must
not be behind hand in generosity, go I beseech
you, at once to that poor girl, marry her,
Hugh, as you had meant to do, bring her here
until you find her a more fitting home, she
shall receive a mother’s welcome and you, my
boy, a mother’s blessing, —no words, no ex-
cuses ;” she said, interrupting him as he was
about to reply, “you have no faith perhaps in
sudden reformation, let me tell you, it has not
been sudden; since you first sought me out and
so generously spent your hardly earned money

in my behalf, I awoke to the sense of the miser-
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 107

able existence I had been passing, and envied
you the happiness you must feel in thus be-
stowing it on others — I little thought at what
a sacrifice, and now I will not keep you a
moment longer from your own happiness —
Go back with this poor child, and when we
meet again let it be with your wife, — don’t be
alarmed, we shall find enough for us all, go, my
boy, go ;” she wrung his hand warmly, would
hear no words, and in another hour Hugh and

Walter were on their way back.

The large red harvest moon was in its undis-
turbed and tranquil beauty gazing down on a
scene of anxiety and confusion, for the whole
village was up and searching for the missing
Walter. For some hours Margaret imagined
he had only gone on one of his long wanderings,

and till late in the evening did not become
108 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

anxious, — for poor girl, there was a feeling of
such utter desolation at her heart, that she bore
everything with a passive indifference from
which she felt it impossible to rouse herself,
but as the night came on she grew painfully
anxious and the neighbours who all loved
Walter went out in numbers to search for him,
but in vain.

That night and the whole of next day and
night, they ceased not their search until Mar-
garet’s agony of terror rendered her so ill, that
she could not pursue it further, and Mrs.
Hopwood, who had been very kind, sat up
with her until the morning. At an early hour
she left her to arrange her own house, and
Margaret rose and sat by the window to catch
the first glimpse of him, for whom she watched
sO anxiously.

The horn of the stage coach, stopping at the
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 109

Inn close by, rang on the clear morning air,
and then a voice, a joyous voice singing a wild
song made Margaret spring from her seat and
fly to open the door, but her senses seemed to
forsake her, as two figures stood before her,
and she remembered no more until warm and
fervent words awoke her to consciousness, and
opening her eyes she found herself supported
in the arms of Hugh Ripley, with her dear
Walter standing beside her.

They had much to say,— much to explain
on both sides, and their long conversation
ended of what had passed, they began to talk
of arrangements for the future, and it was
settled they should go at once to town,
Margaret remaining with Mrs. Ripley until
her term of mourning for her poor father was
ended, during that time Hugh should stay

in the Woodcote house, which having been
110 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

Ford’s own property was left to his daughter,
and where of course they would eventually
return, and reside. Margaret would now have
been perfectly happy but for the painful recol-
lection that her Father had died with a bad
impression of Hugh. As he was insensible for
many days before his death Margaret never
heard the sentence, the cruel sentence revoked,
which forbade her writing to him; “and I
could not, dear Hugh,” she said, lifting her
beautiful, tearful eyes to his face, “do that
when he was gone, which he objected to whilst
he lived ; could I, dear Hugh ?”

“No, my darling, but I was hardly used, —
however that is past now, we have both suf-
fered much, but it will make us appreciate
more than ever our coming happiness; and
shall we not more than ever love dear Walter,

who has done so much for us both, — but
THE DREAM CHINTZ. lll

for him, Margaret, we might never have
met again.”

“TI cannot love him more, but I shall never
forget what he has done,” said Margaret, “his
simple act of love for me destroyed the wall
of pride you had built up between us, Hugh,
and I have indeed good cause to bless and
thank him.”

It is New Year’s Eve again, a twelvemonth
has rolled away since Hugh sat so moodily, so
hopelessly in his lodging ; where shall we find
him now?

There is a bright, a very bright light in that
cottage near the Church, once inhabited by old
Ford — we will look for him there. There
might well be a bright light, for what a log of
wood is blazing and crackling on those old

dogs. It throws a ruddy glow on the faces of
112 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

the inmates of the room. Ishe there? Yes,
standing with one arm thrown round his young
wife, the other raised in the attitude of requiring
silence—on the ground, his head on his
sister’s lap, twining his hat with Holly, is
Walter, and on the other side of the fire a
lady sits with her work in her hand, not
working at that moment, but listening as the
others are.

