Citation
The happy family, or, Scenes of American life

Material Information

Title:
The happy family, or, Scenes of American life designed for well instructed children of seven years old and upwards
Portion of title:
Scenes of American life
Creator:
Cardell, William S ( William Samuel ), 1780-1828
Hunt, Uriah ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
Philadelphia
Publisher:
Uriah Hunt
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1832
Language:
English
Edition:
New ed.
Physical Description:
215, <10> p., <11> leaves of plates : ill., map ; 17 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Family -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Travelers -- Juvenile fiction -- West (U.S.) ( lcsh )
Frontier and pioneer life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Farm life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Happiness -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) -- 1853 ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues -- 1853 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1853
Genre:
Embossed cloth bindings (Binding) ( rbbin )
Publishers' catalogues ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
Publisher's catalogue follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by William S. Cardell.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
026613056 ( ALEPH )
16840612 ( OCLC )
ALG3296 ( NOTIS )

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Full Text






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ad. (Baars ba
hash, WA Le. \
Oh geurtinan

ae





LITTLE CHARLOTTE SPEAKING HER PLEO]




ae’ SyfoardsTLNOUL

fal the planet inthe ay,

‘est I should tre your patience,
Tha brightest i he Sen,

Ladies and gelomen Fon done. pages"





THE
HAPPY- FAMILY:
on,

SCENES OF AMERICAN LIFE.

DESIGNED



YOR WELL INSTRUCTED CHILDREN OF SEVEN
OLD AND UPWARDS.



BY WILLIAM S. CARDELL.

“Worth makes the man.”

NEW EDITION.





PHILADE MP ura:
URIAH HUNT, 44 NORTH FOURTH STREET.
1853.







Ewrenxp according to the Act of Congress, in the year
1832, by Unrau Howz, in the Clerk’s Office of the District
Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.







EXPLANATORY REMARKS,
ADDRESSED TO

PARENTS AND GUARDIANS.

Tuxs work is a humble attempt in that field
which no man worthy of being called an author
is expected to enter, with the anticipation of profit,
or of desirable fame. If such a performance is
noticed with approbation, it is by those, chiefly,
whose feeble voice is not regarded at the tribu-
nals of literary fashion, or not heared at so great a
distance. No work of the kind, with whatever
care or skill it might be executed, is to form the
topic of discourse in a drawing room ; nor, in rich
binding, to become the pride of the book case.
A reviewer, of lofty pretensions, is not to descend
from the reigning productions of the age, to criti-
cise a miniature volume for children. That
would be deemed a childish employment; and

the official judges in the republic of letters would
a S&



6 ADDRESS
not promote their own interest by devoting their
pages to such a theme.

Other motives than those which appear at first
view, must have a share in writing for those who,
where they approve, have no power to confer the
rewards which are commonly sought. Among
the various subjects of human research, few, if
any, involve higher interest than the juvenile mind,
through its gradations of development; and yet
hardly any thing seems to be less understood, in
its most important bearings, or less thought of,
even by those best qualified for the investigation.

Besides the interest which belongs to the early
advancement of intellect, as a subject of philoso-
phic inquiry, there are, in the United States,
many considerations which give it additional im-
portance, in a national view.

It is not now to be made a question whether
our political institutions are right or wrong. Edu-
cation is to be conducted with reference to honour
and usefulness under these institutions as they
are, and to the sentiments on which they depend
for permanent support. In each particular case,
and with regard to the welfare of all, there should



To PARENTS. ?
be a view to this general object. So far as indi-
vidual and domestic happiness are concerned, those
who, inany degree, give direction to the instruction
of children, should bear in mind that it is quite as
necessary to teach the heart as the understanding.
To tell our pupils that they ought to be good, is
a lesson which is easily given ; but, in that didac-
tic form, is not likely to produce a very beneficial
effect; and, often repeated, will tire and disgust.
It is a point of much higher skill to convey, im-
pressively, the requisite instruction; to restrain,
in some degree, the sallies of ill temper ; improve
the judgment and taste, and inspire the love of
what is elevated and good.

Books for children are liable to two prevailing
defects. One, that they present difficulties en-
tirely above their comprehension, and the other,
that they are below all power of salutary influence.
‘There is a very wide difference between being
simple, and being silly, though these ideas are
too often confounded.

Foreign books, of course, are not to be pro.
seribed, nor illiberal sentiments towards foreign
institutions encouraged. At a suitable period, the



8 ADDRESS
writings of European authors may, very properly,
be introduced as sources of instruction : but it is
absurd that they should be made, among our
children, the main standard of feeling and thought.
Parents who take the trouble to examine, can
hardly fail to observe, that extensively as these
juvenile books are multiplied, the far greater part
contain very little American, except occasionally,
in a renewed compilation, the word /2merican, in
a title page.

Some of these works are deserving of very
high praise, and do credit to the British and
French writers who have devoted their talents to
this unobtrusive, but extremely useful employ-
ment: yet, with whatever intrinsic excellence
these transatlantic writings may possess, they
give, in the proportion in which they are here
read, a general wrong direction to the minds of
the young, and to an extent, of which, perhaps,
few persons are aware. ‘They are modelled on
a condition of life, and on prevailing sentiments,
civil, moral, and social, materially varying from
those which American children should early be





taught to cherish.



TO PARENTS. 2

‘This is not the place to dwell at large on the
principles here slightly advanced. ‘The immedi-
ate incitement to the writing of this volume, was
the circumstance of observing a woman in a book-
store, buying-“ something’? for her children to
read. ‘There was a melancholy interest in seeing
a mother, who appeared otherwise respectable,
selecting volumes of falsehood, nonsense, and bad
English, which it would not be easy for malig-
nant design to surpass, as if she had been under the
influence of that necromancy in which she was
unwittingly preparing to instruct her children.
It is not to be expected that persons in general
are to become familiar with this department of
literature, nor to be able, in all instances, to choose
with discretion ; but, how pitiable is the mistake
of that parent who thus, in feelings of tenderness,
infuses poison into the minds of her offspring,
with all their intellectual food.

‘There are mothers, and the number is increasing,
who not only love their children, but manifest
high intelligence in the exercise of maternal af
fection. This, though a very unostentatious is
one of the most interesting exhibitions of human



to ADDRESS TO PARENTS.
nature. ‘Ihe character of the United States, as a
nation, will be high or low, in proportion to the
number of such mothers.

Whether this work has avoided the evils here
alluded to, without falling into others as liable to
objection, is for the public to decide. All the
guaranty which can be offered, is of the negative
kind. No direct aid was received from « Blue
Beard,” or any other giant; nor from a wisard,
or wisard’s pen; nor magic lamp; nor fiddling
cats; nor motherly talking goats. The design
was to make the narrative true to nature, to cor-
rect principles, and the condition of ordinary life.
With all its defects, it is, in substance, but the
plain recital of events which have taken place,
probably in more families than one, and which
are likely to happen in many others. Children
will readily determine whether it pleases them
selves; and sume of their parents can_judge
whether they ought to be pleased with it or not.



wre
HAPPY FAMILY ;

or,

SCENES OF AMERICAN LIFE

CHAPTER I.
The Purposes and Accidents of Life.

“If happiness has not itg seat
And ceritre in the by ys
Bat never canbe bids oe

1. Tue history of Mr. Edward John-
son and his family will explain some of
the scenes which are common in the
varying conditions of human affairs.

3. It must not be supposed that the
members of this family, called happy,
were free, at all times, from trouble; for
earthly happiness is| never complete.
They, like others, had their sorrows ;
and some of the trials through which
they passed were severe. "They were

11



12 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

sensible, and kind: but no human being
is perfect ; and even these excellent peo-
ple had their failings.

3. The enjoyments of this domestic
circle ; the afflictions they felt or feared ;
the fortitude and hope which cheered
their gloomiest hours, will teach us that
happiness does not depend on fine show,
nor on bags of silver and gold; but on
a good temper, a conscience at peace,
and the company of friends deservedly
loved.

4. Some old poets had a wild notion
that there was once a time when whole
nations lived without any kind of work ;
when all were so honest that laws were
useless, and children stood in no need
of gdvice.

5. If there ever was such a state of
things, it was in some other sphere, of
which we have no exact account; and
not in any part of this globe on which
we live. Such a change, if it could take
place, is not suited to the people of our
avorld, as they now are, and would not
make them happy.



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 13

6. That Being, all powerful and good,
who preserves us in life, has certainly
placed us here on earth for some wise
purpose. We ought to find out, as cor-
rectly as we can, what th® purpose is,
and then try, with diligence, to answer
the design for which we were made.
This is what children should think of, in
a serious way.

‘7. All persons wish to be happy: the
greatest happiness is the pleasure of do-
ing good, and it is the duty of all to
make themselves useful, in some way or
other. If it was the general practice for
people to be idle, every thing human
would go to decay.

8. “ Knowledge is power,” said a yery
wise man. To get knowledge then, is
the best means for helping ourselves or
others: and those who are yet too young
to attend to much else, should store their
minds with learning, to prepare for what
is most noble, when they are old enough
to act among men.

9. It is about twelve years since Mr.
Johnson met with a severe loss which

2



14 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

‘ave an important turn to the events of
fis life. He was a native of Massachu-
setts, in which state, till that time, he
had lived, under circumstances of pros-
perous fortum It is proper to explain,
in some degree, the nature of the mis-
fortunes which happened to him.

10. In the different kinds of business
in which men engage, to provide for
themselves and families, many changes
take place, which cause one person to
gain and another to lose.

11. All riches are only the earnings
of working people laid up in some way
or other. aouees are timber, and brick,
stone, metal and glass, brought from the
woods, the clay-pit, quarry, and forge,
put together, with great labor, in the
right shape for people to live in.

12. Persons who have not thought of
such matters would be surprised to find
how many trades are required to furnish
all that is wanted in building a house.
Every part is what*industry produces, i in
some way or other. Dollars and cents
are made of ore, dug from the mine,



‘THE HAPPY



hammered out in fla‘
stamped into coin at the miin

13. The real worth of things is ac-
cording to the importance of their use:
but the price in market es and. falls,
by their being plenty or rare, as they
happen to be easy or difficult to get.

14, Gold would be cheaper than iron,
if there was as much of it; because it
would not answer for so many uses. It
is wisely ordered that the metal neces-
sary, beyond all others, to the wants of
men, exists in most parts of the earth,
while those who hunt or dig for gold,
find that this article is very scarce.

15. It is pleasant to reflect, for a mo-
ment, on the thousand ways in which
our wants are supplied, Farmers and
fishermen, supply us with provisions.
Wool, and cotton, and flax, for clothing,
also come from the farmers. Mechanics,
of different trades, and manufacturers,
work up these materials as they are
wanted for use.

16, It is the merchants’ part to bring
together, from the four quarters of the







16 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

world, such as buyers want, and
keep them for sale. Sailors are employ-
ed to port these goods from one
distant region to another.

17. Some gvrite books, and others

print and bind them. ‘Teachers instruct
us; doctors give us medicine when we
are sick, and the officers of government,
by dealing with foreign nations, and by
bringing rogues to justice, protect honest
men.
18. All these persons help each other,
and it is as if, for binding all their in-
terests snug together, each one furnished
a link of a long and strong chain, with
a hook at. each end, and a swivel in the
middle.

19. One of these trades is as good as
another, if it affords a good profit; for
whatever is honest and useful, is always
honorable in a free country.

20. But if a juggler comes along, and
makes silly children stare and wonder
to see him dance on a rope, balance a
sword upon his nose, or turn a half eagle
into a six cent piece, he is no better than





THB HAPPY FAMILY. 17

a drone in the hive, which eats honey,
without helping to make it: because if
this mountel should swallow twenty
jack knives, or half a peck of live coals,
instead of only cheating blockheads by
retending to do it, all that would be no
Benefit to himself or any body else.

21. When we consider how many dif-
ferent arts and trades are carried on;
how many kinds of dealing and manu-
facture are connected with the safety, or
the wants of men, we do not wonder that
there are thousands of ways to gain or
lose, or meet with accidents.

22. It would not be possible to ex-

lain all these, if a hundred books should

written for that very purpose. A sin-

gle example will give some faint idea of
the whole.

23. There is a very curious kind of
tree which grows to a considerable size,
and is called the logwood tree. The
whole body of this wood is of a deep
brown, or purple color, and the tincture
obtained from boiling the chips, makes a
beautiful stain or dye, for a vast number



18 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

of cloths, and other things, which are
colored with it. >

24. By different ways of preparing this
dye Stuf the color may be changed to
various shades of brown and porple, or

a mixture of copperas, may be turned
to deep black.

25. No body ever saw any trees of
this kind growing in the woods about
here. This article, of such great use, is
brought by sea, from the countries to
the south and west of the if of Mexico.

26. To carry on the business which
belongs to this single thing, one set of
men, with their vessels, must go after
it, another buy and sell it, and the third
work it up in manufactures. This brings
us to consider the nature of trade, in or-
der to understand the misfortunes which
happened to the excellent Mr. Johnson
and his family.

27. Persons who buy goods to dispose
of to others, expect to sell for more than
they give, and this difference in price
makes the profit which they depend on
for their own living; and the owner of a



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 19

factory, who buys cotton in bales, and
has it spun, must get more for the yarn
than he gives for fie cotton, or he loses
all his expense and trouble: but those
who buy or manufacture foods have to:
run the risk of selling em, at such
prices as they can get. There is also
the danger of fire, of thieves, and other
ills, to which human affairs are sub-
jected.

28. Suppose a merchant who deals in
paints and dye stuffs, has a large parcel
of logwood in his store, and there comes
a war: then the ships can not go to get
more, without great danger of being
taken by an enemy. This article, in
that case becomes very scarce.

29. The clothiers and hatters must
have logwood, to color brown and black.
This merchant can then raise his price,
perhaps from two dollars to six, for a
hundred weight. In selling one hundred
tons at that rate, he would gain four
thousand dollars : and thus the same war
which does so much damage to his neigh-
bors, helps to make this one man rich.



20 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

30. Again, suppose the war lasts a
long time, and a trader, at a great ex-
pense, gets a large supply of logwood for
his customers. He expects to sell this
article at a profit; but there suddenly
comes a peace, and whole cargoes of
this wood, newly brought from Cam-
peachy, are offered in market, at a
cheap rate.

31. This merchant must sell as low
as others, or keep a thing which is of no
use to him. Perhaps he gets twenty
dollars a ton, for what cost him sixty.
Such losses on a number of articles
might make him a poor man, and if he
owed money he would not be able to pay
his dents.

32. It happened to Mr. Johnson, not
precisely in this way, but something
much like it, in the year 1815, at the
close of the war with Great Britain.



THE HAPPY FAMILY. ~~ 21

CHAPTER I. 7

Kindred Ties.

“ The little strong embrace —
Of prattling children, twined around his neck,
And ensulons to please him 5 calling forth
‘The fond parental soul.”

33. Mr. Jounson possessed by nature
a pleasing disposition, good talents, and
great fondness for learning. "When
young, he attended the best schools, and
made rapid progress in the different
branches which were taught.

34, From the time he was quite a
child, it was thought, by those who knew
him best, that he would become a man
far above the common cast, for know-
ledge and good character.

35. His good disposition was shown
by many acts of kindness, at this early
period of his life. There was living,
about a mile distant, a boy six years old,
who appeared to have a bright mind,

but by misfortune had never learned his
letters.



22 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

36. Edward Johnson was missing,
one day, and his friends searched a long
time without being able to find him.

37. After much inquiry, and some fear
respecting his safety, it was found that
he had gone with a small book, and a
splinter to point with, to teach the alpha-
bet to the unfortunate boy: for Edward,
who was eight years old, could not bear
the thought that any child should grow
up without knowing how to read and
write.

38. The little boy seemed very anxious
to learn ; and Edward took great pains
to assist him. Mrs. Johnson, seeing her
gon so much in earnest, had this boy in-
vited to her house ; when, finding him a
very smart little fellow, she gave him
good advice, and helped her son to in-
struct him.
$9. Arrangements were soon made to
send him to school, where he became the
best scholar in his class: but Edward
still continued to assist him, as often as

he could.
40. Some rough clownish fellows tried



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 23

to hinder this poor boy from learning.
Whenever they saw him, they used to
set up a laugh, and call him Ned John-
son’s disciple: but Edward’s mother told
them, that if silly people chose to laugh
at them for doing good, she hoped such
a trifling affair, would never drive them
from the right course. In less than a
year the little boy moved away, to a
great distance; and Edward had no
means of hearing from him again.

41. The excellent Edward Johnson
grew up, very much esteemed in the cir-
cle of his acquaintance. Following the
advice of Dr. Franklin, and the stronger
feelings of his own heart, he married,
early in life, Miss Maria Roberts, a
young lady of the.highest merits, then
residing with her parents, a few ntiles
from his own house.

42. Mr. Roberts, Maria’s father, was
the settled minister in the pleasant vil-
lage where he lived; and the meeting
house in which he preached stood so
near his dwelling that the old family
house-keeper could hear the ticking of



24 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

the town clock, and found that the
shadow of the steeple on the 20th of
June, just reached the kitchen door at
four o’clock in the afternoon.

43. Mr. Roberts was a well educated
man, of good sense, and lived that Chris-
tian life which he so eloquently explained
from the pulpit.

44. His wife was a woman of superior
excellence, kind in all the relations of life,
and very careful not to speak evil of
others, without strong cause. Her ad-
vice was generally first asked when
any good thing was to be done among
her acquaintance in the most proper

way.

45. They had three children, two sons
and a daughter. One of the sons died
when a small child: the other appeared
quite promising while young; but, in a
singular and unexpected manner, con-
nected himself with a set of bad com-
panions, and became a very degraded
and wretched being.

46. After all means had been tried to
reclaim him, he got on board a ship, to






‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 25

go to the East Indies, where he lingered
and died on the remote coast of Asia.

47. The suffering which these parents
felt at the conduct of their profligate
son, was in some :degree relieved by the
uncommon excellence of his sister, on
whom all their earthly hopes now rested.
She possessed _a mind and heart of suy
rior order, and her means of instruction
were the best which her parents ceuld
afford.

48. This worthy family were highly
respected’ through the Whole parish.
‘They had _ witnessed some of the ills of
human life; and, attentive to their own
conduct, made large allowance for the
failings of others.

49. Those who knew them were care-
ful not to speak evil of a neighbour in
their presence; and Mr. Johnson, in
seeking a companion for life, followed
the important rule, to choose the dutiful
daughter of a good mother.

50. The parting scene at Mr. Roberts’
was one of much tenderness, when this
daughter left them, to begin keeping

3 ‘



26 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

house for herself. Strongly as her pa-
rents wished for the happiness of this
beloved daughter, it was a painful trial
for them to part with her.

51. Maria, devoteu:.. “> was, in af-
fection and confidence, to her husband,
shed many tears, as she was riding away
from her father’s house, and reflecting,
that though she might often see them
agai, she was not any longer to live at
that parental home, to which she had; till
that time, been indebted for nearly all the
enjoyments of her life.

52. Mr. Johnson noticed her tears,
and readily imagined the cause; but he
chose to leave her, for a little while, to
her own feelings, knowing that if she
could be wanting in grateful attachment
to such a father and mother, she would
be destitute of a charm which he very
highly prized.

53. ‘Though Mr. Johnson’s property
was small, he was prospered in his in-
dustry, and continued to live very hap-
ply with his beloved wife, till they were

essed with four sons and three daugh-



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 2

ters, active, kind hearted, fond. of their
books, as children of bright minds are,
and quite forward in learning for their
age. Their names were George, Wil-
liam, Julia, James, Emma, Henry, and
Charlotte.

54, The delight which this agreeable
family enjoyed was promoted, not only.
by the respect which the children, gener-
ally, paid to their nts, but by their
affection for each other.

55. Great pains were taken to make
them understand that, for then Byes: and
for every blessing, they dey on an
“All-secing God; and te have thom very
careful, when alone, to do nothing, but
what this Divine Being, their parents, and
their own conscience, would approve:
because, when people do wrong, it brings
a feeling of guilt, and shame, and slavish
fear; and then they cannot be happy: be-
sides they are liable, in many ways, to
be punished for their misdeeds.

56. Among other things, very particu-
lar care was taken, in Mr. Johnson’s
family, to teach a sacred regard for



28 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

truth, as the foundation of almost every
thing which is praiseworthy in human
character.

57. Their mother called the children
to stand by her, while she feelingly ex-
plained to them the virtue of truth. She
told them of the excellent people we read
of, who would not be guilty of a base
falsehood to save their lives; who feared
their God, and feared to do wrong; but
knew no other fear.

58. It may seem strange, to some,
that, after all the care taken with these
favoured children, they should, on any
occasion, wilfully depart from what they
knew to be right, and put their parents
and themselves to shame; yet so the
fact was.

59. In one instance, James had done
a piece of roguery, not of a very serious
kind, and which was of only trifling con-
sequ: "ce, if he had been honest enough
too «4 the truth: but, to his sorrow, he
undertook to deceive his father.

60. Mr. Johnson suspecting how the
affair might be, took pains to find out



THE HAPPY FAMILY. 29

the whole in a very particular manner,
before he said a word to James about it,
on purpose to see whethg, his son would
deny it, and resort to dé tion, in the
vain hope of clearing himself.

61. is little boy had not the least
idea that his father knew all about the
matter ; and supposed that if he denied
it, when he was asked to tell how it was,
he should then get clear. He made a
gross misstatement at the very begin-
ning, and then told a number of other
crooked stories, in order to get along, if
possible, and not be detected.

62. Mr. Johnson at last told James to
stop where he was: for he had said a
great deal too much. The poor boy’s
guilt and shame were such that he knew
not how to act, when he heard his father
state,the circumstances, just as they had
happened, and found that this exelent
parent, who looked with horror @..on a
falsehood, knew the full extent of his
son’s guilt.

63. Mr. Johnson talked in a very sen-
sible manner to James, upon the mean-

3°



30 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

ness and wickedness of ‘such a practice.
‘This. good father knew very well that
children are apggto be thoughtless, and do
many things *Mich they should not, even
where they lave ho wicked intention.

64. As long.as a child will own the
truth, and try to do better, there is hope
of him ; atid almost any thing else may
bemore soy overlooked than the prac-
tice of |

65. Mr. Fohnson left his son to his own
reflections, till the next morning. James
slept but little that night. He felt con-
fused at looking his mother in the face ;
and _ when called into the room with
his father, the next morning, his mortifi-
cation was extreme. No one was pre-
sent, except these two, nor is it known
what punishment James received; but,
whatever it was, he appeared neygr to
forget it.

66. Mrs. Johnson was a woman of
uncommon excellence, and _ possessed
great skill in giving instruction to her
children. She used to say, that a large
part of the trouble, in most families,



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 31

proceeds from their own ignorance, or ill
nature, or both. It is a blessing beyond
all price for children to have the teaching
of such a mother.

67. Several years had passed on, in a
very agreeable’ manner, with this family,
so united in affection and respect. No-
thing serious took place to disturb their
felicity, till they were called to endure a
very painful trial in the death of Mr.
Roberts.

68. Mrs. Johnson was with her excel-
lent, and much honored father, during
the chief part of his sickness, which was
but a few days. All which the best of
wives, a most dutiful daughter, and kind
friends could do, was done, to sooth his
pains, and supply his wants.

69. 'The parting with this parent was,
to Mrs. Johnson, a most deeply affecting
sce His life had been the pattern of
what's excellent in human conduct: he
died as the good man dies; and his last
expressions to his friends were the words
of peace and hope.

70. Mrs. Johnson spent as much time





DEATH OF NR, ROBERTS, page 51



32 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

with her widowed mother as she could,
without improper neglect of her own
family: and, in the bereaved situation of
this good parent, the attentions of such
a daughter were better than any other
earthly comfort.

CHAPTER III.
The Fortitude of a Christian.

“They hear, amidst their afflictions, that small voice,
which says, ‘Fear not; for I am with thee.”

71. Mr. Jonnson had been for some
time engaged in a factory, which it was
thought would afford a large profit. He
wished to carry on this business in the
best manner, and was at much e@ense
to prepare for the purpose.

72. He did much also to make his
house convenient for the family ; for he
had no intention of moving from it, while
he lived. The profits began to come in







MB, JORNSON'S TAOTORY, page 52.



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 33

quite as fast as had been expected ; and.
after laboring hard to place his affairs in
a prosperous condition, it now appeared
that he might look forward to a hand-
some reward for his toil.

73. He was not very covetous of
riches for himself; but wished to provide
for his family, to educate them well, and
to put them in situations to e1 re in
good business for themselves, when the
proper time of life should arrive.

‘74, All human affairs are uncertain ;
and Mr. Johnson’s plans, though they
seemed fair and .good, turned out very
badly indeed. ‘The news came that the
war was at an end; and though it is much
the best to have peace, yet it came in a
very bad time for Mr. Johnson.

’ 75. Almost every kind of business
took a new turn. The cotton in bales
greweso dear, the yarn and wove cloth
so cheap, that it was not possible to
carry on the factory to any advantage.
He had to sell all his goods at a very low
price, or not sell them at all.

5. He trusted some people who did

4





34 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

not pay him; some failed and could not

-y 3 others died, and he lost the debus.

ie was obliged to sell the factory for a
quarter. of what it cost 3 and so numer-
ous and great were his losses, in different
ways, that he was not able to pay the
money he owed.

‘77. Then his creditors sued him, and
he was forced to pay large bills of cost.
Still he tried to keep every thing as near
right as he could; and ‘his sons, though
they were young, made the best exertions
in their power.to help him.

78. ith all their efforts, the difficul-
ties increased. To make the matter
worse, there were persons who had plans
of self interest against Mr. Johnson, ex-
pecting to gain by what he lost, and re-
joiced at his downfal. The house, the
little farm, the garden, which the whole
family had taken great pains to ntake ;
the horse and cow, every thing was to be
sold.

79. Mr. Johnson was a man of un-
common fortitude, and could bear almost
any trial for himself; but was so attach-







‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 35

ed to his family, that it greatly affected
him to think of their being reduced to
keen distress.

80. At this critical time, his daughter
Emma, a lovely little girl, five years old,
was taken very sick. Mrs. Johnson her-
self, at this time, was not in good health.
Her troubles, and anxious watching, af
fected her still more. It appeared that
she must sink under so many trials ; but
her greatest sufferings had not yet ar-
rived.

81. Mr. Johnson, in addition to the
cares which perplexed his mind, had been
exposed to great fatigue... He was taken
with an inflammation on his lungs, and
the doctor considered his disorder a very
dangerous one.

82. He lay sick in one room, and
Emma in another, and Mrs. Johnson, by
turns, spent what time she could with
each. Though distressfully pained at the
thought that one or both would be taken
from her, she used all her efforts to cheer
and encourage them, and provide for
their warits.

4



36 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

83. When she could no longer support
her troubles, she went alone to another
room. ‘There is one Being, who, though
unseen, knows all the sorrows of his
faithful children. To this Divine Friend
she opened her whole heart.

84. She begged that, in mercy, her be-
loved. husband and her child, might be
spared ; or that she might be resigned to
whatever lot an all wise Providence had
destined for her : and, when prayers and
tears had relieved her burdened mind,
she went back, with a look of patience,
to the bed-sides of her husband and
child.

85. No children of the same age, would
have exceeded George and William and.
Julia, in dutiful attention to their parents.
James, and even little Henry showed
much concern for his father and sister.
The neighbors manifested great kindness,
on seeing this very worthy family reduced
to such distress.

86. In a few days, Mr. Johnson began
to grow better; but it was not expected
that Emma would live. The thought of



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 37

losing this sweet, kind hearted little child,
was very painful to the whole family ; for
now, when so sick, she seemed more en-
dearecd to them than ever. She was
very patient, and took such medicines as
were given her, without making the least
complaint.

87. The next week, a constable was
sent to take the furniture from the house.
Charlotte, the youngest child, was, at
this time, a babe of four months old, and
Henry, a smart little fellow, of two years
and a half.

88. Among other things, the baby’s
cradle, that all the children, one after an
other, had been rocked in, was taken
away. Mr. Johnson had become so well
as to engage in trying to arrange his af-
fairs, in some degree, and was gone from
home, when the furniture was removed.

89. Mrs. Johnson’s situation, as may
well be supposed, was one which must
severely attect the feelings of a tender
mother and wife. Though her fortitude
and patience were great, her mind was
weighed down with trouble as she looked



38 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

about the empty house, and thought of
her children.

90. She went to her own room, and
Julia saw her put a handkerchief to her
eyes, as she passed through the door.
She remained there till the children ran
to tell her their father was coming. A
man whom he had seen by the way, had
informed him what was done. at the
house.

91. Mrs. Johnson met him at the door,
with the sweetest smile, and said, « my
dear, I am very glad to see you; but you
appear quite fatigued and unhappy.”

est of women,” said he, “ how can I
be happy, while I see you and our dear
children in your present situation ?”

92. «O, my dear husband,” said she,
“it does not become us to be depressed.
We must not forget that there is a high-
er Wisdom than ours, which governs all
events. Instead of repining, let us be
thankful for the blessings we enjoy. T
have some very good news to tell you.
Our dear Emma is much better, and we
think will soon be well.”



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 39

93. “ My precious wife,” said he «I
am indeed thankful that our child is pre-
served; but I must painfully feel the
destitute condition in which you are
placed. Instead of kindly cheering others,
you have great need of comfort.”

94. “Let us drop that subject, my
dear,” said she: “ our happiness depends
on something better than the walls of this
house, or the tables and chairs it may
contain. If we are blest with health, our
own industry will provide for our wants.”

95. George -and William said they
could work, and help their parents. All
the children seemed to catch the spirit,
and wanted to do something to relieve
the difficulty. Even little Henry, though
too young to know what the matter was,
got the idea, that assistance was needed,
in some way or other, and said he could
help them pare apples to make pies.

96. There is nothing on earth like the
tender and refined attachment between
a mother and daughter, when they both
possess good sense, and affectionate
hearts. ‘This attachment, far from being





40 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

weakened, is often much increased, by
severe afflictions, which tend to ripen the
mind, as the changes of weather serve to
mellow the choicest of fruits.

97. It is the nature of most created
beings to love and seek their own kind.
“ As, in water, face answereth to face,
so is the heart of man to man ;” -and,
though people, in the decline of life, may
be surrounded by good neighbours, they
feel the need of more endearing ties.

98, The excellent Mrs. Roberts found
her situation very lonely, after the death
of her husband. “ Mrs. Johnson was all
to her: all that she now had in this
world, to any great degree, to enjoy, or
to hope. :

99. When she heared that this beloved
daughter was in deep trouble, she desired
still more to be with her ; and it was the
strong wish of both, that some way might
be provided for them to pass their re-
maining days together.

100. Mr. Johnson’s disappointments
continued to increase. Some, who had
pretended to be his friends, and for whom



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 41

he had done much, turned against him,
when they found he was in trouble.

101. These base people did not appear
to thank him, or give credit for all he
had done; but now, because he had
failed of success, were ready to say, he
was neither sensible nor honest. Instead
of coming to him with their smiles and
bows, as they used to do, they kept at a
distance.

102. Among all the evils which atten-
ded Mr. Johnson in his bad fortune, he
had this one advantage: No deceivers
hung around him with false professions
of esteem; and he learned, much better
than he knew before, who were his real
friends. A few of these excellent persons
remained firm in their respect for this
worthy man, and defended his character
when he was slandered by wicked and
low minded people.

103. Among the evils which happened
to this family during their troubles, some
pleasant events also took place. One, in
particular, deserves to be mentioned, as
an instance of gratitude. Mr. Sherman,





42 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

a plain good farmer, lived about five
miles from Mr. Johnson’s.

104. This man and his wife, came in
a waggon the next day after the fur-
niture was taken. They saw Mrs. John-
son; but her husband had gone with the
sheriff, to attend to some urgent business.

105. Mrs. Sherman said they had
come to let Mrs. Johnson know how sor-
ry they were that the factory had stop-
ped; and they should be giad to show
their friendship for the family, by any
means in their power.

106. Mrs. Johnson said she felt very
grateful for their kindness; but hoped
such arrangements would be made, as,
with proper industry, would enable the
family to supply their wants; ~and she
should be unwilling to trouble those who
had never received any favour from her,
and whom she had no means of repaying.

107. “O,” said the good woman, “we
owe every thing to your father and mo-
ther. When we were just married, and
beginning the world for ourselves, poor
and destitute, they advised and helped us



THE HAPPY FAMILY. 43

in the kindest manner, or we could not
have got along as we did.”

108. “Now,” said Mrs. Sherman, “we
have a good farm, all paid for, we can-
not see you in want of friends, and true
friends too ; and so we came to see if:
you will accept the offer of such assist-
ance as we can afford.”—“ Here are fif-
ty dollars,” said Mr. Sherman; “if you
don’t like to take it as a free gift, you
may pay it to me when you can, as well
as not.”

109. Mrs. Johnson did not intend at
first to take the fifty dollars; but the good
man and his wife were both so affected
that they shed tears; and she saw thei
feelings would be hurt if she refused:
They said, “we do not pretend to be very
fine people ; but when others do us fa-
vours, we don’t mean to forget them.”

110. It was some time before Emma
became entirely well. She was such a
lovely little girl, that the family had
been much distressed at her sickness,
and were rejoiced to see her pleasant and
lively at play, as before.

5



44 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

111. It was Mr. Johnson’s happiness
to have one man who was like a brother
to. him. This was Capt. Ezra Warner.
This gentleman had never been much
heard of in public life ; but very few, in
the same circle of acquaintance, pos-
sessed so much private worth.

112. He had not the means of going
through a course of studies at a college,
and was not a very great scholar ; but,by
diligent attention, at common schools,
and otherwise, obtained a better educa-
tion than many who have much more
done for them, but do very little for
themselves.

113. Capt. Warner was not readily
inclined to change his opinions, or his
conduct. He would never believe in new
plans, till it plainly appeared to him they
were good. He wore his hair long, and
wound with a ribband, in a cue, down
his back, because his father, and others
in the war of the revolution, had worn
their’s in the same way, when he was a

sy.
114. He was strongly attached to the



THR HAPPY FAMILY. cd

good of the country, and icularly: to
the state in which he lived, It was). his
firm opinion, that, all things considered,
his own state, as he used-to call it, was
the best in the union; but he hoped that,
whatever good things the people of that
state might do besides, they would never
neglect the catching of whales in. the
South sea, and of codfish on the. banks
of Newfoundland; because this business
had done very much to: aid the, United
States.

115. Among his neighbors,Capt. War
mer was honest, noble minded, and a
strict lover of truth; never known to de-
ceive, by pretending to be a friend, with-
out meaning what he said.

116. When Mr. Johnson’s furniture and.
other property was taken away, this man
came with his two sons, driving a-cow,
and with a load of hay ona cart. He
said he wanted Mr. Johnson’s family to
fodder his cow, and have her milked du-
ring the winter, to save him the trouble.

117. When any of Mrs. Johnson’s
friends came to see her, she apy



46 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

cheerful, and received them as if nothing
unpleasant had happened. She set be-
fore them the best she had to offer, and
made neither complaint, nor useless
apology. Persons of good sense admired
her intelligent mind, and the manner in
which she conducted the affairs of the
house, in the circumstances in which she
was placed.

118. There was but one thing“which
seemed to disturb her feelings, so as to
have it plainly perceived. That was
the ill will of some designing persons
in slandering her husband, by hinting
that he had done wrong, instead of say-
ing, what was the truth, that his bad for-
tune was such, as no one could foresee
or avoid.

119. She considered the loss of pro-
perty as sometimes severe, especially to
such as are sick, or unable to take care
of themselves; but not, by any means,
the greatest evil of life. What would our
sufferings be, she said one day, to a lady,
if we had tippling, ignorant husbands and
bad children ?



THE HAPPY FAMILY. aT

CHAPTER Iv.

The ‘Search for a New Residence.

“The world has nothing to bestow,
‘From our own selves our joys must flow,
‘And that dear hut our home.”

120. As the spring approached, Mr.
Johnson began to reflect, that there was
Ro prospect of his succeeding to his mind

at place, and that he must prepare
to move out of the state. He conversed
with his wife, and had the satisfaction to
find, that her opinions agreed with his
own.

