Citation
Ellen Cameron

Material Information

Title:
Ellen Cameron a tale for youth
Creator:
Rankin, Emily Elizabeth
Bowen, G. Clifton ( Printer )
Longman & Co ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Longman & Co.
Manufacturer:
G. Bowen, Clifton
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
New and rev. ed.
Physical Description:
<6>, 170 p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. ; 14 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Emigration and Immigration -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Voyages and travels -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Juvenile fiction -- India ( lcsh )
Bildungsromane -- 1851 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1851
Genre:
Bildungsromane ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date from inscription.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
by Emily Rankin.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026929906 ( ALEPH )
45447226 ( OCLC )
ALH6918 ( NOTIS )

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ze. 66.



ELLEN CAMERON.

A TALE FOR YOUTH.

BY

EMILY RANKIN.

A NEW AND REVISED EDITION.

LONDON:

PUBLISHED BY LONGMAN & CO.

Sold also by G. Bowen, Clifton, Bristol; C. ANDREWS,
Brighton; FLetTcHER, Forpes & FLETCHER, and KING,
Southampton; RockiirF & Eviis, Liverpool; CoE, Stonehouse,
Plymouth; Davies, Gloucester; WiLL1ams, Cheltenham.



Printep By G. Bowen, CLIFTON, BRISTOL.



TO
MISS HARRIET MARTINEAU,
IN ADMIRATION OF HER GENIUS
AND OF HER UNCEASING AND SUCCESSFUL EXERTIONS
IN THE CAUSE OF USEFUL LITERATURE,
THIS HUMBLE ATTEMPT TO EMULATE HER ZEAL FOR THE
INTERESTS OF YOUNG PEOPLE
IS, WITH HER KIND PERMISSION, MOST GRATEFULLY

AND AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED BY
EMILY RANKIN.

CLIFTON.



EXPLANATION OF INDIAN WORDS.

Palanquin.

Bungalow.
Veranda.

Tiffin.
Hookah.
Paun.

Compound.

- Salaam.

Daye.
Pagamahs.
Nabob.
Punkah.

" Bebee Sahib.

A kind of chair with curtains, in which persons
of distinction are carried by servants called
bearers.

A thatched country house.

A covered balcony on the ground floor, surround-
ing houses in warm climates.

Luncheon.

A long pipe.

A paste, composed of herbs, (areca and betel)
mixed with lime made of sea shells. Paun is
chewed by the lower class of Hindoos as an
opiate.

A court, round which are built the dwellings of
the servants.

The eastern salutation. The hands are placed on
the head, and the body is bent low to the earth.

A nurse.

A child’s light dress of frock and trowsers.

A rich man, properly an Indian prince.

A large fan, fastened to the ceiling by a hinge
and moved by cords.

Young lady.



CONTENTS.

CHAP.
PAGE
I. Calcutta ; . ‘ ; ; ]
II. Ellen Cameron . ; ‘ ; ; 5
III. The voyage. . . : : 11
IV. The old aunt. : . ‘ ‘ 17
V. What became of Ellen ; ‘ ; 22
VI. Life at school : ‘ oY ; 26
VII. The little nabob ; ; ; ; 4]
VIII. The two letters : ; ‘ oie
IX. Ellen’s visit . d : ; ‘ 57
X. The harmonious blacksmith . ‘ , 61
XI. The Irish cousins . é ; ; 65
XII. Want of dignity : . ° i
XIII. La Belle Assemblée . ‘ ‘ ; 80
XIV. Odetothe Greeks .. i é ; 84
XV. The critics ; ; ; ; ; 91
XVI. Unexpected news : . : ~ 96
XVII. Midnight F ‘ ; : ae
XVIII. Morning thoughts : ‘ . - a
XIX. Old times and new : j ; .°o ae
XX. The generous enemy . . . - 190
X XI. Better late than never . : ; a. an
XXII. At sea ‘ ‘ ; : . We
XXIII. Fellow passengers ‘ ‘bine ; . ae
XXIV. The ignorant girl . : ; . 133
XXV. Lord S.’s story ; : : . QD
XXVI. The guns ; P : f ~ Bee
XXVII. The pinnace . ‘ . 150
XXVIII. The bungalow ; ; s a
X XIX. The little brother : ; : . ae
XXX. The young Malay . ae ont te ia:
XXXI. Revelling and destruction : : - 162
XXXII. The conclusion ; : ‘ oo



ELLEN CAMERON.

(eI

CHAPTER I.
CALCUTTA.

Wuo has not heard of Calcutta, the Queen of eastern
cities, the captive of the proud merchants of Britain?
Thither sail our stately vessels, braving the stormy
waves and angry tempests, in quest of wealth; thence
they return laden with the treasures of Asia, to enrich
their own adventurous little island.

Those who think Of this metropolis of British India
as an English city, will probably form very false notions
of it. It seems as if all the nations of Asia had sent
some of their people to dwell there. Persians with
their high caps, flowing robes, and graceful counte-
nances, may be seen in the streets; Chinese artisans
with their broad flat faces, and long tail of hair, sit at
their open shops, pursuing their different occupations
of barber, shoemaker, or china-seller; Malays, fiercer of

B



9 CALCUTTA.

countenance; and Turks with their grave and solemn
mien. Here you may see a Hindoo of high caste and
great rank, borne along on his palanquin surrounded
by dependent natives: here an English casitiage dashes
past, with its four beautiful horses; and there an ele-
phant goes along, shaking his huge ears, and making
the earth quake, with his heavy tread, while a man sits
on his neck, and guides the docile monster.

Thus Calcutta has amongst its inhabitants many
from many and distant parts of the globe: from
England come its conquerors: all its grandeur, and all
its importance are English. The quays and warehouses
for merchandise are English; English ships are seen
peopling, but not crowding, the noble river; English
churches point their tall spires to heaven ; English red-
coats abound ; English fashions prevail : in short, every
thing which gives the idea of wealth, strength, or com-
fort, is English; and the traces of Hindoo language,
manners and religion, are rarely found apart from what
is poor, old and neglected in this singular city.

Many thousands of Englishmen leave their native
land, with its sweet wholesome climate and its fireside
comforts, to seek for gain in India. Of these, very few
are contented to return to England, and enjoy the



CALCUTTA. 3

moderate fruits of industry. The love of money, to
which they have already sacrificed so much, gains so
strong a hold of their minds, that they forget friends,
country, all that once was dear to them.—A little
longer, a little longer, a little more, and a little more,
—so they say, till the fatal climate cuts them off, and
tears them from their darling riches; or till, having
arrived at an early old age, and lost all enjoyment of
life, they return invalids to their native land, to shiver
and complain a little while, to find all changed, all
gone, that they had known and loved before,—and then
to die. |

The banks of the river Hoogley, for many miles, are
adorned with elegant houses-belonging to the Eng-
lish, both merchants and militany. These are called
bungalows, or thatched houses. They have all possible
contrivances for mitigating the heat, and imitating?
as it were, the climate and comforts of Europe: yet
which of these dwellings can be compared in comfort
to a neat English cottage, with its sweet-smelling
garden, its light sash-windows opened wide to let in
the cool air, and with it the odour of the hongy-suckles
and roses that creep up the trellised porch?

The reader is now humbly requested to imagine himself,



4 CALCUTTA.

or herself in one of these bungalows, Situated on the
bank of one of those numerous streams that flow into
the Hoogley, it was retired, yet not out of the reach of
interesting objects. The many windings of the little
river, the pleasure-boats that rowed slowly up and
down in the cool of the evening, the frequent sail visible
on the distant Hoogley, the many buildings on the
banks of that great river, and the reflection of trees,
houses, temples, and sky in the broad mirror of water,
made a scene that one might well wish to look upon
again.

The house was worthy of its situation: it was built
and furnished with every ornament, every luxury that
wishes could suggest, and wealth supply. But who were
the inhabitants? A,young man, whose brow was bent
with sorrow, and a poor little motherless babe under four
*years of age.



CHAPTER II.

| ELLEN CAMERON.

Wuen,the heroine of this tale was a very little babe,
her mother died; and though: her father loved her
dearly, he could not, and did not supply a mother’s



ELLEN CAMERON. s

place to the poor child. Every morning he went into
Calcutta, to attend to his business; every evening when
he réturned, little Ellen was brought to him to be kissed
and caressed for a quarter of an hour before she went
to bed, and he saw her again at breakfast time before
he left home. If ever he heard her cry, he rang the
bell and ordered the servants to give her whatever she
wanted, and not to let her be distressed on any account.
She always looked very pretty, ‘she was always nicely
dressed when he saw her, and he ‘had engaged two
European nurses for her at a great expense; S0 he did
not doubt that she was well taken care of. But he was
mistaken. Had he intrusted her entirely to the native
servants, she would have been much better managed ;
for it is impossible to take more affectionate care than
- they take of the children under their charge. The two
English women, as soon as Mr. Cameron was safely out
of the house in the morning, laid Ellen on the floor of
the veranda, to amuse herself as she liked, and then
went to sleep till it was tiffin time. At twelve o'clock
they sat down to tiffin, and, giving themselves all the
airs of European ladies, admitted company, smoked
their hookahs, and gossiped for an hour or two. Ellen
always found her way to the tiffin table, and cried till



6 ELLEN CAMERON.

they gave her more to eat than was good for her; —
and then cried again,-till they shook her by the arms;
and then roared outright, till they called one of the
bearers to take her away. Then she was in her element.
Sejah would take her in his arms, and carry her
wherever she liked, and sing songs to her, and tell
her Hindoo stories all about their wonderful Hindoo
gods; and show her pictures of them, some with a
hundred hands sticking out of every part of their
body, some with serpents’ heads, and others with
elephants’ trunks; and Ellen would coax him, and
squeezing his brown face between both her little hands,
beg him to show her more beast men. In the mean
time, the neglect of her nurses, and the want of regular
and proper food and ‘rest, injured poor little Ellen’s
health, so that when she was four years old, it was
evident to everybody that she did not thrive as she
ought. Her fingers were long and bony, she tottered
in walking, her face was quite pale, and there was a
black streak under each of her eyes: those pretty,
sparkling, laughing eyes were always half shut, and
seemed oppressed by the weight of their lids,

Mr. Cameron began to be alarmed when he saw his
little girl looking so languid. He sent for advice from







ELLEN CAMERON. 7

Calcutta; he bought an elephant for her to ride on; he
fitted out a pleasure-boat to take her up and down the
river; he found she was fretful, so he gave stricter
orders to his servants to indulge her in every wish, lest
crying should injure her health ;—and then he thought
he had done his duty.

One day Mr. Cameron returned to his bungalow
some hours earlier than usual. He had met with an
English gentleman whom he had not seen for some
years, and he brought him home to dinner. As they
went slowly along the banks of the river towards the
house, Mr. Cameron told his friend all that had hap-
pened to him since their last meeting. A very melan-
cholystory it was; and they both of them shed some tears
when Mr. Cameron spoke of the little girl as the only
comfort that was left to him, and said that she was too
sickly to live long, and that he should soon be without
a child. .

They entered the house, and went straight to little
Ellen’s apartments; they were empty. Mr. Cameron
supposed she was sailing on the river, and looked about
for some of his people who might give tidings of her.
‘¢ J suppose I shall find some one here,” said he, and
he walked towards the veranda. Judge of his as-



8 ELLEN CAMERON.

tonishment, when he saw the two nurses with a party of
gossips, sitting at their tiffin. He asked for the child ;
one said she was in her cot, another in the same breath
said she was on the river, and at last both of them
confessed that they did not know where she was: and
how could they? Half an hour before, they had laid
her crying on the floor in a corner of the veranda, and
told her to stay there till she was good: when quite
tired of crying, she had got up, and roamed about
in search of her favourite Sejah and his pretty beasts,
and had found her way through a glass door, and down
a flight of steps that led to the river side.

The house was searched ; Mr. Cameron was half
distracted ; Ellen was. nowhere to be seen. He re-
collected the doorway that led to the river; and to the
river he went. A crowd of native boatmen, and other
idle people, stopped his way; they were laughing
loudly at some object in the midst of them. Let me
pass! let me pass!” said Mr. Cameron; and he was
pushing his way through, when he thought he dis-
tinguished the voice of a child. He listened, and shud-
dered to hear the lips of a young child attempting
to sing a Hindoo song, which a man in the crowd was
teaching it, and lisping out words so very wicked, that



ELLEN CAMERON. 9

it never ought to have heard them. It was but for
a moment; the song ceased, and he heard the child
say: ‘* Now, give me the paun.” Was it fancy?
Could that be his Ellen’s voice? He pushed his way
through the dirty crowd, and saw his little girl sitting
on the ground, and eagerly putting into her mouth a
large piece of the unwholesome drug which the man
had given her for her song.

You will imagine that the poor father lost no time in
snatching his little girl to his bosom, and running home
with her; but when he had deposited her in proper
hands, and taken the paun out of her mouth, I am
sorry to say he flew into a furious passion with the
attendants, and made such a noise, that all the mul-
titude of servants in the house, and the compound,
heard him, and trembled for fear.

The whole of that.day Ellen was not out of her
father’s sight. Many unreasonable wishes she had, but
she was humoured in them all. She sat by her father’s
side during dinner, she fell asleep in his arms afterwards,
and he watched her undressing, and laid her himself in
her cot. After all this was done, his friend ventured to
ask him what he meant to do with Ellen? “ Why,”
said he, ‘‘ what more can I do? I have ordered three



10 ELLEN CAMERON.

of them to be flogged; I have sent the nurses to gaol ;
Sejah and Arkier I have turned off; and have given
the rest of them what they will not easily forget. I
can do nothing more.’”’—‘ You have done nothing,”
answered his friend, “to repair the injuries which
your child has suffered, nor to prevent their recur-
rence. None of the servants who bowed and trembled
just now before you, can or ought to be relied on,
when your eye is no longer upon them. Your little
girl will be lost for want of proper attention; or if
her life be spared, what will become of her mind
among these poor ignorant wretches?’””—‘‘I am an
unfortunate man,” said Mr. Cameron; “ what you
say is very true; but there is no remedy for it.””—
‘“‘ There is one remedy,” said his friend; ‘‘ send her to
England.”— “ No, sir,no; that.is impossible; I never
can part with her. You cannot love your children as I
love mine ;—you do not know what it is to love only
one living thing upon earth, so I pardon you for utter-
ing the cruel words.”’

‘‘ My dear sir,” answered his friend, ‘‘ I do not love
my children as you love yours; for I would rather
consent to part with them for ever, than see them
perish soul and body under my eyes, and hear in

om
x 3
oe



ELLEN CAMERON. 11

my secret thoughts the voice of my Judge, saying:
‘What hast thou done with the souls I committed
unto thee, and where are they? Answer thou for

them.’ ”’

Mr. Cameron was silent; but when his feiend had
retired, he walked out,—and many hours after, when
the heavy night dews were lying on the grass, he was
still pacing up and down under the trees by the river
side. 1 doubt whether he got any sleep that night,
but the morning found ‘him a wiser man than the even-
ing had left him: he had reflected, and had resolved
to give up his own gratification for the good of his
child, and to send Ellen to England, and that without
delay.



CHAPTER III.
THE VOYAGE.

Very early one morning, about three weeks after his
friend’s visit, Mr. Cameron took Ellen on board the
ship that was to convey her to England. It is im-
possible to describe her delight: every thing was new,
wonderful and enchanting to her. She ran up and
down the cabin stairs over and over again, and called



12 THE VOYAGE.

her father to play at hide and seek with her, among the
coils of rope, and other things that were lying on deck.
She wondered that he wonld not play with her, and
began pulling him by the skirts of his coat, and
pointing aloft said : ‘‘ Look, papa, look at the little men
sitting up there in the sky; how did. they get there ? a
Her father looked at her, but so very sorrowfully, that
though she had a great many other questions to ask,
she felt afraid to say any more, and stared in his face
with terror and astonishment.

We will pass over the melancholy moment of parting,
the day of lamentations, when the little girl found
herself among strangers, and the night, when she
sobbed herself to sleep in her berth. Suffice it to
say, that when the due time of mourning for a child
of four years old had passed away, her attention was
turned to new objects, and she became as lively, as
mischievous and as troublesome as ever. Ellen was
intrusted to the care of a Hindoo nurse, who brought
over five or six other children at the same time, and
who, when she had washed and dressed them in the
morning, usually allowed them to run about and amuse
themselves all day. Ellen soon became acquainted
with all the ship’s company, and was equally pleased



THE VOYAGE. 13

when sitting on the captain’s knee, or lighting a pipe
for Tom Cox, the boatswain’s mate. The voyage lasted
four months, and during that time all that Ellen learned
was to climb well, to speak a little English (if the
‘sailors’ language could be called English), and to sing
“ God save the Queen.” Her chief amusements were
pulling away at any thing like a rope that came within
her reach, and calling : “‘ Ha yo 1” like themen; and if
she ever condescended io play with the other little
children, who were not half so lively and high-spirited as
she was, it was upon condition that they should call her
captain, and obey her grders, though she often turned
sport into serious earnest.

Any one accustomed to observe the way in which
children show in their plays their different tempers,
would have been grieved at perceiving many signs of
a proud disposition in little Ellen Cameron during
her voyage. Her playfellows hated her, and found
her a troublesome tyrant; but the sailors, and especially
the young midshipmen, laughed at her little airs, and
encouraged them. ‘ You must not frighten little master
George so,” said the nurse: “itis not pretty for a young
lady to frown and slap.” —“ Yes it is,” said Ellen, ‘‘ for
James Hamilton always laughs at me when I box, and ©

Mi.



14 THE VOYAGE.

calls me a young Saracen.””—<‘And what is a Saracen?”
said James Hamilton, who was standing by. “I don’t
know,” said Ellen, “‘ but I am sure it must be some-
thing very pretty.” , James Hamilton only answered
by a laugh and a kiss, and turned off, saying, “‘ You’
pretty little Saracen you!”’ and Ellen’s idea of pretty in
a young lady was unchanged by the nurse’s reproof.

Sooner or later however the oppressed meet with
' redress; sooner or later tyrants have a fall: happy are
those tyrants, who, like little Ellen Cameron, are not
chastised in vain ! rece

One day, when the voyage wag nearly ended, Ellen was
walking up and down the quarter-deck with a consequen-
tial step, holding her hands behind her as the captain did,
when two of the little children ran past her. She seized
one by the arm, and gave the other a blow on the face,
saying, in an angry voice: “ Why dont you bow to me
when you pass? Don’t you know I’m captain?” Little
George, offended at being slapped by a girl, but too
faint-hearted to do any thing but cry, lifted up his voice
and lamented, while Julia, his sister, running to take
refuge with the other children, called out, as soon as
she thought herself out of danger : “‘ You cannot make me
bow, for I won’t.” This word of rebellion was the signal



THE VOYAGE. 15

for a generaluproar. Ellen rushed on to the fight, and
setting hands, nails, and teeth at work, with astonishing
strength and valour, struck, terror into the assembled
forces of her adversaries. She soon put them to flight,
and with eyes and cheeks on fire, and disordered dress,
hotly pursued them till they reached the sacred limits
of the quarter-deck. Here it was that Ellen was first
stopped in her career by a long and strong arm stretched
across her path, and looking up, she beheld the face of
the captain. She thought he was laughing: No; there
was certainly something like a smile lurking round his
lips; but a frown stood on his brow that could not be mis-
taken, when he roughly said: “ How now ! what’s all
this about, my little lady ?”—“ I only want to make
them bow to me,” said Ellen, “ because 1 am captain.”
“ But you must know,” replied the captain, “‘ that
you have no right to beat and scratch your crew as you
have done. If I were to use my ship’s company ill, I
should be tried and punished for it; so you must be
punished too; and since there is no one else here to
execute sentence on you, I must.do it myself.” So
. ‘ *
saying, he put his telescope under one arm, and Ellen
under the other, and when he had taken her into his
eabin, he gave her no very gentle chastisement.





16 THE VOYAGE.

After this, you may believe Ellen did not attempt to
play the tyrant again; and before the remaining week
of the voyage was over, the scratches she had inflicted
were healed, the fight was forgotten, and the children
called her captain as usual.

What new land have they come to’ now? What
broad fair river are they sailing up? What. people are
shouting joyful huzzas from the shore? What heavy
mass of smoke and cloud is lying before them ?

That country is England! That river is the Thames!
Those people are honest Britons, cheering their own
brave tars on their return home! That huge dingy
place in the distance is London !

CHAPTER IV.
THE OLD AUNT.

Mr. Cameron had an aunt who lived in London;
and he was obliged to send Ellen to her, for all his
other relations lived in the north of Scotland. He
never doubted for & moment that this old and near
relative would -be kind to poor little Ellen in a strange
land; so he gave the nurse a letter to her, in which he



THE OLD AUNT. 17

entreated: her to take care of his child, and let her stay at
her house until she could be placed at a proper school.

It was a matter of some regret to Mr. Cameron that
he knew very little of this aunt. He had seen her
twenty years before, when he was a little boy, and then
he used to admire her for her beautiful red cheeks, and
the feathers she wore in her head-dress. He now tried to
recollect something more of her, something that she had
said or done when he was a child, that he could judge
of now that he was a man, and that would help him
to guess to what sort of a woman he ‘was intrusting
so precious a deposit. If Mr. Cameron: had been an
observing and attentive boy, his memory would have
furnished him readily with some trait of his aunt, which
would have helped him now; but as those who do not
observe cannot remember, he racked poor memory in
vain: nothing would come uppermost but red cheeks
and bobbing feathers; and as he had long ceased to
admire these for their own sake, the recollection of
them gave him no comfort at all. F

After the nurse who had charge of the children
had taken the rest to their different destinations, she
proceeded with Ellen to a large house in Dover-street,
whither Mr. Cameron’s letters directed her.



18 THE OLD AUNT.

The nurse spoke only a few words of English, and
though she made many salaams to the smart gentleman
who opened the door to her, she could not make him
understand what she wanted. At last however she
gave him the letter she had brought for his mistress,
and after turning it round and round and peeping in at
the ends of it, he put it on a silver waiter and carried it
up stairs, leaving the nurse and child in the hall.
After some time he came back to tell them his mistress
wished to see them, and he ushered them into the
drawing-room where she was.

Mrs. Cameron was an old bent woman of seventy,
with a very rich dress, and a very fashionable head-
dress; and she had such white teeth, such a colour in
her cheeks, and’Such @quantity of light flaxen ringlets,
_ that if they had been her own, instead of being bought
with her money, they would have been truly astonish-
ing in a woman of her age.

Mrs. Cameron’s favourite maid was out, and as her
own eyes were too dim to make out the letter, and she
could not wait with patience till Parker came in to
read it for her, she had ordered up the nurse and child
to explain the mystery of their coming; and now ina
petulant and impatient tone she poured forth a multi-

x ae,
8
Be A



THE OLD AUNT. 19
>

tude of questions on the astonished nurse. Now
even if the poor Daye had understood these questions,
she could not have answered half of them; and if she
could have answered them, the old lady was so deaf,
that she could hear nobody well but Parker. So when
she found herself reduced to the necessity of waiting,
she fretted and fumed, and rang her bell till she almost
pulled it down, to ask the footman whether Parker
was come in or not.

At last Parker arrived, and after receiving some
sharp rebukes for being always out of the way when
she was wanted, she was allowed to begin the letter.
She had not proceeded far however, before she was
interrupted by her cross and impatient mistress.

“© Hey !—what !—how! I take* the child! Thank
Heaven, I never had any of my own, and I’m not
going to torment myself with other people’s children.
Besides, it’s all an imposture you may depend upon it.
Edward Cameron has been six years in India: ‘most
likely he’s dead by this time.”

‘¢ Here is his letter,” said Parker: “‘ he cannot be
dead.”’

‘Then he ought to take care of his children himself,”
thundered Mrs. Cameron. ‘‘If he is not dead now, he



20 THE OLD AUNT.
will die soon; for all people die that go to India,
sooner or later; and then I shall be burdened with his
girl,”

‘* But here is a very large remittance,” said Parker,
‘and Mr. Cameron says——”’

“Hold your tongue, Parker,” interrupted her mis-
tress, “If he can afford to pay for it, he will find
people enough who will take care of her; so I will have
nothing to do with her. Make that black woman
understand that she must take the child back again
directly.”

“Then I need not finish the letter, ma’am,”’ said
Parker, folding it up.

“Oh! finish it, by all means,” said Mrs. Cameron;
‘* you may as well read on, to see what he means.”

This permission was just the thing that Parker
wanted. She thought that if her mistress’s curiosity
prevailed so far over her impatience as to let her hear
the rest of the letter, her heart would be touched,
and she would grant Mr. Cameron’s earnest request.
Parker knew her mistress well, and the effect was
exactly what she expected.

‘‘ Ha !—hum !—so !—Well, if the child has lost its
mother, and if it really was dying in that climate, I





THE OLD AUNT. 9]

suppose people would think me cruel in not taking
it; so if you will take charge of it, Parker, and keep it
out of my way, it may stay here till we find a school.
But where is the child? Let me look at it.”

‘During all this time the Daye had been doing her
best to keep little Ellen quiet, for she saw the aunt was
not favourably disposed towards her. It often happens
however, that when children are most urged to show off,
they become the most unruly. So it was with Ellen :
her eyes had roamed round the room, and she wanted
to go where her eyes had been. The Daye held her
fast by the hand till she found that she could do so
no longer without a disturbance, and then suffered
her to creep under the sofa, and she had been quiet
ever since.

As soon as Mrs. Cameron’s inquiry after Ellen was
made intelligible to her, the poor Daye looked under the
sofa; but, to her great dismay, no Ellen was there. There
was a moment’s silence, when suddenly a laugh was heard
from the other side of the room, and an immense china
jar, which had stood for many years demurely on end,
was seen rolling about on its side in a most extraordi-
nary way. All had a presentiment of evil—Mrs. Ca-
meron swelled with rage, Parker sighed, the’ Daye



22 - THE OLD AUNT.

trembled. In short, little Ellen had chosen to hide
herself in this singular retreat, and was so incensed at
being dragged forth by the united powers of her ene-
mies, that in kicking and struggling for mastery, she
threw the beautiful jar down, and dashed it to atoms.
Parker’s countenance fell, for she knew that the spark
of humanity which had just been kindled in Mrs. Came-
ron’s bosom, was not likely to survive the china jar.
“ Poor little orphan, there is no chance for you now gy
murmured she; and again she guessed well, for in the
same moment the old lady rang the bell, and ordered
Ellen and her Daye neversto enter the house again.

‘



CHAPTER V.
WHAT BECAME OF ELLEN.

Parker, with tears in her eyes, followed the nurse
down stairs. ‘‘ Who would think,” said she to herself,
“that a stranger would have more natural pity for the
poor little creature than her own flesh and bleod! I
don’t know what to do with her, but something I must
do, for it seems as if Providence had touched my heart,
on purpose to befriend her when she wants a friend ;



PO als ie he A

WHAT BECAME OF ELLEN. | 23

and it would be sinful to fight against Providence.”
The kind-hearted woman then called to the nurse to
stop; and having left her for a few minutes, she re-
turned with a note, addressed to a sister of hers in the
borough, and directed the black woman to go thither
and leave the child, assuring her that she would be in
good hands.

Parker’s sister was a poor woman, with a large family,
and a very small house; yet she had no sooner read
her sister’s note, simply asking her to take the child in, —
and be kind to her till she should hear more from her,
than she received little Ellen with the affection of a
mother. Indeed, it was not till she had made up a
little bed in her own room, and given her some supper,
that she began to wonder where the child came from,
and what her sister had to do with her. She then
began to ask a few questions, as any other woman in
her place would.

“What's your name, my dear?”
answered the child.

‘¢ Where do you come from 2?”

‘“‘T came out of our ship, and I want to go back,
for this is a nasty little cabin,” said Ellen, looking
round the dark room.

Pd

‘¢ Captain,



94 WHAT BECAME OF ELLEN.

“Who brought you here?”

“ John Murray, and James Hamilton, and Bill
Graves, and little Jack, and a great many more,” said
the little girl.

‘Yes, those were the sailors, I suppose; but was
there no one else with you?”

Ellen pulled her inquirer down by the sleeve, till her
head was on a level with her own, and then whispered
in her ear: “‘ Yes, there was the old captain; but I
don’t like him, for he whipped me.”

« Who was the black woman that brought you here?”’

Qh, my Daye, my Daye !—let me go back to my
Daye!” cried poor Ellen, who having forgotten her
sorrows in her supper, now remembered them all afresh,
and rent the air, or rather the smoke of the dark shop
with lamentations, most earnestly and pathetically im-
ploring to be restored to her Daye. The good woman's
compassion was stirred, and her curiosity was stilled in
the same moment; she took the sobbing child on her
knee, and soothed her, and lulled her, and kept her
there the whole evening, though little Tommy Higgs
her own boy, stood by with his thumbs in his mouth,
sulking, because a stranger had usurped his throne.

The week that Ellen spent with this kind woman



WHAT BECAME OF ELLEN. 95

was a trying one, and brought her many a mortifica-
tion, The little Higgses were a strong-bodied race,
well able to take their own parts, and to support the
laws they chose to impose, with sound blows and buffets.
Thus Ellen, who had never been contradicted by her
Daye, nor overcome by her playféllows, now found her
commands disputed, and her strength despised.

At length Parker came to explain the mystery to
her sister, and relieve her of her charge. . Parker had
consulted a benevolent friend of her mistress, who
without delay made arrangements for sending Ellen to
a school of high and deserved repute in the west of |
England, took charge of the remittances Mr. Cameron
had sent, and promised to write to him immediately.
This good lady completed her kindness by inviting old
Mrs. Cameron to her house for a week, that Parker
might obtaim a few days’ leave of absence, and take
little Ellen to school.

It would be endless work were we to mention what-
ever was new to Ellen; for every thing she saw and
heard was new to her; so when we have introduced
her into the school-room, we shall leave her there for

_ some years, supposing that every little girl can from her
own imagination fill up this interval of time, and infer that

Cc



26 WHAT BECAME OF ELLEN.

where there are so many books, desks, French marks,
and back-boards, Ellen would, in’ process of time, read,
write, speak French, and hold up her head, as well as
her neighbours.



°

CHAPTER VI.

LIFE AT SCHOOL. |
ELLEN at ten years old was very different from Ellen
as we have known her hitherto. The first day she
made her appearance at school, one would have thought .
her'absolutely untameable. She was dressed that day
in a little silk frock, with nothing under it but a pair of
muslin pagamahs or trousers, and wore rings in her
ears, and bracelets round her wrists. She ran about
all day, laughing, singing and talking a jargon of
Hindoostanee and English; and not all -the frowns of
all the teachers could make her sit still, or prevent her
from playing rub-a-dub with the ruler on the desks.
At dinner she behaved like a little savage: she snatched
pieces of meat and pudding from the plate of one neigh-
bour, to cram them with her fingers into the mouth of
another, to whom she had taken a particular fancy ;
and then taking up a glass of water, she tried to pour

17
ra
alge
4



&
vi
?:
;





LIFE AT SCHOOL. 97

:t down her friend’s throat, crying out: “‘ Drink, drink!”
But with all Ellen’s roughness, Mrs. Kirnan, the school-
mistress, was pleased at seeing more of generous feeling
in this wild display, than in the measured conduct of
many a young lady who prides herself on her good
manners. -Ellen’s seizures were all made for the gratifi-
cation of others, and so far was she from thinking of
herself, that she more than once took what she thought
a very nice bit out of her own mouth, and stretched
across the table to give it to a little girl about her own
age, who seemed to be making a serious, business of
her meal.

With such a perfect,absence of selfishness, Ellen
soon found, that her ways were disagreeable, and im-
mediately became as anxious to please her companions
by orderly behaviour, as she had been by overload-
ing: them with dainties. She had wished only to give
pleasure, and had failed only from not knowing the
right way to set about it. But when she once fell
into the orderly customs of the school, she soon be-
came the most polite little girl in it.

What is politeness? The science of politeness is ‘the
knowledge of the right way to please. The practice
of politeness consists in serving your friends in their



28 LIFE AT SCHOOL. |

own way instead of yours. The best master in polite-
ness is the one who gave lessons to Ellen, and to all
other obliging young folks of our acquaintance. His
name is Disinterestedness; he is a man of independent

_ fortune, and though he has a large house of his own to

live in, he gives up the best part of it to accommodate
his friends, and is contented with any little corner of it
himself,—as John Bunyan would: say. |

We have known some children, who behave very
prettily before strangers, and who always courtesy in
passing their schoolmistress, snatch a plaything from
the hands of a schoolfellow, or quarrel about a seat
near the fire. This is not opr politeness, nor was it
Ellen’s. She soon felt real gratitude to her teachers
for their kindness, and real love towards many of her
schoolfellows; and this prompted in her the wish to
serve them in all things. She had no selfishness in
her composition, except that which her old sin—pride
—brought with it. She was never weary of running
errands for her friends; she would willingly give up
the chimney-corner without being asked to do so;
and even when this was demanded of her, she would
give it up, though no one felt better than she, how
much more gratifying it is to do a service of our



|
|
|
|
|



LIFE AT SCHOOL. 99

own accord, than to have it wrung from us. Ellen had
also learned to do and to suffer a great many things.
Slie would make any exertion to help a schoolfellow
out of a difficulty; she would bear blame, or even
punishment for a friend, without complaining or in-
forming ; but one thing, alas! she could not bear well ;

and you will wonder at it when you hear what a little
harmless, powerless thing it was ;—she could not bear
a laugh. *

Now we warn all young ladies who are going to
school, to make up their minds to stand a laugh before
they go. However we may lament the fact, ridicule is
in general use among school-girls, as a thermometer to
measure the warmth of a companion’s temper. In
vain will you try to excite their compassion by your
emotion. If you keep still at one point, their experi-

‘ment will soon be over, and then they will leave you

alone; but the morégapt*you are to bounce up to
boiling-water heat, the oftener will they try you, till
you settle at last, in the natural course of things, at.
the right school temperature, which is little above the
freezing point.

Who that knows how Ellen’s childhood was neg-
lected, will wonder to hear that at ten years old she



, a LIFE AT SCHOOL

often made ignorant blunders ? These blunders, when
they were discovered, hurt her feelings far too much : the.
simple consciousness of unavoidable ignorance ought
not to have distressed her; but Ellen as we already
know, was proud. Her schoolfellows should have made
allowances, but ‘they only laughed at her; and the
strangeness of her mistakes supplied them perhaps with
seme excuse. They were indeed of rare occurrence, not
made up of blot, blur ‘and carelessness, to be read at
first sight in the dirty face of every copy-book ; for
Ellen needed only to be told once what was right, and
she was more careful to teach herself, than others were to
teach her; but when any unfortunate mistakes did occur,
they certainly were egregious.

One evening Ellen was writing, for an exercise,
answers to some questions which Mrs. Kirnan had
given her. Among them was found this one: ‘‘ What
is the size of the moon?”’ > had never learned
any thing about the moon, but she knew in what book
she might find the necessary information. ‘It is not
worth while,” said she to herself, “to hunt through a
book for the sake of such a simple question as that,
when the moon is shinmg upon the window; I'll
open the shutter and measure it. Mrs. Kirnan likes



LIFE AT SCHOOL. 3]

experiment better than copying from books, and so
do 1.” r‘:

She opened the shutter, and held first one thing
aad then another to the window pane, to see if it
covered the moon. Her copy-book was too large,
even when she made allowance for the corners; her
pen-wiper was too small: what should she do for an
eract moon-measure? Mr. D’Orleans, the French master,
yas there at the time; his snuff-box lay on the table.
She took it up, put it close to the glass; it covered the
noon completely—just a total eclipse. ® |

“¢ That will do!” said Ellen; “‘ there is nothing like
experiment! Now for a game at puss in the corner !’’

Little did poor Ellen anticipate the trial she was
about to experience, when she gaily and confidently
produced her exercise the next moming, to be read
and corrected in class: It was well written, and care-
fully done, till the last question came, with its fatal
answer. ‘‘ How large is the moon?” —“A little smaller
than Mr. D’Orlean’s snuff-box.”’ A sudden burst of
uncontrolled laughter broke the silence of the school,
and some moments passed before Mrs. Kirnan’s calm
but steady eye could impose any thing like restraint
on her scholars. Ellen stood beside her in a tumult



32 LIFE AT SCHOOL.

of trouble, amazement and rage: her eye elanced
quickly from one to another of her.companions, who
were-still scarcely able to contain their laughter ; her
hand was clenched, and she advanced her foot, as if
she entertained some dire project-of vengeance.

“This is not the right answer,” said Mrs. Kirnan;
‘if you had looked in the book, you would hae
found that the moon is much largef than you suppose.’

But Mrs. Kirnan spoke in vain; for pride ant
passion make their victims deaf to the voice of instruc:
tion, and Ellen was now in the condition of those un-
happy ones who “ having ears hear not, neither under-
stand.” She forgot that humility especially becomes chil-
dren, that respect is due to teachers, that Mrs. Kirnan
was more likely to be in the right than she was ;—iIn
fact, she forgot every thing worth remembering, and
only listened to her pride. ‘Jt is not larger, but
rather smaller,” said she, stamping with her foot.
“TI have tried, and I know it; and nothing on earth
shall make me believe the contrary.”

Mrs. Kirnan never wasted words. She gave Ellen
her book with a look of pity, saying: “ Go to your
room’ Ellen, till you are yourself again.” Ellen did
not wait till the sentence was finished, but with her



LIFE AT SCHOOL. 33

figure drawn" to its full height, with.cheeks highly
flushed, that gavé unnatural brightnéss to her’ beautiful
dark eyes, and with her lip curled into an indignant
smile, she walked slowly to the door, made a disdainful
courtesy, and left the room.

I think I hear some of my little readers exclaim,
‘¢Oh, what a hard-hearted girl! How could she smile
at such a moment?’’ Happy are those children who
have never felt, who cannot conceive, thé bitterness of
such a smile as Ellen’s! Better weep rivers of tears
than wear a proud smile to conceal the heart’s utter
wretchedness. Perhaps Ellen thought so too, for one
who watched her closely said, that before she closed
the door, a large tear had gathered in her eye, which
rather contradicted the careless unconcern of her
manner. |

She reached her room; she shut the door; she threw
herself on the bed, and burst into an agony of weeping.
What would she not have given, could the last half hour
have been blotted out from her life, or from her memory!
Her mind was in such a state of confusion, that she
seemed unable to separate the ideas which crowded
in one after. the other. Now burning tears of shame
and anger suffused her cheeks, at the recollection



34 LIFE AT SCHOOL.

of her companions’ ridicule; now she wrung her hands
with vexation, when the conviction came across her
that she must have made some mistake that caused her
to appear ignorant and ridiculous; now her tears sud-
denly ceased, she started up, drew in her breath, and
proudly resolved to care for none of these things ; and
now she thought she saw the gentle pitying look of
her friend Mrs. Kirnan, and her pride giving way, she
burst into sobs of real grief. :

How often, after losing ourselves in anger and pride,
is there given to us a moment of stillness and reflec-
tion, and we are led back into the right way! How
does one ray of good feeling, like the first gleam of
dawn, glow into more perfect light, till, like the rising
sun, it disperses our darkness altogether ! Thus it was
with Ellen. She dwelt long on that look, so calm, so
compassionate ; and it told her more truth than words
could tell. As she reflected on it she wept, and while
she wept she repented. )

‘< Oh! what have I done! What have I done! ” said
Ellen. ‘‘She pitied me then, and perhaps even then
she would have pardoned me; but what must she think
of me now? That I am careless, hard-hearted, un-
grateful. And so I am! If I had loved her as !







LIFE ‘AT SCHOOL. 35

ought, I should never have lost her friendship, for the
sake of imposing upon a few silly girls. And what will
they think. of me? Perhaps, after all, they are not
deceived by my manner; perhaps they only laugh at it.
But no; they shall not laugh,” said she, as a momen-
tary pang shot through her at this vision of a laugh ;
‘they shall never know, shall never suspect, what I feel!”

In this way did Ellen think and talk to herself for a
long time. More than once, when she knew that school
was over, and that Mrs. Kirnan was in her own room,
she felt inclined to go to her, and acknowledge her
fault; but the sound of her companions’ steps and
voices, in the long gallery through which she must pass,
prevented her. ‘‘ They will meet me, they will guess
what I am about,” thought she.

At last anew idea struck her; she would write a
note to Mrs. Kirnan, and tell her not to show it to any
one: that would be an easier way than saying what she
wished to say, with such a choking in her throat. She
hastened to get her little desk, and she placed it before
her. It was one which Mrs. Kirnan had given her on
her last birthday; and the recollection of the words of
affectionate approval which had accompanied the gift,
came strongly to her mind. She had often thought of



36 LIFE AT SCHOOL.

those words since that delightful birthday, and they
had always made her happy. Now they seemed kinder
than ever; yet their very kindness fell like a blight
upon her heart. Every word reproached her. She
laid her head down on the desk, and thought of all that
Mrs. Kirnan had done for her, ever since the time when
she first took her, a wild and wilful baby, under. her
care; and when at last she raised her head and her eyes,
she saw Mrs. Kirnan sitting at the foot of her bed.

‘“] have been here some time,” said Mrs. Kirnan ;
‘but when I saw that you were thinking, I did not
disturb you. You have been accustomed to tell me
your thoughts, Ellen: may I ask you what engaged
you so deeply just now?” Ellen threw her arms round
the neck of her friend, hid her face in her bosom, and
sobbed out, ‘‘ I was thinking how very, very good you
are to me, and I am- »»__«¢ Well, Ellen, what are
you?”—“‘ Tam so ungrateful !’’ The long pause before
the last word, showed how difficult it was to bring it
out. Mrs. Kirnan pressed her young friend to her
heart, and said: “That 1s enough. I knew your
thoughts, my dear child, before, and could easily have
saved you the pain of telling them; but though the
struggle was a hard one, I thought your better part





LIFE AT SCHOOL. 37

would gain the victory. It has done so; and now, as
far as your offence concerns me, I have already forgiven
you, and I aly believe that you will never be ungrate-
ful to me again.”’

“Oh! thank you, thankyou ! ” said ‘Ellen. ‘‘ Now
I am perfectly happy;” and.she looked up with a smile
into Mrs. Kirnan’s face. No returning smile, however,
was to be found there. . |

Ellen was silent for a few moments. “ You say, as
far asconcerns you. Have I offended any body else?”

“Tell me, Ellen, do you feel as happy as you were
this morning ?”

‘* No, because I thinkidegraded myself before my com-
panions, and I am vexed that they all saw me in a passion :
but that only concerns myself; it did them no harm.”

‘‘ What! did it degrade you to be in a passion?
And if you do harm only to yourself, why should you
care that others see it ?”’

Ellen considered for,a while, and then replied : “To.
be ina passion, I am sure, must be wrong, and there-
fore degrading ; and as God requires us to do right, it
must be hurtful to us to choose to do wrong.”’

‘‘ But have we not a right to hurt ourselves if we
please? Are we not our own property ?”



38 LIFE AT SCHOOL.

‘¢ | think not; we belong to God who made us.”

“ And ‘what do we say of those who waste and injure
the property of another ¢”

“That they are unjust.”

“ And of those who receive the best gifts, and throw
them away, or trample them under foot ?” |

“‘ That they are ungrateful,” said Ellen, sorrowfully.

‘ And what do you say of those who can’ be unjust
and ungrateful to their. friend, their father, and yet be
more anxious to seem right with the world than to be
right with him? What does it signity, how many eyes
were upon you? They are not worth one sigh, one
regret, in comparison with his who seeth all the deep
places of the heart, and who hateth iniquity.”

« How is it,” said Ellen, “that though I know it is
wrong, I cannot help being more mortified than sorry
when I have behaved ill? I wish I were not proud.”

‘My dear Ellen,” said Mrs. Kirnan, “ you told
your fault to me just now, because you knew I loved
you; and because I love you, now that I see you are
aware of your fault and sorry for it,-I cannot refuse
you forgiveness. For the same reason go to your
heavenly Father; tell him that wish, tell him all your
thoughts; he loves you infinitely more than I, or any crea-

Se



LIFE AT SCHOOL. 39

‘ture could love you;. he will show you infinitely better
than I can what to do. But remember, that if you ask
him in the name of Him who was meek and lowly of
heart, to give rest to your:soul, you must make no
reserves; you must not wish for the praise of men:
God asks the whole heart, its undivided service.”’

Mrs. Kirnan, after she had ceased to speak, con-
tinued sitting in silence for some minutes; she then
kissed Ellen, and arose to go: She turned back
however as she was leaving the room, and said,
‘ Ellen, shall I tell your schoolfellows that you are
sorry for your fault?” Ellen shrunk from this pro- —
posal. ‘‘ No, no, madam, pray do not; there is no
occasion for them to know it.’”’—‘‘ Well,” said Mrs.
Kirnan, ‘‘ we must not expect too much at once. |
will hope better things: meanwhile I promise you your
_ secret shall be safe with me;”’ and she shut the door after
her. Those who recollect Mrs. Kirnan’s advice may guess
that Ellen did not pass unprofitably the next half hour.

At length the dinner-bell-rang. Ellen, after holding
the door half open for some time, made ‘a strong
resolve, and proceeded down stairs. - Her schoolfellows
were already seated. As she passed between the
tables, many heads in the two long rows turned round



40 LIFE AT SCHOOL.

to look at her. ‘She has been crying,” whispered |
one little girl. ‘‘ How ashamed she looks!’’ said
another. ‘These, and sundry other remarks, gave not
a very pleasant impulse to her step as she passed along,
and although a. hasty blush overspread her face for
a moment, she continued to walk-on with her eyes
cast down, till she stood beside Mrs. Kirnan. ‘‘ Will
you be so good,” said she, ‘as to tell them now that
I am sorry?” Her-voice trembled very much, but |
believe every one in the room heard it. There were
no more inquisitive looks seen, no more remarks heard.
- After dinner, Ellen’s companions called her as usual to
lead their plays; and the only respect in which the
remainder of that day differed from others, was, that
on wishing good night, most of the girls kissed Ellen
more affectionately than usual, and a tear stood in
Mrs. Kirnan’s eye while she said: “ God bless you, my
dear child!” After this Ellen became daily more dear
to all around her; and it may be noted as a singular
circumstance, that from this day, the young people of
that school were observed to leave off, in some measure,
the ill-natured custom of laughing at one another’s
foibles, except in those cases where both sides could
laugh in chorus. 3



THE LITTLE NABOB. 4)

CHAPTER VII.
THE LITTLE NABOB.

Ir is not however the labour of one hour, or of one
day, that will root out a weed with such deep and far-
spreading roots. as pride. Nor was the dislike of
ridicule the. only way in which Ellen’s prevailing fault
showed itself. She habitually thought of herself more
highly than she ought; and she had an habitual con-
tempt for the rest of the world. She was ready and
willing to spend herself in services to others; but when
kindness was offered to her, she either received it
coldly, and as her due,—or refused it, if not with dis-
dain, yet from a proud unwillingness to be under ob-
ligation to others. Again, though her kind heart led
her to compassionate the poor and to relieve their ne-
cessities, still her pity for them was allied to contempt.
She knew in theory, but never once felt, that they
were her brethren. Thus her behaviour to servants
and inferiors, though within the bounds of civility,
was such as made them feel their inferior station each
time she bestowed on them a word or a look.

Now, pride is a strange thing to live in the hearts
of children, who have so little, can do so little, and

D



42 THE LITTLE NABOB.

are so little; and if it were not as common in them, as
nettles and thorns in the hedges, we should wonder
how it got there, and we ought to wonder. When we
find this tare among our wheat, we content ourselves too
often with saying: “‘ An enemy hath- done this;” and
then give ourselves no concern to find out how he did
it, where he did it, and when he did it. Rather should
we search our field, find out the careless gap, or the
open gate, by which he came in, and close it that he
may come in no more. Sometimes we may find him
only beginning his mischievous work, and turn him
out with his seed unsown, by the opening at which he
entered.

Two or three circumstances in Ellen’s early life throw
a little light on the origin of her pride. Ellen’s earliest
recollections were of a house very unlike Mrs. Kirnan’s,
of a multitude of servants, and an absolute command
over every thing she wished to have. The things
and the customs which she remembered and described,
appeared to her little companions almost incredible,
because they had never seen them; and thus she
learned to attach an idea of grandeur and importance
to the most simple and natural circumstances of life in
India. ‘Here then her ignorance, which incapacitated



THE LITTLE NABOB. 43

her from making a just allowance for the difference of
climate and manners in the different parts of the world,
‘Jed her to make a false estimate of her own importance.
- “Qh!” cried a little girl to an older one, after the
little East Indian had given a fine description of her
elephant and its trappings, ‘Oh, Mary! Do you know
that Ellen Cameron says she has.an elephant of her
own! Do you think it can be true? Clara says she
does not believe it, because, if it is so, her father must
be a king, like Porus in the Grecian history. And
Ellen says, that she does not remember whether her
father was a king or not, but that she is sure she had
an elephant to ride on..’

‘‘ Nonsense!” said the older girl, “‘ her father is a
rich East Indian, and all that she says is true enough,
I dare say. Those Indian people live in such ‘style!
My cousin has been a voyage to India, and he says that
in England we have no idea how splendidly they live
there. Why, they have a hundred servants and more,
in many families.” ; |

‘A hundred servants! More than a hundred ser-
vants!”” was repeated in a tone of solemn astonishment
by the circle of little ones who heard this wonderful
instance of Eastern magnificence. From this time the



44 THE LITTLE NABOB.

children considered Ellen as one of superior rank, and
treated her with more respect than was necessary; and
she learned to claim it as homage due.

Another trifling incident occurred which satisfied her
concerning her superiority of rank. One day the
parents of a little schoolfellow of Ellen’s came to see
the children dance. The lady in question was noticing
to Mrs. Kirnan those of her scholars whose appearance
was in any way striking. “ And who is that child who
holds herself so well? 1 am sure, from her face, that
she is somebody.”—‘‘ Her name is Cameron,” said
Mrs. Kirnan; “she is an East Indian.” Ellen hap-
pened to cross over the quadrille just im time to hear -
what followed—uttered in a half whisper, a tone in
which even nonsense sounds impressive,—“* An East
Indiafi! Some nabob’s child, of course. I might. have
seen that from the Trichinopoly chain, and the beau-
tiful fan. My word! She looks like a little nabob
herself.”’

‘Nabob!” thought Ellen, ‘1 will not forget that
word.” She did not. She repeated to herself * nabob,
nabob,” during the quadrille, till the tune played .
nabob, the children danced nabob, and to forget nabob
was out of her power.





THE LITTLE NABOB. — 45

As soon as the dancing lesson was over, Ellen
hastened to seek her English Dictionary, and looked
for the letter N—‘‘ Nabob or Nabawb, an eastern
prince.” —‘‘ Now there it is!” said she to herself,
‘My father is a prince! I thought so.” And she
did think so for a long time. When older, and better
informed, it was easy to correct her idea of what is
called in England a nabob; but, alas! not so easy to
undo in her mind all the mischief which that one false
impression had wrought. |

CHAPTER VIII.
- THE TWO LETTERS. ,

Wuen Ellen was placed by Parker at Mrs. Kirnan’s,
the kind lady whom she had consulted on the occasion
wrote to Mr. Cameron, informing him of what had
happened, but softening, as much as possible, the un-
feeling conduct of the old aunt.. Mr. Cameron was little
aware that his aunt -had never, by letter or otherwise,
taken the least notice of Ellen since she had been to
school. He received regular and favourable accounts
of her health, comfort and improvement, from herself



46 THE TWO LETTERS.

and Mrs. Kirnan, and then felt no more uneasiness
about her than every parent must feel who is separated
from his child.

Ellen knew that she had such a relation as an old
aunt, but seldom thought of her, except to laugh at
early recollections, which were still quite vivid. She
thought she stood in no need of Mrs. Cameron’s notice;
yet she was indignant at her neglect: she never desired
a renewal of the acquaintance; yet she was hurt, that
while others were reckoning their various relations, she
could lay no claim to the only relative she had in the
land. Seldom however did she feel her want of con-
nexions. With’a happy and independent disposition,
she found in Mrs. Kirnan all that she wanted,—a
companion, a friend, a mother. School was her home,
and she wished for no other, except now and then, when
a bright vision of Eastern splendour, and of herself ruling
in it, came across her imagination.

Her situation was a forlorn one; and though she was
not sensible of it herself, there was one who felt it for her.
Mrs. Kirnan looked at Ellen with a sigh, when others re-
ceived visits or invitations from sisters, aunts and cousins ;
and wept, when the rest of the young people departed
joyfully to their homes at each returning holiday time;



THE TWO LETTERS. 47

and when she overheard the happy chat of others
concerning domestic pleasures and home indulgences,
Mrs. Kirnan regretted that Ellen was out of the reach of
those soft endearments, those tender exchanges of kind
feelings and good offices, which warm the souls of
brothers and sisters and kindred, and make home home.
She'felt that such an interchange of feeling would have
been of much use to Ellen, by softening her disposition,
and, by teaching her early many practical lessons, that
it would spare her much painful discipline in future years,
For she knew that later in life, hard struggles and cutting
disappointments, with bitter tears, are sent to those who
have neglected in youth to become humble and disin-
terested.

Our little girl had been at school seven years, when
one morning the postman’s well-known rap brought
the accustomed gleam of joy to many a young face in
Mrs. Kirnan’s school-room. ” Is it for me—is it for
me?” was the eager inquiry. All were looking up
anxiously,—all but one, who went on writing tran-
quilly, till the words—‘‘ Miss Cameron,’’—roused her.
“Ellen, a letter for yyou, and it is not a ship letter.”
Ellen turned pale, as he stretched forth her trembling
hand, and read the” address, in an unknown hand-



48 THE TWO LETTERS,

writing. The letter was opened. “ My old aunt,”
said Ellen, recovering herself and laughing; and she
read the letter; which we will transcribe, as it was not a
very long one.

“¢ Miss Ellen Cameron,

‘‘T have received a letter from my nephew, your
father, together with some ear-rings and other trinkets,
some of which are directed for you. I write to inform
you that they are at my house. I hope you are be-
having properly, under the many and great advantages
you are favoured with. As you are now old enough to
know how to conduct yourself in a drawing-room, |
rather think I may have you to spend part of your
next holidays with me. This must however depend
entirely on the account your governess sends of your
conduct. I shall be obliged to her to write a few lines
concerning you, in the letter I expect to receive in
answer to this. |

. ‘*¢ Yours, &c.
‘¢ ANNE CAMERON,

“P.S. Do not consider yourwisit as certain; for
many things may happen betwee this time and then to
make it inconvenient to me.”



THE TWO LETTERS. 49

Ellen’s feelings on reading this ungracious invitation,
may be best gathered from her conduct. She quickly
and silently drew forth a sheet of paper, resumed the
pen she had laid aside, and. wrote the following answer :

“ Madam,

“«{ have received your letter of the 28rd instant, and I
doubt not I shall soon find an opportunity of relieving
you from the care of my father’s presents. I should
have been gratified at hearing that he was well; but
probably that information may come from himself, in a
note with my ear-rings.

‘“‘T beg, madam, to decline your invitation for the
holidays, as I should be very sorry to put you to in-
convenience; and I am never so happy as when I am
with my friend, Mrs. Kirnan, who does not think
my presence a trouble.

“Tam, madam,” &c.

No sooner was this done, than Ellen went to Mrs. Kir-
nan’s room. ‘ Well, Ellen, so you have had a letter?”
“From my aunt, ma’am; here it is; and here is the
answer.” ‘‘ What read and answered too already?
Let me see what your aunt says.” Ellen watched Mrs.
Kirnan’s varying countenance, as she perused the



50 THE TWO LETTERS.

chilling letter of her aunt, and then produced her
own. Again she watched the countenance so well
known, so easily read, and again it expressed disap-
pointment. :

“« My dear love,” said Mrs. Kirnan at last, “‘ there
‘s no need for you to answer this to-day. No letters
can go till to-morrow, and to-morrow you will disposed
to write differently.”

‘No, indeed, ma’am, I am sure I shall not: this is
just what I mean to say.”

“‘] hope and trust, my love, that you will think and
do better things to-morrow. This is not a letter to
send to an old lady,—a relative,—and one who is kindly
disposed towards you.”

“ But you know, Mrs. Kirnan, that I never was a
hypocrite in my life. I must say what I think, or be
silent; and as to her being well disposed towards me,
she has been seven years without showing it. lowe her
nothing yet, and I should be sorry to put myself under
any obligation to her.”

‘‘What do you consider being under an obliga-
tion?” |

‘JT can feel it better than I can describe it; but I
think it is accepting a favour that you cannot return.”



THE TWO LETTERS. 51

<< If so, yon are already under an obligation to your
aunt; for the good heart feels itself less bound by
actual benefits, than by the good will which confers
them. Your aunt has shown you that good will; and
as long as you are ungrateful for it, you lie under an
obligation which you take no care to repay.,”

‘Qh! Mrs. Kirnan,” said Ellen, “‘ you may un-
derstand that reasoning, and, perhaps, I may too;
but every one else would think—” “ Stop, Ellen;
what have we to do with what every one else thinks ?
If our soulsare our own, we must attend to our own
thoughts, and examine what reason and religion have
to say about the matter.” 3

“« Religion tells us,” said Ellen, “ to avoid even the
appearance of evil; and people might well think, and
so might my aunt, if I accepted her invitation, that I
was cringing to her, and that I wanted something of
her.” :

‘No one who knows you, will suspect you of
cringing, Ellen; but are you sure that you want
nothing of your aunt?” | .

** What I!”’ exclaimed Ellen, in a louder tone, with
flashing eyes, and cheeks suddenly crimsoned: ‘‘ No!
thank heaven, my father is a nabob!”



52 THE TWO LETTERS.

‘Well, and what has that to do with the matter?”
said Mrs. Kirnan, very quietly. .

Ellen stared ; for she thought that nabob was a
word that must finish the business at once, and silence
a thousand tongues, and a thousand arguments; but
as Mrs. Kirnan waited in silence, she was reduced at
last to the necessity of explaining herself. “ Why, do
you really think, madam, that I want her paltry
money, when I shall have such a fortune of my
own.”

‘‘No, my dear, my thoughts were not at that mo-
ment fixed on pounds, shillings and pence. You may
call these paltry things, paltry obligations, if you like ;
I was thinking of something which these cannot buy.
Listen, Ellen: you must go to your aunt; you must
Jearn to know her; and, through her means, you must
learn to know and love your other relations, whoever
and wherever they may be. I know nothing of the
fortune of yours that you talk about; but I know that
if your father and myself were taken from you, you
would be an orphan indeed, without a protector,
without a friend, the poorest of the poor, whatever
your fortune might be un

‘‘ Cannot I make other friends? Is it not better to



THE TWO LETTERS. 53

choose friends for their good qualities, than to make
them just because they are related to me?”

‘We may do both, my love; but I believe we all
shall find the truest hearts, and the warmest, within
that little circle of kindred friends, that God has
placed around every comer into this world, as a sort
of natural shelter. They will love you for yourself,
and love you also because you are theirs, and they are
yours.”

