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First steps in general knowledge

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First steps in general knowledge part IV the vegetable kingdom
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First steps in general knowledge
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FIRST STEPS

IN

GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

PART IV.
THE VEGETABLE KINGDOM.

PUBLISHED UNDER. THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION,
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.



LONDON:
Printed for the
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE;
SOLD AT THE DEPOSITORY,
GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN’S INN FIELDS,
4, ROYAL EXCHANGE, AND 16, HANOVER STREET, HANOVER SQUARE;
AND BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.

18538.



LONDON :
GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, PRINTERS,
ST. JOHN’S SQUARE.





ConNVERSATION I.

THE

II.

III.

IV.

VI.

VII.

VIII.

CONTENTS.

VEGETABLE KINGDOM.

FLOWERLEsS PLants. Sea-weeds —
Mushrooms—Lichens .......ccseceeeseeeee
———— Mosses and Ferns ............0000«
FLOWERING PLANTS. ENDOGENS:
Grasses, Sedges, 826. 2. .ercscccrcscccecseeee
——~—— Palm, Amaryllis, Iris, Ginger,
Arrowroot, Orchis, Rush, Autumn
Crocus, and Lily Tribes ..........sssseeee
ExocGeEns: Pine, Yew, Beef-wood, Willow,
Nettle, Hemp, Mulberry, and Plane
TIDES ..0.00.000 000 060 000 cvecee cee coe cee pee eee coceee
————-Spurgewort, Mastwort, Walnut,
Nutmeg, Cucumber, Begonia, Papaw,
Passion-flower, Violet, Tamarisk, and
Houseleek Tribes 10.00. cccccsccecescccccecce
Cistus, Cruciferous, Migno-

nette, Cotton, Nasturtium, Lime, Milk-
wort, and Soapwort Tribes ..........0.00
———— Ranunculus, Poppy, Fumitory,

Sun-dew, Barberry, and Vine Tribes...

PAGE

21

33

45

65

81

99

120



CONTENTS.

CONVERSATION IX. ExoGcens: Heath, Rue, Flax, Balsam,

XI.

XII.

Geranium, Wood-sorrel, Clove, Buck-
wheat, Goosefoot, Leguminous, Al-
mond, Apple, and Rose Tribes .........
Saxifrage, Hydrangea, Loose-

strife, Elm, Buckthorn, Spindle, Gen-
tian, Ebony, Holly, Nightshade, Olive,
Convolvulus, Dodder, Tobacco, Thrift,
Plantain, Primrose, Jasmin, Borage,
Labiate, Verbena, Figwort, Butterwort,
Campanula, and Scabious Tribes ......
Composite, Evening Primrose,
Myrtle,Cactus, Currant, Syringa, Cran-
berry, Coffee, Honeysuckle,and Galium
PON Bctddecnctese seccdcerecccenseeecnccenees
Umbelliferous, Ivy, Cornel,
Witch-hazel, Sandalwort, Loranth, and
Birth wort Tri00s 10. .0c00ecceces soc eve cee cee cee

PAGE

133

151

166

178 '





FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

PART FOURTH.

The Wegetable Kingdom.

CONVERSATION I.

SEA-WEEDS—MUSHROOMS—LICHENS.

Ir was a lovely April morning: the sun shone
brightly after heavy showers ; the birds sang joy-
ously among the trees, and scattered rain-drops as
they flitted from bough to bough: every plant
was laden with moisture, and the thickly blos-
somed cherry on the garden wall had showered
down its* beautiful petals under the influence of
the driving rain. The gravel-pathy afforded the
only dry walking ground, and he ght be seen
three young folks, newly escaped from their morn-

|



.

2 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

ing studies, and now driving the hoop, or tossing
the ball with much glee.

An hour quickly passed away in this manner,
but when their father came out to take his morn-
ing walk, they hastily laid aside their games, and
begged that they might accompany him.

“The roads are too wet for you at present,”
said he, “but as you seem tired of play, I will
spend a few minutes with you before I take my
walk, and we will see if the garden affords an
example of the lowest order of plants; for I
have not forgotten my promise to give you the
same kind of sketch of the Vegetable Kingdom,
which I did last autumnof the Animal Kingdom.”

“Oh, thank you—thank you, papa,” said all
three, and Henry added “ that he thought it must
be the very best time to learn about plants, now
they were all springing up afresh, and now the
crocuses and snowdrops and violets were so beau-
tiful.” He was surprised, however, to see that his
father passed by all the flower-beds, and went to
a part of the garden where nothing seemed to be
growing. -. under the shelter of a wall, and
where the path was very damp, he began to take
up a portion of the green coating which covered it.



LOWEST FORMS OF VEGETABLES. 3

“What are you going to do with that green
stuff, papa?” said Robert ; ‘there is plenty of it
on the glass of the hothouse ; and there was a great
deal on the rocks last summer, close by the sea.”

‘“‘T am going to show it to you under the micro-
scope, as an example of the lowest stage of vege
table life. Some of the plants of this order come
so near the lowest tribes of animals, that even the
best naturalists find it difficult to decide between
them.”

“Why do they not watch them very closely, to
see whether they move?” asked Mary.

“Even that will not decide the matter, for some
of these plants move about in water by means of
little cilia, or hairs, exactly like certain animals.”

“That is very odd,” said Henry; “how ean
people possibly find out which is which ?”

“The only certain distinction which I have
heard of is one that can only be proved by scien-
tific persons ; it is the presence of starch, which is
found in many of these tribes, and which is known
to be a vegetable and not an animal production.
Still, there are mysteries in this subject known
only to that Infinite Being who planned and
executed the wonderful scheme of creation.”

B 2



4 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘‘T never see any of that green slime,” said
Mary, “‘ except in very wet places.”

“ And for a good reason,” replied her father ;
“all the plants of this lowest race are inhabitants
of the water, both fresh and salt; and when a
path becomes soaked with rain, as this is, and the
water settles for some time on the surface, then do
these minute plants spring up, giving a greenish
tinge to the ground.”

‘*‘ And what is the name of these water plants?”
asked Henry.

‘The great tribe to which they belong is that
of the Alga.”

“« Algze,” said Mary, ‘‘is the word which mamma
wrote in our book of dried sea-weed, and I thought
it meant sea-plants.”

‘So it does; but it also includes their fresh
water relations, of which very many families are
of this slimy character, and inhabit still waters
and oozy places in the northern parts of the
world.”

Henry took up a bit of the damp earth that
was covered with this green substance, and he
found that it fell to pieces very easily, and that
there were no roots to the tiny plants to bind it



Â¥

a SEA-WEEDS. 5

together. His father told him that this tribe of
plants has been called drittleworts, on account of
their so easily breaking into fragments.

“There is another order of algze,” he continued,
‘where many of the plants are red, violet, or olive,
instead of green, although they are found in fresh
as well as in salt water. They are called con-
ferve, and some are remarkable for the colour
they give to the water. The Red Sea appears to
have derived its name from the multitude of
minute conferve often seen floating in its waters.
A French writer* tells us that as he entered this
sea by the straits of Babelmandel, in July, 1843,
he was astonished to find the waters stained red, as
far as the eye could reach. Collecting some of the
water, he found it to be covered with a thin layer
of a brickdust colour. This layer changed in the
course of the day to a deep violet colour, but the
water itself was tinged with a beautiful rose-
pink.”

“T am glad they found out what it was,” said
Henry, “ for.I have heard that common sailors are
superstitious, and perhaps they would have fancied
they were sailing through a sea of blood.”

* Dupont.



6 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE. +

‘Other families of these plants make the water
green, or brown, or violet,” said his father; ‘‘so
that we need not be surprised at any wonderful
- stories we read about the colour of the sea. It
also sometimes happens that when meadows are
long under water, they are covered to the depth
of an inch with an entangled layer of similar
plants, almost like woollen cloth, and which is
commonly called water-flannel.”

** Are these plants of any use?” asked Robert.

‘“f do not know of any use in the smaller
species; but some of the larger confervee, called
Laver, are eaten by many persons, either stewed
or pickled. Yet we may be quite sure that it is
for some wise purpose that God has filled the seas
and rivers with such multitudes of these plants.
Another order of algze contains the different kinds
of Fucus, or Sea-wrack, some of which are used
as food by the poorer classes of Ireland, Scot-
land, Iceland, &c. Some are also employed as
manure, and are of importance in the manufacture
of glass and of soap, on account of the quantity of
impure soda (called kelp) which is obtained from
them. Those large dark-looking weeds, with air-
bladders in their leaves, which you called your



FUCUS, OR SEA-WRACK. 7

weather-glass, were some of the common kinds of
sea-wrack.”



FUCUS CANALICULATUS,

‘Those were the weeds you said were useful in
medicine, papa.”



8 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

“Yes; they contain iodine, *which is particu-
larly useful in those swellings of the throat called
goitre. In some parts of South America where
this disease is common, the inhabitants chew the
stem of these weeds, and call them by a name
which means, ‘ goitre-stick.’”

‘‘ Some of the stems are very thick,” said Mary ;
“and one very tough sort, 1 remember, you called
‘sea-girdles.’”-

“Did I tell you of the odd use these girdles
are sometimes put to? They are cut in pieces .
about four inches long, and while they are fresh,
the hilt of a pruning-knife is stuck into each
piece. As the stem dries, it clings closely to the
hilt and forms a good and strong handle, and from
its withered and brown appearance it’ looks very
much like buck’s-horn, especially when tipped with
metal. Thus a number of knives can be easily
and cheaply finished off.”

The children thought the sea-wracks very use-
ful weeds, especially when they found, that if fuel
is scarce, they can be dried and used for that
purpose ; that the young shoots are eaten in Edin-
burgh, as “‘tangles,” and that cattle will thrive
on the plants when boiled. Robert also remem-



ATR-BLADDERS IN SEA-WEEDS. 9

bered that it was from the air-bladders of one of
these weeds* that he made such famous whistleg,
when he was by the sea-side.

‘‘ What are the air-bladders for?” asked Mary.

‘No doubt to support the weeds on the water ;
for some of them are of enormous size and length.
Dr. Hooker saw them high up in the South Seas,
growing in large patches wherever the water was
free of icebergs; the plants were several hundred
feet long, and could scarcely have been supported
without air-bladders. Around the Falkland Islands
they were also very abundant, and sometimes clasped
the rocks, and became tree-like in their form, the
stems being thicker than a man’s thigh, and the
long leaves drooping like the branches of a willow.
Dr. Hooker tells us that no one who has not
actually seen it can form an idea of the amount
of life which is nourished and housed by one of
these tree sea-weeds. Various kinds of worms,
small sponges, corals, crabs, eggs of fish, and
myriads of shells, with their inhabitants, find a
home there, while the lesser sea-weeds cling to it
as moss clings to a large tree.”

“How very different the dark-looking, leathery

* Fucus nodosus.



10 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

sea-wracks are from my beautiful pink sea-weeds !”
said Mary.

‘“ Your pretty specimens,” said her father, “ be-
long to a tribe called Rose-tangles, which are
most of them rose-coloured or purple. Some of
the ocean caves are quite lined with dark red
weeds of this description. Rose-tangles are not
only pretty, but useful; a nourishing jelly is made



DULSE.

from one of them, imprdéperly called Carrageen
moss ; a substitute for tobacco is found in another,
called dulse, which is washed in fresh water, dried



f
ROSE-TANGLES. 11

in the sun, and then rolled up for use, by the Irish
and Scotch. Dulse is also stewed with milk, or
eaten raw with fish. That very — coloured

s

We ij BS A



wahwy
EW LAY a
ay; he > aR at iB
2 SVK ye NY yy
s md aNTy NE Was
YS oxy SA SUR Vay yi a ess
Sy SS »” ss <<
2 y BD AA] AW
: ya y

PINK SEA-WEED.

(Plocamium coccineum.)
weed, in your book, is a great favourite every
where, and may be easily known from other fami-
lies in this tribe by the way in which the branches
are divided. Here, also, we find the beautiful
corallines, of which we have so many specimens
on our shores. There is a small kind of rose-
tangle, which is invaluable to the Chinese as a



«

4 .
12 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

glue and varnish. About 27,000 pounds weight
of this plant are annually brought into Canton,
and sold at sixpence or eightpence the pound.



CORALLINE.

With this they varnish the paper for their
lanterns, and give the beautiful gloss to their
silks; and it seems likewise to be the principal
ingredient in a celebrated transparent composition
which they spread out over slips of bamboo, and
use instead of glass in windows, the bamboo slips
being arranged in the manner of a frame.”



. * my
PLANTS OF STAGNANT WATERS. 13

Mary was delighted to find that the beautiful
rose-tangles served so many useful purposes in
the world; and she was amused to hear that the
eatable birds’-nests, which her brothers had so
often laughed at the Chinese for being so fond of,
are supposed to be made of some of these weeds ;
so that, after all, in devouring the nests, the people
are, perhaps, only eating a jelly, such as we get
from the carrageen and other plants of this family.
Her father told her that the only remaining alge
he had to mention were weeds of ill odour, living
in stagnant water, either fresh or salt, and having
their stems often coated over with carbonate of
lime. They are upright tubes, with whorls of
smaller tubes surrounding the stem, and are
called Charas.

The children were much pleased with what they
had heard of the great tribe of plants that inhabits
the waters; and Mary thought it would be a won-
derful sight if any one could look down into the
deep deep sea, where so many beautiful things
are growing.

“There are no storms there,” she said, “for
I have learned some pretty lines that tell me
So.



é

14 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘“* ¢ The water is calm and still below,
For the winds and waves are absent there,
And the sands are bright as the stars that glow
In the motionless fields of upper air ;
There, with its waving blade of green,
The sea-flag streams through the silent water,
And the crimson leaf of the dulse is seen
To blush like a banner bathed in slaughter.
There, with a slight and easy motion,
The fan-coral sweeps through the clear deep sea,
And the yellow and scarlet tufts of ocean
Are bending like corn on the upland lea.’ ”

During the foregoing conversation the party
had approached the gate of the orchard, where, in
summer, a few mushrooms occasionally Sprang up.
“In a few weeks,” said their father, “we shall
have to set out for yonder pastures, on our mush-
room expedition. After these rains, it is likely
that they will be numerous; for these plants, like
the alge, are very fond of water, though they do
not live entirely in it.”

‘“We must be careful what we gather,” said
Henry, “for some kinds are poisonous.”

‘The Fungus tribe, which includes our common
mushroom, is a very curious and wonderful race
of vegetables,” said his father, “ springing up with
a rapidity unknown in other plants, and not un-



THE FUNGUS TRIBE. 15

frequently growing many inches in the space of a
night, especially after storms.”

“The large puff-ball we found in the meadow
was a fungus,” said Henry; “and so, I suppose,
are all the plants we call toad-stools: and so are
the beautiful orange-coloured velvety spots we
sometimes find on old fences.”

“Every kind of mouldiness, or mildew, where-
ever we may find it,” added his father, “also pro-
ceeds from the growth of innumerable small fungi.”

“Then the mould I saw in the cellar, and that
on my cup of paste,” said Henry, “must be of
this kind.”

“And that on mamma’s preserves,” said Mary,
“and on the bread when it is very stale. I sup-
pose we may make these plants grow when we
like: it is only to keep our food a long time, and
it will be covered with them. Do they grow from
seed, or what brings them ¢”

“That is one of the mysteries we cannot pene-
trate,” said her father. ‘“‘ We cannot tell how it
is, that in the dark or in the light, in the open air
or in the closet, these plants spring up. Whether
their seeds are so light as to be carried about
invisibly, and lodged in such various places, or



16 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

whether fungi are merely different states of decay-
ing vegetable matter, it is quite impossible to say ;
but this we know, that in a single fungus, a
botanist* reckoned ten millions of seeds, or sporules,
as they are called; and these, which are carried
about like thin smoke, may be conveyed by in-
sects, elasticity, adhesion, or other causes, into
remote places, and spring up when they find a
substance suited to their growth.”

‘How could any one reckon ten millions 2”
asked Henry. ‘I have heard that it would take
about a fortnight to count one million.”

‘In reckoning such minute substances, we do
not, of course, count one by one throughout, but
after finding out how many there are in a certain
space, we multiply the others by them. Thus, if
I wished to reckon the sweet peas your mamma
is sowing in the garden, I would fill a small
measure with the seed, and if I found that it
contained two hundred seeds, I should afterwards
know that every time I filled it there would be that
number, or very nearly. Before we leave the fungi,
I must tell you that they are far more numerous in
many foreign countries than in our own. In

* Fries.



EATABLE FUNGI. | 17

Australia, for instance, they are much used by the
natives, and are also eagerly sought after by the
curious pouched animals of that land.”

Mary asked, if any besides the common mush-
room were eaten in this country; and her father
told her that two other families of fungus are
much esteemed, namely, the Moreland the Truffle ;
the former growing up in beech woods, in a mush-
room shape; the latter, an underground produc-
tion, black and warty on the outside, but white
within. Truffle hunters are assisted by dogs,
whose keen scent enables them to find out the
places where the fungus is growing.

The children were also informed that. the “ dry
rot,” which is so often of serious consequence to
the timbers of ships and buildings, is a fungus ;
also the blight in corn, and the diseases called
“smut,” “ergot,” and ‘“‘rust;” likewise a blighted
appearance on the leaves of some plants, such as
the dingy red spots on the leaves of the pear-tree,
which, on turning up the leaves, are found to be
caused by a small fungus growing on the under
side.

‘* How odd that one vegetable should grow upon
another in that way,” said Robert.

c



18 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘“ You have seen many examples of it in the
lichens you are so fond of collecting,” replied his
father; ‘these, as you know, are very common
on timber and on stone. They gain their nourish-
ment from the atmosphere, and not from the
material on which they grow; therefore they are
not so injurious as the fungus, which is fed out of
the very substance of what it grows upon.”
“How delighted we were,” said Mary, “ when
you first taught us to find lichens. We had no |
idea that the yellow and white patches on the
bark of the elm trees, and the brown and grey
spots on the walls of our house, were all living
vegetables. And then, what beautiful pale grey
lichens we found on the church porch, and even
on the tomb-stones ! they were so flat and close to
the stone that they looked like stains.”

‘‘ Without lichens,” said her father, “ our land-
scapes would lose much of their picturesque beauty,
and our ancient edifices much of their venerable
character. It is remarkable in large and smoky
cities, where lichens do not flourish, how much
less interesting is the appearance of the old build-
ings. The harmonious colouring of these little
plants is there greatly missed.”



LICHENS: THEIR USES. 19

‘‘ Are lichens of any use, papa?” asked Robert.

‘They are of great use in several ways. They
are the first plants to clothe the surface of bare
rocks ; and therefore they are the first vegetable
substances on newly-formed islands in the midst
of the ocean, thus preparing the way for higher .
orders of plants, and finally for the abode of man.
Their domestic uses are of two kinds: some are
nourishing and medicinal in their properties, and
some are valuable as affording dyes. Iceland
Moss * and Rein-deer Moss are both lichens; and
it is from a lichen + that the dye called litmus, or
orchil, is obtained, which is very largely. used by
manufacturers. There is a common lichen, called
Lungs of the Oak, which is also used as a strength-
ening diet for invalids: while in Siberia it is
employed for giving a bitter to beer. These and
many others are therefore of considerable im-
portance.”

‘“ Why does Henry always look out for lichens
that have little cups or shields upon them?” said
Robert.

‘‘ Because these shields contain the spores, or
seed, and the lichen is in perfection when so
* Cetraria islandica. + Rocella tinctoria.

c 2



20 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

adorned. Some of these shields, as you remember,
lie flat upon the lichen, others are elevated on
little stalks. They are always best developed in
places fully exposed to the light; hence it is of



‘LUNGS OF THE OAK” LICHEN.

very little use to search for shield-bearing lichens
in shady groves or in the dark clefts of rocks.
You have proved how well lichens can be kept,
. without the trouble in drying which you have
with other plants. Some of those in my cabinet
were gathered twelve years ago, and are very
little altered: and I have seen older collections in
fine preservation.



21

CONVERSATION II.

MOSSES AND FERNS,

Mary had been arranging a cushion of moss on
a china dish, and sticking violets and primroses
among its delicate fibres. This had a pretty
effect, and her mamma praised her spring nosegay.
‘Will you tell us, papa,” said the little girl,
‘‘something about these beautiful mosses, that are
so bright and green long before the leaves of the
trees are out?”

‘* Mosses,” said her father, ‘“‘ are not so simple
in their structure as lichens, and therefore come
higher in the scale of vegetable life. There are
plants nearly related to them, called Liverworts,
‘which are of a somewhat fleshy substance, and
grow only in very damp places. You remember
finding a mass of liverwort on the damp earth
near the pond; it is also to be found on trees in
shady and moist places. A very curious fact con-
nected with liverworts is, that in the little case
which contains the spores there is a spiral thread
lying among them, or sometimes two twisted toge-



22. FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

ther, and contained in a delicate transparent tube.
These threads have a strong elastic force, and
perhaps assist in dispersing the seed.”

Henry asked why they were called liverworts,
and was told that they were formerly used in
liver complaints, and that one of them* is still
thought to be of some value in cases of dropsy.

‘“‘'The mosses in Mary’s nosegay,” said her
father, ‘‘ belong to a vast order, called Urn-mosses,



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URN-MOSS,

their seed-vessels being urn-shaped. You have
often seen on the garden wall small tufts of moss
with a number of slender stalks rising from them,
each stalk supporting one of these little urns.”

* Marchantia hemispheerica.



URN-MOSSES. 23

‘“O yes, papa,” said Mary; ‘“‘and I have looked
at them through Henry’s little microscope, for
mamma told me they were pretty little cups with
lids to them. In some of them the lids had fallen
off, and I saw a number of teeth rising up round
the edge of the cup, like a beautiful fringe. And
mamma said, that if I counted those little teeth,
I should always find them to be four times four,
or four times eight, or four times some other
number.”

‘Yes ; constantly a multiple of four; and all
this regular and beautiful apparatus for the pro-
tection of the minute spores or seeds, which lie
within. These beautiful seed-vessels, as well as
the leafy appearance of the stems in mosses, will
show you that they are considerably raised above
lichens.”

“And are they put to as many uses?” asked
Henry.

“They are not. As far as the immediate
health and convenience of man are concerned,
mosses seem to be of little consequence, except
for the beautiful green carpet they spread under
his feet, in places where little else will grow. But
they perform a similar office to lichens in nature



94. FIRST STEFS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

generally ; preparing waste and barren lands for
higher vegetation, and often existing on the limits
of eternal snow. There are some curious little
reddish or brown mosses *, which cover the rocks
like a mat in such bleak spots, and bear their
seed, not in urns, but in tiny globes. Each globe
is made up of four valves, which split open to let
the seed escape, but are still held together at the
top by a very small lid, which does not fall off as
in the Urn-mosses. ‘These little plants are called
Split-mosses. There are others, called Scale-
mosses, not much unlike these in the shape of the
seed-vessel, but having no lid, so that the four
valves burst quite asunder when the seed is ripe.
Other moss-like plants are called Club-mosses,
because their spore-cases are often collected into a
club-shaped body, not unlike a fir-cone. These
delight in moist and warm climates. Thus, you
see, there is great variety in this humble
family.”

‘** Among them all,” said Mary, ‘‘ what is that
very beautiful pale green moss, which was sent to
mamma from Crowborough, in Sussex, with such
curious horns at the ends of the branches ?”

* Andreea nivalis.



CLU B-MOSSES—FERNS. 95

“It is called Stag’s-horn Moss *, and is one of
the club-mosses I have just referred to.”

‘‘ Near to mosses come those curious plants called
Horse-tails +, which you see in ditches, and often

gather for the purpose
of pulling apart the nu-
merous toothed divi-
sions of the stem. Also
the common duckweed,
and other creeping or
floating plants, its rela-
tions, which are col-
lected under the name
of pepperworts. These
are so simple in their
structure as to be placed
by modern botanists
below ferns, to which
great tribe I now lead
you.”

‘‘T should not have
thought it a great tribe,”
said Henry, ‘for we

* Lycopodium clavatum.



STAG’S-HORN MOSS.
see very few ferns in our walks, compared with
other plants.”

+ Equisetum.



26 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘That is true; but we must not always judge
of a whole tribe of plants by what our own neigh-
bourhood, or even our own country, affords. Ferns
in this country are leafy plants, with stems that
mostly creep along the surface of the earth, or
hide themselves beneath it; but in tropical coun-
tries there are tree-ferns, whose leafless trunks
rise to the height of thirty or forty feet, and send
out an elegant tuft of foliage at the top. And
although many of our woods, and hedgebanks, as
well as our rocks and old walls, are ornamented
with very beautiful kinds of fern, yet these are
not to be compared to the ferns of the tropics, for
number or variety. The island of Jamaica alone
is said to contain at least four times as many
different species as the whole of Great Britain,
and some of them growing to a majestic height.”

‘They may be very large and handsome,” said
Mary, “but I cannot fancy any thing more beauti-
ful than the fern we brought home from the
woods. We little thought, as we scrambled
through a mass of fern leaves, that every one of
them was loaded with hundreds of little seed-
vessels on the under side. It was quite by accident
that I caught sight of them, scattered like little
yellow beads all over the back of the leaf, or



THE LADY-FERN. 27

perhaps I ought to call it the branch, for there
were a great many small leaves upon it.”

“In ferns it is called the frond, and according
to its shape, and the arrangement of the seeds,

you may discover the
name of the. species.
The large frond you
brought from the woods
has the seeds clustered
together, along the mid-
dle vein of each leaflet.
It is called Male Fern*,
on account of its strong
growth and hardy na-
ture. A very delicate
and graceful species is
called Lady Fern, while
anotheriscalled Maiden-
hair.”

Mary remembered
some lines of Sir Wal-
ter Scott’s about the
lady-fern, and she now
repeated them :—



THE LADY-FERN,

* Aspidium Filix, mas.



28 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE,

«Where the copse-wood is the greenest,
Where the fountain glistens sheenest,
Where the morning dew lies longest,
There the lady-fern grows strongest.”’

“The juices of several ferns,” continued her
father, “have been used as medicine, and the
stems of others as food; but their ordinary uses
in this country are merely for thatching, or for
heating ovens, or for horse-litter. But there is
one thing I must not omit to say about the
foreign ferns. Do you remember, Henry, having
your curiosity excited by a picture of a Scythian
lamb, as it was called?”

‘“O yes, papa; it was an odd-looking thing—
half-animal, half vegetable; with four legs that
were exactly like the stalks of a plant.”

‘* That was nothing more than a woolly-stemmed
fern, Barometz, common in the deserts of Scythia,
and which, when deprived of its leaves, and turned
upside down, is not much unlike a lamb, and has
been used to deceive simple people. Ferns are
altogether so curious and interesting, that I hope
you will one day make them a separate study ;
they are the highest forms of flowerless plants,
for you must have noticed that all the tribes we



ARRANGEMENT OF FLOWERLESS FLANTS. 29

have yet spoken of are without blossom of any
kind.”

“ How strange that they should have seeds, and
not flowers!” said Robert.

‘And that the seeds should grow in such odd
places,” said Mary; “some on the backs of the
leaves, and some in little cups, and some in urns,
and some in clubs.”

‘They are not true seeds, therefore you must
learn to call them spores. You must also
understand that these flowerless plants can be
brought under two great divisions: first, those
simple plants in which there is no distinction
of leaf and stem; and secondly, those plants,
whose leaves and stems are quite distinct. Tell
me what you think must belong to the first
division.”

“The green slime we saw in the garden,” said
Robert, ‘‘for even through the microscope it only
looked like a bundle of threads.”

‘“‘And perhaps the sea-weeds,” said Mary, “‘ for
some of them seem all stem, and some of them all
leaf, so that it would not be very easy to find out
a regular stem and leaf on the same plant.”

‘* And I am sure the lichens must belong to the

5



30 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

first division,” said Henry, “for they are leafy or
leathery all over, lying flat on the place where
they grow. Mushrooms have stems, but then they
have no leaves, so I suppose they must come in
the same division.”

‘You are right; and having thus found out the
members of the first division, it follows as a mat-
ter of course, that mosses and ferns come into the
second, for in all these plants leaf and stem are
perfectly distinct. In leaving these flowerless
plants we find the same thing occur, which we so
often noticed in rising from tribe to tribe of the
animal kingdom; I mean that the orders blend
together in so gradual a manner, that we are sure
to find a great likeness to the one we have left, in
that which comes immediately above it. Thus it
happens that the lowest of the flowering plants
look almost like flowering lichens, or mush-
rooms.”

‘Have we ever seen them?” asked Mary.

“You have not, and perhaps you never may in
their own climate; for they are, I believe, wholly
confined to tropical countries. They are parasites
upon roots or trunks of trees, and have no true
leaves, and very little stem: yet they have flowers



A GIANT PARASITE. 3]

growing immediately from the branch of the tree,
and surrounded by scales, which take the place
of leaves.”

“They must look as if they were the blossoms
of the tree itself,” remarked Henry.

‘They cannot be so mistaken,” replied his
father, “‘ because in these parasites the whole plant
is of a uniform dull colour, either brown, yellow, or
purple. The scales that represent leaves, and the
fungus-like mass that sometimes forms a sort of
stem, is never green as in other plants. A giant
parasite of this race*, when in bud, is of the
size of an ordinary cabbage, and when in blossom
measures a yard across.”

“What an enormous blossom!” exclaimed Mary,
“T pity the tree that has to support it. You told
us one day that lazy men and women are called
parasites when they live at the expense of their
friends, without doing any thing for their own sup-
port; this immense flower must be a very expen-
sive parasite, and must wear out the poor tree
very soon.”

“All these strange plants form a sort of inter-

* Rafflesia.



32 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

mediate class between the flowerless and the flower-
ing, and I have mentioned them to you to-day,
because I would not too closely connect them with
the important division of the vegetable kingdom
which will form our next subject.







33

CONVERSATION III.

ENDOGENS.,
GRASSES, SEDGES, &c.

Brerore their papa was ready to tell them about
another division of plants, Mary and her brothers
repeated to each other what they could remember
about that which he had already spoken of; con-
taining, first, plants that have no flowers and no
distinction of leaf and stem, as seaweeds and
lichens ; secondly, those that have no flowers, but
distinct leaves and stems, as mosses and ferns ;
and thirdly, such as have no true leaves or stems,
but perfect flowers, as that strange giant parasite
with blossoms a yard across. They were curious
to know what came next, and they were soon
satisfied, for their father came into the room with
a bundle of dried grasses in his hand, which had
been gathered when in blossom.

“I am obliged to be satisfied with these dry
specimens,” he said, ‘for the spring grass is not
yet forward enough to give you a good idea of
this interesting tribe, We have now arrived at

D



34 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

true flowering plants, of which all the rest of the
vegetable world is made
up; but there is a very
evident difference be-
tween this kind of ve-
getable growth which I
hold in my hand, and
that of trees and shrubs.
Can you tell me what it
ast”

Henry took hold of
some of the grass, and
said, ‘‘ These dried stems
are brittle and jointed,
and when we gathered
them they were tough
and juicy; at first there
was a leaf wrapped
round the blossoms, as
if to take care of them;
Tremember ears of wheat
have just the same sort
of sheath round them
: when they first come
ROUGH-STALKED MEADow-crass, OUT. Trees and shrubs
are very different; they have hard woody stems,





FLOWERING PLANTS. 35

that I can cut pegs and wedges from, and
I never saw this odd sheath round any of their
flowers.”

‘¢ But trees have no flowers,” said Robert.

‘“‘ Indeed they have,” exclaimed his sister, “ and
I wonder you never saw me picking up lime
blossoms and elm blossoms, under the trees. They
are small, but very pretty. I like even the little
purplish laurel blossoms, and the tiny dark flowers
on the arbor vite. And oh how pleasant it is to
go down into the alder bed to get the beautiful
catkins, or to run to the wood for

‘ Hazel-buds with crimson gems,
Green and glossy sallows.’

But perhaps you do not know what sa//ows are :—
they are willows; and you recollect what pretty
green and shining tufts there are at the end of
the willow branches in the early spring.”

“Mary is wild after flowers,” said Robert ;
‘Cand she finds out all the early buds and catkins.
She gathered all these grasses just before hay-
making time last summer.”

“All flowering plants,” said his father, “are
ranged under two great classes, or divisions, called
Endogens and Evxogens, from their manner of

Dd 2



386 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

growth, The stem in the first of these classes
increases inwardly, that in the
second increases outwardly.”
“ Our large trees must in-
crease outwardly,” said Henry,
“for we saw the layers of
wood in the timber that was
felled last year, and you
taught us about the age of a
tree being known by the
number of rings in the trunk.”
“ Hxactly: but these gras-
ses grow in the first place
from within, while their stalks
do not increase outwardly be-
yond a certain size, so that
they belong to the first and
smallest of these two great
divisions.”
Henry wondered how any
‘ one could tell at first sight
whether a plant grew in-
Se wardly or outwardly, and his
father directed him to a sim-
FOX-TAIL GRASS. ple and easy mark of these
different manners of growth.





VEINING OF LEAVES 37

“The plants that increase within,” he said,
‘have the veins of their leaves in straight lines
from one end of the leaf to the other, and those
that increase without, have a beautiful network
of veins all over the leaf. If you collect a few
leaves from the garden you will soon see the
difference.”

The children ran into the flower garden and
gathered such early leaves as they could find, and
bringing them to their father, he held up to the
light a crocus and a hyacinth leaf, and showed
them how beautifully regular are the parallel
veins running from end to end.

“This shows that crocuses and hyacinths are
endogens,” he said; “but if you look at these
lilac and ivy, and primrose and violet leaves, you
see at a glance that the veins branch out from the
rib which runs down the middle of the leaf, and
then subdivide into a kind of network; there-
fore these leaves belong to exogens.”

“Oh yes, papa,” said Mary, ‘‘and that is what
makes skeleton-leaves so pretty. How very easy
it will be to find out which are endogens and
which are exogens; but I wish they had not such
hard names.”



38 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘Those names simply mean, ‘ growing inwardly,”
and ‘growing outwardly ;’ and they are the only
hard names I shall trouble you with for a long
time.”

“And how many plants belong to this straight-
veined division, or endogens?” asked Henry.

“Very many that you are acquainted with, and
very many more that you know nothing about.
In the first place, there is the great tribe contain-
ing the various Grasses which clothe the hills and
valleys with verdure, and in many cases bear
precious grain; for oats, barley, wheat, rye, maize,
and rice, are all produced by plants of this tribe ;
while the inferior kinds of grass feed our flocks
and herds, and thus do us nearly as much service
as the others. But you must not suppose that all
the pastures of the earth consist of the same kind
of short sweet herbage with which our own fields
and meadows are covered. In South America
there are field crops of grass, especially on the
banks of the river Amazon, which grow to the
height of six or seven feet, and yet are perfectly
tender and delicate.”

“We might easily lose ourselves in such a
field as that.” said Henry; “and even tall men



VARIETY OF GRASSES. 39

would not be able to see each other over the tops
of the grass.” °

“On the Falkland Islands there is an extra-
ordinary kind of grass, growing in large tufts or
hillocks, which hide the view of the cattle feeding
among them. I have seen some of this grass
growing in the Botanical Gardens at Kew; but it
was a poor little stunted specimen, compared with
the descriptions of the tussac grass, as it is called,
in its native country.”

“What a good thing it is,” said Robert,
“that grass comes up every where without any
trouble !”

“Tt isa great mercy,” replied his father, ‘that
God has ‘made the grass to grow upon the moun-
tains, and green herb for the service of men.’ It
is also matter for thankfulness that by the skill
and industry of the farmer, our fields are sown
with the best varieties of these grasses, mixed in
such proportions as are suited to the wants of our
cattle. Uncivilized nations move from place to
place in search of fresh pastures; but civilized
people carefully cultivate the same land year after
year, and make it yield as much as possible.”

“Some of the grasses smell very sweetly when



40 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

they are in blossom,” said Mary, “and I dare
say they have a swéet taste to cows and sheep.”

‘No doubt. Sugar is to be found in most
grasses, and the sugar-cane is itself a grass. Maize
or Indian corn also abounds in sugar, and has
been recommended for cultivation as a substitute
for the sugar-cane.”

“What a useful tribe!” remarked Henry. “ It
would be worth while to make out a list of the
things the grasses are used for. It would be a
very long one; for besides the use of the grass
itself and the different kinds of grain, there would
be hay and straw to notice, and all the things that
are made of them.”

“And the use of reeds and canes,” said his
father, “which are only large grasses. But
Sedges*, which much resemble grasses in outward
appearance, are a distinct tribe, and have not the
same nourishing qualities; they are therefore not
much sought after by cattle. You have seen
them growing up in marshy places, and have
noticed their frequently having a sharp triangular
stem, which will almost cut your fingers. The
Papyrus of the banks of the Nile is a species of

* Cyperus.



SEDGES. 4]

sedge, and so is the pretty Cotton-grass*, of which
Mary brought home so much last summer.”



COTTON GRASS.

“ Almost enough to make a pillow,” replied the
little girl ; ‘and when I have collected some more

* Eriophorum.



42 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

I am to sleep upon it, and it will be just like a
pillow of down.”

Robert wished to know what is the real use of
the silky tufts on the cotton-grass, and he was
told that they surround the seed, and are intended
to waft it to different places.

‘“Next to the grasses, I must notice certain
tribes, having a general tendency to one manner
of growth, namely, to bear their flowers upon a
club-shaped spadiz, as it is called. The common
Arum*, or Lords and Ladies, or Cuckoo Pint,
has this kind of spadix, and is a good example
of a tribe of plants chiefly confined to the tropics,
where they grow to a considerable size.”

‘““T thought Lords and Ladies had no flowers;
but only poisonous red berries wrapped up in a
curious hood,” said Robert.

“IT do not wonder at your thinking so, for the
flowers are naked; that is, they have no petals, or
flower-leaves, but only those parts which are
necessary for the formation of the seed. The ber-
ries are very poisonous, but the root can be manu-
factured into a kind of sago. The hood you speak
of is a very curious mantle for the protection of

* Arum maculatum.



THE ARUM TRIBE. 43

these naked flowers : it is called the spathe. There
is another plant which you are fond of searching



CUCKOO PINT.

for, and which bears its flowers on a spadix or
club, but it has no spathe to wrap them up in.”



44. FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE,

The children could not guess what plant it was
until their father said it grew in ditches, when they
immediately recollected the Bulrush *.

“Not that it is properly a rush,” continued
their father ; “ for the rush tribe has a higher place
in the vegetable system; but it is a curious sedgy
plant, bearing numerous and nearly naked flowers
on its spadix. Near to these tribes are placed the
duckweeds +, curious plants which, although they
have no spadix, have yet a certain natural con-
nexion with the foregoing. I cannot enter into
descriptions which belong to the scientific part of
botany, because you are not yet able to ,under-
stand them; but I may often lead you to notice
the more conspicuous features of the different
tribes, and this will be a great help to you. The
grasses and the arum group will be sufficient for
our present conversation : to-morrow we will talk
about the palms.”

* Typha. + Lemna,



45

CONVERSATION IV.

ENDOGENS,

PALM—AMARYLLIS—IRIS— GINGER—ARROWROOT—ORCHIS—
RUSH—AUTUMN CROCUS, AND LILY TRIBES.

‘“‘ The palm-tree in the wilderness
Majestic lifts its head,
And blooms in solitary grace
Where all around is dead.”

Mary had read some verses, beginning in this
manner, and she tried to find them, and also to
learn the different uses of palms, before her father
came into the study. She found out, that in
Egypt, Arabia, and Persia, people make their
principal food of the fruit ; that they make couches,
baskets, bags, mats, and brushes from the leaves,
and also roof their houses with them; and that
they make garden-fences, and cages for poultry,
from the branches; besides using the fibres for
thread, ropes, and rigging. Her father told her
that the uses of the palms are almost endless ; for,
according to Humboldt, wine, oil, wax, flour,
sugar, sago, and salt are obtained from the tribe,
besides many inferior articles,



46 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘““Kven in England,” said Henry, ‘the cocoa-
nut palm is very useful; for we get the nut to eat,
and the shell polished for cups, and the fibres made
into beautiful matting.”

‘““And mamma says that soap and candles are
made of palm oil; and that the little box on the
chimney-piece, which we call vegetable ivory, is
made of the kernel of a sort of palm,” added Mary.

“T have seen pictures of palm trees,” said
Robert, “and they seem to be very tall trees, with
a single stem and large tufts of leaves at the top.”

“That is their common appearance; but there
are at least four hundred distinct species of palms
(and perhaps many more) ; and among these there
is considerable variety; so that palms are oc-
casionally met with that are of a shrubby or
branched growth, or are armed with stiff spines.
Quite in character with the immense size of the
leaves in palms, is the enormous cluster of blos-
soms contained in each spathe; for these trees,
like our common arum, have a large spathe for the
protection of their fruit. Here is a drawing of a
palm blossom, which will show you how the florets
are clustered together: they sometimes amount to
two hundred thousand in a single spathe.”



THE PALM TRIBE. 47

“Tf that is the case,” said Henry, “I dare say
there is a great deal of seed; and it is a wonder
that the palm ever grows
up alone, and blooms ‘in
solitary grace,’ as Mary’s
lines say.”

“Its places of growth
are various,” said his fa-
ther; ‘‘so that one who
has closely studied the ha-
bits of this noble race, says,
‘not a few love the hu-
mid banks of rivulets and
streams; others occupy the
shores of the ocean, and
some ascend into alpine (Rg j
regions; some collect in- Way 47
to dense forests, others \ 7 Vy
spring up singly or in clus-
ters over the plains.’ But PALM BLOSSOM.
this you must understand of the sunny regions
within the tropics, beyond which these plants do
not extend. The tribes of plants immediately
above palms are chiefly foreign, and I shall only
mention the pineapple and agave, or American





48 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

aloe; the latter belonging to the tribe* which
contains our snow-drop and daffodil.”



CLUSTER FROM THE DATE-PALM.

Robert asked if it is true that the aloe only
flowers once in a hundred years, and was answered
in the negative.

‘The agave, of which this fable is told, is a
hardy and useful plant, forming in its native
country excellent hedges, which it is impossible to

* The Amaryllis tribe.



AMARYLLIS AND IRIS TRIBES. * 49

penetrate. The fibres of the leaves are used as
thread, and are manufactured into paper. Some
of the families contained in this tribe have a
poisonous juice in their bulbs, especially a species*
growing at the Cape of Good Hope, in which the
Hottentots are said to dip their arrow-heads. Our
snowdrop and daffodil have a share of the same
quality, and their bulbs have long been known as
emetic. Infants, who are fond of putting every
thing into their mouths, have been seriously in-
jured by swallowing daffodil blossoms, which
shows that some of the poisonous principle resides
also in the flowers.”

“Tam disappointed that my pretty snowdrops
have any thing poisonous about them,” said Mary.
“T hope those handsome purple and yellow cro-
cuses are better off.”

“They belong to the Iris tribe, and I cannot
flatter you that all are free from similar qualities ;
however, the crocus itself is rather beneficial than
otherwise, and it is from one Tf of its family that we
get saffron.”

‘‘Why does mamma put saffron in the canary’s

* Heemanthus toxicarius. t Crocus sativus.
E



50 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

drinking glass, when he is moulting?” asked
Robert.

“ Because it is of a warm and stimulating
nature, and appears to render the same sort of
service to the bird in helping him to throw off his
feathers, as it does to human beings in helping
them to throw out troublesome eruptions of the
skin. Medical men frequently use it for this
latter purpose on the Continent, and I believe in
this country also. Among the tribes closely fol-
lowing this, we meet with other examples of warm
and stimulating qualities in the ginger tribe, a
very useful race of plants.”

‘Green ginger preserves are delicious,” said Henry;
“and people make ginger wine and ginger beer,
otherwise I should not think ginger very useful.”

«All the ginger plants are natives of hot cli-
mates, where the inhabitants need this sort of
stimulant more than we do, and chew such power-
ful spices with much pleasure.”

The children would have been surprised to hear
this, had they not seen a Hindoo servant shortly
before, whose mistress was accustomed to treat her
with nutmegs and ginger, just as we should treat a
child with sugar plums.



GINGER AND ARROWROOT. 51

“Ginger, as you know, is the root of the plant,
but several plants of this kind produce very pun-
gent seeds, as the cardamoms, and some a still
hotter kind, called Grains-of-Paradise. Others
yield a dye, as turmeric, which is much used in
manufactures. Near these comes a small tribe,
containing the plantains and bananas, valuable tro-
pical fruits, of which you have often heard. The
plants also furnish many useful articles, especially
flax, from which some of the finest muslins of
India are prepared. The pretty plant called
Indian Shot, of which we once had several speci-
mens in the conservatory, belongs to a neighbour-
ing tribe, called Marants, from some of which we
get arrowroot. Three or four of the species yield
it in abundance, but especially one*, which is
much cultivated in the West India islands.”

“ How do they get the arrowroot from the
plant?” asked Mary.

‘* When the roots are a year old, they are dug
up, washed, and grated, or beaten to a pulp in
wooden mortars. This pulp is thrown into clean
water, and stirred about to separate the fibrous

* Maranta arundinacea.

E 2



52 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

parts which are collected in the hand. The
milky liquor which remains is poured through a
sieve, and afterwards allowed to settle for some
time. The arrowroot sinks to the bottom, and
when the water is poured off, the white pasty mass
that remains is placed on clean white cloths in the
sun, to dry. It is then fit for use, and will keep
for a very long time.”

‘¢ What is the plant like?” asked Robert.

“Tt is a handsome plant, with long and broad
leaves, of a very rich green. I will show you a
hot-house specimen on the first opportunity.”

The children were now told that they had
arrived at a very curious and remarkable race of
plants, different in many respects from other
natural orders, but not the less interesting to
botanists, or even to common observers.

“Do you remember,” said their father, “ the
odd-looking Bee-orchis we used to watch for so
eagerly every spring? There were a few roots in
a corner of the orchard, but unfortunately they
have now died away.”

“Oh yes, papa,” said Mary, “it looked exactly
like a bee settled on a flower.”

‘‘One of the marks of the orchis tribe, is the



VARIETY AND BEAUTY OF ORCHIDS. 53

very general enlargement, and often the very
curious shape and appearance of one of the inner
rows of petals. Inthe bee-orchis it is quite different
from all the other petals, being of a dark colour,
velvety texture, and looking, at a little distance,
very much like a bee. In another, it resembles a
fly; in another, a lady’s slipper, and so on, giving
corresponding names to the different species. You
are fond of searching for some of the common
kinds of orchis in the woods and marshy places
where they grow; but from these poor little ter-
restrial plants you can scarcely form an idea of the
orchids of tropical countries; where, instead of
being content with such a lowly situation, they
take root among the branches of living trees, or
spring from the decaying bark of those that have
fallen, putting forth the most brilliant and remark-
able flowers, which, towards evening, give out a
delicious scent. I must contrive a visit for you to
some botanical garden where orchids ‘are reared ;
and if you can bear for a few minutes the hot damp
atmosphere, which is artificially created for them
to live in, you will be delighted and amazed at the
extraordinary shapes of the flowers, and at the
curious growth of the plants, frequently parasitical,



54 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

on little logs of wood suspended from the roof “
the hot-house.”

“What is the use of these curious plants?” asked
Henry.

‘In many, we see more beauty than use ; but
there are several which are applied to economical
purposes. A nourishing substance called salep is
obtained from the roots of one species *: vanilla,
used in the manufacture of chocolate, of liqueurs,
and confectionary, is the dried fruit of another + :
while the roots of a third { are so gummy, that
they are used in the United States for mending
broken earthenware, and are called putty-root.”

“J wish putty-root grew here,” said Robert,
“that I might mend mamma’s broken china.”

‘‘ Besides this,” continued his father, “‘ a few are
taken medicinally ; and in New Holland the mealy
roots of many species are eaten by the natives.
Near to the orchis tribe come several tribes of
water plants or marsh plants, all natives of warm
climates, and more interesting to the botanist than
they would be to you; let us therefore proceed to
the rushes.”

* Orchis mascula. + Vanilla planifolia.
t Aplectum hyemale.



THE RUSH TRIBE. 55

The children were very familiar with rushes,
and Mary was in the habit of peeling them for the
sake of a beautiful white pith with which their
stems are filled, and which her mamma had taught
her to apply to many ornamental purposes. They
also knew that rush-lights are candles in which
this pith is used for a wick, and thata great many
useful things are made of rushes.

“These plants,” said their father, “‘are mostly
natives of cold countries, although several are
found in the tropics. Even in the severe climate
of Melville Island, our arctic voyagers found two
species of rush. A damp and cold soil appears to
suit them best, and where rushes spring up it is
generally a sign that the land wants draining.”

‘‘ But I have seen them growing on dry heaths,”
said Henry.

“That may be. Heaths are frequently dry on
the surface, while a little way beneath is a cold
clay, in which rushes would flourish. Large tracts
of land in Japan are devoted to the cultivation
of rushes, and are flooded at intervals like rice
grounds: this large supply of rushes is entirely
devoted to the making of rush-matting for cover-
ing floors. You have seen the basket-maker



56 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

in our village using rushes for mats, chair-
bottoms, and other articles, therefore I need say
no more of their uses. We now approach the
lilies, first pausing at a dangerous tribe called
Melanths, where there are some fatal poisons, as
well as some useful medicines. Do you remember
the pale purple crocuses that came up without
leaves in September ?”

“Yes, papa,” said Robert, “ I had two or three
in my garden, and now there are leaves coming
up without blossoms. How odd it is that the
leaves and the flowers are so far apart !”

“This will help you to distinguish it from the
spring crocus, which belongs to another family.
This autumn crocus *, or meadow saffron, which
we are glad to see when other flowers are gone,
is yet a dangerous plant, and there are well-
known cases of poisoning from chewing the bulb
or the young shoots.”

‘Would any one except a baby be so foolish as
to chew it?” inquired Henry.

“ Some time ago a poor woman picked up a few
of these crocus roots in Covent-garden Market,
and fancied they were onions. One would have

* Colchicum autumnale.



EFFECTS OF WHITE HELLEBORE. 57

thought that she must have missed the powerful
odour of the onion, and so have discovered her
mistake, but unfortunately she did not; but ate
them, and was poisoned. Another plant of this
order, called White Hellebore*, is a nauseous and
dangerous plant, containing a peculiar principle
called veratria, which acts in a singular manner on
the nose, producing most violent sneezing when
taken as snuff in ever so small a quantity. It has
a similar irritating effect when taken into the sto-
mach, and a few grains tried on some of the lower
animals have been fatal.”

‘“*Ts it not very cruel to try the effect of poison
on cats and dogs?” asked Henry.

“‘ Exceedingly cruel, if it is done for mere sport
or curiosity; but if there is a prospect of saving
human life by it, or of doing some important ser-
vice to mankind, then it is lawful and proper to
make experiments of this sort. But let us leave
this gloomy race of plants, and proceed to their
near neighbours, the more innocent and beautiful
lilies.”

“Ts that a large tribe, papa?” asked Mary. “I
can only think of five sorts, the tall white lilies,

* Veratrum album.



58 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.



THE VERNAL SQUILL.



THE LILY TRIBE. 59

and the orange-coloured, and the Turk’s-cap, and
the trumpet, and the dear sweet little lilies of the
valley.”

“The lily tribe,” said her father, “is very ex-
tensive, for in reality the showy tulips, the speckled
bell-shaped fritillaries, the sweet tuberose, the ele-
gant agapanthus, and the fragrant hyacinths, rank
with lilies ; and there are many useful plants, such
as onions, asparagus, squills, aloes, &c. which are
also placed by Lindley in his great order of Lily-
worts.”

‘“‘T thought you had told us about aloes before,
papa,” said Robert.

“TI spoke of the Agave, or American aloe, which
is said to flower once in a hundred years, but
that is of a different family, and has very dif-
ferent properties from the true aloes, several
species of which are used in medicine*, These
latter are tree-like plants growing in tropical
countries. Some of the relations of our lilies,
indeed, grow to a majestic height in those warm
climates, and from their stem and leaves various
gums or resins are collected, some of which are
useful in medicine, especially dragon’s blood, the

- * Aloé vulgaris, A. soccotrina, and others.



60 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

strange name of a resin which comes from a very
large species*, growing to the height of sixty or
seventy feet in the Canary Islands.”

‘What grand and beautiful things the lilies
must be!” exclaimed Mary. ‘ Which of them do
you think it was, papa, that our Saviour spoke of,
when He said that ‘even Solomon in all his glory
was not arrayed like one of these ?’”

‘Probably those ‘lilies of the field’ were the
scarlet lilies+-, which still spring up freely on the
plains of Syria.”

Robert was disappointed at hearing this, for he
had made up his mind that our humble lilies of the
valley were the flowers which our Saviour had con-
descended to notice.

The children were told that several tribes of
plants, following lilies, are natives of marshes or
slow-running water in foreign countries; so few
being British that it would not be necessary to
name more than the Flowering Rush, the Water-
plantains, and Pond-weed, as specimens.

“But immediately succeeding these,” said their
father, “there is a group containing half a dozen
tribes that would be very puzzling to you, were

* Dracenas Draco. + Lilium chalcedonicum.



APPROACH TO A HIGHER STRUCTURE. 61

they common plants. Although their growth is like
that of endogens, yet they have net-veined leaves,
which you know is a sign of the exogens. I shall
not trouble you with the names of these tribes,
because nearly all the plants are natives of hot
countries, and are not likely to offer any difficulty
to us. Among them are the useful yams, culti-
vated as potatoes, and the esteemed sarsaparilla
plants, much employed in medicine. But if you
want an English specimen of this kind of growth,
you must search for Herb Paris, that odd-looking
plant called by country people True Love, which
grows about a foot high, and bears four broad egg-
shaped leaves at the top of the stem, and a green
blossom followed by a purplish-black berry.”

‘“‘T wonder what makes these plants so different
from all the rest of the endogens,” said Henry.
‘‘Perhaps we are coming near the net-veined
plants, and so these are gradually getting like
them, just as the tribes of animals gradually came
near each other, as we travelled upwards.”

‘You are right, Henry,” said his father: ‘we
are now coming to the important and almost end-
less races of exogens, which make up the great bulk
of the vegetable kingdom. And now I must tell you



62 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

of another mark by which the three great divisions
of the vegetable world are distinguished by bota-
nists. The first or flowerless division has no true
seeds ; the second and third divisions have seeds,
but they are differently formed. The seed of an
endogen, when it first begins to grow, sends down-
wards a slender root called the radicle, and upwards
a single seed-leaf or lobe, which is the beginning
of the young plant. But the exogens do more
than this, for they send up two seed leaves instead
of one, as you may have often noticed in lupines
and other plants, where the two thick fleshy seed
leaves push through the soil, nourishing and pro-
tecting the young plant, and having a very dif-
ferent appearance from the leaves which come
afterwards. Sometimes these seed leaves remain
underground, as in the Windsor bean, and gradu-
ally die away when their purpose is answered.
Even before the seed has begun to sprout, these
differences are visible with the microscope, but it
is not often necessary to examine the seed in this
way, because there is such a very plain and sim-
ple means of knowing endogens from exogens
without it.”

‘You mean the straight-veined leaves and the



CHARACTERS OF ENDOGENS. 63

net-veined,” said Henry. “ Yes, that isa very nice
way of knowing them apart, and so little trouble:
I am getting quite a habit of holding up leaves
to the light to see which division they belong to.
But, papa,” he added, “do you not think that
there is something about endogens that would
almost tell you what they are at a distance, with-
out examining the leaves? Look at the lilies and
daffodils in the garden; how delicate they seem,
as if they grew up very quickly and would not
last long. They do not look strong and hardy
like other plants.”

“‘ Endogens,” said his father, “are less highly
organized than exogens, and are, generally speak-
ing, very short-lived. There are exceptions to
this, for some of the palms live two or three hun-
dred years; but even in this case their existence
is short, compared with that of many of our forest
trees. Before we begin our last great division of
the vegetable world, let me give you one other
character by which endogens are in most cases to
be known. In examining their flowers we shall
find the number three or some multiple of that
number to prevail, while in exogens the number
five or its multiple generally prevails.”



64 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

Mary gathered a snowdrop, and looked at the
blossom. ‘There are more than three of these
pretty white petals,” she said.

Her father pointed out to her that there are six
(twice three), arranged in two rows, one within
the other, three petals in each row. He also pointed
out six stamens, and then opened the seed-vessel,
which looked like a little green berry; and there
Mary saw three distinct cells for holding the seed.
“As the spring flowers open,” said her father,
‘take notice how many have the number three
conspicuous. You will find that lilies of the
valley, although they have but one petal to make
up their delicate, cup-shaped flower, yet have
this cup divided at its edges into six (twice
three) segments, enclosing six stamens, while the
seed vessel has also three cells. The same is the
case with the hyacinth. In the tulip and nar-
cissus you will find the petals six, stamens six, and
cells of the capsule, three. Thus you may go on
with numerous examples, and I would gladly see
you gaining this sort of general knowledge of
endogens, before you puzzle yourselves with the
difficult words which are necessary to express
their botanical characters.”



— 65

CONVERSATION V.

EXOGENS.

PINE—YEW——BEEF-WO00OD—WILLOW—NETTLE—HEMP—
MULBERRY, AND PLANE TRIBES.

Tue young larch firs in the plantation had now
put on their beautiful green foliage, and the
children were comparing their delicate colour with
the dark green of the hardy spruce fir, and with
the deep bluish-green of the Scotch fir, when
their father asked them how they should know
that these trees, so different in colour, were all of
one tribe.

‘““ Very easily, papa,” said Henry; ‘because
they all have needle-shaped leaves, and they all
bear cones.”

‘* And they all have a very pleasant smell,” added
Mary, “for that is the reason why we gather fir-
cones in autumn. Mamma sometimes has a few
of the dried cones put on the drawing-room fire,
where they blaze up very quickly, and scent the
room; and we put some in our clothes-drawers to

F



66 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

keep away moth, for the insect does not like the
smell that we are so fond of.”

“The three marks you have mentioned,” said
their father, “are indeed true signs of the Pine
tribe, which all bear cones, and are therefore
called Conifers: and also have peculiar spiny
leaves, and contain an abundance of strong-smell-
ing resin. But can you tell me whether they are
endogens or exogens?”

Mary said she could hardly tell by looking at
the leaves, because they were so narrow, but she
fancied they were straight veined. Henry did not
think so, and he felt sure the trees were exogens,
from their hard and woody growth. Robert, too,
remembered that his father had said that all our
forest trees are exogens, so this settled the matter
_—yet they were told that because of some differ-
ences connected with the seed, these trees have
sometimes been considered a distinct class.

“T shall scarcely do wrong, however,” said
their father, “in calling them the lowest race of
exogens, from which they do not differ in growth,
but. increase exactly in the same manner, by yearly
additions to the outer portion of the wood.”

“T cannot understand how trees get their new



FORMATION OF WOOD AND BARK. 67

layer every year without our noticing it,” said
Mary; “there are the elms at the end of the gar-
den, with their rough old trunks; I play under
them nearly every day, and I do not see the old
bark fall off, and a new one come instead of it.”

