Citation
Peter Parley's tales about the widow's family

Material Information

Title:
Peter Parley's tales about the widow's family including Little Arthur's round table, The young Scotchman, &c. &c
Creator:
Goodrich, Samuel G ( Samuel Griswold ), 1793-1860
Bowyer, Richard T ( Publisher )
Sears, William John ( Printer )
Greatbach, William, b. 1802 ( Engraver )
Howard, H ( Illustrator )
Place of Publication:
[London]
Publisher:
Richard T. Bowyer
Manufacturer:
W.J. Sears
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
188 p., [1] leaf of plates : ill. ; 13 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Birthdays -- juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Twins -- juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Widows -- juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Kindness -- juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Family stories -- 1848 ( local )
Bldn -- 1848
Genre:
Family stories ( local )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Date from holographic inscription on endpaper.
General Note:
Frontispiece painted by H. Howard, and engraved by W. Greatbach.
General Note:
Baldwin Library copy 3 bound with Peter Parley's tales for the chimney corner. [London] : Richard T. Bowyer.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026908106 ( ALEPH )
45964682 ( OCLC )
ALH6084 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text
The Baldwin Library

RmB vin



low 4 6 bin leitereet’
pe git Dee. hg ?WIS

cs LA hirchipa A. Gfelonad



THE WIDOW’S FAMILY,

ie, Ac »







Eagraved. by W’. Greatbech.,

LACK NUT —- CRACKER

luge Go



PETER PARLEY’S TALES

ABOUT

THE WIDOW’S FAMILY.

INCLUDING

LITTLE ARTHUR’S ROUND TABLE,

THE YOUNG SCOTCHMAN,
&e. &c.



7" UBLISHED BY RICHARD T. BOWYER;
AND SOTD BY ALL BOCKSEKLI KRE.



e Sears, t'rinter, 5 & 41vy Lane.



LITTLE ARTHUR’S ROUND TABLE;
OR, THE BIRTH-DAY BANQUET.

Ir is seldom we find children so near each others
age, without either two of them being twins, as the
little family of which we are going to give some brief
account. The oldest is a hearty and rather heavy boy
who has not quite reached his seventh year: the second
is a good humoured, frank, and faithful girl of six:
the third is also a girl, butof a somewhat different cast
of mind, given to artifice and trickery, and one year
younger: and the fourth is a beautiful little boy of four
years old, too conscious, from the admiration he
receives, that he is growing up with attractions a little
above and beyond those which his sisters and brother
possess.

The day on which the incidents of our tale took
place, was the fourth anniversary of this little fellow’s

B



2 LITTLE ARTHUR’S

birth. His fond parents had promised him that this
day should be kept as a day of mirth and festivity—
not for their family only, but for all the few families of
the little village where they resided in the chief house.
They had every convenience arcund the house as well
as within it for a sportive and rural celebration of the
happy season; for it was encompassed by several acres
of fine new mown grass, which the villagers called a
park, but which they rather chose to call a lawn or
pleasureground. The birth of little Arthur had taken
place on the third day of June; his birth day therefore
returned at the loveliest and liveliest period of the
whole year, when the finest foliage and flowers appeared
in every direction—when ‘‘ the time of the singing of
birds was come, and the voice of the turtle was heard
an the land.”

As though little Arthur was to be gratified to the
full, ¢hzs first of June was a much finer day than
either of the three former ones of his short life had been.
The evening preceding it was marked by a sun-set of
the most fiery red that had ever been scen, at least by
these chi'dren; and the morning was even more fine



ROUND TABLE. 3

than this promising evening had led them to anticipate.
They rose almost as early and quite as cheerful and
joyous as the lark. Their first proceeding was to run
half dressed into the bed room of their dear mamma,
to receive her blessing, and listen to the recital of a
hymn and prayer which she had composed for the
birth morning of her little Arthur. Thisexercise being
over she opened a box that had stood concealed under
her toilet, and took from it a new birth day hat, sent
by her brother from London for his favourite nephew;
but received too late for the child to see it or know of
it on the preceding evening.

This only surviving uncle of these children was
remarkably generous and affectionate; but not quite so
discreet as their more prudent parents could have wish-
ed. They as well as their little ones had reason to thank
him for numerous proofs of kindness and liberality:
but they often regretted that he chose for their children
gay and gaudy presents, in preference to such as would
have been much more useful as well as more modest.
Not that he ever thought of doing the slightest injury
to the morals or manners of his young favourites—of



4 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

making them vain rather than virtuous; but he was
not a man of taste—he had certain strange notions of
beauty, which rendered him as indifferent to what was
simple and natural as to what was fashionable. He
was, moreover, somewhat of a recluse, fond of reading,
and remembering, and reciting ancient tales, and of
reviving ancient customs—at least of grafting ancient
upon modern ones.

His birth day present to little Arthur arose from
this whimsical propensity. At first it was thought
that he had sent his beloved nephew a large circular
hat, to preserve his little lovely face from being scorched
by thesummer sun; but on this supposition it appeared
rather strange that it was not larger, and made to wear
sufficiently low for such a considerate purpose. The
mystery was explained by two documents found in the
crown of the hat, and which Arthur’s mamma had not
discovered till they fell out on its being placed on the
little fellow’s head. The first was the bill of the hat,
put in no doubt by the maker without the uncle’s
knowledge, and which described the article as

** LittLe ARTHUK’S ROUND TABLE~ElI. 58”



ROUND TABLE. 5

The other was a short letter from the uncleto Arthur
himself, and which his_ brother picked up and read by
his mamma’s desire as follows—

“< My sweet little four years—

Which you will be by the time you receive this;
when the round table now sent for your pretty head
will be tried on, and your lively little heart will dance
for joy, because the great king Arthur was obliged to
place his ugly table on the ground to feast his knights
upon, and you are able to wear yours aloft in the air,
with a fine feather at the top of it waved by every
breath of your birth-day wind!

I should like to see you to-morrow acting as a little
king amidst your subjects, with a table instead of a
crown on your head; but I cannot leave London just
before Midsummer. When I am down in August we
can keep your birth-day over again.

Think of your affectionate uncle,
And remember to your dear papa
And mamma and the rest—
London, May 31. Cates ARTHUR KONINGSMARK,’’



6 LITTLE ARTHUR’S

Nothing but Mr. Koningsmark, not even the hatter
himself, would have thought of giving the hat this
ancient and fanciful name; but, as he had done so,
there was no appealing from his authoritv: as be had
ordered it to be thus described in the bill, and thus
named by all who should speak or write about it, the
odd appellation was retained so long as Arthur was
able to wear the hat. The present was even preserved
as a piece of antiquity much longer than any ordinary
hatwould havebeen. Years after the little fellow could
get it on his head, it was hung up in a closet in his
room for the inspection of the curious, and never was
known by any other name, than that which the uncle
had first given to it—Little drthur’s round table.

The children bore off the table hat in triumph from
their mamma’s chamber to a little room, opening on
the garden, which was generally used to shelter them
from sudden rain when playing on the lawn, and now
was set apart for a special purpose, and called the birth-
day dressing room. Thither a large looking-glass had
been placed for the children’s use, and there they now
resorted to see Arthur try the round table on his pretty



ROUND TABLE. 7

head. Some of the playful remarks of the rest on this
occasion may amuse children of a larger growth.
The younger and more cunning sister, who had stolen
a feather from the hat and placed it in her own cap,
looked with her usual archness in Arthur’s face and
called him the table bearer—telling him to hold himself
and his burden up 7vigh?, and not toss his little head
so much to the /ef¢ in the pride of his new office and
advancing age!

His other sister fell on her knees in a perfect enthu-
siasm of admiration, as though she would worship the
little idol of the family, ‘‘ rendered doubly sweet,” she
said, ‘‘ under the nice new canopy that uncle had sent
to screen him from both sunshine and showers.”

Their brother joined in the delight and wonder thus
expressed by the sisters. ‘* I could look at the little
prince smiling beneath his new and beautiful table,”
he said, ‘* all day long, and desire for myself no greater
pleasure; but I am anxious for others’ sake that he
should get his robes as well as crown upon him, and
go forth as soon as possible at the head of his knights,
and make them smile with the sweetness which is so
delightful to us.”



& LITTLE ARTHUR’S

At that moment the first bell rang for breakfast, and
intimated that all must assemble in the arbour in a
quarterofan hour. little Arthur’s dress, while Edwin ran to the garden
to see that all things were ready, and his sisters
returned to their mamma’s room to offer their affectionate
services in getting her ready for the first meal of this
gladsome day. It was spread ona round table, in the
centre of an arbour of uncommon freshness and beauty;
and thither little Arthur was soon conducted by his
sisters and their mamma. On the happy prince taking
his seat at what he called his second round table, he
looked about and asked why his dear papa was not
there, and where he was gone ?

‘* Tam returning in time both to hear and answer
your questions, my beloved boy,”’ said his papa, from
behind the harbour. Then appearing in front and
taking the seat reserved for him, he told his children
that respect for their kind uncle had induced him to
order the long table fixing under the meadow oak, on
which the poor children of the village were to dine at
noon, to be formed intoanother round one, to encircle



ROUND TABLE. 9

the tree at a proper distance from the trunk, so as to
bring all the guests under the shade of its spreading
branches. ‘‘ I wonder at you, dear papa,” said his
youngest daughter, ‘‘ and I should be glad toknow the
reason why we are to breakfast, as well as the poor
children to dine, on a round table above all things ?’’

* And so doI wonder,” said her elder brother, “ at
papa’s wishing to have more round tables, because
he smiled when he first saw the one that uncle had
sent, and I knowhe thought the name a very odd
one.”

‘¢ Well, and I too wonder,’’ said the other sister,
‘“¢that papa should have an old round table for us to
breakfast on, and then order a new one of the same
form for the poor children to dine on, when I know
he did not like the fancy of my uncle in sending
Arthur such a hat, and calling it by such a name!”

Papa allowed his children to wonder at this mystery,
without attempting to solve it. In their wonder, in
fact, he partly obtained his end—which he kept secret
through the day; but which was to divert their atten-
tion as much as possible from the new hat, and occasion



1O LITTLE ARTHUR'S

a little interesting perplexity as to which of the objects
was meant when any one spoke of 4rthur’s round table.

Breakfast being finished, the children were allowed
to begin their sports, and to continue them till the
next sound of the bell should call them into thearbour
to take a little of the early fruit of the season. Some
fine strawberries, from a bed which had yielded its first
ripe productions four years ago, on the very day of
little Arthur’s birth, were gathered and brought into
the arbour by bis papa, who on that account had
taken the bed under his special care. As he entered,
with his welcome gathering in a new birth day basket,
he found his other children endeavouring to per-
suade Arthur to let his hat be laid aside, at least while
he was eating the fruit. They all sawthat it was
rather too large, if not too heavy, to be worn through
half the day with ease. They even feared that he was
already beginning to feel it a restraint on his naturally
active movements, and to suffer some conflict between
his wish to be more at liberty, and his pride in the new
and beautiful covering.

While the fruit was eating he was persuaded toallow



ROUND TABLE. 11

the hat again to occupy the place it had occupied during
breakfast—on one of the branches of an adjoining
tree; but when the strawberries were consumed, and
the little party returned to their sports, he resolved
again to endure all the inconvenience of wearing the
new round table. His mamma promised that if he
would part with it till twelve o’clock he should have it
on again when he went to see the poor children dine.
His papa proposed that it should hang on a beautiful
rose tree, before which the little fellow had sat to
breakfast and to take his strawberries. But he was
evidently reluctant to comply with their wishes, and
the more so when he found his brothers and sisters
disposed to support him, by pleading for his continuing
to wear it as long as he could with any comfort endure
the beautiful burden. The point was about to be
settled, perhaps in that manner, when a strange occur-
rence at once relieved him from it for the whole of the
day.

A strong mother bird from an adjoining rookery
had been noticed for some time hovering at no great
distance over the children’s heads, and apparently in



12 LITTLE ARTHUR’S

search of materials for her nest: but they little thought
that the feathers of the hat formed the chief attraction
to the bird, and therefore they took little notice either
of her motions or her noise. Atlast, while Arthur was
standing at some distance from the rest, wearied with
the exertion of his sport, the rook came near enough
to take the topmost feather in her beak ; and then the
feather being fastened to the hat, she lifted that also
from his head, and bore it in triumph to the top of the
tree in which she had built her nest !

It is difficult to say whether Arthur was more
grieved at the loss of his round table, than delighted
to see it rising like another balloon high above bim in
the air, and in a minute or two suspended on oneof the
topmost branches of the loftiest tree in the rookery.
However, there was no difficulty in soothing the little
grief he felt at his loss, and not much in convincing
him that he had better be without his hat altogether
than disturb and perhaps destroy the rookery by at-
tempting to getit down, The romantic accident was
one of those apparent evils, which discreet parents and
well tempered children can eaaily turn to a good



ROUND TABLE. 13

account. Several advantages were immediately derived
from it to Arthur himself. It relieved his little head,
just beginning to ache, from a weight which might
soon have severely pained it for the day, and spoiled
all the pleasure on which he and the rest of the family
had reckoned. It furnished a new object of attention,
and opened a fresh source of amusement, altogether
unexampled as well as unexpected. Mr. and Mrs.
Fairbrace were inwardly pleased, though it was not
right that either the children or the uncle should
know of their pleasure, that a present they never liked
should be thus suddenly and strangely disposed of,
without any one but the rook being to blame. Ag for
the poor bird, as they told Arthur when he passed a
severe sentence upon her, she was not so much to blame
as appearances would indicate—for she took the hat by
accident, and only éztended to borrow a single feather
to make the nest of her little ones handsome and
warm.

All seemed to look as though each would ask the
rest—what was to be done? Was Arthur to pass his
birth day without his birth day hat? or were the sports



14 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

of the day to be suspended, and the rookery to be en-
dangered that he might wear it again, in perhaps a
damaged state, and in all probability to produce a
head ache worse than he already felt. A council to
determine these questions was quickly summoned in the
arbour, and the owner of the departed hat was seated
in the president’s chair. Thelittle fellow was evidently
pleased with tbe alacrity with which the whole family,
and two or three other friends who had just arrived,
surrounded and sympathised with him on this occa-
sion; and when they agrced that something better
would no doubt soon arrive, he began to look up with
cheerfulness to the rookery, and at length said with
a hearty laugh that the old rook might have the hat
for the whole day, and he could play much better with-
out it.

Just then one of the young friends looked around
and said—‘* Where is our sweet Emmeline, and why
did she not come into the arbour as well as the garden?
O! she is now coming up the path, I declare, and
she has something in her band that she is very careful
of!”



ROUND TABLE. 15

“¢T will run and meet her,’’ said Arthur’s brother,
** and scold her for walking so slow,and being so much
behind her time.”

The delay of her arrival and the slowness of her
approach arose first from her wish to pluck some
beautiful rose-buds which grew in her papa’s, or rather
her own garden, adjoining that of Mr. Fairbrace.
Just as she had done so, and was preparing to bring
them to her little favourite, she saw from the distance
the theft of the old rook, and stood for a minute with
angry amazement while the bird placed the hat feathers
and all upon the top of the tree. ‘* What,” she said
to herself, ** will little Arthur now do? and what can
I do to comfort him after this strange accident?’’ She
instantly thought of supplying the place of the hat by
something more light for Arthur to wear, and more
beautiful for others to look at: and what could be so
likely to accomplish her wishes as a garland of roses.
Her own garden yielded plenty of beautiful flowers for
her purpose, and she would not be long in taking the
thorns from the stalks, and forming a wreath large
enough for little Arthur’s head. This was the affec-



16 LITTLE ARTHUR’S

tionate task which had delayed her arrival in the
arbour, and it was a wreath or, as she called it, acrown
of rose buds and carnations, thus quickly but carefully
made, that she was carrying in ber hand when the rest
began complaining of her absenceand slowness.

‘*Why, Emmeline,” said Arthur’s brother, when she
entered the arbour, ‘‘ you have brought your head
dress in your hand, I suppose to prevent the rooks
taking it off your head as you came across the lawn.”’

*“* It is not my head dress, as you call it,’’ said
Emmeline, ‘‘but Prince Arthur's crown’’—and as she
said this she placed it upon him, while all the company
rejoiced that their prediction, of something better than
the hat soon arriving, became fulfilled even sooner
than they expected. The little fellow looked more
charming than ever, and Emmeline was universally
praised and thanked for her quick and considerate
kindness.

Before they left the arbour, Mrs. Fairbrace inquired
why one little girl of the neighbourhood, whom she
herse€ had invited, had not been able or willing to
accep the invitation? She was the daughter of a



ROUND TABLE. 17

little farmer about balf a mile off, and was a child of
great eccentricity and independence. On this account
she had never been much beloved by the other chil-
dren of these parts, and the little Fairbrace’s had
scarcely ever seen her. Their mamma, however, had
been constrained to notice her with growing affection,
from several little voluntary services which she had
accidentally and modestly rendered the family. This
was one reason of her present inquiry after her:
another was a suspicion, which had been privately
rumoured, that she knew something about several
little articles of value recently missing from Fairbrace
lodge. One was a silver waist buckle, a former
present to Arthur from his uncle: another was a
trinket of greater value belonging to his elder sister:
a third was a favourite brooch of their mamma’s.
These, with a few other things of much less worth,
bad all been missing from the two chief bed rooms of
the lodge within the last five or six weeks.

Of course inquiries had been made after them, and
the servants, in their eagerness to free themselves from
suspicion, had gone into every neighbouring part to

c



18 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

obtain if possible aclue to the way in which they had
been removed. The houses as well as the boxes of
two travelling Jews were searched, and the men con-
vinced Mr. and Mrs. Fairbrace of their innocence of
having ever purchased the trinkets of others, as well
as ever having themselves stolen them. One of these
men, however, inadvertently became the cause of
suspicion falling upon the young farmer’s daughter.
*“*She spoke in such a strange manner,’”’ he said,
‘‘ when I inquired if she had heard any thing about
them, that if I did not know her to bean honest girl I
should fear she knew something of where they are
gone.’”” When this was spoken by the Jew at the
gate, a week before Arthur’s birth day, one of the
servants who heard it said, that Sarah Stubble had
been twice in the bed rooms before the things were
lost,

The moment the girl heard of the suspicion thus
formed against her, she went to Mrs. Fairbrace and
not only protested but proved her innocence of the
theft, and her total ignorance of the things altogether.
Ilaving convinced her patroness, as she called the



ROUND TABLE. 19

lady, the girl was perfectly indifferent to the opinions
of others: at the same time, finding those opinions to
be unfavourable, she declined even the invitation of
Mrs. Fairbrace to join a party some of whom cruelly
chose to consider her a thief. She bad certainly
been in the bed rooms just before the things were
stolen; but it was to render the family the very
services for which Mrs. Fairbrace had learnt to esteem
her. It was, in fact, to destroy a number of insects
which had strangely settled about the bed furniture,
and which she had acquired from one of the Jews a
secret for destroying too valuable to be entrusted even
to Mrs. Fairbrace herself.

In this state was the mysterious affair at the time
of the birth day, and when inquiry was made after the
reason of her absence. Some remarks were made by
the children in answer, that induced Mrs. Fairbrace
to be silent, and to request them to be silent, on the
subject till the next day. ‘‘ Then,’’ she said, ‘‘ I am
determined for Sarah’s sake to have the whole affair
well examined.” The reason of a sudden stop being
thus put to the conversation will appear when wecome



20 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

to the fulfilment of this promise of Mrs. Fairbrace ;
at present we must proceed with the children from the
arbour to the round table under the oak, where they
were now summoned to see the poor boys and girls of
the district enjoy a better dinner than perhaps they
had ever eaten before. There was a very large pie
placed on the table just where the gardener’s wife, who
was to cut up the food, had seated herself for that
purpose.

‘¢ How came that pie there ?’”’ Mrs. Fairbrace asked
the woman as she took her seat: *‘ I gave no order to
the cook for any such thing. Yet I am glad,” she
added, ‘‘ that it is here, for I find, as you cut it, that
itis what they call in my country a goose pie.”” This
was a sufficient hint for the hungry and curious guests :
each begged in turn that he might have a, little bit of
the goose pie, and, though it was large, it was nearly
gone by the time the guests were all supplied. As the
dinner drew to aclose, the poor children began talking
freely and cheerfully about what they had eaten,
especially the goose pie, and the strange circumstance
of its having come upon the table 30 suddenly, and



ROUND TABL2®. 21

without scareely any one knowing whence or how it
came! At last a lad who worked in Farmer Stubble’s
yard said that he thought it was made and baked in
the kitchen of the farm. When asked to explain
himself, he answered that all he knew was that he had
been called to help lift just such a pie into the oven
the day before yesterday.

The farmer himself was now coming across the
meadow, and Mrs. Fairbrace, whe was in the sccret,
told the company to be silent a few minutes, while she
requested him to explain if he could the mystery of
the gouse pie. In compliance with the request the
farmer took from his pocket a paper which he said he
would read to the company, and he hoped this would
give them all satisfaction. The paper contained, and
the farmer read, the following memorandum from
Sarah Stubble—

“TI have been unjustly suspected of taking the
articles lost from the chambers of Fairbrace lodge,
and some of the young people who dine under the oak
to-day have I hear been very eager and active in
spreading this evil report against me. I have there-



32 LITTLE ARTHUR’S

fore resolved to reward them by making and sending
the goose pie. The different sorts of food it contains
were purchased by our good and kind friend Mrs.
Fairbrace, and I feel much obliged to her for allow-
ing me to make this addition tothe oth-: things which
her bounty provides for you on this joyful occasion.
While I am cruelly and falsely suspected by any of
you of robbing such a friend, I think the pie stands a
much better chance of being received with a hearty
welcome than I should be. Sarah Stubbdie.’’
Most of the children present understood what the
farmer read, and the elder little Fairbrace went round
and explained it to them that could not understand
it. The firgt who broke the minute’s silence it occa-
sioned was an angry malicious boy, who said that he
did not think a bit the better of the farmer’s daughter
for all this talk about herself and her pie. A girl who
sat near him also sneered at the farmer’s reading
about his daughter, and said—though not loud enough
for him to hear—‘‘I still think she had the things,
and that she has sent this strange pie to stop our
mouths that she may escape !’’ Others of the children



BOUND TABLE. 23

were, however, of a different mind. ‘‘I like,” said
one of them, ‘“‘ to find a girl or a boy return good for
evil: my teacher at the Sunday school always tells me
to love my enemies, to bless them that curse me, and
do good to them that would do me an injury.” “I
shall be glad,’”’ said another, ‘‘ when Sarah Stubble
comes abroad again, for she was always a kind friend
to us, and them that are kind to poor children
certainly never will find in their hearts to rob a rich
lady.”

‘* All this is very well,” said the senior boy, who
was accounted president of the feast: ‘‘but I am for
nothing more being said at present about this matter.
I would rather Sarah should have a fair trial, and I
propose that she be tried this very evening, and that
our Prince Arthur with his new round table hat on,
be the judge of the court.’”” Every one approved of
this proposal, and Arthur, hearing himself spoken of
and the speech so much applauded, asked what it was
about? The little fellow at this moment sat on the
farmer’s shoulders, with his chaplet of roses on his
head, and his feet resting on the dinner table. The



24 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

whole company admired him; while the carving woman
looked in his face, and asked, whether he would be the
judge of Sarah Stubble on her trial in the evenmg ?

‘* What is she to be tried for ?’’ the little fellow
eagerly asked: and when he was told that some persons
suspected that she had taken his new silver waist
buckle, and his mamma’s old golden broach, he said,
angrily—‘** But I don’t think she stole them, and I
won’t be her judge if you don’t let me make her
innocent and set her at liberty !”’

‘*O, we have no fear of your doing that, my little
Prince,’”’ said the president of the feast, ‘‘ especially if
you wear, as I said, your new hat on the judgment
seat. With your papa’s permission we will have the
trial on this very spot and under this ancient oak.”

‘““ My papa’s permission,” said Arthur’s brother,
“must be obtained for something else before all this
takes place. Little Arthur can’t wear his new hat till
some one gets its down from the tree yonder, and I am
afraid papa wont let any one go up for fear the rookery
should be destroyed.” This was the first that the
boy had heard of the accident, which occurred two



ROUND TABLE. 25

hours before the feast, and was now almost forgotten.
He stepped out of his place to lookin the direction he
was pointed to, and there he saw the hat evidently
uninjured, hanging on one of the uppermost branches,
and its fine feathers floating in the afternoon breeze.

*¢ Never fear, sir,”’ said he to Mr Fairbrace, as he
returned to his president’s seat—“‘ never fear, sir, for
the hat or for the rookery. Trust me for climbing up
the tree three or four hours hence without the rooks
caring or perhaps knowing any thing about the matter,
I'll engage, before the time of the trial arrives, to get
the hat down safe and ready for the judge, and there
shall not be one nest or one rook the less for it.”

Mr. Fairbrace rather reluctantly consented that the
boy should climb the tree for this, as he thought,
hazardous purpose. It was to be deferred, however,
till seven o’clock, and immediately after the trial was
to commence—Mrs. Fairbrace engaging that Sarah
should be present. This prudent lady also resolved
that her little Arthur should have two or three hours
quiet slumber after dinner, that he might be refreshed
and strengthened to preside on the trial at a rather



26 LITTLE ARTHUR’S

later hour than he usually sat up. The sports of the
lawn were now resumed, and, after joining in them for
an hour, the family with their select visitors retired
into the house to dine, Relieved of his rather heavy
hat through the warmth and weariness of the day, and
carried about, now on the shoulders of his papa and
then on the broader back of farmer Stubble, little
Arthur was able to take his place with appetite and
comfort at the dinner table, and enjoy the repast as
rouch as he would on an ordinary day of no exertion
or exercise. His mamma took special care that what
he ate was welcome and wholesome, and the other
young persons, influenced by his example, took no
more than was consistent with vigour and comfort the
long remainder of the day.

The considerate and sprightly little girl, who had
manufactured the chaplet of roses in the morning, was
intent upon doing something unusual to promote little
Arthur’s comfort in the afternoon. At dinner she
heard Mrs: Fairbrace say that he should lie down for
an heur’s slumber to recruit his strength for the trial
in the evening: what then did Emmeline do but



ROUND TABLE. 27

privately ask for that lady’s guitar, on which she
could play very well, and came before the open window
playing and singing @ song on his birth day, and after
that a few humorous lines on the rook taking his hat.
These being over, the skilful girl touched the instru-
ment in some plaintive tones, which began soothing
little Arthur into a gentle slumber. He was now on
the sofa, and the company, ata sign from Mrs. Fair-
brace, quietly left the room, while Arthur, under the
influence of the music, fell into a most comfortable
sleep for more than three hours. Thus prudently and
kindly did his parents and friends study to render his
birth day one of real enjoyment, instead of allowing
him to exert himself to weariness, and make more
than half the day a season of repining and distress.
Sarah Stubble arrived just in time to take her
station by the sleeping Arthur’s side, which allowed
Mrs. Fairbrace and evety one else either to join or to
witness the afternoon sports. Sarah was much
attached to the little Prince, and it may be supposed
that, when she heard of his determination to make her
tmnocent, and set her at liberty, her attachment to



28 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

him was not less than before. ‘“ [ will not, however,”’
she jocosely said to his mamma, on her leaving him
to her care—‘‘ I will not stay by him a moment
longer than he is asleep, lest my enemies should
suspect me of having bribed my judge to be partial in
my case, When the time comes to awaken him, or he
gives signs of awaking himself, I will request Miss
Emmeline to take my place.”’

We pass over all that occurfed between dinner and
tea—that is, during the sleep of the idol of the day
—because, except in his dreams, he was not a witness
or a partaker of the sports. Just before six Mrs.
Fairbrace requested Emmeline to relieve Sarah from
her guardianship of Arthur, and try gently to awaken
the little slumberer for the important affairs of the
evening. Emmeline was glad of the office, and on
reaching the room began touching the tenderest
strings of the guitar. Then for the first time the
little slumbering angel moved. When she gave the
instrument a stronger touch and a louder sound, he
opened his sweet eyes, and as he saw her smiling and
playing by his side he gently rose and asked to kiss



ROUND TABLE. 29

her. ‘*‘O what charming sport I have had!” he said.
Then, rubbing his eyes and casting them round the
toom, he added—‘** But it must have been a dream!
was it not, dear Emmeline? It was charming sport,
however! I have seen such sights, and had such
games, with my new tabie hat on, and Sarah wearing
my crown of roses, and you playing and dancing all
the while.’”’ It is sufficient to remark that the purpose
of Mr. and Mrs. Fairbrace, in their prudent discipline
of little Arthur through this day, was completely
answered. Three fourths of the day were gone, and
he was now perhaps more refreshed, aud more capable
of enjoyment, than when he rose in the morning.
Many an indulged child of his age, on such a day, and
in the hand of inconsiderate parents, would hours be-
fore this have been heated to a fever, crammed to
suffocation, sick of every thing it had seen, or heard
or tasted, and fit only to be forced to bed under the
terror of the rod, or the weight of its own fatigue.
The chaplet of flowers adorned again the pretty
little fellow’s head during tea time. It was more
beaatiful than ever, for while Sarah was watching his



30 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

slumbers, Emmeline was recruiting it with some
newly gathered rose buds. But the time approached
for this chaplet to he exchanged for the round table
hat. Before Arthur awoke the poor boys and girls
had been regaled with tea and buns—the latter baked
by Sarah Stubble, and even made with materials which
she herself had purchased, in further recompense of
the slander that had been cast upon her. And while
Arthur was at tea in the arbour, the president boy
prepared toclimb the lofty tree, on which the hat was
still seen uninjured, with its waving feathers appearing
to keep up the signal for its being rescued from so
perilous a situation. The moment the lodge clock
struck the first sound of seven the boy sprang like
lightning to the lower branches of the tree. Having
gained them, he proceeded higher with more quietude
and slowness. However, he was not many minutes
before he appeared within reach of his hat; and tben
he was observed paying considerable attention to a
neglected half-built nest, so that, had Arthur been
able to see what he was about, or had the little fellow
been told that he was near the hatand yet did not seem



ROUND TABLE. 31

anxious to take hold of it, he might for the first time
on this day been offended.

Mr. Fairbrace and the farmer distinctly saw the boy
take sonwthing more than once or twice from the nest,
and put into his pocket; but neither of them suspected
any thing extraordinary, and said nothing about it to
those around them. At last all beheld with joy the
hat taken from the topmost branch, and then thrown
down on an extended sheet prepared and held at the
four corners toreceive it. It came down in a slow and
safe manner like another parachute, and fell on the
sheet so as to preserve the feathers from being in the
least discomposed. Little Arthur was again on the
broad and strong shoulders of the farmer, while his
papa was at hand to take possession of his round table,
and prepare it, should it require preparation, to be
worn on the approaching trial.

The company now assembled under the oak, and
little Arthur was placed in a seat prepared for the
judge, with his mamma sitting immediately under him,
and the farmer and his papa standing on either side.
It was observed that the boy went quickly from the



32 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

tree to the lodge, and held a moment’s communication
with Sarah before she came up to trial. On her
reaching the place Mrs. Fairbrace requested her to sit
down opposite to her little judge; but she respectfully
declined sitting till her innocence was proved to the
satisfaction of the whole assembly. Her accusers were
first called on to state what evidence they had to allege
against her, ‘‘ 1] can only say,” muttered the malig-
nant boy before alluded to, “‘ that nobody is so likely
to have stolen the things as she who was so much in
the rooms at the time they were lost.”” The envious
girl before mentioned followed the boy, as she had then
done, with a surmise against Sarah about as worthy of
belief as his had been.

“ exclaimed one of the travelling Jews at the extremity
of the crowd, beforescarcely any one knew that he was
in the neighbourhood. ‘‘ Z vas resolute to reach here
at the trial,” he said, as the spectators made way f-
him to get nearer the seat, ‘* because people have said
that I bought de things of de girl at de farm ; but I did
not. She did buy some things of me at de time; but



ROUND TABLE. 33

they vas things, she said, to put into de goose pie, to
make it spicy and nice to eat.”

‘his sudden speech of the Jew’s seemed to prevent
any further accusation of Sarah and even to destroy
all suspicion against her. But the company were
astonished beyond measure at what now took place.
Taking the lost trinkets from her pocket, she said—
*¢ Though I am innocent of the theft, I am in posses-
sion of the articles stolen, and am willing to give them
up to their proper owners, on condition, that they will
admit me as evidence against the actual robber.’’ The
conscious innocence and quiet courage with which this
was said convinced all but her determined enemies—
and perhaps even them too—of its perfect truth.
Mrs. Fairbrace, generally in the confidence and secrets
of Sarah, was now almost overwhelmed with astonish-
ment at what she saw and heard. ‘* My good girl,”
she asked, ‘‘ why did you not entrust me, your friend,
with the fact of your having the things in your posses-
Bion ?”

** And so, madam, I certainly should,’”’ answered
Sarah, ‘‘ only that I obtained possession of them, and

D



34 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

became acquainted with the thief, after you had taken
your seat by the sweet and sagacious judge there.
Had it been five minutes before, you should not have
had reason to reproach me for withholding anything
from you.”

‘*¢ And where did you obtain the things from ?’’ asked
Mr. Fairbrace, whose astonishment had appeared to
strike him dumb.

‘* They have passed though the hands of only one
person between the thief and myself, Sir,’’ answered
Sarah, *‘and that one person is present tc answer on
his own account.” As she said this she looked
significantly at the boy president, who also returned
the smile she gave him, and quietly waited to be
questioned in his turn.

‘¢ And where, young man,” said the farmer, who had
betrayed a countenance of great anxiety from the
moment he beheld the trinkets in his daughter's posses-
sion—‘‘ where did you obtain these presents to my
daughter—they are not the first you have givén her of
late 2”

‘* Mr, Stubble,” answered the young man, calmly,



ROUND TABLE. 35

*‘ you seem to forget what your daughter has just
remarked—that she received the trinkets but a few
minutes ago: I could not therefore have given them to
her with any other view than for her immediately to
produce them on her trial, and restore them to their
owners.”

‘* But where, young man, did you obtain them ?”
asked Mr. Fairbrace: ‘* that is the most important
question.”

‘To answer that question, Sir,’’ answered the lad,
‘* I must involve the actual thief, who is not far off, in
the charge of having stolen them from the bed
chambers. And before I do this, I must engage your
mercy, and especially the mercy of our beloved judge,
towards the criminal. I mean, should you be able to
take her, for though she is not far off, as I said, she
may give us a good deal of trouble before she is arrested.
To be plain, Sir, I found these trinkets in the half
built nest yonder, and the rogue that stole them was
the old rook, that afterwards stole LITTLE ARTHUR'S
ROUND TABLE!”



THE WIDOW'S FAMILY ;

OR, THE NEW VILLAGE.

THERE were two female children, remarkable for the
simplicity of their manners, and the gentleness and
softness of their dispositions. They-were very much
alike in person and countenance, and their clothing
must have been different for them easily to be distin-
guished from each other, by any persons but those
who were almost daiiy living with them. They were
remarkable, too, for their mutual attachment, their
fondness for each other’s company, and their resolution
as far as possible to keep together, and to attend one
another in every one of the few excursions that either
of them was obliged to make from home. Their chief
comfort seemed to be derived from constant union and
intercourse, ard an equal mutual share of whatever
recreation of body or mind they had an opportunity of
enjoying.



THE WIDOW’'S FAMILY. 37

At the time we became acquainted with them, they
were about six years old, and had a look of great
thoughtfulness—relieved by a faint and sensible smile
sufficient to shew that they were contented in their
situation, and especially happy in each others society.
It was in the hottest part of the summer, when their
clothing was slight and their pretty form and features
were seen to the best advantage. We were travelling
in the northern part of Lincolnshire, where they were
born, and where they lived with their widowed mother
and one elder and intelligent sister. We went several
miles out of our intended road on purpose to see the
family: not that a report of any wonders concerning
them led us to their remote and rural abode; but we
had time to go where we pleased—the country all round
was very beautiful, and we had seen a simple and
engaging account of the little girls, under the first
title we have taken for our story, in a lady’s album,
left by accident in a room at the inn at Louth where we
had slept two or three nights,

The reader may be interested in the lady's manu-



38 TNE WIDOW’'Ss

script statement as we found and copied it, and as we
afterwards obtained her permission to print it.

** In the wolds of Lincolnshire I found a retired and
humble, but very interesting family, consisting of a
widow and three daughters, living on a slender income,
left by the husband and father, whom death had re-
moved from them about ten months before. The
cottage of their residence first caught my eye, and I
placed myself in as good a situation as I could for
sketching it; when the elder daughter came out to me,
and said she was sent by her mother to know if I would
step in and refresh myself after I had finished my task ?
There was something so pleasing and even politein the
manners of the girl—her behaviour was so much above
and beyond what I could have expected from her abode
—that I felt delighted in telling her I would accept her
mother’s kind invitation, if she would promise that no
preparation beyond their ordinary family arrangements
should be made for me. I left the meadow for the
cottage rather sooner than I intended, and before my
sketch was finished, on account of a sudden and brisk
but very refreshing shower.



FAMILY. 39

The first drop from the threatening cloud had scarcely
fallen before two younger children, very much alike,
were near me, one with an umbrella and theother with
acloak. I closed my portfolio, and one of them re-
quested permission to run with it to the cottage, as she
had brought a clean covering to throw over it. [ al-
lowed her to follow her inclination, and held the
umbrella over the other child and myself while we
hastened to the same peaceful shelter. I told the
widow, who was standing just within the door to re-
ceive me, that I had already made servants of her
sweet children; when she answered, with equal sweet-
ness, that her tender hearted twins, provided they
could keep together, never minded what service they
performed for others. I was struck with the manner
of the widow—with the name she gave to her children,
and the disposition she ascribed to them—and I
inwardly resolved to remain the whole day at the
cottage, and recompense the family for whatever re-
freshment and attention I should receive.

I told the children that, if they wished to look over
the portfolio for their amusement, I would step with



40 THE WIDOW’S

their mamma into the next room, the door of which
was opening by the widow for that purpose. They
carefully opened the lids concealing about fifty sketches,
while I attended their mother, and took my seat in the
neatest little parlour Iever saw. I asked the widow
how long she had been in that condition; but a flood
of tears were the only answer I received to the inquiry :
and, when they ceased, she went to another subject,
and said that perhaps she might be able to tell me
about the girls without weeping, if I would not again
refer to their fatherless state: 1 promised, and she
proceeded as follows—

‘¢ You see that the younger ones are ¢wins and you
heard me call them tender-hearted. They are remark-
ably so. I often say that their sister, who went out
first to invite you, is all mind, and that they are all
heart. I do.not mean that she has no feeling, or that
they have no intelligence; but that intelligence is most
prevalent in her, and emotion in them. With such
children even a widow may be comfortable, and my

widow's tears are often checked by the force of a mother’s
gratitude.”



FAMILY. 4)

Her widow’s tears, however, would not yield even to
this force at the present moment: but she soon
recovered herself, and went on to describe the course
that her children, especially the twins, had generally
taken.

“© It was well,” she said, ‘‘ my children were dis-
posed to teach each other, for there is no school
sufficiently near for them to attend; and, had there
been one, my slender income of sixty pounds a year
would scarcely have allowed of my sending either of
them. One of the twins might be received into a
charity school at Lincoln, and perhaps the other intoa
similar institution at Louth; but, if I could have sepa-
rated them from me, they would not be separated from
each other. When the offers were first made, I pro-
posed selling the cottage and residing near Lincoln; but
the dear girls burst into tears, and said that I could
not reside near Lincoln and Louth too. I had not the
power of wounding their feelings by another hint at a
separation; and therefore here they remain, under the

tuition of their sister, who had no other teachers than
myself and a





42 THE WIDOW’'S

‘The widow’s tears again flowed, and prevented her
proceeding until I had soothed her grief by a few
remarks on what I considered the goodness of her elder
daughter’s education, and the fair prospect she bad of
her succeeding to perfect satisfaction with the two
younger. ‘‘ The dear girl has one difficulty,” the
widow remarked, ‘‘ that she has created for herself,
and that she is quite tent upon overcoming— it is to
preserve either of her sisters from surpassing the other,
or, rather, to prevent one appearing to a disadvantage
in the other’s presence. She says that, as nature has
formed their persons so nearly alike that they can
scarcely be distinguished, so she will endeavour to form
their minds to as close a resemblance as possible. I
often tell her to let things take their course in this
respect; but it is so favourite a purpose with her that
I cannot find it in my heart to throw any serious
obstacles in her way. Her plans, though sometimes
romantic, always succeed.”

One of the twins now gave a slight tap at the parlour
door, and I begged she might be permitted to enter.
It was to ask her mamma what provision was to be



FAMILY. 43

made for dinner ? as Anna, her elder sister, was quite
ready to go and fetch whatever was necessary. I
prevented the widow’s answering by a wish that Anna
might be allowed to receive her orders from me. She
came in, and I reminded her of our agreement—that
nothing was to be done for my accommodation beyond
the usual family arrangement. The widow’s counte-
nance suddenly brightened to an expression of glad-
ness and gratitude that surprised as well as charmed
me. ‘* O madam,” she said, ‘‘ how thankful I am for
this proof that you are willing to remain some little
time with us! Anna, you shall comply with the wish
of our new friend, and not risk her sudden departure
by even appearing to violate the agreement. But
where are your sisters gone? I see them flitting across
the meadow, like two sweet doves with their faces as
close to each other as possible.”

The mystery was soon explained.
farmer had promised them one of half a dozen fine
young rabbits that he was obliged to kill, and, before
either their mamma or I could prevent them, they
were on their way to the farm to request the fulfilment



44 TUE WIDOW’S

of the promise. On their return they said, with a
modest firmness—‘*‘ We had nothing to co with the
agreement, and were not bound to observe it, and
therefore mamma will at least have one dainty dish to
set before her new friend.”” They then curtesied pre-
cisely together, and ran outinto the garden to gather the
particular herb and vegetable that the farmer had told
them were best witha young rabbit. It was the sweet
manner of their doing all this that so delighted me,
and [ took the widow’s hand to intimate that I wished
her to go with me into the garden after them.

‘*T am thankful,” I said, *‘ for the opportunity of
adding to the happiness of your dear daughters.”
** You greatly add to my happiness as well as theirs,”
the widow answered. ‘‘I am often consoled in
witnessing their sweet affectionate mirth; but my
consolation rises much higher in having a friend of my
own age-and experience like yourself to partake of it—
to partake of it by being a joint witness of the mirth
that produces it. I often think, had nature joined
them together like the boys from Siam, which once
created such wonder in London, they could scarcely



PAMILY. 45

have been more with each other, or more interested in
each other’s welfare.”

They now skipped by us hand in hand, while the
other hand of each held what they had gathered for
dinner. I attempted to stop them, when they said—
‘¢The cook is waiting for us, and charged us not to
delay. Dear Anna is governess in the morning, and
cook at noon, and housemaid all the day; and we do
what we can to assist her.”” They spoke as they skip-
ped along, and were ina moment out of sight.

The widow again wept; but I could perceive that
now she shed tears of joy as well as-sorrow. ‘I little
thought,”’ I observed, ‘‘ that I should be able to impart
so much comfort where I must be so little known; nor
could I expect from strangers in this remote spot so
much to console and refresh my own spirit.”’

** Don’t leave us to day,” said the widow, pressing
her arm in mine, and giving me a look which seemed
to Intimate that to-morrow we might be still more
happy together.

‘* My time is my own,” I answered; “‘and you are



46 THE WIDOW’S

able, if you are but willing to detain me a week; but
this is the only condition—this must be yours before
I can consent to stay even a night.’”’ I held out a
bank note, and the widow accepted it—in a manner,
however, which convinced me, on the one hand, that
she was perfectly free from avarice, and on the other
hand that the money was as perfectly acceptable.
** Heaven knows,”’ she said, as she received it, ‘* that
it is accepted in the proper spirit in which I believe it
to be offered : the manner in which it will be spent,
you shall know to-morrow, perhaps to-night.”

Dinner was soon ready; but I was surprised that
Anna, whose care had provided the most delicious
repast I ever partook of, was not at the table. I
expressed both surprise and sorrow, and was answered
that she had an engagement about a mile off, but
would return to tea; and, as the evening was likely to
be fine, all might take a walk to the neighbouring and
beautiful village where she was gone. ‘* We shall not
walk with you, said one of the twins, ‘‘for we shall
be there perhaps before you set out. We promised the



FAMILY. 47

bones of the rabbit to make a poor sick woman a little
broth. She lives on the way, and we shall be as quick
as we can, and help her to make it.”

The sweet girls were just leaving the poor woman’s
hut, as the widow and I arrived within sight of it.
They gave one glance back at their pursuers, and then
frisked on towards the village. When we reached it,
I expressed my surprise that, though it contained but
one open scattered street, not a single spot of which
could escape the eye, I could not behold a trace of one
of the twins!

*“*If you could discover one,’’ their mother answered,
**both would certainly be seen. At home they are
scarcely ever apart, and abroad zever. You will find
them, I expect very soon, and in a place which you
have rendered peculiarly interesting to them. They
are ina house where they always had access; but for
months they have not been willing to enter it: and
now they have entered it only because your kindness
has fnrnished it for them.’”’ As she spoke, she opened
the church yard gate, and before another word coula
be uttered we were in the church, and I saw the z7izes,



48 THE WIDOW'S

with Anna, kneeling before a new and beautiful monu-
ment of their father, recently finished, and fixed up
within the last three hours. The widow had resolved
that it should not appear in the church till she could
pay for it, and my bank note had enabled her to do
80.”

Here the manuscript in the Album ends, and we
deeply regretted that the lady had not an opportunity
of recording any further particulars of her interesting
visit. Having transcribed what we read, we left a
frank confession, in writing of what we had done, with
an intimation that we should not leave the county
without finding out the engaging objects of her kind
and grateful attention. As we have hinted, we went
several miles, out of our direct road for this purpose;
but we were more than rewarded by the gratification
of seeing them. Our first sight of the twins was rather
sudden: they were on a bank, a short distance from
home, playing with a favourite squirrel which some one
of their occasional visitors had given them for their
amusement.

The one sitting highest on the bank, close behind



PAMILY. a9

the other, first caught sight of us as our chaise approach-
ed the spot; while the other seemed too intent upon
the antics of the squirrel, in striving to possess itself
ofa nut she held in her hand, to notice our approach.
We knew that we could not be far from the widow's
cottage, and we observed in these children a perfect
likeness to each other: we, therefore, assured ourselves
that we were in the presence of the Twins, and began
addressing them in as kind a manner as we could.

‘* You reside near this spot, my little dears ?”” I
anid, as the chaise stopped opposite the bank, with
only a low hedge between it and the road.

‘* We never wander far from home, madam,”’ said
the one who bad first observed us. ‘‘ We were only
giving our little sguire an evening's recreation abroad,
madam,”’ said the other, who now turned her attention
from the squirrel to us.

‘“* And why,’ asked my husband, ‘‘ do you call
your little squirrel an esguire®’ ‘*To answer that
question, Sir,”’ she said, with a faint blush and smile,
** would be to confess a blunder of my own. My
French teacher would tell you perhaps if you met with

i



50 THE WIDOW’'S

her; but I am ashamed.” ‘* Where,” I asked;
** shall we find your French teacher.”’

‘*O, we have two French teachers,’’ answered the
other, ‘‘ and they live at the cottage yonder: we some-
times call them mamma and sister Anna. If you
wish to see them we willrun across the meadow and
call them out to meet you.”’

My husband drove down the lane, while the chil-
dren and their esguzre ran towards the cottage along
a nearer path. At a turn of the road, the widow
appeared at the gate. She was an enlarged and
matured, but still delicate, image of the children;
while Anna, whe svon joined her, appeared an inter-
mediate link, uniting together the widow and her
twins, and exactly resembling the whole. After the
few and hesitating remarks that strangers might be
expected to make on such an occasion, the widow ex-
pressed her wonder that so many persons of respecta-
bility had Jately condescended to honour her cottage,
or her children, or herself—she scarcely knew which
—with longer or shorter visita!

“It would not appear to us that you, or your chil_



PAMILY. 51

dren, or your cottage, madam,” I said, ‘‘ can be much
adapted for long or frequent visits. Atthe same time,
the most respectable persons who know you must feel
an interest inthe sight of adi the objects you men-
tion.’’

The widow might have been gratified with the
compliment paid to her cottage, and especially to her
children ; but she evidently regretted the inadvertence
with which she had connected herself with them. She
therefore strove to turn the conversation, and would
have led our attention altogether to another subject,
had we not insisted on confining her longer to this.
‘* We shall consider your reluctance,”’ I said, ‘‘ to go
on with the subject of your being often visited as a
proof that our visit is unwelcome, and that we must
not think of prolonging it.”

‘* Then indeed,’’ she said with a smile, ‘‘I must
undeceive you at once. I have no other visitor at my
house to-day, and niay not have for many days to
come; I shall, therefore, hope you will stay as long as
you can.”

** On condition,’? my husband said, ‘‘ that you will



52 THE WIDOW’'S

allow us to remunerate you as we please, we will
consent to stay at least one week in the delightful
retreat.”’

** T shall rejoice in your staymg with ms,” answered
the widow, ‘‘ and the more so, as we have just fitted ulp
an apartment for visitors, which you may be the first
to occupy.” Remembering that the lady of the
Album had given the widow a five pound note, I
considered that two of us, especially occupying a new
apartment, shouid double that sum. Putting a ten
pound note, therefore, in her hand, I observed that
we should expect the week to be provided for, in the
matter of food, in the same frugal and wholesome
mannet in which she was no doubt accustomed to
prepare for her own family. I saw a tear of gratitude
start in her eye, as she glanced at the amount of the
note, ahd as she said to Anna, to whom she shewed it,
‘** what can all this mean ?”

I was now in the neat little parlour with the widow
and Anna, while my husband was gone in search of
some near place where our horse and chaise could he
twken care of. He soon returned, and asked the name



FAMILY. 53

and character ofa neighbouring farmer, whose son haa
met him, and requested permission to take charge of
them while we stayed. ‘‘The young man,’’ he said,
‘* at the same lime, gave me this couple of fowls to
bring to our good hostess, lest she should not be
sufficiently provided for our first dinner.’”? The widow
now whispered to Anna, and gave her some money,
evidently to send in payment of what she was un-
willing to receive as a present: but my husband told
her that the debt was already discharged. He had
given the young man the price of the fowls, and
charged him to send whatever else the farm could
spare every morning for a week to come. ‘‘ Where
are the twins ?’’ I said, looking round in doors and
out, and missing them. Their mother heard the
question from the kitchen, where she had gone with
the fowls to Anna, and instantly went to the back door
to see if her children were in the garden. They
were not there, and could no where be seen. ‘‘ Anna,
my dear,’’ the widow said, ‘‘ step outa little way, and
try if you can see them: they are gone to find out
something that will be likely to increase the comfort



84 THE WIpoWw’'s

of our friends.”», My husband accompanied Anna in
the search, while I felt a pleasure in relieving the
widow from a little of her labour in the kitchen. For
sometime no trace of the dear children could be seen.
At last Anna looked up, and thought she saw the
squirrel at the top of a large tree in a distant hedge.
As they drew nearer they saw it was a crab tree, which
such creatures always avoid. Then they noticed that
the squirrel was near the point of one of its slenderest
branches, a situation of danger which they never
venture to occupy on any tree. The little creature
at first seemed in a state of considerable uneasiness ;
but this they ascribed to its fear of falling, until on a
sudden, on beholding them, it became as merry as it
had before been uncomfortable. Just then a sound
came from the bottom of the tree which Anna knew to
be the voice of one of her sisters, when my husband
sprung forward, and saw the one that spoke holding
up the other that was evidently hurt. All was now
explained. The kind little girls had thought that
their visitors would like a few of the crabs, and in
attempting to gather them th: one that was hurt had



PAMILY. 55

fallen down, and so sprained her ancle as to be unable
to walk or stand. They were not far from the farm,
though it was concealed from them by a small inter-
vening wood; and after the little sufferer was lifted
out of the ditch, and my husband, who possesses
superior skill as a surgeon, had bathed the ancle with
an excellent liquid he is scarcely ever without, he ran
to fetch the chaise, and returned the sooner as the
harness was not yet taken from the horse. In less
than a quarter of an hour from the time of their
leaving the house, the widow and [ had the delight of
seeing the twins driven within sight of the cottage as
though they were taking a little cheerful recreation ;
while Anna returned at her own request on foot, and
at my husband’s request preserving the accident
an entire secret. With such ease may incidents, often
magnified into calamities, not only be kept from crea-
ting alarm, but be smoothed into occasions of fresh
and increased pleasure. By the time an hour’s ride
was over, all painful effects of the accident had
ceased, and we have no reason to believe that the
widow knows to this day of its having occurred—



56 THE WIDOW’S

unless perchance a printed copy of this narrative
should fall into her hands.

A quantity of the finest crabs, which the children
had gathered, and now brought home in the chaise,
explained to her satisfaction thecause of their absence,
They had beer trained by Anna to the habit of
diverting their mamma s attention from whatever was
painful, and we soon found that there was little danger
of their betraying the secret with which I alone had
been entrusted. On one painful subject only their
sister both permitted and encouraged them to speak at
proper opportunities—this was their dear departed
father.

No visitor came to the cottage without being soon
conducted to the church and directed to his monu-
ment: but we had chosen to reverse this order of
things, and so we had been first to the church, to the
monument, and also to the grave of the lamented man,
before we visited his cottage, or saw his family. We
had done more than this. I speak not of our
conduct «hrough ostentation; but because it led to
incidents which the reader may be pleased to know.



FAMILY. 57

The lady’s album made no mention of a tomb stone,
and we suspected that no visit was made by the widow,
if by her children, to the grave, because the sight of it
without this memorial to distinguish and defend it,
might have had too melancholy an effect upon her
feelings. The remarks of the sexton convinced us
that we were not mistaken.

Being satisfied on this point, we resolved on ordering
a t6mb-stone to be prepared and fixed without delay.
The mason’s yard contained several ready for engraving,
and we staid a night at the village inn near his huuse,
that an inscription which we gave him, a little altered
from that on the monument, with the addition of a
short epitaph, might be engraved, and the whole affair
completed by the afternoon of this day. I confess I
was Impatient to introduce the family to this new
object, yet consented at my husband's request to wait
till the cool of the evening. Soon after dinner, and
while I was eating a crab, and giving the esquire a
nut, the twin who had met with the accident whispered
‘hat we must all go to church this evening. ‘* On
condition,”’ I said, ‘‘ that you and your dear mamma



58 THE WIDOW’S

ride with Mr. Morant, while your sisters and I walk
across the meadows. I proposed this to prevent the
dear creature’s pain returning by an early walk, and I
gently insisted on this condition being fulfilled. It
was the first time the twins had ever gone from home
apart; but the sister knew the reason of my proposal,
and instantly consented.

“‘ Suppose,”’ I said to the widow, when we joined at
the church-yard gate, ‘‘ we take one walk among the
tombs before we enter the church ?”’

‘I have never done so at any one’s request before,”’
she answered; ‘‘ but at your’s I will.” She placed her arm
trembling in mine, and I led her a circuitous path to
the spot. As we came near it, she said, ‘‘ Forgive my
declining to proceed farther in this direction, lest my
eye should fall on the melancholy undefended grave of
my e

She could say no more; but as she paused in her
steps as well as speech, I promised that she should not
be led to such an affecting object, and she consented
to proceed, with her eyes suffused in tears, and fixed
on the ground. At last, on raising them a little, she





PAMILY. 59

saw, to her astonishment, her three children standing
and weeping before a new tomb!

*“* Children,” she said, ‘* these tears would become
you better in the church, before the memorial of your
dear father’s virtues, than at the grave and tomb of a
stranger !’’

‘*‘ Not altogether a stranger, my dear widow,” I said:
upon which she raised her eyes till they reached the
following epitaph—

**Why flows the muse’s mournful tear?

For thee cut down in manhood’s prime!
Why sighs for thee the widow dear?
Cropt by the scythe of hoary timc!

Lo this my friend’s the common lot—
To me thy memory entrust :

When all that’s dear shall be forgot,
I’ll guard thy venerated dust.”

‘Whose dust is thus guarded, and who has been so
generous as to guard it?” said the widow, suspecting
for the first time that she was before a new tomb of



60 THE WIDOW’S

her husband. Then, reading the inscription above
the epitaph, she faintly said—‘* Why did I so hastily
send the dear children away ?”

‘* We are not away, dear mother,’”’ answered Anna,
*‘ we are all here—we are close behind you.”’

They were suffered to give full vent to their tears of
melancholy delight; and then I requested, as we had
conducted them to the tomb-stone, they would con-
duct us to the monument. The church was open in
expectation of a funeral, and the clergyman, a vener-
able looking man, was waiting to perform the solemn
service. He was devoted to the dues and duties of
his church, and few could manage these things with
greater talent and effect; but he was a sour recluse,
and paid little or no attention to his parishioners in
other places. Once, and only once, he had been at
the cottage, when the twins were christened, and
sometime before their father died. On the widow
approaching him, he inquired if she was well, and
then particularly asked about them, and why she
suffered them to go to the meeting instead of bringing
them to church ?



PAMILY. 61

>

‘‘ They are before you, sir,” she meekly answered,
‘‘ and are old enough to answer for thenurelves.”’

The priest was struck with surprise et their rapid
growth, and could hardly believe that children so tall
were infants when last he saw them. ‘‘ They will be
old enough for confirmation when the bishop comes
this way nex€ spring,” he said; ‘‘ but I must first
examine them. I fear that, as hey do not come
often to church, I shall find them deficient in the
necessary qualifications. You know they must at
least be able to repeat the creed, the Lord's prayer,
and the ten commandments.”

‘Indeed, Sir?’’ answered the widow; ‘‘and you
imagine that I and their elder sister have allowed them
to grow up to these years and this stature, ignorant of
the first principles o: tneir duty to God and man!”

The priest was silent and offended, and the widow
requested permission to follow my husband and me
towards the monument. ‘I will not detain you,
madam,”’ he answered, ‘‘ from the only object of wor-
ship you seem to have in this church; but I must
request a word or two with you before you leave the



62 THE WIDOW’S

place: there are some small matters to settle between
us.”” The widow knew what he meant, and promised
to see him again before she returned home.

As she joined us in another part of the church, the
clerk was taking very polite leave of my husband, and
suddenly meeting her, asked if he might undertake the
cleaning of the monument on the usual terms. Her
feelings, as she approached the spot, were too acute to
allow of her answering him, and he passed on to meet
the funeral which was just then advancing to the
church-door, We all retired to a vacant pew, and
joined in the devotions of the solemn occasion. It
was the funeral of a youth of seventeen, who had been
travelling with his parents in search of health, and
who bad requested, as he walked through this church-
yard about three weeks before, to be buried there,
should he die on the journey, or sufficiently near the:
spot.

As the chief mourner—the father of the youth—
retired from the church to the grave, the widow whis-
pered to me—‘ Surely I have seen that gentleman
betore! He was a visitor at the cottage early in the



FAMILY. 63

summer, and the youth he is going to bury was with
him—then almost a corpse.’”’ My husband offered
to lead her to the grave; but this she declined—her
spirit was not equal to the trial. Ee, however, pro-
ceeded with her children to the melancholy spot, not
far from their father’s tomb, and they there became
convinced that}their mother was notmistaken. ‘‘ Dear
mamma,” they said, when they returned to us, “ it is
indeed the same—the very same! He and the youth
were at our house only a quarter of an hour; but it is
the husband, and must have been the son, of the lady
whom we found sketching the cottage, and who after-
wards spent a week with us while they rode about the
country. Poor lady! poor gentleman! poor youth!
how we all feel for them "”’

Anna was interrupted in her simple lamentations by the
very different voice and manner of the priest, who,tz his
surplice, again accosted the widow, and reminded her
that certain fees were due for placing the marble in the
church and the stone in the church yard. Without the
slighest hesitation she took from a small pocket book
that had been ber husband's the ten pound note, and



£4 THE WIDOW'S

~~

requested the priest to pay himself whatever the charge
might be. We did not hear the request ; but we saw the
offer of the note, and I stepped forward to prevent
its beingtaken. ‘‘ There must be some mistake here,”
I said. ‘* None whatever,’’ answered the priest,
“‘except that a _ stranger has improperly inter-
fered between me and my parishioner. What right,
madam, have you to check the due course of
ecclesiastical business, and prevent the church from
receiving her dues?”

‘¢ None whatever, Sir,” said my husband: “ only I
must request that you will let this part of ecclesiastical
business be done by the proper person. Yourclerk, I
presume, can much more consistently receive the dues
of the church, while you retire to take off your
surplice.”’

Finding the dues perfectly safe the priest consented,
only observing, that the clerk might not have change
for the note, which he had. ‘* ‘This Sir,’* my husband
said, ** will be unnecessary—I will settle with the clerk
to the utmost farthing of your demand.”

‘“< Yes, yes, your reverence,” said the clerk, coming



FAMILY. 65

up at the moment, and indistinctly hearing what was
said, ‘‘ the good gentleman has settled all with me,
and I placed the money in the vestry cupboard, that
when your reverence goes there you may be sure to
see it.”

The pampered priest was now disconcerted and angry ;
but he knew not upon which object his anger was to be
vented. The widow had not hesitated to pay his dues
on the first demand. I knew that they were already
paid, and therefore gently interfered to prevent her. My
husband had even asked the clerk their amount, and
discharged it in a moment. And the clerk had care-
fully placed the money where he was certain his
master would find it. Who then was toblame? Not
even the priest himself—at least he thought so, as he
soon after said to my husband—‘“ You perceive, Sir,
that I was under an entire mistake, and if you have
as good an understanding as you have a heart you
will fully account for it.”’

‘« Sir,” my husband said, ina firm reproving tone,
**if you had as good a heart as you have an understand-
jug, you would not, at this time of life, with a noble



66 THE WIDOW’S

fortune, and nota child to leave it to, exact of the poor
widow, and fatherless, three pounds, their living for
three whole weeks, for these memorials of her depart-
ed husband.”

‘“*I perceive, Sir,” answered the priest,’’ that you
are disposed to join in the popular clamour against
the church. You would rob it of its dues, and strip
it of its best ornaments. Here, Sir, is a pamphlet I
have just written in its defence. Accept it, and,read
it, Sir, and it may do you good.”’

My husband looked at the title, and saw it was a
tirade against dissenters. He politely returned it, and
said—‘‘ Sir, I must ever consider such clergymen as
yourself the very worst enemies of the church. Your
rapacity creates the dissent you deplore and reprobate.
As a proof of this, the present exaction will, I am
persuaded, add very much to the number of dissenters
in your parish. Your clerk hinted tomethat the dues
might have been less, had not the widow sometimes
gone with her family to the dissenting chapel; and now
I doubt not she will go there entirely, and never enter
your church except to view the memorials of her

3



FAMILY. 67

departed husband. J blame her not. I am no dis-
senter myself, nor am I likely ever to become one.
I am yet convinced that the views and feelings which
ycur conduct has given to the widow against your
church, will, without the slightest taint of revenge,
i:uduce her henceforth to take her family entirely to
he chapel, where they will at least be trained up to
the conviction of what a Christian church really is,
and what your church and every church ought to be.’’

Thus we parted never to meet again. The priest
retired to his vestry, while we gathered together ona
retired spot of the church yard to confer on the ex-
pediency of seeking an interview with the bereaved
father. This, at present, turned out to be impossible.
He left the village immediately after the funeral, no
doubt to join the bereaved mother in some retirement
of the neighbourhood. We had sent our chaise to the
farm, and proposed all to walk back to the cottage
together.

As we proceeded, one of the twins took advantage
ofa minute of silence, and said with her usual anima-
tinn—‘* Mamma, what could the minister mean whep



68 THE WIDOW’'S

he said he should find sister and me deficient ?”” On
her mamma explaining his meaning, the other twin
smiled and said—‘ If he had condescended to call at
our house, and examined us, we should have con-
vinced him that we could repeat and lL hope understand
all that the bishop wants to confirm us, and much
more too.”’

‘¢ But why, Sir,”’ said Anna, addressing my husband
‘are we required to learn and repeat the creed as
much as the Lord’s prayer and ten commandments?
They are parts of the bible; but ¢haé is only in the
prayer book. It is called theapostle’s creed ; but none
of the apostles say any thing about it.”

‘* The apostles certainly teach us the very same facts
and doctrines as are taught in that creed,”’ I answered ;
“‘though as a creed, in the form in which it is placed
before us, the apostles did uot and could not write it,
because it was unknown till two or three hundred years
after the apostles lived.”

“¢ And yet," said the widow, ‘“‘ it is printed over all
our church communion tables by the side of the
Lord's prayer and ten commandments, as though it
were of the same divine authority as them !”



FAMILY. 69

We had now reached the top of a short lane, along
which we had to pass to another meadow. The ¢wins
were over the style in a moment, and in another mo-
ment we had lost sightof them. I had become fearful
of missing them, and their mother discerned my
anxiety. ‘** We shall soon reach their humble and
favourite retreat,’ she said. ‘‘ They are beneath
yonder thatch, and they have endeavoured to elude
us for a few moments for a favourite purpose, which
you may understand by peeping through a crevice
of the door.”” This was unnecessary: the door was
open, and one of the twins was preparing a nice
little supper for the poor cottager, while the other was
reading to her a chapter of the New Testament.

‘¢ This good old woman,’ the widow said, ‘* is the
only pensioner we have hitherto been able to support,
and we were charged upon his death bed, whose words
will never go from us, on no account to suffer her to
want. She was his nurse in infancy, and would have
been sv in his last illness had she been able; and now
my daughters are nurses to her. Every day, and
sometimes twice and thrice a day, they are with her.



70 THE WIDOW’S

She calls them her cooks, her doctors, her chapJains—
her guardian angels. They often cause her poor
widowed heart to sing for joy.’’

