Citation
A hundred short tales for children

Material Information

Title:
A hundred short tales for children
Uniform Title:
Selections
Creator:
Schmid, Christoph von, 1768-1854
Weir, Harrison, 1824-1906 ( Engraver )
Bosworth, Thomas ( Publisher )
Barclay, George ( Printer )
Wells, Francis Ballard, 1810 or 11-1888 ( Translator )
Westleys & Co ( Binder )
Place of Publication:
London
Publisher:
T. Bosworth
Manufacturer:
George Barclay
Publication Date:
Language:
English
Edition:
2nd ed.
Physical Description:
viii, 189, 15, <1> p., <1> leaf of plates : ill. ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Conduct of life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Children's stories, German -- Translations into English ( lcsh )
Children's stories, English -- Translations from German ( lcsh )
Children's stories -- 1853 ( lcsh )
Westleys &amp; Co -- Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853 ( rbbin )
Westleys &amp; Co -- Binders' tickets (Binding) -- 1853 ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1853 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1853
Genre:
Children
Children's stories ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Binders' tickets (Binding) ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Children
Conduct of life
Juvenile fiction
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London

Notes

General Note:
Plate signed: H. Weir.
General Note:
Publisher's catalogue at end.
Funding:
Brittle Books Program
Statement of Responsibility:
from the German of C. von Schmid by F.B. Wells.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026949438 ( ALEPH )
46337651 ( OCLC )
ALH7656 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text






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ome

The Monkey and the Miser’s Money.



A HUNDRED .
SHORT TALES FOR CHILDREN

FROM THE GERMAN OF C. VON SCHMID



By F. B. WELLS, M.A.

RECTOR OF WOODCHURCH, KENT.

Second Covitton.

LONDON: T. BOSWORTH, REGENT STREET

MDCCCYAITY,



LONDON :
Printed by Grorcr Barcuay, Castle St. Leicester Sq.



PREFACE.

THe interest with which the Translator’s own
children heard many of the following tales first
suggested the idea of publishing the collection,
in the hope that the instruction and amuse-
ment which they contain might be extended
to a wider circle.

Though a few of the tales will be recog-
nised as old acquaintances making their re-
appearance in a somewhat altered form, it has
been thought best not to impair the original
collection by their exclusion; and by far the
greater part of them, it is believed, will be

quite new to the juvenile reader.



vo PREFACE.

The tales in the original, which are used. as
a lesson and. reading-book in the schools of
Bavaria, may on every account be safely re-
commended as an elementary study for young
learners of the German language, and may
easily be procured through the publisher of

this translation.



CONTENTS.

- The Sun
. The Rain

The Sunshine and Rain

. The Thundry Weather
- The Rainbow
The Rainbow and the little “Bowl of Gold

The Eeho .
The Spring
The Four Elements

- The Flowers
- The Wood Strawberries

The Cherries .
The Plums

The Walnut
The Pear-Tree

. The Green Bough

. The Precious Vegetable
. The Turnip

. The Cabbage

«

PAGE

Oa aw

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NMTowowom Fw ©



CONTENTS.

The Ears of Corn

- The Peas -
. The Field

The Vineyard . a

- The Mushrooms

- The Gourd and the Acorn
- The Oak-Tree . .

- The Oak and the Willow

- The Boundary-Stone

. The Canary-Bird

The Swallows

. The Pigeons. -
- The House-Cock

The: Partridge’s Nest
The Song-Birds

. The Yellow-Hammers
. The Titmouse
. The Starling
. The Cuckoo

. The Cow

. The Cow-Bell
. The Sheep

- The He-Goat
. The Stag

- The Wolf .

. The Monkey
- The Lion .

- The Earwig

. The large Cabbage-Head .

ef

. 89

PAGE

36
38

41
42

45
46
48
49
50
o2
54
56
57
58
60
62
64
65
67
69
72
73
75
77
79
81
&3



CONTENTS.

xLix. The Loaf of Bread .

L. Bread and Water : oy a - 7
nt. The Milk : i ee -
riot. The Soup - -, . - 7

Lin. The most Excellent Sauces
Liv. The Honey-Pot
nrirv. The Pearls

Lv1. The Precious Stone . . - oo.
LVI. The Pebbles . . . :
ivi. The Sackful of Earth : _ -

Lix. The Crown- Piece .

Lx. Money well spent . : - .

tx1. The Purse . . . :

uxir. The Diamond Ring . . : ;
nmxm1. The Golden Snuff-Box ; — . ‘
uxtv. The Silver Watch . . . “ .

yuxv. The Watch-Bands . . . .

rxvi. The Looking-Glass

uxvit. The Cloak :
utxvim. The Shoes

uxrx. The Shoe-Nail

uxx. The Horse-Shoe

uxxi. The Shoe-Nail

uxxm. The Seven Sticks
uxxim. The Splinter

uxxiv. The Rope

uxxv. The Willow-Twig and the Straw
Lxxv1. The Fair . :
Uxxvuo. The Mansion and the Cottage .

PAGE
85
87
89
91
92
93
95
97
99

101

103
105
107
109
111
118
115
117
119
121
122
124
126
128
130
182
133
135
137



coe

vill

TLXXXvink.

CONTENTS.

The Child’s Prayer : : .
The Page . .- . .., .
‘The Shepherd-Boy : . .
The Shepherd’s Pipe. . 7
The Good Son 7 : 7 .
The Pious Sister . . .
The True Brothers

The True Sisters . . -
The Little Basket-Maker .

The Fisherman and the little Poacher

The Gardener and his Ass _. -

Lxxxix. The Sportsman and his Dog :

xC.
xcL
xXCIr.
XCITI.
XCIV.
xXCV.
XCVI.

XCVIT.
XCVIITI.

XCIX.
Cc.

The Miller and his Son : .
The Cannibal . . . :
The Ghost . 7 :

The Cleanly Landlady . -
The Charitable poor Woman

The Pious Grandmother .
The Pious Mother and her Sons .
The Dying Father

The Friends after Death

The Better Land .

The Three best Books .

PAGE

139 .
141
143
145
147
150
152
154
156
158
160
162
163
165
167
169
172
175
178
181
183
185
188



I.— THE SUN.

ONE evening, when it was already dark, an
industrious mother was returning home from
her field-work with her two children, when,
lo! there stood a lamp lighted upon their
table.

_ George cried out with surprise, “ There
certainly was nobody at home: who can have
kindled the light, then ?”

«< Ah!” said Margaret, “who can it be but
our father?—he has certainly come home
from the town while we were away.”

The children ran to seek him, and, to their
great delight, immediately found him in the
next room.

On the following day, the parents and
children went to finish haymaking in their
large meadow. The sun was shining with
unusual splendour and beauty, and_ the

children showed their delight at it.
B

Zz



QQ - : THE SUN.

“Now, my children,” said their father,

“you readily guessed yesterday that it was I
who made the light burn in our room; but
as you now behold that beautiful and glorious
light, the blessed Sun, above us in the sky,
should it not occur to you who it is has
kindled that?”
“-* Oh, yes!” said Margaret, “the blessed
God has done it. The smallest lamp cannot:
light itself: and so there must be One who
has lighted up the sun.”

“So there is!” cried George, joyfully;
“‘God has made all things. The sun, the
‘moon, the stars, the grass, the flowers and
trees, and everything that we behold around
us here, are His work.

“ Proclaim alike th’ Almighty’s power and love.’ ”’



Il. —THE RAIN.

A MERCHANT was once riding home from the
fair, with a knapsack full of money behind
him. It rained heavily, and the good man
was wet through and through. He was dis-
contented in consequence, and complained
bitterly that God gave him such bad weather
for his journey. |

His way led him through a thick wood.
Here, with horror, he saw a robber, who
pointed a gun at him, and pulled the trigger.
He would have been killed without a chance
of escape, but, owing to the rain, the powder
had become damp, and the gun did not go
off. The merchant put the spur to his horse,
and quickly escaped the danger.

When he was in safety, he thus said to
himself, “ What a graceless simpleton I was
when I cursed the bad weather, and did not
rather take it patiently as a dispensation of
God! Had the sky been brighter, and the air



4 - THE RAIN.

clear and dry, I should now be lying dead in
my blood, and my children would have waited
in vain for my return home. ‘The rain, at
which I grumbled, has saved both my pro-
perty and my life. In future, I will not again
forget what the proverb says :— ©

“<< Howe’er conceal’d from us the kind intent,
The ways of God are all in mercy meant.’”’



IlI.— THE SUNSHINE AND RAIN.

«“Wovurp that the sun would only always
shine!” said some children on a rough, stormy,
rainy day. ‘This wish soon seemed to be
fulfilled, when, for many months long, not a
cloud was seen in the sky. The long drought
did much damage to the fields and meadows ;
the flowers and vegetables were withered in
the garden; and the flax, on which the young
women would have been so cheerfully em-
ployed, was scarce a finger’s length.

“Do you see, now,” said their mother,
“that the rain is just as necessary as the
sunshine ?— Learn, therefore, from this wise
dispensation of God, the wholesome truth, that
it would not be good for us men to have only
bright and joyful days: there must also come
upon you, from time to time, cloudy days,
afflictions, and pains, in order that you may
grow up to be good men.

““Alike in storm and sunshine, weal and woe,
God makes His blessings on His creatures flow.’

3°



IV.—THE THUNDRY WEATHER. |

F Rank, a little boy from a neighbouring town,
had been out gathering raspberries in a wood.
As he was about to return home again, a
storm sprang up. It began to rain, ligtiten,
and thunder. Frank was frightened, and
sheltered himself in a hollow oak near the
road; for he did not yet know that the
lightning frequently strikes high trees.

All at once he heard a voice calling “Frank,
Frank! come, oh, come quickly, out of that
place!” Frank crept out from the hollow tree,
and, almost in the twinkling of an eye, the
lightning struck the tree, and the thunder
rolled fearfully. The earth trémbled beneath
the terrified boy, and it seemed to him as if
he stood in the Midst of fire. No harm,
however, happened to him; and he exclaimed,
as he prayed with uplifted hands, “ This voice
came from Heaven: Thou, blessed God, hast
saved me; thanks be to Thee!”

But the voice still cried again, ‘“ Frank,
Frank! do you not hear me?” And he was
now aware, for the first time, of a peasant



THE THUNDRY WEATHER. | 7

woman, who was so calling out. Frank ran
to her, and. said, “ Here I am; what do you
want with me?” .

The peasant woman replied, “ I did not
mean you, but my own little Frank, who has
been watching the geese along the stream
yonder, and must have sheltered himself from
the storm hereabouts. See, there he comes,
at last, out of the bushes.”

Frank, the town-boy, immediately related
how he had taken her voice for a voice from
Heaven. But the peasant folded her hands
devoutly, and said, “Oh, my child! ‘thank
God no less for this. The voice came indeed.
from the mouth of a poor peasant; but God
has so ordered it, that I should cry aloud and
call you by name, without knowing any-
thing about you. He has rescued you from
the great danger to which you have been
exposed.”

«Yes, yes!” cried Frank, with tears in his
eyes; “God has made use of your voice in
order to save me: it was indeed you who

called, but the help came directly from God!

“*Oh ! dream not blindly chance thy life could save,
“T'was God alone who all this mercy gave.’ ”’



V.—THE RAINBOW.

AFTER a fearful thunderstorm, a lovely rainbow
was shining in the sky. A little boy named
Henry saw it from the window, and cried out;
full of joy, “Such wonderfully beautiful
colours I never saw before in all my lLfe!
Yonder, by the old willow-tree on the stream,
they reach from the clouds down to the earth.
Surely all the leaves are trickling down with
the beautiful colours; I will run and fill all
the colour-shells in my paint-box with them.”
He ran as fast as he could to the willow-tree;
but, to his perplexity, the poor boy found him-
self standing there in the rain, and could no
longer perceive a single colour. Wet through
with the ram, and out of heart, he turned
back and complained of his disappointment to
his father.
His father laughed, and said, “'These colours
cannot be caught in any shell; they are only



THE RAINBOW. | . 9
the rain-drops, which seem so brightly painted
for a little while in the rays of the sun. But
so it is, my dear child, with all the splendour

of the world: it seems to us to be something:
but it is only empty show. |

“ Instead of joy it will be thine to grieve.’ ”



10

VI.—THE RAINBOW AND THE LITTLE
BOWL OF GOLD.

Lirriz Lina was standing at the open window
after a soft spring shower, and beheld with
rapture the lovely colours of the rainbow.
«Dear mother,” she began, after a little while,
“they say, when a rainbow shines in the sky,
a little golden bowl falls from heaven; but
only a Sunday child can find it. Is there
such a golden treasure? And who are the
Sunday children to whom it belongs ?”

Her mother said, “There is certainly a
treasure of heaven, compared with which all
the gold of earth is nothing. But the Sunday
children, whose portion it will be, need not be
born on a Sunday. The great thing is, that
they be not persons of every-day life, but
always and everywhere as pious and well-
behaved as on Sundays in church. Be you
such a Sunday child, and you will certainly
obtain that treasure.”

Lina strove with all her heart to be pious



THE RAINBOW AND THE BOWL OF GOLD. 11

and good; and as she continually became
more pious and better, so likewise she conti-
nually became more contented and cheerful.

Now, when a rainbow again shone in the
sky, her mother said, “ Lina, are you not
going out to look after that golden treasure
from heaven?” |

<* Dear mother,” said Lina, “I was then a
little, thoughtless child; but now the meaning
of that expression is clear to me. You meant
a nobler and a more precious gift than gold.”

< So I did, dearest Lina,” said her mother.
«That gift of Heaven, which I meant, and
which far surpasses all the treasures of earth,
is the true happiness of mankind. In the
world, out of ourselves, we seek for it in vain ;
we find it only within ourselves, in a pious,
good, and pure heart.

“Whose heart is good and conscience clear,
Will find the heavenly treasure here.’ ”’



12

ViI.— THE ECHO.

A LITTLE boy, named George, knew nothing
yet of the echo. He once cried out in the
meadow, “Oh, hop!” when he was directly
answered from the wood close by with, “ Oh,
hop!” Amazed at this, he cried out, “ Who
are you?” ‘The voice replied, “ Who are
you?” He then screamed out, “ You are a
silly fellow!” and “silly fellow” was answered
from the wood.

George was very angry, and went on calling
worse nicknames towards the wood. They
were all repeated exactly the same. He
therefore went to look for the boy whom he
supposed to be in the wood, in order to take
his revenge; but could find nobody.

So he ran home, and complained to his
mother how an impudent fellow had hid
himself in the wood, and called him nicknames.

His mother said, “This time you have
accused yourself. You have heard nothing



THE ECHO. | 13

except the echo of your own words; if you
had called out a civil word towards the wood,
a civil word would then have been returned
to you.”

But so it is in ordinary life: the behaviour
of others towards us is, for the. most part,
only the echo of ours towards them. If we
treat people civilly, they treat us civilly in
return. But if we are uncivil, rough, and
unmannerly towards them, we cannot expect
anything better from them.

“ Just as the words are utter’d, bad or good,
So faithful Echo answers from the wood.”



14,

VIilil.— THE SPRING.

On a hot summer day, a little boy named
William was on a journey. His cheeks were
glowing with heat, and he was gasping for
thirst, when he came to a spring which burst
bright as silver from a rock in the green shade
of an oak-tree. .

William had often heard that no one should
drink when he is hot. But he was self-con-
ceited, and despised these warnings; he fol-
lowed only his own inclinations—drank of the
cold water—and. sank in a swoon on the earth.
He came home ill, and fell into a dangerous
fever.

“Ah!” he groaned upon his sick-bed, “who
would have thought it of that spring, that it
contained a gift so hurtful?”

But William’s father said, “It is not the
pure spring which is the cause of your sickness,



THE SPRING. | , 15

but your own self-conceit, and your own
unrestrained desire. -
“<< God, in the fulmess of His love,
Has all in mercy given ;

But pride and lust to curses turn
The choicest gifts of Heaven.’” -:



IX.— THE FOUR ELEMENTS.

<< T sHoutp like to be a gardener,” said Philip,
when he was fourteen years old, and it was
time for. him to learn a trade; “it is pleasant
to be always living among the green herbs and
fragrant flowers.” But after a while he came
home again, and complained that he was
obliged to stoop down to the ground, and
creep about at his work. It made his back
and knees ache; and so he had given up
gardening.

Philip now wished to be a hunter. “In
the green, shady wood,” said he, “one lives
a noble life.” But he soon came back, and
complained that he could not endure the
keen air early in the morning, which blew
sometimes wet and misty, and sometimes so
terribly cold as to pinch his nose.

It next occurred to him to be a fisherman.
“To glide along the bright clear stream in a



THE FOUR ELEMENTS. 47

light skiff, and without even tiring 2 foot—to
draw nets full of fish out of the water—this. is
a jolly life!” said he. But this pleasure also
soon disgusted him. ‘“ This is wet work,” he
said; “the water is not at all to my taste.”

At last he wished to be a cook. “To the
cook,” he said, “‘the gardener, the hunter, and
fisherman must hand over all that they obtain
by their industry; and, besides, he never
wants for some nice dainties.”

But once more he returned home with
complaints. ‘It were all very well,” said he,
“‘if there were only no fire. But when I have
to stand at the blazing fire, I feel just as if I
should melt away with the heat.”

But his father now no longer permitted that
Philip should choose another trade for the
fifth time, but rather spoke to him in serious
earnest. “If you wish to live contentedly,
you must learn to bear the grievances of life
with a manly spirit; the man must go out of
the world who would escape all the incon-
veniences that the four elements have in store
for us in one way or another. Only, fre-
quently remember the good which certainly
never fails to accompany your present cir-

Cc



18° ss ‘THE FOUR ELEMENTS.
cumstances: so would your hardships, by
degrees, seem like mere trifles.”

Philip followed his father’s counsel ;. and
when others. complained afterwards, he com-
forted himself as he said, “I have learnt by
experience what this means :— |

“ ' From things forbidden cheerfully abstain ;
For every state of being will impart
Its own peculiar blessing and its pain.’ ”



19

X.—THE FLOWERS.

Lovis stood in the garden before a rose-bush
in bloom, and said to his sisters, “'The rose is
certainly the most beautiful of all the flowers !”

Caroline said, “The lily on the flower-bed
yonder is quite as beautiful as the rose. I
take these two flowers for the most beautiful ;
all others are worthless compared with them.”

“Oh!” said little Louisa, “you must not
consider the lovely violets worthless: they are
really beautiful! and they gave us so much
enjoyment last spring.”

Their mother, who heard the conversation
of the children, said, “The three kinds of
flowers which please you so much are beautiful:
likenesses and symbols of three beautiful
virtues. The violet, with its modest dark-blue
colour, is a symbol of Meekness; the snow-
white lily is a symbol of Innocence; but the
red rose signifies that your heart shall glow with
purer excellence, even with the love of God.”

“ Cloth’d in the guise of flowers, the forms we see
Of Meekness, Innocence, and Charity.”



20

XI.—THE-WOOD STRAWBERRIES.
PART I.

AN old soldier with a wooden leg came into a
village, where he was taken suddenly ill. He
was unable to travel any further, but was
obliged to lay on straw in a shed, and very
hard it went with him. A little girl, named
Agatha, the daughter of a poor basket-maker,
felt the most tender compassion for the poor
man. She visited him every day, and every
time made him a present of a halfpenny. But
one evening the honest soldier said, with much
concern: * Dear child, as I heard to-day, your
parents are poor; tell me truly, then, where
you get so much money? For I had rather
die of hunger than receive a single farthing
which you could give me except with a clear
conscience.”

‘©Oh,” said Agatha, “have no uneasiness
about that; the money is lawfully obtained.
I go to school in the next market-town. The
road thither lies through a wood, where there



THE ‘WOOD-STRAWBERRIES. = 21

are plenty of wild strawberries; so every time
I pick a basket-full, sell them in the town, and
always receive a halfpenny for them. My
parents know ali about it, but they have no
objection. They often say, There are many
people yet poorer than we are, and so we must
do them as much good as our condition permits
us.”’ .

The tears stood in the eyes of the old soldier,
and trickled down his moustaches. <“ Good
child,” said he, * God will bless you and your
parents for your benevolent disposition.”

“ However low its state, the willing mind
‘Will opportunities of mercy find.”

PART I.

After some time an officer of high rank,
who was decked with many orders, was travel-
ling through the village. He stopped with
his-splendid carriage before the inn, in order
to let the horses feed, when he heard of the
sick soldier, and went to pay him a visit.



22 . THE WOOD-STRAWBERRIES. |

The old soldier immediately told him about
his benefactress. ‘“ What!” cried the officer,
“‘has a poor child done so much for you, and.
can I, your old General, do less? I shall
immediately give orders that they provide you
with their best in the inn.’

He did so, and then went to the cottage of
little Agatha. ‘* Good child,” he said, de-
lighted, ““your benevolence has made my heart:
warm and my eyes wet. You have presented
the old soldier with many halfpennies; accept
now, in PoturE for them, the same number of
gold pieces.”

The astonished parents said, “Ah, that is too
much !”

But the General replied, “ No, no! This is
only a poor compensation; the good child has
still her better one to expect in heaven.”

“To deeds of charity are given
The promise both of earth and heaven.”



23

X1I.— THE CHERRIES.

Sanina, the daughter of rich parents, had a
nice little room to herself; but it had a very
untidy appearance inside. She never cleaned
it up, and all the good advice of her mother,
that she should keep it in better order, was in
vain.

One Sunday afternoon she had just finished
dressing herself, and was about to go out, when
the daughter of their neighbour brought her a
basket-full of fine black chersries. As tables
and window-sill were already covered with
clothes and other things, Sabina set the basket
down on a chair, which was covered over
with blue silk stuff, and then went out with
her mother to walk to a neighbouring village.

Late in the evening, when it was already
dark, she came back to her room very tired,
and immediately hastened to a seat. But
scarcely had she seated herself when she
jumped quickly up again, and uttered a loud



24 : ‘THE CHERRIES.

scream of terror. For she had seated herself
exactly in the middle of the basket, which
was piled up full of cherries.

At her screams her mother immediately
hastened to her with a light.. But what a
sight she saw! The cherries were all crushed;
the juice flowed on all sides over the chair;
and Sabina’s new white silk dress was so
entirely spoilt, ‘that. it was never fit to be
used again.

But besides this her mother gave her a
severe scolding, and said: “ You see now how
necessary it is to keep things in order, and to
give to each thing its proper place. You
are now punished for your disobedience and
your untidy habits; in future remember the
saying, —

““* Neglect on Order to attend —
Disgrace and loss will be thy end.”



25

XIl.—THE PLUMS.

Mrs. H. once took her four children to pay a
visit to their grandfather, in his beautiful
garden. Their grandfather brought them, on
a vine-leaf, four plums, as yellow as gold and
as large as eggs. He regretted that there
were not more of them ripe. “Now you
must contrive amongst yourselves,” said he,
jokingly, “how you can divide your four
plums between five persons without letting
any be broken in the division.”

“Oh, I will do that,” said Charlotte, the
eldest sister. “I only ask for myself that I
may be allowed to mix and reckon together
things of two different kinds.”

She took the four plums, and said: “We
2 sisters and 1 plum make together 3. My 2
brothers and I plum also make 3. These 2
plums and 1 mother make another 3. So it
all comes right, and there is no breaking.”

Charlotte’s brothers and sister were well



26 THE PLUMS.

satisfied with this division ; ; “but the gratified
mother insisted that each of the children
should receive a plum, and their grandfather
brought Charlotte a beautiful nosegay besides.
“For,” said he, “ Charlotte’s ingenious reck-
oning does much honour to her wits, but still
more honour to her affectionate heart.”

“To wit and knowledge praise is due,
But a good heart is worth the two.”



27

XIV.—THE WALNOUT.

UNDER a great tree, close to the village, two
boys found a walnut. “It belongs to me,”
said Ignatius, “for I was the first to see it.”
“No, it belongs to me,” cried Bernard, “ for
I was the first to pick it up:” and so they
both began to quarrel in earnest. |
€T will settle the dispute,” said an older
boy, who just then came up. He placed
himself between the two boys, broke the nut
in half, and said: “The one shell belongs to
him who first saw the nut, the other shell
belongs to him who first picked it up: but the
kernel I keep for judging the cause. And
this,” he said, as he sat down and laughed, “is
the ordinary conclusion of most law-suits.”

“Persons who love the law too well
The kernel lose and win the shell.”’



_ XV.—THE PEAR-TREE.

Oxtp Rupert sat in-the shade of the great
pear-tree which grew before his house. His
grandchildren ate of the pears, and could never
praise the sweet fruit enough.

Their grandfather said to them, “I must
now tell you how the tree came to be planted.
“More than fifty years ago I was once standing
here, where there was then an empty space,
but where the tree is now standing, and was
complaining of my poverty to my rich neigh-
bour. <“ Ah,” I said, “well contented should
I be if I corild only bring up my fortune to a
hundred crowns.”

My neighbour, who was a shrewd man,
said: “That you can easily do, if you know
how to begin rightly. See here, on this little
spot where you are standing, are more than a
hundred crowns concealed in a hole. Only
work so as to bring them out.”

“TI was still at that time only a silly lad,



‘THE PEAR-TREE. | 29

and on the following night I dug: a ‘great hole
in the ground: but to my disappointment I
did not find a single crown.. When my
neighbour saw the hole in the morning, he
laughed, till he was obliged to hold both his
sides, and said :— |

“QO you simpleton! That is not what I
meant. But I will now give you a young
pear-tree; plant. it in the hole which you
have made, and after some few years the
crowns will come to light.”