“These new layers of wood are formed under
the bark, and out of our sight. You have seen
people stripping off the bark from trees after they
are cut down, and you must have noticed how
easily it comes off; it is, indeed, quite distinct from
the wood, and has a gummy substance between it
and the true wood.”

‘Then as the wood goes on increasing, does
the bark stretch very much, or how does it manage
to make room?”

“ The bark itself is also gradually renewed on
its inner side, while the outer portion cracks and
peels off, or perishes by slow degrees. Thus,
while the solid trunk of the tree is formed by zone
upon zone of new wood, which is added in suc-
cession, year after year, the bark is renewed by
zone within zone of fresh material; but with this
difference ;—in the bark, the outside perishes, and
a new layer adapted to the increasing size of the
tree gradually takes its place; in the true wood

F 2



68 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

every layer is permanent, and forms solid tim-
ber.”

‘“‘ Then,” said Mary, “ the old bark is obliged to
keep on giving way to the young bark; but that
must get old-looking too before it comes up in
sight, or else we should see a greater difference in
the tree than we do.”

‘“‘ All these processes take place so gradually
that we are unconscious of them, just as we are
generally unconscious of the changes going on in
our own bodies, where new material takes the
place of the old in a very similar manner.”

Robert held up his fingers to show that some of
the skin was peeling off, and that new skin had
formed underneath; upon which Henry compared
him to a young birch tree, whose silvery bark
often peels off in long thin slips. ‘* You forget,”
said Robert, ‘‘that young birch trees make very
good rods,” and he began playfully to chastise his
brother, when their father called them back to the
subject of conversation, by saying,—

“The Pine tribe is an exceedingly valuable one,
on account of its timber, which is well known
as deal, fir, cedar, &c. There are vast forests of
pines in North America, and in some parts of

cs



THE PINE AND YEW TRIBES. 69

northern Europe. The loftier species make capital
masts for ships, while some others, as cedar, cy-
press, and juniper, are noted for the extraordinary
durability of their timber. The celebrated gates
of Constantinople, which lasted eleven hundred
years, were made of cypress. The different kinds
of resinous matter obtained from pines are also
very valuable, and are known as turpentine, pitch,
balsam, sandarach, &c. The berries of the common
juniper are used in flavouring gin, and the large
seeds of some of the pines are eatable when fresh.”

‘* Pines are useful, indeed,” said Henry, “but I
always thought our hardest and strongest wood
was yew-tree wood. I have heard that the ancient
Britons made their bows of it, and they were
famous ones, very strong and elastic.”

“That is true,” said his father; “ and the yew
tribe, which comes next to the pine tribe, is not to
be surpassed as to the durability of its timber ;
but the tribe must still be considered far less
valuable, because the trees are much less common.
In Europe, we have only one species, the common
yew. Asia is richer in trees of this kind, and in
New Zealand the most valuable timber is gained
from members of the tribe. I must warn you,



70 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

however, that the leaves of the common yew are
very poisonous.”

Robert was surprised to hear this, and he
thought he must have had a narrow escape from
poisoning, for he well remembered being tempted
to eat some of the pretty rose-coloured berries of
the yew. His father told him that the soft part of
the berry is quite harmless, if the seed is not
swallowed ; but he advised him in future not to
meddle with any strange fruit, however tempting
its appearance.

“There are several foreign trees,” said his
father, “whose wood is not very inferior to that
of the yew in hardness; but I shall now lead you
to a group which may be known by having their
flowers arranged in catkins, as we are accustomed
to call their dense spikes of blossom. Foremost
are the beef-woods *, a curious race of trees and
bushes in Australia, whose great peculiarity is,
that they have no leaves.”

‘‘ Dear papa, what odd trees !” said Mary; “‘ how
strange it seems that they should be able to live
and grow without leaves. Our trees have no
leaves in winter, but when summer comes, if any

* Casuarina.



THE BEEF-WOOD TRIBE.

of them are leafless we
know that they are
dead.”

“These Australian
trees have drooping
jointed branches, and at
every joint there are lit-
tle sheaths, occupying
the place where we
should expect the leaves
to grow. Their flowers
are in catkins, and the
seed is collected into a
sort of cone, which once
led to the opinion that
they belonged to the
pine tribe.”

“T am glad they “YAK

have catkins and cones
to show that they are
living, and not dead
trees,” said Mary ; “ but
I should like to know
why they have the odd
name of beef - wood
trees.”



BEEF-WOOD TREE.

7]



72 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘‘ They are called so by the colonists because the
timber is very much the colour of raw beef. One
of, the species is also called
the she-oak, because its
branches and cones contain a
pleasant acid, and travellers
suffering from thirst obtain
great relief by chewing them.
I must now ask Mary, who
is so fond of catkins, to name
some of the other trees of
this group.”

Mary soon thought of the
birch * and the alder +, which
her father told her were near
relations, and with few ex-
ceptions, more valuable as
ornaments than as_ timber.
‘Among birch,” he said,
“there is a tree in North
America { with so tough and
thick a bark, that the Indians
make boats of it, and various
other useful articles. Our common birch § yields

* Betula. + Alnus.
t B. papyracea. § B. alba.



BLOSSOM OF ALDER.



THE WILLOW TRIBE. 73

an oil which gives the peculiar smell to Russia
leather, which is dressed with it. A sparkling
wine can also be obtained from the sap of the



BLOSSOM OF WILLOW.

birch, and some North American species furnish
excellent sugar. The alder is less remarkable for
its uses, but there is a bitter principle in its bark
which has been employed medicinally.”

‘“T have thought of some other trees with cat-



74 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

kins.” said Mary. ‘All the willows and poplars
seem to have them; for I have seen them on the
weeping willow that grows by the water, and on
the common willows, and on the tall Lombardy
poplars, and on the quivering aspen.”

aR

Se oi = ny
“ht / I Z

ao

p} ff
oo a l



LEAF OF WHITE POPLAR.

“True,” said her father; ‘the willow tribe,
including all the willows * and poplars +, has this
general mark of relationship, besides others which
bind the families especially into one order. Their
wood is sometimes valuable as timber, but oftener

* Salix. + Populus.



~~

OSIERS AND SALLOWS. 75

for common domestic purposes. Henry’s cricket
bat is made of the common white willow *; your
weeding basket, Mary, is of the common osier *¢,
and your mamma has a basket made of the fine
basket osier, which grows in meadows and marshy
places in Norfolk and Cambridgeshire. Robert’s
arrows are made of the aspen?, and most of our
charcoal is made from sallows.”

Robert wished to know why willows are some-
times called osiers and sallows; and he was told that
these names help to distinguish the different species
in this extensive family, which contains upwards
of sixty distinct species, natives of Britain ; so that
the study of willows is not a little puzzling to
young botanists.

‘* Let us now pass on,” said his father, “to a
neighbouring group, which is chiefly distinguished
from this by the flowers not being commonly ar-
ranged in catkins. I shall only notice the nettle
and the mulberry tribes.”

“Why is the nettle put among trees?” asked
Robert.

‘* Because it resembles these particular trees in
important botanical particulars. But the nettle is

* S. alba. T S. viminalis. t P. tremula.



76 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

not always the despised weed it is with us. Some
of the species grow to the height of trees, and have
their branched form; but the wood is very light
and spongy.”

‘“‘ Nettles are of no use, are they, papa, but really
mischievous, on account of their sting ?”

‘We have no right to say of any created thing
that it is of no use; and if you were acquainted
with old herbals, you would find great virtues
ascribed to nettles, and to their relation, ‘‘ Pellitory
of the Wall.” But if we do not place entire faith
in these accounts, we yet learn that cordage can
be made from nettles; that a species with tuberous
roots * has been used instead of potatoes, and that
even the stinging quality has been made use of
in cases of paralysis, the benumbed limb being
flogged with nettles, to restore sensation.”

Mary said, that if there was any life left in the
limb, the person would be sure to feel the sting ; but
her father told her that he had never heard of a case
in which this rough treatment was of much service.

‘¢ As some nettles,” he said, “‘ can be made into
cordage, so the hemp tribe, which follows, is of
great service, on account of the tough fibres of the

* Urtica tuberosa.



HEMP AND MULBERRY TRIBES, 77

well-known hemp *, from which our ropes, door
mats, &c. are manufactured. In temperate climates
this is the grand use of hemp, but in hot countries
it also affords a resin, which has intoxicating pro-
perties, producing drowsiness and drunkenness.
In this sleep-producing property it resembles its
near relation, the hop, which belongs to this tribe,
and is a well-known ingredient in beer.”

‘“Hops are very pretty,” said Mary, “but I
should not like them to be trained over trellis-work
as some people have them, in their gardens ; because
whenever I touched the blossoms they would give
out that disagreeable bitter smell.”

‘‘ Many persons think it a fine aromatic smell,”
said her father; “ it is produced by little glands
(easily rubbed off), which are scattered over the
green scales of the hop-head, and contain a bitter
resin. But we must proceed to the mulberry
tribe.”

The mulberry tree was a great favourite with
the children, not only on account of the rich fruit
which it afforded them, just in the hottest weather,
but also on account of the supply of leaves it
yielded to their silkworms. They were surprised

* Cannabis sativa.



78 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

to hear that the fig tree belongs to this tribe, and
that both have been brought from the Kast, the
whole tribe being of foreign origin. Their father
spoke of the fig trees, as especially interesting,
since one of them is theremarkable banyan tree of
India, whose immense branches send down shoots
to the earth, which take root, and form pillars for
the support of the extended foliage.

“Bring Milton’s works,” he said; “look in the
ninth book of Paradise Lost, for some mention of
this method of growth in the banyan tree.”

Henry read as follows : —

‘The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow
About the mother-tree, a pillar’d shade
High over-arch’d, and echoing walks between.”

‘What beautiful shady groves it must make,”
said Mary; “and how pleasant it must be in that
hot country to have such a shelter !”

Her father replied, “The poet Southey, de-
scribing a banyan tree, says :—

‘So like a temple did it seem, that there

The pious heart’s first impulse would be prayer :’
we may therefore make due allowance for the poor
Hindoo, who in performing his devotions near this
tree, considers, in his ignorance, that the banyan



THE PLANE TRIBE. 79

itself is an object of worship. There is something
very touching, to my mind, in the reverence and



ORIENTAL PLANE.

gratitude which the heathen show to natural ob-
jects, such as the sun and moon, rivers, trees, and
animals. Sensible of the blessings conferred upon



80 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

them, and ignorant of the source from whence they
come, these poor creatures worship the gifts instead
of the Giver ; and grievous as this error is, yet it
does not seem so gross and debasing as the worship
of images, the work of men’s hands.”

“Another day,” said Mary, “the poor little
Hindoo children will be taught not to worship the
river Ganges, or the banyan tree, but Him who
made all the beautiful groves and streams.”

“God grant it may be so,” said her father.

Henry now inquired whether fig trees are of
any other use than to give fruit and shade, and he
was told that they furnish India-rubber in great
abundance, and that in some of them their milky
fluid forms a wholesome beverage, giving them
the name of cow trees. He was also told that
the noble plane tree *, which affords so much shade,
is not far removed from the mulberry and fig,
although its juice is watery instead of milky.

* Platanus.



81

CONVERSATION VI.

EXOGENS.

SPURGEWORT — MASTWORT— WALNUT — NUTMEG — CUCUMBER—
BEGONIA — FPAPAW — PASSION-FLOWER— VIOLET — TAMARISK,
AND HOUSELEEK TRIBES.

One day the children saw in their father’s study
a smooth, thick piece of wood, on which a very
beautiful drawing had been made. Mary asked if
she might have sucha piece of wood to draw upon ;
but she was told that it was too expensive, and
that she must be contented with paper, until she
could draw in a very superior manner.

“This is the wood of the box tree,” said her
father, “‘and it has been prepared in this way for
the use of the wood engraver, whose interesting
work I will one day take you to see. Meanwhile
let us talk about the group of plants to which the
box belongs. They are called spurgeworts, and
many of them are extremely poisonous; but this
does not prevent the use of several families in
medicine*; yet the fatal character of others is such

* Euphorbia, Mercurialis, Croton, &c.
G



82 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

that no medical man would dare to prescribe them.
One foreign tree, in particular, called the Manchi-
neel, which bears a handsome, apple-shaped fruit,
is SO poisonous, that persons are said to have died
by merely sleeping beneath its shade, while a
single drop of juice on the skin produces an ulcer
difficult to heal.”

“Do you think it can be true, papa, about
people dying who sleep near it?” said Robert.

“fam not qualified to judge of its truth,” said
his father ; “‘ but those who are so inform me, that
with so volatile a poison, it is not at all unlikely
that delicate persons might die from sleeping under
it, and breathing its dangerous atmosphere.”

‘“* What does ‘ volatile’ mean?” asked Mary.

‘“* A substance is said to be volatile,” said her
father, ‘‘ when its essence or principle easily escapes
into the surrounding air. Camphor is volatile;
and hence its powerful odour is immediately per-
ceived, while its very substance becomes converted
mto vapour.”

“Oh yes,” said Mary; “the piece of camphor
I put with my dried plants has entirely wasted
away.”

Robert said that smelling salts must be very



SPURGEWORTS. 83

volatile, for when he left the stopple out of
mamma’s smelling bottle, all the scent and the salts
too went quite away in a few days.

“T can show you a specimen of a very poisonous
spurgewort,” said his father; “it is the common
mercury*, which grows in bushy and shady places,
and flowers in April and May. This insignificant-
looking plant has produced convulsions and death,
so that I must again warn you against chewing
any leaves, roots, or berries of strange plants.
Yet happily in this, as in most poisons, the taste is
so nauseous and burning, that there is little temp-
tation to transgress.”

“Ts there any thing poisonous about the box
tree itself?” asked Mary, “ because I often gather
the little curled-up leaves to make cups and saucers
for my dolls.”

“ And you would not like them to drink out of
poisoned cups,” said Henry, laughing.

“The leaves are very bitter,” replied her father,
‘and it is said that in those parts of Persia where
box trees are common, it is impossible to keep
camels, because the animals cannot be prevented

* Mercurialis perennis.

gq 2



84 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

from browsing on the leaves, which kill them ;
yet, on the other hand, we find that box leaves
have sometimes been used instead of hops, to give
a bitter flavour to beer. Some plants of the group
I am now noticing approach the heaths in appear-
ance, aS our common crowberry*, while others
have the remarkable growth which is seen in the
pitcher plantt. All these have a certain rela-
tionship or affinity with each other; but we now
rise to a higher group, and you need only look
round this room to see specimens of the most
important member of it.”

The children did not see at first what their
father meant, but Henry soon recollected that the
old carved oak, of which the bookcases were
made, must be the specimen.

‘‘You mean the good old English oak, papa,”
said he. “The wooden walls of old England are
made of it, so we ought always to admire the oak.”
Henry here had to explain to his brother and
sister, that by wooden walls he meant the ships
which protect our island; and his father told him,
that although the oak is chiefly employed in ship-
building, and is called the ‘shipwright’s treasure,’

* Empetrum nigrum. + Nepenthes distillatoria.



MASTWORTS. 85

yet other timber is also used, especially teak, a
fine timber which abounds in the East Indies.



SPRIG OF OAK.

Mary said that she remembered several other
uses of the oak, besides ship-building. “ The gall-
nuts are used in making ink, the bark for tanning
leather, and the sawdust for dyeing, besides the
acorns being used for feeding pigs.”



S86 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘The tribe of trees and bushes to which the oak
belongs,” said her father, “has been conveniently
called Mastworts, because the fruit, contained in a
peculiar husk or cup, is called by country people
‘mast.’”

‘“‘T have heard people talk about beech-mast,”
said Robert.

‘Yes, and the fruits of the hazel, the Spanish
chestnut, and the oak, as well as of the beech, are
all called mast. The uses of these valuable trees
are pretty well known to you. In another tribe
nearly related to this, the only familiar example is
the common walnut, which is a native of Persia
and Cashmere, and is greatly valued in those
countries on account of its oil, which is employed
in cookery, and for burning in lamps.”

“T did not know there was such a thing as
walnut oil,” said Mary, ‘‘ until I saw some among
aunt’s materials for oil painting.”

“Among a great number of foreign plants
having a twining or scrambling habit, we find the
nutmegs; although these have a tree-like growth,
and seem to resemble our common laurels. You re-
member the fruit and leaf of the nutmeg which was
sent to mefrom the West Indies, preserved in spirit.”



THE NUTMEG TRIBE. 87

“Oh yes, papa,” said Robert; “it was some-
thing like a pear in shape, and the nutmeg was
like a kernel in the middle of the pulp. What I
thought the prettiest, was the red mace which
was wrapped round the kernel like a coarse net.
It is very odd that there should be two such
different spices in one fruit. I like nutmeg very
much, but I do not like mace at all.”

“Perhaps you do not know that your favourite
nutmeg can only be taken safely in very small
quantities. Whatever the natives of India may
do, it is certain that a European taking this spice
in excess, would soon experience intense thirst,
and headache, and perhaps delirium and death.
Nutmegs are tropical plants, and so are the various
families composing the cucumber tribe, which is
the next I shall mention.”

“Cucumbers grow in the open ground as well
as in hotbeds,” said Mary, “and for that reason |
thought they were English plants.”

“Vegetable Marrows and Gourds,” said her
father, “also grow freely in the open ground, but
they are natives of hot countries, and so are
melons, and all other members of this tribe. They
have a habit of climbing by means of long curling



88 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

tendrils, and in the wild state several species are
poisonous. Thus the pulp of the bottle gourd*
has produced symptoms of cholera, and it is
recorded that some sailors were poisoned by drink-
ing beer that had been left in a flask made of one
of these gourds. The spirting cucumber+ is a
virulent poison, and from its pulp is prepared the
powerful drug called Hlaterium, a few grains of
which sometimes bring on symptoms of poisoning.
Our common Bryony belongs to this tribe, and
partakes in the same qualities.”

“Ts it not dangerous to have any thing to do
with such a tribe?” asked Mary.

“Tt is necessary to use the fruit cautiously,”
said her father; ‘“‘but cultivation improves many
of the species so much, that they lose nearly all
their baneful properties. It would be a pity to
give up our acquaintance with melons, cucumbers,
and vegetable marrows, because some of their un-
cultivated relatives are dangerous characters. In-
deed we are not at liberty to despise even these
dangerous plants, for several valuable medicines
are obtained from them, especially Colocynth f.

* Lagenaria vulgaris. + Ecbalium agreste.
¢ Cucumis colocynthis.



THE CUCUMBER TRIBE. 89

The seeds of most of them are mild and harmless.
In an African species* these seeds, when ripe, are
as large as chestnuts, and resemble almonds in
flavour, yielding also an abundance of oil. The
pulp of the same fruit is excessively bitter, and
produces violent headache when only applied to
the tongue.”

Henry thought it very odd that the seed should
be wholesome and the pulp poisonous, which is the
case with nearly all the plants of this tribe. He
was told that the Begonias of our conservatories,
whose red-veined leaves are so much admired, and
whose whole foliage is sometimes of a deep rose
colourt, are not far removed from cucumbers, and
that some of the species have the same scrambling
habit.

“ Allied in many respects to cucumbers, is a
strange and remarkable tribe of South American
plants, of which we will take the Papaw as an
example. This extraordinary tree has the property
of making the toughest animal substances tender,
so that newly killed meat, when hung amongst its
leaves, becomes fit for cooking in a few hours.”

* Telfairia pedata. + Begonia sanguinea.



90 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘What a convenient tree that would be for our
kitchen garden!” said Mary.

“ Still more strange is it,” continued her father,
“that old hogs and poultry, when fed on its leaves,
become also tender, and fit for the purposes of the
table, in the course of a few hours.”

“We really ought to have it in England,” said
Henry. “If it would not bear our cold winters,
we could keep it in a hothouse, and it would be
worth the trouble.”

“Perhaps its curious properties would be lost
under artificial cultivation,” said his father; “and
at any rate there would be disagreeable effects
to set against the convenience of having such a
tree.”

“How so, papa?”

“The roots of this tree have a most disgusting
and overpowering smell, like decaying animal
matter, and the blossoms also have a disagreeable
odour. The juice, when analysed, greatly resem-
bles animal albumen, dissolving like it in water.
Fibrin, a principle which is considered peculiar to
the animal kingdom, is found in this tribe, and also
in the fungus tribe, which causes both tribes to
be peculiarly interesting to those who love to



THE PASSION-FLOWER TRIBE. 91

search out the wonders and difficulties of the vege-
table world. These papaws are, indeed, so unac-
countable in their properties, that I should have
hesitated to tell you about them, except on the
best authority. Kemind me to give you their
history at greater length from Hooker’s account of
them in the Botanical Magazine.”

“Thank you, papa, I shall not forget it,” said
Henry. |

His father now began to speak of that beau-
tiful tribe of climbing plants called the passion-
flower tribe.

Mary said she knew why they were called pas-
sion-flowers, for her mamma had shown her all the
parts of the flower, which were supposed to repre-
sent the instruments of our Lord’s passion or
sufferings.

‘¢' There were the three nails in the centre,” she
said, “‘and round them the five wounds, and out-
side them the crown of thorns, with the upright
column in the middle, for the pillar of scourging.”

Robert said he did not understand how three
nails could make five wounds, but his sister
reminded him that one wound was from the sol-
dier’s spear, and also that, in crucifixion, the feet



92 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

were usually crossed, and one nail driven through
both, so that the four wounds of the hands and
feet might be made by three nails. The children
were talking thus in a low voice, on the solemn
subject of our Lord’s crucifixion, when their father
told them that the idea of connecting the passion-
flower with that awful event was adopted by some
zealous Roman Catholics, when they first saw
these splendid plants blossoming in their native
woods, and climbing about from tree to tree in
wild magnificence.

“And where are their native woods?” asked
Henry.

“Chiefly in South America and the West
Indies, where the fruit of some species is eaten,
and where infusions of the flowers are used as a
remedy for coughs, and a poultice of the leaves is
used to subdue erysipelas and other eruptions on
the skin. It would not be safe, however, to em-
ploy the passion-flower for such purposes in this
country, as the tribe possesses active and danger-
ous qualities.”

At this part of the vegetable kingdom we must
pass over several tribes of plants, natives of hot
countries, only mentioning a familiar species,



THE VIOLET TRIBE. 93

called the Arnotto plant*, whose orange-coloured
waxen pulp, when separated from the seeds and
dried, forms cheese-colouring, and is also used in
the preparation of chocolate (see p. 98). We next
pause at the Violet tribe, which, besides our sweet
violets, dog violets, and pansies, contains also many
foreign herbs, emetic in their properties, and known
to us under the name of Ipecacuanha. The roots
of our sweet violet have similar qualities, and the
petals and seeds are likewise medicinal.

Henry remembered reading that violet flowers
were made into wine by the Romans, and also
that they are still used in the Kast to make sherbet.
His father told him, that this tribe does not con-
sist wholly of small herbs, such as our own violet,
but that some of the foreign families are berry-
bearing shrubs, and one has a twining stem +.

‘‘Do you remember, Mary,” said her father,
“the beautiful shrubs which fenced some of the
gardens at Shanklin, when we last visited the Isle
of Wight?”

‘“Oh yes, papa: they were the prettiest I ever
saw, with very slender branches like beautiful
smooth rods, and covered with tiny leaves of a

* Bixa orellana, + Corynostylis.



94 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.



BLOSSOM OF THE TAMARISK



Full Text




FIRST STEPS

IN

GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

PART IV.
THE VEGETABLE KINGDOM.

PUBLISHED UNDER. THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION,
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.



LONDON:
Printed for the
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE;
SOLD AT THE DEPOSITORY,
GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN’S INN FIELDS,
4, ROYAL EXCHANGE, AND 16, HANOVER STREET, HANOVER SQUARE;
AND BY ALL BOOKSELLERS.

18538.
LONDON :
GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, PRINTERS,
ST. JOHN’S SQUARE.


ConNVERSATION I.

THE

II.

III.

IV.

VI.

VII.

VIII.

CONTENTS.

VEGETABLE KINGDOM.

FLOWERLEsS PLants. Sea-weeds —
Mushrooms—Lichens .......ccseceeeseeeee
———— Mosses and Ferns ............0000«
FLOWERING PLANTS. ENDOGENS:
Grasses, Sedges, 826. 2. .ercscccrcscccecseeee
——~—— Palm, Amaryllis, Iris, Ginger,
Arrowroot, Orchis, Rush, Autumn
Crocus, and Lily Tribes ..........sssseeee
ExocGeEns: Pine, Yew, Beef-wood, Willow,
Nettle, Hemp, Mulberry, and Plane
TIDES ..0.00.000 000 060 000 cvecee cee coe cee pee eee coceee
————-Spurgewort, Mastwort, Walnut,
Nutmeg, Cucumber, Begonia, Papaw,
Passion-flower, Violet, Tamarisk, and
Houseleek Tribes 10.00. cccccsccecescccccecce
Cistus, Cruciferous, Migno-

nette, Cotton, Nasturtium, Lime, Milk-
wort, and Soapwort Tribes ..........0.00
———— Ranunculus, Poppy, Fumitory,

Sun-dew, Barberry, and Vine Tribes...

PAGE

21

33

45

65

81

99

120
CONTENTS.

CONVERSATION IX. ExoGcens: Heath, Rue, Flax, Balsam,

XI.

XII.

Geranium, Wood-sorrel, Clove, Buck-
wheat, Goosefoot, Leguminous, Al-
mond, Apple, and Rose Tribes .........
Saxifrage, Hydrangea, Loose-

strife, Elm, Buckthorn, Spindle, Gen-
tian, Ebony, Holly, Nightshade, Olive,
Convolvulus, Dodder, Tobacco, Thrift,
Plantain, Primrose, Jasmin, Borage,
Labiate, Verbena, Figwort, Butterwort,
Campanula, and Scabious Tribes ......
Composite, Evening Primrose,
Myrtle,Cactus, Currant, Syringa, Cran-
berry, Coffee, Honeysuckle,and Galium
PON Bctddecnctese seccdcerecccenseeecnccenees
Umbelliferous, Ivy, Cornel,
Witch-hazel, Sandalwort, Loranth, and
Birth wort Tri00s 10. .0c00ecceces soc eve cee cee cee

PAGE

133

151

166

178 '


FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

PART FOURTH.

The Wegetable Kingdom.

CONVERSATION I.

SEA-WEEDS—MUSHROOMS—LICHENS.

Ir was a lovely April morning: the sun shone
brightly after heavy showers ; the birds sang joy-
ously among the trees, and scattered rain-drops as
they flitted from bough to bough: every plant
was laden with moisture, and the thickly blos-
somed cherry on the garden wall had showered
down its* beautiful petals under the influence of
the driving rain. The gravel-pathy afforded the
only dry walking ground, and he ght be seen
three young folks, newly escaped from their morn-

|
.

2 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

ing studies, and now driving the hoop, or tossing
the ball with much glee.

An hour quickly passed away in this manner,
but when their father came out to take his morn-
ing walk, they hastily laid aside their games, and
begged that they might accompany him.

“The roads are too wet for you at present,”
said he, “but as you seem tired of play, I will
spend a few minutes with you before I take my
walk, and we will see if the garden affords an
example of the lowest order of plants; for I
have not forgotten my promise to give you the
same kind of sketch of the Vegetable Kingdom,
which I did last autumnof the Animal Kingdom.”

“Oh, thank you—thank you, papa,” said all
three, and Henry added “ that he thought it must
be the very best time to learn about plants, now
they were all springing up afresh, and now the
crocuses and snowdrops and violets were so beau-
tiful.” He was surprised, however, to see that his
father passed by all the flower-beds, and went to
a part of the garden where nothing seemed to be
growing. -. under the shelter of a wall, and
where the path was very damp, he began to take
up a portion of the green coating which covered it.
LOWEST FORMS OF VEGETABLES. 3

“What are you going to do with that green
stuff, papa?” said Robert ; ‘there is plenty of it
on the glass of the hothouse ; and there was a great
deal on the rocks last summer, close by the sea.”

‘“‘T am going to show it to you under the micro-
scope, as an example of the lowest stage of vege
table life. Some of the plants of this order come
so near the lowest tribes of animals, that even the
best naturalists find it difficult to decide between
them.”

“Why do they not watch them very closely, to
see whether they move?” asked Mary.

“Even that will not decide the matter, for some
of these plants move about in water by means of
little cilia, or hairs, exactly like certain animals.”

“That is very odd,” said Henry; “how ean
people possibly find out which is which ?”

“The only certain distinction which I have
heard of is one that can only be proved by scien-
tific persons ; it is the presence of starch, which is
found in many of these tribes, and which is known
to be a vegetable and not an animal production.
Still, there are mysteries in this subject known
only to that Infinite Being who planned and
executed the wonderful scheme of creation.”

B 2
4 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘‘T never see any of that green slime,” said
Mary, “‘ except in very wet places.”

“ And for a good reason,” replied her father ;
“all the plants of this lowest race are inhabitants
of the water, both fresh and salt; and when a
path becomes soaked with rain, as this is, and the
water settles for some time on the surface, then do
these minute plants spring up, giving a greenish
tinge to the ground.”

‘*‘ And what is the name of these water plants?”
asked Henry.

‘The great tribe to which they belong is that
of the Alga.”

“« Algze,” said Mary, ‘‘is the word which mamma
wrote in our book of dried sea-weed, and I thought
it meant sea-plants.”

‘So it does; but it also includes their fresh
water relations, of which very many families are
of this slimy character, and inhabit still waters
and oozy places in the northern parts of the
world.”

Henry took up a bit of the damp earth that
was covered with this green substance, and he
found that it fell to pieces very easily, and that
there were no roots to the tiny plants to bind it
Â¥

a SEA-WEEDS. 5

together. His father told him that this tribe of
plants has been called drittleworts, on account of
their so easily breaking into fragments.

“There is another order of algze,” he continued,
‘where many of the plants are red, violet, or olive,
instead of green, although they are found in fresh
as well as in salt water. They are called con-
ferve, and some are remarkable for the colour
they give to the water. The Red Sea appears to
have derived its name from the multitude of
minute conferve often seen floating in its waters.
A French writer* tells us that as he entered this
sea by the straits of Babelmandel, in July, 1843,
he was astonished to find the waters stained red, as
far as the eye could reach. Collecting some of the
water, he found it to be covered with a thin layer
of a brickdust colour. This layer changed in the
course of the day to a deep violet colour, but the
water itself was tinged with a beautiful rose-
pink.”

“T am glad they found out what it was,” said
Henry, “ for.I have heard that common sailors are
superstitious, and perhaps they would have fancied
they were sailing through a sea of blood.”

* Dupont.
6 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE. +

‘Other families of these plants make the water
green, or brown, or violet,” said his father; ‘‘so
that we need not be surprised at any wonderful
- stories we read about the colour of the sea. It
also sometimes happens that when meadows are
long under water, they are covered to the depth
of an inch with an entangled layer of similar
plants, almost like woollen cloth, and which is
commonly called water-flannel.”

** Are these plants of any use?” asked Robert.

‘“f do not know of any use in the smaller
species; but some of the larger confervee, called
Laver, are eaten by many persons, either stewed
or pickled. Yet we may be quite sure that it is
for some wise purpose that God has filled the seas
and rivers with such multitudes of these plants.
Another order of algze contains the different kinds
of Fucus, or Sea-wrack, some of which are used
as food by the poorer classes of Ireland, Scot-
land, Iceland, &c. Some are also employed as
manure, and are of importance in the manufacture
of glass and of soap, on account of the quantity of
impure soda (called kelp) which is obtained from
them. Those large dark-looking weeds, with air-
bladders in their leaves, which you called your
FUCUS, OR SEA-WRACK. 7

weather-glass, were some of the common kinds of
sea-wrack.”



FUCUS CANALICULATUS,

‘Those were the weeds you said were useful in
medicine, papa.”
8 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

“Yes; they contain iodine, *which is particu-
larly useful in those swellings of the throat called
goitre. In some parts of South America where
this disease is common, the inhabitants chew the
stem of these weeds, and call them by a name
which means, ‘ goitre-stick.’”

‘‘ Some of the stems are very thick,” said Mary ;
“and one very tough sort, 1 remember, you called
‘sea-girdles.’”-

“Did I tell you of the odd use these girdles
are sometimes put to? They are cut in pieces .
about four inches long, and while they are fresh,
the hilt of a pruning-knife is stuck into each
piece. As the stem dries, it clings closely to the
hilt and forms a good and strong handle, and from
its withered and brown appearance it’ looks very
much like buck’s-horn, especially when tipped with
metal. Thus a number of knives can be easily
and cheaply finished off.”

The children thought the sea-wracks very use-
ful weeds, especially when they found, that if fuel
is scarce, they can be dried and used for that
purpose ; that the young shoots are eaten in Edin-
burgh, as “‘tangles,” and that cattle will thrive
on the plants when boiled. Robert also remem-
ATR-BLADDERS IN SEA-WEEDS. 9

bered that it was from the air-bladders of one of
these weeds* that he made such famous whistleg,
when he was by the sea-side.

‘‘ What are the air-bladders for?” asked Mary.

‘No doubt to support the weeds on the water ;
for some of them are of enormous size and length.
Dr. Hooker saw them high up in the South Seas,
growing in large patches wherever the water was
free of icebergs; the plants were several hundred
feet long, and could scarcely have been supported
without air-bladders. Around the Falkland Islands
they were also very abundant, and sometimes clasped
the rocks, and became tree-like in their form, the
stems being thicker than a man’s thigh, and the
long leaves drooping like the branches of a willow.
Dr. Hooker tells us that no one who has not
actually seen it can form an idea of the amount
of life which is nourished and housed by one of
these tree sea-weeds. Various kinds of worms,
small sponges, corals, crabs, eggs of fish, and
myriads of shells, with their inhabitants, find a
home there, while the lesser sea-weeds cling to it
as moss clings to a large tree.”

“How very different the dark-looking, leathery

* Fucus nodosus.
10 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

sea-wracks are from my beautiful pink sea-weeds !”
said Mary.

‘“ Your pretty specimens,” said her father, “ be-
long to a tribe called Rose-tangles, which are
most of them rose-coloured or purple. Some of
the ocean caves are quite lined with dark red
weeds of this description. Rose-tangles are not
only pretty, but useful; a nourishing jelly is made



DULSE.

from one of them, imprdéperly called Carrageen
moss ; a substitute for tobacco is found in another,
called dulse, which is washed in fresh water, dried
f
ROSE-TANGLES. 11

in the sun, and then rolled up for use, by the Irish
and Scotch. Dulse is also stewed with milk, or
eaten raw with fish. That very — coloured

s

We ij BS A



wahwy
EW LAY a
ay; he > aR at iB
2 SVK ye NY yy
s md aNTy NE Was
YS oxy SA SUR Vay yi a ess
Sy SS »” ss <<
2 y BD AA] AW
: ya y

PINK SEA-WEED.

(Plocamium coccineum.)
weed, in your book, is a great favourite every
where, and may be easily known from other fami-
lies in this tribe by the way in which the branches
are divided. Here, also, we find the beautiful
corallines, of which we have so many specimens
on our shores. There is a small kind of rose-
tangle, which is invaluable to the Chinese as a
«

4 .
12 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

glue and varnish. About 27,000 pounds weight
of this plant are annually brought into Canton,
and sold at sixpence or eightpence the pound.



CORALLINE.

With this they varnish the paper for their
lanterns, and give the beautiful gloss to their
silks; and it seems likewise to be the principal
ingredient in a celebrated transparent composition
which they spread out over slips of bamboo, and
use instead of glass in windows, the bamboo slips
being arranged in the manner of a frame.”
. * my
PLANTS OF STAGNANT WATERS. 13

Mary was delighted to find that the beautiful
rose-tangles served so many useful purposes in
the world; and she was amused to hear that the
eatable birds’-nests, which her brothers had so
often laughed at the Chinese for being so fond of,
are supposed to be made of some of these weeds ;
so that, after all, in devouring the nests, the people
are, perhaps, only eating a jelly, such as we get
from the carrageen and other plants of this family.
Her father told her that the only remaining alge
he had to mention were weeds of ill odour, living
in stagnant water, either fresh or salt, and having
their stems often coated over with carbonate of
lime. They are upright tubes, with whorls of
smaller tubes surrounding the stem, and are
called Charas.

The children were much pleased with what they
had heard of the great tribe of plants that inhabits
the waters; and Mary thought it would be a won-
derful sight if any one could look down into the
deep deep sea, where so many beautiful things
are growing.

“There are no storms there,” she said, “for
I have learned some pretty lines that tell me
So.
é

14 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘“* ¢ The water is calm and still below,
For the winds and waves are absent there,
And the sands are bright as the stars that glow
In the motionless fields of upper air ;
There, with its waving blade of green,
The sea-flag streams through the silent water,
And the crimson leaf of the dulse is seen
To blush like a banner bathed in slaughter.
There, with a slight and easy motion,
The fan-coral sweeps through the clear deep sea,
And the yellow and scarlet tufts of ocean
Are bending like corn on the upland lea.’ ”

During the foregoing conversation the party
had approached the gate of the orchard, where, in
summer, a few mushrooms occasionally Sprang up.
“In a few weeks,” said their father, “we shall
have to set out for yonder pastures, on our mush-
room expedition. After these rains, it is likely
that they will be numerous; for these plants, like
the alge, are very fond of water, though they do
not live entirely in it.”

‘“We must be careful what we gather,” said
Henry, “for some kinds are poisonous.”

‘The Fungus tribe, which includes our common
mushroom, is a very curious and wonderful race
of vegetables,” said his father, “ springing up with
a rapidity unknown in other plants, and not un-
THE FUNGUS TRIBE. 15

frequently growing many inches in the space of a
night, especially after storms.”

“The large puff-ball we found in the meadow
was a fungus,” said Henry; “and so, I suppose,
are all the plants we call toad-stools: and so are
the beautiful orange-coloured velvety spots we
sometimes find on old fences.”

“Every kind of mouldiness, or mildew, where-
ever we may find it,” added his father, “also pro-
ceeds from the growth of innumerable small fungi.”

“Then the mould I saw in the cellar, and that
on my cup of paste,” said Henry, “must be of
this kind.”

“And that on mamma’s preserves,” said Mary,
“and on the bread when it is very stale. I sup-
pose we may make these plants grow when we
like: it is only to keep our food a long time, and
it will be covered with them. Do they grow from
seed, or what brings them ¢”

“That is one of the mysteries we cannot pene-
trate,” said her father. ‘“‘ We cannot tell how it
is, that in the dark or in the light, in the open air
or in the closet, these plants spring up. Whether
their seeds are so light as to be carried about
invisibly, and lodged in such various places, or
16 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

whether fungi are merely different states of decay-
ing vegetable matter, it is quite impossible to say ;
but this we know, that in a single fungus, a
botanist* reckoned ten millions of seeds, or sporules,
as they are called; and these, which are carried
about like thin smoke, may be conveyed by in-
sects, elasticity, adhesion, or other causes, into
remote places, and spring up when they find a
substance suited to their growth.”

‘How could any one reckon ten millions 2”
asked Henry. ‘I have heard that it would take
about a fortnight to count one million.”

‘In reckoning such minute substances, we do
not, of course, count one by one throughout, but
after finding out how many there are in a certain
space, we multiply the others by them. Thus, if
I wished to reckon the sweet peas your mamma
is sowing in the garden, I would fill a small
measure with the seed, and if I found that it
contained two hundred seeds, I should afterwards
know that every time I filled it there would be that
number, or very nearly. Before we leave the fungi,
I must tell you that they are far more numerous in
many foreign countries than in our own. In

* Fries.
EATABLE FUNGI. | 17

Australia, for instance, they are much used by the
natives, and are also eagerly sought after by the
curious pouched animals of that land.”

Mary asked, if any besides the common mush-
room were eaten in this country; and her father
told her that two other families of fungus are
much esteemed, namely, the Moreland the Truffle ;
the former growing up in beech woods, in a mush-
room shape; the latter, an underground produc-
tion, black and warty on the outside, but white
within. Truffle hunters are assisted by dogs,
whose keen scent enables them to find out the
places where the fungus is growing.

The children were also informed that. the “ dry
rot,” which is so often of serious consequence to
the timbers of ships and buildings, is a fungus ;
also the blight in corn, and the diseases called
“smut,” “ergot,” and ‘“‘rust;” likewise a blighted
appearance on the leaves of some plants, such as
the dingy red spots on the leaves of the pear-tree,
which, on turning up the leaves, are found to be
caused by a small fungus growing on the under
side.

‘* How odd that one vegetable should grow upon
another in that way,” said Robert.

c
18 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘“ You have seen many examples of it in the
lichens you are so fond of collecting,” replied his
father; ‘these, as you know, are very common
on timber and on stone. They gain their nourish-
ment from the atmosphere, and not from the
material on which they grow; therefore they are
not so injurious as the fungus, which is fed out of
the very substance of what it grows upon.”
“How delighted we were,” said Mary, “ when
you first taught us to find lichens. We had no |
idea that the yellow and white patches on the
bark of the elm trees, and the brown and grey
spots on the walls of our house, were all living
vegetables. And then, what beautiful pale grey
lichens we found on the church porch, and even
on the tomb-stones ! they were so flat and close to
the stone that they looked like stains.”

‘‘ Without lichens,” said her father, “ our land-
scapes would lose much of their picturesque beauty,
and our ancient edifices much of their venerable
character. It is remarkable in large and smoky
cities, where lichens do not flourish, how much
less interesting is the appearance of the old build-
ings. The harmonious colouring of these little
plants is there greatly missed.”
LICHENS: THEIR USES. 19

‘‘ Are lichens of any use, papa?” asked Robert.

‘They are of great use in several ways. They
are the first plants to clothe the surface of bare
rocks ; and therefore they are the first vegetable
substances on newly-formed islands in the midst
of the ocean, thus preparing the way for higher .
orders of plants, and finally for the abode of man.
Their domestic uses are of two kinds: some are
nourishing and medicinal in their properties, and
some are valuable as affording dyes. Iceland
Moss * and Rein-deer Moss are both lichens; and
it is from a lichen + that the dye called litmus, or
orchil, is obtained, which is very largely. used by
manufacturers. There is a common lichen, called
Lungs of the Oak, which is also used as a strength-
ening diet for invalids: while in Siberia it is
employed for giving a bitter to beer. These and
many others are therefore of considerable im-
portance.”

‘“ Why does Henry always look out for lichens
that have little cups or shields upon them?” said
Robert.

‘‘ Because these shields contain the spores, or
seed, and the lichen is in perfection when so
* Cetraria islandica. + Rocella tinctoria.

c 2
20 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

adorned. Some of these shields, as you remember,
lie flat upon the lichen, others are elevated on
little stalks. They are always best developed in
places fully exposed to the light; hence it is of



‘LUNGS OF THE OAK” LICHEN.

very little use to search for shield-bearing lichens
in shady groves or in the dark clefts of rocks.
You have proved how well lichens can be kept,
. without the trouble in drying which you have
with other plants. Some of those in my cabinet
were gathered twelve years ago, and are very
little altered: and I have seen older collections in
fine preservation.
21

CONVERSATION II.

MOSSES AND FERNS,

Mary had been arranging a cushion of moss on
a china dish, and sticking violets and primroses
among its delicate fibres. This had a pretty
effect, and her mamma praised her spring nosegay.
‘Will you tell us, papa,” said the little girl,
‘‘something about these beautiful mosses, that are
so bright and green long before the leaves of the
trees are out?”

‘* Mosses,” said her father, ‘“‘ are not so simple
in their structure as lichens, and therefore come
higher in the scale of vegetable life. There are
plants nearly related to them, called Liverworts,
‘which are of a somewhat fleshy substance, and
grow only in very damp places. You remember
finding a mass of liverwort on the damp earth
near the pond; it is also to be found on trees in
shady and moist places. A very curious fact con-
nected with liverworts is, that in the little case
which contains the spores there is a spiral thread
lying among them, or sometimes two twisted toge-
22. FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

ther, and contained in a delicate transparent tube.
These threads have a strong elastic force, and
perhaps assist in dispersing the seed.”

Henry asked why they were called liverworts,
and was told that they were formerly used in
liver complaints, and that one of them* is still
thought to be of some value in cases of dropsy.

‘“‘'The mosses in Mary’s nosegay,” said her
father, ‘‘ belong to a vast order, called Urn-mosses,



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URN-MOSS,

their seed-vessels being urn-shaped. You have
often seen on the garden wall small tufts of moss
with a number of slender stalks rising from them,
each stalk supporting one of these little urns.”

* Marchantia hemispheerica.
URN-MOSSES. 23

‘“O yes, papa,” said Mary; ‘“‘and I have looked
at them through Henry’s little microscope, for
mamma told me they were pretty little cups with
lids to them. In some of them the lids had fallen
off, and I saw a number of teeth rising up round
the edge of the cup, like a beautiful fringe. And
mamma said, that if I counted those little teeth,
I should always find them to be four times four,
or four times eight, or four times some other
number.”

‘Yes ; constantly a multiple of four; and all
this regular and beautiful apparatus for the pro-
tection of the minute spores or seeds, which lie
within. These beautiful seed-vessels, as well as
the leafy appearance of the stems in mosses, will
show you that they are considerably raised above
lichens.”

“And are they put to as many uses?” asked
Henry.

“They are not. As far as the immediate
health and convenience of man are concerned,
mosses seem to be of little consequence, except
for the beautiful green carpet they spread under
his feet, in places where little else will grow. But
they perform a similar office to lichens in nature
94. FIRST STEFS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

generally ; preparing waste and barren lands for
higher vegetation, and often existing on the limits
of eternal snow. There are some curious little
reddish or brown mosses *, which cover the rocks
like a mat in such bleak spots, and bear their
seed, not in urns, but in tiny globes. Each globe
is made up of four valves, which split open to let
the seed escape, but are still held together at the
top by a very small lid, which does not fall off as
in the Urn-mosses. ‘These little plants are called
Split-mosses. There are others, called Scale-
mosses, not much unlike these in the shape of the
seed-vessel, but having no lid, so that the four
valves burst quite asunder when the seed is ripe.
Other moss-like plants are called Club-mosses,
because their spore-cases are often collected into a
club-shaped body, not unlike a fir-cone. These
delight in moist and warm climates. Thus, you
see, there is great variety in this humble
family.”

‘** Among them all,” said Mary, ‘‘ what is that
very beautiful pale green moss, which was sent to
mamma from Crowborough, in Sussex, with such
curious horns at the ends of the branches ?”

* Andreea nivalis.
CLU B-MOSSES—FERNS. 95

“It is called Stag’s-horn Moss *, and is one of
the club-mosses I have just referred to.”

‘‘ Near to mosses come those curious plants called
Horse-tails +, which you see in ditches, and often

gather for the purpose
of pulling apart the nu-
merous toothed divi-
sions of the stem. Also
the common duckweed,
and other creeping or
floating plants, its rela-
tions, which are col-
lected under the name
of pepperworts. These
are so simple in their
structure as to be placed
by modern botanists
below ferns, to which
great tribe I now lead
you.”

‘‘T should not have
thought it a great tribe,”
said Henry, ‘for we

* Lycopodium clavatum.



STAG’S-HORN MOSS.
see very few ferns in our walks, compared with
other plants.”

+ Equisetum.
26 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘That is true; but we must not always judge
of a whole tribe of plants by what our own neigh-
bourhood, or even our own country, affords. Ferns
in this country are leafy plants, with stems that
mostly creep along the surface of the earth, or
hide themselves beneath it; but in tropical coun-
tries there are tree-ferns, whose leafless trunks
rise to the height of thirty or forty feet, and send
out an elegant tuft of foliage at the top. And
although many of our woods, and hedgebanks, as
well as our rocks and old walls, are ornamented
with very beautiful kinds of fern, yet these are
not to be compared to the ferns of the tropics, for
number or variety. The island of Jamaica alone
is said to contain at least four times as many
different species as the whole of Great Britain,
and some of them growing to a majestic height.”

‘They may be very large and handsome,” said
Mary, “but I cannot fancy any thing more beauti-
ful than the fern we brought home from the
woods. We little thought, as we scrambled
through a mass of fern leaves, that every one of
them was loaded with hundreds of little seed-
vessels on the under side. It was quite by accident
that I caught sight of them, scattered like little
yellow beads all over the back of the leaf, or
THE LADY-FERN. 27

perhaps I ought to call it the branch, for there
were a great many small leaves upon it.”

“In ferns it is called the frond, and according
to its shape, and the arrangement of the seeds,

you may discover the
name of the. species.
The large frond you
brought from the woods
has the seeds clustered
together, along the mid-
dle vein of each leaflet.
It is called Male Fern*,
on account of its strong
growth and hardy na-
ture. A very delicate
and graceful species is
called Lady Fern, while
anotheriscalled Maiden-
hair.”

Mary remembered
some lines of Sir Wal-
ter Scott’s about the
lady-fern, and she now
repeated them :—



THE LADY-FERN,

* Aspidium Filix, mas.
28 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE,

«Where the copse-wood is the greenest,
Where the fountain glistens sheenest,
Where the morning dew lies longest,
There the lady-fern grows strongest.”’

“The juices of several ferns,” continued her
father, “have been used as medicine, and the
stems of others as food; but their ordinary uses
in this country are merely for thatching, or for
heating ovens, or for horse-litter. But there is
one thing I must not omit to say about the
foreign ferns. Do you remember, Henry, having
your curiosity excited by a picture of a Scythian
lamb, as it was called?”

‘“O yes, papa; it was an odd-looking thing—
half-animal, half vegetable; with four legs that
were exactly like the stalks of a plant.”

‘* That was nothing more than a woolly-stemmed
fern, Barometz, common in the deserts of Scythia,
and which, when deprived of its leaves, and turned
upside down, is not much unlike a lamb, and has
been used to deceive simple people. Ferns are
altogether so curious and interesting, that I hope
you will one day make them a separate study ;
they are the highest forms of flowerless plants,
for you must have noticed that all the tribes we
ARRANGEMENT OF FLOWERLESS FLANTS. 29

have yet spoken of are without blossom of any
kind.”

“ How strange that they should have seeds, and
not flowers!” said Robert.

‘And that the seeds should grow in such odd
places,” said Mary; “some on the backs of the
leaves, and some in little cups, and some in urns,
and some in clubs.”

‘They are not true seeds, therefore you must
learn to call them spores. You must also
understand that these flowerless plants can be
brought under two great divisions: first, those
simple plants in which there is no distinction
of leaf and stem; and secondly, those plants,
whose leaves and stems are quite distinct. Tell
me what you think must belong to the first
division.”

“The green slime we saw in the garden,” said
Robert, ‘‘for even through the microscope it only
looked like a bundle of threads.”

‘“‘And perhaps the sea-weeds,” said Mary, “‘ for
some of them seem all stem, and some of them all
leaf, so that it would not be very easy to find out
a regular stem and leaf on the same plant.”

‘* And I am sure the lichens must belong to the

5
30 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

first division,” said Henry, “for they are leafy or
leathery all over, lying flat on the place where
they grow. Mushrooms have stems, but then they
have no leaves, so I suppose they must come in
the same division.”

‘You are right; and having thus found out the
members of the first division, it follows as a mat-
ter of course, that mosses and ferns come into the
second, for in all these plants leaf and stem are
perfectly distinct. In leaving these flowerless
plants we find the same thing occur, which we so
often noticed in rising from tribe to tribe of the
animal kingdom; I mean that the orders blend
together in so gradual a manner, that we are sure
to find a great likeness to the one we have left, in
that which comes immediately above it. Thus it
happens that the lowest of the flowering plants
look almost like flowering lichens, or mush-
rooms.”

‘Have we ever seen them?” asked Mary.

“You have not, and perhaps you never may in
their own climate; for they are, I believe, wholly
confined to tropical countries. They are parasites
upon roots or trunks of trees, and have no true
leaves, and very little stem: yet they have flowers
A GIANT PARASITE. 3]

growing immediately from the branch of the tree,
and surrounded by scales, which take the place
of leaves.”

“They must look as if they were the blossoms
of the tree itself,” remarked Henry.

‘They cannot be so mistaken,” replied his
father, “‘ because in these parasites the whole plant
is of a uniform dull colour, either brown, yellow, or
purple. The scales that represent leaves, and the
fungus-like mass that sometimes forms a sort of
stem, is never green as in other plants. A giant
parasite of this race*, when in bud, is of the
size of an ordinary cabbage, and when in blossom
measures a yard across.”

“What an enormous blossom!” exclaimed Mary,
“T pity the tree that has to support it. You told
us one day that lazy men and women are called
parasites when they live at the expense of their
friends, without doing any thing for their own sup-
port; this immense flower must be a very expen-
sive parasite, and must wear out the poor tree
very soon.”

“All these strange plants form a sort of inter-

* Rafflesia.
32 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

mediate class between the flowerless and the flower-
ing, and I have mentioned them to you to-day,
because I would not too closely connect them with
the important division of the vegetable kingdom
which will form our next subject.




33

CONVERSATION III.

ENDOGENS.,
GRASSES, SEDGES, &c.

Brerore their papa was ready to tell them about
another division of plants, Mary and her brothers
repeated to each other what they could remember
about that which he had already spoken of; con-
taining, first, plants that have no flowers and no
distinction of leaf and stem, as seaweeds and
lichens ; secondly, those that have no flowers, but
distinct leaves and stems, as mosses and ferns ;
and thirdly, such as have no true leaves or stems,
but perfect flowers, as that strange giant parasite
with blossoms a yard across. They were curious
to know what came next, and they were soon
satisfied, for their father came into the room with
a bundle of dried grasses in his hand, which had
been gathered when in blossom.

“I am obliged to be satisfied with these dry
specimens,” he said, ‘for the spring grass is not
yet forward enough to give you a good idea of
this interesting tribe, We have now arrived at

D
34 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

true flowering plants, of which all the rest of the
vegetable world is made
up; but there is a very
evident difference be-
tween this kind of ve-
getable growth which I
hold in my hand, and
that of trees and shrubs.
Can you tell me what it
ast”

Henry took hold of
some of the grass, and
said, ‘‘ These dried stems
are brittle and jointed,
and when we gathered
them they were tough
and juicy; at first there
was a leaf wrapped
round the blossoms, as
if to take care of them;
Tremember ears of wheat
have just the same sort
of sheath round them
: when they first come
ROUGH-STALKED MEADow-crass, OUT. Trees and shrubs
are very different; they have hard woody stems,


FLOWERING PLANTS. 35

that I can cut pegs and wedges from, and
I never saw this odd sheath round any of their
flowers.”

‘¢ But trees have no flowers,” said Robert.

‘“‘ Indeed they have,” exclaimed his sister, “ and
I wonder you never saw me picking up lime
blossoms and elm blossoms, under the trees. They
are small, but very pretty. I like even the little
purplish laurel blossoms, and the tiny dark flowers
on the arbor vite. And oh how pleasant it is to
go down into the alder bed to get the beautiful
catkins, or to run to the wood for

‘ Hazel-buds with crimson gems,
Green and glossy sallows.’

But perhaps you do not know what sa//ows are :—
they are willows; and you recollect what pretty
green and shining tufts there are at the end of
the willow branches in the early spring.”

“Mary is wild after flowers,” said Robert ;
‘Cand she finds out all the early buds and catkins.
She gathered all these grasses just before hay-
making time last summer.”

“All flowering plants,” said his father, “are
ranged under two great classes, or divisions, called
Endogens and Evxogens, from their manner of

Dd 2
386 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

growth, The stem in the first of these classes
increases inwardly, that in the
second increases outwardly.”
“ Our large trees must in-
crease outwardly,” said Henry,
“for we saw the layers of
wood in the timber that was
felled last year, and you
taught us about the age of a
tree being known by the
number of rings in the trunk.”
“ Hxactly: but these gras-
ses grow in the first place
from within, while their stalks
do not increase outwardly be-
yond a certain size, so that
they belong to the first and
smallest of these two great
divisions.”
Henry wondered how any
‘ one could tell at first sight
whether a plant grew in-
Se wardly or outwardly, and his
father directed him to a sim-
FOX-TAIL GRASS. ple and easy mark of these
different manners of growth.


VEINING OF LEAVES 37

“The plants that increase within,” he said,
‘have the veins of their leaves in straight lines
from one end of the leaf to the other, and those
that increase without, have a beautiful network
of veins all over the leaf. If you collect a few
leaves from the garden you will soon see the
difference.”

The children ran into the flower garden and
gathered such early leaves as they could find, and
bringing them to their father, he held up to the
light a crocus and a hyacinth leaf, and showed
them how beautifully regular are the parallel
veins running from end to end.

“This shows that crocuses and hyacinths are
endogens,” he said; “but if you look at these
lilac and ivy, and primrose and violet leaves, you
see at a glance that the veins branch out from the
rib which runs down the middle of the leaf, and
then subdivide into a kind of network; there-
fore these leaves belong to exogens.”

“Oh yes, papa,” said Mary, ‘‘and that is what
makes skeleton-leaves so pretty. How very easy
it will be to find out which are endogens and
which are exogens; but I wish they had not such
hard names.”
38 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘Those names simply mean, ‘ growing inwardly,”
and ‘growing outwardly ;’ and they are the only
hard names I shall trouble you with for a long
time.”

“And how many plants belong to this straight-
veined division, or endogens?” asked Henry.

“Very many that you are acquainted with, and
very many more that you know nothing about.
In the first place, there is the great tribe contain-
ing the various Grasses which clothe the hills and
valleys with verdure, and in many cases bear
precious grain; for oats, barley, wheat, rye, maize,
and rice, are all produced by plants of this tribe ;
while the inferior kinds of grass feed our flocks
and herds, and thus do us nearly as much service
as the others. But you must not suppose that all
the pastures of the earth consist of the same kind
of short sweet herbage with which our own fields
and meadows are covered. In South America
there are field crops of grass, especially on the
banks of the river Amazon, which grow to the
height of six or seven feet, and yet are perfectly
tender and delicate.”

“We might easily lose ourselves in such a
field as that.” said Henry; “and even tall men
VARIETY OF GRASSES. 39

would not be able to see each other over the tops
of the grass.” °

“On the Falkland Islands there is an extra-
ordinary kind of grass, growing in large tufts or
hillocks, which hide the view of the cattle feeding
among them. I have seen some of this grass
growing in the Botanical Gardens at Kew; but it
was a poor little stunted specimen, compared with
the descriptions of the tussac grass, as it is called,
in its native country.”

“What a good thing it is,” said Robert,
“that grass comes up every where without any
trouble !”

“Tt isa great mercy,” replied his father, ‘that
God has ‘made the grass to grow upon the moun-
tains, and green herb for the service of men.’ It
is also matter for thankfulness that by the skill
and industry of the farmer, our fields are sown
with the best varieties of these grasses, mixed in
such proportions as are suited to the wants of our
cattle. Uncivilized nations move from place to
place in search of fresh pastures; but civilized
people carefully cultivate the same land year after
year, and make it yield as much as possible.”

“Some of the grasses smell very sweetly when
40 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

they are in blossom,” said Mary, “and I dare
say they have a swéet taste to cows and sheep.”

‘No doubt. Sugar is to be found in most
grasses, and the sugar-cane is itself a grass. Maize
or Indian corn also abounds in sugar, and has
been recommended for cultivation as a substitute
for the sugar-cane.”