On the still night air comes the booming
sound of the church-clock striking twelve — at
the last stroke the Chimes burst forth.

“God bless you, my gentle Margaret, and
send you many happy years, and God be
thanked that as my wife I may thus clasp you
to my heart, and breathe this earnest prayer,
which last year I uttered so hopelessly.”

*“When you have done kissing Margaret,
my son, I should like to kiss you,” said Mrs.
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 113

Ripley; “and tell you,” she continued, her eyes
filling with tears, as Hugh moved from his
wife, and put his arm affectionately round his
mother, “how I thank you for all you have
done for me,—how I have contrasted this
New Year’s Eve with the one I passed a
twelvemonth since,—alone in that dreary
house. I owe this happy change to you, my
son, and may you be rewarded by many, many
happy years to come.’

“Thank you, dear Mother, how indebted we
all are to one another, and to none more than
our dear Walter, to him I owe my present
position, my wife and all I most value.”

‘¢ Even HE does not live in vain, Hugh,” said
Margaret in alow voice to her husband, half
smiling as she spoke.

“Qh! Margery, do not remind me of my
folly —experience has shewn me that the

I
1]4 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

mighty Creator of all, made nothing in vain,
that all earthly events are directed by unerring
wisdom and infinite love, and that an humble
dependence on that wisdom, and perfect faith
in that love is the only sure way of securing
to all, the utmost amount of happiness which
is permitted us in this world.”

“Well, my dear Hugh,” said Mrs. Ripley,
“T hope you will meet the reward, your good-
ness and talents deserve.”

“My dear Mother, I consider myself more
than rewarded.”

“Ah! I do not, the extraordinary sensation
_ created by your Chintz should have made you
by this time an independent man, and I con-
sider Mr. Longman has been rather unfair to
you.” .

“Well,” said Hugh laughing, “we will not

discuss this topic at so late an hour, for I know
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 115

it is a sore point with you. I have arrived at
a greater amount of happiness than I ever ven-
tured to hope for, and I am contented, — so
now, dear Mother, let us pray Heaven that we
may not be worse off next year, and then I
think we shall have nothing to complain of, —
and now to bed.”

The next morning all were a-stir early.
Walter was off to the wood to seek for his
gifts, and each member of the little household
had some business to transact, having com-
pany to dinner. At the early post came a
letter for Hugh from his employer Mr. Long-
man, no uncommon occurrence, for he often
wrote to him — but Hugh had scarcely come to
the conclusion, ere with a face of mysterious
import, he called his wife and mother to hear
its contents.

It began by expressing in very warm terms
116 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

his high opinion of Hugh’s character and
talent, and of the unbounded and extraordinary
popularity of the Chintz pattern, which being
so great, he, Mr. Longman felt he ought in
justice, to make Mr. Ripley a sharer in the
enormous profits, and concluded by begging
his acceptance of an enclosed Draft, many
more of which he hoped to have the plea-
sure of sending him.

Amazed and delighted at this stroke of good
fortune, Hugh wrote a warm letter of thanks”
to Mr. Longman, and the following New Year
found him and his sweet wife in comfortable
independence, indebted for it to the miraculous,

and henceforth so called,

Bream ChHhints.
THE DREAM CHINTZ. 117

Years, long years have passed, — and since
then many other wonders of far greater mag-
nitude have engaged attention;— the beauti-
ful pattern is extinct, few now remember it,
and Margaret, Hugh and poor Walter sleep
beneath “those grey stones ” with the friends
who had loved them in their lives, and who
one by one had gone before, marshalling the
way to that “ beautiful Country” to which,
soon after the gay wedding, Whitelock, the
old grave-digger, had departed— but still in
the heart of one of the oldest inhabitants
of Woodcote its memory lingers, and every
New Years Eve, she takes from her trea-
sures a small piece of Chintz, and tells
her wondering and attentive little grand-
children, how the Fairies made that pattern

for their great-grandfather, and how on
118 THE DREAM CHINTZ.

moonlight nights they hover over his grave,

and that of their great Uncle, whom they

always loved and watched over — dear simple

Walter Ford.


