Citation
The young pilgrim

Material Information

Title:
The young pilgrim a tale illustrative of "The pilgrim's progress"
Creator:
A. L. O. E., 1821-1893
Thomas Nelson & Sons ( Publisher )
Place of Publication:
London ;
New York ;
Edinburgh
Publisher:
T. Nelson and Sons
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
1864
Language:
English
Physical Description:
317, <2> p., <1> leaf of plates : col. ill. ; 18 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Christian life -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Pilgrims and pilgrimages -- Juvenile fiction ( lcsh )
Publishers' advertisements -- 1864 ( rbgenr )
Bldn -- 1864
Genre:
Publishers' advertisements ( rbgenr )
novel ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
England -- London
Scotland -- Edinburgh
United States -- New York -- New York
Target Audience:
juvenile ( marctarget )

Notes

General Note:
"This little work ... has been written as a child's companion to the Pilgrim's Progress"--Preface.
General Note:
Publisher's advertisement follows text.
Statement of Responsibility:
by A.L.O.E.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by fair use or other copyright exemptions. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions may require permission of the copyright holder. The Smathers Libraries would like to learn more about this item and invite individuals or organizations to contact The Department of Special and Area Studies Collections (special@uflib.ufl.edu) with any additional information they can provide.
Resource Identifier:
AAA4744 ( LTQF )
ALH9459 ( NOTIS )
48561016 ( OCLC )
026997991 ( AlephBibNum )

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THE YOUNG PILGRIM





3

THE

YOUNG PILGRIM:
& Tale

ILLUSTRATIVE OF “‘THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS,”

oe, &e.

‘This book, it chalketh out before thine eyes
‘Tho Man that socks the everlasting prize:
Tt shows you whence he comes, whither be gocs;
‘What he teaves undone; also what he does:
‘Ttalso shows you how he runs and runs,
‘TH ho unto the Gate of Glory comes,

O then come hither,
Aud lay my book, thy head, and beart together,

dons Busvan.



LONDON:
T. “NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK,

| 1864,

Ce

|
by
A L.0.£E,
Author of “ The Silver Casket," “The Robber's Cave,”
|











Ir may perhaps be necessary to give a brief
explanation of the object of this little work.
Tt has been written as a Cxtip’s CoMPANION
TO THE Piterim’s Procress, That invaluable
work is frequently put into youthful hands
long before the mind can unravel the deep
allegory which it contains, and thus its pre-
cious lessons are lost, and it is only perused as
an amusing tale,

I would offer my humble work as a kind
of translation, the term which was applied to
it by a little boy to whom I was reading it in
manuscript—a translation of ideas beyond
youthful comprehension into the common lan-
guage of daily, life. I would tell the child,
through the medium of a simple tale, that
Bunyan’s dream is a solemn reality, that the



vi PREFACE.

feet of the young may tread the pilgriin’s
path, and press on to the pilgrim’s reward.
I earnestly wish that I had been able more
completely to carry out the object set before
me; but difficulties have arisen from the very
nature of my work. I have been obliged to
make mine a very free translation, full both
of imperfections and omissions, This is more
especially the case where subjects are treated
of in the Pilgrim’s Progress which concern the
deeper experience of the soul. Of fearful in-
ward struggles and temptations, such as befell
the author of that work, the gloom and hor-
rors of the Valley of the Shadow of Death,
the little ones who early set out on pilgrimage,
usually know but little, They find the step-
ping-stones across the Slough of Despond, and
are rarely seized by Giant Despair. It would
be worse than useless to represent the Chris-
tian pilgrimage as more gloomy and painful
than children are likely to find it.

There are other valuable parts of the Pil-
grim’s Progress, such as the sojourn in the



PREFACE. vii
House Beautiful, which is believed by many to
represent Christian communion, which could
hardly be enlarged upon in a design like
mine ; while the present altered appearance of
Vanity Fair has compelled me to wander still
farther from my original, if I would draw a
picture that could be recognised at the pre-
sent day, and be useful to the rising generation.
Such as it is, I earnestly pray the Lord of
pilgrims to vouchsafe His blessing on my little
work, To point out to His dear children the
holy guiding light which marks the strait
gate, and the narrow path of life, and bid them
God speed on their way, is an office which I
most earnestly desire, yet of which I feel my-
self unworthy. I may at least hope to lead
my young readers to a nobler instructor, to
induce them to peruse with greater interest
and deeper profit the pages of the Pilgrim’s
Progress, and to apply to their own characters
and their own lives, the precious traths con-
veyed in that allegory.

ALOB








1. The Pilgrim's Calla
TL. Difficulties on Setting Out
HTT. Man's Way of Works...
TV. God's Gift of Grace s+
‘V. A Glimpse of the Cross...
VI. The Pilgrim in his Home

‘VIL. The Arbour on the Hill

“

VIII, Dangers, Difficulties, and Doubts...

IX. The Armour and the Battlo
X. Shadow and Sunshine ...
XL The Touchstone of Trial
XII, Pilgrims Converse by the Way
XIIL Distant Glimpse of Vanity Pair
XIV. Vexations of Vanity Fair
XV, Citizens of Vanity Fair
XVI. New and Old Companions
XVII, Life in the Great City ...
XVITL Fogs and Mists oe
‘XIX. Disappointment coe
XX, The Perilous Mine ww.

ro

oo

XXL Green Pastures and Still Waters ..,

XXIL A few Steps Aside.