I went first into the cottage, and desired the dear
children to continue their kind offices; while my
husband added to the slender meal by a few biscuits
and a little fruit that he had purchased in the village.
‘* And so,”’ I said, ‘‘ while the lordly and luxurious
priest exacts three wecks of your living for some of
the best ornaments of his church and church yard,
you are able to afford a living to this aged woman,
who should be kept in comfort, with ten thousand
others like her, from the overflowing wealth of the
church !””

‘* She receives,’” the widow answered, ‘a shilling a
week from the slender rates of the parish; though I
am sorry to say this is a fund to which the parish
priest never contributes. He declares himself exempt
from all rates for the poor, and insists upon the farm-
ers keeping them and the church too.”’

As we were preparing to leave the hut, an elderly
good-lvoking man was riding a donkey at a very slew



FPAMILY. 71

pace along the lane. I think he could not be urging
on the creature at the rate of more than two miles an
hour; though he was evidently wishing to proceed at
a quicker pace, and striving mildly to bring the
donkey to his mind. When he came opposite the hut,
the creature stopped, and no effort would make him
proceed. ‘‘ He is past feeling,’’ said the man to my
husband, who advised him to use his stick; ‘‘ and, if he
was not, I should prefer being mild with the creature
rather than severe.”’ Then getting off and looking
in at the hut, as we left it, he asked the good old
woman if he might buy of her a bunch of the carrots
that hung at the door?

We soon found that she had consented, by looking
back and seeing the bunch of carrots at the top of
the man’s stick, and he overtaking us on his donkey
at a rather brisk rate. We did not then understand
the trick that he was playing off upon his dull beast.
‘* I suppose, Sir,” said one of the twins to my husband,
who had taken one in each hand to lead them down the
lane— I suppose that old man bought the carrots for
his supper, and will cat them without dressing,
perhaps as he rides home ?”



72 THE WIDOW’S

‘© imagine,”” my husband answered, “ that theman
is not riding home, but from home; otherwise his ass
would proceed at a quicker pace. However slow that
animal is on a journey from home, it is sure to trot
fast enough the moment its head is turned to go back
again.”’

My husband had scarcely finished the sentence
before the ass trotted by us at the rate of six or seven
miles an hour! But we soon saw a good reason for
the change— the man was holding the bunch of car-
rots a few inches before its head, and it was in pursuit
of this delicious meal, and not with any regard to ita
master’s convenience or authority, that it bad thus
quickened its dull and stupid pace. The young folks
were full of mirth at this scene, and the older, not
excepting the widow herself, were inclined to a hearty
laugh, as the man trotted before them with his carrots
attracting the ass, and yet the creature not able to
reach one of them. Proud of his triumph, the man
looked back two or three times, and joined us in the
laugh. The last turn of his head, however, was
almost fatal to his hopes of quickly reaching the end



FAMILY. 73

of his journey He drew the carrots too near the
mouth of the ass, when the creature seized the bunch,
and it fell at once from the stick and its mouth upon
the ground. Now wasthe test of the creature’s mo-
tive four quickening its pace! Now was the tng of war
between it and its master! JI verily believe, had not
my husband run to his assistance, that the creature
would have devoured enough of the carrots to satisfy
its appetite, and return to its old slow pace. But the
bunch was rescued just as the ass had tasted its
sweetness, and the delicate bit had provoked its appe-
tite. My husband assisted the man to remount, then
tied his bunch more fast to a longer stick, and we
laughed again to see the ass trot off at a quicker pace
than before.

With the widow on my right and Anna on my left, I
walked near enough behind my husband to hear his
conversation with the twins; whom be had again
taken, one in each hand. He began making some
remark on what they had beheld, when one of them
said significantly“ I always thought the ass was a
remarkably kind and patient creature, given to much



74 THE WIDOW'S

self-denial for the convenience and comfort of its
master ; but this a little changes my mind about it.”
‘¢ And mine, too, sister,’’ said the other twin, with still
more significance. ‘‘ The creature now appears a
mere slave, working only as it is compelled, and
bent on nothing but gratifying its own low appetite.”

My husband was silent for a few minutes to let the
dear children go on, delighted with the thoughtful-
ness they manifested, and the clear good sense and
strength of their remarks. But they too were silent,
in hope of an answer from him. Perceiving this, he
said—‘‘ I admire the view you take of this matter, not
for the sake of the ass, but for your own sake, and for
the sake of truth. While some creatures have been
censured for evil tempers which they do not possess,
that creature has been praised for virtues which I fear
seldom or never fell to its lot. Its assumed patience
is sheer obstinacy. Its pretended self-denial is a
sullen submission to labour, and sometimes, though
not often, to hardship, which it cannot avoid.
While the incident we have just witnessed proves
that it can be induced to exert itself with considerable



FAMILY. 75

activity ; but only by the prospect of its own speedy
gratification.”’

‘* How different,’’ I observed, ‘ is this to the dispo-
sition cf the horse! Our active and animated steed 1s
a remarkable example. I do think it would go on at
the quickest pace, if it thought our convenience and
comfort required it, fora whole day without a morsel
of food! And then, when food is brought for it,
instead of instantly siezing it like the ass, it will look
at its master, and express its gratitude for sometime
before the food is touched. Then, having eaten a
little, it looks up as though it would ask whether we
wish to proceed ? and say thatit was ready to sacrifice
its food, and go on with all its hunger and weariness,
if it could but convey us to our journey’s end !”’

Anna now spoke on another subject arising out of
what we had beheld. “I have received,”’ she said,
‘* a lesson from this incident that will be of service to
me as long as I live. As you have spoken of the ass
perhaps I may be allowed to speak of its rider. He
has set us all—at least he has set me and my sisters—
an example of the best method of dealing with idle



76 THE WIDOW’'S

and obstinate creatures. I shall teach my pupils
as well as learn myself, to attract the stubborn chil-
dren of the sunday school we expect to have under our
care, by a view of their own interest, rather than urge
them by a fear of their own injury. JZ shall hang
a bunch of carrots before them to draw them forward,
rather than use any severe methods to drive them.”
The twins were delighted beyond expression with
sister Anna‘’s remarks, especially as she seemed to
assure them of a prospect, which they had hitherto
contemplated with uncertainty—the prospect of becom-
ing teachers in a sunday school. Hitherto the widow
had hesitated to allow her daughters to accept the
kind invitation often given them to assist in the chapel
school near her cottage; but the behaviour of the
priest to-day had removed all remaining objection
from her mind, and she had just told Anna that the
next time thoy were requested to lend their aid, ske
at least should comply with the reqnest—even at the risk
of being reproached as dissenters from the church.
‘The party were now at the cottage gate, and were
surprised to find the rider and owner of the ass wait-



FAMILY. 77

ing to see them. He was now on foot, standing near
the gate, and had lost all the cheerfulness of coun-
tenance with which he had parted with them in the lane.
‘Taking off his hat to my husband, whom he consider-
ed the master of the cottage, he begged pardon for
having put his ass in the hovel.

‘“* What, you have ridden the creature too fast, and
completely tired it out, I suppose?” said my husband.

‘* No, Sir,’’? answered the man, *‘ but I am afraid
the carrots have killed it! I could not bear to tanta-
lize the poor beast any longer, and so, as soon as I got
upon this green, I jumped off its back, and let it take
the carrots; but it has eaten them so fast that it ig
quite ill, and I fear I shall never ride on it again.”

My husband again found the advantage of his medi-
cal skill, and of carrying about with him certain pillg
which he jocosely called—Good physic for man and
beast. One pill was sufficient to conquer the over feed-
ing of a man, and three were necessary for that of a
horse; he, therefore, thought that two would be suf-
ficient to cure the ass of the consequence of its gluttony.
He reduced them to powder, mixed the powder



78 THE WIDOW’S

with a little milk, drenched the long eared invalid, and
in a quarter of an hour had the pleasure of seeing it
quite recovered.

In the joy of its owner, he was eager to mount and
continue his journey; but we advised him, as he had
four miles to go and it was getting dark, to stop all
night where he was, and give himself and his beast
the advantage of several hours rest. ‘* You can start
again,’’ said Anna, ‘“‘ by four o’clock in the morning,
and I will see that a bunch of turnips shall be ready to
attract the creature to your destination.”

The man thanked the kind young lady, and consented.
‘« Perhaps,” he said, ‘‘ I may be permitted to take the
poor sick beast into that nice little paddock behind the
house? the evening air and the delicious grass may
quite recover it to health.”

My husband looked at the widow for her consent,
and then told the man that he had better let the ass
remain out all night. Overjoyed at the offer, he said
to the widow, whom he now found to be the owner of
the cottage and meadow, ‘‘ I shall indeed be glad of
this opportunity of refreshing the poor creature, and



FAMILY. 79

whenI have secured it in the paddock, I will get my-
self some refreshment and rest at the public house.”’

As he was going, we all expressed a wish that so
worthy and creditable a man might have his refresh-
ment at the cottage, and then seek his rest at the little
ale-house. The widow proposed the plan, and the
man was requested to comply with it. ‘‘I will thank
you,” he said, *‘ when I return.’’ This was not long
delayed. ‘Fhe fences and gates of the meadow were
all as secure as he wished, except a slight breach in
the hedge, against which he put a hurdle; and he
returned thankfully to avail himself of the offer to sup
with the family and their visitors.

‘“*T have been,” he said, as he sat down, ‘‘ paying a
heavier demand than before of tythe to the fat parson
yonder; and, instead of going home contented, as my
donkey and the parson wished me to do, I resolved to
go to the town and consult a gentleman of the law,
who has got several of my neighbour’s tythes lessened
lately. Now, if I had been ever so much pressed, I
could not have got my ass into the parson’s large
meadow for even five minutes; but youkinod strangers



80 THE WIDOW'S

—and you kind widow, especially—have granted my
beast the favour for a whole night’s feed in a wonderful
better pasture than his!”

One of the twins at this moment smiled and spoke
to the other, who was immediately and visibly interested
in what her sister said. ‘The man perceived that he
had excited some mirth between them, and requested
to know what it was that so delighted the sweet little
ladies 2 ‘‘ I have but a plain understanding,”’ he said ;
‘‘ but I have credit at home for having a large and a
warm heart; tell me what you are merry about, and
if itis about me, I'll forgive you.”” The twins looked
at Anna as though they would ask her permission to
comply with the worthy man’s request. ‘Their sister
consented, and one of them said—

‘¢ We did not smile and speak about you, Sir; but
about the parson’s grass and the penitent ass. Itisa
fable that sister has given us to translate into French.
We laughed when we read it, and perhaps you will
Taugh when you hear it.

‘* There was a distemper among the beasts, and they
assembied in the lion's den to inquire about the cause



PAMILY. 81

of it. They first resolved that the beast which had
committed the greatest sin should be put to death, to
pacify the wrath of heaven, and remove the plague
from the earth. ‘The lion confessed, first, that he had
committed many murders, and had recently slain and
eaten a man. The tiger acknowledged that he had
devoured three or four children in about as many
months. ‘Ihe wolf allowed that he had committed
much destruction among the neighbouring flocks, and
the fox that he had done the same among fhe numerous
roosts around him. All the other beasts confessed
their several crimes of deeper or fainter dye. At last
it came to the turn of the ass, and with great humility
he admitted that be had trespassed once into the
parson’s paddock ; but was driven out soon after he
had begun cropping the delicious grass, and hoped
that the severe beating he had received would be con-
sidered punishment enough for the sin.

‘*‘ The beasts were exceedingly restless during the con-
fession of the ass, and the instant it was over they all
rose with indignation, no longer wondering what it was
that occasioned the distemper among them. ‘The lion

G



§2 THE WiDOW’'S

then spoke—‘‘ What! eat the parson’s grass! O,
sacrilege! This, brethren, is the flagrant unpardon-
able crime that has brought down the wrath of heaven
upon our heads; and the vile offender must instantly
be sacrificed to appease that wrath, and remove the
dreadful malady it has inflicted upon us!”

‘* And did they kill the poor ass?” the man asked,
as seriously and earnestly as though it were fact instead
of fable.

‘ your ass would as certainly have been killed had it
entered the parson’s meadow without leave.”

Other entertaining subjects of conversation arose,
and rendered the evening a remarkably pleasant one,
especially for the twims, who had been permitted at
their request to sit up an hour or two later than usual.
After they were gone to bed, a subject was started by
the owner of the ass, which surprised the rest who
heard it, and led to the must unexpected and profitable
results. The man had gone to take one more look at
his ass in the meadow, by the light of a moon, bright
almost as a mid-day sun; and he staid much longer



PAMILY &3

than his friends expected. ‘‘ We feared something
had happened to you or to your poor beast,” said my
husband, as the man returned smiling into the room.
** Nothing has happened to either of us,’’ answered the
man ; ‘‘ but I stopped to look at the meadow you have
there. What, ma’am, do you pay rent for this place,
meadow and all, if it be a fair question ?’’

‘* This little estate is the lady’s freehold,” said I,
‘‘and a favourite freehold it is, for a reason which
regard to her feelings will not allow me to explain.”

‘* T understand you—I understand you''answere 1
the man. ‘‘ The lady values the estate out of regard
to the gentleman who bought it more than to what it
is worth in money. All that is very good. But does
she know the value of it in money? I ask her pardon
that I have made her weep: it is in my nature to
lessen the distress of others, but not to increase it.”’

The widow strove to repress her tears, and cast a
look of some surprise and solicitude upon the man.
** Every spot is of inestimable value to me, for the
reason to which my friends have alluded; but I don’t
know the real value in money, as you say, of an



&4 THE WIDOW'S

particular part of the estate, and least of allofthe mea-
dow part.”’

** But I do, ma’am,’’ answered the man: ‘* and
plain as I appear, with only an ass to carry me about,
TI can afford to give you sixty pounds a year for the
meadow only, for as long a lease as you may please to
grant me.”’

The widow was not, as some would have been, thrown
into an extacy of wonder and joy. She had been told
before that her meadow was worth more than would
appear at first sight, and she concluded, if this were
the case, some offer would be made by those who
understood its value: still she was not prepared for so
sudden nor so large an offer as this. ‘+ What, Sir,”
she asked, *‘ is the peculiar quality of the meadow?’

‘“* There is no difficulty in discovering this fact,
and answering this question,” replied the man. ‘ I
have discovered it by moonlight, and I tell you at
once that the meadow contains some of the finest brick
earth I ever felt—for I can tell by the touch better
than the sight, and I never touched better in my
irfe.””



FAMILY. 85

‘‘The moon then has had nothing to do in the
discovery, Sir?’’ said Anna, ‘‘ since you would have
been able to feel the earth in perfect darkness.”

““ Well, let that pass, my young lady,’’ answered
the man: ‘* itis a good joke in more senses than one.
The moon has had nething to do in the discovery with
regard to my brain, any more than my touch—TI mean
Iam no lunatic—as my boy read in the New Testament
last Sunday, Z speak forth the words of truth and
soberness.””

‘* Now you mention the New Testament and intimate
the regard you have for its authority, I am the more
inclined to listen to what you have to say about the
meadow,”’ said the widow: ‘* there appears something
Providential in your stopping here to make the disco-
very of its value.”’

‘© Why, as to that,” the man answered, “ FE believe
the donkey must have the credit of the discovery.
Â¥You have already found it to be a most voracious
beast, and it has betrayed its gluttony, as one of vou
called it, with the grass as well as the carm@ts. Just
as E went into the meadow, it was tugging hard at a



86 THE WIDOW’'S

huge bunch of sweet grass, and just as I reached it, up
came the bunch by the roots, and a big lot of
earth with them. This won’t do, I said, and so I took
the huge turf to put it into its place again, and in
handling it for this purpose I found it to be the much
earth I have described. This is the plain history of
the matter, and without any more to do, I am willing
to give you the rent I have offered.’’

‘* Without the view, of course,’’ my husband said,
*‘of turning it into a brickfield? This will injure the
beauty of the estate, a little, and especially annoy the
dwellers in the cottage.”’

‘** But, Sir,"’ answered the man, ‘ it will do quite as
much good in another way—it will defend the other
parts of the property. Thegarden and cottage will be
much more secure by having a high wall to protect
them, and an encampment of brick makers behind that.
I will engage that the men shall all be honest ones, and
do the widow’s property no harm—nay, that they shall
be its protectors.”

“I have often wished,”’ she said, ‘‘ for a high wall
between the garden and the meadow; but I could not
afford to build it.’



PAMILY. 87

‘“¢ Well, ma’am,”” answered the man, “ but if you
can't afford it 1 can. Come, now, in addition to the
sixty pounds a year, and all expences of the lease, I
will engage to build a wall eight feet high with the
first bricks that are made; and besides this 1 will
cover the garden side of it with some of the choicest
fruit trees you ever saw.””

‘“* I look upon the offer as a liberal one, and as an
interposition of Providence in my behalf,”’ said the
widow dropping a tear; “I shall therefore think
favourably upon it, and if these friends advise me I
shall accept it.’’

My husband had been writing these last few minutes,
on a Sheet of paper that Anna had brought at his
request. Ile finished what he intended Just as the
widow finished speaking, and then placed it before the
man requesting him to say if he approved of it ?”
‘* FHoow can I disapprove of it?’’ he said, ‘‘ since it
declares exactly what I have offered? My word has
always been my bond; but here is my name in my own
hand writing to confirm it.”

The name was written with some obscurity, so that



88 THE WEDOW’S

the widow, on looking at it with great attention, could
not understand it. But Anna knew it, and knew, as
she afterwards remarked to me, that her sisters would
know it as soon as they saw it. My husband, too,
remembered something of the name the moment he
beheld it, and on recollection was fully aware of the
singular and eccentric character with whom they had
been conversing. No explanation, however, passed
that evening; but after a few more indifferent matters
on both sides, the man took his leave; and the next
morning, when the family and their visitors arose,
both he and his ass had disappeared from the village.

The keeper of the ale house, where the man had
slept, came early to the cottage and asked if he could
speak to Mrs. Bland ? Anna received the message,
and wished to know if she could communicate it, and
ber mamma’s answer to it? «* My dear mother,” said
Anna, *‘ is rather poorly this morning, and wishes to
lie a littie longer than usual: something very unex-
pected occurred last evening, which has created
considerable anxiety.”’

‘*Well then, miss,’”’ answered the man, “perhaps



PAMILY. 89

this will relieve the good lady. The old gentleman,
who supped with you and slept at- my house, charged
me to deliver this to her as early as possible. Hesaid
he ought to have left it himself to bind the bargain.”
It was a fifty pound note, and the landlord had nothing
mare to do than to be a witness that it was accepted.
Anna ran up stairs, and came as quickly down again;
telling the publican that her mamma was greatly
obliged to him, and wished him to call again in two
hours.

This conversation was communicated to me by
Anna soon after it occurred, and just before we sat
down to breakfagt. This was later than usual, owing
to Mrs. Bland’s indispogition, snd our determination
to wait till she could come down. As we were
finishing breakfast, I said to the widow—‘** You have
now bound yourself to the agreement past retreating”
—and appealed to my husband, who confirmed my
opinion of the widow being obliged to let her meadow
to the brickmaker, now she had accepted the earnest of
fifty pounds.

‘* Well, my dear friends,” she said, ‘*‘ I am upon the



90 THE WIDOW’'S

whole glad that I have done it before I intended to do
it. I might have hesitated, and he might have with-
drawn the offer. But is it not time to ask about this
new and strange visitor, who is about to occupy part
of our ground, and perhaps become our near and con-~
stant neighbour? Who knows any thing about
him ®”

My husband repeated the question of the widow,
and that with greater earnestness, because he saw in
the countenances of the ¢7ins what he considered to
be an indication that they knew him. Looking at
them affectionately, he said again—‘*‘ Who knows any
thing of this worthy man?” ‘JI do, Sir,” said one of
the twins. ‘I do, Sir,” said the other, precisely in
the same tone and manner, so that if two speakers had
not been within his view, and he had not seen the lips
of both to move, he would have considered the answer
an iteration or an echo of the self-same mild and
melodious voice.

‘¢Did you then, my sweet dears,” said 1, *‘ know
him yesterday evening on his donkey in the lane, or
at the supper table in the next room ?”’



PAMILY. 91

‘*We did not remember him, and we had no idea it
could be the same person,”’ they said.

*‘What same person? Where did you see him
before? How came you to know him at first ?” asked
their mamma in a tone of rising anxiety. The twins
clasped each other with the most endearing tenderness,
and cast a look on their sister, as though they wished
her to answer their mamma's inquiries. In the
Album from which I first quoted, it is said that Anna
was considered all mind, and her sisters all heart;
but that they were not without intelligence, nor she
destitute of feeling. The latter fact was now disco-
vered. Anna wasin a moment, on her sister's look,
dissolved in tears. She would have left the room had
she been able; but, on rising from her chair, she
would have sunk on the floor had I not supported her.
I gently entreated silence till ber strong emotion
abated, and then I did not doubt she would explain
the entire mystery.

Her manima was but partially acquainted with the
cause of her emotion, yet she knew enough to render
her a partaker of it. She, too, requested the dear girl to



92 THE WIDOW’'S

compose herself till she could explain ; while it was
evident from the very request that she longed for the
explanation to be given. At length, when Anna had
recovered composure, her mamma said—‘* There must,
my dearest girl, be some mysterious connection between
this worthy man and what your dear father told us on
his dying bed. Tell me is it notso? I can bear to
hear it all.”’

‘© Dearest mamma,”’ said Anna, “ he told me much
more than you heard—or than you could then have
Rome to hear. I fear you have not strength yet to
Yrear of it. I have locked it up in my own breast, and
in the more tender bosoms of my dear sisters, intend-
ing, when you had recovered the shock of our dear
father’s departure, to reveal the secret; but now cir-
cumstances appear to require that it should bea secret
no longer.”’

They both wept in each other's embrace; but the
widow's anxiety to know all the truth would not allow
her to substitute tears for words a moment longer than
was necessary. ‘ Tell me, dear Anna,” she said, “ all
you know. Ican now bear it—I now wild bear it.”’



PAMILY. 93

But Anna was not yet sufficiently recovered for the
task. I supported the dear girl, or she would have
fallen on the floor. [ soothed her till her agony of
grief had a little subsided. I encouraged her bythe
assurance that she herself would be relieved by mak-
ing the communication. I stimulated her by the
consideration that her dear mother might suffer more
by anxiety than by acquaintance with the fact. At
length she strove to perform in a proper manner what
she was now convinced to be a sacred duty.

*¢ Dear mamma,” she said, embracing and kissing
her, ‘‘ you well remember the words of the dying saint,
—Take special care of the twins, for they are brands
plucked out of the burning !""

‘¢ Well indeed,’ said Mrs. Bland, ‘* I remember,
them, and the look—the look—with which they were
uttered! His countenance shone while he spoke witb
the brightness of an angel! They were, I believe, the
last words I was privileged to hear from his expiriig
but enraptured tongue !°’

** Yes, dearest mother, they were,’’ said Anna: ‘‘.you
were conveyed from the room ina state of iasensibility
and so continued till he could speak no more.”



94 THE WIDOW 'S

‘* And we sat one on each side of your bed, mamma,
till you could speak again,’’ said the twins, in the sweet
and simultaneous manner in which they generally
spoke.

‘“¢ But what did ke say to you, Anna, after I was
removed,’”’ asked her mother, in a tremor of speech
that shewed her half afraid of having the question
answered.

‘¢ He said, dear mamma,” answered Anna, “‘ that my
little sisters were strictly as he described them—
that they had recently been plucked out of the
burning J”

“*O, tell me how ? and when? and where?” ex-
claimed her mamma, clasping the twins one in each
arm.

‘* I will, dearest mother,’ ’said Anna, ‘‘ if you consent
to compose yourself. My dear father took my little
sisters, while you were at Lincoln, as far as the second
village beyond our own, where it seems this worthy
man resides and hasa very large brick manufactory.
They were much pleased in seeing themen and women
make bricks, and place them in rows to dry ; and my



Full Text
The Baldwin Library

RmB vin
low 4 6 bin leitereet’
pe git Dee. hg ?WIS

cs LA hirchipa A. Gfelonad
THE WIDOW’S FAMILY,

ie, Ac »




Eagraved. by W’. Greatbech.,

LACK NUT —- CRACKER

luge Go
PETER PARLEY’S TALES

ABOUT

THE WIDOW’S FAMILY.

INCLUDING

LITTLE ARTHUR’S ROUND TABLE,

THE YOUNG SCOTCHMAN,
&e. &c.



7" UBLISHED BY RICHARD T. BOWYER;
AND SOTD BY ALL BOCKSEKLI KRE.
e Sears, t'rinter, 5 & 41vy Lane.
LITTLE ARTHUR’S ROUND TABLE;
OR, THE BIRTH-DAY BANQUET.

Ir is seldom we find children so near each others
age, without either two of them being twins, as the
little family of which we are going to give some brief
account. The oldest is a hearty and rather heavy boy
who has not quite reached his seventh year: the second
is a good humoured, frank, and faithful girl of six:
the third is also a girl, butof a somewhat different cast
of mind, given to artifice and trickery, and one year
younger: and the fourth is a beautiful little boy of four
years old, too conscious, from the admiration he
receives, that he is growing up with attractions a little
above and beyond those which his sisters and brother
possess.

The day on which the incidents of our tale took
place, was the fourth anniversary of this little fellow’s

B
2 LITTLE ARTHUR’S

birth. His fond parents had promised him that this
day should be kept as a day of mirth and festivity—
not for their family only, but for all the few families of
the little village where they resided in the chief house.
They had every convenience arcund the house as well
as within it for a sportive and rural celebration of the
happy season; for it was encompassed by several acres
of fine new mown grass, which the villagers called a
park, but which they rather chose to call a lawn or
pleasureground. The birth of little Arthur had taken
place on the third day of June; his birth day therefore
returned at the loveliest and liveliest period of the
whole year, when the finest foliage and flowers appeared
in every direction—when ‘‘ the time of the singing of
birds was come, and the voice of the turtle was heard
an the land.”

As though little Arthur was to be gratified to the
full, ¢hzs first of June was a much finer day than
either of the three former ones of his short life had been.
The evening preceding it was marked by a sun-set of
the most fiery red that had ever been scen, at least by
these chi'dren; and the morning was even more fine
ROUND TABLE. 3

than this promising evening had led them to anticipate.
They rose almost as early and quite as cheerful and
joyous as the lark. Their first proceeding was to run
half dressed into the bed room of their dear mamma,
to receive her blessing, and listen to the recital of a
hymn and prayer which she had composed for the
birth morning of her little Arthur. Thisexercise being
over she opened a box that had stood concealed under
her toilet, and took from it a new birth day hat, sent
by her brother from London for his favourite nephew;
but received too late for the child to see it or know of
it on the preceding evening.

This only surviving uncle of these children was
remarkably generous and affectionate; but not quite so
discreet as their more prudent parents could have wish-
ed. They as well as their little ones had reason to thank
him for numerous proofs of kindness and liberality:
but they often regretted that he chose for their children
gay and gaudy presents, in preference to such as would
have been much more useful as well as more modest.
Not that he ever thought of doing the slightest injury
to the morals or manners of his young favourites—of
4 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

making them vain rather than virtuous; but he was
not a man of taste—he had certain strange notions of
beauty, which rendered him as indifferent to what was
simple and natural as to what was fashionable. He
was, moreover, somewhat of a recluse, fond of reading,
and remembering, and reciting ancient tales, and of
reviving ancient customs—at least of grafting ancient
upon modern ones.

His birth day present to little Arthur arose from
this whimsical propensity. At first it was thought
that he had sent his beloved nephew a large circular
hat, to preserve his little lovely face from being scorched
by thesummer sun; but on this supposition it appeared
rather strange that it was not larger, and made to wear
sufficiently low for such a considerate purpose. The
mystery was explained by two documents found in the
crown of the hat, and which Arthur’s mamma had not
discovered till they fell out on its being placed on the
little fellow’s head. The first was the bill of the hat,
put in no doubt by the maker without the uncle’s
knowledge, and which described the article as

** LittLe ARTHUK’S ROUND TABLE~ElI. 58”
ROUND TABLE. 5

The other was a short letter from the uncleto Arthur
himself, and which his_ brother picked up and read by
his mamma’s desire as follows—

“< My sweet little four years—

Which you will be by the time you receive this;
when the round table now sent for your pretty head
will be tried on, and your lively little heart will dance
for joy, because the great king Arthur was obliged to
place his ugly table on the ground to feast his knights
upon, and you are able to wear yours aloft in the air,
with a fine feather at the top of it waved by every
breath of your birth-day wind!

I should like to see you to-morrow acting as a little
king amidst your subjects, with a table instead of a
crown on your head; but I cannot leave London just
before Midsummer. When I am down in August we
can keep your birth-day over again.

Think of your affectionate uncle,
And remember to your dear papa
And mamma and the rest—
London, May 31. Cates ARTHUR KONINGSMARK,’’
6 LITTLE ARTHUR’S

Nothing but Mr. Koningsmark, not even the hatter
himself, would have thought of giving the hat this
ancient and fanciful name; but, as he had done so,
there was no appealing from his authoritv: as be had
ordered it to be thus described in the bill, and thus
named by all who should speak or write about it, the
odd appellation was retained so long as Arthur was
able to wear the hat. The present was even preserved
as a piece of antiquity much longer than any ordinary
hatwould havebeen. Years after the little fellow could
get it on his head, it was hung up in a closet in his
room for the inspection of the curious, and never was
known by any other name, than that which the uncle
had first given to it—Little drthur’s round table.

The children bore off the table hat in triumph from
their mamma’s chamber to a little room, opening on
the garden, which was generally used to shelter them
from sudden rain when playing on the lawn, and now
was set apart for a special purpose, and called the birth-
day dressing room. Thither a large looking-glass had
been placed for the children’s use, and there they now
resorted to see Arthur try the round table on his pretty
ROUND TABLE. 7

head. Some of the playful remarks of the rest on this
occasion may amuse children of a larger growth.
The younger and more cunning sister, who had stolen
a feather from the hat and placed it in her own cap,
looked with her usual archness in Arthur’s face and
called him the table bearer—telling him to hold himself
and his burden up 7vigh?, and not toss his little head
so much to the /ef¢ in the pride of his new office and
advancing age!

His other sister fell on her knees in a perfect enthu-
siasm of admiration, as though she would worship the
little idol of the family, ‘‘ rendered doubly sweet,” she
said, ‘‘ under the nice new canopy that uncle had sent
to screen him from both sunshine and showers.”

Their brother joined in the delight and wonder thus
expressed by the sisters. ‘* I could look at the little
prince smiling beneath his new and beautiful table,”
he said, ‘* all day long, and desire for myself no greater
pleasure; but I am anxious for others’ sake that he
should get his robes as well as crown upon him, and
go forth as soon as possible at the head of his knights,
and make them smile with the sweetness which is so
delightful to us.”
& LITTLE ARTHUR’S

At that moment the first bell rang for breakfast, and
intimated that all must assemble in the arbour in a
quarterofan hour. little Arthur’s dress, while Edwin ran to the garden
to see that all things were ready, and his sisters
returned to their mamma’s room to offer their affectionate
services in getting her ready for the first meal of this
gladsome day. It was spread ona round table, in the
centre of an arbour of uncommon freshness and beauty;
and thither little Arthur was soon conducted by his
sisters and their mamma. On the happy prince taking
his seat at what he called his second round table, he
looked about and asked why his dear papa was not
there, and where he was gone ?

‘* Tam returning in time both to hear and answer
your questions, my beloved boy,”’ said his papa, from
behind the harbour. Then appearing in front and
taking the seat reserved for him, he told his children
that respect for their kind uncle had induced him to
order the long table fixing under the meadow oak, on
which the poor children of the village were to dine at
noon, to be formed intoanother round one, to encircle
ROUND TABLE. 9

the tree at a proper distance from the trunk, so as to
bring all the guests under the shade of its spreading
branches. ‘‘ I wonder at you, dear papa,” said his
youngest daughter, ‘‘ and I should be glad toknow the
reason why we are to breakfast, as well as the poor
children to dine, on a round table above all things ?’’

* And so doI wonder,” said her elder brother, “ at
papa’s wishing to have more round tables, because
he smiled when he first saw the one that uncle had
sent, and I knowhe thought the name a very odd
one.”

‘¢ Well, and I too wonder,’’ said the other sister,
‘“¢that papa should have an old round table for us to
breakfast on, and then order a new one of the same
form for the poor children to dine on, when I know
he did not like the fancy of my uncle in sending
Arthur such a hat, and calling it by such a name!”

Papa allowed his children to wonder at this mystery,
without attempting to solve it. In their wonder, in
fact, he partly obtained his end—which he kept secret
through the day; but which was to divert their atten-
tion as much as possible from the new hat, and occasion
1O LITTLE ARTHUR'S

a little interesting perplexity as to which of the objects
was meant when any one spoke of 4rthur’s round table.

Breakfast being finished, the children were allowed
to begin their sports, and to continue them till the
next sound of the bell should call them into thearbour
to take a little of the early fruit of the season. Some
fine strawberries, from a bed which had yielded its first
ripe productions four years ago, on the very day of
little Arthur’s birth, were gathered and brought into
the arbour by bis papa, who on that account had
taken the bed under his special care. As he entered,
with his welcome gathering in a new birth day basket,
he found his other children endeavouring to per-
suade Arthur to let his hat be laid aside, at least while
he was eating the fruit. They all sawthat it was
rather too large, if not too heavy, to be worn through
half the day with ease. They even feared that he was
already beginning to feel it a restraint on his naturally
active movements, and to suffer some conflict between
his wish to be more at liberty, and his pride in the new
and beautiful covering.

While the fruit was eating he was persuaded toallow
ROUND TABLE. 11

the hat again to occupy the place it had occupied during
breakfast—on one of the branches of an adjoining
tree; but when the strawberries were consumed, and
the little party returned to their sports, he resolved
again to endure all the inconvenience of wearing the
new round table. His mamma promised that if he
would part with it till twelve o’clock he should have it
on again when he went to see the poor children dine.
His papa proposed that it should hang on a beautiful
rose tree, before which the little fellow had sat to
breakfast and to take his strawberries. But he was
evidently reluctant to comply with their wishes, and
the more so when he found his brothers and sisters
disposed to support him, by pleading for his continuing
to wear it as long as he could with any comfort endure
the beautiful burden. The point was about to be
settled, perhaps in that manner, when a strange occur-
rence at once relieved him from it for the whole of the
day.

A strong mother bird from an adjoining rookery
had been noticed for some time hovering at no great
distance over the children’s heads, and apparently in
12 LITTLE ARTHUR’S

search of materials for her nest: but they little thought
that the feathers of the hat formed the chief attraction
to the bird, and therefore they took little notice either
of her motions or her noise. Atlast, while Arthur was
standing at some distance from the rest, wearied with
the exertion of his sport, the rook came near enough
to take the topmost feather in her beak ; and then the
feather being fastened to the hat, she lifted that also
from his head, and bore it in triumph to the top of the
tree in which she had built her nest !

It is difficult to say whether Arthur was more
grieved at the loss of his round table, than delighted
to see it rising like another balloon high above bim in
the air, and in a minute or two suspended on oneof the
topmost branches of the loftiest tree in the rookery.
However, there was no difficulty in soothing the little
grief he felt at his loss, and not much in convincing
him that he had better be without his hat altogether
than disturb and perhaps destroy the rookery by at-
tempting to getit down, The romantic accident was
one of those apparent evils, which discreet parents and
well tempered children can eaaily turn to a good
ROUND TABLE. 13

account. Several advantages were immediately derived
from it to Arthur himself. It relieved his little head,
just beginning to ache, from a weight which might
soon have severely pained it for the day, and spoiled
all the pleasure on which he and the rest of the family
had reckoned. It furnished a new object of attention,
and opened a fresh source of amusement, altogether
unexampled as well as unexpected. Mr. and Mrs.
Fairbrace were inwardly pleased, though it was not
right that either the children or the uncle should
know of their pleasure, that a present they never liked
should be thus suddenly and strangely disposed of,
without any one but the rook being to blame. Ag for
the poor bird, as they told Arthur when he passed a
severe sentence upon her, she was not so much to blame
as appearances would indicate—for she took the hat by
accident, and only éztended to borrow a single feather
to make the nest of her little ones handsome and
warm.

All seemed to look as though each would ask the
rest—what was to be done? Was Arthur to pass his
birth day without his birth day hat? or were the sports
14 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

of the day to be suspended, and the rookery to be en-
dangered that he might wear it again, in perhaps a
damaged state, and in all probability to produce a
head ache worse than he already felt. A council to
determine these questions was quickly summoned in the
arbour, and the owner of the departed hat was seated
in the president’s chair. Thelittle fellow was evidently
pleased with tbe alacrity with which the whole family,
and two or three other friends who had just arrived,
surrounded and sympathised with him on this occa-
sion; and when they agrced that something better
would no doubt soon arrive, he began to look up with
cheerfulness to the rookery, and at length said with
a hearty laugh that the old rook might have the hat
for the whole day, and he could play much better with-
out it.

Just then one of the young friends looked around
and said—‘* Where is our sweet Emmeline, and why
did she not come into the arbour as well as the garden?
O! she is now coming up the path, I declare, and
she has something in her band that she is very careful
of!”
ROUND TABLE. 15

“¢T will run and meet her,’’ said Arthur’s brother,
** and scold her for walking so slow,and being so much
behind her time.”

The delay of her arrival and the slowness of her
approach arose first from her wish to pluck some
beautiful rose-buds which grew in her papa’s, or rather
her own garden, adjoining that of Mr. Fairbrace.
Just as she had done so, and was preparing to bring
them to her little favourite, she saw from the distance
the theft of the old rook, and stood for a minute with
angry amazement while the bird placed the hat feathers
and all upon the top of the tree. ‘* What,” she said
to herself, ** will little Arthur now do? and what can
I do to comfort him after this strange accident?’’ She
instantly thought of supplying the place of the hat by
something more light for Arthur to wear, and more
beautiful for others to look at: and what could be so
likely to accomplish her wishes as a garland of roses.
Her own garden yielded plenty of beautiful flowers for
her purpose, and she would not be long in taking the
thorns from the stalks, and forming a wreath large
enough for little Arthur’s head. This was the affec-
16 LITTLE ARTHUR’S

tionate task which had delayed her arrival in the
arbour, and it was a wreath or, as she called it, acrown
of rose buds and carnations, thus quickly but carefully
made, that she was carrying in ber hand when the rest
began complaining of her absenceand slowness.

‘*Why, Emmeline,” said Arthur’s brother, when she
entered the arbour, ‘‘ you have brought your head
dress in your hand, I suppose to prevent the rooks
taking it off your head as you came across the lawn.”’

*“* It is not my head dress, as you call it,’’ said
Emmeline, ‘‘but Prince Arthur's crown’’—and as she
said this she placed it upon him, while all the company
rejoiced that their prediction, of something better than
the hat soon arriving, became fulfilled even sooner
than they expected. The little fellow looked more
charming than ever, and Emmeline was universally
praised and thanked for her quick and considerate
kindness.

Before they left the arbour, Mrs. Fairbrace inquired
why one little girl of the neighbourhood, whom she
herse€ had invited, had not been able or willing to
accep the invitation? She was the daughter of a
ROUND TABLE. 17

little farmer about balf a mile off, and was a child of
great eccentricity and independence. On this account
she had never been much beloved by the other chil-
dren of these parts, and the little Fairbrace’s had
scarcely ever seen her. Their mamma, however, had
been constrained to notice her with growing affection,
from several little voluntary services which she had
accidentally and modestly rendered the family. This
was one reason of her present inquiry after her:
another was a suspicion, which had been privately
rumoured, that she knew something about several
little articles of value recently missing from Fairbrace
lodge. One was a silver waist buckle, a former
present to Arthur from his uncle: another was a
trinket of greater value belonging to his elder sister:
a third was a favourite brooch of their mamma’s.
These, with a few other things of much less worth,
bad all been missing from the two chief bed rooms of
the lodge within the last five or six weeks.

Of course inquiries had been made after them, and
the servants, in their eagerness to free themselves from
suspicion, had gone into every neighbouring part to

c
18 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

obtain if possible aclue to the way in which they had
been removed. The houses as well as the boxes of
two travelling Jews were searched, and the men con-
vinced Mr. and Mrs. Fairbrace of their innocence of
having ever purchased the trinkets of others, as well
as ever having themselves stolen them. One of these
men, however, inadvertently became the cause of
suspicion falling upon the young farmer’s daughter.
*“*She spoke in such a strange manner,’”’ he said,
‘‘ when I inquired if she had heard any thing about
them, that if I did not know her to bean honest girl I
should fear she knew something of where they are
gone.’”” When this was spoken by the Jew at the
gate, a week before Arthur’s birth day, one of the
servants who heard it said, that Sarah Stubble had
been twice in the bed rooms before the things were
lost,

The moment the girl heard of the suspicion thus
formed against her, she went to Mrs. Fairbrace and
not only protested but proved her innocence of the
theft, and her total ignorance of the things altogether.
Ilaving convinced her patroness, as she called the
ROUND TABLE. 19

lady, the girl was perfectly indifferent to the opinions
of others: at the same time, finding those opinions to
be unfavourable, she declined even the invitation of
Mrs. Fairbrace to join a party some of whom cruelly
chose to consider her a thief. She bad certainly
been in the bed rooms just before the things were
stolen; but it was to render the family the very
services for which Mrs. Fairbrace had learnt to esteem
her. It was, in fact, to destroy a number of insects
which had strangely settled about the bed furniture,
and which she had acquired from one of the Jews a
secret for destroying too valuable to be entrusted even
to Mrs. Fairbrace herself.

In this state was the mysterious affair at the time
of the birth day, and when inquiry was made after the
reason of her absence. Some remarks were made by
the children in answer, that induced Mrs. Fairbrace
to be silent, and to request them to be silent, on the
subject till the next day. ‘‘ Then,’’ she said, ‘‘ I am
determined for Sarah’s sake to have the whole affair
well examined.” The reason of a sudden stop being
thus put to the conversation will appear when wecome
20 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

to the fulfilment of this promise of Mrs. Fairbrace ;
at present we must proceed with the children from the
arbour to the round table under the oak, where they
were now summoned to see the poor boys and girls of
the district enjoy a better dinner than perhaps they
had ever eaten before. There was a very large pie
placed on the table just where the gardener’s wife, who
was to cut up the food, had seated herself for that
purpose.

‘¢ How came that pie there ?’”’ Mrs. Fairbrace asked
the woman as she took her seat: *‘ I gave no order to
the cook for any such thing. Yet I am glad,” she
added, ‘‘ that it is here, for I find, as you cut it, that
itis what they call in my country a goose pie.”” This
was a sufficient hint for the hungry and curious guests :
each begged in turn that he might have a, little bit of
the goose pie, and, though it was large, it was nearly
gone by the time the guests were all supplied. As the
dinner drew to aclose, the poor children began talking
freely and cheerfully about what they had eaten,
especially the goose pie, and the strange circumstance
of its having come upon the table 30 suddenly, and
ROUND TABL2®. 21

without scareely any one knowing whence or how it
came! At last a lad who worked in Farmer Stubble’s
yard said that he thought it was made and baked in
the kitchen of the farm. When asked to explain
himself, he answered that all he knew was that he had
been called to help lift just such a pie into the oven
the day before yesterday.

The farmer himself was now coming across the
meadow, and Mrs. Fairbrace, whe was in the sccret,
told the company to be silent a few minutes, while she
requested him to explain if he could the mystery of
the gouse pie. In compliance with the request the
farmer took from his pocket a paper which he said he
would read to the company, and he hoped this would
give them all satisfaction. The paper contained, and
the farmer read, the following memorandum from
Sarah Stubble—

“TI have been unjustly suspected of taking the
articles lost from the chambers of Fairbrace lodge,
and some of the young people who dine under the oak
to-day have I hear been very eager and active in
spreading this evil report against me. I have there-
32 LITTLE ARTHUR’S

fore resolved to reward them by making and sending
the goose pie. The different sorts of food it contains
were purchased by our good and kind friend Mrs.
Fairbrace, and I feel much obliged to her for allow-
ing me to make this addition tothe oth-: things which
her bounty provides for you on this joyful occasion.
While I am cruelly and falsely suspected by any of
you of robbing such a friend, I think the pie stands a
much better chance of being received with a hearty
welcome than I should be. Sarah Stubbdie.’’
Most of the children present understood what the
farmer read, and the elder little Fairbrace went round
and explained it to them that could not understand
it. The firgt who broke the minute’s silence it occa-
sioned was an angry malicious boy, who said that he
did not think a bit the better of the farmer’s daughter
for all this talk about herself and her pie. A girl who
sat near him also sneered at the farmer’s reading
about his daughter, and said—though not loud enough
for him to hear—‘‘I still think she had the things,
and that she has sent this strange pie to stop our
mouths that she may escape !’’ Others of the children
BOUND TABLE. 23

were, however, of a different mind. ‘‘I like,” said
one of them, ‘“‘ to find a girl or a boy return good for
evil: my teacher at the Sunday school always tells me
to love my enemies, to bless them that curse me, and
do good to them that would do me an injury.” “I
shall be glad,’”’ said another, ‘‘ when Sarah Stubble
comes abroad again, for she was always a kind friend
to us, and them that are kind to poor children
certainly never will find in their hearts to rob a rich
lady.”

‘* All this is very well,” said the senior boy, who
was accounted president of the feast: ‘‘but I am for
nothing more being said at present about this matter.
I would rather Sarah should have a fair trial, and I
propose that she be tried this very evening, and that
our Prince Arthur with his new round table hat on,
be the judge of the court.’”” Every one approved of
this proposal, and Arthur, hearing himself spoken of
and the speech so much applauded, asked what it was
about? The little fellow at this moment sat on the
farmer’s shoulders, with his chaplet of roses on his
head, and his feet resting on the dinner table. The
24 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

whole company admired him; while the carving woman
looked in his face, and asked, whether he would be the
judge of Sarah Stubble on her trial in the evenmg ?

‘* What is she to be tried for ?’’ the little fellow
eagerly asked: and when he was told that some persons
suspected that she had taken his new silver waist
buckle, and his mamma’s old golden broach, he said,
angrily—‘** But I don’t think she stole them, and I
won’t be her judge if you don’t let me make her
innocent and set her at liberty !”’

‘*O, we have no fear of your doing that, my little
Prince,’”’ said the president of the feast, ‘‘ especially if
you wear, as I said, your new hat on the judgment
seat. With your papa’s permission we will have the
trial on this very spot and under this ancient oak.”

‘““ My papa’s permission,” said Arthur’s brother,
“must be obtained for something else before all this
takes place. Little Arthur can’t wear his new hat till
some one gets its down from the tree yonder, and I am
afraid papa wont let any one go up for fear the rookery
should be destroyed.” This was the first that the
boy had heard of the accident, which occurred two
ROUND TABLE. 25

hours before the feast, and was now almost forgotten.
He stepped out of his place to lookin the direction he
was pointed to, and there he saw the hat evidently
uninjured, hanging on one of the uppermost branches,
and its fine feathers floating in the afternoon breeze.

*¢ Never fear, sir,”’ said he to Mr Fairbrace, as he
returned to his president’s seat—“‘ never fear, sir, for
the hat or for the rookery. Trust me for climbing up
the tree three or four hours hence without the rooks
caring or perhaps knowing any thing about the matter,
I'll engage, before the time of the trial arrives, to get
the hat down safe and ready for the judge, and there
shall not be one nest or one rook the less for it.”

Mr. Fairbrace rather reluctantly consented that the
boy should climb the tree for this, as he thought,
hazardous purpose. It was to be deferred, however,
till seven o’clock, and immediately after the trial was
to commence—Mrs. Fairbrace engaging that Sarah
should be present. This prudent lady also resolved
that her little Arthur should have two or three hours
quiet slumber after dinner, that he might be refreshed
and strengthened to preside on the trial at a rather
26 LITTLE ARTHUR’S

later hour than he usually sat up. The sports of the
lawn were now resumed, and, after joining in them for
an hour, the family with their select visitors retired
into the house to dine, Relieved of his rather heavy
hat through the warmth and weariness of the day, and
carried about, now on the shoulders of his papa and
then on the broader back of farmer Stubble, little
Arthur was able to take his place with appetite and
comfort at the dinner table, and enjoy the repast as
rouch as he would on an ordinary day of no exertion
or exercise. His mamma took special care that what
he ate was welcome and wholesome, and the other
young persons, influenced by his example, took no
more than was consistent with vigour and comfort the
long remainder of the day.

The considerate and sprightly little girl, who had
manufactured the chaplet of roses in the morning, was
intent upon doing something unusual to promote little
Arthur’s comfort in the afternoon. At dinner she
heard Mrs: Fairbrace say that he should lie down for
an heur’s slumber to recruit his strength for the trial
in the evening: what then did Emmeline do but
ROUND TABLE. 27

privately ask for that lady’s guitar, on which she
could play very well, and came before the open window
playing and singing @ song on his birth day, and after
that a few humorous lines on the rook taking his hat.
These being over, the skilful girl touched the instru-
ment in some plaintive tones, which began soothing
little Arthur into a gentle slumber. He was now on
the sofa, and the company, ata sign from Mrs. Fair-
brace, quietly left the room, while Arthur, under the
influence of the music, fell into a most comfortable
sleep for more than three hours. Thus prudently and
kindly did his parents and friends study to render his
birth day one of real enjoyment, instead of allowing
him to exert himself to weariness, and make more
than half the day a season of repining and distress.
Sarah Stubble arrived just in time to take her
station by the sleeping Arthur’s side, which allowed
Mrs. Fairbrace and evety one else either to join or to
witness the afternoon sports. Sarah was much
attached to the little Prince, and it may be supposed
that, when she heard of his determination to make her
tmnocent, and set her at liberty, her attachment to
28 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

him was not less than before. ‘“ [ will not, however,”’
she jocosely said to his mamma, on her leaving him
to her care—‘‘ I will not stay by him a moment
longer than he is asleep, lest my enemies should
suspect me of having bribed my judge to be partial in
my case, When the time comes to awaken him, or he
gives signs of awaking himself, I will request Miss
Emmeline to take my place.”’

We pass over all that occurfed between dinner and
tea—that is, during the sleep of the idol of the day
—because, except in his dreams, he was not a witness
or a partaker of the sports. Just before six Mrs.
Fairbrace requested Emmeline to relieve Sarah from
her guardianship of Arthur, and try gently to awaken
the little slumberer for the important affairs of the
evening. Emmeline was glad of the office, and on
reaching the room began touching the tenderest
strings of the guitar. Then for the first time the
little slumbering angel moved. When she gave the
instrument a stronger touch and a louder sound, he
opened his sweet eyes, and as he saw her smiling and
playing by his side he gently rose and asked to kiss
ROUND TABLE. 29

her. ‘*‘O what charming sport I have had!” he said.
Then, rubbing his eyes and casting them round the
toom, he added—‘** But it must have been a dream!
was it not, dear Emmeline? It was charming sport,
however! I have seen such sights, and had such
games, with my new tabie hat on, and Sarah wearing
my crown of roses, and you playing and dancing all
the while.’”’ It is sufficient to remark that the purpose
of Mr. and Mrs. Fairbrace, in their prudent discipline
of little Arthur through this day, was completely
answered. Three fourths of the day were gone, and
he was now perhaps more refreshed, aud more capable
of enjoyment, than when he rose in the morning.
Many an indulged child of his age, on such a day, and
in the hand of inconsiderate parents, would hours be-
fore this have been heated to a fever, crammed to
suffocation, sick of every thing it had seen, or heard
or tasted, and fit only to be forced to bed under the
terror of the rod, or the weight of its own fatigue.
The chaplet of flowers adorned again the pretty
little fellow’s head during tea time. It was more
beaatiful than ever, for while Sarah was watching his
30 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

slumbers, Emmeline was recruiting it with some
newly gathered rose buds. But the time approached
for this chaplet to he exchanged for the round table
hat. Before Arthur awoke the poor boys and girls
had been regaled with tea and buns—the latter baked
by Sarah Stubble, and even made with materials which
she herself had purchased, in further recompense of
the slander that had been cast upon her. And while
Arthur was at tea in the arbour, the president boy
prepared toclimb the lofty tree, on which the hat was
still seen uninjured, with its waving feathers appearing
to keep up the signal for its being rescued from so
perilous a situation. The moment the lodge clock
struck the first sound of seven the boy sprang like
lightning to the lower branches of the tree. Having
gained them, he proceeded higher with more quietude
and slowness. However, he was not many minutes
before he appeared within reach of his hat; and tben
he was observed paying considerable attention to a
neglected half-built nest, so that, had Arthur been
able to see what he was about, or had the little fellow
been told that he was near the hatand yet did not seem
ROUND TABLE. 31

anxious to take hold of it, he might for the first time
on this day been offended.

Mr. Fairbrace and the farmer distinctly saw the boy
take sonwthing more than once or twice from the nest,
and put into his pocket; but neither of them suspected
any thing extraordinary, and said nothing about it to
those around them. At last all beheld with joy the
hat taken from the topmost branch, and then thrown
down on an extended sheet prepared and held at the
four corners toreceive it. It came down in a slow and
safe manner like another parachute, and fell on the
sheet so as to preserve the feathers from being in the
least discomposed. Little Arthur was again on the
broad and strong shoulders of the farmer, while his
papa was at hand to take possession of his round table,
and prepare it, should it require preparation, to be
worn on the approaching trial.

The company now assembled under the oak, and
little Arthur was placed in a seat prepared for the
judge, with his mamma sitting immediately under him,
and the farmer and his papa standing on either side.
It was observed that the boy went quickly from the
32 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

tree to the lodge, and held a moment’s communication
with Sarah before she came up to trial. On her
reaching the place Mrs. Fairbrace requested her to sit
down opposite to her little judge; but she respectfully
declined sitting till her innocence was proved to the
satisfaction of the whole assembly. Her accusers were
first called on to state what evidence they had to allege
against her, ‘‘ 1] can only say,” muttered the malig-
nant boy before alluded to, “‘ that nobody is so likely
to have stolen the things as she who was so much in
the rooms at the time they were lost.”” The envious
girl before mentioned followed the boy, as she had then
done, with a surmise against Sarah about as worthy of
belief as his had been.

“ exclaimed one of the travelling Jews at the extremity
of the crowd, beforescarcely any one knew that he was
in the neighbourhood. ‘‘ Z vas resolute to reach here
at the trial,” he said, as the spectators made way f-
him to get nearer the seat, ‘* because people have said
that I bought de things of de girl at de farm ; but I did
not. She did buy some things of me at de time; but
ROUND TABLE. 33

they vas things, she said, to put into de goose pie, to
make it spicy and nice to eat.”

‘his sudden speech of the Jew’s seemed to prevent
any further accusation of Sarah and even to destroy
all suspicion against her. But the company were
astonished beyond measure at what now took place.
Taking the lost trinkets from her pocket, she said—
*¢ Though I am innocent of the theft, I am in posses-
sion of the articles stolen, and am willing to give them
up to their proper owners, on condition, that they will
admit me as evidence against the actual robber.’’ The
conscious innocence and quiet courage with which this
was said convinced all but her determined enemies—
and perhaps even them too—of its perfect truth.
Mrs. Fairbrace, generally in the confidence and secrets
of Sarah, was now almost overwhelmed with astonish-
ment at what she saw and heard. ‘* My good girl,”
she asked, ‘‘ why did you not entrust me, your friend,
with the fact of your having the things in your posses-
Bion ?”

** And so, madam, I certainly should,’”’ answered
Sarah, ‘‘ only that I obtained possession of them, and

D
34 LITTLE ARTHUR'S

became acquainted with the thief, after you had taken
your seat by the sweet and sagacious judge there.
Had it been five minutes before, you should not have
had reason to reproach me for withholding anything
from you.”

‘*¢ And where did you obtain the things from ?’’ asked
Mr. Fairbrace, whose astonishment had appeared to
strike him dumb.

‘* They have passed though the hands of only one
person between the thief and myself, Sir,’’ answered
Sarah, *‘and that one person is present tc answer on
his own account.” As she said this she looked
significantly at the boy president, who also returned
the smile she gave him, and quietly waited to be
questioned in his turn.

‘¢ And where, young man,” said the farmer, who had
betrayed a countenance of great anxiety from the
moment he beheld the trinkets in his daughter's posses-
sion—‘‘ where did you obtain these presents to my
daughter—they are not the first you have givén her of
late 2”

‘* Mr, Stubble,” answered the young man, calmly,
ROUND TABLE. 35

*‘ you seem to forget what your daughter has just
remarked—that she received the trinkets but a few
minutes ago: I could not therefore have given them to
her with any other view than for her immediately to
produce them on her trial, and restore them to their
owners.”

‘* But where, young man, did you obtain them ?”
asked Mr. Fairbrace: ‘* that is the most important
question.”

‘To answer that question, Sir,’’ answered the lad,
‘* I must involve the actual thief, who is not far off, in
the charge of having stolen them from the bed
chambers. And before I do this, I must engage your
mercy, and especially the mercy of our beloved judge,
towards the criminal. I mean, should you be able to
take her, for though she is not far off, as I said, she
may give us a good deal of trouble before she is arrested.
To be plain, Sir, I found these trinkets in the half
built nest yonder, and the rogue that stole them was
the old rook, that afterwards stole LITTLE ARTHUR'S
ROUND TABLE!”
THE WIDOW'S FAMILY ;

OR, THE NEW VILLAGE.

THERE were two female children, remarkable for the
simplicity of their manners, and the gentleness and
softness of their dispositions. They-were very much
alike in person and countenance, and their clothing
must have been different for them easily to be distin-
guished from each other, by any persons but those
who were almost daiiy living with them. They were
remarkable, too, for their mutual attachment, their
fondness for each other’s company, and their resolution
as far as possible to keep together, and to attend one
another in every one of the few excursions that either
of them was obliged to make from home. Their chief
comfort seemed to be derived from constant union and
intercourse, ard an equal mutual share of whatever
recreation of body or mind they had an opportunity of
enjoying.
THE WIDOW’'S FAMILY. 37

At the time we became acquainted with them, they
were about six years old, and had a look of great
thoughtfulness—relieved by a faint and sensible smile
sufficient to shew that they were contented in their
situation, and especially happy in each others society.
It was in the hottest part of the summer, when their
clothing was slight and their pretty form and features
were seen to the best advantage. We were travelling
in the northern part of Lincolnshire, where they were
born, and where they lived with their widowed mother
and one elder and intelligent sister. We went several
miles out of our intended road on purpose to see the
family: not that a report of any wonders concerning
them led us to their remote and rural abode; but we
had time to go where we pleased—the country all round
was very beautiful, and we had seen a simple and
engaging account of the little girls, under the first
title we have taken for our story, in a lady’s album,
left by accident in a room at the inn at Louth where we
had slept two or three nights,

The reader may be interested in the lady's manu-
38 TNE WIDOW’'Ss

script statement as we found and copied it, and as we
afterwards obtained her permission to print it.

** In the wolds of Lincolnshire I found a retired and
humble, but very interesting family, consisting of a
widow and three daughters, living on a slender income,
left by the husband and father, whom death had re-
moved from them about ten months before. The
cottage of their residence first caught my eye, and I
placed myself in as good a situation as I could for
sketching it; when the elder daughter came out to me,
and said she was sent by her mother to know if I would
step in and refresh myself after I had finished my task ?
There was something so pleasing and even politein the
manners of the girl—her behaviour was so much above
and beyond what I could have expected from her abode
—that I felt delighted in telling her I would accept her
mother’s kind invitation, if she would promise that no
preparation beyond their ordinary family arrangements
should be made for me. I left the meadow for the
cottage rather sooner than I intended, and before my
sketch was finished, on account of a sudden and brisk
but very refreshing shower.
FAMILY. 39

The first drop from the threatening cloud had scarcely
fallen before two younger children, very much alike,
were near me, one with an umbrella and theother with
acloak. I closed my portfolio, and one of them re-
quested permission to run with it to the cottage, as she
had brought a clean covering to throw over it. [ al-
lowed her to follow her inclination, and held the
umbrella over the other child and myself while we
hastened to the same peaceful shelter. I told the
widow, who was standing just within the door to re-
ceive me, that I had already made servants of her
sweet children; when she answered, with equal sweet-
ness, that her tender hearted twins, provided they
could keep together, never minded what service they
performed for others. I was struck with the manner
of the widow—with the name she gave to her children,
and the disposition she ascribed to them—and I
inwardly resolved to remain the whole day at the
cottage, and recompense the family for whatever re-
freshment and attention I should receive.

I told the children that, if they wished to look over
the portfolio for their amusement, I would step with
40 THE WIDOW’S

their mamma into the next room, the door of which
was opening by the widow for that purpose. They
carefully opened the lids concealing about fifty sketches,
while I attended their mother, and took my seat in the
neatest little parlour Iever saw. I asked the widow
how long she had been in that condition; but a flood
of tears were the only answer I received to the inquiry :
and, when they ceased, she went to another subject,
and said that perhaps she might be able to tell me
about the girls without weeping, if I would not again
refer to their fatherless state: 1 promised, and she
proceeded as follows—

‘¢ You see that the younger ones are ¢wins and you
heard me call them tender-hearted. They are remark-
ably so. I often say that their sister, who went out
first to invite you, is all mind, and that they are all
heart. I do.not mean that she has no feeling, or that
they have no intelligence; but that intelligence is most
prevalent in her, and emotion in them. With such
children even a widow may be comfortable, and my

widow's tears are often checked by the force of a mother’s
gratitude.”
FAMILY. 4)

Her widow’s tears, however, would not yield even to
this force at the present moment: but she soon
recovered herself, and went on to describe the course
that her children, especially the twins, had generally
taken.

“© It was well,” she said, ‘‘ my children were dis-
posed to teach each other, for there is no school
sufficiently near for them to attend; and, had there
been one, my slender income of sixty pounds a year
would scarcely have allowed of my sending either of
them. One of the twins might be received into a
charity school at Lincoln, and perhaps the other intoa
similar institution at Louth; but, if I could have sepa-
rated them from me, they would not be separated from
each other. When the offers were first made, I pro-
posed selling the cottage and residing near Lincoln; but
the dear girls burst into tears, and said that I could
not reside near Lincoln and Louth too. I had not the
power of wounding their feelings by another hint at a
separation; and therefore here they remain, under the

tuition of their sister, who had no other teachers than
myself and a


42 THE WIDOW’'S

‘The widow’s tears again flowed, and prevented her
proceeding until I had soothed her grief by a few
remarks on what I considered the goodness of her elder
daughter’s education, and the fair prospect she bad of
her succeeding to perfect satisfaction with the two
younger. ‘‘ The dear girl has one difficulty,” the
widow remarked, ‘‘ that she has created for herself,
and that she is quite tent upon overcoming— it is to
preserve either of her sisters from surpassing the other,
or, rather, to prevent one appearing to a disadvantage
in the other’s presence. She says that, as nature has
formed their persons so nearly alike that they can
scarcely be distinguished, so she will endeavour to form
their minds to as close a resemblance as possible. I
often tell her to let things take their course in this
respect; but it is so favourite a purpose with her that
I cannot find it in my heart to throw any serious
obstacles in her way. Her plans, though sometimes
romantic, always succeed.”

One of the twins now gave a slight tap at the parlour
door, and I begged she might be permitted to enter.
It was to ask her mamma what provision was to be
FAMILY. 43

made for dinner ? as Anna, her elder sister, was quite
ready to go and fetch whatever was necessary. I
prevented the widow’s answering by a wish that Anna
might be allowed to receive her orders from me. She
came in, and I reminded her of our agreement—that
nothing was to be done for my accommodation beyond
the usual family arrangement. The widow’s counte-
nance suddenly brightened to an expression of glad-
ness and gratitude that surprised as well as charmed
me. ‘* O madam,” she said, ‘‘ how thankful I am for
this proof that you are willing to remain some little
time with us! Anna, you shall comply with the wish
of our new friend, and not risk her sudden departure
by even appearing to violate the agreement. But
where are your sisters gone? I see them flitting across
the meadow, like two sweet doves with their faces as
close to each other as possible.”

The mystery was soon explained.
farmer had promised them one of half a dozen fine
young rabbits that he was obliged to kill, and, before
either their mamma or I could prevent them, they
were on their way to the farm to request the fulfilment
44 TUE WIDOW’S

of the promise. On their return they said, with a
modest firmness—‘*‘ We had nothing to co with the
agreement, and were not bound to observe it, and
therefore mamma will at least have one dainty dish to
set before her new friend.”” They then curtesied pre-
cisely together, and ran outinto the garden to gather the
particular herb and vegetable that the farmer had told
them were best witha young rabbit. It was the sweet
manner of their doing all this that so delighted me,
and [ took the widow’s hand to intimate that I wished
her to go with me into the garden after them.

‘*T am thankful,” I said, *‘ for the opportunity of
adding to the happiness of your dear daughters.”
** You greatly add to my happiness as well as theirs,”
the widow answered. ‘‘I am often consoled in
witnessing their sweet affectionate mirth; but my
consolation rises much higher in having a friend of my
own age-and experience like yourself to partake of it—
to partake of it by being a joint witness of the mirth
that produces it. I often think, had nature joined
them together like the boys from Siam, which once
created such wonder in London, they could scarcely
PAMILY. 45

have been more with each other, or more interested in
each other’s welfare.”

They now skipped by us hand in hand, while the
other hand of each held what they had gathered for
dinner. I attempted to stop them, when they said—
‘¢The cook is waiting for us, and charged us not to
delay. Dear Anna is governess in the morning, and
cook at noon, and housemaid all the day; and we do
what we can to assist her.”” They spoke as they skip-
ped along, and were ina moment out of sight.

The widow again wept; but I could perceive that
now she shed tears of joy as well as-sorrow. ‘I little
thought,”’ I observed, ‘‘ that I should be able to impart
so much comfort where I must be so little known; nor
could I expect from strangers in this remote spot so
much to console and refresh my own spirit.”’