‘“* But,” pursued Ellen, after a pause, ‘‘ I know that
my aunt is such a selfish woman, that I never can
make a friend of her. She will wish me, where I shall
wish myself, a hundred miles away, all the time I am
with her. I cannot imagine what has caused this
sudden amiable fit towards me. I dare say it is the
first she ever had in her life.” :

‘“* Do you know, Ellen, who is the source of every
good impulse ?”

‘* Yes,” said Ellen, casting down her eyes.

‘* And if Mrs. Cameron’s kindly feeling towards you
is the first she ever had, will He despise it for that
reason ?””

‘‘ Na,” |

‘* Or because it is still cold and feeble?”



54 THE TWO LETTERS.

“No, certainly.” ?
‘Then, why should you? I allow that Mrs. Came-
ron’s letter was chilling; that she managed to make
her kindness look almost insult: but do not return it
with insult;—rather thank God that he has given you
an opportunity of continuing a good work which he
has begun, of watering a tender plant which he has
planted.” | ,

‘“‘T will go, if you please, my dear Mrs. Kirnan,
and write another letter,” said Ellen, tearing her first
letter in two as she spoke.

‘¢Go, my dear child,” replied Mrs. Kirnan, “ it
costs you something to do right to-day; but you have
overcome your pride in a right service, and the first
fruits of your humility will not be offered in vain.”

It is an old saying, that the first step to wisdom is
to know that we are ignorant; so also the first step
towards humility is to know that we are proud. Never
had Ellen been so abashed at being called proud, as
she was now to hear herself called humble. ‘‘ Oh,”
thought she, ‘‘ Mrs. Kirnan little knows what I am
when she speaks of me as having overcome my pride!”
And filled with this oppressive consciousness, she turned
quickly away, and left the room.



THE TWO LETTERS: 55

Ellen had well said that she was no hypocrite; this
was still evident in the second letter which she now
penned,—as formal and cold a composition as ever
school-girl produced, yet containing none of the inso-
lence of the first. Its very stiffness, however, produced
an effect exactly contrary to what might have been ex-
pected, and it raised Ellen many degrees in her aunt’s
estimation, which will be fully accounted for by the
following historical fact. |

Once upon a time, in a very primitive age, when
our old grandfathers and grandmothers were little
boys and girls, when our little grandfathers used
to run about in little leather breeches and long-
tailed coats, or dance minuets with our little grand-
mothers, and admire their full starched petticoats
and high heads, all powdered and frizzled; in those
days, I say, Mrs. Cameron was a little girl, and went
to school, and learned to write a letter twice a year to
her parents, which began with: ‘‘ Honoured sir and
madam,” informed them when the vacation commenced,
and ended with her being, most respectfully, with duty
to her aunts and uncles, their obedient humble servant.
Now Ellen’s letter came near enough to these models
of the style epistolary of some sixty years before, to be



56 THE TWO LETTERS.

thought by Mrs. Cameron a very proper letter. She
admired it vastly, and augured good things from the
writer’s character, from the firmness of the down-
strokes, and the regularity of the pot-hooks ; and this
opinion was confirmed by a few lines, from Mrs. Kir-
nan, on the other half sheet.

“So, so, so, hum! vastly well!” said Mrs. Came-
ron, before her spectacles were fairly off her nose.
‘‘ Parker, Miss Cameron will be here this day fortnight.
I wish her governess had said whether she can sew well
or not. . What in the world shall I do with her, if she
cannot employ herself! Here, Parker, take a pen, and
write a few lines for me, to tell her to bring her
sampler; and Parker I say, you may put the drawing-
room china out of the way before she comes, and all
the books of prints, for children are apt to tear picture-
books; and bring down the high fender, Parker, that
she may not fall into the fige ; and let the spare-room
be cleaned out, for her to keep her playthings in, and
then I can send her there, can’t I Parker, when she
makes too much noise? And then, remember Parker,
you must take care of her; you know you promised
me, when I wrote, that I should have no trouble with
her.”’



THE TWO LETTERS. 57

Parker with ready zeal repeated her promise; and
very obediently made all the desired preparations for
Ellen’s coming, though she did not see any necessity
for them. She remembered that many a year had
gone by, since the fatal adventure of the jar, and that
. Ellen was now no longer a child; while Mrs. Cameron,
whose even life had never been interrupted by any
great event, since the destruction of her well-beloved
china jar, and who therefore had taken no note of
time as it passed, considered Ellen’s last visit as a
thing of yesterday; and still trembled with something
like rage for the china that was gone, and with fear for
that which remained.



CHAPTER IX.
ELLEN’S VISIT.

Wuew its turn came, in the course of time, the day
appeared which was to bring our heroine to London.
Many times was Parker charged to come, the instant
she should hear the drawing-room bell, and take the
child away. Ellen arrived just in time for dinner, and
during that meal Mrs. Cameron often cast a suspicious



58 ELLEN’S VISIT.

look towards her, to see that she played no pranks; and
Ellen’s quiet demeanour so far gained her confidence,
that, before dinner was ended, she allowed the child to
give herself a potato.

Mrs. Cameron never talked dune dinner ; but that
business over, when she was comfortably seated in her
great arm-chair close to the fire, her natural appetite
for information returned, and. she asked Ellen some
questions about her school, her journey and so forth.
Ellen was not one of those children who have nothing
more to say than yes or no, on any subject. She could
think, feel, and observe: she was not eager to talk:
she could either amuse herself with silent thoughts, or
express readily whatever came uppermost in her mind ;
so that whenever her voice was heard, you might be sure
she had something to say. This day she did not want
materials for conversation: her journey had furnished
her with much that was fresh to her, and Mrs. Came-
ron listened with pleasure to the simple and lively
descriptions that her little niece gave of her adventures.
Indeed she several times laughed very heartily, at
Ellen’s account of incidents which would have put her
in a fine passion had they happened to herself. At last
in the midst of one of Ellen’s long stories, Mrs. Came-



THE TWO LETTERS. 59

ron, without ever remembering to ring for Parker as
she had agreed to do, fell fairly and good-humouredly
asleep in her chair. When Ellen perceived this, she
very judiciously hummed on in the same tone of voice
for half a minute, lowering her voice by degrees, lest
she should awaken her aunt by suddenly stopping; and
then, when she thought all was safe, she turned quickly
round on her heel, and went on tiptoe round the room to
look for a book. The books however had been carefully
removed from the room except old Moore’s Almanack,
which was lying under the snuffer-tray ; so she contented
herself with this; and since she could not amuse herself
as she would, she amused herself as she could.

‘Thus Ellen’s time passed pleasantly away, till the
jingling of spoons announced the entrance of tea.

The evening was short and happy. There was a
bright fire, with a purring cat and a purring tea-urn.
Ellen was as cheerful'as cheerful could be, and Mrs.
Cameron sat amused for more than an hour, while
Ellen first pointed out, and then drew on paper, the
endless grotesque faces and figures which she saw in
the burning coals, in the drapery of the curtains, and
in the pattern of the carpet.

‘What a blessing it is,’ said Mrs. Cameron to



60 ELLEN’S VISIT.

Parker, as she was putting on her night-cap, “‘ what a
blessing it is for a child to be able to amuse itself!
I thought when I saw that she was too tall to be mis-
chievous, that she would have moped herself to death
in this dull place, with a cross old woman like me; but
she really is not troublesome at all.

‘‘ You see, ma’am,” returned Parker, quite pleased
with this uncalled-for praise of her own child, ‘‘ you
see, ma’am, children show the difference of their
natures more in their plays than in any thing else.
I’ve seen some of them too lazy to use either their senses
or their limbs, and who play as if it were the most
‘troublesome thing in the world to amuse themselves.”

‘* Yes,”’ said Mrs. Cameron, ‘‘ that little Miss Pratt,
who spent a day with me once,—do you remember her,
Parker ?—she disgusted me with children. If she had
been in Ellen’s place to-night, she would have yawned
or fretted all the evening; and if any one had told her
to amuse herself, she would have said: ‘ How can I? I
see nothing here but the fire and an old woman; and
there is nothing new in these !’”

** What an unhappy child she is!” said Parker.

‘* Stupid, moping thing!” said Mrs. Cameron, nod-
ding her head angrily three times.



ELLEN’S VISIT. 61

‘* What a selfish useless woman she will be!” said
Parker.

‘* Useless ! worse than useless,”” pursued Mrs. Came-
ron: ‘was she not continually touching and handling
whatever came in her way? Did she not fiddle faddle
with my spectacles till she broke them ?”’

‘It was a pity certainly,” said Parker; “ the young
Jady was very meddlesome.”

‘‘ Meddlesome! a pity! is that all Parker? I am
astonished at you! She ought to have been ashamed
of herself! I say my best spectacles too! what business
had she to touch them? She might as well be a
thief at once!” said Mrs. Cameron, who had gra-
dually heated herself by talking of her poor spec-
tacles. By this time she was settled in bed, and Parker
wishing her good night, left her mind to be calmed by
a night’s repose.

CHAPTER X.
THE HARMONIOUS: BLACKSMITH,
From the first day, Ellen rapidly advanced in the
affections of her aunt, and to her own surprise the
holidays went quickly and happily onwards. This



62 THE HARMONIOUS BLACKSMITH.

visit was not the last. The following year another
‘nvitation came from the old lady, and of this we must
now give a few particulars, to show you Ellen at the
age of thirteen.

When with other young people, and far from flatterers,
our little heroine had not been backward in discovering
that her talents were of a superior*order. Now she was
with her aunt; who, besides being partial, was so little
acquainted with young people, that she was astonished
at every mark of rationality in “‘ a mere child,” as she
called Ellen, whose sayings she repeated like those of
an oracle; while no opportunity was lost of showing
off her accomplishments. At first Ellen was ashamed
‘of receiving praise for such simple things. She was
tired too of showing her satin stitch and netting to
every one that came, and of playing the ‘‘ Harmonious
Blacksmith” a dozen times a day for admiration. At
last however, by dint of hearing those magical adjec-
tives : ‘‘ Wonderful! charming!” &c. she got over these
raw feelings, and became satisfied that she really was a
lion, and must submit to be shown as such.

Nothing appears to us more absurd than the sight of
a little child proud of any acquirement whatever. We
have seen a little girl dance beautifully, so beautifully



THE HARMONIOUS BLACKSMITH. 63

that all the eyes and all the quizzing glasses in the
room were turned towards her. She, poor little thing,
laughed aloud at the sharp elbows of one neighbour,
the round back of another, and the lifted knees of her
heavy partner, as he was prancing towards her across
the quadrille, and pleased herself with the sense of her
own superiority. What a pity that she should forget
the trouble poor Mr. Balparé took, to teach her a
minuet when she was only four years old,—and all the
hard labour that he and his fiddle-stick had undergone
for years, in order to bring head, shoulders, elbows and
knees into proper order. If there was any merit in her
dancing, half of it belonged to the lithe limbs and good
ear that she had received from nature, and the other
half to Mr. Balpare and his fiddle-stick, so that we
could not discover what there was in the business for
her to glory in.

We have said that-Ellen was not fond of admiration ;
neither did she overrate the value of mere accomplish-
ments: you may therefore be surprised to hear that
the flattery she met with did her any harm. To ex-
plain this mystery, we need only relate what passed
through her mind as she opened the piano-forte one
morning for the eleventh time, to play her aunt’s fa-



64 THE HARMONIOUS BLACKSMITH.

-yourite piece “ The Harmonious Blacksmith,” and
several morning callers came round her, to see her
wonderful little fingers fly along the keys. As she sat
down, she felt utter contempt for her aunt, and her
friends, and music in general, and the stupid, easy,
old-fashioned“ Harmonious Blacksmith” in particular.
On all these she wasted a great deal more contempt
than they deserved.

“¢ Silly people!” said she to herself; “‘ I wish they
would not talk nonsense. Above all I wish they would
not clap me on the back and say: ‘ Charming little
creature!’ as if l were a baby. Flattery will never
make me vain, I am sure, They only tell me what I
knew before, that I play very well for my age, and they
- make me despise them not a little for valuing a paltry
accomplishment as they seem to do. All this is easy
enough to me, and does not require any particular
talent. How I could make these people stare, if I
were to show them the lines I wrote on a winter
crocus; or my ode to the Greeks; or my thapsody on
liberty; or a hundred other things! But 1 despise
vulgar applause, so my aunt shall never hear of my
poetry.”

It is to be observed about this time, that whenever



THE HARMONIOUS BLACKSMITH. 65

any new acquaintances were proposed to Ellen, the first
question she always asked concerning them was: “‘ Are
they clever?”

CHAPTER XI.
THE IRISH COUSINS.

One morning Ellen was busily employed in her own
room, in writing to Mrs. Kirnan, when she received a
summons from her aunt, to come down immediately
into the drawing-room, where some ladies wished to
see her. ‘* Now for another hour of display !’’ sighed.
she, as she laid aside her pen. When she passed the
looking-glass she observed’ that her hair was rough and
her dress rather disordered; but instead of remem-
bering that a lady should be lady-like at all times and
in all places, she walked on, rather gratified to carry
a proof with her into the drawing-room, that she did
not care for admiration.

Until lately, Ellen had carried herself before stran-
gers with a modest’ ease; and. the reason of this was,
that she never thought about herself at all: but now
she had acquired a sort of manner, in which a mixture
of cold. disdain. and indifference was too apparent.

E



66 THE IRISH COUSINS.

What was the reason of this? Why she thought now
that she knew the world better than before; that the
generality of people were very frivolous, and could do her
no good; and that she could do very well without them.

Carelessly and haughtily therefore she entered the
room, and looked around to see what these new people
were like. A,lively-looking woman, with bonnet-strings
flying behind her, was sitting close to Mrs. Cameron,
and trying in a loud voice, and with a slight brogue,
to make herself heard. Three fine-looking tall girls
were standing in different parts of the room, playing
with the cat, the dog, and the parrot, and laughing very
merrily. No sooner however did they perceive Ellen,
than jumping over cat, dog and parrot, they ran towards
her; while. she, astonished, and rather discomposed,
received them with a solemn courtesy, and begged they
would be seated. ‘‘ You don’t know us,” said the
eldest, laughing: “‘ cannot you guess who we are?
Weare your cousins, Ellen, your cousins O’ Reilly: Iam
Magdalen, this is Dora;” ‘‘andI,” said the youngest,
who was about Ellen’s age, “‘ 1 am little Alice.” And
upon this warrant of introduction, she threw her arms
round Ellen’s neck and gave her a hearty kiss.

“ Strange girls enough,” thought Ellen; “‘ what odd



THE IRISH COUSINS. 67

behaviour !’’ yet she thawed in spite of herself, while
she looked on their good humoured sunshiny faces, and
soon found herself talking with them quite at her ease.

They spent the day together; and, for the first time
in her life, Ellen comprehended the sympathy that
exists between relations. They did not wait to see
whether she was pretty, clever, or even worthy, before
they gave her the friendly shake of the hand. She had
no trouble to earn their good will; they had given it
to her before she saw them.

In the course of the day, Ellen had some conversation
-with Mrs. O’Reilly about her father. Ellen had left
him when she was so young that she could hardly be
said to remember him; but when Mrs. O'Reilly spoke
of him, and told one anecdote after another of the days
of his childhood and youth; when she spoke of him as
the brother, the playfellow, the companion, the friend of
her early days,—some of her expressions and above all
her smile, rekindled a light that had long been dim
in Ellen’s mind. Her faint, scattered associations as-
sumed by degress a living shape; the form of her father
no longer floated before her in indistinct vision as it
used to do, coming unbidden, and vanishing when she
_ most wished it to stay: it was now her memory’s best



68 THE IRISH COUSINS.

treasure, a real thing, which she knew, felt and under-
stood. Her mother too, whose name she had scarcely
heard mentioned, of whom she knew nothing, .except
that she was no more—her .mother had been Mrs.
O’Reilly’s early friend and playmate.

‘“‘T saw the last of the dear creature,” said Mrs.
O’Reilly, “‘ when she set sail with your father for Cal-
cutta three weeks after they were married. She was
not seventeen then, and a more elegant creature never
was seen in the county Dublin. She tried to the last
to be cheerful, and keep up our spirits, for she never
thought of herself; but she dearly loved Ireland, and
she had never been five miles from her father’s house
before. I remember, as if it were yesterday, when we
were all standing on the shore at Kingstown, waiting
for the boat: we were all silent; for when we had most —
to say, not a word could any of us speak. She turned
round, that her father might not see her tears, and bu-
sied herself with tying my green scarf on the top of her
parasol, to wave for a signal to us. ‘I shall carry it off
with me, Ally,’ said she, ‘to remind me of our own
emerald isle.’ She saw that I noticed the tears that
were falling faster and faster: she placed one hand on
my mouth, and with the other attempted to stop them



THE IRISH COUSINS. 69

from flowing, while she said, smiling; ‘ Hush, Ally, only

a few Irish diamonds!’ but the smile went away quicker
than thought, and a look came after it that I shall never
forget: she looked as if death were in her heart, while
she said to me: ‘ Comfort my father when I am gone.’
So she went: and we received one letter from her. The
next ship from Calcutta brought the news of her death.”

‘“‘ How and when did she die?” said Ellen. I must
have been very young then. I do not remember her
atall.” '

‘ Your father has hever mentioned her name since,”
said Mrs. Reilly; ‘‘ but an old servant of his wrote
an account of the circumstances of her death. When
you, my dear Ellen, were six weeks old, your father
insisted on having you inoculated. Your mother had
been vaccinated, so no one had any fear for her: how-
ever she sickened of the small-pox, and to the surprise
and dismay of every one, died on the ninth day.”

Ellen said nothing, but her heart swelled with mingled
feelings of sorrow, tenderness and grateful love; and
her soul yearned towards her newly found, her early —
lost mother. |

‘* My mother died for me,” thought she. “‘ How often
have I said that I wished for no other mother than



70 THE IRISH COUSINS.

Mrs. Kirnan! How little have I imagined what a mo-
ther must be! Yes, I feel, Iam sure, that her love to
me and mine to her, would have been different from
any thing I have ever felt. Oh! what would I not give
for one kiss from my very own mamma !”’

‘«< Am I like her?” said Ellen, at last.

‘‘ Yes, now your eyes are very like hers, but till the
last half hour I did not see any resemblance.”

‘“¢ How was that?” asked Ellen.

‘‘ Dear creature,” continued her aunt @oughtfully,
not noticing the question, but pursuing her own train
of ideas. ‘‘ How tender her voice was! How every
one who came near her felt her ready, happy look
and her gentle manner. While every one adored her,
how completely she forgot herself, and had a tear or a
smile ready for high or low, rich or poor, whoever
might want it! But come, Ellen, we have been talking
too long: open the piano-forte, your aunt wishes me
to hear you play.”

This conversation made a deep impression upon Ellen.
She renewed it frequently with her aunt, and made herself
minutely acquainted with every circumstance of her mo-
ther’s history.. ‘‘ I wish I were like her,” said she fre-
quently to herself. I should like papa to think me 80



THE IRISH COUSINS. 71

when I go back to him. My aunt almost told me that
my haughty and reserved manner prevented her from
finding out any likeness between me and my mother.
Humility was my mother’s great charm. My dear
mamma, I will think about you till I am humble
too !”’

This was more easily said than done. Ellen always ac-
‘knowledged, in general terms, that she was proud; but
in particular instances she maintained firmly that she
only preserved a proper dignity.

‘Well, Ellen,” said Mrs. Cameron to her, as she
wished her good-night, “‘ you have been very merry
to-day with your new cousins; what do you think of ©
them my dear?” ;

‘* Good-natured girls, but certainly not clever.”

“So much the better, Ellen. They are handsome
girls, and they dress very well, and don’t come into a
room with their dress awry, as somebody did this
morning. I hate clever women: they never know how
to put on a bonnet, and their dresses never hang well.
I could tell a clever woman at first sight !”’

“¢ What a silly woman my aunt is,” thought Ellen.
*f What do such trifles signify? What intellectual per-
son would care for the shape of a gown or a bonnet ?”’



72 THE IRISH COUSINS.

So saying, she went to her room, and wrotea little poetry
before she went to bed. .

Was Mrs. Cameron right or was Ellen ?

They both were right, and both were wrong. A
clever woman who neglects the little elegancies of
womanly appearance, excites disgust; and an elegant
woman whose affections are centred in dress, provokes
contempt. ‘There is happily a middle way: women are
capable of doing the one, without neglecting the other.

Mrs. Cameron’s assertion that no clever women dress
well, confirmed Fllen in her hasty judgment of her cou-
sins. She met them the next day with a feeling allied
to contempt, and sighed to think they were not likely
to be very improving companions. “I should wish,”
thought she, “* to call my cousins my friends; but 1
fear they will not understand my thoughts and feelings ;
and what good can I get from them ?

Annee
CHAPTER x Ii.

WANT OF DIGNITY.

We mentioned some time ago the fact, that Ellen
treated servants as an inferior race of beings. She was
accustomed to receive services from them as her due;



WANT OF DIGNITY. 73

and though she never felt inclined to tyrannize over
them, she would have thought as soon of sweeping and
scrubbing, as of showing sympathy with them, in word,
look or manner, on any occasion.

Imagine then her surprise, when, as Parker was
dressing her for dinner, the door opened and her three
cousins running in, came straight to Parker, and shook
hands with her, with every demonstration of pleasure
that they could show on meeting an old friegd. Ally
even put her hand on her shoulder, and springing up
threw her arms round her neck. Parker smiled and
blushed, and said in a tone in which respéct tried to
repress affectionate familiarity: ‘‘ Oh, Miss Ally, you'll
rumple my clean handkerchief; besides, miss, you are
too big for that now.” | '

‘‘Then why do you not come and see us, you lazy
woman, and we such a little way off? Why don’t you
come and talk over some of the pranks we used to play
together, when you and aunt Cameron stayed with us
in Ireland ?”” |

‘You are very good, miss,” said Parker, ‘‘ to think
of me;” and she turned round to tie Ellen’s hair, and
sighed.

‘‘ Why, Parker, what’s the matter now? Have you



74 WANT OF DIGNITY.

+.

grown so very sober in your old age, that you are driven
to sighing ?”’

‘‘ Do you pretend, with that long face,-to make us
believe you never romped with us? Bear witness,
O ye meadows, bogs and streams of dear little Ireland,
to Parker’s pranks!”

‘‘ Why, there’s hardly a place within five miles of
Castle Reilly,”’ said Dora, ‘‘ that you have not given
a name#o,my good woman. The broad corner by
Larry M‘Cormack’s cabin, where we made you ride
Larry’s pig, and where the pig threw you, is called
Parker’s riding-school to this day; then the potato-
field, where you know we had so many a long battle
with you, every one knows it by the name of Parker’s
field of glory.”

Thus the good-natured girls ran on , reminding Parker
of one childish frolic after another, in which she had
borne her part, until the whole party, Parker included,
joined in one merry and continued laugh—all but Ellen.
She sat, unmoved and immoveable in her chair, looking
as if the merriment around her was no concern of hers ;
and the more they laughed, the graver and more scorn-
ful her countenance became, until Parker having finished
dressing her hair, she arose, and left the room.



WANT OF DIGNITY. 75

‘Where are the girls?” asked Mrs. O'Reilly, as
Ellen entered the drawing-room.

‘‘ They are in my room, amusing Parker,”
Ellen. ‘‘ Parker! I have not seen her yet; it is a
shame for me,” said Mrs. O’Reilly; and, to Ellen’s

‘ great surprise, she arose and‘ went up two flights of

replied

‘stairs to see a servant, instead of ringing the bell for
her to come down.

“Certainly my aunt wants dignity,” thought Ellen.
She could not help expressing a feeling of the sort
afterwards to her cousin Magdalen.

‘‘ Magdalen,” said she, ‘‘I wonder that you, who
seem to have more refinement than your sisters, should
encourage them in making a companion of a servant!” °

‘‘ What! of Parker do you mean? Parker is not a
common servant!”

‘‘Common or uncommon, she is still a servant, and
it cannot be right to break down the barrier that society
puts between one rank of people and another.”

‘“‘ Was it broken down? Did Parker break it down?
I thought her very well behaved.’’

‘‘ No, I find no fault with Parker; she seems to
know her situation better than you know yours; that
I confess.”



76 WANT OF DIGNITY.

Magdalen laughed very good humouredly at this
blunt speech.

‘Well, Ellen, will you teach me to know my situa-
tion as you call it ?” 7

“ Since you ask me, I will give you my opinion freely.
A lady should treat her servants well, that is, give them “
good food and wages, and order them civilly to perform’
her wishes; but she never should converse with them,
because their situation is so different from hers, that
she can have nothing in common with them.”

‘Not in her station as a lady certainly, but as a
fellow-creature and a fellow-christian, you will allow
her to have something in common with them.”

“Qh yes, we are all children of Adam, and all that;
we are all equal when we are born, and we shall all die
and be equal at last; but in the mean time, there are
distinctions of rank in this world which ought to be
kept up.”

‘These things,” said Magdalen, “are easily re-
conciled. I have always found the line so well marked
between myself and those who are poorer, that it has
never cost me a moment’s trduble to keep on my side
of it, or to maintain my dignity, as you would say.
The differences between us are made by man and edu-



WANT OF DIGNITY. 77

cation, the resemblances are all fixed in us by our
Creator.”’

‘¢ What do you mean?”

‘1 mean that I could not consult servants in matters
of science or taste, because education has placed a wide
gulf between us. I could not join in their pursuits be-
cause my situation in society has fixed other pursuits
for me. You were wrong then, when you charged me
with making companions of servants ;, but the reason is
not that I weld not have familiar intercourse with them,
but that I cannot. All this is the work of society; and
though imperfect, it produces good upon the whole;
but now comes the work of God which is not imperfect.
All the best. feelings of our nature are theirs in common
with us; and all the infirmities of mortals are ours in
common with them: here are powerful reasons for
sympathy.” |

‘* Still I maintain,” replied Ellen, ‘‘ that people may
find exercise enough for their sympathies among those
of their own rank; and you, Magdalen, cannot possibly
intend to say that you ever would show your feelings
before a servant.”

‘‘T would only show those in which they are con-
cerned. If they had a tooth-ache I would compassionate



78 WANT OF DIGNITY.

them; if they served me well and loved me, I would
love them; if they spent themselves in my service, I
would be grateful to them.”

“ Grateful! Magdalen, I am astonished at you! It
is théir duty to be grateful to their masters. Are they
not paid for whatever they do?”

‘< If Mrs. Kirnan were to offer you ten guineas a year
for loving her, would you take it Ellen?”

“No,” said Ellen, laughing.

‘¢ A servant’s heart is as free as yours. Hands may
take gold, hearts never.”

‘Tf we owe them gratitude, then, we ought to pay it
+n service; so, I suppose, you would help a housemaid
to sweep the floor and make the beds, out of gratitude,
sympathy and sentiment ¢”’ , ;

‘ Not at all. I have told you before, that these are
the very things in which society has made a difference
between us. ‘They are hewers of wood and drawers
of water.’ Let them mind their business as such ; for
in thesehey excel; and I will read, draw, dress, dance,
talk and think: car je m’y connais.

“ How then would you show them this gratitude,
this, sympathy that you talk about ?”’

‘In many ways :—by talking to them from time to



WANT OF DIGNITY. 79

time of their affairs (not mine, mark me), and giving
them the use of my judgment to direct their conduct ;
by comforting them when they are ill; and, above all,
by speaking to them as if they were made of the same
clay as myself, and showing that I think it no merit of
mine that raises me above them.”

‘*T must trouble you with one question more,” said
Ellen. ‘‘ Was it for the sake of exhortation, consola-
tion, or edification, that you talked all that nonsense to
Parker to-day? For my part, I could see no moral in
it at all.” |

“Oh, that is sii affair,” said Magdalen: ‘‘ Par-

ker was our playfellow in infancy. She ran about our
own green meadows with us, when we were too simple
and unlearned to be ashamed of calling a servant a
friend; and, to my dying day, I will call her friend.
We cannot be.too familiar with a good woman, who
has carried us in her arms, and helped us when we could
not help ourselves. I talked freely with her just now,
because my heart warmed towards her, and hers warmed
to me: so there was no place for ceremony—that was
all. Are you still astonished ?”

‘“T am astonished at nothing,” replied Ellen, “‘ but
! am sure I never could behave as you did.”



80 WANT OF DIGNITY.

‘“« Yes, yes, you would, I am sure, if Parker had been
as kind to you when you were young, as she was to us.”

Here Ellen looked rather confused; for she knew
very well what Parker had done for her when she first
came over, and she felt almost offended, as if Magdalen
had reproached her.,

Magdalen however was quite unconscious that she
had done so; and being called away at the moment to
sing a song, she left her without perceiving her em-
barrassment. a



CHAPTER XIII.
LA BELLE ASSEMBLEE.

ELLEN found her cousin Magdalen rather a puzzle.
She decided the first evening she saw the O’Reillys,
that they certainly were not clever; yet now and then
she was tempted to make an exception in favour of Mag-
dalen. Confident in her own superiority of intellect,
Ellen often said things at random, without considering
whether they contained absurdities or not. She generally
was right; for though she judged quickly, she judged
well; but when she was not right, she had a great
horror of being found in the wrong. Who can bear



LA BELLE ASSEMBLEE. 81
.

their memory, judgment or taste to be impeached by
those who are, on the whole, their inferiors in these
things? Very few.

Her aunt Cameron, when she differed from Ellen in
opinion, always pushed her spectacles on her forehead,
and said: ‘‘ You know nothing about such things ; little
girls should be seen and not heard.” But humiliating
as it was to be treated like a baby, especially when
a third person was present, her mortification was
infinitely deeper, when she perceived an indescribable
something in Magdalen’s quiet countenance, which
made a doubt flash through her mind, that perhaps
Magdalen might know more than she herself did after.
all, and might keep silence only because it was no
pleasure to her to prove others to be in the wrong,
Sometimes she would say a rash thing, and find out
where the folly of it was, before the words had well
passed her lips, if Magdalen happened to look towards
her. As often however as she had resolved to believe
in Magdalen’s superiority of intellect, so often did she
change her opinion on seeing her enter with spirit, even -
with energy, into the most frivolous conversation and
employments.

‘‘What girl of sense,”’ said Ellen to herself one

F

‘



.

82 LA BELLE ASSEMBLEE.

evening, ‘‘ what girl of sense could sit for half an hour
discussing the merits of all the caps and bonnets in that
odious book of fashions, with such a foolish woman as
my poor aunt Cameron? That Belle Assemblée and
‘ts relations aré the only books my aunt ever takes into
her hands, even. on Sundays. There is Magdalen
actually reading it aloud; I hear the wearisome words,
tulle, crape &c.

‘¢ And now she is absolutely arguing with my aunt
about gauze and feathers. It is very disgusting !”’
And poor Ellen turned away with a mixed feeling of
virtuous indignation, contempt and pity.

‘Good night,” said Magdalen, at this moment, to
her aunt. ‘I will bring the patterns I mentioned to
you very early to-morrow, before breakfast if you like;
but you must promise to let me see Miss Smith try
them on you. Promise me now: I will not go away
till you promise me.” ‘¢ Very well, you shall see them
tried on, if you are early enough.”., ‘‘ Oh, trust me
for that!’ And Magdalen tripped away rather early,
and whispered in Ellen’s ear as she passed her: “ Ellen,
if you love me, do not let Miss Smith try any thing on
my aunt till I come to-morrow.”

Ellen looked after her and shook her head, ‘*Can



f
LA BELLE ASSEMBLEE. 83

she take real interest jn my aunt’s feathers and finery?
She must be frivolous; I give her up.”

If Ellen had not nourished such fierce ire against her
aunt Cameron’s Belle Assemblée, and fancied that
wisdom consists in despising foolish things,—if she had
not shut herself up in the notion of her own superiority,
she might have found out what was passing in Magda-
len’s mind; and what motive it was that had made a
sensible girl take real interest in embroidered shawls,
and hats of Areophane and Marabout feathers.

Magdalen loved her aunt Cameron for more reasons
than one. She very readily loved people, because she
had the secret of finding out their good qualities, and of
being rather grieved than angry at their*bad ones.
Magdalen saw that her aunt’s style of dress was very
ridiculous ;* instead of laughing at it, she formed a re-
solution to change it if she could, She dressed remark-
ably well herself, so that Mrs. Cameron frequently asked
her opinion on the one subject that occupied the most
of her own thoughts. Taking advantage of this, Mag-
dalen increased her influence by talking patiently and
good-humouredly about dress, and reading the fashions
to her aunt. Very often she succeeded in making her
aunt discontented with every dress in La Belle Assem-



84 LA BELLE ASSEMBLEE.

blée, and then she ventured to bring forward a pattern
or colour that she had seen in Paris. If it had been
invented in Paris, Mrs. Cameron would wear any thing
in perfect confidence; so that, among the many neat
dark gowns which Magdalen had seen in Paris, it was
easy to select one fit for an old lady to attire herself in.
In this way Magdalen was gradually working a reform in
the most ridiculous part of her aunt’s behaviour, and was
taking benevolent pleasure in the work.

Thus weakness amounting even to folly may be
treated with discretion and benevolence.



CHAPTER XIV.

ODE TO THE GREEKS.

A rew days after this, Ellen went to spend the re-
mainder of her holidays at Mrs. O’Reilly’s. Mrs.
O’Reilly had taken a house a little way out of town,
and Ellen enjoyed the fresh air of the country more
than she ever had done before. There was a lawn
before the house, which sloped down towards the river ;
and a beautiful shrubbery of real country trees, without
any soot upon them, surrounded it. Through this
shrubbery, several winding paths led down to the very



ODE TO THE GREEKS. 85

brink of the river. But the spot that Ellen chose for
her own, in this place of delight, was a little arbour
almost hidden in evergreens and monthly roses, which
stood on a-bank, and looked straight down on the
water.- Here she used to go alone and think, for she
had lately taken to thinking, or rather to dreaming;
and she frequently carried her portfolio with her, and
scribbled her high musings in rhyme. One morning
she was walking towards her favourite haunt, in order
to resume a train of thought, and a stanza of poetry,
which she had packed up ina hurry on hearing the
breakfast bell. She had already reached the favourite
clump of evergreens, and the arbour was not twenty
paces off, when some voices, interrupted by profane
peals of laughter, broke upon her silent imaginings,
and informed her pretty plainly that she must carry
her muse elsewhere. She paused. for an instant, to
consider where she should go, and she heard—horrible
to relate !—she heard her cousin Dora reading, in a
most burlesque style, some lines from her own favou-
rite Ode to the Greeks! She would go and declare
herself :—no, that would betray too much embarrass-
ment. She would go back :—no, that would be run-
ning away like a coward from a laugh that properly



86 ODE TO THE GREEKS.

belonged to her: she stood still then behind a thick
jaurustinus, and Dora continued reading :

‘¢ Land of the brave! methinks I see thee still,
Bending the neighbouring nations to thy will,
Soaring o’er Asia,
Threatening Thracia,
Towering o’er tyrants thy fate to fulfil.
Great Alexander,
Glorious commander!
Spartan Lysander,
Who humbled the proud,
Let your pale ghosts, and those of your hosts,
Still their vain boasts,
And acknowledge, with candour,
That glory’s vain glitter must fleet like a cloud.”

Dora advanced her left foot, flung her arms aloft,
and threw a most heroic-comic swell into her voice,
while she repeated these lines. But when she came to
the close, the candour of the pale ghosts quite over-
came her power of gravity, and she joined the chorus
of laughers. Ellen had not lost a word or a gesture ;
for Dora had stood in the entrance of the arbour, with
her face towards the audience within, and her back to
Ellen. Dora had well known how to give effect to the
ridiculous; and had she not done so, Ellen’s quick ear



ODE TO THE GREEKS. 87

needed .only that her poetry should be read aloud, to
féel'that it was a child’s jingle. Now each line was a
dagger’s blow to her. To find her darling manuscript
in such hands,—to hear it laughed at was nothing to
the pain of finding out that it was trash! Who could
bear it ?

‘“‘Tonorant girls!’’ said Ellen to herself, ‘if it is
nonsense, my own sense and not their foolish ridicule
convinces me that it is so. They would laugh as much
at Lord Byron. Ally, for example, has no soul. [’ll
engage she did not know what she was laughing at all
the time. Why am I so vexed? Am I still abashed by
an empty laugh? No; I will prove to myself and to
them, that I am not.” She advanced to the arbour,
~ and with a calm voice and an unmoved countenance,
said: ‘‘ Dora, the verses you are laughing at are mine;
give them to me.”’ She received them from her cou-
sin’s hand, tore them coolly to pieces, and threw the
fragments into the stream that glided beneath them.
She watched them for an instant or two, and then
turned and walked silently away. ‘‘ Ellen!’ said Dora.
‘“‘ Well,” answered Ellen, turning round, and standing
as if she waited her cousin’s pleasure, but felt very little
concern in what she might have to say. “Ellen,”



88 ODE TO THE GREEKS.

continued Dora, in rather a sorrowful voice, *‘ I hope
you are not offended.” ‘‘Oh dear no,” said Ellen,
carelessly, almost contemptuously. ‘Indeed I would
not have laughed at you for the world, if I had known
it.” ‘Laugh on,” said Ellen; “ luckily my happimess
does not depend for a moment on your approbation or
censure.”

She walked quickly away, but she-had not gone
many steps when Dora overtook her and seized her
hand. “Ellen,” said she, while tears stood in her
eyes, ‘‘ you are unkind to me, or you would not let me
ask twice for your pardon.” There was something in
Dora’s voice that Ellen could not withstand : she as-
sured her that she was not offended ; that she would
never think more of the matter. ‘I am angry with
myself, you see,” said Dora ; ‘it was only yesterday
that mamma reproved me for being satirical, and I
never thought of it till you looked so severely at me.”’
“ Did I look severe?” said Ellen, kissing the tearful
girl; “I did not know it, I am sorry for it.” ‘There,
that will do,” said Dora, smiling through her: tears ;
‘say no more, you look yourself again now. It was
not what you said that hurt me just now,” continued
she laughing, ‘I am not afraid of words; for any



ODE TO THE GREEKS. 89

woman, any Irishwoman at least, is never at a loss for
an answer; but I could never stand a severe look ; it
cuts me to the heart, and makes a child of me at once.”

‘< But we cannot help our countenances, Dora.” |

‘“‘No,” answered Dora, “‘ and that is the very reason
that a terrible countenance is so terrible; we know it
tells exactly the feelings. I think we often keep in our
words when they would sound rude and cruel; and yet
we let our countenances take their own way, and do
twice as much mischief as words could do.”

‘‘We cannot make hypocrites of them, Dora: do
you regret that ?” :

‘‘Oh, no; I would not have them say what was not
true; but it would be very pleasant if they were always
to show a pretty picture of what was really gomg on,
as my camera obscura does.”’

‘‘'Then, Dora, you wish us to be always in the same
mood ; always pretty: that is impossible.”

‘Why should we be always in the same mood? I
can see rocks and rivers in my camera obscura, or
green fields and quiet cattle, or an old castle, ora
hundred other things, all beautiful and all different.
Some of these are grand, some soft, some melancholy,
some gay: there is variety enough, and if there were



90 ODE TO THE GREEKS.

no variety, we could look along time at what is beautiful
without ever wishing to change it.” 1
By this time they: had reached the house. Ellen
walked slowly and thoughtfully into her own room - she
thought upon Dora’s conduct and her own; and she
found that she respected Dora for her frankness, her
ready repentance, and her affectionate feeling. ‘‘ I have
thought myself her superior,” said she; ‘and yet with all
my talent, I have done wrong to-day, and she has done
right. I still think that 1 ama genius, or something
like it; but I think after all, that a good heart is more
valuable than genius; and that it is better to please than
to shine.” She took out a little memorandum-book and
wrote in it as follows: “‘ Thursday, 11th, Learned good
from a quarter whence I did not expect to learn any
thing.” —Memorandum. “ Though variety is charming,
we can look a long time at what is beautiful, without
ever wishing to change it.” |
_ Ellen was not one of those who can be convinced of
a truth, and then lay it aside without acting upon it.
This little incident made her think much more respect-
fully than she had done before of the qualities of the
heart. Gentleness, meekness, all the branches of be-
nevolence stood much higher than they had ever stood



ODE TO THE GREEKS. 9]

before in her list of virtues. Hitherto she had been suf-
ficient to herself, saying and thinking that if she inter-
fered with no one, she had a right to. please herself.
She had stood alone; she had prided herself on her
rank, riches and talents, because she felt as if there was
a sort of power in all these; but now she began to per-
ceive that the power of making people happy was the
best power of all, and the only one worth trying for.
She did try for it, and she soon felt some of the plea-
sure of living for others.

CHAPTER XV.
THE CRITICS.

‘ Come, Ellen,” said Magdalen, one wet morning, as
they were sitting at work, ‘‘ come, let us have another
reading of your poetry; it had not a fair chance the
other morning you know. I am sure you have some
more to show us.”’ ‘‘ I have never shown it to any one,”
said Ellen, blushing, ‘and to tell you the truth, I am
heartily ashamed of it myself.”

“* How long have you been ashamed of it ?”’

“*T believe only since the day that I heard you read-
ing it aloud. I mean to burn it all.”



92 THE CRITICS.

“What! are you going to: exterminate it without
judge or jury? I call that unfair. You must bring it toa
public trial, and if it be found unworthy, let be it burned
by the hands of the common hangman; and do you,
together with. all other poets, take warning by its un-
timely fate. Come, pray produce it; let us read it to-
gether.” . |

‘¢ And laugh at it?” said Ellen, shrinking a little.

‘¢ Yes, if you like,” answered Magdalen, “laugh at
it together, if it deserves to be laughed at; that is all
- fyir: but I am disposed to be serious tosday.. You shall
accuse; your poetry shall plead its own cause ; Dora
and I will be judge and jury.”

‘< And what shall I be?” said Ally.

“Qh! you may be the populace. Your business is
to listen to the trial, and to maintain that the poor pri-
soner at the bar is innocent, in spite of judge or jury.”

Ellen produced her budget of poetry. During the
recital of the first two or three pages, she caught her-
self at her old trick of biting her lips; but by degrees
she became as calm almost as if the composition then
on its trial, was not her own. Of Ellen’s rhymes we
have given a specimen,—not indeed a very favourable
one; but as it is unfair to judge of any author by one