SEEHEEsszeasseaesc?



XXIIL Regrets, but not Despair
XXIV. A New Danger ow”
XXV. The Lake among the Rocks
XXVL Coming to the River ...
XXVIL The Close of the Pilgrimage
XXVIIL Conc:usion ... ”



S822 8%





THE

YOUNG PILGRIM.



OHAPTER I.

THE PILGRIM’S CALL.

“T dreamed, and, behold, 1 saw a man clothed with rags standing in
8 certain place, with his face from his own house, a book in his hand,
and a great burden upon his back."—Pilgrim’s Progress.

« this the way to the ruins of St.

Gy Frediswed’s shrine?” said a clergy-

man to a boy of about twelve

years of age, who stood leaning against the
gate of a field.

“They are just here, sir,” replied the peasant,
proceeding to open the gate.

“Just wait a moment,” cried a bright-haired
boy who accompanied the clergyman; “ that
is your way, this is mine,” and he vaulted
lightly over the gate.

“So these are the famous ruins!” he ex-



12 THE PILGRIM'S CALL.

claimed as he alighted on the opposite side ;
“I don’t think much of them, Mr. Ewart, A
few yards of stone wall, half covered with
moss, and an abundance of nettles is all that
T can see.”

“ And yet this once was a famous resort for
pilgrims.”

“Pilgrims,—what were they?” inquired the
boy.

“Tn olden times, when the Romanist religion
prevailed in England, it was thought an act
of piety to visit certain places that were con-
sidered particularly holy; and those who
undertook journeys for this purpose received
the name of pilgrims, Many travelled thou-
sands of miles to kneel at the tomb of our
Lord in Jerusalem, and those who could not
go so far believed that by visiting certain
famous shrines here, they could win the pardon
of their sins. Hundreds of misguided people,
in this strange, superstitious hope, visited the
abbey by whose ruins we now stand; and 1
have heard that a knight, who had committed
some great crime, walked hither barefoot, with
a cross in his hand, a distance of several
leagues.”



THE PILGRIMS CALL, 13

“A knight barefoot! how strange!” cried
young Lord Fontonore; “but then he believed
that it would save him from his sins.”

“Save him from his’ sins!” thought the
peasant boy, who, with his full earnest eyes
fixed upon Mr, Ewart, had been drinking in
every word that he uttered; “save him from
his sins! I should not have thought it strange
had he crawled the whole way on his knees !”

“ Are there any pilgrims now?” inquired
Fontonore.

“In Romanist countries there are still many
pilgrimages made by those who know not, as
we do, the one only way by which sinners can
be accounted righteous before a pure God.
But in one sense, Charles, we all should be
pilgrims, travellers in the narrow path that
leads to salvation, passing on in our journey
from earth to heaven, with the cross not in
our hands but in our hearts; pilgrims, not to
the tomb of a crucified Saviour, but to the
throne of that Saviour in glory !”

Charles listened with reverence, as he always
did when his tutor spoke of religion, but his
attention was nothing compared to that of the
peasant, who for the first time listened to con-



l4 THE PILGRIM’S CALL.

versation on a subject which had lately been
filling all his thoughts. He longed to speak,
to ask questions of the clergyman, but a feeling
of awe kept him back; he only hoped that
the gentleman would continue to talk, and felt
vexed when he was interrupted by three chil-
dren who ran up to the stranger to ask for
alms.

“ Begging is a bad trade, my friends,” said
Mr. Ewart gravely, “I never like to encourage
it in the young.”

“ We're so hungry,” said the youngest of the
party.

“ Mother's dead, and father’s broke his
leg !” cried another.

“We want to get him a little food,” whined
the third.

“Do you live near?” asked Mr. Ewart.

“Yes sir, very near.”

“I will go and see your father,” said the
clergyman,

The little rogues, who were accustomed to
idle about the ruin to gain pence from visitors
by a tale of pretended woe, looked at each
_other in some perplexity at the offer, for
though they liked money well enough, they



THE PILGRIM’S CALL, 15

were by no means prepared for a visit, At
last Jack, the eldest, said with impudent assur-
ance, “ Father’s not there, he’s taken to the
hospital, there’s only mother at home.”

“Mother! you said just now that your
mother was dead !”

“I meant—” stammered the boy, quite
taken by surprise; but the clergyman would
not suffer him to proceed.

“Do not add atiother untruth, poor child,
to those which you have just uttered. Do you
not know that there is One above the heavens
who hears the words of your lips, reads the
thoughts of your hearts, One who will judge,
and can punish ?”

Ashamed and abashed the three children
made a hasty retreat. As soon as they were
beyond sight and hearing of the strangers,
Jack turned round and made a mocking face
in their direction, and Madge exclaimed in an
insolent tone, “we weren’t going to stop for
his sermon.”

“There's Mark there that would take it in
every word, and thank him for it at the end,”
said Jack.

“Qh! Mark’s so odd!” cried Ben; “he’s



16 THE PILGRIM’S CALL,
never like anybody else, No one would guess
him for our brother !”

These words were more true than Ben’s
usually were, for the bright-haired young noble
himself scarcely offered a greater contrast to
the ragged, dirty children, than they with their
round rustic faces, marked by little expression
but stupidity on that of Ben, sullen obstinacy
on Madge’s, and forward impudence on Jack’s,
did to the expansive brow, and deep thought-
ful eye of the boy whom they had spoken of
as Mark.

