Citation
Marco Paul's voyages & travels

Material Information

Title:
Marco Paul's voyages & travels : Springfield Armory
Series Title:
Marco Paul's voyages & travels
Added title page title:
Springfield Armory
Creator:
Abbott, Jacob, 1803-1879 ( Author, Primary )
Doepler, Carl Emil, 1824-1905 ( Illustrator )
Orr, John William, 1815-1887 ( Engraver )
Harper & Brothers ( Publisher )
Lossing & Barritt ( Engraver )
Abbott, Jacob, 1803-1879
Place of Publication:
New York
Publisher:
Harper & Brothers
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Physical Description:
192 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Responsibility -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Tutors and tutoring -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Armories -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Floods -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Springfield (Mass.) ( lcsh )
Travelogue storybooks -- 1853 ( local )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853 ( rbbin )
Baldwin -- 1853
Genre:
Travelogue storybooks ( local )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Some illustrations engraved by J. W, Orr.
General Note:
Illustrated title page engraved by Lossing & Barritt after C.E. Dopler.
Statement of Responsibility:
by Jacob Abbott.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026784890 ( ALEPH )
01812345 ( OCLC )
ALH0743 ( NOTIS )

Related Items

Related Item:
PALMM Version

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:

oai.xml

E20090219_AAAAAH.xml

UF00003522_00001.pdf

UF00003522_00001.txt

0144.txt

0185.txt

0134.txt

UF00003522_00001_pdf.txt

0052.txt

0084.txt

0066.txt

0000viii.txt

0044.txt

0164.txt

0095.txt

0000ix.txt

0013.txt

0173.txt

0152.txt

0117.txt

0133.txt

0000v.txt

0032.txt

0167.txt

0179.txt

0089.txt

0130.txt

0020.txt

0123.txt

0045.txt

0140.txt

0063.txt

0129.txt

0087.txt

0169.txt

0111.txt

0172.txt

0024.txt

0038.txt

0184.txt

0088.txt

0000iv.txt

0012.txt

0000x.txt

0106.txt

0113.txt

0124.txt

0189.txt

0182.txt

0150.txt

0061.txt

0127.txt

0031.txt

0058.txt

0162.txt

0039.txt

0136.txt

0048.txt

0156.txt

0068.txt

0054.txt

0112.txt

0055.txt

0085.txt

0190.txt

0097.txt

0146.txt

0168.txt

0081.txt

0107.txt

0145.txt

0188.txt

0099.txt

0161.txt

0049.txt

0059.txt

0174.txt

0071.txt

0102.txt

0120.txt

0057.txt

0000vi.txt

0064.txt

0067.txt

0041.txt

0192.txt

0075.txt

0070.txt

0092.txt

0076.txt

0151.txt

0166.txt

0050.txt

0110.txt

0022.txt

0148.txt

0094.txt

0046.txt

0021.txt

0016.txt

0030.txt

0100.txt

0026.txt

0086.txt

0176.txt

0165.txt

0163.txt

0082.txt

0160.txt

0138.txt

0118.txt

0132.txt

E20090219_AAAAAH_xml.txt

0065.txt

0115.txt

0122.txt

0141.txt

0149.txt

0023.txt

0072.txt

0015.txt

0170.txt

oai_xml.txt

0035.txt

0125.txt

0186.txt

0114.txt

0028.txt

0093.txt

0177.txt

0181.txt

0137.txt

0043.txt

0077.txt

0142.txt

0080.txt

0090.txt

0187.txt

0034.txt

0000iii.txt

0096.txt

0029.txt

0037.txt

0000vii.txt

0014.txt

0018.txt

0178.txt

0139.txt

0025.txt

0040.txt

0069.txt

0019.txt

0074.txt

0053.txt

0103.txt

0060.txt

0121.txt

0027.txt

0105.txt

0056.txt

0180.txt

0042.txt

0191.txt

0157.txt

0108.txt

0116.txt

0175.txt

0183.txt

0154.txt

0158.txt

0159.txt

0062.txt

0135.txt

0155.txt

0131.txt

0033.txt

0126.txt

0017.txt

0051.txt

0047.txt

0098.txt

0091.txt

0147.txt

0073.txt

0083.txt

0171.txt

0119.txt

0079.txt

0143.txt

0153.txt

0036.txt

0078.txt

0011.txt

0109.txt

0101.txt

0104.txt

0128.txt


Full Text
TOS LWoacirsss









Watered, acvording to Act of Congress, in the year ons thousand
eight handred and fifty-three, by

Haaren & Brotuzns,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Souther District
.of New York.



PREFACE.

Tue design of the series of volumes, entitled
Manco Pavr’s ADVENTURES IN THE PursuIT oF
Knowxeper, is not merely-to entertain the reader
with a narrative of juvenile adventures, but also to
communicate, in connection with them, as extensive
and varied information as possible, in respect to
the. geography, the scenery, the customs and the
institutions of this country, as they present them-
selves to the observation of the little traveler, who
makes his excursions under the guidance of an
intelligent and well-informed companion, qualitied

+ to assist him in the acquisition of knowledge and in
he formation of character. The anthor has en
deagored to enliven his narrative, and to infuse into
elements of a salutary moral influence, by means



of personal incidents befalling the actors in the
story. These incidents are, of course, imaginary—-



vi, Prerace. £
but the reader may rely upon the strict and exact
truth and fidelity of all the descriptions of places,
institutions and scenes, which are brought before
his mind in-the progress of the narrative. Thus,
though the author hopes that the readers who may
honor these volumes with their perusal, will be
amused and-interested by them, his design through-
out will be to instruct rather than to entertain.



CONTENTS.







ousrren ae Pace
L—Tue Wroxe Boar, . ‘ < . . ow,
1.—Tue Froop, 28 © g, & * 98
WL—Fae Warer Swors, . 6. e
IW.—Forome,. =. ees
V.Inon, . se
VI.—Anrcuery, ean x te te «* es
VIL—Tourxine ann. Bora, woe 8 100
VilL—Insrectox, =. ©. ews
IX.—TsE AnsiNar, - s er: - 128
X.—Tue Dancer of Brine ARMED, . . 189
Xi—Orprance, . Se 1

XIL—Tue Breauise Ur,. 2 +. 6 TT



ENGRAVINGS.



ee
Tar Wroxc Boar, ee ee |
‘Tue Froon, a . . . . . . 39
Srace mmme Warer,- - -- ses
Tae Waren Snors,. . . . ws
‘Tue Forsme Room, =< @ “x - 58
Castine, . . - . . . 4
‘Tue Sroor, . - . % . . . 85
‘Tae Srrean, 3 § Pek SF 2 Me. 7180
Teste tue Bayoxers, . /. . . «8
Farmer’s Worx, . a wth eae
Maine ur rite docks,. [0.0.2 |. ast
Tre Ramway Srarion, [| . . 0s. 14
Maxco’s Mortar, i 4 % . 176

Tae Rarr, . - - . 189



ORDER OF THE VOLUMES.

PAarru Paul, *

I.—IN NEW YORK.
Il.—ON THE ERIE CANAL.

Ill.—IN MAINE.-
Iv.—IN VERMONT.

V.IN BOSTON.
VI.—AT. THE SPRINGFIELD ARMORY.



PRINCIPAL PERSONS.

Mx. Barox,a:merchant of New York.
Matico, hhis son, a boy about twelve’ years old. -

Jou Forxersr, Maréo'a cousin, about nirieteen years old,

Marco is traveling and studying under Forester’s care.



MARCO PAUL
AT THE SPRINGFIELD ARMORY.

Cuarrer I.
Tar Wrone Boar.

‘Visit to Vermont. ‘Marco takes charge.

T was by a somewhat singular accident that
Marco Paul had an opportunity to pay a
visit to the great armory at Springfield. The
circumstances were these.

On one occasion, while he was under his
cousin Forester’s care, they were going from
New York city to Forester’s residence in Ver-
mont. Marco proposed that his cousin Fores-
ter should allow him to choose the route.

“Very well,” said Forester,“ I have no ob-
jection to that. - You may not only choose the
route, but take | the charge and direction of the
whole journey.”

« How do you mean ?” asked Maréo.

“Why, we will suppose,” said Forester,



12 Tue Spriverizup Armory.

Forester’s explanati



Pho two routes.

“that I arf an infirm old. gentleman, and that
you undertake to conduct me safely fo Ver-
mont. You may choose the route, and make
all the arrangements, only letting me know when
I must be ready. ‘Then you shall call the car-
riage, and take me to the boat, and engage our
berths, and doevery thing in a word, which a
gentleman usually does for a lady in such a
case.” 3

«« Well,” said Marco, “I should like that very
much.”

In fact, Marco was very much pleased with
the idea of exercising a little power. So he
got a traveling map of New England, spread it
upon a table, and began to study the features
of the country, with reference to the different
routes. There were two routes, which princi-
pally attracted his attention. These the reader
will understand very distinctly by consulting a
map.

The first was, to go up the North river in the
‘Troy boat, thence by railroad to the southern
end of Lake George, thence by steamboat along
the lakes George and Champlain, to Burlington,
and from Burlington by stage, across the coun-
try, to the town where Forester’s father lived.

The other route was by the way of Boston.



Tue Wane Boat. 138

“Marco chodses the North



“The day line.
Marco liked to be in Boston very much. He
-thought that he should like very well to go and
spend a week at Boston, and then to go. across
the country by railroad and stage. He hesita-
ted.a little, however, whether it would come
within the limits of the power which Forester
ad intrusted him with, to spend a week in Bos-
ton. While doubting on this subject, it oc-
curred to him that after all there would be the
greatest variety to be seen in traveling on the
North river route. .He therefore finally deci-
ded upon that.

Then came another question to be decided,
and that was, whether to take the day or the
night boat up: the North river. ‘There is-one
steamboat which leaves New York for Albany
and Troy every morning, and another every
evening, so that one goes through by day, and
the other by night.’ Marco decided in favor of
the day boat, in order that he might see the
scenery. p

This was not, however, in fact, a very wise
decision, for the whole of a long summer’s day
is too long a time to spend in looking at‘scene-
ry, however beautiful it may be, and the pas-
sengers who take the day boats on the North
river for this purpose, generally become very









14. Tus Srrinorrerp Anmory.
Night line preferable.



tired of the pleasure before night. Whereas; in
taking one of the night boats, some of which
leave New York an hour or two before sunset,
there are four or five hours before bed-time, du-
ring which the river scenery can be enjoyed,
varied too, as it is at this time, by the changing
light of sunset and evening, and perhaps, at
last, clothed in the wild and solemn beauty
which is shed over such a scene by moonlight,
or the still fainter illumination of the stars.
Thus a night passage is far more favorable for
really enjoying the scenery of the Hudson, than
a long and monotonous voyage, made under
the full glare of the sun.

Besides, at the time that Forester and Marco
were making this journey, it was too early in
the season to enjoy the scenery much. It was
early in April, and though the grass was quite
green at the Park at New York, yet the High-
lands and Green Mountains were still covered
“with snow.

Marco, however, did not reflect on these
things, and he’ decided upon the day passage.
The boat was to go at seven o’clock. Marco
learned this by a printed handbill, in large let-
ters, which he saw posted up in the office of
the Atlantic Hotel, where his cousin always





Tut Werone Boar. 15

‘The handbills. Arrangements.

took a room when he came into New York.
There were several of these handbills hanging
in the office, but, instead of being placarded on
the walls, each by itself, they were hung all
together upon a sort of hook which was sus-
pended against a pillar. These various bills
were the advertisements of different boats, go-
ing in various directions,.and as they were all
hung together upon the same hook, the travel-
ers who came to consult them were obliged to
lift up the oufer ones when they wished to ‘see
those that were beneath. It happened, howev-
er, that when Marco went to look, the bill.
which advertised the Albany boat was itself
the outer one ; so that he had nothing to do but
to stand there and read it, without lifting up the
handbills at all. .

«Now, cousin Forester,” said Marco, the day
before they were to go, “I will order a.cab to
come to our house at six o’clock, and will come
down in it to the ‘Atlantic Hotel, and call for
you.”

“Very well,” said Forester. “I will be ready
at six.”

Forester was ready at six, but it was nearly
half-past six when Marco arrived. Forester’s
trunks and baggage were in the hall, and as the



16 Tue Srrinoriztp Armory.
Gabman ‘Goopaira.





cabman was carrying out one of the last arti-
cles, he turned to Forester and said,

“What boat is it, sir, that you wish to go
to?”

“I don’t know,” said Forester, turning to
Marco. “ Marco, he waits to know what boat
we are going to.”

“The boat ?” said Marco, stopping to think.

—«O, [ll tell you in a moment.” So Marco
ran back to the office, and went to the pillar
where the notice was put up. The cabman
and Forester followed him. Marco looked
hastily upon the outer handbill, and his eye
caught the name “CxuroraTra.”

“Phe ‘ Cleopatra,’ ” said Marco.

«“Q+—ay,”" said the cabman, “the Cleo-
patra.”

«Stop a moment,” said Marco, “and I will
see where she lays.”

«I know where she lays,” said the \cabman,
—*she lays at Peck Slip.”

Now it happened that since Marco had read
the outer handbill the evening before, and found
that it described a boat going to Albany, a man
had come in and hung up another handbill, ad-
vertising a boat to go to New Haven, which
was the destination of the Cleopatra. Marco



Tae Wrone Boar. 17
Forestor’s suspicions. ‘Mareo. ‘Mystery.

turned away immediately when the cabman
said that he knew where the boat lay, and thus
did not discover his mistake. Forester said
nothing. He had an impression that Peck Slip
was the place of departure for the Connecticut
boats, and not for the Northriver boats; but as
there was a route to Vermont through New
Haven and Hartford, which he. thought would
be nearly as convenient-for them as any other,
he concluded to say nothing, but to let Marco
manage the business which he had undertaken,
in his own way.

Marco thought, from the expression of his
cousin’s countenance when they got into the
cab, that there was something the matter, or, at
least, it appeared to him that Forester looked as
if he had some secret in his thoughts, and he
questioned him about it.

“You've got somé secret, cousin Forester,—
I know you have,” said he.

“Some secret ?” repeated Forester; “:what
makes you suppose so ?”

“Why, you look very queer,—you’ve got
some present for me, I expect, from my mother,
that you are going to give me when we get
aboard the boat.””

Forester made no answer, and they rode on

B



18° Tue Srainerrenp Armory.
“Marco rambles about the boa Aboy._

in silen¢e. When they reached the slip where
the boat lay, Marco was very busy in paying
the cabman, and in seeing that the baggage was
put safely on board. The first bell was rung.
Many persons were coming and going over‘the_
plank which led from the pier to the boat: As
soon as Marco had the baggage secured, he
went up to the promenade deck, where he
could be a little out of the bustle, and took a
seat with Forester there. There were many
ladieé and gentlemen standing near, or seated
on chairs’and settees, under alarge awning. It
‘was a pleasant morning, and Forester anticipa-
ted a very pleasant voyage up the river.
Marco took his seat upon a settee, and
watched the movements of the crowd upon the
pier, and of the sailors on the guards of the
boat, who were making preparations for cast-
ing off the lines. There was seated near him
a boy somewhat older than he, who also seemed
to be watching the movements which were go-
ing on around him with great interest. Marco
‘was just going toward him, with a design to
enter into conversation with him, when a young
man appeared at the top of the stairs, leading
up from the deck below, and beckoned to the
boy to come to him, at the same time making



Tur Wronea Boar. 19

“Marco accosts the boy. Ro answor.

some other sign which he did not understand.
‘The boy immediately rose and went away.

In a short time, however, the boy returned
and-took his seat again. Marco had some hesi-
tation about addressing him, but as the expres-
sion of the young stranger’s face was intelligent
and good-humored, he at length moved gradu-
ally toward him, and said,

“Do you know what time we shall get to
Albany ?”

- The boy looked at Marco steadily when he
spoke, with a pleasant: expression of counte-
nance, but instead of making any reply, he first
put his finger to his ear, and then to his lips, and
shook his head.

“What do you mean by that ?” said Marco.

The boy said nothing, but gazed a moment
longer in Marco’s face, and ‘then took out a very
small slate from a breast pocket in his jacket,
and began to write upon it. When he had fin-
ished writing, he handed the slate to Marco.
It contained the words, “ Ican not speak ; Iam
deaf and dumb.”

«“O,” said Marco, “I did not know that.”
Then, instantly reflecting that it was vain to
speak to the boy if he could not hear, Marco
took the slate from his hands, and wrote upon it,



20 Tae Serincrietp ARMORY.



‘A correspondence, Marco perplexed. iis ingy

«T only asked you if you knew what time we
should get to Albany.”

The boy read Marco’s writing very slowly
and carefully, and then shook his head and
looked perplexed. He then took the péncil-and
wrote, “I do not know.”

By the same mode of communication, Marco
then asked him what his name was. He wrote
in reply, “ Erskine.”

“Do you live at Albany ?” wrote Marco
next.

Erskine looked at the question a moment or
two, apparently somewhat at a loss, and then he
wrote,

«I do not lena: of Albany; I shall go to
Hartford.”

It was now Marco's turn to be a little per-
plexed, through the singularity of Erskine’s
phraseology. After studying it a moment, he
concluded that Erskine meant that he was going
to Hartford, and the idea flashed across his
mind that he might possibly have made some
mistake, and have got into the wrong boat. So
he turned suddenly to one of the hands that be-
longed on board the boat, who happened to be
passing by just at that moment, and asked him

“Isn’t this boat going to Albany ?”



Tue Wrone Boar. 21
‘Marco olarmed. i He finds Forester.

“No,” replied the man, without’ stopping,
« she is going to New Haven.”

«Then we’ve got into the wrong boat,” ex-
claimed Marco, in great trepidation, “‘Where’s
cousin Forester ?” me

He began to run about this: way and that, in
pursuit of his cousin Forester. Forester had
disappeared. He went down stairs to find him,
and when he reached the lower deck, he found
that the boat was just gliding away from the
pier. The plank had been taken in, and the
cable by which she had been made fast to the
pier, had been cast off, and the hands were
drawing it in. Marco might have jumped
across to the pier, but by so doing he would
only have separated himself from Forester and
the trunks, which would have made matters
worse instead of better.

Just then Marco saw his cousin Forester
leaning. against a sort of pillar which supported
the upper deck. His countenance wore a very
quiet and composed-expression. Marco ran up
to him-and exclaimed,

“Cousin Forester, we've got into the wrong
boat.”

«1 know it,” said Forester, coolly.



22 Tue Serinerteuyn Armory.

Forester composure, il reasoning

« Well, ‘what shall we do? said Marco, in
the greatest perturbation.



THE WRONG BOAT.

“Don’t? you know what it is best to do?”
asked Forester.

“No,” said Marco, “I am sure I don’t.”

« Then I advise you not to be in such a hurry
and flurry,” said Forester. “The time to be
in a hurry, is when we know exactly what to
do, and have but a short time to doit. When
we don’t know what to do, we ought to calm



Ture Wrone Boar. 22
‘Various plana, Forester is amused; Marco displeased.



and compose ourselves, and take time to
think.”

“Why, if we were only ashore,” said Marco,
“we would go back, and find the right boat to
go to Albany.”

«But we are not on shore,” said Forestér,
“and we can’t get on shore ; so that supposition
does not help us any.”

“Why, the captain would put us back,” said
Marco, “I’ve no doubt, if you would only ask”
him.” .

« Perhaps he would,” replied Forester, “but
I’m only a feeble old man, you know, traveling -
under your care. You must go and ask him,
if you want him to put us ashore.” Here For.
ester laughed aloud, at the ludicrous predica-
ment which Marco had got into. As for Marco,
he tried to look grave, but he could not entirely
suppress a smile which struggled to appear upon
his countenance.

“I don’t think it is any laughing occasion,
myself,” said Marco, after. a pause. “ Besides,
I supposed that if we got into any serious diffi-
culty, you would help me out of it.”

“So I would,” said Forester, “ but~I don’t
conceive that you have got into any serious
difficulty yet. "We may as well go to Vermont



24 Tue Serinorierpn ArMory.
Forester spoaks of the armory. ‘Manufacturing muskets,

by the way of New Haven end Hartford, as any
other way. You see we can go up from Hart-
ford to Springfield, and there we can take the
railroad to Boston. There will be one great
advantage in taking this route, for we can visit
the great national armory at Springfield.”

“ What is that ?” asked Marco.

“Why, at Springfield,” said Forester, “ the
government of the United States have a great
establishment for manufacturing muskets for
the national troops, and it is a very curious and
interesting place to visit.”

«« What can we see there ?” asked Marco.

“O, all the processes in manufacturing mus-
kets,” said Forester. ‘ The first is the.work’of
the great trip-hammer, which goes by water,
and forges out the iron plates, which the mus-
kets are made from. These plates are bent
round over a long iron rod, and welded, and
thus the barrels are made. Then these barrels
are bored by various machinery, and the out-
side surfaces turned. Then the forging and
grinding of the bayonets is very interesting.”

“Tshouldn’t think there would be any thing
very interesting in grinding,” said Marco.

“There is,” said Forester. “Grinding an axe
on ahand grind-stone is not a very’ wonderful



The Wrone Boar. 25
Foresters descriptions. ‘The deaf and dumb boy.

process, to be sure,—but in these large estab-
lishments, where they grind on such a great
scale, the enormous stones, and the speed with
which they revolve, and the streams of sparks
which fly out, strike you with wonder.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “I should like to see
them.”

« Then there is a great deal that is curious in
the making of the locks,” said Forester ; “ the,
forging out all’ the small parts, and filing and
polishing them, and. then the putting of themt

together. You will‘be very much interested,
I’ve no doubt.”
“Well,” said Marco, “I don’t care much

about our getting in to the wrong boat.” So
he went away from Forester, intending to go
up upon the upper deck again.

He came back, however, a moment, to tell
Forester that there was a deaf and dumb boy
on the deck above.

“ Where is he going ?” said Forester.

« To Hartford,” said Marco.

“ Very likely he is going to the asylum,” said
Forester.

“ What asylum ?” asked Marco. ,

“ Why, there is an asylum,” replied Forester,
“in Hartford, where the deaf and dumb go from



26 Tue Srrinorienp Armory.
‘Fhe manual alphabet. ‘Marco loarns it.

all parts of the country, to learn to read and
write.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “he can write. He has
a slate.”’

«Then I have no doubt,” said Forester,
“that he is a pupil of the asylum at Hartford.
You had better get him to tell you about that
establishment,.and ask him to teach you the
manual alphabet.” _ :

“What is the manual alphabet?” asked
Marco.

So Forester explained to Marco that the
manual alphabet was a mode of representing
the letters of the alphabet by the fingers of the
hand, and that those who understood that al-
phabet could talk, by means of it, with the edu-
cated deaf and dumb.

Marco was very much interested in this idea,
and he returned to the upper deck, and sat an
hour with Erskine, learning the manual alpha-
bet, and writing in dialogue with him, on his
slate. They were once interrupted in their occu-
pations, by a colored man, who went about the
decks, ringing a gréat bell, and calling out to
all who had not paid their fare, to call at the
captain’s office and settle. Whereupon Marco
left Erskine for a short time, while he went to



Tur Weonc Boar. 27
‘Sumamons to pay the fare, “‘Ewo ticket,



the window of the captain’s offige, on the lower
deck, and after waiting there some minutes
among the crowd, until his turn came, he took
two tickets for Hartford, one for himself, and
one for Forester. ’



28 Tue Srrincriztpn Armory.
Situation of Hartford and Springfield. Great freshet.

Cuarrer II.
Tue Froop.

yr two travelers arrived safely at New

Haven, where, on leaving the steamboat,
they entered a train of cars, and proceeded im-
mediately to Hartford. Hartford is on the
Connecticut river, and Springfield is on. the
same river, about twenty-three miles above.
The travelers expected to have gone up the
river that afternoon, by a small steamboat,
which Forester told Marco was accustomed to
ply between Hartford and Springfield,—but
when they reached Hartford, they were told
that there was no boat. Marco went to the
bar of the United States Hotel—the house to
which he had taken’ Forester on his arrival,—
in order to inquire the reason. The clerk told
him that there was a great freshet on the river,
and that the boat had not been able to get
down. Marco went with this intelligence to
Forester, who was reading the Boston newspe
pers in the gentlemen’s parlor.

“TI don’t see why a flood on the river should



How.



“Hittocta of the freshet,
keep the steamboat from coming down,” said
Forester.

«That is the reason, I know,” said Marco,
“ for they told me so at the bar. Perhaps it is
because the water runs too swiftly.”

“That might prevent the boat from going
up,” said Forester, “but I don’t see how it
could keep it from coming down. I should
think it_would come down all the faster.”

«Perhaps the flood brings down ice and logs,
so that the boat can’t get along,” rejoined
Marco.

“J don’t think that is a very probable expla-
nation,” said Forester. “It is much.more likely
that there is some mistake in\your informa-
tion.” 4

Marco felt a little piqued at having his infor-
mation thus called in question, and he went back
to the bar to inquire how a freshet could keep
the boat from coming down. They told him
that there was a bridge across the river, some
distance above, and that the boat could not get
under it when the water was high. This seemed
very satisfactory, and Marco went back with
the explanation to Forester, who seemed satis-
fied with it too.

It was late in the afternoon when they ar-



30 Taz SprinGrietp Armory.
“The cupola of the state-house, ‘The inundation.

rived at Hartford, and although it was very
pleasant when they left New York, yet the sky
had become overcast during the day, and now
it began to rain. Marco, however, was very
eager to go out after dinner, to see the flood,
and Forester concluded to go with him. It was
so late when they arrived, and the evening
came on so early, that it was not until just be-
fore dark that they got ready to go out. They
first went to the state-house, in order to ascend
to the cupola, to take a view of the flood from
that elevation. The state-house at Hartford is
in the midst of the city, and a broad street de-
scends from it to the river. Forester and Mar-
co went up by various flights of stairs, until, at
last, they reached the summit, where they had
a grand view of the city, and also of the river,
which seemed expanded into a vast sea, that
spread over the whole valley,—with groves,
farm-houses, orchards, and even the buildings
of the city itself rising out of the water.

After looking upon this‘scene for some time,
they descended again, and followed the street
down toward the bank of the river. But long
before they reached the bank, they found the
streets filled with water. Barrels and boxes
were floating about, piles of merchandise, which



Tue Froop. ‘81
‘Goods afloat. ‘The coach. Streets overflowed.

had been taken out of submerged céllars, were
arranged along on the. sidewalks, where they
were out of the reach of the water, and men
were busily at work, getting other goods into
places of safety. By this time, however, it be-
came dark, and the wind and rain seemed to be
inereasing ; so Forester and Marco returned to
the hotel, anticipating much pleasure in taking
a walk in the morning, when they could exam-
ine the effects of the flood to better advantage.

They were called the next morning at six
o’clock, and were told that the boat had come,
and was going to start at seven for Springfield.
So they dressed themselves with all speed,-and
hastened down to breakfast. They had hardly.
time to finish their breakfast, when the coach
‘was at the door to take them to the boat. They
got in, and after riding through several streets,
descending continually toward the water, Mar-
co, who had his head out of the window all
the time, looking forward, said,

«Cousin Forester, look here,—the street is all
full of water. We can’t go but a very little
farther.”

‘Marco expécted that as soon as the carriage
had gone as far as it could go on the firm pave-
ment, it would stop at the brink of the water,



32 Tue Srrincrienp Armory.





The aki, ‘Marco perplexed. Deep wi



and that some other plan would be adopted for
conveying them to the steamboat. What that
plan would be, he could not at first imagine ;
but in a moment there suddenly glided into
view a little skiff, that came down the street
that crossed the one in which they were riding,
at right angles to it, at some distance before
them. The skiff came into view from behind a
block of brick buildings, which formed a corner
of the street, and passing across the street
which Marco was in, kept on, and soon disap-
peared. There was a man in it, rowing.

« He ought to come,” said Marco, “ with his
skiff, and take us along.”

By this time the horses had reached the brink
of the water; but, to Marco’s surprise, they did
not stop, but advanced slowly into it, drawing
the coach after them. ‘The water grew deeper
and deeper, until, at length, the horses were up
to.their ‘knees. At some distance before him,
at the extremity of the street, Marco could see
the end of the bridge which led across the riv-
er; but he saw no steamboat. However, it
was some relief to Marco to see the bridge, as
that promised to be, at léast, the termination of
their ride ; for he did not at all like navigating
such deep water in a carriage.’ The: water,



Tut Froop. 33

“he embarkation. Paddlewheels, ‘The boat.

however, did not grow any deeper, and pres-
ently, just before they had reached the bridge,
it began to grow shallower, and soon the car-
riage stopped at a place where there was a
small piece of dry land, big enough for them to
stand upon. Here the little steamboat came in
sight too, which was to take them up the river.
By scrambling along through a store, and over
planks, and along the edges of piers, they suc-
ceeded, at length, in getting on board.

There were some ladies in the coach, and
they, with the gentlemen who had charge of
them, when they had got on board of the boat,
went down into the ladies’ cabin. The steam-
boat was very small. It had a great paddle-
wheel at the stern, and two small ones at the
sides, one at each side. “ These last,” Forester
said, “ he supposed must be to aid in steering.”
The boat. reminded Marco of the canal-boats,
which he had seen on Erie canal. It was simi-
lar in construction to those boats, though larger.
It had, like a canal-boat, a small foretastle,
which was below the level of the main decks,
and very near the water. From this forecastle,
Forester and Marco went down into a little
cabin, which was, of course, near the bows.
The ladies’ cabin was toward the stern. In the

e



34 Tue Serinerrenp Armory.



deluge of waters. Forestor’s explanations,







cabin, they were sheltered from the wind and
rain, but they.did not remain there long, as they
wished to look about, and observe the effects of
the flood, and the strange aspect which was
given to the whole surrounding scenery, by such
a deluge of waters.

“All this,” said Forester, “comes from the
melting of the snows, away up among the
mountains. I should think that Hartford might
be about at the place where the height of the
waters would be a maximum.”

«I don’t understand what you mean by that,”
said Marco.

“Why, you will see, by reflection,” said For-
ester, “ that up near the sources of a river, there
never can be a very high flood, for the streams
are all small, and they descend rapidly down
the sides of the mountains, and thus the water
runs off fast, making a torrent rather than a
flood. These small streams join together, and
other branches come in from each side, and thus
the river is formed; and when it gets upon
lower land, where it is more level, so that the

ater can not run off so quick, it rises higher,
and spreads over the meadows on each. side.
‘She great body of water moves on slowly now,
and is increased by every branch which comes



Tue Fuoop. 35



in from each side, until the height of the water
reaches the maximum,—that is, the greatest.”

«Why does it not keep on increasing all the,
way to the sea ?” said Marco.

« Because,” replied Forester, “when it gets
within the influence of the sea, the water flows
out freely into the sea, and spreads off over the
ocean. A flood in a river is sometimes twenty
or thirty feet above the common level of the
water; now if it were to be so near -the sea,
there would be a steep descent from the river
to the sea, of twenty or thirty feet, which you
see could not be. For the water, when it gets
near the sea, presses down from the.river by its
weight, and spreads out into the sea so rapidly
as to keep the water down for many miles back
from the mouth of the river. Thus, if a bird
wére to begin in the mountains, when a great
fall of rain was taking place, and follow the flood
down, she would find it increasing, and be-
coming higher and higher as it advanced, until
it reached the level plains, and it would go on,
inundating them more and more, and spreading
out over intervales and méadows ; until at last,
like a great wave which had begun to spend it-
self, it would appear rot to rise quite so high,
though it would still keep advancing; and thus,



86 Tus Srainerienp Armory.
‘fresher moar



outh:







if she was a reasonable bird, she would know
that the water was coming under the influence
of thesea. After this, the freshet would seem
less and less high as it ‘advanced, until it reached
the mouth of the river, where it would scarcely
produce any perceptible effect at. all.”

«Then there can not be any freshet at the
mouth of the river,” said Marco.

“No,” replied Forester, “ there can be none
caused by floods coming down the river. Some-
times, however, a storm at sea, when the wind
blows in toward the shore, raises the water
several feet, and makes a sort of inundation, in
that way, though it seldom rises more than four
or five feet above high tide.”

By this time the men began to push off the
boat from the pier, and the great paddle-wheel
at the stern of the boat began to revolve, and
they swept out into the stream. They were
just above the great wooden bridge, which
stretches across the Connecticut, at Hartford.
Marco saw that the water was up to within a
foot or two of the floor of the bridge, and some
of the men said that it was very fortunate that
there was no ice running.

“Why ?” asked Marco.

“Because,” replied the man, “it would soon



Tue Froop. 37
‘Marco nearly loses bis umbrella.



ke a.jam above the bridge, and carry it

Marco observed that the water was turbid,
and its surface was strongly agitated by whirl-
pools and eddies. Marco went forward, and
took his place upon the forecastle, The wind
was north-east, and thus was almost against
them, and it blew the cold rain{into Marco’s
face. He attempted to hoist his umbrella, but
a sudden gust of wind caught it out of his hands,
and swept it along the upper deck. Marco
scrambled up the steps, and ran after it. It
lodged, very fortunately, under the bows of a
little skiff which had been placed upon the deck
in order to be taken up the river. If it had
gone over into the water, it would have been
irkecoverably lost, as it would not have been
worth while to detain the boat for it.

When Marco got his umbrella, he went back
to his station again, but when he opened it this
time, he was careful to hold it in such a manner
that the wind could not get under it again. He
then peeped out from beneath it, to survey the
wide waste of waters, which extended as far as
he could see, on either hand.. The ordinary
course of the river itself was entirely undistin-
guishable, and instead of it, there was. a broad



38 Tae Sprinorrenn Armory.

‘Melancholy spectacle. ‘Whole country under water.

sea of turbid water, agitated by the wind and
by whirling eddies, and spreading over. fields,
farms, villages, orchards,—extending, at the
extremity of the view, far in, under the trees of
the forests. 2

It was a melancholy sight to see the farm-
houses, some with thewater up above the floor,
or even, to the windows ; and others standing
on-a little spot of ground, which the water
seemed just ready to cover, with the family at
the door, gazing at the unexpected spectacle of
a steamboat going across their mowing-fields ;
for the water being deep enough everywhere,
the boat was not required to confine itself to the
ordinary channel of the river, but made a straight
course, over fields, fences, yards, and gardens.
Once or twice, Marco perceived that they were
going through an orchard. The tops of the
apple-trees were about half out of the water.
Marco thought that if it were only the right
season, they could get some apples; but, as it
was, the trees were leafless and bare. At some
of the farm-houses, men were busy, securing
their goods and furniture ; at others, they were
gliding about in skiffs ; and in one case, Marco
saw aman and his boy going out to the barn,



Tar Froop * 39
“Fhe mit mado of barn doom ae

to take care of the cattle, on a raft made of the
barn doors.







THE FLOOD.

About half-way between Hartford and Spring-
field there is a‘fall, or rather a rapid, through
which boats’ can not go either up or down.
They can not go up, because, even when the
water is deep enough, they can not stem the
current ; and they can not come down, because
the current would sweep them along too swiftly,
and dash them against the rocks on the shore.



40 Tue Sprinerierpn ArmoRY.
‘A village under water.

A canal had accordingly been made around this
fall, in order to take the. boats up, or let them
gently down, by means of locks, in the manner
explained in “ Marco Paul on the Erie Canal.”
This canal was, however, now submerged, and
the steamboat had to stop below it, at a little
village called the Point, from whence the pas-
sengers were to be taken the rest of the way by
stage. When they arrived at this village, the
poat sailed along in front of the principal street,
and then turned into another at right angles to
it, in which the tavern was situated. The
helmsman brought the boat up to the piazza of
the hotel, as if it were a wharf.. The passen-
gers stepped out upon the piazza. It was cov-
ered with people of the village, who had col-
lected there, to witness the spectacle of a
steamboat coming up to a tavern door.

‘The tavern was entirely surrounded by water,
and from the piazza, there was a view of a large
part of the village, with the streets, yards, and
gardens entirely submerged. Barrels, boxes,
and planks were floating about. The people
that had assembled stood upon the steps of the
platform, observing the scene, First, a wheel-
barrow came slowly drifting into the tavern
yard; then a boy on a raft made of two planks.



Tae Froop. 4.



__ Various spectacios.

‘Then a little boat glided by, full of children,
going home from school. There was a bridge,
made of a line of planks, leading across from
the platform to the land behind the tavern.
The ends of the planks were supported by
horseblocks, for piers. Marco ran back and
forth across this bridge several times, until, at
length, the stage-
coaches which .
were to take the
travelers to Spring-
field were ready.
"These stage coach-
es were backed
down through the f
water, to the steps
of the piazza, and
the baggage was
puton. The stages
were then driven
out to dry land,—
the passengers went, one by one, over tne long
plank bridge, took their seats, and thus they all
proceeded to Springfield.



STAGE IS THE WATER,



42 Tur Sprinertenpn Armory.
‘Arrival at Springfleld. __ Buildings of the armory.

Cuarrer III.
Tue Warer Suops.

Oo” the morning after Forester and Marco

arrived at Springfield, they sallied forth
from their hotel, to see the works of the armory.
The village of Springfield is one of the most
beautiful villages of New England. The busi-
ness part of it lays along the bank of the Con-
necticut, on a sort of plain ; and from this plain
streets ascend to a tract of more elevated land
behind it, which is covered in every direction
with handsome villas overlooking the village
and the river, and the broad and beautiful val-
ley of the Connecticut.

The principal buildings of the armory are
situated upon another plain, which extends back
from this elevated land, at the distance of per-
haps half a mile from the river. The buildings
are very large and handsome, and are arranged
around the sides of a spacious square, which is
ornamented with walks and rows of trees.
Marco thought that the whole looked like a col-
lege. There was one. edifice in the center of



Tue Warer Suops. 43

Besidences. “Water shops.

the principal front of the square, which had a
cupola upon it, as if it were achapel. Forester
told Marco that that was the office and count-
ing-house. The other buildings were shops and
storehouses,—though Marco thought that they
were very splendid buildings to be used for such
purposes. On one side was a long row of
houses, which were used for the residences
of officers and others connected with the ar-
mory. From this central square, streets di-
verged in every direction over the plain. These
streets were bordered with small, but very neat
and pleasant houses built for the workmen.
The houses were ornamented with trees and
shrubbery, and surrounded with pleasant yards
and gardens. The whole scene presented, on
every side, a very pleasant prospect to the
view.

After looking at it for some time, Marco pro-
posed going into some of the buildings, but
Forester said that he thought it would be better
to go first to the water shops.

« What are the water shops ?” asked Marco.

«Why, you must understand,” said Forester,
“that in making a musket, there is a great deal
of light work to be done, and also a great deal
of heavy work, and this last can be done best



44 Tue Sprincrietp ARMORY:



‘The mill stream. ___ Forging the barrels.
by the help of machinery. Now there is a little
stream, south of Springfield, which. runs’ into
the Connecticut, just below the town. So they
have built three dams across this stream, and
built shops near the dams, with water-wheels
under them to be carried by the water. Here
they do all the rough and heavy work which is
required.” .

« What is the rough and heavy work ?” asked
Marco.

«Forging the barrels is one thing,” said For-
ester ; “that is very heavy work.”

“I don’t see how they can forge the barrels,”
said Marco. “ They couldn’t make them round,
nor hollow ; if they were to strike upon them
when they are hot, it would flatten them in.
So I think they must make them in some other
way.”

“No,” said Forester; “they forge them with
heavy trip-hammers, as you will see. They
have peculiar contrivances to keep them hol-
low, and to make them round.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “ and what other heavy
work is there ?”

“The grinding and polishing is heavy work,”
said Forester.

“The grinding,” said Marco, “but not the



Tue Warer Suors.
‘The wheels, ‘Rapid revolutions.



polishing. The polishing must’ be ‘very nica
work.”

«It may be nice work, but still it requires
heavy machinery to do it,” rejoined Forester.
“For polishing is done by means of wheels,
which are made to revolve with prodigious ve-
locity, and then the things to be polished are
held against the circumferénce of them. Now
it is not heavy work to hold the article against
the wheel, but to make the wheel revolve so
very rapidly, requires heavy power in the ma-
chinery.”

«How fast do the wheels revolve?” asked
Marco. ;

«I don’t know,” said ForeSter, “ we can ask
the workmen, when we come to the polishing
rooms. At any rate, it is a great many times
in a second, and it requires a water power and
machinery, to turn wheels so fast. Then there
is the boring, and the turning, and the milling.”

«What is the milling ?” asked Marco.

“Why, in some cases,” said Forester, “in-
stead of finishing the work with files, they-cut
it down to its proper form by wheels of steel,
with teeth like those of a file, cut upon them.
These wheels are made to revolve very swiftly,
and the iron or brass is made to bear against



46 Tue Srrinerizetrp Armory.
Finishing. —~—~=~S~S*S*«SMaro0 and Froresior cross tho plain.
them, and also to move along at the same time,
and so it is cut down to the exact shape re-
quired.”

“Why don’t they hammer it into the right
shape in the first place ?” asked Marco.

«They can’t hammer it into precisely the
right shape,” said Forester ; “and, besides, the
surface which is left by the hammer is not per-
fectly sound. There are small flaws and scales
in it, so that the metal must be cut away a little,
to come down to where it is sound. So they
forge it to pretty nearly the proper shape, leav-
ing it a little too large, and then mill it down to
the precise form, or else file it, if the shape is so
irregular that it can’t be milled.”

While Forester and Marco had been engaged
in this conversation, they had been slowly walk-
ing along in the direction which Forester said
led to the water shops. The road which they
took was straight, and it traversed the plain,
which has already been spoken of, in a southerly
direction. It was bordered, for a part of the
way, with the neat and pleasant-looking houses
of the armory workmen, and beyond these there
were extensive fields, traversed by various roads,
the view being terminated in the distance by
occasional glimpses of the great valley of the



Tur Warer Suops. a7



“Mi Holyoke. Valley of the Ootinecticnt. -Awconding._
Connecticut, with the mountains beyond. There
was one round summit off at the north, which
Forester told Marco was the famous Mount
Holyoke, near Northampton.

«What is it famed for?” asked Marco.

“For the prospect which you can have from
the top of it,” said Forester. “The mountain
is close to the Connecticut river, and rises ab-
ruptly from the valley, so that, from the sum-
mit, you look down upon one of the most rich,
and verdant, and populous regions of the land,
covered with farms, fields, villages, and verdant
meadows, ‘and with the Connecticut winding
beautifully through the whole. It is very dif-
ferent from most mountains in this respect.”

“Why, how is it-with other mountains ?”
asked Marco.

“They are surrounded generally,” said For-
ester, “by lower mountains and hills, or, at
least, they rise out of a rough or mountainous
country ; so that the transition is gradual from
the level and fertile land to the high elevations.
But Mt. Holyoke rises abruptly from the midst
of one of the richest scenes in the land; you
can ride in your carriage so near to it that the
remaining ascent is only going up stairs.”

« Have they really got stairs ?” said Marco.



48 Tue Srrinerterp Armory.

Descent into the valley. =

« Yes,” replied Forester; “a kind of rude
stairs, made of stones or of logs, placed across
the way.”

“ I should like very much to go to Mt. Holy-
oke,” said Marco. “I have a great mind to
go that way.”

“It is not the right season of the year,” said
Forester, “to enjoy the excursion. We want
the month of June.”

By this time they had arrived at the end’ of
the plain, and they began to descend, by a wind-
ing road, into the valley where the water shops
were situated. It was a beautiful glen, shaded
by trees, with the mill stream flowing through
the center of it. There was a road, leading up
and down the valley, on each side of the stream,
and, at the point where they came to it, there
was a bridge across it, connecting one of these
roads with the other. 9

Above the bridge was a dam of handgome
mason work, with various flumes for conveying
the water. There were also some large and
handsome shops, on each side of the stream,
with torrents of water pouring out from be-
neath them, indicating that they contained ma-
chinery which was carried by water. Marco
was much pleased with the view.



Tae Warer Suopes. 49

‘Three wator eliops

THE WATER sHO?s.

Forester told Marco that there were three
water shops on the stream, about half a mile
apart, and that this was the middle one.

«TI shouldn’t think that they would wish to
have them so far apart,” said Marco.

“It is probably on account of the stream,”
said Forester. “They have to put their shops
where they can get a good fall of water, and it
happens, I suppose, that the falls on this stream
are at that distance from each-other. They





50 Tre Serincrrerp ARMORY.

“Minimum power. Forster's illustration.

build a dam on each fall, and construct works
to employ the whole power that -they obtain
there,—that is, the whole minimam power.””

“What is the minimum power?” asked
Forester.

« All the power which they can have con-
stantly in use, all the year round,” replied For-
ester. “A stream of water is not constant, you
know. After rains, it is much greater than af-
ter a drought. Now suppose there was a brook
with water enough, in midsummer, to turn a
large grindstone, and no more; of course, the
brook could turn that grindstone all the year,
and that would be all it could do, unless there
was a basin above the dam, which would retain
the water after a rain, and deliver it out after-
ward, in drought, so as to give a greater power
than the stream alone would give. Perhaps, in
this way, with the help of a reservoir of water,
the brook would carry two such grindstones all
the year round. This would, then, be its min-
imum power. But for onehalf the year, that
is, all through the spring and fall months, there
would probably be twice as much water; so
that, during that time, it would carry four grind-
stones. Thus, when people speak of the mini-
mum power of a stream being all employed,



Tue Warer Suoprs. “51

‘Sawmailla. “Marco's idons,

they mean all the power which it can exert,
steadily and constantly, all the year round.
‘Then, above that, there is a considerable power
which may be used at certain seasons, if it is
worth while to construct the machinery to em-
ploy it.”

«And is it worth while, generally?” said
Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “though that depends
somewhat on the nature of the business. For
instance, in saw-mills, they can run one saw
during the summer months, using the minimum
power ; and then, when the stream swells, in
the spring and fall, they can set more saws a-
going. thus employing the surplus power. Still
it is a disadvantage to have a great surplus pow-
er. It is much better to have the stream ateady.
all the year round.”

« Yes,” said Marco, “ that is plain saul F

“True,” replied Forester, “but all ‘the rea-
sons for it are not very plain.”

“Why, they can keep their works” a-going
all the time,” said Marco. ~

«“ Yes ; but why wouldn’t it do as well,” said
Forester, “ to keep twice as many works going
half the time ?””





52 Tae Sperinerrerp Armory.



Forestors reasoning: Drought Torrente
“ Why——, I don’t know,” said Marco, hes-
itatingly.

« Because,” replied Forester, “it would take

twice as great an investment of money to con-
struct the works. Two saws, running six
months each, would saw as many logs as one
running a year ; but then it would cost twice
as much to put them up—with all the necessa-
ry machinery ; and then it would take twice as
many men to work them, and these men would
have to be dismissed for six months in the year,
and go away, and seek other employments.
This would be inconvenient, and attended with
increased expense.

“There is‘a very great difference in different
streams,” continued Forester, ‘in respect to
their steadiness. Some streams are pretty
nearly.the same all the year. They are not
\much increased by rains, or diminished by
droughts Others are very small in mid-
summer, and then, in the spring, or after long
rains, they are torrents, capable of carrying ten,
or even a hundied times as much machinery as
their minimum power would carry. Though it
sometimes happens that, in such streams, the
water-wheels, which must be adapted in their
construction and position to the ordinary flow





Tue Warer Suor 53
Fresbots. Sources of streams. ‘Ponds.

of the water, are all submerged and over-
whelmed when-the water is very high, and so
stopped entirely ; or the dams are undermined,
or torn up, and the mills themselves carried
away.”

“I don’t see why there should be any such
difference in the streams,” said Marco; “I
should think they would all have freshets after
the rains.”

«There is a vast difference,” said Forester.
« It depends upon the source of the water which
supplies the stream. There are three kinds of
streams, in respect to the source of their waters;
or, rather, there are three different sources from
which the water of brooks and streams is sup-
plied,—ponds, springs, and rain. A brook may
flow out of a pond, or it may arise from springs,
or it may proceed from rains, which fall upon a
valley, and run down through the lowest part of
it. Now a stream.that comes from a pond does
not rise and fall very much, because the pond
keeps, at almost all times, near the same level.
The water which falls upon it, in rain, spreads
over.so great a surface, that it does not raise it
more than a few inches, generally, and, of
course, the stream flowing from it rises only in
proportion. It is so with streams which come



od Tue Srrinerierp ArmorRyY.

from springs, or great swamps, which are full
of springs. But where a stream comes from a
great valley, extending many miles, so as to
catch and drain off all the water which falls on
the valley, you see it must necessarily become
a furious torrent in the spring, when the snow
is melting over the whole valley, or after a pow-
erful rain. It is the same with streams that
descend in ravines and glens down the declivi-
ties of the mountains.” 3

“Yes,” said Marco. “I never thought’ of
that difference in the brooks before.”

While this conversation had been going for-
ward, Marco and Forester had come down into
the valley, and had been walking up and down
under rows of trees, which had been planted on
the banks of the stream, admiring the beauty of
the prospect. They now turned their steps to-
ward one of the great shops, where they heard
a loud sound, as of heavy machinery in motion,
and Forester opening the door, they both went
in.



Foreine. 55
‘Forges. ‘Arrangement of the machinery.

Cuarrer IV.
Forerne.

EXE room which Forester and Marco had
entered was a very large apartment on
the ground floor, and not well lighted, except by
the blazing fires of the forges. There were
rows of forges extending through thé whole
length of the room, all glowing with the intense
heat of anthracite fires, urged by bellows which
were carried by water. Connected with each
forge was agreat trip-hammer. A trip-hammer
is an enormous hammer, worked by water.. The
handle is a beam of wood, perhaps ten feet long.
‘This handle moves on an axle near the end of
it. The end of the handle projects a short dis-
tance beyond the axle on which it turns, and is
armed at the extremity with iron, and beyond
it is a wheel with projecting cogs or pins of
iron, which strike against the end of the handle,
as the wheel turns round, and drive it down,
and this makes the head of the hammer rise up.
‘Then, when the cog in the wheel, which had
struck against the end of the handle, slips by, it



56 Tur Srerinerrerp Armory.

om ”~<“CSs~stOS™C*C‘“‘«‘ ip hammer,
lets the end Of the handle up, and the head of
the hammer of course falls down upon- the an-
vil, or rather upon the work placed upon the
anvil to be forged.

There is one thing more, which it is very im-
portant to observe, in respect to the operation
of the trip-hammer, and that is, that when the
wheel containing the cogs, revolves fast, it
throws the hammer up so violently as to spring
the beam of wood which forms the handle, and
the head is then brought back again to the an-
vil, by the elastic return of the handle to its
position, with great force. Persons that do not
understand the operation of the trip-hammer,
are often surprised to see the head of it not so
large, in proportion to the other parts, as they
had expected to see it. They think that if the
head were heavier it would descend with more
force, and do more work.» This would be the
case, no doubt, if it were by the simple weight
of the head that the work was done. But it is
not. It is by the elastic force of the handle,
which brings down the head to the anvil with
great power, after being violently thrown up by
the cog behind, just as the effect of the common
hand hammer, in a blacksmith’s shop, is due not
so much to the weight of the iron in the head





Fororne. 87

‘Operation of the machinery. ‘Red-hot gun-barrel.



of the hammer, as to the force of the arm
which wields it.

Each of the trip-hammers, connected with
the forges, were so connected with machinery,
that they could be made to go very swiftly, or
be entirely stopped. While the iron to be forged
was in the furnace, heating, ‘the trip-hammer
remained.at rest, but when the men wanted to
use it, they could set it in motion, fast or slow,
according tothe work which they wished todo.
Now when Marco and Forester came into the
building, the workmen at some of the forges
were heating the irons; at others, they were
hammering quickly, and at others slowly ; and
every moment Marco observed a long, red-hot
gun-barrel, drawn out of a furnace, and pushed
under a trip-hammer, and then, by some move-
ment of the workmen, the hammer would sud-
denly begin its blows, with the greatest rapidity
and force, throwing the sparks about;in every
direction, and filling the whole place with a
deafening din. Then, after a few minutes, by
some other movement’ of ‘the workmen, the
hammer would be made to cease its rapid
movements, and to strike more’ slowly. Pres-
ently, it would cease altogether, and the iron
would then be drawn out from under it, and put



58 Tue Srrinorietp ARMoRY.





back into the fire to be heated again. Every
time one of the trip-hammers was thus set in
motion, it produced a rapid succession of loud
reports, like a discharge of musketry ; and these
volleys of sound-were continually breaking out
over the great apartment, as the men happened
to get the barrels heated at the several forges.

After standing a few minutes, and looking at
the general scene, Forester and Marco drew up
to one of the forges, to examine the process in
detail. s







oORGING. 59



“Obsorvations. . —~—sThoanvil. = Talking loud,

They found that the barrels were made of
flat bars of iron, bent over lengthwise around a
rod, which kept them hollow. When one of
these bars had been thus bent, so that the two
edges would lap over each other, it was put into
the furnace, and heated very hot, and when all
ready, it was drawn suddenly out, and slipped
under the trip-hammer. The anvil had a groove
in it of a cylindrical form, and the hammer had
another one corresponding +o it, so that if a
finished barrel were placed between them, it
would just fit into the space left bythe two
grooves when the head of the hammer and the
anvil came together.

There was such a continual succession of
loud sounds made by the trip-hammers all
around them,shat Forester had to put his mouth
close to Marco’s ear, and talk very loud, in
order to be heard. Speaking in this manner,
he said,

«Now you see, Marco, how they avoid the
two difficulties which you apprehended. They
keep the barrel hollow, by having a rod inside,
and they keep the outside round, by having a
groove in the anvil and inthe hammer.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I see. I did not think
of those plans.”



60 Tue Sprrincrienp Armory.
Process of forging @ barrel,

Just then, one of the men at the forge nearest
them, was drawing out a barrel from the fur-
nace, which was of a very intense heat. It was
almost white. Forester called Marco to stand
back a little, lest the sparks should fly upon his
clothes.

The man pushed the barrel back again, to
heat it hotter still. It was, however, only the
half which was in the furnace, which was hot.
The other end the man kept cool, by wetting it
constantly with cold water. He wished to keep
that end cool, in order that he might take hold
of it, without burning himself. The end which
was hot was the biggest end of the barrel. In
a moment more, he drew the barrel out again,
and then struck it down upon an iron plate upon
the floor, with great force, two or three times,
to square the end. He then run it under the
trip-hammer, slipping the rod intc'it at the same’
time. The rod thus entering into the hollow of
the barrel, kept the hammer from closing up tlie
bore. There was a sort of pole hanging down
as a handle from one part of the frame of the
trip-hammer, and another’ man was standing
near it. When the hot bar was in its place
under the hammer, this man -pulled down the
pole, and immediately the trip-hammer began



Foretna. 61



its blows upon the iron, while the workman who
held it turned it round and round continually,
that.it might be struck successively on all sides.
Thus he worked the iron into a very round and
smooth form, and then the pole was pushed up,
and the trip-hammer stopped. As the other end
of the barrel had been served in the same man-
ner before, the whole was now finished, and the
man put it upon a rack, with a great many
others which had been made before.

By this time there was another barrel ready
at the next forge, which was in-a different stage
of its progress, from the one last described.
One half of it had been nearly finished, but at
the other end the edges of the barrel had not
veen welded together. They had been brought
round over the rod, but had not. been joined.
Marco looked on while the workman heated the
unfinished end and then placed it under the
hammer. The heavy blows soon brought the
edges together, and joined them around the rod,
so as to give the work the form of a gun-barrel
throughout. Marco saw that when’ the work-
man wanted the hammer to strike slowly, he
could regulate its motion, in some way, by put-
ting his foot upon a projecting bar of wood, close



62 Tue Srrincrierp ARMoRY.

hee

‘to the floor, upon one side of the/anvil ; or, if
he wished, he could stop it entirely.

After this, Forester and Marco sauntered
slowly through the room, looking at the various
forges. There were great heaps of coal near
them, and men were wheeling in fresh supplies
over the stone floor. There were troughs of
water at each forge, with a little stream from
the mouth of a lead pipe running into each,
which kept them constantly full. The fires in
the forges were very hot, being kept up by a
steady blast of wind from some unseen bellows.
After spending as much time as they wished in
this building, Forester and Marco came out, and
went across the stream by a bridge. They
stopped upon the bridge, and looked over into
the stream. The water was pouring along, in
a tumultuous manner, between the walls of
masonry which formed the buildings or the
banks on each side.

“Now,” here is a streqm,” said Forester,
which I should think was Sfyetty uniform and
steady.”

“Why,” said Marco, “how can you tell ?”
“I can tell by the looks of the water.”
_ “It seems to me very strange,” said Marco,
“that you can tell by the looks of the water in



Forarne. 63

Discussion between Murco and Forester.

a brook, whether it comes from a pond, or
springs, or a great valley.”

“I could not tell,” rejoined Forester, “ except
at such a time as this, that is, just after a fresh-
et in every stream capable of a freshet. Now,
look for yourself into this water,” continued
Forester, “and see if you observe any differ-
ence between this and the water of the Con-
necticut.”

“Only that the water of the Connecticut is
muddy now,” said’ Marco.

« And how is this ?” said Forester.

« This is clear,” said Marco ; “only ade of
a dark color.” ee

“Very well—and what do you suppose is
the reason why the Connecticut is so turbid
now ?” asked Forester.

« Because of the freshet,” said Marco.

«But why should the freshet make it tur-
bid 2?”

« Why, I don’t know exactly,” said Marco.

«The reason is,” said Forester, “that the
freshet is produced by rains and melting snows,
from a vast surface of ground, and from such a
surface the water washes all the loose soil and
light particles which come in its way, into the
river. So that the water of a flood, produced



Gt Tue Sreinerreryn Armory.

Taina. ——
by rains falling over an extensive valley, is al-
ways turbid. When, therefore, I’ see such a
mass of turbid water as is now flowing through
the Connecticut, I judge it is water which has
come from the rains and snows of an extensive
valley. But when I see a stream bring down
only clear water like this, after such rains and
thaws as we have had, I conclude that it does
not come from the draining of an extensive sur-
face of land, but from a pond, or else from
springs.”

«And can you tell from the looks of the wa-
ter, whether it comes from a pond or from
springs ?” asked Marco.

“Why, the water is pretty dark,” said For-
ester.

«And what does that indicate?” asked
Marco.

“It indicates,” replied Forester, “that the
stream comes from springs, and swamps which
are fed by springs. The way in which swamps
are formed, is this. When springs arise in flat
land, or in any places where’ the water can not
run off as fast as it issues from the ground, it
spreads over the surface, and keeps it wet.
Then all the plants which grow on dry land are
killed, and none but aquatic plants will grow.



Foraine. 65



onsale oiceee: aie at ote
And these aquatic plants, when they die, do not
decay. The water preserves them, and other
plants grow above them. The leaves, too, and
branches, and trunks of trees, which fall in, are
covered with moss, and aquatic plants, and wa-
ter, and are thus preserved ; and in this manner
a great depth of vegetable substances is formed
in process of time, the'water issuing” continu-
ally from the ground, of a dark color as you
see it in this stream.”

“Yes,” replied Marco, “I see it is, and I
have often observed it so in other brooks.”

“But the water which comes from ponds has
generally but little color,” said Forester.

« What makes it so dark when it comes from
swamps ?” asked Marco.

«I do not know,” replied Forester, “ unless it
be that the plants and the various vegetables
remains, half decayed, which lie soaking in the
swamp, color it.”

Just at this moment, a man appeared, com-
ing out of a shop on one side of the stream, with
some curious-looking piece of machinery in his
hand, and he advanced toward the bridge, as if
he were going to cross it.

“Ask him,” said Marco, “if this stream rises
much, in times of freshet.”

E



66 Tue Serinarietp Armory.



‘The workman. Back wate



Forester said that he would, and according-
ly, when the man had come opposite to them,
Forester accosted him, by saying,

«The freshet does not appear to affect your
works much on this stream.”

«No, sir,” replied the workman, “it never
does.”

« What is the reason ?” asked Forester.

“ Why, the stream is fed,” replied the man,
« almost entirely by large springs, a short dis-
tance from here, and the rain does not raise
it much.” "

“So, then, you are never troubled much with
back water,” said Forester.

« No, sir,” replied the man, “not at all.” So
saying, he passed on.

“What do you mean by back water ?” asked
Marco.,

«When the water below the dam,” replied
Forester, “does not run off fast enough, but
flows back against the water-wheel, so as to
prevent its being turned round by the, current
above, it is called back water by millmen.
Sometimes, when there is another dam a short
distance below, it obstructs the water, so that,
in times of freshet, it can not escape fast enough,
and so the upper mill is troubled with back wa



Foratne. 67
“Forging tho plates,



ter. And even when there is not any other
dam, if the natural bed of the stream offers ob-
struction, or if the descent is not great enough
to carry off the water easily, then, when any
unusual quantity comes, it makes difficulty.
But come, let us go into the next shop.”

So Marco and Forester went over into an-
other shop. Here the workmen were forging
out the plates of iron, and flattening down the
edges, and then bending the edges over toward
one another, ready to be lapped and welded.
There were several trip-hammers here, and
Marco had a better opportunity to observe the
construction of them than in the great forge
room. He was surprised to see how perfectly
they could regulate the blows, and thus strike
slowly and carefully, or quick and strong, at
their pleasure. The workmen were exceed-
ingly accommodating in answering all the ques-
tions that Marco and Forester asked, and.jn ex-
plaining every thing which was going on.
They seemed, in fact, to take a pleasure in do-
ing it.





68 Ture Srrinerizerp ARMoRY.

‘Bras and cast iron. Gold.

Cuarrer V.

Iron.

Ov the walk from the middle water shop to
the upper one, Marco asked Forester why
they did not make gun-barrels of brass, instead
of iron ; he said that they would be handsomer.
“I don’t know,” replied Forester. “ They
make cannon for field-pieces, of brass, but that
is not on account of their beauty, I believe;
perhaps because they can be made lighter and
yet of the same strength, when of that materi-
al; but iron is always used for musket and pis-
tol barrels, I believe. I rather think this may
be it: iron cannon are always made of cast
iron. Now brass may be stronger than cast
iron, and yet wrought iron may be. stronger
than brass. Still this may not be all the rea-
son. The various metals have so many vari-
ous properties, that it would require a great
deal of study to be acquainted with them all.”
“Tread ina book once,” said Marco, “that
iron is really more valuable than gold.”
“ Yes,” said ‘Forester, “that is true.”—



Iron. 69
‘Meaning of valasbio. ‘Value of gold.

“ And that all which makes gold valuable,”
continued Marco, “ was its scarcity.”

“No,” said Forester, “that is not exactly
true. All that makes gold more valuable than
iron, may be its scarcity.”

« Yes,” said Marco, “perhaps that was it.”

“ There is a great difference between these
two statements,” said Forester. “And then,
besides, there is an ambiguity in the meaning
of the word valuable.” a

“Valuable!” repeated Marco; “I didn’t
know that there was more than one meaning to
that.”

« What does it mean ?” asked Forester.

“« It means worth something,” replied Marco.

“Is water valuable ?” asked Forester.

“Why, I don’t know,” said Marco; “we
couldn’t do without it, very well.”

“No,” rejoined Forester, “but still people
will not pay any thing for it, generally, for it is
so plentiful that they can get it without paying.
Thus it has a great value for its intrinsic qual-
ities, but no market or money value. Now if
gold was as plenty as stones in the street, it
would be very valuable in the former sense, for
it has some qualities which no other metals
have, and which are very important.”



70 Twe Srrinerietp Armory.
‘Bet. ~~ ~Ss~=~«”~*«*~*«“‘«‘«*‘« old and trom commpared_

« What are they ?” asked Marco.

«Perhaps the most important,” replied ‘For-
ester, “is, that it will not rust, or tarnish, by
being exposed to air or water, and it will. not
be cdrroded by any common acids. If a drop
of vinegar falls upon a knife-blade, it makes a
black spot; and if you. cut an apple with a
common knife, it blackens it. The acid of
the vinegar, or of the apple juice, corrodes the
iron.

“I thought that knife-blades were made of
steel,” said Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester, “ but steel is a prep-
aration of iron. So if iron is exposed to the
air, and especially to water, it rusts, and is soon
spoiled; but gold might remain half a centu-
ry buried in the ground, without changing.
Therefore, if gold were as plentiful as iron,
it would be used for.a great many things which
iron is used for now, simply because iron is so
common and cheap.”

«*What are some of the things it would be
used for ?” asked Marco. .

“Why, for every thing,” replied Forester,
“which did not require any great hardness,
such as spoons, fruit knives, handles of doors,
knobs, keys, and-all kinds of vessels for use in a





Iron. mn

Etfoct of heat,



family, as plates, cups, &c.; also for all kinds
of cooking utensils, as kettles, skillets, &c. I
presume, too, it would be used for sheathing of
ships, or for covering roofs of houses; and, in
fact, for almost all purposes, where particular
hardness is not required. Still, on the whole,
iron is more useful to men than gold would be,
for it has several qualities of a very curious na-
ture, which admirably fit it for our use. It has,
in fact, two sets of useful qualities, which are
very distinct from each other. One set relates
to the facility of manufacturing it, and the other
set to its usefulness when manufactured.”

«TI believe I know-what one of thém is,” said
Marco. “You can hammer it when it is hot.”

“It undergoes three changes by heat,” said
Forester, “which are all of great service in
manufacturing it. First, it becomes more mal.
leable and flexible. This is when it is red-hot.
If it was as malleable and flexible when cold,
as it is when it is red-hot, it would be unfit for
most of its present uses. It would bend down,
at once, under any load laid upon it, like lead.
But, by becoming more malleable and: flexible
when hot, it can be formed into its proper shape,
and then, on becoming cold, it resumes all. its
hardness and toughness again. It seems as if





72 Tue Sertnorietp Armory.
Brien, S™S™~—“SSSSSSOSOSOSSCS gs

these qualities were given to it expressly for the
advantage of man, as we know of no reason
why heat should make it flexible and soft, rather
than brittle, as it does brass and lead.”

“Does, heat make brass and lead brittle?”
asked Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester; “if you drop a
piece of hot brass upon the hearth, it will break
to pieces. And didn’t you ever observe, when
you are casting little anchors of lead, that if you
attempt to take the anchor out before the lead
is cool, it will break to pieces ?”

“No,” said Marco, “I never cast any an-
chors of lead.”

“ That is the way it does work,” said Fores-
ter; “but iron becomes very malleable and pli-
able as it grows hot, until, at last, when it is at
a white heat, a remarkable effect takes place,
which is of great importance. That is, the sur-
face.softens. It does not melt, that is, become
liquid, as lead does ; but it softens in a peculiar
way, so that, if you put two surfaces together,
while they are in this state, and hammer them
together, they join perfectly, and make one ho-
mogeneous mass.”

“What does homogeneous mean ?” asked
Marco.



Iron. 73
Importance of the wolding property. ‘Stoel welded to iron.

