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Short stories founded on European history

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Title:
Short stories founded on European history Italy
Portion of title:
Italy
Creator:
Clay, Richard, 1789-1877 ( Printer )
Whymper, Josiah Wood, 1813-1903 ( Engraver )
Gilbert, John, 1817-1897 ( Illustrator )
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain) ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge
Manufacturer:
R. Clay
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Language:
English
Physical Description:
254 p., <7> leaves of plates : ill., map ; 14 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
History -- Juvenile literature -- Italy ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853 ( rbbin )
Bldn -- 1853
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Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
non-fiction ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Illustrations engraved by J.W. Whymper after Sir John Gilbert.

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University of Florida
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This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
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05763267 ( OCLC )
ALH7958 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text
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To face Ittle

PLAN OF VENICE



SHORT STORIES

FOUNDED ON

EUROPEAN HISTORY.

aiuly.

PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION,
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.

LONDON:
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE,
SOLD AT THE DEPOSITORY,
GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN’S INN FIELDS,
4, ROYAL EXCHANGE, 16, HANOVER STREET, HANOVER SQUARE,
AND BY ALL BOOKSELLERS,



1853.



LONDON :
R, CLAY, PRINTER, BREAD STREET HILL.



CONTENTS,

. THe BrotHers oF FLORENCE.
ae:
Il.

THe Pore AND THE PAINTER

Tue Douxes or Mrman .

. Tae Brave Orp Ap»sRaL or GENOA .
. THe DoGE oF VENICE .
. Tae ASTRONOMER OF Papua .

. THe FIsHERMAN oF NAPpLEs .

PAGE

38
79

- 100
. 148
. 180
. 220





F, 19,



No. I.

THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE.

In that lovely southern land, which for its extreme
beauty and fertility has been styled “ the Garden
of Europe,” stand seven celebrated cities. Famous
were they in the olden time, and famous are they
still ;—visited by travellers from all parts of the
world, who view them with interest and admira-
tion. And they are worthy of admiration, and well
deserve their titles, Rome the Ancient— Naples
the Lovely—Florence the F'air—Genoa the Superb
—Padua the Learned— Milan the Magnificent—
and Venice the Beautiful. I will tell you some
stories of their bygone days.
B



2 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“ Of all the fairest cities of the earth,
None is so fair as Florence. ’Tis a gem
Of purest ray ; and what a light broke forth,
When it emerged from darkness! Search within,
Without; allis enchantment! "Tis the Past
Contending with the Present; and in turn
Each has the mastery.”

Within the marble halls of the magnificent palace
of the Medici in Florence, there sat, long ago, four
happy children. Descendants of that noble house
which for many ages had held sway im the fair
city, their appearance and manners well befitted
their high birth and station. Courteous, gentle,
and generous, they behaved to each other with
loving affection, to their superiors with modesty
and respect, and to their inferiors with kindness
and affability. Their names were Lorenzo, Nan-
nina, Bianca, and Giuliano.

“‘T wonder when Grandpapa will return,” said
Nannina; “it is now some days since we have seen
him. I shall be glad when he comes home.”

“T think he is come,” exclaimed Giuliano;
“T heard the sound of horses in the court-yard ;
and that must be his step on the stairs.”

The child’s quick ears did not deceive him. In
another minute the large folding doors at the end



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 3

of the hall were thrown open, and Cosmo de Medici
entered. He was a tall, dignified, and venerable
looking old man, with features still handsome and
expressive of kindly feelings. The children with
bright and smiling faces hastened forwards to greet
and welcome him; and when, seated in a massive
arm-chair of carved oak, he blessed them and
smiled upon them in return as they stood around
him, they felt sure that they were going to have
one of their great and rare treats—a chat with
grandpapa.

The family of the Medici had for many ages
been esteemed one of the most considerable in the
Florentine republic ; the true source of their wealth
being their superior talents and their application to
commerce. ‘The renowned and illustrious Cosmo
de Medici, however, surpassed all his predecessors
in wealth, authority, generosity, and prudence.
His palaces, one in Florence and four in the
country, were regal in their size and splendour.
Yet, though chief of the Florentine republic, and
in constant intercourse with the sovereigns of Eu-
rope, his conduct was devoid of all ostentation.
Everything was tempered with prudence. In his
conversation, his servants, his style of travellmg,



4 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

and his mode of living, the modest demeanour of
the citizen was always evident. No one was jealous
of his power, for by his virtue and prosperity he
overcame all his enemies, and exalted all his friends.
The uses to which he applied his great wealth
caused him to be much beloved and respected in
Florence, and obtained for him the highest con-
sideration, not only throughout Italy, but through-
out all Europe. His conduct was uniformly
marked by urbanity and kindness to the superior
ranks of his fellow-citizens, and by a constant
attention to the interests and wants of the lower
class, whom he relieved with the most unbounded
generosity. He was the liberal and munificent
patron of learning and the fine arts, which under
his auspicies began to revive in Italy.

“Yes, my dear boy,” said the venerable old
man, laying his hand on Giuliano’s head, “ I have
been at Careggi, passing my hours with my books,
and attending to the cultivation of my farms. It
is both pleasant and profitable to retire at times
from public affairs, and I own I went to Careggi,
not so much for the purpose of improving my fields
as myself.”’

“ Dear Grandpapa!” said Giuliano, “do you



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 5

need improvement? You, who lead such a useful
and active life ?”’

‘“‘ We all need improvement, dear child, and the
older we grow, the more we see our need of it.
I have endeavoured to live usefully, but often do
I look back with regret on the many hours I have
lost.”

“ But you have done a great deal of good,
Grandpapa, surely? How many churches you
have built, and with what beautiful pictures and
statues have you adorned them!” observed Nannina.

“‘T have never been able to lay out so much in
the service of God as I would have done, Nannina;
all I have done, or could do, is unequal to what the
Almighty has done for me.”

“ Your life has been a prosperous one indeed,
Grandpapa,” said Lorenzo, thoughtfully, “and
how honoured is your name in Italy! I feel
glad to think how the poor love it, and the rich
esteem it.”

“ Yet my early days were full of trouble, Lorenzo,
for I was exiled from Florence. From the age of
forty, I have, however, enjoyed the most uninter-
rupted felicity.”

* Ah! you had enemies once, dear Grandpapa,



6 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

but you have none now,” said Bianca; “ the
Medici will not be exiled again.”

“Then must we be careful not to provoke
jealousies, Bianca. A family such as ours can
only maintain its position by moderation. Your
great-grandfather, my children, by a strict atten-
tion to commerce, gained immense wealth, and by
his affability, moderation, and liberality, secured
the confidence and esteem of his fellow-citizens.
He sought not for the honours of the republic, yet
was honoured with them all. On his death-bed
he called us to him, and thus addressed us ;—
‘I feel, my sons, that I have lived my appointed
time. I die content, leaving you in affluence and
health, and. in such a station that whilst you follow
my example, you may live honoured and respected
in your native city. Nothing affords me more
pleasure than the reflection that my conduct has
not given offence to any one, but that, on the con-
trary, I have endeavoured to serve all persons to
the best of my abilities. I advise you to do the
same. Be not anxious about honours, but accept
such as are bestowed on you through the favour of
your fellow-citizens.’ This advice I have endea-
voured to follow, and it will be well for you,



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 7

Lorenzo, and you, my Giuliano, to do the same.
Your good father is in infirm health, and you may
be early called into public life.”

“‘ T will try to be a great and good man,” said
Giuliano, while Lorenzo expressed a hope that he
should render himself worthy of his illustrious
name.

“ That is well,”’ replied Cosmo de Medici, “ and
now see, Giuliano, what is that prancing I hear in
the court.”’

The boy ran to the window. ‘‘ Oh, Grandpapa!”
he exclaimed, “there is a beautiful Arabian horse,
with flowing tail and mane! he is so pretty and
graceful !”’

“‘ That horse is for you, Giuliano, if you think
you can manage it,” said Cosmo. “ It is time you
learned to ride.”

Giuliano was perfectly delighted. Departing
from the usual custom of respectfully kissing the
hand of his aged relative, he threw his arms round
his neck, and embraced him with all the love
of his young heart. “Thank you a thousand
times, dear Grandpapa,” he said; “it was the
only thing I wanted to make me quite, qguzte

happy.”



8 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

The old man smiled. “It will be well if thy
wishes are always as moderate, my child,” he said,
as he rose to depart, “ but that I cannot hope.
Now go and try your charger.”

Years passed away. The children of Piero de
Medici, as they grew up, gave promise of no ordi-
nary talent. Lorenzo, with good sense, and great
natural ability, inherited also his grandfather’s love
of literature and the fine arts. He made great
progress in learning, and whilst he was yet a boy,
rendered himself conspicuous by his poetical talents
and various accomplishments. The two fair girls,
Nannina and Bianca, brought up under their
mother’s watchful eye, received such instructions
as in those days were deemed. befitting the daugh-
ters of a noble house; and the merry Giuliano,
though he did not by any means neglect his studies,
was yet more partial to horsemanship, wrestling,
and throwing the spear, in which active exercises
he excelled. Both the brothers were fond of country
sports, and in riding or hawking passed many
a pleasant day. Alike generous and affectionate,
educated under the same roof, and participating in
the same studies and amusements, there subsisted
between Lorenzo and Giuliano a warm and unin-



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 9

terrupted attachment. By a frequent intercourse
with their venerable grandfather, and by the ex-
ample and instructions of their mother, Lu-
cretia, who was one of the most accomplished
women of the age—distinguished not only as a
patroness of learning, but by her own writings
also—they were daily preparing for the high sta-
tion which they were destined to occupy in their
native city.

Lorenzo was fifteen years of age, and Giuliano
between ten and eleven, when one summer’s day
they wandered forth to enjoy the balmy air of their
delicious clime. The country round Florence is
very beautiful. The blue Arno, winding through
the richly cultivated land,—now hiding itself be-
hind the vineyards or olive groves, now gliding
between fields of waving corn and verdant grass ;
the flowers—and the flowers in the neighbourhood
of Florence are considered the most beautiful in
Italy—springing up in luxuriant profusion on all
sides; the trees in their summer foliage, and in
the distance the lofty Apennines ;—these were the
objects on which the eyes of the brothers rested, as
they wandered forth that sunny day.



10 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

They were then staying at their father’s seat a
short distance from the city; and great was their
delight in rambling together through the vineyards
and olive groves which surrounded the princely
mansion. But whilst in the height of their enjoy-
ment, a messenger approached them with troubled
looks.

‘¢ Tt is Bernardo!” exclaimed Lorenzo; “‘ I trust
he brings no ill tidings. What news from the city,
good. Bernardo?”

“T regret to announce to you, Signors, that
your illustrious grandfather lies dangerously ill.
I am the bearer of this packet from my honoured
master, which will inform you of further particu-
lars.”

The brothers with tearful eyes read the letter
from their father confirming Bernardo’s account.
He told them that Cosmo considered himself as a
dying man, and expressed his willingness to submit
to the dispensations of Providence. He spoke of
his many virtues, and exhorted his sons to follow
his example.

Lorenzo and Giuliano were deeply grieved at
these sad tidings. They walked slowly and sor-
rowfully home, thinking of the many proofs of



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 11

affection they had received from their venerable
relative, and fearing they should see him no more.
Their fears proved true. Cosmo de Medici, the
merchant prince of Florence, died greatly lamented.
He was in the zenith of his glory, and in the
enjoyment of the highest renown, when death
summoned him away. All the Christian princes
mourned his loss. His funeral was conducted with
the utmost pomp and solemnity, the whole city
following him to his tomb in the church of San
Lorenzo, on which, by public decree, his name was
inscribed as “ Father of his Country.”

Before he died, this great man recommended to
Piero a strict attention to the education of his
sons, of whose promising talents he expressed his
hopes and approbation. His wife inquiring why
he closed his eyes, ‘“* That I may accustom them to
it,”’ was his reply.

“‘ Giuliano,” said Lorenzo, a few days after their
loss, “‘ we must endeavour to follow the example
of our illustrious grandfather. The esteem he
inspired was founded on real merit.”

‘¢ Ah! he was so liberal, and noble, and wise!”
replied Giuliano.



12 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

‘“‘ Yet my father says he knew not half his libe-
rality till now, for he was not one to boast of his
good deeds. It appears that there is no citizen of
note in Florence to whom Cosmo de Medici has
not lent a large sum of money; and often, when
informed of some nobleman in distress, he has
relieved him unasked.”

“Yes, he had a kind heart and an open hand,
ever ready to lend or to bestow. Even kings have
been indebted to him, I have heard my father
say.”

“ True. During the contest in England between
the houses of York and Lancaster, Edward the
Fourth wanting the means for carrying on the
war, our grandfather lent him an immense sum of
money, and thus assisted him to gain the throne.
Giuliano, I hope I shall be as magnificent in my
acts as he was.”

“ And I hope I shall be like him in kindness
and benevolence,” replied Giuliano.

Soon after the death of Cosmo de Medici,
Lorenzo entered on the stage of public life. The
infirmities of Piero rendered him anxious for the
assistance, and even advice, of a son who had
already evinced much sound judgment, promptitude,



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 13

and decision of character. The vigour of his intel-
lect, and that exquisite taste in poetry, music, and
every department of the fine arts, for which he was
afterwards so eminently distinguished, joined to
many amiable qualities, caused the Florentines to
regard him with esteem and affection, and to look
upon him as a worthy successor of the illustrious
Cosmo. And it was not very long before an event
occurred which caused them to admire still more
Lorenzo’s decision of character.

Among the number of opulent and aspiring
citizens of Florence, was Luca Pitti, the founder of
that magnificent palace which has for some centu-
ries been the residence of the sovereigns of Tuscany.
He had reluctantly submitted to the superior talents
of Cosmo de Medici, but now that he was gone,
endeavoured to supplant the authority and destroy
the influence of his son, Piero, with the magistrates
and council of the city. Finding, however, that
he could not succeed in this, he resolved on a
fearful crime—nothing less than the assassination
of Piero.

Weakened by gout, Piero was generally carried
in a chair from his house at Careggi to his resi-
dence in Florence, and the conspirators thought it



14 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

would be a good opportunity to attack him on the
road.

One morning, accompanied only by a few at-
tendants, Piero set out from Careggi. Lorenzo,
who had left a short time before his father, was
surprised to find one part of the road to the city
beset with armed men. Their purpose he imme-
diately suspected.

“Ha! this bodes mischief!”’ he exclaimed.
“Haste, Nicolo! haste back to my father,” he
said to one of his followers; “beg him, from me,
to abandon the direct road to Florence, and pro-
ceed by the retired and circuitous path through the
vineyards ; he will do so at my request. As you
love me, haste!”

The servant needed not a second order; he set
spurs to his horse, and was out of sight in an
instant.

The young de Medici then rode quietly on.

“* How fares the noble Piero? Comes he not to
the city to-day ?”’ were the questions with which
the conspirators assailed him, apparently anxious
for his father’s health.

“He follows at a short distance,” replied Lo-
renzo, marking each speaker with his keen glance ;



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 15

“and is indebted to you, Sirs,” he added, with a
slight smile, “for your anxious care of his health
and safety.”

He bowed, and passed on; but his promptitude
and coolness had saved his father’s life.

The conspiracy was discovered, and quelled.
Luca Pitti fell into disgrace, and passed the re-
mainder of his days in obscurity and neglect. The
F'lorentines were much displeased with him. The
progress of his magnificent palace was stopped, and
those citizens who had contributed to it costly
articles and materials, demanded them back again,
declaring they were only lent. They would not
assist In any way an enemy to the noble family of

the Medici.

When Lorenzo was twenty-one years of age,
he married Clarice, a daughter of the illustrious
house of Orsini, in Rome. Their nuptials were
celebrated with great splendour, and Lorenzo
ever treated his wife with particular respect and
kindness.

Not long after his marriage, he went to Milan,
for the purpose of standing sponsor to the eldest
son of the reigning duke. Perhaps you would like



16 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

to read the following letter, which he wrote from
that city.

‘¢ Lorenzo de Medici to his wife Clarice :-—

‘“‘{ arrived here in safety, and am in good
health. This, I believe, will please thee better
than anything else except my return—at least, so
I judge from my own desire to be once more with
thee. Associate as much as possible with my
father and my sisters. I shall make all possible
speed to return to thee, for it appears a thousand
years till I see thee again. Pray to God for me.
If thou want anything from this place, write in
time.

“¢ From
“Thy Lorenzo DE MEDICct.

“ Milan, 22d of July, 1469.”

** And how did they treat you at Milan, dear
Lorenzo ?”’ asked his brother Giuliano, on his
return home,

“ With great distinction and honour, however
undeserved,” replied Lorenzo; ‘“ more, indeed,



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 17

than was shown to any other person present,
although there were many much better entitled:
to it.”

«“ That I cannot think,” said Giuliano, looking
proudly and fondly on his brother. “I am told,
Lorenzo, that with your usual generosity you
presented to the duchess a gold necklace, and a
diamond worth 3,000 ducats.”’

“Whence it followed, that the duke requested
I would stand sponsor to all his children,” replied
Lorenzo, laughing. ‘“ He purposes paying our fair
city a visit ere long; we must receive him well.
But Giuliano, my brother, I wished to tell you
how much [I rejoice in seeing the progress you
have made in all your studies and varied accom-
plishments lately. The beautiful poem you have
written is the subject of much praise, and your
having carried off the prize in the last tournament
has delighted the citizens, with whom you appear
to be a universal favourite. Continue to improve,
dear Giuliano; so will you add honour to the name
of Medici.”

“Then that will be only by my following the
example of Lorenzo,” replied the youth affection-
ately.

C



18 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

It was true, that by his urbanity, generosity,
and amiable disposition, Giuliano had gained, in a
great degree, the affections of the people of
Florence, to which it is probable his fondness for
public exhibitions not a little contributed. He
was a noble-looking youth, tall in stature, and of
a joyous countenance. Skilled in horsemanship,
and all the athletic exercises of the day, he at the
same time studied the learned languages with
much success, delighted in music and poetry, and
in his attention to men of talent partook of the
celebrity of his brother. He habituated himself to
endure thirst, hunger, and fatigue ; possessed great
courage and unshaken fortitude, and was a friend
to religion and order. Added to this, he had all
the humanity and benevolence that could be wished
for in one born to such an exalted station. It is
little to be wondered at that Giuliano was beloved
both at home and abroad.

Piero de Medici did not long survive the mar-
riage of his son. On the second day after his death,
the principal inhabitants of Florence waited on
Lorenzo, and requested that he would take upon
himself the administration and care of the republic
in the same manner as his father and grandfather



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 19

had done before him. It was a high honour to
one so young, and Lorenzo felt it as such. He
hesitated, at first, to comply with their wishes, but
they persuaded him; and then, aware of the diffi-
culties which he had to encounter, selected as his
chief advisers those citizens most esteemed for their
integrity and prudence, whom he always consulted
on questions of importance.

‘¢ You are young, dear Lorenzo, to be thus dis-
tinguished,” said his sister Nannina to him the
next time they met. “I almost wept when I heard
of the grey-haired citizens so earnestly entreating
you to accept the dignity.”

“I am young, Nannina, and deeply I feel my
responsibility. But see, my sister, I have to-day
received these letters of condolence from several of
the Italian princes, in which they assure me of
their friendship and support. I owe it all to my
illustrious grandfather, in whose steps I would
endeavour to walk.”

“ Then will you do well, dear Lorenzo. You
are the master of immense wealth ; lay it out as he
did, for the good of others.”’

“ T will, Nannina. Our ancestors, in the space
of a few years, expended no less than 660,000



20 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

florins in works of public charity or utility. Some
persons might, perhaps, think it would be more
desirable to have a part of this enormous sum in
their purses; but I conceive it has been a great
advantage to the public, and well laid out, and am,
therefore, perfectly satisfied. I have a great desire
to encourage learning and the fine arts, and to raise
my native city to renown and honour.”

“Ah! Giuliano and Lagree you have magnificent
ideas, and as you have also a magnificent fortune,
you can accomplish what you desire,” said Nan-
nina, with a smile. “ Here comes our merry
brother, let us accompany him and Clarice to the
gardens.”

In the spring of 1471, the Duke of Milan paid
his promised visit to Florence. He and his duchess,
Bona, took up their residencé with Lorenzo, but
their attendants were so numerous, that even the
magnificent palace of the Medici could not contain
them. They consisted of six hundred armed men,
as a guard of honour, fifty running footmen, richly
dressed in silk and silver, and so many noblemen
and courtiers, that with their different retinues
they amounted to two thousand horsemen! Be-



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 21

sides these, there were five hundred couple of dogs,
and an infinite number of falcons and hawks. It
is well such visits are not paid im these days!
What would one of our rich English merchants say
to such an invasion, renowned though they be for
their liberal hearts and hospitable halls !

The Duke of Milan, who was vain and foolish,
thought, by all this display, to dazzle the eyes of
the Florentines. His equipage was in the highest
style of splendour and expense. But, notwith-
standing this profusion, his wonder, and perhaps
his envy, was excited by the superior magnificence
of Lorenzo, which was of a kind not always in the
power of riches to procure. The great variety of
statues, vases, gems, and intaglios, ornamenting the
Medicean palace—the extensive collection of the
finest remains of ancient art, selected with equal
assiduity and expense—the celebrated library—
and, above all, the paintings, the productions of the
best masters of the day, excited alike the astonish-
ment and admiration of the noble visitor.

“In all Italy I have not seen such pictures as
these!” he exclaimed, as he and Lorenzo walked
through the galleries and halls. “ Notwithstanding
my predilection for courtly show and grandeur,



22 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

I must confess, that in comparison with what I
have beheld in your palace, gold and silver sink
into insignificance.”

Amongst the festivities and grand spectacles
which took place in Florence for the entertainment
of the Milanese visitors, there was held a gay
tournament, in which Giuliano bore away the
prize, to the great delight of the people. The
tournaments of old were goodly shows, and
favourite pastimes with the Florentines.

“ Each mantle gemm’d floats gaily,
Each courser stamps and fumes:
"Tis a heaving sea, whose billows free
Are banners and dancing plumes.

The air 1s full of battle,
It 1s full of the trumpet’s sound,
Of the tramp of dashing horses,
And the cries of the crowd around

The earth is strown with splendour,
It 1s strown with fair plumes torn,

With glove, and scarf, and streamer,
For the love of ladies worn ;

But each maiden watch’d her champion,
And oft her white hands sent

Fresh gifts for every token
That was lost in the tournament.



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 23

Oh ' with such eyes above them,
Such voices to cheer the strife,

No marvel those warriors tilted
Like men who are tilting for life '”

And when shouts arose for the victor, and
Giuliano, kneeling on the turf, received the prize
his lance had won, how the hearts -of his sisters
thrilled with pleasure, as Nannina, unlacing his
steel helmet, placed on his brow the chaplet of
green laurel,—

‘¢ While every lip is busy
With the honour of his name,
And with glowing cheeks each good knight speaks
The story of his fame !”

But I come now to a very sad part of my story.
A few years after the visit of the Duke of Milan,
an event took place in Florence which has seldom
been mentioned without emotions of horror and
detestation, and which afforded an undoubted proot
of the ungodliness and irreligion which prevailed
in Italy at that time; for fearful and atrocious as
the crime was, a pope, a cardinal, an archbishop,
and several other priests, were the promoters and
instigators of it! The lovely land of Italy, without
the pure light of the glorious gospel, was dark,
degraded, and unhappy!



24 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

One of the noblest and wealthiest of the families
in Florence was the family of the Pazzi. Though
they had received favours from the house of Me-
dici, they were jealous of its rising power; and
when Pope Sixtus the Fourth stood atthe head of
a conspiracy to destroy two young men who were
an honour to their age and country, they willingly
joined him and his band of ruffians. Sixtus the
Fourth was the first who began to show how far
a pope might go, and how much that which was
previously regarded as sinful, lost its iniquity when
committed by a pontiff. He, with his great-
nephew, the Cardinal Riario, the Archbishop of
Pisa, the King of Naples, and the Pazzi family,
secretly agreed together to assassinate the noble
brothers, Lorenzo and Giuliano de Medici!

The plans of the conspirators being arranged,
the cardinal and archbishop came to Florence, and
took up their residence at a seat of the Pazzi,
about a mile from the city. Lorenzo, who was
then at Fiesole, hearing of their arrival, with his
usual hospitality invited them to his house, and
prepared a magnificent entertainment on the occa-
sion. ‘This pleased the conspirators; they accepted
the invitation, and agreed that the brothers should



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 25

be assassinated in the midst of the banquet. They
went to Fiesole, but to their disappointment,
Giuliano, on account of indisposition, did not
appear; and so their wicked design was, for a
time, frustrated.

‘“ We have been foiled to-day,” said Francesco
de Pazzi, when they had returned home; “ but it
shall not happen again. I long for the hour when
the power of the proud Medici shall be trampled in
the dust. If the deed is to be done, my lord arch-
bishop, there should be no delay.”

“There shall be none,” replied the archbishop ;
“T am as anxious for the death of Lorenzo de
Medici as you are, Francesco de Pazzi. Did he
not object to my preferment on the ground that
my character could not bear imspection? Yes;
and he shall feel my revenge! On Sunday morn-
ing next, when all will be present in the church of
the Reparata, our purpose shall be accomplished.
The signal for the murder shall be the elevation of
the host.”

“A bad hour, and an improper place td choose
for such a deed,” observed Giovan Batista, a sol-
dier who had much distinguished himself; “whilst
I thought it was to take place in a private house,



26 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

I did not object; but now the case is diffe-
rent.”

“ Tt signifies little where it takes place,” replied
the archbishop; ‘our purpose is to see it done.
And as you are a brave man, Giovan Batista, we
commit the assassination of Lorenzo to your
hands.”

‘* Not to me, my lord!—not to me!” said the
soldier. ‘‘ Bold as I am, I am not bold enough to
pollute the house of God with the crime of murder,
or base enough with my own hand to take the life
of one who has been a good friend to me.”

‘¢ | pity your scruples,” replied the archbishop,
with a sneer; “‘ but we need not your help; there
are many ready to perform the service.” And he
selected two priests to execute the deed from which
the soldier shrank.

‘¢ 1 will undertake the assassination of Giuliano,”
exclaimed Francesco de Pazzi, “ that office shall
be mine; though we have been on friendly terms,
I am not so scrupulous as Giovan.”

“* Be it so; we leave him to you and Bandini.
His holiness the pope will not fail to reward your
services.”

‘“¢ Ay,—his holiness would have the dominion of



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 27

??

Florence for himself,” muttered Francesco; “ but
that shall not be whilst I live.”

It was then agreed that the archbishop should
seize on the palace where the magistrates assembled,
whilst at the same time Jacopo de Pazzi was to
endeavour, by the cry of liberty, to incite the
citizens to revolt.

While these bold and bad men were thus
arranging their wicked plans, the two brothers,
perfectly unsuspicious of what was going on, were
passing their time in attention to public affairs,
and in the studies in which they both delighted.
It was pleasant to the citizens to witness their
mutual affection, and to see the confidence and
esteem which they felt for each other. Alas! they
were about to be parted by a fearful blow!

Having heard that the young cardinal Riario
desired to attend divine service in the church of
the Reparata, Lorenzo invited him and his suite to
his palace in Florence. On Sunday, the 26th of
April, 1478, he accordingly came with a large
retinue, aud was received by Lorenzo with that
splendour and hospitality with which he was
always accustomed to entertain men of high rank
and consequence.



28 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

Giuliano did not appear,—a circumstance which
alarmed the conspirators at first; but Lorenzo,
apologising for his brother’s absence, informed
them he intended to be present in the church.

Thither the party proceeded. The service had
already begun, and the cardinal had taken his seat,
when Francesco de Pazzi and Bandini, observing
that Giuliano had not arrived, left the church, and
went to his house in order to hasten and secure his
attendance. Giuliano accompanied them; and,
merrily laughing and chatting, the three young
men walked on together. They entered the church,
and the conspirators, standing near their intended
victims, waited impatiently for the appointed
signal. The bell rang,—the priest raised the con-
secrated wafer,—the people knelt before it,—and
the next instant, Francesco de Pazzi drawing a
short dagger, Giuliano de Medici lay dead upon
the ground !

Lorenzo happily escaped. The two priests who
had undertaken his assassination, perceiving that
he prepared to defend himself, fled, but not without
giving him a wound in the neck. The unfortunate
Giuliano, though he usually wore a dagger, had
that day left it behind him. As Bandini, fury in



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 29

his looks, rushed forwards, the friends of Lorenzo,
encircling him, hurried him into the sacristy, and
closed the brass doors. The alarm and consterna-
tionin the church was extreme; and such was the
tumult which ensued, that many thought the
building was fallmg in. But no sooner was it
understood. that Lorenzo de Medici was in danger,
than several young men, forming themselves into
a body, placed him in the midst of them, and con-
ducted him to his palace, making a circuitous turn
from the church, lest he should meet with the life-
less form of his beloved brother,—that brother
who so lately was full of health and happiness by
his side!

One of these noble youths, named Antonio
Ridolfo, gave a striking proof of his affection for
Lorenzo. Being apprehensive that the weapon
which had struck him was poisoned, he, in spite
of Lorenzo’s entreaties, sucked the wound. An
attendant on the Medici was wounded, and another
lost his life, in defence of their master.

Whilst these terrible events were passing, the
Archbishop of Pisa had, with about thirty of his
associates, made an attempt to overthrow the
magistrates, and possess themselves of the seat of



30 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

government. He went to the palace, and leaving
his followers in an adjoining chamber, entered the
apartment where Petrucci, the gonfaloniere, and
the other magistrates, were assembled. Out of
respect for his rank, and little dreaming for what
purpose he came, Petrucci rose to receive him.
But there was something in the quiet dignity of
the magistrate’s manner, and in the penetrating
glance of his eye, that abashed the archbishop.
Guilt makes a man a coward. He knew Petrucci
to be of a resolute character, and began to wish he
had not encountered him. Instead, therefore, of
making a sudden attack, as was intended, he began
talking to the gonfaloniere about his son, and this
he did in such a hesitating, confused manner, that
t was scarcely possible to understand what he said.
Petrucci also observed that he frequently changed
colour, and at times turned towards the door, as if
to give a signal for some one to approach. Aware
of the character of the man, the magistrate’s sus-
picions were aroused, and he called aloud for his
guards and attendants. ‘The archbishop, rushing
from the apartment, did the same; but a curious
incident had deprived him of their help. They
were awaiting his signal in a chamber in which it



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 31

was the custom for every succeeding magistrate to
make an alteration, as a guard against treachery.
Petrucci had so constructed the doors that they
closed and bolted on the slightest impulse, and
the conspirators found themselves thus unex-
pectedly secured in the apartment, without the
possibility of affording the slightest assistance to
their leader!

The magistrates, finding how matters stood,
soon secured the gates of the palace, and repulsed
their enemies. But on looking from the windows
they beheld Jacopo de Pazzi, with about a hundred,
soldiers, calling out, “‘ Liberty! Liberty!” and
exciting the people to revolt. At the same time
they were informed of the murder of Giuliano, and
the attack made upon Lorenzo.

Their indignation was extreme. “ Giuliano de
Medici dead!” they exclaimed. “ Assassinated
in his own city! and by treachery, too!—We little
know the Florentines, if they do not fearfully
avenge the crime.”’

They did so. Instead of answering to the cry
of liberty, the people with one accord rose up to
take signal vengeance on the murderers of a
Medici, It was a sad and terrible day! In every



32 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

direction the conspirators were attacked and
slaughtered. The resentment of the citizens knew
no bounds. The streets resounded with shouts of
“‘ Palle! palle!—Perish the traitors!”* Francesco
de Pazzi and the Archbishop of Pisa were seized
and hung side by side through the windows of the
palace, the latter not even being allowed to divest
himself of his prelatical robes. Jacopo de Pazzi
shared the same fate. Whilst parading the city,
he had been met by his brother-in-law, who up-
braided him with his conduct, adding, “ I would
advise you to go home, Jacopo; the people and
liberty are as dear to other citizens as they are to
yourself.” Finding that no one seemed disposed
to revolt from the Medici, but that, on the contrary,
stones were thrown at him for proposing it, Jacopo
thought it better to leave Florence. Some peasants,
however, discovered him, brought him back to the
city, and he was hung by the side of his associates.
His body, after being treated with the greatest
indignity, was thrown insultingly into the waters
of the Arno.

Such was the fate of one who had been, as it

* The palle d’or, or golden balls, were the arms of the family
of the Medici.



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 33

were, a prince in Florence, and who had received
the highest honours of the state!

The two priests who had undertaken to assas-
sinate Lorenzo, Giovan Batista, and the cruel
Bandini, were all put to death. The latter had
taken refuge in Constantinople, but the sultan,
being apprised of his crime, ordered him to be
seized and sent in chains to Florence; alleging, as
his motive for doing so, the respect he had for the
character of Lorenzo de Medici.

As for the young Cardinal Riario, who had fled
for safety to the altar, he was preserved from the
enraged populace by the interference of Lorenzo;
but the fright he experienced on this occasion
affected him s6 much, that, it is said, he never
afterwards recovered his natural complexion,

Throughout the whole of this dreadful retribu-
tion—and more than a hundred of the conspirators
had perished—Lorenzo had exerted all his influ-
ence to restrain the indignation of the people, and
to prevent further slaughter. Soon after the attack
made upon his life, an immense multitude sur-
rounded his palace, and not being convinced of his
safety, demanded to see him. Full of bitter grief
as he was at the untimely death of his brother, and

D



34 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

suffering from the wound in his neck, Lorenzo
gladly seized the opportunity which their affection
afforded him, and, appearing on the balcony, im-
plored them, in a pathetic and forcible speech, to
moderate the violence of their resentment.

‘“‘ Let me entreat you, my fellow-citizens,” he
said, “by the love you bear me—by the love you
bore my lamented brother—to calm your excited
feelings. A dreadful crime has been committed—
an atrocious crime. But take not on yourselves
the task of punishing the guilty, lest you involve
the innocent also in destruction. Leave that to
the magistrates; they will do justice—they will
avenge this fearful deed. You have given me
many proofs of your affection—give me yet another;
—let not the name of Medici be a signal for violence
and. bloodshed.”

His words and appearance had a powerful and
instantaneous effect. “We devote ourselves to
you and your cause, noble Lorenzo!” cried the
people with one voice; “your wish is our law.
Only we pray you earnestly to take all possible
precautions for your safety, as on that depends
the welfare of the Republic and the hopes of the
Florentines.”



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 35

They left the palace—many with tears in their
eyes, at the calamity which had befallen the
house of Medici; and many more with expres-
sions of deep anger against the authors of it.
“They have cut him off in the pride of youth
and beauty!” they exclaimed; “his death must
be atoned for.”

‘‘But Lorenzo yet lives!” said one; and imme-
diately the streets echoed far and wide with shouts
of “ Long live Lorenzo de Medici!”

Turning to the Florentine nobles, by whom he
was surrounded, Lorenzo observed, ‘‘I feel more
anxiety from the acclamations of my friends,
than I have even experienced from my own dis-
asters.”

There was not a citizen of any rank whatever in
Florence who did not, upon this melancholy occa-
sion, wait upon him with an offer of his services ;
so great was the popularity which the Medici had
acquired by their prudence and liberality.

The death of Giuliano was deeply lamented,
not only by his family, but by all Florence.
His obsequies were performed with much mag-
nificence in the Church of San Lorenzo, amidst
universal sorrow. Many of the Florentine youth



36 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

changed their dress in testimony of respect to his
memory.

But the people could not forgive the Pazzi
family. Those of them who had not suffered death
were condemned either to imprisonment or exile.
By a public decree 1t was ordered that the name
and arms of the Pazzi should be for ever sup-
pressed ; whilst the appellations of those places in
the city which had been derived from them were
directed to be changed. Thus the very name of
this wealthy, noble, and influential family was to
be forgotten in Florence, or remembered only with
abhorrence !

It was Lorenzo himself—the man they had most
deeply injured—who first forgave them, and even-
tually restored them to their former rank. With a
forbearance and humanity that did him honour, he
had not only rescued some of his enemies from the
fury of the people, but showed much pity and for-
giveness to the families of those who had been
slain.

Florence, under the sway of Lorenzo de Medici,
arrived at a high degree of prosperity, and became
renowned as the seat of learning and the fine arts.
His fellow-citizens, who regarded him with pride



THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 37

and affection, conferred upon him the title of
“‘ Magnificent.” He had several children; one of
whom, made an abbot before he was eight years
old, and a cardinal when only thirteen, was
afterwards the famous pope Leo the Tenth.
Another son, whom he named Giuliano, after his
lamented brother, allied himself by marriage with
the royal family of France, and became Duke de
Nemours.



No. II.

THE POPE AND THE PAINTER.

—_——+>-—-

“ DRAWING again, child! did I not tell thee I
would not have it? thou wilt never get on in life,
Michael, if thus thou dost waste thy precious time !”
exclaimed Luigi Buonarotti, as he entered the room
where his son was sitting.

“T was so weary of my books, Sir,” replied
Michael, a boy about eleven years of age ; “‘ I con-
ceive law to be the very driest of all dry studies.”

“That may be your opinion, foolish boy; but
dry or not, you must make up your mind to study
it. I have too many sons to allow of any whim-
sical likes or dislikes in the choice of a profession,
and, as I informed you the other day, I intend you
to practise as a notary or advocate in Florence.

>





P 57.



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER, 39

But see here!” continued Buonarotti, as he took up
from the desk various little drawings, “ how your
time and talents are wasted by such attempts as
these ! Will trumpery like this ever gain you riches
or honour? or even find you a livelihood ?—answer
me, boy.”

“Tf you will place me with a painter, Sir, that
trumpery shall be turned to good account,” said
Michael, rather proudly. “I have no fear of
gaining a living, if I may devote my time and
energies to the fine arts.”

“‘ Fine arts!” replied his father angrily, throwing
the papers on the ground, “put such folly out of
your head, child. Our family was once noble and
honoured in the land, and no son of mine, particu-
larly my eldest son, shall disgrace it by idleness,
or idle fancies, if [ can prevent it. I shall have
you thinking yourself a great artist, if you go on
thus.”

‘Nay, father, not so;” replied the boy, “ but it
is the great desire of my heart to be one.”

“‘ Well, that you never will be, Michael, so rest
content. ‘To see you distinguished as a notary is
the height of my ambition, as it must be of yours.”’

*‘ Father!” said Michael earnestly, “let me be a



40 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

painter, and you shall have no cause to be ashamed
of your son.”

“Tt is useless to ask it, child, my mind is made
up. Attend to your books.”

He left the room, and the boy, with a sigh,
turned to his studies. In a few minutes, however,
he almost unconsciously sought the pencil, and was
again employed in sketching.

At length, the appointed tasks were accom-
plished, and Michael, with joy putting aside the
books which were so distasteful to him, left his
home, and traversing the streets with rapid steps,
was ere long in the studio of the celebrated painter
Ghirlandajo, then at the height of his reputation.

To rare and various accomplishments Ghirlan-
dajo joined the most amiable qualities. His fellow-
citizens both admired and loved him, and he is
spoken of as “the delight of the age in which he
lived.” He was the best colourist in fresco who
had yet appeared; and though it is nearly five
hundred years since he lived, his colours have stood
extremely well to this day. He was also an excel-
lent worker in mosaic, which, from its durability,
he called “ painting for eternity.” And one of the
characteristics of this great painter was his diligent



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER, 4l

and progressive improvement; every successive
production was better than the last.

To pass a little time in the studio of Ghirlandajo,
was one of Michael’s greatest enjoyments. He
watched with intense interest each movement of
the master’s hand; with admiration he observed
the wonderful imitation of life and nature displayed
in his pictures; and more than ever he wished to
be a painter.

“Well, my boy,” said Ghirlandajo to him one
day, after Michael had been expressing such a wish
to Francesco, one of the scholars of the artist, “ you
must ask your father to let you study with us.”

“Ah, Signor! he will never consent,” replied
Michael; “he loves not painting; he holds the
fine arts in no esteem.”

“And you do? well, it is a pity you do not
think alike on the subject,” said Ghirlandajo
kindly; “but you must endeavour to be satisfied
with your father’s plans for you, my boy. What
is your profession to be?”

“‘T am to study for the law,” said Michael sadly.
‘“¢ My father says I shall gain neither honour nor
riches by painting; and that it is not every one
who is born to be a Ghirlandajo.”



42 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“True enough,” said the painter, smiling; “I
trust that our beautiful art will flourish under
names which will be remembered long after that
of Ghirlandajo is forgotten. Give your best ener-
gies to the study of the law, Michael, as your
father desires it; remember, one may have a taste
for the fine arts, without having any genius for
them.”

Michael, however, could not follow this advice.
While his books were in his hand, his thoughts
were in the painter’s studio. Having formed a
friendship with Francesco Granacci, one of the best
pupils of Ghirlandajo, he borrowed from him models
and drawings. These he took home to his little
chamber, and studied them in secret with such per-
severing assiduity and consequent improvement,
that Francesco, when he saw them, was quite sur-
prised and delighted. He was still speaking warmly
of their merits, when Ghirlandajo himself stepped
into the apartment.

“‘ Here, Granacci,” he said hastily, “I want you
to alter the expression in this mouth ; it is too severe
and— What have you here, Francesco? these draw-
ings are excellent,—and these figures, there is life
in them! they are not your doing, Granacci? I see



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 43

they are by a young hand, but there is great
genius there! none of my pupils could give such
touches as those. ‘Tio whom do they belong, Gra-
nacci? who has done this?”

“‘ Michael Buonarotti,” said Francesco, bringing
forward the boy, who had been listening with
trembling eagerness to the artist’s words. “Ought
he not to be a painter, Signor ?”

“He ought—he must!” replied Ghirlandajo.
“ Michael, I see you have genius as well as taste,”
continued the great master, looking proudly and
kindly on the boy; “you must cultivate your
talents; say, will you give up the law, and come
to be my pupil?”

“ Ah, Signor!” said Michael, with sparkling
eyes and clasped hands, “how gladly !—but my
father ?”

‘“‘T will plead your cause with your father,” said
the artist, “I will go to him this day, Michael.
These beginnings shadow forth great things, or I
am much mistaken. But remember, my boy, with-
out steady perseverance and diligent study you will
accomplish nothing. Genius without industry is of
little worth.”

It required much persuasion on the part of Ghir-



44 SHORT STORIES FROM EUKOPEAN HISTORY.

landajo to gain Luigi Buonarotti’s consent that his
son should exchange the study of the law for that
of painting. At length, however, the old man
reluctantly agreed to it.

“Tt is a pity Michael has taken such a fancy
into his head,” said he, “ but I suppose it must be
as he wishes. Young as he is, he has a stern
inflexible temper, Signor Ghirlandajo; it is not
easy to turn his mind from any object on which it
is once set, and the pencil has been his delight
from a child. But I am not rich, Signor, and
{I have a large family ;—-perhaps we may not agree
as to terms. What remuneration do you demand
for the instruction of my son?”

‘“¢ None whatever,” replied Ghirlandajo ; “on the
contrary, if Michael is bound to me as my regular
pupil for three years, I agree to pay you six golden
florins for the first year, eight for the second, and
twelve for the third ; and I do this because I expect
great advantage from your son’s labours. I am
sure I am not mistaken in him; he will be a great
artist.”

“‘ Say you so, Signor?” replied the old man with
rather an incredulous smile; “ well, I trust he will
not disappoint you. Thanks for your kindness and



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 45

liberality. The boy’s heart will overflow with
happiness at this change in his vocation.”

Michael was fourteen when, to his inexpressible
delight, he was thus received into the studio of the
discerning and liberal-minded Ghirlandajo, who
at once commenced his instructions with a pupil
destined to fill not only Italy, but all Hurope with
his fame—the celebrated Michael Angelo Buona-
rotti, commonly called Michael Angelo—as a
sculptor, an architect, and a painter, unques-
tionably the greatest master that’ever lived.

At that time Lorenzo the Magnificent reigned
over Florence. In his palace and gardens was a
fine collection of antique marbles, busts, and statues,
which the princely owner converted into an academy
for the use of young artists. Michael Angelo was
one of the first who, through the recommendation
of Ghirlandajo, was received into this new academy.
This was a great gratification to the youth. He
had hitherto devoted himself chiefly to drawing,
but the sight of the many splendid works of art in
the Medicean gardens determined him to turn his
attention to sculpture. He was then not quite
sixteen.

Whatever Michael Angelo did, he tried to do



A6 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

well. With the fervour and the energy natural to
his character, he now began first to model in clay,
and then to copy in marble, some of the works of
art before him. ‘They were surprising productions
for one so young.

Having found one day the statue of a laughing
faun considerably mutilated and without a head,
the youthful artist resolved to try if he could
restore to it what was wanting. He succeeded
admirably. Lorenzo, who often visited the gardens,
was much struck with this display of genius, and
inquired whose work it was.

“Tt is executed by one of Ghirlandajo’s pupils,”
was the reply. ‘‘ He and Granacci were the two
he deemed most worthy of entering your academy,
Signor. His name is Michael Angelo.”

““T should lke to see the youth,” observed
Lorenzo, who stood gazing at the statue; “‘ there is
great talent and genius here.”

Michael Angelo was summoned.

““So, Angelo,” said Lorenzo the Magnificent,
“ head does you credit.”

Michael’s dark eyes glittered. ‘It is a noble
art!” he replied with enthusiasm. “By allowing



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER, 47

me the honour of entering these gardens, excellent
Signor, you have, as it were, raised a new spirit
within me.”

Lorenzo smiled. A great lover of the art of
sculpture himself, he was pleased with the youth’s
evident devotion to it.

“‘Do you prefer it then to painting?” he asked.

“‘T do,” replied Michael Angelo. “It is to me
so much more wonderful and sublime.”

“I see you have not exactly imitated the original
in that head,” observed Lorenzo, “the lips are
smoother, and you have shown the teeth. But,”
he added with a smile, “ you should have remem-
bered, Angelo, that old men seldom exhibit a com-
plete set of teeth.”

He passed on ; and the young artist, who paid no
less respect to the judgment than to the rank of
Lorenzo, was no sooner left to himself, than he
struck out one of the teeth, giving to the part the
appearance of its having been lost by age.

On his next visit, Lorenzo, seeing this, and
equally delighted with the disposition as with the
genius of his young pupil, at once determined to
take him under his especial patronage. “ Angelo,”
he said, “ your perseverance and improvement



48 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

merit my regard. In order to give you every
advantage, I am willing to receive you into my
own service, undertake the entire care of your
education, and bring you up in my palace as my
son. What say you?”

What could Michael Angelo say to such a gene-
rous, flattering proposal! With heartfelt gratitude
he thanked his noble patron, and then spoke of his
father.

“T will see your father on the subject,” said
Lorenzo. “I trust he will not object to my wishes.”

He sent for the old man, and gained his consent
to the plan on condition that he himself should
receive an office under government. Accordingly,
Michael Angelo was lodged in the palace of the
Medici, where he remained for three years. He
was ever treated with paternal kindness by Lorenzo,
and had the advantage of associating with the first
literary characters of the age.

But Michael Angelo, with all his genius, was not
of a very amiable disposition. His temper was
proud and haughty; his speech too often contemp-
tuous and sarcastic. He felt his own great powers
of mind, and too frequently indulged in satire
towards those who were not so gifted as himself.



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 49

Lorenzo the Magnificent died, and Michael An-
gelo, thrown on his own resources, studied more
diligently than ever. Secluded, temperate and
frugal in his habits, stern and unbending in his
character, he suffered nothing to divert his mind
from that on which it was set—his improvement in
the art of sculpture.

About this time there was some sensation caused
amongst the lovers of the fine arts in Rome, by
the arrival in that city of a statue of extraordinary
beauty. It was a Sleeping Cupid in marble; and
great was the admiration bestowed upon it.

“Tt is a genuine antique,” said one grave con-
noisseur in such things ; “there is no mistaking it.”

‘Certainly not,” observed another; “how infi-
nitely superior is it to anything which art in this
day is capable of producing !”’

‘‘Tt was found in a vineyard near Florence, I
understand,” said a third; “‘a peasant, while dig-
ging, came upon this exquisite proof of ancient
skill and genius. It is a pity the arm has been
broken off. The Duchess of Mantua much desires
it for her cabinet, I hear; but the Cardinal San
Giorgio has already purchased it at a high price.
He is charmed with its beauty.”

E



50 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“My friends,” said a nobleman, as he entered
the hall with hasty steps, “what do you think I
have heard just now? that this ‘real antique,’ which
has so delighted us all, is the work of a young man
of two-and-twenty, residing at Florence!”

The group round the statue actually started with
surprise.

“Ts it possible ?” they exclaimed ; “has one in
our own day executed this splendid work! It is
marvellous! Are you sure you are not imposed
upon, Ricciardi ?”

“Quite sure. The young sculptor has produced
the missing arm, and given undoubted proofs of
his veracity. The cardinal has invited him to
Rome immediately.”

“And what may be the name of this young
man ?”

“His name is Michael Angelo.”

During his first residence in the imperial city,
Michael Angelo, surrounded by so many beautiful
remains of antiquity, applied to his studies with
unceasing energy and increasing diligence. He
executed several works, which added greatly to his
reputation, particularly a group called the Pieta,



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 51

which is now in the church of St. Peter's at
Rome.

A little time after the Pets had been fixed in
its place, the young artist went one afternoon to
cousider the effect of his work. As he stood before
it, surveying it with a critical yet partial eye, and
with a consciousness that he should yet do greater
things than that, two strangers entered the church.
Struck with admiration at the beautiful group pre-
sented to their view, they expressed, with Italian
warmth and fervour, their great and unqualified
approbation.

« What an exquisite work!” cried one. “ Truly
it is a masterpiece! What form! what proportion !
what excellent grouping! I never saw anything
to compare with it!”

“Wonderful!” said the other, after contem-
plating it for some time in silent admiration.
“ What a mind must the man have who executed
this! Who is the sculptor ?”

“One from Bologna; at this moment I remem-
ber not his name.”

“‘ Nay, my friend, I rather think he is a Floren-
tine. Surely I have heard so.”

“You are mistaken, Bernandino; I am con-



52 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

vinced Bologna has the honour of being his
birth-place; I shall bethink me of his name
directly.”

‘Well, any one in Rome can tell us that, fortu-
nately. There is a young man will set us right,
perhaps.”

‘“‘ Ah! let us not ask him; he might laugh at our
ignorance ; or he might not know himself. We
will find it out. The name of that man ought
never to be forgotten.”

“Tt shall not be forgotten here, at all events,”
said Michael Angelo, as the strangers left the
church ; “‘ the Pret shall not again be mistaken for
the work of the Bolognese.”’

That night, when the mighty city slept, a young
man of haughty bearing entered the church, with a
lantern in his hand. He approached the beautiful
piece of sculpture, and smiled proudly, as in deep
indelible characters he inscribed on it, where it
might best be seen—the name of Michael Angelo.
This Pret is the only one of his works thus
inscribed.

Amongst the ruins of ancient Rome is a splen-
did equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius. It is of
bronze, and was originally gilt with thick leaves of



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 53

gold. The attitude of the horse, and the fire and
spirit displayed in it, are remarkably fine. When
first Michael Angelo saw it, he looked at it for some
time in silence, and then suddenly exclaimed, ‘‘ Go
on!”—thus stamping this famous statue with his
enthusiastic admiration.

A very excellent painter lived at this time in
Florence, whose name was Leonardo da Vinci.
Italy was justly proud of this illustrious artist, and
Francis I. of France loaded him with favours. It
has been said—but the story is a doubtful one—
—that he died in the arms of that monarch at
Fontainbleau. Certain it is, that the king held
him in high esteem, and justly admired his great
and extraordinary talents.

Slowly fading away from the wall of the refec-
tory of the Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, at
Milan, is one of the most celebrated pictures of this
great master. The subject is a solemn one—the
Last Supper; and solemnly it is treated. The
skilful arrangement of the figures, which are larger
than life, and the amazing beauty of the workman-
ship, arrest the attention and astonish the eye of the
beholder. It has thus been spoken of: ‘“ On viewing
it, one head, one face, one attitude, one expression,



54 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

comes forcibly upon the sight, and sinks deeply
into the mind, till every thought and feeling
is absorbed in wonder at the power which could
represent so sublime a figure in so sublime a
manner.

“In the glorious serenity of that countenance
is beheld the history of the pardoned Magdalene,
the reproof of the self-sufficient Pharisee ; there may
be read, as in a scroll, lessons of charity and peace,
so ill followed, though so often cited by erring men,
who, while they respect the gentle words of that
Divine tongue, allow the spirit to evaporate.
There are patience, and forbearance, and endurance
—there are knowledge, and power, and prescience
—there is deep grief for treachery and crime—and,
above all, there is pity and forgiveness.”

Such is, or rather was, this beautiful painting ;
—it is fading from sight now, but from the nume-
rous copies taken from it no picture is more uni-
versally known and celebrated.

Leonardo da Vinci, like Michael Angelo, had
astonishing powers of mind. He was great as a
mathematician, a mechanic, an architect, a chemist,
an engineer, a musician, a poet, and a painter!



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 55

From a child his singular talents attracted notice ;
but he had not the perseverance of Michael Angelo.
His magnificent designs and projects were seldom
completed. He began many beautiful and won-
derful works, and then, dissatisfied with them, left
them unfinished. This highly gifted man and
Michael Angelo were rivals. With all their admi-
ration of each other’s genius, they were jealous of
the distinction each had obtained. The haughty
spirit of the one could not brook superiority, or even
equality ; the temper of the other was capricious
and sensitive. Leonardo was many years older
than Angelo, and did not feel pleased that so
young a man should come forward as his compe-
titor. One day, being annoyed at some remark
made by his rival, he replied with warmth, “ You
will remember, Angelo, I was famous before you
were born!”

It was announced one day in Florence that the
wall of the great council hall was to be painted in
fresco; and the artist who produced the best car-
toon should be appointed to the work. Michael
Angelo and Leonardo da Vinci, equally desirous of
the honour, resolved to compete for it. Hach pre-
pared his cartoon; each emulous of the fame, and



56 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

fully aware of the extraordinary abilities of his
rival, threw all his best powers into his work, de-
termined, if possible, to surpass himself. It was a
deeply interesting contest—a struggle for fame
between the two first artists of the age. Hach
chose a different subject, arid each, bending all his
energies to the task, succeeded in producing a
wonderful specimen of his peculiar skill and
genius.

The cartoons, when finished, met with the high-
est admiration; but the preference was given to
that of Leonardo da Vinci.

From all parts of Italy the young artists flocked
to study these magnificent compositions.

The wall of the council hall was, however, never
painted. It is said that Leonardo spent so much
time in trying experiments and preparing the wall,
that at length, changes in the Government occur-
ring, the design was abandoned.

The Pope at this time was Julius II. Though
seventy-four years of age, he was impatient
of contradiction, fiery in temper, full of magni-
ficent and ambitious projects, and of a most ener-
getic cast of character. He sent for Michael
Angelo,



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 57

“‘T wish thee to erect a splendid monument to
my memory,” said he; “ thou art well able to per-
form the task; see thou doest me justice.”’

The sculptor commenced his work, and the pon-
tiff was delighted.

“'Thou hast wonderful abilities, assuredly, Mi-
chael Angelo!” he said to him one day, as he
watched him with eager interest, “ how thou dost
make the marble fly, man! Truly, it is as if thou
wert angry with it for concealing the statue! There
is something of my own energy in thee, Michael.
But [hear thou art as great with the brush as with
the chisel !—Come with me ; I have a work for thee
to execute in that way also.”

“Tf your Holiness will allow me to finish these
strokes first,” said Michael Angelo, quietly going
on with his task.

The impatient pope was compelled to wait the
sculptor’s pleasure, and then he carried him off
to the famous Sistine Chapel.

“¢ See here!” he exclaimed, as they entered the
building together, “this chapel, erected thirty
years ago by Sixtus the Fourth, is not yet
completed. Though the walls are decorated, the
ceiling remains without an ornament. Thisshould



58 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

not be. Thou must paint it in fresco, Michael
Angelo.”

The artist gazed upwards at the enormous vault,
and then replied, “Your Holiness requires a great
work and a work of time.”

“‘Great! that is the very reason I give it thee!”
said the pontiff; ‘what is work to one like thee ?
thou canst do anything thou wilt. This ceiling
is, as perhaps thou knowest, one hundred and fifty
feet long, and fifty broad, and I desire that thou
shouldest represent thereon a series of subjects con-
nected with sacred history, so as to cover the whole
space. Canst thou—nay, I need not say canst
thou, but wilt thou undertake the work ?”

The great master paused one instant, and then
replied, “I can, and will.”

“That is well,” said the pontiff; “but at what
art thou gazing so earnestly, Angelo? What dost
thou see in that painting of Ghirlandajo’s ?

“T see the hand of my old master, your Holiness,
but yet should scarcely recognise it. How inferior
is this to his later productions! how continuous and
steady was his improvement!”

“So it should be,” replied Pope Julius ; ““what
have great artists to do but improve? Now think



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 59

over thy designs for this ceiling, Angelo; great as
thou art already, I prophesy this will add some-
what to thy renown.”

Michael Angelo continued his work on the mau-
soleum, till the pope, prejudiced by one of the
artist’s enemies,—and he had several,—no longer
visited him as formerly, and neglected to supply
him with the necessary funds. Not being able on
two occasions to obtain access to the pontiff, and
having been treated rather superciliously by one
of the servants, Michael Angelo’s haughty spirit
rose.

“Go,” he said, to one of his attendants, “and
take this message to the Vatican;—that if his Holi-
ness desires to see Michael Angelo, he must send
to seek him elsewhere than in Rome.—Now, Ur-
bino, dispose of my property ; sell my goods to the
Jews; I leave for Florence to-day.”

He started for that city, but had not proceeded
many miles on his road, when, one after another,
five couriers arrived from Pope Julius, with com-
mands, threats, persuasions, and promises, to induce
him to return, but in vain; Michael Angelo turned
a deaf ear to all they said, and determinately con-
tinued his journey.



60 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

He had not been long in Florence, before three
more messengers came from the pontiff, insisting
on his return; but the inflexible artist absolutely
refused. ‘‘Inform his Holiness,” said he, “that I
have accepted -a commission from the Sultan of
Turkey to build a bridge at Constantinople. I
therefore cannot comply with the wishes of his
Holiness.”

Then the pope wrote to Soderini, who was at the
head of the government at Florence, commanding
him, on pain of his extreme displeasure, to send
Michael Angelo back to him. Soderini, fearing the
pontiff’s anger, at length, with difficulty, prevailed
on the offended artist to return, but not till three
months had been spent in vain negotiations.

The pope was at supper, in Bologna, when a
servant informed him Michael Angelo had arrived.

“Oh! at last! bring him instantly to our pre-
sence!’’ he exclaimed in an impatient tone. ‘“ He
shall answer for this conduct !”

‘What does this mean!” continued the fiery old
pontiff, as Michael Angelo appeared before him;
*‘ instead of obeying our command, and coming to
us, thou hast waited till we came in search of
thee !”’



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 61

“ Pardon me, holy father,” said Michael Angelo,
falling on his knees, and speaking in a loud voice,
‘“‘my offence has not been caused by an evil nature;
I could no longer endure the insults offered to me
in the palace of your Holiness.”

He continued kneeling, and the pope in silence
bent his angry brows upon him, wishing to forgive,
doubtless, if he could do so without losing his dig-
nity. Atthis moment, a bishop who was standing
by, thinking he could mediate between the parties,
observed in a pitying tone, “It is through igno-
rance he has erred, poor man; pardon him, holy
father; artists are ever apt to presume too much
upon their genius.”

“Who told thee to interfere ?” said the irascible
pope, bestowing on him at the same time a hearty
blow with his staff, “itis thou that art ignorant
and presuming, to insult one whom we delight
to honour; take thyself out of our sight!”

As the terrified prelate stood speechless with
amazement, the attendants led him from the room.
Then Pope Julius, turning to Michael Angelo, said
in a mild voice,“ We grant thee our forgiveness and
our blessing, my son; but thou must never again
leave us. Be obedient to our wishes, and at all



62 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

times, and on all occasions, thou shalt have our
favour and protection.”

A short time after this extraordinary scene, Pope
Julius, ever willing to employ the talents of the
great sculptor, commanded him to execute a colos-
sal statue of himself for the front of the principal
church in Bologna. It was in bronze ; and Michael
Angelo threw into the figure and attitude so much
haughtiness and resolution, and gave such an ex-
pression of terrible majesty to the countenance, that
Julius, when he saw his character thus portrayed,
could not help smiling.

“Am I uttering a blessing or a curse?” he said
to the sculptor.

“Tt is my wish to represent your Holiness as
admonishing the people of Bologna to submission,”
replied Michael Angelo.

“Good!” said the pope, gazing well pleased
on the statue; “but what wilt thou place in my
hand ?”

“A book, may it please your Holiness.”

“A book, man!” exclaimed the old pontiff, “put
rather a sword; thou knowest I am no scho-
lar.”



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 63

“‘Now then, Michael Angelo,” said the energetic
Pope Julius on their return to Rome, “thou must
forthwith commence the decoration of the vaulted
ceiling in the Sistine Chapel.”

“Should not the mausoleum be first completed ?”
said the artist, who preferred the practice of sculp-
ture to that of painting, and much desired to decline
the task assigned to him.

“By no means,” replied Julius; “there is no
hurry for the monument ; I am yet alive and vigor-
ous ; but I wish to see the completion of the chapel.
I desire that the pontificate of Julius the Second
should be remembered.”

“It is a grand task, and should be grandly
executed,” said the artist. “Some other hand than
mine may give your Holiness satisfaction. ‘There
is Raphael ”

‘“‘He is otherwise engaged for us, thou knowest,”
said the pope in an angry tone; “I tell thee, Mi-
chael Angelo, thou, and none else, shalt perform the
work ; so say no more concerning it.”

The painter, fearful of again incensing the pontiff
by opposing his will, reluctantly submitted to it;
and deeply impressed with a sense of the vast-
ness and grandeur of the task committed to him,





64 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

commenced his cartoons. As he was then inexpe-
rienced in the mechanical part of the art of fresco,
he invited from Florence several eminent painters,
to execute his designs under his own directions.
They, however, could not reach the grandeur of
his conceptions ; and, disappointed and vexed, Mi-
chael Angelo one morning, in a fit of impatience,
turned them all out of the chapel, destroyed all they
had done, and determined to execute the whole
himself. He accordingly shut himself up, and with
incredible perseverance and energy proceeded to
accomplish this great work alone, even preparing
the colours with his own hands.

When the ceiling was about half completed, Pope
Julius, whose impatience to see it had been very
great, insisted on admittance to the chapel. The
sublime and magnificent performance which met
his eye when he entered, excited his deepest admi-
ration and astonishment.

“Thou hast actually surpassed thyself, Michael
Angelo!” he exclaimed with delight; “great as
were my expectations, this exceeds them all!”

T'wo or three persons had found admission with
Pope Julius into the chapel, and unrepressed and
ardent were their expressions of delight and sur-



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 65

prise also. But there was one who in silent admi-
ration gazed upwards, who comprehended better
than any other the extreme grandeur and beauty of
the painting. This was a young man of graceful
form and handsome expressive features. With
dark eyes and luxuriant hair, he had so sweet and
serene a countenance, as to be termed by some,
“angelic.”” His face was a mirror of the mind with-
in. Bright, talented, generous, and gentle, he pos-
sessed the most attractive manners with the most
winning modesty. So amiable was his disposition,
that “‘not only all men, but the very brutes loved
him; the only very distinguished man of whom
we read, who lived and died without an enemy or
detractor.”

Yet, young as he was, and modest as was his
disposition, from one end of Italy to the other his
name was known and celebrated. For this was
“the prince of painters’ —one whose fame eventu~
ally filled the world—Raphael Sanzio d’ Urbino.

The quick glance of Michael Angelo soon noticed
the young artist; and when Pope Julius had de-
parted, he approached the spot where he stood, lost
in admiration. There was no rivalry between
them then. Michael Angelo, though, in general,

F



66 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

he cared not for praise, and despised flattery, could
appreciate the genius of Raphael, and was not
indifferent to his opinion. It was needless to ask
it on this occasion; the speaking countenance of
the young artist was enough. With infinite sweet-
ness and candour he thus addressed the great mas-
ter, older than himself by some years ;—

“ T can but be thankful,” he said, joy flashing
from his eyes, “ that I am born in the same age
with so great an artist as Michael Angelo, and may
be enabled to profit by the grand creations of so
sublime a genius!”

Michael Angelo was satisfied. He valued those
few words more than all the commendations of
Pope Julius IJ. And well he might; for who
could judge like Raphael? what painter has ever
equalled him ?

Pope Julius, anxious to secure the talents of
such an artist in his service, had invited, or rather
ordered Raphael to Rome, to decorate the cham-
bers of the Vatican. The Vatican is the palace of
the Pope. It contains four thousand apartments,
twelve great halls, eight grand staircases, and two
hundred lesser ones, a corridor about a thousand
feet in length, a museum, and an immense library



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER, 67

of 80,000 books, and 24,000 manuscripts. But
the chambers decorated by Raphael are the glory
of the Vatican. Those sublime paintings, the rich
creations of his wonderful mind, have been the
admiration of all ages.

‘With renewed energy Michael Angelo now con-
tinued. his work in the Sistine Chapel; but rapid
as was his progress with it, it was not rapid enough
to suit the impatient Pontiff.

‘ Thou art slow, man, thou art slow!” said he
one day to the indefatigable artist; ‘‘ we desire to
see this great work completed in our lifetime, but
at this rate of progress tell me, when dost thou
intend to finish it?”

“When I can,” calmly replied Michael Angelo.

“When thou canst!” exclaimed the fiery old
Pope ; “ surely thou hast a mind that I should have
thee thrown from the scaffold.”

“Then should I never have the honour of com-
pleting it for your Holiness,” quietly observed the
artist.

The wishes of Pope Julius were, however, grati-
fied ; and not long after, the ceiling was uncovered
to public view.

In the incredibly short time of twenty-two





68 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

months, Michael Angelo had performed his sublime
and magnificent task! The Sistine Chapel was
opened ; and when the people of Rome, by hun-
dreds and thousands, poured in to view the artist’s
work, their delight and admiration knew no
bounds. With reverence and astonishment they
gazed at it, and pronounced it unparalleled in the
history of art.

The following year Pope Julius II. died, and
was succeeded by Leo X., son of Lorenzo the
Magnificent. This was the Pope who permitted
the sale of indulgences, or pardon for sins, against
which Luther so boldly protested,

You have heard of the Church of St. Peter’s, at
Rome? Those who look upon it cannot suffici-
ently admire the vast genius and majestic intellect
of the man who was its chief architect. That man
was Michael Angelo. Wonderful as a painter and
a sculptor, he was yet more wonderful as an archi-
tect. St. Peter’s may be pronounced the most
magnificent structure ever raised by man,

When remuneration was offered the great mas-
ter while engaged on the building, he constantly
declined it. “ No,” he said, “ I am employed in a



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 69

work of piety ; and, for my own honour and the
honour of God, I refuse all emolument.”

On leaving Florence to build the dome of St.
Peter’s, Angelo turned his horse round to contem-
plate once more, in the grey of the morning, the
beautiful city and its far-famed cathedral. He
gazed long on the glorious cupola, rising from
amidst the pines and cypresses, and then said,
with a feeling of the deepest admiration, “ Like
thee I will not build one; better than thee I
cannot!”

His tomb, in the Church of Santa Croce, was
marked out by himself, in such a manner that from
it might be seen, when the doors of the church
stood open, that grand and noble edifice.

The character of Michael Angelo was no common
one. ‘To the last hour of his life—and he lived to
be very old—he was striving after excellence in his
art. Ever endeavouring to improve, with resolute
energy of mind and purpose he was still pressing
on to his standard of perfection. In allusion to his
own infirmities, this mighty master made a draw-
ing, representing an aged man in a go-cart, with
these words underneath,—Swill learning.



70 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

On the 6th of April, 1520, there were tears and
great lamentations in the “ Eternal City.” All
classes of men mourned the death of one, cut off in
the prime of life, and in the midst of vast under-
takings. The generous, the high-minded, the be-
loved and admired Raphael was no more! But
much as all mourned him, the grief of his scholars
was unspeakable.

From all parts of Italy they had come to study
under this “ painter of painters.”’ No less than a
train of fifty artists attended him from his own
house to the Vatican, when he went to court; at-
tended on him with a love, and reverence, and
duty, far beyond that usually paid to princes.

And such was the influence of Raphael’s benign
temper, that all his numerous scholars lived to-
gether in perfect harmony and friendship. No
jealousies disturbed their peace. All was generous
emulation. Each strove to excel; each endea-
voured to catch some faint reflection of the grace,
and beauty, and power, which characterized the
works of their great master.

“« Father,” said little Octavio Mazzola, as he
and his parent walked slowly along the banks of



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 71

the Tiber, “‘ do you think Pope Leo is very sorry
that the great painter is no more ?”’

‘“* He is deeply grieved, my son. During Ra-
phael’s illness he sent every day to inquire after his
health, and when informed of the fatal termination,
broke out into bitter lamentations. ‘ Alas!’ he
exclaimed, ‘ what an irreparable loss io me! what
a misfortune to the world! Where shall I find a
second Raphael!’ ”

** But he still has the great Michael Angelo.”

“True; but Pope Leo much preferred the grace-
ful and amiable Raphael to the stern, unbending
Michael Angelo. The character of the latter
painter accorded more with that of Pope Julius.”

“ Well, there is Titian—the celebrated portrait-
painter, Titian ; why does not his Holiness invite
him to Rome?”

“‘ He has done so, but Titian prefers remaining
in Venice.”

“'Then there was Leonardo da Vinci, who died
last year, did not he please Pope Leo?”

‘* No; his Holiness invited him to court, but was
annoyed by his dilatory habits in executing the
works intrusted to him; and Leonardo, taking
offence at some slight on the part of the Pontiff, left



72 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

him, to enter the service of King Francis IL. When
here, Leonardo used to pass many an hour with
Raphael, whilst he was engaged on the frescoes of
the Vatican; he ever treating the venerable old
man with respect and deference.”

«¢ Ah, there was no one like Raphael! I loved
him most, father, for painting so many beautiful
pictures from the Bible. How sad it was he should
die when he was only thirty-seven !”

“Tt was; and yet, Octavio, how much he per-
formed during his short life! a life of incessant and
persevering study. He has left behind him some
hundreds of pictures and drawings, to immortalize
his name. They are chiefly on sacred subjects, for
in those his pure and pensive mind delighted ; and
surely never were such portrayed, so beautifully,
so poetically, and so intelligibly, as by Raphael.
Besides his grand compositions from the Bible, he
has painted no less than one hundred and twenty
pictures of the Madonna—all varied, and all exqui-
sitely beautiful.”

‘‘ And the painting we saw suspended over his
dead body, as it lay on the bed of state, was his
last! the Transfiguration—oh, father! what a glori-
ous picture it is! but he did not live to finish it.”



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 73

“ Alas! no. ‘The task of completing his un-
finished works he has bequeathed to his two favour-
ite pupils, Giulio Romano and Francisco Penni.
Romano imitates his master’s manner so success-
fully, that it is sometimes difficult to distinguish
the difference of hand. He has copied his portrait
of Pope Julius IT. most admirably. One can
hardly look at it without fear.* Penni, who was
much beloved by Raphael, assisted him greatly in
preparing his cartoons.”’

“ Oh, those famous cartoons! do you remember
how every one rejoiced last year, when the tapes-
tries worked from them were first exhibited, and
what wonder and applause they excited in the city?
Bianca and I stood for a whole hour, looking at
‘The Death of Ananias.” And then my mother
gave us a feast in honour of the day! How happy
we all were! and how many times we wished Ra-
phael health and joy! And when we took that
splendid bouquet of flowers to his house in the
evening, how kindly he spoke to us! The good
and gentle Raphael! Where are the cartoons
themselves, father ?”’

“In Flanders. You know they were sent to

* This portrait 1s now in our National Gallery.



74 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

Arras, to be copied in tapestry work for the walls
of the Sistine Chapel.”

‘“‘ | wonder such a patron of the fine arts as Leo
X. allows them to remain there; for surely the
cartoons must be more precious than the tapestry,
beautiful as it is?”

“* Most true, Octavio; yet these rich tapestries
cost Pope Leo 50,000 golden ducats, while Raphael
received for his incomparable cartoons but 434.” *

“ Tt is pleasing to think how all the great paint-
ers loved Raphael.”

“ All, with the exception of Michael Angelo,
who looked upon him as his rival. The amiable
and talented Il Francia, though thirty-four years
older than Raphael, was much attached to him,
and styled him ‘the painter above all painters.’
A few years since our great artist sent his famous
picture of St. Cecilia to Bologna, for the church in
that city. In a letter full of affection he recom-
mended his picture to the care of his friend Francia,
entreating him to be present when the case was
opened, to repair any injury it might have sus-
tained on the journey, and modestly begging that
he would correct what appeared to him faulty in

* Seven of these famous cartoons are in Hampton Court.



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 75

the execution ; concluding his letter thus :—‘ Con-
tinue to love me, as I love you, with all my heart.’
When the case was opened, and Francia beheld
this masterpiece of the great Raphael, he burst
into transports of admiration and delight, exclaim-
ing, ‘Correct! this far exceeds all I ever even
attempted!’ ”’

Some years after this, the famous Correggio
visited Bologna, where he saw Raphael’s St. Ce-
cilia; after contemplating it for some time with
deep admiration, he turned away, exclaiming,
** And I, too, am a painter!”

“And the poet Ariosto and Fra Bartolomeo
were his intimate friends, were they not ?”’

“Yes; Raphael and Fra Bartolomeo, when
young, mutually instructed each other, Raphael
imitating his friend in the softer blending of his
colours, and in return teaching Bartolomeo perspec-
tive. Modesty was one great charm in Raphael’s
character: superior as he was, he was not too
proud to learn. Some time since, Fra Bartolomeo
having so often heard of the great_works of his
friend, and of Michael Angelo, in this city, could
no longer refrain from seeing their wonderful pro-
ductions, What he beheld in the Vatican and the



76 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

Sistine Chapel so infinitely surpassed all his pre-
vious conceptions, that he was quite overwhelmed
with astonishment and admiration. There was no
envy in his gentle mind, but from that day he could
paint no more! His energy was gone; and he re-
turned to Florence, leaving two unfinished pictures
here, which the generous and kind-hearted Raphael
undertook, in the midst of all his numerous works,
to finish for him.”

“TI suppose Fra Bartolomeo was quite discou-
raged,” said Octavio ; “ did he ever paint again ?”

“Yes, he roused himself; and his finest works
date from his visit to Rome.”

‘“‘ Pope Leo has been very fortunate, I think, in
bringing so many great men into his capital.”

“ Francis I. wished to attract Raphael to his
court, but not succeeding, he desired to have a
picture by his hand. The artist sent him a mag-
nificent one, which so pleased the king that he
rewarded him munificently, expressing his satisfac-
tion in a royal and graceful fashion. Raphael,
considering himself overpaid—and with a heart
generous and liberal as Francis himself—made the
monarch a present of his famous picture of the Holy
Family, adding also another, in compliment to



THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. th

Margaret, the king’s favourite sister. When the
pictures were placed before the royal Francis, he
was perfectly delighted ;—‘ Count me out 3,000/.
for the incomparable Raphael,’ he exclaimed to his
treasurer, ‘and send it to him, with the strongest
expressions of our approbation. He deserves to be
crowned as prince of painters,—But see, here
comes the little Bianca; run to meet her, my boy,
and help her to gather flowers for her nosegay.”

The father of Michael Angelo had no reason to
fear his son’s disgracing their once noble -family.
The acknowledged worth and genius of that-son,—
his wide-spread fame and unblemished integrity,—
combined with the haughty reserve of his deport-
ment to invest him with a sort of princely dignity.
Men vied with each other in doing him honour;
the nobles of the land stood uncovered in his
presence. The popes Julius IT., Leo X., Clement
VIL., Paul ITT., Julius II., Pius [V., and Pius V.
alike esteemed him, and gladly availed themselves
of his talents in ornamenting their capital city. It
is said, that when he waited on Pope Julius III.
the pontiff rose at his approach, and seated him
on his right hand; and whilst proud prelates and



78 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

cardinals, and lordly ambassadors, stood round at
humble distance, he conversed with Michael Angelo
as equal with equal.

This great man died in the eighty-ninth year of
his age. His energy and perseverance never for-
sook him, and his mind was strong and clear to
the last.





89



No. II

THE DUKES OF MILAN.

THE history of the Sforza family is a remarkable
one. Jacopo Attendolo, the first of the name, was
born of humble parents, about the middle of the
fourteenth century. He forsook in early youth his
occupation of a labourer, to enlist in one of those
companies of adventurers which were then nu-
merous in Italy, and which served for hire the petty
princes and republics of that age. Jacopo, having
displayed great courage and perseverance, acquired
a considerable reputation in the turbulent band,
and after servmg under various “ condottieri,” or
leaders, attached himself to Alberico da Barbiano.
This was a captain of high birth and noble views.
Italy was at that time much troubled with foreign



80 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

mercenaries, who plundered the towns, killed the
citizens, and committed all manner of outrages.
Alberico aspired to the glory of delivering his
country from the oppression of these men. Raising
a force of 12,000 soldiers, all natives of Italy, and
supported by Visconti, Lord of Milan, the Floren-
tines, and the people of Bologna, he marched to
meet the foreign troops, and after a desperate
combat utterly defeated them. Jacopo Attendolo,
who, by his bravery, contributed greatly to the
victory, received from Alberico the surname of
“* Sforza,” by which name, and by no other,
he and his descendants have become known in
history.

After being engaged in many battles, receiving
various honours, and displaying much valour, the
restless career of this brave but illiterate soldier
terminated. He litile thought that the name
which he had acquired with honour on the battle-
field, would eventually become that of a sovereign
dynasty.

Francesco Sforza, son of Jacopo, learnt the art of
war under his father. He received from Joanna,
Queen of Naples, the title of Count, and several
domains in her kingdom. Thinking he had been



THE DUKES OF MILAN. $1

badly treated by Visconti, Duke of Milan, he led
his troops against him; when the Duke, in alarm
at his repeated victories, at length offered him the
hand of his only daughter, Bianca, with the city
and territory of Cremona as a dowry. This well
pleased the ambitious Sforza; peace was concluded,
and the marriage solemnized. But the death of
the Duke, his father-in-law, opened a new field to
his ambition, and he now aspired to the sovereignty
of the duchy of Milan. The people of Milan, con-
sidering the Visconti dynasty as extinct, proclaimed
the Republic. But Sforza, with the aid of the
Venetians, besieged the city, and, reduced by
famine and distracted by anarchy, it at length
opened its gates to the conqueror, who was then
solemnly proclaimed Duke of Milan.

In his new dignity Sforza acted with prudence
and mildness. He governed well, was desirous
to promote peace, and improved and adorned
the city. In his private life he was prudent,
affable, and humane, and he died generally re-
gretted, leaving two sons, Galeazzo and~Ludovico,
the former of whom succeeded him on the ducal
throne.

But thrones won by violence and injustice

G



82 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

seldom bring peace to their possessors, and such
was the case with the Sforza family.

Milan, the capital of Lombardy, and the third
city of Italy, ranking next to Naples and Rome
in population and importance, stands in the midst
of a vast plain at the foot of the Alps. It is a
magnificent city; its chief glory being its duomo,
or cathedral. This most beautiful edifice, built
entirely of white marble, has a truly dazzling
effect. Its snowy pinnacles with their delicate
tracery, and its three thousand statues equally
white, which adorn the exterior, rising towards
the bright blue sky, look like some exquisite piece
of sculpture executed in molten silver. From the
top of the duomo there is a magnificent and ex-
tensive view of the fertile plains of Lombardy, and
of the chain of Alps which borders it in the form
of a crescent on the north side. The rich and
glowing plains stretching out like a vast garden,
the blue mountains, the lakes, and the extraordinary
beauty and fertility of the country, render Milan
one of the most attractive cities in Italy.

It was in the winter of the year 1476, when
Galeazzo Sforza reigned in Milan, that, on the day



THE DUKES OF MILAN. 83

after Christmas Day, a family party had assembled
to celebrate the joyous season, in one of the best
houses in the city. This was the comfortable
dwelling of the rich citizen Trivulsio, who, in the
pride and gladness of his heart, had gathered
about him all his children and grandchildren to
share in the good cheer which he had so abundantly
provided for the festive occasion.

A merry group they were—these light-hearted
children of a southern clime,—and yet, occasionally
in the midst of their merriment, a shade would
cross the brow, and a sigh escape the lips, of more
than one of the party. This was especially observ-
able when the conversation fell upon public affairs;
there was then a constraint and a gloom over all,
which it took some minutes to dispel.

At such moments each young wife would look
with tender solicitude towards her husband and
children, as if she feared she knew not what;
while on the countenances of the young men
might be seen an expression of stern resolve
mingled with fiercer passions.

“Tt is a sad state of things, truly,” observed
Trivulsio, on one of these occasions, “neither our
persons nor property are safe now. How different



84 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

was it in the time of the good Duke Fran-
cesco!”’

‘Tt may be worse yet,” replied Antonio, gloomily ;
“he is becoming more tyrannical and cruel every
day. Innocence itself is no safeguard. Only this
morning he gave orders for the execution of my
neighbour Guizo’s eldest son. As fine a lad as
ever you saw, and as innocent of treason as that
babe. It is hard to bear.”

“And why do we bear it?’ indignantly ex-
claimed the handsome young Giulio, with flashing
eyes. “ Why are we thus to stand in daily fear
of losing all we hold dearest in life? We have
bold hearts and sharp steel ; who is the usurper’s
son that we should tamely submit to such oppres-
sion ?”

“ Silence, Giulio!” said his father, sternly.
“How often must I bid you beware of your words,
rash boy? The Duke Francesco ruled us well,
and I will hear no talk of resistance to his son’s
authority. He is a bad man, but we are not to
eall him to account for his crimes, nor is mine the
house in which treasonable language shall be used.
No good ever comes of conspiring against our
rulers.”



THE DUKES OF MILAN. 85

“ T think his behaviour to his mother, the good
Lady Bianca, the worst part of his conduct,” said
Antonio’s wife, Teresa. “I cannot forgive him
such ingratitude to such a mother.”

“ What did he do?” asked little Rosina of her
parent.

“ He made her life so wretched that she retired
to Marignano, where after a short illness she died,
it is said, of poison. Oh! no blessing can attend
a son who fails in his duty to his mother!”

“ Tf we only had such a government as they
have in Florence!” said Giulio. “ Such a chief
as Lorenzo de Medici!”

“ Ah! he is much beloved, and deservedly so,”
replied Trivulsio. ‘“ It were well had the Duke
taken a lesson from him during his visit to
Florence; but I imagine he thought more of as-
tonishing the Florentines by his show and luxury,
than of gaining any good to himself by the example
of Lorenzo.

* Does Ludovico, Il Moro,* at all resemble his
brother?” asked the young Carlo.

“‘ Nay, he appears to have several good qualities;

* Ludovico Sforza was styled “Il Moro,” or the Moor, on
account of his dark complexion.



86 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

but I fear he is both ambitious and deceitful. But
it is better not to talk of these matters, my children;
too much has been said already. Come, Rosina,
sing to us.”

The child was about to comply, when a loud
knocking was heard at the door, and immediately
after two or three citizens hastily entered the
apartment. They were pale and agitated.

“« Have you heard, Trivulsio,” said one, “‘ have
you heard of this terrible murder ?”

“ Murder! no! what do you mean?”

“ Close by!—in this very street!—the Duke
Sforza has been stabbed on his way to church!”

“ The Duke stabbed! Oh, Pietro!”

“‘ Tt seems to have been the act of a few con-
spirators. Some have been seized. The body i
taken to the palace.”

“ Well, few will mourn for him,” said Giulio.
‘‘ He has brought it on himself.”

“ Ah! it is a fearful deed!” observed Teresa.
“The Duchess Bona! what a blow it will be
to her!”

“JT trust the murderers will be taken,” said
Trivulsio; “ such a crime is a disgrace to Milan.”

‘Who will be our duke now?” asked Carlo.



THE DUKES OF MILAN. 87

* Who can tell? His son, Giovanni Galeazze,
is but a child. We must have a regency. These
are troublous times, Pietro. I cannot be thank-
ful enough that none of my family had a hand
in so foul a deed. Be assured it will not go un-
punished.”

It did not. All the conspirators were taken and
put to death. The infant Giovanni Galeazzo
Sforza was proclaimed Duke of Milan, under the
guardianship of his mother, Bona of Savoy, who
was made regent. But not-a long time elapsed
before the ambitious Ludovico stepped forward, took
possession of the regency, arrested the Duchess
Bona, and put her faithful minister, Simonetta, to
death. Ludovico Sforza was a man whose character
stood pre-eminent, even in that age, when such
qualities were but too common, for perfidy, in-
gratitude, and cruelty. He scrupled at little to
serve his own ambitious purposes, and not content
with obtaining the regency, aimed at still higher
power. But ‘his character, bad as it was, had in
it some redeeming points. He was generous, fond
of the arts and learned men, and a friend to
Bramante and Leonardo da Vinci. He instituted



88 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

public schools, patronised distinguised scholars,
founded chairs of Greek, geometry, and astronomy,
and greatly embellished Milan. Still all this could
not counterbalance the crimes to which his ambi-
tion led him.