“T planted the young stem in the earth.
It grew, and became the great and noble tree
which you see before your eyes. The valu-
able fruit which it has now produced for
many years past has already brought me
more than a hundred crowns, and it continues
to be a capital which produces a good interest.
I have, therefore, never forgotten the proverb
of my wise neighbour; do you remember it

also :—

“*Good sense and industry combined,
Will always certain riches find.’ ”’



30

XVI.— THE GREEN BOUGH.

FRED was a thoughtless, mischievous boy.
_ He paid no attention to good instruction ; nay,
he rather turned it into a joke.

One day he went with his sister Sophia into
the garden. Sophia’s little garden was full of
the most beautiful flowers; but Fred’s was
altogether neglected and full of weeds.
~ « Brother, brother,” said the orderly little
maid, “you never have your things in any
order. Listen to me; it is with you just as
our mother says, you will never in your life
grow up to be a green bough.”

Fred laughed, climbed up into a large pear-
tree, and shouted, “ Sophy, look at me up
here. I have already grown up as tall as a
green branch !”

Crack, crack, went the branch; Fred fell
down and broke his arm.

“ The wilful mind, against instruction bent,
Will never long escape its punishment.”



31

XVII.— THE PRECIOUS VEGETABLE.

Two girls, Bridget and Walpurg, were going
to the town, and each carried on her head a
heavy basket-full of fruit. oo

Bridget grumbled and groaned. continually,
but Walpurg laughed and joked.

Bridget said, “How can you laugh | so?
Your basket is just as heavy as mine; and
you are not stronger than I am.” |

Walpurg said, “I have placed on my load
a vegetable which I always carry, and so
scarcely feel it.” .

“Ah!” said Bridget, “that must be a
precious vegetable. I must also lighten my
load with it, so tell me what it is.”

Walpurg replied, “ The precious vegetable
which makes every burden lighter is called
Patience. Remember, Bridget, the saying,—

“¢ Friend, to thy burden add good will ;
Though heavy, twill be lighter still.’ ”’



XVIII.— THE TURNIP.

A poor labourer had pulled in his garden an |
unusually large turnip, at which everybody
was astonished. “I will make a present of
it,” he said, “to my noble landlord, as it
._.pleases. him when his fields and gardens are
well cultivated.”

So he carried the turnip to his mansion.
The nobleman praised the man’s industry and
good-will, and made him a present of three
ducats. |

Now another peasant in the village, who
was very rich and very covetous, heard of this,
and said, “ I shall go directly and make the
nobleman a present of my fine calf; for if he
gives three gold pieces for a common turnip,
what shall I receive for such a beautiful calf?”

So he led the calf by a rope to the mansion,
and begged the nobleman to accept it as a pre-
sent. The nobleman quite understood why



THE TURNIP. oe 33
the avaricious peasant behaved so liberally,
and said that he did not wish for the calf..

But the peasant continued to press him not
to despise such a trifling gift. At last, the
shrewd nobleman said: * Well, then, since
you force me to do so, I will accept your pre-
sent. But, as you are so particularly liberal
towards me, I must not let you find me less
liberal towards you. I shall, therefore, make
you a present in exchange, which cost me two
or three times more than your calf is worth;”
and so saying, he presented to the astounded
and discomfited peasant the well-known large
turnip. :

“ Reward will crown the generous heart,
But shame shall make the selfish smart.”



34°

XIX.—THE CABBAGE.

THERE was a careful mother who used to raise
in her garden vegetables of every kind. One
day she said to her little daughter, “ Look,
Lizzy, at these pretty little yellow things on
the underside of the cabbage-leaf. They are
the eggs from which the pretty-coloured but
destructive caterpillars come. Now, look over
all the leaves this afternoon, and crush these
eggs, and so our cabbages will remain green,
beautiful, and uninjured.”

Lizzy thought that. any time would do for
this work, and ended with thinking no more
about it. Her mother was unwell for a week,
and did not go into the garden. But when
she was well again, she took the negligent girl
by the hand, and led her to the cabbage-bed,
and what a sight! all the cabbage-plants were
devoured by the caterpillars. There was no-
thing more to be seen except the stalks and

fibres of the leaves. The little girl, shocked



‘THE CABBAGE. a 35
and ashamed, wept over her carelessness. But
her mother said, “Do to-day what can be
done to-day, and never put it off till to-
morrow. Still more important,” said her mo-
ther, “is another lesson, which seems, as it
were, written on these sadly injured leaves,—

“< Evil, ere yet its power be felt, withstand ;
Neglected, it soon gains the upper hand.’ ”



36

XX.— THE LARGE CABBAGE-HEAD.

‘Two journeymen, named Joseph and Benedict,
were once going by a vegetable garden near a
village.

“Look here,” said Joseph, “ what kind of
vegetable-heads are these?” for so he named
the cabbage-heads.

« Ah,” said Benedict, who was a great
boaster, “these are not large. When I was
on my travelling apprenticeship I once saw a
vegetable with a head which was as large as
the parsonage-house yonder.”

Joseph, who was a coppersmith, imme-
diately replied, “ That was very well; but I
once helped to make a kettle which was as
large as the church.”

< But what in the world,” cried Benedict,
‘¢ could they want such a large kettle for ?”

Joseph said, “Why, to be sure, they
wanted it to boil your large cabbage in.”

Benedict was ashamed, and said, “Now I



THE LARGE CABBAGE-HEAD. 37

see at once what you mean! You always
keep to the truth, and have only said this now
in order to turn my lying boast into ridicule.
I must be satisfied with this, for— .

“ The same base coin he utters oft receives.’ ”



38 |

XXI.— THE EARS OF CORN.

A. FARMER went out with his little boy, Toby,
into his corn-field, to see if his corn were
nearly ripe. | ,

« Father,” said the boy, “ how comes it that
some stalks bend so low towards the earth, but
others hold their heads so upright?. These
must surely be people of rank; the others,
who bow themselves so low before them, are
certainly the common folk.”

His father picked a pair of ears, and said,
“Look at this ear, which bends itself so
modestly ; it is full of beautiful grains: but
this, which sticks itself up so proudly, is quite
barren and empty.”

“Who proudly holds his head, at once
We write him down a silly dunce.”



39

XXIL—THE PEAS. |

A CONJURER begged permission to perform a
perfectly new trick before a.Prince. .The
Prince gave permission, and the conjurer
brought a bowl full of peas, soaked in water,
into the room; he then had a needle held
before him, and threw the peas so accurately
that every time a pea remained sticking on the
point of the needle. 7

The Prince said, “ Good man, you have
bestowed a great deal of pains on this accom-
plishment, and have expended a great deal of
time to bring it to such perfection. I will,
therefore, reward you for it.” He then said
something privately to one of his servants, who
went out, and soon came back again with a
heavy sack. The conjurer congratulated him-
self, and supposed that the sack was full of
gold.

But when they opened the sack at the com-
mand of the Prince, there appeared nothing in

it but peas.



40 oo, THE PEAS.
_ The Prince now said, “ As your trick is of
no value to any one, and you would be likely
to be paid for it very indifferently, you might
soon fail to have the peas necessary to. carry it
on with. I, therefore, give you an opportunity
to supply yourself with as many as you may
want.” | |

“ Spend: not thy time on trifling things,

Whose exercise no profit brings.”



41

XXIL—THE FIELD.

THE cottage of poor Nicholas stood on a plot
of ground which was overgrown entirely with
thorn and hazel-bushes. One hot day, at
harvest time, as Nicholas was lying in the
shade of a hazel-bush, a peasant drove by him
a cart heavily laden with corn. Nicholas
looked at the laden cart with envious eyes, and
scarcely wished the peasant good day. |

The peasant stood still, and said to Nicholas,
“If you would every day work only so much
of this neglected piece of ground, which is
your property, as you cover with your lazy
body, you could every year reap much more
corn than you see in this cart.”

The advice was plain to Nicholas. He
began to grub up the bushes and roots, and to
work the ground, and so he obtained a field
which cost him not a penny, and amply sup-
ported him and his family.

“Sloth cries in hopeless hunger to be fed,
But Industry ne’er looks in vain for bread.”



42

XXTV.—THE VINEYARD.

A FATHER said to his three sons on his death-
bed, “Dear children, I can leave you nothing
but . these little buildings and the vineyard
near them, in which, however, there is a trea-
sure lying concealed. Dig diligently, there-
fore, in the vineyard, and so you will find the
treasure.”

After their father’s death, the sons dug the
whole vineyard with the greatest diligence,
but found neither gold nor silver. On the
other hand, the vineyard, since they had
worked it so diligently, produced a much
greater abundance of grapes than formerly,
and they earned from it twice as much
money.

It then appeared to the sons what their
deceased father had meant about the treasure,
and they wrote on the entrance of the vineyard
in large letters : —

“ For skilful hand and willing heart behold

In industry the riches mine of gold.”



43

. -X¥XV.—THE MUSHROOMS.

A MOTHER once sent her little girl, Catherine,
into the wood to find mushrooms, as her father
was very fond of them.

< Mother,” said the little cirl, when she
came back, ‘this time I have found some
really beautiful ones! There, only look,” she
said, and opened the basket; “they are all
beautiful, as bright as scarlet, and covered
with white pearls. There are plenty besides
of those brown, ugly ones, of which you lately
brought some home; but they were too bad
for me, and I left them standing.”

“QO you silly, foolish child!” said her vexed
mother. ‘“ These beautiful mushrooms, in
spite of their scarlet and pearls, are only poi-
sonous toadstools, and whoever eats of them
must die. But these brown ones, which are
called * bratelings,’ and which you despised, in
spite of their mean appearance are among the
best.”



44 THE MUSHROOMS. /

So, dear child, it is with most things in the
world. There are virtues which make little
show; and showy faults, at which the fool

stares. Yes, the deceitful glitter of evil can
seduce us readily into sin. |

“Taste not the cup held by the hand of sin,
However sweet, rank poisons lurks within.”



45

XXVL-——-THE GOURD AND THE ACORN.

A. COUNTRYMAN was lying in the shade of an
oak-tree, and looking at a gourd which -was
growing in a garden close by. He shook his
head, and said, “ Well! well! It does not
seem quite right to me, that the little creeping
gourd should produce such a large splendid
fruit, and the large, noble oak-tree, should
bring forth such a poor little one. Now, if I
had made the world, the oak-tree should have
made a splendid appearance, with large gourds
as yellow as gold, and heavy as a hundred
weight. That would, now, have been a glo-
rious thing to see.”

Scarcely had he said this, when an acorn
fell down, and struck him so sharply on the
nose, that it bled.

“Oh, poor me!” said the man, astonished ;
“‘here I have received a sharp crack on my
nose for my conceit. If this acorn had really
been a gourd, my nose would have been
entirely smashed.”

“ God, in full wisdom, the whole world design’d,
And to each part its proper use assign’d.”



46

XXVII.—THE OAK-TREE.

Once—a long time ago—two young men,
named Edward and Oswald, appeared in a
court of justice. |

Edmund said to the judge, “ When I was
going on a journey, three years ago, I gave to
this Oswald, whom I then considered my best
friend, a valuable ring with precious stones, to
keep for me. But now he will not give the
ring up to me.” °

Oswald laid his hand upon his breast, and
said, “I swear, upon my honour, I know
nothing about the ring. My friend Edmund
must be out of his senses in this matter.”

The judge said, “Edmund, can nobody
give evidence that you gave the ring to him?”

Edmund replied, “ Alas! there was nobody
near; there was only an old oak-tree in the
field, under which we took leave of one an-
other.” oo

Oswald said, “I am ready to take an oath,
that I know no more about the tree than I do
about the ring.”



THE OAK-TREE. | 47
| The judge said, “ Edmund, go and bring
me a twig from the tree. I wish to see it.
Meanwhile do you, Oswald, wait here till
Edmund returns.” a |
Edmund went. After a little while the
judge remarked, “ Where, now, can Edmund
be remaining so long? Oswald, Pepen: the
window, and see if he is not coming.”

Oswald said, “ Oh, sir, he cannot come
back again so soon. The tree is above a mile
distant from this place.”

Then said the judge, “O you goaléss 1 liar!
who would have made your false oaths before
God, the highest Judge, who looks into all
hearts. You know as much about the ring as
about the tree!” . |

Oswald was obliged to give up the ring, and
was sentenced to prison for a year.

“There,” said the judge, “you will find
time to consider the important truth : —

“¢Tt comes at last, the judgment-day,
Which every falsehood will display.’ ”



48 ©

XXVIH.-~-THE OAK AND THE WILLOW.

ONE morning, after a fearfully stormy night,
father Richard went out with his son Anselm
into the field, to see whether the storm had
done any harm. —~ |

Little Anselm said, “ Oh, look, father! the
great stitf oak-tree lies yonder on the ground,
and the slight willow is standing pliant and
upright by the brook here. I thought, now,
the tempest would have destroyed the willow
easier than the proud oak, which has hitherto
defied every wind.”

<< Child!” said the father, “ the stiff oak was
broken because it could not bend itself; but
the pliant willow yielded to the storm, and so
could not be injured.”

“Compliance oft escapes the deadly blow
Which lays unyielding Obstinacy low.”



49

XXIX.—THE BOUNDARY-STONE.

UnricH dwelt in a nice house, which was sur-
rounded by a beautiful green orchard, full of
fruit-trees. The meadow of his neighbour
bordered on it. The avaricious man wished
to .enlarge his orchard at the expense. f his
neighbour, and privately removed -*
the boundary-stone some distance further into
his neighbour’s meadow.

Sometime after he mounted a ladder, placed
against a tree, to pick cherries. When he
was at the top of the ladder, which stood too
upright, he fell with it backwards to the
ground, and broke his neck against the boun-
dary-stone. Had Ulrich not moved the stone,
he would have fallen down on the soft grass-
plot and have done himself little injury.




‘The rogue, upon some evil gain intent,
Oft wins ; but, winning, finds his punishment.”



50 |

XXX.—THE CANARY-BIRD.

‘Cristina begged her mother to buy her a
canary-bird. Her mother said, “You shall
have one when you become always obedient
and industrious, but especially when you give



up y@uUr curiosity, which prompts you to pry
into*tseless, or even hurtful things.”

- Christina promised she would. One day
she came home from school, when her mother
said, “There is a little new box on the table;
on no account whatever open it, and do not even
once move it. Ifyou obey me, I shall soon
give you a great deal of pleasure.” .

Her mother then went out to visit her little
sick god-child, William; but scarcely was she
out of the door, ere the over-curious girl had
the box in her hand, “ How light it is!” she
said; “and there are some little holes in the
lid! What can there be in it?”

She opened the little box, and, behold! there
immediately hopped out a most beautiful yel-



| THE CANARY-BIRD. ; 51

low canary, and flew chirping merrily about
the room. As she was vainly pursuing the
brisk little bird about the room, till she was
out of breath, and her cheeks glowed, im
walked her mother, and said, “ You disobe-
dient, curious girl! this beautiful bird I wished
to give to you, but I wished first to put you
to the proof whether you deserved it. But
now I shail give it to good little William, who

is more obedient, and not so curious, as you.”

“Mark well this truth: the prying mind
Will lose far more than it can find.”



52

XXXI.— THE SWALLOWS.

In the spring-time, when the swallows came
back, and with cheerful twitter took possession
of their old nest in the eaves of a farm-house,
the farmer said to his children: ** Now, do no
harm to the good little birds; he who drives
away the swallows from his threshold, also
drives away good luck from his house. Our
neighbour destroyed the swallows’ nest before
his window, and crushed the eggs; and from
that time he has fallen back in his circum-
stances, and he is going to ruin.”

Little Christian asked his father how that
could be. His father replied, “Our neigh-
bour had abandoned the pious, simple customs
of his fathers. His grandfather and great-
grandfather had treated with patience the
harmless, yea, rather the useful swallows, and
were awakened for their work at early morn
by the active chattering birds. But our
neighbour, who was hard-hearted both to man
and beast, and spent half the night in the pot-



THE SWALLOWS. | - 53

house, was glad to dream away the bright
morning hours ; and as the swallows disturbed
him in his morning slumbers, he destroyed
their nest. The sullen, lazy, and wasteful man
in this way drove good luck and blessing from
his house, together with the swallows.”

ro

“ Beneath thy roof protect the swallows’ nest,—
They seem to bid you in God’s name be blest.”



54

XXXII.— THE PIGEONS.

Ewmerrck and Leopold, two active lads, were
neighbours. Emmerick, who was rich, had
many beautiful pigeons; but Leopold, who
was poor, had only a few of the commonest
sort. XN

. One day a pair of Emmerick’s pigeons flew
over to Leopold’s cot, and began to build
there. Poor Leopold thought, “ How lucky
I should be if these pigeons belonged to me!
They shine as white as snow, and their heads
and tails glisten as black as coals. Of all
Emmerick’s pigeons these please me much the
best.”

A. strong desire came over ‘him to shut them
up and keep them. ‘“ But no,” said he, “that
I dare not do; that were indeed asin! I will
at once overcome the temptation.” So he
shut the cot, caught the pigeons, and brought

them to Emmerick.
Now Emmerick felt a great deal of pleasure



THE PIGEONS. 55

at ‘the honesty of the poor lad; so he soon.
took the first eggs which he obtained from the
beautiful pigeons, crept secretly to Leopold’s
cot, and placed them under a common grey
pigeon, instead of her own.

When, therefore, the young ones crept out
of the shell and became fledged, Leopold was
astonished to see that: they were beautifully
marked black and. white, exactly as Emmerick’s
very beautiful pair. He ran full of joy to
Emmerick, and informed him of the supposed
wonder. Emmerick laughed; told him that
he had changed the eggs, in order to show his
gratitude towards the honourable Leopold;
and. said, at the end of the conversation,
«- Always remain thus honourable, dear Leo-
pold; for—

“On unstain’d hand and honest breast
Be sure God’s blessings always rest.’ ”



XXXL —THE HOUSE-COCK.

A&A Busy housewife was accustomed to wake
her two maids every morming to their work
as soon as. the cock crew. The maids were
very angry with the cock, and said one to the
other: “If that abominable cock were out of
the way, we might be allowed to sleep a little
longer.” They therefore killed it; but the
mistress, who was already very old, and al-
ways waked very early, was no longer able to
tell what time it was; she therefore waked
the maids still earlier—yes, often soon after
midnight.
“Trying to "scape a minor ill,
Many incur a greater still.”



«BT

XXXIV.— THE PARTRIDGE’S NEST.

In a cornfield near a wood two boys found a
partridge’s nest, and they contrived to catch
the hen, which was sitting on the eggs.

“ You,”. said the elder boy, “take the eggs,
and I will keep the bird; for the eggs are
worth just as much as the bird.” “If that is
so,” said the younger, “ * give me the bird, and
keep the eggs yourself.

They began to ey and to tear one
another’s hair. During their scuffle, the elder
boy let the old bird go, and the younger unin-
tentionally trod upon the eggs. Neither of
them, therefore, had anything, and said to one
another,—

“¢ Our father, surely, said quite right,
That it is wiser when
Contentedly we share the egg,
Than quarrel for the hen.’”



58

XXXV.— THE SONG-BIRDS..

THERE was a pleasant village, entirely sur-
rounded by an orchard of fruit-trees. The
trees blossomed and perfumed the air in the
most charming manner in spring. Upon their
branches and in the hedges all kinds of lively
birds sang, and made their. nests in every
direction; while, in the autumn, every branch
was richly laden with apples, pears, or plums.

Some mischievous boys once began to take
and. destroy the nests. The birds were scared
away in consequence, and by degrees alto-
gether deserted the spot. There was now no
more singing heard in the garden or the
orchard; all was still and gloomy.. But the
destructive caterpillars, which had hitherto
been destroyed by the birds, got the upper
hand, and devoured the leaves and blossoms.
The trees stood bare as in the middle of winter ;
and the mischievous boys, who used to have



THE SONG—BIRDS. | 59

excellent fruit to eat in abundance, were now
unable to procure a single apple.

“Rob the poor birds of eggs and nest,
Nor fruit nor song you'll find :

_ So kindly let in safety rest
Things harmless of their kind.”



60

XXXVL—THE YELLOW-HAMMERS.

Two children were going from their village to
the mill on a sharp winter’s day, and each
carried on the head a little sack of corn. As
they went along by the miller’s garden they
saw some yellow-hammers, which sat hungry
upon a hedge white with hoar-frost. One of
them, little Bertha, had kind compassion on
the little yellow birds; so she opened her sack,
and scattered two handfuls of corn for them.

Robert, her brother, found fault with her,
and said: “Oh, you soft-hearted simpleton!
see, now, you will certainly receive less meal ;
and then our parents will punish you well for
this !”

Bertha was frightened, and said: ‘ Well,
now, perhaps, I ought not to have done this.
Notwithstanding, our good parents will not
take my kindness amiss; and God can cer-
tainly bless us for it in some other way.”

When the two children came back to the



THE YELLOW-HAMMERS. |—6«dh6S1

mill to take away the meal, behold! there was
just twice as much meal in the sack of the
compassionate Bertha as in Robert’s. Robert
was surprised, and Bertha was much 1 disposed
to regard it as a miracle. _
- But the good miller, who had ‘heard the
conversation of the children by the hedge, said
to Bertha: “ Your compassionate feelings to-
wards the hungry little birds pleased me so
much, that I doubled your measure. But
although I put the meal into your sack, still
you should regard it as a blessing which God
has bestowed on you to reward your kind-
heartedness.”

“God to the good and feeling heart
A blessing ever will impart.”



‘62

XXXVII.— THE TITMOUSE.

< Loox at that beautiful titmouse yonder, on
the apple-tree!” said Lawrence, to his sister
Lucy: ‘I will soon have it.” He climbed up
the tree, set a trap a little way off, and con-
cealed himself with his sister in the arbour; in
order to watch the bird. |

The titmouse went straight mto the trap,
and Lawrence was presently up the tree again ;
but he fell with the trap, while he was taking
the bird out of it. The bird escaped, but
Lawrence wounded his hand against a broken
bough.

Lucy said: “Oh, my poor brother! your
hand is bleeding. Now, you will surely stay
here, and will not climb the tree again to
catch the titmouse. You would perhaps then
break both arm and leg.”

“<“ Ah!” said Lawrence, laughing, “I do not
remain down here on that account, but my
trouble now would be all in vain; for the



THE TITMOUSE. . 63

titmouse would avoid the trap in which it has
been already caught.”

«If that is so,” said Lucy, “the titmouse is
wiser than you: it will not go a second time
where it perceives danger. . But will you, who
have only this instant got a wound, and have
only just escaped a much greater misfortune,
nevertheless venture again into danger, and
make a joke of 1t?”

“Who little warnings foolishly despise,
Will find too late some reason to be wise.’”’



64

XXXVIIL—THE STARLING.

An old huntsman named Maurice had a star-
ling in his room, which had been trained to
speak certain words. If, for example, the
huntsman cried, “ Starling, where are you?”
the starling would always answer, “Here I
am!”

Ihittle Charles, a neighbour’s boy, took parti-
cular delight in the bird, and often paid it a
visit. Once when Charles came, the huntsman
was not in his room. Charles immediately
seized the bird, put it in his pocket, and would
have sneaked away with it.

But just at that moment the huntsman
came to the door. He thought to amuse the
boy, and cried out, as usual, “ Where are
you?” and the bird in the boy’s pocket cried
out, as loud as it could, “ Here I am!”

“However skill conceals it from the sight,
Some chance, unlooked for, brings each fraud to light.”



65

XXxXIX.— THE CUCKOO.

On a lovely May morning, George and Michael
went into a wood, where they heard for the
first time the call of the cuckoo.

«That is a lucky bird,” said George, who
was superstitious; “ his call promises me Inck
—at the least, a pocket full of money.”

«Why particularly to you?” said Michael,
who was just as superstitious as the other; “I
do not see why you should stand higher in the
cuckoo’s favour than I. I am still better than
you; and I maintain, it promises luck to me.”

Instead of enjoying the beautiful morning,
they now began to quarrel; from quarrelling
they came to blows; and at last they separated,
sadly handled, in great anger with one another.

When the wounded boys met again, it was
at the surgeon’s; and while he was dressing
their wounds they told him how the quarrel
commenced, and asked him to which of them
the cuckoo would really prove the lucky bird,

:



66 | THE CUCKOO.

The surgeon laughed, and said, “Oh, you
simpletons! to neither of you two, but to me.
For the cuckoo has sent you both home with
bloody noses; but it has put some money into
my pocket.”

“ Fen though 1 no third should profit, yet the two
Who quarrel will their strife severely rue.’ |



67

XL.—THE COW.

A wipow, named Berene, was living with her.
two daughters in rather poor. circumstances.
What they earned every week, every, week
they were obliged to spend. Besides this, one
day they lost their only cow, and were in the
greatest distress about it. They said, “ Unless
God give us back our cow, we can never have
another; for it is impossible for us to raise
money enough to buy one.”

“Do your part faithfully,” said their neigh-
bour ; “ and so God will send you help.”

< But what, then, can we do?” said Berene.

Their neighbour answered: “ You must, in
the first place, by industry increase your
wages. There are three of you, and you
understand well spinning, knitting, and sew-
ing: work daily two hours longer; it must
indeed go hard if you cannot each earn two-
pence more than hitherto.

“< In the second place, you must by economy



68 ‘THE COW. |
diminish your expenses. You drink at break-
fast.every day a kind of slop, which you call
coffee. Although you take a very little coffee
and. sugar, yet that little costs you too much.
Therefore eat a little broth, which is certainly
more nourishing; and so you will each save, at
the least, another twopence. Follow these two
pieces of advice: lay up that which you so
gain and save; and you will soon. have col-
lected as much money as a good cow costs.”

Berene and her daughters followed this wise
advice; and at the end of the year they had
as much money as they wanted to pay for the
cow. Yes; and, what was still more, they
had thereby learnt to better their poor cir-
cumstances by industry and economy, and
were tolerably well off. Their neighbour
then said, <‘ Do you see, now, that I was right ?
It is always found true:

“¢ Aid but thyself, and surely God will aid
Th’ attempt by industry and prudence made.’”