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JUST PUBLISHED

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HAND BOOK

FOR

THE USE OF VISITORS

TO

HARROW-ON-THE-HILL:

Containing A Topographical and Historical Account
of the Parish of Harrow,

AND

THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL FOUNDED BY JOHN LYON;
WITH A DIRECTORY
Comprising the Residences of the neighbouring Gentry,
Tradesmen, &c.,

WITH SIX WOOD ENGRAVINGS
From Original Drawings by FREDERICK SKILL.
EDITED
BY THOMAS SMITH,

AUTHOR OF AN HISTORICAL AND TOPOGRAPHICAL

ACCOUNT OF THE PARISH OF ST,

MARY-LE-BONE,.
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OPINIONS OF THE PRESS.

THE LITERARY GAZETTE.



“THIS is a nice guide, and very complete description of the
interesting parish of Harrow— of the visible church on the
hill— of the important grammar school founded by John
Lyon, yeoman, in 1571 —of the distinguished characters it
has sent into the busy world—and of all the particulars
which can interest visitors to the pleasing scenery in this
neighbourhood, including the rich pastures of Perivale.”

THE SPECTATOR.

“THis is a good account of Harrow and its vicinity ; dis-
playing more original research and information than is found
in the mass of guide-books. But it is rather a topographical
history than a guide.”

THE CRITIC.

“It is wonderful that Harrow should so long have been
without a help for visitors such as that which Mr. Smith has
now provided. ‘‘ The road from London to Harrow,” and then
“The Parish,” are described. The ‘‘ Early History,” is told
at some length, and every object, natural and artistic, per-
sonal and general, past and present, is described with much
minuteness, and in such a way as to afford really pleasant
reading. Such chapters as ‘Views from Harrow,” and
“Eminent Harrovians,” are rarely found in small guide
books — still we should miss them much if absent here. The
illustrations add to the completeness of the book.’

THE WEEKLY TIMES.

“Harrow, with its pleasant historical associations, its
ancient and far famed grammar school, its still more ancient
and equally celebrated church, and its varied and beautiful
scenery, has—singularly enough — never yet found a his-
torian to record its merits in a substantive publication, till
Mr. Smith—already favourably known in this branch of
literature by his excellent ‘ Account of Marylebone” — sup-
plied the desideratum in the work before us, chiefly from his
own personal experience, and from authentic information,
gained principally upon the spot. We congratulate him on
the excellence of his little publication, which is truly valuable
from its copiousness and simplicity. While nothing has
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escaped his notice relating to the parish and the school, he
has rendered his handbook complete, by giving an account
of the road from London to Harrow, of the various modes of
conveyance thither, the inns and houses of entertainment,
and a vast amount of valuable, interesting, and instructive
miscellaneous matter. With respect to the style of writing,
the text is really exceedingly good, and just what it ought to
be. The book is well got up, and prettily illustrated with
wood engravings from original designs by that rising and
clever artist, Mr. Frederick Sklll.”’

THE County HERALD.

“THE above little work, containing a topographical and his-
torical account of Harrow, has been brought under our notice,
and we confess to an agreeable surprise that there is so much
to tell of the place. Mr. Smith, the Editor, appears to have
been moved to the task of giving a *‘ Hand Book” to Harrow
in justice to its many beauties and celebrities. Hitherto, it has
been without such an interpreter, but we are now well pleased
to find the void has been so ably supplied. The materials of
which the book is composed are no hasty collection ; a great
portion of them evidently carefully prepared, no doubt, by the
friends who have assisted, of whom honourable mention is
made in the Preface, particularly of Mr. W. Winkley, jun.,
who is, we know, a staunch supporter of the name and fame of
Harrow.

The views from Harrow are too well known to need des-
cription. The book contains a wood-cut of the western view
from the Church-yard at a spot now known as Byron’s Tomb.
It is the grave of one Peachey, but Byron made it his fa-
vourite sitting place, and the Poet’s fame has eclipsed the
Memorial of poor Peachey. We have an account of the
Church with its monuments and brasses, among the former
that of the Founder of Harrow School, John Lyon, made more
famous by Dr. Parr’s elegant inscription. The School, the
chief celebrity, occupies a fitting place in the ‘ Hand Book.”
We have the whole rise and progress of this fashionable
School, and a record of the men who have been educated
here and established its name. Bruce, Dr. Parr, Sheridan,
Sotheby, Byron, Peel, Palmerston, Cottenham, will uphold
it as long as the world lasts, and shed a halo on Harrow that
will inspire future pupils. Aw reste, we have a complete

K
Works Published by
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statistical account of Harrow and its neighbourhood, and

a copious Directory to the inhabitants that will be found very
useful.”