One of Ludovico Sforza’s favourite places of
resort was the studio of the celebrated Leonardo da
Vinci, whom he had invited to Milan. The natural
gifts of this great artist—“ the most. accomplished
man of that accomplished age,”—and the variety
of knowledge he had acquired, were perfectly
astonishing. Ardent and successful in the study
of painting, sculpture, botany, natural history,
chemistry, anatomy, architecture, music, philosophy,
engineering, and fortification, he was yet the
greatest mathematician and most ingenious me-
chanic of his time! To these rare endowments
was added that of a remarkably handsome person,
@ winning address, and much wit and eloquence.
His dress was always costly, his manners refined,
and. his conversation varied and interesting. Ludo-
vico greatly delighted in the society of this talented
man, and during the seventeen years of his resi-
dence in Milan, ever treated him with esteem and
affection.



THE DUKES OF MILAN. 89

Leonardo was employed on various works for his
patron ;—one of these, the canal of the Martesana,
would alone have been sufficient to immortalize
him. His wonderful and sublime painting, The
Last Supper, we have already spoken of. It
occupied him two years, and was by far the grandest
picture which, up to that time, had appeared in
Italy.* Ludovico had invited him to Milan to
execute an equestrian colossal statue of his ancestor
Francesco Sforza, but the artist never finished more
than the model in clay, which was considered a
master-piece. Some years afterwards, when Milan
was invaded by the French, this was used as a
target by the Gascon bowmen, and totally de-
stroyed.

“And when did you first become a painter,
Leonardo?” said Ludovico Sforza, one day, as he
stood watching the artist at his work.

“‘T do not remember the time when the pencil
was not a delight to me,” replied Leonardo. “My
favourite pursuit as a child was the art of design
in all its branches; and my good father, seeing

* The genuine works of Leonardo da Vinci are exceedingly

rare. Most of the pictures now attributed to him were wholly,
or in part, painted by his scholars and imitators.



90 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

my inclination, sent me to study under Andrea
Verrocchio.”

‘“‘ Ah! an excellent and correct designer, but
not a good colourist. JI have heard that when
engaged on that painting, the Baptism of the
Saviour, he employed thee to execute one of the
angels ; and that it so infinitely surpassed all the
rest of the picture, that he threw away his palette,
enraged, it is said, that a child should excel him.*
Was it not so?”

* Verrocchio was famed as a sculptor and chaser
in metal, your excellency,” replied Leonardo,
modestly; ‘“‘to painting he was not so partial,
consequently not so successful in the art.”

*‘ Leonardo,” said Sforza, after a pause, ‘‘ what
induced thee to paint that horrible thing, the
Rotello del Fico?t I gave three hundred golden
ducats for it; yet can I never look on it without
shuddering.”

The artist smiled. ‘A peasant on my father’s
estate,” he said, “ one day brought him a circular
piece of wood, cut horizontally from the trunk of a
very large old fig-tree, which had been lately felled,

* This picture is preserved in the Academy at Florence.
+ Rotello means a shield ; Fico, a fig-tree.



THE DUKES OF MILAN. 91

and begged to have something painted on it as
an ornament for his cottage. The man being an
especial favourite, my father desired me to gratify
his request; and, inspixed by some wild fancy, I
took the panel to my own room, resolved, if pos-
sible, te astonish my worthy parent. I determined
to compose something which should have an effect
similar to that of the: Medusa, and almost petrify
beholders. Accordingly, I collected together from
the neighbouring swamps and the river-mud all
kinds of hideous reptiles, as adders, lizards, toads,
serpents, &c., and out of these I compounded the
monster with flaming eyes, represented on the
shield. When finished, and I led my father into
the room in which it was placed, his terror and
horror proved the success of my attempt.”

“ It is, indeed, wonderfully horrible! what could
induce thee, Leonardo, to depict so fearful an
object ?”

“‘ A whim, I suppose, your excellency, and the
desire of surprising my father. We artists take
strange fancies sometimes.”

“ But the peasant ? what said he to the Rotello ?”

“He never saw it. My father sold it secretly
to a merchant, who brought it to Milan; and the



92 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

poor peasant was presented with a wooden shield,
on which was painted a heart transfixed by a dart
—a device better suited to his taste and compre-
hension.”

“ T doubt it not. But, Da Vinci, never again
employ thy talents on the horrible. Depend upon
it, ere long, the Rotello will perish; while such a
work as that on which thou art engaged, in the
church of Santa Maria, will immortalise thy name.*
A mind like thine, with such a sense of the beau-
tiful and the graceful, should depict nought else.
But why dost thou lay down thy brush?”

‘“‘T am not satisfied with my work, your excel-
lency.”’

“Thou never art, man. That is one of thy
failings, Leonardo, that thou dost begin many
things, and finish few. How is this ?”

“IT know not, unless it be that I can seldom
realize my own conceptions, and therefore am dis-
satisfied.”

“ And yet thy industry is great. Thou wert
busily engaged in writing, a while ago. May I
ask what subject occupied thy pen?”

* In the subsequent troubles of Milan, the Rotello was de-
stroyed, as an object of horror.



THE DUKES OF MILAN. 93

“That of engineering, your excellency. I have
discovered a method of making bridges, extremely
light and portable, both for the pursuit of, and the
retreat from, an enemy; and others that shall be
very strong and fire-proof, easy to fix and to take
up again. I can also construct covered waggons,
which shall be proof against any force, and, entering
into the midst of the enemy, will break any number
of men, and make way for the infantry to follow
without hurt or impediment.”

“ Sayest thou so? why, what a myriad-minded
man thou art, Da Vinci! Let us see thy treatise:
ere long thy help may be needed in such matters.”

The valuable and numerous manuscripts of
Leonardo da Vinci are still preserved in Milan.
They are on various subjects, but particularly diffi-
cult to read or decipher, as the artist had a habit of
writing from right to left, instead of from left to
right. It is said that when they were shown to
Napoleon, on his visit to Milan in 1797, he carried
them and Petrarch’s “ Virgil ” to his hotel himself,
not allowing any one to touch them, exclaiming with
delight, ‘“‘' They are mine! they are mine!” King
James I., of England, made an offer of 10,0002.
for these manuscripts, but it was declined.