121. He also consulted his _ friend,
Capt. Warner, who, though opposed to
the project at first, began to be more fa+
vorably inclined. After reflecting a while,
and talking with other neighbors, Cap-
tain Warner learned that he could sell
his own farm, which was small, for a very
food price ; and the thought came into

is head, that if he could suit himself .i in
5°



48 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

the new country, it would be better for
bis family, than to remain where he
was.

122. It seemed like a fearful under-
taking for Mrs. Johnson; but she was

fectly willing to make the attempt.

e said to her husband, “ it will require
avery great exertion, my dear, in our
situation, to remove our family into the
woods, and get through the hardships of
the first year; and especially for our
mother, at her advanced age ; but, if we
should be enabled to accomplish so much,
we should afterwards have a prospect of
a home for ourselves and children.

123. “It is needless, my dear,” she
said, to struggle here with difficulties
which we cannot overcome. In an old
settled place, like this, it is very hard
for a man, when he gets down, to rise
again, while so many are striving against

im.

124. Mr. Johnson was much pleased
to find that his wife had so much forti-
tude on this subject. After consulting
again with Capt. Warner, it was finally



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 49

that they two would take a-jour-
ney together, to the western states; arid
if they liked the country as well as they
expected, to move their families some-
‘where beyond the Allegany mountains.

125. They took care to: have their
families placed as well as they could, du-
ring their absence ; and, after a few days
spent in getting ready, they set out. to-
gether, in Capt. Warner’s one’ horse
‘wagon.

126. Capt. Warner, had a small pro-

erty, but not sufficient to enable him to
lay out a very great expense; and Mr.
Johnson was, at this time, very destitute.
For these men, it would be too expensive
to buy their meals at a tavern: so the
laid in a small stock of provisions, to
start with, intending, when these were
gone, to purchase more at the wholesale

rice.

127. They had a ham and loin of veal;
two boiled chickens; and three beef’s
tongues, with two loaves of bread, and a
bag of hard biscuit. They started with
a bushel and a half of oats, for their



50 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

chorse. Thus equipped, they sét out on
this journey, early a Aprils

128. As these two friends pursued
-their journey, they talked over many cir-
cumstances, respecting the changes of
‘human life, the difference between old and
new’ settlements, and the various.sorts of
people, who compose the great family of
man, -

» 129. They spoke of the hardships en-
dured_ by ‘the Tirst white rsons who
settled at Jamestown, and Plymouth, and
the very. different appearance of this
country. now, from PEat it was two
dundréd: years ago.
i130. “Yes,” said Capt. Warner, “very
different from what it was, when indepen-
dence was declared. Then, the noisiest
did not rush forward, to obtajn office for
‘private gain. ‘Those were chosen who
could best fulfil the trust; and,.when
elected, they proceeded as in their con-
sciences they thought best for the public.
They wanted no jockies in the lobbies,
to talk of turnpikes, and bank stock, and
teli them how to cheat honest men.”





‘ALIS OF NIAGABA, page 61,



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. St

131. Mr. Johrison and Capt: Warner
generally walked. up hill, in order to
relieve their horse,-as_ much as pos-
sible, from the fatigue of the wearisome
road.

132. They directed their course west-
ward, into the state of New York, and
up the Mohawk river, towards lake

ie.

133. As they came near the falls of
Niagara, and heared the vast torrent,
sounding louder and louder, as they ad-
vanced, they called to mind the descrip-
tions, given by different writers, of this
stupendous cataract.

134, When they saw the waters of a
thousand rivers, falling in one collected
flood, from the height of a lofty steeple
into the boiling chasm below, and the
rising mist forming rainbows and clouds
in the air, they stood amazed at the
scene, and almost ready to believe that
the earth would be jarred from its place.

135. In silence and wonder, they. view-
ed ascene which has nothing like it on
earth. At such a time, the pride of man



52 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

is humbled. With mingled hope and
fear, he owns that Power who rules the
“fountains of the great deep:” by whose
will nations live or die ; who commands,
and worlds stand forth in their places, or
sink, to rise no more.

136. The two travellers stayed all
night at a tavern in the village; but
found it difficult to sleep, on account of
the terrible roaring of the falls.

137. From this place they directed
their course south-west, along the shore
of lake Erie, till they came to the state
of Ohio. They continued their way,
through various places, making fre-

juent inquiry respecting the price of wild

tind, and whether. those Pie wished
to sell farms, had good title deeds:
such as could be depended on according
to law.

138. They understood, that some land
speculators had sold farms, and taken
py, for them, when this same land be-
longed to other owners. The buyers,
after great disputes and lawsuits, were
forced to leave these lands, and lose



THE HAPPY FAMILY. 52

what they had paid; because they did
not get their deeds from the right men.

139. At a log tavern, where they’stay-
ed over night, they met a number of per-
sons who were much engaged in dis-
coursing upon the quality of land, in dif-
ferent parts of the western country ; and,
among other places, they mentionéd, very
particularly, the town of Jefferson, in the
state of Ohio.

140. This place had very few settlers
in it at that time; but it was remarka-
ble for its situation, and the uncommon
goodness of the soil. The rocks under
ground were chiefly lime, and the timber
a handsome growth of sugar maple,
beech, oak, elm, birch, walnut, butternut,
and wild cherry.

141. Besides these, there were various
other kinds, in less proportions. This
land, it was stated, could be bought at a
cheap rate ; the title was without dispute;
and, by paying a trifling part down, the
settlers, if they had not cash to spare,
could ‘have time to pay the remainder,
when they could raise something to sell

6



at ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

and get it.,..This they could hardly fal
to-do, inai-short :time, it was said, unless
they.-werk very lazy: miulsi ids,
auld. ‘The. chief. part, of the, evening
was takenoups in. speaking, of. the adyan-
tages of a place so.extremely inviting for
those: who, wished to, settle, in. the new
cauntry,. One. of the. men. was'so engar,
ged in describing this delighiful:township,
that he said it seemed to him: ps. much
like the garden.of. Eden,.as any: place in
the:-western. forest could well be. .
» 143.,-Finally, the man told Mr. Jobn-
gon and. Capt.. Warner,.that he owned a.
large: tract .of land there himself, and
that if they, wished to buy.a part. of it he
yould let them have it ata great bar-
gain. :
144. The land was but a few miles off;
and/after considering the matter, it was
concluded, in the morning, to leaye the
ene horse wagon at the public house
where they were, and go, on horse-back,
through the woods, for the strangers to
take a look at the place.

145. Mrs. Johnson continued, in the



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 55.

absence of her husband, to exert herself
to promote the comfort of her honored
snother, and advance the children in their
learning. Her task was a very severe
one; but the dutiful conduct of her chil-
dren, made the situation in which she
was placed, much more pleasant than it
would otherwise have been.

146. She had two letters from Mr.
Johnson, written from different places
where they stopped, and giving an ac-
count of the circumstances which had at-
tended them on the way.

147. In about seven weeks after Mr.
Johnson left his family, they received a
letter from him, dated at Jefferson, in the
state of Ohio. It was brought by an old
acquaintance, who had been to Jefferson,
and had heard Mr. Johnson and Capt.
‘Warner talk over their plans in a par-
ticular manner. This letter informed
them of the following very important
facts.

148. He was in good health, and had
bargained for a hundred acres of wild
land, in a part of the state which, i





56 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

thought, would be cleared and settled
very fast. He expected to move his
family as soon as the suitable prepara-
tions could be made.

149. The farm was well watered : the
soil appeared to be the very first rate, and
‘was thought, by good judges, to equal
the flats on the borders of Connecticut
river. Indeed, there seemed very little
reason to doubt that, when the woods
were cleared off, they should raise as
large crops of wheat, Indian corn, and
other grain, as could well grow upon the
ground.

150. Capt. Warner, and others also,
wrote letters to their friends, in New
England. These men were even more
confident than Mr. Johnson. In some
openings in the woods, where trees were
not thick, the ground, in its natural state,
was covered with beautiful white clover,
and they found thistles of monstrous size,
which are a sign of good land.

151. There was no mill within eight
miles, but plenty of streams of the best
kind, to erect every sort of water m:





THE HAPPY FAMILY. 57

chines, where they were wanted. As to
roads, the people were talking of cutting
a number, in various directions, so that
m a few years, they expected to have
pretty good travelling through the dif-
ferent parts of the town, and the settle-
ments near it. :

152. The farm which Mr. Johnson
had purchased, was bound on the south
by one of the handsomest rivers in the
state. On the east side, a brook of con-
siderable size, ran down_and emptied
into the larger stream. On this brook
was a very suitable fall for building a
saw mill, and where a strong dam could
easily be made.

153. Mr. Johnson had some hopes of
being able to erect a saw mill; and
thought that, perhaps, in three years,
George, if he should live and do well,
would be able to tend it.

154. He was anxious to provide suita-
ble business for all his children ; because
he and Mrs. Johnson both thought, that,
there is hardly any thing worse for
young persons, than to bring them up in

6*



58 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

idleness. If people do not follow any
kind of business for the sake of profit,
they used to say, employment is neces-
sary to health, and the solid enjoyments
of life.

155. Mr. Johnson had made a begin-
ming in clearing his farm, which was all
woods. He had marked out a piece,
twenty four rods long, and twenty rods
wide, making just three acres.

156. He intended, during the summer,
to clear these three acres, and put up a
small log house, so as to move his family,
in‘ the month of September or October.
He had hired a man to assist him in his
work, and it was thought that they could
girdle the trees on five acres more.

157. In order to carry on this labor,
they had_ built a cabin, with stakes and
green poles, covered over with bark, to
make it snug and tight, for keeping off
the rain. Several bundles of straw were
spread on the ground, in this cabin, for
Mr. Johnson and his hired man to
sleep on.

158. They cooked their own food, a



THE HAPPY FAMILY. 59

a fire made against the side of a rock,
where they placed two crotched stakes,
with a pole laid across, to hang on the
dinner pot. Their tramel was a hicory
withe, and they cut a pot-hook from the
limb of a trec.

159. The style of living, in such a
place, was very different from what it is
among fashionable people, in cities and
large towns; but it was necessary for
them to get along as well as they could.
The object was to obtain a home, if it
was a humble one, and attended with
some difficulties.

160. The furniture of these new set-
tlers, though not very costly, was such
as answered their purposes for the time.
It consisted chiefly of a knife, fork, and
spoon, for each person; two trenchers,
and a large wooden platter. For a ta-
ble, they had a stump, of proper size, cut
off level and smooth at the top.

161. Their seats were benches, made
of split logs, bored with auger holes, and
legs put to them. When they had
worked hard from morning till noon,



60 ‘THE HAPPY, FAMILY.

they found the boiJed dinner, from their
stump table, tasted very well. As they
kept a gun loaded, they sometimes killed
wild game of different kinds, and had
fresh meat.

162. Mr. Johnson wrote that he felt
rather lonesome, without his wife and
children; for he never had been away
from them long at a time before ; but he
hoped the period was not far distant,
when he should be able to have them
with him. He felt anxious, for fear they
were not well, or their situation not com-
fortable ; but wished them by no means
to make themselves uneasy about him.

163. He requested Mrs. Johnson to
assure her honoured mother, that it
would be his pleasure to do every thing
in his power to render her happy; and he
hoped the choicest blessings might at-
tend the evening of her life.

164. Mr. Johnson’s greatest fear was
respecting his wife, whom he now loved
more tenderly than ever. He thought
that, in this new scttlement, she would
have to endure uncommon hards








EXPLANATION,

Of the Map of Mr. Edward Johnson's New Farm, in the state of
‘Olixo, land down according to actual survey.

iL

‘

|
>

Pat













Digan

A. Mr. Jokncon's Cabin —®. Cooking Place—2 Place for a Loe
Howse 4" Pisce for 4 School Hionse 3 Sagtaw Qrehart Place for
wiain Road << “Place fara Ste Milles Plabe for aecting Hwee
A" Pilee for Lavee Bridge 10. Captain Watnera cleuring
Place Jor! Cajiain Warnere Nr Houre—t8. Large. Spring 18
Bede to te tite over Mill. brook—¥4. Place for’ Barn and Com

Howes 15, "Pinfish rivulee
e









THE HABPY FAMILY. 63

be deprived of many comforts, which she
had been accustomed to enjoy.

165. On the other hand, it appeared.

to him, that, if they could succeed in get-
ting well settled in Ohio, though*they
should be subject to many privations at
first, there was reason to hope that, in a
short time, they might have a farm and
Rome oftheir own.
166. \He. fhovght, too, that this would
be, better. their children, and_ they
would, he;:morg; likely to-do. well for
themselveg,,,.e, wrote, wary sensibly, and
feelingly, on.all these subjects. »
,/167. In.this elegant. detter, Mr. ohne
son enclosed a, very handsome -mpp:.of.
his farm, as he had: learned: the.art of
survey§ng, when he. was.a'lad at. school.
This ), served, as a picture, to give a
much better idea of the different. ‘parts,
than ifhg had only described them.’ It
answoredotye same purpose as maps of
countriag this was te exbibit-a: si
gle farm, d of a whole dora.or
state. ogee Bl

168. Children who have over received









G4 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

a letter from one of the best of fathers,
when he was more than five hundred
miles, from them, may form some idea
what were the feelings at Mr. Johnson’s,
wher his letter was produced.

169. Mrs. Johnson called the children
around her, to make them understand
how thankful they ought to be, for having
so good a father. She told them that
he was away there in the woods, with
nothing, but a little straw spread on the
ground, to sleep on, and suffering, for
want of the common necessaries of life ;
and it was all to provide a home for them.

170. She hoped they might all be
spared to get to the farm, and become a
great comfort and honor to their con-
nections, by always conducting in such
a manner, as to deserve the esteem of
the wise and good. .

171. Among all this little circle, no
one seemed more deeply interested in
the letter than the excellent Mirs. Roberts.
She now found that,at her time’of life, she
must either move hundreds of miles from
where she had ever been, or be separated



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 65

from her children, with but little pros-
ct of seeing them again in this world.

172. She could not think of p; ing
with her daughter; but said, as Rt of
old said to her dearest friend, “ ere
thou goest, I will go.” -

173. Many of the neighbors inquired
whether Mr. Johnson was suited with
the country where he was ; and whether
he expected to move his family? Some
of those who had tried to drive this good
man away, now threw out their slander-
ous hints that his going there was a very
bad scheme, and his calculations were as
wild as the country where he had gone.

174. A short time after Mr. Johnson’s
letter was received, the following answer
was sent:

175. My dear Husband,

It would be difficult to give you
a correct account of the scene which
your letter produced in our family. The
interest and affection displayed by the
little group, called up every feeling of
tenderness in my bosom. Emma took

”



66 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

notice of the tears which I could not pre-
vent, and, with the most affectionate

swoginess, wiped them from my cheeks.
You seem anxious, my dear, to
knoW how the children are occupied.

George is doing very well at Mr. Scott’s.
William is in school, making fine pro-
gress in his studies; and the younger
children are improving, quite as fast as
could be-expected, by their own exertions,
with such instruction as I am able. to
give them.

177. No change, of any great import-
ance, has taken place here, since you left
us. We have been favored with our
usual share. of health; and, so far, I have
been enabled to get along with less dif-
ficulty than I expected.

178. Since you wish to know particu-
larly how we proceed, I must mention
one circumstance ; and, if the sports of
our children seem trifling, their father,
perhaps, may be diverted with them,
when he is sitting in lonely mood, at the
little cabin, resting from his toil.

179. A few mornings ago, our good







HE HAPPY FAMILY. 67

mother wanted her staff, to take a walk in
the garden. Search was made, in every
part of the house, without finding it, and
there was great wonder where it could be
gone.

180. As it could not be found, James
stepped forward, in avery gallant manner,
and said, “Nevermind the cane, grandmo-
ther ; I intend to be your staff, as long as
you want one. Lean on my shoulder, if
you please.” She was much’gratified with
this proof of his kind disposition ; but still
the mystery remained, what had become
of the staff.

181. At last, it was discovered, to the
great diversion of all, that Henry, being
im _want of a horse, to take a mornin;
ride, had supplied himself with a bark
bridle, and galloped over to Mr. Wil-
son’s on his grandmother’s cane.

182. We feel very much, my dear, the
want of your company. ‘The children
often ask, “ when will fathercome home?”
Do not stay too long in preparing a place;
but allow us the pleasure of assisting in
the work.



68 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

183. The boys are eager to show how
much they can help in clearing the land,
and planting fruit trees. They have laid
up a great variety of seeds, and expect
to eat fine melons, of their own raising,
in Ohio, next summer.

184, They are quite delighted with the

thought of piling logs and brush to burn:
and tending the large bonfires, in the
evenings. Each one has his plan for
helping to subdue the wilderness, and is
impatient to begin the great work.
- 185. Do not suppose that we can
not be happy there. I know, my dear
husband, that your goodness leads
you to neglect your own ease, to pro-
mote the comfort of your family; and
my greatest fear is, that the toil you un-
dergo on our account, may injure your
own health.

186. Hasten to us, my dear, without
spending too much time in preparation,
that we may be able to get removed, as
early in the season as circumstances will
admit.

187. Cornelia Warner has written a



THE HAPPY FAMILY. 69

letter to her father. She is an uncom-
mon girl for her age.

188. Mother and the children all join,
in love to you, and are anxious for yo
return. The little girls want to know if
they cannot have some kisses sent in
this letter.

Your affectionate wife,
Mania Jonnson.

189. After Mr. Johnson got this letter,
he hurried his work as fast as possible,
to put the log-house he was building in
suitable condition for his family to move
into.

190. In order to carry on the business
to better advantage, he and Capt. War-
ner changed work, assisting each other
by turns. In this way they could per-
form the heavy labour to much better
advantage.

191. "The following is the copy of the
Jast letter which Mr. Johnson wrote,
previous to setting out, on his return to
move the family :

7*



~% THE HAPPY FAMILY.

Jefferson, State of Ohio,

Jaly 17, 1816.

192. My Dear Wife,

Your letter delighted me. The
ood. conduct..of the children fills my
eart with the warmest: affection for

them.

193. Their dutiful attention to their
grandmother is, with me, a very import-
ant consideration: unkindness to elderly

ple, I consider an evidence of a bad
isposition, and bad principles.

194. I laughed heartily at the story of
Henry’s morning ride, and hope the time
may ‘come when he will be able to com-
mand a horse of quite a different descrip-
tion. It is my intention, if the boys do
well, to give each of them a colt, to raise

n the farm.

195. This is not a place for much
news, for people do not go into the
woods to establish a printing office. The
chief which can, at present, be said, is

ting what is going to be done, and
which, perhaps, some may think’ will
never take place.



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 1

196. The labour required is indeed
great: but, with health, and the ordinary
blessing of Providence, it can be accom-

lished. It is, as our sons may here
learn, by: diligence and perseverance that
a beaver gnaws down an oak tree.

197. Atany rate, my dear, I must give
you some account of our situation, as it
now is, and of the prospects which direct-
ly present themselves before us. Time,
the great teacher, will soon determine
wlether these designs are to be reali
or not.

198. A number of the neighbor:
calculating to join next spring, and”put

a snug school house ; and Thave told
them, that they may set it at one corner
of our new clearing, in a beautiful grove
of large trees, where there is very little
underbrush, and which the boys at noon
time, may easily cut down and burn. So
our teachers, as well as those of old
Athens, may give instruction in the shade
of a grove.

199. There is, at present, no meeting
house within twelve miles of us; but,



72 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

about thirty or forty persons, old and
young, assemble in a barn, which is the
most convenient building we have for the

urpose.
zs 200. It is three quarters of a mile
from here, and, if there is no regular
preaching, the time is spent in prayer,
and in conversing together of our de-
pendence on Him whose protecting mer-
cy is every where. Frequently some

rson reads a sermon from one of the
best divines and this, at the request*of
our little congregation, I have generally
dong since I came among them.

Ser Tt may seem, my dear Maria, to
the proud votaries of fashion, that this
kind of worship is very humble. It is
so indeed ; but, that of the earliest chris-
tians Was not less so; and, if our meet-
ings are not attended with much splen-
dor, it is hoped they have the merit of
being sincere.

202. For myself, I have never been
more sensible of the power of religion,
than when assembled with these few
ueighbors, here in the woods. My chief



THE HAPPY FAMILY. 73

want, at such times, is to have my dear
family with me. :

203. There is something sublimely
affecting, in the contemplation of our
various relations to a Divine Creator,
and to our fellow beings. The social
feelings are improved by this exercise,
and we then most desire the company of
those we most love.

204. Our new mansion, my dear, is in
a considerable state of forwardness. It
will’not afford the means of what people
in general would call style; but will serve,
I believe, to keep off the rain; and you
will readily suppose we shall be. iho
want of fire wood, where we have’tinsber
enough to build ships for all the navies
of Europe.

205. In a fortnight from this ttme, I
aope to be on my way to join you; so
as to get through with our removal to
this place, as early in the season as pos-
sible. Such an undertaking will require
a great effort on your part; but such an
effort as, I trust, you will not again be
called upon to make.



7 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

206. Capt. Warner is well, and doing
well in the preparations for the reception
of his family. He desires to be remem-
bered in the kindest manner to you, to
mother, and the children.

207. With devout wishes that your
afflictions may soon be lessened, and
your patient endurance in some degree
rewarded, I am,

Dearest of friends,
Your affectionate husband,
Epwarp JoHnson-



208. In about a fortnight after this
letfr was written, Mr. Johnson and
Capt. Warner set out to return for their
families, to come and take possession of
the snug log houses they had built. ‘They
concluded to return through the state of
Pennsylvania, which is about the same
distance, as the way they went.

209. The first large city they came to,
was Pittsburgh, at the head of the Ohio
river. This place is very remarkable for
the mines of pit-coal, found in all the
hills around it, so that the article costs





mipareypnyer Att, page 75,



76 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

212. The different kinds of beasts,
birds, fishes, reptiles or creeping things,
and insects, are here preserved so as to
look as natural as possible, for visiters to
examine. The skins of the beasts, such
as lions, tigers, and others, are stuffed so
as to appear in the right size and shape.
Snakes and other reptiles, either have
their skins stuffed, or are preserved in
glass bottles in spirits.

213. There are vast numbers of min-
eral or fossil productions, such as ores
of platina, silver, gold, iron, copper, tin,
zinc, and other metals ; specimens of dif-
ferent rocks; various kinds of jewels or
precious stones; and sea shells, and
corals, Indian dresses, ornaments, and
war implements, in astonishing variety.
In one of the rooms they saw the skele-
ton of the mammoth, the largest land
animal which has been known; but of
which none are now living.

214. Mr. Johnson and Capt. Warner,
would have been glad to stay longer in

the different productions of nature, by the best attainable
models.



THER HAPPY FAMILY. 7

this large. and pleasant city ; but: they
were-on important business, which must
not be neglected, and were very anxious
to get back to their families, after so
long an absence.

215. From Philadelphia, they passed
up the Delaware river to Trenton, in
New Jersey, and from thence, by way
of Princeton, and New-Brunswick, to
New York.

216. ‘They made a very short stay in
this city, for as they came near their
families, the thought of seeing them
again, rose above every thing else. ‘They
made their way with urgent speed, to
their long left, and much desired homes.

217. It would not be possible to de-
scribe the scene of joy, when they re-
turned and found their farnilies all in very
good health. The sensible Mrs. Roberts,
Mrs. Johnson, and the rest, seemed as
happy as people could well be.

218. It was early in the evening, when
Mr. Johnson came to his house; and, if
some of the little readers who peruse this
book could have been there, at that time,



73 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

they would have shed tears of joy, to see
these children, all at once, clinging to their
beloved father, on his return, when he
had been gone all summer from them.

CHAPTER V.
The Removal to the Westward.

“ Though long of winds and waves the sport,
Condemmed in poverty to roam;
Soon you shall find a sheltering port,
‘A quiet home.”

219. Tuoven Mr. Johnson’s return
was so very welcome to his friends, he
had not come to a place of rest. It was
necessary to prepare, as soon as possible,
for the arduous journey he had now to

rform.

220. Much was to be done for this
purpose : and this was rendered far more
difficult, from the circumstance, that it
would be attended with expense, which
he was but ill able to meet. He stil]



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 79

owed money, and had no present. means
of paying. ‘From this cause he met with
some serious trouble, and dreaded more.

221. Mrs. Johnson sufféred very much
in her feelings, not knowing but that they
might still be wholly unable to go: and

if the: ey were delayed till late in the fall,
as they imight possibly be, then. their
going would be distressing indeed.

222. They had some very good friends,
and, at such a time as this, they needed
them. Among the ladies of Mrs. John-
son’s acquaintance, were several who
treated her with more attention and re-
spect, than they had when she was in the
most prosperous situation ; and this gen-
erous conduct, at such a time, was very
soothing to her feelings.

223. ‘The good Mr. Sherman and his
wife came a number of times, to sec
them, and manifested great interest in
their welfare ; and there was a worthy
man, by the name of Parker, who acted
the part of a very firm and generous
friend.

224. Several others were bitterly op



80 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

posed to this excellent family, and willing
to do them all the harm they could;
without seeming to know or care why
they did so.

225. There 1s a mean spirit in some

ersons, which makes them wish to do
Rurt to any of those who meet-with ill-
fortune, and to slander all who have been
slandered before. These persons were
enemies to Mr. Johnson, not because he
had injured them, but because they had
injured him.

226. Under these mingled circum-
stances, pleasing and vexatious, the fam-
ily made arrangements, as fast as possi-
ble, for the great undertaking beforethem.
If they met with ill treatment, they made
it their rule to pass on and not mind it ;
but took care to remember those who
did them favours.

227. Numerous objects pressed upon
their attention, as the time of moving
approached. They frequently consulted
with Capt. Warner, upon the plans
which it would be proper to adopt.

228. Many things, much wanted for



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 81

such a journey, they were obliged to do
without, because they were not able to
purchase them, having barely the means
for buying those articles which ‘were
most urgently needed; for, though they
had friends who ‘sincerely wished them.
well, and felt concerned for them; yet
these friends had not :cash to spare, as
they had large families of their own to
provide for

229. Difficult as this moving was, it
was necessary to be performed. 'They
expected to be a whole month on the
road ; such a journey would be quite ex-
pensive, and they were by no means well
prepared. The children knew but little
about the trouble of mind which their
parents endured.

230. They were delighted at- the
thought of going to a new country, and
promised themselves great pleasure, in
the various scenes they were expectin;
to witness. They appeared to. thin'
that the weather would be fair, and the
travelling, all the way, quite pleasant ;
but the older persons expected that



82 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

storms would come, and: some part of
the road would’ be very muddy and
rough.

231. Mr. Johnson and Capt. Warner,
had each a wagon prepared, covered
with- painted cloth, thick ‘with oil, and
supported by green walnut hoop poles,
bent over the top,:in bows, so'as to form
a suitable arch to keep off the'rain. Mr.
Johnson’s family were chiefly ‘anxious to
provide, ‘as far as they .could, for the
comfort - of the good ‘old lady their
honored mother.

232. Mrs.’ Johnson, in the worst of
timés, had -found the means of doing
good to others ; and that afforded her a

leasure which she was fitted ‘ina high

legree to. enjoy.. One circumstance of
this kind, which engaged her attention,
was the situation of three children, who
lived near her, two little girls, and their
younger brother, only four years old.

233. These children had lost their
mother; they were not very well taken
care of, and Mrs. Johnson pitied them
so much, that she used to go and see



‘'THE HAPPY FAMILY. 83

thern; and frequently had them come to
her house, that she might give them. good.
advice, and assist in thei learning.

234. Julia also used to teach them,
according to the directions which her
mother gave. The oldest of these chil-
dren named Jane, was an uncommonly:
sensible little girl, for her age, and talked
remarkably well about the conduct which
children ought to practise.

235. She was, at this time, about
seven years old; she used to. do what
she could to assist her sister and bro-
ther, and set them an example in good
behavior. They were all three very af-
fectionate to each other; and such a
lady as Mrs. Johnson, could not fail to
have the kindest regard for them.

236. In a little time, they grew so
fond of her, that they could hardly have
loved her better, if she had been their
own mother. She used to call them her
little pets.

237. They loved, very dearly loved,
to stand or sit by her, and listen, and
watch her pleasant smiles. while she



84 ‘THE HAPPY: FAMILY.

talked with them about a thousand things
which they wanted to hear, and that
children ought ‘to have ‘such a sensible
woman to tel] them.

238.. As the time of moving drew near,
the hurry of preparation increased. ‘The
weather, though warm, was. very fine,
and the family got-along better than they
expected. The day and evening before
they were to start, was chiefly occupied
in packing and arranging the things, they
were to carry.

239. These articles, indeed, were but
few, for two reasons : one was, that, at
this time, they had but little; and the
other, that it would have been too ex-

ensive to transport much to such a
tance.

240. Many neighbors 2nd acquaint-
ances, called during the day, to bid them
farewell, not knowing when they should
see them again; and among others, Mr.
Sherman and his wife were there, the
chief part of the afternoon, and lent them
all the assistance they could, in the pre-

paration.



‘THE HAPPY FAMILYs 85

241 Mrs. Johnson was much affected,
at parting with some of the ladies, those
whom she had known, from the time of.
her childhood, and who had been steady
generous friends ; but she had made up
her mind to meet, in as: resolute a man-
ner as she could, whatever might take
place.

242. The children, too, had an inter-
esting time in bidding farewell to a num-
ber that. they loved very much, and whom
they did. not expect, for a long time, to
see again. *

243. Capt. Warner was to start, very
early in the morning, with his family,
coming by way of Mr. Johnson’s, and
then they ‘were all to go on together.

244, ‘The morning came; the break-
fast. was over; and Capt. Warner’s
‘wagon, was seen coming at a distance.
Many neighbors were present, and the
moment of departure was nearly ar-
rived. -

245. 'The three pets were seen coming,
on the run, the two girls leading their
little brother by the hands. Mrs. John-



86 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY:

son, was much agitated on seeing them,
and the tears dropped, in quick succes-
sion, down her cheeks.

246. Asthey came up, Jane, the oldest
one, said, in a sweet voice of affection
and grief, “You are all the mother we
have; and you are goingaway!” “Yes,
my dear 3” said Mrs. Johnson. “Shall
now come back next year?” “I don’t

ye my child.”

26, said Jane, “you'll never
ome and the children cried, as if their
little hearts would break. . The company
were much affected. Mrs. Johnson
pressed the children to her bosom, for
some time, without speaking.

248. At last she said, while the tears
were streaming down her cheeks, “ Dear
‘little imocents! Try to do well, and the
good people will love you; and I hope
that God will bless you, and guard you
from danger, and give you wisdom from
above, and bless you for ever, where
there is no trouble, and children are not
parted from their friends.”

249. Some ladies stepped forward,



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 87

and said that they would see that these.
iittle orphans were kindly attended_to:
and the worthy family, fondly recalling
the past, and bidding ‘an unwilling fare-
well to their friends, started for their far
distant homes.

250. It was a delightful morning, and
the children were in high glee when they
had got along a little distance on the
way. The roads were somewhat dry
and dusty; but that was a trifle which
they did not regard.

251. Capt. Warmer had been about
four years a widower, and his main de-

mdence for keeping his house, was on

is oldest daughter, now about :fifteen.
She was naturally a very lively; interest-
ing girl, and much attaclied to her friends,
but was possessed of very good sense:
and seeing the situation in which her
much respected father and the family
were placed, determined to do every thing
in her power for their credit and com-
fort.

252. ‘Though she was obliged to deny
herself many of the enjoyments which at

9



88 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

her age, would havé been very delightful.
yet she conformed, with the utmost
cheerfulness, to what seemed to be her
duty, situated as she was.

253. The kind and skilful manner,-in
which she took care of the younger chil-
dren, and managed the affairs of the
house, drew forth the admiration of those *
who know, truly, how to judge what it
is that makes one girl better than an
other.

254. She did not neglect her learning
but drew the best books from the town
library, and improved herself, at such
times of leisure as she could get. Mrs.
Johnson, had the highest esteem for this
young lady : for so she ought to be called ;
and it was one of the pleasant circum-
stances now, that Cornelia Warner could
be almost constantly near such a friend.

255. Capt. Warner’s other children
were Samuel, Eunice, Benjamin, and
Susan. They were not very remarkable
in their character, any way. They made
it their aim, to conduct themselves well,
and commonly did so, but had not always



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY: 89

honor and judgment enough to keep out
of mischief when they were not watched.

265. The excellent Mrs. Roberts, was
at first much dejected, and needed the in-
fluence of her daughter, to soothe her
mind, under the numerous reflections
which crowded upon it. The most try-
ing part was, that, a few miles from
where they started, they passed through
the delightful village, in which they used
to live, where Mrs. Johnson was born,
and brought up, and where her much
loved father, and her grand parents lay
buried.

257. When they stopped, for a little
time, at the place, the people came round
them in a swarm; but the feelings of
these two ladies were so overcome, that
they requested Mr. Johnson to drive on
as soon as possible.

258. They stayed one night on_ the
way at Springfield, a large flourishing
village on the east side of Connecticut
river. The boys took a short time, du-
ring their stay, to look at the armory, at
this place, a very extensive set of work



90 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

shops, and other buildings, belonging to
the. govertiment of the “United Tintes,
for the manufacture of soldiers’ guns.
They had never heared so much noise in
carrying on any kind of business, as is
made by the heavy trip hammers in this
place.

259. They passed over the great
bridge, at this place, in the morning, and
passed along the dusty road, to West-
field, an other pleasant village, a few
miles beyond which they again put up
for the night. They expected to pass
the next night in one of the towns, upon
the green mountains.

260. In their progress the next day,
winding and climbing, as the road went,
among the high rocky hills, they reflected
that every part of the earth appears to
have its ifficulties, and its THessings.
‘The land here is rough, and the winters
long and cold; but the water is very

ure, and the people enjoy remarkable
ealth.

261. The ground, though hard to till,
is excellent for pasture, and the people



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 91

are able to make large quantities of but-
ter and cheese. Our travellers found
themselves much fatigued when night
came ; but, the mountain air was refresh-
ing, and, in the morning, they arose with
the sun, to pursue their destined course.

262. Mr. Johnson and Capt. Warner,
had their wagons so loaded that they
were obliged to walk nearly all the way.
The boys, except Henry, went on foot,
up the hills, and the rest of the way,
would sometimes climb on the wagons
among the goods.

263. James and William, had new
shoes, which were too tight, and their
feet’ were so blistered that, the second
day, they had to ride all the time. James
was lamed so much, that his mother left
his shoes off, and put bandages around
his feet.

264. Little Charlotte, the baby, could
not go alone very well; for she had only
just begun to tottle about the floor, a
few days before they came away. Some-
times she rode in her mother’s lap, and
then, a little while, in her grandmother’s.

o*



92 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

265. Julia carried her a part of the
way, and the rest of the time they fixed
her a little cushioned seat, and held her
upon it. She wanted to look out and
see every thing, as she passed, and seem-
ed as much engaged about ‘the journey,
as any of the company.

266. The girls got out of the wagons,
and walked a part of the way; because
they got quite tired of sitting so long in
the crowded seats. Mrs. Johnson’s task
was a very hard one; for, besides the
unavoidable fatigue of such a journey,
she had great toll and care in attending
to the rest.

267. Mr. Johnson tried, as far as pos-
sible, to relieve her from the trials she
had to endure; but it was not in his
power to make her situation agreeable
as he wished. ‘They had once been very
well off in the world; but were now
quite poor and destitute, and had tc
struggle with great hardships, to get
through this journey.

268. The next day they went down
the western side of the Green mountains,



THE HAPPY FAMILY. 93

into the delightful county of Berkshire,
and passing over Housatonic river, they
came to the handsome village of Pitts-
field.

269. Here they had a fine view of the
lofty Saddle-back mountain, situated
about sixteen miles to the north, and
near the college at Williamstown. A
few miles to the west of this village, they
crossed the line into the state of New
‘York.

270. This was an important event
with the children; for neither of them
had ever been out of the New England
states before. Resting at a pretty good
tavern, for the night, their next day’s

ogress brought them to Greenbush
Rony, opposite the city of Albany.

271. Crossing the Hudson river ina
ferry boat the next morning, they landed
just below a great number of sloops,
lying at the wharves, and found them-
selves at the seat of government, of the
state of New York.