“What a useful tribe!” remarked Henry. “ It
would be worth while to make out a list of the
things the grasses are used for. It would be a
very long one; for besides the use of the grass
itself and the different kinds of grain, there would
be hay and straw to notice, and all the things that
are made of them.”

“And the use of reeds and canes,” said his
father, “which are only large grasses. But
Sedges*, which much resemble grasses in outward
appearance, are a distinct tribe, and have not the
same nourishing qualities; they are therefore not
much sought after by cattle. You have seen
them growing up in marshy places, and have
noticed their frequently having a sharp triangular
stem, which will almost cut your fingers. The
Papyrus of the banks of the Nile is a species of

* Cyperus.
SEDGES. 4]

sedge, and so is the pretty Cotton-grass*, of which
Mary brought home so much last summer.”



COTTON GRASS.

“ Almost enough to make a pillow,” replied the
little girl ; ‘and when I have collected some more

* Eriophorum.
42 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

I am to sleep upon it, and it will be just like a
pillow of down.”

Robert wished to know what is the real use of
the silky tufts on the cotton-grass, and he was
told that they surround the seed, and are intended
to waft it to different places.

‘“Next to the grasses, I must notice certain
tribes, having a general tendency to one manner
of growth, namely, to bear their flowers upon a
club-shaped spadiz, as it is called. The common
Arum*, or Lords and Ladies, or Cuckoo Pint,
has this kind of spadix, and is a good example
of a tribe of plants chiefly confined to the tropics,
where they grow to a considerable size.”

‘““T thought Lords and Ladies had no flowers;
but only poisonous red berries wrapped up in a
curious hood,” said Robert.

“IT do not wonder at your thinking so, for the
flowers are naked; that is, they have no petals, or
flower-leaves, but only those parts which are
necessary for the formation of the seed. The ber-
ries are very poisonous, but the root can be manu-
factured into a kind of sago. The hood you speak
of is a very curious mantle for the protection of

* Arum maculatum.
THE ARUM TRIBE. 43

these naked flowers : it is called the spathe. There
is another plant which you are fond of searching



CUCKOO PINT.

for, and which bears its flowers on a spadix or
club, but it has no spathe to wrap them up in.”
44. FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE,

The children could not guess what plant it was
until their father said it grew in ditches, when they
immediately recollected the Bulrush *.

“Not that it is properly a rush,” continued
their father ; “ for the rush tribe has a higher place
in the vegetable system; but it is a curious sedgy
plant, bearing numerous and nearly naked flowers
on its spadix. Near to these tribes are placed the
duckweeds +, curious plants which, although they
have no spadix, have yet a certain natural con-
nexion with the foregoing. I cannot enter into
descriptions which belong to the scientific part of
botany, because you are not yet able to ,under-
stand them; but I may often lead you to notice
the more conspicuous features of the different
tribes, and this will be a great help to you. The
grasses and the arum group will be sufficient for
our present conversation : to-morrow we will talk
about the palms.”

* Typha. + Lemna,
45

CONVERSATION IV.

ENDOGENS,

PALM—AMARYLLIS—IRIS— GINGER—ARROWROOT—ORCHIS—
RUSH—AUTUMN CROCUS, AND LILY TRIBES.

‘“‘ The palm-tree in the wilderness
Majestic lifts its head,
And blooms in solitary grace
Where all around is dead.”

Mary had read some verses, beginning in this
manner, and she tried to find them, and also to
learn the different uses of palms, before her father
came into the study. She found out, that in
Egypt, Arabia, and Persia, people make their
principal food of the fruit ; that they make couches,
baskets, bags, mats, and brushes from the leaves,
and also roof their houses with them; and that
they make garden-fences, and cages for poultry,
from the branches; besides using the fibres for
thread, ropes, and rigging. Her father told her
that the uses of the palms are almost endless ; for,
according to Humboldt, wine, oil, wax, flour,
sugar, sago, and salt are obtained from the tribe,
besides many inferior articles,
46 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘““Kven in England,” said Henry, ‘the cocoa-
nut palm is very useful; for we get the nut to eat,
and the shell polished for cups, and the fibres made
into beautiful matting.”

‘““And mamma says that soap and candles are
made of palm oil; and that the little box on the
chimney-piece, which we call vegetable ivory, is
made of the kernel of a sort of palm,” added Mary.

“T have seen pictures of palm trees,” said
Robert, “and they seem to be very tall trees, with
a single stem and large tufts of leaves at the top.”

“That is their common appearance; but there
are at least four hundred distinct species of palms
(and perhaps many more) ; and among these there
is considerable variety; so that palms are oc-
casionally met with that are of a shrubby or
branched growth, or are armed with stiff spines.
Quite in character with the immense size of the
leaves in palms, is the enormous cluster of blos-
soms contained in each spathe; for these trees,
like our common arum, have a large spathe for the
protection of their fruit. Here is a drawing of a
palm blossom, which will show you how the florets
are clustered together: they sometimes amount to
two hundred thousand in a single spathe.”
THE PALM TRIBE. 47

“Tf that is the case,” said Henry, “I dare say
there is a great deal of seed; and it is a wonder
that the palm ever grows
up alone, and blooms ‘in
solitary grace,’ as Mary’s
lines say.”

“Its places of growth
are various,” said his fa-
ther; ‘‘so that one who
has closely studied the ha-
bits of this noble race, says,
‘not a few love the hu-
mid banks of rivulets and
streams; others occupy the
shores of the ocean, and
some ascend into alpine (Rg j
regions; some collect in- Way 47
to dense forests, others \ 7 Vy
spring up singly or in clus-
ters over the plains.’ But PALM BLOSSOM.
this you must understand of the sunny regions
within the tropics, beyond which these plants do
not extend. The tribes of plants immediately
above palms are chiefly foreign, and I shall only
mention the pineapple and agave, or American


48 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

aloe; the latter belonging to the tribe* which
contains our snow-drop and daffodil.”



CLUSTER FROM THE DATE-PALM.

Robert asked if it is true that the aloe only
flowers once in a hundred years, and was answered
in the negative.

‘The agave, of which this fable is told, is a
hardy and useful plant, forming in its native
country excellent hedges, which it is impossible to

* The Amaryllis tribe.
AMARYLLIS AND IRIS TRIBES. * 49

penetrate. The fibres of the leaves are used as
thread, and are manufactured into paper. Some
of the families contained in this tribe have a
poisonous juice in their bulbs, especially a species*
growing at the Cape of Good Hope, in which the
Hottentots are said to dip their arrow-heads. Our
snowdrop and daffodil have a share of the same
quality, and their bulbs have long been known as
emetic. Infants, who are fond of putting every
thing into their mouths, have been seriously in-
jured by swallowing daffodil blossoms, which
shows that some of the poisonous principle resides
also in the flowers.”

“Tam disappointed that my pretty snowdrops
have any thing poisonous about them,” said Mary.
“T hope those handsome purple and yellow cro-
cuses are better off.”

“They belong to the Iris tribe, and I cannot
flatter you that all are free from similar qualities ;
however, the crocus itself is rather beneficial than
otherwise, and it is from one Tf of its family that we
get saffron.”

‘‘Why does mamma put saffron in the canary’s

* Heemanthus toxicarius. t Crocus sativus.
E
50 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

drinking glass, when he is moulting?” asked
Robert.

“ Because it is of a warm and stimulating
nature, and appears to render the same sort of
service to the bird in helping him to throw off his
feathers, as it does to human beings in helping
them to throw out troublesome eruptions of the
skin. Medical men frequently use it for this
latter purpose on the Continent, and I believe in
this country also. Among the tribes closely fol-
lowing this, we meet with other examples of warm
and stimulating qualities in the ginger tribe, a
very useful race of plants.”

‘Green ginger preserves are delicious,” said Henry;
“and people make ginger wine and ginger beer,
otherwise I should not think ginger very useful.”

«All the ginger plants are natives of hot cli-
mates, where the inhabitants need this sort of
stimulant more than we do, and chew such power-
ful spices with much pleasure.”

The children would have been surprised to hear
this, had they not seen a Hindoo servant shortly
before, whose mistress was accustomed to treat her
with nutmegs and ginger, just as we should treat a
child with sugar plums.
GINGER AND ARROWROOT. 51

“Ginger, as you know, is the root of the plant,
but several plants of this kind produce very pun-
gent seeds, as the cardamoms, and some a still
hotter kind, called Grains-of-Paradise. Others
yield a dye, as turmeric, which is much used in
manufactures. Near these comes a small tribe,
containing the plantains and bananas, valuable tro-
pical fruits, of which you have often heard. The
plants also furnish many useful articles, especially
flax, from which some of the finest muslins of
India are prepared. The pretty plant called
Indian Shot, of which we once had several speci-
mens in the conservatory, belongs to a neighbour-
ing tribe, called Marants, from some of which we
get arrowroot. Three or four of the species yield
it in abundance, but especially one*, which is
much cultivated in the West India islands.”

“ How do they get the arrowroot from the
plant?” asked Mary.

‘* When the roots are a year old, they are dug
up, washed, and grated, or beaten to a pulp in
wooden mortars. This pulp is thrown into clean
water, and stirred about to separate the fibrous

* Maranta arundinacea.

E 2
52 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

parts which are collected in the hand. The
milky liquor which remains is poured through a
sieve, and afterwards allowed to settle for some
time. The arrowroot sinks to the bottom, and
when the water is poured off, the white pasty mass
that remains is placed on clean white cloths in the
sun, to dry. It is then fit for use, and will keep
for a very long time.”

‘¢ What is the plant like?” asked Robert.

“Tt is a handsome plant, with long and broad
leaves, of a very rich green. I will show you a
hot-house specimen on the first opportunity.”

The children were now told that they had
arrived at a very curious and remarkable race of
plants, different in many respects from other
natural orders, but not the less interesting to
botanists, or even to common observers.

“Do you remember,” said their father, “ the
odd-looking Bee-orchis we used to watch for so
eagerly every spring? There were a few roots in
a corner of the orchard, but unfortunately they
have now died away.”

“Oh yes, papa,” said Mary, “it looked exactly
like a bee settled on a flower.”

‘‘One of the marks of the orchis tribe, is the
VARIETY AND BEAUTY OF ORCHIDS. 53

very general enlargement, and often the very
curious shape and appearance of one of the inner
rows of petals. Inthe bee-orchis it is quite different
from all the other petals, being of a dark colour,
velvety texture, and looking, at a little distance,
very much like a bee. In another, it resembles a
fly; in another, a lady’s slipper, and so on, giving
corresponding names to the different species. You
are fond of searching for some of the common
kinds of orchis in the woods and marshy places
where they grow; but from these poor little ter-
restrial plants you can scarcely form an idea of the
orchids of tropical countries; where, instead of
being content with such a lowly situation, they
take root among the branches of living trees, or
spring from the decaying bark of those that have
fallen, putting forth the most brilliant and remark-
able flowers, which, towards evening, give out a
delicious scent. I must contrive a visit for you to
some botanical garden where orchids ‘are reared ;
and if you can bear for a few minutes the hot damp
atmosphere, which is artificially created for them
to live in, you will be delighted and amazed at the
extraordinary shapes of the flowers, and at the
curious growth of the plants, frequently parasitical,
54 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

on little logs of wood suspended from the roof “
the hot-house.”

“What is the use of these curious plants?” asked
Henry.

‘In many, we see more beauty than use ; but
there are several which are applied to economical
purposes. A nourishing substance called salep is
obtained from the roots of one species *: vanilla,
used in the manufacture of chocolate, of liqueurs,
and confectionary, is the dried fruit of another + :
while the roots of a third { are so gummy, that
they are used in the United States for mending
broken earthenware, and are called putty-root.”

“J wish putty-root grew here,” said Robert,
“that I might mend mamma’s broken china.”

‘‘ Besides this,” continued his father, “‘ a few are
taken medicinally ; and in New Holland the mealy
roots of many species are eaten by the natives.
Near to the orchis tribe come several tribes of
water plants or marsh plants, all natives of warm
climates, and more interesting to the botanist than
they would be to you; let us therefore proceed to
the rushes.”

* Orchis mascula. + Vanilla planifolia.
t Aplectum hyemale.
THE RUSH TRIBE. 55

The children were very familiar with rushes,
and Mary was in the habit of peeling them for the
sake of a beautiful white pith with which their
stems are filled, and which her mamma had taught
her to apply to many ornamental purposes. They
also knew that rush-lights are candles in which
this pith is used for a wick, and thata great many
useful things are made of rushes.

“These plants,” said their father, “‘are mostly
natives of cold countries, although several are
found in the tropics. Even in the severe climate
of Melville Island, our arctic voyagers found two
species of rush. A damp and cold soil appears to
suit them best, and where rushes spring up it is
generally a sign that the land wants draining.”

‘‘ But I have seen them growing on dry heaths,”
said Henry.

“That may be. Heaths are frequently dry on
the surface, while a little way beneath is a cold
clay, in which rushes would flourish. Large tracts
of land in Japan are devoted to the cultivation
of rushes, and are flooded at intervals like rice
grounds: this large supply of rushes is entirely
devoted to the making of rush-matting for cover-
ing floors. You have seen the basket-maker
56 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

in our village using rushes for mats, chair-
bottoms, and other articles, therefore I need say
no more of their uses. We now approach the
lilies, first pausing at a dangerous tribe called
Melanths, where there are some fatal poisons, as
well as some useful medicines. Do you remember
the pale purple crocuses that came up without
leaves in September ?”

“Yes, papa,” said Robert, “ I had two or three
in my garden, and now there are leaves coming
up without blossoms. How odd it is that the
leaves and the flowers are so far apart !”

“This will help you to distinguish it from the
spring crocus, which belongs to another family.
This autumn crocus *, or meadow saffron, which
we are glad to see when other flowers are gone,
is yet a dangerous plant, and there are well-
known cases of poisoning from chewing the bulb
or the young shoots.”

‘Would any one except a baby be so foolish as
to chew it?” inquired Henry.

“ Some time ago a poor woman picked up a few
of these crocus roots in Covent-garden Market,
and fancied they were onions. One would have

* Colchicum autumnale.
EFFECTS OF WHITE HELLEBORE. 57

thought that she must have missed the powerful
odour of the onion, and so have discovered her
mistake, but unfortunately she did not; but ate
them, and was poisoned. Another plant of this
order, called White Hellebore*, is a nauseous and
dangerous plant, containing a peculiar principle
called veratria, which acts in a singular manner on
the nose, producing most violent sneezing when
taken as snuff in ever so small a quantity. It has
a similar irritating effect when taken into the sto-
mach, and a few grains tried on some of the lower
animals have been fatal.”

‘“*Ts it not very cruel to try the effect of poison
on cats and dogs?” asked Henry.

“‘ Exceedingly cruel, if it is done for mere sport
or curiosity; but if there is a prospect of saving
human life by it, or of doing some important ser-
vice to mankind, then it is lawful and proper to
make experiments of this sort. But let us leave
this gloomy race of plants, and proceed to their
near neighbours, the more innocent and beautiful
lilies.”

“Ts that a large tribe, papa?” asked Mary. “I
can only think of five sorts, the tall white lilies,

* Veratrum album.
58 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.



THE VERNAL SQUILL.
THE LILY TRIBE. 59

and the orange-coloured, and the Turk’s-cap, and
the trumpet, and the dear sweet little lilies of the
valley.”

“The lily tribe,” said her father, “is very ex-
tensive, for in reality the showy tulips, the speckled
bell-shaped fritillaries, the sweet tuberose, the ele-
gant agapanthus, and the fragrant hyacinths, rank
with lilies ; and there are many useful plants, such
as onions, asparagus, squills, aloes, &c. which are
also placed by Lindley in his great order of Lily-
worts.”

‘“‘T thought you had told us about aloes before,
papa,” said Robert.

“TI spoke of the Agave, or American aloe, which
is said to flower once in a hundred years, but
that is of a different family, and has very dif-
ferent properties from the true aloes, several
species of which are used in medicine*, These
latter are tree-like plants growing in tropical
countries. Some of the relations of our lilies,
indeed, grow to a majestic height in those warm
climates, and from their stem and leaves various
gums or resins are collected, some of which are
useful in medicine, especially dragon’s blood, the

- * Aloé vulgaris, A. soccotrina, and others.
60 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

strange name of a resin which comes from a very
large species*, growing to the height of sixty or
seventy feet in the Canary Islands.”

‘What grand and beautiful things the lilies
must be!” exclaimed Mary. ‘ Which of them do
you think it was, papa, that our Saviour spoke of,
when He said that ‘even Solomon in all his glory
was not arrayed like one of these ?’”

‘Probably those ‘lilies of the field’ were the
scarlet lilies+-, which still spring up freely on the
plains of Syria.”

Robert was disappointed at hearing this, for he
had made up his mind that our humble lilies of the
valley were the flowers which our Saviour had con-
descended to notice.

The children were told that several tribes of
plants, following lilies, are natives of marshes or
slow-running water in foreign countries; so few
being British that it would not be necessary to
name more than the Flowering Rush, the Water-
plantains, and Pond-weed, as specimens.

“But immediately succeeding these,” said their
father, “there is a group containing half a dozen
tribes that would be very puzzling to you, were

* Dracenas Draco. + Lilium chalcedonicum.
APPROACH TO A HIGHER STRUCTURE. 61

they common plants. Although their growth is like
that of endogens, yet they have net-veined leaves,
which you know is a sign of the exogens. I shall
not trouble you with the names of these tribes,
because nearly all the plants are natives of hot
countries, and are not likely to offer any difficulty
to us. Among them are the useful yams, culti-
vated as potatoes, and the esteemed sarsaparilla
plants, much employed in medicine. But if you
want an English specimen of this kind of growth,
you must search for Herb Paris, that odd-looking
plant called by country people True Love, which
grows about a foot high, and bears four broad egg-
shaped leaves at the top of the stem, and a green
blossom followed by a purplish-black berry.”

‘“‘T wonder what makes these plants so different
from all the rest of the endogens,” said Henry.
‘‘Perhaps we are coming near the net-veined
plants, and so these are gradually getting like
them, just as the tribes of animals gradually came
near each other, as we travelled upwards.”

‘You are right, Henry,” said his father: ‘we
are now coming to the important and almost end-
less races of exogens, which make up the great bulk
of the vegetable kingdom. And now I must tell you
62 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

of another mark by which the three great divisions
of the vegetable world are distinguished by bota-
nists. The first or flowerless division has no true
seeds ; the second and third divisions have seeds,
but they are differently formed. The seed of an
endogen, when it first begins to grow, sends down-
wards a slender root called the radicle, and upwards
a single seed-leaf or lobe, which is the beginning
of the young plant. But the exogens do more
than this, for they send up two seed leaves instead
of one, as you may have often noticed in lupines
and other plants, where the two thick fleshy seed
leaves push through the soil, nourishing and pro-
tecting the young plant, and having a very dif-
ferent appearance from the leaves which come
afterwards. Sometimes these seed leaves remain
underground, as in the Windsor bean, and gradu-
ally die away when their purpose is answered.
Even before the seed has begun to sprout, these
differences are visible with the microscope, but it
is not often necessary to examine the seed in this
way, because there is such a very plain and sim-
ple means of knowing endogens from exogens
without it.”

‘You mean the straight-veined leaves and the
CHARACTERS OF ENDOGENS. 63

net-veined,” said Henry. “ Yes, that isa very nice
way of knowing them apart, and so little trouble:
I am getting quite a habit of holding up leaves
to the light to see which division they belong to.
But, papa,” he added, “do you not think that
there is something about endogens that would
almost tell you what they are at a distance, with-
out examining the leaves? Look at the lilies and
daffodils in the garden; how delicate they seem,
as if they grew up very quickly and would not
last long. They do not look strong and hardy
like other plants.”

“‘ Endogens,” said his father, “are less highly
organized than exogens, and are, generally speak-
ing, very short-lived. There are exceptions to
this, for some of the palms live two or three hun-
dred years; but even in this case their existence
is short, compared with that of many of our forest
trees. Before we begin our last great division of
the vegetable world, let me give you one other
character by which endogens are in most cases to
be known. In examining their flowers we shall
find the number three or some multiple of that
number to prevail, while in exogens the number
five or its multiple generally prevails.”
64 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

Mary gathered a snowdrop, and looked at the
blossom. ‘There are more than three of these
pretty white petals,” she said.

Her father pointed out to her that there are six
(twice three), arranged in two rows, one within
the other, three petals in each row. He also pointed
out six stamens, and then opened the seed-vessel,
which looked like a little green berry; and there
Mary saw three distinct cells for holding the seed.
“As the spring flowers open,” said her father,
‘take notice how many have the number three
conspicuous. You will find that lilies of the
valley, although they have but one petal to make
up their delicate, cup-shaped flower, yet have
this cup divided at its edges into six (twice
three) segments, enclosing six stamens, while the
seed vessel has also three cells. The same is the
case with the hyacinth. In the tulip and nar-
cissus you will find the petals six, stamens six, and
cells of the capsule, three. Thus you may go on
with numerous examples, and I would gladly see
you gaining this sort of general knowledge of
endogens, before you puzzle yourselves with the
difficult words which are necessary to express
their botanical characters.”
— 65

CONVERSATION V.

EXOGENS.

PINE—YEW——BEEF-WO00OD—WILLOW—NETTLE—HEMP—
MULBERRY, AND PLANE TRIBES.

Tue young larch firs in the plantation had now
put on their beautiful green foliage, and the
children were comparing their delicate colour with
the dark green of the hardy spruce fir, and with
the deep bluish-green of the Scotch fir, when
their father asked them how they should know
that these trees, so different in colour, were all of
one tribe.

‘““ Very easily, papa,” said Henry; ‘because
they all have needle-shaped leaves, and they all
bear cones.”

‘* And they all have a very pleasant smell,” added
Mary, “for that is the reason why we gather fir-
cones in autumn. Mamma sometimes has a few
of the dried cones put on the drawing-room fire,
where they blaze up very quickly, and scent the
room; and we put some in our clothes-drawers to

F
66 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

keep away moth, for the insect does not like the
smell that we are so fond of.”

“The three marks you have mentioned,” said
their father, “are indeed true signs of the Pine
tribe, which all bear cones, and are therefore
called Conifers: and also have peculiar spiny
leaves, and contain an abundance of strong-smell-
ing resin. But can you tell me whether they are
endogens or exogens?”

Mary said she could hardly tell by looking at
the leaves, because they were so narrow, but she
fancied they were straight veined. Henry did not
think so, and he felt sure the trees were exogens,
from their hard and woody growth. Robert, too,
remembered that his father had said that all our
forest trees are exogens, so this settled the matter
_—yet they were told that because of some differ-
ences connected with the seed, these trees have
sometimes been considered a distinct class.

“T shall scarcely do wrong, however,” said
their father, “in calling them the lowest race of
exogens, from which they do not differ in growth,
but. increase exactly in the same manner, by yearly
additions to the outer portion of the wood.”

“T cannot understand how trees get their new
FORMATION OF WOOD AND BARK. 67

layer every year without our noticing it,” said
Mary; “there are the elms at the end of the gar-
den, with their rough old trunks; I play under
them nearly every day, and I do not see the old
bark fall off, and a new one come instead of it.”

“These new layers of wood are formed under
the bark, and out of our sight. You have seen
people stripping off the bark from trees after they
are cut down, and you must have noticed how
easily it comes off; it is, indeed, quite distinct from
the wood, and has a gummy substance between it
and the true wood.”

‘Then as the wood goes on increasing, does
the bark stretch very much, or how does it manage
to make room?”

“ The bark itself is also gradually renewed on
its inner side, while the outer portion cracks and
peels off, or perishes by slow degrees. Thus,
while the solid trunk of the tree is formed by zone
upon zone of new wood, which is added in suc-
cession, year after year, the bark is renewed by
zone within zone of fresh material; but with this
difference ;—in the bark, the outside perishes, and
a new layer adapted to the increasing size of the
tree gradually takes its place; in the true wood

F 2
68 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

every layer is permanent, and forms solid tim-
ber.”

‘“‘ Then,” said Mary, “ the old bark is obliged to
keep on giving way to the young bark; but that
must get old-looking too before it comes up in
sight, or else we should see a greater difference in
the tree than we do.”

‘“‘ All these processes take place so gradually
that we are unconscious of them, just as we are
generally unconscious of the changes going on in
our own bodies, where new material takes the
place of the old in a very similar manner.”

Robert held up his fingers to show that some of
the skin was peeling off, and that new skin had
formed underneath; upon which Henry compared
him to a young birch tree, whose silvery bark
often peels off in long thin slips. ‘* You forget,”
said Robert, ‘‘that young birch trees make very
good rods,” and he began playfully to chastise his
brother, when their father called them back to the
subject of conversation, by saying,—

“The Pine tribe is an exceedingly valuable one,
on account of its timber, which is well known
as deal, fir, cedar, &c. There are vast forests of
pines in North America, and in some parts of

cs
THE PINE AND YEW TRIBES. 69

northern Europe. The loftier species make capital
masts for ships, while some others, as cedar, cy-
press, and juniper, are noted for the extraordinary
durability of their timber. The celebrated gates
of Constantinople, which lasted eleven hundred
years, were made of cypress. The different kinds
of resinous matter obtained from pines are also
very valuable, and are known as turpentine, pitch,
balsam, sandarach, &c. The berries of the common
juniper are used in flavouring gin, and the large
seeds of some of the pines are eatable when fresh.”

‘* Pines are useful, indeed,” said Henry, “but I
always thought our hardest and strongest wood
was yew-tree wood. I have heard that the ancient
Britons made their bows of it, and they were
famous ones, very strong and elastic.”

“That is true,” said his father; “ and the yew
tribe, which comes next to the pine tribe, is not to
be surpassed as to the durability of its timber ;
but the tribe must still be considered far less
valuable, because the trees are much less common.
In Europe, we have only one species, the common
yew. Asia is richer in trees of this kind, and in
New Zealand the most valuable timber is gained
from members of the tribe. I must warn you,
70 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

however, that the leaves of the common yew are
very poisonous.”

Robert was surprised to hear this, and he
thought he must have had a narrow escape from
poisoning, for he well remembered being tempted
to eat some of the pretty rose-coloured berries of
the yew. His father told him that the soft part of
the berry is quite harmless, if the seed is not
swallowed ; but he advised him in future not to
meddle with any strange fruit, however tempting
its appearance.

“There are several foreign trees,” said his
father, “whose wood is not very inferior to that
of the yew in hardness; but I shall now lead you
to a group which may be known by having their
flowers arranged in catkins, as we are accustomed
to call their dense spikes of blossom. Foremost
are the beef-woods *, a curious race of trees and
bushes in Australia, whose great peculiarity is,
that they have no leaves.”

‘‘ Dear papa, what odd trees !” said Mary; “‘ how
strange it seems that they should be able to live
and grow without leaves. Our trees have no
leaves in winter, but when summer comes, if any

* Casuarina.
THE BEEF-WOOD TRIBE.

of them are leafless we
know that they are
dead.”

“These Australian
trees have drooping
jointed branches, and at
every joint there are lit-
tle sheaths, occupying
the place where we
should expect the leaves
to grow. Their flowers
are in catkins, and the
seed is collected into a
sort of cone, which once
led to the opinion that
they belonged to the
pine tribe.”

“T am glad they “YAK

have catkins and cones
to show that they are
living, and not dead
trees,” said Mary ; “ but
I should like to know
why they have the odd
name of beef - wood
trees.”



BEEF-WOOD TREE.

7]
72 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘‘ They are called so by the colonists because the
timber is very much the colour of raw beef. One
of, the species is also called
the she-oak, because its
branches and cones contain a
pleasant acid, and travellers
suffering from thirst obtain
great relief by chewing them.
I must now ask Mary, who
is so fond of catkins, to name
some of the other trees of
this group.”

Mary soon thought of the
birch * and the alder +, which
her father told her were near
relations, and with few ex-
ceptions, more valuable as
ornaments than as_ timber.
‘Among birch,” he said,
“there is a tree in North
America { with so tough and
thick a bark, that the Indians
make boats of it, and various
other useful articles. Our common birch § yields

* Betula. + Alnus.
t B. papyracea. § B. alba.



BLOSSOM OF ALDER.
THE WILLOW TRIBE. 73

an oil which gives the peculiar smell to Russia
leather, which is dressed with it. A sparkling
wine can also be obtained from the sap of the



BLOSSOM OF WILLOW.

birch, and some North American species furnish
excellent sugar. The alder is less remarkable for
its uses, but there is a bitter principle in its bark
which has been employed medicinally.”

‘“T have thought of some other trees with cat-
74 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

kins.” said Mary. ‘All the willows and poplars
seem to have them; for I have seen them on the
weeping willow that grows by the water, and on
the common willows, and on the tall Lombardy
poplars, and on the quivering aspen.”

aR

Se oi = ny
“ht / I Z

ao

p} ff
oo a l



LEAF OF WHITE POPLAR.

“True,” said her father; ‘the willow tribe,
including all the willows * and poplars +, has this
general mark of relationship, besides others which
bind the families especially into one order. Their
wood is sometimes valuable as timber, but oftener

* Salix. + Populus.
~~

OSIERS AND SALLOWS. 75

for common domestic purposes. Henry’s cricket
bat is made of the common white willow *; your
weeding basket, Mary, is of the common osier *¢,
and your mamma has a basket made of the fine
basket osier, which grows in meadows and marshy
places in Norfolk and Cambridgeshire. Robert’s
arrows are made of the aspen?, and most of our
charcoal is made from sallows.”

Robert wished to know why willows are some-
times called osiers and sallows; and he was told that
these names help to distinguish the different species
in this extensive family, which contains upwards
of sixty distinct species, natives of Britain ; so that
the study of willows is not a little puzzling to
young botanists.

‘* Let us now pass on,” said his father, “to a
neighbouring group, which is chiefly distinguished
from this by the flowers not being commonly ar-
ranged in catkins. I shall only notice the nettle
and the mulberry tribes.”

“Why is the nettle put among trees?” asked
Robert.

‘* Because it resembles these particular trees in
important botanical particulars. But the nettle is

* S. alba. T S. viminalis. t P. tremula.
76 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

not always the despised weed it is with us. Some
of the species grow to the height of trees, and have
their branched form; but the wood is very light
and spongy.”

‘“‘ Nettles are of no use, are they, papa, but really
mischievous, on account of their sting ?”

‘We have no right to say of any created thing
that it is of no use; and if you were acquainted
with old herbals, you would find great virtues
ascribed to nettles, and to their relation, ‘‘ Pellitory
of the Wall.” But if we do not place entire faith
in these accounts, we yet learn that cordage can
be made from nettles; that a species with tuberous
roots * has been used instead of potatoes, and that
even the stinging quality has been made use of
in cases of paralysis, the benumbed limb being
flogged with nettles, to restore sensation.”

Mary said, that if there was any life left in the
limb, the person would be sure to feel the sting ; but
her father told her that he had never heard of a case
in which this rough treatment was of much service.

‘¢ As some nettles,” he said, “‘ can be made into
cordage, so the hemp tribe, which follows, is of
great service, on account of the tough fibres of the

* Urtica tuberosa.
HEMP AND MULBERRY TRIBES, 77

well-known hemp *, from which our ropes, door
mats, &c. are manufactured. In temperate climates
this is the grand use of hemp, but in hot countries
it also affords a resin, which has intoxicating pro-
perties, producing drowsiness and drunkenness.
In this sleep-producing property it resembles its
near relation, the hop, which belongs to this tribe,
and is a well-known ingredient in beer.”

‘“Hops are very pretty,” said Mary, “but I
should not like them to be trained over trellis-work
as some people have them, in their gardens ; because
whenever I touched the blossoms they would give
out that disagreeable bitter smell.”

‘‘ Many persons think it a fine aromatic smell,”
said her father; “ it is produced by little glands
(easily rubbed off), which are scattered over the
green scales of the hop-head, and contain a bitter
resin. But we must proceed to the mulberry
tribe.”

The mulberry tree was a great favourite with
the children, not only on account of the rich fruit
which it afforded them, just in the hottest weather,
but also on account of the supply of leaves it
yielded to their silkworms. They were surprised

* Cannabis sativa.
78 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

to hear that the fig tree belongs to this tribe, and
that both have been brought from the Kast, the
whole tribe being of foreign origin. Their father
spoke of the fig trees, as especially interesting,
since one of them is theremarkable banyan tree of
India, whose immense branches send down shoots
to the earth, which take root, and form pillars for
the support of the extended foliage.

“Bring Milton’s works,” he said; “look in the
ninth book of Paradise Lost, for some mention of
this method of growth in the banyan tree.”

Henry read as follows : —

‘The bended twigs take root, and daughters grow
About the mother-tree, a pillar’d shade
High over-arch’d, and echoing walks between.”

‘What beautiful shady groves it must make,”
said Mary; “and how pleasant it must be in that
hot country to have such a shelter !”

Her father replied, “The poet Southey, de-
scribing a banyan tree, says :—

‘So like a temple did it seem, that there

The pious heart’s first impulse would be prayer :’
we may therefore make due allowance for the poor
Hindoo, who in performing his devotions near this
tree, considers, in his ignorance, that the banyan
THE PLANE TRIBE. 79

itself is an object of worship. There is something
very touching, to my mind, in the reverence and



ORIENTAL PLANE.

gratitude which the heathen show to natural ob-
jects, such as the sun and moon, rivers, trees, and
animals. Sensible of the blessings conferred upon
80 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

them, and ignorant of the source from whence they
come, these poor creatures worship the gifts instead
of the Giver ; and grievous as this error is, yet it
does not seem so gross and debasing as the worship
of images, the work of men’s hands.”

“Another day,” said Mary, “the poor little
Hindoo children will be taught not to worship the
river Ganges, or the banyan tree, but Him who
made all the beautiful groves and streams.”

“God grant it may be so,” said her father.

Henry now inquired whether fig trees are of
any other use than to give fruit and shade, and he
was told that they furnish India-rubber in great
abundance, and that in some of them their milky
fluid forms a wholesome beverage, giving them
the name of cow trees. He was also told that
the noble plane tree *, which affords so much shade,
is not far removed from the mulberry and fig,
although its juice is watery instead of milky.

* Platanus.
81

CONVERSATION VI.

EXOGENS.

SPURGEWORT — MASTWORT— WALNUT — NUTMEG — CUCUMBER—
BEGONIA — FPAPAW — PASSION-FLOWER— VIOLET — TAMARISK,
AND HOUSELEEK TRIBES.

One day the children saw in their father’s study
a smooth, thick piece of wood, on which a very
beautiful drawing had been made. Mary asked if
she might have sucha piece of wood to draw upon ;
but she was told that it was too expensive, and
that she must be contented with paper, until she
could draw in a very superior manner.

“This is the wood of the box tree,” said her
father, “‘and it has been prepared in this way for
the use of the wood engraver, whose interesting
work I will one day take you to see. Meanwhile
let us talk about the group of plants to which the
box belongs. They are called spurgeworts, and
many of them are extremely poisonous; but this
does not prevent the use of several families in
medicine*; yet the fatal character of others is such

* Euphorbia, Mercurialis, Croton, &c.
G
82 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

that no medical man would dare to prescribe them.
One foreign tree, in particular, called the Manchi-
neel, which bears a handsome, apple-shaped fruit,
is SO poisonous, that persons are said to have died
by merely sleeping beneath its shade, while a
single drop of juice on the skin produces an ulcer
difficult to heal.”

“Do you think it can be true, papa, about
people dying who sleep near it?” said Robert.

“fam not qualified to judge of its truth,” said
his father ; “‘ but those who are so inform me, that
with so volatile a poison, it is not at all unlikely
that delicate persons might die from sleeping under
it, and breathing its dangerous atmosphere.”

‘“* What does ‘ volatile’ mean?” asked Mary.

‘“* A substance is said to be volatile,” said her
father, ‘‘ when its essence or principle easily escapes
into the surrounding air. Camphor is volatile;
and hence its powerful odour is immediately per-
ceived, while its very substance becomes converted
mto vapour.”

“Oh yes,” said Mary; “the piece of camphor
I put with my dried plants has entirely wasted
away.”

Robert said that smelling salts must be very
SPURGEWORTS. 83

volatile, for when he left the stopple out of
mamma’s smelling bottle, all the scent and the salts
too went quite away in a few days.

“T can show you a specimen of a very poisonous
spurgewort,” said his father; “it is the common
mercury*, which grows in bushy and shady places,
and flowers in April and May. This insignificant-
looking plant has produced convulsions and death,
so that I must again warn you against chewing
any leaves, roots, or berries of strange plants.
Yet happily in this, as in most poisons, the taste is
so nauseous and burning, that there is little temp-
tation to transgress.”

“Ts there any thing poisonous about the box
tree itself?” asked Mary, “ because I often gather
the little curled-up leaves to make cups and saucers
for my dolls.”

“ And you would not like them to drink out of
poisoned cups,” said Henry, laughing.

“The leaves are very bitter,” replied her father,
‘and it is said that in those parts of Persia where
box trees are common, it is impossible to keep
camels, because the animals cannot be prevented

* Mercurialis perennis.

gq 2
84 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

from browsing on the leaves, which kill them ;
yet, on the other hand, we find that box leaves
have sometimes been used instead of hops, to give
a bitter flavour to beer. Some plants of the group
I am now noticing approach the heaths in appear-
ance, aS our common crowberry*, while others
have the remarkable growth which is seen in the
pitcher plantt. All these have a certain rela-
tionship or affinity with each other; but we now
rise to a higher group, and you need only look
round this room to see specimens of the most
important member of it.”

The children did not see at first what their
father meant, but Henry soon recollected that the
old carved oak, of which the bookcases were
made, must be the specimen.

‘‘You mean the good old English oak, papa,”
said he. “The wooden walls of old England are
made of it, so we ought always to admire the oak.”
Henry here had to explain to his brother and
sister, that by wooden walls he meant the ships
which protect our island; and his father told him,
that although the oak is chiefly employed in ship-
building, and is called the ‘shipwright’s treasure,’

* Empetrum nigrum. + Nepenthes distillatoria.
MASTWORTS. 85

yet other timber is also used, especially teak, a
fine timber which abounds in the East Indies.



SPRIG OF OAK.

Mary said that she remembered several other
uses of the oak, besides ship-building. “ The gall-
nuts are used in making ink, the bark for tanning
leather, and the sawdust for dyeing, besides the
acorns being used for feeding pigs.”
S86 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘The tribe of trees and bushes to which the oak
belongs,” said her father, “has been conveniently
called Mastworts, because the fruit, contained in a
peculiar husk or cup, is called by country people
‘mast.’”

‘“‘T have heard people talk about beech-mast,”
said Robert.

‘Yes, and the fruits of the hazel, the Spanish
chestnut, and the oak, as well as of the beech, are
all called mast. The uses of these valuable trees
are pretty well known to you. In another tribe
nearly related to this, the only familiar example is
the common walnut, which is a native of Persia
and Cashmere, and is greatly valued in those
countries on account of its oil, which is employed
in cookery, and for burning in lamps.”

“T did not know there was such a thing as
walnut oil,” said Mary, ‘‘ until I saw some among
aunt’s materials for oil painting.”

“Among a great number of foreign plants
having a twining or scrambling habit, we find the
nutmegs; although these have a tree-like growth,
and seem to resemble our common laurels. You re-
member the fruit and leaf of the nutmeg which was
sent to mefrom the West Indies, preserved in spirit.”
THE NUTMEG TRIBE. 87

“Oh yes, papa,” said Robert; “it was some-
thing like a pear in shape, and the nutmeg was
like a kernel in the middle of the pulp. What I
thought the prettiest, was the red mace which
was wrapped round the kernel like a coarse net.
It is very odd that there should be two such
different spices in one fruit. I like nutmeg very
much, but I do not like mace at all.”

“Perhaps you do not know that your favourite
nutmeg can only be taken safely in very small
quantities. Whatever the natives of India may
do, it is certain that a European taking this spice
in excess, would soon experience intense thirst,
and headache, and perhaps delirium and death.
Nutmegs are tropical plants, and so are the various
families composing the cucumber tribe, which is
the next I shall mention.”

“Cucumbers grow in the open ground as well
as in hotbeds,” said Mary, “and for that reason |
thought they were English plants.”

“Vegetable Marrows and Gourds,” said her
father, “also grow freely in the open ground, but
they are natives of hot countries, and so are
melons, and all other members of this tribe. They
have a habit of climbing by means of long curling
88 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

tendrils, and in the wild state several species are
poisonous. Thus the pulp of the bottle gourd*
has produced symptoms of cholera, and it is
recorded that some sailors were poisoned by drink-
ing beer that had been left in a flask made of one
of these gourds. The spirting cucumber+ is a
virulent poison, and from its pulp is prepared the
powerful drug called Hlaterium, a few grains of
which sometimes bring on symptoms of poisoning.
Our common Bryony belongs to this tribe, and
partakes in the same qualities.”

“Ts it not dangerous to have any thing to do
with such a tribe?” asked Mary.

“Tt is necessary to use the fruit cautiously,”
said her father; ‘“‘but cultivation improves many
of the species so much, that they lose nearly all
their baneful properties. It would be a pity to
give up our acquaintance with melons, cucumbers,
and vegetable marrows, because some of their un-
cultivated relatives are dangerous characters. In-
deed we are not at liberty to despise even these
dangerous plants, for several valuable medicines
are obtained from them, especially Colocynth f.

* Lagenaria vulgaris. + Ecbalium agreste.
¢ Cucumis colocynthis.
THE CUCUMBER TRIBE. 89

The seeds of most of them are mild and harmless.
In an African species* these seeds, when ripe, are
as large as chestnuts, and resemble almonds in
flavour, yielding also an abundance of oil. The
pulp of the same fruit is excessively bitter, and
produces violent headache when only applied to
the tongue.”

Henry thought it very odd that the seed should
be wholesome and the pulp poisonous, which is the
case with nearly all the plants of this tribe. He
was told that the Begonias of our conservatories,
whose red-veined leaves are so much admired, and
whose whole foliage is sometimes of a deep rose
colourt, are not far removed from cucumbers, and
that some of the species have the same scrambling
habit.

“ Allied in many respects to cucumbers, is a
strange and remarkable tribe of South American
plants, of which we will take the Papaw as an
example. This extraordinary tree has the property
of making the toughest animal substances tender,
so that newly killed meat, when hung amongst its
leaves, becomes fit for cooking in a few hours.”

* Telfairia pedata. + Begonia sanguinea.
90 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘What a convenient tree that would be for our
kitchen garden!” said Mary.

“ Still more strange is it,” continued her father,
“that old hogs and poultry, when fed on its leaves,
become also tender, and fit for the purposes of the
table, in the course of a few hours.”

“We really ought to have it in England,” said
Henry. “If it would not bear our cold winters,
we could keep it in a hothouse, and it would be
worth the trouble.”

“Perhaps its curious properties would be lost
under artificial cultivation,” said his father; “and
at any rate there would be disagreeable effects
to set against the convenience of having such a
tree.”

“How so, papa?”

“The roots of this tree have a most disgusting
and overpowering smell, like decaying animal
matter, and the blossoms also have a disagreeable
odour. The juice, when analysed, greatly resem-
bles animal albumen, dissolving like it in water.
Fibrin, a principle which is considered peculiar to
the animal kingdom, is found in this tribe, and also
in the fungus tribe, which causes both tribes to
be peculiarly interesting to those who love to
THE PASSION-FLOWER TRIBE. 91

search out the wonders and difficulties of the vege-
table world. These papaws are, indeed, so unac-
countable in their properties, that I should have
hesitated to tell you about them, except on the
best authority. Kemind me to give you their
history at greater length from Hooker’s account of
them in the Botanical Magazine.”

“Thank you, papa, I shall not forget it,” said
Henry. |

His father now began to speak of that beau-
tiful tribe of climbing plants called the passion-
flower tribe.

Mary said she knew why they were called pas-
sion-flowers, for her mamma had shown her all the
parts of the flower, which were supposed to repre-
sent the instruments of our Lord’s passion or
sufferings.

‘¢' There were the three nails in the centre,” she
said, “‘and round them the five wounds, and out-
side them the crown of thorns, with the upright
column in the middle, for the pillar of scourging.”

Robert said he did not understand how three
nails could make five wounds, but his sister
reminded him that one wound was from the sol-
dier’s spear, and also that, in crucifixion, the feet
92 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

were usually crossed, and one nail driven through
both, so that the four wounds of the hands and
feet might be made by three nails. The children
were talking thus in a low voice, on the solemn
subject of our Lord’s crucifixion, when their father
told them that the idea of connecting the passion-
flower with that awful event was adopted by some
zealous Roman Catholics, when they first saw
these splendid plants blossoming in their native
woods, and climbing about from tree to tree in
wild magnificence.

“And where are their native woods?” asked
Henry.

“Chiefly in South America and the West
Indies, where the fruit of some species is eaten,
and where infusions of the flowers are used as a
remedy for coughs, and a poultice of the leaves is
used to subdue erysipelas and other eruptions on
the skin. It would not be safe, however, to em-
ploy the passion-flower for such purposes in this
country, as the tribe possesses active and danger-
ous qualities.”

At this part of the vegetable kingdom we must
pass over several tribes of plants, natives of hot
countries, only mentioning a familiar species,
THE VIOLET TRIBE. 93

called the Arnotto plant*, whose orange-coloured
waxen pulp, when separated from the seeds and
dried, forms cheese-colouring, and is also used in
the preparation of chocolate (see p. 98). We next
pause at the Violet tribe, which, besides our sweet
violets, dog violets, and pansies, contains also many
foreign herbs, emetic in their properties, and known
to us under the name of Ipecacuanha. The roots
of our sweet violet have similar qualities, and the
petals and seeds are likewise medicinal.

Henry remembered reading that violet flowers
were made into wine by the Romans, and also
that they are still used in the Kast to make sherbet.
His father told him, that this tribe does not con-
sist wholly of small herbs, such as our own violet,
but that some of the foreign families are berry-
bearing shrubs, and one has a twining stem +.

‘‘Do you remember, Mary,” said her father,
“the beautiful shrubs which fenced some of the
gardens at Shanklin, when we last visited the Isle
of Wight?”

‘“Oh yes, papa: they were the prettiest I ever
saw, with very slender branches like beautiful
smooth rods, and covered with tiny leaves of a

* Bixa orellana, + Corynostylis.
94 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.



BLOSSOM OF THE TAMARISK
THE TAMARISK TRIBE. ° 95

bright green. IJ was surprised to see them grow-
ing so close to the sea.”

‘‘T remember them,” said Henry; ‘they were
something like young withy bushes, only the
leaves were smaller and brighter, and the young
branches were tipped with red. They grew along
the edge of the sea-wall, and in winter I should
think they were often washed by the tide.”

“They are tamarisks,” said his father; ‘“‘and
their natural place is by the sea-side, although
they are occasionally seen on the brink of rivers
and torrents. Their bark is bitter and astringent,
and the galls of some species are used in dyeing.
One species* bears a sort of manna, but this
appears to ooze from the tree, in consequence of
injuries by an insect+ inhabiting it. The flowers
of the tamarisk are in close spikes, and altogether
it is one of the prettiest of shrubs. All the species
are confined to the Northern hemisphere, and even
to its Kastern half. Our next tribe will be a more
familiar one; for there is scarcely an old moss-grown
cottage or wall in the village, on which you may
not find a specimen of the houseleek tribe.”

‘There is a beautiful one,” said Mary, “among

* Tamarix mannifera. + Coccus manniparus.
96 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

the moss on the thatched shed over the saw-pit.
It has fleshy leaves spreading out and fringed all
round; and last summer there was a handsome
bunch of rose-coloured flowers on a tall stem in
the middle. And this stem had a great many
leaves upon it, but they were small narrow ones,
very different from those at the root. How much
I wished for that beautiful blossom! I asked the
sawyers to get it down for me; but they were so
busy at their work, that they did not attend to me.”

‘“‘Of course not!” said Henry. ‘ You should
have asked me to climb the shed, as I did the
garden wall, when you wanted a heap of yellow
stonecrop that was growing there.”

“The different sorts of stonecrop* are mem-
bers of the houseleek tribe,” said his father, ‘as
well as the common houseleek+, which Mary has
been describing. There is also the Mossy Tillcea,
or Red-shanks, with red creeping stems and white
flowers, common on the sandy heaths of Norfolk
and Suffolk; and there is the Navelwort, with
purplish stems and pale yellow flowers. All these
and many foreign species make up a tribe, in-
teresting in its hardy habit and power of growing

* Sedum. + Sempervivum.
THE HOUSELEEK TRIBE. 97

almost without any soil. They are found on
naked rocks, sandy plains, and spots where not a
blade of grass will grow.”

‘“‘T have often wondered,” said Mary, “ how the
stonecrop could live upon a wall where there is no
earth for it, and where on sunny days it is so hot
that I can scarcely bear my hand upon the bricks.”

“These plants get their nourishment chiefly
from the air, and are covered with little pores or
mouths, invisible to the naked eye. Some of the
species, when boiled in milk, are eaten by country
people, and are considered cooling and wholesome.
The Greenlanders use one of the tribe * as food ;
but the common biting stonecrop, or wall-
pepper +, which is so abundant in this neighbour-
hood, acts on many constitutions as an emetic.
It is with the fresh leaves of a houseleek { that
the fishermen of Madeira rub their nets, which
are thus rendered as durable as if tanned, being
also steeped in some alkaline liquor.”

“It is a good thing that some of the house-
leeks are wholesome,” said Robert, ‘‘ because they
grow where nothing else can grow; and I dare

* Rhodiola rosea. tT Sedum acre.
+t Sempervivum glutinosum.
H
98 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

say the poor Greenlanders are very glad with
vegetable food, and so must the people be, who
have to cross sandy plains and deserts.”

“It is a wonderful provision of the Almighty,”
said his father, “that these humble plants should
be able to bear the extremes of heat and cold, and
to flourish in situations where our hardiest mosses
would be destroyed.”



ARNOTTO PLANT.
99

CONVERSATION VIL.

CISTUS—CRUCIFEROUS — MIGNONETTE—COTTON—NASTURTIUM—
LIME— MILKWORT, AND SOAPWORT TRIBES.

Amone Mary’s dried plants, were some blossoms
of the Gum Cistus, that handsome shrub which
drops its large white crumpled flowers almost as
soon as they appear, but sends forth also every
day others to take their place. Mary had col-
lected a number of the fallen blossoms during the
previous summer, and her father now called for
them as an example of the Cistus, or Rock-rose
tribe.

‘* These plants,” he said, “are some of the most
elegant and fragrant in the South of Europe,
where they abound in woods and among rocks.
But we have a few of their relations growing wild
in our own woods, and one of them is the yellow
flower that Mary admired so much on yonder hill-
side, last July.” |

‘“'You mean the pale yellow flower, that I
mistook at a distance for a buttercup; but it was
much more delicate, and the blossom was a little

H 2
100 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

crumpled and easily fell off. The stem was
woody, like a little shrub, and the leaves were

white underneath.”



ROSE-FLOWERING CISTUS.

“That is the plant *, and there are others of
its family with which you may one day make
acquaintance : such as the hoary dwarf rock-rose

* Common Rock-rose, Helianthemum vulgare.
*

CROSS-BEARING FLOWERS. 101

of the North of England, and the white mountain
rock-rose, which grows in some parts of Somerset
and Devon. I am not aware of any useful
qualities ascribed to these plants, therefore I leave
them for a most important and highly useful tribe
ealled Crucifers.”

“They must have something to do with ‘a
cross,” said Henry. ‘Is there any fancy about
them, such as there is about the passion-flower ¢”

“No; but each plant is actually a ‘ cross-bearer,’
as its name implies, for the flowers of the whole
_ tribe are in the form of a cross.”

“What an odd shape for a flower ! ” said Mary;
and she tried to recollect seeing one, but in vain,
until her father explained that he meant that sort
of cross, called the Maltese cross, in which the
limbs are all equal. Then she quickly remem-
bered, that the common single wallflower has four
petals opposite each other, in the shape of a
Maltese cross.

‘And so has the stock, and the rocket, and
honesty,” said Robert; “and they all grow in my
garden.”

‘And so has water-cress,” said Henry, “and
cabbage and turnip, and a great many useful
.

102 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

things. I have often noticed their flowers being
all of the same shape, but I did not know they
were cross-bearers.”

“These flowers are like us,” said Mary; “ for
mamma has told me that
every Christian, even a
little child, has a cross to
bear.”

“ What does mamma
mean by that?” asked
Robert.

‘‘She means, that we
have things to disappoint
us and make us sorry,
and things to tease us
and make us angry, and
BLOSSOM OF THE WALLFLOWER. that we must learn to bear
them all without being fretful or unkind. This is
what mamma calls taking up our cross; but she
says, we must ask our Saviour’s help, for we shall
never be strong enough to bear our cross alone.”

“ It is very difficult to help being angry, when
you are teased and worried,” said Henry.

“Then take care you never tease and worry
other people,” said Mary. ‘“ I shall always fancy,”


QUALITIES OF CRUCIFERS. 103

she continued, “that these cross-bearing plants
are very patient, mild, amiable flowers, that will
not do harm to any one.”

‘In some respects, you have guessed their
qualities well,” said her father; ‘for it is a fact



COMMON HEDGE-MUSTARD.
(Sisymbrium officinale.)

that they do no harm to any one, but on the con-
trary are many of them very wholesome and
valuable vegetables: such as the cabbage, which
104 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

you see in all the cottage gardens of our village,
and the turnip, whose benefits to our flocks, and
indeed to our whole system of farming, are almost
endless. Sea-kale, rape, mustard, cress, radish,
and water-cress, are also valuable members of this
extensive tribe, which is not only of use in this
way, but in furnishing oil from the seeds. Rape
oil is in very common use, and the crushed seeds,
or refuse from the oil, make the well-known oil-
cake used in fattening cattle. Thus you see,
that cruciferous plants have a very important
office in the world, while they are so easy to be
known, that there is not much danger of mistaking
them. If you were to be shipwrecked on an
uninhabited island, and were to find a_cross-
bearing plant, you need not fear to eat it, although
it might not be known to you.”

“Is there no other flower that I might mistake
for it?” asked Henry.

“There are other flowers with four petals,
which, by a very careless observer, might perhaps
be taken for cruciferous flowers; but not by any
one who has examined them well. You know what
I mean when I speak of the stamens of a flower ;
and you will always find in these flowers six
CHARACTERS OF CRUCIFERS. 105

stamens, two of which are constantly shorter than

the other four. But in
order to fix the memo-
ry of these important
plants, run into the gar-
den for a sprig of early
winter cress, which is
now in blossom, or look
into the meadow be-
yond for a_ cuckoo-
flower.”

The children all ran
off to execute this wel-
come commission, and
Mary was the first to
espy a cuckoo - flower,
or at least, its near
relation, the hairy
cardamine*; for the
real cuckoo-flowers +, or



+. Y, A f
ES A MY oO 4 /<%
> NS ~ | fl 7
‘ AG, ) fg :
Us dll} Ass 7
ons 7o\ Iw .
Sz AN * \
od is yj ~~
PNA iA
| a

SHEPHERD'S PpuRSE. (Thlaspi bursa
pastoris.)

‘¢ Ladies’ smocks, all silver white,
That paint the meadows with delight,”

were not yet in blossom. Robert also brought
a small plant of shepherd’s purse, which he had

* Cardamine hirsuta.

+ C. pratensis.
106 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

pulled up in haste, root and all, because he saw
that its tiny white flowers were cross-shaped,
and Henry had dug out from the garden wall an
entire specimen of Whitlow grass, which is one of
our smallest flowering plants,
and a very pretty one too, when
closely examined.

‘Tf you want another mark
of this tribe besides that of the
cross-shaped blossoms,” said
their father, “‘ take notice of the
seed-vessel, which is either
a long pod, as in the carda-
mine, or a short pod, as in
shepherd’s purse. If you open
com Draba Verna.) Oe Of the pods, you will see
that it has a partition of thin membrane down
the middle.”

‘In this cardamine,” said Mary, “here are
pods with the two sides curled up, and the partition
standing alone.”

‘‘That is the way in which the seeds are dis-
persed, when they are fully ripe; the elastic
valves burst away, carrying the seeds with them.
In some cases the pods end in a sharp point called


CHARACTERS OF

the beak, as in charlock ;
and if you have ever
seen the white salad mus-
tard when it has run to
seed, you must have no-
ticed the sword - shaped
beak in which the pod
ends. There are no seeds
in these beaks.”

“]T think I shall al-
ways know one of these
cross-bearing plants, when
I see it,” said Mary.

“A third mark, which
may help you,” said her
father, ‘is this; most
flowers have two little
leaves called bracts, very
different from all the
other leaves, and situ-
ated a little below the
blossom, either on the
flower-stalk, or at its
base; but in cruciferous
plants, these bracts are
always absent.”

CRUCIFERS. 107



i »~

\*

YE

‘4 Z i y p
ey!

ye

HAIRY CARDAMINE. (C. hirsuta.)
108 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘‘ But there are leaves on the stem of the shep-
herd’s purse very different from those at the root,”
said Henry.

os





wis “

cat ip 7 8 Ney
a Oe
..)

ws ae

FIELD MUSTARD, OR CHARLOCK. (Sinapis arvensis. )
‘True; and that is very common; but bracts
belong especially to the flower stalk, not to the
general stem, and are very different from these.”
FORMS OF SEED-VESSELS. 109

‘Then if I find a flower in the shape of a cross,
and having pods with a partition down the middle,



SWORD-SHAPED BEAKS OF THE SEED-POD OF WHITE MUSTARD.

and netted veined leaves, and no bracts, I may be
quite sure it is one of these Crucifers, and safe
to eat, if I cannot get a better salad,” said Henry.

‘Certainly ; but as your observations may not
be at first correct, I advise you to bring your salad
to me before you eat it.”

Mary remembered that in looking for shep-
herd’s purse for her bird, she had once found
a plant very much like it, but with larger and
rounder pods. Her father thought from her
description that it must have been penny cress *,
so called from the seed-vessel being about the size
of a silver penny.

‘In leaving these interesting plants,” he said,

* Thlaspi arvense.
110 FiRstT sTEPs IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘‘ which have detained us longer than usual, I must
mention one that has been the subject of super-
stition. Itis called the Rose of Jeri-
cho, and has the curious property of
contracting its branches into a ball.
In this state it is caught up by the
wind of the Egyptian deserts, where
srEp vessex or It grows wild, and is hurried from

mene CRESS: lace to place. On being put into
water, however, it revives, and spreads out in its
natural form. One of the old legends states,
that this plant first bloomed on Christmas eve, to
celebrate our Saviour’s birth, and remained in
blossom till Easter, to do homage to his resurrec-
tion. But let us now proceed to the next tribe,
which is mignonette, consisting of weeds only, but
one of these so fragrant, that it is admitted into
our gardens. Lindley calls these plants Weld-
worts, from one of them, called Weld, which
yields a yellow dye.”

Mary scarcely liked to hear mignonette called
a weed; but her father passed on to notice the
capers, from the flower-buds of one of which we
get our well-known pickle. He said that the
qualities of this tribe resemble those of Crucifers,


COTTON PLANTS. 11]

but are more powerful; and that the plants are
very common in tropical countries, without being
so generally useful as Crucifers are to us.