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describe
'38541' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASKQ' 'sip-files000c.jp2'
f415656c171b427baac3f8b1134f51dd
c3a5a5edf7c44fde788369e91a3ec356df0bfbf3
'2011-12-31T12:29:44-05:00'
describe
'25115' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASKR' 'sip-files000c.jpg'
23d991f6f4a60efdda37607812c9029f
330d8a542e68f8fde4a59486716ac39c303dff81
'2011-12-31T12:36:48-05:00'
describe
'1361' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASKS' 'sip-files000c.pro'
337a4e2108f172d7b6a1cdb5b8dbfc9c
f80d7604bba9d4ef8a1b3140037fbb7c79ac4197
'2011-12-31T12:33:38-05:00'
describe
'21332' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASKT' 'sip-files000c.QC.jpg'
deb46515adaa25213cdfd0aa27019c27
df9a3c700e54e19eca38259a8ac91652e09ad324
'2011-12-31T12:32:27-05:00'
describe
'8661304' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASKU' 'sip-files000c.tif'
0afeb6ff984519c2862ee34b8da0df3f
5fdd08a4084ea9f6253aa040512d7274aedc3f2f
'2011-12-31T12:28:59-05:00'
describe
'110' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASKV' 'sip-files000c.txt'
4a9b30f32a1b2d11fbe8f291e2eb27f1
813f874d654765eeac61b5644c0d3ba2f54802ca
'2011-12-31T12:37:25-05:00'
describe
'20205' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASKW' 'sip-files000cthm.jpg'
e6dba7181e786408ad9e9d06970cdd26
fc93233fa35f96882cf828ad2ef11678d91a2663
'2011-12-31T12:32:49-05:00'
describe
'252594' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASKX' 'sip-files000d.jp2'
870b4004bf7fe0bc30ac54e4c12fd2c2
1ad598169edebf19aaa11e0bd5bf56119113c9b7
'2011-12-31T12:37:07-05:00'
describe
'47792' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASKY' 'sip-files000d.jpg'
e1998c7ebe116f2cf29b1963136d06c3
692dc01fc3e91d2eafc2615d5f7c5b928cc1a94f
describe
'8686' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASKZ' 'sip-files000d.pro'
c1dd69ccc2e76f00aeccbfdba213d543
f9ec2efd7f6922333c64230a40dd59f1dcef5bb7
'2011-12-31T12:38:03-05:00'
describe
'32289' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLA' 'sip-files000d.QC.jpg'
87b050052ec0653b92ac30c4de83abe3
b8a5989555eabb31fb9c202dd869767cae411cd8
'2011-12-31T12:39:36-05:00'
describe
'8662932' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLB' 'sip-files000d.tif'
c8fcb05f063013a4e41655149fe77867
9b7fa5859360f2cc37335462ba029b8ff03eb0d2
'2011-12-31T12:26:44-05:00'
describe
'387' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLC' 'sip-files000d.txt'
98e23ceb201710fc1320723dde3a6492
c3cfcfd53d04af6b922c3ced39eec1fde07b2c7d
'2011-12-31T12:30:13-05:00'
describe
'24550' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLD' 'sip-files000dthm.jpg'
4e99c8416789e110f9e9698171d27f19
3e9b261f1f9e3234d834a41f1bc20fe2e5989a37
describe
'1080294' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLE' 'sip-files000e.jp2'
16977e5063cac2a4a9d09c53f40452a8
bb99038aac1ed513c600b5701fcdce1eb3c68d65
'2011-12-31T12:28:30-05:00'
describe
'132002' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLF' 'sip-files000e.jpg'
6aba9fd8cf580cd1011599dbe07e7b42
81765826d4a2da59bb85f33c196665b8460508c2
'2011-12-31T12:36:08-05:00'
describe
'55410' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLG' 'sip-files000e.QC.jpg'
71f7a998371fa1912af33204aaa19a48
b82e50a615c326da196d9aec72ccdc3ed19641da
describe
'8666396' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLH' 'sip-files000e.tif'
d6716691570aeaba4a60e70899be1a82
fd3039f300acb0f93c833876387b5497028e6fd3
'2011-12-31T12:39:29-05:00'
describe
'32139' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLI' 'sip-files000ethm.jpg'
d951041b5748ee36ad3e6950c8772795
086b1009b34356c6529038f219af5423ef27761e
'2011-12-31T12:38:10-05:00'
describe
'621057' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLJ' 'sip-files001.jp2'
fed8b3ac4ed2b16cf2337a1e6f089da0
44d5f2ffa0f430367bff1c627a01e797339eaf3a
'2011-12-31T12:36:38-05:00'
describe
'86701' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLK' 'sip-files001.jpg'
cf02e80898e385043e07d47405d828b5
83ba6a302e75f02e6265cac271d74172be148394
'2011-12-31T12:32:41-05:00'
describe
'16000' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLL' 'sip-files001.pro'
95977f24332c5f1d3256bc0a2de34167
9dbc3ca87b960972ffaabf77c5e709737858a42f
'2011-12-31T12:27:20-05:00'
describe
'45609' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLM' 'sip-files001.QC.jpg'
fb3531cab065fef35aa660d25d5d86d7
6965b4296a4f794c3ccc4da6db35838923f17ab8
'2011-12-31T12:26:50-05:00'
describe
'8664804' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLN' 'sip-files001.tif'
261d0e99b5872639831d198479ae1b56
73af566911ade1c9284e1e4a66f4906a8e635923
'2011-12-31T12:32:08-05:00'
describe
'659' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLO' 'sip-files001.txt'
137b3f3bf5369d5120c958f6508b24dd
761eb9c200872544dbda493f96d36091c8027ee5
'2011-12-31T12:33:25-05:00'
describe
'28411' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLP' 'sip-files001thm.jpg'
d356bff362ed73c65f3a0fd32026f9ed
1b49bf99e7605da8d9e3ffb17a0190e3324935fa
'2011-12-31T12:36:52-05:00'
describe
'1080272' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLQ' 'sip-files003.jp2'
4a37bf15fb73ddd31e56bcbea9b44af8
698f286254795036d1a1557a12716ad84aaaf510
'2011-12-31T12:29:08-05:00'
describe
'141643' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLR' 'sip-files003.jpg'
968cbb5d3816b74203fcf34ba5904fa3
0342caeef2b06a82b07eb583a6c58ce7352a5dc2
describe
'32635' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLS' 'sip-files003.pro'
a4d1da12c364c3316258ba4d5a8a6e54
2a2f843dcacfd3638b1d8bfc9e22258e0c52a977
'2011-12-31T12:31:16-05:00'
describe
'65923' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLT' 'sip-files003.QC.jpg'
6854b89cfc26c83f3647cfdb184cb3ad
b63e1a45817e5743319c963707f80a2e22de58bd
'2011-12-31T12:35:40-05:00'
describe
'8667044' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLU' 'sip-files003.tif'
1aa7352f10b9473ecfd470922693961b
9d9f80e4e9fd453c093bf624c7d0a9adc0d607ad
'2011-12-31T12:32:45-05:00'
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLV' 'sip-files003.txt'
55b3a528f1e4cbd696435f075a2e474d
42b2146d72cdfd81b210f5fb904b71be3d6d0bd6
'2011-12-31T12:33:16-05:00'
describe
'34538' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLW' 'sip-files003thm.jpg'
6c11129d19b1be6ae5326c0bd4e98aaa
56a859a8f6c82f4bcd48f4d9c41a4b1400e41748
'2011-12-31T12:35:38-05:00'
describe
'1080186' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLX' 'sip-files004.jp2'
632ee46066237a01fa4218e04a2220c9
90f607fa7fd74489973e1e107d5de090b20c2924
'2011-12-31T12:26:56-05:00'
describe
'139492' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLY' 'sip-files004.jpg'
665d7ce92aba85c481ef68218c540a68
45292844be3fe1f52e851b4e4876478d53f344b7
'2011-12-31T12:27:05-05:00'
describe
'32449' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASLZ' 'sip-files004.pro'
d05186adf20bd55e281692b379c803e3
c20641e60327b4752cdbc3a8455110bc695f5dac
'2011-12-31T12:30:43-05:00'
describe
'65269' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMA' 'sip-files004.QC.jpg'
53c78097aec0d904c0c6090e669c8629
533cfaa16cbf5e0a80c0ff7727d1f5f15e64dda5
'2011-12-31T12:31:29-05:00'
describe
'8667180' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMB' 'sip-files004.tif'
d526428b1902eb7a64c2c0f142967d96
4b7f26689ea66583ddd7be85f8ce9ea7bbe7a32e
'2011-12-31T12:26:30-05:00'
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMC' 'sip-files004.txt'
04ec63a838f1b3f7cfcb9ae4c217a859
688b786ea6bb9ba274b949e5167c704e0dda2ca4
'2011-12-31T12:35:17-05:00'
describe
'34756' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMD' 'sip-files004thm.jpg'
f0e93a36f7ddbae5d12c9c72181ce173
7567762e52e84e9bb15fe22667e48a3de1c4bd9f
'2011-12-31T12:39:45-05:00'
describe
'1015212' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASME' 'sip-files005.jp2'
272a97f1334b20b00043e53f4a903162
00bd989689780d9d1f64dab23c5bb2de2b994b8f
'2011-12-31T12:31:04-05:00'
describe
'126168' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMF' 'sip-files005.jpg'
f5cf19b873805b8c46e3398a7befddcc
964d400a2260b21e23e300501f03116aa2e8bfe7
'2011-12-31T12:35:19-05:00'
describe
'28554' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMG' 'sip-files005.pro'
aae13ae5777872d01938933e7cac8e60
23e3d16c5f69cc60e138d7a2832799728c33e2c0
'2011-12-31T12:28:11-05:00'
describe
'61264' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMH' 'sip-files005.QC.jpg'
b7abdec502724204042177c463927cf3
1862412617a6564b699a21533d9f0f6133cef2f1
'2011-12-31T12:29:17-05:00'
describe
'8666900' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMI' 'sip-files005.tif'
7e0557d17aeed6613de647d1cc4d2f8c
373336bbbbfe73ede481df82286e09ef601b3746
'2011-12-31T12:31:33-05:00'
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMJ' 'sip-files005.txt'
1279ac8fda04027f4391057ca3b83f8f
adea6eb5e65f76133ff6466fc83c6a5051adec49
'2011-12-31T12:37:34-05:00'
describe
'34197' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMK' 'sip-files005thm.jpg'
afae5179e526d054790a8f3c8c5f7a05
9e631cf79c76632f8d415874a395dad22fed2f04
'2011-12-31T12:26:52-05:00'
describe
'1080262' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASML' 'sip-files006.jp2'
8cb59ccc4052634f1fedb07c0b7d66a0
ceed5ca1c22f6c44c224c6f8c639eec886ee6018
'2011-12-31T12:37:05-05:00'
describe
'140983' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMM' 'sip-files006.jpg'
9eb88ffb82901f6799a4b48c07683200
2e02c7da3bc6a4444f6621907f03819dea76ebfc
'2011-12-31T12:30:11-05:00'
describe
'33067' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMN' 'sip-files006.pro'
38ed54b53fd885becf9710b471a3ba1a
d0f553610e7b2857a199c7c3f48f7fcfe9d91de3
'2011-12-31T12:31:46-05:00'
describe
'65994' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMO' 'sip-files006.QC.jpg'
dfca8174d07dcf4cc8c0e9d98a3646ba
c59ac97c9093de69c1f8371ef21d23d469a32430
'2011-12-31T12:31:07-05:00'
describe
'8667176' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMP' 'sip-files006.tif'
789f541cbac565d0fe03548b3e79f7d8
fcdbf1ac55802f24ca197596db1f03c1f5292091
'2011-12-31T12:31:39-05:00'
describe
'1272' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMQ' 'sip-files006.txt'
387d9a63016e3e4b740b7997801a30a9
316dc055bee147f08bad5a03ada2130b685304f2
'2011-12-31T12:34:52-05:00'
describe
'34717' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMR' 'sip-files006thm.jpg'
a780fc5a8b039b95352b32dba68d4600
9f1e9a53baf92712dca140bb48ab6c755b2fc3fe
'2011-12-31T12:26:40-05:00'
describe
'994747' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMS' 'sip-files007.jp2'
7c7e8ea5d415775219e55e3e5047abb5
b400368690827c6844fbaa54fc302b5f258691aa
'2011-12-31T12:33:05-05:00'
describe
'124035' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMT' 'sip-files007.jpg'
5c148dbd4177536213e93636ef527659
fafecb97fedf3678d77765064bfb1cc4e6e4074c
'2011-12-31T12:32:25-05:00'
describe
'27530' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMU' 'sip-files007.pro'
24809185efec24ea435ab14d3b5afe2a
507c0175f7a5f14296d93bc51ea8c3fdc7f79cab
'2011-12-31T12:27:46-05:00'
describe
'60844' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMV' 'sip-files007.QC.jpg'
c78bddf8c84ee0edbebc256ec1142881
7b7e75abc8d4e6507fdbeb7b3794416aee2f2af4
'2011-12-31T12:27:24-05:00'
describe
'8666660' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMW' 'sip-files007.tif'
d1dca034e9475360b8ccf0d841473186
5e75024d7ddaa45c3c73f4eaf7adc48e6e2be834
'2011-12-31T12:39:40-05:00'
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMX' 'sip-files007.txt'
0fdec6dcfaade8a50a39135a3d04631c
abb686d58a25e00456f77f576c65c1d3b472d130
'2011-12-31T12:34:33-05:00'
describe
'33779' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMY' 'sip-files007thm.jpg'
75dd6dfaf162a82df0de67159ac9e522
1006cf05c5707df96d854973a5d5f0f86ebefb9a
'2011-12-31T12:35:37-05:00'
describe
'1080266' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASMZ' 'sip-files008.jp2'
52b3061c76cf212a2838e45eb5484152
d38e2d2e6d398ae7ee7ddaa093a4f4894e37ff61
'2011-12-31T12:30:56-05:00'
describe
'146008' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNA' 'sip-files008.jpg'
e7d5620913ac2dbda7a04e0982fb3017
ec89973904d275d4082ce29312866104964ca2b0
'2011-12-31T12:35:28-05:00'
describe
'33422' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNB' 'sip-files008.pro'
203817609f97c44601761fd1679e3c9f
a786bf9e801c98c76f49b048722e31a6f77fec30
'2011-12-31T12:35:32-05:00'
describe
'68120' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNC' 'sip-files008.QC.jpg'
9a6647496ad91c7a879970cf3e644029
168aa4547cb1964be1a507b3e880fe03532681a5
'2011-12-31T12:28:58-05:00'
describe
'8667368' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASND' 'sip-files008.tif'
68166e75aaa96350fa2dd14a9f2b627b
ca40a1b0b7eadc08739afbc17ad4fcc928d0adaf
'2011-12-31T12:33:21-05:00'
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNE' 'sip-files008.txt'
eb047ff9b94ba9fcd6c7ee65ce1ae2db
a71c8987a44851b2a8d883165ae51d5a1146a65f
'2011-12-31T12:36:30-05:00'
describe
'1080282' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNF' 'sip-files009.jp2'
f2ca1733840591bee0cbef038aecdc8f
f1bbe559dfce9cc5b012774385b6ab11abcd80f4
'2011-12-31T12:39:43-05:00'
describe
'35167' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNG' 'sip-files008thm.jpg'
e0dfc289a30d3ee4d2ea2abdca57e8e6
e2915eec476968725cb29dc80834e6115ec6342f
'2011-12-31T12:34:28-05:00'
describe
'135993' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNH' 'sip-files009.jpg'
ae1761e1403b8e20d863dbc9a7ab79e5
7bab3a5aa840a6c9df8b5ec68c47bc9f7fab40e1
'2011-12-31T12:36:42-05:00'
describe
'30642' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNI' 'sip-files009.pro'
51d8632fa5dace9adbc84086cabc43d2
eb19766fd85b38a2b550dd40fa40710a6e346e08
'2011-12-31T12:31:22-05:00'
describe
'64330' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNJ' 'sip-files009.QC.jpg'
ea0093503440594c09778e12251b2a4e
7c17f2aa02df65e836d7432c3259ec98aa2e5ceb
'2011-12-31T12:34:53-05:00'
describe
'8666988' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNK' 'sip-files009.tif'
79a0849a298a8fa7b0b1999807a81f44
c3133ba0a73e20c09a1044bbf4e02c01b9f5dac8
'2011-12-31T12:35:54-05:00'
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNL' 'sip-files009.txt'
3b73150f1795d8fe2e3d11784fdb368f
7f7f3b62ae20951ab0d3b998b9fed47a09f6bc91
'2011-12-31T12:29:18-05:00'
describe
'34473' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNM' 'sip-files009thm.jpg'
8ad5062734397768f466c151e38fc006
54cefa1b0705d6cc80a7ae2eabd220c81a2475d2
'2011-12-31T12:38:41-05:00'
describe
'1074706' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNN' 'sip-files010.jp2'
6b4c814e19b06970c075f1f0f22a4d69
725aca4979aa5564b29bbd57a136ab736f82530e
'2011-12-31T12:27:14-05:00'
describe
'131897' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNO' 'sip-files010.jpg'
990bc271814b8ef93cd334453a68fc46
f91dcb356ff494c8d209da6492f2e115517c31e0
'2011-12-31T12:38:42-05:00'
describe
'29588' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNP' 'sip-files010.pro'
62c19e3e7a9cf88b34d142f568371ab5
6679546c0bbae8e8827702c2418572e60fabacf1
'2011-12-31T12:38:31-05:00'
describe
'62585' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNQ' 'sip-files010.QC.jpg'
4f9550b2f84c1aff7f1f56b4aa951c96
98e9b7f2be12daa0f88326ea26e262f9d53e4c34
'2011-12-31T12:28:40-05:00'
describe
'8667060' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNR' 'sip-files010.tif'
d34110b42adf192c0490e5d70822a306
6d2614d1475747dbdcba39aaebc13ceba4f0e068
'2011-12-31T12:30:20-05:00'
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNS' 'sip-files010.txt'
5962d794dea299c1f0a1b8e3cfc32d67
34b0b3cd97454ba68bbe4e9d597db59b1af326e7
'2011-12-31T12:32:56-05:00'
describe
'34353' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNT' 'sip-files010thm.jpg'
920be79968b53dad89a474ffd8eabe80
82b75066f5582923a4995ac745da49d0e3178cb3
'2011-12-31T12:29:35-05:00'
describe
'1052640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNU' 'sip-files011.jp2'
5f85e31a99ea402e8487839369dab2a1
ae57b1c86421a468551cef5a339958c89058427e
'2011-12-31T12:38:24-05:00'
describe
'129442' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNV' 'sip-files011.jpg'
989a7e6df213734ff11f5c6190c7fa67
d3728e7f220368a8a13d2179b0477351461e405c
'2011-12-31T12:31:24-05:00'
describe
'29681' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNW' 'sip-files011.pro'
4f8a6ce19c5642d0ed329c6d1382a560
f1917a22c188f59277fad816640b943760ea30e2
'2011-12-31T12:31:32-05:00'
describe
'62227' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNX' 'sip-files011.QC.jpg'
19747d75d15e82771a839ac9aa3b2fbd
5f26d54d6755b9b25868d131d5abab1901f3d8b6
'2011-12-31T12:38:55-05:00'
describe
'8666868' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNY' 'sip-files011.tif'
db2e2522b918086d5367b58d41d8c086
4c3928eb7c20cb5ecc8aa83b97529bb12dc80e0b
'2011-12-31T12:32:02-05:00'
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASNZ' 'sip-files011.txt'
081614e801d2a0ba3af7125b4340e2bd
8cb85d95f26a1bca10b492ca3600f56729d432be
'2011-12-31T12:27:53-05:00'
describe
'33991' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOA' 'sip-files011thm.jpg'
c1fe7cbff204f7bd2266a0d69b8ebc1e
0dc94400256918e4e7925c81bee65fa48872d0c7
'2011-12-31T12:36:22-05:00'
describe
'1080273' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOB' 'sip-files012.jp2'
45ee97b61669f76cedaa6a6ea9878f7c
b965a1a7039cefe03cf8a071c6a8e5fb036d1bf9
'2011-12-31T12:37:04-05:00'
describe
'134169' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOC' 'sip-files012.jpg'
2860cbd0883a2be7c5ce7d3659280299
dbdd63d3270d6507e003b884a11cde30dda9d6a8
'2011-12-31T12:27:08-05:00'
describe
'30115' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOD' 'sip-files012.pro'
daa6d3d7a76dd758e4adf6236a1b8464
891927ee5af420fc48bc3eba527fdd916c3ef095
'2011-12-31T12:38:30-05:00'
describe
'64249' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOE' 'sip-files012.QC.jpg'
a7e0134d474e5818fb1d719a3165790f
7cdf32c580dcf36529fba45fda92f50e6f900349
'2011-12-31T12:28:25-05:00'
describe
'8667100' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOF' 'sip-files012.tif'
930705d68e6732cf3d05d82eabf158a6
608b3d671ec6b01db15324c63245d94948c12ce7
'2011-12-31T12:35:46-05:00'
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOG' 'sip-files012.txt'
22b9480d358c440a4d08b66c1b8cc2cf
b44e756c9f69a11c7032cb9a8b5ebab62526550a
'2011-12-31T12:28:53-05:00'
describe
'34773' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOH' 'sip-files012thm.jpg'
17d7d999c27f7a079502330d356cd9c7
84d5f964446c9ee7de8797117e99449985bc539c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOI' 'sip-files013.jp2'
c265d490fc6aed8da1d981eff7dc1870
c850bdef046dd00322eae7c4f3be83e9f659dcae
'2011-12-31T12:33:48-05:00'
describe
'142657' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOJ' 'sip-files013.jpg'
eccc70725529f039e816522d671183cb
d30db667856c55e9292cabf086f8788cc907f330
'2011-12-31T12:28:20-05:00'
describe
'32802' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOK' 'sip-files013.pro'
e0c34d47aa8ce8d901bab77ed1e392da
d83cc1368bbe8b9df3b66151b68ef0430c3f9745
'2011-12-31T12:34:42-05:00'
describe
'66475' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOL' 'sip-files013.QC.jpg'
c2780f9ec0564598afad901ee655d6fa
0bd3bdff8ac32115238ee0cc07c4b5df9920e3f2
'2011-12-31T12:30:06-05:00'
describe
'8667168' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOM' 'sip-files013.tif'
b72910e42147dbcf4ba90871452fbbad
994721ccd066282d038944b890d7af917a3f63b3
'2011-12-31T12:27:43-05:00'
describe
'1267' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASON' 'sip-files013.txt'
e53923d362f2551d43e23027daba1704
f2ff72ab109fdee64b5d1a84b1479bd43d64bf6e
'2011-12-31T12:31:15-05:00'
describe
'34726' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOO' 'sip-files013thm.jpg'
f52be61ad90612f3c5e8f7f9280304e6
0d88f664e2fccc07a13775b1235fa1d35e15655b
'2011-12-31T12:26:32-05:00'
describe
'1029426' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOP' 'sip-files014.jp2'
eb881ddca991307c442125613611522d
521be0cc600c1881ad2973275d84e5abd30f13bb
'2011-12-31T12:28:42-05:00'
describe
'127746' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOQ' 'sip-files014.jpg'
eee853e17708dfc9436d08213fbd2d95
bfa787f7e8af8d1df4bceddf28ba038d27ba3d7d
'2011-12-31T12:31:25-05:00'
describe
'28806' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOR' 'sip-files014.pro'
7604e50a4ab1946e81ab6254bb714aba
243833edf2750483e09b24173134b85208edf698
'2011-12-31T12:33:58-05:00'
describe
'61585' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOS' 'sip-files014.QC.jpg'
275668775b6c1c355d605b336f035229
866e106d6b6e25b1fdeb28c8f7ef93c4207e53fb
'2011-12-31T12:29:41-05:00'
describe
'8666940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOT' 'sip-files014.tif'
e0b9bb10f98b29a2da857f9a17060d6b
72b639e1e71a4a89695fa2ea5cd9791cc684e0ca
'2011-12-31T12:29:45-05:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOU' 'sip-files014.txt'
9658bfe6686a6e59f438e7127d13c7f4
0756033ef1bb70e3c94c3148c81ab2bd156a5ae6
'2011-12-31T12:30:36-05:00'
describe
'34326' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOV' 'sip-files014thm.jpg'
e64baaafc1d4f968d6c9dc7640dc3f43
01953272fe71c6f07a4810624c666e36fdcd215f
'2011-12-31T12:39:18-05:00'
describe
'1045112' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOW' 'sip-files015.jp2'
872cdd745fb361e83b9e512b562da372
cd0b94f4a6a86a149a75705db47ae6bb9bba38f5
'2011-12-31T12:33:07-05:00'
describe
'129110' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOX' 'sip-files015.jpg'
aad3c23d30229dbfbe1effb023f0db6c
89bad057afdef92e4d71c16aa99770e61dac0fe5
'2011-12-31T12:35:35-05:00'
describe
'28944' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOY' 'sip-files015.pro'
c03f5911d4637592c43b5cb894ca1543
c976ac8377d3712f517ad064344fc7f26faa1227
'2011-12-31T12:26:47-05:00'
describe
'61827' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASOZ' 'sip-files015.QC.jpg'
af11baea9276741f41267ecd3a55847e
44bb698ccca47d282cd24e028a0fdce47ebdc765
'2011-12-31T12:32:13-05:00'
describe
'8667036' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPA' 'sip-files015.tif'
ec157301eb9fe8da8c6d06aef71e6e16
622e2b0cc8b5a889aa00f3412c98211a9970dcfb
'2011-12-31T12:36:27-05:00'
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPB' 'sip-files015.txt'
6727bb20270a396fbd5445460761bfb6
9c7b46f500ef58a69f604260690df495a5841abb
'2011-12-31T12:36:49-05:00'
describe
'34040' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPC' 'sip-files015thm.jpg'
9ebdd782c748d6cad9bd7aaee9322a13
a7eeb26f183ece852b23013361402d804a2ecb78
'2011-12-31T12:39:46-05:00'
describe
'844246' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPD' 'sip-files016.jp2'
854978dcc5bd977547f4ea3cabeb19c0
266862a8c69dfd93744d002fe975592cbc91e758
'2011-12-31T12:34:47-05:00'
describe
'107706' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPE' 'sip-files016.jpg'
af86dd3a2666104109cfed9f398ea961
54875ab6032b0ec5f183e0abe1e55fda5ffdd34a
'2011-12-31T12:36:12-05:00'
describe
'22730' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPF' 'sip-files016.pro'
2879a043062ba5e2653da30682c2fc44
4347088ed93639f5720c2cb62d6efd95cb974f2a
'2011-12-31T12:26:33-05:00'
describe
'55627' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPG' 'sip-files016.QC.jpg'
bc4c0c481d3e133c7babe95a3abfa5a3
8ca1a30d4fa7ed0f50c77b11f62e4d48703b51d3
'2011-12-31T12:27:10-05:00'
describe
'8666212' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPH' 'sip-files016.tif'
25c8244fedf4ea2d06cb676657a871f4
301a6050f373b94cac20ff66e0b273a8de9a62c4
'2011-12-31T12:27:28-05:00'
describe
'926' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPI' 'sip-files016.txt'
8acae5a3f9bfecb6ea60f220d52c63a7
2f8b518665fe4a54286ae11a47c38bd8f147dfba
describe
'32804' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPJ' 'sip-files016thm.jpg'
2cf0abc8a40b3b6989c14e60958ffa5a
ca74f75d567937f18698b8b136c0f2d706c3a4c9
describe
'1052535' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPK' 'sip-files017.jp2'
87c32d7b455b807dc6e6855e702061db
506d382a6103617d900dbd6548dbc022dad0c59f
'2011-12-31T12:35:00-05:00'
describe
'130367' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPL' 'sip-files017.jpg'
d704ae230c2f7144d5ffbf0dd7b9ef17
3a585ee86d95fa8b97cb59469279bd398a3b795c
'2011-12-31T12:33:59-05:00'
describe
'29424' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPM' 'sip-files017.pro'
bfa00b5cdb358b4ffe67b939a6e6ec44
64a903e29ab432a19cdb0be9a844544c9bb5a13f
'2011-12-31T12:28:22-05:00'
describe
'62610' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPN' 'sip-files017.QC.jpg'
169fa92243422db0d7c42032a9d4e38e
c1123c3f6562004a7b2a256b90e87f1d94399540
describe
'8666740' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPO' 'sip-files017.tif'
7d61c7e19522b1016f0c37c50bbe94d1
a011d5de9c6a0f2346736e13e0201747e8428422
'2011-12-31T12:32:15-05:00'
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPP' 'sip-files017.txt'
60a105c05ac8eb9c7a60f2d98031a55d
17c2ee98070477045d761b621505bde953a405fb
'2011-12-31T12:26:43-05:00'
describe
'33821' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPQ' 'sip-files017thm.jpg'
28f66b2f5ab3bade9336625b9c829f14
0fb61ee84bf5e13e196dd5f163bb04d583992acb
'2011-12-31T12:33:44-05:00'
describe
'1080289' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPR' 'sip-files018.jp2'
d122004bedfe842b76e807cac121feab
f49f921960bc537a2c3422647a9c3ea5618d0779
'2011-12-31T12:31:56-05:00'
describe
'145757' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPS' 'sip-files018.jpg'
cdd3f6bb6095e5bb73a89758c2d2620e
ee510bcf2d8bb036af3ff306a4f45297ef49c8f5
'2011-12-31T12:30:27-05:00'
describe
'33746' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPT' 'sip-files018.pro'
746297f6f03e712ebc925e059af726d8
a297b87b97bdae2ee08e8df6199c309b17dc4299
'2011-12-31T12:35:24-05:00'
describe
'67816' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPU' 'sip-files018.QC.jpg'
4807c0c9e361421f70bac8be4665d813
f11da9797c285100401573d1219924d03cc844a3
'2011-12-31T12:36:33-05:00'
describe
'8667488' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPV' 'sip-files018.tif'
73e6724819f01fad2e9e0d8311c678b3
1f262e3f325e1f342f8220e81727527e05235866
'2011-12-31T12:32:24-05:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPW' 'sip-files018.txt'
c24130a10905fc0d2604ac6b7ea2b04b
24fa8b61a81c683865e9bfd2f788e1c3045005bb
'2011-12-31T12:29:46-05:00'
describe
'35460' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPX' 'sip-files018thm.jpg'
c01fd99f73622494667800208e712b42
be69eef987fe954f52c30a398bf584e6a9f4957c
'2011-12-31T12:28:52-05:00'
describe
'1080243' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPY' 'sip-files019.jp2'
e2ce8a3e514ca80bbf7e121e285cb593
504728e98f707e15ba66789ec868a27ca3ca4d30
'2011-12-31T12:33:10-05:00'
describe
'136043' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASPZ' 'sip-files019.jpg'
9a37cbfa2a6fb3ec35ea04d5b50dc9d9
544ab7c772803855c39b33371c254ad0d73b57d6
describe
'31355' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQA' 'sip-files019.pro'
37b814d34bba10b9b6f317e87b3a4873
d64592cde220c3092db5260c85bc2c132e5f7071
'2011-12-31T12:30:52-05:00'
describe
'64975' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQB' 'sip-files019.QC.jpg'
b4a53eee343e474e951d6bf15ff6c7ed
3a8a5351c2fe3dcb96091fb7f9b8c6a9d02f4c80
'2011-12-31T12:26:42-05:00'
describe
'8667296' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQC' 'sip-files019.tif'
0497ce28893249db547a33111f0291c8
d53ad543c4cd813b572439cbd18a5959b381e74c
'2011-12-31T12:32:21-05:00'
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQD' 'sip-files019.txt'
945e7e9f0dc9e4732927fc16bbd748f3
b660c0b4e0940c9a4e37ad85b7602686d3ae9302
'2011-12-31T12:39:34-05:00'
describe
'34834' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQE' 'sip-files019thm.jpg'
027f09558315690183594bfbb8a0abff
e895e27269cb94ca49c7cff936c7aaaa99912db6
'2011-12-31T12:29:36-05:00'
describe
'1070003' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQF' 'sip-files02.jp2'
86d77603a8dd3801a66fe94c24d1ef38
a2aab0300012080267e6931fa3d72d1881667eeb
'2011-12-31T12:37:27-05:00'
describe
'131351' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQG' 'sip-files02.jpg'
2a357b952f77d53ebdd7e0d707509171
48a5f7c6848792ec3ce41a41904a05c37d5d0dab
'2011-12-31T12:38:48-05:00'
describe
'32280' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQH' 'sip-files02.pro'
6d934557bce0872d63692236ddcbdb02
cbcfc6bd86b778622d3ebc060b7f86230107b181
describe
'61723' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQI' 'sip-files02.QC.jpg'
19c86b810b9072557bc9988bc721145c
a2467dddef899679bb96f92b15332be365178543
'2011-12-31T12:29:11-05:00'
describe
'8666780' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQJ' 'sip-files02.tif'
e866a4c9f7d5104ffeec5cc3228e1573
78a0ad271c890df6737a58eeed4cee42cf013931
'2011-12-31T12:30:58-05:00'
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQK' 'sip-files02.txt'
133174973d13d30604267ba01f0a6bc3
dd4029d2996ef668e97ac6c76b8c9ba4ced08aa4
'2011-12-31T12:32:44-05:00'
describe
'1080260' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQL' 'sip-files020.jp2'
2723d7de4089e741fdacbdb2a975f522
976024f41b5e35f72de39dd3b5c7db134687ae24
'2011-12-31T12:37:56-05:00'
describe
'135114' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQM' 'sip-files020.jpg'
41f8c89410c2ce049412041787ac675d
2be1999178e790dd09b93a48705d161944457ec6
'2011-12-31T12:34:56-05:00'
describe
'31519' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQN' 'sip-files020.pro'
0f6c9aaa71d78c320b7ed6a4f87dddde
eaf739a5dbbd6b5a1524d63a57cde444e2e68e23
'2011-12-31T12:36:43-05:00'
describe
'63022' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQO' 'sip-files020.QC.jpg'
f20036ceddafc1294f682c3d4c5e10d4
180d2a52c19d0575c3d318b58461e574181f7581
'2011-12-31T12:27:38-05:00'
describe
'8666488' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQP' 'sip-files020.tif'
1b9929fe16ce386a7149f2a783cebc1f
3129b4b5ddd92da4339c173184c6a7a2a7120152
'2011-12-31T12:35:41-05:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQQ' 'sip-files020.txt'
4733d72fb429dcb3b82ce945cc72d6a8
fc73ab32aa83a6b86656d511f65fa949d4b775f4
'2011-12-31T12:33:27-05:00'
describe
'33461' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQR' 'sip-files020thm.jpg'
cd89649c49fe571c42ce5f5766c462d6
fe9731b538a4ef04a41d0177680837a40e6d41a2
'2011-12-31T12:28:31-05:00'
describe
'1080291' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQS' 'sip-files021.jp2'
ed0461de87a87161ba433e1fbabf3416
38c132246dd06e0d43f145fce27778473ec6be76
'2011-12-31T12:39:07-05:00'
describe
'142024' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQT' 'sip-files021.jpg'
3154a882447f87f2ba3e403494ec9e88
cd2b4fe8a1c50a59cf3d26ecda7d4d923285f04f
'2011-12-31T12:33:43-05:00'
describe
'33704' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQU' 'sip-files021.pro'
9b8d5882423559f29854b2b8f91060b2
3bfed091c9e9c31fc2d1aa6b532940c6fce6e261
'2011-12-31T12:34:24-05:00'
describe
'65490' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQV' 'sip-files021.QC.jpg'
0fcb787bb1d654d774b853cba9e36ff0
e0e95bdc237b7b047852f1b4fb79bcfcf1833fac
'2011-12-31T12:33:11-05:00'
describe
'8666872' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQW' 'sip-files021.tif'
c23426c81a2427deaa85a02c6d5ff8f0
f9b5394311af96be68e901ef5b53c78fda18ced8
'2011-12-31T12:35:18-05:00'
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQX' 'sip-files021.txt'
07b634c512f03a93b0fd4f8cb5b69ad8
4d99bf0dbe439e727a35d439145126beb49ac8f3
'2011-12-31T12:35:51-05:00'
describe
'34191' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQY' 'sip-files021thm.jpg'
fd013e07dab2d281c59dfbbb66d9a975
ac0f55d7fc6e0e32bbfd3aab841cabb3046536f1
'2011-12-31T12:32:36-05:00'
describe
'850405' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASQZ' 'sip-files022.jp2'
e1acd115366d1644a1e58394446b57bd
6409830222ef7d64b11ea2907a6c1abe7d4d2096
'2011-12-31T12:28:06-05:00'
describe
'109417' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRA' 'sip-files022.jpg'
60e38211af4a30337211f01d392d6cd9
361d484c46ef6871d35c44f5b4b918cb1e114fa4
'2011-12-31T12:30:08-05:00'
describe
'27302' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRB' 'sip-files022.pro'
79d4fef3ca8c66b721a2660e919fb3b3
7d370bec6316a7096b416788ce92e2cfe3ea3cce
'2011-12-31T12:32:28-05:00'
describe
'53497' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRC' 'sip-files022.QC.jpg'
7318daf1fe1b4ea2c4f1045f63af99a9
52a704bbd3640a9599708410762894fa6dc02140
'2011-12-31T12:27:25-05:00'
describe
'8665892' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRD' 'sip-files022.tif'
c58acd597e5e162def4a6b009c7f7404
c089dbf58e4793fe935b0ef9a35c6b553bd1bd5b
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRE' 'sip-files022.txt'
ce35e6c1509ac01f9f2454516087a469
84455f8135320762eda68f80fb3ec857aee34799
describe
'31314' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRF' 'sip-files022thm.jpg'
d4f8b5b1c09b92b12319f2525dc50d39
f9d47509df6465b3f3e981e6dfbd5b12f98bce19
'2011-12-31T12:33:00-05:00'
describe
'1021020' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRG' 'sip-files023.jp2'
064e78c28518be8b244d019ee27169ba
4a6cd77fed07abf4c32a26fb1c981eaae84352e5
'2011-12-31T12:34:20-05:00'
describe
'127059' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRH' 'sip-files023.jpg'
3f76f5e8b5cc9945ad84ba975f315a81
4abd33d3e41b86308d3e37c72c3f6b9fa81ce4d6
'2011-12-31T12:31:59-05:00'
describe
'30213' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRI' 'sip-files023.pro'
0f9ad0f752980fb70ebee10d227b504a
e000773eadbce05c50c208fc4b6957059154e65a
'2011-12-31T12:38:12-05:00'
describe
'60762' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRJ' 'sip-files023.QC.jpg'
35a65b6af2d574adb7aec11a55e512c8
a5d8d5a6d796b15b8d24d52e9efcbb191aad3c19
describe
'8666756' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRK' 'sip-files023.tif'
e764f7931775e0f66faf81fb8930f447
4fa21ca7af3fb1d4b3f9c47026c58bd2cac9a529
'2011-12-31T12:35:16-05:00'
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRL' 'sip-files023.txt'
da54a704fd2902af163fa75a35c60150
68b296559f744ed2f26524b57be17aff9f81f5cd
'2011-12-31T12:29:51-05:00'
describe
'33489' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRM' 'sip-files023thm.jpg'
e980c6dbeca5169da034dd74df667b09
9422a6cc973f6b9077566bc33fb852656d3d8787
'2011-12-31T12:34:08-05:00'
describe
'1080275' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRN' 'sip-files024.jp2'
ca9d25b1be30e1554e98088efde0a938
9cc3bb6298ab99d1dbe629b9bca5ebb38ad1fe43
describe
'145709' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRO' 'sip-files024.jpg'
81a8cb6ed81b13ea6e2f5abc25615f8f
01a40eab5930baf075b39b2e0d1064db1c2dab17
'2011-12-31T12:26:39-05:00'
describe
'33761' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRP' 'sip-files024.pro'
4b3810326d380db5070451daa20efbde
e7cab2d7772f8cd915ceff4c1f278637cc792571
describe
'66889' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRQ' 'sip-files024.QC.jpg'
0744796ac00b68aa40f2580e66d94079
c43fc53a0db1c12744354b093e10c26929385e73
'2011-12-31T12:28:38-05:00'
describe
'8667292' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRR' 'sip-files024.tif'
b46c5a104cd85441818eac10bf381909
b69b3feedb6457b5fc4ddac111f466502276bdc3
'2011-12-31T12:29:32-05:00'
describe
'1302' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRS' 'sip-files024.txt'
2f200d26fe700600f15039b40ff65d7f
3ff683300cae5950e7a1a9a6a1e87306e80766bb
'2011-12-31T12:29:16-05:00'
describe
'34870' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRT' 'sip-files024thm.jpg'
88b3707b9ccd7d3b3b9afe69727a17c3
e562952d25a084fb07f301e373161fbdf985849b
'2011-12-31T12:38:08-05:00'
describe
'1080292' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRU' 'sip-files025.jp2'
e4ad3719625857a6a72e3e2d3b4d2b60
93a72b7ef9c70b41546adef16d296345a8e5ee32
'2011-12-31T12:30:41-05:00'
describe
'135440' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRV' 'sip-files025.jpg'
32dadd217bfbcd1a42b8ce2ed7077ceb
b2958f28e5f02efca9d5f508b69d07b83f3ea2d7
'2011-12-31T12:29:43-05:00'
describe
'31130' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRW' 'sip-files025.pro'
c47869b90b616103c11b04aada8ca03b
959d024a077a2e1ba7da3e3035c21308bd61e1a5
'2011-12-31T12:35:34-05:00'
describe
'63883' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRX' 'sip-files025.QC.jpg'
c16be0a7c0f8f967e2b6efaea1e67920
90c1878f3f80241e382ab08ccaea7b4e9c05cea7
'2011-12-31T12:38:13-05:00'
describe
'8667092' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRY' 'sip-files025.tif'
b6892814f8b5d69a89a6db74d0dd1a35
830e677991719bee72dd17665ba05c0205ae9a28
'2011-12-31T12:28:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASRZ' 'sip-files025.txt'
dd85ed2637522e3f97cc35dddeeae9cd
2b7b98f990557fd11bf94b80a5ca119fe0d9961e
'2011-12-31T12:34:29-05:00'
describe
'34483' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSA' 'sip-files025thm.jpg'
bc21fa1a52034619c4606be9468939d6
3e58aab429b815ef3c479884b7a434115047727c
describe
'1053025' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSB' 'sip-files026.jp2'
a15882bedf446fd5480e6cb1f91ea536
56f8a31e61035fabf890a4682873b9d955215809
'2011-12-31T12:36:00-05:00'
describe
'129974' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSC' 'sip-files026.jpg'
2e8cd3f4637d73981082debd14f86def
c569fbe7e60357bcc617940b4b4d016ca016bfa7
'2011-12-31T12:34:18-05:00'
describe
'29121' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSD' 'sip-files026.pro'
e605b2f3e1d434274aa7e008dc551ec3
01229fa9b61779a4b00faf6bb9afb5b0d19e4334
'2011-12-31T12:26:55-05:00'
describe
'63550' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSE' 'sip-files026.QC.jpg'
cbe345c055e8712a647dea9f5815bbab
59ddaff18767781bf059cb53adb6195f90dda235
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSF' 'sip-files026.tif'
be424b92467fa5acf7f54ae3706c0864
dba09bcb6c71639e58b20f6f9668a4bb36e5ba1d
'2011-12-31T12:38:06-05:00'
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSG' 'sip-files026.txt'
67aa32822feaa90b430f2c5d68f96744
2d1181c40c0b494bf68e35a28f50d86a25980dce
'2011-12-31T12:31:03-05:00'
describe
'34960' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSH' 'sip-files026thm.jpg'
2a0e82103763c796e3670e0ea8651b78
0c0eafe775cfe355689f78ce6592f216e8a09299
'2011-12-31T12:26:45-05:00'
describe
'1080231' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSI' 'sip-files027.jp2'
78c67cd099c3d2d89adb55a83ad6edde
ad5a1244a0d9d800e5371dbbd0aef95ec3113bd4
describe
'137224' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSJ' 'sip-files027.jpg'
6bc51e0e9a79dba7205b3accbed7f13b
c72e79a8b9ede1ab6297f2292cc800e52bfa6921
'2011-12-31T12:29:23-05:00'
describe
'30984' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSK' 'sip-files027.pro'
282e7ce1ac07c4a19ad16e0934a747f9
7c9ed3dc1128c7e491d0dcac23055ec6235d63da
'2011-12-31T12:37:06-05:00'
describe
'65182' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSL' 'sip-files027.QC.jpg'
a3d8a74cc691336720eb005b285faa26
a43eba86732f818ea2d25336863b40ad08bf211c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSM' 'sip-files027.tif'
685474a1c7f8fd1b4bf462fceecc2c78
d1dda184477c80df688c031e82447ae83c80243b
'2011-12-31T12:26:57-05:00'
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSN' 'sip-files027.txt'
1227d8ca6af329385e6a4a45847165d0
8efb74c416e372157706813ca0283c08c16cb4a0
'2011-12-31T12:39:44-05:00'
describe
'34830' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSO' 'sip-files027thm.jpg'
3ab6b0f11ca2684ce6555b80a0d71209
af6cbb87936ea5febfd359a202cc970dd82abb69
'2011-12-31T12:37:33-05:00'
describe
'1080298' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSP' 'sip-files028.jp2'
6c6c403952c472cc7f54538d42f6ced2
fd52ee092073b254e451344d68e649bb40b0200f
'2011-12-31T12:39:26-05:00'
describe
'143832' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSQ' 'sip-files028.jpg'
bc1eaba72aaf182a6674ef292909c38b
c8c5d1fa23a2c0fd98bed8a0bd41bbb409c58928
'2011-12-31T12:30:24-05:00'
describe
'32728' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSR' 'sip-files028.pro'
181df2ff5741f7a0dead9165b6ad5855
da43c21779417b664a8086d6153860493038f2c4
'2011-12-31T12:39:01-05:00'
describe
'66897' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSS' 'sip-files028.QC.jpg'
0145cb654e7a5f0fefb59d54e8597ba3
2266ffd2d150a8b87616a6806432374dcc0d0eee
'2011-12-31T12:38:20-05:00'
describe
'8667284' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASST' 'sip-files028.tif'
16c530beda95dd3961eaa0c93cf49840
b697ef6786d83dca82980ac13036e9e771fac86f
'2011-12-31T12:39:38-05:00'
describe
'1264' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSU' 'sip-files028.txt'
d3946a01b76a015f602c18d5dfe01bb8
f0922f31232fb27c5e52187a63ac653c35662522
'2011-12-31T12:39:04-05:00'
describe
'35109' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSV' 'sip-files028thm.jpg'
78547990094991e35aec8b674e4f8204
a4afd8a0b382c17803589a54ad1bd196d1cd4115
'2011-12-31T12:34:09-05:00'
describe
'1080295' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSW' 'sip-files029.jp2'
44ac611c12db5dddb163c73eba8200f7
211510c399d16e8be0396cf3dec3b0d90cde2770
describe
'140760' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSX' 'sip-files029.jpg'
7d92f4104e73384ce990d7eee07c2d20
9aa39b46d30591653dd3973ab51b6214b48df68e
'2011-12-31T12:31:14-05:00'
describe
'32039' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSY' 'sip-files029.pro'
8d87e26a2669e304cd91016deedcdad3
ef15865382719cd090b2b1c713d5170f37220c13
describe
'66393' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASSZ' 'sip-files029.QC.jpg'
4d1442b67dbf833e7f7be9337db18752
6281caee082dd981162dc3282cc58de325609b3e
'2011-12-31T12:30:00-05:00'
describe
'8667352' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTA' 'sip-files029.tif'
3e7efa0efd91f76872e6cc3e389dc3a8
868f30144e6e0dc801869006832c2c6b9c4ba53e
'2011-12-31T12:30:16-05:00'
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTB' 'sip-files029.txt'
142d9f897e9e7a8cc7ef4f9226887cd7
fed6ed14aeaaf8e12c3785833a28a7e9b7f42eee
'2011-12-31T12:32:57-05:00'
describe
'35104' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTC' 'sip-files029thm.jpg'
78a5b1348f72477d04e65b2d82ad7101
bccab63095ac9da4d5aa40e2e4ab834e82c9fe62
'2011-12-31T12:34:25-05:00'
describe
'33717' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTD' 'sip-files02thm.jpg'
4676b908ed4da6caaab9bd5fd58e6327
e2b693c1f5d72c3892880ae697045209256a3ed0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTE' 'sip-files030.jp2'
234b43ffb421f43b5c0eb764a83adc0c
5f8b327726ef5cd71f454899d8e1dd51a6dc0dc3
'2011-12-31T12:27:11-05:00'
describe
'149548' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTF' 'sip-files030.jpg'
6685c88309d0dcb4452211efcf6b5452
0d06135df37518a8ba80ec66b6d5dc4abd29c4cb
describe
'34198' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTG' 'sip-files030.pro'
8b2d9fc47f5f9d21e07d5ecafea81ef1
b040a3e47507b307250a24300a2a7e30f9371f66
'2011-12-31T12:29:25-05:00'
describe
'69448' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTH' 'sip-files030.QC.jpg'
32a219ece44b7474294d9a847326e1df
9ae2aefc3862e4a3216b2bdbf0525ed17544e821
'2011-12-31T12:30:42-05:00'
describe
'8667724' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTI' 'sip-files030.tif'
cdf6a76d221e098c3e8ec629b4976a92
58d1b74f209f108fc68ab709bd4489e8458d76f3
'2011-12-31T12:35:50-05:00'
describe
'1313' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTJ' 'sip-files030.txt'
e563b273c382e8692eb1974a7d819cf4
1846cd0d49ff5b889f5246f0b1c4b9d7e9d98d13
'2011-12-31T12:30:53-05:00'
describe
'35784' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTK' 'sip-files030thm.jpg'
794a5e8434a0c7fb69fdd23b955d803c
c5410a93042151a3bfdda8601af2cfcf49225ec6
describe
'1080277' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTL' 'sip-files031.jp2'
0cbfd5bd017e4c2f0043cc5526a89d70
fde354a889952c491b447738d2cd00ec7a25bc71
'2011-12-31T12:37:28-05:00'
describe
'137898' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTM' 'sip-files031.jpg'
537e645d421f8857b7dcfa6fc90f562a
60e9a0d6475f54a5972165d2f6849707186fe071
'2011-12-31T12:31:28-05:00'
describe
'30995' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTN' 'sip-files031.pro'
dbeacaea154d0d5d46b5da4b7ec993ab
535079ce702c85f9966e2fff67bf9fac83a62900
'2011-12-31T12:28:33-05:00'
describe
'65686' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTO' 'sip-files031.QC.jpg'
f7286dd26fdffa916e49cf7dae55ab80
0c038b57f4bdf5be2124db5a80140acdd3434975
describe
'8667468' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTP' 'sip-files031.tif'
daf59a7b3ddce040c5a80756844c8d18
5ee10f5967ea0837569513c488e8a2406101d582
'2011-12-31T12:37:17-05:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTQ' 'sip-files031.txt'
97c9dd6c389f2fa497ecbf96a96b52a0
73b1f664fe1efef2d69504b258a74e059185df5d
'2011-12-31T12:29:42-05:00'
describe
'35157' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTR' 'sip-files031thm.jpg'
0649c92750a4e7407471e14cb06e2f83
3e08ab005ae6a84a436dc1abdb71a1be5bb26575
'2011-12-31T12:32:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTS' 'sip-files032.jp2'
e7f618d6a3e6ccd30183292b876f389c
32fe11354b2b0c8ff1c12ec2f9167f173839cf5e
describe
'141646' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTT' 'sip-files032.jpg'
5f8fec29abff09f5d8142c0b73e4d3d3
cf8d70d889675e5c7018d2f45195c32aea9b48e3
'2011-12-31T12:33:19-05:00'
describe
'32688' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTU' 'sip-files032.pro'
51b3cd6226750844b46c184d93528271
bde551539f22cac5ada398da924cc10ea94d3c83
'2011-12-31T12:37:45-05:00'
describe
'66575' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTV' 'sip-files032.QC.jpg'
d0f54303fd462c724744de873db8909b
0ce20ff656c937b31a848bb9afa2152f5350911f
'2011-12-31T12:38:27-05:00'
describe
'8667400' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTW' 'sip-files032.tif'
2a32c934b377e58463477d6b31847e5f
b58b9833601c419a2e3c0d00338a06ef74ce3937
'2011-12-31T12:27:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTX' 'sip-files032.txt'
bcbc2d07a78a154ac6eeac1490748c86
2441969e64eb80d06c520002eef7307f247e9b92
'2011-12-31T12:37:52-05:00'
describe
'34941' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTY' 'sip-files032thm.jpg'
05fff8949b4a7b7cee8eda0652e2e201
7cdba9604fc9e5303bcfa5f3812a6e98bd742e44
describe
'1080267' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASTZ' 'sip-files033.jp2'
804ed3dce4e93f3df9607d13653d88c6
0bc7c6c9884928229bbc6f581ba05f8ff1bc7661
'2011-12-31T12:39:48-05:00'
describe
'144440' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUA' 'sip-files033.jpg'
9bc89e7bb2c8e5a1a4efdf05841e4511
b19c7731aea7d1eced81c303b0ee88dd59990c55
'2011-12-31T12:33:50-05:00'
describe
'32956' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUB' 'sip-files033.pro'
5251e27a9e77e4d6b835b6807d938384
b8199440e61988f28ad1cb1b0d349ae735d89729
'2011-12-31T12:38:17-05:00'
describe
'67233' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUC' 'sip-files033.QC.jpg'
eabac1d4247ad3647937446471533c3c
1cdf3bc1f8ccabbe37e0fff246c5d57efa7035ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUD' 'sip-files033.tif'
c783c10a91877009557a54d41ca9fccd
5fe76ad3f3a3680726582a7f12d8d839c3587520
'2011-12-31T12:33:53-05:00'
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUE' 'sip-files033.txt'
a3fde51e0d9be43f28a1065a2939897f
7e14d23bd30015b9fd6f5fae0c5fbcead9860cbd
describe
'35121' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUF' 'sip-files033thm.jpg'
090e71a49178b9f2fca2fca1a9e596ca
df5f24eca3c805f89c0e4c110cf4a1ac61bf3149
'2011-12-31T12:33:15-05:00'
describe
'1080216' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUG' 'sip-files034.jp2'
7daf00a4229e7f88aa3ace55c4876a67
1ef6c57273d1e0174802b015f179c74dbbd70e56
describe
'137429' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUH' 'sip-files034.jpg'
f98edd9d050926cf277859055acb6ff1
bc6bd05015efa6a97a53251d8d2f4b00a6c6567c
describe
'31431' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUI' 'sip-files034.pro'
58eada9f1ded405730a0bb3fec6f16b1
9041541557b2c302c087de828e60d7032094190f
'2011-12-31T12:36:35-05:00'
describe
'64786' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUJ' 'sip-files034.QC.jpg'
be749a518ebebfe3b3e9b4b2e5fde9bf
1469020e6e89e4ff811f2ed13ffde1cde962083e
'2011-12-31T12:36:55-05:00'
describe
'8667308' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUK' 'sip-files034.tif'
12576163440354fb5f1128e8a7f16aad
9b54d6a554384e678792eddacc67a59da66870dc
'2011-12-31T12:36:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUL' 'sip-files034.txt'
8380011ff68284e6c5423a1d327db240
81279dc913e56f16355e72997a0a449c6dd85bc7
'2011-12-31T12:38:56-05:00'
describe
'34779' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUM' 'sip-files034thm.jpg'
1a6701633ed1c3cd913184b82d35abe7
53bac5b584fa2fcc4baedf63bc21f7a8670e03ac
'2011-12-31T12:36:06-05:00'
describe
'1080279' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUN' 'sip-files035.jp2'
6cd8b0ba32d1f445691411e86609c7b6
ce416c45ddb475b346c42f35639d095bffbbefe9
describe
'133652' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUO' 'sip-files035.jpg'
c6c555ad4f7023f70f569d353dfafbf7
637d7d20b6ce6a3aef076981f8eadcad54541692
'2011-12-31T12:34:22-05:00'
describe
'30023' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUP' 'sip-files035.pro'
5d42f7b27fced973d65f529d660c43c9
f295d9720555f7860e7aebf6ff0532fba47c2b01
'2011-12-31T12:30:07-05:00'
describe
'63584' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUQ' 'sip-files035.QC.jpg'
af1bd48c51f7062c0ec2ac4e8617ceda
ed0290c295efb218ced82335d312fe24ad9b2e34
'2011-12-31T12:35:13-05:00'
describe
'8667220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUR' 'sip-files035.tif'
71b7978db3edfe60b05b95583b42fa4f
c96b93b782d5c409c819d8130e3e0e99f2b73e66
'2011-12-31T12:32:06-05:00'
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUS' 'sip-files035.txt'
7b4262300b1a8b7ba2af9a991ea2cc4e
7ef8b66b19f5024b127df021bdcaa7092615f864
'2011-12-31T12:27:36-05:00'
describe
'34619' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUT' 'sip-files035thm.jpg'
10d245f1fdb1873c23e9084bd484760f
8c4b0a5aa904976f432c526d2c6f31d303060dbd
describe
'1080175' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUU' 'sip-files036.jp2'
1f2c6353e737ea8c45ed0996faaa427c
a34375ce94fb558ccb8ed82cfc5358085dbd8a37
describe
'136447' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUV' 'sip-files036.jpg'
4ffb9020e9a2893954351156e683e04c
e399b736e8fc43361d950d63ee5f54ae15ac948a
'2011-12-31T12:34:39-05:00'
describe
'30747' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUW' 'sip-files036.pro'
d50baae0dc03f386e5c9b572db9a0513
5847d500b17e002c2471990f4952f9002b3bd982
'2011-12-31T12:36:17-05:00'
describe
'64066' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUX' 'sip-files036.QC.jpg'
43cf727d746f157506ad8ea0f54bd359
8df28e3972c212df807feb228057def635c2ef01
describe
'8667344' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUY' 'sip-files036.tif'
690669627bc660836168dd32aac27a8c
678ef16f0c41f5f9c3deec0f5477534631b859da
'2011-12-31T12:32:12-05:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASUZ' 'sip-files036.txt'
3724a434c1602a951efed23fc49ae5e1
87023407a07d19253904dffa992dffb0f2e01f3e
describe
'34852' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVA' 'sip-files036thm.jpg'
645b37a69504d8f59d99a0e69e3ffac5
3e17d0d64d0982f290fee29b9578eeba429f8f5a
'2011-12-31T12:32:42-05:00'
describe
'409075' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVB' 'sip-files037.jp2'
c53f5c6969563da4b580e1b13f62b152
f42faa6e5fb0dc9166ce496b8f5168f1c87ff48f
'2011-12-31T12:36:46-05:00'
describe
'64578' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVC' 'sip-files037.jpg'
0f578bc912069d2b5f61bcf9fde64a64
8988ebe436acde8d01640001a9262603d807f99d
'2011-12-31T12:28:26-05:00'
describe
'11178' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVD' 'sip-files037.pro'
98aa133a6a77e5c0f3ba9d8b09583596
c100a7c443a1c8290f00b9da0f6497c1f5d4c709
describe
'8663324' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVE' 'sip-files037.tif'
e622ee299bbf6235a8db64056f83df37
6d5945afc0053428faebade1dc2e3a73365cbd57
'2011-12-31T12:32:19-05:00'
describe
'36872' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVF' 'sip-files037.QC.jpg'
2bd558babc7eee605406fad03268d06a
004ffae339e5ddd98b65c7df9425f3e535332632
'2011-12-31T12:32:05-05:00'
describe
'451' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVG' 'sip-files037.txt'
63c6129c9d78971271f731239a07ca18
fcd1c09a333cd61731b34a4c67d7841eb229f958
'2011-12-31T12:29:12-05:00'
describe
'25448' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVH' 'sip-files037thm.jpg'
e5b82185491e55de6a76e9a8460b4446
f0ab1bfe5d7a7ddf3c2784d963bfc9cd7eacdf29
describe
'663586' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVI' 'sip-files038.jp2'
1bece84d8cecfbbb59431be7937d1118
19713c5fb1430afae5753c415c53a43b031f2874
'2011-12-31T12:29:38-05:00'
describe
'91446' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVJ' 'sip-files038.jpg'
5710563c59f006b30c618dd80cdc14b5
0c32ea30bfdb725e449121a583338bb38f3f6904
'2011-12-31T12:31:19-05:00'
describe
'18849' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVK' 'sip-files038.pro'
03a90bd0493263166dafa3c31a837495
3ef7b6e197a19bb3ee355d4834b7d5cdcf1ae110
describe
'47610' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVL' 'sip-files038.QC.jpg'
1896627a9fdab68fa06df72c83ddc772
6d9b0abf8f4d8444e0db4801a9119a0e647b9dcc
'2011-12-31T12:28:17-05:00'
describe
'8665004' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVM' 'sip-files038.tif'
f13901e44df6300ad96d16332050fbc1
4ebbb9668dec25c850db4a4f21c20cac1b647b0c
'2011-12-31T12:27:32-05:00'
describe
'748' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVN' 'sip-files038.txt'
ca5ac98c0a388b4e1172565395cd058d
870c37917b68a00949eb5884982294b1e230297d
'2011-12-31T12:29:02-05:00'
describe
'1002695' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVO' 'sip-files038a.jp2'
bf7e1d08bde14dd0d9ff3c881fdaac7e
30ae4ff23bde2f7958c61007687f0051f24e8fca
'2011-12-31T12:31:58-05:00'
describe
'117205' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVP' 'sip-files038a.jpg'
6cf9d1d63623c4a1d5f94f830023d6e3
9499f1edea1e112a4079b02f0fbb01ce6db4f012
'2011-12-31T12:28:55-05:00'
describe
'51381' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVQ' 'sip-files038a.QC.jpg'
e92067bcfc55d1a44a311a527a1ad595
3979b4d439d6856210bdbb74f9a1fae9719939c0
'2011-12-31T12:30:17-05:00'
describe
'8665988' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVR' 'sip-files038a.tif'
b0f32e5d195959f47c81014cdd0613d8
50da68242b51c34a47407eca2e555a085cdf7227
'2011-12-31T12:32:07-05:00'
describe
'31102' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVS' 'sip-files038athm.jpg'
e1ee3ecb4de3b8c44ad8cf5b5f8d6eee
6d54ed2e622f257912b7460dec977791f1191e7d
'2011-12-31T12:30:26-05:00'
describe
'28995' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVT' 'sip-files038thm.jpg'
e81483925aa6bc2c6d87b2d38d15a203
180fab51b0a88a9850933ad8eeb27fe2dc89b520
describe
'1051648' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVU' 'sip-files039.jp2'
222b0fdbda124f6dd895cf2d445fbb45
912253da292f3f63f2ae77067891fb70477ea8ab
'2011-12-31T12:39:16-05:00'
describe
'130595' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVV' 'sip-files039.jpg'
4a1ef8d5a08bb352d928402bd50dab4f
a895b9eef0f06be308aa37d7d638ddc3e633f1ef
'2011-12-31T12:31:10-05:00'
describe
'31324' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVW' 'sip-files039.pro'
0bba2dec95d64dd790c4983dcabed074
b8562706c93f538195b918f3cab54b7da1c902ca
'2011-12-31T12:33:51-05:00'
describe
'61719' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVX' 'sip-files039.QC.jpg'
12b40cb3d454f4bed19688a5427990c8
1467063651ae7aa6bded0c32fbc84eae16f51c6d
'2011-12-31T12:39:37-05:00'
describe
'8666752' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVY' 'sip-files039.tif'
b5582a80c116d6255708035abe2b3536
52b2a97df163ee654c6be82f6c9313237bd7c726
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASVZ' 'sip-files039.txt'
882ef2460e47220efca00e03ea89c440
c3fead200b0ed3b897b4529811912e7b9178bffc
describe
'33669' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWA' 'sip-files039thm.jpg'
6c715feedaed0c5ad689a9e9fccdbe2e
cce26a4f118885ff78c915cf4b5892a307f0ae22
'2011-12-31T12:31:17-05:00'
describe
'1080235' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWB' 'sip-files040.jp2'
2c9042a7a3de5d0042e9700ca8c20fab
23fdb6532f8a1d51102f316b172724832c22c121
describe
'140357' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWC' 'sip-files040.jpg'
644e9e25cb1851966e044bfec86b7e1a
4cfa31df2e4e428c16b79b9316d3c2a95227b986
'2011-12-31T12:28:15-05:00'
describe
'32380' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWD' 'sip-files040.pro'
c9d8fdb820d72e5850615b4ee397ec6f
ca2c4baa3f2993d97541389fa16ac7d7172d6883
'2011-12-31T12:37:20-05:00'
describe
'65450' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWE' 'sip-files040.QC.jpg'
4145e2000d2bdd2f4a47c4fcc5c9d1e8
e26e533b7e67289bf3ea3afaab2a877699c7329b
'2011-12-31T12:28:57-05:00'
describe
'8667464' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWF' 'sip-files040.tif'
a580799aca883baf1f26b5684b8a8f0f
6b044e7a0d1c90153c84c49105f7377ad41befcd
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWG' 'sip-files040.txt'
2cc84fe6cd5c0f341ee0c70a0df794b6
4bfe0440e1a2ba0d0d2c0537114ded3068d6b6c3
'2011-12-31T12:36:34-05:00'
describe
'1078947' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWH' 'sip-files041.jp2'
05983285fb136c663fbdaaa762fbb226
4e695d68740d741b10ca9038106b25536ac6c3a1
describe
'35209' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWI' 'sip-files040thm.jpg'
f32251aa03bd422585d8b8e5bf6a2ad8
bb8c59858187d708b97ffd6b98dff76aaf712c3d
'2011-12-31T12:26:35-05:00'
describe
'133021' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWJ' 'sip-files041.jpg'
b2ef93c9ae31ff28fdcf577a57f9cae6
097dec7e42a5b3b41711896cd186829575a2fcd2
describe
'30405' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWK' 'sip-files041.pro'
fc811f6c0a57b59a43b30e7c139704c7
073bf741c7cd334356047da353f4d6f8f4b6223b
'2011-12-31T12:32:11-05:00'
describe
'63608' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWL' 'sip-files041.QC.jpg'
61b44e606e536cd5afe25aac31659ad1
2fc0021d2b75cc454c4252b50bef0d145e94129e
'2011-12-31T12:31:38-05:00'
describe
'8667336' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWM' 'sip-files041.tif'
34e364e351446b854c55095cdcfbe913
dc0ca92f25d3bd675311053f030447c675bb80b7
describe
'1183' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWN' 'sip-files041.txt'
cde6476a8f5d82f2e7065fc624ac4c4e
e35f8366300d157b6f7f351aaf8d1cc0f9f3b9e0
describe
'34462' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWO' 'sip-files041thm.jpg'
96796afd3d6ed6ed9fb9f2de4e9e4953
00761582bdf5a1acd8299cb550c11c715e4da9c3
'2011-12-31T12:37:29-05:00'
describe
'1080208' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWP' 'sip-files042.jp2'
2a159085ab232af441fb8f199fb6433b
c82421e847de5ad4a3f20391528da5d123a45980
'2011-12-31T12:28:39-05:00'
describe
'141120' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWQ' 'sip-files042.jpg'
65fcbc080383462a1d85b583ee63f379
102701a0574ab8e92f948b92ccdaed47afc3862e
describe
'32420' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWR' 'sip-files042.pro'
3f84b080de2099358b68ca8a2488a853
c09d239c6e7b3c4011a1a17ae8e63d6255f36171
describe
'65931' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWS' 'sip-files042.QC.jpg'
63fd7a4cf4f9dbe43a4e55e5aaa278c7
0d96886b821057e2e846fcfe7c33ef7f8b6b2463
'2011-12-31T12:37:11-05:00'
describe
'8667452' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWT' 'sip-files042.tif'
9834304ad2ab7eddaac3447a048a02a0
9c541ddaeadf4b1114ddbb44cc188973dfc62382
'2011-12-31T12:37:37-05:00'
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWU' 'sip-files042.txt'
d0f01ee6f67ca7cfde8e51f612e5ab5a
053de9523722c31b41357b43b61760a3ecefcd62
'2011-12-31T12:36:19-05:00'
describe
'35409' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWV' 'sip-files042thm.jpg'
227d6b672a9e07648ab905b50a01814d
b2c35cab97124ff2ca4dfa28e9761ae5fad56fbe
describe
'1062832' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWW' 'sip-files043.jp2'
1fc1738fdc5abed3623f22ed2ef2779d
ef21fad89a79e5af59089a27946aec1c2a55248a
'2011-12-31T12:27:04-05:00'
describe
'130962' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWX' 'sip-files043.jpg'
4e3762d56595c06edfd760f9bbeba30c
f038390be55435e9030c79c81af19c52c4783205
describe
'29166' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWY' 'sip-files043.pro'
c19ed4179a61b5d1969ce4c14ea241a9
44be5e6f2cc41ea56199a0efdc534fcf41f6c341
describe
'63681' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASWZ' 'sip-files043.QC.jpg'
fc517e9a6dedbf7139108268bef73162
2d1e4bec5c85863ee78a010e11ec675ed1d561ec
'2011-12-31T12:39:08-05:00'
describe
'8667360' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXA' 'sip-files043.tif'
a9b35cc92a03e60a369db0b16dee9386
1d77ea4154a5adf155f230b757252da4dab13db0
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXB' 'sip-files043.txt'
1b0d1f0fd5a102d097fe2825b6ebe2fd
3aba2b5dc3d2fbe58e20e51bb0138009785231a6
describe
'35028' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXC' 'sip-files043thm.jpg'
50e02b19e17eff12a56d2f65e0eb81ad
4e9a62c4cd5ea91221709e9255afd7529b31f684
'2011-12-31T12:30:40-05:00'
describe
'1080284' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXD' 'sip-files044.jp2'
129e61419923f1605be8e05f54549bec
48eff91a54ffcdd52735a215ba11346de758d9c5
'2011-12-31T12:39:21-05:00'
describe
'142511' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXE' 'sip-files044.jpg'
8e33968d97700bd205448332810bd771
3f8a74f47990813b1a39e902425c6a19fe206749
'2011-12-31T12:28:16-05:00'
describe
'31941' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXF' 'sip-files044.pro'
cc4346630e0f7df945768806be54261d
79c2f420f8354937b8956741577d0f46ddd1bc21
'2011-12-31T12:37:38-05:00'
describe
'67830' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXG' 'sip-files044.QC.jpg'
d27101061c1009bc7e725339d01e49b8
64af333482242b47d3227882c3e4793b1b0783ad
'2011-12-31T12:35:01-05:00'
describe
'8667960' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXH' 'sip-files044.tif'
991ad6f17475d288b0544b67b4109b28
0354d9c4ec229a141f8770bbb1d3558a2d6f831c
'2011-12-31T12:35:43-05:00'
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXI' 'sip-files044.txt'
0b95536dbaadb0ad3d5e378eef4f0b33
7600e26a25163d7e8e405a9cd247b2208d06516a
'2011-12-31T12:36:39-05:00'
describe
'36323' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXJ' 'sip-files044thm.jpg'
b9b5f82cb70243ea0e7315685d264719
60e1387b4242c7d11022fea8414e3c81502fcaaa
'2011-12-31T12:33:17-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXK' 'sip-files045.jp2'
2afca03f50523b0fa955eb956b846936
2af932c1db1c9b600559da8ea860a9ca1185caa5
'2011-12-31T12:33:36-05:00'
describe
'144356' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXL' 'sip-files045.jpg'
0c4e28b3b2584f44e9685b810b082339
8c8cf907c7ffd2e73c539d3b9647db47485e4130
describe
'32224' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXM' 'sip-files045.pro'
c0959c64933df03dc9f6a5a862dcdcad
4fa68dc6acc0571e3799eabce54927b2dbb416f6
'2011-12-31T12:28:49-05:00'
describe
'67975' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXN' 'sip-files045.QC.jpg'
d0030ede370c37b402b176bfda90ef31
6fd377ef709731e3c3a21a72d9a08a446c389a20
describe
'8667812' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXO' 'sip-files045.tif'
efec17bdd264b4b0212a3772ec6173cd
5415f266a095755190f28172a3733a63e7f99a00
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXP' 'sip-files045.txt'
f53e16ef4097314f034ef83d4b9a8fad
9a92488e7a12dac3f31eab3636cd1fd9cd465f40
describe
'36055' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXQ' 'sip-files045thm.jpg'
1f03bb254e9ed4445ddb7978819e6758
2ed2d1ec39d7adc3ff184b6ea50457ba0b409bfd
'2011-12-31T12:38:38-05:00'
describe
'1080269' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXR' 'sip-files046.jp2'
621f080facd971c8d73ccf5cb264c2ef
5acbca6177828f7390d99a6deab649e355abd145
'2011-12-31T12:39:05-05:00'
describe
'136629' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXS' 'sip-files046.jpg'
0c65091341b94cc151a531b217da6c47
52749876bc8369e3b26d90f1f63b42f83f3d982f
'2011-12-31T12:33:24-05:00'
describe
'30251' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXT' 'sip-files046.pro'
807535f7d6fcfe580cddb33e49d5954f
06ed06d4df5fe1351b25a31ca9350fd7737d1bff
describe
'65381' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXU' 'sip-files046.QC.jpg'
539ec6eb3fa6bcaa01788971642facc7
9eaf617436152ebbf7315959dff617a3374360e4
'2011-12-31T12:30:39-05:00'
describe
'8667728' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXV' 'sip-files046.tif'
d1382fb5a1f7719013ab4a508dcb8401
b51475b86f620f860d3933c2e196223c5b209314
'2011-12-31T12:29:48-05:00'
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXW' 'sip-files046.txt'
806cb38f5d69f8361c9665c3a7517156
9398d62bd13b4cf41e188cc3bd78d09fea5cef0b
'2011-12-31T12:28:50-05:00'
describe
'35684' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXX' 'sip-files046thm.jpg'
ba8c4ab1a8a391f802ae8b0cfeb47332
eafd1113fa0f47bf9d348e1b8bac278e54d100b8
describe
'1080276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXY' 'sip-files047.jp2'
840a804a42707b6697c81a5a71c42a78
a9636ac7bf373bcd18f333621345b1cef56ddd75
describe
'137028' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASXZ' 'sip-files047.jpg'
f7482ffb5be236b73efaa88d15964dd7
f7fda1f74a1bc647dec35a6e6efbc6441441c370
describe
'30659' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYA' 'sip-files047.pro'
92f40e7f7e28b0230240364eaad27201
66d3ca44f7354b67f9d940ab8d13f65319f8f4f1
describe
'65828' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYB' 'sip-files047.QC.jpg'
c219423027b4f16b9611dcc4aa5c2fda
af4ab6b003a480f1836d2b33e05ee0875cffbbb0
describe
'8667700' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYC' 'sip-files047.tif'
3d6a56b352d07287f954144a272cfcd6
45569b2a6599a18c242c91f7cfd19af9d6e895b1
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYD' 'sip-files047.txt'
049cfacef64fdd67033b23e039838d59
4094fa8d2669303773646fd4e9f03228e3eac84b
describe
'35535' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYE' 'sip-files047thm.jpg'
3223c7734754ed6b6223781681c959f9
436d4a2c1f7e7e19c89e64292cdae64bb143e1d6
'2011-12-31T12:38:50-05:00'
describe
'1080185' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYF' 'sip-files048.jp2'
9f77b711463009ab4730e43150cbe672
d6b8a07a46962bd8f466735ffc9cd7c7d1d4b248
describe
'138276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYG' 'sip-files048.jpg'
094696cf511c96f5ac21f833341147ec
ce6da1dddd2b2666c52220540ce84b5f24b8e859
'2011-12-31T12:34:31-05:00'
describe
'31533' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYH' 'sip-files048.pro'
3ade681f09c582fae875c2bfefd574cd
84532d18e9910c205cb49535d1a1937b34c977ff
describe
'65836' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYI' 'sip-files048.QC.jpg'
d3044b105763e2e349f49b8e136d8423
a8435591d49ee8f42fae8d9d55778d4ade1bb16a
'2011-12-31T12:33:18-05:00'
describe
'8667536' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYJ' 'sip-files048.tif'
4ef6b41f087b593dd3d6763061aa1986
83315100af1176fa563d1362cc1ee4c6cd1dcc4c
'2011-12-31T12:29:47-05:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYK' 'sip-files048.txt'
e3f1b9f186562e7e71656e2cf29dd321
a93ab7073bbadfc431d2c24295a0afcceeef6e0e
'2011-12-31T12:30:19-05:00'
describe
'35237' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYL' 'sip-files048thm.jpg'
12d6c609904075406076e2be9c5f8560
ed32bf2e52cb1ddfe96a87e3f5f63f7864274ba4
'2011-12-31T12:32:00-05:00'
describe
'1080227' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYM' 'sip-files049.jp2'
cae2452a4eb35059fc166ba661a50260
a7c5730bd25b6efcbbfbbce97cce463ce19ebd1d
'2011-12-31T12:27:19-05:00'
describe
'138903' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYN' 'sip-files049.jpg'
52269479acb17d368d37eac87fc629b8
d7572a25282324bd1d0697a1af8292fd2bd4da60
describe
'31961' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYO' 'sip-files049.pro'
c7122f88c9288996ac9ca0311304c9d8
5ed4a575a36a9d3ab90c4c0145dd24e17796220d
'2011-12-31T12:27:01-05:00'
describe
'64893' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYP' 'sip-files049.QC.jpg'
f7d125d835ed7fe51a189c74cc8b34ab
58fbb82c9cf3b4a2feadd6d6bece7c21e6bdfad1
'2011-12-31T12:39:39-05:00'
describe
'8667224' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYQ' 'sip-files049.tif'
8694641b5f5aed91458ca96dd41e2f0f
cecfae1acecfa4b272b6631693b638e66accfbe7
'2011-12-31T12:32:16-05:00'
describe
'1263' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYR' 'sip-files049.txt'
aef1b308196ef78726649cbb864935da
08cbdec1bdb674fbef5d5a91a3cab250915ebdc2
describe
'34627' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYS' 'sip-files049thm.jpg'
cc00e571c465daec021c6c709bd39c26
10051b871baf583f09cddf1e9a7c099226401206
'2011-12-31T12:34:46-05:00'
describe
'1012905' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYT' 'sip-files050.jp2'
accd9eb4dda3259af1c35d012a074210
e1d6eb770c0e060f7746513f4c65365c42390e1c
describe
'126333' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYU' 'sip-files050.jpg'
e0447cf5cb9ea7737ec190d564adbcd7
ea04567200e7c44142e757e5f541e4bcd5defc79
'2011-12-31T12:30:45-05:00'
describe
'27963' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYV' 'sip-files050.pro'
c531d0f802a2e7d9b312b9e52bc85e02
5e7d6cdb56d38b0824d3bcd8745880e1551a6e38
'2011-12-31T12:36:29-05:00'
describe
'61017' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYW' 'sip-files050.QC.jpg'
5892f8313ee750ee88e70a8c0313a61b
f4692768ac8bbf5cf4093840e2dbec9a941a05a9
describe
'8666772' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYX' 'sip-files050.tif'
08402d486caed99479110868364bed4e
1cd9fd2242d254bf84ffd113d2477bdff2720824
'2011-12-31T12:31:13-05:00'
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYY' 'sip-files050.txt'
70d6aba495b238d2886a4c24636795e7
4b36f794bf43484fc034770d34b873fa78799e3d
'2011-12-31T12:27:00-05:00'
describe
'33886' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASYZ' 'sip-files050thm.jpg'
3c9ceccc19f6de2dcd67346f6c7e69db
20d7eba7d25827fb6968c02d591bdbc04e4b6b8b
'2011-12-31T12:37:44-05:00'
describe
'1022313' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZA' 'sip-files051.jp2'
7dd4108050e60ffc2a23a38ae1c8e487
13a2aec7597834c50b91079d38c9bb37284bb83f
'2011-12-31T12:39:14-05:00'
describe
'126899' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZB' 'sip-files051.jpg'
9a6fc79813a675c5ba9df5f8aa84a889
1d9917ccef58a4bc34f8b6da34b44564acd6dc05
'2011-12-31T12:34:49-05:00'
describe
'28767' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZC' 'sip-files051.pro'
e540a981f0223c164072ed42e30acbbb
dfa5a134a86e4441fea1c31c3dc538a571ec7d48
describe
'61940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZD' 'sip-files051.QC.jpg'
e42eb2b79b6ba2552986d8cc484fa981
04e025a281610c17a5b56d310239ecd196b83cae
'2011-12-31T12:32:37-05:00'
describe
'8666884' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZE' 'sip-files051.tif'
e0281fe74d236b468f3fb34f4fc5ab81
4b6d545b78a50ab2e7d499c3ed793a98e6af04d0
'2011-12-31T12:35:10-05:00'
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZF' 'sip-files051.txt'
c2e1f455ca4b4dcf0bd8b8cb0cfcbda5
5f8fd12473223a37088f0557d4028a35e9b65fa9
describe
'34042' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZG' 'sip-files051thm.jpg'
e3a7fb82607f019aaf6f352ac93da333
528f7ab90705dafa84a3b8f7d79feee2645ea464
'2011-12-31T12:28:07-05:00'
describe
'1048657' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZH' 'sip-files052.jp2'
0df1fa54e39e497ecc172e2fc4c39228
2d61f8611e40dacd61520ea95b2819e41ded65ec
'2011-12-31T12:34:15-05:00'
describe
'129910' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZI' 'sip-files052.jpg'
eeebed3fef9f6744084a4ba69361b06b
905cee7fb6bc708d471d2c05812151bd3dfd41de
describe
'29326' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZJ' 'sip-files052.pro'
a58a1c914ed6845470ae2021db9c7efd
ed110dcea5c5c4ede884effd24661c9942e3bf58
'2011-12-31T12:34:43-05:00'
describe
'62738' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZK' 'sip-files052.QC.jpg'
7f5cf9edd05e3f48737c01aa54ca10ff
553a1187a141091d2c3149f49c7b8fcfc35b4a0d
'2011-12-31T12:38:40-05:00'
describe
'8666936' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZL' 'sip-files052.tif'
feeecdfd3271b5365af1603629512844
1100d9ae16466c54972762506eb421a7398d0b9b
'2011-12-31T12:28:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZM' 'sip-files052.txt'
9d4e6195aea022f74857d30a0dcb06c4
a031e77509d3ae9f3869b3f389237a844aaebe1b
'2011-12-31T12:34:55-05:00'
describe
'34225' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZN' 'sip-files052thm.jpg'
e315ca5eaaf9a4c37ba68c2dc1a7eff8
f180977d4b02df28d7c313dbafd4a564fc2f8244
describe
'1080254' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZO' 'sip-files053.jp2'
a015e0f3a04f8c9244461485a2a1097a
691fb6ced28ee14c99577c9216cabc1621aa2b06
'2011-12-31T12:27:34-05:00'
describe
'142384' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZP' 'sip-files053.jpg'
699a27869092e0b89ee10a570ece28b4
d26a4f642acd910490705c40941180c6e00e33e1
'2011-12-31T12:31:00-05:00'
describe
'33079' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZQ' 'sip-files053.pro'
c835a5ddb50f1db497206eb72b286358
56033f88ae745a4d12d48a02e30e003388930e32
'2011-12-31T12:38:23-05:00'
describe
'65799' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZR' 'sip-files053.QC.jpg'
964f1d09ed5c11deba2485760cb0513a
673ebcf9544c1d67c2060b97c84391c5570fbed0
'2011-12-31T12:39:33-05:00'
describe
'8667184' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZS' 'sip-files053.tif'
d8d801e2ae77f3656c7be5a0b8c0af59
b0d09ace32b6d166c81d4d8e11664159ca42917b
'2011-12-31T12:27:50-05:00'
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZT' 'sip-files053.txt'
1b984015be2bb22e6a23d559940397bb
8b6a59bee1426b9b420a1a87a5182f08d643ba78
'2011-12-31T12:35:23-05:00'
describe
'34722' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZU' 'sip-files053thm.jpg'
847a1a9b77bbf6e28b8c4f525c927e4d
1cbb08efff45c78d4498a6b6f4170dbb78d4201a
'2011-12-31T12:37:46-05:00'
describe
'1080270' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZV' 'sip-files054.jp2'
104d1c0bfec0d54a22ceda07cb95787e
2e127d8f26480ad9da5f246a35cf772ee454340e
'2011-12-31T12:29:03-05:00'
describe
'135914' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZW' 'sip-files054.jpg'
280b977f9b3466576047d0e13689d238
707faef66c584e62e1b84f424ad8e064df02799c
'2011-12-31T12:37:48-05:00'
describe
'31039' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZX' 'sip-files054.pro'
a7295def67641da6914176ddf5559f20
81b35acbc67927fd8203b22a2ff75a8e0010059f
describe
'64044' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZY' 'sip-files054.QC.jpg'
01f7ff78f95216ef654be30aab8db8ef
faadc1dac0aeee8aa29a333f1c0c5780a1586f40
'2011-12-31T12:28:00-05:00'
describe
'8667140' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAASZZ' 'sip-files054.tif'
4f83131074cfaef44b8581e4ddec978c
4e92c84c36ea2d21e25507c79e6acff181e88b60
'2011-12-31T12:27:47-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAA' 'sip-files054.txt'
4a3b361c318bc8bf6508a38ae04e1a93
31e8457a106c30375f20fc87a5a85d412770d5ca
'2011-12-31T12:30:29-05:00'
describe
'34516' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAB' 'sip-files054thm.jpg'
98fe3a5d4118fcf189c730ff1d6a6726
63c79f7a2b5acb821c223b8c0edad40559f40934
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAC' 'sip-files055.jp2'
6f89d6b036c329692b3c93e1353fc3be
cca32372ddbcfe4213428675a62685c08e29cc37
'2011-12-31T12:38:21-05:00'
describe
'142188' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAD' 'sip-files055.jpg'
640ae3ae1061bff391e5327f998b380c
014813d152a84cf2cdbbacb3b06c653681416177
describe
'32627' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAE' 'sip-files055.pro'
9051264c272267058f31ab43aecd97a3
27ccfca072115f9067224e890faa2a4b42e8721c
'2011-12-31T12:32:48-05:00'
describe
'66368' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAF' 'sip-files055.QC.jpg'
4a2e4f5c8c9ad4b50fadf13f739c8458
18b3b4e19583890873ea133892d291233030622c
'2011-12-31T12:28:37-05:00'
describe
'8667316' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAG' 'sip-files055.tif'
edfcae98ed41c080968e287552601bbd
e3a457b94c58f76ae6c0923fde4dd13610e4b3d1
'2011-12-31T12:31:51-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAH' 'sip-files055.txt'
e437b9654b9d3144c152e034220538bb
dec8f931a2d4a0e4d3710c10eadf1e506d3ce830
describe
'34846' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAI' 'sip-files055thm.jpg'
eb7b518e8e8a7f1114ab2164f4406207
94b20826e1c618fea1c56318eea74ecef220d00f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAJ' 'sip-files056.jp2'
f768b73b6bb7fbb8a7daabae728e8312
91d51a3cd10d3b11c01f015f14ce37f5d63fd425
describe
'133896' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAK' 'sip-files056.jpg'
5807e47d9749b8c841a7fa038c15714c
2625dcc80d681da6501caddbb593ab7098a86010
describe
'30350' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAL' 'sip-files056.pro'
7d1385bb430dd8a44cba3389086407d3
44c88fe11c8e1d4327fa66919185b84605db1f8c
'2011-12-31T12:31:02-05:00'
describe
'63869' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAM' 'sip-files056.QC.jpg'
3c02399ccf2c8eb8c76835ecf9939aec
83d735e032360b22337c40a5bab4d955142d2d18
describe
'8667252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAN' 'sip-files056.tif'
33b2b8b243221a1be435f22f628aecdd
531f29fb1169e01a3ef89a807310436a72bbd858
'2011-12-31T12:32:38-05:00'
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAO' 'sip-files056.txt'
83fb7d68f58c7d603953efff9ea7fd6b
cc5cc47e360c8c387c8be400c3c4097f64d9b2ce
'2011-12-31T12:38:29-05:00'
describe
'34588' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAP' 'sip-files056thm.jpg'
fb778ff2fa251adc8b33cee2d3e946e9
0f5d8f1f2574c23508cd21ea9f2a9292b9c46f9b
'2011-12-31T12:34:19-05:00'
describe
'1080256' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAQ' 'sip-files057.jp2'
a8f4270020218d1b49d6befd9e0d075a
91299171d973e6b537622575328e2e4785947a4b
describe
'136995' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAR' 'sip-files057.jpg'
9dee90e8d3c52785e7cda4c7a34953b5
0b783cdb424fd5f83cd099c4ff5f244d16c06692
describe
'30683' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAS' 'sip-files057.pro'
d654bbc4de7fa939837caaee6e61fe52
45be73741c6391e0bfcdb849a7125aabc8d7ad5a
'2011-12-31T12:31:18-05:00'
describe
'64580' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAT' 'sip-files057.QC.jpg'
73d69a23059c741c37cbea893e7dc778
09a16bcaf2c4b34d6ffa2854ec30f0f2fe2f07a2
'2011-12-31T12:37:41-05:00'
describe
'8667448' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAU' 'sip-files057.tif'
b8e99b07941d015f271ff290d3183c94
f542391ff0c5c5fbd22ca49aa0591d26442a44e7
'2011-12-31T12:39:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAV' 'sip-files057.txt'
8b10af2dbb1effb15e2ae84fe04d5ca8
63c618c154593800484a8e3b054e1b9c89f093a4
'2011-12-31T12:34:10-05:00'
describe
'34979' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAW' 'sip-files057thm.jpg'
852f8ba7858f87c8a8cc210f381e516b
b607a31aeb09c0f5a38ea6ce316d21dbf9d111b6
describe
'1080237' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAX' 'sip-files058.jp2'
c7f69ae2e8e5b7ecab9f880711aad1ba
1c2f09c12644cec6a7ba204bf10a321ba0ae1f31
'2011-12-31T12:28:43-05:00'
describe
'137158' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAY' 'sip-files058.jpg'
1194d34481758d0e0f0335b8e855bee4
84c6a9b85a4f0312b6b928c643af1bbeaa171971
'2011-12-31T12:27:21-05:00'
describe
'31188' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATAZ' 'sip-files058.pro'
3a535fd6cdf382928a3d0de174e00c78
fed756b7802d0710feaecacdf755b451c84ce628
describe
'64628' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBA' 'sip-files058.QC.jpg'
32cdf28637ec107c463ca3bbcf3bde7e
4d92cde13daf73c5589fd53114dc380a690521c3
'2011-12-31T12:29:33-05:00'
describe
'8667612' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBB' 'sip-files058.tif'
a1945960407e744717184d3caab135a9
7ce6ad7d8020eafb50e091a0179d934a8aae0d9a
'2011-12-31T12:28:05-05:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBC' 'sip-files058.txt'
75370adb089e59a5d67c2305c41f9bae
8d4fafc7b9edf7fc3d99e65ba89300cca790147b
'2011-12-31T12:34:30-05:00'
describe
'35394' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBD' 'sip-files058thm.jpg'
263a31524fef6a5c039b2c904ceacdbf
5c3f4df35790e81ee74164952013a56e870ddbf5
'2011-12-31T12:32:54-05:00'
describe
'1080296' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBE' 'sip-files059.jp2'
9145a98142b034237da745a0c7c8d336
34f3f63c12e9983f578c8ed84dac055f41482034
'2011-12-31T12:34:44-05:00'
describe
'135828' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBF' 'sip-files059.jpg'
92c9103014b3e59e3b7b93cb1c351f05
293f7e07093933d14e3854e02e60853f9ef41cef
describe
'31022' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBG' 'sip-files059.pro'
2652840308dd585e8514b13949229bea
68fc4848e3d59557a2a633d6e7c86926f2dad5ed
'2011-12-31T12:34:07-05:00'
describe
'64255' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBH' 'sip-files059.QC.jpg'
1e2502ec5d2fcd2f11b79edd7aad1e92
690328f58b00bf82661b37008803d80770a2ff2f
describe
'8667188' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBI' 'sip-files059.tif'
226c133ede3da0a9e7321546b6cb6a3c
9ef100771dab9a417b2a319876cdc86a32342db3
'2011-12-31T12:38:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBJ' 'sip-files059.txt'
798ceb4d6dfa3cb09cb0b8b5a121fc26
7ebdb262c82e38284f319edcc5c5aac6cf7d96e0
describe
'34637' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBK' 'sip-files059thm.jpg'
08556c3c3ac73aa9a177349c047cdb0b
be9a6837d886b19c214bbcf7104f282c85cd8c46
'2011-12-31T12:30:28-05:00'
describe
'1080286' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBL' 'sip-files060.jp2'
760131dfe3415462df8049f85bdfe6fa
199fd28fcb7f59f1df9089a947abbddbdec42a16
describe
'137077' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBM' 'sip-files060.jpg'
64d9505e1bc71f25557d285461614b39
d46571f1f2349f54813bc46b00277c70049e38cf
describe
'30939' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBN' 'sip-files060.pro'
3bc9699470d6794c3c26c30c2ea5bb28
7295fefda898d453f67961dcc87e37b9cd43f645
'2011-12-31T12:28:13-05:00'
describe
'64217' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBO' 'sip-files060.QC.jpg'
36546db94d813a75f1f12dd488de68cb
9d446cb944155269376bdbae674a845defc11d6f
'2011-12-31T12:27:07-05:00'
describe
'8667132' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBP' 'sip-files060.tif'
628f5996d8b025f4f2151f99c9801bb9
227206fa7c9117175c4c086ba25fe643f5ba2bbc
'2011-12-31T12:34:04-05:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBQ' 'sip-files060.txt'
c1947b750b9512ed8d7a28bbd25509c6
25974b4a502d0afebb4866e4c078420895f0f18b
'2011-12-31T12:33:01-05:00'
describe
'34638' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBR' 'sip-files060thm.jpg'
665c29c12bfeefd64c26a2ad953ef6a9
9da4a9e8c1e98f4f95ab61be1d6d0bdaa4780c7b
'2011-12-31T12:35:26-05:00'
describe
'1080287' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBS' 'sip-files061.jp2'
8bcbf6a976c57416a32e08c7b04d88ce
42ffb8c18974facdb8f18037d873367bd5ff6138
describe
'140979' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBT' 'sip-files061.jpg'
711de6a5c186aa7946cc1849fbfa228f
416a59197a041cd140d289b9131f5644d29061e6
'2011-12-31T12:33:49-05:00'
describe
'32739' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBU' 'sip-files061.pro'
8b6a44ea692847f5f57b8fda94104bc4
4ab440af322a79a7e6a2f6a655c7dc712c416e0e
'2011-12-31T12:31:52-05:00'
describe
'66153' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBV' 'sip-files061.QC.jpg'
b3fa538bfd79594103a7a9e68ff7dd1f
438225101b2f00b10e011a4a0168eb77117f3f65
describe
'8667208' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBW' 'sip-files061.tif'
81e721194a56c6e894054a6553182e8d
465cecd27fa96f4b34b48a85bfcd9607e83a94be
'2011-12-31T12:27:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBX' 'sip-files061.txt'
c3cec66e53d8d146dc1f4890ba5f21a3
b75b5f74379ee9b3ecb8305434f3fbf074fd98be
'2011-12-31T12:35:22-05:00'
describe
'34686' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBY' 'sip-files061thm.jpg'
3022ff5f49a28187d459a80d5cf335ec
d8c81d8ca408bda15298da3c57a9bb186de96dea
describe
'993527' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATBZ' 'sip-files062.jp2'
dfd4c7e7e1cebe3d658d72fe18d94c7e
17e5e3bff82f44e401f9a7a76467ff8e93080a50
describe
'123653' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCA' 'sip-files062.jpg'
031c36d3b53e4126c7471f847b3edf45
8ab7e133a9d984be741b45a30fe4a15f0d553fd1
describe
'27350' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCB' 'sip-files062.pro'
5d34a52facb1f713a31247f82273136c
659a6caae95680bbbf6cc3a9c34ae1f64d549fac
'2011-12-31T12:35:03-05:00'
describe
'60158' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCC' 'sip-files062.QC.jpg'
431c4f4b92c4c6a23a2011bdfb3d6d07
386c463cdfef28a5672baaa4111105710b36e79f
'2011-12-31T12:29:57-05:00'
describe
'8666680' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCD' 'sip-files062.tif'
caffb9427f11abf1c61e30bb004d7fb0
b0adb3f31edf23de843c10249ed93c7b6177e79c
'2011-12-31T12:34:13-05:00'
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCE' 'sip-files062.txt'
b8d7ea0a71df942c258621ced866efd9
9718a325524238ae5dffd4fdb227ce9500476ed0
'2011-12-31T12:28:18-05:00'
describe
'33645' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCF' 'sip-files062thm.jpg'
546721f4f47a4d12a604e275ffa07254
4cf1dd6b585ea5e56dfdb7556989f38c6bffdc3b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCG' 'sip-files063.jp2'
f22a8ec53016e098f0974eec9f5e92b2
c9e27d0e700633505ce08e3f5775c3854e86f495
describe
'136815' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCH' 'sip-files063.jpg'
b34c25c1e79477e9a39bc3f825d82dad
8c66aa7f620b805ae3fdef1524795eeffe99aa3e
'2011-12-31T12:33:32-05:00'
describe
'31257' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCI' 'sip-files063.pro'
1998e8ca6237a4c14e67a5daf10bdada
9ac1294aeb13db3ebf29a8d4dc61733d0ca5db2a
describe
'8667472' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCJ' 'sip-files063.tif'
24850188e0e3a79654ab595b0f52b20b
703cf4a20734e6ddf4d3cd7dc52c90c63ddfd3b7
'2011-12-31T12:26:38-05:00'
describe
'65057' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCK' 'sip-files063.QC.jpg'
474e330b9aad0fbf59c78602101b524f
6e8cac18953a284233cec125a31f1f19b2f1691c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCL' 'sip-files063.txt'
1bf4aaeff1bd1b0029f1fa08dbb14865
01eda6db4150f488606ebbbde5b06905d9394b6e
describe
'35044' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCM' 'sip-files063thm.jpg'
07bf7afce146c39c9023a01f0396dabb
6708bdde3530a0b862ddb37a4069c8803a9e1ac9
'2011-12-31T12:29:14-05:00'
describe
'1080244' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCN' 'sip-files064.jp2'
039d9a9fcf3d5161b1ab6cc82e1eef78
433adda2e95e7a0d4de387660c3b23448aaa4c7d
'2011-12-31T12:38:28-05:00'
describe
'146865' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCO' 'sip-files064.jpg'
f03a911c7897cfeac79310c15d202106
982056e3750602101f05c9b4081a5554935af336
describe
'32948' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCP' 'sip-files064.pro'
7e8e70c1aa5a79c6e6014ab7768098e3
daaa2f78724ddd413f4c360d6488ca5aa7d5c004
describe
'67227' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCQ' 'sip-files064.QC.jpg'
bc389b716623b841a667b5cf52b31516
9db99db6fa7fef8bfe7b6b9a75706c0270de873e
'2011-12-31T12:26:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCR' 'sip-files064.tif'
8edd3d8f7a78ed63c2a5efcec2aca2a0
42d0394eb126ee07623482529de7222afd8b87fc
'2011-12-31T12:31:23-05:00'
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCS' 'sip-files064.txt'
520575a96d8adf287c0443d0a4452dc5
0e2f41addc53596e987435172184c23284998359
describe
'35326' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCT' 'sip-files064thm.jpg'
5390b69646dee5a3205be759f52ed1a8
8316a773c0b373fb884e971f2a49f7c742650081
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCU' 'sip-files065.jp2'
ca39c2b3f5ffe7bbc1e1e548037f6594
35bab5f6700105f663f01dbdd36788d3643697ac
'2011-12-31T12:28:45-05:00'
describe
'142894' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCV' 'sip-files065.jpg'
945c556bffd300cd0a28b715bbc5f43b
736769e081e63aeb298ddea482a7d85daefedc8e
describe
'32424' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCW' 'sip-files065.pro'
a4a1a151ba517465906170f77e42685b
3481e2e5f7f023715439ecd5d0ae6c1081ee50e7
describe
'67127' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCX' 'sip-files065.QC.jpg'
0692300463d41f53838dc1ab62294648
46a7855cc6a58f22daf942bacd9312d2ffcfa56b
'2011-12-31T12:36:07-05:00'
describe
'8667616' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCY' 'sip-files065.tif'
d4d27e2c60c6c11a24ea3eb952120e95
05441ade4b7bbbb1b290d2def2fcc003f2a07837
'2011-12-31T12:38:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATCZ' 'sip-files065.txt'
84f98d950488b8f50f56da17297b25ca
814f6a3867d68c980335330a504b401fdc8b26d3
'2011-12-31T12:35:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDA' 'sip-files065thm.jpg'
5eb685a184c19bacd1d8995c95ea7df4
3c0f991fe28f5e8765f6779a30267e9f2179efe3
'2011-12-31T12:28:29-05:00'
describe
'1080268' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDB' 'sip-files066.jp2'
01b251a94511070d3566b020b970df3a
7d04a84f81728b07018bac543e800fb281e59e9a
'2011-12-31T12:33:12-05:00'
describe
'140570' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDC' 'sip-files066.jpg'
51801fcf00e62789e754b146d67125b3
450cdf5960023df0ac90fa355391b966fa423aa7
describe
'32125' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDD' 'sip-files066.pro'
844d0d1c2a277859cc8df0a858ffa0df
bb52dc1fa6fa817e9913b6ec090ad7a0b5e4159e
describe
'66679' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDE' 'sip-files066.QC.jpg'
490ba22ae07588ed4c73f3ee28ae9fa1
691821bcf26a475b69b4563414c07ef55e9a7f61
describe
'8667576' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDF' 'sip-files066.tif'
40a50ff41115ab057f2044c7436a7c41
586232fe6c7fa164ff5ffbb9cabbbfa374541421
describe
'1239' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDG' 'sip-files066.txt'
4035b0efbf6b1b119bfe7d07f50e5167
8c5487f3002e9a4256f66922c9ee69ae7fdc63a4
'2011-12-31T12:36:02-05:00'
describe
'35584' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDH' 'sip-files066thm.jpg'
f790c6b229c15d242761d2956570227c
22bdf829fff6998a761dc9cbf7a37a7c70ffa8c3
'2011-12-31T12:27:31-05:00'
describe
'1063391' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDI' 'sip-files067.jp2'
fb7c969ef3071728fc2a85212598d007
48e48353621283d4ebdfb48bf49c0cb5e6511807
'2011-12-31T12:37:22-05:00'
describe
'131560' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDJ' 'sip-files067.jpg'
3fb81bacc5177aadf4766eb2a23cd8fc
ef5d4d23c294fdb3e4b71c28fe14592ef97d31cd
describe
'29057' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDK' 'sip-files067.pro'
435b3f3ed167d68e8381ab5b42b3448c
acd0f997f2aa5efb6ad367c0c38b899b87dfd169
'2011-12-31T12:35:33-05:00'
describe
'63434' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDL' 'sip-files067.QC.jpg'
d24cb49dee365e16c9bbce1970704348
b03c8d9d627d2802246a221e86405b96fbd2e1e5
'2011-12-31T12:26:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDM' 'sip-files067.tif'
cded63c3ee3a0ad5e0cc052cc9740607
9ae7b91b8241d70b56acc0e78b8184e1d31a0d8e
'2011-12-31T12:30:02-05:00'
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDN' 'sip-files067.txt'
098875b0090294eaa1e22bb98043617f
865ba75e1061d75ba46a7e776dfc32b728fab82a
'2011-12-31T12:27:02-05:00'
describe
'35042' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDO' 'sip-files067thm.jpg'
8a5f1147675826c75dcfb532b79da61b
ef2af79f1e171dcbf3cce6e6012f2b72db79c029
'2011-12-31T12:28:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDP' 'sip-files068.jp2'
410283d50563832d7a349d95ca08ed58
3d9e5c9b05dfb77b891253f1f4086b06797a89b2
'2011-12-31T12:33:06-05:00'
describe
'134048' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDQ' 'sip-files068.jpg'
b73cc6a2b9677eed16fbefbafadf468b
68bb6e847c357f955647a2d1c62a903038005595
describe
'30513' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDR' 'sip-files068.pro'
a033a922b817c734dbe739bfc26526ae
df3a024879dde6cea310daf9cda66ea509888469
'2011-12-31T12:31:53-05:00'
describe
'62501' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDS' 'sip-files068.QC.jpg'
bd7b098dc9d818aff1a38d5a7f4aa591
b5a85fcb031e128a11ab345d49bdb4d7f93f7fb0
describe
'8667008' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDT' 'sip-files068.tif'
f96a1fbaec5ae3686a34b586d9267ef3
1bcb730c554224103ea7a3b9d0b65f69b5a50d14
'2011-12-31T12:32:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDU' 'sip-files068.txt'
c0dd844c0c5e050661103c3d8c385afa
6cbc239921c291ec05b69bf8051cf88da4d324d6
'2011-12-31T12:30:49-05:00'
describe
'34083' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDV' 'sip-files068thm.jpg'
43876cbffafaa85ed13cf861c802f2dd
831d81a2ea1190ba50197cc24a9857bfa9a3a7ad
describe
'1056419' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDW' 'sip-files069.jp2'
37842700253afca6632f8a2509b9d577
fdd3dd423b71eb5889a02725809f9943c1d6d026
describe
'130418' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDX' 'sip-files069.jpg'
03f607f36a21e9197f77c856b61b010e
7b8facde19f02431ba719c577c6abed900c889e0
'2011-12-31T12:32:53-05:00'
describe
'30344' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDY' 'sip-files069.pro'
90cb45cc811c3b25112a10b3116c4095
8c42ee10a56c765b7bba587bff1475605c5ec4ac
'2011-12-31T12:32:52-05:00'
describe
'61581' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATDZ' 'sip-files069.QC.jpg'
63ad4772d135b8b4136efa68136cbed0
cd16fb7205c4094e5bd1286721ede48e07cd2691
'2011-12-31T12:32:35-05:00'
describe
'8666492' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEA' 'sip-files069.tif'
f7371ee6044cbe4b0c679ed29f160b69
3f71b656c4b1460c48a861f2fed91160ae7f389a
'2011-12-31T12:26:54-05:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEB' 'sip-files069.txt'
d13695538b9bdfc80199ad79928a4fa2
5143440a1893d90c37b19ea64add4a909a1ecc7c
describe
'33301' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEC' 'sip-files069thm.jpg'
5ccf197fe7fd915da5b5119f305f2c81
fe024bd27023625af26b25cd771c56871897bcc8
describe
'1080240' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATED' 'sip-files070.jp2'
d6e7888f8568e14d0a709f5c61383ab5
925e3f795f8713d893edfbe6ed0aed316dce8eed
describe
'133910' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEE' 'sip-files070.jpg'
44840b7e8dba0d6bb49edceaa9e7800a
a8c1533cebe2091e9bfc13ad8f4f15aea66d942a
describe
'30815' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEF' 'sip-files070.pro'
6ce18cd059d3dfeae5e1f2ab97e950ea
c514154e2a6754db626ac15a09436df3c5fccf31
'2011-12-31T12:37:15-05:00'
describe
'8666912' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEG' 'sip-files070.tif'
85bc0a5ae8ebd9e5548a16301d3c381d
2ce990140ac22d69b441c4963ad842b2aabf6062
describe
'63279' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEH' 'sip-files070.QC.jpg'
cc962f683092d048ad1f14b44b188a66
8ba34c77b54814b1e993d011ad51692cbc421065
'2011-12-31T12:35:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEI' 'sip-files070.txt'
e6a8bcab4de485b0e7e4813762eeba47
8e9a7ece6daa37f2f46bf719860bd120ad47c7ad
describe
'34309' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEJ' 'sip-files070thm.jpg'
cba41361343c8095e1ec3ace8a7c86e2
8d632bdff91b4cb7c9e380a5438c209fd9b1e044
describe
'1063297' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEK' 'sip-files071.jp2'
7aa3f7395fa7a72282f2c7a262eeb46f
40d3e7751869167d7a45a09af064b470363ef610
describe
'131706' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEL' 'sip-files071.jpg'
865ed60f70237c939a103cc19669ab5e
27a9787f147db642b083da606f53a2b6982b78bf
describe
'30334' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEM' 'sip-files071.pro'
f8cb6c6c2f52cf94a5e1ab97c6114e5d
f3ee09ec2410e8b70a9c5a92eab0808abe73472d
'2011-12-31T12:32:30-05:00'
describe
'63092' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEN' 'sip-files071.QC.jpg'
9344e5923ac5de0c382b2d9df6a75a4d
61f63ab691a2db4820375503dac37a20ebe1d438
'2011-12-31T12:30:03-05:00'
describe
'8666964' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEO' 'sip-files071.tif'
10de4fe5e2cfd7c5ec7516d93afca78b
01e3e53432cedc0ee47c261b6b966943f71b429d
'2011-12-31T12:33:45-05:00'
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEP' 'sip-files071.txt'
55e5f35cde7ba3f658fcbabd68ce6941
e2287c8c83a34b2080276f69efb19a4f553e7f00
'2011-12-31T12:38:52-05:00'
describe
'34188' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEQ' 'sip-files071thm.jpg'
17f1813722ee42e39beacf10a2b1a24f
62d82a782ff9cf207a9fdf5d3ac216e1895f9265
'2011-12-31T12:37:49-05:00'
describe
'1080199' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATER' 'sip-files072.jp2'
38d900c1fde9800cab594d0556ef05ea
9d4440788125ae3733e25c324988c94a1341c338
describe
'139640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATES' 'sip-files072.jpg'
f4d2a853ebf6a98c495a67b5dfd1b777
e297cd5f6b637fa5fa27087448e437ca689fcf3c
describe
'32659' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATET' 'sip-files072.pro'
83fe382dd660e4a5122ef66b8f45c4a7
1b979186d82afeeefb78de5290cc9e9b62099666
describe
'64638' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEU' 'sip-files072.QC.jpg'
291be099672351ff164030aa028890ad
21b1de7d86d3a88e81a96aaf2985927ff360980a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEV' 'sip-files072.tif'
e4ef5bf6c4cc45033cbcbeace7146157
680396e4110289406d2a2ebeea244036d9263cd4
'2011-12-31T12:30:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEW' 'sip-files072.txt'
a02e44848a4aafaf5ae25c0288f70264
084a4c1e232155901f60432eaad21346ca9b2698
'2011-12-31T12:32:22-05:00'
describe
'34313' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEX' 'sip-files072thm.jpg'
57aa79dc6d6bd5533809d894190164b5
1d8223f7b6f70b77711d59a759c01ddc942ed435
'2011-12-31T12:27:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEY' 'sip-files073.jp2'
fa3f71ba318e0f2b607694410119bec8
cbe3e2185a395e21077be6a40e8b07f5ac41e40c
'2011-12-31T12:27:48-05:00'
describe
'133772' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATEZ' 'sip-files073.jpg'
98881f3b3476ffff6a7c575d5f8585fb
dc9515ef3aae88a53d9453528841f52d78ce860d
describe
'31328' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFA' 'sip-files073.pro'
8d1c60e5dc1c2c60d719c352838f4cf0
957aad9b8b1602b28135494f28ecc8164a398495
describe
'62929' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFB' 'sip-files073.QC.jpg'
36b4c8056af3e88dc1a3f1efd4d9ee1b
a9653875da8b228485bbefb6b410d8be167d968a
describe
'8666720' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFC' 'sip-files073.tif'
dfef9c6fea6ea9fc4e7122f245b4699b
6fed4c16c870e3918d651ae9eb984066a2c46dfc
'2011-12-31T12:32:33-05:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFD' 'sip-files073.txt'
d334f230e2bbb40f4eb810f253fef7c4
29a86a8e30f2715ea79ddd12da99270873440a71
'2011-12-31T12:30:57-05:00'
describe
'33825' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFE' 'sip-files073thm.jpg'
23c15ea58504db9c275293d1f3fea22b
77910004a7fbea719136ec84f380e296a9103a41
describe
'1080271' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFF' 'sip-files074.jp2'
4ae946596899b9f214290e2d7de4461e
386e4300797c36f69c872bb11b8bc4530e92f237
'2011-12-31T12:29:21-05:00'
describe
'136732' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFG' 'sip-files074.jpg'
987b85d51e1908c3cfdc77e01a7785d1
5720f8458dcb5f055ea884781c9c45f61100f493
describe
'32272' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFH' 'sip-files074.pro'
0183628713211bd820eea0f20bf4ae9a
d97ec40e70c6298835990c4d3f4482c94fbdb86c
'2011-12-31T12:33:34-05:00'
describe
'64230' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFI' 'sip-files074.QC.jpg'
0597b11e4f9cccea43c65f6c1f9619c5
c6623ace171dc7d2b2f70a69c26d6ce42fcc31a2
describe
'8667136' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFJ' 'sip-files074.tif'
e53c578bfafd1b56195396d6f2b324c2
cf76329e35e99a94a8e257c39e9d89d7871384cb
'2011-12-31T12:32:29-05:00'
describe
'1253' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFK' 'sip-files074.txt'
0b5d814284d4735212f1d3fccbc4b373
2b80432a74bbc604546211e2bd62a48f0dddf789
'2011-12-31T12:34:21-05:00'
describe
'34528' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFL' 'sip-files074thm.jpg'
b5b805b842291373d951c524ddbf97c6
2099c2e4f5df3c30985deaabc8050f459d5842e0
'2011-12-31T12:36:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFM' 'sip-files075.jp2'
fbdfc5b303a226c60425fbcad2509fab
3ae11b50516286e137b6db6735ebcfb548809ce1
'2011-12-31T12:34:59-05:00'
describe
'137984' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFN' 'sip-files075.jpg'
b0ffa29cc4db891fcec77f10b39bf745
fed5ce103adaeb1ef871ddcda221f342132bc834
'2011-12-31T12:29:34-05:00'
describe
'31565' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFO' 'sip-files075.pro'
9b26537b73014de23df413e5647ede29
36c675ae77dd81edc2db40cde7a3c68ebc3bd3a0
describe
'65117' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFP' 'sip-files075.QC.jpg'
799c308ea1064f93050926f1d842a5eb
06c07cf68a3d5701132850092f74db4937b5d5d5
'2011-12-31T12:26:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFQ' 'sip-files075.tif'
7f86294e19caed3d4257b5ce090da54c
deef9163d22b9885a8d69472a3ee00525678052a
'2011-12-31T12:37:31-05:00'
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFR' 'sip-files075.txt'
0428435d2789b2cde165bac357649861
3ec9328d29824de071a7a78e056962d4462420a0
'2011-12-31T12:39:20-05:00'
describe
'34693' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFS' 'sip-files075thm.jpg'
797065efd4ab55b595a74396a30851d4
648f81be0903d276bab967c7c7f1d219628eeb26
'2011-12-31T12:30:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFT' 'sip-files076.jp2'
27a8cb38c0f9d3fc402c62ac571dd416
cf6b4f06c05acc4285f9a1cfee50f5e8188c9cf0
'2011-12-31T12:31:31-05:00'
describe
'140715' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFU' 'sip-files076.jpg'
c923c5f59b0b1598cf1df13d1e5e768a
99735aec7aba541f4e15510c90e025cd6b3cd5ab
'2011-12-31T12:39:17-05:00'
describe
'32686' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFV' 'sip-files076.pro'
9bd789e4070f7b962f8288af80b76903
314d8ba5636c471442153960c68b4d41ddbdb67a
describe
'65061' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFW' 'sip-files076.QC.jpg'
7b66c0fcc5ebced99660e9b167382541
197406584291ed68c5327551afae88078ac0af45
describe
'8667048' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFX' 'sip-files076.tif'
8b1502026b4558a3b5491331bc102f22
659723e1163fc8d8960fa9cce1ba1c1aa077fef6
'2011-12-31T12:33:09-05:00'
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFY' 'sip-files076.txt'
171647fa487c32f45019bdad2234cf52
c88e093e88bdef98be1e98733287ede47385025e
'2011-12-31T12:34:23-05:00'
describe
'34314' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATFZ' 'sip-files076thm.jpg'
3472f28342c1b5aa614235638cd97542
84d733251e7f5abcde8566a37b9f5cfc08adbdc9
describe
'1080221' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGA' 'sip-files077.jp2'
ca21070da922e3daa4fcb4ded9d9de40
670ac58bea29f9f2b1aced5f4037685cfe09a3ba
describe
'141490' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGB' 'sip-files077.jpg'
11dfdad22a598cf452f0ae72b894e31c
fc81dd9577a56018c4c6b7c103c918984ddca8b7
'2011-12-31T12:29:24-05:00'
describe
'32644' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGC' 'sip-files077.pro'
8bd2cd31b90c7591a60bafd9d70f2f8c
319486fd7b660f02ba400294d076cea36db10c57
describe
'65570' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGD' 'sip-files077.QC.jpg'
e2eaa67d3aefa6db32bdc09fe3c2801f
c1df524f303fcf2547520769b88c23e3ffc5eb4a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGE' 'sip-files077.tif'
224e86a0cc1f12d4002893bc43c3b24c
e886e8a125943137e6b7ffb1b8abdc1a0084c523
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGF' 'sip-files077.txt'
d9d7058ecf979a62315a2eaa080d5f51
e813d2bd1116d6e727614f7f7f21c2b13eec29c3
'2011-12-31T12:33:26-05:00'
describe
'34626' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGG' 'sip-files077thm.jpg'
cbbc5057969e5ba5e05ba68df6b83ab9
45cb1acbdea23249037908e3322b9a137ee8e814
'2011-12-31T12:38:34-05:00'
describe
'322322' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGH' 'sip-files078.jp2'
b7067af55341d1b2de1dfd21b4276b9c
cf1c97754f434f52b9c613a8b7fe9c3420748731
'2011-12-31T12:29:13-05:00'