272. Captain Warner and Mr. John-
son stopped here, for a short time, to



94 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

make some inquiries about the markets,
and the boys went to take a look at the
state house, where the men, elected. as-
semble to make laws.

273. They also viewed the large acade-
my of hewn-stone on the hill ; ‘but they
had not time to visit the state arsenal,
half a mile to the north, in which the
guns, swords, drums, and soldiers’ clothes
are laid up, for public use, in case there
should be another war.

274. They soon left Albany, and. a
little past noon, reached Schenectady, an
other city, fourteen miles farther to the
west. While their horses were feeding
here, they went to see the college build-
ings, situated on a rising ground, where
they make a fine appearance, and afford
an extensive view of the Mohawk river
and surrounding country.

275. From here they pursued their
long road to the west, through Utica and
many other very flourishing villages,
nearly in the same direction in which
the grand canal has since been made.

276. The great object of those two



THE HAPPY FAMILY. 95

families now was, if possible, to get to
Jefferson, in the state of Ohio. ‘They
were not going, on a. stupid pilgrimage,
to the tomb of a false prophet; they
were not going, like tyrants, to rob de+
fenceless people of their rights.

277. "theit intention was to seek a
home for themselves, where they might
live by honest means; and, while enjoy-
ing in peace the company of each other,
might, in their humble way, become use-
ful to their fellow beings.

278. As Mr. Johnson’s condition in
life was now different from what it had
once been ; it may be proper to mention
a few particulars which took place with
these people ; because some of the same
things may happen to other families, in
moving so many hundred miles.

279. Captain Warner had a snug little
property; but he was not rich. He es-
teemed Mr. Johnson as a friend and
brother. He had gone as far as, in
reason, he could go, to assist him; and
Mr. Johnson himself, was unwilling that
he should do more.



Full Text


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THE
HAPPY- FAMILY:
on,

SCENES OF AMERICAN LIFE.

DESIGNED



YOR WELL INSTRUCTED CHILDREN OF SEVEN
OLD AND UPWARDS.



BY WILLIAM S. CARDELL.

“Worth makes the man.”

NEW EDITION.





PHILADE MP ura:
URIAH HUNT, 44 NORTH FOURTH STREET.
1853.




Ewrenxp according to the Act of Congress, in the year
1832, by Unrau Howz, in the Clerk’s Office of the District
Court of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.




EXPLANATORY REMARKS,
ADDRESSED TO

PARENTS AND GUARDIANS.

Tuxs work is a humble attempt in that field
which no man worthy of being called an author
is expected to enter, with the anticipation of profit,
or of desirable fame. If such a performance is
noticed with approbation, it is by those, chiefly,
whose feeble voice is not regarded at the tribu-
nals of literary fashion, or not heared at so great a
distance. No work of the kind, with whatever
care or skill it might be executed, is to form the
topic of discourse in a drawing room ; nor, in rich
binding, to become the pride of the book case.
A reviewer, of lofty pretensions, is not to descend
from the reigning productions of the age, to criti-
cise a miniature volume for children. That
would be deemed a childish employment; and

the official judges in the republic of letters would
a S&
6 ADDRESS
not promote their own interest by devoting their
pages to such a theme.

Other motives than those which appear at first
view, must have a share in writing for those who,
where they approve, have no power to confer the
rewards which are commonly sought. Among
the various subjects of human research, few, if
any, involve higher interest than the juvenile mind,
through its gradations of development; and yet
hardly any thing seems to be less understood, in
its most important bearings, or less thought of,
even by those best qualified for the investigation.

Besides the interest which belongs to the early
advancement of intellect, as a subject of philoso-
phic inquiry, there are, in the United States,
many considerations which give it additional im-
portance, in a national view.

It is not now to be made a question whether
our political institutions are right or wrong. Edu-
cation is to be conducted with reference to honour
and usefulness under these institutions as they
are, and to the sentiments on which they depend
for permanent support. In each particular case,
and with regard to the welfare of all, there should
To PARENTS. ?
be a view to this general object. So far as indi-
vidual and domestic happiness are concerned, those
who, inany degree, give direction to the instruction
of children, should bear in mind that it is quite as
necessary to teach the heart as the understanding.
To tell our pupils that they ought to be good, is
a lesson which is easily given ; but, in that didac-
tic form, is not likely to produce a very beneficial
effect; and, often repeated, will tire and disgust.
It is a point of much higher skill to convey, im-
pressively, the requisite instruction; to restrain,
in some degree, the sallies of ill temper ; improve
the judgment and taste, and inspire the love of
what is elevated and good.

Books for children are liable to two prevailing
defects. One, that they present difficulties en-
tirely above their comprehension, and the other,
that they are below all power of salutary influence.
‘There is a very wide difference between being
simple, and being silly, though these ideas are
too often confounded.

Foreign books, of course, are not to be pro.
seribed, nor illiberal sentiments towards foreign
institutions encouraged. At a suitable period, the
8 ADDRESS
writings of European authors may, very properly,
be introduced as sources of instruction : but it is
absurd that they should be made, among our
children, the main standard of feeling and thought.
Parents who take the trouble to examine, can
hardly fail to observe, that extensively as these
juvenile books are multiplied, the far greater part
contain very little American, except occasionally,
in a renewed compilation, the word /2merican, in
a title page.

Some of these works are deserving of very
high praise, and do credit to the British and
French writers who have devoted their talents to
this unobtrusive, but extremely useful employ-
ment: yet, with whatever intrinsic excellence
these transatlantic writings may possess, they
give, in the proportion in which they are here
read, a general wrong direction to the minds of
the young, and to an extent, of which, perhaps,
few persons are aware. ‘They are modelled on
a condition of life, and on prevailing sentiments,
civil, moral, and social, materially varying from
those which American children should early be





taught to cherish.
TO PARENTS. 2

‘This is not the place to dwell at large on the
principles here slightly advanced. ‘The immedi-
ate incitement to the writing of this volume, was
the circumstance of observing a woman in a book-
store, buying-“ something’? for her children to
read. ‘There was a melancholy interest in seeing
a mother, who appeared otherwise respectable,
selecting volumes of falsehood, nonsense, and bad
English, which it would not be easy for malig-
nant design to surpass, as if she had been under the
influence of that necromancy in which she was
unwittingly preparing to instruct her children.
It is not to be expected that persons in general
are to become familiar with this department of
literature, nor to be able, in all instances, to choose
with discretion ; but, how pitiable is the mistake
of that parent who thus, in feelings of tenderness,
infuses poison into the minds of her offspring,
with all their intellectual food.

‘There are mothers, and the number is increasing,
who not only love their children, but manifest
high intelligence in the exercise of maternal af
fection. This, though a very unostentatious is
one of the most interesting exhibitions of human
to ADDRESS TO PARENTS.
nature. ‘Ihe character of the United States, as a
nation, will be high or low, in proportion to the
number of such mothers.

Whether this work has avoided the evils here
alluded to, without falling into others as liable to
objection, is for the public to decide. All the
guaranty which can be offered, is of the negative
kind. No direct aid was received from « Blue
Beard,” or any other giant; nor from a wisard,
or wisard’s pen; nor magic lamp; nor fiddling
cats; nor motherly talking goats. The design
was to make the narrative true to nature, to cor-
rect principles, and the condition of ordinary life.
With all its defects, it is, in substance, but the
plain recital of events which have taken place,
probably in more families than one, and which
are likely to happen in many others. Children
will readily determine whether it pleases them
selves; and sume of their parents can_judge
whether they ought to be pleased with it or not.
wre
HAPPY FAMILY ;

or,

SCENES OF AMERICAN LIFE

CHAPTER I.
The Purposes and Accidents of Life.

“If happiness has not itg seat
And ceritre in the by ys
Bat never canbe bids oe

1. Tue history of Mr. Edward John-
son and his family will explain some of
the scenes which are common in the
varying conditions of human affairs.

3. It must not be supposed that the
members of this family, called happy,
were free, at all times, from trouble; for
earthly happiness is| never complete.
They, like others, had their sorrows ;
and some of the trials through which
they passed were severe. "They were

11
12 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

sensible, and kind: but no human being
is perfect ; and even these excellent peo-
ple had their failings.

3. The enjoyments of this domestic
circle ; the afflictions they felt or feared ;
the fortitude and hope which cheered
their gloomiest hours, will teach us that
happiness does not depend on fine show,
nor on bags of silver and gold; but on
a good temper, a conscience at peace,
and the company of friends deservedly
loved.

4. Some old poets had a wild notion
that there was once a time when whole
nations lived without any kind of work ;
when all were so honest that laws were
useless, and children stood in no need
of gdvice.

5. If there ever was such a state of
things, it was in some other sphere, of
which we have no exact account; and
not in any part of this globe on which
we live. Such a change, if it could take
place, is not suited to the people of our
avorld, as they now are, and would not
make them happy.
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 13

6. That Being, all powerful and good,
who preserves us in life, has certainly
placed us here on earth for some wise
purpose. We ought to find out, as cor-
rectly as we can, what th® purpose is,
and then try, with diligence, to answer
the design for which we were made.
This is what children should think of, in
a serious way.

‘7. All persons wish to be happy: the
greatest happiness is the pleasure of do-
ing good, and it is the duty of all to
make themselves useful, in some way or
other. If it was the general practice for
people to be idle, every thing human
would go to decay.

8. “ Knowledge is power,” said a yery
wise man. To get knowledge then, is
the best means for helping ourselves or
others: and those who are yet too young
to attend to much else, should store their
minds with learning, to prepare for what
is most noble, when they are old enough
to act among men.

9. It is about twelve years since Mr.
Johnson met with a severe loss which

2
14 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

‘ave an important turn to the events of
fis life. He was a native of Massachu-
setts, in which state, till that time, he
had lived, under circumstances of pros-
perous fortum It is proper to explain,
in some degree, the nature of the mis-
fortunes which happened to him.

10. In the different kinds of business
in which men engage, to provide for
themselves and families, many changes
take place, which cause one person to
gain and another to lose.

11. All riches are only the earnings
of working people laid up in some way
or other. aouees are timber, and brick,
stone, metal and glass, brought from the
woods, the clay-pit, quarry, and forge,
put together, with great labor, in the
right shape for people to live in.

12. Persons who have not thought of
such matters would be surprised to find
how many trades are required to furnish
all that is wanted in building a house.
Every part is what*industry produces, i in
some way or other. Dollars and cents
are made of ore, dug from the mine,
‘THE HAPPY



hammered out in fla‘
stamped into coin at the miin

13. The real worth of things is ac-
cording to the importance of their use:
but the price in market es and. falls,
by their being plenty or rare, as they
happen to be easy or difficult to get.

14, Gold would be cheaper than iron,
if there was as much of it; because it
would not answer for so many uses. It
is wisely ordered that the metal neces-
sary, beyond all others, to the wants of
men, exists in most parts of the earth,
while those who hunt or dig for gold,
find that this article is very scarce.

15. It is pleasant to reflect, for a mo-
ment, on the thousand ways in which
our wants are supplied, Farmers and
fishermen, supply us with provisions.
Wool, and cotton, and flax, for clothing,
also come from the farmers. Mechanics,
of different trades, and manufacturers,
work up these materials as they are
wanted for use.

16, It is the merchants’ part to bring
together, from the four quarters of the




16 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

world, such as buyers want, and
keep them for sale. Sailors are employ-
ed to port these goods from one
distant region to another.

17. Some gvrite books, and others

print and bind them. ‘Teachers instruct
us; doctors give us medicine when we
are sick, and the officers of government,
by dealing with foreign nations, and by
bringing rogues to justice, protect honest
men.
18. All these persons help each other,
and it is as if, for binding all their in-
terests snug together, each one furnished
a link of a long and strong chain, with
a hook at. each end, and a swivel in the
middle.

19. One of these trades is as good as
another, if it affords a good profit; for
whatever is honest and useful, is always
honorable in a free country.

20. But if a juggler comes along, and
makes silly children stare and wonder
to see him dance on a rope, balance a
sword upon his nose, or turn a half eagle
into a six cent piece, he is no better than


THB HAPPY FAMILY. 17

a drone in the hive, which eats honey,
without helping to make it: because if
this mountel should swallow twenty
jack knives, or half a peck of live coals,
instead of only cheating blockheads by
retending to do it, all that would be no
Benefit to himself or any body else.

21. When we consider how many dif-
ferent arts and trades are carried on;
how many kinds of dealing and manu-
facture are connected with the safety, or
the wants of men, we do not wonder that
there are thousands of ways to gain or
lose, or meet with accidents.

22. It would not be possible to ex-

lain all these, if a hundred books should

written for that very purpose. A sin-

gle example will give some faint idea of
the whole.

23. There is a very curious kind of
tree which grows to a considerable size,
and is called the logwood tree. The
whole body of this wood is of a deep
brown, or purple color, and the tincture
obtained from boiling the chips, makes a
beautiful stain or dye, for a vast number
18 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

of cloths, and other things, which are
colored with it. >

24. By different ways of preparing this
dye Stuf the color may be changed to
various shades of brown and porple, or

a mixture of copperas, may be turned
to deep black.

25. No body ever saw any trees of
this kind growing in the woods about
here. This article, of such great use, is
brought by sea, from the countries to
the south and west of the if of Mexico.

26. To carry on the business which
belongs to this single thing, one set of
men, with their vessels, must go after
it, another buy and sell it, and the third
work it up in manufactures. This brings
us to consider the nature of trade, in or-
der to understand the misfortunes which
happened to the excellent Mr. Johnson
and his family.

27. Persons who buy goods to dispose
of to others, expect to sell for more than
they give, and this difference in price
makes the profit which they depend on
for their own living; and the owner of a
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 19

factory, who buys cotton in bales, and
has it spun, must get more for the yarn
than he gives for fie cotton, or he loses
all his expense and trouble: but those
who buy or manufacture foods have to:
run the risk of selling em, at such
prices as they can get. There is also
the danger of fire, of thieves, and other
ills, to which human affairs are sub-
jected.

28. Suppose a merchant who deals in
paints and dye stuffs, has a large parcel
of logwood in his store, and there comes
a war: then the ships can not go to get
more, without great danger of being
taken by an enemy. This article, in
that case becomes very scarce.

29. The clothiers and hatters must
have logwood, to color brown and black.
This merchant can then raise his price,
perhaps from two dollars to six, for a
hundred weight. In selling one hundred
tons at that rate, he would gain four
thousand dollars : and thus the same war
which does so much damage to his neigh-
bors, helps to make this one man rich.
20 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

30. Again, suppose the war lasts a
long time, and a trader, at a great ex-
pense, gets a large supply of logwood for
his customers. He expects to sell this
article at a profit; but there suddenly
comes a peace, and whole cargoes of
this wood, newly brought from Cam-
peachy, are offered in market, at a
cheap rate.

31. This merchant must sell as low
as others, or keep a thing which is of no
use to him. Perhaps he gets twenty
dollars a ton, for what cost him sixty.
Such losses on a number of articles
might make him a poor man, and if he
owed money he would not be able to pay
his dents.

32. It happened to Mr. Johnson, not
precisely in this way, but something
much like it, in the year 1815, at the
close of the war with Great Britain.
THE HAPPY FAMILY. ~~ 21

CHAPTER I. 7

Kindred Ties.

“ The little strong embrace —
Of prattling children, twined around his neck,
And ensulons to please him 5 calling forth
‘The fond parental soul.”

33. Mr. Jounson possessed by nature
a pleasing disposition, good talents, and
great fondness for learning. "When
young, he attended the best schools, and
made rapid progress in the different
branches which were taught.

34, From the time he was quite a
child, it was thought, by those who knew
him best, that he would become a man
far above the common cast, for know-
ledge and good character.

35. His good disposition was shown
by many acts of kindness, at this early
period of his life. There was living,
about a mile distant, a boy six years old,
who appeared to have a bright mind,

but by misfortune had never learned his
letters.
22 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

36. Edward Johnson was missing,
one day, and his friends searched a long
time without being able to find him.

37. After much inquiry, and some fear
respecting his safety, it was found that
he had gone with a small book, and a
splinter to point with, to teach the alpha-
bet to the unfortunate boy: for Edward,
who was eight years old, could not bear
the thought that any child should grow
up without knowing how to read and
write.

38. The little boy seemed very anxious
to learn ; and Edward took great pains
to assist him. Mrs. Johnson, seeing her
gon so much in earnest, had this boy in-
vited to her house ; when, finding him a
very smart little fellow, she gave him
good advice, and helped her son to in-
struct him.
$9. Arrangements were soon made to
send him to school, where he became the
best scholar in his class: but Edward
still continued to assist him, as often as

he could.
40. Some rough clownish fellows tried
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 23

to hinder this poor boy from learning.
Whenever they saw him, they used to
set up a laugh, and call him Ned John-
son’s disciple: but Edward’s mother told
them, that if silly people chose to laugh
at them for doing good, she hoped such
a trifling affair, would never drive them
from the right course. In less than a
year the little boy moved away, to a
great distance; and Edward had no
means of hearing from him again.

41. The excellent Edward Johnson
grew up, very much esteemed in the cir-
cle of his acquaintance. Following the
advice of Dr. Franklin, and the stronger
feelings of his own heart, he married,
early in life, Miss Maria Roberts, a
young lady of the.highest merits, then
residing with her parents, a few ntiles
from his own house.

42. Mr. Roberts, Maria’s father, was
the settled minister in the pleasant vil-
lage where he lived; and the meeting
house in which he preached stood so
near his dwelling that the old family
house-keeper could hear the ticking of
24 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

the town clock, and found that the
shadow of the steeple on the 20th of
June, just reached the kitchen door at
four o’clock in the afternoon.

43. Mr. Roberts was a well educated
man, of good sense, and lived that Chris-
tian life which he so eloquently explained
from the pulpit.

44. His wife was a woman of superior
excellence, kind in all the relations of life,
and very careful not to speak evil of
others, without strong cause. Her ad-
vice was generally first asked when
any good thing was to be done among
her acquaintance in the most proper

way.

45. They had three children, two sons
and a daughter. One of the sons died
when a small child: the other appeared
quite promising while young; but, in a
singular and unexpected manner, con-
nected himself with a set of bad com-
panions, and became a very degraded
and wretched being.

46. After all means had been tried to
reclaim him, he got on board a ship, to



‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 25

go to the East Indies, where he lingered
and died on the remote coast of Asia.

47. The suffering which these parents
felt at the conduct of their profligate
son, was in some :degree relieved by the
uncommon excellence of his sister, on
whom all their earthly hopes now rested.
She possessed _a mind and heart of suy
rior order, and her means of instruction
were the best which her parents ceuld
afford.

48. This worthy family were highly
respected’ through the Whole parish.
‘They had _ witnessed some of the ills of
human life; and, attentive to their own
conduct, made large allowance for the
failings of others.

49. Those who knew them were care-
ful not to speak evil of a neighbour in
their presence; and Mr. Johnson, in
seeking a companion for life, followed
the important rule, to choose the dutiful
daughter of a good mother.

50. The parting scene at Mr. Roberts’
was one of much tenderness, when this
daughter left them, to begin keeping

3 ‘
26 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

house for herself. Strongly as her pa-
rents wished for the happiness of this
beloved daughter, it was a painful trial
for them to part with her.

51. Maria, devoteu:.. “> was, in af-
fection and confidence, to her husband,
shed many tears, as she was riding away
from her father’s house, and reflecting,
that though she might often see them
agai, she was not any longer to live at
that parental home, to which she had; till
that time, been indebted for nearly all the
enjoyments of her life.

52. Mr. Johnson noticed her tears,
and readily imagined the cause; but he
chose to leave her, for a little while, to
her own feelings, knowing that if she
could be wanting in grateful attachment
to such a father and mother, she would
be destitute of a charm which he very
highly prized.

53. ‘Though Mr. Johnson’s property
was small, he was prospered in his in-
dustry, and continued to live very hap-
ply with his beloved wife, till they were

essed with four sons and three daugh-
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 2

ters, active, kind hearted, fond. of their
books, as children of bright minds are,
and quite forward in learning for their
age. Their names were George, Wil-
liam, Julia, James, Emma, Henry, and
Charlotte.

54, The delight which this agreeable
family enjoyed was promoted, not only.
by the respect which the children, gener-
ally, paid to their nts, but by their
affection for each other.

55. Great pains were taken to make
them understand that, for then Byes: and
for every blessing, they dey on an
“All-secing God; and te have thom very
careful, when alone, to do nothing, but
what this Divine Being, their parents, and
their own conscience, would approve:
because, when people do wrong, it brings
a feeling of guilt, and shame, and slavish
fear; and then they cannot be happy: be-
sides they are liable, in many ways, to
be punished for their misdeeds.

56. Among other things, very particu-
lar care was taken, in Mr. Johnson’s
family, to teach a sacred regard for
28 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

truth, as the foundation of almost every
thing which is praiseworthy in human
character.

57. Their mother called the children
to stand by her, while she feelingly ex-
plained to them the virtue of truth. She
told them of the excellent people we read
of, who would not be guilty of a base
falsehood to save their lives; who feared
their God, and feared to do wrong; but
knew no other fear.

58. It may seem strange, to some,
that, after all the care taken with these
favoured children, they should, on any
occasion, wilfully depart from what they
knew to be right, and put their parents
and themselves to shame; yet so the
fact was.

59. In one instance, James had done
a piece of roguery, not of a very serious
kind, and which was of only trifling con-
sequ: "ce, if he had been honest enough
too «4 the truth: but, to his sorrow, he
undertook to deceive his father.

60. Mr. Johnson suspecting how the
affair might be, took pains to find out
THE HAPPY FAMILY. 29

the whole in a very particular manner,
before he said a word to James about it,
on purpose to see whethg, his son would
deny it, and resort to dé tion, in the
vain hope of clearing himself.

61. is little boy had not the least
idea that his father knew all about the
matter ; and supposed that if he denied
it, when he was asked to tell how it was,
he should then get clear. He made a
gross misstatement at the very begin-
ning, and then told a number of other
crooked stories, in order to get along, if
possible, and not be detected.

62. Mr. Johnson at last told James to
stop where he was: for he had said a
great deal too much. The poor boy’s
guilt and shame were such that he knew
not how to act, when he heard his father
state,the circumstances, just as they had
happened, and found that this exelent
parent, who looked with horror @..on a
falsehood, knew the full extent of his
son’s guilt.

63. Mr. Johnson talked in a very sen-
sible manner to James, upon the mean-

3°
30 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

ness and wickedness of ‘such a practice.
‘This. good father knew very well that
children are apggto be thoughtless, and do
many things *Mich they should not, even
where they lave ho wicked intention.

64. As long.as a child will own the
truth, and try to do better, there is hope
of him ; atid almost any thing else may
bemore soy overlooked than the prac-
tice of |

65. Mr. Fohnson left his son to his own
reflections, till the next morning. James
slept but little that night. He felt con-
fused at looking his mother in the face ;
and _ when called into the room with
his father, the next morning, his mortifi-
cation was extreme. No one was pre-
sent, except these two, nor is it known
what punishment James received; but,
whatever it was, he appeared neygr to
forget it.

66. Mrs. Johnson was a woman of
uncommon excellence, and _ possessed
great skill in giving instruction to her
children. She used to say, that a large
part of the trouble, in most families,
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 31

proceeds from their own ignorance, or ill
nature, or both. It is a blessing beyond
all price for children to have the teaching
of such a mother.

67. Several years had passed on, in a
very agreeable’ manner, with this family,
so united in affection and respect. No-
thing serious took place to disturb their
felicity, till they were called to endure a
very painful trial in the death of Mr.
Roberts.

68. Mrs. Johnson was with her excel-
lent, and much honored father, during
the chief part of his sickness, which was
but a few days. All which the best of
wives, a most dutiful daughter, and kind
friends could do, was done, to sooth his
pains, and supply his wants.

69. 'The parting with this parent was,
to Mrs. Johnson, a most deeply affecting
sce His life had been the pattern of
what's excellent in human conduct: he
died as the good man dies; and his last
expressions to his friends were the words
of peace and hope.

70. Mrs. Johnson spent as much time


DEATH OF NR, ROBERTS, page 51
32 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

with her widowed mother as she could,
without improper neglect of her own
family: and, in the bereaved situation of
this good parent, the attentions of such
a daughter were better than any other
earthly comfort.

CHAPTER III.
The Fortitude of a Christian.

“They hear, amidst their afflictions, that small voice,
which says, ‘Fear not; for I am with thee.”

71. Mr. Jonnson had been for some
time engaged in a factory, which it was
thought would afford a large profit. He
wished to carry on this business in the
best manner, and was at much e@ense
to prepare for the purpose.

72. He did much also to make his
house convenient for the family ; for he
had no intention of moving from it, while
he lived. The profits began to come in




MB, JORNSON'S TAOTORY, page 52.
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 33

quite as fast as had been expected ; and.
after laboring hard to place his affairs in
a prosperous condition, it now appeared
that he might look forward to a hand-
some reward for his toil.

73. He was not very covetous of
riches for himself; but wished to provide
for his family, to educate them well, and
to put them in situations to e1 re in
good business for themselves, when the
proper time of life should arrive.

‘74, All human affairs are uncertain ;
and Mr. Johnson’s plans, though they
seemed fair and .good, turned out very
badly indeed. ‘The news came that the
war was at an end; and though it is much
the best to have peace, yet it came in a
very bad time for Mr. Johnson.

’ 75. Almost every kind of business
took a new turn. The cotton in bales
greweso dear, the yarn and wove cloth
so cheap, that it was not possible to
carry on the factory to any advantage.
He had to sell all his goods at a very low
price, or not sell them at all.

5. He trusted some people who did

4


34 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

not pay him; some failed and could not

-y 3 others died, and he lost the debus.

ie was obliged to sell the factory for a
quarter. of what it cost 3 and so numer-
ous and great were his losses, in different
ways, that he was not able to pay the
money he owed.

‘77. Then his creditors sued him, and
he was forced to pay large bills of cost.
Still he tried to keep every thing as near
right as he could; and ‘his sons, though
they were young, made the best exertions
in their power.to help him.

78. ith all their efforts, the difficul-
ties increased. To make the matter
worse, there were persons who had plans
of self interest against Mr. Johnson, ex-
pecting to gain by what he lost, and re-
joiced at his downfal. The house, the
little farm, the garden, which the whole
family had taken great pains to ntake ;
the horse and cow, every thing was to be
sold.

79. Mr. Johnson was a man of un-
common fortitude, and could bear almost
any trial for himself; but was so attach-

‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 35

ed to his family, that it greatly affected
him to think of their being reduced to
keen distress.

80. At this critical time, his daughter
Emma, a lovely little girl, five years old,
was taken very sick. Mrs. Johnson her-
self, at this time, was not in good health.
Her troubles, and anxious watching, af
fected her still more. It appeared that
she must sink under so many trials ; but
her greatest sufferings had not yet ar-
rived.

81. Mr. Johnson, in addition to the
cares which perplexed his mind, had been
exposed to great fatigue... He was taken
with an inflammation on his lungs, and
the doctor considered his disorder a very
dangerous one.

82. He lay sick in one room, and
Emma in another, and Mrs. Johnson, by
turns, spent what time she could with
each. Though distressfully pained at the
thought that one or both would be taken
from her, she used all her efforts to cheer
and encourage them, and provide for
their warits.

4
36 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

83. When she could no longer support
her troubles, she went alone to another
room. ‘There is one Being, who, though
unseen, knows all the sorrows of his
faithful children. To this Divine Friend
she opened her whole heart.

84. She begged that, in mercy, her be-
loved. husband and her child, might be
spared ; or that she might be resigned to
whatever lot an all wise Providence had
destined for her : and, when prayers and
tears had relieved her burdened mind,
she went back, with a look of patience,
to the bed-sides of her husband and
child.

85. No children of the same age, would
have exceeded George and William and.
Julia, in dutiful attention to their parents.
James, and even little Henry showed
much concern for his father and sister.
The neighbors manifested great kindness,
on seeing this very worthy family reduced
to such distress.

86. In a few days, Mr. Johnson began
to grow better; but it was not expected
that Emma would live. The thought of
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 37

losing this sweet, kind hearted little child,
was very painful to the whole family ; for
now, when so sick, she seemed more en-
dearecd to them than ever. She was
very patient, and took such medicines as
were given her, without making the least
complaint.

87. The next week, a constable was
sent to take the furniture from the house.
Charlotte, the youngest child, was, at
this time, a babe of four months old, and
Henry, a smart little fellow, of two years
and a half.

88. Among other things, the baby’s
cradle, that all the children, one after an
other, had been rocked in, was taken
away. Mr. Johnson had become so well
as to engage in trying to arrange his af-
fairs, in some degree, and was gone from
home, when the furniture was removed.

89. Mrs. Johnson’s situation, as may
well be supposed, was one which must
severely attect the feelings of a tender
mother and wife. Though her fortitude
and patience were great, her mind was
weighed down with trouble as she looked
38 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

about the empty house, and thought of
her children.

90. She went to her own room, and
Julia saw her put a handkerchief to her
eyes, as she passed through the door.
She remained there till the children ran
to tell her their father was coming. A
man whom he had seen by the way, had
informed him what was done. at the
house.

91. Mrs. Johnson met him at the door,
with the sweetest smile, and said, « my
dear, I am very glad to see you; but you
appear quite fatigued and unhappy.”

est of women,” said he, “ how can I
be happy, while I see you and our dear
children in your present situation ?”

92. «O, my dear husband,” said she,
“it does not become us to be depressed.
We must not forget that there is a high-
er Wisdom than ours, which governs all
events. Instead of repining, let us be
thankful for the blessings we enjoy. T
have some very good news to tell you.
Our dear Emma is much better, and we
think will soon be well.”
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 39

93. “ My precious wife,” said he «I
am indeed thankful that our child is pre-
served; but I must painfully feel the
destitute condition in which you are
placed. Instead of kindly cheering others,
you have great need of comfort.”

94. “Let us drop that subject, my
dear,” said she: “ our happiness depends
on something better than the walls of this
house, or the tables and chairs it may
contain. If we are blest with health, our
own industry will provide for our wants.”

95. George -and William said they
could work, and help their parents. All
the children seemed to catch the spirit,
and wanted to do something to relieve
the difficulty. Even little Henry, though
too young to know what the matter was,
got the idea, that assistance was needed,
in some way or other, and said he could
help them pare apples to make pies.

96. There is nothing on earth like the
tender and refined attachment between
a mother and daughter, when they both
possess good sense, and affectionate
hearts. ‘This attachment, far from being


40 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

weakened, is often much increased, by
severe afflictions, which tend to ripen the
mind, as the changes of weather serve to
mellow the choicest of fruits.

97. It is the nature of most created
beings to love and seek their own kind.
“ As, in water, face answereth to face,
so is the heart of man to man ;” -and,
though people, in the decline of life, may
be surrounded by good neighbours, they
feel the need of more endearing ties.

98, The excellent Mrs. Roberts found
her situation very lonely, after the death
of her husband. “ Mrs. Johnson was all
to her: all that she now had in this
world, to any great degree, to enjoy, or
to hope. :

99. When she heared that this beloved
daughter was in deep trouble, she desired
still more to be with her ; and it was the
strong wish of both, that some way might
be provided for them to pass their re-
maining days together.

100. Mr. Johnson’s disappointments
continued to increase. Some, who had
pretended to be his friends, and for whom
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 41

he had done much, turned against him,
when they found he was in trouble.

101. These base people did not appear
to thank him, or give credit for all he
had done; but now, because he had
failed of success, were ready to say, he
was neither sensible nor honest. Instead
of coming to him with their smiles and
bows, as they used to do, they kept at a
distance.

102. Among all the evils which atten-
ded Mr. Johnson in his bad fortune, he
had this one advantage: No deceivers
hung around him with false professions
of esteem; and he learned, much better
than he knew before, who were his real
friends. A few of these excellent persons
remained firm in their respect for this
worthy man, and defended his character
when he was slandered by wicked and
low minded people.

103. Among the evils which happened
to this family during their troubles, some
pleasant events also took place. One, in
particular, deserves to be mentioned, as
an instance of gratitude. Mr. Sherman,


42 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

a plain good farmer, lived about five
miles from Mr. Johnson’s.

104. This man and his wife, came in
a waggon the next day after the fur-
niture was taken. They saw Mrs. John-
son; but her husband had gone with the
sheriff, to attend to some urgent business.

105. Mrs. Sherman said they had
come to let Mrs. Johnson know how sor-
ry they were that the factory had stop-
ped; and they should be giad to show
their friendship for the family, by any
means in their power.

106. Mrs. Johnson said she felt very
grateful for their kindness; but hoped
such arrangements would be made, as,
with proper industry, would enable the
family to supply their wants; ~and she
should be unwilling to trouble those who
had never received any favour from her,
and whom she had no means of repaying.

107. “O,” said the good woman, “we
owe every thing to your father and mo-
ther. When we were just married, and
beginning the world for ourselves, poor
and destitute, they advised and helped us
THE HAPPY FAMILY. 43

in the kindest manner, or we could not
have got along as we did.”

108. “Now,” said Mrs. Sherman, “we
have a good farm, all paid for, we can-
not see you in want of friends, and true
friends too ; and so we came to see if:
you will accept the offer of such assist-
ance as we can afford.”—“ Here are fif-
ty dollars,” said Mr. Sherman; “if you
don’t like to take it as a free gift, you
may pay it to me when you can, as well
as not.”

109. Mrs. Johnson did not intend at
first to take the fifty dollars; but the good
man and his wife were both so affected
that they shed tears; and she saw thei
feelings would be hurt if she refused:
They said, “we do not pretend to be very
fine people ; but when others do us fa-
vours, we don’t mean to forget them.”

110. It was some time before Emma
became entirely well. She was such a
lovely little girl, that the family had
been much distressed at her sickness,
and were rejoiced to see her pleasant and
lively at play, as before.

5
44 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

111. It was Mr. Johnson’s happiness
to have one man who was like a brother
to. him. This was Capt. Ezra Warner.
This gentleman had never been much
heard of in public life ; but very few, in
the same circle of acquaintance, pos-
sessed so much private worth.

112. He had not the means of going
through a course of studies at a college,
and was not a very great scholar ; but,by
diligent attention, at common schools,
and otherwise, obtained a better educa-
tion than many who have much more
done for them, but do very little for
themselves.

113. Capt. Warner was not readily
inclined to change his opinions, or his
conduct. He would never believe in new
plans, till it plainly appeared to him they
were good. He wore his hair long, and
wound with a ribband, in a cue, down
his back, because his father, and others
in the war of the revolution, had worn
their’s in the same way, when he was a

sy.
114. He was strongly attached to the
THR HAPPY FAMILY. cd

good of the country, and icularly: to
the state in which he lived, It was). his
firm opinion, that, all things considered,
his own state, as he used-to call it, was
the best in the union; but he hoped that,
whatever good things the people of that
state might do besides, they would never
neglect the catching of whales in. the
South sea, and of codfish on the. banks
of Newfoundland; because this business
had done very much to: aid the, United
States.

115. Among his neighbors,Capt. War
mer was honest, noble minded, and a
strict lover of truth; never known to de-
ceive, by pretending to be a friend, with-
out meaning what he said.

116. When Mr. Johnson’s furniture and.
other property was taken away, this man
came with his two sons, driving a-cow,
and with a load of hay ona cart. He
said he wanted Mr. Johnson’s family to
fodder his cow, and have her milked du-
ring the winter, to save him the trouble.

117. When any of Mrs. Johnson’s
friends came to see her, she apy
46 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

cheerful, and received them as if nothing
unpleasant had happened. She set be-
fore them the best she had to offer, and
made neither complaint, nor useless
apology. Persons of good sense admired
her intelligent mind, and the manner in
which she conducted the affairs of the
house, in the circumstances in which she
was placed.

118. There was but one thing“which
seemed to disturb her feelings, so as to
have it plainly perceived. That was
the ill will of some designing persons
in slandering her husband, by hinting
that he had done wrong, instead of say-
ing, what was the truth, that his bad for-
tune was such, as no one could foresee
or avoid.

119. She considered the loss of pro-
perty as sometimes severe, especially to
such as are sick, or unable to take care
of themselves; but not, by any means,
the greatest evil of life. What would our
sufferings be, she said one day, to a lady,
if we had tippling, ignorant husbands and
bad children ?
THE HAPPY FAMILY. aT

CHAPTER Iv.