** Don’t leave us to day,” said the widow, pressing
her arm in mine, and giving me a look which seemed
to Intimate that to-morrow we might be still more
happy together.

‘* My time is my own,” I answered; “‘and you are
46 THE WIDOW’S

able, if you are but willing to detain me a week; but
this is the only condition—this must be yours before
I can consent to stay even a night.’”’ I held out a
bank note, and the widow accepted it—in a manner,
however, which convinced me, on the one hand, that
she was perfectly free from avarice, and on the other
hand that the money was as perfectly acceptable.
** Heaven knows,”’ she said, as she received it, ‘* that
it is accepted in the proper spirit in which I believe it
to be offered : the manner in which it will be spent,
you shall know to-morrow, perhaps to-night.”

Dinner was soon ready; but I was surprised that
Anna, whose care had provided the most delicious
repast I ever partook of, was not at the table. I
expressed both surprise and sorrow, and was answered
that she had an engagement about a mile off, but
would return to tea; and, as the evening was likely to
be fine, all might take a walk to the neighbouring and
beautiful village where she was gone. ‘* We shall not
walk with you, said one of the twins, ‘‘for we shall
be there perhaps before you set out. We promised the
FAMILY. 47

bones of the rabbit to make a poor sick woman a little
broth. She lives on the way, and we shall be as quick
as we can, and help her to make it.”

The sweet girls were just leaving the poor woman’s
hut, as the widow and I arrived within sight of it.
They gave one glance back at their pursuers, and then
frisked on towards the village. When we reached it,
I expressed my surprise that, though it contained but
one open scattered street, not a single spot of which
could escape the eye, I could not behold a trace of one
of the twins!

*“*If you could discover one,’’ their mother answered,
**both would certainly be seen. At home they are
scarcely ever apart, and abroad zever. You will find
them, I expect very soon, and in a place which you
have rendered peculiarly interesting to them. They
are ina house where they always had access; but for
months they have not been willing to enter it: and
now they have entered it only because your kindness
has fnrnished it for them.’”’ As she spoke, she opened
the church yard gate, and before another word coula
be uttered we were in the church, and I saw the z7izes,
48 THE WIDOW'S

with Anna, kneeling before a new and beautiful monu-
ment of their father, recently finished, and fixed up
within the last three hours. The widow had resolved
that it should not appear in the church till she could
pay for it, and my bank note had enabled her to do
80.”

Here the manuscript in the Album ends, and we
deeply regretted that the lady had not an opportunity
of recording any further particulars of her interesting
visit. Having transcribed what we read, we left a
frank confession, in writing of what we had done, with
an intimation that we should not leave the county
without finding out the engaging objects of her kind
and grateful attention. As we have hinted, we went
several miles, out of our direct road for this purpose;
but we were more than rewarded by the gratification
of seeing them. Our first sight of the twins was rather
sudden: they were on a bank, a short distance from
home, playing with a favourite squirrel which some one
of their occasional visitors had given them for their
amusement.

The one sitting highest on the bank, close behind
PAMILY. a9

the other, first caught sight of us as our chaise approach-
ed the spot; while the other seemed too intent upon
the antics of the squirrel, in striving to possess itself
ofa nut she held in her hand, to notice our approach.
We knew that we could not be far from the widow's
cottage, and we observed in these children a perfect
likeness to each other: we, therefore, assured ourselves
that we were in the presence of the Twins, and began
addressing them in as kind a manner as we could.

‘* You reside near this spot, my little dears ?”” I
anid, as the chaise stopped opposite the bank, with
only a low hedge between it and the road.

‘* We never wander far from home, madam,”’ said
the one who bad first observed us. ‘‘ We were only
giving our little sguire an evening's recreation abroad,
madam,”’ said the other, who now turned her attention
from the squirrel to us.

‘“* And why,’ asked my husband, ‘‘ do you call
your little squirrel an esguire®’ ‘*To answer that
question, Sir,”’ she said, with a faint blush and smile,
** would be to confess a blunder of my own. My
French teacher would tell you perhaps if you met with

i
50 THE WIDOW’'S

her; but I am ashamed.” ‘* Where,” I asked;
** shall we find your French teacher.”’

‘*O, we have two French teachers,’’ answered the
other, ‘‘ and they live at the cottage yonder: we some-
times call them mamma and sister Anna. If you
wish to see them we willrun across the meadow and
call them out to meet you.”’

My husband drove down the lane, while the chil-
dren and their esguzre ran towards the cottage along
a nearer path. At a turn of the road, the widow
appeared at the gate. She was an enlarged and
matured, but still delicate, image of the children;
while Anna, whe svon joined her, appeared an inter-
mediate link, uniting together the widow and her
twins, and exactly resembling the whole. After the
few and hesitating remarks that strangers might be
expected to make on such an occasion, the widow ex-
pressed her wonder that so many persons of respecta-
bility had Jately condescended to honour her cottage,
or her children, or herself—she scarcely knew which
—with longer or shorter visita!

“It would not appear to us that you, or your chil_
PAMILY. 51

dren, or your cottage, madam,” I said, ‘‘ can be much
adapted for long or frequent visits. Atthe same time,
the most respectable persons who know you must feel
an interest inthe sight of adi the objects you men-
tion.’’

The widow might have been gratified with the
compliment paid to her cottage, and especially to her
children ; but she evidently regretted the inadvertence
with which she had connected herself with them. She
therefore strove to turn the conversation, and would
have led our attention altogether to another subject,
had we not insisted on confining her longer to this.
‘* We shall consider your reluctance,”’ I said, ‘‘ to go
on with the subject of your being often visited as a
proof that our visit is unwelcome, and that we must
not think of prolonging it.”

‘* Then indeed,’’ she said with a smile, ‘‘I must
undeceive you at once. I have no other visitor at my
house to-day, and niay not have for many days to
come; I shall, therefore, hope you will stay as long as
you can.”

** On condition,’? my husband said, ‘‘ that you will
52 THE WIDOW’'S

allow us to remunerate you as we please, we will
consent to stay at least one week in the delightful
retreat.”’

** T shall rejoice in your staymg with ms,” answered
the widow, ‘‘ and the more so, as we have just fitted ulp
an apartment for visitors, which you may be the first
to occupy.” Remembering that the lady of the
Album had given the widow a five pound note, I
considered that two of us, especially occupying a new
apartment, shouid double that sum. Putting a ten
pound note, therefore, in her hand, I observed that
we should expect the week to be provided for, in the
matter of food, in the same frugal and wholesome
mannet in which she was no doubt accustomed to
prepare for her own family. I saw a tear of gratitude
start in her eye, as she glanced at the amount of the
note, ahd as she said to Anna, to whom she shewed it,
‘** what can all this mean ?”

I was now in the neat little parlour with the widow
and Anna, while my husband was gone in search of
some near place where our horse and chaise could he
twken care of. He soon returned, and asked the name
FAMILY. 53

and character ofa neighbouring farmer, whose son haa
met him, and requested permission to take charge of
them while we stayed. ‘‘The young man,’’ he said,
‘* at the same lime, gave me this couple of fowls to
bring to our good hostess, lest she should not be
sufficiently provided for our first dinner.’”? The widow
now whispered to Anna, and gave her some money,
evidently to send in payment of what she was un-
willing to receive as a present: but my husband told
her that the debt was already discharged. He had
given the young man the price of the fowls, and
charged him to send whatever else the farm could
spare every morning for a week to come. ‘‘ Where
are the twins ?’’ I said, looking round in doors and
out, and missing them. Their mother heard the
question from the kitchen, where she had gone with
the fowls to Anna, and instantly went to the back door
to see if her children were in the garden. They
were not there, and could no where be seen. ‘‘ Anna,
my dear,’’ the widow said, ‘‘ step outa little way, and
try if you can see them: they are gone to find out
something that will be likely to increase the comfort
84 THE WIpoWw’'s

of our friends.”», My husband accompanied Anna in
the search, while I felt a pleasure in relieving the
widow from a little of her labour in the kitchen. For
sometime no trace of the dear children could be seen.
At last Anna looked up, and thought she saw the
squirrel at the top of a large tree in a distant hedge.
As they drew nearer they saw it was a crab tree, which
such creatures always avoid. Then they noticed that
the squirrel was near the point of one of its slenderest
branches, a situation of danger which they never
venture to occupy on any tree. The little creature
at first seemed in a state of considerable uneasiness ;
but this they ascribed to its fear of falling, until on a
sudden, on beholding them, it became as merry as it
had before been uncomfortable. Just then a sound
came from the bottom of the tree which Anna knew to
be the voice of one of her sisters, when my husband
sprung forward, and saw the one that spoke holding
up the other that was evidently hurt. All was now
explained. The kind little girls had thought that
their visitors would like a few of the crabs, and in
attempting to gather them th: one that was hurt had
PAMILY. 55

fallen down, and so sprained her ancle as to be unable
to walk or stand. They were not far from the farm,
though it was concealed from them by a small inter-
vening wood; and after the little sufferer was lifted
out of the ditch, and my husband, who possesses
superior skill as a surgeon, had bathed the ancle with
an excellent liquid he is scarcely ever without, he ran
to fetch the chaise, and returned the sooner as the
harness was not yet taken from the horse. In less
than a quarter of an hour from the time of their
leaving the house, the widow and [ had the delight of
seeing the twins driven within sight of the cottage as
though they were taking a little cheerful recreation ;
while Anna returned at her own request on foot, and
at my husband’s request preserving the accident
an entire secret. With such ease may incidents, often
magnified into calamities, not only be kept from crea-
ting alarm, but be smoothed into occasions of fresh
and increased pleasure. By the time an hour’s ride
was over, all painful effects of the accident had
ceased, and we have no reason to believe that the
widow knows to this day of its having occurred—
56 THE WIDOW’S

unless perchance a printed copy of this narrative
should fall into her hands.

A quantity of the finest crabs, which the children
had gathered, and now brought home in the chaise,
explained to her satisfaction thecause of their absence,
They had beer trained by Anna to the habit of
diverting their mamma s attention from whatever was
painful, and we soon found that there was little danger
of their betraying the secret with which I alone had
been entrusted. On one painful subject only their
sister both permitted and encouraged them to speak at
proper opportunities—this was their dear departed
father.

No visitor came to the cottage without being soon
conducted to the church and directed to his monu-
ment: but we had chosen to reverse this order of
things, and so we had been first to the church, to the
monument, and also to the grave of the lamented man,
before we visited his cottage, or saw his family. We
had done more than this. I speak not of our
conduct «hrough ostentation; but because it led to
incidents which the reader may be pleased to know.
FAMILY. 57

The lady’s album made no mention of a tomb stone,
and we suspected that no visit was made by the widow,
if by her children, to the grave, because the sight of it
without this memorial to distinguish and defend it,
might have had too melancholy an effect upon her
feelings. The remarks of the sexton convinced us
that we were not mistaken.

Being satisfied on this point, we resolved on ordering
a t6mb-stone to be prepared and fixed without delay.
The mason’s yard contained several ready for engraving,
and we staid a night at the village inn near his huuse,
that an inscription which we gave him, a little altered
from that on the monument, with the addition of a
short epitaph, might be engraved, and the whole affair
completed by the afternoon of this day. I confess I
was Impatient to introduce the family to this new
object, yet consented at my husband's request to wait
till the cool of the evening. Soon after dinner, and
while I was eating a crab, and giving the esquire a
nut, the twin who had met with the accident whispered
‘hat we must all go to church this evening. ‘* On
condition,”’ I said, ‘‘ that you and your dear mamma
58 THE WIDOW’S

ride with Mr. Morant, while your sisters and I walk
across the meadows. I proposed this to prevent the
dear creature’s pain returning by an early walk, and I
gently insisted on this condition being fulfilled. It
was the first time the twins had ever gone from home
apart; but the sister knew the reason of my proposal,
and instantly consented.

“‘ Suppose,”’ I said to the widow, when we joined at
the church-yard gate, ‘‘ we take one walk among the
tombs before we enter the church ?”’

‘I have never done so at any one’s request before,”’
she answered; ‘‘ but at your’s I will.” She placed her arm
trembling in mine, and I led her a circuitous path to
the spot. As we came near it, she said, ‘‘ Forgive my
declining to proceed farther in this direction, lest my
eye should fall on the melancholy undefended grave of
my e

She could say no more; but as she paused in her
steps as well as speech, I promised that she should not
be led to such an affecting object, and she consented
to proceed, with her eyes suffused in tears, and fixed
on the ground. At last, on raising them a little, she


PAMILY. 59

saw, to her astonishment, her three children standing
and weeping before a new tomb!

*“* Children,” she said, ‘* these tears would become
you better in the church, before the memorial of your
dear father’s virtues, than at the grave and tomb of a
stranger !’’

‘*‘ Not altogether a stranger, my dear widow,” I said:
upon which she raised her eyes till they reached the
following epitaph—

**Why flows the muse’s mournful tear?

For thee cut down in manhood’s prime!
Why sighs for thee the widow dear?
Cropt by the scythe of hoary timc!

Lo this my friend’s the common lot—
To me thy memory entrust :

When all that’s dear shall be forgot,
I’ll guard thy venerated dust.”

‘Whose dust is thus guarded, and who has been so
generous as to guard it?” said the widow, suspecting
for the first time that she was before a new tomb of
60 THE WIDOW’S

her husband. Then, reading the inscription above
the epitaph, she faintly said—‘* Why did I so hastily
send the dear children away ?”

‘* We are not away, dear mother,’”’ answered Anna,
*‘ we are all here—we are close behind you.”’

They were suffered to give full vent to their tears of
melancholy delight; and then I requested, as we had
conducted them to the tomb-stone, they would con-
duct us to the monument. The church was open in
expectation of a funeral, and the clergyman, a vener-
able looking man, was waiting to perform the solemn
service. He was devoted to the dues and duties of
his church, and few could manage these things with
greater talent and effect; but he was a sour recluse,
and paid little or no attention to his parishioners in
other places. Once, and only once, he had been at
the cottage, when the twins were christened, and
sometime before their father died. On the widow
approaching him, he inquired if she was well, and
then particularly asked about them, and why she
suffered them to go to the meeting instead of bringing
them to church ?
PAMILY. 61

>

‘‘ They are before you, sir,” she meekly answered,
‘‘ and are old enough to answer for thenurelves.”’

The priest was struck with surprise et their rapid
growth, and could hardly believe that children so tall
were infants when last he saw them. ‘‘ They will be
old enough for confirmation when the bishop comes
this way nex€ spring,” he said; ‘‘ but I must first
examine them. I fear that, as hey do not come
often to church, I shall find them deficient in the
necessary qualifications. You know they must at
least be able to repeat the creed, the Lord's prayer,
and the ten commandments.”

‘Indeed, Sir?’’ answered the widow; ‘‘and you
imagine that I and their elder sister have allowed them
to grow up to these years and this stature, ignorant of
the first principles o: tneir duty to God and man!”

The priest was silent and offended, and the widow
requested permission to follow my husband and me
towards the monument. ‘I will not detain you,
madam,”’ he answered, ‘‘ from the only object of wor-
ship you seem to have in this church; but I must
request a word or two with you before you leave the
62 THE WIDOW’S

place: there are some small matters to settle between
us.”” The widow knew what he meant, and promised
to see him again before she returned home.

As she joined us in another part of the church, the
clerk was taking very polite leave of my husband, and
suddenly meeting her, asked if he might undertake the
cleaning of the monument on the usual terms. Her
feelings, as she approached the spot, were too acute to
allow of her answering him, and he passed on to meet
the funeral which was just then advancing to the
church-door, We all retired to a vacant pew, and
joined in the devotions of the solemn occasion. It
was the funeral of a youth of seventeen, who had been
travelling with his parents in search of health, and
who bad requested, as he walked through this church-
yard about three weeks before, to be buried there,
should he die on the journey, or sufficiently near the:
spot.

As the chief mourner—the father of the youth—
retired from the church to the grave, the widow whis-
pered to me—‘ Surely I have seen that gentleman
betore! He was a visitor at the cottage early in the
FAMILY. 63

summer, and the youth he is going to bury was with
him—then almost a corpse.’”’ My husband offered
to lead her to the grave; but this she declined—her
spirit was not equal to the trial. Ee, however, pro-
ceeded with her children to the melancholy spot, not
far from their father’s tomb, and they there became
convinced that}their mother was notmistaken. ‘‘ Dear
mamma,” they said, when they returned to us, “ it is
indeed the same—the very same! He and the youth
were at our house only a quarter of an hour; but it is
the husband, and must have been the son, of the lady
whom we found sketching the cottage, and who after-
wards spent a week with us while they rode about the
country. Poor lady! poor gentleman! poor youth!
how we all feel for them "”’

Anna was interrupted in her simple lamentations by the
very different voice and manner of the priest, who,tz his
surplice, again accosted the widow, and reminded her
that certain fees were due for placing the marble in the
church and the stone in the church yard. Without the
slighest hesitation she took from a small pocket book
that had been ber husband's the ten pound note, and
£4 THE WIDOW'S

~~

requested the priest to pay himself whatever the charge
might be. We did not hear the request ; but we saw the
offer of the note, and I stepped forward to prevent
its beingtaken. ‘‘ There must be some mistake here,”
I said. ‘* None whatever,’’ answered the priest,
“‘except that a _ stranger has improperly inter-
fered between me and my parishioner. What right,
madam, have you to check the due course of
ecclesiastical business, and prevent the church from
receiving her dues?”

‘¢ None whatever, Sir,” said my husband: “ only I
must request that you will let this part of ecclesiastical
business be done by the proper person. Yourclerk, I
presume, can much more consistently receive the dues
of the church, while you retire to take off your
surplice.”’

Finding the dues perfectly safe the priest consented,
only observing, that the clerk might not have change
for the note, which he had. ‘* ‘This Sir,’* my husband
said, ** will be unnecessary—I will settle with the clerk
to the utmost farthing of your demand.”

‘“< Yes, yes, your reverence,” said the clerk, coming
FAMILY. 65

up at the moment, and indistinctly hearing what was
said, ‘‘ the good gentleman has settled all with me,
and I placed the money in the vestry cupboard, that
when your reverence goes there you may be sure to
see it.”

The pampered priest was now disconcerted and angry ;
but he knew not upon which object his anger was to be
vented. The widow had not hesitated to pay his dues
on the first demand. I knew that they were already
paid, and therefore gently interfered to prevent her. My
husband had even asked the clerk their amount, and
discharged it in a moment. And the clerk had care-
fully placed the money where he was certain his
master would find it. Who then was toblame? Not
even the priest himself—at least he thought so, as he
soon after said to my husband—‘“ You perceive, Sir,
that I was under an entire mistake, and if you have
as good an understanding as you have a heart you
will fully account for it.”’

‘« Sir,” my husband said, ina firm reproving tone,
**if you had as good a heart as you have an understand-
jug, you would not, at this time of life, with a noble
66 THE WIDOW’S

fortune, and nota child to leave it to, exact of the poor
widow, and fatherless, three pounds, their living for
three whole weeks, for these memorials of her depart-
ed husband.”

‘“*I perceive, Sir,” answered the priest,’’ that you
are disposed to join in the popular clamour against
the church. You would rob it of its dues, and strip
it of its best ornaments. Here, Sir, is a pamphlet I
have just written in its defence. Accept it, and,read
it, Sir, and it may do you good.”’

My husband looked at the title, and saw it was a
tirade against dissenters. He politely returned it, and
said—‘‘ Sir, I must ever consider such clergymen as
yourself the very worst enemies of the church. Your
rapacity creates the dissent you deplore and reprobate.
As a proof of this, the present exaction will, I am
persuaded, add very much to the number of dissenters
in your parish. Your clerk hinted tomethat the dues
might have been less, had not the widow sometimes
gone with her family to the dissenting chapel; and now
I doubt not she will go there entirely, and never enter
your church except to view the memorials of her

3
FAMILY. 67

departed husband. J blame her not. I am no dis-
senter myself, nor am I likely ever to become one.
I am yet convinced that the views and feelings which
ycur conduct has given to the widow against your
church, will, without the slightest taint of revenge,
i:uduce her henceforth to take her family entirely to
he chapel, where they will at least be trained up to
the conviction of what a Christian church really is,
and what your church and every church ought to be.’’

Thus we parted never to meet again. The priest
retired to his vestry, while we gathered together ona
retired spot of the church yard to confer on the ex-
pediency of seeking an interview with the bereaved
father. This, at present, turned out to be impossible.
He left the village immediately after the funeral, no
doubt to join the bereaved mother in some retirement
of the neighbourhood. We had sent our chaise to the
farm, and proposed all to walk back to the cottage
together.

As we proceeded, one of the twins took advantage
ofa minute of silence, and said with her usual anima-
tinn—‘* Mamma, what could the minister mean whep
68 THE WIDOW’'S

he said he should find sister and me deficient ?”” On
her mamma explaining his meaning, the other twin
smiled and said—‘ If he had condescended to call at
our house, and examined us, we should have con-
vinced him that we could repeat and lL hope understand
all that the bishop wants to confirm us, and much
more too.”’

‘¢ But why, Sir,”’ said Anna, addressing my husband
‘are we required to learn and repeat the creed as
much as the Lord’s prayer and ten commandments?
They are parts of the bible; but ¢haé is only in the
prayer book. It is called theapostle’s creed ; but none
of the apostles say any thing about it.”

‘* The apostles certainly teach us the very same facts
and doctrines as are taught in that creed,”’ I answered ;
“‘though as a creed, in the form in which it is placed
before us, the apostles did uot and could not write it,
because it was unknown till two or three hundred years
after the apostles lived.”

“¢ And yet," said the widow, ‘“‘ it is printed over all
our church communion tables by the side of the
Lord's prayer and ten commandments, as though it
were of the same divine authority as them !”
FAMILY. 69

We had now reached the top of a short lane, along
which we had to pass to another meadow. The ¢wins
were over the style in a moment, and in another mo-
ment we had lost sightof them. I had become fearful
of missing them, and their mother discerned my
anxiety. ‘** We shall soon reach their humble and
favourite retreat,’ she said. ‘‘ They are beneath
yonder thatch, and they have endeavoured to elude
us for a few moments for a favourite purpose, which
you may understand by peeping through a crevice
of the door.”” This was unnecessary: the door was
open, and one of the twins was preparing a nice
little supper for the poor cottager, while the other was
reading to her a chapter of the New Testament.

‘¢ This good old woman,’ the widow said, ‘* is the
only pensioner we have hitherto been able to support,
and we were charged upon his death bed, whose words
will never go from us, on no account to suffer her to
want. She was his nurse in infancy, and would have
been sv in his last illness had she been able; and now
my daughters are nurses to her. Every day, and
sometimes twice and thrice a day, they are with her.
70 THE WIDOW’S

She calls them her cooks, her doctors, her chapJains—
her guardian angels. They often cause her poor
widowed heart to sing for joy.’’

I went first into the cottage, and desired the dear
children to continue their kind offices; while my
husband added to the slender meal by a few biscuits
and a little fruit that he had purchased in the village.
‘* And so,”’ I said, ‘‘ while the lordly and luxurious
priest exacts three wecks of your living for some of
the best ornaments of his church and church yard,
you are able to afford a living to this aged woman,
who should be kept in comfort, with ten thousand
others like her, from the overflowing wealth of the
church !””

‘* She receives,’” the widow answered, ‘a shilling a
week from the slender rates of the parish; though I
am sorry to say this is a fund to which the parish
priest never contributes. He declares himself exempt
from all rates for the poor, and insists upon the farm-
ers keeping them and the church too.”’

As we were preparing to leave the hut, an elderly
good-lvoking man was riding a donkey at a very slew
FPAMILY. 71

pace along the lane. I think he could not be urging
on the creature at the rate of more than two miles an
hour; though he was evidently wishing to proceed at
a quicker pace, and striving mildly to bring the
donkey to his mind. When he came opposite the hut,
the creature stopped, and no effort would make him
proceed. ‘‘ He is past feeling,’’ said the man to my
husband, who advised him to use his stick; ‘‘ and, if he
was not, I should prefer being mild with the creature
rather than severe.”’ Then getting off and looking
in at the hut, as we left it, he asked the good old
woman if he might buy of her a bunch of the carrots
that hung at the door?

We soon found that she had consented, by looking
back and seeing the bunch of carrots at the top of
the man’s stick, and he overtaking us on his donkey
at a rather brisk rate. We did not then understand
the trick that he was playing off upon his dull beast.
‘* I suppose, Sir,” said one of the twins to my husband,
who had taken one in each hand to lead them down the
lane— I suppose that old man bought the carrots for
his supper, and will cat them without dressing,
perhaps as he rides home ?”
72 THE WIDOW’S

‘© imagine,”” my husband answered, “ that theman
is not riding home, but from home; otherwise his ass
would proceed at a quicker pace. However slow that
animal is on a journey from home, it is sure to trot
fast enough the moment its head is turned to go back
again.”’

My husband had scarcely finished the sentence
before the ass trotted by us at the rate of six or seven
miles an hour! But we soon saw a good reason for
the change— the man was holding the bunch of car-
rots a few inches before its head, and it was in pursuit
of this delicious meal, and not with any regard to ita
master’s convenience or authority, that it bad thus
quickened its dull and stupid pace. The young folks
were full of mirth at this scene, and the older, not
excepting the widow herself, were inclined to a hearty
laugh, as the man trotted before them with his carrots
attracting the ass, and yet the creature not able to
reach one of them. Proud of his triumph, the man
looked back two or three times, and joined us in the
laugh. The last turn of his head, however, was
almost fatal to his hopes of quickly reaching the end
FAMILY. 73

of his journey He drew the carrots too near the
mouth of the ass, when the creature seized the bunch,
and it fell at once from the stick and its mouth upon
the ground. Now wasthe test of the creature’s mo-
tive four quickening its pace! Now was the tng of war
between it and its master! JI verily believe, had not
my husband run to his assistance, that the creature
would have devoured enough of the carrots to satisfy
its appetite, and return to its old slow pace. But the
bunch was rescued just as the ass had tasted its
sweetness, and the delicate bit had provoked its appe-
tite. My husband assisted the man to remount, then
tied his bunch more fast to a longer stick, and we
laughed again to see the ass trot off at a quicker pace
than before.

With the widow on my right and Anna on my left, I
walked near enough behind my husband to hear his
conversation with the twins; whom be had again
taken, one in each hand. He began making some
remark on what they had beheld, when one of them
said significantly“ I always thought the ass was a
remarkably kind and patient creature, given to much
74 THE WIDOW'S

self-denial for the convenience and comfort of its
master ; but this a little changes my mind about it.”
‘¢ And mine, too, sister,’’ said the other twin, with still
more significance. ‘‘ The creature now appears a
mere slave, working only as it is compelled, and
bent on nothing but gratifying its own low appetite.”

My husband was silent for a few minutes to let the
dear children go on, delighted with the thoughtful-
ness they manifested, and the clear good sense and
strength of their remarks. But they too were silent,
in hope of an answer from him. Perceiving this, he
said—‘‘ I admire the view you take of this matter, not
for the sake of the ass, but for your own sake, and for
the sake of truth. While some creatures have been
censured for evil tempers which they do not possess,
that creature has been praised for virtues which I fear
seldom or never fell to its lot. Its assumed patience
is sheer obstinacy. Its pretended self-denial is a
sullen submission to labour, and sometimes, though
not often, to hardship, which it cannot avoid.
While the incident we have just witnessed proves
that it can be induced to exert itself with considerable
FAMILY. 75

activity ; but only by the prospect of its own speedy
gratification.”’

‘* How different,’’ I observed, ‘ is this to the dispo-
sition cf the horse! Our active and animated steed 1s
a remarkable example. I do think it would go on at
the quickest pace, if it thought our convenience and
comfort required it, fora whole day without a morsel
of food! And then, when food is brought for it,
instead of instantly siezing it like the ass, it will look
at its master, and express its gratitude for sometime
before the food is touched. Then, having eaten a
little, it looks up as though it would ask whether we
wish to proceed ? and say thatit was ready to sacrifice
its food, and go on with all its hunger and weariness,
if it could but convey us to our journey’s end !”’

Anna now spoke on another subject arising out of
what we had beheld. “I have received,”’ she said,
‘* a lesson from this incident that will be of service to
me as long as I live. As you have spoken of the ass
perhaps I may be allowed to speak of its rider. He
has set us all—at least he has set me and my sisters—
an example of the best method of dealing with idle
76 THE WIDOW’'S

and obstinate creatures. I shall teach my pupils
as well as learn myself, to attract the stubborn chil-
dren of the sunday school we expect to have under our
care, by a view of their own interest, rather than urge
them by a fear of their own injury. JZ shall hang
a bunch of carrots before them to draw them forward,
rather than use any severe methods to drive them.”
The twins were delighted beyond expression with
sister Anna‘’s remarks, especially as she seemed to
assure them of a prospect, which they had hitherto
contemplated with uncertainty—the prospect of becom-
ing teachers in a sunday school. Hitherto the widow
had hesitated to allow her daughters to accept the
kind invitation often given them to assist in the chapel
school near her cottage; but the behaviour of the
priest to-day had removed all remaining objection
from her mind, and she had just told Anna that the
next time thoy were requested to lend their aid, ske
at least should comply with the reqnest—even at the risk
of being reproached as dissenters from the church.
‘The party were now at the cottage gate, and were
surprised to find the rider and owner of the ass wait-
FAMILY. 77

ing to see them. He was now on foot, standing near
the gate, and had lost all the cheerfulness of coun-
tenance with which he had parted with them in the lane.
‘Taking off his hat to my husband, whom he consider-
ed the master of the cottage, he begged pardon for
having put his ass in the hovel.

‘“* What, you have ridden the creature too fast, and
completely tired it out, I suppose?” said my husband.

‘* No, Sir,’’? answered the man, *‘ but I am afraid
the carrots have killed it! I could not bear to tanta-
lize the poor beast any longer, and so, as soon as I got
upon this green, I jumped off its back, and let it take
the carrots; but it has eaten them so fast that it ig
quite ill, and I fear I shall never ride on it again.”

My husband again found the advantage of his medi-
cal skill, and of carrying about with him certain pillg
which he jocosely called—Good physic for man and
beast. One pill was sufficient to conquer the over feed-
ing of a man, and three were necessary for that of a
horse; he, therefore, thought that two would be suf-
ficient to cure the ass of the consequence of its gluttony.
He reduced them to powder, mixed the powder
78 THE WIDOW’S

with a little milk, drenched the long eared invalid, and
in a quarter of an hour had the pleasure of seeing it
quite recovered.

In the joy of its owner, he was eager to mount and
continue his journey; but we advised him, as he had
four miles to go and it was getting dark, to stop all
night where he was, and give himself and his beast
the advantage of several hours rest. ‘* You can start
again,’’ said Anna, ‘“‘ by four o’clock in the morning,
and I will see that a bunch of turnips shall be ready to
attract the creature to your destination.”

The man thanked the kind young lady, and consented.
‘« Perhaps,” he said, ‘‘ I may be permitted to take the
poor sick beast into that nice little paddock behind the
house? the evening air and the delicious grass may
quite recover it to health.”

My husband looked at the widow for her consent,
and then told the man that he had better let the ass
remain out all night. Overjoyed at the offer, he said
to the widow, whom he now found to be the owner of
the cottage and meadow, ‘‘ I shall indeed be glad of
this opportunity of refreshing the poor creature, and
FAMILY. 79

whenI have secured it in the paddock, I will get my-
self some refreshment and rest at the public house.”’

As he was going, we all expressed a wish that so
worthy and creditable a man might have his refresh-
ment at the cottage, and then seek his rest at the little
ale-house. The widow proposed the plan, and the
man was requested to comply with it. ‘‘I will thank
you,” he said, *‘ when I return.’’ This was not long
delayed. ‘Fhe fences and gates of the meadow were
all as secure as he wished, except a slight breach in
the hedge, against which he put a hurdle; and he
returned thankfully to avail himself of the offer to sup
with the family and their visitors.

‘“*T have been,” he said, as he sat down, ‘‘ paying a
heavier demand than before of tythe to the fat parson
yonder; and, instead of going home contented, as my
donkey and the parson wished me to do, I resolved to
go to the town and consult a gentleman of the law,
who has got several of my neighbour’s tythes lessened
lately. Now, if I had been ever so much pressed, I
could not have got my ass into the parson’s large
meadow for even five minutes; but youkinod strangers
80 THE WIDOW'S

—and you kind widow, especially—have granted my
beast the favour for a whole night’s feed in a wonderful
better pasture than his!”

One of the twins at this moment smiled and spoke
to the other, who was immediately and visibly interested
in what her sister said. ‘The man perceived that he
had excited some mirth between them, and requested
to know what it was that so delighted the sweet little
ladies 2 ‘‘ I have but a plain understanding,”’ he said ;
‘‘ but I have credit at home for having a large and a
warm heart; tell me what you are merry about, and
if itis about me, I'll forgive you.”” The twins looked
at Anna as though they would ask her permission to
comply with the worthy man’s request. ‘Their sister
consented, and one of them said—

‘¢ We did not smile and speak about you, Sir; but
about the parson’s grass and the penitent ass. Itisa
fable that sister has given us to translate into French.
We laughed when we read it, and perhaps you will
Taugh when you hear it.

‘* There was a distemper among the beasts, and they
assembied in the lion's den to inquire about the cause
PAMILY. 81

of it. They first resolved that the beast which had
committed the greatest sin should be put to death, to
pacify the wrath of heaven, and remove the plague
from the earth. ‘The lion confessed, first, that he had
committed many murders, and had recently slain and
eaten a man. The tiger acknowledged that he had
devoured three or four children in about as many
months. ‘Ihe wolf allowed that he had committed
much destruction among the neighbouring flocks, and
the fox that he had done the same among fhe numerous
roosts around him. All the other beasts confessed
their several crimes of deeper or fainter dye. At last
it came to the turn of the ass, and with great humility
he admitted that be had trespassed once into the
parson’s paddock ; but was driven out soon after he
had begun cropping the delicious grass, and hoped
that the severe beating he had received would be con-
sidered punishment enough for the sin.

‘*‘ The beasts were exceedingly restless during the con-
fession of the ass, and the instant it was over they all
rose with indignation, no longer wondering what it was
that occasioned the distemper among them. ‘The lion

G
§2 THE WiDOW’'S

then spoke—‘‘ What! eat the parson’s grass! O,
sacrilege! This, brethren, is the flagrant unpardon-
able crime that has brought down the wrath of heaven
upon our heads; and the vile offender must instantly
be sacrificed to appease that wrath, and remove the
dreadful malady it has inflicted upon us!”

‘* And did they kill the poor ass?” the man asked,
as seriously and earnestly as though it were fact instead
of fable.

‘ your ass would as certainly have been killed had it
entered the parson’s meadow without leave.”

Other entertaining subjects of conversation arose,
and rendered the evening a remarkably pleasant one,
especially for the twims, who had been permitted at
their request to sit up an hour or two later than usual.
After they were gone to bed, a subject was started by
the owner of the ass, which surprised the rest who
heard it, and led to the must unexpected and profitable
results. The man had gone to take one more look at
his ass in the meadow, by the light of a moon, bright
almost as a mid-day sun; and he staid much longer
PAMILY &3

than his friends expected. ‘‘ We feared something
had happened to you or to your poor beast,” said my
husband, as the man returned smiling into the room.
** Nothing has happened to either of us,’’ answered the
man ; ‘‘ but I stopped to look at the meadow you have
there. What, ma’am, do you pay rent for this place,
meadow and all, if it be a fair question ?’’

‘* This little estate is the lady’s freehold,” said I,
‘‘and a favourite freehold it is, for a reason which
regard to her feelings will not allow me to explain.”

‘* T understand you—I understand you''answere 1
the man. ‘‘ The lady values the estate out of regard
to the gentleman who bought it more than to what it
is worth in money. All that is very good. But does
she know the value of it in money? I ask her pardon
that I have made her weep: it is in my nature to
lessen the distress of others, but not to increase it.”’

The widow strove to repress her tears, and cast a
look of some surprise and solicitude upon the man.
** Every spot is of inestimable value to me, for the
reason to which my friends have alluded; but I don’t
know the real value in money, as you say, of an
&4 THE WIDOW'S

particular part of the estate, and least of allofthe mea-
dow part.”’

** But I do, ma’am,’’ answered the man: ‘* and
plain as I appear, with only an ass to carry me about,
TI can afford to give you sixty pounds a year for the
meadow only, for as long a lease as you may please to
grant me.”’

The widow was not, as some would have been, thrown
into an extacy of wonder and joy. She had been told
before that her meadow was worth more than would
appear at first sight, and she concluded, if this were
the case, some offer would be made by those who
understood its value: still she was not prepared for so
sudden nor so large an offer as this. ‘+ What, Sir,”
she asked, *‘ is the peculiar quality of the meadow?’

‘“* There is no difficulty in discovering this fact,
and answering this question,” replied the man. ‘ I
have discovered it by moonlight, and I tell you at
once that the meadow contains some of the finest brick
earth I ever felt—for I can tell by the touch better
than the sight, and I never touched better in my
irfe.””
FAMILY. 85

‘‘The moon then has had nothing to do in the
discovery, Sir?’’ said Anna, ‘‘ since you would have
been able to feel the earth in perfect darkness.”

““ Well, let that pass, my young lady,’’ answered
the man: ‘* itis a good joke in more senses than one.
The moon has had nething to do in the discovery with
regard to my brain, any more than my touch—TI mean
Iam no lunatic—as my boy read in the New Testament
last Sunday, Z speak forth the words of truth and
soberness.””

‘* Now you mention the New Testament and intimate
the regard you have for its authority, I am the more
inclined to listen to what you have to say about the
meadow,”’ said the widow: ‘* there appears something
Providential in your stopping here to make the disco-
very of its value.”’

‘© Why, as to that,” the man answered, “ FE believe
the donkey must have the credit of the discovery.
Â¥You have already found it to be a most voracious
beast, and it has betrayed its gluttony, as one of vou
called it, with the grass as well as the carm@ts. Just
as E went into the meadow, it was tugging hard at a
86 THE WIDOW’'S

huge bunch of sweet grass, and just as I reached it, up
came the bunch by the roots, and a big lot of
earth with them. This won’t do, I said, and so I took
the huge turf to put it into its place again, and in
handling it for this purpose I found it to be the much
earth I have described. This is the plain history of
the matter, and without any more to do, I am willing
to give you the rent I have offered.’’

‘* Without the view, of course,’’ my husband said,
*‘of turning it into a brickfield? This will injure the
beauty of the estate, a little, and especially annoy the
dwellers in the cottage.”’

‘** But, Sir,"’ answered the man, ‘ it will do quite as
much good in another way—it will defend the other
parts of the property. Thegarden and cottage will be
much more secure by having a high wall to protect
them, and an encampment of brick makers behind that.
I will engage that the men shall all be honest ones, and
do the widow’s property no harm—nay, that they shall
be its protectors.”

“I have often wished,”’ she said, ‘‘ for a high wall
between the garden and the meadow; but I could not
afford to build it.’
PAMILY. 87

‘“¢ Well, ma’am,”” answered the man, “ but if you
can't afford it 1 can. Come, now, in addition to the
sixty pounds a year, and all expences of the lease, I
will engage to build a wall eight feet high with the
first bricks that are made; and besides this 1 will
cover the garden side of it with some of the choicest
fruit trees you ever saw.””

‘“* I look upon the offer as a liberal one, and as an
interposition of Providence in my behalf,”’ said the
widow dropping a tear; “I shall therefore think
favourably upon it, and if these friends advise me I
shall accept it.’’

My husband had been writing these last few minutes,
on a Sheet of paper that Anna had brought at his
request. Ile finished what he intended Just as the
widow finished speaking, and then placed it before the
man requesting him to say if he approved of it ?”
‘* FHoow can I disapprove of it?’’ he said, ‘‘ since it
declares exactly what I have offered? My word has
always been my bond; but here is my name in my own
hand writing to confirm it.”

The name was written with some obscurity, so that
88 THE WEDOW’S

the widow, on looking at it with great attention, could
not understand it. But Anna knew it, and knew, as
she afterwards remarked to me, that her sisters would
know it as soon as they saw it. My husband, too,
remembered something of the name the moment he
beheld it, and on recollection was fully aware of the
singular and eccentric character with whom they had
been conversing. No explanation, however, passed
that evening; but after a few more indifferent matters
on both sides, the man took his leave; and the next
morning, when the family and their visitors arose,
both he and his ass had disappeared from the village.

The keeper of the ale house, where the man had
slept, came early to the cottage and asked if he could
speak to Mrs. Bland ? Anna received the message,
and wished to know if she could communicate it, and
ber mamma’s answer to it? «* My dear mother,” said
Anna, *‘ is rather poorly this morning, and wishes to
lie a littie longer than usual: something very unex-
pected occurred last evening, which has created
considerable anxiety.”’

‘*Well then, miss,’”’ answered the man, “perhaps
PAMILY. 89

this will relieve the good lady. The old gentleman,
who supped with you and slept at- my house, charged
me to deliver this to her as early as possible. Hesaid
he ought to have left it himself to bind the bargain.”
It was a fifty pound note, and the landlord had nothing
mare to do than to be a witness that it was accepted.
Anna ran up stairs, and came as quickly down again;
telling the publican that her mamma was greatly
obliged to him, and wished him to call again in two
hours.

This conversation was communicated to me by
Anna soon after it occurred, and just before we sat
down to breakfagt. This was later than usual, owing
to Mrs. Bland’s indispogition, snd our determination
to wait till she could come down. As we were
finishing breakfast, I said to the widow—‘** You have
now bound yourself to the agreement past retreating”
—and appealed to my husband, who confirmed my
opinion of the widow being obliged to let her meadow
to the brickmaker, now she had accepted the earnest of
fifty pounds.

‘* Well, my dear friends,” she said, ‘*‘ I am upon the
90 THE WIDOW’'S

whole glad that I have done it before I intended to do
it. I might have hesitated, and he might have with-
drawn the offer. But is it not time to ask about this
new and strange visitor, who is about to occupy part
of our ground, and perhaps become our near and con-~
stant neighbour? Who knows any thing about
him ®”

My husband repeated the question of the widow,
and that with greater earnestness, because he saw in
the countenances of the ¢7ins what he considered to
be an indication that they knew him. Looking at
them affectionately, he said again—‘*‘ Who knows any
thing of this worthy man?” ‘JI do, Sir,” said one of
the twins. ‘I do, Sir,” said the other, precisely in
the same tone and manner, so that if two speakers had
not been within his view, and he had not seen the lips
of both to move, he would have considered the answer
an iteration or an echo of the self-same mild and
melodious voice.

‘¢Did you then, my sweet dears,” said 1, *‘ know
him yesterday evening on his donkey in the lane, or
at the supper table in the next room ?”’
PAMILY. 91

‘*We did not remember him, and we had no idea it
could be the same person,”’ they said.

*‘What same person? Where did you see him
before? How came you to know him at first ?” asked
their mamma in a tone of rising anxiety. The twins
clasped each other with the most endearing tenderness,
and cast a look on their sister, as though they wished
her to answer their mamma's inquiries. In the
Album from which I first quoted, it is said that Anna
was considered all mind, and her sisters all heart;
but that they were not without intelligence, nor she
destitute of feeling. The latter fact was now disco-
vered. Anna wasin a moment, on her sister's look,
dissolved in tears. She would have left the room had
she been able; but, on rising from her chair, she
would have sunk on the floor had I not supported her.
I gently entreated silence till ber strong emotion
abated, and then I did not doubt she would explain
the entire mystery.

Her manima was but partially acquainted with the
cause of her emotion, yet she knew enough to render
her a partaker of it. She, too, requested the dear girl to
92 THE WIDOW’'S

compose herself till she could explain ; while it was
evident from the very request that she longed for the
explanation to be given. At length, when Anna had
recovered composure, her mamma said—‘* There must,
my dearest girl, be some mysterious connection between
this worthy man and what your dear father told us on
his dying bed. Tell me is it notso? I can bear to
hear it all.”’

‘© Dearest mamma,”’ said Anna, “ he told me much
more than you heard—or than you could then have
Rome to hear. I fear you have not strength yet to
Yrear of it. I have locked it up in my own breast, and
in the more tender bosoms of my dear sisters, intend-
ing, when you had recovered the shock of our dear
father’s departure, to reveal the secret; but now cir-
cumstances appear to require that it should bea secret
no longer.”’

They both wept in each other's embrace; but the
widow's anxiety to know all the truth would not allow
her to substitute tears for words a moment longer than
was necessary. ‘ Tell me, dear Anna,” she said, “ all
you know. Ican now bear it—I now wild bear it.”’
PAMILY. 93

But Anna was not yet sufficiently recovered for the
task. I supported the dear girl, or she would have
fallen on the floor. [ soothed her till her agony of
grief had a little subsided. I encouraged her bythe
assurance that she herself would be relieved by mak-
ing the communication. I stimulated her by the
consideration that her dear mother might suffer more
by anxiety than by acquaintance with the fact. At
length she strove to perform in a proper manner what
she was now convinced to be a sacred duty.

*¢ Dear mamma,” she said, embracing and kissing
her, ‘‘ you well remember the words of the dying saint,
—Take special care of the twins, for they are brands
plucked out of the burning !""

‘¢ Well indeed,’ said Mrs. Bland, ‘* I remember,
them, and the look—the look—with which they were
uttered! His countenance shone while he spoke witb
the brightness of an angel! They were, I believe, the
last words I was privileged to hear from his expiriig
but enraptured tongue !°’

** Yes, dearest mother, they were,’’ said Anna: ‘‘.you
were conveyed from the room ina state of iasensibility
and so continued till he could speak no more.”
94 THE WIDOW 'S

‘* And we sat one on each side of your bed, mamma,
till you could speak again,’’ said the twins, in the sweet
and simultaneous manner in which they generally
spoke.

‘“¢ But what did ke say to you, Anna, after I was
removed,’”’ asked her mother, in a tremor of speech
that shewed her half afraid of having the question
answered.

‘¢ He said, dear mamma,” answered Anna, “‘ that my
little sisters were strictly as he described them—
that they had recently been plucked out of the
burning J”

“*O, tell me how ? and when? and where?” ex-
claimed her mamma, clasping the twins one in each
arm.

‘* I will, dearest mother,’ ’said Anna, ‘‘ if you consent
to compose yourself. My dear father took my little
sisters, while you were at Lincoln, as far as the second
village beyond our own, where it seems this worthy
man resides and hasa very large brick manufactory.
They were much pleased in seeing themen and women
make bricks, and place them in rows to dry ; and my
FAMILY. 95

dear father, thinking no danger, went to some little
distance to converse with a man whom he remembered
to have been here repairing the cottage. On asudden
he heard a dog bark, and immediately a scream from
the dear children alarmed him. Running towards the
spot where he had left them, they were not to be seen,
but he could still faintly hear them scream. In a
moment he turned to the point whence the affecting
sound proceeded, and saw a man—the good man
who has just left us—running out of the burning kjln
with one of the dear girls under each arm. ‘ They
are both safe,’ he said to my dear father; ‘ but in
another minute they must have been burnt to death.
The dog terrified the sweet creatures, and they ran for
safety into the greatest danger.’ ”’

The widow sat listening to the sad tale with a coun-
tenance I never can describe. It shewed the struggle
of one of the tenderest minds I ever knew, between
affrightedness and_ gratitude—between consternation
at the danger and thanksgiving for the deliverance of
her children. Her first remark was—‘‘ I am thankful
96 THE WIDOW'S

for a sight of my daughter’s deliverer. But why did he
not make himself known as such ?”

‘*My dear father,”’ said Anna, ‘‘had charged him
never to mention the circumstance, lest it should
reach your ear; so that if he knew who you were, and
remembered my sisters—which is doubtful—we can ac-
count for his silence on the event.”’

The man was expected to return along the same
road, on his way home, that very day, and the widow
was anxious to see him again. To render her meeting
with him the more certain, my husband proposed
taking her in his chaise a few miles towards the town
he was coming from ; while I promised to accompany
the twins in their usual evening’s walk to the poor
woman’s hut. An incident or two worth recording oc-
curred in both these excursions.

As the twins and I were sauntering along the lane,
a young man was riding towards us very fast, and
stopped as he came up tous. I thought I had seen
him somewhere before, and the dear girls instantly
remembered him as the servant of the parson, who had
FAMILY. 97

attended him in all his movements in the church and the
church yard the preceding day. He also remembered
us, and said to the girls, that he had a letter from his
master to their mamma, to be delivered to her immedi-
ately. ‘*‘ Sneis at present from home,”’ I said, ‘* and
therefore it is needless for you to proceed; we shall be
able to deliver it to her quite as soon as she would
get it by vour taking it to the cottage.’

He gave me the letter, and rode back as quickly as
he came; but not before he had told us that his master
was very ill. The desire of delivering the letter took
us from the woman’s hut sooner than we intended,
and quickened our pace in returning home. On reach-
ing the cottage Anna was still al. ne, kindly preparing
a supper which she accidentally heard her mamma
and myself in conversation say that we were very fond
of. ‘* One great comfort,” Anna said, ‘* that I derive
from mamma’s unexpected riches, is the opportunity
afforded me of providing more suitably and abundant-
ly for her delicate appetite and for the entertainment
of our welcome visitors.”’

““ While you provide for them,’ said her sisters,

H
98 THE WIDOW'S

“you must not forget poor dame Judson at the hut :
here is her basket, and we promised to send it back
full by the first person who may be going that way.”

That first person happened to be one on whose
assistance they did not like to presume. It was Simon
Strange, the brickmaker, who rode upon his ass to the
gate to say, that Mr. Morantand Mrs. Bland would be
home in about half an hour. They had been delayed
by meeting with other friends, who have already been
mentioned, and who will soon appear before the reader
again,

‘* Are these friends,”’ I asked Mr. Strange, ‘‘ likely
to come with them ?”

‘“‘T have no message of that kind to deliver,” he
answered; ‘‘ yet I thinxX it likely they will from what.
I saw and heard. They were in deep mourning, and
seemed very much comforted in meeting with the
widow again. But I must go on,and get home te
night: have you any message to dame Judson, my sweet
little girls 2”’

‘* We have no message for her, Sir, tank you,’
said the twins; ** but "


FAMILY. 99

They were afraid to speak of the basket, and yet
they wished it conveyed to the hut as soon and safely
as possible. Mr. Strange suspected something of the
kind, and said—‘* but—you have something better
than a message to send. Ah, you good children! you
have learned, I see, the Scripture lesson, not to send
compliments to the poor, but food—not to say, Be ye
warmed and be ye filled, while ye give them not the
things that are necdful. Don’t I see a basket pack-
ed up there, ready to go to the hut? Here Tom, hold
my beast !”’

This call was to a boy that had nothing to do, and
was standing on the green in hope of gaining a penny
by minding the ass. The worthy man then took the
basket, fastened it upon the saddle, and charged the
boy to lead the ass gently along the middle of the road
and wait at dame Judson’s hut till he came up. ‘‘ The
basket,”” he said, ‘* will not be half so heavy a burden
as I am, and I shall stretch and refresh myself by the
walk of a mile.”

‘¢ But what is this ?’’ he asked, looking at the letter
brought from the parsonage, and which he knew ina
100 THE WIDOW'S

moment to be directed by the clerk. ‘‘ Why, this is a
double and a treble letter !’’ he added, feeling it. ‘* If
it did not come from the rectory, I should almost
think it was stuffed with bank notes!’’ he added
again.

‘* J believe you are right, Sir,”’ Anna said. *‘ I have
peeped into the letter, and seen that there are two bank
notes at least: but I shall not open it till mamma comes
home."

‘< Why you seem very indifferent about money,
young lady !’’ said Mr. Strange.

*“* No, Sir,”’ answered Anna, ‘‘ I am not indifferent,
only I am not surprised, as you seemed to be, and seemed
to expect meto be. I could almost venture to say
that there is a large amount in the letter, because our
supplies of money have so remarkably increased very
lately, There was first a five pounds note from one
friend—then a ten pounds from another—then a fifty
pounds from a third! and who knows but here is a
hundred pounds from a fourth 2?”

‘* Whatever there is,’ I said, ‘* you will very soon
know, for here are your mamma and my husband al-
most at the gate!”
FAMILY. 101

‘¢ Be they indeed !’”’ exclaimed Mr. Strange, ‘* then
T must either decamp or lose my wager !”’

They had met him on the road, and, as I have hint-
ed, they met nearly at the same time with two other
friends. He was pressed to sup again at the cottage,
and reminded that it was moon light; but, though he
longed to accept the invitation, he felt it his duty to
decline it. As he left them, he was told that they
should find him there; when, to bind himself to get
home he laid a wager with my husband that when
they reached the cottage he would be gone. My hus-
band drove the chaise softly over the green, rather than
along the road, that, should he be there, he might not
hear if. approach so as to have time to depart. He was
caught in the snare, and when he insisted on giving
the twins the trifling wager, they insisted on his leaving
it with poor dame Judson.

The letter contained,as Anna had guessed, two bank
notes of fifty pounds each. It was written by the clerk,
who acted as secretary as well as responser to his
master, and simply informed Mrs. Bland that his
reverence was very ill, and was fearful that he had
102 THE WIDOW’'S

made a harsh demand on the widow and fatherless—
requesting her to accept the enclosed as the restitution
of an uneasy conscience,

‘‘ Just the man, all over!” said Mr. Strange. ‘I
have known him ill fifty times, and every time he had
some restitution, as he called it, to make. Healways
restored four fold, like Zacheus ; but this is the great-
est sum I ever knew him send toany one”

Mr. Strange now bade them good evening, promising
to come in four days, and bring the draught of a
lease for the meadow.

‘¢ And so,”’ said I, when we were sitting down to
the favourite supper, ‘‘ you have met with the bereaved
parents on your little journey ? how are they ?”

**‘ My comforts and friends increase so fast,” said the
widow, ‘‘ that I am almost borne down with the
weight of gratitude. You will have an opportunity of
seeing how they are in a few hours: they have
promised to spend the whole of to-morrow with us.
As they are lodging but a few miles off, they will be
here to breakfast.”

‘¢ And dinner, too, we hope,” said one of the twins,
FAMILY. 103

who had been out of the room until the intention of
coming to breakfast was mentioned. ‘‘ And dinner,
too, we hope,”’ said the other, fearful that her sister
had not been distinctly heard. ‘* They hesitated much
on this point,’’ Mrs. Bland answered, ‘‘ and would
not consent but upon the ancient agreement, that our
usual family provision only should be made. Our
slender appetites, the lady said, can easily be satisfied.”

‘‘ And they shall be very delicately satisfied, too,”
said the happy girls, ‘‘ for Mr. Strange has left two
couple of the tenderest fowls you ever saw, mamma,
and there is a ticket on them which says, that a York-
shire ham will be after them early in the morning.”’

‘*‘ You will then, at least, be able to say that you
have prepared nothing for them beyond the regular
family provision,’’ I observed, while the widow was
full of smiles and tears—smiles of delight at the sim-
plicity of her children’s description, and tears of grati-
tude at the mercy and bounty that were accumulating
upon her. What charming chicken broth you will
have for dame Judson to-morrow evening!” said
Anna. ‘* Perhaps you could spare some for another
101 THE WIDOWS

poor woman, whom I have discovered in this neigh-
bourhood, and whom I beg to call ay pensioner ?”
The twins consented, on condition that Anna would
give the dame an old cloak of hers when the winter
came on.

‘* We shall go to bed soon to night, dear mamma, if
you please,” they said, ‘* that we may be up, as Mr.
Strange says. with the lark to-morrow morning. The
ham will overtake the chickens by six o'clock, the
hour of the errand cart going by; we must therefore
be down stairs at the latest Ly that time.’’

It so happened that #70 hams instead of one came
by the cart; butas they were of different sorts, and
directed by different hands, no doubt was entertained
of the unexpected one coming from their sorrowful but
considerate friends. ‘They themselves arrived about
two hours after their present, and, as the reader may
suppose, completely filled up the little vacant room
left in the cottage. 1 had, however, contrived to
prevent the least confusion, by persuading Anna to
iet breakfast be prepared on a little lawn, behind the
house, shaded from the sun and in a great measure
FAMILY. 105

concealed from public view, by the wide spreading
branches of a mulberry tree, and several clusters of
beautiful shrubs. ‘This arrangement enabled the
widow to receive her additional visitors in one parlonr,
while the other afforded a depository for the several
little delicacies which Anna and I had provided for
the greater ornament of the table and comfort of the
guests.

We sat down about half past eight o’clock, with
Anna presiding, and the twins on each hand of uer, to
execute her demands in waiting upon us. A circum-
stance, however, by which the affectionate girls had
hoped to add to the comfort of their new friends, at
first threatened to spoil the whole entertainment.
Iguring the half hour that the departed youth had been
at the cottage, but a few weeks before his death, he
had taken out of his portfolio several landscapes and
portraits of his own drawing. The best of them, in
the estimation of the twins at least. was a whole length
drawing of himself, beautifully coloured, and under-
neath which he had written in a fine but tremulous
hand—
106 THE wIDOW’S

‘<< For me to be remembered by this swect family
then Iam laid low in the grave.”’

This favourable picture the twins had surmounted
with a festoon of crape, and fastened against the trunk
of the mulberry tree, just opposite the seats appointed
for the sorrowful parents. The mother had never
seen the picture before, and at the first glance expressed
her melancholy satisfaction at being permitted to take
a meal within view of a likeness of the lamented Mr.
Bland ! Turning to her husband as she spoke, she saw
him pale and ready tosink with grief. He had seen the
picture before in his son’s possession, and wondered
what had become of it. The mystery was now solved
—but how could he undeceive the mother without
reducing her to a state of deeper depression than him-
self? He would gladly remove the picture; but this
might do more harm than good: and yet to allow
things to remain as they were, was impossible. Before
he could determine what to do, the widow, who saw
his embarrassment, threw a handkerchief over the
picture to conceal it—when Mrs. Morant, stepping
round to it, said—‘‘ Allow me one nearer look before
FAMILY. 107

it is completely veiled.”” She took a nearer look—
screamed—and fainted.

The picture was now removed, and every effort made
to restore the afflicted mother. On this being accom-
plished, she took the twins, who were absorbed in
grief, on either side of her, and said—‘‘ You, my
sweet girls, meant only to cornfort me, and I am
comforted by every remembrance of my beloved
Frederick: but I would not have you distressed,
because the tenderness of a mother’s feelingscould not
endure the sudden sight of a picture that I did not
know to exist.”

The breakfast now proceeded as though nothing had
happened ; but the twins had lost their power to wait
upon us. They hung around Mrs. Morant as though
they had to repair some great injury done to her feel-
ings; while their sympathy, so sweetly expressed,
tended much to raise her spirits, and restore the usual
tranquillity of her mind. ‘* After breakfast,” she said,
‘¢T shall, 1 hope, have courage enough to look over both
his portfolio and my own Album. I have scarcely
been able to take a single view of the first, and the
108 THE wipow’'s

other I missed for several weeks, having left it amidst
our grief at an inn at Louth, where we stopped a few
nights.”’

Anna now gave me a most significant look. I had
entrusted to her the secret of my extract from the stray
Album, and now most unexpectedly we had the aimable
writer with us. I intimated by the best sign I could
make my wish thatthe secret should for a few moments
be kept, and the lady, without observing us, went on
thus speaking to the twins. ‘* You ask me what an
Album is? It is a book, larger or smaller, with blank
pages, on which different friends are requested to write
whatever they please, in prose or poetry, original or
ex tracted.”’

‘¢T had rather see what you and Mr. Morant have
written in it, if you have written any thing, than what
has been written by strangers,”’ said one of the twins,
while the other intimated that she felt the same prefer-
ence.

‘‘ T have written one piece, rather a long one,”
answered Mrs. Morant; ‘** and it is on a subject that
would be particularly interesting to you, if I dared
PAMILY. 109

show it you. But I will first show you the piece that
Mr. Morant has written, because there will be nothing
but my own feelings to prevent that being shown ; and
if they are too strong I can withdraw while you read
it.””

‘© Thank you, dear lady,” said one of the twins, * for
this promise; but why will you not promise to let us
read the piece that vou have written ?”

‘¢ Never mind, dear creature,” I said, ‘‘if Mrs.
Morant won't show it you, I will—if she resolves to
withhold her original, I have a copy of it which shall be
at your service. For once in my life I was guilty of a
willful breach of the eighth commandment.”’

Mrs. Morant now cast a look upon me which I
cannot describe—it changed from a look of wonder to
one of delight, and satisfaction, and then to one of the
most engaging friendship and affection. ‘* And have
I," she said, ** so soon discovered the rogue of whom
I have been in search ever since the theft was.com-
mitted ? How strange, and yet how gratifying, it is to
meet with you under the roof of the third party
concerned in this interesting affair !"’
110 THE WIDOW'S

*“¢ It is under my roof you are met, and I therefore
must be this third party,”’ said the widow, who had
been mostly silent since the mistake concerning the
picture, and intent only on restoring and preserving
the order and comfort of the breakfast.

« You are certainly the third party alluded to, Mrs.
Bland,’ I said; ‘* but you need not be fearful of
sharing the charge I am fallen under—you had no
concern in the theft.” ‘* But Mrs. Bland has a deep
concern in the article stolen,’’ answered Mrs. Morant:
** though it cannot be considered her property, it is
property which always must remind us of her, and of
the lovely trio belonging to her.”’

The widow was now evidently anxious to have the
mystery explained, and asked, if it were not too greata
favour, to have the Album produced. It was fetched
immediately by Mr. Morant; and, as all eyes were
fixed upon it, I requested permission that his verses—
for I understood his writing to be in verse—should
be first read. Hekindly opened the book where the
desired lines appeared, and, while he took Mrs.
Morant a gentle walk round the garden, Anna read
as follows—
FAMILY. 111

‘‘ Frederick Morant, resigned his active engagements
in London and Paris, and returned to his father’s
house in ————-, two successive years: a few months
after his last return he died in peace.”

*“* Twice, gentle boy, thy father’s home received thee,
When twice ’twas fear’d thy frame might be dissolving.
We hop'd that care and quiet might relieve thee,
And so they did at the first years revolving.

Svon did a blooming spring shed hope abundant,
Thine ardent spirit rose above all fear.

The summer’s heat was thought to be redundant
At Paris, where thou wast, though ’twas not here,

Still hope increas’d so long as Autumn flourish’d;
The climate, season, city, kept it bland.

Though dwelling among strangers thou wast nourisas d
As much as though a pareut were at hand.

But Autumn over, hope begar departing,
And winter ushered fear with its first blast.
Soon tay weakframeat every pore was sinartiny,
And thine own sanguine mind became ov ercast,
112 THE wItbpows

Arviv'da second time at home, thy semblance
Gave fearful sign that danger must be nigh:
Thy wasted features scarce secured remembrance,
And every look proclaim’d that thou must die.

Awidst thy weakness with what rapturous joy
Thy heart was fill’ at reaching home once more!
What strains of praise did thy pale tongue employ,
When the tir’d journey’s closing mile was o'er.

Among thy welcomers a rosy sister,
Who oft before had wearied, then amus'd thee,
Ask’difin France thou had'st not often miss’d her ?
And of long absence mirthfully accus’d thee.

Her smiles and soothings now were most inspiring ;
And when with these alone she sought to cheer thee,
Thou wast refresh’d her sweetness by admiring,
And wish’d her, waking, to be ever near thee.

But smiles and soothings bounded not ner spirit—
That often would break forth in mirth and noise,

Too wild and loud ror timid nerves to bear it—
Spoiling by agitation all thy joys.
FAMILY. 113

An elder sister—graver too—was nigh thee—
Her youth and infancy were pass’d with thine.

In months of former sicknessshe was by thee,
Before we fear’d thy premature decline,

Then, too, another sister, now in glory,
Deligbted lent her sympatky and aid—-

When accident and anguish had come o’er thee,
Yetof thy death we could not be afraid.

Thy parents’ souls thus strive to speak with thine,
Though distant dwellers in such different scenes—
Still human they, while thou art all divine,
And the dense veil of flesh yet intervenes.

None sorrow’d without hope at thy departure—
Thy soul’s redemption had become secure ;
For this thou had’st resolv’d the world to barter
And to the end such faith must e’er endure,

We saw thee as the mortal foe advanc’I—

We heard thee triumph o’er its strength and <*'n:j—-
We felt the flame that thy firm soul entranc’d—

We found that heav'n to earth itself could briny.
114 THE WIDOW'S

Oft as the separating moment lengthenrd,
And thou wast thought to slumber or to faint;
List’ning, our hearts’ devotion became strengthen’d
By prayer and praise becoming well the saint.

At last both pain and sense appear’d suspended ;
And the scarce prison'd spirit long’d to fly.

A few more moments and the struggle ended—
*T was easy for thy wasted frame to die.

Thy soul's beatitude can be no vision,
Flatt’ring our fancy only to deceive us:
Our faith becomes deliberate decision—
Its substance and its evidence can't leave us.””

‘¢ Faith is the substance of things hoped for, and the evidence vf

things not seev. Ilebrews xi. 1.’

As Anna read these simple lines, and especially as
she was finishing the paper with the above psssage
from the New Testament—explanatory of the last line
of the last verse—she kept her hand firmly laid on the
next leaf, as though she would prevent the Album
being farther opened. She would have closed it
FAMILY. 115

altogether, had I not intimated that there were several
admirable pieces in the early leaves of the book, which
I thought all might read. ‘* But why,” said the
widow, ‘‘may we mot immediately turn to what dear
Mrs. Morant has written? ‘These were all the writing
of strangers; but our first attention is due to the only
production of her pen which I hear the book is yet
permitted to contain.”’

*¢ Promise me,” said I, ** that you will not close the
page when you see what is the subject of it, and I
will take on myself the responsibility of allowing you to
read it.”’