‘* We now come to several tribes, more or less
nearly connected with our common mallows ; but
as some of them are wholly tropical, and have
very ‘ hard names,’ I must select particular families
for notice, such as the noble-looking cotton trees *



THE COTTON PLANT.
(Gossypium.)

of the East and West Indies, whose seeds are
wrapped up in a woolly substance, which is not,
however, the true cotton of commerce, this being

* Bombax.
112 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

obtained from several species of the shrubs called
cotton plants *, also inhabitants of the same coun-
tries, and belonging to a neighbouring tribe. Also
the useful trees which produce the seeds called
cacao, or cocoa, the chief ingredient in chocolate.”

“ T used to be puzzled about cocoa,” said Henry,
“ fancying that it came from the cocoa-nut palm.”

“It is obtained from a small tree +, of which
there are extensive forests in the island of Deme-
rara. The pulp which surrounds the seeds is dis-
tilled into an ardent spirit. A neighbouring tribe
to this is the Nasturtium tribe, consisting wholly
of North and South American plants.”

“ T fancied,” said Mary, “‘ that nasturtiums were
poisonous ; it was their strong smell that made
me think so; but mamma says that the seeds are
often pickled and used instead of capers.”

The children were surprised to hear that the
next tribe to this was the Lime tribe, and that
only a small number of these are forest trees,
while the great proportion are weed-like plants,
or shrubs, or small trees found within the tropics,
and resembling, in many respects, our common
mallows.

“JT am now going to describe a group con-

* Gossypium. + Theobroma cacao.
THE MILKWORT TRIBE. 113

sisting of many separate tribes and families, but
all in some measure connected by certain botanical
characters, one of the most evident of which is that
they all have irregular flowers.”

‘How do you mean, papa?”

‘““T mean, that instead of the petals being of
a regular and uniform shape, such as in Crucifers
and others, they are by no means uniform, some
of the petals being fashioned into little hoods or
fringes, or in some way differing from the rest.”

‘*Then I am sure the little blue milkwort*,
that we found on the hill-side, ought to be one of
them,” said Mary; “for when mamma took off
the petals to show us its curious shape, there
was a pretty little fringed hood to shelter the
stamens.”

‘And it does, in fact, belong to this group,
giving its name to one of the tribes. Our little
milkwort was so called because it was supposed
to improve the milk of cows that fed on it, and
it has also the reputation of being useful in
diseases of the lungs. Another species}, however,
contains far more of the bitter principle which
has gained this reputation. Some of the foreign

* Polygala vulgaris. + P. amara.
I
114 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

milkworts furnish dyes, and one is soapy in its
nature; so that the bark of the root, merely
agitated in water, produces a froth; or it may be
pounded, and made into washballs. With these
the ladies of Peru are said to wash their beautiful
hair, while the silversmiths employ them in cleans-
ing and polishing their goods. And this soapy
quality prevails so much in another tribe as to
give the name of soapworts. The fruit of several
of them lathers freely, and is used in the West
Indies instead of soap; it is said to cleanse more
linen than sixty times the same weight of soap
would do.”

“ How convenient it would be to have one of the
soapworts growing in our garden!” said Mary.

‘‘We have one of them,” replied her father ;
“but it possesses this quality very faintly, and
only in the seeds. The horse-chestnut is the one
I allude to; but I have never heard that the
soapy quality of its seeds has been made useful
in any way, although it doubtless imparts the
richness to them which, in Switzerland, causes
them to be valued for fattening sheep.”

“‘] was told not to eat horse-chestnuts, because
they are hurtful,” said Robert.
THE MAPLE TRIBE. 115

“They are neither wholesome, nor agreeable ;
even with the Genevese sheep, the fruit is crushed
and given cautiously in small quantities. Several
of the soapworts are dangerous plants; and in
Brazil the blacks prepare a poison from one of
the species, which slowly, but certainly, destroys
life. Not far from the horse-chestnut, but with
sugary properties, instead of soapy, 1s the maple
tribe, from the sap of some species of which sugar
is obtained in abundance.” |

“You have told us of several plants which
produce sugar,” said Henry; ‘‘ but when shall we
come to the tea plants?”

“T am just going to introduce you to the group
to which they belong, and which includes tribes
of various growth; but most of them remarkable
for producing abundance of resin.”

“T have read an account of the tea plant,” said
Mary, “and they say it is about the size of a
gooseberry bush.” |

“Then I fear,” said her father, “that you have
so connected it with a gooseberry bush in your
mind, that I shall not be able to give you a true
idea of the plant until we visit some botanical
garden where a specimen may be seen.”

12
116 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE,

“The leaves are like gooseberry leaves, are
they not, papa?”

‘¢ Go and ask for some tea leaves in the kitchen,
and examine for yourself,” said her father.

Mary soon brought some damp tea leaves, but
in spreading them open, she found that there was
scarcely one in a perfect state, but all looked as if
they had been cut in small pieces. Yet, after
some search, she found one less injured than the
rest, and was surprised to see that it was a long
smooth leaf, pointed at the end, and slightly notched
at the edges. ‘“ This is more like a small laurel
leaf, or bay leaf,” said she, “than it is like a
gooseberry leaf.”

‘“Eixaétly; and when you see the tea . plant
you will say it is like a young laurel bush, or
rather like a camellia japonica, which, indeed, is
its near relation, and belongs to the same tribe.
Other neighbouring tribes yield various gums
and resins, and also many valuable fruits of hot
climates, such as the mangosteen, said to be the
most delicious of all fruits.”

‘What is it like?” asked Robert.

“In size it resembles an orange, and it is filled
with a very sweet and delightful pulp. It thrives
RESINOUS TRIBES. 117

greatly in the hot, damp atmosphere of the Straits
of Malacca. But I should be sorry to dismiss
these resinous tribes without mentioning British
examples, so I must recall to your recollection the
different kinds of St. John’s Wort that frequently
enliven our hedge-rows and pastures with their
yellow blossoms about Midsummer-day (the feast
of St. John). Also that interesting plant called
Grass of Parnassus, which is less common here,
because we have not much of the boggy soil in
which it delights.”

‘But these are not gummy plants, are they,
pape ” said Henry.

‘They are not, or at least their properties are
not developed in this climate ; but some of their
American relatives yield a sufficient quantity of
gum to make them known in commerce, while
others, and even some of our own species, have
been used medicinally. And now I will conclude
this conversation with a few words on Water
Lilies, which, with some foreign plants called
Water Shields, and Water Beans, form the next
tribes,”

Mary had heard her mamma call the white water
lily the queen of British flowers, and she now
118 FIRsT STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

learnt that in botanical language it is named after
the water nymphs which are fabled to inhabit



THE WHITE WATER LILY. (Nymphea alba.)

streams. Both the white and the yellow water
lily grew in a slow-running river not far from her
home, and she naturally thought them the most
beautiful of all water plants; but her father now
told her that in South America there is a splendid
plant resembling our water lily, but of such enor-
mous size, that people take a boat and row round it
‘* VICTORIA REGINA.” 119

in order to examine its leaves and blossoms. ‘ This
beautiful and extraordinary flower,” said he, ‘“‘ mea-
sures more than a yard in circumference, and its
leaves are two yards wide. The plant has been
named Victoria Regina, in honour of our queen.”


120

CONVERSATION VIII.

EXOGENS.

RANUNCULUS—POPPY—FUMITORY—SUN-DEW—BARBERRY, AND
VINE TRIBES,

Tue pastures now began to be sprinkled with
buttercups and marsh marigolds, and the banks
with the little starry celandine, so that the chil-
dren were able to mix those showy yellow blos-
soms with the budding hawthorn, and the pale
cuckoo-flowers, which they gathered for the Ist of
‘May. There was arustic seat under an old acacia
on the lawn, and when their mamma came down
to breakfast on May-day, she found the young
folks adorning this seat with hawthorn boughs,
and hanging wreaths on the rugged trunk of their
favourite tree. The prettiest of these wreaths
was offered to mamma, and Mary was delighted
to hear it very much admired, and to see her
mamma wearing it as a trimming to her bonnet,
when they walked through the village that morn-
ing. The little girl also had plenty of May
THE RANUNCULUS TRIBE. 121

blossoms in her large straw hat, and the village
children were carrying about hoops made of withy,
and loaded, with marsh marigolds, or else they



THE SMALL CELANDINE OR PILE wWoRT. (Ficaria verna.)
carried sticks with a few flowers tied to the top,
making a shabby kind of May-pole.

“What a pleasant May-day,” said Mary, “ and
how gay the meadows look with buttercups !”
122 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

‘All the flowers you call buttercups,” said her
father, “‘ belong to the ranunculus tribe, the word
being formed from the Latin for a frog (rana).
Can you guess why they are so named ¢”



M'tp,
\

CREEPING CROWFOOT. (Ranunculus repens.)

Robert guessed that it was because frogs are
yellow; Mary guessed that it was because they
have bright eyes; Henry guessed that it was be-
cause they are fond of damp places. And Henry
was right.

“‘ Buttercups, larkspurs, columbines, anemones,
hellebore, monk’s-hood, pzeony, pheasant’s eye,
herb-Christopher, clematis, and others, which be-
THE RANUNCULUS TRIBE. 123

long to this tribe, all prefer a cold, damp climate,
and it is very seldom that any of them are met
with in the tropics, except on mountains.”



FIELD LARKSPUR. (Delphinium ENTIRE-LEAVED PHONY.
consolida.) (Pe@onia corallina.)

“Some of them are poisonous, are they not,
papa?” said Mary.

‘“ All of them are suspicious, and some are vio-
lent poisons. If you were to gather buttercups for
an hour or two, you would most likely find your
little hands blistered, especially if you met with
124 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

two kinds of buttercup which are noted for pro-
ducing that effect *. If you were to chew the leaves

UW £ :

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HERB-CHRISTOPHER, OR BANEBERRY. MONK’S-HOOD. (Aconitum
napellus.)

or blossoms of the monk’s-hood, you would soon
become dangerously ill.”

‘‘Monk’s-hood and larkspur are not at all like
buttercups,” said Henry; “why are they put in
the same tribe ?”

* Ranunculus flammula. R. sceleratus.
THE POPPY TRIBE. . 125

“Their flowers are not alike, but their qualities
are similar, and the arrangement of their seed-
vessels is the same. Examine the carpels or seed-
vessels, and the stamens growing from beneath
them in the buttercup, and you
have the key to the relation-
ship, although there are many
trifling differences. Some of the
foreign tribes related to ranun-
culus produce splendid flowers, .. vs Growixe prow
especially the Magnolia tribe, seyearn rue canpezs.
which contains some of the finest trees and shrubs
in the world. The poppy tribe also claims re-
lationship with ranunculus: but its
juices are milky, instead of watery,
and the seed-vessels are not distinct,
but grow together into one head.”

“Oh, yes,” said Robert, ‘“ I know
what poppy-heads are, for I helped
mamma to shake the seeds out from
those we had in the garden last summer.”

‘‘And mamma says that the Great Celandine,
which grows in hedges, and has those bluish
leaves, is related to the poppies, and is poisonous,”
said Mary.





POPPY HEAD.
126 .FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.



COMMON CELANDINE. (Chelidunium majus.)
QUALITIES OF THE POPPY. 127

“Tt is so, and you might guess it by the strong
odour of the plant, and of the thick yellow juice
which runs from it when you break the stem.
It is well to notice this particularly, because the
pod which follows the flower is not much un-
like that of a cruciferous plant, and it might be
fatal to mistake one for the other. The beautiful
Eschscholtzia of our garden, and the yellow-horned
poppy we saw at Brighton, also have long pods,
but no one could reason-
ably mistake them for
crucifers.”

Henry asked if opium
was not obtained from the
white poppy, and his fa-
ther replied in the affirm-
ative, telling him at the
same time, that in the
case of this drug, men
have turned a_ blessing
into a curse. The chil-
dren wondered how opium :
could be a blessing to *"(Glavciam Inteum.)
any one, until they were told that medical men
use it to subdue pain and convulsions, and that



HD
128 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

it is only by the evil passions of men that it has
been diverted from its proper use, and has been

- I
Wi) .
Rea Wz AY,

WH



COMMON FUMITORY. (Fumaria oficinalis.)

made a means of destruction to mind and body.
Henry had read an account of the fatal condition
FUMITORY AND SUNDEW TRIBES. 129

of opium eaters, and he was not surprised to. hear
his father speak strongly of the vice and misery
of those unhappy persons.

As the children proceeded on their walk, they
found, in the loose soil at the edge of a corn field,
an elegant little plant which they knew well, but
which they had seldom seen in blossom quite so
early. It was the common fumitory, with rose-
coloured blossoms, tipped with purple.

“What a dear little flower this is,” said Mary, |
“to come out in May, and keep on blowing till
November !”

“The fumitory tribe,” said her father, “is not
far removed from poppies, but close upon it
come the sundew, the barberry, and the vine
tribes.”

At the name of sundew, Mary, who generally
had a scrap of poetry connected with her favourite
flowers, began thus :—

‘‘ By the lone fountain’s secret bed,
Where human footsteps rarely tread,
’Mid the wild moor or silent glen,
The sundew blooms unseen by men.”

‘Do not repeat any more,” said Henry, “unless
there is any thing said about the leaves being fly
K
130 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

traps. I know there are little hairs all round

‘ ¥ .
sally ;
/ NSD > Wh
iy” Wi
N ye, ~
XZ Z Pi
is «Re 2 ~
A jy aia AS NY ,
gs ste | \ poh nN U7 ‘
. TRAY ‘ “ A
. ul
sl F Ws re
e .
4 4 Se
»
wt Sa .
fs <<
ZZ Der:

ROUND LEAVED SUNDEW. (Drosera rotundifolia.)

the leaves, and that insects are caught in them,
and cannot get away because they are so gummy.”
THE BARBERRY TRIBE. 131

‘Of course there is nothing said about that in

poetry,” said Mary.

“Well then,” said Henry, “I had rather talk

about the barberry, and
the vine, and their nice
fruit. What a beautiful
barberry bush that is
in the Rectory garden !
In the spring there are
the long strings of yel-

low blossoms hanging Luge
down, and in autumn 77}

the bright red berries
ike clusters of coral.”

_ The stamens of the
barberry grow from be-
neath the oblong seed-
vessel, which is after-
wards the berry, and in
the full-blown flower
they always lie opposite
the petals. These sta-



COMMON BARBERRY.
(Berberis vulgaris.)

mens are curious, for in the little knob at the top
of each, called the anther, there are two little
trap-doors opening backwards, to disperse the pol -

len, or seed-dust.
K
132 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

The vine tribe is much more important, yield-
ing fruit that is delicious, whether fresh or dried,



STAMENS OF THE BLOSSOM OF THE ANTHER OF THE
BARBERRY. BARBERRY. BARBERRY.

and which makes a great variety of wines. Raisins
and currants are very important as articles of
commerce.

Mary remembered her mamma saying that
currants are the dried fruit of a vine bearing
small black grapes, which used to be called
“eorinths,” because the vine grows plentifully
near Corinth; but people have gradually changed
the name into “ currants.”

Her father remarked that the vine has a pecu-
liar interest to Christians, because our Lord and
Saviour employed the vine and its wide-spreading
branches as an image of the union between Himself
and his people. At family prayers that evening
the children were again reminded of this blessed
union, for their father read the fifteenth chapter of
St. John, which begins with the words, “! am
the true vine, and my Father is the husbandman.”
133

CONVERSATION IX.

EXOGENS.

HEATH — RUE —FLAX—BALSAM—GERANIUM—WOOD-SORREL—
CLOVE —BUCK-WHEAT—GOOSEFOOT—LEGUMINOUS, ALMOND ,
APPLE, AND ROSE TRIBES.

One day, the children saw a villager mending
the thatch of his cottage, not with straw, but with
heather, which their father explained to them to
be the elastic tufts of the common ling, a plant
that covers a large extent of open country, espe-
cially in the north, and affords both food and
shelter to abundance of grouse. Mary had a few
dried branches of the three plants of the heath-
tribe which are common in this country, and these
were the common or fine-leaved heath *, with very
thick clusters of purplish flowers, and little tufts
of smooth leaves arranged three together on the
stem,—the cross-leaved heath +, with a small tuft
of rose-coloured flowers quite at the top of the
stem, and fringed leaves four together on the stem,
—and the common ling}, which grows to a much
* Erica cinerea. + E. tetralix. ¢ Calluna vulgaris.


134 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

larger size than the others, and has pinkish flowers
scattered along the whole stem.

“ These are very pretty plants,” said her father;
“but they are not to be compared to the foreign
heaths, of which we see beautiful specimens in
conservatories. There are many other plants in-
cluded in the heath tribe, which you are perhaps
little accustomed to consider as relations of our
humble ling; for instance, the Arbutus, the
Rhododendron, the Azalea, and the Kalmia, all
great favourites of yours, and very many more
that remain unknown to you, being confined to
the tropics. But I must now proceed to several
important tribes, having a bitter principle common
to all.”

“ Are they British plants?” asked Henry.

“Very few of them; but we can find an ex-
ample in our common rue, which, you know, is
bitter enough.”

“They must be disagreeable tribes if they are
like rue,” said Henry.

“ Wait till you know what they are, before you
decide against them,” replied his father. “ There
is the Citron tribe, containing the orange, lemon,
shaddock, lime, citron, &c., with a neighbouring
TRIBES HAVING A BITTER PRINCIPLE. 135

tribe which yields myrrh and frankincense, and
another which produces mahogany and other fra-
grant woods; a fourth yields the cashew-nut, the
pistacio-nut, and the mango ; a fifth produces the
beautiful zebra-wood of the cabinet-makers; a
sixth, the intensely bitter wood called quassia, an
infusion of which is used to poison flies, and, it is
to be feared, is also employed as a substitute for
hops, in making beer ; and several others, more or
less valuable in medicine.”

Henry quickly changed his opinion of these
tribes when he heard of oranges and lemons ; but
he remarked that the one was sweet and the other
sour, but neither was bitter. His father reminded
him that the rind of the orange and the seeds of
the lemon are powerfully bitter; and that the
wood is also intensely bitter in most of the families.

‘“ We now come,” continued his father, ‘ to
several neighbour tribes of our wild geranium
or crane’s-bill, such as the flax, the wood-sorrel,
and the balsam tribes.”

‘“‘ Flax is very pretty, and very useful too,” said
Mary. ‘I once had a plant of it in my garden,
and I could hardly believe that its little delicate
stems had fibres strong enough to make linen.”
136 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

“Tf you admired a solitary plant, you would be

delighted with such large

FLAX. (Linum usitatum.)



fields of flax as I saw

in my journey from
Hamburgh to Dresden
last summer. The ten-
der green of such fields
pleasantlybrought back
the remembrance of
spring, at a time when
the corn harvest was
being gathered in. To
the same tribe belongs
a pretty little plant
called F'lax-seed, very
delicate in its struc-
ture.”

Mary was well ac-
quainted with the pret-
ty little wild geraniums
of our hedges, espe-
cially with herb Ro-
bert *, whose rose-red

blossoms peep out so prettily, and whose leaves
and stems are all tinged with red ; and are nearly

* Geranium Robertianum.
THE GERANIUM TRIBE. 137

as ornamental as the flowers ;—Robert asked why
mamma called all these plants crane’s-bills, and he

FLAX-SEED. (Radiola millegrana.)

was told that they are so called from the shape of
the seed-vessel, which is very much like the bill
of the crane.

‘‘ Another family of the Geranium tribe is called
stork’s-bill,” he added, “ and from a similar cause.”

“The geraniums of the greenhouse have seed-
vessels of that shape,” said Mary; ‘“ but they can-
not be related to the wild ones; their flowers are

so different.”
“The arrangement or colours of petals are
138 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE,

seldom of much importance in tracing the family
connexions of plants,” said her father: “ the form
of the seed-vessel is of much greater consequence,
together with the general principle or quality
which runs through the tribe. The geraniums of
our conservatory * are near relations of the wild
flowers of that name, and all possess aromatic and
astringent qualities. These very handsome flow-
ers grow wild in abundance at the Cape of Good
Hope, and in New Holland; while the damper
parts of India swarm with beautiful species of the
neighbouring tribe of balsams, and multitudes are
also found in Ceylon. Our little wood-sorrel + is
a member of a tribe which approaches these, and
is remarkable, especially in the tropical species,
for the presence of oxalic acid. But we have a
host of British flowers connected with the pinks
and cloves of our gardens, and to these I must now
turn.”

“ T dare say my little mountain-pink, that grows
on the wall, is one of them,” said Mary.

“ Yes ; and the common chickweed {, and the
pretty little stitchwort $, whose white stars are

* Pelargonium. + Oxalis acetosella.
t Stellaria media. § Stellaria graminea.
THE CLOVE TRIBE. 139

common in hedges, and whose weak and slender
stems cannot stand upright without the support of
neighbouring plants. And all the Catchfly family,
of which, perhaps, you are best acquainted with
one that grows in corn-fields, called bladder
campion *, because its ‘calyx is swelled into a
bladder shape; and all the sandworts +, and the
lychnis family, of which one is your favourite
ragged robin } ; and the purple corn-cockle §, that
looks so handsome, but is so little wished for by
the farmer. All these belong to the Clove tribe,
and I think you can hardly help noticing the
family likeness amongst them. As to any quality
common to all, I think they are classed more from
the absence than the presence of any such: being
all insipid herbs, like their neighbours the pur-
slanes. Other relatives of theirs, forming the
Buckwheat tribe, have a pleasant acid in their
leaves and shoots, and very bitter roots. The
common sorrel and dock, as well as the rhubarb,
so much used in tarts, belong to this latter tribe.
Buckwheat itself is one of a very large family of
plants, common in hedges, ditches, and fields.

* Silene inflata. + Arenaria.
t Lychnis Flos-cuculi. § Agrostemma Githago.
140 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

Some of these plants you know under the name of
snake-weed, knot-grass, Persicaria, &c.; and they
may all be known by their numerous joints, which
give the botanical name of Polygonum, or ‘ many-
jointed,’ to the whole family.”

“JT thought buckwheat was a kind of corn,”
said Henry; “for it is used to feed pheasants.”

‘The seeds produce a wholesome meal,” replied
his father, “‘and you have tasted it in the form of
‘crumpets,’ which are chiefly made of it; but it
is very different in growth from corn plants, which
you know are grasses. Many of our commonest
and most despised weeds bear close relationship to
valuable plants ; it is so with snakeweed, which is
related to buckwheat ; and it is so with goose-
foot, which is of the same tribe with spinach, beet,
and mangold-wurzel.”

There was a smile among the children when
“ goosefoot ” was mentioned, for they remembered
the trick Henry once played on his little brother,
by getting him to gather a sprig of stinking goose-
foot *, to examine the greyish green, mealy-looking
leaves, and calyx, there being no petals to these
plants. |

* Chenopodium olidum.
THE GOOSEFOOT TRIBE. 141

“Robert did not look at it long,” said Mary,
“but was glad enough to fling it into the sea;
for it was in a field close by that we found it.”

“The worst of it was,” said Robert, “ that,
after I had washed my hands several times, I could
smell the goosefoot still.”

“ T think that must have been your fancy,” said
his father: ‘but it certainly is one of the most
detestable odours in vegetable nature ; and I can-
not wonder’at your hatred of it. Some of the
species, common in our own fields and waste
ground, have an unpleasant scent, but it is not
to be compared to that of this sea-side species,
which most resembles putrid fish.”

Mary wondered what could be the use of such
disagreeable weeds; and her father told her that
stinking goosefoot is spoken highly of as a remedy
for spasmodic complaints. Robert said, he thought
it would stop his breath entirely to be obliged to
swallow such a dreadful medicine; but he was
assured that when the body is racked with violent
pain, people never inquire whether the medicine
is nauseous or otherwise, but gladly and thank-
fully receive whatever is likely, by the blessing of
God, to afford them relief.

His father here passed by some foreign tribes of
142 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

plants, with the mere mention of the useful pepper
plants, on the one hand, and the ornamental
mesembryanthemums, on the other; ‘‘ But not far
from these,” he said, “‘come a number of hand-
some shrubs, contained in the Mezereum and Laurel
tribes ; and, in the latter, many valuable species
bearing camphor, or yielding spice, for instance,
cinnamon and cassia.”

Mary remembered that a fine piece of lace
bark in the cabinet was described as being the
inner bark of a tree of the Mezereum tribe ; but
she was very sorry to hear that this beautiful
substance was formerly twisted and knotted into
whips for the slave-drivers.

Her father remarked, that the next tribe to be
noticed was so important, that it required their
best attention, containing, as it did, the great host
of leguminous plants.

‘* And what are they ?—and why have they such
a hard name?” asked Mary.

‘Their name is given on account of the form
of the seed-vessel, which is universally a legume ;
and if you are still at a loss to know what I mean
by that term, you must think of the pod of a pea
or bean, for they are both legumes.”

‘‘ And they both have the same shaped flower,”
LEGUMINOUS PLANTS. 143

said Mary; ‘‘ for last summer mamma told me to
find as many different blossoms as I could of a
particular shape, which she called butterfly-shaped;
and I remember sweet-peas, and field-peas, and
beans, and vetches, and clover, and laburnum, and
a great many more, had all the same kind of
blossom.”

“ True,” said her father; ‘‘and this with the
pod will be sufficient to mark most of the legu-
minous plants you are likely to meet with. But
there are others of this vast tribe that have indeed
the same pod, but a very differently shaped
flower. Thus, the mimosas in the conservatory,
whose blossoms seem little more than a bundle of
delicate yellow stamens, are members of this tribe,
as are all the beautiful acacias, their relatives,
which yield various gums, tanners’ bark, and dark
coloured wood for furniture. The rose-wood of
commerce is the timber of a mimosa of the forests
of Brazil, which when fresh has a faint smell of
roses.”

“T have thought of two more plants that have
blossoms and pods like the pea,” said Robert ;
‘and they both grow on our down, and they are
both yellow.”
144 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

Henry guessed immediately what they were ;
namely, the furze and the broom; and Mary
thought of many of her favourite wild flowers
with the same kind of blossom, saying, ‘‘I shall
always know a leguminous plant if it has that
kind of flower.”

‘Several fruits, such as the tamarind, and
various gums, drugs, dyes, and balsams, are ob-
tained from foreign plants of this tribe,” said her
father; “such as gums Arabic and Senegal, the
drug senna, the valuable indigo, We. ; while in the
South American forests there are pod-bearing
trees of enormous size and extreme age. They
are called locust trees, and almost incredible
stories are told concerning them. Fifteen Indians,
it is said, with outstretched arms, can scarcely
embrace one of the trunks, and when the con-
centric rings of one of these giants were counted,
they led to the conclusion that the tree was more
than two thousand years old; that is, that it dates
earlier than the time of our Saviour.”

‘“¢ What wonderful trees ! ” said Henry. ‘“‘ We can
scarcely fancy such giants to be related to our
peas and beans.”

“ Leguminous plants are found in almost every
QUALITIES OF LEGUMINOUS PLANTS. 145

part of the habitable globe; except in two small
islands, which [ will show you on the map.”

Henry quickly brought a map of the globe, and
his father pointed out St. Helena, and Tristan
d’Acugna, both in the South Atlantic Ocean.

‘Then poor Napoleon could not have had any
fruit or vegetables of that kind!” said Henry.
‘| dare say peas and beans would not have grown
there, or any where else within the tropics ; but
tamarinds might, and other fruits and balsams.”

“The fragrant resin called Lign-aloes is ob-
tained from a plant of this tribe,” said his father ;
‘and so are the balsam of Tolu, used in lozenges,
and the balsam of Peru, which gives a peculiar
fragrance to pastiles. The Tonga bean, also, is a fra-
grant seed used by perfumers and makers of snuff.
I have thus told you a few of the uses of legu-
minous plants; but, notwithstanding their value
to us, many of them are injurious in their pro-
perties : the seeds of the laburnum are poisonous,
so is indigo, and the bark of several foreign
trees. In the plants we commonly use, or give
to our cattle, the hurtful qualities are almost
entirely absent ; but there are some, even of these,
which must not be used too freely, or they become

L
146 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

unwholesome. The next tribe also has this con-
trariety, of yielding agreeable fruits while its gene-



BLOSSOM OF THE SLOE OR BLACKTHORN. (Prunus spinosa.)

ral principle is poisonous; far more so, indeed,
than that of leguminous plants.”
ALMOND AND APPLE TRIBES. 147

“Ts it a tribe that we know any thing about ?”
asked Robert.

“Yes; and which you enjoy as much as any one.
It is the Almond tribe, and contains cherries,
peaches, nectarines, plums, and almonds.”

‘But none of these delicious fruits are poisonous
—are they, papa?”

“The leaves and kernels yield an abundance of
prussic acid, which is a deadly poison, and the
fruit, too freely indulged in, brings on dangerous
complaints ; so that the plum season is frequently
a time of sickness. Perhaps the most wholesome
of these fruits is the peach, and it certainly is the
most delicious. This tribe, and several which
follow, are nearly related to the Rose tribe, as
you might guess by the blossoms, which much
resemble, on a smaller scale, those of the wild
rose. The Apple tribe has a similar likeness and
relationship ; and how beautiful are its clusters of
rose-like blossoms at this season ! ”

“Yes,” said Mary, looking towards the orchard ;
“the trees are quite white with blossom, and are
prettier than any thing we have in the garden yet.”

‘This useful tribe contains the apple, pear,
quince, medlar, service, mountain-ash, hawthorn,

L 2
148 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

&c., all the species being trees or bushes of the
northern hemisphere only. Another small tribe,



FRUIT OF THE HAWTHORN. (Crategus oxycanth.)

(of which the common burnet *, and the lady’s
mantle +, are members,) leads the way to the true
roses.”

Henry thought the Rose tribe must be more
beautiful than useful, for he had never heard of
any thing made from it except rose-water, and
attar-of-roses, and conserve-of-roses : but he soon
found that the tribe is not confined to the mere

* Sanguisorba officinalis. + Alchemilla vulgaris.
THE ROSE TRIBE. 149

rose and sweet-briar, but includes the strawberry,
raspberry, and blackberry, with the pretty poten-
tillas and geums of the garden and fields, the tall
agrimony, and the elegant meadow-sweet *, or
queen of the meadows, &c.

“Tam glad,” said Mary, “that the rose is our
own English flower, it is such a sweet and beau-
tiful one.”

‘True; yet there are sad remembrances con-
nected with it; for during the fatal struggles
between the houses of York and Lancaster, which
filled our country with misery and bloodshed from
1450 to 1485, the white and red rose were taken
as badges by the rival parties.”

“ Oh, yes!” said Henry; ‘ York took the white
rose, and Lancaster the red; and those terrible
civil wars were called the ‘ Wars of the Roses.’
At last the red rose married the white, for Henry
VII. was of the house of Lancaster, and he
married a daughter of the house of York, and so
ended the quarrel.”

Mary had her scrap of poetry ready, as usual,
and, as they drew near home, she sang this little
ditty to her brothers :—

* Spirea.
150

FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

“The Rose is red, the Rose is white,
The Rose it blooms in summer’s light ;
But ah! it clouds the heart’s delight,

To muse upon its history :—

“It tells full many a woeful tale,
Of hearts made cold, of cheeks made pale,
Of love’s sad sigh, the widow’s wail,
In days of strife and chivalry.
Sweet Freedom, may the age prevail,
That strife no more may be! ”
151

CONVERSATION X.
EXOGENS.

SAXIFRAGE—HYDRANGEA—LOOSE-STRIFE—ELM—BUCKTHORN~--
SPINDLE—GENTIAN— EBONY — HOLLY — NIGHTSHADE— OLIVE
—CONVOLVULUS—DODDER— TOBACCO—THRIFT—PLANTAIN —
PRIMROSE — JASMIN — BORAGE— LABIATE — VERBENA — FIG-
WORT—BUTTERWORT—CAMPANULA, AND SCABIOUS TRIBES.

Henry had a tolerably large piece of garden
ground, which he cultivated according to his own
fancy. The greater part was planted and sown
with vegetables ; but he had a little flower-bed,
separated from the rest by rock-work of his own
contrivance. Upon this rock-work he was now
busy planting some roots which required very
little soil, and were therefore likely to thrive
among the stones. One of these was the pretty
little plant called London Pride ; and when Henry
showed it to his father, he was told that it be-
longed to the Saxifrage tribe, which consists of
humble plants, natives of cold mountain districts,
and springing up freely amongst the turf in such
situations. Most of them have white flowers,
152 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

dotted with yellow or green or red. “The little
plant in your hand,” said his father, ““was once
very common in the neighbourhood of London ;
hence its name: but I have heard it called ‘ Jeru-
salem stars,’ and also ‘ None-so-pretty. You will
not expect to hear that the showy Hydrangeas of
the greenhouse are near relations of these, and
form the next tribe.” .

Mary had heard her mamma say that in Japan
a species of hydrangea is dried, and used as tea,
which is so much admired by the inhabitants that
they give it a name which means “ tea of Heaven.”
Her father said that the purple loose-strife, a
handsome plant which adorns the banks of rivers
with its tall spikes of blossom in July and August,
stands in a neighbouring tribe to the humble saxi-
frage: which also contains the Egyptian henné
plant, used by women to stain their hands and feet
of an orange colour.

Near Henry’s garden stood a large elm, and his
father now plucked from it a little blossoming
spray, as a specimen of the elm tribe, which con-
tains trees and shrubs of the northern hemisphere,
and is followed by the buckthorns and spindle-trees,
the latter curious for the pink-lobed seed-vessels
THE GENTIAN TRIBE. 153

with which one of its species (the only British one)
adorns our hedges in autumn. ‘“ But I now lead
you to several tribes owning con-
nexion with those pretty little
deep-blue flowers, the Gentians.”

‘Then I suppose they are all
bitter plants,” said Robert; “ for
mamma says the gentians are
very bitter, and that one of them *
is very much used by druggists
on that account.”

‘‘Most of their relatives are
also powerfully astringent and
bitter; but one tribe is chiefly
noted for producing hard black
timber called ebony, others for
having intensely poisonous seeds,
as those produced by an Indian
tree called Strychnos nua vomicd, — wweasr centiay.
or dogbane, so called on account aneen LON)
of their poisonous qualities. To this latter tribe
belongs our pretty little periwinkle+, which cheers
us when there are few other blossoms. Neigh-
bour to these also stands the Holly tree}, which



* Gentiana lutea. + Vinca. t Ilex aquifolium.
154 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE,

forms the only species of its tribe native in Britain.
Here also is (what will seem more strange to you)
the Broom-rape tribe, those extraordinary brown
parasites* that grow on the roots of hemp, clover,
and other plants; but they also possess a bitter
principle similar to that already described.”

‘‘T remember,” said Henry, ‘‘ what hard work I
had to dig up a plant of broom-rape which was
very deep in the ground, and had taken fast hold
of the roots of the clover; it looked a poor de-
caying thing, but I found it very tough and
leathery.”

‘The poisonous nature of some of these tribes
will prepare you for another group possessing also
dangerous qualities; and you will here again ob-
serve that some of our cultivated vegetables are
obtained from very suspicious orders. The group
I speak of contains the Nightshade tribe, and the
Olive, Convolvulus, and Dodder tribes, the last
being, as you know, curious parasites on various
plants, such as that which infests the furze and
heath on our downs.”

‘“‘Nightshades are dreadfully poisonous,” said
Mary, “and there is a very sad tale in my

* Orobanche.
THE NIGHTSHADE TRIBE. 155

MES
ers
Nu

y// Sel
~*

fi



COMMON NIGHTSHADE. LESSER DODDER. (Cuscuta epithymune.)


156 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

Poetical Companion, of a poor little brother and
sister who died from eating the berries of the
deadly nightshade.”

“The Nightshade tribe contains also the hen-
bane, which is a very poisonous weed at the time
the seeds are forming, though comparatively harm-
less at other times; also the pretty petunias, the
tobacco plant, and the common potato.”

There was a general exclamation of surprise
among the children, when they heard that the
potato belonged to this poisonous tribe.

‘And yet,” said Robert, “‘ 1 remember mamma
told me not to chew the berries when I was
gathering the pretty blossom of the potato.”

‘‘The leaves and berries of the potato are nar-
cotic, while the underground part of the plant is
perfectly wholesome. Even the fruit and seeds in
some plants of this tribe are eatable; for instance,
the tomato, or love apple, and the different kinds
of capsicum, the ground seeds of which are the
chief ingredient in cayenne pepper.”

“ Tobacco cannot be unwholesome,” said Henry,
“for some of the healthiest old people in the vil-
lage are smokers.”

‘‘ Moderately used, it does not appear to be


THE NIGHTSHADE TRIBE. 157

injurious ; but, when taken in excess, it is liable
to bring on paralysis. Oil of tobacco is a very



SEA LAVENDER, OR THRIFT.

powerful poison; and even the minute quantity
inhaled in smoking causes nausea in persons
158 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

unaccustomed to the use of it. The tobacco plant
is, as you know, a very handsome one, and when
cultivated over a large extent of ground, it has
a most striking appearance. The next group of
orders contains some old favourites, such as the
different kinds of Thrift, the Plantains, and the
Primroses. The last-named tribe will be the most
interesting to you, for it includes the cowslip,
oxlip, auricula, cyclamen, pimpernel, and others.”

‘‘Then the little scarlet pimpernel is related to
the primrose,” said Mary. “I am glad I know
its family connexions, for I could not tell any thing
about it, except that it is the ‘poor man’s weather-
glass,’ giving him warning by
shutting up its blossoms before

“The delicate bog pimpernel,
which mamma is trying to raise
in the greenhouse, must belong
to the same tribe,” said Henry.

“ Yes; and the yellow pimper-
nel, or wood loosestrife, and the



CHAFF-WEED. e .
(Centunculus minimus.) beautiful water violet, or feather-

foil, and the tiny chaff-weed, all these, and many
foreign families, make up this pretty tribe, con-
sisting entirely of monopetalous flowers.”
MONOPETALOUS FLOWERS. 159

Robert wished to know what that meant; and
his father sent him to gather a primrose, and showed
him that, instead of having several separate flower-
leaves, or petals, all have grown together into one
petal, which can be pulled off in one, with the five
anthers growing to the inside of its tube. Hence
the flower is called monopetalous, or with one
petal; if it had several, it would be called poly-
petalous, or with many petals. The Jasmine and
the Borage tribes are monopetalous, the flowers of
the latter being mostly bell-shaped, or funnel-
shaped, as in the common comfrey, whose clusters
of white or purple bells, and large rough leaves,
are so frequent in ditches.”

‘““T know it well,” said Henry, “for Mary has
sent me into many a ditch to gather it. Viper’s
bugloss has leaves still rougher and more prickly,
and pretty bell-shaped flowers, and I remember
mamma said it was related to comfrey.”

‘“‘True; and so are gromwell, alkanet, hound’s-
tongue, borage, and the various kinds of scorpion-
grass, one of which is the true ‘ forget-me-not.’”

Mary inquired why that beautiful and innocent
flower is called scorpion-grass ; and she found that
the shape of the flowering stem, which curls round
160 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

at the top like a scorpion’s tail, has given it the
name, in the same way that the soft and downy
leaves of most of the plants of the same family
have given the title of Myosotis, or mouse-ear.

But her father now began to speak of a tribe
which is very easy to be known, because all its
flowers are lipped, (that is, the two parts of the
corolla are like lips, either closed or gaping,) and
grow in whorls or rings round the stem at regular
distances.

‘‘That is how nearly all the plants look in the
herb-garden,” said Robert; “so I suppose mint,
and thyme, and marjoram, and sage belong to it.”

“If sage does, then the salvias must also,” said
Mary; “for mamma says that sa/via means sage,
and that the beautiful red and purple salvias are
near relations of common sage.”

Henry recollected many other examples of these
lipped (labiate) flowers, such as lavender, penny-
royal, horehound, rosemary, and ground-ivy.

After remarking that the chief value of the
tribe arises from its aromatic qualities, making it
useful for culinary purposes, his father went on to
speak of the Verbena tribe, which is of little im-
portance except as furnishing the valuable timber
THE FIGWORT TRIBE. 161

called Teak, which is the produce of an enormous
tree * growing in the mountain forests of Malabar
and other parts of the East Indies.

The children were surprised to hear of such a
tree among the Verbenas, having only seen small
herbs of that name.

‘‘ When you were speaking of lipped flowers,
papa,” said Robert, “how was it you did not men-
tion the snapdragon ?”

‘“‘ Because that belongs to a different tribe,
whose properties are dangerous instead of whole-
some ; and even the blossom, which may seem to
you at first sight to be shaped like that of salvia,
is really very different, having a long spur at the
back, and not growing in whorls, besides other
less conspicuous botanical differences. The snap-
dragon belongs to the Figwort tribe, which con-
tains also the curious calceolaria or slipper-flower,
the mimulus, fox-glove, mullein, and others, not
forgetting the figwort itself, a plant of ill odour,
which you have found in the woods, with dull
greenish flowers in a cluster, purplish at the lip.
Near to these plants there is a small tribe called
Butterworts, which perhaps I should have passed

* Tectona grandis.
M
162 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.



PALE BUTTERWORT.
(Pinguicula lusitanica.)



FOX. GLOVE.
BUTTERWORTS. 163

over except for a curious use to which the common
Butterwort is put in Lapland, and which has been
described by Linnzeus.

The children wished to know what that use
was, and they were told that the fresh and fleshy
leaves of the plant are laid on a sieve, and a
quantity of milk, warm from the cow, is poured
over them, and allowed to stand a day or two,
when it becomes solid and compact, and most de-
licious to the taste. The plant, it is stated, pre-
vents the formation of cream or whey, but renders
the whole of the milk rich and consistent. A small
portion of this solid milk acts in the same manner
upon that which is fresh.

‘“‘T hope butterwort grows in England, that we
may get some of this solid milk,” said Mary.

‘‘The plant grows in the northern countries,
and also in Scotland,” said her father ; “‘ but I have
never heard of any attempt to put it to the use
described by Linnzus. But we now arrive at the
bell-flowers, a tribe that I know will please you,
containing, as it does, the little harebell of the
downs, and the various campanulas of the gardens,
blue and white.”

‘“‘T like them very much,” said Mary, “ but I

M 2
164 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

cannot take so much pleasure in them since I have
heard that they are poisonous.”

“ You need not be disturbed on that account,”
said her father, “for although their juices are cer-
tainly acrid, yet the root and the young shoots of
many species are occasionally used as food, espe-
cially those of the rampion bell-flower *. But I
must not pause at these plants, nor at the lobelias,
which are more acrid still, nor at the valerians, the
roots of which have such an odd effect in bringing
on a kind of intoxication in cats; a few words on
the Scabious tribe must close our present con-
versation.”

The large purple flower-heads of the field
scabious had sometimes tempted the children a
few steps among the standing corn; and they also
knew the devil’s-bit scabious, which they had dug
up in the meadows on purpose to see the root,
which is black, and ends abruptly, so that old
stories say the devil, envious of its good qualities,
has bitten it off, that it may not flourish. They
were therefore pleased to hear that the scabious
tribe is a very important one, on account of the
Teazel family, which belongs to it.

* Campanula Rapunculus.
THE SCABLOUS TRIBE. 165

‘The teazel is that handsome plant with a large
prickly head of lilac flowers,” said Henry. “ Its
large leaves have very sharp thorns at the back,
and they meet together round the stem, so as to
hold a great deal of water.”

‘¢ Another kind of teazel,” said his father, ‘‘ sup-
plies the prickly heads so much used in the cloth
manufacture. When you accompany me to some
cloth mills, you will be amused to see the numbers
of teazel heads fixed in frames, for the purpose of
raising the nap on cloth. Delicate kinds of ma-
chinery have been tried for this purpose, but
nothing is found to succeed but the teazel, so that
it is of high importance to our manufacturers.”
166

CONVERSATION XI.
EXOGENS.

COMPOSITE—EVENING PRIMROSE—MYRTLE—CACTUS—CURRANT
—SYRINGA— CRANBERRY—COFFEE—HONEYSUCKLE, AND GA-
LIUM TRIBES.

“T wisn we could get rid of these troublesome

daisies on the lawn,” said Robert; ‘they are quite

thick again, and yet the gardener thought he had
rooted them all out.”

Mary could hardly bear to have a daisy found
fault with, wherever it might show its face, for it
was the first flower she could remember gathering,
and she still loved to watch its crimson-tipped
blossom closing up at sunset and opening wide in
the morning, earning its title to be called the day’s
eye. Her father told her to examine one, as an
example of a very extensive tribe, called composite
flowers, all of them approaching more or less to a
starry shape, and many of them called asters on
that account.

The children had been picking daisies to pieces
while their father spoke, and Henry said he
thought he had found out why such flowers are
COMPOSITE FLOWERS. 167

called composite, for instead of being one blossom,
the daisy is made up of a great many little blos-
soms, all huddled together.

‘‘T never noticed before,” he said, ‘‘ that the
middle of the daisy is nothing but a mass of these
tiny flowers, and each seems to have its own sta-
mens and pistil. But I suppose these rays spread-
ing out round the edge are only petals.”

‘“‘ Look at them well, and you will see that they
also are florets, each having its own pistil, but no
stamens, while the centre florets have each five
stamens, as well as a pistil. These outer florets,
you see, are strap-shaped, the inner tubular; and
a number of composite flowers are made closely
on this pattern, as the yellow corn marigold, the
white ox-eye, the common yarrow, camomile,
golden-rod, colt’s-foot, and others. But if you
gather one of the dandelions in the orchard, you
will find that it does not agree with this pattern,
although it is a composite flower.”

Mary ran and gathered it, and she soon saw
that all its florets are strap-shaped; and her
father told her, that when she could meet with a
thistle in blossom, or its near relation, the bur-
dock, she would find just the reverse to be the
168 FIRST STEPS IX GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

case, for all the florets in those plants are tubular,
and there is no ray at all.

Robert remembered a num-
ber of garden flowers which
must belong to this tribe, such
as chrysanthemums, china-as-
ters, dahlias, marigolds, mi-
chaelmas daisies, hawkweeds,
&e.; and Mary found out that
a piece of groundsel, which
she had gathered for her bird,
also belonged to this composite

tribe.

a a ‘“‘Now I understand,” she
said, ‘‘ how it is that dandelion and groundsel have
such a quantity of seeds. Every little floret,
I dare say, has its own seed, and when they are
all ripe, and have got their silky wings ready, then
they spread out into those pretty globes, and are
ready to fly away with the least puff of wind.
Yes, and that must be the plan with the globe
thistle, and all the rest of the thistles. No won-
der they are called composite, if that means many
together.”

‘“‘ How is it,” said Henry, “that some of our




THE MYRTLE TRIBE. 169

garden flowers have no seeds at all, although they
are of this kind?”

‘“‘ Because by the gardener’s art the flower has
been rendered double; that is, those parts which
were once stamens have been transformed into
petals, and petals alone cannot produce seed.
Several of the composites are very handsome and
ornamental ; but there are others which are simply
useful, as artichokes, succory, endive, lettuce, ca-
momile, and wormwood. Your favourite and sweet-
scented southernwood is also one of this tribe.

‘Passing by some foreign and little known
plants, I must here mention the evening primrose,
and the myrtle tribes, the latter having a fragrant
and aromatic quality, very powerful in cloves,
which are the dried flower-buds of a plant of the
myrtle kind, and almost equally so in allspice, the
dried fruit of another. To this tribe we also owe
the delicious preserve called guava jelly, made
from the pulpy fruit of the guava; also various
valuable gums and aromatic oils. The gum trees
of New Holland are of this tribe, and ay" are not
a little remarkable.”

‘* How so, papa?” said Henry.

“ From their peculiar growth; for it appears
170 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

that they rise to the height of 100 or 150 feet
before they send out any branches, and are then
crowded with beautiful willow-like foliage. Grow-
ing near each other, they look like an assemblage of
elegant columns; and some of them, called stringy-
bark gum trees, are said to rise nearly as high as
the Monument in London without branching.”

“ How I should like to see them !” said Henry ;
“but there would be no hope of climbing such
trees as those.”

‘“‘T do not expect,” said his father, “ that any
of you will feel much interest in the tribes imme-
diately following these, for they contain plants
which you call ugly, notwithstanding their hand-
some flowers.”

‘‘Papa must mean the cactuses,” said Mary,
“for we never liked them very much, they are
such odd, clumsy-looking plants. Where do they
come from?”

‘‘From America, where some are valued for a
refreshing and agreeable fruit, which has a similar
taste to our currants, and very much the same pro-
perties. And although you have never seen any
other description of cactus than strange succulent
plants without leaves, yet there are some kinds
THE CURRANT TRIBE. 171

which bear leaves, and which when old become
woody in their stems. Humboldt even speaks ofa
forest of such plants, grown to the stature of trees,
and yielding wood fit for domestic uses.”

‘“T shall not dislike them so much now I know
they are useful, and bear nice fruit,” said Mary.

‘“T have just said that in their properties some
of these plants closely resemble currants ; therefore
you will expect to hear that the currant tribe is
not far off, however different its outward appear-
ance may be.”

‘Qurrants and gooseberries are all of the same
family,” said Henry; “and so are the pretty flow-
ering currants that bear such a quantity of pink
blossoms, in the shrubbery. Mamma says that they
never thrive except in cool countries like our own,
but that the English often try to make them grow
in hot countries, for the pleasure of eating the
fruits they had at home. Mamma saw a number
of little gooseberry and currant trees planted close
together, that they might be put under air-tight
glass cases, to be sent to the West Indies, but she
did not expect they would live very long there.”

“These plants are very abundant in North
America,” said his father, “and they even occur
172 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

among the mountains of northern India, where the
climate is comparatively cool. Neighbouring tribes
are the syringas, and some curious tropical plants
with fleshy fruit, which children are very fond of,
but which has the strange property of making
their complexions quite yellow.”

“How very odd!” exclaimed Mary. “The
children of that country must look as if they had
the jaundice. What is the name of the tree that
bears such strange fruit ¢”

Botanists call it Gustava speciosa, and they tell
us that the effect on the constitution ceases in one,
or at most two days, after which the children re-
gain their natural colour. The next tribe I shall
mention is the Cranberry tribe, containing cran-
berries, bilberries, and whortle-berries, (which are
all of one family,) besides many foreign sorts.
You are well acquainted with these fruits as pre-
serves, although you have only seen whortle-berries
growing. Not far from these comes the Coffee
tribe, one of the largest we have, containing some
of the most important remedies known in medi-
cine, as cinchona, ipecacuanha, and others. But
these will scarcely interest you so much as coffee
itself, which is, as you know, a most important
THE COFFEE TRIBE. 173

plant, furnishing a wholesome beverage almost as
universal as tea.”

Mary wished to know what sort of tree it was,
and she was told that it is from eight to twelve
feet high, with slender drooping branches, bearing
evergreen leaves, like the bay, white starry blos-
soms, like the jessamine, and red fruit, like the
cherry.

“ But the fruit,” continued her father, ‘is
insipid, and would be little prized, were it not that
each contains two hard oval seeds, enclosed in a
parchment-like membrane. These seeds are the
coffee-berries. But let us leave this tribe for one
that gives us the sweetest ornament of our rustic
porch.”

‘‘Oh, the honeysuckle!” said Mary. ‘It is
already showing some early buds, and next month
I dare say it will be covered with blossoms, as it
was last year.”

‘The honeysuckle tribe is not only interesting
for its fragrance and beauty in these climbing
species, but for the elegance or the usefulness of
some that do not climb, such as the delicate little
northern plant called Linng@a, in honour of the
great botanist, and the hardy and useful elder,
174 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

from which a great quantity of wine is made in
England, much of it employed, I fear, in the



LINNZA BOREALIS.

adulteration of port wine. Some of the Viburnums,
or Gueldres roses, bear a fruit, the pulp of which
ARRANGEMENT OF TRIBES. 175

is made into cakes by the North American
Indians.”

The children did not expect to hear that the
gueldres rose was so near a relation to the honey-
suckle, for they thought its large white balls were
more like the blossom of the hydrangea than of
any other flower. And they were told that in
fact they do come so near hydrangeas as to be
separated by what seem very small points of dif-
ference. ‘I do not expect you,” said their father,
‘‘¢o understand the reasons why certain flowers are
placed in one tribe and not in another. There
are many tribes, indeed, where the family likeness
is so strong, and where the known qualities of the
plants are so much alike, that you may feel tole-
rably certain as to their situation; but for the
greater number, you must simply depend on what
you are told about them. I have named the
different tribes, as nearly as possible, in the order
pursued by an eminent modern botanist *; but
every tribe in its several families touches so many
other tribes, that we dare not say that in nature
they follow the exact order in which we place
them, just one after the other.”

* LINDLEY.
176 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

“No,” said Henry; “perhaps they go side by
side, three or four tribes together, instead of in a
single line.”

“Or perhaps they go round in a ring,” said
Mary, ‘“‘and then all the rings get joined together
like the links of a chain.”

“ Very good ideas,” said their father ; “and you
may fancy, if you please, where I have spoken of
a group of tribes connected with each other, that
they are friendly companies walking abreast, or
holding hands all round.”

Mary was delighted with this notion, and began
to fancy the whole vegetable creation a succession
of flowery wreaths, linked together into an end-
less chain, until she recollected that there are
flowerless plants as well as flowering ones.

“T see a flower in yonder hedge,” said her
father, ‘which will illustrate our next tribe. It
is a slender, weak-looking plant, but covered with
tiny yellow blossoms.”

Robert ran to get it, and he knew at a distance
that it must be the plant his mamma called
Galiwm, or crosswort bed straw. ‘I know what
it is,” said he, as he came running back, “ and
I know what its relations are, for mamma told me
THE GALIUM TRIBE. 177

to look at its leaves, which grow round the stem
like a star, and then she showed me some sweet
woodruff, and some cleavers, or goose-grass, which
grow just the same.”

‘* Then you already know a very striking mark of
the whole tribe, in which these whorls of leaves
growing on square stems are, I believe, universal.
The most important plants in it are the different
kinds of madder, which afford a valuable dye ;
nevertheless, I dare say Mary places sweet wood-
ruff foremost, because it makes her wardrobe
smell like new-mown hay. Do you remember,
Henry, the old-fashioned way of spelling wood-
ruff?”

“Yes, papa, it is this. Double u~ double o
double d ¢ & o double u double f ¢, making woodde-
rowfe ; but mamma says it was sometimes called
wood-rowel, because the leaves stand out round the
stem, like the rowels of a spur.”


178

CONVERSATION XII.

EXOGENS.

UMBELLIFEROUS—-IVY — CORNEL—WITCH-HAZEL—SANDALWORT
—LORANTH, AND BIRTHWORT TRIBES.

As the earlier spring flowers disappeared, the
fields, hedges, and ditches began to display great
numbers of what the children were taught to call
umbelliferous flowers. These had their small
blossoms arranged at the end of little rays, all
spreading out from the stem like the spokes of an
umbrella, forming what it is called an umbel; and
they generally bore at the end of each principal
ray a number of smaller rays, making altogether
what is called a compound umbel.

As most of these plants come into blossom at the
same time, the children were desired to collect as
many different kinds as possible; and when their
father examined them, he found wild carrot and
celery, and several species of parsnip and parsley,
besides archangel and hemlock. “Some of these
plants,” he said, “in their cultivated state are
UMBELLIFEROUS PLANTS. 179

very useful to us as vegetables, but they are not
safe otherwise. Celery, for instance, in its wild
state is poisonous, and even under cultivation only
that part is wholesome which has been blanched by
covering it from the light. I am not aware that
any thing can be said against wild carrot and
parsnip, but fatal accidents have arisen from
persons eating what they thought was the root of
one of these, but which really proved to be that
of the hemlock water drop-wort*, a_ highly
dangerous plant, having a yellowish juice in its
root and stems. Fools’ parsley t+ and common
hemlock + are also most dangerous plants; a poor
boy who ate a small portion of the root of water
hemlock § died in an hour and a half, and [ am
told that it is sometimes fatal to cows who eat of
it when they go down to rivulets to drink. Hap-
pily, it is not a very common plant, or we should
more frequently hear of accidents from it.”

The children did not get a very favourable idea
of umbelliferous plants from what their father
said, but they remembered that there were some
pleasant exceptions in caraway, coriander, and a

* Cinanthe crocata. + Ethusa cynapium.

t Conium maculatum. § Cicuta virosa.

wn 2
180 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

few other plants which they had raised in their
own gardens, by planting some of the seeds out of
their mamma’s spice-box.



HEMLOCK.
“T can show you a plant which has its blossoms

in a simple umbel, and yet belongs to another
THE IVY TRIBE. 18]

tribe,” said their father, pointing to the ivy on the
garden wall. ‘The Ivy tribe is generally more



woody of growth, and more harmless in qualities
than its neighbour; many of the families are
tropical, and one of them produces the ginseng
root, so much prized by the Chinese for its warm
and pleasant flavour, but which you must not con-
found with ginger. In the ivy tribe is Mary’s
182 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.



A)



TUBEROUS MOSCHATEL.
ENDLESS CHAIN OF VEGETABLE LIFE. 1838

‘dear little plant,’ as she calls the little moscha-
tel *, with its humble growth, and curious little
cluster of yellowish green flowers. Following the
ivy, come the cornels and the witch-hazels; but
these tribes of small trees, or shrubs, will not
detain us, for I must now dwell for a few moments
on three tribes which resemble each other in having
no petals, as well as in other more important bota-
nical particulars: they are the Sandalworts—one
producing the sandal-wood of commerce; the
Loranths, a tribe of parasites, one of which is our
common miseltoe; and the Birthworts, curious
plants, of which you may find one specimen in the
common birthwort of our woods and thickets.
With these humble and comparatively unimpor-
tant tribes, I conclude my task, and release you
from a subject in which I must confess you have
been more interested than I could have hoped or
expected.”

‘“‘ Dear papa,” said Mary, ‘I am sure we are all
sorry, and not glad, to be released from the sub-
ject; and I am very much disappointed that you
are come to the end so soon, for I thought we
should go on hearing of plants that were more and

* Adoxa Moschellatina.
184 FIRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

more beautiful and curious, until we came to some-
thing quite grand and wonderful at last.”

“ Instead of which,” said her father, ‘‘ it is here
that the two extremities of the chain meet, so that
at the very place where you expected the highest
and most perfect forms, there is on the contrary a
return towards the earliest and simplest. For in-
stance, the last tribe I have mentioned is one
which declines so much from the structure of an
exogen towards that of an endogen, that it seems
just fitted to occupy that point where we may
suppose the chain to return into itself, making up
the endless series of vegetable forms. And what-
ever arrangement we follow, the same thing must
to a great extent take place.”

‘“‘ If we are come to the place we set out from,”
said Mary, ‘‘I really should like to begin again,
and go overall the tribes a second time.”

“Try to do so amongst yourselves,” said her
father, “and when you are at a loss, apply to me.
I am most anxious you should all acquire the love
of plants, and the power to recognize them and to
tell their history, for I know it will be for your good.”

“It is very pleasant,” said Robert; ‘ but what
particular good will it dous?”