“Yes,” said Jack, “he could never even
pluck a wild flower, but he must be pulling it
to bits to look at all its parts, It was not
enough to him that the stars shine to give us
light, he must prick out their places on an old
bit of paper, as if it mattered to him which
way they were stuck. But of all his fancies
he’s got the worst one now; I think he’s going
quite crazed.”

“ What's he taken into his head?” said

“You remember the bag which the lady

dropped at the stile, when she was going to
the church by the wood ?”



THE PILGRIM’S CALL, 7

Madge nodded assent, and her brother con-
tinued: “What fun we had in carrying off
and opening that bag, and dividing the things
that were in it! Father had the best of the
fun of it though, for he took the purse with
the money.”

“I know,” cried Ben, “ and mother had the
handkerchief with lace round the edge, and
E. §. marked in the corner. We,—more’s the
shame !—had nothing but some pence, and the
keys; and Mark, as the biggest, had the book.”

“ Ah! the book!” cried Jack! “that’s what
has put him out of his wits !”

“No one grudged it him, I'm sure,” said Ben,
“ precious little any of us would have made
out of it. But Mark takes so to reading, it’s
so odd; and it sets him a thinking, a think-
ing: well, I can’t tell what folk like us have
to do with reading and thinking !”

“Nor I!” cried both Madge and Jack.

“TI shouldn’t wonder,” said the latter, as
stretched on the grass he amused himself with
shying stones at the sparrows, “I should’nt
wonder if his odd ways had something to do
with that red mark on his shoulder !”

“What, that strange mark, like a cross,
(33) 2



18 THE PILGRIM’S CALL.

which made us call him the Red-cross Knight,
after the ballad which mother used to sing us?”

“Yes, I never saw a mark like that afore,
either from blow or burn.”

< Mother don't Hie to: hier: it, talked 'of,”
said Madge.

“Well, whatever has put all this nonsense

into his head, father will soon knock it out of
him when he comes back !” cried Jack. “He's
left off begging—he won’t ask for a penny,
and he used to get more than we three to-
gether, ‘cause ladies said he looked so interest-
ing; and he'll not so much as take an egg
from a nest,—he’s turned quite good for
nothing !”
Leaving the three children to pursue their
conversation, we will return to him who was
the subject of it. That which had made them
scoff had made him reflect, he could not get
rid of those solemn words, “There is One above
the heavens who hears the words of your lips,
reads the thoughts of your hearts, One who
will judge, and can punish!” They reminded
him of what he had read in his book, the soul
that sinneth it shall die, he knew himself to be
a sinner, and he trembled.



THE PILGRIM'S CALL. 19

Little dreaming what was passing in the
mind of the peasant, Mr, Ewart examined the
ruin without noticing him further, and Mark
still leant on the gate, a silent attentive
listener.

“I think, Charles,” said the tutor, “that
T should like to make a sketch of this spot, I
have brought my paint-box and drawing block
with me, and if I could only procure a little
water—” :

“Please may I bring you some, sir?” said
Mark. :

The offer was accepted, and the boy went -
off at once, still turning in his mind the con-
versation that had passed.

“Pilgrims in the narrow path that leadeth
to salvation,—I wish that I knew what he
meant, Is that a path only for holy men like
him, or can it be that it is open to me? Sal-
vation! that is safety, safety from punishment,
safety from the anger of the terrible God! Oh!
what can I do to be saved!”

In a few minutes Mark returned with some
fresh water which he brought in an old broken
jar. He set it down by the spot where Mr,
Ewart was seated.



20 THE PILGRIM’S CALL.

“Thanks my good lad,” said the clergyman,
placing a silver piece in his hand.

“Good!” repeated Mark to himself; “ he
little knows to whom he is speaking !”

“It would be tedious to you, Charles, to
remain beside me while I am sketching,” said
Mr. Ewart, “ you will enjoy a little rambling
about, only return to me in an hour.”

“I will explore!” replied the young lord
gaily ; “there is no saying what curiosities I
may find to remind me of the pilgrims of
former days.”

And now the clergyman sat alone, engaged
with his paper and brush, while Mark watched
him from a little distance, and communed
with his own heart.

“He said that he knew the one, only way
by which sinners could be accounted righteous
—tighteous! that must mean good—hbefore a
holy God! He knows the way; oh that he
would tell it to me! I have half a mind to go
up to him now, it would be a good time when
he is all by himself” Mark made one step
forward, then paused. “TI dare not, he would
think it so strange. He could not under-
stand what I feel. He has never stolen, nor



THE PILGRIM'S CALL. 21

told lies, nor sworn; he would despise a poor
sinner like me, And yet,” added the youth
with a sigh, “he would hardly sit there, look-
ing so quiet and happy, if he knew how
anxious a poor boy is to hear of the way of
salvation, which he says that he knows. I
will go nearer, perhaps he may speak first.”

Mr. Ewart had begun a bold, clever sketch,
stones and moss, trees and grass were rapidly
appearing on the paper, but he wanted some
living object to give interest to the picture,
Naturally his eye fell upon Mark, in his
tattered jacket and straw hat, but he forgot
his sketch as he looked closer at the boy, and
met his sad, anxious gaze.

“You are unhappy, I fear,” he said, laying
down his pencil.

Mark cast down his eyes, and said nothing.

“You are in need, or you are ill, or you are
in want of a friend,” said the clergyman with
kind sympathy in his manner,

“Oh! sir, it is not that—” began Mark, and
stopped.