69

XLI.— THE COW-BELL.
PART I.
VENDELIN, a peasant boy, was keeping some
cows in a wood. They were all provided
with bells; but the most beautiful cow had
the most beautiful bell.

Presently there came a stranger through
the wood, who said, “ That is a splendid bell!
how much did it cost you?”

< A crown,” said Vendelin.

“No more ?” cried the stranger. “I will
give you two crowns for it directly.”

Vendelin gave the man the bell, and put the
two crowns into his purse in great glee.

But when the cow had lost her bell, Ven-
delin could no longer hear in what part of the
thick wood she was. ‘The cow wandered away
from the rest; and the stranger, who had con-
cealed himself in the bushes, seized her, and
led her away secretly.



70 . THE COW-BELL.

But poor Vendelin now perceived, for the
first time, that he had been deceived by the

' rogue.

“Who readily will over-pay,
Trust not——he gains some other way.”

PART I.

Vendelin came home with weeping eyes,
and told his story. ‘“ Ah!” said he, “could I
have but guessed that the thief paid me so
high for the bell, only that he might obtain
the cow!”

His father now said to him: “ As the rogue
has deceived you, so will the pleasures of sin
deceive us all: it offers at first a little gain,
but at the last great loss. Ifa man yields but
a finger, it presently seizes his whole hand.
Mark, then, the saying :—

“* Admit not sin in any part,
Pp
Or soon "twill steal away thy carth.’”



THE COW-BELL. —— 71
| PART Il.

His mother said: “ But, my dear. Vendelin,
did it not occur to you why we keep the old
custom of hanging a bell upon the cow ?”

« Ah!” said Vendelin, “the money ‘had
quite blinded me. I: only thought, ‘Now is
my opportunity of gaining a crown in this
clever way: the bell is only an useless orna-
ment; it does not make the cow yield any
more milk.’ But as soon as the cow was gone,
then it struck me what the bell is for.”

“So,” said his mother, “it is with thought-
less and changeable men. They cast off many
ancient customs, as useless and unnecessary ;
but afterwards they learn to their cost, and
understand, that such customs had their good
reasons. .

““’'Time-hallow’d customs ne’er despise :
When lightly lost, we find them wise.’ ”



oJ
we

-XLIL—THE SHEEP.

An old, skilful, and upright shepherd, had
many sons and daughters. They wished once
to go to the fair in the town, in order to attend
a ball. But their father said to them, “ It is
not good for you. I have always tried hitherto
to keep your morals pure from corruption ;
but there you would too readily be exposed to
it.”

The children replied, “Indeed !—vyet other
people go there.”

But their father said, “ Many have already
gone there, and have sacrificed health and life,
honour and innocence: would you imitate
them on that account? Do not, then, act like
the sheep. You know, when one jumps over
the precipice, all the others jump after. On
this account you call them stupid animals.
But the man who plunges himself into ruin
because others do likewise, is not at all wiser
than they.

“ * Be wise, nor follow down the precipice
The self-abandon’d wretch to shame and vice.”



XLITI.— THE HE-GOAT.

LADY named. Hill lived in a beautiful house
at the entrance of a town. One morning she
said to her maid, “ Crescenz, I am just going
to church. When you go across the street to
fetch water, or into the garden to pick beans,
shut the house-door —(I have often given you
directions about this already, and have waited
in hopes that you would at length obey me)—
else some one could easily slink into the house,
and do us injury.”

The lady went; Crescenz cleaned up the
room ; went next to the spring, and left all the
doors standing open, as usual.

‘¢ There is not a person to be seen all up and
down the street,” said she, and laughed at the
over-anxious carefulness of her mistress.

But while Crescenz was chattering with
another maid at the spring, a goat ran in at
the house-door, sprang up the stairs, and came
into the lady’s room.



74: THE HE-GOAT.

There hung a large looking-glass in a ‘gilt
frame, which reached nearly to the floor of the
room. The goat saw himself in the glass, and,
supposing that it was another there, butted and
threatened him with his horns. The goat in
the glass did just the same, on which the real
goat suddenly charged at the imaginary one,
and struck at him so violently that the look-
ing-glass was shivered into.a thousand pieces.

Just then Crescenz came in at the house-
door, with the tub of water on her head, and
heard the crash of the broken glass. She ran
to the room, clasped her hands together over
her head, and beat and drove the goat out of
the house: but that could not put the glass
together again.

When her mistress returned home, the care-
less maid was dismissed for her disobedience,
and her wages were kept back as some com-
pensation for the mischief done. In her new
place it was no longer necessary to order her
to shut the door: by this time she had learnt
to attend to the saying :—

‘““The careless, who despise advice,
Must for their folly pay the price.”



XLIV.—THE STAG.

Hvsert was still a young boy when his good
father, the gamekeeper at Tannstein, was shot
by an unknown poacher in the depth of the
forest. The mother brought up the fatherless
boy as well as she could; and after twenty
years, when he had become an _ excellent
forester, he obtained his father’s place.

One day Hubert was hunting with many
keepers and sportsmen in the wood. He shot
at a large stag——missed it, when a voice cried
out of the bushes in distress: “OO God, I am
wounded!” Hubert sprang in, and lo! an
old man was writhing and groaning, with the
blood rattling in his throat. The whole hunt-
ing-party collected round the dying man.
But Hubert knelt by his side, embraced him,
crying aloud, begged him for forgiveness, and
assured him that he had not observed him.

But the dying man said, “ You have no-
thing to ask my pardon for. I will now



76 _ THE STAG.

disclose what no man has yet known: [I-am
that poacher who shot your father. All round
here, exactly under these lofty oaks, his blood
sank into the ground. And now you, the son
of the murdered man, without knowing it, and
unintentionally, just on the very spot, must
avenge the murder on me!— God is just!” he
still sighed out, as he expired.

A shudder thrilled through the bone and
marrow of all the bystanders ; 3; and one of
them exclaimed :—

“ Early or late, the murderer will find
God’s righteous vengeance following close behind.”



| 77

XLV.—THE WOLF.

JoHN was keeping sheep not far from a large
wood. One day he cried out with all his
might, in order to make some fun for himself,
< The wolf is coming !—the wolf is coming !”

The peasants immediately came running in
troops out of the next village, with axes and
clubs, to destroy the wolf; but as they saw
nething of it they went home again, and John
laughed in his sleeve at them.

On the next day John cried again, “ The
wolf! the wolf!”

The peasants again came out, although not
so many in number as yesterday. But they
saw no trace of a wolf; so they shook their
heads, and went home, full of vexation.

On the third day, the wolf came in earnest.
John cried with dismay, “‘ Help! help!—the
wolf! the wolf!” but this time not a single
peasant came to help him.

The wolf broke in among the flock, killed



78 - THE WOLF. / oy
several sheep, and ameng .them_the beautiful
little lamb, which was John’s own, and which
he had especially loved. :

“The truth itself is disbeliev’d
Of him, who erewhile has deceiv’d.”



7.9:

XLVI.—THE MONKEY.

A ricu miser, who had never given a farthing
in alms to.a poor man, had a monkey for his
companion; but he hoped to sell even him
again for more than he had paid for him.

One day the hard-hearted man went out,
when the monkey got upon the chests full of
money, and threw whole paw-fuls of gold and
silver out of the window into the street.

The people, who saw this, ran hither in
numbers to pick it up; they scuffled and
fought for the money, and picked up as much
as they could get.

When the chests were now almost emptied,
the miser came up the street, and saw with
horror what was going on. “Oh, that hide-
ous —that detestable—that stupid beast!” he
cried out, and already threatened the monkey
with his clenched fist from a distance.

But a neighbour said to the furious man,
““ Rest satisfied. It is certainly stupid to



80 THE MONKEY.

throw money out of the window like this mon-
key. But is it, then, much more reasonable

for a man to lock it up m chests, and make no
use at all of it?”

“ Happy the man, who, wealth and means possessing,
--Makes them to others and himself a blessing.”



~ Sl

“XLVIL—THE LION.

A poor slave, who had run away from his
master, had been re-captured, and sentenced
to death. He was brought into a large wide
place, and a dreadful lion let loose upon him.
Many thousand spectators looked on.

The lon rushed frightfully at the poor
man,— but then suddenly stood still, wagged
his tail, jumped round him full of joy, and
licked his hands affectionately. The people
were astonished at it, and inquired of the slave
HOw it was. The slave told his story.

« When I ran away from my master, I hid
myself i in a hole in the desert, where this lion
came in to me whining, and holding up to me
his paw, m which a sharp thorn was sticking.
I drew the thorn out for him; and from that
time the lion supplied me with venison, and
we lived securely together in the den. At the
last hunting we separated from one another,

G



82 “ | THE LION.

and both were taken; and now the good beast.
is happy to have found me again.” |

_ All the people were charmed at ‘the grati-
tude of the good beast, and cried aloud, “ Let
the man who did him the benefit live! Let
the grateful lion live!”

The slave was released, and richly recom-
pensed ; and the lion accompanied him, now
and afterwards, as tame as a dog, without
doing any one mischief.

“ Through gratitude the very beasts are tame—
May their example ne’er put thee to shame !”’



83 oe

XLVIIL—THE EARWIG.

ANSELM had the fault of being a listener. His
father often warned him, but it did him no
good. One evening a person came to his
father from the town into the garden, and said
he had something to say to him privately. So
the father went with him into the summer-
house, and shut the door.

Anselm presently sneaked up, and placed
his ear on a little chink which was in the
door; but all at once he felt quite a strange
sensation in his ear. It seemed as if something
was creeping and crawling about in it; and he
soon felt such a dreadful smarting that he
was forced to cry out, and became almost
distracted.

The father came with his visitor in alarm
from the summer-house. The doctor was im-
mediately sent for, who syringed Anselm’s ear.
At last there crawled out of it an earwig,



84 THE EARWIG.

which had concealed itself in the chink, and
had crept into his ear.

«Are you now sufficiently punished for
your listening, sir?” said his father. “ Let
this, then, serve as a warning to you for the
future. Know that there are many still worse
things than the earwig which creep into the
ears of listeners— yes, and into their heads
and hearts, too!—I mean, misunderstanding,
hatred, and malice. You must wean yourself
from these failings, if you would ever be an
honest fellow.”

“ Prudence forbids, but shame and honour more,
To stand a sneaking listener at the door.”



85

XLIX.—THE LOAF OF BREAD.

At a time of scarcity a certain rich man in-
vited twenty poor children to his house, and
said to them, “In this basket .there is a loaf
of bread for each of you; take it, and come
again every day at this hour till God sends us
better times.” .

The children seized upon the basket, wran-
gled and fought for the bread, as each wished
to get the best and largest loaf; and at last
went away, without even thanking him.

Francesca alone, a poor but neatly-dressed
child, stood modestly at a distance, took the
smallest loaf which was left in the basket,
gratefully kissed the gentleman’s hand, and
then went home in a quiet and orderly
manner.

On the following day the children were just
as ill-behaved; and poor Francesca this time
received a loaf which was scarcely half the



86 ‘THE LOAF OF BREAD.

/

size of the rest. But when she came home,
and her mother began to cut the bread, there
fell out of it a number of brig ght new silver
pieces.

Her mother was perplexed, and said, “ ‘Take.
back the money this instant; for it has, no
doubt, got into the bread through some mis-
take.”

Francesca carried it back. But the bene-
volent man said, “No, no! it was no mistake.
[ had the money baked into the smallest loaf
in order to reward you, you good child! Al-
ways continue thus contented, peaceable, and
unassuming: the person who is contented with
the smaller loaf rather than quarrel for the
larger one, will find blessings still more valu-
able than money baked in the bread.”

“A modest, peaceful, thankful life,
Gains more than discontent and strife.”



87

L.— BREAD AND WATER.

In a time of great scarcity a poor boy, named
Paul, came down from the mountain to a
neighbouring village, and begged for bread at
the houses of the wealthier inhabitants. Peter,
the son of a rich farmer, was sitting before his
house-door with a large slice of bread in his
hand. “‘ Give me, too, a bit of that,” said poor
Paul; “I am so very hungry.”

But Peter hardheartedly replied, “Go away!
i have no bread for you.”

About a year afterwards Peter went up the
mountain to look after his goat, which had
strayed. He wandered a long time up and
down among the rocks. The sun was shining
very fiercely, and he was almost fainting from
thirst; but he could not find a spring any-
where. SO

At last he saw poor Paul, who was keeping
sheep, sitting in the shade of a tree, with a



88 ' BREAD AND WATER.

stone bottle full of water standing near him.
< Give me some to drink,” said rich Peter ;
<‘T am so very thirsty.”

But ia said, “Go away! I have no water |
for you.”

Then Peter remembered that he had once
unmercifully refused a morsel of bread to poor
Paul; the tears started to his eyes, and he
begged Paul’s. forgiveness. Paul was over-
come, forgave him, and reached him the bottle.
But Peter said, “May God reward you, both
here and. hereafter, for this draught of water !”

~

“Freely pardon, freely give,
Is truly Christianly to live.”



89

LI.— THE MILK.

FERDINAND, a rich boy from the town, walked
one spring day to a neighbouring farm-house,
where he bought himself a basin of milk, and,
sitting down on the grass under a shady tree,
broke his bread into the milk, and feasted to
his heart’s content.

Frederic, a poor boy from the next village,
who looked thin and pale from want and starv-
ation, was standing not far off, looking sadly
on, and would gladly have had a little of it ;
but he was too modest to ask for any.

It occurred, indeed, to the rich Ferdinand,
that he should leave a little over for the poor
boy; but he gave no heed to this good sug-
gestion of his heart, and greedily feasted on.
When he had quite devoured the milk, he
spied at the bottom of the basin a rhyme. He
read it with a blush, got the basin filled again,
and added to it a large slice of bread. Then



90 | THE MILK.

callmg the poor boy Frederic to him in a
friendly way, he broke up the bread for him
with his own hands, and kindly bade him eat
with a good appetite.

«The saying,” observed Ferdinand, “ which
is in-the basin ought to be written in all the
dishes of the rich.” The saying ran thus: —

“¥orgetful of the poor distrest,
Can thy abundance e’er be blest 2?”



Full Text





ToT
aul



fit, 3. oY}
f\\, ey, ‘ hi R

iP

i

ome

The Monkey and the Miser’s Money.
A HUNDRED .
SHORT TALES FOR CHILDREN

FROM THE GERMAN OF C. VON SCHMID



By F. B. WELLS, M.A.

RECTOR OF WOODCHURCH, KENT.

Second Covitton.

LONDON: T. BOSWORTH, REGENT STREET

MDCCCYAITY,
LONDON :
Printed by Grorcr Barcuay, Castle St. Leicester Sq.
PREFACE.

THe interest with which the Translator’s own
children heard many of the following tales first
suggested the idea of publishing the collection,
in the hope that the instruction and amuse-
ment which they contain might be extended
to a wider circle.

Though a few of the tales will be recog-
nised as old acquaintances making their re-
appearance in a somewhat altered form, it has
been thought best not to impair the original
collection by their exclusion; and by far the
greater part of them, it is believed, will be

quite new to the juvenile reader.
vo PREFACE.

The tales in the original, which are used. as
a lesson and. reading-book in the schools of
Bavaria, may on every account be safely re-
commended as an elementary study for young
learners of the German language, and may
easily be procured through the publisher of

this translation.
CONTENTS.

- The Sun
. The Rain

The Sunshine and Rain

. The Thundry Weather
- The Rainbow
The Rainbow and the little “Bowl of Gold

The Eeho .
The Spring
The Four Elements

- The Flowers
- The Wood Strawberries

The Cherries .
The Plums

The Walnut
The Pear-Tree

. The Green Bough

. The Precious Vegetable
. The Turnip

. The Cabbage

«

PAGE

Oa aw

MW WW Dt owt eet oe
NMTowowom Fw ©
CONTENTS.

The Ears of Corn

- The Peas -
. The Field

The Vineyard . a

- The Mushrooms

- The Gourd and the Acorn
- The Oak-Tree . .

- The Oak and the Willow

- The Boundary-Stone

. The Canary-Bird

The Swallows

. The Pigeons. -
- The House-Cock

The: Partridge’s Nest
The Song-Birds

. The Yellow-Hammers
. The Titmouse
. The Starling
. The Cuckoo

. The Cow

. The Cow-Bell
. The Sheep

- The He-Goat
. The Stag

- The Wolf .

. The Monkey
- The Lion .

- The Earwig

. The large Cabbage-Head .

ef

. 89

PAGE

36
38

41
42

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48
49
50
o2
54
56
57
58
60
62
64
65
67
69
72
73
75
77
79
81
&3
CONTENTS.

xLix. The Loaf of Bread .

L. Bread and Water : oy a - 7
nt. The Milk : i ee -
riot. The Soup - -, . - 7

Lin. The most Excellent Sauces
Liv. The Honey-Pot
nrirv. The Pearls

Lv1. The Precious Stone . . - oo.
LVI. The Pebbles . . . :
ivi. The Sackful of Earth : _ -

Lix. The Crown- Piece .

Lx. Money well spent . : - .

tx1. The Purse . . . :

uxir. The Diamond Ring . . : ;
nmxm1. The Golden Snuff-Box ; — . ‘
uxtv. The Silver Watch . . . “ .

yuxv. The Watch-Bands . . . .

rxvi. The Looking-Glass

uxvit. The Cloak :
utxvim. The Shoes

uxrx. The Shoe-Nail

uxx. The Horse-Shoe

uxxi. The Shoe-Nail

uxxm. The Seven Sticks
uxxim. The Splinter

uxxiv. The Rope

uxxv. The Willow-Twig and the Straw
Lxxv1. The Fair . :
Uxxvuo. The Mansion and the Cottage .

PAGE
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130
182
133
135
137
coe

vill

TLXXXvink.

CONTENTS.

The Child’s Prayer : : .
The Page . .- . .., .
‘The Shepherd-Boy : . .
The Shepherd’s Pipe. . 7
The Good Son 7 : 7 .
The Pious Sister . . .
The True Brothers

The True Sisters . . -
The Little Basket-Maker .

The Fisherman and the little Poacher

The Gardener and his Ass _. -

Lxxxix. The Sportsman and his Dog :

xC.
xcL
xXCIr.
XCITI.
XCIV.
xXCV.
XCVI.

XCVIT.
XCVIITI.

XCIX.
Cc.

The Miller and his Son : .
The Cannibal . . . :
The Ghost . 7 :

The Cleanly Landlady . -
The Charitable poor Woman

The Pious Grandmother .
The Pious Mother and her Sons .
The Dying Father

The Friends after Death

The Better Land .

The Three best Books .

PAGE

139 .
141
143
145
147
150
152
154
156
158
160
162
163
165
167
169
172
175
178
181
183
185
188
I.— THE SUN.

ONE evening, when it was already dark, an
industrious mother was returning home from
her field-work with her two children, when,
lo! there stood a lamp lighted upon their
table.

_ George cried out with surprise, “ There
certainly was nobody at home: who can have
kindled the light, then ?”

«< Ah!” said Margaret, “who can it be but
our father?—he has certainly come home
from the town while we were away.”

The children ran to seek him, and, to their
great delight, immediately found him in the
next room.

On the following day, the parents and
children went to finish haymaking in their
large meadow. The sun was shining with
unusual splendour and beauty, and_ the

children showed their delight at it.
B

Zz
QQ - : THE SUN.

“Now, my children,” said their father,

“you readily guessed yesterday that it was I
who made the light burn in our room; but
as you now behold that beautiful and glorious
light, the blessed Sun, above us in the sky,
should it not occur to you who it is has
kindled that?”
“-* Oh, yes!” said Margaret, “the blessed
God has done it. The smallest lamp cannot:
light itself: and so there must be One who
has lighted up the sun.”

“So there is!” cried George, joyfully;
“‘God has made all things. The sun, the
‘moon, the stars, the grass, the flowers and
trees, and everything that we behold around
us here, are His work.

“ Proclaim alike th’ Almighty’s power and love.’ ”’
Il. —THE RAIN.

A MERCHANT was once riding home from the
fair, with a knapsack full of money behind
him. It rained heavily, and the good man
was wet through and through. He was dis-
contented in consequence, and complained
bitterly that God gave him such bad weather
for his journey. |

His way led him through a thick wood.
Here, with horror, he saw a robber, who
pointed a gun at him, and pulled the trigger.
He would have been killed without a chance
of escape, but, owing to the rain, the powder
had become damp, and the gun did not go
off. The merchant put the spur to his horse,
and quickly escaped the danger.

When he was in safety, he thus said to
himself, “ What a graceless simpleton I was
when I cursed the bad weather, and did not
rather take it patiently as a dispensation of
God! Had the sky been brighter, and the air
4 - THE RAIN.

clear and dry, I should now be lying dead in
my blood, and my children would have waited
in vain for my return home. ‘The rain, at
which I grumbled, has saved both my pro-
perty and my life. In future, I will not again
forget what the proverb says :— ©

“<< Howe’er conceal’d from us the kind intent,
The ways of God are all in mercy meant.’”’
IlI.— THE SUNSHINE AND RAIN.

«“Wovurp that the sun would only always
shine!” said some children on a rough, stormy,
rainy day. ‘This wish soon seemed to be
fulfilled, when, for many months long, not a
cloud was seen in the sky. The long drought
did much damage to the fields and meadows ;
the flowers and vegetables were withered in
the garden; and the flax, on which the young
women would have been so cheerfully em-
ployed, was scarce a finger’s length.

“Do you see, now,” said their mother,
“that the rain is just as necessary as the
sunshine ?— Learn, therefore, from this wise
dispensation of God, the wholesome truth, that
it would not be good for us men to have only
bright and joyful days: there must also come
upon you, from time to time, cloudy days,
afflictions, and pains, in order that you may
grow up to be good men.

““Alike in storm and sunshine, weal and woe,
God makes His blessings on His creatures flow.’

3°
IV.—THE THUNDRY WEATHER. |

F Rank, a little boy from a neighbouring town,
had been out gathering raspberries in a wood.
As he was about to return home again, a
storm sprang up. It began to rain, ligtiten,
and thunder. Frank was frightened, and
sheltered himself in a hollow oak near the
road; for he did not yet know that the
lightning frequently strikes high trees.

All at once he heard a voice calling “Frank,
Frank! come, oh, come quickly, out of that
place!” Frank crept out from the hollow tree,
and, almost in the twinkling of an eye, the
lightning struck the tree, and the thunder
rolled fearfully. The earth trémbled beneath
the terrified boy, and it seemed to him as if
he stood in the Midst of fire. No harm,
however, happened to him; and he exclaimed,
as he prayed with uplifted hands, “ This voice
came from Heaven: Thou, blessed God, hast
saved me; thanks be to Thee!”

But the voice still cried again, ‘“ Frank,
Frank! do you not hear me?” And he was
now aware, for the first time, of a peasant
THE THUNDRY WEATHER. | 7

woman, who was so calling out. Frank ran
to her, and. said, “ Here I am; what do you
want with me?” .

The peasant woman replied, “ I did not
mean you, but my own little Frank, who has
been watching the geese along the stream
yonder, and must have sheltered himself from
the storm hereabouts. See, there he comes,
at last, out of the bushes.”

Frank, the town-boy, immediately related
how he had taken her voice for a voice from
Heaven. But the peasant folded her hands
devoutly, and said, “Oh, my child! ‘thank
God no less for this. The voice came indeed.
from the mouth of a poor peasant; but God
has so ordered it, that I should cry aloud and
call you by name, without knowing any-
thing about you. He has rescued you from
the great danger to which you have been
exposed.”

«Yes, yes!” cried Frank, with tears in his
eyes; “God has made use of your voice in
order to save me: it was indeed you who

called, but the help came directly from God!

“*Oh ! dream not blindly chance thy life could save,
“T'was God alone who all this mercy gave.’ ”’
V.—THE RAINBOW.

AFTER a fearful thunderstorm, a lovely rainbow
was shining in the sky. A little boy named
Henry saw it from the window, and cried out;
full of joy, “Such wonderfully beautiful
colours I never saw before in all my lLfe!
Yonder, by the old willow-tree on the stream,
they reach from the clouds down to the earth.
Surely all the leaves are trickling down with
the beautiful colours; I will run and fill all
the colour-shells in my paint-box with them.”
He ran as fast as he could to the willow-tree;
but, to his perplexity, the poor boy found him-
self standing there in the rain, and could no
longer perceive a single colour. Wet through
with the ram, and out of heart, he turned
back and complained of his disappointment to
his father.
His father laughed, and said, “'These colours
cannot be caught in any shell; they are only
THE RAINBOW. | . 9
the rain-drops, which seem so brightly painted
for a little while in the rays of the sun. But
so it is, my dear child, with all the splendour

of the world: it seems to us to be something:
but it is only empty show. |

“ Instead of joy it will be thine to grieve.’ ”
10

VI.—THE RAINBOW AND THE LITTLE
BOWL OF GOLD.

Lirriz Lina was standing at the open window
after a soft spring shower, and beheld with
rapture the lovely colours of the rainbow.
«Dear mother,” she began, after a little while,
“they say, when a rainbow shines in the sky,
a little golden bowl falls from heaven; but
only a Sunday child can find it. Is there
such a golden treasure? And who are the
Sunday children to whom it belongs ?”

Her mother said, “There is certainly a
treasure of heaven, compared with which all
the gold of earth is nothing. But the Sunday
children, whose portion it will be, need not be
born on a Sunday. The great thing is, that
they be not persons of every-day life, but
always and everywhere as pious and well-
behaved as on Sundays in church. Be you
such a Sunday child, and you will certainly
obtain that treasure.”