“All ‘alike,” replied Forester, “through the
whole substance. The place where the junc-
tion is formed is just like all the rest of it. This
is ‘welding. I believe there is no other metal
but iron, that softens in this manner upon the
surface, at a great heat, so that two pieces can
be joined together. This, you see, is of: im-
mense importance in manufacturing iron, for it
is very often necessary to join parts together.
They could not make the gun-barrels in the
manner they do, if it were not for this welding
property of the iron. As it is, they can take
a flat bar, wide enough to make a gun-barrel
when it is rolled up, and then, by rolling it up
so as to have one edge lap well over the other,
they can weld it and make it one solid mass.
If you look at the barrel when it is ground: and
polished, you can not find the least indication
of any joint where one edge lapped over the
other.”

«And nothing else but iron can be welded,
then,” said Marco.

“« Iron and steel,” said Forester. “Steel can
be Welded to steel, or to iron. ‘That is the way
they make nearly all cutting tools. The cutting
part is made of gteel, but the rest of the instru-
ment is generally made of iron—tne two parts





74 Tae Srrinertunp Armory.

Fusibillty of iron,

being made separately, and welded together.
Where steel is welded to iron, you can gene-
rally see a joint, for the two metals are of a lit-
tle different color. In a common table knife,
you can almost always see this mark near the
handle, where the steel blade was joined to the
iron part, which goes into the handle.”

“T’ll look next time I see one,” said Marco.

“So in axes, chisels, plane irons, and all such
tools,” continued Forester, “we can generally
see where the steel-cutting part was welded
to the iron shank. Then the fusibility of iron
isanother property of great importance. In
acertain state, iron can be melted. They
melt it in great furnaces. They mix the iron
with wood in putitng’ it into the furnace,
and then blow the fire with monstrous bel-

Jows driven by machinery. When the
iron is melted, and

has become sufficient-
2 ly hot, they draw it
off through an open-
ing in the bottom
of the furnace—the
opening being kept
stopped up till the
iron is melted.



FILLING THR LADLE,



Iron. 75

‘Gast iron.

When it is ready, they punch the hole oped,
and the melted iron comes out like a streani of
liquid fire.”

«Where does it run to?” asked Marco.

“Oh, they hold a great ladle under it to
catch it. The ladle is supported between two
long bars for handles, and is carried by two
men. When the ladle is full, they carry away
the liquid iron, and pour it into the mold, made
ready for it beforehand. When one ladle full
is carried away, two- men aré all ready with
‘another, to put directly under, when the first is
taken away, to catch the stream of iron, which
keeps running all the time.”

«Where did you see them cast iron so ?” said
Marco.

«Oh, I’ve often been in foundries,” said For-
ester, “where I’ve-seen the process.”

“Why don’t they cast gun-barrels ?” said
‘Marco.

«They would not be strong enough. Cast
iron is of a different nature from wrought iron,
—more brittle ; and, besides, it is apt to have
flaws. So that cast iron will not answer where
great strength and toughness are required, unless
it is in cases where weight is no objection, as,
for instance, where the article is not to be much





76 Tue Srerinoriztp Armory.

Form of the cannons.





‘Cannons of forts.

moved. ‘Thus, the cannons of forts, which are
always stationary, are of cast iron, but, in order
to be strong, they have to be made enormously
thick and heavy. But muskets, which the sol-
dier has to carry upon his shoulder, must be
made as light as possible. So they use the best
wrought iron, and thus the barrels can be made
much thinner than if they were of cast iron.
You see that a soldier, besides his gun, has to
earry his knapsack of clothes, and his powder
and ball, and sometimes several days’ ptovision 5
so that often, when on a march, he is loaded
down with almost as great a burden as he can
carry. With this, he has to travel through mud
and snow, and sometimes through woods and
swamps, and thus it becomes necessary to make
the musket, and all his equipments, in fact, as
light as possible.”

“ What makes them have it bigger at one end
than it is at the other ?” said Marco.

«So as to have the iron thicker at one end.
The bigness at that end is occasioned by the
greater thickness of the iron there. The bore
is of the same diameter throughout. You see
that the chief force of the explosion of the gun-
powder, is at the breech, where the charge lies.
As the ball advances through the barrel, the



Iron. 77
Gases. Philosophy of explosion.



gases expand, and their force diminishes, so that
So great strength is not required at the muzzle.
Cannon are always castin the same manner, so
as to have the greatest strength and thickness
at the part which has to resist the greatest force
of the explosion. There are, in fact, two rea-
sons, why the force of the gunpowder diminishes
as the ball moves on toward the muzzle. The
first is that the gases expand, and the second is
that they cool.”

«< What gases | ?” asked Marco.

“The gases,” replied Forester, “which are
produced by the combustion of the gunpowder.
‘When gunpowder burns, the solid parts, which
it is composed of, suddenly combine, and change
into gases. Now as the solid gunpowder occu-
pied much less room than the gases which are
formed from it, these gases expand with great
force, to get their proper place, and that is what
gives the explosive force.”

“Is that the philosophy of it ?”” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “in part; but that
does not account for the whole explosive force
of gunpowder. For if gunpowder is exploded
in a confined space, so that they can-collect all
the gases which result”.





78 Tue Sprinerienp Armory.
“Ghomical experiments. ———==S=S=~=*~*~<“~*~*~*S*S*C«ntrdvanicom,

“Ishould think it would blow the confined
place all to pieces,” interrupted Marco.

«Oh, the chemists have a mode of arranging
apparatus to prevent that, and to keep the
gases from escaping.”

«« How do they do it ?” asked Marco.

“They drop the gunpowder, by degrees, that
is, a few grains at a time, upon hot iron,—per-
haps the end of a gun-barrel, and then have the
other end of the barrel bent, so as to pass under
water." Then, as the powder is inflamed, and
explodes, the gases pass out through the muzzle
of the gun-barrel and come up in bubbles
through the water.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “but they would get
away into the air aid be lost.”

« Not at all,” said Forester, “for it would be
‘very easy to have a vessel upside down over
the place, to catch all the bubbles, or rather the
gases that are in them. The chemists have
very ingenious modes: contrived for doing all
such things.”

“Idon’t see how they contrive to keep the
gunpowder from all flashing off at once.”

“TI don’t know precisely how they do it,” said
Forester, “but it would be easy to have a tube
screwed into the end of the barrel, directly over



Irow. 719
“Gasscollectet, Results...
the heated part, and then have a contrivance
for dropping the gunpowder, a few grains ata
time, down through this tube. Then if the part
which contained the gunpowder, at the top of
the tube, was closed over, so that the gases
could not escape that way, they would all pass
off through the barrel, and come up in bubbles
through the water. 2

“Now, by some such contrivance as this,”
continued Forester, “the chemists have col-
lected the gases which result from burning a
certain quantity of gunpowder, and then, by
pressing those gases into as small a space as the
powder itself occupied before, they’ can tell what
the expansive force is.”

« Yes,” said Marco, “I understand it, I be-
lieve.”

“The object,” continued Forester, ,“ of all
this is, to measure the expansive power of the
gases, and ascertain whether that power is
enough to account for the explosive force of
gunpowder.”

“ And is it enough ?” said Marco.

“No,” replied Forester ; “the result of the
experiment ‘is, that the expansive force of the
gases, which result from the burning of the
gunpowder, when they are collected and artifi-



80 Tus Sprincrierp Armory.

‘Foresters explanations. Effect of heat.

cially compressed, is not great enough to pro-
duce such powerful effects as are caused by the
explosion of the, powder.”

“Perhaps some ‘of the gases escape,” said
Marco.

« They have tried the experiment very care-
fully,” said Forester. “But there is one cir-
cumstance which makes the case very different,
when the gases are collected in this manner,
from the natural explosion.”

«What is it ?” asked Marco.

“The gases,” replied Forester, “ are in a'very
different condition, when they are first produced,
from what they are when they are collected and
compressed afterward. When they are first
formed by the burning of the gunpowder, they
are intensely hot; but when they are after-
ward collected and condensed slowly, they are
cold. This must make a considerable difference
in the force which they exert.”

«Why ?” asked Marco.

“ Because,” said Forester, “any gas, when
hot, expands with greater force than when cold.
A bladder filled with air, will burst if you put it
down before a hot fire. Steam, too, expands
with vastly greater force when it is heated to a

«high degree, than when it remains at the same



Iron. 81



“Gunpowder. “Conclusion.
temperature at which it was generated. So the
gases resulting from the burning of gunpowder,
when hot, will expand with much greater force
than when cold. And when they are first
formed by the burning of the powder, they must
be intensely hot, from the heat produced by the
combustion. So that, perhaps, that is the ex-
planation of the force of gunpowder. Stated in
general terms, it would be thus. The explosive
force of gunpowder is owing to the sudden for-
mation of a large quantity of elastic and expan-
sive gases, at a very high temperature.

« Therefore,” continued Forester, “the great
thickness of the gun must be at the place where
the gunpowder is lodged, as there the gases are
first formed and most compressed. As the bul-
let moves along the barrel, the gases expand
and fill the space, and so their force is dimin-
ished; but they still continue to act, though
more and more feebly, pushing the bullet along
until it leaves the muzzle of the gun.”

F



82 Tue Serincrietp ARMoRY.

“Marco nunary. The sia. ‘The pleasant front yard,

Cuarrer VI.
ARCHERY.

GF passing along the road from one water shop

to another, Marco saw something which
made him hungry, namely a sign put up over
the door of a small house, saying that cakes and
beer were for sale within. *

“Ah!” said Marco, as soon as his eyes fell
upon this sign, “let us go in and-get some cakes
and beer.”

«Why ! are you hungry ?” asked Forester.

“Yes,” replied Marco, “and thirsty too.”

“ Well,” said Forester, “let us go in then and
see what they have got that is good.”

There was a little yard in front of the house,
with a gate leading into it. On each side of
the path leading from the gate to the door of the
house there was a little parterre, planted with
shrubs and flowers. The flowers were just
coming up out of the ground. The beds looked
very neat and nice, having been spaded up and
raked over only the day before.

At the time when Forester and Marco turned -



ARCHERY. 83

“Girt afraid. ‘Marco and Forester go intothe house. Hot cakes.

to go into the house there was a little girl in the
pathway, employed in sowing some flower seeds.
When she saw Forester and Marco coming,
however, she jumped up and ran into the house.

“I don’t see what she is afraid of,” said
Marco.

Forester and Marco walked into the yard and
advanced to the step of the door. The door
opened into a small entry, and the entry into a
very neat and pleasant-looking room. There
was a woman just coming forward into the
entry from the room.

“We wanted to get some of your cakes,”
said Forester.

“ Walk in,” said the woman.

So Forester and Marco walked in. The
‘woman conducted them into the room, and gave
them seats by a little table.

“Iam just baking;” said the woman,“ and I
can give you some cakes right from the oven.”

“That will be good,” said Marco.

“Have you got milk as well as beer ?” asked
Forester.

“ Yes,” said the woman, “I can let you have
some milk.”

“ Would not you like milk as well as beer
Marco ?” said Forester.



84 Tur Sprinerrerp Armory.



replied Marco, “ better.

The woman then went out to get the cakes
and milk, while Marco and Forester remained,
and began to look about the room. There was
adoor on the side opposite to the one where
they had come in, which seemed to lead out
into a pleasant-looking yard. Marco went to
this side door to see.

He found a little platform outside, covered
with a roof, and having a seat on each side of
it. He sat down upon the seat, and then called
to Forester.

« Forester,” said he, “ come here.”

“No,” said Forester, “not yet.”

In a moment more the woman came in with
a waiter in her hands, containing a plate of
hearts and rounds, hot from the oven, and a
pitcher of milk. There were two tumblers on
the waiter also. ‘The woman placed the waiter
down upon the table.

“Have you any objection to our going out
upon the stoop ?” said Forester.

«Not at all,” said the woman. “I will move
the little table right out there.”

So she took up the table, which was very
small, and carried it, with the waiter upon it,
out to the stoop. Forester followed her. She



Arcuery. 85
“Tho luncheon eating. Rich milk.

put the table down
in the stoop be-
tween the two
benches,and Marco
and Forester took
seats on the bench-
s, one on each side.
«This is a good
place,” said Marco. }
“Yes,” said For- ¥
ester, “and a good

luncheon.” 2

Forester poured
out some of the
milk. It looked very rich indeed. In fact, the
woman having been much pleased with the ap-
pearafice and manners of her guests, had con-
trived in pouring out the milk from the pan
into the pitcher, to mix with it an unusual por-
tion of the cream, so that the milk as she brought
it to the table was very rich indeed.

While eating their cakes_and drinking their
milk, Forester and Marco were much interested
in viewing the scene around them. The stoop
where they were sitting was on the back side
of the house, and there were steps leading from
it down to a neat little garden, all laid out care-
















86 True Srrincrizrtp Armory.
Gato leading into the gard Path beyond.

fully in beds. At the end of the garden was a
gate, and a path beyond it. The path led appa-
rently down to the mill stream; which flowed
through the grounds in that direction. Marco
could not see the stream very well, on account
of the trees and shrubbery that were in the
way. He could hear it, however, and he said
that after he had finished his luncheon he meant
to go down and see it.

Forester did not pay much attention to this
remark of Marco's, for he was busy at the time
in reading a newspaper which he had found in
the room while the woman was gone after the
cakes, and which he had brought out with him
to the stoop. He held the newspaper in one
hand, and the cake which he was eating in the
other. <

“Tve a great mind to go down now,” said
Marco. “.Would you, cousin Forester ?”

“Would you what?” asked Forester, still
reading. “

“Go down and see the brook,” said Marco.
“That path there beyond the garden leads down
to the stream, I suppose.”

“ And you want to go down ?” said Forester.

“Yes,” replied Marco. :

“I shall have to go with you then,” said





ARCHERY, 87

Marco's two cakes. ‘Seonery on the bunks of the stream-

Forester, “to see that you don’t get into any
difficulty.”

“There is no danger of any difficulty,” said
Marco. “But still I should like to have you

0.”
« Well,” said Forester, “go on. Tl follow
you.”

So Forester,and Marco rose from their seats
and prepared to go. Forester held his news-
paper in one hand, keeping his eyes still fixed
upon it, so as to.continue his reading, and he
took another cake in the other hand, so as to
go on with his luncheon by the way. As for
Marco, he took two cakes, so as to be sure of
an abundant supply. Thus provided, Marco
ran down through the garden, while Forester
slowly followed, reading by the way.

A winding pathway led down from the lower
garden gate through a wild scene of rocks and
trees, down to the banks of the stream. The
scenery was so wild and picturesque, that For-
ester’s attention was, for a time, wholly taken
off from his reading by it. He looked at the
water which came roaring and foaming along
over its rocky bed. He looked at the precipices
which overhung the stream, and at the mosses
and lichens which enriched the rocks, and the



8s Tus Sperinerisyp Armory.

“Maroc’a remarke: Robbing birds'-nests. Forester’s story.

climbing plants. which hung suspended from
them in beautiful festoons. He stood a few
minutes admiring all this beauty and neglecting
his newspaper, when Marco. interrupted his
reverie by saying,

“I wish I gould get over to the other side.”

“Why ?” dsked Forester.

«To run about in the woods over there,” re-
plied Marco.“ “I don’t believe but that there
are birds’-nests in those woods.”

“And what -should you do with the birds’.
nests,” said Forester, “ if you should find them ?”

“Oh, nothing,” said Marco; “only climb up
and look in to see the eggs. I would not rob
the nests on any account. It is wicked to rob
birds’-nests ; don’t you think it is ?”

“I think it is generally wrong.”

“ Generally ?” repeated Marco.
ways wrong, I am sure.”

“That depends upon what you mean by rob-
bing the nests.”

“Why, taking the eggs,” said Marco, “and
carrying them away.”

“Well,” said Forester, “I know a farmer’s
boy in Vermont—and a very excellent boy he
was, too,—who used to go out every morning



«It is al-



AncuERrr~ 898
ee ______

‘Burprise of Marto. ‘Forestor’s explanation.



and get the eggs out of ever so many birds’-
nests.” 7

“And what did he do with them ?” asked

Marco.

+“ Why, he would carry them home, and af-
terward the girls in the house used to break
them up.”’

« Hoh !—what girls!” said Marco.

“And I think they did perfectly right,” said
Forester.

‘So saying, Forester turned away and walked
toward some large square stones which lay near
the bank of the stream, and sitting down upon
them, began to read his paper, leaving Marco
overwhelmed with astonishment.

« Perhaps I ought to mention, however,” con-
tinued Forester, raising his eyes from the paper
a moment as he spoke,—“ that the birds were
hens, and the nests that this boy went to were
allin his father’s barn. The girls broke the
eggs up to make puddings and pies.”

Marco laughed aloud at this termination of
the story, and at first he insisted that hens were
not birds. He was, however, soon obliged to.
relinquish this point, and he went down to the
shore of the stream, and began to pick up small
stones, and try to see if he could throw them



90 Tur Serine



reup Armory.



Brajvetton.

across the stream. He found that he could.
The stones that he threw struck against the
precipice on the other side with great force,
and rebounded into the water.

“I can throw stones very swift,” said Marco,
talking to himself. “I wonder if a bullet goes
swifter out of a gun.”



“Forester,” said Marco, “just look here a
minute. Do you suppose that a bullet out of a
gun goes a great deal swifter than that ?”



7 ARCHERY. 91
‘Marco's questions —~=~*~“‘CS™CO#;#~é~é~‘“‘wA Week





As Marco pronounced the word that, he
lanched the stone through the air with all its
force. It flew across the stream and went far
in among the trees on the opposite bank.

«I don’t know,” said Forester, still reading.

«Or an arrow,” continued Marco. “I wonder
how much swifter a bullet goes than an arrow.”

“Cousin Forester,” said Marco.

Forester did not answer.

“Cousin Forester,” repeated Marco.

«What ?” said Forester.

« How swift does an arrow go?” said Marco.

Forester did not answer, but went on with his
reading.

“Does not an arrow go as swift as a bullet,
—nearly ?” continued Marco.

“ An arrow!” repeated Forester. |“ Iam busy
now, reading, Marco. If you will leave me in
peace until I have finished this article, I will tell
you all about arrows and archery. I will deliver
you a regular lecture.”

“Well,” said Marco.

Marco had laid his two cakes down upon a
flat stone while he had been throwing pebbles
across the brook; but now he took them up
again, and began to eat them. After a short
time Forester finished his reading, and then





92 Tue Sperinarrenp Armory.

Forester commences his lecture. “Archery; definition of it,

gave notice to Marco that he was réady to at-
tend to him.

So Marco walked along toward Forester,
saying,

« Now, cousin Forester, for the lecture on ar-
chery that you promised me.”

“Well,” said ‘Forester, “ take your seat on
that stone, and be the audience, and I will de-
liver you a lecture.”

So Marco sat down upon the stone that For-
ester pointed out,—which was nearly opposite
to where Forester himself was sitting——and be-
gan to compose hinself to listen.

“ Ladies and gentlemen!” said Forester.

Here Marco smiled.

“The audience is expected to keep sober,
said Forester.

At this Marco laughed outright, but in a mo-
ment more he recovered his gravity, and For-
ester proceeded as follows :—

“Ladies and gentlemen; The subject of this
lecture is Archery. Archery is the art of
using the bow and arrow. Before the in-
vention of gunpowder, the bow and. arrow
were used as instruments of war. Since
that invention, archery is no longer em-
ployed in the warfare of civilized nations.





ArcHERY. 93
Missiles. —=—=SSS~SCSCSCSCS flo ophlcall explanations.
The North American Indians, and savage na-
tions, still use the bow and arrow'in their wars,
and in the pursuit of game. These instruments
were of very angient use, and are mentioned
‘n the Bible. The principles on which the bow
and arrow are made, will be seen from their
‘structure and design. An arrow is a kind of
missiles Missiles are those weapons which are
designed to be thrown through the air, by the
strength of the combatant who uses them.
‘The dart, the lance, and the arrow, are missiles,
but the sword and the dagger are not. Stones
are often used as missiles. A speer, when it is
thrown,-is a missile, but when retained in the
hands and used only to give thrusts, it is not.
The harpoon thrown at a whale is a mi:

Forester said all this in a very grave and se-
rious way, as if he were really delivering a lec-
ture. _Marco was at first inclined to laugh, but
he gradually became interested in what Fores-
ter was saying, and at length began to listen
quite attentively.

“A man, with his naked strength,” contin-
ued-Forester, “can give a missile a greater or
less velocity, according to its weight. If he
takes up a ball of iron, weighing ten pounds,
avd throws it with all his strength, he can only





94° Tue Srrinerienp Armory.
‘The lecturer interrupted. ‘The lecture suddenly terminated,

give it a slow motion, and this motion will car-
ry it but a very little way. If now he takes a
five-pound ball and makes an effort as great as
before, he will give it a quicker motion. The
velocity of his arm through the air with a five-
pound ball, may be about twice as great as_
when it is loaded with a ten-pound ball, The
man produces the same amount of motion in
the two cases. In the first, he gives a great
quantity of matter a small motion. In the lat-
ter, he gives a small quantity of matter a great
motion. The whole amount of the moving
effect is the same.”’

“I don’t understand that very well,” said
Marco.

“The audience are requested not to interrupt
the lecture,” said Forester.

Marco smiled, and Forester went on.

“If a boy,” he continued, “throws a great
stone, as far as he can, perhaps it would only
go asingle rod. If he makes the same effort to
throw a small stone, it will go eight or ten rods;
that is, if the small stone were only one eighth
or one tenth as large as the other.”

Just at, this point Forester interrupted him-
self to say that it was time for them to go back,
or the woman at the house would wonder what



ARCHERY.



difference between a gun and a bow.



had become of them. She might imagine, he
said, that they had eaten her cakes, and drank
her milk, and had now gone away without pay-
ing for them.

If Forester had not thus felt obliged to go
back to the house, and if he had found that
Marco had been able to understand his lecture,
he would have gone on to state some very cu-
rious principles in respect to the operation of
the bow and arrow. There is an essential dif-
ference between a gun and a bow in this re-
spect, that a gun is an instrument for creating
power by means of the explosion of the powder
contained within it ; while a bow is only an in-
strument for changing power, already existing,
into speed. The force with which a man pulls
a trigger has nothing to do with the velocity of
the bullet; but the force with which a man
draws the bow, is the sole cause that determines
the velocity of the arrow.

What Forester had been intending to say to
Marco, when speaking of the power which a
man has to throw a small stone faster and far-
ther than a large one, was this:—that by di-
minishing the weight of the ball or stone, he
would be able to’ increase the velocity with
which he could throw it up to a certain limit.



96 Tut Srrinorrerp Armory.



‘Timit of velocity in throwing with the arm,

‘The limit would be the utmost degree of swift-
ness that he. could give to the motion of his
arm. Suppose, for example, that a man could
throw a missile weighing three ounces, one hun-
dred yards. That would be equivalent to
‘throwing one of one ounce, three hundred
yards. If now he has power to do the former,
he will have power enough to do the latter,.but
he-can not make this power available, inasmuch
as he can not give his arm swiftness of motion
enough; for the missile will pass through the
air, only with the same velocity that it is mov-
ing in, when leaving his hand. But with the
bow he may accomplish it. For the bow, if it
is perfectly elastic, may be drawn up with a
slow motion, but it will straighten itself with a
quick motion, according to the lightness of the
arrow with which it is loaded. Thus the bow
and arrow is not a contrivance to increase a
man’s power of throwing a missile, but only to
enable him to expend the power which he has,
in giving a greater velocity to missiles of small
weight. There is as much motion given in
throwing a three ounce missile one hundred
yards, which the man could do by his own
strength, as in throwing the one ounce missile
three hundred yards, which he does by bow and



ArcueErRy.



“The bow creates no power. Materials of which bows

arrow. But the latter is much more useful in
hunting and in war, for the marksmen wish to
reach the object at the greatest possible dis-
tance. A bow, therefore, must not be consid-
ered as exercising any force of its own, but only
as expending in a peculiar manner, the force
which the archer applies to it, in drawing it.
There is, besides this, one other advantage in
using a bow rather than in throwing the missile
direct from the hand, and that is, that it can be
aimed better. Practiced archers acquire great
skill in hitting the object at which they aim.
The bow is usually made of some kind of
tough and elastic wood. The best strings are
made from the skins of wild animals. The ar-
row consists of three parts—the shaft, the head,
and the barb. The shaft in the best Indian ar-
row, is about three feet long,’slender, light, and
perfectly straight. The head is made of heavi-
er wood, or is armed with a rudely carved
stone. The savage inhabitants of islands em-
ploy for this purpose, the sharp teeth of some
kinds of fish. The barb consists of pieces of
feather, so attached to the end of the arrow
which is applied to the string, as to cause it to
pursue a steady and straight course in its flight
through the air. The feather end being more
«



98 Tue Serinerienp Armory.
“Advantages of



‘ery arrows. Gros

resisted by the atmosphere, is kept back, and the
head being heavier, moves with greater momen-
tum and is always forward.

The arrow has been found a very deadly
weapon in war. Warlike nations in ancient
times, acquired great dexterity and power in
its use. Scarcely any armor was sufficient pro-
tection against it. Sometimes arrows were
poisoned... And not unfrequently the arrow was
employed as the Congreve Rocket now is, to
fire distant buildings by loading the head with
tow, or with some other combustible substance
that would communicate a spark or a flame.
‘They were accustomed, too, in former times, to
make a kind of arrow with holes through the
head. of it, so as to produce a whistling sound
when they were discharged. ‘These were called
whistling arrows.

The Cross-Bow, often spoken of in the
histories of former times, was substantially
the same instrument with the common bow.
It had in addition a kind’ of stock, attached
to the bow, by which the arrow was made
to pass along a groove, which served to give
more steadiness and certainty to the aim.
The most experienced archers, however, always
preferred the simple bow. In accounts of an-



Arcuery. - 99
‘Forester and Marco go back to the house. ‘The bill,

cient battles, frequent mention is made of arch-
ers, as the most efficient part of the forces em-
ployed in a war. Bullets, however, as dis-
charged from guns, in modern warfare, are infi-
nitely more deadly.

It is very probable that Forester would have
explained all these things to Marco, had he not
felt in haste to return and pay for the cakes and
milk that he and Marco had eaten. He need
not have been uneasy on this account, as the
‘woman at the house would not have suspected
that they had dishonestly gone away, if they had
remained playing about the stream an hour—
so confident was she of the respectability and
trust-worthiness of her guests, from their ap-
pearance and manners.

Forester and Marco, however, went back to
the house, and after sitting in the stoop a little
while longer, and drinking some more of the
milk, they went in and asked what there was to
pay. The woman saidninepence ; which For-
ester said meant a New York shilling. They
paid her the money and then went away.



100 Tue Srrinerizup Anmony.
Raing etey

Cuarrer VII.
Turnine ann Borinea.

MA*8°° and ¥orester spent two or three

hours in rambling through the water
shops, and examining the various processes
which were going on in them. They saw the
place where the iron bars were rolled out, and
cut into lengths suitable for forming the barrels;
and Marco was astonished to observe with what
facility the metal was worked, by the help of
the ponderous machinery. This was done at
the lowest of the three dams. Here was also
the “stocking shop,” as the workmen called it,
where the stocks of the guns were turned.
Marco was very much interested in this pro-
cess, as, in fact, all visitors are. Turning is
performed in an instrument called a lathe.
The work to be turned is put into the lathe, and,
by means of wheels and machinery, is made to
revolve rapidly. While it is thus revolving, the
cutting tool is held against it, which cuts away
the wood, or other material, all around the work.
There is a part of the machine, made to steady



Turnine anv Borina. 101

“‘Farning brass and iron. ‘The cutting tool “Engine lathes,



the tool upon, .which is called the rest. All
kinds of work, which are round in one direction,
such as round boxes, knobs, handles, &c., can
be fashioned in. this manner much more easily,
and much more correctly, than they can be by
hand. Not only wood, but brass, iron, and
steel, can be turned in a lathe. The tools with
which the harder substances are turned, are
ground to a more obtuse angle, though equally
sharp at the edge; and they are, of course, so
adjusted, as to cut off only a small shaving at a
time. Where the iron or brass work, which is
to be turned, is very heavy, not only must the
material be made to revolve by machinery, but
the tool must be screwed firmly into the rest, as
the strength of a man would not be sufficient to
hold it. The rest, with the tool screwed into
it, is made to mpve slowly along, so as to cut
the metal away regularly, from one end of the
work toward the other. Such a lathe as this,
is called an engine lathe.

Marco saw several engine lathes. There
were three or four in one room, for turning the
gun-barrels. Marco watched the tool, as it
moved slowly along the barrel, with a small
shaving of iron running out continually from its
edge, as the barrel turned over constantly



lo2 Tur Sprinarrerp Armory.
[Gooling tho tool, ‘Necossity for this,



against There was a little stream of cold
water, which fell all the time upon the point of
the tool. It came from a little pipe, suspended
over the work. The pipe was connected with
a small flexible tube; about ‘three feet long,
which came down from a long metal pipe, which
passed across the room overhead, and contained
aconstant supply of water. The water in this
pipe was raised, as Forester supposed, by a
pump from the mill-stream. The end of the
little pipe over the work was attached to the
machinery, so that it moved along with the rest,
and thus always delivered its little stream of
water directly upon the edge of the tool, and
upon the part of the iron which the tool was
cutting. The flexible tube, or hose, as the
workmen called it, allowed the pipe to be car-
ried in this manner, along the barrel, from one
end to the other, so as to pour the water con-
tinually upon the point where it was needed.
Marco wanted to know what the stream of
water was for; and Forester told him that it
was to keep the edge of the tool cool. The
force of friction, produced by cutting so hard a
material as iron, would soon heat the tool, and
teke the temper out of the steel—and then, the
edge, being softened, would be immediately