9

/
STUDY OF PLANTS RECOMMENDED. 185

‘‘Tt will add new pleasures to your youth; it
will be a great relief and recreation amidst the
cares of middle age; and it will be a light and
pleasant employment for old age, if it should please
God to prolong your life.”

“And then it will always make our walks
amusing,” said Mary, “for we shall never go out
without finding something to notice, or to carry
home for drying ; and when we go to a new place,
how pleasant it will be to find plants that we had
never seen before! Do you remember, Henry,
how delighted we were when we first saw the
horned poppy on the shore, near Brighton?”

“Yes.” said her brother; ‘‘ but I should have
been much better pleased if the leaves had not
turned black in drying. But, papa,” he continued,
‘T do not understand how old people can take much
pleasure in botany. They generally stay at home
a great deal, and do not often travel, so that they
cannot have much chance of finding new plants.”

“JT assure you,” replied his father, “ that old
people, and even sick people, if they have culti-
vated this taste in their youth, find it a great re-
source in the season of their infirmity. An invalid
lady once made a very beautiful collection of
" a i i i i

186 ¥IRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

plants while confined for a long period to her
couch, and this she managed by sending a servant
to collect considerable quantities every day, from
which she selected those that were worth drying. A
valued friend of our own was cheered to her dying
hour, by a remarkable love of flowers, in which I
believe she saw emblems of that pure and sinless
state on which, through the merits of her Re-
deemer, she has now entered. And with respect
to the aged, nothing I can say will give you so
good an idea of the value of this sort of knowledge
to them, as a beautiful passage which I have read
in Mr. Swainson’s ‘ Discourse on the Study of
Natural History. Speaking of the old age of a
true naturalist—that is, one who looks from the
created to the Creator, he says, ‘Although no
longer fit for active exertion, we can still fancy
him contemplating his collections, the acquisitions
of his youth and the study of his manhood, with
that complacency which we feel towards an old
companion. Every object in his little museum has
its own story; the scenes and incidents of youth
are brought back to his recollection in all their
freshness; and the memory, dwelling on these
green spots in the desert of life, will oftentimes be
FEELINGS OF THE TRUE NATURALIST. 187

prevented from recalling others of a less cheering
nature. He looks abroad in the spring of the
year, and sees the face of nature renewed with the
same beauty and freshness as when he contem-
plated her in the spring of youth. That season of
his life has long passed away, but he knows that
he too will be renewed,—that Ais winter will be
changed to an eternal spring; and with firm but
humble confidence in the promises of his God, he
resigns the contemplation of his sublunary works,
in the sure and certain hope of seeing those which
are heavenly.’ ”

END OF PART IV.



ee ,

GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, PRINTERS, ST. JOHN’S SQUA RE, LONDON,


TRST STEPS IN GENERAL KNOWLEDGE.

THIS SERIES IS NOW COMPLETED IN FIVE PARTS,

Part I. THE STARRY HEAVENS.
Il. THE SURFACE OF THE EARTH.
Ill. THE ANIMAL KINGDOM.
IV. THE VEGETABLE KINGDOM.
V. THE MINERAL KINGDOM.