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WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
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describe
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'2011-10-28T02:22:49-04:00'
describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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describe
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'1254' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZM' 'sip-files00011.txt'
da69140db4774b8952db53a2e94ede86
581ad31c6c6ff4be79e86a7aa83f8cd75aeb6425
describe
'9603' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZN' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
4f7d34e6856340e5091dec8df4d4448c
03b8bfacdfc3e654366d62bf5417e361a8b42a0d
'2011-10-28T02:24:11-04:00'
describe
'919179' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZO' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
0f4a6b8b21ff85099ba7d8c3f13e98f0
cf7d03e247fc5234c08d33242cca124b01d79ffe
'2011-10-28T02:25:54-04:00'
describe
'98858' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZP' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
e16d2acb0e4193c007db2f476ad341ad
0c1be17059ee54fdc33fe890518442a92784e39f
'2011-10-28T02:25:19-04:00'
describe
'32236' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZQ' 'sip-files00012.pro'
6e9030872b002cd6d77784e1a897c2ce
94e462d9d85078952980f7a34cae8a19139d48e7
'2011-10-28T02:21:46-04:00'
describe
'36126' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZR' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
d3053aa0dd997ba4bada793367077980
4e3124e3981f5e5eb2e97b53f518ef6500494371
'2011-10-28T02:25:36-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZS' 'sip-files00012.tif'
3c24b1671ba42e0ddbfbc0e97d5e8714
80e1fe4787bd9ffec63c1efd055751891889160a
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZT' 'sip-files00012.txt'
a445d277d55ed7b7506ff7d8cc98051e
dc1978ff3df227fe1b1e26a3727211f91ac99159
'2011-10-28T02:22:56-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9560' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZU' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
a9daacd2bbd9ee1ea9d53c4c291f54b7
5a794372705cc6546543e5a6f0747f1505e5f011
describe
'961106' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZV' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
fbe5c62f96402ba0dbd5e8cbd0ac0792
06926a4bbeb31c47408d68529af93e05f38bc691
'2011-10-28T02:23:13-04:00'
describe
'85301' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZW' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
d61922fd503d8a5fcc49fa55dd16d903
b48fe50d2040b99851736c7880ece67d0c541b3e
'2011-10-28T02:22:10-04:00'
describe
'26822' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZX' 'sip-files00013.pro'
d891adac7bf73f90b5ea25fd7fe10685
0640aa338b972970b7dda56d8c5b05ce5d079e4a
'2011-10-28T02:25:38-04:00'
describe
'29960' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZY' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
918c9472e64c1099e188ac34646687c7
871a973eba2e5c138466259ed3733820519b6b94
'2011-10-28T02:22:02-04:00'
describe
'7693635' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAJZZ' 'sip-files00013.tif'
a298ac4d54002fe121e7b1cf0c078f9f
99266222f935385f9dfa65dd0576e4a269321419
'2011-10-28T02:25:43-04:00'
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAA' 'sip-files00013.txt'
604bfb4be80e33ef47ba8b3c0403df4d
5d56b6ea80aab2e24cd90fb87ad3997204440c1e
'2011-10-28T02:24:52-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8448' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAB' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
09e42e9e934b729d9bbac55c321b0b01
3f6c6d30f0369d60151a84eb9a70ed587091ba85
'2011-10-28T02:26:02-04:00'
describe
'919169' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAC' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
81616eefe5cd1d11ab3efd8de27b9a4d
8bc4c337945a594fd9ba926ef7cc6c35e0669c27
describe
'104969' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAD' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
c695af8c3433d8bc18b01db704acce21
59276a57ec05c8b975a723d2bb3fff90cfbc93f9
'2011-10-28T02:22:05-04:00'
describe
'34080' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAE' 'sip-files00014.pro'
7e6822509101492132715686d291414f
1fb9e05a39c12b8fbb52ed49b8b8abdcfbbd0251
'2011-10-28T02:22:41-04:00'
describe
'38178' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAF' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
691caf70cfbc047e02f738e239fca9d7
82a3a46425365cb4d7e8f2390c712272645ce1f8
'2011-10-28T02:24:19-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAG' 'sip-files00014.tif'
6d85ff2db4eca9b458c70796663d22bf
6282a3c05fcaef0c7cf008f6dcc42bdf1306d7af
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAH' 'sip-files00014.txt'
75d296fc11b24fa8ad9203a9b6573ac3
92662da431a0a08844f9e2261535b15e73226caf
'2011-10-28T02:26:01-04:00'
describe
'10206' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAI' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
6a5303740171d0dc9887270b63b9a9e9
247a1b9bc0420b292bd5754a3a804c6e96480c88
'2011-10-28T02:21:49-04:00'
describe
'937955' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAJ' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
97e6bbc610855ce9f5f9c92df3ec5a68
54802b9589098ca0af3a5066c96ac4f4136dd127
'2011-10-28T02:22:29-04:00'
describe
'101552' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAK' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
99d3f8dfc8039c3340101852548d7532
97197541e9c945e7f9cd14219b80703285e16e3b
describe
'33007' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAL' 'sip-files00015.pro'
b42f9f487f7b9d22aa024c85f209cd81
cad0510bc62701234542dc8fb7be504633f7cebe
'2011-10-28T02:24:44-04:00'
describe
'37191' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAM' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
9b088c77b67be2de601023325aabaa50
a8919740ee5259d560b894a1c1a6bff99117807e
describe
'7508779' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAN' 'sip-files00015.tif'
72d99fa9373552f0818f59bb9918407a
685083ee9f6b7bef826e12b997425a2900c36e24
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAO' 'sip-files00015.txt'
8126f85c97abeb3410294edfb325aa58
a730d0c4aff735667f889ecc90ccf493ab19877c
'2011-10-28T02:24:13-04:00'
describe
'10001' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAP' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
3d1d34e5d8e48c85206110379a1fed45
40d1ba0ca3fb08a17d4992415d5b37377895f94b
'2011-10-28T02:22:48-04:00'
describe
'919129' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAQ' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
1f9e6c606abf7a7a1cbc590db4571f9a
4e43428ce292703cb17038c3f8ec1192ba202b92
'2011-10-28T02:25:52-04:00'
describe
'101721' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAR' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
63913a8992a84793e64e9c47a4e1fa14
71c711ca66bd323316844e87b5e24c419fe586f3
'2011-10-28T02:22:06-04:00'
describe
'31430' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAS' 'sip-files00016.pro'
9bdd72f75555a5770d4102d935de0b18
5768a602888737ef28af73d6027d8cfc9e9db3da
'2011-10-28T02:23:26-04:00'
describe
'37019' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAT' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
100f057fa7255fed2edd549fb50d200b
2b13a2f0bd5a737a7d290db83b051702367986a3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAU' 'sip-files00016.tif'
79e01d3988b101c5c6ffa4c86a744d12
e77f1c7fc944845d3a6d5431d660565b4aef7669
'2011-10-28T02:24:18-04:00'
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAV' 'sip-files00016.txt'
28d6ee23605aebb2c507d5060fb8c6da
775b5effea90b94b42fb3c3d736c4c59fdf6a2e7
'2011-10-28T02:22:21-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9935' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAW' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
4d4bd183c80b19ae2dad3535028dd6d9
f439a33be54881933946f7bde3648109654663a5
'2011-10-28T02:26:10-04:00'
describe
'966063' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAX' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
e6da1219032ed2199109d6fa62ff8981
990687af8ca8cb299be6a3551b42837a73f7c86e
'2011-10-28T02:25:13-04:00'
describe
'101055' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAY' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
b10f8fd84b886ad4831a6a4564c5db32
cc29a875aa7f820ba3c77d8f05c83455deeb8c4f
'2011-10-28T02:21:58-04:00'
describe
'33212' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKAZ' 'sip-files00017.pro'
fc46a74beaa30c749a16de32e27a28e5
e7a715ea5122cbf60d1cbb7ee39cf0c8d9f2e620
describe
'37360' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBA' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
e5deb37055274d6eb966be399c5dc5b2
0d3d941942bdfa04bf7db044faa31a9d9f4016e4
describe
'7733247' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBB' 'sip-files00017.tif'
67bad7d42c9b51a23ca882d2e3160ce5
3f14523d3646a59628e69f23d8222c321bb409a6
'2011-10-28T02:22:26-04:00'
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBC' 'sip-files00017.txt'
fc4a8d756be49be22cc36dce93304309
882972f87fe27fd1729152d1b2ce0d3381e0374e
'2011-10-28T02:25:32-04:00'
describe
'9997' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBD' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
bdcd8d7d21dceb8bdbe81b8bff377230
4197235aa8076b8bc4034961f6d3d9417418bcf9
describe
'919175' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBE' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
c374932c1e0f278b228ce3fed02edff8
3b57de84444e163fc6ba8e4f1e11c6515223c1d1
'2011-10-28T02:22:50-04:00'
describe
'100884' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBF' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
947fca901e9c1d7bc117b9e7e890efe7
31bc44afd416676db49373e67f24049a741c39ba
'2011-10-28T02:24:46-04:00'
describe
'31978' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBG' 'sip-files00018.pro'
d0a3a798be15d455b39b8ed5ddae4a21
a18908b771e31016ebf8d6ad4cefb2ea95f3766e
describe
'37371' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBH' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
c5b87a5e44fdeef3c9252da53b9c0a93
e1cef7a86af934bd4686c55962e89b428e25766a
'2011-10-28T02:23:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBI' 'sip-files00018.tif'
2e994f0d98193fe442e6f1ecd3c86935
94df1691833bde07ced8168cde1556bae65c9bf6
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBJ' 'sip-files00018.txt'
f632b1a2711e04cac8ab5802b6c1045e
7ba1a69497e3389390e2755899666f292da3e7c1
describe
'9977' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBK' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
14c26bb0cb167a67d8fa4f323c4b2024
65537e50309c7a811e0e3e3a318157c7618d143b
'2011-10-28T02:22:43-04:00'
describe
'945679' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBL' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
fdc4e70003c5a674b62ea9bb9905b074
d5e2aab957eaadf687f76f201b9bbb01289d3ceb
'2011-10-28T02:24:55-04:00'
describe
'98885' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBM' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
ad8ef9d974fe2a00dd904d99aa950805
1418732b16fc2938dc1a1d8c2a25c77a3b511877
'2011-10-28T02:22:46-04:00'
describe
'32021' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBN' 'sip-files00019.pro'
507a90e9c4c82a10523704f14fb248e8
b62f46edce80ce810aef542e643c4fd755dd79da
describe
'36618' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBO' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
23c7616a30b29c7c3fcea3bfde7607e3
79840576449d651d7b79c8cefedff37e02dfe81d
describe
'7570751' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBP' 'sip-files00019.tif'
41e7216a1fd75ad700678527c6f02108
b1d4762408bc2cf4c75657d4f4e3fa76af6054a7
'2011-10-28T02:25:28-04:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBQ' 'sip-files00019.txt'
4c2d010a04c97b0fcd8398f5403b68a2
3c6d77c0216584f13b1b254ac58334eb19ceb45f
'2011-10-28T02:21:54-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9864' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBR' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
9532a2a3f0f26d989ff1257eecef6379
ab6d6080dca7c75d0ccda6f25bc853ea4fcfc049
'2011-10-28T02:22:40-04:00'
describe
'919159' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBS' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
4e3946a0302c38ff91f48da254b4f419
65e5d4cc1db2729bed191beec1024920c4aec291
describe
'89575' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBT' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
cdc7c28a7bdf1bcc04da3ae295978ea7
c00fa6f1b54f9c74460656b7dc93a6bcbdb78a46
'2011-10-28T02:21:59-04:00'
describe
'25794' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBU' 'sip-files00020.pro'
cdf26cb3891aee340f744e072718e9cc
66629ad1d2bc02b82a469dbc161b732212238016
'2011-10-28T02:23:23-04:00'
describe
'32661' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBV' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
1fdf059e571d668f82351ed5b980535c
785bcecb7380af9b69e683ba07a8ed70a2465a32
'2011-10-28T02:25:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBW' 'sip-files00020.tif'
32ab8c3e5026269df5fb5a16242c3973
1361d976d229d6f8e6bd2859a2c26b947ed40830
describe
'970' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBX' 'sip-files00020.txt'
fb077d6904795c8d78c193f42cad3aa3
e2c6805389cc940c0b1c6eea36d74b8a8f8e3e71
'2011-10-28T02:24:34-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'8923' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBY' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
20da4dd12b2a649af982554104709f32
cf982d77f188076b7f3dc949da32ad440c0189da
'2011-10-28T02:25:30-04:00'
describe
'953343' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKBZ' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
027077117be495c6d3e36814a4e478be
2a17df7513857ba5e65e0d97c907b8c80e1573b4
describe
'98412' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCA' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
51e7f0623cec0d29bb9776a5ebdd44f2
e27439df5f96e5c515fc8796472bc1becc8caf48
'2011-10-28T02:26:05-04:00'
describe
'32875' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCB' 'sip-files00021.pro'
3668deced477f7100b16fb5b0e45b16b
6c179bd764cef2751c41a8d563a97dddda5cf949
'2011-10-28T02:23:20-04:00'
describe
'36601' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCC' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
1594420b9470a275781d62b3725d2ace
2c5833bc92335bfbada9856b633bb7e6e335f2dc
'2011-10-28T02:22:53-04:00'
describe
'7631559' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCD' 'sip-files00021.tif'
a58992d7b539310a1a8e9d5b230b8cd1
5a60c362374fe8264eaec2679182fc592c8f58f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCE' 'sip-files00021.txt'
54ecbc651bb7e0e0ef68b8db10dcfea1
6327ce4108907f667ae89103e7e0e2c8b9f15824
describe
'9885' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCF' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
87bea36a9d1ac9ecb0a82e46ea9e617b
37a630b114d816c8645a1d6c7efd3b37b6e612dd
'2011-10-28T02:23:37-04:00'
describe
'919177' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCG' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
02cec8e2827f54b3a42d9bbab85ef8fe
c936f8a03d743fd6c88750c45ad9bf1b6362ea97
'2011-10-28T02:25:26-04:00'
describe
'103263' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCH' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
1570bfeca17057aeed3b1fa2a513aba2
0caf719343318cbca5546c32db74b9cd1dd750e8
'2011-10-28T02:22:07-04:00'
describe
'33575' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCI' 'sip-files00022.pro'
c085c3e393ac295b6e7d359d4a8d059e
3bc2d987f7312bfab297bd8dc34c98d04b4ff185
describe
'38435' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCJ' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
554301e9d4b04880602e1d0871d666d0
e2e28e5c44582f5799c8aea91c0d5f74ac1f315a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCK' 'sip-files00022.tif'
ac4ef7ff67ec8947e422873de98ca624
07eb0334b6c445f97fbbb0bf575509f407b36de5
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCL' 'sip-files00022.txt'
0a0aee66242576d738b4907007f46397
4c42210feb5a5c5363500464f419c7303ea605f6
describe
Invalid character
'10024' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCM' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
e31b7b902deb9103f34f30132f38dac7
55dbfeea675ed9f36eee1fd898c620d3fd5cdedc
describe
'951707' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCN' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
7df665a787541e7b226db5a0b859e2ad
e196c79c0903bf199a16b81d67bfe8e9172e9bdf
'2011-10-28T02:24:12-04:00'
describe
'102328' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCO' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
ffd35230a0e857f51715ff69ed1529a4
a95923d04ce861d315ba3e730003182589cc0ecf
describe
'33420' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCP' 'sip-files00023.pro'
2ed7839cea7086862b5273d75656601d
7d997a1bbee1bae181a121bb702736a2d6a5667e
'2011-10-28T02:24:15-04:00'
describe
'37113' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCQ' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
cd3246158e5c32f9355809974a409fb6
06f4f967a9cdf13bf934694876adcec5cf8b24c0
'2011-10-28T02:24:53-04:00'
describe
'7618371' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCR' 'sip-files00023.tif'
67f328d545e0c1625ea810c60c9a51eb
54820d54895d12e22fdab26f9a2e6ed7b52cf7cf
'2011-10-28T02:25:45-04:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCS' 'sip-files00023.txt'
3c3ca033dddf7086e1c67d18ebf82ffb
c76555cff6531ade720d8edeaf6cb81552c2d5d0
'2011-10-28T02:23:19-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9952' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCT' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
85ebd1dfd57b2b95cafdddc188eeb2c2
8b7ac3934c97e436012e285e4795234ccb9bbd18
'2011-10-28T02:24:41-04:00'
describe
'919164' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCU' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
32ef9580a71451870b2b3f1fa2cdc584
3bf512efa399514b882e807cb5c4fc2d20f27697
'2011-10-28T02:23:14-04:00'
describe
'105983' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCV' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
b8d3eb0fc9442b5cf29098bf5bf52c5b
6f5aca165d2b5d18b54b28cf877719345be1936e
'2011-10-28T02:25:41-04:00'
describe
'34255' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCW' 'sip-files00024.pro'
ff97ddea4446a292f753f6f34392fcc9
61191b2b60fc045125c1acb05e9da746aab42082
describe
'38226' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCX' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
e06177abf773db7e6279531f01ee7de3
aa572b7d61fa8c509ea1cd1a1e2c5750578a15f8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCY' 'sip-files00024.tif'
898fefda4f5804042ce4db02f996434e
9e05c4e8ac6e4f761c8e899a81e46e9d9595a09d
'2011-10-28T02:24:28-04:00'
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKCZ' 'sip-files00024.txt'
cb78c2a3e7718508d0239d390c3623cf
11b1349b67448643cd97d7bd75286fe009853360
describe
Invalid character
'10159' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDA' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
9371dded719dce1b1e5a7b4d614e65a2
e2096da05ebf313c31c992aa5d101a0da94239c0
'2011-10-28T02:22:30-04:00'
describe
'958790' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDB' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
acd32d8dd1a9e8e18a353e74072cb6ae
e32ce0d0061c5162829cacd656897d65b2995a99
describe
'85917' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDC' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
5e7abc7ad7860739fa4f4baa7aa13f2a
158a5e1d08cc49c01cd7c94e232cf463faf8a644
describe
'25868' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDD' 'sip-files00025.pro'
79324b9a9ac18a03679801897a355009
9b4e947553758cad635a7fed20300cbe2537f4ce
'2011-10-28T02:22:28-04:00'
describe
'30166' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDE' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
978f9e8751f9786ff1855bc4a20d10a4
ad1100b0e2944a7b08891f7d06703fedea5deaec
'2011-10-28T02:22:33-04:00'
describe
'7676511' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDF' 'sip-files00025.tif'
0bdeed69d1d68d6bc3ed62831e725f8c
a21cef150ed40cb928a8f19f8c7e7c006b4c1a05
describe
'971' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDG' 'sip-files00025.txt'
c62238822460ad625556fc2d46e2ec19
b92115ab545a7c5c774dfb87d7743f4ff52b8cd3
describe
'8469' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDH' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
9d4d1c854f64fac30fc06a3f5d95897c
31c6fa4af8a83f3f46b196e2fd20226787a5cb5b
'2011-10-28T02:23:50-04:00'
describe
'919028' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDI' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
00e7c4cecbce4526ba4a625208d4ddb7
83dc588d4f13fcca371e5f1a6d28d2168be1798e
'2011-10-28T02:25:11-04:00'
describe
'103744' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDJ' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
317516e7006492cd774a2c9a04fc5269
e0268382f661a34c7f684c79a4b08e0457e34232
'2011-10-28T02:23:04-04:00'
describe
'32874' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDK' 'sip-files00026.pro'
9505211ab88e8236aaf54272434437e9
efd6e5e2ca2362ce8dd4fb3547c7da3db5246039
'2011-10-28T02:21:44-04:00'
describe
'37752' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDL' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
8daa43f43d4174d6c97deec04064c83b
90e64f4e557865ff77f77c6f805a5dbcac2334c8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDM' 'sip-files00026.tif'
6c98335fff45cea5ef64effaca7d8cbd
d145d00d31cf34bc4c6906eac7a88a3faf2cbe36
'2011-10-28T02:23:12-04:00'
describe
'1247' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDN' 'sip-files00026.txt'
3e525cf10bb4b3acd1c68cba1efbfe73
ebc33ccad6cef10e825a29434649c597e8fe27dd
'2011-10-28T02:25:14-04:00'
describe
'10146' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDO' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
c32211874bf71735482d576caa6848fc
a78e63bfa37bc937ac033f86b34e8b91a4507da9
'2011-10-28T02:24:06-04:00'
describe
'947869' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDP' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
68f90792474a6b30db0f15241038b65f
eeae3623d24dbbdcd19568cb54bd4f7cad09c423
'2011-10-28T02:25:33-04:00'
describe
'99525' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDQ' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
d01bfc2eec00a04d5a301f11dcc819e6
3abdb98299f74761273c293ff5ad158e76ba0ac3
'2011-10-28T02:23:24-04:00'
describe
'32401' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDR' 'sip-files00027.pro'
763394bb098d369434075425bd52dff2
0a8a2b18b063cf9cd21c5d0bde8a5dc3648ca1c8
describe
'35431' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDS' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
36f693a54fb9a63853e62bbb2faacb22
6d4d7ebaf20db828bd58cd8e06f7cb924996db30
describe
'7588003' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDT' 'sip-files00027.tif'
b422f28075370e37f787348ae3cdb536
a26053b2c232acb3560826fbe38660732818525a
'2011-10-28T02:24:35-04:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDU' 'sip-files00027.txt'
b4f040c0c005af8b9a9c4d4cb7f8fd28
88ade248456b0ab69a2d3f792e2a7754c8b7a6a7
describe
'9505' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDV' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
ab41d2e0ae599fb2ff7ef533536d002f
5e8033e3a9d418b667b254894901a80b0afd2fe9
describe
'919178' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDW' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
19a6bb5cf3c27ad4acd84c19d0e68ff3
d71459b6b225890f42db5c47517e8a93ec6b5ffc
'2011-10-28T02:25:23-04:00'
describe
'96691' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDX' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
b2738d1aa7ff632d9dc4168fa8106775
5c47a40843abafa2ad3da9f8b842544e0487a06d
describe
'30203' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDY' 'sip-files00028.pro'
dacafc6c20593bd6d4d55cd93ac787f8
806e5cf3bad1b65a1dd2dddf667a00ca397b6454
'2011-10-28T02:25:22-04:00'
describe
'35220' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKDZ' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
69c20c6e8622cbc19cdf934656c81b94
20a5b41cc5cf13ae5d8db70c8110c615be895b8a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEA' 'sip-files00028.tif'
7da321984803f9cb581b73410ae466c3
4b34e322121ab0781554b92afcb1e5e44b025d5e
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEB' 'sip-files00028.txt'
76f7aa1c8a954bc0f36348df47d1fc30
c7ecb2c3e3a35a1334ee8fc3b4ccd76cbd8bc63c
'2011-10-28T02:24:47-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9551' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEC' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
8217264cfeab029b794c3e975b1af8eb
cf671212b69408342a6da17cc20e8480c832292b
describe
'951209' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKED' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
d1c12deef826c7d73bd108cb8e936269
25af293056ba12382e4c7faba7542f4d2b538ef5
'2011-10-28T02:22:36-04:00'
describe
'89925' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEE' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
8e83fd78d6d6598717129a51874c17fb
c8aa563641c7740c08e1cce57f6a302c77967733
describe
'28887' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEF' 'sip-files00029.pro'
ddc1fc596253a505a6307d314577428e
89bc13fb75be1aac68c6a958577e43f8cf61b91d
'2011-10-28T02:23:47-04:00'
describe
'33268' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEG' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
cbe2ab534b98eb828633f675ab7796b1
841cb7739e10c89bb7932bea271ef2e598337ab9
describe
'7614411' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEH' 'sip-files00029.tif'
17fb4f28bf05a8d08910f7575d367c69
7d2d861074a0d291eeb375243250043f2136f43e
'2011-10-28T02:24:58-04:00'
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEI' 'sip-files00029.txt'
9029ab06029eaa6c36dff54185c7f823
4eb3a4093e579249858e6aceb63ee46d9f826add
describe
Invalid character
'9120' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEJ' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
52ec04ca53abf567057a1a30444731fb
5daec9b27c0feee396b7fc0ed348a0023832328d
describe
'918978' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEK' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
be9edc5bf2cc8f4f0e3b76ac2d1994a7
3fdbb48c464492ba9de77d9d3bfd21946fcd4805
'2011-10-28T02:24:21-04:00'
describe
'100336' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEL' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
bb37f48215aeceeb7c3592bcab6a5186
877c4cf55294a195b3a5eafb84addc79cf4d56d0
'2011-10-28T02:22:22-04:00'
describe
'32410' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEM' 'sip-files00030.pro'
7652af072eae1fc081edac97d1e8a9c2
66bb2774aa359fa1a61265c65e13424a417a9e56
'2011-10-28T02:25:48-04:00'
describe
'37378' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEN' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
a3241bf4db432eb0c311590744ac4a11
881f81bd634b53048eeb57440c45e8ca33e6a90e
'2011-10-28T02:22:58-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEO' 'sip-files00030.tif'
caa2432d438fa9c83594470130f3d359
9f95d7ab585053acd3fd269f3f2f56c40cad964a
'2011-10-28T02:23:35-04:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEP' 'sip-files00030.txt'
4da5c336adba4c86553e35dcd6050984
dc4f72f6263571bc3a1edd88190f25c1799e4baa
'2011-10-28T02:26:06-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9910' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEQ' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
c00c9f5278521a902306fa52b0241cb3
55511374d5ad9a4b8657a65ee4de4c45e75dadf2
'2011-10-28T02:23:53-04:00'
describe
'952334' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKER' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
54e5d910d3095720fa53bf71547f5560
356e6d435080de9cb60200251ec947dd0a00e865
'2011-10-28T02:21:51-04:00'
describe
'89976' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKES' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
79c2f836281bf4d690f6c89f3ee36cd2
b80a0de4051e090063de096d855296bfb112bb37
'2011-10-28T02:22:38-04:00'
describe
'28059' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKET' 'sip-files00031.pro'
dd34ac22290e89d50f4d83b96487344c
036f4f0bbbf1ca5cd28fed789c12211a32eef57f
describe
'31851' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEU' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
195dceb031b8bd45de20c7a85a3bcb98
dc8980ce480b6faeac40edca7690121d463edd8f
'2011-10-28T02:25:44-04:00'
describe
'7623631' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEV' 'sip-files00031.tif'
807acb601815e129bd29ceebbcb394b5
78ae3579b5aea6ea34b29dabe86cc03ae2c0acea
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEW' 'sip-files00031.txt'
a7021489926c797de9cad2ba04e5b9be
5b9cffe5941c375571772bd9579b640354ea2cc0
'2011-10-28T02:25:16-04:00'
describe
'8719' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEX' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
cff006915e4d41ae848fbf48776beaaa
e6751062e2566422db96b6d3540366fc227088ea
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEY' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
e376ba393dfc483ab632ceadcc1ede5d
5860c25d514b0d6d97b8d27bd09ae410c47abf9c
describe
'94252' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKEZ' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
e9f23c5b54e73783d29f5208921d05ec
3b85f10f7bc596a0eb5536c28c99abc4106c62ee
'2011-10-28T02:23:51-04:00'
describe
'28994' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFA' 'sip-files00032.pro'
6ad5c0c4c27569c3370deb21c98db14c
51e0bb7b67ddc7d6ff4ccaa66dff2f5b146eb3e2
describe
'34624' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFB' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
4cde6e2d6ca06803e62389806ba85f5b
83e4c06e9fcbc1558ce366643b6fe9a892f3c22e
'2011-10-28T02:24:27-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFC' 'sip-files00032.tif'
6fb221db7eb31b5975a7e2fc47ab364c
0a17713be28d9dfb285ccc73c2b82981cc6d091c
'2011-10-28T02:22:15-04:00'
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFD' 'sip-files00032.txt'
8772d33c0edad035e89547d910457ef1
faf6de06b533e07d8880a4eab62c21933498fa47
'2011-10-28T02:22:11-04:00'
describe
'9173' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFE' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
d41a826e3f93fbfbf74fed7c78d17481
9229166f1c21fb201966b94b5c93877ea12ddc49
'2011-10-28T02:22:57-04:00'
describe
'941807' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFF' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
a6140dc2c2a4d6e7f991e3dd7a8431f5
b229514b8bf4214ab656f33495e2f26a2e83719f
'2011-10-28T02:22:20-04:00'
describe
'96663' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFG' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
c139a81f40d58a10c03e01cdba287cca
b5b1d00fa6a47cc30e4a04a3a18d5361ff194ce4
'2011-10-28T02:23:16-04:00'
describe
'30523' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFH' 'sip-files00033.pro'
3575955a18f331a42bb82e3b49b21252
bfba37dbffb4753e886fbe01b8d5ea41423dc014
describe
'35864' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFI' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
203eeff04c3870b00621915ce1a0ab0e
2d8f6698a83b4f00ae6293130ea2da4975b689c4
'2011-10-28T02:23:32-04:00'
describe
'7539243' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFJ' 'sip-files00033.tif'
b3fb7756a222459a089eeb64db989297
a4337570a29729e3ad5285c9cfde4361ec1ce18a
'2011-10-28T02:25:55-04:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFK' 'sip-files00033.txt'
646befc1cecffcf8c6a646ca02cd5728
95cb90c0fba666b6a683d5d7d6aa13bfd2f6aaf9
describe
Invalid character
'9721' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFL' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
17dd62306bd35701b49f6ae31a7c4ca1
4daf8a748f8f8715d41c219dd3561cadd3ff22c1
describe
'919156' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFM' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
f6518b12532a10a380a667c2687ce13d
e9847c459e46255d881045923ed7673f60b3717f
describe
'104758' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFN' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
dc8ce0b7c8a4fbffc8b33b7ca5173cfa
5d2655a61b2ed3ba1f74a84aadda8b2b95695f23
describe
'32793' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFO' 'sip-files00034.pro'
46cc6afcf89d4b10247918e0b7057541
41072a8865c00c38bfe5c6cda09893026034f300
describe
'37796' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFP' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
50b1fb3001cd5ce4235f9684f0e4bcc6
e71aa932cd6356448dae39ef15c28c7050f3f241
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFQ' 'sip-files00034.tif'
e29a21734fe0d2c2bd9352ff78b02701
4722b2a75e121877a941a23f7ee581c8ae4336e9
'2011-10-28T02:25:12-04:00'
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFR' 'sip-files00034.txt'
da894878498090dd8df47c0518a656d0
62132a1069602d1298a93ff164d9b79e121079cd
describe
'9880' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFS' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
5d78f8a6f9f7b21e1848e72199d77f39
3792f73e277928664f4dbb113be131829eed6dfc
describe
'944099' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFT' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
ddbdf0a2c3cbcefa40c9c13ce6b3ab05
adf9c1eb5153901c534c78582e1e192b5a3bebf9
describe
'93545' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFU' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
ef3ad854492b6293d76db88c29a50677
2dfcdd32bc32839500cd0b4c46b4550dab9f1270
'2011-10-28T02:26:04-04:00'
describe
'29020' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFV' 'sip-files00035.pro'
e88c88604740aa266754053c40020b5c
8b26944c7a6eb0476cd731d4b8ebfb52618da129
describe
'32724' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFW' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
effce2fb6a296440c8aa54f7ff35fb43
0640833cb0c2a0170f874eefc9116af2636b27e1
'2011-10-28T02:25:29-04:00'
describe
'7557531' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFX' 'sip-files00035.tif'
afbd8eb9a27b905efdee5dd48f44c55d
e40cccfa332678894fbd21739824534817d5df7a
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFY' 'sip-files00035.txt'
483d5109cbbc11b011cfd2ba9315b5da
9d43afd3b4c5cf467267c692506af156ae07fa2e
describe
'8761' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKFZ' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
db27959edacafb48eb7f33f6e50b6298
3e16a2a5e903a24b4e4023318b94acd8ce30c068
'2011-10-28T02:24:33-04:00'
describe
'919176' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGA' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
df581e6c4ac57acfe85cd3461e2ac68f
8d59762b69b6df4d6472522534d9a2d672d68dde
describe
'102951' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGB' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
f74ab054a83d919c9e8ae48e26389f24
aef5cebd77ce8392a311264090873985dfa82803
describe
'32501' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGC' 'sip-files00036.pro'
1509d3c4ebda384519021c4f93225124
4212c41c859b05c0f842430ff2e0d63b3152b772
describe
'37441' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGD' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
f772c92b61d6066522d7d8f5d33a403f
92fe9de62f957898f8236814e76041b2950c3ca6
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGE' 'sip-files00036.tif'
6bd25032429cf212f660e2cfa3c2d8f4
f095dad0be021c9c519dd849466cac26ccb66c25
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGF' 'sip-files00036.txt'
5e4583211194dfe6704aed386ff1ba24
3f214efde7794b3a306b21d82326f1e5ebdc8d01
describe
'9705' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGG' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
c9230beeb554379fd0b6ea87d750e406
a38619dea41bc0679d5ceba2ea98e8ae815ae281
describe
'949394' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGH' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
124f18781808c3bcfaee9feb881d4fab
73520735dba7e5f212ed2af96afc4d6ba170eb4f
'2011-10-28T02:25:04-04:00'
describe
'101327' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGI' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
d27027d3ec1472168fe15ed57c3ed9ba
bd0a87d628447980d68cc46bdc697533e27ebc2b
describe
'33265' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGJ' 'sip-files00037.pro'
ffc75e5de1260a69890b5153a79d5627
2d063ad3fe6b53bc6f890d498a36c18ecf90e7d9
describe
'36539' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGK' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
5f00cc4cacb374a8a813ba84b3143ea4
24d9dda1831958d9d8c32afab8e296085b886502
'2011-10-28T02:25:10-04:00'
describe
'7599883' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGL' 'sip-files00037.tif'
e3217eb85e2321855b4cab093118b428
c6212595e1ea1713d0750e80a61abed6e98ceb30
'2011-10-28T02:21:48-04:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGM' 'sip-files00037.txt'
5a5c8af8bfec6cf265b07926db8c8f1e
8a23d7a143af5275d38717c9e80aa494a0f32187
describe
Invalid character
'9775' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGN' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
89de88ae448783f6e64e6639577fed95
3effcc39bc51d17233ba26634c45ef3f5075deac
'2011-10-28T02:24:54-04:00'
describe
'919082' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGO' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
074e20d3dac8d95f23b3abfa9d22bbb6
01ff3c5bb83265b2bb32eaa91589fd0465fcefd5
describe
'99901' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGP' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
8e2814b90bad4a288f24fad7f44ec8b7
0da1d2a3ae837e65b226775ad083de1c9939149d
describe
'31817' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGQ' 'sip-files00038.pro'
fbe7c8a6041ee3ab757c314c3c346f38
ad15a44242d4ec1168e61913d5a4a1e366b609b4
describe
'36871' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGR' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
19488c8e57427f30bc3e7219acc62d91
292cb972a749ec06f4a1aec1fbb141ff79a137bd
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGS' 'sip-files00038.tif'
08a9f9817cba2e8a21c61b8129556a35
c73ff5141102b75642b91dda81e01baabf96ab60
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGT' 'sip-files00038.txt'
051c561e4fbba752e985030a5d014631
9249d2d737addc917a940181a633accf0a32a55f
'2011-10-28T02:24:03-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10005' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGU' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
e965f356982b6716c2ffa80f93d8dfbc
a4ff835a909cc16db0ff205914848e76e711331c
describe
'914511' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGV' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
0194dc764e5379b0394b673a83950d73
110cd1d5521ddedf8590f2c5a6363fb0ab47209b
describe
'101881' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGW' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
f7b1c2f51e3e099d93057e659e620686
20dd3fd9e16bcadf74e7cb8bac2bb29ebd81ca4a
'2011-10-28T02:24:29-04:00'
describe
'32827' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGX' 'sip-files00039.pro'
4f97cd8bcdc4f57213a718c6b9038a7b
7616fba1e3146c060e9fed400101368603eff227
describe
'36575' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGY' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
66af09022675d1b5900e47045663e7f7
5d4192544cc9afe600e0b950b1ddf3ec7844695b
describe
'7321523' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKGZ' 'sip-files00039.tif'
94568ca87676103a5927aab0fd373345
e39ac6d0e75f375f7bb32a364cd5031274be1ac4
'2011-10-28T02:26:09-04:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHA' 'sip-files00039.txt'
f861f7748ea8ca9ee55ebf04d3b530f2
3065d25199148cfeb6c895cd7189912f73c35d4c
describe
'9649' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHB' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
01754aeae5712ba6339ad554985881e1
15116f5a53e911476a5108e21fadf63b53694edd
'2011-10-28T02:24:43-04:00'
describe
'919167' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHC' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
d44774238048ef590a729aeddc142fca
f11fdd8b5645c55420018b4ce8b7daa77916f33d
describe
'100572' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHD' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
6ef5a2476c8bbdb1a91f17bc1fed3025
16df6da179cf7a6f0bbb8b8b8d3aa4fd37f54fc1
describe
'31617' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHE' 'sip-files00040.pro'
7a1a59a1bc34177ba02d531b3df3dead
ca03a63aa6c97df79dd366833a6afd755f98a025
'2011-10-28T02:25:56-04:00'
describe
'36241' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHF' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
779df5bd2cfeed82db43923c33e971b4
4a612757c2dfc072a62c1dbd008ef24d7fbd8306
'2011-10-28T02:25:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHG' 'sip-files00040.tif'
3566e60895cb47c87f5efe5074056522
1922df519e6f37148dd3801e4a921524f4e6d96c
'2011-10-28T02:25:03-04:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHH' 'sip-files00040.txt'
0bd262320900b337bfbc2b2bf9d6afab
a3f3a5975381d84bb9556e50882c5ae009444eb3
describe
Invalid character
'9583' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHI' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
ca192fb480b8a3147eba481c5edb6c5a
b5e491694e313670e850d9fd73af1b4fd4e46ed5
describe
'937229' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHJ' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
b979b8f293bd5753b93401f2e6648ed0
6509ada2baac45403b1a77ce2cab0988c726623d
'2011-10-28T02:21:55-04:00'
describe
'102552' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHK' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
63b8ad71a5fedfa9321e482078b7a267
5a8effa15b615b43ceb8b51317a8bf87f27a1103
describe
'32766' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHL' 'sip-files00041.pro'
bbb48ffa82067b0a40d4bb4ad09a243a
8fff0021e7c6236cf93be0b2402d0ef427590ca3
'2011-10-28T02:25:08-04:00'
describe
'36908' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHM' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
e50521dc3baa74bc86310a1d0975da02
268b6f375a9bf5c845e70d5535112be35ea1c9fb
'2011-10-28T02:25:18-04:00'
describe
'7503751' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHN' 'sip-files00041.tif'
cd89d952c64993665ce8edf5bb1dd035
dde7a1a365f7158ce8898891701bd18aa1ea972a
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHO' 'sip-files00041.txt'
4c9e06042133504e4d1babb85ee210ec
98faf2ab4b1b855a25fa1a3eccc128b5dcfb032d
'2011-10-28T02:24:39-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9734' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHP' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
23b72ee27d5aa59f7a110a9f158b9186
141e49f51760cc6de78cd7ad7781bce1ef5dd559
describe
'919137' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHQ' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
fb9708a59043aa99341cf0b2d9b5afe1
a676350b01cd88177f580fe74b971f7b49cd15e5
describe
'100636' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHR' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
3350e91213ad609760b05b1e9c1ea588
0629d154ca63a381bab14d2ea64a9f72f3ef9be3
describe
'31874' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHS' 'sip-files00042.pro'
81882287486907e691699e026de08112
f3942b8311dc0dbcdee9f4275a22c1712e1b72b8
describe
'36366' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHT' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
c6fa62a140514e9814b9f45cb7b2c5ce
e4f284aab6673a68af3506d3405e3f1b5ae18eb7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHU' 'sip-files00042.tif'
6ad9186277132977a51bbc9b8b8af7be
8665e0e7bdafe399c8a9dff1111dc3d042c30435
'2011-10-28T02:25:05-04:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHV' 'sip-files00042.txt'
831018e0b41578818c025445e4f65b48
c30ef6f1157d1ee92f3435e980a445a3c4d405da
'2011-10-28T02:23:48-04:00'
describe
'9518' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHW' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
bc159d9e49c45f41ce09ec586d57f254
027d4b205d232a1e7e7ca49912a15533666823d2
'2011-10-28T02:24:36-04:00'
describe
'931050' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHX' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
b52ae3c4e6ad29bffdda8dab2e995110
4212ab72e295f0d3464cbc26a81cd62745639a2b
describe
'100976' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHY' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
2031ffc0c8b3a31fd482eb7ffa0200de
1e37db11f28584dc602e5ac83b2c3b564d1ece37
describe
'32302' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKHZ' 'sip-files00043.pro'
b46b5fad39847dded40762a5fa247f84
87caa386f79659e1fe3b2c38daec7aa109c972af
describe
'36584' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIA' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
ec1cac96c6e68549136b4ad926920463
d951bc0b97002f315c1a04db0d78d87e0f5b0a4d
describe
'7454187' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIB' 'sip-files00043.tif'
c281fa2c50338ca41e98f5cda2314895
a4dc9079cc67a708c4b3e12d42c620151e2d9db3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIC' 'sip-files00043.txt'
a8c73659a649d89abcf685e78304382c
916c74161c8d38c3a88231e14837c9877938e74d
describe
'9833' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKID' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
eaa71a14a3e3a2ce9022f8ea31703fd9
8f890fc51c659b5ecb9f04caae703dcc171bde9d
describe
'919097' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIE' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
8613e54fe6979d59dad7ca4e56dd23c1
471059ee32ac0dd528c64d8c7ad41e4b04e02177
describe
'105346' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIF' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
8b6043d7e66f15b59bbe4b9d614efaa7
c5348c620250c5de20dc6e8463283866bcc20a86
describe
'33534' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIG' 'sip-files00044.pro'
4d87f523f637ea34835b107686a31f55
457c57234a2da312e95800275f83f94666df4bca
'2011-10-28T02:21:52-04:00'
describe
'38272' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIH' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
732b97915009ccf466ebfda7c3c82dae
8f3b7a651687dd99503cd7b40593753bf553e911
'2011-10-28T02:24:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKII' 'sip-files00044.tif'
e4e33fb92d21e5413ac49ab882b2edde
ce2de30c2f3f4d41739a15e51955fb3449dc5ac2
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIJ' 'sip-files00044.txt'
1efc7c1f7944a438cc510f719be8776e
2eebee5b6895ac512cb223b76265e46d60928a5d
describe
Invalid character
'10042' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIK' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
f6b1a7fe8e74f3700a8bcc2d072ebce1
663396b220a7a0633109aaa49aeee92e5b22b2f6
describe
'924202' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIL' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
d6a719261988bef20cae412909bbae5c
b13ca469c94b6bac6d823d60b17c750cb8190d02
describe
'102458' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIM' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
c3ff5c0880f2b30807e6701eecc8e167
a9aa05d2ef682288baa28ad93a8c8d68664706d9
describe
'33262' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIN' 'sip-files00045.pro'
6b93ca555376eacfe53211fb985fcd1a
cc61ba070b1b26ead1d5c653a3fed9348240b2db
describe
'37382' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIO' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
29365f6b19b3252bf57874b9545340f0
a44f364d7eed08668f6e5a16d97c702b760ea820
describe
'7399595' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIP' 'sip-files00045.tif'
cbcfedffad0f6466bd86dd9a45d8eb23
09dcf847c9f04fdceff07b76a084100c80073bcb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIQ' 'sip-files00045.txt'
d26d36d2ba6382faf6a6d7aa98d14f4c
f8a1bc5b23d179d0ef845c4b9374ad2f11f54ab8
describe
Invalid character
'9972' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIR' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
c3417d9168b7d336b79840121704aaff
61422d780ecdabecf6ee5fa5dc44214421beccc9
describe
'890766' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIS' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
78fe6a152e96f1c0b0fd96a78b429d57
d82547584e92abf06a0d600c7d4b6cca4ec5b2b5
describe
'99216' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIT' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
0194b71977936d64ee9f4c00f893516e
10f5523f62603091f74cce32668e400aae744aa2
describe
'29706' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIU' 'sip-files00046.pro'
9f77d2dabbfaf4d2a60b764e24c11a21
1ecfc41237bcb25f1d536ffdb34b4907444bc9cc
'2011-10-28T02:23:43-04:00'
describe
'35376' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIV' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
5a975e6733e022f2cbf669c0368c2d97
5999d31434d40529e6a0617518d3ef17b28b6c9b
'2011-10-28T02:25:57-04:00'
describe
'7130827' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIW' 'sip-files00046.tif'
8e83c4709a05766cb3db0468cd986390
dab76e63be0ece796079cd69174f151d28f0190f
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIX' 'sip-files00046.txt'
d238de47b8238616bcdd719960a14302
24094d6d4c0122245d865b163b470145c74b1aca
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIY' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
1de6e9363794a199f165b13155598937
1713a546361502caf538416bda10177aee3726be
describe
'929409' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKIZ' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
337e13cc8a6d4d808d09c43fe63e7a9a
4591d0b89116780c7deb31e299218657a181ef6b
'2011-10-28T02:24:26-04:00'
describe
'97916' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJA' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
72ee180adfa215fb22335ecb5261ffcd
fbea82a0e56a3fe0cb4ed92fa9fbd7528f024b4b
describe
'31683' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJB' 'sip-files00047.pro'
a650def44b7ec193507cca863c6642f3
5e4eb764d6b5b85b3a24815aa5f73f3f1907a1b6
describe
'35259' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJC' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
3c57c0cb26650182ce661f27df3d28af
52993781bee31bdd8cee3dbc75ebb55732090d35
describe
'7439947' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJD' 'sip-files00047.tif'
57672fba3d3a6b8c16c991d995632de6
100d49cae37f3ed40e78fd56acfa9d11ec0cdcbc
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJE' 'sip-files00047.txt'
532d29abddeba7950b93506a2c9fb0f4
c9325bd8c850a19a5387864af79679ab72deb23f
'2011-10-28T02:23:06-04:00'
describe
'9344' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJF' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
039cebd4b003c9522fa16a9355b5f507
2c5949458a6bea4065a59d2893f89c913128ade0
'2011-10-28T02:23:36-04:00'
describe
'918989' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJG' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
f50ab78f824b90c929da46a60f0e9df0
b18004d338a3581f892df59f114d27fb800090ec
describe
'101401' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJH' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
a427867bc8779f650aa4e0880fd90db8
87051c4f621051378cce541c4a91a2a13dc83f4b
describe
'32770' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJI' 'sip-files00048.pro'
edf3504bb8489aa970656b66107acc8c
1a98800c57aa71a293395a8f06810a682c63f4db
'2011-10-28T02:24:32-04:00'
describe
'37674' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJJ' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
2ccaa4b87c3e5b0bdeb03140a08534b0
54a9a6bfba6961218cfcf070a9054b20c99742ed
'2011-10-28T02:21:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJK' 'sip-files00048.tif'
8bb89470477f70d11ebc5cf036d31da8
a62fdd44980e1d115497a772b3bfea801b38f7bc
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJL' 'sip-files00048.txt'
583dced34f640c0892ba58b56a86beca
7e4e709536fe5bd656092e5506c17a9f7031b570
describe
Invalid character
'9569' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJM' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
fb1e2ba5804607367311c25143c334c6
d62dd9751615e3c68c41439251f091aa34f9846b
describe
'933884' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJN' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
e2747c6b96b1f2ec8135b0173e9833e8
735f7d9a99b00ffe52ba41a244ec7be64b47982d
describe
'100676' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJO' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
a478493eae59a10568cb75adb31f0bf0
158c28a30585de6499763b06b74e294e7ad7c44c
'2011-10-28T02:26:07-04:00'
describe
'32887' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJP' 'sip-files00049.pro'
3ae4748aa48f511aabe758357d638934
d78335f5a3e1f92ae5ec0c21933dbdcbdd49e4cf
describe
'36484' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJQ' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
9161a806e13a6f56b669adc66bc731b0
c0a4a6a199752f834237c4450974289a690bf4fe
describe
'7476411' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJR' 'sip-files00049.tif'
92b0a8f59f0907008631ff8c2f31123f
c74b16c2f5f870bd2016c990b9eace445a47621a
'2011-10-28T02:24:20-04:00'
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJS' 'sip-files00049.txt'
ada708a95da17b86102424eded6d4799
00e2109966e5c5001fb860d020de70f3968e96a4
'2011-10-28T02:22:24-04:00'
describe
'9640' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJT' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
ddff5e1eb1f9784933333a3a39691569
f95866c7a48743c9de6dea8b4c2e32b654b6ff66
describe
'919174' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJU' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
6e9d5c933840a66815cc96f89008eadc
9f14edf49248ea46a9310f7cefda4b5dede42ab1
describe
'94386' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJV' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
104e12dd3cb60232575a468e6e1a2768
a307eb63cf278899c1a564e510ca1a0ec55889c5
describe
'30681' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJW' 'sip-files00050.pro'
3441a709fb02783b406918f98dd4d0f1
e903c414b4b02f6612654383f88e888d4086d1ad
describe
'34380' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJX' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
2dc5608cc10fabdea2b1e759939e2936
5c5b26695141984a900ffa18328790d12cb48de8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJY' 'sip-files00050.tif'
d9a9cf3fa80b65bf37b83023254ad192
2a35765c3933f5895a8403dd1835ac1396217989
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKJZ' 'sip-files00050.txt'
620a75d51840f660ee6f89d34d4ad08f
6466e33f5983712d37e806a4044cf0fca63eac9e
describe
Invalid character
'9414' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKA' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
cc21ff71bf7105c3b512c88796e80cd9
2cf3037a34a2e54b86359b3b4b7702d4a6fd2892
describe
'929243' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKB' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
860757a9df650528ad108ccb104f0ddf
01237bb58352a3fd2e1906d17df73e4aa0656a43
'2011-10-28T02:24:23-04:00'
describe
'96600' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKC' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
2a5d832585338f220fec8ecd58e68b66
dbcdb183b805d7e728e76068fa3e3d8f87b46bf9
describe
'32627' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKD' 'sip-files00051.pro'
7afb22e2a2ec8527ae9c47ba4e6acb2e
d66bf415aafc5d54dfb65c27a414a893daf9069f
describe
'35412' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKE' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
d5726d8e041715bb8333e2c7780fe88e
9d5342859f7282ccd0978926176bb3f902873c03
describe
'7438631' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKF' 'sip-files00051.tif'
350d0662ada12eb7ff65e9313e962458
28da879a1896b8f23f8c36d4e218da909672b4ef
'2011-10-28T02:23:55-04:00'
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKG' 'sip-files00051.txt'
2f6045915b0d2255eadc01494565c27d
5da30256f4cb5c1fd02fc9fa4a2a531ba992a550
describe
'9512' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKH' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
ce5e8fd5d4a24940b0e7fae1372d9841
fe756b6863cf8973a25849bfef627b0e2d209f9a
describe
'919172' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKI' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
17a06262018c394e68520d148a2ebf49
4d0a02553238d7b0079c842e953c7137311d7298
describe
'98476' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKJ' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
7a55ab947ab663dca1ac43d90259e377
96b23dd055a58f7c703315207d6da2b5480f072f
describe
'32125' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKK' 'sip-files00052.pro'
ef660e7661917ee8a2da3e3eac6d9d5a
7e654441f1e1b598ba9ac3e2ff851eff03ec0519
describe
'37481' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKL' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
42d94529d08b0953c2a5627a53c3a14e
2ea60f86052cc7125e4e145945a4c14fc06d86f0
'2011-10-28T02:22:23-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKM' 'sip-files00052.tif'
0f6105445b45a5a3b1a400ffba46ccea
87737a0efdbc56d344f19409ce07908198542bd1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKN' 'sip-files00052.txt'
afc791ba505252a5d93487e84a780c1a
aac72754a6c5c08f2b66e0d9e4c736500c4007ed
describe
'9825' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKO' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
a86dd9a3edd85e836547b1f4f0333749
38df7094e98d06694ce74d32249f9e29492def86
'2011-10-28T02:22:59-04:00'
describe
'952440' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKP' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
4098498b3564e8ca460b54f7bd272925
1dacf812ac87093f446605b60e33c6102a1d694a
describe
'92531' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKQ' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
59b8e169bffa4bf25583393b3b4bdf27
2a899e62868353cae82784d606abef30be45b870
'2011-10-28T02:24:00-04:00'
describe
'31180' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKR' 'sip-files00053.pro'
7168a62bf990584d348d6761a7e890a4
c46433eb8fb0a4df987823fd907e89aaef5b0fd7
describe
'34294' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKS' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
4223195810fb77fa32e3473bed2c01f1
0a83312fc94ce5cb4fecc01e99027602f401b345
describe
'7624591' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKT' 'sip-files00053.tif'
7add5754d9d825a6f35a596331baf455
99d3281258416b85e0c718c2c91cea48a7a02c8c
'2011-10-28T02:22:54-04:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKU' 'sip-files00053.txt'
1eb153e42d81699e77b0e31d42e60868
2194b121714bb06b5db9a45c74f9cc507a9a004c
'2011-10-28T02:25:59-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9106' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKV' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
27c9cfbf461ffcc2e69650af29360840
130c6f084cd2f6c42b620777333f6bf3c3b07731
describe
'919148' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKW' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
b17f6a3d6806114a7e938e9a4cf89900
beea20f3f040959023e2b3f9f4bd156b063bb4bf
describe
'87482' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKX' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
d67b8080c086b0e01866c60cca5942c4
5ad90eb8e78af539dec49516028871e3139fc4ba
describe
'26378' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKY' 'sip-files00054.pro'
cef00cdd286d46124f6e2a0b43bac241
324bc8cc5deb961d53e81ca658b611676ac6a1fa
describe
'32578' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKKZ' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
8de04a0f9b207e06f2d1d8f73c5f008b
25d0511bbf8723ddca2e2496a8f368a856dd34d6
'2011-10-28T02:22:25-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLA' 'sip-files00054.tif'
510438bf014d4aed612826a1d77ff0bc
0838d71b38b0d2881a46953791dfd5bf2249c247
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLB' 'sip-files00054.txt'
32decb52cf0afde25fd1ba5031cfe3fc
80150946871606e982a3b9016772024fbb92a482
describe
Invalid character
'8906' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLC' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
d4767e14790b4854c3c260cc77edefb1
ccb31855a81954856ae94fbf42dccbc74c8743e5
describe
'935271' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLD' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
9feabcb228543fbad2394e14b4b0c602
fb777c85c27d3dc003c5f6a68f1dab8b57134b93
describe
'98061' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLE' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
fd503311b4d9cfdebb7fa4b6b29932b1
8fd4f18c71e57f2ddae8d453ca54d6975ff77914
describe
'33218' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLF' 'sip-files00055.pro'
b6fb6ea5337a456cad4d2ab0340b4bd3
53d20d613c9c022b36320492d9aad039503fe760
describe
'36022' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLG' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
d180c06089ba78de3766e09074f78473
ed720063f245ba1829adab128effa7a72d32b708
describe
'7486863' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLH' 'sip-files00055.tif'
22b8f276e58139aa405c581707a2a4ee
4e66c58134b8ef39c295dbc01ba6f5df398f3a21
'2011-10-28T02:24:01-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLI' 'sip-files00055.txt'
7a2e2b7b0bd5952382c6b1cfa21f945c
bf785f607e2cdd8a7365bc5ea637b242a58c2337
'2011-10-28T02:23:44-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9634' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLJ' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
bd5b1b9e67b86d4294c9d116de09def6
9e8695ebceaf32b08df31286e343555522f6fe24
'2011-10-28T02:24:22-04:00'
describe
'919165' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLK' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
5baace192257c118e947eaaab204f478
462c7003256534be9cbb2fcc2f56288d8ef04a16
describe
'100585' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLL' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
044375bb05e7e26c92f68c1c328f4209
333497f0b836c1856a2a6fc409e7e4015896e652
describe
'32909' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLM' 'sip-files00056.pro'
2b1fd5afb4ae206e744c37737b30c000
f1d8aabe716d99b7e92c3c951f92bb670a50545d
'2011-10-28T02:23:56-04:00'
describe
'37321' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLN' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
3ecedb93d5f4498f0dde81fd8a3b527c
7e0df0fea3df6d801afc0726e6fd1602e8a6435f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLO' 'sip-files00056.tif'
699cdf9c9b78ef9e9fce5aec9b00d8af
77e35ac52642c00add1597791b46d103f5f08e93
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLP' 'sip-files00056.txt'
271ec72f309297dde9c157a8fa9222ce
d0617b7c4dc4558d56458d505de9768d61da2f17
describe
Invalid character
'9872' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLQ' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
eef34ffe58a76176719606f77ec6ee60
b8f8f2fb1b2366528d445804ef042211376a1266
describe
'942424' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLR' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
d635abe6dfc76c678831c9049b258d21
6c6254c8932a9d0db584012714b329b0e1440596
describe
'82876' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLS' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
e3c4c08611de6156a97d36eb1b7c775f
9461540a1daabfd264a3db941a10061375850724
describe
'26584' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLT' 'sip-files00057.pro'
dcdc696c531f775743439cdb4d92d301
e1d155cf715fea8ed3522686d2b0bc9cdc2df16e
describe
'30396' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLU' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
cfde49dbd3a6df5825498841090ab2e6
775b5c15c862512e65689b38d28d01f56685bd90
'2011-10-28T02:25:47-04:00'
describe
'7544427' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLV' 'sip-files00057.tif'
9877321aff707c092da756758e3f9e99
3dde251cd18451bfd3fd8f65519e5a69a201eddc
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLW' 'sip-files00057.txt'
ffb9e0d704cb6e382eab53d94d0fc0b7
2c848adb1429a7dc424ae773f6a512467cebd374
'2011-10-28T02:23:46-04:00'
describe
'8270' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLX' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
ae647748c2129cf7cbaa8008866bc5e6
b1025dc0e3311fb8b6ba91adeaa5331e2ccf1b16
describe
'919151' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLY' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
8175b74ea3af34d70491839f8b492e4b
ff33fc54a50232f51e2582a9c6d47cae7606aec3
describe
'89846' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKLZ' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
f4e22ad4aed1603165e2aca50ee4f545
c94c8af0a54fdbaf092de96fd3de1177a7313eb1
describe
'28597' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMA' 'sip-files00058.pro'
92ca7d1b1fd54457bea6c023ee5b5908
dbffea5080ffa81ab6de80f9bb66c296551cc2db
describe
'33032' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMB' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
4abb74e6f26dde9c879af0e8b7706eec
ca52b6863d4c2ed78d2a9c25f0b9ca1e7639e330
'2011-10-28T02:23:10-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMC' 'sip-files00058.tif'
648849276408888f02ca11aadc136b30
d0113ee44d29761a9cdf3ba1dde7ef2b3f975102
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMD' 'sip-files00058.txt'
9126ec6d1722e2f9ff5ddbf60c88a2ba
ce4dbae82c69dfd1a60151c5228aba4bf341d78b
'2011-10-28T02:25:00-04:00'
describe
'8971' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKME' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
d62d261381f12a4862e9a99afb1714d6
67cd0d290ef153be8674ef37e7e513979c396918
describe
'950159' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMF' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
12d921454fa830979db3987d9c95383c
f1bce858db4eb9f34864e5abb77bd6d17808aedc
describe
'84931' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMG' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
281ceea6c700b7b8ab688f14c921d565
580ea56b32d7eb6c5010876bc6da5a007c8415a1
describe
'28179' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMH' 'sip-files00059.pro'
da59eb5e734657b80b82d79e89794b2c
3155bdf0ed03025b87c9b00f809ce68b0756bf67
describe
'30848' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMI' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
4b124b076cdf4928d2b953b3d2e61cd4
2b7efdd24482c94428b9090340b2df3f4687e3df
describe
'7605975' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMJ' 'sip-files00059.tif'
f781d1d095698ab0320dfeacec6fa9ac
e6348758af5093a5231badf892c413e9eabed31b
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMK' 'sip-files00059.txt'
3f99add5b482ff3037a41dad394d8113
570aa5ed153533f9a684e5c9527ca0eef6683b60
describe
Invalid character
'8828' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKML' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
c691dcec4dc2613b6d10a79fe38eff01
8ad3946a31fa67a21422ecb41c6f119f62ddec1e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMM' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
d14a3ff7dc65a37709d642575763826e
5bd71761cde8bd02c75bfda7287a986a0a0adf0a
describe
'92192' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMN' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
7ad0f501d1b79516d86b7e73deefc03c
e9e7c6a22c2267f1ce3a0a365933e34ccee583d2
describe
'29613' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMO' 'sip-files00060.pro'
f207b675208d2ad1c12a324fb6d04db2
85a5dde4e923bd1c337ec9dc473e3a147cfcb37f
describe
'31822' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMP' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
327d70d88b0a8fd4864fcd2b8b93d26a
b815451d5303ba8bef67667fe0dfe0d8de1eb2c1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMQ' 'sip-files00060.tif'
e947722eb00fcc04438818b3d18280fb
1d7a598b6554d16461513a3880923e34c298809c
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMR' 'sip-files00060.txt'
d586a5b7eb568998886adf9b96f63fc4
83f270442f20cf31ea884cd0a4c62bad267cd1de
'2011-10-28T02:22:01-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'9328' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMS' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
ac63fd0ba4a8ccb8468db6df918d927a
767ec4209c32ff56fea125b7e93c2cf82a13060d
describe
'959265' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMT' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
72d83eae39ff8fab26678e5856f63f89
754debccbd97b33ee7e0a297f236c2d2d9a4a59f
describe
'90278' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMU' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
ab462a16a73dbf79a183b6ae05d6321f
0128774d5df4531aa3eefa97e42d5383a9e4f645
describe
'30295' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMV' 'sip-files00061.pro'
93fd7d1f1c8deeae7dfd7b14697c1303
91a293ead1a8efd389175cecb6ec212537d80edd
describe
'32992' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMW' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
73ff72eec73c95368b78e06a29428940
0dadbcd2864ff091c3e5d5a24f500366f42f02d3
describe
'7678819' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMX' 'sip-files00061.tif'
5cd6b609fb1424441a10aa7f5706725d
b85dae8d5d78fe692db7204be900856124741248
'2011-10-28T02:22:31-04:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMY' 'sip-files00061.txt'
6d0f087ef154f6176b5d540ba1c6eaf0
a69905d94852c1b3af56ba04d243446b205c4b49
describe
'9148' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKMZ' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
0a3534d0d2a51b8c1358274900c142fd
b34c2766c2305abfaa3d2a686605aa2612f9bc5c
'2011-10-28T02:24:42-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNA' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
4b22335401e972d4fef23d4aedc20c85
44bd946f87754d6d23390a90bae82c986b6b3ca6
describe
'86704' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNB' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
eebc4aecf3cadd8f8fc63de8f71c1bc1
5668d756d522029cc89270941a915c77ee028897
describe
'27616' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNC' 'sip-files00062.pro'
022b8b629d1a2f2d89ee55b57cc54d2d
236531ef96ab307756f9657cd5087f9eeed4c655
describe
'31167' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKND' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
c5e860996c2c4fb93302feceede52306
b0be79d77bef0508f0f7c40a4e84f0dd30007342
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNE' 'sip-files00062.tif'
59f82e1a223d44c679ae5221ac00f645
796ff263e6501339459dcc3d0ab0779f181036f9
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNF' 'sip-files00062.txt'
8d45d09ea2a81157936d657915ecb786
796717aaaf9955719bb14295204f1fc746a0ae0d
describe
'8743' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNG' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
838f3324143eef6c3f296ecaf0995f52
2970829b72c341a4aa43759b3bea00b1421c5ac5
describe
'961307' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNH' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
141d315ff311268c6e9cc75106923b04
6d588fca2ac92f7324528a4823141ae1122b2167
describe
'88947' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNI' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
a573205aab14c24772377be2fa2d54e9
c153a04103bcaac3aca665b26cc650ba0fa59988
describe
'30189' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNJ' 'sip-files00063.pro'
13abedc101060f55121feeda73a2cdc1
bb431a7cb1073e131c89eb013fba08631324e0eb
describe
'32685' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNK' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
4d85efd13d1de818f6510cb637f4ad0b
bf38520a38022a94123e734e6ff66bc2ce4a7b69
describe
'7695311' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNL' 'sip-files00063.tif'
d64ebdd72bcca848f26edd82c838362a
37d4457a6dfb8bc647254c1023efcc84b029621b
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNM' 'sip-files00063.txt'
830822ec60484627e10f3bce5085383a
9b8fb6b5fa0b038ab7f030cd85e4883faace211f
describe
Invalid character
'8713' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNN' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
0cdac9a68ddb4a7715437566ca4ebb7a
54463999b17e5ebe578a79446d89273d8db30a47
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNO' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
0ded6bf556e453d7d481c214e33edc05
9e79dc8d42bc804baf2118e18d23a0c6af5281d4
describe
'102200' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNP' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
2f97962cbc21771d2155abc8b4b57255
53cb7fcce67e6af764b28d18a9aafb1fbc05b045
describe
'33038' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNQ' 'sip-files00064.pro'
193978ff0659a5bc6485b5597e617b2b
a4aa33c14a42f92c58afafd2abccc92c85bf43f6
'2011-10-28T02:22:37-04:00'
describe
'36177' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNR' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
38feecc088fbcca7c7f86d12948463e9
1118917e4c2c9043644c8b87c27ce2ff7a77f6eb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNS' 'sip-files00064.tif'
e30a64787f704db61c60cc5b685579af
3b65dc7dafbbe6beaf466bce688343fa4108a42c
'2011-10-28T02:25:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNT' 'sip-files00064.txt'
292965d2f4000410624b3b6e7529240b
5a7766c516e88cb5ca58f61e61e3b7f1793f619b
describe
Invalid character
'10019' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNU' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
6dca691d5b0b466f23eab8d6a4e33905
347332092a0cc86af02d18e96036ca8daa7e2316
describe
'955750' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNV' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
39de446213b532c3c9d4833f49856f72
873ebdd663def1aabf11e578ea04a20aa5af8f7b
describe
'95831' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNW' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
afa9fed03ec9cd92f24874cd61201c39
091b2f1bcd5e43ada488d3970f767dc63a6813c2
describe
'31863' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNX' 'sip-files00065.pro'
56e0dcfebcdefe2b653b421fd3c55bcd
95424fff0e7c276e9df758baa37fff2df4d711e1
describe
'35043' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNY' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
b97b5494fb5c5dfe9c2a3dae7e09e27c
15a592dee4a7cb0010afd017bb1b4f0c13d277e3
describe
'7650807' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKNZ' 'sip-files00065.tif'
33991c6ae1a85efca8a26fa970b18628
23bec83ff9aab4287857bfb103ccc05a5eedad07
'2011-10-28T02:22:04-04:00'
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOA' 'sip-files00065.txt'
3e2853566939e2c78d0afd8895eea8ed
7d84d6d3213ceeb5305caf0976f0fe7e016b0678
describe
'9387' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOB' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
e9276ac7f587d44555dab3f37de58348
0cf6df31efb2f2da087a461b8c60dec6e77ca005
describe
'919158' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOC' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
1341fc045e3852b8e29711de3b1964e2
c1ba7b2162edac6ce2b039c3862bea90b91d9952
describe
'88570' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOD' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
f1ca4944fa32eb5d2a273224cbbc8f63
784bd4330a4ed2c1251d5223ce340c25e214dcef
'2011-10-28T02:25:07-04:00'
describe
'26411' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOE' 'sip-files00066.pro'
5d3af00598b0aa436026c02234f0cdf6
98419e3dc5d31e1552875866d0519bb1fd990c05
describe
'31375' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOF' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
88d3f98aa482c65af9c4be21cce8795e
ca752ad900ca34e39e5d2453d3372f58b0626d93
'2011-10-28T02:24:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOG' 'sip-files00066.tif'
c72b1533a2cae09255efd60042a0c441
307809fd0c99e005ec8754fff14e7307cfd9781b
describe
'995' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOH' 'sip-files00066.txt'
275e6fe31795c9e3a9f39f976fc7df17
fea6faba93ce07758542023a2b6fc56f53322061
describe
'9131' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOI' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
554925cf3603a9a75b12ce05be9d51f5
31c1fdb260ffa29a989812d8fb509464ccbc1c25
describe
'976435' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOJ' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
ec90192bbedbafd0a0f60ceead32d862
347c52f69a4d609a2afd573d2bbcff773582f55d
describe
'96848' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOK' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
f1dfc311fbc0b099d2f352ca56739225
5ae107fa539b2171e615821b57adab4d1edc88b3
describe
'33691' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOL' 'sip-files00067.pro'
1d98990e66d5e58a91df3b2b7abded79
52d3178b298c38d8b573a2b13d395dc7f0aa79af
'2011-10-28T02:25:17-04:00'
describe
'34473' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOM' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
d81c49d00b4ec9a43a8f9b11171da766
839ce0891266c5c4e913268c3615d8f210b8f79f
'2011-10-28T02:22:27-04:00'
describe
'7816191' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKON' 'sip-files00067.tif'
b20d082580b4a766b604ff6f930244fe
00f2be45cc9c8eed9f3376a1717c574ec9b27ac9
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOO' 'sip-files00067.txt'
8bd43969e0b5f378ee3c82561c232442
40c3d629ea28d1a5ccdf12109aeb2bb8e3eb60bb
'2011-10-28T02:25:42-04:00'
describe
'9090' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOP' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
2d506cb9253dd4031974f91c9cb8617e
30b7feadf9c92cae0d09afe0a754655e02ff0161
describe
'919150' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOQ' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
a017a1d5b624faa1fd2bb1f7a8d652db
58b69ff00d11b72ae2c7dbd58a66405fd6b084d6
describe
'100079' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOR' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
3fe880e8e9f25fafdcae1307966afd36
d9738d99814a5343ef79861dc2c38eda503ad8d6
describe
'32688' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOS' 'sip-files00068.pro'
8dbd3697c7978ea56c6666e5b10aeb78
87b1f33a71d23820161f0ccb2b28c18c6893509d
describe
'35933' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOT' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
920d95e49b961fd3ad6046d8b6d4e63a
044f072b95cdc50fa631cc914da6ba502d18c136
'2011-10-28T02:22:39-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOU' 'sip-files00068.tif'
3673c21f08ee6dd91f2e66231f7f57d0
4c406510535ab972c7cf3a1d65dc70dff8d6fedf
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOV' 'sip-files00068.txt'
cab8ed50251c17c8c0224364744a065d
86a8d8664625e7c9b9f0fedf1ee2a85f705e1f58
describe
'10203' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOW' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
eccdb7a7ec29a17bb2264522e335d170
b2fe201c6fbe88b641c787edcd4dfb6a0e51f05e
describe
'969326' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOX' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
42fdb171c9aaf893c7ac80381b6ffbb5
1ad1051d13c7dc7e6fea3e305dfbfcb190214367
'2011-10-28T02:24:59-04:00'
describe
'92691' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOY' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
b5d7dfc3904b70e6255a93bd9ab04df6
3e0355ca9d8e6cae3e4bb2af6bf55e306c3cffc0
describe
'32362' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKOZ' 'sip-files00069.pro'
6f1697ab8c69f5e7b04f2aae64bc0755
13d7082d5bc58fe03fa754d920d6d976d22d25da
describe
'33965' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPA' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
2e98b6574255b98c907e8ea3eb378e2b
b6b55aa9b4101b1586812f0c39f2ab7a6f2a0a1f
describe
'7759655' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPB' 'sip-files00069.tif'
a36e2bfb72f42eba4c290ce2810d13e2
70f180f434fcb19908b6b0577c4081164e69f68a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPC' 'sip-files00069.txt'
24a80a53da26729dd2be34f687ded826
e5738d8e85a359ea8b00032d4a887fb595a110fe
describe
Invalid character
'9037' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPD' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
b36c32a3a0d826353bbe0b5010d54f19
f8e491d348d06de01fed4358e9edf1615dcc6458
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPE' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
5aeec2fa2bf994ca37814085b8b3da54
654d684fb0b19f1e9e36bfd5fb08c039eb22a688
describe
'83336' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPF' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
ea241fd4ba404c422b03eac43274d020
8a8a1d3c2c46d8cc7f51bf28357276924041269e
describe
'25169' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPG' 'sip-files00070.pro'
fa4b6bd42557293a46374654345e75e5
54fa61ea6ccb1a371a28cf67e53a5eedbaf978f3
describe
'32523' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPH' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
1210c16ff83e4f8fd830c93ffa239268
5f43d006cabf55a8b27057c4383ae2eda1c3de4b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPI' 'sip-files00070.tif'
c5399e12163209372d7ef6e6b46ef4a3
69abcb9a4070dcb25250803006fe95f11ce36507
'2011-10-28T02:22:08-04:00'
describe
'951' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPJ' 'sip-files00070.txt'
f0221d085283dcaeb1d53f3fa9d5afe9
60639d04cf01767b59c7c2e5014a753a202ff63d
'2011-10-28T02:23:07-04:00'
describe
'8408' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPK' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
79c880b5a2af437e6690deaaa612a372
cb48a26975fbad615e460a538049c5d028bf4c66
describe
'975471' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPL' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
5bf510e8c02046ba9660314637e7b5f5
e3a4e87d211b13462ccce8a2cd181dfc532eb9f4
describe
'95236' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPM' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
ae8f8538153e80d9eba678dac9b9131e
645be21bbc5ca581dde125c40e249fff7a42bdef
'2011-10-28T02:23:22-04:00'
describe
'33446' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPN' 'sip-files00071.pro'
52e02e29ae77391c57894e5024c54d28
77ad163d03b22c6fa30b9cbe2b07f13283d32d7a
describe
'34424' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPO' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
2dffa1d49965f91da1c25bd9070acea7
3e74f9e3fcb3b588bbaf82ee235a87a28671960e
describe
'7808711' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPP' 'sip-files00071.tif'
7995aaa3032b483d8f618541a3c24595
d7e8477826e3aefa5137e14bede3cdfcb8588eee
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPQ' 'sip-files00071.txt'
0a2dda6ae8c0faf3152a57b3b5ba42eb
27897bf0d0c94689e797fc7143bb3d9444e689aa
'2011-10-28T02:26:00-04:00'
describe
'9381' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPR' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
9a1c000f127c4cd2c473eb752cba18b0
666dba043df29c22bddd94165a71986a33ac2501
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPS' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
80cdf9ba1b37d50f9f6780a678e5d07a
e1dc6cc896d6a0bc5e68f7a000cd4fff9967dd20
describe
'100380' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPT' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
70ebe39b40d6e6a2145fdb32d60d9b75
f6ca2169cb70e962a4b77a3b99922c9465e616e1
describe
'33199' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPU' 'sip-files00072.pro'
8e5456980a4c894e8b8abb69ad59220b
0286a78bce5de2249393a069235fd0537a54e2b3
describe
'38989' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPV' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
be82983cf9c37e4e97277f5ddbb8a17b
c4f5facdf88b145624e5480271f3067b16aa4789
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPW' 'sip-files00072.tif'
1963891ea6f6e9452610d10eb370736b
88ce84e7ddffed78f6c1dab65bd8dd8673f53c0b
'2011-10-28T02:24:40-04:00'
describe
'1246' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPX' 'sip-files00072.txt'
76c6a0eb93c2e79e8ac6b95db18080a0
6b4a4c26d1fe80a0d3b096776f89a08a4557b438
'2011-10-28T02:23:01-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'10030' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPY' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
81a5b489b60c07bd5073d5110082c5b4
1b68dc5bb3b6c0738e8a984489b4e0b38f01d57b
describe
'810640' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKPZ' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
5027cd81e3cbee9493a76a87d3725ebf
64b532a3eb02fc79bb96a79ce944f6e027e97a34
describe
'89469' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQA' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
f91f2f7a1527daf520dacd4181a95511
ca20e0225608a6c7cee9ed74539a694fea6c13c6
describe
'30010' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQB' 'sip-files00073.pro'
18f7eeb5b767279b2ce4b79f35db959f
ea4afb29f415462a12eaab6b1e460fe4d60a4ddd
describe
'33705' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQC' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
764d884f3a83634be2b8c2c6730522ca
26ee3eca4e3e9ab0984c7b9ede54bd04c44707a7
describe
'6492803' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQD' 'sip-files00073.tif'
f49523c8efed764ea518028080b75364
1097b48cf93fe4e552563ccd7b5231f359109019
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQE' 'sip-files00073.txt'
17ec6c56838a6d7295fb52ee9c5bae21
f100bb18f9ad72d9887bd674a968dda509a15751
describe
'9107' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQF' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
f497147b4776dc864cd3ae982e9c78b0
b91bc8603204b90d8fccca0ef0a53e06ba72eb47
describe
'866861' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQG' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
81ea114e7b7f268983c10a4ea5c9c874
d232ee544a37c0b9b6938d67ed74b4537992656b
describe
'98622' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQH' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
61dbdce15e15c688680297acb7e12fe2
4072198d2af5ef9cdf1a57e1133f1c0f51fcfdf0
describe
'27442' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQI' 'sip-files00074.pro'
faf729d0c9d44a4e2054209b4cedff5a
d1f3a60e0eef06924ecba6212038e361ef759613
describe
'34831' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQJ' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
f9e0be3a8ab31e9c8a2e15aaa55f9e34
318b8e0db0e8ae1073600367f03ffb6ff1b4982a
'2011-10-28T02:21:53-04:00'
describe
'6939687' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQK' 'sip-files00074.tif'
b26cc20171b78df834dc34df601a1593
7e0e34b96529d1b028b48f06c7f2aad448c906b3
'2011-10-28T02:21:50-04:00'
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQL' 'sip-files00074.txt'
136c5198dfacf5e819c723df66078664
de9a3c014e4f209967cb5faca8e10ea423ad3e25
describe
'9637' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQM' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
99e7fef6046f72ea101d850d67faa020
989ac1058621b185f05c52d89883aaeba04102d0
describe
'910825' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQN' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
fa1de419c612e454c7ac96386fd19ff3
d65a2938a86a758d938b317dc32b1855ee87d8df
describe
'104798' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQO' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
6b7ba2a714996e3e9e976e61ddcf5a6c
095f5fe5979ecc052c7801a728fe5e5240ba728d
describe
'33765' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQP' 'sip-files00075.pro'
22bcb99590a3fca1f1064647dd38ba75
af1d004d970d79793c709a72d0771b3ee87b2123
'2011-10-28T02:22:19-04:00'
describe
'37979' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQQ' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
2cb4a8319ddba8a3c276ff64c7b404d9
f0040bd19bfdde3be9c9e86921feee6f75dddaeb
describe
'7291443' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQR' 'sip-files00075.tif'
e29cba1db2eb62deff15a82cc3d48d42
cc44b9638a476b5c2ce82c672dbc0daaeb26acd1
describe
'1278' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQS' 'sip-files00075.txt'
be6dd943a7fc16ac97cc9e989dea4f21
b6ba8d15cf9c20a43319fcf19d89effb3c90c87d
'2011-10-28T02:26:03-04:00'
describe
'10000' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQT' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
eb7c09d9b70758d063f974c6eed66f9b
f70c2ffba542036aa008a474caa1abe3cdd269e0
describe
'876084' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQU' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
19a7aa9c10eb0595712467e00f8fd04f
f3652396b03335cd986c6b4016eb0c2afe00b01f
describe
'106367' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQV' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
98580bdc8833336997cecae8c1278166
f9d19d635caa70f91147f2463e6cb49fc6de9daf
describe
'33362' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQW' 'sip-files00076.pro'
ff2deb02e322391696220eedb6bbabb3
72ba4e31b8f3c7bf4b89f9a8a227aaae94565d8b
describe
'39154' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQX' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
bf9d0ba97972fcf985b46f040047fbaa
b4d335bebdbaeda296e350f6f611e77616e780e7
describe
'7013607' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQY' 'sip-files00076.tif'
6568c5dad330d95e94844e31cde5cf88
73a3710d629f83e80f5b946590d23742663e822a
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKQZ' 'sip-files00076.txt'
87bf6a0398887e24bce7365ce2a35c14
69b8f4f793dc46c0c96a179898501012bec91698
describe
Invalid character
'10187' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRA' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
0aeb64b73452db765bc151b2561484ec
a4ecfcc34106fa552ecc5bd495c383d3be3f7071
describe
'935453' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRB' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
9c4368b26e69d062dc108d34a5094bee
6b391b9aa36edc340104c51a9f20fc546810735d
describe
'101560' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRC' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
157e812c92183dc0dd60871d7a4cb72c
e64ba2571ec5a9cdfda247e55ccd2eaf2baeeb56
describe
'33761' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRD' 'sip-files00077.pro'
b2128dce0b075f23e2b14bc97370d428
3ed17a4cded8505b66b1a3340a483e97cebb63b6
describe
'36641' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRE' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
e24c57d77c326df4a7d346c5410f908d
974e99c4844f244fc6de5ea37710c5d102d844e6
'2011-10-28T02:23:38-04:00'
describe
'7488291' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRF' 'sip-files00077.tif'
59883bc3a7b531fbedada948723e4042
d2ae0b42dcb0b48a60117d65a4de661485b12235
'2011-10-28T02:22:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRG' 'sip-files00077.txt'
52efb70712d1c561183ff505cfc64068
903e109f31875f98cc418772ba7138e68fe15fe9
describe
Invalid character
'9716' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRH' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
c7b44cc0af4f429cc42c15287f562fc0
9c640821c8721b92758f633014860da41a92e181
describe
'919163' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRI' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
0c26b7e21b46f35c2ca6b39e56974b39
b40afca32851babf36ce01aeda9b31795a20d8e5
describe
'101318' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRJ' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
358f28cfe688fc6ac236514b0191e8ec
dc76f93f1bc0737f4297185a6952d9c8734438f4
describe
'31518' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRK' 'sip-files00078.pro'
ee3bb383d9524480072f69261bf87768
e76823d09b9c2671b3461cf73e5d52c9a6a91270
describe
'38252' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRL' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
a30b84c028698b076eaeb28bba0dbca2
f79a2c6349e24c45fbe22836e7d63ee24e89d909
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRM' 'sip-files00078.tif'
b05927b76d37c555299466d41c68cc8f
a23f7678b6ba2f91c83634eb8fd271ec74f3cb54
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRN' 'sip-files00078.txt'
4c454acfef329cb140808edc3c5ed4b3
32e032adb26a02e9fdb250d77911d34f94415d12
describe
Invalid character
'10066' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRO' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
967730783695feea17bf090bc88331d9
a904f6c8a46ac6ae8167d2044c3d5e2983c7ddda
describe
'934170' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRP' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
0fcb0d38edd709ffe031bfd547cea17d
1c4c08b7598dd802763429431c8e82fa3481b69a
describe
'95911' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRQ' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
1eba5d05cab79c36f857b90be3c39b37
5f15fe0cbfd7872fcdb1bcc5e95b4724452d5b47
describe
'31534' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRR' 'sip-files00079.pro'
8a0770c3ffffe90cbcbf2d61ac03df42
738b26387f5b321f84c58d97b5d11a68cb352bb6
describe
'33607' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRS' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
1ba5d61de6b6a3aa0f1a3f752b05b054
c6d06d0ba536927065957c46624437c76c38dc8d
describe
'7478211' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRT' 'sip-files00079.tif'
0bfa44ccc087493ff62699d4b6cc777c
e29108d8ab2e867b6e33ecf10a64e09146f9453a
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRU' 'sip-files00079.txt'
14caef2d48bee707def4be320294f90a
60350213566123e9b7f64a0a43209c79494280df
describe
'9478' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRV' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
bc264c8321d77673f16c0e75392fbcc5
49f918e76c68329b085aee7d3c5823a36bfc355c
describe
'919162' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRW' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
1231ab42f981350b7472f869acf671ae
e2662ee81e7c1d006be8aeceedf13a93a2d7ea14
describe
'96664' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRX' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
93c7ffadaaa2c2efeb4574c185b0f2fa
9090717a77af133bb004ba81ec763e9c51a75f6d
describe
'29779' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRY' 'sip-files00080.pro'
7eaa38c108a0bf50962385decb2f9f87
4b2515d4d8f8b1fbb966888d1fd5e72d3291478c
describe
'35678' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKRZ' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
9182fe83d940e9246ff5a935fee9d43b
7b7b8d50aaa5f5f773e68176c6a2bce8118a7624
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSA' 'sip-files00080.tif'
a1618a3c97d4c1fa6f1e8abc66740da0
816117a59d05ba04ecf75cce73a9ce2034a1f654
'2011-10-28T02:22:18-04:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSB' 'sip-files00080.txt'
dab4447cc581cfcb2e348c7814c936c8
7dc03ed1121be5fb4de352fac08bffbe167eef2f
describe
'9598' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSC' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
b061892cf7d2498023bd74a21a1ede0a
dd2b536ce02480f9cf8b270ea61fd40667e1d5a8
'2011-10-28T02:23:54-04:00'
describe
'895306' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSD' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
e22893e8952647d3f75e024fd4b717dc
e560e007e3e0a82b79a65597c393b6459bd30b52
describe
'91051' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSE' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
9a1cfdce03c2ad9d23fc94534a1b469e
049ad115fc63aa4a94283f0bc1709f520a65e3f5
describe
'27480' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSF' 'sip-files00081.pro'
5098c57019afab7855bcbb088b4654fd
49e0f00e924d4d5c24282fda8fe4260c565868e2
describe
'32210' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSG' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
41316758d28df4c652a34b90a66d4c5c
a5012098a0cc5ac4822ae26217aacf081b183db1
describe
'7167239' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSH' 'sip-files00081.tif'
4abcfc248ad7e7e0fab5b6e2c59ef032
28aae14bf61c3104af8d9e4b5367ab281275d8db
'2011-10-28T02:23:00-04:00'
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSI' 'sip-files00081.txt'
b7ff6145679ed50559d8cb5180a8e9cb
062f147f84f671ecee2bec9348a901ab2caddfeb
describe
'9005' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSJ' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
43c146fccac266e9f2a1e13d934c907c
b708223e75bf5717e1608a08a1d0e877d4571230
describe
'872323' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSK' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
cb7de99b3c25d8f9782b64bcefec3fdb
b20a1478a010cdeb9c46b837cd2364aa9dcfe35f
describe
'99103' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSL' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
ad0b85eae367b169fd3cabb3ac2216e6
741304bc124936d3772ffb2c0b936b44af069bc5
describe
'29774' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSM' 'sip-files00082.pro'
2c427851ec1d13191722f0344d800395
a24fbada3f97a40c235e05fe6d87468402dfae6e
describe
'35702' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSN' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
39b83002b7c50841a7227dfb8cc7820a
b3d21f6ef42df8b2d646825fa4ff19f61d1e28f8
describe
'6983383' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSO' 'sip-files00082.tif'
3bad92240c9fd9917db80e29ad54d5ca
ddb7649297239c171ff69ff349e1ceb2213a504b
describe
'1127' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSP' 'sip-files00082.txt'
6c69b5c13614e7613ee861993934c72e
2b03d9e7eb6a2654aaf56afe6d4d6421f40c9306
describe
'10071' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSQ' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
2a29d15bf29409b7229375152803ac51
e43efddc3186c28faad56e1807364d959b42db2e
describe
'939869' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSR' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
bfab9e5e881cc7191aa7e52f6e07b6ce
985d0a7004ce0e6922fcefd9f0ef9bac64deabf1
'2011-10-28T02:25:25-04:00'
describe
'93931' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSS' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
4701bfc225f43ddd2602d684110dfce2
5730559682d9c5606d66b434b677ad0750812143
describe
'30895' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKST' 'sip-files00083.pro'
4633e0c6482048099de1da8986d75669
cafa9d3b868b91792dddf7e0a30a2890b4250c6c
describe
'34233' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSU' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
c0b169f3a7c197b0cd489606016ff7e8
27fc65e554e06020bf5376b75bccc1e6769cf531
describe
'7523639' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSV' 'sip-files00083.tif'
f3d310d8adc70ba88283133fae8d25fd
5bca3a0ed48bcd31aa834000950d957f43d45f8a
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSW' 'sip-files00083.txt'
534c0ceb37c85416c30559e26d326466
0dd48a49779049a9978cda31ba2d382ec7f15165
describe
Invalid character
'8890' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSX' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
4ae5f57f3fa1b1707d07a61190172872
ce130d0c76840f0ff0d545efe02571a0d0267e60
describe
'889661' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSY' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
fd0b29ac093d0901d1d30c41a825fec6
d4fd99f02db6f59e1c5c7af87164941a7a8d8d9e
describe
'92806' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKSZ' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
66f830f461b22407c1b0c839277271a8
58e5e78243a47e0409787bcaf545770d0a2cc294
describe
'28088' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTA' 'sip-files00084.pro'
d423a614bbbe322897e85e5a9d912683
aaa1f40ed97303db8aa28c31905a34b2000a7611
describe
'32706' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTB' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
194aaa2f28bec76c28936e767a827c08
6ca61d2030409e8d7fefd88946f1f2b17029e811
'2011-10-28T02:24:57-04:00'
describe
'7122079' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTC' 'sip-files00084.tif'
8cb3a18f43e8951ef915b291a9efea9c
1ca35b154da77a91c836189e10806e3fe62ef1c1
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTD' 'sip-files00084.txt'
482bfac9b605a1578b562dee8d686db1
0b7c814c83f261b52042c50b666688a75f1ff088
describe
Invalid character
'9456' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTE' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
c92a8c06d66c783aeefea1c3c43b8c76
47c7ad738474055d657da9e42ba56755c9b51605
describe
'928739' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTF' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
5c994bdb1adc118392aba65f06cb19e9
b5f7d51e72020b2954cef70d5fb14a98cfc99188
describe
'92673' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTG' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
05cf90aaf50c8d636f2c2f699624c3b2
2612497c9f42d9ac623135b61c24005327281d8e
describe
'30541' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTH' 'sip-files00085.pro'
716943434f6ba7f249c707284675f50e
0c0b88beb3f7c3125a2c315bb6acd1e0b0a82ae2
describe
'34090' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTI' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
d369fc9b8bb1535ca83d13575f5df909
2cd86d40ad34d430fcf759ee3951caf0f46fa6a1
describe
'7434751' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTJ' 'sip-files00085.tif'
fa7add5639c8da36ece32874d26ea937
0eacfaad5af9b1f75093c337aa5fab096322f967
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTK' 'sip-files00085.txt'
5536d2bfe084ac15d107e823a7bb65a3
a7c00b5609afefe541bbc8b99048fa3bdce9cf16
describe
'9141' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTL' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
b62ad733314496e41a607361a3e6e9a6
74b6e3168560cf3603da65b49724899950f95fa7
describe
'884233' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTM' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
f17494c9aaef05cd0be7e426ca0cccd3
3bbda71571c5855e2bcacde13c4f0e8db51b4b3c
describe
'97829' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTN' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
775823b413a19012773935f544493adf
2d10e2d4590b1bc0484752cb04526e6ff9edf19d
describe
'30066' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTO' 'sip-files00086.pro'
95af1ea3fba3c034da8241d31f356818
0405efee5f46dbf9dd9786230c2bb2d7911fa4f5
describe
'36087' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTP' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
9567b92253259dc7ea8a1367c2909fe8
0dd22d2da013de0b98252ef761749c54ad6f614c
describe
'7078591' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTQ' 'sip-files00086.tif'
7933c19ff82c2c7d4bf3fd2ac0805256
199b4bbf5281cff7fc9ebe293c894ec580743561
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTR' 'sip-files00086.txt'
ad6de97ace8e2dc4c19e3ddcf9e9ca0e
e137562e8e825f2851a4f6e870495ddd35b15fd8
describe
'9792' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTS' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
bc0f1436b55f72ba640d54c61f920c93
e323c6a8435e90072fa93536864fbfc9efb41290
describe
'913681' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTT' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
55ab58fc82f0bcb112374fe66d4eb43b
f5fc437892fa34c452121d82726d741b34de0af6
describe
'89905' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTU' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
a87e821301e0410a617a1eb1343b494e
eb161372a8fc6dfb22889c94bd4a83ebbfb18e21
describe
'29217' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTV' 'sip-files00087.pro'
74d8b85bd1305e5c12844e81101a642b
dc141267f514d715ed0c972294fd2de507ab1c06
describe
'32689' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTW' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
ab739c40ed114663d2f4f6e318b47911
913db8fd8e8c59d77b3eeee8fc1803f29b22b07d
describe
'7314167' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTX' 'sip-files00087.tif'
98b45e86b49df48a55cdcdd35e0591ce
619731b0f0a184861415ae21591695cb15cee1a4
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTY' 'sip-files00087.txt'
4a7f76c43bdb826ba4338213c9e5612c
111c472e33640836978fc2c67278179ff4468f31
describe
Invalid character
'9057' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKTZ' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
cf73d5c353d15da2d962bf1f90e58e45
9b1645eaf364098b950a6c9ef9edcff044d37d1a
describe
'916479' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUA' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
59de91926fd792cb1e1e48e491ae2628
f71b68fa3cdc90a665a3c0c666904e04cf974e9b
describe
'98934' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUB' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
1d1dcd8663b0e2557acf05a00f5d8627
85f7058c55db1727f5f58809a792578517540357
describe
'31235' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUC' 'sip-files00088.pro'
7d72b996ac5f88957df92d6f4ab52528
039ada733a2cffc43fbcfa4745e6c06200c9efcf
describe
'36848' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUD' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
4cfd5bb4340978f74a0e6639bd101712
28db5b126ccdfb2a58c968e6be70c5db4d804b2f
describe
'7336639' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUE' 'sip-files00088.tif'
147b3acaed7647b8b3d661442db16d68
76b9920e27528a392fda3f1e7ecb9513fd786b5e
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUF' 'sip-files00088.txt'
13c711223ed8baed6899762a0ae2b313
63cfeaaf2966a120e69962b276aaf588594ef992
describe
Invalid character
'9859' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUG' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
dbdf60f6f9d3b7400b301ee4de13fb89
d2f794f93d500c0316f6b834b0a3eac79b54a7c0
describe
'925233' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUH' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
5cef3ea436bd5f3a9e43797d0a9b918e
1c093bc7ebe639c24b613e3ca695f3fe572f81e8
describe
'91395' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUI' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
63e6709cf111125ebb85cce625bb2dcc
8e189960c2f50c979f47ea193359e306b9ebcc9d
describe
'27263' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUJ' 'sip-files00089.pro'
2057f7914bfc6619896e7fb161f177b9
e6f32ec94a995cc6a32998164bcd8dbed81eef10
describe
'33610' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUK' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
dc846bbacc3e9fa7b318b4187881f895
a1261054323afd54b15d5f1676fd8013739e4917
describe
'7406679' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUL' 'sip-files00089.tif'
820d5b79c138815099cb75e5ba8fe4c0
38ecaaae6109cdf4ea085a777c0611913d99cd77
'2011-10-28T02:23:18-04:00'
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUM' 'sip-files00089.txt'
054e4d6964528c6229245b746b13cf0f
32039004212fd723db4c04e4f00936898fed3cb4
'2011-10-28T02:25:35-04:00'
describe
'8878' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUN' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
ac68ee0f960a666bf2bd1a99bcd8968e
1bb453b91344453b2d5068bbd13927acaf439895
describe
'932111' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUO' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
d499094c99d8fd25cfc0fd8060ac86cb
f36828f9403a5d6dc9eb82c8ca99767ce415426e
describe
'99230' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUP' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
3573ad58739a9a7c114888008af4f99c
09fbad9861b430998b7c2ccea1c9de23204c6591
describe
'31500' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUQ' 'sip-files00090.pro'
b8e136970f3db8c08cac32b94c4c733c
d7a30d2cc697cf643d2b0498809ae427d29102be
describe
'33955' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUR' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
9ceb44c28f7991aa1369410cc1894d84