The widow promised, whatever it might be, to read
it through herself; on which the twins declared they
would run and tell Mrs. Morant what we were going
to do. This was exactly what I wanted ; and, on their
leaving us, I took the album into the parlour, fastened
the door, and with my husband and Anna only present,
sat while the widow wept over the interesting account
of her children and herself which I have already given
to the reacler.

*‘] have been caught,” she said, as svon as she
116 THE WIDOWS

recovered her spirits, ‘‘in my own snare. Our sex
was always renowned for curiosity, and have often
been punished for indulging it. With regard to you,
it is the first sin you have committed in my house, and
I shall therefore forgive you leading me into the error
of reading about myself.”

‘‘T am entirely indebted to this manuscript for my
happy acquaintance with you,”’ I said. ‘* You heard
me accused of theft, and this was the stolen article.
You heard Mrs. Morant say that she left her album at
the inn at Louth: there I found it, and extracted this
paper. ‘This brought us into your neighbourhood, and
this determined us to be inmates in your cottage for
the delightful week which is much too quickly passing
away.”

We now heard footsteps near the door, and the voice of
Mr. Morant inquiring of the twins where there mamma
was to be found. ‘‘ Madam,”’ he said, as soon as he
saw her, ‘‘] have been examining your meadow, and I
wonder you do not dispose of it by lease or sale, to
some one who will turn its valuable soil into bricks!
1 am almost inclined myself to make you an offer, and
FAMILY. 117

build a cottage near your own, for the health of Mrs.
Morant, and her enjoyment of your society.”’

She answered her friend only by a look of evident
disappointment. Not having overcome the strong
emotions excited by reading the manuscript, and feel-
ing at the moment deeply sorry at her engagement
with Mr. Strange, she seemed to Mr. Morant as though
she disliked the thought of his becoming either her
tenant or her neighbour. He was a man of quick and
strong sensations, and he therefore turned immediately
aside without uttering a syllable more on the subject.
Meanwhile, Mrs. Morant had paid a visit to Anna in
the kitchen, and heard from her that the other ham
and the four fowls had been sent by an elderly and
eccentric gentleman a few miles off, who, when he
came here, intended to turn the meadow into a brick
field !

A wrong interpretation was put upon this commu-
nication. Mrs. Morant again joined her husband in
the garden, and, while the twins were gathering cur-
rants, they walked into the meadow in very close
conversation with each other. The silent and confused
118 THE WIDOWS

countenance of Mrs. Bland when he spoke of his wish
to build and reside near her, seemed to confirm the
conclusion of his wife, that this elderly and eccentric
gentleman was soon to be master of the little estate, by
becoming husband of the interesting widow. The
mistaken couple did all they could to confirm each
other in this opinion, and by the time they sat down to
dinner they were quite certain that this change of
things was at hand. This certainty was completed
by the arrival of a hamper of wine, as manifestly
unexpected as it was welcome to Mrs. Bland.

‘* How very kind Mr. Strange is, mamma!”’ said one
of the twins, as soonas the first bottle of new wine was
placed on the table. ‘‘ He is to be here to-morrow or
next day, Anna,’’said the other.—‘‘ And _ then,’’
answered Anna, “ our friends will have an opportunity
of seeing the gay and handsome manner in which he
rides to visit us!"’

Mr. and Mrs. Morant looked at each other with a
smile of surprise; which vastly increased when one of
the twins asked whether Mr. Strange was likely to
travel this time with a bunch of carrots or turnips at
FAMILY. 119

the end of his stick? and when the other vowed that,
whichever it might be, it should be given to the ass as
soon as its masterdismounted! Theirsurprise rose te
consternation, upon the widow’s gently reproving the
mirth of her children at Mr. Strange’s expence, and
observing that, with all his eccentricity, he was evi-
dently a very worthy as well as wealthy man! My
husband confirmed this opinion, and spoke of the
honest brickmaster as one deserving of universal and
unreserved confidence. I said but little; yet that
little tended rather to strengthen than to weaken the
impression of our friends, that the simple and lovely
scene at the cottage was about to be marred by the
rude hand of some old man, whose wealth was his only
recommendation, and who was strange by nature as
well as by name.

Our new friends were silent and perplexed; but we
ascribed this to their melancholy condition, and the
novelty of a visit to strangers—the first visit they had
paid to any person since the death of their son. At
length Mr. Morant became more cheerful, and begged
leave to propose the health of the expected owner of
120 THE WIDOWS

the estate. ‘* Stop there, Sir,’’ said the widow: “ I
uin not going to part with the whole of the estate.
Mr. Strange is not to have the cottage or the garden ;
but only the meadow: and, in order to separate the
two properties, he intends the first bricks to be built
into a high wall, along where you see the light and
low fence at the end of the garden.”’

This, however, did not undeceive our mistaken
friends. ‘They only inferred from it that the cottage
and garden were to be settled on the widow, and
descend to her children—a precaution the more neces-
sary by reason of the advanced age of Mr. Strange—
while this minuteness of thr trrangement only estab-
lished their conviction that Mrs. Bland was destined
soon to become Mrs. Strange. ‘* As you have passed
on Mr. Strange the compliment of proposing his
health,’ said the widow, ‘* I hope you will allow him
to acknowledge and return it, by your staying over
another day, when I trust we shall have the worthy
man amongst us.”’

‘*T find, madam,” said my husband, ‘‘ that he is
actually coming to-morrew, and will be here by noon.”
FAMILY. 121

‘““ Why, how did you know this?” I asked, with
an expression andemotionofwonder. ‘‘ Miss Bland,”’
he answered, ‘** must be accountable for the revelation
of the secret, for she gave me the papers which he
packed up with the ham, and which, in a note, he
requests me to look over before he comes,”

Mr. and Mrs. Morant, as they afterwards told me,
had no doubt whatever that these papers were the
draught of the marriage settlement, and that my
husband, as a friend of the widow, had undertaken to
examine and correct them—while, in fact, they were
only the draught of the meadow lease, in which he was
to insert Whatever conditions he or she might judge
proper.

Before we rose from the dinner table, Mrs. Morant
was anxious to have some explanation of the turnips
and carrots; and yet she dared not directly ask any*
one about them. ‘‘ This worthy gentleman,’’ she
said, ** is I find rather eccentric; but he can afford
to be so. Does he, however, really ride on an ass?”’

‘¢ O yes,”’ answered Anna, ‘‘ and in the excess of his
humanity, to save the ass from being beaten along, he
THE WIDOW'S

holds a bunch of something that the creature is fond of,
to attract it into a brisk pace. When he comes here
finally he intends, he says, to have a donkey chaise 5
but whether the carrots and turnips will then be in
request I don’t know.”’

The twins were now hand in hand frisking along the
meadow, and Mr. Morant seeing them through the
window asked my husband permission to join them,
as the ladies were about to retire into the other par-
lour. ‘* And you will beglad,”’ he said, on overtaking
them, ‘‘ when Mr. Strange brings his donkey here that
you may ride!” “ O, sir,’’ one of them answered, ‘* he
has two sweet donkey colts, and he says we shall have
them for our own.’ “They are as much like each
other,’ her sister said, ‘* as we are, Sir.”’

‘¢ But this Mr. Morant remarked, “ will not be all
that will gladden you. Mr. Strange himself will be
more welcome to both of you than his donkeys.”’

‘““O yes, Sir,’”’ they answered together, ‘“‘ he has
promised to be a father to us, and to doevery thing he
can to comfort and cheer us, and to make our dear
mamma happy.”
PAMILY. 123

In this mistaken state of mind the Morants continued
without one circumstance or one intimation calculated
to undeceive them, till sometime after the arrival of
the brickmaker the next day. At first, their regret
that the widow was about to change her condition was
so great, that they were disinclined to prolong their
visit ; but their desire to see the eccentric man overcame
this feeling so that they engaged a bed at the village
inn, and consented to meet him. He arrived on his
donkey, but without the attractive aid of either carrots
or turnips, about one o’clock. The fact was, the
creature had enjoyed the delicious grass of the widow's
meadow so much, that it no sooner found itself going
in that direction than it quickened its pace to the full
extent of itsmaster’s wish.

“‘O do come to the gate!” said one of the twins, to
Mr. and Mrs. Morant, onthe first and distant view of the
brickmaker approaching the cottage. They had re-
solved and prepared to proceed farther than the gate.
Anxious to have a perfect view of the eccentric man on
his brisk rosinante, they went across the green, and
stationed themselves so as to obtain a full sightof him
124 THE WIDOWS

as he rode up to the house. ‘* Do you think, Sir,”
the publican said to Mr. Morant, as he stood smiling
at the scene, ‘‘ that Mr. Strange intends staying at the
cottage ? because, if so, I will run and take the ass
into my stable.*” The publican was assured that he
was come to stay the day at least, and might therefore
want his beast thus taken care of. But before the man
could reach the cottage gate, and almost before the
brickmaker could leave the back of his ass, the hungry
longing creature gallopped round the house, thrust
himself through a broken part of the hedge, and be-
gan cropping with delight the long and luscious grass
as though it were convinced that the favourite food
had but a very short time to live.

We must do the brickmaker justice. He knew how
to behave in good as well asin bad company. Recol-
lecting there were visitors at the cottage, he had
brought in his saddle bag the means of appearing to
some advantage in point of dress ; and, having 2 good
person and a better face, he took his place atthe di-
ning table as really a genteel looking man, Moreover,
he spoke and acted through the meal in a manner s0
FAMILY. 125

politely good humoured, that the Morants began to be
reconciled to the match which they thought it was
the chief design ofhis visits to promote. In fact, they
sought to please and encourage him, and with this view
they first began praising the remarkable tenderness of
his chickens.

‘* Why to be sure,” he said, ‘** they are young, and
easy to be eaten; but this is the case with all my poul-
try—that is, all that I send abroad tomy friends. My
housekeeper takes special care of them, and she was
very anxious that these should be better than usual,
because she might not have many opportunities of
making Mrs. Bland a present.”’

This was the finishing stroke of the evidence
that the widow was about to change her name. Ars.
Bland, in the judgment of the Morants, would most
certainly and very soon be Mrs. Something else. So
conclusive was this proof of the assumed fact, that
Mrs. Morant, pleased with the excellent temper and
character of the man, began gently congratulating the
widow on the prospect of altering her condition!

**I know, madam,” she said, ‘‘of no alteration
126 THE WIDOW’'s

likely to take place at present, beyond the change of my
meadow into a brick field.”

‘“‘ Well, Mrs. Bland,” said Mr. Morant, *‘ we will be
content with this at present, as you say; but in
jfuture perhaps some greater alteration will take
place ?’’

Had the widow been spoken to on these points with
gaiety and mirth—had the Morants cheerfully rallied
her on what they thought she had in view—though
they might have used the sclfsame expressions, she
would doubtless have attached to them a different
meaning. But they had not yet learned to smile in
any part of their speech or behaviour—there was stil!
amelancholy in every word and lonk, so that the
widow, utterly unsuspicious of their design, rather
encouraged than checked their proceeding.

‘¢ What the future may produce,” she said, ‘‘ we
know not. For ought I know, the gentleman who
takes my meadow may afterwards want my cottage,
and even my children: but he must take care not be
too extravagant in his desires.”” This was said with a
quiet mirth peculiar to the widow. She was the more
FAMILY. 127

cheerful that, if possible, she might rouse her melan-
choly friends into something like cheerfulness ; and
convince them that if one who had losta Ausband
could in society cast off grief, they who had lost only
a son might surely do the same. They, on the other
hand, attributed her gaiety of manner altogether to the
presence of Mr. Strange, and especiallly the ‘riendly
welcome he had received from all her friends.

** You begin to be somewhat tired of having only a
housekeeper to take care of your poultry, Sir,” said
Mr. Morant, *‘ dont you ?”’

““ Why, Sir,” answered Mr. Strange, ‘“‘I might be
so if she was not a very good one—the best perhaps
in this country. But then, supposing the thing to be
otherwise, and that she was a bad housekeeper, there
would be some mighty powerful reasons for keeping
her. She has been with me twenty years—she is my
first cousin—I promised her father when I took her I
would use her well and never part with her me

** And then, Sir,’”’ said one the twins, *‘ you have four
nice children, and it would be a pity for them to lose
their mother!"’ ‘ How should we feel,”’ said the other


12s THE WIDOW'S

twin, ‘if we were toloseourmamma! We shall miss
the meadow a good deal; but if you were to take
mamma from us we should miss her much more!’’

The reader must be left to imagine the surprise of
the Morants at this discovery. Not an intimation had
before been given, by my husband or myself, by the
widow or Anna, or by either of the twins, that Mr.
Strange was ahusband and a father. On thecontrary,
every thing that had been said and done seemed to
favour the conclusion that he was an eccentric old
bachelor, who late in life had resolved, for the sake of
a handsome interesting widow, to change his condition,
to spend his few remaining years in domestic quietude,
and then leave his wealth to enrich her and her
deserving children. Into such mistakes are the most
discerning and prudent liable to fall! Such is often
the effect of our judging by appearance, and not early
inquiring into reality and fact.

We must now attend the younger members of the
party in one of their charitable excursions. It has
been intimated that Anna had found out a new pen-
sioner in the neighbourhood. The charity of the
FAMILY. 129

family had before been confined to dame Judson; but
now the widow had become better able to administer
to the wants of the poor, Anna sought around for some
other necessitous and deserving object, and soon found
one who had been too long overlooked. It was the
deserted wife of a worthless cobler, who had lost his
trade through dissolute and drucken habits, and then
left his home and wife altogether, and it was thought
became a soldier, Could an apology exist for his
brutal conduct, it would be the circumstance of her
being nearly twice his age.

Before the company separated from the dinner table,
Anna mentioned the case of the injured weman, and
implored a little contribution of money to take with
the fragments of food to becollected for her. “ She
is behind in her rent,’’ Anna said, ‘‘and is anxions to
pay at least part of the arrear, lest she should he
driven from the only home she thinks she shall ever
have on the earth.”

“Well, and suppose she is, Miss !"" said Mr. Strange ;
‘her landlord is better able to lose it all than she is to
yay any part of it. Here, my good young tady, tabe

K
130 THER WIDOWS

these half crowns to buy her some clothes; and tell
her not to distress herself about the rent.”

Anna now discovered, for the first time, that Mr.
Strauge was her landlord, and set off with a cheerful
heart to communicate his kindness to her. As. she
left the house, both the Morants and ourselves made
an addition to the money for clothes; and after she
was gone Mr. Strange called out— Tell Goody Grace
that, if she has nothing better in prospect, she may
become chief woman in the new brick field at two
shillings a day—half a crown, if I can afford it—and
the house to live tn for nothing !”’

*“* Thank you, Sir—thank you, Sir,’’—said the twins,
** this is such good news that we must go and see the
tears of joy trickle down the woman's cheeks while
sister tells her what you say !""—So away they ranafter
Anna, crossing another meadow beyond their own,
and overtaking her just before she reached the neat
little brick house of Goody Grace. ‘If Dame Jud-
son’s hut had belonged to Mr. Strange,” said one of
them, “Sit would have been as good a habitation as
this.”” ‘** And if this house,” said the other, ‘* had
FAMILY. 131

belonged to Dame Judson’s landlord, it would by this
time have been as shabby as her’s.”’

‘“©O misa!’’ said Goody Grace, on seeing Anna, and
before the twins were observed, ‘* I am glad to see you,
because you promised when you came last that you
would take what money [ could raise to my landlord.
I have raised a little, and should be glad for him to
have it soon, because they say he its coming to make
bricks of your mamma’s meadow.”

‘¢ Can you make bricks, Goody ?"’ said one of the
twins. ‘* If you cannot,”’ said the other, ‘‘ you can
soon learn, you know.”’

‘* To be sure I could, my sweet dears,’’ answered the
woman; ‘** but then what use would that be 2”

‘* OF very great use, I assure you,’’ said Anna; * for
Mr. Strange says he shall want a chief woman for the
new field, and you may have the place, and at least
two shillings a day wages.”’

The woman wept with joy, for since her husband
left her, and indeed long before, she had not one
shilling a day on which she could depend. A little
washing, and a small contribution from two daughters
132 THR WEDOW 3

at service, was all she now had to aupport her. When
she had wiped her tears, she said—‘‘ Then, dear miss,
I will let Mr. Strange have all the mouey I have col-
lected for my rent: I thought of sending him half,
and keeping the other to buy me a little clothing ; but
he shall have all now.’’

‘* No, he shan’t have all, though,”’ said one of the
twins. ‘* He shan’t have any,” said the other. ‘* Put
up your money, Mrs. Grace, for Mr. Strange won't
receive a shilling of rent fram you,’’ said Anna.
“* You will need some good strong shoes and other
articles of clothing against the time you begin your
new work, and here is a little in addition to your own
savings to buy them,”

The poor woman was now overwhelmed. ‘I in-
tended,” Anna said, “ to let a basket of faod come up
to your cottage; but as I was coming away mamma
told me to send you down to fetch it ; and then, as you
like to work for what you have, you may assist in what
we call repairing the ruins of a feast.”

Goody Grace had generally gone to the cottage to
wash; but never before to do any otber work. ‘Lo
FAMILY. {33

ave seen her joy, the twius observed, when she was
told that there was something else for her to do,
would have done our hearts good. Then, how much
more easy in her mind, as they added, she was now
than she had ever been before! A certain livelihood
—a blessing she had never yet enjoyed—was now
within her reach. She would now become independent
ef her hard-working and honest daughters. These,
and twenty other pleasing things, she mentioned with
gratitude as she walked over the meadows between the
twins, while each of them carried a little basket, that
she might, as they said, gather up and carry home
some of the fragments. ‘‘ We saw two little baskets,”
one of them observed, ‘‘in your house ; so we brought
one for you and the other for Dame Judson, that you
two may divide what Anna has to spare.”

She had hastened home before these three had gone
over the first meadow—so intent were they in conver~
sation, aud so fond had the twins suddenly become of
Goody Grace. ‘‘ She shall be our pensioner as well as
dame Judson,” they said to Anna, when they took her
into the kjtchen. ‘‘She shall be no one’s pensioner,
134 THE Wi1DOW’'S

young ladies,” cried out Mr. Strange, who overheard
them. ‘‘The woman is willing to work for whatever
she has, and it will be time enough to pension her off
when she can work no longer.’

The voice of her landlord at the first sound made
the poor woman tremble, so that she could scarcely get
on with the work that Anna had appointed her; but
the twins, in the kindest manner, encouraged and
assisted her. ‘*‘ Why don’t you,”’ said one of them,
‘“‘throw some of these nice fragments into your own
basket?”’ ‘If you do not,” said the other, ‘‘ we will
change the baskets, and that we set for dame Judson
shall be yours.’ ‘‘ Let me do as I please,” she an-
swered: ‘*‘ dame Judson will enjoy those nice morsels
while I can eat bits and pick bones that she cannot.
She is fifteen years older than I am.’”’ The gratitude
of the woman, expressed in this and various other
ways, soon endeared her to the whole family; and it
was settled that, until Mi. Strange wanted her, she
should do the labour of the cottage, brought on by the
widow’s increasing visitors.

Soon after tea,and justas we were inquiring whenand
FAMILY. 135

by whom dame Judson was this evening to be visited,
a neat set of harness was brought to the gate by a
saddler of the neighbouring village for Mr. Strange’s
donkey. While he was taking it into the meadow to
put it on the ass, the landlord brought a remarkably
pretty chaise across the green, which had been left at
his house for Mr. Strange by a servant of the coach-
makerat a town farther off. As he led his donkey into
the yard, for the twins and Anna to admire its new and
neat dress, he said, ‘‘ Now if the chaise that I ordered
was but finished, you could soon ride to dame Judson’s,
basket and all!’”?. He continued talking to them
through the window; meanwhile the donkey slipped
from his hand, and came round to the front of the
cottage, as though it wished to be fastened to the
chaise at once. This was done in a moment, and
when the owner, who soon missed the ass and ran in
search of it, came to the proper spot, the twins were
sitting in the chaise, and the landlord with difficulty
preventing the ass from starting home with its new
dress, and train, and burden.

On the creature hearing its master’s voice, it became
136 THE WIDOW'S

perfectly still, ‘*‘ My sweet girls,’ he said, “you
should not so quickly take possession of the chaise till
you know whose itis. If it were mine, you should be
welcome as though it was your own; but it belangs to
neither of us, and it will be proper to read the owner §
name before you think of riding off in it.”

They jumped down, one on either side, as if by
magic; while Anna, who had come round to the sight,
tead on the foot board the name of her mamma—/4ra-~
bella Bland. ‘‘ The harness, too, has a B on every
part of this side,” said one of the twins. ‘* And on
every part of this side, too,” said the other. ‘Faking
each other by the hand, they ran in-doors to inform
their mamma, and to ask her permission to ride to
dame Judson s in her new chaise ?

“‘Ifit indeed be mine,”’ said their mamma, ‘‘ you
ere of course perfectly welcome; but the prettiest
chaise will not draw itself along: you must therefore
ask permission of the owner of the donkey to allow it
to draw you.

In a moment the twins were one on each side of Mr.
Strange, requesting permission for his donkey to draw
FAMILY. 137

them in dear mamma’s chaise to dame Judson’s ?
‘* But suppose,”’ he said, ‘‘ the donkey should not be
mine! then you must ask some one else ; and it happens
that, while you have been in doors, I have given it to
your sister. Don’t be angry with me, because, you
know, you are to have a little colt a piece as soon as
they are old enough.”’ As he said this, he lifted
them into the chaise; while Anna fetched the basket
and placed between them, and Mr. Strange ordered
the sadler to lead the ass as carefully as possible to
dame Judson’s, and wait there til) he arrived.

We set out with him, and left the Morant’s at home
with Anna and her mamma. A mecting had been
appointed that evening between Mr. Morant and the
old clergyman ; and Mrs. Bland stayed at home to take
the opportunity of expressing her gratitude for the
handsome sum by which he had made restztutzon to
her a few days before. He had now recovered the
sudden and serious attack which had induced him to
perform that extraordinary act of generosity; and,
Mr. Morant having being informed of it, became recon-
ciled to whatever demand the parson might urge for
138 THE WIDOW'S

the grave, and tombstone, and monument, of his
lamented Frederick.

The indulgent priest passed us in his carriage, and
put his rosy head out of the window to tell Mr. Strange
that he should expect much more tithe from him for
the widow’s meadow, when he had begun making
bricks of the earth. The brickmaker shook his head,
as though he would say—‘‘You may find me of a
different opinion.’”? Then turning to my husband, he
observed, that he could always manage the old gentle-
man. ‘* The moment his reverence is ill,’’ he added,
** Teither go to him myself, or employ that schoolmas-
ter’s nephew of mine, his clerk, to persuade him to
restore a little of the money that the sad laws in favour
of the church allow him to take from the people.”’

‘* Then the widow,’’ I said, ‘‘ is indebted to you for
the amazing sum that he has sent to her! indeed for
his sending to her at all.”’

** Well, well,’’ he answered, ‘‘let that pass; the
widow has no more than she deserves, I only fear
he will presently have a quarter of it back from her
FAMILY. 1329

friends, on account of what he calls his dues, for the
grave and monument of a stranger !”’

We were exceedingly anxious to know how far this
conjecture was just: yet we were disinclined to break
in upon the party, or to be seen returning to the
cottage till the priest was seen returning to the par-
sonage. We, therefore, staid at dame Judson’s as
long as was proper, and then conducted the twins, in
their new and pretty vehicle, along a grassy course
within sight of the high road. We had nearly reached
the green on which the cottage stood, when the car-
riage of the priest passed along. He knew my hus-
band again, and beckoned him across to the road.

** I could almost have thought you were brothe:s—
that other gentleman at the cottage and you, Sir,’ he
said ; ‘‘ you are so much alike—in disposition, 1 mean.
Why, he paid me all I charged him as freely as you
paid the charges upon the widow the other day. 1
have taken a cheerful glass of wine with him. We
drank your health, Sir; and nothing would give me
greaier satisfaction than to crack a bottle with you
and with him again at any time.”’
140 THE WIDOW’S

‘¢ And nothing, I think,” answered my husband,
‘*can be more easy. We will accept your invitation
for either day this week you may condescend to give
it. I will be free to anticipate it. Shall you be at
leisure to-morrow or next day? the day after I fear
we, at least, shall be obliged to leave this neighbour-
hood.”’

‘ Why, Sir,” the parson replied with hesitation;
and witha slight abatement of the strong colour of
his cheeks, ‘¢ I shall most unfortunately be frora home
to-morrow, and on the next day the parsonage will be
in an uproar by some workmen. But, Sir, I could
ride over to the cottage on either day f°

‘*'To be sure,”” said my husband, with a smile, in
which I was constrained to join, ‘* that would do;
but then it happens that while the parsonage is yours,
the cottage is not ours : we cannot therefore invite you.
Besides, the wine of the rectory cellar is famed all
through the district for age and abundance, and the
rumour is that it really wants drinking.”’

t¢ Yes, yes,”’ the mortified, still merry parson cried
out, as he motioned his coachman to drive oa, ‘“‘all
FAMILY. 141

this may be reported and may be true; but then you
know we cannot drink it when I am from home, nor
when the house is repairing. However, we shall meet
again, and with the bottle between us! Good even-
ing madam—your servant, Sir.”’

His prediction—we shall meet again—can never be
fulfilled on earth—will find no accomplishment till the
great day of judgment. The rector died of apoplexy
in about thirty bours after we parted with him. He
had easily obtained his exorbitant dues of Mr. Morant:
this had some what relieved him of the regret he began
to feel at having beenso generous to the widow: and
jn this cheerful state of mind he indulged much more
freely than usual before he went tu bed. The next
morning he rose with difficulty. In fact he would
have returned to bed had he not been invited toa
magistrates’ dinner, or he would have remained at
home, had he not feared a visit from my husband and
Mr. Morant, In opposition to the advice of his doctor,
and the entreaties of his clerk, he accepted the magis-
trates invitation. With them he was indiiced to gorge
agaiu, and he was carried home early in the evening
142 THE WIDOW &

with serious apprehensions for his life. His clerk sat
up with him, and soon after midnight thought he was
comfortably dozing. He might be so fora time; but
he never awoke again—not even to hint at making
restitution to Mr. Morant or any one else.

But I must return to give some account of the man-
ner in which the day before the rectors death was
spent at the cottage. It was the day appointed by Mr.
Strange to bring the draught of the lease, and, when
my husband approved of it, to take it or send it to the
attorney to be completed. The worthy man arrived
about noon, and his first newswas the illness of the rector.
‘* My nephew tells me,”’ he remarked, “‘ that his master
is worse than ever he has seen him; and, if he could
have persuade! hiin to stay at home and keep in bed
to day, I should not have ventured away from home,
but I should have: gone to see him instead of you.
However, his reverence has thought himself well enough
to dine with the magistrates at the Mitre, and therefore
I have thought rayself at liberty to come over and dine
with you.”

‘*We should like,’”’ I said, ‘“‘to know something
FAMILY. 143

more of that well behaved nephew of yours, Mr.
Strange. Heismuch superior, we find,to theordinary
race of parish clerks, especially village ones.”

My husband, who had been remarkably pleased
with his politeness and good sense in the affair of the
widow’s dues, joined in my wish for afurther acquaint-
ance with him.

‘‘If,’’? said Mr. Morant, ‘‘it be the same young man
who officiated as clerk at the funeral of our dear
Frederick, I confess I should be exceedingly glad of
the opportunity of rendering him some service.”’

The twins had just before come in, and both listened
to this conversation with great earnestness. They had
taken their station one on each side of me, and now
whispered that he was appointed clerk when Goody
Grace’s husband became so bad that the parson and
the people would not put up with him any longer.
They also told me the general opinion was that Mr,
Reuben Strange was more fit for a parson than aclerk,
and would read prayers and preach much better than
his master.

I asked them what he was before he became clerk of
144 THE WIDOW’'s

the parish, and they told me that he was brought up
by his uncle, and employed by him to mind his men in
the brick field ; and that it was his good conduct in
that employ that made the clergyman wish to have
him to manage kis concerns, and say 4men after him
in thechurch. While they were communicating these
facts to me, and their mamma was doing the same to
Mrs. Morant, I saw Mr. Morant intent upon some
project of great importance. At last, having heard
every particular about Reuben, he said to Mre, Morant
—‘* My dear, what think you of assisting this young
man to pass through the university, and then present-
ing him with the small living that we had in reserve
for our lamented boy ?”

Mrs. Morant stifled her rising tears, and told her
husband that nothing would give her greater satisfac-
tion. There was but one vear difference in the ages of
the young men, .and in other respects they remarkably
resembled each other. Perceiving the delight which
this new project gave to all parties, my husband was
about to offer his contribution to the university ex-
‘pence, when Mr. Strange, whose manly countenance
FAMILY. 145

evinced the gratituae ne felt towards his friends, said
—‘* As to the expence of the unjversity, I beg not a
word may be said about that. I know my nephew is
down pretty largely in his master’s will: and if we can
persuade his reverence—which I am afraid we shall
not—to let him go to college, why I will bear all that
burden. About the living, I hardly know what to
say. Let him go to college first and be tried, and
then, if our good friends be in the same mind, I
sha’nt baulk their kind intentions.”’

The widow was now anxious to be heard on another
subject, and we all requested she would proceed freely
to state her wishes. ‘‘ In two more days,” she said,
‘* I fear we shall lose our new and valuable friends
for the present, and I wish, now we are all together,
to express my earnest hope that it may be only for
the present. On the first day of our being together,
Mr. and Mrs. Morant gave some slight intimation of
their wish to build a residence near this spot. If this
wish be still in existence, and especially if it were capa-
ble of being cherished by some other friends, we might
1146 THE WIDOW’'S

collect a little society—form a little village—and make
good use of the best of Mr. Strange’s bricks.’’

As the widow spoke she looked earnestly on me.
The twins, too, who had not left my side, cast each a
longing glance, as though they were anxious I should
give a favourable answer to their mamma’s proposal.
I knew whav they meant, and said—‘* Well, my dear
children, for your sake I will consent that the rude
village map my husband has drawn for you shall be
fetched down stairs, and that what was a freak of his
fancy may, if practicable, be turned into something like
reality.’”” The Morants were in the secret, and pre-
pared to consent to any practicable plan that might be
framed to give satisfaction to all parties. The moment
I had consented to the rude sketch of a new village.
being shewn, the twins ran up stairs to fetch it; and
to their surprise as well as my own, when it was un-
rolled on the table it was considerably improved and
beautifully coloured. I knew who had done this from
the manner of its being done; but the artist had for
once since our marriage kept the secret from me.
FAMILY. 147

** Well,” said Mr. Strange, after a few moments’ in-
tense examination of the plan, ‘“‘ I am outwitted at last.
I thought to have taken the lead in this new scheme
—for it entered my brain perhaps before your’s—but I
have delayed mentioning it too long, and now the pre-
mium is your’s,”

*“‘It is ours, Sir,” said the twins, “‘ if you please,
for we first mentioned it to our dear friends, and they
promised for our sake to think of it. There are at first
to be three houses and a school; and then there are
to be four or five cottages, each with a little garden
before it.”

The ground now became the subject of inquiry, and
some disappointment was felt on discovering that the
most favourable spots for new cottages were in the
hands of the rector, and could not be obtained during
his life. Part of the remainder belonged to the keeper
of the public house, a man of some worth as well as
property. ‘I shall have no difficulty with him,” said
Mr. Strange: ‘ he is likely to benefit so much by the
new brickfield, and he has already benefitted by the
visitors to this cottage, that he will consent to any
118 THE WIDOW'S

reasonable terms. I have seen him this morning, and
though we said but little, he gave me to understand
that a new village, especially such a village as you
would form, must be very acceptable to hin®”

‘* My sisters,’”” said Anna, whose engagement in
preparing for dinner had allowed us little of her com-~
pany, ‘* are teasing me about what the name of the
village shall be 2’? One suggested the name of the
widow. ‘I should consent to this,’ said Mr. Strange,
‘if I could be certain it would never be altered.”
Another asked if dear Frederick’s name could not be
given to it. “ Not if we are to live in it,’’ answered
Mrs. Morant with atear. I asked the name of-the spot
already, and was told that ithad never been known
but as the Green.”

‘““Then,” said the widow, ‘‘ let us braid the green
with a few pretty lively houses, and let these two
words—Braid-green form the name of the village.”
All approved of the idea, and the name was thus given
before the village could be said to exist.

As we sat down to dinner, the widow was astonished
to find two fine ducks under the cover placed before
PAMILY. 149

her. She looked at Mr. Strange, who said—“ I plead
not guilty, madam, tothis offence; but I think I know
who has committed it. While I was talking to the
landlord this morning about the ground, his wife came
up and asked if she should do wrong in sending over
a couple of ducks to the cottage? No, there will be
nothing wrong in it, her husband said; only as there
is very little room and a good deal of company, you
had better send them smoking to the table at three
o'clock to a minute, when I send the beer. This
madam, is all I know about it.”’

“If this were a capital crime, Mr. Strange,” said
Mr. Morant, ‘* you would still stand in an awkward
position, since you knew it was about to be committed
and did not tmterpose to prevent it. Your lawyer
would say this was being accessary before the fact.”

Nothing material occurred till just after tea had
been taken on the lawn. ‘Then a horseman was seen
riding towards the green very fast, and in a few mo-
ments he was heard to stop at the front of the cottage,
and call aloud for Mr. Strange. He brought a short
note from bis nephew informing him that the rector
150 THE WIDOW’S

was in great danger, and requesting him to come
home without delay.

As Mr. Strange had walked over to the green, Mr.
Morant offered him the use of his chaise to return
home, which he accepted on the simple condition of
his undertaking to drive him. ‘* Then,”’ hesaid, ‘‘you
may see my nephew, and say what you please to him.”’
Having seen the nephew, Mr. Morant was requested
by the young man, to enter the chamber of the priest—
as his reverence had already spoken of him, and might
do so again. Mr. Morant silently entered the cham-
ber, while the priest was muttering some unintelligible
sounds: but in a few moments he heard something
that he thought he understood. ‘* What do you wish
me to do, your reverence?” said Reuben. ‘* Don’t
call me—reverence—zowm,’’ the dying man answered ;
but give back the strange gentleman double money—
mind, do that.’’

These were the last words he uttered; and it was
mus far gratifying, that restitution and not rapacity
was the disposition with which he left this world. He
had no relation near him; and only one, his nephew
FAMILY. 151

and heir, in being, and his death was too sudden for him
to arrive in time to speak with him. Mr. Strangeand
his nephew were his executors, and it his will a thou-
sand pounds’ were bequeathed to Reuben, sufficient
to conduct him with comfort and success through the
university! but to this Mr. Morant insisted upon add-
ing the double money, after the nephew had insisted
upon its being paid out of the estate.

I now draw near the close of my narrative. Several
new characters have so unexpectedly started up, that
I have not paid so much attention to the sweet little
heroines of the tale as I purposed ; but the reader will
be glad to hear that they are still in the enjoyment of
even more than their accustomed reputation, spirits
and health. The Morants and ourselves were happy
to embrace the opportunity of having cottages on a
spot of so much rural beauty, and where we can be
neighbours as well as friends of a family so truly in-
nocert and estimable. Mr. Strange would not allow
of our waiting for bricks from the new field; but he
has supplied the builders with some well seasoned ones
of the longest manufacture. Tne houses are nearly
152 THB WIDOW'S FAMILY.

finished and are undergoing the seasoning of the win-
ter. In the spring our families intend entering
them.

Reuben has been four months at Cambridge, under
the best and kindest tutors. Mr. Strange declares that
he shall have Anna for a wife; and her mother consents
to the arrangement, if Anna will have him. Thesun-
day school is to be opened on Easter Monday, and the
new clergyman, with exemplary liberality, requests
that, as the church is so distant, the children may be
allowed to attend public worship at Bruidgreen
chapel. Possibly the reader may wish to hear a little
more of this new colony; and ifso, his wish may be
gratified.
153

THE YOUNG SCOTCHMAN.

Ir was on one of those bright, still spring days,
when heaven and earth are conjoined in peace that
seems too beautiful ever to be broken, and when the
hearts of the children of toil and poverty are not only
reconciled to their lot, but feel it, in perfect content-
ment, to be the happiest that H[leaven could have
bestowed,—that Allan Lorimer, a mere boy doing
man’s work, was levelling, with spade and pickaxe, a
rocky mound that, to an agriculturalist’s eye, some-
what disfigured the small field in which it rose, as it
prevented the plough from turning over a. fair furrow
from hawthorn hedge to church-yard wall, itsencircling
boundaries. The mid-day hour of rest bad come
upon him, heedless of its approach, till, resting on his
mattock, he saw standing beside him, with her milk-
can and basket of oatmeal cakes, his little sister Alice,
whose figure at the same stated hour let fall its shadow
on the knoll where he had for weeks been working, as
154 THE YOUNG

duly as the hand on the dial-stone in their own garden.
The loving creature sat down before his feet, under the
shadow of the only birk that yet was spared; and
after grace was said, and all the while unconsciously
playing with the uprooted wild-ftlowers, she sang,
without bidding, first one and then another of her
brother's favourite ballads. Just as she began to sing,
so did a lark that had been walking without fear close
beside them on the old lea, and at the close of her
tunes, Alice knew that she must have been singing for
no short time, as the lark had finished his journey to
and fro the heavens, and dropt in silence just as she
herself was silent. Her brother did not thank her, as
usual, for her sweet songs, nor ask any of his usual
questions about the domestic proceedings; but his
eyes remained fixed on the church, that stood with its
sj'ire a little loftier than the few pine-trees, and when
she playfully leant upon his shoulder, and warbled
snatches of a merry kind, he still sat buried in his
¢wn thoughts, and to all her sportive interrogatories
returned no answer. At last, rising up, and lifting his
&inds and eyes to heaven, he exclaimed, ‘‘ Gracious
SCOTCH MAN. 155

Father! if it be thy will, accept me as a Servant of
thy Holy Word.”’

It was in no transient fit of enthusiasm that the
prayer was uttered ; for the hopes it breathed had been
long gathering at his heart, and for a year past had
given a shade of solemnity to his naturally cheerful
character. Much by himself at work in his father’s
fields, he had meditated on holy things with a pro-
founder feeling since his only brother died ; and often,
as he looked towards the nook in the church-yard, where
that dear companion lay, it seemed to him that he too
might become a student, and, following in the footsteps
that had too early been led into the grave, be called to
the ministry, and to his friends of the hamlet preach
the promises of the Saviour, even in the church of his
own native parish. And now, during this one serene
hour, these wishes and hopes had gained a wonderful
strength within him, till they amounted to a sacred
trust. Perhaps his innocent sister’s hymns—little as he
had seemed to heed them—had touched some secret
springs in his heart—the voice of the lark in heaven—
the cooing of the doves in the helfry—the shadowo
156 THE YOUNG

the grove over the house of God—the many quiet heaps
above the buried—and especially the stone at his
brother's head, on which the verse of inscription had
been chisled by his own hand, ard was as distinct in
his memory as when he read it in the Bible. The
change that had long been imperceptibly going on, was
now complete: and from that hour he considered him-
self dedicated to the service of his Maker.

When he communicated his resolution to his parents,
it may be said that their hearts sang together for joy.
Their Wiititam had been taken away a few weeks after
his admission into holy orders; nor had that fatal de-
cline suffered him to open his I‘psin public prayer ; and
now that time had let other feelings mix with sorrow
they had a pride in looking, every sabbath-day, on the
words that followed his name on the tombstone—
‘* Preacher of the Gospel.” It seemed now that
Heaven had inspired the soul of the remaining son.
No doubts, no misgivings, were theirs: although no
treasures had they in store, for the savings of many
years had gone to the education of him who had been
taken away; yet there had been and ever would be, a
SCOTCHMAN. 157

blessing on the few fields of Holm-Brae, that lay so
sweetly sheltered to the sunny south; and the father,
while he lifted up his hands to heaven, felt as if strength
were added to till the earth, and that his youth was
restored.

Allan continued to work in the fields as before,
alone or with his father,—only shorter hours. By sun-
rise he was at his books, and at evening the village
schoolmaster, no mean scholar, read along with him,
taking up the subjects where his deceased brother had
left them, and using the volumes he had bequeathed.
How slow the progress of the idle or indifferent! But
Allan, though with far other feelings, studied as in-
tensely even as the convict, who knowing the day he
is to die, for the first time begins to learn the very
alphabet, that he may be able to read the Bible before
taken from his cell. Nature had given him strong and
fine talents, that had indeed been hereditary in his hum-
ble race. And then, when he sat in the room that had
been his brother's, all his faculties were expanded— ail
his feelings became more elevated and pure. He otten
heard his voice—he sometimes saw his face; pale but
152 THE YOUNG

with a smile—and when at night he returned thanks to
God for the progress ofthe day, he could have thought
in the dusk that he was kneeling at his brother's side
as he used to do whena little boy. ‘Thus before
the corn was stacked, and the ingle shone at merry
harvest home, Allan Lorimer was fit to go to college,
without shaming his preceptors, either the dead or the
living,—and to college he went, with a blessing from
those whose grey hairs he was to bring the halo that is
indeed divine—the light of honour which a dutiful son
sheds round the temples of those who gave him
being.

The son of poor parents, from a remote part of the
country, and altogether unknown, without introduction
to one living soul, with manners and appearance
which, although not wanting in natural graces, were
yet plain even to rusticity, and a disposition somewhat
retiring, not in pride but independence,—for a little
while Allan Lorimer attracted not the attention either
of his teachers or his fellow-students. But as the
session advanced, his name began to emerge from the
crowd; and before the Christmas holidays he was
SCOTCHMAN. 159

distinguished not only as an assiduous but successful
scholar. Some few lingering remembrances of his
brother’s accademical fame still survived, and now and
then elder students, for his sake, made voluntary ten-
ders of their friendship. ‘I'he Spring found him no
longer a solitary being, studying in the uncompanioned
passion of knowledge within his dim cell, but elate in
hope and ambition that daily brought their own
reward. New worlds opened before his imagination
and his intellect. Things formerly dark and obscure
grew clear and bright; feeling kept pace with thought;
and as he became acquainted with the spirits of the
dead, his heart glowed with finer, deeper sympathies
with the living. He felt now that he had gaineda
firm footing, and that his course was rapidly progres-
sive. He walked the college courts nowerect ; nota
a shade of fear or despondency clouded his intellectual
countenance; and he looked with a bold eye on the
great city’s throng, confident that he would one day
achieve the honourable, the holy object of his soul's
desire. The Winter, with all its long, dear devoted
nights, many of them utterly sleepless, so haunted had
160 THE YOUNG

they been with the voices of bard, orator, and philoso-
pher of old, nor less with ‘‘ those strains that once did
sweet in Sion glide’’-—the Winter was over and gone,
and with all his human affections strong as deatn, Allan
Lorimer returned to the humble house of his parents.

It was on the cotter’s Saturday night that he return-
ed; and he had lingered for a while in the little dell
with its broomy braes so close to the house that the
waterfall was heard within, in order to relieve his heart
of its exceeding joy, and also that he might cross the
threshold at the well-known hour of prayer. His
father had just opened the Bible; there -hhis mother sat
sedate: and Alice's sweet face was in the shade of her
devout simplicity. Before he could speak, the eyes of
the family were turned toward him; and it was more
than an hour before they attempted to sing the psalm.
The voices of the parents first faltered, then were mute;
but no nightingale on earth, no lark in heaven, ever
poured out such melody, as that child rejoicing by her
brother's side in her evening hymns.

And did Allan Lorimer continue to love his father’s
house, those that dwelt therein, and all their lowly
SCOTCHMAN. 161

ways, and all their meek virtues? Had he commu-
nion with the thoughts dearest to them, and that filled
up the measure of their contented existence? Could he
turn from those glorious books that unfolded to him
a new being, with all their assemblages consecrate@ in
the light of antiquity, to the humble creatures sitting
silent, or with a few words, by the ingleside. wearied
with toil and, ready at night-fall for their dreamless
sleep? Yes. the roof of heaven, with all its stars, was
not to him more beautiful than the roof of the hut in
which he was born. Not ail the fields of Elysium
contained a spot so blessed as the fields where, for his
dying brother, he had so often wept; where, with his
father he had walked in the calm of so many sabbath
evenings, and worked through so many week-days,
heediess alike of sun or storm. And what was the
little he knew, or might ever know, when set beside
that knowledge in which his father, and his mother,
and his sister walked before God ! Therefore did Allan
Lorimer again put on the uress of a tiller of the
ground : his right hand had not forgot its cunning : and
when the meadows by the burn side were heavy with
Mu
162 THE YOUNG

Midsummer, the wide swathe fell beneath hissweeping
scythe; white his father, not yet old, but somewhat
declined, took the lighter task with Alice, who was
growing to womanhood visibly before their eyes. The
neighbours saw the youth working like a hired servant
beneath a kind master’s eye, and not a tongue in the
parish was silent in his praise. Everybody prophesied
good of such ason; and many prayed that the good
old minister might be spared till Allan Lorimer, one
of themselves, and born and bred like themselves,
might be his successor. Thus winter after winter,
summer after summer, went on; and Allan Lorimer
was now a man, withall the intelligence and knowledge
becoming manhood. There was no need now for him
to work on the farm: even his father might do so or
not at will, for every thing in town and country had
prospered, and there was a complete competence at
Holm-Brae. It stood in a very garden, so bright was
the cultivation of its enclosures: the old house, like
its possessors, renewed its youth ; the heritor was now
an elder; in another year his son was to be called to
the ministry ; and the whole parish was proud of him
from hall to hut.
SCOTCHMAN. 163

One evening, Allan Lorimer was walking by himself
near the old Castle, that was still inhabited by the
family to whose ancestors it had for many generations
belonged, when he met several persons hurrying along
in great distraction. From them he learned that the
young heir had climbed up to a dangerous height on
‘he cliffs, and that it was found impossible to afford
him any assistance. On arriving at the foot of the
rocks, Allan saw father, mother, and sister, all gazing
in despair on the youth who paralyzed with fear, was
clinging to one of the ledges, on the very brink of
destruction. In his boyhood, Allan Lorimer had been
of an adventurous and daring character ; and often, in
search of wall-flowers, or the starling’s nest, had he
passed along the face of that precipice by paths where
even the goat would have hesitated to clamber. Ina
few minutes he was by the side of him placed in such
jeopardy; and then seeming to whisper words of en-
couragement, descended the rock, and beseeched all
who were standing there to be calm, for that life would
be saved. With that promptitude and decision before
which the most dreadful danger often seems to change
164 THE YOUNG

into a mere dream, Allan’s scheme for the youth’s
preservation was carried into effect. Ile soon re-as-
cended, and fastening a rope round the body of him who
had lost all power of motion, he lowered him down
from that dizzy platform, and soon heard, nota shout,
but a deep prayer of thanksgiving for deliverance—a
confused prayer cf words, sighs, and even groans, so
agonizing was the blessedness that tore the hearts of
them whohad lost all hope, and row poured their
kisses on one almost miraculously snatched from
death.

Had Ailan Lorimer been rude in manners, in person,
and in mind—the most ignorant and uncultivated
peasant in the parish,—yet had he, after that hour,
been a pleasant sight, in the eyes that then were too
horrified even to weep, and welcome to the Castle all
the days of his life. But Allan, although humbly
born, was indeed one of the special favourite of Nature.
Happy to have been the instrument employed by
Providence to save the life of a fellow-creature, yethe felt
an? knew that there was no merit in what he had done;
ana without the slightest emotion of self-applause, be
SCOTCH MAN, 165

listened to the fervent gratitude ofthe youth’s parents,
and the praises of the crowd. But these parents had
vowed, before they rose from their knees, to honour
and love their son’s deliverer, and to hold him thence-
forth in a friendship that was to endure for ever. To
them, his calm, sedate, and thoughtful eyes had an
expression that seemed no less than angelical : his few
solemn words, turned their souls away from him, not,
in forgetfulness, towards the throne of the Most High
and Merciful ; and, unknown to each other, they at the
same moment thought ‘‘ what a friend may this man
so fearless in his faith, become to our beloved son,
whose life, before our very eyes, he has chosen to save!”

So Allan Lorimer, after a few weeks, became an in-
mate of the Castle. To him was committed the charge
of the high-born heir’s education, and before the first
sabbath he was beloved even as a brother and a son.
Over all that dwelling, and over the habits and man-
ners of its possessors, there reigned that air of elegance,
delicacy, and refinement, which perhaps is found only
in its perfection among those who have been born in
more exalted life. But with that quickness of percep-
166 THE YOUNG

tion and feeling with which, along with all nobler
qualities, he had been gifted by the prodigal hand of
Nature, he soon, almost instinctively, acquired that
which he sought not to imitate; while he lost nothing
of that modest demeanour so becoming below the
cottage roof—nothing of that respectfulness in presence
of high birth, which dignifies the independence of the
humble, and bestows on him whom it characterises,
the charm ofa touching propriety. His new friends,
who knew but little of the ways in which poor men
walk, could not but regard with wonder manners by
such slight shades distinguishable from their own;
while each successive day brought to light more and
more of that worth that makes the man, and that,
thanks be to Heaven, full frequently grows up to
strength and beauty in the hamlets that sprinkle
Scotia’s Jong-withdrawing vales, or cluster round the
spire of the village church.

The young heir of that house was endowed with the
virtues of his ancestors; but his spirit had too long
run riot In the unchecked wildness of youth, and had
been in danger of yielding even to the seductions of
SCOTCHMAN. 167

vice. But now he felt himself constantly in the-pre-
sence of a superior nature. It was impossible very
grievously to disobey the mild command of that voice
and eye; and then the remembrance of the hideous
hour, when he seemed falling down into death, came
across him with fresh impulses of gratitude and affec-
tion, By degrees he flung aside all caprice, all way-
wardness, all selfish will; grew enamoured of the
liberal studies, without which high rank is adishonour,
and learned from the pure and pious life of the pea-
sant’s son, what are the essential and prime qualities
of the gentleman.

Far and wide as the eye could reach from the
battlements of the old Castle, lay the hereditary pos-
sessions of the family; but hitherto the youth had
seen with little or no emotion—perhaps scarcely noticed
them—the smoke- wreaths rising up from the woods or
vales from a hundred cottages. Now, in company
with his friend, he walked over the domain, and, day
after day, visited some tenant’s house. Every thing
he saw was wisely explained to him, without exagger-
168 THE YOUNG

ation or concealment, in the very light of truth. The
joys and the sorrows of poor men, their happiness and
their hardships, were laid before the eyes of him whose
privilege it was to relieve or protect them ; and as his
heart expanded with a wide and thoughtful humanity,
he upbraided himself for his utter ignorance of his
fellow-creatures, and in no single vow, but in the
calmness of habitual resolve, meditated gracious and
beneficient plans for their comfort and welfare, In pro-
portion as he loved he was beloved : the smiling maidens
dropt their curtesies with a sweeter blush as they met
him on the braes; and the old men bowed their grey,
uncovered heads with more affectionate reverence when
the noble boy passed througn among them along the
church-yard into the house of God.

The gratitude of the poor, the feeble, the afflicted,
was given to those from whose hands flowed the
streams of charity and beneficence. Their prayers, their
blessings, were for that ancient house: but the son of
the peasant, their own Allan Lorimer, of whose famed
learning all in the parish were proud—the Christian,
whose holy life, young as he was, they held up as an
SCOTCHMAN. 169

example to their children,—neither was his name for-
gotten in their mid-day meditations in the fields, nor
in their morning and evening prayers by the newly-
awakened orexpiring hearth. ‘“ Ay, the Lorimers of
Holm-Brae always walked before God, ever since the
white head of him, who died in the cause of

nant, lay on the greensward before his own door,
drenched in a martyr’s blood. It seems that in these
our peaceful days, the spirit of that saint has descend-
ed upon him; and the day may not be far distant,
when we shall see him lifting up his hands in prayer
within our own church, and when our hills and vallies,
yea, the very lilies of the field, shall rejoice in the first
Sabbath of his ministry !”’

There was no change inor about Holm-Brae, except
that gentle, and, to themselves, imperceptible change,
which steals over a household released from the prese
sure of poverty, and left at liberty to give outward ex-
pression to all their humbie affections. A neater
bookcase now held the old man’s small library; the
linnets sung in a handsomer cage; curtains of a some-
what costlier material shaded the parlour window ; the
170 THE YOUNG

entrance had its trelliced porch there was now a
regular avenue (formerly a mere cart-road) from the
lane to the house, with a pretty white gate; the garden
was enlarged on its southern exposure, by the breadth
of a flower-border: the bee-hives stood bencath a
little straw-roofed shed ;and another, of larger dimen-
sions, was filled with anemones, auriculas, and ranun-
culuses, old Allan Lorimer being a famous florist,
and now at leisure to attend to ornamental gardening,
for which he had the native Scottish genius. He saw
bis son removed into another condition of life,indeed ;
but he felt that the removal had strengthened all the
ties that continued to bind his heart to his humble
birth-place. Every Saturday night he was with his
parents, talking of former years ; and every Sabbath
he walked home with them from the kirk. Not oneof
his old friends was forgotten; and he sat among
familiar faces in all the cottages around, with perfect
sympathy with the thoughts and feelings of their
simple inmates, and deeply interested as ever in all the
on-goings of lowly life. To his capacious mind the
rural virtues appeared now in more affecting beauty:
SCOTCHMAN. 171

in the light of knowledge, the poor man’s lot, with all
its trials, was seen to be a lot of peace; and as he sat
beneath the shadow of the sycamore, the dreams of
imagination blended with the holiest feelings of the
heart. In that pensive twilight, filial piety was indeed
to him its ownexceeding great reward; for he knew
that the household was beloved of Heaven!

Allan Lorimer was now in holy orders, and about to
be appointed successor to the old minister of his native
parish. when his pupil, who had for some months been
unwell, was pronounced far gone in a consumption.
The anxiety of his parents was suddenly changed into
despair; and, as for his mother, she seemed to be hur-
tying to the grave along with her son. The youth,
whose fine face now wore an unearthly beauty—so
sunk and yet so bright—and whose tall figure, in
health so graceful, was almost ghostlike in decline,
never slept, night or day; but on the vesy confines of
death, seemed inspired with a more restless animation.
The brightest visions arose before his fancy, and he
would speak, with an eloquence overpowering to the
hearts that tenderly loved him, of all his airy schemes
172 THER YOUNG

and plans for that life which others saw to be so near
its close. ‘The very air he breatied male him more
than happy—wildly elate—and carried him, as on the
wings of hope, into the glorious future, without seem-
ing to tread the earth. Oh! sad, sad was the lustre of
those eyes to his father’s soul; for he knew that. ere
long, it would be extinguished in the dust. Ail saw
that he was dying, except the joyous victim himself;
and who could bear to break the gracious delusion of
nature, and speak of the grave, to one whose whole
being overflowed with life? Allan Lorimer availed
himself of their hours of prayer to bring the truth
slowly, calmly, and solemnly before him; and the
same buoyant spirit that had made life so beautiful to
his eyes, enabled him, after the disclosure, to look
forward unappalled to death. The comforts of reli-
gion, administered by one who had to him been
father, brother, and friend, almost entirely subdued
the frail and ineffectual longings for life that beings of
the dust retain as long as their dwelling is on the dust.
While Allan Lorimer was in the room with him, his
countenance always had a smile: an hour's absence
SCOTCHMAN. 173

was like a cloud before the sun; and a promise had
heen made—a holy promise—that at the last he would
be kneeling at the bedside. O, blind as the worm are
we, alike in our hope and our despair!

The father of the dying boy was loth that he should
be buried in a foreign land; yet, sometimes ina dream,
and even when awake, he believed that the air of Italy
night restore him, and that there, beneath that genial
climate, he might be kept alive for years. Allan
JLorimer grasped at the same weak hope; and as the
sufferer was to any event resigned,a blind farewell was
taken—Oh! shall it be an everlasting farewell?—and
they two sailed away together, on a voyage, as it might
almost seem, to another world!

All was still and silent about the Castle. The lady
never lifted up her head, and no longer thought on her
son as among the living. Iler husband, in tending her
sick bed, sometimes forgot him upon the seas. And
are there not strange, dim, and incomprehensible
hopes that sometimes arise suddenly in the inmost
regions of our being, unallied to reason that disowns
tiem all, but that will rot be put down, no, not by al!
174 THR YOUNG

the death-pang agonies the soul can suffer, departing
and again returning, as if they loved the wretched,—
even like beautiful white sea-birds hovering in the
gloom of the tempest, and unwilling to flee utterly
away, even to a place of rest ?

At Holm-Brae all was peace, disturbed but by a
thoughtful sorrow. The lord of the Castle often came
and sat down beside the old people, looking for com-
fort in their faces, and finding it in the habitual calm-
ness that characterises the whole manner of the pions
poor. Frequently something like hope breathed u»
through the hush, and after joining with the humbi«
household in prayer for the dying—perbaps the dead—
he knew not how it was, but in spite of all the predic-
tions of the most skilled, and his own forebodings, he
felt a sort of instinctive assurance that his son would
return. ‘‘ Nota fire is put out at nightin a single
dwelling in all the parish,’”’ would the old man say,
‘* till the inmates have knelt in prayer to God for your
son!’”’ And when he thought of this, and looked
abroad from his high window over the night-scene, he
felt the influence of all those ascending prayers, and
SCOTCHMAN. 175

remembered that mercy, to the eyes of us mortal
creatures, is the holiest attribute of Him who inhabit-
eth Eternity.

The first letter that arrived from abroad, was in the
hand-writing of their son; and for awhile both parents
were without power to openit. It held out no hopes
of his recovery, but breathed throughout a perfect
spirit of resignation and gratitude. Day after day it
was read over and over again, many hundred times,
that some expression, some one single word of com-
fort, besides the calm character of the whole, might be
detected and devoured. Ina few weeks it was fol-
lowed by another equally tranquil; and the father
thought, but durst not utter the thought, from fear
that the very sound of the words would destroy it,
that since death had delayed so long to strike, he might
yet change his purpose, and lay down the fatal dart.
A third letter came from his son, written it seemed
with a firmer finger, and along with it one from Allan
Lorimer, cautiously offering hope along with consola-
tion. The doleful gloominess of the earth and sky
was on a sudden lightened: and when father and
176 THE YOUNG

mother knelt down that night, they felt what thankJess
creatures they had been all their lives before, so
blessed were their spirits in the very sickness of
gratitude to the great God.

Meanwhile the worn and weary voyager had found
rest in a sunny and sheltered Italian vale; and such
was the restorative delight of the cloudless climate,
that, although in all humility he was prepared to die,
the hope rose with the love of life, and tears began again
to flow at the thought of departing into darkness from
so beautiful a world. Few, who bad left their native
land as he left it, had, he well knew, ever returned.
Two or three months sight of that heavenly sky, and
their eyes closed for ever! Allan Lorimer, in all his
hours of langour, lassitude, and sickness, was still beside
hiscouch! He understood every motion of his eyes and
hands, and could interpret even the sighs unconsciously
made in disturbed sleep. The sick chamber was a
place of silence, but the hush was the hush of intense
wakefulness, alive to the slightest stir, and ready in a
moment to give the cup, or smooth the pillow. And
when the voice of that watcher was heard, it was ia
SCOTCHMAN. 177

itself a medicine, so cheering in its present meanings,
so pleasant and so pensive with the music of remem-
-kered years! Far away as they were from the Castle,
the youth, on his awakening from his day’s sleeps, often
for awhile thought himself in his own study at home;
for there was Allan Lorimer with a book in his hand,
and none else beside, and all peace and silence as in
their lofty cell below the battlements, But the twitter
of the martins was not heard, nor the thunder of the
waterfall down among the wooded rocks.

Like flowers growing under the shadow of some old
ruin, but not altogether unvisited by the sunshine, and
therefore beautiful in their melancholy lustre as those
expanded in the full light of day, were the feelings
and fancies that rose within the heart of him who lived,
it might be said, within the gloom of the burizal-place,
yet even in those mournful precincts, felt the warmth
of restoring Hope. His whole character was softened,
subdued, and at the same time (so perfect was a Chris-
tain’s resignation,) sublimed. The querulous and
testiess impatience of disease, constantly soothed by
the sympathy of a brother, subsided finally into utter

N
178 THE YOUNG

calm: patience had succeeded remorse for all the sins
his youth had known, and none are sinless; and so
unappalling now was the thought of death, that there
were seasons when he felt that to die would be great
gain. But wasted as his frame was, and faint, feeble,
and irregular too often the beatings of his heart, Oh!
how that heart yearned within him when the images of
his father and his mother and his sister passed before
him during the night watches!—when he saw the
lighted cottage windows burning like stars up and down
the darkness ; and heard, afar off as it was and beyond
the roar of seas, the frequent psalm rising from glen
and hill-side, the sacred melodies of his native land !
Often has a sailor, in shattered bark and through
raging surf, in safety reached the shore, and often has
a gallant ship, with all her bravery on and scarce a
breath of wind, gone down at sea! Out of almost
hopeless jeopardy, Allan Lorimer saw that his brother
had been brought by God’s own hand: the prayers that
so many hearts had been pouring out were heard ; and
the green earth closed on the yawning grave without
its victim. The feet that seemed to be awaiting the
SCOTCHMAN. 179

swathes of the shroud, once more trod lightly among
the flowers; that faint, sad smile, brightened into a
happy expression, in which itself was lost; and his
voice was like a musical instrument skilfully re-tuned.
A day in one village, a week in another; a month in
some fair town, and a winter in the Eternal City ; and
he who had come to Italy—almost to die—prepared to
leave it with a new life. He felt that for him a miracle
had been wrought; nor did he fear to use that word in
his prayers. Must we wait until we see the dead arise
before we say, ‘‘ A miracle, a miracle!’’ Faith sees
them wrought within the confines of the clay, and
looks from the Bible with a cleared eye over the daily
revelation connecting Time with Eternity.

There was the voice of singing heard throughout the
whole parish, and the waving of boughs was seen over
bands of children, and flower-gardens brightened every
humble porch, the day on which it was known that
Allan Lorimer was to bring home the young heir of
the Castle from the far off country, that had seemed to
the imagination of those simple people the very region
of death. Nota single person was left at work ir the
1&0 THE YOUNG

fields; the key was turned in every cottage door;
even the very bed-ridden were brought out to knolls
by the road-side; and when a signal was given that
the Returned were coming up the Brae, the old sexton
began ringing the small kirk-bell, and a shout went
circling along the hills all the way to the Castle.
Within its walls, there was a solemn silence, broken
only by the sobbing of a joy almost too severe. Again
and again the parents embraced one another in secret,
and sank down together, on their knees; but the meet-
ing came in its agony, and passed over ; and then
there was perfect blessedness even on this side of the
grave!

Allan Lorimer continued to reside in the Castle.
Indeed, his presence seemed essential to the very life
that, under Providence, he had saved; and his own
parents, happy in his prosperity, were well content
with his daily visits of duty and affection. At the
Castle he was indeed beloved as a son: but could it be
with a brother's eyes, that he looked on that fair
Vision who kept gliding for ever before him, calling
herself his sister, in her tearful gratitude; surrounding
SCOTCHMAN. 181

him at all times with the unconscious fascination of
her joy-brightened beauty, and at night-fall touching
his inmost spirit with her low, fervent murmurs,
breathed at the holy hour of prayer !

Yes! brother and sister they indeed were, and to
them aufficient were such pleasant names. Although
she had grown up, during his long absence, from the
simplicity of childhood into maiden pride, and was
now the loveliest being his eyes had ever beheld,
lovelier far than the divinest of the pale-cheeked and
dark-eyed daughters of Italy, yet Allan Lorimer looked
untroubled on her countenance, and untroubled
listened to her voice. A dear and solemn duty
had been fulfilled by him in tending so devo
tedly that sick bed. Sitting there for so many
days and so many nights, and often expecting
to hear the latest sigh, he came to regard the family
with feelings so profound in their sadness, suv hallowed
by theircontinual communion with the world of spirits,
that even that love which innocence and beauty inspire,
could not now invade his heart, towards her whom he
had so long comprchended in his most sacred sorrow.
1&2 THE YOUNG

He had brought back to her embrace a brother for
whom she had often wept as for the dead: and the
reward he desired was not that heart so tender and so
affectionate, not the beautiful bosom beneath which it
beat ; but that calm, deep, and unending affection, that
brings no blushes to the cheek, no sigh to the breast,
no tear to the eye, but in freedom and confidence
bestows its day-light smiles on its object, and uncon-
sciously shows itself in many a little token of gratitude
and respect. Besides, Allan Lorimer was a man
humbly born, and he looked on to a humble life, as
the happiest of lots. Had love, as a passion, sought to
take possession of his mind, his reagon would have
resisted the impulse. For believe it not that we have
no power over Jove! Let us know well ourselves and
our condition—their natural powers, duties, and desti-
nies; and with that aid from above, which is never
withheld from them who beseech it in humility and
truth, we may walk our way through the world,
delighting in all that is beautiful, without being
disturbed or enslaved, and blest with the due measure
of all life's holiest affections.
SCOTCHMAN. 183

It is the Sabbath-day, and the little kirk can never
hold that congregation assembled in the church-yard,
and covering even the tombstones and the circle of the
old mossy wall. Lo! a tent is pitched facing the
Braes, and from it the preacher will address his flock.
Walking between the aged pastor, whose earthly
services, in the eye of his great Task-master, are now
near their close, and his own father, Allan Lorimer, in
the sacred garb, is seen to approach. It is the first
Sabbath of his assistant ministry, and his soul overflows
with a holy joy. His friends of the Castle bow reve-
rently to him as he passed by: he sees his own mother
and his sister Alice, and almost thinks he hears them
sob; on Alice leans, with downcast eyes streaming
with tears, one to whom he is betrothed, the orphan
grandchild of the aged pastor who ere long must drop
the body; and now he stands in his place in all the
beauty of pious youth, with hands uplifted to implore
a blessing! There is the church-tower,—there the
shadow of the sycamores,—there the sound of the doves
cooing in the belfry—there his brother’s grave!
A lark at that moment rises as if let loose from
among the silent congregation, and carries up
3&4 THE YOUNG SCOTCHMAN.

its hymns to heaven. For a moment that hour
fiashes back on his memory, when beneath the birch-
tree, on the knowl, he felt himself called upon bya
voice within his own soul; and, ere he opened his lips
in public prayer, he ventures to breathe to himself in a
whisper, the words he then uttered before his wonder-
ing sister,—‘‘ Gracious Father! if it be thy will, accept
me as a servant of thy Holy Word !’’
185

SANDANEE’S DREAM,

SoME years ago, two negro youths were taken out
of a vessel in the London Docks, and brought to
Sheffield, by a benevolent lady, belonging to the So-
ciety of Friends. They were placed under the care of
Mr. William Singleton, who resided at a small village
in theneighbourhood. By him they were instructed in
reading, writing, and other branches of useful learning ;
but above all, in the knowledge of the Scriptures, and
the doctrines of Christianity, as held by the Friends.
They accompanied their kind patroness on a visit to
West Africa; and during their residence in this neigh-
bourhood, one of them, named Sandanee, had the
following extraordinary dream. The accounts of the
day of judgment, which are to be found in various
parts of the scriptures, evidently suggested the scenery
and circumstances of this dream. The personage
styled ‘‘ the minister’’ no doubt represents ‘‘ the Judge
of quick and dead :”’ the form in which He appears,
and the part which He and the Bible may be said to
act in this tremendous drama, have not been exceeded

©
186 SANDANEE’S

in splendid imagery, or sublime conception, by any
thing in the writings of uninspired man ; nor are they
in the smallest degree degraded, but rather heightened
by inimitable simplicity and the beautifully-brokeu
English in which thestory is given, from the lips of the
poor negro-lJad. What can be more exquisite than the
effect of the last paragraph ;—the repose the reality, the
deliverance implied in the sight of ‘* the moon, and the
stars, and the clouds, all there !’’ after the terror, the
peril, and ‘‘horrible imaginings” of the preceding
vision 2

Sth month, 7th, 1820.—Last night Sandanee bad a
Dream, which he related in language nearly as follows.