“Come nearer to me, and tell me frankly,
my boy, what is weighing on your heart. It
is the duty, it is the privilege of the minister



22 THE PILGRIM'S CALL.
of Christ to speak comfort to those who require
comfort,

“Can you tell me,” cried Mark, with a great
effort, “the way for sinners—to be saved !”

“The Saviour is the Way, the Truth, and
the Life, the Gate by which alone we enter
into salvation. Believe on the Lord Jesus
Christ and thow shalt be saved. The just shall
live by faith.

“ What is faith?” said Mark, gathering
courage from the gentleness with which he
was addressed.

“ Faith is to believe all that the Bible tells
us of the Lord, His glory, His goodness, His
death for our sins. To believe all the pro-
mises made in His word, to rest in them, hope
in them, make them our stay, and love Him who
first loved us. Have you a Bible my friend?”

“T have.”

“ And do you read it?”

_ “Very often,” replied Mark.

“ Search the Scriptures, for they are the
surest guide; search them with faith and
prayer, and the Lord will not leave you in
darkness, but guide you by His counsel here,
and afterward receive you to glory.”



THE PILGRIMS CALL, 28

Mr, Ewart did not touch his pencil again
that day, his sketch lay forgotten upon the
grass) He was giving his hour to a nobler
employment, the employment worthy of angels,
the employment which the Son of God himself
undertook upon earth, He was seeking the
sheep lost in the wilderness, he was guiding a
sinner to the truth.

“T hope that I have not kept you waiting,”
exclaimed Charles, as he came bounding back
to his tutor; “the carriage has come for us
from the inn; it looks as if we should have rain,
we must make haste home.”

Mr. Ewart, who felt strongly interested in
Mark, now asked him for his name and address,
and noted down both in his pocket-book. He
promised that, if possible, he would come soon
and see him again.

“Keep to your good resolutions,” said the
clergyman, as he walked towards the carriage,
accompanied by Charles; “and remember that
though the just shall live by faith, it is such
faith as must necessarily produce repentance,
love, and a holy life.”

Mr. Ewart stepped into the carriage, the
young lord sprang in after him, the servant



“4 DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT.

closed the door and they drove off Mark
stood watching the splendid equipage as it
rolled along the road, till it was at last lost

t. é

“I am glad that I have seen him,—I am
so glad that he spoke to me—I will never
forget what he said! Yes, I will keep to my
good resolutions, from this hour I will be a
pilgrim to heaven, I will enter at once by the
strait gate, and walk in the narrow way that
leadeth unto life !”

s
F

OHAPTER IL
DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT.

“ They drew nigh to a very miry slough, that was in the midst of
the plain; and they being heedless, did both fall suddenly into
the bog, The name of the slough was Despond.”—Pilgrim’s
Progress.

Eventna had closed in with rain and storm,
and all the children had returned to the
cottage of their mother. A dirty, uncomfort-
able abode it looked, most unlike those beauti-
ful little homes of the peasant which we see
80 often in dear old England, with the ivy-



DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT. 25

covered porch, and the clean-washed floor, the
kettle singing merrily above the cheerful fire,
the neat rows of plates ranged on the shelf,
the prints upon the wall, and the large Bible
in the corner.

No, this was a cheerless-looking place, quite
as much from idleness and neglect as from
poverty. The holes in the window were
stuffed with rags, the little garden in front
held nothing but weeds, the brick floor ap-
peared as though it had never been clean, and
everything lay about in confusion. An untidy
looking woman, with her shoes down at heel,
and her hair hanging loose about her ears, had
placed the evening meal on the table; and round
it now sat the four children, busy with their sup-
per, but not so busy as to prevent a constant
buzz of talking from going on all the time
that they ate.

“TI say Mark,” cried Jack, “what did the
parson pay you for listening to him for an
hour ?”

“How much did you get out of him?” said
Madge.

“ Any money?” asked Ann Dowly, looking
up eagerly.



26 DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT.

Mark laid sixpence on the table,

“T daresay that you might have got more,”
said Ben.

“TI did get more,—but not money,”

“What, food, or clothes, or—”

“Not food, nor clothes, but good words,
which were better to me than gold.”

This announcement was received with a
roar of laughter, which did not, however, dis-
concert Mark. ;

“Look you,” he said, as soon as they were
sufficiently quiet to hear him, “look you if
what I said be not true. You only care for
things that belong to this life, but it is no
more to be compared to the life that is to
come, than a candle to the sun, or a leaf to
the forest! Why, where shall we all be a hun-
dred years hence ¢”

“In our graves, to be sure,” said Ben.

“That is only our bodies, our poor, weak
bodies, but our souls that think, and hope, and
fear, where will they be then ?”

“We don’t want to look on so far,” observed
Jack.

“But it may niot be far,” exclaimed Mark.
“Thousands of children die younger than we,



DIFTICULTIES ON SETTING OUT, 27

there are many, many small graves in the
churchyard ; death may be near to us, it may
be close at hand, and where will owr souls be
then #”

“«T don’t know,” said Madge; “I don’t
want to think,” subjoined her elder brother ;
their mother only heaved a deep sigh.

“Ts it not something,” continued Mark, “to
hear of the way to a place where our souls
may be happy when our bodies are dust? Is _
it not something to look forward toa glorious
heaven where millions and millions of years
may be spent amongst joys far greater than
we can think, and yet never bring us nearer
to the end of our happiness and glory ?”