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'8757' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYK' 'sip-files00001thm.jpg'
4f7195b753ca5cd4066e4713d585a355
d6fe873bce42fbcad0513c7429017c7292f0b8b1
'2012-03-31T23:16:06-04:00'
describe
'379395' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYL' 'sip-files00002.jp2'
c95a418235742bbd315c44de3ff31b60
becd42ad200f6b8efc2f83b14ffcfa5adc91949c
'2012-03-31T23:16:02-04:00'
describe
'9853' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYM' 'sip-files00002.jpg'
85d7a18b54af5e731f262392438b6428
9a89891afaa06b09afdd9908e7c6435159fa80e5
'2012-03-31T23:18:57-04:00'
describe
'2930' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYN' 'sip-files00002.QC.jpg'
d55b4d272b1b98937fdc02628cae6904
19b8dc537499b59ef9de8bf14b78f277cb35603d
'2012-03-31T23:17:40-04:00'
describe
'6833561' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYO' 'sip-files00002.tif'
353c8eff1a5a9b25963ef92de7c4ef5f
7f6cf394c4e3e4b7477ab555f348b176fdd3d52e
'2012-03-31T23:14:38-04:00'
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYP' 'sip-files00002thm.jpg'
67efa6da500cdcd0632ee9e32579c645
2e85ac8010995d936d8a58bf7b3ab41b1732513f
'2012-03-31T23:16:18-04:00'
describe
'632140' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYQ' 'sip-files00003.jp2'
fac2193e7af0ffdbe0e2dfe7bd32a909
2a8ca7a2d0f8a3c26268cd5c1299257ea8079e58
'2012-03-31T23:19:41-04:00'
describe
'37209' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYR' 'sip-files00003.jpg'
fb7e7327887c69416f3f3f9f13afddcc
1a2879cde9047a1fcbc1c4267a9d3fd1a97a36b1
'2012-03-31T23:20:58-04:00'
describe
'11234' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYS' 'sip-files00003.pro'
413013f0bfa5be82b981e974c2441463
e41ec1023ffd2ca97a8599a693298e6b7d298ce1
'2012-03-31T23:19:14-04:00'
describe
'13126' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYT' 'sip-files00003.QC.jpg'
b87a1c4b3e7a811a5a3a7fd90fe909fe
b4c161300a07f639bbe64ce5e5c8c0baba9d8068
'2012-03-31T23:14:57-04:00'
describe
'6529423' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYU' 'sip-files00003.tif'
130636727065cbc489f6380224b1beef
ae274257d6ad4d1ae6d3d14ab311f8b7ef7b6d6c
'2012-03-31T23:17:42-04:00'
describe
'702' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYV' 'sip-files00003.txt'
44421e8826de2786e873e3d4de564a88
acccbd62c5ade3b2e15b91de970db3c0907de483
'2012-03-31T23:20:40-04:00'
describe
'3983' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYW' 'sip-files00003thm.jpg'
cfe9ba2b9e4a191e000e2678e318270b
18cab2699c8c6abe37c66c91b97b06774aa109ee
'2012-03-31T23:20:52-04:00'
describe
'411576' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYX' 'sip-files00004.jp2'
0ce7c1749d4714a56d2fa236adcfa9d7
77f7417c980e3d2b2d5d644bbb01928ec060b57c
'2012-03-31T23:17:11-04:00'
describe
'13627' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYY' 'sip-files00004.jpg'
3456f0c9c3d218ead293ec6d18e05fde
772d4bc0e3fd019801f89f746eabc91344dff2c8
'2012-03-31T23:16:52-04:00'
describe
'1814' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKYZ' 'sip-files00004.pro'
a6ca937592e77c692fe78a2ac3d5efe2
83c8e5e8deb9a84dce23325d1afaa15cda03ac0c
'2012-03-31T23:15:26-04:00'
describe
'4679' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZA' 'sip-files00004.QC.jpg'
0c6f4ba3ddf6e43d04d4018fd66ee216
2207b2357925ab8c9a66d466d8a9a7bdc4161a37
'2012-03-31T23:15:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZB' 'sip-files00004.tif'
4183f4257013f5916832ea35435aad47
2cfe2605829d02d59bd46da84f68a88c661c30b5
'2012-03-31T23:18:36-04:00'
describe
'144' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZC' 'sip-files00004.txt'
a9f62e5fd44513c3ca27bdf7fb51e1d7
4f2fdbac36896aa277ddfbe4449cb150222fb1d4
'2012-03-31T23:20:37-04:00'
describe
'1631' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZD' 'sip-files00004thm.jpg'
ecca584feb6f463ea974650b95e657fc
7eeac057bd72c024fd339b7c7febb5748b7d8390
'2012-03-31T23:19:10-04:00'
describe
'651416' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZE' 'sip-files00005.jp2'
9792500293a190ee43758321d1f9e7c2
efc8a47b086108cf19e4a01a70476da9ce396ae2
'2012-03-31T23:21:20-04:00'
describe
'43484' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZF' 'sip-files00005.jpg'
48b5c220d01e833d3410d242a034f5a2
25120a341450b52a78f2dae8c63b24757c9a1b0e
'2012-03-31T23:17:47-04:00'
describe
'22838' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZG' 'sip-files00005.pro'
767f63b55a16d25e4a3faea90c0004ba
a83ce991e823952666e8e5b4c41fe75ba5d395c8
'2012-03-31T23:16:24-04:00'
describe
'16113' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZH' 'sip-files00005.QC.jpg'
79dbfb42392ab82029c618a35fe6bfea
2047e7760558f04e864b339a2f5ac6317a951054
'2012-03-31T23:18:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZI' 'sip-files00005.tif'
7fe7c0cc114e9cb246ede902729f4f6a
e68687b628e5f94f1f23922334f0e71217792f12
'2012-03-31T23:18:10-04:00'
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZJ' 'sip-files00005.txt'
b881af8a5db5031e97b00b9da9eef15b
f65e86e097d48008b8a963e184ecbf382151f6d6
'2012-03-31T23:17:01-04:00'
describe
'4596' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZK' 'sip-files00005thm.jpg'
eb288c36919b09b885ba7e358e5c307f
0a9ab49669b904731ea40ece71cb157e92715f84
'2012-03-31T23:21:05-04:00'
describe
'623843' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZL' 'sip-files00006.jp2'
d7837766887ebc4328e45b3449355b5a
e976697ffdaca7d788637ce11fb2dda4c112540f
'2012-03-31T23:19:16-04:00'
describe
'39136' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZM' 'sip-files00006.jpg'
937d7a8c4b2e7e153b977c30c00ad96e
3f59713b1130ec2ba2787509de2631ecfe04092b
'2012-03-31T23:15:25-04:00'
describe
'19290' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZN' 'sip-files00006.pro'
10ddf7d84f63d8714269a2effe85da2d
ce79399d888f33d3f427ca3736a52a589fb80764
'2012-03-31T23:19:42-04:00'
describe
'14001' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZO' 'sip-files00006.QC.jpg'
e9c913a11b00ca192ef751a33e0bb93b
fc4200a9aa93a441c483d673828e4b9f9707dc88
'2012-03-31T23:18:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZP' 'sip-files00006.tif'
f7665ba2ad73fc702bb34529c5def298
6ceb13d52167203aa24309444223c2324102677a
'2012-03-31T23:21:31-04:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZQ' 'sip-files00006.txt'
0b866e03dfcb63cc8b04540a6528d803
43ca0364e071471c7315f64e32bc65740565af8e
'2012-03-31T23:20:13-04:00'
describe
'3954' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZR' 'sip-files00006thm.jpg'
c519c9344a663f8ff1959b0ff260ba8b
df2bca655a5ad874854e0e55bbf90f8a344fb663
'2012-03-31T23:18:18-04:00'
describe
'724046' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZS' 'sip-files00007.jp2'
81d8a1428d72ba0df210961da3bb8ad0
d383900d2aa20512a1c7e1f486c319284730f9a6
'2012-03-31T23:18:15-04:00'
describe
'55669' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZT' 'sip-files00007.jpg'
fb52218bfbff79cdab7557213b2c8897
f7ae924c155bdf713355b9c9c9c8b31e8683bddc
describe
'15628' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZU' 'sip-files00007.pro'
102694f937443ada0f5f17d2ba637361
08065b73792cfd4c731d193b0fcb44d2d707c17f
'2012-03-31T23:20:00-04:00'
describe
'20689' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZV' 'sip-files00007.QC.jpg'
3a517fb7900f16aa90c30ee4dbc5e89c
7677925d4cb245f218566f24af270e5e177d1b91
'2012-03-31T23:16:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZW' 'sip-files00007.tif'
02d91891c24c5a3b550b0d5508bca9e4
f67816973057c7058e7962fb96505e5c45465ea3
'2012-03-31T23:17:41-04:00'
describe
'697' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZX' 'sip-files00007.txt'
d988d18ff97d3cb5a6f01bd219a6473f
b358804e5923aa347cc4c28cc267f0005e05f727
'2012-03-31T23:17:37-04:00'
describe
'5937' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZY' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
499c8b6140eed7d18d7fdcf4a38e0210
d3fcd1d1e2468dfa4edb495b33c9a968ff04a9ae
'2012-03-31T23:14:52-04:00'
describe
'853222' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAKZZ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
11f22514df018d3d7873dfb45ed663a0
0738ee4ec03f3db1afb5af545c90f4b699458833
'2012-03-31T23:16:11-04:00'
describe
'89766' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAA' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
f2ec0f99d3ccf2154f4bd86aa7197fa5
76b13585e10953c9b430defc8efab6fa6eecbc97
'2012-03-31T23:20:34-04:00'
describe
'31241' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAB' 'sip-files00008.pro'
bf065f37c6432f4aff035ffead7b7f47
a4bcd6cc9a71e9a2de993c43e1eefa3ba7b9bb3a
describe
'33576' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAC' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
3af207d1aebc4cad39e843fb4840e084
a6a6b90f6bf5beaeb79606c1e300dbb9713db1ee
'2012-03-31T23:15:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAD' 'sip-files00008.tif'
f8e244ffada73c69cc33f7378d64e45e
7b87721229e11927caa99e07b7909e71e676d9db
'2012-03-31T23:15:39-04:00'
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAE' 'sip-files00008.txt'
7e68972efa27c73d4f68561b894d02f1
eb5f7ee99f9bfac8c80450761099fb8ed18131ae
'2012-03-31T23:19:47-04:00'
describe
'9240' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAF' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
484100a34021e0b56b1cb3bc4b13e9d6
abb52af15b19cbde01802c71c70ef78bc012c855
'2012-03-31T23:15:54-04:00'
describe
'815204' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAG' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
8f8cd45f2975b00319b70a29ec0901d6
da5c749a9067d8df9d6244c400d53934faeb2db1
'2012-03-31T23:19:35-04:00'
describe
'91175' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAH' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
ef1e7addeb47f4b508fde4717fab35f4
52fa8974d3316b785e28b52b595cec85d2719808
'2012-03-31T23:18:35-04:00'
describe
'30745' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAI' 'sip-files00009.pro'
aeb389e67942436fc25b19771dd027f2
38e9d6c403cdae1976885e6bc8d478063eec4d5c
'2012-03-31T23:18:52-04:00'
describe
'34409' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAJ' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
42f5393648b7d4d84d7c864f2dc8ae08
fdb4bc0c7437dba9e6efa32e44b2cc2f0be8a180
'2012-03-31T23:21:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAK' 'sip-files00009.tif'
909ce0ba2ec6a00934e8389baf7217aa
60209f49cf6a5f2e3abae3761d1a59ae9bcc2b8a
'2012-03-31T23:21:03-04:00'
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAL' 'sip-files00009.txt'
573bea7916c293d366b7ea76446b9885
4e9a07106aa9f4eaf2a6cd16b37ff81204bf33b7
'2012-03-31T23:16:31-04:00'
describe
'9239' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAM' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
3199d273ec920c7ff3db634193613519
55081a10bf623b390609c6886dfb5f073d93f854
'2012-03-31T23:19:06-04:00'
describe
'853216' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAN' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
d6ea7585ff39aa7bfb188a039570bfe9
c1ccf1449697dcb0fd6d40e83b34322c227ecebf
'2012-03-31T23:15:05-04:00'
describe
'78564' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAO' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
18736c402daeaaefb0a3c54625585149
358ff6ec9b78bdcf2b34c411799c7f6dad4dd7b6
'2012-03-31T23:16:10-04:00'
describe
'27834' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAP' 'sip-files00010.pro'
48d77422d3868ec395f1932f9b61ecbc
d0c8bec6643e2fb276eb1ca4384f63c33b926170
'2012-03-31T23:19:46-04:00'
describe
'29860' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAQ' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
2274ac8f96ea7f80726bbe53fe759012
af41cd1e02fe0f36887a616e15862ec4d92e3f1a
'2012-03-31T23:16:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAR' 'sip-files00010.tif'
bd06d9d0622c684c9b2cbeaea664a1fa
b2c60ab81b5e34469a70f39cb4ed476e90205373
'2012-03-31T23:21:26-04:00'
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAS' 'sip-files00010.txt'
fd57bfc0ee2ca7edf947d4eb9fc6016a
04cded7a3b9af5930dfbf755deb85af6390e339e
'2012-03-31T23:19:57-04:00'
describe
'8573' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAT' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
8f137af23d84f2e1fe64dd0729a684db
d8f4ff30909dbfc777e92e5644933df5a5d31a46
'2012-03-31T23:21:25-04:00'
describe
'815217' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAU' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
f16c2991b25a580dc3d85879ccd600cf
6f265ae88b17be5e78db02e32dfdbaeac5618ee7
'2012-03-31T23:17:53-04:00'
describe
'86516' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAV' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
d01f73eedbaf779efb34ae78e4b46321
c6231038c80c1211f43cd38c19fe481705a0b603
'2012-03-31T23:18:50-04:00'
describe
'30092' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAW' 'sip-files00011.pro'
c5efc2ba4cffb729dc39a98d9c20a4d9
6b56fb8f7f6564ac8b6c27a92038504e4bff4caf
'2012-03-31T23:14:39-04:00'
describe
'32911' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAX' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
2ae9e2a7e8a51379c593dc14afb07df0
661503aa7b27fe404b0c861c61a625ee4fed1ae7
'2012-03-31T23:18:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAY' 'sip-files00011.tif'
0b1fa24eb045921d94cee70f9948297a
768d5d6bd3db4478912a273cfc77023e72df57db
'2012-03-31T23:20:49-04:00'
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALAZ' 'sip-files00011.txt'
30399696cf450639811640c536ea1314
45a86d8a449b129f10cdeb8911d97d001f483220
'2012-03-31T23:21:28-04:00'
describe
'8884' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBA' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
d86dfd6f83a521d91db0f01e206cf72d
e3862daafdc9ad3182c95e6848d0b8a95d7a9529
'2012-03-31T23:18:23-04:00'
describe
'853206' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBB' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
1107a8cabdd19d34567ac016928d887d
5b03a8696da82d66f746d3461dd4ce970c43e01f
'2012-03-31T23:17:25-04:00'
describe
'92459' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBC' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
8b9367985410c363017569524f925575
6a328215e996b80a158bd1ee293a370b39f4471b
'2012-03-31T23:20:28-04:00'
describe
'31875' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBD' 'sip-files00012.pro'
048dbc83290d5969257ec2c4e7e0b494
29753f3448b929b7f6a845fff083b4bce841bdab
'2012-03-31T23:16:54-04:00'
describe
'34770' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBE' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
989c97feee24de1100e26ac9ccb96664
c3fd2063af3eefbfed6ba30745934bd35c672237
'2012-03-31T23:17:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBF' 'sip-files00012.tif'
d319fd97f1cd7ce0db8eca652f9a41b6
13de709a5eedd703e28b3917ea77182c64c3c76d
'2012-03-31T23:19:19-04:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBG' 'sip-files00012.txt'
c9f654ff2ed2c2cb5b3c90c2c068f187
6c0a94b3d8fd533cef3e2529b075f6a274f312de
'2012-03-31T23:19:02-04:00'
describe
'9173' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBH' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
4642ea9ba48247c1063c1d968437996f
4bef403c5e62a55fff45e2cd60dba48dd04fdbcc
'2012-03-31T23:18:13-04:00'
describe
'815171' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBI' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
e7f238b4b1d46141ee7ba8de0d7814e9
75b6690772ae9c592347c201aa8cee96922f98da
'2012-03-31T23:14:42-04:00'
describe
'55999' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBJ' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
ec3f3b7a47b08a063d923cc4fc26060d
ca5932b67715855654919555ec596e5ecf35d826
describe
'4579' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBK' 'sip-files00013.pro'
b52745d20f0b4f06b278d416adab1f59
c4822ea29429b75c3a919583d0aacc440e1698ca
'2012-03-31T23:20:57-04:00'
describe
'19313' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBL' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
3c32e24db49fee4c328d755cfea196e0
da7511fe233882102dc4c897f431819746da399d
'2012-03-31T23:20:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBM' 'sip-files00013.tif'
dc6687cf13fc69715f77d97605206aa9
f07c769a872435e1c3c0b551f4fef11cccf0bdbe
'2012-03-31T23:14:53-04:00'
describe
'230' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBN' 'sip-files00013.txt'
a1ace561d2d09d1130750c0bf6a8c0df
d34109a5860111329fe001fffd50225a0701d015
'2012-03-31T23:21:21-04:00'
describe
'6174' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBO' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
034d9e047e8a8470520842a3ce8d5a42
a57975e595304dc9645034eec1a65d72946f408d
'2012-03-31T23:20:50-04:00'
describe
'853198' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBP' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
b0761cd255a646ac214d287a1998f95d
722ffc19356ca822c186518dc1aa33f894e57abb
'2012-03-31T23:20:23-04:00'
describe
'87536' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBQ' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
c9df2d80491d962b08fd2d44b692a908
ae8bef41cc80048fb260216f081e5163c9d5b47d
'2012-03-31T23:15:37-04:00'
describe
'30593' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBR' 'sip-files00014.pro'
96d85e9da75629dba6921200766ae787
f4b80a8a2edfebd93e1cd9c6843075e2f86b9707
'2012-03-31T23:17:49-04:00'
describe
'32888' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBS' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
be30eb0b003bcb7bc342a98e12f4b3a4
2bdde0202681c0a5a8146da4feccae4c9935d557
'2012-03-31T23:15:04-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBT' 'sip-files00014.tif'
dbcdf81cda873b5d7b7db0c5366b3dbe
1eb9e7ea24a56f82d5d90d4891bd13623866c251
describe
'1223' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBU' 'sip-files00014.txt'
826ffc215d9fdb4ef7100ad77f7beb8d
12f02bfefe26ac948c08f0516bbf1d3bec6ba8cb
'2012-03-31T23:19:54-04:00'
describe
'9057' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBV' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
971689a8a64505c0f8cda5051a0ed519
fa621c13f3262517807f845127bbed63dedaebdf
'2012-03-31T23:18:32-04:00'
describe
'815211' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBW' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
24613f71cf91dcd35a5ff34ac3377d07
2f43c4bc4b3264cc08b7cd7682da69ba36922894
'2012-03-31T23:18:12-04:00'
describe
'89999' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBX' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
09c063c92b49f64ac198b981ce6e5a90
82fb3a345d6d09f520359b582f5771edfec219c7
'2012-03-31T23:21:06-04:00'
describe
'30349' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBY' 'sip-files00015.pro'
76debef9ac71f85a7bdc92bbd3d9703f
c9c416597c307ef29edb8226a3c5c58eab1500c7
'2012-03-31T23:21:33-04:00'
describe
'34329' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALBZ' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
344dde9d83de9e4cc81865e6871a5bcc
79c7c3d64e6bb96ae938a0863725c94f4bd776ff
'2012-03-31T23:15:07-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCA' 'sip-files00015.tif'
a186c3157c5016319a99ce0bb97046e9
6643422c7e67e0c12ccae3b2736eb0701b00ae8d
'2012-03-31T23:21:24-04:00'
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCB' 'sip-files00015.txt'
59f92db4268520ec498241e4018f05b7
af2d658273241ea2ecd38dbb90242eb4186fecb9
describe
'8875' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCC' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
521d227817aad99d297e105464f9cc85
e9d0a31b443e10a900ff201042b292d1a3775114
'2012-03-31T23:19:33-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCD' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
b560631f23784af0336be972e9c57ce6
7f9cdaf9ff26d401e04980076ebac4b2d779111d
describe
'64623' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCE' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
a24fdb0901ca1321116b8523235f8a47
e783b3004edf60404cf74fe4d5ef1b90a1a09a9b
'2012-03-31T23:17:31-04:00'
describe
'14283' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCF' 'sip-files00016.pro'
02b0cb3e5002e389bf607ffffc272d60
0503a2a0e5c25b338da793c2896b135ca3dd7610
'2012-03-31T23:14:37-04:00'
describe
'23047' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCG' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
532d7aeebb878a971277cb7d5c6c4e94
86fed5b84ff9f337d699a8fc78749844f02dbfa6
'2012-03-31T23:18:00-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCH' 'sip-files00016.tif'
a6ed99f8a1b9883f86feaa708c70dff1
9b89861cbf2195400d98f707502ae080a134df66
'2012-03-31T23:14:46-04:00'
describe
'598' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCI' 'sip-files00016.txt'
217ce9926814927df40038d07f89c416
aa5f285733ccad68e3b19fd0c9aa1f8a066714bc
'2012-03-31T23:15:10-04:00'
describe
'6965' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCJ' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
07e280fc9e5a595d971c622ced6425c2
f9e032fe9ed3247924e3a35d5410b920ba359da1
describe
'815216' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCK' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
29b2d9077b3c29df51618ae8719ac41c
e4bc65bbaa1613f84279d828912245dd17c3d91e
describe
'72955' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCL' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
eb304139697f8a32fd55d8b23bca0373
95a1ade107db06a07096d9fa647c4164d8bf4091
'2012-03-31T23:16:46-04:00'
describe
'14052' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCM' 'sip-files00017.pro'
d6abbbeef84e4b83c54486c3164cd3a5
d762e16e613c8333f914f53e15cc99cc9bdbdea9
describe
'25349' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCN' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
1ff3244ee3b207706d49d004348b276a
91635bab681940a7baa72c7e6024faa963471cb5
'2012-03-31T23:17:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCO' 'sip-files00017.tif'
480aa5e28d21560e633729110247684d
0e928f385450d463caaad8d7ca69e551f3bbbb82
'2012-03-31T23:16:47-04:00'
describe
'606' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCP' 'sip-files00017.txt'
3cc991d8396f15c0258faa460db2a9d2
7231f19f07677be666612dc3715bd9d767434fe2
describe
'6907' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCQ' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
05c8754434c2df818edecc9bb1db2a1d
808f6ea4c0f4d006e0ce932ffbb36c144066947e
'2012-03-31T23:16:43-04:00'
describe
'853067' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCR' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
e5501e7e2e8392292f6c3dd5dc7f8e0f
e0f5bdf75ad5a76c23e90e98ecaf37a6c242ccc5
'2012-03-31T23:20:25-04:00'
describe
'70743' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCS' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
f974dc0c3564f2cdce5dc2b7df5f6725
54f5f2c1c0040b4b8f15f4ec03cbd048fabdd2d6
'2012-03-31T23:18:45-04:00'
describe
'13469' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCT' 'sip-files00018.pro'
2fe32419d7c883ad046cecb23de6b6a1
91c008d6580959d0dcbf4591566ab00eaecfe1b3
'2012-03-31T23:21:12-04:00'
describe
'24124' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCU' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
8461da18b747081873e52f730a2b7474
d3dd932db12b06ba10da79956d15cad371a748a0
'2012-03-31T23:16:32-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCV' 'sip-files00018.tif'
43cf92b3981a94d6e94d24eca4d942d4
fe6eca99719a1f896c074d4ebd6178d69d406178
'2012-03-31T23:20:32-04:00'
describe
'593' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCW' 'sip-files00018.txt'
c8036dcac2aa8c7eef0d69e13b4449bb
2b5194f4936c6931247fa4cb3dfc8c5685b10a59
'2012-03-31T23:15:48-04:00'
describe
'6845' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCX' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
959aaf566c3c73f95443887f4eb366a8
7d26b217431845edb06a91fca842001f33c518aa
'2012-03-31T23:15:36-04:00'
describe
'815225' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCY' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
b35cd3333c1f9991a1e884f79ee96ce3
38a6644448829e123739bda54f000464f362e603
'2012-03-31T23:19:07-04:00'
describe
'86252' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALCZ' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
20bef59a87673169f7c0d744415f0984
405cdec852e40ff4579511392d8ef0a1e0d8f346
'2012-03-31T23:20:19-04:00'
describe
'29218' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDA' 'sip-files00019.pro'
4ad6fccc87b974cdff073d8ab467c0d9
30b1f57a6e4784f73f0eecf063b487f4fac2d23a
describe
'32364' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDB' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
57cb7618b9246a10d1732e0da0c87a79
aff067d2bbf4598ff079aaddffa37394991046f6
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDC' 'sip-files00019.tif'
d86abef0c66e6a564e7e2ff51d897cfc
c1039881147ada800b204e03f540c3e61fbeb8dd
'2012-03-31T23:18:19-04:00'
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDD' 'sip-files00019.txt'
9624e8085cb5b6a1ac9845fcd77ef211
8c581427100bb6c7512fced3f500947c154e9e20
'2012-03-31T23:16:26-04:00'
describe
'9043' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDE' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
f5269fc3acf196aeaa4aeb2ee4a521b9
7c7d26338ff8a7c2d87b8d51104c1e55a8e61e35
'2012-03-31T23:17:05-04:00'
describe
'853172' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDF' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
88451682d4bd4e5f65d42690ea646528
de4956ca4fb2db3f983554d780fa4c34fddc856c
'2012-03-31T23:20:43-04:00'
describe
'80230' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDG' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
9652ad96ea949f14fcc86f9e88b058ca
6d437affec89f29eeb7f551720c96e7b8a647c45
'2012-03-31T23:15:57-04:00'
describe
'32004' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDH' 'sip-files00020.pro'
0518348269fcb38395b7e91481bb8501
8df7e1d1d965bb2dbbe3d72521ac0d228ec804d4
describe
'29648' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDI' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
f88b1213a6b53aa4caa5a7a6972a33de
f8d3abfa91e24c6ffb91cc0852a7bf5e555d369c
'2012-03-31T23:21:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDJ' 'sip-files00020.tif'
b13c32ea6a4bed832fdd88c371e31803
9a8308c831053030b4f77ca76462f00a48823048
describe
'1402' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDK' 'sip-files00020.txt'
4d8a05b95d81b37a5319bed67965323a
5974b8b96ce42a0fc9d7ecbd61f09560e93b0e0c
describe
'8083' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDL' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
1834ae492b7c5802d0ffac5ea6020221
2ab89783d1ecd62a28b6851c2f6a7f876743be99
'2012-03-31T23:19:15-04:00'
describe
'815196' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDM' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
9adca058aa2c55904a4947720b782776
650bfcae81bebaef934d441e55f27c6f6c7be390
'2012-03-31T23:15:09-04:00'
describe
'85279' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDN' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
aa2ebf929de8f999f455585767f82a21
83686db1a9d37a32ba4253c6f57d72987b063b14
'2012-03-31T23:18:08-04:00'
describe
'29385' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDO' 'sip-files00021.pro'
229a6c2abec291219c2217e8c458f5dc
56d910f59d87f16954d782562676c58817896cf8
'2012-03-31T23:17:54-04:00'
describe
'32276' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDP' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
965702e27f0395e8f03386c5f1a47de6
1aa49c40b196d5375795328e69188153cae940b3
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDQ' 'sip-files00021.tif'
44e03bd4574e93470da4e45410d5ba88
7cb0bcadfcdbcfbc64bbe82784c4a2e2f25cc69c
'2012-03-31T23:19:44-04:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDR' 'sip-files00021.txt'
ea8abfdbd5dd1138d78dc6129ef94e51
c887355c07973e194e2c6981b6a2a1e00d6cbf21
describe
'8829' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDS' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
f8779a68d1ebd4ab57afcfd64e14ba2a
2a7048c2b94cbbf6536823df514fbb344a36225a
'2012-03-31T23:17:33-04:00'
describe
'824796' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDT' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
3df1a2b4ff4bb8c1c133ae602d527099
996c89003c47fcab47707e2bc511315df876d73c
'2012-03-31T23:17:24-04:00'
describe
'86601' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDU' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
dec9b77be4feb594bad0fef345bd7239
9715fbd3e1679d936cbcbe518532ffbde94d6708
describe
'30803' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDV' 'sip-files00022.pro'
bf98b4ea7765384a9f2ba7a398c94c6a
0618bb0ae6baf5cfa474ad580d24bd4188ddddb2
'2012-03-31T23:16:37-04:00'
describe
'33179' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDW' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
435a2e162f33c01da7455dae053fd958
9b5778684275409b7ca0fd6c27aafda987aef746
'2012-03-31T23:19:55-04:00'
describe
'6606071' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDX' 'sip-files00022.tif'
0b72cc1c9ee1bfddc6645d2079cfea49
221010e90947851f41181ef8f98c048273b603bc
'2012-03-31T23:20:05-04:00'
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDY' 'sip-files00022.txt'
62991e166c95cea919a32dec89cc76da
9e9039689705be8d27ae04a8e7d399cca32204ae
describe
'8579' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALDZ' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
e5ba274df73c71da34cbd436f3106481
407ac39d1513731e510fb45ff8a20db65ff3786d
'2012-03-31T23:19:51-04:00'
describe
'803596' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEA' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
105f53109b39de3d8230857c81388182
df3fc19428773ab129ba1c399e9f58941a42c332
describe
'87230' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEB' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
93d658bdafc4cf856acb95917259643d
4fc55091e0a9716384f96bb790267d77639815c9
describe
'29753' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEC' 'sip-files00023.pro'
a410a711c315d36740b29ae3c6728777
b43984b0db295e3cc152dec44b3ac6a6b99c0a0c
'2012-03-31T23:19:59-04:00'
describe
'33077' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALED' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
056f9d12682d8f23b2f0035a551eb1f3
c9e3bbd721f60fc6c8cc6cdba9c49be91e250594
'2012-03-31T23:16:56-04:00'
describe
'6436405' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEE' 'sip-files00023.tif'
07a966bf91a497450964c9c91aa2c34d
c5b3de45689c3d4bd029df4e0a4edcb3e1622c11
'2012-03-31T23:20:30-04:00'
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEF' 'sip-files00023.txt'
5d146ffe4a6b75f2b248cdad33cd5cb3
b9dc6feb66fe730e65bea3fd69dc6482448ba16b
describe
'8850' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEG' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
e2035cd30cbc2e764164f36457087a2e
eee0a87d74674b3dc1fb5353a08d8eaab686a471
'2012-03-31T23:20:41-04:00'
describe
'824790' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEH' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
96b277db7ca533665ffe3134d6b48fab
0db1a38b12189c15910c0134a80c46f945971845
'2012-03-31T23:18:01-04:00'
describe
'91289' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEI' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
9c691ea7fa98831ad286683a32453784
3448e189a21db28b0fe60053c5b234586b64a960
'2012-03-31T23:15:51-04:00'
describe
'31554' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEJ' 'sip-files00024.pro'
a76415e139eb4994ad391e45376eb96f
b9790feb3c296c71b60b736179ee6de14c7708c6
describe
'34416' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEK' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
83e38dbfce17f0fd6e96f18fdf648f51
07386f5cd8474442818a0d5c9d6e5e95c18001e9
'2012-03-31T23:19:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEL' 'sip-files00024.tif'
ab538e015396e5f6f556d97f5039ea0c
1d2c9220c9a95162b1b70e477040003c81902547
'2012-03-31T23:17:50-04:00'
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEM' 'sip-files00024.txt'
c16e24871b4e3c1a90231b8a5716c3f8
be9203f8cab855a961b37d5e14f033af8cc85879
describe
'9039' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEN' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
a8d1746f3db765ab8567557fd0c87a04
0ac60657c81aeca2d53cd293b49fdfa72f2ec922
'2012-03-31T23:19:58-04:00'
describe
'803582' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEO' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
6c0ba7492de5fd06dbc811807f503132
01d8d911d6ba105d2e0d74b17ff5f778da002fd8
'2012-03-31T23:20:35-04:00'
describe
'91235' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEP' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
05e000bd934957e4ed03ebfd6a0e8878
f394eac611dd721b3bcf0102388cbcfb6e297886
'2012-03-31T23:14:55-04:00'
describe
'30090' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEQ' 'sip-files00025.pro'
9adaca8554bf87fb8379b157e48a1f0c
d2b3b2b2f3fad7b6b86b3c4c48c682aa5651f798
'2012-03-31T23:17:44-04:00'
describe
'34979' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALER' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
08200338a17d96d6b80d99fb3cff559d
d7581ddd3bb076da72297f36b032eda4450ab218
'2012-03-31T23:21:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALES' 'sip-files00025.tif'
edf58b64d8798a94c8af6d4897dd68fd
f799ef931b23920840e659efa5d12f9109ce8762
'2012-03-31T23:19:00-04:00'
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALET' 'sip-files00025.txt'
33918f18b2fc61829055cff68ccebc33
cf7a3771393265a78bb0fba452a0bf8b78cb7860
describe
'9445' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEU' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
c284203cc7bafab42965e516f6d012c2
2cdcba498f3f18670b768e9205d0c3de252bb096
'2012-03-31T23:18:53-04:00'
describe
'824789' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEV' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
9d031a8ccdd3ee48bdc6531e78b448c7
00514791ddf3d8abb583e99a1bedb1177abc5762
'2012-03-31T23:16:59-04:00'
describe
'76783' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEW' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
ed0a16088a999def1e208a51686a471f
f08c37187abe1a78d1130bb82e8c3832eb1a611a
'2012-03-31T23:15:41-04:00'
describe
'16182' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEX' 'sip-files00026.pro'
e28c6a7d35c261b26616b4364a4d531a
95612684aaea56b2b07777bcafa6684426db690f
'2012-03-31T23:15:17-04:00'
describe
'26726' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEY' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
d99eaa7d0ea334cb50593b4230626b56
39f282048ee360ca045f5b7e8d51e075914d50e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALEZ' 'sip-files00026.tif'
b442d90bba5d88576d57740af5d133c3
b259b40dd3cdf206821116e136f5f4f139406843
'2012-03-31T23:16:07-04:00'
describe
'710' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFA' 'sip-files00026.txt'
926ac899d4afa45201f65b91036f5403
47f5ab99af174c1335c02953ab450972a3dbfeb7
'2012-03-31T23:19:34-04:00'
describe
'7119' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFB' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
2c294fbe47824bafd29611058cc6b533
f64615817fe39339d0aa0d40a8bd7982dca215fd
'2012-03-31T23:15:16-04:00'
describe
'803573' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFC' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
efab63b6892dbee2742f784ad5d36e97
15f6120eb02ed223a5b093c0e8030b536c5a62a2
'2012-03-31T23:19:31-04:00'
describe
'77947' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFD' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
2241338c262543904b28588b1bdb0cb6
ff3b06f65f3b13315a54ac9b6ef7514118190edc
'2012-03-31T23:20:33-04:00'
describe
'25534' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFE' 'sip-files00027.pro'
5251ad4881f1c82643a06e4521ee09b4
6c0bb5994943f76351d17d97cb585110f06e1536
describe
'30173' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFF' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
c90a556c547ef8fd16f3eaf69ff4a075
4abe8bee015dd75126210484f6e2a77fd0036b07
'2012-03-31T23:19:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFG' 'sip-files00027.tif'
113f08e6181468eae64f159efb72114f
feb8ca6ea4212673bfb6b59f0fabc8e2df4cb46c
'2012-03-31T23:17:46-04:00'
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFH' 'sip-files00027.txt'
ae429e75a874e54160af7a92f202fbce
f5eeb5ac58af3f4f39981fb0c3fe7b74ebc316ff
'2012-03-31T23:21:15-04:00'
describe
'8201' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFI' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
a3f99189a628d7c9e53e80b7e384a62c
4214b3558668dba0044a289dc7f4786ecc802fda
describe
'824802' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFJ' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
d1574a32dad301bb40f80d2ca10a8c82
b968c978ca02340bd90f9daa14b5ce2fb3277455
'2012-03-31T23:15:40-04:00'
describe
'71271' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFK' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
c62abaeca68292f3889816a785ff24bb
ec50003f09b571f0b568c05ab48d7b2cef417ce5
'2012-03-31T23:16:05-04:00'
describe
'17958' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFL' 'sip-files00028.pro'
2a60ae5b39d57d375da135b1ef4b39bc
f20b9a300ad587e7ad7aa80dd5f2e7fed2386407
describe
'25566' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFM' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
abdfdc92102f4f55c30eaaa3f2343c0f
9bf6936913b180ea183978617811822548b22335
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFN' 'sip-files00028.tif'
9511190b8b90faec5f1907736b6c38aa
9bf5ec9df2e1108c004c3204af72fd88dc27c8f8
'2012-03-31T23:18:22-04:00'
describe
'781' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFO' 'sip-files00028.txt'
679c87d405cb19ec4edb40e2fd765064
d4599b13c6fc02b06a48559cb81ae0d686d43330
'2012-03-31T23:15:11-04:00'
describe
'7366' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFP' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
30136dace185b0154724a33e83eaf7cd
1f1a9466eba64782ef972ee2bcabd75b4c19eb8a
'2012-03-31T23:17:52-04:00'
describe
'803608' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFQ' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
06ab014d4495dea074cc7d8a3a7f2ade
59dfacc5ef1df116e82903e81dbca506c5655f00
describe
'83961' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFR' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
208a03c5f736ac8910fdccb28eacb6fd
0003111c03fb683dbd7694abaa446654575c7c16
'2012-03-31T23:19:48-04:00'
describe
'28579' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFS' 'sip-files00029.pro'
9b970921d5ba979492ce230d11da2c45
679558710903ef66393fde23e6b3b4a4bbf10965
'2012-03-31T23:17:59-04:00'
describe
'32820' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFT' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
1fafd334cee9e4bd59a004b989b55824
af2aceb49502833b04c4e817e629766b07a38f20
'2012-03-31T23:18:26-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFU' 'sip-files00029.tif'
54e3df1c48dfc080ba0b181b26800c43
27af96edb10f5403889ce27c412cc7db542f9653
'2012-03-31T23:17:19-04:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFV' 'sip-files00029.txt'
491e97cf6068cb8bfc91d613662293e2
bd8869a24a6241b8c3ef676f5603e2b8b9ea34e9
'2012-03-31T23:17:35-04:00'
describe
'9015' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFW' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
2a0ac85cff283129b736d3d091dca897
a41f9368a4478950c66bb157cd18fc41dcb90c28
'2012-03-31T23:17:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFX' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
5a2fce8c072516dc07fa13528e427aa8
0c43f1b9503a7005aa826acfebccc704d7bd3b36
'2012-03-31T23:16:29-04:00'
describe
'87015' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFY' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
2a51dca7f52143038968b965c1b72faa
d374f928562969099f7d50e044d9f9cdfc33ad9e
describe
'30715' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALFZ' 'sip-files00030.pro'
79b625aa884f79e9934a3e79ee670791
8e4f8a4ed26791afc90eb516b0f989bd66d117c4
'2012-03-31T23:17:17-04:00'
describe
'32514' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGA' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
7ccd8589dbbdf18dc398fd3f9b99f4bd
51bb67b5c79ffc421400fa44fed4d36289aa453d
'2012-03-31T23:21:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGB' 'sip-files00030.tif'
0f5c43af0ff4fec8c2bd68e5f42757b8
cac2cf7443aa4545ea6b774b3877d129df16a68b
'2012-03-31T23:19:09-04:00'
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGC' 'sip-files00030.txt'
02a3d54417536028433d27f4a79668a4
fe299936689e8f7dabd51723cfe03d37c3f9c527
describe
'8542' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGD' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
1e0000ae3801e7a8ca00dee55be1b8b2
db298344068697ba7a39fb5252b610e5b7894230
'2012-03-31T23:21:14-04:00'
describe
'803601' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGE' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
6a863b664960ebd0f157534d1e89b0d8
0e2fc2189d5f4247f953cf86df2152fddb724cfb
describe
'78053' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGF' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
fbbd4e7e600cc439ef36753a130aa10f
46034f10656e01615eeec7c31c5df426e47ca1b5
'2012-03-31T23:21:08-04:00'
describe
'19575' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGG' 'sip-files00031.pro'
51a4981475775a57a1208feb520430ed
f6f0d0fc1b23dd79ed5702ff955bbb319d9cc539
describe
'28451' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGH' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
bc0113dcb7fed741f084f0eac9043a36
20f77a425582744634feedcbf5dd4d641cf4f335
'2012-03-31T23:20:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGI' 'sip-files00031.tif'
3e88863ff1f4742c12ef4a478862f582
dc548162a2b5aa84e8f069dca89c0e24ca338331
describe
'826' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGJ' 'sip-files00031.txt'
24578f854d7598347556d2e09f1917da
f367038c1573de1a376f26c9d3d5235cf7d99123
describe
'7875' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGK' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
143ef47ea21f8f96a5d505ef32b23fcf
5d28a5c0e5daf8981b219ce86b3594d4188ed3a6
'2012-03-31T23:17:04-04:00'
describe
'824798' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGL' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
56e5ad0dae1dbbc15b9de7ce66afd3f4
f64479bb1b178194fc2ed11d710895594c1700b0
describe
'97390' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGM' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
816e61b9100bd30cfc27926cb37362c8
a11d76929b3f09a6ac9fefce4f1d3541385a0300
'2012-03-31T23:16:34-04:00'
describe
'33619' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGN' 'sip-files00032.pro'
2a073e6597a676f13a50faa470d1157f
47dd037db57f45a31429d4bf57ba902cc4c58d36
describe
'36789' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGO' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
13eeb6f724c48cb7b3e373525379d9b3
0905079b2036d51f49e1f9ccb715601fe4a2bf5f
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGP' 'sip-files00032.tif'
8768624af306bd88a55deedf549451e0
8b18b6135e958ab3c5e12ebbb90c414665216f9a
describe
'1333' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGQ' 'sip-files00032.txt'
fe81589d8954cbd5296b3f89b70b8d3f
6871508aac24de93dbacc8ebb06cb7143179fb0a
'2012-03-31T23:14:56-04:00'
describe
'9506' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGR' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
7c1aaf8be08a614a405f1fa26f744d34
fd9706ab0312514d23c714c9cafeecbe3bc5bd62
'2012-03-31T23:16:39-04:00'
describe
'803605' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGS' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
9ac8d3c2ac9000fa0eafc730ae7ec2af
99b79996e86da1bb9bafa74e0aec41788560bb6d
'2012-03-31T23:17:26-04:00'
describe
'84185' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGT' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
2c741772f85b92378bbbfcb891c49a8c
b57d5dc57838e332251a925dbcf5ece7c3d635b1
'2012-03-31T23:17:13-04:00'
describe
'17914' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGU' 'sip-files00033.pro'
c51dda67bc25c7f48ff97220f3603e9c
ba2038b0ac99824c09c244c0e68d3a8244e380b5
'2012-03-31T23:14:51-04:00'
describe
'29845' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGV' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
80125dbadb8198491edfa7660d28404e
80289c7b2814378c2d0747d7c5887e0a38a4c9ee
'2012-03-31T23:20:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGW' 'sip-files00033.tif'
d96e9ddd16f7e0d58d4232eb7e5f5a58
4d4d0ea22650c0320912a3c0004a9a126bd58f7b
'2012-03-31T23:16:57-04:00'
describe
'783' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGX' 'sip-files00033.txt'
3c5cda2b2aee13dd5cdf76d3ba55a3ca
8e185e8ee3aae54ddfbab029aecb9d5f79b5e01d
'2012-03-31T23:18:21-04:00'
describe
'8329' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGY' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
f3a4434552a3d1f106e3f3dcf498828a
95a4fad1f04e0c281a803726f354be17e2ae4aa5
'2012-03-31T23:20:29-04:00'
describe
'824807' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALGZ' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
8147aed9a63b03cb3a705638ad757670
8bbc0eca7ef7a222e8d4ca699b6b4696f1c55d58
'2012-03-31T23:15:32-04:00'
describe
'84367' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHA' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
67224bb3f31cc9b27eb36b3725a7921e
c80380a86173f1306c7b8b7f5ad9b3aebe8a8e97
'2012-03-31T23:20:42-04:00'
describe
'30200' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHB' 'sip-files00034.pro'
796126976b67d277eda3df7b6d2df72f
e7b58d367b054770e56a6c96b0635535c821f278
'2012-03-31T23:14:58-04:00'
describe
'30861' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHC' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
4df4ecac8f04c730536bdea371665281
cf93397bb79f3f457be72cfbffa7e49538b16c7b
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHD' 'sip-files00034.tif'
6b45c6213e7533d5f2026c90647f7a4f
21da8884b4ef8147aa0d33471029c0a7862d3dc1
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHE' 'sip-files00034.txt'
4c5131d87e7fec5743e0fa9fac026115
f12a4c8849246eba63b2731f9a3be0275ca12560
'2012-03-31T23:17:34-04:00'
describe
'8634' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHF' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
0c06cbeb1ebf8d65499946af4a4b7901
c4db9e71ae8430c36305600b3d5ea2f97e18aa98
'2012-03-31T23:16:22-04:00'
describe
'803606' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHG' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
d220f4024f1c9367c9a4567ba79bacd1
a70c91d65681634d6fb746d5c64e219ff7a4aad8
describe
'84016' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHH' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
b46992184a1d3a50d646757e0379c010
2e48a563e62401584ede3888deb519d290f94fc1
describe
'27712' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHI' 'sip-files00035.pro'
5ab9684a9600f091c898de9346ed3efd
8076f838b792641226fa47cd5d4c0bbf5d1eb9a9
describe
'32566' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
9ae10d9a0f23e688b81cb79e1539f918
d027923c268a3599a9c45e39084bbc3c3463731d
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHK' 'sip-files00035.tif'
f1089e4c4c8ef05cf96fa308ba745024
cd6201431867a2e66448d2cffb11bd7634e829ea
'2012-03-31T23:18:27-04:00'
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHL' 'sip-files00035.txt'
9d736b3af8abda87b04d29314acad4cf
bd678b961d85eb77b62d6a45be6e49e6bc79dc27
'2012-03-31T23:14:34-04:00'
describe
'9262' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHM' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
fcdcf9943396e05c3977822d2bc6ebbc
6fa727285606c2687891854b2dfacdac70720d3a
'2012-03-31T23:21:27-04:00'
describe
'824813' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHN' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
f3287c7ce9b3fb7a9dc077f4be6b2a1d
3475fd63925dbbc1c1901b691327f38a1d8dd1dd
'2012-03-31T23:14:36-04:00'
describe
'90218' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHO' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
9e8048bbb07f5124da4ff8e207cf88ad
ac685a38d1e5c814bd7aed7e94729f3aad9a73e7
describe
'30877' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHP' 'sip-files00036.pro'
a6f9baddb639c2622decec25ae112ce9
31a9889b78733880a9e7a07195e8b0eace1b6f6a
'2012-03-31T23:16:08-04:00'
describe
'33762' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
027d1c0f7600577a0b439575eadd3916
57b3c261f03250fa40f66d710f05281997b79ddf
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHR' 'sip-files00036.tif'
0c6f906b818acf725a99ba2bbb95e8b6
ec922347f91d627a76db7a42550436dde681eb7f
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHS' 'sip-files00036.txt'
21c18b3f7fb31ff085bddcc46ca38e70
744e9ee66346b60dd33c5d6fbb9338520024b2b4
'2012-03-31T23:19:11-04:00'
describe
'9147' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHT' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
c667d420b98d9d19c283c882964fc963
050d56bfd308139c695acf830dbc4fd200833e4d
describe
'803604' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHU' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
a99e8d2988e577194ab0818f728dba13
6849d3ff4d0a4393f4b1e185e80f1c49e4ba6c7b
'2012-03-31T23:19:20-04:00'
describe
'82408' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHV' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
51cbb6ac9d7ac091e419d4a0faefe774
17a3a0d1626cd9d8e16cd12327394f5997ccad5f
describe
'27473' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHW' 'sip-files00037.pro'
2171cd25d25f9da0bccade4ca12dd256
8a9d19ce8318d6f940373e8aec476ab2d7b5c176
'2012-03-31T23:14:35-04:00'
describe
'31351' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHX' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
a011eae1f095e5c338c29f91701a947b
a19a49bd289c32b79fd8219b430cb75f373b708e
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHY' 'sip-files00037.tif'
6e5236b3dfb1c79660b647fb6c9d03e9
af69503cc5cfcac27dedc069486f6d259e2d3cc9
'2012-03-31T23:15:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00037.txt'
a675eb47ab7f431c5b3502fe074eabb4
54c21a879aaa52b82f39ce28ea57c4b00538d73a
'2012-03-31T23:19:49-04:00'
describe
'9086' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIA' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
16b2882650a37dba263c56e8244a3bee
31836e48a26cfd22938b8d50147a974c15032456
'2012-03-31T23:15:53-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIB' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
c544d41b6a5c456421cd960627de6fae
9c4760cc80c8c36594c84aa11996b0467b84123c
describe
'65687' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIC' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
076c131aae1f8d7b23206c87c221443a
ca0432e796ed90c15a8d1749d564decf807b4123
'2012-03-31T23:20:06-04:00'
describe
'6971' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALID' 'sip-files00038.pro'
0b6ee0e50a199da6601669214351cb83
cdd2b7ce82aec56df31519beaffcdd816dec1a8c
'2012-03-31T23:16:53-04:00'
describe
'20671' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIE' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
e75e9968c1f39c13be42d18c3c929640
d982682679dcf41d4cc2673c4e4c04420d7f74d6
'2012-03-31T23:18:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIF' 'sip-files00038.tif'
f63261b5724932936bc01a5b45be6bc2
55d6004b096c1910decf4e77cf39439d63a7f502
'2012-03-31T23:15:03-04:00'
describe
'285' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIG' 'sip-files00038.txt'
ab482715cf56685eb937a7d313e2ae22
0b861c1976bdfec086ba32f6b26c2f847d1f558c
'2012-03-31T23:14:40-04:00'
describe
'5401' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIH' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
87762745b5374b4c433ff46f1dd22798
64331d2a06ba4e9f0e5aeea439feacd4d87ce72a
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALII' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
a1f4751904887d2fd6676ed7d09f3d1f
780c9acfbcf5b88c18aa1c1115e11674f31d510d
describe
'79109' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
21595520aeca6d96e355fb94305339e3
7bcb214f633affcf44f70e540d25fb620c9eaa7b
describe
'24874' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIK' 'sip-files00039.pro'
6b9bb91ff9d9cdea049f1632f408059a
4ffe74931c5bee0c70338e7d67b90f793d8b35ee
'2012-03-31T23:17:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIL' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
9eb4afb13870dc3bed0dc9889ca8a5c7
337ad84bf59a01e6f80c927f48a4876c93e6cdcd
'2012-03-31T23:16:20-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIM' 'sip-files00039.tif'
aef875ea154b6803e30f18f681ca1d1f
82c44c7f1cdfbf74a8c4a1ab6b89c9d8ee86adac
'2012-03-31T23:16:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIN' 'sip-files00039.txt'
ae73129ae14c61744c4353c43abd0c6f
d1d98711797660cf3b7319f023d82c12aeb92451
describe
'8131' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIO' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
04777eccab3c8c9a1fe29493d5569765
3a70b1062fa334d3632136362fd81a9f0f142150
'2012-03-31T23:19:50-04:00'
describe
'786696' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIP' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
1662a7d6cdfcec00e789f4ed9d11886f
63bef993cc0cb17e3f28d538247da6bc215693ab
describe
'114544' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
ce348c783df84e3e4eed007efbe7c3bd
3dc49c5020cf2827b68884d1ad44d75e3d4cceb5
'2012-03-31T23:17:27-04:00'
describe
'19732' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIR' 'sip-files00040.pro'
31594f853d80cb1392d82ee6d6e66a8c
01b6f84dd5809f794cc3da00c99b1302910c019a
describe
'58216' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIS' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
f724312f90003909f074d6641891a9d9
19d4bfcf4a6d9e7769b0ec3fc8fc457bf7ea7cbc
'2012-03-31T23:15:49-04:00'
describe
'6316652' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIT' 'sip-files00040.tif'
0f7fb997d0d7c77021c3d66408271758
cec32681cea09a45e526c17de295f68d5da3cf0a
'2012-03-31T23:20:21-04:00'
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIU' 'sip-files00040.txt'
efc7931cdbba64bc918b53e2897d8cae
d92a1970edc68bb7b78f8e71fc17b44abc3024ff
describe
'31738' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIV' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
56d9cfecfcd4213cdce90ffac9dba998
3cc59dda0265e16e706e957533d8895ef56bbebb
'2012-03-31T23:14:41-04:00'
describe
'779829' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIW' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b336b327b6d2158f3f5041cea07faca2
e1693aeb5db167500780801c891cf90bef5c930b
describe
'86285' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIX' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
4636d69a56ee12fbaf68ff2fa2823c10
37b79597a5115892e33c60edd402d0717bfe69f2
'2012-03-31T23:20:44-04:00'
describe
'28414' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIY' 'sip-files00041.pro'
d36a317ac832162b764ba7d161645bb4
876b85c4bc86bd89320509bdc3986f68daeede31
'2012-03-31T23:20:09-04:00'
describe
'33694' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
c506e0343b324c07ca3aff440b148eae
e0e3e366a83ea2224d66682a02dab505b3ebaea0
'2012-03-31T23:21:02-04:00'
describe
'6242935' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJA' 'sip-files00041.tif'
01e52e6acc93b07f0c4ddd85ca6663ef
748e79f48a168bd7e008e73e8f30d2417d0ef2ea
'2012-03-31T23:16:48-04:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJB' 'sip-files00041.txt'
0663c2c7da0ddcb05e2f0959fe28d982
a34be1ab57a09c1295ded3fdc744e3284bd587ca
describe
'9321' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJC' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
0b0e6f51c1823a8b3e7f7a3841bd7bb2
8750f236e3f425b035cc1bf94d4748849605059c
'2012-03-31T23:21:13-04:00'
describe
'803011' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJD' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
2e354512b3850381020888328dfe57c1
a18bf2c2bb7971e64ed8fa90d14ca820585a3562
describe
'124593' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJE' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
f23aec628d930f4a6298c65741eb16ec
165bbfd6d564f2e34980dbd5833280156cbe2eac
'2012-03-31T23:18:59-04:00'
describe
'20423' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJF' 'sip-files00042.pro'
336a540afeeec718c49f8ce85cf408b8
58dd60d074a67c4f2c2a823bbb6cf591dbf77d27
'2012-03-31T23:20:45-04:00'
describe
'61639' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJG' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
1e2fb1689bcae473741faa29761c7b00
ece581b947d98ffcaf9bee225743505171ecc9ab
describe
'6447340' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJH' 'sip-files00042.tif'
be5972789ca69221edbe468d9bf1f141
916a9715f1efac9818c745f917175cb1d5fc466e
'2012-03-31T23:15:12-04:00'
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJI' 'sip-files00042.txt'
fdd5cd58b89c2c236a2db2cda718ed6c
c22def4294fc495381dc04c307abacf6b95fcaad
describe
'33301' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
fdacd464b26ed9e4a298e2098d02ef5e
9dfbc3589cb8091a609564d73226419ccd39b0d6
describe
'793619' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJK' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
3ea4c7ffeccbe834670a0b72d5b840a4
93e84c51051cf6775f20486ff8e88d4365ab7730
'2012-03-31T23:17:07-04:00'
describe
'87755' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJL' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
b4530d389fc6b93843f88ceef87b1c51
c6ede2cba3d49ffc94da116984eb02b6166de30e
describe
'28774' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJM' 'sip-files00043.pro'
f8477b807ec424d139209f1d6168b04e
660d96e8b3c1b804d2e9ca68d18e94236606e43c
describe
'33539' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJN' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
b5225ce776ef781c8bd0a83c10234db3
f51d6f216b1df4e1be78548587c328aed2284e6b
describe
'6353259' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJO' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f876641de718c28bf23b74afc982a066
a47e2acad58348b2355effe16fda8e491b6638ff
'2012-03-31T23:16:23-04:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJP' 'sip-files00043.txt'
eaac4bb1a7ad994d1f247a7e69c10738
73bce3125b9a86852df3be9ee178ca8197b13235
'2012-03-31T23:21:23-04:00'
describe
'9423' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
88be2ef8ac82dc9d1c25941edb76a433
80ce259d307ac384ec256577f8ed0876a0e0fe8b
'2012-03-31T23:20:26-04:00'
describe
'794064' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJR' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
d8d49ae2f03510e25e2a08f2bade4f9b
d5815b33c4fdd586dae7d95920354f9bcd988578
describe
'136915' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJS' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
49b42e45fa5054b3c16bf02a97b0889b
39aa7b4e6bc266fdc29edbf51cc57a3035b6b59c
'2012-03-31T23:15:59-04:00'
describe
'30335' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJT' 'sip-files00044.pro'
db3f9e3d2b97d3c272327b32add4aa96
539ed656de9df98ef9502717c7ca969f82eac413
describe
'66443' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJU' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
9f0c8623c13410b00e75c8241c5d1b8a
f9e079835d79c41efbf758e46fb9519475e1b4db
describe
'6375688' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJV' 'sip-files00044.tif'
6e3e607a1958fbfc6ad56ee6e5e093e6
531ee391039fd57174d370855188fedeb3eabea3
'2012-03-31T23:18:17-04:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJW' 'sip-files00044.txt'
5cb1f6143771c3db250ec5beecefc48a
e7850cdeaeed134131e13b35dd8e99c3ef688a28
'2012-03-31T23:19:05-04:00'
describe
'34336' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJX' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
0b86b79c20244387ed367e22a1db9efc
e9056525db02148882c0937ddad99192da0df41b
'2012-03-31T23:21:17-04:00'
describe
'805012' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJY' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
018224ac1deda64c00c7729e5db7e250
b077fc78bbaba1cf77bb8a2fd9af2dd3cdda3d8f
describe
'90143' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
28e9c78c6aec9f43fbf0383777df88df
f7eaabdf620aeff1524b6b8b5ec131e2bfa196fa
'2012-03-31T23:20:10-04:00'
describe
'29558' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKA' 'sip-files00045.pro'
984fdbb395e7f3cdf42fbc0d5ac44d7e
1b021965bf35437bac3ceb3ace298eaad18ae256
'2012-03-31T23:19:43-04:00'
describe
'33889' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKB' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
119a06822d22bc7f3226a6af10810078
e613587527cbbcad774837935b03dff79801d6ec
'2012-03-31T23:15:18-04:00'
describe
'6447627' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKC' 'sip-files00045.tif'
01511df02601b0f65daeb520ad29c01e
596da64fd2dcbe999e36e19ee66c9a64771a5cd1
'2012-03-31T23:18:04-04:00'
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKD' 'sip-files00045.txt'
0a829c3634adffd90fc1e40742d036fe
3c5644fa565d5a77937680d45c49dc18ce76dc08
'2012-03-31T23:19:29-04:00'
describe
'9325' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKE' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
109677aed337373b9a3a5438c12a5182
713e776153f8d4f2ae689418efabb37285a752c0
'2012-03-31T23:16:17-04:00'
describe
'782081' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKF' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
c9984af013c9f7a1263308509a89908d
9b724a75cdd1fa1d7d04f313b54ca64f2378e44b
describe
'89613' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKG' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
1c421f66e8f15092ead9732fff9febac
b0765bb1fe1e398492bfa228ed3400692742322d
describe
'29366' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKH' 'sip-files00046.pro'
f7a8284080205b32f3bcaf813a13ef32
b731c55ff8198a4251727d03d8812d1c3f519836
'2012-03-31T23:17:48-04:00'
describe
'35340' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKI' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
e122c60ea77a4eaf307be9d0fc873a47
ebc7233374b93358c87959ccb3c24a0dc75ba491
describe
'6261075' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00046.tif'
c7c0bfa29a2570076cf74e782d205705
08d6d2d68ec2a7015d7955691796c615741474de
'2012-03-31T23:21:30-04:00'
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKK' 'sip-files00046.txt'
cdd362817a628cea33baa7aad46d95f9
7584ad8ffdd8c0b8d990a9c5401f9b09b09a3d40
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKL' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
c1538acf33e0c2d0a193eb1240eafd63
caf01c8eb92b69612ab476ce737469b4edc35859
'2012-03-31T23:20:55-04:00'
describe
'737898' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKM' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
6079cded424f011568567314ed061e3a
60def4bd72018d8814acc032a802395028479c96
describe
'47980' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKN' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
2db2526d661abc02273d3a7fd001e0e5
11aa16bc308c578fc24be993d3c757b3050be71b
describe
'6162' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKO' 'sip-files00047.pro'
5df8dbda7b686cf9e142ee4c7258082f
5efcc85e88463fe1bf7a3c1499cd3d8b4c9419ef
describe
'15522' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKP' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
0a031fdf05c0652dc41ef262ae4a3c49
6da76f58945db4ae8cebb17ee8ddc6f8007c406d
'2012-03-31T23:15:24-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00047.tif'
f3c83791e4776fbfba2081f427aa266c
9b02335b588b134e3d41ad61ef1d0aa531dc9aa3
'2012-03-31T23:18:58-04:00'
describe
'299' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKR' 'sip-files00047.txt'
2023a05a261d8c5c2b6ad9b08fc1ff28
674294864eceef63481c394b448e9eadfe956c2c
'2012-03-31T23:16:38-04:00'
describe
'4700' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKS' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
dbd504441e4f47cf15c093e8f1702de6
ce2ddc003955343b1d6f5e5a9e500ea58d3bf175
describe
'791508' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKT' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
6324fd8a38283b67683b304321e638d7
51958da1f9add1097676a49482927f9559989cac
describe
'88319' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKU' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
b282bc0b2fae38af69a6e5fe0e563c85
3c9f546d0d1ae540641f0443621cc21389d1c470
describe
'29504' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKV' 'sip-files00048.pro'
843eeda0e70d65a80eea013693b3b059
309c3024872ee65a296126b0763b64d6994fd69b
describe
'34369' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKW' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
c8428fef4cab0026b5e8815da33dd410
46949b99ba4860392bdeeeabdfb334f52e8763eb
'2012-03-31T23:17:56-04:00'
describe
'6336275' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKX' 'sip-files00048.tif'
953b40207e131ac27359e4ca74dc54bf
395851ede0b60ee1b8f3d2a864813f6f749691e4
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKY' 'sip-files00048.txt'
d0fc2e20b9ead95b5fccb12e5f67c8e5
913f4a62ff685594a382036f8772c595a68b5ea6
describe
'9322' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
8c5d41d46d1f678687765dafd75d7172
17642f8b2a4548ef02da5d03f43a4f7403ae154f
'2012-03-31T23:16:00-04:00'
describe
'767153' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLA' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
d96ce117c9d82d1603785266ccb83453
05660a73043f02e71a4c4278ccc4914b9f36b5b1
describe
'49587' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLB' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
d9e918e5a7c202702fd994c1eaeb8ae0
3e753b8e5728c90c1a115d6d046cc16fa84b6e10
describe
'6108' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLC' 'sip-files00049.pro'
fd0b2f184a365281e5ac1d88e54a8618
380e50fba106aa1860c9fe0b5452c0993ec48456
'2012-03-31T23:20:31-04:00'
describe
'17224' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLD' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
4eac0d2d1f0fdd25305fea4bf09226f6
3f23490dd5d3ee097088606373c07185a8d435fa
'2012-03-31T23:18:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLE' 'sip-files00049.tif'
4b8d5b7ac7887e6ee65882ed1f43fe6b
11a1aba5d3cbfcb629cb03e595f7a9e0f83354b3
'2012-03-31T23:14:59-04:00'
describe
'274' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLF' 'sip-files00049.txt'
0f37586374f60cbe0464c0c23c19bb6b
2d211d43d3687cfb7dba9331e7b48c55f673c0ce
'2012-03-31T23:15:31-04:00'
describe
'5326' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLG' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
5e53c6ceeb78b3ce170f20eb510e5b6a
a0243394fecdf0192739f55615a023f3f2f46e73
describe
'794003' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLH' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
1d1a243eb2bf63ce35e832bd55b36dcc
8edc5a67cddea768be7d330fc1bcdd88451dfa68
describe
'74864' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLI' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
15ceee9c1e36d163b71a5c03f437f3c7
114e981a6180b2981ede398cb422fc178f6a29ee
'2012-03-31T23:18:37-04:00'
describe
'24680' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00050.pro'
e10f429fd0bc25029be0e77ebf86b748
cb600af7cb1617e83b6b92692bb3748338ff92ed
'2012-03-31T23:18:39-04:00'
describe
'28471' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLK' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
9dfc73b26804c79750eeadb7815d0476
df17a36746e3b0335afbbd55fa24702dd755f3a9
'2012-03-31T23:15:28-04:00'
describe
'6356723' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLL' 'sip-files00050.tif'
da6d4b5ee042973721e42f11eb7a0b61
29eecf932309317843cdfa07c6b99e7e3ad64ded
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLM' 'sip-files00050.txt'
228cc54be982f5e8c9b6f964c687e395
ca558d15134cc5651a258ec25164cd480a860252
describe
'7751' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLN' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
35828836b7574dcb81d355eb77609a9a
c2b6ae58bbfe7c3869b69ec7e72c730f1f27689c
describe
'805007' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLO' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
9afb4ac38fa97f0e26e33e49d5ca9b7b
def330f0fa9e0332d8417dcfff6603e28ff88301
'2012-03-31T23:18:38-04:00'
describe
'71623' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLP' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
e5e41bd1325c39bb4b2e579f166a1643
c7c9ddfdbff62979e4ec79c4edf0aa1d22677970
'2012-03-31T23:19:37-04:00'
describe
'24437' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00051.pro'
5c837178a2102ced638bc31d3a314750
2497e9f593ecc7a2329d15f27910092eb1b192dd
describe
'27251' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLR' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
38dda40f9aec8c560ae5be609a907265
ad4a68cbd496866c2b4aaeda6463497c7e187dce
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLS' 'sip-files00051.tif'
bc50d36fe77bae41119b09b3f89e7c13
293737b6c20dea9d324b418cd98a8ec1e233b3d1
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLT' 'sip-files00051.txt'
117feec6acec732ec0467811c345b5e9
fc3620d5692a4750ea2acaea7dbc27733f597bc2
describe
'7452' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLU' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
723ab2f86963865531d7be1621a888e4
bed41b3ea2346123c363de902b00255019ef7ada
describe
'819591' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLV' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
c0b32a1c36a55d7870800c18dc363b98
a61a3d92fe9ac0bcf145614cfbbf4f3eafc64d71
describe
'92904' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLW' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
56f9afab27fda993a887072def6422f3
d837df7a4113a0ed3ee9338590a2ccfe61912a1c
describe
'31705' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLX' 'sip-files00052.pro'
2401d25c6b621fc8e7eaaeeb14db0ada
1bbe3fbf01a8b4207328fd9d073e69d0a593582c
describe
'35231' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLY' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
46ec1b5b75cc89a2a6184050df7aebd0
49e587fd0f79adb6636daa19633cb881e44c43e3
describe
'6564433' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00052.tif'
16a43a764c9f7f3d12630c507fa3231e
7aa4b43b39955d3ffeb761a8e10770763a4f918d
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMA' 'sip-files00052.txt'
cdcba311a8a5cd9be8a2c3a7ecb200f9
3c558e5a6c64414278809daa3d78ed4b060820eb
describe
'9233' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMB' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
cdb640b18891ae5581792e18e4d4d512
4229f4ca56de270bfacb57c4a5fd48a8f87827cf
describe
'805009' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMC' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
e7d6e493190e9fa1bae707f7fc8b5f5f
1dcdcddfda2c114a49bd817c65820f3a293d1cca
'2012-03-31T23:18:24-04:00'
describe
'92680' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMD' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
4725fdf1d6a83df7d8d8ebdfa7b5ad13
d2efe19b1a615b4b5d3cef7de4b97d17f9c869d3
describe
'21585' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALME' 'sip-files00053.pro'
37cd5a80e678d9e2610e38399d5e7b5a
29611dc971f42263f97b09300f1033306d5f77c9
describe
'33093' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMF' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
2310327a1c8e3097f420128725ee128c
ef440cd028f9889794c7f2e8a9c5c7eb8dfdd250
'2012-03-31T23:20:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMG' 'sip-files00053.tif'
14514393dc4c106f7a640164bf5212aa
b85e0774c98fb0f2f2ae50c40567a028522db695
'2012-03-31T23:16:14-04:00'
describe
'890' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMH' 'sip-files00053.txt'
8ff2d8d691f1823a652396b2593f8cd0
63190e33b2db88dde16331d7e3afa667814f5601
describe
'8983' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMI' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
4fe226b7b340296d398e157742143916
e8c02628a995598e3313964a5e220f471330f0d2
'2012-03-31T23:17:00-04:00'
describe
'819592' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
1e742a43a8ed8d390a07249312c80d7a
c356bc81df4b0633c2b931900b41bc0cc2ccda5d
'2012-03-31T23:16:13-04:00'
describe
'84558' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMK' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
917cbbd59cdd0cd01cbdb8b6ba7606a5
e3a84a0c4b2f5a11e0dc5b40009f607b052b4a8e
describe
'11252' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALML' 'sip-files00054.pro'
5adea6da1d1a8e72416d89aed384e80e
b00ab98cabf1c7b4ae72ca6e81d4cd55d96f1ba5
describe
'28264' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMM' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
3d2cb9bfa69b8183126a7c54eecaa68a
83671826a9a0be792fcc3964839dd55784245fc3
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMN' 'sip-files00054.tif'
2a2abe70a2088d02de79c36b0d23c5d4
8fa0a7ed5cc39726fa8f02b4b1902cf5848f13a2
describe
'492' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMO' 'sip-files00054.txt'
d3a254c4829ff018552f5ed482a64c7d
1584023b1943e99d2c0fd3f46f33487e3123e244
describe
'7857' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMP' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
798e7d0bb9572cec121d2f1b67ae5ab8
4cf653f8fa14eccf1a4125d8b024ccc0f3b8949f
'2012-03-31T23:15:06-04:00'
describe
'805008' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
3d11d6fe330d08a367406d549fed7797
7208951407856514da3ef350ef01729375ada590
describe
'128253' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMR' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
15a1a748504d01ae2ad4f61d8549d6da
f97b537f137d888a0cd4f59433fe75fac466c113
describe
'28681' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMS' 'sip-files00055.pro'
bfd7d765c8fde0ba02de99947e77a5fa
9d563c149b90a34db0939089ea3420b91fd560b6
'2012-03-31T23:16:55-04:00'
describe
'64506' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMT' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
07185f36fa720ab2b5748b60aebfe61b
e51ce0084d54769784dbd4a63f34b4f31f7a371f
'2012-03-31T23:17:58-04:00'
describe
'6463036' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMU' 'sip-files00055.tif'
dff406df5c92aae7fa30e2cef9fc05f0
91fb39d55f0f365547e2a7534e2e6eabe130d1aa
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMV' 'sip-files00055.txt'
127593b847108b3635ef0931cfb76f82
2d81d3357115f669be4f16f3336632c44bc281db
describe
'33381' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMW' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
4a5af3891aba55cbe5e289394f82dcc9
6e95976273e3064cc7b759022e8d1390cb6bf2a0
describe
'819610' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMX' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
46e7b43483cb2e7bbe54ad1c2828cf47
ac7f7dd60e3662a271cb719a5854a1211f013673
describe
'129975' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMY' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
d8f4ff0b66f994dad8c5ae94d86aa55b
631654b2f262f67ba1ed987edbb1a094ef43aca6
describe
'29804' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00056.pro'
b7575f3f815ea159051ba433833d2394
b34999ce889dadc9e596926570149b659116a020
'2012-03-31T23:20:47-04:00'
describe
'65149' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNA' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
b354255761a6c0c44f1ffd114a6523d4
6ea604bea8212c21b208e2ef6fea3bb834b64f13
describe
'6580148' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNB' 'sip-files00056.tif'
c121a8bffd9444d4bc3fef2011214cb6
0d0af1a2881b7d971f64d7a87d32cf07b58e285d
'2012-03-31T23:18:47-04:00'
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNC' 'sip-files00056.txt'
d2e0f3d4f2860a81380eb3e640c53c15
5814ae75b5a18874838a380adcaff8c562f08cc1
'2012-03-31T23:14:45-04:00'
describe
'33346' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALND' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
931104430d6b5ad328fcbbb5da0b7187
05d16be85b5915b9e05f85c35be710466e1084c1
describe
'804953' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNE' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
5610af29ce7cd16803184be4e189f574
afa88f26159829f1475857e30dee3866a37fc84b
describe
'87268' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNF' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
81f9ebfa14dbe3020584ce15cb8aadba
6796f9967160c7c4cd58b56ceb119ff892ddff81
describe
'29214' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNG' 'sip-files00057.pro'
ba4eec567dbf93dc47ea54677cea7352
855b46f8117db798b824736009504825a30439fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNH' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
f4fef223f5b61f7caa98ea5a3cb4fde1
4e6c9d217836dd0b816e1a4dee700fcbcef0c950
'2012-03-31T23:18:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNI' 'sip-files00057.tif'
714fa30dea963d9ab4c745fb6f0abacf
d24c9f05841c5a7130e86173dd56cdff83831c9d
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00057.txt'
c657a1e8a154767506e5cd3421cf5320
df6c354aef46578c08188bd955e2975d8f2e1f57
describe
'8731' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNK' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
4a1c117b6aaf0b35cf7d1bf213c5540a
fb4345f10c9da4b5a8aaf3bd436606e72d99ee63
describe
'790001' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNL' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
391df499c5c113c589106f1b5f5cf35f
3d878beb0e6e7df34db5f44c336429293d653191
'2012-03-31T23:17:29-04:00'
describe
'88214' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNM' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
eec85ba4602da9701f7740486cf11d80
a252e7c8409c658709a8d4cee68ecc3040a16b72
'2012-03-31T23:18:55-04:00'
describe
'29632' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNN' 'sip-files00058.pro'
8ab140718f5641270d0c3e5bebe15339
077b6d21a004720e95a5d7e64f80a7f4626fbb62
describe
'33160' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNO' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
2ff19017cf3daca165ef265889676979
5d30dcc644efd62ac745bb88303a5fcd13cd6ad7
'2012-03-31T23:19:21-04:00'
describe
'6324335' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNP' 'sip-files00058.tif'
30167d500b3417a337d242704099830b
3654bb3a350bdb941bc687b10b170d2a056a0627
'2012-03-31T23:20:27-04:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00058.txt'
82602c20e9ec5b868c48a3e0f06ffe48
7dbf65135f809ce4e78193f10188b313c25a8494
'2012-03-31T23:20:16-04:00'
describe
'9194' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNR' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
b72de3a88a18886585cc09701b82059f
a7611ed736fc81fb3365025c1312b7359b47191f
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNS' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
895ca405d7dedd357b0a1517d6945d07
ba38d115753a00fbbf2114199402c42876f964eb
describe
'98110' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNT' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
6647c712b60165783933f4e8059bb8da
0dcf516ab334bb5bcff5cf8ccfa1fe61c2ec485c
'2012-03-31T23:18:51-04:00'
describe
'33358' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNU' 'sip-files00059.pro'
03a50ea3f6d67d103f53185b69f9a19e
c927460fac9438c62589b3cbe71b478c8f8f497e
'2012-03-31T23:19:32-04:00'
describe
'37192' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNV' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
3deb422471300faa207a612c53415bae
4b5adf8e48ef482ee108763d5e44bd28bf930258
'2012-03-31T23:16:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNW' 'sip-files00059.tif'
744f4e1c786be0b182a32865c76cc9cd
ccd3b55a644e8539c9a302781a8b75d52ef95417
'2012-03-31T23:15:44-04:00'
describe
'1337' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNX' 'sip-files00059.txt'
5f21652c0f902287c96e40031cf0aa49
d69fb7b9c3934be6df38920e4a5e9ed983253a65
describe
'9721' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNY' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
8131fc8ab0c18bb146472cbabeda1335
0d8eae40db0f45d56903649d40f8e166433505cd
describe
'789584' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
2b60c02562437275e08e66d719cb83ef
5ab9d970fd90da06348d9335240d7bc2745cff14
'2012-03-31T23:20:14-04:00'
describe
'130477' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOA' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
3f92b4129ae6cca42e8e000e4c1a2c32
afdc459319a59e8004eb6db67b048f58b1ca8d84
describe
'28759' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOB' 'sip-files00060.pro'
c898f8c1200d223bcdcb762c7cbec29c
46620dd177a3c4f5dbf615b0f0ea2d6f5ca01792
describe
'64716' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOC' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
3f1f4261be1d70599a386bfab8b2edac
c2495add17c6737854a1e64e91d7795232791082
describe
'6339744' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOD' 'sip-files00060.tif'
9c2063532a7a2f569c17ca9d5764f439
39f2f7d59c81d3392c05271b0f3087605ca5031e
'2012-03-31T23:16:45-04:00'
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOE' 'sip-files00060.txt'
3abeb9c46ac363cba2ebd6a7bc1f082c
9a26b7fdc3811c9c35afadfd08f1db5fdceb152c
describe
'34038' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOF' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
1f54546763c09da58931e5ad31ae33ec
59f0314c6097fa80bb1a89e749d5be62350fe68e
describe
'793550' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOG' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
f7d3cae824dba05639527047046e61f5
dd571bd9538e8117ddaa7985a6c7ebddc2445283
'2012-03-31T23:18:33-04:00'
describe
'91423' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOH' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
26cb054850055afa1c006e9ae7f2c362
6ec91e4c4ac4a3fe6a1a67bb3d20f0c914fff3ae
describe
'30683' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOI' 'sip-files00061.pro'
1a27ecb9e76a2d6fdc8deded7f860de5
c26254409699e0cc6fb4d1599560025760091359
describe
'35327' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
098c650fa46f1a176d257faee40427a9
67abf87980b876db4a066738064d2f41dfe26241
'2012-03-31T23:16:01-04:00'
describe
'6353123' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOK' 'sip-files00061.tif'
29a1bc86a0999a6c32f0cece1b96be8a
7a1c6432abb819426e271eda6e8dbf0f45c8b443
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOL' 'sip-files00061.txt'
67f103873349a3ddef6711beca6b2ff2
156966c6c7999f034ce8f8e6d093f4299dce7f81
describe
'9205' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOM' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
3175c5eac530d9a63d6c4ef66c080d71
58dc42bdc2c559eb5f0f1a153ec6bcce06fc04c9
'2012-03-31T23:17:36-04:00'
describe
'784481' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALON' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
dcd68fff2b6d8fe0adccb8ebfbb01beb
f8e5c930b3071928881080413ad8a1a29acaa0bb
'2012-03-31T23:15:45-04:00'
describe
'88971' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOO' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
b576b0105c630de3495f4b3f47b8b894
8c21e1756db86ee062746af0d880a5fe12275567
'2012-03-31T23:20:15-04:00'
describe
'28846' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOP' 'sip-files00062.pro'
6e8674cdb16214212e60d3876a3dd440
e09202805d983dfba5483ef586fb661db7b1eeb1
describe
'34415' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
55ba23a3cd0b22138cc857d28813a7f5
fad4ed4c7ec9fcdbc16103b4b489e2a093e36419
'2012-03-31T23:16:42-04:00'
describe
'6280095' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOR' 'sip-files00062.tif'
79aaff1e54627178e8e533efc3e00802
a1cf951db4a4b6b66b0e278f0813f6fa54b44129
'2012-03-31T23:15:46-04:00'
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOS' 'sip-files00062.txt'
175cb76307eff01de6b55d441c74b933
7831b8881c6202727f9d9abdd03dd4fc29448d83
'2012-03-31T23:19:52-04:00'
describe
'9305' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOT' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
1453bf3996644ea9e9b7c60c4d898454
aead69dca4664f9336b7a9f15d7dbfa66be436e7
describe
'797235' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOU' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
4d739aca1798bb37c56179a2e3ee9fcd
e959284b72c86d855c3ce453fe5e4c8b53c89db7
describe
'88582' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOV' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
b919939327a78c01ea61afbb28d8f7c0
10b9c2c0e75a107c5f0f724013162d620475749f
describe
'29993' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOW' 'sip-files00063.pro'
c1c0bd9e77677f4aad771174fe51a68f
470ea0b6d1ab409fadeba14b02ac1f6339096d39
'2012-03-31T23:15:52-04:00'
describe
'34043' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOX' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
d5f12a4f4e3da8001e0dda6eb9d36f7c
507b7475ab72b74c49c26f05c77eb7fdecad0fe7
'2012-03-31T23:19:13-04:00'
describe
'6382159' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOY' 'sip-files00063.tif'
61b93482e546e179ee67c8cea679807e
11b60048115377738ebadb40786a5374344874ac
'2012-03-31T23:17:15-04:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00063.txt'
cfedbe13012caa6cd1bfbb454ed4d583
851c1a96b8fb38e89fe78fcea1e4cd6dc522fb12
describe
'9020' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPA' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
a4001aa17d8673ea63458e44c5ea0485
4b4bb2961f6a44fe9d36e6c318640e7fbce5e6d3
describe
'658021' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPB' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
8e412595e941320c4d457ec3b4618378
90fe57dfa9b2c57789c8e342fd85316c7c6a2618
describe
'43086' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPC' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
cb4de7c9b059cdc77f80b058077ee0e2
c790f520ae6660a1b709fe78e9ea23da46aa91b6
describe
'1749' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPD' 'sip-files00064.pro'
9a2441a42117671e735c2055c658cf11