Lina strove with all her heart to be pious
THE RAINBOW AND THE BOWL OF GOLD. 11

and good; and as she continually became
more pious and better, so likewise she conti-
nually became more contented and cheerful.

Now, when a rainbow again shone in the
sky, her mother said, “ Lina, are you not
going out to look after that golden treasure
from heaven?” |

<* Dear mother,” said Lina, “I was then a
little, thoughtless child; but now the meaning
of that expression is clear to me. You meant
a nobler and a more precious gift than gold.”

< So I did, dearest Lina,” said her mother.
«That gift of Heaven, which I meant, and
which far surpasses all the treasures of earth,
is the true happiness of mankind. In the
world, out of ourselves, we seek for it in vain ;
we find it only within ourselves, in a pious,
good, and pure heart.

“Whose heart is good and conscience clear,
Will find the heavenly treasure here.’ ”’
12

ViI.— THE ECHO.

A LITTLE boy, named George, knew nothing
yet of the echo. He once cried out in the
meadow, “Oh, hop!” when he was directly
answered from the wood close by with, “ Oh,
hop!” Amazed at this, he cried out, “ Who
are you?” ‘The voice replied, “ Who are
you?” He then screamed out, “ You are a
silly fellow!” and “silly fellow” was answered
from the wood.

George was very angry, and went on calling
worse nicknames towards the wood. They
were all repeated exactly the same. He
therefore went to look for the boy whom he
supposed to be in the wood, in order to take
his revenge; but could find nobody.

So he ran home, and complained to his
mother how an impudent fellow had hid
himself in the wood, and called him nicknames.

His mother said, “This time you have
accused yourself. You have heard nothing
THE ECHO. | 13

except the echo of your own words; if you
had called out a civil word towards the wood,
a civil word would then have been returned
to you.”

But so it is in ordinary life: the behaviour
of others towards us is, for the. most part,
only the echo of ours towards them. If we
treat people civilly, they treat us civilly in
return. But if we are uncivil, rough, and
unmannerly towards them, we cannot expect
anything better from them.

“ Just as the words are utter’d, bad or good,
So faithful Echo answers from the wood.”
14,

VIilil.— THE SPRING.

On a hot summer day, a little boy named
William was on a journey. His cheeks were
glowing with heat, and he was gasping for
thirst, when he came to a spring which burst
bright as silver from a rock in the green shade
of an oak-tree. .

William had often heard that no one should
drink when he is hot. But he was self-con-
ceited, and despised these warnings; he fol-
lowed only his own inclinations—drank of the
cold water—and. sank in a swoon on the earth.
He came home ill, and fell into a dangerous
fever.

“Ah!” he groaned upon his sick-bed, “who
would have thought it of that spring, that it
contained a gift so hurtful?”

But William’s father said, “It is not the
pure spring which is the cause of your sickness,
THE SPRING. | , 15

but your own self-conceit, and your own
unrestrained desire. -
“<< God, in the fulmess of His love,
Has all in mercy given ;

But pride and lust to curses turn
The choicest gifts of Heaven.’” -:
IX.— THE FOUR ELEMENTS.

<< T sHoutp like to be a gardener,” said Philip,
when he was fourteen years old, and it was
time for. him to learn a trade; “it is pleasant
to be always living among the green herbs and
fragrant flowers.” But after a while he came
home again, and complained that he was
obliged to stoop down to the ground, and
creep about at his work. It made his back
and knees ache; and so he had given up
gardening.

Philip now wished to be a hunter. “In
the green, shady wood,” said he, “one lives
a noble life.” But he soon came back, and
complained that he could not endure the
keen air early in the morning, which blew
sometimes wet and misty, and sometimes so
terribly cold as to pinch his nose.

It next occurred to him to be a fisherman.
“To glide along the bright clear stream in a
THE FOUR ELEMENTS. 47

light skiff, and without even tiring 2 foot—to
draw nets full of fish out of the water—this. is
a jolly life!” said he. But this pleasure also
soon disgusted him. ‘“ This is wet work,” he
said; “the water is not at all to my taste.”

At last he wished to be a cook. “To the
cook,” he said, “‘the gardener, the hunter, and
fisherman must hand over all that they obtain
by their industry; and, besides, he never
wants for some nice dainties.”

But once more he returned home with
complaints. ‘It were all very well,” said he,
“‘if there were only no fire. But when I have
to stand at the blazing fire, I feel just as if I
should melt away with the heat.”

But his father now no longer permitted that
Philip should choose another trade for the
fifth time, but rather spoke to him in serious
earnest. “If you wish to live contentedly,
you must learn to bear the grievances of life
with a manly spirit; the man must go out of
the world who would escape all the incon-
veniences that the four elements have in store
for us in one way or another. Only, fre-
quently remember the good which certainly
never fails to accompany your present cir-

Cc
18° ss ‘THE FOUR ELEMENTS.
cumstances: so would your hardships, by
degrees, seem like mere trifles.”

Philip followed his father’s counsel ;. and
when others. complained afterwards, he com-
forted himself as he said, “I have learnt by
experience what this means :— |

“ ' From things forbidden cheerfully abstain ;
For every state of being will impart
Its own peculiar blessing and its pain.’ ”
19

X.—THE FLOWERS.

Lovis stood in the garden before a rose-bush
in bloom, and said to his sisters, “'The rose is
certainly the most beautiful of all the flowers !”

Caroline said, “The lily on the flower-bed
yonder is quite as beautiful as the rose. I
take these two flowers for the most beautiful ;
all others are worthless compared with them.”

“Oh!” said little Louisa, “you must not
consider the lovely violets worthless: they are
really beautiful! and they gave us so much
enjoyment last spring.”

Their mother, who heard the conversation
of the children, said, “The three kinds of
flowers which please you so much are beautiful:
likenesses and symbols of three beautiful
virtues. The violet, with its modest dark-blue
colour, is a symbol of Meekness; the snow-
white lily is a symbol of Innocence; but the
red rose signifies that your heart shall glow with
purer excellence, even with the love of God.”

“ Cloth’d in the guise of flowers, the forms we see
Of Meekness, Innocence, and Charity.”
20

XI.—THE-WOOD STRAWBERRIES.
PART I.

AN old soldier with a wooden leg came into a
village, where he was taken suddenly ill. He
was unable to travel any further, but was
obliged to lay on straw in a shed, and very
hard it went with him. A little girl, named
Agatha, the daughter of a poor basket-maker,
felt the most tender compassion for the poor
man. She visited him every day, and every
time made him a present of a halfpenny. But
one evening the honest soldier said, with much
concern: * Dear child, as I heard to-day, your
parents are poor; tell me truly, then, where
you get so much money? For I had rather
die of hunger than receive a single farthing
which you could give me except with a clear
conscience.”

‘©Oh,” said Agatha, “have no uneasiness
about that; the money is lawfully obtained.
I go to school in the next market-town. The
road thither lies through a wood, where there
THE ‘WOOD-STRAWBERRIES. = 21

are plenty of wild strawberries; so every time
I pick a basket-full, sell them in the town, and
always receive a halfpenny for them. My
parents know ali about it, but they have no
objection. They often say, There are many
people yet poorer than we are, and so we must
do them as much good as our condition permits
us.”’ .

The tears stood in the eyes of the old soldier,
and trickled down his moustaches. <“ Good
child,” said he, * God will bless you and your
parents for your benevolent disposition.”

“ However low its state, the willing mind
‘Will opportunities of mercy find.”

PART I.

After some time an officer of high rank,
who was decked with many orders, was travel-
ling through the village. He stopped with
his-splendid carriage before the inn, in order
to let the horses feed, when he heard of the
sick soldier, and went to pay him a visit.
22 . THE WOOD-STRAWBERRIES. |

The old soldier immediately told him about
his benefactress. ‘“ What!” cried the officer,
“‘has a poor child done so much for you, and.
can I, your old General, do less? I shall
immediately give orders that they provide you
with their best in the inn.’

He did so, and then went to the cottage of
little Agatha. ‘* Good child,” he said, de-
lighted, ““your benevolence has made my heart:
warm and my eyes wet. You have presented
the old soldier with many halfpennies; accept
now, in PoturE for them, the same number of
gold pieces.”

The astonished parents said, “Ah, that is too
much !”

But the General replied, “ No, no! This is
only a poor compensation; the good child has
still her better one to expect in heaven.”

“To deeds of charity are given
The promise both of earth and heaven.”
23

X1I.— THE CHERRIES.

Sanina, the daughter of rich parents, had a
nice little room to herself; but it had a very
untidy appearance inside. She never cleaned
it up, and all the good advice of her mother,
that she should keep it in better order, was in
vain.

One Sunday afternoon she had just finished
dressing herself, and was about to go out, when
the daughter of their neighbour brought her a
basket-full of fine black chersries. As tables
and window-sill were already covered with
clothes and other things, Sabina set the basket
down on a chair, which was covered over
with blue silk stuff, and then went out with
her mother to walk to a neighbouring village.

Late in the evening, when it was already
dark, she came back to her room very tired,
and immediately hastened to a seat. But
scarcely had she seated herself when she
jumped quickly up again, and uttered a loud
24 : ‘THE CHERRIES.

scream of terror. For she had seated herself
exactly in the middle of the basket, which
was piled up full of cherries.

At her screams her mother immediately
hastened to her with a light.. But what a
sight she saw! The cherries were all crushed;
the juice flowed on all sides over the chair;
and Sabina’s new white silk dress was so
entirely spoilt, ‘that. it was never fit to be
used again.

But besides this her mother gave her a
severe scolding, and said: “ You see now how
necessary it is to keep things in order, and to
give to each thing its proper place. You
are now punished for your disobedience and
your untidy habits; in future remember the
saying, —

““* Neglect on Order to attend —
Disgrace and loss will be thy end.”
25

XIl.—THE PLUMS.

Mrs. H. once took her four children to pay a
visit to their grandfather, in his beautiful
garden. Their grandfather brought them, on
a vine-leaf, four plums, as yellow as gold and
as large as eggs. He regretted that there
were not more of them ripe. “Now you
must contrive amongst yourselves,” said he,
jokingly, “how you can divide your four
plums between five persons without letting
any be broken in the division.”

“Oh, I will do that,” said Charlotte, the
eldest sister. “I only ask for myself that I
may be allowed to mix and reckon together
things of two different kinds.”

She took the four plums, and said: “We
2 sisters and 1 plum make together 3. My 2
brothers and I plum also make 3. These 2
plums and 1 mother make another 3. So it
all comes right, and there is no breaking.”

Charlotte’s brothers and sister were well
26 THE PLUMS.

satisfied with this division ; ; “but the gratified
mother insisted that each of the children
should receive a plum, and their grandfather
brought Charlotte a beautiful nosegay besides.
“For,” said he, “ Charlotte’s ingenious reck-
oning does much honour to her wits, but still
more honour to her affectionate heart.”

“To wit and knowledge praise is due,
But a good heart is worth the two.”
27

XIV.—THE WALNOUT.

UNDER a great tree, close to the village, two
boys found a walnut. “It belongs to me,”
said Ignatius, “for I was the first to see it.”
“No, it belongs to me,” cried Bernard, “ for
I was the first to pick it up:” and so they
both began to quarrel in earnest. |
€T will settle the dispute,” said an older
boy, who just then came up. He placed
himself between the two boys, broke the nut
in half, and said: “The one shell belongs to
him who first saw the nut, the other shell
belongs to him who first picked it up: but the
kernel I keep for judging the cause. And
this,” he said, as he sat down and laughed, “is
the ordinary conclusion of most law-suits.”

“Persons who love the law too well
The kernel lose and win the shell.”’
_ XV.—THE PEAR-TREE.

Oxtp Rupert sat in-the shade of the great
pear-tree which grew before his house. His
grandchildren ate of the pears, and could never
praise the sweet fruit enough.

Their grandfather said to them, “I must
now tell you how the tree came to be planted.
“More than fifty years ago I was once standing
here, where there was then an empty space,
but where the tree is now standing, and was
complaining of my poverty to my rich neigh-
bour. <“ Ah,” I said, “well contented should
I be if I corild only bring up my fortune to a
hundred crowns.”

My neighbour, who was a shrewd man,
said: “That you can easily do, if you know
how to begin rightly. See here, on this little
spot where you are standing, are more than a
hundred crowns concealed in a hole. Only
work so as to bring them out.”

“TI was still at that time only a silly lad,
‘THE PEAR-TREE. | 29

and on the following night I dug: a ‘great hole
in the ground: but to my disappointment I
did not find a single crown.. When my
neighbour saw the hole in the morning, he
laughed, till he was obliged to hold both his
sides, and said :— |

“QO you simpleton! That is not what I
meant. But I will now give you a young
pear-tree; plant. it in the hole which you
have made, and after some few years the
crowns will come to light.”

“T planted the young stem in the earth.
It grew, and became the great and noble tree
which you see before your eyes. The valu-
able fruit which it has now produced for
many years past has already brought me
more than a hundred crowns, and it continues
to be a capital which produces a good interest.
I have, therefore, never forgotten the proverb
of my wise neighbour; do you remember it

also :—

“*Good sense and industry combined,
Will always certain riches find.’ ”’
30

XVI.— THE GREEN BOUGH.

FRED was a thoughtless, mischievous boy.
_ He paid no attention to good instruction ; nay,
he rather turned it into a joke.

One day he went with his sister Sophia into
the garden. Sophia’s little garden was full of
the most beautiful flowers; but Fred’s was
altogether neglected and full of weeds.
~ « Brother, brother,” said the orderly little
maid, “you never have your things in any
order. Listen to me; it is with you just as
our mother says, you will never in your life
grow up to be a green bough.”

Fred laughed, climbed up into a large pear-
tree, and shouted, “ Sophy, look at me up
here. I have already grown up as tall as a
green branch !”

Crack, crack, went the branch; Fred fell
down and broke his arm.

“ The wilful mind, against instruction bent,
Will never long escape its punishment.”
31

XVII.— THE PRECIOUS VEGETABLE.

Two girls, Bridget and Walpurg, were going
to the town, and each carried on her head a
heavy basket-full of fruit. oo

Bridget grumbled and groaned. continually,
but Walpurg laughed and joked.

Bridget said, “How can you laugh | so?
Your basket is just as heavy as mine; and
you are not stronger than I am.” |

Walpurg said, “I have placed on my load
a vegetable which I always carry, and so
scarcely feel it.” .

“Ah!” said Bridget, “that must be a
precious vegetable. I must also lighten my
load with it, so tell me what it is.”

Walpurg replied, “ The precious vegetable
which makes every burden lighter is called
Patience. Remember, Bridget, the saying,—

“¢ Friend, to thy burden add good will ;
Though heavy, twill be lighter still.’ ”’
XVIII.— THE TURNIP.

A poor labourer had pulled in his garden an |
unusually large turnip, at which everybody
was astonished. “I will make a present of
it,” he said, “to my noble landlord, as it
._.pleases. him when his fields and gardens are
well cultivated.”

So he carried the turnip to his mansion.
The nobleman praised the man’s industry and
good-will, and made him a present of three
ducats. |

Now another peasant in the village, who
was very rich and very covetous, heard of this,
and said, “ I shall go directly and make the
nobleman a present of my fine calf; for if he
gives three gold pieces for a common turnip,
what shall I receive for such a beautiful calf?”

So he led the calf by a rope to the mansion,
and begged the nobleman to accept it as a pre-
sent. The nobleman quite understood why
THE TURNIP. oe 33
the avaricious peasant behaved so liberally,
and said that he did not wish for the calf..

But the peasant continued to press him not
to despise such a trifling gift. At last, the
shrewd nobleman said: * Well, then, since
you force me to do so, I will accept your pre-
sent. But, as you are so particularly liberal
towards me, I must not let you find me less
liberal towards you. I shall, therefore, make
you a present in exchange, which cost me two
or three times more than your calf is worth;”
and so saying, he presented to the astounded
and discomfited peasant the well-known large
turnip. :

“ Reward will crown the generous heart,
But shame shall make the selfish smart.”
34°

XIX.—THE CABBAGE.

THERE was a careful mother who used to raise
in her garden vegetables of every kind. One
day she said to her little daughter, “ Look,
Lizzy, at these pretty little yellow things on
the underside of the cabbage-leaf. They are
the eggs from which the pretty-coloured but
destructive caterpillars come. Now, look over
all the leaves this afternoon, and crush these
eggs, and so our cabbages will remain green,
beautiful, and uninjured.”

Lizzy thought that. any time would do for
this work, and ended with thinking no more
about it. Her mother was unwell for a week,
and did not go into the garden. But when
she was well again, she took the negligent girl
by the hand, and led her to the cabbage-bed,
and what a sight! all the cabbage-plants were
devoured by the caterpillars. There was no-
thing more to be seen except the stalks and

fibres of the leaves. The little girl, shocked
‘THE CABBAGE. a 35
and ashamed, wept over her carelessness. But
her mother said, “Do to-day what can be
done to-day, and never put it off till to-
morrow. Still more important,” said her mo-
ther, “is another lesson, which seems, as it
were, written on these sadly injured leaves,—

“< Evil, ere yet its power be felt, withstand ;
Neglected, it soon gains the upper hand.’ ”
36

XX.— THE LARGE CABBAGE-HEAD.

‘Two journeymen, named Joseph and Benedict,
were once going by a vegetable garden near a
village.

“Look here,” said Joseph, “ what kind of
vegetable-heads are these?” for so he named
the cabbage-heads.

« Ah,” said Benedict, who was a great
boaster, “these are not large. When I was
on my travelling apprenticeship I once saw a
vegetable with a head which was as large as
the parsonage-house yonder.”

Joseph, who was a coppersmith, imme-
diately replied, “ That was very well; but I
once helped to make a kettle which was as
large as the church.”

< But what in the world,” cried Benedict,
‘¢ could they want such a large kettle for ?”

Joseph said, “Why, to be sure, they
wanted it to boil your large cabbage in.”

Benedict was ashamed, and said, “Now I
THE LARGE CABBAGE-HEAD. 37

see at once what you mean! You always
keep to the truth, and have only said this now
in order to turn my lying boast into ridicule.
I must be satisfied with this, for— .

“ The same base coin he utters oft receives.’ ”
38 |

XXI.— THE EARS OF CORN.

A. FARMER went out with his little boy, Toby,
into his corn-field, to see if his corn were
nearly ripe. | ,

« Father,” said the boy, “ how comes it that
some stalks bend so low towards the earth, but
others hold their heads so upright?. These
must surely be people of rank; the others,
who bow themselves so low before them, are
certainly the common folk.”

His father picked a pair of ears, and said,
“Look at this ear, which bends itself so
modestly ; it is full of beautiful grains: but
this, which sticks itself up so proudly, is quite
barren and empty.”

“Who proudly holds his head, at once
We write him down a silly dunce.”
39

XXIL—THE PEAS. |

A CONJURER begged permission to perform a
perfectly new trick before a.Prince. .The
Prince gave permission, and the conjurer
brought a bowl full of peas, soaked in water,
into the room; he then had a needle held
before him, and threw the peas so accurately
that every time a pea remained sticking on the
point of the needle. 7

The Prince said, “ Good man, you have
bestowed a great deal of pains on this accom-
plishment, and have expended a great deal of
time to bring it to such perfection. I will,
therefore, reward you for it.” He then said
something privately to one of his servants, who
went out, and soon came back again with a
heavy sack. The conjurer congratulated him-
self, and supposed that the sack was full of
gold.

But when they opened the sack at the com-
mand of the Prince, there appeared nothing in

it but peas.
40 oo, THE PEAS.
_ The Prince now said, “ As your trick is of
no value to any one, and you would be likely
to be paid for it very indifferently, you might
soon fail to have the peas necessary to. carry it
on with. I, therefore, give you an opportunity
to supply yourself with as many as you may
want.” | |

“ Spend: not thy time on trifling things,

Whose exercise no profit brings.”
41

XXIL—THE FIELD.

THE cottage of poor Nicholas stood on a plot
of ground which was overgrown entirely with
thorn and hazel-bushes. One hot day, at
harvest time, as Nicholas was lying in the
shade of a hazel-bush, a peasant drove by him
a cart heavily laden with corn. Nicholas
looked at the laden cart with envious eyes, and
scarcely wished the peasant good day. |

The peasant stood still, and said to Nicholas,
“If you would every day work only so much
of this neglected piece of ground, which is
your property, as you cover with your lazy
body, you could every year reap much more
corn than you see in this cart.”

The advice was plain to Nicholas. He
began to grub up the bushes and roots, and to
work the ground, and so he obtained a field
which cost him not a penny, and amply sup-
ported him and his family.

“Sloth cries in hopeless hunger to be fed,
But Industry ne’er looks in vain for bread.”
42

XXTV.—THE VINEYARD.

A FATHER said to his three sons on his death-
bed, “Dear children, I can leave you nothing
but . these little buildings and the vineyard
near them, in which, however, there is a trea-
sure lying concealed. Dig diligently, there-
fore, in the vineyard, and so you will find the
treasure.”

After their father’s death, the sons dug the
whole vineyard with the greatest diligence,
but found neither gold nor silver. On the
other hand, the vineyard, since they had
worked it so diligently, produced a much
greater abundance of grapes than formerly,
and they earned from it twice as much
money.

It then appeared to the sons what their
deceased father had meant about the treasure,
and they wrote on the entrance of the vineyard
in large letters : —

“ For skilful hand and willing heart behold

In industry the riches mine of gold.”
43

. -X¥XV.—THE MUSHROOMS.

A MOTHER once sent her little girl, Catherine,
into the wood to find mushrooms, as her father
was very fond of them.

< Mother,” said the little cirl, when she
came back, ‘this time I have found some
really beautiful ones! There, only look,” she
said, and opened the basket; “they are all
beautiful, as bright as scarlet, and covered
with white pearls. There are plenty besides
of those brown, ugly ones, of which you lately
brought some home; but they were too bad
for me, and I left them standing.”

“QO you silly, foolish child!” said her vexed
mother. ‘“ These beautiful mushrooms, in
spite of their scarlet and pearls, are only poi-
sonous toadstools, and whoever eats of them
must die. But these brown ones, which are
called * bratelings,’ and which you despised, in
spite of their mean appearance are among the
best.”
44 THE MUSHROOMS. /

So, dear child, it is with most things in the
world. There are virtues which make little
show; and showy faults, at which the fool

stares. Yes, the deceitful glitter of evil can
seduce us readily into sin. |

“Taste not the cup held by the hand of sin,
However sweet, rank poisons lurks within.”
45

XXVL-——-THE GOURD AND THE ACORN.

A. COUNTRYMAN was lying in the shade of an
oak-tree, and looking at a gourd which -was
growing in a garden close by. He shook his
head, and said, “ Well! well! It does not
seem quite right to me, that the little creeping
gourd should produce such a large splendid
fruit, and the large, noble oak-tree, should
bring forth such a poor little one. Now, if I
had made the world, the oak-tree should have
made a splendid appearance, with large gourds
as yellow as gold, and heavy as a hundred
weight. That would, now, have been a glo-
rious thing to see.”

Scarcely had he said this, when an acorn
fell down, and struck him so sharply on the
nose, that it bled.

“Oh, poor me!” said the man, astonished ;
“‘here I have received a sharp crack on my
nose for my conceit. If this acorn had really
been a gourd, my nose would have been
entirely smashed.”

“ God, in full wisdom, the whole world design’d,
And to each part its proper use assign’d.”
46

XXVII.—THE OAK-TREE.

Once—a long time ago—two young men,
named Edward and Oswald, appeared in a
court of justice. |

Edmund said to the judge, “ When I was
going on a journey, three years ago, I gave to
this Oswald, whom I then considered my best
friend, a valuable ring with precious stones, to
keep for me. But now he will not give the
ring up to me.” °

Oswald laid his hand upon his breast, and
said, “I swear, upon my honour, I know
nothing about the ring. My friend Edmund
must be out of his senses in this matter.”

The judge said, “Edmund, can nobody
give evidence that you gave the ring to him?”

Edmund replied, “ Alas! there was nobody
near; there was only an old oak-tree in the
field, under which we took leave of one an-
other.” oo

Oswald said, “I am ready to take an oath,
that I know no more about the tree than I do
about the ring.”
THE OAK-TREE. | 47
| The judge said, “ Edmund, go and bring
me a twig from the tree. I wish to see it.
Meanwhile do you, Oswald, wait here till
Edmund returns.” a |
Edmund went. After a little while the
judge remarked, “ Where, now, can Edmund
be remaining so long? Oswald, Pepen: the
window, and see if he is not coming.”

Oswald said, “ Oh, sir, he cannot come
back again so soon. The tree is above a mile
distant from this place.”

Then said the judge, “O you goaléss 1 liar!
who would have made your false oaths before
God, the highest Judge, who looks into all
hearts. You know as much about the ring as
about the tree!” . |

Oswald was obliged to give up the ring, and
was sentenced to prison for a year.

“There,” said the judge, “you will find
time to consider the important truth : —

“¢Tt comes at last, the judgment-day,
Which every falsehood will display.’ ”
48 ©

XXVIH.-~-THE OAK AND THE WILLOW.

ONE morning, after a fearfully stormy night,
father Richard went out with his son Anselm
into the field, to see whether the storm had
done any harm. —~ |

Little Anselm said, “ Oh, look, father! the
great stitf oak-tree lies yonder on the ground,
and the slight willow is standing pliant and
upright by the brook here. I thought, now,
the tempest would have destroyed the willow
easier than the proud oak, which has hitherto
defied every wind.”

<< Child!” said the father, “ the stiff oak was
broken because it could not bend itself; but
the pliant willow yielded to the storm, and so
could not be injured.”

“Compliance oft escapes the deadly blow
Which lays unyielding Obstinacy low.”
49

XXIX.—THE BOUNDARY-STONE.