describe
'55416' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGI' 'sip-files078.jpg'
a51652178b9ab34411f10afc627de4f3
273de625030f39e22cd2efa7024727fec2bcf0f7
describe
'8539' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGJ' 'sip-files078.pro'
6505cacab0a80aad2060389bbddcfa23
6ca94e3b3bd273691ef3fa960921c2613c464581
'2011-12-31T12:39:10-05:00'
describe
'33063' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGK' 'sip-files078.QC.jpg'
31d408983349720b10290960c6f979f3
3712b8fee909c49ffa5a6977f0282602672294bd
'2011-12-31T12:30:35-05:00'
describe
'8662992' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGL' 'sip-files078.tif'
c2d19c79cbcf88bc95e5a72fcc6719f5
bc1671dfd407bb7d601723678a67bfcd5977cd67
describe
'338' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGM' 'sip-files078.txt'
de62d793e08fc43b9aed2b4ae099dda4
c2f88af91a207812e31091b0e6c91d8b183b7703
describe
'709184' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGN' 'sip-files079.jp2'
3bb1af8bab043a99731fef83d59ce558
a53cd6cfef34dc99686baed540824b76ae3226b7
describe
'891380' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGO' 'sip-files078b.jp2'
10e13e78b49ac90159389c1cd1a5615a
79d3ab9ad5e48f8912e972968660d6c73e76799e
describe
'106774' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGP' 'sip-files078b.jpg'
c17faeb295e25721366f04a3e8bfcc69
ddfbf8d8cab54590e069e0ee48d2bcfd9725ad82
'2011-12-31T12:36:31-05:00'
describe
'47806' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGQ' 'sip-files078b.QC.jpg'
883a4c1c767570898d9ba534f9fdb9cd
8cc703f54e6e8b299c5fc0ada45d92ba233dcac3
describe
'8665316' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGR' 'sip-files078b.tif'
7e396df26f28686db19249709c7c6f26
dc041cb9f168fcdb017b92316d31cfb89c61e05d
'2011-12-31T12:28:01-05:00'
describe
'29611' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGS' 'sip-files078bthm.jpg'
68cadd9196d5f2374318b3662a90372c
887acbac5c5ca40ce5c4d53b683f3eda6411a424
'2011-12-31T12:28:41-05:00'
describe
'24647' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGT' 'sip-files078thm.jpg'
864584315f5666572bcc8a5c173c8a95
53d589755acbd5158de1cc0313c5f8a84672303b
'2011-12-31T12:30:22-05:00'
describe
'95449' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGU' 'sip-files079.jpg'
a60fbaf1b68a320fedb0946b1c1f7643
74a79fb0d339245d4c55c7d1efeff3a58a774131
'2011-12-31T12:30:54-05:00'
describe
'19447' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGV' 'sip-files079.pro'
1e5bc7de0d137133d1ba12990b6e6501
028df6d9dd42520813d4115f1db68976ac1334ea
'2011-12-31T12:27:51-05:00'
describe
'48087' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGW' 'sip-files079.QC.jpg'
7074c180070905e5f5971dbfc15264d7
2f3930d6673b15bc756de937fdea53df6e49bbde
'2011-12-31T12:33:57-05:00'
describe
'8664868' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGX' 'sip-files079.tif'
e52b79586922beadb6cb7582a117e376
15ed03b9c3684fe1318f0fdb043d8982bb38ba0e
'2011-12-31T12:30:38-05:00'
describe
'775' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGY' 'sip-files079.txt'
d5800e8c4fe61c03de7c1bf6ef92a2b1
14e9173801720c539df46fa0bd94096af52d88d8
'2011-12-31T12:27:22-05:00'
describe
'28955' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATGZ' 'sip-files079thm.jpg'
b52e4610014b8477164e3e7fc5eba265
dcaf03c536d31beef29e551b2363f12dae44cf78
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHA' 'sip-files080.jp2'
496754f64a695e410663671d1793c454
741d3bb724faf4aa2932d857dd9f9b0427bad969
describe
'137748' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHB' 'sip-files080.jpg'
7a5a7a19df2e588732c7ea9a42491823
11c81d8f86e1ff3df410ebe5fea2d368d89496d9
'2011-12-31T12:33:30-05:00'
describe
'31640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHC' 'sip-files080.pro'
d7f0759206d064dc2120c54367b9ce81
3566d6e176e1e4da350278a7141a5d17083243f8
'2011-12-31T12:36:36-05:00'
describe
'65001' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHD' 'sip-files080.QC.jpg'
0b387b32447c1e49d4241e4ef38cfaf9
b5e1aedc151b5fea5e019fb91b77d982fbae0e0f
'2011-12-31T12:38:32-05:00'
describe
'8667160' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHE' 'sip-files080.tif'
aafe893ed73e00417b6cef16f5b3bb9e
78de27792b4f7440148d61d610beea87b9e4584e
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHF' 'sip-files080.txt'
0d6202a4c90b9379e05258a45f53c74a
b04ca3220924f3e94831299244ac633f70ec434d
'2011-12-31T12:34:17-05:00'
describe
'34681' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHG' 'sip-files080thm.jpg'
aba9fff41856c5ff369b1cfdac6f4daa
ffbb9f917fdb83a0cfafe117c5bfac8e9a73bbeb
'2011-12-31T12:28:23-05:00'
describe
'1080259' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHH' 'sip-files081.jp2'
2d156d859fb4bf4baf46d0b84c4d438e
111094a8a7d1166d0c4b1e103521ce64d4bea728
describe
'137675' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHI' 'sip-files081.jpg'
f5cfe9493baa529db2117cee6bcce3a4
b3e07609f77c9ab6a9daecf89086a36a56014692
'2011-12-31T12:37:39-05:00'
describe
'31445' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHJ' 'sip-files081.pro'
ced71ff8a52cec910fe1ed3eb057dcc0
434eccc9309a6a8e22319fdc28eaa8018f6e35bc
describe
'64394' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHK' 'sip-files081.QC.jpg'
4ddd9c3064e7d8c326a61502b835ad6b
ed81a80fc04733420cbcad23aa69369673b99f64
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHL' 'sip-files081.tif'
83d92aaa3a821df4e97d52f8896d9a0c
242164b951cdbd751c98030cb4e0bfc3b0786c6e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHM' 'sip-files081.txt'
2dcbd526fe7c2a2e0252e2fc70f1db15
12f1d39436b4dc538d31599438c7d2b837a2db79
'2011-12-31T12:36:32-05:00'
describe
'34398' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHN' 'sip-files081thm.jpg'
4cd366c3e42b4d0676f341f3a716c9ac
bd8c2d1a9fc0b59aed73f542db3d9efa78015ad6
'2011-12-31T12:30:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHO' 'sip-files082.jp2'
02ac2a69eb8d21e245600c7217d84790
a09c7b9550f693fe442c5a76fe38223ccae33d20
describe
'139725' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHP' 'sip-files082.jpg'
413c0d567e5c5986a5bb019c7a7f4afd
e78fc15ff39e4265ffa15214e95b789f3cadfeb5
'2011-12-31T12:38:59-05:00'
describe
'32177' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHQ' 'sip-files082.pro'
fd691988883a73f51ca448d3b31da62e
1e7fe53939f1e14b17a1db62b6a94c6a1cf199bb
describe
'65892' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHR' 'sip-files082.QC.jpg'
e52ca672150c2bdd3ecfb6c76506b646
34d9c0260077694dcc0bd1e00b784502113ac263
describe
'8667372' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHS' 'sip-files082.tif'
574b1149cc1c6171d7b1091c50e14000
8287fe431886bf1144a92550cdf106ee5de4c4b1
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHT' 'sip-files082.txt'
3e3b4e63999bbd945cac4eae8edc9f60
dbe63676bbce5322f0fc8ae9ee8c40bfb82dd864
'2011-12-31T12:31:41-05:00'
describe
'34886' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHU' 'sip-files082thm.jpg'
eca13d5a7df4245fc308953028c0a495
8a29e7f90841545a3aea586a66a518594f8c7b55
'2011-12-31T12:28:54-05:00'
describe
'1080188' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHV' 'sip-files083.jp2'
333a12aef4a1ef36d861b015700bcbf1
fecdfac50ad7e44b92866db0f8b1db4854d0c2da
describe
'138697' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHW' 'sip-files083.jpg'
a622ae2792a33738af00ee599ae179d8
521109eeb859a1e9122cc6e7b20cf3126f9fa5e6
describe
'32146' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHX' 'sip-files083.pro'
2ec0ee3e13901d00e721e52868bbbdd3
7466f2331170a6a9a4179b36155e6d692922ee83
'2011-12-31T12:34:16-05:00'
describe
'64780' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHY' 'sip-files083.QC.jpg'
d1ed0753f7236e15130a53fbaf037be0
2945df2b6edb59341dbc4e267cf268ba5923beff
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATHZ' 'sip-files083.tif'
70e34e98b19e54fd04c664442810af7f
38e64cd35ac2714b5facee5a7c5a627605625ba3
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIA' 'sip-files083.txt'
c0e1931722cf4e139e322db3a182e5ca
6205ca9f442fbbf7e78606f4cba8f41bdcdfdc2d
'2011-12-31T12:33:03-05:00'
describe
'34223' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIB' 'sip-files083thm.jpg'
2e900ebf0841c1a881a0760e40060c4f
804d9fff9620fef94bf8065883969543dcb2709e
describe
'1046375' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIC' 'sip-files084.jp2'
12b405263d4b518b3405651096dedbf2
7db7e23e05754533c8b98d3f8901f390d9293729
'2011-12-31T12:29:09-05:00'
describe
'129012' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATID' 'sip-files084.jpg'
ccf56cc994b2ea6dcc9db49689d05964
dee324ec399f08492d0f7836e8d4a82cfbfa975e
'2011-12-31T12:27:44-05:00'
describe
'29495' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIE' 'sip-files084.pro'
8e8ce5776aea34ec4919b82a239f09e2
52fd01bef91d602700ed8381ca65b7671d44732b
describe
'62344' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIF' 'sip-files084.QC.jpg'
94c01ba879913e48c5bbb945f70959a5
169d1991798b918bb3246134629eead469a8eb9f
describe
'8666836' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIG' 'sip-files084.tif'
9779c8d704f755c7f0a6efebcd0c222a
21fc3ac228bf87fa8b44712c8fd6d85c37b46d42
'2011-12-31T12:29:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIH' 'sip-files084.txt'
5d2ebd88891c0c7017b46402b36468fc
d0fb829499d6cc34658c8409e3044fa3fb49be66
'2011-12-31T12:37:12-05:00'
describe
'33970' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATII' 'sip-files084thm.jpg'
173ca76c10df51a313effc0b54ad69ad
a762f3188957f202aa2ea1c08f1ed636d4b887f1
'2011-12-31T12:28:10-05:00'
describe
'1007710' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIJ' 'sip-files085.jp2'
86175047a04173d42333c9acd2c99352
0fcdaeed9d0a54921334d8372dd816757f08c028
describe
'125424' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIK' 'sip-files085.jpg'
37c55f13cdbe282f60dce8616302e835
4f7c1730b76124329ac49894946c7bae79bd6625
describe
'29257' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIL' 'sip-files085.pro'
35c28a2f0c066848adb897cc32a7baec
6fa273a30c0e7eeb512db749898b4ae0488c3c76
describe
'60412' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIM' 'sip-files085.QC.jpg'
bfabacd2c3529e0892a111ba4998a232
b78f7a3a7ca473d713a8855cd7cec78136696a00
'2011-12-31T12:33:13-05:00'
describe
'8666672' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIN' 'sip-files085.tif'
eef3e3f1398141e242981b28b4d5ff9e
4de445f424d798ab8718a51d9007471bee1fcdb5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIO' 'sip-files085.txt'
86b95584f9f22811342b0007370cfba4
921e50132ef2e8aba55285fdfe0f2af9dff2d8ba
describe
'33597' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIP' 'sip-files085thm.jpg'
d2c697f89ed870639b70ed6ebe37fb7c
38b4f990548b53872e5741b353cb5367d28b91fe
describe
'1009732' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIQ' 'sip-files086.jp2'
54d3c6849db8765643e05b1e01dcd5e5
6ef5b6034dd624f507a63f64051611f79398117d
'2011-12-31T12:34:54-05:00'
describe
'126510' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIR' 'sip-files086.jpg'
f5df7cb409e05600e7e2cc1ad95fb46f
4336ad4da58e69f887c0dd446b7f7d7a5db1770d
describe
'28520' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIS' 'sip-files086.pro'
a232fa16fd7ab42b20c01558167c59e8
e9350e0d0c1dd46ee8a5934967976adde28e9a1e
'2011-12-31T12:36:47-05:00'
describe
'60434' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIT' 'sip-files086.QC.jpg'
cb8415198d29694a34623e6b821b21e5
646f3ef01b7c4f8b36c1e343ab6502b8d98b9c06
describe
'8666784' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIU' 'sip-files086.tif'
5e2e6a9376abd7c1081956aff3419201
63f98e836e9999c96f435c5628fe612738e97824
'2011-12-31T12:34:32-05:00'
describe
'1120' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIV' 'sip-files086.txt'
a5d134200346fb4b47a1fe78454d95c4
9807dc1097e6427ee3079f0eeb7ed1d9ff5e32c7
describe
'33703' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIW' 'sip-files086thm.jpg'
7589664ff76fb359d43867bdb573d227
346ec877654af8f137b8fbf70be9485904783269
'2011-12-31T12:37:32-05:00'
describe
'1080182' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIX' 'sip-files087.jp2'
172b83306eeee11ff7845c719c91ad8a
9a47f2f5737dfa8cecf27592ffdbc0769a0ef143
'2011-12-31T12:29:53-05:00'
describe
'133134' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIY' 'sip-files087.jpg'
b68a06d7f18bf52d696432eaa89cd8ac
ca8c74815d2774613ca0b2907773eeb63c14d2bb
describe
'30570' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATIZ' 'sip-files087.pro'
e8287cb3ece399749832ce4120a6f1e6
717fafb67f649584dd84d517b885761abba29823
describe
'62823' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJA' 'sip-files087.QC.jpg'
54f8a244fd5d4b3837e9f97eae644046
863d48e29f934dd9d4921a9ed014d0fb73b799fe
describe
'8666696' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJB' 'sip-files087.tif'
7464df30879608a44f578e24b1d58dc4
b8c45de1741e7ea7f42009cea1c626be98972d9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJC' 'sip-files087.txt'
d3b1f596c5bdebb1319055a0764758ea
70fb7d828fdf0e3e551f391acbec148f3f8f3c1e
'2011-12-31T12:38:26-05:00'
describe
'33844' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJD' 'sip-files087thm.jpg'
2b004da3daebadde3bb424f9c2499b17
fbfdbe7e39b0a446f0d568169fb67021c07b16f8
describe
'1080290' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJE' 'sip-files088.jp2'
4cfc18166a7ef665137770732d531aca
82608e4eb2176f1ab56c973c3f3fd3d12018518b
'2011-12-31T12:30:21-05:00'
describe
'140634' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJF' 'sip-files088.jpg'
ce15f6adf55d5b9c2011fd888c36417e
e568c878c45332781a2f457db4ea300d37d5eb5d
describe
'32175' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJG' 'sip-files088.pro'
1ebd9a08a5802432d6986428bb863eae
793d73c8fcf36474e48abda1af3dc5ecef54e3c6
describe
'65169' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJH' 'sip-files088.QC.jpg'
3d2563617b7bf7415aea63c94fb9e694
3f504c383eef2b2f8e67a752d45ed3ac81ec4722
'2011-12-31T12:31:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJI' 'sip-files088.tif'
dad1a035c1f6d07d58201515ee7256d6
5c4a3056a772214be8f7883fa33caead927991af
'2011-12-31T12:39:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJJ' 'sip-files088.txt'
70e74d7eb50df5b68cc1884d943eb77a
1cda88945c2656f4db618eca1132f128f7b65d18
'2011-12-31T12:35:44-05:00'
describe
'34417' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJK' 'sip-files088thm.jpg'
e8ba15116c0b34bd6d90050e5b6bd1a0
13a26f28fb02bb5de678978e112d289f683220ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJL' 'sip-files089.jp2'
6109bd43ed857f2fb6a87182a4898ffa
089882a92df47ac809e4e7db7843becff38f04d6
'2011-12-31T12:37:03-05:00'
describe
'135118' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJM' 'sip-files089.jpg'
f7df6be8015fd6b502f93588708b84c0
200d2f3378c46305183414164cfca1d95142b61d
describe
'32406' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJN' 'sip-files089.pro'
66a2adac3698e59b3492d2a22303a2ef
f8e13cc6c8264c4957b816acf8f64eb4bd31e740
'2011-12-31T12:27:40-05:00'
describe
'63677' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJO' 'sip-files089.QC.jpg'
3836a52231249a2b3af711e3c5428969
0920f06dce91f866e37411e58906d150015fef6c
'2011-12-31T12:27:49-05:00'
describe
'8666896' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJP' 'sip-files089.tif'
432049ecfa80258eea34dc03c80288c8
3abdfd9b17adebe359eb7ffed5641c37d0f92783
'2011-12-31T12:34:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJQ' 'sip-files089.txt'
99c7080e8111a24e2247072cbe61f13f
11225688bc64bddf170240ab4e4dc6f7d50610e7
describe
'34135' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJR' 'sip-files089thm.jpg'
3b45c48e8d95cd2bb83cbbb2bc55458a
e706b871ade52fef744d1506e71f179993495346
describe
'1063341' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJS' 'sip-files090.jp2'
9b2ecf2fadc02ef2784276ffdf2f59eb
96be099d2ad3500628280e3c0d6b5541c4f1528c
'2011-12-31T12:30:44-05:00'
describe
'131206' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJT' 'sip-files090.jpg'
ab72cd698c23ea440b64663d9d55ac92
38fcb21d4152db6fe419a4dc4e376cc2f6c47e1e
'2011-12-31T12:33:33-05:00'
describe
'31095' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJU' 'sip-files090.pro'
4387ca129a04ce0f0b698c40e1454568
d11dd688d65ab37bae6d03b47078d3dcb78b6e49
describe
'62691' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJV' 'sip-files090.QC.jpg'
b4ed2c3aaa2348dbfc3565e95b8a79f8
3df94795164fbc6d3991da89304a49c65c057de5
describe
'8667032' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJW' 'sip-files090.tif'
d728d193d73594a5e4b0ae78bf94b786
42c79301341c1e13abf994e87a72413b18d2e388
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJX' 'sip-files090.txt'
6294ad2b0ba968b35c63c64a3ed88cae
09f1771b35d5c6b9e9b9815f2731915ca5a45af9
describe
'34254' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJY' 'sip-files090thm.jpg'
b28b95295f33bebb14dcbb22d394a7b5
7294686a052867fdbf1dd1f9f33a78754c949139
'2011-12-31T12:37:58-05:00'
describe
'1080204' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATJZ' 'sip-files091.jp2'
794e4664b91a4dd190466427c5291f15
4210946d6827b93a7cd1f3b1388a43f137586e06
describe
'136706' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKA' 'sip-files091.jpg'
8f01771668cb015ed43c658ab273c678
f825a5cfcac7851d9e2e2419d20d797f1ba529de
describe
'31617' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKB' 'sip-files091.pro'
a20c3df0acae4c8dce0799c0b95485c2
fca54339ecc6de692be1d92cea8b872b27b4cd69
describe
'64079' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKC' 'sip-files091.QC.jpg'
897038b02274713ebf1499c74f60e109
970ff48474ef3a5d1120d3ee280e2f977c2c3b31
'2011-12-31T12:37:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKD' 'sip-files091.tif'
033305591fe9794787ef6a03f7ef40a4
f5a1237bc989c0253ab7f25ed582662d0c1a3ce0
'2011-12-31T12:35:31-05:00'
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKE' 'sip-files091.txt'
1bb7ccf41e99862abdd85d6a7093d2a8
56d1ad2f07cbbfabc8ad0b00f1561cd49e262f06
'2011-12-31T12:31:42-05:00'
describe
'34006' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKF' 'sip-files091thm.jpg'
71c246b72e5bfe4bc344b3605f2ceba3
e8ccc4cee0015055ae6bdcad1659ca049a27ee5b
describe
'1020690' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKG' 'sip-files092.jp2'
c45e9e16141901dbd4719f74754d89d8
64f2afcc436263eb4be6145112b919c92ecfbc0c
'2011-12-31T12:29:56-05:00'
describe
'126861' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKH' 'sip-files092.jpg'
08d60316c7c91334ad072ea7b1d867ed
01ecdff8f54302f4bc93eda8e8a3c131635b138d
'2011-12-31T12:35:53-05:00'
describe
'29496' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKI' 'sip-files092.pro'
12e89bfbaa1afefebac9eee404f449fc
995acb43f35f3932f54486651e0d9792d736c622
'2011-12-31T12:38:58-05:00'
describe
'62301' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKJ' 'sip-files092.QC.jpg'
5607cb1cf0dda452f1f4555be9ea0a7f
757e42bbdc371428b13a666e42bbf2ac2a60f1b6
describe
'8667076' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKK' 'sip-files092.tif'
7d243b26a0c8c26b4c3c10213b43fc24
4d531b5e5b90ca1391cedd39fa95b7d614725860
'2011-12-31T12:28:34-05:00'
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKL' 'sip-files092.txt'
66a2efc6dbc9662568746df7a8e02f1b
89d0fa6dbb9e24d5e301c3f225fcaabe7bf22afe
describe
'34443' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKM' 'sip-files092thm.jpg'
a4d5cebdb73d487a4830e31425986097
82a739d3a3d2922cc9e49bf63224b3b98fb020a1
'2011-12-31T12:36:51-05:00'
describe
'1080263' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKN' 'sip-files093.jp2'
1455282b53337bfae60b8388cebda23c
a95131563c4a3c475c33b7163d7c40d7121d1f5c
describe
'143492' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKO' 'sip-files093.jpg'
6976cc111c1be937135b3fcc704cdb8e
87bee70f960bedf68470f88e7c4504498b7cf8e7
describe
'33449' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKP' 'sip-files093.pro'
fbc2ce6dff2e743e3e2589ed392aea5e
c3b7da1b1bd5fba90f5e93d9188d04abf7645ce2
'2011-12-31T12:34:48-05:00'
describe
'66273' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKQ' 'sip-files093.QC.jpg'
188f928fa0ff27a46700f86be22bdf97
578084e0de3adb6dae11bdc32f9cf49c970e1639
'2011-12-31T12:37:42-05:00'
describe
'8667320' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKR' 'sip-files093.tif'
d3f8a521eb09aa1333a85ee88b990116
bc273566c90b1773ba4e2d5b017153b70a646854
'2011-12-31T12:33:31-05:00'
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKS' 'sip-files093.txt'
c7dadcb7d6335e18876f114b7fb81d1c
074a648c0b3c8572b18c9b4751cd43d6ce31afc7
describe
'34792' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKT' 'sip-files093thm.jpg'
703f5e57b179bb95b13edf9b5fb8733a
c4bbed528c3dc59f6c2d459e70d2b1aa8a78ec97
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKU' 'sip-files094.jp2'
91bcb4a7a94a4ce45aac7e47caad256e
b0d5e040de9a90b71110562c39d0fccebd65b9a0
describe
'138527' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKV' 'sip-files094.jpg'
06f0d2ff970f368a24cc714850cb2e4f
b22dcc61af0517f4fc90bd594a815b24c5f971e3
'2011-12-31T12:35:05-05:00'
describe
'31444' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKW' 'sip-files094.pro'
8d9360039fe6f526affdc9b3eb9f6732
2953ad213ad371d99e23bd91f28d6578563e23a3
describe
'63890' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKX' 'sip-files094.QC.jpg'
bc4db5e610a1e4c7458f646bc1562a42
aa00e23d2ef868977bfacbf4f654176ff9e2eb25
'2011-12-31T12:39:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKY' 'sip-files094.tif'
28a81ccb7adb92d2d61c09962e1e359c
9a86b8baa6b89c893813efea514ffbe8bbddc113
'2011-12-31T12:32:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATKZ' 'sip-files094.txt'
82c6b97cbe21a5999c9bc37bc4817cf4
14c96037e796ad0837edb342cebb10968d3a5053
describe
'33712' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLA' 'sip-files094thm.jpg'
baef0274b45267b21575e01e8cad8f4a
bd9fd4950931596fad6adbbc096baf3dd2a15b18
'2011-12-31T12:28:02-05:00'
describe
'1055518' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLB' 'sip-files095.jp2'
8e1ef563111a466173308022d0107958
e17298dc294786adb4ec5d4a1fe006da32d08e0b
'2011-12-31T12:39:41-05:00'
describe
'130806' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLC' 'sip-files095.jpg'
e5966b277f6b6f854e206d332ac6b7f8
6cb622e4e88a1ecb527455076f54d089402c6414
'2011-12-31T12:34:35-05:00'
describe
'29738' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLD' 'sip-files095.pro'
f7f144049956bca26b271c7c47a560ea
5c968fa60a3771f2b461a0683afb2eb987a96f22
describe
'61756' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLE' 'sip-files095.QC.jpg'
7d9c099d1824a8d22466cd1040b1f60a
1db1a17b9ea1bbdc6eb9a4768285e7c28d1fd338
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLF' 'sip-files095.tif'
ef3a41119a973199d9a4955285b0c786
51f1621cd7eebdf0bcb95480362242790e1bca27
'2011-12-31T12:33:29-05:00'
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLG' 'sip-files095.txt'
86c7ebbcf76238c22a0817020ff8076d
4cd4febf3f4a1640a7d06320b0fc111b22cf8642
'2011-12-31T12:38:35-05:00'
describe
'33653' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLH' 'sip-files095thm.jpg'
9342a353ebbac8149d4d586612129451
f7e6e5da4a831b196f1af2783279be9f76353102
'2011-12-31T12:34:51-05:00'
describe
'1080264' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLI' 'sip-files096.jp2'
800f3702632d8a16c179084984c330a4
3fd3d72bac2f5b47d9c0a4d24e133d547f17c95a
describe
'134280' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLJ' 'sip-files096.jpg'
95a8cb3630ee9cb44ec7fb2bb74da889
03b77d76b6d6e4e4aef595bdf72b4c72847f152c
'2011-12-31T12:35:55-05:00'
describe
'31266' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLK' 'sip-files096.pro'
9cf39804457451e17d3e6861e574a989
9cde1744d185ea3384f45434a4dadf31d28c35bd
describe
'62418' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLL' 'sip-files096.QC.jpg'
e7051b273c8e3ffd54fbd91e4691dfb9
308900b045bbbec4e765e99ea0974338f7e27c13
describe
'8666712' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLM' 'sip-files096.tif'
387c147d0e2595a7a2bf31ad130acaf1
6550e158947326e6dd5e0909c810ace16732ff6d
'2011-12-31T12:29:22-05:00'
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLN' 'sip-files096.txt'
50182b7f52ca022730bfcfcf46b58b65
2c8d329f059176970265086e515d72033103b8fd
describe
'33694' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLO' 'sip-files096thm.jpg'
1b4c14aa74e5cb4bdcfc952794660755
09d54a46f0dcb08170b369272f7ac4440713c279
describe
'1017003' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLP' 'sip-files097.jp2'
743e7f2b608b02d6bfdf1af1a6ba8efe
2ae0104d248aae3de13a65ef66fcf3b39c430f05
'2011-12-31T12:27:17-05:00'
describe
'126475' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLQ' 'sip-files097.jpg'
b7b1e5fc9db7ba920d178b3f8877b409
55172f592cf15c93cf6d8700f0f4399204c052da
'2011-12-31T12:38:18-05:00'
describe
'28966' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLR' 'sip-files097.pro'
feebd696058b528a6fcbb0761568aac3
84f1b365d9dba594f02e121b220783b9e40daa11
'2011-12-31T12:35:04-05:00'
describe
'60747' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLS' 'sip-files097.QC.jpg'
9825fbf16c574132350a5b2a68ac1310
59403c01e9bcc40298f1d11b2c3591cc968d72f6
'2011-12-31T12:31:55-05:00'
describe
'8666860' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLT' 'sip-files097.tif'
6a58c7bae79e4846a98e1d8d76dccdfc
7db12cd1225c8dcecd1473b0d730f054f6cc6613
'2011-12-31T12:29:29-05:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLU' 'sip-files097.txt'
cb608d2ef3f42692548e48b719cb8f14
d59c8ef3f0369c6d27ab4b30b82b4dbfa8ce5114
'2011-12-31T12:28:44-05:00'
describe
'33884' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLV' 'sip-files097thm.jpg'
6de0d18892615b5044ae10d9d22f6778
9a3023bb6363a03864f77b1d83f772f7a4f66645
'2011-12-31T12:33:28-05:00'
describe
'1057082' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLW' 'sip-files098.jp2'
78f44b1fa645f2d4d97ab3c9293fe167
eb9ef95aa31e043b3c6ebaa1e18a926aaa435b8e
describe
'130640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLX' 'sip-files098.jpg'
79c7c4631a969d27cf0c167b967d2a6f
19dba018632af61ece0a949bc30027515cc39a98
'2011-12-31T12:27:06-05:00'
describe
'29533' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLY' 'sip-files098.pro'
e40c4b9f1622192b77acab62540539c9
5b10632671d680ad3c3aac40bf3e932deb765fe0
'2011-12-31T12:39:00-05:00'
describe
'61868' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATLZ' 'sip-files098.QC.jpg'
a4678faa04ba5ad60b623d8414056486
5ef7095ea1dac44dad25ebcccf159e1c96a3d973
describe
'8666944' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMA' 'sip-files098.tif'
113cdcdf08798edcf54795f9a575ae23
9ccfff3b4430db8e2a66212e6a55a1c93dec7579
'2011-12-31T12:30:51-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMB' 'sip-files098.txt'
0cbe0936dfa6719443098742b3e3e2c9
90e4ddd2749aa8ce18ea950b8da52c46c6adc199
'2011-12-31T12:35:56-05:00'
describe
'34185' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMC' 'sip-files098thm.jpg'
5f4c870b95d4e37a4c3f78a616d9fb19
1f0429ee115e8cd37de25c323628c440a5d765d8
describe
'509244' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMD' 'sip-files099.jp2'
afd8e72042934c31247a790f3deb94f0
e4a80b1d635222e9eba237bff704fe975cc52d5c
'2011-12-31T12:28:27-05:00'
describe
'75303' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATME' 'sip-files099.jpg'
8355113ce8e4bfaa088cca387dcf1f1d
42a41da6eae83b0ef185c165f7f07d01eda983c8
describe
'14291' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMF' 'sip-files099.pro'
e7c4f52e2c720d3f97eb0c5307284ccc
2c283e245bba58cbab03330e6a0e55c887368084
describe
'40508' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMG' 'sip-files099.QC.jpg'
b5f169387912ed438fa8a2ee83809dfe
c6bbb6b19838f3661946b7d7a2e09af5385f5b34
describe
'8663772' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMH' 'sip-files099.tif'
81d57380b052c1252dd9b2e530592bf4
c5fe1b9c906199f003eb5f1aafca85e5234b4b44
describe
'562' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMI' 'sip-files099.txt'
8137a4b3bed922d89178c5d9801c79be
1e3484a17290226b384b277815718aa856b7211c
describe
'26588' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMJ' 'sip-files099thm.jpg'
d2143e8340163f225362c3e3b0cf65f9
b36b4a43f6ea4e9e27fdb8c3369e332ea5f560bd
describe
'773165' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMK' 'sip-files100.jp2'
67d50eb70fd7912e594cdda82c6681a9
3b3744490d3c009325faab9580e65f3d114c2f05
describe
'101504' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATML' 'sip-files100.jpg'
99c04f260c010cbbf7b1487aec8245ae
badf416577b114173ff045ea225c75207d2bb1ba
describe
'20944' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMM' 'sip-files100.pro'
77f5fca92c220582c5c85ee2c401630d
fa13a456cb7b088f4bdeb8a90f956a01bae42d41
describe
'51009' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMN' 'sip-files100.QC.jpg'
b1b5f5e6574dd6ab761ee36254b73b8b
6aefc0353bdf52f7b2d37a3bd4fab7af0c83de4e
describe
'8665072' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMO' 'sip-files100.tif'
de895114534422829e0727d11bd2db5a
45683968972b247a5a40a1c59b661cd4c6f3421a
describe
'824' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMP' 'sip-files100.txt'
db3586248d526fd2dd9ffbb311337f51
e5cdc081cd2220ac70a0efa5cb97ad4c33cad98d
describe
'903959' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMQ' 'sip-files100a.jp2'
38246f53256fe976357aa00a7ddf8339
002adb6278a736a1e588884f0c43944c5fcd1b60
describe
'108204' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMR' 'sip-files100a.jpg'
6d772bae65a9142d44fc993a44dd3627
f6362e6dfe114a2ecab3dbcbc40100a1ff27d624
'2011-12-31T12:28:28-05:00'
describe
'47682' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMS' 'sip-files100a.QC.jpg'
4ba55c39eb3fa474d12ac90fc369e65b
0fd2e19df69c13fa5698be2781d48d0647ea0cfa
describe
'8665160' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMT' 'sip-files100a.tif'
9289118f78bac4d9e64cef85d0c2f3b2
f6f7864c15d0fa25d91722cc224ec0b48b8f6295
describe
'29362' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMU' 'sip-files100athm.jpg'
f7af141e0934ed175dcf39c1f959162a
2c838bf65f9d46af45e328c0bf8a04cfabd6dded
describe
'29739' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMV' 'sip-files100thm.jpg'
a245ab0829de7eb7281ab05979adf0f6
8e2e4529b90f2acb2dfd0f7f6c576572cb81d474
'2011-12-31T12:26:51-05:00'
describe
'1050542' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMW' 'sip-files101.jp2'
f62cc533ce54bd46b7a66ecf43ec13b4
2672d454948719528ba63ac68d9f4749b7b001dd
'2011-12-31T12:33:39-05:00'
describe
'129704' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMX' 'sip-files101.jpg'
8f6c45f6946f09dd9ea04d0f37bb03c9
1780232341bc9f50afa342e02805e0e52642b986
describe
'31079' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMY' 'sip-files101.pro'
48e71c110a9b913295f6655bfd62db32
3a930587b142cacc2b18394221564e32df1eb8ab
'2011-12-31T12:35:45-05:00'
describe
'61361' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATMZ' 'sip-files101.QC.jpg'
946507590cfc90525e5163765b3695c3
b16cb7fb68a9687f1dc0780c98dbf41ca894230d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNA' 'sip-files101.tif'
83fbbf3fdb691bd9f34d3259925fb3ed
2fb4da190c2b065e2b22baed1b1e9821cbaef9d8
'2011-12-31T12:35:49-05:00'
describe
'1271' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNB' 'sip-files101.txt'
94bc6118973930cfc1a579e6a30266f0
c917b2d044c364d2f2832f652051cc713757c272
describe
'33900' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNC' 'sip-files101thm.jpg'
e7f12f42bafbfb3698944764a451a476
3bf4420b1752bc4807d69fb01763bcef22febd3b
describe
'1080288' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATND' 'sip-files102.jp2'
2f46d72be90869f865b242d54c15cbae
d5515d05a1d16b953d6b55902dd501ef72419400
describe
'140162' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNE' 'sip-files102.jpg'
76c7b30b872c9e62bfa3098a2e39db86
a1f62edb855e3654baa900162d522b5c87587314
'2011-12-31T12:33:52-05:00'
describe
'31398' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNF' 'sip-files102.pro'
40115f7f10834c6faa3343cad59be14f
47a2614fa54fdb7ba5c7c5e96bb7f1a199897c99
describe
'65448' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNG' 'sip-files102.QC.jpg'
acfc8951f835b7e1d0b8be794c8c2f35
3ce65089cbe55c38a105e11212aa5c84e563e076
'2011-12-31T12:28:47-05:00'
describe
'8667456' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNH' 'sip-files102.tif'
002e51dfc939a5478446809c352be11e
8cb6cc9be3dc5e68bc42fe727ecb6ff21f74b777
'2011-12-31T12:34:58-05:00'
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNI' 'sip-files102.txt'
83cdff57de34f21c35a438e561bf3ee9
9a974dab382707d95cc1791b1537a8337479919a
'2011-12-31T12:35:30-05:00'
describe
'35297' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNJ' 'sip-files102thm.jpg'
41b345380a66200b70989a51e5574e9b
2e3e7866aa9fe0c27b2f187eb065dae1d93ee1a6
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNK' 'sip-files103.jp2'
21ad90e9dde36823cf18e42a45e3b731
69843a929fe8025cf613aebfb57c4f1fe633c936
'2011-12-31T12:39:02-05:00'
describe
'136371' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNL' 'sip-files103.jpg'
d5c41d68a86d9f0e6a2d139df7511b9a
6f5e26faf633881a15eec00c261e4cf2bf55f1b7
describe
'30746' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNM' 'sip-files103.pro'
eaf491f0b996594154b48ed31319ecfa
8a52466e4d4c2997d1ae535e79fa3dd3cea2e2cb
describe
'64878' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNN' 'sip-files103.QC.jpg'
48b1e5fbeae97b65745d9b548d1bedce
d0621e683269f314d103e87c057f8fd3febb389d
'2011-12-31T12:32:47-05:00'
describe
'8667124' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNO' 'sip-files103.tif'
192447b40e245964f5aabdde6cb48d35
c5a72ec0b23811c365b65aea6b61b5edcbe59f6c
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNP' 'sip-files103.txt'
9e24155c79b98cbd3637d3c4c7202ade
b10cf4535cfab4a95fd550dbbdf97f293db05cb5
describe
'34757' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNQ' 'sip-files103thm.jpg'
6315762473ea859dce2da08839ab1eb1
f8e2afc475ee50e7bad1ed96e9677045c24a5af1
'2011-12-31T12:29:49-05:00'
describe
'1080252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNR' 'sip-files104.jp2'
8d2af47d0c691a5b10092fa4a29ddd96
40e3d820273b3c662125248f234e9fea088222cc
describe
'144362' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNS' 'sip-files104.jpg'
6b6982277c0b47a19ec4455d16121996
be72424e1ee539392ccbd08b471e57ba24b6e7fe
describe
'32966' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNT' 'sip-files104.pro'
b551c1cdc653ad277e52490721b55d4f
975069f87aa5b194ce1c4bcb78695d2e3b09711d
describe
'67848' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNU' 'sip-files104.QC.jpg'
827eef90af45156129e5e319b93936b0
96a1b84b3ac9f358888c3c8fffaed414b0094da0
'2011-12-31T12:27:41-05:00'
describe
'8667760' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNV' 'sip-files104.tif'
f5926e95c238b9b3656f1c7f499a2442
5ff36628bf7e9217f1884af7bfc823b63cd43fbf
'2011-12-31T12:39:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNW' 'sip-files104.txt'
bf22ff913ad69a1aefa13c72ab734d2b
e707d8eae3b109d622a3acae1fe502d8b10b58ab
'2011-12-31T12:36:50-05:00'
describe
'35949' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNX' 'sip-files104thm.jpg'
02a45bd34498fec8aa59c873ab446aba
24c5dce387cfa86f2e639f27110f5ceae2315e59
'2011-12-31T12:33:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNY' 'sip-files105.jp2'
faf533b9b674f3e2eb57ee46629f2faf
afd954ff9cf4857f4784faa1b3e36be6da4c8df8
describe
'136599' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATNZ' 'sip-files105.jpg'
f20c164cbf12dd2e0fced31eabc8f6a8
0bad190d4b89678b1dca0b956b7f2747cd4d149e
'2011-12-31T12:31:05-05:00'
describe
'30881' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOA' 'sip-files105.pro'
d71831057be497be775524ae17e34241
5d6a073defff61c09d74e346d8fa73bde1f57996
'2011-12-31T12:39:19-05:00'
describe
'64350' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOB' 'sip-files105.QC.jpg'
d720bea2cdec225a8cabee6e6b9a4037
b786eca5d549f70d780f863fcfc6249366d6c927
describe
'8667172' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOC' 'sip-files105.tif'
9fa9ff87d46890069fbc7185839d6f89
acbcafb1fa2bfc5060a8fa7c0ef8ddb0f57cc701
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOD' 'sip-files105.txt'
3714b243692a341ddd57ca1b16fcea8e
1676c98c3142f445336a73b13b66637b5876534f
'2011-12-31T12:34:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOE' 'sip-files105thm.jpg'
a56e411fa1a220eb3222da5ab778ea51
9f62fe19fc60f6b48e31b2c80fd108dca15650e0
describe
'1080280' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOF' 'sip-files106.jp2'
4725cd1ed6456c4209e620cdb6513a96
f05f699002a6c6b68b8f1b2184ffebc195f15bca
describe
'136640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOG' 'sip-files106.jpg'
a1fceb072400186bff42179550d5a56b
139445add91db46d0bca9f4313798dec744ace0b
describe
'30300' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOH' 'sip-files106.pro'
8f0225be972fbc95cda7c1fcf57c9a10
cf55bc55c572baad97451d407e25255b31159906
'2011-12-31T12:26:59-05:00'
describe
'64846' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOI' 'sip-files106.QC.jpg'
d57fcb5add8c566e8bf346d50a367d03
f29c78958b10449d505879a7195c5ad99546b9df
'2011-12-31T12:37:59-05:00'
describe
'8667264' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOJ' 'sip-files106.tif'
40b54b6ace61ff3d44b612d8b120580f
4f0a936644b9b56e305e03d3631467f115b7603f
'2011-12-31T12:39:27-05:00'
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOK' 'sip-files106.txt'
276be9fa760209e62702de6eef4a51e1
2310964c8748c7b383cd6f9428277d9234df3ef4
describe
'1080258' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOL' 'sip-files107.jp2'
66ccebba793bac575140d3fa978d7930
00518050bbbf90d554d798d3aec7771c0b102ea0
'2011-12-31T12:36:37-05:00'
describe
'34964' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOM' 'sip-files106thm.jpg'
c97e35d806d44c1acfb02dba57f5c7dd
a7ea7bf53a1c5269b0c7c80020b3a8b1315659cf
describe
'145768' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATON' 'sip-files107.jpg'
fcf0b406124ae05fafa93d3751ee46e3
1882b385fc7baa0b0030ac751cbef9589788d5e9
describe
'33197' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOO' 'sip-files107.pro'
1fa200c998abfa68377980eb6cd999d1
78858ecc68da46d5d6ede49f583d901ac398217f
describe
'68859' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOP' 'sip-files107.QC.jpg'
ac715b1f41c6e556518be4f3c2b9ee69
5b76b495de438587fe307df9bd93900b147a56fb
'2011-12-31T12:29:00-05:00'
describe
'8667888' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOQ' 'sip-files107.tif'
b39ae5facf45b7da8425ece60546cfec
8a839ed63bde6c477e0d610dd12a67b16df88615
'2011-12-31T12:31:54-05:00'
describe
'1280' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOR' 'sip-files107.txt'
3148d6b31037675fd66542d68b9df88a
2020bf237718fb7a8e19b835104c0e4aa982dad7
describe
'36109' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOS' 'sip-files107thm.jpg'
d51662222091b63ed2370862171ce008
e593c819e45c3ec49a6018d5a414d682122ec2b3
'2011-12-31T12:36:28-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOT' 'sip-files108.jp2'
8f01c850398ddc702c7f87a61b44f996
de0885589f89ec653b4f75b5a466f53c78199f71
describe
'144733' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOU' 'sip-files108.jpg'
9591dc70cf0820e022adc05186eda61b
0cf3c81519851fb13e99f176abfd5f24a0c3cd8d
'2011-12-31T12:34:02-05:00'
describe
'33435' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOV' 'sip-files108.pro'
77543ad6d44cc57490427380bd188cc2
2108d7274202360087569b434ffa6a0841df25e9
'2011-12-31T12:27:12-05:00'
describe
'68942' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOW' 'sip-files108.QC.jpg'
8116a6728c2429b5d08b8565e97baf28
bfaf92b3fd613affe9d44f966bd50abd428a0799
'2011-12-31T12:36:21-05:00'
describe
'8668004' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOX' 'sip-files108.tif'
ac6df3628c72bf58b2d63b6a152222e5
0fc8ee7a9738a971b9e105ce04cac7be98b68c1d
describe
'1289' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOY' 'sip-files108.txt'
dcbf75ac628c06461215f8b868fc376e
c515b3a65545c77743c164ba8a47ff6ac0796442
describe
'36385' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATOZ' 'sip-files108thm.jpg'
b254fa8607d2c8390f0804028c2f283c
3c3a7b857bed0f2c1854585c384c6a37a92f1138
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPA' 'sip-files109.jp2'
347c138f7e47364baac7aa8d10826514
8eaade922a011939b363f2d22d2f7f79584f649b
describe
'142725' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPB' 'sip-files109.jpg'
fb28e9cf65b2982e5ff33b0d511ba3e4
789433b2f39a868ed348e9a57fcf9cd58f43b174
describe
'32508' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPC' 'sip-files109.pro'
94bdad16bb380f6914481618bcb17ad5
1fc58f7b070c231a15a609cd943745a9989a98c3
'2011-12-31T12:32:59-05:00'
describe
'67638' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPD' 'sip-files109.QC.jpg'
0b7c4946cfefc906ae05dbc5cf52af17
4fced728d94c0821830eebfefc372a60dccef8c3
'2011-12-31T12:37:23-05:00'
describe
'8668052' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPE' 'sip-files109.tif'
e8bcb0c3aa294b75563e15a1074294d4
eec9d6bd243611b6eef1df473340053c77c68d09
'2011-12-31T12:32:58-05:00'
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPF' 'sip-files109.txt'
c010b95223e074060806384b488d21aa
9e6ca5622e7b599d39843d9c9f64fca5cabeac6c
describe
'36305' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPG' 'sip-files109thm.jpg'
64f005978b22c2016cc9ae6186eb36da
64885ade2f3cd1efa2a529b4471681cf0f1cae3d
'2011-12-31T12:29:58-05:00'
describe
'1080293' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPH' 'sip-files110.jp2'
e4ae450e57e1500acf03c85c950e5b67
b7eee44c989e0387250fc6d6d70ce0b802639f01
'2011-12-31T12:28:35-05:00'
describe
'145252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPI' 'sip-files110.jpg'
e3123587f20eb33263cbdcd74c1d815a
ca275b6fbf99fd2c5b09c461ca2ad8489276ddcd
describe
'33498' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPJ' 'sip-files110.pro'
8a46ae96dc8167288cc16caa4dff3882
743e24535b634440d24286ea2e8de5200b39ae26
'2011-12-31T12:31:48-05:00'
describe
'68144' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPK' 'sip-files110.QC.jpg'
2698d83e957906eb43c3f2b5eb8d22b9
dfcf313efdbaf71b8d0d0efdf3e629aa0a81cbb9
describe
'8667936' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPL' 'sip-files110.tif'
3ddeb414bfda4c2c929ef97298e01f84
bcc5b0c5b77e645b0b8e8ae321094b52f591bf43
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPM' 'sip-files110.txt'
b2e96ba33f34b75358c08dfabed768ed
374571fd990d7bc319a9d2235955827a51eec339
describe
'36164' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPN' 'sip-files110thm.jpg'
481117bff4691fff8325a66e9d7dd570
c10b635385f6701e61c0486d8700c4983f3a32ed
describe
'1080248' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPO' 'sip-files111.jp2'
54871c02f2c2dbd378a9a10a3ed33d73
3b136b7e30eca1a6a51136fa6fe8a55b8685335a
'2011-12-31T12:31:49-05:00'
describe
'147869' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPP' 'sip-files111.jpg'
83601fde692e502119f9e1d9d272a543
97c52b159963593f56f83d9c5a16539324280609
describe
'34716' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPQ' 'sip-files111.pro'
313f9bc4d48c47314c10f3e650dc4cb5
b73865eb15fa5e4d5511018be6dd82b22cef6bc8
describe
'67657' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPR' 'sip-files111.QC.jpg'
f26884e9f18bcea3c3b6c022caa23c64
57103eaeca1a64b5aab74582d5b9a4398d33af6c
'2011-12-31T12:36:58-05:00'
describe
'8667248' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPS' 'sip-files111.tif'
a302eaeaa49ff44e94ec7d4edab62e3d
b432bab5776b671ed411bc7952f587ec15377360
describe
'1334' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPT' 'sip-files111.txt'
bd1877db4e6f6fcc0f38b353954ada3b
d7d0b2812cb0ec3617e1ed25f746ac3293f534d5
describe
'34932' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPU' 'sip-files111thm.jpg'
c3232d027aac77702bc35ccdc301f670
202e466f556dee0623e5318341ac50f925b6e27a
describe
'1028700' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPV' 'sip-files112.jp2'
251854261a83cb401e729d4c4d7fd004
37680867a6288cb2c189398e83dc94f43d2c95fa
'2011-12-31T12:35:39-05:00'
describe
'127329' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPW' 'sip-files112.jpg'
c2ad75fffc7b7507598afcb9d2878aef
4fc09325873cd878b110bc86c79fc77565140073
describe
'28527' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPX' 'sip-files112.pro'
14543b74294a8eb0bb68bf5bce6a9478
90e8bc46024ca4cb938b69331fb8de8174f52c7f
describe
'61198' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPY' 'sip-files112.QC.jpg'
65acaa1eec39ac8456066de533aba137
29bb2f9fc7107b92da9fe1a77f7056c50f7424ff
describe
'8666928' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATPZ' 'sip-files112.tif'
7b51e939530dac4a81452425add02416
39afe66deb468d8925eae86063034caead79f45c
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQA' 'sip-files112.txt'
dc83b6c4b2556ee30cbd23bdd122409b
113ada42f08a059e832cc02f06886525b1456357
describe
'34074' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQB' 'sip-files112thm.jpg'
979eddb5d2ece3f185a6aa5cf98b486b
776ae66e3840f92aad7c9053a41634e9cf278b17
describe
'1080247' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQC' 'sip-files113.jp2'
a6ff1d2e755d3ac16de8a3328c0186ac
5ebaee815b7f65a0c7daa7abdef7e006c0ddb6f4
describe
'136800' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQD' 'sip-files113.jpg'
1aea70945bfd7239d731cee67719071e
75c2b7c3d0dd8c0ddb3dea64d1e712380e19d1d8
describe
'31825' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQE' 'sip-files113.pro'
c386ccb93f9c509c94dc8f26fff2ee0a
a437826b14decd2f016712bc9a84c007cc33cee8
'2011-12-31T12:28:09-05:00'
describe
'64322' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQF' 'sip-files113.QC.jpg'
2a1a7ed00a188f117a41f94c5539b9ed
27c7b7e53fffdffe16eb46aa7d2961ea11672489
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQG' 'sip-files113.tif'
3fe609f03b23083707fb571de9f15c86
403ab15fcfc310478387264d485bcf957e9ef59e
'2011-12-31T12:38:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQH' 'sip-files113.txt'
75f06d116ab8561d9881390ba93ad1f9
6fbed5ee0fdde39f5c39428d5ee29cf4e167d387
describe
'34359' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQI' 'sip-files113thm.jpg'
1e46024090e5ce88fe7d83c98a5e7fca
844a227b391d0415a4b7a3cbdd2187ca6e2df0c3
describe
'1080234' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQJ' 'sip-files114.jp2'
4f25210cf8df32e92c8bbe588badcf9e
9f20424411a845c6c5f919dd49cd6b9c5a3694e9
describe
'136163' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQK' 'sip-files114.jpg'
9b47e481b34e36936d29160a2f8d6541
6840bbdd782131ffa0471415a2bbedf99c1aa190
'2011-12-31T12:35:12-05:00'
describe
'31383' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQL' 'sip-files114.pro'
0a826f1b9df65a7f2a4b339f4d55232b
8d105318ef47f4cc89cdfd50b94998a63feed848
describe
'63930' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQM' 'sip-files114.QC.jpg'
abaf6063d93a972bd6472b0c2481c26d
e3abb118224fb80d37010d28ab22eaec6801a14f
describe
'8666924' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQN' 'sip-files114.tif'
722de911afa8466d6d6db7720da7899b
f9a66224f2538deabbb960db7a1008fd5c6e9f31
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQO' 'sip-files114.txt'
6b422d9bdfa176f2af02b117d4bce86f
103025813bc5daef8c7a7c7a9a76894846d87734
describe
'34302' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQP' 'sip-files114thm.jpg'
a3f8b2ef46ae4781836bc3fc25c9a3f7
ffc9f04a277641c6a07267463638adc567b29bf4
describe
'1059134' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQQ' 'sip-files115.jp2'
d353896d0a0f8840dd7e4186696aa88f
a8239bc36750a549a056f1bb96be4bfa585efb41
describe
'130526' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQR' 'sip-files115.jpg'
9977648213075dea3120a2390cd43679
5803dbab52665b16662a71991b9c8df1a21b5545
'2011-12-31T12:30:37-05:00'
describe
'30618' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQS' 'sip-files115.pro'
e538ac4503fd7c12b4864d8ee7c893e0
95c06b79116e749bdcab1c3361c889533b24bb3b
'2011-12-31T12:36:41-05:00'
describe
'61619' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQT' 'sip-files115.QC.jpg'
eb0161055945f5a2ea243e956eaa42f7
b5f1557e7be61ceedbbd342a46f5a3b33a79f3a2
'2011-12-31T12:30:18-05:00'
describe
'8666840' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQU' 'sip-files115.tif'
0d8af679e07d780409d7a026e1e3862d
24ff76bd1d6cd29562510de67d35cbd8a6974093
'2011-12-31T12:31:44-05:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQV' 'sip-files115.txt'
167174f4657f14f27bd69132bfedac5d
0a0323eb7f890b97b0999d34865061ac66142e4f
'2011-12-31T12:30:30-05:00'
describe
'33810' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQW' 'sip-files115thm.jpg'
ce39cfeacbbf7c405a3d8f49a45ccca6
6ea840f3e90e3b087bf05fca7555b0c31a8a689e
describe
'1080251' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQX' 'sip-files116.jp2'
df5f179bff267c3ca61c647f35361e6d
5efd05d724bd0ab43740552aae61c1b5b472f8f8
describe
'134104' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQY' 'sip-files116.jpg'
ea6126e05ac004c34a35bc0197bc0907
28f9572883ffee00c06f410553b45bd2de476521
'2011-12-31T12:33:23-05:00'
describe
'30365' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATQZ' 'sip-files116.pro'
6c3d78e02a0c4bcfdbcfaa8959743301
76cd0334a62feb64f32cc332f66e83247067c9dd
describe
'64635' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRA' 'sip-files116.QC.jpg'
4cc4ffd301db97094c6ace837beda454
13d27fbc75aba3a3508cc66caf3b0e6de8d08816
'2011-12-31T12:38:07-05:00'
describe
'8667108' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRB' 'sip-files116.tif'
381d0e809a3fae3a6c4db4541bf15c20
a53f51099ae2aae0016c55d2a70485292cf606fa
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRC' 'sip-files116.txt'
9a370081dc107eb46bfd0298e5b445c3
128814a5574c4b342d531ca35de28e030e92c455
describe
'34915' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRD' 'sip-files116thm.jpg'
e58d753e8a64aa314db46104dc735ca9
d27bb581375fdbc75b79e477212b86fe00c114bc
describe
'1080189' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRE' 'sip-files117.jp2'
8c75889589f010d9eb725f51835f8d32
6243fbc0cd693509c1396a03c95cbf6c76776a8d
'2011-12-31T12:26:29-05:00'
describe
'135539' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRF' 'sip-files117.jpg'
e375c53775c0540a7161d7c4480048b9
d27d41b4d39296c260427c4f46819aae535aa2e0
'2011-12-31T12:35:21-05:00'
describe
'31178' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRG' 'sip-files117.pro'
a213cde6b8325ff72090690e10956cdb
250048009825c804dd5a37fff5ab142fcd3fcf9e
describe
'63534' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRH' 'sip-files117.QC.jpg'
32357fc76b09214d0f70a4858ed8ad1d
7c6fe4ec08e0808ae337264bb1394415b3691273
'2011-12-31T12:36:16-05:00'
describe
'8666956' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRI' 'sip-files117.tif'
1bb65b1c36a842716cb9f1fcfa1e6d13
e9eba04fb016da2342d939675248d765d95be6fb
'2011-12-31T12:34:12-05:00'
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRJ' 'sip-files117.txt'
28fa25db0cab54d2d7e925f792c7f716
dd4b17ed41640151e32a00e1f8d23b9c43e56eb6
describe
'34429' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRK' 'sip-files117thm.jpg'
5978356951a45516656532d1139f73bb
1932ad7d0b836acfbd007f2ea19a3e078ec427ef
describe
'1080297' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRL' 'sip-files118.jp2'
8e35d3ee47516c150d0f68220d2315eb
83142a941b1910ec5e6c0ad8d2e567e9a03b0642
describe
'144327' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRM' 'sip-files118.jpg'
059ad2bf5ced3dcc9e6495041e62f11e
46848071551ccf9ab0647fab93fd781fda17af14
describe
'33391' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRN' 'sip-files118.pro'
a061d9e270bbec76cae1c8a26d3dae0f
bc81dee8926c1b9a645bd708d2a4b62f01b6320b
describe
'66510' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRO' 'sip-files118.QC.jpg'
355d91b5b735e2342db3033e3eb6bef0
c21bad3fcbb58a5f931874e0ba09fefd8587973b
'2011-12-31T12:26:31-05:00'
describe
'8667116' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRP' 'sip-files118.tif'
43d2173e020ea1e4eae92ee2e32ab48f
23534f140698ab83fbb96521b7580fbfe29fae90
'2011-12-31T12:34:27-05:00'
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRQ' 'sip-files118.txt'
e17e54545cb2d649ac3a0565372c5a14
fa30b88971cc80636eeca9fe7df5c68fe21ed6f6
describe
'34865' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRR' 'sip-files118thm.jpg'
c9427694de9b306353498da853a6902a
6513c595dfcc72db9eb1c7b46cbbc56a7bb095fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRS' 'sip-files119.jp2'
3ab11904d4ce7d39e0fa802f2312aed4
b189b35cdcd6b25b5fa884c851d346995c0688f3
describe
'139585' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRT' 'sip-files119.jpg'
8fe993127be069810b799dbb6b47f0d7
b662e1d8ad5b1c2ad5ed69badf516a43ee094d4a
'2011-12-31T12:37:13-05:00'
describe
'32048' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRU' 'sip-files119.pro'
2f484867e98c5030ac545a22f679036e
d989ad983ad90fb52efb643820e9d1d1650c35b3
'2011-12-31T12:32:32-05:00'
describe
'65569' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRV' 'sip-files119.QC.jpg'
04b53ba67a5ae694ea210e1a9a172e5b
d2d7f3ba362d5357ed8203020daa752bbd10463d
describe
'8666976' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRW' 'sip-files119.tif'
ac3b15a4721513c6fc270fcff65b24fc
2b5165de91b3839a837df749980ea551f0f92a92
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRX' 'sip-files119.txt'
c405aa088d65bde99df8f9d687be0bb8
84b3b3327b13429e3ab0dcd2b0272cdfa4662a90
describe
'34710' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRY' 'sip-files119thm.jpg'
5ce547700c045b8b2596140a38f6d714
7a70ab7509b7ae5e7fcfc0ebb4b2b157f6d0cce9
'2011-12-31T12:28:21-05:00'
describe
'1080233' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATRZ' 'sip-files120.jp2'
0918fe50387926950a65f421756484be
ec37e658a78cedff4181b79ae1839c090e28270a
describe
'144981' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSA' 'sip-files120.jpg'
cee3c350457169ed016599be8dbe82fe
ae8307ebaa4d1e80a839efdb42702329cb5b2e49
describe
'32969' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSB' 'sip-files120.pro'
28b3b7c155fb6a5bf386535bf84dfa3e
53d420584196a30d3b8bfb078e32df9b1805be11
describe
'67664' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSC' 'sip-files120.QC.jpg'
f184c0eea124689976fcf78357ff5150
da191b972146ad93955c55181753f7eae43cdf82
describe
'8667228' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSD' 'sip-files120.tif'
34df0ad3734ddd41448c5027ea8b69ca
37f7bf8910b4c0e60af8548806b59163db0bc389
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSE' 'sip-files120.txt'
9856d99868adb1b6ca2dbbd37cce781d
30c1ab42f4121cffbcf8ad99ae3719a9831cceb7
describe
'35107' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSF' 'sip-files120thm.jpg'
71b991495d903a25b05fe1d3766703ce
be84356edc94dec6db79c487ee62407ef0e5df5f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSG' 'sip-files121.jp2'
da4e3113aac2c802711363cabfd6ad02
346486d9e5894bd8a53bc3ed403465f63c51491f
describe
'134207' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSH' 'sip-files121.jpg'
b9441c417f3ae15d159817838d65c980
3044acb3f9c1336bdb9e5dd01eba66afaa3f9a20
'2011-12-31T12:35:29-05:00'
describe
'30406' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSI' 'sip-files121.pro'
0d25c0d2cd3858018e69c168ed1afc99
d6ca667d0d8b8e58d7bbc711db3ad3ccadf7e153
describe
'64130' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSJ' 'sip-files121.QC.jpg'
ced00ac6c7789eb75e8c48dc476012af
9af2e9936d2a4218ccd55868e136d4ddeb791e7e
describe
'8666892' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSK' 'sip-files121.tif'
915c8a9f5a9cf42681148129685d7779
3b451e212e28783fae31a26af8bff5f5d0202587
'2011-12-31T12:37:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSL' 'sip-files121.txt'
3d6a1b5d2cda0ebdf3c0733fac4096b2
e9ac010bcc8ee05f49e000fea308db07093c774b
'2011-12-31T12:39:11-05:00'
describe
'34240' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSM' 'sip-files121thm.jpg'
1753bdcf631ba85e7dfc90220f137ff3
18d64861c680cf77f61f793674362616f3c7f3e9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSN' 'sip-files122.jp2'
e39026322854620086587e9233d69846
ca24924e8226a17da05a6c546ffd4b9aa480435a
describe
'136455' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSO' 'sip-files122.jpg'
5bf86a3292c666e3174470f30ea61b0e
248e0d89c69016786cad7de16e4394c22458698a
describe
'31812' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSP' 'sip-files122.pro'
656cb17de764d5258adf4e8d181e92d0
0904c4af4b430b43d7f8fc8a722fb3a02c2fc6f9
describe
'63150' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSQ' 'sip-files122.QC.jpg'
78d01f30a587952c246fc7186db7505d
601dd6cfa188c980f3ab6912893e612ed9fdd5d0
'2011-12-31T12:32:39-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSR' 'sip-files122.tif'
29869345a6de948d62f87a3ecfe8d930
2913b7318afbaa2b899ff56f5674785ac8f2eaf6
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSS' 'sip-files122.txt'
522858f5e210dd59c3bc13152c0ab1e4
cfc673838a942184f9fbc70dfffab3e822539e55
'2011-12-31T12:35:58-05:00'
describe
'34278' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATST' 'sip-files122thm.jpg'
8ac9c13b9a1b5ea1d91f0cfdab5dca35
25d7ce7bbc99616daa920dcde753c42a33d9721c
describe
'683898' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSU' 'sip-files123.jp2'
248f726f4ede664ec27fd056aa8e53fc
28464729683de7232f536bc2b6404b784a06232e
'2011-12-31T12:34:11-05:00'
describe
'92489' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSV' 'sip-files123.jpg'
e5031d151a234dbade6ed49720585b44
25c2e39bfbd420087c2d99ab6f3b7b039a070654
'2011-12-31T12:38:51-05:00'
describe
'24854' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSW' 'sip-files123.pro'
ccfe975cf6834b448b6afab3929c5643
c4d53e40d5b85a1b47259efd3d99127914ec62ed
'2011-12-31T12:32:31-05:00'
describe
'46127' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSX' 'sip-files123.QC.jpg'
b552942d51e990d1738ff6d1735e8f81
6768ab5f3281570bc937d1ad5eda6858cf9f86ed
describe
'8664884' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSY' 'sip-files123.tif'
a2b51f40f9b6b14ee57e7a702c779448
8e8984dae299160f961b6a990611389042417d8e
'2011-12-31T12:30:46-05:00'
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATSZ' 'sip-files123.txt'
bdf91178adff5ead3ec8788f4a3d027a
09741f7fe1e7e927395789b8ed02ea4c64d9daad
describe
'28976' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTA' 'sip-files123thm.jpg'
dd5d333199de9fde8ec31aab4f4ab2fa
155f65d2c19875788c5bf28ac126d0eb90741210
'2011-12-31T12:38:46-05:00'
describe
'891513' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTB' 'sip-files124.jp2'
70414975d6ada434b38eaa9d624bfd15
ac4220ddc702ec1c08ddf6fdbdd221dd426fcada
describe
'113911' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTC' 'sip-files124.jpg'
74ce618c6d51550400ba4b8be61280d6
4b278c8d114df6163b67eaf992af381b9afdd50e
describe
'28114' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTD' 'sip-files124.pro'
fab541e47e353c9ba609d524638c6bfd
8bf2bf59390a3cfd9a20c175b1fb2dc1d75bd214
describe
'54327' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTE' 'sip-files124.QC.jpg'
ae436f10397ee26cbbf4970914731164
da4b4d5b868344d16a9c5b0304ac5721a4deb391
describe
'8665824' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTF' 'sip-files124.tif'
fd233dbb065a90d90e4ff80b16448381
05028d779d2423a0bc3a9bca0131087744f88222
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTG' 'sip-files124.txt'
53d8ec3a4ade9e3b214b7649e30dbb17
35268ee793b7242019f4fab3c858c54615e1416b
describe
'31528' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTH' 'sip-files124thm.jpg'
e1d254144a984341ebe1a8b8168ea1b3
bf9a1eee00cd580fea8403d083682fce76cec7db
describe
'1080285' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTI' 'sip-files125.jp2'
2b26989252c16b4c9a8963df0c675365
fed054505c88a69ef6f3e738ac95b50a82931235
describe
'135477' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTJ' 'sip-files125.jpg'
80e3521d96e092f673dd64dcb213d5ef
4e0880456dcebdc27039916e3f7f9de72d3fe691
describe
'31187' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTK' 'sip-files125.pro'
478b305457d98d3102528e0caf1fde2a
fe56008c1d26459e1cf12a3584dd300abb0a1b4f
describe
'63995' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTL' 'sip-files125.QC.jpg'
5a104761a6f0e5a314486a63fb582952
351b5861327810bf52d689f07ce44e2c1860ef19
describe
'8666992' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTM' 'sip-files125.tif'
dac7d7e73ac5f519e4d6dce0009cce1a
637d0fb1e5f5169e4036777e2692a167a7847473
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTN' 'sip-files125.txt'
a868e5e8899b8dd648cffa31a58b573c
78695a22f98163212e4879abc7187d716f41e2c9
describe
'34017' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTO' 'sip-files125thm.jpg'
89fc3a6b679559ca0c2f07b9bf411fad
c235a1dfaae84ef7ee4ddbc6a2cdfb340d81f928
'2011-12-31T12:29:39-05:00'
describe
'1080245' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTP' 'sip-files126.jp2'
00fdfbdd3e5553d78d4d750249cbb794
b7c4e8de9badb1a7d9885eee8c90032a8f2d67bc
'2011-12-31T12:31:57-05:00'
describe
'140043' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTQ' 'sip-files126.jpg'
a9492b9bfa36c643feff55b41e25eaa6
155da80e81b273cd16c0185217ba03a75b4482bc
describe
'32748' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTR' 'sip-files126.pro'
1fc5a1db1a8ed40a584d674a4b30321d
16d05ef95d999c0c13de5b72628619cae32eccb0
describe
'65689' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTS' 'sip-files126.QC.jpg'
f0c3920320587f9a2df5720fd7f78ffd
5880a2ad7287276a2b990713014312260b5b4fe9
describe
'8667104' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTT' 'sip-files126.tif'
ed2c46b98ac43d5aad0730d03b94272e
3f8cbcaf1993dad92d6991a55429bcc1614aad37
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTU' 'sip-files126.txt'
faccde7e54f739dd607debf2d71eda4f
0dffa3f99a80109dbec105bcfd1c8085c0d27e03
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTV' 'sip-files126thm.jpg'
8af800c5ade4e8c662ea1c91b02795b1
7c05785a1743e93b7522d692db5194238ff29b86
'2011-12-31T12:32:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTW' 'sip-files127.jp2'
6a18f2ecb57feda642cb0d2ac123319f
d83b0e12fde1fadeabea4fe74391c2fc96f57125
describe
'136121' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTX' 'sip-files127.jpg'
c23ccae2b453088833b905491442a066
3e2be621aec9823b5d5f86d37804a355b38b4ea7
describe
'31210' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTY' 'sip-files127.pro'
0ac7fbdacdec318cb4105c9be44dbb34
adf326db53ec1c989ad21ae58b94eb5b716da416
describe
'62928' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATTZ' 'sip-files127.QC.jpg'
2b126471f2b2232d62e2b7920870f164
ae34ac2ed8180324db1aad2aa25772b113dad7a9
describe
'8666816' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUA' 'sip-files127.tif'
57deadd5c78124284377d1ab43d54469
b2773175e423c61a5855c2572bc0b4ca3ed8eaf1
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUB' 'sip-files127.txt'
9a97ae6c5d717323464df9ce2bd6a9ba
c35cf9c705f4c6c44abe8c195c43aae6af74db66
'2011-12-31T12:33:37-05:00'
describe
'33962' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUC' 'sip-files127thm.jpg'
cc5e81a8bd2a034e43336061adcaba47
73eaf92d611c5ec4fbed465e88f55dbd4378ae8e
'2011-12-31T12:31:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUD' 'sip-files128.jp2'
49d19e4238533ce42eeb658694475a1f
46d781cf1d12448f6db845d50eda684b2dbfa58c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUE' 'sip-files128.jpg'
40e8c30cbcca0abc990cc2cea564114e
51f353d391cd4cafa8a7c600f8ab1d4c7b2c5c9c
describe
'31663' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUF' 'sip-files128.pro'
c823dd90ff4e6319f323105338c84fea
b4e098bff8080e748f31904540fcaed67ce0e62c
describe
'64328' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUG' 'sip-files128.QC.jpg'
9306bbe0beef6939993652907fc1130a
699ca11738114c28bd81641c6ae6773b259a27eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUH' 'sip-files128.tif'
21aaca0edf90323b05a0ade758025d30
c105e90726e9a3bfda8711354e1156cba352d02b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUI' 'sip-files128.txt'
499939776776106fa53b3f1fc9b50423
fc1ecff93eec02876ceb273381076ece69c78373
'2011-12-31T12:30:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUJ' 'sip-files128thm.jpg'
061f36a0880c757c3d2cdcbc4a1c1f7e
269d7b7616a19c606c3be019010bba342375646b
describe
'1080206' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUK' 'sip-files129.jp2'
22c35d113fd0afbbd415478df3b423ce
6c9d2a7fb4e9590458245856fb221a6b02968ee6
'2011-12-31T12:34:38-05:00'
describe
'139372' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUL' 'sip-files129.jpg'
cda883a019041fd9c907445475647d18
8247eb2f978c53257c4188f1f8a8aaedd544d512
describe
'32218' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUM' 'sip-files129.pro'
49023848293580b8e7a2fda15bf44c26
ca21fa11c0e698f15328f4aab0b45f4cf5e88721
describe
'64435' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUN' 'sip-files129.QC.jpg'
09ce72a44afe6087230bc0bcddb9f6b5
96d7d5ee70d968456de554af0da6e6ed5162685d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUO' 'sip-files129.tif'
9ed0c330fcf1870f99962ad8430953a8
9b38d7e6aeeea59823611a44fccd722db07dd556
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUP' 'sip-files129.txt'
4cdf1a740d4e72ea975ab4ce713822ba
fc29eee345200bded94dc303527ae5d72ffa1317
describe
'34542' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUQ' 'sip-files129thm.jpg'
22ae9bfc5c295666a5b9c930f8a1f681
5f8fa82356365017eac5660b71978210eaca466d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUR' 'sip-files130.jp2'
82e9ba6460a26eaba6f6a785f3490e32
c9397278ae9951301fbc771357cd0b1df8d1ad69
describe
'147341' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUS' 'sip-files130.jpg'
03d2b02c8f24b4df7c67a8db54cedd72
08c17a56cfc8d3cf467f79276a6fa54e4f8edb77
describe
'34755' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUT' 'sip-files130.pro'
9200e11ce33efd7028e9350824851896
2fe4bd2f2f9fc004545998923dd7fec9474dea5c
describe
'67197' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUU' 'sip-files130.QC.jpg'
fb097ac972684577031823ac87211585
c61141bc4ad49c0a10f16a2672741acebd22d8e9
describe
'8667084' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUV' 'sip-files130.tif'
f7a1881ba88a599a06f6f91bc248b6fc
ad7f7c528263a85baee007b49755567e13e2119e
'2011-12-31T12:27:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUW' 'sip-files130.txt'
4bdfd177bf8fe2e68c693cf3c600a649
0c5c19f8041f5a24d38855c13edbc50afd334cdb
describe
'34739' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUX' 'sip-files130thm.jpg'
d488e2e6780fd796d864e11b48f1c4b2
edfbd71b9e726898e4887eaec521a0c4240a07d1
describe
'1080192' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUY' 'sip-files131.jp2'
192426bd7324a11b5272225b96273e70
cb52a2bf56d0658b305737f8edd47950296920cc
describe
'139539' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATUZ' 'sip-files131.jpg'
2152d862252578f0970cbf706e40a410
f5a5b0ae070ff358e12cd52093a4afd153cb16c6
describe
'32436' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVA' 'sip-files131.pro'
b154e6c449c4cb407b1b28b10e8be1ba
ebe48f8cda4f7c062b79c9f4bcbd034a829b39e2
'2011-12-31T12:39:31-05:00'
describe
'65225' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVB' 'sip-files131.QC.jpg'
815e1de3d3d77437477ad65f0f72161a
8eb19ba2e1ef89b06607a5c086d64df455e186ba
describe
'8667064' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVC' 'sip-files131.tif'
3d26ce44fe85dc9a06d433c96059e146
456fd7f417e5c73b03e604963e04e50a4d079301
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVD' 'sip-files131.txt'
ecbe813ce0ba86fb0accab0ef98901db
f41a32ba5940f4d825e20a9dcc20700ed56d769b
describe
'34455' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVE' 'sip-files131thm.jpg'
614ee49db1fb281cbbce0c29f0d70623
719e898fac279005e81e768d1f9baa85b7ebc70e
'2011-12-31T12:30:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVF' 'sip-files132.jp2'
bf3afa23b7215e8adc3472d9df51d553
c838b5b03cf5d8ee8c972da0dd32e3094896b802
'2011-12-31T12:29:27-05:00'
describe
'141032' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVG' 'sip-files132.jpg'
b29d567297f72a89acc123ffc17b4631
43b78cdf6c4523434d482f750a05f21d314a9dfa
describe
'32897' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVH' 'sip-files132.pro'
8aadefcd0bb94872ca168285412d68e5
a40069701cb1c6c092e9e4dd873b8e80b0275e0d
describe
'66534' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVI' 'sip-files132.QC.jpg'
018ea65ec138e78368f4dddf87766a0c
aa945651ddcc4b9bbcec40d6ea49fcfe4b159f00
'2011-12-31T12:31:11-05:00'
describe
'8667200' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVJ' 'sip-files132.tif'
15c8996a0f2517c0840ba7b3c07b4848
e6aa59aeeeb7b6c243ddbf8a08a23a1c8ad4110e
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVK' 'sip-files132.txt'
e5b666efe764d101b1bbe1836d787142
854d03db91f78a31487efe57c02ff5f336c026b3
describe
'34966' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVL' 'sip-files132thm.jpg'
c4d8c6e57f6f8357aff22663698eb1e7
b071daab8696f6d22d59fd54f7bd23d5db59f6ce
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVM' 'sip-files133.jp2'
4fb3c1b9d857d1b0acc3d9c8eecf4bf4
caffd1a867b65fc5f1da52bac35e61b6534a3960
'2011-12-31T12:35:27-05:00'
describe
'141050' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVN' 'sip-files133.jpg'
35979e91be15efc3f9eef93f41b40cf3
7cc0dd80e59379db67de86134e41fe847df36400
describe
'32663' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVO' 'sip-files133.pro'
625a7aefec02f62a6bb6fcd9d7ef9b87
318b8f73c61dabca524c58c5132c9bde68f6c872
describe
'66133' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVP' 'sip-files133.QC.jpg'
d30e1efca28dca69c083d1963544ba0e
35f480c77388eec41d14f9188d7ee4131e2d9f77
describe
'8667236' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVQ' 'sip-files133.tif'
7b8bdba0d497998da51a4a2f6ee3f182
e8e1d805dee5d898af747b5021dd835855dd6843
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVR' 'sip-files133.txt'
704d494ce4be274559f635700d31051f
83b9a56fecff99e40e10a1efb2439336a9ada777
describe
'34844' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVS' 'sip-files133thm.jpg'
23b1aeff370ad3270ef99ca87460af74
c4dfdaae480925bbab6c0dbd48336408d973d051
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVT' 'sip-files134.jp2'
be7ed5d1d4ec4034b3918daf5ef72326
b1aa48e28f82b11bbd0726d8b03bcb5fbe5419ff
'2011-12-31T12:34:37-05:00'
describe
'134870' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVU' 'sip-files134.jpg'
a10a93e763039bb0223104b24ccd7bbb
dd2cdefa276a0df9cde97eccf704667be7d32459
describe
'31303' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVV' 'sip-files134.pro'
627cf58323e36d0395ff870d94d8fe13
296f3eb0c97c8e5d6d6d2e13ad00b7a4ee734988
'2011-12-31T12:30:47-05:00'
describe
'64808' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVW' 'sip-files134.QC.jpg'
cdc534ab1f0929d338996a6fad52f574
58d35bf77b1e3257c4d517113046cc44676d0d3a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVX' 'sip-files134.tif'
12ecce435c903e2e2c1054dd6cb32430
c04c34c7a435f8bf9404cbc0d18e3569bd9493db
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVY' 'sip-files134.txt'
86e1f15222cf7691840418f7b458d469
f976f101f7d27371df3028815a2b4a312b4e7633
'2011-12-31T12:35:57-05:00'
describe
'34345' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATVZ' 'sip-files134thm.jpg'
0bc7d455d9cc76e3c253097da17b1232
816c8f94cddbfc1f6d0f6b24d329b4e6495b45e8
'2011-12-31T12:27:29-05:00'
describe
'1080246' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWA' 'sip-files135.jp2'
616874a4311ec0c7c55a2787d5743907
14f7c10ac45de4ca278426510f3a40d4868716f3
describe
'140712' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWB' 'sip-files135.jpg'
ca83ec0bfc9472b36dc7409779eb60d3
1dbb69a134ab208d63f4a9b5cbd2a3bf27a44988
'2011-12-31T12:27:35-05:00'
describe
'33279' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWC' 'sip-files135.pro'
f716dfdadd10a64c7df0da78a4b77f26
251c7d4262703d7c0a66f8460bca3bb1e36462fb
describe
'65795' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWD' 'sip-files135.QC.jpg'
7947970cb14be3400aa1e33f8b82a896
2fbe177572d9c874e33ee1203ea0c97c72f64550
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWE' 'sip-files135.tif'
52dc7261b997ca7ac3a08b5ef4d54a6b
6efc35e8ca3253196d789817c11983b6bb977383
'2011-12-31T12:31:34-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWF' 'sip-files135.txt'
d7600188b684f0fb3d94983ad852b4bd
3adc56dc27601dddd06fe52d3bd9b02eb4a6dc11
describe
'34492' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWG' 'sip-files135thm.jpg'
68152d196c3ca052eb99e54e4ce5124e
c8a7562ddb2511961c71591270dfeedca1ea7da8
describe
'1080197' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWH' 'sip-files136.jp2'
28029ccc4673ec380f204ec232aebc96
028463989263a99e8edebe79197e3b725c2b5951
describe
'137410' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWI' 'sip-files136.jpg'
1cf8c074c758707dfbd935e54c6e0d93
ac1216e79cefbd79269376ca6beb23f5ce4e0e12
describe
'31715' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWJ' 'sip-files136.pro'
6af73f75525873b5cc615fce17e616cd
2f3313ee1261bb57da21af58a8513b9f9f7b610e
'2011-12-31T12:29:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWK' 'sip-files140.tif'
06b6e2bb49e91757337fe812aee9af27
3de294c39983bc817c301877ca8f8bb00a26b07d
describe
'65074' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWL' 'sip-files136.QC.jpg'
244943533b9c7540784bcf6de3e8815c
c42e8763d42279a1f36c6ea7a7a53bf1ba5df90d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWM' 'sip-files136.tif'
ad197c2762935bff106e795a988494cd
3dc9a026067a163ded53e9b0d0b643d0a5fe6a28
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWN' 'sip-files136.txt'
bca9e64baf9d80e4c718b1d23464225b
a09875e6b237286ff21be5b5f13bdb20fed47b28
describe
'34783' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWO' 'sip-files136thm.jpg'
6417056516e4d355d483eb4c860cf88b
9923384ad7b6980408a5c2b850fea713fe46c7d4
describe
'1058694' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWP' 'sip-files137.jp2'
5a7dbe813afa304d699bfb4dac85dd65
dd4ab30a51ae22211d9f4248a8909df55579a31e
'2011-12-31T12:32:34-05:00'
describe
'130222' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWQ' 'sip-files137.jpg'
b1519dd1a2989b574b2aa989ba81e742
4efb7eea492c45e5009f8c0fd59ab60d522978ab
'2011-12-31T12:30:48-05:00'
describe
'30301' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWR' 'sip-files137.pro'
9049ede89ebdf059815593886501b93c
734e592ae0cc8ac62f2d9576bc175f1ea5f81fa8
describe
'62828' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWS' 'sip-files137.QC.jpg'
e5573929131c913b60dd9ccd79fa156a
bb7963e9a2b44310a7cd773af058593f7dc705c7
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWT' 'sip-files137.tif'
1e1ec1aeb3d5d7b59a6efc93730ff3e5
13e16edd80a5c3c82cc83750306ccfa633a18a3f
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWU' 'sip-files137.txt'
b7b9fed626321755063e79fc8b9daf64
3b46c0ce23512f498a66f80e777c74e7f7fe39b2
'2011-12-31T12:37:02-05:00'
describe
'34277' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWV' 'sip-files137thm.jpg'
23099355d6808866c42fec881c700497
0f6b080283b7b3ec231b191cddcfe7694d7c1e17
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWW' 'sip-files138.jp2'
c622e84641a3980205e018939ec8bbe1
44397c120a7698d40bf4e5a069d4661a37a1e44d
describe
'137315' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWX' 'sip-files138.jpg'
3030c5cca598239f4259d1ebac22f57d
f510c557c86541e213b85537e3ed5d077b33f057
'2011-12-31T12:28:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWY' 'sip-files138.pro'
3200287e4671ebd9ef33c97aa3b2cb70
9ee395c658bd314ec580615f0142b3fb2fef0a51
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATWZ' 'sip-files138.QC.jpg'
d397a2a431cb8911799301201f5c466e
93b4da356a428f59ca610f241a2fdf9fa0191cf5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXA' 'sip-files138.tif'
53a59f25c88a8fbcfb436aba739dc63f
ec071f8a814e932281ace9c93483d693677b3471
'2011-12-31T12:36:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXB' 'sip-files138.txt'
79c8997e0e17623ae3d5df1af935c423
ba88a0b7d9b3182966be21eb188d0f85274e1f67
'2011-12-31T12:32:51-05:00'
describe
'34825' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXC' 'sip-files138thm.jpg'
234ee01f82902a3584f09dd2280eaf0e
ee27a90d18a668456340aa33e4d088dd910f8639
describe
'1064503' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXD' 'sip-files139.jp2'
007ce21386a0dd331d74c991e1f4f6a9
ad90ee5b1d23e83cc94dffe94b2d487ed66f1fd5
describe
'131406' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXE' 'sip-files139.jpg'
a612db7c35319399632b685e627013e9
3c3182a7e0f4f93eae5c17b50614d127d0dcfaf7
describe
'30123' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXF' 'sip-files139.pro'
774f2e35a2d175430549550efb4d2f08
09b31a591be3c8b13b3012b614d2ec382c80b89c
describe
'61943' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXG' 'sip-files139.QC.jpg'
d31d1b9f2f78ab03ece6208c1886b462
7cdbcb538276db56586b5103cd0b3b4d067821f3
describe
'8666604' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXH' 'sip-files139.tif'
f17030081f93eb46d72c6c8c53521746
ab856bd7617a1f7aab4a7f8856a68c3adcee0564
'2011-12-31T12:37:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXI' 'sip-files139.txt'
a97eed9ac0626a6ee3652dfd5ea6bc67
44edb8210db4c0242834c057410909ab4972f146
describe
'33909' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXJ' 'sip-files139thm.jpg'
20c6e28118f6bdfca439edcd495ca677
f386de9fed9c467a0a67e08923040ca85d1007ee
'2011-12-31T12:35:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXK' 'sip-files140.jp2'
90361af598e948d01337834ef01503e1
13672bfe5b2a42fb4e1414bf5d616719abd48869
'2011-12-31T12:38:14-05:00'
describe
'146645' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXL' 'sip-files140.jpg'
8bfa55053bc25db0eefabb05694a853b
c6b146d92e0338e21add8aa326b44a61e32ae91a
'2011-12-31T12:29:37-05:00'
describe
'34133' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXM' 'sip-files140.pro'
9d17ae6054f38da291cab372b5dc9172
b3c7d3cc273778e739a5c779d11457cd8be70ecd
describe
'67435' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXN' 'sip-files140.QC.jpg'
62586618f1821a75ec8508d1c1b54487
1bd391018d53ef3a50530dc9d0b2fb3222af67b9
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXO' 'sip-files140.txt'
9ff509e40cd01815def0881e01e24a3e
592531968b3842ab3fcfc2e91c9d91c34bb9fe9d
'2011-12-31T12:29:30-05:00'
describe
'35113' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXP' 'sip-files140thm.jpg'
4ccfdab480affb577bae9c8713bb75a5
8ffc84a373f4915e288cfa27d01715d7ebfd53ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXQ' 'sip-files141.jp2'
684d89cb96e8c4878ee55d1565c82cd6
b92eb1311f1a1d1c0636b3a350e58fd5fef7b59a
describe
'133569' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXR' 'sip-files141.jpg'
46827f9960535fe0625ef269b911a66e
ae9abc6dd057a312926a31041eaed35580136ccf
describe
'30953' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXS' 'sip-files141.pro'
eff7c30d4837a1616f25f8a3e957bf31
eeb3a0d4923ad89bbb72bba13c52db3c49602ad9
describe
'63395' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXT' 'sip-files141.QC.jpg'
c5a52320042d322472890501af9a8d69
bff17a6a3dba26da4cc41fb122e16a190a2c83e3
'2011-12-31T12:38:11-05:00'
describe
'8666960' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXU' 'sip-files141.tif'
4ff24cc0fa399e4494701c24c169e413
76cb230cd6a4fe2c41bc12095dbf176817839f0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXV' 'sip-files141.txt'
fee170b2f486d1aa1165ccdb3aed886e
2524998c51ec6237c3784b2d6b81bbbd220d89e3
describe
'34418' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXW' 'sip-files141thm.jpg'
4dae9f7930105283b295296a557ab388
cdf09dc1e721191ecffa9132890c29167639cf9e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXX' 'sip-files142.jp2'
93e42f3a1a3c27933c085224e4747a96
a4bd6412f852c64c4ed2aa61d24cc5fa95f7bf24
'2011-12-31T12:26:58-05:00'
describe
'140667' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXY' 'sip-files142.jpg'
5c5c25974ba942d960529957679541e6
21a9d0cef74a8332e97de7ede46395c1c74ee7fb
describe
'32293' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATXZ' 'sip-files142.pro'
ca6b6b5214242daf44d63ada1d2269ea
08c85379575d7cdf0e367c0ca8573b50096f1e02
'2011-12-31T12:32:04-05:00'
describe
'65520' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYA' 'sip-files142.QC.jpg'
085216087026afab9aa6651927500449
cc0e267f52500cbe5a1c41de1f8a10ce2457cd02
describe
'8667192' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYB' 'sip-files142.tif'
6dc94e590b6e84b7c9978f9f3799714b
ec6f73f64a06100815109234754672f6f4ddfd2b
'2011-12-31T12:27:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYC' 'sip-files142.txt'
0b646eff4cbe5229ad39aa653005e023
923ae0b85d4029ed2beb8098de5e2f958d770c48
'2011-12-31T12:35:52-05:00'
describe
'34794' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYD' 'sip-files142thm.jpg'
815e6cdfd29a4c5b22a564dfee117de5
ea44021cfca813255e9248bea885d64ae60987c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYE' 'sip-files143.jp2'
a734c397d051f69fb589660a282ee05d
773e6a5c7b9ffd268c126904c40d6b16f1364b88
'2011-12-31T12:31:12-05:00'
describe
'140753' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYF' 'sip-files143.jpg'
3fba295b46bb0a248695a135c3d3bb75
66063784cbcd95645e9f58df0d39ebaa69b8408d
describe
'33150' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYG' 'sip-files143.pro'
fee89963e99bb2e3894453c21636733a
7baf74ac4fc5b81c8cd99763a46f9302e1d402d0
describe
'64938' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYH' 'sip-files143.QC.jpg'
f87ef02e51f947acd6499cf788685d22
d223539ddaa228e128b7626b2ac45bf9d668ab46
'2011-12-31T12:27:16-05:00'
describe
'8666984' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYI' 'sip-files143.tif'
9faf40004baea27c90721b11be51b1b8
895317a559834ff6715cde2abe615295ed977066
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYJ' 'sip-files143.txt'
12dbd7b53fa7bdb7dbfa460fd48457aa
cc7cb0b502c4c4cfbbfbc8b199843de9fd43ebf4
'2011-12-31T12:37:10-05:00'
describe
'34445' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYK' 'sip-files143thm.jpg'
93e6b98bf84f15c1c95863948fa3b8d9
f3e49c573fbc2ef85f3124d3c63b9227f69e4df0
'2011-12-31T12:36:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYL' 'sip-files144.jp2'
a8882b45e1fb903686ec05bb1c3c8098
8c938c2e418b7ec280c217a1286934a3a3656ee9
describe
'144187' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYM' 'sip-files144.jpg'
e8d7a28d6c0ec984620944bcff4149de
88ef1e190246e6edc3fad992f9d948069696ecd3
describe
'32701' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYN' 'sip-files144.pro'
0c6bc415118bd637828a9fb2e54ab585
5eeb4811dd18899636398c090061cffbcb9fd9c7
describe
'66790' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYO' 'sip-files144.QC.jpg'
76a951a769525e0cf08006946156634b
a9902664b8258c262456ddad03e60db29286460c
describe
'8667280' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYP' 'sip-files144.tif'
ebba5fbf95f21d0d0790ed3314047174
8cac581f7fb0317bcfdb6feb4fc018ee83182811
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYQ' 'sip-files144.txt'
5975f90bcaaf33ee17654e0800abc3e0
bbcc20e095645dba9a8175f85b5896236cd9ed88
describe
'8667932' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYR' 'sip-files156.tif'
24df43d8940d44a34c6d58830b66a9e1
b037f657d5ab6e7892df86b09d33338937e100eb
'2011-12-31T12:26:46-05:00'
describe
'35223' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYS' 'sip-files144thm.jpg'
d921dba556dd882792cc0a520ebc5991
f09703639a7ac7d1905996674172cce3fc4f060a
'2011-12-31T12:30:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYT' 'sip-files145.jp2'
f80ca08ee94387317f33fcf82d2af514
2113797c8cd213bd4299172b8fe4e211077a4ff7
'2011-12-31T12:37:14-05:00'
describe
'145584' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYU' 'sip-files145.jpg'
7d9bcccfdf5a5f4354af68940fbb2f09
e8a356e0b9ed1167fa93ff7dec96713b3ebd6be0
describe
'33097' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYV' 'sip-files145.pro'
b2660f6bee052027ed718b9c64712cf7
f2291d55751be397b44b50b9ed2ddec363796fc2
'2011-12-31T12:38:25-05:00'
describe
'67593' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYW' 'sip-files145.QC.jpg'
de08702d27456563491a54c175fa6a25
7ed993865ea88d8be65890eea1d22b89a014ee88
describe
'8667476' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYX' 'sip-files145.tif'
dfe6149d7aff9636fe24173385819e0b
e02852bf47f0d42cc4d6e7817667d40073e30791
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYY' 'sip-files145.txt'
f0225e5f08f6189b704b83d91cc61ddf
67f5fadc97450d5792cd7f655b9b31259cd8ad5f
'2011-12-31T12:30:50-05:00'
describe
'35500' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATYZ' 'sip-files145thm.jpg'
f5629945b449058ce2d22f3bd9a6754b
eb51fc50e4b58638e249a69025c8de207b9c1558
describe
'1050024' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZA' 'sip-files146.jp2'
e79e7db5eb4da9cfa9105a5f092839ad
a9f644c57851441f1a9315e0e8e8259ac8b9d13b
describe
'130249' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZB' 'sip-files146.jpg'
c187d4e4a9f699be07f498c4eccb724c
1f7f80458290f32480c67dad170f104fb6db6745
describe
'30000' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZC' 'sip-files146.pro'
66a49594a4eb5f14b0c045f692468b83
3e97caaf124dca26342f0d05ce9238768d9de966
describe
'61863' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZD' 'sip-files146.QC.jpg'
3a4c1dcd632bae52bb7edd6c7ced7f1e
90da8c7b25e94720d3c22d5929b699ee53f79b51
describe
'8666576' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZE' 'sip-files146.tif'
f782de420a271ee90b8683e790a098a5
9b250c78bf44894298d855680d932dfc70d2167b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZF' 'sip-files146.txt'
174e423ce6727dbda1c9c43e7c3a26fa
8d2584620ac47fe2b0fd04682870b770fde56d52
'2011-12-31T12:26:53-05:00'
describe
'33634' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZG' 'sip-files146thm.jpg'
36591b23659dc66843dab2a92b036cf5
569a480875c29f47bbb7c092ae0279eceee694bf
describe
'788360' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZH' 'sip-files147.jp2'
042089d5ba954d790c1d95b8d3fbf7b3
4b6310948da187826b024fd92a2334a95bd32801
'2011-12-31T12:30:25-05:00'
describe
'103848' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZI' 'sip-files147.jpg'
a3a84a109239ef5c518e855aed785ebc
3a9500bbf62cc2c2523bbff9fcc2cac33a11c2e1
'2011-12-31T12:39:32-05:00'
describe
'22536' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZJ' 'sip-files147.pro'
f457d1784f9130f56d7a9ccba6fe06a0
229cc0028d39dc01d2e33cfbfc7b25e8ce93d538
describe
'51319' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZK' 'sip-files147.QC.jpg'
1daddd069a3b403deb44b5c09562a513
3a9490e96f5db6d2e34f7e5d216344062db57bf8
describe
'8665220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZL' 'sip-files147.tif'
a4529f6e247cdba226e42740d01b801b
cb313913556bb532b04fd7705ba19681e6e0b720
describe
'918' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZM' 'sip-files147.txt'
bd4a2a4ba7c6d87688ebe5ffa97245c4
7c2ad6f11c136cca5ad4ae2b4d64c1e5fa15f69b
describe
'29930' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZN' 'sip-files147thm.jpg'
8d3a4552a4967ec09ab3c02ae70ab761
a3ca5ec5ce610647de062b2216e060d6680d57c7
'2011-12-31T12:33:02-05:00'
describe
'642828' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZO' 'sip-files148.jp2'
13fb2bdc900ce8219a163c3a0ccddb74
e43735b7a9fd78f3075d0a5d0dfa627b653c5f53
describe
'89157' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZP' 'sip-files148.jpg'
a25f281158ebaa01038bac0236dad5f9
ff09af0d20da77448d82ea8d3c0d0eabd66b0219
describe
'20821' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZQ' 'sip-files148.pro'
38dbb508a21568c5f9a3cf1e52a3f299
97a6e3f72d7095bb8701cf4606f7d354b14e229d
describe
'45101' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZR' 'sip-files148.QC.jpg'
8631f7d73038e459f805ea0a1afe24ae
4bd6e886b3ecdbc79ba259840e0c5c1252e982a5
'2011-12-31T12:27:45-05:00'
describe
'8664668' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZS' 'sip-files148.tif'
00779379c69a103c35fc11d851e4b2af
6fdf213f346ff2b31d3ae00e357ef273202914d9
'2011-12-31T12:30:12-05:00'
describe
'931' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZT' 'sip-files148.txt'
1a0b8b94a08d0eedca4e8c4f54c2bc88
9658b59792659f586220ab31e2cf8cc43f446e4e
describe
'961945' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZU' 'sip-files148a.jp2'
688a9f235051bf600e2bc3d2fe0782db
12ddd9e6a2f5a2a8d4650fadaabecb89c111581c
describe
'111654' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZV' 'sip-files148a.jpg'
91010369b4ef805db12c2e3188ac8614
39454b3965b0fe29f16dea464640b53ad6f05687
describe
'48026' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZW' 'sip-files148a.QC.jpg'
2468ebae70e5075565eb13cb754826e1
e532560550d55c06a2a724207bff5a06d503d0d8
describe
'8665144' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZX' 'sip-files148a.tif'
576c774d58611531c88605eb251e392a
a2e1cfa4fc3582a94ae620fc20e4ddab8315c0ca
describe
'29386' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZY' 'sip-files148athm.jpg'
2c81ed3c7a184ed9bc5fccba310fe9a9
35469332651fabe836c51a772f8dd90223239f36
'2011-12-31T12:30:23-05:00'
describe
'28541' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAATZZ' 'sip-files148thm.jpg'
ca55a4b185bc312b38dfc25f19e6b029
ca134c03decc265aae32770a7bf8d10a003ed0fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAA' 'sip-files149.jp2'
a5fcc1c7cdc0b9b1f2de78b69880a7d6
9cb2dbd3360d9be240327ccf4a3deee00254c5ac
describe
'142094' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAB' 'sip-files149.jpg'
5ba00d091229d2f9405e275ded8ba37f
e7b3d3f8b25e5ba465d31b232ec0c917c9bdcaf5
describe
'33349' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAC' 'sip-files149.pro'
8dc88667a977059509137b8bce069935
4602a569b8fb5eae1dd27455ccad0b892ef5f4ef
'2011-12-31T12:34:06-05:00'
describe
'65785' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAD' 'sip-files149.QC.jpg'
468b40cd1b0c79a0db8cbedd105d69c5
a700a9afb797c182b5f7487dce4bcc2feb19d64e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAE' 'sip-files149.tif'
6a97e20f1d3937f179d6d40965c1cf26
f85bba2a1b73d6f3f8aba4ae5883b2650973a077
'2011-12-31T12:35:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAF' 'sip-files149.txt'
2a429841ac20199f2ea38f2aaa535b86
91e7b562f8d4c5fe87581e81e6ba5b7583bffcaf
'2011-12-31T12:29:52-05:00'
describe
'34729' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAG' 'sip-files149thm.jpg'
5dc22fb150d9325b79a291da648befb0
6735d37f5e6d04717d4dadd95dc21f82a1ed4b98
'2011-12-31T12:37:30-05:00'
describe
'1079932' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAH' 'sip-files150.jp2'
9bd349bb2ff1861dccc5ced6af8f0207
3f63ad0603c6f65c2ac12d664796fe515f40f38f
describe
'132624' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAI' 'sip-files150.jpg'
b079ba2f3460da0e93603c590859aa5d
526054771b5f4297d07dd7d65aeea1414de3925f
describe
'30688' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAJ' 'sip-files150.pro'
a5dae3bd6d6b1b7ce0955302c321b5da
dab943f698437b8f29b6d217c25f6eed8511f8a0
describe
'63514' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAK' 'sip-files150.QC.jpg'
b15c35d7e37fb052daff8e9e9b4afde8
61dfd9fcdb171094c0bfee3eefa1cc220074e1c9
'2011-12-31T12:33:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAL' 'sip-files150.tif'
354ec260e8d796cd403a8b44ad5a54b8
66088d0e7e0e21b093508f139d4c7fa2173fcf00
'2011-12-31T12:36:18-05:00'
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAM' 'sip-files150.txt'
1b5431ccc0ec2c0ab0f483915df90cb9
ff7126b669b32c18ebb287b11a9d9b44046680f4
'2011-12-31T12:34:57-05:00'
describe
'34540' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAN' 'sip-files150thm.jpg'
cb5490b1be54da211adcbd34cc56f3f1
c155ba55720ae46ad049a313360fa518fc63841f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAO' 'sip-files151.jp2'
5c8b8addd822d44a4cd9c17329dc0c68
a9342c3e693a1c0a9deeffec6f24d8fc5196a104
describe
'140756' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAP' 'sip-files151.jpg'
76be20610137c87b39eac2c9a7e27525
8e6d656574470bdcd2c85d4f8009305f7d0e864d
describe
'32661' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAQ' 'sip-files151.pro'
7259266fb20ee1a9d258439131811e69
3e50a0ce77e72b81e61307a42446559ea9c5bea9
'2011-12-31T12:38:00-05:00'
describe
'64953' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAR' 'sip-files151.QC.jpg'
13bef05ec1b141615d04f7400d529bec
53111cdd6654e9a5b2a07ec0b2aca5bf247ab6b1
'2011-12-31T12:29:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAS' 'sip-files151.tif'
f7ee6acc65a0bcfee43c5aff861e36fc
7a2bb493ebc301f24f7b37815cde525f7931b2fc
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAT' 'sip-files151.txt'
0f4889e68e121b7707bb3bcfbebd9fea
e07744651d316c7af40c92c43bc131627c2d6b29
'2011-12-31T12:37:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAU' 'sip-files151thm.jpg'
5e94d3147d8c39aa9defadd8abc9fbcb
8398f112ed2fc2659dc4b3eea94df599fd300b23
'2011-12-31T12:31:50-05:00'
describe
'867492' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAV' 'sip-files152.jp2'
241e06211e28f6b8c9c71becc1114162
07f93102becd928594a9527f69a2999a4a280f11
describe
'110643' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAW' 'sip-files152.jpg'
4d8585d21c89ef29ed242d8709ed1482
d1e450b2a0ae602177023f5fbe67a4a1a35b1203
'2011-12-31T12:33:55-05:00'
describe
'26575' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAX' 'sip-files152.pro'
70fddbb9a376c2b991e6f0e4b6156366
0351ec27a670d0d77f96258d3e82ccc3c8980a9e
describe
'53613' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAY' 'sip-files152.QC.jpg'
d1496d8cd38bc8ad8d307ef0a3dbb55f
e8258ffb2816a82773369abb973421c3c5d229a8
describe
'8665984' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUAZ' 'sip-files152.tif'
fbc8b8dec538bd5befd4a3ac5d3a1c8b
fa0e462afeb3092ab178226b2ca6c52841c240ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBA' 'sip-files152.txt'
fca4ddeb37739c383e87effd27868c81
344646e427b28ad4f6e26fd29aaaf310e13ed367
'2011-12-31T12:38:09-05:00'
describe
'31865' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBB' 'sip-files152thm.jpg'
7a522f7824ccda3d222b0008185feb5e
88684d1d3ab1ed08100171381598a1905431f6cf
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBC' 'sip-files153.jp2'
219b98861ca7504739a913f2d02fcb39
3b45009dd7e4fe28ee830802af5c8954b2afe86d
describe
'140210' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBD' 'sip-files153.jpg'
e68c7bc12d11a6230b36462a8b46f2e4
52e591336d79dac2cf521ff0d20c7ce748d03ec5
describe
'32465' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBE' 'sip-files153.pro'
b4819e6ccef8c18dd52df21291d481f8
fdb41ea0dcf66da01b47aae4249a9d9c278d61f8
describe
'65224' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBF' 'sip-files153.QC.jpg'
c5eba7b3f01a6f13cc6cb3a6a5945e55
c25f9cc3f213564050a1e8c6fc07acffabb446bb
describe
'8667204' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBG' 'sip-files153.tif'
45de770071c355c55421980be65d4d94
24cc6eda7be0a59f7f4efbfb48648c8fdda39444
'2011-12-31T12:36:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBH' 'sip-files153.txt'
df77b985f2b88e825a1c51ecf37a8532
216c46ecc4a65787566c86ca4ef8a6728ae74802
describe
'34682' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBI' 'sip-files153thm.jpg'
cc72d4174f370d24f9a878bfaa2fc462
3333ca7fb54f5fdb6302b84ffebec4a75492e7f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBJ' 'sip-files154.jp2'
c64da48d3e0121a478afde87ea2d6e82
d5e4fb7491d7302f5754bf09d07d028ebd19f7c6
describe
'136237' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBK' 'sip-files154.jpg'
0f0019aa04dea2908517eb561bb92574
524b4f7d037545c942aac87d3007a89dfa836265
describe
'30439' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBL' 'sip-files154.pro'
e80861bb8512f7f43f5ff088cd63ddd3
f34a87866bc1c85c6a901e45bcad23c93eaf8881
describe
'64175' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBM' 'sip-files154.QC.jpg'
6003f53d5f34fb11683af278fcda4a7b
0f94b92fe73a34523ad77b4aa2b2d16a51342369
'2011-12-31T12:30:14-05:00'
describe
'8667216' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBN' 'sip-files154.tif'
6312c587f6a2b4086fc22e92beb46622
ab7735c7f9af850eff79197833df517758598c23
'2011-12-31T12:36:54-05:00'
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBO' 'sip-files154.txt'
00774191c9b5d4df237bf236b142390b
125858df6a7fa2f26e3da38f0bb5ac60fc3ea004
describe
'35030' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBP' 'sip-files154thm.jpg'
d7eeeb97c7a90ee1bd2bbd5893e828a5
f36a23456c366284394e804154b5fb6e2d9a7b9a
'2011-12-31T12:28:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBQ' 'sip-files155.jp2'
bf8fa7148127be818bc704e83a040854
92c9b7c9abb3b6f0055d8130da3d640d30629c54
'2011-12-31T12:36:13-05:00'
describe
'138248' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBR' 'sip-files155.jpg'
880da7b871000b73be72be1b6b0ba8e2
bee64b3378dc92a17aa75b5b95787b182ddebeaa
describe
'31977' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBS' 'sip-files155.pro'
2046abb23809336459abc9f3f2d759d1
e1a833b60ebd0b43ec523e8ec05f0b1ab88fc8a6
describe
'65900' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBT' 'sip-files155.QC.jpg'
f0e53441f0dfbbd395ea225e381da1b0
c2faa7d1989d2f1d1d683f37f616d0073ab5ee3b
'2011-12-31T12:35:48-05:00'
describe
'8667120' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBU' 'sip-files155.tif'
d035bba1a0208d4da03cc3ecfa0649de
cbf27cdd1f03a09a2de04838b78134b192f37c5f
describe
'1232' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBV' 'sip-files155.txt'
11c3679c0c69aad8446f720fcd181e8b
7646ceb0f149c0e75ad3d35de40099cf330a48eb
describe
'34935' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBW' 'sip-files155thm.jpg'
4b7c023a88d181fd2e9761789c3a2611
8a1e9cb9a5e306a359a24de237d3e73364026eb7
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBX' 'sip-files156.jp2'
03cf785d6a7d754bb7de08b66435962a
ece79631b06c7a60f3739a54b2e8173ad39d6119
describe
'144852' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBY' 'sip-files156.jpg'
ed7bb2e8219bd28760cb1f46c1fb09f6
d8bb3f330950308698791e30d737c81c29a1f84b
'2011-12-31T12:32:03-05:00'
describe
'32685' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUBZ' 'sip-files156.pro'
9f86b07d945016818ffcfe273d14bdeb
b6708871a09f2b074bf0e40506e19af20cc296ec
describe
'68637' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCA' 'sip-files156.QC.jpg'
087725a86307738f2c43484eda943ba2
ccaa8b8ab5e76516d1dd9fbe70ccceabac138751
'2011-12-31T12:34:45-05:00'
describe
'1270' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCB' 'sip-files156.txt'
726924dd3bd43c4516bbedf6bb518040
8eccaacc1fa706649dabf12326cf4724dd1bd947
describe
'36130' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCC' 'sip-files156thm.jpg'
994a9d400536d98ee4009cee47ce138e
4effbc3b7654d93d590901415d4b2c5ea1d3545f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCD' 'sip-files157.jp2'
baa3bf2813bb2143d18c8ffada81da25
e6d882899299a96910bd60800503e796ae7e81a1
describe
'136982' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCE' 'sip-files157.jpg'
e74c1e64b76bff5de49906e9fe72118a
1375f0eb86bd4da1af29c7b7e2b682fed0c4d74f
describe
'31029' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCF' 'sip-files157.pro'
36d1e5de37b42f9fa7ce3f869e6fad1a
844475fde06122a17489c744f640b3bd45580653
'2011-12-31T12:27:03-05:00'
describe
'66063' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCG' 'sip-files157.QC.jpg'
386d7cf4c18ebf2e30ecee29e2382c60
365a2011bafd1cbfaacbd5d734f8162f88dd39a3
describe
'8667496' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCH' 'sip-files157.tif'
11aa029f01d59363446a7f8fd7725c02
5d0ba07c8190045e7b77ae64f90a72c1bf1c916a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCI' 'sip-files157.txt'
f88a0cd23d8707515088fbe160f270f0
7c2db13c747eaad71df889dd73e13bf852f1031f
'2011-12-31T12:36:11-05:00'
describe
'35316' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCJ' 'sip-files157thm.jpg'
cf54280a1f3153746934ccddd1de3026
0d0e499ded24474e59b696d70b4cb6ff2257ed74
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCK' 'sip-files158.jp2'
dab1ac8782b51b0f5bc0b0e97fbd4076
fb0cdcebf578ed0e44ec39af8c9b9b6744466b91
describe
'140495' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCL' 'sip-files158.jpg'
d62a3074e47a9d54dae1ee755701ee76
b97c33ac37537e01b0d766d68a0c4ca098e43c02
'2011-12-31T12:26:41-05:00'
describe
'32215' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCM' 'sip-files158.pro'
f0e598f2a68420da99e5080340993c0c
4336c8316b61472f9b87b5a575464e25570ead31
describe
'65010' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCN' 'sip-files158.QC.jpg'
0b3e00132f80ba77b456b20054d3f8ad
5a22273946997740c63774ac5bfb546db6c9505a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCO' 'sip-files158.tif'
1b13b105b994e1ccc8d00d7583b4336a
b3480c3ae12a52972db06e3df3055fc9731e377e
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCP' 'sip-files158.txt'
cf6d8d43eafc64b7ced3ed6d6e2b0eb9
030a95bbd508a4dd5732b19d1fb569259e83ba1f
'2011-12-31T12:31:35-05:00'
describe
'34647' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCQ' 'sip-files158thm.jpg'
a4067e3c615816a5b6633c42875eb1cd
8d3b7142779096e2b6acec25b0b6810f01f02870
describe
'949789' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCR' 'sip-files159.jp2'
2dc9e28ec60a8b59b8cbad2c5bd63776
3f37375fea8dfff77efe7ea6d7df034ed4fae722
describe
'119914' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCS' 'sip-files159.jpg'
59170a48e14bb598580f0ef17413c671
f9f8ae74288cdfae633fcdd501d3527abb1cc403
describe
'30800' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCT' 'sip-files159.pro'
c19ce388fb94a99cae4dcb0655717248
9e859246c8c0c7a6fdd12d0533023a79ebdab0db
describe
'56841' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCU' 'sip-files159.QC.jpg'
eedaf359bf0d39595cc47c487ebb422a
27b4638454987d3d45d41d5cbfb92851bd097832
'2011-12-31T12:35:36-05:00'
describe
'8666276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCV' 'sip-files159.tif'
8a30472919729cfb58dc6ae29e947226
f3c4e59736471d3d16097be1fd9fa144ab999b82
describe
'1287' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCW' 'sip-files159.txt'
002d79fff3682c379bf34efb62c21674
b9af61c76b494f50674901d8965312fb2d1db823
'2011-12-31T12:34:50-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCX' 'sip-files159thm.jpg'
482bf52e5fbc252be32b12b517e10bee
c4a36a82a01ba16f786edf3f941921ac8dcc3675
describe
'1080191' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCY' 'sip-files160.jp2'
8f986f049ce3e9c4f5734c71bd93fcec
7039ba50fb3d11fa583a93fc5e7464d70adb0a2a
describe
'140764' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUCZ' 'sip-files160.jpg'
483ee10f973c51f200269cdbccea5972
a11de4bfe13ae5553c147b6cf2866a45e9bda90c
'2011-12-31T12:28:08-05:00'
describe
'32254' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDA' 'sip-files160.pro'
30ded6f2c2e12286e1a3cf9381876e9f
168d1e155faa6073c63d45951bf6430f02514dea
describe
'65727' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDB' 'sip-files160.QC.jpg'
0e23e5535095234c4ab967177e0d80a5
d3a284733c40ec8d3b5bc3bb4e9ab0211da53283
describe
'8667156' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDC' 'sip-files160.tif'
f837c4dee4be10bad559c0bf0756e94b
6a2ae1630d54dc6cb84eb6312d5b551e233b50bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDD' 'sip-files160.txt'
ca396763751b2966cdf8a56158c22833
773c60d10ad93f97bdc4f1bd76f38c4f9cdd5dae
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDE' 'sip-files165.jp2'
6b973dfe1af62ae45a115cfb7374ea18
cbb59fe3962f2f45fdc359f26b95b6cb5dbd77ec
'2011-12-31T12:36:23-05:00'
describe
'34725' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDF' 'sip-files160thm.jpg'
8f1ffd85f74ccdedee7180047198214e
5b039138ef7028979525198b3a874a8cec3ead92
describe
'1006223' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDG' 'sip-files161.jp2'
6b2fa365432a9b32cc984621f8895c3d
1a7688907e61cae052e3906650a1a9170b7ec312
describe
'125921' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDH' 'sip-files161.jpg'
63cdc2d5e3d5559b791afaa31a461e9b
6ab9f3360680cd691dcf38fd2ca911f354870bad
describe
'29162' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDI' 'sip-files161.pro'
cf08a5ed6cb271c05345bd9c1da1623c
c478c1fdac48b591f274dda48fdcb3c1c5ae494d
describe
'60060' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDJ' 'sip-files161.QC.jpg'
71424d5b2d64b19a3d732850da3799e5
b8af9a19cbe67f9725f531e4fde6d5819d5e77e8
describe
'8666468' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDK' 'sip-files161.tif'
fdad59de74469bb8f2ece0d003057ec1
25b6bb7e8fad7bd57e88b370da7e115ac692399a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDL' 'sip-files161.txt'