‘*O Fader, when I sleep last night, I hear somthing
like as it call me here, (laying his hand on his breast)
* Sandanee ! Sandanee! look at this.’

*“‘ Then I look, and see a great star there (pointing
backmard). O! I never saw such a great star in all my
life. When I look at him I cry water from my eyes—
I cannot look he so bright.

** Then the star go that way (forward, ) O so quick !
And when the star go quick, the clouds all go away,
DREAM. 187

some on this side, some on that side, and no sky left,
but all fire in the middle, and very light with the star.
And the star has great tail, and the tail go every way,
and turn about ; and when he go so very quick to the
West, then he fall, and make very great fire, and burn
the earth, and burn the trees, and burn every thing.
And the fire make very great noise, and go over me from
th: West to the East,—and the clouds very red, and the
ground all red; and I saw the Minister very, very tall.
He stands very great height, upon a beautiful stone,
very high ; I nosee his face, he stand-so high; and
then I see the Bible open of itself, no man open it, and
all the black print turn red.

‘- Then I see plenty people, black and white, men
and children, and babies come out of the graves---O
great many ! If I take great many sheep, and drive them,
they go close together ; so the people go very close, some
fall down, some go over them, they all come very quick
by the Minister, where He stand; and they run to the
Fast away from the fire. Some say to the Minister,
what must we do? what this Star? Then the Minister
say very loud in English, and all could hear him :—‘ I
188 S8ANDANEE’S DREAM.

been told you all these things many times before, and
you no helieve; but now there is the day for you to
believe these things.”

** Then the bible speak like a man, and it say the
same as the Minister :—‘ I been told you all these things
many times before, and you no believe ; but now there
is the day for you to believe these things ;’ and the
people cry very much, and they have no clothes.—And
1 very much afraid, and I awake. Then I sleep again,
and dream the same ; and when I awake again, I very
much frightened, and I sit up in bed.and make the
bed shake very much, O, very much ! 1 never sawsuch
a dream in allmy life! IL nodare go sleep again! I
never forget him till I die.

““Then I tell Mahmadee (his companion) ; and he
say, ‘ | never saw such a dream !’

‘* Then I look through the window to see if it be so;

but [ see the moon, and the stars, and the ciouds, all
there!

W. J. Sears, Printer, 3 & 4, ivy Lane, Newaute Street





xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0000353900001datestamp 2008-12-08setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Peter Parley's tales about the widow's familydc:creator Goodrich, Samuel G ( Samuel Griswold ), 1793-1860Sears, William John ( Printer )Greatbach, William, b. 1802 ( Engraver )Howard, H ( Illustrator )dc:subject Christian life -- juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Birthdays -- juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Twins -- juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Widows -- juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Kindness -- juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Family stories -- 1848 ( local )dc:description Date from holographic inscription on endpaper.Frontispiece painted by H. Howard, and engraved by W. Greatbach.Baldwin Library copy 3 bound with Peter Parley's tales for the chimney corner. London : Richard T. Bowyer.dc:publisher Richard T. Bowyerdc:date 1848?dc:type Bookdc:format 188 p., 1 leaf of plates : ill. ; 13 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00003539&v=00001002235621 (aleph)AAA4911 (ltqf)ALH6084 (ltuf)45964682 (oclc)dc:source University of Floridadc:language Englishdc:coverage England -- London