Full Text


xml version 1.0
xml-stylesheet type textxsl href daitss_disseminate_report_xhtml.xsl
REPORT xsi:schemaLocation 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss2Report.xsd' xmlns:xsi 'http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance' xmlns 'http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss'
DISSEMINATION IEID 'E20090219_AAAAAH' PACKAGE 'UF00003522_00001' INGEST_TIME '2009-02-19T21:11:13-05:00'
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT 'UF' PROJECT 'UFDC'
DISSEMINATION_REQUEST NAME 'disseminate request placed' TIME '2013-12-09T17:44:24-05:00' NOTE 'request id: 299457; Dissemination from Lois and also Judy Russel see RT# 21871' AGENT 'Stephen'
finished' '2013-12-13T17:27:29-05:00' '' 'SYSTEM'
FILES
FILE SIZE '62756' DFID 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHA' ORIGIN 'DEPOSITOR' PATH 'sip-files0000iii.jp2'
MESSAGE_DIGEST ALGORITHM 'MD5' b9c5fd38c6a0983c1a58c98838ded1c3
'SHA-1' c0ec470b4bc78bbaaf25ff45f136b599fe16a984
EVENT '2011-12-31T13:38:28-05:00' OUTCOME 'success'
PROCEDURE describe
'110687' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHB' 'sip-files0000iii.jpg'
609f15ecf9dbc6554beccd19bf256e24
a7880e5d02faf0c303eeb3a0c21f835cc25db7a4
'2011-12-31T13:37:36-05:00'
describe
'1213' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHC' 'sip-files0000iii.pro'
d66cc1433d2506a417f3edb3a0caf9a2
444bcf1aa4a94b8c060121e6b12ca87bccf710b3
'2011-12-31T13:35:15-05:00'
describe
'40851' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHD' 'sip-files0000iii.QC.jpg'
4c6525b5e825d339e29737fb44674acb
871d2164e27feea5df01de85809959e8924ad357
'2011-12-31T13:35:52-05:00'
describe
'515528' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHE' 'sip-files0000iii.tif'
c586219a81eee9a3316b50735693f422
97c809c85770ac060d60648808203782895e48dc
'2011-12-31T13:35:10-05:00'
describe
'50' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHF' 'sip-files0000iii.txt'
881f0af7de06bdf9a607d6e0e1d627e0
6f68b2ee251c45865577b85af540284afbbedc34
'2011-12-31T13:39:54-05:00'
describe
'20253' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHG' 'sip-files0000iiithm.jpg'
22622153c0fd81549363fb8242445d3d
ac5f0213733b163cc6edd043f99d6cd70acc8955
'2011-12-31T13:35:57-05:00'
describe
'26226' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHH' 'sip-files0000iv.jp2'
f053d052adab686231dd47193adbfc91
86c9257c74668820b97766291b3b0c3e11e9ea68
'2011-12-31T13:37:18-05:00'
describe
'24049' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHI' 'sip-files0000iv.jpg'
8d656f3555cb5d822f35692ded671e28
f25a5315043833e16146e35356c971c023c3e3ea
'2011-12-31T13:36:03-05:00'
describe
'4204' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHJ' 'sip-files0000iv.pro'
1ff2bc100f56c236e932c63e30a16c11
23efdc72463302e70cc3c2010155aa4e1049d176
'2011-12-31T13:38:29-05:00'
describe
'14107' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHK' 'sip-files0000iv.QC.jpg'
837b80d8a4022507e0775608d3f3240e
3b284129677862f15c2ff8ce195b8396b96325e5
'2011-12-31T13:38:18-05:00'
describe
'511224' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHL' 'sip-files0000iv.tif'
35a3b0286078d92ae46e658ef4ae349d
295d2d14597db5b5358044c1abf81a260eed8b8d
'2011-12-31T13:34:52-05:00'
describe
'240' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHM' 'sip-files0000iv.txt'
24ee2bc9105b11cf5d02571f77035f91
c1af50ca571f54874f3d530a87f3d929215a3041
describe
'10403' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHN' 'sip-files0000ivthm.jpg'
63aea35e0da3a165b22a03d62362e828
420a1840632bd64bb205d89af29250d98fae5370
'2011-12-31T13:35:01-05:00'
describe
'51472' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHO' 'sip-files0000ix.jp2'
7f89b67ad4e18b795fd9fb6a7f08e029
be79b3c5eca62e7da4031b17a766219ecb139624
'2011-12-31T13:38:35-05:00'
describe
'36587' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHP' 'sip-files0000ix.jpg'
af69b70b5516eb77911d89fe9bbd17c2
6dea4111fa30a869f3fc5990ec5fb1241b5a5a9a
'2011-12-31T13:38:42-05:00'
describe
'4238' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHQ' 'sip-files0000ix.pro'
0cb4ef93f06a3609993f0556f2da0261
a54b3aa539cf27de86a97770cf156fd2e81489f7
'2011-12-31T13:38:39-05:00'
describe
'19564' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHR' 'sip-files0000ix.QC.jpg'
2d91054ae3a99b1ef5934d2c711945bc
856b9fe013e6897dd1b7fe4cd4dcd6e1a53d22f6
'2011-12-31T13:36:36-05:00'
describe
'512148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHS' 'sip-files0000ix.tif'
bc40d3748b22eba64aae01efb65582f3
60b0b9ca031ebc70035df1de771c4e4fd5768c5e
'2011-12-31T13:40:30-05:00'
describe
'188' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHT' 'sip-files0000ix.txt'
7f5b0581f1efa8037aed30019dfb10ad
234ab041e81e608d01b27178a4ef3dd10e03bdf1
'2011-12-31T13:39:06-05:00'
describe
'12863' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHU' 'sip-files0000ixthm.jpg'
c56856db7cf2dd27e1b3c812a8a4448e
c9763cc161fccbab581c4d0f2d8a2e581a552acf
'2011-12-31T13:38:25-05:00'
describe
'62833' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHV' 'sip-files0000v.jp2'
c0579974b28f11b92105896e821c8545
da7c85a7da70e92cc571833aee46498de249fb06
'2011-12-31T13:35:46-05:00'
describe
'84829' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHW' 'sip-files0000v.jpg'
a83aed4e3432731d9ac2db3d46450cf9
b28932e2d3f113097c11a1f18636bd1bb32a0735
'2011-12-31T13:40:27-05:00'
describe
'22911' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHX' 'sip-files0000v.pro'
c074297d27a5c301d4d9e2c345808217
b8559f7ff36d5950749753054bd66a197e2d4d24
'2011-12-31T13:38:13-05:00'
describe
'39356' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHY' 'sip-files0000v.QC.jpg'
6e6bdd0d3885df99e66efae0214d6e06
adf868c2b43a6c7de86bf7348c479be74f91f778
'2011-12-31T13:35:55-05:00'
describe
'514852' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADHZ' 'sip-files0000v.tif'
b6339f530be9ea04513313843b018a9b
ba1b4267499850b318e50e3f1e78cf10946a68dc
'2011-12-31T13:36:48-05:00'
describe
'908' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIA' 'sip-files0000v.txt'
b47a5da65bbf7a2b1d0fb778b8991300
988941ef020828c8143dca6c8e1299696010207b
'2011-12-31T13:36:41-05:00'
describe
'62849' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIB' 'sip-files0000vi.jp2'
12a024e12409bc926e7104331f3b3cac
4e3ce6b08e7069321f1898f48517c90d192465b6
'2011-12-31T13:38:08-05:00'
describe
'45297' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIC' 'sip-files0000vi.jpg'
0fbf8f67a361969353f8fa48bb61325a
396f9799f1293c673620e5deef089bab55b51812
'2011-12-31T13:37:20-05:00'
describe
'11221' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADID' 'sip-files0000vi.pro'
5812198591e2107d26781ac7d9e34617
e09b2d92c0b09711329e7bd6f1eef3a1b5c35cc5
'2011-12-31T13:36:01-05:00'
describe
'23645' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIE' 'sip-files0000vi.QC.jpg'
9a0d90f56f1510ebc46230c3c647d756
fd3100a4126d6f84064ea78cff7dbf9c37550d9c
'2011-12-31T13:35:42-05:00'
describe
'512552' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIF' 'sip-files0000vi.tif'
53f9d1faf35c81422f7a1e064438c5b8
7cb4efad3a051947583dbf5c7d6264c6afc11c5f
'2011-12-31T13:36:16-05:00'
describe
'450' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIG' 'sip-files0000vi.txt'
f28079900bdbaab57c753bc5a368d1d7
3d231477f51c7c3fd3775102c9dee2cb4a8747e4
'2011-12-31T13:38:58-05:00'
describe
'62855' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIH' 'sip-files0000vii.jp2'
3e1ac9435dffdc3866196826260679af
f6e22a8e634531d2c173870e3520ca1a0d7c0cf2
'2011-12-31T13:35:02-05:00'
describe
'43492' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADII' 'sip-files0000vii.jpg'
5e4e32b31f1f6d1f071dc2df47496c11
fe6e5ddb4651d7dd8a9308af75687b6d4243abe8
'2011-12-31T13:40:45-05:00'
describe
'12157' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIJ' 'sip-files0000vii.pro'
f3b706fa198f5ca95549edc7cd204923
38f32a562460e01fa48526a5c14124c899edaf9b
'2011-12-31T13:36:52-05:00'
describe
'23182' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIK' 'sip-files0000vii.QC.jpg'
409fac7b6026e80562bad3fd5b5892b2
8ee46d1f713d39db6704a3e67156ae17f62b07a8
'2011-12-31T13:38:30-05:00'
describe
'512820' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIL' 'sip-files0000vii.tif'
47f73d3b5b82400e2fa6f7ab5d9a191f
835b00dff0ade108ea052257b0033c48319f603c
'2011-12-31T13:37:34-05:00'
describe
'526' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIM' 'sip-files0000vii.txt'
18b98d4090e1ee55bf68697c8d2242d6
facefec75cbe21c6f709d7c427be103cf2505534
'2011-12-31T13:40:04-05:00'
describe
'62859' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIN' 'sip-files0000viii.jp2'
92015e2a55f796ef6f8988c516fedbfc
8e2c3bcf4ea932f238cab236a07d88ff46d8d04a
'2011-12-31T13:38:45-05:00'
describe
'46934' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIO' 'sip-files0000viii.jpg'
b03d48e81e9c1252d5a197c35bbdca79
6251726362926e93499c90856af80b9868f56ac9
'2011-12-31T13:40:44-05:00'
describe
'13987' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIP' 'sip-files0000viii.pro'
7c9f889fbeeadb58266f2d56ca2e3417
389540d5085a7897ba27b82dc3fb94ea2352dcf4
'2011-12-31T13:39:20-05:00'
describe
'25335' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIQ' 'sip-files0000viii.QC.jpg'
c1ac7321ffff79f448939dbaa4a7ecc0
14596843c2e9d6c63a16933180ed8971cde1d8a6
'2011-12-31T13:40:58-05:00'
describe
'512940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIR' 'sip-files0000viii.tif'
6ab0b6111cbf52f815b3c8bc0940121a
143734edb165c0ffc637414dd3ed4c1c0c3c2353
'2011-12-31T13:35:00-05:00'
describe
'617' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIS' 'sip-files0000viii.txt'
aea1a6c5393959d2af5f792c1bacbb3a
0571b66abd9c20cc9cf65124539fb3589aef1832
describe
'14439' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIT' 'sip-files0000viiithm.jpg'
63cce6b64d9d03fac8c00db9889dada8
af2014c5f370b52d4ba94535e9c22f2a4e2c26ae
'2011-12-31T13:37:09-05:00'
describe
'13948' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIU' 'sip-files0000viithm.jpg'
e072050c8f71f2bf5a73bc643cb28b20
a35fd1da8ae76dda8197dc96a18e8846fc490c7f
'2011-12-31T13:39:32-05:00'
describe
'13467' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIV' 'sip-files0000vithm.jpg'
b56f8b10dbbdea49c404634678419063
e9f1ae644510f847606d0eab5142e15e50241bda
'2011-12-31T13:40:26-05:00'
describe
'18913' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIW' 'sip-files0000vthm.jpg'
14d16dfa0a6b7e1b50c62149d3a09b45
afdd7625f50558cbdaf972d0cd7da82ab31b3a5a
describe
'33848' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIX' 'sip-files0000x.jp2'
dbeb4259c76021fc1cd95d62e9d17f3d
3bc9f8f561cc242bc1e9c2b010c71575b653b806
'2011-12-31T13:37:37-05:00'
describe
'27348' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIY' 'sip-files0000x.jpg'
0383f452c66edcd948e91ee5516ce687
7a20c33259ceb0f235c455bf424547e5a4771777
'2011-12-31T13:36:39-05:00'
describe
'5567' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADIZ' 'sip-files0000x.pro'
6547a8f5bcf0491118c2a46a2dfc250f
f4d7a9e75857b33be41b3496eb8d29f959cbf272
'2011-12-31T13:41:15-05:00'
describe
'16721' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJA' 'sip-files0000x.QC.jpg'
005a6c51aeefde23651a79abd7dc38d0
b6dbeb0ec3eb8791c2cecd23c783141ccd319bdd
'2011-12-31T13:36:20-05:00'
describe
'511620' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJB' 'sip-files0000x.tif'
fb8da65b27d30e522afba970a83e4990
b30d7642f0235989bbe8d231429f00cf809e4637
'2011-12-31T13:34:57-05:00'
describe
'268' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJC' 'sip-files0000x.txt'
ba23234d5b24da8d4ceb9bcca90b2d6e
cb44d578e6b84ecc42ed7d5cccae74d591f9b6cf
'2011-12-31T13:39:59-05:00'
describe
'11270' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJD' 'sip-files0000xthm.jpg'
78284853bac47171a5341806bca154ce
9957ebccdc250db58acdd4a2a9ab186ec20185f6
'2011-12-31T13:35:40-05:00'
describe
'62866' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJE' 'sip-files0011.jp2'
7758fc881074cfeac363769ed2102174
e29d3d296387da4e10be475465a2c9372175d371
'2011-12-31T13:35:26-05:00'
describe
'86734' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJF' 'sip-files0011.jpg'
dc0524ff53fc9d02aa77a31787cbf339
a6f1172c6aa047e8f3d28f8d9c2ed8b034c2a5c9
'2011-12-31T13:35:19-05:00'
describe
'18666' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJG' 'sip-files0011.pro'
29d18fbc78aedbfc866b7e2a44be39e7
0397946d3512a4842d539eb3d8cab867443ed37d
describe
'39091' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJH' 'sip-files0011.QC.jpg'
d0c7189fbd3e888d658f5c2eb333adff
89aaffdd8637b0c79824011a563984c6a8fb71f7
'2011-12-31T13:38:32-05:00'
describe
'515248' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJI' 'sip-files0011.tif'
a174035c6b87ea83f2d6fa5f68552786
3fea40aecc19dd1c2b4e6877cc4a842993fb905f
'2011-12-31T13:37:30-05:00'
describe
'797' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJJ' 'sip-files0011.txt'
6707040cd6792e07bc5bca1ce422ed76
6e1f8011139b6000b0af69295b1d28d4e8a5e331
'2011-12-31T13:37:13-05:00'
describe
'19468' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJK' 'sip-files0011thm.jpg'
8995d0a639fa86761d041f50aedef013
800becbcb307fa8ffe368bb4816737cb6eaf15c5
'2011-12-31T13:39:38-05:00'
describe
'62789' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJL' 'sip-files0012.jp2'
e3a6e962cc7e40e89b0c96fe0c898467
cc769e1017373fb49b747b4930af55e68b3ee688
'2011-12-31T13:40:14-05:00'
describe
'128959' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJM' 'sip-files0012.jpg'
4548180b7a82afcc3d5950a766cfff41
0668224c7953ff28c3c0413f56be7f6477829894
'2011-12-31T13:35:13-05:00'
describe
'30507' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJN' 'sip-files0012.pro'
40e330a0c28463013529bae07d5403a5
b06a3d04b8829ee681670c8899aff393f54f8f18
'2011-12-31T13:36:23-05:00'
describe
'53584' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJO' 'sip-files0012.QC.jpg'
1376752877c8cb5ba239d802505a686c
e85fecb39051fcbb91b3655ce7c123f6936203eb
'2011-12-31T13:35:20-05:00'
describe
'517072' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJP' 'sip-files0012.tif'
dc5096cb704e364420f6c80fffd887aa
d936762868c3e32abf6d941c0e9c87cb33044920
'2011-12-31T13:37:27-05:00'
describe
'1205' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJQ' 'sip-files0012.txt'
c85d3807d1aee5d631a53c20eb27cfa3
23659d1660345ac2daad0329976d2db56b869a50
'2011-12-31T13:40:09-05:00'
describe
'23636' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJR' 'sip-files0012thm.jpg'
0b2e296162a77861b3c4aee127ca133d
fed97bb2a38a1b004d21ccc5fc8665da066e3f64
'2011-12-31T13:41:30-05:00'
describe
'62837' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJS' 'sip-files0013.jp2'
5196aa81f29bccf359a2cf76238fe2f9
1a449280e9871c39599725296aeca029e15024ce
'2011-12-31T13:39:11-05:00'
describe
'134294' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJT' 'sip-files0013.jpg'
c5e39a17f850158e26bbd36d27ea5a71
9b42fb7dab7c3697350ce29a9e4ab6a935eed8aa
'2011-12-31T13:38:11-05:00'
describe
'32806' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJU' 'sip-files0013.pro'
6f51f0d88503ae06957dc944d4c3c453
9393200fa0538ad2e2cf4709cbe85c7dad55279c
'2011-12-31T13:41:37-05:00'
describe
'55005' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJV' 'sip-files0013.QC.jpg'
cd50eceae9131155d8f10f89bb58bbea
0ac768ad44c5993c9d5a925895516d84c27ec195
describe
'517252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJW' 'sip-files0013.tif'
af9954e6667e8b2b929f9540f13e9116
7b800eeb1a7ead39758709c1bc6f60b9488cb471
'2011-12-31T13:37:32-05:00'
describe
'1315' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJX' 'sip-files0013.txt'
65a2d78cc6995ba76a346be6aa4e6c6f
dd4fd488fa8dfbdaeb3fd705d962292f14dffd6a
'2011-12-31T13:37:31-05:00'
describe
'24408' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJY' 'sip-files0013thm.jpg'
8aeaedb6fbfb6ca588754968087256e3
6f2017a3961c7648b15acde3891de925ca8d8a0f
'2011-12-31T13:39:29-05:00'
describe
'62788' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADJZ' 'sip-files0014.jp2'
72f4b03eaf200b1e402854be0d0ffd76
0868e55d3910b9abf9276d034687b961ff54a1d7
'2011-12-31T13:38:47-05:00'
describe
'133261' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKA' 'sip-files0014.jpg'
3bd562d8a9364a2f7c6c56b4c166f93d
117a6bd9da820cdd0d9c89a69f5c829827158941
'2011-12-31T13:37:05-05:00'
describe
'32719' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKB' 'sip-files0014.pro'
5915c0e1b08eeb14da6caac7d9d0035e
e591392ba7fcd5477256353dae82e1e5c171cd37
describe
'54974' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKC' 'sip-files0014.QC.jpg'
f00d76748358aa0e5864ece919fbc541
960c85f4ed3091dc0f29bac3d8a2611c41f51bd8
'2011-12-31T13:36:31-05:00'
describe
'517220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKD' 'sip-files0014.tif'
d5b33747ee71717b03ca5a6387a0950c
368bdd0e3d3f22b7d0dc17ebbdafe423d1ca86f9
'2011-12-31T13:34:48-05:00'
describe
'1299' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKE' 'sip-files0014.txt'
8cd58f3b975c385984b317b49d5d2a78
f93ab637c12db4547bca7b4b4a429cb5e0a3883b
'2011-12-31T13:40:33-05:00'
describe
'24233' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKF' 'sip-files0014thm.jpg'
1be095997edca34d0bd1d19d03f1ed06
743c3b751a7450ff5f6ba4cd8ecd936f1381cc8d
'2011-12-31T13:35:23-05:00'
describe
'62759' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKG' 'sip-files0015.jp2'
fcacd56335b07bacd90ae1cab779e1f2
b1ef8ddb132d58d16257c18eb25a51053d72052c
'2011-12-31T13:37:45-05:00'
describe
'129564' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKH' 'sip-files0015.jpg'
416d6767d818a54d701e6423bf9a6646
d5b37423d6019b4bd0ee7eb6999b079a0d0140ac
describe
'31525' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKI' 'sip-files0015.pro'
34ed6384c3f222c0ef582953897337d3
65f3f4b8781afc9aba17a50b48a04eec42441703
'2011-12-31T13:35:21-05:00'
describe
'53508' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKJ' 'sip-files0015.QC.jpg'
7dd98155e1850ec24cb6650f9f7d5c6f
21b6cb57e28ca094731c0d00fa44d4b2809a22c3
'2011-12-31T13:41:28-05:00'
describe
'517216' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKK' 'sip-files0015.tif'
c6e578c0547fda27cb39f25262c9de3a
295acc91e12f572577f1bcec2bf84c7d91d15d2e
'2011-12-31T13:35:37-05:00'
describe
'1256' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKL' 'sip-files0015.txt'
1dddc87f4dfbd3f93769f328a278ccf7
96e226d4cfc56cc3ae5738a4bf96ae8ecb455c3f
'2011-12-31T13:37:46-05:00'
describe
'24200' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKM' 'sip-files0015thm.jpg'
91c3d0df365b12dfe3ee1fdf1931c8bc
645980f71c4ab8e12e52fb1d0e15196a73de2303
'2011-12-31T13:35:48-05:00'
describe
'62850' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKN' 'sip-files0016.jp2'
256fd34be8a5885d986f131395614a24
fb90784aa446b27f0c6f051eb736318d68201e3c
describe
'119791' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKO' 'sip-files0016.jpg'
9001bf87af540c56a4afa11098432ddb
6928e9839ead19fb04830bfba7f91cc23f994919
describe
'28547' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKP' 'sip-files0016.pro'
03c07941a6c33c06d0904f80fee70711
929d5f30b66bf3e6536905eef232657195c9c8dc
'2011-12-31T13:39:51-05:00'
describe
'50921' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKQ' 'sip-files0016.QC.jpg'
b7070e28b46ea2fe57f60cd6e8709e1a
fc805809fcd96c0bc107f4c0d163b23f40d21b94
describe
'516964' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKR' 'sip-files0016.tif'
19272719a1feaea6e78a33a0a66d6f90
003cb0d571261708d1962a1dae518f0e365b185e
'2011-12-31T13:41:32-05:00'
describe
'1143' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKS' 'sip-files0016.txt'
06460e6a9c6191a77c4bf9ba0387c6b8
cb1c2a2cc0a3062b812a47961cfa09785ab0312c
'2011-12-31T13:37:51-05:00'
describe
'23640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKT' 'sip-files0016thm.jpg'
e47688abbbe89faee25246a80d961df0
92ea58490d780df7d35f54e462d55583cd21673c
'2011-12-31T13:40:12-05:00'
describe
'62871' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKU' 'sip-files0017.jp2'
597b82c7f2935257e0b4410769f79efe
ef810e97bd7bc1fec2b76f9b8bc0394a48173a24
'2011-12-31T13:35:05-05:00'
describe
'125595' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKV' 'sip-files0017.jpg'
6de991c3bd908607e7c1e38328cb6b5c
f7cf2eb4413811af34af69d8dbbf9ba6f22b8a10
'2011-12-31T13:40:29-05:00'
describe
'29781' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKW' 'sip-files0017.pro'
38d3f0cada8f4258ce00c3bcf8b64da2
71c7884c67719f9fb5601c1e5e9422c8f3a57ed7
'2011-12-31T13:35:44-05:00'
describe
'51907' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKX' 'sip-files0017.QC.jpg'
baad4474eea14f1fb4d6057852a6fdfb
dd6738bb712a93eb0111a6d2dbd503ce4cd354d4
'2011-12-31T13:39:40-05:00'
describe
'516764' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKY' 'sip-files0017.tif'
40780bf0b08b16b99aebd6374ff6d1fc
4d5ec0f5e36c67724898ee861305dead4094c686
'2011-12-31T13:37:07-05:00'
describe
'1211' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADKZ' 'sip-files0017.txt'
af2c0cefca3479db305a57834253c0ab
0bc5f072f013416f0f5e5eae6f711f34f54c0df6
'2011-12-31T13:41:35-05:00'
describe
'23071' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLA' 'sip-files0017thm.jpg'
8d062cf80f39925826bea1d50cd7bb8c
a6438f6cd7b32f4ea4cd77c26ab798b1dfe39ddc
'2011-12-31T13:35:53-05:00'
describe
'62771' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLB' 'sip-files0018.jp2'
a978ca56a80a19a8f5c38c7b47f3dc21
c70be649a416bea38ad1ff961d3e7b1035e68ecb
'2011-12-31T13:37:39-05:00'
describe
'136734' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLC' 'sip-files0018.jpg'
b592ed7476990a10b6c2e5a4d34ea49d
2f4a308b1752c50ae84ce7153efb811be655e75a
'2011-12-31T13:38:20-05:00'
describe
'32976' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLD' 'sip-files0018.pro'
92a5b27edf32a7b63419475397116ce1
582a99afea608a26d69d69d0aa87cc74216e0ba7
'2011-12-31T13:37:21-05:00'
describe
'55641' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLE' 'sip-files0018.QC.jpg'
7e8d7d3144c34a513f6b934b0da373a9
04bd12ebf2384f42d8743961b6d8ca9c4dc6f6af
describe
'517236' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLF' 'sip-files0018.tif'
c0eed56bca6941857fdad90ca369f1e9
f1127b71c80c0011777a1239f4eeae683cf827f3
describe
'1296' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLG' 'sip-files0018.txt'
e0afefb6336b4fba770c1f73529c1998
e0dd521e341c89a83b75fed657750997b7950c80
'2011-12-31T13:40:15-05:00'
describe
'23978' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLH' 'sip-files0018thm.jpg'
78d0e514a74a6e286ea0d4c5b228f183
ff137ab4b4a39d19b91cb03c14d1372b1675e27b
'2011-12-31T13:35:28-05:00'
describe
'62860' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLI' 'sip-files0019.jp2'
f228ed940ad9eddfad447d68c6eaacc0
0d94bc2a378bd01f3fbb23663b51b71abaa2bc4b
'2011-12-31T13:35:11-05:00'
describe
'127063' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLJ' 'sip-files0019.jpg'
9ef7d16b9e03c4921da2886a2335f8b6
f23933384df579e477840d5fa136f9f8d0b817de
'2011-12-31T13:34:59-05:00'
describe
'30849' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLK' 'sip-files0019.pro'
1186efaf0b99dda82b8190dd3f82d361
6cd95b329b38fb186be308e4978579ca4ab8154f
'2011-12-31T13:40:03-05:00'
describe
'52701' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLL' 'sip-files0019.QC.jpg'
8bdc50fe1f613329db222a0f7b506a1c
691e28cccd9c779174521e2e118ec2896967a653
'2011-12-31T13:37:29-05:00'
describe
'516992' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLM' 'sip-files0019.tif'
eed69a3eef496056805869fc05df8287
4856fc75707cd002edb606761b1b6b39bb808f2e
'2011-12-31T13:38:48-05:00'
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLN' 'sip-files0019.txt'
27edb4081452da46fdacac75a53ccb76
0a022285b5b77494a9624f5d2fb8cb30d28e32ec
'2011-12-31T13:37:28-05:00'
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'23741' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLO' 'sip-files0019thm.jpg'
0654767698dea18e783f3e8b4c5cc3ed
28a440161294516f293003f4530c84e42844b842
describe
'62832' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLP' 'sip-files0020.jp2'
0a7835e5c7f24e01ce6f5b33373a01e1
a44b591d628b3d486f667fc6b3efb16391f3aa96
'2011-12-31T13:34:51-05:00'
describe
'121632' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLQ' 'sip-files0020.jpg'
1a38d9bc411be03600a7470fa46f5aa4
34b0e46bd139227e8ab269ba46e4aabb6f0a82b2
'2011-12-31T13:35:08-05:00'
describe
'28069' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLR' 'sip-files0020.pro'
4677111421ccb4f7e798b3e67bff8760
929ce6f97b9de78eeffb018a2a6a4d05ab5b4787
'2011-12-31T13:40:00-05:00'
describe
'50824' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLS' 'sip-files0020.QC.jpg'
8b7624fa1d2b5c0537a3607c88f10d63
b1301ab7d5df98d3f1d9bcd0fbfaf99773ab3e8a
'2011-12-31T13:40:43-05:00'
describe
'516808' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLT' 'sip-files0020.tif'
ee9180b35b2ea99a8c670b072cb44c4c
3ef0a420ea32866388cbea498351726ccaac8a5e
'2011-12-31T13:40:01-05:00'
describe
'1116' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLU' 'sip-files0020.txt'
97b2bce55e9080b8a413f547471750cb
c10a10e33dc0b589c1b307d2c6e2dea356292a41
describe
'23331' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLV' 'sip-files0020thm.jpg'
eff2ea21b4fe45cfd2a905ed9052c264
91714c3bd4d9b35e6d5ee39f5d89783b0e0ee239
'2011-12-31T13:40:10-05:00'
describe
'62778' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLW' 'sip-files0021.jp2'
8b7060fd323ad86de4e9456f822d7d40
b5757dd54e807114c8e593b5415adf6df80c17c5
'2011-12-31T13:39:15-05:00'
describe
'118295' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLX' 'sip-files0021.jpg'
dc9687de3d87846d33bfeab904f87215
6895f87468ad27f1fcbd854b43a1b69fc04acb31
'2011-12-31T13:40:40-05:00'
describe
'27764' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLY' 'sip-files0021.pro'
b78536569198d752058f229a3c201be3
c9b17e851e86d64dc59007929df3eda760da2b7a
'2011-12-31T13:36:13-05:00'
describe
'50425' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADLZ' 'sip-files0021.QC.jpg'
ad9dc0f2da7dd60c167f6a6aa9a6b16b
68525a620f38b8b30f9978075fccfd6cfbd1f12a
'2011-12-31T13:38:50-05:00'
describe
'516620' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMA' 'sip-files0021.tif'
19c56f46cdd8f50da0fa6bac8166ca85
ecd2c160a5d8c98c8598f52f5588c9035dccf8ca
'2011-12-31T13:39:05-05:00'
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMB' 'sip-files0021.txt'
cb58abf36bb03bba474838522862fe33
2d99f1dd83b5059b7c1f437b51810f8bd1d25789
describe
'23171' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMC' 'sip-files0021thm.jpg'
878f8601c5f4c113cb86a294ad6cf48d
f6c4f62ef2e13917a6f78191a6441c47368ae940
'2011-12-31T13:40:08-05:00'
describe
'62749' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMD' 'sip-files0022.jp2'
f034b652819604e3f05c37c51ef9e368
8f926a10a2562ce9b95c5ce71066493d976d4174
'2011-12-31T13:40:20-05:00'
describe
'121891' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADME' 'sip-files0022.jpg'
9de7c939a21d11d8fe0dfe32064c068c
66f53e76c8c158d02192d81e1610a9ff3333acfe
describe
'11625' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMF' 'sip-files0022.pro'
a28cc770fcbf104365207638b50eddf0
82aadfbcae05d5f0978d7fcc816606d393025d60
'2011-12-31T13:36:27-05:00'
describe
'47384' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMG' 'sip-files0022.QC.jpg'
a30f750eec9ad7349627ef0bcd10a2f6
364ca29380cd384a7fbbdb2fa79932160def3f9a
'2011-12-31T13:37:35-05:00'
describe
'516736' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMH' 'sip-files0022.tif'
91b4dec1dcd1ed8c3ca5fad963b7807c
9729cdb5a3e2d0f5e2d7c17fb51d3730e3a75351
describe
'471' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMI' 'sip-files0022.txt'
4a52a9c7de6e3216309544e5b5f57db0
70b87d7294bc5dd3687f5625984905c0a592ebe0
'2011-12-31T13:41:09-05:00'
describe
'22954' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMJ' 'sip-files0022thm.jpg'
07f6e3567786206ac775c955f7944d08
f0a86d76df8b0387da300c392808097b1704a2ce
'2011-12-31T13:37:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMK' 'sip-files0023.jp2'
98d096bfea456dc63763fa0967c6e363
92dffc9fa94e7eb8188d5831346fd488561e568f
'2011-12-31T13:35:30-05:00'
describe
'123906' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADML' 'sip-files0023.jpg'
9220bebd180ca6f1528d27c2a712a022
e4b98f5ca9866c9be59d2716518a47dac207b862
'2011-12-31T13:36:38-05:00'
describe
'28702' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMM' 'sip-files0023.pro'
41b3783f4899beddc5fd0ce24975a327
51105ff8b984cb98c03dfb8eca6b24205387a393
'2011-12-31T13:40:55-05:00'
describe
'51834' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMN' 'sip-files0023.QC.jpg'
b936ac83599c24f5799ce5e320270b4e
afed3a0705dc4b0ae50eb8502c93d39f7f144d6d
'2011-12-31T13:36:12-05:00'
describe
'517052' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMO' 'sip-files0023.tif'
5ec5d7d9bba84dcf8164a20cf12e5f83
f8c4abe8dd9956cdccab227db8e8d998c4585b69
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMP' 'sip-files0023.txt'
e297cc3a5226335766d638b2df83622d
a2c055184b5160917a5a8c2f3c3cf7d4adf578ae
'2011-12-31T13:37:48-05:00'
describe
'23677' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMQ' 'sip-files0023thm.jpg'
24686c7caa4d73b5a89f5419b27546a9
398774e431e6043ec44821aaa1e6fd572a6ddcaf
describe
'62773' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMR' 'sip-files0024.jp2'
43bbb9500397a1228eedadff4139396f
ebf1d2cb5953572c0047310f5cb0359647f18410
describe
'132833' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMS' 'sip-files0024.jpg'
1569f9a903425127cf18bda8d8b3e5c5
132117023257e0dc2365622dbfbe245b14080aaa
'2011-12-31T13:38:59-05:00'
describe
'31378' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMT' 'sip-files0024.pro'
6efc6a2f84ae8c917c3f3428d8fa2901
0e0f29a572fe51a7484eabaa201909b47cfcc946
'2011-12-31T13:37:57-05:00'
describe
'54473' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMU' 'sip-files0024.QC.jpg'
d1a42184780c71d941c74191a05ecdd2
5d31860e047a21d71328b00e96536e4dc915e390
describe
'517008' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMV' 'sip-files0024.tif'
0b44be0298fbd155dff18afc745fddd0
e8644ae9021e633f36de5c707ca9298d52a3f8c5
'2011-12-31T13:38:27-05:00'
describe
'1242' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMW' 'sip-files0024.txt'
c1c01bdb07f69ad08c2d908d2094733f
5dc338a55b8a86e0e30596b43c1b50b137e3dff6
'2011-12-31T13:36:32-05:00'
describe
'23655' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMX' 'sip-files0024thm.jpg'
9335ba447001f2a553025d6447bbefce
78b2a974e3b46555641e01d5f59fd73a78bed8da
'2011-12-31T13:41:01-05:00'
describe
'62793' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMY' 'sip-files0025.jp2'
b9550f5bcf76625f427fe0f74b6f3d82
81d9116d6fdbb87827a39a5f315171d2f9097ce4
'2011-12-31T13:37:42-05:00'
describe
'119343' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADMZ' 'sip-files0025.jpg'
942fc8a8d03ac6ee265bd7bfe659f6f9
f9292461219586f2974f5aec0aa8bcf434f7aa26
'2011-12-31T13:39:27-05:00'
describe
'29040' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNA' 'sip-files0025.pro'
304ebc17df1d6e39d60ce781ee874888
eb6501b1414a79388af73893f4d58763db639262
'2011-12-31T13:39:08-05:00'
describe
'50243' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNB' 'sip-files0025.QC.jpg'
fb7b36042165fcc986e5f4b24c59aba9
b512bccce428fc0c9cde6a5c3ba666975425f5d9
'2011-12-31T13:38:57-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNC' 'sip-files0025.tif'
26b41ad76911008738f4f0c06310b390
82c89a01cc8702fdae5ec3f5d6d16527fcdb8160
'2011-12-31T13:41:13-05:00'
describe
'1157' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADND' 'sip-files0025.txt'
cf850feb9db9c1fe0f3ba8103270de9e
c2639f9008a8bedec5a0b4debe1483d4cdf78d52
'2011-12-31T13:37:41-05:00'
describe
'23151' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNE' 'sip-files0025thm.jpg'
804dcbb27177017dc0fe3dd6f91586dd
cfda5d5be4ba6962ec3f16560055eaaaeb14cf77
'2011-12-31T13:38:53-05:00'
describe
'62818' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNF' 'sip-files0026.jp2'
24363479dbeb167f57bafe91c7d8503d
eebee96f64d84ddb9e827a6ec7c48676b2fcb8b7
'2011-12-31T13:39:10-05:00'
describe
'123586' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNG' 'sip-files0026.jpg'
fdc82a22b19bc7fcae2918555ee391cc
905dbb5c935c1fe38f857d0baf85164fb1a2811f
'2011-12-31T13:40:47-05:00'
describe
'29262' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNH' 'sip-files0026.pro'
4c5b003e098310ed000e8a3e016a9954
cf861877624641e3dfccaba717176a7e59182956
'2011-12-31T13:39:14-05:00'
describe
'52444' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNI' 'sip-files0026.QC.jpg'
1c071e488baff6f35d4c2ace8f144ad2
f2b6aee07edcaf983630c2f7a8cf47e52b426503
'2011-12-31T13:41:05-05:00'
describe
'517120' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNJ' 'sip-files0026.tif'
7dea57494a7eaf6c1986bad8fa3cf96b
0ea7536782c6384a4e27689bf3dfe2dbc7e39805
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNK' 'sip-files0026.txt'
c4c86d0573b69264a3db0a7b33b9cd3b
486255c3bfb545544196566f28f4e88a76f762e0
'2011-12-31T13:39:26-05:00'
describe
'23732' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNL' 'sip-files0026thm.jpg'
0bb2a510859284a9e98f430cd5c82d2e
58ef347cc76503cc4226407cb7ba4a7cad921ecf
'2011-12-31T13:36:07-05:00'
describe
'51638' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNM' 'sip-files0027.jp2'
2804b62e78b6f4e429f3fe408f900c69
3b97f20dd0090fbcc0a74dcad21cb67c99e54a3f
describe
'39602' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNN' 'sip-files0027.jpg'
b7fbd194c5a49535477bcf70934ae4f7
5dcf46b0757b434b5bc57332299d488bb30897e3
describe
'7152' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNO' 'sip-files0027.pro'
bdf5100598c0fce5e8dcb5256164593c
bdf79683ac372bf33051a32ed8ea2f2fafde85a1
'2011-12-31T13:37:40-05:00'
describe
'20037' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNP' 'sip-files0027.QC.jpg'
9ff8c2d8b8b57a4c56f52dd17fb4e76d
d862cfad56f38c691e4b4fab31c370d4619d2f3c
'2011-12-31T13:38:51-05:00'
describe
'512068' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNQ' 'sip-files0027.tif'
6e14d9baadae0027ae78cb8bb195a447
c99ec3c170fd9df59b040696bb15c4ac495293e0
'2011-12-31T13:37:47-05:00'
describe
'308' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNR' 'sip-files0027.txt'
4ba4b3c5284c5e21eb6853d29e0fcee7
e47cedd8394c68cf7efe5a7a87f9df710d884ade
'2011-12-31T13:39:58-05:00'
describe
'12355' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNS' 'sip-files0027thm.jpg'
e14e234b9c0d0b79b67ec9b34f8d6c93
f62c8ea1a76e042da2d014eac693ccb97d96798a
describe
'62867' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNT' 'sip-files0028.jp2'
c6cb8a9eecc250a6933ac713a79b9bfa
0fd6437ad1203c5c5896119d60bc56834ff29dec
describe
'111008' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNU' 'sip-files0028.jpg'
6c80849f3916bf07ae1dedb45e78bcce
33cad0c042dad151efc6c4d631768a5b3507a6f9
'2011-12-31T13:37:52-05:00'
describe
'26745' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNV' 'sip-files0028.pro'
fc5e1b96b34663fc2fe15427434aec0a
91b5a621817e59ea2f509849d915034e3a4e6c5b
'2011-12-31T13:35:39-05:00'
describe
'47476' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNW' 'sip-files0028.QC.jpg'
d2193df1d8d5f23fbd26cfa544f52bb8
4e8972f1a5f2c632526ce5785ec9afdb98dd0d9d
'2011-12-31T13:40:32-05:00'
describe
'516260' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNX' 'sip-files0028.tif'
567e85177b19b2e41926919505078ef2
788a02886eac37ecd5810ff813d3acba7b6d46d6
'2011-12-31T13:36:28-05:00'
describe
'1097' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNY' 'sip-files0028.txt'
e7a5a79e93e72e5b51a329be8f670cc8
3bbec84ac386118dacccb35c8bd132f1730b4c5b
describe
'21687' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADNZ' 'sip-files0028thm.jpg'
ddce94f7ac20bca58e1f0d727ad69a8d
c5ad852ea665b2b6611458acc022a5770fe3f5f8
'2011-12-31T13:35:07-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOA' 'sip-files0029.jp2'
8110d5cb5770c00e3a1c2704746b847d
8eb945be31f347a475efa613231ef653bdf9ba81
'2011-12-31T13:36:40-05:00'
describe
'119921' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOB' 'sip-files0029.jpg'
74edb43933407b21441211cb2e9ef576
15ce7370b7b11f03b5595da9e5b34b24de09d291
'2011-12-31T13:41:22-05:00'
describe
'30015' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOC' 'sip-files0029.pro'
f2dc0340d6a879add14ff36aefbffc48
b3c03e694659eab15dba807c5255263d2b2881a6
'2011-12-31T13:40:18-05:00'
describe
'50992' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOD' 'sip-files0029.QC.jpg'
99739b699f0f8113c7ac37b155a927d6
41b7d4b848f44368202d26ea9b58f987a7011a39
'2011-12-31T13:34:55-05:00'
describe
'516768' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOE' 'sip-files0029.tif'
1ad319f3f010e7c2928300768703c95d
0b87b5c6982c811b4eb9d1a3e05c98e50f619580
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOF' 'sip-files0029.txt'
a28a1c7ec6bd9f8129030f43ba239878
1bb589cb96a044457412b5ee0034f0bff7a041cf
'2011-12-31T13:38:00-05:00'
describe
'22932' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOG' 'sip-files0029thm.jpg'
4aadf5f6206b3e8ef65aaf97e7f74925
186e551026872b4bda05b0298414b90fb241af62
'2011-12-31T13:40:48-05:00'
describe
'62854' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOH' 'sip-files0030.jp2'
cb0efce168682f4b9c908af15576b9e2
7b275261f29f637f29d044bce3048a517e01e772
'2011-12-31T13:39:48-05:00'
describe
'137509' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOI' 'sip-files0030.jpg'
a44861501defb446a7943005c106b5ae
5ce173590fac2f49e38c2647838b2c1156012455
'2011-12-31T13:36:02-05:00'
describe
'33042' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOJ' 'sip-files0030.pro'
b5f398f720399f148a6b1a00ef1f41d3
1b8e58d59024a314aee4e720513bdc24018d99bc
'2011-12-31T13:35:25-05:00'
describe
'56030' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOK' 'sip-files0030.QC.jpg'
ac2e3d758eb9dce390bbf40501b675d2
1a8ad40cc9382b0ebae0f522e5a7632e064b81d7
'2011-12-31T13:39:53-05:00'
describe
'517280' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOL' 'sip-files0030.tif'
361bb35ba6b1b4d24264e87f2b1b9ad6
c83bbf66ef8bac1317620b41e62df5ae224613bc
describe
'1300' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOM' 'sip-files0030.txt'
8522f96b88311c1e36421d4b44febe96
5cfac44c951a4c8a57b0b925c3f8894915a453e0
describe
'24176' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADON' 'sip-files0030thm.jpg'
3c728ebafc8d6eae35d0be9ed5fd5e76
a4461660f6db2bfac006e0797528f9296d40a7ea
'2011-12-31T13:36:51-05:00'
describe
'62762' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOO' 'sip-files0031.jp2'
57580e5bd86a1377ffd14a6e2d44a4ff
31e8f5ecd2d2da3bb19afc0d7fa83d8cd3598b37
'2011-12-31T13:40:06-05:00'
describe
'132615' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOP' 'sip-files0031.jpg'
1a15fbac888a420a13fd036a8ff21f33
50596c4c1d9241fc1ad9fc34f97c2cdaacdaf7c1
describe
'32723' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOQ' 'sip-files0031.pro'
7636db2930492a72104a740dac19eb45
79341aa43267e2b3e7b00e76e5cdb8f869631379
'2011-12-31T13:41:08-05:00'
describe
'54480' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOR' 'sip-files0031.QC.jpg'
58369b5a12b96af8c1898d5fb13b3296
c25ea788651b5a2faf7774612401c2dde8be7879
'2011-12-31T13:40:37-05:00'
describe
'517112' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOS' 'sip-files0031.tif'
96485ce4c11d3c7dfbe0a2859964aab6
c6f45f79f86be14b2eb22ac994af29864c664c2c
'2011-12-31T13:37:02-05:00'
describe
'1292' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOT' 'sip-files0031.txt'
8fff0b6db69a5603c6fed7652432c163
b411bbbe71494a2681d86756c47146f4f08d4482
'2011-12-31T13:35:51-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'23698' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOU' 'sip-files0031thm.jpg'
10007056e189ffc51cf9777333eb9da2
bf599c479730a17d5f64108dd0f73c607db97f61
'2011-12-31T13:38:44-05:00'
describe
'62868' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOV' 'sip-files0032.jp2'
f968766335c70911b9c36e410d10ce79
5ce570332431ad538c9d429d16b768af62eca7a8
'2011-12-31T13:34:50-05:00'
describe
'133908' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOW' 'sip-files0032.jpg'
47f88ec49b65eaa0325a39adc9a3234b
d211a63251a27d47873c7ea990f072b965a772d1
'2011-12-31T13:41:00-05:00'
describe
'34186' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOX' 'sip-files0032.pro'
53af3cdc429dc5a728fb5d9c6e95c240
6343c84f80a0499d1accb17eb97396bab793c0c8
'2011-12-31T13:40:31-05:00'
describe
'54357' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOY' 'sip-files0032.QC.jpg'
78ed6a0ebfefa1757a71ee71ad223693
94140fc42020f73d4abe0b304611c602441f5680
describe
'517080' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADOZ' 'sip-files0032.tif'
695e6ef43a6d45b9e8ab5400b3685cc5
0e24124cb68c5f76290fc25f25afc0371dfb7361
'2011-12-31T13:39:31-05:00'
describe
'1346' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPA' 'sip-files0032.txt'
8c78de5f00e3b2d5e2aac871fb89884c
af4e7499ca7b66c3b6816eeed143177dc7bfbd32
'2011-12-31T13:38:05-05:00'
describe
'23761' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPB' 'sip-files0032thm.jpg'
b990a70bd64a08703f0906cf5665d536
06ca40c78f15e32f2e91815b02c8d6fef2435515
describe
'62816' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPC' 'sip-files0033.jp2'
b5b1c6c999aad3bb0a702ec73168c4ca
74bd8e7add8dff1176ecaf4835237c4537523916
'2011-12-31T13:38:16-05:00'
describe
'133094' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPD' 'sip-files0033.jpg'
2e5ad3196db247adf5445728c8bc7cbb
7267d1cab3e748d6cc1d81726662ae6e23abed1e
'2011-12-31T13:37:17-05:00'
describe
'34326' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPE' 'sip-files0033.pro'
98036bf5f3e7696af77ccf6f5b986196
dd478317342b0489d01e620b3b084ffd218c71d5
describe
'53980' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPF' 'sip-files0033.QC.jpg'
8eec84a1ec7f34180ce99318732a4d68
066daf52103e74440eb9e8788cdf54c6d2cf132b
'2011-12-31T13:35:45-05:00'
describe
'516924' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPG' 'sip-files0033.tif'
8e9be218f4202e2827ddc94756be6c18
fcf6789fd62a7778d5ca28d2050ed1da4f458ecd
'2011-12-31T13:35:29-05:00'
describe
'1365' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPH' 'sip-files0033.txt'
50ae4de47de3d76a26138f5bcae770cb
c317c53df8441d95ec70da90bc591308b60901cd
'2011-12-31T13:40:02-05:00'
describe
'23308' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPI' 'sip-files0033thm.jpg'
700d802086dff43aaa460fa0ab7dfab1
a0d6956c61c99c07a5689c02fff50f4f87590d21
'2011-12-31T13:38:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPJ' 'sip-files0034.jp2'
5230febb9b8852be6deee8914521b3a0
be4e20da02d942fa58ef9cc19faffcdd8d239586
'2011-12-31T13:38:34-05:00'
describe
'129728' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPK' 'sip-files0034.jpg'
61bdb17da40d57b28b2be356e74dedbc
25a92bc3e2946f13336a59bfc8df5ee6c303c3b8
describe
'33023' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPL' 'sip-files0034.pro'
fdc2e0878280656188960a8b1d5f25eb
0a2a43f6466c907ae351116a4a44ba6217a368a1
'2011-12-31T13:35:22-05:00'
describe
'52935' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPM' 'sip-files0034.QC.jpg'
df623eca56a39fdfcfd5fb1d3f611834
59d5547efdbe5a9f9970dd569e092f161de2eb3c
describe
'516708' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPN' 'sip-files0034.tif'
817e2ab7f868f1022aa718a409f73670
084be5147fb2c52ba6d189518527d2dca28b839d
'2011-12-31T13:38:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPO' 'sip-files0034.txt'
4b2ca8f03f058f12e67dcd765efa522e
acf031ea094a10e9c9c8d1fcd004f4be59e0f9b7
'2011-12-31T13:35:17-05:00'
describe
'23160' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPP' 'sip-files0034thm.jpg'
05978925f6180e26af360cfc1c95a552
f61d34513df2ef7672d8234e804839b16f546814
'2011-12-31T13:35:35-05:00'
describe
'62821' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPQ' 'sip-files0035.jp2'
a89b1e9977c36dbab83bab5ddcf60ef4
7574cd7788947300406fc857724d8e2f60e7d8a5
'2011-12-31T13:38:02-05:00'
describe
'132419' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPR' 'sip-files0035.jpg'
d7370849afb00eb7144824f393b82904
d612cbeda8110d9b931b6dae51da41e611ed5958
'2011-12-31T13:39:07-05:00'
describe
'34522' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPS' 'sip-files0035.pro'
7bfc450a7c0f19c8f10db8fcdbd0d502
54919fde067e6d7d85a0438d91c550b41be83d48
'2011-12-31T13:38:26-05:00'
describe
'54610' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPT' 'sip-files0035.QC.jpg'
d96f4b8966e3625dda7f0261776f8f43
c657b60dbbd1f702a7ae0858254df388975aadcb
describe
'516720' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPU' 'sip-files0035.tif'
fcbc4e2c83d9a67c3bfebfb02f189fe3
f8bc690d026515c4fcee0c86329c0e7504f724b8
describe
'1382' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPV' 'sip-files0035.txt'
34efe560ea5675fc5785ed97c52bb16c
883d73f33d33e12391f974b5e94c194473762a40
'2011-12-31T13:38:07-05:00'
describe
'23121' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPW' 'sip-files0035thm.jpg'
f76320923cf14acc846fb7743f0ff896
f62e6c6837500097d73849cc709b099641b78337
'2011-12-31T13:36:57-05:00'
describe
'62838' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPX' 'sip-files0036.jp2'
8c9dad4231c21e10993fea67e83fe4dc
c5b57a02dd436d606b96162948a5f972f59b7df7
'2011-12-31T13:40:56-05:00'
describe
'127042' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPY' 'sip-files0036.jpg'
6c6b15341ef1f275ac32a90a34579ad0
32b112e773f2863073e4736c963040e93a1d5dd2
describe
'32529' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADPZ' 'sip-files0036.pro'
d17c8d39421db7445b75229353a0b344
d79ba8ad47094d1276e24051bc4107b820f02de6
'2011-12-31T13:37:50-05:00'
describe
'51455' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQA' 'sip-files0036.QC.jpg'
3a2943dd793ede2745ada586e962da84
3335e498a2ef22c37c43ebf69ff49e8d14eadaf7
'2011-12-31T13:39:09-05:00'
describe
'516544' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQB' 'sip-files0036.tif'
b20dfa07897d5bdb87a2fd3bdcf5b125
4fa2f50d0f2bf657e8cfe893496ee74ec49269b7
'2011-12-31T13:35:32-05:00'
describe
'1297' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQC' 'sip-files0036.txt'
e1a182dc3e072ef591987205317a2ca9
c80f3addc8ab9db85f423cb133e6df1b6fa74976
'2011-12-31T13:36:45-05:00'
describe
'22562' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQD' 'sip-files0036thm.jpg'
f660305f6591ba554a2103cdec9ad859
76b3d0e45dec20f14e104b61f0b4ce2cc2aa742e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQE' 'sip-files0037.jp2'
ec16e4391de6f6f11e07fab15cc7b6a8
3dbbad2fc74e7eb4e6f23dcf600c2f915b9250d6
describe
'128207' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQF' 'sip-files0037.jpg'
b6bc89241d38d8784fcd8f54e35c1cd4
d79ce9ddc046c6de580d42ed864f9b2428491f0f
describe
'31850' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQG' 'sip-files0037.pro'
cbf7f89e49d55cd6173f9618a55f96ab
0350d69118be77a53a26be3ff5ede0e12f347fc1
describe
'53204' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQH' 'sip-files0037.QC.jpg'
df15160654180b504ce4e84535bacb1d
1c2d5e622b007c0beeb6944179303c16b8f5ff85
'2011-12-31T13:34:54-05:00'
describe
'516784' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQI' 'sip-files0037.tif'
55eb0da244d1b4de17d33bde283c26f5
8a6062654253e0de0951c26271c9345c907fdc84
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQJ' 'sip-files0037.txt'
80b1fbc0da4d90d697afe7012d858349
4b22341e191a64ea0f0796ed02978b7ce38f3cd6
describe
'23036' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQK' 'sip-files0037thm.jpg'
bde3f8b8f26d6c8e06eba8c3fa3b59dc
70235949f117504ce4e75f477d5ebb6f618c48d3
describe
'62840' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQL' 'sip-files0038.jp2'
2766741697979da99d375393b3a7a0da
314475568367dc8d67a2c3e5e22010fb36b39396
describe
'129957' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQM' 'sip-files0038.jpg'
d67ed93b4ac80ec86a03341ddf985854
205fe8c24a575c02ba2606ea78e327e31e6c556c
'2011-12-31T13:38:12-05:00'
describe
'33372' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQN' 'sip-files0038.pro'
edeb28327af238f74861afd5c8a0be6d
51651eb52e8afb6e81cb5a45a8a0171495806ed3
describe
'53308' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQO' 'sip-files0038.QC.jpg'
da1a0104bf92f012e0e9c4351bcd8848
c5a806c09caa2006d0b2876f62cff24ca3d6a770
'2011-12-31T13:39:00-05:00'
describe
'516648' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQP' 'sip-files0038.tif'
0f474fff4a7201d55e9c758a74b85387
f37ed07ae97e7e0423b96c38ca3572f92b1dd2e0
describe
'1308' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQQ' 'sip-files0038.txt'
cef33068fbdae24cdc836bf8cbd2d9c4
06951f561409c76d193a6aa17114aacb7b182f72
'2011-12-31T13:40:17-05:00'
describe
'23146' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQR' 'sip-files0038thm.jpg'
3a9ffd834ef673dbd6082dc0c9168372
487107d5981256722d17a226ce06e1574e26e02b
'2011-12-31T13:39:30-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQS' 'sip-files0039.jp2'
15000b179f6da9f9726943fe4f8b4b02
2515703c57121414ed47f6ddb173cf5d0134e99f
'2011-12-31T13:35:31-05:00'
describe
'117067' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQT' 'sip-files0039.jpg'
7f33999abe7dee70fd23e698d5d8c5e4
06844ceea9715584f419ea0d20f4aa35c66abaee
'2011-12-31T13:38:31-05:00'
describe
'12774' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQU' 'sip-files0039.pro'
79b26ad6d9fe4d67750e986bf49643b1
dbb88e296e9bdae393cce072cc2dee71ca16783c
'2011-12-31T13:35:36-05:00'
describe
'45608' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQV' 'sip-files0039.QC.jpg'
e3e36099e05c080cff0f6b016accbe89
a8aac255cfa5815cd9e5f5d0c7a9bf12ad004c19
'2011-12-31T13:40:38-05:00'
describe
'515996' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQW' 'sip-files0039.tif'
5e9db74ee8b9eddb9537a7d1662fa3f1
4472b3c99909265933312a327b6fd7595d2370c1
describe
'527' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQX' 'sip-files0039.txt'
1b9f610ba0a6e12099578c265440071d
56a1fd5b22385822eef00ec8506ac9c53147a698
'2011-12-31T13:39:56-05:00'
describe
'21019' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQY' 'sip-files0039thm.jpg'
f00e3e6b3c8ad07be24889b60df7b6ad
7f931e58e0a3dbf42f708eacaaa532ec9a01f36a
describe
'62842' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADQZ' 'sip-files0040.jp2'
fb422a107a2b85114dbf7d6063815200
5578b0bcfb1297d5401a48e2031e6eb1a806938c
'2011-12-31T13:35:56-05:00'
describe
'132839' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRA' 'sip-files0040.jpg'
a07e7b4d3c5d261c1af81a4180cb05cb
eabae8bb1d138b8f30cdb43916dea5c5f0e31004
describe
'34259' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRB' 'sip-files0040.pro'
a9d5e9cfe8b35fac1930449d1950eaa1
e869561194ca1475a1f6a7b9ee3835aaef4f9f75
describe
'53981' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRC' 'sip-files0040.QC.jpg'
8f5b84b3cef0880d25c81bbad24097bb
efb5a209fc8577eb19b1352bc4bd59942587685d
describe
'516844' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRD' 'sip-files0040.tif'
7ce9a81fe1f94b22e4b3752ac5527147
349f03357485b3dc707f297eeeaf285981027be5
'2011-12-31T13:38:04-05:00'
describe
'1352' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRE' 'sip-files0040.txt'
02d429c8dc43621c53fbe458b358e618
93862ea49098ffa8c22218278c219d4fb242924d
describe
'23236' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRF' 'sip-files0040thm.jpg'
b1a1d383f2b785ee73de8ad418dfe520
90e25347506826d5fb9a2eff5a3b1629aef78e6a
'2011-12-31T13:39:23-05:00'
describe
'62851' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRG' 'sip-files0041.jp2'
a266cea52dd32fc078ce2d16084d4941
d0ec6f6effdae88d380108b0ad66722d7b141e0a
'2011-12-31T13:41:19-05:00'
describe
'111650' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRH' 'sip-files0041.jpg'
a4ee623a3602fb541be5bddca11585a3
2277501dcb2d961677d5a7d9b7b4842c095af338
'2011-12-31T13:35:34-05:00'
describe
'20326' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRI' 'sip-files0041.pro'
6577abdc5e3602c6103c5c63f960e7ed
f965fc2618e988eac6f26b697e82ac40997a70ed
'2011-12-31T13:38:23-05:00'
describe
'45208' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRJ' 'sip-files0041.QC.jpg'
bf1efb314ac651f2f53206c3bb9e4b15
dc145d75b9410b53b0337b4caa6e22658d0a7328
'2011-12-31T13:41:14-05:00'
describe
'515864' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRK' 'sip-files0041.tif'
df1606a51eb67e839588e22b8604f501
48fe10e5d87682023aa078212905ff40ab8eb81a
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRL' 'sip-files0041.txt'
79e615396c67a6f535eee4925bc3457c
a49caa1155a4cc81a59e120e3d05b57e18720023
'2011-12-31T13:37:56-05:00'
describe
'21055' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRM' 'sip-files0041thm.jpg'
88d123132add61e2ed1c203139f3f827
a2a409f79d096e1056bb6794e6e45c095fd67ac9
describe
'62804' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRN' 'sip-files0042.jp2'
1a521e31e60eec09e2942d634b787cb7
61c26303731285e6babb4361c5cb18dc1cce0e68
describe
'112259' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRO' 'sip-files0042.jpg'
34ad61acd679b927f3b507f4b7477583
4e1cedc04180db3c4a778e331ae4961c35637753
'2011-12-31T13:35:04-05:00'
describe
'28033' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRP' 'sip-files0042.pro'
5e851b99528de10615aa2c7c75c51f28
136c3e98db5f4f747df9dbc7832b041a1b3d6de6
describe
'46648' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRQ' 'sip-files0042.QC.jpg'
f9d6f7992f06651a60739ccfd62f8e64
34909b48c278b414886dd571f4c4f47e6cd1c148
'2011-12-31T13:40:42-05:00'
describe
'516120' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRR' 'sip-files0042.tif'
ebce8c4d13410572b1442d2792e0fdea
69f1900915aef5c46abffef84ce0750877db2f1b
'2011-12-31T13:37:22-05:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRS' 'sip-files0042.txt'
bbff1a664463c030c6093d67824c339d
1b57444be75b088c07dca52e07ad947d44d0c0a4
describe
'21311' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRT' 'sip-files0042thm.jpg'
5d5532b5a8536ceee1f281404b15a260
fe9524cabd93d14c98474bdbde8e76b8a8561db3
describe
'62831' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRU' 'sip-files0043.jp2'
212364f05bf8a95b831a9274c3dd24d2
0e916cacefa2a6e6858316506bff8e15717ae6de
'2011-12-31T13:36:59-05:00'
describe
'128553' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRV' 'sip-files0043.jpg'
0acf00bd298ddade058101e9845c775b
68890f93b67562f75e6faacb1299f88cd95a8c46
'2011-12-31T13:38:41-05:00'
describe
'31770' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRW' 'sip-files0043.pro'
cd8257c95acdb32984b1832e8a1eb335
c2e6d57bc8ac3344b2a1c3272de61c43a5d44fcf
describe
'53020' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRX' 'sip-files0043.QC.jpg'
e4df4a01107ca23a35f496d8a59853a0
04365f7157a416a234dadf2769e9870d6e61e8d3
describe
'516880' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRY' 'sip-files0043.tif'
281953d32433d5c2c26b89ef8660cba2
fe2188fe5a0cfcd6f41ad2c9d6d8f4ef8cfadcd4
describe
'1252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADRZ' 'sip-files0043.txt'
d0f271996bc34780a2b85cbf82cfa30b
e43f53ef7adfb1c869db0ae3056484613009473e
'2011-12-31T13:36:42-05:00'
describe
'23232' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSA' 'sip-files0043thm.jpg'
4eaac381294d1c676e613964d0cf3324
ba7d18827321b7b747dd986cef475f1cd7d67633
'2011-12-31T13:36:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSB' 'sip-files0044.jp2'
cc3d30ddd36b06acd1a3415f00b57e3d
ef2cff04f90d728081720f39c8f2e2bca91fabf4
'2011-12-31T13:35:50-05:00'
describe
'116940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSC' 'sip-files0044.jpg'
ce12f5aafb16081cbfa0bd65d104ac43
96d336829489b21f506bac9679b61e5ee17cf208
describe
'28867' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSD' 'sip-files0044.pro'
8083a8895188038d76c19163ddfb2631
14a9c90094931dbff2c0298b3726e6cabf9d51f3
'2011-12-31T13:36:06-05:00'
describe
'49070' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSE' 'sip-files0044.QC.jpg'
d9011059fd19e5b540a7a916842599f9
88892bb07d7764e059cb93cdfb528f73d2680d4a
describe
'516652' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSF' 'sip-files0044.tif'
f56381208ebef53c55035f3a2fd883cc
d75fd1fd3bc5d87887a7dd84d713387f8036dcdf
'2011-12-31T13:37:43-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSG' 'sip-files0044.txt'
51a1fbd3b4c474f742b2e0535847a3d1
0a2aa753c7a09c220489a0fd81e7789179ba3153
describe
Invalid character
'22885' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSH' 'sip-files0044thm.jpg'
67edba6c875581376eb78ad5c8c2b88c
8d444516162382b3a86f602897e375f393fd7da4
describe
'62845' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSI' 'sip-files0045.jp2'
9068ac64f21b3cebf3ff307da77cf4a3
d50842dfcc61db0a9dd272cef3b50ec30416047a
'2011-12-31T13:38:24-05:00'
describe
'122823' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSJ' 'sip-files0045.jpg'
7f6ea59e151ca9af7aca24bf2853e977
39e83bd35156d6a4999fa08845e6ef7aa9720218
'2011-12-31T13:37:49-05:00'
describe
'31425' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSK' 'sip-files0045.pro'
43c831bb66283b665d5260e99b8b8e03
0a21296cd8d62daf2b6a0c2f6b00776186509322
'2011-12-31T13:38:14-05:00'
describe
'51750' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSL' 'sip-files0045.QC.jpg'
d059a2d1def2a6efb7508a3a04f632fc
7d9bfc39c5ee7dd44853551956842eb992fc79cc
'2011-12-31T13:38:46-05:00'
describe
'516668' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSM' 'sip-files0045.tif'
a2fe820b8e775a0a4947a038614cdf2f
4ee8a1c1bdb4a32655903730c52cf73f3b52fa0b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSN' 'sip-files0045.txt'
2a71f4c14f42c1f8024ee5516786ed51
85edf14feac7a432f7a08e880f9f54fd0bbc3f48
describe
'22946' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSO' 'sip-files0045thm.jpg'
2e65b2c685f41c01b7daf179d07b8701
f8b5aec48fc27ec58b2486efb96d80aed983674f
'2011-12-31T13:38:19-05:00'
describe
'62828' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSP' 'sip-files0046.jp2'
2d3e9f4a3d9d8663f78d7ebc6a003b4b
a145df2b3dd5dd1ccdcfd34e8594b11f1c621847
'2011-12-31T13:37:12-05:00'
describe
'131382' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSQ' 'sip-files0046.jpg'
a3912a834dc9bb6100b826343a14057a
61508a8b9affb4c6d0ab7d138d2ab3b044bbe672
'2011-12-31T13:40:28-05:00'
describe
'34390' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSR' 'sip-files0046.pro'
421cdbc5ca5179bd55d194600efc3427
be63bbed348f1448e2a1508cd97eb1e882b3dbc1
describe
'53475' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSS' 'sip-files0046.QC.jpg'
4c8d7fe68d3b61a0cacec5cf3160fcea
dc0506bbeb369629fa3c7c995a1dfeba626e5815
describe
'516780' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADST' 'sip-files0046.tif'
4fb50e709124c8de01feff23ae781df8
72cd43ff9d3e441052f748ce0187cf1ce2bbea09
'2011-12-31T13:39:28-05:00'
describe
'1359' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSU' 'sip-files0046.txt'
23e3b4458c7a0f20d686032d890e67bf
915d90b781bbdabc1fa61a997114304bb2ffd31e
'2011-12-31T13:37:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSV' 'sip-files0046thm.jpg'
2f958b108bb65578a2fe5ef654730772
6c5c40992378ba4d34367f4086761dee68690ff2
'2011-12-31T13:41:29-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSW' 'sip-files0047.jp2'
9d98ebb3c3e9aa6abd3b9d5aa775a27f
c7cd9b714c2dc70a043c4af087e6e56ecf4dfbcb
describe
'129360' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSX' 'sip-files0047.jpg'
e45a4523f1e52b3f8244ee38fe5d306c
7eb81653b228924deb10cfe8819cb5634f020054
describe
'33274' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSY' 'sip-files0047.pro'
2dd95a138c18bd2405302360b884de9c
fa02fee680840f47c24646c1f8da636b7548149e
describe
'53498' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADSZ' 'sip-files0047.QC.jpg'
dd3256be0562a7c0d62a9f801906e031
b971df2dfe346f38895e38499db400726df85c4d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTA' 'sip-files0047.tif'
f17b829ca992519194009960e767ed3e
eec895342eb1a6e3a625fdf83bc7e235bafc02ac
'2011-12-31T13:36:09-05:00'
describe
'1325' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTB' 'sip-files0047.txt'
6c728310cf937aeb04ca531debb371a5
0e2f30e0031d5ff7a779c00f7a544353b1010022
'2011-12-31T13:35:27-05:00'
describe
'23252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTC' 'sip-files0047thm.jpg'
9ba551f0e834cf89ca8f339893562172
007ef936cafb4f43957147072c0a6b74b650dbe7
'2011-12-31T13:35:59-05:00'
describe
'62805' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTD' 'sip-files0048.jp2'
4c1a8797b1723fa403a3ed75b8a7c5bf
dca39468b7aacee04540deada64fce32db352c69
describe
'119990' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTE' 'sip-files0048.jpg'
f5972bf8bba004208615badd6ce1088d
cac4770d8a94e16c77753b087b80cd1a467d8b61
describe
'30645' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTF' 'sip-files0048.pro'
4da4833934b41fb761c9e2f205940784
c9fb758eb508636cd6fa7c9d2b64196519bd9910
'2011-12-31T13:36:58-05:00'
describe
'50359' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTG' 'sip-files0048.QC.jpg'
7e3eb3c5f4e0e1f4dfaf717da9a580db
cc6c7e82d7788230b4b282a754a4ef60150595ce
describe
'516660' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTH' 'sip-files0048.tif'
595bf5c3b068775d4e76dea43a78e51f
fddc0a3b1f6700568ce12b54fc1bab5c73b864d5
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTI' 'sip-files0048.txt'
27d09f543d753e83d711627c4e3b1f1c
bcbd5f7058e853de27acac523f0d3daad9cca1d0
describe
'22594' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTJ' 'sip-files0048thm.jpg'
19bb18992ee200079f9364753c459b1c
d0470388623e7758eb2f336d0a2cb5596739c879
describe
'62852' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTK' 'sip-files0049.jp2'
1346f1ca77232ed93845aaa41c628119
c55a3977cb4cbe8cee68c39b85fc0994dcf9ad72
describe
'135498' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTL' 'sip-files0049.jpg'
e90f56d56345376554039cda6d9b20d4
1af4d048f7d0e38f64d658a735101700eeab925b
'2011-12-31T13:35:38-05:00'
describe
'13339' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTM' 'sip-files0049.pro'
98d48e8769e57d9410d4958712e7a517
42c4a42dc4cf8c921fc970b1122d1013c3017073
describe
'49201' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTN' 'sip-files0049.QC.jpg'
bd2406115aea71de7d6c449c7101bd2c
590f3a277ea3af67374321bdc8bf262622da2ce7
describe
'516444' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTO' 'sip-files0049.tif'
850e4f992185fe4cb8cb73f907b4fc19
a4b4643e70067d6994d36266512804293154224b
'2011-12-31T13:41:20-05:00'
describe
'555' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTP' 'sip-files0049.txt'
9a31e9b7426c5efe30d43120de36c1cb
f41cebf8e976464fa4ffa060da93a155d58a0678
'2011-12-31T13:41:04-05:00'
describe
'22329' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTQ' 'sip-files0049thm.jpg'
c812e7a5b6aa07f8033483a8f5dbbe9c
cc6235adfd49b0e7b278c68243e4ff79ee724362
'2011-12-31T13:41:27-05:00'
describe
'62807' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTR' 'sip-files0050.jp2'
01d0d514b3f21101e5296ccd5599ffc7
718005621d517804db7b0362e7746435d9564a9f
describe
'127814' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTS' 'sip-files0050.jpg'
0fbccabef1901cc27de86ae4cddd18a1
d82f292ed9b0cb736429e52ba3741216713ac6f8
'2011-12-31T13:36:30-05:00'
describe
'33605' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTT' 'sip-files0050.pro'
6c1efcf469e9e77c9c9eec942c84f8d4
746cf79f46d43a1e0ffb31af4a2f8c1f4638dfb6
describe
'52109' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTU' 'sip-files0050.QC.jpg'
ac4b498b344e6f67bc7b0b33c18eab37
b7a4c79ec5e113fc03c58120d533103f394efe55
describe
'516656' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTV' 'sip-files0050.tif'
a9d4bbfe5a56d4f3cc3659ff6dbdb286
f3e20faf37cbb55a4d2a3c254004b229c5c0548e
'2011-12-31T13:35:47-05:00'
describe
'1331' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTW' 'sip-files0050.txt'
7edd9954436b164f96318770182475bd
f8d2af399ab3f58de6a1611748f29c2b52776757
describe
'22797' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTX' 'sip-files0050thm.jpg'
4ef3b86b70e4eaf6e80556f7a143678b
91abceb3b1038107f9023a1f36513e0b500d6022
describe
'62808' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTY' 'sip-files0051.jp2'
693b33b1ba2b4e984cf4be92bad6f0cf
9aa34fb3c041d870cfa48fe005c6a0c76fdc1870
describe
'110777' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADTZ' 'sip-files0051.jpg'
27ac483dc0ecc308955667535e59bae5
36ee8483ea419c99f8f1ada3f46f6068731fcd39
'2011-12-31T13:36:56-05:00'
describe
'28085' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUA' 'sip-files0051.pro'
b326bae369f596c43937fc26658c1b36
2b8620a9b3f2de083fa06d8bc7e5b37fb324c46e
describe
'47256' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUB' 'sip-files0051.QC.jpg'
f66993ca8bed81faa97431c6b0298074
f1eab0b32c51101408f1ac03e80393013472016d
describe
'516184' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUC' 'sip-files0051.tif'
6d0d6b343351f7c02add25e7e5f2eb18
13d30909726df55c61a5f213072a03a4e5f0e2db
'2011-12-31T13:38:56-05:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUD' 'sip-files0051.txt'
56b1b1c5aa3d72b1d297bb7e21b1cfaf
f64d67126dc9eb0b5a7c2ec60750e71ccebdf767
describe
'21818' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUE' 'sip-files0051thm.jpg'
4d85d99452e3f97dcefddbfe51b673b8
28e3db12b5eff278d1739846da446ec6a6180a8d
'2011-12-31T13:35:24-05:00'
describe
'62685' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUF' 'sip-files0052.jp2'
5b6c7ae8e3c63b3b26d9774c34cfe074
0f2072b03fcc83d6d69b0eea11211520f42bd7e4
describe
'128880' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUG' 'sip-files0052.jpg'
618163b77b34beeb838c4885eefefddc
b3e15c85a25cc4768ff02508b7e69bd6cd68b309
'2011-12-31T13:41:23-05:00'
describe
'32491' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUH' 'sip-files0052.pro'
f0b094a24fc6cac41bce902b7bc8c665
084b2ab5470052b8054e314dc0eb0e19f46676d4
'2011-12-31T13:38:21-05:00'
describe
'53115' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUI' 'sip-files0052.QC.jpg'
b453c0450a1eac803d67e1f005b16570
cc0859bcc3c5b7b1e2d65ed86c276ed58227516f
'2011-12-31T13:41:11-05:00'
describe
'516848' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUJ' 'sip-files0052.tif'
75caf9f9e5a9e2f1df2d3a7430a113bf
6bc669339ab420f9e51c81a0a3079aaff1477476
describe
'1288' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUK' 'sip-files0052.txt'
c484f8efb1d75e6123c9ab8f43b4a541
463aa67e88f5c4f97b5cc61033b4ed178f03a831
describe
'23063' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUL' 'sip-files0052thm.jpg'
fbc5e0398a316742ab260aff3a40bba9
1f15b06e3302d356432ac8d8a2064f8520571713
'2011-12-31T13:38:22-05:00'
describe
'62736' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUM' 'sip-files0053.jp2'
4f12de66ab0f618f55e506d2d17563a0
409981970ce34a34821d815eb96aab133b4b2d64
'2011-12-31T13:41:24-05:00'
describe
'127710' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUN' 'sip-files0053.jpg'
8ee052f9bbf25dd9f2594852af5b1e72
860a169a098438f4ee35f30e4441791b0387c470
describe
'32279' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUO' 'sip-files0053.pro'
f50882621a75b8482a6644bd01df4d3e
d79760e572aa94bd0e56fbad4688b8b81f8cbf80
describe
'52466' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUP' 'sip-files0053.QC.jpg'
6062469f0a669315d486d2a69cf17e7b
839050e4b54284c75f8b66332d0f688639a17794
'2011-12-31T13:36:22-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUQ' 'sip-files0053.tif'
558563fcc98a445b625fdada76b895f7
ee5f06bf8d72863e877fe365729eefc3405f304f
describe
'1284' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUR' 'sip-files0053.txt'
646839a8e8f5f7745697f7838582c565
b2e991f808ed88b14e70e9856afe7d06b0fa8757
'2011-12-31T13:36:33-05:00'
describe
'23082' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUS' 'sip-files0053thm.jpg'
f73fe7bc4efad33de3022920d359e777
d824dc111b13613100fb1b41c1814088ae9ac1f9
'2011-12-31T13:38:38-05:00'
describe
'62861' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUT' 'sip-files0054.jp2'
f0a0525b15be827e05ee51f2edadf080
e6609c8c6106030440cdbff1074d7fcadcf00bcc
describe
'105630' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUU' 'sip-files0054.jpg'
f767ce59d303971acce75b18794131b6
eb83edda234b516be7ba44a6a74ba61f4724cb10
describe
'25657' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUV' 'sip-files0054.pro'
dd6152bac8045a88da7b5a5bac38baa8
b37fd217d4963441e85239824b9dfdc0fef5d1b4
describe
'44852' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUW' 'sip-files0054.QC.jpg'
7b29eb6327fbc05321521f63c4009159
2b5b82d8994682dc742bc3ae54016bc9451c5420
'2011-12-31T13:41:33-05:00'
describe
'515472' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUX' 'sip-files0054.tif'
d847930a62031d2bdf0624575d9020a8
d82fedfdd659f01504f33c712180836f261a6079
'2011-12-31T13:38:06-05:00'
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUY' 'sip-files0054.txt'
b8fa3a7681a25d5ccbad51da63961281
bd2d6f2ee0510733f7a2f498cd1a0cfa53cad184
'2011-12-31T13:39:41-05:00'
describe
'20301' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADUZ' 'sip-files0054thm.jpg'
d06d01342bff15fa241fc8ae37593850
f1db69b719ba0f81551804aded19b6d5fa0f5630
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVA' 'sip-files0055.jp2'
0bf7cac0d0d9ef0012c4c452448dd9a3
ed7f82d93b736146a0e0c6c84a95bb49aa19ba19
describe
'111839' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVB' 'sip-files0055.jpg'
a627e47fc575267e182460a1bfcd3223
43c1bcc6a2258a0bb7d8fddd7282c22715f15a3a
describe
'26782' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVC' 'sip-files0055.pro'
9b0b6a86dfd4156eff0d70c15e400e68
97fee65a7accf4ea5d7d0a71f28650c1c1358a22
describe
'46474' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVD' 'sip-files0055.QC.jpg'
6bb68ee52208f118af5283512faa97c5
3ed08f0212f81db0eddefc153c00d68715df4f65
'2011-12-31T13:34:56-05:00'
describe
'516004' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVE' 'sip-files0055.tif'
19295a1c2245cc14bd7fb39515038283
f3af5713ec9266b102dca2c938602eaaf11c0278
'2011-12-31T13:35:06-05:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVF' 'sip-files0055.txt'
076f0177ca1ec8a46e0196e193e86343
43decdbf49f791f159e2d9e9873b2b15862b45cb
'2011-12-31T13:40:41-05:00'
describe
'21068' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVG' 'sip-files0055thm.jpg'
c1c36b122bab9dbfc2d7286b9a156f9c
274f6bb8049e37db29e47bedab5b03fce06ab138
describe
'62702' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVH' 'sip-files0056.jp2'
7f7774d3b076acf07bb9d624bb40ce90
3f73b096ba0df43e6f5bf470360cda65ab189b39
describe
'130055' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVI' 'sip-files0056.jpg'
e927391b173e8cf0cac3f2c14433f296
6953b8c1a0950ac7387bcfdd7e4090716fce46a2
describe
'33453' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVJ' 'sip-files0056.pro'
da72e2f03350d4a8e3d4ead141d1512e
13108448ea52db25de8cb8438759c3e9e8765771
'2011-12-31T13:39:03-05:00'
describe
'52880' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVK' 'sip-files0056.QC.jpg'
fe1925ea9265718f5bcd7738f8cbc964
6cb95075bc95372caaf37870a07a68d269f2755e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVL' 'sip-files0056.tif'
35dbe839228a587d7faef9a90eb2ff7c
272eea761ccbec9fe166e10e69f473ac63b0d07f
describe
'1311' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVM' 'sip-files0056.txt'
9dceb1b46130089937994cfba4fa0d13
4d1cd767750a75bc043788a4266e14b70a8ea372
describe
'22737' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVN' 'sip-files0056thm.jpg'
66aed0f5f115353dadae60b869de3868
a68b5f2313d942e35b345b7ce47bdd80e7a3729f
describe
'62843' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVO' 'sip-files0057.jp2'
90a58e0303b1bb16a86e66fb212d93dc
779fff655a4fd26a1c0074b4d0b4de2d98672fe8
'2011-12-31T13:36:10-05:00'
describe
'131217' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVP' 'sip-files0057.jpg'
a28559db42788956af313a7884b8dff3
c89ebb03e7867e3add4e5c7dcb8cc56733048df4
describe
'32735' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVQ' 'sip-files0057.pro'
e2007231401981dc58d06ee34dcab651
4952d8b43f4069b960f1bf0d070e7e784d6b74c1
'2011-12-31T13:37:54-05:00'
describe
'53947' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVR' 'sip-files0057.QC.jpg'
2f7d2a749dd8f26a607d4d8c36b0359d
4ad427081b2d4638ff9d53d868c2a4fa76d72f95
'2011-12-31T13:40:19-05:00'
describe
'516900' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVS' 'sip-files0057.tif'
d47865ea8c5bce662ad6740e08202d95
43470d74baf783efb0fd6016ca04836fffe30857
'2011-12-31T13:39:22-05:00'
describe
'1282' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVT' 'sip-files0057.txt'
148a21700cf29e78a8a91835e8e3b178
89fc002cc7e0235a963d65214951d900811f5d2a
describe
'23124' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVU' 'sip-files0057thm.jpg'
a3df3a3e189300b63fd95154bc6cd02e
59df858f2725aa9c2f5682270089b6027a098ce3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVV' 'sip-files0058.jp2'
c2c536c5863721112ff5a398def47b13
b185cef33584a0ab7c1905c871a1da709838d85c
describe
'119495' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVW' 'sip-files0058.jpg'
0de0d71a4f46dae4ab020c3d6191c04f
c8d465d63dff58c7c9e76074a25fe533ef444dd2
describe
'13538' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVX' 'sip-files0058.pro'
4a0e3e15f724c4f10968fa4ac0376e62
f1b12e34d7673f20a24d801de291ae1815c1c052
describe
'45311' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVY' 'sip-files0058.QC.jpg'
66eb17a3b2df84ec87c3de5a88e7dc20
38b2293a4d29bf70d39b88ee60297782d28dde28
'2011-12-31T13:39:34-05:00'
describe
'516024' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADVZ' 'sip-files0058.tif'
45c9b741aa10003481450a911fdda24f
8899e3190366d154a255210ebf52854f5e412e21
describe
'550' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWA' 'sip-files0058.txt'
5e59ea127e9fc2cd8337553b78013147
5277d872c8a02fb9d0a7a24db842be6e3c4cdb75
describe
'21581' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWB' 'sip-files0058thm.jpg'
4e52fca71e2a3e7bc0cd8d80f21298a2
eae56ba1d92c981bdcf5f96d07edb7a8f5f1a6bb
describe
'62839' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWC' 'sip-files0059.jp2'
9d9f652a382f6697e95b591db0898e6d
17406c4bb0e936a625ff64d510dec9c736c163d5
describe
'122071' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWD' 'sip-files0059.jpg'
f8bf76ede9a5b0641070856ab679f908
7f82727efe4e4af499fedf60a1c40f8bf98f5ba3
describe
'31252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWE' 'sip-files0059.pro'
0cfd115564916816bb8f190c4bf29645
3cb41ad841df4596edb5689d753b7096041312db
describe
'50855' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWF' 'sip-files0059.QC.jpg'
e531cba07c2cf43dbbbfc6e452b0abd2
98e9bf3ba9dcbff56c449501b7e85a8d96631f90
'2011-12-31T13:35:18-05:00'
describe
'516516' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWG' 'sip-files0059.tif'
550ad840daa4f885220ebf9af6dc20a2
f9424aad3149a2d73793ab2763508eb1f30c72a8
describe
'1262' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWH' 'sip-files0059.txt'
848a1f0c103ff66877dcf0d94ae03e97
b7aa38fd3baeeb49bfbe320240c7c71cb8e7dd84
describe
'22364' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWI' 'sip-files0059thm.jpg'
bdeaa1c940ea4aa259c3199535dfb0dd
a1e97cbf86b4e2fe11f7137c2605a456ec8fc714
describe
'62870' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWJ' 'sip-files0060.jp2'
9de23db2bf6a32df5147295c78d18db2
5e5f3d998e417c46bdfa49b5d20e5a90edbc2d45
'2011-12-31T13:35:54-05:00'
describe
'130779' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWK' 'sip-files0060.jpg'
b71eab87399daacacf90061ba82ae0d6
0b853b915eb2763fe378d9a5a26ef14878351da6
describe
'32669' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWL' 'sip-files0060.pro'
5d5c2c72738bb66b4d38e55093777bc2
60982f20c535094b8234dc6ce3ea6f439e6058d8
describe
'53766' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWM' 'sip-files0060.QC.jpg'
ad22d9ebb44e3c7920a93ed8a30d432e
48bf906879b496f70dd8eee9dd88be41d9e4d922
describe
'516960' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWN' 'sip-files0060.tif'
dcf5bb379c80524dbb4ee4eabdc77c56
770620eded96c526390c6ddec2b97558adc776ee
'2011-12-31T13:41:26-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWO' 'sip-files0060.txt'
d4d24875b8718212f830c329d3ce72f3
996695d337cee267d5b743218b8f01039afae671
describe
'23391' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWP' 'sip-files0060thm.jpg'
b95fce5c70e117b057112b4eaadcb063
1b30f38d976023e8e5e64012d173089abf34920f
'2011-12-31T13:35:09-05:00'
describe
'62785' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWQ' 'sip-files0061.jp2'
af7ba8de11bb3c30a9b4202f54b40c57
cbaa70e3c5502f6e58ae469cd5a5da9469e52bb1
describe
'128429' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWR' 'sip-files0061.jpg'
058ebff794f11f7da89b6d8398342338
af95a517a4790b76140e3390c7717a4271783b70
describe
'33207' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWS' 'sip-files0061.pro'
3b866b749146edfbdeed66e2322d8e2d
c1c87c2ba2c0f3f868ec9ab1a185d07e510be1c4
describe
'51996' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWT' 'sip-files0061.QC.jpg'
35cfaa11a5152d2eb2b8bed532c8aabf
2c90b3880bfd974bc7ed94246cd5943a64cdefde
describe
'516480' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWU' 'sip-files0061.tif'
5b2698b3f0f1459cc53d21a9a46c10de
53932d6315dd31764bb0aa19ac843f330e7f20da
'2011-12-31T13:40:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWV' 'sip-files0061.txt'
05a8b7141f71754349d5c63bd1734c93
2085c403e1ea4c128d7362a499a6ddad8942def3
describe
'22526' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWW' 'sip-files0061thm.jpg'
e9713d531d0d8fb0c6b168684a8a0358
3cfb9aff0159edf8faccf36fc056c7877a1d7e5e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWX' 'sip-files0062.jp2'
992e025316f46fe6055fdb392f66d73e
cf337e3c8bf61a610f108fc26741883b91f5d834
describe
'124579' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWY' 'sip-files0062.jpg'
8833878a76f668c4c48c1bf440e349b1
b31f90ae010ed3ec4ce57581d506a9ace569d833
describe
'32027' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADWZ' 'sip-files0062.pro'
0e609a11c06d249d42f815a35c3e1c15
9cd42d485677aaabde637988211cc69b06dc49a8
describe
'51432' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXA' 'sip-files0062.QC.jpg'
042fa56c52c01cef4b93956f65afbee6
698a7f9fe46c7e75f9371e75ed5fea40648d7c72
describe
'516724' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXB' 'sip-files0062.tif'
94136ccbbb1068e45b915c84515d1a02
98a47320ae2572f2c10b01b2dce2fe9ef2dccacd
describe
'1273' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXC' 'sip-files0062.txt'
123834817b60e6f2bc1e0d1a58547b6c
c68ccb184fb3d485e3d0949af6c51cd5aed9b261
describe
'22880' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXD' 'sip-files0062thm.jpg'
40464ca42323730da1720d31d206b502
af5a5a83303c8bb9a013e5a9f8a77e486bf7be6a
describe
'62841' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXE' 'sip-files0063.jp2'
1ba1985e182161731dde5c25c994c4be
9836b514394828113a996b7d5a40ede45595135e
'2011-12-31T13:40:54-05:00'
describe
'112121' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXF' 'sip-files0063.jpg'
facdbb995f0c32edc7d6bcda6a03e014
4bf559586231cca21c8738ff5d03e15abca4d869
'2011-12-31T13:36:04-05:00'
describe
'28898' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXG' 'sip-files0063.pro'
f3e89e98155d23c8761a81f2c3a4c3eb
eefc1fa2063ff765bd702bfcd465ee66d53920ea
describe
'48105' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXH' 'sip-files0063.QC.jpg'
d40e6bb0e8e9d491b48958e7e113cbd4
3d8d659b8e52df64de6522b409f8c69f4dab6294
describe
'516296' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXI' 'sip-files0063.tif'
bda94c5320186be457e28a392aa548a6
042672337b29e1a870c76827f40ad826edd1e5ab
'2011-12-31T13:40:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXJ' 'sip-files0063.txt'
8727825f3f9fb53e3cfbef9cb6bcb9e2
9157ee5445579752385eafa4f2016dcd24c58780
'2011-12-31T13:36:17-05:00'
describe
'22005' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXK' 'sip-files0063thm.jpg'
e3386672292d62e96c0e58303abc0885
5e0043e1683eb5fcdd8475d9ae4f067b2a7c8064
describe
'62858' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXL' 'sip-files0064.jp2'
413efb904ba612e939f9ef57d5b90949
4a4acc38194d4bf876b27ed5e2cb556e0bd521ed
describe
'119318' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXM' 'sip-files0064.jpg'
5b85d4567733f23477abd73b814cb6c8
1eb0506cb31bae538724669d10c1a025345b4131
describe
'31166' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXN' 'sip-files0064.pro'
37b2b026892139d6bd2a2888537d0e57
1ed2c69e64dbc1e720560f5065d1e69c8e66d0f0
describe
'50328' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXO' 'sip-files0064.QC.jpg'
59a7d72a4b9639ca4cf0978e820e54f4
f77ad1b652592d6bb2dc7129e4071c6c819cae34
describe
'516716' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXP' 'sip-files0064.tif'
878db95404bc4428c818fa3d19c3919e
fc0840a4446e56397541e7db79393538615a63ff
'2011-12-31T13:36:43-05:00'
describe
'1231' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXQ' 'sip-files0064.txt'
b009ca2a1ae1085dd5c3edbe0d8f966e
404745d8d5d591f648802bd716dddbc4a102dc67
'2011-12-31T13:37:25-05:00'
describe
'22920' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXR' 'sip-files0064thm.jpg'
602499b86e857f94c4f524a46dce18a8
1b9e56617be6789f6eb18bf5a22825a87169033e
describe
'62811' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXS' 'sip-files0065.jp2'
e83b0ef31e683f0cffdd9e0be18506a1
2706d392dc1b3e63b4841bfc6f4f031aadf5bcab
describe
'122031' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXT' 'sip-files0065.jpg'
30ba633ff3d629e749448a1cae73c71b
85b23c0d96788ed47280534cdd0252f037e5d14c
describe
'31670' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXU' 'sip-files0065.pro'
bf1319545c48d9357ef52f390717620c
6910f6b316e8211d9a941d52d3aeb9676bfc6aa0
describe
'50891' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXV' 'sip-files0065.QC.jpg'
d9eac0b8ed47eacdfbc4c1609e74b7d5
958e596eb4647275e914dafdcbf5152efb162f35
describe
'516556' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXW' 'sip-files0065.tif'
d76a2963ddfc62f14785c6711d68b5be
92a316aef09bedb0d7cef46de23703eb73767b82
'2011-12-31T13:40:22-05:00'
describe
'1309' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXX' 'sip-files0065.txt'
2cc10e0882efc05877841d52eb2d0243
c465796411550e9c3e6072aa29b82a9045e6f5b9
'2011-12-31T13:40:46-05:00'
describe
'22687' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXY' 'sip-files0065thm.jpg'
13ce667504df85c5e5a28db9bdb1133b
74505e254b1ce0941fabd18c50f093126beec9a2
'2011-12-31T13:39:01-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADXZ' 'sip-files0066.jp2'
ce8489295547c919679d8fc88dd62d62
61993f9d8866279d0a6b983fb976cba404cf54d6
describe
'115940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYA' 'sip-files0066.jpg'
2f4243de7c1b3c85cce1fa35ec3cb77d
54a03e24d3c5689c6bf984914831ed56588757cb
'2011-12-31T13:37:38-05:00'
describe
'29098' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYB' 'sip-files0066.pro'
a88c7a3a2386bbc5a04087ddfe7ed9e5
f7ea4ff3a4dc957ee82293dc5491e410696592f6
describe
'49182' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYC' 'sip-files0066.QC.jpg'
5f093619d70bb40dfd6c74f0e6d8ea83
9e62de3826000db453e9a6f64943b80ec1bb4058
'2011-12-31T13:37:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYD' 'sip-files0066.tif'
723c420caa879eda65d4202d2d2da394
c3d108a982a66464a9faf5a2741731e667916316
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYE' 'sip-files0066.txt'
bd0b0ec59451cf3eee4bdee5d0d14246
adce0dd216bbb50f63964015aa88b00abad288a2
'2011-12-31T13:37:04-05:00'
describe
'23008' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYF' 'sip-files0066thm.jpg'
587c1ffc891a7507c917c12a031a6c47
ae08d46a9eb3105b6bdaa1c5386d56c57003edf4
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYG' 'sip-files0067.jp2'
4296f595eb8713b4472f98d4504fb008
420bf669e48d3a924176f97f052c337d6ad25dc6
describe
'110395' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYH' 'sip-files0067.jpg'
8dd572a49c67b10a770913709de10237
c97ce2e45064af2f838252080fe0423971d8bebd
describe
'27493' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYI' 'sip-files0067.pro'
f2a431fc270c280eafba27d91d2dda06
e8cf27f504eaf881d75d555fd077a366888a5cbd
describe
'46196' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYJ' 'sip-files0067.QC.jpg'
7fd85cccbea785c82054e44805e284e1
8a0d9767d8fead0ab9db37624f792afd3ebeae74
describe
'515788' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYK' 'sip-files0067.tif'
fcec2be98e4d60a7cc8673e023e9bf01
07fda949648a28a53a96a2b0299f341f27cf58d6
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYL' 'sip-files0067.txt'
706136e4081e83091b8b9be3a78dad45
e8b66406429b50ed0d6a2464daf54872088f192f
describe
'20813' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYM' 'sip-files0067thm.jpg'
0d0a053c66d2f5c4bd8552e404ddc4b2
71eefbd41eb67a848d5506bf4cf50cc22e8e9629
'2011-12-31T13:36:44-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYN' 'sip-files0068.jp2'
c4ef756e3d4025372d28a7139c0a77fc
2fced097256a37b3b1365b5a7d87bfd68e86d436
'2011-12-31T13:40:52-05:00'
describe
'109820' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYO' 'sip-files0068.jpg'
ab93373bd1214bb6de0f467b8a3fc3c3
7523fd2010f305a1b50e6d6b7b15bfc0b713808f
describe
'26020' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYP' 'sip-files0068.pro'
fb2e8629afc4de76cc5aa5bd296a565c
a03073c8c77c2b861d6e8c80d113dedb7953d934
'2011-12-31T13:36:54-05:00'
describe
'45932' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYQ' 'sip-files0068.QC.jpg'
5bf9d15361a40ce6eb1af754b6c46892
42e0099bb8ceb8fa2e768e0d9f7c1bfbf1d7fbdc
describe
'515984' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYR' 'sip-files0068.tif'
4dcb86dbac2a32761ef183fa265d3d64
9ff4612ad3a766821ca8172a400c8d83d2eeffb9
describe
'1064' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYS' 'sip-files0068.txt'
81e1d25121ec252b71fdc2761a46bc11
3b93a9aaa77b5eb09ea77fc6e4d204542fa31432
describe
'21317' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYT' 'sip-files0068thm.jpg'
eea419e1d6f789360be13db0bed2e915
994344b77345da98ef77f7980072a5be0cce8576
describe
'62780' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYU' 'sip-files0069.jp2'
180f085654cf45b168e65488aded20f8
c79be33841fcac08f1b9abc98c1c739c5538e44d
'2011-12-31T13:40:39-05:00'
describe
'118588' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYV' 'sip-files0069.jpg'
41310b7036e9ef44e76d3a12e9a6e82b
6ea85b3c4b6c314b53f9cb0fb6e168f9d3b62313
describe
'30113' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYW' 'sip-files0069.pro'
a97cdc62ce94789652308288113d1e7d
1c63c4ca1cda9817d5da0e70916c15bea4b6899b
describe
'49832' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYX' 'sip-files0069.QC.jpg'
87985310adde8586bf8c3193be92ad22
ecabeb9549aa7786865825f1b601213232f9b9cd
'2011-12-31T13:35:58-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYY' 'sip-files0069.tif'
9651bda24d74313d04aca8f5b5416e09
feb877c8b334fcf7a88f1aa7984a742673e3dae1
'2011-12-31T13:38:49-05:00'
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADYZ' 'sip-files0069.txt'
a82f11333fbbe3d5c5b9beaaffc90fb2
1769ca22c4a49879cc40c970fcd813c12e175882
describe
'22664' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZA' 'sip-files0069thm.jpg'
5332e2401d4d98d3c3e794715baf1b79
b53182e280ce0fecb0a43a1261844eb42a051246
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZB' 'sip-files0070.jp2'
1da3311a663d7cfd8cb1b61f2db6f892
cb43d5b25acd610b388a5a945625a0f1fbfcebb3
describe
'123179' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZC' 'sip-files0070.jpg'
7f0e12a26eb4a29a41343039c9dafe12
03f1b135d701c348245c688ae39fdaf238f46f81
describe
'31290' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZD' 'sip-files0070.pro'
5f681aaa2b367921b3d6539552c3b16a
58cbb6d49d4fe9574d7c072934d0bcd584e8e83c
'2011-12-31T13:36:34-05:00'
describe
'51676' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZE' 'sip-files0070.QC.jpg'
cf53a6a3ace659d0d93aea53d5da10fc
ea1bc86dbd5cdaa6ff9771b82708f5c78fd0190c
'2011-12-31T13:39:49-05:00'
describe
'516912' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZF' 'sip-files0070.tif'
ece865c1b3f70590a4b0d37c039ca095
1d717698272ff65dd6a642c34b11295a23d3060f
'2011-12-31T13:37:03-05:00'
describe
'1260' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZG' 'sip-files0070.txt'
983b6efa92fd45b3267722ed6a55495e
16b892bde86ff7f8717fd72dc9f9d22b0a9be076
'2011-12-31T13:40:23-05:00'
describe
'23246' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZH' 'sip-files0070thm.jpg'
eee548444bcfe9e9f9ea55288f6b8a4c
f63f886ebc227b5fd9bf2aa1a571c4bfe0cb442c
describe
'62708' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZI' 'sip-files0071.jp2'
0a3b647f736e60228a7b63a37bb53d05
f69f9499c5bfb4a1d70b4c8cb8a6ca6790e38567
'2011-12-31T13:38:54-05:00'
describe
'131513' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZJ' 'sip-files0071.jpg'
61d83ed3bc883b15675c23244b8a0cd6
22da91ca38261fa2905cc13aec362a97f53fc4f0
describe
'33932' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZK' 'sip-files0071.pro'
7ab1ab6c6d42c56b88dc2a583852b9e7
68c165ed93ea1669b6be1aa5efa7c660700875fc
describe
'53248' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZL' 'sip-files0071.QC.jpg'
2bc7a03d753e5d3e96e1e6d2be37a2fd
22e176df77a7135bfd42cc4a72f5165ac9950e82
'2011-12-31T13:37:23-05:00'
describe
'516856' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZM' 'sip-files0071.tif'
8f8ea63a24bc950f1e5c4bb1677a4d2e
137c70321e9b38c683c92b9496ebe1c420161414
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZN' 'sip-files0071.txt'
1cccf6b5c1b08d14680b5f33bea8eefa
edd946d420530b3723912eb7c8b59da14b87743c
describe
'23001' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZO' 'sip-files0071thm.jpg'
be237b9526841ed70067c1b326995e52
c4e5665d2a26334aa6f3cab267df81800405b319
describe
'62862' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZP' 'sip-files0072.jp2'
9dee7aefdd5db948b8b11833e041ae6d
e1b85063555d877fe900889d39f00984c2b9345f
'2011-12-31T13:39:39-05:00'
describe
'120066' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZQ' 'sip-files0072.jpg'
7f295009004ff5d31d2ac02240afdddc
0dfa7551756fe5d178973387575686fbebeaeb81
describe
'30255' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZR' 'sip-files0072.pro'
c1445d9ab20ac92b892e33e935055189
e3bcdc1cc1a093423a8ad575610f730e45105ae3
describe
'50297' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZS' 'sip-files0072.QC.jpg'
ebf2af0cd1b51a5e79cd3a0a5a729bcc
95b9f1310f47f99ce09a1a36ba188356e45404ad
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZT' 'sip-files0072.tif'
c0e398268b834fe29e1456fecd2f9a46
b4e4ceda00b8a6320217f0cc0c754c9f456d3711
'2011-12-31T13:39:33-05:00'
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZU' 'sip-files0072.txt'
01e49df7de6c8121a64f2f659b537b89
5984ab869e039345925ec64baa8b415c2e6129b4
describe
'22703' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZV' 'sip-files0072thm.jpg'
0b933afbd65fb5bbca59ac5bad415a38
7cfa7945fb24ac05a14132e1d7796290303f6d2b
'2011-12-31T13:41:25-05:00'
describe
'62678' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZW' 'sip-files0073.jp2'
90348391e794ea479c5352b09ab7ba26
2b6259532d5355cb22e953e7d79f79538620d27e
describe
'127285' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZX' 'sip-files0073.jpg'
9f0cc02bf8b4e05de76d83c47ab604b1
eba03376f95c61bcc066e7bf522de72e341a360c
describe
'33022' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZY' 'sip-files0073.pro'
e685bb5d58f17e3afbd1492016e8adf6
d72e5af28524b771f22ceb542f535246424c1dab
describe
'53162' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAADZZ' 'sip-files0073.QC.jpg'
2ed2aef06ac59e27f6a4efdab43be7b9
af09d35e4e6888edbaaa0fb50f709f5549ebb972
describe
'516696' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAA' 'sip-files0073.tif'
434cf11fd9870538735e39f7765371ae
e40df76a6929849b1978e765fef4e5886f8021e5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAB' 'sip-files0073.txt'
0fb604015021eed71c88825d6d886119
35c56c7556791f2d4ba5e25e50213637e77e1ff4
'2011-12-31T13:41:07-05:00'
describe
'22921' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAC' 'sip-files0073thm.jpg'
a95eef6a47e75285699671e9cbb76264
d6d66d3c9f36147052a5b15673b3c24ef4dbbe14
'2011-12-31T13:39:13-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAD' 'sip-files0074.jp2'
43736c851123a6cb5c1e731ea97904cc
6dbb79a2c6575252fb0f99f559f3974d587a2d27
describe
'126467' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAE' 'sip-files0074.jpg'
87bb671644cbf95c6a363714bb2ea6a7
4b23f44cfbf4c65ece536033f1802e4c79a67e6e
'2011-12-31T13:40:36-05:00'
describe
'27575' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAF' 'sip-files0074.pro'
111f7fd88daf885c9b0b47fae9c5fb7c
e8669c3289cd8063e96645dfcbc6fabc0faaa361
'2011-12-31T13:40:16-05:00'
describe
'51426' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAG' 'sip-files0074.QC.jpg'
ee31afcc19640dc648b22c561ed4a9d2
016631f28e0c851e7e4a1f2382700fcdd9b029cb
'2011-12-31T13:36:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAH' 'sip-files0074.tif'
4c1dcf326716385cf9e8fe68a3b48f91
8ff9ae5deeab2807694adef2c96aca5a904ae449
describe
'1294' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAI' 'sip-files0074.txt'
2d0d87c8a7c03d538af0fee0484fa63a
eebbbc31510f935f9d2a4f3204c287130e7bf000
describe
'23039' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAJ' 'sip-files0074thm.jpg'
a014e7e0749a0c50bb320310fb0c6a9e
a41c5049a42f0aed17f2f1dbf837db304bbb6598
'2011-12-31T13:36:53-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAK' 'sip-files0075.jp2'
0882e93fd7e058a7754a3695201beb9a
d1b1610d023b38d6cb0208ef194d31a3078f167d
'2011-12-31T13:36:29-05:00'
describe
'119286' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAL' 'sip-files0075.jpg'
ada402d2314c0888ff1334e40f8b7765
c7095dbc9be8a406b701a0a38d8e1f8ad535d157
describe
'29188' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAM' 'sip-files0075.pro'
28cd19230e3d034a9d0ebbe54a531fd2
f2a2c4ae7972b37badfe6b75fc8221bf91340a34
describe
'50485' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAN' 'sip-files0075.QC.jpg'
c0c6aed9cee0dcc26553afdf2b8b2aec
c27337fccfdbc05b2a7aefa86addd67bde890a6f
describe
'516608' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAO' 'sip-files0075.tif'
cd154acc4c8b1800dc726711517f62f2
2641b983d77ddad5a91cbd5c8e6b522546ea4769
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAP' 'sip-files0075.txt'
285f6286c04d5ef666575ce3952f7e63
e94a833ba114959ad9a4c3feda873eccba27dc11
describe
'22788' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAQ' 'sip-files0075thm.jpg'
10a0ea7b1ab7da385b22b007cbec8321
d7cba05aa9af2b290497de9ceb509f2edeba376b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAR' 'sip-files0076.jp2'
7985834de504daaf0de43fc44906927a
1f026d3ecb4760b4feef23578da0e149d976f16d
'2011-12-31T13:36:18-05:00'
describe
'133846' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAS' 'sip-files0076.jpg'
5b07962be7f02ac4eece82faa6a44848
1bc6d51ee6b8b72d95b446fb53e72c03d635d75a
describe
'33227' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAT' 'sip-files0076.pro'
cdee4f4cdcb876cfbc86d91c5c109b01
741662e0abb15ca20a6397e57bf7955e0a63b3b3
describe
'54804' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAU' 'sip-files0076.QC.jpg'
8406830a690fedc479b0e7d12586c76c
2cb69ee4b8119a8538691f59267455e88964f764
'2011-12-31T13:34:58-05:00'
describe
'517084' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAV' 'sip-files0076.tif'
019a87f65f36624365d3905b5d80f2fe
552ab6167a0f9c9054a9caf100dc0f56b6701e66
'2011-12-31T13:39:52-05:00'
describe
'1310' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAW' 'sip-files0076.txt'
a7b6f965d370d443efb749807a0c5678
768de1a42a212347b7f780e6ea9741ead990a784
describe
'23847' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAX' 'sip-files0076thm.jpg'
94105f0ecb89aac04d7860345a83656c
57a90bfd996ffbc2a199631ebb7bf3fc6c499695
'2011-12-31T13:41:34-05:00'
describe
'62783' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAY' 'sip-files0077.jp2'
1ea646422fcec8bdac7702b2236aa66c
98ecb086727d22ff7f6b4ecda24a279657f81a45
describe
'124920' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEAZ' 'sip-files0077.jpg'
ba5b0755775c6562fcc8e1d40b909c57
1e67a2add3906e0c8a3cdb47e23f17f4036a1d30
describe
'30898' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBA' 'sip-files0077.pro'
2f9aa93d7c2d76f025c7ef95c171ef73
6d4cf8a1a38ca0660b2ab115a43be4d2a261e905
describe
'51222' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBB' 'sip-files0077.QC.jpg'
b547b3a211a66394ad8598f6cd869b12
41bc34aea51c59b5b63bbf683b3e0ecd6349ab26
describe
'516456' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBC' 'sip-files0077.tif'
36fd83b37499b4061a683316de5ead15
1055f1fc827c37e0b49157563ff3166f105354a7
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBD' 'sip-files0077.txt'
91f197a459ac321ad1988379dbff6f21
5df67f2e02bba28f048061a25eae43aae4803369
describe
'22648' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBE' 'sip-files0077thm.jpg'
27b66fc24518c36ca5dd29161acd095b
ecb54be0877b5f2a15a3ad052cdd03148733b1b7
describe
'62801' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBF' 'sip-files0078.jp2'
2d3c153202163a056393a012b86efea3
652ec721bb59cc17dda6f12ea7d945abd1a02092
describe
'126579' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBG' 'sip-files0078.jpg'
5eb09eeb629a06380faf263730f6d83b
4800f82d90c60446a783202cf267862f68a870d7
'2011-12-31T13:38:17-05:00'
describe
'30416' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBH' 'sip-files0078.pro'
dc830ed8f0058cba8ac9ce16890fafed
9fe0c5e3fde101630e319e844624ab2dd51a4aa5
describe
'53123' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBI' 'sip-files0078.QC.jpg'
0868dc2148c289b692b19a33f4b77ef3
bcb76f5e62c0330707c73775085bbe1ff4a8f2da
describe
'517076' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBJ' 'sip-files0078.tif'
5161c3054b19317bf2ad1406ebc44c1b
23fc2b2355a28b3c9128d76739039daf4789a913
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBK' 'sip-files0078.txt'
a851abe9c8a43b621770a87ed6a26c8e
a8c9e6c34fac0b096343a5e08c29cf41ed3ce066
describe
'23966' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBL' 'sip-files0078thm.jpg'
1dbff3dedcdeefc9559d2d0243f0397f
8ee04fbae82ef37baa0d90fcaca04daaef4f0eac
describe
'62847' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBM' 'sip-files0079.jp2'
73c19ccf31fc03300f47646e79095fc8
d72ddb863420c41440fdd5cdaec0b1bed09817e5
describe
'122486' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBN' 'sip-files0079.jpg'
b7e0bb478537b2567c0cdc4d5eb83208
0cc32ffa929c9695c453155b6068ebd1141a21cb
describe
'29468' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBO' 'sip-files0079.pro'
3d6ccf49288812cedfe1a12608a93e8b
6ad8803d098d43bbb252fe95e704df86b17d9153
describe
'50995' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBP' 'sip-files0079.QC.jpg'
29d79fc78e39197cd6753a09f1c86826
67cf6b95f879406b9f62231693c0438eaae29c7d
'2011-12-31T13:37:06-05:00'
describe
'516732' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBQ' 'sip-files0079.tif'
74e52d205124e0ab03377c127617ada2
7dc5924244c85b18ea999ce570beeb64d9561a35
describe
'1162' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBR' 'sip-files0079.txt'
237add03afc6704b754733a967676390
b8538978d158c025672f7838ea58cd6d7789f54d
describe
'22980' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBS' 'sip-files0079thm.jpg'
0a62674b8ea09927c14aeea96f3085b8
66377b1d21ccdc48d7da893557c9e42796144f93
'2011-12-31T13:39:57-05:00'
describe
'62824' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBT' 'sip-files0080.jp2'
87150db704ceb0ea4797e11204b443ba
ec7c4ecdf361bd7fffe1f5f98e979c9f3e3812a3
describe
'124178' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBU' 'sip-files0080.jpg'
db259a5c94cb65c8b5c2a9de2e9ec463
1c2ba12b92b93dbfb8b8e3db02399779d8c268fe
describe
'30684' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBV' 'sip-files0080.pro'
0b441086ea8cee9bba1953f056d00312
357adcf2ae7edcd0e1520b73d6bebccc3767f8a1
'2011-12-31T13:37:14-05:00'
describe
'51660' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBW' 'sip-files0080.QC.jpg'
a44cb16634ddee0fc423f0e5a61a2aa6
84ce28a29c68e44c78f79c0b523486cb5a13deda
describe
'516824' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBX' 'sip-files0080.tif'
501341a1989b973ad767fa3858634142
1e4b8d25f56e0705b71ba59cb703bcbd9921beb5
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBY' 'sip-files0080.txt'
ef4f6a7c483e717eba491dd2841b085e
fc350193e9185005ec9af723de78fc36091bba52
'2011-12-31T13:40:49-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEBZ' 'sip-files0080thm.jpg'
a541c3598f63b8001789a57f79c1dba1
46c74cb072dc8ac1ea160c77f95b7069d7b1ff6a
describe
'62740' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECA' 'sip-files0081.jp2'
852db3d3dbb77f08a8cd308e510c3376
f2a06dd3652a9a5089d51345dbe73970756f5666
describe
'107914' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECB' 'sip-files0081.jpg'
94388af9b8112d32a88a4eecfdd040ad
0e6d6495e1f018e8d5615ace14c3355ae982bdf6
'2011-12-31T13:41:12-05:00'
describe
'26580' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECC' 'sip-files0081.pro'
d3d359f409cc8b4837adc13a6fcfd7cc
58ae522be4a398d01930a2a274fd1e695f2cde8a
describe
'45009' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECD' 'sip-files0081.QC.jpg'
6ed954942466aa0a35e260002da35c77
153fbd24482777b37cd6803b9048614eeea5a180
describe
'515496' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECE' 'sip-files0081.tif'
7bbc89f4cd4ad788655c31abfd18427c
054e4bdd2544f25f8a135a0360d1877ee3fabf8d
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECF' 'sip-files0081.txt'
673d798af3f5ae125f6b306c16cd4509
7b29ca18ee733393a4f193013dd6015d1e7cbc56
describe
'20236' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECG' 'sip-files0081thm.jpg'
fd999cb4f54f0506153aae4b0568dc1c
ed8d1125ae6820ec20ea00b3ed12c38d13e7cb26
describe
'62787' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECH' 'sip-files0082.jp2'
b8a86fcec1d70584177b3d4cf96e37c9
579a7e2a3a65326ee4d92f5c8d96dc8dd5db94df
describe
'107124' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECI' 'sip-files0082.jpg'
aaa76ad42a1e8aff748eec5aae67bcc2
18cb40377c4552b1c84bc2bccb712b13a456c693
describe
'25377' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECJ' 'sip-files0082.pro'
286c6bab3fb59c94a6c42e0415618846
0f9cd32f5874d2922a6d5cb8b45a466d94cd9cab
describe
'45510' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECK' 'sip-files0082.QC.jpg'
49f7c9802385ddd031fc0f82c1d2ce2b
f5dcc1331e0b25b73fe55d6835e4ac49b8d44578
'2011-12-31T13:39:16-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECL' 'sip-files0082.tif'
090f58cc8eb83d1790a12cb4ec648f61
f063acb31b1e55064d707502c1d425ec9418ed18
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECM' 'sip-files0082.txt'
d5fd164318f45fcddc9946c3422b2ed4
3c65e5b0d6c09e41a271995d10017fdf9b2f3d3c
describe
Invalid character
'21422' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECN' 'sip-files0082thm.jpg'
5f878a877dd138cbe11e5a75273a5cc5
0fe1ea2905bb3a51c64f06fe6f832a213f65f038
describe
'62806' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECO' 'sip-files0083.jp2'
17e74deba7f8cec089c51136d3eecbe1
9e21acd2071cf1a5ec2784d01cbf52371c9c25c9
'2011-12-31T13:36:35-05:00'
describe
'113663' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECP' 'sip-files0083.jpg'
6496644e9fc5b90c07ed88532425e716
eeedde66f7ec98c0c3d9e610bd668441ee87365d
describe
'27290' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECQ' 'sip-files0083.pro'
544966b404b8d4b83481b53005e38957
24ca618306506633562b165510bff08aa00efdfb
describe
'48670' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECR' 'sip-files0083.QC.jpg'
00b69995c3465af34848db525ab8a73e
e0ce4eb054b549ffc7764cc66d3357ae20fbd505
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECS' 'sip-files0083.tif'
691b2bd998d858f06f14921e714cc258
420c8f96722369a204b1dd9f15f6e33d214e1ce6
'2011-12-31T13:37:08-05:00'
describe
'1091' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECT' 'sip-files0083.txt'
6fe8501f9fa6ff36c4f7fe9a292b76de
525a5f89f3fefd03f2559e012768e77d84f6c85b
describe
'22816' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECU' 'sip-files0083thm.jpg'
711c81efdc132a3da082e82c984afbbe
bda349775b1acb53e54b2b718b4261029a2fcb31
'2011-12-31T13:37:33-05:00'
describe
'62791' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECV' 'sip-files0084.jp2'
5f85f49d32eb6744c915feb8c9dc2635
d40a4e6c4ce750030727560443cd33fac51e795b
describe
'120957' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECW' 'sip-files0084.jpg'
17e0beb494d3c06a6b10d312bbc3e96d
a6976b6f258e99867574a753bdfe5827c51d1dad
describe
'29121' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECX' 'sip-files0084.pro'
ca1fe8d202f1933097cf119442ab3754
7ae09ec57835604c7aaa56b222b565272268a6d0
describe
'50762' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECY' 'sip-files0084.QC.jpg'
204703446d6a1dc02fda4543230fc9ae
8370a434662794e053d5354c4e6d15b25b84e5e0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAECZ' 'sip-files0084.tif'
c9282fbddf28f8266d058e2dc6e9ca5b
4ca3d75b69552e6da57faddcb23c8ae31f750eef
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDA' 'sip-files0084.txt'
326bbf89b4a0bded73bbe45f52230ae3
a0bb418eefe35b6d36066717f693f1f996178dd6
describe
'23092' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDB' 'sip-files0084thm.jpg'
b1455fc836ebc9ccb00176a0cdd136d8
e52e3dcf6e8a65693712cfb93e699cd87907d71b
'2011-12-31T13:41:18-05:00'
describe
'62823' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDC' 'sip-files0085.jp2'
63a00823ce1916c310d397d64f824d7c
8120fcfca4fb54eef50051992b7da4273847422d
'2011-12-31T13:37:53-05:00'
describe
'127231' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDD' 'sip-files0085.jpg'
d2b34548ba53684b2762ea9dc489548e
28b38f140f7afa05006aaf65d6c47ee89c7aee02
describe
'24255' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDE' 'sip-files0085.pro'
7535d3f5b64fe230b7997143f7b73fac
fce89172e60169c5c75217d6382ad3a5b666bd16
describe
'50552' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDF' 'sip-files0085.QC.jpg'
1e022f1d35104147b2704a00514169e7
efe862e0ea144a2d398e78802116016edb51de3d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDG' 'sip-files0085.tif'
c9328c18613de3c516327cadfd399466
52328e221788c73c91964956f7772a405daba870
describe
'961' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDH' 'sip-files0085.txt'
d664a0bc8c6de7477e99d385c00797e8
05f3e0e046aa3d423d23967b15e3fd6a26ec24af
describe
'22866' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDI' 'sip-files0085thm.jpg'
795c8331b32334ea56e7841a40bfd03c
db6e11f6e8ed510b6b6eaf790b81ca0a26f0c4db
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDJ' 'sip-files0086.jp2'
15187166ebf7375a54a228cf10fb6ac6
a6b8d14ef7229da52e53b87a9f3348b19c29cb05
describe
'121505' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDK' 'sip-files0086.jpg'
51f261659ae8c6b51995383770314360
e7ace7b67e1ea401bde980483e85158fe3f5f5fe
'2011-12-31T13:35:33-05:00'
describe
'29466' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDL' 'sip-files0086.pro'
ed98ff00e616f8257d510ef1217d1af5
8228960ec1a386547afe955f539853809d2efda9
describe
'50996' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDM' 'sip-files0086.QC.jpg'
53fcd28e761f340ab7a6b2bba173eb23
c40231e411fb90e2f766b33fe61e39ad050b6ffc
'2011-12-31T13:41:03-05:00'
describe
'516640' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDN' 'sip-files0086.tif'
7bbe82a3fa830f94d75843b45ee27d98
a3c79eba77b9bd14977615cf17f7af4443752ad7
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDO' 'sip-files0086.txt'
158b92b3d127dd39c8264b25ef166d73
081cc09f11ed0bacefdba13ac3755c0f6c3b108b
describe
'22883' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDP' 'sip-files0086thm.jpg'
193aa52b553c6ec3933670144cf66693
131b2b1c2486b0580269659dff60baf50608322c
describe
'62846' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDQ' 'sip-files0087.jp2'
b7cab67b0e6b6e74abf47c1863e12059
29c08edd46e08051916f934bf244ed0b6fc33117
describe
'120841' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDR' 'sip-files0087.jpg'
dd38d3c71d1238a372cd5c31f7505d09
d5411836928bb6d8063b01150eca07c255f7e7a3
describe
'30562' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDS' 'sip-files0087.pro'
65095f1ace2939518c23162223ff68d7
f8998221a56a536812546b42eeeb40ae0db18d2d
'2011-12-31T13:38:52-05:00'
describe
'51168' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDT' 'sip-files0087.QC.jpg'
2acc348f7dc77acab804f2b5a1af1baf
9d46962d08dfafc940085d7016f4fc9001335046
'2011-12-31T13:39:44-05:00'
describe
'516596' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDU' 'sip-files0087.tif'
5322700ef2fc4ad155bcac00715142a3
987d747e8c5dab8013690d14317d9632fe8c1cfd
'2011-12-31T13:38:10-05:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDV' 'sip-files0087.txt'
3473c7ad341392f04f4b1802260a5441
9e763bf131048634bd24c004fd2709659a1b4531
describe
'22938' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDW' 'sip-files0087thm.jpg'
d5ca3149f07a3360dcbc9daaaaad8a8c
4658f3d8137ceaeb1758352cb6ad87bc3ca1e125
'2011-12-31T13:35:03-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDX' 'sip-files0088.jp2'
460c419951aa3136d1ba0bef4f84211c
1bf3847ec7a4737208691e2830d7088b468c7ff5
describe
'118779' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDY' 'sip-files0088.jpg'
0129e1f2a3416f76834854a433cba34d
66f4a0c1a1a0b64b355842172867a3f44a18cf6e
'2011-12-31T13:36:47-05:00'
describe
'27878' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEDZ' 'sip-files0088.pro'
43c04ac4d810eb38adec59396782bfd9
d0bcc8bca61ca6ff2d8f36a28dd14755b6cb20f9
describe
'49784' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEA' 'sip-files0088.QC.jpg'
33fb184b8b36615cba663bccba83e1ee
ac62b07f505bedc9c169ec4eb0c9fc40ce0df5a6
describe
'516612' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEB' 'sip-files0088.tif'
0b3e588b44428c7bf839ed5279e9c05c
b39d2b5ddeb689465512980bd15bb33ce9314a77
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEC' 'sip-files0088.txt'
6342e0f61664a7076ae3151cbd5b1d00
e322e91bdcb705399df11bed8fc715febd59aed5
describe
'23147' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEED' 'sip-files0088thm.jpg'
be68f5c1728fe6e72e2a19620484d0f5
51300c6537908c45389168d6aa2327b33ad705d8
describe
'62796' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEE' 'sip-files0089.jp2'
7e4d3926d3e99d560be2eb6ade1e54c8
5781fdfd6b4439c6e80f376b941d82a4d130e2b7
describe
'118415' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEF' 'sip-files0089.jpg'
74bc3acac0c2b4ca28f5384b48809292
f96e3ab731505dc447b78bf6cb1ffb3803a5e028
'2011-12-31T13:40:24-05:00'
describe
'28627' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEG' 'sip-files0089.pro'
8c0da218ac5064f13a5af13e7fa473e5
59d473c94f16949fe7fe6890165a3092bbb10626
describe
'50389' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEH' 'sip-files0089.QC.jpg'
66182dcabc7c7c324383a4829c25928a
35f7ecc022ffbd6717b66b8a603c202d55324d14
describe
'516680' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEI' 'sip-files0089.tif'
6821bf410d9633f20e1091d513450237
1122cbad7762bc56804aaff2b1c9edbdb5c67895
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEJ' 'sip-files0089.txt'
3cf101bde921baa45ae3ae900a3bca8b
8cb713055c52cede893d7c8c69a90aa300aff25b
describe
'22976' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEK' 'sip-files0089thm.jpg'
838d69abaa6dd1cefca14715b82b5c6a
aeef65177bbfeab08a52b08144e99ffa8093e376
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEL' 'sip-files0090.jp2'
6b36deb360043e0c08a17ae151763069
96bc5f9ce47ad6a679456e0b5a3da8327095810f
describe
'118705' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEM' 'sip-files0090.jpg'
f28ede434fc1152b9cc65bc193207ed3
bb1b5daf2de355e7859666647499673779e9b3f0
'2011-12-31T13:41:10-05:00'
describe
'11423' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEN' 'sip-files0090.pro'
5b13a8b6511b112098557c32cad83a89
4c180d080383fde26c4c5df1948f1e15e4aee342
'2011-12-31T13:37:01-05:00'
describe
'45398' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEO' 'sip-files0090.QC.jpg'
bc323034901d2fd1967d50878833f8b6
5a08bf38126e5118517b19bc9e353a3df99d6c24
describe
'516040' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEP' 'sip-files0090.tif'
b97ca2ce96f2be94d1822fef69dadd08
e8191741244f0c0970b2db1995d24ec193abcdc8
describe
'464' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEQ' 'sip-files0090.txt'
e597b40f4f8671e9b1fe0ef9efbcbb94
75e3e06c999e5d94004463991d17364ff6b37263
describe
'21641' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEER' 'sip-files0090thm.jpg'
23efd75a864b2124d28380f806b075a4
656845f4b5f7b0ef16ac04ded190bf98147b7270
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEES' 'sip-files0091.jp2'
adc0c9b8dcee9540409b989f788160f5
446ee997e07b9cff15a71914eaa5e6281262a0aa
describe
'116464' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEET' 'sip-files0091.jpg'
e63c98364aec563e507c064b36ff785f
ba69c1692f7ca90cbc7919349256e498e3c3a3b3
'2011-12-31T13:36:46-05:00'
describe
'28762' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEU' 'sip-files0091.pro'
298d0c31fa283a87a12cc5ab6b2bda34
2da16fb8c38769cff14b0e4369662aa10612e35e
describe
'48756' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEV' 'sip-files0091.QC.jpg'
77d98e5dc9e460bc79c6c85564dfaf35
b9e17e5b412a0e7350b55c3c9943e5f33dd814a5
describe
'516388' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEW' 'sip-files0091.tif'
7b66a8f5ccf4d82b94ce55692998f6ad
05e56435b2d80e70229d80395ae12b2d34a90ca4
describe
'1166' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEX' 'sip-files0091.txt'
69cdf77717e879572f57a2ee517a9bb5
55d040ba21e4c5f71fe7cf24bf93da1e7249022a
describe
'22134' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEY' 'sip-files0091thm.jpg'
d3498b7e732dfd97ca151a876b28e5bd
6efece1e32d09ab03de2d52e36c835318355fc67
describe
'62830' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEEZ' 'sip-files0092.jp2'
e396f754373dc20da647741eed8cd174
a26a4f3b8960d785e61537983f3ac79a0f966e45
describe
'116852' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFA' 'sip-files0092.jpg'
a51aeebf49061eb8cb475cae8ed16ef1
8013bb54f6e39404005c2763fa8be17556bcd0bf
describe
'27209' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFB' 'sip-files0092.pro'
1e3030852f30e0cc8de004d6c81eb0d6
adb1f7fd59407483b7bac76092a06b026e08a4be
'2011-12-31T13:39:17-05:00'
describe
'49616' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFC' 'sip-files0092.QC.jpg'
f0b2cf55213538124e424ac56044ecf0
b49ad266c8b31b4822e82439eba2d53d26dd9441
describe
'516712' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFD' 'sip-files0092.tif'
0affa7e59b62e8e10a5dbc22dcb648b3
074e5c2f9b56c568ad83f2aeedbcfc62046f50d7
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFE' 'sip-files0092.txt'
4ec3d35b97fe5295329f7998f31a5a99
8aefb8bfee5b3c26ca0676346ba41899f0dc3b28
'2011-12-31T13:40:34-05:00'
describe
'23050' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFF' 'sip-files0092thm.jpg'
61a3103391e07dc230ff0b1cf98ab5d5
d3b883e1920eb0ba54c8b1a454972d4be8452cd5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFG' 'sip-files0093.jp2'
67a2356c826c518abe352b3acfd9a9de
abff8afcd8c1ed882f305007b35d52c604803da6
'2011-12-31T13:37:55-05:00'
describe
'132541' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFH' 'sip-files0093.jpg'
af4ce6b30aa747b6e9fdba5649a18979
4b672a1825e22abe1301a3380258cbd8cefff983
'2011-12-31T13:35:12-05:00'
describe
'33211' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFI' 'sip-files0093.pro'
8781ffce3499dacc7235d27b433e32c6
45d0896aebd6beca9cf6283ddc0060990aaa426f
describe
'54424' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFJ' 'sip-files0093.QC.jpg'
6c16f4da173a1adb8174aac84c64004b
3ebfbc46f6a5a031d45a140d804ca867b7bd0485
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFK' 'sip-files0093.tif'
5a463280196d07498a8ae2689988020d
ca3d17137de70b355c5de9f5cb7277be17d66744
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFL' 'sip-files0093.txt'
a6ce1a819f9636a4d0b92cbae6523d36
3c213ed77dc04ad26ab23482fb4331a0f3fba137
describe
'23872' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFM' 'sip-files0093thm.jpg'
4b9b4f1d138d5d8705d3df0c80136ec8
c976be24653f1dc12cd88d1d61d6a705e8c379d9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFN' 'sip-files0094.jp2'
80428838eee847a493c651871fcbbac8
9c3489d2454a2ff25e1040c899e31d47037fae99
'2011-12-31T13:35:43-05:00'
describe