d306e50cdf8521a6c2223ade51135fa2
833c126f4e07b86425ffb6336b7f896c1accd554
describe
'33219' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDM' 'sip-files161thm.jpg'
eb4906dbbbd146c483f994ff837e45fe
7a4e16928d0328aac37ab4201257ce550f1a8680
describe
'1080232' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDN' 'sip-files162.jp2'
60cd44ae71c854c1b379b474220b5b66
865e1d30a7eefb36bd9c9fdba112ead9326b3cb0
describe
'137544' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDO' 'sip-files162.jpg'
7d44b2665d7af9d6183758a2d343d8f8
ca5d5eda0f49155b914fd388abac70ff81cbe59e
describe
'32137' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDP' 'sip-files162.pro'
9a58a07f27c2fe91dce8fdaad9b25c66
0d5a2b16e0f5517673ce0636d4524f814f72439e
describe
'63948' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDQ' 'sip-files162.QC.jpg'
84c85a7fd16334fa66cfca78b7d99b6a
f30ca7a54f6711485335b5d336054dfc5b332282
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDR' 'sip-files162.tif'
59fe93a41a764558479fc10b99412ce4
7c47776b492f3d8e2fb0114a26bdc35b1c347a51
'2011-12-31T12:38:02-05:00'
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDS' 'sip-files162.txt'
cf54fe21429e0b9060f62ad1732e4b0c
2062d4bf401a5300dc14124fef02627e2793ab2b
describe
'34213' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDT' 'sip-files162thm.jpg'
d91d6fcf730970b069e1128c2828d15c
d7cd2bd43c5ada1b96343baa4d819ff58ba5261c
describe
'1075194' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDU' 'sip-files163.jp2'
49931cd1f9feeab6d38f2af7f2fdf86b
bd40d3fa4786803713128044d5e39aa6dc96914d
describe
'133106' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDV' 'sip-files163.jpg'
20ecbddd181d8e7d67a18b73430fa0b3
b76c65b1af6d036c271264111347eebf0c77760d
'2011-12-31T12:29:31-05:00'
describe
'31251' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDW' 'sip-files163.pro'
1d019d737353c93c53f09affba08cfb2
c6a23e80d9edbaa64edebc0ce767696184f7069c
describe
'62420' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDX' 'sip-files163.QC.jpg'
09664dea7392471d57b3b09ee7a65f6b
cbcdc9a8657515472a80836e73c2cf7252cde904
describe
'8666728' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDY' 'sip-files163.tif'
72ad62396c15b2f36630f5a1a06054d9
6a4225eec769358a19ed7e1a8b7cbdb555796339
'2011-12-31T12:29:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUDZ' 'sip-files163.txt'
331241402ed7a01cee85eb38b373ddda
5cd489e36021dd71919ab81f003bb3a46dcc1f25
describe
'33727' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEA' 'sip-files163thm.jpg'
791d8e397dc725dca54888f5419d55cc
d1d608fb0f7977fbbd8de9bd1a92669666cf8bea
'2011-12-31T12:33:54-05:00'
describe
'1028056' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEB' 'sip-files164.jp2'
e3abce35dfe5b04da5075a60fd715344
367325b2b61680da991ee8b8c788fa6c9df3d05e
describe
'127559' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEC' 'sip-files164.jpg'
c7c156eca3eb2291da24efe30311815c
970b2c3a947147b2964a35b554ebd2bfc4d5f3bf
'2011-12-31T12:38:37-05:00'
describe
'32014' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUED' 'sip-files164.pro'
29f2af8f895286dcf60e64c4abb01beb
2289e6aa8a9b1d7f62fffdff9db42ecedb08546f
'2011-12-31T12:28:04-05:00'
describe
'59286' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEE' 'sip-files164.QC.jpg'
f58153282298161adc6168025d657ec4
e733a45ff57123396fb7c23167272518c9cb764f
describe
'8666412' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEF' 'sip-files164.tif'
622b4c930eee197e9022048542892b40
e85a6b43bba1c12585a83236071e8384445d263f
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEG' 'sip-files164.txt'
540a4fc82070365f592f418e69b29e4c
9cd65cf64f3097bdeb4267cac2bb2b7add37c51a
describe
'32927' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEH' 'sip-files164thm.jpg'
538c3834364e61a417776246a8a8c1a6
23d5b2e0ca713f8ed4171720b12ba2ccf92e06ac
'2011-12-31T12:38:43-05:00'
describe
'134604' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEI' 'sip-files165.jpg'
3212cced4db557399b4ad186de556bd7
66fe3f1c6a23f2b359d5e7b61007bfdbc12548b9
'2011-12-31T12:34:01-05:00'
describe
'32052' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEJ' 'sip-files165.pro'
4e42abd568d0b84c4c59a0713672733e
be5188502f4b67064c83cad4f3764e09d7e73bee
describe
'62655' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEK' 'sip-files165.QC.jpg'
f33d1337c6a0698ef96bc753140216f1
182874df8415664c70b83218469d41b0c2ac57fb
describe
'8666796' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEL' 'sip-files165.tif'
9bc5937b008be3d47dea3ee10c28c375
f0fc615d41a9cc38936e31aad6f01e6734c67fc1
'2011-12-31T12:27:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEM' 'sip-files165.txt'
3a42446d7ccc3ecb8be44c151460c4e9
e5f068dd317ec38a798dfbc7c930dbb7f4bfd178
'2011-12-31T12:36:14-05:00'
describe
'33817' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEN' 'sip-files165thm.jpg'
d40cea18c86121c64d5d125db4ff08dd
12fa86d808b3236887c0a582678770c686b6ea48
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEO' 'sip-files166.jp2'
cd7cb2c592f2e61aff586efc2d8ac1a6
84a5642c901449206e46c58de7040507ea7eb646
describe
'136655' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEP' 'sip-files166.jpg'
afd135067f78514fadf16aa9d9b95541
87ff3e2d8ae2ebd2a1683e9f57ae4c923e4234d8
describe
'31466' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEQ' 'sip-files166.pro'
cf0fc7b0704c89db05fbf0bc8a35c30e
9d9f7e0de4a370a491ef2fbcb4e4affe98b18a2c
describe
'63924' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUER' 'sip-files166.QC.jpg'
ad764b7604ffe8271e3731928d1ca65b
47653dff1becad50e7833de4f427b390368dbade
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUES' 'sip-files166.tif'
4cd2bba4508855f66ad27c6e01ddec59
37ff42cfb27212ae07e5b43080bba182552e8504
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUET' 'sip-files166.txt'
fd1a0255d39517576f600a42328f7cbf
39b98a9c9f6699a6e939c9c513f0a41d723054c9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEU' 'sip-files166thm.jpg'
9345032e08d97bb099c0fac7adc2e3b3
c29b61c1649cc34819d8c32519e7c4872524c33f
describe
'1064212' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEV' 'sip-files167.jp2'
d91240e9464644b5ebf72708654aed2e
9ffce0939f2437170af1e0cf115ced781c704a2c
'2011-12-31T12:35:11-05:00'
describe
'131194' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEW' 'sip-files167.jpg'
9bc0c5c041068c511270f1e1948ff8c0
b747f385c871d0113aacee690d410a87202c3693
'2011-12-31T12:28:03-05:00'
describe
'30267' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEX' 'sip-files167.pro'
192565134d7816b58e8ad24aa4a4bd4e
d809cad341dab7e6b142b16198c5ec57a7b55584
describe
'62661' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEY' 'sip-files167.QC.jpg'
afc957f1f4b13456675c15308ece03cb
f1c22362d58f554ea5c67565f619cd19ea89ceab
describe
'8666732' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUEZ' 'sip-files167.tif'
48cdb9e42ca1068157c06249c4741b8e
99619b98f14bc603385c33e432c90961a2f7dc0f
'2011-12-31T12:31:27-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFA' 'sip-files167.txt'
c5abae642e70a7a610ce01d9099b321a
6065137da59df0e235343c0e91e25b29b103f709
describe
'33861' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFB' 'sip-files167thm.jpg'
d84c09229b50d687495850b790e1da43
07f46f386aeb1c9020c6ebecc424acb7780831c4
'2011-12-31T12:27:15-05:00'
describe
'1004762' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFC' 'sip-files168.jp2'
5612837851f9ecf2453fb161c250fd3a
1d1af8e3b95e762e81042b2f4fd4e35606707363
describe
'124850' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFD' 'sip-files168.jpg'
1c5732fd9486ec9ed7f23b2e1a476903
22d12807cb11cc1233c2f68f86688e448b5eae8a
describe
'28021' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFE' 'sip-files168.pro'
f9f47afdcb0270bd74fa7d919811301a
89fce2a59d90437a793843997e1c40520930644f
describe
'60184' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFF' 'sip-files168.QC.jpg'
e2c36cc7edc002535efe25cd5b2460ca
978c022a69c383f0b4cbbe36f83d460bd7f62f93
describe
'8666736' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFG' 'sip-files168.tif'
2c32a7968f0c425ef4d742c24900b28a
d8db59887fc8d8110470a7675c660d9ca7931de9
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFH' 'sip-files168.txt'
783f76f991ab1df8f003cbdc380b6a72
3a4cd09011d3e9a06ee0992bc54f003c6449d757
describe
'33781' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFI' 'sip-files168thm.jpg'
1b1b037395d5a655ea4ca7883ffe0393
3b0279ca22e0a5a4bf05de698082c2aa478e84ec
describe
'1000848' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFJ' 'sip-files169.jp2'
b482555101fb53c8724c7f5f0861ea71
3fa9d029e5db486db8811d622f2825044f4db7e5
describe
'124984' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFK' 'sip-files169.jpg'
97ea0f43066f7c178a7a6e94f0986ff9
3321ff88595e76f49716274b98c006d3309cb182
describe
'28880' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFL' 'sip-files169.pro'
13775cea6bb8f1e0f2138684ce38e31c
bdf567365b659ddb41c4f7a9e922cbd0103b75a1
describe
'60007' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFM' 'sip-files169.QC.jpg'
0802a3e4bb2289272d803119a836e571
30244703b36569b26d7351ffb31e92cb401d17f9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFN' 'sip-files169.tif'
d6972484a98cff59bde595fe707222c9
e624c4d9882873543b40778648230b26e0fe76fa
'2011-12-31T12:27:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFO' 'sip-files169.txt'
3545117f5331a3e835638bc01b175bd7
975d605514e564182d201a7098ab20e071902e90
describe
'33707' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFP' 'sip-files169thm.jpg'
bbd74e21cac25070cee83713286f102d
771e096750f11bfb413ff8a45d2f0353be9608f2
'2011-12-31T12:27:52-05:00'
describe
'1019276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFQ' 'sip-files170.jp2'
9eb5fef654c227ccf01b82608b3eae99
8bb65c64ef5eb5a2f32a935c9758336aa6c6d6f6
describe
'126671' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFR' 'sip-files170.jpg'
98362301dae49f6e3ff4a4865bed8551
def7e206040090b51436207141d9d1f161b7335b
describe
'31399' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFS' 'sip-files170.pro'
7bd10b6db463eaea292fc5d33d045445
9496b2e069d18f8a34665822738f2cf5c190086d
describe
'60360' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFT' 'sip-files170.QC.jpg'
83399f42c491240fce710f2f666f4535
bfcf389e34ca6cb3852d0e17ca41bf5f83fd527b
describe
'8666648' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFU' 'sip-files170.tif'
596e698ac622569301546df121419414
899ed4d7169f72abb9218d775cef331febb8be06
describe
'1238' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFV' 'sip-files170.txt'
d21408e04b754a50ea2f23785f2c4398
00a077f0d6ab9b7597b9f30a8b9721e3cbe65669
'2011-12-31T12:28:51-05:00'
describe
'33578' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFW' 'sip-files170thm.jpg'
99b344baaf3a77679151d4df5f1820a7
9c61d66c7374569234ba2a880a425c5eb325081b
describe
'996906' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFX' 'sip-files171.jp2'
559e4f10d658eb27d0a51ab3edd0405f
044befe12c26d3215bc85c492d89dba28fd389e7
describe
'124506' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFY' 'sip-files171.jpg'
0527faddb0f1fa956ef2d1174a380099
eef4696f98c2da3e073aadb8e825b4042373dba4
describe
'28528' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUFZ' 'sip-files171.pro'
58e87afef4193fa25afc62daa0124c82
1998cfbe413c91fcdf2200866a00297c74e764f5
describe
'59981' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGA' 'sip-files171.QC.jpg'
08099b2cc0e3ed7245925907c21fd06b
7cdefa3285a88451787b38b68b3a615ab7ffb525
describe
'8666640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGB' 'sip-files171.tif'
e00c910dea1c70a4a0f5c557ceca866c
01d0bb5759f445665a15c63ce764c9908bf4c899
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGC' 'sip-files171.txt'
311f7ed55f9f785d6827a66d8cdd9b87
eb5e554345d490f77cb97717a61334debd489940
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'33545' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGD' 'sip-files171thm.jpg'
6af88f782174687486e9ad50139f5bcd
2d22dc755ddcf2e1f6c2789669b26f40b115331a
describe
'1062405' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGE' 'sip-files172.jp2'
df8b6648ac3d150360b9a27783702dc9
1e5ba75dbbc90e94fd57448d97d856b6b14ccaf0
'2011-12-31T12:30:34-05:00'
describe
'130377' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGF' 'sip-files172.jpg'
2120cd77a077fe9ee89083ac1aaeb37d
59995706e8f166062c86099ebddff102acfeffae
describe
'30277' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGG' 'sip-files172.pro'
4372630cf3f0f952a96d1c54e39d34a4
021f528806b847f8d0ae3dc99b41a785c7008c67
'2011-12-31T12:36:03-05:00'
describe
'61912' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGH' 'sip-files172.QC.jpg'
f552ae4527f192d99c54f1ba06d6a728
c0ee00a6a62752f1e58408c20a736018776d262f
'2011-12-31T12:29:07-05:00'
describe
'8666792' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGI' 'sip-files172.tif'
25afa4ac0f465d29e73bc17cb3025bff
ea191dbadedc0d04632cd8988c5dbf763b94b5c7
'2011-12-31T12:38:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGJ' 'sip-files172.txt'
7c3b5b25139b44d3a0fde0f80c5a8015
4f6467d01532d7b5f14e09e612ba52c0675a2719
'2011-12-31T12:27:13-05:00'
describe
'34001' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGK' 'sip-files172thm.jpg'
ed4bf999bb2068292e459f37ed5b7e8e
655381b1f77c17fa314590726ef80626c880ce19
describe
'1024763' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGL' 'sip-files173.jp2'
5db8f5c1d1f414330ed34e938f401e02
5f2e987b51596983c365cd647ea447d88b44849c
'2011-12-31T12:35:07-05:00'
describe
'127420' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGM' 'sip-files173.jpg'
4c194085dccb6ece390bf2481ce676e9
72e8170e525edd50a03dbd38f85caa8782a0e001
describe
'29245' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGN' 'sip-files173.pro'
b93b5e66d3d8dd0faa74c0df157da1ba
eb161f8c92edeb4f1ddb523ba5e48f6d706a32ad
describe
'60523' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGO' 'sip-files173.QC.jpg'
3193401170b3b5bdbf77625b0fb7bf94
c82951e1587bbe60e4a958ea04867f467d39d0f9
describe
'8666504' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGP' 'sip-files173.tif'
f8f6ddff7c0fb965bd0e73cd2d795c6b
56198e6911cac212403a6a9212d91cc22f2b5630
'2011-12-31T12:33:04-05:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGQ' 'sip-files173.txt'
7c224770c702abd79e0abacb6698ac02
f174023764acae2297379c6ecb11bb4160d07d11
describe
'33497' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGR' 'sip-files173thm.jpg'
d56b8ee967b1175dec72eff7ae74ba80
8c9abc42a10fd109f92d1e0801bb495401a3302d
describe
'1079384' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGS' 'sip-files174.jp2'
e8927f404057618e27bd9aa6999f8148
4044c0e8176b162282c3cbef864c27128623eaf2
describe
'132966' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGT' 'sip-files174.jpg'
1f7c3304ce6379d65a929cf835a908f2
c1b111c4db71a43085cbc44d0f098e6b91361c9a
describe
'29802' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGU' 'sip-files174.pro'
aac946c07ecac2020acb0ced92c32c95
27bc9606c8bdcbf513f2de6b8976e8d78b306d14
describe
'63882' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGV' 'sip-files174.QC.jpg'
6dc50b227ac8dd11e34b5a2acb72f2c4
d84a31a59a7ee229459a41c64a63f4c7978eae11
describe
'8667148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGW' 'sip-files174.tif'
2d28d8e766e8d3c92c13faa2be491647
e6131ab84166e74069216c6bcde97ec1bf85e68a
'2011-12-31T12:27:57-05:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGX' 'sip-files174.txt'
3ca67525df64768be3f5d84fed7e57cf
b75d3e6ca416d3158643135ebff13e598260f75d
describe
'34774' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGY' 'sip-files174thm.jpg'
d1c718509a5bd4befb5d69d8ffcb0b35
7b342eb98b237cbee5c8b13a73b158705a11b43f
describe
'1051765' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUGZ' 'sip-files175.jp2'
42b2be4a74420d92e82bb6c1757c273c
1b32f34475eaf8d65c3159a2c531c810045fc14b
describe
'130050' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHA' 'sip-files175.jpg'
629af32a8a1668af31d5777946042a4f
844d9d835d54e33908e1def45e910874ac89c247
describe
'29143' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHB' 'sip-files175.pro'
269bd011daedba403ca37c100613bb12
638166d9608aabfd64f4ece0dede1449fa67752c
describe
'63155' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHC' 'sip-files175.QC.jpg'
1bf7dbe0944520819709aa18b4c295e6
27db20145113a945ecbe6705a89dad3f999a36c3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHD' 'sip-files175.tif'
5defcae71a4b9285c3b128bd53940d88
52c44535adc57e053bc1466b3ea7cd6ce9cc22b4
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHE' 'sip-files175.txt'
427bdfab0827ca8d45164c4c6500f828
4c00742fc159e1aea5e8a371e84989e43dcde3bf
describe
'34489' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHF' 'sip-files175thm.jpg'
5bdc6a01c4018f198e30dbc34cd6c686
a72c5cc7f824f851ebb9d1525b669a3b63ccf547
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHG' 'sip-files176.jp2'
f41f5c13a7db08ae6a324797e26835b7
e75ae03b856cb1b2a926409d9265354ca2ed5433
describe
'135688' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHH' 'sip-files176.jpg'
40513647178f4886f87015bbc818c70b
c317b83cbee604c3cf6cbfeb668b88f9d11350c4
describe
'31335' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHI' 'sip-files176.pro'
514ca224a6c491de221bb2808a27425e
6597d23634fa53b1848fbc45d843353fab14706b
describe
'64262' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHJ' 'sip-files176.QC.jpg'
e37f5d02fb4ec4b27b8308454152dd8b
1410fc2cb3c77399d20415ef34ac1912df7d8d0c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHK' 'sip-files176.tif'
7536d6831ac8f6ab4a47dbf60fbdb0d4
3a2e350e13c52c22ea571fcf38a3551a759e79f9
'2011-12-31T12:34:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHL' 'sip-files176.txt'
b30a3727aaff1ec039b7563bc1b17c37
11ff8854171cb625a074e344a7f7c78a0d6ca28c
describe
'34352' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHM' 'sip-files176thm.jpg'
5efa70c1f2210f5d4891e88f2e981324
9f3281df7ce6d66a5f7edc6607ab819bf78a4ac1
describe
'974492' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHN' 'sip-files177.jp2'
d662713efa6f1e627f3621346df794c6
a3fe840b7ddecc4194744687bb5d0987a21a6f8a
describe
'122015' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHO' 'sip-files177.jpg'
ab0513384c69d3db8c3dca22be357764
bc13aa7b004c9b89cd3a4dc394c5bc316b8d28f5
describe
'29318' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHP' 'sip-files177.pro'
0640b3919748b05e3b666a5a3fbcb2d2
01f3b03059484e490f716225cc2b2b19c5ef41f8
describe
'59397' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHQ' 'sip-files177.QC.jpg'
f7ae77e4021d3016e7d5f4d793db04bd
105861da5a652a2a9e1012f2e104b6665c93306a
'2011-12-31T12:39:28-05:00'
describe
'8666520' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHR' 'sip-files177.tif'
f3af100a188845047ca360f25553aaec
595a3843e33aa7cbc2c3378ecffbca8668c719b0
'2011-12-31T12:39:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHS' 'sip-files177.txt'
f777f096c6e5773ff240479b50c445f3
f31d253f51498f21c1d46338e5ebe4ca4831a0d1
describe
'33035' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHT' 'sip-files177thm.jpg'
c0393d0f1ae259e676e2c21b6aafe78a
c4e80dabbdb67612267f2129ee7c34146fe95be1
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHU' 'sip-files178.jp2'
2ef14aad106051f875f5c437c5a1ee19
e1a7c5e08a6832ec0b75c98fd5caa20118f8ada0
'2011-12-31T12:34:05-05:00'
describe
'144162' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHV' 'sip-files178.jpg'
060791420474efa64b05c8c171aa38cb
2971c59cfce17251f1c436740a06fcf6e9ed5dda
describe
'33246' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHW' 'sip-files178.pro'
86db50e05353dc0509df92ca44982cf3
6f9a9b7f0057c609a48e27023cfb19d8b9fcf41d
'2011-12-31T12:38:47-05:00'
describe
'66608' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHX' 'sip-files178.QC.jpg'
c406c63d2fb21d61ffa85c1d6f561407
b0ad050674cb0cbfacf3c9c71eded0984d607e91
describe
'8667416' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHY' 'sip-files178.tif'
f79019685a589fce19aa5af6e648885d
6d39610076d399613f0b2d91ea7cdb89049fdd2d
'2011-12-31T12:39:35-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUHZ' 'sip-files178.txt'
24eef3a8de7d8bb3a94eebb31325034d
a8d44f034297a7dad907ca4b484e56673fd0e86b
describe
'35033' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIA' 'sip-files178thm.jpg'
ed1fafa9b1f366094cecab54e34592fc
34dcb573105b4e82682d35583e01011203ad35ec
describe
'866402' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIB' 'sip-files179.jp2'
83c3fe220e1191bdd03501f2755fe474
6aa9b972c7f0f1ed9eb98854f1899eb114bec5b4
describe
'111501' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIC' 'sip-files179.jpg'
5b80688c2e30b629ae840acb6d7a1352
67e9681b49f33149d27e68ae8c3a08f52b9520a0
describe
'24019' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUID' 'sip-files179.pro'
382b03c9f40640015eb4f7b9a34c3355
d543c6eb9758e56eeb1b90d824e3053186c4dd85
describe
'54685' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIE' 'sip-files179.QC.jpg'
3394cc601cef01d0fedf002b4f32d89a
f2f9c49f5772cbb3bbfdee8cfbb387f4bb3d9834
describe
'8665816' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIF' 'sip-files179.tif'
f958126342ce54a1faa9b905773184df
d117387772918333d03ffaa9752b6123b3ac7eb0
describe
'940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIG' 'sip-files179.txt'
08f5a0bd77e8d071f649fcfcb734dbb8
7977d1b07d76c5b875b666c68b538066da4a959e
describe
'31289' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIH' 'sip-files179thm.jpg'
19efc0a8b7b6f184e531b81aeb2601c1
fbd538fca5d818a53249153b2cfc07b1875106a4
describe
'677442' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUII' 'sip-files180.jp2'
99cf50608116ae74635075c44865e616
70be127f0073bb5b366d041ef3c013c5099880f2
'2011-12-31T12:37:50-05:00'
describe
'92534' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIJ' 'sip-files180.jpg'
7b20d2717444eef794d8b3dec6f00e21
10b7139dc2b4542b669ad6dbb2263c0f149459d4
describe
'17820' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIK' 'sip-files180.pro'
807ec633984c5dd024f639e120eca6ea
fb711197dab75779725c88b645f9fbe7e34afae3
describe
'47571' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIL' 'sip-files180.QC.jpg'
a636bc8b01c57fa5cbab970cf1425f33
ebd2864482b28d99aaa53f65c9993c8643966427
describe
'8664976' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIM' 'sip-files180.tif'
badd4253e1f49dbeeee4dde0908b8d75
82d6fc49bfff1ab519fc19d3b96ef95063cb7140
describe
'709' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIN' 'sip-files180.txt'
de117a4c30d5e4cb4148ece0d5c34321
ac686a531d9f477f7a6afe426e7f62451a33d47b
describe
'978865' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIO' 'sip-files180a.jp2'
274d008bb1185986f867faf226484571
982e12bf56e754e6e47bf7f8ba329b3b43c640cb
'2011-12-31T12:39:22-05:00'
describe
'114057' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIP' 'sip-files180a.jpg'
c03015bc0233d4226338d3938c3a3833
129ff00daa36edbfae45fee32c320aac875b54bd
describe
'49834' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIQ' 'sip-files180a.QC.jpg'
5de3982214fd4f7f98bb1bcf1c08e266
c1ae8442ecb65ea4b44b41a2688e9d4a91df03a7
describe
'8665392' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIR' 'sip-files180a.tif'
dafec68ef2b0ad1134464a607711812e
2570fb09d524843b7403ccd700f45dbd57745a9f
'2011-12-31T12:31:20-05:00'
describe
'30081' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIS' 'sip-files180athm.jpg'
a1e991a3967a086540349360ceaa674f
2f01a87b4535232bc6893938ac4d2af777304245
describe
'28967' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIT' 'sip-files180thm.jpg'
264606855e3e32caded68981056ae2c9
6c5e316fc219637fa454f3c52742e538ade41c97
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIU' 'sip-files181.jp2'
de91676a989df6d782439c7d030ba090
6a15e9fa8ac8236ab1f47e5e87706d06e43e0338
describe
'136433' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIV' 'sip-files181.jpg'
2f8fdccbdef8a25f2763f9c0370a7ea4
07a3a65cc814975fc3617b4dd040bb5dc36a0adc
describe
'31228' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIW' 'sip-files181.pro'
85f0a98e71d53591cb532b2aeb1b41cf
d32e15e02136359652dc68b96c239b6e40c5ba3b
describe
'64210' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIX' 'sip-files181.QC.jpg'
7181ada8525506d19c0aeab12e8dea0f
ace6303c933117114addcb8c9e0b2df5c39c2f09
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIY' 'sip-files181.tif'
cca79c914794b42b9f5ba29e21ff85a8
676c05f04471e69d04f962b8d1da82a21d78b897
'2011-12-31T12:33:47-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUIZ' 'sip-files181.txt'
18282189c698debf2cf0b649acacb02f
3520fc21537fbddfa820380f86296ae0a5736081
describe
'34356' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJA' 'sip-files181thm.jpg'
d00752d7105eeabc3b14c501daea1ec5
cb7881d4789650b6daf21344a8a3eb2e77bc59e8
describe
'1055031' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJB' 'sip-files182.jp2'
733d2c55d152ef937a76614dc98d0cc5
a5b887cf2b1501b467af6975788a00bee465ee95
describe
'130160' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJC' 'sip-files182.jpg'
e38df0b373a2675abf421314e0691a44
6ebe28e792aa3b4d7f0950017d4d74baa065666c
'2011-12-31T12:31:21-05:00'
describe
'29719' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJD' 'sip-files182.pro'
11444ed7ca9167623ee4fc60775670c0
9c474516220ca07ca1d95564eacb9a85d4ca419c
describe
'61815' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJE' 'sip-files182.QC.jpg'
45028371629011fcf001f4f7eb9cd5ee
351d01ddfe77edd9e229c2951e6b6ec499b5d66f
describe
'8666980' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJF' 'sip-files182.tif'
0cb6b1f07fcfbc939768e5cee241f7e7
a070e2bb57ab98f87ab79ba8b45f0b5c273485ef
'2011-12-31T12:30:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJG' 'sip-files182.txt'
50a14350d219ce34f5c010bd926ed2c2
649b31ab79080d16d5527efcfb62b4bc2ce3ea5c
describe
'34107' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJH' 'sip-files182thm.jpg'
fc7c5269bf45a9b410ed87aa6de1a948
9b80df88d41df03b3b0f55083af5f4aba5860fce
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJI' 'sip-files183.jp2'
9f8e8988422d6dd3bce18f7f122320a5
74ed68ae4cdf3b80807bcd08092c31a9677895e8
describe
'133484' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJJ' 'sip-files183.jpg'
59594a6ea5839ac286b3d9db4e676247
62033f238ce495aab4597d418df2e44d334451b4
describe
'30565' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJK' 'sip-files183.pro'
5acc1f64c4a76c1c5daed5c417ad2f15
e2733fc9b48e5b305373558a669f3d4457c99a45
describe
'63148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJL' 'sip-files183.QC.jpg'
06d176ffa7cd0268b313fc909c0bc6e9
816971cff9ae80120c606f4c23e7e299d75fd58b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJM' 'sip-files183.tif'
ce776fafee2cb3fc166596f50c54b881
9faca11ee6b8b46d4876639533f2a2ce7375b28a
'2011-12-31T12:32:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJN' 'sip-files183.txt'
47a9d86f70ea72e633f776f431627d67
b024a6c8082baef02692c01af553c102300aa122
describe
'34259' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJO' 'sip-files183thm.jpg'
4542678478a53faa400e1a91fc5675af
d802ec0ec8d6e27df3c86a9b4a59af0e4b406abc
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJP' 'sip-files184.jp2'
200f5ea1af505a3d06d58fa846088dfe
3198277288a4abf1e8df76e74e11e5bc8f2c6643
describe
'134101' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJQ' 'sip-files184.jpg'
11f7ecaf38ffc225304075c1120749f8
581d51f7707507ae7e90603d9f3d1fc9dc13b921
describe
'30755' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJR' 'sip-files184.pro'
48d3aeec062ab66e198b3b6b7bbf14fd
0609840606982feaee6fb96edbd11e792e41b72c
describe
'63066' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJS' 'sip-files184.QC.jpg'
37be256e9c06291072d2a9a466f186f4
d48f8c506f3a279e5dddf1cf29d7a6f0036b3b7f
describe
'8666820' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJT' 'sip-files184.tif'
cf2ffee32f3eed02727950979e1f2139
84ebde2646bf8504b7401d15588186eb3aefd37e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJU' 'sip-files184.txt'
d8ad3f21a81f2c32eb32bc2115e19ee0
6715766f30d0abfa52fe2efdbb45d43d5a858374
describe
'34045' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJV' 'sip-files184thm.jpg'
27f5f50b8856167ce2eb0b2b431e4a81
54969b9460836997c44d6b080610e5d7cf703607
describe
'1017300' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJW' 'sip-files185.jp2'
77314d57a3705c3a91f610f108f64dfa
d507438bc354a7f722a3ad5a4bf17990c0c9d904
describe
'126366' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJX' 'sip-files185.jpg'
98f0d50f214e582dfb2d59a3e6f6d6cf
edf618757032fa64f1a75c32ac1cb3870f853f7c
describe
'29327' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJY' 'sip-files185.pro'
58706effcf14afc1518d8edc67815430
86e664ba6dc3575c7d0a103f193991a0c23cb958
describe
'8667024' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUJZ' 'sip-files189.tif'
743a5525668fb01bce11dbe264089f29
ef5071d92f2802291038a310f251d993e2b01218
'2011-12-31T12:37:19-05:00'
describe
'60488' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKA' 'sip-files185.QC.jpg'
62fbd238f642c26207122ca54a97518b
b2fd8de641d25fcaa7f0516037fe1840667606d5
describe
'8666760' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKB' 'sip-files185.tif'
8c8d291bc11743ea3554e4e68b7ab187
bb1218352e07c9829456ec219adb34b4cce55bfd
'2011-12-31T12:39:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKC' 'sip-files185.txt'
e08b5b3a2df8c488280a084ac7664874
c174ab60b40b946b0c90214a50c186604ed4a13b
describe
'33629' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKD' 'sip-files185thm.jpg'
533ce3341022416c38ba3ec7667847c9
9395ff1f0daf73760ff25f93cead85cc7d935b0f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKE' 'sip-files186.jp2'
16e03c63bfa563491c238385d445aafb
1b33c002d9f71c93afb384c9bcdbe5686f9fe8d8
describe
'133477' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKF' 'sip-files186.jpg'
0e32d6e5694733a3dfbba31e5bd6bebb
797c381f43443ac74b4f96306c970c732148bc8f
describe
'29878' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKG' 'sip-files186.pro'
6c819233d947fba3bd8349dbd8971fb0
b09646cb51f99cbe956e94e33ba02f6e1f6dd73c
describe
'64141' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKH' 'sip-files186.QC.jpg'
6d3c0457ead9e001799333e835c78fff
b392cefc3d9228b18fdd140abd94a9421b859674
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKI' 'sip-files186.tif'
2044e658cbaa98b91f9c41f9b20f2824
94a28a56dd8f90fb31af6023a9e6d1774259370e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKJ' 'sip-files186.txt'
641b715fb4da4c12e57e0d5f22a9f16f
a4bcea1b0ba801067836bc9cf1a103546d81fc70
describe
'34911' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKK' 'sip-files186thm.jpg'
7016280c9485cde827fca45e4ae3abe7
05e864b267a2f3c24febbaec85393d09086ca9a6
describe
'1033610' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKL' 'sip-files187.jp2'
4bae44856aab0fd55bc7190d2b01b71b
fe17ac3c00667fb291c3021572db7ccbd8630e11
describe
'128146' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKM' 'sip-files187.jpg'
f60deae7d09a85ecaaa641330573ca6e
388e56ae952b56170b9b5001322a0821157102ed
describe
'29591' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKN' 'sip-files187.pro'
e775ca91646267f9ac8ef5bad2934ab7
893606b4c996dd3f931206b1ad32242634f4af0c
describe
'62486' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKO' 'sip-files187.QC.jpg'
f4c8d1325fed42937f0e7a3b03d8cb88
6ba697b7069d737a329fa577877ab2fe6022b69c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKP' 'sip-files187.tif'
7ceed6fbc38901728775fa8f7a11b0c3
61998d52f4794920d8cd126fbdaebcc76417d5c7
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKQ' 'sip-files187.txt'
538856ed38fa3be28901c9cda9a38283
d28ed2f6b7ae844a7d9432f98a5937820892d85f
'2011-12-31T12:31:06-05:00'
describe
'34593' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKR' 'sip-files187thm.jpg'
ad377480511fbbbd2fa3b9caa83d1cd2
893639e1d5d493fe2875b59180b4f5e9b98c6c23
'2011-12-31T12:39:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKS' 'sip-files188.jp2'
9aef849ecd0a09774d47e5e1dfa27839
17a17f6641fcca46ab42327976b7f8aef77c7fb6
describe
'145583' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKT' 'sip-files188.jpg'
8aa805d25146f25807d79ca43d05d2d4
9114031fc12e6357a05c35ae2fb3a69c4999fce1
describe
'33351' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKU' 'sip-files188.pro'
0ceccd743e582ec674db1212f28dbb07
723d5b421e98f462fb16ed0629108186f977664a
describe
'67018' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKV' 'sip-files188.QC.jpg'
da642e5d076bf5e8e74ddf1b53c99d6f
e24d5c6567d357102a05ae5ca1e337cc749c1e07
describe
'8667388' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKW' 'sip-files188.tif'
7dab9a34a8d2d7a0539829c49ab32e5b
e519f0ef2c6bfd9708a52a7a80dd0144db511576
'2011-12-31T12:34:14-05:00'
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKX' 'sip-files188.txt'
4313329c6a476154f471f67736561679
76cf2826e65a0931e3e8d296350fe545caaafdd6
describe
'35062' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKY' 'sip-files188thm.jpg'
3a20a98882185942df477517a2074ecd
74885adae621f3e81248bf6b5bed728c793233c0
describe
'1080217' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUKZ' 'sip-files189.jp2'
9efa9b33516f00707049acdff8284b7c
3a632514d5e7779ca6e933ba9de6a72dd283123d
'2011-12-31T12:37:00-05:00'
describe
'138689' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULA' 'sip-files189.jpg'
5fa97ecb5ff4d2bb90e68258f2c4e838
17a6cd7a000ce439773ca49928bcc652df61d152
describe
'31932' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULB' 'sip-files189.pro'
d5a32e9f847967d3cb6518c33d6adbee
3d7932e2644ad7fa9c65331546fc4162e5be015d
describe
'65174' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULC' 'sip-files189.QC.jpg'
f48e6805c3cc044c8b4d088ca835db16
4d3f589ee5896a6298d0acd060cf75c6e5badc07
describe
'1233' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULD' 'sip-files189.txt'
bea5d19232a686a32926671065762a33
a93fdac6931cce328650e3d3105ec0f120d6ddcc
'2011-12-31T12:27:18-05:00'
describe
'34449' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULE' 'sip-files189thm.jpg'
24ee9d6c730e05cb48607c6dce781315
64b517043916936f241c884503ec9c734bc650ae
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULF' 'sip-files190.jp2'
c8da05e4b31dcb5baec73e257570ab36
a7824734e1ad63b0c2e39598913e850ff8eab57b
describe
'141576' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULG' 'sip-files190.jpg'
bb8edf62ba96bcf53e06aabf4bf07cbc
360ca613167d5204613699d198f364921d1857c4
describe
'32832' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULH' 'sip-files190.pro'
fc250d843a60f442447a2cbb7b1e8384
f499d3f6fa9d3057d66998816f879714c95de293
describe
'66126' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULI' 'sip-files190.QC.jpg'
27f4ccd6fc7e1f4564f4dd0edff77a57
8bb107820eb853102b8681c22ef4221f8db1c76f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULJ' 'sip-files190.tif'
38c2e3a02bd63f30095887d8e33d83d5
102cf90f52113653094257db41982bcd04c150b8
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULK' 'sip-files190.txt'
8aab61204c62607eaf447a4b4e0d1763
85d79d3dd1816ce9fc0981153bd0c7e63cd1b215
'2011-12-31T12:34:34-05:00'
describe
'34780' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULL' 'sip-files190thm.jpg'
206775b3181cf038357af789f2eedc72
31b051ab4e99b815f82bf906f0304d23b23f6dad
describe
'1027340' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULM' 'sip-files191.jp2'
e2c7848e8e327fc7fe29ab3bb04a66fd
094584bd86c44a8381b87d17d416b75f46f61169
describe
'127722' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULN' 'sip-files191.jpg'
6f0b7d2be77a4278c5156748bc090b2a
cdcc8398bcc51097fce0317d3e9e40e9b0b1dfa2
describe
'28960' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULO' 'sip-files191.pro'
7cfd98d82e64c356486b73384daa025e
115523f0fbaecf0eaf05b9a209754a253f7a09fe
describe
'61349' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULP' 'sip-files191.QC.jpg'
f92d9a2bf1a0611dd784fc643728d8a4
63ba24e0d5d42bf52cd720122e212f03b17ae9af
describe
'8666724' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULQ' 'sip-files191.tif'
c738b172134e2d6457c3e3a54cfa09e4
76e308872f19723d0d58814a92d39086bdfa8a73
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULR' 'sip-files191.txt'
916c43ad90b3074add3c6b89e83eb3db
87923fa3623f53c471e8f60220e8526efaa7f479
describe
'33833' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULS' 'sip-files191thm.jpg'
118a2c1c69f372c724901aab5f23fe32
aa75a134131e70bfdb9b6b865bc95424329204d8
'2011-12-31T12:32:46-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULT' 'sip-files192.jp2'
62d791c449947bfc9eede0b7b4fdb148
353107fc9ecf6af8b4320d1caae8886fd169bc31
describe
'134486' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULU' 'sip-files192.jpg'
ed55ad279c30a3c853df7ff644565afc
d75be955129f1845f9c3e4f3a051c5f531da35f1
describe
'30888' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULV' 'sip-files192.pro'
436c98d5d0319eb30734c25431093b53
912a9528585b43c5ae2c1bbbf20ca574da6a82d5
describe
'63573' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULW' 'sip-files192.QC.jpg'
61144c3216050c0760c10b5b8164d492
d9d5ad69fd84c3677d58c4c19fd68ee9f62336ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULX' 'sip-files192.tif'
790f11b9869f853db6c48657666b5561
cbd812ac3718ca95b5624dbfdec406165f8e58f1
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULY' 'sip-files192.txt'
f6f35cc01724418289c2a4bb8e3fc585
8eb4929d78602d5df27d7be7746baf2043899fc3
describe
'34377' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAULZ' 'sip-files192thm.jpg'
dfdc0ce68760d2723d2d4479601f5764
ac4227a6bb48501bafa542cb8a2ba5304a701881
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMA' 'sip-files193.jp2'
b490aa3bb0da7d36e4977b23940f3431
fe49b6b06e06dcd6425b78c688a8931fae262f91
'2011-12-31T12:38:16-05:00'
describe
'134374' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMB' 'sip-files193.jpg'
c30ea2bacb4066a5fcefb570cee70068
7543ede2f98355610244ec68facf403cc9d32a21
describe
'31267' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMC' 'sip-files193.pro'
8506bae686336767e1901bf079d740f6
82676906dd626891d9c719a4426adf6b013dec9a
describe
'62986' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMD' 'sip-files193.QC.jpg'
ac05aca657a9e76f1f7d195382d46a54
85f37cc26b34e6bd96b9223611eea03080e7b78b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUME' 'sip-files193.tif'
1bb24725adf635a45bcf850cee33457e
78bf6f5fc3568c60ff72adc74391e201c7704b90
'2011-12-31T12:35:42-05:00'
describe
'1237' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMF' 'sip-files193.txt'
2a7547b813a76f60fa3d6614e3bd1fb3
1f64116710e4227f1d89e70a78956e6b9d17e205
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMG' 'sip-files198.jp2'
627ec23e18c59edfcacd4edde4e328cb
f4e8eb34da597dce986631d11d0e18d5ad4cd955
describe
'33990' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMH' 'sip-files193thm.jpg'
7789ac34e7a11d07d0517da48cf250c5
827b27a0c0053dc99d31d2c44db8da2bd4246431
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMI' 'sip-files194.jp2'
f4c7124b270dc96aba51c2e694f09d7e
c92320cba682d3892b0090d51b3101dbfa9c8144
describe
'136297' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMJ' 'sip-files194.jpg'
b565eba0e30cd92a59daef943b204a75
b4f0459df0fcd398affdcf3fdf5d8e4eccc3726d
'2011-12-31T12:32:55-05:00'
describe
'30925' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMK' 'sip-files194.pro'
293c94208995180bf92a67f770c4a8ea
2fa8579c623f609d0cdb9e157ee5390b5683ddd9
describe
'64711' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUML' 'sip-files194.QC.jpg'
6591043a07e00ff4b440f638e63179db
2b69872ccd1f8ab15cac4e6f9be8bc33de98f540
describe
'8667040' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMM' 'sip-files194.tif'
bb07f47ede5a6cb3ff292bdf45b0b220
925d298dea8c0f6438819aa1dec3d5b48ec7241a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMN' 'sip-files194.txt'
e6a5635bd07dc7384854de8f60baca19
0db1119830cdefc9b020607b97d1a24544d7a23a
describe
'34744' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMO' 'sip-files194thm.jpg'
6114f2d5bd82ac99d2ba41d4d3d4112f
ac6a9ad0e02ee5dc9687944aab155ac4fe68c1ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMP' 'sip-files195.jp2'
784ca7b29ac6021ac0d46370f5f01be5
322ccfe663ac02d3d323461f5fc069e83a9edab9
describe
'137145' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMQ' 'sip-files195.jpg'
ec6fdfc1f56160dffcefb92f4bb8cccf
2933cc5fa50c3fa61391e0e0a9e424f8a04485d0
describe
'31269' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMR' 'sip-files195.pro'
79f4af86c0c4d7c95d5705530921b90a
d054f8415cc07d42bcfb07cbb9379169e250a705
describe
'64417' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMS' 'sip-files195.QC.jpg'
39d2f12c348c80e8b1f79e00be4a6da9
63ffb1f3b4eeccb5cd2e1c5e64450d8d397a7a8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMT' 'sip-files195.tif'
d95f5a36a95eb706df7674018861356a
b2e6558c9b0418f561ba3c178f9e8bd531fff157
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMU' 'sip-files195.txt'
9f2f7bb8243cb70c2b0594e523e1a60a
8240289f571a0046ef573fa697eeab1fbfe8705e
describe
'34583' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMV' 'sip-files195thm.jpg'
cdb13eec592b4152d6967f1d0bd91231
8e891f701a1b9db354ce49e06d6ac0fd818dfb42
'2011-12-31T12:34:41-05:00'
describe
'1080213' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMW' 'sip-files196.jp2'
13b19c5e119f39be4b8eff11a9a4ee86
c2ac30fbac0738bbc6121fcff31710dbd9359d4b
describe
'142886' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMX' 'sip-files196.jpg'
221fa0e5872c2a11b1b43f64b4489ad2
6070fd4d18706ddc4254c676bd5138619066323b
describe
'31380' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMY' 'sip-files196.pro'
62116d716b098fa0c23019500853b0cc
a8a347db232034ffe46c7c111ef4d808d9e2f57b
describe
'67098' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUMZ' 'sip-files196.QC.jpg'
a20b9945a249d6784f18ce3edf97b96e
086609541c34e05a2b1f658c5839580168eea109
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNA' 'sip-files196.tif'
27fe22024c3e597ef7d9017512d1fe92
38d45899db604cfe6cb70f749d7c92088a4b4394
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNB' 'sip-files196.txt'
c48914f306ace1165eacb7064389bd7b
efb3d70500c57859883e19bde7b6445f67af9918
describe
'35203' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNC' 'sip-files196thm.jpg'
4ca1aa7f4b602db028312fc229621db2
8bb7c9466c5af23d54ccec9abfe327215b967454
describe
'1080238' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUND' 'sip-files197.jp2'
f9dcbf49a409c4f952c5d6fc56e5324f
a2909f9495a5b470832df085c0f5e80d89bf140c
describe
'143470' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNE' 'sip-files197.jpg'
46d3ca50b26753db0742896b09fa57d8
eae542305bb01be4ca6f3c385456572cbd7cbf8c
describe
'31952' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNF' 'sip-files197.pro'
0c002f557d757e70fefbd5e5156910bf
cc5bfb7c657f9ca0b73c967a411f0e630b000d6f
describe
'66867' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNG' 'sip-files197.QC.jpg'
39334384bbed2c184aa0f6fe678b1533
036901e1a67e0fe30fa707468fa32234bdfeb21e
'2011-12-31T12:38:53-05:00'
describe
'8667564' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNH' 'sip-files197.tif'
73bc2bdf207558a0ba2f0c6b07f9d3d5
9f4832fa5e962f9ee31e59bf5fc3cd0544901c41
'2011-12-31T12:26:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNI' 'sip-files197.txt'
c358ac5ab69a1e001e81c983bbb06642
d05d02f3202ea5442be17b2e94eee105f209b3ab
'2011-12-31T12:33:56-05:00'
describe
'35440' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNJ' 'sip-files197thm.jpg'
06a60a5c6de4ecd25f2fa955750ec9ce
ce332cb3718a9637f020e3259c577cb8fdc9bb4c
describe
'146862' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNK' 'sip-files198.jpg'
9cfd4c80f83e5abcaef3a8a304bd7efc
d860cfecacd75a8eb178be593296d3c7f3e2afdf
describe
'33332' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNL' 'sip-files198.pro'
d57c23c32cab4b3790f45bae11679f0f
8f9ce423d2853b4e9d44aff33476f37a4c649293
describe
'67284' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNM' 'sip-files198.QC.jpg'
41a5449c8d28beff03d84c69f7f60a41
237a50f692fdd4c599fa117c8168b4fe91140df8
describe
'8667512' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNN' 'sip-files198.tif'
fb2094a9f6e52cca75948db5f73a40de
13f609e049f25f363cdec770a54c34ee4e454c5d
'2011-12-31T12:27:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNO' 'sip-files198.txt'
91ec59cc0953b14062f882feeabceb60
9ea0c0119fc7dca4b67560ef635258d28476e37c
describe
'35428' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNP' 'sip-files198thm.jpg'
0f16433e63ee9f813920ce558e876798
6fea20cab43757faf3814cc28a02a903d318cada
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNQ' 'sip-files199.jp2'
72133a7e0007d76faedca043de76a6d6
4af7b02def33f1b37112138c81786b89ce5251c8
'2011-12-31T12:32:01-05:00'
describe
'137504' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNR' 'sip-files199.jpg'
8b82d169d37fb148ae42b4de5ef1cdfb
c79cf818b04674ce05a96abd320298245935efb5
describe
'31058' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNS' 'sip-files199.pro'
f8d7fbee2bedf0858600a2cd27279adb
463861d346080bf6dc600acd20a17d4e6eb6e25a
describe
'64784' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNT' 'sip-files199.QC.jpg'
397916feb9b8dabe752ec653541edbf0
c099e8bd19f2a94f28d1b1d86f6b02a8b8c81176
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNU' 'sip-files199.tif'
cd1f24b4d099bd619cd5e9bf0fd5868e
8d6d9eb58ed6abae8d1a19a4920b7a1ad0d74c8b
'2011-12-31T12:31:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNV' 'sip-files199.txt'
6af38b740dc81216194d560e983b1442
0bb34e527eaea971417db2b14f1594fdf262fbed
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNW' 'sip-files199thm.jpg'
43d3f0f7c70a249d1f8c21d804fe8b07
5d24d9037566edf192e963507ee3d2d0f332dd1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNX' 'sip-files200.jp2'
53dc58b63dcbba4193410bbb0678244a
a63a19f2c05e28e56da17cd71d9f5bc617a39c83
describe
'141600' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNY' 'sip-files200.jpg'
54028a45cdedb04bf2268b7557650415
89269d24ae9b8e3ebc1b9977f983770957f328b5
'2011-12-31T12:37:43-05:00'
describe
'31990' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUNZ' 'sip-files200.pro'
fc180c0f9a5e56b1ddb2994eacecc8cc
6bcfa0541b34e3a6a5eea367186d48b367d9f733
describe
'65699' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOA' 'sip-files200.QC.jpg'
2495cc8a0c106ef813889c8f66096f18
0df345a087ba7c3fe541461d0c8530a90131f20d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOB' 'sip-files200.tif'
6a15f293eb451fac051b9eaf943325d8
5ca40566fc1542d18060cea496be1b501e6cd23e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOC' 'sip-files200.txt'
a7b5d4e8d9ac138123a76b7ef408c2f8
f3add585e13da3dca80bdfb3ebb03b60e94c866a
describe
'34684' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOD' 'sip-files200thm.jpg'
33e857234c200c5871b37a94f2e6f3f8
4472169c2e7c818d1cbc9df8c38d381de9880607
describe
'1080218' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOE' 'sip-files201.jp2'
aa2a3865990c5e3dde79d4df2f1e270a
83ee2c2b82c4fd60a310fd4e3b6d0a994389e449
describe
'136786' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOF' 'sip-files201.jpg'
cf857f7aa607b4f155944508603684ef
e4a4484f0a82699f1da374403f81663703cb35d7
describe
'31498' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOG' 'sip-files201.pro'
bcaec6e9fd0c670f7f38333586dacaca
67bfb867d51308dc890b043c874cfbb5854e6161
describe
'64237' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOH' 'sip-files201.QC.jpg'
b2a5ebca82469206a5332e5eb87bf701
4079ef6ed0e61ad65d7f849936cbb198363deaf4
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOI' 'sip-files201.tif'
078ac9a5eafe1f7f86c50859161560df
12b957063c7c0c164aa156165dac6573d61eb6f2
'2011-12-31T12:35:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOJ' 'sip-files201.txt'
ea8511c6114d6c0e24e3a8a79d833082
7eb560f11a5ce8173a9e243e42e0c8634036e07a
'2011-12-31T12:35:14-05:00'
describe
'34323' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOK' 'sip-files201thm.jpg'
3d76270cba25a4596c62e6b1dfe7f6b5
3f66c54362b70980fc582e95ee582b408c2e1c70
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOL' 'sip-files202.jp2'
f6c4bf357487fed937c0023aad3a00bb
1d00bb8ae8c450ee5646a2d975b6c540a6af8eee
describe
'145431' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOM' 'sip-files202.jpg'
5497b1c2dc2209dd39c4c6a8836fcd05
0cac132fb81f1b7e2007d504ca67827b64b1f78a
describe
'32771' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUON' 'sip-files202.pro'
d446dec952b8aa580c7024ff87f790c0
d102d3e38af247f3e555cdd0013a62c0ab3fbcd9
'2011-12-31T12:34:03-05:00'
describe
'67587' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOO' 'sip-files202.QC.jpg'
61b529c44b57cb97eadcf23dc5411cdf
e080336d3f87e438a0f37b8d7ba3f0b2e31ef7df
'2011-12-31T12:37:47-05:00'
describe
'8667528' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOP' 'sip-files202.tif'
a1f197f20bed211bf16be198b3ea5ba9
ebc65458ac8411cc3396db8ddedfe52144e4e14f
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOQ' 'sip-files202.txt'
42dca7d1ae74a2279140d58ad78683ab
0dc9aa2e4f871b7e45541d6841d6434e70efda7e
'2011-12-31T12:33:08-05:00'
describe
'35469' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOR' 'sip-files202thm.jpg'
f971c47980d2cbaabd319de17ee6df57
1be15a6dee907ca924bcc9bcb4c2bce12fb10a8f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOS' 'sip-files203.jp2'
58890df909c23c1beafd4ac19d2c8489
08ba63622976501f6cd7be4ea4cc8c3823dcaf6f
describe
'137637' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOT' 'sip-files203.jpg'
7f1123539f1376c14b588c79f02b488c
3e298d9f737836569c8770f6b724ff8b73940895
describe
'31073' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOU' 'sip-files203.pro'
03b57a710fe5459f19f2958d0f7c1859
a0f89ba48d4aebb85404df5bf5f7fa6c35d6b241
describe
'65205' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOV' 'sip-files203.QC.jpg'
d64c0bad16c7ade5753543d7fbd2a143
394c13665af2ad0441e47bcad4cb5c9d7dd9ae79
describe
'8667212' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOW' 'sip-files203.tif'
4da5baf59362ffeefb8b377dd4fcc637
b4f4c447da447daa0b6600901bbfa0b16ed176f2
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOX' 'sip-files203.txt'
8e32859044d4a6d5d7b65d9515079370
91c6227676ac6b8e2caace7d54bb9969d710031c
describe
'34883' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOY' 'sip-files203thm.jpg'
f7544b1eb11310dc60e49ee854434fef
79891c8aef086d6ad1820d3950669a21776386da
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUOZ' 'sip-files204.jp2'
d5a0fad61bc36596dd90543b96440c65
db1cf1ebb35f098cecc75b8f78f85cedc4ae8df3
describe
'142043' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPA' 'sip-files204.jpg'
14d5a8dc92fab22027ddf0bfb452d4c8
a3963ea6a3f19c37148a06dcf3e316f60acc243b
describe
'32735' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPB' 'sip-files204.pro'
0ead839509657551367a22ed7722b294
2d6a1d7bfa418d29df865816ada8a75052a29be0
'2011-12-31T12:38:49-05:00'
describe
'65784' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPC' 'sip-files204.QC.jpg'
f4fc6fe4cc48e4c82b4fa661eadb8535
8b87e9c43c6ac602c4156f2267e7e1d64b1009c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPD' 'sip-files204.tif'
c16ae66411f45220ab866f15ff5678d9
77c84a3e0b0ed773294d3c9c7054d6941b08e607
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPE' 'sip-files204.txt'
8d06f4cfe3d29424c45b589dde452200
b2729c1eebd6960b93612a511b9c99ad7b39dcbb
describe
'34603' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPF' 'sip-files204thm.jpg'
c33d2f6631242891efa40de24067523b
ff3c41c43b782e8b09618ef17fee54062f4e9271
'2011-12-31T12:36:25-05:00'
describe
'1080219' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPG' 'sip-files205.jp2'
61fa9b6f477979dc9052ddcd13bda2ad
0c78f5ea445f6d11bb4d6e1d03bf7edaaf10e91c
describe
'138916' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPH' 'sip-files205.jpg'
c19f4f0b2dfbb968997c468f3ec67095
46f743542fe7cc14b3e9de0cfa7d79c3dab4acd1
describe
'33266' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPI' 'sip-files205.pro'
216529c5bbbe124ac28f6ca6583aa6bc
aa689663a35905ae2b2ea7c2b74d7f77b4d09afa
describe
'64433' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPJ' 'sip-files205.QC.jpg'
e81f3c443b82f3c5e437b123e7bcefa4
51875d4574db0cc01babb1390c365f6ff932fe88
describe
'8666968' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPK' 'sip-files205.tif'
9155db12bf7df9e09ce72875324ad354
a69490c6ea4108d60f304acb9adf4fe908280bbc
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPL' 'sip-files205.txt'
e4ae7766022ab15d5b3849e6e674f847
d44343aaed00def4a60f4ccc0d110dffe6fc4d91
describe
'34217' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPM' 'sip-files205thm.jpg'
e02e739a2b861fc93e508b3c0fcea65b
632f0ad9dbf9f87253aa2dd6febb116220faa106
describe
'1080274' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPN' 'sip-files206.jp2'
20b63d9a06fcfa6572368dd39e630c7b
cb8fa621cd7b477fc5c63cc94ba8f6a2c18b0c3c
'2011-12-31T12:31:37-05:00'
describe
'140890' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPO' 'sip-files206.jpg'
d23cac030716d6e32c0d386b790e63f2
b9753f9575c1dec864492ed4cf19d43cb1d56398
describe
'32865' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPP' 'sip-files206.pro'
2cc719b2dc8938a859b214b5ff34128a
c3a20c9ac19cdd548aafb1bc877af1abd0603b08
describe
'66560' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPQ' 'sip-files206.QC.jpg'
6099b67739ca2a8de461ff7330e94c2a
324891b5d81368787794c5716dbf861a36c2409a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPR' 'sip-files206.tif'
ca004b63b9b9add30bcf2e74bc374eb5
7017233dfbcc5cfc569700614e6e0fdb4545006a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPS' 'sip-files206.txt'
5948bef07647f0974b30593f1e6c9a35
e6b6f22bdc2c4c0b9cb89ac0d01fe554204bdb04
describe
'34651' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPT' 'sip-files206thm.jpg'
fae391ae3aadfd14d48b5e84a920995c
c85d247686cf1f550bc59c86eb22e94a186c656e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPU' 'sip-files207.jp2'
e939d5d451f84e30601f0e9c27883468
68dc24a12bf6808465a9c4ac9aa32b6adb8a2e22
describe
'140803' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPV' 'sip-files207.jpg'
e59201ee12a0106699f1618982bcd201
2e9a31bedc4163a1b523a1cc057b5f88d50e51eb
describe
'32650' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPW' 'sip-files207.pro'
a028a5dfc608a3bf3bc48cfae67a2d4c
f40a9d4a55af410aa3926cec86f4c5565b016fd4
describe
'65562' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPX' 'sip-files207.QC.jpg'
02f107b44e96a59fe3a73e156dee0ee1
47fabf14890e3d2a0be16eb6dd6e185ffa7bbcd7
describe
'8667016' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPY' 'sip-files207.tif'
d363eedd0f1a4c56f6cf63a51791310a
641c432c2c48c7ae2d02b2ab2ee9b44241609634
'2011-12-31T12:30:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUPZ' 'sip-files207.txt'
391ae5cf122b14636a4f22cd769bfc87
17fd69a259a3c4bb9af70478cf043b30097e5de0
'2011-12-31T12:32:43-05:00'
describe
'34582' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQA' 'sip-files207thm.jpg'
c7cc73ab819782e4e88509227d16a492
ba307e6b81bea415c46f395b8e5253be93a41861
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQB' 'sip-files208.jp2'
07b4a096d05af66d40832e8566a3c4e5
cb3bde5a7f9e89a3a6247fbd7ad0e1d76153ec7c
describe
'147255' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQC' 'sip-files208.jpg'
59d726e047a1940f739cad5d93dbe90f
cf7409b2d81d799d8039247a95768f702247925e
describe
'32795' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQD' 'sip-files208.pro'
a24938ab0b07b2276dfab1ce60723175
950177a1407c8ea8f87bfced19dbee5c8429cbcb
describe
'67785' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQE' 'sip-files208.QC.jpg'
1795e833f68de92a69b8f49aade2ddb3
c1604cfa6607b00ddc4932aec3e78af865a2a211
describe
'8667392' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQF' 'sip-files208.tif'
433c9d4e46603068c741433c4ab46e7e
237ddd75dd378e4a4d650d270ec3c5752c7f250c
'2011-12-31T12:36:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQG' 'sip-files208.txt'
70bbacc527ccd90e73ef0f58d0c253e1
56b864fe394d59ab9d74b22678dfb30f52f39739
describe
'35338' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQH' 'sip-files208thm.jpg'
0451fc9a15ef04fec8830ecb4b86f452
d478909e9588b9dd58a3ee2e7c527da18cd35917
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQI' 'sip-files209.jp2'
1e7fb40d59c2a1aa23bd79218ca3f2b0
fec31a4940184e6870b81e8099e11c34fc62d446
describe
'137124' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQJ' 'sip-files209.jpg'
08545e69177dc527be2bcbc5a11bbb19
11dd22b40cbf1a9a531f04a5fe9a616d2ef4c828
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQK' 'sip-files209.pro'
6963b0d3c720181871c23107982dc294
50cb29c7cc6ff0310e58a70e7ce23c9799aca60f
describe
'64537' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQL' 'sip-files209.QC.jpg'
6cc97ce14b6b4a170cdfa628f3b69b40
089e9eab547bfc976b93c81032d043b33f1f92a3
'2011-12-31T12:29:10-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQM' 'sip-files209.tif'
02d9b5dc9227d1271a542926fe3511a9
ba88b06d5941cfd1aa15ec56b19e5f9eedb3360b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQN' 'sip-files209.txt'
d2a40264ef5550059d0bc00849fb5fe8
63e20c898494b9b242a6c1a6df74a04770b57920
describe
'34606' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQO' 'sip-files209thm.jpg'
fce2e32f574de00d4d692034d91b5833
c08988a5083071cb968fdac17ea88fefc1ee0cf2
'2011-12-31T12:36:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQP' 'sip-files210.jp2'
dd6d3ddf8ed8ae99ace9879507ad6aa8
6d9629ce58b411abeb8327d75901c554c87898fc
describe
'148128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQQ' 'sip-files210.jpg'
6931676c2d46b3654aac59b0cf8a375c
32e5bb03ce5efed27f451c970acdc56d658bf8d4
'2011-12-31T12:31:47-05:00'
describe
'33374' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQR' 'sip-files210.pro'
cf4d39ac88b1e68d877733eede12602f
cf6bec3c6c81e5cbf1d20bea496922909dd5a877
describe
'68097' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQS' 'sip-files210.QC.jpg'
201c3da774d383df35b4438b04ab61a8
1f9a7eac2d64d75e3cc3965e1c657c524f158f8c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQT' 'sip-files210.tif'
18b307c61ad40fab012e6e0e7616b512
1dcd62226abfb0f891187095e85f96ae6fd14329
'2011-12-31T12:39:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQU' 'sip-files210.txt'
0aef48297097c86b35f5cd5492a31e7a
ff69ddbab45002ea8826f55764a1b7d5be64a595
describe
'35431' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQV' 'sip-files210thm.jpg'
e1755a715d87d2b52f50346929d5d364
d266a7b368abad7c3a880d7eddd014eca5ee537a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQW' 'sip-files211.jp2'
0db8788730eb29b85cf1e4a4adb961ee
cd8be0f5af1f6bdb126f29e198900fa6e13e984a
describe
'142372' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQX' 'sip-files211.jpg'
b59de546d04b88a36037c6504042d9e3
a5b92fc43655b06402d58280f8422585c6c832a6
describe
'32400' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQY' 'sip-files211.pro'
9b4adda3355bd07ae93e3d5eae9e90c9
27b90feebfa90efade32a28606e28bc25f10bf71
describe
'66929' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUQZ' 'sip-files211.QC.jpg'
b985fda8a11505169c826a4b38be693f
87ed91ce2fa57d5aaa8e9e5211562314a4db2984
describe
'8667348' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURA' 'sip-files211.tif'
f0ee546a6a9a322ddd76c6798892d396
fa1477cd3e8c40c1158761d1b1d223b3380fc73e
'2011-12-31T12:32:17-05:00'
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURB' 'sip-files211.txt'
1255582600f19967d280b711a943a05f
d09f63abbe9866e920bb5ccb88536126db41ab00
describe
'35181' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURC' 'sip-files211thm.jpg'
9fb097f0a440ccd4bb4ff9cbf2db6405
9d526d1403201cc3f5daa1c10000380ccfc4b245
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURD' 'sip-files212.jp2'
85cec873f6833d9c03ce889643870dd9
c823df77fb9a49c1e7bf8f5fa234cbf7be60f993
describe
'141734' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURE' 'sip-files212.jpg'
9c8e8f3a878cbcece1cdd2a7991fc51b
0a72a41a024e7bd2d78c43f85f413a6c701b5d25
describe
'32470' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURF' 'sip-files212.pro'
17444ffcee534601193ba536f398e6fc
937db8feb95ecfce081f164aa0cf3d99ad72f1dc
'2011-12-31T12:32:09-05:00'
describe
'65731' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURG' 'sip-files212.QC.jpg'
e25c692f83f56a321aa391065eb0607f
28dbfdb8df38b8efc6df4ca0398b9fe725bb78f4
describe
'8667256' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURH' 'sip-files212.tif'
873d2a3b4be3dc5a426b9c45b6ff244d
310ed7c3d7af6fcbd34f5737aa9ea0b064cfe2c4
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURI' 'sip-files212.txt'
b9b05e855051f64b1030206ae3abbaa9
9240e81254c0e2d731ba1da6737e74aef60333b7
describe
'34731' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURJ' 'sip-files212thm.jpg'
fb699db194cb48fca2a75a62bc7fe8c7
5d11edb83983fcdb05e18a2a0421b3e6cde65723
'2011-12-31T12:38:04-05:00'
describe
'1048640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURK' 'sip-files213.jp2'
de9f8a39e4b6530e804a2594820501b5
f223bf4e9f9a5a216179e3b2b7ec0c6bb56b3a96
describe
'129969' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURL' 'sip-files213.jpg'
60a1efeb614d624dbf71e7d0659873cb
8f40e2f12752018e8d85c24b401736c698781d04
describe
'31486' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURM' 'sip-files213.pro'
d7a3c2c06eb6467edd95b44b50d4d40c
e1b71603de9f8a3178269f8b1b4a3a9c3298de63
describe
'62089' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURN' 'sip-files213.QC.jpg'
6e4a08dfa687652b66ed71045933a34b
4a14cb7b749988761b5ed62e297ae921a7231839
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURO' 'sip-files213.tif'
80752ef129fcb8696b5ca0acd1f9e7ef
4784149b2fe403e632748d03d7f5577581d8cdf9
'2011-12-31T12:35:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURP' 'sip-files213.txt'
d49fb7fc035c07e1537895a785964fae
f4c1076014a6d6c6c5ac93f766f5a449b233653e
'2011-12-31T12:33:46-05:00'
describe
'33501' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURQ' 'sip-files213thm.jpg'
8cbf47cd65ab6d3f0bf7ee47fac8f4fa
1c384f16a5ea9b393caef331f9d34ee05610b648
describe
'1080226' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURR' 'sip-files214.jp2'
47bff3b7c53db80fe6b212787fd63931
a1835fea35fdc4320647bfe0706ac0b034e2cd0a
describe
'146156' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURS' 'sip-files214.jpg'
882b4d64dd1c1d0ec87dd70ed0f870f9
4b19df50c2da3d1cf2f0a2e795944a0961823ead
describe
'32808' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURT' 'sip-files214.pro'
cdc2432ae8921c499a80e3986aba4bdb
e1e67e55b3a4fc69d6ea3104362bb4ea80c49cb3
describe
'67875' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURU' 'sip-files214.QC.jpg'
9514c6762d799ba10348198b5d45cc1e
e2fe3081682de7bcd0e2109bc2c2d9684394d7d9
describe
'8667688' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURV' 'sip-files214.tif'
d4a59a367995805df2e5249af55e0e16
501d0c1e56bf6a2c2bfa0fcebf46012003af6ffb
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURW' 'sip-files214.txt'
59d05b05990aa66d6edc94924a900998
ada15c5e0f847ace8a0da8ee6e65bdc258701649
describe
'35471' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURX' 'sip-files214thm.jpg'
2507d4aad361547f4ad311e20ab148a9
7c971c6c3800b1f8dc68f854e5293f7a30ae7301
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURY' 'sip-files215.jp2'
c13344edf932099e05088de3d24f53b0
9e7dab66ee0bac63766f57bc6da7a31e5c24ac23
describe
'143296' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAURZ' 'sip-files215.jpg'
0dbe124dcf320620564731371c789aa4
3e73a3974f36c1d7ca70452eff190351aefa53b4
describe
'32497' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSA' 'sip-files215.pro'
7b12247f0f7fbc77574b1925f440da45
87ffda07313b79665de6db06584a50d132e171e0
'2011-12-31T12:38:15-05:00'
describe
'66801' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSB' 'sip-files215.QC.jpg'
0989afe03c883b693735da5eb9544f98
70fd45a98a9d0b2b6365c9afae72b5669111cbd2
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSC' 'sip-files215.tif'
a855f0c01ff5ecbe795053bda0229893
bba5da8c84b9771b7c8e518d205e1bd9eeb51f17
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSD' 'sip-files215.txt'
5ae02366d536ddf3f84b3f7ef002425b
29395d2835639c4dcdc334ef4d09e975c944313a
describe
'35008' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSE' 'sip-files215thm.jpg'
a2afc99df1a373e60d52de906d4ab539
d415768517df6ecd415ee4da5255c0595b47581f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSF' 'sip-files216.jp2'
7c241a21a973815a5c288ebdd94b33a9
443b6bb9b93c6d1c72d2c72bc35d0094c6d0d7fc
describe
'146951' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSG' 'sip-files216.jpg'
351940218b313a72022e8c282b078622
ea96cabfad5f63470a61a935f2b2c1f40df00a2f
describe
'32329' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSH' 'sip-files216.pro'
572771cfa9e26ce039bd507ca75fabd7
1de3095852d2985e711b4a12bd726714d6f7333c
describe
'68525' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSI' 'sip-files216.QC.jpg'
cde885deb5be40acfe8631621411629f
260502194a674a8892a76497c45625526240d03e
describe
'8667444' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSJ' 'sip-files216.tif'
f586eb638c6194561e57400bd608ef25
bfa4e22a900114cec98af2915fc22326199406eb
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSK' 'sip-files216.txt'
e336dc712bd3391323512de363e80418
90073ddc01c7fc8c2c56b63b0c5463c683a0b5f1
'2011-12-31T12:39:12-05:00'
describe
'35757' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSL' 'sip-files216thm.jpg'
24881b82918fa227cdfb450f2aaaecb4
177c1289adf9a6d982d682eeae9a8909c5bd5a09
describe
'1046736' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSM' 'sip-files217.jp2'
16ed5b6a163dcd2d8c4f1578a45d4395
c8cc7b27c769bdcb653451f43c92573f74de4e68
describe
'129827' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSN' 'sip-files217.jpg'
f338bf49c4d09057cf20d7a2f56c0e55
23fbbc16c3a1f6ada848b692e9f3f0f517a86761
describe
'32464' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSO' 'sip-files217.pro'
b4e00d6330ab1f7cff81ab611d679b53
f0ba4ce6a550e3f3f346e5198274866d9fb775e3
describe
'61053' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSP' 'sip-files217.QC.jpg'
4c680de666cc1a6a781bb9bc175f4b9f
43537f47a307a652cc28060c8294e882a4ef5001
describe
'8666744' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSQ' 'sip-files217.tif'
5143de927ed5c2b68c749dd19ce84324
4104324ca30da41c30296dc1581738d8aa556ea7
describe
'1341' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSR' 'sip-files217.txt'
87a7a6fc366866665e7b5c3818e4e5a8
d45023f73fa4f13f473240f65d56aefd16b527fb
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSS' 'sip-files217thm.jpg'
85d324bcec25e8fad9eaddc26c30ed59
c03417a0191f140fdf99f13f8394a9fe298109ab
describe
'1080223' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUST' 'sip-files218.jp2'
1678c699e552e6db938ba85621c613c6
60d3bc7d36bf6ad1e3092c291bcc6fb018de561e
describe
'148001' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSU' 'sip-files218.jpg'
7b59bc7e436e123115dd7226da4700ea
066ef5c32628ef8d7ff841ec9742d206f8dbd270
describe
'34394' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSV' 'sip-files218.pro'
88c67650dfd3199ef0cfa942aff03dbc
c60ba4d756bcfee70f819efa4f63d141e4d9da47
describe
'68344' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSW' 'sip-files218.QC.jpg'
1fae94dd63ddaae0126b6c06477f599c
be770c75b65b6498c423aa492dfc6346cbcc7fab
describe
'8667620' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSX' 'sip-files218.tif'
648d33d462eb5dde1d237e60c9248922
974cd7fd5f53669922a5502ffc38b05a9dfdab46
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSY' 'sip-files218.txt'
7e99e3a92c95e0acf66a1a786a0a676a
b274d245e41a48a295ae4b2f1267b6f7b4fdc390
describe
'35611' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUSZ' 'sip-files218thm.jpg'
ec3865560ef5c33bf6e8b646550bf6c3
23b58a719e71969b17dff6e09e5f5e52612ecff6
describe
'399315' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTA' 'sip-files219.jp2'
d569a087840f265731d8749652633195
ca4d6b712504ad48b0b9cb15d57d48b2bc420bc2
describe
'63925' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTB' 'sip-files219.jpg'
d3fd5cd62591a805a7f0ba12ec0c1745
404ce13397a44abfe3c5831d0e203c0e82555f9e
describe
'12445' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTC' 'sip-files219.pro'
2518734fca7f23d5394e56035ac9133d
7661ed6c7c3ef2a4bc619bc7c1596cc66c37908e
'2011-12-31T12:29:19-05:00'
describe
'35700' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTD' 'sip-files219.QC.jpg'
b353d567073a904bef1d5aba0b19dfd8
27a7d6673ba54acea7509325222c35934a5f3c85
describe
'8663292' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTE' 'sip-files219.tif'
466d5d8a549e66d8c323be17dc9df0e1
f630b81f4fbd7ceabc4bcb0269bf73662b7dcaad
describe
'551' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTF' 'sip-files219.txt'
b16b37e7115bfcef8890631c527c45b5
d566d814706f5dd35366e0564774ca616085ced7
describe
'25324' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTG' 'sip-files219thm.jpg'
260ecd48ec06081c74cf75c5c9d107cf
07bd9dd9ede0a29b12c6dd0f82262055c7f79b3a
describe
'715698' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTH' 'sip-files220.jp2'
845770207241c687e89684d93aee3b1f
32f2205be04a5af6eebc15864390fc375240b87b
describe
'95997' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTI' 'sip-files220.jpg'
c5c45d33bc56f7e9d8d061e4fb532635
a295dc36e2e6fba3c4751476e28c1dfb9f386d1e
describe
'19691' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTJ' 'sip-files220.pro'
b6b48c23947b1035677aec8d6eef762d
553bccf88677910f74c36293e58823b3c9404401
describe
'48801' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTK' 'sip-files220.QC.jpg'
d64f03d69d488a8aea17306fd9bd7b2a
d191430badbfa742b0caba93648d3d539b977bfa
describe
'8665024' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTL' 'sip-files220.tif'
5f7ca06b4ea9eb9946d16f0e396de741
2171a4b62e03ba436f497344b3468bbd4b7fdc5f
'2011-12-31T12:31:43-05:00'
describe
'823' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTM' 'sip-files220.txt'
27dc66c2a010cfda9dfde1d1b093cf36
50150c3f1cbc6461b9e0d74e83d54d6aa8ab21b9
describe
'992418' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTN' 'sip-files220a.jp2'
54deb987d5cbc017d564493d1d0d2027
08a5a9c8923a72ad533238131a90c3f3d21373fa
describe
'115453' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTO' 'sip-files220a.jpg'
ed4b887f7bb900524a08d427ed41fe9d
8f718d3b18ca5f2a2591c40730f406c17f1451ec
describe
'49767' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTP' 'sip-files220a.QC.jpg'
b84aefa7e0af96f0892350d17d8c2299
444f1b95c9922c7ac35dc5ffa09d58b716898496
describe
'8665452' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTQ' 'sip-files220a.tif'
387857c3ba8e92fad3c37c2b85a38a6c
7bce77c5ce5bf8ea3e4916310b09ad6b72435f2a
describe
'29976' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTR' 'sip-files220athm.jpg'
5209e9e95a4fee076fb628325c684e0d
6ace328d6f685f5e222049bb34966e4eacd9b882
describe
'29452' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTS' 'sip-files220thm.jpg'
9e559de018c08480fcb7e1e5a7d36ed3
1885cbef0b4e80ab73efe50e9684a2b8b25c90f2
describe
'1072596' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTT' 'sip-files221.jp2'
7c34ad457d51edbf3e46aefe2912d25e
45e1cb4808d16dd37a076bb31831614f25dc5eca
describe
'133015' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTU' 'sip-files221.jpg'
b4bde76330c89d46fb05f882126b2504
5029557a93069141065fc5d9a52713bdcb38fb32
describe
'31112' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTV' 'sip-files221.pro'
11c2a51c3cd49132716d3fa2738df9c3
ef94e578a456b727f984a28fa227d9731a135d9f
describe
'63096' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTW' 'sip-files221.QC.jpg'
726bed4dbed18e813a14626dbadcdcff
2f92570d149bd927efc30cfdec7f5b16c185ab2a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTX' 'sip-files221.tif'
fa8608900ef2221db0965d2f7c6efa40
d9861c44b6c288e9e13c28d74a2d92ecd4e8d035
'2011-12-31T12:29:28-05:00'
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTY' 'sip-files221.txt'
46392b4628e524497d5d42c22ae59128
7e1543d83a5e7f5976520cccfa91ec52af7d3188
describe
'34452' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUTZ' 'sip-files221thm.jpg'
b067c1ad61fcec393b699c1e77ea0cb8
538d8094989b374655d0b3109442f984959d9fb0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUA' 'sip-files222.jp2'
286550c45c15fa2c5774527836f96a81
15e335472ec1a4ed677af20f8d413b1b2d53077c
'2011-12-31T12:33:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUB' 'sip-files222.jpg'
42dd16602f2a8c3cc3a0fa7518be42f2
7e0367c81c5426e1fff2802df6cdfdc2aff59f8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUC' 'sip-files222.pro'
8544d184c90976c4534710528af24d9c
6932cd5ab79b4da30c7983da68a7962af08a0261
describe
'66965' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUD' 'sip-files222.QC.jpg'
266716f48d6798ddc5471368edac2116
89e4ae600c315636f0eb903c7bfdb04c26c296cc
describe
'8667592' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUE' 'sip-files222.tif'
1f347a4ca8b6213ec2d6d268bc93285f
4d103b2ff7344ea8b638f6359e7ff78abf7f16b2
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUF' 'sip-files222.txt'
bd20538c05f97a1c2483efe9e3957eba
493b406e502461fda2ec58a55e4f7b049803ddc9
describe
'35569' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUG' 'sip-files222thm.jpg'
5416e10fbbf033100370904567e99432
dfda35b0c526ab8c86dbfa676cd0483ceeab6fce
describe
'1080236' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUH' 'sip-files223.jp2'
77b90f410185952943b23c66c56ed4b2
7d71863a6046bb2543d5e743d397bb49570fbedd
'2011-12-31T12:31:26-05:00'
describe
'138933' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUI' 'sip-files223.jpg'
60376396173220277a2bccfc7ccdf4b8
f1bb3bf2c8ac4e4d783dc19cdd9b5991539e4942
describe
'31177' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUJ' 'sip-files223.pro'
626471378cc63da869fc4e67966b0010
3fff3b138945278a729f7e7df2eed4583204c974
describe
'65533' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUK' 'sip-files223.QC.jpg'
df6bde58b530ea79ff02e846c1c5eef2
3c47c7a22203676766d5ba86275851546f28810c
describe
'8667304' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUL' 'sip-files223.tif'
5899e21147b3fc8569136f174896019a
bbf28686adf173ccdb4344ebe79aa4e2aa34d713
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUM' 'sip-files223.txt'
4808bb84ecb0223cf68a42bb6c03dd0c
8769ae1972854e8490b0533bb667dee7c1ee4e62
describe
'34724' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUN' 'sip-files223thm.jpg'
1822b9ecb222644d1def9f4f9d8990d5
dd53a875cb2c75aca2bf6f73ec325756bd818c64
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUO' 'sip-files224.jp2'
d8bac9ab61a9d0b3561cc82b3eacb2ec
2a1fcdcfd850305f70227a4408553aa162ce6605
describe
'136940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUP' 'sip-files224.jpg'
211fc82b2ba9f4863ac8839d8fba0334
f743f13790e3b969a7837bdb7d8904824b18fe72
describe
'29826' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUQ' 'sip-files224.pro'
ba0d2b8750b559e787b88548f3469bdf
7a018b3113b7b6e445d475e6ef7d4963c7ed9ce4
describe
'65789' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUR' 'sip-files224.QC.jpg'
23ec5d1be82242f65a8177ec18094535
e89b99722b0ef44dc0f3b65869f273d2d99f74c1
'2011-12-31T12:36:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUS' 'sip-files224.tif'
d3026245d1a0fe7ddd6177ab3f1d6f55
ef57d2fb40d194d1c1dadd650e36841ddfdddca9
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUT' 'sip-files224.txt'
9db09a11ded31dc12f4066b7ad492a85
9c59b99b2edab097ed7cc5b0da37795ff3d6209c
'2011-12-31T12:36:15-05:00'
describe
'35248' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUU' 'sip-files224thm.jpg'
819d61f628b242efb0509ba910af8201
a08b18234cc13c8e813f15c08c4b668ded69b118
'2011-12-31T12:37:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUV' 'sip-files225.jp2'
7d629874a88b6e8729894d05b7596d90
908d1ae541a358af1f5f04e4a2f4f33a22002c60
describe
'137097' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUW' 'sip-files225.jpg'
97c218d99f70f9aeeb0e8f56a540ca15
556aa834bc12cf9a5d6062cc580da3848cca8bb8
describe
'29578' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUX' 'sip-files225.pro'
589bda822cf41657706e9fdae75e60b8
ac7fc3d759ccd01f2384094e04f2b64ce132498f
describe
'64957' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUY' 'sip-files225.QC.jpg'
399edbdc437fc3b71d565ecd1baeb660
91a3e238e9f76f42389a1173eb0ab69750c220aa
describe
'8667552' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUUZ' 'sip-files225.tif'
3e294c77465dcf228f2f3f8f1749a9df
69d000c093e04c101de485753f478aa750d1a071
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVA' 'sip-files225.txt'
14527ac3be343ef2b98f2907e4d7a032
dc4362d509f793d310e928f0290e97622cc909e7
describe
'35063' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVB' 'sip-files225thm.jpg'
a8e7036356858c063b903980ee550fb9
79f0faaf9bc5d45e5516404f31c2592d9ec90efe
describe
'1080222' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVC' 'sip-files226.jp2'
aca523bd41c688a6b29a49e727d28492
c51918abb245018985ad1d6622c162554d49898f
'2011-12-31T12:36:26-05:00'
describe
'139818' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVD' 'sip-files226.jpg'
35fca9d950de4830a17f42a8c4842d01
d8dceb654e3c4894360fa32f93e96d1c276fb98a
describe
'30926' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVE' 'sip-files226.pro'
b9a11cba1ced2efb42e6fc01cb6dba62
b6f9236a214109097ff79217724a496ba722b151
describe
'65383' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVF' 'sip-files226.QC.jpg'
c1d9a4ac15744936dff227f6b1c63c92
0a087d190484550df1c8dfa137f0478c5abe0db8
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVG' 'sip-files226.tif'
867332731f906b022c5c084b72a7007c
36cd9f7408394c2c6b715f74044d38fd70661d17
'2011-12-31T12:27:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVH' 'sip-files226.txt'
a2893f8f05aed59f93ac29898371f9fb
fb82e4b6afe440fc24b4dbf03d4385749cdaed0e
'2011-12-31T12:36:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVI' 'sip-files231.jp2'
6c937577efb6bc035c127c65b571f0d1
e4d57248de05bf89c1b6a4cef85c2a2eb6d19228
describe
'34893' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVJ' 'sip-files226thm.jpg'
b3df1149d98ed0ee2dcc5ca4434d9381
2daf4ad724285ab24995d2ded4e3052a4760df3f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVK' 'sip-files227.jp2'
97f24c189e4aa436d87ea5896a9b2d63
af860e9ef3fc684e419237d00e79a84fcc583537
describe
'146103' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVL' 'sip-files227.jpg'
735bba5a63d24cbeae85988fd12339ab
f8d137f678136276de61fac30a3472c0f75566ff
describe
'32971' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVM' 'sip-files227.pro'
83e5d71b785f347a067c0f260a86225b
03fc082c0bac02a823ebaa075fc14da9918c9d14
describe
'67543' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVN' 'sip-files227.QC.jpg'
596eaf9d457f93f9a4c2ce45538935fa
ac0215790856eac62a3fdb1fdabf47036d672216
describe
'8667600' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVO' 'sip-files227.tif'
6abe794b912d312e1d48c675e33d864e
37ff8be9518a3f8ab3ee0bfb64f722773355ad2f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVP' 'sip-files227.txt'
7caea9fd2ad1f8d1a9787ff7ebcb8054
16f10f77cd40111e1d4a1832fc9ffa59967e359f
describe
'35078' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVQ' 'sip-files227thm.jpg'
527592077dfa3324bd1d3b7720b07984
0b43d255c3c169e129c7b8c52a2c852009da2845
describe
'1080203' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVR' 'sip-files228.jp2'
8a158e2385d1f42527491c536b145c34
60f84ed1bf5aef22662d8106ddc8ffb46d039875
describe
'138420' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVS' 'sip-files228.jpg'
9e1b877fef2049c9512659b42833d704
d9abb64294174b7166320573492e9a795fd5ae23
describe
'30075' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVT' 'sip-files228.pro'
91e93f1c2361a3489871413deff909d5
1ec3d48c3b07f6e99f773fd5d32c431a3913c801
describe
'65175' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVU' 'sip-files228.QC.jpg'
85063da328eb3b9050bcead961e96628
3c5e9793d6c2525ce2f698c90aa4c710890de03b
describe
'8667440' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVV' 'sip-files228.tif'
0e894352ae9293415fc218ca2626dd97
dd7d96db6efc7c114e35ab8800da7a00e7cde58c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVW' 'sip-files228.txt'
5fc30f17a184afe3ca4e04b281f0bfbd
0b41abba4c315c587800a9cea67374c645b45acc
'2011-12-31T12:29:26-05:00'
describe
'35231' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVX' 'sip-files228thm.jpg'
e6e68fb478e52bb3278e82edbf75715d
f70283e2cbf0763f811d0569b435c2380b169149
describe
'1080278' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVY' 'sip-files229.jp2'
5de646d2aacff3344102278b80cee771
425e2eb8a402e0c2343c822b3f649c305399c5c7
describe
'134419' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUVZ' 'sip-files229.jpg'
26b9b04089018d721dd135e3ab3589ea
360224d32d6d5dab3900887e276300220de23b54
describe
'31732' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWA' 'sip-files229.pro'
4b19c2ed0c4fa9e184b4fbac3ce60ee0
3041b9d1d5be26dbfb572015ff9f3ed8848aeb06
describe
'62997' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWB' 'sip-files229.QC.jpg'
d0bccd27e9d5889866795154a48416f1
37890ca0e0c9e5f026bddca3935819c31b9f291e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWC' 'sip-files229.tif'
3936c8be8705327bbb57ab41f0e687ee
52829fa71f3b9c6d15ad4e87028afcde2bbcf351
'2011-12-31T12:35:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWD' 'sip-files229.txt'
ad924656fdf23e7523e6b54f86c341e6
3a91373e0ab48ced93b9c03bc2d41b2b4bee7df3
'2011-12-31T12:30:31-05:00'
describe
'34143' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWE' 'sip-files229thm.jpg'
26991f4fa7c388afd81ec9d3c1035d22
4ce6c934e404d0ba6d0c3f3491c769043b94f1b5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWF' 'sip-files230.jp2'
45d8f7c73dd212f3e5123dc4b3e2febf
3bafc33525144709a07095204cb0ca79dfadc57d
describe
'137905' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWG' 'sip-files230.jpg'
40857f12e785027182fa10a9fb29bab1
3fccb60451c059e71ac6a3e45f2f3d34b28fccf4
describe
'29655' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWH' 'sip-files230.pro'
1e3e31c490f634e0f92571bff637cf0e
9a8e1b5ae8fa4a350008b3cd55a5e789be320b3c
describe
'65355' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWI' 'sip-files230.QC.jpg'
8d17e796954be558fff37ad3abc7dcc7
9d55d157a54721e249b2674a2755dc99dd20205e
describe
'8667744' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWJ' 'sip-files230.tif'
7c59e5c45d81c2792ed5cd3b6657bfa2
b7640272b12fc4ff9139da5eb974f9285f854c69
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWK' 'sip-files230.txt'
376f93756d1c92e9c994d7d69ef9b7ee
50112ea95229b2207f90261d219259e7db1d8f14
describe
'35858' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWL' 'sip-files230thm.jpg'
a3ab40c3d249de79ff5ffd0d427e90b7
7f854e487bab6fbe8945d50c3286611b8659cc0f
describe
'133314' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWM' 'sip-files231.jpg'
862576147cddc49e8ac4a2c5becd6ea9
7699b2107930bdb571a6728fbb01deeb50010825
describe
'28886' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWN' 'sip-files231.pro'
45fa07a4979ece6596fbe3587c6a4676
88be719561c135ce607c25d0cb9d3de28cba3b43
describe
'64343' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWO' 'sip-files231.QC.jpg'
2830122864f3984662ab2def8f8e808c
c142931f77b01f9e1a0a50c4cf6836b01e1e35c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWP' 'sip-files231.tif'
d7cfc9210864459a9357eda954aa8c95
99463b699a2f4a4ea40c7cee4683dc3fde7471f3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWQ' 'sip-files231.txt'
a898d9ff0fad282021b28704d962f17a
d4842ac092de6bdbb7610658819b4436e0b813e1
describe
'34898' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWR' 'sip-files231thm.jpg'
101fb54908daf59773b6ea14fef73e10
91564bd4c2ca9f7b01bed75258cabaf2b6a89ac8
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWS' 'sip-files232.jp2'
28231e64ddb748631092044ae8246419
c5654137646af935e35beec262b0db813a5d5f7c
describe
'149018' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWT' 'sip-files232.jpg'
38e28398ee3a94ff7fe2f5528f91d98b
24728499c4c0314a6569d3ca44f8ae92465727f4
describe
'32599' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWU' 'sip-files232.pro'
d2c8ff28b60d5aa025213e87812b7c39
e0e4ce31f24304e2c8fc4c5656b870f3d3986fb6
describe
'68741' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWV' 'sip-files232.QC.jpg'
e9cd68be54b8d5607168c7bdd21d957c
f6f5bcf383f8b33f781cc8c9961a6bc86895b36c
'2011-12-31T12:36:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWW' 'sip-files232.tif'
366813a00187ea42b79298d9198c2aa3
2977ff6996bb2df1a887cd9622f2cf2546747620
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWX' 'sip-files232.txt'
57fdf164e961e16a47199ef2bdfd2b1d
2d95890382f64d3840762b63d2c09fba9887231d
describe
'36398' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWY' 'sip-files232thm.jpg'
92fe0ade555e5c889be95234230d8ca1
dc2f6922c2d3e893672ee8d4333e72d1e48a9b20
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUWZ' 'sip-files233.jp2'
95883bd5f295cfbd5b21824cb9830ac4
d50ec57c429126f64b385560cca4a7a120d484d0
describe
'139892' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXA' 'sip-files233.jpg'
7a9cb4648973c6cb1e598e4fbff7dfdf
68f49006632f3311a62b069cd7548e58fba31643
describe
'30395' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXB' 'sip-files233.pro'
fef24958fbf8dd9e8d03a01815b744f6
da1fbaa17be2e91b88c54918dd7949f1e90fcb6c
describe
'66544' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXC' 'sip-files233.QC.jpg'
04fac0d5fae3dcf35e79eff4a52d1517
d6453f7338f7fbd401096b73d94ae60ced6d4b80
describe
'8667668' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXD' 'sip-files233.tif'
bb96b6343a277b8625d54f635a589d48
33ff90fa0d9da038b2c0c8f5b5720898a71e3b3c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXE' 'sip-files233.txt'
95e0c8cfb558802c946274ea9eb2f55a
04a95ba84e07f2f0176636a93d97f78208b3525f
describe
'35510' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXF' 'sip-files233thm.jpg'
4d396614a161c3d5e4758d6ef2233386
33f83c51a46445e84fdd36bca5d7ad4375fd3c0a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXG' 'sip-files234.jp2'
1d32056861182430c8cc78baddfe3b9c
d10ece3ea0cd491db3474a86b402daa042e5953d
describe
'143696' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXH' 'sip-files234.jpg'
2acb507b79b73d841f5ee2e70669d897
a41c3cfa36bcdc374a703b4557120cb1c4dd0ba1
describe
'31357' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXI' 'sip-files234.pro'
fabe158fe7a83b83cf35bc9fd81d78a6
eb40dd12a072b61aa58f12dff6cf86d8295bc10a
describe
'67306' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXJ' 'sip-files234.QC.jpg'
e0861354318bac12036f4996b1541d00
4652f1a49fe6e46515549cf9a82836f45a7f8f92
describe
'8667676' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXK' 'sip-files234.tif'
42f9498c8c308362e465f1c0dad76d96
354384360ed2cc64a18405b4729ed182bd745eab
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXL' 'sip-files234.txt'
353bc279cf04cfcc0e8148337bc07034
1f090b1a29c0400d0723930a0b6fbf4f62cb266b
describe
'35915' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXM' 'sip-files234thm.jpg'
4f5df2b42a69a8d69a458a357d2d9651
bf46082b21ce677ea577675fe5faca7eb78fc6f4
describe
'1080250' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXN' 'sip-files235.jp2'
2b257775e14a8e4e09249e09439b20d0
fcd521a775022df8874dca895c398b641bdb1279
describe
'138684' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXO' 'sip-files235.jpg'
d108f45d31dc8755ef130688d8376444
3653ac232bed01646755096c6da19c7696a9b409
describe
'30431' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXP' 'sip-files235.pro'
79794d43baeb0e1d6b6eb27d9165b94e
39b45e73588a57cf02dbfaca6016d00723d82f5b
describe
'65659' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXQ' 'sip-files235.QC.jpg'
b1b8aa36fb5a231cd829a2a7bba6d017
9f62506137c02ce64e99aaf53a8125364ed25d88
describe
'8667300' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXR' 'sip-files235.tif'
3002bab2f667c89a12f8c5f0ec88678c
6dc2e49fe0f5cbf0586f2a7f205242dec9b27884
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXS' 'sip-files235.txt'
65e4beba97eb7cd7217d24c3410b9d71
ad02c6bf98277ac0d7d844e865150330715fae58
'2011-12-31T12:36:40-05:00'
describe
'34988' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXT' 'sip-files235thm.jpg'
52efb5b486a036900cf4279a98debb66
209a409b923ff988caa33356c78eb843b06ea2bd
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXU' 'sip-files236.jp2'
16c579c99792913037267f3f6aaafa11
28c74242b8fb8a256c710291e1924d57aa0796d2
describe
'136821' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXV' 'sip-files236.jpg'
0a2f9d29ab7449eb8705f2b5aac90859
e03784c8e580376774a78412d5ea936a0d803b33
'2011-12-31T12:38:54-05:00'
describe
'29564' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXW' 'sip-files236.pro'
6096744b92702e2d4a3b29d48d358ea0
fc82edc4132932a082ad4e444764c94341ecdff4
describe
'64646' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXX' 'sip-files236.QC.jpg'
611d5328ac3e85bd09b9058a351d9b8e
5d6a8b84eb84aef6055834a851fad6bbcc47cc8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXY' 'sip-files236.tif'
22a10a7c89b746c9ec01819f87058419
68596d81bd2c3cf8a897725ec914ee1f6e62b543
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUXZ' 'sip-files236.txt'
50cd98e90a2f2b550438cf3c920385ef
57b0084e0ce85901891cbe9284f11ce29819555e
'2011-12-31T12:38:33-05:00'
describe
'35079' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYA' 'sip-files236thm.jpg'
df4030baeb9fb4ceabd49433dfc6721b
8a9ad381e687d5ced8738f6cc8f97d6f7054e449
describe
'1075820' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYB' 'sip-files237.jp2'
e406d07c7fb768e208e141583afaf445
001c3c425ffa583420e7e988ec7ed47f22187e6c
describe
'132340' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYC' 'sip-files237.jpg'
ea777e206d1d77007e4ee36f28b964fd
035fea3a8e05eab2b64894710568b91cee1f5894
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYD' 'sip-files237.pro'
fbce5e14a6b0df3e26c6f0b34dc65d90
4cdc59c5c6e60cd2d0dfb666e163a591200722f6
describe
'63491' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYE' 'sip-files237.QC.jpg'
ce3a293428dedc400b65fbda1ebd81f8
aa8658cb83c7d18cd39e26025ca3b76ffab011da
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYF' 'sip-files237.tif'
ad7a060abe4433f11e3529a2959d5098
6e5b2a8883e1870f6e2a678434622ce89bfee432
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYG' 'sip-files237.txt'
faf4fa42f7b56f8489d5a12a8acfb8d8
b038731db8c90be0effe19445be7c03489dc556a
describe
'34532' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYH' 'sip-files237thm.jpg'
d946b334a00444ecf6a6d7dec4f3ac3e
e7bd1398a3f74f19d540ccce98fcdab7c59c7e12
'2011-12-31T12:33:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYI' 'sip-files238.jp2'
e17b7c503b598a5f0806ae78b7d53a61
ddd2ceab6a0ba29d5561f15c555466fb65aceab3
describe
'144216' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYJ' 'sip-files238.jpg'
b5f141379d50ec8cf56a9f531abf11d7
701730c512acff96c7238770c71b465d4d9e2d6c
describe
'31875' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYK' 'sip-files238.pro'
f78299c5f5b3e06da4cdf6f27c0caeae
77a24831e3ecb7ca2fd17e98467a92a083ddb6c5
describe
'67671' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYL' 'sip-files238.QC.jpg'
8b75066c75f285834c7984dfc6a9a21c
7921ef1112efd1baa883a652783fbc4c5b7260a8
describe
'8667696' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYM' 'sip-files238.tif'
72b9aad87ca6c27a43e8b14320629581
abc272c0c267c1e496e73aa2a225ac039eddfd99
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYN' 'sip-files238.txt'
28beaf8141f688a6d1696cc097a85840
740e97787b8fc19fec2088c5f038098c32b91f8c
describe
'35455' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYO' 'sip-files238thm.jpg'
351fb122e5cb83db090478004ebff8e4
7beeb594db9543fc0c57f50c34d8ff80be0baf89
describe
'1080249' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYP' 'sip-files239.jp2'
0961d138671f3c74da289ce5bce3df56
66a33ccc958a510c3eb7102e1ff07e541a3a2348
describe
'138770' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYQ' 'sip-files239.jpg'
a449efa1534743b4a3b407bd2d274bd9
36955b6b17d07071111e0906f0eb421f25220394
describe
'31572' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYR' 'sip-files239.pro'
db89dd85a4fd1dccd914288597e0fc7d
467d9c77f66fe04902822c9352fafd1913e212de
describe
'65503' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYS' 'sip-files239.QC.jpg'
7fd65711d7a64dc3941aacbd132e96ce
442af5b6a9ebfc85c9c8bb7f7b0097bd01af3297
describe
'8667404' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYT' 'sip-files239.tif'
e5f16a3c48d5d2ece4b55ff468f89e60
685cdaebfba1e2563ee30ecb402ea56bad977f43
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYU' 'sip-files239.txt'
178f2a836e0d3ef6fd308bca70659169
852ed4a2b9ce657fb4c51c44af14e33114cf44c5
describe
'34980' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYV' 'sip-files239thm.jpg'
114fce553eeb5986b59260fc8e862ec6
47f9c78d2fe9f4f7bacf097d8ff381dac219a278
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYW' 'sip-files240.jp2'
dd610a5f1749bfb360796455b40850f6
23cd2e01c2a8473a7aa9b2d9d60d767d5934d9c8
describe
'143730' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYX' 'sip-files240.jpg'
c54edc06b5fbb0df3c9972a115e50b6e
fe99520a6992864d841a85d1a967bdfe4903ad68
describe
'31792' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYY' 'sip-files240.pro'
8a659f32aa6b64e2df5b18816cd5b8f0
4502c16bbe67d75048e802fb9789c65140a403c2
describe
'66848' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUYZ' 'sip-files240.QC.jpg'
4bb4febb7563c5335caf117bf4dd9c18
9cd85880e4a3407be66b2d0d864dcc98aff74f65
describe
'8667580' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZA' 'sip-files240.tif'
08dae35f7a9324b9812dc89cbf1c09e1
bf9ca3a8f30f35df543e29286f8d81cce62387c2
'2011-12-31T12:29:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZB' 'sip-files240.txt'
7d11e6101931ed73a13a33c629e4a28c
a1f8deab78acd0ed30c72565a40f21d45ebb719c
describe
'35257' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZC' 'sip-files240thm.jpg'
ba02a435205f4208192dafc7301f1da4
777752fa7009f0749120791b1b1a64bb9fce389b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZD' 'sip-files241.jp2'
3a6e89ce55dc77af7004720066bcee26
6ab002ed2ac1b14a14c1f4bc7e634ecc3b5308d1
describe
'137427' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZE' 'sip-files241.jpg'
4569bdde99b74bf00184418c70d4572e
f593ef45d3bda91e2edb7cd2194165f456fc2256
'2011-12-31T12:31:40-05:00'
describe
'31329' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZF' 'sip-files241.pro'
3190a68ff2da4ab451eeaf8aeb061009
472bda8bb7d5d97552313df866a045fecdadf6ab
describe
'65266' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZG' 'sip-files241.QC.jpg'
55d22f2de754647254f5fdaca20e30c8
521eb501cda5db5f06d09e8cd92f7bea5639ce3e
describe
'8667568' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZH' 'sip-files241.tif'
94ea7a5686fa478432c249449eeef207
3a140fc966c00672d2c42c64385be138706ee460
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZI' 'sip-files241.txt'
891474b680ce3315ab7ae85786c849d1
ac9674cf3b08b56fe6797bc0c32a42a2180c7739
'2011-12-31T12:37:16-05:00'
describe
'35235' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZJ' 'sip-files241thm.jpg'
b7ca41aad23037bd055b4c57b5fbebe1
1a72fb56d07517c7cf67210cac02d5c2b7a7b22e
describe
'1064691' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZK' 'sip-files242.jp2'
1b1cb5ba48b00d709c7333cd77c58f64
251ad95575e47d5badbf4379a0523c9f37c97b6d
describe
'130791' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZL' 'sip-files242.jpg'
6d27d005cb1472c3dad8cd727bda39c8
477f90d4c4f04d2024d7fa38d79dd8dc09318670
describe
'28988' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZM' 'sip-files242.pro'
590e7249129a9e41614a4584a654b114
4873187f7b997f4e6b4fa6042c5ac6d56fc31f10
describe
'62509' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZN' 'sip-files242.QC.jpg'
cf2508ef3b864d38a5ed812bab3aa23e
374f523a3ce16f3d1fb63490d5a08587542b28d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZO' 'sip-files242.tif'
00d156741ca7efae85502112e8f811ca
61c111895d23fd06739303bffbdea594b6eaa041
describe
'1137' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZP' 'sip-files242.txt'
3356502d9767b0d385f0addc3b36a585
86d97a81859c0ac50984d863da7817476badd991
describe
'34346' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZQ' 'sip-files242thm.jpg'
2e96915699be58a24d2fcf72d8496a38
5f536bf677be46ae9bd82aa024bfc5c63b1e2db7
describe
'1080261' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZR' 'sip-files243.jp2'
247224faed8f2f90c98d13b81769e824
114ad455b2bdaff7d4515fce3754787cd69ecf14
describe
'133274' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZS' 'sip-files243.jpg'
931a0aa6f87542e1882b16dec0b9fdc4
6d6b37900dd07bcc804b45f14a25446f175e2130
describe
'29610' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZT' 'sip-files243.pro'
1353e492c029ef53e8573b0739ab99c3
638654e52b46c8b806353157ed50bee3312209c5
describe
'63436' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZU' 'sip-files243.QC.jpg'
289c6aa9b514fb24f2c70c6d2b259092
07d16747a7ea97bd3b18f8fbb1a6fa67e2d7c2c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZV' 'sip-files243.tif'
1440e36120fc3955da89974c470c6dbf
4f6d2dd84f8b3cc01c8416772d82f2d36ddf4742
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZW' 'sip-files243.txt'
a712685d20ecd9b5e364bfd11dd370f9
67813ae289507914f358eba75a562bfe22764181
describe
'34564' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZX' 'sip-files243thm.jpg'
ba70e4f21067837eeb34ed59d2493ed0
ea1e53d2d9d41651ff69ba68b1bb349ebf70d357
'2011-12-31T12:37:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZY' 'sip-files244.jp2'
bc1b0b7ad5232482bd65ccf96380facd
35a65ad8c308f5fc396b50068a0889002ebd59ac
describe
'141775' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAUZZ' 'sip-files244.jpg'
a96270514ff80658b601284f3eff7ab2
c66f160142abc183c1a87305387b76fbdf0a61a9
describe
'31832' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAA' 'sip-files244.pro'
8ddd9cfa9b2275653dce0b0c2d786ef1
1e386af9c1b357b34a08a65d7c300c04bdcd3e2c
describe
'65937' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAB' 'sip-files244.QC.jpg'
ebc4c0051844ceb0ffc7ef9d6f8421a2
8724d51c0e98eefe94a42bbd6a32bf1b58ae873c
describe
'8667664' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAC' 'sip-files244.tif'
0233d58b3ea565dc0a75f2d8849890df
d698b69713ce4863e81ab12d750fa2b18223af79
'2011-12-31T12:31:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAD' 'sip-files244.txt'
be1ee4fa03093464e3b9249b31b025d2
aa9c132cde1fb677a8e68062edfb8ff3b439f3e4
describe
'35410' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAE' 'sip-files244thm.jpg'
c95f6a07f6c557f3259304b7cbd7da09
628178adca1e8b00e4aaa577576679ecfc4ba276
describe
'1069816' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAF' 'sip-files245.jp2'
ce87e78da4d103374cd4dd18c632c43d
f9e890e826e415d4d969538d6ce924fbfa366419
describe
'131946' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAG' 'sip-files245.jpg'
50e22dc5d6a3e89a2f352d629e99cc40
f41fa647a158a3779d2d1ed324227d627100f4fd
describe
'29049' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAH' 'sip-files245.pro'
270978d0eb5b74e91930f44d890720ac
991bfc262e4833767e23ff8543a0281f9647b698
describe
'62696' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAI' 'sip-files245.QC.jpg'
5d26b20e4e4ac106f913433a572761a2
0920e896da87af4476d0599e8f0075f20b303b87
describe
'8667260' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAJ' 'sip-files245.tif'
8686cde789353b8af964048b60a7d6b3
d99b99a63397342cd6d9253c396549d05228e5b3
'2011-12-31T12:38:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAK' 'sip-files245.txt'
2a37f0b79d3d59cf2f2c4420ae664f1a
8f0e35005482576d2348c9571703bcd0b40c7607
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAL' 'sip-files245thm.jpg'
86ca8e2a3d0c1e5beb48e2c2a8bf94b9
89aee309e0f69c60f29679d50a71e1649294333b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAM' 'sip-files246.jp2'
cfb2b5d808a609fec9313917a0e746eb
ec491acfd7d6dc2298c5d215b5bd05b598bab451
describe
'138066' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAN' 'sip-files246.jpg'
26faed36c686817d641425e579d22b2a
81f8a273fbc71c7ff0af258af6c79870599e41f0
describe
'30845' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAO' 'sip-files246.pro'
88f3e4450d31b836b0441a1dcaa709b7
1280197d3e7bc1c0dad545cb49e85cd73c108338
describe
'65131' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAP' 'sip-files246.QC.jpg'
f86143683f2c7eb95b7f62d6cb41c6c6
9a4a84546e745224af58f91623596262d4e9ec6a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAQ' 'sip-files246.tif'
1b3144cb892cb3950bcaa146918c55a9
90d68787dc749d101d1c8f0ad75c6b652e97da2d
'2011-12-31T12:29:01-05:00'
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAR' 'sip-files246.txt'
c11207562faa26053333846f5021cc1b
66755b1e2f6516f54065f6975da9f6ec61affaff
describe
'34958' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAS' 'sip-files246thm.jpg'
bc8d46bebf54b0858c648a4911a098f7
9521380fe1a39ebebb29d419688b553bbf505618
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAT' 'sip-files247.jp2'
60f7f0836369f2a2711344636b1a0445
f23e884a31085de1063d2370694295448cf7d051
describe
'136156' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAU' 'sip-files247.jpg'
1e01fa8863d52d85bc579914b98826f7
b3f9bd17ff5af37767ea8d06e31428383697ca41
describe
'30678' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAV' 'sip-files247.pro'
c28ba68bb9919a3740e1895aba2586a9
b6937498d7a8f815e176ff85e7e6068cb02b31a8
describe
'64173' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAW' 'sip-files247.QC.jpg'
62a3fbdda2420c7fa12effe3f6d6160f
ac79d3d2f84179922d59d73eb7e9e5a9dddded95
describe
'8667544' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAX' 'sip-files247.tif'
177d6c35427d7e39db90b6f1217a2b92
454bf79ed031a2040e21dbd30bb6c09b95591b09
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAY' 'sip-files247.txt'
418375014b76c683b639fe4ccedede08
3fbad8e3b742964deca6d4d01d8a54df9ffaddd1
describe
'35124' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVAZ' 'sip-files247thm.jpg'
2d3b2c3c584b07844eb8bd466141fee1
6838353820a3f59b9659422eb495c3f9ab3e1b16
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVBA' 'sip-files248.jp2'
60200fdbd55dcfb250502d82b393d5e7
f54ce43cb2b1e16e5278ec73c63ffdb04ed35b8e
describe
'135606' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVBB' 'sip-files248.jpg'
57f72242d9ee8bcc618db5952ce40d5a
7bc0fb00307e77170ee69cdd50f3a84f7904b35d
describe
'29769' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVBC' 'sip-files248.pro'
87ae906fc4b9ac8062f4c2ec767d38b5
63998b765767300f7b758ba22ba3ba861da8b366
describe
'65666' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVBD' 'sip-files248.QC.jpg'
df861eab4534e1435921d9b484dfe0cb
12a1640990931c3d087ac08acc6be87ddc9db514
describe
'8667484' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVBE' 'sip-files248.tif'
e085102d0ff17011ee0f44c30a7d14a9
ce5e6cce6db9b6f0c130023c7011b85ea1bcd0ff
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVBF' 'sip-files248.txt'
72527e0f58be4bd37f550b69b5a4b2cf
de4e19a6cd628dcc369f67de8879a7c0a9c71b04
describe
'35233' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAANfileF20090220_AAAVBG' 'sip-files248thm.jpg'
f8b21e96624a8cbd205cb8ca49d829d5
00ccd9c9b0597da6337aca7714841c3d00656000
describe
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xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0000354200001datestamp 2008-12-08setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Short stories founded on European history Italydc:creator Clay, Richard, 1789-1877 ( Printer )Whymper, Josiah Wood, 1813-1903 ( Engraver )Gilbert, John, 1817-1897 ( Illustrator )dc:subject History -- Juvenile literature -- Italy ( lcsh )Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853 ( rbbin )dc:description Illustrations engraved by J.W. Whymper after Sir John Gilbert.dc:publisher Society for Promoting Christian Knowledgedc:date 1853dc:type Bookdc:format 254 p., <7> leaves of plates : ill., map ; 14 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00003542&v=00001002237471 (aleph)AAA4914 (ltqf)ALH7958 (ltuf)05763267 (oclc)dc:source University of Floridadc:language Englishdc:coverage England -- London