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describe
'54441' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQJT' 'sip-files000d.jp2'
c181ec3387b12fc13fad9bdcbc5add60
d4fb28db674da6b7444b9f64a30b6e65418c0a42
'2011-12-31T12:57:39-05:00'
describe
'27051' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQJU' 'sip-files000d.jpg'
ece1e07d87df541a90c193abd0d693e6
90a5d0302c4ba178f3d1d06b9530bba69cb3b040
'2011-12-31T12:57:26-05:00'
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQJV' 'sip-files000d.pro'
be169e30eabbb72dcead9596d89d8492
f4f20c377ddc8a864e896e7eec5472f208c4401d
'2011-12-31T13:01:01-05:00'
describe
'22594' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQJW' 'sip-files000d.QC.jpg'
ea67d3bd4c6be53d30eb308dacd71a00
0014bf776750d349f934f5754863edbd96ecf48b
'2011-12-31T13:01:54-05:00'
describe
'8661564' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQJX' 'sip-files000d.tif'
b17d76087c27890d208071ea03252c47
d9bab30085f4d33f8c19daf39ae9d00e9cbec9c3
'2011-12-31T12:55:54-05:00'
describe
'81' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQJY' 'sip-files000d.txt'
cefe0162e04e5379cfb44747bc068019
68ad219f30a3f5e9dd80f9bb27157e553b5b24a7
'2011-12-31T12:55:34-05:00'
describe
'20757' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQJZ' 'sip-files000dthm.jpg'
66303d31ccc78be10b917cefd9d990e3
9ff98f47dd75f3b32dead5ecc5cd6ec59f7a6a27
'2011-12-31T12:55:47-05:00'
describe
'435672' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKA' 'sip-files000e.jp2'
a021cd9ae3224a885591dd69f1df8899
6e51702f3e336b308edc8ef99f7fc04e8cb2224f
'2011-12-31T12:56:41-05:00'
describe
'61569' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKB' 'sip-files000e.jpg'
544cd8984215c5e208e79bb5ce4fa908
05b5ee1ec687e98efe76ec2106c527bd8bba7593
'2011-12-31T12:55:28-05:00'
describe
'1336' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKC' 'sip-files000e.pro'
6308acb1a59d3968d581ae5837b824e8
3cfd0d6e9e6c77ce558c0331e426623b6c42bff2
'2011-12-31T13:00:05-05:00'
describe
'33388' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKD' 'sip-files000e.QC.jpg'
0ceaa44b0226413aab62f8c4afd4ac08
752ecd2b6d75e17dc7c5f17dbdc301f8b9cceafa
'2011-12-31T12:59:20-05:00'
describe
'8663272' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKE' 'sip-files000e.tif'
f7c643b2607e2ee2a2ac4c319a793be9
11b8a44786d6170b23c344db02eefe85255cc320
'2011-12-31T13:01:25-05:00'
describe
'181' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKF' 'sip-files000e.txt'
4b3043119483f67e0ecf9bf16237d25e
774fc137e94895bec0d0eb4ce7af6e2a304a5683
'2011-12-31T13:00:34-05:00'
describe
'25118' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKG' 'sip-files000ethm.jpg'
fa29db154b454d232c6420e67ae05fd6
7f4f3b506b88f91aa8c830676893be5a1e5819f0
'2011-12-31T13:00:02-05:00'
describe
'460524' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKH' 'sip-files000f.jp2'
c9dbc0ccd0f8f61535bf7ee439bfd07a
e9c052576925e2028482e7d70f65dc3c29d615f5
'2011-12-31T12:57:14-05:00'
describe
'70820' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKI' 'sip-files000f.jpg'
871ca0f030a538e1a4d48f33a2badf90
b60317023dc09e05e096c19e6d7ea8b861631dcc
'2011-12-31T12:57:10-05:00'
describe
'5872' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKJ' 'sip-files000f.pro'
fffbea5f7b0c83a0100036261a7442ce
bcb042a3d146228bdc62e3ce05ddf5afc525ba49
'2011-12-31T13:00:31-05:00'
describe
'42140' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKK' 'sip-files000f.QC.jpg'
4a2c4ad42217c40a273aa29977f1251f
a7daab00986503c748e9670a8fd0f3b628c0d848
'2011-12-31T12:55:53-05:00'
describe
'8665248' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKL' 'sip-files000f.tif'
9c35accc8cff56d252b57f4b1f7fef54
a8b206c43e6693b34f34ab9cac9e026a0fe0bf40
'2011-12-31T13:02:52-05:00'
describe
'274' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKM' 'sip-files000f.txt'
cbd7a72971013e0b27c954ef3f743e6b
4901d754e2c7c687f0fdd9fc94ff42e17a4e186d
'2011-12-31T13:02:18-05:00'
describe
'28912' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKN' 'sip-files000fthm.jpg'
d57b02145d222227f97d456886ff6e26
c17bc36f98f3067e2dfb0175b1a36b3e85e626b4
'2011-12-31T13:00:12-05:00'
describe
'25865' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKO' 'sip-files000g.jp2'
9d9513d7ebdb9f7bdaa0012c0d2ea054
2c0b60423171b0cdfe14199770f9a7a90ef8de83
'2011-12-31T12:55:42-05:00'
describe
'23667' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKP' 'sip-files000g.jpg'
088745156f18caca80b9d5e9ac0aa76b
08f0de2523ba101d9bb3affc3445849db2b1347e
'2011-12-31T13:01:03-05:00'
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKQ' 'sip-files000g.pro'
98a49c63c4caabcbb4eadc6bfb892cd4
2bb2668be71fbd24826949c5c5e6b4b69fafa42b
'2011-12-31T12:56:51-05:00'
describe
'21159' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKR' 'sip-files000g.QC.jpg'
275e95f4d0ff8761cc164bb78faf7f78
8779b7f77aeab9bf5fae9102b1eba3fd8ec958af
'2011-12-31T12:57:28-05:00'
describe
'8661128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKS' 'sip-files000g.tif'
19fb822a4964154b3567c65ddbc5b628
3e9bd19990af414500e3dece49b80bca917f2487
'2011-12-31T12:56:34-05:00'
describe
'89' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKT' 'sip-files000g.txt'
9a41a0ac5bf7975972bb925a94ad4be6
c910fd52df370122f4746772cf9d4b2dfd8df028
'2011-12-31T12:56:29-05:00'
describe
'20016' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKU' 'sip-files000gthm.jpg'
996637095ab388fb15806c536d2dca67
b161771167df571fc0de86fde0f5e12ea9c74664
'2011-12-31T13:01:35-05:00'
describe
'784539' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKV' 'sip-files001.jp2'
bf06fddf8a36163321d73abc8ae9ffeb
0d6949c447f5468858b2888b1963bb51a7a03c4e
'2011-12-31T12:59:17-05:00'
describe
'103026' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKW' 'sip-files001.jpg'
aeb01d73c5c79005da7e48e73ec1ae5c
66839ddab9ab21eeebf69d56b923d7469c27210f
'2011-12-31T12:56:45-05:00'
describe
'21884' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKX' 'sip-files001.pro'
9514e8175084daac25cbfef3656dbf69
d19cdbb7f7d5a3d400c850c6d3d82f3f4fe522f0
'2011-12-31T12:59:31-05:00'
describe
'53452' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKY' 'sip-files001.QC.jpg'
97fa9b840f8ea426d6d2d24165680fa9
c2613497567f4a598a1d1367e92a8496ff2c5ccc
'2011-12-31T12:59:19-05:00'
describe
'8666468' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQKZ' 'sip-files001.tif'
91f58e028767aebdfae575680dd7520f
417c3080e593acdd48b1e5fd3a0caf6702ca94fa
'2011-12-31T12:58:24-05:00'
describe
'919' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLA' 'sip-files001.txt'
d604db34dbd4a305568db1ece8a132e7
69b63788af094267df8d299e324ae8540aedb964
'2011-12-31T12:57:53-05:00'
describe
'31869' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLB' 'sip-files001thm.jpg'
a7a38d84f8d6ccaecf0903ddd28094b6
5396b4e2f688dd1486f8260864396d9b62b842ad
'2011-12-31T13:03:02-05:00'
describe
'1046572' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLC' 'sip-files002.jp2'
b37fcbe31acf9ad7f17e6070ed1f08fa
664ffc98da7ebb3a31a0232195dbe5891591f5a8
'2011-12-31T13:03:22-05:00'
describe
'129803' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLD' 'sip-files002.jpg'
fe35074668eb89d6a5fcbfb7fd8d98de
e052026ad8e6d079eeda03754721ff8379ddca15
'2011-12-31T12:56:14-05:00'
describe
'31386' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLE' 'sip-files002.pro'
ee6e73a1432f262bf82375af590ec222
654f22b4ad382d8681f2b6936f3c09988e4906b7
'2011-12-31T13:01:57-05:00'
describe
'65716' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLF' 'sip-files002.QC.jpg'
8bfa73e22c5e525741ae3bba24637224
46b67ba28596d997d00b9eb096b83495051ae43a
'2011-12-31T12:58:54-05:00'
describe
'8667744' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLG' 'sip-files002.tif'
ca8cd2c71fcd4c4645646d54f6737cd6
e81d68ad9227234fff21a824434b1a6ae6d463cf
'2011-12-31T12:57:46-05:00'
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLH' 'sip-files002.txt'
fca9b7c088925218a077919b838f8433
9748934bca39d8d97096251d1f2d4b4fd4d38354
'2011-12-31T12:56:43-05:00'
describe
'34806' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLI' 'sip-files002thm.jpg'
a24e43dd167139bc38a7c5fa9359c323
9e498329f8b062ff4a18d63dd943f8966615487a
'2011-12-31T12:59:54-05:00'
describe
'1065681' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLJ' 'sip-files003.jp2'
ce6751b3177611d621f0aacc2de5ec23
8e03699af63abd348cb8d6c6f00222207f3a569f
'2011-12-31T12:58:28-05:00'
describe
'132076' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLK' 'sip-files003.jpg'
4611c2442539060df04f2447f5f6c2e3
28c9465db5091cddebc89dfe6f450fe0e9a33efd
'2011-12-31T13:03:24-05:00'
describe
'31509' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLL' 'sip-files003.pro'
c6b1ae1f16cb2cbd081100ddd31200e4
c873c637c5eadb5423bf88940880184d1a1eeba3
'2011-12-31T12:59:49-05:00'
describe
'65983' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLM' 'sip-files003.QC.jpg'
2146599b66a3c4ed11abccdd37e32e67
f7bdf2bb3b7244e3ad843f4dedaf40002ac348ab
'2011-12-31T12:59:28-05:00'
describe
'8667592' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLN' 'sip-files003.tif'
325031c052d0415d0b52fba37cbdda74
7e20ad201e8e70e88690ed2eeed011cfe5e93d59
'2011-12-31T12:59:09-05:00'
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLO' 'sip-files003.txt'
f7790b00596c494892b7c5b0e4a84925
9930137b69572944ede05a73acbd3177224e60bb
'2011-12-31T13:03:14-05:00'
describe
'34936' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLP' 'sip-files003thm.jpg'
9e9a1421bcecaed33c42bb873b486255
20c6b690783eb33c83a14d9e20273aeb86e3fd64
'2011-12-31T12:56:09-05:00'
describe
'1024771' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLQ' 'sip-files004.jp2'
1cea78409add55a0d9f5a7e7b1777aaa
92f7b6c7fabf1859094cf5aa0b05deca4db6f371
'2011-12-31T12:59:02-05:00'
describe
'128017' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLR' 'sip-files004.jpg'
67254a6671da0adc7eaec7859f99f2a2
87b24fc4d6c5d1aa2c99fe20800f7e42cd02d8fe
'2011-12-31T12:55:55-05:00'
describe
'30446' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLS' 'sip-files004.pro'
48e974345a135997d5ef17dcb69e9554
05212650308f737b7894218758347ac3c3aadf88
'2011-12-31T12:57:36-05:00'
describe
'64693' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLT' 'sip-files004.QC.jpg'
9b08fbf4fc15e0c0ebb59d6a7f39c09c
5ddc6f2705f7c4c258f3edb7f64cc0f408edc36a
'2011-12-31T13:00:30-05:00'
describe
'8667900' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLU' 'sip-files004.tif'
cc2bb1df6cc965dc7e814f651bd5c798
c1845e96303c8718e12d43ccba5caf55b80adece
'2011-12-31T12:59:30-05:00'
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLV' 'sip-files004.txt'
c2b060d02f72dc1c9fb6111a76d9f73f
672436951d446ee9e4525eff11f9e61399b99890
'2011-12-31T12:58:47-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'35167' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLW' 'sip-files004thm.jpg'
eb81a6523193fe34bfecbff295832136
8bdc6baa634f251492cb9de4938a09d359cecba0
'2011-12-31T13:02:53-05:00'
describe
'882157' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLX' 'sip-files005.jp2'
6230aa677fc52af2cacc92140d382724
5b55068016a35bb9200e89752318391a515b72b9
'2011-12-31T13:02:43-05:00'
describe
'114044' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLY' 'sip-files005.jpg'
0467fd57fa2a23bd224e3cab020a06c6
e460283b6223380de4bcd50f0d5828805f360560
'2011-12-31T13:00:55-05:00'
describe
'25980' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQLZ' 'sip-files005.pro'
ceb24cd7ec9b32e8bd4234033911dde7
888d720b4c96fcfa12c31b42ca7f710fdedeebbf
'2011-12-31T13:02:17-05:00'
describe
'59152' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMA' 'sip-files005.QC.jpg'
7fd0125ffe79e04184075cc99c06405a
a551f5ccf325ff302eb77becbdaae2b5b0a22971
describe
'8667024' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMB' 'sip-files005.tif'
9a28078854e35281e88019e236a9ee13
41a628e9e94cae13d3a521dc7af9379fef511ecc
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMC' 'sip-files005.txt'
42b2ce056b501a64f4187c935ff42a9e
296c6ccda7977f4d54fc72934bb4bbc3109e167d
'2011-12-31T12:57:01-05:00'
describe
'33488' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMD' 'sip-files005thm.jpg'
a5e91215a6761e198519fa879f3913b9
ea13f6d63ee3a305b48a7ca409a3ed84f0093dbf
'2011-12-31T13:01:08-05:00'
describe
'1080210' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQME' 'sip-files006.jp2'
1756ba0b74e38b53c4f52d0df1cdd236
0fa709b23746676016356ee16b86aac448e5d3b7
'2011-12-31T13:01:43-05:00'
describe
'135836' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMF' 'sip-files006.jpg'
a8d5fb0452fa246c31459a31c69c00c3
5aae2ea317bc05e26c206c2573f37a66c9287f3e
'2011-12-31T12:56:44-05:00'
describe
'31802' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMG' 'sip-files006.pro'
d88e6e46b8c1bd6a76e9feb6aa100c15
061f9696f0712e8cf3ef1f985e908e83c9183587
describe
'67321' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMH' 'sip-files006.QC.jpg'
8e622d8636f63b20df94e8eb7a2e1dfd
21e3cd613258bbf18f589e0959e3c7c49989646d
'2011-12-31T12:59:40-05:00'
describe
'8667992' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMI' 'sip-files006.tif'
b1d4d146efba31378f1f312114b198a3
532448b55cd2ac4b767611a267899496164c485a
'2011-12-31T13:00:43-05:00'
describe
'1228' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMJ' 'sip-files006.txt'
51f210fb6c9d8fd9bb1afa2995c7e953
292b1775ec6a9bbb50c3a890bc4a409d9d26a8f2
'2011-12-31T12:58:58-05:00'
describe
'35985' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMK' 'sip-files006thm.jpg'
d80831461ecac60c1af51ff8e16eb942
974795e3c1cfea5cfbf5390b2377aaf0aa9038a4
'2011-12-31T12:56:25-05:00'
describe
'1079977' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQML' 'sip-files007.jp2'
34e78bcfd6823a217482eae76d38e9b9
327db578e3e29cc77702fba7f8b1151b41ee233f
'2011-12-31T12:58:17-05:00'
describe
'133768' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMM' 'sip-files007.jpg'
ff7a11b390a0cb135df4769f64f62301
88bace6627d8dc54428450ca5d431f8d4e6f858f
'2011-12-31T12:59:37-05:00'
describe
'31445' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMN' 'sip-files007.pro'
338836f16fff5e0666993a71038aed24
ca85d83c1d86cdb1e45c822da56c967c9aee61c9
'2011-12-31T13:02:27-05:00'
describe
'66397' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMO' 'sip-files007.QC.jpg'
6e33296f8521d1b64d7280caed6e51b0
df52831d956e307658010d9138ac3784fb2fc5fe
'2011-12-31T13:01:17-05:00'
describe
'8668080' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMP' 'sip-files007.tif'
6283574f2a0df1df1db543dc8d6b1c09
3bd3dcca4e2f89a3701d0c5a2442b82e04de525f
'2011-12-31T13:02:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMQ' 'sip-files007.txt'
a20d9e20948d6564fcb5e0883b1dbec1
07a3e5790da677d6f8cd4cacdd5de91d7a166cf6
'2011-12-31T12:58:21-05:00'
describe
'35791' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMR' 'sip-files007thm.jpg'
1c504190895baa74976fc9fe8df20f20
3eca42bb2ce9ed0c590d06f6dc825be77bfbadba
'2011-12-31T13:02:57-05:00'
describe
'1057599' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMS' 'sip-files008.jp2'
aadd1af99671def0dfc6aeea75335f6a
e9cd19ba37061a81b410361ef2794eb455d7c7a1
'2011-12-31T12:56:53-05:00'
describe
'131277' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMT' 'sip-files008.jpg'
1d1211e8a8c465b3030b4b076b8fdd0b
5796a0678dc1cb69a5829154c8e876043e59e7ee
describe
'31180' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMU' 'sip-files008.pro'
96c47bd31235f4fdbb9641f7dc24c66b
81778951dc007ea6bbff2d9cb012c52336794eb9
'2011-12-31T12:58:38-05:00'
describe
'66361' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMV' 'sip-files008.QC.jpg'
cf5de8b2b60177d7aea48fc5c4a94e57
fcf3dac09eddfb8ea5967121a4993d4874aba2cb
'2011-12-31T12:59:03-05:00'
describe
'8667772' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMW' 'sip-files008.tif'
fd85900f2c24f737e4a8f5709bf39f73
3ddae44434f265062a73c6fb75e476b048e3d41b
'2011-12-31T12:59:26-05:00'
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMX' 'sip-files008.txt'
5352f8528850b878dadad3ffdf6ef04a
9a04c4b6af721f7a26b2020a94d5909a7620231a
describe
'35099' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMY' 'sip-files008thm.jpg'
30b40e05141e02a4b00ec14997679d60
7713bc08ffe99df8cba2dd2d6fb40300288ac0ad
'2011-12-31T12:56:00-05:00'
describe
'1007099' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQMZ' 'sip-files009.jp2'
55921353e3aaa0a6b48733a1787b605c
c79a5a280b756369ad57a90e1fd837e0735bc5ba
'2011-12-31T13:00:25-05:00'
describe
'126109' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNA' 'sip-files009.jpg'
97c538621fd160a39c3c5caf546733d1
b0150e0c9b120cf56a059f756470d007210bc602
'2011-12-31T12:55:25-05:00'
describe
'30023' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNB' 'sip-files009.pro'
45b226c8500edb347f085c1f18404009
b058da842d61da9c601935bd9af91ab0d970792d
'2011-12-31T12:58:22-05:00'
describe
'64385' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNC' 'sip-files009.QC.jpg'
5cc8da881c5bc7021ee14659a699658b
d58dfb15150893e146775aee80fd10ac2f38a21a
describe
'8667676' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQND' 'sip-files009.tif'
3a57c38b0382ec0065f0c13596ec680e
555e422169cf66234ea9e4290313b080de9665b0
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNE' 'sip-files009.txt'
a70a0ec8f05a08961e6202fcad392fb6
c2fdc329f22cd4835a662cf118e26fee61bcd495
describe
'34836' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNF' 'sip-files009thm.jpg'
4114bf23ffcfce3411061a141c8e8f85
d42d0b61d08a150acf41a816e74f42678db8fd99
'2011-12-31T12:56:20-05:00'
describe
'1064614' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNG' 'sip-files010.jp2'
33788426b6944974e1d3e60e9fafd08a
8ed3016e9921942b02a5a956e57098715efd9e6d
'2011-12-31T12:58:15-05:00'
describe
'132755' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNH' 'sip-files010.jpg'
d437237cc07d78ffd581b81c00dbafe3
a12852f33233e50f80a0789604e0f2d5d59ba185
describe
'31720' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNI' 'sip-files010.pro'
8ad0cb6a6fb8a663d6502e2c27331731
ca848a84207c24bb33931bd3463a4e8f745a47bd
describe
'66175' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNJ' 'sip-files010.QC.jpg'
e92bef16861af1525c03540cadb235dc
037cc121a66edb86f27f5de51fac58765733db21
describe
'8667980' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNK' 'sip-files010.tif'
6a614f76d6268f289bb5bc6882d3ca45
a5b36fa3106ca0aeb0604fc297937d2e590a02e8
'2011-12-31T12:57:22-05:00'
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNL' 'sip-files010.txt'
5776425c0baa6b7b8ad23ea7bd8c73f8
171100187a17b0adc31462b7c656e4c2e93cee9e
'2011-12-31T12:55:35-05:00'
describe
'35261' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNM' 'sip-files010thm.jpg'
6c2a18cc85d8b340b6adb03702d740b6
5b5100bde13442f40a71c1708930cfba7b6c9ba5
'2011-12-31T12:55:40-05:00'
describe
'1042501' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNN' 'sip-files011.jp2'
5730740eeea98690fbe03d613e55df13
e9201af2f4c597b567b8e73e197df49b7e31581b
'2011-12-31T12:56:21-05:00'
describe
'129397' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNO' 'sip-files011.jpg'
6847926bb76a45e88ccf0519efa1c597
9f4b2f14ee3dff48fe4fe0f0e4bdc6671f54cf1e
'2011-12-31T12:58:48-05:00'
describe
'30216' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNP' 'sip-files011.pro'
eb9336ca982f0dc0f916faf333f2541a
2ed71c2b44cf23393608c3657fe3f5eade9d3084
'2011-12-31T13:01:05-05:00'
describe
'65604' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNQ' 'sip-files011.QC.jpg'
465696afcba745e54542d66ec0e1347a
5a5d03613bb44893e0f8f34a723d78eef70bc643
'2011-12-31T12:57:16-05:00'
describe
'8667884' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNR' 'sip-files011.tif'
2cd1c3a2141d2227d9ea3f26a10e6d7a
390a7aee9d1cf02a3d49f16fdb60643d75d913d9
'2011-12-31T12:56:49-05:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNS' 'sip-files011.txt'
2ddd894b6437fc43c3221996cd796470
a1d3abab047e8ed6f04c403352c838df127cf388
describe
'35382' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNT' 'sip-files011thm.jpg'
72d137ccc24d866d5d578493e82031f8
a7ca9ac6e172a3bb2078e3c93ab04dc0fb04417e
describe
'1080276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNU' 'sip-files012.jp2'
1cef92e8f31f9e452e773748a6b47138
1e5290472a3cde8f5c9143bc3dc4e59b4ccc8215
'2011-12-31T12:56:08-05:00'
describe
'134271' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNV' 'sip-files012.jpg'
398a0d4181b4fbc56e0135e50af72b0c
b188a4f46373d9198c9b1f0eafbb0b54cf94b1f7
'2011-12-31T12:58:00-05:00'
describe
'32204' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNW' 'sip-files012.pro'
40bb07f6fddcb4a3cae267da8b82a660
87efbed7e07bec79d07e0b0a6ce5b87da16a1c20
'2011-12-31T12:58:05-05:00'
describe
'66627' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNX' 'sip-files012.QC.jpg'
5d30f0f573806ac6a29b476ae680e393
f027b4dda7509ef6e6fc4be8b89c8144c38ef7fc
'2011-12-31T12:59:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNY' 'sip-files012.tif'
c6b524b46e5b86cd8942f023d6c3779d
8965490d6ff68abac030481bb8e2853e0c31f429
'2011-12-31T13:02:00-05:00'
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQNZ' 'sip-files012.txt'
4636a5de7215897bcb8b6eaa2a2ece93
10b06c63cfe812402343228327ab895a7530695b
'2011-12-31T13:00:35-05:00'
describe
'35362' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOA' 'sip-files012thm.jpg'
a3420682259e936cea165e92f15abf60
090078ab7aa8045a38f50fe413ff72f660d079e0
describe
'1041914' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOB' 'sip-files013.jp2'
b38cb5db279ea8f63c3410c550d155b4
795a75bb3bebe60c20102962d5b6bdb74da33387
describe
'129383' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOC' 'sip-files013.jpg'
361e9c5adf2b3436b8651e3911e6d44c
c2b6a96d41166a508e01f409107bfeaf28dca75e
describe
'30259' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOD' 'sip-files013.pro'
f5ba4205bee4f0924ee85667878fd7fb
a553cb723ce94ae5b9f634798682af14c74ea06b
'2011-12-31T12:59:51-05:00'
describe
'65719' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOE' 'sip-files013.QC.jpg'
4de13a84ff0f51af14997058d4ea92a5
edd8c27fca4626a6943252037e99c0249b355e36
'2011-12-31T12:56:28-05:00'
describe
'8667808' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOF' 'sip-files013.tif'
0d06564b65177467675bbb55f984ef3d
faad7ee760a2d59890a995cbbf33a3770e6ba8b6
'2011-12-31T13:01:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOG' 'sip-files013.txt'
e20a59e4021f8bf0495dcc5168a7ba88
254497722b114f4865c0de9d4494f2039b3798b0
'2011-12-31T13:01:46-05:00'
describe
'35520' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOH' 'sip-files013thm.jpg'
e844423aed548a3633caaffc768dec01
03fabd78e287d67d14ea0a93e21725a8ed87d6a5
'2011-12-31T13:02:03-05:00'
describe
'993241' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOI' 'sip-files014.jp2'
6f91b5d1278d6346d9782d9e1afdbc14
8a30fb0f6cf93a300ccd63561b726b05b16822d0
'2011-12-31T12:58:30-05:00'
describe
'124965' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOJ' 'sip-files014.jpg'
7e7ae9ea25ce51e984ba89c14ff05fc4
115b0f62ad325508ec2dd96e33b3f2d42fc5f537
'2011-12-31T12:55:33-05:00'
describe
'29160' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOK' 'sip-files014.pro'
b3d972a97cb8470d16732a846d8a6d38
4268266fab46daad35dd7bdcaecfc428f8c688ff
'2011-12-31T12:58:31-05:00'
describe
'63406' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOL' 'sip-files014.QC.jpg'
252644e027fba0bd9cec2ee798ad9e3a
5dbf6691a2d69558c1b9eb12b9cb6ffabec2b62f
'2011-12-31T12:58:50-05:00'
describe
'8667564' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOM' 'sip-files014.tif'
67ba57b93be6775b7869c68e17ea816d
7366de20edbcf3093d1667ea44fa9a052a3a8c2f
'2011-12-31T13:00:33-05:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQON' 'sip-files014.txt'
8ce37461820207edd51a88a2d4aeb6c4
8803f027a114dbebd9477065daf24b8f722e4e4b
'2011-12-31T12:58:53-05:00'
describe
'34526' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOO' 'sip-files014thm.jpg'
90ba95579c3571e358adc8dc62caae18
510c3f0e08139bfa5224ec9d1de40d116474fa18
'2011-12-31T12:56:30-05:00'
describe
'1049189' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOP' 'sip-files015.jp2'
e84d1be3f04756ef6c84a158b76b0cba
3efe82dd664ee34e21a4b2ba101a04ae14846be3
'2011-12-31T12:59:01-05:00'
describe
'130774' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOQ' 'sip-files015.jpg'
8d00a73ff8ad0696ffd66acbd97bb3a7
8757355e023ab069b95112a22d427ad0cff1a2df
describe
'30922' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOR' 'sip-files015.pro'
27a0b7d5b85623ba4e5e5b66c52fa05e
b50f2f5cb5e69e887551f78f0c6261434f0866f4
'2011-12-31T13:01:52-05:00'
describe
'8667584' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOS' 'sip-files015.tif'
05ad8c50904bd27b3d390b28edf42f39
161439819d7af500649ade8c4ce4d0bc98f6e080
'2011-12-31T13:02:38-05:00'
describe
'65522' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOT' 'sip-files015.QC.jpg'
95b2d287a22ef6e00e09e93f6233f599
76008cb16f38dd86d1dfb51d494fa71de5733ae0
'2011-12-31T13:01:16-05:00'
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOU' 'sip-files015.txt'
2f66c3b36aec9d30ed5261670ab319f7
b3e7df137765b038c3e85e2ea45c612336cd1c2d
'2011-12-31T13:00:45-05:00'
describe
'34973' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOV' 'sip-files015thm.jpg'
9f5a4c4a5eb878c0f87b542f43ce7e7a
5658ae42f72face3a892b5fb520b69b095476729
describe
'1072021' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOW' 'sip-files016.jp2'
538f9b1dd8473f3adb3dd342051cdc0a
02bb3eca74e91f548d5b56fc728887be11e193ac
'2011-12-31T13:01:36-05:00'
describe
'132667' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOX' 'sip-files016.jpg'
44216d8fe3a9e0ef8f82206666c4c62c
8ed804931ca7a78c89a48b436cd0ff8e89d98a8c
'2011-12-31T12:57:20-05:00'
describe
'30093' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOY' 'sip-files016.pro'
cc45b523497edfc06f2ab3a63d65fedf
64c337b41f4628d5054544f7cd2084d5ecce0ac9
'2011-12-31T12:56:47-05:00'
describe
'66541' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQOZ' 'sip-files016.QC.jpg'
f3723cc77f66973c7d002ba91bc51b0f
cc1e65a5f46e8a6c3f616771b2ba1330b595775c
'2011-12-31T13:01:59-05:00'
describe
'8668036' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPA' 'sip-files016.tif'
6b2979cc3a26d0e5a8e9a7c165e22868
13cb611b9da3f748a510e057e83d67d9ecc1ebb6
'2011-12-31T12:57:25-05:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPB' 'sip-files016.txt'
c70c744d0f418846d09528a3e01f1871
e3641866a86d7f3550669398a143c15c647d29bb
'2011-12-31T12:55:30-05:00'
describe
'36205' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPC' 'sip-files016thm.jpg'
4f907da8271c0eff1c78a67cd3029234
816f31f12d5f25464703002d06ac1a5a11897c95
'2011-12-31T13:00:17-05:00'
describe
'1080258' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPD' 'sip-files017.jp2'
101d518b032fd47f7ca07d1e5df4e416
c95981a29eac291721d13e9cb490d95948c6a829
describe
'138394' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPE' 'sip-files017.jpg'
ade63a22e530126fb2cd80c732b9870c
d99186ef47b1e0ba2c759992f2b49e0d0c8b3520
'2011-12-31T13:03:39-05:00'
describe
'31050' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPF' 'sip-files017.pro'
b22e2201f79afea88b2a0a890abfce01
d30979c70d50d257d236ee69af079164c1300fb0
'2011-12-31T12:57:29-05:00'
describe
'69447' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPG' 'sip-files017.QC.jpg'
82c3338627ac4411d3c834251beec413
6d356ea2f78c997995c92105d4ae6e8b93b579a5
'2011-12-31T12:56:55-05:00'
describe
'8668460' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPH' 'sip-files017.tif'
82b96ceb58a8878aca6d76256cbaa526
c3c7c609f8286545307e4a86a0435e20574e302b
'2011-12-31T12:56:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPI' 'sip-files017.txt'
3b687e3945bf96f58fcb1cf3274c5911
7de0da94cb59c25089d44bbd556a19b21e58dc62
'2011-12-31T12:58:57-05:00'
describe
'37045' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPJ' 'sip-files017thm.jpg'
0b45bdc500a87510350f89ec6d8365ba
188cde0abe33d1fb2adae5dc4fc4017040da3304
describe
'1080285' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPK' 'sip-files018.jp2'
a3b2a0e9d4763fc600aa932dff2ab068
52b33955e51997cf158c29966704544fe9a28553
'2011-12-31T12:57:43-05:00'
describe
'135960' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPL' 'sip-files018.jpg'
ca5c63cb1b6408ef097af9e2ab2e2cc9
7c304a71ca7c0299d77062e76f225dd919ce279f
'2011-12-31T13:02:54-05:00'
describe
'29613' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPM' 'sip-files018.pro'
0f6c38cde80c1bca1b27b2e886208c12
5b073be29ac133ca9fde8f4f6958a1e4a74a6160
'2011-12-31T12:59:13-05:00'
describe
'69022' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPN' 'sip-files018.QC.jpg'
62c1df08ebc36664e4683e010c71c40b
ca4292fabada6f4bac13e3ff02fc6e9cb7968813
describe
'8668896' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPO' 'sip-files018.tif'
86fcc3accdcd4a07b2bc94bbe34bb961
042e0a3e1576d7d6cb70fe1fa2313f9273452d94
'2011-12-31T12:58:11-05:00'
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPP' 'sip-files018.txt'
788928dcabdc38ce9ef9069e43f0ee0a
e36bdfa252580d57870a153b6dbe73af67a4d78e
describe
'37315' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPQ' 'sip-files018thm.jpg'
80bbf1b9d2e022fca0f31aed18494db2
ba817a19331bc9f680c2383d932926e94999b29b
describe
'1080291' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPR' 'sip-files019.jp2'
feafcb4919ee6d223846b3febfcfc8c2
1961414705b1028ef83abfcb13c382ad33a9a37b
'2011-12-31T12:55:23-05:00'
describe
'135847' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPS' 'sip-files019.jpg'
b5696102d8359753c319f785910aa8a2
dee84cc8d27d42ecb7905e6be160fcb774022350
'2011-12-31T12:57:55-05:00'
describe
'30853' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPT' 'sip-files019.pro'
019240de946b729ecb64e8ee0cea2bb6
7f733189d593fc798e504dbf863187ed77c3c31f
describe
'68270' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPU' 'sip-files019.QC.jpg'
17e59f513f30fab3f615c014439e7309
c31b2b39400ecdeae755c3d27bba7ecfa9c6236d
'2011-12-31T12:56:03-05:00'
describe
'8668452' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPV' 'sip-files019.tif'
2b80dc18d9a2cf39bfd86aed3bef2704
331d742c647453e39f88a7a839a9053f831d2a21
'2011-12-31T12:57:44-05:00'
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPW' 'sip-files019.txt'
1b3d416ec0ddc8371257a8f61094c55d
750ac685d6223c808f22b08333a5c736fb2dc13e
'2011-12-31T12:57:08-05:00'
describe
'36938' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPX' 'sip-files019thm.jpg'
d4e33c38bf3b160ed9c2b4c34f3c59cd
a0cee699af4813a701b65b31f339358691a5b8c5
'2011-12-31T12:59:53-05:00'
describe
'1062207' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPY' 'sip-files020.jp2'
b58b6d23750978aa351ba702759ec627
d8c9ab25f1900bc55f929fb103a354db6aad30e8
'2011-12-31T12:58:43-05:00'
describe
'132294' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQPZ' 'sip-files020.jpg'
cf0a4f395676d3b5b33e777dd3392970
01ad6b576b73b68d283f84ef226a4db49c6b47a6
describe
'30852' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQA' 'sip-files020.pro'
dc770fb18ba0c8c4dfab6e3435513103
7a1593bae3765d00ec03c97e1fa07203e0f2b7dc
'2011-12-31T12:57:31-05:00'
describe
'66278' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQB' 'sip-files020.QC.jpg'
85560ff23ffcad9eaaae48d644a3583d
9df4f1d7fe959f3d00fdbe1e759d56390c6c43de
'2011-12-31T13:03:31-05:00'
describe
'8668060' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQC' 'sip-files020.tif'
6d7d446f40e050f35e895cd71645fb80
e2cf58d7f7aa97282e9129618acab80d2bb656d1
'2011-12-31T13:01:45-05:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQD' 'sip-files020.txt'
61d232739a52022986f82b4a464bdf58
a61723693ad41fc3f87d7de3ff0a5bfab95e8373
describe
'35808' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQE' 'sip-files020thm.jpg'
883155cfd37a909ee314bfb2e39962f6
509111481bfcebded2ae7913367f37e856cd89a3
'2011-12-31T12:56:40-05:00'
describe
'1032337' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQF' 'sip-files021.jp2'
2b50033cc4a81eb5aa65410b89cbb0be
fb3cea232d309b39d5413fc2b40dd5240aafaa71
'2011-12-31T13:02:20-05:00'
describe
'129518' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQG' 'sip-files021.jpg'
4d10bbfe40114cbd723c4f9e0369e5f7
c982ba39bd68700df92e6f472fabc4fd919a4015
describe
'28963' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQH' 'sip-files021.pro'
43386de47cef05224b507263387d86aa
088ce22651775c9b8e7a0079e0e8fd84ca8ca4d5
'2011-12-31T13:01:56-05:00'
describe
'65093' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQI' 'sip-files021.QC.jpg'
bd844000a5fcec5710903b82ce212d82
d0753aa7cefac140e91aba1e53263a79e13e3077
describe
'8667868' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQJ' 'sip-files021.tif'
06baf05004d9dd6c35f1e899c62be0be
08f1d4c130b39d3c6ea71d0dbd8516517a8489b7
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQK' 'sip-files021.txt'
f3141c807ac6f4d433d6e5c796218d9e
8669ac218df2ba83612339e2a6e262678f214470
describe
'35642' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQL' 'sip-files021thm.jpg'
589939299d7d04ff9893b28299f3ce9b
90517fcecb1c69db46963791bfa714d9fee22110
'2011-12-31T12:57:03-05:00'
describe
'1080292' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQM' 'sip-files022.jp2'
497c04a5f845036de8865cf48b769eeb
2e885a9e7dacff775be3daa6cb031df89744f21e
describe
'136453' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQN' 'sip-files022.jpg'
ebc67fb9dda7f38604542831fe161d43
801a1435d1d12feb04b4c649ac80a7545cafc448
'2011-12-31T13:02:04-05:00'
describe
'31412' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQO' 'sip-files022.pro'
46106f26e47e39be23b8bcb88dd103e3
47cb99903556af32056c360aee0fa2c251f0ec34
'2011-12-31T13:03:19-05:00'
describe
'67762' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQP' 'sip-files022.QC.jpg'
d74ad7539b412e16d572a6e679036fc5
f9cf2318a460cc493319a5f24c3eb01c83f0f2ab
'2011-12-31T12:57:32-05:00'
describe
'8667896' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQQ' 'sip-files022.tif'
252b6cd840a5acc306841d3b164db8b2
f73827ae53d2d21c9a6450c686225da0c83449f9
'2011-12-31T12:59:44-05:00'
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQR' 'sip-files022.txt'
1eb84aed8b68ddacd9e953ea51b01e4c
ceac2007d9aca2923b5cd3ef5567a59230c291ee
describe
'35774' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQS' 'sip-files022thm.jpg'
3a3f418f9e7a0284f69b643a9b144690
4d963a16c9c9138d5f4cbb7b7eed28df12b20dab
describe
'1059325' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQT' 'sip-files023.jp2'
5d57ddc466760266839c88230a7966d5
2a9827a337379d8fdbfb9496807a2a6456e4d780
'2011-12-31T12:59:50-05:00'
describe
'132328' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQU' 'sip-files023.jpg'
5ede7a283c443530e020c039f6ff59a3
206bc95b4a8fc54dec91c3f7d3fc40866ef697aa
'2011-12-31T12:55:48-05:00'
describe
'30158' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQV' 'sip-files023.pro'
d176808db23b83fabcd70553f4111405
5120e051a9dfb2837587bb2f5a0581ecbb178101
'2011-12-31T12:58:20-05:00'
describe
'66711' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQW' 'sip-files023.QC.jpg'
6c119bcb9b57e82ab2c73db46199d204
d14094bc6d5c68d952f5a4792e413c94529b9cfd
'2011-12-31T13:00:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQX' 'sip-files023.tif'
46c3dc5a205eef009cc8b0410372d697
a2c159ff3e7d38ddb50ac99dda975c20dcfa9fe6
'2011-12-31T12:58:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQY' 'sip-files023.txt'
f68f1a62f509871aeae24e9aaeb79533
8f26cc96c2af0598a69f0d073281ac08ac07519e
'2011-12-31T13:02:30-05:00'
describe
'1080244' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQQZ' 'sip-files024.jp2'
4580cf4fa851a370e54be9bbd4e6f793
8366e7ba4576e17102a4e1808edfe0dc382d39b1
describe
'35997' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRA' 'sip-files023thm.jpg'
6ec4b73eb7d032d62c00a05e9e1b5e4b
e6e6159eb90f446b7d1ae905cb57722bc19c1f6f
'2011-12-31T13:00:21-05:00'
describe
'135404' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRB' 'sip-files024.jpg'
1d2fe725f4b80bd044cc134e047c162d
5400a018b4f71f88e883d4ccdffc8a0cc98680ff
describe
'31004' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRC' 'sip-files024.pro'
330081272d7a919e57de90953b41f00c
ef5a9c5fe366cc91b9294178b0c18e686268690c
describe
'67887' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRD' 'sip-files024.QC.jpg'
f2997ef545618cc6a4c6515238631e4e
e0de6f619c073c8c1ae6a9f971bf10552000388f
describe
'8668248' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRE' 'sip-files024.tif'
b0de07c9e3cbd7f57b860e49e6ab9161
bd105655a7f6db10f261af82836d683575538928
'2011-12-31T13:00:50-05:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRF' 'sip-files024.txt'
3355b4039f7deb41b55df0430cf77003
49a47f60681afc6daf243c288172933f693e1f4e
'2011-12-31T13:00:15-05:00'
describe
'36421' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRG' 'sip-files024thm.jpg'
7b66b297caf9b4625ee104a5bba8c2c6
cbad9d439492f649e6fdc1a56dd86abdbe8b80d3
describe
'1080294' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRH' 'sip-files025.jp2'
34b36ddffbadda0b46b41a1bfc3d5c65
b8b5587324f8d3776bd818e658c0cefcf66f57b6
'2011-12-31T13:02:58-05:00'
describe
'137870' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRI' 'sip-files025.jpg'
dc7b15253b227515b78581469308832a
5ab8aa1b03df507b485015f475b307a42e41b9fc
'2011-12-31T13:01:28-05:00'
describe
'31977' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRJ' 'sip-files025.pro'
206db9552f6268030fa54cd85c3fe5d6
1070d93fb6f10d6c6941b37cd6155e8729bc78e5
'2011-12-31T12:57:07-05:00'
describe
'68253' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRK' 'sip-files025.QC.jpg'
18f146fc2c09cfec088e0c804760dc7e
9455c02c5ef3a2141b7847fbf3d1cc754a7816e7
'2011-12-31T12:55:46-05:00'
describe
'8668356' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRL' 'sip-files025.tif'
39f85c880176e8ce213455e02244cc3e
8e1c830525299150bddde18a6219a48022dba1fa
'2011-12-31T12:58:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRM' 'sip-files025.txt'
527895bc8ca0d8add421184a3852704c
da83c8f4854f5fef71c4d5984575dbcf86e70505
'2011-12-31T12:57:35-05:00'
describe
'36595' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRN' 'sip-files025thm.jpg'
5fa083ee6230c0d08db8626ff562448b
0dbd7dae0eed99a6aa13794ef124fc181c5edaef
'2011-12-31T12:57:47-05:00'
describe
'1080270' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRO' 'sip-files026.jp2'
e9af92ecaf3a85d6f7cf0873b9052ef5
199a6b8033683a7390d26047839d4d5d5b194cfa
describe
'134394' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRP' 'sip-files026.jpg'
c2f413dd80e247bb1ea74a8edba87577
f5b43efafea628a01b6f57155c1c9228a060ba6f
describe
'30693' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRQ' 'sip-files026.pro'
1efac8d9bc251f38bad4c7b09ae7b0c1
336e28ef80799c895f47cd7687af6ade92871fb2
'2011-12-31T13:01:37-05:00'
describe
'67856' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRR' 'sip-files026.QC.jpg'
bb114cc4812484268d7b8dad647d7bfc
13f3619be9e70f5c328757d0a2d2c960d7e3a049
'2011-12-31T13:00:37-05:00'
describe
'8668212' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRS' 'sip-files026.tif'
5b2d3d25a9ea9cef1ab007f1682fe06a
21095681f86887223e16644938f52e50a024e646
'2011-12-31T12:56:38-05:00'
describe
'1187' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRT' 'sip-files026.txt'
d23a4746ae50e54aca946bab64d2e5f3
63d920b1c4b73957280cc46a5b6c7201ff06df38
'2011-12-31T13:01:27-05:00'
describe
'36416' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRU' 'sip-files026thm.jpg'
eb26f8b0c85c7c4bd7e4cc6e666efe57
0cf67f4ef83af84b3dd851d544d1ce04a9b1351e
describe
'1080263' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRV' 'sip-files027.jp2'
1edd7247286358bf7524782b5df7e818
90ac1490bd82575cf828527679b306cac90b9013
describe
'135758' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRW' 'sip-files027.jpg'
2546bb5ecfb9d8c1814679c228cc7c7f
459a667e52d787a26b8a69c6a086cbe6d8c56a71
describe
'31535' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRX' 'sip-files027.pro'
4e69b5a4f024bb9bc0eed556c7ab091e
93ec52ba22cc63ee7d2d50791e1f601ceeb0814a
describe
'68453' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRY' 'sip-files027.QC.jpg'
234473b8f3519a25dfe10c95b23b1818
5f679630c79939044aa6917bbdc1fa847a9a4e0a
'2011-12-31T12:59:05-05:00'
describe
'8668160' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQRZ' 'sip-files027.tif'
bde213b1ea151a6c4094a7dcc6e57a83
8561119a82bc79ad78d291af75c13ffd5330a8c2
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSA' 'sip-files027.txt'
0fdedaff91fa2608922f8c7358281785
6a6f40fc062eceb5c919d1b44e04c57076774926
'2011-12-31T12:57:57-05:00'
describe
'36308' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSB' 'sip-files027thm.jpg'
53732523450b20bd9720d51311159ca2
024c0945e3eecde7232d1612b3bcda6385ff238c
describe
'1045602' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSC' 'sip-files028.jp2'
7808881a004b41357b495022e8da670a
a699508ce764d5a09a024b5884a08ca9a5dd69b8
'2011-12-31T13:01:09-05:00'
describe
'129997' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSD' 'sip-files028.jpg'
5ac2fd9b008f2c7b7f5b770cc2a4cc4b
7d818427ec9412ed6b2e9b756c8e7f317b668695
'2011-12-31T12:56:02-05:00'
describe
'30263' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSE' 'sip-files028.pro'
8ace81fa99b03816330d2c3cdc10b441
221956c725e0f7afe6970145aff2b908e23ac466
'2011-12-31T12:55:45-05:00'
describe
'66296' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSF' 'sip-files028.QC.jpg'
0d49817bde8b11d7b2a4e66959021ee2
b36fb52283f7f3f84ca47a664105a8be8710213e
'2011-12-31T13:02:21-05:00'
describe
'8668000' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSG' 'sip-files028.tif'
36d5f78577afab6f705b4b0a3d5efbdb
4bbe496d486663f115731c7a918ddbba5c5217a1
'2011-12-31T13:00:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSH' 'sip-files028.txt'
edf64fd619af5b82eaa617e3e8d61c3a
070172c12dae1192835a1b6850885cc768ee0374
'2011-12-31T12:58:26-05:00'
describe
'35661' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSI' 'sip-files028thm.jpg'
872bf7baefed7516ff1dc179ef6353ad
0878e352f89ec355eab07801bc93d39398b8dd1a
'2011-12-31T13:00:47-05:00'
describe
'1050639' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSJ' 'sip-files029.jp2'
e52ab09509340005e81dffe2abfafe12
31bd651d6e2ac2077b6ae9b1bf770db6ff2e5d71
'2011-12-31T12:56:59-05:00'
describe
'131408' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSK' 'sip-files029.jpg'
cadef474d19803f8a36ced10e350aafb
04a53fe4a322b386f1a0ccdcb5ba87e7a3104eef
describe
'31159' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSL' 'sip-files029.pro'
55bc2b9d4dd42e50b7789bfdf4bc2000
b9bca4097b6152643b6be462f046860704f81131
'2011-12-31T13:00:53-05:00'
describe
'66623' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSM' 'sip-files029.QC.jpg'
dc182b420e77f02bb781dad015b6c7ae
9951a8d59408768cc9ca064e320d741db018b986
'2011-12-31T12:56:06-05:00'
describe
'8668072' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSN' 'sip-files029.tif'
bc962934fb3f3ef25442be090816ac0f
e315c885b22c653f4c0ad96f802d4911a30c7ccb
'2011-12-31T12:56:57-05:00'
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSO' 'sip-files029.txt'
4b71dc4428e050d1919fbc3f7592f31e
c95c695abfe64c5b8757c1c267f3c43d34a3c085
describe
'35569' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSP' 'sip-files029thm.jpg'
1e1769fffbab1da3b7458456b2657a64
bbc4e2219b25cb70292d0b03be9102ed8b24ded2
'2011-12-31T12:56:07-05:00'
describe
'1080282' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSQ' 'sip-files030.jp2'
614b3627ce599178e0ae0d17568772bd
75cb278c06134edfa046db300aa88263050a172b
'2011-12-31T13:02:41-05:00'
describe
'134893' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSR' 'sip-files030.jpg'
fd40db1fc82d074c24034dd80849266e
c7f59c65ff6a6b47c4753a428a285b00681fac4d
describe
'31324' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSS' 'sip-files030.pro'
a05b787e564f22944ac28e0048febac7
75767edfbef8812ab681a4310a7ac90aa4b98053
'2011-12-31T12:58:03-05:00'
describe
'67233' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQST' 'sip-files030.QC.jpg'
786fff766315ac01f827abcbd67b3adc
d17bd904d910bf2334cdb82bbdf13af3b490cdd5
'2011-12-31T13:00:20-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSU' 'sip-files030.tif'
a5b850a7194edc3e9bb4f60cb42497a4
e095d7bf0fe73d01a49bc340ec47f7807136cec1
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSV' 'sip-files030.txt'
6e9b2ab19464ebaf20aec5b60c25e0f6
8dda21eaa201c45f32c840a725a00a51cb3522cb
'2011-12-31T13:01:24-05:00'
describe
'35618' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSW' 'sip-files030thm.jpg'
102fe51d0c13541d1ca50cbf31ac048a
5018bd4f1bf4f944256b6301bb067868c7ca03be
'2011-12-31T12:56:56-05:00'
describe
'1041880' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSX' 'sip-files031.jp2'
3c2da0bc83d1102a5225459547593ce5
f4ccb8cab46e9b1458b2692ecb90b0633b63aa18
'2011-12-31T12:59:27-05:00'
describe
'129702' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSY' 'sip-files031.jpg'
2f8d14d4e0af8c10dd169d8258f65505
7c42c2a34ca83415c50ee770f9a0970183b86cc3
'2011-12-31T12:58:45-05:00'
describe
'30496' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQSZ' 'sip-files031.pro'
6e731afb42f28193395cfa9e45308c4c
bff94d0a7830ae85b67263cc8469ab09d4c6fb3f
describe
'66042' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTA' 'sip-files031.QC.jpg'
163173c5ec3d26975d70a2ea15945216
7cd862cfe5bb76fad661e02229d700c50dd3dc0a
'2011-12-31T13:00:11-05:00'
describe
'8667872' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTB' 'sip-files031.tif'
1728bbde55bd180d089abe882655aa10
94cec161f017e4f075d563e856784f98b9e2577f
'2011-12-31T12:58:56-05:00'
describe
'1176' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTC' 'sip-files031.txt'
fe6bfc444fc90941158c2f1331f6ed8f
7dbe5ec412041d9dadc9dbb7113a3548144093dc
describe
'35771' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTD' 'sip-files031thm.jpg'
0cd5208c14c21427732642bdfd554e1a
62324ff10489260fbec90f8678f896b93bb72e0c
'2011-12-31T13:02:55-05:00'
describe
'1072054' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTE' 'sip-files032.jp2'
56834581c7320041d6b57728add1642a
3ef498fc73fe60ea7fbe398a6178fcb7d6c42f96
'2011-12-31T12:59:41-05:00'
describe
'133533' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTF' 'sip-files032.jpg'
2c55505fe39e7ea511cadcb8b120c02e
8b6a2c8720e0680afca2507f371088ce4960fbdb
'2011-12-31T13:00:46-05:00'
describe
'31473' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTG' 'sip-files032.pro'
8bb4cdcd1caa2b2a4283dcd3ace4d632
f3a6a412ce14718b75e09d49ffa3163b4084192d
describe
'66656' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTH' 'sip-files032.QC.jpg'
5c2e1efda4a7dfbecff41087f702534a
3fd394d7ee3d6464f29e2550d3971e74b91fdeb3
'2011-12-31T13:01:47-05:00'
describe
'8668052' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTI' 'sip-files032.tif'
722110ab263cea19c88bfa24f8cca488
2ffcbc1a397805a98a7e11fdb455d13e1fdc7012
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTJ' 'sip-files032.txt'
003c82f69dcc6f6591af4a90b304b288
27e4c994bded73bdfd07a603fc03ebe01fca9852
'2011-12-31T13:00:40-05:00'
describe
'35884' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTK' 'sip-files032thm.jpg'
5e8d5eaa2993cec586ef022fdfe855e5
75bd27a03bf539d23b405215a52999806a0cf66d
'2011-12-31T13:00:41-05:00'
describe
'1015369' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTL' 'sip-files033.jp2'
a00b6c90b780f272c1a5c85a5a1cd15c
94f2208cdee38c12e9fd4fc2c182757ef46959f5
describe
'127480' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTM' 'sip-files033.jpg'
194a9cd244e1c1fad9dd466935c035b7
e7d7a5fd55c520e6e2bc797759471c3f5a0343a1
'2011-12-31T13:00:07-05:00'
describe
'29715' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTN' 'sip-files033.pro'
e2cd838acd01b8e5302e431b742ff106
aeeee0970d2fd20c08abaa019b3c39bea9a651a3
describe
'64294' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTO' 'sip-files033.QC.jpg'
50e6d81d5855f44e8821253256922d6e
52c7cb38ed3bfe8f201d4a5c9d76d81db4f8c9a3
'2011-12-31T12:58:33-05:00'
describe
'8667760' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTP' 'sip-files033.tif'
57f7218382e9e495d6489c132c5125c4
7d56780c31cd4e6d8107ec0040c25f221b7ec3c5
'2011-12-31T13:03:17-05:00'
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTQ' 'sip-files033.txt'
7a47838c53eb5620197514ea348f3474
5f3939df5077d51bd16c7b9f575e3db0e907de24
'2011-12-31T13:00:16-05:00'
describe
'35049' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTR' 'sip-files033thm.jpg'
d08cadf171bd13e18d4a5d145d04f6be
d41ac0849e67d0e217e70e19e6236cb239e9828d
'2011-12-31T13:01:07-05:00'
describe
'946747' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTS' 'sip-files034.jp2'
e6e9e362a0a23b2fd3e0ba70a752df87
fbc8a8b3aeb2cab4fc8d4b86eb7e8cf416a54a17
'2011-12-31T13:01:58-05:00'
describe
'119854' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTT' 'sip-files034.jpg'
db6a527e43c8761ee5b5ab8f4a3e5a96
1e258e9af86155f7c6f189af67ee5069474c6545
describe
'26893' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTU' 'sip-files034.pro'
568d9a4f0c8dfe1381b7040590d2f20d
6696740759058d4baf76c118cfe06719cdcd5a65
'2011-12-31T13:03:40-05:00'
describe
'61602' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTV' 'sip-files034.QC.jpg'
6c164641ddf6e4a87e39571d9c7ac265
765a7c89b66e76835f84402f8519ca1a3f200111
describe
'8667332' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTW' 'sip-files034.tif'
8cdd48198384427659de9aad1d1f7e9e
157698146530fe66a4f13cff21075289d882da67
'2011-12-31T12:57:12-05:00'
describe
'1054' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTX' 'sip-files034.txt'
2cf29ca2958e88774f7657d0642cdbf8
e07a61a5f4825059f68e6881a0f52e3ada0ac32a
'2011-12-31T13:03:00-05:00'
describe
'34676' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTY' 'sip-files034thm.jpg'
3adec4fe5186121900e2586d1abde33e
c5930ce1c17021754429e274df6e6774f62e0d00
describe
'902121' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQTZ' 'sip-files035.jp2'
1f0ff95336c1782aa7d99c2dd6cc31c1
62ed7cc2680e358e3f18c09685f95d85d6408b4b
describe
'114962' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUA' 'sip-files035.jpg'
681920dd133d85f7932fc4ab253e4ab5
8dabc86c5f468d27c847bfdb1b711e8ebb188a25
'2011-12-31T13:01:38-05:00'
describe
'26710' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUB' 'sip-files035.pro'
fe752f364561583469b332bebf378855
bb27fe33d86124bcef573ab899ae3a69d8fdb069
'2011-12-31T13:00:38-05:00'
describe
'60022' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUC' 'sip-files035.QC.jpg'
e21b50daf2509dbfb4d16867dbdf58f8
55b00fe580799ba6ceaddacd389811f705e83a6e
'2011-12-31T13:01:31-05:00'
describe
'8667168' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUD' 'sip-files035.tif'
2df861b4d16ddc7bcd1fc35634f2ee25
9d4d178188a791b636f7d0bcbfdace72c4cf3b66
'2011-12-31T13:03:38-05:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUE' 'sip-files035.txt'
622569dcce61b259dead0394fe7c6696
e9de88385e990fab5fd6c17fe9bea8a30329d8cd
describe
'33886' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUF' 'sip-files035thm.jpg'
007767da9c2bfc449649f7b4f1c653a0
276b52584355b7999f713e3448e91bdac905db05
describe
'780299' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUG' 'sip-files036.jp2'
c7fec9bc9cddc50099cb892913fcc92e
8051f8121b19189c775f98ffa3204b17a5abbbbe
describe
'102352' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUH' 'sip-files036.jpg'
8fe02412d3c83d8bbc81438b4a143a59
872115758f4fefd174d91459391ed9e8d74ce015
'2011-12-31T12:56:15-05:00'
describe
'22623' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUI' 'sip-files036.pro'
62c65b9fe2c534a71d3320d00cae0491
e2cf8c8178842ffc7201ee0347ebc033b89aefbe
'2011-12-31T12:57:21-05:00'
describe
'54043' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUJ' 'sip-files036.QC.jpg'
91db1fc1543899a32883f0dac9960a5d
e1314c610464a604dae851245b8407838ecafc56
'2011-12-31T12:56:42-05:00'
describe
'8666012' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUK' 'sip-files036.tif'
dd34ddbe918e9e1717d714774309a80e
f4d1845449b04ef4105316bcd3ea8035c76322cd
'2011-12-31T12:59:55-05:00'
describe
'912' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUL' 'sip-files036.txt'
4dcaf3e8681bcec8085cfdcdfa7af96f
80af73273407688767cd546b2e0ce815a8c653d6
'2011-12-31T12:57:27-05:00'
describe
'31315' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUM' 'sip-files036thm.jpg'
7ce257fc1e92915bd0b92cca284f4762
50696f343140204608ae87b7ea72e541d97ad163
describe
'1005866' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUN' 'sip-files037.jp2'
3d02daa8ef536bfcbe1b1966c13b2308
398a9c75fa3430978d58ad60c7e1ea85568e1796
describe
'126644' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUO' 'sip-files037.jpg'
578b7da448332ef44f8a8a880f0f2b01
b17db23bc81e2932df8f850bba797183fa9b6d04
'2011-12-31T12:58:02-05:00'
describe
'29744' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUP' 'sip-files037.pro'
899e9e2f2e68cbdf39b2d39ddc5fa163
58068d2f24761e78033a17c57bb109e59f8a2457
describe
'64135' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUQ' 'sip-files037.QC.jpg'
018da22ddd691b640aa7a44456641e39
901051b9576ae1ef863d97561df480c97f0efb38
describe
'8667700' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUR' 'sip-files037.tif'
9f24dbc22986d84ac193b981ba7b9c66
e02525ba0abf520d487b6f393724e5c4ec9f8215
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUS' 'sip-files037.txt'
ab0a629da02c6f704a73b9bac7c40e12
355d223fe9d96f57e3439457497eb73e742a2387
describe
'34669' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUT' 'sip-files037thm.jpg'
8248fe6d0fcd12a5ecdc27d173f8ac84
cc1bfb1c79b8671d32eec35b339340bda1397907
'2011-12-31T13:02:39-05:00'
describe
'1054995' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUU' 'sip-files038.jp2'
98bdc44535f756c11f55534994d19083
e5ff01d9e8f14ade38eee2a016e5c0ce245f58fc
describe
'132063' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUV' 'sip-files038.jpg'
2f78cad27577ce2303792e43e13fd440
aa947f21aaed74e1a5195a610ed1b6c4194c51f6
describe
'31153' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUW' 'sip-files038.pro'
299882abb81987884fffef1a34886b29
c1c58c3eac225b656b97006db43752179cc906d2
'2011-12-31T12:57:19-05:00'
describe
'64962' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUX' 'sip-files038.QC.jpg'
e2c1d501c0091ca905668521ead2c67c
cdf7bc7a2f963251fc0b0dc2aed1d7b18e7a8a2c
'2011-12-31T12:55:27-05:00'
describe
'8667448' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUY' 'sip-files038.tif'
3d6a21cd3ad915123735bd953732b1dc
bc057bc233d2cf58cdebaa68b665f5eb66969a4c
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQUZ' 'sip-files038.txt'
4563c39f619d9a983c750c8195ff8c22
14a9ed5bcd65ea18a397bbfa04269677e67538be
'2011-12-31T13:01:48-05:00'
describe
'34522' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVA' 'sip-files038thm.jpg'
5c0c1e5f764f86b18420fc697d16af98
06da18728313cfee5aeb657a3b6f3bbc515ec5b8
describe
'1037991' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVB' 'sip-files039.jp2'
5edb5da675dfa0b58fb336c3cd30207a
993625747262e321e14dbea927e3bcfbe607fae8
describe
'129904' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVC' 'sip-files039.jpg'
30785dc5f8a2b04fe6efe9a8bb43f493
82844fceedfadf250e32a7db67f36e6f4bdfd35a
'2011-12-31T12:57:24-05:00'
describe
'30841' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVD' 'sip-files039.pro'
af485e5411bca4ad91bcf86e04608714
1f647d8f7d1f028b49b901e63a664e19558079a8
'2011-12-31T12:59:16-05:00'
describe
'65038' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVE' 'sip-files039.QC.jpg'
a9927e8cab7bbc3e7a61928b9059b41a
8475e5319825336f4754553b46521ddb34449567
'2011-12-31T12:59:07-05:00'
describe
'8667640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVF' 'sip-files039.tif'
bd2cd034bbb09759299dcfbab1c4a571
fa3579f2c5cbe3a2e842323abf6fcfa6775fb274
'2011-12-31T13:02:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVG' 'sip-files039.txt'
cd95092587ec27c4260497e23c478698
ec6fe1b3d4c8006ad9277602a08c90c66a41af70
'2011-12-31T13:03:41-05:00'
describe
'34692' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVH' 'sip-files039thm.jpg'
4adf7d1bcb93c84338ee42168ddaa1cf
62ae9dcdeb423a06169eb8c4a99387d92a46c3f7
'2011-12-31T12:55:59-05:00'
describe
'997100' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVI' 'sip-files040.jp2'
faf439d70a4f250e03d6a0d21ccae257
6ac615e52d34093ba723f968a6ceb19db3538840
describe
'125168' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVJ' 'sip-files040.jpg'
ad7e210df4cbdeebc346d34c044530c3
9dd0a9041637b4292e6fd71ac81f57288e3876a8
describe
'29946' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVK' 'sip-files040.pro'
87a81772380adb6d6b6883ab49ea3175
f32bd70726a08a8695ce52d2766659845d592b64
'2011-12-31T13:03:18-05:00'
describe
'63483' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVL' 'sip-files040.QC.jpg'
a052d19758ab9e46a07519b290092fd2
0fab3b19766ffa7ec2e7c91d1f079296a7ded8f9
'2011-12-31T13:01:11-05:00'
describe
'8667404' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVM' 'sip-files040.tif'
ee14914f8042b8a4a4c158740ddc8174
e90caa4af1285a07e0ab5607b81466301d0a325d
describe
'1171' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVN' 'sip-files040.txt'
6448392a5617df861138f187ba69bc1d
427dbe63edf507a25da7fb08f96dc1092b7d4479
'2011-12-31T12:59:22-05:00'
describe
'34555' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVO' 'sip-files040thm.jpg'
198308f9eeff5cb599816f69a72b4514
86a047f0d7f1a4f90e428e10a40128d604bb4d31
'2011-12-31T13:00:42-05:00'
describe
'993486' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVP' 'sip-files041.jp2'
003f30d078f5677c6abd1f7c563a0c6d
7244d39e1ecc4ecf65504c2769568e37f050ca60
describe
'124841' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVQ' 'sip-files041.jpg'
24e34607b9b564405721fd4a7932be88
f6e2a1f298d51c90327c6acf2c3c6f90845ed5a8
'2011-12-31T13:02:12-05:00'
describe
'29469' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVR' 'sip-files041.pro'
94f3205e23656917e6de3b13ba681b1f
754864156573d32e198d8f6bc6a39cdb889a7063
describe
'63271' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVS' 'sip-files041.QC.jpg'
80a79ab74f8a64477c5f3b39947c704c
76c32a05f6d626b8ecdf051d248f99692b1ea0d3
describe
'8667544' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVT' 'sip-files041.tif'
cbcde2c688385735910e0e7654dfdd38
aacc7379c2e1a8a7bb898e9bf4c9051530109567
'2011-12-31T12:58:08-05:00'
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVU' 'sip-files041.txt'
0e88dd06cc657c862edafb6a2b80e9d0
40a2bad80c381b7a988ec8177e49caf82599da44
describe
'34595' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVV' 'sip-files041thm.jpg'
64fbeb041c30af00b8932935ef6b72bc
2f38881403c951b496c4014a9292ed9bd8e90c6a
'2011-12-31T13:00:28-05:00'
describe
'1037218' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVW' 'sip-files042.jp2'
4760880bcb31c5d91a6f2096283f1768
ef3163edfcf482f4536f82931d39025a43922ee9
'2011-12-31T12:56:37-05:00'
describe
'129387' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVX' 'sip-files042.jpg'
3f9f5d8224ce9d883da5a048020702bb
82f6577df19334f0c0b93cc1f386de702bddb8a6
'2011-12-31T13:03:04-05:00'
describe
'31093' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVY' 'sip-files042.pro'
6f7fcf57689e368c601f61f954a9b50c
19e6d3af51b7433b9bcf9f2b41dd360ab6c5aab6
describe
'65043' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQVZ' 'sip-files042.QC.jpg'
dfd901a3726207fa2482263b38428f1a
345e0b290b1856ebb2c2ba56d563bca9dbd4b265
'2011-12-31T13:00:52-05:00'
describe
'8667632' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWA' 'sip-files042.tif'
e600ef42d03f5478ac2e748985ce2007
463164ccdf2315b533cce411541cb7c9cc244ca4
'2011-12-31T13:03:01-05:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWB' 'sip-files042.txt'
abe8f91ffc0a3c2b0dce68aad8bda6ed
250e515ed3b8ae3a0db90e9e1deb2e8f05da5fed
describe
'35080' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWC' 'sip-files042thm.jpg'
0175978ed8f484fa91b41d33027b5017
2097621510a78aa201dfb018b1ebcc9e9f6a36b0
'2011-12-31T12:57:42-05:00'
describe
'1056158' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWD' 'sip-files043.jp2'
8058a04fc71c46a5ec584624162c80e2
4c454fcbff81cc6661686a62e39f37bfd902df40
describe
'131513' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWE' 'sip-files043.jpg'
f8a6c0c9488e441f78c7a637dcad933d
8d20985dcabc30784d6970b6c39e5e2417ad0457
'2011-12-31T12:59:48-05:00'
describe
'30472' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWF' 'sip-files043.pro'
89212ecf0ea82550bd7410c8bbb4eb88
bfbc1c394aa3cccda193f7dee5c59d910beced55
'2011-12-31T13:00:24-05:00'
describe
'65047' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWG' 'sip-files043.QC.jpg'
9a5aa7c8532119e2d7bb328e938077a5
27e7fae9acb9f30018db46000a75575f49d3f992
describe
'8667604' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWH' 'sip-files043.tif'
9c822a7fd9201059d09240282b065a61
4d4faace8312405f48698647a811ef3e76e72a8b
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWI' 'sip-files043.txt'
2449127bbe88fd3432fab357cecb695e
ad1825312d8b454cbeeadcfcf406dbe29de5dd34
describe
'35103' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWJ' 'sip-files043thm.jpg'
9824667986b5397bb0297ac668e3e4ba
5b46e0e91d1fbcc79bd0cc745ab2f3d73d03c2f2
describe
'1062815' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWK' 'sip-files044.jp2'
85ad066a09eeec3a95b93cebb92de9d6
e7984258610d8a1932924eb9960f51a69f1ab1fe
'2011-12-31T13:00:57-05:00'
describe
'132423' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWL' 'sip-files044.jpg'
b39775a6fe64d4141727740d270cefc3
e57adbc05cb96e0e8ce804404e803aff82907dd2
describe
'31261' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWM' 'sip-files044.pro'
df6ae0b08b0c025482cba5327377084d
e87c8c1e3d8f85baf6875b6bc690b0d5b035eb54
describe
'66687' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWN' 'sip-files044.QC.jpg'
ea2f4c32a215fb5421fcf470d4c9ffda
a912e14c1aa139ca23f39bb38cdd475cdc65a752
describe
'8668196' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWO' 'sip-files044.tif'
ff9455f225f0bde7a76fbc0ce345efe5
3f9e241348af1d316fe76e823999c57fbda433e2
'2011-12-31T13:01:29-05:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWP' 'sip-files044.txt'
33b633b59405e9e8eee097d86e8f0e3f
32770ddf4723a11108a4de2fed3842629bbc5c7d
describe
'35951' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWQ' 'sip-files044thm.jpg'
0bc1976e4fb90326fc6c9091b7080305
c7a515e6a020d393cc6c6693fd81682fc6639ef5
'2011-12-31T12:56:19-05:00'
describe
'931968' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWR' 'sip-files045.jp2'
975167900941cea28dd75db45884f78f
5ccb607b05fa92b6df33749f6f971254660a8dc2
describe
'118616' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWS' 'sip-files045.jpg'
f159116332e0ab4fb43e10cfb2b2369b
76167f63e78fba45fffa68373fb119d5f833275c
'2011-12-31T12:58:06-05:00'
describe
'27326' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWT' 'sip-files045.pro'
cb3cd8eb254f24b61e5ceb9de03c451e
17f11f388ea6ab6c06915a5a8fe06c3d3232e4f7
'2011-12-31T13:01:10-05:00'
describe
'61041' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWU' 'sip-files045.QC.jpg'
3638a0c61805e7f390266e4f4d9c334c
1556230a4393108cd0ddc20831f7bc3a7ec373eb
'2011-12-31T13:00:10-05:00'
describe
'8667428' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWV' 'sip-files045.tif'
67d7aec5f92eac40993e393408f3afc8
302994b16d7c02b1c9a0ad5dfa3d5e4f4254b4f3
'2011-12-31T13:00:08-05:00'
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWW' 'sip-files045.txt'
0b795052b40bba95787e6c8c458dbb61
9530cd41d828e7d0c433caddb440059e3b9ae50c
describe
'34244' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWX' 'sip-files045thm.jpg'
eb13c90a86533667aae485a7864848ac
fce0d3ec91c44f320a7d65dd5d788ade74d92b48
describe
'999829' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWY' 'sip-files046.jp2'
8ae7091e4e10486c879ce14c9d06e872
c24cb9b5f8d848331bf005209bf7d63c7c4fb3ac
describe
'125708' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQWZ' 'sip-files046.jpg'
b79509d615d3e2f15247e4fac1c35976
79aafdbc182faced831b9e85fbb6eccdff0330e8
describe
'29681' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXA' 'sip-files046.pro'
f59b0d3aeb167a0818d45366a5080c82
a925bae2d772b68208f60d131c7ae84ccc57cc8d
'2011-12-31T13:02:49-05:00'
describe
'63994' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXB' 'sip-files046.QC.jpg'
1d29087c036fe2f150b273b083c774a2
ac061c0bddfdaf9aa3922fe04cde01a4b722ff98
describe
'8667644' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXC' 'sip-files046.tif'
bc2bdb368fa77c94d83b41a2961421d7
0d0376832460151566b7d517b5e1c4e2550090fe
'2011-12-31T12:59:52-05:00'
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXD' 'sip-files046.txt'
fa51493d9468006d21a8a45b578941b7
5c6afcafcb00cde6d6d990728d8b8d2b9c48ea98
describe
'35026' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXE' 'sip-files046thm.jpg'
447a458bd81d21fefc33fd0031b95916
cdd68b3796ca8d2713e58a414af2ee80b3575f68
describe
'1011012' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXF' 'sip-files047.jp2'
0be2b1bd9e23e1d510c42b3318a80b2e
51e6111dbcd2d133c21de356c7e58d0471f324f6
describe
'126927' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXG' 'sip-files047.jpg'
3d336ca941cfb2fa298f19213c584216
9fa4af28ddaeaa997f93166e5f872e2ec3b975ff
'2011-12-31T13:01:23-05:00'
describe
'30136' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXH' 'sip-files047.pro'
42aa952a0aa206a511553b711896a8b1
cfdfa0d299b00f08119f65def2cf7efe7022b29a
'2011-12-31T12:55:44-05:00'
describe
'64546' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXI' 'sip-files047.QC.jpg'
a5f1ca1548ada913de65d8a706a6453a
71d98015a35ac120424ad3c9557963f10ded2c96
describe
'8667712' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXJ' 'sip-files047.tif'
fa5fffa6fc5196d84bf53ba943041c2b
5efc6b52434a48132378722492683b285b6ea931
'2011-12-31T12:55:56-05:00'
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXK' 'sip-files047.txt'
636902fb2f07ed176b621be625d0e246
6e6559ac272f594b477931aec5ca914a767e495e
describe
'34728' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXL' 'sip-files047thm.jpg'
fea6c15672194531e2be61f50410159a
ddddc38b1d94b5a99c244b1ebc596fedec3e4b21
'2011-12-31T13:03:30-05:00'
describe
'1016267' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXM' 'sip-files048.jp2'
968f0a0e42bb5ebec151edbd0ac1342b
cbd514688bf9e19dfad0dcc3303de8610f229ca4
'2011-12-31T13:00:32-05:00'
describe
'126469' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXN' 'sip-files048.jpg'
0f39297ae2e753c04851c65fad8a47f1
bd8c4aa6c61022a349dc54a734013817ac95ca2a
'2011-12-31T13:02:28-05:00'
describe
'29230' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXO' 'sip-files048.pro'
aabc37029f92b457c88e9c8ee5148d0c
dcff54393d91889652139485f20818c6f14b48d6
'2011-12-31T12:56:22-05:00'
describe
'65005' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXP' 'sip-files048.QC.jpg'
dda6d7f463daef00696e83685c7d202c
d1fb6e75ad5cd3bb046b46bfc33c9f8ed6a0af90
'2011-12-31T12:55:29-05:00'
describe
'8667936' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXQ' 'sip-files048.tif'
c73d7883f7f6de4434c60b67a1f07f7b
64cfd9afc3fa99761eb6e0947d506b97e5e207a2
'2011-12-31T12:59:34-05:00'
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXR' 'sip-files048.txt'
96b1fa3f94011648cd08d499e814dd25
74be6bc0daf52b49a59ee7a6f0ad4151447f76ed
describe
'35609' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXS' 'sip-files048thm.jpg'
4a294734c39c2cf3c37992fb2ce3a0e0
5f3054c60e5693c92ab36fb90b3ac26bc18008b3
describe
'1002286' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXT' 'sip-files049.jp2'
8770cc4827777f77cd632541fd1b8f39
06b83c30c4bae7585843a5360506204e13bafc1f
describe
'126775' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXU' 'sip-files049.jpg'
e5fbb44051ffc0b5a26a94c7af455150
79295e63bdeb0608df0c42aeeb4bcc0b1dfeafed
'2011-12-31T12:56:16-05:00'
describe
'32231' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXV' 'sip-files049.pro'
112d57f017ec23d2826b14309e75343e
c2f2db3981b0751c4719ef7046cf4fd05c6d3995
'2011-12-31T13:03:11-05:00'
describe
'65174' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXW' 'sip-files049.QC.jpg'
25cea685e35e4ba4f7421c7207e137f1
c4af479027b3c75ce933b7232018d9c3ac79e3c5
describe
'8668148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXX' 'sip-files049.tif'
a55ec4757ece6177de32c8db600b4a05
9002e99966c8bff38e72c8c916dc0f478b8fa4ec
'2011-12-31T12:57:48-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXY' 'sip-files049.txt'
f87dc65e2e71e698596dc2d23bd19b6a
eb40fc40faeaaac07c309a3798971943affc42c6
describe
'35873' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQXZ' 'sip-files049thm.jpg'
5456536704cde7a827b5700dab292d69
0ea6a8bfa7b9835d6b5637c06fdf76ce74ef2a73
'2011-12-31T12:59:38-05:00'
describe
'987924' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYA' 'sip-files050.jp2'
e80c69763684a3eeaa3473db061ea8c4
f80696a5358f18007a1610dfdb6d367a23ff55e0
describe
'124397' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYB' 'sip-files050.jpg'
7e0b862de115982dd0f3ff3626684723
8df1a09e646901a5cef680f8264ec7ab4460b246
describe
'28836' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYC' 'sip-files050.pro'
312e5a6472f743858419d23b2be4222c
8b1399ec17ca77b653cfb22033c39dbf34ba1597
'2011-12-31T13:01:18-05:00'
describe
'63964' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYD' 'sip-files050.QC.jpg'
0d951bf0a0e1aa7338dc670dd6defbc0
26bf9d211db06db127d9ab4aece4ce9ac210586c
'2011-12-31T13:00:09-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYE' 'sip-files050.tif'
33a69f46b554e3a805f07d3017d83b22
0b04877481c6ddd8926256b5254c9a2cdf5fa6f9
'2011-12-31T12:55:51-05:00'
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYF' 'sip-files050.txt'
3b2d3dbd2f0c793fef612d333924ca99
9ff4551e2836a8f6057b38c6fb5de7b6596a247b
describe
'35239' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYG' 'sip-files050thm.jpg'
6a8b911f94741d2628c0a80c5eb1bd0c
0ac856016e4f615aa7fa301d618af72d74a756c8
describe
'958032' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYH' 'sip-files051.jp2'
2607aaedd62f5dcf9b49d5ea941ba5d4
0eb15d1173b814973c10cc8625fb2c30f46c3e81
describe
'121055' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYI' 'sip-files051.jpg'
5a31e1f85fe532e7ff3f15a48d24185e
bca8344567e63f7f1e923b1a0887949598d613af
describe
'28337' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYJ' 'sip-files051.pro'
0938610f3e8429f348c6e6f4b05b76a2
ef57cd6f70393df5865b07e3e083ab21c4378f60
'2011-12-31T12:58:27-05:00'
describe
'62366' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYK' 'sip-files051.QC.jpg'
e9d445e58f129d3f115d2be512773c20
59794a495889c020b3dee3c5462fd91f08243b2a
describe
'8667408' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYL' 'sip-files051.tif'
b410327069738f3ae8e951129752d991
475947ff3afaff7c838e52632b0addd6c1499cf0
describe
'1103' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYM' 'sip-files051.txt'
36a8f9be5c7caa6d2ccb5d8b437c840f
d513e20c52c87c598404359e165c6b47d4111764
describe
'34208' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYN' 'sip-files051thm.jpg'
4ef2fff449e99b42717cca09735a372c
1a4abc32d7f42cc8dca9f420ad90da4b854de4ed
'2011-12-31T13:01:55-05:00'
describe
'996352' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYO' 'sip-files052.jp2'
053282f40bf74b83eb3de89a7d98c3e1
562474db53bdc7301f86ccfdb64bfe0076961b93
'2011-12-31T12:58:52-05:00'
describe
'126273' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYP' 'sip-files052.jpg'
64e492594fc485366b11a6a226db8963
1bd047d67a0f4e8786394f9bb467d6f6e21d3ebd
describe
'29174' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYQ' 'sip-files052.pro'
492e0054b9e5cfc2360b4abe51e81522
36749e7d6acda5fe9bf481e14165a1a55b1245d0
describe
'64650' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYR' 'sip-files052.QC.jpg'
53f4ac639497cd6e3083da06b2bdf42b
c16cf49ba96d2efbfecbec81cbbfcb0ecd177493
describe
'8668140' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYS' 'sip-files052.tif'
55e2089d13903422e296a75ba7d77d8f
aab39b3b2f477c058d870551cd9bf27007f28936
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYT' 'sip-files052.txt'
f10b8c442a09736db6182b72d73734b2
b95bb3207866aceeb3491f480e76fb3df27a7ef3
describe
'35523' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYU' 'sip-files052thm.jpg'
9847af932725cbb71ba20b92009326e7
f0b4619d047a9219cc28bcf1f47c000e8dbe5306
'2011-12-31T13:03:37-05:00'
describe
'1022599' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYV' 'sip-files053.jp2'
e231219f77e064ab79235e7928f3f052
776c70679ee022c95a1414a767e7591a1ad3f7ca
describe
'128847' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYW' 'sip-files053.jpg'
527004a0e80db2a4f1d970c94b361a04
829eb2c3050bf0551a672fe1800886ea60e4244e
describe
'30798' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYX' 'sip-files053.pro'
1ad05878815a0cf89d99ec10544d8f43
10922ea2170ae2071768ee262820c5edb425ae60
'2011-12-31T13:00:51-05:00'
describe
'8667976' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYY' 'sip-files053.tif'
0ebe46566d47b64bd9ceedb5ba6bf9bb
018f67c281219eab4ee6605a1dd4a810bb555d92
'2011-12-31T12:55:57-05:00'
describe
'65873' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQYZ' 'sip-files053.QC.jpg'
b2f78359474c3ea85f730469c89a11f6
9602a0106770c11dce5308e4f1adad0eff018d5e
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZA' 'sip-files053.txt'
625263ad97efab0dad426a4d71a6ae3f
96abdab69239b7952b92cf0aebec28402a22c653
'2011-12-31T13:02:48-05:00'
describe
'35664' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZB' 'sip-files053thm.jpg'
49905a12e785e18d6a52012966cba388
9bcce136e355dd635cbf0a545c33c3bdfeed6169
describe
'1060660' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZC' 'sip-files054.jp2'
a415f2e0f66d0fc0d085e29ee3ab4cfc
c225bb38c5e72bfedee64ccd4de79e14b45bb810
'2011-12-31T12:57:41-05:00'
describe
'132915' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZD' 'sip-files054.jpg'
cd6187e1cb5db3d9c2aba74bf7ac4b48
86b48ea075a2b7fd736053a7c3f3ef1e528fc86f
describe
'31383' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZE' 'sip-files054.pro'
6c52bee4d19d77f4e30225288e77b1b0
913b1b53e2b1540ec28c404efad96adf92706fc3
describe
'65940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZF' 'sip-files054.QC.jpg'
6390105c9cc1fec1a8af109e70dbbc62
5474e1b03e7c020669f2f8882e1b1e4815acc5f8
'2011-12-31T13:03:03-05:00'
describe
'8667656' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZG' 'sip-files054.tif'
ad978967b79df0d851706554aae05738
8c05b412a2ba84f10315c5370ebdfe8431c6eb62
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZH' 'sip-files054.txt'
a2876a25c0e1cca42481f59045f4d95a
38892692db8600d298ae6c84f7af0955a75a142d
describe
'35082' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZI' 'sip-files054thm.jpg'
cae2ad479b6c6e0abfd8c9b492e47a4a
08858c2e5023cf6811d77ddd0f39a2031e784b8f
describe
'1039026' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZJ' 'sip-files055.jp2'
be27ce060fdfc876151ae0cba65724ba
5240401065151523283e12abdffd10143888bc8e
'2011-12-31T13:03:08-05:00'
describe
'128708' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZK' 'sip-files055.jpg'
06666f87f690c739c06beb246ad80210
060205040fccaf887f859b8cdaafc1d45829d5a0
describe
'31085' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZL' 'sip-files055.pro'
f4a74b12b49c1f0c31c74df9d31e2fb4
3ddf623007b0702a5e4a0a6d8d342c3a5823a159
describe
'64943' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZM' 'sip-files055.QC.jpg'
05ad95a159f09d893364a179c3035105
a0a66ba1a895a962bb33e4e8f964500f005eb104
describe
'8667800' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZN' 'sip-files055.tif'
8dd607af5b13ce847b991770ec9fe3a7
9ba3b9538bf64e2a9b168e9ddd617d99477b0e7e
'2011-12-31T13:02:06-05:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZO' 'sip-files055.txt'
0a63c5e9b8f5c3290601423f110469ce
95d1db65584a7f430c4b9671c1e33ea2e0d74789
describe
'34904' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZP' 'sip-files055thm.jpg'
7142871faf2a9d9cadcf89a25dc535a3
f7a12524133796f13a4c1234dbe809707f6de553
'2011-12-31T12:58:18-05:00'
describe
'1026146' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZQ' 'sip-files056.jp2'
56064936a322e7f63aea250c77bca497
e4e81c070efd631addcc19ab30bf8a9eb0cf7a81
describe
'129163' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZR' 'sip-files056.jpg'
01b356f571d243c8bae330891b976412
6c7d2d600d18fc70121f0dee426f751bbdfc9415
describe
'29139' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZS' 'sip-files056.pro'
2166bf2468565f632ae62dba3a903f79
2eedb9aebbdca2e6d2a5dae1cfa45692ab2016be
'2011-12-31T12:58:46-05:00'
describe
'65455' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZT' 'sip-files056.QC.jpg'
d119a8afc7944967d142bf9f5e7e5c01
9753a2bb75d026f949b84e27b451f058b3273f30
'2011-12-31T13:02:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZU' 'sip-files056.tif'
7dd5b1e8d5ed16367d706b5ecbbb1669
44fb7165f6f9db255db5a6302e1fb2a60f8b2a14
'2011-12-31T12:58:01-05:00'
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZV' 'sip-files056.txt'
ac89ceaa60d347edecd051b3478df770
3473d40a93de1668bfbdebdfd6f20c989283ea70
'2011-12-31T12:56:05-05:00'
describe
'36026' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZW' 'sip-files056thm.jpg'
296821f061c9af0eabb4d626f905dcc7
4552a6aa99571772851fd6d12e4cd3bac9a9e6a0
'2011-12-31T12:55:43-05:00'
describe
'1056725' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZX' 'sip-files057.jp2'
9bf8b68ef0990eb2002c95505a32f71d
38545146ea80c3a0ff41fc44f5f7c70a2aa560dd
'2011-12-31T12:57:37-05:00'
describe
'132193' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZY' 'sip-files057.jpg'
5b1c079f4af2f7566d698d4b29de8d8b
397568f54c8e8a6844c46359d2d84290630ce2ab
describe
'31840' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAQZZ' 'sip-files057.pro'
909890d0c2669616def58afed1de71bf
3f2b74497bfbcdcacb8a8a1809a031ed8723481d
'2011-12-31T13:03:23-05:00'
describe
'66376' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAA' 'sip-files057.QC.jpg'
c5b420baa0dc7fc45597218a5aeb23f0
632157db7023f40ad065371addd0af01a5d6bc70
describe
'8668204' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAB' 'sip-files057.tif'
e1a29031cd21d7637769dc5ff69670ed
14cabdd7ba0512fdfee5f411ef9fd3c8accaaccf
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAC' 'sip-files057.txt'
97def84be657ff6836f54aa3429bb4c5