'127086' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFO' 'sip-files0094.jpg'
e120f51678c5eb7393cd56f39e4af558
e957748894ae99733e0f369b6b2be456771960f0
'2011-12-31T13:35:16-05:00'
describe
'31765' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFP' 'sip-files0094.pro'
7635ccfad4119c0d9a6ed1eb7617a5f8
e72b3c443a73af4d8961eebb9c8ee858e38281a3
describe
'52778' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFQ' 'sip-files0094.QC.jpg'
a65e6b7e7b9fbb66082b9dbef1331a95
c1b6742b13511e5de48ffb8b276e2c2a49ae77d8
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFR' 'sip-files0094.tif'
83181ce7c1ac69aa26947174e3ea115c
f92512e661d48c7a591764566436dc22b0ea8b8d
'2011-12-31T13:39:24-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFS' 'sip-files0094.txt'
9e3c36cc527d5d234cba18edd83e43da
14f1dc9d52db769924c6f3114f1b7662471721d4
describe
'23615' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFT' 'sip-files0094thm.jpg'
933041afda411552e4663b7fe4715dd9
9f0483f3258750210dc429051f617d317bc9ca74
describe
'62755' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFU' 'sip-files0095.jp2'
2262867b75f67349e3655e9de1ecb6ea
b4e7aa30ae6303c2f076cc2ee5aac03074e8dfcf
describe
'130148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFV' 'sip-files0095.jpg'
5522b1fb26f0089e752ac24aac7e7d02
9d094b3f2dd43d431fa7d4207d94fae07506a79d
describe
'32532' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFW' 'sip-files0095.pro'
1f03d78e769b5766c7c9174a6a5ae0a3
083b6ddb84562c0dc4d2ad6f78afe7817bf81f7b
describe
'53582' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFX' 'sip-files0095.QC.jpg'
fbafc5bedab090a62f158753e7df9d28
08e2ee0c46127186854492a6840c75269269168a
describe
'516788' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFY' 'sip-files0095.tif'
9292a369cca856fa07fa3af9dd04aba8
1195d75ebd2fc519afd5208b00978a3008e8b076
describe
'1274' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEFZ' 'sip-files0095.txt'
c06f1ae9f2839d2080248de61d33ddd9
0e29dca0fb75f2cd19bfb34018a538c1bf008a6c
'2011-12-31T13:36:00-05:00'
describe
'23326' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGA' 'sip-files0095thm.jpg'
b55ce60992d2804cfc36b3b03792446a
d7ace4f07887a11875e79945fbbe852437ca7abf
'2011-12-31T13:39:25-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGB' 'sip-files0096.jp2'
a144ae6a006178c62397b948385dfad4
ef86baeec8fce52b3c353c0fc39d9f1c70f38cc8
'2011-12-31T13:39:55-05:00'
describe
'136434' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGC' 'sip-files0096.jpg'
724475149d6f672adf4df33b3d42c96b
1a7b71784c3e73cc836d90e9629a618edbb679c3
describe
'34444' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGD' 'sip-files0096.pro'
12b046bf733ffc42a39d82f28a46c830
56a3d3153299cd0fc10029376bcc6a1268d1dc9c
describe
'55966' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGE' 'sip-files0096.QC.jpg'
dabbad859fa61f2e090bde8125b10b89
2cdff25daae014a3d9fe57ff59cce91d5c68cdf9
'2011-12-31T13:38:33-05:00'
describe
'517032' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGF' 'sip-files0096.tif'
fe20fda6cbf2381679db87b1de6ac3f9
21c0c85a7a2fff2dad0c2d61605a320e601de9d3
describe
'1353' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGG' 'sip-files0096.txt'
a5a9cd958bc44902ad5024a8473e50e2
5c0a83dd364fa3dd1578673929b0113f926a5a32
describe
'23578' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGH' 'sip-files0096thm.jpg'
c704226ac737737b7dd6e889a27d0625
a6a92085996967a8f5ce7be5969bad642de9637c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGI' 'sip-files0097.jp2'
afdec1b76141c206a6064f28c905d8e5
6d2fd81d6a6156459e85fb2566704d08fd4d2de3
describe
'133808' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGJ' 'sip-files0097.jpg'
5fc57e67b9bca03f58123c5f67505577
9445e5c89588a80831411dd5d70dac4b3e054f68
'2011-12-31T13:40:35-05:00'
describe
'34770' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGK' 'sip-files0097.pro'
92589a3e3ab4165475f80dd2b80f430c
bbb304daf2f665cae7fb6817c7b08ca3b627de7a
describe
'54995' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGL' 'sip-files0097.QC.jpg'
db06023e5a61f48364e2884402b23c8e
0dc896da017a0337d286486218c7318d4c675f07
describe
'516976' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGM' 'sip-files0097.tif'
271c8a77e9f30ce0a7cda77d914e9752
ff6e6fb41eb03f44b6c2c2016e6810a43b736aa5
describe
'1381' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGN' 'sip-files0097.txt'
198834cf94a250f2d5683a38f17b4888
5769d09b222304daf56d106fcd70ebafa1afc562
describe
'23683' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGO' 'sip-files0097thm.jpg'
8c1a16b8ff5ae4a314a9297e2f4e1086
da670c014ad0788250b834fa3bce4229ea1b2088
describe
'62774' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGP' 'sip-files0098.jp2'
d4b267824d0f42a5fee18331236b3420
f1eb886403d486e3f2d1a73340cf7076756a2593
describe
'131330' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGQ' 'sip-files0098.jpg'
8e7a2ff1700eee7338c0b21513dd2a5a
90bb439012e186ae2f3852f27b8d0054e3ee5f86
describe
'32444' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGR' 'sip-files0098.pro'
093cde7ff389aadd39dcc2b3a5b5b3f8
80956c52c76a83d2286a299a9aafb5aeba006059
'2011-12-31T13:37:11-05:00'
describe
'53825' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGS' 'sip-files0098.QC.jpg'
fd62b09477edd819bbd6f3516960c015
3189d1e375d018abef8ad97ac0f4daa4c126439b
'2011-12-31T13:34:53-05:00'
describe
'516872' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGT' 'sip-files0098.tif'
77eab9596d6eb07b1721bc10849a6265
eb2d957af037d8e7b896fe7fe940a74586d22b5e
describe
'1276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGU' 'sip-files0098.txt'
495ac527e9829e51c77bf7f6a9e98017
452507f752ba6b5f2431490023b7f553dbf43a0a
'2011-12-31T13:36:11-05:00'
describe
'23440' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGV' 'sip-files0098thm.jpg'
2db028b05c69ab39eb049fe786dff26e
45eda9565ef5a3da83d2343a0499cdbcdff99831
'2011-12-31T13:36:05-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGW' 'sip-files0099.jp2'
d393fab1f1a439e8bc3dde94e221093c
b355da428671eb79b62606696fe98ef1f83658e4
describe
'112935' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGX' 'sip-files0099.jpg'
c484aa21c6bab1ea0f820a5b487aead6
0d41ed6b5e25a11e05c24a8fde2506b4c40c4014
'2011-12-31T13:36:49-05:00'
describe
'28032' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGY' 'sip-files0099.pro'
abdc3aa126be54059d842d40db627d14
4a557035ad7c257a178cfc54cefbda822bc38b93
describe
'47295' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEGZ' 'sip-files0099.QC.jpg'
7fe997f4211f79562e647a9f566cf65b
c2eef2c37a122926275c28f75b54f038bf2d5334
describe
'515988' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHA' 'sip-files0099.tif'
6f55de220961ece950c44419b3ca35e5
d11ace2f013c6af7e872cdeaa247b027ef52653d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHB' 'sip-files0099.txt'
0839376b0674626eb9b9aac3c43cd87d
9143b349ebed1935117792b6bbbd74d49bf8795f
'2011-12-31T13:39:36-05:00'
describe
'21435' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHC' 'sip-files0099thm.jpg'
3046466b881c7e4e8d1c3a29ce3db0c6
780bc1687cb1428458a6f1ab2f39e8725cd9432d
'2011-12-31T13:40:59-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHD' 'sip-files0100.jp2'
4755c4cf2e0c1c3a20d065012d80a97b
69980322a7ba57ebb99a3ed813b4725d44756d33
describe
'115624' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHE' 'sip-files0100.jpg'
9c9f761fbc164b2def2f6e5ea8fd2f10
ef93c12e0716422e260cf486ab1f206108a64c15
describe
'27338' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHF' 'sip-files0100.pro'
e6f7156e28bfe33382f9523aebeb0055
183806e9c6938ad3c285c4faa8a1765bc3879efb
describe
'48165' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHG' 'sip-files0100.QC.jpg'
7545448b104f6d0af929b95d3a7a8ae8
319525039cff229d83ded631c90195a3854efd2e
describe
'516240' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHH' 'sip-files0100.tif'
894b9b9163ce3a9a1340064ed4e1487a
008118e6b4ebf67e427348d387e2b2ea2743cb19
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHI' 'sip-files0100.txt'
4475fd7c3b52c25566ef4309807ca3bb
72c9e1366244fae3aac44035ec3f62dba984aa79
describe
'22132' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHJ' 'sip-files0100thm.jpg'
61f81de6c462e1369946d0a267606b22
7f8cf003da5f03c5ec35bcad49a08afc1c1b3d97
describe
'62856' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHK' 'sip-files0101.jp2'
b9b368ed6cb41b7a9049807fc43d236f
d4f73270c3281dae1412f3a65f16e0a42a2d6060
describe
'132051' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHL' 'sip-files0101.jpg'
cc8ff377736ee77745b6616010e1c8c1
dca5de4b3931983b2a721f3d941e8cbbdfca27bb
describe
'33654' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHM' 'sip-files0101.pro'
0cabdfa2b7e3dafce66fcd6dcf114a87
a4782796e2ab9c2f66853611d521316a2e56fed2
describe
'54849' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHN' 'sip-files0101.QC.jpg'
d4d2a928bb731498d72a9b1956eb6e06
fb052c2c0d9b6c30c0ab4577a94a223be9b95a34
describe
'517036' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHO' 'sip-files0101.tif'
0261b65a2ecc62879f08897edc32317d
34ec179bcabd036787fef6ee7febed56b92c5513
describe
'1317' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHP' 'sip-files0101.txt'
9146d8f12a17c98daa8f6c51dd154b75
1fce4e7c316c5559886219fbaf990c7a8d612214
'2011-12-31T13:35:49-05:00'
describe
'23763' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHQ' 'sip-files0101thm.jpg'
6275dbf0cb234b5f57ddf2b7cb91de5e
fbad3d990da16feb740fe45e3f01974b185039e4
describe
'62661' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHR' 'sip-files0102.jp2'
3770394bdb403f62450f52e9b7ba325e
73cf2ef0a7acc549180fd148332bc57c175f34b2
describe
'134371' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHS' 'sip-files0102.jpg'
3a80a8230de8db5a90f093fc21403cee
ab443059e125303deaa69d51d12dc4118ef2603f
'2011-12-31T13:40:50-05:00'
describe
'34606' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHT' 'sip-files0102.pro'
d3b6e0a29dbf70937b7e88d9242bb38c
90df2ff7331c399fdcc3e502d9c83681a2352c1d
describe
'55117' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHU' 'sip-files0102.QC.jpg'
b63df4d87869b7d48bfc2d4e4e364813
99f597ace89c775a4ae71322de348ba42a06234b
describe
'516996' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHV' 'sip-files0102.tif'
7ccc91c89b9fba1ed75631e40e891f61
0fefeb179039c249a4aee16c1ea3268224296055
describe
'1363' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHW' 'sip-files0102.txt'
a50640be55c00fa6e2e6515383b15ce3
c63ef65c5de8e1919d01f36bf3dcb70023dc60bc
describe
'23757' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHX' 'sip-files0102thm.jpg'
90daafb2c072f920fee86657fb6e38d3
6dc26a5696b56f589734442172bc8c1b63c7f3d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHY' 'sip-files0103.jp2'
bf74b0d7640042a520eccbeff0f56d0b
842aa376ed593a7c0d0184083759c8e3fbf7d0a3
describe
'123984' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEHZ' 'sip-files0103.jpg'
fa8788e6bdf374304b73d8216b2aac3a
26a01d292c954cc1c8e5d1aff630e68e4cbebc37
describe
'31375' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIA' 'sip-files0103.pro'
55f589257ebd4dc25961cc4b6271d410
a59a81f19daeda1f1c1f357cd1b97da7b6f7066f
describe
'51883' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIB' 'sip-files0103.QC.jpg'
64a16905971a6c2aa68b846ef01df710
009009fafabf69d61a08436000de2f34b785e5f1
describe
'516804' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIC' 'sip-files0103.tif'
291688df29634175398b132216abbda3
8b3abcd23ccdab065ddd58e73983efbdb56146b8
describe
'1251' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEID' 'sip-files0103.txt'
0a751671ae8a5449d82482ee7ec3959e
a2ebf3b543fa78e6788e980179b314a81e52bdcd
describe
'23114' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIE' 'sip-files0103thm.jpg'
161c06d49ff65bc520a536bfa7391b35
96a1b7b96b31caf4a7cb93b4efe373391ca3a5ba
describe
'62772' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIF' 'sip-files0104.jp2'
159aaa771a76f586d8f407774d9d3e3f
9bd951a011c2b8beacea1b3dc64b4add1d234de5
describe
'134905' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIG' 'sip-files0104.jpg'
7e5769667e4a20017417436b0d659ed5
7a72ebb5ea9b547448930fdf77522bd692f06b45
describe
'34754' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIH' 'sip-files0104.pro'
fa6e136fb974e376036232e0c4ccf20f
94178a783d8f0fd3005cf4d52d265b3dfb56982f
describe
'55295' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEII' 'sip-files0104.QC.jpg'
851d2d1094b0c19f30709c08cbfbaa22
a58095136d02533f06cd47a9b55eb5cfad4ef364
'2011-12-31T13:35:41-05:00'
describe
'516916' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIJ' 'sip-files0104.tif'
989427c235a30a2903e50a890ab619c6
56fd069792fd42767633d330dbab4047fe04612d
describe
'1401' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIK' 'sip-files0104.txt'
da37c458b83484c8070e6a603316d6a7
f7ee9ed713914c687674754522fda0d27021bb38
'2011-12-31T13:39:50-05:00'
describe
'23663' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIL' 'sip-files0104thm.jpg'
71f20c59ad3b17512ee773b6026529bb
bee4faf2be947d1b617b407a8166ac2ed33c68a1
describe
'62865' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIM' 'sip-files0105.jp2'
7afd62a543dfbb0d19ffe959f7b2ceb7
eb711aa379412c63c3d5177f8dd50b75f96df18a
describe
'133131' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIN' 'sip-files0105.jpg'
97ae21dcf4343f5de1c69a52901e6557
87a8cff8171a29ca972ab7e52670285aedf84a97
describe
'34530' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIO' 'sip-files0105.pro'
650c38c06370b44dc02fec7a8ca46bb2
c814dfa884ed221135312d2bd64d0135832d2a73
describe
'55437' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIP' 'sip-files0105.QC.jpg'
ef117ea594fae6ba46120bb3f51a01bb
de6e5969036b26869635b04a2ba74523eb8c5103
describe
'516980' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIQ' 'sip-files0105.tif'
7d6b88020199323abcb59b3f839c0927
e458060c6d1383b3a9dfd20594a2d292466a8d69
describe
'1355' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIR' 'sip-files0105.txt'
af2de10adbd823af36d86f424d9bb65d
7bd46933da44e35a85e46d02ad38f34455156693
describe
'23710' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIS' 'sip-files0105thm.jpg'
5f4a4e2ad4fb4539a3c60ea19da2795d
6f468c17d297898f4c9394716b986f8abfbe2876
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIT' 'sip-files0106.jp2'
1af9b2275cb05ed92a730de0473cf59a
6ae43be2934c55b0383783e1db813de07be03d85
describe
'131674' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIU' 'sip-files0106.jpg'
b914f07d6f3f241f518fb41d193841aa
980b449a952c3e106124341370020b717e5910ab
'2011-12-31T13:37:19-05:00'
describe
'32605' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIV' 'sip-files0106.pro'
db5c254cdfaa81b8b8adfbfce61bf69c
b452f8349e736bfafae8fd016d701e7f3fcf43c0
describe
'54884' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIW' 'sip-files0106.QC.jpg'
6d35ab6e4316c8cfa0460ea56e9aa207
ee13529354ddf51de6033cd9ecf38a6c0f39cb1a
describe
'517028' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIX' 'sip-files0106.tif'
29e717e83f6dbf07d038f35b839b9a45
d9553b7cc1d38c692645c5c2d89138360b9440b5
describe
'1275' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIY' 'sip-files0106.txt'
70370a2975da0e19954138fc4fb7403f
291ead9b5ef7e224ae4ab82128fd3d875c8b5bec
describe
'23912' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEIZ' 'sip-files0106thm.jpg'
4d300a0e1dadf565034591a547422657
fd59026945ca8d955052916ed76f60d44c7c5135
describe
'62872' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJA' 'sip-files0107.jp2'
caeaba39fa2575fa5a436310f186f0cb
244a9e8bd9c78f8c58dc9a329ef21dfdd6627baf
describe
'133865' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJB' 'sip-files0107.jpg'
3fb0d49c66d5bacb34fbe7260367154f
83832d106351acb25e8601084f55cfd696f656c7
describe
'31846' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJC' 'sip-files0107.pro'
2323f7a9a88d21c407ad0817c32d6d22
638345aaeae2a7f0b330d91e7f8cb9ac63f3ad87
describe
'54926' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJD' 'sip-files0107.QC.jpg'
7956c131b0a46ffbf72130aa68d7a983
c7dd72124865b664bdd536b69d199574ecd1c2b9
describe
'517000' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJE' 'sip-files0107.tif'
8898f038359156968a784a93dc64940f
c0631cfbe59d2e4fd0020bcabc6b355e5bfc5161
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJF' 'sip-files0107.txt'
479f9df2543448a13a030572792b69d5
8b9121c34082e4f0420ebf1019da151c9ccbdcc9
describe
'23882' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJG' 'sip-files0107thm.jpg'
55279778db63e464145293f75331bb81
ef124d8bb33e03861081022d6bec298c11ab2d6f
describe
'62813' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJH' 'sip-files0108.jp2'
ce595a438cf9c65960a797ec939a64aa
90587aa9d0ee7828ea9a230900bd64e3d92e27a2
describe
'130597' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJI' 'sip-files0108.jpg'
e559311bcdbd0e4f4ec9e5d1fc080469
24e2fd1b906a6af267e7380e5c51034669719251
'2011-12-31T13:39:46-05:00'
describe
'33393' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJJ' 'sip-files0108.pro'
ec25f74c54c423d0b96f1b422c786483
725edabb24fc5249dd5abe30bbef04f36375ca3a
'2011-12-31T13:40:53-05:00'
describe
'53818' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJK' 'sip-files0108.QC.jpg'
70bfc72e18b2be19cfc0260950fae3e5
ee330451ea002998804674154fad1c5d32a48566
describe
'516936' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJL' 'sip-files0108.tif'
f7b960badd8181daab30b98627db3c7e
b0974e6af6b8760bc1bc3907b8611439b26c4fbd
describe
'1304' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJM' 'sip-files0108.txt'
b1dc690f0f3bf0752e541b2c7973ea40
21a75754af03881576cc40d7d4bc7a974fb2ecba
describe
'23780' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJN' 'sip-files0108thm.jpg'
6a33a70e380304732f92f76926c1eef5
ecaa14125cc7c2c4c79fac5a65198492bcb0b90e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJO' 'sip-files0109.jp2'
b812c6b353d04144cc11f1fd15c7264c
14bb2089fcee9c8d294b197e395b309c2c562bed
describe
'126768' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJP' 'sip-files0109.jpg'
6dfb8f04c1f0c26ed6c6ef75cc6f626b
5dc38a951aea42f4202326d7043492961244b978
describe
'31458' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJQ' 'sip-files0109.pro'
f65eec4ae02388dd8bd60aa303a121c8
ee0fa6fa680a85030f1a2b627e3a5ff6e85464a3
describe
'52883' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJR' 'sip-files0109.QC.jpg'
344cfd29d3744a8c947c02fb3616e8fe
25a5bd3701c7c55b6420b738b20079e5a7220e59
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJS' 'sip-files0109.tif'
3dd94166039a8a67ca477777e6f598db
9d6b3c085b8306564427ed0f8c5a7371c86d0200
'2011-12-31T13:34:49-05:00'
describe
'1248' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJT' 'sip-files0109.txt'
739835e6dece9611084df6f55dc0146f
77fe5c8bf3f7a4a730630d6118331173fc6ddd3b
'2011-12-31T13:38:55-05:00'
describe
'23460' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJU' 'sip-files0109thm.jpg'
61c82caf0555769661127b984f2a142c
6f9764efa722fcdbaa0a79c500f87ab67678a028
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJV' 'sip-files0110.jp2'
9e46cb32e0f35a670bc3d1e8bef86381
bef0b747de60dfa5882cf7acf2d4bd660dd9cb7d
'2011-12-31T13:37:00-05:00'
describe
'138441' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJW' 'sip-files0110.jpg'
74756e29d2315805b87c37527e1e4db7
77e89913cac8ad059fd1e8ef5e739f8c97f797d5
'2011-12-31T13:37:59-05:00'
describe
'35346' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJX' 'sip-files0110.pro'
c3ccb419faef15143c91741887489529
720317b8f3ab5bbf04d9dff3badc9448246f7f7e
describe
'56770' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJY' 'sip-files0110.QC.jpg'
123fb85d1a97ff0229edef5002316a21
c4d24403d6a73236583d2fda7db297e7970820ed
describe
'517192' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEJZ' 'sip-files0110.tif'
84ecd9fa0d055fe2bd94609bf296bf4b
95781e02e16772969e563f97853b24edb4507da9
describe
'1392' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKA' 'sip-files0110.txt'
9fb97c78d2d3f188b282cd24c3c84264
cf2d0677294a7fc02f186cdaccfca7d0b4cbbcd0
describe
Invalid character
'24261' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKB' 'sip-files0110thm.jpg'
ed9fef6b3aad2340f0dd9c3d4eafcfad
18cc0dc6d2e662417db36266fce37241109e69f7
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKC' 'sip-files0111.jp2'
be6b271a757fb06773dfcb5740607cde
9c606e720634d19e320b297764e14ad673f2235f
describe
'123881' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKD' 'sip-files0111.jpg'
707044514d8b44bb1a5c66520afc4146
6e2cb42441d9c5cf299bc224a28aeaecc5dc22de
describe
'30233' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKE' 'sip-files0111.pro'
02338afada050bbd079872ba815eb916
f39cddf3eecaf5a5ecfa3796631cf47b3327a679
describe
'52625' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKF' 'sip-files0111.QC.jpg'
2a1a9eb16aad8c36221ab65465d2b224
ed0fb5f119cea1f3daa94bc0a4cb5f283076634f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKG' 'sip-files0111.tif'
1feefd4861ec12c4675756b85286a833
773e52599d3d4e3e6615133694f4fe1ebefcdd34
'2011-12-31T13:38:43-05:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKH' 'sip-files0111.txt'
c7974e7f4ee045a6b781ba8dfa624752
7ae942593a0942d3adccb9f0e98d95cfc8d67f7b
describe
'23614' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKI' 'sip-files0111thm.jpg'
49825f250423a447501c54107fa1c665
ea9c3aa2a0c8722a6d06efea11de843068feb889
'2011-12-31T13:41:17-05:00'
describe
'62776' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKJ' 'sip-files0112.jp2'
a1796e42f7f9e1199e6cfc4df7e05e0c
fd084d64129c73aafce7e39327d0b4d4f2378b67
describe
'129015' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKK' 'sip-files0112.jpg'
5b201cbac627bb1e16cfd8d28fbfb547
cfff0bef936336b618feaf24dc48557de1319504
describe
'33113' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKL' 'sip-files0112.pro'
ce437cfc89722108cd84aaa6ecc288c8
52499fa8bfef07532f34dfbfdcf5c429c0397146
describe
'52903' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKM' 'sip-files0112.QC.jpg'
969592e38d260017bcf29cf92d0db411
61530fcdf1d95e5ae757b24bf89f994653f2b416
describe
'516988' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKN' 'sip-files0112.tif'
5a42875ac5d89debb86e8749608f3111
fa608e2f46531e6061c59e2ac9f731aba2343b9e
describe
'1307' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKO' 'sip-files0112.txt'
9b1c30596dd3ae3a1fa0238086918db4
cfb62391aed4eb6a770632560bbb0ea32f407257
describe
Invalid character
'23681' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKP' 'sip-files0112thm.jpg'
81cec586338a0046f5c1dec7bd7c5873
2f24d366e30d7b6bf668eca2e7112942bd365d09
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKQ' 'sip-files0113.jp2'
aae8c7382167e2612d4fa30b0aba9b71
0a50d47b6182527f0b7a6f49b5668f903d6c5181
'2011-12-31T13:37:15-05:00'
describe
'128483' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKR' 'sip-files0113.jpg'
6ff862881830551417c30e6634c44167
de4a1934b31576e1249fbaa975bf521d04051d54
describe
'31966' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKS' 'sip-files0113.pro'
cc8ade076f8602853c78307ea877d37e
d309b7ba1693ad6df264ce976f207e4cd1ca5d65
describe
'53599' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKT' 'sip-files0113.QC.jpg'
273813f70494a5f1b2cc550568708afd
19de0bebd76cabb3aad1df112f5bb256d463579c
describe
'516984' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKU' 'sip-files0113.tif'
42eeaa3a7ec0881bf1842ca9fb650c84
9001cdc356e6c63ceaa1588ebd6f35cb6763d17e
describe
'1261' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKV' 'sip-files0113.txt'
5ec7aa1eacac23b0c868d76ab8b82738
a8b60857203ec78bcedcfd84af099dbdbef8c227
describe
'23389' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKW' 'sip-files0113thm.jpg'
6d69f07cc0637ffe5744747cfa771924
75a93f9308d1c760e028090637437623c4430e13
describe
'62684' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKX' 'sip-files0114.jp2'
15a3bb54710a1fdbbeb2ee3b06195597
5a3aa14cb7b106b5b54392bdbb111bb94b9e7d0b
describe
'136191' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKY' 'sip-files0114.jpg'
4d7c130523304ad207e7c3df9c87a013
e8a45c42ca8fd79e163ba9f6762b52d4d21332df
describe
'34810' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEKZ' 'sip-files0114.pro'
b103301de93b96a184cdf94d432904eb
b8fc65207087558c6f5923008048205e0a1159f1
describe
'55308' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELA' 'sip-files0114.QC.jpg'
e676f7a83764033b211cf06d840b75ed
4e18890b82244cd3e051d442bdbc525d3d9f6852
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELB' 'sip-files0114.tif'
3f2fd4beaa0300a86fe30e0420156fdc
edb690bc42a666286c6c967a66432981b94c25c2
describe
'1358' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELC' 'sip-files0114.txt'
e2b3a39e080c676563f587d8835761fc
e7bb8df6770b704988f738098cec7f0aa65bba7b
describe
'23431' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELD' 'sip-files0114thm.jpg'
3e70f21178b9c68c5cb6cb2e6f7db5e9
d156fc680ed7a27bb9ec40786ec53d6e2b096e72
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELE' 'sip-files0115.jp2'
782d017e6641b5d9fe82775cec2f0f0a
2e22a5c181d8dd2c0db0541093717f35e3b15f2a
describe
'122482' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELF' 'sip-files0115.jpg'
3263d1c90cee0bb26cfa168611fc5ef5
928198fb7292e25bb7a59632dd4e5071923b46e4
'2011-12-31T13:36:55-05:00'
describe
'30535' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELG' 'sip-files0115.pro'
c256c67b303feaa35bb16c474901e47b
f98ee9096dd0d6f6e74eef28f80816f3b0cbb83a
describe
'50963' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELH' 'sip-files0115.QC.jpg'
4c86dd6bcff067e7ed35bce9228c3f43
c5762383e33c4566f74f9ef226b3eed7e4f1f797
'2011-12-31T13:40:57-05:00'
describe
'516476' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELI' 'sip-files0115.tif'
baaa342e23eb6cc65af04235e678f8d9
fceb9cd7c3ef07f6891e22259fc5fa15b6470fdb
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELJ' 'sip-files0115.txt'
1f91b8140e12c9a83921de01da141f73
b05568c13e03cbcf26dacce5be3cf1372ab6412b
describe
'22437' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELK' 'sip-files0115thm.jpg'
fa95912d4e35157e3392ec236dc09c6e
8a590cc7833267e03b437188582a4bb919c7908e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELL' 'sip-files0116.jp2'
fdb2368096fc6add521d21edaf17a400
f1b782f987b051a486a7900df71d214042eb7962
describe
'112483' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELM' 'sip-files0116.jpg'
ae1572e309a7a08d7902e077d6487aae
dc404a127bec33b6e255c4862ce92cbc67c88711
describe
'27394' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELN' 'sip-files0116.pro'
decd7610b69ee27c53110fa40cc775fd
db3d5b0eb50229f8a3b54244684146c6c6f19cb8
describe
'47941' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELO' 'sip-files0116.QC.jpg'
5b83a74ba8b01fc7c805f76cb09dd59f
7aada89256f4ce1a94536d3cb2c2990def0b445b
describe
'516232' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELP' 'sip-files0116.tif'
7f954616714e214e353b488c91a61ee8
c3a08b7d5c6f79eaa8418b52c61f100b28f32a60
'2011-12-31T13:41:06-05:00'
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELQ' 'sip-files0116.txt'
caf8c552774245fee2673820e55f33e8
faa7d29aff307afdfd8594f488895f786c6c4135
describe
'22101' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELR' 'sip-files0116thm.jpg'
b7dbeb7987d3f44e6eb36cc43d4c15f6
938f8e7ac81a9e2d9bf930eaab9fb63f97424606
describe
'62829' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELS' 'sip-files0117.jp2'
978202793c2f5739d8ba8e18dc164001
585695782ff871dc166bf7b87b33a3fb45ca66b1
describe
'128092' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELT' 'sip-files0117.jpg'
920bb0b4728d38b3f05d24a4cae0c04f
950f3e03c4d60c22b4404557c619d886971a32f4
describe
'32595' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELU' 'sip-files0117.pro'
330f821da74e0732d52f5c8405b60477
686527b79771a1ecc501b8460db3608db7166978
describe
'53127' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELV' 'sip-files0117.QC.jpg'
5a9ef74b3b666383d637fdf9d8b57bac
e8fb3dec7ed0898d30d115e14cc1d63de7bf9695
describe
'517108' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELW' 'sip-files0117.tif'
466aeaa2f07401f7b646fbb82ef39633
162d0edc1ddf1d3f6c328aa8934bd9fa1191e91b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELX' 'sip-files0117.txt'
87eb52e9739f57f38b7d453c87c732cd
9dee4b559cef26f17ba1661f45bc26db054eb7be
describe
'23810' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELY' 'sip-files0117thm.jpg'
1a2e686e5c3b39a0bbdb288ae27ecd55
de99dd071d02f5407aaa262135221ff8a14f43c2
describe
'62863' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAELZ' 'sip-files0118.jp2'
41c95d82ae6ce7afe31fb054d04471ba
ad44dcd47245fd70add5bede45dda656020d469e
describe
'124877' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMA' 'sip-files0118.jpg'
896a59f9720b944fe485060d0942782d
78487f06b32380a5b7a263bc296b3db1538d7b35
describe
'26000' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMB' 'sip-files0118.pro'
3273d3ec9c235bcf90900d7564361688
1735d1a22f6445adf8d837007edce725161ded2f
describe
'51169' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMC' 'sip-files0118.QC.jpg'
ecd3861d662fbf3b2dfc0fbbdd7e8d76
396b85d4de89a4a4a262ac8b609c9d32c4cef76c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMD' 'sip-files0118.tif'
9880a50826fed8bdde593e3c39b48623
c56afedb3729d5c9ec809347e505fe85ac800099
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEME' 'sip-files0118.txt'
b9d4a9bef0042527c10c3545423824f9
57f7727c7599c367be2cc9dcaa59df5e1aceaa36
'2011-12-31T13:36:14-05:00'
describe
'23107' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMF' 'sip-files0118thm.jpg'
82934ef8debd4b3a9f56d0a1e1b3b268
fc84fbb265261255329f4c86863b3dd7e6983f3b
describe
'62676' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMG' 'sip-files0119.jp2'
96cc327e600a9545a01502d0e943d9e6
643be1a4664a2a0b15776a79c7fc1534b26ba7be
describe
'135089' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMH' 'sip-files0119.jpg'
f54456859a3e6f13c73c790cf7a29e15
cee8d2f7fc5edb523513ef2c57d7518692b169eb
describe
'34229' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMI' 'sip-files0119.pro'
39fde54fa2eac05675ac7b4c3abcba6a
f8d30f45f51f0feae7fe4be134a84805b9a62289
describe
'54417' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMJ' 'sip-files0119.QC.jpg'
00b049071938ba01380282b7bd75d1ef
14ed78847fa580f1b2d953f9101a887f7bb678e4
'2011-12-31T13:36:26-05:00'
describe
'517024' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMK' 'sip-files0119.tif'
4cb0998ec293c57fe000fb4292b7b1c4
7f3ae1731977ba2720ee40ebe776179aba05f5e8
describe
'1380' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEML' 'sip-files0119.txt'
002bd9cd48a422e7506a90e30251143f
ac15ef101e4bddecab3f43adf726a03a9ce3467d
describe
'23679' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMM' 'sip-files0119thm.jpg'
3312f09828a5b478d5f15ef2cd943acc
6831ea009063c3c77160e8ec30950fb74151c01e
describe
'62733' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMN' 'sip-files0120.jp2'
909124be79384bdb4d93bbc01ecb25f6
bc65cd97a9c468b6b7b37b228094f5aa9aa9044c
describe
'119950' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMO' 'sip-files0120.jpg'
080a7617cae0424e8107d0494d89118b
2bfd9cec217229092e26d0acf67f07f1129a95b3
describe
'28962' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMP' 'sip-files0120.pro'
93f04d48a7cf1d863e094184179ac0ee
bbb2395b0162f36bdca24e7c0b5f9555b2ad1057
describe
'51006' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMQ' 'sip-files0120.QC.jpg'
bf0630da7f30e7d3910cd50543ae1a7c
2225f4d4489f21eda16c6351def7d850341ce882
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMR' 'sip-files0120.tif'
b74e355268f431073e3ccd5255983828
b113cd23193df1c45f41c563f64aefe58df354db
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMS' 'sip-files0120.txt'
7e983bf9141743fb2ebaa8252a09e9dc
007348f5b3782ef7b7e7aa74bf227d28fe31159f
describe
'23587' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMT' 'sip-files0120thm.jpg'
032525ae6cf35ce5845e388a00a38aca
227931521257b4b027b927dc78f53e231e1b9514
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMU' 'sip-files0121.jp2'
308a9b9b8ce7a19617beba5ee2b6a86d
e5107b586454f46c3333eccb6eaa94735ef35eaa
describe
'128323' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMV' 'sip-files0121.jpg'
ab04da30e2c72a42e7b6df90ffb62b7a
f70c928ab8ecda4697f6df990fa164550853f3b9
describe
'30854' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMW' 'sip-files0121.pro'
3edc7948aa63ea93ff1ae3fd028b5c13
eae6c1dede3c1b8d227c82aaa1e2862ef72048d2
describe
'53099' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMX' 'sip-files0121.QC.jpg'
680c0607da7eccb43de93e6f3637cd25
f29a580dadaa0c2f8399d6ee93386655326548bb
describe
'516952' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMY' 'sip-files0121.tif'
7191566ce06bc7ba2fa366e526d70a7b
0974b6617d4903888c2f5de77df446ac2173b53b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEMZ' 'sip-files0121.txt'
1f21aec0625c2618c30b452defb60623
e3ea473ee0b6a9be53784c9a5fddaed888f16b3b
describe
'23486' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENA' 'sip-files0121thm.jpg'
e0e36885530209cb3a873d8bece6586f
811d3e45d2907083d2d0530a6dac7f1365dd6641
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENB' 'sip-files0122.jp2'
754ea5905c2abd99a4363d818f5061bf
2d57273e1bf2ba58bd66ca165383fd36170425e4
'2011-12-31T13:39:35-05:00'
describe
'133485' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENC' 'sip-files0122.jpg'
49abfe8e1a82923d95c004e5aa61a85c
d7acfd299dbbba2060d0f82bb896da1a5bf8720e
describe
'33251' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEND' 'sip-files0122.pro'
2f6ba62b4fa10f1e4a9bcb1e050d002c
75d84eb687ac949128b64d4ed6fef61e286b0f03
describe
'54310' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENE' 'sip-files0122.QC.jpg'
7d7ea5a968501bbccad4d5a059ff2636
5ba7287914c291e5001fb3bbc812c41c4574d9d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENF' 'sip-files0122.tif'
de2c0f1569a8d143df985c818fe7ed74
dff623a350a85f91e7ae9fab055bcc6304cdaed8
describe
'1339' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENG' 'sip-files0122.txt'
a13ee6bc607ea7f1138f809984419402
41cbdf65109a9421b080c6b9f8557e9caa50a8f5
describe
'23798' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENH' 'sip-files0122thm.jpg'
b6dfbc4942e963fdab04467f15201d16
18bd72e185353eeaf121569b3af3f3af3b31da69
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENI' 'sip-files0123.jp2'
cd537fa9a1ad34bad908777191af9fc6
b311db68fa1227c7979616de63950fe6b2f7fd9d
describe
'126665' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENJ' 'sip-files0123.jpg'
32b21a8f5ef5457491bead5b20525e8a
47913ccb157299e168204c03c50b31379fd7e504
'2011-12-31T13:39:45-05:00'
describe
'31597' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENK' 'sip-files0123.pro'
71e9cd38769e1f77e51cb9e9a82f7726
6f80c210651b43020d4ae90d0ecc6eb16e257878
describe
'52504' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENL' 'sip-files0123.QC.jpg'
1466319799a5d372ce2d913505e5a6eb
ea45fc2bc939b839f562d12fb2b0a45e90ded5f9
'2011-12-31T13:37:58-05:00'
describe
'516888' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENM' 'sip-files0123.tif'
138f2c4482f854e1d450c4797764aa0a
92db5a9729c7c63fe41a1a59f9ffd92f3584f196
describe
'1255' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENN' 'sip-files0123.txt'
a8c83f2eeda4c5ac3c958c362c664169
a98dc24ab789936aece2755d8efc2ed9c07ac469
describe
'23245' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENO' 'sip-files0123thm.jpg'
0838f87b1a04140843112480f0110227
9473961269c722e2111bb3bbb693d9af2ee77cd0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENP' 'sip-files0124.jp2'
19f549392129f0ca3b44ed5531c0b069
20a418c8cf969e5e0664c4763f41fb4f81a39578
describe
'130956' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENQ' 'sip-files0124.jpg'
91d14b214bb15852caacb08e377dddd9
f64c3dd260f0a38ca3adc7995ae60ef8c11d0404
describe
'24540' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENR' 'sip-files0124.pro'
64bc92df4c3cdcb647e12eea513035ba
cea32b9410a4a73fa86507d0a0de0a8d908a2cf8
describe
'52834' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENS' 'sip-files0124.QC.jpg'
bc837326ed9ceedc6609bde3dfc623a9
4fdfb1ac48dcaaa7119a03dbc71fc9d45b4c3bf0
describe
'517064' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENT' 'sip-files0124.tif'
59d181fb5908a1dcf0b676d454f4ae2a
29d06b7e24be574835e882acc89b6e46f25766ee
describe
'1298' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENU' 'sip-files0124.txt'
a16c51c6cb3d2cdf63d7d80d99ea10b7
78eb72c7e024c4175b3d4e11bc4fa47e3acde28f
describe
'23967' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENV' 'sip-files0124thm.jpg'
d23e60c395c5b308ea765a21e164fceb
7743505b2e3637f9d4ebefaec663f2d821598ec3
'2011-12-31T13:41:36-05:00'
describe
'62827' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENW' 'sip-files0125.jp2'
ff44ae93853779a3431024e206bc8107
9dc4bc7ba78179b943a710f4f651d54a8b60d0db
describe
'127276' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENX' 'sip-files0125.jpg'
1089497ce80a30da6efb17c362148dc1
56d1b47d44331f2e4c360237c8c8dbe597f73c1d
describe
'31565' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENY' 'sip-files0125.pro'
76959a6055c14f490cd46f2a498a78ba
8305bbcbdffe8341107f2895bc0fd9425051cdff
describe
'52460' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAENZ' 'sip-files0125.QC.jpg'
006fff820e64156fe9f750c2e62d96f5
2d50c188922c6d3e8c70836bb6560b3c5c832cc5
'2011-12-31T13:38:01-05:00'
describe
'516772' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOA' 'sip-files0125.tif'
9c11ebe3630c96aff4daecbef3bfecf5
7b919e70561d63e3741efa570b9019869fb3bdcc
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOB' 'sip-files0125.txt'
78cbab65d1888007f5413da1d732ed46
a830c8db8829ff76bb16f07496cfb1a819ab884d
'2011-12-31T13:38:37-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOC' 'sip-files0125thm.jpg'
d22e0dd6c1304bfba741053a625df8b8
1b8d9ec651518b057eda0ee43b944c2eba270491
describe
'62696' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOD' 'sip-files0126.jp2'
f107e408246bdf7b14d47110009730ea
050d972b19f26512847331414552b042404f0767
describe
'136408' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOE' 'sip-files0126.jpg'
61f956f1c03c6873359b9755999af18f
88e514e42a3ec9098dc76b207639a256ec679a14
describe
'32908' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOF' 'sip-files0126.pro'
b47831f81ba117501686ad4839b3c088
003267e03173cfbbc1794fbe9eb78116f13ba1c8
describe
'54780' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOG' 'sip-files0126.QC.jpg'
90b9bba5cee3f5f1f065a68c083dadb9
14e1a77305e330cc42fcf243030298b45f40635f
describe
'517060' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOH' 'sip-files0126.tif'
3e969ca5032f54585c41caca4b3c33b1
2553efacd47a6f34bf6d63cf7f636f43f8dee52e
describe
'1324' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOI' 'sip-files0126.txt'
08cb272dc96deb8be5887b2bf73a5289
8b62dd02cc13ccdc0a3151143a49663d75a84308
describe
'23826' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOJ' 'sip-files0126thm.jpg'
213f4ba3360365747b34d6a3ddabbfb0
c6d43aabb2eda99071fb468f73b8c156f9820be1
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOK' 'sip-files0127.jp2'
9e81b537f5a32bb34fab06dca11ebd6a
cabadd4664beeff1caa0755356d20d85be139c3a
describe
'82527' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOL' 'sip-files0127.jpg'
2c9fee824bfdc6ac16dd15e1640119e5
c273fc99fefd36b170c3b8441bdb4b6da30effbf
describe
'17329' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOM' 'sip-files0127.pro'
65eff21b04609b8c2fbaedf5447f9da4
f53ce4e3153ca1e647dd659b0ffdbb8d71e3ce28
describe
'35680' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEON' 'sip-files0127.QC.jpg'
96acb0a0ec49527441760534de6f5e31
32c1578feed8c445556dc0fa1b782600da2ee85b
describe
'514348' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOO' 'sip-files0127.tif'
bb1042da142ddf74d2814d4e0c93a967
5896e5cff0753801e8098f9131022b3ab2d78ca1
describe
'685' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOP' 'sip-files0127.txt'
4703c39ca2f36228114526295eca6ac2
9e041fc7b0dc8d7a1bb26c00aed96e782099aa62
describe
'17582' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOQ' 'sip-files0127thm.jpg'
e9aed801c1863dfadbe334bc03661d7b
e8fbdd439ae839058bec7c4189ca7401267ff85a
describe
'62836' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOR' 'sip-files0128.jp2'
2e7e8a06f6ac9e013dfcd2b20e07b64b
cb7540ca2a0287da1ca9a9ad9550690e8844e4d3
describe
'111051' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOS' 'sip-files0128.jpg'
05aca4801904f265c12d8fe259cdcb0d
e57d5dad9ecbb491963206029bbfed1940d54b4f
'2011-12-31T13:40:51-05:00'
describe
'27123' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOT' 'sip-files0128.pro'
dbdb1017f7da446d857973ecf38281d3
641de493f88ff0ea08abded8ce14b80610640502
describe
'47549' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOU' 'sip-files0128.QC.jpg'
2971a4a32e7ffbd3b955d9d85d830a58
c71d21c1e792441a6d4a40548798c25b1b0b8dbf
describe
'516088' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOV' 'sip-files0128.tif'
ec3d7f16307058e030ec6b36a4a6fdec
d9a2e0ed3d6a7e560ed1cad8cbb73c81095c50ae
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOW' 'sip-files0128.txt'
94554ecbfb58cdc82d3d391124a3303f
bfe2362aa3349184451510678229a2882df94a4e
describe
'22016' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOX' 'sip-files0128thm.jpg'
16e5f471ed3d4b206ab7f2cbb14b53e1
4505c0f4db1ef2b64a74c9675160b1409229df64
describe
'62817' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOY' 'sip-files0129.jp2'
f0629aaa422630c955a828f4815e9e48
aea00f09c6d65a46dbf2a2b538b28868a5874311
describe
'133378' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEOZ' 'sip-files0129.jpg'
aad1a110cedac4fa69f941db2d138fed
64b0ce92c9a2c3201a9376578f614b7fd13635ee
describe
'33008' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPA' 'sip-files0129.pro'
992e5ffecc3747566d5febe5a8eba6a5
6fd934294b4451bad7a32cc89b5942d26cdc15f6
describe
'55599' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPB' 'sip-files0129.QC.jpg'
10e817750ad68c3796da1a2b8d3ec1bc
0f7d0b4778ea0aa80ffcd24c686440d337212c74
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPC' 'sip-files0129.tif'
cf0c162c790a8b253ade6840756cc384
59aec50ba958d5cd013d872abbf4d7cdd06559b6
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPD' 'sip-files0129.txt'
6a1e4d500b1b55f88e51f5108fe6cdcd
e7eb4b883b6e9969465c554469528a95298c5b04
'2011-12-31T13:39:02-05:00'
describe
'23961' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPE' 'sip-files0129thm.jpg'
7c529135b1c5d5f4eef7a6e47d8bbc33
0aa10f63dcfbea642c974b1b8b2c90b528aab461
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPF' 'sip-files0130.jp2'
3931cce8e4aa5a9f24e34eafe0cdfa0d
10774be663d6d43fa5e33e5e88e17bfaaa39ca1f
describe
'132194' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPG' 'sip-files0130.jpg'
6c08e3382b3d25ec04312d603dea96e8
9f840cd540070714ef48c432b7664b40ad008b5f
'2011-12-31T13:41:21-05:00'
describe
'33461' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPH' 'sip-files0130.pro'
16c575226a02173ac20237c71c23578a
600003b22691c4ca1758601202ea73e423c73342
'2011-12-31T13:39:42-05:00'
describe
'54683' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPI' 'sip-files0130.QC.jpg'
94da80a52fe7a4f58df89094d82ffba7
7d6dc9e9498d2ea8da3ad170a75747f535a4d9b0
describe
'517068' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPJ' 'sip-files0130.tif'
7768a0d96ac0895842823f2fe62f2ed6
19e08d52c0f7ea3f4a91b46c44a659b9af82591d
'2011-12-31T13:35:14-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPK' 'sip-files0130.txt'
fc5d4ade1625df89ac5600d5362ce86b
92a7be8c96885045cf2a4afea5593eae623d0dbd
describe
'23774' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPL' 'sip-files0130thm.jpg'
06d79792c51ef08100aad1d73f1177b1
692bf9cfa17007e98a4c178795883d42bd89d3d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPM' 'sip-files0131.jp2'
3b392b449c404df58fee8e6392c232e4
1063330abec8d97e45b79444566293dd6d730693
describe
'125014' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPN' 'sip-files0131.jpg'
4bdb3648c316f46bde596426015fb18d
b2e1e9fd0f872eeb466d9c5013d71f348045cc55
describe
'24403' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPO' 'sip-files0131.pro'
c29ceed1480575559076e1ae0ace3e14
df689fa547a9ede93ed96ba8c3a1c1893c377598
describe
'50192' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPP' 'sip-files0131.QC.jpg'
7b6b3030d27322094d504131c62bac3d
6bd8923b37a85fc272d8db548651dd5ef1a8235e
'2011-12-31T13:40:05-05:00'
describe
'516572' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPQ' 'sip-files0131.tif'
9241d8db0411375f911aa1a049c806ac
d72fb08f4a498960e9543fa7c8219d14cee277ba
describe
'981' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPR' 'sip-files0131.txt'
d86558f6bf33cbd9e35e68ae3a3a3ced
43dbbb052423584a927d4567abdfe244dc878053
describe
Invalid character
'22701' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPS' 'sip-files0131thm.jpg'
b9e3999c082682a6873b7e0e5175273d
6a1f23d69039e1dcbdec500da3eaa2834e967d35
describe
'62763' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPT' 'sip-files0132.jp2'
a9517c0ca0e98fb49ec1791b258f5984
900d837e8489adbe7e82c179891db2d3cb9759e4
describe
'132234' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPU' 'sip-files0132.jpg'
5c1fb6bcde2578dd7c583193e82fdb64
dd88d061e238733150065c3adfc4e8adcff0d7fa
describe
'32596' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPV' 'sip-files0132.pro'
c66653dfcf242a9d981bf6cbe8aaddf8
07cf5045e88c491e336e0e07b50247defff037f2
describe
'54652' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPW' 'sip-files0132.QC.jpg'
68989b6c4ff344dfdb6ef59e5ddee6f8
287f35758bd932edc99e231c6f42b696576b209f
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPX' 'sip-files0132.tif'
375a5a96835a8df3545f6e0cc5e772b3
6465c791cc7978252e3ba0f07d1c96d906c4449f
describe
'1291' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPY' 'sip-files0132.txt'
e967acf91b9019f3511117cf976bb3ea
85fc53bbafb3d130a3bf85caad773410fc2c86de
describe
'23852' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEPZ' 'sip-files0132thm.jpg'
b9193d11eeaa6a7d0b36a89a5ee1a07e
80869bb28d2c0f3e5bbc054a6a4a3da393774863
describe
'62820' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQA' 'sip-files0133.jp2'
1a161baf38fa70b19969e68e31036ec4
f426192c2ac02634709cbe524fe704aa1492edb3
describe
'131393' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQB' 'sip-files0133.jpg'
f4fbb3fae9d2b478b196ef0eb9fecc12
7fd904a773ca26ab385ef36516b42f605cbfa1eb
describe
'32958' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQC' 'sip-files0133.pro'
4c588446d7b8a083d4812bdfbc8e0e42
1f975fb1bd0016656fd65b10c725d9ffe36e3d7a
describe
'54242' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQD' 'sip-files0133.QC.jpg'
06f53d0377b4d006bc2422b238c8b0f1
d0d4e8b0eb83c757d4b8fb7a10be86eee4fc1b07
'2011-12-31T13:40:25-05:00'
describe
'517048' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQE' 'sip-files0133.tif'
c45269dd99bea0782f3342b52e4bc123
f979c1027109b3acb86a3e5e9764365aefbeb132
describe
'1290' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQF' 'sip-files0133.txt'
bcf1ba78192299c30cf704afaf3fcc61
ed04953247d1d3822481468c3b515812cfa95d72
describe
'23896' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQG' 'sip-files0133thm.jpg'
8ce9fcdbd9a6b954c0f47ca154c678bb
70293082f9914a7897140d243f8aa04fec603782
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQH' 'sip-files0134.jp2'
3c2772e7b550f88236e9469f37ebbce2
f825f6fc20ca08b3335678196dc3a38ebe03dcf8
describe
'138277' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQI' 'sip-files0134.jpg'
d13f86c99b7aae520d88f71c593e7d19
4a09f4ee6db0c5ca346bfeb1832a48c8bb3369cb
describe
'34129' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQJ' 'sip-files0134.pro'
102f7c1561efc3910b7aa2f626355557
8b9f2e834cb37059377039a494b23a9304d02712
describe
'55694' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQK' 'sip-files0134.QC.jpg'
c3e0b0c67fe901bed1e858b1d7ed5ebd
c50474e0e99e66162cb57888d93954724028d536
describe
'517056' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQL' 'sip-files0134.tif'
0c18e71fde7527c38fcfb9aaf6f7ac2c
9a34cf0ba685d05a08034d10014a12a4768ceaa4
describe
'1350' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQM' 'sip-files0134.txt'
1ba3db57ebb65d730f2a012101533d14
8941d964c23faa63f154c4b3f19581bc98e2ec66
describe
'24144' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQN' 'sip-files0134thm.jpg'
c98e55c88f88539f770cd68247dfe30d
d409a8221da02e076c1895be26dc32134c111fc4
describe
'62857' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQO' 'sip-files0135.jp2'
94ecdc20b42d209679ed0207f1622481
e407b9929890eda693330a16c62546a196117c23
describe
'134287' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQP' 'sip-files0135.jpg'
3c7c1bb366ff29414e8cd4fe2717a82f
b4da82b0a2c9fe65b435e414bd871cd94e522ad0
describe
'32638' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQQ' 'sip-files0135.pro'
8fbbae39d08d4568394567c22de074a1
37e286647a3cafa46525c2d18abbfbb689e55750
describe
'55257' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQR' 'sip-files0135.QC.jpg'
eb55b8431d111e1576f32f47df585bf8
f1f7a7bcedda1ad34fb04cb6b6a117b6f9f9178d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQS' 'sip-files0135.tif'
a1945fcd6b5745fda51e4722905d7865
26ea315c833ed4feb70de12968d3e7068aa11398
describe
'1286' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQT' 'sip-files0135.txt'
ab9e5b68c9bc61a8c945458637551d1c
fa0119d29632eb24ee6038480824dd23e63bc0b0
describe
'23980' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQU' 'sip-files0135thm.jpg'
ac0a847c57876df6a342f229a2a9d93f
86354d6b7b39f65cfe1bfc9bd570a0a0bd61b0e0
'2011-12-31T13:39:04-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQV' 'sip-files0136.jp2'
b7397e1af6cb0a719aacf11be86def2f
5f7e3edcd49d3cd9cd0b3cced110d6f96abfd25a
describe
'134981' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQW' 'sip-files0136.jpg'
e6a6469c193bf3df7cd29ab0e9ae77d5
fc79ebfaa67002910bdf5ed99f1b76c0dcad80f0
describe
'32092' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQX' 'sip-files0136.pro'
c7a5a7141bf3ef0029dcf25bae4a12a9
8fa2aa0695d08c8cdd336f1667f1211006852a2e
describe
'55347' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQY' 'sip-files0136.QC.jpg'
ac461ad0639361b932a0508bc9e8b9f8
076539348889f1ae071714af789cfd86c0b82fd7
describe
'517148' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEQZ' 'sip-files0136.tif'
02df63a17e1b493c5fdc9698bf1586b3
d359a107c06710f550d90030626f5f81282b5e62
describe
'1265' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERA' 'sip-files0136.txt'
7c4b9a0e0beb716c5ee12959a80c1619
db02713a78ef0461c00df6726657845389340be6
describe
'24161' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERB' 'sip-files0136thm.jpg'
1d711c3df10f3496641b3fd2cb57d65e
501fd9dd01a11fc274a9e809ed35313bc810dd09
describe
'62743' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERC' 'sip-files0137.jp2'
209452f73bef74fef57c74aedb2d0d36
d73d18a6f7c6ce40b9e77cce99eff473a25955be
describe
'135324' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERD' 'sip-files0137.jpg'
8ad3ba286ffb1e43740b855c5622db2e
fc636a085bc0dc510142707a3c2ffcb8364a28f6
'2011-12-31T13:38:03-05:00'
describe
'33221' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERE' 'sip-files0137.pro'
366feada21a788d51439dfa49ec934fd
acf6c2bacd37ddfa9728b3310820e52a38e83e6a
describe
'516876' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERF' 'sip-files0137.tif'
aadbf282701227e380668a36d6709065
34db5653f8f60e29308447a06592342344e816f5
describe
'55485' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERG' 'sip-files0137.QC.jpg'
eab70e2bc2c3abd22b6316f81854d480
39f6e761bcd854d10b1aef7216d1529943840d34
describe
'1301' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERH' 'sip-files0137.txt'
836dd95c3b24d2020af96e62a3d54a15
09f91ed93bf8da50b6c40d16f766ceb47563c7f4
describe
'23903' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERI' 'sip-files0137thm.jpg'
d0315e8994b706e0dc6fd7234cc4904c
46ecedbfc990eb7bdc0cb1625053d3b2076409c1
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERJ' 'sip-files0138.jp2'
f12d155a3c50a1a173f0c60cabcb5cfc
80cf8b3d1e84cba77a5b4d2a1b962614a0252b62
describe
'91609' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERK' 'sip-files0138.jpg'
9b2ab6113a97906745b58ff8c9c0d32b
75a8d8c63855e45af35d8c504b281d6548660461
describe
'21438' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERL' 'sip-files0138.pro'
8d537eec49750039b7b442222bc55b08
a06ede6e1ccc5d478282bde227f24b7b3265461d
describe
'38512' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERM' 'sip-files0138.QC.jpg'
0ba59d21bcf8060ad84f478b4c397a81
36cb30964d28934818d69d89893a1f91b42ab1fc
describe
'514676' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERN' 'sip-files0138.tif'
f42593e9da23a14ed17dc885b14f80f3
13faf31334c7b82073659501098787770aa7fbcf
describe
'846' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERO' 'sip-files0138.txt'
4665ba5650eaf1ee0284b20197301f18
ad56f3d981cf398f13d09f68a31cbc7e73f7102c
describe
Invalid character
'18604' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERP' 'sip-files0138thm.jpg'
857bd6fdb8b67306bee193070c7d7e54
2382f9e621a84157aefa910a2829c7506cdaa52e
describe
'62853' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERQ' 'sip-files0139.jp2'
209b5cd01e17605405f127409943de86
b4df261ae0fccc104aee07de97f8c23f7c82e7da
describe
'118014' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERR' 'sip-files0139.jpg'
c88a4b3b9a9f7177a1f7791d3e45ce09
a114bdc53f2990a7280670630ef44c284f1c4c3d
describe
'28438' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERS' 'sip-files0139.pro'
99425831b5c3b4263ea741c00a28eb15
d1598376cd364604cfa59fa7c7ffe0d51093f486
describe
'48915' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERT' 'sip-files0139.QC.jpg'
222cbd4323bbaff00c9f1cf5272ac0ce
1649ed46f9cfa876c2a3bc9b6c7f2ed32a7021bd
describe
'516484' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERU' 'sip-files0139.tif'
cd7e5b3ffc2a057b4779ac1ddf20b9b9
de3746530407354ab6aff290ee6e21887aab02e8
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERV' 'sip-files0139.txt'
c0ffdcc01ed63eebf8e60fc6ddbf392a
a7e93a50488c8e4de814091f18ca10ed55a8fefa
describe
'22404' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERW' 'sip-files0139thm.jpg'
f9e5e81ae2069bc5db9133aa64fc22c3
3159357c20d51858e4abc2d36ad778fc4304ea71
describe
'62718' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERX' 'sip-files0140.jp2'
8726948a00151090a5bc9eacee2697b0
460054abfa0d5efc3f8200cd4fa8ab8809bdb609
describe
'126087' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERY' 'sip-files0140.jpg'
5c45e17cbb35252aad8b43f1528ea16f
b476d35767e1f84b840b50a88e6b353ed9bc88aa
describe
'30131' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAERZ' 'sip-files0140.pro'
373ecd98cecd8408281171b6b0ffc8c7
4fd18405b4e40ccbde967e6d0787810a01be4810
describe
'53104' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESA' 'sip-files0140.QC.jpg'
e3c71ebbe9aa024dded43193dd7ab86e
66978f45892574a2785b2dacc279eea7f8f40137
describe
'516948' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESB' 'sip-files0140.tif'
af0c3e827ccf5d9f7df04bb99ac0fc97
6590bb722a99907e3698d9821917d93eeb8142df
describe
'1194' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESC' 'sip-files0140.txt'
fc27ef5513e96f5bc4e6f141c9a8bdb0
8c0daab4c82ad94715af133e05163a507e3c08cb
describe
'23709' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESD' 'sip-files0140thm.jpg'
60c0066c18978f596d977b006cb9041b
ebc7831db33f575ea4cf1880c4a676264f0c1f79
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESE' 'sip-files0141.jp2'
09462369870c83aa65e84db054a9af0c
bf8022f5b669d7934ea5064ea713283581a9de66
describe
'121890' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESF' 'sip-files0141.jpg'
b456071f473a450de2a3e228ded01c09
846a5208d6bf5759371df85899876fe00012158c
describe
'14962' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESG' 'sip-files0141.pro'
a9b47ee2d72d20020ec5f8668e7c472a
735a9061e7d448759a5e3d9b0000a157fcdd60fa
describe
'47505' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESH' 'sip-files0141.QC.jpg'
3d2650de9b990d52e33aea816f42a119
dcfaeb340b19fadec2495b590e439db2eeb803fc
describe
'516252' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESI' 'sip-files0141.tif'
b270fe148686e866c91ad9c108c3830a
b7c0b611f7efc2e5a579d80a7fc62ad1c1ee9401
describe
'606' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESJ' 'sip-files0141.txt'
4e43b8adc0baf1a1dd3e8755855874a4
6bb4fc38cc111d87a67fca406621f17050782e13
describe
'22129' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESK' 'sip-files0141thm.jpg'
c8cd1c5cd0fda0a0d5f40bf245e01924
b7cafdb08bac22a0294ca50ef8f7add50b8e4af0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESL' 'sip-files0142.jp2'
6801cf2ea984676089415fdd403c8630
5c0b9fd60ab185e84cb05e5086746af3183d85e8
describe
'131000' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESM' 'sip-files0142.jpg'
a37707c26dea021fe5bd5b31f37dc5c4
77ba0c581c1ed53058bfc4cb38f064cf48826920
describe
'31904' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESN' 'sip-files0142.pro'
f95c0b961311802fee2063331588c4e0
e6a314116be4f2ee23b88427dd018f78c5172725
describe
'54027' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESO' 'sip-files0142.QC.jpg'
551666d68ad94b17ebe5cfdd76f119ab
5adc246ce91c193ff2c2674f6dacbbd9267b7b7e
describe
'516968' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESP' 'sip-files0142.tif'
b42b776af4e3bca92081b958dadb95c3
13558c82d09dc3633bf8415e44464d9e0726dbdf
describe
'1268' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESQ' 'sip-files0142.txt'
b0600fd0cb635b8b9325f42877f78913
72414a48351b20cd9e4f68ab2e8d261fc0e67622
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESR' 'sip-files0142thm.jpg'
a3d5798f8a2de62b5e1c829ac99f2f12
e10de0e8a624b5d691c1115d01ab8b0d0c3ab95a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESS' 'sip-files0143.jp2'
4bd0a44c45b8258bc7247fabf05bac1e
9eb74fd26ab12381638c049c0932fd1e166795d1
describe
'123220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEST' 'sip-files0143.jpg'
5e3b6baa9562667be2fc3eded7bf9927
a71e8d093bd1e37e85ec43a0ddecfe4e4b5dba5b
describe
'29299' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESU' 'sip-files0143.pro'
8d9369302e0853b5b1213aa85c2527e2
0617d4fecd3f49fe94d142f717c33356cdd48efe
describe
'51471' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESV' 'sip-files0143.QC.jpg'
81ee08f80247a1f3270b0e9efe9ba9b1
76d2cd4c551726ce3f0bc631620e9a3b736e5576
describe
'516832' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESW' 'sip-files0143.tif'
eb326b65a5546c4c2a22dda62701147f
bc5759f0a61affa44be0c4901884be3e03d0f348
'2011-12-31T13:36:50-05:00'
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESX' 'sip-files0143.txt'
cd8d50cd176014bc560f26d048cca553
5378175203e45c34af94bfdcfcc4c4a5e1e408b8
describe
'23554' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESY' 'sip-files0143thm.jpg'
ade3a56465050f245053fca1ffacab91
b9686767ed86dad5690fc03da0baa805537bbb8c
describe
'62728' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAESZ' 'sip-files0144.jp2'
c8632a181912265c51ff668ab428e2f8
4daa48d237527170a82686a35a8e1bc99a166526
describe
'134403' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETA' 'sip-files0144.jpg'
d01a22a37754933b9a45498984511d91
6461bc5fcac2593ce33224b874cd8c688f9a3edd
'2011-12-31T13:36:25-05:00'
describe
'33524' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETB' 'sip-files0144.pro'
cdc98f1cb8a2148b561c5e2cd0ebfa5f
ac45cf7f4f26f569c64a96132467fdac22729b5c
describe
'55186' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETC' 'sip-files0144.QC.jpg'
6878a1ce32bcd3236487ef5a444801e5
880296e086231dbb6d778dc4921462ef8984fac6
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETD' 'sip-files0144.tif'
a98fde39606118cd7cdcdec6d3564325
af3d554d51ebd80f975f7e892e987fba3691f584
describe
'1318' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETE' 'sip-files0144.txt'
54c604962214a598310c953ddc5f6c74
1596bab641e30ccf59a152b35ee56ef83f10a0da
describe
'23897' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETF' 'sip-files0144thm.jpg'
cfe532f3dbbbab4562677928c0d62813
3beea4d180fc90ebff037f91aff3177f2fcb7592
describe
'62760' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETG' 'sip-files0145.jp2'
aa9964fc2bf3e003c628f0e8014c9293
ff67713076cccc5a1db08db105e5c0d392203a54
describe
'127156' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETH' 'sip-files0145.jpg'
028d2f6b06b474a92c4cd74ff0aa7ea7
89a72290e42a7a744ba386d3ac5ad7af10369868
describe
'31530' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETI' 'sip-files0145.pro'
fa49c42597251802afca658306980431
3d0ede216714b76170d20a457ca76bc6baced463
describe
'52537' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETJ' 'sip-files0145.QC.jpg'
2ad4c58d2d12630e1d7ae09791f09c6f
ca442f22115105f7eab9eb5cdce85f746fd47832
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETK' 'sip-files0145.tif'
b8ed64b8885d6e52ece7e4d0ff714319
853258f67009dba04036c3db4b78bd8cbb0e6ed5
describe
'1258' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETL' 'sip-files0145.txt'
cc1ef16e62eedacb948dd605dc537646
6b1c8522b7207c4aa9d6c4257a1c6726639ff319
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETM' 'sip-files0145thm.jpg'
efb88670b5bf72f9bc46e4f4c2a61891
edc7fd78665259bc379cd163a5332451907ee3e4
describe
'62735' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETN' 'sip-files0146.jp2'
054b2aac301a3f1c80edb40d0c3fc975
4c81c7f5ce6852e6fa4462ad1714224f8dabb9f4
describe
'131353' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETO' 'sip-files0146.jpg'
cbf0f2b2c3c46d5083fdeb13c7b67b6a
6a87fb6d321316d2b6200cf0606d81fe591765b6
describe
'32350' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETP' 'sip-files0146.pro'
2f41f79b5c9297ff0f3fce8ed69f1d2c
224517d3c78a082c082663df3ea62214f1b2c71a
describe
'53663' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETQ' 'sip-files0146.QC.jpg'
2afc1b1f2ebe146bd8dfebbc9722cd8c
9b959572754fae8166ec1c51f08981c5aa892dd1
'2011-12-31T13:41:16-05:00'
describe
'516740' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETR' 'sip-files0146.tif'
ad375a0139421613a836428c6190de3d
dc7a6939ecfae1daa59eb6b9eb7a6b3a4480a685
'2011-12-31T13:39:43-05:00'
describe
'1281' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETS' 'sip-files0146.txt'
3793667c915a9bd6e25b0629edb8c487
b8cfef2e387299b84bcbc53559bad9b24e6e3c10
describe
'23260' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETT' 'sip-files0146thm.jpg'
a8cb1d61c91ddaa3a5bcc3bea05f27d4
d09df4e0b714373bad2129e4707f2c7972a853d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETU' 'sip-files0147.jp2'
7e6e55cf01b3386d87f9824abf213d02
3f78f6dae799757177fa9bd3de0f3529066e2b5c
describe
'127907' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETV' 'sip-files0147.jpg'
4e9d70cfe6e84dd0cf3cef69ef3c7455
4cfe915d2a70c3f479fa7c1774cf1e345815f2cc
describe
'32128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETW' 'sip-files0147.pro'
0656c1b024d4933550db9b83585b1e49
d5958323854bfe65080d66ce6a487b35166988e6
describe
'53424' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETX' 'sip-files0147.QC.jpg'
ccb8868f39cac8889c57d0c5c9dfa2b0
0935cce1988c57fc8140a15552858aeff0bf6331
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETY' 'sip-files0147.tif'
c35219f4656f96b5b6c6c65761239cb4
26eb1c23a428e99191014788dfcfdc8676f5db12
describe
'1269' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAETZ' 'sip-files0147.txt'
70c4c57aca6aedff972f79b40f3da1ca
cb1610d2a18dc84e712b99d83cc13fb50de180cb
describe
'23673' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUA' 'sip-files0147thm.jpg'
939f2bb3280e575616b31d10b3699e84
00c85acbfe5285f206daff3225402d0bd407beac
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUB' 'sip-files0148.jp2'
bd8a7a7f51028b50b5abb517a35e02d7
e7aac56db85c67114bec3c5cc8f92f67f5add7a2
describe
'125706' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUC' 'sip-files0148.jpg'
3e105cbf52b70472c379d2a943538ecd
311a5540d7eafbe1b97f1381284551d536ce2832
describe
'30974' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUD' 'sip-files0148.pro'
6761cee23a05e59dcaa1c509e9134108
e4af8ea18c7915790463bef1f27df75fdc77ca97
describe
'52749' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUE' 'sip-files0148.QC.jpg'
3e1afd6b6da35180da8c59f6793dd728
b4a55e0ad83ea0812c4bf6a4c80da16ca553e80e
describe
'517004' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUF' 'sip-files0148.tif'
b51d59aad7adf9600c7c1c6998d76aa3
255d362b46498f55340884200aaeff18a5c67be4
describe
'1236' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUG' 'sip-files0148.txt'
783f7a5ee650ae548b18c7c73b51b2b2
8ed5f0e41fcf58fc2949e26476aa89868efda474
describe
'23750' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUH' 'sip-files0148thm.jpg'
a76cdb887a5d74091038046c85d955b6
243807c6b260bbca212998789fc90c6f5216abcf
'2011-12-31T13:36:19-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUI' 'sip-files0149.jp2'
b542c95f257f0c0ffe19be4b35f4933c
23e294bd32995fbc370a784b0feeb06776d5de06
describe
'135874' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUJ' 'sip-files0149.jpg'
a47b76cd13d627987d0f7176339460cc
ea39581991a9ca4bfe2f8a886d651d051382e471
describe
'33153' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUK' 'sip-files0149.pro'
2c96046e7f7d14744425137f3db19888
93176b3ac77d11978bdc8814184e710f7761a57f
describe
'55705' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUL' 'sip-files0149.QC.jpg'
ce445565bd833eb57b5f3fd64c16dff5
34199425d9201492ab2163b9f8154e7b1a7af119
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUM' 'sip-files0149.tif'
a04fe1cc323993aa62b1ad881199a112
c58ba7ad66a92671e6e54c6457a05c82775eb423
describe
'1293' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUN' 'sip-files0149.txt'
9a8dd5a3bb07e42b645f7886ad42963e
8ea7ce90191397c9c7992145d29edf25b997fb19
describe
'24284' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUO' 'sip-files0149thm.jpg'
10ac0a0c9abd93c1ca9d6130d6b099a7
07c3514b4ac9a5ca34eaacf5871b257020cc0dfb
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUP' 'sip-files0150.jp2'
c08ed0f99cdaf44ca032906f7a8899c5
10caaea5ac388b70e61753f05e2254b174641268
describe
'130450' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUQ' 'sip-files0150.jpg'
0a7ccba5cd1d025ec96dab6bd585a3fb
4bf95b617059d001b7f785ea916f673a601c94e8
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUR' 'sip-files0150.pro'
345f55b45e122314dba5f530340b8a0b
a4aab4fe5bcb9b3b8d42cf9a06531642f88c2281
describe
'54369' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUS' 'sip-files0150.QC.jpg'
c5a485d29d8ef5d0b1f47febe62e9da5
6adc6b0ba174d179650b8ae5c286e18ed7016f31
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUT' 'sip-files0150.tif'
3bac4898bc70543b0928731d1b1a2b34
1eb638b86df4df5bd1a836000ae7d03b3fa86c9f
describe
'1305' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUU' 'sip-files0150.txt'
058f96f56824ad928339d67700f862a8
f9f7e38adade1a313d29c54576b21fa9b1b7576a
describe
'23805' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUV' 'sip-files0150thm.jpg'
183cbd25b87d168c8bedcffdde69e980
7cf36a151534c32d5f7c558482fc48348311b3fb
describe
'62717' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUW' 'sip-files0151.jp2'
1cb62a2ef56cf29c3b3347ee0feb4def
4fccd1ce697ea5b0529a940978e248ef4e49a5d8
describe
'137348' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUX' 'sip-files0151.jpg'
157ea484ddd336edb57720a459c3d4b2
59301320ba3949d57d9899e7a20bca15c8278147
describe
'33193' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUY' 'sip-files0151.pro'
737cb9966b8dba5bb29f2ab6919652d0
a70309e209a6deb31b56b7e6dcee93b30f934c64
describe
'55858' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEUZ' 'sip-files0151.QC.jpg'
5119de041591a9d4c53b2a55751cea77
98a67b34aa46e5dfde58e954353b6eda1d40a013
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVA' 'sip-files0151.tif'
7f52fa32e9feb3a4ba011a2ba7a9806c
7408adacfe1a492e0a20e0a59834d7a1981bb270
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVB' 'sip-files0151.txt'
6d8f65d29b343dee57784b4dd4241169
beafabab38267f93e89f8470760fccc13cd5c780
describe
'24089' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVC' 'sip-files0151thm.jpg'
bf4110b45c29dfcfa54e67c397997d31
41b47c757428afd9082c1910ead43067ac8f1262
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVD' 'sip-files0152.jp2'
d599dafe06eb023a9299e3108e52d893
f4f9e1e4d9c307e5457f4bdd35b773a8151fc3a0
describe
'118839' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVE' 'sip-files0152.jpg'
9d35bfe1c6cc7b2d54fddff6b3489616
63d22fcb8654ba1b1920454aaaae7fc92ff109ce
describe
'28719' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVF' 'sip-files0152.pro'
d05ae5963f6ae9308e78b886d7718c4a
f47c5659d863d38fc52fba21588a0ce9b7f44123
describe
'50321' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVG' 'sip-files0152.QC.jpg'
1945c975ef97e35b8449e82c85addcf3
91bc0f5f9e4028a4b1126d4bc090e6d34e01b871
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVH' 'sip-files0152.tif'
7663879c006808d21800a8c9bab893fd
25f12295e04c760498d9b7e39171a8fc87a81790
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVI' 'sip-files0152.txt'
be1b37fbff1c1e489a57cce99319c122
7d4f7dbeca21e29a0c7f079a31852ad5961d21b7
describe
Invalid character
'23371' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVJ' 'sip-files0152thm.jpg'
c80ef104b02924f6b03adc810256f21f
d3cf0c33892649020847d71231926e1458bdbab1
describe
'62809' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVK' 'sip-files0153.jp2'
2a33f0aa4945d6526437d26cb6b7a75a
0306af0392b6b3798cbc12e8ea77fdfcf6617efe
describe
'122538' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVL' 'sip-files0153.jpg'
3a60c5bb72fa7908037e1d77c691cad4
12212e0f07202a0f434755961d21f9f52c9f249c
describe
'30355' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVM' 'sip-files0153.pro'
39ea843d6b3e4fc47d8a1f14c4883b16
443eef2d86578f904aa1502dbd7ec3cfef6f108a
describe
'51852' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVN' 'sip-files0153.QC.jpg'
45cdf5addabee134b034bbb24a74f3ba
877d4298527e5f930cfd6e9abfdb01f3f02c8d70
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVO' 'sip-files0153.tif'
f4e23ee8d7fc0d5b7d640161a56f500c
7464383ec78a8ac4fcfd725b604f7f730d6d3226
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVP' 'sip-files0153.txt'
7b314b102ca6f7ed9b1cd719aede1ac4
6c1210af3cc45939a7135329589b46b4fa06d4e6
describe
'23593' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVQ' 'sip-files0153thm.jpg'
70f0093ad51fb3ec5576e9c4693b418d
6e120950b1d29ef215798b095c6924dc50efbffb
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVR' 'sip-files0154.jp2'
3db1237c05124555b48b2e00198dd09c
fbe6a03dbd94787a250673b15b19fb715a9d4177
describe
'128404' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVS' 'sip-files0154.jpg'
028ecf99e14440518755bcf4a6f532e0
1bc3b7c659755fad30aafb83d02057ca48992844
describe
'31621' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVT' 'sip-files0154.pro'
8458fe7ec214e8327813969851b99feb
80c382c6b6bfc76f9a50ec43660697afe4910ef4
'2011-12-31T13:36:21-05:00'
describe
'53514' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVU' 'sip-files0154.QC.jpg'
76d7094a6eaae2b22ef5a04f40ea96c0
2094740891d8f85fa3f88b27008f1f98f4b0d9a0
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVV' 'sip-files0154.tif'
41fcf506255a042b4f7785cf17e2a512
ad2cdce19944926ec7383d372cc0818db855957a
describe
'1254' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVW' 'sip-files0154.txt'
74481d4aab1e6e7068c6a787de58645a
f527aa2abbe06c00235b39940580d0f5123dde80
describe
'23997' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVX' 'sip-files0154thm.jpg'
f84bec87be33077cc8e3b6994f4dbe4d
b55e95dbc5ceaa9759a74c3ff1d454db9d1c5cb6
describe
'62700' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVY' 'sip-files0155.jp2'
7e8662caab3be2174032528ee355449e
1a11758397554be4e7b1024cec116c6267024465
describe
'76065' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEVZ' 'sip-files0155.jpg'
74490bdeec9c7356a373cdccbf0253a0
f8758b0aac51aa470f764008c35a518e3425f91d
describe
'17330' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWA' 'sip-files0155.pro'
e7923a3d99134cbaf789e02002a2c72f
9466314c84ae4d701e3efa72bc95699f31e3220d
'2011-12-31T13:39:19-05:00'
describe
'33423' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWB' 'sip-files0155.QC.jpg'
c5428865d034db141625049bde4e0ca1
805969974ec8b6d20534071f5ec956048963b87b
describe
'514068' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWC' 'sip-files0155.tif'
8db5188c024b04b58a3a56b465f65104
fc575076d8cc0f94f9a6ecc6df4f17f171ec52e0
describe
'690' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWD' 'sip-files0155.txt'
8734271d6a1c320ddeaacc232d84e0ef
cd50d94ab2f99533259351af69f4e979185f4201
describe
'17033' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWE' 'sip-files0155thm.jpg'
388184f3eb5c08c660f0f5c6b98bdb91
d396ef0b3e52b750a8dbd85bf88ddfa31b0f7221
describe
'62874' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWF' 'sip-files0156.jp2'
f668f6ebe019f35edbdf3ee6e86bb262
5c39093d1de92aa41ec066130681b3fd751aea2f
'2011-12-31T13:37:10-05:00'
describe
'99990' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWG' 'sip-files0156.jpg'
803f6a388c70ce21f3dbfeee0395e20f
aec67f5a47d29ff5e41950ee936c605da62820fb
describe
'23474' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWH' 'sip-files0156.pro'
ae049127cc41d81c92fd89b939ef8aad
8f8d9a6134906739cf2b02cbad650d1d5c7cab16
describe
'43474' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWI' 'sip-files0156.QC.jpg'
b3a6940eae2142626ecefc6aac39cb9b
a7c927f41462f20de74121175bfd8a57e3a6e285
describe
'515912' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWJ' 'sip-files0156.tif'
5410c13285e04ffb1f6a8d14e3141c4c
05ea072c489a7da82e05bd3b63aec76facc2cd16
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWK' 'sip-files0156.txt'
de00b742d022cb090e3617e7102b4e8f
c608e21cce291690b999203283ce2c6a4bd2954d
describe
'21173' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWL' 'sip-files0156thm.jpg'
09374ab0e217aa89a380f2a55cff7675
d00679845dfa8478a98c5aaedca1561fb3a63b07
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWM' 'sip-files0157.jp2'
a098ecc6c50731e871f1022d284e6edf
fe596e75e81d0ff645df9bb0ae467354a2bf5fa4
describe
'122429' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWN' 'sip-files0157.jpg'
5699cba48fe1f709da3827cc5bf917ac
4d26871811a3903e1f34129813aeb52f73138eac
describe
'30598' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWO' 'sip-files0157.pro'
aed9aa58d8ef3cd37f84dd0148b93ca7
729c6026a0a214bc057b84f49e77b00456080c9b
describe
'51745' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWP' 'sip-files0157.QC.jpg'
cea2fdfa1b65d06744e30935e94ca799
c133e200b66ca05eb8371a457d8863ea873715c0
describe
'516864' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWQ' 'sip-files0157.tif'
1925ea168873c5fa52fcbd0bf104a558
136edfc7f7fe87dd9d321684000fd38cb7e5755c
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWR' 'sip-files0157.txt'
cd0b95da4726e581b21d5e9ec1b1ce8d
ee5ca549373242a354134beba707e48a1d12286d
describe
'23320' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWS' 'sip-files0157thm.jpg'
3ff08106b4b054cc72d3403a356abb3a
34421c3210c42f69ec9747ed8c44e7ee30d4d217
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWT' 'sip-files0158.jp2'
915d6d5c4455177bfa6fe6ebc86ec397
f1a00574f0c2fc3705583c5d98317dcf81dcf9a5
describe
'115298' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWU' 'sip-files0158.jpg'
5e77fb4fc2b838b3f18d14572d9f9f6b
76a664501383a5bd3543aee2756c116d3c4178ab
describe
'28398' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWV' 'sip-files0158.pro'
02baf0709e51b6081393326945f75218
3e33ba909fa42d93d20b16835dff78e511ef4aac
describe
'50119' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWW' 'sip-files0158.QC.jpg'
c1b29d35de8bb1973a8616c98c678304
eafd950d3395d716534c2bb11a0949fcde87d088
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWX' 'sip-files0158.tif'
fc28580c66e1ade24e34748fe886dc4b
d7264ab1600b0d6ca9d370ae9072de5f9ff556a6
describe
'1138' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWY' 'sip-files0158.txt'
0b0228bbc01dca34836a4b4b188175e9
4e54f7825a47245b2b3255b200177737fe47a91e
describe
'23204' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEWZ' 'sip-files0158thm.jpg'
eb74f4534661e8d9103c89e46b52417a
5c0a971b66709b85541ae621eed59443537abd28
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXA' 'sip-files0159.jp2'
9edfd562275ee951934739cf1de080fe
a59081d5ee56fc9a6d03780f2068da10588a2ee1
describe
'120486' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXB' 'sip-files0159.jpg'
62b91d8632db9201fcc0168c479415d2
3b8dd3cfd33bae853a216f10992985b9be0e1ef1
describe
'30220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXC' 'sip-files0159.pro'
ab18c61173dcf79e6f1d6eecb46db373
1bd579e91464998c6f2319ac14e0131ca81b89b7
describe
'50831' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXD' 'sip-files0159.QC.jpg'
d4a85776bd313c3bfc6306ee5b628089
b3ace4dfaf2ed8fadae0fd0532727380aee53279
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXE' 'sip-files0159.tif'
083b993a94803d3620fb63ec9aae3569
df0aa8f5388d20ed1292e7d922544d5f43f21b46
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXF' 'sip-files0159.txt'
478fcd37f06146ecb28010c1a6e67991
90b014b9f222891756b292f8a5dd6f5622c1784f
describe
'22795' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXG' 'sip-files0159thm.jpg'
2061fe8dffbffd32bc4265ecf96dd38b
2c87d83621a34518a0f7da2f3810c256246dedcb
describe
'62803' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXH' 'sip-files0160.jp2'
2d07ac824aa18f187a6c415c4dec2f8d
ff04e938ef48e1cf7dc208045c114404fa9b7f36
describe
'113504' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXI' 'sip-files0160.jpg'
0cfdb1137f38a63a0f0455b45902312e
bef428311801df0ddcba62257460430b10d0d348
describe
'27709' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXJ' 'sip-files0160.pro'
dcb1878f1d7fbbd23c22e802cf259484
ec8dacbf8d639e18ca1d5489a69c98b7f2d7522c
describe
'48329' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXK' 'sip-files0160.QC.jpg'
3ae970c153557f492f804f9f67482bb1
fc9e3134d4344a8e014f49f799340025e64a651a
describe
'516752' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXL' 'sip-files0160.tif'
6b16a37fbc8df1df1c5c4877df226837
8a1b9f32fc02db8f9e26830388f2998e3ae2d23d
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXM' 'sip-files0160.txt'
a588f78a0e42f404114db45be1a477a9
6afc466ea5424f1a38ea3df9649adedcf9a12926
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXN' 'sip-files0160thm.jpg'
b356cfdeebf5715b75a21c2b4dcb306a
916b4bb32ad60cc563a469086a25f411a97f0e36
describe
'62739' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXO' 'sip-files0161.jp2'
19866c869eb7bc7e8ceb40d90e6202b8
84cf725e468d693a0e07afaa6487cec0a7c889e1
describe
'126487' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXP' 'sip-files0161.jpg'
1dc29de527ff2375bad5ade8ba209ba8
9ff10a7f3d03902f1e88f2f72c7b25535d0163d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXQ' 'sip-files0161.pro'
30d6fd8019e173cfe8cacbfbd105a95d
928f5e356bf9b50c43125660701a51ba3bafc494
'2011-12-31T13:39:21-05:00'
describe
'52553' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXR' 'sip-files0161.QC.jpg'
ca29554c45b6845e194b658017b28001
d189ebca77321b269efd545a94e6e67a41f60092
describe
'516728' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXS' 'sip-files0161.tif'
e339d29b995ec413d0473bc88615f96b
91e9a4650104ea265ca544f544ec5fc7ade7b80d
describe
'1259' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXT' 'sip-files0161.txt'
bc634d16110d26e552840077c2276a4f
17c38564cd555a4e2566d16250e19c6f5184bd1d
'2011-12-31T13:38:09-05:00'
describe
'23307' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXU' 'sip-files0161thm.jpg'
a18ea80c47c8df9b41ef0c636e719281
14952a29c45c1887e5977b5c8312fefe2f31e9c6
describe
'62767' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXV' 'sip-files0162.jp2'
8b7cce746d9244ba215ea3a3e1c95746
3d6ac2d7a82cc4a41a965a8cd6bab9b28b76fb21
describe
'132664' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXW' 'sip-files0162.jpg'
c3011e064e36ffef6fe45887deeab358
cfc80ef47d1521692f2ea0eb65d4b53ebf5e5fcb
describe
'33307' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXX' 'sip-files0162.pro'
af9e088173d91769feca74a30d973bfe
cc167391c4fcc50ae769fff1c0fa72141bc78a7e
describe
'54210' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXY' 'sip-files0162.QC.jpg'
a49fcc8bed57c794f0e787966b7dbcd4
088ca5bce4cf4edf0be9b60455526d83b923c44b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEXZ' 'sip-files0162.tif'
d728e23c7b12674156904a36f3406d9e
3c476fbc8db41d6f270451e95dd0f61e2390cfa9
describe
'1328' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYA' 'sip-files0162.txt'
9aeaec288806f2b79707afc511544e14
25f9f1c378b1aaf693b04a22f782af4694f0fd8e
describe
'23510' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYB' 'sip-files0162thm.jpg'
3801f0e8827e8589fa2e0402c455439e
fdba5e22fb629b1ea0b59fbc36712012bf99fd30
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYC' 'sip-files0163.jp2'
8cf0a654818ab3e15bc5c03c89ca5581
158475c0ad46d733a0ae6dbb14f4860bd416ed6d
describe
'129567' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYD' 'sip-files0163.jpg'
8d07ceeb96f08a9cee061efacfcf44f1
cb95136b8117e27e0f1c0d3b38d1df509bc4225d
describe
'32727' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYE' 'sip-files0163.pro'
1b7e93598b9d65cea519b514bd73f3d8
a12885f09891a2cbc4bdf3a3b8295db28a7333c0
describe
'53131' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYF' 'sip-files0163.QC.jpg'
f52f2d94843ccbf16ea902924e22b8dc
156631cd3066b0c88990e89d1da051159c49ec13
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYG' 'sip-files0163.tif'
0b9a619cb9d679b4657be59b4fb7ffe7
a8021b888fdcf12dbe7380275016b31e6d1d7a20
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYH' 'sip-files0163.txt'
075b990b3b8ec74d8bbd0fd873a6cc30
4e82ade95ca4e6bafefad1ee8a6f8cd284383cea
describe
'22956' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYI' 'sip-files0163thm.jpg'
ba0918595f2faf0cb95bc2bac86cdd3c
22c64dc2f80c03e14be1ae364d2a6aeffbfadb42
describe
'62744' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYJ' 'sip-files0164.jp2'
41b5c5639e8f9b8bf488b2ab312a45b7
36e7cbaa9a884b36244a45e681b426d1314cf55a
describe
'138082' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYK' 'sip-files0164.jpg'
749f4c66112bc50244de769e7cfb1928
6140ac74bf476b3326a4bfea226f1603514dca58
'2011-12-31T13:39:37-05:00'
describe
'33652' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYL' 'sip-files0164.pro'
610daa368f26cea5517564635ec0725b
824ba6620c31c64f78644c933f1267c2472d0b33
describe
'55199' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYM' 'sip-files0164.QC.jpg'
65e9e1d25fe13e46c88f2affb3e7416a
fff6618567c39289bbc48d9d0b08f5cacc75c902
describe
'517144' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYN' 'sip-files0164.tif'
a92a8cf94228867c365842ca9c24796e
f05e3198f6c36cf848bffca6ad3ff1d0ebeac04a
describe
'1319' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYO' 'sip-files0164.txt'
5ae858db655233505ef25a19ba668526
d44077d5519d9eaf59a3f83a19010670f24507e0
'2011-12-31T13:41:31-05:00'
describe
'24078' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYP' 'sip-files0164thm.jpg'
68f6dfde9fb7e6e783f284fec3c733d4
11cbd8b27e4ff3a3b87af7a1bccf16e8e4228247
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYQ' 'sip-files0165.jp2'
eb24b0ec375da6998661a23b7afa0723
70ab9811cdb72b50db9a94cd5861c36558e6f88e
describe
'121543' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYR' 'sip-files0165.jpg'
a0a9372b53ba0f7cd7ff873c5d4ab71c
574b9d9076d90ee479da181b10721f952ab7396d
describe
'28700' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYS' 'sip-files0165.pro'
9071be137b18f9e59a0374b30c17c90c
a8d436dcce65e3ed7467c788a0a4e3bc771c0ef7
describe
'51675' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYT' 'sip-files0165.QC.jpg'
d8e2e0375837299e4efdda02c5fcb2a3
7d81d140486a8e5c2dd72bfb3160bd944555234c
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYU' 'sip-files0165.tif'
e1eaa3911b9c71ca0ab120c8b79b80de
35a804e8799a0dab39209b7221d79a0680fd5231
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYV' 'sip-files0165.txt'
2841f8e1823dd0c36d7eb737cde7f0db
ec7ec16547ffe70d1e82c7091f04ca12ebf0ea19
describe
'23548' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYW' 'sip-files0165thm.jpg'
c92555781173357183953a673ca04738
10cbae5582333a28ccdfa1de42f771103a3132ee
describe
'62802' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYX' 'sip-files0166.jp2'
ff59131dc7e912ccbe01a43725d736e5
264aab6a0f4c29a06441eeacf101190ebfa6ba7f
describe
'117320' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYY' 'sip-files0166.jpg'
e19ab7673a484b7930142d6cce781749
aed0ce4ece4cfd1a2d889e4093d6fed486c60305
describe
'28940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEYZ' 'sip-files0166.pro'
bd7425df14aa8d8167d78420c958ae07
f98c6b1e49a6463fe1487f8293689a5262d92538
describe
'50371' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZA' 'sip-files0166.QC.jpg'
12a68fe25826b858bf7546b58d932c61
bce0fce1ab637158cc2c598952b672dd52cd2c6b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZB' 'sip-files0166.tif'
4799b2fcd63cf13d1cc43c30214dadf4
752a585a2f782b51229356e7e59a918488e6bc80
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZC' 'sip-files0166.txt'
3b1fa0e04280ffbfa74f006e071072a4
bf13c8d92726bfd68b0cff47763e290c8fcc179a
describe
'23435' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZD' 'sip-files0166thm.jpg'
66105b21cf936dd78ac900ab7ace6624
e5494d8dc0fc47f55f7d075db805cd04b97daf2a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZE' 'sip-files0167.jp2'
e13b9634b4f5acda9a52ed998ffcf49d
d1ba6e8492e6964bd6069840b988f5be437a522e
describe
'123937' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZF' 'sip-files0167.jpg'
7a5d7a4d1ffd949824ab469cbbee1767
27ff8e165bc41fa432b8208a90d7f14ab1485217
describe
'29501' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZG' 'sip-files0167.pro'
6df4d62e587e677cc22847227877ba68
87c035778d9a9880da72e0dbefa0fb7ca97dde98
describe
'52325' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZH' 'sip-files0167.QC.jpg'
e0b9e165ad5d73a8b9a13006a5d62f74
88f705015229bdc16711c3ba0dc1bb786996dc8d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZI' 'sip-files0167.tif'
26e639129380e8a4b057398cfac690a9
0aec4cc83fcf9e90830c676c275a0fdfbdea032a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZJ' 'sip-files0167.txt'
419910733392b883cceae633ada964af
b29d3de0df4a46f45429ce9f593f728259a54b01
describe
'23702' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZK' 'sip-files0167thm.jpg'
6a10ace65df79d36668f31958b271e11
895268f3bfdeca33b75eb445fd9a92f1bdb793e3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZL' 'sip-files0168.jp2'
acf1d5d06b7709bcfe6f31bbb8120987
33605baea0274b3ef0548c18ac8dd796ab510d11
describe
'133946' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZM' 'sip-files0168.jpg'
6a5eaf59f6747bb051425c2a2ca58069
7b20c18cfda607087be476542611e6665eabf969
describe
'33906' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZN' 'sip-files0168.pro'
85a0054a02aaa1819fafe2bd65e26816
e1c8eba290482758d761765be573ec8df9804266
describe
'55760' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZO' 'sip-files0168.QC.jpg'
dd2310c3035dcf9c8b8bbfafea8eadc9
0e0a71364b46bd20810fb24b7901e7a02a0cfb8e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZP' 'sip-files0168.tif'
a2567c56b74769dc24d8a1624c893def
5ea58763c6e692d36371d692825ec836817aef6e
describe
'1343' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZQ' 'sip-files0168.txt'
b4214cdec285c630a5f5381b97425723
f774921abc567d360a62d4a9552dda48eb321437
describe
'24484' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZR' 'sip-files0168thm.jpg'
30de72ba611ea98e21af57d64964b133
c07cabc994b76283dc7a8ccacf974fe089a0825a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZS' 'sip-files0169.jp2'
7b130eaafbf3d2ccf72daf6f5355a5c5
edeef4ba538288de0ef86ce460ea0c7f377fe43b
describe
'134004' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZT' 'sip-files0169.jpg'
8633466463fe4647b344c3e449f0fbfa
7269a75647870ddb670ed87a0cb83ad718dff86a
describe
'33499' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZU' 'sip-files0169.pro'
06e42ea0f61832788b686f838b991c2b
ddaa1addd30a9fee6955ba825ba69a4ecd76f297
describe
'54564' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZV' 'sip-files0169.QC.jpg'
e9496c0e16e132d00ceff5bbfd65985b
080dcf48ae6c42ab22a801a48a334cbf6687d172
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZW' 'sip-files0169.tif'
59cee520306952ebc5b2bd4b07088f19
3020efd8e7e8557234808ead0ed0993f45769076
describe
'1322' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZX' 'sip-files0169.txt'
e75923e3ab9a8d7a1cec4f107432e237
170f9575ce31ef6ee955cc846c8c7a2c291e5ca6
describe
'23824' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZY' 'sip-files0169thm.jpg'
ebc004c9d47213739d6f7ba096df16d6
c11edb5dae7c3c20ad8ddd3cf5a0bea7dbde1c68
describe
'62834' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAEZZ' 'sip-files0170.jp2'
9bbce5c9fc66de443467d9233822c702
7ecd37fdeff2713dd6f4185f04f327e659168893
describe
'120605' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAA' 'sip-files0170.jpg'
437dba03599d8fed8d3198434e669025
2c8e2c280fc271c7efc8a9764ed2742dfe00b2e4
describe
'29218' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAB' 'sip-files0170.pro'
dea2d3116a61183a7b05dfe44178f232
d5f2a06c69f5aa896d1c92c9c3fd6a7da78db5a5
describe
'51166' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAC' 'sip-files0170.QC.jpg'
14a984b0cf67a196c2a464e3fe98187b
017d7b0aedebc140fbadd87ecbb7cc49182b7b9d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAD' 'sip-files0170.tif'
127e69545d7f35ed11f2ea13ad2c8b19
7e334aebdd60cca2b09ed403810fc46a31c623e3
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAE' 'sip-files0170.txt'
db4958533763ff26a85e87731edbfd1b
841610f83ed537b6f0c28df717e350330e32d1ad
describe
'23621' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAF' 'sip-files0170thm.jpg'
0882fb98a170ab2f9321584b02fc1ba5
57fb3bec348c2215547d16de4d69586a70baf1d7
describe
'62738' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAG' 'sip-files0171.jp2'
f9e342e2e7e24885852b205a5d99d064
8046cf4ce17a54d4f58b39a69345037b68827342
describe
'127132' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAH' 'sip-files0171.jpg'
6bb21a436520f6569f685ed8ef12cf4d
b20b911ae7639ecaaf45da446d3ab301ba86d5ee
describe
'31264' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAI' 'sip-files0171.pro'
05bd4031d63bbdb5f211341b260cb788
d62090bb5b23c7ba30ced8307530c00bb543cf4a
describe
'52618' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAJ' 'sip-files0171.QC.jpg'
cc4f74fd43cf52957a21630498c56943
542c2672ae7ef3735dbe96f4e571bc68a37418dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAK' 'sip-files0171.tif'
c846106a3991ee47619349195081114f
0811763d9f90b7b3e34bbc02de071eaf55800765
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAL' 'sip-files0171.txt'
66c76bcba0ceba31175edc2ea3de6a9e
2d0ff1aa4fc3968eab0e323a5609038e73fb8f20
describe
'23772' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAM' 'sip-files0171thm.jpg'
6239e14efc7c9c671bff023f9bcee54d
563c1070cd4f3e588e164ecfd997070fb727079a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAN' 'sip-files0172.jp2'
b26df4e404dabbd0f28cf645d10cadd0
8a864d2b44a2e9a11ef1c8907c54a55653a22e67
describe
'125588' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAO' 'sip-files0172.jpg'
62f964dc007af791d9cc1c5b2ed6f4d9
ab534d0785c59a82b60d5ac5c6a2f15fa05d2f60
describe
'30403' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAP' 'sip-files0172.pro'
d7dc815450787ba26e7fc9a0fee31a8d
8d2697a73cc68ca4c63608e3042e701bbf59604f
describe
'52250' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAQ' 'sip-files0172.QC.jpg'
1d58300000fe9e80456486006f494d74
580cd5d89d8e29a071aa7b9c7c9ddd35dc3cf6dc
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAR' 'sip-files0172.tif'
e70450cf02b1f0a981f5682015fe401f
85fcb614dabe7ba895e120a3f52fa76061b31e52
describe
'1212' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAS' 'sip-files0172.txt'
aade375fb644a4f33992e6a12e986ef2
7aa03a39942e46cfd002efb973e36ecc15c32afa
describe
'23860' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAT' 'sip-files0172thm.jpg'
541663eec62ec5c0047c284a9ee0233c
9d1d018d082aa25678d07631c67876efad6fc1d2
'2011-12-31T13:39:18-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAU' 'sip-files0173.jp2'
97ab8116af2185bdcef38dbebca32d25
f955e579bfe4852662953ee80bf41176d82b9647
describe
'125550' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAV' 'sip-files0173.jpg'
d1647d3ece65f187b09a48bb2764a445
297a7ba07ae0e58d7730c7ad10da33fe87c88cd0
describe
'30447' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAW' 'sip-files0173.pro'
367682224f4852d576569fb9d6b5dc23
40871fce4ca96cb29ea522869c0aa1d99e055cf9
describe
'52614' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAX' 'sip-files0173.QC.jpg'
e023daceaa6b7805b2690fbedd604710
48369b00508c01194363ad341e463c6119babf38
'2011-12-31T13:37:44-05:00'
describe
'516896' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAY' 'sip-files0173.tif'
5fb7c779e6eaac2fe31ba07df0af0ae0
7c8b93aa7e07b8098f0a6bfac7a2de7df60249ef
describe
'1217' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFAZ' 'sip-files0173.txt'
e9ba3b62a39804aa858f0fb296419ecf
dea284137afa7b2903d3c7762149aaf10cbcde58
describe
Invalid character
'23369' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBA' 'sip-files0173thm.jpg'
0db3e9f637773e3cab10fa2953f47090
eb76f7d44c0222a6850f1f0e9b5371c0fa96ddbe
describe
'62753' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBB' 'sip-files0174.jp2'
d7d505b96c0af90c6b7a832bb68bfa8f
e5c5861c0b56e4896e268a56edc8af5abf4b7edd
describe
'129316' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBC' 'sip-files0174.jpg'
08dc8e250fccb3fc25e8894963412531
c800e42936359313825010ebff805dc2bf69203b
describe
'32775' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBD' 'sip-files0174.pro'
ec653fa3918797a6fbb354bfcb5143e9
10aaef30fd4ada80104e325586f630fe38d84384
describe
'53581' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBE' 'sip-files0174.QC.jpg'
f626b36f4db6638116aaa1979a52116e
741172cbbe60333382903b5b8abaa9dabcce7ec7
describe
'517020' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBF' 'sip-files0174.tif'
0a027fca9e0fd8f5e685f88d441fd070
8a8c2b685f6d82c838323ae84d6502c026bdccc5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBG' 'sip-files0174.txt'
2905a3b708c3f2e8bab66cc80d3b5d01
d4fec411f856fc98ea66d2573b0fe13258760426
describe
'23802' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBH' 'sip-files0174thm.jpg'
0bcc1f864ad4b749c949ac8f48e19a1a
ce893b99120f235c7f9377d363975969bea9a9c6
describe
'62873' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBI' 'sip-files0175.jp2'
dea3e7e67476fe930314ee9ce54078b9
4e3b53af4f14ee4f7484cf3fed4b64bf0980db26
describe
'123588' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBJ' 'sip-files0175.jpg'
db4405efccfa1685fe51741cca38b25f
3e7856b65596723e091c3b037a66215c0a3bae2a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBK' 'sip-files0175.pro'
abd57ca35427196abdf8d2add0486ce7
50358d81b693023691b0384d706d747c58f69bd4
describe
'52469' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBL' 'sip-files0175.QC.jpg'
ee0341876efe1367e320f9f6fbf6a7f1
59808d263aa74eec4a7bcf2ee38d88af8ae8967f
describe
'516944' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBM' 'sip-files0175.tif'
015dc873b6f6139aec306bc2993b4b7b
75f4ecc5a0a78fc8827bfd240401d0167ad94b58
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBN' 'sip-files0175.txt'
406cedc1d76510b17f2337e0c262487c
91a9cf922cbaf9d56c596a3cda008f8f50b53abd
describe
'23713' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBO' 'sip-files0175thm.jpg'
c0a1d9364c67e6d919f8fb6a8494bd8f
da37293dd1bdba76377b842cd294d579d1b9ccd9
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBP' 'sip-files0176.jp2'
3c595b0811b415658b7e9d8a2d980c8d
347f98021a40fc3c2d76f5f568d521defe01f233
describe
'115213' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBQ' 'sip-files0176.jpg'
dd12915bcbd34df95adf93b47da4c4f2
6cb05af9f3d9c4497c21fbeb73eae55624924292
describe
'9003' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBR' 'sip-files0176.pro'
b0949fbe2b324239d974ee2009864154
95cc8450bb9df33b26139f2945179b5ffe117785
describe
'43132' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBS' 'sip-files0176.QC.jpg'
b057b4da9a3712fbba61f05b1fa13474
0f3e8a34c7c572b30e0b8fac5cbf855483ef3320
describe
'515932' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBT' 'sip-files0176.tif'
79b487d26c88e14cafdbe15aba234c49
e2d114448223212115578abe11b5cad517796d99
describe
'366' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBU' 'sip-files0176.txt'
4fce0a79174f5f57723c550f0a0ce1f2
e2db8ec56c192809060d16a83c4530cb79436876
describe
Invalid character
'20889' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBV' 'sip-files0176thm.jpg'
c3865ca60bccb9ef8a86b9390de0553b
244d0d05241770e59783951dace748c10d3df92a
describe
'62732' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBW' 'sip-files0177.jp2'
d0580cf9e1c62c6bb572e887a024f8ee
555150bb43a5cd0b9dc73ccc9f2d17e50ed5c9e0
describe
'113335' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBX' 'sip-files0177.jpg'
9ad1a91a23e4c2e172db512613543caf
787de87f8f4f72dc22c2c47715b06784f63c9353
describe
'24892' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBY' 'sip-files0177.pro'
63c5e6f4bfd8f8c490910df52d0dbd0c
cbfa989cb5b4c593f9d205008829d248dca6edfd
'2011-12-31T13:40:21-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFBZ' 'sip-files0177.QC.jpg'
23501ae8b16505ae8083b174c327bfea
14f32ca7d49364956df5f5bf04b1a1d33fdd8a4b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCA' 'sip-files0177.tif'
f48554f658976b59ba4172d01842cb35
ddd800525fb70555b6124fbec409f79f1b044be6
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCB' 'sip-files0177.txt'
b08f0bffb5c1a192dee7cb43ed5a1dcd
1c8308158adcb753f7c09916db794c504b1a1983
describe
'21822' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCC' 'sip-files0177thm.jpg'
a8438d9a8def87bb3838a61152314eaf
d5b6bae3993c1761e00801b1c01e6269256ac399
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCD' 'sip-files0178.jp2'
87d69fa548cfab0d268c646b658b062e
0b29e5caebcf0eb434e434d8eafa7a9fdce8f89b
describe
'129631' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCE' 'sip-files0178.jpg'
2446ff833b60de6be14434e7855c8377
dcd9e5dd28e9236d42d1faa81070da108f5bf073
describe
'33205' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCF' 'sip-files0178.pro'
622d020e092a546d6da9f5d772ef3965
abfcecabfe13d294452fdb74c33145353ed63cb8
describe
'53024' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCG' 'sip-files0178.QC.jpg'
76fbeaad99aaad9dbc3eb45f709ddede
b865d4357985919453fde8a2a8df986523db4dc5
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCH' 'sip-files0178.tif'
e28cae80de342b5ca843c2b61bea33ec
fc10b0418d4ad90de16667162e557fe3521907dd
describe
'1320' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCI' 'sip-files0178.txt'
84b513dbbcca39270bee009675e00d4d
85ff2a5579ba2cf033c5e6a5468ed13cb18beb05
describe
'23250' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCJ' 'sip-files0178thm.jpg'
243f98b2eb9c1f18bc1d59a338369bb7
13a3ca391505c33ad8c16c7f8d6db79e9ee3dfa3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCK' 'sip-files0179.jp2'
47a2f957475f650aa2f1da1f206456a7
36e6603e277211a15d4c1d5db00e5dff56bba917
describe
'108725' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCL' 'sip-files0179.jpg'
6d973a13b68709f4ec04d1abd696a358
ee7c387d7bde3d74a4948413a3a02be5c9bbaff6
describe
'27488' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCM' 'sip-files0179.pro'
6411d9720c2613a00895639bc83699bb
036585c8d4c02e7820c9db13bf0ebf1ef072f35b
describe
'47104' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCN' 'sip-files0179.QC.jpg'
a1098e0d0108ec94d99abb5932762bac
74822e2ea58536f6158e10142e77033e32791479
describe
'516432' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCO' 'sip-files0179.tif'
fb0e6933913999d3d1e64e96b586cd44
30ed2cbca702f90c5ce8fe1516dc7ee878c446a5
describe
'1098' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCP' 'sip-files0179.txt'
2634bc7d8c6aff8b7c43f99aa347a3e1
bda811a44b4bdeb58108c8ad6ed2e6b82cc38bdc
describe
Invalid character
'22194' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCQ' 'sip-files0179thm.jpg'
a8b1c498023210fd58cb6f78b65aad70
1b4285c274453037e85de8b42656baaa2da26717
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCR' 'sip-files0180.jp2'
fc65472adeea6889cfb045167a4a869a
c8075300b557f66a4b68e06b36927c1697bc83e2
describe
'121848' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCS' 'sip-files0180.jpg'
434ae93ff8c258932bf5e9ab94b7142e
cdfad7ce75fd3e574ab65fe1d06493890e443a9b
describe
'31821' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCT' 'sip-files0180.pro'
7b0316a4e34bde0d7dc9ae9af1dc11bb
00820b050042ea267eba07c14dfc0d1a3de23395
describe
'50732' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCU' 'sip-files0180.QC.jpg'
5bbc681cc54c36f717237e04e91434e0
b2341d3a5ce1a5263204dcf1357f4a72f57bb091
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCV' 'sip-files0180.tif'
280b07eb57f1d811944b95a48b380961
3e0e987bc9e1e27d41a84863aca374f29a48ec06
describe
'1257' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCW' 'sip-files0180.txt'
8d9b76f914bfb78d1bec24c1f5c4377b
13fe2ed169c6340af6c30886b9ab5321384c42a7
describe
'22639' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCX' 'sip-files0180thm.jpg'
e04b4bdb131c5586a19ec8ec6e0cde53
81b94bdb26eb9ed57b13f26f29e6f3d29d1e1e6b
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCY' 'sip-files0181.jp2'
3196e14f09b32a71435ab989878f95aa
19c9484e982d1f9bd6965996e0234f80e83bd2fc
describe
'122099' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFCZ' 'sip-files0181.jpg'
4f1e3f1515e03216cd6f745e8724b785
6fd284faa93503064fe252cce0d2d40956154666
describe
'30869' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDA' 'sip-files0181.pro'
2d26a25cd4061354e2d2d236b6c414df
05c83827b5f727f29b97ac169ef743b1f4005229
describe
'50352' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDB' 'sip-files0181.QC.jpg'
83b70243f34fb84391b30c98688c8e35
5fd12bc813cacb497efe2259c0611f5e28575a88
describe
'516644' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDC' 'sip-files0181.tif'
2a0ce28a29c503ecdd10ca9a78271240
c331d663c43e5d597b9eb8b2786182fdecb6d5c8
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDD' 'sip-files0181.txt'
a16a5c68867340bbb43bea551e43569c
5f88337f49947463d3ec45e4be963dee641415fd
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDE' 'sip-files0181thm.jpg'
a224fa228f5af3f1be35c134f2afa6a3
a15e82458c82013aebd6b557fe607cc0ee6462c2
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDF' 'sip-files0182.jp2'
ddb7b9fded15b231e23481cbcd53e514
6d54d5f5eaac2b3d77702f4232ab7305335ac783
describe
'128256' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDG' 'sip-files0182.jpg'
bc1dcd03df14f41a07a7c903901106b4
ea39edaebd243eea1562564f9dcb8d908d0c9e0f
describe
'32015' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDH' 'sip-files0182.pro'
343fea01d6a1de4ccc95e8a72db8f841
38bd9fab39a210fcd5ca91df04005aaeba942bf6
describe
'53784' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDI' 'sip-files0182.QC.jpg'
423b1752e5741d2fe8378cfa5cff89e6
26a5943f58f641eb36ed307b84da3e449b2083ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDJ' 'sip-files0182.tif'
51e24a7baf8a0711f6a13247341ba476
69d9497b9890be3c27ae2cb9899c853d04167914
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDK' 'sip-files0182.txt'
0f646b3edb7ee41084fac3939ea81652
3bd73eb6f274150c40ca7a6b5eaa20759aabaa34
describe
'23726' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDL' 'sip-files0182thm.jpg'
dca2e657c4f1cee3a05a1b6e9ca3473f
1d65b031493a0099731abb3544d27fd74c5bace4
describe
'62667' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDM' 'sip-files0183.jp2'
1d96682a6fa2a0a05a14154b32fec8d9
a0043368be5a3bbd436e755d2f312266457d48ae
describe
'130342' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDN' 'sip-files0183.jpg'
5af518c894c30de202cb65d2b2cab6cb
46dafb382f8d04c18b21d8372d93e3b8ccf6c9b9
describe
'33455' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDO' 'sip-files0183.pro'
59d14d6bd424dc05f6ba16b0154d360a
97fd4a4877e8d0f777b9f49414107dfed0508c05
describe
'54291' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDP' 'sip-files0183.QC.jpg'
1fb5dc237be1d276ca364d3d8a8a0184
779956d31e8a64de4b37ff4ac0071cb5ce5d8f18
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDQ' 'sip-files0183.tif'
a900ef11430ce534d1944c7fd6d7fd3b
1915508ec81d595d48ff14ccfb9db45523560134
describe
'1312' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDR' 'sip-files0183.txt'
1ff15a56b282326ebdc8fc1c560bf2ae
d89769cbeb93002f658e383c599751dce2943cbd
describe
'23237' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDS' 'sip-files0183thm.jpg'
290476ff00484c4a44ade95fc30a3fce
7c7ae148c38854600fad8e1c858726798a58975b
describe
'62710' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDT' 'sip-files0184.jp2'
123b93abd268c06066c4b9aae5636b9b
015f5afcc413a0cc51ae90a827a9b9650b99f587
describe
'135637' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDU' 'sip-files0184.jpg'
cbdafa7828dc70c674d78261e0907859
b80d3e1d28be67f657ce91186bfedea18f7940c0
describe
'33576' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDV' 'sip-files0184.pro'
872311928d87abc992e8475b72dbf6a1
266fb9bd5601ea872aa0895c2d845f6092743784
describe
'55408' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDW' 'sip-files0184.QC.jpg'
c76940b6723a0d5cd808cc5553f7b3ba
909107adb0cc3f7c0b1a8eec8880e9847bbb3e4e
describe
'517100' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDX' 'sip-files0184.tif'
31a758a4297fb5f9fa65016241624507
40a1fb1fd194b9c8327ec131e992fb903fb90bb1
describe
'1316' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDY' 'sip-files0184.txt'
28cde34f24e678815df05199ed1ffdd8
f32b4ca584f75ee842ee04f41b1d28ba7d72402b
describe
'24146' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFDZ' 'sip-files0184thm.jpg'
952e70ecc76260ec2f846767c584dc7c
fc24f4d815a3f7aa6c2b35b1917828ae5b59bec3
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEA' 'sip-files0185.jp2'
fc1d89134e49213f3f307f0f0e63b187
8255875892093077ea85bce92027e0ac26e0218e
describe
'126614' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEB' 'sip-files0185.jpg'
8e5decfc088adc586c35e72a18b53bbc
a4acda918557b7b54f70e429d3c438d396a96a92
describe
'30975' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEC' 'sip-files0185.pro'
fb9a7aa768de8fc7d9cdeec6d4aefff7
33a0cce9d113b07bc711ffcbb2c9e78f7ec37b28
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFED' 'sip-files0185.QC.jpg'
35ef662f7fbbf6dad121206d03baf500
1592f39b84908e6cef92d11e152bad7105cb874d
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEE' 'sip-files0185.tif'
1e5b08ee6949f669100a94933f723141
8dbdbd30725332d04e3d280227bf77b17d882e41
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEF' 'sip-files0185.txt'
8f8a4b654aeeb630e4bac7f6c74e7264
6bc76d656b3eebd5e4852a652019ee5a818b18b3
describe
'23468' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEG' 'sip-files0185thm.jpg'
79abc561d243043c11d061c405cb331d
7c666721cb4e34f037d7959bf8e180d5630f8ec1
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEH' 'sip-files0186.jp2'
f30a5595fef668760bbd27774eb9019e
876601522072a7651af81858f2095baa56361e12
describe
'131055' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEI' 'sip-files0186.jpg'
dd378cacec49db9b2f12288be7e2eeb6
772e7981edf0ba3e894d474c5c9b7b367e6ff394
describe
'33019' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEJ' 'sip-files0186.pro'
7c47741cb73cd3407d67fd6758fb1592
a9c1525c14e0b6985b1275405ab04a7592abd436
describe
'53249' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEK' 'sip-files0186.QC.jpg'
16da0e92d822405e4f7feb1df08fbbab
034901a01434dbbef2b8753df378dd2680ec3013
describe
'516940' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEL' 'sip-files0186.tif'
13167d14985e6efcacc095542555e862
eda88aed324dfd7b0095559855d9d2d4ad83f1f0
describe
'1306' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEM' 'sip-files0186.txt'
b421b1dbd0772f10f559de2e35132315
c8495950742293c6838ba5d0bfd59d2fa522a80a
describe
'23794' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEN' 'sip-files0186thm.jpg'
79a0aa0818e1aebc0126bee0b51c36b8
4ba008d780d450303302f44fb81f8f0f1962a845
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEO' 'sip-files0187.jp2'
ee148f6e0ff60bd44340820ccb590e47
c5ec1dce44c260ba5e6fee2a3c0e72f6d13e8486
describe
'124996' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEP' 'sip-files0187.jpg'
685b0701c09a7b8e643fdc272f7bce00
dbb46cd1bfea2264adc99e840d425020afff3d7d
describe
'30583' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEQ' 'sip-files0187.pro'
03113bfc8ac147185b23d429501cec63
d91661ed3a0c2228219b52a30370e3aca5c7d050
describe
'52162' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFER' 'sip-files0187.QC.jpg'
995370c716cf84786530cd9402c1e7a9
2dd92e2f67a96c8d0386e78773499139503b96cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFES' 'sip-files0187.tif'
e6533b1030ce39cd58844fec4e2de41a
9030677929946797477a9680cc05d98a473e0d17
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFET' 'sip-files0187.txt'
1575db2c9c15e6c0bcc3fa038ac28026
1ec80b1dc946b53e79be84701284bb1a7d2a432a
describe
'23374' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEU' 'sip-files0187thm.jpg'
27dec17c32131b64773ebe3735588564
fa0f61d4cdfd92ce9643b6c7779f689298c0b06e
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEV' 'sip-files0188.jp2'
123b32513f0be29db02f267cf31641fa
ed134e69654e9a1fecbb747217504d7f8477e0d6
describe
'123851' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEW' 'sip-files0188.jpg'
f9653e26c0e40ffed56af10c30a604be
5e78da378bf1f069822cb037b38f737d750ea693
describe
'30548' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEX' 'sip-files0188.pro'
43ad6d5f5364d9fcc103f63694a02138
cd8fa6b766cde46b7f60c77005c20c8753489d72
describe
'52200' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEY' 'sip-files0188.QC.jpg'
8cce10d89a99e3fac3f5416ef679fea6
a8a8831ef4c16f1db23611631155908c6b3a0d5e
describe
'517040' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFEZ' 'sip-files0188.tif'
32779d4521cef0f6c3494d24e57d7bda
799b5787ecc8b450d64c708fca850c9860088f15
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFA' 'sip-files0188.txt'
9a03be664e1f76be39c9fd7681161ff3
6f0cb3bb3936a5fe3d7c5782f811edd037ecda71
describe
Invalid character
'23854' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFB' 'sip-files0188thm.jpg'
47dcff6dcc402c56879f42f2b92702c4
e28b37068486bc5c3bfe4fcd341ca79e40eafc5e
describe
'62869' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFC' 'sip-files0189.jp2'
ee7f72698a457ada46a2e436307c7d55
b87cb8444ec3b045a1c8ab053f24e47ca2a425e0
describe
'131623' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFD' 'sip-files0189.jpg'
656f7e1cc09d705fbe51f526e9d4da16
95c775a4e709f4e0f161904f4ae245a45eab5e24
describe
'15522' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFE' 'sip-files0189.pro'
bbf50a48021f85b3cfe2d00f9a7bce66
bb582dc3cdfbe6f1d74b261d1a28d8d5bf31fe0d
describe
'49622' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFF' 'sip-files0189.QC.jpg'
0b3b1835565157e436181f0170e696f1
85b804dc372eaee9520634744e74c0dc8fb7adb3
describe
'516616' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFG' 'sip-files0189.tif'
7199771af8d1d4062b2a824d550d5172
c1f19a6835e7a83da552ff867dc9c655ce6bd6f7
describe
'627' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFH' 'sip-files0189.txt'
8f2f56b3b747b9187a426c5804a94d81
6da60dcd66653c5e5b3a379905e92c674515999b
describe
'22711' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFI' 'sip-files0189thm.jpg'
07c43596c8a7a09a0bed7cdc68a3690a
140737af2f68714bc97ee30b55b748d9b9d83747
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFJ' 'sip-files0190.jp2'
ca0e1a9fbd5ae8873164978b11c352d3
88d2f26fb55faebee3dddf6f060722731432caff
describe
'124610' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFK' 'sip-files0190.jpg'
21fd8cc0b213fb9c1c0abe2ecb57c374
0792012880fb64b4ca782a2e4f0558fabbab42d1
describe
'29269' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFL' 'sip-files0190.pro'
0eff9395bc50e3a49f159a5997bac750
c9db8ede38526e0da82a27f312a11d3ec3f7fff5
describe
'52688' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFM' 'sip-files0190.QC.jpg'
b88d48e08eed28f9342dbeabca4ae126
09756ae3517da8207643c2eef2e7816ba7f1fa74
describe
'517128' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFN' 'sip-files0190.tif'
98b540ce35acf2795eb43c5c8564a890
0cd5b436eccda2c76b7381ee7966ee7fefc1f76a
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFO' 'sip-files0190.txt'
e5c192036e00d13463fc583d36c21629
e496fe4cd6cf53bf6451533cd2e5b4481b53cde8
describe
'24031' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFP' 'sip-files0190thm.jpg'
51d69dfe644a946b8d018ac8670ee61a
f28488bae95280c3268115debe0c9c4172fc6f38
describe
'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFQ' 'sip-files0191.jp2'
f5c1b9570ff008e5ddcdad047fafb151
3b343e4993a3911f8d15be1dde8a2e66f6662559
describe
'126707' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFR' 'sip-files0191.jpg'
d2669ebf4fea0e91084d24634bcb864f
b3ba1f88f9188664faeb7f05d03a345e9b78e4bc
describe
'31836' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFS' 'sip-files0191.pro'
456fdf764393f8adfde0663afe4a66b8
e5a8ec4a7b00da3954989733eb13b527f3e88271
describe
'53655' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFT' 'sip-files0191.QC.jpg'
adea1875941ad790a1f10874c2e9bc61
276497722bfad74795ac4a4768bfe232fb65fdff
describe
'517016' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFU' 'sip-files0191.tif'
964c0c09b8391d050b0979aeb3e86c34
e348f7c73e69c450c44fd59992498cba4082894a
describe
'1266' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFV' 'sip-files0191.txt'
503d4bf294cbe2652e3d2fedc0c31163
e933fad280260119847e4599fc7e95fd4d1d44f3
describe
'23771' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFW' 'sip-files0191thm.jpg'
e5927ec7273dff7df3b0c8e8b80717be
94eb16d5bcd02dfb2fd8f832e48a8e555eb6ce4b
describe
'54362' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFX' 'sip-files0192.jp2'
f13e72a417f48f873d5fe9d0b30d98e9
f40a94fa41661af69a23ee1528b08528c69d94d3
describe
'41029' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFY' 'sip-files0192.jpg'
7a2deb5621a912761338bf3603f7d546
0ab31aa77ddcea865373564f68394dd02a07bcf6
describe
'6812' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFFZ' 'sip-files0192.pro'
2d3d97c953a8c48dad81c76b81aff17e
cd739541462cc694cec3437e56ffa011dc77965c
describe
'20274' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFGA' 'sip-files0192.QC.jpg'
21bb491f2b3fa9bedd76ad086e6fbef8
6f6c2b36ca7fc5b7040d7ac4cb60ee08754a9c87
describe
'512280' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFGB' 'sip-files0192.tif'
fab9acf01355c9698ab6b83048ad5e4d
9bc9a18cb132e30f87d8b183d1d2d9c9432edc30
describe
'277' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFGC' 'sip-files0192.txt'
e3437264b8d70337404b817d5660ce49
d4b25546a3e0351e808338666ba36c4717090fc1
describe
'12875' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFGD' 'sip-files0192thm.jpg'
1e929de463755b8e14f6ee127fb213da
a59e8f184dfad2c61955f214c0508ffa595206e4
describe
'284044' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFGE' 'sip-filesUF00003522_00001.mets'
7fb29d8b1c699aeb4ac77dd11bfe7db7
ef33219b724e4eb1645ca0b193fdb17e774c039d
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T17:20:57-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'367599' 'info:fdaE20090219_AAAAAHfileF20090220_AAAFGH' 'sip-filesUF00003522_00001.xml'
ab64d46fd5f9072e7194a5d9b881e58a
e1776747534ee41ac147a812638c21c38639aada
describe
'2013-12-13T17:20:59-05:00'
xml resolution