52dce8b69eb0e4f03002f465f2796e8836d3e366
describe
'7461675' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUS' 'sip-files00090.tif'
9a2d5e458e2e799667d43dae9865ad3f
e538410941ddb23bf99549aa6c24a5fe9700981d
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUT' 'sip-files00090.txt'
ba241c6000b1f811947ada00d9476faf
eadac818645f601cc52e88588b35d6fb41b30d0c
describe
'9813' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUU' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
166f4a9c9fbf253cee14e4f235564aa1
5ccfc3b3fb7f67671ae010988c0256d24aa45068
describe
'931921' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUV' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
f4bdf2ffc518a7c12ff60c7d945b9024
dfc08ebafbf3264e46f2c2c64a4d1e758d105eae
describe
'97362' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUW' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
e05ebcf4eb46cdbdc4fbebdcb4c2c4b3
78d8cd29b0afce9e4277f1dc066e60fd06595869
'2011-10-28T02:26:11-04:00'
describe
'31679' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUX' 'sip-files00091.pro'
c1e891345f901945fd5bad23c90e7330
922f57ffd4067b3aa50d9783e56b55a3ec8bcdac
'2011-10-28T02:22:09-04:00'
describe
'36042' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUY' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
4791748ad126e240929a1b170fb034d0
ef293ac09433a45cf23294af64e061e210a462d8
describe
'7460115' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKUZ' 'sip-files00091.tif'
9c337e1cdba13273c71f1927d733e11d
df986d7546802aff4494926ef139801d46b92b06
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVA' 'sip-files00091.txt'
c078f2b3386f07f7149b4144659d67aa
5b119a65eeeedcb47bb43fb0156ad149c7cec268
describe
'9712' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVB' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
69797b9b5c1521ecaafc615491c07be8
5f39767c438b9c25d38af5a33d381f6a8bea565b
describe
'945468' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVC' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
e267d8da94447fbb14c496f423a72924
ae6bbac08c12d4df14babdc647f4fc700bf993f6
describe
'105086' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVD' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
3d49c875a9fc86741cafa9db58fc1d1a
022e74b36a049ba52d6ef22d078fd9e984eb1f1f
describe
'34009' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVE' 'sip-files00092.pro'
42b016549b082b5327bc1ddc7fec0eba
4ecaab29bd55ee20ef7b10882853acbb7f436353
describe
'36846' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVF' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
d66aea077ef12fe16531fe6977040847
9444aca44f2fdc7bd493c1fabb26d6cd3b4a760a
describe
'7568715' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVG' 'sip-files00092.tif'
a10ba9e27ac59a973fbf70524f7138f5
4ef46ac16d4ce47ff1057e84b9ca3639c188c204
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVH' 'sip-files00092.txt'
2ec270a0a612a09915b2627369a1e560
6d27eef7576bcee09923eb723270c27ec43db213
describe
Invalid character
'9884' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVI' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
94ae58d0114a6f2849196c69bc8dc579
4f51d0ba73be34ad29c96f44e659bea0b6d3c255
describe
'929742' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVJ' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
a454416be56b4d692f5b95517e73dd5d
b8709661ddbc1f0de569ed37c027aabbb7d7d10e
describe
'91814' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVK' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
cd60a5a8c234399bef079b7c46b661be
7ed97fd594762eb5b1aabaec80059c1d175a9b48
describe
'28642' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVL' 'sip-files00093.pro'
824cda2a890a39ff704445b15c45bdd6
f22fb76fa83340a1fad62b898008ca89cf097732
describe
'32858' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVM' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
2b1afe54eff74ed169514c2e32f89bcb
2404fec85c6be2a8548941f96a80e69ac9d3bcaa
'2011-10-28T02:24:31-04:00'
describe
'7442759' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVN' 'sip-files00093.tif'
611caf4a0f7d70d14cfe2f0cc64306db
89d63d1b5151881bfdf4f00984761f5939c614cf
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVO' 'sip-files00093.txt'
89e34feb5ddc21dbc5ec35809c18e4c0
68a55a6911dfbf58be51bde34314056455733471
describe
'8982' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVP' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
3531f00ea461d7d6fb4fb0bea3b6ee2e
fe95fdae326af5f54601fd49212b9e8be092c9a2
describe
'947688' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVQ' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
44a029260ceb237b8fda4b9635197701
207785356411976052f6437421499207cb1d7e06
describe
'102483' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVR' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
2cbe52ad2e7e50dc121f6ccfff58806c
cff29f80952e783f0f51963796cb1f3a7c858f8b
describe
'33093' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVS' 'sip-files00094.pro'
e0b570f0901bb93cfae518baeb35119b
d219ee69d3c80698ef4372dde002b17022b989c1
describe
'36422' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVT' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
5b55dac031a3dd774fe9c0409ec95f67
a8d1ad623c9df4be95af33facc2fd0f37d0f2a72
describe
'7586399' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVU' 'sip-files00094.tif'
b2dc513880ebd5979af9f2c479036425
0c4c6755b542cd8d38b0f05c89e2a3f7cd3f2906
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVV' 'sip-files00094.txt'
cbb3ee77cc349179634eb89ba740e3e8
4d25bdc0efed0422c7be74d3b384859a45a3496a
describe
Invalid character
'9890' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVW' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
3650d7ece1d111a6d227cca835bb874f
daa0eadd78c8f9c14e9104966f0a42e6cd2a640e
describe
'922451' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVX' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
ed3d40a0a88c06f373dd18ceb6215223
16a795a434888afda940614ac378fc2805ad6eed
describe
'86142' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVY' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
408729d0e219c25e6622f6253b93d529
0b54534f6ef0634c5285a32f1bf44c77d4c3102c
describe
'27505' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKVZ' 'sip-files00095.pro'
33db06de1e7f3bc19bf51414d057b2e3
167470ff68614378b70f25da18cbdbec62c54618
describe
'30213' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWA' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
53cbf33acffb3b7ebd766de1b03c678b
7b59bd116b223895b4fdae5c53d81948d7006f0d
describe
'7384543' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWB' 'sip-files00095.tif'
7ad9be1c2152c5ca2d963e3b2351c917
c924b77125a90c4f0d697ba94d2185e6d94078f3
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWC' 'sip-files00095.txt'
778297c536ccc0b829f5bad6dc6faf5e
bcaeacf01bb3eec83ae6e2896593c4fe7dd2daa6
describe
'8212' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWD' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
2f46a7c74e53df608b94513a5d3fff64
1897345db74a612cf4fdf85029fc6f63cabb0c4e
describe
'948292' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWE' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
f8cda7e6bccb963586cb24d6fa23c125
f96e62e308c35b9e1aca908e5305a1f73f5fa9aa
describe
'100627' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWF' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
49107075f4cfb27a5b39e13da7872112
88a879bdf16cc5ead253323504685e5df4933866
describe
'32295' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWG' 'sip-files00096.pro'
2da30836f92844a839d855e9deffbf98
83d5b0a641ea09b79f091b8587861885fa367846
describe
'36776' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWH' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
c742aa847282b5a27334855058dadc6a
510f8809fc1afed8f055e350bc01bc1852c2d053
'2011-10-28T02:24:30-04:00'
describe
'7591163' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWI' 'sip-files00096.tif'
72be7ac5bdbd63bf304ea297acca0fa2
584b47fb6851da871c17249271193c7c4e5b9747
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWJ' 'sip-files00096.txt'
efb286b35220039258c535413c239664
80867504830a0fb0577271157516629eebc68ae4
describe
Invalid character
'10180' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWK' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
34c60d6e5efce73e7d7a78f00bfa9afd
14f9e8e6f6c00a58d220fa2e7facf366f2845f03
describe
'914888' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWL' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
e457439bbd316b4a66e7266364c14e0a
6206a4e64c37bc91447542f07c8575625e251e7d
describe
'99145' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWM' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
64b4f9db33a89a297c60f2468603b303
6193373f0b3bffaabe221756830af60021f43046
describe
'31997' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWN' 'sip-files00097.pro'
1a49c012cbb237b2a815caa639505f46
94246d5e7727e94d121f1c63d7840007e2b120cd
describe
'36853' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWO' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
e63e3288fcfe8dab8e8d989d21acf7b3
6eda67b04d9c0c17c66fd266656e942f2827fb2c
describe
'7323923' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWP' 'sip-files00097.tif'
32c07f6c9f7af586dac7676e40939e99
f0d1316750ab830fdf2095560e2d25e995be2e92
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWQ' 'sip-files00097.txt'
1ac81b575d5b44a9292238f6c01df01c
185665131b67ccd99edc15f9c308eb7969d1a7b1
describe
'10121' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWR' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
1e6f300a7487d733d5ec1d6782271435
84fd5dfa8d68ee9b874530eb31799c8963b3007d
'2011-10-28T02:25:02-04:00'
describe
'929836' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWS' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
4bdc21ff294970ba54a1fb566b930c3b
a3c60b41b188d4b731a35684fc7a946a83a2e90b
'2011-10-28T02:23:45-04:00'
describe
'97059' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWT' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
a89763955699924d19d8ade10dabd651
1d40b0394903ba30cd9058a0e0615a68fb578f48
describe
'31015' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWU' 'sip-files00098.pro'
02ed02976516736fb02dfec57aac7160
2402cc7eacf3c20d708adcba29ba310eb8de65c2
describe
'38635' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWV' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
82fafb5ed0398d10c19f186a7664994f
747bea75e4aada37b7608fe15453b4ac43825394
describe
'7443807' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWW' 'sip-files00098.tif'
e16f692d18d82892fe34762b3f497065
c74ccca4a82650ed4b3490711ead4bb563a5f2cd
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWX' 'sip-files00098.txt'
c4c10fdf26787a0bfdb7adb102cb0961
a68751065f1a72caf7ae76f9d3e47eb74685b388
describe
'9686' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWY' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
2946e767977109c4bdcf822fe55e8864
f81d2a4881c5e76bc55f89632c08b8fea5ea2f3d
'2011-10-28T02:24:45-04:00'
describe
'928545' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKWZ' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
16a35e6a869012093fa31ab1d6689d5c
fd57b17d82611871371b64781f0e5ed887257da8
describe
'101353' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXA' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
9b4e74dd0d93f6aecf378212f820dcf8
c04eda817894b0318e4e6f340030007797b9569c
describe
'33419' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXB' 'sip-files00099.pro'
5f26320ab904d330c945c9feccc26ef3
323e839ff01099a15655525a2dc2e358d232209e
describe
'36912' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXC' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
302019b08be00829e0c8e772e0cd96ec
b041f41a7193e92923da3642fbada7ada57226d5
describe
'7433739' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXD' 'sip-files00099.tif'
ffda563a8aaed938a38d6713898c54c4
9225b2e24433628eec5484eb9d42e8e38106fae8
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXE' 'sip-files00099.txt'
6474e9b7423ba42494baad49a3f3757e
e08f858f6f764262402fec5d82cd7e5b8bdb76ae
'2011-10-28T02:21:56-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXF' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
4688ab01af29667d22ca91b79c6d160f
6ee8b1570eb5b9fd406607bd9893312d49b0ecb4
describe
'971297' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXG' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
b801a33764767aa823b314bdf6644042
6fcf0f081181192a129f89fa24ef42d6b8f61b2e
describe
'88636' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXH' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
29fcf70d79c493dc5ea7366a542cd28a
7690725442b3c22ba8adc765862ddb95c2912252
describe
'27592' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXI' 'sip-files00100.pro'
40dd62cac3cb074203f8b53e59e46c1f
911db4828b4c162dcc5dc0350daf977b00bc48cb
describe
'31712' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXJ' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
9b94132b8e3c8404c0aadf7bb1e17133
50005fe321ff4466e638907c6a443e31f7ffdabf
describe
'7779005' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXK' 'sip-files00100.tif'
c240d12aae01dffb9a51a84998c63765
46893c12a0d92c1d77bdffb7b4112e3788e91c97
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXL' 'sip-files00100.txt'
205ab3957b3dc8aa803ad2181910db81
23a89caf9ba3d6af798c246f6a18d286d06aa876
describe
'8777' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXM' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
d99129aa5a04c82733e57be6b2654b04
6368c33082ad4a7588fa72114bfb9f27859713a0
describe
'921918' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXN' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
c7c205804e1f9925bfafd5713bba5c96
cc179c414052bbc61f4fd00bf756562b2ef1b282
describe
'95926' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXO' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
08fbcdd8af9224828d83db2d12005b51
3104c3941163997f904083425bdc6730dd77edd3
'2011-10-28T02:24:50-04:00'
describe
'31968' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXP' 'sip-files00101.pro'
38049623f8b86904927e30e16662b678
cb38bef5b9375b39476c22bc0ae02caff4dba465
describe
'35438' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXQ' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
8b0113c97c5543a3a5c8692f58b1ac43
32c2b6ea6ee4f2ba3626e6b284250b66198b41b5
describe
'7380399' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXR' 'sip-files00101.tif'
f574f8edbdbb60c542ea016608ca88df
ab2828a102ebfe664b60be890300b0a531b80308
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXS' 'sip-files00101.txt'
2e91f3b98f24bfd050af675947b98516
1a862a30465c83ba9d67d7cd080d9c94655478a8
describe
Invalid character
'9471' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXT' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
c5c7cbd4b405a1479000ef6c9ee64655
6bc638c003f2b3531ec6019b9f94be6e7fbb26c7
describe
'971321' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXU' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
5c9ce96c2a333bcf9e6784343f816833
20708e9b481105da810de1bcb8871894be4ed422
describe
'93651' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXV' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
72d1bc53b2ff069174f8a05729176902
e912f01e21a392c46b79f8e990303c548a3bfe17
'2011-10-28T02:23:08-04:00'
describe
'30350' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXW' 'sip-files00102.pro'
2a829b7df412e6b10fc28c2ec549203c
3f6071f539ba5e0ba35b3cf1c35985393d5e4e41
describe
'33382' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXX' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
21aa277e8519b46c2d9c2a2ed7bc109e
bf277a94832f2bec91547c44baf83ce5bda72722
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXY' 'sip-files00102.tif'
24ecf95d4ca29f3ba893a95de18e27cd
a24b4b44573c46516ef907c36aa7eae4f571bdcc
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKXZ' 'sip-files00102.txt'
3e86071f2c559b6face0096a5ad198b1
c567cb00069617a198bf9fbdd3281cc773d503d9
describe
'9011' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYA' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
fd213af5b0cd69117f774ebd9804acf4
2d01338433b0085aa63d8d1b437ba147b8ad9ea9
describe
'922032' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYB' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
5bf4c51daab8f8dbda91b539a5dc0e7f
76cb75f91b540f5beedc129791db0af3a630c9ba
'2011-10-28T02:23:30-04:00'
describe
'93905' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYC' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
757d1a8e69a2e7daf1a066d03b34fa89
81f10066f82c43aade454b5f39f20e37440a77e8
describe
'29916' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYD' 'sip-files00103.pro'
ffe20734762e4a5561a13e34fdd12af0
3b247f8cc97b4954c8774b3d4d5fef30594c8006
describe
'34411' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYE' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
77ff35aab6f13a23979114fbac46dd3d
a4a955f4a5aafb54509218cfd1a0f7580e31ce60
describe
'7380987' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYF' 'sip-files00103.tif'
33ebcb93446fa3bff987b3db8f532118
da319ddb75da05d4b7e11dbc2651735e3165c863
'2011-10-28T02:23:40-04:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYG' 'sip-files00103.txt'
5262a0dbb38e97ff3d11d6826cca90a5
f48ae3f762853c01f9585921e8c946ffa027ace8
describe
Invalid character
'9519' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYH' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
d656e34db8f70f58ef22492605e694ff
889455b3b284e00ca4fe6f05c944b032f662e56b
describe
'971274' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYI' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
d78e4be73685413ee2bed36299b59a82
f188f91233808aeb22399b78b824200c8e91ff2e
describe
'97175' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYJ' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
74bccb1468c30f516b9544f343f1fd77
a0ffe8264ff161b6622d87a2e767bccd70f6a9e1
describe
'32157' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYK' 'sip-files00104.pro'
836cec7b3e225a71aeabd22f4ac15286
43f05fbc66c86b5db2fe67ba5e0228bfc0975d61
describe
'35215' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYL' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
dd10591a3e6ef81301ef3b8d0d43771f
31b30dc452b72b3441c90f1d8afe07c12db4f4b8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYM' 'sip-files00104.tif'
89ffe8c774c0203e7667a8ed08ca4b64
d0031550a03b293613d4e9c1e5b847602c9e78a2
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYN' 'sip-files00104.txt'
bb98c39b0e22bb93a9909ad00171f0e2
4d097d3616df7172b636b3abeaed5be8d044c97d
describe
'9406' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYO' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
9567f51d8b0c20cb1a7c210e66f3976f
e31c82c8a6de74851204a6dcf915784893e406cd
describe
'933039' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYP' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
e84536269db46e8262f3401e95b3647d
c502a9987995e2631e05c60b0d57ebef49cd375d
describe
'85896' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYQ' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
b2262219260a96281d3ce1eadac6f5cb
77eb5eb4e4869935cbbd8f6c5e6dd4322eadc8aa
describe
'25884' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYR' 'sip-files00105.pro'
d6bf5b54d288d82d5bb67c951d5e8f0a
69c2456e27d089eb74ff83df5ae567ce811ff0a9
describe
'30369' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYS' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
3486c67abe3671358fd7595eba978fc6
6984b00db5ac516038ed3f95455a39d7b8520a93
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYT' 'sip-files00105.tif'
5ea0c3d2dc27b9f2933e7e1ac8e30b2a
cb2bd4b0ddeed92256c2743dcdd6ae337a62b2e8
'2011-10-28T02:24:02-04:00'
describe
'984' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYU' 'sip-files00105.txt'
e05f2c79b134aa8129f613fcd6a079ee
076eadff9f813382766ab20f5434acd7e7c33fe8
describe
Invalid character
'8484' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYV' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
6e50e0be81d4160fc74fd11454313874
b95398bd51e9b5000c829f6a05697467333575f0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYW' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
a12d494ccb32f2da51bf740ecf286a23
a795da1cfd11230743b87512a6553a06d83c9329
describe
'91611' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYX' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
4d7180b742cda96930d0bd3686858eda
dad9ca55cbf725d7efe9741d54051be9751b1d36
describe
'29739' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYY' 'sip-files00106.pro'
6aed6f31548d063d5849ff7a019e5e90
83970118fcd945328873ed0c1385f69feb941111
describe
'31847' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKYZ' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
d4319fce89546d66c9eb222382932d9d
2a54e8bdd73bd3c8b5c762e04a90779919f7ce28
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZA' 'sip-files00106.tif'
8848a3e7bb1b741bbcc4198d017ee866
c3d8dfb366103f8416d8f6c2b71ae33788a526fb
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZB' 'sip-files00106.txt'
c7454a754ce149f318c7eab3a1f87d0e
13652d7e829cb56d8c38bf1e495ecac772d67878
describe
Invalid character
'8927' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZC' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
b330ed183392fe28f84b3fcf1df55eb4
5e11315d66610199bf10aa2a01baee3f8d2c61db
'2011-10-28T02:25:21-04:00'
describe
'919777' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZD' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
237bdb99ee91ee8e5eb765eb06d6b01b
66e4b4b49a049191bfbf7d58fe9286de3a4f1be8
describe
'100373' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZE' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
3fc086dc2162ead3d5514138507e3365
0d48737562fd100dfea1c6379a28b51b49875d1a
describe
'31509' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZF' 'sip-files00107.pro'
c1c52bfa5bdffaeeeffe3e4fd636530b
11056242d6a7fe5c4a24449d2e8331db42ad0d3d
describe
'36651' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZG' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
86603b9ab109bc3ecca60924fd27222c
f91a48047c50091128a3a16032d50665b43d9c10
describe
'7363075' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZH' 'sip-files00107.tif'
4a0e055c58e76e2444209c72ac579943
c90f2f32b7bed0ecc16623b7b6d3af72c7043331
'2011-10-28T02:25:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZI' 'sip-files00107.txt'
a8c7c7101f77a3408dc370e1aca6e974
fbffeef0be37defeb1fc040a544dd141d674e90b
describe
Invalid character
'9946' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZJ' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
7c9e8506e5f0a6e0d9f3768dbf4ed448
b2dccfc5696acf92016336ca7c7a086ae5dc25ee
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZK' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
c842612ede3e759dee1b5498a600b631
a0197ad66186ecf473dea41abb54e8e902a514e5
describe
'98945' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZL' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
d384685eadad5aef732291bceccb2ca8
1852c86eb797e9b07e3e860d8eb2a3d3a197b6c4
describe
'31913' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZM' 'sip-files00108.pro'
b7b69a78a6b02ad4466c9f8564b76765
c73cc28116737d71325d53955a502d3163e889f2
describe
'35434' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZN' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
a716374177ae141602906f19a00def12
abe99821ff29428daf83a1e996350d91d460719b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZO' 'sip-files00108.tif'
9bfdd555d57316000301b9fd5b47f8c9
d3cc5a0c34be45358cffd8497b4a71ba263d8552
'2011-10-28T02:23:21-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZP' 'sip-files00108.txt'
9c0944381392373e2ecfa4292d5bc70d
ed4e973fa8678c8e056f6d2ddd97583f84e8eaa7
describe
Invalid character
'9515' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZQ' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
ef02846c0ffff99a10d9e770c2454d03
bc08da6699b1cb53f253633d0a946a66609182f2
describe
'920905' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZR' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
4a410423c4dffe5dfbf9462441d0525d
4ede9200e8030b25c9791140493fb55ea01aca9e
describe
'99860' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZS' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
54499f0fcc61ea764ea244cd8a9b455c
92b4fc6e0fbc9daf2e4144ba0b6c640dd49bc89b
describe
'32261' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZT' 'sip-files00109.pro'
c48df67f5c91f28a1b2ba88db3d8adc9
f9121103a9fc9a1ae37c97a21b6b27183f0d8255
describe
'35861' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZU' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
74b1addba8418ff3770baf459d3f7e13
0ad16ca0a38b9d539391a9bcabc536ad2ba97c65
describe
'7372031' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZV' 'sip-files00109.tif'
97928aa5f489b922ba749c20389b16ba
0322c4695e62f377956bbcfca32d5f6de2473304
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZW' 'sip-files00109.txt'
6e0710be4c6be015c0612afd9a3d0747
a80ec0bae114bbd1c013ebcb871b64c82122a134
describe
Invalid character
'9865' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZX' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
f875fa310beb5b6f024e380f56d89028
250735a8d2a91844d8f01ec2b4cc927deba6fcc3
describe
'971308' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZY' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
30c3347367316eef070af40d7150ba84
7391892c6584af98cc79186d9cb21ed918037a87
describe
'92424' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAAKZZ' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
463d274df3b243e8b8334c1778c6dadb
376ee1c104aac21c65550439d89503e83e31e8fc
describe
'28751' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAA' 'sip-files00110.pro'
c2dddf898ff54ea6ae59bc9d5a6d72fe
4611ecc071ca72066cfcf0ea9c29cc37b9c539e4
'2011-10-28T02:22:34-04:00'
describe
'32289' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAB' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
0dfaaa466820bf4bb250df7acf0950fa
c3d1150551c64ed1c1c66f6024397d3b52db28c1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAC' 'sip-files00110.tif'
c5b712b292103d2b7ab97650ea9601c9
8b0c9fd06ed3a89c6c089df577d02d70100c1d88
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAD' 'sip-files00110.txt'
848b22d2117e5a6767ab9ef8a35b18f9
422c38ec85ae4afee1d109ad61223bdfa88c472c
describe
Invalid character
'8855' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAE' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
246c3c3f70d9ae8c95d9be5df4ded59b
3de5b5c46dbd57708931d1ef1a6ed950c9a1527f
describe
'920965' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAF' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
e144c209186d55eee356634f4782e99e
6854caad7c3c06744cc8a7c54157a173c9e4091c
describe
'102939' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAG' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
52309d6dd4f8abde97e501a6f9765bbf
c251d2919433b18f24b170541fe0d71c3e5f569f
describe
'33313' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAH' 'sip-files00111.pro'
cd56922e89d0096f7d9a0b3d54e20cb3
b4dcf01aa40504b29606f37753eb6d4d3d4e3f5a
describe
'37414' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAI' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
94330e337f7eea8c2a9893027642d1ce
b38f1996745d43621fa726715386a283a27971a5
describe
'7372451' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAJ' 'sip-files00111.tif'
3961ebc3af26680f679c179929165c25
fe9161c7f90d21ee5a8bc5c18e9d7972ddb4dc71
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAK' 'sip-files00111.txt'
70de37cdccf819c05a32cc91449433aa
f0be2c1f53132b04a420fadf7cc1a15a88df5da8
describe
Invalid character
'9898' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAL' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
53cd410e33cfb4cb0b867c2b5ba0a05c
fe7e3a67db0c26436ed3fa74670c0707e91a7b4f
describe
'971317' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAM' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
7a891f4ad10eef49a12fe4a8d87970e6
4e40b3d057b703b90e0e41e8fac12f2284e07891
describe
'96572' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAN' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
3d40098c86abd5937f7fc4b53ae1802e
0551e0db859282a79929b0b90acd262e421cca35
'2011-10-28T02:26:08-04:00'
describe
'32228' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAO' 'sip-files00112.pro'
0749992f61bb79fbaef598e9d74bf011
c006dd5f5b453beac424f722f9e8e3cb7eb503e0
describe
'34234' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAP' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
f67cd09d1d177e15f8475181bbfc9017
8da9cfa893d142623a5bd6faea7c6b9a243e5dc7
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAQ' 'sip-files00112.tif'
7c2a186b34b6f9d205d7c7bba39614b5
5e839927a8150c73587baed1990ca72ee44a9c61
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAR' 'sip-files00112.txt'
16286ac469d769300bcc1d244f78935f
59f0ff076aae81ff2d82f584ac0e2edea2b3055d
describe
Invalid character
'9273' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAS' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
eda0d396e25da165e7cf72320466ffa9
b637309e3138de186d29f300957930f4b9675e3d
describe
'933056' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAT' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
fc4fe1ae52b0de05b7ac9f5d5aa08d19
bfe791fc84c0bbb995ca40e3bc8afc89aca96cd1
describe
'96224' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAU' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
220c818cc227008e4054d43aee2569d1
7e12ad831dcaa2c5a57d39703ac6c643072dfd62
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAV' 'sip-files00113.pro'
e0de3a53e0fa7089b4ad3dacdcb93be5
ac7247486cd475c7c7cae5c9bf416061fd8e2e81
describe
'34758' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAW' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
44dbbad82a785b26ba5793fcce218103
2c6d3329497ddacf15a064cf961601a042984cd2
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAX' 'sip-files00113.tif'
d5fcab8461e95112878e0fb123c8ded5
99990682b2aa39bd73fde96ede8b3d0c4003f8ec
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAY' 'sip-files00113.txt'
f93cb229bf62f6407a45a29c75837a31
71a869cd301f12de574368da207d81214151eefc
describe
'9650' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALAZ' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
cb1ff9c36b0afb6e5d6a23c21569e917
9f23f77e08b7a0911d32760ab5235f81f508ae4b
describe
'971301' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBA' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
0333bb70ec29e09c37c3c60681a349f5
f2367ee1143ebe65d22874b055e2ea86bca766b4
describe
'87580' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBB' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
15fdc7055c9cdb48cd373381975c7fcc
66551d78bc718f82a120d745a6ef2bb758355cb1
'2011-10-28T02:23:49-04:00'
describe
'28049' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBC' 'sip-files00114.pro'
0e3ba4245a241cfee367bc1cee91861b
862905436c6580a2adf3f5b639f808acd2836f99
describe
'31539' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBD' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
c13c3e9fdfedb163026b36f18910d5de
78a74f1641761bbe59c09bd7d362fed6cbe610ca
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBE' 'sip-files00114.tif'
e4689357617687c161b94e616757d444
f312b859aff95068acc8ffecb190f5956fbb02d1
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBF' 'sip-files00114.txt'
7237cb054e55b0187404febeec94d5e0
fa4e4fc057735084917a4a82d45a5f85bac0ff91
describe
Invalid character
'8781' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBG' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
17e0d9a512558321d6bd85022d3ba3f4
865e6c8c0708c5ffb51889727c1b54ca52239afa
describe
'937482' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBH' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
c7496e8d63c8ab8cad9f5f76145069ab
a634ecf8a7b223a2d27552f243669c5bd104df97
describe
'97335' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBI' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
b08885bcfe54e022b766d5417bd27672
3fb84b69a6932ee704dacf7bdebeb4e9962a18f9
describe
'33454' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBJ' 'sip-files00115.pro'
eb768dc88555573ee294d2e1319ae444
2a914edaf4b76b0f80f474f23d1324cd9c2c33dd
describe
'35484' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBK' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
8fc7ff95bb6cbe7cdcd32fecb97f497f
8168a45a70b59c9319d1eb531f09f420e35441ad
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBL' 'sip-files00115.tif'
536e9b07b18e8ff77e9f2156f81a0e66
f60fea120730de6b6b523db7e0bce353226485a9
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBM' 'sip-files00115.txt'
4297fdb05a1209aad9d9a5ac026e35e4
fd0063605b83fd75fbd038223b098db013fefbc7
describe
Invalid character
'9564' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBN' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
a847e77fb00a4d7c63bbbd0972975f74
071273afaeca11140bd3251f833921fa9bdf3dfa
describe
'971304' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBO' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
694869a54f177b4ef740c054192a0dfe
e2ce976986246cfe88f2363a78a9409fb808fde5
describe
'94180' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBP' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
bcccb65e338531f1fd2fe4fb60d5b69a
466f11816d6960c6d329f4b68f4dfaa8bcfc5f3e
describe
'31523' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBQ' 'sip-files00116.pro'
06f4abddfa25422d5f5d735022dd4436
6df97dccfa89e3012edb5c9cda3db45032965be4
'2011-10-28T02:25:58-04:00'
describe
'34728' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBR' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
403e2466dfdeaf3da8bbe247600a8aca
f8c6fd86724cbd62c81da6da42db200d785f4abd
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBS' 'sip-files00116.tif'
44d73ff822be707a31a872951396f72e
187488fc5549373fe27aebde7a85c9899ef2f511
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBT' 'sip-files00116.txt'
6a660b978135705f408d5c1b9a398480
d1b9b228d64f7c7c62705f8a551d1acabfda1cf0
describe
Invalid character
'9408' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBU' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
ed01fb37c6a7333436805feecc145a53
f3fbed54bddf8acf60ebeb88d0888351ddf3ba3d
describe
'940750' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBV' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
a54ad0741c6273328d58ef51d8d2a3a2
50b37eef773dd3e2082de7c1ba6c7b0fc11b28ba
describe
'98838' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBW' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
d7d0d369a36b37506762fce55dfa186c
ffebf79f2550a35104ace39d9af4b9ec21aa5460
describe
'33528' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBX' 'sip-files00117.pro'
5e4ad76657dd9b9ef224dcb10a1fee94
f815cb6949e857d2d6bff57978183a36a196be42
describe
'35644' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBY' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
2899528a0e0fa71a390aa597cddc1393
11adfc53af3ca04a7654141bb15cf90da8bac2a0
describe
'7531091' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALBZ' 'sip-files00117.tif'
1e2224f3e2d342d49024927d4657fede
c66ab0ec8942ba9bd501e24cb1d85a45a8dfbe30
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCA' 'sip-files00117.txt'
818144f6ec46966e9717c27c39601e5f
f59add3be3a68584385545ba85fb2d3b535a8c5a
describe
Invalid character
'9589' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCB' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
061402a5e333b071fef5e7b4e94419b1
443dec19f4014e1d7879b00dcc9b304b014dd0a9
describe
'971291' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCC' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
fb91983c1fde2507613e6703d96ff294
185c36279b1683ae628fa9e9ecd13e3de8e8fdb4
describe
'95567' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCD' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
5572d2772042e84c2dd156f36440fc44
ee3c9f1179798a7b0fd85ecdac6081f16a27c02c
describe
'32127' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCE' 'sip-files00118.pro'
dee710cc189fcd3342b898fc3707f002
c15ed5747e845e1867a9b2bfbe375ca865c11c6c
describe
'34880' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCF' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
386ae184a2deb8d9d77dc613705bea48
71044254adb2fccfb1028dfb6239543615480bdf
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCG' 'sip-files00118.tif'
4e0677623a68d5921caab6c77e4bffcb
e8e3315912baf290b0166dd9b1deef6f003b99c7
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCH' 'sip-files00118.txt'
2ee3a1e651fb1160140ef02017fa40a7
047c51545c081deb60bb25d03efb21ae86e09d8a
describe
'9397' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCI' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
85df245005f8be99166fb8a823723c47
0283a381bc6eae3526841734b705871920dc18a7
describe
'937734' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCJ' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
aa7e060d8f39c3053fa59d00d6673618
7fe1e26915109a847b2711c86f7817f1dfe3b98d
describe
'95711' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCK' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
48b7f69e178002122422c7015b6cf8b9
d5f523b45784c7785906befc39d75e32aebbc239
describe
'33373' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCL' 'sip-files00119.pro'
fe521aedc445679d7cb592c26ebc4d6c
7f03aab8f738912bb890d4eebd1277fecbab5ed0
describe
'35429' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCM' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
84af621fc0b375526847036d00c816fd
814156db1a87c261665ac66e65f5d7f194a3e554
'2011-10-28T02:23:29-04:00'
describe
'7506619' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCN' 'sip-files00119.tif'
b0cd27364cae6355f7179613cde26cc7
f7cdc4e0d18b96c18b1a0799c69e9e2da6d7abfc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCO' 'sip-files00119.txt'
b53e30090ba0d051274cab5bc4c4aa84
312e7a5a7d5af21fe7c44a74b2ca57b2ae9c4dbb
describe
Invalid character
'9644' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCP' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
3c757075e78ce64aca7261760984700d
1f733e17388d193da8caddb9c664bc13ad371c24
describe
'971282' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCQ' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
4e086a97e507c2c2e9703b2f4c5d7402
3cd49beeaaa9bcc66aae352b2d69fa0889d4b0ca
describe
'92116' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCR' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
388fe08864bb3e7e0b00da0cc948ba05
1e20942cd489538d5aa3fd7b8931817211c403bb
describe
'31030' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCS' 'sip-files00120.pro'
25966c03ad7181bc3c3660c1377a4620
99274dbd4c00c6a775c8076963dfdb7e3340e236
describe
'34737' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCT' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
08f7967a05766b9d2de663b6e859fea6
cc2b33ddb377b25f369af83982c73a307a64b753
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCU' 'sip-files00120.tif'
da4919ec09566cf9bde51532553c2b70
d5efa144296606cc23e2cdbf94d586ab4f6c9496
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCV' 'sip-files00120.txt'
28222e018e3d14d6c201ac7312d72d91
90dc4743143a7ac2edccf085561677134fa6e4b6
describe
Invalid character
'9539' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCW' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
6e3e7518087f58fe7ef351091870bc5c
c02e93cd91e816df76fa7814108e31950f211c26
describe
'916346' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCX' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
9141460996bd71fa4aba9133143ae6d1
141a041da85b4e77b87ecdc74df4b0b19ab3ac6f
describe
'91057' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCY' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
383d206b11706c85141cf403c1739204
901e2a03d4c7c5225d820eedcd9f385ba3296be3
describe
'28859' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALCZ' 'sip-files00121.pro'
199049c53d1d1c6352df343703c1378b
374b0d00342d7073b041a0618d396be5ff6a6b07
describe
'34460' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDA' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
83f0acb2c00994a8452913863cee2a85
26b6ecb0ee08e3d60def334d84303e5f9a4c1580
describe
'7335467' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDB' 'sip-files00121.tif'
3760485175eaba6a67984c5d678ddc4e
b059b222ec4de2116ab5d29fe3f80f6aeeb8f6ea
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDC' 'sip-files00121.txt'
ff4f05d89a3849a26f1d913842d07b53
da477fe75f1e31dc795bc0c6d779544d0425337c
describe
Invalid character
'9321' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDD' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
811d532c0cf8f52c94d6b1a9c598c089
69072b28fde9a2868136741f67f3d5b989f5cdac
describe
'971320' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDE' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
c2b280cb861b29d645b4969033632f8a
192ae385b0b6110e8e4cb9b674c1b00291dd870c
describe
'91631' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDF' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
d0dc8f6e913f06078fe6607121af9c10
221869466463f5b6f49915baa06717793a41455c
describe
'28888' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDG' 'sip-files00122.pro'
bc692e7e2e3fedf9258d18ef018c387f
aaa80d9e1599c28389a60130f5284220b56d2432
describe
'33081' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDH' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
ca9740a1c39d13a1c7098d03b08d6f03
617b6c6b1f3892bfd1f99f2d69f2d4fffe57e271
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDI' 'sip-files00122.tif'
e9a23732f3209548c27d899b707b871d
cabd9b300330589aafe0abd0bfc58c60942d4be4
describe
'1092' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDJ' 'sip-files00122.txt'
c9d38634a9cf5f3d44d892bc3748b315
b7a749e5f7e3f11e3448af02df9e7951b129ccb5
describe
'9070' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDK' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
37ab3787bb2d07405ba1b236a7cd8fe2
d06efcb8a27dea4f46d9fc0e81e71aa3d14000ef
describe
'914060' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDL' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
2ff06ba545ea9fe5d7f50fbc40057e36
56ef8535718d23751e46b5aa3fcd815146972e4c
describe
'92634' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDM' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
91aef43a25bfc2b594e885a7962afa2d
c669bc6c65e8e9bc4ff5402fae7022530e6503cd
describe
'30971' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDN' 'sip-files00123.pro'
934aca043bc41ed293a550ed9bc96a82
3320145a71c47e061ef821e75ff3f4be64e4c904
describe
'34027' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDO' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
40a63cf8499647c98e96a55f396b2ba0
eba16a90b960cb1e00e398e76e146382caed9fbd
describe
'7317499' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDP' 'sip-files00123.tif'
98f80a0ef72b5afc15adda2f3ccc27fb
1cc1bd9d2d54e01bd1e6b2a0c084379c8c6ecc7c
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDQ' 'sip-files00123.txt'
5c1fcf6eda8e39d5520e7e937c7779d4
5adcaafb9b36129a34d7189d972d8deb5652266d
describe
'9609' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDR' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
eb42c1d81f385506c1426d7de60d410e
98630e8a2cac8ce548d74e32aed40a6cb3d209ab
describe
'949466' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDS' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
e0567d1ae32f2b5b4811a71c4f4a801e
713712ee7a7e5f6caeddec3b5f53b0f2e981d272
describe
'88491' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDT' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
0c69b3297dd0764be762994fd0cf151f
f97a3c022356a937d2394e572840053bedf6eefb
describe
'28398' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDU' 'sip-files00124.pro'
f6c41cf7e0da2369753c4dfad549e954
946b6c4c29fad74d5ae4a9d03e69ebc6388bc5b5
describe
'32434' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDV' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
1f005095cfa51487ab37862d9850b957
0747467ac22fc077fb24b613991541aa4561f501
describe
'7604095' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDW' 'sip-files00124.tif'
22031557bcefecde7064f5ea9aae93f9
70303d5d79fd722b9065d5f57c833cbb87efb4cf
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDX' 'sip-files00124.txt'
3b08cd279af093895341fad14baffce2
47789b9335e4d11f68a85017dd8955fecbf05df0
describe
'9075' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDY' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
6e50bc74572e5a7fdbc724cd82f599ec
58d6d1b0488e98b0e9574a7f17850bfd1d7cd59d
describe
'915702' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALDZ' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
b017b6ca4e05a947ec48c69ad72f5ef5
9e5acddb5595f4799ab4e33d0b66661ebacab141
describe
'92088' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEA' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
7a3be3d451004427891cd5acf3d3b8bd
6207c47fe06cf945acd2c6e9cfc0762229856698
describe
'30044' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEB' 'sip-files00125.pro'
703a9c10c8409bd0de49db935e15bc0a
aa8a5570fdd4664cfa3cad7d5838ee15a7afb3e4
describe
'34279' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEC' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
1dacab57416fbc44470998c68359f821
7557127cc138caf8936c4e863a01d0b2fc367c13
describe
'7330527' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALED' 'sip-files00125.tif'
c0c476495226f4b1ec8bb9fa60daa197
c07491d291678579a039af10f48f460cb1c5fd66
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEE' 'sip-files00125.txt'
b4845244a659fc4bc534a92f918f68b0
4a4fdd885f42f9d12857a9cbdd8a3bab26a2d6fe
describe
Invalid character
'9292' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEF' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
d7e948425798e9cbe060790bf7a6965a
f743e9bae99e6e11251ad71c21db0248e213a764
describe
'949447' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEG' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
12e17f293d505bcd10dc6be788a09011
eeb5bbca2940d6aafca4807090928e5bfd9bfe52
describe
'97095' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEH' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
b44cd9df94c580a144117e05b24fcf34
42183348b10cf73e54de1d34a2f3b5302bdd5b7b
describe
'32291' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEI' 'sip-files00126.pro'
6094b81124776d3990e721bf3ed36aeb
2dd60118059404f10b045893e4eb908352b0c98a
describe
'35185' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEJ' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
7af7cef622655ee6ac2491cac0f1af3d
178cf2d2603eed99ec98a4d187f4134fc0ecc95d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEK' 'sip-files00126.tif'
71f04663a4a6f8926de5c80b2f3cc2fc
6770f3019cb9e5adec46c831ae51f609042b56fc
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEL' 'sip-files00126.txt'
bcff54066811dc58547c2aaaabcfee2f
63d8ef3de514d77875e91ba467f4f9719f81c244
describe
'9656' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEM' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
32abbdcd6a5e882036f2238bf97b3e57
d5a24b58771270952b1976a93d518f979d16a87e
describe
'914084' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEN' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
685af635d1c207da4318b0ffb7a1c582
0bf55af20a4b10b4cddedc6c4c6a35aa3edc8271
describe
'101525' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEO' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
5c55b4403578aca908856880969d32e3
27db3655ff320eab05613d4bd5caf40dad17a409
describe
'34581' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEP' 'sip-files00127.pro'
097b6a7b4a6eef61eff264c144031a2f
084aa7917a97a7acc7b6efba62ddf6223815ff3a
describe
'38852' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEQ' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
00bb4624c4bb02d6c49886539a49c6b0
6ea5b8c96bcd5b34a6b2f9e2914f38be32c840d3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALER' 'sip-files00127.tif'
422e456cabe5cb24048103036de90474
6497f5c159d09fc04954d76a76c0d610e05d2d8a
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALES' 'sip-files00127.txt'
f406fabf07830564164129f4433c7ddb
19f9aa3045f2743fa5e025e19e0a6d0e5077db16
describe
Invalid character
'10427' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALET' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
1186665b42730028962dcf9bf3e41ce4
a6a9a91febf068e0fe17dcfb1e573164dc6840d3
describe
'920194' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEU' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
1f2688afdf937b269345275701576041
f301e3fc1b46e754b3bdcd8c718aea785eadc6cc
describe
'95179' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEV' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
b44bf8d8259f6e645a9c8cc93fc7f9eb
8102d3618bee4a1dd97f71dafa23f48313eef824
describe
'31610' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEW' 'sip-files00128.pro'
0572e4003afe7d1f5416d8f61628f1a6
06812e729c4f1f7b7ed1b1fbc2121e440d7a93f8
describe
'33803' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEX' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
f480481083fa0778d4598bbe914a438d
0d8d0696d062e7ae8181c7c363ed1911357386ca
describe
'7366535' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEY' 'sip-files00128.tif'
f432633154ccbef69b4f33007464b5e7
0a5991d195019e74a948750f0bac764b3d5870be
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALEZ' 'sip-files00128.txt'
2db4a48f8aa9d615e654c64b3818a814
69228b90f8f8dc5ee18c11c1c3e251eb3f3d792e
describe
'9984' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFA' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
8fb476edfc4a60751fe04e1a458db560
6d707dc3a31f0f9cdbdc6e9ac4d570bb82645555
describe
'915707' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFB' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
c7f1e5d0c4ad7261d78b26d470310574
99efd86398101a663325ee08943bc56d2c9ff5d4
describe
'83001' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFC' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
310381d0a2636822e0005a0535cc18ea
61b26f849c9f70496e92bbbc9a72b30962de948d
describe
'25922' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFD' 'sip-files00129.pro'
328ee1e913c2d87528f75d9e9f762d12
f4445bea45cb19024761a943e556e2349fa8b9a7
describe
'29736' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFE' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
79e2323fde67b2b797190f5e63bd0d79
f3271f63ae57ffc827ae001929d9ded0f064e5dd
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFF' 'sip-files00129.tif'
10ec580c3d58578f066218b410baa626
f4be67f1cf1afec1fa011d76a5032f3b75419eb7
describe
'974' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFG' 'sip-files00129.txt'
d0eca7e6e755cbda8dbc4b8f9a0954e6
e36d03b812805193c684fcaa0cfa224a0097b63b
describe
'8690' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFH' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
a54b8c29816d7768723a730bf77fe91c
4d041e4f54f9690b5db368e46147d4e9cd9e2c20
describe
'921207' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFI' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
dcd7d0fb920efe818650dd4477ea6d7b
db9f92cd0d7e4ee5421ff16066e9e0f84bd9485e
describe
'110602' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFJ' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
20670c2b7ca37faa78a362f15fc6e610
a54800fac4e88eded606e0460c329213fed6be63
describe
'32621' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFK' 'sip-files00130.pro'
ac4b057679fe27767fe400b205f89315
9f3e49cea407dcf5fb2d43bfcbaebe4472d4a79b
describe
'38207' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFL' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
a429282dadc5f1b92ee80ad399c33440
92da5231ffec64e32665b88db867e3b3f625ae3f
describe
'7375539' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFM' 'sip-files00130.tif'
e19cbb58cdf7b82c2f92619acc6c647c
4b6d4ca7ba68c2faa828c0dad12e6add4108b8d3
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFN' 'sip-files00130.txt'
7537bfb2766cdeffd369d0b381e1e343
66e16580b62d29ca6abc2283f95c2594a9c44838
describe
Invalid character
'9878' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFO' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
6192b0b3261b00df55fe46ce0be0ea5e
3a47fbc6ed0a65acaa68295fd5adf83f0c17430a
describe
'924915' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFP' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
04475489fa473f5ad619640e3c48d3d3
a8cb73c5476f5a6a59e52a77d230fd1449626a51
describe
'102541' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFQ' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
b49d51d89790fc76e85bac81a089c4c2
2aa5f0000669bebf7c705b4119b98f575de2e2f3
describe
'31498' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFR' 'sip-files00131.pro'
7795a8a14cb83a810f410e06c3101907
02a054b6e0e400b75cc1e2ad3e85c1e76ba15c54
describe
'35556' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFS' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
2ef9a2c7921e5f64d9983d86cb5b74c3
217bd93afe6625b225e14fa3339429d56bfeed84
describe
'7404751' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFT' 'sip-files00131.tif'
a2e85429ef4d840efc7fcb3821bcd4c1
2bfbeabaf58e242cf75b685556cd31dace953f33
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFU' 'sip-files00131.txt'
b82d9db37c2720dba9277606d202b6ff
b4de3bc94e725566090643f75ca2d78f6d3f1168
describe
Invalid character
'9469' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFV' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
5e53e5bcf8bf3cbb723198aa02bab682
cfd18b7137a4178fed7900d916f17ab6499340b1
describe
'920552' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFW' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
2e159dff260d4ff0fca5f4cfa89fa1ea
ab2a48616854a33df51eae8b2dc0c085dcf0dbec
describe
'102838' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFX' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
b8c1eead76211f4bffdcc93d5ba991d1
d689afde72c1f1551f5e5afb125e925056bd8fae
describe
'31879' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFY' 'sip-files00132.pro'
5bd9ce376207d000a77b4c2c011028f8
2e82c5b5fa72742fadab64c05facb12ea84bf609
describe
'35888' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALFZ' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
837fa62077c8d6977376af9a931144ef
277a461aa5963eda4956ee1692152d5af222c8d0
describe
'7369611' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGA' 'sip-files00132.tif'
e57a8c1cea6953755318b31db82eef82
d6162fc13919e365005eb30cf26ac27b645a8400
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGB' 'sip-files00132.txt'
4a8b77245160d0d6a1e2b628284db9a8
417ef201e56d5f4479087745255ac9c08b5b5a0d
describe
Invalid character
'9967' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGC' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
14aa76fae7f60578f39e8387657968ec
5b0fbd20bac1ed9937bdcab99d903a505c0e81aa
describe
'918483' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGD' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
2ed1a27e2ee625fcdf72c789c43ab80c
ca563680628ef88945110f67cbd6bdcab5573a58
describe
'95834' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGE' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
a38e966af106942d5ffec0f9fb20380d
25cb0efdd4f4eb960270d47aa11f1ce000b4f240
describe
'29072' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGF' 'sip-files00133.pro'
af11be2548ba23482253df26ca6c8f2e
797646edb261b831714fc14d354451d0d617207a
describe
'33968' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGG' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
4ad3d223110f0d3f8663129dfc395df6
6a699d82cc1a15f4f262c591951da695eaf79290
describe
'7353443' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGH' 'sip-files00133.tif'
12aee3e30ffb7ef647ca163e094e74e5
09d5b663fd24894e51e0d6e30b092d9051c8ae16
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGI' 'sip-files00133.txt'
d1b4f3af690acd3e83397ecc6ce76e13
bbace454570de31915aa67eae89ba7aff8ad2a36
describe
'9293' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGJ' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
b20ad29649fc85ac19ce34d7b3f9ba37
1217b49d073c990f257300fd073912f7bb692902
describe
'919062' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGK' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
64f0a94023d4d3d735ab940cde6c1d94
23000571e51de9ff1a637821646ce94d47b11314
describe
'104035' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGL' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
4ae3a79f425f4093b8ee81267712694d
786c61d921640d8bf5ed37e848ea302fb53db690
describe
'32929' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGM' 'sip-files00134.pro'
a247c9ef84a6b337342a7cf91a83ec7d
91770a416371390170053f6146cfb17784a8d288
describe
'37393' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGN' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
00230f3828c006129cfc8ee336a303cf
cfd69deb6ec097837242bccd69404823d3f3e0e2
describe
'7357531' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGO' 'sip-files00134.tif'
387abff54bd1c70d77f619f12ca2557b
46d3297d04678b0e108ed50d1e721e5e275a9885
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGP' 'sip-files00134.txt'
51b36a18206329108b8dd92f56b824ec
1c35343add419c51a44e912b825588c5655748ad
describe
'9998' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGQ' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
901098a3555c681052b56853cee96352
2bc7f721ccd767fb7b7e15370e99eb260a5e5316
describe
'954749' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGR' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
6cfa0101615f4b69b88fc5df0cc44ecc
6959c41a55619d903a3487c080e8bb5c33b9d3f1
describe
'101001' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGS' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
c29c711ca9047fc3883aeaa5b76d19d1
526679241f5ecf63efe243712c4fc1c43e3798bb
describe
'32962' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGT' 'sip-files00135.pro'
c3c936d2e91d2d234c47c0466e462a83
159e4d23d4d8e6f30338f18e650b87885e0bb566
describe
'35767' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGU' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
d9ea8f47a20a7d968a8964efbb928d55
3b0d29c6db5d1b0f44dd81a6caf6095ae7d064ea
describe
'7646347' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGV' 'sip-files00135.tif'
31598397c1707ba6602aec5b01f05b35
e9e5218dc1ddf09e665eb4aedf3b9e5dbc95b95d
'2011-10-28T02:22:32-04:00'
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGW' 'sip-files00135.txt'
b231543d37cab623c813097beaa71346
bb449c11b7067ec35a001a8256c9479a715872fc
describe
'9318' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGX' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
28bf7ea5cb6f6db1bc84abe45af85485
26d466d5cd86bd483c92982e6103f9fdb03bcf29
describe
'906508' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGY' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
36e51d1ddb115ad90c05775ddeeb07cd
47796bcb5cde201988c2b1a96f28071d040bc21d
describe
'104443' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALGZ' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
aa57874a5bc6c3881aa62e15b2718ddb
534416191a560adc55f12ed84a5be25283d7ccc2
describe
'31602' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHA' 'sip-files00136.pro'
63eac9042957a19c2ad5b69252a4d973
acca7dea79abeb44fb94e999709f6cd53e610d63
describe
'38694' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHB' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
19828af0390745a352249461426b3f83
44e614d128cd50190166cc5fc43d642f8e395630
describe
'7257107' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHC' 'sip-files00136.tif'
b8e5e9a302b7b7900e6e25725159fc3c
a96aca9e20e35d9852944c9853f79f0f40bd6450
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHD' 'sip-files00136.txt'
e8ef1110a50a46f0c2888f92da461d5d
f4f70a94c2f858325cfb2683270dbf08eaa501d6
'2011-10-28T02:23:28-04:00'
describe
'10084' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHE' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
27e0a699f9f5c2cb7c5c7eeafa9eae4a
52bb70e7244124c0a957a40c22c3067ff0f38f2b
describe
'954762' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHF' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
ed11d0c1e0b750c389262bca93636269
859a9b12b2ebb02dcb05b4e395eebd3f3ee97e74
describe
'102917' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHG' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
a66426d3378b3963e45d94761cf7b7d6
51d88dd613f40aa68027a98003a41f80bced46b4
describe
'32589' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHH' 'sip-files00137.pro'
86dd445c6eb57a4cd188cd37a23af87e
59a20f2d67f54e723128791c12674cabda5dccfe
describe
'35966' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHI' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
5804350c5550352cc4eec3b794dc91a0
4f6d1aa8dd8e321986191f642f155a2e440232d3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHJ' 'sip-files00137.tif'
ae01a5e19bbc71da482cb5aedd1ecb1c
0c6e1ed6c35d7ed540e668cda50cd01de132863e
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHK' 'sip-files00137.txt'
a933d98a0498790a7dd320a0cb60c1f7
af92ede28e779e3cf06ec9b550591a3405b52591
describe
Invalid character
'9482' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHL' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
2c1c4b2e498ce2e504b75b9c511eabf0
2057b5851463ab481c8f37b5f5584dcab91bb4b8
describe
'925769' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHM' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
bede6ef7a2346bfc88ab16c493b78784
b9669b12c7b10eb42aa7f01c9ac9a0f123518f21
describe
'105090' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHN' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
2ea6213de761ff9c9bf6bcb85a0514f4
b55423ea2e072f01d9fd68df65a6de219d0aae42
describe
'32330' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHO' 'sip-files00138.pro'
38fee81f4cd561a420954adee89b34eb
48557756a7a25068a318413a9f4615ad2232fc06
describe
'35781' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHP' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
6b5f79f675d7b6823f7ad9c375c0d50a
82f4752812e1e0ba077aaddd83a543d25dc14060
describe
'7412111' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHQ' 'sip-files00138.tif'
06a6b00b1f3a1adc737019c34cd8cdd5
257da8eafd294bfc9df3d221e41b6fda9608a589
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHR' 'sip-files00138.txt'
ae8e086ffe28e7e324135bec26409db9
2a54c6488b4cb626a6657ced2c9f7d084a76c154
describe
Invalid character
'10092' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHS' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
d75676e4678d0bd5f0eccbda109c0ebd
dfad0e51bd238166d61d29f1265477e25bb9909d
describe
'954761' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHT' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
6d994579d186eb68dc4230771b9b51d1
091d375827b8d97321b444504d04ada1ebc38ad5
describe
'101873' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHU' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
3dd14eacd8cf7ac71223c3387c2d1c75
9215e85ad3c9c74a664674c3c1519e6415c9f430
describe
'33548' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHV' 'sip-files00139.pro'
7ef13150b62052d96fe1d5cf41b9e38d
946b8eb60e8004bd46f1f6893908148532aa0d67
describe
'36268' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHW' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
1b57cca60b5b1c6c7b8039ddb30a8826
c22cadd3174e521914b920cc380709abda59b8e0
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHX' 'sip-files00139.tif'
2e52ce02bc382a7ce9cf11c0d86c1887
3a6104418c0438caf064df73e1323c84e8af7731
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHY' 'sip-files00139.txt'
6d8d16887c33bbd47aadbb3e22da32b3
8c9d01dfc76008859bffa6a809108d9933f4b831
describe
'9682' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALHZ' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
936fd22ec274ff359ec62dc63f2b4b2a
b834ff69d17e57d7cc5bacf8bbaa95fa48371cb1
describe
'933007' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIA' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
5cf94d746aecb085a81d04fe836248c9
6a82b48ea7bfa20498197f16b3d153ded52c7cad
describe
'101601' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIB' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
43868be57c40179099cc009c80e1db98
977cfe0d33a32c6cedb68b72971b1a1182a9e39b
describe
'31162' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIC' 'sip-files00140.pro'
713e68e8c7936ad22d922237835bd8a3
4be649b991f37ce7d30a9cd94faeba13e50dc84b
describe
'36865' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALID' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
512362529703a30056d9531bd0e24468
e90aa436a77a01f01cedcbfce09dfd052b65d927
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIE' 'sip-files00140.tif'
97806391d976f6cbef57652a6fea5e1a
62be794eaceb46250d5a4735ca2d5bb1064b6842
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIF' 'sip-files00140.txt'
0593fd90f55f3af8f2f033a4e6215c87
fea487a6d33adb695e093692690b23af30aeaf06
describe
Invalid character
'9684' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIG' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
2f54048c71429904b72cf3d5ddd52efc
e8c146e41eb36a5873d3596ac05142d19346f978
describe
'954708' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIH' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
7e567bc4b964c3464702660dd531f6be
577e53ccf787d83c8926071d8f9d2ebf751dcf0b
describe
'95905' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALII' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
c48979f3da5ce5fe95f63d9afb33debe
16b6106d139cc285cf9489c280e1e0446d0bec5f
describe
'29582' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIJ' 'sip-files00141.pro'
2ffcb406b1b4b45b2dfcd15eb0a6da29
8d961a41f4174ebead6d60c16f4000bf2bfdcebf
describe
'33585' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIK' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
56a94953a19afefb0ad2025ddd09dd52
faadf79f96b1370d8ed5592eafffdd39027a1daa
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIL' 'sip-files00141.tif'
cfcac70d644812323ebabb7b23bf686f
30276d31fb78de6051689c4a6ae3f308c50e4f5d
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIM' 'sip-files00141.txt'
c4f41f528a3fe34a9ef9ac53d5e730f4
1c29c90ae6367b867941f5baee256b6f9e233361
describe
'8858' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIN' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
6c4e3441b81c1251e9b9e437277e0d33
3b54144435cad1102f58d10ca805c3d322b54965
describe
'949460' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIO' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
3c03d260b0d22849c5108015f30874ed
49123caeb85ff695d71578e4b5a8b6a320ca652e
describe
'97348' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIP' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
9949a3bad2d36305d54811523be85ae4
f6f1b3ae11e4233998c6228ba09f2df519af0639
describe
'28534' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIQ' 'sip-files00142.pro'
73b7956d6d783ff75018a41c6c2accb0
ae08e46bfbdbbfbbde2a998793fb215ab52ee1d9
describe
'33980' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIR' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
5ccb000e1634d45d52ad558a6adbbb92
51d3d86dec503fd0b128dc1ad187c93eeb630416
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIS' 'sip-files00142.tif'
2be95495cae0ad54ce74e402ec5d1b39
fd8f5e5b217a0ab07dfbd9448aab999fd310a67b
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIT' 'sip-files00142.txt'
df2ad236433c09eb46d326394c5cfaec
ec1307601b6a361fd5ef797c4d38156743d17e52
describe
'9249' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIU' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
2beb62fee44698808d46c8a76f299606
dbd5e2670ef00aed457240a679d2eb651a577c6e
describe
'954768' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIV' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
e39ea2056ffa2d6e5af2cbf8fa192abc
8fd05ed27c6afc383fcf7a43ee72114b768bb641
describe
'98685' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIW' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
2550a82ec5fbddc3407c22308b120caa
3e2c8a6a910bbf02afde96ef8b9333807ace6cfd
describe
'31537' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIX' 'sip-files00143.pro'
7486e85e0b31c2afedcd20f051048857
6f30e436bd8cc7076fbb33b6d5c7a4220db4b363
describe
'35425' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIY' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
0a27dce8faf83585fd8d374f229d5b6b
ab2e8acdefc171c9b19e27d522b99d0681392e7d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALIZ' 'sip-files00143.tif'
c283862fd4f7966766509dcd4197bfba
187e41495944e655baeb03d71f1c8b04cebe16d4
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJA' 'sip-files00143.txt'
b090cee400a3ca2784fc9c711e774c60
0b62dc32bf7eb622cd82c5830fa3f7aee6686c80
describe
'9409' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJB' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
7b6c2e8a02738a587264a419c818e794
cb94f37902be831e7e83b4b448444880f833c512
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJC' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
65dbbcfad1c5f4dbe1ed1ec602adbd0d
8d969ada4c9f61212db669ed3da493650836bbc2
describe
'92204' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJD' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
838e087e38f4b61fd0d57ce4b3c84a94
f18bd956cbdf8bf4fc8927887befdd7939878780
describe
'27131' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJE' 'sip-files00144.pro'
2adba7b6dbdb7dee7b44e9491d09549d
d04eb63817f77fe281084423a8afe0350e63cecd
describe
'32513' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJF' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
6f24417d93fa005a9cf97c7e94ee216e
a37e6bb4b1535fc910f800dbe51637e43cef7a3b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJG' 'sip-files00144.tif'
37666932d6f0f388aa1711dbb22629cc
37c4d823d81e2f1f96442b9222f138480f7dc1cf
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJH' 'sip-files00144.txt'
e5e6849e87d531114ced72c2284f3e4c
def1bfc6d02c9c45a5bd8ff9de7eecea38490df2
describe
Invalid character
'9123' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJI' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
52cd44a82a504dd9b6a4b50617a3b7e2
eab3b9402763876ef9de61c9a84d5989b7a44552
describe
'954751' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJJ' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
2d102bbc50a060d76e5ad5151e7eaa38
18252ad9c7a8326bec233dd6a71eec830909728d
describe
'101114' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJK' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
13bca603231bd1f706038d8b9c150bcf
644fa75582affbc0327f02ebbf8dbee5e51f88fa
describe
'33092' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJL' 'sip-files00145.pro'
f8e8f4c84f98d0c46c1bbe368ae8fa31
f3ecb7eb774608fee3c2c065b8a872db8648061d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJM' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
8927007867a9523ebdc3a3d7664d1386
bf8dd4b1e2e9a05d4dd2b03f5e01c6f121491360
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJN' 'sip-files00145.tif'
d1829e7cd06bd736989c6d52e1bf467b
f727a49908db3f2b470e7423f3c30fb20690a74a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJO' 'sip-files00145.txt'
5bfe965ffaf8e0b0099619bc82fe3b5b
ed1284cca2c125dbd4ed36f90144fb02d3795bc2
describe
Invalid character
'9446' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJP' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
40b0c55baad88a85a26fd01b87ee1c51
3b65b84ae5136e54fadeb72552e82a374de50126
describe
'949322' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJQ' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
e552d21723117ad39c5191a4ce09aca9
e1f6560cfb97224bbcfb89d8902a7ae9c40d7d16
describe
'97368' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJR' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
d64d06abfd455cf50cdea084bc4e5823
2f04539563f51ce8e9efc86dd85ed8410259c226
describe
'29038' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJS' 'sip-files00146.pro'
7261e0836d648761b17d29886dee7461
0a3914043c50be6665791ce9dbabc8b0e0177fc6
describe
'34191' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJT' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
883b875f707c8f1c6851ae86209a8d13
16e779796182b24fc5d12b27e137acf8ed777a7d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJU' 'sip-files00146.tif'
99f6c3bd38f60e808834544fa9878912
6632fc324d4b45bc94b5ef75171b1c5dde920f84
describe
'1089' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJV' 'sip-files00146.txt'
bd225466a48e0dcc2cb331abae7d21a3
0f8e3b4c2c2abd8af38d1b576ebfc9b8d5734922
describe
'9379' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJW' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
d2fa4b9cccc3e8cfa795f370d9883d4d
b66bb2efa60f75181e35ba08f3ed3a41780331b9
describe
'954765' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJX' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
6eb150e75477724d04752bb0db7484a7
d03c3ce4a39d6df987b749499b7071bfa519700d
describe
'96818' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJY' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
080a5326277c0e353886916f45d1af7e
2f0039dd5a7d681665b335ded4c228e59aec359f
describe
'31666' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALJZ' 'sip-files00147.pro'
b6e98714804c61504fdf7ed01e7f8f80
de58848b2c95e93f0195b09bcf9f6c10cea9c281
describe
'34149' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKA' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
987b32a6312c364804a7df0a9c34973f
3efd14eae14e1dfb7ad2a16d3239a77415a152d3
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKB' 'sip-files00147.tif'
6e4c0d8bc675049729e795d9beda691c
6a1986d98ce1d5cd5695033ea06659d9964a4e16
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKC' 'sip-files00147.txt'
efe0e7076072ca6ed7f12ac7d2e0c9ea
a00c195b5ad754577f557be66e11e97d8e8bdfc5
describe
'9300' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKD' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
ce4f65b7bdcc67760034cfe065c2e239
396aac851aa1eda37ba82ce1b74a73221688b9b2
describe
'949472' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKE' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
34b1e0a742d58165a167ded8a9c1a27b
3c76fa9f6ae088a02f8047a3a4916505c4533720
describe
'93660' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKF' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
6a9571fe4200e5f8b47471a798d762ec
9ff52f196a025dcca197ad2df91ca48b3a2d75e8
describe
'27811' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKG' 'sip-files00148.pro'
b13f402c835f56ea6d027c83be696667
7a51e820ef93e5a12fcfda8887ae0b4f5000faa8
describe
'33099' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKH' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
d96b4fd32ba64c59903780a27efc6271
79e051e655117c99378a65eba800a24da9886b6a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKI' 'sip-files00148.tif'
fd19f6860ad8a75c1beae699b1a69043
8b24ba9218a17021398227194c01236eb81d1478
describe
'1043' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKJ' 'sip-files00148.txt'
6847ed6caff4d7de9b1cab2f04983ce1
4dbd1422f4397543e6d50d905a3a1ae537ed8e80
describe
'9080' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKK' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
ee25ea5d82e88e69b8c8add755162fbc
ec9a9b2ab216b25c5bb226550f8f86d5f29d9b3a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKL' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
1e4426f0c2e67e8ab311654decd2580a
e7657efcddc475f95e0ac00cec8f71b2234cd10c
describe
'87930' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKM' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
fc7ffee5984fbfe8e39b5b7c84ba6732
0f7809340d682e6dca061daff9eb77e153cb4d4b
describe
'27008' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKN' 'sip-files00149.pro'
591ef8bb3de28e68ed4f23fff4f46e77
b98b1fc6c60b18514c0a6a154a5e8e5a90b505ad
describe
'30887' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKO' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
79fab74ce2affa681d876e148eb3c892
c402415210b4ac3f3f627be05bf814f92d0b823b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKP' 'sip-files00149.tif'
c4cf258c2c94f6cdb3aa52f052c22035
905684e0ae74f8e63c5a8e1312944b5234dc7967
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKQ' 'sip-files00149.txt'
edde8fb4818624549613aa7b4bd81f29
2d7fbbbceaf297690dfda192796161b6695cb3d0
describe
Invalid character
'8460' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKR' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
dd8ccb1667606a52ddead890951a9779
285987213625f5777568ebd9199395e4a15bf08a
describe
'949452' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKS' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
173693a084e88e29b5e31e5d29899436
f81ec6e2ae26c4a7f09e89e8fce549f05af64968
describe
'97208' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKT' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
7c3c85472401ea1c85ae5c4be4623fa8
d5b574e7143cd0b8134a030aeed641c952dc7f90
describe
'30947' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKU' 'sip-files00150.pro'
42ed7184d85452f52140e35f1210fe64
6bb49051ce55866fafcd60979719163a132f83d3
describe
'34187' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKV' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
5392c2723f6438e554caa05b6de61058
e8bb482ced735e8cc79e59ef4e54fd67a5ae297b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKW' 'sip-files00150.tif'
52a8a6abb1ad9d8bfbb647c1ea367ac3
bb097ca4afcc17f0194844013cd4ba3fd280e881
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKX' 'sip-files00150.txt'
c83e99816dc1f92e61167948a84bc3d7
c81b2c3a15efee3d959549a60deacd16ee0e05fe
describe
Invalid character
'9152' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKY' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
c892a470d170b202896fca228b3d0e06
374c8428c516da72d575d665b574f08bda1e6bc3
describe
'954589' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALKZ' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
1b6bd2fcd06dbe040669e36aa2b9cef9
96c69b30fb84b353cc721e5bed4e0415e18de0ca
describe
'96184' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLA' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
f173eb25802b500c383409e2dc7e4baa
3ef20154aabba4141a49a2fe06c37c1793ebe99e
describe
'31425' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLB' 'sip-files00151.pro'
f90d19010d42934b4258ba29d78ced49
de12646937a5bc6605acf3911e5aab969e5b675e
describe
'34094' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLC' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
726973d3195130e8b576c3b467cabdcb
1332eb425517402298c180c7455f10b0516ec1a8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLD' 'sip-files00151.tif'
f45af9e91c94fe6a7361941448cf3908
8402d402347f9ee57b72bae055a1cd78c616a1e1
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLE' 'sip-files00151.txt'
8e0cd199d307d7f1f164597bca5ce3c1
844f9ad778e06edf61f02c7cf9cc1492848e1faa
describe
'9126' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLF' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
8524a52cae6a1b6b3c8199e2b89f5608
fab7baabf8c9ba8b460f1150654405844be26397
describe
'949456' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLG' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
f018d91a7a7e73af821780fcc85af826
122728140f60fd58b2897ab381fab2841cfd38a5
describe
'104599' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLH' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
f07e6991e8b3c42f0d5dad2b87694653
5831f269ba41527dc29a7fb65dbcc1a381a41f73
describe
'34146' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLI' 'sip-files00152.pro'
d2f32baf805c10e97d8300957fc1563e
0a14c431a273a5f94592bd924bbf87db1f9ede31
describe
'37203' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLJ' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
e22237e61e5d2444b58b3ff746072085
bfe31cc82502ae003803c55709f197b7c0106e28
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLK' 'sip-files00152.tif'
028885513c52f08e76e398a07c1e7c59
d0006d0491ef217435663eedc3569165691e37ed
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLL' 'sip-files00152.txt'
46fce543b34978c540975d7d8219750b
0e4a305f898a779e326ee0df469677a0659a3a59
describe
Invalid character
'9723' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLM' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
f679564d1ebcef705678780a580b5d8a
d64b083fadb9bb96a65910d9fb7b3ea77d96ed5f
describe
'954752' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLN' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
988ad6d6bdfe5ab1bd6dc87cb992a94b
9086a8a7dec8319a12cd06e28ab97b151937540e
describe
'98928' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLO' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
71818cf7b80149ac276e49a5724a82eb
b3b19798d825b227a3477bb0d93db926e894aa5a
describe
'32585' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLP' 'sip-files00153.pro'
e80de206b9d4de384de3eb7ee6f0749e
454c0f9a852aa24f88e698b0a24f8b6be3ea8124
describe
'35122' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLQ' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
2108c4cbf45e7278de81a238ad67dde5
6830743f737f3a38c95814e5a1af9db3bbb9d91f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLR' 'sip-files00153.tif'
a45c2af16c8799acf0502be3142453da
7ffbabe2a8e6401e1e39f7f0b34746497a34589e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLS' 'sip-files00153.txt'
4b3d56addedfb3f4391a6b3f7423fe1b
44464acab3cb8271c5dbfc65b82dd03e646faea4
describe
'9459' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLT' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
720908bffe0d605bb289a957bb8e4179
6d8f20fe4c2485b11ab4151042370ffbbbf7b980
describe
'949437' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLU' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
b885942da362766b153f08c7466aa397
be83d61761762fc16fb9e1825193d1ff51b2b231
describe
'94073' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLV' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
7b74c187312e060e51fd3b40da1058ae
882fd68e970d3499fd4a2c457d948423bd59f152
describe
'30481' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLW' 'sip-files00154.pro'
5f5181139b70eab219850520b5b64f83
0790f3da129fe6e3ea276a6eb473428c5e21fc77
describe
'34091' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLX' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
245a7d13d1fee4120f0912aa92687fb8
84bb04d254062de494cbb1fc22d6a1109ffe5b0d
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLY' 'sip-files00154.tif'
dd593063fa0ceffc3a6b4805137ad61f
837f2e99a13dde3e7816259eb2d9193145867093
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALLZ' 'sip-files00154.txt'
e678a6a950b175c22004aae66c922b31
f6343b0476703960cd9775a6abbabee97a98e9e1
describe
'8975' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMA' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
7822c833ffb8d6a3d3d6f0bc1f90976b
a665e4afb0dcdb446fd07efa1a35613d49b39a5f
describe
'954758' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMB' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
5b1c771642a743804d304dedb157d277
3c341c1b35d1488536a8cdb5a739417edb29e76b
describe
'99248' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMC' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
0b92e374952c4bfca89b03e058193848
b37230c02b5d1e973a99dcb094ad7cb0f34178af
describe
'33982' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMD' 'sip-files00155.pro'
9c1f50b5099591195e0faea2396047cb
abe4c2fb99ef9f00079f76fcfd03f2f1c76c6177
describe
'36141' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALME' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
c3ce309ec646adde671c5daec9e52416
4b91b086c0fc3cc607e991650d1e93cf3214a7bb
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMF' 'sip-files00155.tif'
7d7ed7098c4838737245fc04930c12d6
7e2db409a08c1baac9abd8d58e0d1cb408c125a4
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMG' 'sip-files00155.txt'
74c5fd613dc34193bdcccf286b6b50e4
10c452969d722d99161f43d0be52dbf81d30ef2c
describe
'9565' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMH' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
26b48a5d435450a55b92d88c1dc212e5
167ef3163eaf344060bfd99f4e973cc8ae241e1d
describe
'949419' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMI' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
95be7fc081845940239b9916396b67a1
42ad2485db1ee72b6ca0bf80dae4147dda388c16
describe
'86470' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMJ' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
b2aefbf3acb18a38b9be5c412a77c277
079ebbcdddf96663dd607180383bf473b4c5d28c
describe
'26333' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMK' 'sip-files00156.pro'
e90deb338794ef6d99213aba7d30e228
4291ad7bd754149c6f627dea77abca6b4aa13319
describe
'30773' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALML' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
6f220db0217c2a95d6405a38115928dd
7104abe01dbea2680bbe1b91118e51c4cadb6ce8
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMM' 'sip-files00156.tif'
7782738e30a2bf93a7c4b80284779151
79bc7bd42ab3b47c9dbb9ffa48db1b1c6d277733
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMN' 'sip-files00156.txt'
f386b8a02c29162c16915f84656c5761
3a6be7802d9016e5522fab93f0757b90b00b5f21
describe
Invalid character
'8049' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMO' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
7edf4e241abcbe2e3ba5e05d1e5b5851
3d6ef3f892bd17bdb8807f6762469690d8bea10a
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMP' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
3796481e471ccde8bf97129d30af8f8c
7713a38c752f38b9c1c0967cae7582c650f39d20
describe
'88826' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMQ' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
478ca15e0c90b0656e379c512407cb69
261d806400a61095e08492beaa76c0690c2e40ce
describe
'28623' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMR' 'sip-files00157.pro'
1dd7c6a5d10b00fa05f8a3abee82037f
a3081b13b491df18f10fe7fc8bb2c1c5ab0259ee
describe
'32224' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMS' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
dfd1021d59711c62ba57e559372debab
4b13b47cd5699c5bb4e86daa508713259ec57835
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMT' 'sip-files00157.tif'
ff6f1eb76051ceb95af76f58005e42a4
84806fe1c267117c8de50184cc9b2141779c8686
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMU' 'sip-files00157.txt'
025e21b8a13c31e25309bd7cdc570896
284c4c901be06b84395332733f99265a81a5bfa7
describe
Invalid character
'8871' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMV' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
9743213df0ada028d5fb6591d0c5842d
f48bfea95246525ac7086956cb4feb2a93430528
describe
'949469' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMW' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
80a022bd958848c887f227b1cf45db9d
29f9a67ab7e0be0ed72fac61170ff9d9abd98b49
describe
'89131' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMX' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
1aa39b9678f33665def9ae0d2eccef17
b740999fc898433be60afd887b6463e10aed67aa
describe
'27588' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMY' 'sip-files00158.pro'
e1e5203e7a3bdddee1bd5b8e8c3b1d22
6abac8edeff5792898b96e5e7902218ea1378ed6
describe
'32029' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALMZ' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
c3304df1c818df9a30939424c0886d4f
ca17032fac8223c860a4e0d7ff384677e4018372
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNA' 'sip-files00158.tif'
1778aea2e2a7fcbfcadac493b718b16d
d92fd73b5909014ae495525c468d1379827d3b6c
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNB' 'sip-files00158.txt'
f998b9e0db88db178cee27a083bacb1f
c0db678f58d72a3517e691c974fd0252289427b0
describe
'8710' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNC' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
361f46c8ab6d4e3e32b9c49908b5fec5
035e73675f5026a8435560d2f1b8e69e15cfde3b
describe
'954760' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALND' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
e5bbd8d37364fc64936c021c8803cca1
ae4ac32ceb6cf786c49b19e95cb1112b55c07557
describe
'94366' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNE' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
83b86ed65450713a65abc1862a8fd225
dfda47973828d49e6d974deca12d245a7f01d82d
describe
'31304' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNF' 'sip-files00159.pro'
83d38d4336bbde8d9adaf73842f07a9b
373e4e3abe487356bac4cae9ff809a00ebc3f826
describe
'33947' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNG' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
b2bc7c722ad62229c21123ee5d5fbd9e
3027aacd5c19e6bf05ce17b85a98f119747c8812
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNH' 'sip-files00159.tif'
7790b376e042e1d9976d7d5d2042aa62
06fd35c749d3e5103fb7405551452b400fb0eeba
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNI' 'sip-files00159.txt'
c6b21464f2cb82745bed757b23ebe4dd
d1c0e19902d4d5810cbea392f7a005ffc8d588d4
describe
'9128' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNJ' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
d79e2bc2f085dec94fb9c5d5d20cb8c6
b6c5a37094373d999cb3b402626d6d6d369661a7
describe
'949467' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNK' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
40a19a140dfc4cfd830d9382a525885b
56b10016885de0e1e355f67ed5b2d0a326f47b7b
describe
'93568' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNL' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
839f584f9a0996078d907308247955ad
05205f38c6e2d8e2fe157714f2f5a6408c8ce3e2
describe
'29554' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNM' 'sip-files00160.pro'
ff238b755638a8ad792ccb96e02b876b
204694d5dc1f4d93dc311055d45bf2ff2fb41ec7
describe
'33589' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNN' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
ceb782c4803ee22e364657f4be6e0126
ee4b464fdc449561be971b4f7c11897758abb9e9
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNO' 'sip-files00160.tif'
2ac83d00efe783a4bf47b303cc991ab4
188d53aa899460fad25ef2875450fbedae11b96c
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNP' 'sip-files00160.txt'
29545484e14565a6b8452994b20fadcb
fd1f739275a274734378cac3fb283059798ce843
describe
Invalid character
'9127' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNQ' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
2ec2ccd25b8885047abcae500bd4ceb6
9b04c3d39d81307d24a00311b550dc16e3196a7a
describe
'905250' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNR' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
6546adbec3d3fa3e0e179860591f5075
4dc759e8c38b8edd2fb1f24e85d786de29817520
describe
'102902' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNS' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
9ec4720e3a83ce3749aab9c6299397e7
4717b81dc693bc4683ea84796899f4508fbfeb3d
describe
'34128' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNT' 'sip-files00161.pro'
d82336c93e046401192a23648849fb0c
60f104ed0e19324187ad24d20796b6baef14e59a
describe
'38261' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNU' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
20167370d2ede6d328d4ab1ca9ea9cbe
affa039364cf6b56982fa12d24f9041361a7a65c
describe
'7247539' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNV' 'sip-files00161.tif'
91b549ac7d9fa0ec885c68281b5e790e
b405aa458fd1e7462ea272821496103562a73dbd
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNW' 'sip-files00161.txt'
951664c654bc7e26ea6d8c7cbc73266d
7864d50458a2b74e4bb48854e20058b45f601722
describe
Invalid character
'10215' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNX' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
d65f76202d1b2ee1ec974307707228a3
2442156384eb107bdf97cc6d3599a12253962b97
describe
'949243' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNY' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
327a26f24a2c150e4b6df8748cd974da
6c059e5a5731932d3be427b995bd3525170d54ea
describe
'100201' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALNZ' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
8adb120f9ae988390463b12085e67c60
b30f51401f4306e0d751faae93de6667981f37da
describe
'33424' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOA' 'sip-files00162.pro'
9930df4134cb184ecf8185a411ba441e
9219c85341ff8fb6d58a2ee5b3f449b13f12c313
describe
'36125' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOB' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
4779ccc95e1a8c13a1cf849a118d5101
8a5dace6e86af98e82d03b1f4ab3ec497a8c5918
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOC' 'sip-files00162.tif'
57647553ab19996a1eb5f35d9a79160f
31b181d9aafbf47871939482c754f35dc93812e2
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOD' 'sip-files00162.txt'
dfb3bc23a8b4faa677c44698f83c7769
02e2ea22253536ceec7ef38e5f3eeebe19745c58
describe
'9730' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOE' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
eac3ed41d7bbf72e463b6445773d550d
a2f47bb5cc698b771ffbbda2e7f9a9f139a744e8
describe
'910732' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOF' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
7a6f56689839967464acb1548318b9af
7e624d7727da60e6edad55f39895e08f4dd98c94
describe
'101821' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOG' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
999eac62462a636c97430fca7c1a4acc
f27eac3bc3db9c1650f796a069536c1590a238dc
describe
'34226' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOH' 'sip-files00163.pro'
6cb52ce8738772443036f9eadfab7b29
7fbc3c04450cc85e05d39ad86a29ca38fe93d5a4
describe
'38536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOI' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
cc6ae9d31e53e1d40fb6ae7f129b68cc
701edc48d060e9b347582e850a11468f67358b14
describe
'7290535' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOJ' 'sip-files00163.tif'
461bffc6a0093714b0c5d2ca18f87768
8b402368feb3ec5dbcda6a1a4a0380bf587fac19
describe
'1285' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOK' 'sip-files00163.txt'
f11f72e30aed803270f6ea4a45c5c8f3
29e92ea32a84dc048c677312100956216da7853d
describe
'10119' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOL' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
ed9c3293e52d3248d2d4c48e1a0865b2
fe862b4df8bd265e32aedd622822bf4868141dda
describe
'949401' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOM' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
1ba9a6829ad6e10bba3b58affaf3fac2
3ad97bd3d1f388c89e5dfd2e960c5f1d44f59c8b
describe
'101373' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALON' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
6f0f2f3884c39c980c20cd8b384bf215
61791a039e4f6c6e870c6d2f4ac679421bdb4b0a
describe
'33273' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOO' 'sip-files00164.pro'
37aad89b73b8dff2d25ac8a8312a894a
6b6ffc97c164e9ae819ebd951aef0d2ae1c68a9f
describe
'36850' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOP' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
a3aede855282b4e21df703b02c585291
776f8e4b0039eb5424881c5a2727837b3d215b14
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOQ' 'sip-files00164.tif'
63b762590ad007aa5541e5f9300d8437
9f6e628b00ad4944984314898fad4a78225b548c
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOR' 'sip-files00164.txt'
790a9e91611cbf72260c05ecf9cb4f44
4d605aafe02d46fe89d3c44dda2e56a7b5e56122
describe
'9722' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOS' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
f9dee6a7667233bb3e1ad1008ee162e4
4a5a303e729cf1917eb1479804ac6abf98bd9a6f
describe
'893408' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOT' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
afee8cc9ce271919c019fca80e0867b4
feca35598df8b2645fbe3188af4efdd7065d0834
describe
'93230' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOU' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
33b4dd6793e18098a571c2227d991dee
8d86c7307f29bece8497674242eea34d03e9ac87
describe
'28588' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOV' 'sip-files00165.pro'
56bac10fea91bf3a751aa80e4de0284a
7f2958ca449fdf18694fd110f8d8deebd17dc43b
describe
'34158' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOW' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
8d41412f3be42c0a03afcbcdbe555346
7b6af6e5be701bc6dc43d471f221404b37b9e28b
describe
'7151915' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOX' 'sip-files00165.tif'
4182316c51d515f12cf71c5722c29714
b38ccf73845295668b97832c524ec65513705207
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOY' 'sip-files00165.txt'
4df03b6a1ae4e1c3ca8b288cdd668aa7
a2dc4b9270af00ad01ba644839279f352930a70e
describe
'9229' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALOZ' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
4c7ab55f59ce8cb40145d1df37898624
6f5b42fc3780b3dfbdf2b76ea24300fec07a3ae3
describe
'949350' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPA' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
61ff093a724674257f3437ff17430bcb
e85049158438782bf5dced634a066f94cbbd9718
describe
'99922' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPB' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
f6f60d2f9bdd67ad5b67d4414dd34791
de973034f2af8c31fc06f96156cd2ee8eda58338
describe
'33020' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPC' 'sip-files00166.pro'
0411d60f6f5b9e1e362acadbf425d3ff
f423100f5707dfc9511e878e4214cfd6a5a68fcc
describe
'36862' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPD' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
5671f3c4edfb71bf2446b5e9f48b4ff6
e478ee5aef56b4a983e75433f6ebe17662d18515
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPE' 'sip-files00166.tif'
b109664390dc43eb23d7c552e67dfb77
d88e14efe801f31cc562a458a4d5c72d7052ec0e
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPF' 'sip-files00166.txt'
ea19653fed02a948b227306bb6bbf930
746bc61244f5ddc6766d62adf445c3bb66735ebe
describe
Invalid character
'9907' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPG' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
6f81389e4a69ce1e25ccec13a6c6abb0
9bf28e50fd4a5836388b9489610e81f599cbb4eb
describe
'895508' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPH' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
5603394b8dc8d9e79cb66139c25d433e
2a29eb9d12f5aa1f36eafd3f9faceb0db0de18d0
describe
'102380' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPI' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
c530648096ca58cdb7796711b5413c25
31d749100d1b56834024fbdcdbd0a69e68f500fe
describe
'33668' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPJ' 'sip-files00167.pro'
fce92c4d8cc2be5fe43539f8a5985b51
f7475ce881604ba88f5462e2e56a12967e61079c
describe
'38133' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPK' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
f297cdf2ce56449222a8a64905765f94
43d31007ce9a894a3e5eeac364c9a4967357e007
describe
'7169959' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPL' 'sip-files00167.tif'
01a63747051c94387932979f12f8a892
2a89a7e6cbb4b7534b97bcc2f67022ff8ca6fe05
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPM' 'sip-files00167.txt'
b461d3d12634e9089d421bfd97f38583
eaa2bc51dfa823ad72cfadfc2fc17beb218221d1
describe
'10252' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPN' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
fe6c44e61859ca818d303ca5bce26df4
a3b57c5fc77ac2788e1ba2c7ed5582bf368945da
describe
'949337' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPO' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
2933a783ca0c206125b31b28ae5e6799
89a783edd5651fbb42805a7db3fb72bef5aa8dc1
describe
'100833' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPP' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
92f26c7557f97b9daee5c787d288d950
47edddf1ffee7097476da75443e7e19be4ebdf70
describe
'33824' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPQ' 'sip-files00168.pro'
8c7d1bdf618582d06402786677e8647e
16d2baef38cd03115311ae5f4e256d4f4c35e9a4
describe
'36631' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPR' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
02953645e6a0c5fffacd4e1251b61b7f
0fc775db3a9d92390de87fa917c65a8e8aec7e6b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPS' 'sip-files00168.tif'
eb4a99b7bb2a59a6f5523eee42474427
356e3e7b77424897d9db38434defb083db78f301
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPT' 'sip-files00168.txt'
c0272b4c55da4362b1887528dd67e53b
b2cd2fccbf8c45b03d149dcbe3ba056cf4967c23
describe
Invalid character
'9986' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPU' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
834743bcd338258927566aaa0005b6f6
f3e852cbdceca815e35dbcaa1207e4fc716faccc
describe
'887448' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPV' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
00fb21b8a1c3ea924b14b935df42031c
53c4c41711a7a1a48c3b36b8a068e90ff3f0007e
describe
'90811' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPW' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
0fb032fb446407dc0e08f895bf1c5a9f
9d1058baf98473fb360a75dc86daa687bc9db8cf
describe
'27239' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPX' 'sip-files00169.pro'
995f6ae9802b3dd012ade62ce989e805
077898f10d41932f36dfa8b171aad70709e745ea
describe
'33440' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPY' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
4e76f3c6c5312f64e1cdcc31241e0bc7
1990ac18f7fb1d767b9ee91e618949896808d827
describe
'7104243' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALPZ' 'sip-files00169.tif'
5f515072196cf747f2bc3d47b54c30a3
f3a4f59bd3e47f00de148153380c58bdd5e27edb
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQA' 'sip-files00169.txt'
c7e9a5883fcf563dc410fd97cb167e17
6c20f1361ad3ff4b9f80a0546191d94f94691378
describe
Invalid character
'9184' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQB' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
4d5c0f521a49953d3f48a00bf677d21d
bf4827408478bf224533815da1ff92f0300f3f83
describe
'927238' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQC' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
f30b9439d8e0f045424da29443cd8e04
5dbf4a5d58ab0ca5e9f9ece2caec3fa47156cd21
describe
'98432' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQD' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
5d3d567dc8bbfda332119b62e0703e98
c5eeedf5a0ed79fe4ce9d98ec490b2cd9f8b3fc6
describe
'31881' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQE' 'sip-files00170.pro'
e7f4549f5e42650eff59726038c934da
c8a2810b2cbc9a0bbea2ed8ffca6a5cd8f9840aa
describe
'35358' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQF' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
5ac8c996bab6b7ce70c257bf421c3afc
c15b2d25dfa2d13d5c424428ba968d88ad0f24a7
describe
'7422911' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQG' 'sip-files00170.tif'
c502eabc9e61d38e969d2ac81b2ef85a
4a455206ad3e4075184648ad142d2bb6773c2bda
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQH' 'sip-files00170.txt'
15ecb23660ec51e138d5df2fc5af773c
c1570e8d5eae0202eb62400b0311396e0e59bc2f
describe
Invalid character
'9587' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQI' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
2723e21f95b654873437c1fa5feab425
66ba6b11d323d58d0013dcb5e22bf9c7c538b047
describe
'890211' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQJ' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
7d1dfe256f320668942ab1aa431bfd51
943896856e3a87581be3b0dcaa393708584af510
describe
'94947' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQK' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
c1054e3c53fb0022e02debeaad5ddfbb
18429bfe4b8c5c1c99df41cc0c06f5a9c0bd5602
describe
'28038' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQL' 'sip-files00171.pro'
3cb098e67718880f8a44e038161b2676
78fadc15157ec2499be3d73988acb15a190ba966
describe
'34908' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQM' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
f31b0342f6fc8eb9cfb7c94906c230d3
86ef8311e8580200e3b5e8ce0b21b4fd19b7479d
describe
'7126343' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQN' 'sip-files00171.tif'
c0b329b72ef81c6d97e77868ac000c19
594267ad75416fd45d7d4f2d4939e2d95b4436bf
describe
'1056' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQO' 'sip-files00171.txt'
b3376de81ab6edbb1e303330fc6143fb
c092c5482becdf1f30bb268adb13058e08cce355
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQP' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
f331bc5274c42dfc7342225c8cb39baa
5b88e6599bb81859fd95b278c931d9fe804afcb0
describe
'949461' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQQ' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
54ff2baea7935240a266c593b8f355b0
69ef57e7c99187e7ce339cdb40352ca745947f9b
describe
'95564' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQR' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
099adf85735d870a63abf1e06daae956
0f3127fa640415dac1fa1e81e5910911ad0b71a9
describe
'30071' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQS' 'sip-files00172.pro'
4da962a923292ba62f86f12758925324
d98b5683a7332b7434e0fbdec97285b5175a6a5c
describe
'34196' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQT' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
e1fc6d965a93d4b3b6992b9740711438
24eff5ffb532c5cebd5b8d7c9a3b9054c021449f
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQU' 'sip-files00172.tif'
60f1ce6e6ad7d952e28b4258d77e2fbc
97c6c8fe1efff8edb98017219284f3936f11260b
describe
'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQV' 'sip-files00172.txt'
7a0aeac6ec7cf9ba4f89ebcd84c80342
4e95e0a45d5f668a3d08a64fd4fab1342216f684
describe
Invalid character
'9199' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQW' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
ac310720d3432abd944e5ad71c83c317
70ece9cf775ce8e198dff25b191c7a86bccf23ad
describe
'883698' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQX' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
23d4fe8caea80d638f16a38435573e00
b3ff16d59643277831a6dae45768c420ed6cccd1
describe
'101536' 'info:fdaE20081113_AAAAQBfileF20081115_AAALQY' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
58cf99b660bf13de689173ba8649026e
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describe
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The Baldwin Library