a681737dbc7e4d96e7ec81468a30a2f0c4559afb
'2011-12-31T12:59:45-05:00'
describe
'36191' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAD' 'sip-files057thm.jpg'
d88b5f5050bbcef45adcb5004bc6d91b
2f5260f767c389fbf46b1ce477074a2955b2c027
describe
'990899' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAE' 'sip-files058.jp2'
09c8a4964faee19882c1a52e0a485227
2f675fe6b8f3ec099f1b61c077cacd32b5960636
describe
'124495' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAF' 'sip-files058.jpg'
b4fde43e96eff476a02ca432ad233e73
d98c6ec0a55fd463e1390621bed5f88ab2e25d1e
describe
'29660' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAG' 'sip-files058.pro'
6df3660ff4c62759548d75db0c1a82d8
d20450357a4bab9ad566e9fa0eb01d3c9365c418
'2011-12-31T13:01:39-05:00'
describe
'63386' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAH' 'sip-files058.QC.jpg'
efc47e2e3486e6b86009303a704025b5
4ef2efe8a7a72a46c45c5a52a20fd551557b0605
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAI' 'sip-files058.tif'
1e21280bb78cecfe70afe48ec208ddca
add7626ce89dcc8e470ac970d286efb1120ca3af
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAJ' 'sip-files058.txt'
9e2d72c7ad254163167257c3740b7304
479d5bb4a6dd9374a8e4c18130c9a07d1470d6da
describe
'35433' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAK' 'sip-files058thm.jpg'
f0523f5007e6fd9b87531aa780506783
81336e00e9bd6b0afb2335d8dc55caaa3e52fd7c
describe
'712425' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAL' 'sip-files059.jp2'
a1d953cf1b8defb49321a304eb6ab27f
deecc25c565c85c87547bc61ea9005ba9e5f215a
'2011-12-31T12:59:32-05:00'
describe
'95742' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAM' 'sip-files059.jpg'
da9466da377456fbc73b42f5dd89cd0b
f105d91a1c77ae2a7ae8b5fa96cb9f07df0f4c7b
'2011-12-31T13:03:10-05:00'
describe
'22543' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAN' 'sip-files059.pro'
a6d5e31b749068b03a87a86c756dfc07
c2d2f61739c01e346f50ebc2c197414edd3ea582
describe
'50821' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAO' 'sip-files059.QC.jpg'
14c4c52ec8059c2b2febc8580b545d2d
d508218fece11c991f000f7917b438683a94a378
describe
'8666204' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAP' 'sip-files059.tif'
376e7d8b4f867987d39d663f43f79ce6
9f449eb2328eecf56b281b0061edf00e4404d8fd
describe
'953' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAQ' 'sip-files059.txt'
d2c46e0ed234bc905d30f71d09abd93c
8dfb4fa6d168f6ce17dfcde170210d1d488aebdc
'2011-12-31T13:02:44-05:00'
describe
'31389' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAR' 'sip-files059thm.jpg'
e8c3228b2bd7321f51cfe8c0a04d96eb
d8d2fb7887666394992627256cee037b725255a6
describe
'1019192' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAS' 'sip-files060.jp2'
45b83b061a6ea6e0164b0e6fb2c8a274
aa84eaa7a98fa8923a6ebde10686c7615e5316e0
'2011-12-31T12:59:25-05:00'
describe
'127524' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAT' 'sip-files060.jpg'
48dc4af459bac2d34e8c0ab35dfed1df
48f739b56b2a2385f1cace246bbbef8521da3c37
'2011-12-31T13:01:02-05:00'
describe
'29106' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAU' 'sip-files060.pro'
733f76042948044a07d97f356b351d5a
7e80a5b4b0cdf3cc46d246adcaf3931a21c86d2b
describe
'65397' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAV' 'sip-files060.QC.jpg'
e3c3e2169bffbb124e9e04b225aa13cd
8482b7123086f891307ad4100c03970031255156
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAW' 'sip-files060.tif'
3832c8139e7d84aab6d6ee665d2e1903
166449ff349e610bb9883c01c7953c0613f14909
'2011-12-31T12:56:24-05:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAX' 'sip-files060.txt'
c9c89b838b83a4f4b6ecd28866b9ceba
37e18102e1753f3827e8cc823ff8fdefaccb6317
'2011-12-31T13:01:19-05:00'
describe
'35514' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAY' 'sip-files060thm.jpg'
54fbba3162cd8a65a1fe20c9791fa46b
6aff3f7c9f47690aad3e8409e570ff273e99ad0c
describe
'1014463' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARAZ' 'sip-files061.jp2'
5d362385129932008986d2704f7cffe0
c62cf391adb7c1802755f845be328104aab61ced
describe
'128446' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBA' 'sip-files061.jpg'
9bf7f7e9b767ce4f6bf28f0bf1cd8f39
a5e1b51df321f7207979b14b4b060f2146597051
'2011-12-31T12:59:10-05:00'
describe
'29739' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBB' 'sip-files061.pro'
c75386aee13bb6dc8c3959c9cbebae6e
96a22c6b4699f5fd1e26ccc00d239ed7cefa2f5a
'2011-12-31T12:55:50-05:00'
describe
'66295' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBC' 'sip-files061.QC.jpg'
bd6d509b69e0060d07f402246e1dd670
edc357e907c8c366d2b340845e5885d46d1c4fb0
describe
'8668328' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBD' 'sip-files061.tif'
5e598b2fe78713b5bcaa5d1ef436b2d9
880267a8775c5ce5af3995195f170ffa92841bae
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBE' 'sip-files061.txt'
582c1746675ccfcec272aab89bdfaaca
cf7c9746971b4c5f10e98e7419abe96137239fcb
'2011-12-31T13:00:58-05:00'
describe
'985330' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBF' 'sip-files062.jp2'
0e27033e57cff9ecd08758759bd3ae99
d79da431b4fe97fd8adb0d3cc1a8de2961ccbd8f
'2011-12-31T12:59:42-05:00'
describe
'36487' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBG' 'sip-files061thm.jpg'
858f5f965be81255e20bbc8cce6f6734
f3c26b3aa0f5e1dd38d06b8ff3ff030c3bc95aec
describe
'123078' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBH' 'sip-files062.jpg'
2c2df5129e1c90f8e3a5a37e543f8b3f
31ddb15101e295ac1616314c77703db92ffe3fa3
'2011-12-31T12:55:39-05:00'
describe
'29661' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBI' 'sip-files062.pro'
039f099d4636d4eb9512057524107685
6bfd910cec7b6365b44a859388628eb8daa48fcd
'2011-12-31T12:59:00-05:00'
describe
'63972' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBJ' 'sip-files062.QC.jpg'
80ecf7972e21f2b6fde494d23e69d9df
7ad04482091d9e5f56d4b08880906f18388b9eb4
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBK' 'sip-files062.tif'
9906e8c1fea0caace772bcdb13c32e4d
24ae0e24432d4b8feee9eafa5a26ffe4a149806f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBL' 'sip-files062.txt'
34bc96616f560e53cdd12759a991f66a
4f0b33a0fa14a30b24e9c3551185901d0eed8f50
describe
'34877' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBM' 'sip-files062thm.jpg'
21b5c476889c6605e69414c89877c9e1
4d4f5ee074b9e1d6269744f05b555d8c95065ef2
'2011-12-31T12:57:58-05:00'
describe
'1024365' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBN' 'sip-files063.jp2'
2e24c5aa9bdbcce908f4438de4fafb03
ef3f8cb720ae97cdfe28e924fb1a68e2e4246d98
describe
'131069' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBO' 'sip-files063.jpg'
99e384d76a22bc87036203dbd9b10dee
cc9ba8d24c77ab22765a55e2ce6d10cad6b90aa1
describe
'31060' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBP' 'sip-files063.pro'
af931a532b9612b397771be484aa3341
a2d31b6a37d44370c3c988a31257ddbd62a5b6f0
describe
'8667628' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBQ' 'sip-files063.tif'
4e94106bb0cd81d319bc5137ca2aabdb
34b82f73e0df94bdebb5b83473d8d4a80e675f61
'2011-12-31T12:57:38-05:00'
describe
'65731' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBR' 'sip-files063.QC.jpg'
f3ec19db4527c489cf1a1e473ed2db39
c9346c10f32058e642018c35995427da0c4c7e68
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBS' 'sip-files063.txt'
0b1c80fd292b03f687ca80535315fa13
e50e6db7c7bf89677f8705946c35d98192a4d233
describe
'34506' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBT' 'sip-files063thm.jpg'
99ffafe5b728fd3ad5825945155a7ec9
253bed5bf888eb9a54b66a58851ba589e7daf10f
'2011-12-31T13:03:07-05:00'
describe
'955940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBU' 'sip-files064.jp2'
fb3e916966c7bfd87cb2f86b36b7fa2c
c558cb839522f8baa1c8c360e18bf978dee91873
describe
'121939' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBV' 'sip-files064.jpg'
789b99cd92f4c1f5a18e1a6bc6d2220c
eeb4d8acaca216312e21619ba19fb0d4c64e132e
'2011-12-31T12:57:13-05:00'
describe
'28956' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBW' 'sip-files064.pro'
0ec50cadf1d0f84c86810d9553f7c5eb
239ad6a660aec55745e3c79286f5129515bc6d07
describe
'62109' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBX' 'sip-files064.QC.jpg'
d0a427305250aa065857b5c6aaa04129
f653a0466ffa22480260b85129be2e8371220fde
describe
'8667732' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBY' 'sip-files064.tif'
f21d7e82b52c15938c45f0fc48a2c9ba
91dd14ff3cff4c3101a8324cb744d63baf72a1de
'2011-12-31T12:57:02-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARBZ' 'sip-files064.txt'
94aaeb05428bf8ada14389bb68936a97
4b3a4135af75f1ec7cf11b49fb458fbfaecc6649
describe
'34640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCA' 'sip-files064thm.jpg'
c918689d7a5d2409a0e9591bcbea195c
b5bf8b7826193bc238074a47dcd9fff08a334a4c
'2011-12-31T13:00:01-05:00'
describe
'953605' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCB' 'sip-files065.jp2'
a976869345c2ac17724c69995d60713e
0069f5b1305d09c1cf9f28277440ddc32a17c022
'2011-12-31T12:58:42-05:00'
describe
'121100' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCC' 'sip-files065.jpg'
8448d792f79133a2d8c464ee7f7eb6a4
4ed5d567c1e110d5c744974801952275467c4c2c
describe
'29375' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCD' 'sip-files065.pro'
db8c9b7445cb342921dea5219aa662eb
325280c4db4822f73afd19ffeb05a1eb45a41390
describe
'62336' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCE' 'sip-files065.QC.jpg'
257acd49638534a93d89d16086582375
a60ed8013813e14de975b183564d6badd3cef1bf
describe
'8667468' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCF' 'sip-files065.tif'
0afb4671739fe87e4acc5c8bc8f812ec
deeb0f280f9b1164e2c6e42021e6f64ac7a88b5e
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCG' 'sip-files065.txt'
a2f7c4279e65572c7734db37cf7f20d1
dcd7d4e078eb08daa048cb0af75321b8bfab2259
describe
'34311' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCH' 'sip-files065thm.jpg'
7a37a6c8589a0cbf05a215bd067f2737
de3a97defe6de8038c720825c1adaa3d6c25710f
describe
'982720' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCI' 'sip-files066.jp2'
856e9db7db073d40f00e07561ea274bc
7484d1a5e713b647c9f332eea39bab44befeb969
'2011-12-31T12:59:04-05:00'
describe
'124972' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCJ' 'sip-files066.jpg'
5a80f193f015a74f5297714c02a8e451
d746f8e06a176322f99298511da4fec382bf9d51
'2011-12-31T12:57:18-05:00'
describe
'30282' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCK' 'sip-files066.pro'
4d12b3332e7c36c5d8e8902d97af7da4
f76387548edce05b4c860e98d5de4635f66df4f3
describe
'63191' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCL' 'sip-files066.QC.jpg'
aaf30be0246baffcd3217d7906966882
746c88f36d21d2a592cacc87c0c1badb85827f11
'2011-12-31T13:01:22-05:00'
describe
'8667372' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCM' 'sip-files066.tif'
ead64aae2ae5660cb2378ec075294721
d3ce31e01aee7cd62dba1a2ff95968d578fbac02
'2011-12-31T12:55:37-05:00'
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCN' 'sip-files066.txt'
75ae34deb7ffc8e73235e9fc504bd788
bc58ac0f3b964c4663676586e7cf059682634700
'2011-12-31T12:57:49-05:00'
describe
'34565' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCO' 'sip-files066thm.jpg'
303f13e86bce5a07c66e87f8d5472e8a
38bc515291b9baad1af8b1f9d3d00e002f5240fe
describe
'1001956' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCP' 'sip-files067.jp2'
c102537fda9654d5d81426b8dcba94f8
7621fc3993784480728371ba2429f08ff1b04a5d
describe
'128131' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCQ' 'sip-files067.jpg'
7925d540ad62d1fed0458eafc1338514
6210f7ca67f4f0bb45db614354f57d6be08d5f2b
describe
'30004' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCR' 'sip-files067.pro'
67cd6e0d515b9dee582110406dca3013
829f997af71198b0655e9979577aa3ab8d7c3903
describe
'64566' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCS' 'sip-files067.QC.jpg'
7afef1977c7b4d0168743554e4f2d442
cbea7e5e9e1bb9d6bf8d89294c3492d54bc2e3a0
'2011-12-31T12:59:36-05:00'
describe
'8667492' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCT' 'sip-files067.tif'
8f7a8685d07f912dc990c1c9a56e6ba6
34d3674c581b0cd2a44de47e32762b47964a4f02
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCU' 'sip-files067.txt'
40873c0605e410caf7fbbe09125c8533
fc4eff9bdac3303be828271d524d09777814fcde
describe
'34830' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCV' 'sip-files067thm.jpg'
d6a60f9d7a80ad891988b65f1e8e6214
2171824a38bd6632382ecc5011d0382bc5231f8a
describe
'1065754' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCW' 'sip-files068.jp2'
5c2c7bea0655be4226d8876c19f89f90
9c35f230f2419f0df686dbb3cdc0a96f6c2cf7cb
describe
'132534' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCX' 'sip-files068.jpg'
ca1b46234a1e58926909bd9f239e66fe
b558a34c300590897d3566333b096b343245f391
describe
'30547' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCY' 'sip-files068.pro'
c4c17ce7b15505c8573e24fd457167ba
e45f138e93b46aad0b3bf5d1e272117fd6aa18bd
describe
'66813' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARCZ' 'sip-files068.QC.jpg'
81b18aab2d98c7a35517e9599d51bbc5
917bfe1e19d84bf637461da01ae9f320673f25e0
'2011-12-31T13:01:30-05:00'
describe
'8667948' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDA' 'sip-files068.tif'
9a6a4062a26970bef3dbbd8bcc7c8d50
2e6f1e55740110e5e014a387c1a7b0ddb20ae139
'2011-12-31T13:01:41-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDB' 'sip-files068.txt'
38bf031885293cc76ea1f1172740e062
1bbad32e372966a6bced7a73ef50d4b3f1eec2d0
describe
'35731' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDC' 'sip-files068thm.jpg'
103de8ff12bc3dc0f617915d9e000e56
a88cd87d6edc74fb20b82766969d80e01c7232ba
describe
'1036913' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDD' 'sip-files069.jp2'
9a2c075da1bf657d4faeece7d0abe456
b6b6e3b5931bb6b695e2d61f89cdffa5f9b9fa21
describe
'128474' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDE' 'sip-files069.jpg'
a78cebdf50a7826a4d18ad988bce2854
b63d2452fcc55c5210a2bc6f4c3a09143f54178a
describe
'30608' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDF' 'sip-files069.pro'
43100620a4b78286c2a642923f0c02bc
0b8bb4f957f3d826bb5b32ebc18f3cd999cdca18
'2011-12-31T12:59:08-05:00'
describe
'65312' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDG' 'sip-files069.QC.jpg'
06a4e087d2dbfdb9b7c91395d91f4c4c
ea5d9015e9e9042954a436168d67e89cd065943e
describe
'8667664' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDH' 'sip-files069.tif'
471009599e750411f88697e5179a0c2e
16a8ca76b03c947f3b26e907dcc5125e2cc0dc85
'2011-12-31T12:57:56-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDI' 'sip-files069.txt'
ce244f4024b033404ae77fcd721cc4c2
fb9dd2fbb9addbfbf4a8520b7c78e00af2a2fe72
describe
'35159' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDJ' 'sip-files069thm.jpg'
0704d28271bc61802f7989fcb22c5b3c
cc03e7205abecc4ef9c2babf65f3a6e346cefbd8
describe
'982174' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDK' 'sip-files070.jp2'
3d62192330de9bf513352bc9a777c345
6eb097fd88ac360f0247eed5d85b46f3e1f2df1e
'2011-12-31T12:55:58-05:00'
describe
'123417' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDL' 'sip-files070.jpg'
9d6008f72760acedef028a3b65114474
48ab08595870b24433b7bdc06d9e0bac40a93583
'2011-12-31T13:02:15-05:00'
describe
'29229' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDM' 'sip-files070.pro'
d6602f0de5134c82ab165884ac0201a7
354fa98fd65cbcc5dfb82d8a019974aca83a7192
describe
'63827' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDN' 'sip-files070.QC.jpg'
a4c3269e6d1a8badfcf60ea6682008a9
c30e4d3491c9b8c9eceb2de9b45cf39cdc0b8229
'2011-12-31T12:58:51-05:00'
describe
'8667464' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDO' 'sip-files070.tif'
7d5394a2d6e7aa22846542a0e0c064fc
c6cc66b28cd645380c819c9b45c7efb3f0265adf
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDP' 'sip-files070.txt'
120675826013dafda35f9fb3bb37ced4
7def1018619aee5bb49e2b9c33df0659fd1774c8
'2011-12-31T12:56:50-05:00'
describe
'34922' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDQ' 'sip-files070thm.jpg'
306319d644cc22fc1c0a7977fc84ba50
8d421e06d3f2df6c77e800535aed1f36805de478
describe
'1028051' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDR' 'sip-files071.jp2'
4a7f4508ad0533df6f991509632930de
b9aea9158894c9ab142f2a5d2565ecf4a320a286
describe
'126424' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDS' 'sip-files071.jpg'
11f6da6b4e30553b21ed994194e67fbf
2fc75f097f59179836e5cfa9375356ae8bfe0c7c
'2011-12-31T12:55:36-05:00'
describe
'31125' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDT' 'sip-files071.pro'
922e7f0f336bd38f6b702cb6d1430069
d0dcf7adf369c7f1d0820eefc7dd45152bccd099
describe
'65872' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDU' 'sip-files071.QC.jpg'
ca6d21c231c79695dd87be5d2557a84e
56ab014ec5b2115f310173fdd3e3119e941c30aa
'2011-12-31T13:01:20-05:00'
describe
'8667792' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDV' 'sip-files071.tif'
18f8848b91cd479d56555be4a9117ee2
60af7ce979e89dfd525313a3157aa1b501b44a0c
'2011-12-31T12:57:23-05:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDW' 'sip-files071.txt'
481701b391ab5dcf808b80db5682bc10
f3579c0b238dad1ca1cf4bfcab694403a883285b
describe
'35510' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDX' 'sip-files071thm.jpg'
e2c319bc3e2c7749d8150cda9f6bb1c2
83bd52ea813d984f4968e55a2ed6052c97c80472
describe
'981796' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDY' 'sip-files072.jp2'
3cae57d1e31b424ca8f2c6862d79bbb1
26f09b38a20ac179bef2959518b5821e46e23345
describe
'122456' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARDZ' 'sip-files072.jpg'
5f32d6c356f5be514e4005578ed8efac
465a477e44fa11ae719095a4124d913f44895fe2
describe
'30227' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREA' 'sip-files072.pro'
bf361782122e2bb0f62d2214922be852
c778a5955a9c36ea9ae9782e5538f1ecbb39b3c2
describe
'64680' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREB' 'sip-files072.QC.jpg'
ea35a929003af59510f791934f04bcae
a7de4c1a4b471247076d41cd845ca783fd13e5d8
describe
'8667460' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREC' 'sip-files072.tif'
d637633ac951ac3a5fbe5d3052319c64
645ecbf7b5ef60257f194d430b00648948003561
'2011-12-31T12:56:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARED' 'sip-files072.txt'
81f656282d76a4a352a75beca0fa8c59
e7decce06960bc2cef3f943ed36be3d69001bd7a
describe
'34866' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREE' 'sip-files072thm.jpg'
88a89592dd606ed733c0bef270c89783
0f76bc4234b1294c1c4fb6860f36cc02bc361cb1
'2011-12-31T12:56:10-05:00'
describe
'988826' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREF' 'sip-files073.jp2'
f413ac960f8b96838c85861fcd0256d6
0bcd5578c91feed6a4552f263dc0723d75c32323
describe
'123917' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREG' 'sip-files073.jpg'
484b63d7aac9fe5a65248798e476d3d8
df0d05360474df17599d8acebe4ae927038fbd71
describe
'29788' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREH' 'sip-files073.pro'
2adb43f9604a369e3eaea9c14bd8e924
fcc28330ad925b2cc53668391628d2b9f71d1855
describe
'65625' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREI' 'sip-files073.QC.jpg'
26c2ee6c3537db9c7d51d01b36fd1a55
480c3024385cf6d9523bf4e1ee342f694d99cb16
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREJ' 'sip-files073.tif'
fa8ace2f6409a618cbb0b9b347db29ea
6850f1bde7b8cddbbab3903244e1ffafbe463a03
'2011-12-31T13:03:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREK' 'sip-files073.txt'
e6f7706ecb16d9a31eedb162572596ef
25942bb4e8fa0a463b15a0cab45149b6477f26d2
describe
'34732' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREL' 'sip-files073thm.jpg'
d59604e34211d3aef7881e948a8b5937
9938f14645ba40d8a2a703d1416baec7cba581f3
describe
'1027800' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREM' 'sip-files074.jp2'
4df1604ad776b915eb38cb4f34f8fea7
d6b248946cbda78bcf81645d42cb42a9ecd23a06
'2011-12-31T13:02:19-05:00'
describe
'127147' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREN' 'sip-files074.jpg'
0e0195edd6e0f1ed3b9d8da7efe43e70
937df287d0846f7e1b0ce6740e928afd05542650
'2011-12-31T12:56:52-05:00'
describe
'31521' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREO' 'sip-files074.pro'
f2500956c089f7fb7e8fba95a31ab809
2b517b094c3ebbfd2c4ea4b160a8341a908fefb4
describe
'65105' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREP' 'sip-files074.QC.jpg'
29fbd7aaa9db41d7c5ed700b2802efd2
72e5833e463b7be50d3368242e883125569b4c71
describe
'8667672' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREQ' 'sip-files074.tif'
110bb58b9c13246f4162a544c5041bef
0f6bf8b695db14a8ded09be910dabe2c377f6e2f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARER' 'sip-files074.txt'
0e95dde2c91ed021ed1f512477a5b80d
8e97ae308bca3065f50e027dc0a52aa9522f5a49
describe
'35002' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARES' 'sip-files074thm.jpg'
4c20b632a704378a489995292c3856cd
2dcc804be91fe06a16c5bc942046bbfaf8db6da3
'2011-12-31T13:00:22-05:00'
describe
'1002422' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARET' 'sip-files075.jp2'
c14f037abbbfbbd7f266f811a84feee7
662c407de9873882cdd753fb4789b2ef6fda6d2b
describe
'125003' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREU' 'sip-files075.jpg'
3c58703be08462a45d3df39d7e9df8ce
d0e979e3dcc827aca416ea895fa5810f0c8612f2
describe
'30719' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREV' 'sip-files075.pro'
12fd2941aa01e32b5c96a012c3241bef
7605f0d730f31d8c314f57487287bd3414d335a9
'2011-12-31T13:01:13-05:00'
describe
'63350' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREW' 'sip-files075.QC.jpg'
31aff14ace5deb4823069eb971061c26
ef035ee4254e53ddad4f0f7b924684cd2dbb2f1f
describe
'8667312' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREX' 'sip-files075.tif'
628a6e4e81fc0e494ff74e7a0804ac3d
46b316acaab049141b9057459b83ad857b2570cd
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREY' 'sip-files075.txt'
575f4500f15bdebada83e0f087e48a7c
543bf7bb46cdd17372330ef04c427530b7e3ecb3
describe
'34608' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAREZ' 'sip-files075thm.jpg'
da701bb200a7d198a05dabf9e17a45e7
066f4b0e341955dc5974c7d6b3d54166c3828900
describe
'1080247' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFA' 'sip-files076.jp2'
b6172e46ef13b50a516da323b2a1ca59
2a815a3653823e00267b0e118ca183818868f8d7
describe
'135419' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFB' 'sip-files076.jpg'
8787bea01e3451fab10019ca784415ca
3f27b9586cb9f1d55e9dc87f9ab7e1bfde45471a
'2011-12-31T13:02:51-05:00'
describe
'31464' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFC' 'sip-files076.pro'
36254464a4e73c42eb51f5f5586e981b
6974379ed0c7a2ed2e78717ff6414a7d02fbc854
'2011-12-31T12:59:15-05:00'
describe
'67858' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFD' 'sip-files076.QC.jpg'
ec2326dd9b026b0316e4824819c9aaf4
1c5e7d5395de2f83544d8943428342e8342517f6
describe
'8668216' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFE' 'sip-files076.tif'
f90eb1c89f4514c58434416c6ad01cb2
cdfea36bb372c0bfc6245c5a6eb13dd1db9d2355
'2011-12-31T13:01:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFF' 'sip-files076.txt'
740c641ea41d05cedad331efbcaed48a
aeee5e0b43984ce8ea0b94e11d157f014f413942
describe
'36104' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFG' 'sip-files076thm.jpg'
0405d4c32b5e2823f412562463e3334d
a7fcf416a9c33cb84480b3e9ebf92a0d95ab8e25
'2011-12-31T12:56:31-05:00'
describe
'1080238' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFH' 'sip-files077.jp2'
e7baa2497f60b13b75f0e6d3e12e6aba
2ba66862bd8e60b30e58d1d0326516b054bc4ecb
'2011-12-31T12:58:35-05:00'
describe
'135734' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFI' 'sip-files077.jpg'
8f5d0248c87ec4b7306f0cecfe8b456d
846ee15942ae06f19270013eed9c3b58d6098bc1
describe
'31221' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFJ' 'sip-files077.pro'
4169032a35183f2223e1dd30435961d8
49a22a076a44e7d2be8117e8b98b2c7d659e49c6
describe
'68089' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFK' 'sip-files077.QC.jpg'
7212891b30f50a82a2b3663324a0e379
e1b02a955cf494f79e7b46b2b890415d4c5a70da
describe
'8668292' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFL' 'sip-files077.tif'
c8c371ce2ce1057a8ab65ddef7e0dd97
cb9aeccd7038eebbcd483e1fa51384069ad51758
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFM' 'sip-files077.txt'
840f38fd3ccccb82e8facafc0206ca20
eabdbe8c3b1666dee46811d837321d0bdc46d546
describe
'36544' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFN' 'sip-files077thm.jpg'
79b4bd92d0edd029cc8d0d46bccebbb4
9993d3f9c3519aadd2264489aec533b762d69af4
describe
'1053126' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFO' 'sip-files078.jp2'
d9cb0fa5f698e313d1c31578a6555e22
e53a25664ca232eec90557b6797643b71f72443b
describe
'130991' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFP' 'sip-files078.jpg'
2907a6e013b59a7fe81e4e9c92f8589b
f71edccab992d2c31a698fb4b9d67ed96a755053
describe
'30040' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFQ' 'sip-files078.pro'
d256d4488d28a259caf7b32552e3e478
b69ee57028fe5cfbe8e03df2b314392d88d3da29
'2011-12-31T12:59:33-05:00'
describe
'65829' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFR' 'sip-files078.QC.jpg'
b055408c41dff6f5bfe4e0458c5dce91
57720db3953898b1a4a90f48049d27dfb897554f
describe
'8668176' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFS' 'sip-files078.tif'
6d40d17f14526a7058dec9bcc9dd63bc
7db1c9df62ac1a9ca77048ced9be93290d3f97c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFT' 'sip-files078.txt'
6a4d8d86d754fb9dc56459f51ca52159
efbdd59b0bbff6b1954de7cf4c26a5cba0711b0a
describe
'36114' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFU' 'sip-files078thm.jpg'
e286e6d7dcae4e4cc0ac5903ada0a83c
50b93e7e7e3221540c547329b613c10a987bb085
'2011-12-31T12:56:46-05:00'
describe
'1050908' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFV' 'sip-files079.jp2'
fb72117500f1bf17032651ce8f142b3a
7b2f49e58541df10fbb2f9e2055c081ce2e2c7e1
describe
'131197' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFW' 'sip-files079.jpg'
03886df86ccdaeb65bc86c6ff013deda
fa1ff3da7ed84eeea85cef2d1b6f7ca81324bc23
'2011-12-31T13:00:19-05:00'
describe
'30704' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFX' 'sip-files079.pro'
8b80c088c5e9076079ba2bc218631d49
61fe422cd6dd79b7a4a1a93d8e19ab5ca90706f3
describe
'66382' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFY' 'sip-files079.QC.jpg'
b9c286ed5f80c6e9a8c9d7ff5ef06ca9
a89f3815f82d9c896d1ea8e0868b11201c824817
describe
'8667944' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARFZ' 'sip-files079.tif'
7747ddc22babf978c0a98943589c641b
73a1a915e4557154b4aa531ee4f1197d02bc0ea1
'2011-12-31T13:02:59-05:00'
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGA' 'sip-files079.txt'
691ccddc23d33b4a3415a7797506a0ac
bece0ca93f8ebc2963a1e75d62dae4ba0799177d
describe
'35772' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGB' 'sip-files079thm.jpg'
7e2ea126078594622ddf323c3b473d87
5af4cfb0e2d29a285e5556a3024c804fdfa83a2d
'2011-12-31T12:58:07-05:00'
describe
'1015408' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGC' 'sip-files080.jp2'
34339699cce6f5839aec6ce40287478f
8caaf0fa3828d32d5b8097dd3a28947a8762bed9
describe
'127143' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGD' 'sip-files080.jpg'
2790b8806a9ee9f931e06fdc486d900b
1c7d0a729f6bf3bc4cb284cdc839d0d28da8344f
describe
'29522' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGE' 'sip-files080.pro'
912c0bc08fac8fdb9dc08491fee75f31
7d544c4f498eb26b50524c63c16d574c409fbcf5
'2011-12-31T12:57:33-05:00'
describe
'64723' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGF' 'sip-files080.QC.jpg'
5714d3afe1dc4ce16266091168575ad9
fd4461a3f2ae4d78671ae66836be7a70faadfde0
describe
'8667500' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGG' 'sip-files080.tif'
1da030a8583560f7e8b3624d3db50514
28487256754ca0ecced3b71623e84c8ee8267316
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGH' 'sip-files080.txt'
45a394664339e171b4ee19c29b34fdff
70a22ed2ab1ee3576d9825e7041eaa763ec7f8e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGI' 'sip-files080thm.jpg'
964a6bf0f277deef7ff6819b16f83002
ed9fbb0195c50186cd3e4783d1d3fe795e04cd8a
'2011-12-31T13:02:13-05:00'
describe
'1064430' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGJ' 'sip-files081.jp2'
dea5354edbf24c0efac0335c0e4dcf79
a432d2640027cd52927f8fe8541960793fb3e1b3
'2011-12-31T12:55:32-05:00'
describe
'132608' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGK' 'sip-files081.jpg'
dd42bcd62fe359da17a0cef752887774
8e6a694e40b4d93bf03c46424a87173c7f1e3bb2
'2011-12-31T12:58:04-05:00'
describe
'30983' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGL' 'sip-files081.pro'
acbe5c006b37f6645f8cf6a5adc8d1a7
f21bce2181cf913a446a47fc97aa565e7c229515
'2011-12-31T12:55:24-05:00'
describe
'67144' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGM' 'sip-files081.QC.jpg'
873c6394bd4e16b35322b1738e6844b2
030c494b4e34265e6412a7bc40fe78664262a768
'2011-12-31T13:02:47-05:00'
describe
'8667852' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGN' 'sip-files081.tif'
48991002a13700abfc8915a3c071068e
3caa8a6b57c71e1201931f8ead64813827513f70
'2011-12-31T13:03:20-05:00'
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGO' 'sip-files081.txt'
f9d9068dddb6a6c4f4c80b99e855f70f
883786ad8390bf4cf8ffe358c85541dbfe78ce83
describe
'35786' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGP' 'sip-files081thm.jpg'
5dcbd2b5b269f14a72e5bd65131a9227
db5c3caf4724dfc7d2e71b704e08f3a256bf1962
describe
'1030798' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGQ' 'sip-files082.jp2'
64931b71817fe1d189a89e8da238c91f
49b7bd24b210a0ac73c78174dd245d9d9dfb7870
describe
'129225' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGR' 'sip-files082.jpg'
0c4acd4c7fbf9e5da9e1f97fc69ab628
80db96253c6e10121d816652a9650649104dbd7e
describe
'29872' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGS' 'sip-files082.pro'
2a2fd67db5e0df707438bbbd0b429578
62e4be0f4194aabd83fed187ff4870c2f2bf07f3
describe
'65576' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGT' 'sip-files082.QC.jpg'
2866a5a9752d5e7f1b9db68956142acf
e94211de398f76c01c093c2737b19fb08a6e0cca
'2011-12-31T12:58:14-05:00'
describe
'8668112' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGU' 'sip-files082.tif'
a829ca514ef414b0c61bd8c92bcc9f14
1de35942737d64e23ff01a1d2e6d64e40ca23099
'2011-12-31T13:03:33-05:00'
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGV' 'sip-files082.txt'
8eb45b8052bde0ddfa5b83bd4a899f64
d0086e74dba4bcf59ceda5ffba2416f6c700d3ef
describe
'35746' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGW' 'sip-files082thm.jpg'
dd7f21c792a8e159f01aca11e260b6e6
b1f5aead69abe90a86f43ce5d615860a93c2a8d1
describe
'1053625' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGX' 'sip-files083.jp2'
c162f135100caab269d7cb38d2724a4b
2307bbb20ddb50e1b650a454d05f08c3e52d52ad
describe
'131616' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGY' 'sip-files083.jpg'
482cdd9604ffa5e8d8878726f94ee142
b6dcc43a91341f1013c352d2520dbf327962e146
'2011-12-31T13:02:46-05:00'
describe
'30658' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARGZ' 'sip-files083.pro'
3682ff33800f7a02bae81f2cb3ac7368
8b855c948252e34a97167b0389caf078753b650f
describe
'66815' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHA' 'sip-files083.QC.jpg'
08242974dfcc497427db150860b9ff11
1600abb666f941241b797e0bc4bb10d7483f4c6c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHB' 'sip-files083.tif'
2f0fee30ff46fb8e5de3f0491c1001cb
f0dd0374391ca3f37dbd47ef38e63553dcbdc8da
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHC' 'sip-files083.txt'
bebf0cb75dc064d6a92bc5e4322ab497
129a685e07a7c68fabce2dbb14ee083cc1327134
describe
'35939' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHD' 'sip-files083thm.jpg'
b0cdad81c41c7be68bb40e67b2061a29
9b0ae9ecec8789a4a83d7d12ecb958a1bc4eda80
describe
'968064' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHE' 'sip-files084.jp2'
60f66117cde831488788d69f7df49b5e
546dcd597ff340c6e82be73b6f5fcc89da92c911
'2011-12-31T12:59:59-05:00'
describe
'122659' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHF' 'sip-files084.jpg'
dc81c560e978876baf6f7fcb54d5cdec
a56c4febb76cc2229291ef72972b7bc5a80ced13
describe
'28043' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHG' 'sip-files084.pro'
7e3bfb9c2abbc8c2148fbb6b56dbaa64
0318000272eb2d0e4e95bf1434a3fb790da1b87f
describe
'62851' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHH' 'sip-files084.QC.jpg'
3e54c9cb422c0bda1b9ad48bfe9cff63
b994113fb90188d7ac529ec933c28d73b0616a09
describe
'8667776' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHI' 'sip-files084.tif'
3b4e52191755eb16c1cb2ed7f1d3dca2
528747fa9544853cf740f866ba62b97619e9f0b2
'2011-12-31T12:55:38-05:00'
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHJ' 'sip-files084.txt'
c24e0ffbcff1d1ceb3e4f5138fb38b98
d3c76fcc12b8195ec2233a7b3a5d48ccabab901e
describe
'35272' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHK' 'sip-files084thm.jpg'
3cf1ba3a12ab933a78d2375b245dbb90
5c05190eb4cdbed421ce8a9caf67f1449325fa73
'2011-12-31T12:56:27-05:00'
describe
'1006839' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHL' 'sip-files085.jp2'
2435a629782540357811fae6b70f7c8d
a059599c09de794b36f40675e2bc989395af417b
describe
'126518' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHM' 'sip-files085.jpg'
bff848fb34d4965637af2b19e2e3422f
99f9c96bac1b91b7386ac21b5fed723901d4d8b9
'2011-12-31T13:00:59-05:00'
describe
'30855' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHN' 'sip-files085.pro'
419db2a7e3cf3dc7c8d906d5c6bb0e64
4b19996a157d84ed654983cea0218827d0340b7b
describe
'64885' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHO' 'sip-files085.QC.jpg'
77ae2ca55e3f3df53b3172755f93a1d9
333444969e3e1280c5cbca34c8f23253ee176ea5
'2011-12-31T12:55:41-05:00'
describe
'8667844' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHP' 'sip-files085.tif'
157d96f041d378743085813e6badc6d9
c3e360661f9aeccaaa13c8cc7c157ecd5f6a05d1
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHQ' 'sip-files085.txt'
7950cd61bfdc311a9beee9450e82dabc
0f7df5413a712dcc52493eb264e54bebff7a26bf
describe
'35692' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHR' 'sip-files085thm.jpg'
18ba917c414dcd839cee857319933a0e
d5b9341285b2fa3ca7828ca689df6cb8ceab70bb
describe
'1025375' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHS' 'sip-files086.jp2'
e4af3a0e591748778db17507a8189d48
1e9f98a143fd44f57fbe768eeeec6fdd440fe3e5
'2011-12-31T13:03:34-05:00'
describe
'129280' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHT' 'sip-files086.jpg'
4bb3fed3be7189e832f8b9ee19757bf2
522f123facc992f73ca04303fb3f5975e9a6c34b
'2011-12-31T13:01:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHU' 'sip-files086.pro'
b08e0ba2c4419549b0b3bfd5065a2215
6c9ccdf1c0f36994289e4c7e73ac22e4b71f1296
describe
'64936' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHV' 'sip-files086.QC.jpg'
2d69b1f46d9f24b4610261eeadc7189a
58f32e096f6c28d2df562499077ba137442d1f23
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHW' 'sip-files086.tif'
24ff510845f3509db0f5b90b276c417e
3211e6d22688ae91b7e0384a6aa6dcafe2b71ab4
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHX' 'sip-files086.txt'
70e7ccd906f677dc37595c99156b5d80
f2ac2e490f2d21ca65206e4c9c24591f8c97b0af
describe
'35273' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHY' 'sip-files086thm.jpg'
ca2769f9b822d4818004069b46de58cd
0ec98a8dbc649bdb052c6cba9d069fc8491d2e8b
describe
'948116' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARHZ' 'sip-files087.jp2'
32e7b10d326a9038af771efeb07fb557
a51bf981f75894811b067c060eaa0d59d88dc0a3
'2011-12-31T12:57:05-05:00'
describe
'119195' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIA' 'sip-files087.jpg'
0e59c12ea1d4edd155f460c76e05364e
e49e866673b6f8fe00a11c0c89c92dc78a059f34
describe
'28691' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIB' 'sip-files087.pro'
b146086a8f5a13a9cb1b0cdb167eecc9
0592d369fe6e4d08c04e5b9752a81170d6471a7b
describe
'62045' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIC' 'sip-files087.QC.jpg'
365fc02d8d857ee8afee5f73cfc4788e
e2617fc29c03e53724cdf43f2d765cff4e942414
describe
'8667160' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARID' 'sip-files087.tif'
0ee5bf98798220bf94af96afdf727510
c8238ccbea6d788b5875578a5d6bcebded632246
'2011-12-31T13:02:16-05:00'
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIE' 'sip-files087.txt'
7f06cd8656470e7ac33c0806fb4e5ca4
5eff1c53cf421ddbf48f823b6418a2a9cc22fd7c
describe
'34299' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIF' 'sip-files087thm.jpg'
940163239566f8ec2ec54cffef6d3203
e221af6d46463899729744e053e741611f8767c1
'2011-12-31T12:59:12-05:00'
describe
'1045121' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIG' 'sip-files088.jp2'
8f298bc9652ababe9c15cfa7e3bec23c
de3eb4597609d179e529872a7ae97976de79d585
'2011-12-31T13:00:27-05:00'
describe
'129805' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIH' 'sip-files088.jpg'
e7983e99b8134c4046424d1ce5d493c6
f92b233c6c421a7a2aa726ac6d142f48fa4f4d66
describe
'30084' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARII' 'sip-files088.pro'
e1d37030ddae7ceeaff946cbc6f5160b
83beca7d58d986d2e21582f6349926aab053e1ca
'2011-12-31T12:57:04-05:00'
describe
'66439' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIJ' 'sip-files088.QC.jpg'
5b62f47857407ff2b52faec877b544d4
fe3c294f0c44dd3e7c39a2ad85837dee56fd15ef
'2011-12-31T13:03:05-05:00'
describe
'8667920' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIK' 'sip-files088.tif'
1c4aa8bbad3f41a7fe5b9f5512ec801d
14fe2f0d1987cebf4992b4ca6ef2c8f4091e93a3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIL' 'sip-files088.txt'
31e83c5209dbdf23086c6d187e91a5e8
800b45a849547833be8d704abc202cbf6eca4e85
'2011-12-31T12:57:45-05:00'
describe
'35971' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIM' 'sip-files088thm.jpg'
0c15cbf07fdf1a14fc772b0166968e40
2f0c229286e6dff751d0bb2b6d47bfb2a8a99457
describe
'991584' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIN' 'sip-files089.jp2'
17886c0cdadb99fab6e8b223b832289f
9bdf41628b53b3fd6a984fca6f8728300b46802a
describe
'125513' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIO' 'sip-files089.jpg'
e8c62c3f2f8affa43ae762f6a132d7cc
633c61896babedb72338c13c4834cc412060d2ce
describe
'30409' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIP' 'sip-files089.pro'
847d1e0d5f570275afcb0682cc396ca8
92582813ce02323788654298fe33645e7c6aadc9
describe
'64339' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIQ' 'sip-files089.QC.jpg'
6af50e62cf6236c27cbe31b80a80e748
f862b4d204c3b24935cdcb61bbc5d5c3fec4768e
describe
'8667860' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIR' 'sip-files089.tif'
3548c568593df9c4c44d120f9af397bc
e99e2f3f86c972ba883277959a33b34d083c3b9b
'2011-12-31T12:55:49-05:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIS' 'sip-files089.txt'
9b6f60b7b85555317af69a1915af1aaa
5290419146dba49fc6509243c14a6d81ef6b37b2
describe
'35832' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIT' 'sip-files089thm.jpg'
7f1c19eed7341817c2f6d157b20ab210
97d7c2b7cacc9fce72db38f1608210e89a6ee2f6
describe
'973950' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIU' 'sip-files090.jp2'
c7084687e4a083e5abbb945f25655c79
8b07ff7f3dc04e3992599a518662ec7aa0dd5fe5
'2011-12-31T13:02:05-05:00'
describe
'123434' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIV' 'sip-files090.jpg'
4f5f3a189595106e3bcdbdf4613de84a
71069d5ef09e5b4ebce46ba4e7c60116a25ddd38
describe
'28545' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIW' 'sip-files090.pro'
399ce5a4ca823399b38ac146682e2d8e
baae9d8e304d6b07b16f85f0d7cdc8a2bc64b480
describe
'63550' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIX' 'sip-files090.QC.jpg'
375e90548c69fafb8d343b84b05b8b58
5e323ed8337076877480d2312ed199d3ed6ba306
describe
'8667680' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIY' 'sip-files090.tif'
83140b08dda9e07640dd016bc1a9e11f
a438a3c00c5fa2a59e06bf418f7327ace55e814f
'2011-12-31T13:03:15-05:00'
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARIZ' 'sip-files090.txt'
0c8fe64e3787f33f47aeb28017829615
b9a21095ffb7ea35ffc86a9dcff86aa0283b4bf8
'2011-12-31T12:56:48-05:00'
describe
'35171' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJA' 'sip-files090thm.jpg'
627b71306656b9b5f7354e834ad8bdc3
c4a0749f069291ff312c41fe39260158c0aac887
'2011-12-31T12:59:58-05:00'
describe
'1019172' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJB' 'sip-files091.jp2'
3b8ee9585b2bc10a40e1e358f23a4e02
1dcda0f291d82b2ac07e88805f37be3a36dc4532
'2011-12-31T12:57:52-05:00'
describe
'127694' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJC' 'sip-files091.jpg'
373944dc294c9a1326f14f1d0923d10d
7f03bf047059218a761b8473f5a410eff81c2393
describe
'29677' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJD' 'sip-files091.pro'
32135b8e88b2535d768d59e593473e88
7070e378bebd76cb35f40d0123b83a86d14cf92d
describe
'8667720' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJE' 'sip-files091.tif'
2d826c762d573cf195980b107d486c91
a52be6c1714734e73f397a12ddc7606d0256e458
describe
'64405' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJF' 'sip-files091.QC.jpg'
28e5368102323c9d17e18a04e77b8ae1
0258b273896f840ec0d2038d1043e4328de26177
'2011-12-31T13:00:26-05:00'
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJG' 'sip-files091.txt'
4c398b03a1f3145b8a3a67ffa5439862
0564afece80773a8a1d9d0ec8027ea701bb9ceab
describe
'35200' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJH' 'sip-files091thm.jpg'
f78d09a159748b6d45b74a4c2bd85a6a
a1e4ece26b20c5a16e30736a21936a1e2040ba8a
describe
'973925' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJI' 'sip-files092.jp2'
abb487800a16f272db6a5906c42e7ecc
6b2d6f1d267be4cb4d5f75140e1b9246b6487328
describe
'123483' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJJ' 'sip-files092.jpg'
1039453b561430ecaa59f6f509f5b906
9da47c275200830426dc39372f5e26f11bfe73ca
'2011-12-31T13:00:00-05:00'
describe
'29571' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJK' 'sip-files092.pro'
d072a43e816c54cef63389cde8f740ed
676e02e27139ecb4fb4104f2fd9e569808e801b8
describe
'63680' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJL' 'sip-files092.QC.jpg'
146b271c7c1804387e8a48f741f93369
35725c125a101b111977fccedcbb9ca71e7bd488
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJM' 'sip-files092.tif'
76071684243f467b198a5ed8b52ca217
9cda69b3bbae709e7205019653839dfc52a68143
'2011-12-31T13:00:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJN' 'sip-files092.txt'
3a9569e464aff648e95283f73cc46e6e
3fa2c4570c7fa9a036d604c655840ed681ebb3c3
describe
'35095' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJO' 'sip-files092thm.jpg'
426fc778f4c58988cea2f77d870f3c92
8536458fe1e24fdb741c897006278c1ca5dd890c
'2011-12-31T12:59:46-05:00'
describe
'1019550' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJP' 'sip-files093.jp2'
b1f336650f1a87a4158bfccd77a828d0
856afd1c6d9b6af4580b81823dd0fb7a9d25413f
describe
'127332' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJQ' 'sip-files093.jpg'
ceec6497ceed55c525b0fa89ae937ac6
b00447605bd1e005fd699e1826101e911f2339ea
describe
'32686' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJR' 'sip-files093.pro'
abf05119b34adf1a910de4c3cb3b608c
ddb0df47953e0d67925997a55ef948ec4fbb041e
'2011-12-31T12:56:39-05:00'
describe
'66112' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJS' 'sip-files093.QC.jpg'
804ee47c7be1876481d3ea8e8c338949
0eb01f515fcad2be73d7ac6524fcfc6026306181
'2011-12-31T13:02:09-05:00'
describe
'8668020' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJT' 'sip-files093.tif'
563727675da1da623c067e4cf50d1375
e54980dc72b6f72bbefb1ffb76cca7601610ea54
'2011-12-31T13:02:45-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJU' 'sip-files093.txt'
6a992e2c7a17d4a5bb77a73c297beb84
4857dcd48f07621843d54768f870de4f0542b80b
describe
'36092' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJV' 'sip-files093thm.jpg'
dd675b2df79a87c89c67a3a9dea1c661
b20252c9d931c16eae5d3157b8266b35038a388e
'2011-12-31T12:59:14-05:00'
describe
'911672' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJW' 'sip-files094.jp2'
d6f7d218b3b2a927bdf9cf21ad970d65
53c645ab642980da450f4c292ebc7f513d1f583d
describe
'116435' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJX' 'sip-files094.jpg'
cf8fe5ff7ef028debd35035ad2a83bc9
0d6ff81b22e91e2a52c13931bbe03e47ae737e3f
describe
'26086' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJY' 'sip-files094.pro'
68eff93c5e5d16bed5131bfbf4febab2
436b446948a95bbdffb4616a77cacf4a285c6cef
describe
'60928' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARJZ' 'sip-files094.QC.jpg'
c3bd2b97f5b3d1962fb799aaefc11ccc
abfe99b98a73ec28b6c807ef998c98114480e19d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKA' 'sip-files094.tif'
c65899d834c68455545a21d8d6b26da8
0b59a60925aedc14e2306cb60aad3169dbeca552
'2011-12-31T12:58:19-05:00'
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKB' 'sip-files094.txt'
a154b8a7df6dddc779ff2cf606690359
14d523904e2765eba10072716ca0603922f6d912
'2011-12-31T12:58:12-05:00'
describe
'34616' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKC' 'sip-files094thm.jpg'
fbe92adfaaba1161ae3ed346da4f028d
56e3d3b926ecee52138095ffa2cf3bc03470b549
describe
'991502' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKD' 'sip-files095.jp2'
529e5999c405f08b087e5da51a0aa8f2
2bd2f95fa67e5f7fde1c93d6acac73a0c271ef50
'2011-12-31T12:58:37-05:00'
describe
'124816' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKE' 'sip-files095.jpg'
e9d08d95d2703901405ed12ade0a0625
a4fa5f3bb3673046b44a8b5724d828e4c9d67a5e
'2011-12-31T13:01:12-05:00'
describe
'29032' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKF' 'sip-files095.pro'
f8b258e4adbea25be0e8d5692f85e6bb
ac794e1ced1a543eb71f07abb71dca6b4f6c7f79
describe
'63730' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKG' 'sip-files095.QC.jpg'
242e20e4eceb9f22a9a8009fbd0a44cf
3ed710083bf083328cb1ee3b299446d7a08b5371
'2011-12-31T12:58:34-05:00'
describe
'8667360' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKH' 'sip-files095.tif'
118e30429c6087460045dfc3e4b011ff
3768f0d5755a4e87c3ff37b9b0837223f198bce6
'2011-12-31T13:01:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKI' 'sip-files095.txt'
4b4d1bddfe76fffbf21ae8282d7604af
cae332a031aff9d6ccacc5862e68becf21c2e534
'2011-12-31T12:59:29-05:00'
describe
'34650' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKJ' 'sip-files095thm.jpg'
060396b60d7878daaa7c7aa5884a7645
88c40bc2604803ca2171abaad79955b8d6e7d8e8
describe
'973996' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKK' 'sip-files096.jp2'
3f9ea59d32066ed3c37ece0bf0d4827a
6851864b9b64086e6675c3488b7aaa95d307f855
describe
'123252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKL' 'sip-files096.jpg'
be9d1bf32ff4b04d1d7ac407d6f0c079
b649b99178fb42e5d31c3b973ff6ad008c18122f
'2011-12-31T12:57:06-05:00'
describe
'27993' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKM' 'sip-files096.pro'
93f7804ab13acfe357e375c42d372bf7
1a14982b6aa92ccda328dfdf1541d20ee793dce3
describe
'62982' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKN' 'sip-files096.QC.jpg'
512ff2de3f3eb4b9fc92b66ae960f025
6549d277f1fbfd6cadbdd0e9639a7927bca7157e
describe
'8667684' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKO' 'sip-files096.tif'
a0481a3094c103f3b46210e576ee059d
36fa8b0dd644135430c97e31f148d0cb04f08889
'2011-12-31T13:02:02-05:00'
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKP' 'sip-files096.txt'
a93ec597560767b921949451adad266c
50d906cd55e25dda8c2a0534e62c2354a0045e79
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKQ' 'sip-files096thm.jpg'
21782009a69efd6f35a23becacba08fa
d4d1d77351b4a6a980b7e13f3aeddfba74a370dd
describe
'1005611' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKR' 'sip-files097.jp2'
3d5e7f0ba8d7e10cd83b99217b1f4ee2
b189b8564f900f57f3f76a4c7742c31634bb94f7
describe
'126212' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKS' 'sip-files097.jpg'
bf252e8276cd6c88ecc50c9132886421
e0e2beabe9e36fb6b0b4d131522679f438a4fa92
'2011-12-31T12:56:35-05:00'
describe
'30799' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKT' 'sip-files097.pro'
157ce6f6cb47483a85d4745a439bc776
3088a93424cddeb388e62b1fe2efea6d40daf70b
describe
'64190' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKU' 'sip-files097.QC.jpg'
0e32f82f364293ac4d4167d9096d6957
273502f2f80d7984acb6546c9e50f85413e9d9fc
'2011-12-31T13:01:14-05:00'
describe
'8667148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKV' 'sip-files097.tif'
ceb3f6920e2503a11f532c8df4dfff0a
8dc7dcb7cf856e5ff1ffdc8e1f3735fc5ace654d
'2011-12-31T12:56:11-05:00'
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKW' 'sip-files097.txt'
ba1f4e5f79d84cb3c2ae009bf1b5572a
b52ad0deddccc2e4fece50b65658b24227c40122
describe
'34448' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKX' 'sip-files097thm.jpg'
ddf08bcafb5ff11a3411770508b493f6
5438c9f137edce999d9d884f435726df8caf3d10
describe
'958726' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKY' 'sip-files098.jp2'
f059f47e9b87fa5a06bcd555e10a5e80
31924e4615f05c27575c2618f5ce737d4c0901c8
describe
'121449' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARKZ' 'sip-files098.jpg'
ba7688f590c4ed51065f7e9f9f4c96f5
ca76b59149c99f427a9b4226e4d67f7c1df6a083
describe
'27032' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLA' 'sip-files098.pro'
38aa08573a33d6a8dc09a6b63e0ae533
07b8fc14db7a6e5932fdb0e10cfca4fbbe1c2961
describe
'62064' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLB' 'sip-files098.QC.jpg'
b275dfe3b4f40d50cdd5c20ad78507a9
bbfe29c1b793650fab6135425007699782a3fdde
describe
'8667512' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLC' 'sip-files098.tif'
fa3d3a3f40c9262d9560de2d792cd7f7
899d23247800d03961a7cd57a82673fc698625b0
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLD' 'sip-files098.txt'
c7617eec2bc0e40955d7e29ece92f6d6
f01abca59c7f17cc336a85ef8510245e11953172
'2011-12-31T13:02:40-05:00'
describe
'34731' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLE' 'sip-files098thm.jpg'
4b9aa5d6c3ce4b2e7281f1d217f17cbb
cee3dd32dcefcc38bc2b79d820e33ec7648ca457
describe
'1003215' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLF' 'sip-files099.jp2'
8b729003b44e1523dcdebaa1079555a2
1d3aa779ec45390661992f3abc8c6991a91d8c0d
describe
'125067' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLG' 'sip-files099.jpg'
42e9ba5879c1d78b38c104e1b6a1fe3b
306996c1b7f027c2cedff57a189793956e768411
'2011-12-31T12:57:54-05:00'
describe
'29267' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLH' 'sip-files099.pro'
1eba7fff9b3ef6824b7773f73e34ae39
5cf0f167a1eeaa03a5def3328db5a21511e3353f
describe
'63982' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLI' 'sip-files099.QC.jpg'
0b548bee6ea83cad364d5fe6363d245f
055118b58b9640d15a8d0b0017c68a7a2a5f7524
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLJ' 'sip-files099.tif'
6c924d208d91d3d741ca41266afacd16
b432b8fdb33a1908b1840b413d4535651692dbf9
'2011-12-31T13:00:29-05:00'
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLK' 'sip-files099.txt'
46b4567455b1e8b558ad6596cbfe46c3
6f9c2053b3d80bc5dd9799b282011d5306cce844
describe
'934729' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLL' 'sip-files100.jp2'
d0edafd9dff30e0a92a9d076294acc4f
bcae252d1bb292a821e1d5b077146f7ebec056a5
describe
'34803' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLM' 'sip-files099thm.jpg'
42548d32432f2c3ca36e17c544530454
ee5957b321c4d068140820dc2ca95bb08760eec5
describe
'118503' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLN' 'sip-files100.jpg'
6299d7fb2a2c454f460606df665a6356
7c2340123203d0e550c66149531e4bc945f55b20
describe
'28659' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLO' 'sip-files100.pro'
c43f9943378a6dfe61cee43f7daaf2f0
e340058d87242623eb7df57b2604e5de592cf8fa
describe
'62359' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLP' 'sip-files100.QC.jpg'
a9dd7bbcf56cece475d62ac29afd5972
20c0ebef35052ce99b4dc3a9df18ed3081931a86
describe
'8667136' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLQ' 'sip-files100.tif'
de18255e4136288ff461a20468face54
0b0c58d8f5b560b520cc27edd6988aebb69c361b
'2011-12-31T13:00:04-05:00'
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLR' 'sip-files100.txt'
d78fb9f9cec04144cd2138e791e03773
223cb0ec371c03e4d6898deead4e5d00f6539775
'2011-12-31T12:59:21-05:00'
describe
'34099' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLS' 'sip-files100thm.jpg'
b4400468b3185723915d8e53bf42cedd
68ad7b15dfaa6a4157028e2fcff476c6560482e1
'2011-12-31T13:02:10-05:00'
describe
'1019601' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLT' 'sip-files101.jp2'
eab26aacd0d36b5638f13f8327096568
70e145952d6d687e695541f917f412879662afc3
describe
'127508' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLU' 'sip-files101.jpg'
78b0ad0d3c2b67a95dcd3af286c8a910
70b8e088515161d8cbb1ce5730dcface8512183a
describe
'30495' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLV' 'sip-files101.pro'
977aa84d76f117ee0654fb2e18a8c4de
be623aacd5ed431a4fc8d93373ba22410022f31d
describe
'64133' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLW' 'sip-files101.QC.jpg'
5c1648ae840758fda03b13150ea43ce7
be45392b5fb5e25b6c742447ec73455ccc69d908
describe
'8667284' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLX' 'sip-files101.tif'
8369160506fec7845edd0056f0a2abd9
f35a63890f81b6eda8cb82e815b11aa5d6c8f54f
'2011-12-31T12:58:32-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLY' 'sip-files101.txt'
c931989f6591e53743406c75298139dd
6ddd47941329e5129c17709583a15a3682cc7af7
describe
'34559' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARLZ' 'sip-files101thm.jpg'
4cbaaa7579ce6eaff11f725ea1b5644b
529d61ae0c9ddbefcdbcc097abfc20b35a9830f9
describe
'987673' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMA' 'sip-files102.jp2'
74497063133f7ce06da0a31e5dd53482
9bf3b73b987057fbe276ffcee3f98d259f939f61
describe
'124148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMB' 'sip-files102.jpg'
e825f70fa9ac2dfddebcfb9dd4120e6a
53a49ff8a47c736931a24d35d3de8bbc902e5c7d
describe
'28386' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMC' 'sip-files102.pro'
d96c0d3e15233e01037afbde47df44cc
0ddb0ea1e825e19afd23f03507daf2640bc240f3
'2011-12-31T12:57:09-05:00'
describe
'64122' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMD' 'sip-files102.QC.jpg'
38fcd80d3b1816923de51dcf556da4cc
60a2829ab5cf05b711379aa47d65c45f55f6bf70
describe
'8667780' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARME' 'sip-files102.tif'
38cdbb91c9fd440dc4bf9962f1f8a349
ee1d09883fd79573398bfd08658868f3dd885219
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMF' 'sip-files102.txt'
c74843996732002bda87a8175a9b49f5
0604712e73632225dd784a373ccbac2cc0177d87
describe
'35446' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMG' 'sip-files102thm.jpg'
64b9eadbf5879abdead2724f34193eb3
b3b92e4cbce94dde493a332843b363bda9104b78
'2011-12-31T12:58:49-05:00'
describe
'1080253' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMH' 'sip-files103.jp2'
4b3c3296da7d24d27fd45a696cf42614
0775cf88bfe4609008d55754356b46efde06b5f5
describe
'134823' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMI' 'sip-files103.jpg'
fd8665777ee0bb2b04ff87bd01916ac9
6d439b87cabc3cee2070fdc2b5a38a04b3e942e8
describe
'31208' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMJ' 'sip-files103.pro'
6e9821759906c7d3678911f4e789d3d6
641ddb1660541937c098d918aedc212ce96e04bc
describe
'67193' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMK' 'sip-files103.QC.jpg'
7cbf64d8bb57fa97e3b4514cd1097247
d9c2fd36362e790a784856178cfb68f3ee0df7ad
describe
'8667828' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARML' 'sip-files103.tif'
96990decfbe58c2d06dfcc1cc0c2f84d
a7d5047e341879151f193d5b6416161ce86756a7
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMM' 'sip-files103.txt'
abe1237d47a2e5cb029e729d062f1a9c
701c16101ffd681e93d3145246e377ac93e82843
describe
'35700' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMN' 'sip-files103thm.jpg'
7ec3a57b22adb5530a98b40b5165b53c
cfc93a10dea133dfba919336c288c8823984afe6
describe
'986147' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMO' 'sip-files104.jp2'
05cbf7236e1df2cdca06926649fe1348
d442faec417b9693babaa909ad6fe81298e9d1d8
describe
'124508' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMP' 'sip-files104.jpg'
8f36fe22d825f8964c61dc75ecac49ff
64470f0a8965717943285fd406f72cc33b1ce0ae
describe
'29865' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMQ' 'sip-files104.pro'
4af844d9954a1668dc3e7671dc2d1978
73d57a87d60e8682a9f59e479d03b219edc43f38
describe
'63820' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMR' 'sip-files104.QC.jpg'
ae5c664aeefd3399604f02668d152536
6f4e22793315245755f947b226f1d1d6758cef80
describe
'8667368' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMS' 'sip-files104.tif'
53978d5becb43bf1b28600dbaf6aca35
70cbf3bc0f5997fc2130044ce5ef7dacf1136e1e
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMT' 'sip-files104.txt'
2c56fa2fb54535b8a86603c0c5b7fb41
d344a6f05bd2a915ba08aa5bc5c86ed245b5f14e
describe
'34452' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMU' 'sip-files104thm.jpg'
4dda50e50ff4442cf1ad390a373695f4
814b456ebd4386d7bb1ca17c0231d7b9d10a681d
describe
'965878' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMV' 'sip-files105.jp2'
c667d49497997a68f656d72b4a8c6f45
13068bdd20ec17100ad3f59bf081673239e21656
describe
'122780' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMW' 'sip-files105.jpg'
154313434ab40a6d836747a92045fbe7
6cdadfbf1e940bcece13217f40f52839a6c5e26b
describe
'29319' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMX' 'sip-files105.pro'
6e27d7dbb9148e92bf683c50d32f1dad
ca7a5fed85ee44c5cf49ba8ecf24e61020cc05b8
'2011-12-31T13:00:06-05:00'
describe
'62867' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMY' 'sip-files105.QC.jpg'
6717d8ec1e3087058621cde5ce34d467
cd667353e63301590856003a8e8aa8278a6208e0
describe
'8667292' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARMZ' 'sip-files105.tif'
51e0735c9ccbe91af224a2b425f89f50
a297ced38c630d84e2f1d85274f04c33e1c2eff1
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNA' 'sip-files105.txt'
eda8372e4aae61658551fddde7f9f49e
6d11ecc65a02fec988eaa1ecf11b534920ae273e
describe
'34322' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNB' 'sip-files105thm.jpg'
933299616653f2b4be5edb297442fc2f
2f27176290e3d154ca9344f680841c1a384826a1
describe
'1080284' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNC' 'sip-files106.jp2'
4626a4925ae98e2b23c4e967eb9e9cd8
a3f80714413f469df5e52eb5888c0275406e3400
describe
'133685' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARND' 'sip-files106.jpg'
363f77cd5b880c96eaf514ad410adbad
b429d794066ccb18280129c4776208f86d2803a4
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNE' 'sip-files106.pro'
a2a225d5719e620c55f9a4f77649c29a
b8869a17455758109bb66161783d05af72ade648
describe
'66751' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNF' 'sip-files106.QC.jpg'
8536921c28087e16e7f09930b7678431
cb961ef0e66bfff70de87e79fd29b78ccff4dd9a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNG' 'sip-files106.tif'
248652ee9f2c77e8fad4f53da3e433f8
4b479de1c65d41d7d18c07fc80c6f32861206c96
'2011-12-31T13:00:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNH' 'sip-files106.txt'
9d3c9a0f59a49168313ec1c6bbd925ae
d2a932fec84f6b787dc6fb6ab15a8574b830ce34
'2011-12-31T12:59:35-05:00'
describe
'35567' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNI' 'sip-files106thm.jpg'
8fd3eb97e8e5620dcdf604645fe64506
0b2444c34fb355cf2dfe2273e888b7baaf37e254
describe
'1018310' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNJ' 'sip-files107.jp2'
f11a7ee26a5fd10958aca28cebf00387
8e31775b983cac296caf2b7c3facb9a4d69ffc31
describe
'127226' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNK' 'sip-files107.jpg'
eafdb2cdda9b95a43859649f1da4df6a
09d9a5ae83e174059d3d0580cac0fb6de8836fb3
'2011-12-31T12:56:17-05:00'
describe
'29198' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNL' 'sip-files107.pro'
c3da90f575f2b831ba41d426242d9d89
972be3ea5dbc33069248a8207b2506e4747ac0a7
describe
'64867' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNM' 'sip-files107.QC.jpg'
2bcb6004ebf6487df2deb3fe496b973d
f2ec1ca296c6289d822af8a8825bf76f28ed3878
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNN' 'sip-files107.tif'
f839018d387c17be6cea4f5a0d1eeeeb
5c7991cf9fc9a04dd138dac975d6db38c2feddd2
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNO' 'sip-files107.txt'
69a433b133c41f180136ec38030da0f8
0daa1ded9746bfcc1ce507b7f85145a2bde589f3
describe
'35220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNP' 'sip-files107thm.jpg'
e815bdffa2a70e12c9c3d6c5b5a72bd1
a2d59ebfbd4900c8fa5e3d6748043e25265ab9de
'2011-12-31T12:57:34-05:00'
describe
'938077' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNQ' 'sip-files108.jp2'
18108e8a6f77a055048a9b183a6a48f9
0d16c1d585693d93682980c6098789b42cbbde5c
'2011-12-31T12:59:06-05:00'
describe
'119603' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNR' 'sip-files108.jpg'
9078037d80016f5d5f885491290f5e7e
dbdb3e31d86e6b5883b6ccefbeaa8cd21dfbea9d
describe
'28588' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNS' 'sip-files108.pro'
9695acd59d43e2c11d1065fcdabfc2c9
8aee8f1ff07fdf279e6057e9f3e08b04b91e1dd2
describe
'62174' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNT' 'sip-files108.QC.jpg'
156434b2e717392128463eb0b602513d
185960ec5a47dab77b672d851dd6e0c411deaf62
describe
'8667388' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNU' 'sip-files108.tif'
fe5a0e1461a62b0fd61f4b1368dd82aa
8764475ee9193ef122f87f78c3d69b023a601972
'2011-12-31T13:01:51-05:00'
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNV' 'sip-files108.txt'
017b83d6f8c962dc68a96844d1449424
ad8ca3429b487d2cdc57fb37b496944a8ec57048
describe
'34794' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNW' 'sip-files108thm.jpg'
ebcc19d328d21267722b99180cc9abf8
8f17ec922c818f1186ee4fde0d0e9c18dd3cab5c
describe
'951327' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNX' 'sip-files109.jp2'
a6eb3228456446676b052b49f4c51579
fe01ac820803ee1d7bd00ed9e671994c05e571c2
describe
'120360' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNY' 'sip-files109.jpg'
fc7af54b69719e455673e6f66daafb28
0e44f90cc6d758d298313438d49c1335958f25c2
describe
'29402' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARNZ' 'sip-files109.pro'
278c1249700b4ac0f3910e4912f32e33
b8690790ea73f5585ed7f4db73b953cd28d51114
describe
'62582' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROA' 'sip-files109.QC.jpg'
190f5c97aa0c92e259226057767bc7f6
bdc91c2bdbd151c92a912d9188d66ebbbec37248
'2011-12-31T13:01:32-05:00'
describe
'8667164' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROB' 'sip-files109.tif'
c9d70d920666ae4fe79c900e68042e92
504c6ca0013401c183c9f9ff573b05f1bd526ba6
'2011-12-31T12:55:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROC' 'sip-files109.txt'
9b6fdb0f910a2f17442b9fbd97c21da3
86831ae2187f185f910095e35d6aa4d0cafdc8e5
describe
'34113' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROD' 'sip-files109thm.jpg'
95170b1c0ca6476a073e0c627ad74bde
9cd8aced782cbf26a6a2a5d9d68af63523eb65be
describe
'1034407' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROE' 'sip-files110.jp2'
9454e58bce23c8e838983f39bfdc0404
71551c0136e286610cf687da0025cef11afd7178
describe
'129054' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROF' 'sip-files110.jpg'
e02657779b00e2a2aa577d8a9a142598
24edca101e340569b46155ae85c6a347d8cd49b2
'2011-12-31T13:03:12-05:00'
describe
'30467' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROG' 'sip-files110.pro'
fc759457bc00b161160fe468b5cc61a3
a2ea21e02047eb9961398f2e27cda626a19cec37
describe
'65640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROH' 'sip-files110.QC.jpg'
2491543b90a272ca8d6a952fe5260b43
a2dac73fc2ef8c19d069faefdce3de84d0d5fe62
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROI' 'sip-files110.tif'
b62571b7b09e64eb0ab6dee1a996f412
ec6d5b691ef8b361f683a14115a4f2b072cdc0c5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROJ' 'sip-files110.txt'
de26620bb6131b0e9f4ad733d7d2434b
5aacc6cd7a49bfbb46294e83e4ad8a9a132080a0
describe
'35188' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROK' 'sip-files110thm.jpg'
31fef32273128724c63f09fe225d6e52
6b570df39a15c1af26da3daa03590cedf11668ce
describe
'719727' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROL' 'sip-files111.jp2'
69b907d19ec8b70be0a18893a67cc012
6673cbcecfc4698cdcb07146a6a3af86f1ab0f30
describe
'96893' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROM' 'sip-files111.jpg'
c9d28e30c4826d9ef729e0dffe68a0aa
925a116ed3e63c5ce8ce7585d4fe93237a1efe0a
describe
'26167' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARON' 'sip-files111.pro'
900212b374242c2cfc369c74de63e5a6
c185845c78144f9931b18d07062bef27c2c6f926
describe
'51766' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROO' 'sip-files111.QC.jpg'
d8a679e6599d50253e145643f71903fe
bc756b071d94c206fe33f3253f52b089d30df43e
describe
'8666008' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROP' 'sip-files111.tif'
41c233bc578bfb53f2d3689216662a65
5fa76776b2c8d1d0f18f6992c623589b4d1b85da
'2011-12-31T12:56:33-05:00'
describe
'1035' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROQ' 'sip-files111.txt'
87c1d3c59db64237b188a6dbd967e330
506881e81d298bbbcf827d032b0161fbac544fd2
describe
'31196' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROR' 'sip-files111thm.jpg'
05c4b54b0c72df4a96e8675cfded6465
312c5a24ae9ebe24b73e74bb3d7afb87bf53f612
describe
'642108' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROS' 'sip-files112.jp2'
68087beaf113b80d9e9b9983d20411f9
da628c3ca5231d26ff2eba984d01f21523a86945
describe
'88896' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROT' 'sip-files112.jpg'
1f97e56e4f27c788de3ade238d151d3e
b8aa14b8f8282e0d4608b600d872d025da30c220
describe
'26887' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROU' 'sip-files112.pro'
f1a4bd65c34d513ff582ed0b08524984
3ecb59d86662e831a5dd10932750401fea4ccb45
describe
'46769' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROV' 'sip-files112.QC.jpg'
dceea70acf7a3f09cb3ee00794463370
b2bb3d325b678bbb580fbe786e75926bba8441ca
describe
'8665164' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROW' 'sip-files112.tif'
8bfe5d8412b93f5332901b1bbfcf40e5
fc25277b777a714de7bf54d12370400e57a42dbd
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROX' 'sip-files112.txt'
e9fd7b3bd7425d527ec6b2172e94f80b
8947bcdf12ca5e11f3a0be5c6b64cf05e0503e14
'2011-12-31T13:02:07-05:00'
describe
'29475' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROY' 'sip-files112thm.jpg'
c57545144ecea568e2a8da2458c629ed
98a03102e0f793b8b65aa7b451032dd84c56111c
describe
'637358' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAAROZ' 'sip-files113.jp2'
e7dc5b9524b3961acab4d708ffe6ab90
881063d674ef9cd934c89a575679256de7398fec
'2011-12-31T13:01:00-05:00'
describe
'89621' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPA' 'sip-files113.jpg'
63632c49e4139190a7075a3efe129364
731810fe459e0686da4c91a311b1101f319b0ba8
describe
'26378' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPB' 'sip-files113.pro'
0d240dc1189fbcf9a0e4ea051ab4766b
139d6d984f0b4a55c27b03a1b7abba38f8509d63
describe
'46421' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPC' 'sip-files113.QC.jpg'
849db27799c9cac9f1ca2d2d506e1882
5ef21efbd47853c70f1d33ae10df432ec62f7e18
'2011-12-31T13:00:03-05:00'
describe
'8665184' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPD' 'sip-files113.tif'
a6cdf6ecaa040edac61da8fac3c9c3f1
d4637aa9160c42e886fc4d09b2c861b139cd126d
describe
'994' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPE' 'sip-files113.txt'
d3857347dbeb302930e26ebabaa325e8
76697839dc8e04d774c3e0f25767a8cebe10e679
describe
'29453' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPF' 'sip-files113thm.jpg'
15d8c280943877223cbcb7736ad6b700
e06af2ae75973e54a39c54836435f97f12198b33
describe
'740291' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPG' 'sip-files114.jp2'
339e0fd497be050d40d578b4c9e18a34
b9cedb64e97bb47f83223938341d3638d9f581f3
describe
'99675' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPH' 'sip-files114.jpg'
22c390934825609db12bb22a8f5e11df
fd3f736662524d2da884b6d1d4be6d9088eb6e76
describe
'25967' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPI' 'sip-files114.pro'
f48ccee0e9ef4bdedaa0b367f6c9f846
adfcfebc5d0c259777219caa122fd4bce2b0d69b
describe
'51151' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPJ' 'sip-files114.QC.jpg'
50e80857d6e63b2f4a84146a4ca236ce
cd124c86fda15a5318ab0bfa31b6e7659d43a49f
describe
'8665936' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPK' 'sip-files114.tif'
def3e401dc7440821c7dd4a02f054e8b
e64e70664f81d8056cebc38b7ab666d9a66ba7f8
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPL' 'sip-files114.txt'
36308a53ed81c2e136b536897df34bca
6827aae0850b3d4cbf4cbe365e3255629942ccdf
describe
'31175' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPM' 'sip-files114thm.jpg'
12c80c2677ec3f675f85e0ffa246ef49
11d7ed5e2e0c7c33070e69c84b3e99d551f6b482
describe
'946682' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPN' 'sip-files115.jp2'
3e7c08bdef45436b36b1b27704d7fd34
f4e51520b839b18026f53567087bd190dd89adbf
describe
'118600' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPO' 'sip-files115.jpg'
6a9ba4b81a1fcea94e2d89e46ea401c2
355cc6f0d37c53b87ae215951bfbd4743f700a81
describe
'28577' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPP' 'sip-files115.pro'
6198ed0e19be777279d8896b0b8fb20a
a9dafdef666be0d6d88dbb8bee35753590a75951
describe
'61154' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPQ' 'sip-files115.QC.jpg'
75d56aea4958ef68d98d0099cfcaae33
6d2094948a43787a37498045a47f2f4aedea35fd
describe
'8667208' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPR' 'sip-files115.tif'
39c57a0accd928a80731b474b51fde62
b1cd8a5165153919c5940154508988727ae8e325
'2011-12-31T12:58:36-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPS' 'sip-files115.txt'
0663687520060c371e9fdc36ee6b4f5b
a2d1ef305ed364fbc08d5f49fb6324e67b948169
describe
Invalid character
'34053' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPT' 'sip-files115thm.jpg'
6a24ddd61b2ab175a86272cf3e86bf46
639cc5c1129496336de5ace0b99396a7aed927e2
describe
'1029692' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPU' 'sip-files116.jp2'
7808c83da88f65068e925458cfa33a03
d4ff0fa68b441cc94c90c3fb35b7db8989e8366a
describe
'129465' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPV' 'sip-files116.jpg'
6774e9ccbfb5be3949fe68fe70fa0d99
1c3f5268b61ae3cd18e59c062e93ea84a7ae71e5
'2011-12-31T13:03:09-05:00'
describe
'29862' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPW' 'sip-files116.pro'
3931128ed6aab5351c88100c1b16442f
aa90fddc7851f01287c1407fd0f5a3937d774988
describe
'65673' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPX' 'sip-files116.QC.jpg'
9c60ef3d0798a12f44631749643b7a62
f7e6f46faec159923ce848dd32dcd7adb4a08e67
'2011-12-31T13:01:21-05:00'
describe
'8667876' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPY' 'sip-files116.tif'
d7957035e9bae53451e304902b7b8dfc
7e6539f7c8ba3f15cdcb9133c0b90bf99ea362f0
'2011-12-31T13:02:31-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARPZ' 'sip-files116.txt'
986cdd65f86b1c3226fb825511a20c3c
527b2e68185b158cb34bb04d4a6374933361211a
describe
'35653' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQA' 'sip-files116thm.jpg'
e8d88e845229dd24195d4d933672620c
ffa2058099ec3ba77fc5164e5ab075a25c047361
describe
'1018450' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQB' 'sip-files117.jp2'
98e34c7877fc5b3011a87eef7aa80629
de2ed24c91c3786d923c1b11ff768d42e7b777f8
describe
'126905' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQC' 'sip-files117.jpg'
ff3ce2278b6c9a4912ba010702266fe5
9f037f4c4d9357131f19c97139ce032b012f1d13
describe
'29685' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQD' 'sip-files117.pro'
fcf1164fbaa6a4426bd8f991160463e5
3e74fea1665449cc241afef65baa1ae15293c26e
describe
'65100' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQE' 'sip-files117.QC.jpg'
3275b25213cb0e08fac3a6f9e713ef88
03d7a24ae600b9ce38c2887f30f3b27768ad51db
describe
'8667548' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQF' 'sip-files117.tif'
55cd6b4f495f06d8431d1cd82eced74d
0f3644ca9f95a52f676ff92bc8d4d6661f03df5f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQG' 'sip-files117.txt'
28e6215ffc5ac4e260836b7ed6a2796b
5de2a03c7db9c665535df7a18b88471c0dafdf9b
describe
'35022' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQH' 'sip-files117thm.jpg'
9de8c40345756baf9b5583a0f46497c6
b6a04cb3dda8541bf1a1beffef2fff727bf2eaf5
'2011-12-31T12:59:23-05:00'
describe
'1044666' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQI' 'sip-files118.jp2'
79f036d9882214512e2ed1ba2fed3269
a754618e25837a498317043c973b0c7d0d0b7217
describe
'129814' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQJ' 'sip-files118.jpg'
a42924913ce96e8b47ffabb45c58221c
3c56b072688999f44255a34b67ef618022b01413
describe
'30234' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQK' 'sip-files118.pro'
bb9697593b27e61fd70c7a9e157e93ee
38d42334cdbb6aa606e3d30213138e5106030793
'2011-12-31T12:59:47-05:00'
describe
'64826' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQL' 'sip-files118.QC.jpg'
954e6863fdb6156c28eaa980df4d6105
91c3d82cc5f7985a8fbe16e145397d4201a2a7b9
describe
'8667616' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQM' 'sip-files118.tif'
6ca75fc6654d5eee28dedb9fa6506686
7a9c65cbf0ded00cfa7e93fb588822973c568a5e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQN' 'sip-files118.txt'
eae22b149240956536755ab513c2a274
6cf64e7cc6e4c6a536ca9f18394645fe06b680fc
describe
'35422' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQO' 'sip-files118thm.jpg'
29b0cb66a475f172d91df5e148885333
aa48a36304a872039fc9594b68ad99681466e10f
describe
'1048347' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQP' 'sip-files119.jp2'
871ed3be0eaaba5c4fa2ec3f4cd5408f
3e262a35719f71f623e793da8fd36bd9f7b0d90f
describe
'130773' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQQ' 'sip-files119.jpg'
1c21e9fa65dcdf69016ea45b2d927ba5
b89321f2e429559ec354a419dd697f87e9a2f85f
describe
'30533' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQR' 'sip-files119.pro'
561e9c2250b7258abd2d8ae78db90548
0305942515bb026213a2d192ef5de5485d75805d
describe
'65815' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQS' 'sip-files119.QC.jpg'
dbc7ee34fc7cfebe014366aa01f6dcc0
a87600a6bffe70f4abd4c6c5b741b1738091e1fa
describe
'8667796' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQT' 'sip-files119.tif'
47da489592f7fd590dac62dbab09b735
d303748795369da63df193af31426d3b6e2c1b35
'2011-12-31T12:57:15-05:00'
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQU' 'sip-files119.txt'
74c1b4e824b9f36f51a84b943003edb4
9582a18e875aaee93736b936b83d833d30914b60
'2011-12-31T12:57:59-05:00'
describe
'35268' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQV' 'sip-files119thm.jpg'
3024c439d3a50bef9a2ba99604a2ba8a
a1dd08366c359eb274981342926be92fdf742755
'2011-12-31T12:58:41-05:00'
describe
'986250' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQW' 'sip-files120.jp2'
91259d37d32d13d3d065bbdb0d78e5d6
9c39fd056f27ae75128174d4f50413105b87e32e
describe
'124181' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQX' 'sip-files120.jpg'
6027c510abda20f1d643f7f44ce2f94e
a3b261771ddabe17ed66423b7b9c3e5149093565
describe
'29775' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQY' 'sip-files120.pro'
4b6d8b07b02e2e42b2c1013ca2f00d8b
b1002be9c2fcf8ea9927a3fa3f97dc26a058edb0
describe
'64313' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARQZ' 'sip-files120.QC.jpg'
3094fa833744e489ea4440d51b82d9e4
fb1a4a4f23d41acf6b6e1215cb139a2967e1740b
describe
'8667480' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRA' 'sip-files120.tif'
79483be6ff71c48335d9b9e82a9f859a
633ea9a73666a55ef48247895d39423aacc7c192
'2011-12-31T13:01:06-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRB' 'sip-files120.txt'
4095d91c8fe9409cec9446d02c5ba90c
b7204455c21022cf2f717d16927a2c36163c359a
describe
'34899' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRC' 'sip-files120thm.jpg'
314ee471076b0b089566eeaf70c41326
8ffc5997efad50a92146f11cf958c4d0998ad4f0
describe
'967052' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRD' 'sip-files121.jp2'
6032813b06474838de50953e9b6c0e0d
de4b3002e71625cf5e8fb2d95be42b6cfecad6e4
describe
'121641' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRE' 'sip-files121.jpg'
51b8aba7deee2f14189a0d0138015fc0
3437b3d2e711c698d58a1e6ba443d63d4fd2b267
describe
'29444' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRF' 'sip-files121.pro'
c93be575acc28be07ef4e5859e47ff63
3b8df56dc76dacfbc03b9ad00504d14da847be77
describe
'63801' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRG' 'sip-files121.QC.jpg'
5aacf48521da90a6d12024e799ba38b3
796326dcc75cc69aa2e952a3cf84c07f3211a60e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRH' 'sip-files121.tif'
95398f20f137be3bc69aeb0cc199adc0
1969ab77b6f618d6c217b08f30705e7498595da2
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRI' 'sip-files121.txt'
8f5daf15ca01c2f99f3422bc9cfab311
80b540475648f0c927b91d7fd9886a9e506294d7
'2011-12-31T13:00:44-05:00'
describe
'34766' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRJ' 'sip-files121thm.jpg'
d315c8b3d4a7fa33a0eb7e358ca30846
4067279bb74196f03fdcd041e1b9e84f9a06c752
'2011-12-31T13:03:26-05:00'
describe
'982471' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRK' 'sip-files122.jp2'
be0146c85276d177189a756317cd57c6
e690bea098aa82bf52cb50a0e53e4a3f1baff468
describe
'123233' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRL' 'sip-files122.jpg'
61b75380555aa675b1af91a3ff2b5028
df7a44b6d77fccbcc3b0091de6e4101d798da22f
describe
'28882' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRM' 'sip-files122.pro'
be12550796c90ba3304ffdcdb449fbb5
54001b959b07e5bd5b374c8a030514fb0ce560f7