xml record header identifier oai:www.uflib.ufl.edu.ufdc:UF0000352200001datestamp 2008-11-13setSpec [UFDC_OAI_SET]metadata oai_dc:dc xmlns:oai_dc http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc xmlns:dc http:purl.orgdcelements1.1 xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.openarchives.orgOAI2.0oai_dc.xsd dc:title Marco Paul's voyages & travelsSpringfield Armorydc:creator Abbott, Jacob, 1803-1879Doepler, Carl Emil, 1824-1905 ( Illustrator )Orr, John William, 1815-1887 ( Engraver )Lossing & Barritt ( Engraver )dc:subject Boys -- Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Responsibility -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Tutors and tutoring -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Cousins -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Armories -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Floods -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )Description and travel -- Juvenile fiction -- Springfield (Mass.) ( lcsh )Travelogue storybooks -- 1853 ( local )Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853 ( rbbin )dc:description b Statement of Responsibility by Jacob Abbott.Some illustrations engraved by J. W, Orr.Illustrated title page engraved by Lossing & Barritt after C.E. Dopler.dc:publisher Harper & Brothersdc:date c1853.>dc:type Bookdc:format 192 p. : ill. ; 18 cm.dc:identifier http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/ufdc/?b=UF00003522&v=00001002230383 (ALEPH)AAA4894 (LTQF)ALH0743 (LTUF)01812345 (OCLC)dc:source University of Floridadc:language English