THE SunpDAY TIMES.

‘‘THE present little volume, which contains a topographical
and historical account of the Parish of Harrow and of the
Grammar School founded by John Lyon, is edited by Mr.
Thomas Smith, author of an historical and topographical
account of St. Marylebone. The information which it affords
is full and copious, and appears to have been collected with
considerable industry and care.”

&
BELL’s WEEKLY MESSENGER.

“The title of this volume sufficiently explains its nature
and object; and when we say that the editor has had access
to the best authorities, and has been assisted by Mr. W.
Winkley, the vestry clerk of Harrow, we have said enough to
show that the result of his labours is a book which cannot
fail to impart to the casual visitor to this celebrated seat of
learning a high degree of gratification, while to the inhabitants
of the town and nelghbourhood, its value will be of a more
enduring nature.”

JUST PUBLISHED, Price 1s.

With Illustrations on Wood by C. H. Weicatt,
THE UGLY DUCK,

OF HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN,
VERSIFIED

By the Author of “Tur Turee Bears,”

‘An Hour at Bearwoop,”
AND
“Tue Great Bear’s Srory.”
Works Published by
W. N. WRIGHT, BOOKSELLER TO THE QUEEN,
60, Pall Mall.



A New Book of Eastern Travel.

EL YDAIOUR, (The Wanderer.)

By CHRISTOPHER PEMBERTON HODGSON.
Author of Reminiscenses of Australia, &c.

“‘ Sphynxes and Tryphons, hieroglyphics, all,
Grinned but the tell-tales of an Empire’s fall.”

Foolscap 8vo., Morocco cloth, Price 6s.
Notices of the Press.

“This account of travels in some of the principal
countries in the East, is written in a very sprightly and
discursive style, and is extremely entertaining. The au-
thor visited successively Egypt, Arabia, Abyssinia, Ceylon,
and Hindostan. There is originality, in some instances
approaching to eccentricity, in the author’s views and
ideas; his descriptions of scenery are animated, and his
sketches of the manners of the natives of the East, graphic
and characteristic.” Morning Herald.

“It was Katerfelto, we believe, who wrote a tour,
which commenced, ‘‘ Having travelled all over the world,
full gallop on horseback ;’’ and the nearest in extent and
speed to that illustrious wanderer, we think we must
rank Mr. Hodgson. He has flown all over the world
like a swallow skimming the surface of a lake; and, like
the bird, dipped here and there to pick up something or
other for book-making, if not for nest-building. His
movements are certainly far and wide, and his evolutions
rapid; but still he has aggregated enough to furnish
plenty to the spectator, or in this case, reader.”

Literary Gazette.

‘Having accompanied our author through varied
scenes of Eastern life, and acquiesced in most of his ob-
servations and opinions, we close our notice with a strong
recommendation to our readers to follow our example.
It is just the sort of volume to beguile a long winter even-
ing. And though the cold winds kowl without, and the
rain falls, the curtains are drawn close, the fire burns
- Works Published by
W. N. WRIGHT, BOOKSELLER TO THE QUEEN,
: 60, Pall Mail.

brightly, and the reader sits in his easy chair, yet in imagi-
nation he may be transported to the bright blue Mediter-
ranean, where, on board a felucca, he skims the placid, lake-
like sea, whose Shores are hallowed by many a classic
memory and glow with natural beauties. Page after page
the reader turns, unable to resist the inspiriting narrative
which seems to realise the velocity it describes. We
reiterate our recommendation that this pleasant little
volume should be read.” The Critic.

A TRAP TO CATCH A SUNBEAM.

SEVENTEENTH EDITION,
By the Author of ‘‘ Otp JouuirreE,” &c.
Price One Shilling.