Rm Bra




of
Florida





a le sto C Sul une JE a
1 T 7
é Vora continued readi
ze. 66.
ELLEN CAMERON.

A TALE FOR YOUTH.

BY

EMILY RANKIN.

A NEW AND REVISED EDITION.

LONDON:

PUBLISHED BY LONGMAN & CO.

Sold also by G. Bowen, Clifton, Bristol; C. ANDREWS,
Brighton; FLetTcHER, Forpes & FLETCHER, and KING,
Southampton; RockiirF & Eviis, Liverpool; CoE, Stonehouse,
Plymouth; Davies, Gloucester; WiLL1ams, Cheltenham.
Printep By G. Bowen, CLIFTON, BRISTOL.
TO
MISS HARRIET MARTINEAU,
IN ADMIRATION OF HER GENIUS
AND OF HER UNCEASING AND SUCCESSFUL EXERTIONS
IN THE CAUSE OF USEFUL LITERATURE,
THIS HUMBLE ATTEMPT TO EMULATE HER ZEAL FOR THE
INTERESTS OF YOUNG PEOPLE
IS, WITH HER KIND PERMISSION, MOST GRATEFULLY

AND AFFECTIONATELY INSCRIBED BY
EMILY RANKIN.

CLIFTON.
EXPLANATION OF INDIAN WORDS.

Palanquin.

Bungalow.
Veranda.

Tiffin.
Hookah.
Paun.

Compound.

- Salaam.

Daye.
Pagamahs.
Nabob.
Punkah.

" Bebee Sahib.

A kind of chair with curtains, in which persons
of distinction are carried by servants called
bearers.

A thatched country house.

A covered balcony on the ground floor, surround-
ing houses in warm climates.

Luncheon.

A long pipe.

A paste, composed of herbs, (areca and betel)
mixed with lime made of sea shells. Paun is
chewed by the lower class of Hindoos as an
opiate.

A court, round which are built the dwellings of
the servants.

The eastern salutation. The hands are placed on
the head, and the body is bent low to the earth.

A nurse.

A child’s light dress of frock and trowsers.

A rich man, properly an Indian prince.

A large fan, fastened to the ceiling by a hinge
and moved by cords.

Young lady.
CONTENTS.

CHAP.
PAGE
I. Calcutta ; . ‘ ; ; ]
II. Ellen Cameron . ; ‘ ; ; 5
III. The voyage. . . : : 11
IV. The old aunt. : . ‘ ‘ 17
V. What became of Ellen ; ‘ ; 22
VI. Life at school : ‘ oY ; 26
VII. The little nabob ; ; ; ; 4]
VIII. The two letters : ; ‘ oie
IX. Ellen’s visit . d : ; ‘ 57
X. The harmonious blacksmith . ‘ , 61
XI. The Irish cousins . é ; ; 65
XII. Want of dignity : . ° i
XIII. La Belle Assemblée . ‘ ‘ ; 80
XIV. Odetothe Greeks .. i é ; 84
XV. The critics ; ; ; ; ; 91
XVI. Unexpected news : . : ~ 96
XVII. Midnight F ‘ ; : ae
XVIII. Morning thoughts : ‘ . - a
XIX. Old times and new : j ; .°o ae
XX. The generous enemy . . . - 190
X XI. Better late than never . : ; a. an
XXII. At sea ‘ ‘ ; : . We
XXIII. Fellow passengers ‘ ‘bine ; . ae
XXIV. The ignorant girl . : ; . 133
XXV. Lord S.’s story ; : : . QD
XXVI. The guns ; P : f ~ Bee
XXVII. The pinnace . ‘ . 150
XXVIII. The bungalow ; ; s a
X XIX. The little brother : ; : . ae
XXX. The young Malay . ae ont te ia:
XXXI. Revelling and destruction : : - 162
XXXII. The conclusion ; : ‘ oo
ELLEN CAMERON.

(eI

CHAPTER I.
CALCUTTA.

Wuo has not heard of Calcutta, the Queen of eastern
cities, the captive of the proud merchants of Britain?
Thither sail our stately vessels, braving the stormy
waves and angry tempests, in quest of wealth; thence
they return laden with the treasures of Asia, to enrich
their own adventurous little island.

Those who think Of this metropolis of British India
as an English city, will probably form very false notions
of it. It seems as if all the nations of Asia had sent
some of their people to dwell there. Persians with
their high caps, flowing robes, and graceful counte-
nances, may be seen in the streets; Chinese artisans
with their broad flat faces, and long tail of hair, sit at
their open shops, pursuing their different occupations
of barber, shoemaker, or china-seller; Malays, fiercer of

B
9 CALCUTTA.

countenance; and Turks with their grave and solemn
mien. Here you may see a Hindoo of high caste and
great rank, borne along on his palanquin surrounded
by dependent natives: here an English casitiage dashes
past, with its four beautiful horses; and there an ele-
phant goes along, shaking his huge ears, and making
the earth quake, with his heavy tread, while a man sits
on his neck, and guides the docile monster.

Thus Calcutta has amongst its inhabitants many
from many and distant parts of the globe: from
England come its conquerors: all its grandeur, and all
its importance are English. The quays and warehouses
for merchandise are English; English ships are seen
peopling, but not crowding, the noble river; English
churches point their tall spires to heaven ; English red-
coats abound ; English fashions prevail : in short, every
thing which gives the idea of wealth, strength, or com-
fort, is English; and the traces of Hindoo language,
manners and religion, are rarely found apart from what
is poor, old and neglected in this singular city.