describe
'63747' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRN' 'sip-files122.QC.jpg'
de1a48eae878f9330a8cca18822b3c21
dabdaf728d2de95308f43de40a663df2aa53d314
describe
'8667484' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRO' 'sip-files122.tif'
4cdc494f3831e57f7e194e018bc29328
7067b847a96d52cc2c15b9c75fa9d3497fea3ef7
describe
'1121' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRP' 'sip-files122.txt'
40113e1c2c532bea126c9c66faeec366
2a39475a990d37ab1111bcb663ee93625c5a4bab
describe
'34844' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRQ' 'sip-files122thm.jpg'
025459ac78ae0d2df78e9202a9c9b5a1
d3883cd406f509f43f0c69b7f144860b445c7fda
'2011-12-31T13:00:48-05:00'
describe
'1074366' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRR' 'sip-files123.jp2'
16fd03ee64212270c1587d151dff3541
0df3d2b3cf0e63e66209b0b743e92f138826a2c6
describe
'133161' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRS' 'sip-files123.jpg'
28984582a47f0a1cdd1c3b0ef9ba171f
fabd9c05ded5440aa1a6e614f8903d917a595325
describe
'31652' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRT' 'sip-files123.pro'
985658d1f5873b77289776d2164bc77d
e417764c2808be1645e7130fd7018d8e5f4bad6c
describe
'66176' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRU' 'sip-files123.QC.jpg'
02bdcfe0b28f9f0cb4a11769e67a1149
712410e7595a86e6928f7281a50e9d9ed644471b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRV' 'sip-files123.tif'
715be980b445a5c1fd519299f2c14d86
5a8cfdede763fd69d602c69ebf97708b7a352f66
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRW' 'sip-files123.txt'
91a097017068b9c5ee098a6bf65561a5
4ace8b1424abae2585a1bbba0e870cf774039e48
describe
'35485' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRX' 'sip-files123thm.jpg'
475544db0863058c5eeeb1a33d32f7e1
7d3d2f9112a69273ac2da0c4c42f837b9ce77fc0
describe
'1041457' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRY' 'sip-files124.jp2'
477de8939cfd4e3243521d1b2a91db5b
a2b483a05b8aea75ac2435ec7eda9eb0d946c5fc
describe
'130187' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARRZ' 'sip-files124.jpg'
4fe9a034a4dbb254365acff580424cb2
ec033ede0f828eb70bdf928802464267fb006c52
'2011-12-31T12:57:00-05:00'
describe
'31206' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSA' 'sip-files124.pro'
8d65fe1013a02cb3a832286c4deec278
c72bcaee88937bed106d56cbf19aa0f0947c983e
describe
'66049' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSB' 'sip-files124.QC.jpg'
f0472864840314b5df1ea2d72a7375b5
a67c6ca877806aebe60e8d602ae2611b486f3afe
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSC' 'sip-files124.tif'
d036ea2302c1e0aac96d6631e9da5d17
b4ed7cca88bdeffde689f4a7b80f7dd3dcbad9f0
'2011-12-31T12:59:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSD' 'sip-files124.txt'
13b01f10699bfd6c081cac4279f67740
620f88f04fe21ed3688d7d9a8629f9dc54c285d2
describe
'35348' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSE' 'sip-files124thm.jpg'
7175d5343ff754c5902f962ba883d2f1
190595feb70cbf27101019da62d1cbe362736ec7
describe
'1018603' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSF' 'sip-files125.jp2'
158f217a8cdc0dbb87b3a81c2f121ccf
7252b4e69c9380e630cfcae5d4b4a9ce933f2dba
describe
'126527' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSG' 'sip-files125.jpg'
ed5fa08a755356e418f4a142a9ceadb4
74e2455104288c5fa5c16b22bbd469757a3aa82e
describe
'29491' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSH' 'sip-files125.pro'
1b69d5dbf0aecc56528881a2b0f09bc4
75d054df534b8f145225492bdc9f81c29e7c5ffd
describe
'64907' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSI' 'sip-files125.QC.jpg'
4e58f4d56d4ff325007ff58cd8c3585a
a284455d37034a3e6a5c9bef2192b0302c15863c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSJ' 'sip-files125.tif'
d3910d7729bc51f57c7fdd0f83fb08a6
9236d086fc103a910fd328a130c1b4df183dcd92
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSK' 'sip-files125.txt'
50e60c2021db8614b73d7512bf247150
550a99ea07cc5962b27a9f17845e83b0f6f2cd95
describe
'35238' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSL' 'sip-files125thm.jpg'
70a91f63dd5feac34959dfb1376e65fb
2268bc00a532d1ff8a277eb9a1e3e9fdac5f00b1
describe
'1001225' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSM' 'sip-files126.jp2'
9afdcb06aa7342162a3e004c28961382
60c3a1b9fdef6c115ad441f7292af512769e3610
'2011-12-31T13:01:04-05:00'
describe
'125539' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSN' 'sip-files126.jpg'
8fb0dac655a31dcb6696857fac8850e7
02f7ea9cc62e58f73bb24443fe60b2b887944994
'2011-12-31T12:56:26-05:00'
describe
'28549' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSO' 'sip-files126.pro'
f2c40231e7ecee10e5469da5448fa56b
772730b068c77c73376f7f185f49290f8a01e842
describe
'63925' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSP' 'sip-files126.QC.jpg'
57882cc86c78b031ba8c03650ad3853f
0e553ffe0c69b23072472bf2ae7622127ab7a31a
describe
'8667940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSQ' 'sip-files126.tif'
ed725a00128a137ab6c6a5ee357276f6
639882ab0dfead19b9df3d1dd1d7dbd0bff61b42
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSR' 'sip-files126.txt'
d852a0c6fb340f2b082c5603693eda72
af75e1016783ebece35b7b3ccda1c81a4ae35655
'2011-12-31T12:57:40-05:00'
describe
'35716' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSS' 'sip-files126thm.jpg'
d4c3579044ab305cd4fee163da1d14cb
46c9ad91d2ae6503d37970ad57fe93f1de64248a
describe
'1035292' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARST' 'sip-files127.jp2'
35728ff301861a48e3cd2633c9ee0926
fe0f2ad69187bbd2085810aab7c7e7ae20203ce4
describe
'128946' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSU' 'sip-files127.jpg'
cc530c421a9e0a3c081234b0a43c614e
2a736ef55ba2b4c6f84102abe73e3a1ec10e391e
describe
'30421' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSV' 'sip-files127.pro'
4d8b1c69624404c9c4bb602e0776ef9d
4f4d64793e21fa3d0a92262b52a188e3b575deed
describe
'65142' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSW' 'sip-files127.QC.jpg'
b44f00e5ff321d876747f7a1c7113c6d
4dd8445576924ea91e01ef4c66c628c852766e64
describe
'8667648' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSX' 'sip-files127.tif'
f48aa505799cc88f036c1f790f96b440
478be2219adb5d3adf28e37501653a39ee823b4c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSY' 'sip-files127.txt'
d3c672e2ad588c3a2877626c3ef76f17
2eaf134eb71760a9f1810e25e7c53cd721090a69
describe
'35320' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARSZ' 'sip-files127thm.jpg'
3791b5285541692a777823d14b099303
8b385deb8ac72577ddce1e8b74b3713e95cb33c4
'2011-12-31T12:59:39-05:00'
describe
'985720' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTA' 'sip-files128.jp2'
72885c731efff6025811a2d32a6ce566
ef66c95352699b6905c4cf0d56f37a8ee286e191
describe
'120345' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTB' 'sip-files128.jpg'
2613a9fc46e6be36efd7873e90ef484e
e37f9ddb18299c690650cd6ba9a1e97104854e92
describe
'30394' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTC' 'sip-files128.pro'
6ae89b62393e4bc8ce9e1467ba1364bb
5d36049dac09be0d320b40c2a15362f4a052d857
describe
'63988' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTD' 'sip-files128.QC.jpg'
a3993061651b2c1fa300825f4bc21333
723f3f30d960ef8d132381fff7556b39fe92c61b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTE' 'sip-files128.tif'
67e8aa970ce8a2f78e0a52830369a8b0
6a6e3e540d5a10db669518f3636b0cf016982299
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTF' 'sip-files128.txt'
7da3189237dd1bbad0a5c2d4d3db4190
ab58fb00095f93d696a3952b0447185afb0970ce
describe
'34578' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTG' 'sip-files128thm.jpg'
fab4dea6f5e01f4e8fb0455636c8c3e7
041006afe9ce84ab8426d6daa2ccbaee835d95ef
describe
'985368' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTH' 'sip-files129.jp2'
1cae8d4d13f9bae92d8829010378bfaa
0414abcae7af07a3176adb05ac63233520f6d80e
'2011-12-31T12:59:57-05:00'
describe
'125438' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTI' 'sip-files129.jpg'
28218f11cc247850c47da6387ece7d6e
8a31d6e017bb56979948d492877ece078f283795
describe
'30287' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTJ' 'sip-files129.pro'
2f1c931d0dc0724f8296c9b5d0df7c0b
c6daaca9cc23d8cfd7b2174f490b3cc7eabe7cea
describe
'8667688' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTK' 'sip-files133.tif'
7643f6af0aa9c1083feb0119f7cc5b25
00efbdba14637d1e8f8c812434310a3198898ce1
'2011-12-31T12:57:50-05:00'
describe
'63282' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTL' 'sip-files129.QC.jpg'
3aeacb1a40bbee476c0d1c0cb8955947
9cb92da094845ba3636fea74e4313334e73f1c50
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTM' 'sip-files129.tif'
07e6a38faf4cfa1092347d08dea4f0da
ae277c456f9b9bdbc9f047c7ebaecf10ae3d2abc
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTN' 'sip-files129.txt'
2cc9b834146a846de8c032b9e54c5319
2a512ab3b6cfbca3cf514d6a52945b22a896326f
describe
'34603' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTO' 'sip-files129thm.jpg'
bd18635eecd9c5d97dccc067f5366526
2598295cdd24c766a4ad75886471a407a328de1c
'2011-12-31T12:59:56-05:00'
describe
'997129' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTP' 'sip-files130.jp2'
01fd338b80c404ed1c0c62f12fe00eef
f780aec215f552e44faa77acbbd6751cb284c1eb
describe
'123056' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTQ' 'sip-files130.jpg'
c091f8520d0043206db26259455408eb
89c84c66e77efb460b07bc71666d632e2efc741f
describe
'30391' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTR' 'sip-files130.pro'
803153b6d0f3916a488bbe5df4c78339
8dc5b767f1c3457b10a122033526c7f6e4254cb9
describe
'64946' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTS' 'sip-files130.QC.jpg'
d1f6ce4806a3ba6c5db7c3896f0784fb
d3f756eadbd247d921ae4efe2cd178ccec8eab7a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTT' 'sip-files130.tif'
d0dedc404f70c3e3fd1954deca59f159
176794cc54eeef29497ad1d9bb51b357dd5051f4
'2011-12-31T12:56:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTU' 'sip-files130.txt'
deff8477771f825acccd2bd7870645d7
44afee005cfd9e59e71463346b2232c2aa334606
describe
'35097' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTV' 'sip-files130thm.jpg'
4148eb90cccedbb3d9ea60cf47a6fcfa
20eb6c28bca533a62bc3ca8d928d76b57168d169
describe
'979199' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTW' 'sip-files131.jp2'
c0a9124b1c651277166b04a3d95868c0
8827516c37a5fca7aeddb2c6b974417e4ac49e11
describe
'123862' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTX' 'sip-files131.jpg'
33688fa676612f5e410994eed620073b
55bc0687626176c2b28b6b0f0257a3b21e676426
describe
'28405' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTY' 'sip-files131.pro'
a62d25058044ae3975e9ecd1a49a30be
bb6360266120f8b868de8770be8546907a2f8c4f
describe
'61973' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARTZ' 'sip-files131.QC.jpg'
203ba0fcce5cfba70161b76525a9f78c
dbf66dc929d7c335b984fb8b4fecfbda856ae6f4
describe
'8667716' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUA' 'sip-files131.tif'
67b21fe435d1fc25af9b4f82b97a6d54
ffb25e24311178cb26d8682edf828794d3710e1c
'2011-12-31T12:56:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUB' 'sip-files131.txt'
4da371ce3f2260f54af69d17285bcc68
2315d75d00e4df2d2e66aba06f944db825212497
describe
'34996' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUC' 'sip-files131thm.jpg'
a2a16bbe54c4bc93e477b7c8fc3a711d
ed641cff0a84ee14a6365e199b350eeed491d9e1
describe
'945375' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUD' 'sip-files132.jp2'
8b23621463a8fd43d6168f2e17b3b9cf
847a26b2af1fb45a1953649d3234e5f0f11a56c6
describe
'118552' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUE' 'sip-files132.jpg'
4ce0330e858a7fcfc88788246bccd3fe
60d7c7989638595638d0b49f2365d64842063fc7
describe
'29202' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUF' 'sip-files132.pro'
0789467ea6cae0c3eb5a09b36339c4f7
1d893aefffa8cc855c9243d14ecd5c8f2dbc7fa5
describe
'62470' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUG' 'sip-files132.QC.jpg'
d19c6227aa4b2206f4f84ad3021b34e9
1debab30a1433afe9a5fe89a1f79791bd65dc71e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUH' 'sip-files132.tif'
d43f9923f94cedada4bb05fd5b093d10
faf3ac9a6ac14811fd21b339b18bd981bd7f8c41
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUI' 'sip-files132.txt'
5866e5687bd6128bc1ae7a69feec8bc9
9f4bcf17f8b75c9ae00c340d17fbe668bdb75db3
describe
'34967' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUJ' 'sip-files132thm.jpg'
4eb067fa79b20c22cccffb50d6b2d451
73745066f532d5d05812553cf024cfcfb4e18838
describe
'1000783' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUK' 'sip-files133.jp2'
e692065c69bba5d77563994760c20d2b
67d38057eaeca92e95a69a09ff2f7271a710eda9
describe
'123875' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUL' 'sip-files133.jpg'
35ee58782099fdea6563f28126ee0464
abaa239f1cd36e5d7fc37c0bd96508b68069932c
describe
'30622' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUM' 'sip-files133.pro'
bbb5d9826d476f9e7bef7464982cb4f0
477252ef6f43e92ff19ce5f808948dd93079538a
describe
'65290' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUN' 'sip-files133.QC.jpg'
aed4e5734d94bad3132af0aa57b54e3e
e02da728fb50ba776e77095846c81082754f5911
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUO' 'sip-files133.txt'
6e8873bf6e574f98f89d22e51e33156f
4ca293af171432e0c17105f5ff56df607a08f195
describe
'35116' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUP' 'sip-files133thm.jpg'
c4f2d4b451cf16240b0172d05d1edf1e
84b747c87e67f1eebef5e3888d997bf7a6d69c3e
describe
'1020798' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUQ' 'sip-files134.jp2'
1e1ab7ae15e8fd97111edd64f1a10b50
1904aaf75106e7bea13fd5fd0b83a15c8e4321a2
describe
'127189' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUR' 'sip-files134.jpg'
cb124980fd1529b6ba1ab53b392cda66
f6a0f6e9edd8b14b956927cbeb2c77976ebca56f
describe
'30015' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUS' 'sip-files134.pro'
f3794f6ac0fc252c351050c7b9c87f45
0e9b0d264e5c7ebe3b2d0ede9a555c1700af15ae
describe
'63507' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUT' 'sip-files134.QC.jpg'
789cec3a302799f5cd2f059ddf056656
4f19d3fd0e1ea8c92740bd96ee9b5a0ee807a839
'2011-12-31T13:01:34-05:00'
describe
'8667928' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUU' 'sip-files134.tif'
72687c533c72be90e615c497702e167b
1afc073441f543c348688afd21f1ce779a3d3645
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUV' 'sip-files134.txt'
50d38cf445fbee2a8988e8f40a08cf88
2e3f1bd4a4c4d5963291930ea0c40221aa13caff
describe
'35519' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUW' 'sip-files134thm.jpg'
82e9ad6679d80c27ac7cc59ea578fafc
4a56e1bdbc42e4b41ba9a99028f6e752ac1d5855
describe
'1014623' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUX' 'sip-files135.jp2'
e2eb3e98a678ec12441954e23d866eef
2ad06572ff719bbbace98443cac3e37e5f3bf7ba
describe
'127682' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUY' 'sip-files135.jpg'
f693707d675d6cb6ca433e72132f4b15
ed147744c94709f787a1890c13d4b5e070293dce
describe
'30487' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARUZ' 'sip-files135.pro'
1b5e564046c765f877774bdc64226fb4
a1eb46e1fb6244bdc47d661118a9e14f496924bf
describe
'65630' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVA' 'sip-files135.QC.jpg'
b92b6d27bd1c16ff9e3ad552e6b2c53e
28b76c5d82e6942300062780a1bce821ee73f9db
describe
'8667724' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVB' 'sip-files135.tif'
6d346a789d0dcc28d341b9383aa52983
474b86a5492175256b1710a94d53eeabb8783147
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVC' 'sip-files135.txt'
484d80bcca568c1523351af83549ffc9
6517df3949536972ac8957826321bec287bf9817
describe
'35193' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVD' 'sip-files135thm.jpg'
31794aa7076a6bc711b76c0c06172dbb
3398d14e25ab5899de5896d5d5dcb1eb3afc60b9
describe
'972457' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVE' 'sip-files136.jp2'
50358da1f2765c10db67d24ae4c81cb2
d7aa26e88996c26b783667c96af265d27c58c6bc
describe
'123079' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVF' 'sip-files136.jpg'
178b4b20a6f978b73da033da99768ffb
74ce1c18821eb1016b0d2376f9b04c64d5b86d93
'2011-12-31T12:58:09-05:00'
describe
'29435' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVG' 'sip-files136.pro'
d75ba1b62d55a7b1dfd5219727f2cbd6
46ec7cc408af7f0e58d498156f44e8320f90fd00
describe
'63001' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVH' 'sip-files136.QC.jpg'
3ff1c322f18a7864756e1a78f9c0ce28
9b19420890cc3744a1755860f034ff848324ae3b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVI' 'sip-files136.tif'
5c7495967e40e9e25fa6e115f0674822
69fc3735e4d0bbabb44d7d80a330269b8e17f942
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVJ' 'sip-files136.txt'
d07f6fc4f7d202ad0935a457ebf24f27
af0b9903ac63bf1f22187e544af51fcf871c4132
describe
'34769' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVK' 'sip-files136thm.jpg'
b47afbbf5473397512e1a02b2106f086
2561d60563599206822a50a66e0882f1117a6c6a
describe
'1036015' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVL' 'sip-files137.jp2'
ddd19c4deabc2adcf299b7f1fe77a911
41d431a9d3a02f2d9e25cb76d7ac3f49b865f15a
describe
'129556' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVM' 'sip-files137.jpg'
1684159f0ac9c738a6dad7bac5615641
8177df95ed1bfc8f041299092504dbeb8d335387
'2011-12-31T13:03:16-05:00'
describe
'30442' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVN' 'sip-files137.pro'
94e0beb69afa42f7815fb0d68fa02406
f536c25476fe437c3739259cb834c2bf78db431e
describe
'64356' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVO' 'sip-files137.QC.jpg'
794f74a60011a2fb7ffe9685400aed29
ce32374f33b408aa29e148e3147d401b58283825
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVP' 'sip-files137.tif'
33f7979156242786cc1140f3967bd2ff
f827ccfcca048d3510be90c621d23960ebf72df4
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVQ' 'sip-files137.txt'
adae5c8c08eb8e98293a3a1065e2a8c0
dd5c3ddcb074e95a9a84920e509266a905956da7
describe
'1043106' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVR' 'sip-files142.jp2'
a95c67891bee51cacca07ff3e0ebf9ff
07e3f79cf4db2154b5ca36864a81dcec26667979
describe
'34447' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVS' 'sip-files137thm.jpg'
715b335ad4ecfe9114bc8bb49768b6ff
c7043ea9a7befa7d57945d68101069f8a6b0a954
describe
'988534' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVT' 'sip-files138.jp2'
459832a2288f5ea4a934602f3d624ded
3be45c19adac272ae867b1eaa6716c05d01e5140
describe
'124552' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVU' 'sip-files138.jpg'
f0faeccebe771b809a4e05201fbce1aa
9b10452c94e5b60e624dcc8efc0912bf30b55a37
describe
'27933' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVV' 'sip-files138.pro'
3b6ea85a241b93ea07c96dc7ec9449d0
c55ac4efb64d62d8ced92ae7ff389b28ef3ad443
describe
'62320' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVW' 'sip-files138.QC.jpg'
dd0a7ef4a8e65f9f0f3ba341bc2c9d58
42e4b0e5bf01c96f91384092f6d69882a7b756a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVX' 'sip-files138.tif'
b8677726f0c0d2adddfbe1dced84dc48
3f44a352c5573479a913311ad453924d814eafaf
'2011-12-31T13:03:06-05:00'
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVY' 'sip-files138.txt'
73a830b778a97832355e49b1bc4c8d1e
d6012c6aa8fac61ef68f8a4a99b6a97623a40bc3
describe
'35041' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARVZ' 'sip-files138thm.jpg'
ab96ebfd381082f96c047593d494450c
c28966a0c5b85e60e8c37c63c82ed9560454df1f
describe
'1010780' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWA' 'sip-files139.jp2'
98ce015d4505d3a982e055adc30da96a
0e6ecf29d8af9d33e6724727f3f408b07d361059
describe
'127518' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWB' 'sip-files139.jpg'
5a509a8c6e0dea470a0ac1c823df77ed
c0d8234e0ee66baa2acabd25399e0f8baf329b6b
describe
'29874' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWC' 'sip-files139.pro'
c4ebc87bf74a9a963cde8f60707ebd64
7909959093679322a14fadace8520dbcc3c9dd72
describe
'63787' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWD' 'sip-files139.QC.jpg'
eefda6fb7007c4e8883a117cff0b0d86
f153d8b6ce8bad966fc5c0c8fd2652a9ef9f6491
'2011-12-31T13:03:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWE' 'sip-files139.tif'
655426aa771af501f0b9a46fe76740c3
2db4e501b75e345f34709e8dfd386b537575bf90
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWF' 'sip-files139.txt'
573c9bc3994e58910461b12c0b532eac
dcfc9bdcdbde14814baa0ae18c10ff326b46ad12
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWG' 'sip-files139thm.jpg'
18e06dcaa880c0f4ce2dfc2f0054513b
07d0eb193162bd3f4a2d9c810ddcafa765a3ed09
describe
'972157' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWH' 'sip-files140.jp2'
0bb7f591dd3e2e50cbda1f886d4a8a74
ecef06d101279edf98e59ef903a484fdd1b028f5
describe
'120939' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWI' 'sip-files140.jpg'
4d6649567c6ce04083789b8f677ea037
69f5366fa425bf632459c5f3ce4c9783a8bc7614
describe
'29610' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWJ' 'sip-files140.pro'
6dccc49861a9ce7e89831bf17603d1cd
ca5ede30899423deba31bb59da3d814db2b0e3ba
describe
'62308' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWK' 'sip-files140.QC.jpg'
7f093022d999d29c36025c9155933a4a
b1ad7041ba6640a31b348c72f8b3029593c59b9a
describe
'8667288' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWL' 'sip-files140.tif'
f2439365073be074793aa8645aa965e6
9308632e33a789f5080029c4d127375ae06cd9c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWM' 'sip-files140.txt'
85ac66f2507f408efd29351f88bf2f82
a7b01a1705dd65f5f0ee5452808b556d576c3b7f
describe
'34348' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWN' 'sip-files140thm.jpg'
a2385eaf87ff7bd0490a41ac699e3676
42fbfebb14af5715e8b2694c3c4bb66b6f528e3e
describe
'1000637' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWO' 'sip-files141.jp2'
7d5fba945fa834a2cf145aab737130ee
fc111396c8faace60e7e3e485671edf157bf2111
describe
'123987' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWP' 'sip-files141.jpg'
a36432f2bb314cfcc9cb3933c3b1c621
8bb2cff0c726b74eac3346c08351f7012dd9fa68
describe
'30571' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWQ' 'sip-files141.pro'
8c7db7cf9fcb8959fcb244cafa2dc855
03b77bf26b229c1bf7eb9d1b55303b01582f2915
describe
'64718' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWR' 'sip-files141.QC.jpg'
5566a886e93e2fc070ca62da0566aac9
d40a27123e7e7dc2f73269dc9373e64532ff3e8a
describe
'8667552' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWS' 'sip-files141.tif'
cbee8c35ff168e2852d0210ffc736eda
e66b025ec4616a3ac5926e3fc0bfac170045e79a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWT' 'sip-files141.txt'
a41e66b0eea80d0afe6dfdace7429e1c
fcf623904594ecc426486c5725e96a04a7c4f02e
describe
'34437' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWU' 'sip-files141thm.jpg'
fab50d9216074091fe47cfe560fd9bc6
21595d00afd820b8a62dd1c10d7fcf62a77a91bf
'2011-12-31T13:03:13-05:00'
describe
'130231' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWV' 'sip-files142.jpg'
79554aafab84e9e1a07d34f1a9f0c081
bdb330f3fff1ff9a646901a4ecfb60a1c163b1b0
describe
'30192' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWW' 'sip-files142.pro'
904a0932bc29e570a2de35b1d4f974a3
b393782a0c799cfec4f1fcba9808e119f57942f2
describe
'65446' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWX' 'sip-files142.QC.jpg'
85f8aac56bbb3718cd7593c2ae84a61e
8ef16087c115ce9b7c1d485304624381e2bf6cee
describe
'8668120' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWY' 'sip-files142.tif'
7b53cd7e0a270eb19d0b6ec40d84cc12
3ccfd87bc27267475a40141bd2ec220f90f9e00c
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARWZ' 'sip-files142.txt'
6ad48441871e96b4819421b1b67e1e6e
b53234841302e576c01fc478bd88f9f655d34b34
describe
'35924' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXA' 'sip-files142thm.jpg'
1a75ab7c1627cf2119701d9de5a6a864
5e190162fc0191739398a67c7ef24f2afdb81bc2
describe
'994854' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXB' 'sip-files143.jp2'
0fccf1dbdcaf0db24a5fedd37c6b0829
e53e59b78031e46585c7ce24ed446dd0431a001c
describe
'125074' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXC' 'sip-files143.jpg'
f3e81041174fce8ffb9ec3260f8852ec
43ca28c497c6daeb3c25b5f9c9f91300b7ab95c4
describe
'28572' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXD' 'sip-files143.pro'
6c20c130794b32fc9b16080048edbdf6
a32bd9a1b9c104389b24efaf9ce06b0fb1b716f6
'2011-12-31T13:01:53-05:00'
describe
'62997' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXE' 'sip-files143.QC.jpg'
604a6a30a914145154a84179707a3971
54d9168f148f4e441a07e81586e56986400126e7
'2011-12-31T12:58:23-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXF' 'sip-files143.tif'
e73bc193ba4a0ee11993d1bdf5e7186b
d83f20a81938a9ca65b2f14a0ed56e872b9eeb25
'2011-12-31T13:01:33-05:00'
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXG' 'sip-files143.txt'
8407fc730c99991fad2a114f5372fc51
88aeb853be5b009b183e2e765fa656a132e1a748
describe
'35290' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXH' 'sip-files143thm.jpg'
d0132d69e76ae1b056644d56170b011e
f420a3a676f74e0ffbe3d97896861a4075ff6738
describe
'1035449' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXI' 'sip-files144.jp2'
00b5ed8c5a239bbd451e95160eeb6b90
e92d20f84cd1aa0ab440afdbd3ba3404c7605f16
describe
'128817' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXJ' 'sip-files144.jpg'
d45c65fb57005b29f7a852b1cb8d369d
2429687ce4978b724756ebabc4ed147251253cf0
describe
'30694' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXK' 'sip-files144.pro'
319986613bad56d684a8528f9f87d266
50ba1783f45727c199836e50a90c0c105a825335
describe
'65512' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXL' 'sip-files144.QC.jpg'
87f404f4450116c3a7a48454be13ee15
3232867ce55cbe668a657cddadf60be377f37edb
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXM' 'sip-files144.tif'
0b2972d0a1c26dc8624e299b258687d6
aca5311bea9a7d1fa22296d90427d89d9cf5d1cc
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXN' 'sip-files144.txt'
3b8d9074b6ddb7c4e66e1b47d8e71bff
3e7a575c0fad22f8e968293322b61e23a824be68
describe
'35288' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXO' 'sip-files144thm.jpg'
9cb165d8f7e83a5d0ee6fbf198c01e18
ba4c9fb31c08b9defdd0ba55ebefddd36c11b93f
describe
'976097' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXP' 'sip-files145.jp2'
05a6a17a0e2c8b4c450fc1d5d22bf5b8
f5fcef36cc50a955a7e7418ad25eff8056e56224
describe
'124247' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXQ' 'sip-files145.jpg'
9ee3baeaf0a5ec4aa3d9181db5bc7df6
fc2b657437b39f65e2e19946672e2858cce8a51b
describe
'30280' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXR' 'sip-files145.pro'
c8fe242c05f9b6141c8680d53e025a3d
8f2e0d1a83e24a89219b76149dc19d4e123579cc
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXS' 'sip-files145.QC.jpg'
d6d1927fdbfb4ecec5ab04e0a0d0804a
44d93b5a5c4ac80e4bb01005b17cf71017b42e85
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXT' 'sip-files145.tif'
972eac7e3f8ea2ba8f8bd404e4276c52
8a961c5b294d35183fe501a3b1f4b376008f633d
'2011-12-31T12:58:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXU' 'sip-files145.txt'
1de53146a4898199c9fa7704d0897b55
f65f158146035960a456d35473273d00eced1ac7
describe
'34927' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXV' 'sip-files145thm.jpg'
1203be83d7cdd2e37eb1c7447709dc91
fe51e4a68a19c763428a7f105b22fd35314ee266
describe
'1008126' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXW' 'sip-files146.jp2'
a0566eace39682b43a82e75d3b19780e
60df1a203e9287a5fd56c030d6f989eeb43c3541
describe
'126776' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXX' 'sip-files146.jpg'
f2ae0a36fa302a6ae87cbad3b757bfa5
e4eab5a1cc8fd3ca3da17738f2f56a0518adde83
describe
'29971' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXY' 'sip-files146.pro'
4274bafcd6420d8a7d327d14111112d3
1cd9e3994806e4880d5485d3d839980f77365cee
describe
'64202' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARXZ' 'sip-files146.QC.jpg'
e59614280e4f28946c8dd25ce1afa341
77a26f2f44c5292c4293184dd0ab949d8af32ccd
describe
'8667804' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYA' 'sip-files146.tif'
73056492e46eea157925e25e9c1002bf
b0775b75fef4d9892c2398cd86e9c49c8f486449
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYB' 'sip-files146.txt'
28ad6f398c8322a094fdcc44acc15503
c3970148288afa5f9c03483b8f8f4bdd383a0e3a
describe
'35194' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYC' 'sip-files146thm.jpg'
790631871c290120d87f28e3da6755da
f83b5d97c69abf52f5f5215ee86c7888e9c28ac9
describe
'987184' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYD' 'sip-files147.jp2'
53ab8cc83e59b4e0ad30ee05b8c8be89
2357819b4a85f6abcea6c7690220efac29619e24
describe
'124538' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYE' 'sip-files147.jpg'
7e8250f455ce0c9f18269fd557848ebe
9f8a37c66fd6c6546a38ebbd35c6ad9e8063bc43
'2011-12-31T12:56:04-05:00'
describe
'29917' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYF' 'sip-files147.pro'
975ca3a53e7c8d0afd4f825f5a74b555
affe877b6b15715bc0ef95ae24fe8e48dbe77407
describe
'63695' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYG' 'sip-files147.QC.jpg'
fbb7899f91ac36d6a7bffe9160dea6a9
92fa8ca0d9bb33657e2a2683f91e471b01dab202
'2011-12-31T12:59:18-05:00'
describe
'8667536' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYH' 'sip-files147.tif'
f1da41fd039074171539307a769e69c2
5aeb18096bb73f72907f7e1fc6413716375ebb75
'2011-12-31T13:03:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYI' 'sip-files147.txt'
eab4b6e3f993f3bdb6dfe4d1b9f68c78
bbbb5909785d24fb8b0488764e4775efd75553c4
'2011-12-31T12:58:29-05:00'
describe
'34722' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYJ' 'sip-files147thm.jpg'
368a4e41e9db494393c9b6e2e9376a72
2b7631b592e1adf8b1350eb7231645ab61043037
describe
'1004323' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYK' 'sip-files148.jp2'
ce322f4c24399f2f6cdeafb8836df6fb
cf3a8fd255549197cb9b0293cc41c86ef74f2b2e
describe
'126918' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYL' 'sip-files148.jpg'
62a2604e9376bb6f24750ea8381f7612
b95395a7b12b5886c887f101fe57ad7912ccb852
describe
'30008' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYM' 'sip-files148.pro'
2fda0d2c72af5ea8269c167b1206628f
ae9286ef089ea4e83eaf8dbc7e701f047f5a1010
describe
'65127' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYN' 'sip-files148.QC.jpg'
7052a8a94b2e99ffb3cd0bf8719f5018
b51b9d3f04951aa57ab31f536f25f14d0b1a52b0
describe
'8668056' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYO' 'sip-files148.tif'
625afc40a256f025ac3c8cee87150089
f1eb0237ebbe8922eafbf548016519b70815ae79
'2011-12-31T13:02:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYP' 'sip-files148.txt'
de2970072a6c77ad10fd0233a7e181bb
092ae26e8bd33ab6479e72e87d6cbe7da07a0763
describe
'35889' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYQ' 'sip-files148thm.jpg'
8edff3f21c53d4aa63f53c1a44ca5020
605300463d8c6fe1552cce7f93c8013aacbb931d
describe
'1023078' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYR' 'sip-files149.jp2'
10a841e63bfd36c279ec225ff4b682bb
cfdafcb99d5f69894e20636a9ebca3716b90f275
describe
'127892' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYS' 'sip-files149.jpg'
1cf8962a1bc7b52a4173078426e6bda3
f8a95e3d2901c5d8234acccc12989015c52034f1
describe
'30744' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYT' 'sip-files149.pro'
9d1b7ac67bc4c1be55281a74804760f9
0d11ae3ff0d4bbd8c61c7cbd16759f1d96e05f46
describe
'65901' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYU' 'sip-files149.QC.jpg'
45c149fe033b76639f9e292879332a17
d3275f1acb02832c006d7e6ef7de9111025dd4d0
describe
'8667968' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYV' 'sip-files149.tif'
51851e6200458d3f046648aefeff1f76
59d8f5e900091622fa230c43b0693048c57ee3de
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYW' 'sip-files149.txt'
bbac94eeaa1191bed11a915b42e3020b
905c307c3a09c6a7982a864244daa33e15a535ef
describe
'35854' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYX' 'sip-files149thm.jpg'
1a9a54cec5055ea85903f089aba3fd57
dc78ea2520e164ef45c4041309aa2d5903ab1b8f
describe
'1006342' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYY' 'sip-files150.jp2'
f2225c21bfb7ee2eb0729d09705b41a9
22f239f6a4d46dc5d91601c1dd8a257c418817c3
describe
'126760' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARYZ' 'sip-files150.jpg'
0332b4742b4f6bb3608baa98bd93369a
29673aaf85accbbb5b605b7f1b2e03dc82e521da
describe
'29099' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZA' 'sip-files150.pro'
2c6b494de21a98dbc6bf667927df4434
358cef7100344cf5969f087a2c6f8e3925f2372f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZB' 'sip-files150.QC.jpg'
6623eb53a6ccfa44ded8160646628c80
470e59329c3ce2c5648c83f586fe3d8d161508f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZC' 'sip-files150.tif'
e3bed4bbf95f70a34b22616ad396ee39
340c89f34c5fd7b170ebdc8b3e9746d77b9ed643
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZD' 'sip-files150.txt'
351ee83f0f46bbe769cf283f76d7f5ab
2a42ceacb32114ba3da322c1f1c116213845caa0
describe
'35329' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZE' 'sip-files150thm.jpg'
b64ceccac07ccfe7ff1ab0189675813a
f0352d69b0e4766e304c4c03289c78df400de7da
describe
'1047616' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZF' 'sip-files151.jp2'
06eea6781995c704a1488741862b3e5e
358162be9fe93b26818d799c7d1fe1f8a22daf52
describe
'129884' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZG' 'sip-files151.jpg'
117e9f225034b9699daa1b50863e11c5
c5de445a7969eb1cc80b581eda54147b349c869f
describe
'31270' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZH' 'sip-files151.pro'
b479ebe9a5563547695990c1ee4e841a
b2d926c0b5c181cbc7e59c1be65cb70e99c95be3
describe
'65830' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZI' 'sip-files151.QC.jpg'
a357abfd6634b5f2d2b6379fadf2fba5
6f91175739c663c418942546eabc194e324dac7e
describe
'8667812' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZJ' 'sip-files151.tif'
6ac70fa976d568d79926bd8240d0cd84
969a1d7b64ef0314e68ca0f3c0f72f8715d1bfb1
'2011-12-31T13:02:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZK' 'sip-files151.txt'
398ef1630ef48db548362fa0f2ffbd6f
04b8b297e5583f92b66b02248c1783f27cd6e714
describe
'35543' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZL' 'sip-files151thm.jpg'
556b88b880412029b5ed22fd155183d6
be492ed66c71ff2c3bbdb6b403b05ff23d1ed674
describe
'615535' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZM' 'sip-files152.jp2'
8a3b05ff98e60266a9f3d339fb19aa1b
d19b11e32b371b1518970229a194695c8f486e9b
describe
'86393' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZN' 'sip-files152.jpg'
1c8c4369b23f3096d0146d03fa6dc5e5
ea8d93c2cba63643901df8adf1b60bb21cc2d25b
describe
'17948' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZO' 'sip-files152.pro'
1aad51015a1090123f497d2ea5f1a191
5979a103ce3aa665801e2fcf0b07a20f515c16bf
describe
'47269' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZP' 'sip-files152.QC.jpg'
60f6779d178242bbc2903bab8ba5c6db
837942779544940724ea70d9fa9d86477a693e90
describe
'8665372' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZQ' 'sip-files152.tif'
84e7fc0550f2a8c0e9107baed15784f1
34739c33dc4e467d21afdc023a923121f5fc1692
describe
'706' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZR' 'sip-files152.txt'
152eab2434b36613f0eb0518b99e9633
f0c7e6773c11243ce9393a292303455f3b9c8c11
describe
'29807' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZS' 'sip-files152thm.jpg'
8950d29519a1299304b90bad642f988a
71b1f177b6d238a1b534b259efaf0d3dbf414840
describe
'879774' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZT' 'sip-files153.jp2'
1107d518ccf382075b84ce405b7a639f
5b7a1661af8f7eac0ecb768e095bf03fc4404a5d
describe
'114968' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZU' 'sip-files153.jpg'
183f3ae905100cd5b81b9299900f8daf
6195004a6b65d9415b017efe99e7d8259f8c6b7c
describe
'27388' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZV' 'sip-files153.pro'
c18a162a60c7e57de76b09719a27a125
fda99d96f27d1cf8bb9214589fbbb39e0e31e122
describe
'58666' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZW' 'sip-files153.QC.jpg'
6725f50f9941b57357c66ba027ac753b
96beb478ddf981e5585ed13cfea0b9ea99f27bc7
describe
'8666580' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZX' 'sip-files153.tif'
d13cfa31052bba1ad81c3bad5900fe80
fc97142f1486a45bb9b96d5d502b50141f3ca9e9
'2011-12-31T13:02:50-05:00'
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZY' 'sip-files153.txt'
d14ce717ed8569eebd5bd393917c1c3f
46222e54a5b1952abfae96f7cb4eb269d78005d2
describe
'32753' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAARZZ' 'sip-files153thm.jpg'
7aa0c0abbe6cd7d99b98122fbb3cbe6c
82e1637a108159fbd601f7c028a81571f6bc1aa2
describe
'1060109' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAA' 'sip-files154.jp2'
19a1a09a93299d777642f27ae2fdc871
6516cf4a0332c3fedf5517a8bc4fc5eb2a304e6c
describe
'131924' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAB' 'sip-files154.jpg'
eee521702d9cb95c43d1d68796969607
937754bc03f5a4b226b1d9d698ad73a4e63bae60
describe
'32041' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAC' 'sip-files154.pro'
eff73abd7195413542610d0d71985bf9
d722eae0c860f2d397612b7854846d4e02a2f022
describe
'67013' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAD' 'sip-files154.QC.jpg'
c145ab0afc2cb1e8cea9facbb8b27a0c
a27a8de989ad4c4bba599a692c206f974d0d38e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAE' 'sip-files154.tif'
515c7c8d77f0c81da5971c9b741ed5e8
7aaa4fc4f3699294d5c1207266a5191d46faa5e6
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAF' 'sip-files154.txt'
b6056b2e4e8ebda6ba6b04a4a77d624c
0ac9974dbd6b0e28ceedabab1ff5332201beda8c
describe
'35395' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAG' 'sip-files154thm.jpg'
360e042d851db76a390a143c96243ef9
661524a6214a51e14350009772d0443f74f76f25
'2011-12-31T13:00:54-05:00'
describe
'1042715' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAH' 'sip-files155.jp2'
4c4f0de29de152eb9c3797361c01f380
8b637a41f4406cc6173785d4da18183990d5dead
describe
'130234' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAI' 'sip-files155.jpg'
dec707cf0d2bfd056c5e5d8af6bb4e77
664a5c99b226833868592b85977aa6f852b18852
describe
'31066' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAJ' 'sip-files155.pro'
8c9ec15d4fed03183377c437da511165
ad6c7fd03460269163d7b18066e8c4471ea1067e
describe
'65166' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAK' 'sip-files155.QC.jpg'
101b91acb93c012e3995f651ff1d3386
50cc083291a95afa779194b4ccfee1fba1954241
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAL' 'sip-files155.tif'
a15cb4ca31168288eb9141a740c3c858
d27971453e3ba04da84f5eac0f49ab79623e4978
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAM' 'sip-files155.txt'
1f6d4772c3ad74cb0bc41cd6d06a3bb9
06f4c864295c3b31e977c0f78e0a6d6b3495d753
describe
'35197' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAN' 'sip-files155thm.jpg'
2079d4dbea41d123dfa0daf54a62605e
db09f39b64c371771173578efc8995b25c0c47b3
describe
'1050245' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAO' 'sip-files156.jp2'
b20d91eb369fbcf8c0a1d1cbb7550b9d
104f50464b2b5619e8cebb44fb802add1cb94bce
describe
'131000' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAP' 'sip-files156.jpg'
fc8914cce8895262d4a4db488996177f
79a934306b0465ca55326b8da2e18254d5e1a0f0
describe
'31186' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAQ' 'sip-files156.pro'
965f7ef93c0838af3310e34ec1c4c02f
9b5f8b9ffaceb35ba5ecff290b6010b432608e0b
describe
'65629' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAR' 'sip-files156.QC.jpg'
e53555b0b301a0402e3a007fe82e559d
0889282555ad270b6cd57e0c1d355c87e7f725d5
describe
'8667620' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAS' 'sip-files156.tif'
08d97bf3a742622664e9adcecf85a9ff
c5f9df3b4c9284ac635ec8bb2f3b49a8e2c3ebde
'2011-12-31T12:56:12-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAT' 'sip-files156.txt'
a333818e1475b78bd4bc9eacb945a3d7
d9bcb6188c270919d2c3627a340b777c9e0caa68
describe
'35096' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAU' 'sip-files156thm.jpg'
7b14367bcfb0b5bd2f9940ef9dfa4147
c0f82b9bdec3ff3391e2d6bd40e2e2f6b75c7b82
describe
'1015524' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAV' 'sip-files157.jp2'
a2ac0f6a96625c230a028bcd0bb7ccaf
ba8d52b30522ee1c8e19ae87faf278a77495e8cb
describe
'128628' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAW' 'sip-files157.jpg'
b6b3ec211463da5ea34cf28bb59cbf35
64ce7b836df310f6454e8524d1426841dd62f2fe
describe
'31095' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAX' 'sip-files157.pro'
e3cc7e8d4457e6cfc3853ff347d25391
de18e86018c0747dd07f4f7b92be737ddf961171
describe
'64017' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAY' 'sip-files157.QC.jpg'
2857ab4aa2b6d9a48efc8adcfb67dd2b
11a59116124f446fc67cdd7a14015ca8fba6dce6
describe
'8667580' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASAZ' 'sip-files157.tif'
0221e8d3cf059e6881671337b498174e
07793ab9c1b450d3df8944fd840dea7ba3f4fee0
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBA' 'sip-files157.txt'
ba8476de349891cc434bd8491c785cf0
4fb3fa376cb9ee4c67b56e5a906f534165415f17
describe
'34712' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBB' 'sip-files157thm.jpg'
ce71e309876bab609b684452e686905a
b109742a758038fdd4bf71769d934990cec44940
describe
'1020562' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBC' 'sip-files158.jp2'
212c9bc1b67716e3e7ecab181e3a4a3b
0a7677be0ed88406ae5be025252c95894da6a72c
describe
'126648' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBD' 'sip-files158.jpg'
dd71b8c829aec8aeb99b5f9f18fd6918
1d196e67479395ec033d0d0162e3966feff979b6
describe
'30251' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBE' 'sip-files158.pro'
3790d5163000d8aa345432f8b93b2af7
fc01743c25a9459cdd15e73f9f897c0608758c80
'2011-12-31T12:56:23-05:00'
describe
'63246' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBF' 'sip-files158.QC.jpg'
3515799bfb140c0d83a8d2d3bb97beec
b2482ae98863aaabbdaa920fb59699733016c36b
describe
'8667392' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBG' 'sip-files158.tif'
1710838061bed4288ece90ef8dfb0b6a
ce24b0af68cbf5ececa2e440e2ca6eed88460752
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBH' 'sip-files158.txt'
056c548b815f087979c80c461944da7a
069cfd0252f4748073a1bcdb13d9e5408592cd53
describe
'34339' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBI' 'sip-files158thm.jpg'
02ec5d7223f5a36a265bb06d4858263f
b75939c1fbd3c4b2bd07fa230d0ba614a5c9be6d
describe
'1055276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBJ' 'sip-files159.jp2'
97853e07a5ea8a01e3275768d24a0d1f
a51d0684bd5d4248e4b82f045490495d6413100f
describe
'130268' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBK' 'sip-files159.jpg'
0bde25fd64da7774ebea6786e9406443
ae6714f6d6a9c932cf349ccb86e110d1a33d851b
describe
'31693' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBL' 'sip-files159.pro'
7ce3261bbec1ecc936ec26d7e349e7d4
709a399fa717e5e34ec6fb466fc58504fed6937c
describe
'64884' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBM' 'sip-files159.QC.jpg'
1c38a78202b80f80743706047e610f22
ebdd8d45246a1ea3a595d5a43ba8c27cccc11169
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBN' 'sip-files159.tif'
cc84393c058f45bc0cba90c5199c2da7
f600335b178f3146ec056c8a7fc7f09169c14e85
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBO' 'sip-files159.txt'
340c897210d9b1c508134bfea031c171
bec78d8985cb3799d804def725712a114e8453f5
describe
'34567' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBP' 'sip-files159thm.jpg'
471308266db334ca4578dccea3c3f738
d632a67ab151d3bfb0941662967e3797332b4584
describe
'1028288' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBQ' 'sip-files160.jp2'
df3354c801d53a030dcf67ae83a86349
5fb9f3fdcf7b598d23a04c4dd2221bcce18a8551
describe
'128224' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBR' 'sip-files160.jpg'
91d367e7715b4acbe2ed8ec4bf1792e0
a6a973558b0f8bee76ff379c4c575a99fae80054
describe
'31985' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBS' 'sip-files160.pro'
75b16e4b72c21b5e0d00e7b27646671a
79a5af7d9b53c85de918b50308f7cf8e2377c3b0
describe
'64284' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBT' 'sip-files160.QC.jpg'
a3117816a2131852443f4a8eaa7aad00
85333fe2d1b9b07bca94b4d87c3bb17085d0e0e8
describe
'8667624' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBU' 'sip-files160.tif'
501668d20b40c22c413a5789810f8406
2d489e21a56be139d8c9abdd2168595cd2f287e1
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBV' 'sip-files160.txt'
6b48ca3fdd3db985d1e2af1c26172d1a
d666d896f251b35699df36443dc4416b3b2a960a
describe
'34624' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBW' 'sip-files160thm.jpg'
5622a47e219d9153ce3d40ed82c78950
d16289fd4d98da36c71de3ff3da8eb06a107f60b
'2011-12-31T12:58:39-05:00'
describe
'1015447' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBX' 'sip-files161.jp2'
26f54e892ff49580907673005065d77e
6a4eeb826c379e4a224376e52c332d93cc63d1a6
describe
'126377' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBY' 'sip-files161.jpg'
3b85b57ef004dedb4895cdf39aa4c487
e7c3a42379ae4bba1d8fcd1180392e3995bfc76c
describe
'32894' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASBZ' 'sip-files161.pro'
4ca5398350dcba0704169876a0825ee1
9e73f5f7fc3e08300dc12a33a7692741b3c897d2
describe
'65161' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCA' 'sip-files161.QC.jpg'
baf68f737ea05f20898ea5bd83802002
5d07081c4aa695d7500c0abfc8365addb669b561
describe
'8667532' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCB' 'sip-files161.tif'
4975ede2416ff6f0d61a527fb385cca0
96536762caee051862f5badc7b510d349229a2e6
'2011-12-31T12:57:51-05:00'
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCC' 'sip-files161.txt'
3579e77e486dbdfa319b464ea28123a0
b74a960f5b79b7589993a7934320325b31e32afe
describe
'34690' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCD' 'sip-files161thm.jpg'
b5c8c83dae09722abae89f1362881244
f9941275655383c266f64383047888fca0df2bca
describe
'1040317' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCE' 'sip-files162.jp2'
648c1e0960a91a2636a8f13faad7b596
31e50d7bd7baba7ea9cf1d8d33aac7cf4db69f4d
describe
'131159' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCF' 'sip-files162.jpg'
150b0a00df138e32691139242078859e
3048fb27d74a973b568f57b7e936f1043d956928
'2011-12-31T12:55:52-05:00'
describe
'31822' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCG' 'sip-files162.pro'
51c9aa18414a311b753d88218b04d26f
9c2bdb70f6a47a95d50c02db828db84cdf46d134
describe
'65953' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCH' 'sip-files162.QC.jpg'
42d9f80b8db0739d6a999b51e4234a83
492d44e08b00663a163851003729db5ff9ecb90e
describe
'8667452' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCI' 'sip-files162.tif'
70b879c25e058860b32f7a0d569158b4
3b7c2823bbedeee271c56598a87124ebd5013aa1
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCJ' 'sip-files162.txt'
3dda8e71a0f12fa5ae44d4d4e17defac
35c00f92f970f6a9110caa7d9fb9931bd9b754d7
describe
'34591' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCK' 'sip-files162thm.jpg'
a786bf7054faa392e04475e3fe817318
8013fc24d3056dcadf2b6606946ed692ac0c17ee
describe
'1037959' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCL' 'sip-files163.jp2'
ce0abc2960c0bbf2e26b9b680ffa8f02
061b43fc53442c69ed63c4b4496b2d1267ddfd74
'2011-12-31T12:57:11-05:00'
describe
'131504' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCM' 'sip-files163.jpg'
6ee7d80c87eecddc96e0b28666dd1adf
714f143b84bf3f3caebf3242700c64caa2fad43c
describe
'31784' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCN' 'sip-files163.pro'
1d88cec1b072de740ac4cc8ef9bfcc66
7b73fd87e905b725876aceaf240927f5541d2267
describe
'65613' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCO' 'sip-files163.QC.jpg'
07cb041e37561875d844d044ccb3fce4
4fc5693321c90d8fbcc618a3953bc7c1168b78ab
describe
'8667380' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCP' 'sip-files163.tif'
42d49420a529e487d7c3491e63367f51
9a8d5505195fcac806f1c48818c9b6174664a3df
'2011-12-31T13:03:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCQ' 'sip-files163.txt'
a969d0a096cf3fb57fcd228b116cf086
8f5b3161f38daaf68a2134fff0e697576c4988c1
describe
'34303' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCR' 'sip-files163thm.jpg'
36b58f9eefa7dbf9e68f01b79eb7b7d4
11b409ab89692d27a4dc8f40cfd9d6b7f1a7096e
describe
'988558' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCS' 'sip-files164.jp2'
d651cff04f6a573fa59ccee90ce4e825
6b40a2e67147505f90801815c6f5c07a692575f0
describe
'125795' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCT' 'sip-files164.jpg'
5e58d6728382dd0e8ef95debb898e673
1d36e6dea4132218b8ecb1869491ba2d5a8c6fe1
describe
'30215' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCU' 'sip-files164.pro'
7da785dc7c41eb485d1d9fa0ab122b25
b6bbc8eb002e035b8e38a9477d21138057cd3479
describe
'63279' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCV' 'sip-files164.QC.jpg'
43ef4b19292c7f7409417566a96e0b4d
00813535d8f5accb9bce86e2d6b6f4a8a2899a03
describe
'8667364' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCW' 'sip-files164.tif'
890e786f488b2227d02b71db20f6bb16
e75ad12ff9c8a85c9d68bd4f8f6a92168dc69bff
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCX' 'sip-files164.txt'
44d5726ad8b0800a34dabaccdc46281e
777a581040510a6fc22498baf955b5c8f554ef38
describe
'34206' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCY' 'sip-files164thm.jpg'
8c956ab0b06a77425e5562d5fe128173
1e11e1215851153a27dbb4b87ebf91a890ca7fb1
describe
'1021692' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASCZ' 'sip-files165.jp2'
abc9d096eaff153ba0db709241a65b41
5b17f96405138332efa62b5af58406b2a3aa6395
describe
'128974' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDA' 'sip-files165.jpg'
0798c2f0df17c07bc772cf507d751621
60f75017aa9fee38be93d60126043d91c39fc7ae
describe
'34071' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDB' 'sip-files165.pro'
b02689779bf188c083eca20167924dad
d8f284cc14bd6af16bf28bd8deddf2fc506c66ca
describe
'64214' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDC' 'sip-files165.QC.jpg'
67ee28502185516d04156a3255cab78f
1d2b0dbfa5b4604369e149b4b2b15c289765b07c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDD' 'sip-files165.tif'
ce1342c2fbec310e56835867c9e9281f
6483c936e81bf0f1c2342a112e741fe3039c9a55
'2011-12-31T13:02:08-05:00'
describe
'1249' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDE' 'sip-files165.txt'
7a5f77d8250bedc85231f546d5463a05
651a711261e8b5c3e84b603a17c5772d9b1e1efc
describe
'34263' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDF' 'sip-files165thm.jpg'
fc05a47f79ef9f81588b962bbcec9b8f
d29584bf7aa5441739ab223802643cd5a432c641
describe
'995242' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDG' 'sip-files166.jp2'
e38e6ea5aa2015101b893f4a647427d1
1d8b6b97706fdfaa5934294ad82cbbc2b75023c8
describe
'123333' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDH' 'sip-files166.jpg'
a0b5ecc7de69464fba147b01cc734837
82885cd9a594d02181d25492fb37cb55bc55a9a6
describe
'30603' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDI' 'sip-files166.pro'
ea613a9c571b6dca9ecda5be6e562e1b
bcc3c0c2dd4bb5b0d38f2419bcd487c2bbacd094
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDJ' 'sip-files166.QC.jpg'
21262a5d078010cc93e61983bf317317
4d5e784e12557b7967a0e345fa899a7a8d18bb3a
describe
'8667348' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDK' 'sip-files166.tif'
c001fd42c4b28327da1e1f0687bf275b
5b057fb48bbe9153e5487b5fe43e967ad5dad13e
'2011-12-31T12:56:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDL' 'sip-files166.txt'
58590fd6f719e8ad8c5a835828f904d5
24f38b088cd76483e826944711d5807abd4d95be
describe
'34543' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDM' 'sip-files166thm.jpg'
a1f46ae0652cc27a4007e3f3a9c05c41
e7d3a1257bd5a28999419321de8bb5a46f7d5ac8
describe
'973287' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDN' 'sip-files167.jp2'
1a6609ba874c783c2966700bd3abc6e7
20f30583e820d56f94ec4a0b80f5659c0ab848fe
describe
'124055' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDO' 'sip-files167.jpg'
95927d5132906290d7842af40fc36e9f
63a198e9277278cda9404542205947eec5df3964
'2011-12-31T12:58:16-05:00'
describe
'28918' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDP' 'sip-files167.pro'
9f96e0106f780f2062c198e5c2f85370
dab26939eeabc0397137ddd7ff41fa3e6e30bb9b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDQ' 'sip-files171.tif'
e103229305299fdaa7e382820292f4c7
5511c207f5236df65534ff5620c2a2ff6257ccb9
describe
'61849' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDR' 'sip-files167.QC.jpg'
cdd4ce10db4f59ba1bba963c6e034aaf
bf7cae0f145ffeac168a8eb877a76ea14718b8ef
describe
'8667028' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDS' 'sip-files167.tif'
4835685d8a2d8673161155117c4e7674
941f2af076928f46f470c40a6053b90953cd2fbd
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDT' 'sip-files167.txt'
bf3fe86a17c75710e09ebd0c8c6a981f
a57bd23e17f9aeaca1bcad5ca134f8bc551bbae3
describe
'33706' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDU' 'sip-files167thm.jpg'
1f30bf60b9f2728667e51391f16f41ae
2927b0d84238d62075906ac311b2a907ec7c5951
describe
'1009779' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDV' 'sip-files168.jp2'
01874a5df84a99e6f55e7ab282f47dcc
dc84b1c2c783b61d518083b7e34b8e1aa814a63d
describe
'129353' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDW' 'sip-files168.jpg'
2f3561849b275106df7e457501e39878
e598e3912bbc6a263d1f8e00e7fe41c57d6b52eb
describe
'31700' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDX' 'sip-files168.pro'
b1d0d36389e255afac412f2a5ef60e89
c1b01349468466d202637739891b6181296388cb
describe
'64522' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDY' 'sip-files168.QC.jpg'
c41c9c18ceef88e4a2a5d22cf86a7135
d59e1877277e4751a64824bbf1e6aa310ad75845
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASDZ' 'sip-files168.tif'
13a2ba37a2253b312334812dfc01019f
956251d4ea5383a842f6e0843094e8757e0a823d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEA' 'sip-files168.txt'
edf8fd84072fdf172509665f643df146
c3d827cddb08bb9614f8fead7b897ba915174789
describe
'34250' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEB' 'sip-files168thm.jpg'
c51bce2d5dd4f3fd0da35054f70677de
9dd65c1c5a2aa31f1928011c4f2fb8265b273320
describe
'994543' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEC' 'sip-files169.jp2'
aff51f903cc3b452d84cdc9f67d27fef
01232482f83c4e55ad9d71087c5719bbb87f3b82
describe
'125459' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASED' 'sip-files169.jpg'
254818fa05154638b5924b6a5cadbec1
d2c563cbbafe0d90064bc5ee694f97d716be8779
describe
'30973' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEE' 'sip-files169.pro'
31104eb54350f9c2eccdb0a2d34fb462
9b826d08a3c9d600f9425b5f32948f7688ef4e9c
describe
'63485' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEF' 'sip-files169.QC.jpg'
1b1516908e89a52c63a38afcd12b08d3
12f8bc7ad98b692f3df4370ff291cc120b40e77e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEG' 'sip-files169.tif'
351c19d87532f9ed988f6075dd90e812
b7be97332ef0cdc0495c775b14ddcf1b31f65690
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEH' 'sip-files169.txt'
a4dac3e76107d863bb62ab3d51a922af
f7574cd0d1b315223608246a1f9eb95dec3208eb
describe
'34431' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEI' 'sip-files169thm.jpg'
50f9385bc8de55d5afd6aeb2a4d01b4f
f4abd0c48b771630dcc07b7001fbcc3e5c6a22d2
describe
'1021836' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEJ' 'sip-files170.jp2'
c80dc25c8079ed71239921404319a454
dfc3f5253fba833fe176ff0ce52c4062ef463069
describe
'127595' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEK' 'sip-files170.jpg'
7df1f2f281f2e750d1cfc6c1b42b9437
07570d6ab181bf56b9f406e0cbbc7d5dd40479af
describe
'31531' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEL' 'sip-files170.pro'
ad924d59da2602922513c5757f2577e4
a18ddfdba6210d39e4bcd7a7790d7f7d28736c01
describe
'63792' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEM' 'sip-files170.QC.jpg'
203ad4fa1fed5185ac30c4b95128d5bd
2a09d755af6c87933be208b28b28d35425d28ad8
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEN' 'sip-files170.tif'
513663964d2f2a36b665bd348d444c0b
1d3bd640b8ff69ade5a6448220dc30ca45ac362a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEO' 'sip-files170.txt'
7a2fdf7edc9b74dce0062ca11886db8c
c4d5f4c4b42ba6a28ff717304a21df8e2fdaaf27
describe
'34188' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEP' 'sip-files170thm.jpg'
72e1c93ffb20c7b546b17308af5f0804
44646d6bb0cc8e1f7ee32f5b2c712cee3d983d73
describe
'1004813' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEQ' 'sip-files171.jp2'
888e326ca2d2c396f4bd3ea0b9a1bf00
eb0430cdd256e022824e5d22bae776fc32716b75
describe
'126838' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASER' 'sip-files171.jpg'
c478ac189a9064153d38bf74b2f635d1
3ce7075039ba0a1b20abf07e16b089ee3fa24e9a
describe
'31717' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASES' 'sip-files171.pro'
9118e63eb5279c52428c10d4853e7de0
733b2a9cabd54c338261d3429dbd9ab6f9effdbe
describe
'63113' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASET' 'sip-files171.QC.jpg'
62269e94a920208f34b6f3d01f5fbaa5
f4682eba6e85be57e868fff8b91b5f40b62661ba
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEU' 'sip-files171.txt'
65784cc82283e9be16e7f91567991877
1f545cbcfb6222eb0e37acb1ddc825a132cef425
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEV' 'sip-files171thm.jpg'
5fa91b1c20ced5e270343e7c6e349c66
5e41a239f033794593be6f135772727200951256
describe
'987658' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEW' 'sip-files172.jp2'
149432aec89fc26c8c67ad0a9ad826a7
3f86d601589d8d8bb70af0d0edff4fbae4b3e354
describe
'125922' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEX' 'sip-files172.jpg'
d13a07e76a62c07e977c6fac21f6d377
0024c53f29acd6d752e2aeaa278d8240381dd97c
describe
'32088' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEY' 'sip-files172.pro'
7532f5c8499651cff6946bbb7a19b6f8
3f06f89fbce3c0c9d35ced3fe71c1f308c2f1339
describe
'65081' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASEZ' 'sip-files172.QC.jpg'
3b80d1d923558189f3071a8c6acbc0b6
6ee502fa6182322888e7a6f7086c82f29b5dc2da
'2011-12-31T13:00:13-05:00'
describe
'8667444' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFA' 'sip-files172.tif'
7b75bac91360855060d2fdf21b8bda48
a6f970aaf3bf1d2b0b5795d4b08891b9f22498bd
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFB' 'sip-files172.txt'
be2850c5ccd26ffe4280329fe45fa31d
6671a71fa96dc1f47f05af4e6c99bdef5f7cee52
describe
'34336' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFC' 'sip-files172thm.jpg'
81e3bc366b6abae85cfaff8221a9c7e7
15a13b5681aa746f69a2655d4c0dcce1ab890ec6
describe
'953063' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFD' 'sip-files173.jp2'
5f1470bba30e133c68b78eb1d65195dd
bd491c198e3f210343993d6a9296283f8ed15e0f
describe
'119687' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFE' 'sip-files173.jpg'
405341806c6901639f611a74524ab2ff
e4e8fb119ac0e60b7f172bac811f9005a7a5a912
describe
'32779' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFF' 'sip-files173.pro'
cb23afa7aab6bbc0e0436c98c52d91f4
16c7c0fca76d1b2dd75e4405997bd49061d64cf7
describe
'62695' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFG' 'sip-files173.QC.jpg'
eff5505cb501591bf2aadc136075ca8c
ab6e92ba08cc49e1b32a54d7294d4cdf90f99361
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFH' 'sip-files173.tif'
8cfe938d6a8ffbf0bbf9a8cab4149c8a
adbac13d9a2425a62bf02a6ea5fa29ebcdc8b703
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFI' 'sip-files173.txt'
1d6ff485e06ce0dab3a9fe2782afdfe4
9d9406705aced26e714819e96c5371dbbed3e286
describe
'34239' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFJ' 'sip-files173thm.jpg'
e10bfb902c5da61ba7216b6be81552df
d2a08eae53ad2395a29ae907d5ca39b1c0550162
describe
'1017829' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFK' 'sip-files174.jp2'
bd836fa75c30e6c8b2f4bd6e0f92570c
1e0386404a95eca23d6b084e72bcf2d6863fee82
describe
'128873' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFL' 'sip-files174.jpg'
0ad5450c819f4d52251fedd43d82bde6
15307caf2b099709ef4a163a6cf376b820ef3fc1
describe
'31228' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFM' 'sip-files174.pro'
bfb6da003316283dfea91273adade61d
8d181404def14d84b229fa5f62fbea0a7ad2546e
describe
'64274' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFN' 'sip-files174.QC.jpg'
a4131d98029686cff8ddf44dfb11d07d
236c5278a03bc3f9c4ad55528d1b1dab4b30fd27
describe
'8667272' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFO' 'sip-files174.tif'
2d324b642b9dc2194578257009dcb113
d1e85c5b85fb6615d9104d11ea008f7ada3a7060
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFP' 'sip-files174.txt'
2269ec896d9524f4dbfdbe8105f42413
6893db888e5d2402db92b761bcf018189457b3d4
describe
'34174' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFQ' 'sip-files174thm.jpg'
ffefd6320f05f5fc4263d93c07fc1d83
a324260833d62ad14a74d13308b25cff93a5abf1
describe
'985795' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFR' 'sip-files175.jp2'
248ca0f24b656e64fc2b45235580215b
8b0b77d16e3d23ae8f6ea1d740616074d3b6573a
describe
'124245' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFS' 'sip-files175.jpg'
b3a5ce1a45eddc6962ed2cba13c0d82f
1268d9f97bc95587176db5ab866636c6668a5aaf
'2011-12-31T12:59:24-05:00'
describe
'30330' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFT' 'sip-files175.pro'
efe6cab92d0e116ade94ba0d05e0a6dd
b496ff017a9759384068b212d4026e6fece9f4f0
describe
'62951' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFU' 'sip-files175.QC.jpg'
a999acbf05c4926f095654bee4cdba4b
20b1382399fd8cbf07fb174327a4ee5fc645b214
describe
'8667424' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFV' 'sip-files175.tif'
73f9fa19a2767d0dc0e45830c8c49d4c
32e5cc36face0f7a2b5b7ca2198190387e72a542
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFW' 'sip-files175.txt'
0abdef4199ff1c185444f6e3f22024f7
ea7d83d3e24ecba1d01ef7bc79c1e11e959e2570
describe
'978621' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFX' 'sip-files180.jp2'
323461562b6e17579d8b3279ca5c056f
96da96c2504261f1a6ce17568c941102c0c594d4
describe
'34355' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFY' 'sip-files175thm.jpg'
0f162a879c2ff0455c6d8993bb697da1
0d248128961fac1e1bd42ca146a51ab39e95ab83
describe
'1005247' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASFZ' 'sip-files176.jp2'
5090ab435d4d4ab77615a5fb03c54a1e
d662ba95df9b01db31c8e7be82d3afa39be4a18d
describe
'126920' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGA' 'sip-files176.jpg'
760b6d54fd0bef94fcfbe6c349a12728
f633b75a294163fc83bfb3176a2650ae218ed9ce
describe
'31917' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGB' 'sip-files176.pro'
536582168a1669ece4dfbdfc06115a45
fa6fd8c43a5ef6b00dee943a60f77c3f7633a383
describe
'63396' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGC' 'sip-files176.QC.jpg'
dca4accc56875d4fc9bcc3f55d0df581
062a67f5607f234692fc2f8530105c2c6f5a22f1
describe
'8667824' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGD' 'sip-files176.tif'
c78f755bffe2fb0a8e674def830a0979
19f330c85e9272c08f4fb995833c568bca7e1a20
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGE' 'sip-files176.txt'
4385b298e7a5cb69e3206e65ac43044f
a09c14bfabe99c16147f0b31d3511645c65f0214
describe
'34808' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGF' 'sip-files176thm.jpg'
c609d2fd760ae6778ffbe82c22a548f6
51199407a0b38a6d584831f32a79f312ef285da5
describe
'1028155' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGG' 'sip-files177.jp2'
16ee988286427cfd7dd473bd2ad8f795
64145502a46f94f088e77cc8cca2bc7b92ffb03e
describe
'130214' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGH' 'sip-files177.jpg'
58f5e24d4b90519a04d5e575ba05bd93
5643300bc1064db8339ac67d62e0669ef741664b
describe
'32604' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGI' 'sip-files177.pro'
2b516b1a6df039cf1df764f8b43f42cf
988e7289172c332856db6e82847ad2faf599ae13
describe
'64494' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGJ' 'sip-files177.QC.jpg'
480f0d7a314ffcae4e9bca91e305c15b
044353ebfbf3b71d25072eb2fe98bf29014a9a1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGK' 'sip-files177.tif'
bfcff621625a873224cad58573045055
9d43adee00bf4f125e92f268af3ae90f0ad3d602
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGL' 'sip-files177.txt'
b0ef716da124163ae297728b42e54fe2
305ff0d1a8057efbb659b5c3fe01269515b07280
describe
'34749' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGM' 'sip-files177thm.jpg'
2c6cf0b7de297e2733e3d391553546af
fb558040f339e64d9f79ff27d53c26af58deb576
describe
'1042739' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGN' 'sip-files178.jp2'
c404fa9dc805510ab91f3ee94bba4d60
ff9f94c5a70806ae39c0e06e57613a504d68e932
describe
'131915' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGO' 'sip-files178.jpg'
e1ff368fc6279e53a84c170a54b9e24a
71b744ff823b8cc65f00fba6fd86cfbf041e2f2e
describe
'31764' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGP' 'sip-files178.pro'
f5d4c4d2a938cb83864ab26a408505ea
1d4de02ef8fc6cc218b649d4b046c240c284b404
describe
'65586' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGQ' 'sip-files178.QC.jpg'
12d037b399c5e4246792f81de6085083
38eaf437de20a95684bab1b8410be73333007d7f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGR' 'sip-files178.tif'
f6523688669929bc58f0925e7aab9adf
0838d1f00cd4a3b2f413271aaff05b2ed4655f61
'2011-12-31T12:58:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGS' 'sip-files178.txt'
1501908413c4ec52d65f25c84612324e
40612588c23fbd385cfcffce6b8c6f80eb28150a
describe
'34592' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGT' 'sip-files178thm.jpg'
ccc3ab1f3e7e51071225132d43089ec3
f9e32c834446f84b330169239449e782ef62e07c
describe
'1031117' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGU' 'sip-files179.jp2'
c26fe354d00296e1105a8c29492221e9
a6adb328738e6e96189f04e7607d1715d36b041f
describe
'130594' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGV' 'sip-files179.jpg'
ed2bdf0e0b1918860b86490cc6f621f4
affa1829e43f8787af81251fad25976370ef0c01
describe
'31626' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGW' 'sip-files179.pro'
b7dc5b8fca10064fbe46d09f6960825f
b1400f56222ea9e8c4e3a582e1427f8e5ab3816e
describe
'64605' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGX' 'sip-files179.QC.jpg'
c300ae1c90bd1b7d8b1155a19e55ce47
22d96edb8e10df81a6e79ca9bee2d154a8c0c103
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGY' 'sip-files179.tif'
d433deb265e994e0cf2777af33361e76
2287ffd2d05653aeac9d206c939ee5d0f7390ef6
'2011-12-31T12:57:30-05:00'
describe
'1224' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASGZ' 'sip-files179.txt'
52bbc0615fa351c94a1cef328e251455
dc2b2b1a58e4ed3381e0934fc2cc9a3cb2721319
describe
'34618' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHA' 'sip-files179thm.jpg'
b623105ec129ca4486a5cfb81c4af678
4d492d6fe3098c4f9c8d7125dac4777bfcac53e7
describe
'124022' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHB' 'sip-files180.jpg'
1ab50d12b3680a423c907cb4aeeebe3e
a03a9da19539077403b2a530a36395abe883958a
describe
'32083' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHC' 'sip-files180.pro'
43c0f0051194526590b75cbd7d3bede1
ae8de0dd9d700818dd7b621a94d23f45c838d581
describe
'63866' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHD' 'sip-files180.QC.jpg'
40bf37a27fbf65bdbc6ba107eb1c3f91
32ddb118aaf4658f64b19c0b783200d2c61cf21d
describe
'8667832' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHE' 'sip-files180.tif'
a66e420a4596c33ce58fc1c2edcbd752
36ede8fb0c853b7f5f58ec5b5c6a940a56a7ae0d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHF' 'sip-files180.txt'
3e35e4bfa60874eb1c5112c264e4cfb4
f7bfe5da2f1480dbbb17bcf1b3016b8808e34fcc
describe
'35155' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHG' 'sip-files180thm.jpg'
f693cf5fd45622c044c43f2ec84117d2
cc4798d74c0e6e732694c96acc95acc6e1328b7d
describe
'979388' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHH' 'sip-files181.jp2'
60fee430e6aa4d061203db63885fb6d5
ff77e397ddad2087ce4a62cd0bc38072ff4a369f
describe
'124571' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHI' 'sip-files181.jpg'
e6a245e56c97a37b9e40af3e06c1c1d2
f34426926e171b315d3989533298aeec2344b327
describe
'32410' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHJ' 'sip-files181.pro'
bcb0be9e84caf572cb0ddab466b57efb
166b2ec1a9c76a50f6f7c2299a52ed44105dc105
describe
'63462' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHK' 'sip-files181.QC.jpg'
89feb48b263b3e142bcbbe1b35adc79a
de0dc95300bce93bc1a71fb7f7ea5bf95f8a6d62
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHL' 'sip-files181.tif'
e3ec1bdb83def5a7bbe8ae40a4b062d0
737bcba8e9c4e0c7874fa9e996148594d8a337b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHM' 'sip-files181.txt'
93e556a717f840dafa6cdce4c10004ee
c7cad31f27a09ee7d0f8a20f778883c5e2e77c8f
describe
'34970' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHN' 'sip-files181thm.jpg'
f9a6ddf78dda2cd08cbc92e521a0e901
772f7695beeed333f145486431eea13061ca9732
describe
'1004407' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHO' 'sip-files182.jp2'
58f457578045bc7f4de33ba254186236
ccf0cfa0feb5c7d2fdcc8673ee9349e725902908
describe
'126686' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHP' 'sip-files182.jpg'
345a623952b8769fbbf4789758fe0ecb
0bf370c3e9c25a66fa3bb8cc5655c2be1a112fee
describe
'30791' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHQ' 'sip-files182.pro'
aee18e729874e3d6237369041c708af7
149da7b22f89943bb61c0aa6d74dd86717d39ca1
describe
'64035' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHR' 'sip-files182.QC.jpg'
66684220957337be874fe47134a9307a
d74f561eca36e54a6559f470c4ee12464941c3a1
describe
'8667220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHS' 'sip-files182.tif'
e96754ec954dee18dfe64137c4370d55
e5868c909db0010819eda20f39a0fecb62f1bf71
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHT' 'sip-files182.txt'
369456db0eacd283a7e6e36e5a74b6cf
1fe9d5dbb1e9c406102a049c7a59e28a4a20f7d9
describe
'34049' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHU' 'sip-files182thm.jpg'
fa7a46b05fd91e24a0e30a37b7c32b55
6ad1dd2b6f4fe93b92a6802e12560437480eed30
describe
'1072161' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHV' 'sip-files183.jp2'
f5c77591a2114e4f27edb402a2de02d3
7e96e1027ab4dfc660f310b313fa98bd2af14581
'2011-12-31T12:55:26-05:00'
describe
'133726' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHW' 'sip-files183.jpg'
9bc093bb737746699a0c591bd3799d52
39eb59b105ce273023ab3fbd5c29cb75e7cfa2ee
describe
'32934' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHX' 'sip-files183.pro'
8f116318058dc74f369b7e00bbde3db2
fe2a011fe8911505814c454634f481753f7cf0fe
describe
'66254' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHY' 'sip-files183.QC.jpg'
3f6153b7925c06f1e13e4bea1247bac5
37df607a866b15383139a757396e33320ff3654f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASHZ' 'sip-files183.tif'
c1fa51677334ef0a0a27c48ae4620ad6
792c69c35a9c772d21f12bd0bfa01083353c2971
describe
'1277' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIA' 'sip-files183.txt'
0e50992b2865f2ddd88a10df05826e35
e59b40f2bab459692bcd517c6effd3bb59a84e29
describe
'35425' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIB' 'sip-files183thm.jpg'
585940f0f78ce10cd55a332188f57e73
30d8522a41f8720755c85eae79b1e18c6480a573
describe
'383594' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIC' 'sip-files184.jp2'
4b3edc14fa1182ba15e7d2c7c1c0e38e
35ec53935130ff29682eabf1c238aba8ecb2d28e
describe
'63035' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASID' 'sip-files184.jpg'
3ab2e94f97da67475706fe38701e25eb
359409dea22933ca3b20164fbaeecc0761881cf8
describe
'12122' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIE' 'sip-files184.pro'
696ed1ae617a99be1cf294dcc90faa99
207af6739d5caeb677d93985e4764c55a2ffcd53
describe
'36818' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIF' 'sip-files184.QC.jpg'
454514f8060e087818d4efb996824c35
80476e52ebadaf70a407b10689c448157494169e
describe
'8663736' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIG' 'sip-files184.tif'
8775691eda2678a9918a7f2ac4bb46eb
8aaea3e22cc6a533d309e70facc4aaadbccc4bc7
describe
'466' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIH' 'sip-files184.txt'
74db30c2f8489b3b01ad453e1ed0ca84
df0799bd6926780948a72d74774e5e57ae43a3f4
describe
'25714' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASII' 'sip-files184thm.jpg'
6e301819abc49532514cdec3c0d868fc
ba0645e00e26a0b9578bc38a4662db105621a463
describe
'928862' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIJ' 'sip-files185.jp2'
eb830fc8258d2ce20accb75d4d13e3b1
e7680b0f4c560904e365f9fbd32fd4105d9ee857
describe
'119553' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIK' 'sip-files185.jpg'
92dfe16a8b8d6ebee638b101b93ea36d
49b080ed4d4735fdf251cdcda7c4ee3604e68aa3
describe
'29973' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIL' 'sip-files185.pro'
937266cf8f08c367bc390c317b7a47f1
c896d3b53b3e484b5e19859cee6a91857e54db40
describe
'60175' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIM' 'sip-files185.QC.jpg'
47de18499c3ba1686398e1500621270e
928526371fa07abcfcf224426c0ea1f03e20d202
describe
'8666780' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIN' 'sip-files185.tif'
0d08bf88a75033e7c29c76889627990e
c76aa3b52ba98cbe282eb0e1d2e748715739464e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIO' 'sip-files185.txt'
2db290d42b3d560cb3a0c762b1cc2e46
5448e1fcc682b7fc2563272439a48f2675c32dac
describe
'33118' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIP' 'sip-files185thm.jpg'
9148cf7d569c4c0cb087e646fea84843
c44359064ce745743aeb6e45da62d4dfd61da07b
describe
'955686' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIQ' 'sip-files186.jp2'
cb87c896dcb0164c8452ca4a68554c67
d09c30f1898d5e9217c31140effbcf8b08659f71
describe
'121189' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIR' 'sip-files186.jpg'
3e4bf6919ea062d125063745a894d057
e77d5b4c979cc647f86dc143c613fe1b70708b38
describe
'29920' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIS' 'sip-files186.pro'
3c4ceecf28d72dd700488bde0070cb4d
506a9ac98004cec1c444b55276d997b1dec95248
describe
'60985' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIT' 'sip-files186.QC.jpg'
ee7d00230722396c328e5c8b8f535417
9a4dbb1a3b5cf0cea59fdeed64cfdf558b080d36
describe
'8667204' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIU' 'sip-files186.tif'
42c960c90d7870ef0ccdeea595650a0d
87dcd46daebed0f3f4d450f5a4c90a73f92702f3
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIV' 'sip-files186.txt'
06fa53715f4660dbc0b0fc271856453d
6732406f6fc6a9f6b0483513fd6e1e2f9a2f577a
describe
'33856' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIW' 'sip-files186thm.jpg'
6ae8164024c9428a16b4e7c6aae7fe17
0b84f53397e9f1308fad34363456d600562dc798
describe
'972716' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIX' 'sip-files187.jp2'
a86b2a822d2e7322a1435aa22121e134
982c00129df54539a57d47fd9880444471292a61
describe
'123973' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIY' 'sip-files187.jpg'
16986ba20883afcee951b70e08417513
cb9713889eaabffb96e48be19b1f7dda13185c78
describe
'31847' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASIZ' 'sip-files187.pro'
17e2310e3424040770558680f57b8e37
cdedc97a96a979c063715d6a07c0b84a3b986714
describe
'62190' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJA' 'sip-files187.QC.jpg'
fea76e56e446e24848f24b62098442f5
2b2e72ffe5de64059fa3dd46c7c8d1cbe3a6d552
describe
'8667060' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJB' 'sip-files187.tif'
d805ac188cd12400a0e3c4ddf383ac6f
588b90e12e0f31f9e93d31c23bdc02e49690f38a
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJC' 'sip-files187.txt'
b06851b44ee8697ae6ee14e28fa037d0
1f61fbee9f99e735e41b1e16035e72b300f994dd
describe
'33666' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJD' 'sip-files187thm.jpg'
eda7514a558969272744ede6bc6ccf16
f1fa6988362d1872f9b5d4800f834f2661aa7073
describe
'808183' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJE' 'sip-files188.jp2'
f8671c222154e131c4f3599535e51a95
dfb3dc57e12351bcfa88952f82c648281efed9c9
describe
'105030' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJF' 'sip-files188.jpg'
a25caa8dcafc7d2751806c51afad2d45
f58b8d999584073e6a8ccd9ef918470b01a9cfcd
describe
'26139' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJG' 'sip-files188.pro'
887d576dc8f58d402c1b166fa22f92ae
a014dd2dd8e4f1e6b94bf29cfad1146e42ab449d
describe
'56301' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJH' 'sip-files188.QC.jpg'
613e9da0f3b6bb9c1616652a2b479a65
50d4baa3d384c7d6f660d55fa040746c35ce91aa
describe
'8666716' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJI' 'sip-files188.tif'
dffdce4aaa6b912a28069cdc67a18a2f
c1cad6f72ebb1f3677df09f37f3d5de8c2c57dd3
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJJ' 'sip-files188.txt'
a0d1077d26aa8df1a4a0b6f3395ffc08
e25cfb4d04dc80769491cdaf3f6afaff9eb03368
describe
'32679' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJK' 'sip-files188thm.jpg'
2751198c364a738994404023995a8bf2
59cd82a75346278455b5d4e44d333b6aa918b1ee
describe
'14' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJL' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
5348ebae2692914295d6823fc8db81ae
164ec4c95b944636526e582a5f5d13f92e422bd6
describe
'287107' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJM' 'sip-filesUF00003539_00001.mets'
a0f45aba763cb5208116d8d3471e7f6f
2bc440a92d5494fdface3b17c69fad10e777e2d2
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T17:00:26-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'372007' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAMfileF20090220_AAASJP' 'sip-filesUF00003539_00001.xml'
1e6f7b55a3ade6481ca03d6954634074
4d5ba4ed5c8bf43aa9df2d1649cf156a5a0d4c0f
describe
'2013-12-13T17:00:22-05:00'
xml resolution