The ‘Search for a New Residence.

“The world has nothing to bestow,
‘From our own selves our joys must flow,
‘And that dear hut our home.”

120. As the spring approached, Mr.
Johnson began to reflect, that there was
Ro prospect of his succeeding to his mind

at place, and that he must prepare
to move out of the state. He conversed
with his wife, and had the satisfaction to
find, that her opinions agreed with his
own.

121. He also consulted his _ friend,
Capt. Warner, who, though opposed to
the project at first, began to be more fa+
vorably inclined. After reflecting a while,
and talking with other neighbors, Cap-
tain Warner learned that he could sell
his own farm, which was small, for a very
food price ; and the thought came into

is head, that if he could suit himself .i in
5°
48 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

the new country, it would be better for
bis family, than to remain where he
was.

122. It seemed like a fearful under-
taking for Mrs. Johnson; but she was

fectly willing to make the attempt.

e said to her husband, “ it will require
avery great exertion, my dear, in our
situation, to remove our family into the
woods, and get through the hardships of
the first year; and especially for our
mother, at her advanced age ; but, if we
should be enabled to accomplish so much,
we should afterwards have a prospect of
a home for ourselves and children.

123. “It is needless, my dear,” she
said, to struggle here with difficulties
which we cannot overcome. In an old
settled place, like this, it is very hard
for a man, when he gets down, to rise
again, while so many are striving against

im.

124. Mr. Johnson was much pleased
to find that his wife had so much forti-
tude on this subject. After consulting
again with Capt. Warner, it was finally
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 49

that they two would take a-jour-
ney together, to the western states; arid
if they liked the country as well as they
expected, to move their families some-
‘where beyond the Allegany mountains.

125. They took care to: have their
families placed as well as they could, du-
ring their absence ; and, after a few days
spent in getting ready, they set out. to-
gether, in Capt. Warner’s one’ horse
‘wagon.

126. Capt. Warner, had a small pro-

erty, but not sufficient to enable him to
lay out a very great expense; and Mr.
Johnson was, at this time, very destitute.
For these men, it would be too expensive
to buy their meals at a tavern: so the
laid in a small stock of provisions, to
start with, intending, when these were
gone, to purchase more at the wholesale

rice.

127. They had a ham and loin of veal;
two boiled chickens; and three beef’s
tongues, with two loaves of bread, and a
bag of hard biscuit. They started with
a bushel and a half of oats, for their
50 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

chorse. Thus equipped, they sét out on
this journey, early a Aprils

128. As these two friends pursued
-their journey, they talked over many cir-
cumstances, respecting the changes of
‘human life, the difference between old and
new’ settlements, and the various.sorts of
people, who compose the great family of
man, -

» 129. They spoke of the hardships en-
dured_ by ‘the Tirst white rsons who
settled at Jamestown, and Plymouth, and
the very. different appearance of this
country. now, from PEat it was two
dundréd: years ago.
i130. “Yes,” said Capt. Warner, “very
different from what it was, when indepen-
dence was declared. Then, the noisiest
did not rush forward, to obtajn office for
‘private gain. ‘Those were chosen who
could best fulfil the trust; and,.when
elected, they proceeded as in their con-
sciences they thought best for the public.
They wanted no jockies in the lobbies,
to talk of turnpikes, and bank stock, and
teli them how to cheat honest men.”


‘ALIS OF NIAGABA, page 61,
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. St

131. Mr. Johrison and Capt: Warner
generally walked. up hill, in order to
relieve their horse,-as_ much as pos-
sible, from the fatigue of the wearisome
road.

132. They directed their course west-
ward, into the state of New York, and
up the Mohawk river, towards lake

ie.

133. As they came near the falls of
Niagara, and heared the vast torrent,
sounding louder and louder, as they ad-
vanced, they called to mind the descrip-
tions, given by different writers, of this
stupendous cataract.

134, When they saw the waters of a
thousand rivers, falling in one collected
flood, from the height of a lofty steeple
into the boiling chasm below, and the
rising mist forming rainbows and clouds
in the air, they stood amazed at the
scene, and almost ready to believe that
the earth would be jarred from its place.

135. In silence and wonder, they. view-
ed ascene which has nothing like it on
earth. At such a time, the pride of man
52 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

is humbled. With mingled hope and
fear, he owns that Power who rules the
“fountains of the great deep:” by whose
will nations live or die ; who commands,
and worlds stand forth in their places, or
sink, to rise no more.

136. The two travellers stayed all
night at a tavern in the village; but
found it difficult to sleep, on account of
the terrible roaring of the falls.

137. From this place they directed
their course south-west, along the shore
of lake Erie, till they came to the state
of Ohio. They continued their way,
through various places, making fre-

juent inquiry respecting the price of wild

tind, and whether. those Pie wished
to sell farms, had good title deeds:
such as could be depended on according
to law.

138. They understood, that some land
speculators had sold farms, and taken
py, for them, when this same land be-
longed to other owners. The buyers,
after great disputes and lawsuits, were
forced to leave these lands, and lose
THE HAPPY FAMILY. 52

what they had paid; because they did
not get their deeds from the right men.

139. At a log tavern, where they’stay-
ed over night, they met a number of per-
sons who were much engaged in dis-
coursing upon the quality of land, in dif-
ferent parts of the western country ; and,
among other places, they mentionéd, very
particularly, the town of Jefferson, in the
state of Ohio.

140. This place had very few settlers
in it at that time; but it was remarka-
ble for its situation, and the uncommon
goodness of the soil. The rocks under
ground were chiefly lime, and the timber
a handsome growth of sugar maple,
beech, oak, elm, birch, walnut, butternut,
and wild cherry.

141. Besides these, there were various
other kinds, in less proportions. This
land, it was stated, could be bought at a
cheap rate ; the title was without dispute;
and, by paying a trifling part down, the
settlers, if they had not cash to spare,
could ‘have time to pay the remainder,
when they could raise something to sell

6
at ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

and get it.,..This they could hardly fal
to-do, inai-short :time, it was said, unless
they.-werk very lazy: miulsi ids,
auld. ‘The. chief. part, of the, evening
was takenoups in. speaking, of. the adyan-
tages of a place so.extremely inviting for
those: who, wished to, settle, in. the new
cauntry,. One. of the. men. was'so engar,
ged in describing this delighiful:township,
that he said it seemed to him: ps. much
like the garden.of. Eden,.as any: place in
the:-western. forest could well be. .
» 143.,-Finally, the man told Mr. Jobn-
gon and. Capt.. Warner,.that he owned a.
large: tract .of land there himself, and
that if they, wished to buy.a part. of it he
yould let them have it ata great bar-
gain. :
144. The land was but a few miles off;
and/after considering the matter, it was
concluded, in the morning, to leaye the
ene horse wagon at the public house
where they were, and go, on horse-back,
through the woods, for the strangers to
take a look at the place.

145. Mrs. Johnson continued, in the
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 55.

absence of her husband, to exert herself
to promote the comfort of her honored
snother, and advance the children in their
learning. Her task was a very severe
one; but the dutiful conduct of her chil-
dren, made the situation in which she
was placed, much more pleasant than it
would otherwise have been.

146. She had two letters from Mr.
Johnson, written from different places
where they stopped, and giving an ac-
count of the circumstances which had at-
tended them on the way.

147. In about seven weeks after Mr.
Johnson left his family, they received a
letter from him, dated at Jefferson, in the
state of Ohio. It was brought by an old
acquaintance, who had been to Jefferson,
and had heard Mr. Johnson and Capt.
‘Warner talk over their plans in a par-
ticular manner. This letter informed
them of the following very important
facts.

148. He was in good health, and had
bargained for a hundred acres of wild
land, in a part of the state which, i


56 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

thought, would be cleared and settled
very fast. He expected to move his
family as soon as the suitable prepara-
tions could be made.

149. The farm was well watered : the
soil appeared to be the very first rate, and
‘was thought, by good judges, to equal
the flats on the borders of Connecticut
river. Indeed, there seemed very little
reason to doubt that, when the woods
were cleared off, they should raise as
large crops of wheat, Indian corn, and
other grain, as could well grow upon the
ground.

150. Capt. Warner, and others also,
wrote letters to their friends, in New
England. These men were even more
confident than Mr. Johnson. In some
openings in the woods, where trees were
not thick, the ground, in its natural state,
was covered with beautiful white clover,
and they found thistles of monstrous size,
which are a sign of good land.

151. There was no mill within eight
miles, but plenty of streams of the best
kind, to erect every sort of water m:


THE HAPPY FAMILY. 57

chines, where they were wanted. As to
roads, the people were talking of cutting
a number, in various directions, so that
m a few years, they expected to have
pretty good travelling through the dif-
ferent parts of the town, and the settle-
ments near it. :

152. The farm which Mr. Johnson
had purchased, was bound on the south
by one of the handsomest rivers in the
state. On the east side, a brook of con-
siderable size, ran down_and emptied
into the larger stream. On this brook
was a very suitable fall for building a
saw mill, and where a strong dam could
easily be made.

153. Mr. Johnson had some hopes of
being able to erect a saw mill; and
thought that, perhaps, in three years,
George, if he should live and do well,
would be able to tend it.

154. He was anxious to provide suita-
ble business for all his children ; because
he and Mrs. Johnson both thought, that,
there is hardly any thing worse for
young persons, than to bring them up in

6*
58 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

idleness. If people do not follow any
kind of business for the sake of profit,
they used to say, employment is neces-
sary to health, and the solid enjoyments
of life.

155. Mr. Johnson had made a begin-
ming in clearing his farm, which was all
woods. He had marked out a piece,
twenty four rods long, and twenty rods
wide, making just three acres.

156. He intended, during the summer,
to clear these three acres, and put up a
small log house, so as to move his family,
in‘ the month of September or October.
He had hired a man to assist him in his
work, and it was thought that they could
girdle the trees on five acres more.

157. In order to carry on this labor,
they had_ built a cabin, with stakes and
green poles, covered over with bark, to
make it snug and tight, for keeping off
the rain. Several bundles of straw were
spread on the ground, in this cabin, for
Mr. Johnson and his hired man to
sleep on.

158. They cooked their own food, a
THE HAPPY FAMILY. 59

a fire made against the side of a rock,
where they placed two crotched stakes,
with a pole laid across, to hang on the
dinner pot. Their tramel was a hicory
withe, and they cut a pot-hook from the
limb of a trec.

159. The style of living, in such a
place, was very different from what it is
among fashionable people, in cities and
large towns; but it was necessary for
them to get along as well as they could.
The object was to obtain a home, if it
was a humble one, and attended with
some difficulties.

160. The furniture of these new set-
tlers, though not very costly, was such
as answered their purposes for the time.
It consisted chiefly of a knife, fork, and
spoon, for each person; two trenchers,
and a large wooden platter. For a ta-
ble, they had a stump, of proper size, cut
off level and smooth at the top.

161. Their seats were benches, made
of split logs, bored with auger holes, and
legs put to them. When they had
worked hard from morning till noon,
60 ‘THE HAPPY, FAMILY.

they found the boiJed dinner, from their
stump table, tasted very well. As they
kept a gun loaded, they sometimes killed
wild game of different kinds, and had
fresh meat.

162. Mr. Johnson wrote that he felt
rather lonesome, without his wife and
children; for he never had been away
from them long at a time before ; but he
hoped the period was not far distant,
when he should be able to have them
with him. He felt anxious, for fear they
were not well, or their situation not com-
fortable ; but wished them by no means
to make themselves uneasy about him.

163. He requested Mrs. Johnson to
assure her honoured mother, that it
would be his pleasure to do every thing
in his power to render her happy; and he
hoped the choicest blessings might at-
tend the evening of her life.

164. Mr. Johnson’s greatest fear was
respecting his wife, whom he now loved
more tenderly than ever. He thought
that, in this new scttlement, she would
have to endure uncommon hards


EXPLANATION,

Of the Map of Mr. Edward Johnson's New Farm, in the state of
‘Olixo, land down according to actual survey.

iL

‘

|
>

Pat













Digan

A. Mr. Jokncon's Cabin —®. Cooking Place—2 Place for a Loe
Howse 4" Pisce for 4 School Hionse 3 Sagtaw Qrehart Place for
wiain Road << “Place fara Ste Milles Plabe for aecting Hwee
A" Pilee for Lavee Bridge 10. Captain Watnera cleuring
Place Jor! Cajiain Warnere Nr Houre—t8. Large. Spring 18
Bede to te tite over Mill. brook—¥4. Place for’ Barn and Com

Howes 15, "Pinfish rivulee
e






THE HABPY FAMILY. 63

be deprived of many comforts, which she
had been accustomed to enjoy.

165. On the other hand, it appeared.

to him, that, if they could succeed in get-
ting well settled in Ohio, though*they
should be subject to many privations at
first, there was reason to hope that, in a
short time, they might have a farm and
Rome oftheir own.
166. \He. fhovght, too, that this would
be, better. their children, and_ they
would, he;:morg; likely to-do. well for
themselveg,,,.e, wrote, wary sensibly, and
feelingly, on.all these subjects. »
,/167. In.this elegant. detter, Mr. ohne
son enclosed a, very handsome -mpp:.of.
his farm, as he had: learned: the.art of
survey§ng, when he. was.a'lad at. school.
This ), served, as a picture, to give a
much better idea of the different. ‘parts,
than ifhg had only described them.’ It
answoredotye same purpose as maps of
countriag this was te exbibit-a: si
gle farm, d of a whole dora.or
state. ogee Bl

168. Children who have over received






G4 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

a letter from one of the best of fathers,
when he was more than five hundred
miles, from them, may form some idea
what were the feelings at Mr. Johnson’s,
wher his letter was produced.

169. Mrs. Johnson called the children
around her, to make them understand
how thankful they ought to be, for having
so good a father. She told them that
he was away there in the woods, with
nothing, but a little straw spread on the
ground, to sleep on, and suffering, for
want of the common necessaries of life ;
and it was all to provide a home for them.

170. She hoped they might all be
spared to get to the farm, and become a
great comfort and honor to their con-
nections, by always conducting in such
a manner, as to deserve the esteem of
the wise and good. .

171. Among all this little circle, no
one seemed more deeply interested in
the letter than the excellent Mirs. Roberts.
She now found that,at her time’of life, she
must either move hundreds of miles from
where she had ever been, or be separated
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 65

from her children, with but little pros-
ct of seeing them again in this world.

172. She could not think of p; ing
with her daughter; but said, as Rt of
old said to her dearest friend, “ ere
thou goest, I will go.” -

173. Many of the neighbors inquired
whether Mr. Johnson was suited with
the country where he was ; and whether
he expected to move his family? Some
of those who had tried to drive this good
man away, now threw out their slander-
ous hints that his going there was a very
bad scheme, and his calculations were as
wild as the country where he had gone.

174. A short time after Mr. Johnson’s
letter was received, the following answer
was sent:

175. My dear Husband,

It would be difficult to give you
a correct account of the scene which
your letter produced in our family. The
interest and affection displayed by the
little group, called up every feeling of
tenderness in my bosom. Emma took

”
66 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

notice of the tears which I could not pre-
vent, and, with the most affectionate

swoginess, wiped them from my cheeks.
You seem anxious, my dear, to
knoW how the children are occupied.

George is doing very well at Mr. Scott’s.
William is in school, making fine pro-
gress in his studies; and the younger
children are improving, quite as fast as
could be-expected, by their own exertions,
with such instruction as I am able. to
give them.

177. No change, of any great import-
ance, has taken place here, since you left
us. We have been favored with our
usual share. of health; and, so far, I have
been enabled to get along with less dif-
ficulty than I expected.

178. Since you wish to know particu-
larly how we proceed, I must mention
one circumstance ; and, if the sports of
our children seem trifling, their father,
perhaps, may be diverted with them,
when he is sitting in lonely mood, at the
little cabin, resting from his toil.

179. A few mornings ago, our good




HE HAPPY FAMILY. 67

mother wanted her staff, to take a walk in
the garden. Search was made, in every
part of the house, without finding it, and
there was great wonder where it could be
gone.

180. As it could not be found, James
stepped forward, in avery gallant manner,
and said, “Nevermind the cane, grandmo-
ther ; I intend to be your staff, as long as
you want one. Lean on my shoulder, if
you please.” She was much’gratified with
this proof of his kind disposition ; but still
the mystery remained, what had become
of the staff.

181. At last, it was discovered, to the
great diversion of all, that Henry, being
im _want of a horse, to take a mornin;
ride, had supplied himself with a bark
bridle, and galloped over to Mr. Wil-
son’s on his grandmother’s cane.

182. We feel very much, my dear, the
want of your company. ‘The children
often ask, “ when will fathercome home?”
Do not stay too long in preparing a place;
but allow us the pleasure of assisting in
the work.
68 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

183. The boys are eager to show how
much they can help in clearing the land,
and planting fruit trees. They have laid
up a great variety of seeds, and expect
to eat fine melons, of their own raising,
in Ohio, next summer.

184, They are quite delighted with the

thought of piling logs and brush to burn:
and tending the large bonfires, in the
evenings. Each one has his plan for
helping to subdue the wilderness, and is
impatient to begin the great work.
- 185. Do not suppose that we can
not be happy there. I know, my dear
husband, that your goodness leads
you to neglect your own ease, to pro-
mote the comfort of your family; and
my greatest fear is, that the toil you un-
dergo on our account, may injure your
own health.

186. Hasten to us, my dear, without
spending too much time in preparation,
that we may be able to get removed, as
early in the season as circumstances will
admit.

187. Cornelia Warner has written a
THE HAPPY FAMILY. 69

letter to her father. She is an uncom-
mon girl for her age.

188. Mother and the children all join,
in love to you, and are anxious for yo
return. The little girls want to know if
they cannot have some kisses sent in
this letter.

Your affectionate wife,
Mania Jonnson.

189. After Mr. Johnson got this letter,
he hurried his work as fast as possible,
to put the log-house he was building in
suitable condition for his family to move
into.

190. In order to carry on the business
to better advantage, he and Capt. War-
ner changed work, assisting each other
by turns. In this way they could per-
form the heavy labour to much better
advantage.

191. "The following is the copy of the
Jast letter which Mr. Johnson wrote,
previous to setting out, on his return to
move the family :

7*
~% THE HAPPY FAMILY.

Jefferson, State of Ohio,

Jaly 17, 1816.

192. My Dear Wife,

Your letter delighted me. The
ood. conduct..of the children fills my
eart with the warmest: affection for

them.

193. Their dutiful attention to their
grandmother is, with me, a very import-
ant consideration: unkindness to elderly

ple, I consider an evidence of a bad
isposition, and bad principles.

194. I laughed heartily at the story of
Henry’s morning ride, and hope the time
may ‘come when he will be able to com-
mand a horse of quite a different descrip-
tion. It is my intention, if the boys do
well, to give each of them a colt, to raise

n the farm.

195. This is not a place for much
news, for people do not go into the
woods to establish a printing office. The
chief which can, at present, be said, is

ting what is going to be done, and
which, perhaps, some may think’ will
never take place.
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 1

196. The labour required is indeed
great: but, with health, and the ordinary
blessing of Providence, it can be accom-

lished. It is, as our sons may here
learn, by: diligence and perseverance that
a beaver gnaws down an oak tree.

197. Atany rate, my dear, I must give
you some account of our situation, as it
now is, and of the prospects which direct-
ly present themselves before us. Time,
the great teacher, will soon determine
wlether these designs are to be reali
or not.

198. A number of the neighbor:
calculating to join next spring, and”put

a snug school house ; and Thave told
them, that they may set it at one corner
of our new clearing, in a beautiful grove
of large trees, where there is very little
underbrush, and which the boys at noon
time, may easily cut down and burn. So
our teachers, as well as those of old
Athens, may give instruction in the shade
of a grove.

199. There is, at present, no meeting
house within twelve miles of us; but,
72 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

about thirty or forty persons, old and
young, assemble in a barn, which is the
most convenient building we have for the

urpose.
zs 200. It is three quarters of a mile
from here, and, if there is no regular
preaching, the time is spent in prayer,
and in conversing together of our de-
pendence on Him whose protecting mer-
cy is every where. Frequently some

rson reads a sermon from one of the
best divines and this, at the request*of
our little congregation, I have generally
dong since I came among them.

Ser Tt may seem, my dear Maria, to
the proud votaries of fashion, that this
kind of worship is very humble. It is
so indeed ; but, that of the earliest chris-
tians Was not less so; and, if our meet-
ings are not attended with much splen-
dor, it is hoped they have the merit of
being sincere.

202. For myself, I have never been
more sensible of the power of religion,
than when assembled with these few
ueighbors, here in the woods. My chief
THE HAPPY FAMILY. 73

want, at such times, is to have my dear
family with me. :

203. There is something sublimely
affecting, in the contemplation of our
various relations to a Divine Creator,
and to our fellow beings. The social
feelings are improved by this exercise,
and we then most desire the company of
those we most love.

204. Our new mansion, my dear, is in
a considerable state of forwardness. It
will’not afford the means of what people
in general would call style; but will serve,
I believe, to keep off the rain; and you
will readily suppose we shall be. iho
want of fire wood, where we have’tinsber
enough to build ships for all the navies
of Europe.

205. In a fortnight from this ttme, I
aope to be on my way to join you; so
as to get through with our removal to
this place, as early in the season as pos-
sible. Such an undertaking will require
a great effort on your part; but such an
effort as, I trust, you will not again be
called upon to make.
7 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

206. Capt. Warner is well, and doing
well in the preparations for the reception
of his family. He desires to be remem-
bered in the kindest manner to you, to
mother, and the children.

207. With devout wishes that your
afflictions may soon be lessened, and
your patient endurance in some degree
rewarded, I am,

Dearest of friends,
Your affectionate husband,
Epwarp JoHnson-



208. In about a fortnight after this
letfr was written, Mr. Johnson and
Capt. Warner set out to return for their
families, to come and take possession of
the snug log houses they had built. ‘They
concluded to return through the state of
Pennsylvania, which is about the same
distance, as the way they went.

209. The first large city they came to,
was Pittsburgh, at the head of the Ohio
river. This place is very remarkable for
the mines of pit-coal, found in all the
hills around it, so that the article costs


mipareypnyer Att, page 75,
76 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

212. The different kinds of beasts,
birds, fishes, reptiles or creeping things,
and insects, are here preserved so as to
look as natural as possible, for visiters to
examine. The skins of the beasts, such
as lions, tigers, and others, are stuffed so
as to appear in the right size and shape.
Snakes and other reptiles, either have
their skins stuffed, or are preserved in
glass bottles in spirits.

213. There are vast numbers of min-
eral or fossil productions, such as ores
of platina, silver, gold, iron, copper, tin,
zinc, and other metals ; specimens of dif-
ferent rocks; various kinds of jewels or
precious stones; and sea shells, and
corals, Indian dresses, ornaments, and
war implements, in astonishing variety.
In one of the rooms they saw the skele-
ton of the mammoth, the largest land
animal which has been known; but of
which none are now living.

214. Mr. Johnson and Capt. Warner,
would have been glad to stay longer in

the different productions of nature, by the best attainable
models.
THER HAPPY FAMILY. 7

this large. and pleasant city ; but: they
were-on important business, which must
not be neglected, and were very anxious
to get back to their families, after so
long an absence.

215. From Philadelphia, they passed
up the Delaware river to Trenton, in
New Jersey, and from thence, by way
of Princeton, and New-Brunswick, to
New York.

216. ‘They made a very short stay in
this city, for as they came near their
families, the thought of seeing them
again, rose above every thing else. ‘They
made their way with urgent speed, to
their long left, and much desired homes.

217. It would not be possible to de-
scribe the scene of joy, when they re-
turned and found their farnilies all in very
good health. The sensible Mrs. Roberts,
Mrs. Johnson, and the rest, seemed as
happy as people could well be.

218. It was early in the evening, when
Mr. Johnson came to his house; and, if
some of the little readers who peruse this
book could have been there, at that time,
73 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

they would have shed tears of joy, to see
these children, all at once, clinging to their
beloved father, on his return, when he
had been gone all summer from them.

CHAPTER V.
The Removal to the Westward.

“ Though long of winds and waves the sport,
Condemmed in poverty to roam;
Soon you shall find a sheltering port,
‘A quiet home.”

219. Tuoven Mr. Johnson’s return
was so very welcome to his friends, he
had not come to a place of rest. It was
necessary to prepare, as soon as possible,
for the arduous journey he had now to

rform.

220. Much was to be done for this
purpose : and this was rendered far more
difficult, from the circumstance, that it
would be attended with expense, which
he was but ill able to meet. He stil]
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 79

owed money, and had no present. means
of paying. ‘From this cause he met with
some serious trouble, and dreaded more.

221. Mrs. Johnson sufféred very much
in her feelings, not knowing but that they
might still be wholly unable to go: and

if the: ey were delayed till late in the fall,
as they imight possibly be, then. their
going would be distressing indeed.

222. They had some very good friends,
and, at such a time as this, they needed
them. Among the ladies of Mrs. John-
son’s acquaintance, were several who
treated her with more attention and re-
spect, than they had when she was in the
most prosperous situation ; and this gen-
erous conduct, at such a time, was very
soothing to her feelings.

223. ‘The good Mr. Sherman and his
wife came a number of times, to sec
them, and manifested great interest in
their welfare ; and there was a worthy
man, by the name of Parker, who acted
the part of a very firm and generous
friend.

224. Several others were bitterly op
80 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

posed to this excellent family, and willing
to do them all the harm they could;
without seeming to know or care why
they did so.

225. There 1s a mean spirit in some

ersons, which makes them wish to do
Rurt to any of those who meet-with ill-
fortune, and to slander all who have been
slandered before. These persons were
enemies to Mr. Johnson, not because he
had injured them, but because they had
injured him.

226. Under these mingled circum-
stances, pleasing and vexatious, the fam-
ily made arrangements, as fast as possi-
ble, for the great undertaking beforethem.
If they met with ill treatment, they made
it their rule to pass on and not mind it ;
but took care to remember those who
did them favours.

227. Numerous objects pressed upon
their attention, as the time of moving
approached. They frequently consulted
with Capt. Warner, upon the plans
which it would be proper to adopt.

228. Many things, much wanted for
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 81

such a journey, they were obliged to do
without, because they were not able to
purchase them, having barely the means
for buying those articles which ‘were
most urgently needed; for, though they
had friends who ‘sincerely wished them.
well, and felt concerned for them; yet
these friends had not :cash to spare, as
they had large families of their own to
provide for

229. Difficult as this moving was, it
was necessary to be performed. 'They
expected to be a whole month on the
road ; such a journey would be quite ex-
pensive, and they were by no means well
prepared. The children knew but little
about the trouble of mind which their
parents endured.

230. They were delighted at- the
thought of going to a new country, and
promised themselves great pleasure, in
the various scenes they were expectin;
to witness. They appeared to. thin'
that the weather would be fair, and the
travelling, all the way, quite pleasant ;
but the older persons expected that
82 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

storms would come, and: some part of
the road would’ be very muddy and
rough.

231. Mr. Johnson and Capt. Warner,
had each a wagon prepared, covered
with- painted cloth, thick ‘with oil, and
supported by green walnut hoop poles,
bent over the top,:in bows, so'as to form
a suitable arch to keep off the'rain. Mr.
Johnson’s family were chiefly ‘anxious to
provide, ‘as far as they .could, for the
comfort - of the good ‘old lady their
honored mother.

232. Mrs.’ Johnson, in the worst of
timés, had -found the means of doing
good to others ; and that afforded her a

leasure which she was fitted ‘ina high

legree to. enjoy.. One circumstance of
this kind, which engaged her attention,
was the situation of three children, who
lived near her, two little girls, and their
younger brother, only four years old.

233. These children had lost their
mother; they were not very well taken
care of, and Mrs. Johnson pitied them
so much, that she used to go and see
‘'THE HAPPY FAMILY. 83

thern; and frequently had them come to
her house, that she might give them. good.
advice, and assist in thei learning.

234. Julia also used to teach them,
according to the directions which her
mother gave. The oldest of these chil-
dren named Jane, was an uncommonly:
sensible little girl, for her age, and talked
remarkably well about the conduct which
children ought to practise.

235. She was, at this time, about
seven years old; she used to. do what
she could to assist her sister and bro-
ther, and set them an example in good
behavior. They were all three very af-
fectionate to each other; and such a
lady as Mrs. Johnson, could not fail to
have the kindest regard for them.

236. In a little time, they grew so
fond of her, that they could hardly have
loved her better, if she had been their
own mother. She used to call them her
little pets.

237. They loved, very dearly loved,
to stand or sit by her, and listen, and
watch her pleasant smiles. while she
84 ‘THE HAPPY: FAMILY.

talked with them about a thousand things
which they wanted to hear, and that
children ought ‘to have ‘such a sensible
woman to tel] them.

238.. As the time of moving drew near,
the hurry of preparation increased. ‘The
weather, though warm, was. very fine,
and the family got-along better than they
expected. The day and evening before
they were to start, was chiefly occupied
in packing and arranging the things, they
were to carry.

239. These articles, indeed, were but
few, for two reasons : one was, that, at
this time, they had but little; and the
other, that it would have been too ex-

ensive to transport much to such a
tance.

240. Many neighbors 2nd acquaint-
ances, called during the day, to bid them
farewell, not knowing when they should
see them again; and among others, Mr.
Sherman and his wife were there, the
chief part of the afternoon, and lent them
all the assistance they could, in the pre-

paration.
‘THE HAPPY FAMILYs 85

241 Mrs. Johnson was much affected,
at parting with some of the ladies, those
whom she had known, from the time of.
her childhood, and who had been steady
generous friends ; but she had made up
her mind to meet, in as: resolute a man-
ner as she could, whatever might take
place.

242. The children, too, had an inter-
esting time in bidding farewell to a num-
ber that. they loved very much, and whom
they did. not expect, for a long time, to
see again. *

243. Capt. Warner was to start, very
early in the morning, with his family,
coming by way of Mr. Johnson’s, and
then they ‘were all to go on together.

244, ‘The morning came; the break-
fast. was over; and Capt. Warner’s
‘wagon, was seen coming at a distance.
Many neighbors were present, and the
moment of departure was nearly ar-
rived. -

245. 'The three pets were seen coming,
on the run, the two girls leading their
little brother by the hands. Mrs. John-
86 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY:

son, was much agitated on seeing them,
and the tears dropped, in quick succes-
sion, down her cheeks.

246. Asthey came up, Jane, the oldest
one, said, in a sweet voice of affection
and grief, “You are all the mother we
have; and you are goingaway!” “Yes,
my dear 3” said Mrs. Johnson. “Shall
now come back next year?” “I don’t

ye my child.”

26, said Jane, “you'll never
ome and the children cried, as if their
little hearts would break. . The company
were much affected. Mrs. Johnson
pressed the children to her bosom, for
some time, without speaking.

248. At last she said, while the tears
were streaming down her cheeks, “ Dear
‘little imocents! Try to do well, and the
good people will love you; and I hope
that God will bless you, and guard you
from danger, and give you wisdom from
above, and bless you for ever, where
there is no trouble, and children are not
parted from their friends.”

249. Some ladies stepped forward,
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 87

and said that they would see that these.
iittle orphans were kindly attended_to:
and the worthy family, fondly recalling
the past, and bidding ‘an unwilling fare-
well to their friends, started for their far
distant homes.

250. It was a delightful morning, and
the children were in high glee when they
had got along a little distance on the
way. The roads were somewhat dry
and dusty; but that was a trifle which
they did not regard.

251. Capt. Warmer had been about
four years a widower, and his main de-

mdence for keeping his house, was on

is oldest daughter, now about :fifteen.
She was naturally a very lively; interest-
ing girl, and much attaclied to her friends,
but was possessed of very good sense:
and seeing the situation in which her
much respected father and the family
were placed, determined to do every thing
in her power for their credit and com-
fort.

252. ‘Though she was obliged to deny
herself many of the enjoyments which at

9
88 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

her age, would havé been very delightful.
yet she conformed, with the utmost
cheerfulness, to what seemed to be her
duty, situated as she was.

253. The kind and skilful manner,-in
which she took care of the younger chil-
dren, and managed the affairs of the
house, drew forth the admiration of those *
who know, truly, how to judge what it
is that makes one girl better than an
other.

254. She did not neglect her learning
but drew the best books from the town
library, and improved herself, at such
times of leisure as she could get. Mrs.
Johnson, had the highest esteem for this
young lady : for so she ought to be called ;
and it was one of the pleasant circum-
stances now, that Cornelia Warner could
be almost constantly near such a friend.

255. Capt. Warner’s other children
were Samuel, Eunice, Benjamin, and
Susan. They were not very remarkable
in their character, any way. They made
it their aim, to conduct themselves well,
and commonly did so, but had not always
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY: 89

honor and judgment enough to keep out
of mischief when they were not watched.

265. The excellent Mrs. Roberts, was
at first much dejected, and needed the in-
fluence of her daughter, to soothe her
mind, under the numerous reflections
which crowded upon it. The most try-
ing part was, that, a few miles from
where they started, they passed through
the delightful village, in which they used
to live, where Mrs. Johnson was born,
and brought up, and where her much
loved father, and her grand parents lay
buried.

257. When they stopped, for a little
time, at the place, the people came round
them in a swarm; but the feelings of
these two ladies were so overcome, that
they requested Mr. Johnson to drive on
as soon as possible.

258. They stayed one night on_ the
way at Springfield, a large flourishing
village on the east side of Connecticut
river. The boys took a short time, du-
ring their stay, to look at the armory, at
this place, a very extensive set of work
90 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

shops, and other buildings, belonging to
the. govertiment of the “United Tintes,
for the manufacture of soldiers’ guns.
They had never heared so much noise in
carrying on any kind of business, as is
made by the heavy trip hammers in this
place.

259. They passed over the great
bridge, at this place, in the morning, and
passed along the dusty road, to West-
field, an other pleasant village, a few
miles beyond which they again put up
for the night. They expected to pass
the next night in one of the towns, upon
the green mountains.

260. In their progress the next day,
winding and climbing, as the road went,
among the high rocky hills, they reflected
that every part of the earth appears to
have its ifficulties, and its THessings.
‘The land here is rough, and the winters
long and cold; but the water is very

ure, and the people enjoy remarkable
ealth.

261. The ground, though hard to till,
is excellent for pasture, and the people
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 91

are able to make large quantities of but-
ter and cheese. Our travellers found
themselves much fatigued when night
came ; but, the mountain air was refresh-
ing, and, in the morning, they arose with
the sun, to pursue their destined course.

262. Mr. Johnson and Capt. Warner,
had their wagons so loaded that they
were obliged to walk nearly all the way.
The boys, except Henry, went on foot,
up the hills, and the rest of the way,
would sometimes climb on the wagons
among the goods.

263. James and William, had new
shoes, which were too tight, and their
feet’ were so blistered that, the second
day, they had to ride all the time. James
was lamed so much, that his mother left
his shoes off, and put bandages around
his feet.

264. Little Charlotte, the baby, could
not go alone very well; for she had only
just begun to tottle about the floor, a
few days before they came away. Some-
times she rode in her mother’s lap, and
then, a little while, in her grandmother’s.

o*
92 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

265. Julia carried her a part of the
way, and the rest of the time they fixed
her a little cushioned seat, and held her
upon it. She wanted to look out and
see every thing, as she passed, and seem-
ed as much engaged about ‘the journey,
as any of the company.

266. The girls got out of the wagons,
and walked a part of the way; because
they got quite tired of sitting so long in
the crowded seats. Mrs. Johnson’s task
was a very hard one; for, besides the
unavoidable fatigue of such a journey,
she had great toll and care in attending
to the rest.

267. Mr. Johnson tried, as far as pos-
sible, to relieve her from the trials she
had to endure; but it was not in his
power to make her situation agreeable
as he wished. ‘They had once been very
well off in the world; but were now
quite poor and destitute, and had tc
struggle with great hardships, to get
through this journey.

268. The next day they went down
the western side of the Green mountains,
THE HAPPY FAMILY. 93

into the delightful county of Berkshire,
and passing over Housatonic river, they
came to the handsome village of Pitts-
field.