Many thousands of Englishmen leave their native
land, with its sweet wholesome climate and its fireside
comforts, to seek for gain in India. Of these, very few
are contented to return to England, and enjoy the
CALCUTTA. 3

moderate fruits of industry. The love of money, to
which they have already sacrificed so much, gains so
strong a hold of their minds, that they forget friends,
country, all that once was dear to them.—A little
longer, a little longer, a little more, and a little more,
—so they say, till the fatal climate cuts them off, and
tears them from their darling riches; or till, having
arrived at an early old age, and lost all enjoyment of
life, they return invalids to their native land, to shiver
and complain a little while, to find all changed, all
gone, that they had known and loved before,—and then
to die. |

The banks of the river Hoogley, for many miles, are
adorned with elegant houses-belonging to the Eng-
lish, both merchants and militany. These are called
bungalows, or thatched houses. They have all possible
contrivances for mitigating the heat, and imitating?
as it were, the climate and comforts of Europe: yet
which of these dwellings can be compared in comfort
to a neat English cottage, with its sweet-smelling
garden, its light sash-windows opened wide to let in
the cool air, and with it the odour of the hongy-suckles
and roses that creep up the trellised porch?

The reader is now humbly requested to imagine himself,
4 CALCUTTA.

or herself in one of these bungalows, Situated on the
bank of one of those numerous streams that flow into
the Hoogley, it was retired, yet not out of the reach of
interesting objects. The many windings of the little
river, the pleasure-boats that rowed slowly up and
down in the cool of the evening, the frequent sail visible
on the distant Hoogley, the many buildings on the
banks of that great river, and the reflection of trees,
houses, temples, and sky in the broad mirror of water,
made a scene that one might well wish to look upon
again.

The house was worthy of its situation: it was built
and furnished with every ornament, every luxury that
wishes could suggest, and wealth supply. But who were
the inhabitants? A,young man, whose brow was bent
with sorrow, and a poor little motherless babe under four
*years of age.



CHAPTER II.

| ELLEN CAMERON.

Wuen,the heroine of this tale was a very little babe,
her mother died; and though: her father loved her
dearly, he could not, and did not supply a mother’s
ELLEN CAMERON. s

place to the poor child. Every morning he went into
Calcutta, to attend to his business; every evening when
he réturned, little Ellen was brought to him to be kissed
and caressed for a quarter of an hour before she went
to bed, and he saw her again at breakfast time before
he left home. If ever he heard her cry, he rang the
bell and ordered the servants to give her whatever she
wanted, and not to let her be distressed on any account.
She always looked very pretty, ‘she was always nicely
dressed when he saw her, and he ‘had engaged two
European nurses for her at a great expense; S0 he did
not doubt that she was well taken care of. But he was
mistaken. Had he intrusted her entirely to the native
servants, she would have been much better managed ;
for it is impossible to take more affectionate care than
- they take of the children under their charge. The two
English women, as soon as Mr. Cameron was safely out
of the house in the morning, laid Ellen on the floor of
the veranda, to amuse herself as she liked, and then
went to sleep till it was tiffin time. At twelve o'clock
they sat down to tiffin, and, giving themselves all the
airs of European ladies, admitted company, smoked
their hookahs, and gossiped for an hour or two. Ellen
always found her way to the tiffin table, and cried till
6 ELLEN CAMERON.

they gave her more to eat than was good for her; —
and then cried again,-till they shook her by the arms;
and then roared outright, till they called one of the
bearers to take her away. Then she was in her element.
Sejah would take her in his arms, and carry her
wherever she liked, and sing songs to her, and tell
her Hindoo stories all about their wonderful Hindoo
gods; and show her pictures of them, some with a
hundred hands sticking out of every part of their
body, some with serpents’ heads, and others with
elephants’ trunks; and Ellen would coax him, and
squeezing his brown face between both her little hands,
beg him to show her more beast men. In the mean
time, the neglect of her nurses, and the want of regular
and proper food and ‘rest, injured poor little Ellen’s
health, so that when she was four years old, it was
evident to everybody that she did not thrive as she
ought. Her fingers were long and bony, she tottered
in walking, her face was quite pale, and there was a
black streak under each of her eyes: those pretty,
sparkling, laughing eyes were always half shut, and
seemed oppressed by the weight of their lids,

Mr. Cameron began to be alarmed when he saw his
little girl looking so languid. He sent for advice from




ELLEN CAMERON. 7

Calcutta; he bought an elephant for her to ride on; he
fitted out a pleasure-boat to take her up and down the
river; he found she was fretful, so he gave stricter
orders to his servants to indulge her in every wish, lest
crying should injure her health ;—and then he thought
he had done his duty.

One day Mr. Cameron returned to his bungalow
some hours earlier than usual. He had met with an
English gentleman whom he had not seen for some
years, and he brought him home to dinner. As they
went slowly along the banks of the river towards the
house, Mr. Cameron told his friend all that had hap-
pened to him since their last meeting. A very melan-
cholystory it was; and they both of them shed some tears
when Mr. Cameron spoke of the little girl as the only
comfort that was left to him, and said that she was too
sickly to live long, and that he should soon be without
a child. .

They entered the house, and went straight to little
Ellen’s apartments; they were empty. Mr. Cameron
supposed she was sailing on the river, and looked about
for some of his people who might give tidings of her.
‘¢ J suppose I shall find some one here,” said he, and
he walked towards the veranda. Judge of his as-
8 ELLEN CAMERON.

tonishment, when he saw the two nurses with a party of
gossips, sitting at their tiffin. He asked for the child ;
one said she was in her cot, another in the same breath
said she was on the river, and at last both of them
confessed that they did not know where she was: and
how could they? Half an hour before, they had laid
her crying on the floor in a corner of the veranda, and
told her to stay there till she was good: when quite
tired of crying, she had got up, and roamed about
in search of her favourite Sejah and his pretty beasts,
and had found her way through a glass door, and down
a flight of steps that led to the river side.

The house was searched ; Mr. Cameron was half
distracted ; Ellen was. nowhere to be seen. He re-
collected the doorway that led to the river; and to the
river he went. A crowd of native boatmen, and other
idle people, stopped his way; they were laughing
loudly at some object in the midst of them. Let me
pass! let me pass!” said Mr. Cameron; and he was
pushing his way through, when he thought he dis-
tinguished the voice of a child. He listened, and shud-
dered to hear the lips of a young child attempting
to sing a Hindoo song, which a man in the crowd was
teaching it, and lisping out words so very wicked, that
ELLEN CAMERON. 9

it never ought to have heard them. It was but for
a moment; the song ceased, and he heard the child
say: ‘* Now, give me the paun.” Was it fancy?
Could that be his Ellen’s voice? He pushed his way
through the dirty crowd, and saw his little girl sitting
on the ground, and eagerly putting into her mouth a
large piece of the unwholesome drug which the man
had given her for her song.

You will imagine that the poor father lost no time in
snatching his little girl to his bosom, and running home
with her; but when he had deposited her in proper
hands, and taken the paun out of her mouth, I am
sorry to say he flew into a furious passion with the
attendants, and made such a noise, that all the mul-
titude of servants in the house, and the compound,
heard him, and trembled for fear.

The whole of that.day Ellen was not out of her
father’s sight. Many unreasonable wishes she had, but
she was humoured in them all. She sat by her father’s
side during dinner, she fell asleep in his arms afterwards,
and he watched her undressing, and laid her himself in
her cot. After all this was done, his friend ventured to
ask him what he meant to do with Ellen? “ Why,”
said he, ‘‘ what more can I do? I have ordered three
10 ELLEN CAMERON.

of them to be flogged; I have sent the nurses to gaol ;
Sejah and Arkier I have turned off; and have given
the rest of them what they will not easily forget. I
can do nothing more.’”’—‘ You have done nothing,”
answered his friend, “to repair the injuries which
your child has suffered, nor to prevent their recur-
rence. None of the servants who bowed and trembled
just now before you, can or ought to be relied on,
when your eye is no longer upon them. Your little
girl will be lost for want of proper attention; or if
her life be spared, what will become of her mind
among these poor ignorant wretches?’””—‘‘I am an
unfortunate man,” said Mr. Cameron; “ what you
say is very true; but there is no remedy for it.””—
‘“‘ There is one remedy,” said his friend; ‘‘ send her to
England.”— “ No, sir,no; that.is impossible; I never
can part with her. You cannot love your children as I
love mine ;—you do not know what it is to love only
one living thing upon earth, so I pardon you for utter-
ing the cruel words.”’

‘‘ My dear sir,” answered his friend, ‘‘ I do not love
my children as you love yours; for I would rather
consent to part with them for ever, than see them
perish soul and body under my eyes, and hear in

om
x 3
oe
ELLEN CAMERON. 11

my secret thoughts the voice of my Judge, saying:
‘What hast thou done with the souls I committed
unto thee, and where are they? Answer thou for

them.’ ”’

Mr. Cameron was silent; but when his feiend had
retired, he walked out,—and many hours after, when
the heavy night dews were lying on the grass, he was
still pacing up and down under the trees by the river
side. 1 doubt whether he got any sleep that night,
but the morning found ‘him a wiser man than the even-
ing had left him: he had reflected, and had resolved
to give up his own gratification for the good of his
child, and to send Ellen to England, and that without
delay.



CHAPTER III.
THE VOYAGE.

Very early one morning, about three weeks after his
friend’s visit, Mr. Cameron took Ellen on board the
ship that was to convey her to England. It is im-
possible to describe her delight: every thing was new,
wonderful and enchanting to her. She ran up and
down the cabin stairs over and over again, and called
12 THE VOYAGE.

her father to play at hide and seek with her, among the
coils of rope, and other things that were lying on deck.
She wondered that he wonld not play with her, and
began pulling him by the skirts of his coat, and
pointing aloft said : ‘‘ Look, papa, look at the little men
sitting up there in the sky; how did. they get there ? a
Her father looked at her, but so very sorrowfully, that
though she had a great many other questions to ask,
she felt afraid to say any more, and stared in his face
with terror and astonishment.

We will pass over the melancholy moment of parting,
the day of lamentations, when the little girl found
herself among strangers, and the night, when she
sobbed herself to sleep in her berth. Suffice it to
say, that when the due time of mourning for a child
of four years old had passed away, her attention was
turned to new objects, and she became as lively, as
mischievous and as troublesome as ever. Ellen was
intrusted to the care of a Hindoo nurse, who brought
over five or six other children at the same time, and
who, when she had washed and dressed them in the
morning, usually allowed them to run about and amuse
themselves all day. Ellen soon became acquainted
with all the ship’s company, and was equally pleased
THE VOYAGE. 13

when sitting on the captain’s knee, or lighting a pipe
for Tom Cox, the boatswain’s mate. The voyage lasted
four months, and during that time all that Ellen learned
was to climb well, to speak a little English (if the
‘sailors’ language could be called English), and to sing
“ God save the Queen.” Her chief amusements were
pulling away at any thing like a rope that came within
her reach, and calling : “‘ Ha yo 1” like themen; and if
she ever condescended io play with the other little
children, who were not half so lively and high-spirited as
she was, it was upon condition that they should call her
captain, and obey her grders, though she often turned
sport into serious earnest.

Any one accustomed to observe the way in which
children show in their plays their different tempers,
would have been grieved at perceiving many signs of
a proud disposition in little Ellen Cameron during
her voyage. Her playfellows hated her, and found
her a troublesome tyrant; but the sailors, and especially
the young midshipmen, laughed at her little airs, and
encouraged them. ‘ You must not frighten little master
George so,” said the nurse: “itis not pretty for a young
lady to frown and slap.” —“ Yes it is,” said Ellen, ‘‘ for
James Hamilton always laughs at me when I box, and ©

Mi.
14 THE VOYAGE.

calls me a young Saracen.””—<‘And what is a Saracen?”
said James Hamilton, who was standing by. “I don’t
know,” said Ellen, “‘ but I am sure it must be some-
thing very pretty.” , James Hamilton only answered
by a laugh and a kiss, and turned off, saying, “‘ You’
pretty little Saracen you!”’ and Ellen’s idea of pretty in
a young lady was unchanged by the nurse’s reproof.

Sooner or later however the oppressed meet with
' redress; sooner or later tyrants have a fall: happy are
those tyrants, who, like little Ellen Cameron, are not
chastised in vain ! rece

One day, when the voyage wag nearly ended, Ellen was
walking up and down the quarter-deck with a consequen-
tial step, holding her hands behind her as the captain did,
when two of the little children ran past her. She seized
one by the arm, and gave the other a blow on the face,
saying, in an angry voice: “ Why dont you bow to me
when you pass? Don’t you know I’m captain?” Little
George, offended at being slapped by a girl, but too
faint-hearted to do any thing but cry, lifted up his voice
and lamented, while Julia, his sister, running to take
refuge with the other children, called out, as soon as
she thought herself out of danger : “‘ You cannot make me
bow, for I won’t.” This word of rebellion was the signal
THE VOYAGE. 15

for a generaluproar. Ellen rushed on to the fight, and
setting hands, nails, and teeth at work, with astonishing
strength and valour, struck, terror into the assembled
forces of her adversaries. She soon put them to flight,
and with eyes and cheeks on fire, and disordered dress,
hotly pursued them till they reached the sacred limits
of the quarter-deck. Here it was that Ellen was first
stopped in her career by a long and strong arm stretched
across her path, and looking up, she beheld the face of
the captain. She thought he was laughing: No; there
was certainly something like a smile lurking round his
lips; but a frown stood on his brow that could not be mis-
taken, when he roughly said: “ How now ! what’s all
this about, my little lady ?”—“ I only want to make
them bow to me,” said Ellen, “ because 1 am captain.”
“ But you must know,” replied the captain, “‘ that
you have no right to beat and scratch your crew as you
have done. If I were to use my ship’s company ill, I
should be tried and punished for it; so you must be
punished too; and since there is no one else here to
execute sentence on you, I must.do it myself.” So
. ‘ *
saying, he put his telescope under one arm, and Ellen
under the other, and when he had taken her into his
eabin, he gave her no very gentle chastisement.


16 THE VOYAGE.

After this, you may believe Ellen did not attempt to
play the tyrant again; and before the remaining week
of the voyage was over, the scratches she had inflicted
were healed, the fight was forgotten, and the children
called her captain as usual.

What new land have they come to’ now? What
broad fair river are they sailing up? What. people are
shouting joyful huzzas from the shore? What heavy
mass of smoke and cloud is lying before them ?

That country is England! That river is the Thames!
Those people are honest Britons, cheering their own
brave tars on their return home! That huge dingy
place in the distance is London !

CHAPTER IV.
THE OLD AUNT.

Mr. Cameron had an aunt who lived in London;
and he was obliged to send Ellen to her, for all his
other relations lived in the north of Scotland. He
never doubted for & moment that this old and near
relative would -be kind to poor little Ellen in a strange
land; so he gave the nurse a letter to her, in which he
THE OLD AUNT. 17

entreated: her to take care of his child, and let her stay at
her house until she could be placed at a proper school.

It was a matter of some regret to Mr. Cameron that
he knew very little of this aunt. He had seen her
twenty years before, when he was a little boy, and then
he used to admire her for her beautiful red cheeks, and
the feathers she wore in her head-dress. He now tried to
recollect something more of her, something that she had
said or done when he was a child, that he could judge
of now that he was a man, and that would help him
to guess to what sort of a woman he ‘was intrusting
so precious a deposit. If Mr. Cameron: had been an
observing and attentive boy, his memory would have
furnished him readily with some trait of his aunt, which
would have helped him now; but as those who do not
observe cannot remember, he racked poor memory in
vain: nothing would come uppermost but red cheeks
and bobbing feathers; and as he had long ceased to
admire these for their own sake, the recollection of
them gave him no comfort at all. F

After the nurse who had charge of the children
had taken the rest to their different destinations, she
proceeded with Ellen to a large house in Dover-street,
whither Mr. Cameron’s letters directed her.
18 THE OLD AUNT.

The nurse spoke only a few words of English, and
though she made many salaams to the smart gentleman
who opened the door to her, she could not make him
understand what she wanted. At last however she
gave him the letter she had brought for his mistress,
and after turning it round and round and peeping in at
the ends of it, he put it on a silver waiter and carried it
up stairs, leaving the nurse and child in the hall.
After some time he came back to tell them his mistress
wished to see them, and he ushered them into the
drawing-room where she was.

Mrs. Cameron was an old bent woman of seventy,
with a very rich dress, and a very fashionable head-
dress; and she had such white teeth, such a colour in
her cheeks, and’Such @quantity of light flaxen ringlets,
_ that if they had been her own, instead of being bought
with her money, they would have been truly astonish-
ing in a woman of her age.

Mrs. Cameron’s favourite maid was out, and as her
own eyes were too dim to make out the letter, and she
could not wait with patience till Parker came in to
read it for her, she had ordered up the nurse and child
to explain the mystery of their coming; and now ina
petulant and impatient tone she poured forth a multi-

x ae,
8
Be A
THE OLD AUNT. 19
>

tude of questions on the astonished nurse. Now
even if the poor Daye had understood these questions,
she could not have answered half of them; and if she
could have answered them, the old lady was so deaf,
that she could hear nobody well but Parker. So when
she found herself reduced to the necessity of waiting,
she fretted and fumed, and rang her bell till she almost
pulled it down, to ask the footman whether Parker
was come in or not.

At last Parker arrived, and after receiving some
sharp rebukes for being always out of the way when
she was wanted, she was allowed to begin the letter.
She had not proceeded far however, before she was
interrupted by her cross and impatient mistress.

“© Hey !—what !—how! I take* the child! Thank
Heaven, I never had any of my own, and I’m not
going to torment myself with other people’s children.
Besides, it’s all an imposture you may depend upon it.
Edward Cameron has been six years in India: ‘most
likely he’s dead by this time.”

‘¢ Here is his letter,” said Parker: “‘ he cannot be
dead.”’

‘Then he ought to take care of his children himself,”
thundered Mrs. Cameron. ‘‘If he is not dead now, he
20 THE OLD AUNT.
will die soon; for all people die that go to India,
sooner or later; and then I shall be burdened with his
girl,”

‘* But here is a very large remittance,” said Parker,
‘and Mr. Cameron says——”’

“Hold your tongue, Parker,” interrupted her mis-
tress, “If he can afford to pay for it, he will find
people enough who will take care of her; so I will have
nothing to do with her. Make that black woman
understand that she must take the child back again
directly.”

“Then I need not finish the letter, ma’am,”’ said
Parker, folding it up.

“Oh! finish it, by all means,” said Mrs. Cameron;
‘* you may as well read on, to see what he means.”

This permission was just the thing that Parker
wanted. She thought that if her mistress’s curiosity
prevailed so far over her impatience as to let her hear
the rest of the letter, her heart would be touched,
and she would grant Mr. Cameron’s earnest request.
Parker knew her mistress well, and the effect was
exactly what she expected.

‘‘ Ha !—hum !—so !—Well, if the child has lost its
mother, and if it really was dying in that climate, I


THE OLD AUNT. 9]

suppose people would think me cruel in not taking
it; so if you will take charge of it, Parker, and keep it
out of my way, it may stay here till we find a school.
But where is the child? Let me look at it.”

‘During all this time the Daye had been doing her
best to keep little Ellen quiet, for she saw the aunt was
not favourably disposed towards her. It often happens
however, that when children are most urged to show off,
they become the most unruly. So it was with Ellen :
her eyes had roamed round the room, and she wanted
to go where her eyes had been. The Daye held her
fast by the hand till she found that she could do so
no longer without a disturbance, and then suffered
her to creep under the sofa, and she had been quiet
ever since.

As soon as Mrs. Cameron’s inquiry after Ellen was
made intelligible to her, the poor Daye looked under the
sofa; but, to her great dismay, no Ellen was there. There
was a moment’s silence, when suddenly a laugh was heard
from the other side of the room, and an immense china
jar, which had stood for many years demurely on end,
was seen rolling about on its side in a most extraordi-
nary way. All had a presentiment of evil—Mrs. Ca-
meron swelled with rage, Parker sighed, the’ Daye
22 - THE OLD AUNT.

trembled. In short, little Ellen had chosen to hide
herself in this singular retreat, and was so incensed at
being dragged forth by the united powers of her ene-
mies, that in kicking and struggling for mastery, she
threw the beautiful jar down, and dashed it to atoms.
Parker’s countenance fell, for she knew that the spark
of humanity which had just been kindled in Mrs. Came-
ron’s bosom, was not likely to survive the china jar.
“ Poor little orphan, there is no chance for you now gy
murmured she; and again she guessed well, for in the
same moment the old lady rang the bell, and ordered
Ellen and her Daye neversto enter the house again.

‘



CHAPTER V.
WHAT BECAME OF ELLEN.

Parker, with tears in her eyes, followed the nurse
down stairs. ‘‘ Who would think,” said she to herself,
“that a stranger would have more natural pity for the
poor little creature than her own flesh and bleod! I
don’t know what to do with her, but something I must
do, for it seems as if Providence had touched my heart,
on purpose to befriend her when she wants a friend ;
PO als ie he A

WHAT BECAME OF ELLEN. | 23

and it would be sinful to fight against Providence.”
The kind-hearted woman then called to the nurse to
stop; and having left her for a few minutes, she re-
turned with a note, addressed to a sister of hers in the
borough, and directed the black woman to go thither
and leave the child, assuring her that she would be in
good hands.

Parker’s sister was a poor woman, with a large family,
and a very small house; yet she had no sooner read
her sister’s note, simply asking her to take the child in, —
and be kind to her till she should hear more from her,
than she received little Ellen with the affection of a
mother. Indeed, it was not till she had made up a
little bed in her own room, and given her some supper,
that she began to wonder where the child came from,
and what her sister had to do with her. She then
began to ask a few questions, as any other woman in
her place would.

“What's your name, my dear?”
answered the child.

‘¢ Where do you come from 2?”

‘“‘T came out of our ship, and I want to go back,
for this is a nasty little cabin,” said Ellen, looking
round the dark room.

Pd

‘¢ Captain,
94 WHAT BECAME OF ELLEN.

“Who brought you here?”

“ John Murray, and James Hamilton, and Bill
Graves, and little Jack, and a great many more,” said
the little girl.

‘Yes, those were the sailors, I suppose; but was
there no one else with you?”

Ellen pulled her inquirer down by the sleeve, till her
head was on a level with her own, and then whispered
in her ear: “‘ Yes, there was the old captain; but I
don’t like him, for he whipped me.”

« Who was the black woman that brought you here?”’

Qh, my Daye, my Daye !—let me go back to my
Daye!” cried poor Ellen, who having forgotten her
sorrows in her supper, now remembered them all afresh,
and rent the air, or rather the smoke of the dark shop
with lamentations, most earnestly and pathetically im-
ploring to be restored to her Daye. The good woman's
compassion was stirred, and her curiosity was stilled in
the same moment; she took the sobbing child on her
knee, and soothed her, and lulled her, and kept her
there the whole evening, though little Tommy Higgs
her own boy, stood by with his thumbs in his mouth,
sulking, because a stranger had usurped his throne.

The week that Ellen spent with this kind woman
WHAT BECAME OF ELLEN. 95

was a trying one, and brought her many a mortifica-
tion, The little Higgses were a strong-bodied race,
well able to take their own parts, and to support the
laws they chose to impose, with sound blows and buffets.
Thus Ellen, who had never been contradicted by her
Daye, nor overcome by her playféllows, now found her
commands disputed, and her strength despised.

At length Parker came to explain the mystery to
her sister, and relieve her of her charge. . Parker had
consulted a benevolent friend of her mistress, who
without delay made arrangements for sending Ellen to
a school of high and deserved repute in the west of |
England, took charge of the remittances Mr. Cameron
had sent, and promised to write to him immediately.
This good lady completed her kindness by inviting old
Mrs. Cameron to her house for a week, that Parker
might obtaim a few days’ leave of absence, and take
little Ellen to school.

It would be endless work were we to mention what-
ever was new to Ellen; for every thing she saw and
heard was new to her; so when we have introduced
her into the school-room, we shall leave her there for

_ some years, supposing that every little girl can from her
own imagination fill up this interval of time, and infer that

Cc
26 WHAT BECAME OF ELLEN.

where there are so many books, desks, French marks,
and back-boards, Ellen would, in’ process of time, read,
write, speak French, and hold up her head, as well as
her neighbours.



°

CHAPTER VI.

LIFE AT SCHOOL. |
ELLEN at ten years old was very different from Ellen
as we have known her hitherto. The first day she
made her appearance at school, one would have thought .
her'absolutely untameable. She was dressed that day
in a little silk frock, with nothing under it but a pair of
muslin pagamahs or trousers, and wore rings in her
ears, and bracelets round her wrists. She ran about
all day, laughing, singing and talking a jargon of
Hindoostanee and English; and not all -the frowns of
all the teachers could make her sit still, or prevent her
from playing rub-a-dub with the ruler on the desks.
At dinner she behaved like a little savage: she snatched
pieces of meat and pudding from the plate of one neigh-
bour, to cram them with her fingers into the mouth of
another, to whom she had taken a particular fancy ;
and then taking up a glass of water, she tried to pour

17
ra
alge
4
&
vi
?:
;





LIFE AT SCHOOL. 97

:t down her friend’s throat, crying out: “‘ Drink, drink!”
But with all Ellen’s roughness, Mrs. Kirnan, the school-
mistress, was pleased at seeing more of generous feeling
in this wild display, than in the measured conduct of
many a young lady who prides herself on her good
manners. -Ellen’s seizures were all made for the gratifi-
cation of others, and so far was she from thinking of
herself, that she more than once took what she thought
a very nice bit out of her own mouth, and stretched
across the table to give it to a little girl about her own
age, who seemed to be making a serious, business of
her meal.

With such a perfect,absence of selfishness, Ellen
soon found, that her ways were disagreeable, and im-
mediately became as anxious to please her companions
by orderly behaviour, as she had been by overload-
ing: them with dainties. She had wished only to give
pleasure, and had failed only from not knowing the
right way to set about it. But when she once fell
into the orderly customs of the school, she soon be-
came the most polite little girl in it.

What is politeness? The science of politeness is ‘the
knowledge of the right way to please. The practice
of politeness consists in serving your friends in their
28 LIFE AT SCHOOL. |

own way instead of yours. The best master in polite-
ness is the one who gave lessons to Ellen, and to all
other obliging young folks of our acquaintance. His
name is Disinterestedness; he is a man of independent

_ fortune, and though he has a large house of his own to

live in, he gives up the best part of it to accommodate
his friends, and is contented with any little corner of it
himself,—as John Bunyan would: say. |

We have known some children, who behave very
prettily before strangers, and who always courtesy in
passing their schoolmistress, snatch a plaything from
the hands of a schoolfellow, or quarrel about a seat
near the fire. This is not opr politeness, nor was it
Ellen’s. She soon felt real gratitude to her teachers
for their kindness, and real love towards many of her
schoolfellows; and this prompted in her the wish to
serve them in all things. She had no selfishness in
her composition, except that which her old sin—pride
—brought with it. She was never weary of running
errands for her friends; she would willingly give up
the chimney-corner without being asked to do so;
and even when this was demanded of her, she would
give it up, though no one felt better than she, how
much more gratifying it is to do a service of our
|
|
|
|
|



LIFE AT SCHOOL. 99

own accord, than to have it wrung from us. Ellen had
also learned to do and to suffer a great many things.
Slie would make any exertion to help a schoolfellow
out of a difficulty; she would bear blame, or even
punishment for a friend, without complaining or in-
forming ; but one thing, alas! she could not bear well ;

and you will wonder at it when you hear what a little
harmless, powerless thing it was ;—she could not bear
a laugh. *

Now we warn all young ladies who are going to
school, to make up their minds to stand a laugh before
they go. However we may lament the fact, ridicule is
in general use among school-girls, as a thermometer to
measure the warmth of a companion’s temper. In
vain will you try to excite their compassion by your
emotion. If you keep still at one point, their experi-

‘ment will soon be over, and then they will leave you

alone; but the morégapt*you are to bounce up to
boiling-water heat, the oftener will they try you, till
you settle at last, in the natural course of things, at.
the right school temperature, which is little above the
freezing point.

Who that knows how Ellen’s childhood was neg-
lected, will wonder to hear that at ten years old she
, a LIFE AT SCHOOL

often made ignorant blunders ? These blunders, when
they were discovered, hurt her feelings far too much : the.
simple consciousness of unavoidable ignorance ought
not to have distressed her; but Ellen as we already
know, was proud. Her schoolfellows should have made
allowances, but ‘they only laughed at her; and the
strangeness of her mistakes supplied them perhaps with
seme excuse. They were indeed of rare occurrence, not
made up of blot, blur ‘and carelessness, to be read at
first sight in the dirty face of every copy-book ; for
Ellen needed only to be told once what was right, and
she was more careful to teach herself, than others were to
teach her; but when any unfortunate mistakes did occur,
they certainly were egregious.

One evening Ellen was writing, for an exercise,
answers to some questions which Mrs. Kirnan had
given her. Among them was found this one: ‘‘ What
is the size of the moon?”’ > had never learned
any thing about the moon, but she knew in what book
she might find the necessary information. ‘It is not
worth while,” said she to herself, “to hunt through a
book for the sake of such a simple question as that,
when the moon is shinmg upon the window; I'll
open the shutter and measure it. Mrs. Kirnan likes
LIFE AT SCHOOL. 3]

experiment better than copying from books, and so
do 1.” r‘:

She opened the shutter, and held first one thing
aad then another to the window pane, to see if it
covered the moon. Her copy-book was too large,
even when she made allowance for the corners; her
pen-wiper was too small: what should she do for an
eract moon-measure? Mr. D’Orleans, the French master,
yas there at the time; his snuff-box lay on the table.
She took it up, put it close to the glass; it covered the
noon completely—just a total eclipse. ® |

“¢ That will do!” said Ellen; “‘ there is nothing like
experiment! Now for a game at puss in the corner !’’

Little did poor Ellen anticipate the trial she was
about to experience, when she gaily and confidently
produced her exercise the next moming, to be read
and corrected in class: It was well written, and care-
fully done, till the last question came, with its fatal
answer. ‘‘ How large is the moon?” —“A little smaller
than Mr. D’Orlean’s snuff-box.”’ A sudden burst of
uncontrolled laughter broke the silence of the school,
and some moments passed before Mrs. Kirnan’s calm
but steady eye could impose any thing like restraint
on her scholars. Ellen stood beside her in a tumult
32 LIFE AT SCHOOL.

of trouble, amazement and rage: her eye elanced
quickly from one to another of her.companions, who
were-still scarcely able to contain their laughter ; her
hand was clenched, and she advanced her foot, as if
she entertained some dire project-of vengeance.

“This is not the right answer,” said Mrs. Kirnan;
‘if you had looked in the book, you would hae
found that the moon is much largef than you suppose.’

But Mrs. Kirnan spoke in vain; for pride ant
passion make their victims deaf to the voice of instruc:
tion, and Ellen was now in the condition of those un-
happy ones who “ having ears hear not, neither under-
stand.” She forgot that humility especially becomes chil-
dren, that respect is due to teachers, that Mrs. Kirnan
was more likely to be in the right than she was ;—iIn
fact, she forgot every thing worth remembering, and
only listened to her pride. ‘Jt is not larger, but
rather smaller,” said she, stamping with her foot.
“TI have tried, and I know it; and nothing on earth
shall make me believe the contrary.”

Mrs. Kirnan never wasted words. She gave Ellen
her book with a look of pity, saying: “ Go to your
room’ Ellen, till you are yourself again.” Ellen did
not wait till the sentence was finished, but with her
LIFE AT SCHOOL. 33

figure drawn" to its full height, with.cheeks highly
flushed, that gavé unnatural brightnéss to her’ beautiful
dark eyes, and with her lip curled into an indignant
smile, she walked slowly to the door, made a disdainful
courtesy, and left the room.

I think I hear some of my little readers exclaim,
‘¢Oh, what a hard-hearted girl! How could she smile
at such a moment?’’ Happy are those children who
have never felt, who cannot conceive, thé bitterness of
such a smile as Ellen’s! Better weep rivers of tears
than wear a proud smile to conceal the heart’s utter
wretchedness. Perhaps Ellen thought so too, for one
who watched her closely said, that before she closed
the door, a large tear had gathered in her eye, which
rather contradicted the careless unconcern of her
manner. |

She reached her room; she shut the door; she threw
herself on the bed, and burst into an agony of weeping.
What would she not have given, could the last half hour
have been blotted out from her life, or from her memory!
Her mind was in such a state of confusion, that she
seemed unable to separate the ideas which crowded
in one after. the other. Now burning tears of shame
and anger suffused her cheeks, at the recollection
34 LIFE AT SCHOOL.

of her companions’ ridicule; now she wrung her hands
with vexation, when the conviction came across her
that she must have made some mistake that caused her
to appear ignorant and ridiculous; now her tears sud-
denly ceased, she started up, drew in her breath, and
proudly resolved to care for none of these things ; and
now she thought she saw the gentle pitying look of
her friend Mrs. Kirnan, and her pride giving way, she
burst into sobs of real grief. :

How often, after losing ourselves in anger and pride,
is there given to us a moment of stillness and reflec-
tion, and we are led back into the right way! How
does one ray of good feeling, like the first gleam of
dawn, glow into more perfect light, till, like the rising
sun, it disperses our darkness altogether ! Thus it was
with Ellen. She dwelt long on that look, so calm, so
compassionate ; and it told her more truth than words
could tell. As she reflected on it she wept, and while
she wept she repented. )

‘< Oh! what have I done! What have I done! ” said
Ellen. ‘‘She pitied me then, and perhaps even then
she would have pardoned me; but what must she think
of me now? That I am careless, hard-hearted, un-
grateful. And so I am! If I had loved her as !




LIFE ‘AT SCHOOL. 35

ought, I should never have lost her friendship, for the
sake of imposing upon a few silly girls. And what will
they think. of me? Perhaps, after all, they are not
deceived by my manner; perhaps they only laugh at it.
But no; they shall not laugh,” said she, as a momen-
tary pang shot through her at this vision of a laugh ;
‘they shall never know, shall never suspect, what I feel!”

In this way did Ellen think and talk to herself for a
long time. More than once, when she knew that school
was over, and that Mrs. Kirnan was in her own room,
she felt inclined to go to her, and acknowledge her
fault; but the sound of her companions’ steps and
voices, in the long gallery through which she must pass,
prevented her. ‘‘ They will meet me, they will guess
what I am about,” thought she.

At last anew idea struck her; she would write a
note to Mrs. Kirnan, and tell her not to show it to any
one: that would be an easier way than saying what she
wished to say, with such a choking in her throat. She
hastened to get her little desk, and she placed it before
her. It was one which Mrs. Kirnan had given her on
her last birthday; and the recollection of the words of
affectionate approval which had accompanied the gift,
came strongly to her mind. She had often thought of
36 LIFE AT SCHOOL.

those words since that delightful birthday, and they
had always made her happy. Now they seemed kinder
than ever; yet their very kindness fell like a blight
upon her heart. Every word reproached her. She
laid her head down on the desk, and thought of all that
Mrs. Kirnan had done for her, ever since the time when
she first took her, a wild and wilful baby, under. her
care; and when at last she raised her head and her eyes,
she saw Mrs. Kirnan sitting at the foot of her bed.

‘“] have been here some time,” said Mrs. Kirnan ;
‘but when I saw that you were thinking, I did not
disturb you. You have been accustomed to tell me
your thoughts, Ellen: may I ask you what engaged
you so deeply just now?” Ellen threw her arms round
the neck of her friend, hid her face in her bosom, and
sobbed out, ‘‘ I was thinking how very, very good you
are to me, and I am- »»__«¢ Well, Ellen, what are
you?”—“‘ Tam so ungrateful !’’ The long pause before
the last word, showed how difficult it was to bring it
out. Mrs. Kirnan pressed her young friend to her
heart, and said: “That 1s enough. I knew your
thoughts, my dear child, before, and could easily have
saved you the pain of telling them; but though the
struggle was a hard one, I thought your better part


LIFE AT SCHOOL. 37

would gain the victory. It has done so; and now, as
far as your offence concerns me, I have already forgiven
you, and I aly believe that you will never be ungrate-
ful to me again.”’

“Oh! thank you, thankyou ! ” said ‘Ellen. ‘‘ Now
I am perfectly happy;” and.she looked up with a smile
into Mrs. Kirnan’s face. No returning smile, however,
was to be found there. . |

Ellen was silent for a few moments. “ You say, as
far asconcerns you. Have I offended any body else?”

“Tell me, Ellen, do you feel as happy as you were
this morning ?”

‘* No, because I thinkidegraded myself before my com-
panions, and I am vexed that they all saw me in a passion :
but that only concerns myself; it did them no harm.”

‘‘ What! did it degrade you to be in a passion?
And if you do harm only to yourself, why should you
care that others see it ?”’

Ellen considered for,a while, and then replied : “To.
be ina passion, I am sure, must be wrong, and there-
fore degrading ; and as God requires us to do right, it
must be hurtful to us to choose to do wrong.”’

‘‘ But have we not a right to hurt ourselves if we
please? Are we not our own property ?”
38 LIFE AT SCHOOL.

‘¢ | think not; we belong to God who made us.”

“ And ‘what do we say of those who waste and injure
the property of another ¢”

“That they are unjust.”

“ And of those who receive the best gifts, and throw
them away, or trample them under foot ?” |

“‘ That they are ungrateful,” said Ellen, sorrowfully.

‘ And what do you say of those who can’ be unjust
and ungrateful to their. friend, their father, and yet be
more anxious to seem right with the world than to be
right with him? What does it signity, how many eyes
were upon you? They are not worth one sigh, one
regret, in comparison with his who seeth all the deep
places of the heart, and who hateth iniquity.”

« How is it,” said Ellen, “that though I know it is
wrong, I cannot help being more mortified than sorry
when I have behaved ill? I wish I were not proud.”

‘My dear Ellen,” said Mrs. Kirnan, “ you told
your fault to me just now, because you knew I loved
you; and because I love you, now that I see you are
aware of your fault and sorry for it,-I cannot refuse
you forgiveness. For the same reason go to your
heavenly Father; tell him that wish, tell him all your
thoughts; he loves you infinitely more than I, or any crea-

Se
LIFE AT SCHOOL. 39

‘ture could love you;. he will show you infinitely better
than I can what to do. But remember, that if you ask
him in the name of Him who was meek and lowly of
heart, to give rest to your:soul, you must make no
reserves; you must not wish for the praise of men:
God asks the whole heart, its undivided service.”’

Mrs. Kirnan, after she had ceased to speak, con-
tinued sitting in silence for some minutes; she then
kissed Ellen, and arose to go: She turned back
however as she was leaving the room, and said,
‘ Ellen, shall I tell your schoolfellows that you are
sorry for your fault?” Ellen shrunk from this pro- —
posal. ‘‘ No, no, madam, pray do not; there is no
occasion for them to know it.’”’—‘‘ Well,” said Mrs.
Kirnan, ‘‘ we must not expect too much at once. |
will hope better things: meanwhile I promise you your
_ secret shall be safe with me;”’ and she shut the door after
her. Those who recollect Mrs. Kirnan’s advice may guess
that Ellen did not pass unprofitably the next half hour.

At length the dinner-bell-rang. Ellen, after holding
the door half open for some time, made ‘a strong
resolve, and proceeded down stairs. - Her schoolfellows
were already seated. As she passed between the
tables, many heads in the two long rows turned round
40 LIFE AT SCHOOL.

to look at her. ‘She has been crying,” whispered |
one little girl. ‘‘ How ashamed she looks!’’ said
another. ‘These, and sundry other remarks, gave not
a very pleasant impulse to her step as she passed along,
and although a. hasty blush overspread her face for
a moment, she continued to walk-on with her eyes
cast down, till she stood beside Mrs. Kirnan. ‘‘ Will
you be so good,” said she, ‘as to tell them now that
I am sorry?” Her-voice trembled very much, but |
believe every one in the room heard it. There were
no more inquisitive looks seen, no more remarks heard.
- After dinner, Ellen’s companions called her as usual to
lead their plays; and the only respect in which the
remainder of that day differed from others, was, that
on wishing good night, most of the girls kissed Ellen
more affectionately than usual, and a tear stood in
Mrs. Kirnan’s eye while she said: “ God bless you, my
dear child!” After this Ellen became daily more dear
to all around her; and it may be noted as a singular
circumstance, that from this day, the young people of
that school were observed to leave off, in some measure,
the ill-natured custom of laughing at one another’s
foibles, except in those cases where both sides could
laugh in chorus. 3
THE LITTLE NABOB. 4)

CHAPTER VII.
THE LITTLE NABOB.

Ir is not however the labour of one hour, or of one
day, that will root out a weed with such deep and far-
spreading roots. as pride. Nor was the dislike of
ridicule the. only way in which Ellen’s prevailing fault
showed itself. She habitually thought of herself more
highly than she ought; and she had an habitual con-
tempt for the rest of the world. She was ready and
willing to spend herself in services to others; but when
kindness was offered to her, she either received it
coldly, and as her due,—or refused it, if not with dis-
dain, yet from a proud unwillingness to be under ob-
ligation to others. Again, though her kind heart led
her to compassionate the poor and to relieve their ne-
cessities, still her pity for them was allied to contempt.
She knew in theory, but never once felt, that they
were her brethren. Thus her behaviour to servants
and inferiors, though within the bounds of civility,
was such as made them feel their inferior station each
time she bestowed on them a word or a look.

Now, pride is a strange thing to live in the hearts
of children, who have so little, can do so little, and

D
42 THE LITTLE NABOB.

are so little; and if it were not as common in them, as
nettles and thorns in the hedges, we should wonder
how it got there, and we ought to wonder. When we
find this tare among our wheat, we content ourselves too
often with saying: “‘ An enemy hath- done this;” and
then give ourselves no concern to find out how he did
it, where he did it, and when he did it. Rather should
we search our field, find out the careless gap, or the
open gate, by which he came in, and close it that he
may come in no more. Sometimes we may find him
only beginning his mischievous work, and turn him
out with his seed unsown, by the opening at which he
entered.

Two or three circumstances in Ellen’s early life throw
a little light on the origin of her pride. Ellen’s earliest
recollections were of a house very unlike Mrs. Kirnan’s,
of a multitude of servants, and an absolute command
over every thing she wished to have. The things
and the customs which she remembered and described,
appeared to her little companions almost incredible,
because they had never seen them; and thus she
learned to attach an idea of grandeur and importance
to the most simple and natural circumstances of life in
India. ‘Here then her ignorance, which incapacitated
THE LITTLE NABOB. 43

her from making a just allowance for the difference of
climate and manners in the different parts of the world,
‘Jed her to make a false estimate of her own importance.
- “Qh!” cried a little girl to an older one, after the
little East Indian had given a fine description of her
elephant and its trappings, ‘Oh, Mary! Do you know
that Ellen Cameron says she has.an elephant of her
own! Do you think it can be true? Clara says she
does not believe it, because, if it is so, her father must
be a king, like Porus in the Grecian history. And
Ellen says, that she does not remember whether her
father was a king or not, but that she is sure she had
an elephant to ride on..’

‘‘ Nonsense!” said the older girl, “‘ her father is a
rich East Indian, and all that she says is true enough,
I dare say. Those Indian people live in such ‘style!
My cousin has been a voyage to India, and he says that
in England we have no idea how splendidly they live
there. Why, they have a hundred servants and more,
in many families.” ; |

‘A hundred servants! More than a hundred ser-
vants!”” was repeated in a tone of solemn astonishment
by the circle of little ones who heard this wonderful
instance of Eastern magnificence. From this time the
44 THE LITTLE NABOB.

children considered Ellen as one of superior rank, and
treated her with more respect than was necessary; and
she learned to claim it as homage due.

Another trifling incident occurred which satisfied her
concerning her superiority of rank. One day the
parents of a little schoolfellow of Ellen’s came to see
the children dance. The lady in question was noticing
to Mrs. Kirnan those of her scholars whose appearance
was in any way striking. “ And who is that child who
holds herself so well? 1 am sure, from her face, that
she is somebody.”—‘‘ Her name is Cameron,” said
Mrs. Kirnan; “she is an East Indian.” Ellen hap-
pened to cross over the quadrille just im time to hear -
what followed—uttered in a half whisper, a tone in
which even nonsense sounds impressive,—“* An East
Indiafi! Some nabob’s child, of course. I might. have
seen that from the Trichinopoly chain, and the beau-
tiful fan. My word! She looks like a little nabob
herself.”’

‘Nabob!” thought Ellen, ‘1 will not forget that
word.” She did not. She repeated to herself * nabob,
nabob,” during the quadrille, till the tune played .
nabob, the children danced nabob, and to forget nabob
was out of her power.


THE LITTLE NABOB. — 45

As soon as the dancing lesson was over, Ellen
hastened to seek her English Dictionary, and looked
for the letter N—‘‘ Nabob or Nabawb, an eastern
prince.” —‘‘ Now there it is!” said she to herself,
‘My father is a prince! I thought so.” And she
did think so for a long time. When older, and better
informed, it was easy to correct her idea of what is
called in England a nabob; but, alas! not so easy to
undo in her mind all the mischief which that one false
impression had wrought. |

CHAPTER VIII.
- THE TWO LETTERS. ,

Wuen Ellen was placed by Parker at Mrs. Kirnan’s,
the kind lady whom she had consulted on the occasion
wrote to Mr. Cameron, informing him of what had
happened, but softening, as much as possible, the un-
feeling conduct of the old aunt.. Mr. Cameron was little
aware that his aunt -had never, by letter or otherwise,
taken the least notice of Ellen since she had been to
school. He received regular and favourable accounts
of her health, comfort and improvement, from herself
46 THE TWO LETTERS.

and Mrs. Kirnan, and then felt no more uneasiness
about her than every parent must feel who is separated
from his child.

Ellen knew that she had such a relation as an old
aunt, but seldom thought of her, except to laugh at
early recollections, which were still quite vivid. She
thought she stood in no need of Mrs. Cameron’s notice;
yet she was indignant at her neglect: she never desired
a renewal of the acquaintance; yet she was hurt, that
while others were reckoning their various relations, she
could lay no claim to the only relative she had in the
land. Seldom however did she feel her want of con-
nexions. With’a happy and independent disposition,
she found in Mrs. Kirnan all that she wanted,—a
companion, a friend, a mother. School was her home,
and she wished for no other, except now and then, when
a bright vision of Eastern splendour, and of herself ruling
in it, came across her imagination.

Her situation was a forlorn one; and though she was
not sensible of it herself, there was one who felt it for her.
Mrs. Kirnan looked at Ellen with a sigh, when others re-
ceived visits or invitations from sisters, aunts and cousins ;
and wept, when the rest of the young people departed
joyfully to their homes at each returning holiday time;
THE TWO LETTERS. 47

and when she overheard the happy chat of others
concerning domestic pleasures and home indulgences,
Mrs. Kirnan regretted that Ellen was out of the reach of
those soft endearments, those tender exchanges of kind
feelings and good offices, which warm the souls of
brothers and sisters and kindred, and make home home.
She'felt that such an interchange of feeling would have
been of much use to Ellen, by softening her disposition,
and, by teaching her early many practical lessons, that
it would spare her much painful discipline in future years,
For she knew that later in life, hard struggles and cutting
disappointments, with bitter tears, are sent to those who
have neglected in youth to become humble and disin-
terested.

Our little girl had been at school seven years, when
one morning the postman’s well-known rap brought
the accustomed gleam of joy to many a young face in
Mrs. Kirnan’s school-room. ” Is it for me—is it for
me?” was the eager inquiry. All were looking up
anxiously,—all but one, who went on writing tran-
quilly, till the words—‘‘ Miss Cameron,’’—roused her.
“Ellen, a letter for yyou, and it is not a ship letter.”
Ellen turned pale, as he stretched forth her trembling
hand, and read the” address, in an unknown hand-
48 THE TWO LETTERS,

writing. The letter was opened. “ My old aunt,”
said Ellen, recovering herself and laughing; and she
read the letter; which we will transcribe, as it was not a
very long one.

“¢ Miss Ellen Cameron,

‘‘T have received a letter from my nephew, your
father, together with some ear-rings and other trinkets,
some of which are directed for you. I write to inform
you that they are at my house. I hope you are be-
having properly, under the many and great advantages
you are favoured with. As you are now old enough to
know how to conduct yourself in a drawing-room, |
rather think I may have you to spend part of your
next holidays with me. This must however depend
entirely on the account your governess sends of your
conduct. I shall be obliged to her to write a few lines
concerning you, in the letter I expect to receive in
answer to this. |

. ‘*¢ Yours, &c.
‘¢ ANNE CAMERON,

“P.S. Do not consider yourwisit as certain; for
many things may happen betwee this time and then to
make it inconvenient to me.”
THE TWO LETTERS. 49

Ellen’s feelings on reading this ungracious invitation,
may be best gathered from her conduct. She quickly
and silently drew forth a sheet of paper, resumed the
pen she had laid aside, and. wrote the following answer :

“ Madam,

“«{ have received your letter of the 28rd instant, and I
doubt not I shall soon find an opportunity of relieving
you from the care of my father’s presents. I should
have been gratified at hearing that he was well; but
probably that information may come from himself, in a
note with my ear-rings.

‘“‘T beg, madam, to decline your invitation for the
holidays, as I should be very sorry to put you to in-
convenience; and I am never so happy as when I am
with my friend, Mrs. Kirnan, who does not think
my presence a trouble.

“Tam, madam,” &c.

No sooner was this done, than Ellen went to Mrs. Kir-
nan’s room. ‘ Well, Ellen, so you have had a letter?”
“From my aunt, ma’am; here it is; and here is the
answer.” ‘‘ What read and answered too already?
Let me see what your aunt says.” Ellen watched Mrs.
Kirnan’s varying countenance, as she perused the
50 THE TWO LETTERS.

chilling letter of her aunt, and then produced her
own. Again she watched the countenance so well
known, so easily read, and again it expressed disap-
pointment. :

“« My dear love,” said Mrs. Kirnan at last, “‘ there
‘s no need for you to answer this to-day. No letters
can go till to-morrow, and to-morrow you will disposed
to write differently.”

‘No, indeed, ma’am, I am sure I shall not: this is
just what I mean to say.”

“‘] hope and trust, my love, that you will think and
do better things to-morrow. This is not a letter to
send to an old lady,—a relative,—and one who is kindly
disposed towards you.”

“ But you know, Mrs. Kirnan, that I never was a
hypocrite in my life. I must say what I think, or be
silent; and as to her being well disposed towards me,
she has been seven years without showing it. lowe her
nothing yet, and I should be sorry to put myself under
any obligation to her.”

‘‘What do you consider being under an obliga-
tion?” |

‘JT can feel it better than I can describe it; but I
think it is accepting a favour that you cannot return.”
THE TWO LETTERS. 51

<< If so, yon are already under an obligation to your
aunt; for the good heart feels itself less bound by
actual benefits, than by the good will which confers
them. Your aunt has shown you that good will; and
as long as you are ungrateful for it, you lie under an
obligation which you take no care to repay.,”

‘Qh! Mrs. Kirnan,” said Ellen, “‘ you may un-
derstand that reasoning, and, perhaps, I may too;
but every one else would think—” “ Stop, Ellen;
what have we to do with what every one else thinks ?
If our soulsare our own, we must attend to our own
thoughts, and examine what reason and religion have
to say about the matter.” 3

“« Religion tells us,” said Ellen, “ to avoid even the
appearance of evil; and people might well think, and
so might my aunt, if I accepted her invitation, that I
was cringing to her, and that I wanted something of
her.” :

‘No one who knows you, will suspect you of
cringing, Ellen; but are you sure that you want
nothing of your aunt?” | .

** What I!”’ exclaimed Ellen, in a louder tone, with
flashing eyes, and cheeks suddenly crimsoned: ‘‘ No!
thank heaven, my father is a nabob!”
52 THE TWO LETTERS.

‘Well, and what has that to do with the matter?”
said Mrs. Kirnan, very quietly. .

Ellen stared ; for she thought that nabob was a
word that must finish the business at once, and silence
a thousand tongues, and a thousand arguments; but
as Mrs. Kirnan waited in silence, she was reduced at
last to the necessity of explaining herself. “ Why, do
you really think, madam, that I want her paltry
money, when I shall have such a fortune of my
own.”

‘‘No, my dear, my thoughts were not at that mo-
ment fixed on pounds, shillings and pence. You may
call these paltry things, paltry obligations, if you like ;
I was thinking of something which these cannot buy.
Listen, Ellen: you must go to your aunt; you must
Jearn to know her; and, through her means, you must
learn to know and love your other relations, whoever
and wherever they may be. I know nothing of the
fortune of yours that you talk about; but I know that
if your father and myself were taken from you, you
would be an orphan indeed, without a protector,
without a friend, the poorest of the poor, whatever
your fortune might be un

‘‘ Cannot I make other friends? Is it not better to
THE TWO LETTERS. 53

choose friends for their good qualities, than to make
them just because they are related to me?”

‘We may do both, my love; but I believe we all
shall find the truest hearts, and the warmest, within
that little circle of kindred friends, that God has
placed around every comer into this world, as a sort
of natural shelter. They will love you for yourself,
and love you also because you are theirs, and they are
yours.”

‘“* But,” pursued Ellen, after a pause, ‘‘ I know that
my aunt is such a selfish woman, that I never can
make a friend of her. She will wish me, where I shall
wish myself, a hundred miles away, all the time I am
with her. I cannot imagine what has caused this
sudden amiable fit towards me. I dare say it is the
first she ever had in her life.” :

‘“* Do you know, Ellen, who is the source of every
good impulse ?”

‘* Yes,” said Ellen, casting down her eyes.

‘* And if Mrs. Cameron’s kindly feeling towards you
is the first she ever had, will He despise it for that
reason ?””

‘‘ Na,” |

‘* Or because it is still cold and feeble?”
54 THE TWO LETTERS.

“No, certainly.” ?
‘Then, why should you? I allow that Mrs. Came-
ron’s letter was chilling; that she managed to make
her kindness look almost insult: but do not return it
with insult;—rather thank God that he has given you
an opportunity of continuing a good work which he
has begun, of watering a tender plant which he has
planted.” | ,

‘“‘T will go, if you please, my dear Mrs. Kirnan,
and write another letter,” said Ellen, tearing her first
letter in two as she spoke.

‘¢Go, my dear child,” replied Mrs. Kirnan, “ it
costs you something to do right to-day; but you have
overcome your pride in a right service, and the first
fruits of your humility will not be offered in vain.”

It is an old saying, that the first step to wisdom is
to know that we are ignorant; so also the first step
towards humility is to know that we are proud. Never
had Ellen been so abashed at being called proud, as
she was now to hear herself called humble. ‘‘ Oh,”
thought she, ‘‘ Mrs. Kirnan little knows what I am
when she speaks of me as having overcome my pride!”
And filled with this oppressive consciousness, she turned
quickly away, and left the room.
THE TWO LETTERS: 55

Ellen had well said that she was no hypocrite; this
was still evident in the second letter which she now
penned,—as formal and cold a composition as ever
school-girl produced, yet containing none of the inso-
lence of the first. Its very stiffness, however, produced
an effect exactly contrary to what might have been ex-
pected, and it raised Ellen many degrees in her aunt’s
estimation, which will be fully accounted for by the
following historical fact. |

Once upon a time, in a very primitive age, when
our old grandfathers and grandmothers were little
boys and girls, when our little grandfathers used
to run about in little leather breeches and long-
tailed coats, or dance minuets with our little grand-
mothers, and admire their full starched petticoats
and high heads, all powdered and frizzled; in those
days, I say, Mrs. Cameron was a little girl, and went
to school, and learned to write a letter twice a year to
her parents, which began with: ‘‘ Honoured sir and
madam,” informed them when the vacation commenced,
and ended with her being, most respectfully, with duty
to her aunts and uncles, their obedient humble servant.
Now Ellen’s letter came near enough to these models
of the style epistolary of some sixty years before, to be
56 THE TWO LETTERS.

thought by Mrs. Cameron a very proper letter. She
admired it vastly, and augured good things from the
writer’s character, from the firmness of the down-
strokes, and the regularity of the pot-hooks ; and this
opinion was confirmed by a few lines, from Mrs. Kir-
nan, on the other half sheet.

“So, so, so, hum! vastly well!” said Mrs. Came-
ron, before her spectacles were fairly off her nose.
‘‘ Parker, Miss Cameron will be here this day fortnight.
I wish her governess had said whether she can sew well
or not. . What in the world shall I do with her, if she
cannot employ herself! Here, Parker, take a pen, and
write a few lines for me, to tell her to bring her
sampler; and Parker I say, you may put the drawing-
room china out of the way before she comes, and all
the books of prints, for children are apt to tear picture-
books; and bring down the high fender, Parker, that
she may not fall into the fige ; and let the spare-room
be cleaned out, for her to keep her playthings in, and
then I can send her there, can’t I Parker, when she
makes too much noise? And then, remember Parker,
you must take care of her; you know you promised
me, when I wrote, that I should have no trouble with
her.”’
THE TWO LETTERS. 57

Parker with ready zeal repeated her promise; and
very obediently made all the desired preparations for
Ellen’s coming, though she did not see any necessity
for them. She remembered that many a year had
gone by, since the fatal adventure of the jar, and that
. Ellen was now no longer a child; while Mrs. Cameron,
whose even life had never been interrupted by any
great event, since the destruction of her well-beloved
china jar, and who therefore had taken no note of
time as it passed, considered Ellen’s last visit as a
thing of yesterday; and still trembled with something
like rage for the china that was gone, and with fear for
that which remained.



CHAPTER IX.
ELLEN’S VISIT.

Wuew its turn came, in the course of time, the day
appeared which was to bring our heroine to London.
Many times was Parker charged to come, the instant
she should hear the drawing-room bell, and take the
child away. Ellen arrived just in time for dinner, and
during that meal Mrs. Cameron often cast a suspicious
58 ELLEN’S VISIT.

look towards her, to see that she played no pranks; and
Ellen’s quiet demeanour so far gained her confidence,
that, before dinner was ended, she allowed the child to
give herself a potato.

Mrs. Cameron never talked dune dinner ; but that
business over, when she was comfortably seated in her
great arm-chair close to the fire, her natural appetite
for information returned, and. she asked Ellen some
questions about her school, her journey and so forth.
Ellen was not one of those children who have nothing
more to say than yes or no, on any subject. She could
think, feel, and observe: she was not eager to talk:
she could either amuse herself with silent thoughts, or
express readily whatever came uppermost in her mind ;
so that whenever her voice was heard, you might be sure
she had something to say. This day she did not want
materials for conversation: her journey had furnished
her with much that was fresh to her, and Mrs. Came-
ron listened with pleasure to the simple and lively
descriptions that her little niece gave of her adventures.
Indeed she several times laughed very heartily, at
Ellen’s account of incidents which would have put her
in a fine passion had they happened to herself. At last
in the midst of one of Ellen’s long stories, Mrs. Came-
THE TWO LETTERS. 59

ron, without ever remembering to ring for Parker as
she had agreed to do, fell fairly and good-humouredly
asleep in her chair. When Ellen perceived this, she
very judiciously hummed on in the same tone of voice
for half a minute, lowering her voice by degrees, lest
she should awaken her aunt by suddenly stopping; and
then, when she thought all was safe, she turned quickly
round on her heel, and went on tiptoe round the room to
look for a book. The books however had been carefully
removed from the room except old Moore’s Almanack,
which was lying under the snuffer-tray ; so she contented
herself with this; and since she could not amuse herself
as she would, she amused herself as she could.