“Oh! these are all dreams,” laughed Jack,
“that come from reading in that book.”

“They are not dreams!” exclaimed Mark
with earnestness, “ they are more real than
anything on earth! Everything is changing
here, nothing is sure, flowers bloom one day
and are withered the next; now there is sun-
shine, and now there is gloom; you see a man
strong and healthy, and the next thing you
hear of him perhaps is his death! All things
are changing and passing away, just like a



28 DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT.

dream when we awake; but heaven and its
delights are sure, quite sure; the rocks may be
moved,—but it never can be changed ; the sun
may be darkened,—it is all bright for ever !”
“Oh that we might reach it!” exclaimed
Ann Dowley, the tears rising into her eyes.
Her sons looked at her in wonder, for they
had never known their mother utter such a
sentence before. To them Mark’s enthusiasm
seemed folly and madness, and they could not
hide their surprise at the effect which it pro-
duced upon one so much older than themselves.
Ann Dowley had been brought up to better
things, and had received an education very
superior to the station in which she had been
placed by her marriage. For many years she
had been a servant in respectable families, and
though all was now changed,—how miserably
changed !—she could not forget much that she
had once seen and heard. She was not ignor-
ant, though low and coarse-minded, and it was
perhaps from this circumstance that her family
were decidedly more intelligent than country
children of their age usually are. Ann could
read well, but her only stock of books con-
sisted of some dirty novels, broken-backed and



DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT. 29

torn,—she would have done well to have used
them to light the fire. She was one who had
never cared much for religion, who had not
sought the Creator in the days of her youth;
but she was unhappy now, united to a husband
whom she dreaded, and could not respect,—
whose absence for a season was an actual
relief; she was poor, and she doubly felt the
‘sting of poverty from having once been ac-
customed to comfort,—and Mark’s description
of peace, happiness, and joy, touched a chord
in her heart; that had been silent for long,

“You too desire to reach heaven!” cried
Mark, with animation sparkling in his eyes ;
“oh! mother, we will be pilgrims together,
struggle on together in the narrow way, and
be happy for ever and ever !”

The three younger children who had no
taste for conversation such as this, having
finished their meal slunk into the back room,
to gamble away farthings as they had learned
to do from their father. Ann sat down by the
fire opposite to Mark, a more gentle expression
than usual upon her face, and pushing back
the hair from her brow, listened, leaning her
head on her hand. .



80 DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT.

“T will tell you, mother, what the clergy-
man told me, I wish that I could remember
every word. He said that God would guide
us by his counsel here, and afterward receive
_us to glory. And he spoke of that glory, that
dazzling, endless glory! Oh! mother, how
wretched and dark seems this earth when we
think of the blessedness to come !”

“But that blessedness may not be for us,”
said Ann.

“He said that it was for those who had
faith, who believed in the Lord Jesus Christ.”

“T believe,” said the woman, “I never
doubted the Bible; I used to read it when I
was a child.”

“We will read mine together now, mother.”

“And what more did the clergyman tell
yout”

“He told me that the faith which brings us
to heaven will be sure to produce—” Mark
paused to recall the exact words-—“ repentance,
love, and @ holy life.”

“A holy life!” repeated Ann slowly. Pain-
ful thoughts crossed her mind of many things
constantly done that ought not to be done,
habits hard to be parted with as a right hand



; DIFFIOULTIES ON SETTING OUT. $1
or a right eye ; holiness seemed something as
far beyond her reach as the moon which was
now rising in the cloudy sky; she folded her
hands with a gloomy smile and said, “if that
be needful we may as well leave all these fine
hopes to those who have some chance of win-
ning what they wish!”

“The way is not shut to us.”

“TI tell you that it is,” said the woman
impatiently, for the little gleam of hope that
had dawned on her soul, had given place to
sullen despair, “To be holy you must be
truthful and honest,—we are placed in a
situation where we cannot be truthful, we
cannot be honest, we cannot serve God! It
is all very well for the rich and the happy, the
narrow way to them may be all strewed with
flowers, but to us it is closed,—and for ever !”
She clenched her hand with a gesture of des-
pair.

“ But, mother—”

“Talk no more,” she said, rising from her
seat “do you think that your father would
stand having a saint for his wife, or his son!
We have gone so far that we cannot turn back,
we cannot begin life again like children,—



82 DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT.

never speak to me again on these matters!”
and, so saying, Ann quitted the room, farther
than ever from the strait gate that leadeth
unto life, more determined to pursue her own
unhappy career.

The heart of Mark sank within him. Here
was disappointment to the young pilgrim at
the very outset, fear, doubt, and difficulty
enclosed him round, and hope was but as a
dim, distant light before him. But help seemed
given to the lonely boy, more lonely amid his
unholy companions than if he had indeed stood
by himself in the world. He looked out on
the pure, pale moon in the heavens, the dark
seeming to blot her from the sky; then a faint,
hazy light would appear from behind them,
then a slender, brilliant rim would be seen, and
at last the full orb would shine out in glory,
making even the clouds look bright !

“ See how these clouds chase each other, and
crowd round the moon, as if they would block
up her way!” thought Mark. They are like
’ the trials before me now, but bravely she keeps
on her path through all, and I must not,—I
will not despair !”



MAN’S WAY OF WORKS, 33

CHAPTER III.
MAN'S WAY OF WORKS, .