269. Here they had a fine view of the
lofty Saddle-back mountain, situated
about sixteen miles to the north, and
near the college at Williamstown. A
few miles to the west of this village, they
crossed the line into the state of New
‘York.

270. This was an important event
with the children; for neither of them
had ever been out of the New England
states before. Resting at a pretty good
tavern, for the night, their next day’s

ogress brought them to Greenbush
Rony, opposite the city of Albany.

271. Crossing the Hudson river ina
ferry boat the next morning, they landed
just below a great number of sloops,
lying at the wharves, and found them-
selves at the seat of government, of the
state of New York.

272. Captain Warner and Mr. John-
son stopped here, for a short time, to
94 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

make some inquiries about the markets,
and the boys went to take a look at the
state house, where the men, elected. as-
semble to make laws.

273. They also viewed the large acade-
my of hewn-stone on the hill ; ‘but they
had not time to visit the state arsenal,
half a mile to the north, in which the
guns, swords, drums, and soldiers’ clothes
are laid up, for public use, in case there
should be another war.

274. They soon left Albany, and. a
little past noon, reached Schenectady, an
other city, fourteen miles farther to the
west. While their horses were feeding
here, they went to see the college build-
ings, situated on a rising ground, where
they make a fine appearance, and afford
an extensive view of the Mohawk river
and surrounding country.

275. From here they pursued their
long road to the west, through Utica and
many other very flourishing villages,
nearly in the same direction in which
the grand canal has since been made.

276. The great object of those two
THE HAPPY FAMILY. 95

families now was, if possible, to get to
Jefferson, in the state of Ohio. ‘They
were not going, on a. stupid pilgrimage,
to the tomb of a false prophet; they
were not going, like tyrants, to rob de+
fenceless people of their rights.

277. "theit intention was to seek a
home for themselves, where they might
live by honest means; and, while enjoy-
ing in peace the company of each other,
might, in their humble way, become use-
ful to their fellow beings.

278. As Mr. Johnson’s condition in
life was now different from what it had
once been ; it may be proper to mention
a few particulars which took place with
these people ; because some of the same
things may happen to other families, in
moving so many hundred miles.

279. Captain Warner had a snug little
property; but he was not rich. He es-
teemed Mr. Johnson as a friend and
brother. He had gone as far as, in
reason, he could go, to assist him; and
Mr. Johnson himself, was unwilling that
he should do more.
96 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

» > 280. Mrs. Roberts had a few articles
which they were taking along, and she
had given what little money she could
get; to help as far as it would go. For
a part of the way, the weather and the
roads were good: but it became rainy,
and the mud and water rendered the
travelling extremely unpleasant, particu-
larly for those who had to walk.

281. One of the horses got lame, and
for two days they only gained about
twelve miles, on their road. It was im-
portant that both families should keep
together, that they might put all four
horses to one wagon, when they came to
a difficult place.

282. 'The travelling through the new
part of the country was very bad, as
they had in many places to pass over
long causeways, of poles and logs laid
across the road, to prevent being mired
in the deep mud. In places where there
were no bridges, they had to pass through
streams, and up steep banks, where it
was necessary to unite all their strength.

283. It was not expected that so many
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.. 97

together, could get beds at the public
houses where they stayed; and besides,
they were not. able to pay the tavern
prices for their lodging.. Their only way
was to take such beds as they carried in.
their wagons, and spread them on the
floor. For the children, blankets. and
coverlids were folded down.

284. In this humble manner,. these
worthy people rested, after the toils and
cares OF t the day ; but they looked for-
ward with hope. They thought, in a
few days more, to reach a quiet home of
their own, and where they could provide
better for their comfort.

285. When the weather had been
very chilly and bad, for several days,
nearly the whole company were affected
with colds, and some of them more than
half sick. Mrs. Johnson herself was
almost overcome with continued fatigue ;
and little Charlotte was so much unwell
as to excite great fears on her account.

286. Mrs. Roberts’s rheumatic lame-
ness was increased, and she suffered
more pain than she had before ;, but she
98 ‘THE HAPPY FAMILY.

bore it, as far as possible, ‘without com-
plaining, knowing that her daughter and
son-in-law were weighed down with trou
ble. Even Capt. Warner began to talk
in a discouraging way.

287.. Then was the time to see the dif-
ference between Mr. Johnson and the
common sort of men. When he saw
the trouble thickening, and his company
sunk in dejection around him, instead of
hanging his head, as many others would
have done, he was more firm and decided
than ever.

288. He told the rest to keep up good.
spirits; they should get through with the
difficulty. ‘The true mark of a hero, he
said, was to stand firm when the storm
came on; and it was almost impossible
to judge of the real characters of people
whilethe weather was perfectly fair, and
they travelled only on smooth roads.

289. He called on his sons, in a par-
ticular manner, and told them, he should
be ashamed to have them bear his name
if they could not meet difficulty and dan-
ger, in a brave and resolute manner,
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY. 99

when it was necessary for the purpose
of doing good.

290. He mentioned the instance of
Hannibal, besieged in an Italian city,
anxiously expecting his brother to come,
with an army, to his relief; and when he
had long waited, in a distressing situation,
and knew not what could cause such a
delay, his beloved brother’s head was
thrown to him over the walls. That
brother had been met, and conquered,
and slain, by the way.

291. Yet Hannibal, instead of sinking
in despair under these trying events,
rose, in the grandeur of his soul, above
them all. With the masterly powers of
his mind, he out-generaled the Romans,
and, even as his enemies tell the story,
obtained one of the most signal victories
of which we have any account. Mr.
Johnson’s influence kept up, in some de-
gree, the resolution of the others, but it
was a severe contest.

292. At the close of a very bad day,
they arrived at a tavern, in much need
of comfort, and finding but little. It was

10
100 THE HAPPY FAMILY.

a dark rainy night, and their prospects
seemed quite gloomy.

293. The house was thronged with
noisy people, and it was difficult for
these travellers to get to a fire to dry
and warm themselves. The chief part
of them had slept in their wagons, the
night before, because the house was filled
with travellers.

294. The excellent Mrs. Johnson for-
got her cheerfulness, for a while, as she
looked on the feverish cheeks of her babe,
and felt the beatings of its little heart.
That night there was an increased con-
cern about Mrs. Roberts’s situation, as
there was reason to fear she would not
be able to trave! with them.

295. When Mr. Johnson and his wife
had provided, as well as they could, for
the others, their thoughts were turned to
their. revered mother, on one side, and
their children on the other.

296. They had taken the greatest
pains, during the whole way, to do every
thing in their power for the comfort of
this much honoured parent. They had
‘THE HAPPY FAMILY: 1018

hired a bed for her, the best théy ‘could
get, at the different taverns where they
stayed; but, at this place, they could
procure nothing without paying a very:
extravagant price.

297. They looked at their money, and
shuddered to see how little was left, to
bear their expenses through the distance
which yet remained. Their mother’s
situation again rushed upon their minds.
‘The reflection was distressing ; and tears
started from the eyes of both.

298. Mrs. Johnson, standing by her
husband, was holding his arm. She

essed that arm close to her side. Their

(opes rose together to the Fountain of
Mercy; and, as their custom was, they
united in commending themselves, their
friends, and all their cares, to that Wis-
dom which never fails.

299. They offered their thankfulpraises
to the Author of life, for the blessings of
their past years, and prayed the continu-
ance of his guiding sel, in the trials
before them; and rd retired to such
rest as they could obtain.