UnricH dwelt in a nice house, which was sur-
rounded by a beautiful green orchard, full of
fruit-trees. The meadow of his neighbour
bordered on it. The avaricious man wished
to .enlarge his orchard at the expense. f his
neighbour, and privately removed -*
the boundary-stone some distance further into
his neighbour’s meadow.

Sometime after he mounted a ladder, placed
against a tree, to pick cherries. When he
was at the top of the ladder, which stood too
upright, he fell with it backwards to the
ground, and broke his neck against the boun-
dary-stone. Had Ulrich not moved the stone,
he would have fallen down on the soft grass-
plot and have done himself little injury.




‘The rogue, upon some evil gain intent,
Oft wins ; but, winning, finds his punishment.”
50 |

XXX.—THE CANARY-BIRD.

‘Cristina begged her mother to buy her a
canary-bird. Her mother said, “You shall
have one when you become always obedient
and industrious, but especially when you give



up y@uUr curiosity, which prompts you to pry
into*tseless, or even hurtful things.”

- Christina promised she would. One day
she came home from school, when her mother
said, “There is a little new box on the table;
on no account whatever open it, and do not even
once move it. Ifyou obey me, I shall soon
give you a great deal of pleasure.” .

Her mother then went out to visit her little
sick god-child, William; but scarcely was she
out of the door, ere the over-curious girl had
the box in her hand, “ How light it is!” she
said; “and there are some little holes in the
lid! What can there be in it?”

She opened the little box, and, behold! there
immediately hopped out a most beautiful yel-
| THE CANARY-BIRD. ; 51

low canary, and flew chirping merrily about
the room. As she was vainly pursuing the
brisk little bird about the room, till she was
out of breath, and her cheeks glowed, im
walked her mother, and said, “ You disobe-
dient, curious girl! this beautiful bird I wished
to give to you, but I wished first to put you
to the proof whether you deserved it. But
now I shail give it to good little William, who

is more obedient, and not so curious, as you.”

“Mark well this truth: the prying mind
Will lose far more than it can find.”
52

XXXI.— THE SWALLOWS.

In the spring-time, when the swallows came
back, and with cheerful twitter took possession
of their old nest in the eaves of a farm-house,
the farmer said to his children: ** Now, do no
harm to the good little birds; he who drives
away the swallows from his threshold, also
drives away good luck from his house. Our
neighbour destroyed the swallows’ nest before
his window, and crushed the eggs; and from
that time he has fallen back in his circum-
stances, and he is going to ruin.”

Little Christian asked his father how that
could be. His father replied, “Our neigh-
bour had abandoned the pious, simple customs
of his fathers. His grandfather and great-
grandfather had treated with patience the
harmless, yea, rather the useful swallows, and
were awakened for their work at early morn
by the active chattering birds. But our
neighbour, who was hard-hearted both to man
and beast, and spent half the night in the pot-
THE SWALLOWS. | - 53

house, was glad to dream away the bright
morning hours ; and as the swallows disturbed
him in his morning slumbers, he destroyed
their nest. The sullen, lazy, and wasteful man
in this way drove good luck and blessing from
his house, together with the swallows.”

ro

“ Beneath thy roof protect the swallows’ nest,—
They seem to bid you in God’s name be blest.”
54

XXXII.— THE PIGEONS.

Ewmerrck and Leopold, two active lads, were
neighbours. Emmerick, who was rich, had
many beautiful pigeons; but Leopold, who
was poor, had only a few of the commonest
sort. XN

. One day a pair of Emmerick’s pigeons flew
over to Leopold’s cot, and began to build
there. Poor Leopold thought, “ How lucky
I should be if these pigeons belonged to me!
They shine as white as snow, and their heads
and tails glisten as black as coals. Of all
Emmerick’s pigeons these please me much the
best.”

A. strong desire came over ‘him to shut them
up and keep them. ‘“ But no,” said he, “that
I dare not do; that were indeed asin! I will
at once overcome the temptation.” So he
shut the cot, caught the pigeons, and brought

them to Emmerick.
Now Emmerick felt a great deal of pleasure
THE PIGEONS. 55

at ‘the honesty of the poor lad; so he soon.
took the first eggs which he obtained from the
beautiful pigeons, crept secretly to Leopold’s
cot, and placed them under a common grey
pigeon, instead of her own.

When, therefore, the young ones crept out
of the shell and became fledged, Leopold was
astonished to see that: they were beautifully
marked black and. white, exactly as Emmerick’s
very beautiful pair. He ran full of joy to
Emmerick, and informed him of the supposed
wonder. Emmerick laughed; told him that
he had changed the eggs, in order to show his
gratitude towards the honourable Leopold;
and. said, at the end of the conversation,
«- Always remain thus honourable, dear Leo-
pold; for—

“On unstain’d hand and honest breast
Be sure God’s blessings always rest.’ ”
XXXL —THE HOUSE-COCK.

A&A Busy housewife was accustomed to wake
her two maids every morming to their work
as soon as. the cock crew. The maids were
very angry with the cock, and said one to the
other: “If that abominable cock were out of
the way, we might be allowed to sleep a little
longer.” They therefore killed it; but the
mistress, who was already very old, and al-
ways waked very early, was no longer able to
tell what time it was; she therefore waked
the maids still earlier—yes, often soon after
midnight.
“Trying to "scape a minor ill,
Many incur a greater still.”
«BT

XXXIV.— THE PARTRIDGE’S NEST.

In a cornfield near a wood two boys found a
partridge’s nest, and they contrived to catch
the hen, which was sitting on the eggs.

“ You,”. said the elder boy, “take the eggs,
and I will keep the bird; for the eggs are
worth just as much as the bird.” “If that is
so,” said the younger, “ * give me the bird, and
keep the eggs yourself.

They began to ey and to tear one
another’s hair. During their scuffle, the elder
boy let the old bird go, and the younger unin-
tentionally trod upon the eggs. Neither of
them, therefore, had anything, and said to one
another,—

“¢ Our father, surely, said quite right,
That it is wiser when
Contentedly we share the egg,
Than quarrel for the hen.’”
58

XXXV.— THE SONG-BIRDS..

THERE was a pleasant village, entirely sur-
rounded by an orchard of fruit-trees. The
trees blossomed and perfumed the air in the
most charming manner in spring. Upon their
branches and in the hedges all kinds of lively
birds sang, and made their. nests in every
direction; while, in the autumn, every branch
was richly laden with apples, pears, or plums.

Some mischievous boys once began to take
and. destroy the nests. The birds were scared
away in consequence, and by degrees alto-
gether deserted the spot. There was now no
more singing heard in the garden or the
orchard; all was still and gloomy.. But the
destructive caterpillars, which had hitherto
been destroyed by the birds, got the upper
hand, and devoured the leaves and blossoms.
The trees stood bare as in the middle of winter ;
and the mischievous boys, who used to have
THE SONG—BIRDS. | 59

excellent fruit to eat in abundance, were now
unable to procure a single apple.

“Rob the poor birds of eggs and nest,
Nor fruit nor song you'll find :

_ So kindly let in safety rest
Things harmless of their kind.”
60

XXXVL—THE YELLOW-HAMMERS.

Two children were going from their village to
the mill on a sharp winter’s day, and each
carried on the head a little sack of corn. As
they went along by the miller’s garden they
saw some yellow-hammers, which sat hungry
upon a hedge white with hoar-frost. One of
them, little Bertha, had kind compassion on
the little yellow birds; so she opened her sack,
and scattered two handfuls of corn for them.

Robert, her brother, found fault with her,
and said: “Oh, you soft-hearted simpleton!
see, now, you will certainly receive less meal ;
and then our parents will punish you well for
this !”

Bertha was frightened, and said: ‘ Well,
now, perhaps, I ought not to have done this.
Notwithstanding, our good parents will not
take my kindness amiss; and God can cer-
tainly bless us for it in some other way.”

When the two children came back to the
THE YELLOW-HAMMERS. |—6«dh6S1

mill to take away the meal, behold! there was
just twice as much meal in the sack of the
compassionate Bertha as in Robert’s. Robert
was surprised, and Bertha was much 1 disposed
to regard it as a miracle. _
- But the good miller, who had ‘heard the
conversation of the children by the hedge, said
to Bertha: “ Your compassionate feelings to-
wards the hungry little birds pleased me so
much, that I doubled your measure. But
although I put the meal into your sack, still
you should regard it as a blessing which God
has bestowed on you to reward your kind-
heartedness.”

“God to the good and feeling heart
A blessing ever will impart.”
‘62

XXXVII.— THE TITMOUSE.

< Loox at that beautiful titmouse yonder, on
the apple-tree!” said Lawrence, to his sister
Lucy: ‘I will soon have it.” He climbed up
the tree, set a trap a little way off, and con-
cealed himself with his sister in the arbour; in
order to watch the bird. |

The titmouse went straight mto the trap,
and Lawrence was presently up the tree again ;
but he fell with the trap, while he was taking
the bird out of it. The bird escaped, but
Lawrence wounded his hand against a broken
bough.

Lucy said: “Oh, my poor brother! your
hand is bleeding. Now, you will surely stay
here, and will not climb the tree again to
catch the titmouse. You would perhaps then
break both arm and leg.”

“<“ Ah!” said Lawrence, laughing, “I do not
remain down here on that account, but my
trouble now would be all in vain; for the
THE TITMOUSE. . 63

titmouse would avoid the trap in which it has
been already caught.”

«If that is so,” said Lucy, “the titmouse is
wiser than you: it will not go a second time
where it perceives danger. . But will you, who
have only this instant got a wound, and have
only just escaped a much greater misfortune,
nevertheless venture again into danger, and
make a joke of 1t?”

“Who little warnings foolishly despise,
Will find too late some reason to be wise.’”’
64

XXXVIIL—THE STARLING.

An old huntsman named Maurice had a star-
ling in his room, which had been trained to
speak certain words. If, for example, the
huntsman cried, “ Starling, where are you?”
the starling would always answer, “Here I
am!”

Ihittle Charles, a neighbour’s boy, took parti-
cular delight in the bird, and often paid it a
visit. Once when Charles came, the huntsman
was not in his room. Charles immediately
seized the bird, put it in his pocket, and would
have sneaked away with it.

But just at that moment the huntsman
came to the door. He thought to amuse the
boy, and cried out, as usual, “ Where are
you?” and the bird in the boy’s pocket cried
out, as loud as it could, “ Here I am!”

“However skill conceals it from the sight,
Some chance, unlooked for, brings each fraud to light.”
65

XXxXIX.— THE CUCKOO.

On a lovely May morning, George and Michael
went into a wood, where they heard for the
first time the call of the cuckoo.

«That is a lucky bird,” said George, who
was superstitious; “ his call promises me Inck
—at the least, a pocket full of money.”

«Why particularly to you?” said Michael,
who was just as superstitious as the other; “I
do not see why you should stand higher in the
cuckoo’s favour than I. I am still better than
you; and I maintain, it promises luck to me.”

Instead of enjoying the beautiful morning,
they now began to quarrel; from quarrelling
they came to blows; and at last they separated,
sadly handled, in great anger with one another.

When the wounded boys met again, it was
at the surgeon’s; and while he was dressing
their wounds they told him how the quarrel
commenced, and asked him to which of them
the cuckoo would really prove the lucky bird,

:
66 | THE CUCKOO.

The surgeon laughed, and said, “Oh, you
simpletons! to neither of you two, but to me.
For the cuckoo has sent you both home with
bloody noses; but it has put some money into
my pocket.”

“ Fen though 1 no third should profit, yet the two
Who quarrel will their strife severely rue.’ |
67

XL.—THE COW.

A wipow, named Berene, was living with her.
two daughters in rather poor. circumstances.
What they earned every week, every, week
they were obliged to spend. Besides this, one
day they lost their only cow, and were in the
greatest distress about it. They said, “ Unless
God give us back our cow, we can never have
another; for it is impossible for us to raise
money enough to buy one.”

“Do your part faithfully,” said their neigh-
bour ; “ and so God will send you help.”

< But what, then, can we do?” said Berene.

Their neighbour answered: “ You must, in
the first place, by industry increase your
wages. There are three of you, and you
understand well spinning, knitting, and sew-
ing: work daily two hours longer; it must
indeed go hard if you cannot each earn two-
pence more than hitherto.

“< In the second place, you must by economy
68 ‘THE COW. |
diminish your expenses. You drink at break-
fast.every day a kind of slop, which you call
coffee. Although you take a very little coffee
and. sugar, yet that little costs you too much.
Therefore eat a little broth, which is certainly
more nourishing; and so you will each save, at
the least, another twopence. Follow these two
pieces of advice: lay up that which you so
gain and save; and you will soon. have col-
lected as much money as a good cow costs.”

Berene and her daughters followed this wise
advice; and at the end of the year they had
as much money as they wanted to pay for the
cow. Yes; and, what was still more, they
had thereby learnt to better their poor cir-
cumstances by industry and economy, and
were tolerably well off. Their neighbour
then said, <‘ Do you see, now, that I was right ?
It is always found true:

“¢ Aid but thyself, and surely God will aid
Th’ attempt by industry and prudence made.’”
69

XLI.— THE COW-BELL.
PART I.
VENDELIN, a peasant boy, was keeping some
cows in a wood. They were all provided
with bells; but the most beautiful cow had
the most beautiful bell.

Presently there came a stranger through
the wood, who said, “ That is a splendid bell!
how much did it cost you?”

< A crown,” said Vendelin.

“No more ?” cried the stranger. “I will
give you two crowns for it directly.”

Vendelin gave the man the bell, and put the
two crowns into his purse in great glee.

But when the cow had lost her bell, Ven-
delin could no longer hear in what part of the
thick wood she was. ‘The cow wandered away
from the rest; and the stranger, who had con-
cealed himself in the bushes, seized her, and
led her away secretly.
70 . THE COW-BELL.

But poor Vendelin now perceived, for the
first time, that he had been deceived by the

' rogue.

“Who readily will over-pay,
Trust not——he gains some other way.”

PART I.

Vendelin came home with weeping eyes,
and told his story. ‘“ Ah!” said he, “could I
have but guessed that the thief paid me so
high for the bell, only that he might obtain
the cow!”

His father now said to him: “ As the rogue
has deceived you, so will the pleasures of sin
deceive us all: it offers at first a little gain,
but at the last great loss. Ifa man yields but
a finger, it presently seizes his whole hand.
Mark, then, the saying :—

“* Admit not sin in any part,
Pp
Or soon "twill steal away thy carth.’”
THE COW-BELL. —— 71
| PART Il.

His mother said: “ But, my dear. Vendelin,
did it not occur to you why we keep the old
custom of hanging a bell upon the cow ?”

« Ah!” said Vendelin, “the money ‘had
quite blinded me. I: only thought, ‘Now is
my opportunity of gaining a crown in this
clever way: the bell is only an useless orna-
ment; it does not make the cow yield any
more milk.’ But as soon as the cow was gone,
then it struck me what the bell is for.”

“So,” said his mother, “it is with thought-
less and changeable men. They cast off many
ancient customs, as useless and unnecessary ;
but afterwards they learn to their cost, and
understand, that such customs had their good
reasons. .

““’'Time-hallow’d customs ne’er despise :
When lightly lost, we find them wise.’ ”
oJ
we

-XLIL—THE SHEEP.

An old, skilful, and upright shepherd, had
many sons and daughters. They wished once
to go to the fair in the town, in order to attend
a ball. But their father said to them, “ It is
not good for you. I have always tried hitherto
to keep your morals pure from corruption ;
but there you would too readily be exposed to
it.”

The children replied, “Indeed !—vyet other
people go there.”

But their father said, “ Many have already
gone there, and have sacrificed health and life,
honour and innocence: would you imitate
them on that account? Do not, then, act like
the sheep. You know, when one jumps over
the precipice, all the others jump after. On
this account you call them stupid animals.
But the man who plunges himself into ruin
because others do likewise, is not at all wiser
than they.

“ * Be wise, nor follow down the precipice
The self-abandon’d wretch to shame and vice.”
XLITI.— THE HE-GOAT.

LADY named. Hill lived in a beautiful house
at the entrance of a town. One morning she
said to her maid, “ Crescenz, I am just going
to church. When you go across the street to
fetch water, or into the garden to pick beans,
shut the house-door —(I have often given you
directions about this already, and have waited
in hopes that you would at length obey me)—
else some one could easily slink into the house,
and do us injury.”

The lady went; Crescenz cleaned up the
room ; went next to the spring, and left all the
doors standing open, as usual.

‘¢ There is not a person to be seen all up and
down the street,” said she, and laughed at the
over-anxious carefulness of her mistress.

But while Crescenz was chattering with
another maid at the spring, a goat ran in at
the house-door, sprang up the stairs, and came
into the lady’s room.
74: THE HE-GOAT.

There hung a large looking-glass in a ‘gilt
frame, which reached nearly to the floor of the
room. The goat saw himself in the glass, and,
supposing that it was another there, butted and
threatened him with his horns. The goat in
the glass did just the same, on which the real
goat suddenly charged at the imaginary one,
and struck at him so violently that the look-
ing-glass was shivered into.a thousand pieces.

Just then Crescenz came in at the house-
door, with the tub of water on her head, and
heard the crash of the broken glass. She ran
to the room, clasped her hands together over
her head, and beat and drove the goat out of
the house: but that could not put the glass
together again.

When her mistress returned home, the care-
less maid was dismissed for her disobedience,
and her wages were kept back as some com-
pensation for the mischief done. In her new
place it was no longer necessary to order her
to shut the door: by this time she had learnt
to attend to the saying :—

‘““The careless, who despise advice,
Must for their folly pay the price.”
XLIV.—THE STAG.

Hvsert was still a young boy when his good
father, the gamekeeper at Tannstein, was shot
by an unknown poacher in the depth of the
forest. The mother brought up the fatherless
boy as well as she could; and after twenty
years, when he had become an _ excellent
forester, he obtained his father’s place.

One day Hubert was hunting with many
keepers and sportsmen in the wood. He shot
at a large stag——missed it, when a voice cried
out of the bushes in distress: “OO God, I am
wounded!” Hubert sprang in, and lo! an
old man was writhing and groaning, with the
blood rattling in his throat. The whole hunt-
ing-party collected round the dying man.
But Hubert knelt by his side, embraced him,
crying aloud, begged him for forgiveness, and
assured him that he had not observed him.

But the dying man said, “ You have no-
thing to ask my pardon for. I will now
76 _ THE STAG.

disclose what no man has yet known: [I-am
that poacher who shot your father. All round
here, exactly under these lofty oaks, his blood
sank into the ground. And now you, the son
of the murdered man, without knowing it, and
unintentionally, just on the very spot, must
avenge the murder on me!— God is just!” he
still sighed out, as he expired.

A shudder thrilled through the bone and
marrow of all the bystanders ; 3; and one of
them exclaimed :—

“ Early or late, the murderer will find
God’s righteous vengeance following close behind.”
| 77

XLV.—THE WOLF.

JoHN was keeping sheep not far from a large
wood. One day he cried out with all his
might, in order to make some fun for himself,
< The wolf is coming !—the wolf is coming !”

The peasants immediately came running in
troops out of the next village, with axes and
clubs, to destroy the wolf; but as they saw
nething of it they went home again, and John
laughed in his sleeve at them.

On the next day John cried again, “ The
wolf! the wolf!”

The peasants again came out, although not
so many in number as yesterday. But they
saw no trace of a wolf; so they shook their
heads, and went home, full of vexation.

On the third day, the wolf came in earnest.
John cried with dismay, “‘ Help! help!—the
wolf! the wolf!” but this time not a single
peasant came to help him.

The wolf broke in among the flock, killed
78 - THE WOLF. / oy
several sheep, and ameng .them_the beautiful
little lamb, which was John’s own, and which
he had especially loved. :

“The truth itself is disbeliev’d
Of him, who erewhile has deceiv’d.”
7.9:

XLVI.—THE MONKEY.

A ricu miser, who had never given a farthing
in alms to.a poor man, had a monkey for his
companion; but he hoped to sell even him
again for more than he had paid for him.

One day the hard-hearted man went out,
when the monkey got upon the chests full of
money, and threw whole paw-fuls of gold and
silver out of the window into the street.

The people, who saw this, ran hither in
numbers to pick it up; they scuffled and
fought for the money, and picked up as much
as they could get.

When the chests were now almost emptied,
the miser came up the street, and saw with
horror what was going on. “Oh, that hide-
ous —that detestable—that stupid beast!” he
cried out, and already threatened the monkey
with his clenched fist from a distance.

But a neighbour said to the furious man,
““ Rest satisfied. It is certainly stupid to
80 THE MONKEY.

throw money out of the window like this mon-
key. But is it, then, much more reasonable

for a man to lock it up m chests, and make no
use at all of it?”

“ Happy the man, who, wealth and means possessing,
--Makes them to others and himself a blessing.”
~ Sl

“XLVIL—THE LION.

A poor slave, who had run away from his
master, had been re-captured, and sentenced
to death. He was brought into a large wide
place, and a dreadful lion let loose upon him.
Many thousand spectators looked on.

The lon rushed frightfully at the poor
man,— but then suddenly stood still, wagged
his tail, jumped round him full of joy, and
licked his hands affectionately. The people
were astonished at it, and inquired of the slave
HOw it was. The slave told his story.

« When I ran away from my master, I hid
myself i in a hole in the desert, where this lion
came in to me whining, and holding up to me
his paw, m which a sharp thorn was sticking.
I drew the thorn out for him; and from that
time the lion supplied me with venison, and
we lived securely together in the den. At the
last hunting we separated from one another,

G
82 “ | THE LION.

and both were taken; and now the good beast.
is happy to have found me again.” |

_ All the people were charmed at ‘the grati-
tude of the good beast, and cried aloud, “ Let
the man who did him the benefit live! Let
the grateful lion live!”

The slave was released, and richly recom-
pensed ; and the lion accompanied him, now
and afterwards, as tame as a dog, without
doing any one mischief.

“ Through gratitude the very beasts are tame—
May their example ne’er put thee to shame !”’
83 oe

XLVIIL—THE EARWIG.

ANSELM had the fault of being a listener. His
father often warned him, but it did him no
good. One evening a person came to his
father from the town into the garden, and said
he had something to say to him privately. So
the father went with him into the summer-
house, and shut the door.

Anselm presently sneaked up, and placed
his ear on a little chink which was in the
door; but all at once he felt quite a strange
sensation in his ear. It seemed as if something
was creeping and crawling about in it; and he
soon felt such a dreadful smarting that he
was forced to cry out, and became almost
distracted.

The father came with his visitor in alarm
from the summer-house. The doctor was im-
mediately sent for, who syringed Anselm’s ear.
At last there crawled out of it an earwig,
84 THE EARWIG.

which had concealed itself in the chink, and
had crept into his ear.

«Are you now sufficiently punished for
your listening, sir?” said his father. “ Let
this, then, serve as a warning to you for the
future. Know that there are many still worse
things than the earwig which creep into the
ears of listeners— yes, and into their heads
and hearts, too!—I mean, misunderstanding,
hatred, and malice. You must wean yourself
from these failings, if you would ever be an
honest fellow.”

“ Prudence forbids, but shame and honour more,
To stand a sneaking listener at the door.”
85

XLIX.—THE LOAF OF BREAD.

At a time of scarcity a certain rich man in-
vited twenty poor children to his house, and
said to them, “In this basket .there is a loaf
of bread for each of you; take it, and come
again every day at this hour till God sends us
better times.” .

The children seized upon the basket, wran-
gled and fought for the bread, as each wished
to get the best and largest loaf; and at last
went away, without even thanking him.

Francesca alone, a poor but neatly-dressed
child, stood modestly at a distance, took the
smallest loaf which was left in the basket,
gratefully kissed the gentleman’s hand, and
then went home in a quiet and orderly
manner.

On the following day the children were just
as ill-behaved; and poor Francesca this time
received a loaf which was scarcely half the
86 ‘THE LOAF OF BREAD.

/

size of the rest. But when she came home,
and her mother began to cut the bread, there
fell out of it a number of brig ght new silver
pieces.

Her mother was perplexed, and said, “ ‘Take.
back the money this instant; for it has, no
doubt, got into the bread through some mis-
take.”

Francesca carried it back. But the bene-
volent man said, “No, no! it was no mistake.
[ had the money baked into the smallest loaf
in order to reward you, you good child! Al-
ways continue thus contented, peaceable, and
unassuming: the person who is contented with
the smaller loaf rather than quarrel for the
larger one, will find blessings still more valu-
able than money baked in the bread.”

“A modest, peaceful, thankful life,
Gains more than discontent and strife.”
87

L.— BREAD AND WATER.

In a time of great scarcity a poor boy, named
Paul, came down from the mountain to a
neighbouring village, and begged for bread at
the houses of the wealthier inhabitants. Peter,
the son of a rich farmer, was sitting before his
house-door with a large slice of bread in his
hand. “‘ Give me, too, a bit of that,” said poor
Paul; “I am so very hungry.”

But Peter hardheartedly replied, “Go away!
i have no bread for you.”

About a year afterwards Peter went up the
mountain to look after his goat, which had
strayed. He wandered a long time up and
down among the rocks. The sun was shining
very fiercely, and he was almost fainting from
thirst; but he could not find a spring any-
where. SO

At last he saw poor Paul, who was keeping
sheep, sitting in the shade of a tree, with a
88 ' BREAD AND WATER.

stone bottle full of water standing near him.
< Give me some to drink,” said rich Peter ;
<‘T am so very thirsty.”

But ia said, “Go away! I have no water |
for you.”

Then Peter remembered that he had once
unmercifully refused a morsel of bread to poor
Paul; the tears started to his eyes, and he
begged Paul’s. forgiveness. Paul was over-
come, forgave him, and reached him the bottle.
But Peter said, “May God reward you, both
here and. hereafter, for this draught of water !”