Notices of the Press.
“‘The moral of this charming little Christmas Tale,
is of universal application, every one of us, high and low,
may derive a lesson from old Davip CoomBeE and the

sparkling fairy; every one of us may further learn how
to catch a sunbeam.” - Morning Post.

“We cannot but look on this wee book but as the
work of one of those wee fairies who delight in perform-
ing services for the human race: such as, sweep the
house, skim the milk, churn the butter, and execute
many other useful and agreeable services, whilst families

are fast asleep, and only wake to discover how kind the
tiny elves have been.

Aide toi, et le ciel t?aidera, is the moral of this pleasant
and interesting story, to which we assign in this Gazette
a place immediately after Charles Dickens’ as its due,
for many passages not unworthy of him and for a general -
scheme quite in unison with his best feelings toward the
lowly and depressed.

Like the Christmas volume just gone before, it is of a
nature to awaken the kindlier sympathies of the heart,
and direct the mind to the only true source of happiness—
that of not being indifferent to, but desirous to promote
the happiness of our fellow creatures. The hero is an
Works Published by
W. N. WRIGHT, BOOKSELLER TO THE QUEEN,
60, Pall Mall.

old cobbler of the name of David Coombe, who is led by
a Sunbeam to forsake squalor and apathy for cleanliness
and activity.” Literary Gazette.

** This is one of the most charming stories we ever
read; it may be compared to a new-found violet, or an
early primrose, or the first May rose, or the song of the lark
floating between heaven and earth; it is real, simple, pure
in intention, and full of the best philosophy. We thank
the author heartily, and hope Easter, Midsummer, or at
furthest, Christmas, may bring us such another story.”

Art Journal.

‘‘ This pretty little tale was suggested by the whim-
sical wish expressed by a friend to the author, on a dark
and wintry day, that it were possible ‘‘to catch a sun-
beam.” On that hint he spake and produced a story in
which he shows how energy, perseverance, industry,
charity, faith, hope and content, will gild as with a sun-
beam the dullest days, and make the lowliest habitation
cheerful. In the short and simple history of the adven-
tures of one Davip Coomsg, this philosophy is illus-
trated. The author has more of the manner of DICKENS
than any of his imitators. It is a sweet bit of Christmas
fire-side narrative.” The Critic.

** A charming little Christmas Story in forty pages, with
an illustrated title page, full of pictorial and poetic beauty.
In the opening we are introduced as follows to the hero
of the story.”

Here occurs a long quotation from the tale.
For the further fortunes of poor David Coombe the
cobbler, we refer our readers to this fairy little book of
loveliness.” Shropshire Conservative.

* ONLY.”

A TALE FOR YOUNG AND OLD.
FirtH EpITIon.
By the Author of “ A TRap To CATCH A SUNBEAM,” &c.
Price 1s. 6d.
Notices of the Press.
“ The charming tale with the quaint title of “ Only ,,
Works Published by
W. N. WRIGHT, BOOKSELLER TO THE QUEEN,

60, Pall Mall.



discloses two phases of ordinary life, one in the upper,
the other in the lower ranks of society.

In one series of tableaux, we behold a family reduced
from affluence to the dependence on the bounty of the
benevolent, by the folly of the father in yielding to every
expense—without judgment, thought, or calculation—
on the plea that each sum was “only” a trifle; and by
the weakness of the mother in not resisting a bad habit
that she foresaw would lead to ruin; and we see the
danger to which the children of these parents were ex-
posed from the tendency to follow the parental example.
In the other series is exhibited the fall of a family in
humble life from a sufficiency, to poverty, and the doors
of a workhouse, by the indolent, reckless habits of the
man and the hard-hearted over-grasping selfishness of
the woman. In both families we distinguish many traits
of sterling worth, and in all the members some good
disposition, that only requires cultivation to bear whole-
some fruit. > ” + * * * ”

The value of this little tale must not be estimated by
its size. It is simple in its incidents; the narrative
possesses a fresh and girlish grace ; it abounds in passages
of gushing eloquence; it is fragrant with expressions
truly original; it is composed in pure English, such as
our most popular novelists would be none the worse for
imitating; above all, it is written with the laudable in-
tention of reminding us just now that we all have our
faults, and that this is a peculiar fitting season for us to
atone for our sins by charity and by assisting those who
need our help.” Morning Post.