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'222' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVGS' 'sip-files0003.txt'
e6ade9d9e0ca4e8798c60e6f28e1954a
d3d02771eb3883c684434e381d8b3130cc33b22c
'2012-01-13T21:53:14-05:00'
describe
'14305' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVGT' 'sip-files0003thm.jpg'
269390661c806c6306d55bb61f3543d1
601ed6329a4973f5929d8e6aa3364ea6512cc95d
'2012-01-13T21:52:34-05:00'
describe
'28137' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVGU' 'sip-files0004.jp2'
773562dd7c3683cf0c100967b209ecf3
99900383c1aff18b13b843f187ffbb6e8e68b595
'2012-01-13T21:52:49-05:00'
describe
'25043' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVGV' 'sip-files0004.jpg'
2687eca24cb6824388f10c9c88d4a544
b3c6f8752358d4fc0ad1b8d2138d749ee1ee9715
'2012-01-13T21:51:54-05:00'
describe
'4134' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVGW' 'sip-files0004.pro'
00621c11e9d2b96b1700e3551b290dfc
3f59f523efb5eea64ce39ef27763d72c694514d6
'2012-01-13T21:51:57-05:00'
describe
'14798' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVGX' 'sip-files0004.QC.jpg'
11bd97962138ac7a37e88a5e3414132f
124f50955f308396b5849e2310ac791fb9c3d086
'2012-01-13T21:52:50-05:00'
describe
'497036' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVGY' 'sip-files0004.tif'
50f5aadf89617927a3d255db14b378b7
4a0f55364fe1623314381d751aab9bd96b9309e9
'2012-01-13T21:53:56-05:00'
describe
'204' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVGZ' 'sip-files0004.txt'
85287f74781dc649beb81b6a8887b75f
eec969cd136f9c5692785e83753d857699202637
'2012-01-13T21:51:14-05:00'
describe
'10572' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHA' 'sip-files0004thm.jpg'
1cd0f56dd34c779fa4f54f449b00012f
895dd12e68696e6805c795366b4ef5c77d048b97
'2012-01-13T21:54:52-05:00'
describe
'61063' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHB' 'sip-files0005.jp2'
d5578b6fe56a7bff86b9f5f05f4a4396
8672964ec551c0f5f09bd045cdc6d7d65c33a26a
'2012-01-13T21:54:03-05:00'
describe
'84118' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHC' 'sip-files0005.jpg'
f136c522a4650b9efa11f0c6ba017d6f
24c3a52f5a739ace65d4db11f0deb97dcfbc6dc4
'2012-01-13T21:53:39-05:00'
describe
'22352' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHD' 'sip-files0005.pro'
e9a431d6cf18fb83740e29e99dba1773
632c920101a99e6bf7205168c58ca99359e72fd5
'2012-01-13T21:51:34-05:00'
describe
'37479' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHE' 'sip-files0005.QC.jpg'
891db49c1e0d038fd62242e463a5968c
1e187219eba8df065904373238f3632acce0c60d
'2012-01-13T21:52:46-05:00'
describe
'500248' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHF' 'sip-files0005.tif'
a70d3a959bf29f93370c376f8d926a2b
06f115ce351d651b4f823080ef2fdf41df18d4cd
describe
'932' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHG' 'sip-files0005.txt'
000a02687c926dc5a9217e41ace211aa
fbf9ec3b9d297764f522833dec78d88c0e9b2c90
'2012-01-13T21:52:05-05:00'
describe
'17938' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHH' 'sip-files0005thm.jpg'
4577f2ceade8b0e24c5656fe81046499
d2f232f5ef5a0f9e9697c20b347bec9ae877b24b
describe
'61060' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHI' 'sip-files0006.jp2'
e35f32defa315e1258e39b8f4018a5ed
f7c8863fc3bbe6cc81532e7435201f0c00eec51b
'2012-01-13T21:51:11-05:00'
describe
'101641' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHJ' 'sip-files0006.jpg'
0659d5a36cc5674278c440f02dfd9a9a
5740a4e66e8724a980aec857e8efc6e23afe8fe6
'2012-01-13T21:53:23-05:00'
describe
'30324' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHK' 'sip-files0006.pro'
b4620b718ecf6c915a51873168b85546
bd36f3e4b9f7ac011b17c7698113fcab5b09b5dd
'2012-01-13T21:52:06-05:00'
describe
'42622' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHL' 'sip-files0006.QC.jpg'
21e7ec58466b5efc6606171f696c54e5
66ab0ddb726529034d8bea6c86b7e26d80a1d949
'2012-01-13T21:53:51-05:00'
describe
'500880' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHM' 'sip-files0006.tif'
54e85962d78f1e9372f7fcbb1c6fb56b
d9259810541725275998c6626220825f89a8aaf2
'2012-01-13T21:53:58-05:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHN' 'sip-files0006.txt'
4d1ff3bbc2b8586376c49f5ec3e41576
3c0a5cf15a40a64029cb19b8e97f5a90a0babb29
'2012-01-13T21:51:48-05:00'
describe
'19478' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHO' 'sip-files0006thm.jpg'
9fce520d6b636a6b9d47ce3236c3e321
064ba90506868c6c189f33f3550b4a35a188090a
'2012-01-13T21:54:29-05:00'
describe
'61053' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHP' 'sip-files0007.jp2'
1b4470d8ab597ba108e97318957f5a96
04876768194bea533a805f02cde3abce2a03ccd2
'2012-01-13T21:52:24-05:00'
describe
'105074' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHQ' 'sip-files0007.jpg'
79b668e9fbf869499d37064c7591a92e
d9cfde9dc698a796472c5c3aba831cf3d2ccaae7
describe
'30932' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHR' 'sip-files0007.pro'
16194a296d4b22cdcea71085ba9ec261
96d6a9f3033ade6c1e92081cc583e0e62546270d
'2012-01-13T21:53:18-05:00'
describe
'43247' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHS' 'sip-files0007.QC.jpg'
2042b4d5e87e5db6e5753445fb68a6e4
bbebd618f9f265b728583d7a85bb927b0328e56b
'2012-01-13T21:51:33-05:00'
describe
'501100' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHT' 'sip-files0007.tif'
cc51ac22f300fd3f752c7405fe94c7e0
a140c45d26afcaa53c4bbccc319905157a7367ac
'2012-01-13T21:52:30-05:00'
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHU' 'sip-files0007.txt'
235ed2db5829d9b8982093303607d42b
e8424e5f7be57a4bbf1efe6d3c46de5347dc5a09
describe
'19877' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHV' 'sip-files0007thm.jpg'
924df5a3f8582077e7d4be42ef56ab6d
030d18e2185baff9642c0c371f74ae1f44169ca7
'2012-01-13T21:51:40-05:00'
describe
'60997' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHW' 'sip-files0008.jp2'
88613fbda0231e036ea9d96cf493e39e
9e697358692384552de965f0e8436e73a13b68d8
'2012-01-13T21:52:59-05:00'
describe
'99787' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHX' 'sip-files0008.jpg'
2031ed1d78a7a37f21ec8fcacbeb7f72
73efced7441ff7a94abe3afcf9e6219e468d8e1d
'2012-01-13T21:52:12-05:00'
describe
'28785' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHY' 'sip-files0008.pro'
e4639f7e5b82d788836f7a91406f954b
0906171fc1cba7b522ec5f59700d6fd9a90088cd
'2012-01-13T21:54:35-05:00'
describe
'42556' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVHZ' 'sip-files0008.QC.jpg'
f7e654c459ee1a67fede5065e0d6f39b
a552825f817aa2491de43470aee4c23a4eb569b1
'2012-01-13T21:54:36-05:00'
describe
'500828' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIA' 'sip-files0008.tif'
76bc98120eab84e904ee8ff9575184ad
8e9331d3189189fc77a9d8f1cf9775b8ba71dcab
'2012-01-13T21:53:37-05:00'
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIB' 'sip-files0008.txt'
817175c3a07f0cf6399ca4b8989a6e68
e251260e6b8868955327a252dc16e223f99700a1
'2012-01-13T21:52:40-05:00'
describe
'19538' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIC' 'sip-files0008thm.jpg'
d942df61631d506861c83108c54aba3a
a5270d83130bb6977cd097a103a0edcdac8162c6
describe
'60963' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVID' 'sip-files0009.jp2'
e5782f49e40be7d4f55a33561898162b
f1b765747b0ef82d6c6d994e1375fe6f9fc13089
'2012-01-13T21:51:13-05:00'
describe
'105683' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIE' 'sip-files0009.jpg'
dfd4520d5558b6cbf9ad00f1760c0265
924ae78ed0dcb512016e7bc119219b8c1ba019b9
'2012-01-13T21:54:47-05:00'
describe
'30607' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIF' 'sip-files0009.pro'
2643c81225ae90572410326dfd6485d6
555300be2184261ceb18b4da229cd3d909c5690b
describe
'44177' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIG' 'sip-files0009.QC.jpg'
fe07556fe12066d2b70b5c8a2d9a9314
521d2bafb5ef22be3d2219d6a2d92078822d7fd9
'2012-01-13T21:52:52-05:00'
describe
'501200' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIH' 'sip-files0009.tif'
fde862bd24769c6b5e0e6bfb59db5eb5
1ac8f348931cc213e0fd3c3bf6b3ed89b167a0f3
describe
'1204' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVII' 'sip-files0009.txt'
ed4fda92901578bf94eb314b16da0ebb
ed536084cb0ccbd46a3d9948ed22b117d6ec9e3e
'2012-01-13T21:52:41-05:00'
describe
'19959' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIJ' 'sip-files0009thm.jpg'
c2d2962a2d6add80785897b12ddb4742
85be994cbdae7567c65bb0e0f6856e00702e1c27
'2012-01-13T21:53:02-05:00'
describe
'61056' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIK' 'sip-files0010.jp2'
043aeaec39a750ffe6f2b686645d8900
ceb077ccc537e9eab57b3d00d5962fcc93584b9c
'2012-01-13T21:54:57-05:00'
describe
'91179' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIL' 'sip-files0010.jpg'
2621429b479dacb0c5d2564a00d3728e
899738000fafd6e3f71aa1e2a943df7055892578
'2012-01-13T21:53:49-05:00'
describe
'25773' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIM' 'sip-files0010.pro'
dd30772c506e16f7c96b5947dac090be
e90f3723739749336e1d92b21ed66c626d113e41
describe
'39711' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIN' 'sip-files0010.QC.jpg'
3ec2059fb88145159921afabf876bc90
d421fc3ed528bf128f8591ce1ea6e8e7777514c0
describe
'500624' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIO' 'sip-files0010.tif'
fcc1a54a4c745f11b941cd784ae16a46
a5180f95397c96346e0e11040e3bc6268f0a5bb6
'2012-01-13T21:51:31-05:00'
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIP' 'sip-files0010.txt'
b6376502da427dd8389665bc17c03215
570d95977aa9c6d499efda2862b5fd0d377d65b8
describe
'18693' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIQ' 'sip-files0010thm.jpg'
6fde9a71a664d31f5a982c7d78958bfb
7ec06c423bb96782fd79d471ae8557f32d885aa9
'2012-01-13T21:51:32-05:00'
describe
'61001' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIR' 'sip-files0011.jp2'
c2cb43c82c0ea2221cbaae9ee8b7fa36
ac9782644e498e9dd46dfced13dac6cd518ad79d
'2012-01-13T21:51:22-05:00'
describe
'80481' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIS' 'sip-files0011.jpg'
fe015d19e79f4483a9ca37fc7eff7215
a50f23eb661bb81ddf883902c18c7ad4d93783b8
'2012-01-13T21:53:42-05:00'
describe
'16203' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIT' 'sip-files0011.pro'
5f5eccb83b13f8d1afb47b8eb0f85824
adc0c5a9a0e6a0fb5c845a01f3927d668fee07ee
describe
'33709' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIU' 'sip-files0011.QC.jpg'
b87184982cbd1c5ac3b8b8d0e28202e1
acf05d10d49ccf75e62b48a43bb89f8e3324f98b
describe
'500284' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIV' 'sip-files0011.tif'
61a705e49b526834d677564d8b17cc8f
4b5b30f6fb758b33eb71d27dfc14cee298d47a3d
'2012-01-13T21:54:51-05:00'
describe
'727' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIW' 'sip-files0011.txt'
107ee10c7dbab65ef8c8892443c6c67e
294b19353243674d976db190372dcc80bb3d5188
'2012-01-13T21:53:32-05:00'
describe
'18275' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIX' 'sip-files0011thm.jpg'
d4e1216d888f674345f38c659c1aa9f0
30ae65dd3e5eb7e3676e46e81ac5dcd3af02a439
'2012-01-13T21:52:55-05:00'
describe
'61014' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIY' 'sip-files0012.jp2'
073559d5c00abc3e785dc0884f7fb91c
7fd9219097d52c3f18118696baffcd17eb6d2557
'2012-01-13T21:53:00-05:00'
describe
'114743' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVIZ' 'sip-files0012.jpg'
bf59b28c7a79fcdbb7a201e2f15577ad
41c46e58f3b154632bd588c7ae394efcbabea7d1
'2012-01-13T21:51:24-05:00'
describe
'24551' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJA' 'sip-files0012.pro'
a455a7bd23e579a07d17cdae94c8cf77
848491fde0cfef600c71fba992495ff7b75e406c
'2012-01-13T21:54:31-05:00'
describe
'46365' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJB' 'sip-files0012.QC.jpg'
a4e40d10bf5aeff75dd513fb9734c118
aebe111d820dfe8cb8bd1308dc0fd61d45c9e338
describe
'501836' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJC' 'sip-files0012.tif'
19f35a0a2f843b4ce78c7d3c6689980f
831e89800da9136229c17d890a6267f8c45acdcc
'2012-01-13T21:51:38-05:00'
describe
'986' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJD' 'sip-files0012.txt'
c35f4d576b0795014f290f20ac16b5c9
ace76d98da1cf9fbd5054b6e457b7ffe5c2d44c4
describe
'21534' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJE' 'sip-files0012thm.jpg'
8079557c7876fc8a3d4b14e65733503e
d5a36b8f3824cfaa15b4f4b20748e54764384675
'2012-01-13T21:52:19-05:00'
describe
'61013' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJF' 'sip-files0013.jp2'
c203bf904b8cd896243e77dcad0d9bd7
f15ea5b36f06dda40a8ecbe154b58c7f1b5ccea8
describe
'118847' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJG' 'sip-files0013.jpg'
34e9643a5a5b6f8a948f18e9109c4e4b
046b4f632a0e43e0329f2cfbb86fcc29c66b0829
'2012-01-13T21:54:34-05:00'
describe
'26084' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJH' 'sip-files0013.pro'
4cb8eb0e58eb80007463cacf77a28b01
27bec1aac0732e09dab14a32ca2d6ad1b0b05bd7
'2012-01-13T21:52:03-05:00'
describe
'46873' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJI' 'sip-files0013.QC.jpg'
cbd180bb6ddf690c3f19d42d93c4bdcf
aa90c651543ef298d537d3a5fdd47458153084af
'2012-01-13T21:53:36-05:00'
describe
'501928' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJJ' 'sip-files0013.tif'
bb46cd2a188bb49993a7e05c9cc580fa
c6cd60e105ccb74c044ad7884b4881805267fb27
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJK' 'sip-files0013.txt'
43b5f3be56d0c76efab1347ad76e923f
c76788b7bcad5dd73c5d0f054ba7c62772dc9972
'2012-01-13T21:52:51-05:00'
describe
'21464' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJL' 'sip-files0013thm.jpg'
7112ec2c1e84129a7f8e991a32f2d3a8
2c89fddc0bd4672eddf22e98a155c02185227ce9
'2012-01-13T21:51:26-05:00'
describe
'61049' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJM' 'sip-files0014.jp2'
81c20f15b9bd9a0c53785a8163df4285
4f68df378b488715f193dd8d3bcffcf645fd9807
'2012-01-13T21:54:14-05:00'
describe
'119633' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJN' 'sip-files0014.jpg'
71603f2ac0d4526f225365e0d35a9af0
cd8a0a6c331378379085f09c3d11050c18876ff6
describe
'26281' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJO' 'sip-files0014.pro'
55fe85a9427d24f4039882da02789306
65279e40aaef06903205bcd493d6fe158e176ca0
describe
'46680' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJP' 'sip-files0014.QC.jpg'
8fb8b0e59744d6749717f21378427cc6
d7dd1df7d0df1cc88bb73f9ef0c193171f093eba
'2012-01-13T21:51:39-05:00'
describe
'501736' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJQ' 'sip-files0014.tif'
268eca4d0ce3be044f7181b92d252ef1
e34ed8429cdca38d954ab84c04866a40a9189954
'2012-01-13T21:53:40-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJR' 'sip-files0014.txt'
b44fce057373a5e72c9f550e2ada25ae
3a10eae1e326816c448f7a91bd7160e82cdc5d28
describe
'20956' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJS' 'sip-files0014thm.jpg'
0ebf2e290972d19433aa61d1ecd5ddeb
82d19fe99fa9703dc208915e67464fdb9cea6183
'2012-01-13T21:53:20-05:00'
describe
'61036' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJT' 'sip-files0015.jp2'
b6b3d1f13c629013829663ce2bc08e75
f0d934cf405ddb28dec76f695a804180bf1ba860
'2012-01-13T21:52:35-05:00'
describe
'119226' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJU' 'sip-files0015.jpg'
fa8b96855d3b32681f17fdb5d436e459
0597899e68e661ea545d26477b0c1a7ab0c53c18
describe
'26582' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJV' 'sip-files0015.pro'
ec284e04d7755412ab0d254109f9ee53
f30817f241aef61aa2eb893a5f8e03e9d9cff313
describe
'46205' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJW' 'sip-files0015.QC.jpg'
ea0847fb20a95ee8163ac66cb6894b91
cdff048018940bb69066dee897351e6e6ce928a6
'2012-01-13T21:53:21-05:00'
describe
'501976' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJX' 'sip-files0015.tif'
286ad7ec988f51491468cc048e4a768f
8f2356b8cf5ef1eae8ffddc292a2d1f3a49f4979
'2012-01-13T21:52:23-05:00'
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJY' 'sip-files0015.txt'
e2a0b781be6d411cc3107a4f69ee6ce6
61a7c0a88fd36ac06219b542944f6f4ac91d869a
'2012-01-13T21:52:48-05:00'
describe
'21491' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVJZ' 'sip-files0015thm.jpg'
d54107cbe831739db32bc483fa190b5b
47bed55e50313225f6cae12c048f9e2247f9aa2b
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKA' 'sip-files0016.jp2'
3dee64f512ec69cb4e099db08ccdcab6
afac6f06f15554e9af197609a8401f963e73f008
describe
'104874' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKB' 'sip-files0016.jpg'
3b31ae0b5a6c1bc643f2a134c0097fae
985382143f8607c5ae2915d7325c939a0b1c710e
'2012-01-13T21:54:28-05:00'
describe
'25163' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKC' 'sip-files0016.pro'
9f071fa47632a37b7156f2f58ae7aab3
743331286c2e28e5381b426c972c483685ef6c8a
describe
'41740' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKD' 'sip-files0016.QC.jpg'
6fa582533fffd79b071cbec792330424
f0bbedf152f942b9a2069dac2725970bef055cde
'2012-01-13T21:51:41-05:00'
describe
'500892' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKE' 'sip-files0016.tif'
c3cab83bb9e730b1414148b3efd204d3
194b56d618171ddfc5dc1211ae03a9211d4de2d2
'2012-01-13T21:54:02-05:00'
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKF' 'sip-files0016.txt'
a951bfcc005254d1253aab120a63193e
21fbab9b9e50152160095bd6d27eff50e7c2f480
describe
'19814' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKG' 'sip-files0016thm.jpg'
35be8932b8d23a87f8c2853b497d9b27
0b5618eba309033188c47b5d284f4416a8b3583b
'2012-01-13T21:54:50-05:00'
describe
'61017' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKH' 'sip-files0017.jp2'
faf45c46aec69f9bfa940b2eeeab186e
c33d3efe689fa844d6b624d97c28405fc461bcbd
'2012-01-13T21:54:40-05:00'
describe
'108030' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKI' 'sip-files0017.jpg'
3496bd9d4137c593f077172075ac7218
3faeff0f068151ef77eb1bfb9fde021e50f9a3d4
'2012-01-13T21:53:59-05:00'
describe
'26797' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKJ' 'sip-files0017.pro'
4655d062c97757746c80cf188672fd64
910a1804e662662ec9c195fa5f9e68e64f0bfeae
'2012-01-13T21:53:16-05:00'
describe
'41885' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKK' 'sip-files0017.QC.jpg'
e7614db02a175f33e5b4e2bb4e579f99
6e9ee7e94b68415c2be21713259105e020673b20
describe
'500920' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKL' 'sip-files0017.tif'
e529cf3dd93accaa9526113d37ecef07
3d6f238ae5ca38d463ade0b9eab9173fb3ddee00
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKM' 'sip-files0017.txt'
ab764488c3c5013b96dc83ab88474df7
8bcc815e449e575e6d858abba6875cfea16ce483
'2012-01-13T21:51:52-05:00'
describe
'19788' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKN' 'sip-files0017thm.jpg'
a9b7c12501688c0c3eaa11bc746e02e6
5a54416f93b710c1878a44f87f96154914680591
'2012-01-13T21:53:03-05:00'
describe
'61062' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKO' 'sip-files0018.jp2'
643a8bbeb326abff837ba51e0e987685
5811125b0548ffd744111755d229e72838da6aed
describe
'106279' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKP' 'sip-files0018.jpg'
fc482f55b1938efeabcb24ba3487cd1e
112ddf84b44ebb08650d8eae03718c6b058b4061
'2012-01-13T21:53:19-05:00'
describe
'25461' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKQ' 'sip-files0018.pro'
5d311fba595ee83f24569e053d407c17
cc2612f203bff2586161b2f1d2bfb0fc001284dd
'2012-01-13T21:53:30-05:00'
describe
'41770' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKR' 'sip-files0018.QC.jpg'
a58323e24d22d28f043a51035d6991c1
ea44ecbcb5fc74aee542702b7a2c5f5a52b14bb6
describe
'500984' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKS' 'sip-files0018.tif'
ae2e6a5fe4da651ead2bc2e6bd713f3c
9b58ec8c0154f083629f50e36afa2581bbab4c1b
'2012-01-13T21:54:16-05:00'
describe
'1009' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKT' 'sip-files0018.txt'
944a90b0857e4903bc372e61385c2e63
46f59feee0cea493e95b44abab734e2e5dff5878
'2012-01-13T21:54:22-05:00'
describe
'19874' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKU' 'sip-files0018thm.jpg'
e807695860dada21496128be54aa8dae
8689a4f052e4e13502df7b4c11a00a3a3e04bc53
describe
'61061' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKV' 'sip-files0019.jp2'
0b06547b5442bbe7cfce2870ebaf281c
f8d90bc0aa5d0317c0a6d776b43731ebd02e603e
'2012-01-13T21:51:21-05:00'
describe
'107625' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKW' 'sip-files0019.jpg'
696d6aee5ae756d3b8bfc716f2e0b1d2
9dde5404b6a4a2bf3824732fa237c66d5f205403
describe
'25877' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKX' 'sip-files0019.pro'
b8165aa72e0204c2478dcb595ad3a775
ab28e0ba81909ef196b30823215ce307cb31cc3f
'2012-01-13T21:53:52-05:00'
describe
'41913' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKY' 'sip-files0019.QC.jpg'
2054794d8c72934c3a60dede683d73d4
a714d4dbbf7bbf40eafb318f9c8e9bad76a4da75
'2012-01-13T21:53:08-05:00'
describe
'501128' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVKZ' 'sip-files0019.tif'
0d444b9b05afccf4df0fc9a8aa6b6b3e
e630d7a128bd529bed1870beff9a4e763ca20c53
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLA' 'sip-files0019.txt'
aa22b17255a958309dc755b74e47d682
65a8e63694d647ec174e0327cb5ee218c0aebac2
'2012-01-13T21:53:38-05:00'
describe
'19795' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLB' 'sip-files0019thm.jpg'
cb940414b597879d9b80ed2e76304c69
ce3405bb7b39e86336180b46c90d3c1f00b6d675
'2012-01-13T21:52:25-05:00'
describe
'60986' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLC' 'sip-files0020.jp2'
bf28536f5bc2e4d5ffe4d871d8debfe1
e6d78aa251dbcfd184e34360cae7a098507859d1
describe
'92111' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLD' 'sip-files0020.jpg'
d2654fa3dbcdf040b252d15afce9a1e1
1ecfb59ac64faab15173d150d8c35e1af115b72c
'2012-01-13T21:54:19-05:00'
describe
'19784' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLE' 'sip-files0020.pro'
e5c6be8f86b995619e697a00fb6c2a8c
9933ea4e02ace177e8f0019419ac2d75d73fdbef
describe
'37794' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLF' 'sip-files0020.QC.jpg'
2e5da419f246e292aa9ca6b385580c7b
7287f4810ca5fc1bed535da312d37c953aa14506
describe
'500476' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLG' 'sip-files0020.tif'
7183dd47666b90c1db58e4734a2af82b
5707d2fbd6a40cfbca6c5992e26252cbf677d01c
describe
'797' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLH' 'sip-files0020.txt'
4f5fbf6e083e0b5d1bd0c67886c9aea3
907342b6ae3b2787d5756c97e1f0b023ac733c54
'2012-01-13T21:51:16-05:00'
describe
'18648' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLI' 'sip-files0020thm.jpg'
e689b4953505cc25294f80c5561a90ee
cccd9b674258f0e59a24ce6b254798f1fc744b98
describe
'60967' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLJ' 'sip-files0021.jp2'
cf2ea043f437421f4cc6f77df2ba4ec4
2a2de655d51679f71000b40ff28ff12f935c3d5a
describe
'96412' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLK' 'sip-files0021.jpg'
adf5bdf5f93b3bbcc8bb10440b59aa49
f832281892be9af7fd21c12b821f107adb114738
'2012-01-13T21:52:45-05:00'
describe
'22008' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLL' 'sip-files0021.pro'
d4d88aa06599f34a8659d19c27453219
6700d0c9367e8c57e4635aab1e0ff5d15eb406bc
describe
'39181' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLM' 'sip-files0021.QC.jpg'
b4e0f7231bcf1f1008632fc1331430e8
c865cba7310046a4fc9f0471a50c268ae6d6a1d2
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLN' 'sip-files0021.tif'
05de69af2553e5efafb9132edfc7d725
20a3c7e58974dc723b0eaaedf32d23b1b103c557
'2012-01-13T21:51:50-05:00'
describe
'933' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLO' 'sip-files0021.txt'
edaac906e2519ca870c338c922095239
da0c8193ea6db9daa9c59ee785b006cea1d5b793
describe
'19249' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLP' 'sip-files0021thm.jpg'
5642c5cd295ef77f8db3c0cb89b7363c
9c1e95b614e55db5cc4bc1ea121d5096f2800f9b
'2012-01-13T21:53:53-05:00'
describe
'61015' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLQ' 'sip-files0022.jp2'
dae4701e65f053ed20ef0646ea73a619
3296eaf4abd765fbc13b8665a55b00b6e402c786
'2012-01-13T21:54:07-05:00'
describe
'114391' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLR' 'sip-files0022.jpg'
61dda29938b3b955f667db8eced046d2
0ad8a9da0e2cb8142c91e7ba3af0c1ee5614db7c
'2012-01-13T21:53:47-05:00'
describe
'24643' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLS' 'sip-files0022.pro'
c035c9720d3080e0cbffcf7cb0fd0e97
1bc80e73914cc19be327a9881d238acddc0fb08b
describe
'46074' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLT' 'sip-files0022.QC.jpg'
b7cbbf0367622fa88eb1a095ccfc3ef1
d4773a0a97648c341ed7ffd66113d20263d2783f
describe
'501764' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLU' 'sip-files0022.tif'
bcc33460a8e2a264ed2dfeb93ce3de29
4ff05249f1903feb383a629d5dae3595dd9b52d9
describe
'989' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLV' 'sip-files0022.txt'
731b9f24337a924cfd8a8d14c796a7ba
05dc0a962305ec99037bca202f5abfe0f45acd53
'2012-01-13T21:52:32-05:00'
describe
'21090' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLW' 'sip-files0022thm.jpg'
e3ed64e67ac4f8366188e7ed7560ba93
d10b24f5f0a6e306de6e69e169a7906f0ab328cf
describe
'60904' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLX' 'sip-files0023.jp2'
d4adf52db1fee9eb41b2023c63fe4fd0
ad80422844965c8753b2575f872ad240b36d4132
describe
'122189' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLY' 'sip-files0023.jpg'
5bf67a5642af86982b4354b85671005e
2573a0fd395f308cccc3e53753f46aa93cd04ab8
'2012-01-13T21:54:33-05:00'
describe
'26033' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVLZ' 'sip-files0023.pro'
705aecd3a0499f4c99dc1339d2129cec
386ca1116bff4fe8547369c045cfbe8e4b7f874c
'2012-01-13T21:52:28-05:00'
describe
'46452' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMA' 'sip-files0023.QC.jpg'
76705ea013944fc8cf8a7dff8f9bce82
656ba435ab17f27d96cbf2a33cf9fbae1bc6ae01
'2012-01-13T21:54:37-05:00'
describe
'501828' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMB' 'sip-files0023.tif'
306b53a8066e9ed70c72574d3903ede9
dc06cda5b9159d0a91c5e8615becd10ebe44fe20
describe
'1025' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMC' 'sip-files0023.txt'
a688a3cdff2ee014742b968c0ed918ba
26274eec291206cb3e8cbe2555523b657c47c167
describe
'21356' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMD' 'sip-files0023thm.jpg'
ca6f407d32602b77a76c0134cd970ad3
ad258ed4dd4b10201b32ecb0999daacf2821c2b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVME' 'sip-files0024.jp2'
ff70dfacf57fe41d5d69cf04979725f0
399c67018d1b60840ce6e1fa1682f560cbe3d9fe
'2012-01-13T21:54:45-05:00'
describe
'114563' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMF' 'sip-files0024.jpg'
561a098ee977a45d31f173a473775a99
f8d1a4a10fbc724a56978e9df573d9ab10ec6ea4
describe
'24449' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMG' 'sip-files0024.pro'
2669731357172f91267ac543f650f918
a877594c9adf8481a11a819f09bc62086b31d8de
'2012-01-13T21:51:35-05:00'
describe
'45801' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMH' 'sip-files0024.QC.jpg'
dfdefb213bd91e61764ddf974a09f7f0
cef868c84283189eab1f818b42462bf7b956e039
'2012-01-13T21:51:18-05:00'
describe
'501784' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMI' 'sip-files0024.tif'
7eb8659c9684f44e67f818a7b4c9df29
928e6789bdb8228a4c30018f919ef590124fbac3
describe
'969' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMJ' 'sip-files0024.txt'
4f3082a6a94f82acf8207364ce2a0352
f7f200bf1125790edc43d1406d6bc2cf26ec6ab0
describe
'21296' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMK' 'sip-files0024thm.jpg'
62e99392c2006c41889437d5f8e17e3c
054aec27f3230cd0b5f34d9b9c368ddabdb27bf8
'2012-01-13T21:52:58-05:00'
describe
'61059' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVML' 'sip-files0025.jp2'
179828ac0cac16d43ec1aa1dd6e53630
5c0d31e642e82413e1229f045d3d6f05c43fa326
'2012-01-13T21:51:36-05:00'
describe
'118973' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMM' 'sip-files0025.jpg'
05de31ac2505ded084df6643c74c7495
98e41857e711e4e73c75df6cb8c53fa8b928ec0f
describe
'25808' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMN' 'sip-files0025.pro'
5ea4a290b542af268aa309abbdb79587
114a1220d5f87dbf1b05e3d1acbbe3890f8e95dc
'2012-01-13T21:54:55-05:00'
describe
'47005' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMO' 'sip-files0025.QC.jpg'
de4a4c589cd238fbb63de0719afc321f
b38acdc9ca87902bbbe9a225e4f91755f31dd7a5
'2012-01-13T21:54:06-05:00'
describe
'501960' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMP' 'sip-files0025.tif'
4f5d1364fde33a00ac66e40065e7d816
2d38bd82a38a17e92d8bee924d3b8c830f2a9d4e
'2012-01-13T21:53:41-05:00'
describe
'1031' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMQ' 'sip-files0025.txt'
4231721af01bacff4e862755d10d2879
057c32b74fee6caab12a36566fa716f505d3b33d
describe
'21513' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMR' 'sip-files0025thm.jpg'
fd36145fdaf7143d1376937bec579bd4
8f9e1924b53c3dc5db4abb21128838cb5b14fba5
'2012-01-13T21:52:54-05:00'
describe
'60949' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMS' 'sip-files0026.jp2'
989d05657659f6e3cd937324444910f1
21a1eebcd61ecdd9c12691a347a9816df185a97d
describe
'115896' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMT' 'sip-files0026.jpg'
5945bb11c7a555ae3e67c865443db7a7
674c7c2fa272538c60e232f888ce41b748ff4d66
describe
'26394' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMU' 'sip-files0026.pro'
ca1ef15af15b2bfbaaea5d06a6d075c1
604a4423d8de564dc9c927fa463b9bb9aefcba5c
'2012-01-13T21:53:35-05:00'
describe
'44424' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMV' 'sip-files0026.QC.jpg'
a41c3e686994b688eb6951efabd0a8a7
2a0ef17ccea51368d5e65d06a3ecb318eeaffd5e
'2012-01-13T21:54:26-05:00'
describe
'501568' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMW' 'sip-files0026.tif'
2bd68d84defb30cb2c7c6de6f98fca81
2efd2cfc2b8754fbc0ffe04d8cb95b406a87975f
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMX' 'sip-files0026.txt'
4fbd1a9bb1649171ba8231119a312ae3
718212ce7867b98a8bef7564d62530096ece8eea
describe
'21030' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMY' 'sip-files0026thm.jpg'
9ffeadb2769e25cb81c3f3be562e1e51
30bb5656f742fb28b6d0061f102bdda647fbbfd6
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVMZ' 'sip-files0027.jp2'
42f5b6fbff48a1a0565cad51c318599a
54cf16840325cf0bb0b09621ffe460ffb766a6dc
'2012-01-13T21:51:55-05:00'
describe
'115246' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNA' 'sip-files0027.jpg'
15ad96a3f16a014b9015c5e3c9012f62
a48e26a650f1f60ab4f317972101893d3b965a5e
'2012-01-13T21:53:55-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNB' 'sip-files0027.pro'
ab0c3bf2e7cef4c9aa25ce8e57e9c9fc
9cd8b48f83867ac3732460441d081af84764d8ed
describe
'45151' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNC' 'sip-files0027.QC.jpg'
7ae8cb09c36fce1a52fb604769f057a1
1e63384c8f21a936fc0221623ca346bd0d855996
'2012-01-13T21:51:10-05:00'
describe
'501668' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVND' 'sip-files0027.tif'
9b1614d9f209107ff4b52446ec419047
451c9ed5745815b2fd3c5fa487d32025cda122d4
'2012-01-13T21:51:23-05:00'
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNE' 'sip-files0027.txt'
70c2401273a9091f5183a2c3a0bb31f6
a87822cec979f67c4fed9dbd4febaaeece63e9b8
describe
'21087' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNF' 'sip-files0027thm.jpg'
1012b8b7dccd479961dd6720acc3ad05
308e6676d0a4bab44326cb205ca259885ccfe600
describe
'61026' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNG' 'sip-files0028.jp2'
2bd4262899cd8d687acfc972ac9a1d59
4751bf8dee8d5557f43bb9eaea82da808ba0dc8f
describe
'115542' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNH' 'sip-files0028.jpg'
6de78c909547613f2cf4385992ec02f4
42bcfc64a40c34612143958425cc1cdac40644c5
'2012-01-13T21:52:10-05:00'
describe
'25033' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNI' 'sip-files0028.pro'
25f76b5d1530444e8a63cbdc296f3e52
505c1596a46f76942a433463662b123de216fa20
describe
'46127' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNJ' 'sip-files0028.QC.jpg'
f0f5a66505a10bd6b330d36989a64801
f25b6c9f45d8346784d64ddc9cc33be140a5a769
'2012-01-13T21:54:09-05:00'
describe
'501900' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNK' 'sip-files0028.tif'
53163fda6864080a84bb083c96851905
7b64d683088ac6ddd2c9d1a3f12ee84f95ae3156
describe
'992' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNL' 'sip-files0028.txt'
6b5b27e39d42cc6c342e2f65371b960c
05d1b0e59e28e1ee2142aa8ee586c447983bf067
describe
'21239' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNM' 'sip-files0028thm.jpg'
abd1fa2a6c82d8313742cd98242d2675
6e5b6eda7152c4f8ab82ac91cd568d3a72990783
'2012-01-13T21:53:17-05:00'
describe
'60999' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNN' 'sip-files0029.jp2'
212351125beae24ae429ff0ae43b896f
421684b96c3a4ee9ff2d9a54a709b28d920d3f78
'2012-01-13T21:51:37-05:00'
describe
'120170' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNO' 'sip-files0029.jpg'
b27d967baab7b0790714e4cb52dee8e9
d6fc48e46d3a68189cc80ccd177b7b971d485742
describe
'25944' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNP' 'sip-files0029.pro'
8e672d6be8e7568ab05f55945f12c782
de2f696d0f07d6ee48a31edd08ff9b5576011d17
describe
'47150' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNQ' 'sip-files0029.QC.jpg'
499c84306dd734f8ae1a560404788d77
8707097ee5deb4cba25452b7cd074a31b455634e
'2012-01-13T21:53:09-05:00'
describe
'501952' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNR' 'sip-files0029.tif'
d400746a8e59a5b454119a038d2fe3a8
4a0554459fbd76aa2d6243e25aceb8d74b730716
'2012-01-13T21:53:25-05:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNS' 'sip-files0029.txt'
8b0f98b9056c6afd4c8b17b8d8b69a29
daba740989be7c6e43c3b387984ec9211582aa30
describe
'21455' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNT' 'sip-files0029thm.jpg'
2cdf5a97e34b97bcea5b3ea981522a24
ab2f977cd0606359954416fce4263be6a8bc1832
'2012-01-13T21:54:39-05:00'
describe
'61040' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNU' 'sip-files0030.jp2'
90f3d73374144db5e4af395e5dd56e0f
7bfa22990d0e876e2bee859e843b4b107e24f238
'2012-01-13T21:53:45-05:00'
describe
'112919' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNV' 'sip-files0030.jpg'
b70743d03f707bdc76479860f9cf7290
a490136d113a998c5d2d33c2e796697ae6b797c6
describe
'26204' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNW' 'sip-files0030.pro'
ae7fc92e576b3089d79a32f64bd5f4e6
516b8b085740ee739de8349156deaaf35343b202
describe
'44167' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNX' 'sip-files0030.QC.jpg'
8ff9c88dd8dc6ea1c56bec9d1272bea6
bcbeb092d9b412c916a4ee5b47a63e6735c0b2a7
describe
'501432' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNY' 'sip-files0030.tif'
b952a6b87dfc5f0d77409b6fe6892b20
d7a814b67288df1a974e25feb1af6ebf05fa9371
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVNZ' 'sip-files0030.txt'
161b28998783c483ad8e982527f39d66
cecb4ad09e094a50cd71e20e5b46d4142579a0bd
'2012-01-13T21:52:20-05:00'
describe
'20621' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOA' 'sip-files0030thm.jpg'
d6b78f6880888db062e10a8b04535c3b
7845cc189b7adc7864dfffce52e56cd6a05890e5
describe
'61042' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOB' 'sip-files0031.jp2'
92efdece6288a0b5b2f641e86ba38e47
3413138dae55f9a6cf0edcd7244acad60aea197a
describe
'108418' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOC' 'sip-files0031.jpg'
ae4c18ccab0c19c5199b1d683dd275b7
5b3331baa00b40fa18f26f7df5e44583673b9e8b
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOD' 'sip-files0031.pro'
6382827340bc928571f7223e50efdbd3
0ac2150f93fda78593f565a62abc2033dc049785
describe
'43032' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOE' 'sip-files0031.QC.jpg'
3a9e41d12ebb61ed0020a2ae92b20376
d6470ab88819e20b7044f292fa8c6423ea2394af
describe
'501124' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOF' 'sip-files0031.tif'
f905c99d1617ee702b77cb308ea124e1
f83602db8a2e7a381b4dced14d9fd95b69380951
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOG' 'sip-files0031.txt'
1430883c340b75aa80e70dfced8ccbe9
190c067dbffefd1dc21ff9b9c8a2f4ec6982bbd2
describe
'62071' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOH' 'sip-files0031a.jp2'
3bc3cfc75ac37dbf2931643553b60094
66c948e45a6673192bd205ce8e9ab2bbd99f62c2
'2012-01-13T21:53:34-05:00'
describe
'64800' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOI' 'sip-files0031a.jpg'
0ceda487ca1ee1899f44c8c2caccf80a
6f672fec07d1ce75637e1d3bb33eb8481af7bf33
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOJ' 'sip-files0031a.pro'
1f40ecbe788e7520e7e2ac507b32594a
10b6d1c578d0abec3a5a4c7afa59f31fcef0b512
'2012-01-13T21:53:50-05:00'
describe
'27227' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOK' 'sip-files0031a.QC.jpg'
70801736c771c52736ce8e75404abd82
c9f4aa940aae74e6e923ec00f5fbcaa601999d79
describe
'508740' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOL' 'sip-files0031a.tif'
6f180bdbb66ff7418ef3f81f74b67246
87abd456ebe81f058094f7f0ce40c3dcdedc8178
describe
'96' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOM' 'sip-files0031a.txt'
c4f4d3f2dcbd7dba8f4d34b02eedc738
706bde8bdf3bc374a5a7a763803f5c877c6ff98e
describe
'16116' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVON' 'sip-files0031athm.jpg'
a6c5a7be98e31847c0b26959575dad93
540c7b66013f00a82adb7ad89002432d64c1c4fc
describe
'20124' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOO' 'sip-files0031thm.jpg'
0fd62217c384cb0e7f877c1922b525f9
bddbf17c5a06baef3f77ee63895a056e86671c06
'2012-01-13T21:53:06-05:00'
describe
'60988' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOP' 'sip-files0032.jp2'
739b7cbf3446bd1b2433313faa0cfbc8
2f294d4068d71fea40b3e0c869bec6e61cdb03c8
describe
'86659' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOQ' 'sip-files0032.jpg'
547df5776a4f83b15daaf90d817724d0
ab27ebf64df0e6e7e24aa225b7a168cd4d71be3d
describe
'19865' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOR' 'sip-files0032.pro'
0443ddd846575b56c365767723c6479a
172c033ebdfd20b970b581bceb4b9b25b7ca5ea7
'2012-01-13T21:53:22-05:00'
describe
'36063' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOS' 'sip-files0032.QC.jpg'
e3e6adfcdfd72479f73143ea3bbbbf90
bf1041eb17acd3c6b4f9da0a91cee3487fb79d48
'2012-01-13T21:51:20-05:00'
describe
'500312' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOT' 'sip-files0032.tif'
8426a7a19117346103799d9c73288788
308165548397838c3f0d5ed5d401cb8e90bacb74
'2012-01-13T21:53:43-05:00'
describe
'818' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOU' 'sip-files0032.txt'
09d5810bb4fdc13005bff63cb8e4ec5e
a47f89c7cec73b6908b7e3cec1e2b13d6672a153
describe
'61884' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOV' 'sip-files0032a.jp2'
c9ff47cea4e592a39c4f04ed6e37f4b4
493c2cfc9edc3bea4c61905356086f2a535f902b
describe
'49557' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOW' 'sip-files0032a.jpg'
330e19ab5c4b4c80de64a0401bccc7e7
8c8aee528b6de658c05466db51cbf8e297de407e
'2012-01-13T21:54:04-05:00'
describe
'921' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOX' 'sip-files0032a.pro'
7961ed43b38baf284cc1418a50d71e61
93aa1dcc3f0569f0ec1fc24af869813967b41263
'2012-01-13T21:52:09-05:00'
describe
'22669' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOY' 'sip-files0032a.QC.jpg'
99dd3167decd25618e15352a3344ca04
f54796be3df2d40c5e1202f92a9a65865d0b8051
'2012-01-13T21:54:44-05:00'
describe
'507740' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVOZ' 'sip-files0032a.tif'
6b37ce15f9dde5937040b5f6f0c77e28
db833861ba43dcbfe7275c037fa8831a8c2ae7ad
describe
'77' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPA' 'sip-files0032a.txt'
3b42c39c5b48244cf9284160e46d5d50
238edb63994dd2060aed167539df9a3bf22d6a72
'2012-01-13T21:52:02-05:00'
describe
'14294' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPB' 'sip-files0032athm.jpg'
1a62acacb3ec2f4ef9916326821a2bad
199c4ad809bbbcee351eecd94bf409d24e1582dd
describe
'18373' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPC' 'sip-files0032thm.jpg'
3917d2c924deaa6c2aff2ba31e9e6115
d425655868d4501ade1d81c381dc6fec4e984acd
describe
'61028' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPD' 'sip-files0033.jp2'
b5980cc0cf78ac35a14779a05c2c121e
3a29c886c99113e03c967a4749184c053e129e95
'2012-01-13T21:52:37-05:00'
describe
'114195' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPE' 'sip-files0033.jpg'
a6c505fab9f540b777ebbb61c82c1fc0
bc551d44d24005e5e5b3fc6f7a7c451feab47938
'2012-01-13T21:52:26-05:00'
describe
'26074' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPF' 'sip-files0033.pro'
f0c8d5f6c30f3d5576e1e3592aaf9509
74fa14330e45e33207fe2479f20cf2c27eb07657
describe
'44877' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPG' 'sip-files0033.QC.jpg'
49df15bd1081c5be7fdcae82893a2b39
1a076445ddc3390d27dc54c6773e76f8849327b5
describe
'501396' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPH' 'sip-files0033.tif'
5a35dc446cfbea9d1d02eba960ad55d4
47f9cb3db2385746337c614aa2f3a322999f987b
'2012-01-13T21:52:47-05:00'
describe
'1047' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPI' 'sip-files0033.txt'
5971d47183f706c716abfa9083e84ac3
fe19f37ce60b9cc885f21c7e8451c3fa979ac5be
describe
'20607' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPJ' 'sip-files0033thm.jpg'
c8a4aa4e9f0ef4218dbb8ca13b8123b1
958a4a4edf2dd2b326715ca38633d928a6e5dcb5
describe
'61034' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPK' 'sip-files0034.jp2'
fa576d61cc29656b5aeba5b5c4486dc0
e5f5d60ca4ae762efeb5cdb74e2ca03caadef9fd
describe
'121180' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPL' 'sip-files0034.jpg'
4a6145260162487b0e6a133664186d7b