“ Now as Christian was walking solitarily by himself, he espicd
one afar off, come crossing over the field to meet him; and
their hap was to meet just as they were crossing the way of
each other, The gentleman’s name that met him was Mr,
Worldly Wiseman.”—Pigrim’s Progress.

Tae bright morning dawned upon Holyby, the
storm had spent itself during the night, and
nothing remained to mark that it had been
but the greater freshness of the air, clearness
of the sky, and the heavy moisture on the grass
that sparkled in the sun.

As the young pilgrim sat under an elm-trea
eating the crust which served him for a break«
fast, and meditating on the events and the
resolutions of the last day, Farmer Joyce came
riding along the road, mounted on a heavy horse
which often did service in the plough, and drew
up as he reached the boy.

“T say, Mark Dowley,” he called in a loud,

hearty voice, “you are just the lad I was look-
ing for
(aay 3



84 MAN’S WAY OF WORKS.

“Did you want me?” said Mark, raising
his eyes.

“Do you know Mr. Ewart?” cried the
farmer ; and on Mark’s shaking his head, con-
tinued, “why, he was talking to me about you
yesterday,—a clergyman, a tall man with a
stoop,—he who is tutor to Lord Fontonore.”

“Oh! yes!” cried Mark, springing up, “ but
I did not know his name. What could he be
saying of me?”

“He stopped at my farm on his drive home
yesterday, and asked me if I knew a lad called
Mark Dowley, and what sort of character he
bore. Says I,” continued the farmer, with a
broad smile on his jovial face, “I know
nothing against that boy in particular, but
he comes of a precious bad lot !”

“And what did he reply?” cried Mark
eagerly.

“Qh! a great deal that I can’t undertake
to repeat, about taking you out of temptation,
and putting you in an honest way: so the
upshot of it is that I agreed to give you a
chance, and employ you myself to take care of
my sheep, to see if anything respectable can be
male of you.”



MAN’S WAY OF WORKS. 85

“ How good in him,—how kind!” exclaimed
Mark.

“Tt seems that you got round him,—that
you found his weak side, young rogue! You
had been talking to him of piety and repent-
ance, and wanting to get to heaven. But I'll
give you a word of advice, my man, better
than twenty sermons, You see I’m thriving
and prosperous enough, and well respected,
though I should not say so, and I never
wronged a man in my life. If you would be
the same, just mind what I say, keep the com-
mandments, do your duty, work hard, owe
nothing, and steer clear of the gin-shop, and
depend upon it you'll be happy now, and be
sure of heaven at the last.”

“Mr. Ewart said that by faith—”

“Faith!” exclaimed the farmer, not very
reverently; “don’t trouble yourself with things
quite above you; things which you cannot
understand. It is all very well for a parson
like him, a very worthy man in his way, I
believe, but with many odd, fanciful notions.
My religion is a very simple one, suited to 4
plain man like me, I do what is right, and I
expect to be rewarded, I go on in a straight-



86 MAN’S WAY OP WORKS.

‘forward, honest, industrious way, and I feel
safer than any talking and canting can make
one. Now you mind what you have heard,
Mark Dowley, and come up to my farm in an
hour or two. I hope I'll have a good account
to give of you to the parson, and the young
lord, he too seemed to take quite an interest
in you.”

“Did he?” said Mark, somewhat surprised.

“Yes, it’s odd enough, with such riches as
he has, one would have thought that he had
something else to think of than a beggar boy.
Why, he has as many thousands a year as there
are sheaves in that field!”

“ He had a splendid carriage and horses.”

“Carriage! he might have ten for the
matter of that, they say he has the finest
estate in the county of York! but I can’t stay
here idling all day,” added the farmer; “ you
come up to my place as I said, and remember
all you've heard to-day. I have promised to
give you a trial, but mark me, my lad, if I
catch you at any of your old practices, that
moment you leave my service. So, honesty is
the best policy, as the good old proverb says.”
With that he struck his horse with the cudgel



MAN'S WAY OF WORKS. 87
which he carried in his hand, and went off at
a slow heavy trot.

“There is a great deal of sense in what he
has said,” thought Mark, as he turned in the
direction of Ann’s cottage to tell her of his
new engagement, “‘ Keep the commandments,
work hard, and steer clear of the gin-shop, and
you'll be sure of heaven at the last!’ These
are very plain directions any way, and I’m
resolved to follow them from this hour, Some
of my difficulties seein clearing away; by
watching the sheep all the day long I shall be
kept from a good many of my temptations, I
shall have less of the company of my brothers,
T shall earn my bread in an honest way, and
yet have plenty of time for thought. ‘Keep
the commandments,’ let me think what they
are,” and he went over the ten in his mind, as
he learned them from his Bible. “I think
that I may manage to keep them pretty strict-
ly, but there are words in the word of God
which will come to my thoughts. A new com-
mandment I give you, that ye love one another,
and he that hateth his brother is a murderer ;
how can I love those who dislike me, ‘tis im-
possible, I don’t believe that any one could.”



88 MAN'S WAY OF WORKS,

The first thing that met the eyes of Mark
on his entering the cottage put all his good.
resolutions to flight. Jack and Ben were
seated on the brick floor, busy in patching up
a small broken box, and as they wanted some-
thing to cut up for a lid, they had torn off the
cover from his beautiful Bible, and thrown the
book itself under the table! Mark darted
forward with an oath,—alas! his lips had been
~ too long accustomed to such language for the
habit of using it to be easily broken, though
he never swore except when taken by surprise,
as in this instance. He snatched up first the
cover, and then the book, and with fiery in-
dignation flashing in his eyes exclaimed, “I'll
teach you how to treat my Bible so!”