~

“Freely pardon, freely give,
Is truly Christianly to live.”
89

LI.— THE MILK.

FERDINAND, a rich boy from the town, walked
one spring day to a neighbouring farm-house,
where he bought himself a basin of milk, and,
sitting down on the grass under a shady tree,
broke his bread into the milk, and feasted to
his heart’s content.

Frederic, a poor boy from the next village,
who looked thin and pale from want and starv-
ation, was standing not far off, looking sadly
on, and would gladly have had a little of it ;
but he was too modest to ask for any.

It occurred, indeed, to the rich Ferdinand,
that he should leave a little over for the poor
boy; but he gave no heed to this good sug-
gestion of his heart, and greedily feasted on.
When he had quite devoured the milk, he
spied at the bottom of the basin a rhyme. He
read it with a blush, got the basin filled again,
and added to it a large slice of bread. Then
90 | THE MILK.

callmg the poor boy Frederic to him in a
friendly way, he broke up the bread for him
with his own hands, and kindly bade him eat
with a good appetite.

«The saying,” observed Ferdinand, “ which
is in-the basin ought to be written in all the
dishes of the rich.” The saying ran thus: —

“¥orgetful of the poor distrest,
Can thy abundance e’er be blest 2?”
Oi

LIL.— THE SOUP.

«'THE soup is not good enough—I can’t eat
it,” said little Gertrude at dinner, and laid her
spoon down.

«< Well, then,” said her mother, “I will get
you some better at supper.”

Her mother then went into the garden and
dug up some potatoes, which Gertrude had to
pick up and put into sacks till sunset.

After they had both returned to the house,
her mother at length brought out the soup.
Gertrude tasted it and said, “ This is certainly
a different kind of soup; it tastes better.” So
she ate the whole plateful.

But her mother smiled and said, “It is the
very same soup which you left to-day at noon ;
but now it tastes better, because you have well
earned your supper by hard work.”

“ A dinner, earn’d by honest labour,
Will never want a pleasant flavour.”
92

LIU.—THE MOST EXCELLENT SAUCES.

A PRINCE was overtaken in his walk by a
shower, and sought shelter in the nearest
cottage.

The children happened to be sitting at table,
with a great dish full of oatmeal porridge
placed before them. They were all eating it
with a right good appetite, and looked, more-
over, as fresh and ruddy as roses.

«Flow is it possible,” said the prince to the
mother, “ that they can eat such coarse food
with such evident pleasure, and look so healthy
and blooming withal ?”

The mother answered, “ It is on account of
three kinds of sauces which I put on the food.
First, I let the children earn their dinner by
work; secondly, I give them nothing to eat
out of meal-time, that they may bring an
appetite with them to table; thirdly, I bring
them up in the habit of contentment, as I keep
them altogether ignorgnt of dainties and sweet-
meats.”

‘Seek far and wide, no better sauce you'll find
Than hunger, work, and a contented mind.”
93

LIV.—THE HONEY-POT.

MarGarer’s mother once had both her hands
full of work in the kitchen, and cried out,
“< Peggy, bring mea lemon, directly ; ; here is
the key of the store-room.”

As soon as Margaret came into the store-
room, she looked greedily round to see if there
were anything nice to taste, when she saw the
honey-pot on an upper shelf. She stretched
herself as far as she could, in order to reach
the pot, and put the top of her fore-finger into
the honey.

But suddenly she felt her finger dreadfully
pinched by something, and when she drew her
hand out, screaming and crying——lo! there
hung on it a large craw-fish, which had seized
her ‘finger in its pincers, and would not let it
go again.

Her mother had, indeed, without Pegey’s
knowing it, sold the honey two days before ;
94 | | ' THE HONEY-POT.

and as the pot: was standing empty, she put
some craw-fish in.

She ran into the store-room when she heard
Peggy cry, released the child’s finger from the
fish’s claw, and said, “ Let this little punish-
ment be a warning to you; for gluttony may
bring yet sadder consequences upon you.
Many already, who have accustomed them-
selves to dainty living in their youth, have
squandered their money, injured their health,
and, what is-still worse, their souls.”

-“ Of liquorice mouth, my child, beware,
The source of many an after care.”
95

LV.—THE PEARLS. |
PART. I. |

A TRAVELLER had lost himself in a desert, in a
far-distant region of the world; for two whole
days he found nothing to eat or drink, and
was almost fainting from hunger and thirst.
At last he reached a shady tree, and a fresh
spring: on the tree there was no fruit, but a
little bag was lying by the spring. “ Praise
God!” said the man, as he felt the bag;
<‘ perhaps these are peas, which will save me
from starvation;” so he eagerly opened the
bag, but cried out in horror, “ Alas! alas!
they are only pearls!”

“ Jewels and gold, in hunger’s sore distress,
When food alone can save, are valueless.”

PART It.

The poor man now seemed likely to die
of hunger, though in possession of pearls
96 a THE PEARLS.

worth many thousand crowns. But he prayed
earnestly to—Ged; and presently he saw a
Moor coming towards him at great speed, on
a camel. The Moor had lost the pearls, and
was overjoyed at finding them again. He
had compassion on the half-famished man, and
giving him some bread and refreshing fruit,
took him up behind him on the camel. “ See,”
said the Moor, “ how wonderfully God con-
trives! I considered it as a misfortune to lose
my pearls; but it was a happy event for you:
for God has so ordered it that I, of necessity,
came back hither, and so saved your life.”

“Upon the love of God rely,
Thine Helper in necessity.”
97

| LVL—THE PRECIOUS STONE.

A GOLDSMITH was employed to make a splendid
ornament for a lady of rank, for which. she
gave him many precious jewels.

Robert, his apprentice, took great delight in
one of the stones, which was clear and spark-
ling with various hues, and often examined it.

One day his master observed that two of the
most beautiful stones were missing ; suspecting
the apprentice, he searched his bed-room, and
there found the jewels in a hole of the wall,
behind an old chest.

Robert firmly persisted that he had not
taken them; but his master chastised him
severely, told him that he deserved hanging,
and turned him out of his place.

On the next day another stone was missing,
and the goldsmith found it in the same hole,
and now took more pains to discover who
concealed it there. He soon observed a mag-
pie, which the apprentice had trained and

H
98 THE PRECIOUS STONE.

tamed, , perched on the working-table, take a
stone in its beak, and_ carry it away to the.
hole in the wall.

The goldsmith now felt heartily sorry that.
he had done an injury to the poor lad ; he
took him back again, from that time treated

him very kindly, and never again suspected
any one so lightly.

“« Distrust, that rests on insufficient ground,
Will both one’s self and all concern’d confound.”
99

_LVII.— THE PEBBLES.

FLORIAN, a young waggoner’s mate, had
brought a dangerous illness on _ himself
through drinking spirits.

The doctor said to him, “If you do not
entirely give up spirits, you will certainly
die; for they are poison to the young.”

The patient said, “That I can’t do. I am
already so accustomed to it that I am obliged
to drink up this bottleful every day.”

The doctor said, “ Well, well; I must then
think of some other remedy.” On the follow-
ing day he brought a little painted box full o
pebbles, and said, “« Put one of these stones into
your bottle every day; let it always remain
in, and so the spirits will not do you any
harm.”

The sick man believed that the pebbles had
some virtue to make the spirits harmless, and
every day put one into the bottle. In this
way he daily drank a few drops less, without
100 | THE PEBBLES.

observing it himself; and. when the bottle
was at length full of pebbles, he had weaned
himself from the pernicious habit of spirit-

Seinkine,

“Who day by day his evil habit betters,
Breaks off by slow degrees sin’s loathsome fetters.”
101 |

LVUL—THE SACKFUL OF EARTH.

A ricH man had deprived his neighbour, a
poor widow, of her only field, in order to
enlarge his garden with it. As he was going
round it on the following day, the poor widow
came with an empty corn-sack, and said to
him, with tears in her eyes, “I beg that you
will permit me to take only so much earth
from my paternal property as will go mto this
sack.”

The rich man said, “I can certainly grant
you this silly request.”

The widow filled her sack with earth, and
then said, “ Now I have still another request ;
be so good as to help me to take up the sack
on my shoulder.”

The rich man had no inclination to do this,
and angrily refused her; but the widow per-
severed in her request, till at last he consented.
But when he tried to lift up the sack, he ex-
102 — THE SACKFUL OF EARTH.

claimed, “It is impossible—it is too heavy
for me!” |

Then said the widow, with great energy,
“‘Here is this sackful of earth already too
heavy for you, how then will the whole field,
which a thousand such sacks could not contain,
weigh you down to all eternity !”

The man was struck with terror at these
words, and gave the field back again to her.

“Take heed, for ever on the soul remains
The heavy burthen of ill-gotten gains.”
103

LIX.— THE CROWN-PIECE.

FRmoLIN, a pious farmer, often said, “ He
who loves God with all his heart, will find it
easy to do good and to avoid evil.” |

Now he had a man who was very passion-
ate, and at such times broke out into the
roughest language. Fridolin often reminded
him how he should strive to subdue his pas-
sion, out of love to God. But the man said,
“It is impossible for me to do so; both man
and beast put me out so much.”

One morning Fridolin said to him, “ Mat-
thew, see, here is a bright new crown! I will
make you a present of it, if you go through
the day without letting an angry word escape
from your mouth.”

The man was pleased with the proposal, and
gladly accepted it.

The rest of the servants, however, agreed
privately among themselves to make him lose
104 . THE CROWN-PIECE.

the crown. All that they did or said during
the whole day was done with the purpose of
putting him into a passion. But the man
behaved so firmly that he did not let a single
angry word escape him. |

In the evening Fridolin gave him the crown ;
but took the opportunity of saying to him,
«You ought to be ashamed of yourself, that
you are able to overcome your passion So
easily from a desire of obtaining a paltry piece
of money, but will not do so out of love to
God!”

The man did correct himself after this, and
became a peaceably-disposed character.

““God’s love, pervading all with strong control,
Can from sin’s heaviest weight release thy soul.”
105

LX. —MONEY WELL SPENT.

AN industrious joimer, who earned much
money, used to content himself with very simple
fare, clothed himself and his family in a plain,
neat manner, and carefully avoided all super-
fluous expenses.

“Where do you put the money which you
have over, Master Joiner?” asked his neigh-
bour, a turner.

The joiner answered, “I pay off some debts
with part of the money, and part I put:out at
interest.”

« Ah!” said the turner, “you are joking!
You have neither debts to pay, nor a capital
out at interest anywhere.”

«Yes, indeed, I have,” said the joiner; “ let
me only explain the thing to you. Observe,
then, all the money which my good parents
have laid out upon me since the hour that I
first saw the light I consider as my debt, which
I must repay them; but the money which I
106 ‘MONEY WELL SPENT.

lay out upon my children, in order to get them
a good education, I consider as my capital,
which some day, when I am old, they will
repay me, together with the interest. As my
parents spared no expense to educate me well,
so I do the same with my children; and as I
regard it as my filial duty to repay the kind-
nesses of my parents, so I hope that my child-
ren also will repay me this same debt on their
part, as certainly as if they had given me a
deed to that effect, duly signed and sealed.”

“What parents for their children’s good outlay,
Forms but a debt those children will repay.”
107

LXL—THE PURSE. _

NoRBERT, a poor charcoal-burner’s boy, was
sitting under a tree in a wood, mourning, cry-
ing, and praying. A person of rank, in a
green coat with a star of honour on his breast,
who was sporting in the wood, approached
him, and said, “ What are you crying for, my
little man ?”

“Oh,” said Norbert, “my mother has been
ill a long time, and my father sent me to town,
to pay the doctor, and as I came along I lost
the purse with all the money in it. ”

The nobleman spoke privately with the
keeper who attended him, and pulling out a
purse of red silk, with some new gold pieces
in it, said, ““Can this be your purse?”

«Oh, no,” Norbert answered; “ my purse
was only a little one, and had no such bright
money in it.”

«This must be yours, then,” said the keeper,
as he pulled out of his pocket a shabby lea~-

thern purse.
108 THE PURSE...

« Ah, yes!” exclaimed Norbert, Joyfully,
“that’s it!”

The keeper gave it him ; but the nobleman
said, “Since you prayed so heartily, and have
proved so honest, I shall make you a present
of this purse with the gold that is in it.”

| “'Ne’er let the honest heart despair,
For anguish finds relief in prayer.”
109

LXU.— THE DIAMOND RING.

A MERCHANT named William, who had travel-
led mto a far country over the sea, and ob-
tained a large fortune by industry and skill,
after many years returned to his native country.

When the ship landed, he heard that his
relations were just then assembled at a jovial
supper in a neighbouring country-house. He
immediately hastened thither, and in the joy of
his heart did not even take time to put on a
better coat instead of his grey cloak, which
was tolerably well beaten about by the voyage.
But as he came into the brilliantly-lighted
room his relations testified but little pleasure
at seemg him back again, since, in consequence
of his shabby dress, they supposed that he had
returned poor.

A. young Moor, whom he had brought with
him, was very indignant at the relations, and
said, “These are bad people, who do not even
welcome their friend with affection after so
long an absence.”
110 a THE DIAMOND RING.

“Only wait,” said the merchant aside to
him; “they will soon change their counte-
nances.” a a

He then put a ring, which he carried with
him, on his finger; and lo! all their counte-
nances immediately brightened up, and each
pressed towards their “own dear cousin Wil-
liam.” One squeezed him by the hand, an-
other embraced him, and all contended for the
honour of receiving and entertaining him at
their houses.

‘Has the ring some hidden power to be-
witch the people?” asked the Black, in amaze-
ment.

“Oh, no!” said William; “they only see
by the sparkling ring, which is worth some
thousand crowns, that I am rich; and riches
are all in all to them.”

«“O you blinded men!” cried the Moor ;
‘it is not, then, the ring, but covetousness,
which has bewitched you! Can they indeed
value a bit of yellow ore, and a transparent
stone, at a higher rate than a man so noble as
my master ?”

“'Virtue’s the pearl of price: the gold and stone
Seem of more value to the fool alone.”
‘di

LXIII.— THE GOLDEN SNUFF-BOX.

A CotoneL showed to his officers, who were
dining with him, as they sat at table, a new
and very beautiful golden snuff-box. After a
while he wanted to take a pinch of snuff, and,
feeling in all his pockets, said with surprise,
«Where is my box? Do just see, gentlemen,
if any of you has put it into his pocket in a fit
of absence.”

They all stood. up immediately, and turned
their pockets inside out, without the snuff-box
being discovered. An Ensign only remained
sitting, with evident embarrassment, and said,
““T cannot turn my pocket out: my word of
honour that I have not got the box ought to
‘be sufficient.”

The officers went away shaking their heads
at one another, and each looked upon him as
the thief.

_” The following day the Colonel had him sent
for, and said, “ The box has been found; there
112, THE GOLDEN SNUFF-BOX. —

was a hole in my pocket, and it got in between
the lining. But now, tell me why you refused
to show your pocket, as all the rest of the
company did?” |

The Ensign answered : «To you alone,
Colonel, can I willingly tell it. My parents
are poor: I therefore give them half my pay ;
and I eat nothing hot at my dmner. When I
was invited by you, I had already got my
dinner in my pocket; and [I should have felt
ashamed if, in turning out my pocket, a slice
of black bread and a sausage had fallen out.”

The Colonel exclaimed in delight, “ You are
a very good son! and in order that you may
support your parents more easily, you shall
dine at my table every day.”

He then invited all the officers to a festive
banquet, assured them all of the Ensign’s imno-
cence, and handed to him for a testimony of
his esteem the golden snuff-box as a present.

« Who treats his parents with respect and love,
Himself from God and man the same shall prove.”
113

. LXIV.— THE ‘SILVER WATCH.
‘ALBERT, a poor student, once got -a -night’s
lodging at a mill, where a bench in the lower
room served him‘for a bed. ‘About midnight
he woke up, and heard something ‘ticking: on
the wall near him; he looked, and:saw' by‘the
moonlight a silver watch.

‘A. strong desire seized him to take the
watch, and ‘to -run away with it through the
window. His conscience indeed whispered to
him, * Thou shalt: not steal;” but his desire
after the beautiful watch became stronger and
stronger. At last he sprang up with a sudden
effort, and jumped. hastily out of the window,
in order to escape the temptation. When he
had run about a hundred steps, he felt sorry
that he had not taken the watch, and already
wished to go back for it. But his conscience
warned him yet again; and, giving heed to
this warning, he wandered further on his
way.
114. THE SILVER WATCH.

The moon went down, and it became quite
dark. Albert lost his way into a swamp, but
at last reached some rising ground. He
there laid himself down, worn out with
fatigue, and fell fast asleep. At daybreak he
was awakened by a hideous cry, and when he
opened his eyes, he was seized with terror and
amazement. He found himself lying under a
gibbet; and over his head hung a thief, around
whom a large flock of ravens had assembled.
It seemed to him exactly as if a voice said to
his inmost soul, “ See, so would thy end have
been if thou hadst commenced stealing!” He
knelt down, and made a sacred vow to God
that he would for the future immediately and
earnestly withstand every temptation.

“ The stronger threats temptation’s hour,
The closer seek God’s saving power.”
115.

LXV.—THE WATCH-BANDS.

Tue scholars in a- knitting-school determined
to have a portion of the work which they had
on hand sold for the benefit of the poor; and
a tradesman’s wife in: the town, who had. a
large shop, undertook the business out: of
charity.

Now ‘Adelgunde, a very vain scholar, who
considered herself a mistress. of the pearl-
stitch, thought, “I shall now be able to learn
with certainty what is the real value of my
skill. My schoolfellows only envy me, and the
mistress herself is not kindly disposed towards
me; but the tradesman’s wife does not know
from whom the work comes, and will certainly
tell me the truth.” |

So she went into the shop, ‘pointed out a
very pretty watch-band, which one of her
schoolfellows had knitted, and inquired the
cost of it. “I cannot let you have that one,”
said the woman, “for less than thirty-six
kreuzers.”
116 . THE WATCH-BANDS.

«¢ And what is the price of this one here?”
Adelgunde continued to inquire, and pointed
out a still prettier one made by another school-
fellow. |

< That costs forty-eight kreuzers,” the wo~
man replied.

< But how much do you set this one at?”
again inquired Adelgunde, and -pointéd out
one which she had knitted herself, and which
she considered as the most beautiful’ of all.

<< Ah, that there!” said the woman; “ why,
if you take the other two, I will give you that
one into the bargain.”

Adelgunde could not conceal her shame,
and blushed quite red. But the woman said,
“ watch-band yourself. I am very sorry that
you have not succeeded better. You came
here, however, to learn the truth; and'I have
told it to you in sincerity.”

“ A silly heart will oft itself
With flattery deceive,
But common sense will nothing else
Save honest truth receive.’
117.

LXVi.— THE LOOKING-GLASS. |

MarTinpA was a very passionate girl. Again
and again her mother strongly impressed upon
her how sinful, detestable, and dangerous is a
violent temper, and exhorted: her. to gentleness.

She was sitting one day at her work-table,
on which there stood a pretty vase full of
flowers. Her little brother threw it down by
accident, and broke it to pieces. Matilda was
almost beside herself with passion; her eyes
glared, her forehead was swollen, and her
whole countenance distorted.

Her mother immediately held a looking-
glass before her face, and Matilda was so
shocked at her own appearance, that her
passion subsided, and she began to cry.

« Do you see, now,” said her mother, “ what
a hideous thing is passion? If you let it grow
into a habit, these frightful marks will by
degrees become fixed, and every.grace will
disappear from your countenance.”
118 THE LOOKING-GLASS.

_ Matilda laid this to heart, and took much
pains to conquer her passion. She became
very gentle, and her gentleness adorned her
countenance. But her mother often reminded
her afterwards, “ As it is with passion and
gentleness, so it is with all vices and virtues.”

“As if reflected, in the face

Each character of soul we trace:

Vice makes it hideous, rough, and wild,
But Virtue lovely, sweet, and mild.”
119

LXVII.— THE CLOAK.

Some soldiers came into a village during a
time of war, and asked for a guide. A poor
day-labourer was ready to go with them. It
was very cold, and snowed and blew in a
fearful manner. He begged the villagers im-
ploringly to lend him a cloak, but they paid
no attention to him; only one old man, a
foreioner, who had been driven out of his own
country by the war, and supported himself
scantily in the village as a smith’s journey-
man, had compassion on the day-labourer, and
gave him his own old cloak.

The soldiers marched on, and lo! late in
the evening there came riding into the vil-
lage a young handsome officer in a splendid
uniform, with a cross of honour on his breast,
and had himself conducted to the old man who
had lent his cloak to the guide. The kind-
hearted old man, as soon as he saw the officer,
uttered a loud cry: “O! it is my own son
120 — a THE CLOAK,

Rudolph ! !” he called out, sprang to him, and.
folded him in his arms. |

Now Rudolph had been enlisted. as a soldier

many years before, and had been promoted. to
be an officer on account of his:superior abilities,
integrity, and valour. He heard nothing more
of his father, who. was formerly a master-smith:
in a considerable market-town. But the son
had recognised the old cloak, and satisfied.
himself by the account of the guide that his.
father was at this time living in that village.
_ Father and son wept for joy, and all the
people who stood near wept with them.
Rudolph remamed with his father all the
night, and conversed with him till daybreak.
He gave him, before he rode away, a supply
of money, and promised to take further care of
him.

But the people said, “ As the old man had
compassion on others, so God has had com-
passion on him, and has let his son find him
again, who has delivered him from all his
necessity.”

“The gracious Lord his soul will bless
Who helps the stranger in distress.”
12h

LXVIIL—THE SHOES.

A voor boy, named Meinrad, was keeping
goats, but his wages were so small that he
was not even able-to buy himself a pair of shoes.
His feet were sadly frost-bitten, for it was
already late in the autumn, and the weather
very wet and. cold.

Now there came a man out of the bushes
near, who had already been twice put into the
House of Correction for theft, and said, <‘ My
occupation is pretty profitable: come into my
service, and I will have some new shoes made
for you. Then you need no longer suffer so
much, and no longer go bare-foot through the
mire.”

But the lad replied, “No! I had rather go
barefoot, and continue honest, than earn the
richest livelihood through dishonesty. For
surely it is better to dirt my feet with mire,
than to do evil with my hands, and stain my
soul with evil deeds.”

“ Poor—but an honest, upright lad ;
Oh, better far than rich—and bad !”’
3y22

LXIX.—THE SHOE-NAIL.

Aw industrious nail-maker, named Ohnerast,
used to sit the livelong day in his workshop,
and hammered away so that the sparks flashed
round about. The son of his rich neighbour,
Mr. Von Berg, came daily, and often watched
him for hours together.

<¢Come and learn to make a nail for your
amusement, young master,” once said the nail-
maker; for who knows what good it may
sometime do you !”

The idle young gentleman accepted his
offer. He sat down laughing at the anvil,
and soon gained such dexterity that he could
finish off a good serviceable shoe-nail. The
elder Mr. Von Berg died; but the son lost
all his property through the war, and went as
a poor emigrant to a far-distant vitl.ge. In
this village there lived a great many shoe-
makers, who used to spend much money on
shoe-nails in the town, and often knew not
how to procure them on account: of their
THE SHOE-NAIL. 123

extravagant price ;. for through the whole
district many thousand shoes were made for
the soldiers.

The young Mr. Von Berg, with whom
things went badly, now bethought himself
that he understood very. well the art of making
shoe-nails. He offered to supply the shoe-
makers with nails in abundance, if they would
assist him to set up a workshop. They helped
him to do so, and he soon maintained himself
very amply.

“It is good, indeed,” said he frequently,
“if a man can only make a shoe-nail. This
now renders me more service than all my
landed possessions, which would not have been
offered for sale for a hundred thousand
crowns.”

“ An honest craft, well understood,
Will always bring its owner food.”
124

_LXX.— THE, HORSE-SHOE.

A PEASANT was going on a journey . with his
son Thomas. “Look,” said the father, on the
way, “ there is a piece of horse-shoe lying in

pocket, ”

“Oh!” said Thomas, “it is not worth the
trouble of stooping down.”

The father picked up the iron without say-
ig anything more, and put it into his pocket.
In the next village he sold it to the smith for
a few farthings, and bought some cherries
with .the money. They both travelled on.
The sun was shining very fiercely; far and
wide there was no house, no tree, nor spring
to be seen; and Thomas was almost fainting
with thirst.

His father now let drop —as if by accident
—a cherry. Thomas picked it up as eagerly
as if it were gold, and put it directly into his
mouth. After a while his father let another
THE ‘HORSE-SHOE. . 125

cherry fall, and Thomas stooped down as
eagerly for that. In this way, from time to
time, his father let him pick up all the cherries ;
and when Thomas had devoured the last, he
turned round to him laughing, and said, “See,
now, if you had been willing to stoop down
only once for the horse-shoe, you need not have
stooped down so many times ‘for the cherries.
Learn from ‘this how.good and true ‘is the old
saying: |
“‘Ne’er slight, when duty bids, a little thing,
For troubles numberless may from it spring.’
126

LXXI.— THE SHOE-NAIL.

A. FARMER. saddled his horse to ride to town,
and though he observed that one of the shoes
wanted a nail, he only said, “It does not
matter much about a nail,”’—and rode away.

He had not yet completed half his journey,
when his horse cast his shoe. “If there were
a forge near at hand,” said he, “I should have
the horse shod; meanwhile there are still
three shoes to go on with.”

But the horse next injured his hoof upon
the stony ground, and began to go lame; when
suddenly two robbers sprang forward from
the forest to plunder the traveller. He was
unable to escape on a horse that limped, and
so they took from him his horse, with bridle,
saddle, and portmanteau.

“IT could not have supposed,” said he, “ that
I could have lost my horse on account of a
single nail!”