TOS LWoacirsss






Watered, acvording to Act of Congress, in the year ons thousand
eight handred and fifty-three, by

Haaren & Brotuzns,

in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Souther District
.of New York.
PREFACE.

Tue design of the series of volumes, entitled
Manco Pavr’s ADVENTURES IN THE PursuIT oF
Knowxeper, is not merely-to entertain the reader
with a narrative of juvenile adventures, but also to
communicate, in connection with them, as extensive
and varied information as possible, in respect to
the. geography, the scenery, the customs and the
institutions of this country, as they present them-
selves to the observation of the little traveler, who
makes his excursions under the guidance of an
intelligent and well-informed companion, qualitied

+ to assist him in the acquisition of knowledge and in
he formation of character. The anthor has en
deagored to enliven his narrative, and to infuse into
elements of a salutary moral influence, by means



of personal incidents befalling the actors in the
story. These incidents are, of course, imaginary—-
vi, Prerace. £
but the reader may rely upon the strict and exact
truth and fidelity of all the descriptions of places,
institutions and scenes, which are brought before
his mind in-the progress of the narrative. Thus,
though the author hopes that the readers who may
honor these volumes with their perusal, will be
amused and-interested by them, his design through-
out will be to instruct rather than to entertain.
CONTENTS.







ousrren ae Pace
L—Tue Wroxe Boar, . ‘ < . . ow,
1.—Tue Froop, 28 © g, & * 98
WL—Fae Warer Swors, . 6. e
IW.—Forome,. =. ees
V.Inon, . se
VI.—Anrcuery, ean x te te «* es
VIL—Tourxine ann. Bora, woe 8 100
VilL—Insrectox, =. ©. ews
IX.—TsE AnsiNar, - s er: - 128
X.—Tue Dancer of Brine ARMED, . . 189
Xi—Orprance, . Se 1

XIL—Tue Breauise Ur,. 2 +. 6 TT
ENGRAVINGS.



ee
Tar Wroxc Boar, ee ee |
‘Tue Froon, a . . . . . . 39
Srace mmme Warer,- - -- ses
Tae Waren Snors,. . . . ws
‘Tue Forsme Room, =< @ “x - 58
Castine, . . - . . . 4
‘Tue Sroor, . - . % . . . 85
‘Tae Srrean, 3 § Pek SF 2 Me. 7180
Teste tue Bayoxers, . /. . . «8
Farmer’s Worx, . a wth eae
Maine ur rite docks,. [0.0.2 |. ast
Tre Ramway Srarion, [| . . 0s. 14
Maxco’s Mortar, i 4 % . 176

Tae Rarr, . - - . 189
ORDER OF THE VOLUMES.

PAarru Paul, *

I.—IN NEW YORK.
Il.—ON THE ERIE CANAL.

Ill.—IN MAINE.-
Iv.—IN VERMONT.

V.IN BOSTON.
VI.—AT. THE SPRINGFIELD ARMORY.
PRINCIPAL PERSONS.

Mx. Barox,a:merchant of New York.
Matico, hhis son, a boy about twelve’ years old. -

Jou Forxersr, Maréo'a cousin, about nirieteen years old,

Marco is traveling and studying under Forester’s care.
MARCO PAUL
AT THE SPRINGFIELD ARMORY.

Cuarrer I.
Tar Wrone Boar.

‘Visit to Vermont. ‘Marco takes charge.

T was by a somewhat singular accident that
Marco Paul had an opportunity to pay a
visit to the great armory at Springfield. The
circumstances were these.

On one occasion, while he was under his
cousin Forester’s care, they were going from
New York city to Forester’s residence in Ver-
mont. Marco proposed that his cousin Fores-
ter should allow him to choose the route.

“Very well,” said Forester,“ I have no ob-
jection to that. - You may not only choose the
route, but take | the charge and direction of the
whole journey.”

« How do you mean ?” asked Maréo.

“Why, we will suppose,” said Forester,
12 Tue Spriverizup Armory.

Forester’s explanati



Pho two routes.

“that I arf an infirm old. gentleman, and that
you undertake to conduct me safely fo Ver-
mont. You may choose the route, and make
all the arrangements, only letting me know when
I must be ready. ‘Then you shall call the car-
riage, and take me to the boat, and engage our
berths, and doevery thing in a word, which a
gentleman usually does for a lady in such a
case.” 3

«« Well,” said Marco, “I should like that very
much.”

In fact, Marco was very much pleased with
the idea of exercising a little power. So he
got a traveling map of New England, spread it
upon a table, and began to study the features
of the country, with reference to the different
routes. There were two routes, which princi-
pally attracted his attention. These the reader
will understand very distinctly by consulting a
map.

The first was, to go up the North river in the
‘Troy boat, thence by railroad to the southern
end of Lake George, thence by steamboat along
the lakes George and Champlain, to Burlington,
and from Burlington by stage, across the coun-
try, to the town where Forester’s father lived.

The other route was by the way of Boston.
Tue Wane Boat. 138

“Marco chodses the North



“The day line.
Marco liked to be in Boston very much. He
-thought that he should like very well to go and
spend a week at Boston, and then to go. across
the country by railroad and stage. He hesita-
ted.a little, however, whether it would come
within the limits of the power which Forester
ad intrusted him with, to spend a week in Bos-
ton. While doubting on this subject, it oc-
curred to him that after all there would be the
greatest variety to be seen in traveling on the
North river route. .He therefore finally deci-
ded upon that.

Then came another question to be decided,
and that was, whether to take the day or the
night boat up: the North river. ‘There is-one
steamboat which leaves New York for Albany
and Troy every morning, and another every
evening, so that one goes through by day, and
the other by night.’ Marco decided in favor of
the day boat, in order that he might see the
scenery. p

This was not, however, in fact, a very wise
decision, for the whole of a long summer’s day
is too long a time to spend in looking at‘scene-
ry, however beautiful it may be, and the pas-
sengers who take the day boats on the North
river for this purpose, generally become very






14. Tus Srrinorrerp Anmory.
Night line preferable.



tired of the pleasure before night. Whereas; in
taking one of the night boats, some of which
leave New York an hour or two before sunset,
there are four or five hours before bed-time, du-
ring which the river scenery can be enjoyed,
varied too, as it is at this time, by the changing
light of sunset and evening, and perhaps, at
last, clothed in the wild and solemn beauty
which is shed over such a scene by moonlight,
or the still fainter illumination of the stars.
Thus a night passage is far more favorable for
really enjoying the scenery of the Hudson, than
a long and monotonous voyage, made under
the full glare of the sun.

Besides, at the time that Forester and Marco
were making this journey, it was too early in
the season to enjoy the scenery much. It was
early in April, and though the grass was quite
green at the Park at New York, yet the High-
lands and Green Mountains were still covered
“with snow.

Marco, however, did not reflect on these
things, and he’ decided upon the day passage.
The boat was to go at seven o’clock. Marco
learned this by a printed handbill, in large let-
ters, which he saw posted up in the office of
the Atlantic Hotel, where his cousin always


Tut Werone Boar. 15

‘The handbills. Arrangements.

took a room when he came into New York.
There were several of these handbills hanging
in the office, but, instead of being placarded on
the walls, each by itself, they were hung all
together upon a sort of hook which was sus-
pended against a pillar. These various bills
were the advertisements of different boats, go-
ing in various directions,.and as they were all
hung together upon the same hook, the travel-
ers who came to consult them were obliged to
lift up the oufer ones when they wished to ‘see
those that were beneath. It happened, howev-
er, that when Marco went to look, the bill.
which advertised the Albany boat was itself
the outer one ; so that he had nothing to do but
to stand there and read it, without lifting up the
handbills at all. .

«Now, cousin Forester,” said Marco, the day
before they were to go, “I will order a.cab to
come to our house at six o’clock, and will come
down in it to the ‘Atlantic Hotel, and call for
you.”

“Very well,” said Forester. “I will be ready
at six.”

Forester was ready at six, but it was nearly
half-past six when Marco arrived. Forester’s
trunks and baggage were in the hall, and as the
16 Tue Srrinoriztp Armory.
Gabman ‘Goopaira.





cabman was carrying out one of the last arti-
cles, he turned to Forester and said,

“What boat is it, sir, that you wish to go
to?”

“I don’t know,” said Forester, turning to
Marco. “ Marco, he waits to know what boat
we are going to.”

“The boat ?” said Marco, stopping to think.

—«O, [ll tell you in a moment.” So Marco
ran back to the office, and went to the pillar
where the notice was put up. The cabman
and Forester followed him. Marco looked
hastily upon the outer handbill, and his eye
caught the name “CxuroraTra.”

“Phe ‘ Cleopatra,’ ” said Marco.

«“Q+—ay,”" said the cabman, “the Cleo-
patra.”

«Stop a moment,” said Marco, “and I will
see where she lays.”

«I know where she lays,” said the \cabman,
—*she lays at Peck Slip.”

Now it happened that since Marco had read
the outer handbill the evening before, and found
that it described a boat going to Albany, a man
had come in and hung up another handbill, ad-
vertising a boat to go to New Haven, which
was the destination of the Cleopatra. Marco
Tae Wrone Boar. 17
Forestor’s suspicions. ‘Mareo. ‘Mystery.

turned away immediately when the cabman
said that he knew where the boat lay, and thus
did not discover his mistake. Forester said
nothing. He had an impression that Peck Slip
was the place of departure for the Connecticut
boats, and not for the Northriver boats; but as
there was a route to Vermont through New
Haven and Hartford, which he. thought would
be nearly as convenient-for them as any other,
he concluded to say nothing, but to let Marco
manage the business which he had undertaken,
in his own way.

Marco thought, from the expression of his
cousin’s countenance when they got into the
cab, that there was something the matter, or, at
least, it appeared to him that Forester looked as
if he had some secret in his thoughts, and he
questioned him about it.

“You've got somé secret, cousin Forester,—
I know you have,” said he.

“Some secret ?” repeated Forester; “:what
makes you suppose so ?”

“Why, you look very queer,—you’ve got
some present for me, I expect, from my mother,
that you are going to give me when we get
aboard the boat.””

Forester made no answer, and they rode on

B
18° Tue Srainerrenp Armory.
“Marco rambles about the boa Aboy._

in silen¢e. When they reached the slip where
the boat lay, Marco was very busy in paying
the cabman, and in seeing that the baggage was
put safely on board. The first bell was rung.
Many persons were coming and going over‘the_
plank which led from the pier to the boat: As
soon as Marco had the baggage secured, he
went up to the promenade deck, where he
could be a little out of the bustle, and took a
seat with Forester there. There were many
ladieé and gentlemen standing near, or seated
on chairs’and settees, under alarge awning. It
‘was a pleasant morning, and Forester anticipa-
ted a very pleasant voyage up the river.
Marco took his seat upon a settee, and
watched the movements of the crowd upon the
pier, and of the sailors on the guards of the
boat, who were making preparations for cast-
ing off the lines. There was seated near him
a boy somewhat older than he, who also seemed
to be watching the movements which were go-
ing on around him with great interest. Marco
‘was just going toward him, with a design to
enter into conversation with him, when a young
man appeared at the top of the stairs, leading
up from the deck below, and beckoned to the
boy to come to him, at the same time making
Tur Wronea Boar. 19

“Marco accosts the boy. Ro answor.

some other sign which he did not understand.
‘The boy immediately rose and went away.

In a short time, however, the boy returned
and-took his seat again. Marco had some hesi-
tation about addressing him, but as the expres-
sion of the young stranger’s face was intelligent
and good-humored, he at length moved gradu-
ally toward him, and said,

“Do you know what time we shall get to
Albany ?”

- The boy looked at Marco steadily when he
spoke, with a pleasant: expression of counte-
nance, but instead of making any reply, he first
put his finger to his ear, and then to his lips, and
shook his head.

“What do you mean by that ?” said Marco.

The boy said nothing, but gazed a moment
longer in Marco’s face, and ‘then took out a very
small slate from a breast pocket in his jacket,
and began to write upon it. When he had fin-
ished writing, he handed the slate to Marco.
It contained the words, “ Ican not speak ; Iam
deaf and dumb.”

«“O,” said Marco, “I did not know that.”
Then, instantly reflecting that it was vain to
speak to the boy if he could not hear, Marco
took the slate from his hands, and wrote upon it,
20 Tae Serincrietp ARMORY.



‘A correspondence, Marco perplexed. iis ingy

«T only asked you if you knew what time we
should get to Albany.”

The boy read Marco’s writing very slowly
and carefully, and then shook his head and
looked perplexed. He then took the péncil-and
wrote, “I do not know.”

By the same mode of communication, Marco
then asked him what his name was. He wrote
in reply, “ Erskine.”

“Do you live at Albany ?” wrote Marco
next.

Erskine looked at the question a moment or
two, apparently somewhat at a loss, and then he
wrote,

«I do not lena: of Albany; I shall go to
Hartford.”

It was now Marco's turn to be a little per-
plexed, through the singularity of Erskine’s
phraseology. After studying it a moment, he
concluded that Erskine meant that he was going
to Hartford, and the idea flashed across his
mind that he might possibly have made some
mistake, and have got into the wrong boat. So
he turned suddenly to one of the hands that be-
longed on board the boat, who happened to be
passing by just at that moment, and asked him

“Isn’t this boat going to Albany ?”
Tue Wrone Boar. 21
‘Marco olarmed. i He finds Forester.

“No,” replied the man, without’ stopping,
« she is going to New Haven.”

«Then we’ve got into the wrong boat,” ex-
claimed Marco, in great trepidation, “‘Where’s
cousin Forester ?” me

He began to run about this: way and that, in
pursuit of his cousin Forester. Forester had
disappeared. He went down stairs to find him,
and when he reached the lower deck, he found
that the boat was just gliding away from the
pier. The plank had been taken in, and the
cable by which she had been made fast to the
pier, had been cast off, and the hands were
drawing it in. Marco might have jumped
across to the pier, but by so doing he would
only have separated himself from Forester and
the trunks, which would have made matters
worse instead of better.

Just then Marco saw his cousin Forester
leaning. against a sort of pillar which supported
the upper deck. His countenance wore a very
quiet and composed-expression. Marco ran up
to him-and exclaimed,

“Cousin Forester, we've got into the wrong
boat.”

«1 know it,” said Forester, coolly.
22 Tue Serinerteuyn Armory.

Forester composure, il reasoning

« Well, ‘what shall we do? said Marco, in
the greatest perturbation.



THE WRONG BOAT.

“Don’t? you know what it is best to do?”
asked Forester.

“No,” said Marco, “I am sure I don’t.”

« Then I advise you not to be in such a hurry
and flurry,” said Forester. “The time to be
in a hurry, is when we know exactly what to
do, and have but a short time to doit. When
we don’t know what to do, we ought to calm
Ture Wrone Boar. 22
‘Various plana, Forester is amused; Marco displeased.



and compose ourselves, and take time to
think.”

“Why, if we were only ashore,” said Marco,
“we would go back, and find the right boat to
go to Albany.”

«But we are not on shore,” said Forestér,
“and we can’t get on shore ; so that supposition
does not help us any.”

“Why, the captain would put us back,” said
Marco, “I’ve no doubt, if you would only ask”
him.” .

« Perhaps he would,” replied Forester, “but
I’m only a feeble old man, you know, traveling -
under your care. You must go and ask him,
if you want him to put us ashore.” Here For.
ester laughed aloud, at the ludicrous predica-
ment which Marco had got into. As for Marco,
he tried to look grave, but he could not entirely
suppress a smile which struggled to appear upon
his countenance.

“I don’t think it is any laughing occasion,
myself,” said Marco, after. a pause. “ Besides,
I supposed that if we got into any serious diffi-
culty, you would help me out of it.”

“So I would,” said Forester, “ but~I don’t
conceive that you have got into any serious
difficulty yet. "We may as well go to Vermont
24 Tue Serinorierpn ArMory.
Forester spoaks of the armory. ‘Manufacturing muskets,

by the way of New Haven end Hartford, as any
other way. You see we can go up from Hart-
ford to Springfield, and there we can take the
railroad to Boston. There will be one great
advantage in taking this route, for we can visit
the great national armory at Springfield.”

“ What is that ?” asked Marco.

“Why, at Springfield,” said Forester, “ the
government of the United States have a great
establishment for manufacturing muskets for
the national troops, and it is a very curious and
interesting place to visit.”

«« What can we see there ?” asked Marco.

“O, all the processes in manufacturing mus-
kets,” said Forester. ‘ The first is the.work’of
the great trip-hammer, which goes by water,
and forges out the iron plates, which the mus-
kets are made from. These plates are bent
round over a long iron rod, and welded, and
thus the barrels are made. Then these barrels
are bored by various machinery, and the out-
side surfaces turned. Then the forging and
grinding of the bayonets is very interesting.”

“Tshouldn’t think there would be any thing
very interesting in grinding,” said Marco.

“There is,” said Forester. “Grinding an axe
on ahand grind-stone is not a very’ wonderful
The Wrone Boar. 25
Foresters descriptions. ‘The deaf and dumb boy.

process, to be sure,—but in these large estab-
lishments, where they grind on such a great
scale, the enormous stones, and the speed with
which they revolve, and the streams of sparks
which fly out, strike you with wonder.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “I should like to see
them.”

« Then there is a great deal that is curious in
the making of the locks,” said Forester ; “ the,
forging out all’ the small parts, and filing and
polishing them, and. then the putting of themt

together. You will‘be very much interested,
I’ve no doubt.”
“Well,” said Marco, “I don’t care much

about our getting in to the wrong boat.” So
he went away from Forester, intending to go
up upon the upper deck again.

He came back, however, a moment, to tell
Forester that there was a deaf and dumb boy
on the deck above.

“ Where is he going ?” said Forester.

« To Hartford,” said Marco.

“ Very likely he is going to the asylum,” said
Forester.

“ What asylum ?” asked Marco. ,

“ Why, there is an asylum,” replied Forester,
“in Hartford, where the deaf and dumb go from
26 Tue Srrinorienp Armory.
‘Fhe manual alphabet. ‘Marco loarns it.

all parts of the country, to learn to read and
write.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “he can write. He has
a slate.”’

«Then I have no doubt,” said Forester,
“that he is a pupil of the asylum at Hartford.
You had better get him to tell you about that
establishment,.and ask him to teach you the
manual alphabet.” _ :

“What is the manual alphabet?” asked
Marco.

So Forester explained to Marco that the
manual alphabet was a mode of representing
the letters of the alphabet by the fingers of the
hand, and that those who understood that al-
phabet could talk, by means of it, with the edu-
cated deaf and dumb.

Marco was very much interested in this idea,
and he returned to the upper deck, and sat an
hour with Erskine, learning the manual alpha-
bet, and writing in dialogue with him, on his
slate. They were once interrupted in their occu-
pations, by a colored man, who went about the
decks, ringing a gréat bell, and calling out to
all who had not paid their fare, to call at the
captain’s office and settle. Whereupon Marco
left Erskine for a short time, while he went to
Tur Weonc Boar. 27
‘Sumamons to pay the fare, “‘Ewo ticket,



the window of the captain’s offige, on the lower
deck, and after waiting there some minutes
among the crowd, until his turn came, he took
two tickets for Hartford, one for himself, and
one for Forester. ’
28 Tue Srrincriztpn Armory.
Situation of Hartford and Springfield. Great freshet.

Cuarrer II.
Tue Froop.

yr two travelers arrived safely at New

Haven, where, on leaving the steamboat,
they entered a train of cars, and proceeded im-
mediately to Hartford. Hartford is on the
Connecticut river, and Springfield is on. the
same river, about twenty-three miles above.
The travelers expected to have gone up the
river that afternoon, by a small steamboat,
which Forester told Marco was accustomed to
ply between Hartford and Springfield,—but
when they reached Hartford, they were told
that there was no boat. Marco went to the
bar of the United States Hotel—the house to
which he had taken’ Forester on his arrival,—
in order to inquire the reason. The clerk told
him that there was a great freshet on the river,
and that the boat had not been able to get
down. Marco went with this intelligence to
Forester, who was reading the Boston newspe
pers in the gentlemen’s parlor.

“TI don’t see why a flood on the river should
How.



“Hittocta of the freshet,
keep the steamboat from coming down,” said
Forester.

«That is the reason, I know,” said Marco,
“ for they told me so at the bar. Perhaps it is
because the water runs too swiftly.”

“That might prevent the boat from going
up,” said Forester, “but I don’t see how it
could keep it from coming down. I should
think it_would come down all the faster.”

«Perhaps the flood brings down ice and logs,
so that the boat can’t get along,” rejoined
Marco.

“J don’t think that is a very probable expla-
nation,” said Forester. “It is much.more likely
that there is some mistake in\your informa-
tion.” 4

Marco felt a little piqued at having his infor-
mation thus called in question, and he went back
to the bar to inquire how a freshet could keep
the boat from coming down. They told him
that there was a bridge across the river, some
distance above, and that the boat could not get
under it when the water was high. This seemed
very satisfactory, and Marco went back with
the explanation to Forester, who seemed satis-
fied with it too.

It was late in the afternoon when they ar-
30 Taz SprinGrietp Armory.
“The cupola of the state-house, ‘The inundation.

rived at Hartford, and although it was very
pleasant when they left New York, yet the sky
had become overcast during the day, and now
it began to rain. Marco, however, was very
eager to go out after dinner, to see the flood,
and Forester concluded to go with him. It was
so late when they arrived, and the evening
came on so early, that it was not until just be-
fore dark that they got ready to go out. They
first went to the state-house, in order to ascend
to the cupola, to take a view of the flood from
that elevation. The state-house at Hartford is
in the midst of the city, and a broad street de-
scends from it to the river. Forester and Mar-
co went up by various flights of stairs, until, at
last, they reached the summit, where they had
a grand view of the city, and also of the river,
which seemed expanded into a vast sea, that
spread over the whole valley,—with groves,
farm-houses, orchards, and even the buildings
of the city itself rising out of the water.

After looking upon this‘scene for some time,
they descended again, and followed the street
down toward the bank of the river. But long
before they reached the bank, they found the
streets filled with water. Barrels and boxes
were floating about, piles of merchandise, which
Tue Froop. ‘81
‘Goods afloat. ‘The coach. Streets overflowed.

had been taken out of submerged céllars, were
arranged along on the. sidewalks, where they
were out of the reach of the water, and men
were busily at work, getting other goods into
places of safety. By this time, however, it be-
came dark, and the wind and rain seemed to be
inereasing ; so Forester and Marco returned to
the hotel, anticipating much pleasure in taking
a walk in the morning, when they could exam-
ine the effects of the flood to better advantage.

They were called the next morning at six
o’clock, and were told that the boat had come,
and was going to start at seven for Springfield.
So they dressed themselves with all speed,-and
hastened down to breakfast. They had hardly.
time to finish their breakfast, when the coach
‘was at the door to take them to the boat. They
got in, and after riding through several streets,
descending continually toward the water, Mar-
co, who had his head out of the window all
the time, looking forward, said,

«Cousin Forester, look here,—the street is all
full of water. We can’t go but a very little
farther.”

‘Marco expécted that as soon as the carriage
had gone as far as it could go on the firm pave-
ment, it would stop at the brink of the water,
32 Tue Srrincrienp Armory.





The aki, ‘Marco perplexed. Deep wi



and that some other plan would be adopted for
conveying them to the steamboat. What that
plan would be, he could not at first imagine ;
but in a moment there suddenly glided into
view a little skiff, that came down the street
that crossed the one in which they were riding,
at right angles to it, at some distance before
them. The skiff came into view from behind a
block of brick buildings, which formed a corner
of the street, and passing across the street
which Marco was in, kept on, and soon disap-
peared. There was a man in it, rowing.

« He ought to come,” said Marco, “ with his
skiff, and take us along.”

By this time the horses had reached the brink
of the water; but, to Marco’s surprise, they did
not stop, but advanced slowly into it, drawing
the coach after them. ‘The water grew deeper
and deeper, until, at length, the horses were up
to.their ‘knees. At some distance before him,
at the extremity of the street, Marco could see
the end of the bridge which led across the riv-
er; but he saw no steamboat. However, it
was some relief to Marco to see the bridge, as
that promised to be, at léast, the termination of
their ride ; for he did not at all like navigating
such deep water in a carriage.’ The: water,
Tut Froop. 33

“he embarkation. Paddlewheels, ‘The boat.

however, did not grow any deeper, and pres-
ently, just before they had reached the bridge,
it began to grow shallower, and soon the car-
riage stopped at a place where there was a
small piece of dry land, big enough for them to
stand upon. Here the little steamboat came in
sight too, which was to take them up the river.
By scrambling along through a store, and over
planks, and along the edges of piers, they suc-
ceeded, at length, in getting on board.

There were some ladies in the coach, and
they, with the gentlemen who had charge of
them, when they had got on board of the boat,
went down into the ladies’ cabin. The steam-
boat was very small. It had a great paddle-
wheel at the stern, and two small ones at the
sides, one at each side. “ These last,” Forester
said, “ he supposed must be to aid in steering.”
The boat. reminded Marco of the canal-boats,
which he had seen on Erie canal. It was simi-
lar in construction to those boats, though larger.
It had, like a canal-boat, a small foretastle,
which was below the level of the main decks,
and very near the water. From this forecastle,
Forester and Marco went down into a little
cabin, which was, of course, near the bows.
The ladies’ cabin was toward the stern. In the

e
34 Tue Serinerrenp Armory.



deluge of waters. Forestor’s explanations,







cabin, they were sheltered from the wind and
rain, but they.did not remain there long, as they
wished to look about, and observe the effects of
the flood, and the strange aspect which was
given to the whole surrounding scenery, by such
a deluge of waters.

“All this,” said Forester, “comes from the
melting of the snows, away up among the
mountains. I should think that Hartford might
be about at the place where the height of the
waters would be a maximum.”

«I don’t understand what you mean by that,”
said Marco.

“Why, you will see, by reflection,” said For-
ester, “ that up near the sources of a river, there
never can be a very high flood, for the streams
are all small, and they descend rapidly down
the sides of the mountains, and thus the water
runs off fast, making a torrent rather than a
flood. These small streams join together, and
other branches come in from each side, and thus
the river is formed; and when it gets upon
lower land, where it is more level, so that the

ater can not run off so quick, it rises higher,
and spreads over the meadows on each. side.
‘She great body of water moves on slowly now,
and is increased by every branch which comes
Tue Fuoop. 35



in from each side, until the height of the water
reaches the maximum,—that is, the greatest.”

«Why does it not keep on increasing all the,
way to the sea ?” said Marco.

« Because,” replied Forester, “when it gets
within the influence of the sea, the water flows
out freely into the sea, and spreads off over the
ocean. A flood in a river is sometimes twenty
or thirty feet above the common level of the
water; now if it were to be so near -the sea,
there would be a steep descent from the river
to the sea, of twenty or thirty feet, which you
see could not be. For the water, when it gets
near the sea, presses down from the.river by its
weight, and spreads out into the sea so rapidly
as to keep the water down for many miles back
from the mouth of the river. Thus, if a bird
wére to begin in the mountains, when a great
fall of rain was taking place, and follow the flood
down, she would find it increasing, and be-
coming higher and higher as it advanced, until
it reached the level plains, and it would go on,
inundating them more and more, and spreading
out over intervales and méadows ; until at last,
like a great wave which had begun to spend it-
self, it would appear rot to rise quite so high,
though it would still keep advancing; and thus,
86 Tus Srainerienp Armory.
‘fresher moar



outh:







if she was a reasonable bird, she would know
that the water was coming under the influence
of thesea. After this, the freshet would seem
less and less high as it ‘advanced, until it reached
the mouth of the river, where it would scarcely
produce any perceptible effect at. all.”

«Then there can not be any freshet at the
mouth of the river,” said Marco.

“No,” replied Forester, “ there can be none
caused by floods coming down the river. Some-
times, however, a storm at sea, when the wind
blows in toward the shore, raises the water
several feet, and makes a sort of inundation, in
that way, though it seldom rises more than four
or five feet above high tide.”

By this time the men began to push off the
boat from the pier, and the great paddle-wheel
at the stern of the boat began to revolve, and
they swept out into the stream. They were
just above the great wooden bridge, which
stretches across the Connecticut, at Hartford.
Marco saw that the water was up to within a
foot or two of the floor of the bridge, and some
of the men said that it was very fortunate that
there was no ice running.

“Why ?” asked Marco.

“Because,” replied the man, “it would soon
Tue Froop. 37
‘Marco nearly loses bis umbrella.



ke a.jam above the bridge, and carry it

Marco observed that the water was turbid,
and its surface was strongly agitated by whirl-
pools and eddies. Marco went forward, and
took his place upon the forecastle, The wind
was north-east, and thus was almost against
them, and it blew the cold rain{into Marco’s
face. He attempted to hoist his umbrella, but
a sudden gust of wind caught it out of his hands,
and swept it along the upper deck. Marco
scrambled up the steps, and ran after it. It
lodged, very fortunately, under the bows of a
little skiff which had been placed upon the deck
in order to be taken up the river. If it had
gone over into the water, it would have been
irkecoverably lost, as it would not have been
worth while to detain the boat for it.

When Marco got his umbrella, he went back
to his station again, but when he opened it this
time, he was careful to hold it in such a manner
that the wind could not get under it again. He
then peeped out from beneath it, to survey the
wide waste of waters, which extended as far as
he could see, on either hand.. The ordinary
course of the river itself was entirely undistin-
guishable, and instead of it, there was. a broad
38 Tae Sprinorrenn Armory.

‘Melancholy spectacle. ‘Whole country under water.

sea of turbid water, agitated by the wind and
by whirling eddies, and spreading over. fields,
farms, villages, orchards,—extending, at the
extremity of the view, far in, under the trees of
the forests. 2

It was a melancholy sight to see the farm-
houses, some with thewater up above the floor,
or even, to the windows ; and others standing
on-a little spot of ground, which the water
seemed just ready to cover, with the family at
the door, gazing at the unexpected spectacle of
a steamboat going across their mowing-fields ;
for the water being deep enough everywhere,
the boat was not required to confine itself to the
ordinary channel of the river, but made a straight
course, over fields, fences, yards, and gardens.
Once or twice, Marco perceived that they were
going through an orchard. The tops of the
apple-trees were about half out of the water.
Marco thought that if it were only the right
season, they could get some apples; but, as it
was, the trees were leafless and bare. At some
of the farm-houses, men were busy, securing
their goods and furniture ; at others, they were
gliding about in skiffs ; and in one case, Marco
saw aman and his boy going out to the barn,
Tar Froop * 39
“Fhe mit mado of barn doom ae

to take care of the cattle, on a raft made of the
barn doors.







THE FLOOD.

About half-way between Hartford and Spring-
field there is a‘fall, or rather a rapid, through
which boats’ can not go either up or down.
They can not go up, because, even when the
water is deep enough, they can not stem the
current ; and they can not come down, because
the current would sweep them along too swiftly,
and dash them against the rocks on the shore.
40 Tue Sprinerierpn ArmoRY.
‘A village under water.

A canal had accordingly been made around this
fall, in order to take the. boats up, or let them
gently down, by means of locks, in the manner
explained in “ Marco Paul on the Erie Canal.”
This canal was, however, now submerged, and
the steamboat had to stop below it, at a little
village called the Point, from whence the pas-
sengers were to be taken the rest of the way by
stage. When they arrived at this village, the
poat sailed along in front of the principal street,
and then turned into another at right angles to
it, in which the tavern was situated. The
helmsman brought the boat up to the piazza of
the hotel, as if it were a wharf.. The passen-
gers stepped out upon the piazza. It was cov-
ered with people of the village, who had col-
lected there, to witness the spectacle of a
steamboat coming up to a tavern door.

‘The tavern was entirely surrounded by water,
and from the piazza, there was a view of a large
part of the village, with the streets, yards, and
gardens entirely submerged. Barrels, boxes,
and planks were floating about. The people
that had assembled stood upon the steps of the
platform, observing the scene, First, a wheel-
barrow came slowly drifting into the tavern
yard; then a boy on a raft made of two planks.
Tae Froop. 4.



__ Various spectacios.

‘Then a little boat glided by, full of children,
going home from school. There was a bridge,
made of a line of planks, leading across from
the platform to the land behind the tavern.
The ends of the planks were supported by
horseblocks, for piers. Marco ran back and
forth across this bridge several times, until, at
length, the stage-
coaches which .
were to take the
travelers to Spring-
field were ready.
"These stage coach-
es were backed
down through the f
water, to the steps
of the piazza, and
the baggage was
puton. The stages
were then driven
out to dry land,—
the passengers went, one by one, over tne long
plank bridge, took their seats, and thus they all
proceeded to Springfield.



STAGE IS THE WATER,
42 Tur Sprinertenpn Armory.
‘Arrival at Springfleld. __ Buildings of the armory.

Cuarrer III.
Tue Warer Suops.

Oo” the morning after Forester and Marco

arrived at Springfield, they sallied forth
from their hotel, to see the works of the armory.
The village of Springfield is one of the most
beautiful villages of New England. The busi-
ness part of it lays along the bank of the Con-
necticut, on a sort of plain ; and from this plain
streets ascend to a tract of more elevated land
behind it, which is covered in every direction
with handsome villas overlooking the village
and the river, and the broad and beautiful val-
ley of the Connecticut.

The principal buildings of the armory are
situated upon another plain, which extends back
from this elevated land, at the distance of per-
haps half a mile from the river. The buildings
are very large and handsome, and are arranged
around the sides of a spacious square, which is
ornamented with walks and rows of trees.
Marco thought that the whole looked like a col-
lege. There was one. edifice in the center of
Tue Warer Suops. 43

Besidences. “Water shops.

the principal front of the square, which had a
cupola upon it, as if it were achapel. Forester
told Marco that that was the office and count-
ing-house. The other buildings were shops and
storehouses,—though Marco thought that they
were very splendid buildings to be used for such
purposes. On one side was a long row of
houses, which were used for the residences
of officers and others connected with the ar-
mory. From this central square, streets di-
verged in every direction over the plain. These
streets were bordered with small, but very neat
and pleasant houses built for the workmen.
The houses were ornamented with trees and
shrubbery, and surrounded with pleasant yards
and gardens. The whole scene presented, on
every side, a very pleasant prospect to the
view.

After looking at it for some time, Marco pro-
posed going into some of the buildings, but
Forester said that he thought it would be better
to go first to the water shops.

« What are the water shops ?” asked Marco.

«Why, you must understand,” said Forester,
“that in making a musket, there is a great deal
of light work to be done, and also a great deal
of heavy work, and this last can be done best
44 Tue Sprincrietp ARMORY:



‘The mill stream. ___ Forging the barrels.
by the help of machinery. Now there is a little
stream, south of Springfield, which. runs’ into
the Connecticut, just below the town. So they
have built three dams across this stream, and
built shops near the dams, with water-wheels
under them to be carried by the water. Here
they do all the rough and heavy work which is
required.” .

« What is the rough and heavy work ?” asked
Marco.

«Forging the barrels is one thing,” said For-
ester ; “that is very heavy work.”

“I don’t see how they can forge the barrels,”
said Marco. “ They couldn’t make them round,
nor hollow ; if they were to strike upon them
when they are hot, it would flatten them in.
So I think they must make them in some other
way.”

“No,” said Forester; “they forge them with
heavy trip-hammers, as you will see. They
have peculiar contrivances to keep them hol-
low, and to make them round.”

“ Well,” said Marco, “ and what other heavy
work is there ?”

“The grinding and polishing is heavy work,”
said Forester.

“The grinding,” said Marco, “but not the
Tue Warer Suors.
‘The wheels, ‘Rapid revolutions.



polishing. The polishing must’ be ‘very nica
work.”

«It may be nice work, but still it requires
heavy machinery to do it,” rejoined Forester.
“For polishing is done by means of wheels,
which are made to revolve with prodigious ve-
locity, and then the things to be polished are
held against the circumferénce of them. Now
it is not heavy work to hold the article against
the wheel, but to make the wheel revolve so
very rapidly, requires heavy power in the ma-
chinery.”

«How fast do the wheels revolve?” asked
Marco. ;

«I don’t know,” said ForeSter, “ we can ask
the workmen, when we come to the polishing
rooms. At any rate, it is a great many times
in a second, and it requires a water power and
machinery, to turn wheels so fast. Then there
is the boring, and the turning, and the milling.”

«What is the milling ?” asked Marco.

“Why, in some cases,” said Forester, “in-
stead of finishing the work with files, they-cut
it down to its proper form by wheels of steel,
with teeth like those of a file, cut upon them.
These wheels are made to revolve very swiftly,
and the iron or brass is made to bear against
46 Tue Srrinerizetrp Armory.
Finishing. —~—~=~S~S*S*«SMaro0 and Froresior cross tho plain.
them, and also to move along at the same time,
and so it is cut down to the exact shape re-
quired.”

“Why don’t they hammer it into the right
shape in the first place ?” asked Marco.

«They can’t hammer it into precisely the
right shape,” said Forester ; “and, besides, the
surface which is left by the hammer is not per-
fectly sound. There are small flaws and scales
in it, so that the metal must be cut away a little,
to come down to where it is sound. So they
forge it to pretty nearly the proper shape, leav-
ing it a little too large, and then mill it down to
the precise form, or else file it, if the shape is so
irregular that it can’t be milled.”

While Forester and Marco had been engaged
in this conversation, they had been slowly walk-
ing along in the direction which Forester said
led to the water shops. The road which they
took was straight, and it traversed the plain,
which has already been spoken of, in a southerly
direction. It was bordered, for a part of the
way, with the neat and pleasant-looking houses
of the armory workmen, and beyond these there
were extensive fields, traversed by various roads,
the view being terminated in the distance by
occasional glimpses of the great valley of the
Tur Warer Suops. a7



“Mi Holyoke. Valley of the Ootinecticnt. -Awconding._
Connecticut, with the mountains beyond. There
was one round summit off at the north, which
Forester told Marco was the famous Mount
Holyoke, near Northampton.

«What is it famed for?” asked Marco.

“For the prospect which you can have from
the top of it,” said Forester. “The mountain
is close to the Connecticut river, and rises ab-
ruptly from the valley, so that, from the sum-
mit, you look down upon one of the most rich,
and verdant, and populous regions of the land,
covered with farms, fields, villages, and verdant
meadows, ‘and with the Connecticut winding
beautifully through the whole. It is very dif-
ferent from most mountains in this respect.”

“Why, how is it-with other mountains ?”
asked Marco.

“They are surrounded generally,” said For-
ester, “by lower mountains and hills, or, at
least, they rise out of a rough or mountainous
country ; so that the transition is gradual from
the level and fertile land to the high elevations.
But Mt. Holyoke rises abruptly from the midst
of one of the richest scenes in the land; you
can ride in your carriage so near to it that the
remaining ascent is only going up stairs.”

« Have they really got stairs ?” said Marco.
48 Tue Srrinerterp Armory.

Descent into the valley. =

« Yes,” replied Forester; “a kind of rude
stairs, made of stones or of logs, placed across
the way.”

“ I should like very much to go to Mt. Holy-
oke,” said Marco. “I have a great mind to
go that way.”

“It is not the right season of the year,” said
Forester, “to enjoy the excursion. We want
the month of June.”

By this time they had arrived at the end’ of
the plain, and they began to descend, by a wind-
ing road, into the valley where the water shops
were situated. It was a beautiful glen, shaded
by trees, with the mill stream flowing through
the center of it. There was a road, leading up
and down the valley, on each side of the stream,
and, at the point where they came to it, there
was a bridge across it, connecting one of these
roads with the other. 9

Above the bridge was a dam of handgome
mason work, with various flumes for conveying
the water. There were also some large and
handsome shops, on each side of the stream,
with torrents of water pouring out from be-
neath them, indicating that they contained ma-
chinery which was carried by water. Marco
was much pleased with the view.
Tae Warer Suopes. 49

‘Three wator eliops

THE WATER sHO?s.

Forester told Marco that there were three
water shops on the stream, about half a mile
apart, and that this was the middle one.

«TI shouldn’t think that they would wish to
have them so far apart,” said Marco.

“It is probably on account of the stream,”
said Forester. “They have to put their shops
where they can get a good fall of water, and it
happens, I suppose, that the falls on this stream
are at that distance from each-other. They


50 Tre Serincrrerp ARMORY.

“Minimum power. Forster's illustration.

build a dam on each fall, and construct works
to employ the whole power that -they obtain
there,—that is, the whole minimam power.””

“What is the minimum power?” asked
Forester.

« All the power which they can have con-
stantly in use, all the year round,” replied For-
ester. “A stream of water is not constant, you
know. After rains, it is much greater than af-
ter a drought. Now suppose there was a brook
with water enough, in midsummer, to turn a
large grindstone, and no more; of course, the
brook could turn that grindstone all the year,
and that would be all it could do, unless there
was a basin above the dam, which would retain
the water after a rain, and deliver it out after-
ward, in drought, so as to give a greater power
than the stream alone would give. Perhaps, in
this way, with the help of a reservoir of water,
the brook would carry two such grindstones all
the year round. This would, then, be its min-
imum power. But for onehalf the year, that
is, all through the spring and fall months, there
would probably be twice as much water; so
that, during that time, it would carry four grind-
stones. Thus, when people speak of the mini-
mum power of a stream being all employed,
Tue Warer Suoprs. “51

‘Sawmailla. “Marco's idons,

they mean all the power which it can exert,
steadily and constantly, all the year round.
‘Then, above that, there is a considerable power
which may be used at certain seasons, if it is
worth while to construct the machinery to em-
ploy it.”

«And is it worth while, generally?” said
Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “though that depends
somewhat on the nature of the business. For
instance, in saw-mills, they can run one saw
during the summer months, using the minimum
power ; and then, when the stream swells, in
the spring and fall, they can set more saws a-
going. thus employing the surplus power. Still
it is a disadvantage to have a great surplus pow-
er. It is much better to have the stream ateady.
all the year round.”

« Yes,” said Marco, “ that is plain saul F

“True,” replied Forester, “but all ‘the rea-
sons for it are not very plain.”

“Why, they can keep their works” a-going
all the time,” said Marco. ~

«“ Yes ; but why wouldn’t it do as well,” said
Forester, “ to keep twice as many works going
half the time ?””


52 Tae Sperinerrerp Armory.



Forestors reasoning: Drought Torrente
“ Why——, I don’t know,” said Marco, hes-
itatingly.

« Because,” replied Forester, “it would take

twice as great an investment of money to con-
struct the works. Two saws, running six
months each, would saw as many logs as one
running a year ; but then it would cost twice
as much to put them up—with all the necessa-
ry machinery ; and then it would take twice as
many men to work them, and these men would
have to be dismissed for six months in the year,
and go away, and seek other employments.
This would be inconvenient, and attended with
increased expense.

“There is‘a very great difference in different
streams,” continued Forester, ‘in respect to
their steadiness. Some streams are pretty
nearly.the same all the year. They are not
\much increased by rains, or diminished by
droughts Others are very small in mid-
summer, and then, in the spring, or after long
rains, they are torrents, capable of carrying ten,
or even a hundied times as much machinery as
their minimum power would carry. Though it
sometimes happens that, in such streams, the
water-wheels, which must be adapted in their
construction and position to the ordinary flow


Tue Warer Suor 53
Fresbots. Sources of streams. ‘Ponds.

of the water, are all submerged and over-
whelmed when-the water is very high, and so
stopped entirely ; or the dams are undermined,
or torn up, and the mills themselves carried
away.”

“I don’t see why there should be any such
difference in the streams,” said Marco; “I
should think they would all have freshets after
the rains.”

«There is a vast difference,” said Forester.
« It depends upon the source of the water which
supplies the stream. There are three kinds of
streams, in respect to the source of their waters;
or, rather, there are three different sources from
which the water of brooks and streams is sup-
plied,—ponds, springs, and rain. A brook may
flow out of a pond, or it may arise from springs,
or it may proceed from rains, which fall upon a
valley, and run down through the lowest part of
it. Now a stream.that comes from a pond does
not rise and fall very much, because the pond
keeps, at almost all times, near the same level.
The water which falls upon it, in rain, spreads
over.so great a surface, that it does not raise it
more than a few inches, generally, and, of
course, the stream flowing from it rises only in
proportion. It is so with streams which come
od Tue Srrinerierp ArmorRyY.

from springs, or great swamps, which are full
of springs. But where a stream comes from a
great valley, extending many miles, so as to
catch and drain off all the water which falls on
the valley, you see it must necessarily become
a furious torrent in the spring, when the snow
is melting over the whole valley, or after a pow-
erful rain. It is the same with streams that
descend in ravines and glens down the declivi-
ties of the mountains.” 3

“Yes,” said Marco. “I never thought’ of
that difference in the brooks before.”

While this conversation had been going for-
ward, Marco and Forester had come down into
the valley, and had been walking up and down
under rows of trees, which had been planted on
the banks of the stream, admiring the beauty of
the prospect. They now turned their steps to-
ward one of the great shops, where they heard
a loud sound, as of heavy machinery in motion,
and Forester opening the door, they both went
in.
Foreine. 55
‘Forges. ‘Arrangement of the machinery.

Cuarrer IV.
Forerne.

EXE room which Forester and Marco had
entered was a very large apartment on
the ground floor, and not well lighted, except by
the blazing fires of the forges. There were
rows of forges extending through thé whole
length of the room, all glowing with the intense
heat of anthracite fires, urged by bellows which
were carried by water. Connected with each
forge was agreat trip-hammer. A trip-hammer
is an enormous hammer, worked by water.. The
handle is a beam of wood, perhaps ten feet long.
‘This handle moves on an axle near the end of
it. The end of the handle projects a short dis-
tance beyond the axle on which it turns, and is
armed at the extremity with iron, and beyond
it is a wheel with projecting cogs or pins of
iron, which strike against the end of the handle,
as the wheel turns round, and drive it down,
and this makes the head of the hammer rise up.
‘Then, when the cog in the wheel, which had
struck against the end of the handle, slips by, it
56 Tur Srerinerrerp Armory.

om ”~<“CSs~stOS™C*C‘“‘«‘ ip hammer,
lets the end Of the handle up, and the head of
the hammer of course falls down upon- the an-
vil, or rather upon the work placed upon the
anvil to be forged.