7

SS

———T
a

%

‘

ek —— "9



To face Ittle

PLAN OF VENICE
SHORT STORIES

FOUNDED ON

EUROPEAN HISTORY.

aiuly.

PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF
THE COMMITTEE OF GENERAL LITERATURE AND EDUCATION,
APPOINTED BY THE SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING
CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE.

LONDON:
SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE,
SOLD AT THE DEPOSITORY,
GREAT QUEEN STREET, LINCOLN’S INN FIELDS,
4, ROYAL EXCHANGE, 16, HANOVER STREET, HANOVER SQUARE,
AND BY ALL BOOKSELLERS,



1853.
LONDON :
R, CLAY, PRINTER, BREAD STREET HILL.
CONTENTS,

. THe BrotHers oF FLORENCE.
ae:
Il.

THe Pore AND THE PAINTER

Tue Douxes or Mrman .

. Tae Brave Orp Ap»sRaL or GENOA .
. THe DoGE oF VENICE .
. Tae ASTRONOMER OF Papua .

. THe FIsHERMAN oF NAPpLEs .

PAGE

38
79

- 100
. 148
. 180
. 220


F, 19,
No. I.

THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE.

In that lovely southern land, which for its extreme
beauty and fertility has been styled “ the Garden
of Europe,” stand seven celebrated cities. Famous
were they in the olden time, and famous are they
still ;—visited by travellers from all parts of the
world, who view them with interest and admira-
tion. And they are worthy of admiration, and well
deserve their titles, Rome the Ancient— Naples
the Lovely—Florence the F'air—Genoa the Superb
—Padua the Learned— Milan the Magnificent—
and Venice the Beautiful. I will tell you some
stories of their bygone days.
B
2 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“ Of all the fairest cities of the earth,
None is so fair as Florence. ’Tis a gem
Of purest ray ; and what a light broke forth,
When it emerged from darkness! Search within,
Without; allis enchantment! "Tis the Past
Contending with the Present; and in turn
Each has the mastery.”

Within the marble halls of the magnificent palace
of the Medici in Florence, there sat, long ago, four
happy children. Descendants of that noble house
which for many ages had held sway im the fair
city, their appearance and manners well befitted
their high birth and station. Courteous, gentle,
and generous, they behaved to each other with
loving affection, to their superiors with modesty
and respect, and to their inferiors with kindness
and affability. Their names were Lorenzo, Nan-
nina, Bianca, and Giuliano.

“‘T wonder when Grandpapa will return,” said
Nannina; “it is now some days since we have seen
him. I shall be glad when he comes home.”

“T think he is come,” exclaimed Giuliano;
“T heard the sound of horses in the court-yard ;
and that must be his step on the stairs.”

The child’s quick ears did not deceive him. In
another minute the large folding doors at the end
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 3

of the hall were thrown open, and Cosmo de Medici
entered. He was a tall, dignified, and venerable
looking old man, with features still handsome and
expressive of kindly feelings. The children with
bright and smiling faces hastened forwards to greet
and welcome him; and when, seated in a massive
arm-chair of carved oak, he blessed them and
smiled upon them in return as they stood around
him, they felt sure that they were going to have
one of their great and rare treats—a chat with
grandpapa.

The family of the Medici had for many ages
been esteemed one of the most considerable in the
Florentine republic ; the true source of their wealth
being their superior talents and their application to
commerce. ‘The renowned and illustrious Cosmo
de Medici, however, surpassed all his predecessors
in wealth, authority, generosity, and prudence.
His palaces, one in Florence and four in the
country, were regal in their size and splendour.
Yet, though chief of the Florentine republic, and
in constant intercourse with the sovereigns of Eu-
rope, his conduct was devoid of all ostentation.
Everything was tempered with prudence. In his
conversation, his servants, his style of travellmg,
4 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

and his mode of living, the modest demeanour of
the citizen was always evident. No one was jealous
of his power, for by his virtue and prosperity he
overcame all his enemies, and exalted all his friends.
The uses to which he applied his great wealth
caused him to be much beloved and respected in
Florence, and obtained for him the highest con-
sideration, not only throughout Italy, but through-
out all Europe. His conduct was uniformly
marked by urbanity and kindness to the superior
ranks of his fellow-citizens, and by a constant
attention to the interests and wants of the lower
class, whom he relieved with the most unbounded
generosity. He was the liberal and munificent
patron of learning and the fine arts, which under
his auspicies began to revive in Italy.

“Yes, my dear boy,” said the venerable old
man, laying his hand on Giuliano’s head, “ I have
been at Careggi, passing my hours with my books,
and attending to the cultivation of my farms. It
is both pleasant and profitable to retire at times
from public affairs, and I own I went to Careggi,
not so much for the purpose of improving my fields
as myself.”’

“ Dear Grandpapa!” said Giuliano, “do you
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 5

need improvement? You, who lead such a useful
and active life ?”’

‘“‘ We all need improvement, dear child, and the
older we grow, the more we see our need of it.
I have endeavoured to live usefully, but often do
I look back with regret on the many hours I have
lost.”

“ But you have done a great deal of good,
Grandpapa, surely? How many churches you
have built, and with what beautiful pictures and
statues have you adorned them!” observed Nannina.

“‘T have never been able to lay out so much in
the service of God as I would have done, Nannina;
all I have done, or could do, is unequal to what the
Almighty has done for me.”

“ Your life has been a prosperous one indeed,
Grandpapa,” said Lorenzo, thoughtfully, “and
how honoured is your name in Italy! I feel
glad to think how the poor love it, and the rich
esteem it.”

“ Yet my early days were full of trouble, Lorenzo,
for I was exiled from Florence. From the age of
forty, I have, however, enjoyed the most uninter-
rupted felicity.”

* Ah! you had enemies once, dear Grandpapa,
6 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

but you have none now,” said Bianca; “ the
Medici will not be exiled again.”

“Then must we be careful not to provoke
jealousies, Bianca. A family such as ours can
only maintain its position by moderation. Your
great-grandfather, my children, by a strict atten-
tion to commerce, gained immense wealth, and by
his affability, moderation, and liberality, secured
the confidence and esteem of his fellow-citizens.
He sought not for the honours of the republic, yet
was honoured with them all. On his death-bed
he called us to him, and thus addressed us ;—
‘I feel, my sons, that I have lived my appointed
time. I die content, leaving you in affluence and
health, and. in such a station that whilst you follow
my example, you may live honoured and respected
in your native city. Nothing affords me more
pleasure than the reflection that my conduct has
not given offence to any one, but that, on the con-
trary, I have endeavoured to serve all persons to
the best of my abilities. I advise you to do the
same. Be not anxious about honours, but accept
such as are bestowed on you through the favour of
your fellow-citizens.’ This advice I have endea-
voured to follow, and it will be well for you,
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 7

Lorenzo, and you, my Giuliano, to do the same.
Your good father is in infirm health, and you may
be early called into public life.”

“‘ T will try to be a great and good man,” said
Giuliano, while Lorenzo expressed a hope that he
should render himself worthy of his illustrious
name.

“ That is well,”’ replied Cosmo de Medici, “ and
now see, Giuliano, what is that prancing I hear in
the court.”’

The boy ran to the window. ‘‘ Oh, Grandpapa!”
he exclaimed, “there is a beautiful Arabian horse,
with flowing tail and mane! he is so pretty and
graceful !”’

“‘ That horse is for you, Giuliano, if you think
you can manage it,” said Cosmo. “ It is time you
learned to ride.”

Giuliano was perfectly delighted. Departing
from the usual custom of respectfully kissing the
hand of his aged relative, he threw his arms round
his neck, and embraced him with all the love
of his young heart. “Thank you a thousand
times, dear Grandpapa,” he said; “it was the
only thing I wanted to make me quite, qguzte

happy.”
8 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

The old man smiled. “It will be well if thy
wishes are always as moderate, my child,” he said,
as he rose to depart, “ but that I cannot hope.
Now go and try your charger.”

Years passed away. The children of Piero de
Medici, as they grew up, gave promise of no ordi-
nary talent. Lorenzo, with good sense, and great
natural ability, inherited also his grandfather’s love
of literature and the fine arts. He made great
progress in learning, and whilst he was yet a boy,
rendered himself conspicuous by his poetical talents
and various accomplishments. The two fair girls,
Nannina and Bianca, brought up under their
mother’s watchful eye, received such instructions
as in those days were deemed. befitting the daugh-
ters of a noble house; and the merry Giuliano,
though he did not by any means neglect his studies,
was yet more partial to horsemanship, wrestling,
and throwing the spear, in which active exercises
he excelled. Both the brothers were fond of country
sports, and in riding or hawking passed many
a pleasant day. Alike generous and affectionate,
educated under the same roof, and participating in
the same studies and amusements, there subsisted
between Lorenzo and Giuliano a warm and unin-
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 9

terrupted attachment. By a frequent intercourse
with their venerable grandfather, and by the ex-
ample and instructions of their mother, Lu-
cretia, who was one of the most accomplished
women of the age—distinguished not only as a
patroness of learning, but by her own writings
also—they were daily preparing for the high sta-
tion which they were destined to occupy in their
native city.

Lorenzo was fifteen years of age, and Giuliano
between ten and eleven, when one summer’s day
they wandered forth to enjoy the balmy air of their
delicious clime. The country round Florence is
very beautiful. The blue Arno, winding through
the richly cultivated land,—now hiding itself be-
hind the vineyards or olive groves, now gliding
between fields of waving corn and verdant grass ;
the flowers—and the flowers in the neighbourhood
of Florence are considered the most beautiful in
Italy—springing up in luxuriant profusion on all
sides; the trees in their summer foliage, and in
the distance the lofty Apennines ;—these were the
objects on which the eyes of the brothers rested, as
they wandered forth that sunny day.
10 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

They were then staying at their father’s seat a
short distance from the city; and great was their
delight in rambling together through the vineyards
and olive groves which surrounded the princely
mansion. But whilst in the height of their enjoy-
ment, a messenger approached them with troubled
looks.

‘¢ Tt is Bernardo!” exclaimed Lorenzo; “‘ I trust
he brings no ill tidings. What news from the city,
good. Bernardo?”

“T regret to announce to you, Signors, that
your illustrious grandfather lies dangerously ill.
I am the bearer of this packet from my honoured
master, which will inform you of further particu-
lars.”

The brothers with tearful eyes read the letter
from their father confirming Bernardo’s account.
He told them that Cosmo considered himself as a
dying man, and expressed his willingness to submit
to the dispensations of Providence. He spoke of
his many virtues, and exhorted his sons to follow
his example.

Lorenzo and Giuliano were deeply grieved at
these sad tidings. They walked slowly and sor-
rowfully home, thinking of the many proofs of
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 11

affection they had received from their venerable
relative, and fearing they should see him no more.
Their fears proved true. Cosmo de Medici, the
merchant prince of Florence, died greatly lamented.
He was in the zenith of his glory, and in the
enjoyment of the highest renown, when death
summoned him away. All the Christian princes
mourned his loss. His funeral was conducted with
the utmost pomp and solemnity, the whole city
following him to his tomb in the church of San
Lorenzo, on which, by public decree, his name was
inscribed as “ Father of his Country.”

Before he died, this great man recommended to
Piero a strict attention to the education of his
sons, of whose promising talents he expressed his
hopes and approbation. His wife inquiring why
he closed his eyes, ‘“* That I may accustom them to
it,”’ was his reply.

“‘ Giuliano,” said Lorenzo, a few days after their
loss, “‘ we must endeavour to follow the example
of our illustrious grandfather. The esteem he
inspired was founded on real merit.”

‘¢ Ah! he was so liberal, and noble, and wise!”
replied Giuliano.
12 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

‘“‘ Yet my father says he knew not half his libe-
rality till now, for he was not one to boast of his
good deeds. It appears that there is no citizen of
note in Florence to whom Cosmo de Medici has
not lent a large sum of money; and often, when
informed of some nobleman in distress, he has
relieved him unasked.”

“Yes, he had a kind heart and an open hand,
ever ready to lend or to bestow. Even kings have
been indebted to him, I have heard my father
say.”

“ True. During the contest in England between
the houses of York and Lancaster, Edward the
Fourth wanting the means for carrying on the
war, our grandfather lent him an immense sum of
money, and thus assisted him to gain the throne.
Giuliano, I hope I shall be as magnificent in my
acts as he was.”

“ And I hope I shall be like him in kindness
and benevolence,” replied Giuliano.

Soon after the death of Cosmo de Medici,
Lorenzo entered on the stage of public life. The
infirmities of Piero rendered him anxious for the
assistance, and even advice, of a son who had
already evinced much sound judgment, promptitude,
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 13

and decision of character. The vigour of his intel-
lect, and that exquisite taste in poetry, music, and
every department of the fine arts, for which he was
afterwards so eminently distinguished, joined to
many amiable qualities, caused the Florentines to
regard him with esteem and affection, and to look
upon him as a worthy successor of the illustrious
Cosmo. And it was not very long before an event
occurred which caused them to admire still more
Lorenzo’s decision of character.

Among the number of opulent and aspiring
citizens of Florence, was Luca Pitti, the founder of
that magnificent palace which has for some centu-
ries been the residence of the sovereigns of Tuscany.
He had reluctantly submitted to the superior talents
of Cosmo de Medici, but now that he was gone,
endeavoured to supplant the authority and destroy
the influence of his son, Piero, with the magistrates
and council of the city. Finding, however, that
he could not succeed in this, he resolved on a
fearful crime—nothing less than the assassination
of Piero.

Weakened by gout, Piero was generally carried
in a chair from his house at Careggi to his resi-
dence in Florence, and the conspirators thought it
14 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

would be a good opportunity to attack him on the
road.

One morning, accompanied only by a few at-
tendants, Piero set out from Careggi. Lorenzo,
who had left a short time before his father, was
surprised to find one part of the road to the city
beset with armed men. Their purpose he imme-
diately suspected.

“Ha! this bodes mischief!”’ he exclaimed.
“Haste, Nicolo! haste back to my father,” he
said to one of his followers; “beg him, from me,
to abandon the direct road to Florence, and pro-
ceed by the retired and circuitous path through the
vineyards ; he will do so at my request. As you
love me, haste!”

The servant needed not a second order; he set
spurs to his horse, and was out of sight in an
instant.

The young de Medici then rode quietly on.

“* How fares the noble Piero? Comes he not to
the city to-day ?”’ were the questions with which
the conspirators assailed him, apparently anxious
for his father’s health.

“He follows at a short distance,” replied Lo-
renzo, marking each speaker with his keen glance ;
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 15

“and is indebted to you, Sirs,” he added, with a
slight smile, “for your anxious care of his health
and safety.”

He bowed, and passed on; but his promptitude
and coolness had saved his father’s life.

The conspiracy was discovered, and quelled.
Luca Pitti fell into disgrace, and passed the re-
mainder of his days in obscurity and neglect. The
F'lorentines were much displeased with him. The
progress of his magnificent palace was stopped, and
those citizens who had contributed to it costly
articles and materials, demanded them back again,
declaring they were only lent. They would not
assist In any way an enemy to the noble family of

the Medici.

When Lorenzo was twenty-one years of age,
he married Clarice, a daughter of the illustrious
house of Orsini, in Rome. Their nuptials were
celebrated with great splendour, and Lorenzo
ever treated his wife with particular respect and
kindness.

Not long after his marriage, he went to Milan,
for the purpose of standing sponsor to the eldest
son of the reigning duke. Perhaps you would like
16 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

to read the following letter, which he wrote from
that city.

‘¢ Lorenzo de Medici to his wife Clarice :-—

‘“‘{ arrived here in safety, and am in good
health. This, I believe, will please thee better
than anything else except my return—at least, so
I judge from my own desire to be once more with
thee. Associate as much as possible with my
father and my sisters. I shall make all possible
speed to return to thee, for it appears a thousand
years till I see thee again. Pray to God for me.
If thou want anything from this place, write in
time.

“¢ From
“Thy Lorenzo DE MEDICct.

“ Milan, 22d of July, 1469.”

** And how did they treat you at Milan, dear
Lorenzo ?”’ asked his brother Giuliano, on his
return home,

“ With great distinction and honour, however
undeserved,” replied Lorenzo; ‘“ more, indeed,
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 17

than was shown to any other person present,
although there were many much better entitled:
to it.”

«“ That I cannot think,” said Giuliano, looking
proudly and fondly on his brother. “I am told,
Lorenzo, that with your usual generosity you
presented to the duchess a gold necklace, and a
diamond worth 3,000 ducats.”’

“Whence it followed, that the duke requested
I would stand sponsor to all his children,” replied
Lorenzo, laughing. ‘“ He purposes paying our fair
city a visit ere long; we must receive him well.
But Giuliano, my brother, I wished to tell you
how much [I rejoice in seeing the progress you
have made in all your studies and varied accom-
plishments lately. The beautiful poem you have
written is the subject of much praise, and your
having carried off the prize in the last tournament
has delighted the citizens, with whom you appear
to be a universal favourite. Continue to improve,
dear Giuliano; so will you add honour to the name
of Medici.”

“Then that will be only by my following the
example of Lorenzo,” replied the youth affection-
ately.

C
18 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

It was true, that by his urbanity, generosity,
and amiable disposition, Giuliano had gained, in a
great degree, the affections of the people of
Florence, to which it is probable his fondness for
public exhibitions not a little contributed. He
was a noble-looking youth, tall in stature, and of
a joyous countenance. Skilled in horsemanship,
and all the athletic exercises of the day, he at the
same time studied the learned languages with
much success, delighted in music and poetry, and
in his attention to men of talent partook of the
celebrity of his brother. He habituated himself to
endure thirst, hunger, and fatigue ; possessed great
courage and unshaken fortitude, and was a friend
to religion and order. Added to this, he had all
the humanity and benevolence that could be wished
for in one born to such an exalted station. It is
little to be wondered at that Giuliano was beloved
both at home and abroad.

Piero de Medici did not long survive the mar-
riage of his son. On the second day after his death,
the principal inhabitants of Florence waited on
Lorenzo, and requested that he would take upon
himself the administration and care of the republic
in the same manner as his father and grandfather
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 19

had done before him. It was a high honour to
one so young, and Lorenzo felt it as such. He
hesitated, at first, to comply with their wishes, but
they persuaded him; and then, aware of the diffi-
culties which he had to encounter, selected as his
chief advisers those citizens most esteemed for their
integrity and prudence, whom he always consulted
on questions of importance.

‘¢ You are young, dear Lorenzo, to be thus dis-
tinguished,” said his sister Nannina to him the
next time they met. “I almost wept when I heard
of the grey-haired citizens so earnestly entreating
you to accept the dignity.”

“I am young, Nannina, and deeply I feel my
responsibility. But see, my sister, I have to-day
received these letters of condolence from several of
the Italian princes, in which they assure me of
their friendship and support. I owe it all to my
illustrious grandfather, in whose steps I would
endeavour to walk.”

“ Then will you do well, dear Lorenzo. You
are the master of immense wealth ; lay it out as he
did, for the good of others.”’

“ T will, Nannina. Our ancestors, in the space
of a few years, expended no less than 660,000
20 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

florins in works of public charity or utility. Some
persons might, perhaps, think it would be more
desirable to have a part of this enormous sum in
their purses; but I conceive it has been a great
advantage to the public, and well laid out, and am,
therefore, perfectly satisfied. I have a great desire
to encourage learning and the fine arts, and to raise
my native city to renown and honour.”

“Ah! Giuliano and Lagree you have magnificent
ideas, and as you have also a magnificent fortune,
you can accomplish what you desire,” said Nan-
nina, with a smile. “ Here comes our merry
brother, let us accompany him and Clarice to the
gardens.”

In the spring of 1471, the Duke of Milan paid
his promised visit to Florence. He and his duchess,
Bona, took up their residencé with Lorenzo, but
their attendants were so numerous, that even the
magnificent palace of the Medici could not contain
them. They consisted of six hundred armed men,
as a guard of honour, fifty running footmen, richly
dressed in silk and silver, and so many noblemen
and courtiers, that with their different retinues
they amounted to two thousand horsemen! Be-
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 21

sides these, there were five hundred couple of dogs,
and an infinite number of falcons and hawks. It
is well such visits are not paid im these days!
What would one of our rich English merchants say
to such an invasion, renowned though they be for
their liberal hearts and hospitable halls !

The Duke of Milan, who was vain and foolish,
thought, by all this display, to dazzle the eyes of
the Florentines. His equipage was in the highest
style of splendour and expense. But, notwith-
standing this profusion, his wonder, and perhaps
his envy, was excited by the superior magnificence
of Lorenzo, which was of a kind not always in the
power of riches to procure. The great variety of
statues, vases, gems, and intaglios, ornamenting the
Medicean palace—the extensive collection of the
finest remains of ancient art, selected with equal
assiduity and expense—the celebrated library—
and, above all, the paintings, the productions of the
best masters of the day, excited alike the astonish-
ment and admiration of the noble visitor.

“In all Italy I have not seen such pictures as
these!” he exclaimed, as he and Lorenzo walked
through the galleries and halls. “ Notwithstanding
my predilection for courtly show and grandeur,
22 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

I must confess, that in comparison with what I
have beheld in your palace, gold and silver sink
into insignificance.”

Amongst the festivities and grand spectacles
which took place in Florence for the entertainment
of the Milanese visitors, there was held a gay
tournament, in which Giuliano bore away the
prize, to the great delight of the people. The
tournaments of old were goodly shows, and
favourite pastimes with the Florentines.

“ Each mantle gemm’d floats gaily,
Each courser stamps and fumes:
"Tis a heaving sea, whose billows free
Are banners and dancing plumes.

The air 1s full of battle,
It 1s full of the trumpet’s sound,
Of the tramp of dashing horses,
And the cries of the crowd around

The earth is strown with splendour,
It 1s strown with fair plumes torn,

With glove, and scarf, and streamer,
For the love of ladies worn ;

But each maiden watch’d her champion,
And oft her white hands sent

Fresh gifts for every token
That was lost in the tournament.
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 23

Oh ' with such eyes above them,
Such voices to cheer the strife,

No marvel those warriors tilted
Like men who are tilting for life '”

And when shouts arose for the victor, and
Giuliano, kneeling on the turf, received the prize
his lance had won, how the hearts -of his sisters
thrilled with pleasure, as Nannina, unlacing his
steel helmet, placed on his brow the chaplet of
green laurel,—

‘¢ While every lip is busy
With the honour of his name,
And with glowing cheeks each good knight speaks
The story of his fame !”

But I come now to a very sad part of my story.
A few years after the visit of the Duke of Milan,
an event took place in Florence which has seldom
been mentioned without emotions of horror and
detestation, and which afforded an undoubted proot
of the ungodliness and irreligion which prevailed
in Italy at that time; for fearful and atrocious as
the crime was, a pope, a cardinal, an archbishop,
and several other priests, were the promoters and
instigators of it! The lovely land of Italy, without
the pure light of the glorious gospel, was dark,
degraded, and unhappy!
24 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

One of the noblest and wealthiest of the families
in Florence was the family of the Pazzi. Though
they had received favours from the house of Me-
dici, they were jealous of its rising power; and
when Pope Sixtus the Fourth stood atthe head of
a conspiracy to destroy two young men who were
an honour to their age and country, they willingly
joined him and his band of ruffians. Sixtus the
Fourth was the first who began to show how far
a pope might go, and how much that which was
previously regarded as sinful, lost its iniquity when
committed by a pontiff. He, with his great-
nephew, the Cardinal Riario, the Archbishop of
Pisa, the King of Naples, and the Pazzi family,
secretly agreed together to assassinate the noble
brothers, Lorenzo and Giuliano de Medici!

The plans of the conspirators being arranged,
the cardinal and archbishop came to Florence, and
took up their residence at a seat of the Pazzi,
about a mile from the city. Lorenzo, who was
then at Fiesole, hearing of their arrival, with his
usual hospitality invited them to his house, and
prepared a magnificent entertainment on the occa-
sion. ‘This pleased the conspirators; they accepted
the invitation, and agreed that the brothers should
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 25

be assassinated in the midst of the banquet. They
went to Fiesole, but to their disappointment,
Giuliano, on account of indisposition, did not
appear; and so their wicked design was, for a
time, frustrated.

‘“ We have been foiled to-day,” said Francesco
de Pazzi, when they had returned home; “ but it
shall not happen again. I long for the hour when
the power of the proud Medici shall be trampled in
the dust. If the deed is to be done, my lord arch-
bishop, there should be no delay.”

“There shall be none,” replied the archbishop ;
“T am as anxious for the death of Lorenzo de
Medici as you are, Francesco de Pazzi. Did he
not object to my preferment on the ground that
my character could not bear imspection? Yes;
and he shall feel my revenge! On Sunday morn-
ing next, when all will be present in the church of
the Reparata, our purpose shall be accomplished.
The signal for the murder shall be the elevation of
the host.”

“A bad hour, and an improper place td choose
for such a deed,” observed Giovan Batista, a sol-
dier who had much distinguished himself; “whilst
I thought it was to take place in a private house,
26 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

I did not object; but now the case is diffe-
rent.”

“ Tt signifies little where it takes place,” replied
the archbishop; ‘our purpose is to see it done.
And as you are a brave man, Giovan Batista, we
commit the assassination of Lorenzo to your
hands.”

‘* Not to me, my lord!—not to me!” said the
soldier. ‘‘ Bold as I am, I am not bold enough to
pollute the house of God with the crime of murder,
or base enough with my own hand to take the life
of one who has been a good friend to me.”

‘¢ | pity your scruples,” replied the archbishop,
with a sneer; “‘ but we need not your help; there
are many ready to perform the service.” And he
selected two priests to execute the deed from which
the soldier shrank.

‘¢ 1 will undertake the assassination of Giuliano,”
exclaimed Francesco de Pazzi, “ that office shall
be mine; though we have been on friendly terms,
I am not so scrupulous as Giovan.”

“* Be it so; we leave him to you and Bandini.
His holiness the pope will not fail to reward your
services.”

‘“¢ Ay,—his holiness would have the dominion of
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 27

??

Florence for himself,” muttered Francesco; “ but
that shall not be whilst I live.”

It was then agreed that the archbishop should
seize on the palace where the magistrates assembled,
whilst at the same time Jacopo de Pazzi was to
endeavour, by the cry of liberty, to incite the
citizens to revolt.

While these bold and bad men were thus
arranging their wicked plans, the two brothers,
perfectly unsuspicious of what was going on, were
passing their time in attention to public affairs,
and in the studies in which they both delighted.
It was pleasant to the citizens to witness their
mutual affection, and to see the confidence and
esteem which they felt for each other. Alas! they
were about to be parted by a fearful blow!

Having heard that the young cardinal Riario
desired to attend divine service in the church of
the Reparata, Lorenzo invited him and his suite to
his palace in Florence. On Sunday, the 26th of
April, 1478, he accordingly came with a large
retinue, aud was received by Lorenzo with that
splendour and hospitality with which he was
always accustomed to entertain men of high rank
and consequence.
28 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

Giuliano did not appear,—a circumstance which
alarmed the conspirators at first; but Lorenzo,
apologising for his brother’s absence, informed
them he intended to be present in the church.

Thither the party proceeded. The service had
already begun, and the cardinal had taken his seat,
when Francesco de Pazzi and Bandini, observing
that Giuliano had not arrived, left the church, and
went to his house in order to hasten and secure his
attendance. Giuliano accompanied them; and,
merrily laughing and chatting, the three young
men walked on together. They entered the church,
and the conspirators, standing near their intended
victims, waited impatiently for the appointed
signal. The bell rang,—the priest raised the con-
secrated wafer,—the people knelt before it,—and
the next instant, Francesco de Pazzi drawing a
short dagger, Giuliano de Medici lay dead upon
the ground !

Lorenzo happily escaped. The two priests who
had undertaken his assassination, perceiving that
he prepared to defend himself, fled, but not without
giving him a wound in the neck. The unfortunate
Giuliano, though he usually wore a dagger, had
that day left it behind him. As Bandini, fury in
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 29

his looks, rushed forwards, the friends of Lorenzo,
encircling him, hurried him into the sacristy, and
closed the brass doors. The alarm and consterna-
tionin the church was extreme; and such was the
tumult which ensued, that many thought the
building was fallmg in. But no sooner was it
understood. that Lorenzo de Medici was in danger,
than several young men, forming themselves into
a body, placed him in the midst of them, and con-
ducted him to his palace, making a circuitous turn
from the church, lest he should meet with the life-
less form of his beloved brother,—that brother
who so lately was full of health and happiness by
his side!

One of these noble youths, named Antonio
Ridolfo, gave a striking proof of his affection for
Lorenzo. Being apprehensive that the weapon
which had struck him was poisoned, he, in spite
of Lorenzo’s entreaties, sucked the wound. An
attendant on the Medici was wounded, and another
lost his life, in defence of their master.

Whilst these terrible events were passing, the
Archbishop of Pisa had, with about thirty of his
associates, made an attempt to overthrow the
magistrates, and possess themselves of the seat of
30 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

government. He went to the palace, and leaving
his followers in an adjoining chamber, entered the
apartment where Petrucci, the gonfaloniere, and
the other magistrates, were assembled. Out of
respect for his rank, and little dreaming for what
purpose he came, Petrucci rose to receive him.
But there was something in the quiet dignity of
the magistrate’s manner, and in the penetrating
glance of his eye, that abashed the archbishop.
Guilt makes a man a coward. He knew Petrucci
to be of a resolute character, and began to wish he
had not encountered him. Instead, therefore, of
making a sudden attack, as was intended, he began
talking to the gonfaloniere about his son, and this
he did in such a hesitating, confused manner, that
t was scarcely possible to understand what he said.
Petrucci also observed that he frequently changed
colour, and at times turned towards the door, as if
to give a signal for some one to approach. Aware
of the character of the man, the magistrate’s sus-
picions were aroused, and he called aloud for his
guards and attendants. ‘The archbishop, rushing
from the apartment, did the same; but a curious
incident had deprived him of their help. They
were awaiting his signal in a chamber in which it
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 31

was the custom for every succeeding magistrate to
make an alteration, as a guard against treachery.
Petrucci had so constructed the doors that they
closed and bolted on the slightest impulse, and
the conspirators found themselves thus unex-
pectedly secured in the apartment, without the
possibility of affording the slightest assistance to
their leader!

The magistrates, finding how matters stood,
soon secured the gates of the palace, and repulsed
their enemies. But on looking from the windows
they beheld Jacopo de Pazzi, with about a hundred,
soldiers, calling out, “‘ Liberty! Liberty!” and
exciting the people to revolt. At the same time
they were informed of the murder of Giuliano, and
the attack made upon Lorenzo.

Their indignation was extreme. “ Giuliano de
Medici dead!” they exclaimed. “ Assassinated
in his own city! and by treachery, too!—We little
know the Florentines, if they do not fearfully
avenge the crime.”’

They did so. Instead of answering to the cry
of liberty, the people with one accord rose up to
take signal vengeance on the murderers of a
Medici, It was a sad and terrible day! In every
32 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

direction the conspirators were attacked and
slaughtered. The resentment of the citizens knew
no bounds. The streets resounded with shouts of
“‘ Palle! palle!—Perish the traitors!”* Francesco
de Pazzi and the Archbishop of Pisa were seized
and hung side by side through the windows of the
palace, the latter not even being allowed to divest
himself of his prelatical robes. Jacopo de Pazzi
shared the same fate. Whilst parading the city,
he had been met by his brother-in-law, who up-
braided him with his conduct, adding, “ I would
advise you to go home, Jacopo; the people and
liberty are as dear to other citizens as they are to
yourself.” Finding that no one seemed disposed
to revolt from the Medici, but that, on the contrary,
stones were thrown at him for proposing it, Jacopo
thought it better to leave Florence. Some peasants,
however, discovered him, brought him back to the
city, and he was hung by the side of his associates.
His body, after being treated with the greatest
indignity, was thrown insultingly into the waters
of the Arno.

Such was the fate of one who had been, as it

* The palle d’or, or golden balls, were the arms of the family
of the Medici.
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 33

were, a prince in Florence, and who had received
the highest honours of the state!

The two priests who had undertaken to assas-
sinate Lorenzo, Giovan Batista, and the cruel
Bandini, were all put to death. The latter had
taken refuge in Constantinople, but the sultan,
being apprised of his crime, ordered him to be
seized and sent in chains to Florence; alleging, as
his motive for doing so, the respect he had for the
character of Lorenzo de Medici.

As for the young Cardinal Riario, who had fled
for safety to the altar, he was preserved from the
enraged populace by the interference of Lorenzo;
but the fright he experienced on this occasion
affected him s6 much, that, it is said, he never
afterwards recovered his natural complexion,

Throughout the whole of this dreadful retribu-
tion—and more than a hundred of the conspirators
had perished—Lorenzo had exerted all his influ-
ence to restrain the indignation of the people, and
to prevent further slaughter. Soon after the attack
made upon his life, an immense multitude sur-
rounded his palace, and not being convinced of his
safety, demanded to see him. Full of bitter grief
as he was at the untimely death of his brother, and

D
34 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

suffering from the wound in his neck, Lorenzo
gladly seized the opportunity which their affection
afforded him, and, appearing on the balcony, im-
plored them, in a pathetic and forcible speech, to
moderate the violence of their resentment.

‘“‘ Let me entreat you, my fellow-citizens,” he
said, “by the love you bear me—by the love you
bore my lamented brother—to calm your excited
feelings. A dreadful crime has been committed—
an atrocious crime. But take not on yourselves
the task of punishing the guilty, lest you involve
the innocent also in destruction. Leave that to
the magistrates; they will do justice—they will
avenge this fearful deed. You have given me
many proofs of your affection—give me yet another;
—let not the name of Medici be a signal for violence
and. bloodshed.”

His words and appearance had a powerful and
instantaneous effect. “We devote ourselves to
you and your cause, noble Lorenzo!” cried the
people with one voice; “your wish is our law.
Only we pray you earnestly to take all possible
precautions for your safety, as on that depends
the welfare of the Republic and the hopes of the
Florentines.”
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 35

They left the palace—many with tears in their
eyes, at the calamity which had befallen the
house of Medici; and many more with expres-
sions of deep anger against the authors of it.
“They have cut him off in the pride of youth
and beauty!” they exclaimed; “his death must
be atoned for.”

‘‘But Lorenzo yet lives!” said one; and imme-
diately the streets echoed far and wide with shouts
of “ Long live Lorenzo de Medici!”

Turning to the Florentine nobles, by whom he
was surrounded, Lorenzo observed, ‘‘I feel more
anxiety from the acclamations of my friends,
than I have even experienced from my own dis-
asters.”

There was not a citizen of any rank whatever in
Florence who did not, upon this melancholy occa-
sion, wait upon him with an offer of his services ;
so great was the popularity which the Medici had
acquired by their prudence and liberality.

The death of Giuliano was deeply lamented,
not only by his family, but by all Florence.
His obsequies were performed with much mag-
nificence in the Church of San Lorenzo, amidst
universal sorrow. Many of the Florentine youth
36 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

changed their dress in testimony of respect to his
memory.

But the people could not forgive the Pazzi
family. Those of them who had not suffered death
were condemned either to imprisonment or exile.
By a public decree 1t was ordered that the name
and arms of the Pazzi should be for ever sup-
pressed ; whilst the appellations of those places in
the city which had been derived from them were
directed to be changed. Thus the very name of
this wealthy, noble, and influential family was to
be forgotten in Florence, or remembered only with
abhorrence !

It was Lorenzo himself—the man they had most
deeply injured—who first forgave them, and even-
tually restored them to their former rank. With a
forbearance and humanity that did him honour, he
had not only rescued some of his enemies from the
fury of the people, but showed much pity and for-
giveness to the families of those who had been
slain.

Florence, under the sway of Lorenzo de Medici,
arrived at a high degree of prosperity, and became
renowned as the seat of learning and the fine arts.
His fellow-citizens, who regarded him with pride
THE BROTHERS OF FLORENCE. 37

and affection, conferred upon him the title of
“‘ Magnificent.” He had several children; one of
whom, made an abbot before he was eight years
old, and a cardinal when only thirteen, was
afterwards the famous pope Leo the Tenth.
Another son, whom he named Giuliano, after his
lamented brother, allied himself by marriage with
the royal family of France, and became Duke de
Nemours.
No. II.

THE POPE AND THE PAINTER.

—_——+>-—-

“ DRAWING again, child! did I not tell thee I
would not have it? thou wilt never get on in life,
Michael, if thus thou dost waste thy precious time !”
exclaimed Luigi Buonarotti, as he entered the room
where his son was sitting.

“T was so weary of my books, Sir,” replied
Michael, a boy about eleven years of age ; “‘ I con-
ceive law to be the very driest of all dry studies.”

“That may be your opinion, foolish boy; but
dry or not, you must make up your mind to study
it. I have too many sons to allow of any whim-
sical likes or dislikes in the choice of a profession,
and, as I informed you the other day, I intend you
to practise as a notary or advocate in Florence.

>


P 57.
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER, 39

But see here!” continued Buonarotti, as he took up
from the desk various little drawings, “ how your
time and talents are wasted by such attempts as
these ! Will trumpery like this ever gain you riches
or honour? or even find you a livelihood ?—answer
me, boy.”

“Tf you will place me with a painter, Sir, that
trumpery shall be turned to good account,” said
Michael, rather proudly. “I have no fear of
gaining a living, if I may devote my time and
energies to the fine arts.”

“‘ Fine arts!” replied his father angrily, throwing
the papers on the ground, “put such folly out of
your head, child. Our family was once noble and
honoured in the land, and no son of mine, particu-
larly my eldest son, shall disgrace it by idleness,
or idle fancies, if [ can prevent it. I shall have
you thinking yourself a great artist, if you go on
thus.”

‘Nay, father, not so;” replied the boy, “ but it
is the great desire of my heart to be one.”

“‘ Well, that you never will be, Michael, so rest
content. ‘To see you distinguished as a notary is
the height of my ambition, as it must be of yours.”’

*‘ Father!” said Michael earnestly, “let me be a
40 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

painter, and you shall have no cause to be ashamed
of your son.”

“Tt is useless to ask it, child, my mind is made
up. Attend to your books.”

He left the room, and the boy, with a sigh,
turned to his studies. In a few minutes, however,
he almost unconsciously sought the pencil, and was
again employed in sketching.

At length, the appointed tasks were accom-
plished, and Michael, with joy putting aside the
books which were so distasteful to him, left his
home, and traversing the streets with rapid steps,
was ere long in the studio of the celebrated painter
Ghirlandajo, then at the height of his reputation.

To rare and various accomplishments Ghirlan-
dajo joined the most amiable qualities. His fellow-
citizens both admired and loved him, and he is
spoken of as “the delight of the age in which he
lived.” He was the best colourist in fresco who
had yet appeared; and though it is nearly five
hundred years since he lived, his colours have stood
extremely well to this day. He was also an excel-
lent worker in mosaic, which, from its durability,
he called “ painting for eternity.” And one of the
characteristics of this great painter was his diligent
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER, 4l

and progressive improvement; every successive
production was better than the last.

To pass a little time in the studio of Ghirlandajo,
was one of Michael’s greatest enjoyments. He
watched with intense interest each movement of
the master’s hand; with admiration he observed
the wonderful imitation of life and nature displayed
in his pictures; and more than ever he wished to
be a painter.

“Well, my boy,” said Ghirlandajo to him one
day, after Michael had been expressing such a wish
to Francesco, one of the scholars of the artist, “ you
must ask your father to let you study with us.”

“Ah, Signor! he will never consent,” replied
Michael; “he loves not painting; he holds the
fine arts in no esteem.”

“And you do? well, it is a pity you do not
think alike on the subject,” said Ghirlandajo
kindly; “but you must endeavour to be satisfied
with your father’s plans for you, my boy. What
is your profession to be?”

“‘T am to study for the law,” said Michael sadly.
‘“¢ My father says I shall gain neither honour nor
riches by painting; and that it is not every one
who is born to be a Ghirlandajo.”
42 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“True enough,” said the painter, smiling; “I
trust that our beautiful art will flourish under
names which will be remembered long after that
of Ghirlandajo is forgotten. Give your best ener-
gies to the study of the law, Michael, as your
father desires it; remember, one may have a taste
for the fine arts, without having any genius for
them.”

Michael, however, could not follow this advice.
While his books were in his hand, his thoughts
were in the painter’s studio. Having formed a
friendship with Francesco Granacci, one of the best
pupils of Ghirlandajo, he borrowed from him models
and drawings. These he took home to his little
chamber, and studied them in secret with such per-
severing assiduity and consequent improvement,
that Francesco, when he saw them, was quite sur-
prised and delighted. He was still speaking warmly
of their merits, when Ghirlandajo himself stepped
into the apartment.

“‘ Here, Granacci,” he said hastily, “I want you
to alter the expression in this mouth ; it is too severe
and— What have you here, Francesco? these draw-
ings are excellent,—and these figures, there is life
in them! they are not your doing, Granacci? I see
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 43

they are by a young hand, but there is great
genius there! none of my pupils could give such
touches as those. ‘Tio whom do they belong, Gra-
nacci? who has done this?”

“‘ Michael Buonarotti,” said Francesco, bringing
forward the boy, who had been listening with
trembling eagerness to the artist’s words. “Ought
he not to be a painter, Signor ?”

“He ought—he must!” replied Ghirlandajo.
“ Michael, I see you have genius as well as taste,”
continued the great master, looking proudly and
kindly on the boy; “you must cultivate your
talents; say, will you give up the law, and come
to be my pupil?”

“ Ah, Signor!” said Michael, with sparkling
eyes and clasped hands, “how gladly !—but my
father ?”

‘“‘T will plead your cause with your father,” said
the artist, “I will go to him this day, Michael.
These beginnings shadow forth great things, or I
am much mistaken. But remember, my boy, with-
out steady perseverance and diligent study you will
accomplish nothing. Genius without industry is of
little worth.”

It required much persuasion on the part of Ghir-
44 SHORT STORIES FROM EUKOPEAN HISTORY.

landajo to gain Luigi Buonarotti’s consent that his
son should exchange the study of the law for that
of painting. At length, however, the old man
reluctantly agreed to it.

“Tt is a pity Michael has taken such a fancy
into his head,” said he, “ but I suppose it must be
as he wishes. Young as he is, he has a stern
inflexible temper, Signor Ghirlandajo; it is not
easy to turn his mind from any object on which it
is once set, and the pencil has been his delight
from a child. But I am not rich, Signor, and
{I have a large family ;—-perhaps we may not agree
as to terms. What remuneration do you demand
for the instruction of my son?”

‘“¢ None whatever,” replied Ghirlandajo ; “on the
contrary, if Michael is bound to me as my regular
pupil for three years, I agree to pay you six golden
florins for the first year, eight for the second, and
twelve for the third ; and I do this because I expect
great advantage from your son’s labours. I am
sure I am not mistaken in him; he will be a great
artist.”

“‘ Say you so, Signor?” replied the old man with
rather an incredulous smile; “ well, I trust he will
not disappoint you. Thanks for your kindness and
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 45

liberality. The boy’s heart will overflow with
happiness at this change in his vocation.”

Michael was fourteen when, to his inexpressible
delight, he was thus received into the studio of the
discerning and liberal-minded Ghirlandajo, who
at once commenced his instructions with a pupil
destined to fill not only Italy, but all Hurope with
his fame—the celebrated Michael Angelo Buona-
rotti, commonly called Michael Angelo—as a
sculptor, an architect, and a painter, unques-
tionably the greatest master that’ever lived.

At that time Lorenzo the Magnificent reigned
over Florence. In his palace and gardens was a
fine collection of antique marbles, busts, and statues,
which the princely owner converted into an academy
for the use of young artists. Michael Angelo was
one of the first who, through the recommendation
of Ghirlandajo, was received into this new academy.
This was a great gratification to the youth. He
had hitherto devoted himself chiefly to drawing,
but the sight of the many splendid works of art in
the Medicean gardens determined him to turn his
attention to sculpture. He was then not quite
sixteen.

Whatever Michael Angelo did, he tried to do
A6 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

well. With the fervour and the energy natural to
his character, he now began first to model in clay,
and then to copy in marble, some of the works of
art before him. ‘They were surprising productions
for one so young.

Having found one day the statue of a laughing
faun considerably mutilated and without a head,
the youthful artist resolved to try if he could
restore to it what was wanting. He succeeded
admirably. Lorenzo, who often visited the gardens,
was much struck with this display of genius, and
inquired whose work it was.

“Tt is executed by one of Ghirlandajo’s pupils,”
was the reply. ‘‘ He and Granacci were the two
he deemed most worthy of entering your academy,
Signor. His name is Michael Angelo.”

““T should lke to see the youth,” observed
Lorenzo, who stood gazing at the statue; “‘ there is
great talent and genius here.”

Michael Angelo was summoned.

““So, Angelo,” said Lorenzo the Magnificent,
“ head does you credit.”

Michael’s dark eyes glittered. ‘It is a noble
art!” he replied with enthusiasm. “By allowing
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER, 47

me the honour of entering these gardens, excellent
Signor, you have, as it were, raised a new spirit
within me.”

Lorenzo smiled. A great lover of the art of
sculpture himself, he was pleased with the youth’s
evident devotion to it.

“‘Do you prefer it then to painting?” he asked.

“‘T do,” replied Michael Angelo. “It is to me
so much more wonderful and sublime.”

“I see you have not exactly imitated the original
in that head,” observed Lorenzo, “the lips are
smoother, and you have shown the teeth. But,”
he added with a smile, “ you should have remem-
bered, Angelo, that old men seldom exhibit a com-
plete set of teeth.”

He passed on ; and the young artist, who paid no
less respect to the judgment than to the rank of
Lorenzo, was no sooner left to himself, than he
struck out one of the teeth, giving to the part the
appearance of its having been lost by age.

On his next visit, Lorenzo, seeing this, and
equally delighted with the disposition as with the
genius of his young pupil, at once determined to
take him under his especial patronage. “ Angelo,”
he said, “ your perseverance and improvement
48 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

merit my regard. In order to give you every
advantage, I am willing to receive you into my
own service, undertake the entire care of your
education, and bring you up in my palace as my
son. What say you?”

What could Michael Angelo say to such a gene-
rous, flattering proposal! With heartfelt gratitude
he thanked his noble patron, and then spoke of his
father.

“T will see your father on the subject,” said
Lorenzo. “I trust he will not object to my wishes.”

He sent for the old man, and gained his consent
to the plan on condition that he himself should
receive an office under government. Accordingly,
Michael Angelo was lodged in the palace of the
Medici, where he remained for three years. He
was ever treated with paternal kindness by Lorenzo,
and had the advantage of associating with the first
literary characters of the age.

But Michael Angelo, with all his genius, was not
of a very amiable disposition. His temper was
proud and haughty; his speech too often contemp-
tuous and sarcastic. He felt his own great powers
of mind, and too frequently indulged in satire
towards those who were not so gifted as himself.
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 49

Lorenzo the Magnificent died, and Michael An-
gelo, thrown on his own resources, studied more
diligently than ever. Secluded, temperate and
frugal in his habits, stern and unbending in his
character, he suffered nothing to divert his mind
from that on which it was set—his improvement in
the art of sculpture.

About this time there was some sensation caused
amongst the lovers of the fine arts in Rome, by
the arrival in that city of a statue of extraordinary
beauty. It was a Sleeping Cupid in marble; and
great was the admiration bestowed upon it.

“Tt is a genuine antique,” said one grave con-
noisseur in such things ; “there is no mistaking it.”

‘Certainly not,” observed another; “how infi-
nitely superior is it to anything which art in this
day is capable of producing !”’

‘‘Tt was found in a vineyard near Florence, I
understand,” said a third; “‘a peasant, while dig-
ging, came upon this exquisite proof of ancient
skill and genius. It is a pity the arm has been
broken off. The Duchess of Mantua much desires
it for her cabinet, I hear; but the Cardinal San
Giorgio has already purchased it at a high price.
He is charmed with its beauty.”

E
50 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“My friends,” said a nobleman, as he entered
the hall with hasty steps, “what do you think I
have heard just now? that this ‘real antique,’ which
has so delighted us all, is the work of a young man
of two-and-twenty, residing at Florence!”

The group round the statue actually started with
surprise.

“Ts it possible ?” they exclaimed ; “has one in
our own day executed this splendid work! It is
marvellous! Are you sure you are not imposed
upon, Ricciardi ?”

“Quite sure. The young sculptor has produced
the missing arm, and given undoubted proofs of
his veracity. The cardinal has invited him to
Rome immediately.”

“And what may be the name of this young
man ?”

“His name is Michael Angelo.”

During his first residence in the imperial city,
Michael Angelo, surrounded by so many beautiful
remains of antiquity, applied to his studies with
unceasing energy and increasing diligence. He
executed several works, which added greatly to his
reputation, particularly a group called the Pieta,
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 51

which is now in the church of St. Peter's at
Rome.

A little time after the Pets had been fixed in
its place, the young artist went one afternoon to
cousider the effect of his work. As he stood before
it, surveying it with a critical yet partial eye, and
with a consciousness that he should yet do greater
things than that, two strangers entered the church.
Struck with admiration at the beautiful group pre-
sented to their view, they expressed, with Italian
warmth and fervour, their great and unqualified
approbation.

« What an exquisite work!” cried one. “ Truly
it is a masterpiece! What form! what proportion !
what excellent grouping! I never saw anything
to compare with it!”

“Wonderful!” said the other, after contem-
plating it for some time in silent admiration.
“ What a mind must the man have who executed
this! Who is the sculptor ?”

“One from Bologna; at this moment I remem-
ber not his name.”

“‘ Nay, my friend, I rather think he is a Floren-
tine. Surely I have heard so.”

“You are mistaken, Bernandino; I am con-
52 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

vinced Bologna has the honour of being his
birth-place; I shall bethink me of his name
directly.”

‘Well, any one in Rome can tell us that, fortu-
nately. There is a young man will set us right,
perhaps.”

‘“‘ Ah! let us not ask him; he might laugh at our
ignorance ; or he might not know himself. We
will find it out. The name of that man ought
never to be forgotten.”

“Tt shall not be forgotten here, at all events,”
said Michael Angelo, as the strangers left the
church ; “‘ the Pret shall not again be mistaken for
the work of the Bolognese.”’

That night, when the mighty city slept, a young
man of haughty bearing entered the church, with a
lantern in his hand. He approached the beautiful
piece of sculpture, and smiled proudly, as in deep
indelible characters he inscribed on it, where it
might best be seen—the name of Michael Angelo.
This Pret is the only one of his works thus
inscribed.

Amongst the ruins of ancient Rome is a splen-
did equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius. It is of
bronze, and was originally gilt with thick leaves of
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 53

gold. The attitude of the horse, and the fire and
spirit displayed in it, are remarkably fine. When
first Michael Angelo saw it, he looked at it for some
time in silence, and then suddenly exclaimed, ‘‘ Go
on!”—thus stamping this famous statue with his
enthusiastic admiration.

A very excellent painter lived at this time in
Florence, whose name was Leonardo da Vinci.
Italy was justly proud of this illustrious artist, and
Francis I. of France loaded him with favours. It
has been said—but the story is a doubtful one—
—that he died in the arms of that monarch at
Fontainbleau. Certain it is, that the king held
him in high esteem, and justly admired his great
and extraordinary talents.

Slowly fading away from the wall of the refec-
tory of the Church of Santa Maria delle Grazie, at
Milan, is one of the most celebrated pictures of this
great master. The subject is a solemn one—the
Last Supper; and solemnly it is treated. The
skilful arrangement of the figures, which are larger
than life, and the amazing beauty of the workman-
ship, arrest the attention and astonish the eye of the
beholder. It has thus been spoken of: ‘“ On viewing
it, one head, one face, one attitude, one expression,
54 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

comes forcibly upon the sight, and sinks deeply
into the mind, till every thought and feeling
is absorbed in wonder at the power which could
represent so sublime a figure in so sublime a
manner.

“In the glorious serenity of that countenance
is beheld the history of the pardoned Magdalene,
the reproof of the self-sufficient Pharisee ; there may
be read, as in a scroll, lessons of charity and peace,
so ill followed, though so often cited by erring men,
who, while they respect the gentle words of that
Divine tongue, allow the spirit to evaporate.
There are patience, and forbearance, and endurance
—there are knowledge, and power, and prescience
—there is deep grief for treachery and crime—and,
above all, there is pity and forgiveness.”

Such is, or rather was, this beautiful painting ;
—it is fading from sight now, but from the nume-
rous copies taken from it no picture is more uni-
versally known and celebrated.

Leonardo da Vinci, like Michael Angelo, had
astonishing powers of mind. He was great as a
mathematician, a mechanic, an architect, a chemist,
an engineer, a musician, a poet, and a painter!
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 55

From a child his singular talents attracted notice ;
but he had not the perseverance of Michael Angelo.
His magnificent designs and projects were seldom
completed. He began many beautiful and won-
derful works, and then, dissatisfied with them, left
them unfinished. This highly gifted man and
Michael Angelo were rivals. With all their admi-
ration of each other’s genius, they were jealous of
the distinction each had obtained. The haughty
spirit of the one could not brook superiority, or even
equality ; the temper of the other was capricious
and sensitive. Leonardo was many years older
than Angelo, and did not feel pleased that so
young a man should come forward as his compe-
titor. One day, being annoyed at some remark
made by his rival, he replied with warmth, “ You
will remember, Angelo, I was famous before you
were born!”

It was announced one day in Florence that the
wall of the great council hall was to be painted in
fresco; and the artist who produced the best car-
toon should be appointed to the work. Michael
Angelo and Leonardo da Vinci, equally desirous of
the honour, resolved to compete for it. Hach pre-
pared his cartoon; each emulous of the fame, and
56 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

fully aware of the extraordinary abilities of his
rival, threw all his best powers into his work, de-
termined, if possible, to surpass himself. It was a
deeply interesting contest—a struggle for fame
between the two first artists of the age. Hach
chose a different subject, arid each, bending all his
energies to the task, succeeded in producing a
wonderful specimen of his peculiar skill and
genius.

The cartoons, when finished, met with the high-
est admiration; but the preference was given to
that of Leonardo da Vinci.

From all parts of Italy the young artists flocked
to study these magnificent compositions.

The wall of the council hall was, however, never
painted. It is said that Leonardo spent so much
time in trying experiments and preparing the wall,
that at length, changes in the Government occur-
ring, the design was abandoned.

The Pope at this time was Julius II. Though
seventy-four years of age, he was impatient
of contradiction, fiery in temper, full of magni-
ficent and ambitious projects, and of a most ener-
getic cast of character. He sent for Michael
Angelo,
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 57

“‘T wish thee to erect a splendid monument to
my memory,” said he; “ thou art well able to per-
form the task; see thou doest me justice.”’

The sculptor commenced his work, and the pon-
tiff was delighted.

“'Thou hast wonderful abilities, assuredly, Mi-
chael Angelo!” he said to him one day, as he
watched him with eager interest, “ how thou dost
make the marble fly, man! Truly, it is as if thou
wert angry with it for concealing the statue! There
is something of my own energy in thee, Michael.
But [hear thou art as great with the brush as with
the chisel !—Come with me ; I have a work for thee
to execute in that way also.”

“Tf your Holiness will allow me to finish these
strokes first,” said Michael Angelo, quietly going
on with his task.

The impatient pope was compelled to wait the
sculptor’s pleasure, and then he carried him off
to the famous Sistine Chapel.

“¢ See here!” he exclaimed, as they entered the
building together, “this chapel, erected thirty
years ago by Sixtus the Fourth, is not yet
completed. Though the walls are decorated, the
ceiling remains without an ornament. Thisshould
58 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

not be. Thou must paint it in fresco, Michael
Angelo.”

The artist gazed upwards at the enormous vault,
and then replied, “Your Holiness requires a great
work and a work of time.”

“‘Great! that is the very reason I give it thee!”
said the pontiff; ‘what is work to one like thee ?
thou canst do anything thou wilt. This ceiling
is, as perhaps thou knowest, one hundred and fifty
feet long, and fifty broad, and I desire that thou
shouldest represent thereon a series of subjects con-
nected with sacred history, so as to cover the whole
space. Canst thou—nay, I need not say canst
thou, but wilt thou undertake the work ?”

The great master paused one instant, and then
replied, “I can, and will.”

“That is well,” said the pontiff; “but at what
art thou gazing so earnestly, Angelo? What dost
thou see in that painting of Ghirlandajo’s ?

“T see the hand of my old master, your Holiness,
but yet should scarcely recognise it. How inferior
is this to his later productions! how continuous and
steady was his improvement!”

“So it should be,” replied Pope Julius ; ““what
have great artists to do but improve? Now think
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 59

over thy designs for this ceiling, Angelo; great as
thou art already, I prophesy this will add some-
what to thy renown.”

Michael Angelo continued his work on the mau-
soleum, till the pope, prejudiced by one of the
artist’s enemies,—and he had several,—no longer
visited him as formerly, and neglected to supply
him with the necessary funds. Not being able on
two occasions to obtain access to the pontiff, and
having been treated rather superciliously by one
of the servants, Michael Angelo’s haughty spirit
rose.

“Go,” he said, to one of his attendants, “and
take this message to the Vatican;—that if his Holi-
ness desires to see Michael Angelo, he must send
to seek him elsewhere than in Rome.—Now, Ur-
bino, dispose of my property ; sell my goods to the
Jews; I leave for Florence to-day.”

He started for that city, but had not proceeded
many miles on his road, when, one after another,
five couriers arrived from Pope Julius, with com-
mands, threats, persuasions, and promises, to induce
him to return, but in vain; Michael Angelo turned
a deaf ear to all they said, and determinately con-
tinued his journey.
60 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

He had not been long in Florence, before three
more messengers came from the pontiff, insisting
on his return; but the inflexible artist absolutely
refused. ‘‘Inform his Holiness,” said he, “that I
have accepted -a commission from the Sultan of
Turkey to build a bridge at Constantinople. I
therefore cannot comply with the wishes of his
Holiness.”

Then the pope wrote to Soderini, who was at the
head of the government at Florence, commanding
him, on pain of his extreme displeasure, to send
Michael Angelo back to him. Soderini, fearing the
pontiff’s anger, at length, with difficulty, prevailed
on the offended artist to return, but not till three
months had been spent in vain negotiations.

The pope was at supper, in Bologna, when a
servant informed him Michael Angelo had arrived.

“Oh! at last! bring him instantly to our pre-
sence!’’ he exclaimed in an impatient tone. ‘“ He
shall answer for this conduct !”

‘What does this mean!” continued the fiery old
pontiff, as Michael Angelo appeared before him;
*‘ instead of obeying our command, and coming to
us, thou hast waited till we came in search of
thee !”’
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 61

“ Pardon me, holy father,” said Michael Angelo,
falling on his knees, and speaking in a loud voice,
‘“‘my offence has not been caused by an evil nature;
I could no longer endure the insults offered to me
in the palace of your Holiness.”

He continued kneeling, and the pope in silence
bent his angry brows upon him, wishing to forgive,
doubtless, if he could do so without losing his dig-
nity. Atthis moment, a bishop who was standing
by, thinking he could mediate between the parties,
observed in a pitying tone, “It is through igno-
rance he has erred, poor man; pardon him, holy
father; artists are ever apt to presume too much
upon their genius.”

“Who told thee to interfere ?” said the irascible
pope, bestowing on him at the same time a hearty
blow with his staff, “itis thou that art ignorant
and presuming, to insult one whom we delight
to honour; take thyself out of our sight!”

As the terrified prelate stood speechless with
amazement, the attendants led him from the room.
Then Pope Julius, turning to Michael Angelo, said
in a mild voice,“ We grant thee our forgiveness and
our blessing, my son; but thou must never again
leave us. Be obedient to our wishes, and at all
62 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

times, and on all occasions, thou shalt have our
favour and protection.”

A short time after this extraordinary scene, Pope
Julius, ever willing to employ the talents of the
great sculptor, commanded him to execute a colos-
sal statue of himself for the front of the principal
church in Bologna. It was in bronze ; and Michael
Angelo threw into the figure and attitude so much
haughtiness and resolution, and gave such an ex-
pression of terrible majesty to the countenance, that
Julius, when he saw his character thus portrayed,
could not help smiling.

“Am I uttering a blessing or a curse?” he said
to the sculptor.

“Tt is my wish to represent your Holiness as
admonishing the people of Bologna to submission,”
replied Michael Angelo.

“Good!” said the pope, gazing well pleased
on the statue; “but what wilt thou place in my
hand ?”

“A book, may it please your Holiness.”

“A book, man!” exclaimed the old pontiff, “put
rather a sword; thou knowest I am no scho-
lar.”
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 63

“‘Now then, Michael Angelo,” said the energetic
Pope Julius on their return to Rome, “thou must
forthwith commence the decoration of the vaulted
ceiling in the Sistine Chapel.”

“Should not the mausoleum be first completed ?”
said the artist, who preferred the practice of sculp-
ture to that of painting, and much desired to decline
the task assigned to him.

“By no means,” replied Julius; “there is no
hurry for the monument ; I am yet alive and vigor-
ous ; but I wish to see the completion of the chapel.
I desire that the pontificate of Julius the Second
should be remembered.”

“It is a grand task, and should be grandly
executed,” said the artist. “Some other hand than
mine may give your Holiness satisfaction. ‘There
is Raphael ”

‘“‘He is otherwise engaged for us, thou knowest,”
said the pope in an angry tone; “I tell thee, Mi-
chael Angelo, thou, and none else, shalt perform the
work ; so say no more concerning it.”

The painter, fearful of again incensing the pontiff
by opposing his will, reluctantly submitted to it;
and deeply impressed with a sense of the vast-
ness and grandeur of the task committed to him,


64 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

commenced his cartoons. As he was then inexpe-
rienced in the mechanical part of the art of fresco,
he invited from Florence several eminent painters,
to execute his designs under his own directions.
They, however, could not reach the grandeur of
his conceptions ; and, disappointed and vexed, Mi-
chael Angelo one morning, in a fit of impatience,
turned them all out of the chapel, destroyed all they
had done, and determined to execute the whole
himself. He accordingly shut himself up, and with
incredible perseverance and energy proceeded to
accomplish this great work alone, even preparing
the colours with his own hands.

When the ceiling was about half completed, Pope
Julius, whose impatience to see it had been very
great, insisted on admittance to the chapel. The
sublime and magnificent performance which met
his eye when he entered, excited his deepest admi-
ration and astonishment.

“Thou hast actually surpassed thyself, Michael
Angelo!” he exclaimed with delight; “great as
were my expectations, this exceeds them all!”

T'wo or three persons had found admission with
Pope Julius into the chapel, and unrepressed and
ardent were their expressions of delight and sur-
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 65

prise also. But there was one who in silent admi-
ration gazed upwards, who comprehended better
than any other the extreme grandeur and beauty of
the painting. This was a young man of graceful
form and handsome expressive features. With
dark eyes and luxuriant hair, he had so sweet and
serene a countenance, as to be termed by some,
“angelic.”” His face was a mirror of the mind with-
in. Bright, talented, generous, and gentle, he pos-
sessed the most attractive manners with the most
winning modesty. So amiable was his disposition,
that “‘not only all men, but the very brutes loved
him; the only very distinguished man of whom
we read, who lived and died without an enemy or
detractor.”

Yet, young as he was, and modest as was his
disposition, from one end of Italy to the other his
name was known and celebrated. For this was
“the prince of painters’ —one whose fame eventu~
ally filled the world—Raphael Sanzio d’ Urbino.

The quick glance of Michael Angelo soon noticed
the young artist; and when Pope Julius had de-
parted, he approached the spot where he stood, lost
in admiration. There was no rivalry between
them then. Michael Angelo, though, in general,

F
66 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

he cared not for praise, and despised flattery, could
appreciate the genius of Raphael, and was not
indifferent to his opinion. It was needless to ask
it on this occasion; the speaking countenance of
the young artist was enough. With infinite sweet-
ness and candour he thus addressed the great mas-
ter, older than himself by some years ;—

“ T can but be thankful,” he said, joy flashing
from his eyes, “ that I am born in the same age
with so great an artist as Michael Angelo, and may
be enabled to profit by the grand creations of so
sublime a genius!”

Michael Angelo was satisfied. He valued those
few words more than all the commendations of
Pope Julius IJ. And well he might; for who
could judge like Raphael? what painter has ever
equalled him ?

Pope Julius, anxious to secure the talents of
such an artist in his service, had invited, or rather
ordered Raphael to Rome, to decorate the cham-
bers of the Vatican. The Vatican is the palace of
the Pope. It contains four thousand apartments,
twelve great halls, eight grand staircases, and two
hundred lesser ones, a corridor about a thousand
feet in length, a museum, and an immense library
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER, 67

of 80,000 books, and 24,000 manuscripts. But
the chambers decorated by Raphael are the glory
of the Vatican. Those sublime paintings, the rich
creations of his wonderful mind, have been the
admiration of all ages.

‘With renewed energy Michael Angelo now con-
tinued. his work in the Sistine Chapel; but rapid
as was his progress with it, it was not rapid enough
to suit the impatient Pontiff.

‘ Thou art slow, man, thou art slow!” said he
one day to the indefatigable artist; ‘‘ we desire to
see this great work completed in our lifetime, but
at this rate of progress tell me, when dost thou
intend to finish it?”

“When I can,” calmly replied Michael Angelo.

“When thou canst!” exclaimed the fiery old
Pope ; “ surely thou hast a mind that I should have
thee thrown from the scaffold.”

“Then should I never have the honour of com-
pleting it for your Holiness,” quietly observed the
artist.

The wishes of Pope Julius were, however, grati-
fied ; and not long after, the ceiling was uncovered
to public view.

In the incredibly short time of twenty-two


68 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

months, Michael Angelo had performed his sublime
and magnificent task! The Sistine Chapel was
opened ; and when the people of Rome, by hun-
dreds and thousands, poured in to view the artist’s
work, their delight and admiration knew no
bounds. With reverence and astonishment they
gazed at it, and pronounced it unparalleled in the
history of art.

The following year Pope Julius II. died, and
was succeeded by Leo X., son of Lorenzo the
Magnificent. This was the Pope who permitted
the sale of indulgences, or pardon for sins, against
which Luther so boldly protested,

You have heard of the Church of St. Peter’s, at
Rome? Those who look upon it cannot suffici-
ently admire the vast genius and majestic intellect
of the man who was its chief architect. That man
was Michael Angelo. Wonderful as a painter and
a sculptor, he was yet more wonderful as an archi-
tect. St. Peter’s may be pronounced the most
magnificent structure ever raised by man,

When remuneration was offered the great mas-
ter while engaged on the building, he constantly
declined it. “ No,” he said, “ I am employed in a
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 69

work of piety ; and, for my own honour and the
honour of God, I refuse all emolument.”

On leaving Florence to build the dome of St.
Peter’s, Angelo turned his horse round to contem-
plate once more, in the grey of the morning, the
beautiful city and its far-famed cathedral. He
gazed long on the glorious cupola, rising from
amidst the pines and cypresses, and then said,
with a feeling of the deepest admiration, “ Like
thee I will not build one; better than thee I
cannot!”

His tomb, in the Church of Santa Croce, was
marked out by himself, in such a manner that from
it might be seen, when the doors of the church
stood open, that grand and noble edifice.

The character of Michael Angelo was no common
one. ‘To the last hour of his life—and he lived to
be very old—he was striving after excellence in his
art. Ever endeavouring to improve, with resolute
energy of mind and purpose he was still pressing
on to his standard of perfection. In allusion to his
own infirmities, this mighty master made a draw-
ing, representing an aged man in a go-cart, with
these words underneath,—Swill learning.
70 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

On the 6th of April, 1520, there were tears and
great lamentations in the “ Eternal City.” All
classes of men mourned the death of one, cut off in
the prime of life, and in the midst of vast under-
takings. The generous, the high-minded, the be-
loved and admired Raphael was no more! But
much as all mourned him, the grief of his scholars
was unspeakable.

From all parts of Italy they had come to study
under this “ painter of painters.”’ No less than a
train of fifty artists attended him from his own
house to the Vatican, when he went to court; at-
tended on him with a love, and reverence, and
duty, far beyond that usually paid to princes.

And such was the influence of Raphael’s benign
temper, that all his numerous scholars lived to-
gether in perfect harmony and friendship. No
jealousies disturbed their peace. All was generous
emulation. Each strove to excel; each endea-
voured to catch some faint reflection of the grace,
and beauty, and power, which characterized the
works of their great master.

“« Father,” said little Octavio Mazzola, as he
and his parent walked slowly along the banks of
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 71

the Tiber, “‘ do you think Pope Leo is very sorry
that the great painter is no more ?”’

‘“* He is deeply grieved, my son. During Ra-
phael’s illness he sent every day to inquire after his
health, and when informed of the fatal termination,
broke out into bitter lamentations. ‘ Alas!’ he
exclaimed, ‘ what an irreparable loss io me! what
a misfortune to the world! Where shall I find a
second Raphael!’ ”

** But he still has the great Michael Angelo.”

“True; but Pope Leo much preferred the grace-
ful and amiable Raphael to the stern, unbending
Michael Angelo. The character of the latter
painter accorded more with that of Pope Julius.”

“ Well, there is Titian—the celebrated portrait-
painter, Titian ; why does not his Holiness invite
him to Rome?”

“‘ He has done so, but Titian prefers remaining
in Venice.”

“'Then there was Leonardo da Vinci, who died
last year, did not he please Pope Leo?”

‘* No; his Holiness invited him to court, but was
annoyed by his dilatory habits in executing the
works intrusted to him; and Leonardo, taking
offence at some slight on the part of the Pontiff, left
72 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

him, to enter the service of King Francis IL. When
here, Leonardo used to pass many an hour with
Raphael, whilst he was engaged on the frescoes of
the Vatican; he ever treating the venerable old
man with respect and deference.”

«¢ Ah, there was no one like Raphael! I loved
him most, father, for painting so many beautiful
pictures from the Bible. How sad it was he should
die when he was only thirty-seven !”

“Tt was; and yet, Octavio, how much he per-
formed during his short life! a life of incessant and
persevering study. He has left behind him some
hundreds of pictures and drawings, to immortalize
his name. They are chiefly on sacred subjects, for
in those his pure and pensive mind delighted ; and
surely never were such portrayed, so beautifully,
so poetically, and so intelligibly, as by Raphael.
Besides his grand compositions from the Bible, he
has painted no less than one hundred and twenty
pictures of the Madonna—all varied, and all exqui-
sitely beautiful.”

‘‘ And the painting we saw suspended over his
dead body, as it lay on the bed of state, was his
last! the Transfiguration—oh, father! what a glori-
ous picture it is! but he did not live to finish it.”
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 73

“ Alas! no. ‘The task of completing his un-
finished works he has bequeathed to his two favour-
ite pupils, Giulio Romano and Francisco Penni.
Romano imitates his master’s manner so success-
fully, that it is sometimes difficult to distinguish
the difference of hand. He has copied his portrait
of Pope Julius IT. most admirably. One can
hardly look at it without fear.* Penni, who was
much beloved by Raphael, assisted him greatly in
preparing his cartoons.”’

“ Oh, those famous cartoons! do you remember
how every one rejoiced last year, when the tapes-
tries worked from them were first exhibited, and
what wonder and applause they excited in the city?
Bianca and I stood for a whole hour, looking at
‘The Death of Ananias.” And then my mother
gave us a feast in honour of the day! How happy
we all were! and how many times we wished Ra-
phael health and joy! And when we took that
splendid bouquet of flowers to his house in the
evening, how kindly he spoke to us! The good
and gentle Raphael! Where are the cartoons
themselves, father ?”’

“In Flanders. You know they were sent to

* This portrait 1s now in our National Gallery.
74 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

Arras, to be copied in tapestry work for the walls
of the Sistine Chapel.”

‘“‘ | wonder such a patron of the fine arts as Leo
X. allows them to remain there; for surely the
cartoons must be more precious than the tapestry,
beautiful as it is?”

“* Most true, Octavio; yet these rich tapestries
cost Pope Leo 50,000 golden ducats, while Raphael
received for his incomparable cartoons but 434.” *

“ Tt is pleasing to think how all the great paint-
ers loved Raphael.”

“ All, with the exception of Michael Angelo,
who looked upon him as his rival. The amiable
and talented Il Francia, though thirty-four years
older than Raphael, was much attached to him,
and styled him ‘the painter above all painters.’
A few years since our great artist sent his famous
picture of St. Cecilia to Bologna, for the church in
that city. In a letter full of affection he recom-
mended his picture to the care of his friend Francia,
entreating him to be present when the case was
opened, to repair any injury it might have sus-
tained on the journey, and modestly begging that
he would correct what appeared to him faulty in

* Seven of these famous cartoons are in Hampton Court.
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. 75

the execution ; concluding his letter thus :—‘ Con-
tinue to love me, as I love you, with all my heart.’
When the case was opened, and Francia beheld
this masterpiece of the great Raphael, he burst
into transports of admiration and delight, exclaim-
ing, ‘Correct! this far exceeds all I ever even
attempted!’ ”’

Some years after this, the famous Correggio
visited Bologna, where he saw Raphael’s St. Ce-
cilia; after contemplating it for some time with
deep admiration, he turned away, exclaiming,
** And I, too, am a painter!”

“And the poet Ariosto and Fra Bartolomeo
were his intimate friends, were they not ?”’

“Yes; Raphael and Fra Bartolomeo, when
young, mutually instructed each other, Raphael
imitating his friend in the softer blending of his
colours, and in return teaching Bartolomeo perspec-
tive. Modesty was one great charm in Raphael’s
character: superior as he was, he was not too
proud to learn. Some time since, Fra Bartolomeo
having so often heard of the great_works of his
friend, and of Michael Angelo, in this city, could
no longer refrain from seeing their wonderful pro-
ductions, What he beheld in the Vatican and the
76 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

Sistine Chapel so infinitely surpassed all his pre-
vious conceptions, that he was quite overwhelmed
with astonishment and admiration. There was no
envy in his gentle mind, but from that day he could
paint no more! His energy was gone; and he re-
turned to Florence, leaving two unfinished pictures
here, which the generous and kind-hearted Raphael
undertook, in the midst of all his numerous works,
to finish for him.”

“TI suppose Fra Bartolomeo was quite discou-
raged,” said Octavio ; “ did he ever paint again ?”

“Yes, he roused himself; and his finest works
date from his visit to Rome.”

‘“‘ Pope Leo has been very fortunate, I think, in
bringing so many great men into his capital.”

“ Francis I. wished to attract Raphael to his
court, but not succeeding, he desired to have a
picture by his hand. The artist sent him a mag-
nificent one, which so pleased the king that he
rewarded him munificently, expressing his satisfac-
tion in a royal and graceful fashion. Raphael,
considering himself overpaid—and with a heart
generous and liberal as Francis himself—made the
monarch a present of his famous picture of the Holy
Family, adding also another, in compliment to
THE POPE AND THE PAINTER. th

Margaret, the king’s favourite sister. When the
pictures were placed before the royal Francis, he
was perfectly delighted ;—‘ Count me out 3,000/.
for the incomparable Raphael,’ he exclaimed to his
treasurer, ‘and send it to him, with the strongest
expressions of our approbation. He deserves to be
crowned as prince of painters,—But see, here
comes the little Bianca; run to meet her, my boy,
and help her to gather flowers for her nosegay.”

The father of Michael Angelo had no reason to
fear his son’s disgracing their once noble -family.
The acknowledged worth and genius of that-son,—
his wide-spread fame and unblemished integrity,—
combined with the haughty reserve of his deport-
ment to invest him with a sort of princely dignity.
Men vied with each other in doing him honour;
the nobles of the land stood uncovered in his
presence. The popes Julius IT., Leo X., Clement
VIL., Paul ITT., Julius II., Pius [V., and Pius V.
alike esteemed him, and gladly availed themselves
of his talents in ornamenting their capital city. It
is said, that when he waited on Pope Julius III.
the pontiff rose at his approach, and seated him
on his right hand; and whilst proud prelates and
78 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

cardinals, and lordly ambassadors, stood round at
humble distance, he conversed with Michael Angelo
as equal with equal.

This great man died in the eighty-ninth year of
his age. His energy and perseverance never for-
sook him, and his mind was strong and clear to
the last.


89
No. II

THE DUKES OF MILAN.

THE history of the Sforza family is a remarkable
one. Jacopo Attendolo, the first of the name, was
born of humble parents, about the middle of the
fourteenth century. He forsook in early youth his
occupation of a labourer, to enlist in one of those
companies of adventurers which were then nu-
merous in Italy, and which served for hire the petty
princes and republics of that age. Jacopo, having
displayed great courage and perseverance, acquired
a considerable reputation in the turbulent band,
and after servmg under various “ condottieri,” or
leaders, attached himself to Alberico da Barbiano.
This was a captain of high birth and noble views.
Italy was at that time much troubled with foreign
80 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

mercenaries, who plundered the towns, killed the
citizens, and committed all manner of outrages.
Alberico aspired to the glory of delivering his
country from the oppression of these men. Raising
a force of 12,000 soldiers, all natives of Italy, and
supported by Visconti, Lord of Milan, the Floren-
tines, and the people of Bologna, he marched to
meet the foreign troops, and after a desperate
combat utterly defeated them. Jacopo Attendolo,
who, by his bravery, contributed greatly to the
victory, received from Alberico the surname of
“* Sforza,” by which name, and by no other,
he and his descendants have become known in
history.