“Your Bible!” exclaimed Ben, with a
mocking laugh, “ Mark thinks it no harm to
steal a good book, but it’s desperate wicked to
pull off its cover !”

“Oh! that’s what the parson was teaching
him!” cried Jack. Provoked beyond endur-
ance Mark struck him.

“ So it’s that that you're after!” exclaimed
Jack, springing up like a wild cat, and repay-
ing the blow with interest. He was but little



MAN'S WAY OF WORKS. 39

younger than Mark, and of much stronger
make, therefore, at least his match in a struggle,
The boys were at once engaged in fierce fight,
while Ben sat looking on at the unholy strife,
laughing and shouting and clapping his hands,
and hallooing to Jack to “ give it him !”

“ What are you about there, you bad boys!”
exclaimed Ann, running from the inner room
at the noise of the scuffle. Jack had always
been her favourite son, and without waiting to
know who had the right in the dispute, she
grasped Mark by the hair, threw him violently
back, and, giving him a blow with her clenched
hand, cried, “get away with you, sneaking
coward that you are, to fight a boy younger
than yourself!”

“You always take his part, but he'll live
to be your torment yet!” exclaimed Mark,
forgetting all else in the blind fury of his
passion.

“He'll do better than you with all your ~
canting!” cried Ann. The words in a moment
recalled Mark to himself; what had he been
doing? what had he been saying? he, the
the pilgrim to heaven! he, the servant of
God! With a bitterness of spirit more painful



40 MAN’S WAY OF WORKS.

than any wrong which could have been inflicted
upon him by another, he took up the Bible
which had been dropped in the struggle, and
left the cottage without uttering a word.

Mortifying were Mark’s reflections through
that day, as he sat tending his sheep. “Keep
the commandments!” he sadly murmured to
himself, “how many have I broken in five
minutes! I took God’s name in vain,—a ter-
rible sin, it is written, above all things swear
not; I did not honour my mother, I spoke
insolently to her; I broke the sixth command-
ment by hating my brother, I struck him, I
felt as though I could have knocked him down
and trampled upon him! How can I reach
heaven by keeping the commandments, I could
as well get up to those clouds by climbing a
tree. Well, but I'll try once again, and not
give up yet, There is no one to provoke me,
no one to tempt me here, I can be righteous
at least when I am by myself.”

So Mark sat long, and read in his Bible,
mended it as well as he could, and thought of
Mr. Ewart and his words. Presently his mind
turned to Lord Fontonore, the fair, bright-
haired boy who possessed so much wealth, who



MAN’S WAY OF WORKS. 41

was placed in a position so different from his
own, ,

“He must be a happy boy indeed!” thought
Mark, “with food in abundance, every want
supplied, not knowing what it is to wish for
a pleasure, and not have it at once supplied.
He must be out of the way of temptation too,
always under the eye of that kind, holy man,
who never would give a rough word, I am sure,
but would always be leading him right. It is
very hard that there are such differences in the
world, that good things are so very unevenly
divided. I wish that I had but one quarter
of his wealth, he could spare it, no doubt, and
never feel the loss.” Without thinking what
he was doing, Mark turned over a leaf of the
Bible which lay open upon his knee. “ Thow
shalt not covet,” were the first words that met
his gaze; Mark sighed heavily and closed the
book.

“So, even when I am alone, I am sinning
still; coveting, repining, murmuring against
God’s will, with no more power to stand up-
right for one hour, than this weed which I have
plucked up by the roots, And yet, the soul
that sinneth it shall die: I cannot get rid of



42 MAN'S WAY OF WORKS.

these terrible words, I will not think on this
‘subject any more, it only makes me more
wretched than I was. Oh! I never knew, till
I tried it to-day, how hard,—how impossible it
is to be righteous before a holy God!”

So, tempted to banish the thought of religion
altogether from his mind, because he felt the
law to be too holy to be kept unbroken, yet
dreading the punishment for breaking it, Mark
tried to turn his attention to other things. He
watched the sheep as they grazed, plucked wild
flowers and examined them, and amused him-
self as best he might.

The day was very hot, there was little shade
in the field, and Mark grew heated and thirsty.
He wished that there were a stream running
through the meadow, his mouth felt so parched
and dry.

On one side of the field there was a brick
wall, dividing it from the garden belonging to
Farmer Joyce. On the top of this grew a
bunch of wild wall-flower, and Mark who was
particularly fond of flowers, amused himself by
devising means to reach it. There was a small
tree growing not very far from the spot, by
climbing which, and swinging himself over on



MAN’S WAY OF WORKS. 43

the wall, he thought that he might succeed in
obtaining the prize. It would be difficult, but
Mark rather liked difficulties of this sort, and
anything at that time seemed pleasanter than
thinking.

After one or two unsuccessful attempts, the
boy found himself perched upon the wall; but
the flower within his reach was forgotten.
He looked down from his height on the gar-
den below, with its long lines of fruit-bushes,
now stripped and bare, beds of onions, rows of
beans, broad tracts of potatoes, all the picture
of neatness and order. But what most at-
tracted the eye of tle boy was a splendid
peach-tree, growing on the wall just below
him, its boughs loaded with rich tempting
fruit. One large peach, the deep red of whose
downy covering showed it to be so ripe, that
one might wonder that it did not fall from the
branch by its own weight, lay just within
reach of his hand. The sight of that fruit,
that delicious fruit, made Mark feel more
thirsty than ever. He should have turned
away, he should have sprung from the wall;
but he lingered and looked, and looking de-
sired, then stretched out his hand to grasp,



44 MAN’S WAY OF WORKS.

Alas for his resolutions !—alas for his pilgrim
zeal! Could sosmall a temptation have power
to overcome them?