c675bcffc1ce0a77e1deb487886243b2c20e2757
describe
'13848' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPE' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
ba032dccbc530e316c070ebb2073f95e
e5bc517f58913faa3e6443eaa68ad8fe355378c4
'2012-03-31T23:21:16-04:00'
describe
'6189339' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPF' 'sip-files00064.tif'
35bf68481267ddd0b86731842d021baa
9b65a0c86c2f06f5e4bdbf7f171eeb502760b641
describe
'74' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPG' 'sip-files00064.txt'
c7ca090b6dffd86738cf1c926cd55354
e0a8614448f0870eb0393b0a575506bd3bbcdfd4
describe
'4381' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPH' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
5869bd5e02610e63bff8746ca195e421
8e0279a9bcab57fad30b0c26bf04c9c3aace5b2a
'2012-03-31T23:15:42-04:00'
describe
'795492' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPI' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
50bb92d0bf98eec561a7bcd3c78aa982
4805332d93735c7c822258b6e5ad8bbab6022529
'2012-03-31T23:18:41-04:00'
describe
'86654' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
b5813e102800820e53146da7f17f276b
f09539fb4b774a5532c2d2f476d48714713abd52
describe
'29615' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPK' 'sip-files00065.pro'
ab62f8217a51961a797bd3524fa34f67
e215dab5a1f61e3d212b2b90da576b210cee7836
describe
'32691' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPL' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
b825d56bbc2101ace633b5954c6b994f
4bd63d147448e51c9dbd5dd7e0e3a2e9785175c9
describe
'6368247' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPM' 'sip-files00065.tif'
1d6a2b314203f93086683d1b0f5e366c
27f8bd86d179e421549f02fa5328c9cf4d6dfc09
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPN' 'sip-files00065.txt'
834c77ff990d7e41bd711eb75b8213b2
e7ef87afeef245ce12bf30348cd1c3adb94a44ef
describe
'8877' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPO' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
1bbd99c8744cdcefa2ddc907e6cbd113
2f9a14b5814bff3edcf9255080bb747f3afdf8ad
describe
'777305' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPP' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
e162ec37ba677a9a4fd27ebcd7428198
56d1c5e17cd63b839c35e74d3e6578f9a4428565
describe
'90908' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
c16ef65deaffe629682f90522021fe47
590aeda8a9b687ad8daa862b850cee2cc39f0a70
describe
'29937' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPR' 'sip-files00066.pro'
061f60b0bc1406982649b22743897042
ed01f24081b4b97057b44631cb44b3ae5a9c5f96
'2012-03-31T23:20:20-04:00'
describe
'34345' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPS' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
c729607926d044e89b68f0c9a2d73075
a2ccd6b8d6a23afbf2accebd7b7bb930bf357b32
describe
'6222663' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPT' 'sip-files00066.tif'
b0743d2ca55b67ce8bebe4604ab0f984
b399361d6cefaa04b70602e56d33bcb19adba412
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPU' 'sip-files00066.txt'
8972fa34b6914c2e32dfa38f61b5c126
657f4f1220029e18942188c83a2c3b8810994279
describe
'9512' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPV' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
d57f26f8b932c206861f1b4db5b8ba53
0e42efac422fb5ed7a0c80e0bec84458e2b34146
describe
'794029' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPW' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
92938d6cfb5bc3228dd016b56f39885c
a05e6d7957edb8f0cdb41f7d434005643383d12a
'2012-03-31T23:19:26-04:00'
describe
'96515' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPX' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
5e8a8929cde3a002336e5dc94336c8a5
7e63028e7ca59d6d42c39ac2cd4764f6e6fa3b1b
'2012-03-31T23:18:43-04:00'
describe
'32237' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPY' 'sip-files00067.pro'
06d41c7166795b0899ce374cc7778e8c
ed97da7e8ec88353ca3a6e7dd966b69d4a1afc9d
describe
'36345' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
4d31dae810a32f4d1c30ac1addd69ed1
23b81cda205d5c03a9eecab6534fded90bac4d45
'2012-03-31T23:14:49-04:00'
describe
'6356403' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQA' 'sip-files00067.tif'
3359d14a4c3d3a7b43a890379c4d308b
13d0970372c5870799ab032639155bd370c29463
'2012-03-31T23:18:44-04:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQB' 'sip-files00067.txt'
1c25d483b7ae01681308aa0b4955581c
ed3eed5b6e7ceccc0e1117bd786ed894f46f22e7
describe
'9582' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQC' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
13d1eb0b349e71823b99b1c22e4efcfd
b55086b7f8fde0760d2d652b6160d1c0e8fe4e39
'2012-03-31T23:16:49-04:00'
describe
'806926' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQD' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
62f9bd4769c7c8ed157209523640d4cc
0ee0843673089a0b781d46b458fe4fab0a81d6b6
describe
'93078' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQE' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
e039f971b8744c384ba3a7f7f7c0fe4e
ca59ff9f509bdb2aa10c37997bb28ad6dcbb3992
describe
'31716' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQF' 'sip-files00068.pro'
06dee606466958c251848ccd5c7479d0
b54cfd729d8336fddef8eb608dd580af19acd34a
describe
'35250' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQG' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
6837dc07e9a40e302e64a0f6bcb61021
b2f7411f5b6aa2c63743e03dedefae5d85ae76a5
describe
'6463265' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQH' 'sip-files00068.tif'
09a9aa3fa9e302a5132133cc28454521
5e55a2252db81fc89fc629da0b277c5bd08f0043
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQI' 'sip-files00068.txt'
7f71eea712ba389f2d18a3ca9f8b77e4
8e78e207f05dc81e70f5a369cfd06743b3fa9a07
describe
'9118' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
c5abf8ae6ec7e72d9e7ac9ef18986e04
07f4ace9188da5dc442f451b6e318900feca0b3d
describe
'819878' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQK' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
dc0074ce6819a4f9c5efb8a9207c5951
4b7c8f4ecbb18fd517330d21b0de74f797c8d0d2
describe
'89572' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQL' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
8f97006a57b2e12182c9ec5b838dc68c
20811ac1e9258915c21ee6f67c78a17ec57fa029
describe
'31294' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQM' 'sip-files00069.pro'
50593054e80ff21a4ea5be6869ed5ca0
eb924fde14b3ecd4f6d38b79015dd1c4c1e3c488
describe
'34065' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQN' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
314046b255de197dabf26a64ff8d3355
3abc57534104de41d85f101db0a24b65b8d34037
'2012-03-31T23:16:04-04:00'
describe
'6566621' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQO' 'sip-files00069.tif'
a4c3a1fff2d723df17ac1e65ccd3fee0
7e5e9bed32aa726c3dd326aa58f50f7e607250e8
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQP' 'sip-files00069.txt'
34c398450be736fb5f7a6e31934a6564
8915830627b4cd1d457fea82c9501b74593402e6
'2012-03-31T23:18:02-04:00'
describe
'8947' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
5a2de98bd92b1ea2cc066e7c6b71a192
d7ec05b10382e3f75b44a3e4bda839e916bc00c2
describe
'806927' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQR' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
991416c81b9617e2d1007b3328493678
749ea6d765bed6de4900f66a6dee8123b8a78dda
describe
'89993' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQS' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
cdaafd3527e6275ad73ab067eb52c876
6e79e7f4a8cac4f5b24ba88311429e0a576680b5
describe
'31171' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQT' 'sip-files00070.pro'
a59c22f7037f0a8234b2d17f738b0ecf
ecf48ccf54252c10d1ac235f9aa40b1cb3ac8c76
'2012-03-31T23:18:16-04:00'
describe
'34417' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQU' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
39d29aa01ea22267adf71701209a384c
e223ea3acc999201c86a1efa4401e79c9289b200
'2012-03-31T23:15:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQV' 'sip-files00070.tif'
7957dde4a40519ffc249dc1fb00fc7b1
07134a55fd2d69589bcef067a18ed1fd9fb4bd03
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQW' 'sip-files00070.txt'
aad7ac95507ed2790903efaf54e8138c
9901479fa7eb42cd744e75b74faa280914cf5866
describe
'9227' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQX' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
1b0dc065e864cb053f8c340134203733
1dbe17295cac1e3cf64ce8c298d24fae178c5493
'2012-03-31T23:21:11-04:00'
describe
'785358' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQY' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
42d199ff08718f181a12e31edc9d5fc3
463f86cfd29c3ff5486dda6251a5d289458f3352
describe
'103467' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALQZ' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
dc65e5891a96aaa93d37112617086c43
703af694f921a301e0108e52f863a2ca1ca8c468
describe
'21963' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRA' 'sip-files00071.pro'
e7caaaf968100f4ac7f1a0ac3dda60ea
55c4baca08ce48e8771b4ce7c9aefea3848ace1b
describe
'53013' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRB' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
3642c7d402c3509beb5c384eda1bfe3e
42e21bc8f6fab4e324d0eaa73017e88b8287c132
describe
'6580876' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRC' 'sip-files00071.tif'
85ab34b3adabc2391e816e72a5a979f1
31650421fee2f3d42ea9e6441ee02d9942c33bc8
'2012-03-31T23:20:08-04:00'
describe
'967' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRD' 'sip-files00071.txt'
fc57e9055fcbaa3e44b5a7257a614b5e
625a93c148c766b16142af3d4a7cb10b71a376d4
describe
'30055' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRE' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
b13befd596a889c6626018664fe17ae5
a4790a60478bdd056f106e96b97e3835ac285406
'2012-03-31T23:17:43-04:00'
describe
'806956' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRF' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
dcf19ce2636eda5b3b7910b73bef3867
2af8db0f42c78031748666b769af5bf206907618
describe
'88219' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRG' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
f584471c87cb7f707afd1687ea46c0d5
0b887b388ad555d79aea378de4341406607cd162
'2012-03-31T23:19:53-04:00'
describe
'30960' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRH' 'sip-files00072.pro'
ec219bfd2c16359e82966311336082c3
5510b44389c5af716a126037e8c80e3f2be18246
describe
'33232' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRI' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
dc2f2a7983710c98264ef31ba647d261
471f491dd39f4d8eb81028def111dd938b3800c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRJ' 'sip-files00072.tif'
cf10023e61a1603e3f3a3ba9bf19a0b6
7986c05a5f36749e5929d7bd98299f50c17c3fd6
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRK' 'sip-files00072.txt'
1ba30bfa342192139f0b6b16c87712c4
486987bc389e4c237627095cd2b49f2ae32d8394
describe
'8562' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRL' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
cf13d9d101bec0171110ad31f3a5aeec
d465d17d448795d16c77ea53e516a0ded8bf73f8
'2012-03-31T23:15:38-04:00'
describe
'819867' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRM' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
3e8e29f44bb9080edc4481548ccb828a
ef365a1d3dfb01759a7f7e956fd1f7289bdc74b8
'2012-03-31T23:15:00-04:00'
describe
'129545' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRN' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
3efe4df83b1c35c55c04f1147ae55ec7
7947b54b9565c071d98e6c67a46897c63168cb35
'2012-03-31T23:20:38-04:00'
describe
'30971' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRO' 'sip-files00073.pro'
d9f5d8aa3900ba9c899533429f43442a
7503648e5c6127b4c878577880b0f3d2fd0c0d3f
describe
'63674' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRP' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
4dc45f133b57c8188453e4a4f2dfb476
956bae1dad4fc0a13ce4dc290506eff32d72acec
'2012-03-31T23:16:35-04:00'
describe
'6581884' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRQ' 'sip-files00073.tif'
bcce0556160e678f456987a9d6d9397f
43afb8d3af62f3dc4d2aeadde4f4bb5ffb62aeda
'2012-03-31T23:18:48-04:00'
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRR' 'sip-files00073.txt'
5d36c0da1dea1ad0c180b9a10393993c
e82eb1de7ecdfcbf3100a58ba80c6bf063c399c0
describe
'33003' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRS' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
17948a64c24237314463ccf0fd59429c
dee110abe02946118aaf2a29b32643cd9a190b09
'2012-03-31T23:15:58-04:00'
describe
'806970' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRT' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
49a6d2e6c257897bede978772d87c63e
a5d81c8cc9d34cfa8b0977ec3d6127f1678da19f
describe
'128714' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRU' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
18add816e91b89ec6c325f28510342a8
7affcd3d794477c27713a78f6527edc5f77117d8
'2012-03-31T23:14:44-04:00'
describe
'30022' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRV' 'sip-files00074.pro'
b874059e3be5354a9661ab95e635e7c9
cb27230e2ac2baa53e67452bf3d4dcde262ccfe7
describe
'65076' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRW' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
cb5c4026db63a0b33493dc059af66823
05e7d85118efbe5ffedbf173cdd040c4f9266220
describe
'6478908' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRX' 'sip-files00074.tif'
c76196e360105c887745f02a19d884bb
1a91b3277cf88374844942bcf02b7fb2cc34ca21
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRY' 'sip-files00074.txt'
8ed375389bba36d62fc245aa88e0980e
629bfcb0b8299d5ebe2aec1bae820cc1405d1132
'2012-03-31T23:15:08-04:00'
describe
'33639' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALRZ' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
9a57cbcd721b3de808c1839aabf06efb
8b6177b40d6b94f09c1592b97999e924920f159a
'2012-03-31T23:17:14-04:00'
describe
'819872' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSA' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
457da4a3f5177e2d09858193b9844020
224a9c93e536721bef80749d2edd3fbac876eeef
describe
'92320' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSB' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
7fb21269df4f90ef59d20f67d9eb1cbf
8be2d3995eeebf1206964aa443f09c2dc794d2f6
describe
'32174' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSC' 'sip-files00075.pro'
e7e5955ba8b699469431b39ebbdbcccb
436bd8074e1f5e040e950ad872c0d5269d7de17c
describe
'34679' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSD' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
f3f8cb9a1789a9346bd0a7b10a2394f5
5b2324439157a7af085e04f9b15d413cf741f6bc
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSE' 'sip-files00075.tif'
f6d96cdf0688c3aaa7b0fe955c229ca5
fad81b5d1c5504b0f04d4cbf59c3d6f99b390708
'2012-03-31T23:16:30-04:00'
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSF' 'sip-files00075.txt'
e40c621a036776eca00f039b97e72a1a
45600e7a55b2906a2105d3f59efd2bf8e71fa167
'2012-03-31T23:17:45-04:00'
describe
'8970' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSG' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
3c9c7235dd25491f35bda4fb747aafbe
b596b0e97b41d71a12255033ecafa741d84564d6
describe
'806951' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSH' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
a0927c48af4fae32976f209ff5611b89
b9ff61f8a617deac1292d426700be0d81721b8b0
describe
'82436' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSI' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
fae2c3ff52cb3f3e51af2093aef25fba
1da684016bddc82d915be17978a0e87d363655b9
describe
'28985' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSJ' 'sip-files00076.pro'
7cb21dc5e9f08d82db094b621efe070a
779b17a9460d0d3134c3231cacc6ddae1ab26b18
'2012-03-31T23:19:12-04:00'
describe
'31295' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSK' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
26de6075d37170119fd056dee6dc4847
c7f95bb1e605fb9960c899cf6f4c45083633784e
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSL' 'sip-files00076.tif'
621a67fc2a778536beea93ecd9ac0745
3dd33bfdc03707b5ac7d83050623fda4b09b732c
'2012-03-31T23:20:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSM' 'sip-files00076.txt'
a0703c49d4791e2e77ea07dad05dc352
2b778ad7bd5f56b2e086c0deb5273d2bebc97b2b
describe
'8285' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSN' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
881f5e73b93e7093452f9716e06f855f
ac438790ef7483eea05a4494a1f01e2cf29b7a50
describe
'819849' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSO' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
89048de48bf385241c4330e53a46e049
673b91519803655351d61ab2b3baff4c05713d27
'2012-03-31T23:16:16-04:00'
describe
'75999' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSP' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
13860f5b424f0dc7330fff48cad9e8e2
411bc0e737df9210bcaed5458855a65ff4c01374
describe
'15567' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSQ' 'sip-files00077.pro'
6991c7e50879e3786be3a1aeabd71516
1ac05e0739fa401b582b7e2c06bb960ca0828244
describe
'26479' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSR' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
f943063c216bc070290b960d68eea0db
5faa1bacfb817263729a86655badf1733ccde46d
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSS' 'sip-files00077.tif'
4b98a2617d33a84b90a600781f052f96
fe4585738e7f01991df8caea384e4b6a098e3728
'2012-03-31T23:16:51-04:00'
describe
'673' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALST' 'sip-files00077.txt'
f30aeddbba25e89e30ad12a1ddb11cfa
580658f363c5e531df5d8fba60fda8b19a1afc5f
describe
'7560' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSU' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
bd5ff2b244145845d550f3514607ef3c
16992d171cb46519bd90cc3523af22e8e1764ce9
describe
'806938' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSV' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
897c1f4063f0c9b497a5a35fa20b06ec
d8bcc3c03c010f07fa25a5c33e4bc1be5408816e
describe
'74124' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSW' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
9be6d17f05bf906286c3f47d59662de4
ebe3eecbca8066ff72820816fd4e03ce5cfe8fb2
'2012-03-31T23:17:57-04:00'
describe
'22128' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSX' 'sip-files00078.pro'
8d5097b6d48273092a53939da550cb2d
0e25910c2e865528e6df6b8aac7634d4fe38f44a
describe
'27876' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSY' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
2b7cb6c517a339e22056b0f137547b99
ac59f1853ff61030a485ff526519aeae02358960
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALSZ' 'sip-files00078.tif'
05412ce4889b54b0fb02fd2a3b5b3b14
1423b2a4bfe79bda6a6735ee0b92d076057ce3c2
'2012-03-31T23:20:39-04:00'
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTA' 'sip-files00078.txt'
4d47d835c7f2ea5ae1d7ed3c3f5231cc
0e52635a59a9785ad0cf5ca28e799f6f5bb16622
'2012-03-31T23:19:27-04:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'7932' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTB' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
e1849f00273ecd33de910f9c0ca429e2
a442853a80888ef24127d609ae6da38b2faeedf2
describe
'715722' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTC' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
9d387f91366011a5600d8781ee29357f
08a12dbaa87dda6885f49463bd4858e46906daad
'2012-03-31T23:20:46-04:00'
describe
'52252' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTD' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
1465ef2874aec28ca38a536d6a70d7a2
0276274aa5fc4c2ba8a51b7625cbb698ece60632
'2012-03-31T23:16:40-04:00'
describe
'10987' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTE' 'sip-files00079.pro'
7a79801b99743c8bc4a563b5ff9ecb71
3a638353165bcd501c4514a501fbd697739c0df8
describe
'18884' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTF' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
aae4d0f62fa5b887ffe0d8acc2d77681
1961676112138862d32d892df255d16487051a92
'2012-03-31T23:14:54-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTG' 'sip-files00079.tif'
9c0dd4d835833574e087fc95b76f20b6
f5c4af5e1e753606a55a292b3b81d7d08bad0d13
describe
'466' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTH' 'sip-files00079.txt'
da84de8a7b04a931375b455f3ad22c4d
d5c4366a5177ae7206945534285af3ca6d353dfb
'2012-03-31T23:14:43-04:00'
describe
'5335' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTI' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
9e00f05f8325a4c092daba3b6805c31a
70f969a6511cff4a48dbf8486e92e7704123b618
'2012-03-31T23:15:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTJ' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
fd7206f89d7cae079a4a708cb26a401a
9f918a096921d438516b51587fc53b91f9da3a9c
describe
'67504' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTK' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
665c6c7a2b72f5d7cf3cd4c099fca891
953cf60bd7562d6620c6f6a51c22f265c14b0c05
describe
'14431' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTL' 'sip-files00080.pro'
73d695b34748e18e23a6a4913bacdd3a
9dc953c655cb4802d23b91a1f2bdbe270b633ba5
describe
'22835' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTM' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
176c3b5fdd882d2ce627273f8c47ba11
0cb11dbe513d62659754901d7fd4780583025f8c
'2012-03-31T23:18:40-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTN' 'sip-files00080.tif'
b982494cb764ac2c0c436fab7aee8e6f
343959ace9b64224c58d1bd0044c23c01de469ba
'2012-03-31T23:20:24-04:00'
describe
'643' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTO' 'sip-files00080.txt'
203b66e6849800b79184477959c75215
2f9d64c68070739d135a7c1af8deb515cf9b308e
describe
'6720' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTP' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
c57efbf42253b9906f5ec08d98100b9b
ca140f54dd7e7f7bca4ba1e883bcf2732304e8d4
describe
'819865' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTQ' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
8b2c91952ff9c9130071346e4e714f4e
b52673abe61726ffe0e3c2d2d4d0fdf152659e22
describe
'82886' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTR' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
815327d99c467a159a9c9714ce56691f
fc33c42dbb792a2e9c640f0a4b9d5b5c1416434f
describe
'29300' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTS' 'sip-files00081.pro'
e67f5aa31a8febddf39775c869066de6
4e6d9904485014cb55b6f4e144aa6804b8df5222
describe
'30076' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTT' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
c18b40360f73658bbfc7f14de03e3f07
01b65050047bedf88b22d79b184ccc355af17422
'2012-03-31T23:19:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTU' 'sip-files00081.tif'
cecfafbbff1806b1c4878c941fa2e848
4d61a242c37db01c7e7e6bd153ff9589b4e91e08
'2012-03-31T23:21:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTV' 'sip-files00081.txt'
5d11c8f89f863a771735b9e3fd7bfad6
c085b7a04d647ec3e644a138b7aef2fab05b3565
describe
'8202' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTW' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
03c0a6b7d2dab554a7b6eebbd05a83c6
b5daca6fba1aa94a3ab97487e114e1518680745a
'2012-03-31T23:18:05-04:00'
describe
'806974' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTX' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
f7014a6d628ce2174ff1613c8f5e383a
2b9a415df0c49fdb22a9df9d6fde3e8991e26cb3
describe
'90223' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTY' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
8a720721b5f2d1e640a5e92c7f0cf9df
6c9a7cf8a8e28dae73365e55bf1ff96c5bb73409
describe
'31329' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALTZ' 'sip-files00082.pro'
560f4d65d971ea329c4313683462aca9
28ff21e1964d980f7c45d89f32fc9f222532f274
describe
'34138' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUA' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
88822273a8719c86f7ca7a44db1aeb14
6676a98600b0e3ec3be412c9358e0723ade93e85
'2012-03-31T23:20:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUB' 'sip-files00082.tif'
5d87e397fe1e2b72010c1061ea1ccce3
02c86a10253622b4c045521dea2215d4b00dfeee
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUC' 'sip-files00082.txt'
45069532dc8be8580a84a872eaa646ff
6866c2c6077191da3fef5e671dc31c319d209e14
'2012-03-31T23:15:14-04:00'
describe
'8903' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUD' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
871798fd2128bdc5dc05b84fe858144f
99c145e146bde0b9f9524c234707fde9261065be
describe
'819891' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUE' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
4e683184f347a0c327ff3e0ade51d8a2
3e972ad7604edb32157e82e4faa7123c9e278a2d
describe
'86995' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUF' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
d31ad6b1c7395d8e0877ea4ccdc38152
7590b477f8667e7a1be20e677206fa9241a3145e
'2012-03-31T23:19:38-04:00'
describe
'30413' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUG' 'sip-files00083.pro'
b656dc02acabc36eecbd8e977dc22c6e
98945c9d3d4f3056ebab893817f973ccf3d07158
describe
'32868' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUH' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
00a7007c33e133d4c55cd74d110f03c2
5eca70b5b8071700cfe208de12b74566e01d28c9
'2012-03-31T23:17:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUI' 'sip-files00083.tif'
2beb7ff9b34e44b11f5fbbcef2a48e19
d6163bfec01d652b6b0854df63f1642d1df13322
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUJ' 'sip-files00083.txt'
eca3488729f8924e0d9c39db574d8221
c04f0914873790411c5b347bef435feead467941
describe
'8733' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUK' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
60d5eff87c7f6a499140f7eb441e1e25
bf4bd1ca7ccd78d38268771a9fce85dbd9948db6
describe
'806954' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUL' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
8ce498f77ba6a2a2ae358bf43d08846e
d459538231f3290908cf3b8a5cb88da7caba63fa
describe
'81337' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUM' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
90e3dc2107054296364ceffd616cd011
13fc3b0264a701d2ab881de078bd739a64e2015c
describe
'29926' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUN' 'sip-files00084.pro'
656960c3f187e7df2a4cfd8e073f4ed7
3f068666aebdd606edc66a69b7742a926c30161b
describe
'29953' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUO' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
d68659315d390ac56b3aa7d88bb89cdf
83f6c0fb85de078faf4906754e7ce07c31cb21b1
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUP' 'sip-files00084.tif'
79426d2785ccca15820118487e641d25
98c1df459f5dc7a78903586b2598f4d1e45bfb69
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUQ' 'sip-files00084.txt'
4df119c0f17c9eb420356964d816151b
77add31bfbcd1b9174eca2c0326ef36db4491d91
'2012-03-31T23:17:10-04:00'
describe
'7904' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUR' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
b741788ee695c79b014d6d24dd4f9edc
00651788beb16e65b6ee8d2b7167d354ea9c3737
describe
'819870' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUS' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
c0ce103a5cb255efc3b74f6ec09dd8df
887b28a0a98c2c64a20c4dabf616fffc84e31eb8
describe
'58246' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUT' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
1150a62d99f2e82d0872501b189d107f
9db01f2d2c3c31d6fe30bd8d771929ff7235e23b
describe
'7569' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUU' 'sip-files00085.pro'
d1b8668ceee74be8e0635d461687ff70
b1157de86909d3dbcf2b9af4351292c5d36f8b01
'2012-03-31T23:18:46-04:00'
describe
'18620' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUV' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
0a0e4f0997b954e02ef90a43c5d9102a
126b5afc990106e36ef77042314048a3a2fdbba0
'2012-03-31T23:16:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUW' 'sip-files00085.tif'
aef8f4d7ce859687e5ab7f5f2dc07aa6
e414231ced8bc07cedf5c19ab217c736d67450e7
'2012-03-31T23:20:22-04:00'
describe
'330' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUX' 'sip-files00085.txt'
b408b89069a65369b32aae4604dc4116
d1070e7cc9cb0cbeb9f4aaea5785601fa2ed14e0
describe
'5909' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUY' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
a81cc96406ada1d3c0a5b906e29ee7d2
0f2410f8e433c90c0a5432795ea6080ca4c143aa
'2012-03-31T23:15:33-04:00'
describe
'806899' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALUZ' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
82dfb1293ffe08136dbcf7f1769ae6d4
98c50716cee5ffad056bdd7f151bb394c1f81129
describe
'75354' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVA' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
eb1b1e4fde70a315a12fb6f150c48a3f
ea1da7ec3c8c1a63a2a8315441c43d2483b7d44e
describe
'24458' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVB' 'sip-files00086.pro'
99f935d9606370dde15fa9925f91d03c
e1f13845fb06effc782589ca12da6b328391bbea
describe
'28196' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVC' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
8455bd36be1049d93de20a5b96fb8b53
434d0b7de206d74c514914c208594ab10c60e8bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVD' 'sip-files00086.tif'
9d8f5c9ce0c2dbb6f92426ced1764e30
c112a912dceadc75ecc013cecf4b1ff90317b641
'2012-03-31T23:18:49-04:00'
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVE' 'sip-files00086.txt'
c4a4dd7b9961c4fc3530a440f11daebb
32d98737f3c2a79cfd73a0def9ebcf231dbfa64a
describe
'7501' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVF' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
99cf6a310551ba85f2ad29a05ab0dfc1
f18e716b3aae73f078f132e1b57e7883c13f893f
describe
'812323' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVG' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
d9216aa34d5792a274e0a74b3e19004c
4ba171cfafee67d5f411c40ed5d689c5bcae9718
describe
'109454' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVH' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
e64f7fc8243b89bc0563ccdba1f5b694
ce0ccb621269ed0dabe7b629342f78ab8e9395ec
describe
'24830' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVI' 'sip-files00087.pro'
96edd5a4dd26933aa92ae5ee9a31fdec
b06b364db6fd4833dca3d31ef2b36ed5f60d3f68
describe
'55228' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVJ' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
9a569ed81b7078365cfe62e1b3fa58fb
3a01cc31e535b8deebfc6776c84b3e7ac38ade59
'2012-03-31T23:20:56-04:00'
describe
'6580840' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVK' 'sip-files00087.tif'
aaf246fc8bfde0c3a848152b7d9d95ee
bd5332bdfb475e76067192a0ca4e61231a1f5cb2
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVL' 'sip-files00087.txt'
e45ebc6639b679dcd45a7c3af8adce3a
ef03bdcfcac80080bf5bf58afa43c2e628e1d0e3
describe
'30332' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVM' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
62def25a562218c9137e86d3aa7205fe
200d434856648584c2913c1f63dd67b14debefcb
describe
'806946' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVN' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
e8b59bc208a30eb1d07b85fadc411916
46acabf49e060544392a57f1a0118cb34b8a876e
describe
'84241' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVO' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
8b120cc654567fda850b109e7da8534d
c55bac180802fb50efff5df1bab4aaf23ca130b9
describe
'29587' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVP' 'sip-files00088.pro'
0ebc46f2c00e16b5e9777982377d51b8
d83ce17e96c2b39d7c8e794aad218fc83069ea4d
'2012-03-31T23:15:01-04:00'
describe
'32064' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVQ' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
0b5bef66fd08ef1fb81c9dde97aa6184
cd0a7facac39b85b8f42db6b84bfb349c13d9ba9
'2012-03-31T23:17:22-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVR' 'sip-files00088.tif'
7681b878f87043314b64400d7efc2145
447782b63c1227ab422e305d33bf3bc697f1fcd7
'2012-03-31T23:18:42-04:00'
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVS' 'sip-files00088.txt'
789f19b821a80fdbdd46bf4a286de59f
3bfcb47a832966cb4e4bc2db4e8b4fc5546c982b
describe
'8585' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVT' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
c68774a0b7cee400c4f8933edbe8c00c
6a9143821a83a0940ad7ebe643171dc1a9b7559a
describe
'819871' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVU' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
2649602a3e3f99c150cf84453b02cab0
d1e83807f77a001951736d79e48ad1336d5fa532
describe
'80601' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVV' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
672f6448b851ce5b8ee0349eba5c0c6a
d8f110b64be7b551ee2a94a6a6525e9f18c8dcbd
describe
'28526' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVW' 'sip-files00089.pro'
86cb961a7c20ec32c0304a0bdab2b4c0
bdb624453788e4815b6f89bd795657aaf44374af
describe
'29839' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVX' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
9b629b97ff0b31f526714846cc8148e7
b124254de270c575d54889ae09a0461f03819a1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVY' 'sip-files00089.tif'
31386da2a5ba9254bfe66799f7eea887
3846cf57d8f70f3bf96913dce31286cca25cb3ae
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALVZ' 'sip-files00089.txt'
9dc21ef3ff67105fddb790fa073f0b8a
461958341a39a1cb8bae59e90fdcc8b7a62fec08
'2012-03-31T23:15:13-04:00'
describe
'8088' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWA' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
43df674f359f4f83632d51116c592031
26760f431f55b0ae42b46907ea9982f52f9c20f5
describe
'806971' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWB' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
1accdd1d2325466887c1c03d4f1e4ec8
23b968a7245f807f3300bef2656631ad929f6d4b
describe
'89663' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWC' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
135c21bcbd49d72c742061283775e645
5e521927804ec722a207a98c37303b935dc4c9a6
'2012-03-31T23:19:04-04:00'
describe
'30718' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWD' 'sip-files00090.pro'
a3473d8382d52dfa71f4039264af1239
d76aaeb57b89f6ba2c552dab1dc4eb1b2e73de68
describe
'34146' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWE' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
cdf0e84b83aa79c14ebeb7970dabb9ff
3e294a274deaefa93b0552be57c4b616c1663f07
'2012-03-31T23:16:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWF' 'sip-files00090.tif'
a33a87714e7511be25bedf5237dea817
d299363c6a780db4783a4a69757cf8e22cca7f5d
'2012-03-31T23:18:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWG' 'sip-files00090.txt'
85ac1cb81d0d70f6fb3b61b908222d34
17129a3d56869cea63ceef30e4e1d1e5e8265a95
describe
'9124' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWH' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
8916c79fc3604f2fe4af069883875e3e
c6168cb9489327972a7d8704706036814038d04a
describe
'782138' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWI' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
1c0e40601d36dffa0812781b9761d914
aaad7cebec89340a79871bdbeeab8e0b699218e2
describe
'58199' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWJ' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
d0a7e42e3e048c68a0b9fe3687861cdb
7b8fb14a001ff915422dbe86842046c0de074f6a
describe
'9466' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWK' 'sip-files00091.pro'
75fd0728966500a9e4abacc05f781737
1dc2007452ec5a415cb1c7d03789929854eb652e
describe
'19907' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWL' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
f75413f62c830d0ad27b64fad552b954
6ef7792d71c60e4be51db4ecc0d418ea630171b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWM' 'sip-files00091.tif'
f700c0455e9bf0764cbec42eb3aaa43c
7fb8b22480816d60beefc5dd99b1577414dbc64b
describe
'406' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWN' 'sip-files00091.txt'
5ed697100e53432999689bc02a1c148d
d6705d6df2c549862fe2b378efd2a8846341fd6f
describe
'5905' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWO' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
87124bd10281152cb5410891f953485e
1a48780d0a7f93f22f8002fe72c18fca130e9015
describe
'806975' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWP' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
9053e08c3b9764cffd80efd1c9c95825
9067cc29cb7ea0c2ad06f956e47654d07221ec75
describe
'85661' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWQ' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
d5b579837ef90e7405a0b6bd91dbc51d
06b7eb3934a6bc8f906adcf185b0abbd7d7cec8c
describe
'29794' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWR' 'sip-files00092.pro'
3d95647a48a9a2fd0d8e64d89689f72e
3021502179cecba21f69cdced218810b5142a894
describe
'32798' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWS' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
4f8a8bf0d1fd1e866316a961b7d09000
7f5a70de066640613906e142175f17008d786c2d
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWT' 'sip-files00092.tif'
542a1de540a0eebb42ca413f35b0d33f
27d163cb5aa5c5ec823b79fb8f7a0924e9f81515
'2012-03-31T23:17:32-04:00'
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWU' 'sip-files00092.txt'
8eb0c11511b7da420851274735db480b
c053b0bbae3d7057f220852f4fe6931397ef4220
describe
'8781' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWV' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
e2683cb15a1bc15807d1531d2e7cc3cc
a172056663c2b0ac7b8a927f2a88d0dabb97659b
describe
'819859' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWW' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
ae221f72b93e8d244095c3be32b4da93
e6daa9a69aa993940639e582ac17978f45a300e3
describe
'86508' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWX' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
ac360fc74204fb5bcb05f405a9019726
2724a93445675d07668f23f330983d3cb83162e0
describe
'30412' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWY' 'sip-files00093.pro'
04180a1841877bd566a5ae21fd4d62be
a62d059fc429994dfe3d255871ed31c8f549a5a2
'2012-03-31T23:16:41-04:00'
describe
'32756' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALWZ' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
a67916b547fdefaa4066ad84d1412d91
6652e5cf539cbcb9bb9ed499de7f4a8b9e78b000
'2012-03-31T23:20:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXA' 'sip-files00093.tif'
f74f5ceaae938ddbb0b7ee7d6b77e441
20e2b3b8b7c71a00e47880099e8956692ded83d6
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXB' 'sip-files00093.txt'
17483a9cfa8752c8b2a22f4ffcde8063
2922be00ab682b3ee7361f9e36857f6c47480375
describe
'8502' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXC' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
05a148fe3bd22d5ebefa9198d492fd14
6b9cd8ab65868a7d53a8a2083e98ed01cb84b15e
describe
'806964' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXD' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
6d8937858af9de2c57b29370c0d13c99
81043c548c1e1693c0455960896eb2dc08fa9fce
describe
'87284' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXE' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
d4686d1c5366d41bfebd0d5a9b2e2441
d8eda76c729f7c33bbd730e22063447981327359
describe
'30483' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXF' 'sip-files00094.pro'
b37f81992c0759be06fc49b2a24da1e0
c9333d0feb77c96670ef86a62203441d00cc0788
describe
'33738' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXG' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
7b1734989ff5a234056cd233c18a9609
d6bedd8ade0db40f42c3f512cda384c4925a11b8
'2012-03-31T23:20:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXH' 'sip-files00094.tif'
2c57d41ebeb098f0c4fd53b0dcb0f6a4
11eae9b8128d4b1c0440f0da419b9700f23310b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXI' 'sip-files00094.txt'
68b48806c4016f21e1e8770ed0b9bec6
c43b753ca3dfe56bc88b148a82d04547402e5d6f
describe
'9018' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXJ' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
7d615e96e16b54a61f0eb9cf7eaac751
bfe4c379a9b9fdd56bf4d598b5b62326f75fa10d
describe
'819880' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXK' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
a21de672a0733b82b2d2a2b5ee0ba835
6afdcbf2cf4d6c555fbd5fe75e73edc22e3bd690
describe
'83516' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXL' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
52c644fe348bc154f81ef51fe52dd1c5
bb121e83d8c365cf56132a0258e9589a9ad7fea4
'2012-03-31T23:17:16-04:00'
describe
'28869' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXM' 'sip-files00095.pro'
07c6d973b6a978ef1c51811faae7b385
1f953e1e0d3e953b4106609989b26ad688b488a6
describe
'31361' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXN' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
abf0361d6aa0e5bd770331bc8c1a3a43
6790ce460cd49ffc9e0b54a2cfd0dafff78819ff
'2012-03-31T23:16:15-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXO' 'sip-files00095.tif'
2df148a526d26aa10d445b499e2c9578
4efa09b848a397b4bd5b9868f306d0ca256d79d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXP' 'sip-files00095.txt'
454b6f89abee91a8aea9438e86c3095a
0860a6ca9498dc06315b24b8aa2464d30ac93bb6
'2012-03-31T23:21:18-04:00'
describe
'8396' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXQ' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
4135e96b9649972b5dd67baf2933a26f
36b4a2c5bf6d4aefb32cb381ade3995f138daf36
'2012-03-31T23:17:06-04:00'
describe
'806977' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXR' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
0dc4510b26d26aa9d013eb0206dd6e88
cba006ca3b78bbd4262ff1a27c864c7d80b7c706
'2012-03-31T23:18:25-04:00'
describe
'83076' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXS' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
8f921cd3e42826672f1b0e7e75290b67
0ce1ed73c2b8501fab0e9eb46bef6a0598ff7de9
describe
'29229' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXT' 'sip-files00096.pro'
7db896135b6db3bf41bf4ddb20bf1911
0933f559ae453a76cc29f51f8c6f7da95d9c5d52
describe
'30854' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXU' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
d04580cecf38a5f39d880917804546e8
fafacbf31fd227914f0e49cf61a8030c6811b65f
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXV' 'sip-files00096.tif'
6e586756c5d504f813a573b44b0eea26
f1e11c8dbacc05178dd5c26f112695f7ceb077ca
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXW' 'sip-files00096.txt'
98aa9d1a9b606ae157ded489f8cd434c
72128d71c7a21c3b98a6ba75979441e0a9b90d2d
describe
'8224' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXX' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
f12999f6ef9b025867c58552bf7742d6
b4d89d08e59d682334eb9ea978e95df157b83e72
describe
'819887' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXY' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
a94e1bd23c1e5503dcae800291d8c8ac
41a34cf9991d3d92a981c98dfb1b8d238988d22b
describe
'82662' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALXZ' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
5b35862327cb360b7bbb55c4fffe9747
ca50b3cc1b7f3eb980169fe4d47d0e12db7335e6
describe
'28851' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYA' 'sip-files00097.pro'
ff58353d1deb19b01d11c2ca2a971c7f
50c383dcb20c75bea2cdbef6c1f5040fe2baa3cc
'2012-03-31T23:20:48-04:00'
describe
'30958' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYB' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
4665a6176eccef82192a2c445a8a9ba5
f0105e3fad0200a91d994aade8268b6262714f53
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYC' 'sip-files00097.tif'
4303281c6eacb763639ffc0dc6b3251d
2446c3758b095170235905a65e50d5dd076bd46f
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYD' 'sip-files00097.txt'
fcd393f194be2d6d189b1eb3f97b6ae3
a899cd5e5fe93c1ae61f29cab2fe4820880ccacf
describe
'8506' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYE' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
0e79dd4bcbb72a7241671e0504544651
a5557869d33e3cb7c40c54a99640764053ba3c99
describe
'806943' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYF' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
c1ddb41526b01f1dd02ec5bcd273fea1
5809c91ec3b578c046d4cfa4727212815765671f
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYG' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
6fa259a27277fb9e74b30d7c1456f250
bbce6ba5a59c9f830316bb9b07af9e2f613ff2f0
describe
'29431' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYH' 'sip-files00098.pro'
4f1c053b6e7f495785854e387970a232
9171cd8f093684909238da7d0bc1313abaee3918
describe
'33478' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYI' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
7278db3f1c2d4c21a17df2619b2fa6c8
39bf1227a170459526058bf37eeae35e4aeae389
'2012-03-31T23:14:47-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYJ' 'sip-files00098.tif'
96afc182660709de4d0cf7a78c202721
364e3d364ee9300e97e8d0da12572fe0bb735d0e
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYK' 'sip-files00098.txt'
ddc797cdd27ec87cfb8f5e1d426dd484
258574a9a7639213edea5aed553c2385687e5bca
describe
'9150' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYL' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
a934af2325487417831028561be9b639
479ddb5c2795419c59118820841abc9b9e9097cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYM' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
347b012557eacf783de47a0ed57e6267
313ecc89009883ea1e86a4c907b541ac4fc93227
describe
'87798' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYN' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
82ba72a6e0b6fe3c6690debe57fe0d48
8f5d24c67b825b407327e41073618a128223c8dd
describe
'30935' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYO' 'sip-files00099.pro'
89d37314f7fa9a17a9875c79a7a52f3e
2f30d5ea6fda559cd6742efafb06b8700328751b
describe
'32923' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYP' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
b9046dbd19f42d6c717bdd8b7952c4f3
ed49d3950111db34a60a55ee35207c8c5754fd4b
'2012-03-31T23:17:28-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYQ' 'sip-files00099.tif'
7400637e6189ce3f32b7f75212a702af
99990ebebb7ca1131c4c74b1be375cef55c50a91
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYR' 'sip-files00099.txt'
02b7f88b184a5f38b7dcb4f8b96e4910
d019dddc1b6f33409eab35356320b8867ce8570c
describe
'8726' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYS' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
2fe1e8b6d99c08f1ba2ba567916cc833
0f40024e8dd3ce29170aa11e6d03e59ed9b9d73b
'2012-03-31T23:19:28-04:00'
describe
'723851' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYT' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
c4ef19023a257790e75b485eabc43843
b43baddf204aa9a1cac8c0f9a7aa1da837fa10ae
'2012-03-31T23:17:51-04:00'
describe
'49356' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYU' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
472b9362ea262d0b519c094b5399988f
78a5e279100afbe92f1218fe0d8f8b696e669c9c
describe
'1746' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYV' 'sip-files00100.pro'
fe644c2c4b4bd4a7b75cfd544db6ebce
d9e633d559c59520d903a19bb8e342bca8a0ca1d
describe
'15729' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYW' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
8b384c310d62b4d4d8e08ff4a9e10219
21070c6f54e7e47cd6cdbec6e3cd5716253ae129
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYX' 'sip-files00100.tif'
44219c3e78cf78930075571f2a503875
e420b16687aa016689328b30fdf744480d58e936
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYY' 'sip-files00100.txt'
2eeec35b901f2db88b19afcbf2c6e779
7179b817433841b52b99f5eb79cf05a5d18b5a8c
describe
'4681' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALYZ' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
d5781239d3c7bfbf44415e683bc838c7
2486f87dd607ebf9754a19dcd12d16c6f5a1e957
describe
'819883' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZA' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
6d97e98b879afd5d55919e739f39dbcb
17f94d53cac0b41421aed78db9c41f5012387503
describe
'86447' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZB' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
de07777e2da1bfaedfa29f7ce86f9774
786559149b2f03b44ca82e38659e7fb8d95f0559
'2012-03-31T23:16:27-04:00'
describe
'31382' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZC' 'sip-files00101.pro'
d79e432f9940709a6b29d9cb626bb2ee
e981986361c2fb1a98973733be495db6c7279f38
describe
'32279' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZD' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
17c8fe93d9921da554933509a3233df2
7ea2a224e20aa73b3af91fddcde389b9be594876
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZE' 'sip-files00101.tif'
ce2e93e4b2cc9e663331b427c45369a8
c3b0311778f912f80dba7e1bf05ab3abccccc185
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZF' 'sip-files00101.txt'
546ab58ff2a92783d326619f112a02cf
48ab062bc8e249d0714906345cdece4470977d7e
describe
'8479' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZG' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
0f7af92705fa43ed2c2a99fc4521ce3e
55c2e9f74db7d7e629245841750cab275ada1946
describe
'775630' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZH' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
533efd6ea88c548146daf995cac9252f
a6830e9805d4e6a898ad96f446c597b4836bcaa2
describe
'92157' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZI' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
a55a70868ca968ae2ac24219ccfca00f
43bbf68146c654dca8e339a556f558468983ea36
describe
'30824' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZJ' 'sip-files00102.pro'
44f8359d605822a69d049279fdb6ca6f
d9993cdf30f75eca35d87873fb5b7b5543e9ff24
describe
'35986' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZK' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
f58e4c9c32ab6a9cdc6c8b5e86381261
ace25097704c1c846fd424bfd55f090086470b4d
describe
'6209295' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZL' 'sip-files00102.tif'
6c81a9abc288de645a33e6cbfcfe064f
3ef605983b888fe5d6269a272064de68ec3a0bc1
'2012-03-31T23:18:06-04:00'
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZM' 'sip-files00102.txt'
cd6b39b02fe4f3bcc0df6b24f1e5904c
196d9d2c9568dc2b6e317612b822473200d03377
describe
'9525' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZN' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
1741a7b2875f3d8c03a5204ba925db46
22cba03b9643cd0f603224d8a2028d05e450d093
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZO' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
82baa44aa83393c20886e4347f687a72
d265ce5436558b2cb144b727211e140f9b02827e
describe
'84834' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZP' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
44968439b7d85ddee70097d1156e0e09
1403847f638edb51db8b39255fdb185f30a3733c
'2012-03-31T23:15:27-04:00'
describe
'30281' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZQ' 'sip-files00103.pro'
96931b85f170d7d2189a76376e88047b
e28d5b01e3a4b5e470e8450e6f2a853f35ad5c6a
describe
'31744' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZR' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
023d823e0d6fc0feb8be844a7f2fe0a1
6bb2fc8f82245e154ed64d14c6c4b23c91d69f49
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZS' 'sip-files00103.tif'
d477edb191bd6b02b5a76f64d0fbfae3
efa476c406275ddf6a60469d5eb5c318b0babb1e
'2012-03-31T23:16:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZT' 'sip-files00103.txt'
55a0378b4ec2698d7e0fbe2192e4320b
ee3fdcab4fcc154a0007759670beb21e9f9b2e63
describe
'8291' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZU' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
5da6b02f83c0801a999e6a425d4d9628
20cdb0123a4c1093e5c99c39898620a3c32077cc
describe
'797698' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZV' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
f0c987a7f64e82b3b34100278a165bac
ee64c27a438fb253a6826db1f439294a973c46ee
describe
'59785' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZW' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
da869ded0aea7eb6dd02e374f26acc5c
693abec021dade2cdf1723076a1d56de58fb9186
describe
'10582' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZX' 'sip-files00104.pro'
36438c6704413031ee9f96bd728771ca
b61a6dc64043574f0ea73bd3c94ed8f55fa159fb
describe
'20203' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZY' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
6754a2302da1576e4f1be65900bd97be
c6171e4161be9de7bf5db7c5a909cbc5401ce1e4
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAALZZ' 'sip-files00104.tif'
e5a8c60881ca17cfdcce5a58e1603ce1
ebf5f6c48f7fd3f62fc35dfd82e40576918d24a9
describe
'434' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAA' 'sip-files00104.txt'
76906b340092bcf1cf73bfbceb8b07fa
148c69a486ff6f4fa422c59dd884f143902ffad9
describe
'5725' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAB' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
aa9e775e56f81a1acf2971bdf4d6771e
a3e5c69583739d220856ae22731e0d4cd1e1d9b1
describe
'819877' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAC' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
52279b6ad4ad7e38e39bddb6eacdc67f
6f7997b8b066f828ab2470613d424280de7fafa6
describe
'72016' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAD' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
c3f07f57e0c12f24334f2cfe1d8f54ff
348e590268f6e223dcf7b4293958dd7a54ab0bf9
'2012-03-31T23:15:02-04:00'
describe
'24721' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAE' 'sip-files00105.pro'
5650512ff4b5cf6f30f9b363d38f1ec8
11fb96625000706c166279f96ae53d54451c280b
describe
'26748' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAF' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
b53273571455a5ca4803d04c42686c57
1d496bb24bdb4d27bd40c329f601b990786e54db
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAG' 'sip-files00105.tif'
dc7d61aaa48cb7cd3066112033663667
af8a12c991f1722a63b8df9f658f645ff9905cb2
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAH' 'sip-files00105.txt'
deb3d84ff7020020456eca4b996da7e5
c9b7066e4d5832218c3e786c4a72fbb53ab46189
describe
'7573' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAI' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
031847a70bb591660861644df655d2ac
92e55629555ffe1fec4a4e034485714540c5d3d7
describe
'806879' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAJ' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
24d13d6b0a399e53061075df55043f51
f61b12f637d6b67fa1243ff2db4b99d154de71e1
describe
'107132' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAK' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
763e1b52678a6d6ca7f9ca3e64c7bf76
537d6778c33793594c0e4d6f8860830dbfffc803
describe
'9822' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAL' 'sip-files00106.pro'
d00723858c45032c2522bdf4ab35ddcf
049e4c261de150873e6e8a2a2b231eb2175e4b6d
describe
'51297' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAM' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
ef489c4f7982e6efa5b5bcba1b40f2d4
3118361c74894c93752c1f96b7bdd51276018331
describe
'6477704' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAN' 'sip-files00106.tif'
b4fa96ce3e623642e11050d840142a4b
d865a965b9acc02f1677e8d2df7ffa8cb73fcd0a
describe
'447' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAO' 'sip-files00106.txt'
dbbfbf54fd573c1ff166f81eb6646f52
7b2c05da9c57832feef95595a89a1417488b8aa3
'2012-03-31T23:19:08-04:00'
describe
'30235' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAP' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
20af7faf5f580ed8daac93b683dd4a28
5e411e03e7c182502c63df98117cfda0de69840e
describe
'819851' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAQ' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
95942a096c28aaf0fb33a605a5a8e30e
94094b7c45dd6374129ef60a79137474d05e419e
describe
'85770' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAR' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
d7959cffe749752c5c9fb6600710b36a
e86c00a933c79b34f33f348d883beda65bc4108b
describe
'29132' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAS' 'sip-files00107.pro'
5105fed361d5a5ea5723cd5e5adbd056
f6b20df9b71d585b1437791c4e85b602d6549507
describe
'32145' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAT' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
a801653613aa24c340c9b4ef5f1e8843
27db3c8337ee3324aee83bc7644344e8901c0d85
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAU' 'sip-files00107.tif'
bf773091886808e09bfd4fd5e75f9a31
2113eee2221a26ecce564c6a30733cf700025e52
'2012-03-31T23:19:17-04:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAV' 'sip-files00107.txt'
8030802bad543dd9f50277b25cb61301
2e3043b36fa5f30e9ed48f4d8afac474985a556a
describe
'8999' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAW' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
8e689392bbf07054ed2e36597c097614
02daab850c23cc84f6d848d9c64cb3520373481a
'2012-03-31T23:17:55-04:00'
describe
'806965' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAX' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
88968c317d09b4065c60cc782f48a45e
e543c8523d365bd702ac2c3dd54cd9375f10ad7a
describe
'74673' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAY' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
e4e7457a84a396c401b381a87793c09e
cd00e4358bc04346cdb2f89767902e5cae0158a0
describe
'23368' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMAZ' 'sip-files00108.pro'
6ed2825564a20a2f786950f2c4585d47
3df61e2a65a6f49cedd07306e887fbe1e06a5eed
describe
'28069' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBA' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
f6f8f36f3a356c68b559f2905fbd32a3
3117b4cee32b651221f5859e62fe25f148787d7a
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBB' 'sip-files00108.tif'
c581acfd7f6032f1e0935e9d1a21d892
a4657a4aa0f81eb0ab826fae140d145c14e98de5
'2012-03-31T23:15:50-04:00'
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBC' 'sip-files00108.txt'
643148e4736952e91ba5875fe06ad562
f7d251d4a7ffa6027a78704e47ac443040751b0e
describe
'7797' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBD' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
4b8a3ce69ef45afbc1caa6b45e6a66e6
4dcddb11739c98481548af74b75f90d898ff222f
describe
'721952' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBE' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
bb0af262b50ea4b8f3d0320f82f610e2
0ac691bb0c30c3445b41c5b51fe62982ed740eae
describe
'52697' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBF' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
83269e22b7dbbc925fcb05e695ceea58
0728a6977d60ac4751536c19610b6ab2fdce184b
describe
'11264' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBG' 'sip-files00109.pro'
e1903c6b8b42d8bf9302c9cd787e77df
171bc31a08ecae5bad7975d5099bf30e03383286
describe
'19205' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBH' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
85b830af44b962a88ebacaea7c2e5c70
5ebc765300c2aa320c9f8f1a47bb1c45eca74506
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBI' 'sip-files00109.tif'
0dfa0080135558ca6a9df2fc8403ac10
a7cfe7cc7dff8c108908aa4d74d34241584a8284
'2012-03-31T23:19:30-04:00'
describe
'493' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBJ' 'sip-files00109.txt'
283892a75e029db37a09b17de169a7de
9a97c64fc13a6994bbc25e4d0c3945e7c4ace6a7
describe
'5597' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBK' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
682ce4a5145bb41b8560d0c1062c33fd
8f6314780900cc763680fb441f121fdad1d4349b
describe
'806947' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBL' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
d30e39db30e851aafc51ebb7fb32ab10
655d62975c3b8d1fe2a5fc0e06570df8bfa02251
describe
'89322' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBM' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
aa96cf1c185b9d6f4ce099717bfbaf8d
b7baa2ffe83a0dcae2c7adcc79f963ffe7154c5c
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBN' 'sip-files00110.pro'
a89bf828575b8971544885e1ab88db3a
4021731d32b1e01f17c64468a207500196abb605
describe
'34258' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBO' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
050a84c629010763f5dcbbb2cd7d39c5
9ecf0084da9181fe261cdda203f2d08d35606a1e
'2012-03-31T23:14:50-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBP' 'sip-files00110.tif'
832d886605b2a025edbcc57fb1409d06
f2ecace764b0229fddab49728169deab175e57fa
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBQ' 'sip-files00110.txt'
28a6e23f6ad87ff07ffc8c9e80f1426a
8014a235166573507178e32366907b34c150ea1b
describe
'8892' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBR' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
a468d522c11b0596c36036ad5d0a0e51
deaa97f53f53e035b4c793d40ff741cf26723fef
describe
'819817' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBS' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
c38802ff929ba7c6a36ebeca7cf1d740
68a7c3d7597ff63181955f81f646821280081617
describe
'72394' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBT' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
09bac67197633ccfa916d68d68268dab
46a71e90abf305493fea966551bbcbd037a4adcc
'2012-03-31T23:20:53-04:00'
describe
'21145' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBU' 'sip-files00111.pro'
5873e795d744472efa792f0580a3bd86
a9b54c6b19a4d91f336c9bd15c9d5512cd64a8c3
describe
'26664' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBV' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
767802e9cb2b7308bc95d8283c17e401
106d5f196e1c57be907829e41608e00ce28529ed
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBW' 'sip-files00111.tif'
11063209dd491ec86af88e2928ea59ce
7c1de203a1af80cdfe1e61383d8d282d9a11f1c7
describe
'926' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBX' 'sip-files00111.txt'
92eabec61ff9566cca28d307ec091d7c
201e393a2b5b7bbe41ed1ea1d9660d2224e421fc
describe
'7504' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBY' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
5c119372c6f73d03fa282860f53b25e9
8beef56d44f89bb7851347ff84b9d4fb7805e37d
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMBZ' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
b347cf5abbaf20775bfc0a6e2db0c820
fc949fa2d187a74d658a40754edec16c45b22d7b
describe
'81741' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCA' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
c26619f4173948e545bd9b77ebc171e6
8eabbd653b9646f4bb0b3e3e80c95511202d99c2
describe
'25756' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCB' 'sip-files00112.pro'
42c4dcbcfd3e352e62713fd746bbe04f
513f619d7930479955806fb8f25d2ae1440e1558
describe
'30621' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCC' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
141cd963c8b2b02c8876d3e1d66d3c07
4447471ac84fb9d0b8a971c9673dd1d6b8ca5800
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCD' 'sip-files00112.tif'
53bfb44263838bbd4791b1206f0bd60a
964afe592dc83676953a438369e3f853eb24cf62
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCE' 'sip-files00112.txt'
aa3bd3c6b9045626f91fd965e8e0a661
6e7f287fa5aea8cd8de691f72ad5af1b9e6255db
'2012-03-31T23:16:19-04:00'
describe
'8388' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCF' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
9c0784b1b10e898e645cdbcae3694590
abd6e5856f5a80d8b0d1ff029a101844eddcf3a3
describe
'819864' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCG' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
f67b9f7c3c2a9f8e8d5f68788f7e98e3
72b0afaac6dd3be90612ec79f76be5073cdd7f59
'2012-03-31T23:19:24-04:00'
describe
'74964' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCH' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
6fd03054be67c93d63d3f6dcb7efcec4
5f7ce899c710ab8ac7868da481953716abd7e111
describe
'17436' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCI' 'sip-files00113.pro'
82aa74c17211710e1c385f0b7e44fbce
4dffc1d4f9572f227f5d9543b2488698a07f65c4
describe
'27460' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCJ' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
6e4ea045593236bc8b5ca0818d7cd9a0
fe30b75c3d3b66c9c2bb6c5e0615f02828ecde3e
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCK' 'sip-files00113.tif'
a3f2fdce6c5846fb018d6e231d181a03
34d72aae27e61a66f0c840068da937760289e343
describe
'716' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCL' 'sip-files00113.txt'
bc648b88624a87d7248bb9adbcf0ce05
815a3d8ca2728156f1b11632e90c9da6d0e28ed5
describe
'7716' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCM' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
9fd3e26ec20875e9219e0138fdc3313a
b9c10df087b8728bc420b815652cbed05367e6aa
'2012-03-31T23:18:54-04:00'
describe
'649062' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCN' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
73b5020d95059058af0d2f2009d30bd9
2cc8bda2a9f9fe1b7b23932d9a3b6162845d5348
describe
'46568' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCO' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
1b84e69ebea1d5abb7178808d54edf1f
0ed59c937e8f98dfd0ac21e36bffe86e8644e1d0
describe
'8800' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCP' 'sip-files00114.pro'
5c38ed66638cf89289521896a25c092d
ded6fa36fc15beb246cdcdeafe7eec4ea045d6f5
'2012-03-31T23:19:56-04:00'
describe
'16848' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCQ' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
598bf839d6e2f2252d7036cc309743c7
369261375a1e8c120e9a886b454559d08003177b
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCR' 'sip-files00114.tif'
c84634d70bdeb0c0f18fa4d4dfc93f03
70e071b6f5ef32058c394e8e0da091c9db8d6601
describe
'417' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCS' 'sip-files00114.txt'
01c188c1b948a729676d8d934da58a5e
7cefc4463beeeb14945914194273200da478009f
describe
'4830' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCT' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
8ead28b72746d7f21d70f73e078f1dc1
15166506d1bcd436a202162862e4f7f8852e7e10
describe
'819819' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCU' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
9c352f6a191eddfa109948b93b22587f
176a9707dd8ebe44a3eee8e74126906787751d1f
describe
'70424' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCV' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
b2fe22093d9536a06390539acb184fab
32f23456e0fa34096cc8c86d0d90607529d4b06b
describe
'21732' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCW' 'sip-files00115.pro'
8815d06ab5ee1274b04285c2373d4544
7ce1502eb4f269fed57734f9a7f5f541279e86ba
describe
'26564' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCX' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
5c7a117950357d7b2b18e98b5ed9ebad
d7d07804380f024c28e6b68208451a24ee14af6f
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCY' 'sip-files00115.tif'
344cd7aaa1b5ebbd5bc94a2610eea43e
9ba0095bc7abc7f9fd2d89d4744d7ab04b36b3e2
describe
'917' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMCZ' 'sip-files00115.txt'
d6699c00f8fd49b6905ffd9d10fb0bd7
5abc5ba7bbd5326e5a244df4e0316ae28ffa4a6a
describe
'7539' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDA' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
be6613210791794d475936aa38e9631e
71587db86c4eb499615f883f737c58aa286f3511
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDB' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
d870bb9d9accf05d52d267d6e09c27c0
85acb5183ad22cde10a93be91520336ce2314d64
describe
'89065' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDC' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
236e450cab9d8afe8a6f8d1eaa54b19e
556f2310b36350a24d95dbcb7180c8258cd90dfc
describe
'30583' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDD' 'sip-files00116.pro'
de7ac9e6a3352d77064ff848541ea8da
5c66eedebd453650be5d2d37098b0db24861c185
describe
'33615' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDE' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
3e32efa02cd16d4d4325a4ca403f513e
057f08682bd01d69bdd51fdf244ff782282a7abb
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDF' 'sip-files00116.tif'
efd6a21c9175a087a528820be2ea9b0a
ad4d85bf8c4dd40094f32c1fde04741caa5cd032
'2012-03-31T23:16:28-04:00'
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDG' 'sip-files00116.txt'
a761af1e2d601f8e9ed9871e02094ff1
4655832777f0c0bff8132348b79f203c22205fce
describe
'8867' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDH' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
f7e7f29209385c9e51a530f0993647ab
789e475d7e3f674244fc18f5538cc87520536c4c
describe
'774780' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDI' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
1974c208662ff7901dc88f3a55f4d098
ba7899dbf8d5f815d400e830e3ff2ca48c9ed0e2
describe
'76506' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDJ' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
47c53c36d1d363a60616bd8a3dd87ee3
7cb2f0d849feb4d1256cca2c921bc0962463352a
describe
'15343' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDK' 'sip-files00117.pro'
64eca7f515be278092503329242f6e20
73eb2ea78ee54e53d90e2a04c7e131486298e212
describe
'26465' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDL' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
c7eeb626de234ca980629650723f385f
f4708cb2f856c673c4f5d40275e3b7799a3a5646
describe
'6202431' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDM' 'sip-files00117.tif'
cb3f780fcf99520d7e3e71a0d3369e7e
ffad9e2acfe1c2dc27b06d083357fd3e4f63a0d6
describe
'712' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDN' 'sip-files00117.txt'
cc8ae54e0985511efa3c62762e98b26c
2a41567c6a72253033cc1e13e1be85419693cbd0
describe
'7830' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDO' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
7ad12459c9195cd7bca5eb06a0e2453c
129f307a7fa10a3b0334f7cb7e33642ed96af982
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDP' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
79a06b652985d9b184354c09b8cca042
272d176de8b97b51b8166f9685c0fd74786776f6
describe
'137256' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDQ' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
9292858adb8c834d4100193989afac80
dc96e9179b05d09b99f8a406cfb96ddbf064a0b8
describe
'32025' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDR' 'sip-files00118.pro'
13046ab1ad600bbc9dcb8b4f594b3acc
0b96d8e490463f564b056dc6dbbba45ddda554f8
describe
'67053' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDS' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
2755a040ed840fa30c2a33c44a586f97
3ab04dfb5332cad8f42447c9d13ab66c23103281
describe
'6479044' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDT' 'sip-files00118.tif'
b0640be069144c88c5081e7d9418fabf
b8e3ffe24f740bd8c432a5a5db7266bbff5dccdb
'2012-03-31T23:18:20-04:00'
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDU' 'sip-files00118.txt'
c0f8905bd172528dd8db345868575ac4
75afc34709b9effce0226d9a8b5c46b16f38f2a7
describe
'34074' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDV' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
cd4dcf650d9367f086e0de964f7371e2
00ebccc5c596ea223d911b211eb78be2b4e81c1d
'2012-03-31T23:16:33-04:00'
describe
'767206' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDW' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
e6074d9f5551aec7c8a98bef8d451f0f
a39d944cb8670fb25f4e2a143627380c2cffad02
'2012-03-31T23:16:36-04:00'
describe
'133274' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDX' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
86aea22801f42a2046d1989fa9e2ecf3
61894ee6c567c127505de5671f85d38d9cc2d14e
describe
'29687' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDY' 'sip-files00119.pro'
aa3c5bb31b2955095013e0131e31acd9
94d3783e699ca14e79e90a06174e578bf1081a0c
'2012-03-31T23:19:39-04:00'
describe
'67475' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMDZ' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
17199868fecbf16e61cadf240cb5572b
e018f5987b3704239c0d6d2aa4e40b088b840bbf
describe
'6160736' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEA' 'sip-files00119.tif'
e604bc194b6f713655dfdc12e5393442
2980d6be2fc8fdcc42afe1fd9f6f09082e889477
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEB' 'sip-files00119.txt'
eb2ea93a2f3a4f67b622be9b9234c58a
a0caa515eec42f8c0244fe19139c0cf55b18028b
describe
'34104' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEC' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
7ceb4a5de053878ee3549863e3da6257
679496709322d848e973a5e8641b5de1e4f8fcfc
describe
'806950' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMED' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
a9e7fc140c42c089aa3c38426ab12442
9b26eb6aefb927c5c0725edd637c7e49afcd2500
describe
'87308' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEE' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
51bbd04e24812bf736d8bcf10e2efc2d
615e16718ddf48a52822573f545f62cf1ba1a3c7
describe
'30578' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEF' 'sip-files00120.pro'
e9c7e01d06cc788a1b2df4895e7b658c
4388513fcf3341314714629db1f65153d16348c9
describe
'32896' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEG' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
803c7a1ca696ed79926d7f6a402ae7b8
57c09af8395cab8acdfe08fd7f2b123e0fa70ca0
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEH' 'sip-files00120.tif'
dac5dca012305efaa065ea8fbbfbba59
81c2ef897ff29394452520de5b5d7e5636efd731
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEI' 'sip-files00120.txt'
49602f3bfa0df15f13b67301fc7fdcae
5f0ff9d73de3d24fd9017b6d8b42c94be1fb5038
describe
'8791' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEJ' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
21f957d503fb0533a96b1bdb1bc0b6a2
20a5d5a1284f037f195193efa7c65fea96626206
'2012-03-31T23:14:48-04:00'
describe
'787664' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEK' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
eaaee7d683871e8c9592c150dd490bc2
d205761e3c463170c29d83669826dea50ce6407e
describe
'87558' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEL' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
b4fc4702fbfd6a52ad807b86b7ea35ce
83dc3ecda758a98c1ea9dba58194d817048c42c0
describe
'29207' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEM' 'sip-files00121.pro'
49de05123f45e60bdd1b0f582543b640
109a7442971584288fc84e005ffba4613029e901
describe
'33156' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEN' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
edb9cfae9b0f4f754d278658bef4f431
22d885d7a9ff19a02fcbebc84d5208a941191a4a
describe
'6305683' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEO' 'sip-files00121.tif'
2629ef972e28acb644462903d40e338a
470f6511b1ef02dc9a46501717b7842ff32af6b4
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEP' 'sip-files00121.txt'
69308c3b763d8e1934e47fb78a82a9bc
035f9ce0a522e0de946d42b3135b393d42f47924
describe
'9067' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEQ' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
01b41ee097fc945b60d793cbc9d102e9
e4fb2cedd7d84ed7174643192b08553ac3cbcef7
describe
'837203' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMER' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
7379e6ebff11f2d0da3edea409a33d3d
5f2923ff79e54657a1bb7d8ea8faf0e920258fc7
describe
'84322' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMES' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
2fa1f2bf4b02cdc62a9d201de3c86120
e9b787a9f202e6eca68e054a879d6a435ed918c4
describe
'30110' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMET' 'sip-files00122.pro'
483c5dfe6e72242295a2e852744bc15d
1c3736f764d9554d35783fe0b467a7012c96525f
describe
'31429' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEU' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
c6d64d06d77617a310a8788f6f8a4488
4f6e03dc5fe52d4178b1107a0fcc357b32a4129f
describe
'6705337' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEV' 'sip-files00122.tif'
6b4b5049652e80215cde59ab11b18089
914f355021e457fba089be806fb1200d09047615
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEW' 'sip-files00122.txt'
99148be81d79ca8457b648a29df6076b
cc31d468d0d787ed0f8fa388350343f966cd737f
describe
'8481' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEX' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
7c144a5ee48493c158f9201f89dd664a
ffeb628ec99b0da5c7235a6418e01e89a40e6bec
describe
'837205' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEY' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
5afb508bf5bd9845ea92eb3065bcc6a8
fe19e5d04d6a43c9928dfee307e5fe747fe99290
describe
'84833' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMEZ' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
9ac07c31635a7a9e4dd9c25008501ba2
3e8b01596dbbb528dbbbc2400b13480f7870628b
describe
'29052' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFA' 'sip-files00123.pro'
ea5687b56a01bdbb604326f4823b659e
9919ff890f9e81b056bd977483b8b0e482b809b4
describe
'31595' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFB' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
96b9d50c5aff237c89f35ebe1579d364
97aa50328a6f4cb717ecabce9f2a07086ea069f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFC' 'sip-files00123.tif'
513bf25862676d877b773faa3548f592
47f99fbd6a04d6f1ffc458001698f96c132a1b20
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFD' 'sip-files00123.txt'
a65fc3ae28654411ff18f281d6ecb029
9ba33d90fde5c5b300de6865b9dfcee3e1621817
describe
'8805' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFE' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
544d0db162602e7d56af5190b2ad82ad
216a4e23846332af0fbad9c1904956094213b765
describe
'837209' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFF' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
51e1b78f187086c4fe15c1de943ca594
675d700a115f10e1a6f8687b33e0cda088c4a282
describe
'81940' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFG' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
896587f689b046a70671e26eceaf0ef8
991c54d408823ee8639014ce4094b178e9bc7444
describe
'13514' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFH' 'sip-files00124.pro'
253f2e7d2019741b548827ff74001425
1dd9af0ae11b246efe314b6354f764cd5f6e2881
describe
'26455' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFI' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
b8f1aa861b6d817b4f48a154ffc481cb
5d84ab05fea929c1eee8924c6ada0fed743398ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFJ' 'sip-files00124.tif'
1059cb82d301164afddb2259522e1a92
c78b970bca99793dd798edbbfc3cc8cbef356243
describe
'555' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFK' 'sip-files00124.txt'
9425361ed981c623d96fee00f4d691dd
1247f6c9b2f5c1a195a59853f16e029a12569d49
describe
'7234' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFL' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
fb438ef0d56c89515062a0b2d2b24047
54b2a04fceb48d1eeecf7341838ace1d752d6d2f
describe
'837195' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFM' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
c1715d678ee831be9948957d5ce7e430
66d3b0249fc1d04830e54e77191fbe1ea4ca1724
describe
'64269' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFN' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
5ec3eaccd5348c77cb42145b49c0a8e8
0ffa71fb8153f140158993ac2770e77a24a713f0
describe
'7104' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFO' 'sip-files00125.pro'
cdf484fc57989ba383ed95010a5caf0a
41ad8f141923d884e5327f6888c03171ee40dbd0
describe
'20002' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFP' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
66f22242daa4d4ee3ffe7e17a80410ee
a7e9eb37aa2d7dbc0acb579c88c3f80b32558acb
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFQ' 'sip-files00125.tif'
3f871aaf3423bb8b66cb384282c7415a
01ce526fba49e3f427a25a38d8e526517ec29dc0
describe
'308' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFR' 'sip-files00125.txt'
8d638799e8fe63ff881aed5f57b96801
0bef121a83ccac42af5e7c80c69f4fc445272440
describe
'5600' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFS' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
fe836a5ae0abf8ffd660c87f807663c1
6f3bc086443e114c36086cca135f2cd024f16ecc
describe
'797706' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFT' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
b5e73494462d0725aa3ed4f421ab7e79
7d55b495b76a2d10c20ab7ba68540c928dbf04a6
describe
'69728' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFU' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
703b8dd3ac301ddb5d33f6b052c72070
409ef70db55eb00ef79ef8e01a641821d2eecafb
'2012-03-31T23:19:36-04:00'
describe
'23372' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFV' 'sip-files00126.pro'
545d821015edefbe3a48dbcb3ff86adb
b71e01810d2c333acaa1bea55079e30f285c088c
describe
'26292' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFW' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
ce40d4855675cc1910975b02dc4b6dae
9e6079814ddbc950d41f6579eda25fee4e96f318
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFX' 'sip-files00126.tif'
78ffa76b4bf825b73ceba877f944ecb7
bc69671f28229883f605df40ae4d4b6c31cedff5
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFY' 'sip-files00126.txt'
6263e85f9e05eb3a6516bd6d709ad302
0860de1adc4923cee67e1d2c1e859e7b1d8a4bff
'2012-03-31T23:19:23-04:00'
describe
'7158' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMFZ' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
503555f1c43517146a89fc256a4349f2
499a3eea9ea7ccb619610daa0ca38ee61e0c01a5
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGA' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
e371d8ef959dbfdc11ec6717585848a7
cebdd6931e9f52feb0c122f954c880fce6357f7a
describe
'76126' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGB' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
e9f043ecd5e4d7a575e607594b6dae43
2ace0cfdc7e1b270491f440fc7edbb538230eb39
describe
'10361' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGC' 'sip-files00127.pro'
76c9293a57c25ca729761d50942fed89
0a20101866c02dd573fbabd5afec17c919d543e9
describe
'25789' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGD' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
d009d422a1a8d5ee0e37f7cf6153e39a
d499c9b9ccfe037f190737cfc7c0857dca9c6519
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGE' 'sip-files00127.tif'
56c5e3b0f45acff8b8a6480dac0cdd9a
a1aa8e254d7d6ce119ecf8431e753b17db3249d7
describe
'431' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGF' 'sip-files00127.txt'
e17b6ff6a4349b9da676ce87c2087a76
e13f090722cd82627e5862e1e1d8c85ad4758ccc
describe
'7758' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGG' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
ce5a1ab6f52c7897b2b8efcc35c06fdf
c740112a4ed82f1b4c8af0b931334095c50741e8
describe
'837206' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGH' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
3db14f05d96bcbd8d83f2499790f74de
d5c08a1778e422de0d83a022f3dc28b2c4aa59db
'2012-03-31T23:18:31-04:00'
describe
'80231' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGI' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
a40a5eaeff98a06fc6ed5bec3f12ce84
87b4fda5a46de474db974a598793a490ba204b99
describe
'15809' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGJ' 'sip-files00128.pro'
40a01fa72a097d144fa17bba9e18af60
02f74c10264d4e2365d7dc17357b61efc79ac99a
'2012-03-31T23:21:00-04:00'
describe
'28521' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGK' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
b2b5104028d12b3f1e922a54c0de5a03
411739b41f380b6520c780e0578fdba08f536b40
'2012-03-31T23:17:30-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGL' 'sip-files00128.tif'
bd7dc7358534fd8942571f626a53e6c8
299ac731adcc568b4b9b119a264610fb9cd05d7b
describe
'696' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGM' 'sip-files00128.txt'
b8dc2239c863ded49e71ff4f9c0b1e53
d078cbe8047e144da67e488a31b4d947c69980c7
describe
'8184' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGN' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
48dae3f7e37acb02480442fec1948c64
3c5cb255b9956b01ff12e1f94d7e85413878a684
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGO' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
3bd2a68a65139efd36e009c0e178ac97
52ed8b8b97df7619b106d0527783b9f8f1444b5a
describe
'68640' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGP' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
9b1e45e13bfea07739b1f4048e4375ef
e82cd05cfb93ad44ba8c4ea852d1eaaee9583469
describe
'13713' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGQ' 'sip-files00129.pro'
ed84c1562dd338b3c8639c4cad269fdb
43a295ab34500c81d0eab84ffe5d6f4883eef146
describe
'24404' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGR' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
a077acb88800c707b552aaa6e3cdea11
fca2796d7c60cd3efdba1658cfc11767293cf1be