After being engaged in many battles, receiving
various honours, and displaying much valour, the
restless career of this brave but illiterate soldier
terminated. He litile thought that the name
which he had acquired with honour on the battle-
field, would eventually become that of a sovereign
dynasty.

Francesco Sforza, son of Jacopo, learnt the art of
war under his father. He received from Joanna,
Queen of Naples, the title of Count, and several
domains in her kingdom. Thinking he had been
THE DUKES OF MILAN. $1

badly treated by Visconti, Duke of Milan, he led
his troops against him; when the Duke, in alarm
at his repeated victories, at length offered him the
hand of his only daughter, Bianca, with the city
and territory of Cremona as a dowry. This well
pleased the ambitious Sforza; peace was concluded,
and the marriage solemnized. But the death of
the Duke, his father-in-law, opened a new field to
his ambition, and he now aspired to the sovereignty
of the duchy of Milan. The people of Milan, con-
sidering the Visconti dynasty as extinct, proclaimed
the Republic. But Sforza, with the aid of the
Venetians, besieged the city, and, reduced by
famine and distracted by anarchy, it at length
opened its gates to the conqueror, who was then
solemnly proclaimed Duke of Milan.

In his new dignity Sforza acted with prudence
and mildness. He governed well, was desirous
to promote peace, and improved and adorned
the city. In his private life he was prudent,
affable, and humane, and he died generally re-
gretted, leaving two sons, Galeazzo and~Ludovico,
the former of whom succeeded him on the ducal
throne.

But thrones won by violence and injustice

G
82 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

seldom bring peace to their possessors, and such
was the case with the Sforza family.

Milan, the capital of Lombardy, and the third
city of Italy, ranking next to Naples and Rome
in population and importance, stands in the midst
of a vast plain at the foot of the Alps. It is a
magnificent city; its chief glory being its duomo,
or cathedral. This most beautiful edifice, built
entirely of white marble, has a truly dazzling
effect. Its snowy pinnacles with their delicate
tracery, and its three thousand statues equally
white, which adorn the exterior, rising towards
the bright blue sky, look like some exquisite piece
of sculpture executed in molten silver. From the
top of the duomo there is a magnificent and ex-
tensive view of the fertile plains of Lombardy, and
of the chain of Alps which borders it in the form
of a crescent on the north side. The rich and
glowing plains stretching out like a vast garden,
the blue mountains, the lakes, and the extraordinary
beauty and fertility of the country, render Milan
one of the most attractive cities in Italy.

It was in the winter of the year 1476, when
Galeazzo Sforza reigned in Milan, that, on the day
THE DUKES OF MILAN. 83

after Christmas Day, a family party had assembled
to celebrate the joyous season, in one of the best
houses in the city. This was the comfortable
dwelling of the rich citizen Trivulsio, who, in the
pride and gladness of his heart, had gathered
about him all his children and grandchildren to
share in the good cheer which he had so abundantly
provided for the festive occasion.

A merry group they were—these light-hearted
children of a southern clime,—and yet, occasionally
in the midst of their merriment, a shade would
cross the brow, and a sigh escape the lips, of more
than one of the party. This was especially observ-
able when the conversation fell upon public affairs;
there was then a constraint and a gloom over all,
which it took some minutes to dispel.

At such moments each young wife would look
with tender solicitude towards her husband and
children, as if she feared she knew not what;
while on the countenances of the young men
might be seen an expression of stern resolve
mingled with fiercer passions.

“Tt is a sad state of things, truly,” observed
Trivulsio, on one of these occasions, “neither our
persons nor property are safe now. How different
84 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

was it in the time of the good Duke Fran-
cesco!”’

‘Tt may be worse yet,” replied Antonio, gloomily ;
“he is becoming more tyrannical and cruel every
day. Innocence itself is no safeguard. Only this
morning he gave orders for the execution of my
neighbour Guizo’s eldest son. As fine a lad as
ever you saw, and as innocent of treason as that
babe. It is hard to bear.”

“And why do we bear it?’ indignantly ex-
claimed the handsome young Giulio, with flashing
eyes. “ Why are we thus to stand in daily fear
of losing all we hold dearest in life? We have
bold hearts and sharp steel ; who is the usurper’s
son that we should tamely submit to such oppres-
sion ?”

“ Silence, Giulio!” said his father, sternly.
“How often must I bid you beware of your words,
rash boy? The Duke Francesco ruled us well,
and I will hear no talk of resistance to his son’s
authority. He is a bad man, but we are not to
eall him to account for his crimes, nor is mine the
house in which treasonable language shall be used.
No good ever comes of conspiring against our
rulers.”
THE DUKES OF MILAN. 85

“ T think his behaviour to his mother, the good
Lady Bianca, the worst part of his conduct,” said
Antonio’s wife, Teresa. “I cannot forgive him
such ingratitude to such a mother.”

“ What did he do?” asked little Rosina of her
parent.

“ He made her life so wretched that she retired
to Marignano, where after a short illness she died,
it is said, of poison. Oh! no blessing can attend
a son who fails in his duty to his mother!”

“ Tf we only had such a government as they
have in Florence!” said Giulio. “ Such a chief
as Lorenzo de Medici!”

“ Ah! he is much beloved, and deservedly so,”
replied Trivulsio. ‘“ It were well had the Duke
taken a lesson from him during his visit to
Florence; but I imagine he thought more of as-
tonishing the Florentines by his show and luxury,
than of gaining any good to himself by the example
of Lorenzo.

* Does Ludovico, Il Moro,* at all resemble his
brother?” asked the young Carlo.

“‘ Nay, he appears to have several good qualities;

* Ludovico Sforza was styled “Il Moro,” or the Moor, on
account of his dark complexion.
86 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

but I fear he is both ambitious and deceitful. But
it is better not to talk of these matters, my children;
too much has been said already. Come, Rosina,
sing to us.”

The child was about to comply, when a loud
knocking was heard at the door, and immediately
after two or three citizens hastily entered the
apartment. They were pale and agitated.

“« Have you heard, Trivulsio,” said one, “‘ have
you heard of this terrible murder ?”

“ Murder! no! what do you mean?”

“ Close by!—in this very street!—the Duke
Sforza has been stabbed on his way to church!”

“ The Duke stabbed! Oh, Pietro!”

“‘ Tt seems to have been the act of a few con-
spirators. Some have been seized. The body i
taken to the palace.”

“ Well, few will mourn for him,” said Giulio.
‘‘ He has brought it on himself.”

“ Ah! it is a fearful deed!” observed Teresa.
“The Duchess Bona! what a blow it will be
to her!”

“JT trust the murderers will be taken,” said
Trivulsio; “ such a crime is a disgrace to Milan.”

‘Who will be our duke now?” asked Carlo.
THE DUKES OF MILAN. 87

* Who can tell? His son, Giovanni Galeazze,
is but a child. We must have a regency. These
are troublous times, Pietro. I cannot be thank-
ful enough that none of my family had a hand
in so foul a deed. Be assured it will not go un-
punished.”

It did not. All the conspirators were taken and
put to death. The infant Giovanni Galeazzo
Sforza was proclaimed Duke of Milan, under the
guardianship of his mother, Bona of Savoy, who
was made regent. But not-a long time elapsed
before the ambitious Ludovico stepped forward, took
possession of the regency, arrested the Duchess
Bona, and put her faithful minister, Simonetta, to
death. Ludovico Sforza was a man whose character
stood pre-eminent, even in that age, when such
qualities were but too common, for perfidy, in-
gratitude, and cruelty. He scrupled at little to
serve his own ambitious purposes, and not content
with obtaining the regency, aimed at still higher
power. But ‘his character, bad as it was, had in
it some redeeming points. He was generous, fond
of the arts and learned men, and a friend to
Bramante and Leonardo da Vinci. He instituted
88 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

public schools, patronised distinguised scholars,
founded chairs of Greek, geometry, and astronomy,
and greatly embellished Milan. Still all this could
not counterbalance the crimes to which his ambi-
tion led him.

One of Ludovico Sforza’s favourite places of
resort was the studio of the celebrated Leonardo da
Vinci, whom he had invited to Milan. The natural
gifts of this great artist—“ the most. accomplished
man of that accomplished age,”—and the variety
of knowledge he had acquired, were perfectly
astonishing. Ardent and successful in the study
of painting, sculpture, botany, natural history,
chemistry, anatomy, architecture, music, philosophy,
engineering, and fortification, he was yet the
greatest mathematician and most ingenious me-
chanic of his time! To these rare endowments
was added that of a remarkably handsome person,
@ winning address, and much wit and eloquence.
His dress was always costly, his manners refined,
and. his conversation varied and interesting. Ludo-
vico greatly delighted in the society of this talented
man, and during the seventeen years of his resi-
dence in Milan, ever treated him with esteem and
affection.
THE DUKES OF MILAN. 89

Leonardo was employed on various works for his
patron ;—one of these, the canal of the Martesana,
would alone have been sufficient to immortalize
him. His wonderful and sublime painting, The
Last Supper, we have already spoken of. It
occupied him two years, and was by far the grandest
picture which, up to that time, had appeared in
Italy.* Ludovico had invited him to Milan to
execute an equestrian colossal statue of his ancestor
Francesco Sforza, but the artist never finished more
than the model in clay, which was considered a
master-piece. Some years afterwards, when Milan
was invaded by the French, this was used as a
target by the Gascon bowmen, and totally de-
stroyed.

“And when did you first become a painter,
Leonardo?” said Ludovico Sforza, one day, as he
stood watching the artist at his work.

“‘T do not remember the time when the pencil
was not a delight to me,” replied Leonardo. “My
favourite pursuit as a child was the art of design
in all its branches; and my good father, seeing

* The genuine works of Leonardo da Vinci are exceedingly

rare. Most of the pictures now attributed to him were wholly,
or in part, painted by his scholars and imitators.
90 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

my inclination, sent me to study under Andrea
Verrocchio.”

‘“‘ Ah! an excellent and correct designer, but
not a good colourist. JI have heard that when
engaged on that painting, the Baptism of the
Saviour, he employed thee to execute one of the
angels ; and that it so infinitely surpassed all the
rest of the picture, that he threw away his palette,
enraged, it is said, that a child should excel him.*
Was it not so?”

* Verrocchio was famed as a sculptor and chaser
in metal, your excellency,” replied Leonardo,
modestly; ‘“‘to painting he was not so partial,
consequently not so successful in the art.”

*‘ Leonardo,” said Sforza, after a pause, ‘‘ what
induced thee to paint that horrible thing, the
Rotello del Fico?t I gave three hundred golden
ducats for it; yet can I never look on it without
shuddering.”

The artist smiled. ‘A peasant on my father’s
estate,” he said, “ one day brought him a circular
piece of wood, cut horizontally from the trunk of a
very large old fig-tree, which had been lately felled,

* This picture is preserved in the Academy at Florence.
+ Rotello means a shield ; Fico, a fig-tree.
THE DUKES OF MILAN. 91

and begged to have something painted on it as
an ornament for his cottage. The man being an
especial favourite, my father desired me to gratify
his request; and, inspixed by some wild fancy, I
took the panel to my own room, resolved, if pos-
sible, te astonish my worthy parent. I determined
to compose something which should have an effect
similar to that of the: Medusa, and almost petrify
beholders. Accordingly, I collected together from
the neighbouring swamps and the river-mud all
kinds of hideous reptiles, as adders, lizards, toads,
serpents, &c., and out of these I compounded the
monster with flaming eyes, represented on the
shield. When finished, and I led my father into
the room in which it was placed, his terror and
horror proved the success of my attempt.”

“ It is, indeed, wonderfully horrible! what could
induce thee, Leonardo, to depict so fearful an
object ?”

“‘ A whim, I suppose, your excellency, and the
desire of surprising my father. We artists take
strange fancies sometimes.”

“ But the peasant ? what said he to the Rotello ?”

“He never saw it. My father sold it secretly
to a merchant, who brought it to Milan; and the
92 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

poor peasant was presented with a wooden shield,
on which was painted a heart transfixed by a dart
—a device better suited to his taste and compre-
hension.”

“ T doubt it not. But, Da Vinci, never again
employ thy talents on the horrible. Depend upon
it, ere long, the Rotello will perish; while such a
work as that on which thou art engaged, in the
church of Santa Maria, will immortalise thy name.*
A mind like thine, with such a sense of the beau-
tiful and the graceful, should depict nought else.
But why dost thou lay down thy brush?”

‘“‘T am not satisfied with my work, your excel-
lency.”’

“Thou never art, man. That is one of thy
failings, Leonardo, that thou dost begin many
things, and finish few. How is this ?”

“IT know not, unless it be that I can seldom
realize my own conceptions, and therefore am dis-
satisfied.”

“ And yet thy industry is great. Thou wert
busily engaged in writing, a while ago. May I
ask what subject occupied thy pen?”

* In the subsequent troubles of Milan, the Rotello was de-
stroyed, as an object of horror.
THE DUKES OF MILAN. 93

“That of engineering, your excellency. I have
discovered a method of making bridges, extremely
light and portable, both for the pursuit of, and the
retreat from, an enemy; and others that shall be
very strong and fire-proof, easy to fix and to take
up again. I can also construct covered waggons,
which shall be proof against any force, and, entering
into the midst of the enemy, will break any number
of men, and make way for the infantry to follow
without hurt or impediment.”

“ Sayest thou so? why, what a myriad-minded
man thou art, Da Vinci! Let us see thy treatise:
ere long thy help may be needed in such matters.”

The valuable and numerous manuscripts of
Leonardo da Vinci are still preserved in Milan.
They are on various subjects, but particularly diffi-
cult to read or decipher, as the artist had a habit of
writing from right to left, instead of from left to
right. It is said that when they were shown to
Napoleon, on his visit to Milan in 1797, he carried
them and Petrarch’s “ Virgil ” to his hotel himself,
not allowing any one to touch them, exclaiming with
delight, ‘“‘' They are mine! they are mine!” King
James I., of England, made an offer of 10,0002.
for these manuscripts, but it was declined.
94 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

The young Duke Giovanni Galeazzo was now
grown up, and had married the grand-daughter of
Ferdinand, King of Naples. But instead of taking
peaceable possession of the ducal throne of Milan,
he was prevented doing so by the intrigues and
artifices of his uncle, Ludovico. One crime leads
to another. He who had usurped the regency,
now aspired to sovereign power, and basely and
treacherously meditated the destruction of his
nephew, that he might get possession of the duchy
for himself. This, however, he did not openly
dare to do, fearing the vengeance of King Fer-
dinand; but he would allow Galeazzo no share
in the government, and confined him and his wife
to their own apartments. Ferdinand,-indignant
with his conduct, remonstrated and threatened,
and Ludovico, to avoid the storm, and give the
old king something else to think of, in an evil
hour for himself invited and encouraged Charles
the Eighth, of France, to undertake the conquest of
the kingdom of Naples. He willingly agreed;
and this was the origin of all the wars and
calamities of Italy in the sixteenth century, with
the total loss of her political independence.
THE DUKES OF MILAN. 95

it was a sad day for Italy when the French
armies landed on her shores, and ere long Ludovico
Sforza bitterly repented his rash invitation. He
went to meet King Charles, and stayed with him
till he was assured of the success of a dose of
poison, which he had a short time before found the
means of giving to his unfortunate nephew. As
soon as he heard that Galeazzo was dead, he
hastened back to Milan, and took possession of the
duchy he had so long coveted.

The inhabitants of Milan were much shocked
at the suspicious death of their young duke, who
was only in his twenty-fifth year; nevertheless,
Ludovico Il Moro was peacefully proclaimed. But
the French nobles loudly condemned such base
and treacherous conduct, and urged their king to
proceed immediately to Milan, and avenge his
cousin’s death; for Charles and Galeazzo were
sister’s children. ‘The monarch, however, refused
to comply with their request.

“* My whole mind,” he said, “is set on con-
quering Naples, and I am not to be turned aside,
even to punish a usurper.”

Accordingly he proceeded on his march, wherever
96 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

he went proclaiming himself“ the friend of freedom,
and the enemy of tyrants.” Every gate was opened
to him as he passed on, while Florence and Rome
received him in triumph. He took possession of
Naples, and-was welcomed by the inhabitants as
their deliverer from oppression. With the ex-
ception of three, every city in the Neapolitan
dominions submitted to him; and he achieved this
great conquest without striking a single blow!

But the princes of Italy soon began to recover
from the panic into which they had been thrown
by the inruption of the foreigners. The Neapo-
litans, too, finding their new masters worse than
their old ones, and weary of their insolence, rapa-
city, and oppression, longed to see them depart.
So the Pope, the Venetians, and Ludovico Sforza,
who no longer needed their help, entered into a
confederacy together, and ere long drove the French
out of Italy. But the path once found, could be
traversed again.

And now that Ludovico Il Moro was, as he
imagined, securely seated on the ducal throne of
Milan, perhaps you may think he was a happy man ?
Far from it. Itwas now his troubles began.
THE DUKES OF MILAN. 97

Amongst the nobles who had accompanied King
Charles to Italy, was the Duke of Orleans. He
saw the fair duchy of Milan, and immediately raised
some hereditary claims to it. Ludovico now per-
ceived the danger to which he had exposed himself
by soliciting foreign aid. With some difficulty he
repulsed his rival; but the fertile plains of Lom-
bardy were too goodly a prize to be forgotten.

When, by the death of Charles, the Duke of
Orleans became king of France, as Louis XII., he
sent an army to the conquest of Milan. The
Venetians and the Pope joined the French; Sforza
was obliged to yield to the storm, and took refuge
in Germany.

“So we have a new ruler, now,” said Trivulsio,
one day, in the summer of 1499; “TI find the king
of France is about to enter our city in his ducal
robes, as lord of Milan.”

“ Yes,” replied Giulio, “he soon crossed the
Alps when he heard of his general’s success. It
was an easy conquest. I wonder if he has really
any claim to the duchy.”

“{ know not. It is certain, however, that
Ludovico il Moro had none.”

H
98 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY

“No. He did not long enjoy his usurped
dignity, father.”

‘Ah! my son. Honours obtained by unfair,
means cannot be depended on. They bring neither
security nor peace.”

“‘ But yet,” said Giulio, after a pause, “I would
the duke were back again. The thought of being
governed by these foreigners is unendurable.”’

“‘ They are certainly not the rulers for Milan ;
and if they treat us as they did the Neapolitans, it
is my opinion they will not long continue so,”
replied Trivulsio.

After a sojourn of three weeks in the city, King
Louis returned to France, thinking he had arranged
affairs very satisfactorily. The French, however,
soon made themselves as much disliked in Lom-
bardy as they had been in Naples; and, disgusted
with their tyranny and oppression, the Milanese
revolted. ‘They were driven away, and Ludovico
Sforza once more entered his capital.

But it was not to enjoy peace. Louis sent fresh
forces into Italy, and Ludovico was not only de-
feated, but taken prisoner. His restless ambition,
which had led him into the commission of so many
THE DUKES OF MILAN. 99

crimes, was now visited with a heavy punishment.
For the remainder of his life he was kept a close
captive in the solitary castle of Loches, in France.

But the evil of what he had done did not end
here. The possession of the duchy of Milan was a
constant source of dispute between Francis I., suc-
cessor to Louis, and his great rival, Charles V.
After many years of war in Italy between the
French, Germans, and Spaniards, Lombardy fell
into the hands of Austria, and the House of Sforza
became extinct.
No. IV.
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA.

+> ——

OnE of the finest cities in the world is Genoa
the Superb. Built in the form of a crescent, over-
looking the beautiful bay, with sumptuous marble
palaces, churches, and convents rising one above
another on the steep hill-side, the whole crowned
with formidable ramparts, and the bold range of
the Apennines in the back-ground, its appearance
from the sea is truly magnificent. The splendid
edifices, the terraces, the balconies of white marble,
planted with orange and lemon-trees—a realization
of hanging gardens—which adorn this far-famed
city, render it well worthy of admiration; and when
we think of its former power—of its numerous and
wealthy possessions, of its celebrated naval force,
and of its having been the birth-place of Chris-




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THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 101

topher Columbus—we cannot survey it without
feelings of the deepest interest.

Amongst the many marble palaces which add
beauty to this beautiful city, is one, for grandeur
and extent, the most magnificent edifice on the
Bay of Genoa.

“ O’er the sea
Delicious gardens hung; green galleries,
And marble terraces in many a flight,
And fairy arches flung from cliff to cliff,
*Wildering, enchanting; and above them all
A. palace ;”
a fit residence for the first sovereign in Europe.

Its marble staircases, splendid saloons, and spa~
cious galleries, all adorned with the richest tapes-
tries, beautiful statuary, and valuable paintings—
its balconies, opening on to the terraced gardens,
where bloom in rich luxuriance the orange, the
myrtle, and the oleander—its sparkling fountains
and shady grottos, washed by the deep blue sea,
and canopied by the deep blue sky—all denote it
to have been in former times the abode of one
raised above his fellow-men. It was so. A single
line under the windows of the palace states that its
illustrious founder had been Admiral of Pope
Clement VII, of the Emperor Charles V, of King
102 SHORT STORIES FROM EURUPEAN HISTORY.

Francis I, and of his own country—an extraordi-
nary and justly celebrated man, whose alliance was
sought by the greatest princes of the age, and who
was in himself almost a power. It was the resi-
dence of the true and brave Andrea Doria, one of
the greatest characters that Italy produced during
the middle ages, and one whom it is the boast of
Genoa to have justly appreciated.

Noble, patriotic Andrea Doria! well may Genoa
be proud of thee and love thy name !

“ Thine was 2 glorious course!’

One summer’s evening in the year 1528, the
inhabitants of Genoa were seen hurrying down to
the port, with countenances expressive of mingled
joy, fear, and curiosity. Some galleys were enters
ing the bay in the distance, and on them every
eye was fixed in suspense. To know under whose
flag they sailed, and for what purpose they were
approaching Genoa, was the anxious desire of each,
one present; for this was a time of war, and none
knew how soon their fair city might be involved
in its horrors, and become the prey of the con-
queror. The suspense, however, did not continue
long; an old weather-beaten sailor, who, shading
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 103

his eyes with his hand, had regarded the vessels
attentively for a few minutes, at length exclaimed
with a satisfied air, “ They are the Admiral’s gal-
leys returning from Naples!”

“ Are you sure of it, Mattea?”’ anxiously
inquired the bystanders.

“ Am I sure of it?” replied the old sailor,
“who knows them better than I do? Methinks
I have served too many years under our brave
old admiral to be mistaken in his galleys; and
see! there is the flag of victory! another conquest,
brothers! fresh glory to Andrea Doria, and to the
Republic of Genoa!”

“It is so indeed!” exclaimed the delighted
people, as the vessels rapidly approached; “ they
come from Naples, and come triumphant! All
honour to the Admiral and to his gallant nephew!”

“ What is it, papa? why do the people shout
so?” asked a little boy, who, holding his father’s
lrand, looked on in childish wonder.

“ ‘These are some of the galleys the admiral sent
out under the command of his nephew, Filippino,
to assist King Francis against Charles V. The
French are besieging Naples, and it appears that
we have gained a victory for them.”
104 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“ ‘Then I must shout too!” exclaimed the boy,
waving his little cap in the air, and adding his
voice to the general acclamations of ‘“‘ Long life to
the Admiral! health to the King of France, and
prosperity to the Republic of Genoa!”

‘“¢ Papa,” said the little Genoese, when he was
tired of shouting, “ the king of France must feel
very grateful to our good admiral for fighting his
battles for him; does he not?”

‘“‘ He does. It is not every monarch who can
command the services of one brave, wise, and skil-
ful as Andrea Doria. King Francis courteously
and earnestly entreated the admiral’s valuable
assistance, and for many years he has now been
a conqueror in the service of France, covered with
glory, and enriched by the sovereign. He is a
great man, Alberto, and a true patriot. Much ser-
vice has he rendered us by ridding the seas of those
pirates which caused so great alarm. The sea
robbers tremble at the name of Andrea Doria.”

‘| hope so, I hope so,”’ exclaimed a voice behind
them, and looking round, Alberto and his father
perceived the admiral himself. He was a fine look-
ing man, about fifty years of age: weather-beaten,
for from early life the sea had been his home,— but
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 105

with a frank, good-humoured, and intelligent ex-
pression of countenance, that bespoke at once the
true sailor, and the brave and skilful commander.

“Yon galleys bring us good tidings, Maratti,”
he said, as he laid his hand on Alberto’s curly
head; “my brave Filippino has again humbled
the proud Spaniard. Bless the lad! he has a fine
spirit, and a noble heart.”

Before Maratti could reply, there was a renewed
shout of “‘ Long life to the Admiral!” for the peo-
ple, catching sight of the brave officer, whom all
loved, showed by their hearty acclamations how
truly they rejoiced in his success.

And louder still became the “ Vivas,” and
brighter yet the joyful faces of the animated
group,.as the galleys approached nearer; and
when from the lips of the sailors was heard the
announcement ‘“ Victory! Great victory over the
Spaniards!” one long loud burst of gratulation
welcomed them home.

In a very few minutes a young officer had
sprung on shore, and approached Doria with re-
spectful deference.

“I bear you greetings from the lieutenant, noble
Signor,” he said, saluting the admiral; “ he desires
106 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

me to acquaint you that he has been fortunate
enough to gain an important victory over the
Spaniards off Naples. The Spanish viceroy has
been killed, most of his fleet destroyed, and many
officers of distinction, amongst whom is the Mar-
quis del Guasto, taken prisoners. They are now
on board these galleys, sent to you by our brave
commander as trophies of his victory, and testi-
monies of his respect.”

“My gallant boy!” exclaimed the admiral,
while something like a tear glittered in his eye,
* he has done well indeed! This is a blow from
which the Emperor will not soon recover. Thanks
for your tidings, brave Veletti; you have earned
promotion, I see, or my nephew would not have
entrusted one so young with so important a charge.
Come to my house, and inform me of particulars.
Come, Maratti, let us hear how bravely our men
bore them in the fight.”

That evening Andrea Doria and his friend
Maratti, who had served under him for many
years, were seated in one of the shady grottoes
which commanded a view of the beautiful Bay of
Genoa. Little Alberto was playing near them;
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAT OF GENOA. 107

he was a great favourite with the kind-hearted
admiral, who had many a stirring tale to tell of
bold sea-fights and perilous adventure, The air
was fragrant with the perfume of the orange and
lemon-trees, the flowers bloomed im rich profusion
around, and the clear bright moon was shedding
her light on the deep blue waters of the bay.
Doria’s eyes rested on the galleys anchored near
the shore.

“Yes; it is an important victory for King
Francis,” he observed; “ I trust he will now have
the grace to attend to my remonstrances. He has
too long been regardless of them.”

“‘ Has he then given you no reply to your last
appeal?” asked Maratti in surprise.

“ He has not. I have served King Francis,
Maratti, to the utmost of my power, and would
gladly serve him still, but I must have justice. He
placed a garrison in this city on condition of re-
specting the liberties of the inhabitants; and how
has he kept his promise? In various ways our
people have been oppressed and tyrannized over,
and I have remonstrated and complained in vain.
My appointments are not paid, and my advice, even
in naval affairs, often slighted. But what touches
me most, for it concerns the honour and interest
108 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

of my country, is this fortification of Savona by the
French. They have already removed thither some
branches of the trade carried on in Genoa, and
plainly show that it is their intention to render that
town our rival in wealth and commerce. This is
not to be borne. I am a plain sailor, unused to
flattery, and unaccustomed to courts; but at the
same time I am a free and independent citizen
of the republic of Genoa, and while I live Genoa
shall have justice.”

“‘ King Francis surely cannot be aware of the
conduct of his agents,” replied Maratti: “ he is a
generous and noble prince, and not only entertains
@ just sense of your valuable services, but has also
a high esteem for your character.”

‘‘ That is more than I shall have for his if he act
thus towards us,” observed Andrea Doria; “ but
it may be as you say, that he is unacquainted
with all our grievances. He is so surrounded with
courtiers, who think nothing of telling falsehoods
to gain their own ends, that the real truth may not
have reached him. Could I but get speech of the
royal Francis for one half-hour, he should soon
hear it from me.”

“ [do not doubt it, admiral. Meantime, what-
ever the courtiers may say, the king must ever
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 109

gratefully acknowledge the valuable assistance you
have rendered to him and his cause.”

“ He must acknowledge that from the time I
entered his service, at his own earnest entreaty,
I have been true and faithful to him. AILI ask is
that he should be the same to me and my country.
Fair promises are not enough, Maratti. So long as
King Francis acts honourably, my services are at
his command, but I will never sit tamely by and
see an insult offered to Genoa.”

There was a’ look of stern displeasure on the
admiral’s brow as he spoke. It soon passed away,
however, when little Alberto, running with childish
eagerness towards him, joyfully placed a tiny boat
in his hands.

“‘ There,” he said, with beaming eyes, “ it is
finished at last! I hope you will like it; I made it
for you, because I love you so much.”

‘** Bless you, my darling!” said the brave old
officer, evidently touched by this proof of the child’s
affection for him, “it is very pretty. And so you
made it all yourself, Alberto?”

““ Yes, all myself, only papa taught me how to
rig the sails. Do you like it?”

“‘ [like it very much, my boy, but I like your
truth and honesty better. Always speak the truth,
110 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

Alberto, and you will do well. Why, if you can
build such a gallant little vessel as this, you will
soon be ready to go to sea with me, and fight for
King Francis.”

“Oh! I shall be so glad when that day comes,”
exclaimed the boy with delight; “do you think
I shall be ready by next month, admiral ?”

“Next month? well, I took my first voyage
when J was no older than you are, dear child; and
a rough trip it was! But I loved the sea from the
first moment I saw it, and for more than fifty years
it has now been my home.”

“« And I love the sea too!” said Alberto, “ the
dashing, sparkling, glorious sea! Oh, I long to
be a sailor! like Christopher Columbus, to discover
new lands, or like you to fight and conquer!”

“‘ Christopher Columbus, when he was a little
boy, had the same desire that you have, Alberto,
as he looked out upon those blue waters. Sit down,
my boy, and I will tell you how it was he won for
himself a name which shall never be forgotten.”

To that gentleness and kindness of heart which
made even little children love him, Andrea Doria
joined a high and determined spirit. The citizen
of a republic, and trained up from his infancy in
the sea-service, he retained the independence
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 111

natural to the former, with the plain liberal man-
ners peculiar to the latter. A stranger to the arts
of submission or flattery necessary in courts, but
conscious at the same time of his own importance,
he always offered his advice to King Francis with
freedom, and often remonstrated with some bold-
ness. The French ministers disliking a man who
treated them so unceremoniously, determined to
deprive him of their master’s favour, and though
Francis himself both esteemed Doria’s character,
and highly valued his services, yet by hearing him
continually represented. as a proud and self-willed
man, more eager to enrich himself than to promote
the interests of France, the monarch’s mind became
gradually filled with suspicion and distrust. From
that time the brave admiral was subjected to many
affronts and indignities. He bore them as well as
he could, but an injury offered to his country trans-
ported him beyond the bounds of patience. Find-
ing that no attention was paid to his remonstrances
concerning Savona, and animated by a patriotic
zeal for the honour and welfare of Genoa, Doria
complained in the highest tone, and even threatened,
if the measure were not instantly abandoned. This
bold action, by the malice of the courtiers placed
112 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

in the worst light before King Francis, irritated
him to such a degree, than in an evil hour he com-
manded one of his admirals to sail directly to
Genoa, arrest Doria, and seize his galleys. It was
conduct unworthy the royal Francis; but the rash
order was given in a moment of petulance, and
bitterly did he afterwards repent it.

Maratti one morning entered the admiral’s apart-
ment in some agitation.

“What is the matter?” asked Doria, “ has any-
thing happened to the boy ? speak!” and he started
up in alarm for the safety of his little favourite.

“ He is well, quite well,” replied Maratti, “ but,
my dear friend, I have just heard some scarcely
credible tidings.”

“ Speak them.”

“ ‘They nearly concern you.”

“© So much the better. If good, they are wel-
eome ; but if bad, as I suspect, 1 would rather they
came to me than to my friends. What have you
heard, Maratti?”

“That the King of France has given secret orders
to Barbesieux to arrest you and seize your galleys !
The admiral is now on his way hither.”
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 113

“ Arrest me!” exclaimed Andrea Doria, in the
greatest astonishment. “ Seize my galleys! do I
hear rightly, Maratti?”

“ Alas! my friend, you do; alas! for kingly
honour! Well may it be said, ‘ Put not your
trust in princes.’ You have enemies at the French
court, who would gladly ruin you, Admiral. They
have misrepresented your words and actions to the
king, and filled his mind with distrust and suspicion.
Fortunately, though his orders were secret, I re-
ceived intelligence of them. You have time to
escape.”

“And so King Francis suspects and distrusts
Andrea Doria!” said the gallant sailor, the proud
blood rising to his cheek; “ it is the last time he
shall do so. Need is there indeed to separate if
matters stand thus. And he listens to the tales
of a few envious courtiers against one who for
years has been as true as steel to him and his!
Well, be it so. Andrea Doria needs not the favour
of Francis of France, and can dispense with friend-
ship so distrustful and uncertain.”

“ It is conduct so unworthy of his right royal
and generous heart, I could scarcely have believed
it,” observed Maratti; “ but he has been prejudiced,

I
114 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

and will discover his mistake before long. Now,
there is no time to lose, admiral; ere morn the
French fleet will anchor in the bay.”

“ They will come on a bootless errand as regards
me and my galleys,” replied Doria, smiling quietly;
-‘ for the present I retire into the Gulf of La Spezia.
Before long they shall hear of me again—perhaps
sooner than they like. Come, Maratti, this is but
another of fortune’s changes.”

When the French fleet, early the next morning,
anchored in the Bay of Genoa, the gallant Doria
and his galleys were beyond the reach of its
power. But the indignation of the Genoese was
very great when they learned the errand on which
it came, and bitterly and loudly they inveighed
against King Francis and ‘all his ministers. That
their brave countryman should be suspected! he
who was a pattern of truthfulness, fidelity, and
honour! it was an insult scarcely to be borne.
They disliked the French more and more, and
earnestly desired to be rid of their yoke.

And Andrea Doria, fired by the unworthy treat-
ment to which he had been subjected, sent for his
nephew, Filippino, to join him with the galleys
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 115

from Naples. Whilst his indignation and resent-
ment were at their height, the Marquis del Guasto,
his prisoner, who had observed and fomented his
growing discontent, determined to lay hold of this
favourable opportunity to induce him to enter the
service of his master, Charles V.

“The King of France has indeed treated you
most unworthily,” he observed one day, as Doria
sat in silence by his side; “you surely will not
remain in his service longer?”

“ He has treated me badly, but my country yet
worse,” replied Doria. “ I see no hope for Genoa
in the present state of things.”

“The Emperor would never have acted thus
towards a faithful ally,” said the Marquis. ‘“‘ There
is hope for your country, brave Doria, if you will
trust him.”

Andrea Doria looked up.

‘« Offer your services to Charles,” continued the
Spaniard, “and you will never have reason to repent
it,—he is a princely master and atrue friend. Aided
by him, you will deliver Genoa from French op-
pression. Let me entreat you, for the sake of your
country, to seek the powerful protection of one able
and willing to serve her.”
116 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

‘And will Charles secure her safety and inde-
pendence, should I do as you desire?” asked
Doria.

“ Be assured he will. You may make your own
terms with him. Let me prevail on you to despatch
an officer to the Imperial court, with your overtures
and demands; the reply will be all you eould
desire.”

“ T will do so!” said the admiral, after a pause
of some minutes, during which he remained in
deep thought; “ France has cast me off by her
unjust treatment. I owe her nothing. But Genoa
must have the powerful protection of one or other
of the rival monarchs, and to the Emperor will
I apply.”

He did so; and Charles with a joyful heart, and
glad smiles, received his proposals. Fully sensible
of the importance of such an acquisitio. as Andrea
Doria, he instantly granted him whatever terms he
required. These were, that Genoa, as soon as it
was freed from the French, should be restored to
its independence under the Imperial protection,
and that no foreign garrison or government should
be admitted into it. At the same time, Doria
engaged to serve the Emperor with twelve galleys,
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 117

fitted out by himself, for which Charles agreed to
pay him 90,000 ducats a-year.

Then, Andrea Doria, taking off the collar of St.
Michael, sent it back with his commission to King
Francis, saying as he saw the messenger depart,
“It is thine own doing, fair king; thou hast cast
from thee one who was thy faithful friend.” And
at once, hoisting the Imperial colours, he sailed with
all his galleys towards Naples, not, as formerly, to
block up the harbour of that unhappy city, but to
bring protection and deliverance to the distressed
and famishing inhabitants. A very short time
afterwards, appearing before Genoa with his
little squadron, he obtained possession of the
city, and after a sharp contest drove the French
away.

It was a proud and happy moment for Andrea
Doria, when his grateful countrymen, with joyful
acclamations, hailed him as their deliverer. He
had attained the object of his highest ambition,—
his earnest desire was fulfilled—he had freed Genoa
from the dominion of foreigners. Noble Andrea
Doria! with thy guileless, simple, manly, trusting
heart; high stands thy name among the patriot
band !
118 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

And now arose a striking scene. The people
forming into a triumphal procession, appeared be-
fore their deliverer’s palace, and while the streets
echoed with the sound of his beloved and honoured
name, a deputation of the richest and noblest
citizens entreated him, in the name of all, to accept
the sovereignty of Genoa. “ You have an un-
doubted right to it, noble Admiral,” they said,
“‘ you have freed our country from oppression, you
have restored to us peace and liberty; now, then,
rule over us and protect us still. The fame of your
former actions, the present glorious success, the
attachment of your friends, the deep gratitude of
your countrymen, and the support of the emperor,
all combine to prove you worthy of the throne of
Genoa. Accept it then from your country, and so
add to our happiness.”

Doria was deeply touched. It was only on the
previous day that Charles himself, struck with the
gallantry of his conduct, had offered to establish
him on the throne of his country. All conspired
in inviting him to lay hold of kingly power.

But with a magnanimity of which there are few
examples, this true patriot sacrificed all thoughts
of self to the virtuous satisfaction of establishing
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 119

liberty in his native land,—the highest object at
which ambition can aim. “ My friends,” said this
disinterested and noble man, addressing the im-
mense crowd assembled in the court before his
palace, “‘the happiness of seeing you once more in
possession of freedom is to me a full reward for all.
my services; and believe me when I say, the name
of citizen is infinitely dearer to Andrea “Doria than
would be that of sovereign. Far be it from me to
claim pre-eminence or power above you, my fellow-
countrymen; 1 am one of you; and to you do I
entirely remit the right of settling what form of
government you would now have established if
Genoa.”

With tears of joy and admiration the people
listened as he spoke. They saw he was sincere in
what he said, and much as they had always loved
the brave and good Andrea Doria, their respect
and affection for him now increased tenfold.
They could not answer him; they did not attempt
to turn him from his high resolve; but they in-
voked blessings on his head; and each went to his
home that day a better man from the influence of
Doria’s virtues and example.

Twelve persons were then appointed to remodel
120 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

the constitution of the Republic. The factions
which had long torn and ruined the state seemed
to be forgotten; prudent precautions were taken to
prevent their reviving, and the form of govern-
ment which since that time has subsisted with
little variation in Genoa, was established amidst
universal applause. Doria lived to a great age,
beloved, respected, and honoured by his counitry-
men; and, without deviating from his simple,
straightforward conduct, or assuming any power
unbecoming a private citizen, he preserved a great
ascendency over the councils of the Republic.
The authority which he possessed was more flatter-
ing, as well as more satisfactory, than that derived
from sovereignty, for it was a dominion founded
in love and gratitude, and upheld, not by the
dread of his power, but by veneration for his
virtues. His memory is still reverenced by the
Genoese, and he is distinguished in their histories
and public monuments by the most honourable of
all appellations—THE FATHER OF HIS COUNTRY
AND THE RESTORER OF ITS LIBERTY.

And not only at home, but abroad, was Andrea
Doria loved and honoured. As admiral of CharlesV.
he highly distinguished himself, gaining victory
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 121

after victory over the Turks and pirates of Barbary.
The emperor set great value on his services, ever
treated him with distinction and respect; and gave
him many marks of friendship and attachment.

In his voyages from one part of his extensive
dominions to another, it was generally Doria’s
galley which conveyed him; and twice the admiral
magnificently entertained him in his palace at
Genoa. On one of these occasions Charles pre-
sented Doria with a favourite dog, saying, ‘‘Keep
Reedan for my sake, Admiral; may-he prove as
faithful a friend to you, as you have been to his
master.”

In the Emperor’s expedition against Tunis, his
Genoese admiral escorted him, and contributed
greatly to the taking of that place. But when
Charles proposed an attack upon Algiers, the
experienced old sailor endeavoured to dissuade
him from it. ‘Do not, I entreat your Majesty,”
he said, “expose your whole armament to such
almost unavoidable destruction. The coast of
Algiers is most dangerous at such an advanced
season of the year as this. Let me implore you
to delay the expedition for a time.”
122 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

‘Why, Doria! this is unlike you,” said Charles
smiling, “ you are not wont to be backward in
such an enterprise as this, nor are you in general
afraid of a few gales. Look at the glorious force
IT command, and say have you the heart to bid me
desist? Here are 20,000 foot and 2,000 horse,
together with 3,000 volunteers, the flower of the
Spanish and Italian nobility, and 1,000 soldiers
from Malta, led on by a hundred of the gallant
knights of St. John, all eager to share in my
glory. My schemes are all well laid, and I have
the most sanguine hopes of success. How then,
I ask, can you bid me desist ?”

“‘On account of the danger I foresee,” answered
the admiral. “The autumnal winds prevail with
such violence at this season on that perilous coast.
I am an old sailor, your Majesty, well acquainted
with the sea in all its moods, and you know I am
no coward; but I confess I have many fears con-
cerning this expedition.”

‘“‘ And I have none,” replied the emperor. “So,
good Doria, we embark on board your galleys at
Porto Venere, in the course of two or three weeks.
You will be in readiness ?”

‘“‘T will,” said the brave admiral; “since your
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 123

Majesty is determined on going, Andrea Doria is
not one to stay behind.”

The emperor and his forces embarked, and,
alas! the admiral’s predictions proved too true!

“One night, ’twas im November,
A must arose on high,
Not the oldest could remember,
Such a dense and darken’d sky.

“‘There was no wind to move them,

So the sails were furl’d and fast,

And the gallant flag above them
Dropp’d down upon the mast.

All was still as if death’s shadow
Were resting on the grave;

And the sea, like some dark meadow,
Had not one rippling wave,

“When the sky was rent asunder

With a flood of crimson light,

And one single burst of thunder
Aroused the silent night

"T'was the signal for their waking
The angry winds arose,

Like giant captives breaking
The chain of forced repose.

* Lake old oak of the forest
Down comes the thundering mast;
Her need is at the sorest—
She shudders in the blast.
124 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

Hark ! to that low quick gushing,
The hold has sprung a leak ,
On their prey the waves are rushing,
The valiant one grows weak.
“One cry, and all is quiet;
There is nor sight nor sound,
Save the fierce gale at its riot,
And the angry waters round.
The morn may come with weeping,
And the storm may cease to blow,
But the gallant ship is sleeping
A thousand fathoms low.”

And such was the fate of many ships in that
most unfortunate expedition !

“T have weathered not a few storms during my
life, but never have I seen one equal to that in
fierceness and horror,” said the old admiral to his
young friend Alberto, now grown a fine boy and a
brave sailor. ‘The sea rose mountains high, the
wind blew with terrific violence, the ships all torn
from their anchors were dashing, some against each
other, some on the rocks; some ran ashore, and
many sank. In less than an hour, Alberto, fifteen
ships of war, and 140 transports, with 8,000 men,

perished in the deep waters!”

‘“ Oh! what a dreadful scene! ”
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 125

“ Aye; and such of the unhappy crews as
escaped the fury of the sea, were murdered without
mercy by the Arabs as soon as they reached land.
All the vast stores of ammunition and food which
the Emperor had provided, were alike swallowed
up by the greedy waves. May I never again
behold such a fearful sight!”

«¢ And the Emperor,—where was he ?”

“Qn shore with the army. The rage of the
tempest was such, that the soldiers were obliged
to thrust their spears into the ground, and support
themselves by them to prevent falling. The
ground was so wet they could not lie down, and at
every step they sank up to their ankles in mud.
Dispirited and benumbed with cold, their matches
extinguished and their powder wet, so that their
muskets were useless, they were in ill condition to
meet the enemy, and were soon thrown into con-
fusion. ‘The presence of the Emperor fortunately
restored order, and saved his army from utter
destruction.”

“ But what must have been his feelings when
day broke, and, casting his eyes on the waters, he
saw all hopes of success for ever blasted?”

“In silent astonishment and anguish he stood
126 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

and gazed. The storm was such it was impossible
to communicate with him, or send him any intelli-
gence of what had happened, and for twenty-six
hours he remained in all the anguish of uncertainty.
The next day I despatched a boat, manned by
some of my boldest sailors; it made shift to reach
land, and bore this message from me to ‘the
Emperor, ‘ That during my fifty years’ knowledge
of the sea, never having experienced such a hurri-
cane, I found it necessary to bear away with my
shattered ships to Cape Metafuz,’ to which place
I entreated him to march with all speed, and re-
embark his troops.”

‘“¢ He took your advice this time, I hope?”

“He did. The situation of the army was such,
not one moment was to be lost. Charles ordered
the soldiers instantly to march,—the sick, the
wounded, and feeble, being placed in the centre.
A terrible march it was! Worn out with fatigue,
and perishing with famine, the brave men could
scarcely support the weight of their arms, and num-
bers fell to rise no more. The roads were almost
impassable, the brooks so swollen with the rains,
that in crossing them the men waded up to the
chin; they had no food, but the flesh of horses,
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 127

killed by the Emperor’s command, and not a few
were slain by the enemy, who pursued, alarmed, and
harassed them nightandday. At length they reached
Cape Metafuz, and right gladly we received them on
board, supplied them with plenty of provisions, and
cheered them with the prospect of safety.”

«« And how did the Emperor bear these terrible
calamities ? ”

“ Admirably! His firmness and constancy of
spirit, his magnanimity, fortitude, humanity, and
compassion, could not be sufficiently applauded.
He endured as great hardships as the meanest
soldier, exposed his own person wherever danger
threatened, encouraged the desponding, visited the
sick and wounded, animated all by cheering words,
and when the army embarked, was the last to leave
the shore. I loved and honoured him so truly for
the great qualities he then manifested, that I
almost forgave him his obstinacy in undertaking
the rash and presumptuous expedition which in-
volved such a fearful loss of life.”’

“ His misfortunes were great indeed!” observed
Alberto.

“ Yes! and I understand King Francis means
to take advantage of them, by renewing hostilities.
128 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

Peace does not continue long between the rival
monarchs.”

“I suppose they truly and thoroughly dislike
each other ?”

“¢ You would not have said so, Alberto, had you
seen what I once saw. It was after the treaty of
Nice. Iwas conveying the Emperor to Barcelona,
when contrary winds drove us to the isle of St.
Margaret, off the coast of Provence. We had not
been there many hours, when a messenger arrived
from King Francis, inviting his rival to take
shelter in his dominions, and proposing a personal
interview with him at Aigues-mortes. Charles,
resolved not to be outdone in complaisance, in-
stantly repaired thither. No sooner had we cast
anchor in the road, than Francis, relying entirely
on the Emperor’s honour for his safety, visited him
on board my galley. A touching sight it was, my
boy, to witness the meeting of those two great
rivals for power !—to behold the warm demonstra-
tions of esteem and affection with which Charles
received Francis, and the generous confidence and
frank gaiety of the French monarch. The next
day the Emperor returned the visit. He landed at
Aigues-mortes with as little precaution, and met
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 129

with a reception equally cordial. He remained on
shore all night, the two monarchs vieing with each
other in expressions of respect and friendship.
Thus, after twenty years of open hostility, or secret
enmity—after so many injuries given and endured
on both sides—after having openly challenged
each other to single combat—after the Emperor
had publicly declared Francis to be a prince void
of honour or integrity—after Francis had accused
him of breach of faith and deceitful conduct—such
an interview was most extraordinary and sur-
prising! In one moment all seemed to be for-
gotten; suspicion and distrust gave place to perfect
confidence ; and from practising the arts of a de-
ceitful policy, they assumed on a sudden the liberal
and open manners of two gallant gentlemen.”

“It must have greatly astonished you, Signor.”

“ Tt did, Alberto ; but my astonishment increased
tenfold when, not long after, war broke out again
between them. I then found that their protesta-
tions of friendship were but as the summer cloud,
which passeth away. ‘Truth, honour, and kindly
feeling—all gave way to the love of power.”

Twenty years had passed away since Andrea
K
130 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

Doria restored liberty to his country. The form
of government then established in Genoa, though
at first received with eager approbation, did not
eventually give universal satisfaction. There are
generally in a republic some turbulent and factious
spirits who wish to overturn the existing state of
things. So it was in Genoa. Though all reverenced
the disinterested virtue of Doria, and admired his
character, not a few were jealous of the ascendency
he had obtained in the councils of the common-
wealth. Of this number was Lewis Fieschi, Count
of Lavagna. The richest and most illustrious sub-
ject in the republic, this young nobleman possessed,
in an eminent degree, all the qualities which win
upon the human heart. Of a commanding and
graceful figure, affable and gentle in his manners,
with a manly spirit and a courage unacquainted
with fear, magnificent even to profusion, and gene-
rous in the extreme, he seemed formed to enjoy
and adorn social life. But under all this fair show,
which rendered him exceedingly popular in Genoa,
Fieschi concealed an insatiable and restless ambi-
tion, and a spirit that disdamed subordination. His
was a temper that could ill brook a station of infe-
riority, and, jealous of the power which Andrea
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 131

Doria had acquired in the republic, he determined
to attempt the overthrow of a domination to which
he could not submit. For this purpose he placed
himself at the head of a dark and dangerous con-
spiracy.

Now Fieschi had a wife, a lady of the noble
house of Cibo, whom he loved with tender affec-
tion, and whose beauty and virtue rendered her
worthy of his love. She was little aware of the
aspiring thoughts which filled her husband’s mind,
though she knew him to be dissatisfied with the
government; for often he would complain that
Andrea Doria possessed too much influence in the
councils of the republic, an influence which might
be hurtful to the interests of Genoa. On these
oceasions, his sensible and amiable young wife
would point out to him the peace and freedom they
enjoyed, and the wise measures which Doria took
to secure the welfare of their country.

‘“‘ Great as the power is which he undoubtedly
possesses, we may surely and safely depend on his
never abusing it, my dear husband,” she said one
day, as they walked together in the gardens of
their palace. ‘‘ Doria’s age, his love of liberty, and
his moderation, afford us ample security that he
132 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

will not stain the close of his days by attempting
to overturn a fabric which it has been the pride
and labour of his life to erect.”

“Tt is not so much Andrea Doria that I fear,
as Andrea Doria’s nephew, Giannetino,” replied
Fieschi. “He is a haughty, insolent, arrogant
young man, and overbearing to such a degree as
would scarcely be tolerated in one born to reign,
but is quite insupportable in the citizen of a free
state. This youth is destined to be the heir of his
uncle’s private fortune, and I know he aims, like-
wise, at being his successor in power. But that
shall never be, while I can prevent it.”’

“ Let not the thought of such a thing disturb
you, my dear lord,” said the Countess, affection-
ately. ‘There are too many good and wise men
in the republic for us to fear that the power and
influence which the virtuous Doria justly possesses
should descend like an hereditary possession to a
young man unworthy of it. Besides, we will hope
that the brave old admiral may yet live many years
to guide the helm of state affairs.”

Fieschi smiled, and turned away to play with
his little girl. He well knew that at that very
moment he and others were engaged in a deep
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 133

conspiracy to assassinate the two Dorias, with the
principal persons of their party, to overturn the
established system of government, and to place
Fieschi himself on the ducal throne of Genoa.
Time, however, and preparations were requisite to
ripen such a design for execution, and while em-
ployed in carrying on these, Fieschi made it his
principal care to guard against everything that
might betray his secret, or excite suspicion. With
his wife he was not always so guarded; he occa-
sionally betrayed the bitterness of his feelings
towards the Dorias, as in the present instance ; but
in public, he entered into all kinds of pleasure, and
seemed to think of nothing but amusement. None
but his confederates knew that under those ever
ready smiles and that careless gaiety, there lurked
a deep and deadly purpose! At the same time he
paid court with such artful address to the two
Dorias, as imposed not only on the generous and
unsuspecting mind of Andrea, but also on his
less truthful and more designing nephew Gian-
netino.

On the morning of the 2d of January, 1547, the
Count of Lavagna appeared in unusual spirits.
After spending some time in discoursing with his
134 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

wife and seeing his friends, charming all by the
gaiety of his manner and the sprightly wit of his
conversation, he proceeded to visit the Dorias, and
paid his court to them with his usual marks of
respect. He was received with frank-hearted cor-
diality by the brave old admiral, who little dreamed
of the storm which had been so long gathering,
and was now ready to burst with fearful violence
over his head.

“ Ah!” said Fieschi, as he left the palace,
and his smiles gave place to a dark look of
triumphant hatred, “I have them now/ Little do
they dream that this day is the last of their pride
and power! The reign of the Dorias is over, and
now for that of Fieschi!”

The palace of the ambitious Count of Lavagna
stood alone in the middle of a large court, sur-
rounded by a high wall. The gates had been set
open early in the morning of this day, and all
persons without distinction were allowed to enter,
but strong guards posted within the court suffered
no one to return. Some of the conspirators had
dispersed themselves through the city, and invited
to an entertainment in Fieschi’s palace the principal
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 135

citizens whom they knew to be weary of the Doria
administration, and to desire a change of govern-
ment. As evening approached, a vast number of
persons filled the palace. Only a few, however,
were aware of the purpose for which they were
assembled ; the rest, astonished at finding, instead
of the preparations for_a feast, a court crowded with
armed men, and apartments filled with instruments
of war, gazed on each other with.a mixture of
curiosity, impatience, and terror. Whilst they were
in this state of uncertainty and agitation, Fieschi
appeared amongst them.

‘“‘ My friends,” said he—and his eye was bright,
and his smile gay as ever—“‘ you are most welcome.
Though I have not called you to partake of an
entertainment, but to join in a deed of valour,
which will lead you to liberty and immortal
renown, I feel not the less assured of your co-
operation and assistance. Hear me, my friends!
The exorbitant and intolerable authority of Andrea
Doria, and the ambitious designs of Giannetino,
are no longer to be borne. The tyrants must be
cut off. I have taken the most effectual measures
for this purpose. My associates are numerous—all
is prepared. Happily, the tyrants are as secure as
136 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

I have been provident. They dream not of the
doom that awaits them, and they will feel the
blow before they suspect any hostile hand to be
near. Let us, then, sally forth that we may de-
liver our country by one generous effort—an effort
almost unaccompanied by danger, and certain of
success.”

These words, uttered with eloquence and fervour,
made the desired impression on the audience.
Fieschi’s vassals, ready to execute whatever their
master should command, received his discourse
with a murmur of applause. To many whose
fortunes were desperate, the prospect of an insur-
rection was very agreeable. Those of higher rank
and more virtuous sentiments, though struck with
horror and surprise at so atrocious a proposition,
yet feared to object to it, surrounded as they were
by persons who waited only a signal from their
leader to perpetrate the greatest crime. With one
voice, then, all applauded, or feigned to applaud,
the undertaking.

Fieschi, having thus encouraged his associates,
before he gave them his last orders, proceeded to
the apartment of his countess. The noise of the
armed men who crowded the court and palace
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 137

having long before this reached her ears, she feared
some hazardous enterprise was at hand, and trem-
bled for her husband.

“Oh! my dear lord,” she exclaimed, as he
entered the room, “I am glad to see you; my
woman's heart has been full of fears, and you are
come to calm them. What means this gathering
of your friends and vassals? this clash of arms, and
hurrying to and fro of armed men? What does it
mean, my dear Lewis? I fear, I greatly fear, you
are on the eve of some hazardous expedition. Is
it so?”

‘¢ We are on the eve of an expedition certainly,
my love,” replied Fieschi, smiling, “but not a
hazardous one by any means. Be not alarmed, my
Emilia, I stir not from Genoa.”

“ Ah! it is then as I feared!” said the agitated
countess. ‘ Fieschi! you are conspiring against
the government, and the life of Andrea Doria!”
and she burst into tears.

‘“‘ Nay, my beloved wife, be not so distressed,”
said Fieschi, soothing her with the utmost tender-
ness and affection, “‘ we are but about to restore
liberty to Genoa; and as to Doria, he has lived long
enough for a tyrant.”
138 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“‘ Ah, my dear husband, say not so,” replied the
weeping countess; “ stain not your hands with so
foul a crime. Doria is wise, and good, and virtuous ;
he will listen to any representations you have to
make. Oh! let me entreat you, by the love you
bear me, to abandon this fearful undertaking.”

“I cannot do so, Emilia; I have gone too far to
stop. After what has passed to-day, my own life
would be in jeopardy.”

‘“‘ And are you not about to risk it now ? fearfully
risk it? Oh! Lewis, my husband! for the sake of
our children—by the love you bear that sleeping
boy, your only son, let me implore you not to ex-
pose your precious life to such imminent danger—
let me entreat you to give up so wild and wicked a
scheme.”

The Count of Lavagna for a moment bent over
the lovely infant sleeping so peacefully, and as he
kissed its fair forehead, the father’s heart seemed
touched ; he appeared to hesitate in his purpose;
but it was only for an instant ; and sterner thoughts
took possession of his breast.

“It cannot be, Emilia,” he said, “ I am pledged
to save Genoa. The change will be soon effected,
my dear wife, for Doria is quite unconscious of any
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA, 139

conspiracy against him, consequently will be unable
to resist. Your husband will, to-morrow, be at the
head of the government, and you will be, as your
beauty and virtues deserve you should be, a very
queen in Genoa.”

“Oh no! I would not have it so;” said the
countess, shuddering; “‘ I should be a wretched
queen. But I have been a happy wife, Lewis; you
have ever anticipated my slightest wish ; refuse not
to hear me now, my dear husband; separate your-
self from these wicked men ; go to Doria, and con-
fess all; he has a noble heart, and will forgive.”

‘¢ Never!” replied Fieschi. ‘ You ask impossi-
bilities, Emilia. My course is taken. Farewell,
my love; you shall either never, see me more, or
you shall to-morrow behold everything in Genoa
subject to your power.”

He tenderly embraced her, and strode from the
apartment.

It was midnight, and the people of Genoa slept
in the security of peace, when Fieschi and his band
of conspirators, numerous, desperate, and well-
armed, rushed forth to execute their wicked plan.
They soon got possession of the city gates, and of
140 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

the admiral’s galleys, not, however, without meet-
ing with some resistance ; and ere long every part
of Genoa was filled with noise and tumult. The
streets re-echoed with the cry of “ Fieschi and
Liberty!” At the sound of that name, so popular
and beloved, many of the lower orders took arms
and joined the conspirators. The nobles and friends
of Doria, on the contrary, astonished and alarmed,
shut the gates of their houses, and thought of no-
thing but of securing them from pillage. At length,
the noise excited by all this violence and confusion
reached the Doria palace. Guannetino was the first
to be aroused. He imagined the noise was occa-
sioned by a mutiny of the sailors, and starting
immediately from his bed, called together a few
attendants, and hurried towards the harbour. The
unfortunate young man had not proceeded far, when
he was met by some of the conspirators. Instantly
recognising him, they exclaimed, “ It is the younger
Doria! the proud Giannetino! Down with him!”
and falling on the hapless youth with the utmost
fury, they murdered him on the spot.

In the meantime the Admiral, awakened by the
tumult, was hurrying on his clothes, when Alberto
Maratti hastily entered the apartment. “ There is
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 14]

an insurrection, Admiral!” exclaimed the young
officer ; “the mob approach the palace—save your-
self, I entreat you!”

‘“¢ Explain your words, Alberto,” said the Admi-
ral, calmly ; ‘“‘ who heads this outbreak ?”

“ Fieschi, Count of Lavagna; the city is in the
hands of him and his adherents.”

‘“‘ Fieschi! is it possible ?” exclaimed Doria, in
great surprise.

“‘ It is too true. He has a numerous and armed
band with him. There is not a moment to lose,
noble Signor ; your life is in the utmost danger.”

“‘ T have faced danger before now,” said the brave
old admiral, buckling on his sword; “ call out the
guard; I will soon bring this foolish people to order.”

“The guard is overpowered, Admiral; your
galleys are in the rioters’ hands; there is no re-
source but instant flight.”

“ Flight! do you talk to Andrea Doria of flight,
Alberto? Call my nephew; call Giannetino. These
disturbers of the public peace shall soon be silenced.
Why do you pause?” he continued, looking at the
terrified attendants ; “ call my nephew, instantly.”

“ Alas! noble Admiral,” said Alberto, “ your
nephew has been slain in the tumult.”
142 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“ Slain! my nephew slain! Oh! Alberto, un-
say those cruel words! you speak not; oh! my
Giannetino! child of my affections! would that I
had died instead of thee!” And the old man hid
his face in his hands, and groaned in anguish.

It was a terrible blow to Andrea Doria! He
had brought up the youth from a child; lavished
on him the utmost tenderness and affection, and
made him the heir to his house and fortunes. True,
Giannetino was not worthy of his love, but, with
the partiality of an aged relative, the Admiral over-
looked his faults, and saw only his good qualities.
And now he was gone! the last prop of his solitary
old age! his bright days suddenly cut short by
violent hands. Oh! it was a terrible blow!

And in this state of anguish, and whilst the
tumult of the approaching mob came nearer and
nearer, Alberto found it less difficult to persuade
the sorrow-stricken man to retire to a place of
safety. Being fully assured that all resistance
was hopeless in the present state of affairs, and
yielding to the earnest solicitations of his friends
and dependants, Doria mounted a horse which
had been prepared for him, and sought safety in
flight.
THE BKAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 143

In the midst of this general consternation, a few
senators assembled in the senate-house to concert,
if possible, some measures for allaying the tumult,
and restoring peace to the city. All agreed that it
was useless then to attempt to resist the conspira-
tors by force, and that nothing remained but to
treat with them. Deputies were accordingly sent
to learn from Fieschi what were the concessions
with which he would be satisfied, or rather to sub-
mit to any terms he might please to prescribe.

But where was Fieschi? Alas! the unhappy
man had already paid the penalty of his crime!

Hearing a sudden uproar on board the admiral’s
galley, he feared the slaves were about to overpower
his associates, and hastened thither in some alarm.
Stepping precipitately on the plank which led from
the shore to the vessel, it overturned, and he fell
into the sea. Being loaded with heavy armour, he
immediately sank to the bottom; and at the very
moment when he was about to take full posses-
sion of everything his ambitious heart could desire,
Fieschi, Count of Lavagna, perished in the deep
waters !

“ We come from the senate-house,” said the
deputies, approaching a small group of the principal
144 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

conspirators, “‘and we desire to treat with your
leader. Where is the Count of Lavagna ?”

The few conspirators, who had just learned the
fate of Fieschi, desired above everything to keep it
secret, till a treaty with the senators should put
the city entirely in their power. They knew how
much depended on this, and trusted to succeed in
concealing the fatal news, when all their hopes
were disconcerted by the imprudence of Jerome
Fieschi, the Count’s younger brother.

“Where is the Count of Lavagna, you ask ?”
he said, with an air of childish vanity ; “I am now
the only person to whom that title belongs, and
with me you must treat.”

These words discovered to his friends as well as
enemies what had happened. While the deputies,
with admirable presence of mind, immediately took
high ground, and made high demands, suitable to
this change in their‘circumstances, the conspirators,
dismayed at the death of a man they had loved and
trusted, and placing no confidence in Jerome, a
giddy, inexperienced youth, felt their courage die
away and their hearts sink withm them. Their
leader was gone, and with him the spirit which
had animated the enterprise. There was no one
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 145

who could supply his place. Many had obeyed
his orders merely from a desire to please the popu-
lar young noble; they desired no change in the
government, and scarcely knew the object at which
he aimed. But he was no more; and, sad and
dispirited, the conspirators withdrew,—some to their
houses, hoping that amidst she darkness of the night
they ‘might have passed unobserved, and might
remain unknown; and some, seeking safety by a
timely retreat, were, before break of day, many
miles from that city, which but a few short hours
before had been so nearly in their own hands.

The next morning all was quiet in Genoa; not
an enemy was to be seen; and the conspirators
having conducted their enterprise with more noise
than bloodshed, but few marks of violence remained.
Two, however, had fallen on that eventful night,
whose loss was long and bitterly mourned. The
widowed Countess of Lavagna sat in her darkened
chamber, in the deepest grief; whilst the aged Doria
lamented the death of one who had been the pride
and joy of his declining years. The ambition of
Fieschi, and the haughtiness of Giannetino, had
alike proved fatal to each.

The sun was shining brightly on the magnificent

L
146 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

city of Genoa and on the calm blue waters of its
bay, when Andrea Doria returned to his home, He
was welcomed back by the inhabitants, who poured
forth to meet him, with loud acclamations of joy;
but he scarcely heeded them; his heart was full.

Alas! the first object that met his eyes on his
entrance into his palace, was the mangled body of
his beloved nephew. It had been conveyed to the
hall, to await interment. The brave old admiral,
who had faced danger and death so many times,
was quite overcome at the sad spectacle.

“ Will you not move on, noble Signor?” said
Alberto, who had attended him, and affectionately
endeavoured to soothe his grief; “this is no place
for you.” But Doria moved not.

“‘ Never a word he answer’d,
In sorrow strong and deep,
But he wept, that aged warrior,
Tears such as women weep.”

It was a heavy blow for him! and yet, such was
the moderation and magnanimity of this noble-
minded old man, that the sentence passed against
the conspirators did not exceed the just measure of
seyerity requisite for the support of the government,
THE BRAVE OLD ADMIRAL OF GENOA. 147

and was dictated neither by the violence of resent-
ment nor the rancour of private revenge.

When Andrea Doria was in his eighty-sixth
year he went to sea again, to attack his old enemies,
the Turks. His death took place in 1560, he being
then ninety-four years of age. Though he had been
for so many years at the head of the republic of Ge-
noa, and in high favour with the Emperor Charles,
he left no very large fortune behind him, owing to
his princely style of living and his generous dis-
position. He died deeply lamented by his country-
men, who paid the highest honours to the memory
of the departed patriot. To this day the name of
Andrea Doria is reverenced and loved in Genoa.

“ His land is one vast monument,
Bearing the record high,
Of a spirit in itself content,
And a name that cannot die.”
No. V.

THE DOGE OF VENICE.
—— ema eanne

“ THERE is a glorious city in the sea;
The sea is in the broad, the narrow streets,
Ebbing and flowing ; and the salt sea-weed
Clings to the marble of her palaces.
No track of men, no footsteps to and fro,
Lead to her gates. The path lies o’er the sea,
Invisible , and from the land we went,
As to a floating city ;—steering in,
And gliding up her streets as in a dream,
So smoothly, silently.”

SucH is Venice the Beautiful ; for thirteen hun-
dred years Queen of the Adriatic! Seated on the
waters, she appears at a distance like a glorious float-
ing city—her domes, her spires, her cupolas, and
towers, glittering in the sunbeams. A dream-like,
silent city, unlike any other in the world! The
rumbling of a wheel, or the tramp of a horse, are
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THE DOGE OF VENICE. 149

sounds never heard in her streets, if such may be
called her noiseless, narrow, paved passages. No;
her streets are of water ; instead of calling for your
carriage, you must call for your gondola, in which
you silently glide from one part of the city to
another. Splendid marble stairs, with marble
balustrades, lead up at once from the water to the
hall door. No less than four hundred and fifty
bridges connect the islands on which Venice is
built ; the chief of which is the celebrated bridge of
the Rialto, thrown over the Grand Canal. The
sides of this canal are lined with marble palaces of
large size.

There is much to admire in this fairy-like and
once splendid city. The grand square of St. Mark,
so gorgeous and magnificent, with its ducal palace,
long the residence of the Doges of Venice—its
cathedral, where you see nothing, tread on nothing,
but what is precious, the floor all agate and jasper,
the roof mosaic, the aisle hung with the banners of
subject cities—its campanile, or belfry, with its
immense bell, only rung in former times by order
of the Doge—the Bridge of Sighs, connecting the
ducal palace with the state prisons—the magnificent
granite columns, on one of which stood the cele-
150 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

brated “ winged lion of St. Mark,” cherished by
the Venetians as the symbol of their far extended
power; these, and much more, attract the eye of
the traveller, and call forth his admiration. There,
too, is the Giant’s Staircase, leading into the palace,
where may be seen the two lions’ mouths, which
gaped day and night to receive the anonymous
informations that ensured the safe gratification of
private revenge. Woe be to him who was accused
to the State by a paper dropped into the lion’s
mouth! He generally disappeared a short time
after, and was never heard of again. The mys-
terious Council of Ten—the dreadful dungeons—
the secret and silent executioners—alone knew his
fate !

This singular and beautiful city is fast sinking
into decay ; in another century, perhaps, few traces
will remain of the once proud and queen-like
Venice.

“ Oh Venice! Venice! when thy marble walls
Are level with the waters, there shall be

A ery of nations o’er thy sunken halls,
A loud lament along the sweeping sea !”

It was in her high and palmy days, when the
magnificence and splendour she displayed were
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 151

unequalled in Italy, that the inhabitants of the sea-
girt city prepared one year to celebrate the Feast
of the Ascension. Every citizen had donned his
best attire, and wore his gayest smiles. The gon-
dolas were decked out ; and all made ready to wit-
ness the annual ceremony of the day—the marriage
of the Doge with the Adriatic.

A splendid vessel, called the. Bucentaur, was in
waiting. It was gilded from prow to stern, covered
with an awning of rich purple silk, fitted up with
crimson velvet and. gold, and adorned with statuary.
At the appointed hour, the Doge, Francesco Foscari,
the senators, the nobles, and persons of quality,
with the foreign ambassadors, all dressed in their
state robes, entered the vessel, and, set in motion
by rowers concealed in the lower deck, the Bucen-
taur sailed out into the open sea, followed by mnu-
merable gondolas. The gondola is a light and
elegant boat—-a kind of canoe—impelled by two
gondoliers, who accompany the strokes of their
paddles by singing a melodious ballad. It is
painted black, in consequence of a law having been
passed to that effect, to restrain the extravagance
of the nobles,—and prescribing likewise its size
and form.
152 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

When all were in the open sea, the Doge, with
much ceremony, threw a gold ring into the blue
waters of the Adriatic, saying in a loud voice,
‘We marry thee, O Sea, in token of that true and
perpetual dominion which the Republic has over
thee.”

The Bucentaur, with its noble company, then
returned to Venice.

And no more will the gay vessel sail out in
gorgeous splendour to the marriage ceremony!
those days are gone for Venice!

“ Her glory is departed,
And her pleasure is no more,
Like a pale queen, broken-hearted,
Left lonely on the shore ,

No more the waves are cumber’d
With her galleys bold and free,
For her days of pride are number’d,
And she rules no more the sea.

Her sword has left her keeping,
Her prows forget the tide,

And the Adriatic, weeping,
Wails round his mourning bride ”

“'This is an imposing sight indeed!” exclaimed
Giovanni Micheli to his father, a Venetian noble,
as in their gondola they witnessed the ceremony ;
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 153

“our beautiful city may well be termed queen of
the waters; but I know not exactly the origin of
the custom; can you tell me, father?”

“JT can, my son. About three hundred years
since, the Republic assisted Pope Alexander III.
against his enemy Frederick Barbarossa, and
destroyed his fleet. His holiness, who had taken
refuge in Venice, was very grateful for this help,
and when the Doge Ziani returned in triumph to
the city, he went to meet him, attended by a train
of nobles, and a vast concourse of people, who rent
the air with joyful acclamations. Then the pope,
embracing the doge, gave him a golden ring, saying,
‘Take this ring, and present it to the sea, in token
of your dominion over it. Enjoin your successors
to perform annually the same ceremony, that suc-
ceeding ages may learn it was your valour which
acquired this great prerogative, and subjugated the
ocean, even as a wife is subject to her husband.’
Such was the origin of the doge’s marriage with
the Adriatic, Giovanni, and long may the ceremony
be continued !””

“Father,” said the boy with sparkling eyes as
he gazed over the waters, “I should like to be a
doge! how proud and happy should I be this day!”
154 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“Not so happy as you are, Giovanni. Proud
the Doge Francesco Foscari well may be, placed
as he is at the head of our flourishing and powerful
Republic ; but happy he is not.”

“Not happy!” exclaimed Giovanni in surprise,
“how can that be? he seems to have everything
he could wish for; to be in the exalted station he
is, one would think was alone sufficient to secure
his happiness.”

“ Alas! that is the very cause of his constant
sorrow,” replied Micheli. ‘As doge, he has been
obliged to pronounce sentence of banishment against
his only, his loved son.”

“Oh, how sad!”

“Yes; most earnestly desirous was Foscari of
being elected doge, and much opposition he encoun-
tered before he attained the dignity. He at length
gained the height of his ambition, but only to bring
down upon himself unspeakable misery !”’

“But what offence had his son committed?”
asked the boy. ‘“ Surely one who has been doge
for so many years, and is so beloved by the people,
might have pardoned, if he willed it?”

“‘My son,” said the noble in a low voice, after
being satisfied that the gondoliers were out of
THE DOGE OF VENICE, 155

hearing, “these are matters rarely spoken of, but
it is right you should know what has happened,
though at the same time I warn you never to men-
tion the subject. Any remark on the proceedings
of the Council of Ten might cost your father his
life. Be silent therefore. You must know, then,
that anxious as the Doge Foscari was to attain his
present high office, he soon discovered that the
throne he coveted was anything but a seat of
repose. Accordingly, after some years, wearied
with the factions which ascribed all disasters to the
prince, he tendered his resignation to the senate,
and was refused. At the end of nine years more,
he again expressed his wish to retire—and was
again refused. On this occasion, the council obliged
him to take an oath that he would retain his bur-
densome dignity for life.”

“‘ But his son? what of him ?” inquired Giovanni
eagerly.

“‘ He had four sons, but three of them died, and
to Jacopo, the survivor, he now looked for the
continuation of his name, and the support of his
declining age; and tenderly attached were they
one to the ather. The young Jacopo married a
daughter of the illustrious house of Contarini; the
156 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

nuptials were celebrated with great joy, and the
doge began to look forward to some degree of hap-
piness in his old age. The birth of a grandson
increased his hopes. Alas! they were fatally dis-
appointed. About five years since, Jacopo Foscari
was denounced to the Council of Ten as having
received presents from foreign potentates. This
offence is considered by our law as one of the most
heinous which a noble can commit. He was seized
and put to the torture, his wretched father being
obliged to preside. And from the lips of that
father, who loved him so tenderly—who believed
him innocent—he received the sentence which
banished him for life to Napoli di Romania.”

“But he was not guilty, Sir, was he?”

“Tt is not easy to establish innocence before the
Council of Ten,” said Micheli, sinking his voice to
a whisper. ‘The utmost the doge could do, not-
withstanding his services to the Republic, was to
obtain permission for his son to reside at Treviso,
and that his attached wife should be allowed to
accompany him in his exile.”

‘¢ What a trial for the Prince!” exclaimed Gio-
vanni. ‘¢ How does he bear it, father?”

“ Wonderfully. He lets no one perceive, in his
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 157

calm, dignified demeanour, the heart-consuming
grief that is within. The feelings of the father
appear to be lost in the stern justice of the doge;
but itis not so. Every hour he mourns his beloved
Jacopo !”’

“ But could he not procure a remission of the
sentence? You say he has served Venice well?”

“Venice owes him much, my son. By his
courage, prudence, and sagacity, he has increased
her glory not less than her dominion. He has
added. four rich provinces to the Republic, and
rendered brilliant services to his country. During
the many years in which he has been at the head
of the State, he has by his conduct gained the
respect of the senate, and the love of the people.
But all this availed nothing with the Ten ;—all
this could not save his son!”

* Poor J. acopo | ! I pity him much, but I pity his
father still more,” said Giovanni.

“‘ They are to be pitied indeed!” replied Micheli.
“ But, Giovanni, my dear boy, I charge you never
to mention what I have told you. It might bring
you and me into trouble. Make no remarks, what-
ever you hear; remember the lion’s mouth!”

These last words were uttered in a low impres-
158 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY,

sive whisper, and the young Venetian boy, silently
pressing his father’s hand, signified that he under-
stood their import, and would obey.

** See!” said Micheli, after a pause of some
minutes in the conversation, durimg which they
glided in their graceful gondola over the placid
waters, “how glorious looks the Bride of the
Adriatic to-day! She is decked in unusual splen-
dour for the occasion. See, Giovanni, in what
a flood of golden sunshine she reposes! Look at
her winged lion bidding defiance to her enemies!
See the glorious standard of St. Mark unfurled to
the breeze! see the brazen steeds glittering and
glowing in the sun! Beautiful Venice! well may
thy sons love thee, and the nations fear thee!”

Giovanni gazed in delight and admiration. For-
getting for a time the troubles of the doge, he
thought only of the fair city before him ; and pride
and joy filled his heart that he too was a Venetian.

That city was then in the height of her pro-
sperity. The exhaustless treasures of the East
were poured into her lap ;—her vessels ruled the
seas ;—her merchants were princes ;—she was “a
queen with an unequalled dower.”

Those were the days when
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 159

** Many a subject land
Look’d to the winged Lion’s marble piles,
Where Venice sat in state, throned on her hundred isles.”

But within those marble halls was many an aching
heart !

In the winter of this year an assassination took
place in the streets of Venice. Hermalao Donato,
a Chief of the Ten, was murdered on his return
from a sitting of that council, at his own door, by
unknown hands, Amazed at the indignity offered
to them, as well as at the magnitude of the offence,
the council eagerly caught at the slightest clue
which suspicion could afford as to the perpetrator
of the crime. With stern countenances and bent
brows they met in that hall. where sentence had
been passed on so many victims. At the head of
the council board sat the Doge Foscari.

“Upon his calm and noble face
Deep thoughts had left their living trace,—
Thoughts, such as press, with giant power,
A common life into an hour;
Each line of lofty meaning there
Was graven by the hand of Care,
And the flash of that triumphant eye,
That arching lip’s stern majesty,
Told of full many a foe withstood,—
Without, disdain’d—within, subdued '”
160 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“‘Signors,” said one of the Ten when all had
assembled, “‘ I am happy in being able to give you,
as I believe, some clue as to the author of this
most barbarous murder. It chanced this morning
that I was in my boat off Mestre, when hailing one
from the city, and inquiring what news was stir-
ring, we were informed of the assassination of the
noble Donato. Immediately returning to Venice,
I found to my astonishment that few were aware
of the crime which had been committed. This
aroused my suspicions as to my informant, and on
inquiry, I learned that he had been seen in the city
on the evening of the murder. Is it not strange,
Signors, that this person should have been ac-
quainted with that which was not generally known
for some hours after ?”

“Tt savours strongly of guilt,” they replied.

“Yet,” said the Doge, “his frank disclosure
would seem to disprove his participation in the
crime. The author of such a deed is not likely
thus unseasonably and prematurely to disclose its
committal, is he, think you, Signors?”

‘“‘ He doubtless put on the show of frankness to
ward off suspicion,” observed one of the Ten.

‘¢ He should be arrested at once.”
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 161

To this all agreed.

“Who is the man ?” inquired the doge, as paper,
pen, and ink were laid before him.

‘‘ His name is Pietro Ranieri,—a servant of the
exiled Jacopo Foscari,” was the reply.

The Prince spoke not—started not. But those
near him might have observed a scarcely perceptible
quivering of the lip, when that loved name fell
thus unexpectedly on his ear.

*‘ Signors, there is the order for the arrest,” he
said in calm tones, “I believe our business is con-
cluded for the day ;” and with a dignified step he
left the council hall.

‘“‘He does not appear to feel much for his
son,” said one, “and yet he must be aware he is
suspected.”

“‘ He shall feel then, ere long,” was the reply.

“How, Loredano? what mean you?”

“How! can there be a doubt who is the author
of this murder? Who could be more likely to arm
the hand of an assassin against a Chief of the Ten
than one whom the Ten have visited with punish-
ment? If the servant will not confess, the master
must.” He turned away, muttering, “I have
vowed to be revenged on him, and I will.”

M
162 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

Ranieri was arrested ; but though tortured in the
most cruel manner that malice could devise, the
unfortunate man denied all knowledge of the
murder, and not a word did he utter that could
justify the suspicions entertained against his master.
Jacopo Foscari was, nevertheless, recalled from
banishment, and in the presence of his aged father,
had to undergo similar tortures to those inflicted on
his servant. And though they failed to wring
from him the avowal of having even the slightest
knowledge of the crime of which he was accused,
the unfortunate young noble was convicted without
proof, and sentenced to be banished for life to the
remote island of Candia.

Again had the unhappy doge to pronounce the
words which tore from him his last—his only son
—his innocent Jacopo!

Yes,—Jacopo was innocent. A short time
afterwards, a Venetian noble confessed on his
death-bed that he had himself murdered Donato,
from motives of private revenge. Yet this distinct
proof of the young Foscari’s innocence wrought no
change in his unjust and cruel sentence!

“T cannot believe the young noble guilty of
such a deed,” said a citizen of Venice one evening
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 163

to a friend, as they stood together on the Rialto, a
few days after the second banishment of Jacopo
‘Tt was an act unworthy one of the Foscari.”

‘Were he not guilty the Ten would not have
condemned him,” replied his friend.

Nay, Filippo, the torture he endured must
have wrung from him a confession, if so.”

“‘ He may have great fortitude, Giuseppe. I was
told he uttered not a word or a groan. His father
is not easily moved, you know.”

“ Ah, the doge! what must he not have suffered
in beholding his son’s anguish! What a trial for
a kind and loving father to undergo! He feels,
Filippo, he feels deeply, though he lets it not
appear. To believe him innocent, as he must have
done, and yet to pronounce the fatal sentence
which sent the noble youth from his home for ever!
My heart bleeds for him.”

“So does mine. But Giuseppe, it is as well not
to talk of these matters. It is for the Council to
judge of the guilt of the young Foscari. They
desire not our opinion on their proceedings, and it
is safer not to give it. Be-advised.”

“Well,” replied Giuseppe, as he turned way,
‘*- I only wish the Ten would act with a little more
164 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

justice, and a great deal more mercy, and then |
should be satisfied.”

The young man said this more to himself than
to his companion, but the words were heard where
he least intended they should be. One who was
not friendly towards him, passmg by, marked the
incautious speech. That night, a muffled figure,
hurrying up the Giant’s Staircase, dropped a paper
into the lion’s mouth. Ere two days had passed,
Giuseppe had disappeared from Venice. His friends
never learned his fate!

It was no wonder that Micheli warned his son to
be careful of what he said in Venice!

“A strange mysterious power was there,
A power that never slumber’d, never pardon’d,
All eye, all ear, nowhere-and everywhere ,
Enterng the closet and the sanctuary,
Most present when least thought of—nothing dropp’d
In secret, when the heart was on the lips,
Nothing in feverish sleep, but instantly
Observed and judged.”

It was a wicked and fearful system, that Vene-
tian Inquisition! With its ever watchful spies, its
tortures, its secret dungeons, its mysterious, silent
executions, it exercised a despotic sway over the
lives and fortunes of the Venetians, and filled their
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 165

minds with an unspeakable dread. ‘The secresy
and despatch of this tribunal excited the wonder of
every citizen of the republic, and taught them to
veil their sentiments with the utmost caution.
Alas! that poor Giuseppe had not concealed his!

For six weary years the unfortunate Jacopo
pined in his Candian prison. Torn from his wife,
his children, his father, and his country.he almost
sank beneath his accumulated load of wretchedness.
The one longing, restless desire of his heart, all
those weary years, was to return to his beloved
home. ‘This occupied his thoughts by day, his
dreams by night. With folded arms he would
stand and gaze over the waters, hour after hour,
and day after day, to see if perchance a vessel
might be coming with tidings of mercy. But none
such came,—and at last, reduced to despair, the
unhappy exile resolved on a desperate and danger-
ous expedient. He wrote a letter to the Duke of
Milan, requesting his interference and interces-
sion with the Venetian government in his behalf.
He knew this was considered a great crime by the
State, but it was his last hope of seeing Venice
again. ‘This letter he purposely left where it was
166 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

seized by the spies, who never ceased to watch
him, and by them conveyed to the Council of
Ten.

Jacopo was instantly recalled to Venice, to un-
dergo his trial for this new offence. And gladly
did he obey the summons! His love for Venice
was an intense love. Though he knew that tor-
tures and perhaps death awaited him there, he
cared not, he faltered not, his only desire was to
behold once more his native land; and he preferred
encountering the worst vengeance of his foes to
dragging out a miserable existence in Candia.

Swiftly over the waves flew the vessel which
bore the exile to his home—and, alas! to his prison
also.