There is one thing more, which it is very im-
portant to observe, in respect to the operation
of the trip-hammer, and that is, that when the
wheel containing the cogs, revolves fast, it
throws the hammer up so violently as to spring
the beam of wood which forms the handle, and
the head is then brought back again to the an-
vil, by the elastic return of the handle to its
position, with great force. Persons that do not
understand the operation of the trip-hammer,
are often surprised to see the head of it not so
large, in proportion to the other parts, as they
had expected to see it. They think that if the
head were heavier it would descend with more
force, and do more work.» This would be the
case, no doubt, if it were by the simple weight
of the head that the work was done. But it is
not. It is by the elastic force of the handle,
which brings down the head to the anvil with
great power, after being violently thrown up by
the cog behind, just as the effect of the common
hand hammer, in a blacksmith’s shop, is due not
so much to the weight of the iron in the head


Fororne. 87

‘Operation of the machinery. ‘Red-hot gun-barrel.



of the hammer, as to the force of the arm
which wields it.

Each of the trip-hammers, connected with
the forges, were so connected with machinery,
that they could be made to go very swiftly, or
be entirely stopped. While the iron to be forged
was in the furnace, heating, ‘the trip-hammer
remained.at rest, but when the men wanted to
use it, they could set it in motion, fast or slow,
according tothe work which they wished todo.
Now when Marco and Forester came into the
building, the workmen at some of the forges
were heating the irons; at others, they were
hammering quickly, and at others slowly ; and
every moment Marco observed a long, red-hot
gun-barrel, drawn out of a furnace, and pushed
under a trip-hammer, and then, by some move-
ment of the workmen, the hammer would sud-
denly begin its blows, with the greatest rapidity
and force, throwing the sparks about;in every
direction, and filling the whole place with a
deafening din. Then, after a few minutes, by
some other movement’ of ‘the workmen, the
hammer would be made to cease its rapid
movements, and to strike more’ slowly. Pres-
ently, it would cease altogether, and the iron
would then be drawn out from under it, and put
58 Tue Srrinorietp ARMoRY.





back into the fire to be heated again. Every
time one of the trip-hammers was thus set in
motion, it produced a rapid succession of loud
reports, like a discharge of musketry ; and these
volleys of sound-were continually breaking out
over the great apartment, as the men happened
to get the barrels heated at the several forges.

After standing a few minutes, and looking at
the general scene, Forester and Marco drew up
to one of the forges, to examine the process in
detail. s




oORGING. 59



“Obsorvations. . —~—sThoanvil. = Talking loud,

They found that the barrels were made of
flat bars of iron, bent over lengthwise around a
rod, which kept them hollow. When one of
these bars had been thus bent, so that the two
edges would lap over each other, it was put into
the furnace, and heated very hot, and when all
ready, it was drawn suddenly out, and slipped
under the trip-hammer. The anvil had a groove
in it of a cylindrical form, and the hammer had
another one corresponding +o it, so that if a
finished barrel were placed between them, it
would just fit into the space left bythe two
grooves when the head of the hammer and the
anvil came together.

There was such a continual succession of
loud sounds made by the trip-hammers all
around them,shat Forester had to put his mouth
close to Marco’s ear, and talk very loud, in
order to be heard. Speaking in this manner,
he said,

«Now you see, Marco, how they avoid the
two difficulties which you apprehended. They
keep the barrel hollow, by having a rod inside,
and they keep the outside round, by having a
groove in the anvil and inthe hammer.”

“ Yes,” said Marco, “I see. I did not think
of those plans.”
60 Tue Sprrincrienp Armory.
Process of forging @ barrel,

Just then, one of the men at the forge nearest
them, was drawing out a barrel from the fur-
nace, which was of a very intense heat. It was
almost white. Forester called Marco to stand
back a little, lest the sparks should fly upon his
clothes.

The man pushed the barrel back again, to
heat it hotter still. It was, however, only the
half which was in the furnace, which was hot.
The other end the man kept cool, by wetting it
constantly with cold water. He wished to keep
that end cool, in order that he might take hold
of it, without burning himself. The end which
was hot was the biggest end of the barrel. In
a moment more, he drew the barrel out again,
and then struck it down upon an iron plate upon
the floor, with great force, two or three times,
to square the end. He then run it under the
trip-hammer, slipping the rod intc'it at the same’
time. The rod thus entering into the hollow of
the barrel, kept the hammer from closing up tlie
bore. There was a sort of pole hanging down
as a handle from one part of the frame of the
trip-hammer, and another’ man was standing
near it. When the hot bar was in its place
under the hammer, this man -pulled down the
pole, and immediately the trip-hammer began
Foretna. 61



its blows upon the iron, while the workman who
held it turned it round and round continually,
that.it might be struck successively on all sides.
Thus he worked the iron into a very round and
smooth form, and then the pole was pushed up,
and the trip-hammer stopped. As the other end
of the barrel had been served in the same man-
ner before, the whole was now finished, and the
man put it upon a rack, with a great many
others which had been made before.

By this time there was another barrel ready
at the next forge, which was in-a different stage
of its progress, from the one last described.
One half of it had been nearly finished, but at
the other end the edges of the barrel had not
veen welded together. They had been brought
round over the rod, but had not. been joined.
Marco looked on while the workman heated the
unfinished end and then placed it under the
hammer. The heavy blows soon brought the
edges together, and joined them around the rod,
so as to give the work the form of a gun-barrel
throughout. Marco saw that when’ the work-
man wanted the hammer to strike slowly, he
could regulate its motion, in some way, by put-
ting his foot upon a projecting bar of wood, close
62 Tue Srrincrierp ARMoRY.

hee

‘to the floor, upon one side of the/anvil ; or, if
he wished, he could stop it entirely.

After this, Forester and Marco sauntered
slowly through the room, looking at the various
forges. There were great heaps of coal near
them, and men were wheeling in fresh supplies
over the stone floor. There were troughs of
water at each forge, with a little stream from
the mouth of a lead pipe running into each,
which kept them constantly full. The fires in
the forges were very hot, being kept up by a
steady blast of wind from some unseen bellows.
After spending as much time as they wished in
this building, Forester and Marco came out, and
went across the stream by a bridge. They
stopped upon the bridge, and looked over into
the stream. The water was pouring along, in
a tumultuous manner, between the walls of
masonry which formed the buildings or the
banks on each side.

“Now,” here is a streqm,” said Forester,
which I should think was Sfyetty uniform and
steady.”

“Why,” said Marco, “how can you tell ?”
“I can tell by the looks of the water.”
_ “It seems to me very strange,” said Marco,
“that you can tell by the looks of the water in
Forarne. 63

Discussion between Murco and Forester.

a brook, whether it comes from a pond, or
springs, or a great valley.”

“I could not tell,” rejoined Forester, “ except
at such a time as this, that is, just after a fresh-
et in every stream capable of a freshet. Now,
look for yourself into this water,” continued
Forester, “and see if you observe any differ-
ence between this and the water of the Con-
necticut.”

“Only that the water of the Connecticut is
muddy now,” said’ Marco.

« And how is this ?” said Forester.

« This is clear,” said Marco ; “only ade of
a dark color.” ee

“Very well—and what do you suppose is
the reason why the Connecticut is so turbid
now ?” asked Forester.

« Because of the freshet,” said Marco.

«But why should the freshet make it tur-
bid 2?”

« Why, I don’t know exactly,” said Marco.

«The reason is,” said Forester, “that the
freshet is produced by rains and melting snows,
from a vast surface of ground, and from such a
surface the water washes all the loose soil and
light particles which come in its way, into the
river. So that the water of a flood, produced
Gt Tue Sreinerreryn Armory.

Taina. ——
by rains falling over an extensive valley, is al-
ways turbid. When, therefore, I’ see such a
mass of turbid water as is now flowing through
the Connecticut, I judge it is water which has
come from the rains and snows of an extensive
valley. But when I see a stream bring down
only clear water like this, after such rains and
thaws as we have had, I conclude that it does
not come from the draining of an extensive sur-
face of land, but from a pond, or else from
springs.”

«And can you tell from the looks of the wa-
ter, whether it comes from a pond or from
springs ?” asked Marco.

“Why, the water is pretty dark,” said For-
ester.

«And what does that indicate?” asked
Marco.

“It indicates,” replied Forester, “that the
stream comes from springs, and swamps which
are fed by springs. The way in which swamps
are formed, is this. When springs arise in flat
land, or in any places where’ the water can not
run off as fast as it issues from the ground, it
spreads over the surface, and keeps it wet.
Then all the plants which grow on dry land are
killed, and none but aquatic plants will grow.
Foraine. 65



onsale oiceee: aie at ote
And these aquatic plants, when they die, do not
decay. The water preserves them, and other
plants grow above them. The leaves, too, and
branches, and trunks of trees, which fall in, are
covered with moss, and aquatic plants, and wa-
ter, and are thus preserved ; and in this manner
a great depth of vegetable substances is formed
in process of time, the'water issuing” continu-
ally from the ground, of a dark color as you
see it in this stream.”

“Yes,” replied Marco, “I see it is, and I
have often observed it so in other brooks.”

“But the water which comes from ponds has
generally but little color,” said Forester.

« What makes it so dark when it comes from
swamps ?” asked Marco.

«I do not know,” replied Forester, “ unless it
be that the plants and the various vegetables
remains, half decayed, which lie soaking in the
swamp, color it.”

Just at this moment, a man appeared, com-
ing out of a shop on one side of the stream, with
some curious-looking piece of machinery in his
hand, and he advanced toward the bridge, as if
he were going to cross it.

“Ask him,” said Marco, “if this stream rises
much, in times of freshet.”

E
66 Tue Serinarietp Armory.



‘The workman. Back wate



Forester said that he would, and according-
ly, when the man had come opposite to them,
Forester accosted him, by saying,

«The freshet does not appear to affect your
works much on this stream.”

«No, sir,” replied the workman, “it never
does.”

« What is the reason ?” asked Forester.

“ Why, the stream is fed,” replied the man,
« almost entirely by large springs, a short dis-
tance from here, and the rain does not raise
it much.” "

“So, then, you are never troubled much with
back water,” said Forester.

« No, sir,” replied the man, “not at all.” So
saying, he passed on.

“What do you mean by back water ?” asked
Marco.,

«When the water below the dam,” replied
Forester, “does not run off fast enough, but
flows back against the water-wheel, so as to
prevent its being turned round by the, current
above, it is called back water by millmen.
Sometimes, when there is another dam a short
distance below, it obstructs the water, so that,
in times of freshet, it can not escape fast enough,
and so the upper mill is troubled with back wa
Foratne. 67
“Forging tho plates,



ter. And even when there is not any other
dam, if the natural bed of the stream offers ob-
struction, or if the descent is not great enough
to carry off the water easily, then, when any
unusual quantity comes, it makes difficulty.
But come, let us go into the next shop.”

So Marco and Forester went over into an-
other shop. Here the workmen were forging
out the plates of iron, and flattening down the
edges, and then bending the edges over toward
one another, ready to be lapped and welded.
There were several trip-hammers here, and
Marco had a better opportunity to observe the
construction of them than in the great forge
room. He was surprised to see how perfectly
they could regulate the blows, and thus strike
slowly and carefully, or quick and strong, at
their pleasure. The workmen were exceed-
ingly accommodating in answering all the ques-
tions that Marco and Forester asked, and.jn ex-
plaining every thing which was going on.
They seemed, in fact, to take a pleasure in do-
ing it.


68 Ture Srrinerizerp ARMoRY.

‘Bras and cast iron. Gold.

Cuarrer V.

Iron.

Ov the walk from the middle water shop to
the upper one, Marco asked Forester why
they did not make gun-barrels of brass, instead
of iron ; he said that they would be handsomer.
“I don’t know,” replied Forester. “ They
make cannon for field-pieces, of brass, but that
is not on account of their beauty, I believe;
perhaps because they can be made lighter and
yet of the same strength, when of that materi-
al; but iron is always used for musket and pis-
tol barrels, I believe. I rather think this may
be it: iron cannon are always made of cast
iron. Now brass may be stronger than cast
iron, and yet wrought iron may be. stronger
than brass. Still this may not be all the rea-
son. The various metals have so many vari-
ous properties, that it would require a great
deal of study to be acquainted with them all.”
“Tread ina book once,” said Marco, “that
iron is really more valuable than gold.”
“ Yes,” said ‘Forester, “that is true.”—
Iron. 69
‘Meaning of valasbio. ‘Value of gold.

“ And that all which makes gold valuable,”
continued Marco, “ was its scarcity.”

“No,” said Forester, “that is not exactly
true. All that makes gold more valuable than
iron, may be its scarcity.”

« Yes,” said Marco, “perhaps that was it.”

“ There is a great difference between these
two statements,” said Forester. “And then,
besides, there is an ambiguity in the meaning
of the word valuable.” a

“Valuable!” repeated Marco; “I didn’t
know that there was more than one meaning to
that.”

« What does it mean ?” asked Forester.

“« It means worth something,” replied Marco.

“Is water valuable ?” asked Forester.

“Why, I don’t know,” said Marco; “we
couldn’t do without it, very well.”

“No,” rejoined Forester, “but still people
will not pay any thing for it, generally, for it is
so plentiful that they can get it without paying.
Thus it has a great value for its intrinsic qual-
ities, but no market or money value. Now if
gold was as plenty as stones in the street, it
would be very valuable in the former sense, for
it has some qualities which no other metals
have, and which are very important.”
70 Twe Srrinerietp Armory.
‘Bet. ~~ ~Ss~=~«”~*«*~*«“‘«‘«*‘« old and trom commpared_

« What are they ?” asked Marco.

«Perhaps the most important,” replied ‘For-
ester, “is, that it will not rust, or tarnish, by
being exposed to air or water, and it will. not
be cdrroded by any common acids. If a drop
of vinegar falls upon a knife-blade, it makes a
black spot; and if you. cut an apple with a
common knife, it blackens it. The acid of
the vinegar, or of the apple juice, corrodes the
iron.

“I thought that knife-blades were made of
steel,” said Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester, “ but steel is a prep-
aration of iron. So if iron is exposed to the
air, and especially to water, it rusts, and is soon
spoiled; but gold might remain half a centu-
ry buried in the ground, without changing.
Therefore, if gold were as plentiful as iron,
it would be used for.a great many things which
iron is used for now, simply because iron is so
common and cheap.”

«*What are some of the things it would be
used for ?” asked Marco. .

“Why, for every thing,” replied Forester,
“which did not require any great hardness,
such as spoons, fruit knives, handles of doors,
knobs, keys, and-all kinds of vessels for use in a


Iron. mn

Etfoct of heat,



family, as plates, cups, &c.; also for all kinds
of cooking utensils, as kettles, skillets, &c. I
presume, too, it would be used for sheathing of
ships, or for covering roofs of houses; and, in
fact, for almost all purposes, where particular
hardness is not required. Still, on the whole,
iron is more useful to men than gold would be,
for it has several qualities of a very curious na-
ture, which admirably fit it for our use. It has,
in fact, two sets of useful qualities, which are
very distinct from each other. One set relates
to the facility of manufacturing it, and the other
set to its usefulness when manufactured.”

«TI believe I know-what one of thém is,” said
Marco. “You can hammer it when it is hot.”

“It undergoes three changes by heat,” said
Forester, “which are all of great service in
manufacturing it. First, it becomes more mal.
leable and flexible. This is when it is red-hot.
If it was as malleable and flexible when cold,
as it is when it is red-hot, it would be unfit for
most of its present uses. It would bend down,
at once, under any load laid upon it, like lead.
But, by becoming more malleable and: flexible
when hot, it can be formed into its proper shape,
and then, on becoming cold, it resumes all. its
hardness and toughness again. It seems as if


72 Tue Sertnorietp Armory.
Brien, S™S™~—“SSSSSSOSOSOSSCS gs

these qualities were given to it expressly for the
advantage of man, as we know of no reason
why heat should make it flexible and soft, rather
than brittle, as it does brass and lead.”

“Does, heat make brass and lead brittle?”
asked Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester; “if you drop a
piece of hot brass upon the hearth, it will break
to pieces. And didn’t you ever observe, when
you are casting little anchors of lead, that if you
attempt to take the anchor out before the lead
is cool, it will break to pieces ?”

“No,” said Marco, “I never cast any an-
chors of lead.”

“ That is the way it does work,” said Fores-
ter; “but iron becomes very malleable and pli-
able as it grows hot, until, at last, when it is at
a white heat, a remarkable effect takes place,
which is of great importance. That is, the sur-
face.softens. It does not melt, that is, become
liquid, as lead does ; but it softens in a peculiar
way, so that, if you put two surfaces together,
while they are in this state, and hammer them
together, they join perfectly, and make one ho-
mogeneous mass.”

“What does homogeneous mean ?” asked
Marco.
Iron. 73
Importance of the wolding property. ‘Stoel welded to iron.

“All ‘alike,” replied Forester, “through the
whole substance. The place where the junc-
tion is formed is just like all the rest of it. This
is ‘welding. I believe there is no other metal
but iron, that softens in this manner upon the
surface, at a great heat, so that two pieces can
be joined together. This, you see, is of: im-
mense importance in manufacturing iron, for it
is very often necessary to join parts together.
They could not make the gun-barrels in the
manner they do, if it were not for this welding
property of the iron. As it is, they can take
a flat bar, wide enough to make a gun-barrel
when it is rolled up, and then, by rolling it up
so as to have one edge lap well over the other,
they can weld it and make it one solid mass.
If you look at the barrel when it is ground: and
polished, you can not find the least indication
of any joint where one edge lapped over the
other.”

«And nothing else but iron can be welded,
then,” said Marco.

“« Iron and steel,” said Forester. “Steel can
be Welded to steel, or to iron. ‘That is the way
they make nearly all cutting tools. The cutting
part is made of gteel, but the rest of the instru-
ment is generally made of iron—tne two parts


74 Tae Srrinertunp Armory.

Fusibillty of iron,

being made separately, and welded together.
Where steel is welded to iron, you can gene-
rally see a joint, for the two metals are of a lit-
tle different color. In a common table knife,
you can almost always see this mark near the
handle, where the steel blade was joined to the
iron part, which goes into the handle.”

“T’ll look next time I see one,” said Marco.

“So in axes, chisels, plane irons, and all such
tools,” continued Forester, “we can generally
see where the steel-cutting part was welded
to the iron shank. Then the fusibility of iron
isanother property of great importance. In
acertain state, iron can be melted. They
melt it in great furnaces. They mix the iron
with wood in putitng’ it into the furnace,
and then blow the fire with monstrous bel-

Jows driven by machinery. When the
iron is melted, and

has become sufficient-
2 ly hot, they draw it
off through an open-
ing in the bottom
of the furnace—the
opening being kept
stopped up till the
iron is melted.



FILLING THR LADLE,
Iron. 75

‘Gast iron.

When it is ready, they punch the hole oped,
and the melted iron comes out like a streani of
liquid fire.”

«Where does it run to?” asked Marco.

“Oh, they hold a great ladle under it to
catch it. The ladle is supported between two
long bars for handles, and is carried by two
men. When the ladle is full, they carry away
the liquid iron, and pour it into the mold, made
ready for it beforehand. When one ladle full
is carried away, two- men aré all ready with
‘another, to put directly under, when the first is
taken away, to catch the stream of iron, which
keeps running all the time.”

«Where did you see them cast iron so ?” said
Marco.

«Oh, I’ve often been in foundries,” said For-
ester, “where I’ve-seen the process.”

“Why don’t they cast gun-barrels ?” said
‘Marco.

«They would not be strong enough. Cast
iron is of a different nature from wrought iron,
—more brittle ; and, besides, it is apt to have
flaws. So that cast iron will not answer where
great strength and toughness are required, unless
it is in cases where weight is no objection, as,
for instance, where the article is not to be much


76 Tue Srerinoriztp Armory.

Form of the cannons.





‘Cannons of forts.

moved. ‘Thus, the cannons of forts, which are
always stationary, are of cast iron, but, in order
to be strong, they have to be made enormously
thick and heavy. But muskets, which the sol-
dier has to carry upon his shoulder, must be
made as light as possible. So they use the best
wrought iron, and thus the barrels can be made
much thinner than if they were of cast iron.
You see that a soldier, besides his gun, has to
earry his knapsack of clothes, and his powder
and ball, and sometimes several days’ ptovision 5
so that often, when on a march, he is loaded
down with almost as great a burden as he can
carry. With this, he has to travel through mud
and snow, and sometimes through woods and
swamps, and thus it becomes necessary to make
the musket, and all his equipments, in fact, as
light as possible.”

“ What makes them have it bigger at one end
than it is at the other ?” said Marco.

«So as to have the iron thicker at one end.
The bigness at that end is occasioned by the
greater thickness of the iron there. The bore
is of the same diameter throughout. You see
that the chief force of the explosion of the gun-
powder, is at the breech, where the charge lies.
As the ball advances through the barrel, the
Iron. 77
Gases. Philosophy of explosion.



gases expand, and their force diminishes, so that
So great strength is not required at the muzzle.
Cannon are always castin the same manner, so
as to have the greatest strength and thickness
at the part which has to resist the greatest force
of the explosion. There are, in fact, two rea-
sons, why the force of the gunpowder diminishes
as the ball moves on toward the muzzle. The
first is that the gases expand, and the second is
that they cool.”

«< What gases | ?” asked Marco.

“The gases,” replied Forester, “which are
produced by the combustion of the gunpowder.
‘When gunpowder burns, the solid parts, which
it is composed of, suddenly combine, and change
into gases. Now as the solid gunpowder occu-
pied much less room than the gases which are
formed from it, these gases expand with great
force, to get their proper place, and that is what
gives the explosive force.”

“Is that the philosophy of it ?”” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “in part; but that
does not account for the whole explosive force
of gunpowder. For if gunpowder is exploded
in a confined space, so that they can-collect all
the gases which result”.


78 Tue Sprinerienp Armory.
“Ghomical experiments. ———==S=S=~=*~*~<“~*~*~*S*S*C«ntrdvanicom,

“Ishould think it would blow the confined
place all to pieces,” interrupted Marco.

«Oh, the chemists have a mode of arranging
apparatus to prevent that, and to keep the
gases from escaping.”

«« How do they do it ?” asked Marco.

“They drop the gunpowder, by degrees, that
is, a few grains at a time, upon hot iron,—per-
haps the end of a gun-barrel, and then have the
other end of the barrel bent, so as to pass under
water." Then, as the powder is inflamed, and
explodes, the gases pass out through the muzzle
of the gun-barrel and come up in bubbles
through the water.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “but they would get
away into the air aid be lost.”

« Not at all,” said Forester, “for it would be
‘very easy to have a vessel upside down over
the place, to catch all the bubbles, or rather the
gases that are in them. The chemists have
very ingenious modes: contrived for doing all
such things.”

“Idon’t see how they contrive to keep the
gunpowder from all flashing off at once.”

“TI don’t know precisely how they do it,” said
Forester, “but it would be easy to have a tube
screwed into the end of the barrel, directly over
Irow. 719
“Gasscollectet, Results...
the heated part, and then have a contrivance
for dropping the gunpowder, a few grains ata
time, down through this tube. Then if the part
which contained the gunpowder, at the top of
the tube, was closed over, so that the gases
could not escape that way, they would all pass
off through the barrel, and come up in bubbles
through the water. 2

“Now, by some such contrivance as this,”
continued Forester, “the chemists have col-
lected the gases which result from burning a
certain quantity of gunpowder, and then, by
pressing those gases into as small a space as the
powder itself occupied before, they’ can tell what
the expansive force is.”

« Yes,” said Marco, “I understand it, I be-
lieve.”

“The object,” continued Forester, ,“ of all
this is, to measure the expansive power of the
gases, and ascertain whether that power is
enough to account for the explosive force of
gunpowder.”

“ And is it enough ?” said Marco.

“No,” replied Forester ; “the result of the
experiment ‘is, that the expansive force of the
gases, which result from the burning of the
gunpowder, when they are collected and artifi-
80 Tus Sprincrierp Armory.

‘Foresters explanations. Effect of heat.

cially compressed, is not great enough to pro-
duce such powerful effects as are caused by the
explosion of the, powder.”

“Perhaps some ‘of the gases escape,” said
Marco.

« They have tried the experiment very care-
fully,” said Forester. “But there is one cir-
cumstance which makes the case very different,
when the gases are collected in this manner,
from the natural explosion.”

«What is it ?” asked Marco.

“The gases,” replied Forester, “ are in a'very
different condition, when they are first produced,
from what they are when they are collected and
compressed afterward. When they are first
formed by the burning of the gunpowder, they
are intensely hot; but when they are after-
ward collected and condensed slowly, they are
cold. This must make a considerable difference
in the force which they exert.”

«Why ?” asked Marco.

“ Because,” said Forester, “any gas, when
hot, expands with greater force than when cold.
A bladder filled with air, will burst if you put it
down before a hot fire. Steam, too, expands
with vastly greater force when it is heated to a

«high degree, than when it remains at the same
Iron. 81



“Gunpowder. “Conclusion.
temperature at which it was generated. So the
gases resulting from the burning of gunpowder,
when hot, will expand with much greater force
than when cold. And when they are first
formed by the burning of the powder, they must
be intensely hot, from the heat produced by the
combustion. So that, perhaps, that is the ex-
planation of the force of gunpowder. Stated in
general terms, it would be thus. The explosive
force of gunpowder is owing to the sudden for-
mation of a large quantity of elastic and expan-
sive gases, at a very high temperature.

« Therefore,” continued Forester, “the great
thickness of the gun must be at the place where
the gunpowder is lodged, as there the gases are
first formed and most compressed. As the bul-
let moves along the barrel, the gases expand
and fill the space, and so their force is dimin-
ished; but they still continue to act, though
more and more feebly, pushing the bullet along
until it leaves the muzzle of the gun.”

F
82 Tue Serincrietp ARMoRY.

“Marco nunary. The sia. ‘The pleasant front yard,

Cuarrer VI.
ARCHERY.

GF passing along the road from one water shop

to another, Marco saw something which
made him hungry, namely a sign put up over
the door of a small house, saying that cakes and
beer were for sale within. *

“Ah!” said Marco, as soon as his eyes fell
upon this sign, “let us go in and-get some cakes
and beer.”

«Why ! are you hungry ?” asked Forester.

“Yes,” replied Marco, “and thirsty too.”

“ Well,” said Forester, “let us go in then and
see what they have got that is good.”

There was a little yard in front of the house,
with a gate leading into it. On each side of
the path leading from the gate to the door of the
house there was a little parterre, planted with
shrubs and flowers. The flowers were just
coming up out of the ground. The beds looked
very neat and nice, having been spaded up and
raked over only the day before.

At the time when Forester and Marco turned -
ARCHERY. 83

“Girt afraid. ‘Marco and Forester go intothe house. Hot cakes.

to go into the house there was a little girl in the
pathway, employed in sowing some flower seeds.
When she saw Forester and Marco coming,
however, she jumped up and ran into the house.

“I don’t see what she is afraid of,” said
Marco.

Forester and Marco walked into the yard and
advanced to the step of the door. The door
opened into a small entry, and the entry into a
very neat and pleasant-looking room. There
was a woman just coming forward into the
entry from the room.

“We wanted to get some of your cakes,”
said Forester.

“ Walk in,” said the woman.

So Forester and Marco walked in. The
‘woman conducted them into the room, and gave
them seats by a little table.

“Iam just baking;” said the woman,“ and I
can give you some cakes right from the oven.”

“That will be good,” said Marco.

“Have you got milk as well as beer ?” asked
Forester.

“ Yes,” said the woman, “I can let you have
some milk.”

“ Would not you like milk as well as beer
Marco ?” said Forester.
84 Tur Sprinerrerp Armory.



replied Marco, “ better.

The woman then went out to get the cakes
and milk, while Marco and Forester remained,
and began to look about the room. There was
adoor on the side opposite to the one where
they had come in, which seemed to lead out
into a pleasant-looking yard. Marco went to
this side door to see.

He found a little platform outside, covered
with a roof, and having a seat on each side of
it. He sat down upon the seat, and then called
to Forester.

« Forester,” said he, “ come here.”

“No,” said Forester, “not yet.”

In a moment more the woman came in with
a waiter in her hands, containing a plate of
hearts and rounds, hot from the oven, and a
pitcher of milk. There were two tumblers on
the waiter also. ‘The woman placed the waiter
down upon the table.

“Have you any objection to our going out
upon the stoop ?” said Forester.

«Not at all,” said the woman. “I will move
the little table right out there.”

So she took up the table, which was very
small, and carried it, with the waiter upon it,
out to the stoop. Forester followed her. She
Arcuery. 85
“Tho luncheon eating. Rich milk.

put the table down
in the stoop be-
tween the two
benches,and Marco
and Forester took
seats on the bench-
s, one on each side.
«This is a good
place,” said Marco. }
“Yes,” said For- ¥
ester, “and a good

luncheon.” 2

Forester poured
out some of the
milk. It looked very rich indeed. In fact, the
woman having been much pleased with the ap-
pearafice and manners of her guests, had con-
trived in pouring out the milk from the pan
into the pitcher, to mix with it an unusual por-
tion of the cream, so that the milk as she brought
it to the table was very rich indeed.

While eating their cakes_and drinking their
milk, Forester and Marco were much interested
in viewing the scene around them. The stoop
where they were sitting was on the back side
of the house, and there were steps leading from
it down to a neat little garden, all laid out care-













86 True Srrincrizrtp Armory.
Gato leading into the gard Path beyond.

fully in beds. At the end of the garden was a
gate, and a path beyond it. The path led appa-
rently down to the mill stream; which flowed
through the grounds in that direction. Marco
could not see the stream very well, on account
of the trees and shrubbery that were in the
way. He could hear it, however, and he said
that after he had finished his luncheon he meant
to go down and see it.

Forester did not pay much attention to this
remark of Marco's, for he was busy at the time
in reading a newspaper which he had found in
the room while the woman was gone after the
cakes, and which he had brought out with him
to the stoop. He held the newspaper in one
hand, and the cake which he was eating in the
other. <

“Tve a great mind to go down now,” said
Marco. “.Would you, cousin Forester ?”

“Would you what?” asked Forester, still
reading. “

“Go down and see the brook,” said Marco.
“That path there beyond the garden leads down
to the stream, I suppose.”

“ And you want to go down ?” said Forester.

“Yes,” replied Marco. :

“I shall have to go with you then,” said


ARCHERY, 87

Marco's two cakes. ‘Seonery on the bunks of the stream-

Forester, “to see that you don’t get into any
difficulty.”

“There is no danger of any difficulty,” said
Marco. “But still I should like to have you

0.”
« Well,” said Forester, “go on. Tl follow
you.”

So Forester,and Marco rose from their seats
and prepared to go. Forester held his news-
paper in one hand, keeping his eyes still fixed
upon it, so as to.continue his reading, and he
took another cake in the other hand, so as to
go on with his luncheon by the way. As for
Marco, he took two cakes, so as to be sure of
an abundant supply. Thus provided, Marco
ran down through the garden, while Forester
slowly followed, reading by the way.

A winding pathway led down from the lower
garden gate through a wild scene of rocks and
trees, down to the banks of the stream. The
scenery was so wild and picturesque, that For-
ester’s attention was, for a time, wholly taken
off from his reading by it. He looked at the
water which came roaring and foaming along
over its rocky bed. He looked at the precipices
which overhung the stream, and at the mosses
and lichens which enriched the rocks, and the
8s Tus Sperinerisyp Armory.

“Maroc’a remarke: Robbing birds'-nests. Forester’s story.

climbing plants. which hung suspended from
them in beautiful festoons. He stood a few
minutes admiring all this beauty and neglecting
his newspaper, when Marco. interrupted his
reverie by saying,

“I wish I gould get over to the other side.”

“Why ?” dsked Forester.

«To run about in the woods over there,” re-
plied Marco.“ “I don’t believe but that there
are birds’-nests in those woods.”

“And what -should you do with the birds’.
nests,” said Forester, “ if you should find them ?”

“Oh, nothing,” said Marco; “only climb up
and look in to see the eggs. I would not rob
the nests on any account. It is wicked to rob
birds’-nests ; don’t you think it is ?”

“I think it is generally wrong.”

“ Generally ?” repeated Marco.
ways wrong, I am sure.”

“That depends upon what you mean by rob-
bing the nests.”

“Why, taking the eggs,” said Marco, “and
carrying them away.”

“Well,” said Forester, “I know a farmer’s
boy in Vermont—and a very excellent boy he
was, too,—who used to go out every morning



«It is al-
AncuERrr~ 898
ee ______

‘Burprise of Marto. ‘Forestor’s explanation.



and get the eggs out of ever so many birds’-
nests.” 7

“And what did he do with them ?” asked

Marco.

+“ Why, he would carry them home, and af-
terward the girls in the house used to break
them up.”’

« Hoh !—what girls!” said Marco.

“And I think they did perfectly right,” said
Forester.

‘So saying, Forester turned away and walked
toward some large square stones which lay near
the bank of the stream, and sitting down upon
them, began to read his paper, leaving Marco
overwhelmed with astonishment.

« Perhaps I ought to mention, however,” con-
tinued Forester, raising his eyes from the paper
a moment as he spoke,—“ that the birds were
hens, and the nests that this boy went to were
allin his father’s barn. The girls broke the
eggs up to make puddings and pies.”

Marco laughed aloud at this termination of
the story, and at first he insisted that hens were
not birds. He was, however, soon obliged to.
relinquish this point, and he went down to the
shore of the stream, and began to pick up small
stones, and try to see if he could throw them
90 Tur Serine



reup Armory.



Brajvetton.

across the stream. He found that he could.
The stones that he threw struck against the
precipice on the other side with great force,
and rebounded into the water.

“I can throw stones very swift,” said Marco,
talking to himself. “I wonder if a bullet goes
swifter out of a gun.”



“Forester,” said Marco, “just look here a
minute. Do you suppose that a bullet out of a
gun goes a great deal swifter than that ?”
7 ARCHERY. 91
‘Marco's questions —~=~*~“‘CS™CO#;#~é~é~‘“‘wA Week





As Marco pronounced the word that, he
lanched the stone through the air with all its
force. It flew across the stream and went far
in among the trees on the opposite bank.

«I don’t know,” said Forester, still reading.

«Or an arrow,” continued Marco. “I wonder
how much swifter a bullet goes than an arrow.”

“Cousin Forester,” said Marco.

Forester did not answer.

“Cousin Forester,” repeated Marco.

«What ?” said Forester.

« How swift does an arrow go?” said Marco.

Forester did not answer, but went on with his
reading.

“Does not an arrow go as swift as a bullet,
—nearly ?” continued Marco.

“ An arrow!” repeated Forester. |“ Iam busy
now, reading, Marco. If you will leave me in
peace until I have finished this article, I will tell
you all about arrows and archery. I will deliver
you a regular lecture.”

“Well,” said Marco.

Marco had laid his two cakes down upon a
flat stone while he had been throwing pebbles
across the brook; but now he took them up
again, and began to eat them. After a short
time Forester finished his reading, and then


92 Tue Sperinarrenp Armory.

Forester commences his lecture. “Archery; definition of it,

gave notice to Marco that he was réady to at-
tend to him.

So Marco walked along toward Forester,
saying,

« Now, cousin Forester, for the lecture on ar-
chery that you promised me.”

“Well,” said ‘Forester, “ take your seat on
that stone, and be the audience, and I will de-
liver you a lecture.”

So Marco sat down upon the stone that For-
ester pointed out,—which was nearly opposite
to where Forester himself was sitting——and be-
gan to compose hinself to listen.

“ Ladies and gentlemen!” said Forester.

Here Marco smiled.

“The audience is expected to keep sober,
said Forester.

At this Marco laughed outright, but in a mo-
ment more he recovered his gravity, and For-
ester proceeded as follows :—

“Ladies and gentlemen; The subject of this
lecture is Archery. Archery is the art of
using the bow and arrow. Before the in-
vention of gunpowder, the bow and. arrow
were used as instruments of war. Since
that invention, archery is no longer em-
ployed in the warfare of civilized nations.


ArcHERY. 93
Missiles. —=—=SSS~SCSCSCSCS flo ophlcall explanations.
The North American Indians, and savage na-
tions, still use the bow and arrow'in their wars,
and in the pursuit of game. These instruments
were of very angient use, and are mentioned
‘n the Bible. The principles on which the bow
and arrow are made, will be seen from their
‘structure and design. An arrow is a kind of
missiles Missiles are those weapons which are
designed to be thrown through the air, by the
strength of the combatant who uses them.
‘The dart, the lance, and the arrow, are missiles,
but the sword and the dagger are not. Stones
are often used as missiles. A speer, when it is
thrown,-is a missile, but when retained in the
hands and used only to give thrusts, it is not.
The harpoon thrown at a whale is a mi:

Forester said all this in a very grave and se-
rious way, as if he were really delivering a lec-
ture. _Marco was at first inclined to laugh, but
he gradually became interested in what Fores-
ter was saying, and at length began to listen
quite attentively.

“A man, with his naked strength,” contin-
ued-Forester, “can give a missile a greater or
less velocity, according to its weight. If he
takes up a ball of iron, weighing ten pounds,
avd throws it with all his strength, he can only


94° Tue Srrinerienp Armory.
‘The lecturer interrupted. ‘The lecture suddenly terminated,

give it a slow motion, and this motion will car-
ry it but a very little way. If now he takes a
five-pound ball and makes an effort as great as
before, he will give it a quicker motion. The
velocity of his arm through the air with a five-
pound ball, may be about twice as great as_
when it is loaded with a ten-pound ball, The
man produces the same amount of motion in
the two cases. In the first, he gives a great
quantity of matter a small motion. In the lat-
ter, he gives a small quantity of matter a great
motion. The whole amount of the moving
effect is the same.”’

“I don’t understand that very well,” said
Marco.

“The audience are requested not to interrupt
the lecture,” said Forester.

Marco smiled, and Forester went on.

“If a boy,” he continued, “throws a great
stone, as far as he can, perhaps it would only
go asingle rod. If he makes the same effort to
throw a small stone, it will go eight or ten rods;
that is, if the small stone were only one eighth
or one tenth as large as the other.”

Just at, this point Forester interrupted him-
self to say that it was time for them to go back,
or the woman at the house would wonder what
ARCHERY.



difference between a gun and a bow.



had become of them. She might imagine, he
said, that they had eaten her cakes, and drank
her milk, and had now gone away without pay-
ing for them.

If Forester had not thus felt obliged to go
back to the house, and if he had found that
Marco had been able to understand his lecture,
he would have gone on to state some very cu-
rious principles in respect to the operation of
the bow and arrow. There is an essential dif-
ference between a gun and a bow in this re-
spect, that a gun is an instrument for creating
power by means of the explosion of the powder
contained within it ; while a bow is only an in-
strument for changing power, already existing,
into speed. The force with which a man pulls
a trigger has nothing to do with the velocity of
the bullet; but the force with which a man
draws the bow, is the sole cause that determines
the velocity of the arrow.

What Forester had been intending to say to
Marco, when speaking of the power which a
man has to throw a small stone faster and far-
ther than a large one, was this:—that by di-
minishing the weight of the ball or stone, he
would be able to’ increase the velocity with
which he could throw it up to a certain limit.
96 Tut Srrinorrerp Armory.



‘Timit of velocity in throwing with the arm,

‘The limit would be the utmost degree of swift-
ness that he. could give to the motion of his
arm. Suppose, for example, that a man could
throw a missile weighing three ounces, one hun-
dred yards. That would be equivalent to
‘throwing one of one ounce, three hundred
yards. If now he has power to do the former,
he will have power enough to do the latter,.but
he-can not make this power available, inasmuch
as he can not give his arm swiftness of motion
enough; for the missile will pass through the
air, only with the same velocity that it is mov-
ing in, when leaving his hand. But with the
bow he may accomplish it. For the bow, if it
is perfectly elastic, may be drawn up with a
slow motion, but it will straighten itself with a
quick motion, according to the lightness of the
arrow with which it is loaded. Thus the bow
and arrow is not a contrivance to increase a
man’s power of throwing a missile, but only to
enable him to expend the power which he has,
in giving a greater velocity to missiles of small
weight. There is as much motion given in
throwing a three ounce missile one hundred
yards, which the man could do by his own
strength, as in throwing the one ounce missile
three hundred yards, which he does by bow and
ArcueErRy.



“The bow creates no power. Materials of which bows

arrow. But the latter is much more useful in
hunting and in war, for the marksmen wish to
reach the object at the greatest possible dis-
tance. A bow, therefore, must not be consid-
ered as exercising any force of its own, but only
as expending in a peculiar manner, the force
which the archer applies to it, in drawing it.
There is, besides this, one other advantage in
using a bow rather than in throwing the missile
direct from the hand, and that is, that it can be
aimed better. Practiced archers acquire great
skill in hitting the object at which they aim.
The bow is usually made of some kind of
tough and elastic wood. The best strings are
made from the skins of wild animals. The ar-
row consists of three parts—the shaft, the head,
and the barb. The shaft in the best Indian ar-
row, is about three feet long,’slender, light, and
perfectly straight. The head is made of heavi-
er wood, or is armed with a rudely carved
stone. The savage inhabitants of islands em-
ploy for this purpose, the sharp teeth of some
kinds of fish. The barb consists of pieces of
feather, so attached to the end of the arrow
which is applied to the string, as to cause it to
pursue a steady and straight course in its flight
through the air. The feather end being more
«
98 Tue Serinerienp Armory.
“Advantages of



‘ery arrows. Gros

resisted by the atmosphere, is kept back, and the
head being heavier, moves with greater momen-
tum and is always forward.

The arrow has been found a very deadly
weapon in war. Warlike nations in ancient
times, acquired great dexterity and power in
its use. Scarcely any armor was sufficient pro-
tection against it. Sometimes arrows were
poisoned... And not unfrequently the arrow was
employed as the Congreve Rocket now is, to
fire distant buildings by loading the head with
tow, or with some other combustible substance
that would communicate a spark or a flame.
‘They were accustomed, too, in former times, to
make a kind of arrow with holes through the
head. of it, so as to produce a whistling sound
when they were discharged. ‘These were called
whistling arrows.

The Cross-Bow, often spoken of in the
histories of former times, was substantially
the same instrument with the common bow.
It had in addition a kind’ of stock, attached
to the bow, by which the arrow was made
to pass along a groove, which served to give
more steadiness and certainty to the aim.
The most experienced archers, however, always
preferred the simple bow. In accounts of an-
Arcuery. - 99
‘Forester and Marco go back to the house. ‘The bill,

cient battles, frequent mention is made of arch-
ers, as the most efficient part of the forces em-
ployed in a war. Bullets, however, as dis-
charged from guns, in modern warfare, are infi-
nitely more deadly.

It is very probable that Forester would have
explained all these things to Marco, had he not
felt in haste to return and pay for the cakes and
milk that he and Marco had eaten. He need
not have been uneasy on this account, as the
‘woman at the house would not have suspected
that they had dishonestly gone away, if they had
remained playing about the stream an hour—
so confident was she of the respectability and
trust-worthiness of her guests, from their ap-
pearance and manners.

Forester and Marco, however, went back to
the house, and after sitting in the stoop a little
while longer, and drinking some more of the
milk, they went in and asked what there was to
pay. The woman saidninepence ; which For-
ester said meant a New York shilling. They
paid her the money and then went away.
100 Tue Srrinerizup Anmony.
Raing etey

Cuarrer VII.
Turnine ann Borinea.

MA*8°° and ¥orester spent two or three

hours in rambling through the water
shops, and examining the various processes
which were going on in them. They saw the
place where the iron bars were rolled out, and
cut into lengths suitable for forming the barrels;
and Marco was astonished to observe with what
facility the metal was worked, by the help of
the ponderous machinery. This was done at
the lowest of the three dams. Here was also
the “stocking shop,” as the workmen called it,
where the stocks of the guns were turned.
Marco was very much interested in this pro-
cess, as, in fact, all visitors are. Turning is
performed in an instrument called a lathe.
The work to be turned is put into the lathe, and,
by means of wheels and machinery, is made to
revolve rapidly. While it is thus revolving, the
cutting tool is held against it, which cuts away
the wood, or other material, all around the work.
There is a part of the machine, made to steady
Turnine anv Borina. 101

“‘Farning brass and iron. ‘The cutting tool “Engine lathes,



the tool upon, .which is called the rest. All
kinds of work, which are round in one direction,
such as round boxes, knobs, handles, &c., can
be fashioned in. this manner much more easily,
and much more correctly, than they can be by
hand. Not only wood, but brass, iron, and
steel, can be turned in a lathe. The tools with
which the harder substances are turned, are
ground to a more obtuse angle, though equally
sharp at the edge; and they are, of course, so
adjusted, as to cut off only a small shaving at a
time. Where the iron or brass work, which is
to be turned, is very heavy, not only must the
material be made to revolve by machinery, but
the tool must be screwed firmly into the rest, as
the strength of a man would not be sufficient to
hold it. The rest, with the tool screwed into
it, is made to mpve slowly along, so as to cut
the metal away regularly, from one end of the
work toward the other. Such a lathe as this,
is called an engine lathe.

Marco saw several engine lathes. There
were three or four in one room, for turning the
gun-barrels. Marco watched the tool, as it
moved slowly along the barrel, with a small
shaving of iron running out continually from its
edge, as the barrel turned over constantly
lo2 Tur Sprinarrerp Armory.
[Gooling tho tool, ‘Necossity for this,



against There was a little stream of cold
water, which fell all the time upon the point of
the tool. It came from a little pipe, suspended
over the work. The pipe was connected with
a small flexible tube; about ‘three feet long,
which came down from a long metal pipe, which
passed across the room overhead, and contained
aconstant supply of water. The water in this
pipe was raised, as Forester supposed, by a
pump from the mill-stream. The end of the
little pipe over the work was attached to the
machinery, so that it moved along with the rest,
and thus always delivered its little stream of
water directly upon the edge of the tool, and
upon the part of the iron which the tool was
cutting. The flexible tube, or hose, as the
workmen called it, allowed the pipe to be car-
ried in this manner, along the barrel, from one
end to the other, so as to pour the water con-
tinually upon the point where it was needed.
Marco wanted to know what the stream of
water was for; and Forester told him that it
was to keep the edge of the tool cool. The
force of friction, produced by cutting so hard a
material as iron, would soon heat the tool, and
teke the temper out of the steel—and then, the
edge, being softened, would be immediately
s Turning anv Borine. 103
‘The iron shavings. Called turnings,

worn away. In/fact, Marco observed, in many

other instances, that such streams of water were
made to fall upon the work, where the cutting
tool was exposed to heavy friction, in order to
keep it cool.

The shavings cut off at each of the lathes
where the barrels were turned, fell into a box
beneath. The workmen told Forester that
these turnings were all worked up into solid iron
again, and used for making more barrels.

“TI shouldn’t think that would be worth
while,” said Marco.

« Why not ?” asked Forester.

“ Because,” said Marco, “ they can only make
a very little iron,—such thin shavings.”

«We call them turnings,” said the workman.
“They amount to a great quantity. In fact, in
finishing a gun-barrel, we take off more than
we leave; so that if the trimmings and scraps
were thrown away, more than one half the iron
would be wasted.”

Forester, as: well as Marco, was surprised to
hear this statement, but, on more particular in-
quiry, they were told that the barrel, in the
rough form, weighed about ten pounds and 4
half, and that, when finished, it weighed only
four pounds; so that considerably more than
104 Tue Sertnerrenp Armory.
Grinding the barrels. ‘Monstrous grindstone,

one half the quantity of material was cut away
in the process of finishing.

One of the most interesting processes which
Marco saw, was the grinding of the barrels after
they had been turned. It seems that although
the tool by which the barrel is turned, is held
and moved by machinery, which machinery
remains precisely the same for a great many
different barrels—still the barrels are not pre-
cisely alike when they come from the lathe.
Some will be a very little thicker or thinner in
some parts than others. Then, besides, the tool
does not leave the iron perfectly smooth, for, as
it moves slowly along at the same time that the
iron revolves, it cuts in a, spiral direction, round
and round the iron, and leaves the work marked
with a sort of.spiral depression, left by the form
of the edge of the tool. This has to be ground
away, in order to make the surface of the barrel
smooth and uniform throughout.

Now the manner in which it is effected, is
this. “An enormous grindstone, five or six feet
in diameter, is made to revolve with great ve-
locity, and a stream of water pours constantly
upon it from a pipe above. This water would
fly in all directions from the stone, on account
of what is called the centrifugal force; produced
‘Gontrivances.



by the rapid revolution of the stone, were it not
prevented by inclosing the stone in a box, which
confines the water. In front of the stone, and
opposite the middle of it, there is a small open-
ing through the box, large enough to admit the
gun-barrel, and when it is in, there is a lever
which may be pressed against it, to crowd it
hard against the stone. .The-end of this lever,
which is a smooth iron bar, passes out in such
a.direction, as to come behind the workman, as
he stands in the proper position for holding the
barrel; and thus, while he holds the barrel in
his hands, he can lean against this lever, and
press the barrel with great force against the
stone.

It is very evident, however, that if the barrel
was held at rest in this position, while the stone
was rapidly revolving, that it would only grind
off a portion of it from one side, thus spoiling,
instead of improving its form. In order to pre-
vent this, and to grind it on all sides alike, the
workman has an iron rod, with a crank handle
upon one end of it. This rod he runs into the
barrel before he applies it to the stone, and
drives it in hard ; and as the rod is made to fit
the barrel, it holds it firmly by the friction.
‘Then, by means of the crank at the end, he can
106 Tue Serinerietp Armory.
‘Velocity of the stone. Spar,

turn the rod, and with it the barrel, and thus
bring all parts of the barrel, in rapid succession,
in contact with the stone. Thus, while the
grinder was crowding back upon the lever, in
order to press the barrel against the stone, he
was at the same time turning the barrel con-
stantly, by means of the crank, and thus the
superfluous metal was ground off equally from
all sides of the barrel.

So great was the velocity of the wheel, and
the force with which the barrel was pressed
against it, that Marco could see, by looking in
at the place where the bar was inserted, that
long sparks and streams of fire, struck out by
the violence of the friction, were continually
darting down among the streams of water, which
were descending all the time from the stone.
It required but a very few minutes to grind the
barrel to its proper shape. The workman had
a gage, or- instrument for measuring the. size
of the barrel, at short distances, along its whole
length. While grinding it he frequently drew
it out to apply his gage, until he had reduced
it to the proper size at every part.

In the same room with this machinery, there
was another grindstone, with grooves in the
circumference. This was used: for grinding
Turnine anv Borine. 107
Grinding bayonets,

bayonets. The edges of the bayonets fitted
into these grooves. The man who ground
them, sat on a seat at one end, and held the
bayonet which he was grinding against the
stone. It appeared to be hard and disagree-
able work. The stone revolved with great
velocity, and so great-was the friction, that a
long stream of sparks flew out from the bayo-
net, wherever it was applied to the stone, al-
though a stream of cold water from above was
kept constantly pouring upon the place. The
workman said that these monstrous stones,
‘were very dangerous. In the first place, the
stones themselves, in their original structure,
are not very strong, and in order to fasten
them securely upon their axles, they are wedg-
ed up very tightly. The effect of this is-to
strain them a great deal, so as to make them
almost ready to burst before they are put in
motion. Then when the water comes to be
poured on, the stone is softened and weak-
ened still more by the action of it, for the
stone must be kept deluged with water, while
they are grinding with it, in order to pre-
vent the friction from heating the steel, and
taking the temper out.

Thus it happened, they said, that the stonesnot
108 Tue Sprincrizetp Armory.
‘Bursting of the stones. ‘Mode of preventing this, ‘Polishing.

unfrequently flew in pieces, on account of the
swiftness of the rotary motion, and, in that case,
some of the fragments would be sometimes
driven through the roof of the building, or, per-
haps, kill the workman seated at it. He said,
however, that they had now an improved mode
of securing the grindstone to the axle, by which
this danger was very much lessened. In for-
mer times, they would put the stone upon the
axle, and then secure it in its place, by driving
wedges in between the axle and the. stone,
which, of course, tended to split the stone, or,
at least, to aid the centrifugal force in splitting
it. But now the stone was secured by large
plates of iron on each side, which were forced,
by means of wedges, against the sides of the
stone, thus securing the stone in a manner rath-
er calculated to bind it together, than to force
it open.

From the grinding room, they went into the
boring and polishing room, though they found
that the boring of the barrels, in fact, preceded
the turning; and in order, therefore, to have
seen the processes in their regular order, they
should have seen the boring first, then the turn-
ing, and, finally, the polishing. When Marco
Turnrine- ann Bortna. 109
Boring. ‘Machinery for boring.

saw the boring machinery, and was told what
it was for, he said,

« But Lthought that the barrels were made
hollow at the forge.”

“Yes,” said Forester, “they are hollow, but
they are necessarily left in a rough state, at the
forge. The interior has to be bored out and
polished, so as to make it smooth and true
throughout.”

Marco advanced with Forester to the ma-
chinery by which the barrels were bored. They
found ‘that there was a solid iron frame, like a
bedstead, a little more than twice as long as the
barrel, on which were bars; and wheels, and
rods, and systems of rack-work, too complica-
ted for Marco to understand. In the midst of
all the machinery, there were one or two bar-
rels, writhing, as if in pain, but neither revolv-
ing nor adyancing. A long rod issued from
each, and these rods were attached to wheels at
the top of the frame. Marco perceived that
these rods were revolving, and that the same
machinery which caused them to revolve, was
drawing them forward out of the barrel. He
watched one of them until it came out, when he
perceived that there was a sort of auger upon
the end of it, by which it had bored its way
110 Tue Spertnerrerp Armory.
The auger. ‘Forester and Marco look through a barrel.

through. The man then took another similar
rod, with an auger upon the end of it, like’ the
first, only it was a little larger; and, running it
through the barrel, he attached the end of it to
the proper machinery, at the head of the frame,
and then set the works in motion again, by
which the auger was drawn through slowly, but
with great force, turning round and round all
the time, so as to bore its way through,—the
barrel writhing under the operation as before.
On another frame, at a little distance from
this, other barrels were placed, and a different
instrument, being of the form of a square steel
rod, with sharp edges, was drawn through it,
revolving swiftly all the time. This smoothed
the interior, and removed all the marks left by
the auger. Near these works there were some
of the barrels that were finished,—that is, so far
as the bore was concerned, and the workman
held up one of them for Forester to look through.
Forester seemed much pleased with the appear-
ance of it, and held it for Marco. Marco
found, to his astonishment, that the interior was
highly polished, reflecting a high luster, and ex-
hibiting a curious succession of concentric
rings of great brightness. This resulted from
some optical illusion, which even Forester said
Turnine anv Borine. lll
‘Appearance. : “They work from within oats

the could not explain. The workman said he did
not know what caused the appearance of rings,
as there was nothing, in reality, corresponding
to them in the barrels—the bore being perfectly
uniform and smooth throughout the interior.
The outsides of these barrels were black and
rough, just as they came from the forge. They
had not yet been turned and ground.

Marco wished to know why they finished the
inside first. é

“That is a general principle, in turning,”
said Forester, “I believe,—to work from the
inside outward. If they should first turn and
polish the outside, and thén undertake to bore it
out, it would be very difficult to get the bore
exactly in the center.”

“Well,” said Marco, “and suppose it were
not exactly in the center ?”

« Then,” said Forester, “ the barrel would be
of greater thickness on one side than on the
other, and it would be in danger of bursting on
the thinnest side.”

“But,” said Marco, “they might make it so
thick, that even the thinnest side would be
strong enough.”

«“ True,” replied Forester, “ but then all the
extra thickness on the other side would be of no
1120 Tue Sperinerrerp ARMony.
“Guns thicker at the breech. ‘Explanation.

use. It would only add to the weight of the
gun, without being of any service; for the gun
could not be charged any more heavily than
the strength of the thinnest part would bear.
Therefore, to combine lightness with strength,
in the greatest degree, it is necessary to have
the thickness of the barrel the same all around,
and to have this thickness diminish toward the
muzzle, exactly in proportion to the diminution
in the force of the gunpowder, as the ball moves
along from one end to the other. Then the
barrel would be equally strong throughout, and
not more likely to burst in one place than in
another.”

“Very well,” said Marco, “I admit that ; but
I don’t see why they can not finish the outside
first, and then make the bore to correspond with
that, as well as to finish the bore first, and
then turn the outside to correspond with the
bore.”

“It is because,” said Forester, “ they can’t
control the boring as well as they can the turn-
ing. The boring tool must be long and slen-
der, in order to be passed through the barrel,
and of course it will easily spring, and yield
somewhat. If the outside of a cylinder were to
be turned true, and fixed precisely in the center
Turnine anv Bonina. 113
‘The dri. ‘Foresters reasoning.

-of the motion of the lathe, and then if a drill
Gould be made absolutely inflexible, it would
run through the center. But it is impossible to
realize these conditions.”

“I don’t know what you mean by reelizing
conditions,” said Marco.

“Why, making the circumstances such as
I have supposed. The drill will yield and
spring a little, especially if the cylinder is _al-
ready hollow, and is énly to be bored out mbre,
and made true. The inequalities in the interi-
or will force the drill or auger to one side or
the other, and thus render it impossible to con-
trol the boring. But after the boring is fin-
ished, then the barrel may be set in the lathe,
and chocked by the bore.”

«“Chocked by the bore?” asked Marco.

“ Yes,” said Forester, “that is, the pivots on
which it turns may pass into the bore, and as
the pivots are precisely in the center of the
motion of the lathe, the bore will be so too, and
then the outside.can be turned to correspond.
Because you see that on the outside there is
plenty of room, and the tool can be made very
massive and solid,so as to have no sensible
spring. ‘The reason why the boring tool can
not be made inflexible, is, that it must be long

4


114. Tue Spainertzrp Armory.
‘Carious machinery. ‘Carious and complicated nfotion,

and slender in order to pass into the bore.
‘There is not room for metal enough to make it
firm and unyielding. Therefore, in turning, it
is generally best to finish the hollow part first,
and then to make the exterior to conform to it.”

At this moment Marco’s attention was at-
tracted by a curious appearance at one end of
ihe room, and he advanced with Forester to see
what it was. It proved to be the machinery
for polishing the outsides of the barrels after they
were ground. It appeared that the barrels af-
ter being bored, as Marco had seen, were carried
into"the other shop to be turned and ground on
the outside, and were then brought back to be
polished in this shop again. There were two
machines for polishing, and gach had four gun-
barrels in it. The form of the machine was an
upright iron frame, and the barrels were placed
in it im a perpendicular position. The upper
ends were attached to wheels, by which they
were kept in constant fevolution, and these
wheels were also attached to a beam which as-
cended and descended continually, like the
beam over the piston rod of a steam-enginé, or
that which ca-ries the saw in asaw-mill. Thus
the barrels were alternately drawn up and
pushed down, continually revolving at the same


Turnine anv Borina. 115
‘Polishing the screws.

time. They passed in this manner between a
set of leather cushions, covered with oil and
emery,—a fine powdér used for polishing.
These cushions were pressed together by
springs, with the barrels between them, and
thus all the roughness of the iron, léft by the
grindstone, was gradually worn away, and the
barrels came out at last highly polished.

The smaller parts of the musket, such as the
screws, bands, and parts of the lock, were pol-
ished in a different manner,—by holding them
one by one against wheels, revolving with great
velocity, as Forester had said. There were a
great many of these wheels in one of the rooms,
with workmen seated before them polishing
small pieces of steel work. One of the work-
men said.that the wheels revolved from twelve
to fifteen hundred times per minute. This
would be about twenty times in a second.
Marco tried to whirl his hand around in the. air
as swiftly as he could, but he thought’ that he
did not succeed in making more than two or
three in a second. Long streams of sparks
issued from the emery wheels when’ the steel
was brought in contact with them.


116 Tue Sprinertenp Armory.
‘Tooting the work. “Faking a co



Cuarrer VIIL
InspEecTIon.

Tr an apartment connected with one of the
: water shops, Marco and Forester saw an
operation going on which was different, in its
very nature, from all which they had seen be-
fore. It was the operation of testing the work
after it was finished. The testing which they
saw, was that of the bayonet. A pile of bay-
onets lay before a workman on a bench, and he
was trying them, to see whether they were of
the proper temper and strength. o

‘The manner in which he tested the bayonets,
was this. He put them, one by one, upon a
gun, and then, striking the point a little into the
floor, he would spring it forcibly one way and
the other, to see if it would bear the necessary
strain. By this operation, the bayonet was
bent a little to one side or tothe other. This
was called taking a set. A piece of steel, or
iron, or brass, or any similar metal, may be bent
a little out of its natural position, and it will
spring back again, so as to take precisely the
Insrzcrion,



form which it had before. If it is bent, how-
ever, a little too far, it will not come entirely
back, but will remain bent. This is called
taking a set. Steel, highly tempered, may be
bent much more, without taking a set, than
brass or iron. This makes it suitable for
springs. Its elasticity is so- great, that it will
Gestore itself entirely from a very considerable
flexion.

The more highly tempered steel is, the less
easy it is to make it set, but then, the more
brittle it becomes. A file is very highly tem-
pered, and it can not be sef at all. If sprung a
very little from its proper position, it will spring
back again entirely. If sprung more, it will
break,—but it can not be bent so as to remain
bent.

A saw, on the other hand, is not tempered so
highly, and it may accordingly be bent so as to
take a set. Saws often get so’bent, by being
carelessly used, and thus they become crogked:
But by being thus tempered not so high, they
can not be so easily broken. A-saw will'not
snap off suddenly like a file, but, bent beyond
the point from which the steel is capable of re-
storing itself, the particles will yield a little, and
thus it will take a set. Now, though it is an
118° Tue Sperinorreny Armory.
“The proper temper for a bayonet. ‘A contrivance.

evil for a saw to take a set, since it makes it
crooked, it is a greater evil for it- to break in
two,—and therefore it is tempered in such a
manner as to bend a little, rather than break.
It is the same with the bayonet. It is desir-
able to have it elastic,—but then it must. not be
brittle. The workman tested the strength of
the bayonet, by springing it forcibly with the
point upon the floor, in the manner which has
been already explained. He tested its elasticity
in another way, which seemed to Marco very
ingenious. There
was & place fitted
at the end of the
bench, where he
could rest the neck
of the bayonet up-
2 on a solid support,
which was used as
a sort of fulcrum.
The point of the
bayonet was then
inserted into a loop
snermo Ta sarower, formed at the upper
endof awire,which
had attached to the lower end of it a heavy
weight of lead. Then, by bearing down upon


Insprorion. ~ . 119



es ere ee ee oe
the end of the gun, the lead was lifted, the whole
weight of it resting upon the-point of the bay-
onet. This weight was:so heavy that it bent
the bayonet down an inch or two, and when it
was let down again, the bayonet would spring
back nearly into its place, but not quite. It set
about a quarter of an inch. The man who was
examining the bayonets, said, that if they did
not set more than a quarter of an inch in lifting
such a weight, they were considered as passing
a satisfactory trial in respect to their elasticity.

After watching the process of testing the
bayonets in this manner, for some time, the
workman opened a box which was under the
bench, and showed them some which had been
condemned. One was broken in two in the
middle, not having had strength sufficient to
bear the violent strain which the workman had
given it, with the point upon the floor. Marco
took up the fragments and examined the frac-
tured surface, to see if he could discover the
cause of its breaking. There was a small dis-
colored spot, visible near one edge, which was
caused by a flaw in the iron. Another bayonet
was whole, and Marco could not see why it
was condemned. The workman, however,
pointed out to him an imperfection in the cor-
120. Tux Srrinerizup Armory.
“Work by tho plese Paving by the tm

ner, where the blade of the bayonet joins the
neck.

“Whose loss is it,” said Forester, “if the
blade is condemned ?”

«If it is owing to the workmanship,” said the
man, “it is the loss of the man who made it.
But if it arises from any flaw in the iron, he
does not lose it.”

«And is most of the work done by the
piece ?” said Forester.

Yes,” replied the man ; “and if it does not
stand inspection, the man loses it.”

Marco did not understand this conversation
very well, and he asked an explanation of For-
ester after they had left the shop. Forester
told him that paying by the piece, was paying
in proportion to the work done. “ For instance,
if a man is forging bayonets,” said he, “paying
him by the piece, is giving him a certain:sum
for every bayonet ‘he makes.”

« And what other way is there ?” said Marco.

“Why, they can be paid by the time,” said
Forester,—“ so much for a day’s work, for ex-
ample; whether they accomplish more or less.”

“I think it is better to pay by the piece,” said
Marco.

“Certainly,” replied Forester, “when the


Insrrorion. 121

‘Measurement of work. ‘Modo of paying workmen.

work is of such a kind that it can be aceurately
measured.”

« Well,” said Marco, “and can not all work
be accurately measured ?”

“No,” replied Forester; “for instance,
mending the roads in the spring, after they have
been washed by the rains, can not be measured,
There will, be much more injury done in some
places than in others,‘and the facilities for_get-
ting materials and repairing the injuries, will
vary much in different parts of the road. Then,
besides, there would be no way of deciding
when the work was properly done. A very.
accurate test of the elasticity of a bayonet can
be applied, by requiring that it should lift a cer-
tain weight, without setting more than a quarter
of an inch. But there would be no mode of
ascertaining precisely how much should be done
to the road. Therefore, persons employed in
mending the roads, must always be paid by
time.

“In almost all kinds of manufacturing estab-
lishments, however,” continued Forester, “ they
can estimate most of the work exactly, and, ac-
cordingly, they contract with the laborers to
pay in proportion to the work done. This is
altogether the best mode, and they always en-
122 Tue Serincrieup Armory.
Government works.

deavor to adopt it, especially in all great estab-
lishments, where the men would be very likely
to be idle if they were paid by the time. It
would be so more particularly in a government
establishment, like the Springfield armory.”

“Is the Springfield armory a government
establishment ?” asked Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester, “it all belongs to
the government of the United States. It is in-
tended solely for manufacturing muskets for
their armies. The government have built the
shops, and put in the machinery, and they em-
ploy the workmen to do the work, and pay them
all according to the work they do, provided it
is done so well as to pass inspection.”

“Why is it more important,” asked Marco,
“for a government to employ its men to work
in this way, than for a private individual ?”
——* Because,” replied Forester, “if a private
individual employs persons to work for him, and
is going to pay them by the time, he can over-
see them himself, and know whether they are
industrious or not. But a government can not
do this. It can not be present itself, but must
act through agents; and agents are never so
faithful as principals. Therefore, governments
and corporations always avoid paying men by
InsrectTion. 123

“Corporations. —SSS~—sSCSCSCSCSC*CiR gl oS
time, if it is possible to systematize the work so
as to measure it, and to pay in proportion to the
work done.”

«* What are corporations ?” asked, Marco.

“Where a large number of men combine to
carry on any great enterprise in common, they
form an association, called corporation. Now
a corporation, like a government, can not be
present to oversee its work. They must depend
upon agents, and they, therefore, are very re-”
luctant to employ men and pay them by the
time. Railroads are commonly made by cor-
porations, and the directors are very unwilling
to pay laborers by the time that they are em-
ployed. A great deal of the work which the
laborers do, is grading the road, which is a very
difficult kind of work to measure, because it
consists of digging away, or filling up very
irregular pieces of ground ; still they take pains
to measure it, and employ men to do it, by pay-
ing them so much per square yard for all that
they remove.”