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGS' 'sip-files00129.tif'
0e81697ec0b1931cf3d95fe9a28cd39a
7e59838022b9c38caf73a0a47d855af5b93ac128
describe
'579' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGT' 'sip-files00129.txt'
5e5da31dc9a0aeed9af02321f755b2cb
24822c96c1af0628b91adb97025953c3351a694d
describe
'6970' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGU' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
0b25903a035db919f92cf2f0ad97248f
5258edc15c4f2fec5f30be70934568f47db9b00f
describe
'837162' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGV' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
2263d818839345157dcd05ed9789e7e2
dff55db472934def93693503820524963d683d03
describe
'63894' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGW' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
ce76eeb97798f53c80dcc47837708f87
0086bd6b027cc74276436ae5ccd3b5468895a6f1
describe
'11130' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGX' 'sip-files00130.pro'
ea37bc931154030ebf1b9239afc56ed9
68070e9dd9684bb222697ed0be2268ed2f1fb3b6
describe
'22152' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGY' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
d0a578a3c69f75e62a07621cd2b2ee0f
fb3a250912edc321b53460b4f8440c0ab2ddf811
'2012-03-31T23:17:02-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMGZ' 'sip-files00130.tif'
e11f6847657979d8a1a4e4243d61b1c3
f6a9c0165368f28ca7e88275f33ce41ed04d2959
describe
'480' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHA' 'sip-files00130.txt'
5c2455a768ae2aca8a14661c0e5421d8
c88e00a023371a5acb5ff924e3babd2f673f2968
describe
'6600' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHB' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
c100419d0a4ad8e5f48ee4d916a1a376
b99b111131c3428586ec0a7d43bdf02b78d1ed63
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHC' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
9d00dc823a06eed7048cef9830c8e481
c39c5fe0f89f9660155b4b2ed2923e6d4c6fa050
describe
'82123' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHD' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
846852b1fc3bbcefa3647966d34a60d1
05b3e5ea85bc866ea1fdebc318eebe1ce0983bda
describe
'26950' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHE' 'sip-files00131.pro'
b8b18685590d92a48b5a2eac2404323f
b1382aa7ee79046090d974f440ddd14df56a8938
describe
'30274' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHF' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
4fdac71a77ef1233c79c9e277acbb4c0
de760d4e621311c4e14c6a1c84a5dd27c17c7d69
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHG' 'sip-files00131.tif'
e4ac33e379faad4fbe31ca1e1b5af717
21c7b1491246799dfe1957d55aa1616c75accc57
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHH' 'sip-files00131.txt'
ea5a1e48d9a90bfc9379d7c018a43b1a
575c890ed11d2bedf26e4a9880f64e0ef94061b3
describe
'8241' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHI' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
30e988d5bbc66819d52a45f8f2e38557
cb48d0309b9c16b0d32963848bd4d34ba74ba058
'2012-03-31T23:20:07-04:00'
describe
'837210' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHJ' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
f1773ffca2cee960d1a5db6869af9f74
73bbf851a22806a0bb47752c0b12e41c82ee557a
describe
'62442' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHK' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
c3bc03734cd79396325c8c923a8fd040
a0cda047410d13be39cc9c65038253f635bcba5f
describe
'2503' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHL' 'sip-files00132.pro'
7f812f9f27defdbe6a50c9fd238b2618
1b7e3c8bdab652ec7de343b3b293a1bbaeff4430
describe
'18170' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHM' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
790c23decd8d66760145799ed6b88241
cb50973a35fcdb844d0b3fa821f8ca327c21e431
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHN' 'sip-files00132.tif'
eeea6ba7dc1547aa44bc046e6b968ac7
794b7a7b16f51e2e985611adc1f41ee044ee0e4e
describe
'140' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHO' 'sip-files00132.txt'
ea1855e78fe52b791dda3a404d62d805
3b682bc5da645f8e61a90254c041319bb811ffea
describe
'5277' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHP' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
5e4e6c89f7a3dcdce94dd8cf61eaec54
b564b01debd297f82ea3bc91edd3a144821a0054
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHQ' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
3682b3fb8123b43aec81000feed24849
96e872be314ae633806af1982cac3445efaa78a1
describe
'82361' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHR' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
5f7ebe77940cb158e280da2c2d47660d
93dba886665847922afff46ffe320f23431c2419
describe
'25271' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHS' 'sip-files00133.pro'
3f74668ecf0c4688813e114f918a2448
7dfe9bd752e0956bd77c9d7e6ba4eeb6f33f07ff
describe
'29661' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHT' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
4c10a514a0ac111f5ccb4764d2e3b71f
337cfea90630fe52d498da24b924e1b70731bfb1
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHU' 'sip-files00133.tif'
b3c204ab126e19947384987f29fff7b7
3aa96553e1d285f6cc17be2fb5bf09c4b858913a
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHV' 'sip-files00133.txt'
ff907492f7b7057eef725a353943c290
11993c4546a2eb374ff482d7de9540f53ee248c9
describe
'7972' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHW' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
40ac3b39f82a060e964603550a74c308
346b4a171614ab16eb22cea5042a7069eea4244d
'2012-03-31T23:21:29-04:00'
describe
'800138' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHX' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
f90daf7645385a603836436d7cb0fb7f
0a31e1d09120b6324d1691f7f8f976e527831556
describe
'57720' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHY' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
255319955dd88d907c152eb4786be2a8
ceceb825b57d777fd1a3c962472e8a7816e30934
describe
'7054' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMHZ' 'sip-files00134.pro'
6591c79f7db4220b3dd40d5df5fb26c2
b341101c550885635578fcb30115a877a36b3c89
describe
'20172' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIA' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
04c5ca586c875145397e4698de10acf4
4a91c9ffe505bff31671280662d843b561bd24d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIB' 'sip-files00134.tif'
15ae8629d7c2d0df0f215c22697474ad
a89b199d4b5073c3539d1850596ce5d5fba8fa49
describe
'302' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIC' 'sip-files00134.txt'
c0bffe427fc45cd378c8b9507b204e5f
01077abd839299974ff7e762b46cc69b64be0654
describe
'6456' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMID' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
9fc003ea6e631cb60ea6d317e8116b5c
914772aff0b8206c851ef76b91995a11efa1f7a6
describe
'837051' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIE' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
82d473f633900966f9e320734cd87ba1
c367da81732dcaa494cd6ca53c46c829661869d5
'2012-03-31T23:20:36-04:00'
describe
'76952' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIF' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
bac427ea15d6c7c58ec68657f00a900b
f12fe6053d1c02ae34a3d6f89ef49275a3ad84df
describe
'27158' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIG' 'sip-files00135.pro'
8556f3d1e28d45d49bdabdc4b1e184b9
3329f55383a4052c177c1fdcf6bb75917773df82
describe
'28777' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIH' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
fbfa7dbc3509106ebb4474b22abbce7a
cec9e064c644816bb3e5747b4c1087542fa15445
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMII' 'sip-files00135.tif'
0936aef6c4c202602580001e250c73d9
e59076b936dfa00aaf90a8a7f860b9d4097d7795
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIJ' 'sip-files00135.txt'
f423976f69bdcb6a24698914015db279
0fac5f9ac925e5d4f658ee9e72b0a814f3fc0109
describe
'7927' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIK' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
6e0db4181e7d3e44bb7b0909679d8cee
3b2310c2646ff5b485595d7d01b67b65bbd36760
describe
'625281' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIL' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
e6ea6d6f707ba508c66817bac9dded2f
df91a904718cf7106b61f31c3f2a061500fd6f30
describe
'41044' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIM' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
3d737ab42d869e67f495e0bffed1a914
401c8132b15e1624af7f140aa1f29f7be667f18f
describe
'5992' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIN' 'sip-files00136.pro'
c28bc39b54ae052ce8c4cee6288307d1
02548b60de9511a67c8671a0473ad7d16d07e6f9
describe
'14490' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIO' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
eb1536a2fe2d3d2dfc37860a84e75cae
ca3327d07bea5e0d619ef3ab02d09bad867a5e78
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIP' 'sip-files00136.tif'
bc449664bc800c7776750f56fde03aeb
04b897858df8e76ca9f347584cfbbca8ff16f947
describe
'258' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIQ' 'sip-files00136.txt'
7afe9e4ff3020cf133565bd5c25fe3ca
d146c8f6e5503a2ba2b30cbb9e3cb1d982b7b6ff
describe
'4516' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIR' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
1eb0154c51b1db027b9225358313d1a4
2d4baf960ca61c335c46da3a6a97c305cdbda576
describe
'837187' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIS' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
e5da309abf4d7c9ad4a4ace150050656
81097e778f34d37580ab2124b7df2a42114420db
'2012-03-31T23:20:12-04:00'
describe
'79728' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIT' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
77ae2786fb2ed18a02c91886345c4955
daa9c0fdb351234217556269cb8af89f6da71c17
describe
'21433' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIU' 'sip-files00137.pro'
9953e216e4dee801d53987a2f383a11b
c5ae5bbbea348c1cfeba8e69eec438925e2a53f4
describe
'28742' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIV' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
2ba229d3089660ed33572855345a4a26
51a0c6e0baff2fc4bfd809703a451bb5d9aa6127
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIW' 'sip-files00137.tif'
8e16317bb5da35892d9aacaf6ff5131b
13ec00041696c85c5f95055a34026119a189d273
describe
'947' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIX' 'sip-files00137.txt'
3ed2b02a6653b8b68084a28786cb5b3d
d39471bae5812a9b61d22c7332a96fbeab688b30
describe
'8212' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIY' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
6df054eeaa1021c3f5b276f27292d472
11bf3f6d075a9cdf80c1e41f8201655830b33f09
describe
'837201' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMIZ' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
6168463434b395a32ff3c526ee202a60
556ab6aad6446effb15bdba1964f4c32c1eb9e5d
describe
'83680' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJA' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
6c9433a571dc7c5f2d61a77ad8442651
dd70ef3acbd165a0a607f4b26a756718076de4e0
describe
'26511' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJB' 'sip-files00138.pro'
e00b6ccdafbd70f31621684e0b0ceaf2
3beccf6c91cf23cb8589279dbf1c89d6e7f58961
describe
'31035' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJC' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
4d58241a02883d2116faf1a3f24b3257
14eb9d3c08bcaa02e4d69762ecb00b321a3d2277
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJD' 'sip-files00138.tif'
d7160373f9b874d5aa4b991c3f6e9bfa
150ddc9f45a49f264939de615cc0a3e49b9d30c0
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJE' 'sip-files00138.txt'
cd718fa9c87488469ac3c722e429f6e2
f6cf00d75c7c07e15beedaee7ca5ea61b2e250c3
describe
'8698' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJF' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
1cacd631dee48625fca6f1967450e161
f07ad45d9f0fad6165ef6744ebb4c947e8cd90a3
describe
'818175' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJG' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
f4c7e6fbcce5a8fa254f185f5dc3b161
548f5ce950dd8512872985f66d035b971584abe8
describe
'74384' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJH' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
f4f098f080aa36767ec4227bf3c2dffd
22268846c0b42a1e9f4ba2c1f639b9167fa9d7e3
describe
'25743' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJI' 'sip-files00139.pro'
77cf3fd9287342d273aff85689c69cd6
99b8f35d1ab7e570e8fd2ffcd3de87e095494568
describe
'28037' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJJ' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
16ed87793234b9b38c4f8c5085a88930
0cd5e45aca9c8ee1395979676ba567cf50672e1c
describe
'6550303' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJK' 'sip-files00139.tif'
1934a71e4da3353e03c9a412558316f4
ea2e7e76c3b92260c0d5a64aae1d5c743f01c34c
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJL' 'sip-files00139.txt'
735f670acc28f46b7cdeb2e8fbc2fea0
e4cd8f9d6a9039566dcc8e43e3eef09961ae5508
describe
'7538' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJM' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
8695681ace6953920b968b8814d44c71
83bae50ab0847e3514b9341d6abebfb0283c675c
describe
'837196' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJN' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
181d49f58a8c71ba9af013c9c4cade89
7f94375be7f53f780051b48a58afdfd6b0756e5c
describe
'84456' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJO' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
1f3e3d9947c9ba879e772dd35ee3ce1b
8897d801c3ef6ff78656c206ca8bd2f6c04fb8d9
describe
'29010' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJP' 'sip-files00140.pro'
3f177ffd1ca490d8c59d5636b2722976
64b977b17d2b9cf273c28aaa2f5df7ea943780d0
describe
'31792' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJQ' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
aedc807ad8e4ff8bf1e511760f73de93
5dc16b119eaff43a81d11e951f30a72a2f469afe
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJR' 'sip-files00140.tif'
a093adc9743dd36f22f196307d229f5b
caa864c78926ee3f74f060d434c0e0ee5f3f21e5
'2012-03-31T23:17:21-04:00'
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJS' 'sip-files00140.txt'
694ac432791953bee040b4aa029b92c3
52b739f467ec0570cc446350887170c07641e3ca
describe
'8665' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJT' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
8faf2b1d9bece100c9220723ec013bd4
fe1d68b0abe8f8d14ded0aac1f8c0997512f8fcd
describe
'810489' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJU' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
710999406532f5f8db9f1386732ec027
94db40fba500eb22dd53a608d52d85654c972c71
describe
'92008' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJV' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
87c5508854c2d5637c63d420475a55a6
15e38ba5d0872d84252bb140b78655ba7130c057
describe
'31387' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJW' 'sip-files00141.pro'
4d53cbd3b0d6d8981fa0b311f6022182
4e0c29d59ecffd1ea929a5884d540a3d8e1c3bd5
describe
'34379' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJX' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
072d7c8050b2e7f86d6b02ea98deba40
c95a0495222e71cb912c0e545149ef36ae42ee12
describe
'6488239' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJY' 'sip-files00141.tif'
55136511fea8505f3a6c279a04ed2837
2ae47ed611bebc85d2d7a163f09bb57bd6a92310
'2012-03-31T23:18:56-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMJZ' 'sip-files00141.txt'
aef1f26bec6989fc473ad5fcd78ba0cf
d252472a1051b252012b5e3e03263ae25a186ac0
describe
'9106' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKA' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
93e9c0109690dec8374054290e45839d
9120613b9918104d5d67efd53a06a4126dec4333
describe
'821611' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKB' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
dd6bf114a9bed7dcb3f768f1e6acc1e8
3a4e04ef91c320934b4f5708cee3fefb4b819a1d
describe
'74257' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKC' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
6b69324b23924f9cdfa1b4a47c36f99a
f613aa34ca9f86c055e9ba3f27419c2a61f2e9cb
describe
'18851' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKD' 'sip-files00142.pro'
2e8ce0d932fdae78c65713e85b8e0826
c1ef8acc8376571d836709cd2d9ae75ba256ef23
describe
'26729' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKE' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
f4d7b5e1550b5851662ad88842d033bb
73cb7706ef586e2946d9c2e27604c22f425eef03
'2012-03-31T23:15:43-04:00'
describe
'6577535' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKF' 'sip-files00142.tif'
10fcdafc5a7cdec518547d8ee9931452
bf9e4598b0dd3b87290ba33c5b57a147846e4d2b
describe
'1283' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKG' 'sip-files00142.txt'
d3e948cd48a53f0caabf7e5c496a4b09
0f9ae4da206ecf91b62de1a94c7e106caf2f6c31
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKH' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
b848bbaaa2c05cc304a18e12dd5b4bb8
bfa7dd269d359d0370314c744066ba5bd0d26483
describe
'802506' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKI' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
eb1065fab512b226f545a750e1a0d771
0bb423ebb51b37553232c78146c6d5dbca8b3e8c
describe
'67355' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKJ' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
e7a38a324bddf9fbe3250dc162a0fce5
ad63a3cef9b59d2dc9ddf8a9966085524617c409
describe
'15135' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKK' 'sip-files00143.pro'
4af6629759560894947530522da2e20b
adbf5bd8d7c79c21e44fe5770f26a41b69d023ce
describe
'24533' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKL' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
b252ca842a3e170c58b4cedf04b290e7
b005f6e3f902d3cc81c5ace4b49cf07e57441674
describe
'6424283' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKM' 'sip-files00143.tif'
ae6db691a68963c566442fd3d1f42327
116fea9257db67847da723ea50a3afbc650773e9
describe
'657' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKN' 'sip-files00143.txt'
59408c3edc7b58aae144138231c7c4d9
9fa2265cb57577460689a3bedadbbb9624ce8a8e
describe
'7004' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKO' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
16a7cab5894dee95da16d19e562ad517
8d12be4ddfef0a40bde60c802d5e7f51b0f161a2
'2012-03-31T23:21:01-04:00'
describe
'820950' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKP' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
24a583756eff9cf0df3ddd72700a31ca
6ef40b622c6d192f74f8207ead1ea46aeba5b691
describe
'87785' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKQ' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
4de259ff9ee961bb320b8b5ab2b80dc2
13b45c1ebe5f2c2b925a3b71027859385956327b
describe
'30872' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKR' 'sip-files00144.pro'
86b2e19ac0473475bfca98e4d6cdf9d1
3a5ada263415df6a11a69fa3ba3f6afab25b306e
describe
'33170' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKS' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
fef280b9d9aeadcbb6376f8ee61f5f9d
eb8ef06bfb6fb04965f1be31098c7c042a886b89
describe
'6571931' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKT' 'sip-files00144.tif'
0c14a73e42235ec671d16e7f2219bb5d
7da8ed18ea258796189c970b29760fc5a739c8da
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKU' 'sip-files00144.txt'
0bea24de2db1f1f49824c80a6bd6d986
36524f172b378f8231178212cabc75193fd27dde
describe
Invalid character
'8621' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKV' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
2086335a93a1ee42709a1a0276cf785b
a2f2152ab9b15ceef5c2d35223efeb7ef9b97999
describe
'796581' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKW' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
10d69946894de34789bad6375972bf88
2d0b7e9c73776a1852ccbd5db61ef06d17987c48
describe
'90522' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKX' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
e25ba667958896219b79cccb1d1cf0f0
629a1bdb892ba21845cb1459ee29cd145b1c376a
describe
'31461' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKY' 'sip-files00145.pro'
bb58753cddc4ccf96b326a92f26d8b7f
7f33621ddf652d1f8e3230c105086f0c4d0b2629
describe
'34006' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMKZ' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
a4c266c14c6f5f7f762bdd5407047ad6
0ff7c55345e070c0eac4f585353b677c38e8e74a
describe
'6376843' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLA' 'sip-files00145.tif'
15936f49de029ec08591523638aca081
ce676176ae1400e75b5aadfa085465636e722faf
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLB' 'sip-files00145.txt'
f02aa1d1c8213b712f23953370b56ff8
990c345dbf4eea8fee3847bcb1dd3089becf51c3
describe
Invalid character
'8925' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLC' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
e4bd8148d5e90e53c5df049e5bd624df
1ac3bd495e452c186a549ce291c308554d154389
describe
'842733' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLD' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
ead75e00447402e46ec7266a8f7fe888
99480f85254aff7932e12727b3c0630df6fd7407
describe
'86189' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLE' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
374f1485663797e83ded41c72f4493ae
d10f22d105af8fdd0ba358e9ec7c3d06c918a7cc
describe
'29864' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLF' 'sip-files00146.pro'
4ba08218cf1291c1a0ae756dcc7e2c5c
97f83d8a4176ca5c449334b457f8da82c349ca1f
describe
'32246' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLG' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
8b810cc99edb0722f5f7b2bca358081c
03429ba6bd5ecc4aab7011c4b58f41df9701a133
describe
'6749553' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLH' 'sip-files00146.tif'
edaf0027f267945b4b1d7741f9ff1970
f91849f84479ccf7b2b0f1851ec05aaeb5f231d2
'2012-03-31T23:17:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLI' 'sip-files00146.txt'
6d9561f8c614f119c0bfd17f351d6218
cb4fc45eb287f7cf4b778ee9e72dea2d35154722
describe
'8384' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLJ' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
fa0d6d0bea04c24a146a0436016470aa
af035da8ec52b1d8489c8522e5b72a265a8d27a7
describe
'831935' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLK' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
dd10663f470c9b20a72278b01a13e4c1
e3f5a03f5b36fe63cdf0117397457e1279df57d1
describe
'91061' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLL' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
7d7114230e673847a64082084dfaad29
b2b020a0c1236bf91708e2ef902fc67faa97c6bd
describe
'31810' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLM' 'sip-files00147.pro'
bfb2fe1ad271ed388b0b6219ec7ab54d
fa3b906006f6bbb6a6477504a49729682a5285b0
describe
'33991' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLN' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
aed9f2fafabd0b71cc6a6cb77db33774
9a75853ba235fe4b1b7a5a602091bb11174ff2f7
describe
'6663337' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLO' 'sip-files00147.tif'
f1bc42831ba19a55782296f0ba3637d6
73907513e32e337d05e73386d90efe2bc567ab3a
describe
'1279' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLP' 'sip-files00147.txt'
4b5f4ca013dd7583a687ccdaefee4360
f4059f5143937c7be6a70895f803cb04623edf2f
describe
'9425' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLQ' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
c5a8c446f8f375afd125394c90a8b549
a51e0417a6adb2e34d1d9a7bdc46684a8473b935
describe
'842723' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLR' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
9174c6d21e7168b9b9437206a73cb898
4c10d951c94ac008c0761f16f58226cb19e235b9
describe
'133789' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLS' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
df5d1df74883f4f865ed56e806eab978
117e438726717cb890570465128f88812389e3f5
describe
'30724' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLT' 'sip-files00148.pro'
5ca1951b38e07220f5609c61012acbdc
d14de4016225b54df12619d1e04eba84e9637182
describe
'66710' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLU' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
67e6c3778e6347a9c069f99ccfad418c
af49ccb727a02dedd019193edda59a32bb0a176a
'2012-03-31T23:20:03-04:00'
describe
'6765284' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLV' 'sip-files00148.tif'
cc6d7066eee6cff035acfcae8bed97dd
cca15508b3c6fc5409ea374f52af31535650e052
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLW' 'sip-files00148.txt'
d9e4de5495f60c462351fce61e5206f8
161bc19bf3eb54c263e0e648187b1d5e3ead5566
describe
'34471' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLX' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
468e6a82f4392f9d4f3d52d115aaaf4c
a05298f59c6690fb6c8cb645390077762231cd8e
describe
'831947' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLY' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
1c7726e0e203a989ac363ba70576b996
473805566127e5c708850fbeaa3fb08e7a2f6c41
describe
'126491' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMLZ' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
71e72e7320c64b8ac372842347130a9e
98fcf61447106de97b75fc0fec278fa29df1512e
describe
'28884' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMA' 'sip-files00149.pro'
381a35582d890adde27c5dd31d05d7d9
52beaf86cb862125c9589d385d5ce157246810dd
'2012-03-31T23:15:56-04:00'
describe
'62417' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMB' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
22c45e2f3495ad3a9b401e442937c19e
03c05ad9ddf0a3462f6a06d540151c69fc580dd8
describe
'6678504' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMC' 'sip-files00149.tif'
7f4641c0db528734c44f34ff4cf38122
03b474963488f9c92f93ca420aa2bbe926fb4dbb
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMD' 'sip-files00149.txt'
4dd54511d61366889281157fe61f1082
868870d41cf193da86fdffc16b2e99a179b50f10
describe
'32878' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMME' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
f8d9bef60150d127029b0d1eb2263d2c
63d9bbba5631d706690c7f52ec16bbd349a21f3a
describe
'842699' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMF' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
42d4331974993f6155c94ebfd377616e
d5399437c9f59bd42c70c2331b47f36808523fe6
describe
'86352' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMG' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
277669cacf30d7c2f2505b128a5955e3
b36c10ff05a5954a8f33c8786b4c9eff31388df9
describe
'30009' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMH' 'sip-files00150.pro'
2b757b741ebd8b951cb2ee2cd5af802e
4cf103686558250ade59d77436439eb536f766a2
describe
'32895' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMI' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
d53b953384ef419502cd92aa481cdfea
73c3e4fe5b16d22f354a33c29aada8416994ac9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMJ' 'sip-files00150.tif'
cd2a034f9c15b9a7589ba22b59d58855
99c607f788239f46946e82e8369fa442c51d8068
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMK' 'sip-files00150.txt'
883d1716026f790b515ced6e699145f5
de865c9cbb4a0219d3f8a84d004ea5e6f4690346
describe
'9024' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMML' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
814644b642748744330405dfae54df93
c30f77eda537bbf65a9adf09ecc659e52fdeb985
'2012-03-31T23:19:40-04:00'
describe
'831968' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMM' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
69296f09df3bab1f3b8d4e1f36619621
db248f1e5216eca80ea8679a7db6ef7e76bd62cb
describe
'135666' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMN' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
59a239df77afb5e37abf2d17c6c9bf32
f046d5afe755ae838cb49a86a6f3d895010f5698
describe
'32159' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMO' 'sip-files00151.pro'
38613f387c9e5d22f65480320bf71594
654af3640cc82712d53b811cde2c8b637c676bc4
describe
'67082' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMP' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
71fde3956fba69b68abf2d5f6a678ef5
101aa84a51480d756f2e4d9d503eac899f5b2d18
describe
'6678852' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMQ' 'sip-files00151.tif'
69738babbf7ea5c4de9ab1129cf9c983
e9e36b3e401df71b868bb7d7f097c67196982f1f
describe
'1332' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMR' 'sip-files00151.txt'
60f2e580e3f04e639c28b54f956b31bd
60f93920e4393b6f1807a707c3751ace5ed9b49d
describe
'33664' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMS' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
176a550b1e7609bf25222bc9869b4774
78652c162a9cf2e72026dd200b10ae4b6bc8f172
describe
'714743' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMT' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
a169c1567ae1e0f8de060a940235c505
de417b3e5f38f880e2f94bb7bdad25b1b6f9fc73
describe
'81728' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMU' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
090efd98c32d232343bec95cc097582d
9c44bdbc02142d7691c66f45dd6e2d0c515d8634
describe
'7087' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMV' 'sip-files00152.pro'
de0f8e1bbdba707b2905591db4352679
e29a313de466e46040bdd3e2f1eacee6b7625d39
describe
'43719' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMW' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
656a2001ae94915eb9a5c88ccd200fee
bdecdfff0393d328dedc7f656f42da938ac1aaae
describe
'6762892' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMX' 'sip-files00152.tif'
f58d8352bd88463af1a457afe1defa1a
6b7c47944d6739c698fb808102288e78264ecda7
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMY' 'sip-files00152.txt'
1fd1c98eaef74934f8d2400c74070c2f
476e26dee52711e5f6401e1db52045a7353ef3fb
describe
'27617' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMMZ' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
f25d352263c4651ede4317709f0ede96
d5643c823a5eed00b9998081cffdc3fbdf54946e
describe
'831952' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNA' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
5a0a50c91dd94e02ee854cc28cf37ada
f51ca329d14c67b04712219354394f12cc869ba2
describe
'87109' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNB' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
016b32e444844766fa2c21c41b711a0f
1e9c5620d2edee606d87dc23e6d2e5e751707712
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNC' 'sip-files00153.pro'
548929486cac285ae2b7e860c13e2925
37396cbf289e2077c95feae264f99b9fe92857ec
describe
'32736' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMND' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
c04c081cc83528731e48b045e13de748
6706350680c4f721646c2c83c1a7cab203219d8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNE' 'sip-files00153.tif'
c9c5ef06fa5ce36fb858dddaf665179d
cb639c922f33836a90dc3c65f725d6789f31c49d
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNF' 'sip-files00153.txt'
e0784801441f4fe70e37351626444d73
80130fe717f212e9c0c90fa28c19cb657315023b
describe
'8897' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNG' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
ab772aaa2776d69179e326db5de8d1e9
1b32dcdcf1309c29f65a2170f5b9a2b659c079e3
describe
'855274' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNH' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
a104ee71dfaacd7f5ebd9b2d07342be3
48c6be278f18e5a31d7807a3fe1474064be45ead
describe
'98534' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNI' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
5188121e5b9d123a8b7456b5d5e8cc06
7247ed8b45b6de3499b3a058e40a3ac6527ec21b
describe
'14820' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNJ' 'sip-files00154.pro'
bbbf3f1ab9e5560b21f8e158af441b73
759adb3384602555c76808adbb435196b2682d3f
describe
'49989' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNK' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
c43059b822991ad6602faa93a3330a26
09753a53b6d9d300cf24cf2d57ce21189e49de8a
describe
'6863852' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNL' 'sip-files00154.tif'
e40ffb76d90f22e1cee01196b8556276
a1e898c520e8fd6c17e0d1cd8a594efeabf91902
describe
'611' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNM' 'sip-files00154.txt'
7fc6823eab9ec94220a5c433fb8d7a78
4bc12a176080ec4057118e5fcb2f7d5daec7f39a
describe
'29565' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNN' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
6305f400f0cdba9b2d670682afdd1118
4b7711caf2f2a46c93c50608eb9a5e7473a90fa6
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNO' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
9cef242dffc5066b397e64b4306a2b45
483cad653bda4213f13f9a6a7c844a302ff01d4a
describe
'80526' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNP' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
9300e2eb8505ad23e5fdd9435c953b9e
a7c1e50b512222c6690cc65320060ebcf7f3f1c0
'2012-03-31T23:20:04-04:00'
describe
'27587' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNQ' 'sip-files00155.pro'
acbb48d02da4577bae6069c8b5e2cf2c
41f7c5139eb354bd8dc7198ac48445212fcf60ea
describe
'30730' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNR' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
eb0f6e9fa8c97ee1464ee7f3dcbde3fb
e40c308afd2e8973b093ceeaeb3b13d0feb467df
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNS' 'sip-files00155.tif'
fa41a3d8a5449c3e5bc91288db3b3636
aee4ac836ef7fd0299e247eaacf87a475ca972e9
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNT' 'sip-files00155.txt'
a3b3537f9b13929d60047935fc45cf0e
b3b01ad2c988d2c06a7099f975d99883c7a071a4
describe
'8313' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNU' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
f652083dddba36ff23abf7bc638eacad
4a2650241f1fd74c549b3289037843187029a4eb
describe
'497828' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNV' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
1587cbfd984ca9abffefb098eda2ac10
6781232601d265712d0b20182318ed5cfbc7bd47
describe
'30024' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNW' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
33b5826efbc95e851b86a21cb72965d9
46bd557065639d245cb5ae3daaa9254555bf5ee8
describe
'10110' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNX' 'sip-files00156.pro'
47bb298d9f2b40906d2eecac65a87332
a3a6b4e91457c396e5d9abe20bc2cabde8142bbc
describe
'10270' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNY' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
007d71067eb9922b658c5c6d97c972cb
76c62f629b7c30bbb0d38c4a783a3ff8b93affa3
describe
'6849921' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMNZ' 'sip-files00156.tif'
4f31adb151dd893b2d768194013240c9
aaa20bc7acba95b36ae25dc78f695a150f6a6a84
'2012-03-31T23:18:09-04:00'
describe
'528' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOA' 'sip-files00156.txt'
4c32d52d605dcf7c6724061c3d401bbe
650ac6244427daf7682eaefed41ea4b9ee0f727f
describe
'3121' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOB' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
52dc2a36f70f7915bc59d2ee4ef16b81
461f772b3cc36a8a2cedb45ab19259cac93ddede
describe
'831940' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOC' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
b792e0507073a624a0484ff7f5902657
d73e045110e589f9277f7181b10eb9531fa55e1f
describe
'72520' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOD' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
1c6f46fa21c1662cc79039e243476ba0
f76c84ac7bf0fc2a11f1773ac09490f004a5ccdf
describe
'25758' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOE' 'sip-files00157.pro'
31e688eff54b22a67c8652f33bc47ac7
641435f2ace0df7407c5767a46edba865a45d8db
describe
'27401' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOF' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
08c87820da3bf795e1c0bbeb0c60fdd5
9b25d6baffe75042e3a43ed3c4db1b99231ff9d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOG' 'sip-files00157.tif'
e0908e84098b84f0e68e1881288bfa72
8f68c23b0d423c664f79c7ec31030bcb44279653
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOH' 'sip-files00157.txt'
44385a683d2f9fb43f74b28ba6f73fa6
4e67d8f5acb8d3a008a10b42153e21d65afe43fd
describe
'7162' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOI' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
9331a7d0dbaa6f2bc05da7eb43fed770
898fcc78f5b966d23fb22a7eb4293a29f4f0e588
describe
'855253' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOJ' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
14943dad149de5c5c72b5c67c03d5cbc
649f136b3c82d14e0fcf431dc82b782d45b16245
describe
'133604' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOK' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
88cc462b9e37f7dfed3bdb1cc4a83248
7af3e95de72a5c11f3b05652756e99f467621dba
describe
'31323' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOL' 'sip-files00158.pro'
f3c830777fca7ed68b3f1c9d4f6386b2
0610ee64c5a71e999b964adc9a24c19229541d7d
describe
'64784' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOM' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
f8aee68069e50d4b74e34eaacb0aab17
b61fda66bb90503125b2e7a173143fc99c8033cd
describe
'6865208' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMON' 'sip-files00158.tif'
b9a0e75e4d0fd3abd5c0547d8bbabc37
b13a0983e955419059d2751597e309262e5d395e
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOO' 'sip-files00158.txt'
50d3c1528d50d795c607fc26c8f101bb
41e24e30f6c6b4d9553fb626fdf9a9be1dc7c18b
describe
'33111' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOP' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
24d2fc06b3c4ab15bf173430b664cc20
5e01e21beafa7080bbece24571e6746169763ffc
describe
'831895' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOQ' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
1d471b029df024608c24df733aaa8eeb
c90edaa0a42588f01b2267f37a106e5592791894
describe
'75579' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOR' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
b4aada00b2466d6b08b922e9b12a1fa1
ced84622ce2a460766dc9bfd02cebbfab1257e0b
describe
'25068' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOS' 'sip-files00159.pro'
3377d079d1a4a77a0f82070c74831726
c600401190e48e5072daf93e2f63ae76a6a01630
describe
'28278' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOT' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
c7a14e6e03e0ce13295ec0cd6a6950c1
9aa7aaab49169af5b2f222c4d6513a966e5ea98e
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOU' 'sip-files00159.tif'
0833e621518ff25f5c905e150ace0d59
efa49b8a045d0cb48499bdd989b515d9f7e53c7e
'2012-03-31T23:15:30-04:00'
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOV' 'sip-files00159.txt'
c17e497fc14a5f842fedc28e57805c4e
a3f3f7ecfb72d95ea599a35d1e52ee00a37a8db3
describe
'7647' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOW' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
984b942ac66b3b6a82023b672b002ea8
1950b5bae527eb4c3f80893db5fca3425726fa8a
describe
'855241' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOX' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
7e0c6a6513e8db142edd250f05d69a32
a2151f3470a58bcc58bb8e0aa14ce7108996a6ac
describe
'129361' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOY' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
9c009670fa21e2f156180f08109b05b2
2669a65684cc95daabb9cbbe5d1b04b538d33cda
describe
'29619' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMOZ' 'sip-files00160.pro'
566024229abb44928d7d73401c9dd610
48ffba5adc9ee3ab9cbf882f209c097fa6eb91b7
describe
'64390' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPA' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
1189fbb39d23b8fe1f462dc107b6b11b
f2b84f406734e64236c40c0bbf608297437559d0
describe
'6865180' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPB' 'sip-files00160.tif'
4c5c6f2b0218dd709eb58c3d91e92fad
e3dd7657747fbfb520ebaf227d1e57203a61f22b
'2012-03-31T23:17:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPC' 'sip-files00160.txt'
4dd7c3c3e63eff81dfa43a54b2b73832
f32827e2e8b4dce9ec35d2f4caad435e71a4aee4
describe
'33226' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPD' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
32b98e691fa3016dfdb6fef95e154e7d
105c04022228624a0ede5ac35a52bc96192d2ab4
describe
'831966' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPE' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
0c621c9b604cc63c4514a3d6d1a88b5a
5efbd6d449a106098edf12fe3d5d44ecec16f109
describe
'57041' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPF' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
038546883bfb3fa260c642f2ffbe59dd
04cfe8a69b9dc14d0211928d4ba458c9e31e7542
describe
'2415' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPG' 'sip-files00161.pro'
b2e059ba69131612299b46c4c24be2b6
e90524523870596c0cb404765225145edef4ca14
describe
'19074' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPH' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
84bf8a27fa7bd3deb8c71757907e33ff
76307dd91cf671d0068bff7845116e8a4f371181
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPI' 'sip-files00161.tif'
4ad5825861e0d5d2d61643cbea024bce
973c1094278fe0997a9446e64e029af9c28e3aa9
describe
'105' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPJ' 'sip-files00161.txt'
29e220dfa212aa4eed7188e81ba01e39
219cf3aaf724d01bddcf9fda63beb1e63ba2f3c6
describe
'6154' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPK' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
57b2e213ef81e3aa5496d43ed35f99f0
fcf20e533fcf503d9649875a0d87861ea995bd1e
describe
'847719' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPL' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
302c2123fb2f54eb9cd487024d7955a3
28321ef311460ee5d19837997d3c33de21afd046
describe
'129147' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPM' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
85c682a2e058f7362a00871edb73c919
f29cb584d69adf122b0e771ceead8329cbf51c2f
describe
'29902' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPN' 'sip-files00162.pro'
938e91bd23f206f680372311252b3f9a
977fb98143a6982103beb3d6228a5f63260fd281
describe
'64407' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPO' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
f393c12dac7aae6df93bc257ebae92e3
ab9108f245346011df6aebbaf21d5df8680c02bb
describe
'6805124' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPP' 'sip-files00162.tif'
a0583d1ee1523684fa72f30b8f43776b
7de861c6938a559623bd79b379012326c0e7b2dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPQ' 'sip-files00162.txt'
4e794665e2891e5f34122b540bcc98c3
05613fe4548f2e76161aae42dcb5f598f97ab244
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPR' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
6fa760cf5b2a72dc669483124a554565
0cd714fa3da1d6f7f315b98b1f4d0f64bd9e0849
describe
'711011' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPS' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
5e7c422f0acefc645b0a181d52d95df3
8780be84e982f4d034b38ce559eaa922a71ec900
describe
'49121' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPT' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
9a032e36d1ba082c41b666df39b6cdf0
abb044fcee963dc34b9a486fdf1324e17ef72f1b
describe
'6320' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPU' 'sip-files00163.pro'
d7f84d91eca0932d7912a5c5891f1b70
265df9b084c680e507644df040e2bba1bc9a68dc
describe
'15969' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPV' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
a2c5ec3c9bbeb72a4dc83b2be3c41a98
b20784378187cb813d568dac4a5d7910488c06dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPW' 'sip-files00163.tif'
df59e20dfb092bee44ae71cd4d3fab3d
38874c9a5e3709a6e8f1c5e0b197f631c9642b5e
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPX' 'sip-files00163.txt'
667969eebf42dd5da24c289a20ea39f0
35a001e735f1b2db77d681fb85e5bb3d1535b998
describe
'5157' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPY' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
a3cd5931958e38994ddda2d71091aa73
2dbdd5b0baa78a77865157e08a4ff976f1c753fe
describe
'855277' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMPZ' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
a17bef1fd43faaba65bcca27c4bb9418
a47e0239be4893e7c100e08cf94c09b087d7e5cc
describe
'132543' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQA' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
9505fe775cbfbca1278d561b08f2da19
ab65cb5096a5ef5265374ba5affaa87801cfefed
describe
'29989' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQB' 'sip-files00164.pro'
7e31281a7fb57ae3d12b8eb49f8ad04f
b0cdb4420b5e97458e405f6245c17ea28cf0d9c7
describe
'64793' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQC' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
18138d0468a9e28515d2960272ead4de
894c879295652f85a28a2815ee9bcf058fd971bc
describe
'6865316' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQD' 'sip-files00164.tif'
5978fb54ae5e618fc9f79f1bf2cbc107
6baa062a4c1cc52434267c7aca8ed2ef87d954a7
describe
'1338' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQE' 'sip-files00164.txt'
117f3de0e830f6aefb4a76a957af7971
fb5212037688fc5d086aca41402c5a5bb4ccc4cf
describe
'33499' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQF' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
3236f4f01eabce74d7410b08c599cacc
f6509c69f5aef6540ec3eb1472b1788cb495d70c
describe
'831925' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQG' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
7f0e93efd992b92922f66d283a190727
48eccaa4d058b04c54a7aa5d5f6daee448386013
describe
'90870' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQH' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
0f80a6b463f92b33fb59ffe198439c65
a72d2a51d958b571ad684a6b88b3d02739362970
describe
'31878' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQI' 'sip-files00165.pro'
b22a7f1ae94afe439199b38076e51389
ad016661a231cd14c0cac7fcdfd0cb788e48ac2c
describe
'33944' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQJ' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
ad56a0cad7b7a9768f793ff0f6b1ae7c
4f40dc00c7972afaf7260afd0ec45cc03ae3548f
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQK' 'sip-files00165.tif'
857c42936a01e9e3916f13ead56efbc6
2d1534897b0f2294dd429b17121122b3003febeb
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQL' 'sip-files00165.txt'
1f6207afbe7131506a4425cb4ffb9136
1620fe79b34ecaf3d653dbf13c5e99f593b2dcb5
describe
'8864' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQM' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
316f3de6c737b11e684f97cf5300b30b
f2e10edffbead76cbdc1a63cc3697dc528dc107f
describe
'849486' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQN' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
e470e188f5e7092715df091f5d828f86
9ac24c0d8a73586024f8452d201a581218c0523d
describe
'133926' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQO' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
2220cb7ac5a166bb4b15af7aeee63c0d
56b71586199f66110e8e72767d385cec0631818b
describe
'31232' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQP' 'sip-files00166.pro'
042ab55f439fca28ebb690b74e09209e
e77f319464e608b81c96fc1cbca730e859b8c483
describe
'66565' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQQ' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
0707523381bdd2fbb5c223901e0b4ab2
304508500cbf60367c40f891b9ec0e81cd3e1c40
describe
'6819332' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQR' 'sip-files00166.tif'
10c71394610024b5fe3fdcd71061eb15
2d521bfbd52f552d67847cf4a83974b10af38439
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQS' 'sip-files00166.txt'
77dd019fffc05e2786a6892712bfd998
a719e7a6f8036bb5121d8c54ba5928136e764410
describe
'33920' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQT' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
dcfab3ebf4d0c8c28a49731c40d2a41b
f62f993140d4210a34d9c254bf01693138bfe9ef
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQU' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
710cd35c57f2fb492ea4fee5dbd5f818
8b94ae53feade01fb51a0b1371db1ee3efdf4d31
describe
'86242' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQV' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
d42f9f392b33573ad5b30e016b182928
246077581a64d8634a693e0a8fe1ec6b6e71c890
describe
'29935' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQW' 'sip-files00167.pro'
c87c6c4d4024f1e6175521e51e86bc53
75b6c07b3a3f7fc4cc5d39928d308f1542537457
describe
'32491' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQX' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
1a74330d0c87a67742fbc25aad9e78e7
ddf8b0e818a8b8b5598c632aef17747b81f70352
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQY' 'sip-files00167.tif'
ac31d53c0a778130779faffc2c74be57
90300969cce913721a2442e68d4b5e4fd74de5f5
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMQZ' 'sip-files00167.txt'
699e9d44fc55b784190059e90f12e4c5
031952595a74d21217231a3d3b4f794f6f9d3d50
describe
'8432' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRA' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
b406ebca74e0cf13b125492fd4f8bd25
2f1b6c1b11710de902619a2fbd0e5520426f244b
describe
'725475' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRB' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
c450642af9226bc6e66b21024c0663a1
ff91d7a6c57260e57caabe9662722a9dfc721bf8
describe
'75326' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRC' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
876be1b74d0cfc8d33298165fac3f22b
80fe855a197c8c0517a5ef66eed087d53fe91b39
describe
'2736' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRD' 'sip-files00168.pro'
204b21ae255b044a265fc2f684a387bc
197b6b0cc26e89bd4520d5bd13ac3053507d7807
describe
'39739' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRE' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
ba2b6c64d24bc98320176b064f83d3c7
c2bdf3a9e03990802c0ddd59a4180175fc50a26b
describe
'6792228' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRF' 'sip-files00168.tif'
b5c7958217a6b390ac9c4cb6c3786ed4
92b270a8984f3948b7c9562c16fe6e9293946d73
describe
'117' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRG' 'sip-files00168.txt'
ef59e9c1d6a876c899aa1849e64f2c9b
2717fe09e3d8dfc358d4997f8e3aae95826c743d
describe
'26849' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRH' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
b0a12978159f6f2fe76edf3fcc62d6f2
6d98ed72da7bbbe7e567e53708521a94a3e9569f
describe
'831970' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRI' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
92fe21e0862429242c1faa997790ff6d
bfc2e791cfbb565a7ada22c30fc4a10beb3e5b94
describe
'86727' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRJ' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
99d1ed156109c9748d7d7a2e4a2518e7
efc8cd9990d988ce7eed5d7b1fa1c15fe6a7a1eb
describe
'29912' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRK' 'sip-files00169.pro'
7d3726009215107cc52d4648b2fd7ee2
0c9936dec6d7889c3ef13ba3d9d5dbcc6afb39db
describe
'33153' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRL' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
54d68d0792aedf49bab3a2edf772f953
e2232e48217f036af846d40e2ccf5d2ff9cd28e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRM' 'sip-files00169.tif'
4009908d77fa86c69ee11a64e6b45c6f
e38b01397f6836b7fcca3a0774a94b55b52c7ba6
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRN' 'sip-files00169.txt'
86a74f8592e842a58bb4f735a66dd3e0
25be2abd20456a124eb255fa236a015ff5ae0efd
describe
'8679' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRO' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
1918ed5dd9a6d843ddb439afb48f9459
cf4e18de88850404098f5049db2e3b56d2926f15
describe
'837618' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRP' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
29e711f7cbc03d16a9ab04477a44f475
729bd23e191e6da1910b6166b789c87669b0da30
describe
'134279' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRQ' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
1721d07617cfe898d00aec7d0256fb83
f772a1499a536e47bc697c061379ec2d57f67da4
describe
'30652' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRR' 'sip-files00170.pro'
9a0b66c950c76dab65d0de1a64fb6c35
327523a091b157d71bd494d44cabfb27027b5cda
describe
'66751' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRS' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
02cb62c620cf7099afa4f36dcf8994cc
76f1b3c7ab27522b03a7ee55045870ae55903976
describe
'6724328' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRT' 'sip-files00170.tif'
7ed5ae951ca7daf951e86a9642aed04b
6b61c5bf5e8fab9100466da0d26de83f38af4b43
'2012-03-31T23:19:18-04:00'
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRU' 'sip-files00170.txt'
dbf448582ef603654481fdd9bdbceb6e
3f92c0e8439239e89d1f201b5d76b1e2a626bee4
describe
'34149' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRV' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
f920e9607169fda6738eb1da848496c8
658d26bff45ea57d21092b8ff0c1fe4e6a812f99
describe
'712180' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRW' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
4beaafd4dff1e8bec043b2ce9382ca9c
8c068242b1a2b5c254362bb0e73aa2d058baec44
describe
'56101' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRX' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
f2a2c98b0f1b46d55ad0658eacd88d1d
6d280e349584f234acb8159ffddf160676ccd34c
describe
'17973' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRY' 'sip-files00171.pro'
23232bbe825eda19c3f44ed15f2ce53d
2a7bd1d72454bc93c0f201e6a32961bd2b38f47e
describe
'20939' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMRZ' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
decb840b252920f5cd6f31df87cb9545
b5b208a95af5da26324d631889c160ec626dcdd1
'2012-03-31T23:16:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSA' 'sip-files00171.tif'
f97f120643fd6b1cc0324c047b727e2b
2d37d4efb1d4488ca2821c1dcd72ea0a380b78d6
describe
'742' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSB' 'sip-files00171.txt'
bdf448c0b2d4b37d4e5b44b5490e1645
24c8582a84ef35a94df3dabc4383b77fda94e011
describe
'5311' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSC' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
319cf1bf5a674e62dae84745b6f5b5c9
5469956908f76b8a5b82c5536082e770be469512
describe
'837694' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSD' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
1dff607f7bc7619a9d4e892934cf02fa
45beb56e047d29e8196d08cd72fd8ae97a4057b2
describe
'113948' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSE' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
a257af0e47958bb877d06b16ab465bae
e3020442ae5adb3c43cee6046ed88ade7995cea7
describe
'25105' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSF' 'sip-files00174.pro'
9ef4d94745cd95fbc574976fedbe5bd4
2c3b02c8c45c3923b479b2e636f80e2331b90517
describe
'57112' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSG' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
ff99e9ce76e2d1c30b8e23e57a0d90f9
170ca3b263d32a69026e3d4a75c0e8ac61d50c8b
describe
'6723928' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSH' 'sip-files00174.tif'
731f1096a0cfc36160de1e257125e687
c85818ba7cb36bf28232d324cd6f2d373b03dd9f
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSI' 'sip-files00174.txt'
800bb879d690eb6060579b4e90d474b3
904e0d26655814f8f1d162c3ddf0ee4c679c31f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSJ' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
ee408c9d8108ae39d3e733931f9629b9
45834ee1529d3054dd746f775ae7404098cce346
describe
'831974' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSK' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
4ad9cf45f407a49f679fc97b31dc28fe
4f81dd1fd1b1835dc8257b011fe1f9916a801c2b
describe
'90112' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSL' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
6ba3aed0fe3d4a85732cbc47a4ca3043
176664f1c8fc7e8cfd7350f3ac3c1d35d0df1333
describe
'31418' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSM' 'sip-files00175.pro'
e47f55e900971f68d49626a660a70010
9bc3f3421cdf3ccd7137838d8ab4fe1defd746ff
describe
'34555' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSN' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
9cfc889f8f1cc6e03ec5993bd9fbffae
22c7f3ceef2821f6cfc653dd342bb8adc31fe644
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSO' 'sip-files00175.tif'
4bd8d0c471f8f0185bd17370f8fb9c30
b3ccb3bd6ba917d6db59cd4199320fb0b530e3d8
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSP' 'sip-files00175.txt'
77bad5efcc6c622ec98be0445a84f643
87311d29f815d7a5cd4851d03398e955390d91f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSQ' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
39e0cdd9034f6d606de906bda2c411ae
71206424ba4dccbc52848b3d3c6a1c99c338df99
describe
'852963' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSR' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
37aa5814e301220b3c26bac65be71811
6d1377f5b0c24ed1792ec9aad0b808a2da443d50
describe
'124307' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSS' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
0a12f720dfa06faa28c40736fac4c109
f5b8c7754f34afa7a2a170a1ace3e2caf4326c3e
describe
'25463' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMST' 'sip-files00176.pro'
c261aaf5975b498d027ad8a75a0cc728
a19028889b040149d8ce8598bdead7e720c6bc5e
describe
'60801' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSU' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
ff1cbbf1840c9504edd85391b6c5e999
9fe6a85c45598323e99b0a36bed9ca37cdc603c1
describe
'6846708' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSV' 'sip-files00176.tif'
7e69da990ce32f272d72a4dedcf45604
0c9f8c70f0dc51e9382bed33afedd7e1de6403a7
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSW' 'sip-files00176.txt'
3defc804a3423f7850083356239a3413
4a246e9b01405f54ef50669a7ef79b4f3feeb0c5
describe
'32893' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSX' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
3e6cf3c924bb11deaf631433892df3f4
d62c2c9b22a5dca956bf04f84e915ce330b97032
describe
'831955' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSY' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
1cb000e13ffeb1f4ec46b0058a439b3b
fb325b18353af2cf54ccee2ae1bf3caee64c817c
describe
'88034' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMSZ' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
22285e33738c124a1ff3115f451a787f
437a2bf1d5eca011d4508c6cc74f2d79a1da443f
describe
'30347' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTA' 'sip-files00177.pro'
602fdea7feff019bfb542f32bd8794d9
e81a6ef70f7bac21727ec79328c70eb13572c14d
describe
'33702' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTB' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
375674998ce724068b0aa8c06aaabf99
5d0e49a69c4ab9854391a151859e10b9ae78a5d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTC' 'sip-files00177.tif'
c5dd08b8cd0fe6cd58f5c3793c7db54b
fcd95bf35e8eb1da68fc23aabd3e488ba7418a6d
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTD' 'sip-files00177.txt'
e1531cd53f9b85de5792f87429c50921
69361be306e0495535000ef5137d975e6d0da9c8
describe
'8939' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTE' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
87d781e14f20aca4801d38e45e9ae1bb
1669f0f54f301099111dfee8fa12aa59fd001154
describe
'844490' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTF' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
74898faf7490b09a6482b166b12f0ecb
6b90bb1e9b98e8947ee041827ba0e1652703788f
describe
'132743' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTG' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
bd9ede14141c63c968fc389889d46992
cda81e66022788d2de58ca241e1e4c1fb384e840
describe
'29553' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTH' 'sip-files00178.pro'
ee085f3f46790ff9d09744b1a66ebfe8
4f4e1e886278af9de6ac848628a61f519dfec5e7
describe
'66599' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTI' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
c75dc3412472c6211ab0ddc3259dc0c6
20a50ef77bbdb877bf04d8f229c8108193ca62fe
describe
'6779372' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTJ' 'sip-files00178.tif'
3348eb75279b6b72dbd527fdc52f957e
4342f471d064bc1296d710be0f4a5fae26d8e586
'2012-03-31T23:18:14-04:00'
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTK' 'sip-files00178.txt'
86875b189cddf093d26b0775c5b6347a
4d72b7c13b56e6755506c466981c46ce8a3d599d
describe
'33977' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTL' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
2287346da4b7742a95198cf59d65e474
b673c537c7a91e09f2777161defab4f94aa3fa2d
describe
'831951' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTM' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
50b75b9d5268f3e76e4528575066bfdc
ca98c81727d5aa3420ac95ad5c7e496fff5b94f3
describe
'90502' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTN' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
e462888fdc32636eb0f27571ee6acb00
2e4263595c783a52b452d2cee1773d918c79dd30
describe
'31423' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTO' 'sip-files00179.pro'
b7ba76b224ca638ab4c708f4b7639ecf
e49d775ae4f59b5021387d08150ed03342aa2135
describe
'34046' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTP' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
ac7eab4569800ce79920947db46ec99a
00d27141f707406834c866cccea4ec289d146c10
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTQ' 'sip-files00179.tif'
0347f16348a1f6c99d6ac275356b47ef
d7a64f12df542c134995e397e135e9d7340f0fae
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTR' 'sip-files00179.txt'
acf32a0e9c68314f32955b7f914c86c0
8b418a6b884633608d1e640b0652bb21e0164cbc
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTS' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
65ff3d0e4c0a1e3c3abb00beb36f740a
fd399f7b887e290c10fb0e7d9a1df98c4d1dc9d2
describe
'810957' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTT' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
02b37f81aab391cf8323bd9c9916545b
dc92b8c2c2c1451bb03290bd3b621529243fa61a
describe
'93521' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTU' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
394e239e592100e198cc8133216cd784
8bc8a31efadf525d3a080d785c95f2c7c7715502
describe
'31990' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTV' 'sip-files00180.pro'
d83418f9c06685a8878b0fc1f7b6e37b
86d8374c5f6edfc1368b54c4d34fcebbd272d9db
describe
'35251' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTW' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
c259e0b2820c306b560386fe8e5953ac
0579b9e0f751f3f3023bbd21a9533941d6dab5ea
describe
'6492127' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTX' 'sip-files00180.tif'
175442778eeacb466ee842726ef0409b
410ee88c98b70e95dd7bb1a92b6aea72f1218d49
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTY' 'sip-files00180.txt'
7ad08e84d2d94ebef2d423922f866af5
340d6959d5cd3c068fe948d1796616643befbbca
describe
'9417' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMTZ' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
574023ceaa066807bdbe95fd8ae6b3df
59e27c5bee1560a64db01b2baf2c914a4b0ecb8b
describe
'812072' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUA' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
a45dc1deff26ceccd102dd1aa18ddd0e
20c9b769502c7059c1c3f9901ce0b50762741ad2
describe
'82630' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUB' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
584cc7554bb18a6e62fd426126f87e93
c521db15989518e6b8592eafd56d8c3d6c7c0252
describe
'28709' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUC' 'sip-files00181.pro'
4a244a1f5d905c22f278449236534293
c366b3c5af866a32c693e217e2c18a367a6bf79d
describe
'31377' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUD' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
dbc54cdb2e04add0e8d2a0c1e093acb9
8c674c5b0f038005a7cd03042d3cb1279bceb3bd
describe
'6501079' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUE' 'sip-files00181.tif'
82422096ed2cbdd4bdacb27892a3b549
0d09589f2f40230407e2c3d90db50498621b2695
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUF' 'sip-files00181.txt'
13d63e017c69eec575f933e1a77d9d91
8d3bdaf4b32ca140620ed8fd81541fd3a1c1b7bc
describe
'8584' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUG' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
5e38003184b17fc198787eced870f85f
f19a610a69b1655cd5b3ef4e6a4e2d081cf0c88c
describe
'736831' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUH' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
c12ab4df47d08f97e0d69ea3dc6ec097
0ff414dc42012d6baf2d74d256303f4cf5396655
describe
'50566' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUI' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
0c2532edcdcbdc20c39062b4db18356c
91cff1f8b3fce869a756d224f32e3119919428ae
describe
'6473' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUJ' 'sip-files00182.pro'
dd6266a8647944bb832dce7e7fbea4c0
6ebb1f0a4eeafc75c242d9924aabe0ca4847c2ea
describe
'17757' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUK' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
a377f6ee04f119b53ed63d21b207fc61
3f6a4ed4a865f9b0a48b8c3f5f7b4e3fab112c73
describe
'6579795' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUL' 'sip-files00182.tif'
d5ceb2ee64348c4507fc7c5d9926e7e9
caf5b005c42e8e43d41dd90ceab295622942e5c2
describe
'289' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUM' 'sip-files00182.txt'
fd6c07e9f76b3f9d3066febeef57f02b
c4cc546a3e5d71b593448d42d10770c374c248d9
describe
'5902' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUN' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
ae160288fc45b612b0fbe21743668f20
e9ad136d77ffd150d14e11fa0243bec5b28f8d4a
describe
'812795' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUO' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
f29bff4f0a939e807b1a6ef8408ed8d0
9ba97fcc49e1c896a2a1834cc1262fbd7e0f7f5c
describe
'86739' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUP' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
cc87e2108b3225624742133ddaf4dccf
abbf3ee092ebf9a1ea4d9c51a1d9e2193b1794a6
describe
'29807' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUQ' 'sip-files00183.pro'
33add6125657981737823b8e2099e7e6
4655f4ae44a7104beacfe1e2520285ba436b836e
describe
'33254' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUR' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
9871a54c1f45136b04d7c06dc0a5b0c2
58d74fd23f495bea1d33337d66ff25ec4f9afedd
describe
'6506651' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUS' 'sip-files00183.tif'
67fffe761e92f1c5708c74ec911d7ed4
ac8a77db83ec1e3b1f90692806794f3771d28dde
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUT' 'sip-files00183.txt'
fe6da2e44ef28e8f924cbdec3ecbfd01
e23c6a457dd9e581340c628220001344e51230e6
describe
'8815' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUU' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
6f821d0fb0f133c289fae82969d6832f
e40de1fad0bb957f615ef06ce4e565ca0969a9f8
describe
'842736' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUV' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
232c97da06802dc5ab23e98e92648cb9
85f3982572a42a55bac183060c6ce0a7d2574323
describe
'86226' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUW' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
f49ba3d692634fd01179a03fdc3034aa
b7dfb3b34d6ec0b17fc3358ab3f1f6a202b670db
describe
'29531' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUX' 'sip-files00184.pro'
e1e31f9c806200811838d4f20c8664c2
e7b2a8f7cdcb943325598fa3b3a665637b1ca388
describe
'32387' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUY' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
34f0874f3597470604929093e944cea9
1ac1517b98780ebdc14a0edea686d023d3509202
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMUZ' 'sip-files00184.tif'
1dbdd06a615f04e3258d786cb40125b1
24cf0b42b5d050e7502caf2c232930320a33be79
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVA' 'sip-files00184.txt'
804bbd3ac043e3f787740413b18926b1
8ec581a9af26bca682a3efaa3377db6e996d9438
describe
'8990' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVB' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
5585a63d41ad19c53ad7386919c134d8
2bb8f320883dfb2406b8ca98578f65c24a226bc9
describe
'801659' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVC' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
c665101e9a5806b1c77d2810b467dc6e
5a6c3d27b7a6f167879198cd11c1267ad963062d
describe
'68416' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVD' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
e8f2c6256c5ae8659ca903bd78f774f2
ca3176cb73bcd07e410a79cda17f9343055d2cae
describe
'22165' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVE' 'sip-files00185.pro'
017ab4f2e6fbb64c83d502f3f431475f
9b7ad1f3dc6bf6dbcc9cc792e7ae1f1d90944495
describe
'26044' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVF' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
658f14c72d2ae8bc1091a3b6767a0470
34e27bb4ade00eb028ba7b9cde85d903df4e1fa9
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVG' 'sip-files00185.tif'
58da628d5d227b204339d2de597a7392
58cd85a776fd0a492c20bd3d2ae46bbbaa689b56
describe
'889' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVH' 'sip-files00185.txt'
c4669c9a03aa36e18fb42ff9af689f89
326dfd7099a53bd12b5d193273442f6d8c782091
describe
'6927' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVI' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
27b84ad78c7e7e45338de818291035ca
8e3cb40e70e8cf472eb03edb124b8c826a8ebe9e
describe
'829446' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVJ' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
cedf6adcea325f3df3ed1017ff5ca818
5293d05ad290255bbc5ef0d10c22fe7be7451311
describe
'72209' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVK' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
09c0ec73ab2c79efd31b54715c0afdd4
126beb4e61521a9e35b8273a956a66c5b0d85154
describe
'24370' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVL' 'sip-files00186.pro'
30f417da47a23804512ab597327a8b27
48591f6126d2bf521bf2be53195973ccd9ee0183
describe
'26888' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVM' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
e5034bb3f5f9a714cf9a6e89fd2a9c2f
d4e206d4c2b1ee133d2e58865224a3dbc376968d
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVN' 'sip-files00186.tif'
5110c280ba62a341b78a11edafadf92c
baf089de7390ac17ad6ba533b2bb0dd29daa513b
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVO' 'sip-files00186.txt'
bb94166f44340bab64384ed3a3db26ac
d3f4d321b6c8882372597502bb6c75441607f768
describe
'7687' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVP' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
cac5027af6b49872e93c29b9d3c76b34
dd8f6d59b644decb9867d44e34a8b647cc25ea53
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVQ' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
50d1f0324169637a2a9b37eae3ac7445
4149d5426dfb9c3f9eef7c6f620280dd337b9ccf
describe
'90121' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVR' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
6090a9c889c57dd91cd5d342f78f5020
28b874695af48600875b81f451db7e3203ec94d9
describe
'31714' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVS' 'sip-files00187.pro'
d1d9c30f6e092e8bb04179e4f098f218
e0c4df3a6c1b0d557fb482b2e8f214ed4f087018
describe
'34461' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVT' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
03eb22729b6dd5b2570e2366d95e524b
91e37c218113bc8858eaf494d1089bd9f2f4b6fe
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVU' 'sip-files00187.tif'
1c5668b6d8fdf75b06436f57f65d5560
7c98983dd64f0b11e497f311d05dd3114efe283c
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVV' 'sip-files00187.txt'
42b308f978a411999d51d3980dfa7fd7
6296c4501b0417167294526571646bdb982aa578
describe
Invalid character
'9096' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVW' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
422a5ad655854ff24850d34fe7a5a265
9c2aee0983a565876bf971ee29f9d4cae6316c6b
'2012-03-31T23:19:25-04:00'
describe
'842554' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVX' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
49d931812903c593e32b33c5c565406e
30f208a7d26d2bd6dbae19a27680f90d6b3b651b
describe
'71786' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVY' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
600c85c5c35df655bd4f414a4fb0106f
6da9408962875a98ea4e16b5d37b44a2a2ac5076
describe
'6879' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMVZ' 'sip-files00188.pro'
ed6d67aacb9ab6205bfbd46e59d753c2
6841bac79ab6554bfc403b081ec29a017b2d87d9
describe
'24966' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWA' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
2898eaf02ac6bb0dbccd3c1455e49595
acba84fd220424db84e722b5ad8ea810fe595421
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWB' 'sip-files00188.tif'
3b2f8ad2216f362f791e7b79270b6be4
c5671e5c24feaad2d0814a12e436acc85ac25ddd
describe
'306' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWC' 'sip-files00188.txt'
f46f890592c56291115451550537427f
82d8e41f57fec5cc382bc87bf0588a2d1c7db48d
describe
'7281' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWD' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
8ef237d4b362340b766a66dc0edefedc
34dcf1e640a572aa00fd1e7caa79a991e4c2264e
describe
'783565' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWE' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
d4e4074876430d41595fd83a156121f0
e71855d938bc7403dcb4adbe570f3d76b7d3c5a0
describe
'56533' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWF' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
59a61dcb25b9c020ede1e84dcee2f3ab
a031806ca0bff5a7b698345e3555f73978e9d9ff
describe
'10808' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWG' 'sip-files00189.pro'
bcd40dfc63191c592dc0c164862e80a6
5273b017ca17fb1048d39a50306cf79a854e28c7
describe
'20040' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWH' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
8134e03bc853012fcbbfb039fbbf24c8
4f0e7935752935d5d57d8dfcfc84c2759cf3cffb
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWI' 'sip-files00189.tif'
1656b7e2603a3f8540146ff85a194050
d5885e946c65ea50d562c141ba9ac50292b59015
describe
'464' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWJ' 'sip-files00189.txt'
0b29086ad5971088bf35b8aa4b382fb3
d9472440828d7667ebb91746b48051cf190a331e
describe
'6098' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWK' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
2c9025b73c08bd8b9a636da6869874fe
6f7cda7439387c8475da7e68f9a56f57e2ec58e0
describe
'682023' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWL' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
9f07cf010cca5d8ebc9ce67b4f41afb2
8f9f1f67df2d26407d76664f87cd045ccffb3d52
describe
'39926' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWM' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
86e2d14d007c540bf40a75784eb28b66
af320565f714c245d76afa47f98918136d1b8af3
describe
'1789' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWN' 'sip-files00190.pro'
06c8ca29044520bc889d4a784c32272a
41d1884dc188a26eb793724c95d45952cc3dc9a8
describe
'13890' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWO' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
26a0a74a03cc1435dc44d1a4a77b8d68
ade7c528231d26cd4d04a7101db88de3bd4caa45
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWP' 'sip-files00190.tif'
f0c7c4f7762d0b858936960f4eb308de
ed208cf58fa1a51b79c19fd949355d1922a9cb8c
describe
'84' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWQ' 'sip-files00190.txt'
66693f3e3e4f3b6d5f8ef0da98aec4c5
e3a722bce3ab2687268a99d83fd86f5f7cb28890
describe
'4725' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWR' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
0f1ee0adfbf16789577c08023d991179
fd7b6f879f3730cf082f3e51a79b9f346b4fd273
describe
'837194' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWS' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
a1119fc890a45735d45f2b6c356dcb7b
1e25c4c5fe2cac301c13f6aab06e73af6b2bd490
describe
'135267' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWT' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
3d36a39e48c30506891f3edf29472bef
bb8c8362b0220cc68e927ae0cda2d86979d32a55
describe
'30828' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWU' 'sip-files00191.pro'
455af51a137e0d1a8eb9f7919e21276c
104e09f240060c76b5a897aceca0af60997c3388
describe
'67062' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWV' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
ec858af01d13ba5daf69a43c5a3c7d21
e2aae06c85b37e8d23c07cb78aa5021a7e710103
describe
'6721116' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWW' 'sip-files00191.tif'
c4b7c311b55cded32bf355351d985614
20cf8b0a319383561502ba4edd181fb8125e5cbc
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWX' 'sip-files00191.txt'
47e9f0f254f2552d56b62e32172b1771
5a70cfe3598e3b69c8eb1315566a43672a0fcbb9
describe
'34095' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWY' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
00d1e68bae253e2e7967fc8827c2fbac
d8ac50a4798ad183cafdd85075e493ccb83585fc
describe
'842739' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMWZ' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
50949de56fb74bf62b02f06314012b95
c95e820db44b9219a47afd15b2ad9b6d645582fd
describe
'94384' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXA' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
d4a00e4e4a84339456213e59ce783182
588e333e2a55d8388d0baf1484348a14795090ba
describe
'31731' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXB' 'sip-files00192.pro'
a0b70765c4f24e9a479e777976e05b18
b334b32ecdfdf298305e03123b18ab9879186c98
describe
'35969' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXC' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
ea65312573ca644ce94c0db2cbfd9d5d
56138bc0e5c047d874e87a71bf9296cc6bbcf1f4
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXD' 'sip-files00192.tif'
28dff6f5d9c982b8b2ffe80f9e4182cd
a4af0c0b31df646b6d46eac18e1da8997e1237a9
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXE' 'sip-files00192.txt'
fcf947e0175da8c93e13292afe598f6f
fcee32f760b112e7e6aca1facfa524dcc9fd84b5
describe
'9681' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXF' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
46dcc28cadb63d0102b485e1825e9929
8ba9a2cd27033dd7b4b71ddea6b66359d179856a
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXG' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
68d34869512c11aa28020257853934cd
7a70a8a7d43db99e7d472ac167a946a3aa610630
describe
'92045' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXH' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
634c9a941635d313e4106795a221f87a
c2251d999802cde9c26ef50322c5ddf6c5f21f2c
describe
'31465' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXI' 'sip-files00193.pro'
b3713d0a8ac20f1590644857ad2954d1
51a04eec9c035ab38b28a4e86fca936b2e089f7f
describe
'35178' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXJ' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
a03c25645f30d355de28b1bde098982e
d622cdb11da8afc687ad7dc77d17e5586aa2366a
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXK' 'sip-files00193.tif'
9acaac16c67d93c74f2530b10485e15f
bdcb2787a4b6368423ad8c2cbfa103e35e0cbd78
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXL' 'sip-files00193.txt'
d8012b9fcbaa3313a143b4fc7d4f5ad5
7c9bce154835dfd24426936243c7bd0dd121e322
describe
'9171' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXM' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
d4b9ebe41b276ab774e7abe61d44953f
3157dea9f9105b980bd5f44c4d0721dc5fc66ec2
describe
'842712' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXN' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
09eb172e3e58ff4284e42f04d9ecbebb
c790b264b64845dbbcd9e990ba57905ea44ad0bf
describe
'96589' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXO' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
0d2988089ee68f625e957dfe8f26161e
e1457a343ce519d757dd69cdd2aaa89c6dd778ce
describe
'33229' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXP' 'sip-files00194.pro'
aaf16f0b69f91dd6b0a44d1351402d89
693baffeacc4293231978eb5af7f835c30063992
describe
'36897' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXQ' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
aab07a528a927e548112c9e6c55f2614
f287563d378c51ac1382240b093d0ed9d8a84495
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXR' 'sip-files00194.tif'
b46f9a414d50bb5a470c94bc7e68e892
92137c4d7948c48c1c01ad49b795194b5da91d13
describe
'1327' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXS' 'sip-files00194.txt'
9b22dbf5083d443c326ad29a97b487e2
daa80dbfb64bdbfe24bdbf3fbf990a1b0e119084
describe
'9754' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXT' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
98e18a5f67fede83091d8747b628972d
a92fa8743da48902dae94af9c56f0597152b51ff
describe
'718749' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXU' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
f1db3e4e36a672694f6725782f89ba04
7909af0b2f4a30a91fa3380c758f50c1b12a7631
describe
'88473' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXV' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
eba0a63caf522f1dc3163a815d3e46ec
a75e27155ea4a8a2de7b2166c708aba7efc6233f
describe
'17283' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXW' 'sip-files00195.pro'
29d5630e5dfc26e51f392b41adade379
dff626dd6fbe3cd999edc81615bf84eba7a72cb5
describe
'47233' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXX' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
29e9b57e0f775eb57ac63f41e18adc81
f2b1ae6d330f96d348370917fce2eb3e4a3759a4
describe
'6685536' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXY' 'sip-files00195.tif'
121c99bdde3ce04c030699fa92190627
16a6233ad497a0a453d5cd175f99dae91d30514f
describe
'727' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMXZ' 'sip-files00195.txt'
54f8a375be48d41c6739832177d2bc0a
b2878e454499fb9900e2ca6b1a2e52bb1057a046
describe
'27562' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMYA' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
a56b80e4d19ae82dc3c92242f6b3fac8
640016d6e19396411d4abd80d696da855ce32d50
describe
'465227' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMYB' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
1b07bab14e9bcbc50198cdef39b51fd7
8d1f412832e06c985ddfc13ff334c6573fee12b6
describe
'25455' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMYC' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
3f77054e9ae75498d9beea979bdb4f4d
98a9332468d2c528cfdebacd57bbdc5cec8f43e3
describe
'5608' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMYD' 'sip-files00196.pro'
f37d5af7c193d7caf0f8fae4bd5c12fd
0247e1dbbefd8991c7ac6ddf99efc412416bb3f0
describe
'9195' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMYE' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
0c892b041f698555513273d69fe25332
177ea03974cc6d2d3d5e3d4249419ab46eb97bff
describe
'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMYF' 'sip-files00196.tif'
3830f39f9abb52b110664057ca026a5d
96e9e14d5c96758961b6cfc5c0c80e44872ab56b
describe
'322' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMYG' 'sip-files00196.txt'
725a53fa24cbaa8c9819933e12487a84
c840c6b7605f9ab26bce3881e3a5a4841fe0ecdc
describe
'2902' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMYH' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
b0b7912932c4e063eae2754bbfb83dba
bfbc8e79c38a0020a69b1e51bba1e1e792f26012
describe
'8' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMYI' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
d536f17b261fa277eb147642124f94e5
df20530d68c16ae0b0e9c849dfeae519717d1c05
describe
'286923' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMYJ' 'sip-filesUF00003572_00001.mets'
447bc0fc901c6784198077ee7dccd095
9aea2f713388a7773ef5adafb1640e57ca109c09
'2012-03-31T23:17:39-04:00'
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T23:49:12-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'375740' 'info:fdaE20090903_AAAACCfileF20090903_AAAMYM' 'sip-filesUF00003572_00001.xml'
557163fa379da7cda3d35d7d4ab15d65
98884744abfda57361f9e65a05cf596465fab14b
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-11T23:49:09-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0000357200001datestamp 2009-02-23setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title First steps in general knowledgedc:creator Tomlinson, Sarah Windsor.Gilbert and Rivington ( Printer )dc:publisher Society for Promoting Christian Knowledgedc:date 1853dc:type Bookdc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00003572&v=00001AAA4950 (ltqf)ALH9158 (ltuf)45892214 (oclc)002238636 (alephbibnum)dc:source University of Floridadc:language Englishdc:coverage England -- London