For the third time was the unhappy doge com-
pelled to preside at the persecution of his son; and
although Jacopo openly avowed that he had writ-
ten the letter for the sole purpose of being recalled
to Venice, to answer for this infringement of the
law—that he had never for an instant contemplated
its reaching the Duke of Milan—yet again was the
wretched father a witness of the agony inflicted
on his hapless son, in order to extort from him a
denial of the act he had previously acknowledged.
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 167

Poor Jacopo remained firm to the last, declaring
that such only was his motive for writing the let-
ter; but in vain he so manfully endured—in vain
he asserted his innocence. Once more was the sen-
tence of perpetual banishment pronounced -on him.
Again did those cruel words issue from the lips: of
the heart-broken father, with the additional seve-
rity that the first year of his exile was to be passed
in a prison.

Oh! what were all the honours of the doge to
him in that moment of misery !

One interview was the unhappy young noble
allowed with his family; one short hour to bid
them all a last farewell.

Guarded by two officers, Jacopo Foscari was
brought from his dungeon, across the Bridge of
Sighs, to one of the splendid apartments in his
father’s palace. There he met his beloved wife
and children—a sad, sad meeting! Jacopo’s pale
cheek spoke too plainly of the tortures he had
endured, and the weeping Marina, as she gazed
upon him, could not for some time suppress her
grief. . At length in a voice almost inarticulate
from emotion, she said, “ My beloved husband, we
part no more!”
168 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

‘No more!” said Jacopo starting, ‘“ know
you not the decree of the council, Marina ?”

“ Alas! too well, my Jacopo. But from hence-
forth your exile shall be mine also.”

“‘ My true wife! my only friend on earth! this
is indeed a taste of happiness in my cup of misery!
But will the Ten permit this? Have they indeed
so much mercy ?”

“ They have granted my earnest request, Ja-
copo, but mercy they have none.”

“ And our children, Marina? our dear chil-
dren?” said Foscari, fondly caressing his little
ones as they stood around him.

“They will be cared for by the Doge,” replied
their mother, looking on them with tearful eyes ;
“the mercy of the Ten does not extend so far as
to permit them to accompany us. Oh Jacopo!
the wild beasts of the forest are more feeling and
pitiful than the cruel Ten!”

“ Hush, my beloved! we may be watched.”

“ And if we are, can they do more than they
have done? Has not their malice reached its
height ?”’

“They might withdraw the permission granted
you, my Marina.”
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 169

“Ah!” sighed Marina, “ that would be my
death-blow! They will tear my children from me,
but I still shall live whilst I have you to live for,
Jacopo.”

*« Do not send us away, dear Mamma,” said little
Francesco, the youngest child, “let us go with you
wherever you go. Papa, will you say that no one
shall take us away, and then poor Mamma will be
happy ?”

‘“‘ My darling boy! would that I could say it!”
was all that Foscari could reply, as he strained the
prattler to his heart. The little fellow climbed up
on his father’s knee, and looked wistfully in his
face.

“Why cannot you say it, dear Papa?” he
asked, as he put his arm round his neck, “ will
they not obey you? But you seem sorry; I will
not go away from you, my own dear papa, I will
stay with you and love you always. You will let
me, will you not?”

The glance of those deep, loving eyes, the sound
of that childish pleading voice, quite overcame the
unhappy father. He clasped the boy in his arms,
and tears rolled down his pale cheeks.

It was hard indeed to part from this, his
170 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

youngest one—his loving, playful Francesco, who
had scarcely known a father’s care! With his
noble appearance, his clustering curis, and graceful
symmetry, he was just such a child as the poet
describes,

* His little heart’s a fountain pure, of kind and tender feeling,

And his every look’s a gleam of hght, rich depths of love
revealing.

A playfellow he 1s to all, and yet with cheerful tone

He sings his little song of love, when he is left alone.

His presence is like sunshine, sent to gladden home and
hearth,

To comfort us in all our griefs, and sweeten all our mirth '”

It was hard indeed to part with such an one!

Mastering his emotion, Jacopo turned to the
window, and looked out on the placid waves of the
Adriatic. The noiseless city was reposing in the
sunshine ; nought was heard but the quiet plashing
of the waters.

“‘ Beautiful Venice!” exclaimed the young noble,
“ how truly, how fondly [love thee! This Adrian
sea breeze, oh! how refreshing is it, Marina! how
unlike the hot gales of Candia! It gives me new
life. Oh Venice! how often have I skimmed over
thy blue waters in my gondola, a happy, laughing
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 171

boy! how many times have I, as.a_youth, breasted
thy billows, a daring fearless swimmer! And now
thou dost banish me from thee for ever! And for
nought, save too great love for my country.”

““ My innocent, my persecuted husband,” said
Marina, “ think not of thy ungrateful country;
have no regrets for Venice. I never wish to see it
more.”

At this moment the doge entered the apartment.

“¢ My father!” exclaimed Jacopo, as he rose to
meet him, “ my beloved father!”

‘“‘ My son! my last—my only son!” murmured
the aged man, as he fell m Jacopo’s neck; “ my
boy ! my broken-hearted boy!”

‘‘ Father, 1 am innocent! believe me, thy Ja-
copo hath not disgraced the name of Foscari.”

“Oh, my son! if thou knewest all !—never wert
thou so dear to me as now, Jacopo,—and thou
wilt go, and leave me desolate!”

‘“‘ Not desolate, my father; these dear ones shall
take my place; they shall be the solace and stay
of your old age.”

“‘ Dear they are; as yours, doubly dear; but
they will never be to me what my Jacopo has
been,” said the unhappy doge.
172 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

The sight of his beloved parent’s grief—the
thought that he was about to be separated from
him for ever, and leave him a childless sorrow-
stricken man—wrung Jacopo’s heart. For the
first time he asked for mercy.

“Oh my father!” he exclaimed, “ appeal to the
council; they will show some forbearance, they
will show some consideration for your grey hairs ;
Venice owes you much; they cannot, will not refuse
you the boon you ask.”

Then the noble old man endeavoured to exhibit
some portion of composure.

“‘ Such a request would be made in utter hope-
lessness, my son,” he said, in a calm voice. “ My
duty to the State forbids me to urge it. Go, Ja-
copo, submit to the will of your country, and seek
nothing further.”

The long and exquisite pain he had endured
without a groan or a murmur—the sorrows he had
undergone—the anguish of that moment,—quite
unnerved the young Foscari.

“ But they will relent in some years,” he said,
as the tears rolled thick and fast down his cheeks ;
“ O tell me [I may come back again! let there be
some point of time, however distant, to which I may
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 173

look forward as the term of my banishment. Help
me, father, | pray; plead for your son, your only
son! Let me live in hope that I shall see my loved
home once more.”

“« Alas! my dearest son, it cannot be, nor can
I ask it,” replied the doge. “ Thrice have you
been sentenced. It is not for me to trifle with the
laws of Venice, or make light of its decrees. Sub-
mit, my son; your father’s duty to the State is a
paramount duty.”

The doge well knew that the Ten, while they
gloried in his humiliation, would reject his petition
with scorn.

But the self-restraint he had exercised proved
too much for the enduring and broken-hearted old
man. On retiring from his son’s presence he fell
senseless in the arms of his attendants. And the
unfortunate Jacopo, innocent of the crimes for
which he had suffered so much, was re-conveyed
to his Candian prison, where, not long after, he
was released from his sorrows by death.

The troubles of the Doge Foscari were not yet
over. The groundless hatred entertained against
him by Loredano, led him, as one of the council,
174 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

to propose that he should be deposed. But even
the Ten, ill-disposed as they were towards Foscari,
hesitated to adopt such a measure. ‘“‘ He has
grown grey in the service of the State,” observed
one; “‘to depose him would be a poor return for
his many years of unceasing labour.”

‘It would be but a useless form,” said another ;
“his age and shattered health will soon release
him from the cares of office.”’

“ Not soon enough,” replied Loredano; “‘he is
too infirm and feeble to be at the head of the Vene-
tian State.”

“ But, Signor Loredano,” said an aged member,
“it surely would be most inconsistent and contra-
dictory to compel the Prince to abdicate, when we
have twice refused to accept his voluntary resig-
nation.”

“Tell him we accept it now,” replied Loredano ;
“let him give place to younger and more active
men.”

“ He has ruled well and wisely,” observed the
youngest of the members, touched with some pity
for the doge; “ his reign has been a brilliant one
for Venice. And he has suffered—suffered much.
Let us not embitter yet more the short time that
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 175

remains to him. Loredano! he is a desolate and
broken-hearted old man.”

“ He shows it not,” said Loredano ;—“ he is
hard and cold as marble itself. A prouder man
never breathed.”

“ He has a noble spirit,” was the reply.
“To depose him will be to sign his death-
warrant.”

The debate lasted long. ‘To assist them in their
deliberations, the Ten called in the aid of five-and-
twenty members of the Great Council, and for
eight days and nearly as many nights they sat in
solemn discussion. The result of their protracted
meetings was, that the Doge Foscari should be
requested to resign his high command.

When the deputation, headed by the Chief of
the Ten, waited on the aged Prince for this pur-
pose, he heard them with surprise, but with dignity
and composure.

“ Signors,” said he,—and he spoke as a noble
prince,—“ you ask of me an impossibility. When
I twice before expressed my wish to abdicate, it
was refused me, and not only refused, but you
made me take an oath that I would never resign
my office. I have sworn to die in the full exercise
176 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

of my power as Doge of Venice. I cannot break
my oath.”

“« [Ts this your answer, Prince?”

“It is. You speak of my length of days,
Signors,—remember, each day has been given to
my country; I am ready to lay down my life for
her, as I have laid down things far dearer than life.
But my office as doge I hold of the whole Republic ;
if you see fit, you can appeal to the Great Council,
and take their opinion. I have no more to say.”

** And you will not resign, Prince?”

“ Never! Ido not make vows to break them.
You have heard my answer.”

The deputation retired, disappointed. It was
far from their intention, however, to subject them-
selves to the chances of debate in the Great Council;
so, assuming a power they did not really possess,
the ‘Ten discharged Foscari from his oath, declared
him to be no longer doge, assigned to him a pen-
sion of two thousand ducats, and ordered him to
quit the palace within three days. The cruel
Loredano enjoyed the barbarous satisfaction of
presenting this decree with his own hand to the
deposed Prince. Foscari received it with calmness.
“Tf I had imagined,” said he, “ that my old age
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 177

was in any way hurtful to the State, never for one
moment would I have placed my high dignity
before my country’s welfare; but my life not
having been altogether useless to Venice, I would
fain have consecrated to her the last moments of
it. The act is passed—TI obey it.”

“ He was deposed,—
He who had reign'd so long and gloriously
His ducal bonnet taken from his brow,
His robes stript off, his seal and signet-ring
Broken before him. But now nothing moved
The meekness of his soul.”

The following day Francesco Foscari left the
palace where, for so many years, he had lived and
reigned a prince. As he was about to depart, it
was suggested to him that he should retire by the
staircase which led to the grand canal, and thus
avoid the concourse of people assembled in the great
square.

‘“* No,” said Foseari, proudly; “ I descend by no
other than the Giant’s Stairs,—the selfsame steps
by which I mounted, five-and-thirty years ago, to
be elected Doge. I was publicly elected, and I
will be publicly deposed.”

Accordingly, leaning on the arm of his brother

N
178 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

and supported by his staff, the aged noble slowly
descended the Giant’s Stairs. Once—only once—
his arm trembled, and his voice faltered, as he
murmured, “My boy! my Jacopo! thou hast
been spared this!” Arrived at the foot of the
staircase, he turned round, and giving a last look
to the palace, exclaimed, “ My services established
me within your walls; it is the malice of my
enemies which tears me from them. Farewell!”
The people of Venice much grieved when they
heard of the deposition of the beloved and respected
Doge, but they dared not express their grief.
Whatever pity they might secretly chewsh for
their wronged and humiliated prince, all show of
it was silenced by a peremptory decree of the
Council of Ten, forbidding any mention of his name,
and annexing death as a penalty to disobedience.
On the fifth day after Foscari’s deposition, Mali-
pieri was elected Doge of Venice. The dethroned
prince, now in his own palace, heard the great bell
of St. Mark’s strike out, announcing his successor.
He was visibly agitated. ‘That sound!” he ex-
claimed, ‘“ I know it well—TI heard it once before ;
it tolls for my Jacopo—my lost, my innocent
Jacopo! My poor, poor boy!” His agitation
THE DOGE OF VENICE. 179

increased ; he vainly endeavoured to suppress it,
and bursting a blood-vessel, in a few hours Fran-
cesco Foscari expired.

Beautiful Venice! thy name is, indeed, renowned
in story, “thou dream-like city of the hundred
isles!”” With wonder and admiration we think of
thy power and splendour and magnificence,—of
thy marble palaces and princely halls; thy proud
towers and fairy-like: beauty. We think of thy
metry masques and moonlight serenades—of thy
graceful gondolas and orange-bowers—of thy per-
fumed breezes—of “the cloudless beauty of thy
deep blue skies.” But we know that even in thy
best days thou wert ever an unquiet and unsafe
abode; and, turning from all thy gorgeous splen-
dour, we look with renewed satisfaction and grate-
ful hearts on the freedom, and security, and
domestic peace which shed so bright a glory on
our own beloved and highly-favoured land.
No. VI.

THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA.

In one of the large and dimly lighted apart-
ments of the university of Padua, there sat, one
summer’s evening, in the year 1597, a young man
in the prime of life, intently engaged in reading.
Time passed on, and still he sat there, undisturbed,
and forgetful of the world without. At length,
laying down the book he had been perusing, he
leaned his head on his hand for some minutes,
apparently lost in thought. His fine open brow
and intelligent eye were clear indications of a mind
of no common order; and few could look at him
without being ‘convinced that he was not hiding
in a napkin, or burying in slothfulness, the talents
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THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 181

with which God had endowed him. No; he was
a diligent searcher. after truth and knowledge; and
destined to be nobly rewarded! In a few minutes,
turning to a desk which stood near him, the stu-
dent exclaimed, while a smile of joy passed over
his countenance, “ Yes; I will write to him!
He is a man after my own heart; a bold and
daring genius!” He took up the pen and wrote
a letter, from which the following is an extract.
It was addressed to the celebrated German astro-
nomer, Kepler, and proved to be the eommence-
ment of a friendship between two of the greatest
men of the 16th century :—

“ T have as yet read nothing beyond the preface
of your book, from which, however, I catch a
glimpse of your meaning, and feel great joy on
meeting with so powerful an associate in the pur-
suit of truth, and consequently such a friend to
truth itself: for it is deplorable there should be
so few who care about it. I promise to peruse
your book dispassionately, and with a conviction
that I shall find in it much to admire. This I
shall do the more willingly because many years
ago I became a convert to the opinions of Coperni-
182 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

cus,* and by that theory have succeeded in ex-
plaining many phenomena which otherwise are
inexplicable. I have arranged many arguments
and confutations of the opposite opinions, which,
however, I have not yet dared to publish, fearing
the fate of our master Copernicus, who, although
he has gained immortal fame amongst a few, yet
by an infinite number is exploded and derided.
Were there many such as you, I would venture
to publish my speculations, but since that is not
so, I shall take time to consider of it.”

Having concluded and sealed the letter, he rose
and walked out in the green meadows adjoining
the university.

“ Who is this coming with a book in his hand ?”’
asked the young Beatrice Novelli of her father, as
they stood together admiring the gorgeous splen-
dour of an Italian sunset; “ I shonld take him
for a philosopher, were it not that he smiles
occasionally.”

“‘ He is professor of mathematics in our univer-

* Copernicus was a celebrated Prussian astronomer, who

established the true system of the universe in opposition to that
of Ptolemy.
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA, 183

sity,” replied her father; “ and a very clever man.
I am slightly acquainted with him.—Good even-
ing, Signor, I see you do not leave your studies
behind you, even when you come out to enjoy
such an evening as this. You prefer the writings
of man to the open book of nature.”

“‘ Nay,” said the professor, with a smile, “judge
me not so harshly, Signor Novelli; few can admire
the glorious works of nature more than I do. On
such an evening as this, with my favourite com-
panion to enhance my enjoyment, I am almost in
danger of forgetting there is such a place as the
university of Padua.”

** Ah! the Orlando Furioso; you are an admirer
then of the poet Ariosto ?”

“I prefer him to all poets, ancient or modern ;
in proof of which I have this enchanting poem
nearly by heart.”

“ Pardon me for differmg from you, Signor,”
said Novelli, “ but in my opinion he is not to be
compared to Tasso. What can be finer than his
poem of ‘ Jerusalem Delivered?’ What can speak
more in his praise than the unbounded celebrity
he enjoyed, and his being crowned in the Capitol
at Rome as ‘ the prince of poets?’ ”
184 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

‘** Poor Torquato Tasso!” replied the professor,
“he was highly sensitive and of a most fervid
imagination, but I fear his mind was at times a
little disordered.”

“The cruel treatment he received was enough
to make it so,” replied Novelh. “ Could anything
have been more painful to a man of his tempera-
ment than to be shut up in a dark and solitary
prison? How often must his thoughts have re-
verted to the bright sky and the blue sea of his
native Sorrento! how must he have pined in his
lonesome dungeon for the vineyards and orange
groves, the sunny slopes and dells of that lovely
spot! and above all, with what a longing heart
must he have desired once more to behold his
affectionate and gentle sister! Poor Torquato
Tasso!”

‘‘ Who imprisoned him, papa?” asked Beatrice.

** The Duke Alphonso d’Este, my love. Tasso
presumed to admire at a distance the duke’s fair
sister, the Princess Eleanora, and for this crime he
was nine years confined in Ferrara.”

“The duke, I believe, thought him insane,”
observed the professor. ‘ If you remember, when
staying once at the castle, Tasso threw a knife at
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 185

one of the servants, on account of some trifling
negligence, which act of violence greatly alarmed
his noble hosts, and he was confined as one that
had lost his reason.”

“ Ah! they merely wanted a pretext for his im-
prisonment,” said Novelli; “I am aware he was
excitable. But he rests in his grave; his earthly
sorrows are all over.”

“‘ Did he die in prison, papa ?”

“‘ No; he was released from his prison, and died
two years since at a monastery near Rome.”

“‘ And which of our poets does your little girl
admire?” said the professor, turning to Beatrice ;
“is it the sweet and melancholy Petrarch, or the
immortal Dante?”

“I do not even know who Petrarch and Dante
were,” said Beatrice, laughing, yet half blushing
at her ignorance.

“‘Is it possible!” exclaimed her father; “ my
dear child, you must begin to study more closely.
My little girl, Signor, is too fond of play, I fear,
and cares nothing for poetry.”

‘Time enough,” said the professor; “let her
enjoy her happy childhood while she can. But
you ought to know something of our great poet
186 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

Dante, Beatrice, for the lady to whom he addressed
most of his sonnets bore your name.”

“Tf you will kindly tell me of him, Signor, I
will try not to forget him,” said Beatrice modestly.

“« Dante was a Florentine, my little girl, and
lived about three hundred years ago. Exiled from
Florence, he for some time took up his abode in
Padua,”

“ And Petrarch, Signor ?”

“ Petrarch flourished about two hundred years
since. He also lived in our city, and afterwards re-
tired to a villa at Arqua, a sweet spot amongst the
Euganean hills. You must ask your father to take
you to see it, it is only a pleasant drive from the
city.”

“Yes; that I will,” said Beatrice, “I shall
remember about him better if I see his house.”

“ Then you must remember about Ariosto, Tasso,
and Dante, as well as Petrarch, for all once lived
and studied in Padua, and you may see their
dwellings any day. An illustrious band, Beatrice!
whose names and works will never perish from
Italy, as long as Italy is a land of poetry!”

“T am afraid [ shall never like study,” said
Beatrice, with a sigh.
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 187

Now Beatrice was the sunniest little Italian girl
that ever bounded with lightsome step over the
flowery meadows of her native land. She would
chase the butterflies in the early morning, and
explore the valley in search of wild flowers, and
listen to the song of the uprising lark, till her
child’s heart was filled with joy and gladness.
Happy little Beatrice!

“ In a clime
Where all were gay, none were so gay as thou.”

To hear her sigh was therefore a thing of rare
occurrence.

“‘ But,” said the professor, smiling, ‘“ though
you do not like study you like a story, I have no
doubt, Beatrice. Come, while we sit down on this
mossy bank I will tell you an anecdote of my
favourite Ariosto.”

“The poet who wrote that book? oh! thank
you, Signor; I like a story.”

“I fear you are troublesome to the professor,
Beatrice,” said her father. “‘ Pardon her, Signor, she
is an only child, and I am afraid rather spoiled.”

“IT was ever fond of children,” said the good-
natured professor, “ and shall be glad to interest
my little friend. Perhaps from a story she may
188 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

learn to like history, and from history may go on
to philosophy. What say you, Beatrice, do you
think you shall ever be a philosopher?”

Beatrice laughed merrily at this question, and
no one, as he looked at the professor, could have
imagined he was the same grave student, who, a
few hours before, was seated in such deep thought
amongst his books in the university.

“¢ 'The poet Ariosto was like you,” he continued,
“ partial to flowers, and fond of gardening; so fond,
that he used to take up the seeds he had sown, in
his impatience to see how they were getting on!
One morning, after having been busy with his
flowers, in a fit of abstraction he wandered from
home attired in his dressing gown and slippers.
‘When at a considerable distance from any habita-
tion, he suddenly found himself made prisoner by
a troop of banditti, who were proceeding to use
violence towards him, when one of the lawless
band, drawing his chief aside, whispered in his
ear, ‘ It is the poet Ariosto!’ The captain of the
brigands immediately approaching Ariosto, saluted
him in the most respectful terms, apologized for
not knowing him, and concluded by saying, ‘ Be
assured, Signor, the renowned author of the Orlando
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 189

Furioso has nothing to fear from us; we beg as
a favour, that we may be permitted to escort you
in safety to your home.’ They did so; and the
brigand chief expatiated all the way to the castle
on various fine passages in the poem, with which
many of the men appeared to be intimately ac-
quainted, and with their leader joined in loading
the author with praise. Another time, having occa-
sion to pass through a wood with a few attendants,
they encountered a band of armed brigands, who,
to their surprise, suffered them to proceed without
molestation. The captain, however, asked one of
the servants the name of his master, which he had
no sooner heard, than he set spurs to his horse,
and galloped after Ariosto, who stopped in some
alarm. Approaching him with every demonstra-
tion of profound respect, the brigand chief offered
his humble apologies, for having, through igno-
rance of his name, suffered him to pass his troop
without paying him the homage so justly due to
his merit.”

“ Then his being such a famous poet saved his
life, very probably,” said Beatrice. “ His poetry
was worth something to him then. Was Ariosto
an amiable man, Signor?”
190 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“ He was most amiable. When in his twenty-
first year, he had the misfortune to lose his father,
and found a large family left on his hands in nar-
row circumstances. He was at first quite dismayed
at such a charge, but setting manfully to work for
them, his efforts were rewarded with success. An
affectionate son to his widowed mother, this young
man supplied the place of an anxious and care-
ful father to brothers and sisters who almost idol-
ized him.”

“ That was very kind and good,” said Beatrice ;
“it seems to me a poet is not the man to have
anxious cares about providing for a family.”

“ Very true, Beatrice, they are not in general
fitted for it. But though of a mild temper, Ariosto
could be roused into warmth. There is a laugh-
able anecdote told of his passing one day by a
potter's shop, and hearing the owner recite some of
his verses in a style of which he did not at all
approve. Enraged, he burst into the shop, and
broke vase after vase in his fury. When the pot-
ter expostulated, Ariosto replied with much com-
placency, ‘ Destroying your worthless vessels is
far too mild a punishment for the shameful way
in which you destroyed my beautiful verses!’ ”
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 191

‘“‘T hope, however, he paid the poor man for the
injury he had done him?” said Beatrice.

** He most probably did, for he was a man of
a generous disposition, who would not willingly do
an act of injustice. But I must wish you good
night, Beatrice, my hour of relaxation has ex-
pired.”

*¢ Are you then going to study, Signor?” asked
Beatrice, fixing her large eyes with a kind of awe
on one who spent so much time amongst his books.

“ Tam going into my observatory,” replied the
professor, smiling at the expression of her coun-
tenance; ‘Look up there, little girl, at those
myriads of glittering stars studding the blue ex-
panse! I am going to try and learn something
about them.”

“* But they are millions and millions of miles
away, Signor!”

“True; but they are not quite beyond our
reach, Beatrice. 'The immortal mind can soar as
high as the stars. Good night! adieu, Novelli.”

Beatrice thought for a few minutes of what the
professor had said, and then turning to her father
asked, “Is he an astronomer as well as a mathe-
matician ?”
192 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“‘ He is, Beatrice, and spends many hours in his
observatory whilst you are asleep.”

“¢ Then it was very kind of him to spare time to
talk with me, papa.”

“ He is a very amiable man; and, like the
poet Ariosto, took charge of his brothers and
sisters on the death of his father, assisting them to
the utmost of his power.”

“ Do you think he will find out anything con-
cerning the beautiful stars, papa ?”

“Very likely he may, my child; he is ex-
tremely clever, and most industrious and perse-
vering. From observing the vibrations of a lamp
swinging from the roof of the cathedral whilst he
was studying at Pisa, was suggested to him the
laws which regulate the movement of a pendulum;
and to him we also owe the re-invention of the
thermometer. He has tried many experiments to
ascertain the laws of motion; amongst others,
from the leaning tower of Pisa, in the presence
of the university and a crowd of people, he dropped
at the same moment two bodies of very different
weights to disprove the notion that heavy things
fall to the ground more quickly than light ones.”

“© Why so they do, surely, papa?”
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 193

“‘ So we thought, and so the Pisans persisted in
thinking and maintaining, with the sound of the
simultaneously falling weights still ringing in
their ears. ‘The professor has proved, however,
that with the exception of an inconsiderable differ-
ence, which he attributes to the resistance of the
air, a weight of one pound will reach the ground
in the same time as a weight of ten pounds of the
same material.”

“« How clever he must be! I thought he looked
like a philosopher. What is his name, papa?”

“‘ Galileo Galilei. You well may call him clever,
Beatrice; he is not only a philosopher, an astro-
nomer, and a mathematician, but a skilful me-
chanic also. He draws beautifully, is passionately
fond of painting, and is an excellent performer on
several instruments of music.”

“ And yet with all this knowledge, he was so
goodnatured as to sit down and tell me a story!
I like Signor Galileo.”

“There is one thing I do not understand in
him, however,” said Novelli. ‘“ He told me the
other day, in confidence, that it was his private
opinion the sun did not go round the earth.”

“¢ Not go round the earth!” exclaimed Beatrice

O
194 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

in surprise, ‘why where does he think it goes to,
papa?”

‘“‘ He is inclined to believe that the earth goes
round the sun.”

“ Oh! that would be impossible!” said the little
girl, in still greater astonishment than before; “can
the Signor really suppose the earth moves? What a
strange idea! how frightened I should be if I
thought it was true! Why, papa, he saw the sun
go down to-night, and he knows it will rise again
to-morrow on the other side of the ‘world. Oh!
Signor Galileo is not so clever as I thought he
was.”

“ Philosophers take strange notions into their
heads sometimes, my child; but the professor is a
clever man for all that. Come, we will return home.”

In those days people supposed the earth to be
immoveably fixed in the centre of the universe,
with the sun, moon, and planets revolving round
it once in every twenty-four hours. Copernicus
showed that this theory was a false one; it re-
mained for Galileo to prove it. The difficulties he
had to encounter in doing so were continual and
almost overwhelming, yet every step of his course
‘vas a triumph. The penetrating acuteness of his
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA, 195

invention, and the unswerving accuracy of his
judgment, must cause our wonder and admiration ;
while the persevering energy and patience with
which he combated the host of obstacles in his
path, must win our esteem and respect.

He was born on the very day and hour that
Michael Angelo died, and, like that great man,
persevered till he triumphed!

The fame of Galileo increased. Twice was he
re-elected to the professorship, his salary being
raised each time. Persons of the highest rank
attended his lectures, and such was the number of
his auditors, that on many occasions he was com-
pelled to adjourn to the open air, the lecture-room
not being large enough to contain the crowds of
people.

Suddenly a new star appeared in the heavens;
and the Paduans, both learned and unlearned,
flocked in numbers to the astronomer’s lecture-
room, to hear from him some explanation of the
prodigy. The first thing he did was to reproach
his auditors with their general insensibility to the
magnificent wonders of creation, daily and hourly
exposed to their view, in no respect less admirable
than the new star about which they were so
196 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

interested. He then showed that this splendid
phenomenon could not be, as some supposed, a
mere meteor, but that it must be situated amongst
the remote heavenly bodies. ‘This was quite in-
conceivable to those whose notions of an unchange-
able sky were quite at variance with the intro-
duction of any such new body; and we may
consider this lecture as the first public declaration
of Galileo’s hostility to the old and erroneous
astronomy.

In the time of which I am speaking, people
knew very little about the heavenly bodies, those
magnificent and glorious creations, the contempla-
tion of which must fill every thinking mind with
the most profound admiration and wonder. No
telescope had ever then been turned towards the
heavens; and it required a courageous mind to
contradict, and a strong one to bear down, a party
so prejudiced against all new discoveries, that they
refused to credit even their own senses. But the
illustrious Galileo persevered in his laborious and
indefatigable observations, and, undismayed by the
persecutions to which he was subjected, continued
to announce his new discoveries At length to
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 197

his great joy he discovered the telescope, and was
enabled to construct one. How often had he
gazed at the luminous orbs above him, and longed
to find out more concerning them, and the laws by
which they are guided!

And now he could doso. Oh! who can imagine
the thrilling joy the astronomer felt, when he first
directed his telescope to the starry firmament, and
by its aid discovered worlds till then unseen!
then, overwhelmed with the grandeur and magni-
ficence of the system he explored, he must have
acknowledged with the Psalmist how truly “ The
heavens declare the glory of God !’”—+then, as he
turned his glass night after night, and fresh dis-
coveries and new glories gradually burst upon his
gaze, revealing laws and systems before unknown,
he must have exclaimed with adoring reverence,
“‘ Great and marvellous are Thy works, Lord God
Almighty !”

But the people of Padua did not all approve of
Galileo’s discovery, and some of them even said it
was a wicked invention. The principal professor
in the university actually refused to look through
the telescope! They argued that the planetary
bodies which the astronomer saw through it could
198 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

not exist; they called him an impostor and a heretic,
and heaped abuse and scorn upon him. Heseldom
condescended to notice their invectives, otherwise
than by good-humoured retorts, and by prosecuting
his observations with renewed assiduity and zeal.

Galileo’s first telescope was no sooner conipleted
than he took it with him to Venice, where for a
whole month his time was employed in exhibiting
his instrument to the principal inhabitants, who
thronged the house to take a peep through it, which
seemed almost to them like taking a visit to another
world. At the end of that time the Doge caused it
to be intimated that such a present would not be
deemed unacceptable by the senate. Galileo took
the hint, and was rewarded for his complaisance by
a nomination for life to his professorship at Padua,
his salary being doubled.

About the same time this indefatigable philo-
sopher discovered the microscope.

“‘ My dear Beatrice,” said Novelli one day, en-
tering his daughter’s apartment, “ I have to tell
you of a most wonderful discovery made by Signor
Galileo. You know the first use to which he
turned his double eye-glass was to examine the
irregularities on the surface of the moon, which he
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 199

conceives to be mountains. He then directed his
attention to Jupiter, and after much fatigue and
many a midnight watch, to his great joy he has
discovered four moons, or satellites, revolving round
that beautiful planet!”

‘“‘ Oh, papa, is it possible!” exclaimed Beatrice.

“You may well be astonished, my child. I
cannot describe to you the extraordinary sensation
this discovery has produced. Many doubt, and
many positively refuse to believe it, whilst all are
struck with the utmost wonder, either at the new
and sublime view of the universe thus opened to
them, or at the daring audacity of Galileo in in-
venting such fables.”

“Fables! oh, papa! he is truth itself! how I wish
I could have a peep through his double eye-glass.”

“ He invites you, Beatrice, to do so. He would
have you see and admire the wonders of creation,
and acknowledge, at the same time, the happy re-
sults of persevering study.”

“ How goodnatured of him! and how wonderful
it seems that he can discover by his instrument
what goes on amongst those glittering stars! It is
a beautiful evening; let us go to the observatory
at once, dear papa.”
200 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

They went; and after a long gaze through the
wonderful ‘“‘ double eye-glass,” during which she
received many explanations from the kind pro-
fessor of what she beheld, the astonished and grati-
fied Beatrice returned home, humbled at thinking
how little she knew of the glorious works of creation,
and inwardly resolving that from henceforth she
would apply more diligently to the study of them.

On the discovery of Jupiter’s satellites the
astronomer, Kepler, wrote thus to his friend :—

“ T was sitting idle at home, thinking of you,
most excellent Galileo, and your letters, when
Wachenfels stopped his carriage at my door to tell
me the news, that by the help of your double eye-
glass you had discovered four new planets; and
such was my wonder when I heard it, such my
agitation at seeing an old dispute between us
decided in this way, that what with his joy, my
surprise, and the laughter of both, we were for
some time unable, he to speak, or I to listen.”

But while Kepler rejoiced, others were very
angry. Some argued that the discovery was con-
trary to Scripture, as it would make the planetary
bodies more than seven in number, and seven was
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 201

the emblem of perfection. Others said that as there
were seven windows given to animals in the domi-
cile of the head, namely, two eyes, two ears, two
nostrils, and one mouth, to enlighten, to warm,
and to nourish the body, so there could be but
seven planets in the heavens; others said that the
telescope, though true for the earth, represented
celestial objects falsely; while some contented them-
selves simply with the assertion that the planets
were not there; and could not be.

“Oh, my dear Kepler,” wrote Galileo, “ how I
wish we could have one hearty laugh together,
Here is the principal professor of philosophy in
Padua, whom I have repeatedly and urgently re-
quested to look at the moon and planets through
my glass, and yet he pertinaciously refuses to do
so! Why are you not here? what shouts of laughter
we should have at this glorious folly! and then to
hear the professor of philosophy at Pisa, labouring
before the Grand Duke with logical arguments, as
if with magical incantations, to charm the new
planets out of the sky!”

The intense interest which the discovery of
Jupiter’s satellites inspired, created for Galileo
202 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

friends as well as enemies. The Grand Duke of
Tuscany, after several times examining the new
planets through his telescope, begged the instru-
ment of him, that he might lay it up m the museum
at Florence, amongst other rare and precious
curiosities. Galileo presented it to him, and re-
ceived from the Grand Duke in’return a present
worth more than a thousand florins, and an earnest
entreaty that he would attach himself to his
service and reside in Florence, with the title of
Philosopher and principal Mathematician to his
Highness. As he found he should have no duties
to perform, and consequently leisure to complete
the treatises he was writing, Galileo accepted the
proposal.

You may believe that Novelli and his daughter
Beatrice were very sorry when the talented and
amiable professor left Padua. They had had many
interesting and instructive conversations together,
and the mind of Beatrice had gradually opened to
the delight of acquiring knowledge. It was one of
her greatest treats to sit by her father’s side in the
shady alcove, and listen to his discourse with the
astronomer. Sometimes they would converse on
one subject, sometimes on another, but all was
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 203

improving ; and Beatrice ever learned something in
those pleasant evenings to raise her thoughts and
do her good.

One day her father having spoken of the instru-
ments which the philosopher had invented, Galileo
observed, “‘ Soon after I had first used them, I was
struck with the thought that while the telescope
speaks to us of the unnumbered worlds which
engage the attention of the Almighty, and causes
us to feel our own nothingness, while we contem-
plate His majesty, and power, and wisdom, the
microscope, by revealing the myriads of tiny in-
sects formed with such wonderful skill and rejoicing
in His providential goodness and watchful care,
tells us of His love and tender mercy. The glorious
orbs above, and the smallest insects at our feet,
are alike dependent on Him.”

“ Most true,” replied Novelli; “ our minds may
well be filled with awe and reverence when gazing
on the starry firmament. You have made great
discoveries, excellent Galileo, but perchance there
is still much to learn concerning that spangled
sky.”

“ Most undoubtedly there is, my friend. We
are yet very ignorant of the heavenly mechanism,
904 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

How great and common an error is the mistake of
those who persist in making their knowledge and
apprehension the measure of the apprehension and
knowledge of God; as if that alone were perfect,
which they understand to be so! If one of our
most celebrated architects had had to distribute
this vast multitude of fixed stars through the great
vault of heaven, I believe he would have disposed
them with beautiful arrangements of squares, hex-
agons, and octagons; he would have dispersed
the larger ones among the middle-sized and the
less, so as to correspond exactly with each other ;
and then he would think he had contrived admi-
rable proportions; but God, on the contrary, has
shaken them out from His hand as if by chance;
and we, forsooth, must think that He has scattered
them up yonder without any regularity, symmetry,
or elegance!”

There was a pause of some minutes, during which
all gazed intently at the deep blue vault above
them, glittering with a thousand stars, and then
Novelli exclaimed, “ Oh, Signor Galileo! how far
more honourable and praiseworthy it is, with
watching, and toil, and study, to discover some-
thing admirable and new in the vast book which
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 205

nature holds ever open before those who have eyes
to see, than to pass a listless and lazy existence,
contented with the knowledge we possess, and
leaving the world neither wiser nor better than
we found it! Tell me, Signor,—that beautiful
moon, which looks to us so smooth and polished,
they say you have discovered irregularities on its
surface, which you conceive to be mountains; is
it so?”

“ T do imagine it. By the aid of my glass, I
can distinctly trace the outlines of mountains and
other inequalities in the moon; though my oppo-
nents say I am utterly mistaken, and that I take
delight in distorting and ruining the fairest works
of nature. One, however, constrained to allow the
evidence of these inequalities, asserts that every
part of the moon which to us appears hollow is, in
fact, entirely filled up with a clear crystal substance,
imperceptible to the senses, but which preserves to
the planet her smooth, unalterable surface. I told
him,” continued the astronomer, smiling, “ that this
was an admirable idea, provided only it could be
proved; but I was ready to agree to it, on condi-
tion I might be allowed to raise upon his smooth
surface crystal mountains, which nobody can per-
206 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

ceive, ten times higher than those which I have
actually seen and measured. Since that, I have
heard no more of the crystalline theory.”

« And do you indeed believe, Signor Galileo,
that the world on which we live revolves round the
sun?” asked Beatrice. ‘‘'The Scriptures do not
tell us so.”

“IT am inclined to believe, Beatrice,” replied
Galileo, “‘ that the intention of the sacred Scrip-
tures is to give to mankind the information neces-
sary for their salvation, and which, surpassing all
human knowledge, can by no other means be
accredited than by the mouth of the Holy Spirit.
But I do not hold it necessary to believe, that the
same God who has endowed us with senses, with
speech and intellect, intended that we should
neglect the use of these. The object of the Scrip-
tures is not to teach us astronomy ;—expressions
are used in the sacred writings as are intelligible
to the vulgar belief concerning the structure of the
universe ; but so little notice is taken of this science,
that none of the planets, except the moon «nd
Venus, (under the name of Lucifer,) are so much
as named there. In my own mind, | am convinced,
from long and careful observation, that the earth
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 207

and other planets revolve round the sun as their
centre.”

This opinion of Galileo’s brought him many ene-
mies. The pope and cardinals did not at all approve
of the Copernican system ; indeed, they had burned
one of its advocates, Bruno, at Rome, in the year
1600. They now threatened Galileo with impri-
sonment if he persisted in spreading his notions.
But one of the most striking features in the cha-
racter of this great man, was his mvincible love of
truth, and abhorrence of that spiritual despotism
which had so long brooded over Europe. The
uncompromising boldness with which he published
and supported his opinions, regarding little the
power and authority of those who advocated the
contrary doctrines, raised against him a host of
foes, who united to crush, if possible, so dangerous
an innovator. The Jesuits, in particular, were
alarmed; they fancied they saw in the spirit of
Galileo’s writings the same inquisitive temper
which they had already found so inconvenient in
Martin Luther and his adherents. Their conster-
nation increased every day; for the astronomer
drew around him a numerous band of followers,
all imbued with the same spirit of inquiry; and his
208 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

favourite scholars were successful candidates for
professorships in many of the most celebrated uni-
versities of Italy.

Meantime, his discoveries increased. One day
he announced the detection of innumerable stars,
invisible to the unassisted sight, in that remarkable
cloudy appearance in the heavens, known to us
familiarly by the name of “the milky way;”—
another, he delighted all his friends, and raised the
anger of his foes, by communicating the discovery
he had made of the phases of Mercury and Venus.
At one time would be circulated the astonishing
intelligence that “ Signor Galileo had discovered
two strange appendages to Saturn,” (which, in after
years, and by the aid of more powerful telescopes,
were found to be his rings;)—at another, that he had
observed dark spots on the body of the sun. His
opponents were indignant; they had scarcely time
to compound anything like an argument against
him and his theories, before they found him in
possession of some new fact which they were quite
unprepared to meet. All they could do was to
heap upon him abuse and contempt.

I cannot now tell you of all the discoveries in
astronomy and philosophy made by this indefa-
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 209

tigable and persevering man, or of the many- books
he wrote concerning them; you may read about
them when you are older; but I must speak of
one of these publications, which caused a great
sensation.

Galileo had received formal notice from the
Vatican that he was not to teach the Copernican
system of astronomy, or in any way to venture to
assert that the earth moved round the sun. But
the truth-loving philosopher, convinced that his
opinions were correct, could not remain silent on
so important a point. Fearing the anger of the
pope, if he too boldly expressed his own sentiments
after the prohibition he had received, he wrote a
book under the title of “ Dialogues on the Ptole-
maic and Copernican systems,” in which, without
making his own views very prominent, he leaves
his readers to form their own conclusions from the
lively remarks of two speakers maintaining the
opposite opinions, and a clever friend who draws
out the observations on both sides. It was evident,
however, which speaker had the best of the argu-
ment; and the book was condemned by the In-
quisition.

And now Galileo, an aged man of seventy years,

P
210 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

and in very infirm health, was brought to Rome
to be examined by that dread tribunal. It was
an affecting sight to see this venerable sage, clothed
in the sackcloth of a repentant criminal, standing
before the ignorant and bigoted cardinals and
prelates, and compelled to renounce and abjure,
as “impious, false, and absurd,” the opinions
which his whole existence had been consecrated to
form and strengthen. ‘The exciting and touching
interest of the scene, the awful formality of the
proceedings, the black robes and solemn counte-
nances of the judges, and the bending form of the
aged prisoner, whose enlightened mind and vigo-
rous intellect soared far above them, trammelled
down as they were by ignorance and superstition,
afforded another striking proof of the cruelty and
bigotry of that intolerant and wicked tnbunal.
After passing sentence upon Galileo and his book,
and solemnly declaring that the theory of the sun
being immoveable, and that the earth moved, was
an “absurd, false, and heretical” theory, his judges
caused him to kneel down before them and take an
cath to that effect.

Broken down as he was with age and infirmities,
and overawed by the merciless tribunal to whose
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 211

power he was subjected, and of whose cruel tor-
tures for the refractory he was well aware, it was
not without extreme reluctance and pain that the
truthful Galileo was compelled thus formally to
declare his whole life to have been a continued
falsehood, and assert his renunciation of those
opinions to which he still clung more fondly than
ever. But the terrors of the Inquisition could
appal the stoutest heart. He knelt, and in the
presence of all assembled, declared solemnly “ that
his past views had been erroneous, absurd, and
heretical, that the sun was not the centre of the
system, and that the earth did ot move round it;
and that he abjured and detested his former errors
and heresy.”’

As he rose from his knees, after making this
declaration, he whispered to one of his friends who
stood near, “ It moves, for all that.”

The aged astronomer had, previously to his
examination, been kept in strict seclusion in Rome,
for more than four months; he was now sent to
the dungeons of the Inquisition, with orders to
perform certain penances at stated intervals. His
numerous friends, who felt the deepest sympathy
with him, had been most earnest in recommending
212 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

him to acquiesce in whatever the Inquisitors re-
quired him to say; and thus his life was saved.
‘They well knew that even if he adhered to the
truth, a tribunal that carried on its inquiries in.
secret, could at any time put words into the mouths
of its victims, and give them to the world as
genuine. Copies of Galileo’s sentence and abju-
ration were immediately sent in every direction,
and orders given that they should be read publicly
in the universities. People were astonished and
alarmed; they could not understand how Pope
Urban VIII, who had been such a friend to the
astronomer, should sanction these proceedings
against him. His opinions, however, had widely
spread—though every copy of his book had been
burnt at Rome—and the celebrated Pascal wrote
to the Jesuits, saying—“It is in vain that you
have procured against Galileo a decree from Rome
condemning his opinion of the -earth’s motion.
Assuredly that will never prove it to be at rest;
and if we have unerring observations proving that
it does turn round, not all mankind together can
keep it from turning, or themselves from turning
with it.”

While the philosopher remained in his dungeon
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 213

cell, an officer of the Inquisition entering one day
questioned him as to his belief in a Supreme
Being. Galileo replied, pointing to a straw on
the floor of his dungeon, “ From the structure of
that object alone can I infer with certainty the
existence of an intelligent Creator.”

The remaining nine years of Galileo’s life were
years of pain and humiliation. He was ordered
to reside in seclusion, as a prisoner, at his villa of
Arcetri, near Florence. Here he gave himself up
to his philosophical studies, but suffered from
constant indisposition and pain: At first his
friends were allowed to visit him, and he much
prized this privilege, and charmed every one by
his varied powers of conversation; but latterly
even this favour was denied him. Celebrated
foreigners, who had heard in other lands of the
fame of the Paduan astronomer, bent their steps to
the villa at Arcetri.

“ Sacred be
His villa; justly was it called the Gem!
Sacred the lawn, where many a cypress threw
Its length of shadow, while he watched the stars.”

But a still more terrible calamity than imprison-
ment overshadowed the declining years of this
214 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

illustrious man. He became totally blind! Few
can bear unmoved the loss of the invaluable bles-
sing of sight; with what peculiar and terrible
severity then must it have fallen on Galileo! on
him who had declared he would never cease to use
the senses which God had given him, in showing
forth the glory of His works, and the business of
whose life had been the splendid fulfilment of that
undertaking! He bore this calamity with won-
derful patience and resignation, expressing himself
thus to one who loved him :—

‘¢ Alas! your dear friend and servant Galileo
has become totally and irreparably blind; so that
this heaven, this earth, this universe, which with
wonderful observations I had enlarged a hundred
and a thousand times beyond the belief of by-gone
ages, henceforth for me is shrunk into the narrow
space which I myself fill in it.—So it pleases God;
it shall therefore please me also.”

‘“‘ The noblest eye is darkened,” said one of his
friends, “‘ which nature ever made; an eye so

rivileged, and gifted with such rare qualities,
that it may with truth be said to have seen more
than all of those who are gone, and to have
opened the eyes of all who are to come.”
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 215

It was truly a heavy calamity for such a man!
The intelligent eye which night after night, in
many a midnight watch, had scanned the starry
firmament, was now for ever dim! No more could
he explore the wonders of the heavens, or search
out the laws which govern the planetary host; no
more could he admire the glorious works of nature,
which had been to him such a constant source of
delight! The beautiful scenes around him, the blue
sky, the flowers, the sparkling waterfalls, his very
books, were closed to him for ever! The light
was quenched.

As long as power was left him, he had unceas-
ingly pursued his astronomical observations. Just
before his sight began to fail, he had observed a
new phenomenon in the moon, now known by the
name of the moon’s libration, which closes the long
list of his discoveries in the heavens. And now,
an aged man, blind, afilicted, persecuted, and a
prisoner, Galileo waited his dismissal.

He was seated one evening under his favourite
tree on the verdant lawn, when a stranger, a young
man of pleasing appearance, desired to be intro-
duced to him. Galileo received him courteously,
placed him by his side, and entered into conversa-
216 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

tion with him. Though he saw not the noble and
intelligent countenance of the interesting stranger,
yet the philosopher felt he was conversing with a
man of genius and intellect, and delighted with his
companion, he for a time forgot his sorrows. The
young foreigner was equally. charmed with his
host, and much sweet and pleasant discourse they
had together. On various subjects they conversed,
and on all felt that they were kindred spirits. The
stranger youth never forgot that evening; and
when, returned to his English home, he, in after
years, gave forth to the world that sublime and
noble production, the Paradise Lost, it was found
to contain many beautiful allusions to Galileo and
his astronomy.

Ah! little did John Milton think, when con-
versing with the sightless Galileo, that he himself
was about to suffer from the same terrible calamity!

Such were the closing days in the life of this
profound philosopher and searcher after truth!
Science justly regards him as one of her most
valued sons; and as century succeeds century, the
importance of his discoveries becomes more and
more apparent.

In the church of Santa Croce at Florence lie the
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 217
remains of Michael Angelo, and “ The Starry

Galileo.”
“* Tilustrious sage! thine eye is closed,

To which their secret paths new stars exposed.
Haply thy spirit in some higher sphere,
Soars with the motions which it measured here,
Soft be thy slumbers, Seer, for thanks to thee,
The earth now turns without a heresy.
Dost thou, whose keen perception pierced the cause,
Which gives the pendulum its mystic laws,
Now trace each orb with telescopic eyes,
And solve the eternal clockwork of the skies:
While thy worn frame enjoys its long repose,
And Santa Croce heals Arcetri’s woes ®”

I cannot better close this story than in the words
of our own great astronomer, Herschel, who speaks
thus concerning Jupiter’s satellites :—

“‘ The discovery of these bodies was one of the
first brilliant results of the invention of the tele-
scope; one of the first great facts which opened
the eyes of mankind to the system of the universe,
which taught them the comparative insignificance
of theix own planet, and the superior vastness and
nicer mechanism of those other bodies, which had
before been distinguished from the stars only by
their motion, and wherein none but the boldest
218 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

thinkers had ventured to suspect a community of
nature with our own globe. This discovery gave
the holding turn to the opinions of mankind re-
specting the Copernican system, the analogy pre-
sented by these little bodies—little, however, only
in comparison with the great central body about
which they revolve—performing their beautiful
revolutions in perfect harmony and order about it,
being too strong to be resisted. This elegant sys-
tem was watched with all the curiosity and interest
the subject naturally inspired.

“« 'The eclipses of the satellites speedily attracted
attention, and the more when it was discerned, as it
speedily was, by Galileo himself, that they atforded
a ready method of determining the difference of
longitudes of distant places on the earth’s surface.
Thus the first astronomical solution of the great
problem of the longitude, the first mighty step
which pointed out a connexion between speculative
astronomy and practical utility, and which, re-
placing the dreams of astrology by nobler visions,
showed how the stars might really, and without
fiction, be called arbiters of the destinies of empires
—we owe to the satellites of Jupiter, those atoms
imperceptible to the naked eye, and floating like
THE ASTRONOMER OF PADUA. 219

motes in the beam of their primary— itself an atom
to our sight, noticed only by the careless vulgar as
a large star, and by the philosophers of former ages
as something moving among the stars, they knew
not what, or why.”
* What though no real voice or sound,

Amid these radiant orbs be found,

In reason’s ear they all rejoice,

And utter forth a glorious voice,

For ever singing, as they shine—
The Hand that made us is Divine.”
No. VII.

THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES.

—_—@—-

Ir was on a lovely evening in the month of May,
1646, that a fisherman’s boat, with its white sail,
was seen crossing the bay, which for beauty has
perhaps not its equal in the world—the Bay of
Naples. As the little bark, impelled by a favour-
ing breeze, flew rapidly onwards over the deep blue
waters, the fisherman, a handsome, active young
man of about twenty-four years of age, gazed with
fond admiration on the beauteous scene before him;
his eye resting with peculiar pleasure on that
quarter of the city in which his own humble home
was situated.
“ Not a grove,
Citron, or pine, or cedar, not a grot

Sea-worn and mantled with the gadding vine,
But breathes enchantment. Nota cliff but flings
)
4

ovum

- x ee

Se nt S.A
MO a


THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 221

On the clear wave some image of delight,
Some cabin roof glowing with crimson flowers,
Some ruin’d temple or fallen monument,

To muse on as the bark is gliding by.”

“ See, Antonio! see, my son!” he cried to a
curly-headed little fellow, his only companion in
the boat, “look at our beautiful city! is she not
like a queen upon the waters? and see the moun-
tains glowing in the setting sun! are they not
glorious? Beautiful Naples! there is not such
another city in the world! And yonder is our
home, Antonio! you will see it plainer ere long;
we shall very soon be there now.”

“ But I cannot see mother,” said Antonio; “I
should like to see her best. Where is she ?”

‘“« Looking out for us, my boy, you may be sure,
and preparing our supper, like a good wife as she
is. She will be well pleased at our success to-day,
Antonio; these fine fish will fetch a good price in
the market.”

“ ‘When shall I be old enough to stand in the
market-place and sell the fish, dear father? I should
like to do that,” said the child, looking up entrea-
tingly with his large dark eyes.

“ Very soon, my little one,” replied the fisher-
922 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

man, fondly stroking the curly locks of his child,
“very soon; you will be one of the best little
merchants in Naples one day; and then, some time
or other, you may perhaps have a boat of your
own; and go out with your nets, as I do.”

‘“‘ Ah! then I should be happy,” said Antonio,
clapping his tiny hands. ‘“ And then we should be
so rich; we could have as much macaroni as we
liked to eat! I hope I shall make haste and grow
up, father.”

“ That you may have plenty of macaroni, Tonio?”
said his father, laughing, as he proceeded to trim
the sail. ‘ Ah, it is a happy life we fishermen lead,
my child! especially when the fish come into our
nets as they have to-day. With the blue skies
above us, and the blue waters all around us, with a
boat of one’s own, and the work not too hard, what
more can we wish for? And then the return in
the evening to a home like mine, and a good wife
like Teresa! Why, I could not be a happier man
were I king of Naples.”

“ Who is the king of Naples?” asked Antonio,
after a pause.

‘“‘ Naples, at present, is under the dominion of
Philip IV. of Spain, and he governs here by a
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 223

viceroy. Some are discontented at the state of
things, but it little matters to me. See! there is
thy mother waving her handkerchief! now, my
boy, we are at home.”

In a few minutes the boat touched the landing-
place, and the fisherman springing out, was imme-
diately surrounded by a crowd of his acquaintance,
congratulating him on his well-filled nets. Laugh-
ingly passing through the group, with a kind nod
to one, a smile to another, and a merry jest to a
third, the young man pressed on to where a pleas-
ing-looking young woman was standing, whose
earnest eyes and merry smile spoke a welcome to
the sailor.

“‘ Here is your little one, my Teresa,” said he,.
as he placed the child in his mother’s arms, and
gave her at the same time an affectionate salute,
“he is rather tired, I fancy; but has done very well
for the first trip.”

‘““ And you, dear Masaniello, you have had a
good day, I see? I suppose the little one helped
to throw the nets,” said the fisherman’s wife, as she
smilingly caressed the child in her arms.

“Oh! he will be a fine fisherman one of these
days,” replied Masaniello; “we must soon teach
2994 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

him to take the fish to the market. Thanks,
Piedro! thanks, good Ludovico!” he cried to two
young men who were busy unlading the boat;
‘‘ you must take some of these fine fish home with
you for supper.”

‘“ No, no, Masaniello; who is so ready to do a
kind turn as you are? You shall keep your fish,
and get a good price for them to-morrow. We
want you, when you have supped, to come down
with us to the point; we cannot get on at all with-
out you.”

Masaniello was a general favourite. In active
exercises he always took the lead with his young
companions, while his frank good nature, his gaiety,
his kindness of heart, won him the love of all his
associates.

The young fishermen laughed. ‘‘ You are good
friends, truly,” said he, “to take me from home
just when I have returned to it! Come, Teresa,
let us go in to supper; poor Antonio will make sad
havoc with the macaroni.”

It was a happy, affectionate, and merry party
that evening in the fisherman’s hut—the indus-
trious and kind husband, the gentle and- loving
wife, and the playful, happy child. Thankful for
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 225

the present, they looked not with anxiety to the
future. Alas! their happiness was to be fearfully

interrupted !

A year passed away; and a crowd of lazzaroni
were assembled one evening on the beach, not far
from Masaniello’s hut. The lazzaroni are the idle
beggars with which Naples abounds, who, as long
as they can get sufficient food without the trouble
of labour, are satisfied. On the present occasion
they looked sullen and discontented. Their care-
less apathy seemed to be roused; and their usual
quiet laziness had given way to loud murmuring
words and threatening gestures.

“ It takes the food out of our very mouths!”
exclaimed one man, with vehemence; ‘‘ and we
neither can or will submit to it! What right has
the king of Spain to lay such a tax on the
Neapolitan people? A tax on all the fruit and
vegetables brought to market! How are we to
live now? Itwas hard work before, but now—we
must starve.”

“< Nay,” cried another, “‘ what is Philip of Spain
tous? why should we starve to please him? ‘The
Spanish treasury has already been enriched by more

Q
926 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

than a hundred millions of ducats from Naples;
but the more they have, the more they want!”

‘¢ Down with the tax!” shouted the third; “ we
will resist it, my friends; in spite of king or
viceroy !”

“ We will! we will!” cried the incensed mob;
“not a carlin shall be paid; the Duke of Arcos
may look elsewhere for his gold than amongst the
Neapolitan peasants!”

A Spanish flotilla lay at anchor in the bay; the
most conspicuous vessel of which was the Admiral’s
galley, remarkable for its strength and beauty.

“« See there!”’ said a young man in rags, as he
pointed to the ship so peacefully floating on the
calm waters; ‘‘see there! in yonder galley lie
300,000 ducats, ready for transmission to Spain—
ducats wrung from the Neapolitan peasants, to fill
the coffers of King Philip!”

“They shall never reach him!” muttered one of
the crowd; and soon deep and whispered threats
passed from mouth to mouth.

That night, when all was still, and the bright
moon shedding its clear light on the lovely bay,
the Spanish galley was discovered to be on fire.
All efforts to save the gallant ship were in vain—
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 237

she blew up with a tremendous explosion, and with
all her treasure, sunk in the deep waters!

The Neapolitan mob, once roused, proceeded from
one act of violence to another. The Duke of Arcos
could not appear in the streets without being in-
sulted; seditious clamours were heard throughout
the city; insurrectionary placards were posted in the
market-place; and the booth erected for the collec-
tion of the tax was burned to the ground. ‘These
riotous proceedings had, however, no effect on the
Duke of Arcos ; though informed by the nobles how
heavily the tax pressed on the poor, he refused to
repeal it.

Masaniello, the fisherman, though equally with
his countrymen he hated the obnoxious tax, yet had
refrained from joining in any of their outbreaks of
fury. Happy in his home and in his daily occu-
pation, he went cheerfully on his way, with a smile
and a kind word forall. But one day, on returning
home, singing as usual, he was met at the door of
his cottage by the little Antonio, who, weeping
bitterly, exclaimed, “‘ They have taken her away,
father! they have taken dear mother to prison!”

“To prison! your mother to prison! what do
you mean, child ?”’ said Masaniello, m surprise.
2298 sHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“ Tt is too true, friend Masaniello!” observed
Piedro, who just then entered the hut; “I have
been looking out for you this hour, to tell you
of it.”

“¢ What does it mean?” again asked the young
fisherman, in an agitated voice, ‘“‘ who has dared to
lay a hand on my wife? Speak, Piedro.”

“ Your wife was bringing home some flour ;—
to evade the tax, she concealed it in her basket
—the collector discovered it, and took her to
prison.”’

“ To prison! my Teresa to prison!” exclaimed
Masaniello, with flashing eyes; and without another
word he rushed from the cottage.

But Teresa had done wrong in attempting to
evade the payment of the tax; it was dishonest ;
and her husband could not obtain her release until
he did so with a sum of money.

From that day Masaniello conceived a violent
hatred against the Spanish government; he was no
longer light-hearted; dark thoughts took possession
of his breast. The fisherman of Naples was destined
to experience more rapid changes of condition in
the troubles which ensued, than perhaps any man
ever underwent in the same space of time.
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 229

It was Sunday—a peaceful and a happy day in
England! the resting-place given us amidst the
hurry of life, to remind us of eternity! the quiet
aud grateful pause from worldly cares, to prepare
us for an everlasting Sabbath!

“Rejoice! for the day that God hath blest
Comes tranquilly on with its promised rest !
His light is on all below, above,

The light of gladness, of light, of love ;

Oh ! then, on the breath of the early air,
Send upward the incense of grateful prayer !”

But alas! the sun which on that Sunday shone
in brilliant splendour over the beautiful city of
Naples and her lovely bay, lit up anything.but a
scene of peace and gladness. Several peasants had
come in from the country with fruit and vegetables
for sale, and were assembled in the market-place to
dispose of their stores. It was a festival-day also;
and sham fights, and the storming of a wooden
castle, amused the crowd in the streets. The leader
in these sports was Masaniello; unanimously chosen
as such, for his readiness of wit, and great personal
activity in all those manly games which delight the
people of Naples.

“< Fine ripe figs and juicy melons! who will buy?
230 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

who will buy?” cried a hard-working young pea-
sant, as he displayed a well-filled basket of delicious
fruit.

** No one, till you have paid me the tax,” said a
collector, stepping up to him.

“« Paid the tax! what, before I sell my fruit?”
cried Domenico; “ what do you mean ?”

“TI mean what I say,” replied the man; “ such is
the provost’s law; so come, one carlin on every
pound you have there.”

“This is shameful!” exclaimed the indignant
Domenico; “this is not to be borne! Here is a
new law, my friends!’ he said, raising his voice ;
“JT am to pay the tax on what has as yet pro-
duced me no profit! Is that justice ?”

«“‘ Shame! shame!” cried the people gathering
round, and ever ready to take part against the col-
lectors of the obnoxious tax; ‘“‘ what new law is
this?—Ah, here comes the provost—and Masaniello
too—let us know what he thinks. Masaniello! is
it just to pay the impost before the fruit is
sold?”

*¢ Just! no! who says it is?” replied the young
fisherman, making his way through the crowd;
“ what! is it Domenico, my Teresa’s brother, they
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES, 231

are tyrannizing over!” he exclaimed, his dark
eyes gleaming with passion; “this shall not be,
while I can prevent it!”’ and in an instant he was
at his side.

** Ay,” said Domenico, now sure of support,
“but they shall get neither tax nor fruit from me,
I promise them;” and so saying, he threw the
basket of figs- amongst the crowd; crying out,
“Take those who will; our tyrants shall have
none of them!”

“They shall have this at least!” exclaimed
Masaniello, his sympathy and passion alike aroused ;
and seizing a bunch of figs, he flung it violently in
the provost’s face.

This was the signal for a general riot. Missiles
of every description were thrown at the provost
and his attendants; the toll-bars were torn down ;
the booths of the collectors burned; and in avery
few minutes the market-place was at the mercy of
the infuriated populace.

““The Neapolitan people must pay no more
taxes !’’ cried Masaniello.

The cry was canght up and repeated by a thou-
sand voices. ‘‘No more taxes! no more taxes!

Masaniello shall be our chief!”
232 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

In a few eloquent words the mistaken fisherman
addressed the people. He told them that this was
the crisis of their fate; that they had gone too far to
go back then; and that if they would stand by him
he would obtain a redress of all their grievances.

The excited multitude vehemently applauding
the address, shouted, “‘ Lead us on, good Masaniello!
lead us on to the viceroy’s palace !”’

And on to the residence of the viceroy the rioters
marched. Rapidly increasing in numbers, and
armed with such weapons as they ould procure
from the gunsmiths’ shops or elsewhere, they
forced their way through the guards, and stood
before the palace, loudly insisting on the abolition
of all taxes whatsoever.

Terrified by their violence, destitute of any force
on which he could rely, and perceiving that every
hour increased the popular excitement, the Duke
of Arcos readily assented to every demand. ‘“ You
shall have all you desire, my good people,” he said,
as he appéared on the balcony, “be calm; the
taxes shall be repealed.”

“ He will not keep his word!”’ cried one of the
mob, “‘ we know him to be crafty and treacherous.”’

“ Will he not?” said another, “‘ then what right
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 233

has he to stand there, and utter falsehoods to the
people of Naples?” and as he spoke, he aimed a
stone at the Duke’s head.

The Duke instantly retired; and the rioters,
with wild shouts rushing forwards into the palace,
began to destroy the valuable furniture it con-
tained.

All at once a cry was heard—“ He is escaping!
he is flying from us!”

The terrified Duke was indeed at that moment
driving from his palace as fast as four horses could
carry him. With loud threats of vengeance the
furious mob pursued the coach, and soon stopped
its further progress.

The unfortunate noble gave himself up for lost
as the fierce Lazzaroni pressed round him with in-
sulting language and menacing gestures. ‘The cry
of Masaniello— Do him no harm !”’ was unheeded.
One, bolder than the rest, struck the viceroy, ex-
claiming, “ Your day of tyranny is over, proud
Spaniard!’’- Pale and agitated, he sunk back in
the carriage, expecting instant death; when sud-
denly a thought struck him. Taking out a well-
filled purse, he scattered the gold and silver pieces
amongst the crowd. A scramble immediately
234 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

ensued, and the postilions at the moment setting
spurs to their horses, the Duke escaped.

Then the mob proclaimed Masaniello “ Captain
General of the faithful people of Naples ;”—and
he who had been a humble fisherman in the
morning, was an absolute sovereign ere the night
closed in.

With loud acclamations a platform was hastily
raised for him in the great square, and there he sat
in judgment, in his fisherman’s attire, with a naked
sword in his hand. Thence he issued his orders,
and his will was law.

But Masaniello was a changed man. His kind-
heartedness seemed to have given place to one deep
feeling of revenge. ‘Surrounded by the lowest
rabble, his commands were instantly and eagerly
obeyed. The prisons were broken open; the man~
sions of several, whom he considered averse to the
liberties of the people, were set on fire; and all
who resisted put to the sword. One building, con-
taining a large quantity of gunpowder, was blown
up, and eighty-seven persons perished!

The flames of burning houses lighted every part
of the city; and the Sunday closed amidst the
shrieks of the wounded, the lamentations of the
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 235

relatives of the slain, and the savage exultations of
the rioters.

When Masaniello returned home that evening
his brow was flushed, and. his whole frame trembled
with excitement. ‘Take the child away, Teresa!”
he exclaimed as the little Antonio ran forward to
embrace him, “‘ and give me some supper; I have
eaten nothing to-day.” His manner was almost
stern as he spoke, and tears filled Teresa’s eyes ;
it was the first time he had ever returned home
without a kind word for his wife, and a kiss for his
child. But she well knew how he had been em-
ployed that day, and sending Antonio out to play,
she hastily set before her husband his favourite
dish of macaroni. Masaniello, however, did not
eat; he remained in moody silence, leaning his
head on his hands, while Teresa tenderly pressed
him to take some refreshment.

“* Come, it will revive you, dear Tomasso,” she
said, laying her hand on his shoulder, “ you have
done so much to-day!”

“‘T have,”’ said the fisherman, “ but I have done
good, have I not, Teresa?’ he asked, as he looked up
anxiously in her face. “ We shall be happy still.”
236 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

“Oh! I hope so, my dearest Tomasso,” replied
his wife, ‘why should you doubt it?”

“ JT do not know; but sometimes—I fee]l—oh !
Teresa, my head is hot—so hot! But they call me
their liberator, and I will free them; yes—and
they will love me and bless me—will they not,
Teresa?”

“ They will, my husband; calm yourself,” said
Teresa, bathing his burning forehead.

‘“ Hark! those shrieks!” cried the fisherman,
as his sturdy frame trembled in every limb;
“ Teresa, I am not cruel, am I? yet those shrieks!
oh how dreadful are they !”

Teresa tenderly endeavoured to soothe her excited
husband. She told him he would be a blessing to
Naples, and that when taxes were abolished, every
Neapolitan would love and-revere the name of
Masaniello.

By degrees he grew calmer. ‘“ You are a good
wife,” he said, grasping her hand; “ it is cool and
quiet here; it is ever quiet and happy in my home.
But where is the little one, the bambino, Teresa?
I have not seen him to-day.”’

The laughing, merry child, was soon seated on
his father’s knee; and amused by his innocent
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 237

prattle, the fisherman’s brow relaxed into a smile.
“Thou art a happy one, my bird!” he said, as he
put back the clustering curls from his forehead;
“ sing to me, my bambino.”

Antonio, in a sweet, melodious voice, trilled forth
one of the simple airs of his country. The song of
the child had its effect. Masaniello, in the presence
of those he loved, was again calm and happy.

Just then Ludovico entered. ‘ Come, Masan-
iello!” he exclaimed, “ the council waits for you;
all are in attendance ;—are you not ready, good
Masaniello? there is much to be arranged to-
night.”

The fisherman started up. “ Arranged!” he
said, ‘‘ truly there is much to be arranged before
to-morrow’s dawn!—much, good Ludovico! They
wait for me, you say? Come then; not a moment
will I delay our great work.”

““ Ah, my Tomasso,” said Teresa, seizing her
husband’s hand, “ go not forth again; you are both
feverish and weary; stay with us, dearest Tom-
asso.”’

“Teresa, my wife,” he replied, “‘ I go to obtain
freedom for the people of Naples! You would not
detain me, surely? Adieu!”
238 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

The two fishermen hastened to the tower of the
Carmelites, where the council of rioters met, and
poor Teresa, with a sigh, sat down by her child.

Few slept that night in Naples. Masaniello
remained with his council, which was composed
of the lowest of the rioters, till the morning
broke.

The next day the tumults increased with ten-
fold violence. Masaniello, beginning to display a
still fiercer hatred of the nobility, again desired his
followers to destroy the houses of those whom he
considered enemies of the people. Fearful scenes
ensued! The Lazzaroni paraded the streets with
boathooks to drag the gentlemen from their horses,
whilst women, with muskets on their shoulders, and
even children, took part in the national frenzy.
Night again closed in amidst riot, dismay, and
death. The lovely city of Naples was in the
hands of a lawless mob!

That evening, when Masaniello returned. to his
cottage, Teresa could scarcely recognise the happy,
light-hearted husband of her youth, in the figure
which stood before her. His face was pale and
haggard, and his eyes blood-shot and wild with
excitement. ‘Taking no notice of his wife, he sank
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 239

gloomily on a seat, and glanced restlessly around
him, as if anxious and fearful. As he made no
answer to the repeated and affectionate inquiries of
the trembling Teresa, she threw herself on his neck
in a flood of tears.

‘¢ What is it, dear Masaniello?”’ she asked in an
agitated voice, ‘ what is the matter? you are ill?
Oh! that you had never gone with the people!
Far, far better to pay the taxes twenty times over
than to see youthus! Speak to me, my 'Tomasso—
you are ill—I know you are ill—oh speak!”

“¢ 'Teresa,’’ said the fisherman in a hoarse voice,
“my brain is heavy and burning as if it were now
overflowing with molten lead—but I have promised
freedom to the people, and they shall be free !—
yes, I say it—they shall be free! Listen ! they call
—they shout my name! I come, my friends!
I come!” and starting up he rushed from the
cottage.

The fears—the terrible forebodings that crowded
into poor Teresa’s heart, were, alas! but too well
founded. The excitement of the strange and sud-
den events which had taken place, proved too
much for the mind of the humble fisherman,
Masaniello began to give unequivocal symptoms
240 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

of insanity, though at times for several hours toge-
ther he was calm and collected.

It is not my intention, dear children, to tell you
of the many lamentable events which ensued during
that fearful burst of popular fury in Naples. But
T will relate some of the proceedings of the deluded
fisherman, Masaniello, ere death put an end to
his sad, strange and eventful history.

The Duke of Arcos, who had withdrawn to the
Castel Nuovo, endeavoured to bring the excited
people to reason, and for this purpose employed
first, a Neapolitan noble, and then the Neapolitan
archbishop, to act as his mediators with the msur-
gents. The latter being beloved by the people,
was received more favourably than the former, and
the negotiations proceeded.

In the meantime, large parties of banditti flocked
to Naples from the neighbouring country, desirous
of having their share in any plunder that might be
obtained. Now when the Duke of Matalone, who
had acted as the first mediator, saw them arrive, he
conceived the plan of their putting the leader of the
mob to death. Accordingly he promised them a
sum of money if they would shoot Masaniello as he
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 241

sat on his tribunal in the market-place. They
agreed to do it.

It was a lovely morning, when Masaniello, having
summoned a general assembly to deliberate on the
proposals made by the Duke of Arcos to the people
of Naples, an immense multitude thronged into the
square.

The fisherman sat on his tribunal, surrounded
by his friends, while every eye in that vast assem-
bly was fixed on him. As he dictated to his secre-
tary—for unable to write himself, he was obliged to
depute another to do so—a profound silence reigned
in the crowd. It was broken, however, by the
entrance into the square of several hundred banditti,
armed, and on horseback.

‘¢ Masaniello,” said Domenico, who stood near his
brother-in law, “ I like not the looks of those fel-
lows; they come here for no good, I feel sure.”

“No,” observed Piedro, “they care not for liberty,
they pay no taxes ;—see how fiercely they look on
the people ; beware of them, good Masaniello.”

“ I will soon see on whose side they are!” ex-
claimed Masaniello; then, raising his voice, he
desired the banditti at once to dismount.

Instead of obeying the command, seven of them

R
942 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

instantly discharged their carbines full at the
speaker !

Then arose a wild cry! The people alarmed for
the safety of their favourite, and maddened with
rage at the attempt made upon his life, turned upon
the robbers, and the next moment thirty of them
lay dead on the ground. A desperate struggle
ensued, but the bandits were at length overcome;
those who could not escape, being put to a cruel
death.

Masaniello was unhurt ;—not a ball had struck
him; and the people, testifying their delight and
joy at his escape, made the air resound with their
acclamations.

When this terrible day was over, another attempt
was made to renew the negotiations. Masaniello
drew up articles, in which he insisted on the total
abolition of all taxes, and a general pardon to all
concerned in the insurrection.

“Ts this as you would have it, my friends?”
he asked, as he read aloud the conditions he had
prescribed ; “‘ have I expressed your wishes? ”

“¢ Exactly ! excellent! excellent!”’ shouted the
Neapolitans. “ Viva! Viva/ Masaniello for ever!”
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 243

The acclamations having subsided, it was agreed
that Masaniello should, accompanied by the arch-
bishop, proceed at once to the Castel Nuovo, to
receive the signature of the viceroy to the articles
drawn up.

Accordingly, changing his fisherman’s attire for
a superb robe of silver tissue, and mounting a
splendid charger, richly caparisoned, the rebel
leader set forth, accompanied by the archbishop,
and attended by an immense multitude of people.

The proud Duke of Arcos received the poor
fisherman in the Castel Nuovo with the utmost
respect ; treating him as he would have treated a
Spanish grandee; and without hesitation—though
with much inward reluctance—accepted and signed
the articles.

But the conference, owing to the ceremony with
which it was attended, lasted so long, that the
people outside began to be alarmed for the safety
of their favourite.

‘“* He is in the very jaws of the lion,” said one ;
“ will he escape unhurt ?”

“ Who can trust the Spaniard?” said another.
‘“‘ He loves neither us nor our leader.”

“‘ ‘We will burn his palace to the ground if he
944 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

hurt but a hair of Masaniello’s head!” cried a
third.

These symptoms of suspicion and uneasiness
increased ; the rioters grew impatient and tumul-
tuous; and long shouts were heard of ‘“ Where is
our Masaniello? Give us back our leader!”

“ Fear not, my lord duke!” said the fisherman,
—as the wild shouts reached the ears of the party
within the castle, and the viceroy’s cheek grew
pale at the sound—“ fear not! the people are but
anxious for my safety. I will quiet them.”

He stepped out on the balcony, and by a single
word hushed that immense crowd to perfect silence!

*« You are somewhat astonished, I see, my lord,”’
said Masaniello, turning to the amazed viceroy :
“ T will give you yet a further proof of my influ-
ence with the people of Naples, and of their willing
obedience to me, their chosen leader.”’

He looked on the crowd and waved his hand,
when instantly every bell in Naples began to toll ;
—he made another signal, and the tolling instantly
ceased! He lifted his arm, and the multitude
raised deafening shouts of “ Viva! Viva!’’—he
placed his finger on his lips, and the assembled
thousands at once became mute and motionless!
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 245

“This is wonderful indeed!” exclaimed the
astonished viceroy ; “‘ your power and influence are
marvelloiis, Signor.”

‘“‘ You are convinced, I hope, my lord, that it is
useless to resist the wishes of the people of Naples,”
said the fisherman.

“IT must own it,’ replied the duke, who saw
that resistance was indeed vain; “ I must own it;
and I must ‘salute you by your title of Captain
General of the people of Naples; a title you have
earned truly !”

Then, judging it expedient to soothe where he
could not compel, the viceroy, taking a chain of
massive gold, hung it round the fisherman’s neck,
saying as he did so, “ I thus recognise your power
and authority, Signor Masaniello, and create you
at the same time Duke of St. George.”

Masaniello calmly received the honours awarded
him, and then taking leave of the viceroy, returned
in triumph to his humble home. Peace was thus
momentarily restored to Naples.

But Masaniello’s malady increased. His sudden
elevation to a dukedom—the numerous and un-
ceasing questions which were referred to him—his
246 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

total inexperience of business—the heat of the
season—his want of sleep—all contributed to de-
range his intellects.

That night poor Teresa, with mournful anxiety,
watched by her husband’s couch. He slept but for
a few minutes at a time, continually starting from
his troubled slumbers, and exclaiming, ‘‘ Up! up!
there can be no rest for us until we are masters of
Naples!”

As day broke, he rose, feverish and unrefreshed.
Fears troubled his mind, especially fears of a violent
death. Anxious and agitated, he took little notice
of his wife or smiling child. The remembrance of
the honours he had received on the previous day
gave him no pleasure. He dressed himself in his
fisherman’s attire, and, after a silent meal, wandered.
forth from the cottage.

A beautiful orange grove stood at no great dis-
tance, and towards it Masaniello, sad and melan-
choly, directed his steps. With a deep sigh, he
cast himself on the green grass. It was a lovely
morning. The birds were singing merrily amongst
the trees, the flowers looked up with their bright
little faces to the azure and cloudless skies; on the
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 247

blue and beautiful sea, sparkling in the distance,
many a white sail was floating, and the glorious
sun shone resplendent over all. There was a time
when Masaniello would have truly enjoyed such a
scene, but that time was gone for ever !

“‘ Give me of your grapes instantly!” said the
poor unhappy fisherman to a peasant who was
passing, well laden with delicious fruit; “ quick!
I perish with thirst.”

“ You must speak in a more civil tone, friend, if
you want my grapes,” said the man. ‘“ One would
think you were the Viceroy himself!”

“ Only one bunch! or a water melon,” asked
Masaniello, in a supplicating voice. ‘‘ Come, I
will richly repay you.”

“« And who are you that are so rich?” said-the
peasant. “If looks go for anything, one would
not think you were overburdened with gold, or hap-
piness either. Here, my friend, take the grapes
and a melon also—I ask not for payment. Truly,
it is payment to see how the fruit refreshes thee.”

“Thanks! thanks, good friend!” said Masa-
niello, already revived; “it isexcellent. Tell me,
are you from Naples ?”

“ Nay,” replied the man, “JI am from the vine-
248 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

yards at Sorento, and am called Geronimo Giotti.
May I ask, in return, who it is that praises my
fruit?”

‘¢ T am the fisherman, Masaniello.”

The name acted like a magic spell.

‘“‘ Masaniello! our Masaniello!” exclaimed the
peasant, all his coldness and caution vanishing in

an instant, and giving place to the warmest and

most ardent expressions of delight. “I did not
dream it! Take all I have, good Masaniello ; it
is yours by right. What do we not all owe to
you? But you are overcome—you have over-
exerted yourself for our sakes. Yes, while all
Naples rings with the name—the loved name of
Masaniello—he is ill with over exertion.”

“Til! no!—but listen, Geronimo,” said the
fisherman, in a low voice; “thou hast an honest
face—listen! the banditti—the nobles—all seek
my life; they thirst for revenge; they would give
a king’s ransom to. have the head of Masaniello.
I fear them; I will return home, there I shall be
quiet and safe. Come, Geronimo, come with me.”

And Masaniello returned to his once happy
home.

From that day he sat no more on his tribunal in
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 249

the market-place, but stationed himself at the open
window of his cottage with a loaded blunderbuss
in his hand. As he had put some to a violent
death, so now he feared a violent death himself.
A guard of Lazzaroni surrounded the cottage while
Masaniello received petitions and issued orders.
He now showed himself capricious, absurd, and
cruel. The fisherman who a short time before
would not have injured any living creature, so kind
was his heart, now pronounced sentences of death
with frightful rapidity. His hatred of the nobles
increased with his fears of their revenge.

Another Sunday dawned, and Naples was still
in a distracted state. Masaniello determined that
day to go on a party of pleasure by sea, to the
Cape of Posilippo. On hearing this, the viceroy
ordered his own barge to be prepared for him, and
attended by a band of musicians, the fisherman
went in state. Teresa and little Antonio accom-
panied him, while an immense crowd hastened to
the landing place to receive him with acclamations.

No sooner was Masaniello on the deep blue
waters of the bay, where he had passed most of
his life from the time he was a little child—no
sooner had he felt the cool sea breezes on his
250 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

fevered. brow, than he became calmer and more
gentle. ‘Oh! this is good! this is beautiful!” he
exclaimed ; “ would that I had never left this
glorious sea! Teresa, I will return to my boat
and my nets; with them I was happy ; I had no
fears then—no fears In my boat on the waters.
Men called me the merry Masaniello ; but now—
yes, I will resign my power, and return to happi-
ness and peace.”

His words brought tears of joy to Teresa’s eyes;
she began to hope that the sorrows of the past week
would be remembered but as a troubled dream.
Alas! her joy was of short continuance.

On arriving at Posilippo, Masaniello went to
mass ; but the malady of the unhappy man again
increased, and scarcely was the service concluded,
than he hastened hurriedly back to the sea, and
throwing himself into the water with all his clothes
on, swam about for nearly an hour. After this, he
went to supper, at which he drank an enormous
quantity of wine, and was taken home in a state of
intoxication—a vice to which the Italians are rarely
addicted. With wonder and surprise the people
beheld the strange conduct of their leader. But
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 251

the next day, his behaviour being still more extra-
ordinary, even his friends became convinced of his
insanity, and carefully watched him durmg the
ensuing night.

The archbishop of Naples was performing mass
in the church of Del Carmine, on the following
morning, before a crowded congregation, when
Masaniello, having escaped from his friends, rushed
in with wild and alarmed looks. At the conclu-
sion of the service, the unfortunate man ascended
the pulpit, and with a crucifix in his hand, ad-
dressed the numerous audience. Hé told them he
was betrayed and deserted, and with tears implored
them not to abandon him. The people were at
first affected by his words, but when he began to
talk wildly and incoherently, many laughed, and
some left the church. The priests then, with some
persuasion, made him come down from the pulpit,
and the archbishop, seeing the state he was in,
spoke to him in a kind and gentle manner.

“Come, good Masaniello,” he said, in a soothing
voice, “come, and rest awhile in the adjoining
cloister; you are excited needlessly. Calm your-
self, my friend.”

‘““Save me!” said the poor man, clinging to the
252 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

archbishop ; “‘ protect me! the nobles seek my life.
Tell them I resign-all my authority. I will return
to my nets ;—would that I had never left them!”

“‘ Do not be alarmed,” said the prelate, leading
him to a cell; “rest on this couch, and you will
be better soon.”

Masaniello rested for a few minutes; he then
started up again and stood looking sadly out of a
window upon the calm and beautiful bay which
lay stretched before him in placid loveliness. As
he gazed, he thought of the happy days when he
used to glide over the blue waters in his little
fishing-boat, light-hearted, and without a care. He
thought of the joy with which his gentle wife
would ever greet him on his return home, and of
the playful caresses of his little Antonio.

“T will go back to my boat,” he said, as he
gazed. with fresh delight on the scene. “I will
return to my occupation; I shall be happy then.
Yes, I will return.”

But suddenly steps sounded in the corridor, and
voices were heard shouting, “ Health to the King
of Spain, and death to Masaniello!”” Armed men
appeared at the cell door. Masaniello turned
towards them.
THE FISHERMAN OF NAPLES. 253

“‘Do my faithful people seek me?” he said, in
a firmtone. “Here I am.”

The words had scarcely passed his lips, when
he received the contents of four muskets in his
bosom.

“ Ungrateful traitors!” he exclaimed, and fell.
Ere his head touched the ground, he was a dead

man.

You may be surprised to hear that the congre-
gation in the church of Del Carmine learned the
fate of the popular leader without any emotion.

The very men who had followed him the day
before with loud acclamations, now stood patiently
by while his head was cut off to be sent as a trophy
to the viceroy. The body of the unfortunate fisher-
man, after bemg dragged through the streets by a
troop of boys, was thrown into one of the city
ditches.

Such is the value to be set on the favour of a
riotous mob.

The morning after the murder of Masaniello,
the changeable multitude sought out his remains,
and in melancholy procession carried them to the
cathedral. They were interred amidst tears and
954 SHORT STORIES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY.

lamentations, and the funeral celebrated with the
utmost pomp, thousands of the people attend-
ing it.

Thus, in the short space of ten days, the
humble fisherman had been raised to the height of
power, then murdered, dragged with ignominy
through the city ; and finally buried with princely
honours !

Teresa died of grief soon after the tragical event
which deprived her of her husband; and poor little
Antonio was left an orphan.

The revolt of the Neapolitans was not quelled
for some time; but at length they were compelled
again to submit to their Spanish masters. They
had gained nothing, and lost much, by their riot-
ous outbreak.

Should you ever visit the lovely city of Naples,
and see the idle Lazzaroni basking in the sun,
will you not remember the story of the fisherman,
Masaniello ?


R. CLAY, PRINTER, LONDON.