“Is there any other kind of work, ”’ said Mar-
co, “ which can not be estimated, so that people
have to pay by the time, as they do for mending
the roads ?””

“Yes,” said Forester, “all kinds of farm
124 Tue Srrinogrrenrp Armory.
Farmers’ work. Trrogularity of farming work.
work. Ifa farmer hires men to work upon his
farm, he pays them by the time they labor,—by
the day, the month, or the year. He can not
pay by the work done, for the work is so ir-
regular and variable, that it can not be measured
or estimated.”

“Why, he might pay them so much,” said
Marco, “for hoeing so many rows of corn, or
for plowing so much land.”

- « No,” said Forester, “ for the work of hoeing
and plowing will vary exceedingly, according
as the ground is hard or mellow, or more or less
encumbered with stones and weeds. Then a
great proportion of the other work on a farm, it
would be still more
difficult to meas-
ure; for instance,
digging out great
¢ stones to clear a
© field. A farmer
might set his hands
at work to dig out
. @ stone without

_ knowing at all
whether it would
zi take an hour or

TaRMEns WORK three’ to accom-





InsPucrion. 125
‘Farmers’ management. Cost of machinery.

plish it. Therefore, a farmer, if he hires a la-
borer, must pay by the time. This is one rea-
son why men can not well carry on a farm to
advantage by hired labor. They can not meas-
are the labor, and pay for it, according to the
amount of work which is done. Still, the far-
mer has one great advantage, which the corpo-
ration has not. He can work with his men and
oversee them all the time ; and when working
with him, in his presence, they are much more
industrious and faithful. But if a man under-
takes to manage a farm by hired laborers, with-
out laboring with them himself, the difficulty
becomes very great. He almost always fails in
his experiment.” k

« IT saw one man,” said Marco, “in one of the
shops, who was making little screws. They
were the little screws used in making the lock:
He said there were seven different operations
to be performed on each screw, and that each
one had a separate. machine for performing it ;
so that it took seven engines to make one little
screw.”

“Yes,” said Forester, “ and not unlikelf each
engine may have cost a hundred dollars.

“Aud there was the forging, besides,’
Marco.

said


126 Tus Sprinorrerp Armory.
“Advantage of uniformly.

“Yes,” said Forester ; “so that, perhaps, five
hundred or a thousand dollars may be invested
in machinery, all of which is necessary to make
one screw. This would be an expensive way
if only one screw was required,—but when
they have so many to make, it is the cheapest
way, because, by means of all this machinery,
they can make them very fast. And that is not
the only advantage. They can not only make
them fast, but by being made in machines, they
are all precisely alike. This is a great advan-
tage ; for they can send some spare screws with
muskets when they go into the army, and then,
if one gets lost or broken in any lock, they can
at once replace it. Any one of the spare screws
will exactly fit the place of the lost one.”’

“Or if two locks get broken,” said Marco,
“in different places, they can put the parts of
one with those of the other, and so get one good
lock out of the two.” ue

“ Yes,” said Forester. “There is, however,
one inconvenience in having machinery to make
all these parts of the musket, and that is, that
they can not make any change in the pattern of
the musket, without'a great expense ; for all
machinery which was, adapted to making the
parts according to the old pattern, becomes


Insreorion. 127
The finishing shops

useless, and they must construct new and ex-
pensive engines to correspond with the new
pattern. So it. becomes a great work to intro-
duce any new and improved modes of construc-
tion.”

During this conversation, Marco and Fores-
ter had been walking slowly along toward the
high land, where the finishing shops of the ar-
mory and the storehouses were, around the
great square, on the plain above Springfield, as
explained in the third chapter. By this time
these buildings appeared in’ sight, and our two
travelers advanced toward them, much inter-
ested to know what new objects of curiosity
they were to find in this part of the establish-
ment.
128 Tue Sperinerrenyn Armory.
“The forging shops. ________ Garfous anvils.

Cuarren IX.”
Tue Arsznan.

ye first building to which Forester con-

ducted Marco, at this part of the works,
was near the north-west corner of the square.
On-entering it, they found a very long, spacious
apartment, with a double row of forges extend-
ing through the middle of it. The floor was
paved with flat stones. The walls and ceiling
were neatly whitewashed. Over each forge
was a pair of blacksmith’s bellows. There were
men working at several of the forges, and For-
ester and Marco advanced to see what they
were doing.

Instead of the simple anvil and hammer, used
by blacksmiths for common work, they found
that much more complicated apparatus was
used here. . There was at each forge a large
anvil, but the surface, instead of being flat and
level, as usual with anvils, had upon it a varie-
ty of depressions and perforations ; and there
were also by the side of each, what Marco was
disposed to call little anvils, but which the
THe Arsena 129

‘Operations. ‘Tho jamper.





workmen told him were called stakes. These
stakes had excavations and depressions sunk in
them, of various irregular forms, the use of
which Marco did not at first understand.

At the first forge to which Marco approached,
a workman was heating the end of a long iron
rod. . When it was heated, he put it over one
of these stakes, in such a manner that the hot
iron would lie in one.of the depressions. There
was another piece of steel placed over the stake,
and supported in a peculiar manner, which
could be struck with a hammer from above,
and driven down upon the stake. This was
called a jumper ; for it would jump up in a cu-
rious way after it was driven down. Now
there was a depression in the under side of the
jumper, corresponding to the one on the upper
side of the stake, in such a manner that when
the two were brought together, a cavity was
left between them, of such a form as that the
piece which they were going to forge would
exactly fit into. By this contrivance, it was
easy to‘forge the most irregular parts of the
gun-lock. They had only to heat the end of
the iron rod, and insert it while, hot, between
the stake and the jumper: - Then by striking
repeated blows upon the jumper with the ham-

I
130 Tue Serinerisup ArMoRY.
‘Various forgings. Other shops. (Gun-stocks,

mer, the hot metal would be forced into the
cavity between them, in such a manner as to
take its exact form.

In some cases it was necessary to perform
more than one operation upon the same piece.
One part would be formed between one stake
and jumper, and then it would be heated again,
and the other part fashioned by another. The
stakes, and jumpers, and other similar appara-
tus, were, of course, all different at the different
forges ; each forge being designed for some par-
ticular part of the lock. At some forges the
work to be performed was making screws; at
others springs; at another, what was called the
tumbler, which is a part of the lock, of a very
irregular’shape. Marco was very much inter-
ested to see how easily all these various forms
were produced by means of this contrivance
of a stake and jumper.

From this forging shop Marco and Forester
went to other large buildings where various ope-
rations, connected with finishing the locks and
guns were going on. In one room men were
employed in smoothing over the gun-stocks, tak-
ing them as they came from the lathes in the
stocking-shop. Others were fitting the locks to
the stocks, or rather cutting away the wood in
Tue Arsenat. 131
‘Making the locks.



such a manner ‘as that the locks would fit.
They went into one long chamber which had
benches all around it, where workmen were
employed in jéling and finishing the small parts
of thé lock which they had seen forged in the
forging shop.

In this apartment, Marco observed that each
bench seemed to be fitted for one particular
branch of work ; and it had its vice, its tools,
and its patterns, adapted to that, and to that
alone. The patterns were made of steel, and
the workmen filed the work to correspond with
them exactly. Here each man was employed
in finishing a great many pieces of the same
kind, and he made
them all as exactly
alike as possible.

In one part of ;
this room a man |
was engaged in
putting these pieces
together, to make
the locks complete...
He had a long box
before him, divided
into many com-
partments. These MaAxING UP THE rocks. ~


ws2 Tue Serincrietp Armory.
“SDivision of labor. ‘Advantage of it.

compartments had the several parts of the
lock in them, a great many of one kind being
in each part. The workman would take up
one piece of each kind, and put them together,
to make a lock. In doing this, he had to file
them down a little sometimes, to fit them
exactly to their places. If the holes which
the screws were to go into, were not quite
large enough, he would bore them out larger,
and Marco was astonished to see how easi-
ly he would cut and bore the solid brass and
iron. It took but a very short time to put ‘one
set of the parts together to_make a lock.

As they walked away from this place, Fores-
ter said that it afforded a very fine example
of what was called division of labor.

« What is meant by that ?” said Marco.

“Why, you see,” replied Forester, “that in
making a lock,they divide the work into a great
many parts, and give each man only one small
part to do. . They construct tools and instru-
ments expressly for that part, and as the man
has nothing else to do, he acquires great expert-
ness in doing the particular thing assigned to
him. The other plan would be to let each man
be employed in making a whole lock. In that
case the work would be done to great disad-
Tue ARrsENAL. 133

‘Watural talent, Forester’s explanations.

vantage ; for, in the first place, each man must
have a complete set of fixtures and tools for all
the different kinds of work, and thet he must
constantly change from one kind of work to
another, and thus lose time. Besides, by having
to learn a great many different kinds of work,
he could not be so skillful in any. But, on this
plan, each man has only to learn one or two
operations, and these he learns perfectly, and
he naturally falls into such operations as he has
the most natural talent for.”

«I never heard of natural talent for work,”
said Marco.

«There is talent for work,” said Forester.
“Men have different talents or capacities for
different kinds of mechanical works. -One man
has excellent success, for example, in tempering
edge tools. He has a certain nice power of
perception, which enables him to regulate the
process exactly, and temper the steel at precisely
the right heat. Another has not that peculiar
quickness of eye for this, but has a good capa-
city for judging of form; and so he makes a
good filer. He will file a piece into the true
shape, in a much shorter time, perhaps, than
the one who is so skillful in tempering. There
is as much variety in the bodily system as there
134 Tae Sprinerizenp Armory.
“Sapam Ca comin

is in ‘the mental, and it makes as great a differ-
ence in the powers.and capacities of men, in
regard to their fitness for different mechanical
pursuits, as the difference in intellectual genius
makes in their fitness for the professions, or
other mental employments. I have heard it
said, by printers, that some men can never make
rapid Gompositors.”

«What are compositors ?” asked Marco.

«Those that set up the types,” said Forester.
“Composing, is setting types. The compositor
has the copy before him, and a box inclined
toward him, like a desk, with small partitions in
it, and each compartment has one kind of type.
Now the compositor looks at a word, notices
the letters, and then takes the types up one by
one from the various compartments. The
philosophy of it is this. The image of a letter
in his eye produces an effect on the nerve,
which is communicated to the brain, and thence
to his mind. Then there arises in his mind an
idea of the compartment where that letter be-
longs, and the nerve leading to the arm pro-
duces the proper motion to carry the hand to
the proper compartment. You see it is, in fact,
quite a complicated process,—partly bodily and
partly mental. Now this process is completed
Tue Arsenar. 135
Netural differences among men. ‘Tho central building.



much quicker with some persons than with
others. It is owing to some peculiar-and hid-
den difference in the-nerves, or brain, or mus-
cles, by which the mechanism in some cases
acts quickly, and in others more slowly. But
those persons in whom these nervous commu-
nications are made more slowly, are not necés-
sarily inferior to the others, for they may have
the advantage in some other power of body or
mind, which more than counterbalances this.
For instance, one person may hear or see
quicker than another ; but the second may hear
more correctly than the first. One may have
such a bodily constitution, that his sense of
touch is very nice—another has correct ideas
of form, another of sounds, and thus all vary.
Thus, different workmen are fitted to different
processes and employments; and by adopting
the system of division of labor, each after a time
falls into the one which is most adapted to his
powers; and so he works to the greatest ad-
vantage in doing always what he can do easiest
and best.”

Not long after this, Forester and Marco went
into the central building, on the main front of
the square, which Forester said was the office
and counting-house, and asked a gentleman,
186. Tue Sreinerisnp Armory.

“The arsenal. Interior of tie room.

who was there at a desk, if they could go into
the arsenal. The arsenal was one of the large
buildings where the muskets were stored after
they were finished. They had been told by
some of the workmen that the arsenal was
locked, but that if they went to the office, a
gentleman would go with them, and let them
see it. As there was nobody at work in the
arsenal, it was customary to keep it locked.
The gentleman in-the office said he would go
with them ; so taking a key, and putting on his
hat, he followed them out.

*He conducted them along a gravel walk,
which led between two rows of trees, toward.
the center of the square, and after advancing:
for some distance in that direction, he turned at
right angles into another walk, which conducted
them across that part of the square, toward the
front door of the arsenal.

He unlocked the door, and ushered Forester
and Marco into the apartment. They were
both struck with astonishment at the imposing
spectacle which was presented to their view.
Except the necessary space for passages, the
room was entirely filled with muskets. The
muskets were arranged, with the most ‘perfect
precision and svmmetrv. in an upright position.


Taz ArsEeNnay 137
‘The guns and bayonets. ‘Symmetrical arrangement

the butts resting in frames made for the pur-
pose, and raised at a little distance from the
floor. The tops of the bayonets reached nearly
to the ceiling. The dark and glossy brown
color of the stocks, with the highly polished
luster of the bayonets, and other metallic parts,
gave to each individual gun a very beautiful
appearance ; but, in addition to this, there was
a@ most surprising effect produced by the im-
mense numbers and admirable arrangement of
the whole. The rows of bayonets glittered in a
long perspective. Even the locks, and the ram-
rods, and the sights upon the barrels, and, in
fact, every single part of the gun, were pre-
sented to the eye, in long ranges, extending up
and down the room. The guns were placed on
the frames only about half an inch apart, and
yet so precise was the arrangement, that, by
standing at one end of the room, and looking
through, Marco could see the window at the
other end, through any one of these crevices, at
a hundred and twenty feet distance, which was
the length of the room. The room was a hun-
dred and twenty feet long, and forty feet wide ;
and there was another in the second story, of

the same dimensions, and filled in the same
manner.
138 Tue Serincriznp Armory.
“Abundred thousend muskets. —=—=s=S=~=~*~“~*s~*S:C~S*SO tho otal.

Forester asked the gentleman who conducted
them to the arsenal, how many muskets there
were in the building; he said, nearly a hundred
thousand. These were allready foruse. They
had to be taken down and oiled, he said, every
few years, to keep the bright parts from rusting.
They could be very easily taken out of their
places, as they were not fastened in in any way.
The gentleman took one of them out, to show
how easily it could be removed.

After admiring this beautiful spectacle a few
minutes, Forester and Marco thanked the gen-
tleman for his kindness, and went away. As
they had now completed their survey of all the
shops and buildings, they left the grounds, and
went down into the village ‘of Springfield to
their hotel.
Dancer or ezine ARMED. 139
‘Going to Boston. ‘Tho carriage. ‘They roach the station.

Cuarren X.
Tae Dancer or seine ARMED.

HEN Forester and Marco had finished
their examination of the armory, Mar-
co began to consider, in pursuance of the plan
which Forester had adopted of allowing him to
have the whole direction of the journey, what
arrangements he should make for going to Bos-
ton. He decided, at once, to go by the western
railroad. He knew very well that the great
western railroad from Boston to Albany, passed
through Springfield; and he very naturally in-
ferred, that he could.take that railroad, and go
directly to Boston. He asked what time the
cars came in, and they told him about noon.
He accordingly made arrangements to have a
carriage take them to the depot at that time.
There was one thing very excellent in Mar-
co’s traveling arrangements, and that was, the
principle of always being in ample season. On
this occasion, they reached the depot about
twenty minutes before the usual time for the
ears to arrive, and while they were waiting


140 Tue Srarincrizrnp ARrmMoRY.
‘Marco talies, Forestor is silent.



there, seated upon a settee in the gentlemen’s
room, they spent the time in conversation.

Marco had been very much: interested in the
admirable system and order which prevailed in
all parts of the armory ; and he had been as-
tonished at the vast accumulation of arms, which
he saw must exist inthe arsenals. After con-
versing with Forester on various other topics,
he began to talk about this; but Forester did
not appear to take much notice of what he said.

“It must cost a great deal of money,” said
he, “to make such .an immense number of
muskets.”

Forester did not answer.

“And it must take a great deal of time and
trouble to keep them all safe and in order.”

Forester said, “Yes,” faintly; but yet he
seemed to be thinking of something else.

«But I think it is an excellent plan,” said
Marco, “notwithstanding ; don’t you, cousin
Forester ?”

«Cousin Forester!” repeated Marco, when
he found that his cousin did not answer ; “don’t
you think it is a good plan to make all these
muskets ? and then when the enemy comes to
fight us, we shall be ready for them.”

« Why, to tell the truth,” said Forester, “1


Dancer or petnc ARMED. 14.

‘Tho railway station.

was thinking of something else. Let me see
your tickets.” Marco had gone, when they
first got to the office, and bought two Boston
tickets, one for himself, and one for Forester.
Marco handed these tickets to Forester. In
the mean time, the bustle in. the great house,
Glose adjoining the office, had been for some
minutes rapidly increasing. Heavy trains of
cars moved slowly one way or the other ; some:
times pushed by men, and sometimes drawn by
a locomotive. Passengers were coming and



TRE RAILWAY STATION
142 Tue Sperinorizrp ArmMorRY.
Mystery.



going in considerable numbers, and at this mo-
ment a bell was heard to ring. . A conductor
also came to them, and asked them which way
they were going. -

«On the western railroad,” said Marco,
promptly. ~

«The western cars are ready,” said the con-
ductor. :

So Marco and Forester rose, and Marco led
the way toward the cars—Forester and the con-
ductor following. Marco heard them talking
together about something, on the way, but he
could not tell what, on account of the noise and
bustle which surrounded them ; and presently
they took their seats comfortably in the cars.

Now Marco unfortunately forgot, that, though
the railroad between Boston and Albany is all
called the western railroad, at Boston, yet at
Springfield, a part of it extends toward the east-
ward, and it was this eastern part which he
ought to have taken, in order to be conducted.
to Boston. But as Marco said that he was go-
ing on the western railroad, the conductor sup-
posed that they were going to Albany, and he
put them into the western cars accordingly ; su
that as soon as the train began to get fairly un-
der way, Marco was carrying the party under
Dancer ofr seine. ARMED. 143
‘Conversation resumed. Going armed.

his charge, at the rate of twenty miles an hour,
in a ‘direction exactly contrary to the one in
which they wanted to go.

Forester understood all this, but made no ex-
planation, and so they went on. After a few
minutes’ pause, he said,

“You were asking me, Marco, about the wis-
dom of manufacturing all these muskets.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “so as to have them
ready.”

“T don’t know: myself,” replied Forester,
“whether it is a good plan or not. It takes a
statesman to judge safely about measures for
the defense of nations. But as far as I can see
into the subject, I should think there was some
doubt about it.

“Why ?” asked Marco.

“It generally makes men quarrelsome to go
armed,” said Forester; “and I did not know
but that it might possibly have the same effect
among nations. In some countries it is the cus-
tom for almost every gentleman to carry some
deadly weapon about him—as a little dirk or
dagger, or a pistol; and in such countries, quar-
rels, and murders, and assassinations, are gene-
rally very frequent.”

“What countries are they ?” asked Marco.


144 Tur Sprinorizup Armory.
oct of the practice of going armed. ‘A mapposition

“Why, this was the practice in almost all
countries, a century or two ago, I believe,” re-
plied Forester ; “and the custom continues to
this day, in some places ; and wherever it does
continue, a great many quarrels, duels, and
murders, take place. Where persons wear
dirks, or bowie-knives, or pistols, ready to pull
out at a moment’s warning, it is apt to make
them fierce in spirit, boastful and revengeful.”

“But then,” said Marco, “they know that
every body else is armed, and I should think
that that would make them keep civil.”

“No,” replied Forester, “it does not have
that effect. Each one has an exaggerated idea
of his own skill and power, and thinks that, ina
fight, he should come off conqueror ; and so he
is always ready to give provocation and to re-
sent provocation. But where nobody goes
armed, serious quarrels are very rare.

“You can easily see how it must be,” con-
tinued Forester, “by the case of boys. Sup-
pose fifty boys were amusing themselves upon
a green; and while they were engaged in play-
ing ball, or some other peaceable sport, suppose
that a pedler should come along with a bundle
of little whips,-fifty in the bundle, and the boys
should each buy one, and then go back to their
__Daneer or neinco Anmup. 145
‘Whips in the hands of boys —=sS—=~=~“~*~s*~‘~*~*~“‘“ts‘“‘“‘*~*‘S

play; it is very easy to see that there would
probably soon be difficulty.”

« Yes,” said’ Marco, “I suppose there would.”

«“ The boys,” continued Forester, “ would run
about, snapping and brandishing their whips at
one another, in a threatening manner. In fact,
the very possession of a whip would produce a
sort of instinctive desire to use it, and it would
be very likely that although they might all
have been very peaceable and harmonious be-
fore, there would several serious quarrels arise
out of this unlucky arming of themselves with
whips.”

“Yes,” said Marco; “whips are very apt to
make difficulty among boys.”

« Now it is somewhat so with men,” rejoined
Forester. ‘When a man gets a new. patent
revolving pistol, which will discharge six bul-
lets in as many seconds, ‘the possession of it
awakens a sort of desire to try it. ‘ There,’
says he to himself, ‘I should like to see a robber
attack me now ;’ or ‘if any body wishes to in-
sult me now, let him come on.’ Thushis mind
assumes a belligerent attitude, ready to take of-
fense at any provocation.”

«What is belligerent ?” asked Marco.

“ Warlike,” replied Forester.

K
146 Tue Serinerrerp Armory.

‘The arming of nations, ‘The argument in favor of le

«“ Now I think it probable,” continued Fores-
ter, “that it is somewhat so with nations. Ifa
government has just finished some very superi-
or ships of war, or has got an immense army all
finely organized and armed, I should think it
likely it would not be quite so patient and for-
bearing as if it were unarmed. At any rate, I
am quite sure that if all the nations would dis-
band their armies, and destroy their stores of
arms and ammunition, reserving only an amount
of physical power sufficient to preserve internal
order, the peace of the world would be much
more secure than it is now. Every body ad-
mits this; but then they say that the nations
generally will not do this, and that it-is not safe
for any one to go defenseless while the rest
are armed.”

«So I should think,” said Marco.

«Iam not certain about that myself,” said
Forester. “If a peaceful traveler goes to a
country where people are generally armed, he
does not arm himself, but passes to and fro
among the dirks and bowie-knives, as safe as
any of those that are armed. He is not as safe
as he is at home, but he is safe as any man can
be in a community where he is so surrounded
with deadly weapons.
Dawnezer or seine ArnmeEp. 147
‘Marco?



opinion. ‘Objections to shooth



robbers,

“If I were going to travel among robbers,”
said Marco, “I should certainly get some pis-
tols.”” :

“Why, even that would be doubtful,” said
Forester. “If you were attacked, it is very
likely that pistols would do you more harm than
gone”

« How ?” asked Marco.

“ Why, not being used to fights and firings,
you would feel a kind. of excitement and trepi-
dation, and would-not act coolly enough. Per-
haps you would fire too quick—before you had
proper aim; or else you would wait so long,
that, while you were aiming, the robber, seeing
that you were going to try to shoot him, would
shoot you, or cut you down with a sword ;
whereas, if you had offered no resistance, he
would probably only have robbed you, without
taking your life. To shoot a defenseless man,
is very easy,—but to shoot a robber, who comes
up to attack you, completely armed himself,
and on the alert, is very difficult. It requires
great coolness, steadiness, and precision, to act
in such a case exactly right, and exactly at the
right instant. And then, if you exercise all this
coolness and firmness, and act exactly right,
and shoot one robber,—ten to one there will be
148 Tae Srrinertern ArMoRY.
‘Maroo’s argument.





‘Tho killing a man alws

another, or a gang of them, who will immedi-
ately kill you in revenge; whereas, if you had
been unarmed, they would probably have only
taken your money, and let you go.”

« No,” said Marco; “I think they would kill
me.”

«I think not,” said Forester. ‘ Robbers sel-
dom murder those whom they rob,
think they are compelled to do it
of the resistance they make, or for
cause.”

unless they
on account
some other

« Well,” said Marco, “I suppose if there was
a gang of them, it wouldn’t be of any use; but
if there was only one, I think I could shoot
him.”

“You might possibly,” said Forester ; “but
even that would injure you more than it would
him; for if you should succeed in wounding
him badly, it would be a horrid sight to see a
wretched man writhing in convulsions on the
ground, and biting the dust in agony; and it
would be a great many years before you could
get it out of your mind. It would make you
gloomy and miserable while awake, and visions
of it would terrify you in your dreams. The
indignation and anger which you felt when you
shot at him, would be changed into pity and
Dancur or seine ArmeEp. 149
Painful Ghowghis._ ~___Minreo convinced.

compassion for him when you saw him in
misery. Perhaps he would linger several days
in extreme suffering, and you would watch him
and inquire after him day after day, and wish
that death would come and put an end to his
pain. You would begin to imagine excuses for
him. ‘You would think that perhaps he had
been neglected when a boy, and had never been
taught to be honest and true,—or that he had a
wife and children perishing for food, and that
he had no way of earning a supply for them.
These thoughts wauld add to your anguish ;
and you would perhaps wish that you had given
up double the sum that he would have taken
from you, rather than to have shot him. Even
if your sense of his guilt remained unchanged,
and you were satisfied that he deserved to die,
you would wish that you had left it to somebody
else to be his executioner.”

Marco said nothing in reply to these remarks.
The view of the subject, which Forester thus
presented, was new and unexpected to him.
He saw, however, very plainly, that it was a
correct one, and he was rather inclined to come
to the conclusion, that if a traveler was so un-
fortunate as to be compelled to choose between
the two evils of suffering a robbery or commit-
150 Tur Srrincrizup Armory.

‘Case of a nation. Tmporiant difference.

ting a homicide, it would be best, on the whole,
to submit to the former. At any rate, he saw
very clearly that Forester would rather be roh-
bed than shoot a robber.

«« However,” said Forester, at length, “to re-
turn to the subject; I think it is best for an
individual to go unarmed, whether other people
do or not. But in regard to a nation, the case
is very different, in one respect, at least; and
so I don’t decide that question.”

“In what respect is it different ?” asked
Marco.

“Why, when an unarmed individual is
among others that are armed,” said Forester,
“he has the laws of the country to protect him.
There are courts and officers of justice, which
have all the individuals in the community under
their control, whether armed or unarmed ; and
these powers of government preserve the peace
and protect the defenseless. If a defenseléss
man is attacked in the street in such a country,
he has only to call out ‘ watch,’ and there are
plenty of men ready to run to his rescue, fully
empowered to protect him, if it is possible to do
it. But nations have no such system of general
law and government over them. There is a
general system of law, commonly recognized
Dancer or peinc ARMED. 151

‘Tmmense expense of public armaments.



and acknowledged, called the law of nations ;
but there is no government to execute it.
Every nation has to execute the law of nations
for itself. If a man in a country where people
generally go armed, concludes no longer to go
armed, and throws his pistol away, he does not,
by any means, throw away all the physical pro-
tection he has. He still reserves his claim to
the force of the police and the officers of justice,
who stand always ready. But if a nation were
to disband its armies, and destroy its arms and
ammunition, it would give up the whole—for
there is no power above it to afford protection.
This makes the case of nations essentially dif-
ferent ; and I don’t know enough about it to
judge what the effect would be of a nation giv-
ing up its defenses in time of peace. One thing
I know, and that is, it would save an enormous
expense by doing so, and it seems to me that
what it would save in time of peace, would be
of more use in money, in case a war should
break out, than what was left of the preparations
they had been making; for a great deal of the
amount expended is lost and consumed year by
year, and does no good. Then the way of con-
structing arms, and ships, and forts, changes
from time to time, and thus many expensive
152 Tue Serinerretp Armory.

Forester in doubt. Marco alarmed. _. Distance to Worcester.

preparations become uséless, by being super-
seded, before they can.be used. If I could meet
ith some intelligent politician, I would ask
him what amount our government has expended
for warlike preparations, since the last war, and
what it is all worth now.”

Marco said that he should like to know very
much, and then asked Forester what time he
thought that they should get to Worcester. He
knew that Worcester was between Springfield
and Boston, as any of our readers can see by
looking upon a map.

“I don’t know,” said Forester. “I think it
is very doubtful when we shall see Worcester
again.”

«Why, how far is it to Worcester ?” said
Marco.

« From here,” said Forester, “and in the way
we are going ?” :

« Yes,” said Marco.

“If we keep On always in the same course by
the compass, it may be about fifteen thousand
miles; but if we go in a straight line, about
twenty-four thousand. It would be just once
round the world, minus fifty miles !’”

«Round the world!” exclaimed Marco, in
astonishment.


Daneer or seine ARMED. 153
‘Pho explanati





Irregular work.

“Yes,” said Forester, coolly. ‘“ Worcester
is east from here; and we.are going west.
These cars are going to Albany.”

Marco started up in amazement, and was
going to run to the conductor, to get him to stop
the train, but Forester advised him to sit down,
and keep quiet. He then explained to him=the
cause of his mistake.

\._« And why did not you tell me before ?” asked
Marco.

“Because,” said Forester, “I thought it
would be a good joke, and that you wouldn’t
care much. We can go to Vermont through
Albany, as well as through Boston. It was only
by mistake that we got into Massachusetts at
all, and now, by this second accident, we shall
get back again upon our original route.” 3

“Yes,” said Marco, “only my tickets won’t
do; I bought Boston tickets.” So he began to
feel in his pockets for his tickets, but Forester
told him that he need not trouble himself about
them.

“When I saw,” said he, “that you were
coming into these cars, I handed the tickets to
the conductor, before we got in, and he ex-

changed them for me, and gave me checks, and
here they are.”


154 Tae Sertncrietn Armory.
Navigation mysteries.

After Marco had in some measure recovered
from his surprise, he asked Forester what he
meant by saying, “that if they went round the
world by the compass it would be fifteen thou-
sand miles; but if they went in a straight line,
it would be twenty-four thousand. I should
think,” said he, “ that going in the same course
by the compass, would be going in a straight
line.”

“No,” said Forester ; “going by the com-
pass, is not going straight, except in some par-
ticular cases. If werset out to go exactly west
from here, we should go round the world on a
parallel of latitude, keeping always at the same
distance from the pole. But if we keep on.in
the same absolute direction, we should go round
upon a great circle, and thus pass entirely round
the world.”

«I don’t understand it very well,” said Marco.

«I can make it very plain,” said Forester,
“with a globe. I willshow you, when we have
an opportunity to see a globe.”

Just then the cars began to go slower, and
presently they stopped at a little village, where
an orange girl came in with a basket of oranges
for sale. Forester bought two,—one for Marco
and one for himself; and he made Marco’s
Danerr or serne Armep. 155
Forester buys a model of the world.

which was the biggest, answer very well for a
globe, so far as was necessary to explain to him
the difference between going round the world
on the forty-second parallel of north latitude,
which is about the parallel that they were then
on, and going on a great circle. The one would
keep them on the north side of the equator, all
the way, about equi-distant from the equator
and the pole, while the other would carry them
to. the antipodes.

After this, the cars were soon in motion again,
and they went on their way. Marco met with
no farther mishaps till they reached the end of
their journey.
156 Tum Srrinerieup Armory.



‘Various Kinds of firearms. ~ Foresters enumeration,

Cuarrer XI.
Onpwancs.

QP the course of their travels in going to Ver-

mont, Marco and Forester fell into con-
versation one day on the general. subject of
arms and military engines.

“They don’t seem to make any thing but
muskets at Springfield,” said Marco, “ but there
are a great many other kinds of weapons and
things used in war, are there not ?”

“Oh yes,” said Forester, “a great many
kinds.”

“ What are they ?” asked Marco.

“Oh,” replied Forester, “ they are almost in-
numerable. There are cannons, and mortars,
and howitzers, and carronades, and bomb-shells,
and petards, and grenades, and Congreve rock-
ets, and pistols, and crackers, and torpedos, and
squibs.”

Marco laughed at this long enumeration of
the means of war, beginning so terribly and yet
ending with squibs. He asked Forester to ex-
Oxpnanos. 157
Bquibs. ‘A mortar. ‘Tho shel, ‘The oxplosion.

plain the things to him,—all except the squibs.
He knew what squibs were already, he said.

“And ‘you know what cannon are?” said
Forester.

« Yes,” said Marco ; “ but I don’t know what
@ mortar is.”

«A mortar is something like a cannon,” re-
plied Forester, “ only it is made to. throw bomb-
shells instead of solid balls.”

«“ And what are bomb-shells ?” asked Marco ;
« you had better tell me what they are first.”

“They are large iron balls,” said Forester—
“some of them a great deal bigger than your
head, and hollow. The inside is filled with
gunpowder, so as to explode and burst the ball
all to pieces. There is a hole through the iron,
where they put the powder in. "When the shell
is filled with powder they stop up the hole, put-
ting into it what they call a fuse, which com-
municates with the powder within.”

«That is to set the powder on fire, I sup-
pose,” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester. “And the fuse is
regulated to burn a certain number of seconds.
‘They fire the bomb-shell into the air, and it falls
down upon the town or fort that they are bom-
barding. By the time that it comes down. the
158 Tur Srprinerrerp Armory.

Blowing up houses. ‘Women and children.

fuse has burned out, and the powder in the
bomb-shell explodes and bursts the shell all to
pieces. The piecessometimes kill a great many
men.”

“Yes,” said Marco, “I should think they
would.”

«If the bomb-shell falls upon a house,” added
Forester, “it breaks through the roof and all
the floors, and goes down into the cellar, where
it bursts and tears the house all to pieces.”

«Hi—yi!” said Marco. “I should like to
see it.”

«Perhaps the house belonged to some man,”
said Forester, “ who had been working all his
life to earn it, for a home for himself and his
children ;—and perhaps he and his wife and
children were all in it when it was blown to
pieces.”

“ But why did he not go away ?” asked Mar-
co, “before the bomb-shell came.”

“Perhaps they would not allow him to go
away,” replied Forester. “When an army
comes up to a town and summons the authorities
to surrender, the authorities sometimes refuse,
determining to defend themselves, and they ask
permission of the enemy to remove their wives
OrpNANCE. 159



‘Women and children not ajlowed to ray. =
and children before the attack begins. But the
enemy will not allow them to do so.”

« Why not?” asked Marco. He was much
surprised at this statement, for he could not
conceive that any generous enemy could wish
to murder helpless women and children.

“The reason why they will not allow the
women and children to go away,” replied For-
ester, “is because they think that the men
‘would make a more obstinate resistance if their
families were in safety. So they refuse per-
mission, and compel every body to remain, in
order that the inhabitants may be forced to sur-
render by being unable to endure such a dread-
ful destruction of their wives and children.”

« I would not make them stay,” said. Marco.
“They should all go away wherever they
pleased,—if the men did fight more obstinately
for it.” .

“Then you would be a very poor soldier,”
said Forester. “A good soldier must have no
mercy, in such cases as that. If you should
lose an opportunity to take a town, out of your
pity for women and children, very likely you
would he cashiered.” é

“ Cashiered,” said Marco ; “ what is that ?””


160 Tre Srrinarienp Armory.

‘Marco doos not wish to be a soldier, Masie,

«Degraded from office,” replied Forester,
“as unfit for a soldier.”

« Then I would not be a soldier at all,” said
Marco.

“Nor I,” said Forester. “ And yet there are
some things about military life that I like very
well.”

«What ?” asked Marco.

«I like the regular and systematic manner in
which every thing is done,” said Forester. “I
like to see a body of troops marshaled in order,
and all acting together like one man.”

“So do I,” said Marco.

« And F like the music,” said Forester.

“Yes,” said Marco, “ and I too.”

“The drum and fife make very animating
music,” said Forester.

« Yes,” said Marco ; “and in New York the
companies generally have a band.”

“ There is one thing that I should particularly
dislike, if I were an officer in the army,” said
Forester.

«“ What is that ?” asked Marco.

«The system that they go upon in engaging
the men. They do not pay the men wages
enough to make them contented with their
work, and desirous of retaining their places ;




Pay for officers.



but they defraud them into enlisting by offering
them bounties, or getting them intoxicated, and
afterward compel them to remain in the army
and do their duty by whipping them, or by
threatening to shoot them if they run away.”

«Is that the plan ?” asked Marco.

“Yes,” replied Forester, “in all regular ar-
mies, and in the navy too. The officers are all
paid well, both in the army and navy, so that
they are all desirous of keeping their places ; so
much so, in fact, that whenever, for any reason,
a government desires to diminish the number
of officers in the army it is always very hard to
get rid of those whom they do not need. They
always cling to their places in a very resolute
and determined manner.”

“That is a sign that they pay them too
much,” said Marco.

«It is a sign that they pay them enough,”
replied. Forester, “ at any rate. And so when-
ever there is a plan for increasing the army,
there is always a great multitude of applications
for the new offices that are to be created.
There are a great many more than can possibly
be received. The country seems to be full of
men who want to be colonels, and captains, and
generals.”

L


Tae Serincrieup Armory.

“Ariifices in enlisting the men.



« And no soldiers ?” said Marco.

“No,” replied Forester. “That is to say,
there would generally be very few if the gov-
ernment adopted a fair and honest mode of
enlisting them. In any other business of life if
men want laborers they advertise for them and
engage those that apply, letting them understand
honestly beforehand what the work is to be that
they will have to do, and paying them when the
work is done. But in engaging men to serve
as soldiers in an army, they have to resort to a
great many artifices and much dexterous man-
agement, in order to entrap the men and get
them to enlist. They conceal the nature of the
service as much as possible, and exhibit such
appearances before the recruits as to lead them
to expect that they are going to have a life of
ease and comfort in the army, instead of one of
hardship, exposure, and cruelty. Then they
tempt them by paying them a considerable sum
in advance, which they call bounty money.

‘The bounty is a sort of bait that they put upon
the hook to catch them with.”

“Ho!” said Marco, “ what a plan!”

“ They justify this plan,” said Forester, « by
pretending that the men need some money in
advance to pay their debts with, and wind up
OrpNance. 163
‘Operation of it, Panisbmonts. Forester’s supposition.

their affairs, before they go away to serve in the
army. . But the actual operation of it is, that
the men spend the bounty money in drinking
and dissipation, and then when it is all gone
they find themselves entrapped into an enlist-
ment, and made miserable prisoners and slaves
for many years. The officers then keep them
by means of a system of coercion and punish-
meyt which would be thought intolerable in any
other employment.”

«« What kind of punishments ?” asked Marco.

“Why, scourging them dreadfully upon the
bare back,” said Forester, “ chaining them to
heavy weights, putting collars upon their necks
with sharp points inside, and making them wear
them for months. And then if the men, find-
ing their misery intolerable, attempt to run
away, they are liable to be shot for desertion.

« Now one of the greatest objections I should
have to being a soldier,” continued Forester,
“is that I should not like to have the responsi-
bility of executing such a system as this.”

« Nor I,” said Marco.

“Suppose,” continued Forester, “ that such
a plan were adopted in any other business. Sup-
pose that a man who had a large tract of wild
land to clear up should come into a city and tell
164 Tue Srrinerieup ARMorRyY.
‘Goaring land. Bupposition continued. ‘A paraliol.

ail the poor miserable wretches that he could
find there, that if they would agree to work for
him three years, he would give them twenty
dollars’ apiece at oncé to spend as they liked,
and afterward that he would pay them wages,
—naming, however, only about half what the
wages of laborers usually were. And suppose
that the men were tempted by the twenty dol-
lars to agree to it. Perhaps he would get them
half intoxicated at first, and induce them to sign
the papers while they were in that state. Then
after they had spent their money in dissipation
and carousing, he takes them offinto the forests,
and sets them to work in the hafdest and most
unhealthy labors. He exposes them to wet, and
cold, and hunger, and to every possible hard-
ship, and if any of them, feeling dissatisfied with
their wages, neglect their work, he ties them up
to a tree and scourges them almost to death, or
chains them to a heavy weight, or fastens a col-
lar upon their necks, with sharp points inside to
lacerate the flesh ; and then if any of them run
away, he catches them if he can, and shoots
them What a monster we should think such
aman was!”

“Yes,” replied Marco. “ We should, truly.”

“And yet,” added Forester, “that is pretty
Oxvwanog. 165
‘Compulsion. ‘Conseripta. ‘Grand spectacles.

much the way that modern governments deal
with soldiers and sailors.” .

« Well,” said Marco, “I am sorry for them.
But they had no business to enlist.”

«* In time of war,” said Forester, “‘ when great
numbers of soldiers and sailors are required,
they can not generally get enough to enlist,
with all their artifices. Then they compel the
men to go. In France they have all the young
men that are of a suitable age to become sol-
diers, registered, and then they draw lots to see
who shall go. Those to whom the lot falls have
to go, unless they can get a substitute.”

“Well,” said Marco, “and can’t they get a
substitute ?”

“The rich can, but the poor can not,” re-
plied Forester, “and so the poor are compelled
to go. It is often very hard for them, but they
are compelled to submit.

« However,” continued Forester, after a short
pause,—*there are some things about war that
I like.”

«What, besides the order and system?”
asked Marco.

“The grand spectacles,” replied Forester.
“It must be a grand spectacle to see a fourteen
inch shell taking its flight in the night, soaring


166 Tue Srrincrieuyn Armory.
Flight ofabomb-
into the air in a magnificent curve of two or
three miles’ extent, and then coming down upon
a town and tearing the houses to pieces with a
tremendous explosion.”

“Yes,” said Marco,—* but can they see the
shell when it is going through the air.”

“They can not see the shell itself,” replied
Forester, “ for it is only a great black ball; but
the fuse is burning all the way, and they can
see that. It makes a bright line of light in the
air.”

“I should think that the wind would blow
the fuse out,” said Marco.

« But there might not be any wind,” replied
Forester.

“Yes,” said Marco, “the shell would make
a wind, going so swift.”

“That is true,” replied Forester,—< but I
presume that the fuse is made in such a way
that no wind whatever could put it out. Be-
sides the fuse always keeps behind, while the
shell is going through the air, and so it is shel-
tered.”

«What makes it always keep behind ?” asked
Marco.

« Because the other end is the heaviest,” re-
plied Forester “And whenever any thing ie
Oxpvnance 167

‘Foresters Iustrations and explanations.

thrown through the air, the heaviest end always
keeps foremost.”

“ What is the cause of that ?” asked Marco.

«Why, suppose,’’ said Forester, “that you
throw a bullet, and a cork ball just as large as
the bullet, through the air; with all your force,
which would go the swiftest ?”

«The bullet would go the farthest,” said
Marco.

“Yes, and it would go the swiftest,” said For-
ester. “It would go the farthest, because it
would go the swiftest. The reason would be
that the bullet would be less resisted and re-
tarded by the air than the cork ball.

« Now,” continued Forester, “suppose that
you should fasten a bullet and a cork ball to-
gether, and throw them through the air.”

“How could you fasten them together?”
asked Marco.

“Oh that is of no consequence,” said Fores-
ter; “we can suppose it to be done. You
might fasten them together with sealing-wax.
Or you might bore a hole through them both
and pass a wire through, and then bend over
the ends of the wire. But no matter how it is
done. Suppose them to be fastened together
in any way, and thrown through the air.. The
168 Tue Sraincriretp Armory.

Ball wit



hole in it, ‘Momentam.

bullet would tend to go faster than the cork,
and would keep ahead, pulling the cork along;
while the cork would tend to go slower, and
would keep behind, holding the bullet back.”:

« Yes,” said Marco. “I see that it would.”

«In the same manner,” continued Forester,
“if you were to make a wooden ball to be fired
out of a cannon, and were to bore a small hole
im at one side, and pour lead in and leave it
there, and then fire it from the cannon, the
loaded side of the ball, that is the side which
hed the lead in it, would keep foremost all the
time, and would strike first; or rather the ball
would strike the object with that side of it fore-
most.

“ Then again,” continued Forester, “ suppose
we were to take a second wooden ball, just like
the first, and bore a hole in it as before, only
instead of pouring lead into it, leave it empty +
and then fire it from the cannon.. Now the side
of the ball that was not bored will be the
heaviest, for that side is solid wood ; whereas
the other side has a hole in it, which makes it
lighter. Of course the solid part of the ball will
keep ahead, and bring the other along after it:"f

“ That is very curious,” said Marco. ob

“Yes,” replied Forester. “Now it is very
Orpwance. 169
‘Original mode of making shells,



important-in firing a bomb-shell that the fuse
should be kept behind,—especially when the
shell strikes ; because although the fuse might
not have been put out by the wind while it was
passing through the air, it would be very likely
to be put out on striking the ground, if the shell
were to strike fuse foremost. When shells were
first made it was the custom to have the iron
cast thicker on the side opposite to the fuse, so
as to make that end the heaviest. This was to
make it'sure that the shell would fall with the
fuse uppermost. . It was found, however, at last,
that this was not necessary ; for the shell would
always go with the solid part foremost, even if
that part was not any thicker than the other.
The reason was, that the hole left for the fuse
made that side of the shell so much lighter than
the other, that it would go right without any
difference of thickness in the sides of the shell.
“It is very important, you see,” continued
Forester, “ that the fuse should be uppermost,
for when the shell falls, it comes down with
prodigious force. If it strikes the ground it
buries itself in the earth, out of sight. Some-
times it goes down several feet, and when it
bursts there, it throws up the earth and makes
170, Tue Sprincrretn Armory.
ee er
an ‘enormous hole,—big enough sometimes to
wallow up a cart and oxen.”

«I should like to see it,” said Marco.

“ You could not be near enough,” replied For-
ester, “to see it well without being in great dan-
ger. In old times they used to have very small
shells, such as a man could hold in his-hand, and
throw among the enemy upon the field of battle ;
but they found that this plan did not work very
well.”

“ Why not ?” asked Marco.

“ Why, the men could not throw them very
far,” said Forester ; “and then, besides, acci-
dents would often happen. You see themen
were obliged to light the fuse with a match, and
then throw the shell quick, so as to be sure to.
get it off before it should explode.”

* Well,” said Marco, “there is no difficulty
in that. That is the way we fire India crack-
ers.”

« Yes,” rejoined Forester ; ‘ and does not the
cracker sometimes go off suddenly in the boy’s
hands ?”

“No,” replied Marco, “not usiless he is care
less.”

“True,” replied Forester ; “ but boys will be
careless sometimes, and so will soldiers. Then
Oxvnance. i771
‘What a mortar te. ‘Shot and shells. Aim

besides, the fuse might burn too quick,—or the
man who held the grenade might be shot down
after he had lighted it, and before he had time
to throw it.”

“Grenade ?” repeated Marco. “Do they
call these small shells grenades ?”

“Yes,” said Forester ; “and the men that
throw them were called grenadiers. But they
don’t use grenades now.”

There was a short pause in the conversation
after this, when at length Marco remembered
that Forester had not explained to him exactly
what a mortar was.

“You told me,” said ‘he, “that a mortar was
to fire bomb-shells with. Why don’t they fire
them out of cannons ?”

“One reason is,” replied Forester, “ that they
wish to throw shells in a different direction from
balls. Balls are aimed directly at the object
which the gunner wishes to strike, or rather a
little above it; and they wish to have them go
through the air in as straight a line as possible ;
so they point the guns a little above the mark.”

« What is that for ?” asked Marco.

“ Why, the weight of the ball,” said Forester,
“keeps it falling all the time while it is passing
through the air; and so if they were to aim
172 Tae Spatnerizyup Anmory.
Gunnery.

directly at the object, the ball would have fallen
below it, before it came to strike. So they
point it above. But it requires a nice calcula-
tion or a great deal of practice, to know how
far above to point it.”

“I don’t see how they can make any caleu-
lation,” said Marco. :

“They can,” replied Forester. “They can
make a very exact: calculation. They know
exactly the curve that/a ball or any thing else
thrown in the air, makes in moving. “Then
they know how far off the object is which they
mean to strike, and how much gunpowder they
put in, and how strong it is; and they have
rules by which they can determine how high
the gun must be elevated to throw the ball to
the right point. It is quite a sciencé.”

«I should think it-was,” said Margo,

« Yes,” replied Forester ; “to be a good gun-
ner, a man must be a good mathematician.
Schools of artillery are schools of mathematics.”

« Well,” said Marco, “and now about mor-
tars ?” :

“Mortars,” said Forester, “must be larger
than cannon, because the shells which they are
intended to throw are larger than the balls



Calealations. ‘Mortara; large but short.
Orpnance. 173



which the cannon are intended to throw
they need not be so long.”

«Why not ?” asked Marco.

« Because it is not necessary that the shells
should be thrown with so much force. They
are to be thrown up into the air in order that
they may fall down upon the object which they
are intended to destroy, and lodge there before
they explode. If they were to be thrown
straight through, the air, like a ball, they would
perhaps pass entirely by the object before ex-
ploding, and so do no harm.”

“Oh yes,” said Marco, “they would do a
great deal of harm, by tearing through it.”

«That is true,” replied Forester,. “though
they -would do much less harm than they would
do by lodging and exploding on the spot.

“The mortar, accordingly,” continued For-
ester, ‘‘is made short and large, and it stands in
almost an upright position ;.so that instead of
looking like. a common cannon,, it resembles
somewhat an apothecary’s mortar. That is the
way it gets its name.”

“Yes,” said Marco ; “I recollect now that I
have seen them in the Navy. Yard at Brooklyn.”

“There is another thing peculiar. about a
mortar,” said Forester.


174 Tue Serincrizup Armory.
‘recoil of guns. “The rocoll of mortars. ‘Tho mortarbed.

What is that ?” asked Marco.

The mortar bed,” said Forester. “ When a
gun is fired or a cannon, there is a recoil; that
is, the gun is thrown back at the same instant
that the ball is thrown forward. Now all heavy
guns are mounted upon very strong carriages,
and the force of the recoil is expended in
trundling the carriages back a little way. _ But
as the mortar is pointed up into the air, the re-
coil tends to drive the mortar itself down into
the ground ; and consequently, if the frame that
it rested upon was not very heavy and strong,
it would be broken all to pieces by the force of
the explosion.”

“They need not have any frame at all,” said
Marco. “They might put the mortar directly
upon the ground.”

« Then,” said Forester, “ they could not move
it so as to point it in different directions.”

“Oh no,” said Marco.

«« You see,” continued Forester, “it is neces-
sary sometimes to elevate or depress the mortar
more or less, and also to move it a little to the
right or left, according to the position of the
object which they wish to strike. Therefore it
moust be regularly mounted, and the frame which
it is mounted upon must be very heavy and


Mortars at soa.



solid, so as to resist the recoil. And it-mhust be
made so as to turn round upon a pivot.

« Sometimes,” continued Forester, “they use
mortars at sea. In this case they place them
upon vessels of a peculiar kind called bomb-
ketches. These vessels are made very strong.
The builders use very- heavy timbers in the
construction of them, and strengthen them with
a@ great many braces. If they were not to do
this, the vessels would be soon shattered to
pieces by the force of the explosions.”

After Forester had said this; there was quite
a pause. Marco seemed to be musing upon
what he had heard. At last he said,

“Cousin Forester, when I ‘get to Vermont I
mean to borrow an iron mortar and fire it.””.

“Oh, you can not fire a common mortar,”
said Forester. ‘

«Yes,” said Marco, “I can tie up the gun-
powder in. a paper, for a cartridge, and put it in
the bottom of the mortar, and then put in a
round stone, as “big as will go in, for.a bomb-
shell.”

“And then,” said Forester, “how can you
fire it ?—there is no touch-hole.”

«I know that,” said Marco, “but 1 could.
make a fuse and pass it into the mortar along
176 Tux Srainerreip. Armory. -

‘Ho contrives @ mortar,

by the side of the stone, and so light the outer
end of it.”



MARCO'S MORTAR

“Well,” said Forester, “perhaps you would
succeed in getting it off, but it would be a very
dangerous experiment; for the stone would be
as likely to come down upon your head, as upon
any thing else of the same bigness.”
Tar Breaxctne uP 177



‘Stato of the roads ta Vermont. ‘Drift.

Cuarrzr XII
~ Tas Breaxine vr.

Axrhocss the snow had nearly disap-

peared from Connecticut, and even Mas-
sachusetts, when Forester and Marco Paul
passed. through those states on their visit to ‘the
armory, yet they found, when they reached
Vermont, vast stores of it still remained. The
route which they took required them to make a
day’s journey by land, at last, to’ reach Mr.
Forester’s. This day’s ride, which they took
in the stage, would have carried them .home
if the traveling had been tolerable; but the
state of the roads, caused by the breaking up
of the winter, was such that they went on very
slowly.

In some places the wheels of the coach ran
along very easily upon the thin stratum of ice
which remained upon the road and kept it hard.
At other times they plowed their way along
through deep patches of snow, extending for
miles,—the remains of the great drifts of the
winter ; and sometimes these drifts were so deep.

M
178° Tue Srrincristy Armory.
“Tho snow. ~~ Long bil Speculations.

that the wheels of the coach would set fast in
them. In such cases the passengers would
have to get out, and then the driver would urge
the horses to draw out the empty carriage to
the land beyond. At other places still, the sur-
face of the ground seemed broken, containing
patches of a hard crust, with deep holes filled
with soft mud between them. The horses’ hoofs
would break through in such cases, and some-
times the wheels would sink in up to the hubs,
making it almost impossible to get along at all.

In one such place as this, at the foot of a
long hill, the passengers had to get out, in order
to make it possible for the horses to go on; and
after they were out, and the horses had drawn
the coach out of the worst of the slough, they
called out to the driver to drive along, saying,
that they would walk up the hill. There was
bank at the side of the road, where they could
walk on the grass all the way up; and, though
it rained, they all had umbrellas. They walked
two and two, and Marco and Forester walked
together.

“Marco,” said Forester, after they had com-
menced making this ascent, “I don’t believe
you know what makes it so muddy.”

“ Yes,” said Marco ; “the'rain.”


Tun BeBauinea vr. 179
“Operation of the frost. —=—====S=S~*«*«éR reeing of the ground

“No,” said Forester.

“Then it is the melting of the snow,” said
Marco. ,

“No,” said Forester.

« What is it, then ?” said Marco.

“It is the frost,” said Forester: “The frost
operates very curiously,—in a manner that few
persons fully understand. I will explain it to
you. ‘

«“ What water there is in the ground, in the
fall of the year,” continued Forester, “freezes
and swells. It of course swells the ground up
with it.”

«I never knew that before,” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “ that isthe case, You
knew that water always expanded in freezing,
didn’t you ?”

“Yes,” said Marco.

“ And, of course,” said Forester, “it causes
the ground to swell, unless the ground is com-
posed of sand or some porous material which
enables the water to swell into the pores, with-
out raising the ground itself. In all common
soils it swells the land, and raises it.”

“ How much ?” said Marco.

“O, an inch or two,” replied Forester;
“sometimes more. Did you never observe,


180 ‘Tue Srrinoriznp Armory.

‘Frost the great Ullor of the ground.

where a large stone peeps out of the ground,
that when the ground freezes there is an inden-
tation all around the stone, as if it had set-
tled 2” ;

«“ Yes,” said Marco, “I’ve seen the stones
so in the pasture. I thought they really set-
tled.”” 3

“No,” said Forester, “they remain as they
are; but the land rises, being swollen by the
frozen water that is in it. The whole surface
of the ground is raised in this way every win-
ter, and then, in the spring, when the ground
thaws, it lays up light, all ready for roots to ex-
tend themselves in every direction into it.
‘Thus the frost is the great natural pulverizer
of the fields. All summer, in the fields and in
the woods, the roots are pushing themselves
forth in every direction, and filling up the earth,
and the loose particles are washed into the in-
terstices, and men and animals tread it down
so that it becomes quite hard; and then the
frost comes in the fall and winter, and swells it
all up again, so as to separate the particles of
earth from each other a little; and then, when
the water thaws in the spring, it leaves them

so, all ready for the roots to take a fresh
growth.”
Tae Breaking ur.n ier
Bitvcta of the expansion.

What an excellent plan,” said Marco.

“Yes,” said Forester, “ it saves the farmer a
vast deal of labor; but there are some inconve-
Miences that arise from it.’””

“What are they ?” asked Marco.

“Why, there are two principal ones,” said
Forester. “First, when the ground rises in
this manner it lifts up every thing upon it;
buildings, fences, and every thing else.”

«Not the houses,” said Marco:

“Yes,” said Forester, “if they rest upon it ;
that is, upon the upper part of the ground,
which is the part lifted. To prevent this, men
dig down and lay the foundations upon the
lower part of the ground, which remains at
‘rest—because it is so far below the cold air,
that the water in it doesn’t get frozen. But
fences can not Well be protected; for the sur-
face of the earth will freeze around the posts,
and thus when it rises, it heaves them up a lit-
tle way. The next year they get hove up a
little higher, and so, finally, sometimes out of
the ground.”

«Entirely ?” asked Marco.

“Why, so far that they fall over,” said For-
ester. “But the greatest of the inconveniences
produced by the swelling of the land, is on the
182 Tus’ Serinerieryp Armory.
[The roads spolled, ‘The top of the hill, Forester concludes to atop.

roads. In the spring of the year, when the roads
thaw, the water which is in the gravel shrinks
in thawing, and leaves the gravel not only wet,
but lying loosely as if it had been plowed and
harrowed. This is what makes the road so
soft. It isn’t the rain, or the melting snow; for
you know, in summer, after a long rain, though
the road is as wet as it can be, it is not so soft
asit is now.”

Forester would have explained the subject
more fully to Marco, but they now arrived at
the top.of the hill, and got into the coach again.
They rode on until nearly night, and were then
more than twenty miles from home. Now For-
ester had an uncle who lived in the part of the
country where they were passing ; and as they
were tired, and Forester thought there would
be some danger of upsetting in riding in the
night, they concluded to stop there and to take
the next stage home.

«When will the next stage come. along?”
asked Marco. ;

« Day after to-morrow,” said Forester. “The
stage goes one day and comes the next.”

Marco anticipated some pleasure in callingto
see this uncle. He lived in a solitary place
among the Green Mountains, upon his farm.
Tue Breaxine ur. 183
‘Forester’s uncle sick, Marco is to go for Mr, Forester. ‘The letter.

Their pleasure was, however, very much marred
on their arrival, at learning that their uncle
was sick. Forester watched with him that
night, and. the next morning he was worse.
They wanted to send to Mr. Forester to come
and see him, as the physician considered him
in danger. There was nobody to send but
Marco; for Forester was unwilling to leave his
uncle, and the family were also very unwilling
that he should go. Marco volunteered to take
@ wagon, and go for his uncle Forester. It was
only twenty miles, he said, and he could drive
twenty miles very easily. Forester was very
much at a lossto know what to do. He was
unwilling to send Marco alone, on such an ex-
pedition, but there seemed to be no alternative.
So the horse was harnessed into a light wagon,
the next morning, and Marco took his seat in
it. Forester wrote a letter to his father, describ-
ing the circumstances of his uncle’s sickness,
and he gave Marco many charges to drive
slowly, to walk the horse nearly all the way,
and to keep well up on the highest side of the
wagon in going over the drifts of snow; and,
finally, if he got into any difficulty, or found
that he could not get along, to stop at any
184 Tue Sprineriaty Armory.
Land overflowed. ‘Maroo’s dimculties. ~The traveler:

house, and hire a man to go the rest vd the way
with him.

Marco was very much pleased at being in-
trusted with so important an enterprise. .He
went on ten miles without any” ‘special hin-
drance. The road was lonely, conducting him
through glens and forests, and among swamps
and streams swelled to overflowing with the
rains and the melted snows. These streams,
however, had all bridges, and there were cause-
‘ways across the swamps, so that Marco found
no difficulty with them until, at last, when he
was within about ten miles of home, he came
to a place where he saw the water standing in
the road, apparently quite deep, for a long dis-
tance before him. There were great swamps
on each side, which were also full to overflow-
ing with water, and about at the middle of the
inundated part of the road a strong current was
setting across the road, with a large cake of ice
floating down upon it, exactly in his way.

Marco judged that the water was not very
deep, however, in the road, from the height at
which it stood at an old brush fence which ex-
tended along on one side of the road. While
he was hesitating, however, what to do, he saw
a pedestrian traveler advancing along the road,
. Tue Breaxine ur. ~ 185
“Marco perplemed. ‘Tho travelows proposal

on the other side of the water. He had a
bundle on his-back. He stopped, like Marco,
as soon as he reached the water.

Maico called out to him, in a loud voice,
“Can I come along through this water ?”

«I don’t know,” said the man; “I suppose
mies 5

Maréo hesitated a moment in doubt. He
perceived, however, that the water could not
be wery deep; so that if he should fallin, he
would only get-a wetting. Then that man was
there, ready to come to his aid if any accident
should happen. Besides, he could not turn
round very well, where he was, to get back
again, even.if he had wished to turn back ; so
he boldly pushed on. The horse waded along
the road, the wagon following him, and tipping
to one side or to the other, according to the in-
equalities of the snow and.ice which yet re-
mained under the water on the track. When
Marco got to the middle, he had to wait a min-
ute or two for a cake of ice to float by; then
he went on, and the horse soon came out upon
the firm ground—his limbs dripping with the
water.

The traveler then wanted Marco to turn
round and carry him across the water, and of-
186. Tae Seninoriztp Armory.
‘The pond. BHdge gone.

fered to pay him well for it if he would. But
Marco did not see how he could turn safely ;
so he declined this proposition, advising the man
to. clamber along as well as he could on the
brush fence. Marco sat in the wagon looking
back for a few minutes, laughing at the comical
figure which the man made, with his. bundle on
his back, clambering along on this unusual sort
of bridge. He said to himself that the man
looked like a hump-backed monkey climbing
trees. After he saw that the man got safely
over, he rode on.

He however soon encountered a more serious
difficulty than this. He came to a large pond.
The road passed around the end of it. A large
stream issued from the pond at this place, and
the road had crossed this stream just by the
edge of the pond, on a bridge. The water was,
however, so high, that the bridge was not in
sight ; but Marco supposed it was there,- and
that be could ride over it, through the water.
There was a small house near the edge of the
woods, a short distance back, and just as Marco
was going to drive forward, a man came out
from behind some piles of lumber near it, and
called out to Marco, telling him that the bridge
had been carried away.
Tae Breakina ur. 187
‘Marco and the farnier. ‘Marco's plan.

« Then how shall I get across ?” said Marco.
_ You can’t get across at all,” said the man.

« But I must go,” said Marco.

“Well,” said the man, “ if you must go, and
can’t go, I don’t know how you'll settle it.” So
saying, he turned around and disappeared.

Marco got-out of the wagon, fastened the
horse, and went back to the house. The man
‘was at work under a shed, making a cart-body.
He kept on-with his work, but in answer to
Marco’s questions, he told him that it was im-
possible to get across there till. the water went
down, and the bridge was. repaired; and that
there was no road by which he could go around
the difficulty, except by a circuit of fifteen miles.
Marco sat down upon a log lying in the yard,
in a state of great perplexity. After some min-
utes, he looked up, and said,

“Could you work for me, sir ?”

“ Work for you ?” repeated the man.

“Yes,” said Marco. “I will pay you for it
at the rate of a dollar aday.” Marco had heard
that this was pretty high wages for that part of
the country at that time.

“Idon’t believe you have got any money,”
said the man.

“Yes,” said Marco; and so saying he took
188) Tue Srainerienp Armory.
‘Negotiations. Plan for a raf. ___The raft begun,

out one half a dollar from his pocket, and showed
it to the man.

““ What do you want me to do?

« To help me build a raft, to raft my horse
and wagon over this water.”

*O, you can’t raft them over,” said the man.

“Yes,” said Marco ; “ you must fell me some
small trees, and cut them isto lengths, and roll
them into the water. Then I shall want to
buy some of your boards to cover it with.”

«©, no,” said the-man ; “ we could not make
a raft in that way big enough to float your horse
and wagon.”

“No,” said Marco, “but we could raft the
horse over first, and then the wagon.”

« Well,” said the man, “Ill try it for half a
dollar.””

“No,” said Marco ; “I'll pay you at the rate
of a dollar a day for the time it takes.”

“Very well,” said the man, “ any way to suit
you. I don’t know but that you will get over.”

So the man went with Marco down to the
shore of the pond, and began to cut down some
trees. He told Marco which were the lightest
and most suitable, and when about twelve of
the lengths had been. prepared, he and Marco
rolled them into the water, and placed a board
Tun Breakine vp. 189



"Plane,

across them to hold them together. The man
then walked out upon the board, and with an
auger bored holes down through it into the logs,
and pinned it down. There was one pin driven
into each log. Several other boards were
placed alongside of the first, until the raft was
floored over. The man then cut a long pole to
push with. They were going to push the raft
across at the end of the pond, just above where
the outlet issued from it. They led the horse
carefully on to: the raft, and Marco held him


190 Tue Srrinoriztp ARmMoRY.
‘Buocess of the plans. ‘Marco offers his raft for salo.

while the man pushed over. They accomplished
the passage safely, and then came back for the
wagon. The transportation of the wagon was
effected without difficulty, and ‘the horse har-
nessed into it again, and Marco was once more
able to proceed. The man estimated his work
at one fourth of a day, and the boards and logs
he considered to be worth twenty-five cents.
So Marco paid him half a dollar, and was just
going to get into his wagon, when the stage
appeared in sight, coming toward him. “Now,”
said Marco, “I'll sell my raft to the driver of
this stage.” -

When the driver saw the condition of the
road, he exclaimed,

“What! is this bridge carried away ?”

“ Yes,¥ said the man, “it-went off last night.

“ And how then’am I to get over ?”

“I don’t know,” said Marco, “ unless you buy
my raft.”

“ Your raft ?” said the driver; “is that your
raft?” :

“Yes,” said Marco; “I’ve just paid for it,
labor and materials. It has cost me half .a dol-
lar, besides all the planning of it. You may
have it for.the same.” 2

The driver looked at the raft a moment, with
Tue Breaxine ve. 191
‘The driver buys it.

a smile on his countenance, and then said,
“ But I need not pay you for it. There the raft
is. I’ve only to take it and use it, if I’ve a mind
to.”

«But I forbid you to use it,” said Marco,
“unless you pay me for it.”

“What good will your-forbidding do?” said
the driver. “I happen to be the strongest.”

“O, yes,” said Marco ; “ you can rob me of
it, know. If I am so unlucky as to get rob-
bed here in this solitary place, I suppose I must
submit to it; that’s all.”

The driver did not quite like this aspect of.
the subject, and besides, his passengers began
to put their heads out of the windows of the
coach, and told him that he had better buy the
raft. So he gave Marco half a dollar, saying,
at the same time, that it would cost him one
quarter of a dollar more to make it big enough
to float his stage-coach ; but even that he ad-
mitted would be better than to go fifteen miles
around. Thus Marco got across the water
without any other inconvenience than the de-
lay. He arrived home safely. His uncle For-
ester returned next day in the wagon to see his
sick brother. He crossed on the raft.. He
found his brother better, and on the third day
1920 Tue Srrinerrenp Armory.
‘Forester gots homo.

he and Forester returned in the stage,—but by
this time the bridge had been repaired.

Marco remained at Forester’s father’s a long
time, and had various adventures there, but
they can not be described in this volume.