Heavy and sorrowful he repaired home on
“THE SHOE-NAIL. > | 127
foot, and often afterwards he impressed the
proverb on his children,— _

“A heedlessness of little things
A heavy train of mischief brings.”
128

LXXIL—THE SEVEN STICKS.

A FATHER had seven sons, who were constantly
at variance with each other, and who even
neglected their work in consequence of their
quarrels and contentions. Indeed some bad
persons had the intention of turning this
difference to their own advantage, by cheating
the children of their inheritance on the death
of their father.

The venerable old man had all his seven
sons assembled together one day. He laid
before them seven sticks which were bound
together, and said, “I will pay directly a
hundred crowns to any one of you who can
break this bundle of sticks. asunder.”

Each of them strained every nerve, and
each said, after a long but vain attempt, “It
18 quite impossible.”

“And yet,” the father said, “nothing is
easier.”

He then untied the bundle, and broke one
stick after the other with little effort.
THE SEVEN STICKS. 129

_ © Ah!” said his sons, “it is easy enough to
do it so; any little boy could do it in that
way” | oe |

_ But their father said, “ As it is with these
sticks, so it is with you, my sons. So long as
you hold fast together, you will succeed, and
no man will be able to overreach you; but if
the bond of unity, which ought to bind you
together, be loosened, it will happen to you as _—
to the sticks, which le here broken on the
ground around us.”

“ House, city, country,—all are prosp’rous found,
When by the powerful link of union bound.”
130

LXXTI.—THE SPLINTER. —

An honest: messenger, who carried a large
sum of money with him, was seized, robbed,
and murdered, on a bitter winter evening.
His corpse was found lying in the snow, which
was stained red with his blood. The officer.
made inspection of the bloody spot by torch-
tight that very night; he there observed a
splinter of a knobbed stick, and took it home
without saying anything.

On the following morning, as he was going
into the office, he observed with horror that
just such a splinter was wanting in the stick
of a bailiff which was leaning against the door ;
and the splinter which he had found exactly
fitted into the hole. The officer immediately
gave orders to seize the bailiff as the mur-
derer, and to.put him into custody.

The wretch at first resolutely denied the
tact; but the little dumb piece of wood
witnessed too loudly against him. He turned
THE SPLINTER. DBT

pale, and confessed that he had learnt that the
messenger was to deliver a considerable sum
of money to the officer ; and the love of money
had seduced him to murder the good man,
who had never done him an injury.

The murderer had concealed the packet
which contained the money unopened under a
stack of wood, and so had not even seen the
money for which he had committed the
murder. He had his head cut off before a -
vast crowd of people, of whom each won-
dered that the secret crime had been brought
to light by so slight a circumstance. _

“Full oft is guilt discover’d here below, —
And all, at last, the day of doom will show.”
132

LXXIV.— THE ROPE.

Two beggar-beys, Guy and Klaus, found an
old rope-on the road, and strove and quarrelled
for it, till hill and valley echoed with their
noise. Guy held the rope at one end, Klaus
pulled at the other, and each sought to draw
it by main force out of the other’s hands. All
of a sudden the rope broke asunder, and both
the boys rolled over into the mire.

A. man, who happened to come up to them,
said, “So it is with the quarrelsome! They
make a great noise, and quarrel about some
trifling matter; and what do both parties
gain at last? Nothing—except to cover
themselves with ridicule and disgrace, as you
two are now befouled with mud.”

“Be peaceable, and strife forego,
Whose end is always full of woe.”
133

LXXV.— THE WILLOW-TWIG AND
THE STRAW. |

A poor widow and her two boys were re-
turning to the village one evening from a
neighbouring willow-bed, where they had
gathered some twigs; the mother carried a
large bundle of willow-twigs on her head, and
each of the boys a small one, bound together
with a band of straw.

On the way a rich merchant from the town
met them, and of him they begged for charity.
But the rich man said to the widow, “ You
need not beg; intrust your two children to
me, and I will soon have them taught to make
gold out of twigs and straw.”

The mother considered this as a banter, but
the merchant assured her that he was truly in
earnest: so at last she consented, and the
merchant had one of the children taught
basket-making, and the other straw-platting.

After three years they came back to their
134 THE WILLOW-TWIG AND THE STRAW-

mother’s little cottage, indefatigably manu-
factured the most beautiful baskets and the
finest straw hats, and disposed of their produce
to the merchant. After a little while the
merchant came one day into their room, paid
them for the work which he had received in
bright ducats, and, laughing, said to the mother,
“Do you not see, now, that I was right, and
have kept my word?

“¢By honest industry, behold, —
The wood and straw are turn’d to gold!?” _
(185 —

LXXVI.—THE FAIR.

A weautuy lady, who lived in the country,
having no children of her own, wished to
adopt an active and well-behaved girl from
among her relations in town.

For this purpose she once went there ; ; and
no sooner was her intention known than
several girls presented themselves before her,
recommending themselves, and boasting of
their relationship.

The lady at first let this pass quietly, and
gave to each of the girls a piece of gold, saying
at the same time, “ There is a fair to-day;
now, go and buy for yourselves anything which
you like and value most; and then come back,
and let me see what you have bought.”

The girls hurried away, and came back full
of joy. Almost all of them brought gay-
coloured ribbons, strings of glittering pearls,
caps of gold-embroidered stuff, and similar
136 © : _ THE FAIR.

ornaments, and showed their supposed treasures
to their relation. | |

Only one girl, poor little Augusta, had
bought none of these trifles, but a Prayer-book,
and a distaff with a dozen spindles. The lady
was delighted ;. she took Augusta kindly by the
hand, and said, “I am pleased,.dear child,
that you have already turned your thoughts
to prayer and industry: the others have
shown too clearly, by their inconsiderate
purchases, that finery and frivolity are more
to their taste than piety and industry. You
shall be henceforth to me as a daughter:
continue thus; be always good, pious, and
industrious ; so will the blessed God be always
with you, and his blessing everywhere attend
yi ou. 39

“To pray for succour, and strive all we can,
Make up the duty of the perfect man.”
137

LXXVII.—THE MANSION AND THE
COTTAGE.

A young lady, named Gertrude, lived in a
beautiful mansion, and prided herself not a
little on her lofty station.

One day Maria, the daughter of a poor
bricklayer, came and said. to her, “ My father,
who is at the pomt of death, has sent to entreat
you. to come to him, as he has something of
importance to say to you.”

The young lady replied, sneeringly, “ It
must indeed. be something of importance which
such a poor man has to say to me; Go
along! I have nothing to do in your wretched
cottage.” —

After a while Maria came back again, almost
out of breath, and said, “ Oh, dear young
lady! do come now directly. Your late mo-
ther had a quantity of gold and silver concealed
in the walls during the war-time, and charged
my father to mention the place to nobody but
138 THE MANSION AND THE COTTAGE.

yourself, as soon as you were twenty years old.
But he is now just dying, and cannot wait SO
long.”

Miss Gertrude: now made as much haste as
she could; but when she entered the room, the
good man was already gone. She was almost
beside herself with terror and vexation: She
had the walls of the mansion broken through,
sometimes in one direction, sometimes in an-
other, but found not the least trace of the
treasure. Oh, how she lamented now, that
through her pride she had troubled such an
honest man in his last moments, and had de-
prived herself of a large possession! Although,
indeed, these griefs arose partly from selfish-
ness, and so were worth but little, yet she now
perceived the truth of the saying,—

“A haughty mind, an iron heart,
Makes both itself and others smart.”
139

‘LXXVIL —THE CHILD’S PRAYER.

A. poor widow said one morning to her five
children, who were still dependent on _ her,
«Dear children, I can give you nothing to eat
this morning; I have no bread, no flour, not a
single egg in the house. Pray, therefore, our
blessed God to help us; for he is rich and
mighty, and says himself, ‘Call upon me in
your necessity, and I will deliver you.’”

Her little boy Christian, who was scarcely
six years old, set off to school empty and sad
enough. He came along by the church-door,
which stood open; so he went in, and knelt
down before the altar. As he saw nobody in
the church, he prayed with a loud voice:
“ Blessed Father, who art in heaven, we child-
ren have nothing more to eat. Our mother
has no bread, and no flour—not even an egg.
Send us, then, something to eat; that we and
our dear mother may be saved from starvation.
Yes, I pray, help us! Thou art indeed rich
140 THE CHILD’S PRAYER.

and mighty; Thou canst help us if Thou wilt,
and Thou hast indeed promised to do so!” —

So Christian prayed in his childlike sim-
plicity, and then went on to school. But when
he reached home again, he saw on the table a
large loaf of bread, a dish full of flour, and a
basket full of eggs. “ Now, God be praised !”
cried he, joyfully ; “ God has heard my prayer.
Tell me, then, dear mother, has an angel really
brought all this in at the window ?”

“No,” said his mother; “but God has
nevertheless heard your prayer. When you
were praying at the altar, the steward’s lady
was kneeling in her private pew. You could
not see her; but she had observed you, and
heard your prayer. For this reason she has
sent us all this; she was the angel through
whom God has helped us. My children, thank
God all of you; be joyful, and never forget in
all your life the beautiful saying,—

“< By miracles of love the Lord supplies
Our needs ; and true faith on that love relies.’ ”
141 —

LXXTX.—THE PAGE.

A pags, named Augustus, had the night-watch
in the King’s ante-room. The King was
unable to sleep, and so rang his bell, to have a
book brought him. But Augustus was fast
asleep, and did not hear him. The King rang
frequently, and each time louder than before ;
but in vain. At last he came himself out of
his bed-chamber into the ante-room. The
still tender lad was sitting sound asleep at a
writing-table, upon which stood a lighted
taper; a letter, which he had not yet quite
finished, lay before him.

The King read the letter, which began
thus : —‘ Dearest mother,— This is already
the third night that I have undertaken the
night-watch for the other pages. I can hardly
bear it any longer; but I am so happy that I
have in this way earned ten crowns in a single
week. Iam going to send them to you, that
142 — THE PAGE.

you. may find a little comfort in your poor
circumstances.”

This filial love » delighted the King extremely.
He fetched a rouleau of gold pieces, and put it
into the coat-pocket of the page. He felt sure
that Augustus would send the present to his
mother, and again he betook himself to rest.

When the page woke up, and found the
money in his pocket, he guessed correctly who
had given him such a rich present. As soon
as the King came out of his bedroom in the
morning, Augustus fell down at his feet,
thanked him for his liberal present, and
begged forgiveness for his fault. The King
praised the dutiful love of the good son, placed
great confidence in him from that time, and
promoted him afterwards to high posts of
honour. Augustus administered the offices
entrusted to him most conscientiously, with
pious regard towards God, and true allegiance
to the King.

“From the same spirit of true love will spring
Duty towards God, our parents, and our king.”
143 |

LXXxX.—THE SHEPHERD-BOY.

A LIGHT-HEARTED shepherd-boy was keeping
sheep one bright spring-morning in a flowery
valley between wooded hills, and he sang and
jumped for joy. The Prince of that country,
who happened to be hunting in the district,
saw him, and calling him up, said, “ What
makes you so merry, my little fellow?” |

The boy, who did not know it was. the
Prince, replied, “* Why should I not be merry ?
Our most gracious Prince himself is not richer
than I am.” |

“Indeed!” said the Prince; “let me hear
then, directly, how much you have.”

The boy replied, “The sun in the bright
blue sky shines as smilingly for me as for the
Prince, and hill and valley look as beautifully
green and blooming for me as for him. My
two hands I would not part with for a hundred
thousand crowns, and I would not sell my eyes
for all the pearls in the Prince’s treasure-
144 . ‘THE SHEPHERD-BOY.

chamber. Over and above this, I’ have all I
want; for I donot want anything more than
I have. I have sufficient food every day, and —
have clothes to dress myself tidily with; and
every year I receive as much money for my
trouble and work as I find necessary. And
can you say that the Prince has more?”

~The good Prince laughed, and, making him-
self known, said, “ You are quite right, my
good lad; and you can now say that the -
Prince himself perfectly agrees with you.
Only continue in the same happy spirit.”

“ Contentment still can joy and riches bring,
And make the peasant equal with the king!”
145

LXXXI.— THE SHEPHERD’S PIPE.

A ROYAL treasurer was accused to his master
of having embezzled the treasures of the realm,
and of having secured the monies and jewels
which he had stolen in a secret chamber with
an iron door. The King went to the trea-
surer’s palace, had the iron door pointed out
to him, and ordered it to be opened. But how
surprised he was when he entered in! He
saw nothing but four bare walls, a common
table, and a straw chair. Upon the table
there lay a'shepherd’s pipe, with a crook and
wallet. Through the window were seen green
meadows and wooded hills.

The treasurer now observed: “In the time
of my youth I used to tend sheep; it was thou,
O King, who broughtest me away to thy resi-
dence. But still in this chamber I spend an
hour every day, recalling to mind with delight
my former station, and playing over again the
hymns which I formerly sang to my Creator’s

L
146 THE SHEPHERD’S PIPE.

praise by the side of my sheep. Ah, then was
I far happier in my paternal fields, with all
my poverty, than in this palace, with all the
riches with which the favour of my King has
overwhelmed me!”

“Tn vain we seek with riches to supply
Contentment’s peace,— the sweets of piety.”
147

LXXXII.— THE GOOD SON.

ANTHONY was apprentice, and his father clerk,
in a merchant’s house of some importance.
Now the father had to make a voyage over
the sea, on the merchant’s business. ‘The sad
intelligence arrived that the ship had been
seized by pirates; and it was impossible to
ascertain what had become of Anthony’s father.

Anthony served out his apprenticeship
truly and faithfully, became himself clerk,
and earned a property of his own by industry
and ability. At last he heard that his father
was a slave in Turkey, and immediately
formed the resolution to obtain his freedom.
He therefore collected all the money that he
had saved, sold his best clothes, and everything
that he had of any other kind that could be
turned into money, made a bargain to serve
out the price of his passage over the sea as
cabin-boy, reached the residence of the rich
Turk whose slave his father was, and offered
148 > THE GOOD SON.

to, buy his freedom. But the Turk demanded
such a large sum of money, that all that. An-
thony had brought with him did not amount
to half.

— € Well, then,” said Anthony, “take me as
your slave, instead of my father: I am young,
and can perform more service for you than my
father, who is already old.”

At the command of the Turk his father
came, fell in amazement on his son’s neck, and
both shed tears of affection. But when the
father heard that his son wished to be a slave
in his place, he cried more bitterly still, and
would not at all consent to it. But the son
said, through his tears, “Oh, my dearest fa-
ther! I am not only ready to wear the bonds
of slavery for you, but to give up life itself.
Take the ransom money, which I have brought
with me, for the expenses of your journey, and
farewell!” |

At this the Turk was moved to tears, and
said to Anthony, “ You are indeed a faithful,
noble son! I give your father his freedom
without ransom, and present you with suffi-
cient money to set up an establishment of your
own. For you, excellent Anthony! have acted
| THE GOOD SON. _ 149,
as a good son should conduct himself towards
his father according to the will of God.”

“ A duteous son will freely give _
His life, to let his parents live.”
150

LXXXTil.—THE PIOUS SISTER.

JacoB and Anna were once alone in the house,
when Jacob said to Anna, “Come, let us go
and find something nice to eat; and let us
thoroughly enjoy ourselves!”

Anna replied, “If you can take me to a
place where no one can see it, I will go with
you.”

< Well,” said Jacob, “come then with me
into the dairy; there we can eat up a dishful
of sweet cream.”

Anna replied, “ Our neighbour, who is cleav-
ing wood in the street, can see it there.”

«<< Come, then, with me into the kitchen,” said
Jacob. “In the kitchen cupboard there is a
pot full of honey ; and we will dip our bread
into it.”

Anna replied, “Our neighbour, who sits
spinning at her window, can look in there.”

“Well, let us eat some apples down in the
THE PIOUS SISTER. 151

cellar,” said Jacob: “it is so piteh-dark there,
that no one can possibly see us.’

Anna replied, “ Oh, my dear Jacob! do you
then really think that no one sees us there?
Do you know nothing of that Eye far above,
which pierces through the walls, and looks into
the darkness ?”

Jacob was frightened, and said, “You are
right, dear sister; God sees us there also,
where no mortal eye can see us: we will then
do evil nowhere.”

Anna was delighted that Jacob took her
words to heart, and gave him a pretty picture:
the eye of God, surrounded with rays, was
painted above; and below was written, —

“ Bethink thee, child, that God’s all-seeing eye
Can every secret work and thought desery.”

7
152

LXXXIV.—THE TRUE BROTHERS.

Axout the time of harvest two strong youths
came down from the hills to the low country,
where labourers were wanted, and said to a
farmer, —‘“‘ We shall be both glad to work for
you through the whole harvest-time, and to
carry in your corn, if you will give us our
board and ten crowns wages.”

farmer; “I fancy ten florins would be more
than enough.”

“No,” said the young men, “it must be
exactly ten crowns; we cannot give our assist-
ance for less. If you cannot give us so much,
we shall offer our services to somebody else.”

«< What can you want so much money for ? ”
inquired the farmer.

“ Well,” said they, “we have a younger
brother at home, who is now fourteen years
old: a skilful wheelwright will take him into
apprenticeship, but he requires positively ten
THE TRUE BROTHERS. _ 153

crowns fee. Our old father, however, knows
not how to scrape together so much money ;
and therefore we two elder brothers have
agreed. together to earn this sum.” |

« Well, now,” said the farmer, “for the sake
of your brotherly love I will give you ten
crowns, if you work so madustriously: that I
may be satisfied with you.”

Both the. brothers worked unweariedly
through the hot harvest days, in the sweat of
their brow; they were the first up in the
morning, and the last to lie down to rest at
night. When the harvest was brought to a
close, the farmer paid them the ten crowns,
and said, *‘ You have fairly earned your wages,
and I now give each of you a crown over.”

“When in sweet union brothers live,
And for each other’s welfare strive, —
Can earth a lovelier picture give ?”
154

LXXXV.—THE TRUE SISTERS.

THERE was a wealthy lady who had adopted as
her own child an orphan girl, who was ex-
tremely pious, obedient, industrious, and al-
ways pleasant and cheerful. One day the lady
said to her, “ ’Theresa, as you are always so
good, I intend you to have a new dress for our
next Christmas festival. Ihave already spoken
to the shop-woman. There is the money; so
go and get for yourself the beautiful stuff of
sky-blue colour which pleased you so much.”

The lady gave her two crowns. Theresa
looked. at the money, and then said, “ Oh,
dearest mother! I have already got clothes
enough ; but my sister, Francesca, has not got
such a good place as J. She is very poorly
clothed ; and it will be a mortification to her if
she sees me dressed in the beautiful new gown.
May I not give her these two crowns? She
has always loved meso; and when [I lay ill,
THE TRUE SISTERS. 155

she came here so readily, and was the very
kindest nurse to me.” | |

You good child!” said the lady, “ write to
your sister; she shall come to us: I will then
have you both dressed alike. And since you
have the like affection towards one another, s SO

you shall also have the like dress.”

“Of sister-love, so pure and fond,
By God is tied the golden bond :
_ Dear children, love thus sisterly,
‘Like God’s blest angels in the sky.”
ae
156.

LXXXVI.—THE LITTLE BASKET-MAKER.

A youtH named Edward had very rich parents ;
he depended entirely on their wealth, and would
learn nothing. But little Jacob, the son of his
poor neighbour, learnt basket-making with
great industry.

One day Edward was standing on the sea-
shore fishing for his amusement. Jacob, too,
had been cutting a large bundle of willow-
twigs, and was just then about to carry them
home, when suddenly there sprang some pirates
out of the bushes near, and dragged the two
boys on board their vessel, in order to sell
them as slaves.

The ship was driven out of its course by a
storm, and was wrecked on the rocks of a dis-
tant island. Only the two boys escaped to
land, which was inhabited by some savage
Moors.

Jacob thought that his skill might perhaps
obtain him some favour. So he drew his knife
THE LITTLE BASKET-MAKER. 157

out, and, splitting some willow-twigs, began to
make a pretty little basket. Many of the
blacks, with their wives and children, came
there, and watched him with curiosity. When
the basket was finished, he presented it to the
person who appeared of highest rank among
them ; when all of them, both great and small,
desired to have such baskets. So they pre-
pared a hut for Jacob, which was shaded by
some fruitful trees, that he might be able to
work there undisturbed. They also promised
to supply him abundantly with the means of
living. © “

They next desired that Edward should also
make a basket. But when they observed that
he had learnt nothing, they beat him; they
would indeed have murdered him, if Jacob
had not begged off his life for him. Edward
was now forced by their orders to give up his
velvet jacket to Jacob, to wear himself Jacob’s
common rough frock, to wait upon him, and
to carry willow-twigs for him.

“ A skilful and industrious hand
Will earn its bread in every land.”
158

LXXXVII—THE FISHERMAN AND THE
LITTLE POACHER.

Denys, a very thoughtless lad, crept to a well-
stocked fish-pond near the village, to steal a
fish. He put his arm into the water as deep
as he could, and groped about for a long time.
“« Ah!” he said, “I have at last got hold of a
noble fish; I do believe it is an eel.” —

He drew out his arm, and lo! a dreadful
water-snake had coiled itself round his hand.
He shrieked out with horror, threw off the
snake in a moment into the water, and was
about to run away. But as he turned himself
round, he had a new cause of terror, for there
stood before him the old fisherman, Jacob
himself. : :

< This time,” said the fisherman, “ I will let
you off with your double fright. But mark
well, all your life long, the good lesson of an
old man: Have always as much abhorrence
of ill-gotten gains as of a poisonous beast. ‘The
THE FISHERMAN AND LITTLE POACHER. 159

stolen fish in the hand of the thief will always

turn into a snake ;

“<¥or every gain unjustly won _
Still to destruction leads us on.’”
160

LXXXVII—THE GARDENER AND HIS ASS.
A. GARDENER, who was going to the weekly
market in the town, loaded his ass so heavily,
and with so many kinds of vegetables, that
nothing could be seen of the poor beast but its
head. | |

The road lay through a willow-bed, and the
gardener cut a bundle of willow-twigs for
binders; for he said, as he loaded them up,
weight as this.”

A little farther on there was a hazel-bush,
and the gardener looked out two dozen slight
wands to serve as flower-sticks. “They are
so slight that the ass can scarcely feel them,”
he said, and loaded them up also.

Meanwhile the sun rose higher, and already
shone fiercely. The gardener then took off
his green coat, and threw it upon the rest of
the load. “It is not much farther to town,”

said he; “and the beast can hardly flinch at
THE GARDENER AND HIS ASS. —6«d7161

the frock, which I can lift with my little
finger.” . |

But scarcely had he said this, when the ass
stumbled over a stone, fell to the ground, and,
overcome by the heavy burden, could rise no
more. Then the gardener, in a fright, com-
plained and lamented loudly: “Now I see, to
my great loss, that neither man nor beast can
be burthened beyond their powers!”

“The last addition to a load too great,
However small, decides the stroke of fate.”
162 _—

LXXXIX.— THE SPORTSMAN AND HIS DOG.

A. SPORTSMAN one day set his dog after a hare.
« Hie at him! hie!” cried the sportsman; and
the dog sprang forward with all his strength,
hunted the hare far over the field, caught him
at last, and held him fast with his teeth. The
sportsman presently took the hare by the ears,
and said to the dog, “Let go! let go!” The
dog immediately let it go, and the sportsman
put the hare into his game-bag.

Many people from the village had witnessed
it, and an old peasant among them said: ‘* The
miser is just like this dog. Avarice calls out
to the miser, ‘ Hie on! hie!’ and the blinded
man obeys, and pursues with all his powers
the riches of this world. But at last comes
Death, and says, ‘Let go! let go!’ and the
wretched man is obliged to give up, without
even enjoying them, the riches which he has
obtained with so much labour.”

“ Who heaps up treasures here, must see the day
When Death will come, and sweep them all away.”
163.

XC.—THE MILLER AND HIS SON.

A. MILLER and his son once drove an ass to the
town, in order to sell it at the market. There
met them a man on horseback, who laughed,
and said, “ You are dull fellows to let the ass
go idle, and neither of you get on it!” So the
father immediately called his son to mount.

After a while a waggon met them. The
driver called out to the son, “ Are you not
ashamed, young fellow, to ride, while your
old father has to go along by your side o
foot ?” |

As soon as the son heard these words, he
immediately jumped off the ass, and let his
father get up.

After they had gone some distance farther
along a sandy road a peasant woman met
them, who carried a basket full of vegetables
on her head. She said to the father, “ You

are a merciless father, to make yourself so
164 THE MILLER AND HIS SON.

comfortable upon the ass, and to let your poor
son there toil through the deep sand !”

The father therefore took his son also up on
the ass. But when a shepherd, who was keep-
ing sheep on the road, saw them both riding
along on the ass, he called out loudly, “ Ah,
the poor beast! he will surely fall to the
ground under such a double load. You are
unmerciful tormentors of the animal!”

They then both got down, and the son said
to his father, ““ What shall we now do with
the ass, in order to satisfy the people? We
must at last tie his feet together, and carry
him on a pole on our shoulders to market.”

But his father said, ““ You observe now, my
son, that it is impossible to please everybody ;
and. that the advice is very wise :—

“¢ Seek to perform your task as best you may,
And little heed what others think or say.’ ”’
XCL—THE CANNIBAL.

Two boys from the, town lost their way m a
gloomy forest, and remained there for the
night at an ill-looking lonely inn.

At midnight they heard some conversation
in the next room, and immediately both applied
their ears to the wooden partition, and listen-
ing, distinctly heard these words, “ Wife, have.
the copper boiling early in the morning, for I
shall kill our two little fellows from the town.”