f49b0a9c7c9eed270868acb9f34e64011c4f8218
'2012-01-13T21:53:28-05:00'
describe
'25799' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPM' 'sip-files0034.pro'
954f7b26ff29c1ea1e4ea08e719870b5
ca96b18d386e2a27016eb8946e32721347725ee5
describe
'46631' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPN' 'sip-files0034.QC.jpg'
d1e99cb413af9f9a23d1cf3b236e0e95
24aa32d8c0fefe9a8df9858c8472b791529a1c9d
'2012-01-13T21:54:32-05:00'
describe
'502068' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPO' 'sip-files0034.tif'
42d3f004d9e2b988a4aa47fa020cfee0
1ea822467031f43e001c0da4dad1d6ade1a15e16
describe
'1017' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPP' 'sip-files0034.txt'
79e8914b6a9b91286d92fb16b4ff65fd
e0047d5e8d2c09bc1b5a740715d03a9ec1e1ddbd
describe
'60993' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPQ' 'sip-files0034a.jp2'
2677f3f79e5ab40bda1853f980586532
5b611c28f01eddb147301b927a2681a7b32fe7f0
describe
'90992' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPR' 'sip-files0034a.jpg'
6b47bac1d755c93164cfd466895cd89b
cbaf82818e3acba3929dc0b654e049443bfb1543
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPS' 'sip-files0034a.pro'
44dad03f3a5dbd5f8b61efd47c91a3eb
d3f5e743892b7da95c9f28033c822e33f9134cb4
'2012-01-13T21:52:31-05:00'
describe
'32627' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPT' 'sip-files0034a.QC.jpg'
8b70d3c455db4ccd11e33952a0874611
3932e2848f153939c36bf7555facfee0163541fc
describe
'499960' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPU' 'sip-files0034a.tif'
08ff947f4033a288bb3853a9ce32150f
b39467771d7ccccb32873fef2e4bac3081dd2198
describe
'71' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPV' 'sip-files0034a.txt'
d451d04b0a3251049724a631e08166cd
c5e22d05f7b4aeb6b0d2b72fb8b9488abc02a722
describe
'17457' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPW' 'sip-files0034athm.jpg'
583c637c38b10ab89c64f58b35793e57
807840ed3b24ced525c09e60a2f45e19b14a0bfd
describe
'21965' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPX' 'sip-files0034thm.jpg'
26a596f169387d32ea5dfac5412119c2
72a3551061bd4b92e0ec8d472bfd2b257f854fc5
'2012-01-13T21:52:15-05:00'
describe
'61054' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPY' 'sip-files0035.jp2'
b6530dc908fca874c2abecb9613bd813
638c8cb1c720d0d5b7d724975370b2cde38bb407
'2012-01-13T21:54:56-05:00'
describe
'106894' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVPZ' 'sip-files0035.jpg'
48e28a42b680d23d9e4d2d81dfdbdf5d
08bf2e895e4f5852516c5da2fab1108e41736bd4
'2012-01-13T21:53:01-05:00'
describe
'24681' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQA' 'sip-files0035.pro'
3cff00b1430c231f58d4410185727045
2a917dfb6f2b97ee1eb350e08c1484ec494c95f0
'2012-01-13T21:54:24-05:00'
describe
'42244' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQB' 'sip-files0035.QC.jpg'
4921053f7258aa6d8ddc8ec7b7c1fd68
231670981061a8d7532c5d850a32b28733ccde4c
'2012-01-13T21:54:49-05:00'
describe
'501044' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQC' 'sip-files0035.tif'
e76df3c5dcc4803114cb663a9abac061
511238e6b2f3f2e06d1d59de8c719afd1573d360
'2012-01-13T21:52:17-05:00'
describe
'977' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQD' 'sip-files0035.txt'
2b22bd7e77e809cefb1fa7ada04c0140
e2cae842456434e5fe252fb559098e14dfeed146
describe
'20080' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQE' 'sip-files0035thm.jpg'
cf2c3c07f57c385ab4ccc3b21f073cf2
277a7c0610bf0df7a0cde4173171ff449eb094ab
describe
'60915' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQF' 'sip-files0036.jp2'
8a6a15ce99ebfe895aeac3b41e29922d
8f28abfa4024fb4eb8d4d16ae7a422c681790f76
describe
'112742' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQG' 'sip-files0036.jpg'
08448a526686f5135d7172bb0e8bd6a0
7c1e5cb0656ce99139dde2bc24e938042b60ec8e
describe
'25936' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQH' 'sip-files0036.pro'
674cd018dda58506fa1d7cd7584b8d57
41187f60800363f5e7a5c45eeefe712733a558b8
describe
'44263' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQI' 'sip-files0036.QC.jpg'
bf7a4b4c87ec8c8a06de6131cb86d278
9692ac328bbe2407b9bf4dea0acaf20d893b19d4
'2012-01-13T21:54:41-05:00'
describe
'501368' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQJ' 'sip-files0036.tif'
74c5e2d432e6e2a6681a16a6694ba1c6
6eb8916b84f7e3ed4d4d55115a363717fa81d7d0
describe
'1024' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQK' 'sip-files0036.txt'
377c640dd3c05dcc7b3b6ea88f3df014
25effcfd6ac76c228ed9f3bcc45a8c0b8c02fac1
describe
'20486' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQL' 'sip-files0036thm.jpg'
99bf34408ddae19ed0f0f4a529100168
89796c10c85f7356f0a5329321d9dadc07c6af82
describe
'61009' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQM' 'sip-files0037.jp2'
64fd224d07f7deb690961ac2be673f97
b68546b92c84d8ac2b9cf2b59f4d2e8e3c34f328
describe
'114896' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQN' 'sip-files0037.jpg'
cd378c9465a55dd449548ec93a43d6be
609b5c5e7dc21f845871aebe4ce5e9c25115c825
describe
'25981' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQO' 'sip-files0037.pro'
b9af6fbf3c8ed8a4c3bdf08a05e749a2
a745cebbd924e35bb62e9b7f001468aaf7eb006b
'2012-01-13T21:54:18-05:00'
describe
'44681' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQP' 'sip-files0037.QC.jpg'
4930a2c70edf545bc6c78b22dc37bc9d
6206e89665d95a3bbf921576dea03c6ec2d511ec
'2012-01-13T21:51:49-05:00'
describe
'501436' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQQ' 'sip-files0037.tif'
1adfdee7d2dff0b44b2a3df3dd6c0ea4
65b37556f313f3f20c0923d7c67c49395ac9a90e
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQR' 'sip-files0037.txt'
5008f7efd56dffca37a309ed404c28b3
9610f75e24bca09962b9daafceae2c12e79d5188
'2012-01-13T21:51:53-05:00'
describe
'20605' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQS' 'sip-files0037thm.jpg'
a461436ffbdf149fe47d222be5c3a8ab
7eb01595e0a9d5d82cae932a4a07733b0e2bd867
describe
'60804' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQT' 'sip-files0038.jp2'
06913bbcb8272a9ce677a1394da37600
3d84f27eeb0aabd86f83cd5644aec50b1a15a24a
describe
'109698' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQU' 'sip-files0038.jpg'
1c295c9a804c53988267934d7715d6a8
005e6b9cbec1df4da5c73caca43687861acd0ba6
describe
'24759' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQV' 'sip-files0038.pro'
5d99f8de6537117a7b67eaf04b9e9b17
40e1862361c1046466775d6dd934253231e99e3d
'2012-01-13T21:54:27-05:00'
describe
'43590' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQW' 'sip-files0038.QC.jpg'
22e19b395019dc2ceba348b4579b12c1
f9d111b53adc9cea4c144d6b0e30fe6de7e32a24
'2012-01-13T21:54:13-05:00'
describe
'501228' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQX' 'sip-files0038.tif'
cec8d17a136a64d8385df76ddb5874cf
e9427455e66ef64a16bd3dfac2db178ccaa6597c
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQY' 'sip-files0038.txt'
f2dde2c38d0dd6071d57800322338aae
2229051cae02f9f088d14a9418f42ea9971876b1
describe
'20333' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVQZ' 'sip-files0038thm.jpg'
1ea31a7385d70903dc9ae7424271bc97
e50c6b286ef7bd6cd29c801d7d7a34745c524b19
describe
'60994' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRA' 'sip-files0039.jp2'
d0314b75a2b27a1bf4abec40f3505ff3
81b9031a3a3eea3f4eb362a8ee770a42420707cf
'2012-01-13T21:53:05-05:00'
describe
'115495' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRB' 'sip-files0039.jpg'
5499d5a67c42d175abb2520bb73dd0a3
e70821eaba942c9d1db43750bbac77a1922519c2
describe
'27035' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRC' 'sip-files0039.pro'
9b331c376a22b72a00641ea746768324
8efb17dbcc49604c36df3c85789e767a92f0bbe0
'2012-01-13T21:51:43-05:00'
describe
'44040' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRD' 'sip-files0039.QC.jpg'
67f7d7a242cd4e11dca2af83d28d3326
a1da3e13979e6d418fed4b458ff0a89f016d7d13
describe
'501216' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRE' 'sip-files0039.tif'
80a1a99f478f3c2020049e190345e7b3
69e288b1ce994815255d7fff67ceeef3b3d8ddbe
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRF' 'sip-files0039.txt'
39780137ba84f90d0dc09827ad3f27e9
d40236e2721da232d9b49a768f80a983f05adab5
describe
'20266' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRG' 'sip-files0039thm.jpg'
91fd57e00788ce2b55e66365bae5f493
f08d45d2eef38196999e753c66ed26088168d3ac
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRH' 'sip-files0040.jp2'
14d9724dffe143b5a107e86fda7bcf71
55e2d03b1b33b2ce78f1f1c2e55d9982519505df
'2012-01-13T21:52:14-05:00'
describe
'112744' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRI' 'sip-files0040.jpg'
334b042fdfe336535056ca767ae3f9fe
6c0e20ae2aa0a6935ba6c0a86f99c4fc44c1ecf2
'2012-01-13T21:54:38-05:00'
describe
'25851' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRJ' 'sip-files0040.pro'
bce3b0a0f87ef029ee19459b2d61f87b
f54fdd41c7837b8ccfdaf166ab4c690d4d7d6a70
describe
'43955' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRK' 'sip-files0040.QC.jpg'
b56e2a9966a325e9a4be9e81fa3a209b
5ae465a8ca3087e944497bebbd1c9c65af1092b3
describe
'501272' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRL' 'sip-files0040.tif'
976889670dda5e2244b8b964d53a4bd5
803ec1822f553c7cb991f03815dbd7b3d4f38e76
'2012-01-13T21:52:11-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRM' 'sip-files0040.txt'
cdc1214da76f84fd040d486ed0eefce5
dcb46d704c21fecf51d7bc3a2b04ff7ccdd640a8
describe
'20438' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRN' 'sip-files0040thm.jpg'
46a53144b59cc14019e69d9db5323eda
834f8340c439b41102c163b345095e6712157047
describe
'60890' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRO' 'sip-files0041.jp2'
c194057acd9142427baa31290d70676b
a742db73f4c706b7a2ef046e8edd365386201f1a
describe
'112177' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRP' 'sip-files0041.jpg'
01e766814656737532a7861dae694b44
ecec019a17c62fbffa296d14eae27257fa2ff693
describe
'25695' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRQ' 'sip-files0041.pro'
f05b86a6458fe55a6d12ce43a616c47c
c867dcb8f394a520c7ae2245a7f997e188e914e3
describe
'43449' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRR' 'sip-files0041.QC.jpg'
7c74f4ce5f6dae55d93203c5c24e77bc
728013ec3dbc7caf3f5b1d33d8faa10750c3a7cc
'2012-01-13T21:53:12-05:00'
describe
'501180' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRS' 'sip-files0041.tif'
ab1baa364465c8729320c84b2f3f36c2
65f82dc54b4e2952aba3bc925309a22471b6c5a0
'2012-01-13T21:52:27-05:00'
describe
'1013' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRT' 'sip-files0041.txt'
171adf9dcf1792595696b72b2800e33c
efd72b560a3853474cd26debca625e2e468e9d89
describe
'20352' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRU' 'sip-files0041thm.jpg'
60322bf52193a677ea9577bee397f34f
5714f22fb313dc320ad4bbd53e7aae0432326631
describe
'61035' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRV' 'sip-files0042.jp2'
62aefb4e4dc0e7ee9e1b1f7125337b0f
eab1f1933e85fc537edbc2c9c7968babfb5489c1
'2012-01-13T21:51:27-05:00'
describe
'119045' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRW' 'sip-files0042.jpg'
20bfad429479c3913fa8f6a0812941a2
24957d90f91058f6b3705558c86403f0112642ad
describe
'25903' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRX' 'sip-files0042.pro'
b06a77ee0b3aacf3dc4730a7be628a27
30b8052a841334c66d36a849e4bf2c97e5095c4b
describe
'46128' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRY' 'sip-files0042.QC.jpg'
96435371f9d408d2b8010ef1303c2491
7d61a16729e9ddb2e9e69f1482db0feea4dd7ae6
describe
'501716' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVRZ' 'sip-files0042.tif'
cc76d66792cf953d80bfc941a3946b1a
7053fb8d3125fd2ec2fb59268baca29039c90505
'2012-01-13T21:52:00-05:00'
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSA' 'sip-files0042.txt'
a4c57918591749e47027aa005765b3cb
5ac80ca5c345b9b1d34b1732fcdd36d100c66803
describe
'21179' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSB' 'sip-files0042thm.jpg'
418e8c970e48114b533fa330f1b34929
a5722cf15e5d830c8986bf5a63b2318309588484
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSC' 'sip-files0043.jp2'
6ff8b6e47c30a8ec0f981454a393ba37
66a4a702152f389f321efb8acfc7b5345780b9cd
'2012-01-13T21:52:07-05:00'
describe
'117610' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSD' 'sip-files0043.jpg'
8ac3342aa4ecdb74e78173c264466168
c15b588f486079a1df13bb4235c23c737d144b57
describe
'25892' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSE' 'sip-files0043.pro'
f7105c4ae8db5a638981d2f6d14d6599
789554c3f2472e862d7f4158f78e13f6a2c92b5d
describe
'46666' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSF' 'sip-files0043.QC.jpg'
c2e20594b92f64faba056467c42491b8
792688f5f5614bb73ca1f23a605b22e26c3b57e9
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSG' 'sip-files0043.tif'
bd90bb3265a4ae56eadffc7663895e54
9001f9f25d7f0bd645ef2ba96ac1c37f4ddc1c1c
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSH' 'sip-files0043.txt'
adc8b21b694823f2218c5e5ad50ab791
db651f032128cd25c6bc09dff873e8c8a18d3a94
describe
'21398' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSI' 'sip-files0043thm.jpg'
fb6b479d0d8327be909444be4e7b2b30
0591a524d65a9d2e1904c3c08e167014e42cd13c
describe
'60970' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSJ' 'sip-files0044.jp2'
f549656d27000d95db1636055ef4e93b
3f1d44c5b14100bbf4a9974f9653b56653c37fc6
describe
'115620' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSK' 'sip-files0044.jpg'
b9411431bb3cdab07d7803ec8b828dfe
5e4e0912fbb7487772252b306bb01c7477946a57
'2012-01-13T21:52:36-05:00'
describe
'24815' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSL' 'sip-files0044.pro'
6d4b1bc2c725c8a12ed5578158b81422
97a0f405ac83a26727b780ddd8a55de4a94552bb
describe
'45372' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSM' 'sip-files0044.QC.jpg'
c2411068a16d9540ec99e25767a5495c
18a68727607b93a50771009df25750723a6076f6
describe
'501884' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSN' 'sip-files0044.tif'
1d9cfe4d8668e9505eeedfac0ebb56f2
282bff4cd2d8054e6861f990825929b9ec015acf
'2012-01-13T21:53:11-05:00'
describe
'982' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSO' 'sip-files0044.txt'
aa2cf3fa59819fd65afd81f55c8b1bd1
3fb05afebe608442e4dc9224a0d83205ee6f02bf
describe
'21400' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSP' 'sip-files0044thm.jpg'
13503305eae4e558aabe4b690cb369fd
12c0b4760b368273b6b67d807010e14e579c553d
describe
'61030' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSQ' 'sip-files0045.jp2'
c2cc78953fc2fcdc1a73e2eb022e5f8a
cb0001dff96eafa46679fd11a2ef531436ee7346
describe
'122154' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSR' 'sip-files0045.jpg'
9c8da72dcd2824d22cb107a4278b0a6c
065d9a1100e0eae9e467d5a2f2f25508734d9530
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSS' 'sip-files0045.pro'
1c0418f04d50ae64425005f59cfbc09d
71b682ec85bc86b54cefc002e80b8da9cf4558d3
'2012-01-13T21:52:44-05:00'
describe
'46908' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVST' 'sip-files0045.QC.jpg'
e4e3dcf7520672a02ffac648823ecb0c
422035a4c3bdb7d3af76c2d7e0b75a6b5db11d17
describe
'502004' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSU' 'sip-files0045.tif'
521dbfba7270edc893d78c5f784de9d1
a9079b1101d7aeafd78d05895bfba3a4a9c77924
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSV' 'sip-files0045.txt'
c94f3fe23c9a73316b1498e73fe1288d
3e0545aeac62849056836e430d25b71277aa6879
'2012-01-13T21:52:18-05:00'
describe
'21663' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSW' 'sip-files0045thm.jpg'
ec63f16f5e2c0e6ef4000f7b0bf08866
505526e55dd38a32e55fbd37cb081a5aeeb0ef4c
describe
'60953' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSX' 'sip-files0046.jp2'
91c5d92743f25426314a9c474bb6d8ec
709aeb0e5269ad1b5ed9f0656b575ab21259fc6f
describe
'115640' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSY' 'sip-files0046.jpg'
d34003146a20427f2b3e1882cf010247
4a68f0a3a76af7a2b87d50f48c21998f83bc6f6b
describe
'25253' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVSZ' 'sip-files0046.pro'
4a36074ee985f57810dd3af8b4da878a
4d52e209c3d304d184b9d4aab475359806563763
describe
'45149' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTA' 'sip-files0046.QC.jpg'
e566394ad5a9e47059f214a00795a612
206fd3503ef6f927052fa1aca730c01dd7382b77
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTB' 'sip-files0046.tif'
2f3b8f83fb830940b840fb677835d7bb
3d0c34ffd1cc739fc42beed993c2a461d6a58d84
'2012-01-13T21:54:46-05:00'
describe
'996' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTC' 'sip-files0046.txt'
c10bd4858852e1475e47ad986a794a1b
fbcbbba0b6f84b717d94e0e4c7d7f86146850799
describe
'21086' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTD' 'sip-files0046thm.jpg'
4a2455272a3a6023f283af512b9175cf
8fe447dea432834d0c00133aecde6c80f67fa826
'2012-01-13T21:53:26-05:00'
describe
'60870' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTE' 'sip-files0047.jp2'
5740a8f9da1120b74ef110c2dc0f0c34
04974c3d87e1dea8a55711090b3c088d14c9f2cc
'2012-01-13T21:53:10-05:00'
describe
'103060' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTF' 'sip-files0047.jpg'
0ba18ac093c752b4dcdc29060167aad8
2c1229c47329c675a0538aa89aa9fe4ca780b6f6
describe
'21093' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTG' 'sip-files0047.pro'
7e1e3919f521f6ba4ef70e531f09d9ff
b3f95d23e77675e4c50563f9ad600037eab12acd
'2012-01-13T21:54:25-05:00'
describe
'41026' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTH' 'sip-files0047.QC.jpg'
4a4d8e821c66c0c7816c4b6a1ac1a577
80e238f19c90a58cac4eed45c86839a32c461245
describe
'501268' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTI' 'sip-files0047.tif'
95ca28870354c4c4e5b90cc15956e154
2d9213b56bb622d4f0c64b2406637eb3c655ded7
describe
'901' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTJ' 'sip-files0047.txt'
ff8cad4b4516ad1aec20150adc5b11b2
c81fa133da3545d476c8fa6df97fb9650cf3e65f
describe
WARNING CODE 'Daitss::Anomaly' Invalid character
'19964' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTK' 'sip-files0047thm.jpg'
3a6399f3e44a2868e81ec8f0ba13fd6d
672ce8e93e51874e78901c248d7270a25cb29b4c
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTL' 'sip-files0048.jp2'
eb34c3fea0faafb40d3fc837a8b9d474
2f45892455e66372171ff0669baee7e50556b233
describe
'113776' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTM' 'sip-files0048.jpg'
1ef3c402215c1ff390d1c17644d5079f
4d7323823e43872540d091827c04613f614dce4e
describe
'25201' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTN' 'sip-files0048.pro'
d89884cf671729738983628549a7b793
1f45dfad146fab874308f5f305051a386d792243
describe
'46096' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTO' 'sip-files0048.QC.jpg'
476a4a16838d7795b1dde7c27e65231d
c07c0ad5e793a263b173cc98beaa79e1e56a797c
describe
'501880' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTP' 'sip-files0048.tif'
7e2bb2f9fc974aefee20157a7efaa612
8c0d14e0b48972e4d567a4997ed0d8ace0c2858c
'2012-01-13T21:51:59-05:00'
describe
'997' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTQ' 'sip-files0048.txt'
6fb460cb4882164ade62e196ffc4b68d
8d37c502436762d5626ccc4328f5f233606e86e4
'2012-01-13T21:51:30-05:00'
describe
'21308' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTR' 'sip-files0048thm.jpg'
05c2ec852d48d0b4ea4e4c522238f30f
b4d17fd33e154c5a405b1ec686ca1bc647ea2dc1
'2012-01-13T21:52:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTS' 'sip-files0049.jp2'
4a09b8f65f361d7f90e52a7d4ac6cfaf
0f0196eb6e7416e96df1fc2ec5ddeba4421456b9
describe
'118020' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTT' 'sip-files0049.jpg'
0946a9fbcec8715fcc343eaca99ec200
393f4a25661002f353b236590f63f6b21fe4adfa
describe
'25617' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTU' 'sip-files0049.pro'
453c92a25d0fdc794a8055a79afba73a
58212a536fe6066e9ca8197851ff601cc034fe12
describe
'45860' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTV' 'sip-files0049.QC.jpg'
0e3bdb6d2b96249bdc63e1313a2c9611
f75475d8c219790ad9f247e5d3dfd2e8913441a7
describe
'501760' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTW' 'sip-files0049.tif'
ad869cf5cf2c9a4237d77ac2f7593b53
a6e0192ced8271b0aa5397bd3cbbe3521f96ace6
describe
'1021' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTX' 'sip-files0049.txt'
4d3c110a27d0805fbc7ac1c9a03e1d55
e10ef1da2de522b575a287591cd2b4540abd7fd4
describe
'21302' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTY' 'sip-files0049thm.jpg'
68fccac7a5d7db11eb30bd6c1cb45e54
d4982800a279fdf5c91f4827dd8ab461c5c34ce5
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVTZ' 'sip-files0050.jp2'
401fcfba63f09a91a0ec4a6abe5665ca
8afd8ab70cdb3ef5e79b688be65eb10963bed8e5
describe
'118637' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUA' 'sip-files0050.jpg'
f9e38467e1662bdffe4d8d9d6ccd6544
4f7afd7f024cafe9ab1cd0a00369fa22e96681fa
describe
'25631' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUB' 'sip-files0050.pro'
699a6f97877434ef3923b1865c738074
e5a7094420080584883bb95e8d9c4b4cc90a11ae
'2012-01-13T21:53:48-05:00'
describe
'45768' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUC' 'sip-files0050.QC.jpg'
7383646a2a36213dc160f1892d0cf7ea
5e06ef079aa89aec03cfc260a94db515e1724d66
'2012-01-13T21:51:25-05:00'
describe
'501648' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUD' 'sip-files0050.tif'
36e7245ef651864eb91202c041b259bb
6731929917566b3ceb211ce60770757cfbabc241
describe
'1014' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUE' 'sip-files0050.txt'
9c4eb83e5cbe569108574a2828d5a863
a1eff26146e229c8d32ff7cdd27db989ca4b6ef8
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUF' 'sip-files0050a.jp2'
1513d32cb01207390cb24d2b4df43b01
707196286533e54b5c836df7c60de47e57a89e4b
describe
'62897' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUG' 'sip-files0050a.jpg'
3fc7d4c25b0e3beb1829b98258df71e6
ef3aa4ca903c227b216cae5775161a15e9d76d5c
describe
'775' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUH' 'sip-files0050a.pro'
f84961a02caf106c3e0483c76a4dc657
afbc90683d3f046155f813efccd5e3ebec21200a
describe
'26557' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUI' 'sip-files0050a.QC.jpg'
b20f4b4e0d91610249143c99f5a4d6d2
daef4acac40beb7e8f4418393650d4fba4e8d1ef
describe
'499884' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUJ' 'sip-files0050a.tif'
14007ba92fa9e8e5591201695cb7796f
f984cc3984fa7641cb178c695cf9128ff7a3ef78
describe
'87' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUK' 'sip-files0050a.txt'
e81d156ee72f87cf2d7e6ad599b17078
3e5face18f72ef11feb8f7ea75d4c810a5a7a1bc
describe
'15747' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUL' 'sip-files0050athm.jpg'
d162d557f7b48d5a9f0951362a0a5f7a
36561d93079efa2f136ba363cac0059f1c349f47
describe
'21155' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUM' 'sip-files0050thm.jpg'
88243c7e2c4836c9e22a2709b6f81522
ea9b2c783ec1354f86855b042678d0760a8e1752
'2012-01-13T21:54:23-05:00'
describe
'60977' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUN' 'sip-files0051.jp2'
b36d7848853f6676b45a18843d5bf29f
ab2cb1aa5ff4f5e8866197aab5d012caa4052c66
describe
'109311' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUO' 'sip-files0051.jpg'
984cd433f7eabefc172e2a39809943cd
2c79dc6815105b1478dc8136510fbf300b92a825
'2012-01-13T21:54:12-05:00'
describe
'24490' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUP' 'sip-files0051.pro'
b304944ba15555cdafe337a384efc959
8eccc39c3acbe927a0816b3de5a2f2f5ea7e105c
describe
'42621' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUQ' 'sip-files0051.QC.jpg'
c1ff38c1b142bb6869d7364b740aa35a
ac2815540de3466b896108960c02f694c733552c
describe
'501276' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUR' 'sip-files0051.tif'
62997f681decdccc7e3082997ab61660
7c17250c4de7154372e8b4e49e49efccc3cc99c1
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUS' 'sip-files0051.txt'
e8a8a0e1ec68b6c84488bc97832d0b50
68f4aeaa11bbe85f4ff3ee53c5b81a01fe5af732
describe
Invalid character
'20524' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUT' 'sip-files0051thm.jpg'
d9011a79c3089c59762abfc3ec9b1f9b
b4580c9845e9550884f6a223151fecb9a866abcc
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUU' 'sip-files0052.jp2'
736687f3cce183c9d22d3d66fdd75b3e
d60104ca7929d5635f66a66c80f8b654e8c86165
describe
'113446' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUV' 'sip-files0052.jpg'
87608637ecb6f008eaff32d687dc38aa
375a0ac40d27acdfad76a9f1844a153dd2185613
describe
'25305' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUW' 'sip-files0052.pro'
3c8ed0dd913352d6c2947a0bd652dcb8
b572737ac64921889a50b4a904d8266109524805
describe
'45645' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUX' 'sip-files0052.QC.jpg'
6a59bbe5a09d4dff8f916951cbf3689a
abcbf328c094a365e14f4c9f8a2eedd70f6ad4a4
'2012-01-13T21:51:29-05:00'
describe
'501728' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUY' 'sip-files0052.tif'
148719f040972bb70380cd14088c970c
6488eec90c64aa027eb0ab55ea6a9550bed76a28
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVUZ' 'sip-files0052.txt'
9f599ae142dfb128e316be4156adc626
038971026e10df5ed4df61acbb9ce10dfb3cfa87
describe
'21162' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVA' 'sip-files0052thm.jpg'
5ebc460f3d9ca95867a97b4e99ab9357
ecc76b5db727c6196b43cb3955dd4e4aa914b35e
describe
'61055' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVB' 'sip-files0053.jp2'
43e5cbd9ef9cc30f500a7270574e0154
77eef5bd16feafab10ef3a349aaee19088d82d68
describe
'114171' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVC' 'sip-files0053.jpg'
dbfb2394b01debaf64825c6c3704c9a2
5b3317831064f5c4eeeaca930b25d46443192e8e
describe
'26650' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVD' 'sip-files0053.pro'
68dd672305d3c7d2682974e0d68fbc5e
35284af091806dd86697a0f8611a49dd0a73278e
describe
'44205' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVE' 'sip-files0053.QC.jpg'
6a3f5721d913aaa4f46cabc916b72f06
2187cb312009cb9823241206849bb608d55fd079
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVF' 'sip-files0053.tif'
c237ad58ffa78666af8b705222e46b8e
cdd2a1ade38ca26207a9419de533083914e0d33d
'2012-01-13T21:54:17-05:00'
describe
'1070' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVG' 'sip-files0053.txt'
b375b303aaf77dabb91d22061609e742
a847db0082a778ad563c2d561f380c1a454d3bf1
describe
'20200' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVH' 'sip-files0053thm.jpg'
b4407b564ad612c3299b48a4b087cc74
bc1d38f17ebba3046bc11e5dc663bd6e4679529b
'2012-01-13T21:51:19-05:00'
describe
'60964' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVI' 'sip-files0054.jp2'
7b34a132dcc535ea12a43b604de88cca
84cc863020607bc41ee99e0fa0c55945164f9cfa
describe
'112905' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVJ' 'sip-files0054.jpg'
2f94d70f7b54368c16d76df1fac356c2
ca35fb35672eff4334d62ad8a26d4bfb15490532
describe
'25185' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVK' 'sip-files0054.pro'
b81dc7650d663d44c2a14256ec8353bd
8111fd8876b9f723214fb6df7bc85c9326304e99
describe
'41341' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVL' 'sip-files0054.QC.jpg'
43cd6402556c22b4fe7261911b265d2f
4ea506515af205232b00ef84a2eded206d408e78
describe
'501004' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVM' 'sip-files0054.tif'
ccb2f8cb3c1fe4c37a2220488b7cd83a
cc6a54565c052512f70474ed3ff3dd132c059c0e
describe
'993' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVN' 'sip-files0054.txt'
94eeb39d9509b19657fe05da1d9ae1a1
29fcff9d0eb345d6863c77ac1a15bf60091f5a9e
describe
Invalid character
'19529' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVO' 'sip-files0054thm.jpg'
26601c981866756d28f0073ba60f116b
96b32e4e8e037d424635b24c542f960b6bbdb186
'2012-01-13T21:53:24-05:00'
describe
'60899' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVP' 'sip-files0055.jp2'
e595f33768351a31c28eadae9c1eff75
573c4f89b3fa000c8f638e370306dcbe0eba5cf7
describe
'104231' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVQ' 'sip-files0055.jpg'
fbe2a0b42600591446dfb566e95c7b73
b893675f8960a9c3aa13a08e8815ce6f1641a2d0
describe
'25487' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVR' 'sip-files0055.pro'
bf960110de66cecc99d7f2722fa7f005
c3ef343c057d51304a5aa3faff2bd4573ad56b8f
describe
'41133' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVS' 'sip-files0055.QC.jpg'
2af78c6fa74c521b4caa3ead4b1a4f5c
132949cdcaec7709eb9938eed1a5943523dd1b6a
describe
'500744' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVT' 'sip-files0055.tif'
43ad1b101870ad192eb0b56496091514
09e0e34bde1d8cc67dcce4e1e1925975b748f28e
'2012-01-13T21:54:15-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVU' 'sip-files0055.txt'
60f1b6bc456ec9c4e33ccf0b1db8aaa8
57c0b6e7dee30d64de3b0a9db941745d17719a77
describe
'19318' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVV' 'sip-files0055thm.jpg'
158a4ef7b1ca7b5677e0288c8ff35ca5
76d55ce989568fe76fe13c64ff1f49e3225895a4
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVW' 'sip-files0056.jp2'
0c045802bfe28c3e3897a00eeea1150e
a2bd836d170d15aa90a63df0d49a6ba6f265c3dc
describe
'106334' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVX' 'sip-files0056.jpg'
007a68c35d4746b85a4f0ebb21ffee34
aa5a6216e6d1823e05b8761de6426a6fb1ecd7ad
describe
'25565' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVY' 'sip-files0056.pro'
4c46dda49c90d05fa5e4e9e0b8a3b153
bcf44a06c9a766ef49923618f2070b7e5ae2b75f
describe
'41436' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVVZ' 'sip-files0056.QC.jpg'
a2dc146343cee273122bf045439cdccd
38768b3c9270687af082bc07936e5827d9100eda
'2012-01-13T21:53:15-05:00'
describe
'500832' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWA' 'sip-files0056.tif'
05b1b8a719965393f34fc2bf541ffe9a
a6b01ef133e4531506efd6bf82dfaed49f2a4441
describe
'1011' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWB' 'sip-files0056.txt'
68f4aea83e7218d5e3e333ffd1372141
091ab3dd36d7c047f491f57dccb927f6c4f442a4
'2012-01-13T21:52:33-05:00'
describe
'19575' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWC' 'sip-files0056thm.jpg'
1224f5f853891aa684d2dd1616c5f639
b02215480b1a97394eba62e637630852b9491c20
describe
'61012' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWD' 'sip-files0057.jp2'
865ba7721b7f5398811a91938f65a411
406e2a78125c74acf9f80d7324ad0e57dd95a087
describe
'105404' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWE' 'sip-files0057.jpg'
c0348366c4967650dc353559013a8c99
8d7296e8ff1fded9cb311ba9f7f4df86f2f9faf7
'2012-01-13T21:53:44-05:00'
describe
'25320' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWF' 'sip-files0057.pro'
74cebd67fae4f189f5067b2b211a4fb0
3d39b13913267bca568df0edbe58a5e7c0cf641f
'2012-01-13T21:54:11-05:00'
describe
'41102' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWG' 'sip-files0057.QC.jpg'
386d5ba90294b4fe3971f4c5060f20e5
95f327a7a6e86fbea987b0d2be5ad4435d0e8e62
'2012-01-13T21:53:46-05:00'
describe
'500764' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWH' 'sip-files0057.tif'
3a9922f2190432d2fc464d123840db99
61373da4251eab778e00fb9f41ba3a085ca1067d
describe
'1019' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWI' 'sip-files0057.txt'
c25d9b85802926500c6caea64e9c509f
fc4dc90b0df1155052f51e6a98ffa7e75dd58233
describe
'19482' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWJ' 'sip-files0057thm.jpg'
ded2b0af5535b13c42cd2e11469b0429
34bf1afc459acc9cabb1f90b990dbd6a72536b56
describe
'60928' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWK' 'sip-files0058.jp2'
35e896ef65f9ea9ed279898b3a717e13
719a1b362d22a5b5f88bb23c7a02dbdf2a4b4a08
describe
'104983' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWL' 'sip-files0058.jpg'
d5d7e9f7f3793ba3700b5c873d70104e
6f94707b45d921ac681d5b0035dd1cfcddef609d
describe
'25718' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWM' 'sip-files0058.pro'
fe68604aa834161dcabc2ebc9cb86828
03a78ef98f07429e8e7996625baf05e7ce5a546c
describe
'41623' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWN' 'sip-files0058.QC.jpg'
d9425fb4d4d3000d339edfe329d0e0eb
cf6b01d857644396848aa33e959381fe1a19d159
describe
'500872' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWO' 'sip-files0058.tif'
a121a1513d9db4061d056a76a0200714
b94d8fa68b0a4abee254c40bf11762f8b2da686c
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWP' 'sip-files0058.txt'
f61b38e8bb3413037b3c73f9702be875
6495cdb75897374eac2df3a00497b53b2376954f
describe
'19706' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWQ' 'sip-files0058thm.jpg'
3dae2792170f97a5c25c56a1c8578375
863eb0ae22d04640128a090141a7fb1a922ddd08
describe
'60896' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWR' 'sip-files0059.jp2'
25439001220856bab1fe3c7b61bb78b4
6fc305276ecdcac07adb8881237684cd956593dd
describe
'108593' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWS' 'sip-files0059.jpg'
e9056e661bbce99defaaf9c66a9d534d
af2babd75a1a006ab463a55c5fb4b303f3a4ea81
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWT' 'sip-files0059.pro'
b841d2d0d012fa08bbbbbbc0c0d5e993
7f0aa67d2f4b64524114a68fc28915360660fe09
describe
'42396' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWU' 'sip-files0059.QC.jpg'
bec915972dffb9d8f1b73e0a65f9cb78
0ba596093f6ebcedce869ec4997166b50f86ae74
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWV' 'sip-files0059.tif'
99249fd3d42b6f1bdfc5a8ef6518b3a2
ce81f385dfe5e0ed6a5485ad212caa08fe89a23b
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWW' 'sip-files0059.txt'
218a97ff537c744b5c6cb67067710ff7
4c4c34f27a33b5c50e74802a96003eccd7ba1366
describe
'19993' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWX' 'sip-files0059thm.jpg'
790fc5f47568629cd21fda1965995264
09f8215a208124a7e6147714f8e162eeddad7be4
'2012-01-13T21:53:54-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWY' 'sip-files0060.jp2'
7b8fa3b13f2046133547be29408a9648
b1bec7374d5da379e0f0eaf6cb2aded8e77bdc63
describe
'108288' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVWZ' 'sip-files0060.jpg'
f0400eb1cec89f32a5f928eb3e418316
b9adafe8b3b6ef23f7d2eb866b045613dbea1b4d
describe
'25775' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXA' 'sip-files0060.pro'
c958feb91056dfa41420ab616477a19a
34442c1d2031ee4847a2368989afffd01c2f1c4b
describe
'41834' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXB' 'sip-files0060.QC.jpg'
10263e40ee10e54a3c4e9c7942e5ffe4
79b038bd831ce7867f9831f60f213b520b99a30d
describe
'500788' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXC' 'sip-files0060.tif'
6f9a9a5ed155535d9b1dac918ae38282
a736654bb74287f8008b52cf67ff408e66bb4280
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXD' 'sip-files0060.txt'
2fe0070026d8300ab14523008d3dcc4c
81806251483abe5784ca23a3ccc56053c565736c
describe
'19409' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXE' 'sip-files0060thm.jpg'
2265eba6ce6faafea3e94eed5b631677
cefb9c4ec663d9377a4308bfa990ce143902f865
'2012-01-13T21:51:56-05:00'
describe
'966' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXF' 'sip-files0061.jp2'
6d31b78735ecd06018b3e29781a7323d
ca75e5168bce0e65eb661cf46151c539f154a683
describe
'10055' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXG' 'sip-files0061.jpg'
1f5927da5fe4e75b0f13bd738ca740f2
edc94bb1d24f7b8bc83b11e15941de209b9b0cf4
describe
'8630' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXH' 'sip-files0061.QC.jpg'
09a3cb4879d85ef4b1cd4693aea6f673
d9a35ae3afabab0c683dd7a7952135495fc378c0
describe
'495916' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXI' 'sip-files0061.tif'
39f2fdb2ebe8a27c0e527b772c26ad33
c5f83f1d0efb5dcfdecb0cbbca7332618b21a853
describe
'8249' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXJ' 'sip-files0061thm.jpg'
5f7f9da6e9d57b4ede2e5a42ef6381b6
089e0886d760870909c745379f2f7e9a9fde8753
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXK' 'sip-files0062.jp2'
8cd28dcea7138f7f5fe1422011231b54
7a0b472ecae02c0d1c6677570d8275460ee37626
describe
'109220' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXL' 'sip-files0062.jpg'
eaf91ef81cf039aab7979a22eaafa834
432876de1d83fa493ad36a573ccc5f1ef19c8f77
describe
'13416' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXM' 'sip-files0062.pro'
7c87dec329fd6495880e92fe126a2a3a
939038c69973bd8328626a135179dec252daacdc
describe
'41045' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXN' 'sip-files0062.QC.jpg'
dd9b39de108faddd4f16fb082a8d0d25
4c1ae0489705376c0e6e44577cb85d3b42b48083
describe
'501172' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXO' 'sip-files0062.tif'
3dd6c75fd843b1229e64b1ea35f9c77e
6bc223b7b5e9bb7eeef579c01312d0824dca2bb1
describe
'690' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXP' 'sip-files0062.txt'
bf2c213b53f6b25700840be0b97e6c6b
4a61aad2ca5a01c4e23f62ae301fa103570d529e
'2012-01-13T21:54:42-05:00'
describe
Invalid character
'19818' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXQ' 'sip-files0062thm.jpg'
1432c30a1fbe5ded4cdd384c7b377745
480eb33def1c3d831bc8b3c8b29a99c4e692b58c
describe
'61019' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXR' 'sip-files0063.jp2'
d100ce6f6d2af55b9dd202f9af3dec24
9b41bc30f94553a16722b998d2006c42e0259770
describe
'114847' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXS' 'sip-files0063.jpg'
c3a43e488a134624a57ecb199d507c98
7962fa8a6a39b46b6c1df8736f555f16146ecb34
describe
'25081' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXT' 'sip-files0063.pro'
0aedcf10eb9d7d31942bfaf971602562
2834f0b67d2445dfee119aab3cee83d4adeaea98
describe
'43000' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXU' 'sip-files0063.QC.jpg'
18b95879aef46c33c3d0aba2568dce58
292fe5c2c583039d194d22762f64dd73c122875d
describe
'501092' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXV' 'sip-files0063.tif'
600120e34569a84215df3396a510791c
8b5d27e1c0ac3eec19af148cd463e3df0c82fff3
describe
'990' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXW' 'sip-files0063.txt'
dae97a65e89df29000a5352078b2c93c
3476a1a05838cca3add162b5b3f1c5a33bff74a4
describe
'20024' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXX' 'sip-files0063thm.jpg'
215ba61cceec918de6af175f4d6ddd07
a1b223fa6f18f3f0e200fea56ece745bea0130ca
describe
'60971' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXY' 'sip-files0064.jp2'
a366c065f998561182c10806aaa7a62a
ae71e5dbea8cc44aaa4641c4f7bede8c127f4789
describe
'108720' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVXZ' 'sip-files0064.jpg'
76af9c41ade7ab835b543e384ffc4713
46d5ed0564fb5fa2d43a467289c1e5ec7ee4b009
describe
'26501' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYA' 'sip-files0064.pro'
da3e0b108d27e08828071c3dc5cd033d
3c6bd46c48958432a54669ee528e9ac242e15858
describe
'42158' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYB' 'sip-files0064.QC.jpg'
4d09748b7967ec600da1d56772892465
9a67b1b74eae1241ec1a75199a42fd2df7617e30
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYC' 'sip-files0064.tif'
a3c9f03119f952b53403e02141ca8a9c
798b906f14fde36078871362716a071f743d45d7
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYD' 'sip-files0064.txt'
a75eed04229d5218c05ce3cb9cc196e5
32379b39449db1b58c0e6dfa7ec8c5f0a61f6a98
'2012-01-13T21:53:57-05:00'
describe
'19661' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYE' 'sip-files0064thm.jpg'
ee08d65090817fdd8fb6b033e1b38eb5
b797f9bda8cb95776ac25f28bc0b124491364ba2
describe
'61046' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYF' 'sip-files0065.jp2'
439d40caa0e282bb773050aac37956e5
0c456a790181c37791d7bf5aad07c89178ee2906
'2012-01-13T21:52:16-05:00'
describe
'104958' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYG' 'sip-files0065.jpg'
7a18b1cf7c16062250160c71a3ff4d95
b66428d1db5961090ad45a72b89139531c52df4c
describe
'24590' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYH' 'sip-files0065.pro'
bd4df1b46fa13fbc5590de14d076dfce
cd86fb99e3d7d4a0a465941132f14b6f96b2c70d
describe
'41265' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYI' 'sip-files0065.QC.jpg'
45931758a43a7310f80eeb0cfa77e5f2
455f51176aed2ebc7b2867f424f335b75af94477
describe
'500968' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYJ' 'sip-files0065.tif'
6d8efe45bb510beca0ec32e75f10fedc
d834d958946a80fa54cf863011e0029a78a17838
'2012-01-13T21:53:33-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYK' 'sip-files0065.txt'
cdab232d610b227b986afb56f9a1bbdf
77cd413cbc1b07a50012ae2324f319fa7dce10bf
describe
'19808' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYL' 'sip-files0065thm.jpg'
0c56f2a4c17165562e0d7ddc1d879d72
191ff31124b06836da12911b617531b64f724e03
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYM' 'sip-files0066.jp2'
32549187fadf6a42a8a916bb2f19e0cf
11879556f2693abc380d3cbac7e24b1ec4f11b0c
describe
'109084' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYN' 'sip-files0066.jpg'
dea65804ba10e3ca91bc6537cec8a95f
02e249c5a8df29b15062cc380db0f56df93909ad
describe
'25697' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYO' 'sip-files0066.pro'
4968cfeb939d2841d4bb16de2102336d
ed9e69160faf440bd557df7c951fdbffb3fe994e
describe
'42683' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYP' 'sip-files0066.QC.jpg'
464b5f1cca2363c385c2aaa8072f924a
61e4c5c24a880829c25f0ef897ec3d38c35cc250
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYQ' 'sip-files0066.tif'
3748ae0a96b053734b5dc63b023c0b62
07edacb52fff1f15c90535222b95751c9ec9c7ab
describe
'1027' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYR' 'sip-files0066.txt'
4c30ce9fa01db637dc05c965ff414c56
94db394a34ce24d2930c54c89e0d366b9562c541
describe
'20178' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYS' 'sip-files0066thm.jpg'
317726c2172d243b241afa1a745b7674