“The moral of this tale is more earnestly enforced
than in the preceding interesting justly-favourite produc-
tions from the same pen ; and is, in great measure, more
applicable to grown-up people in the world than to the
mere exemplary teaching of the young. For them, the
boy and girl Vernon are the lessons; but for their elders,
the previous lives of their father and mother, and other
characters, possess the spirit and influence of works of
more extended and elaborate fiction. In all instances
the danger of the fatal ‘“‘ Only” is exhibited, and the se-
rious evils which emanate from transgressions in trifles,
and the want of firmness to act decisively, and without
deviation from the right line of conduct in small matters,
Works Published by
W. N. WRIGHT, BOOKSELLER TO THE QUEEN,
60, Pall Mall.

are conscientiously deduced from the premises. The
story is cleverly and dramatically constructed; and the
actors in it, both high and low, naturally drawn. The
portion in the humblest ranks is indeed so close to
reality, that we wonder how the young and fair author
could depict it so truly. It shows how talent can make
much out of rare chances for limited observation. The
sketches of the self-indulgent Martin and his scolding
wife are capital in their way.” Literary Gazette.

“A MERRY CHRISTMAS.”

SECOND EDITION

By the Author of ‘‘ Onty,” ‘fA Trap To CaTCcH
A SUNBEAM,” &c.
Price One Shilling.
“Tis greatly wise to talk with our past hours ;
And ask them what report they bore to Heaven.”
Young’s Night Thoughts.
From the St. James’s Magazine.

“A few months since we had the gratification of recom-
mending the beautiful Tale of “‘Only;” and it is now
with equal pleasure, that we call attention to the little
work before us. The story is prettily conceived and well
told, the characters, especially the old misanthrope Peter
Pringle, naturally drawn, and the moral, admirably incul- .
cated, and yet the space occupied is but a tiny volume
of less than fifty pages. The Author of ‘‘ Only” never
fails to awaken our kindliest sentiments, to throw a
charm and freshness round the scenes described, and to
enlist our best feelings in the cause of benevolence and
truth. We will give no insight into the plot of ‘A
Merry Christmas,” but leave the wee tome to win its
own way to the cordial and well merited favour of the
public. To add to the attraction, Mr. John Teuniel,
whose recent fiesco of St. Cecilia in the House of Lords
is so much admired, has ornamented the cover with a
very tasteful design.”

From The Critic.

“ A short tale, delightfully written, full of quiet humour,
and enriched with a vein of poetry that runs through it,
recommending it to the season from which it takes its
name.
Works Publisded by
W. N. WRIGHT, BOOKSELLER TO THE QUEEN,
60, Pall Mall.

‘‘The Author’s power of composition is such, that we
should anticipate a great treat from a formal novel in
whih he might give full play to the genius that is so
visible in the small books, to -which he has hitherto re-
stricted his pen. Why does he not try ?”

With numerous Illustrations,
Price 2s. each Plain, or 3s. Coloured.

THE STORY OF THE THREE BEARS.

SEVENTH EDITION.

AN HOUR AT BEARWOOD, OR THE WOLF AND
THE SEVEN KIDS; Tuirp EpITIon.
THE GREAT BEAR’S STORY, OR THE VIZIER
AND THE WOODMAN ; SEconp EpITION.
The above Stories are in Verse, and may be had, bound

together in 1 vol. Price 5s. plain, or 8s. coloured.

Notices of the Press on the First Editions of
Otp JoLiirFE and SEQUEL.

Morning Post.

** Old Jolliffe’ is not a mere talker, he acts up to his
philosophy, as those who read the book may see; and it
well deserves the pains, being short, fanciful, unaffected,
and exquisitely written; moreover its motto is ‘ cheer
up and despond not,” which entitles it to a place equally
in the sumptuous library of the rich, and the plain deal
shelf of the poor man who reads, and reads with the
intent of nourishing his mind with the dictates of truth
and blessings of religion.”’

Spectator.

“A most charming little work written in a pleasant

flowing veim of the purest philanthropy.”

John Bull.

“This is a well imagined and equally well executed
little work.”