The poor boys felt all the terrors of death.
“ O mercy, this innkeeper is a cannibal!” said
they one to the other; and both jumped out of
the window to run away. But, to their fresh
dismay, they found the yard-door locked.

They then crept into the pig-sty, and passed
the night frightened to death. In the morn-
ing the innkeeper came, opened the sty-door,
sharpened his knife, and said, “ Now, my little
fellows, come out; your last hour is come!”

Both the boys uttered a cry of dismay, and
166 | THE CANNIBAL.

implored him on their knees not to kill them.
The innkeeper was astonished to find them in
the pig-sty, and inquired why they took him
fora cannibal? The boys answered piteously,
«You said yourself ain night that you would
kill us this morning.” |
But the innikesber said, “Oh, you silly
children! I did not mean you! I only named,
in joke, my two little pigs my two little fellows
from the town, because I happened to buy
them in the town. But so it is, if people listen.
They misunderstand a great deal, easily en-
tertain false suspicions of others, cause them-
selves unnecessary care, incur misery, and
bring many troubles upon themselves.”

“The listeners, oft deceived by what they hear,
Are slaves of dark surmise and idle fear.”
167

XCIl.—THE GHOST.

Martin had skulked into the castle-garden,
filled two sacks full of fruit, and was carrying
them home one at a time.

As he was going with the first sack along
the garden-wall, the church clock just then
struck twelve. The air sighed awfully
through the leaves of the trees, and Martin
saw suddenly a black man by his side, who
seemed to be carrying the other sack for him.

The terrified thief uttered a cry, let his sack
fall, and sprang forward as fast as he could.
The black man also let his sack fall, and
sprang forward in the same manner by
Martin’s side as far as the end of the garden-
wall, where he vanished.

On the following morning Martin told
everybody about this fearful ghost—only,
he said nothing about his stealing. But the
bailiff had Martin sent for the same day, and
said to him, “ You were stealing fruit last
J68 THE GHOST.

night in the castle-garden : the sacks, on which
your father’s name is found, have convicted
you. I shall, on this account, have you sent
to the house of correction. But the black
man, whom you believed you saw, was nothing
else but your own. shadow, which, as the moon
rose at twelve o’clock, you beheld on the
newly-whitewashed wall of the garden.”

_ The rogue is never without fear; the evil-
doer is afraid of a rustling leaf, and runs away
from his own shadow. |

“'The man who keeps his conscience clear
Will never have a cause of fear.”
169

XCIIL—THE CLEANLY LANDLADY. |

A cooreR from the town was employed to
mend some casks for an innkeeper in the
country; and after he had finished his work
he came into the landlady’s room, who brought
him a pint of wine. , “Well, my worthy
hostess of the Sun; ‘héw goes business ?” in-
quired the cooper.

“Not so well as it might,” replied the land-
lady. ‘ The people from the town almost all
stop at the house of my neighbour, the land-
lord of the Star; but they seem to despise my
wine, though it is undeniably better. I can’t
tell how it is at all.”

The cooper said, “I could tell you exactly,
landlady, if you would not take it amiss of
me”

“Quite the reverse,” said the landlady ;
“J should rather regard it as an act of
friendship.”

“Well, then,” said the cooper, “if so, I
170 THE CLEANLY LANDLADY.

must out with my observations. The land-
lord of the Star has certainly not got such good
wine as you, but his glasses are bright and
clean as crystal. My landlady of the Sun
has, on the contrary, better wine, but glasses.
which are dirty and smeared with flies. Now,
let the wine be ever so good, still it does not
taste so out of dirty glasses. You should
therefore take fare, my worthy hostess, that
your glasses be as clean as your wine is good ;
and that the company find at your house
windows, tables, and floor always clean and
polished; and so you will soon have guests
enough stopping at your house.”

The landlady took these words to heart.
Scrubbing and polishing soon went on briskly ;
all the furniture was cleaned; and not even
the least spot of dirt was tolerated any more.
The people in the town, as soon as they. heard.
this, came in numbers to drink good wine out
of bright glasses in a room which was well
cleaned and comfortable; and frequently s0
many guests arrived, that the hostess could
scarcely accommodate them.

«See, my children,” said she frequently to
her sons and daughters after this, ‘‘ what
THE CLEANLY LANDLADY. 171

cleanliness does!. It has made us well to do,
and. contented; while, through a want of
cleanliness, we were once already almost
brought to the brink of ruin!”

“ Just as thy house is duly cleansed and swept,
So should the chamber of thy soul be kept.”
172

XCIV.— THE CHARITABLE POOR WOMAN.

A poor widow named Cunigunda, every day
before she sat down at her spinning-wheel, in
her lonely room, used to repeat her morning
prayer with great devotion, and then read one
of the beautiful verses which were in her
Pray er-book.

One day she read a verse which stirred her
up to works of charity, and pleased her very
much. “ But, oh!” said she, “how can I do
good to others? I have nothing in the world
to maintain myself with except my spinning-
wheel, and with that I can scarcely earn my
daily bread. Winter is already at the door,
and I have not even sufficient firing: my
fingers are already so stiff, from the coldness
of my room, that I can scarcely spin. Besides
this, my rent is not yet paid; and I shall be
obliged myself to beg for assistance of some
charitably-disposed persons.”
THE CHARITABLE POOR WOMAN. _ 173

Meanwhile she- ‘still ‘reflected -what she
might haply be able to do. It then occurred
to her that a friend of her youth, wha lived at
the other end of the town, and who was poor
and old, lay sick. “Come, I will visit her
to-day,” said she; “I can take my spinning
there, and perhaps I shall be able to say to
her a comfortable word or two.”

She took a couple of apples——the only ones
she had, which she had received as a present a
little while before—out of her box, to carry
them to her friend, and started off with her
spinnine-wheel.

The sick person felt great pleasure when
she saw her old friend. “Only think, now,
Cunigunda,” said she, “I have just inherited
several hundred florins. Could you not
manage to come to me, and be my nurse?
You would then save firming and rent; and
your spinning, and my little inheritance,
would well suffice to maintain us both.”

Cunigunda accepted the proposal joyfully.
She soon changed her quarters; and could
now, for the first time after a long while, sleep
soundly and free from care. She very often
174 . THE CHARITABLE POOR WOMAN:

recalled to mind the verse which had so
much pleased her: — |

_ “With some small deed of love
Let every day be blest; 2 |
Then every day will happy prove,
And sweet thine hours of rest.”
175

- XOV.—THE PIOUS GRANDMOTHER.

Dorie the last war the inhabitants of a house
which stedd by itself were in great alarm.
As night came on, the enemy had drawn near
the place; the darkened sky was lighted up
at intervals with the glare of fires as red as
blood; the guns were heard rolling fearfully.
Moreover, it was winter, and the weather cold
and stormy. The good people were in dread
of being plundered; and still more of being
turned out of house and home during the
roughest season of the year. :

Now the pious old grandmother had comfort
and courage from her reliance upon God.
She read to her children and grandchildren a
prayer out of her old Prayer-book, in which
occurred the words—‘‘ May God build a
strong wall, and keep off the enemy from this
dwelling !”

Now one of the grandchildren, who had
176 ‘THE PIOUS GRANDMOTHER.

listened. devoutly, thought that it was too much
to ask of God to build a wall, and that they
ought not to pray for a thing so impossible.
But the grandmother said, “These words are
not to be taken so literally. You would say
in plain language, ‘May God defend us so
securely from the enemy, as if our house were
surrounded by a wall!’ But if God were
really willing to build a wall for our house,
do you then think that it would be impos-
sible with Him?” -

Meanwhile the night passed away without
a single soldier of the enemy reaching their
house. All within wondered at it. But when
they ventured to the door in the morning,
behold! opposite the very spot where the
enemy were placed, the snow had been drifted
up by the wind as high as a wall, so that it
was impossible for any one to come through
it. .

They all thanked and praised God... But
the grandmother said, “See, God has indeed
built up a wall, to keep off the enemy from
our dwelling. He is wise and merciful, and
at last supplies the means to deliver us from
THE PIOUS GRANDMOTHER. 177
each necessity. We should, then, never be
discouraged and fearful: I, at least, adhere to
the saying, —

“He whose trust in God is sure,
Builds on ground that is secure.’ ”
$78

XCVI.—THE PIOUS MOTHER AND
HER SONS.

PART I.

On a certain high festival a lady of rank said to
her two sons, * Oh, would that I could: attend
at church to-day, and offer up my prayers to
Almighty God with the thousands who will
be there assembled! But it is too far for me
to walk to town; and our carriage can no
longer convey us, since we were obliged to
sell the horses on account of our reduced
circumstances.” .

The sons speedily got out the carriage, and
offered to draw their mother to the church,
which was some distance from the place.
Their mother got in, and the noble youths
drew the carriage instead of the horses. All
the people were moved to tears at the piety of
the mother and the filial love of the sons;
they strewed their way from the town-gate to
THE PIOUS MOTHER AND HER SONS. 179

the church with green boughs and fresh flowers,
and cried out in delight, “ Hail to the happiest
of mothers, and the noblest of sens!” __

“ He will the loveliest of all virtues prove, .
- - Who God and parents serves with filial love.” |

PART IL.

Amid the joyous acclamations of the people
the good sons reached the church. ‘The good
mother knelt down weeping at the altar, and
prayed in her heart, “ Merciful God! give thy
blessing to my two sons, and vouchsafe to them
what seems to Thee best.” |

The youths drew their mother home again,
and at night went cheerfully to bed. But
when their mother wished to waken them in
the morning, they were both lying there,
beautiful and lovely as angels sleeping — but
they awoke no more.

The mother was at first shocked at the death
of her beloved sons; but she soon recovered
herself, and said: “Good Lord! Thou hast
180 THE PIOUS MOTHER AND HER SONS.

heard my prayer. Now I consider it, I per-
ceive an easy, blessed death, is the best thmg
that mortal men can wish for themselves.
My sons are now with Thee; the earth was
too poor to reward their filial love: for this
reason Thou hast taken them to Thyself in
heaven.” :

“< Wouldst thou the terrors of the grave defy,
Think of the better land beyond the sky.”
181

XCVIL— THE DYING FATHER.

A «oop. father, who was very ill and near his
end, called his children together to his death-
bed on the last morning of his life, and ex-
horted them to everything that is good; but
he charged them especially to seek for Christ-
ian instruction with constant diligence, and to
receive it with attention.

“Dear children!” said he, “I have lived
fifty years, and have tasted many joys; but
the purest, the most blessed, yes, truly hea-
venly joys, Religion imparted to me: it
rendered all my earthly joys pure, it exalted
and ennobled them. This I declare before
God.

“JT have lived fifty years, and suffered much
in this world, and had many hard struggles to
endure; but, in all my griefs, I have found
my best comfort and surest support only in
our holy religion. This I declare before God.

“TI have lived fifty years, have often been
182 | THE DYING FATHER.

nigh to death—yes, I shall now certamly not
live to see the evening; and I declare, from
experience and before God, that only the divine
strength of religion can deprive Death of its
terrors; only the holy faith in our Redeemer
can give us courage and strength to take with
confidence the important step into eternity, and
to appear before the judgment-seat of God.

“Do you strive, then, to learn to know
rightly Him, our divine Redeemer, and to
follow His holy doctrines: so will you be well-
pleasing to God, will live contented, and at
some time die happy.”

The children heard these words with tears
of affection. The next hour their father died ;
but the children kept his last words in their
hearts all their life, followed them, and learnt
also from their own experience that they were
the very truth.

“ God’s word alone the way to life prepares,
And he who seeks it the best portion shares.”
183

_XCVIIl.—THE FRIENDS S AFTER DEATH.

A FATHER once related the following parable
to his children: —'The Viceroy of a certain
island was once summoned by his lord the
King to render an account of his government.
Some of his friends, on whom he had placed
the greatest reliance, let him depart without
stirring themselves from their place; others,
in whom he had not a little confided, went
with him only as far as the ship; but some,
in whom he had scarcely trusted at all, ac-
companied him through the whole of the
distant journey, even to the King’s throne,
spake in his behalf, and obtained for him the
grace and favour of the King. |

The children did not understand who these
friends could be; so their father said, “‘ Man
also has three kinds of friends on earth; but,
for the most part, he does not learn to know
them well till the time when he is called from
this world, in order to give account of his con-
184 | THE FRIENDS AFTER DEATH.

duct. The first of these friends, wealth and
possessions, remain behind; the second, his
relations, accompany him only to the grave;
the third, his good works, follow him imto
eternity, even to the throne of God, where it
will be recompensed to each according to his
works, and even the cup of cold water which
is given to one who thirsts will not be un-
rewarded. How thoughtlessly, then, does the
man act who does not concern himself in the
least degree about such true friends!

“Do good on earth : for all thy works of love, +
Like friends, will follow thee to realms above.”
| ‘185 —

XCIX.—THE BETTER LAND.

A FATHER and mother were living with their
two children on a desert island in the midst of
the ocean, on which they had been shipwrecked.
Roots and vegetables served them for food; a
spring supplied them with water, and a cavern
in the rock with a dwelling. Storm and tem-
pest. often raged fearfully on the island.

The children could not remember how they
had reached the island ; they knew nothing of
the vast continent: bread, milk, fruit, and
whatever other luxury is yielded there, were
things unknown to them.

There landed one day upon the island four
Moors in a small boat. The parents felt great
joy, and hoped now to be rescued from their
troubles; but the boat was too small to take
them all over together to the adjoining land, so
the father determined to risk the passage first-

Mother and children wept when he em-
barked in the boat with its frail planks, and
186 THE BETTER LAND.

the four black men were about to take him
away. But he said,“ Weepnot! Itis better
yonder; and you will all follow soon.”

When the little boat returned and took away |
the mother, the children wept still more. But
she also said, “ Weep not ! In the better land
we shall all meet again.”

At last came the boat to take away the two
children. They were frightened at the black
men, and shuddered at the fearful sea over
which they had te pass. With fear and trem-
bling they drew near the land. But how re-
joiced they were when their parents appeared
upon the shore, offered them their hands, led
them into the shade of lofty palm-trees, and
regaled them upon the flowery turf with milk,
honey, and delicious fruits. “ Ohbkkew ground-
less was our fear!” said the children; “ we
ought not to have feared, but to have rejoiced,
when the black men came to take us away to
the better land.”

“Dear children,” said their father, “ our
voyage from the desert island to this beautiful
country conveys to us a still higher meaning.
There is appointed for us all a still longer
voyage to a much more beautiful country.
THE BETTER LAND. __ 187

The whole earth, on which we dwell, is like
an island. 'The land here is, indeed, a noble
one in our eyes, although only a faint shadow
ofheaven. ‘The passage hither over the stormy
sea is——death; that little boat resembles the
bier, upon which men in black apparel shall at
some time carry us forth, But when that
hour strikes, then we, myself, your mother, or
you, must leave this world. So fear not.
Death is for pious men who have loved God,
and have done His will, nothing else but a
voyage to the better land.”

“Expectant of eternal peace,
The Christian feels Death’s terrors cease ;
And, led by God’s paternal hand,
Mounts upward to the better land.”
188

C.—THE THREE BEST BOOKS.

An old and pious man, who lived in a poor
solitary cottage, had such great knowledge and
understanding that he was able to impart good
counsel and wholesome instruction to every
one. |

_A learned man, who visited him, was asto-
nished at his wise remarks, and said to him,
“Whence have you this wisdom? I see in
your cottage no collection of books, from which
you could have learned so much of what is
good and beautiful.”

The old man answered, “ And yet I have
the three best books that exist, and I read
them daily. These books are, the works of
God above me and around me; conscience
within me; and the Holy Scriptures. The.
works of God, the heaven and earth, are like
a large book opened before us; they proclaim
to us the almighty power, the wisdom, and
goodness of our heavenly Father. My con-
THE THREE BEST BOOKS. 189

science tells me what I have to do and leave
undone. But the Holy Scriptures, that book
of all books, informs us how God revealed .
himself to man from the creation of the world ;
and how the Son of God, our Lord and Sa-
viour Jesus Christ, came into this world, and
what He commanded and promised, did and
suffered, im order to make us holy and blessed.”

“In Nature, Conscience, and the written Word,
Behold the threefold volume of the Lord ;
Here Duty’s path distinctly traced we see,
And in each page Faith, Hope, and Charity.”

LONDON:
Printed by G. Baxrcuay, Castle St. Leicester Sq.
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A Leaf of a Christmas Tree. From the

German. Edited by the Rev. F. GitBERtT WHITE, M.A,
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2s. 6d. |

The Ocean Queen and the Spirit of the
Storm ye Fairy Tale of the Southern Seas. By
W. #H. G. Kinaston, Esq. With Dlustrations. Square
12mo. cloth gilt, 4s.; or with the Plates beautifully

coloured, 5s.
‘‘ A very pretty fairy tale, the attractions of which are vastly in-
by numerous coloured engravings.” —Critic.

A Young Traveller’s Journal of a Tour in
North. and South America. With Sixteen Illustra.

tions. 12mo. cloth gilt, 6s.

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vations it contains on men, manners, and things, indicate a surprising
precocity. The profuse engravings, too, with which it is illustrated, are
from the pencil of the same ingenious young personage. North America, -
the ‘ 8tates,’ New Orleans, Mexican Cities, and West Indian Islands, are
dealt with in the most off-hand and familiar manner; and we must
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THE POETS OF THE WOODS.

Twelve Pictures of English Song Birds, executed in Colours,
in the best style of Lithography.

FROM DRAWINGS BY JOSEPH WOLF.

With Poetical Descriptions sélected from the best Authors.
Small 4to. cloth gilt, gilt edges, 15s.

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“‘ Delightful to look at, more delightful to read ; full of high poetry, like Prospero’s
| Island, with its sights and sweet sounds, which give delight and hurt not. Nothi
can be more faithful to nature than the delineations of the twelve songsters of our fields
and woods. In form, colour, and attitude they are admirable, full of life, and glittering
| in their daintily-hued plumage. We recommend all our readers to this very agreeable
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—to say, that printing in colour has scarcely piesa Set more delicately or clearly
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the birds thus painted, and these also have been judiciously selected and with great
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ost acceptable present.” —Obeerver.
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The Poets of the Woods. Twelve Pictures

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colour, and attitude they are admirable, full of life, and glittering in
their daintily-bued plumage. We recommend all our readers to this
very agreeable book, in which the painter and the poet are both sum-
mened to do justice to these our brilliant company of singing -birds—the
opera troupe of nature.” —Morning Chrontcie. 2

The Fine Arts; their Nature and Relations.

_ With Detailed _ Criticisms on certain Pictures of the
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MASTER OF SHERBURN HOSPITAL AND PREBENDARY OF SALISBURY.

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eee ee



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A LEAF OF A CHRISTMAS TREE.
From the German.
EDITED BY THE REV. F. GILBERT WHITE, M.A.

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A HUNDRED TALES FOR CHILDREN.
Translated from the German of Christoph Von Schmid.

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RECTOR OF WOODCHURCH, KENT.
With ExoUspIece ane Vignette. 16mo. cloth, 2s. 6d.

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THINGS TO COME.

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THE DIFFICULTIES OF ROMANISM IN |
| RESPECT TO EVIDENCE; > |

Or, the Peculiarities of the Latin Church evinced to be Untenable
on the Principles of Legitimate Historical Testimony.

BY GEORGE STANLEY FABER, B.D.
‘Third and Cheaper Edition, Revised, and Remoulded. 8vo. cloth, 10s. 6d.

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testant series, or one which is better calculated to be useful.”— Bell’s. Weekly Messenger.

UNCLE TOM’S CABIN.
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Mrs. Stowe has a direct interest in the sale of this Edition, and it is the only
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By the same Author,

A KEY TO UNCLE TOM’S CABIN:

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With a Portrait of the Author. 12mo. cloth, 3s. 6d.
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| ° THE oe
HISTORY OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH.
| Vol. I.—The Church in the Apostolic Age.
BY HENRY W. J. THIERSCH,

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND THEOLOGY.

Translated from the German by THomas CaRLYLE, Esq. of the

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translated into English, for it is a learned and instructive work.”—Rev. 7. K. Arnold in
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Vol. II. is in preparation.

ILLUSTRATIONS OF MEDIAVAL COSTUME
IN BNGLAND.

Coltected from MSS. in the British Museum, Bibliothéque
de Paris, &c.

BY T. A. DAY AND J. H. DINES.
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LAST GLIMPSES OF CONVOCATION.

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PRINCIPLES OF ECCLESIASTICAL
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BY HENRY DRUMMOND.
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THE

PLEASURES, OBJECTS, AND ADVANTAGES
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BY THE REV. ROBERT ARIS WILLMOTT,

Incumbent of Bearwood, and Author of “ Lives of the Sacred Poets ;”

“ Jeremy Taylor, a Biography,” &c. &c. Second Edition, revised, fcap. 8vo.

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oe olthatet

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TRADITIONS OF TUSCANY, IN VERSE:
And other Poems.
BY MRS. D. OGILVY.

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-expression to imaginative thought.” — Weekly News.

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POEMS.

BY CHARLES H. HITCHINGS,

OF THE MIDDLE TEMPLE.
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AN EXPOSITION OF THE PRINCIPAL
MOTIVES WHICH INDUCED ME TO LEAVE

THE CHURCH OF ROME.

BY Cc. L. TRIVIER,

FORMERLY A ROMAN CATHOLIC PRIEST.

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THE POPE’S SUPREMACY A THING OF
| PRIESTCRAFT;
Being a Compendious Refutation of the Arguments from Holy
Scripture and Tradition, by which Modern one attempt
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BY CHARLES HASTINGS COLLETTE,
AUTHOR OF “ ROMANISM IN. ENGLAND EXPOSED,” ETC.
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THE ART OF CONVERSATION.
BY CAPTAIN ORLANDO SABERTASH.
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is ae volume overflows with humour, good sense, and rood advice.”— United Service

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THE LIFE OF WALLENSTEIN, DUKE OF
FRIEDLAND.

BY LIEUT.-COL.. ‘MITCHELL.
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A TREATISE ON FIELD FORTIFICATION,

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POEMS.
BY THE REV. ROBERT ARIS wiEemot ts

_ INCUMBE NT OF BEARWOOD.

Second Edition, feap. 8vo. cloth, 4s.

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scholar and the poet.”—Gentleman’s Magazine.

By the same AMEN,
PRECIOUS STONES:

Aids to Reflection from Prose Writers of the 16th, 17th, and
18th Centuries.

Foolscap 8vo. cloth, (O8.

THE REVEALED ECONOMY OF HEAVEN
AND EARTH.
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THE OCEAN QUEEN AND THE SPIRIT
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A Fairy Tale of the Southern Seas.

BY W. H. G. KINGSTON, ESQ.

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‘THE RIFLE:

Its Uses.and Advantages in War, in the Volunteer Service, and
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the Power, and the Relative Economy of the various kinds

_of Projective Weapons. Dedicated to the Metropolitan Rifle

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7 THE STANDARD COOK.
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BY ROBERT REYNOLDS,
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HISTORIES OF NOBLE BRITISH FAMILIES;

With Biographical Notices of the most Distinguished
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Dilustrated by their Armorial Bearings, Portraits, Monuments, Seals, &c.

COMPILED AND EDITED
BY HENRY DRUMMOND, ESQ.

The First and Second Volumes of this splendid and truly national
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‘““Mr. Drummond's work ought to be in the library of every English gentleman.”—
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WHAT IS MESMERISM P

“‘ Nec inveniatur in te... . qui ariolos sciscitetur, et observet somnia,

atque auguria, nec sit maleficus, nec incantator, nec qui pythones con-
sulat, nec divinos, aut querat a mortuis veritatem.”—-VuLG.

12mo. sewed, 6d.

THE SLAVE, AND OTHER POEMS,
ENGLISH AND SPANISH.

BY THE LADY EMMELINE STUART WORTLEY.

Crown 8vo. cloth, 2s. 6d.

THE COLONY, A POEM:
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THEKE GHOST OF JUNTIUS;

Or, the Authorship of the celebrated ‘‘ Letters” by this anony

mous writer deduced from a Letter, &c. addressed in
1775-6, by Lieut.-General Str Roserr Ricw, Bart., for-
merly Governor of Londonderry and Cullmore Fort, to the
Right Hon. Lorp Viscount BarrinetTor, His Majesty’s then
Secretary-at-War. Illustrated with a Genealogical Chart,
showing the connexion between Sir Robert Rich and the
ennobled families of Grenville, Lyttelton, Temple, Pitt,
Hampden, &c.

BY FRANCIS AYERST.
‘* Look, my lord, it comes 1° H amet, Act I. Scene 4.

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A YOUNG TRAVELLER’S
_ JOURNAL OF A TOUR IN NORTH AND
. SOUTH AMERICA.

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is illustrated, are from the pencil of the same ingenious yo personage. North
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with in the most off- hand and familiar manner ; and we must admit that we have met
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THE BRITISH WEST INDIA COLONIES

IN CONNEXION WITH

SLAVERY, EMANCIPATION, ETC.

BY A RESIDENT IN THE WEST INDIES FOR THIRTEEN YEARS.

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SUGGESTIONS

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Cotton in Jamaica and British Guiana.
DEMERARA, AFTER FIFTEEN YEARS OF FREEDOM. .
BY A LANDOWNER.

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~BOSWORTH’S LITERATURE FOR THE PEOPLE.

No. 1.

~

A SUMMER CRUISE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN ON BOARD
AN AMERICAN FRIGATE.

BY N. PARKER WILLIS.

Square fcap. 8vo. well printed, and containing upwards of 300 pages,
1s. 6d. sewed and 2s. cloth.

*,* The Publisher intends to issue immediately a Series of Standard
and Interesting Works, in the same style as the present volume, in order

to meet the rapidly-increasing demand for ‘‘Good Literature at a Low
Price.”

LONDON :

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