‘Thus Ellen’s time passed pleasantly away, till the
jingling of spoons announced the entrance of tea.

The evening was short and happy. There was a
bright fire, with a purring cat and a purring tea-urn.
Ellen was as cheerful'as cheerful could be, and Mrs.
Cameron sat amused for more than an hour, while
Ellen first pointed out, and then drew on paper, the
endless grotesque faces and figures which she saw in
the burning coals, in the drapery of the curtains, and
in the pattern of the carpet.

‘What a blessing it is,’ said Mrs. Cameron to
60 ELLEN’S VISIT.

Parker, as she was putting on her night-cap, “‘ what a
blessing it is for a child to be able to amuse itself!
I thought when I saw that she was too tall to be mis-
chievous, that she would have moped herself to death
in this dull place, with a cross old woman like me; but
she really is not troublesome at all.

‘‘ You see, ma’am,” returned Parker, quite pleased
with this uncalled-for praise of her own child, ‘‘ you
see, ma’am, children show the difference of their
natures more in their plays than in any thing else.
I’ve seen some of them too lazy to use either their senses
or their limbs, and who play as if it were the most
‘troublesome thing in the world to amuse themselves.”

‘* Yes,”’ said Mrs. Cameron, ‘‘ that little Miss Pratt,
who spent a day with me once,—do you remember her,
Parker ?—she disgusted me with children. If she had
been in Ellen’s place to-night, she would have yawned
or fretted all the evening; and if any one had told her
to amuse herself, she would have said: ‘ How can I? I
see nothing here but the fire and an old woman; and
there is nothing new in these !’”

** What an unhappy child she is!” said Parker.

‘* Stupid, moping thing!” said Mrs. Cameron, nod-
ding her head angrily three times.
ELLEN’S VISIT. 61

‘* What a selfish useless woman she will be!” said
Parker.

‘* Useless ! worse than useless,”” pursued Mrs. Came-
ron: ‘was she not continually touching and handling
whatever came in her way? Did she not fiddle faddle
with my spectacles till she broke them ?”’

‘It was a pity certainly,” said Parker; “ the young
Jady was very meddlesome.”

‘‘ Meddlesome! a pity! is that all Parker? I am
astonished at you! She ought to have been ashamed
of herself! I say my best spectacles too! what business
had she to touch them? She might as well be a
thief at once!” said Mrs. Cameron, who had gra-
dually heated herself by talking of her poor spec-
tacles. By this time she was settled in bed, and Parker
wishing her good night, left her mind to be calmed by
a night’s repose.

CHAPTER X.
THE HARMONIOUS: BLACKSMITH,
From the first day, Ellen rapidly advanced in the
affections of her aunt, and to her own surprise the
holidays went quickly and happily onwards. This
62 THE HARMONIOUS BLACKSMITH.

visit was not the last. The following year another
‘nvitation came from the old lady, and of this we must
now give a few particulars, to show you Ellen at the
age of thirteen.

When with other young people, and far from flatterers,
our little heroine had not been backward in discovering
that her talents were of a superior*order. Now she was
with her aunt; who, besides being partial, was so little
acquainted with young people, that she was astonished
at every mark of rationality in “‘ a mere child,” as she
called Ellen, whose sayings she repeated like those of
an oracle; while no opportunity was lost of showing
off her accomplishments. At first Ellen was ashamed
‘of receiving praise for such simple things. She was
tired too of showing her satin stitch and netting to
every one that came, and of playing the ‘‘ Harmonious
Blacksmith” a dozen times a day for admiration. At
last however, by dint of hearing those magical adjec-
tives : ‘‘ Wonderful! charming!” &c. she got over these
raw feelings, and became satisfied that she really was a
lion, and must submit to be shown as such.

Nothing appears to us more absurd than the sight of
a little child proud of any acquirement whatever. We
have seen a little girl dance beautifully, so beautifully
THE HARMONIOUS BLACKSMITH. 63

that all the eyes and all the quizzing glasses in the
room were turned towards her. She, poor little thing,
laughed aloud at the sharp elbows of one neighbour,
the round back of another, and the lifted knees of her
heavy partner, as he was prancing towards her across
the quadrille, and pleased herself with the sense of her
own superiority. What a pity that she should forget
the trouble poor Mr. Balparé took, to teach her a
minuet when she was only four years old,—and all the
hard labour that he and his fiddle-stick had undergone
for years, in order to bring head, shoulders, elbows and
knees into proper order. If there was any merit in her
dancing, half of it belonged to the lithe limbs and good
ear that she had received from nature, and the other
half to Mr. Balpare and his fiddle-stick, so that we
could not discover what there was in the business for
her to glory in.

We have said that-Ellen was not fond of admiration ;
neither did she overrate the value of mere accomplish-
ments: you may therefore be surprised to hear that
the flattery she met with did her any harm. To ex-
plain this mystery, we need only relate what passed
through her mind as she opened the piano-forte one
morning for the eleventh time, to play her aunt’s fa-
64 THE HARMONIOUS BLACKSMITH.

-yourite piece “ The Harmonious Blacksmith,” and
several morning callers came round her, to see her
wonderful little fingers fly along the keys. As she sat
down, she felt utter contempt for her aunt, and her
friends, and music in general, and the stupid, easy,
old-fashioned“ Harmonious Blacksmith” in particular.
On all these she wasted a great deal more contempt
than they deserved.

“¢ Silly people!” said she to herself; “‘ I wish they
would not talk nonsense. Above all I wish they would
not clap me on the back and say: ‘ Charming little
creature!’ as if l were a baby. Flattery will never
make me vain, I am sure, They only tell me what I
knew before, that I play very well for my age, and they
- make me despise them not a little for valuing a paltry
accomplishment as they seem to do. All this is easy
enough to me, and does not require any particular
talent. How I could make these people stare, if I
were to show them the lines I wrote on a winter
crocus; or my ode to the Greeks; or my thapsody on
liberty; or a hundred other things! But 1 despise
vulgar applause, so my aunt shall never hear of my
poetry.”

It is to be observed about this time, that whenever
THE HARMONIOUS BLACKSMITH. 65

any new acquaintances were proposed to Ellen, the first
question she always asked concerning them was: “‘ Are
they clever?”

CHAPTER XI.
THE IRISH COUSINS.

One morning Ellen was busily employed in her own
room, in writing to Mrs. Kirnan, when she received a
summons from her aunt, to come down immediately
into the drawing-room, where some ladies wished to
see her. ‘* Now for another hour of display !’’ sighed.
she, as she laid aside her pen. When she passed the
looking-glass she observed’ that her hair was rough and
her dress rather disordered; but instead of remem-
bering that a lady should be lady-like at all times and
in all places, she walked on, rather gratified to carry
a proof with her into the drawing-room, that she did
not care for admiration.

Until lately, Ellen had carried herself before stran-
gers with a modest’ ease; and. the reason of this was,
that she never thought about herself at all: but now
she had acquired a sort of manner, in which a mixture
of cold. disdain. and indifference was too apparent.

E
66 THE IRISH COUSINS.

What was the reason of this? Why she thought now
that she knew the world better than before; that the
generality of people were very frivolous, and could do her
no good; and that she could do very well without them.

Carelessly and haughtily therefore she entered the
room, and looked around to see what these new people
were like. A,lively-looking woman, with bonnet-strings
flying behind her, was sitting close to Mrs. Cameron,
and trying in a loud voice, and with a slight brogue,
to make herself heard. Three fine-looking tall girls
were standing in different parts of the room, playing
with the cat, the dog, and the parrot, and laughing very
merrily. No sooner however did they perceive Ellen,
than jumping over cat, dog and parrot, they ran towards
her; while. she, astonished, and rather discomposed,
received them with a solemn courtesy, and begged they
would be seated. ‘‘ You don’t know us,” said the
eldest, laughing: “‘ cannot you guess who we are?
Weare your cousins, Ellen, your cousins O’ Reilly: Iam
Magdalen, this is Dora;” ‘‘andI,” said the youngest,
who was about Ellen’s age, “‘ 1 am little Alice.” And
upon this warrant of introduction, she threw her arms
round Ellen’s neck and gave her a hearty kiss.

“ Strange girls enough,” thought Ellen; “‘ what odd
THE IRISH COUSINS. 67

behaviour !’’ yet she thawed in spite of herself, while
she looked on their good humoured sunshiny faces, and
soon found herself talking with them quite at her ease.

They spent the day together; and, for the first time
in her life, Ellen comprehended the sympathy that
exists between relations. They did not wait to see
whether she was pretty, clever, or even worthy, before
they gave her the friendly shake of the hand. She had
no trouble to earn their good will; they had given it
to her before she saw them.

In the course of the day, Ellen had some conversation
-with Mrs. O’Reilly about her father. Ellen had left
him when she was so young that she could hardly be
said to remember him; but when Mrs. O'Reilly spoke
of him, and told one anecdote after another of the days
of his childhood and youth; when she spoke of him as
the brother, the playfellow, the companion, the friend of
her early days,—some of her expressions and above all
her smile, rekindled a light that had long been dim
in Ellen’s mind. Her faint, scattered associations as-
sumed by degress a living shape; the form of her father
no longer floated before her in indistinct vision as it
used to do, coming unbidden, and vanishing when she
_ most wished it to stay: it was now her memory’s best
68 THE IRISH COUSINS.

treasure, a real thing, which she knew, felt and under-
stood. Her mother too, whose name she had scarcely
heard mentioned, of whom she knew nothing, .except
that she was no more—her .mother had been Mrs.
O’Reilly’s early friend and playmate.

‘“‘T saw the last of the dear creature,” said Mrs.
O’Reilly, “‘ when she set sail with your father for Cal-
cutta three weeks after they were married. She was
not seventeen then, and a more elegant creature never
was seen in the county Dublin. She tried to the last
to be cheerful, and keep up our spirits, for she never
thought of herself; but she dearly loved Ireland, and
she had never been five miles from her father’s house
before. I remember, as if it were yesterday, when we
were all standing on the shore at Kingstown, waiting
for the boat: we were all silent; for when we had most —
to say, not a word could any of us speak. She turned
round, that her father might not see her tears, and bu-
sied herself with tying my green scarf on the top of her
parasol, to wave for a signal to us. ‘I shall carry it off
with me, Ally,’ said she, ‘to remind me of our own
emerald isle.’ She saw that I noticed the tears that
were falling faster and faster: she placed one hand on
my mouth, and with the other attempted to stop them
THE IRISH COUSINS. 69

from flowing, while she said, smiling; ‘ Hush, Ally, only

a few Irish diamonds!’ but the smile went away quicker
than thought, and a look came after it that I shall never
forget: she looked as if death were in her heart, while
she said to me: ‘ Comfort my father when I am gone.’
So she went: and we received one letter from her. The
next ship from Calcutta brought the news of her death.”

‘“‘ How and when did she die?” said Ellen. I must
have been very young then. I do not remember her
atall.” '

‘ Your father has hever mentioned her name since,”
said Mrs. Reilly; ‘‘ but an old servant of his wrote
an account of the circumstances of her death. When
you, my dear Ellen, were six weeks old, your father
insisted on having you inoculated. Your mother had
been vaccinated, so no one had any fear for her: how-
ever she sickened of the small-pox, and to the surprise
and dismay of every one, died on the ninth day.”

Ellen said nothing, but her heart swelled with mingled
feelings of sorrow, tenderness and grateful love; and
her soul yearned towards her newly found, her early —
lost mother. |

‘* My mother died for me,” thought she. “‘ How often
have I said that I wished for no other mother than
70 THE IRISH COUSINS.

Mrs. Kirnan! How little have I imagined what a mo-
ther must be! Yes, I feel, Iam sure, that her love to
me and mine to her, would have been different from
any thing I have ever felt. Oh! what would I not give
for one kiss from my very own mamma !”’

‘«< Am I like her?” said Ellen, at last.

‘‘ Yes, now your eyes are very like hers, but till the
last half hour I did not see any resemblance.”

‘“¢ How was that?” asked Ellen.

‘‘ Dear creature,” continued her aunt @oughtfully,
not noticing the question, but pursuing her own train
of ideas. ‘‘ How tender her voice was! How every
one who came near her felt her ready, happy look
and her gentle manner. While every one adored her,
how completely she forgot herself, and had a tear or a
smile ready for high or low, rich or poor, whoever
might want it! But come, Ellen, we have been talking
too long: open the piano-forte, your aunt wishes me
to hear you play.”

This conversation made a deep impression upon Ellen.
She renewed it frequently with her aunt, and made herself
minutely acquainted with every circumstance of her mo-
ther’s history.. ‘‘ I wish I were like her,” said she fre-
quently to herself. I should like papa to think me 80
THE IRISH COUSINS. 71

when I go back to him. My aunt almost told me that
my haughty and reserved manner prevented her from
finding out any likeness between me and my mother.
Humility was my mother’s great charm. My dear
mamma, I will think about you till I am humble
too !”’

This was more easily said than done. Ellen always ac-
‘knowledged, in general terms, that she was proud; but
in particular instances she maintained firmly that she
only preserved a proper dignity.

‘Well, Ellen,” said Mrs. Cameron to her, as she
wished her good-night, “‘ you have been very merry
to-day with your new cousins; what do you think of ©
them my dear?” ;

‘* Good-natured girls, but certainly not clever.”

“So much the better, Ellen. They are handsome
girls, and they dress very well, and don’t come into a
room with their dress awry, as somebody did this
morning. I hate clever women: they never know how
to put on a bonnet, and their dresses never hang well.
I could tell a clever woman at first sight !”’

“¢ What a silly woman my aunt is,” thought Ellen.
*f What do such trifles signify? What intellectual per-
son would care for the shape of a gown or a bonnet ?”’
72 THE IRISH COUSINS.

So saying, she went to her room, and wrotea little poetry
before she went to bed. .

Was Mrs. Cameron right or was Ellen ?

They both were right, and both were wrong. A
clever woman who neglects the little elegancies of
womanly appearance, excites disgust; and an elegant
woman whose affections are centred in dress, provokes
contempt. ‘There is happily a middle way: women are
capable of doing the one, without neglecting the other.

Mrs. Cameron’s assertion that no clever women dress
well, confirmed Fllen in her hasty judgment of her cou-
sins. She met them the next day with a feeling allied
to contempt, and sighed to think they were not likely
to be very improving companions. “I should wish,”
thought she, “* to call my cousins my friends; but 1
fear they will not understand my thoughts and feelings ;
and what good can I get from them ?

Annee
CHAPTER x Ii.

WANT OF DIGNITY.

We mentioned some time ago the fact, that Ellen
treated servants as an inferior race of beings. She was
accustomed to receive services from them as her due;
WANT OF DIGNITY. 73

and though she never felt inclined to tyrannize over
them, she would have thought as soon of sweeping and
scrubbing, as of showing sympathy with them, in word,
look or manner, on any occasion.

Imagine then her surprise, when, as Parker was
dressing her for dinner, the door opened and her three
cousins running in, came straight to Parker, and shook
hands with her, with every demonstration of pleasure
that they could show on meeting an old friegd. Ally
even put her hand on her shoulder, and springing up
threw her arms round her neck. Parker smiled and
blushed, and said in a tone in which respéct tried to
repress affectionate familiarity: ‘‘ Oh, Miss Ally, you'll
rumple my clean handkerchief; besides, miss, you are
too big for that now.” | '

‘‘Then why do you not come and see us, you lazy
woman, and we such a little way off? Why don’t you
come and talk over some of the pranks we used to play
together, when you and aunt Cameron stayed with us
in Ireland ?”” |

‘You are very good, miss,” said Parker, ‘‘ to think
of me;” and she turned round to tie Ellen’s hair, and
sighed.

‘‘ Why, Parker, what’s the matter now? Have you
74 WANT OF DIGNITY.

+.

grown so very sober in your old age, that you are driven
to sighing ?”’

‘‘ Do you pretend, with that long face,-to make us
believe you never romped with us? Bear witness,
O ye meadows, bogs and streams of dear little Ireland,
to Parker’s pranks!”

‘‘ Why, there’s hardly a place within five miles of
Castle Reilly,”’ said Dora, ‘‘ that you have not given
a name#o,my good woman. The broad corner by
Larry M‘Cormack’s cabin, where we made you ride
Larry’s pig, and where the pig threw you, is called
Parker’s riding-school to this day; then the potato-
field, where you know we had so many a long battle
with you, every one knows it by the name of Parker’s
field of glory.”

Thus the good-natured girls ran on , reminding Parker
of one childish frolic after another, in which she had
borne her part, until the whole party, Parker included,
joined in one merry and continued laugh—all but Ellen.
She sat, unmoved and immoveable in her chair, looking
as if the merriment around her was no concern of hers ;
and the more they laughed, the graver and more scorn-
ful her countenance became, until Parker having finished
dressing her hair, she arose, and left the room.
WANT OF DIGNITY. 75

‘Where are the girls?” asked Mrs. O'Reilly, as
Ellen entered the drawing-room.

‘‘ They are in my room, amusing Parker,”
Ellen. ‘‘ Parker! I have not seen her yet; it is a
shame for me,” said Mrs. O’Reilly; and, to Ellen’s

‘ great surprise, she arose and‘ went up two flights of

replied

‘stairs to see a servant, instead of ringing the bell for
her to come down.

“Certainly my aunt wants dignity,” thought Ellen.
She could not help expressing a feeling of the sort
afterwards to her cousin Magdalen.

‘‘ Magdalen,” said she, ‘‘I wonder that you, who
seem to have more refinement than your sisters, should
encourage them in making a companion of a servant!” °

‘‘ What! of Parker do you mean? Parker is not a
common servant!”

‘‘Common or uncommon, she is still a servant, and
it cannot be right to break down the barrier that society
puts between one rank of people and another.”

‘“‘ Was it broken down? Did Parker break it down?
I thought her very well behaved.’’

‘‘ No, I find no fault with Parker; she seems to
know her situation better than you know yours; that
I confess.”
76 WANT OF DIGNITY.

Magdalen laughed very good humouredly at this
blunt speech.

‘Well, Ellen, will you teach me to know my situa-
tion as you call it ?” 7

“ Since you ask me, I will give you my opinion freely.
A lady should treat her servants well, that is, give them “
good food and wages, and order them civilly to perform’
her wishes; but she never should converse with them,
because their situation is so different from hers, that
she can have nothing in common with them.”

‘Not in her station as a lady certainly, but as a
fellow-creature and a fellow-christian, you will allow
her to have something in common with them.”

“Qh yes, we are all children of Adam, and all that;
we are all equal when we are born, and we shall all die
and be equal at last; but in the mean time, there are
distinctions of rank in this world which ought to be
kept up.”

‘These things,” said Magdalen, “are easily re-
conciled. I have always found the line so well marked
between myself and those who are poorer, that it has
never cost me a moment’s trduble to keep on my side
of it, or to maintain my dignity, as you would say.
The differences between us are made by man and edu-
WANT OF DIGNITY. 77

cation, the resemblances are all fixed in us by our
Creator.”’

‘¢ What do you mean?”

‘1 mean that I could not consult servants in matters
of science or taste, because education has placed a wide
gulf between us. I could not join in their pursuits be-
cause my situation in society has fixed other pursuits
for me. You were wrong then, when you charged me
with making companions of servants ;, but the reason is
not that I weld not have familiar intercourse with them,
but that I cannot. All this is the work of society; and
though imperfect, it produces good upon the whole;
but now comes the work of God which is not imperfect.
All the best. feelings of our nature are theirs in common
with us; and all the infirmities of mortals are ours in
common with them: here are powerful reasons for
sympathy.” |

‘* Still I maintain,” replied Ellen, ‘‘ that people may
find exercise enough for their sympathies among those
of their own rank; and you, Magdalen, cannot possibly
intend to say that you ever would show your feelings
before a servant.”

‘‘T would only show those in which they are con-
cerned. If they had a tooth-ache I would compassionate
78 WANT OF DIGNITY.

them; if they served me well and loved me, I would
love them; if they spent themselves in my service, I
would be grateful to them.”

“ Grateful! Magdalen, I am astonished at you! It
is théir duty to be grateful to their masters. Are they
not paid for whatever they do?”

‘< If Mrs. Kirnan were to offer you ten guineas a year
for loving her, would you take it Ellen?”

“No,” said Ellen, laughing.

‘¢ A servant’s heart is as free as yours. Hands may
take gold, hearts never.”

‘Tf we owe them gratitude, then, we ought to pay it
+n service; so, I suppose, you would help a housemaid
to sweep the floor and make the beds, out of gratitude,
sympathy and sentiment ¢”’ , ;

‘ Not at all. I have told you before, that these are
the very things in which society has made a difference
between us. ‘They are hewers of wood and drawers
of water.’ Let them mind their business as such ; for
in thesehey excel; and I will read, draw, dress, dance,
talk and think: car je m’y connais.

“ How then would you show them this gratitude,
this, sympathy that you talk about ?”’

‘In many ways :—by talking to them from time to
WANT OF DIGNITY. 79

time of their affairs (not mine, mark me), and giving
them the use of my judgment to direct their conduct ;
by comforting them when they are ill; and, above all,
by speaking to them as if they were made of the same
clay as myself, and showing that I think it no merit of
mine that raises me above them.”

‘*T must trouble you with one question more,” said
Ellen. ‘‘ Was it for the sake of exhortation, consola-
tion, or edification, that you talked all that nonsense to
Parker to-day? For my part, I could see no moral in
it at all.” |

“Oh, that is sii affair,” said Magdalen: ‘‘ Par-

ker was our playfellow in infancy. She ran about our
own green meadows with us, when we were too simple
and unlearned to be ashamed of calling a servant a
friend; and, to my dying day, I will call her friend.
We cannot be.too familiar with a good woman, who
has carried us in her arms, and helped us when we could
not help ourselves. I talked freely with her just now,
because my heart warmed towards her, and hers warmed
to me: so there was no place for ceremony—that was
all. Are you still astonished ?”

‘“T am astonished at nothing,” replied Ellen, “‘ but
! am sure I never could behave as you did.”
80 WANT OF DIGNITY.

‘“« Yes, yes, you would, I am sure, if Parker had been
as kind to you when you were young, as she was to us.”

Here Ellen looked rather confused; for she knew
very well what Parker had done for her when she first
came over, and she felt almost offended, as if Magdalen
had reproached her.,

Magdalen however was quite unconscious that she
had done so; and being called away at the moment to
sing a song, she left her without perceiving her em-
barrassment. a



CHAPTER XIII.
LA BELLE ASSEMBLEE.

ELLEN found her cousin Magdalen rather a puzzle.
She decided the first evening she saw the O’Reillys,
that they certainly were not clever; yet now and then
she was tempted to make an exception in favour of Mag-
dalen. Confident in her own superiority of intellect,
Ellen often said things at random, without considering
whether they contained absurdities or not. She generally
was right; for though she judged quickly, she judged
well; but when she was not right, she had a great
horror of being found in the wrong. Who can bear
LA BELLE ASSEMBLEE. 81
.

their memory, judgment or taste to be impeached by
those who are, on the whole, their inferiors in these
things? Very few.

Her aunt Cameron, when she differed from Ellen in
opinion, always pushed her spectacles on her forehead,
and said: ‘‘ You know nothing about such things ; little
girls should be seen and not heard.” But humiliating
as it was to be treated like a baby, especially when
a third person was present, her mortification was
infinitely deeper, when she perceived an indescribable
something in Magdalen’s quiet countenance, which
made a doubt flash through her mind, that perhaps
Magdalen might know more than she herself did after.
all, and might keep silence only because it was no
pleasure to her to prove others to be in the wrong,
Sometimes she would say a rash thing, and find out
where the folly of it was, before the words had well
passed her lips, if Magdalen happened to look towards
her. As often however as she had resolved to believe
in Magdalen’s superiority of intellect, so often did she
change her opinion on seeing her enter with spirit, even -
with energy, into the most frivolous conversation and
employments.

‘‘What girl of sense,”’ said Ellen to herself one

F

‘
.

82 LA BELLE ASSEMBLEE.

evening, ‘‘ what girl of sense could sit for half an hour
discussing the merits of all the caps and bonnets in that
odious book of fashions, with such a foolish woman as
my poor aunt Cameron? That Belle Assemblée and
‘ts relations aré the only books my aunt ever takes into
her hands, even. on Sundays. There is Magdalen
actually reading it aloud; I hear the wearisome words,
tulle, crape &c.

‘¢ And now she is absolutely arguing with my aunt
about gauze and feathers. It is very disgusting !”’
And poor Ellen turned away with a mixed feeling of
virtuous indignation, contempt and pity.

‘Good night,” said Magdalen, at this moment, to
her aunt. ‘I will bring the patterns I mentioned to
you very early to-morrow, before breakfast if you like;
but you must promise to let me see Miss Smith try
them on you. Promise me now: I will not go away
till you promise me.” ‘¢ Very well, you shall see them
tried on, if you are early enough.”., ‘‘ Oh, trust me
for that!’ And Magdalen tripped away rather early,
and whispered in Ellen’s ear as she passed her: “ Ellen,
if you love me, do not let Miss Smith try any thing on
my aunt till I come to-morrow.”

Ellen looked after her and shook her head, ‘*Can
f
LA BELLE ASSEMBLEE. 83

she take real interest jn my aunt’s feathers and finery?
She must be frivolous; I give her up.”

If Ellen had not nourished such fierce ire against her
aunt Cameron’s Belle Assemblée, and fancied that
wisdom consists in despising foolish things,—if she had
not shut herself up in the notion of her own superiority,
she might have found out what was passing in Magda-
len’s mind; and what motive it was that had made a
sensible girl take real interest in embroidered shawls,
and hats of Areophane and Marabout feathers.

Magdalen loved her aunt Cameron for more reasons
than one. She very readily loved people, because she
had the secret of finding out their good qualities, and of
being rather grieved than angry at their*bad ones.
Magdalen saw that her aunt’s style of dress was very
ridiculous ;* instead of laughing at it, she formed a re-
solution to change it if she could, She dressed remark-
ably well herself, so that Mrs. Cameron frequently asked
her opinion on the one subject that occupied the most
of her own thoughts. Taking advantage of this, Mag-
dalen increased her influence by talking patiently and
good-humouredly about dress, and reading the fashions
to her aunt. Very often she succeeded in making her
aunt discontented with every dress in La Belle Assem-
84 LA BELLE ASSEMBLEE.

blée, and then she ventured to bring forward a pattern
or colour that she had seen in Paris. If it had been
invented in Paris, Mrs. Cameron would wear any thing
in perfect confidence; so that, among the many neat
dark gowns which Magdalen had seen in Paris, it was
easy to select one fit for an old lady to attire herself in.
In this way Magdalen was gradually working a reform in
the most ridiculous part of her aunt’s behaviour, and was
taking benevolent pleasure in the work.

Thus weakness amounting even to folly may be
treated with discretion and benevolence.



CHAPTER XIV.

ODE TO THE GREEKS.

A rew days after this, Ellen went to spend the re-
mainder of her holidays at Mrs. O’Reilly’s. Mrs.
O’Reilly had taken a house a little way out of town,
and Ellen enjoyed the fresh air of the country more
than she ever had done before. There was a lawn
before the house, which sloped down towards the river ;
and a beautiful shrubbery of real country trees, without
any soot upon them, surrounded it. Through this
shrubbery, several winding paths led down to the very
ODE TO THE GREEKS. 85

brink of the river. But the spot that Ellen chose for
her own, in this place of delight, was a little arbour
almost hidden in evergreens and monthly roses, which
stood on a-bank, and looked straight down on the
water.- Here she used to go alone and think, for she
had lately taken to thinking, or rather to dreaming;
and she frequently carried her portfolio with her, and
scribbled her high musings in rhyme. One morning
she was walking towards her favourite haunt, in order
to resume a train of thought, and a stanza of poetry,
which she had packed up ina hurry on hearing the
breakfast bell. She had already reached the favourite
clump of evergreens, and the arbour was not twenty
paces off, when some voices, interrupted by profane
peals of laughter, broke upon her silent imaginings,
and informed her pretty plainly that she must carry
her muse elsewhere. She paused. for an instant, to
consider where she should go, and she heard—horrible
to relate !—she heard her cousin Dora reading, in a
most burlesque style, some lines from her own favou-
rite Ode to the Greeks! She would go and declare
herself :—no, that would betray too much embarrass-
ment. She would go back :—no, that would be run-
ning away like a coward from a laugh that properly
86 ODE TO THE GREEKS.

belonged to her: she stood still then behind a thick
jaurustinus, and Dora continued reading :

‘¢ Land of the brave! methinks I see thee still,
Bending the neighbouring nations to thy will,
Soaring o’er Asia,
Threatening Thracia,
Towering o’er tyrants thy fate to fulfil.
Great Alexander,
Glorious commander!
Spartan Lysander,
Who humbled the proud,
Let your pale ghosts, and those of your hosts,
Still their vain boasts,
And acknowledge, with candour,
That glory’s vain glitter must fleet like a cloud.”

Dora advanced her left foot, flung her arms aloft,
and threw a most heroic-comic swell into her voice,
while she repeated these lines. But when she came to
the close, the candour of the pale ghosts quite over-
came her power of gravity, and she joined the chorus
of laughers. Ellen had not lost a word or a gesture ;
for Dora had stood in the entrance of the arbour, with
her face towards the audience within, and her back to
Ellen. Dora had well known how to give effect to the
ridiculous; and had she not done so, Ellen’s quick ear
ODE TO THE GREEKS. 87

needed .only that her poetry should be read aloud, to
féel'that it was a child’s jingle. Now each line was a
dagger’s blow to her. To find her darling manuscript
in such hands,—to hear it laughed at was nothing to
the pain of finding out that it was trash! Who could
bear it ?

‘“‘Tonorant girls!’’ said Ellen to herself, ‘if it is
nonsense, my own sense and not their foolish ridicule
convinces me that it is so. They would laugh as much
at Lord Byron. Ally, for example, has no soul. [’ll
engage she did not know what she was laughing at all
the time. Why am I so vexed? Am I still abashed by
an empty laugh? No; I will prove to myself and to
them, that I am not.” She advanced to the arbour,
~ and with a calm voice and an unmoved countenance,
said: ‘‘ Dora, the verses you are laughing at are mine;
give them to me.”’ She received them from her cou-
sin’s hand, tore them coolly to pieces, and threw the
fragments into the stream that glided beneath them.
She watched them for an instant or two, and then
turned and walked silently away. ‘‘ Ellen!’ said Dora.
‘“‘ Well,” answered Ellen, turning round, and standing
as if she waited her cousin’s pleasure, but felt very little
concern in what she might have to say. “Ellen,”
88 ODE TO THE GREEKS.

continued Dora, in rather a sorrowful voice, *‘ I hope
you are not offended.” ‘‘Oh dear no,” said Ellen,
carelessly, almost contemptuously. ‘Indeed I would
not have laughed at you for the world, if I had known
it.” ‘Laugh on,” said Ellen; “ luckily my happimess
does not depend for a moment on your approbation or
censure.”

She walked quickly away, but she-had not gone
many steps when Dora overtook her and seized her
hand. “Ellen,” said she, while tears stood in her
eyes, ‘‘ you are unkind to me, or you would not let me
ask twice for your pardon.” There was something in
Dora’s voice that Ellen could not withstand : she as-
sured her that she was not offended ; that she would
never think more of the matter. ‘I am angry with
myself, you see,” said Dora ; ‘it was only yesterday
that mamma reproved me for being satirical, and I
never thought of it till you looked so severely at me.”’
“ Did I look severe?” said Ellen, kissing the tearful
girl; “I did not know it, I am sorry for it.” ‘There,
that will do,” said Dora, smiling through her: tears ;
‘say no more, you look yourself again now. It was
not what you said that hurt me just now,” continued
she laughing, ‘I am not afraid of words; for any
ODE TO THE GREEKS. 89

woman, any Irishwoman at least, is never at a loss for
an answer; but I could never stand a severe look ; it
cuts me to the heart, and makes a child of me at once.”

‘< But we cannot help our countenances, Dora.” |

‘“‘No,” answered Dora, “‘ and that is the very reason
that a terrible countenance is so terrible; we know it
tells exactly the feelings. I think we often keep in our
words when they would sound rude and cruel; and yet
we let our countenances take their own way, and do
twice as much mischief as words could do.”

‘‘We cannot make hypocrites of them, Dora: do
you regret that ?” :

‘‘Oh, no; I would not have them say what was not
true; but it would be very pleasant if they were always
to show a pretty picture of what was really gomg on,
as my camera obscura does.”’

‘‘'Then, Dora, you wish us to be always in the same
mood ; always pretty: that is impossible.”

‘Why should we be always in the same mood? I
can see rocks and rivers in my camera obscura, or
green fields and quiet cattle, or an old castle, ora
hundred other things, all beautiful and all different.
Some of these are grand, some soft, some melancholy,
some gay: there is variety enough, and if there were
90 ODE TO THE GREEKS.

no variety, we could look along time at what is beautiful
without ever wishing to change it.” 1
By this time they: had reached the house. Ellen
walked slowly and thoughtfully into her own room - she
thought upon Dora’s conduct and her own; and she
found that she respected Dora for her frankness, her
ready repentance, and her affectionate feeling. ‘‘ I have
thought myself her superior,” said she; ‘and yet with all
my talent, I have done wrong to-day, and she has done
right. I still think that 1 ama genius, or something
like it; but I think after all, that a good heart is more
valuable than genius; and that it is better to please than
to shine.” She took out a little memorandum-book and
wrote in it as follows: “‘ Thursday, 11th, Learned good
from a quarter whence I did not expect to learn any
thing.” —Memorandum. “ Though variety is charming,
we can look a long time at what is beautiful, without
ever wishing to change it.” |
_ Ellen was not one of those who can be convinced of
a truth, and then lay it aside without acting upon it.
This little incident made her think much more respect-
fully than she had done before of the qualities of the
heart. Gentleness, meekness, all the branches of be-
nevolence stood much higher than they had ever stood
ODE TO THE GREEKS. 9]

before in her list of virtues. Hitherto she had been suf-
ficient to herself, saying and thinking that if she inter-
fered with no one, she had a right to. please herself.
She had stood alone; she had prided herself on her
rank, riches and talents, because she felt as if there was
a sort of power in all these; but now she began to per-
ceive that the power of making people happy was the
best power of all, and the only one worth trying for.
She did try for it, and she soon felt some of the plea-
sure of living for others.

CHAPTER XV.
THE CRITICS.

‘ Come, Ellen,” said Magdalen, one wet morning, as
they were sitting at work, ‘‘ come, let us have another
reading of your poetry; it had not a fair chance the
other morning you know. I am sure you have some
more to show us.”’ ‘‘ I have never shown it to any one,”
said Ellen, blushing, ‘and to tell you the truth, I am
heartily ashamed of it myself.”

“* How long have you been ashamed of it ?”’

“*T believe only since the day that I heard you read-
ing it aloud. I mean to burn it all.”
92 THE CRITICS.

“What! are you going to: exterminate it without
judge or jury? I call that unfair. You must bring it toa
public trial, and if it be found unworthy, let be it burned
by the hands of the common hangman; and do you,
together with. all other poets, take warning by its un-
timely fate. Come, pray produce it; let us read it to-
gether.” . |

‘¢ And laugh at it?” said Ellen, shrinking a little.

‘¢ Yes, if you like,” answered Magdalen, “laugh at
it together, if it deserves to be laughed at; that is all
- fyir: but I am disposed to be serious tosday.. You shall
accuse; your poetry shall plead its own cause ; Dora
and I will be judge and jury.”

‘< And what shall I be?” said Ally.

“Qh! you may be the populace. Your business is
to listen to the trial, and to maintain that the poor pri-
soner at the bar is innocent, in spite of judge or jury.”

Ellen produced her budget of poetry. During the
recital of the first two or three pages, she caught her-
self at her old trick of biting her lips; but by degrees
she became as calm almost as if the composition then
on its trial, was not her own. Of Ellen’s rhymes we
have given a specimen,—not indeed a very favourable
one; but as it is unfair to judge of any author by one
THE CRITICS... 93

specimen, it is only riglit to tell our readers the general
character of her poetical attempts. There was a great
deal of good feeling and good sense throughoutj and
some good taste, considering the writer’s age. The
only thing we regretted, when we-read her manu-
script, was that it had not been made in plain honest
prose.

The young people entered into the merits of the case
very freely, Ellen found continual fault. Ally and
Dora excused and applauded; but Magdalen kept the
middle way, like an impartial judge. It was evident .
that the hearts of Dora and Ally ran away with their
judgments, and they thought that Magdalen was parti-
cularly disposed to be severe.

‘What is the matter with you, Magdalen?” said
Ally. You smile every, now and then, and give your
approving nod, but when you open your mouth to speak,
lo! you undo the work at once. Nothing comes forth
but ‘ Ellen, that is a bad line; Ellen, that is an indif-
ferent rhyme: Ellen, that is very obscure ;” and so on.’”

‘“‘ And the strangest thing of all,’”’ cried Dora, ‘“‘ is
that us seems to like your blame better than our
praise.”

“So I do, Dora,” said Ellen, ‘‘ nme I feel that
94 THE CRITICS.

you are only good-natured, but that Magdalen is also
just. | ,

“But I have been trying all this time to find fault,
and I cannot,” said Dora.

‘You did your part the other day with my poor Ode
to the Greeks, and I thank you for it now.”

“ Tam afraid you think me foolish,” said Dora, “‘ and
do not care for my opinion ; but I cannot help it, now
that I know that the Ode is yours, I cannot for the life
of me see any fault in it.”

‘“] think your judgment is not as yet so good as
Magdalen’s; but meanwhile,” said Ellen, kissing
Dora’s cheek, ‘‘I shall love my dear cousin all the
better for her Irish fault of taking a friend’s part through
thick and thin.” ;

‘Yes, I would go through fire and water for you,”
said Dora, ‘* though I do not understand poetry.”

“J am sure you would,” answered Ellen earnestly ;
and she felt deeply in her soul at that moment,—and
was humbled while she felt it,—that warm and disin-
terested kindness is worth all the poetry in the world.

Ellen did not repent of having sacrificed her feeling
of reserve to please her cousins. Magdalen’s remarks,
during this trial, proved that she had studied well
THE CRITICS. | 95

in matters of taste; and Ellen was surprised to find
herself in possession of many ideas acquired from this
morning’s work. ‘‘ You are very likely to be a jpet in
time ;”’ said Magdalen, ‘‘ but in order that you may
be one, burn all this young work, and begin a new era
in your literary life. Write common sense in plain prose,
for three or four years at least.”’ ’

** T will,”’ said Ellen ; ‘‘ I wish I had done so before.”

“Your time has not been lost,” said Magdalen.
*- Writing this has given you expertness, if not ease, in
expressing yourself. You have gained a good stock of
words by it; but you have done with it now; burn it,
and go on to something better.”

“ Do you think then that I shall never be a poet?”

“‘] think you may be something better. Put poetry
out of your head as an object. Try to think clearly,
for you can do it, and to feel correctly, and to express
yourself accurately in speaking as well as’ in writing.
Observe well, think well, and read well. And then if
your poetic fire continue, by and by you will be a poet:
or if not, you will be at least a useful woman.”

“Oh!” said Ally, staying Ellen’s hand, “ give
it to me; what a pity to burn it! Only let me
show it to mamma and my aunt; whatever Magdalen
96 THE CRITICS.

may say, I am sure they would be quite astonished
at it.” | :

“Yes, they would,” said Magdalen, ‘“‘ therefore
burn it;” and as she spoke, the consuming flame rose
brightly over the sacrifice ; and Ellen saw it burn
without one emotion of regret. _



CHAPTER XVI.
UNEXPECTED NEWS.

We will not stay to tell of the many happy mornings,
or of the many merry evenings, which the cousins spent
together. Suffice it to say, that the. mornings were
spent in pleasant improvement, and the evenings in easy
cheerfulness or in active play, and time flew very fast.
At last, the melancholy day of parting approached,
and every evening as they separated, they sighed more
deeply in counting the diminishing days of their last
week: ‘ Six, five, four, three: only two good nights
more !”’ .

There was still alast hope: Mrs. O’Reilly had written
to Mrs. Kirnan, begging her to come, if she possibly
could, and spend a few days with them, and then
take Ellen back to school. No answer had come yet,
UNEXPECTED NEWS. 97

but Ellen told her aunt not to expect to see Mrs. Kirnan,
for she never went from home in the beginning of school-
time.

“< What would I not give for one week more?” said
Dora, as the young party met at the breakfast-table,
the last morning but one.

‘‘ And if Mrs. Kirnan could be here!” said Ellen:
“one week with you and Mrs. Kirnan, with the delight
of seeing you love her, is the thing I most wish for in
the world. I should be quite happy then.”

At this moment a servant entered with the letters and
papers. Mrs. O’Reilly was not come down stairs. One
letter was for her, the other for Ellen; both were pant
Mrs. Kirnan. :

Ellen’s eye sparkled as she broke the oat ‘“* Now
for it—do guess?” said she playfully: ‘is Mrs. Kirnan
coming for me or not?” '

“Yes! yes! yes!” cried the three sisters at once.

‘Thank you, good sibyls three,” said Ellen: ‘‘ now
you shall hear how it is,’’ and she read aloud: ‘‘ My.
dear Ellen, your aunt will tell you that I have presumed
upon her kindness, and invited myself tg her house
for a week, instead of two or three days.” A general
clapping of hands followed this sentence, and in the
98 UNEXPECTED NEWS.

mean time Ellen’s eye glanced quickly down the page.
Dora and Ally had already flown to Mrs. O’Reilly’s
room with the news: Magdalen stood still, for she
saw, though Ellen’s back was’turned to her, that all
was not right.

At last Ellen rose and turned towards her; but her
cousin stood aghast when she saw her countenance.
Her lips were livid, her eyes sunk, and a cold dew stood
on her forehead. She put the letter into Magdalen’s
hand, and tried to walk towards the door, but she
staggered, and Magdalen caught her as she fell senseless
to the floor. |

How little do we foresee of the trials that may:ac-
company the fulfilment of our requests! Ellen had
said an instant before, that her happiness would be
complete, if Mrs. Kirnan would consent to come even
for one week. She was now coming ,—but it was to fit
Ellen out for the East Indies, and to part with her
perhaps for ever. Our young heroine had more strength
of mind than most girls of her age, and seldom or never
was known to give way to vain lamentations; but the
news she had just received was startling, and surprised
her into unusual emotion. Her father was married
again, and now that his house had a mistress, and
UNEXPECTED NEWS. 99

could be called a home, he was anxious to have Ellen
with him. The pains that he took to justify his con-
duct in his letter to Mrs. Kirnan, awakened a suspicion
that his conscience reproached him: for selfishness, and
that he feared he might injure the best interests of his
child, by taking her at so. early an age from her present
means of improvement. ‘

Mrs. Kirnan tried, however, to snatch some comfort
from Mr. Cameron’s assurances, that his house was in a
healthy situation, and that his wife expressed the greatest
possible interest‘in the dear child.

When Ellen recovered her senses, she found herself
in her own room, with none but Magdalen. Kind
Magdalen! She had taken care that her friend on
returning to consciousness should not be bewildered by
a multitude of faces, or distressed by well-meant in-~
quiries and attentions. She had conveyed her quietly
to the place she would like best, and now she stood
beside her, ready to comfort her if she could—if not,
to weep with her.

Now it was that Ellen felt the value of a friend. A
few weeks before, she would have suffered torments
without showing them: she would have locked and
doubled-locked her door, that no one might see her tears;
*

100 UNEXPECTED NEWS.

she would have _called sympathy officious meddling,
and would have said: ‘‘ What are my troubles to any
one else?” But now she was no longer alone in the
world ;- she had learned to live in others; she leaned
on the bosom of a friend. Even before they spoke,
when they only shed silent tears together, they under-
stood one another-—they comforted one another; and
when at last Ellen burst into speech, and uttered
thought after thought as rapidly as they came into her
mind, Magdalen caught every feeling before: it was
uttered, understood every thifaght, antl knew how to
restore by degrees her friend’s mind to calmness.

‘More than an hour passed away. “ Mrs. Kirnan will
be here presently,” said Magdalen.

“True, and I must be myself for her sake,’’ said
Ellen, starting up, and looking at her disfigured face in
the glass. ‘‘ Come, Magdalen, and walk a little in the
garden with me: she must not see these frightful eyes.
Let the wind blow upon them.”

Wearily the hours passed, till Mrs. Kirnan arrived.
Ellen had determined to receive her calmly, and when
she saw that Mrs. Kirnan, fatigued in body and ha-
rassed in mind, was much more overcome than she ex-
pected to see her, instead of catching the infection of
=

e
UNEXPECTED NEWS. 101

her grief, she felt the motive for restraining her feelings
increased tenfold; she therefore did restrain them. She
had employed herself the greater part of the day in
writing a letter to her father. It was so sensible a letter
that it might well make her father reconsider his plans,
and so moving a’ one, that a heart of stone could not
have registed it, much less a father’s heart of flesh.
Mrs. Kirnan allowed her to send it to her father’s agent
in London, but he returned it saying: ‘‘ That he had
positive orders to see Miss Cameron shipped for India
in the Clara Mowbray, @hich was to sail in a week’s
time, and he had already taken her passage.”

This reply extinguished her last hope. She must
bear her trial, and her only business was to bear it well,
Alas! this was no easy task,

CHAPTER XVII.
MIDNIGHT.

Wuar has happened to Ellen; she seems no longer
herself! There was a time when some said. that she
wanted sensibility ; but now all her power of endurance
seems gone, and she is wholly given up to sorrow. She
tries to smile, but from morning to night the tear stands
102 MIDNIGHT.

in her eye, and from night till morning her uneasy pil-
low is wetted with tears, and her bed shakes with vio-
lent sobs, or with the sudden starts of one who wakes
with the consciousness of something painfully horrible
hanging over her.

This certainly was no small trial fora child. of Ellen’s
years and temper to bear. She loved her friends dearly
—-she must leave them all; she loved improvement—
she must bid it farewell; she could not enter a ferry-
boat withont some fear—she must cross two wide oceans
and live for months on the tossing waves. She wondered
at herself for not being better able to command her feel-
ings; she did not know that all the strength which she
thought she possessed was derived from pride; and that
though pride may resist little vexations, it is not strong
enough to bear us up through real afflictions.

One night—it was the last but one—Ellen had been
in bed some hours, when she heard the room door open,
and Mrs. Kirnan’s gentle step approach her. She
turned her face towards the pillow and lay quite still ;
for she knew that if Mrs. Kirnan found that she was
awake, it would be seen that she had been weeping.
Mrs. Kirnan put down her light for fear of waking Ellen;
and stooping over her kissed her cheek, ‘¢ Poor child!”
MIDNIGHT. 103

said she, as she felt that it was wet. She leaned over
her for a moment or two, and whispered a few words,
—they were words of prayer, and of prayer for her!
Ellen could no longer restrain her agony of mind. The
swelling sob burst out, the gathering tears gushed forth,
the flood-gates of her heart were opened, and her grief
rushed on like a torrent. Mrs. Kirnan wisely let it for
a while take its course ; but when its first violence was
spent, she said calmly though sorrowfully: ‘‘ Ellen we
must not indulge in passionate grief; it is wrong to do
so. I had hoped for more firmness from you than you
have shown under this affliction.”’ 3

‘T cannot help it, mdeed I cannot; and why should
I? It is not wrong to feel,”

“* No, quite the contrary. We are not commanded
to be without our feelings, but we must govern them,
and not let them interfere with ourduties.”’

* “ T assure you I did determine, as I always do, not to
show my feelings, and at first I kept my resolution;
but the more I think about this cruel voyage, the more
it distresses me, and now that it comes so near, I
cannot command myself any longer.”’

‘* If your resolution has failed, it is, my dear, because
you determined only to conceal not to moderate your
104 MIDNIGHT.

feelings. An equal effort to shut out the thoughts that
aggravate your feelings, would have made you more
successful,”’

“ Have I not cause to complain?” continued Ellen. 3
“ It is cruel to take me away now, you must own that it
is. Who is there in the wide world to take care of me as
you have done? Why must I be taken away from you
and from every thing that is good ¢ Why must I run -
the risk of so long a voyage, without a friend on board
who will care whether I live or die?. You know well
that there is no good reason for it. If there were any
use in my removal from you, I should be able, I think,
to bear it with firmness; but it is useless and pro-
voking, as well as afflicting.”

‘‘ Mypoor child,” said Mrs. Kirnan, “this will not do;
we are not to choose what trials we will bear; we must
bear meekly those Which our heavenly Father sends us.”

“Yes, yes, you have often told me that afflictions are’
~ gent for our good, and that therefore we ought to bear
them; but I do not think this is for my good : it is
neither right nor just for Papa to send me away from
every thing I love, and to expose me to so many
dangers. It is not for my good, or you would
have proposed it; it is not for my good, or you
- MIDNIGHT. 105

would not be sorry and anxious about it, as I know
you are.”

“‘T am anxious,” said Mrs. Kirnan—‘‘I had laid
down many plans for you, and it has pleased God to
overthrow them all: I firmly believe that His plans are
better than mine: if I am anxious, it is because I fear
I have made you too dependent upon me. It is for
you I fear—I do not distrust Him.”

‘“How is it possible you can have done me any
harm !” !

““T have, if I have led you to trust more in me than
Him. You seemed to say just now that his ways are.
wrong ;—if not, that I should haye chosen them.”

‘Oh, no! I did not mean that: I said that my
father’s plan is neither right nor just: I must think it
most unreasonable.” |

‘Yet your father’s plan, no doubt in his judgment,
is consistent with your happiness and interests, and
therefore he thinks it just and reasonable. Whether
his views on the subject are better than Ours, we may
be uncertain. But of one thing we have no doubt :—
that it has been ordained that children are to obey
their Parents,”’

A misgiving of the propriety of the sentiments which

G
106 MIDNIGHT.

she had expressed now arose in Ellen’s mind ; and as
she could not see her way clearly, she did not venture
to make any remark. She had not acquired the bad
habit of arguing for the sake of victory, or of asserting
any thing of which she had not a clear conviction. On
this occasion, she looked up with hope that Mrs. Kir-
nan would proceed ; nor was she disappointed.

‘‘ Your father’s just wishes, then, come to you, my
dear, with the authority which God has given to him as
your parent. I see you are inclined to repeat, that his
wishes on the present occasion are not just. We will |
calmly consider this point. If they: are unjust, my
dear Ellen, your conclusion is unquestionably right :—
they are not entitled to your obedience. If.-he required
you to forget’as well as to leave your friends in Eng-
land,—or to become indifferent about those who have
so long been solicitous about you, and who must ever
most tenderly love you,—his wishes would indeed be
wrong and most unreasonable ; and you would disre-
gard them in obedience to Him who has given no au-
thority to do wrong, and whose command it is that we
should be affectionate and grateful. Where human
clashes with divine authority, we know which is para-
mount, and which we ought to obey. Now to our own
MIDNIGHT. 107

immediate concern. You are required by one, whom
God tells you to obey, to go out to India. It seems to
me that if you were to remain in England a few years
longer, it would not only be more agreeable to our
matual feelings—these comparatively must be allowed
to be of small weight in the present matter,—but that
you might secure some very important advantages,
which it is difficult, if at all possible, to obtain out
there. I think that here your education would be more
vigorously pursued and successfully finished than in the
enervating climate of the East,—and above all that
maturer thought and a more lengthened cultivation of
good dispositions would make you better prepared to
encounter the dangers of Indian life. Society there
abounds, my dearest Ellen, with peculiar dangers to
young people.” |

‘Have you not clearly shown,” exclaimed Ellen,
bursting afresh into a flood of tears, ‘‘ that my father’s
orders for my removal from you are most improper,
cruel and injurious to me ?”’

“No, no! my dear child. I have expressed some-
what of my solicitude for your welfare; and I have
expressed an opinion that your safety and happiness
would be better ensured by a longer stay with us But
108 MIDNIGHT.

in this I may be mistaken: your father may be right:
the same ends may be attained by other means than
those that have occurred to me: nay, I should be very
wrong, if I did not confide in His guidance and pro-
tection of you, who loves you with an unbounded love,
and without whose permission, your father could not,
thus exercise his parental authority. In justice to your
father, we must give him credit for good motives. m
calling you out to India, and allow him the free exer-
cise of his judgment in ordering the plans of “your
future life. Ifwe do this, Ellen,—and we ought not
to do less, we shall not be able to charge him with
cruelty and injustice. What are probably his views in
sending for you? He has now a home every way more
suitable for you than while he remained a widower :
he perhaps thiriks: your education so near completion,
that by an industrious use ofthe acquirements you
have already made you may easily compensate for your
early removal from school: he may judge that by in-
troducing you into society, he can ensure you valuable
knowledge which is not to ‘be acquired at school, and
which may be more precious than any other treasure
he intends to bequeath you: he may think that your
health is consulted by your going out now instead of
MIDNIGHT. | 109

later, because your constitution will the more readily
adapt itself to the trials of so hot a climate. My dear,
is thére any cruelty in these motives and views ?”

Ellen showed by her sobs that she was convinced
that she had nowa fresh source of trouble: she felt she
had rashly judged and condemned a parent.

‘“‘'Your father,” continued Mrs. Kirnan, “has a
right to the comfort of your presence and attentions in
his declming years. But it is not thus perhaps that he
thinks of himself. It may be to him a matter of self-
reproach, that he has left you so long in the hands of
strangers.

Ellen started : ‘‘ Strangers!” ‘My dear child, we
are not strangers now: nor can either distance in time
or space, or any thing else ever render us so: but we
were strangers when your father last looked upon you,
and gave you his parting embrace. The impression is
still deep in his heart; and when he thinks of your
dear mamma, it is not improbable, I was going to
say, when you started so, he feels something of the na- ©
ture of reproach, as if he had neglected to strengthen
the natural ties of affection which should bind pa-
rent and child, or had allowed time and distance to
weaken them. And by the by, would such a result of

rt
110 MIDNIGHT.

your continued absence from him be deemed unlikely
by any one who should hear your censures of his

conduct 2” °

©] have been wrong, and I am sorry for it,” said
Ellen firmly ; and while she spoke, her tears ceased to
flow; she dashed with her hand the last drop from her
cheek, and looked calmly and steadily in Mrs. Kirnan’s
face ;—‘‘he is not unreasonable, cruel or unjust in send-
ing forme. I will obey as cheerfully as I can; and when
once in India, it will be my delight to show my love for
him: Ithink I have always loved him: 1 am sure I have
ever since Mrs. O'Reilly spoke of him tome. But it is
hard to think with composure: of so long a voyage;
but oh, infinitely harder to bear the pang of parting
from you. How am Lto bear this ?”’ bait
‘‘ My dear child, we are both weak; we both stand
in need of being strengthened in this moment of trouble.
To whom shall we have recourse ¢ To the Father of all.
It is our privilege so to address him. You will ‘be as

‘ near to his mercy and protection when the ship rolls ‘on

the tumultuous billows, as you are now, We will commit
all to him. In the course of obedience, will that Pro-
vidence fail us, which has never lost sight of us even in
our wanderings? Go then, my child, on the awful deep
MIDNIGHT. 111

with the consoling consciousness that he who com-
mands the winds and the waves and they obey him,
has adopted you as his child, and bids you commune
with bim as your Father who is in heaven.”’

“‘T do not fear the voyage now,” said Ellen, ‘ but
shall I offend by my extreme distress at the thoughts
of leaving you ?”’

“‘T hope not, my dear, we cannot command exemp-
tion from the pangs of natural grief, but we can bear
them submissively to the will of the supreme Disposer —
of all events: we can make a deliberate act of the will,
preferring obedience to God to the indulgence of our
own natural inclinations. By obedience we are per-
mitted to emulate the angels.” —Mrs. Kirnan kneeling
at the bedside, and taking Ellen’s hands between her
own, “join me,” said she, “in prayer suited to us
both;”’ and after a pause of a few seconds, she slowly
and fervently prayed: ‘‘ Thy will be done on earth, as
it is in heaven.” Ellen did with her whole soul join in
this prayer.

Mrs. Kirnan rose and left her. Ellen looked after
her, and then listened to her retreating steps, till she
could hear them no longer. She thought of all her
tender care, and fancied herself alone, far from. her
112 MIDNIGHT.

guidance, with a rolling ocean, and half the world be-
tween them. ‘‘ But,” said she, ‘‘ He who gave me to
her, may bring me to her again, and if not—thy will be
done.” Still hot tears coursed one another down her
cheeks; she closed her eyes ; and once more laying her
head on her pillow, she whispered : Thy will be done
on earth, as it in heaven:”’ and exhausted by the
struggles she had gone through, but comforted by her
victories over herself, she fell into a sound sleep.



CHAPTER XVIII.
MORNING THOUGHTS.

Wuen Ellen awoke the next morning, it was with a
lighter heart than she had had for a long time. She
felt relieved and refreshed, and at first she could not
tell why; but by degrees her conversation with Mrs.
Kirnan came to her recollection, and the words she
had had on her lips when she went to sleep, came into
her mind again, with all the freshness, all the energy
of a first morning thought. ‘‘I am but a child,” said
she to herself, ‘but I feel as if I had grown since yes-
terday. There is business to be done ;” and before
the words were said, she was up and doing.— While
MORNING THOUGHTS. 113

she dressed, she arranged in her mind the business she
had to do in the day. She must write to her father, to
tell him the day she was to embark; she would then
pack up some favourite books and keepsakes, then pay
a parting visit to her aunt Cameron; and, finally, she
must take leave of Mrs. Kirnan, who was obliged to
reture home that evening. There was enough in any
one of these tasks to make her dismal, but the last
hung like a heavy chain about her heart. “It is of no
use to think of it beforehand, unless it helps me to
bear it when it comes,” said Ellen. She now recol-
lected many instructions which she had received in
past times, to look up to Heaven in the hour of trou-
ble. This was almost the first time that she felt that
such admonitions were applicable to her. She did
pray for divine help, deeply sensible that she needed it,
and with freshened hopes that it would be vouchsafed
to her in her coming trials.

CHAPTER XIX.
OLD TIMES AND NEW.
Wuew Ellen went to bid adieu to her aunt Cameron,
the old lady was still in bed, and she ordered Ellen to
114 OLD TIMES AND NEW.

-beshown upstairs. Ellen was startled as she approached

the bedside at the sight of her aunt’s ghastly counte-
nance: her eyes were hollow, her cheeks sunk, and her
face of a deadly yellow colour.

“My dear aunt,” said Ellen, “ why did you not
send us word that you were ill? you must have been
very ill indeed since I saw you last.”

‘Not so ill as you think,” said Mrs. Cameron,
laughing heartily: ‘‘ you shall see me recover in an in-
stant. Here, Parker, come and give me a little colour.
I wake in this state oneey: alien my dear; but Par-
ker understands my case.’

Parker approached with the rouge pot; but ms
took it from her hands. ‘‘ Do not put it on for me,”
said she; ‘‘I like you better without it.”

‘Do you indeed! that is rather strange, for people
used to say, forty years ago, that I wanted a little, and
I have less colour now than I had then.”