cdc8c515f9e12844dd016fd00ec3cc0722c7fc66
'2012-01-13T21:54:10-05:00'
describe
'60976' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYT' 'sip-files0067.jp2'
851caaa7b418499a817c4e1ed26af4b0
0bf87fee3dc822dc309ec2c43e13aceac4d39270
describe
'106264' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYU' 'sip-files0067.jpg'
b7142b7ffd6fcee598a6549bd3f50204
3281c0a7004e575786667cf2dc2f9ba5f337c697
describe
'25761' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYV' 'sip-files0067.pro'
8791670b149bc796d00c6fd8428139d7
d391b8d4cfe00dcee2971ff537885745112cc9cf
describe
'41048' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYW' 'sip-files0067.QC.jpg'
4509ee0d319a4c666973b815330af485
5f92d7b9f652a097a6ef5066278c3ba285eb57a6
describe
'500912' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYX' 'sip-files0067.tif'
3f6884c1ee4dfecb3af8e70357b83122
7b8010db85330f224d28b5769da90575b0074785
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYY' 'sip-files0067.txt'
eaf982c019318b1191a427267d5f884a
0b85f758e4872389b821d9d88fdc44e34d95b209
describe
'19692' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVYZ' 'sip-files0067thm.jpg'
c9e5f99ab97c9e685f007d071e6805da
5b32722b94656a3c3c0b71ba9b38ee1962853ec0
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZA' 'sip-files0068.jp2'
ce2e7a5ae6102a37fc3cca231d29d718
cab6cff2d61b04e56ea5a7e740e05902cc6d6e08
describe
'114296' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZB' 'sip-files0068.jpg'
5e63970a47bba727a624634266cbdc7a
56c370729f395646fd575ee226a9ba7cd85d0125
describe
'24577' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZC' 'sip-files0068.pro'
2d0adbbb55cd03862537673833082562
f93f5f2bae606cf4a60fa4ae711eed0a69761bc9
describe
'45777' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZD' 'sip-files0068.QC.jpg'
46137071710305f26c801052c3a4fbd1
4f6c08256eec921a3e2b913e797284715268d2d0
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZE' 'sip-files0068.tif'
6df3cb8b6c9ad82c95507d09cde9484a
f21c4cb50a148066915328095080481f3a3ffbfe
describe
'983' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZF' 'sip-files0068.txt'
67340395f325239655f70adc58807683
768f15c28e821ba117bfdf23a6a4ae8848c8ae95
describe
'21222' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZG' 'sip-files0068thm.jpg'
c1de2bf0ffdb7f4c6c3507947086ed37
b1f661f70eeeb791fa4d8a1d2eaa1ef54e1a27fd
describe
'60894' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZH' 'sip-files0069.jp2'
97427f878719cd8b5dcca5ab00d34147
7368298bef4b9c36a0ac14fefab25030877fa56f
describe
'99186' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZI' 'sip-files0069.jpg'
458c43f1491fde5b858a2616a0fb575b
ef0ee4c0969f37dbe1e9ed946716226bbcc1ac96
describe
'20701' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZJ' 'sip-files0069.pro'
bb32d32d559a83771e1e6a471a56b3b2
6e1eb3ec113f585ffa999bd1df256209825bc838
describe
'40996' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZK' 'sip-files0069.QC.jpg'
2af5d6fc86c88e5f531628c1ec32c251
c7e3c5f1e95b5d0fa4f614548cdea527329b7ca1
describe
'501244' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZL' 'sip-files0069.tif'
c49aae8c1ef5151382b2d44a8ee3f457
a26180f831b2aaa2285dc4f97bb71ded91a4a04b
describe
'865' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZM' 'sip-files0069.txt'
232a6dba346866c86951a4b08e6222b2
842761b7bde899891a81e9a1e73e61ae0a71953a
describe
'19930' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZN' 'sip-files0069thm.jpg'
c797d3f28a75d611ba54edb1a45eb7d2
d6361accded9620ceff626135c9cde2fa36cea52
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZO' 'sip-files0070.jp2'
bafc1a8c1a15d2a56dcbe87cc409ba63
69eb8154db5dc66b3eb004db30c20b6039c646a7
'2012-01-13T21:53:13-05:00'
describe
'107698' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZP' 'sip-files0070.jpg'
70fb05a25c8a545a42c9458509aba4d2
6faab28299510a195f7511766fa8d225606ff4d2
describe
'23166' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZQ' 'sip-files0070.pro'
1971756fb60060ccbd18d7341b4108b3
c55860882acbf248714a6ed9efa1f47c4a531a6f
describe
'42979' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZR' 'sip-files0070.QC.jpg'
d66d5bbf0d1c5068448a45c6f02e4dcc
320ba184e6ebd89228ddefaeb9e6f579a4bc79b4
describe
'501544' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZS' 'sip-files0070.tif'
664485af965465c2404ca3b39ff83a23
bf9425e6412e15ea5d83d1eaaa99448d877f4a2f
describe
'972' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZT' 'sip-files0070.txt'
84fa7885f136a6fb983ed01e4734aad1
65dcafce318c957e8e6c196c3154a802e6add0d7
'2012-01-13T21:53:31-05:00'
describe
'20584' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZU' 'sip-files0070thm.jpg'
37cb841db7f27ea02ed05b1e8778bde5
6fc0572b3f5659c76e77398beb976f8e59c9fa23
'2012-01-13T21:51:12-05:00'
describe
'61023' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZV' 'sip-files0071.jp2'
bd9ba0e35a63ab6e81a0a50b7446b929
d83080cd19d375cf28fdb26ca4d0e64586028eb9
describe
'119055' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZW' 'sip-files0071.jpg'
f94588f0600ca58dba54593aca67c30c
ebfa9d433d6ebaba1928f6e4583359fdc1477498
describe
'25645' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZX' 'sip-files0071.pro'
6be06699c3e429ca8b265c79066e80bd
bb768d75fed2e3634c233fe24441aba96290431e
describe
'46507' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZY' 'sip-files0071.QC.jpg'
379236901036666814bba9d17f76ebbf
75cea2c6c9bb3384f8f4286560ba64c329c4d77b
describe
'502116' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAVZZ' 'sip-files0071.tif'
0da5e9aec562538778017543d54d624c
c05b21302e00beb73445eaa1cacd42de39e57334
describe
'1016' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAA' 'sip-files0071.txt'
e78dfe89da0c3eb7cccb8eed0a2acf4e
7e9e15f2b0d35fbb9c15ef334989c4d25311c7a0
describe
'21600' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAB' 'sip-files0071thm.jpg'
a8edfd7a8a191fed5d8a3b9e094cd77d
e5f576d2078f625de9d1d3d89662525cf6051805
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAC' 'sip-files0072.jp2'
79bc1fcd7b4ee819f007eb6fe725759a
4a12ba69b004ebe5c555e8dfa8be14a5c4e81d93
describe
'117271' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAD' 'sip-files0072.jpg'
64b7bb03712a403b7c9349e640b63a65
4e7515526daa4fee8db5ec2a4c3a253cffb25574
describe
'25279' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAE' 'sip-files0072.pro'
a2f9b0b657dae7951b9c2a8512b1021b
646b86c828a73dd3031990a5d126736bc115bda6
describe
'46520' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAF' 'sip-files0072.QC.jpg'
6570692a4885969547a69dc6a9afb23d
76fa246f82588031a053a65c599b6e5ec48faddf
describe
'501964' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAG' 'sip-files0072.tif'
11463f5b2a389c937d1c1a8ace9754e3
5d93d9826df51943044e9513d135da277e73cdf8
describe
'998' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAH' 'sip-files0072.txt'
c988614bba3239a14b55b847e1da69ee
8052ae876616840b2b37fcbc31fff98284c25e45
describe
'21376' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAI' 'sip-files0072thm.jpg'
f37d0e7ba37c70c4eb68966ad20ef93f
464e59428575803495f3ee0d6627fc5d10f9144c
describe
'61007' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAJ' 'sip-files0073.jp2'
feedf20ff5619aba646c31f599c77693
129f6288b15998a1c8dcd6c4cc07e551c07f6d72
describe
'115550' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAK' 'sip-files0073.jpg'
4ea74c89430fe21c3395d0fa63496976
0b7c715076a2779e4dd1504e91dc2d89e1fa444f
describe
'24995' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAL' 'sip-files0073.pro'
31cfaf635cefc672792feda9d65a2900
f5eeae63ba05ef030b4ca18c301c1376df65f32c
describe
'45455' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAM' 'sip-files0073.QC.jpg'
a4fac135e7b739025d263ca329a60bc9
10c9f8544eaf11431fbc2ff3771111250628513f
'2012-01-13T21:52:57-05:00'
describe
'501796' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAN' 'sip-files0073.tif'
26fa0065151aef6fbc3a95d87a237b16
115f2337654cadf147ff18d66043667529f8a6f8
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAO' 'sip-files0073.txt'
fd730286a405b38619565610591ac186
c14553a087fdccf2880aaf333e5e0626007c8e2d
describe
'21117' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAP' 'sip-files0073thm.jpg'
e4ec3f0a37d3377830992a8d97f95c53
faf0e6fa0f2506befae0db189758c1b3a02ad318
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAQ' 'sip-files0074.jp2'
faee571a83340f4dbd8f3c72d623b027
80b0ef5c7533cae92d64ffa1ddcce0800f90c6dd
describe
'110935' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAR' 'sip-files0074.jpg'
a580d707d85d40d1f86eb0195c87ea39
b39f4b7436c6d850581e6019d04c2365b7ddac23
describe
'23602' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAS' 'sip-files0074.pro'
5bd35db311af6879303dd1f4e71092d0
0a548e9d5996372e6d20a8b619c96868ad2695af
describe
'43571' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAT' 'sip-files0074.QC.jpg'
93afe912aa312952e3ea92573d673f6e
9292a2a4d87d840aef3b556a4e51447297a83e4e
describe
'501592' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAU' 'sip-files0074.tif'
315ddebb34acaae087b32a4546e688b0
0885f9a8e924749b97e996d6125a8f1ce8b741ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAV' 'sip-files0074.txt'
1347b5d100e405daeb69ca489415b6c9
0f83299660cc4e9e6f2240364c7d60de3ea00bbf
describe
'20762' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAW' 'sip-files0074thm.jpg'
451d400e1d383d106a9140e04fe69db1
c1011d9f3b353ab2c180d68227d695c8749cfffb
describe
'60975' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAX' 'sip-files0075.jp2'
817c3810f96aa56a6a553d6f07e8a309
1d4005cb384009dd12126bdfe71fe2517a800fea
describe
'77488' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAY' 'sip-files0075.jpg'
c0a8d86fc60ee2ebfe6ea516add11751
9d784eefe081ed3518bd2318ee89fd03390106c6
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWAZ' 'sip-files0075.pro'
c0a99b1d0c5b045478ba0f17f363564c
4ca0bace2b32cb5c930569b4dd840ece0116694c
describe
'29265' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBA' 'sip-files0075.QC.jpg'
ab220877af070c565f4fb4623a45f500
53be0380dc9cf9a4491b97cda38591888a14424c
describe
'500436' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBB' 'sip-files0075.tif'
658d0d93880ba0dbc9a4c2870be08016
9b21450dc09c188211f03caa01f05065f7744473
describe
'66' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBC' 'sip-files0075.txt'
6c955a2cd992e1cd6f455962140fe9e9
e1a512215b7ea346b34d11567ca4dacb01f8b391
describe
Invalid character
'16675' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBD' 'sip-files0075thm.jpg'
da85864015fb3560772872c7d7d8b7ac
05bb8e1544d52420d83da45e8dc37ed91e004908
describe
'60966' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBE' 'sip-files0076.jp2'
3b0805a15f7817ac580aa47889b001d6
666f1c8fa34c649be9da50e2b6f24d22d897ba7b
describe
'115750' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBF' 'sip-files0076.jpg'
7c667ed7986872e04864b9930b1c30f1
d61614af5bbe649748efc5994470bccbc32e317a
describe
'26440' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBG' 'sip-files0076.pro'
753a9f32dafb0a459129c274fe1a9ac0
624c17fef03304f2afaa433807630739a07eb087
describe
'45271' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBH' 'sip-files0076.QC.jpg'
a9f21421372c34b86089dfa1eee0dad4
9568f1155d0daaa1d462892b1d4d63c03a4fec5b
describe
'501572' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBI' 'sip-files0076.tif'
a12ef3810373d2c1ee90b81313680a92
6b39c714b93e74769c1a3151b62316aa243ba918
describe
'1045' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBJ' 'sip-files0076.txt'
4ff44ae993a5776c2dc34990440b146f
e584418a659f56e1c33dd8a7c765925610ef8cdc
describe
'20739' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBK' 'sip-files0076thm.jpg'
b393d6df21ac0430d8d3d2dd0c97d5bc
81bbe86022ddf2612a841452612e6774b83205ba
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBL' 'sip-files0077.jp2'
6b0a654477a5aa3e4a39d7b75c6637ef
7adf4dad1d6b518b369284e2bdd62ce1b87d8c60
describe
'115761' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBM' 'sip-files0077.jpg'
32f79ce37fbc1a1221044d40a2cbe8d6
ec28647a1c7910f92ee221d77197d44a7b91ee7e
'2012-01-13T21:54:30-05:00'
describe
'25409' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBN' 'sip-files0077.pro'
21d60b842f6f53f7be76aa9a07482299
35a41a57e2f6152d0f710498435da28b556ea6a2
describe
'45698' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBO' 'sip-files0077.QC.jpg'
55d34dbab8bad0a65f23b7c8eb507041
d7b2f8c76462a93b6ed28f8d836d4b50dfac3d72
'2012-01-13T21:54:48-05:00'
describe
'501856' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBP' 'sip-files0077.tif'
69917f7bae3e52e93a379209e07b07f2
dc7b6e4587b86d946d148631454e48f6d0de083c
describe
'1007' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBQ' 'sip-files0077.txt'
a483b19e9c10ee266d5d1c4829dadc3b
15f1888f8e7687091fc618f5c60a1e63aa3dd0f0
describe
'21306' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBR' 'sip-files0077thm.jpg'
5d0e94d9048c0b169407d374bca9cb1d
374caf3f44ed39c9329c22d7f4d248cc7c5ec482
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBS' 'sip-files0078.jp2'
d20e6343723b5722c72af46425bc0c2d
2a513f670b21e66b4e6301254983447288d048d1
describe
'82323' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBT' 'sip-files0078.jpg'
e79dfe2c50a8078664f4af34dca73078
cf60c40dab978489b08e06262b14d20e1762c25d
describe
'19285' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBU' 'sip-files0078.pro'
3e42efbc20158a778b85a6ed1f860f52
c2398b704efe149ce6c6ef7ef979fc02a47184a5
describe
'34235' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBV' 'sip-files0078.QC.jpg'
4e1c6218f6092b8e2992c01214d50541
f2a5409011906ba0b9336ffce9ed24651ebac20a
describe
'499932' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBW' 'sip-files0078.tif'
c72585fc868b65856481e52c891c0f69
2da1d4feb45a467b2ce4183e99f77ce935fe36c4
describe
'826' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBX' 'sip-files0078.txt'
7ae67fb7896eba6dee5477e2af9828b9
7b6b8e0932966d808d5c8c8f6e9317f8aaac69b2
describe
'17617' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBY' 'sip-files0078thm.jpg'
d2823d2d40fc247ebcb1a1b8885d8945
dc447bd28d56e25aa4399fb2065e94ef45954b1f
describe
'60991' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWBZ' 'sip-files0079.jp2'
461bf106265f32dc87ce53d4352cf248
5544d6cf631fb7eed05e3c5c36459c6d249b4e65
describe
'109666' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCA' 'sip-files0079.jpg'
25d29ba45b8e8dab70c427c1d7a74fcf
05dd754cc0a17015f93a0ac44f4d8b08abba0f83
describe
'25709' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCB' 'sip-files0079.pro'
0001e7f73b1af4737b5a2c890c70745a
fbcd7d5eab6f97a7bf3cf6cac8933791444599b9
describe
'42861' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCC' 'sip-files0079.QC.jpg'
a267aa34c8587e1d725701f4bd2ba6ae
350c865ca0f8f15063b8ba12c899ed367be4fd86
describe
'501116' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCD' 'sip-files0079.tif'
c5278804f996f027e0883c0874e462d3
d5d03693e16fa6de54d0742534ca3c4a39ab2898
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCE' 'sip-files0079.txt'
3fbc801057a5a56c1b687917c7ecae1b
5c56e4b2859970326c9a6f11f7111d6f0e4061ec
describe
'20086' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCF' 'sip-files0079thm.jpg'
0fad016db01cff353f2a6a160917fb1b
0fe19c8138e0e1126bdd3c6006b94d713f910b04
describe
'60831' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCG' 'sip-files0080.jp2'
6266f9abdd9d807ea9b5dc7a15d8b7de
1fe0f0e7cca6dc2166290e630812e96a298bae19
describe
'112741' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCH' 'sip-files0080.jpg'
4d79925595c258c03c28475d539464a6
99935b30d25447928f2affd1892b0756ee07a972
describe
'24863' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCI' 'sip-files0080.pro'
f28b4c9f67643f1a54ade94e86f3e21c
d5ab55f464f0b3c2962b6c7d5a408071d1c06c6f
describe
'44691' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCJ' 'sip-files0080.QC.jpg'
69244998bc92c4de323005c41bdc6f9b
ff9e9a37593d3306d8328dca68866bcc4f0a9114
describe
'501468' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCK' 'sip-files0080.tif'
d13b40d9cd88d7cb3cd830410cf70b59
2ec3981c9961cd2ac50521046f07fffd05cf7e8f
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCL' 'sip-files0080.txt'
bb11a57db421138e394f98fe30eccfd7
7c2aee30032f02992e98749239f0c17f76e6f81b
'2012-01-13T21:53:04-05:00'
describe
'20731' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCM' 'sip-files0080thm.jpg'
f4aba3f6d00483fff3a717c27ba87d3a
5579ded0a19040820b75221420ff977403a92b1a
describe
'61047' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCN' 'sip-files0081.jp2'
20d0bde6705a681042ca6227a52750d0
ffcba7c13089c92bf8c23de0a8252c0e77d5c0f1
describe
'117419' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCO' 'sip-files0081.jpg'
56842c3309de9321468d198b003f6fe3
64d43727647a0c755d9bc4e934433f834cbfdd2b
describe
'25383' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCP' 'sip-files0081.pro'
9f330dd59eba446afe0bab8a1c1e3a96
932ac2515f73e4864783fe21d878c1cfd4d15084
describe
'45321' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCQ' 'sip-files0081.QC.jpg'
94260eebaa6f0e6ee4dfaf74999fc274
330004a1799f01ea7ec8b206c5f502bc43f6a104
describe
'501664' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCR' 'sip-files0081.tif'
ddb79f0a7fd28a53408d3a1022700c96
68311a0b01d4991fbd0a2a5a4b7e7b551398d897
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCS' 'sip-files0081.txt'
7feabc0db168fc5e32890e77229ec5aa
bd02710087f4b482c32539487a5552fa10bb7546
describe
'21024' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCT' 'sip-files0081thm.jpg'
50de3cf4d31cc8a3cf424f36d848b82a
801d58bad7ebd8c9a296a0d4458fd770f7f0040b
describe
'61051' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCU' 'sip-files0082.jp2'
47427e634d3d4f0f4c521a9fd1dd7495
cf12933d9bfbfa5a3a7576562dca6a4029d2ec08
describe
'121717' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCV' 'sip-files0082.jpg'
c1cfd803182d6bf851c68d1e2f895ca9
8bafaa051fb1f247f0c0817e2c4e7ed9a9a4baf0
describe
'25099' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCW' 'sip-files0082.pro'
2de3c645e95ee39c65c43a76ce5aae0d
0051db371e33d3bcd6968d1bcd8b8517ba7bb6b0
describe
'46816' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCX' 'sip-files0082.QC.jpg'
9b368b6658be30b45d5187cd4692777d
0e71bcb375182d7f2254aaab8fcdfc70f2340776
describe
'501920' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCY' 'sip-files0082.tif'
0c801105450c1b1b8d06c5c175f0d43a
4076c4f8292ec1fe05e0f2353a23004224d277ea
describe
'1008' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWCZ' 'sip-files0082.txt'
cc8df9162d1faa5ed6875866f1cf7d4e
d7866cf101f863e44bef85be3885026d1396f428
describe
Invalid character
'21479' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDA' 'sip-files0082thm.jpg'
9826d85517593c8ae437d78cdde41cb4
69dd43b6b37e375c4059c2ddd6d78e4b94250c7a
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDB' 'sip-files0083.jp2'
0fc55f1d6a5449f3baa1627844a3c5eb
7e8bf67ab4ac963358ef515dfa9f7eea998afda5
'2012-01-13T21:52:01-05:00'
describe
'118811' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDC' 'sip-files0083.jpg'
72bf94def5bf48869f36fba1f6c02996
e8ca740b572ef15d5e98fe2b6ae1003a89f450b9
describe
'25539' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDD' 'sip-files0083.pro'
e34c46b4bdb7a6fca024966371ff7340
f957e9aeb3cd806098e719321f647dcc68d00f3b
describe
'45957' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDE' 'sip-files0083.QC.jpg'
a1f88cfd50bfabff8fd4a70c558f9f3f
1bc481a3e5940fc47c985036f78ebe3994fde2cc
describe
'501848' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDF' 'sip-files0083.tif'
0a3161b6b330dcfcb55dff29cab86d10
9569983f1269dea18ec32e1c0f5a7004dcf3ee1a
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDG' 'sip-files0083.txt'
03af8b74f8766c5f6ddb1925c6598a83
757134e4baf36427c6c144119040873c9dd89d0d
describe
'21269' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDH' 'sip-files0083thm.jpg'
adc82cb37090a3d8c8678bd25c0f728e
f43964c5d34dc50d2ea1c864d778e19a5ca7f724
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDI' 'sip-files0084.jp2'
0ec9b9abd31033f503bb6fd836ca2f0e
529f3b1f70c9c95269899df9bcf761b4d26e3cac
describe
'116070' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDJ' 'sip-files0084.jpg'
4ab6649cbd6117cdf27464dfcccfc3ef
e23ddc4875d10e8121d8c5e8fc885918ddc2d9aa
describe
'24395' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDK' 'sip-files0084.pro'
0fcdfc22a2b179fa5e73b2903c95a113
398d48827c03ef0f0d30340dd9262a2ffa60f942
describe
'45862' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDL' 'sip-files0084.QC.jpg'
9f0bf8acee9deda311b5354dce7c23c4
4cba796956766142e90d16626b3d2a485e5d8aad
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDM' 'sip-files0084.tif'
8849123f52ae9bf87c68fdbb233939ef
cc331545e4f77e657f6fb61a27d0dc2210a9ac28
describe
'965' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDN' 'sip-files0084.txt'
369d76aad43a2b0110906bc8d1f52154
15f596bc37f19da73976f7a99c3ea4a3591db496
'2012-01-13T21:51:47-05:00'
describe
'21182' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDO' 'sip-files0084thm.jpg'
360fc18f8166abaa675c93d97ba69323
96528d21cadb6a7448bd34764800219d41805592
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDP' 'sip-files0085.jp2'
35187e9b91cd513a47848d1b4f55cc6e
251092908e93b1c4eb1c6416814aaa88b8a65234
describe
'114707' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDQ' 'sip-files0085.jpg'
98d145725a176b5ff6a53e6e9e835ba5
d5c1cef585b913616fbee90be1361f503fbb44d1
describe
'24083' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDR' 'sip-files0085.pro'
b079877a7cf4d973a71a5f296fc41aeb
f6c0e7818ac9b894101e506995e6f7480425059e
describe
'44811' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDS' 'sip-files0085.QC.jpg'
4419610e3e2488f45854b72323809258
ed3787d9b8a2f18cf32dd11ed06da1f323dc476e
describe
'501660' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDT' 'sip-files0085.tif'
8911bb2c47d25ad10481d576d90f0bf0
3b2b8cadbb2b235ae7b4c1966b2fa31b7a2ccaf4
describe
'955' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDU' 'sip-files0085.txt'
471135fc1e4332c83feff28c42a3533c
cbf1e82e91143ab45f5cc0bea079301305b42ecb
describe
'21140' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDV' 'sip-files0085thm.jpg'
d6f9a4bcd5f9d53062e5f21e73708135
e77c23a5842941a462363099004ec123265d73f7
describe
'61018' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDW' 'sip-files0086.jp2'
94fc0545e006769ed6e3df9b20e51088
cd37bad34f5b0e4d3b71a73ce604761528f9c956
describe
'114880' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDX' 'sip-files0086.jpg'
531e833c0e130eb7a157c68e0b8a7172
dd27d6a13d105075a9eb0b89f9baf394a73ef949
describe
'25139' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDY' 'sip-files0086.pro'
6326e0debf58cc5659d152bb4d50a054
280977b3a7b3d17137dd22b2bfe34319a2171922
describe
'45828' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWDZ' 'sip-files0086.QC.jpg'
80e30dd59b3fd21b87ad50a41405e381
a8d999735407257a11159a674bb8471f71374961
describe
'501812' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEA' 'sip-files0086.tif'
a03e52e335e3272fce2e4d23289139ad
a9ccaeca13e8c841a5c23f8cf6628337da802268
'2012-01-13T21:52:08-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEB' 'sip-files0086.txt'
cf13676a0c2307f6c3d1c81a0e6e2fd9
557ea91a4819794b3402c33839ffaf99c0c60b0a
describe
'21085' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEC' 'sip-files0086thm.jpg'
3dafb32b8e0cf91c5c915e03d84ec2aa
29a9e061bb61c45942cbc56bef4ff66ad6efeae3
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWED' 'sip-files0087.jp2'
7da4cb9042af728cde6eb989fa97fecd
6895b52ea601b296cb7859695e0bda15d00b24cd
describe
'117320' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEE' 'sip-files0087.jpg'
31d79ef7c592b1413ae16186f53a333c
caade00d4bd0269613d9259f8318e5416301fd01
describe
'25268' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEF' 'sip-files0087.pro'
6313d4c0841279b4770e993183b94f8f
cebf309f7420daac3528cf35d3bf7eb30fffc17b
describe
'45820' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEG' 'sip-files0087.QC.jpg'
74a8f3b3fb63329ee9c68978a03d4d9e
787a95b76ccd0577c7bb7d691d83e0ed047ade05
describe
'501832' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEH' 'sip-files0087.tif'
d38a2e0602e8cf9e21eaa432ddd2cb98
7c98a4f410acee587cd34e1e02c5182e729494cb
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEI' 'sip-files0087.txt'
9513b4fd452d1dcf1c42c90b986ff5d7
83ac7a9fc6296b0d9fefc699604236dadd6f485c
describe
'21206' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEJ' 'sip-files0087thm.jpg'
f4183bd3fae1b28711d3b25d12dc245c
19ef28f7e5aedad097863de985d05688b81a1e34
describe
'61048' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEK' 'sip-files0088.jp2'
fa01ffc44b97899cc49b47b8a0403f03
e0e8b1c57fb3e26f03220bf38c6aaf1a9945ff73
describe
'121080' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEL' 'sip-files0088.jpg'
7255a0feee0bcdd263592cb5ff8de2c0
74016de95a0417e6666580d5a51d27128000f446
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEM' 'sip-files0088.pro'
08b5d98b61639c60219c75d7fa6dd165
547cc3e10cdb18ba4ad5f211778875bb32de88d6
'2012-01-13T21:52:21-05:00'
describe
'47480' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEN' 'sip-files0088.QC.jpg'
00e126b1743a25e914df342736f4826a
67e136bb30fa327d379802fc8655b8ce1b90db53
describe
'502104' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEO' 'sip-files0088.tif'
017a1fb7ac473a5e42fbc4f1ab52e2d1
3d4bc0eaa266aaa12f41d6a749ee44aa02f2338e
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEP' 'sip-files0088.txt'
c763172eaf8dd65490dd132493102364
17ac739a1c1b1a276f3dadf0cdd39d851eb680b0
describe
'21680' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEQ' 'sip-files0088thm.jpg'
e59880f18995780cd858f8583676b763
f2704f5be99241301096ecdc5c1531df16b5bc49
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWER' 'sip-files0089.jp2'
22bb9d314c555c3b76962115e663944b
52c5752cfdac85a82cacd9d960fd89a9f83461af
describe
'120433' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWES' 'sip-files0089.jpg'
b39b6ebcce1f44842504f7defb642906
85b6af48dcbd578567e10856dd23e93f85c14267
describe
'25721' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWET' 'sip-files0089.pro'
f1f5095c0b100c3f5b6ce058dbb4c4b8
08fcbacac2e7c40e4efdadf50d2e4710aa84c88b
describe
'46679' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEU' 'sip-files0089.QC.jpg'
a1f3804cbc365ed1bb5fe8940c04bda5
e9f120c498bb14941138eb4a4e3384a7304c8e4f
describe
'502156' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEV' 'sip-files0089.tif'
ce6370564e287577dc86d66270d34e60
f7e4d85c5cc260de5954ad435a0c75d39615195d
describe
'1015' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEW' 'sip-files0089.txt'
a518a4742d853f0926d98508b544d1ea
1e3f7b9013cb35c93498b281e0a41b4ed3dd58b2
describe
'21694' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEX' 'sip-files0089thm.jpg'
35a9d96d7aa33ad19d0069984f034955
6b2e14819a985b0cc8a155d0b8e6b7058dda9032
describe
'60829' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEY' 'sip-files0090.jp2'
ad6e83d43162cf8f72632c0a4c952eb5
29aeaf840bc317c7df76e469f4da560694f43ed8
describe
'113324' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWEZ' 'sip-files0090.jpg'
11241d513ded5b6f343fdaa888cd7849
dbda933b905813cd5706202dc87b18ede434b2ae
describe
'24889' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFA' 'sip-files0090.pro'
8878356ac0b649f6cdc9e70d6728ef80
6fa04e43b13d5bb1971fee2984adc068412a69bf
describe
'45328' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFB' 'sip-files0090.QC.jpg'
f85d1018f9439766b6685529837288d7
f1141f60dff0ccc15e63c2aaf29f7a90fa2ee4ea
describe
'501864' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFC' 'sip-files0090.tif'
3ae2438155f9209cd2eac9e54305331e
e0aaef382fafb5112ffadf6f319a77c182b2287f
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFD' 'sip-files0090.txt'
47458c416547f6a87374f3f77de90430
cac5a8c9be9f237545d573a7efb564847b1f3f21
describe
'21167' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFE' 'sip-files0090thm.jpg'
9fc5711251ae36ce2fc3bd49d90187c5
837da95198e058b5ffd2207af05f869b58302934
describe
'61016' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFF' 'sip-files0091.jp2'
75137a3cb31b3895fc083b17cf19fa22
9de62d5fdeb3db7f6f7178f95c25c28afdaad4a5
describe
'118024' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFG' 'sip-files0091.jpg'
07d8d06b9ad64b4b9221402c948ea461
def73beab46364865d64088fadb24a0b21c6581b
describe
'25866' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFH' 'sip-files0091.pro'
df0033bddfa98c632bc4e5fc921def01
86c99cb1220c7f4925e785ce6f7d8d3a94913c18
describe
'46970' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFI' 'sip-files0091.QC.jpg'
1e1d2e09155ed622efde2df6dc0ceddf
6ffc0ddd83f5f671900ad03405769724514257f5
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFJ' 'sip-files0091.tif'
c07a76837e85d5659c18f82049c1bc58
7c418c43483ad72e609be3b9efe0e0b6c42e241f
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFK' 'sip-files0091.txt'
6b334aa6d3864f257baf9b88be24d1df
cdebe26dd053f4886a3628a6a898cec2fc280418
describe
'21375' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFL' 'sip-files0091thm.jpg'
53dacc7bd705174483cd0548af5b3362
27335860dfea94a6f9654797e96c2d7b9e241571
describe
'61027' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFM' 'sip-files0092.jp2'
9a50287d4425ef5e6b6c22bd776f30da
622a80df7552d5be27fdf57abc16cad9abf56d8a
describe
'115683' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFN' 'sip-files0092.jpg'
e075bcfc475b60e68e4204401b6fd7a7
e56cbd286d740408140a62abf5381d81c22a696f
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFO' 'sip-files0092.pro'
417af390629f10ea5e9a36857a08394b
bb7618038a4e2727837571618d5cfd6b072dd4e8
describe
'45917' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFP' 'sip-files0092.QC.jpg'
8521a37b6bf94d2766696c067c684992
504b7a6b199ca84897bfd6065f4f1b7b15313613
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFQ' 'sip-files0092.tif'
a0f81488547cf7c141d4f4e7d21f7bb2
0d57c2c58be3df67c57ff3face9b6dd444bb557a
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFR' 'sip-files0092.txt'
2b50f01ce14ffced4ed6244e3cb7805b
a6de49d5f930430150a9043f6bdc42c626803853
describe
'21230' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFS' 'sip-files0092thm.jpg'
2df5503498c61a730f2a146ed87443da
dd20c4760f50fa79199c626c0134082807b03362
describe
'60974' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFT' 'sip-files0093.jp2'
ac79119e3cee37556a155f869183ae0e
e6f6cb63ee224557b6842faaf56a1b3a358142cc
describe
'112313' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFU' 'sip-files0093.jpg'
aec92948766f6d395e2adb1477055f98
2da03834bc66ccfbfe61124c96388b253082e8e0
describe
'24291' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFV' 'sip-files0093.pro'
f82170c59c8dca9baa4e05c8159c591f
884df696c0a881008f20c59da4c123d8fc7bffc5
describe
'45077' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFW' 'sip-files0093.QC.jpg'
c857bd3e1dbe51ebf2af1052237067c1
42d5d5724819e8f826316427d8f9afa258c8c4a1
describe
'501692' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFX' 'sip-files0093.tif'
e69bf51076e8a11a48dcb54a595256f5
b9b4ae81d87fa0eea817a2f96235a77dd6880dde
describe
'964' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFY' 'sip-files0093.txt'
79498ad6cdeef8f1478e509968c1ab23
491b9b0d815ad82e273d9f880ae133229a6efd98
describe
'21108' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWFZ' 'sip-files0093thm.jpg'
4dc1bccbd651c806a9bcef0dd2f36e18
c5b2f2bd872e8244abc592d1601e7dbff0a72c82
describe
'61024' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGA' 'sip-files0094.jp2'
8ba989938b2543b6d59f0a8006f0b73d
eef7266a5e93d2272eb266860f14bf97459c880f
describe
'116584' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGB' 'sip-files0094.jpg'
512e31a3fbc7f916f20150c164dbbf9c
e9fa9908562dc2937662d3f8a71e4679f7d3795a
describe
'26500' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGC' 'sip-files0094.pro'
24c9cf81e4e37eec6155ef755e763d3b
7b7550475ea6097bd33820994710b7418a420109
describe
'45520' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGD' 'sip-files0094.QC.jpg'
498e71700fd6eba07e241d90d91a65c2
9a47f6103fc6730a284987ca93195102c448bed5
describe
'501708' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGE' 'sip-files0094.tif'
dacacbcf632b43f17e82d9cad06b0d68
95e7ad7d4ba18e3d663dd01a7e4841ce8065bcd4
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGF' 'sip-files0094.txt'
35e744a1b9e16f832bdfba0c6251ab71
37cdd5db11d874e503cc44a14870e33d9bf05766
describe
'21105' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGG' 'sip-files0094thm.jpg'
da1787d5a09b465742377af60f9868f3
1808b458765c5381cabfdee3066b5d55aad2fc07
describe
'61005' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGH' 'sip-files0095.jp2'
8a668592882fbd91d7abed74c7a5f5c0
080cc2734fa244c9d8aa98d0b85cfe856945c2ab
describe
'115656' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGI' 'sip-files0095.jpg'
28b923c1406d03d57002d13d7ef9f5df
2b7d477cc2f6b2ecaac745c1b1fa19abf9797a08
'2012-01-13T21:51:42-05:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGJ' 'sip-files0095.pro'
2b2d2bd762852cf98714c6bdb0bc37b4
6b55176c84c0211662c9bf4d76f321cc6e4dc36c
describe
'45257' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGK' 'sip-files0095.QC.jpg'
4ba4d6566f657da203849cd4591094a6
a50ce855c3c889a17a8fe21f373ed202b653a04a
describe
'501584' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGL' 'sip-files0095.tif'
15cbb3ab47ab3b8a763df84f63f45516
acc9859d649313d21d858ad639076ad63cf79043
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGM' 'sip-files0095.txt'
565fc1d1c50d43320fd6391ad239cae9
0ef8a9ab503b0e516ed6822a95bf035873aafb70
describe
'20843' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGN' 'sip-files0095thm.jpg'
136328380ded36338c1ef1bf4554d29d
24ac61a0579bcd4c1a0ec95cf481c51fb2a1b843
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGO' 'sip-files0096.jp2'
b6f3e01f723b516a46e9b8b4b37401ef
43bc3d36c114beee4974eef2c3ec109dd40e5014
describe
'119990' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGP' 'sip-files0096.jpg'
ec91cd646f31ab85ae0b8f1ba4470816
e916d95f773a8fbe2411dd814b27cc057c85a9af
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGQ' 'sip-files0096.pro'
28e3bbaacedc7240735f187ec59c4b17
fcf3a7b2f2652feba4cd357a2776672d730f1b08
describe
'47447' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGR' 'sip-files0096.QC.jpg'
e3607a8dc09715b63b4e1eeeddaf3fe1
0db31b1ae297a4a0123c1229b5dc2d63a72372ce
describe
'502144' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGS' 'sip-files0096.tif'
b1266c1480992ac0799c9d7948cd6fc3
3761d1fd4985269addebf336065b13cbe27c1dee
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGT' 'sip-files0096.txt'
726f8ea024150cba57f6601b6f0d7ba7
7fef4416205f5494ff00c49a929eab0cbe5656e2
describe
'21671' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGU' 'sip-files0096thm.jpg'
2f185c5b7b909fad2c1fb0f6ff62c5e5
4b67bcbf981fe797e12d3fc7c024b1ae0b61cca0
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGV' 'sip-files0097.jp2'
d0dd3ce75bc8848e55eeb80119148994
af5a74ceb1f23a4caa3ab7fd2fe083eeebfdc608
describe
'121997' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGW' 'sip-files0097.jpg'
5092e334e61bb8ef6afd2344ba9e5006
562bf5869cd99b497b396ca1877e14982c7914f8
describe
'25955' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGX' 'sip-files0097.pro'
0afb5a7b65fbfa8f26d75ebe6c7f26f3
d3c549b66b01c9e4e57327e446b84a9a7d554331
describe
'47335' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGY' 'sip-files0097.QC.jpg'
98c6b50a521718f6746263a4138fdcde
28b21311509cbb51cf60638cb1acd307aae7fb58
describe
'502088' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWGZ' 'sip-files0097.tif'
7368244a9f5e70460ce2cdf27d87741c
cfc782afabe8fcec7f0640913ba59e1de84f7664
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHA' 'sip-files0097.txt'
2f6d24a6a832aa192bf1a18423ef625d
681c96b7b43328ff27d162ccc44b826db6de72d2
describe
'21609' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHB' 'sip-files0097thm.jpg'
71fdcb4b355fc094b3735d9da2a119d1
7b2d0bc28a0b6d4c33005363338533fff1028c94
describe
'61033' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHC' 'sip-files0098.jp2'
843769789fd23912793436abff45b81b
93f1ddfad2c618f9decff13f40d4e0ae245989e2
describe
'116258' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHD' 'sip-files0098.jpg'
e2c02e9fa97daa74055c2140f80657dd
47c7d5e663e09a0302ce72b6b784cc322cb9c6e2
describe
'25825' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHE' 'sip-files0098.pro'
b720bad2138538a2b442e2d20f031d17
f8d2b79a8c1cadcf0b58ad478d8042a629c77ab5
describe
'45896' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHF' 'sip-files0098.QC.jpg'
74d32f67ef1e84b76204a35d966ce97e
9b543115718808fcb53c4aacfd12726622dcc311
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHG' 'sip-files0098.tif'
166f154e8cc619374c85250b1df51736
b7b7af8198ea67813ae28ea4353ea0ce7454a3d5
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHH' 'sip-files0098.txt'
c93b580ef226f19467cf08132d3bc299
9a257e29110303db25fc235e5ac0cd3328ee7d0f
describe
'20917' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHI' 'sip-files0098thm.jpg'
0959cf16fa165b2dec3f0169adc0031d
c816a9747196b5d3332691706e37f418a78b397f
describe
'60989' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHJ' 'sip-files0099.jp2'
b0531529f0e44301c3e04694557c2cf2
0445beb90cbe46eb463918cd1eda9dc09efaef51
describe
'113582' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHK' 'sip-files0099.jpg'
36827ecd539bdcd933602444564c92b1
743dff53e63168e895adee682cce337feba4e18d
describe
'25600' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHL' 'sip-files0099.pro'
1833427f6bc74360ccec0ed06776e798
18cdb6d18850d9b33c47c0439e8d4f47a085ff18
describe
'45277' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHM' 'sip-files0099.QC.jpg'
fadeac44e4680b9a6885c0db57a3ddf4
f75fb5ea55e355984533d4661250195a908454be
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHN' 'sip-files0099.tif'
91e047862d96599ef759438b516deee9
c868786a86f31a3ec688f8f5b6371ec5379f9809
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHO' 'sip-files0099.txt'
c04e598fc711053457ceffbec1ed29f0
3c847a9ff0616cd9756beacd01d7147d1dadb6ff
describe
'20863' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHP' 'sip-files0099thm.jpg'
f9bfa463e032297dbc34434021f50a14
dddabbd7002d7966149032af5376f9e947e366b7
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHQ' 'sip-files0100.jp2'
38a7f7c5b7160f0b9918b12521da06e0
7dfcce1dd540b961f32ae683e6d1016762295284
describe
'115653' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHR' 'sip-files0100.jpg'
8ac00a04a691d6eecf4f79bdc5ca7fb0
445b5a7e025f63d9a2b5d699c9fd0ae0a8a05017
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHS' 'sip-files0100.pro'
309ae1a011f77f26306423687635b48c
8fc7834c95d208a0c320815b05749b562cc24315
describe
'45072' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHT' 'sip-files0100.QC.jpg'
7eb5fa5d4f454b3e8a4699f195f50708
ee87a154fa9886d4effa0031e65c719bb0363e58
describe
'501604' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHU' 'sip-files0100.tif'
f35d9bf32c9e13363dabfbda20d57eae
65f680bb6e26b8024421c62baf979e52a669f226
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHV' 'sip-files0100.txt'
09f4586695e0d3e29354b3ad12fb0912
086da12cdf1a5c1f7b6aac31ee790f7bc9d01c79
describe
'20859' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHW' 'sip-files0100thm.jpg'
db493aba03d1d6b7ad9bd5a4f498fb55
b51874523514d8930094ea1588e797cfd6720a24
describe
'61010' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHX' 'sip-files0101.jp2'
39f0e740a3609a14a61d54e0d441302e
5a71897cd557e24c5404af903101ca9ca0607dff
describe
'116807' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHY' 'sip-files0101.jpg'
80d36f64b285dd1637ab7e3ec0690bb9
4a8493e7aa6f80558defae8c56f3b080565ff9db
describe
'25805' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWHZ' 'sip-files0101.pro'
765cd4f51d3c6c83bd8e39403e161695
20993e88ecd92c2ceccb4e6b21c65804abf4bd1f
'2012-01-13T21:51:51-05:00'
describe
'45012' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWIA' 'sip-files0101.QC.jpg'
3e202249a33f40266f325f099d3c2782
741345e66dbf7ae153a74bb78d8a4a968484e56a
describe
'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWIB' 'sip-files0101.tif'
36ab53e9c8e2480d293ae82567798a15
c28f87c684119ce3937a5a524322b2f418b50439
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWIC' 'sip-files0101.txt'
58f5ebead65a9577aaa4f1bd64c1f894
7a2633509088484a7aa62e805830800ec2aba9e9
describe
'20717' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWID' 'sip-files0101thm.jpg'
a1339cea55332a4e716ec377d96c83ba
554d3dcf7ef796764493965ca114dc3f3a55661d
describe
'22' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWIE' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
41f7f8e0b46a95afec151eec63b79b3d
76ba4cf4cf4d39b506f68f7383ea9ea72f33b7ed
describe
'159082' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWIF' 'sip-filesUF00003520_00001.mets'
19dacc4c2ff2312931af404d51f69d3c
64b0494bb7242ffab14a99c042f311465b5e7891
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-13T13:25:06-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'204851' 'info:fdaE20090310_AAAAJIfileF20090311_AAAWII' 'sip-filesUF00003520_00001.xml'
25f82eb2855e7944806f3102df5a9b84
91daec2a81ec78162785bd21eba4b7092ceaab1f
describe
'2013-12-13T13:25:04-05:00'
xml resolution