“<] detest rouge,” said Ellen, ‘‘ and every thing that
does not tell truth.”

“That is right,” said Mrs. Cameron laughing : “ tell
the truth at once; I like the truth as well as you, though

‘Ido wear rouge. Put it down, then, and you will see

a necklace on the dressing table: I have been getting
OLD TIMES AND NEW. 115

some stones new set for you; if you like them you may
wear them for my sake.

“* You are a good girl, Ellen,” said Mrs. Cameron,
after the business of the necklace was fully settled ;
“T have-a great regard for you, and I wish to give
you some serious advice before you go.”

“Thank you, aunt.” :

‘When you go into the world, there is no knowing
what sort of people you may have about you to direct
you; so I hope you will remember that a great deal
depends on a young person’s first entrance into life,
and that you will never be persuaded to do any thing
foolish or unbecoming.”

“T hope not, aunt.”

‘Tn the first place then, let nothing tempt you to
wear blue, that is, pale blue, either in a dress or in a
head-dress ; you are much too pale for it. Lacea little
tighter by degrees than you have hitherto done, and
above all, be particular about the colour of your hand,
for there cannotbe a greater disadvantage to a young
lady than a red hand. Are you listening to me?”

*: Yes,” said Ellen, smiling.

‘* But I suppose you think these things of no conse-
sequence ?”
116 OLD TIMES AND NEW.

“ Of very little consequence, certainly.”

‘‘ You are mistaken then; child, you do not attend
half enough to them: you should have seen how girls
spent their time when I was young; how much better
we dressed than you do now. I dare say you would
think it a waste of time to sit for three hours under a_
hairdresser’s hands, to be pomatumed and frizzled for a
ball ?”’ |

‘‘ Indeed I should,” said Ellen.

‘Or to have a master to teach you to twirl a fan,
and carry a long train gracefully behind you, and to
step backwards without treading upon it.”

‘< Worse and worse,”’ said Ellen.

‘‘ Well then, these were the talents and accomplish-
ments of my time, and if a young lady could do all
these, and could read English, write a good legible
hand, make out a washing bill, and do all sorts of nee-
dle-work, she was considered to be a very clever woman.
What do you think of that?”

‘1 think that girls are better off now.”

‘¢They might be, Miss Cameron, I tell you that they
might be better off if they chose,—but are they? I
must tell you, that you are most of you quite as frivo-
lous as your grandmothers, and not half so agreeable.
OLD TIMES AND NEw. 117

When we learned to twirl a fan, or carry a train, at
any rate we learned to do it well; but which of you
does any thing well now-a-days? Jibber-jabber in bad
French, thrum thrum on the piano, without any tune,
just up and down, backwards and forwards, till one is
wearied with hearing you. I am accustomed to the
sound now, but fifty years ago, I should have fancied
it was Molly dusting the harpsichord, instead of a
young lady playing upon it. And you should have’
seen what dancing was then! We used to go through
a minuet like so many ships in full sail, with our
hooped petticoats, and our arms stretched gracefully
out; but in your quadrilles, no two people dance alike:
one bounces, another slides, another walks; and you
all look down to the ground, and hold yourselves as if
your arms were so much in your way, that you did not
know what to do with them. I often hear that there
is still good dancing ; but for my own part I have seen
nothing of the sort, since I left off dancing myself fifty
years ago.”

‘* These are only accomplishments,” said Ellen. ‘If
we acquire more useful knowledge, does it signify much
whether we dance and play well or not ?”

““Signify ! to be sure it does. It is of the greatest
118 OLD TIMES AND NEW.

importance, I tell you, to do them well, if you do them
at all. You do not know the meaning of the word
useful. What use is there in half knowing any thing?
You will leave off music, when you have half learned
it, because languages are more useful. When you have
a smattering of French and German, you will forget
them again, to learn a little Latin and Greek. By and
by you will fancy that these are not so useful as the arts
and sciences; and then when you have hammered at
the stones for a little geology, and burned your fingers
with a little chemistry, you will dip into metaphysics,
and then what will you do? Why, you will sit down
and laugh at your great grandmother, for the years she
spent in embroidering her best bed-curtains, and thank
your stars that the world is so improved! It is all folly,
I say, and worse than folly: I would rather do one
thing well, aye, if it were only cross-stitch, point-stitch,
or chain-stitch. If it were only dancing a minuet, or
twirling a fan, I would rather do one thing well, than
dabble in every thing and yet learn nothing thoroughly
after all. The things that young people are to learn,
do not depend on their own choices they learn what-
ever the fashion of the times puts in their way; and it
is not these things, but the power of doing thoroughly
OLD TIMES AND NEW. 119

whatever they do at all, that makes all the difference
between a wise woman and a fool. I tell you again,
the great question is not, “‘ what does she know, and
what can she do?” but, ‘‘ how does she know it, and
how can she do it ?” |

During this lecture, Mrs, Cainencin grew very warm,
as.she always did, when she talked a great deal. She
had the strange fancy that the people who listened to
her were all contradicting her, so she always spoke as
if she contradicted them in return; and thus she
worked herself up into a passion. This time, she
ended by grumbling at Ellen and all other young
people, for their conceit in fancying themselves wiser
than their elders.

‘* How little does my aunt know what is passing in my
mind!” thought Ellen. ‘‘ She thinks me as conceited
as ever; it is indeed the first time in my life that I have
not considered myself the wiser being of the two.
Many a time I have thought her a very silly woman,
and she never found it out; and to-day, when I think
there is a great deal of real solid sense in what she
says, she thinks I am contradicting her. She is how-
ever right in the main: till now I have been conceited ;
{ have hitherto been unjust to her, and I owe her an
LO LLL _

i —

120 OLD TIMES AND NEW.

apology.” So without excusing herself, she kissed her
aunt Cameron, promised not to be conceited again, and
said that she must be forgiven, as she was going away
so soon.



CHAPTER XxX.
THE GENEROUS ENEMY.

“ Mrs. Kirwan is going away to-night, is she not "7
said Mrs. Cameron. |

‘¢ Yes, ma’am.” .

‘T dare say you mean to give her a little keepsake
of some kind before she leaves you?”

Ellen nodded assent, but did not venture to speak.

Mrs. Cameron put a bank-note into Ellen’s hand ;
‘‘ Here,”’ said she, “ take this; do what you like with
it before you go: you may want it either for yourself
or others.”

When Ellen had taken leave of her aunt, she drove

back in silence through the busy streets of London.

Her heart was full. She had hitherto entertained a
sort of grudge towards this aunt; she had endured her
as a relation, but disliked her as a snappish, quarrel-
some woman, and despised her for her folly. Now,
just as she leaves her for ever, she finds that she has
THE GENEROUS ENEMY. 12]

done her injustice, and is doubly touched by the good
sense and the delicate generosity which she is so late in
perceiving. | | ,

Once upon a time an Athenian was sent into banish-
ment,—how and why you may learn elsewhere. As he
stood on the quay, to see his luggage stowed, he felt
some one-tap him on the shoulder. He turned round,
and who should it be but an.enemy of his, called Demos-
thenes, who was the cause of his banishment !. ‘‘ Here,”’
said Demosthenes, quite out of breath with running, have brought you a purse of gold, for I thought you
might want it in a foreign land.” He then shook hands
with his rival, gaye him the gold, and walked off without
waiting for thanks ; and Aischines, for that.was the name
of the other man, turned to the people about him, and
said: ‘‘ Who can wonder that Iam unwilling to. embark,
‘when the enemy I leave behind me is kinder than any
friends I am likely to find elsewhere ?”

Ellen’s thoughts were something like those of Eschi-
nes, and she was so wrapped in them, that an hour passed
before she thought of looking at the amount of the money
she held in her hand: but as some of our little readers
may be more curious than she was, we inform them that
it was a fifty-pound Bank of England note.

H
122 BETTER LATE THAN NEVER.

CHAPTER XXI.
BETTER LATE THAN NEVER.

Exien has been very long in going. You all wish
her fairly shipped before this time ; so she shall em-
bark forthwith. You must however have patience with
one incident more before the anchor is weighed.

When Ellen went on board, she saw that some kind —
unknown hand had been before her, to provide a hun- —
dred little nameless comforts for her. She had heard ©
that she must share the cabin of a young lady who
was an utter stranger to her. This had given her a
moment’s uneasiness, for she knew the happiness there
is in being sometimes quite alone. She found that a
green curtain, on a brass rod, had been put up; it
made a pretty barrier between them, but not an
immoveable one: the very thing that she wanted,
Again, there was a neat shelf opposite her bed, with’
some books “upon it; neither too few nor too many,
and so exactly such as she would have selected for
the place, that she thought she must have put them
there herself. A timepiece was there also, and over
the shelf,—oh sweet surprise! were true and spirited
sketches of her aunt and cousins O’Reilly, and of Mrs.
Kirnan, in which she instantly recognised the pencil

%
nt
. @
ee Re
BETTER LATE THAN NEVER. 123

of Magdalen. “ Who can have: thought of all this ?”
said Ellen ; ‘“ bless them, whoever they were!”

She had hardly said the words, when she was startled
by a loud sob close beside her. She looked, and
just within the door, with her face to the wall, and her
apron held to her eyes, there stood Parker,—<‘ What,
Parker! were these kind contrivances yours?”—Parker
only sobbed more violently, but,at last said : ‘“ Per-
haps, miss, if I told you they were, you would take
back your words again ?”’

‘I deserve this,” said Ellen, throwing her arms
round the neck of Parker, who never remembered her
smooth, starched handkerchief. ‘‘ Dear, kind Parker!
you were my first friend in England, and you are my
last. I deserve the pain of going away with a reproach
from you; I have been very ungrateful !”

‘““Oh no, miss!” said Parker; “I am sure I have
no right to call you so. It is not to be expected that
you, who know so many better people, should feel for
the like of us what we feel for you; and I am sure I
have scolded myself over and over again for craving
after any thing else. | say to myself: ‘ Didn’t she
give me a gown, and didn’t she give me a guinea when
she went away ?’ and. yet, for all that, I feel as if I

r
124 BETTER LATE THAN NEVER.

could throw the gown into the fire, and the guinea
after it; and I’m sure. that would be very sinful. I
don’t hardly know what it is I want, after all.’’

‘‘] know,” said Ellen. “ You want to see a spark
in me of kindness like your own, which is worth all the
presents in the world; and you shall. I will give you
anew gown and a new heart, and you may give the
old ones to Sally the housemaid.” ,

‘As to that, miss, say no more about it; I would not see
a thread that you have given me on any one else’s back:
but if you wish to give me any thing now, may I beso bold
as to ask for alittle bit of your hair? and will you give me
leave to send my duty to you when my mistress writes ¢””

Ellen cut off one of her dark bright locks, and taking
a plain gold brooch out of her handkerchief, with a case
for hair, she said: ‘‘ Wear it for my sake, Parker.”



CHAPTER XXII.

AT SEA.





Anp now Ellen is really out at sea. She has seen
the last of the white cliffs of old England; she has
been rocked by the rolling waves of the Bay of Biscay;
she has touched at Madeira, that beautiful island of



AT SEA. 195

wood, of flowers, of fragrance and of music. She
spent two days there, and saw as much of the island
as she could in so short a time. There were moun-
tains wooded to the very summit; the air was filled
with fragrance from the thickly blossoming orange
trees, and the geraniums, roses and myrtles, that
abounded in the hedges and fields. The birds there
sang more sweetly by far than birds are wont to sing
in other places; and above other songs rose the
natural strain of the canary bird, wild, rich and clear
beyond expression. Ah! how different is its own free
note, from the shrill song it sings as a captive in a
stratige land! How can it sing its own songs where
there are neither friends, nor wild woods, nor liberty ;
and where, if a ray of sunshine, straggling through the
wiry bars, brings with it a gleam of natural joy, and
a burst of natural music, tyrants hasten to exclude
that first and last blessing of freedom, the glorious light !

To all who had been on the sea, these days in Ma-
deira seemed days in paradise; but again the anchor
is weighed, and again they are on their watery road;
sea around them, water beneath them, heaven above
them. Very soon, scarcely a bird was to be séen
crossing the blue breadth of sky, which could rest’on

ee.


126 AT SEA.

the rocks the sole of its foot, and call earth its dwell-
ing-place. Yet the creatures of earth moved on,
through the foreign, the tremendous element of water.
By the mighty invention which God has given them,
they had put a barrier between themselves and de-
struction; and having made themselves wings where-
with to fly, they traversed the immeasurable gulf.
Fearlessly they went on, and the mighty vessel, as if
she knew her path and rejoiced in her beauty, rode
over the wild waves, and called herself their queen. |
Ellen, though she did not cease to love the friends
she had left behind, turned most of her thoughts to
those she was going to meet. She longed impatiently
for the day when she should see her father and her
home: she had determined to love her new mamma;
she had- already planned those occupations which
would depend on herself; for occupied she determined
to be, in spite of the heat of the climate, and the lassi-_
tude which it causes to every European. Ellen was
not one of those, who in planning for the future, forget
that they should always be doing, and that only the
present is our own to use as we please. As soon,
therefore, as her sea sickness was over, she read,
worked, and played on the pianoforte as usual.
FELLOW PASSENGERS. 127

CHAPTER XXIII.
FELLOW PASSENGERS,

Ir is time to speak of some of Ellen’s fellow passen-
gers, particularly of those under whose especial care
she was placed; and then it will be seen how it came
to pass, that her mornings, during the early part of the
voyage, were spent in solitary study; and that when
she walked up and down the deck, or sat in the poop,
she had liberty to watch for hours in silence the spark-
ling waters, the brilliant colours of the dolphins that
sported round the ship, the wings of the flying-fish
glancing in the sun, as it was followed in swift chase
by the boneto, and all the other beauties of the sea.
Well was it for Ellen, that she had learned not to look
upon these things with a vacant eye, but to find a
companion in every living creature!

Most of the passengers were men, who were going
out.to India either for civil or military service: but the
people who most concerned Ellen, were a Lady Mary |
Dalton and her daughter, under whose charge she
was placed. There was:also a Mr. Dalton, but he was
old, and had a fit of the gout ; he was therefore very
seldom to be seen. Mr. Dalton and Lady Mary had
come over for their daughter, who had been in Eng-

&


128 FELLOW PASSENGERS.

land since the age of four years, and had had the best
education that mere money can procure; that is to
say, who had had a great deal of money spent upon
her, and had learned nothing. She was now seventeen
years, of age, and was going over to India with four
ideas in her head, three of which were arguments, and
the fourth a conclusion. First, that her papa was rich;
second, that her mamma was titled; third, that she |
herself was perfection; and to conclude,—that she
should soon get married. Now though Ellen was
under Lady Mary’s protection, she was left very much
to her own protection; for Lady Mary had weak
nerves, and lay on the sofa all day; and her daughter,
after giving Ellen a stare, and a double stare, and
saying in a familiar tone: ‘‘ How old. are you, my
dear ? what school were you at, my dear?’ and so
forth, finished by saying: pray sit down, my love;”
and then never spoke to her again for weeks.

It was quite new to Ellen to feel herself a cipher in
the world. Among her young companions she had
always been a leader; and Mrs. Kirnan, though she
had not brought her too much forward, had always
treated her like a rational being, who was capable of
taking. some interest in passing events. By de-—
FELLOW PASSENGERS. 129

grees however she got rid of the sense of mortifica-
tion which this neglect at first occasioned her, and
found resources for herself in her own quiet employ-
ments.

Ellen soon discovered that Miss Dalton was not only
an ignorant and frivolous, but also an artificial girl ;
and therefore her neglect was little to be regretted.
Ellen was thoroughly honest, and she despised, as a
want of principle, that affectation which disfigured Miss
Dalton’s speech, actions and countenance.—‘‘Affecta-

tion,” Ellen used to say to herself, “is the meanest

sort of lying and stealing.” Poor Miss Dalton only
thought of gaining admiration; and so accustomed was
she to manage /her appearance, and. so little to manage
her inward spirit, that she was hard at work every day,
and all day long, at that most laborious and unpro-
fitable of all manufactures, grimace-making.

What should you think of a man who set about
moving all the little and great wheels of a steam engine
in a cotton manufactory? He could certainly manage

only one at a time, and that very badly; for his hand

would soon grow tired, and he would make but little
cotton in his day’s work. You would say to him if you
saw him: ‘‘ My good man, you had better go and put a

>
r


130 FELLOW PASSENGERS.

little water into that boiler, and make a little fire under
it; you will save yourself an- amazing deal of trouble,
Thus it is with our

,

and.do your work much better.’
machinery; the moving power must come from our
hearts. If this little boiler only goes on’well within us,
the great beam will be set at work, which moves all the
little wheels; and if we direct-the power well, our work
will be easy and good: if this boiler is out of order,
our labour is in vain. .

Miss “Dalton was not aware.of this, so that it was
very fatiguing to see her trying to turn her wheels
about, while all her efforts resulted in nothing. . If
any anecdote of misery was related, she made her
face twice as long as any face around her; if she was
in doubt, she shook her head as though it would come
off, When the witty captain B. came within ten yards of
her, she began to laugh and talk as loud and as fast as
she could. When-the pensive young Major C., with his
arm in a sling, happened to be near, she was leaning
on the taffrail looking into the water, or standing on
the. stern gallery, throwing her eyes upwards to the
moon when the major was looking at her, or down-
wards to the major when only the moon was looking at
her. When the learned lawyer, Mr. D.,came past her

¢ .


FELLOW PASSENGERS. 131

with a book, she too was reading very attentively, and
marking every page with her pencil, to show how much
she was struck by it. Notwithstanding all this, Ellen
could not help observing, that when Miss Dalton was
left to herself, she neither was nor pretended to be sen-
timental, witty or wise; but that she spent her time in
quarrelling with her papa and mamma, and in patting
her lap-dog. She rarely spoke to Ellen, unless it was
to ask her to accompany her in a song, or to charge
her not to tread on Diamond’s toes—until they left
Madeira, and then her conduct underwent a sudden
change, and she became as importunate as she before
had been neglectful. 7

At Madeira they took in two passengers. One of
these was a great man, who had an important office in
India, and it was.on his account they had touched at
Madeira: the other was a plain-dressed pale young lady,
whom nobody knew, and nobody seemed to care for ;
who in fact was nobody, and therefore ‘sat at the
bottom of the table near Ellen.

‘Who is that fine-looking little girl at the bottom
of the table?” said the great man to-Miss Dalton, who
sat next him at dinner.

_ “She is a Miss Cameron. Poor child! she is


132 FELLOW PASSENGERS.

going out very young, and she is badly educated
too.”

‘J should.not have thought so; she has one of the
finest countenances I ever saw.”

‘Yes, has she not?” exclaimed Miss Dalton, making
shew of a great deal of delight and admiration.

‘¢ Under whose care is she ?”’

‘¢ Qh! mamma has the care of her; but as mamma
is such an invalid, the charge devolves principally upon
me. By the way, she is talking too much to that
person beside her; I must caution her. Who knows
whether she is a fit companion for her or not ?”’

‘You need not be alarmed; I know Miss Pierce-
field; she is a very worthy young woman.”

‘¢T am glad to hear it; but one cannot be too pru-
dent. You /éttle know what a weight, what a respon-
sibility, is attached to the interesting task of watching
over the mind and conduct of so young a creature !”’

‘‘T am sorry you have such a troublesome task,”
said the great man; ‘‘ but I am a good physiognomist,
and I augur, from her countenance, that she will fully
reward you for your pains.” Here the conversation
turned to another subject.

This however was enough for Miss Dalton. Lord 8.
FELLOW PASSENGERS. § 459

had taken notice of Ellen, and she would do so too;
and from this time forth, she became most troublesome
in her kindness. At first Ellen was amused by the
whim; and though she shook her off when she ‘at-
tempted any show of intimacy, such as patting her on
the shoulder, or twirling her ringlets, she bore with her,
and wondered what would come next.

In the mean time, Ellen had found a new friend.
Miss Piercefield, the plain-dressed lady before men-
tioned, had about as small a share of the public notice
as Ellen, and for reasons which a few months before
would have appeared to Ellen most satisfactory ones.
She was not rich; she had gained her bread by teaching
music, and she was going out to be married to a poor
missionary clergyman, to whom she had long been en-
gaged. Notwithstanding all this, and in spite of the
supercilious airs of Miss Dalton, Ellen soon loved Miss
Piercefield, and was not ashamed of avowing' it.

CHAPTER XXIV.
THE IGNORANT GIRL.
‘* How much less noble are all Lady Mary Dalton’s
nervous affections and endless annoyances, than Miss

,


134 @ THE IGNORANT GIRL.

Piercefield’s quiet exertion! - How much less dignified
Miss Dalton’s stare, than Miss Piercefield’s calm in-
difference whether she is stared at or not! How much
less captivating Miss Dalton’s airs arid graces, than
one smile from Miss Piercefield, though her smiles are
few and far between! Miss Piercefield’s smile of ap-
proval says, ‘ Well done!’ When she gives a smile to
folly, it says good-humouredly, ‘Laugh on!’ Some
of her smiles say more than I can tell, and every new
smile says'a different thing: but the only thing Miss
Dalton’s laugh ever says is, ‘ Hee, hee, hee!’ and I defy
any one to make more of it.” Ellen was moralising this
way one morning, as she was playing a duet with Miss
Piercefield, when Miss Dalton came running in: “Come,
Ellen, my love,” said she, ‘‘ Iam dying to talk with
you; I have seen nothing of you to-day.”

‘¢T cannot come now; I am busy with Miss
Piercefield.”’

‘¢ Oh! Miss Piercefield’s business cannot signify; do
come, I have something very particular to say to you.”
‘“‘ Say on,” said Ellen. |

“Impossible! You must come and walk with me,
for mamma is just going on deck, and I want to tell
you what Lord S. has been saying of you.”
THE IGNORANT GIRL. 135

‘1 have heard nothing from you but‘Lord S.’s sayings
ever since he came on board; and yet you have never
told mevany thing of him that another man could not
say as well.”

‘* But this is about you.”

‘* Well, I cannot leave my duet even for that. Tell
me at once, for you long to tell.”

“He says,” whispered Miss Dalton, “ that your
eyes are very like Signora Zittorini’s.”

“Indeed!” said Ellen, in a tone of mock surprise,
— “* are you sure he said so ?”’

“* Mamma heard him say it,” replied she.

“ What is her name? How do you spell it?”

Miss Dalton spelled Zittorini, and Ellen very seri-
ously'spelled it, syllable for syllable, after her.

‘“ What are you about, Ellen?” asked Miss Pierce-
field.

“Tam learning to spell the name of a woman
whose eyes are like mine, that I may gain a word, if
not an idea, from all the wise things that the great man
says.”’

Ellen heard a loud laugh behind her. She looked
round, and saw Lord S. standing in the door-way. She
blushed ;—it was not because he had heard her werds,

&


136 THE IGNORANT GIRL.

but because his laugh reproached her for having done
ill in ridiculing. Miss Dalton. She felt still more pain
when she looked in her silly face, and saw that she had
not the slightest suspicion that any one was laughing at
her. Ellen could only promise herself not to be satirical
again.

At that moment Miss Dalton was called away by her
mamma, and Lord S., sitting down, begged Miss
Piercefield and Ellen to finish their duet. ‘‘ Miss
Piercefield,” said he, ‘‘ has given me free admission to
her cabin, whenever I hear the sound of her piano-
forte; and that duet caught my attention, because my
own little girls play it.”

When the duet was finished, Lord 8. entered into con-
versation with Miss Piercefield, He talked of India in a
general, a political, and a military way; but though all
this interested Miss Piercefield, my young readers would
pass it over if it were inserted here. We will only say then,
that Lord S.’s manner of expressing himself was so easy,
—there was so much liveliness in his argument, and so
much argument in his playfulness, that though his con-
versation raised the spirits, and was decidedly amusing,
not. a. word that he uttered could properly be called
frivolous. At last he rose, looked at his watch and de-

Me


THE IGNORANT GIRL. 137

parted, nodding good-humouredly to Ellen, and saying :
‘Good morning, Miss Cameron : you are a good lis:
tener, I see; I have given you words enough to spell,
I hope, during the last half hour,”

‘ What is the reason,” said Ellen, as soon as the
door was ‘closed after him, “ what-is the reason that
Miss Dalton makes such worthless reports of Lord S.’s
conversation, though she talks of nothing else from
morning to night ?”

* Chaff is lighter than corn,” replied Miss Pierce-
field. “ Miss Dalton’s object is not to lay up what is
precious, but to catry away as much as she can; so
she takes the chaff, and leaves the corn behind.”

““ But that does not remove my wonder. Not one of
- Lord S.’s ideas to-day could be called common-place ;
yet Miss Dalton has never repeated any thing which Tony
Lumpkin, or any other stupid squire could not say as
well. Does he talk in the same way to her that he does
to you?”

Miss Piercefield smiled. “I rather suspect hedoes not.”

** And why ?”

‘Simply because she would not understand him,
and it is not polite to talk to a young lady in an un-
known tongue.” ;

’


138 THE IGNORANT GIRL.

“Then you really believe that he only talks to Miss
Dalton about the trimmings of gowns, and the different
merits of different confectioners, milliners, and hair-
dressers ?”’ ‘

‘Yes. I believe that to be the case.”

‘The poor girl then is very unfortunate." How can
she grow wiser, when people really wise make them-
selves foolish for her sake? Is it fair that she should
- not be allowed to pick up improvement from the high-

ways and hedges ?”’ 3

‘‘T am afraid it is. She has had the choice of wis-
dom and folly, and has chosen the last, and now she
must abide by her choice. « Had she been here just
now, she would have taken no interest in the conver-
sation, for want of the most common information, for .
want of such knowledge of geography and history as _»
she ought to have acquired at ten years of age, and
which she then thought troublesome and unnecessary.
Miss Dalton’s ignorance renders her incapable of being
amused by wit, or instructed by knowledge.”

‘Poor girl, how much she loses! To be constantly
in the society of such a man as Lord S. must bea conti-
nual delight to you; but any one, that is, any lord who »

,gave the best balls in India, would do just as well for her.”
THE IGNORANT GIRL. 1389

“It is, however,” said Miss Piercefield, “ the blessing
of the foolish, that they are satisfied with the portion
they have chosen. Never imagine that their case is to
be pitied.”

‘“How can you call it a blessing to be blind?” said
Ellen ; “ to me it seems the greatest of misfortunes.”

CHAPTER § XXV.
| LORD S.’S STORY. ,

Mayy pleasant hours fell to Ellen’s lot, during the
remainder of the voyage; and when every one else
was tired of the dull routine of a ship life, Ellen, with
her constant friend, Miss Piercefield, was wondering
how it was that the days flew over so quickly. Lord
S. was their frequent morning companion. He said
that their cabin was the only-place of refuge from
the gaping-mouthed fiend ennui, who, over the rest of
the passengers, ruled and reigned without control.
Ellen often had occasion to thank Mrs. Kirnan for
having accustomed her to think, feel and understand ;
and for having given her, by this means, a passport
through the largest and richest and most beautiful
empire in the world, the empire of thought.

.
140 LORD S.’s STORY.

‘‘T used to think,” said Ellen one day to Miss
Piercefield, ‘‘that a time came when people finished
their education, and having nothing more to learn, sat
down and enjoyed the knowledge they had acquired.
But the more I learn, the farther I seem to be from
this point :—will it ever come?”

‘‘T hope not.”

“Why do you hope not? I think it would be so
pleasant to know every thing!”

“Does what, you already know give you much
pleasure ?”’ )

‘‘T must consider.”

Lord S., who liad been reading, laid down his book,
and putting his hand to his heart, as if in an ecstasy of
joy, began repeating: ‘‘Twice one, two—twice two,
four,”—and so on. |

Ellen laughed, ‘‘ No,” said she, “‘ that gives me no
pleasure. I believe it was a trouble to me,to learn it
when I was little, but now that I know it, it is a matter
of indifference to me.”

“‘ Yet it is real knowledge: do you then never re-
peat it for your own pleasure ?”’

‘No, what would be the use of doing so? Yet, now
that I think of it, even the multiplication table gives
LORD S.’s STORY. 141

me pleasure, for it helps me every hour of the day to
find out something which I wish to know. It is a very
useful servant, and I value its services,” 7

“You will find it the same with all mere know-
ledge,” said Miss Piercefield: “knowledge is only a
servant; but if we employ it in good offices, it serves
us well, changes its name to wisdom, and becomes a
very valuable friend.”

“Then as all sorts of knowledge cannot be equally
valuable, pray tell me which is the most useful, and
I will not waste my time in gaining the rest.”

“Do not press that question now, my young philo-
sopher,” said Lord S.; “if any knowledge ig alto-
gether useless to you, it will be your own fault. Pick
it up wherever you can; it will serve your turn some
day, when you least expect it. I once heard of a little
girl who lived in a part of America where there were
no schools, and who therefore was—-””

‘‘ Uneducated,” said Ellen.

‘‘No—who was therefore obliged to educate herself.”

“* How could she do that?” |

“Ifyou like a long story, I will tell it straight through:
but first you must understand, that though the facts shall
be true, Ido not answer for the names and conversations,”

’
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142 LORD S.’s STORY.

‘¢Oh! thank you, thank you,” said Ellen: *< pray
begin.”

‘When Angélique was a little girl, she was allowed
to run about in. search of amusement. Her mother
was not uneasy about her, for she knew that the
people who lived near were simple honest folks, and
that her little girl was not fond of going into mischief.
When dinner was ready therefore, she used to send a
servant in search of Angélique, who always found her
soon, and brought her home safely. And how do you
think she spent her mornings? In a quiet corner of the
blacksmith’s forge, where she could see every wonder
of bellows, hammer and anvil, without being in the
way; there little Angélique would stand for a whole
morning, with her pinafore held up to screen her from
the scorching blaze, and to enable her to follow with
eager eye the progress of every nail in the shoe, and
the shoeing of every horse.

‘A good-natured old man lived hard by, whose
craft it was to make and mend human shoes. To this
man, after she had learned all that the smith could

teach her, Angelique went in search of fresh amuse-

ment. She went quietly into his shop, and sat down
opposite to him. For a long time she watched him
LORD S.’s STORY. 143

with curious eye, unabJe to discover very clearly how
he got his thread through his leather, but giving an in-
voluntary twitch with her elbows whenever he twitched
his. - By degrees she ventured closer, and looked over
his shoulder: her anxiety increased, as she seemed to
understand the operation better; and when at last she
felt herself sure of it, she could not help crying out:
‘Pray, cobbler, let me try.’—The cobbler, who had
long seen her elbows at work, was so highly amused with
this request, that he let his shoe fall down, and putting
his hands on his knees, as he sat with his feet under
‘him, he laughed and grinned, and laughed again; while
Angélique thinking only of one thing, quickly gained
possession of the shoe and the awl he had dropped in
his mirth, and set seriously to work to pierce a hole
through the leather. ‘Who ever saw the like! who
ever saw the like!’ said the cobbler. ‘ Bless your
pretty face! you'll never be able to do it. Hollo! wife,
come here and look at my journeyman!’ and again the
poor cobbler laughed till the tears ran down his hard
brown face. Angélique was so intent upon her work,
that she was hardly aware of the mirth she occasioned,
and certain it is that she would have gone on, if fifty
cobblers instead of one had been laughing at her,

r
144 ‘LORD. 8’s STORY.

But, alas! just as the awl wag about to go through, it
slipped, and hurt her finger not a little. ‘ Look, she
has hurt her finger!’ said the cobbler, quite distressed,
‘and it is all my fault for letting her have, the awl;’
and up he jumped to take it from her. ‘ Only let me
get it through first,’ said Angélique earnestly, and she
held out her bleeding finger; ‘1 have not hurt my
working hand, you see.’

“‘ The cobbler, though he was but a cobbler, was as-
tonished at the courageous perseverance of the little
girl, and though he would not give her the awl again,
he. consoled her by promising that he would procure:
some softer materials for her to try upon, and that if
she would come the next day, he would show her how
to use them. He kept his word, and Angélique, though
she had not strength to make real boots and shoes,
very soon understood the process as well as any shoe-
maker in the country.

‘Thus she went on from one trade to another, till
she was mistress of all that were exercised in the place
where she lived. The carpenter and turner were her
favourites, and she soon became very expert in the use
of tools, and made herself many a pretty box. It is
remarkable, that she never grew tired of any trade till
LORD S.’s STORY. 145

she knew it thoroughly, and then she went in search
of another. She never got into mischief, for only idle
people find time for mischief, and Angélique was never
idle. Neither did she learn any harm from smith, car-
penter or cobbler, for she was too intent upon what
they were doing to talk with them, or to listen to-what
‘they said. Thus, though so much of her time was spent
among the common people, Angélique did not catch
from them one vulgar thought, word or ‘trick: she was
a little lady still.” |

‘T think,” said Ellen, “‘this was a very useless
education for a young lady: what matter is: it whe-
ther a woman knows how to do carpenters’ work: or
not ?”’ |

‘* You forget that Angélique picked up an education
for herself; she had no choice of studies. My story is
not meant to prove that every lady ought to know
how to shoe her own horse, but to show that any thing
which a woman learns well, a woman may use well.
Hear what Angélique did.

‘At the age of fourteen she went into a convent.
This convent was situated in Upper Canada, which
in those ‘times was ill supplied with the luxuries, or
even the conveniences of life. The sisters of the con-

I
.
146 LORD §.’s STORY.

vent devoted themselves to acts of charity: they re-
ceived weary travellers, and sent them on their way
again in peace; if any were sick, they took them in
and nursed them. They had also an hospital, which
was visited twice a week by a doctor who lived a great
way off. Angélique’s habits of observation served her
as well here as they ever had done. She became not
only the most judicious nurse in the convent, but no
contemptible surgeon: she regularly received the di-
rections which the medical man gave for the treatment
of his patients during his absence, and she never was
known to mistake or to forget any of them. One day,
a man was brought in with his leg dreadfully fractured :
the surgeon had been there in the morning, but he was
not expected to return for three days. Angélique with-
out hesitation took the patient under her charge, and
before the doctor came, his leg was set, and he was
doing well. There was a school also in this convent
for the children of the poor, in which, before Angelique
came, nothing had been taught but knitting, sewing
and spinning. Angélique introduced different manu-
factures, and superintended the work of the little
carpenters, weavers, shoemakers and printers.’ By this
means she not only increased the revenues of the con-
LORD §&.’s STORY. 147

vent, but improved the whole country round, and
provided for many destitute little children. Angélique
lived happily and usefully for many years; and if, in
the course of your travels, you should ever explore the
western world, and discover the place where she spent
her life, the sisters of the convent will show you the
window-shutters and the desks that she made with her
own hands; the books that she bound; the linen that
she spun and wove: and the poor, the maimed, the
halt and the blind in the country round, will remember
and bless the name of sister Angelique.”



CHAPTER XXVI.
THE GUNS.

THE story was just finished when the, dinner was
served. On repairing to the cuddy, our three friends
found that Lady Mary Dalton was absent, and on
inquiring what was the cause, they found from her
daughter that she had been in hysterics all the morn-
ing. ‘* And no wonder,” said Miss Dalton; ‘‘I was
so horridly frightened, that I have hardly yet recovered
myself,”’

‘What has alarmed you ?”

,
148 THE GUNS.

‘‘ What! have you heard nothing of it? I wonder
mamma’s screams did not reach you. My poor little
dog Diamond got behind a press that stands close to
mamma’s berth, and we ran in a hurry to move it,
for fear he should hurt himself. Thank goodness, we
got him safely out, but we had such a narrow escape ;—
we might all of us have been killed !”’

‘‘ Did you pull the press about your ears?” said the
captain.

‘Oh no! a great deal worse than that! When we
moved the press, we saw two guns hanging up! They
must have been there ever since we came on board, and
we never knew it before.”

‘‘ Well, what has that to do with your alarm?” said
the captain.

‘Don’t you see? They have been hanging up all
this time not far from mamma’s berth—and pointed at
each other. If they had happened to fire, she might
have been shot.”’

Here the captain and many of the gentlemen lenipehed
aloud. Lord S. kindly kept his countenance, and tried
to explain to Miss Dalton that a gun could not go off
of itself; that when hanging quietly up, it was quite as
harmless as any other machine. Miss Dalton however


THE GUNS. 149

only looked sulky at being laughed at, and refused to
attend to a word he said. |

“It may be so,”’ pouted she; <« you men are sad
daring creatures, and will not allow that there js danger
in any thing. For my part, I don’t pretend to under-
standghe matter, but I have a horror of guns, and so
has mamma.”

‘Will you allow me to show you a gun? It shall do
' you no-harm I promise you.”

“Oh, not for the world!” said Miss Dalton,
‘“ you never could convince me that guns do not
shoot people; and if you could, I never should get
over the horror I have at the sight of them; nor
would mamma either, I am sure: therefore it is useless
to explain.”

“* Miss Piercefield,” said Ellen, ‘“‘women have nothing
to do with guns; but if Angélique ever spent an hour
in company with one, I am sure she secured herself
from any fear of this sort by examining it. I think
knowledge must save us from a great deal of useless
pain and fear.” Lord S. looked across the table to-
wards her, and nodded, as much as to say: ‘‘I guess
what you are thinking of; you are right.”
150 THE PINNACE.

CHAPTER XXVIII.
THE PINNACE. ,

Day after day the southern sun poured hotter beams
upon our voyagers. But when the evening came on,
and the moon arose, and the evening breeze was fol-
lowed by the placid coolness of night ; when the@park-
ling waters were gleaming with phosphoric splendor,
and the vessel was cutting her quiet way through the
sea of living light; at such a time it was pleasant for
those who could find pleasure in silence, and compa-
nionship in the mute works of creation, to sit still and
look upon these things. The heavens were rich in
beauty. Countless families of stars, beautiful stars,
which we never see in our northern hemisphere, were
shining gloriously in the. dark tent of heaven, and look-
ing into the broad mirror of the great Indian ocean. The
creaking of the labouring ship, the tread of the officer
on watch as he paced up and down, only made the
silence of night more completely felt. Ellen staid on
deck as late as she could, and while the coolness re-
vived her after a languid day, the calm beauty of the
evening refreshed her spirit, and her happy days ended
in peaceful thought and prayer to the Creator of all
these glorious works.


THE PINNACE. 151

And so things went on until one fine morning, when
the Clara Mowbray found herself where you have wished
her long ago,—in the mouth of the Ganges ; and while
our heroine was still jumping for joy at feeling herself
so near home, and wondering when the remaining hun-
dred miles which separated her from her father’s bun-
galow would be traversed, a beautiful little pinnace,
gaily painted, with streamers flying and an elegant awn-
ing to shade its passengers, hailed the ship, and inquired
whether Miss Cameron was on board. A hasty fare-
well was exchanged with her friends, promises to write,
and to see one another soon, were taken and given: a
chair was lowered; and an instant after, the pinnace
was flying towards her home. As for Ellen, she knew
not, cared not whither she was going. The pinnace
was the world to her; for a tear was on her.cheek and
on her hand and on her lips; and he who shed them was
her father.:



CHAPTER XXVIII.

THE BUNGALOW.
Oxcr more Ellen is in the bungalow by the river side; |
once more she walks under the banana trees to breathe
the morning air, before the sun has risen; once more


152 THE BUNGALOW.

she pants in the heat of an eastern day, fanned with
hot air, seeking rest and coolness, and finding it not.

Ellen’s history has been long enough we apprehend ;
we must therefore make the rest of our narative as short
as we can, by passing rapidly over the most eventful
part of her life,—the part which she spent in India.
She staid there two years, and they were years first of
painful mortification, and then of wholesome discipline.
Every airy castle she had built was rudely destroyed ;
every bright dream faded under the shade of realities
dark and huge; and nothing but bare rugged truth was
left to her. But she was recompensed ; she learned to
love truth for its own sake, and to find sublimity even
in its ruggedness; and she willingly gave up the orna-
ments of fancy, one by one, in exchange for the good
tools of experience. With these tools she worked well,
and out of the rough obstacles that lay in her way, she
shaped much solid good for herself; as the workman
makes fine statues out of rough blocks of marble, and
finds precious things in lumps of dirty earth.

One of the first disappointments that Ellen felt, was
in her father. Many of the objects around her,—the
rooms, the river, the creaking of the punkah, the
graceful forms and dress of the native servants, and the
THE BUNGALOW. 153

sound: of their soft language, came to her mind like
things she had known before, though whether in dreams,
or in reality, or in her own imagination, she could not
tell; but her father was quite a new man to her. Instead
of the princely and sublime figure that she had imagined, ©
ever since she looked in the dictionary for the word
‘‘nabob,” she beheld a little yellow man, worn with
the cares of business, dried up with the heat of the
climate and with the wines and curries he had lived on,
and the liver complaint that consumed him. Instead
of the careless free-hearted young fellow that her aunt
O’Reilly had described, she saw a timid, a suspicious,
even a peevish old man, hesitating in the most trifling
matters, and finally ruled in all things by his wife. He
loved Ellen, but his wife loved her not; and so accus-
tomed was he to obey, that he dared not show even a
father’s natural kindness. |

This Mrs. Cameron was a remarkably selfish woman,
and almost as cruel a stepmother as those unnatural
people we read of in books. It is said that she was
angry because Mr. Cameron did not speak a word to
her the first evening that Ellen came, and because he
had said that his Ellen was the living image of her own
gentle mother. These causes seem hardly sufficient to


154 THE BUNGALOW.

account for the constant persecution that poor Ellen expe-
rienced; but as no others are forthcoming, we must be
contented with these. Certain it is, that Mrs. Cameron
the second had a great deal of mean jealousy in her com-
position, and never saw any attention paid to others, with-
out fancying that so much was taken from herself. Hap-
pily for Ellen, many of Mrs. Cameron’s attempts to mor-
tify her failed, beeause they were only adapted to wound
people like herself; and Ellen was not one of these.
Mr. Cameron’s fondness for ‘his daughter showed
itself, as long as he had courage to manifest it, in his
anxiety to see her look well. He constantly bought
for her dresses and jewellery of the newest European
fashion; and this kindness, or rather her wish to return
it, improved her taste in dress more thah ten thousand
of her aunt’s fashion-books could have done. This
was a new cause of jealousy to Mrs. Cameron. She
saw that Ellen took pleasure in studying her father’s
wishes, and looked well in her father’s presents; and
she did not rest till she had persuaded Mr. Cameron
that his daughter had too much vanity; and the obe-
dient man made no more presents. This gave no pain
to Ellen, who had never loved dress for its own sake ;
she did not know the cause of her father’s change of
THE BUNGALOW. 155

behaviour, but conjectured that he gave her no more
because she had enough already; and she was satisfied.

Ellen wished very much to go on with her studies,
but Mrs. Cameron told her father that she was already
too conceited, and that it would keep her down to
employ her in domestic concerns. Under this pretence,
the poor girl was made an absolute slave: she kept all
the household accounts, and was responsible for all the
linen, which in this land of thieves was no light care.
Employment was no punishment for Ellen, who had
all her life delighted in activity. It was only when she
discovered that these tasks belonged to slaves, and
that in her subjection to them, her rights as a young
lady, and an only daughter, were infringed :. it was not
till then that they became what they were intended to
be, a bitter distress to her.

This was not all. Ellen had always been accustomed
to be gently encouraged in doing right. Now, however
much she might try, she tried in vain; she met with
nothing but sharp rebukes for not doing enough. Once,
twice, she thought of applying to her father for redress ;
but there was something in her spirit which made it
easier to bear injustice than to utter complaints; she
therefore remained silent. Once something like rebel-
156 THE BUNGALOW.

lion escaped her in her father’s presence, but his look
of timidity and utter helplessness distressed her so, that
she determined to bear any thing, rather than ever
behold such a look again. It galled her to see her
father led in such bondage, but’she thought, as there
was no remedy for it, that the best way to preserve
peace in the house, and to gain her father’s love, was
to possess her soul in patience. It was a hard duty,
but under a strong sense of right Ellen performed it
well: and the task of bending her will to the will of
others became every day less difficult. In this sorrow
too she had no sympathy. She went to spend a week
with Miss Piercefield, and she would fain have asked
for her advice and consolation to help her on; but she
felt that she had no right to lay open the faults of her
father, and of her father’s wife, and strongly resolved
that no one, not even Mrs. Kirnan, should know that
her home was unhappy. |



CHAPTER XXIX.
THE LITTLE BROTHER.
Asour a year after Ellen’s arrival in India, an event
happened which threw her into utter neglect. A son
THE LITTLE BROTHER. 157

and heir was born, who, from the moment that he first
saw the light, engrossed the care of his mother, and
the love of his father. This little being had an estab-
lishment of his own, even from his cradle. Master
Cameron’s coachman, master Cameron’s bearers, mas-
ter Cameron’s horses, master Cameron’s cook, were all
running about in master Cameron’s service ; while the
poor little puny, red-faced master Cameron was squall-
ing in his nurse’s arms, and had not strength to hold
his own head upright on his own shoulders.

Ellen was far from envying all the glories of her baby
brother; she loved him with her whole heart. She
used frequently to say, as she kissed and caressed him :
‘‘When you grow up, you shall be my comfort; you
shall be my friend, my dear little brother!” But
though she was a stranger to envy, she could not help
grieving, when she saw that her father day by day
seemed more forgetful of her, and she often wondered
why he could not love two children as well as one.
With these thoughts the beloved remembrance of
England often recurred to her, and sighing, she longed
to be there again.—One morning Ellen was sitting at
work in the verandah; she as usual had had no one to
converse with all day, for no one was near her but a _
158 THE LITTLE BROTHER.

little Malay girl who waited upon her, and who now
sat at her feet, helping her with her task. No wonder
then that she gave way to dismal thoughts. ‘‘ England
is my true home, my true country,’ said she silently.
‘‘ There they loved me, and I was always happy; I felt
myself to be alive, I had’a part to play in the world :
but here I am of no use, and nobody loves me. If 1.
were to fall into that river and be drowned, it makes
me sick to think what a fine funeral they would give
me, and what becoming mourning Mrs. Cameron would
put on; but I do not think that any one would cry for
me, unless it were the baby.”’ aa

Pitying oneself is the saddest thing in the world,
and perhaps the most useless. Poor Ellen became very
plaintive when she thought of these things, and actually
melted into tears as she lamented her own death. She
cried till she fairly laughed at herself for crying. ‘‘ This
< ridiculous,” said she, ‘and it is wrong too. I have
no right to complain, even if 1 am the most insignifi-
cant being upon the face of the earth: yet it seems
rather hard that every created thing is doing good to
its neighbour except myself. Those banana trees throw
their shade over the river, and the grateful river washes
their roots; the earth supplies the clouds, and the
THE LITTLE BROTHER. 159

clouds refresh the earth when it is thirsty. There is
not a bird in the ‘air that lives to itself; there is not
a flower in the field that lives only to itself. Yes,
pretty flower,” said she aloud, as she plucked @ rose
on which a butterfly had rested, “‘ you are better off
than I am; it is something to make even a butterfly
happy.” As she said this, she fixed her eyes mourn-
fully on the flower, and fell into a reverie. This did
not last long, but when she shook it off, she perceived
that the little Malay had laid down her work, and was
sitting with her dark eyes raised towards her mistress,
and a countenance scarcely less sorrowful than her own.

‘¢ What is the matter !’”’ said Ellen.

The little girl could not speak English; she answered

in Hindoostanee : but Ellen understood enough of her

language, and of the universal language of sympathy,
to comprehend that she was sad with Ellen’s grief, and
not with her own. ‘‘ What could she do,” she said, “‘ to
make her Bebee Saheb happy? Should she bring her
books, or her music, or the picture she was drawing, or
should she tell the nurse to bring the baby to her?”
Where was Ellen’s pride now? How was it that her
heart felt the tear of affection, and the voice of sympa-
thy, and forgot that the tear shone on the swarthy cheek
160 THE LITTLE BROTHER.

of a poor Malay, and that the voice was the voice of a *
slave? Her pride was gone. She had learned to love
the treasures of the heart wherever she found them,
and they were here.

‘This little girl loves me,” thought she; ‘cannot I
do her good? I am determined to try; perhaps that
may make me happy again.”

anne er

CHAPTER XXX.
THE YOUNG MALAY.

From this day Ellen set diligently:‘to work to im-
prove the mind of her little Malay, and the employment
soon became one of great interest to her. She began
her instructions by teaching her pupil English. The
next and most difficult thing to be done, was to make
her think and ask questions; and it was long before
Ellen could excite her curiosity, or elicit any other
answer than: ‘‘ Whatever missus please.” When how-
ever ‘this part of her education was accomplished, she
‘Became so greedy after new ideas, that Ellen found
_ difficulty in supplying her fast enough. She generally
asked several questions at a time, and they were most
strangely assorted ; for instance : ‘¢ Wilt missus tell me
THE YOUNG MALAY. 161

why the wheels run away with the coach,—and how far
the moon walks every night,—and who says tick in the
clock,—and has Ma’am ever seen Queen Victoria, and
what is she like ¢”’

Ellen always answered her questions on those matters
first which the little girl could best understand. She
first told, and then showed her why a wheel went round,
and how the clock ticked; and the reverence that the
little girl felt for Ellen, when she found, as she said, that
‘‘ Missus’ words always came true,” prepared her for
the belief of those more wonderful facts about Queen
Victoria and the moon, which she could not hope to
ascertain for herself. |

We will leave this subject. Perhaps Ellen may one
day write a book upon education, or, what is still more
probable, the Malay girl may. We are not sure that
she can read and write yet; but every body knows
that the march of intellect is very rapid. Let it suffice
for the present to say, that Ellen shared the common
fate of those who work for others; she gainedmore
than she gave. She gained a good stimulus for her
mind; she gained roses on her cheeks, and smiles on
her countenance; she gained a faithful, grateful heart ;
she gained new ideas and sound habits of thinking ;

K
162 THE YOUNG MALAY.

and, above all, in teaching another, she gained an
imcrease of the knowledge: of herself, and with it the
inestimable advantage of more humility.



CHAPTER XXXII.
REVELLING AND DESTRUCTION.

Tue baby was even a year old before the grand cere-
mony of christenmg was performed at Mr. Cameron’s
bungalow. It was a pity that the little lord of the feast
was insensible to the glories of his lace dress, and knew
so little what it had cost, as absolutely to scratch a
hole in it: a pity too that the great little man was
making wry faces, and spluttering with his insipid
arrow-root pap, while all the richest viands of Calcutta
were smoking to his honour. But this is the way of
the world! Those who have not its good things sigh
and toil for them, and those who have them are often
as insensible to them or as unable to enjoy them as
little master Cameron was.

The infant was christened by the bishop under as
many names as would satisfy and flatter all rich and
unencumbered relatives. He was admired, and his
robe was applauded. The newspaper reporters were
REVELLING AND DESTRUCTION. 163

there to edify the world, through the Calcutta Journal,
with an exaggerated account of the splendid féte, and
finally, the supper was dismembered, and the guests
were gone. When.

‘“‘ The lights were fled,

The garlands dead,
And all but they departed,”

Mr. Cameron walked up and down the long gloom of
the deserted banquet-hall, thinking, or seeming to
think, with his hands in both his pockets,—and_ his
wife, as she was wont to do, threw herself on the sofa,
complained that she could not speak for exhaustion,
and then talked incessantly for an hour, to prove that
every thing had gone wrong that day. Mr. Cameron
was advising her for the third time, to ring for her
Ajah, when a shriek, long and@ shrill, rang through the
whole house, and a servant who rushed past the room,
and a glare of red light which flashed through the
windows, told at once the horrible news: ‘‘ The house
is on fire!” “It is from the nursery,” exclaimed
Mr. Cameron, who had gone to the window. ‘‘ Oh
my child, my child !”’ and with trembling steps he
tumed towards the door. His wife however seized his
arm, and forcibly held him back. “ What!” said she,
164 REVELLING AND DESTRUCTION.

‘na voice of horror, ‘ will you leave me here to be
burned? Take me away first! take me away, or I
shall be burned to death!” He assured her that there
was no immediate danger for her, and entreated her to
make her way out through the verandah, promising to
join her soon in the path by the river-side. It was in
vain; she held him fast with convulsive strength, and
did not cease screaming: ‘‘ I shall be burned to death ! -
I shall be burned to death!’” Another flash, and an- ;
other; and now heavy clouds of smoke rolled into the
yoom where they were standing. Mr. Cameron, in
desperation, made a last effort, and disengaged himself
from her strong grasp: he rushed towards the door, but
before he had reached it, Mrs. Cameron, quite overcome
by selfish, helpless terror, had sunk senseless on the
floor. He could not leave her thus; he turned his eyes
away from the place where his hopes had been. “It
is too late; there is no other to save now!”’ said he, as
he took her in his arms, ‘‘ Cruel mother, you have let
your child perish !",

The flames had spread so rapidly, that there was
now but one way of escape left. This was through the
door which has been described elsewhere as leading to
the river-side. This little path was quite deserted, and
REVELLING AND DESTRUCTION. 165

‘though the clamour and confusion from the crowd in
the front of the burning house was distinctly heard,
Mr. Cameron reached the ‘ compound’ without meeting
a living creature. He carried his unconscious burden
into one of the huts, and laid her on the floor. The
door was open, the hut was desolate; every inhabitant
of the ‘compound’ had run out to “see the burning
house, and to add to the general din and confusion.
Mr. Cameron looked around for some one to whom
he might resign his charge. No one was in sight. He
struck his forehead: “‘ Miserable man that I am!” said
he, “I have still another child; thefe may yet be time
to save her. Is there no one here to help me; must I
stay here, and let her perish too He went to the
door of the hut to look round iccour, and he saw
a light glimmering in a dwelling not far off. He ran
towards it, calling for assistance for his wife; but his
knees tottered under him, and his steps seemed to be
dragged back as in a horrible dream. The sky was
lighted by the red glare of the flames, and his house
stood before him one mass of fire: on that side all was




now inevitable ruin. He continued to stagger towards
the hut, and with his little remaining strength knocked
at the door. It was opened immediately by a little
166 REVELLING AND DESTRUCTION.

dark girl. “Hush!” said she, placing her finger on
her lips, and drawing him in by the arm she closed the
door gently, and pointed towards the other end of the
room. Was he dreaming? No, it was a blessed
reality. His own Ellen was kneeling beside a-cradle,
and singing, in a low voice, the well-known lullaby :
her dark curls concealed her face as she bent over the
cradle, and they shaded the baby within; but he saw
an infant’s finger clasping tightly one of those curls;
he heard an infant’s voice murmuring as it was wont to
do, when it was lulled into slumber by the strain it loved !

Mr. Cameron did not move; perhaps he could not :
his whole being was lost in the one blessed conscious-
ness that he was sti ather! Ina minute the baby’s
voice ceased, as it =... sound sleep, and its little
fingers relaxed their hold. Ellen gently disengaged
her lock of hair and arose. Her face was pale as a
statue, and she seemed still to be trembling under a
recent feeling of horror. Mr. Cameron advanced.
‘< My father!” said Ellen, almost screaming with agi-
tation, “are you come at last? They told me you
were safe, but I hardly believed them.” And she
threw herself on his neck, and wept aloud. “ Yes,
my own Ellen, we are all safe now: it is enough that we
REVELLING AND DESTRUCTION. 167

are spared to one another. But who saved you? Tell
me, how did you escape?”

‘Oh, no! no!” said Ellen, putting her hand to her
eyes, and shuddering. ‘‘It is too dreadful to think of.
Thank God we are all safe !’’

At this moment they heard the drum beat. The
soldiers had come to assist in extinguishing the fire.
Mr. Cameron left Ellen, to go and save what he could,
and lend his assistance in stopping the progress of the
flames.

Wonderful things are told by the Malay girl of
Ellen’s heroic presence of mind that night. How many
of them are true can never be known, for Ellen has
never said a word about the matter. We have how-
ever very good evidence that she thought of others, and
not of herself. She was the first to discover the fire,
which had been caused by the carelessness of an in-
toxicated servant; and she reached the child’s cot just
when the flames had caught its mosquito curtains.
The next morning it was found that Ellen’s hand was
much burned, and one of her ankles was sprained. _
When she was asked how this happened, she simply
said: ‘It was when I went back to look for papa, and
I hardly know how it was done.”’
168 REVELLING AND DESTRUCTION.

We left Mrs. Cameron in the hut, alone and insen-
sible: but she had not been neglected. No time had
been lost in sending the Malay girl to her with the
good news of her baby’s safety : but the messenger
found Mrs. Cameron surrounded by attendants, who
were trying in vain to restore her. Medical aid was
immediately procured, and she at length revived to
a sense of what was going on: extreme terror however
had brought on a paralytic seizure, and she remained

crippled and speechless.

Ellen forgot all the injuries she had ever received
from her stepmother, when she looked on her altered
countenance, and saw her helplessness ; and no daugh-
ter could study a mother’s wishes more tenderly, or
bear with a mother’s infirmities more patiently, than
she has ever done since that awful night of revelling
and destruction.



CHAPTER XXXII.
THE CONCLUSION.

Restorep fully to her own place in her father’s heart,
Ellen had now but one wish on earth,—to see her father
in his own land again, released from the cares of busi-
ness, and enjoying in his old age the friends and the
THE CONCLUSION. 169

happiness he had loved in his youth. She had not much
difficulty in bringing him over to her project: he had
long talked of returning to England, but his wavering
wish had been unable to conquer his natural indolence,
and the chain of habit had kept him where he was.
Now that he was fairly burned out, it was almost as
easy to return to England as to settle elsewhere. The
resolution was taken, and quickly followed by their
embarcation. After a short and agreeable voyage they
arrived in London, where Ellen found all the friends
she loved best, save her aunt Cameron, who had a few
months before sunk under extreme age, having be-
queathed a handsome annuity to her faithful Parker,
and her very considerable property to Ellen. “Her
cousin Magdalen was married, and she had prevailed
on her mother and sisters to come from Ireland, and
had also invited Mrs. Kirnan to her house, that
she might procure a delightful surprise for her cousin

Ellen.

‘In a beautiful village on the south coast of England,
there is a house on the top of a hill which slopes to-
wards the sea. It is built in the cottage style, yet it
gives the idea of perfect comfort and elegant repose.
The grounds are extensive, and the tall pines and thick
170 THE CONCLUSION,

chestnut trees are the most splendid ornaments 6f the
place. The windows open on a smooth green lawn,
and the tones of a harp, sweetly blending with the
plaintive notes of a young, but rich and cultivated
voice, are often heard there in a summer’s evening
by those who happen to be wandering’ through the
green quiet lane which passes beneath the lawn. If
you should ever chance to be roaming through this
most luxuriant of Devonshire-lanes, while you are ga-
. thering the honeysuckle or pale columbine, or admiring
the majestic stature of the fox-glove, do not forget to
look through a little white gate which opens to the lawn.
There, perhaps, you may see a young girl affectionately
supporting a feeble old man;—you may know by his
look of pride that he is her father; or, perhaps, the same
girl may be walking beside the chair of a pale invalid, or
playing at bo-peep among the myrtles with a laughing
boy about four years old. If you see this young creature,
mark her well; see whether her eye is dark and large, her
her step light; and if her heart shines happily through her
soft smile, and if you catch the sound of her voice, sooth-
ing like music, or of her liquid laugh, like water dancing
over pebbles in the sunshine,—that is Ellen Cameron.
THE END. 7

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