Yet let the disadvantages of Mark’s educa-
tion be remembered: he had been brought up
with those to whom robbing an orchard seemed
rather a diversion than asin. His first ardour
for virtue had been chilled by failure; and who
that has tried what he vainly attempted does
not know the effect of that chill? With a hesi-
tating hand Mark plucked the ripe peach ; he
did not recollect that it was a similar sin which
once plunged the whole earth into misery
—that it was tasting forbidden fruit which
brought sin and death into the world. He
raised it to his lips, when a sudden shout from
the field almost caused him to drop from the wall.

“Holloa there! you young thief! Are you
at it already? Robbing me the very first
day! Come down, or I'll bring you to the
ground with a vengeance!” It was the angry
voice of the farmer.

Mark dropped from his height much faster
than he had mounted, and stood before his
employer with his face flushed to crimson, and
too much ashamed to lift up his eyes.



MAN’S WAY OF WORKS, 45

“ Get you gone,” continued the farmer, “ for
a hypocrite and a rogue; you need try none
of your canting on me. Not one hour longer
shall you remain in my employ ; you're on the
high road to the gallows.”

Mark turned away in silence, with an almost
bursting heart, and feelings that bordered on
despair. With what an account of himself
was he to return to his home, to meet the
scoffs and jests which he had too well deserved!
What discredit would his conduct bring on his
religion! How his profane companions would
triumph in his fall! The kind and pitying
clergyman would regard him as a hypocrite—
would feel disappointed in him! Bitter was
the thought. All his firm resolves had snapped
like thread in the flame, and his hopes of win-
ning Heaven had vanished.



46 GOD's GIFT OF GRACE.

CHAPTER IV.
GOD'S GIFT OF GRACE.

“Ye cannot be justified by the works of the law; for by the
deeds of the law no man living can be rid of his burden.”—
Pilgrim's Progress.

“ Waar ails you my young friend?—has any-
thing painful happened?” said a kindly voice,
and a hand was gently laid upon the shoulder
of Mark, who was lying on the grass amidst
the ruins of the old Abbey, his face leaning on
his arms, and turned towards earth, while short
convulsive sobs shook his frame.

“Oh, sir!” exclaimed Mark, as a momentary
glance enabled him to recognise Mr. Ewart.

“Let me know the cause of your sorrow,”
said the clergyman, seating himself on a large
stone beside him. “Rise, and speak to me
with freedom.”

Mark rose, but turned his glowing face aside;
he was ashamed to look at his companion.

“Sit down there,” said Mr, Ewart, feeling
for the boy’s evident confusion and distress;
“perhaps you are not yet aware that I have



GOD’s GIFT OF GRACE, A

endeavoured to serve you—to procure you a
situation with Farmer Joyce?”

“JT have had it, and lost it,” replied Mark
abruptly.

“Indeed, I am sorry to hear that. I trust
that no fault has occasioned your removal.”

“T stole his fruit,” said Mark, determined at
least to hide nothing from his benefactor; “he
turned me off, and he called me a hypocrite.
I am bad enough,” continued the boy, in an
agitated tone; “no one but myself knows how
bad; but I am not a hypocrite, I am not !”

“God forbid !” said Mr. Ewart ; “but how
did ull this happen?”

“T was thirsty, it tempted me, and I took
it. I broke all my resolutions, and now he
has cast me off, and you will cast me off, and
the pure holy God, He will cast me off too!
I shall never be worthy of Heaven !”

“Did you think that you could ever be
worthy of Heaven?” said the clergyman, and
paused fora reply. Then receiving none from
Mark, he continued—“ Not you, nor I, nor the
holiest man that ever lived, One excepted, who
was not only man, but God, was ever worthy
of the kingdom of heaven.”



48 GOD’s GIFT OF GRACE,

Mark looked at him in silent surprise.

“We are all sinners, Mark; all polluted
with guilt, Not one day passes in which our
actions, our words, or our thoughts, would not
make us lose all title to eternal life. The
Bible says, ‘ There is not one that doeth good,
no, not one, Every living soul is included
under sin.”

“How can this be?” said Mark, who had
looked upon the speaker as one above all
temptation or stain.

“Since Adam, our first parent, sinned and
fell, all his children have been born into the
world with a nature tainted and full of wick-
edness, Even as every object lifted up from
the earth, if unsupported, will fall to the

' ground, so we, without God’s grace, naturally
fall into sin.”

“ Then can no one go to Heaven?” said
Mark.

“ Blessed be God, mercy has found a means
by which even sinners can be saved! Sin is
the burden which weighs us to the dust, which
prevents us from rising to glory. The Lord
Jesus came from heaven that he might free us
from sin, take our burden from us, and bear it



GOD’s GIFT OF GRACE. 49

Himself; and so we have hope of salvation
through Him.”

“T wish that I understood this better,” said
Mark.

“T will tell you what happened to a friend
of my own, which may help you to understand
our position towards God, and the reason of
the hope that is in us. I went some years
ago with a wealthy nobleman to visit a prison
at some distance. Many improvements have
been made in prisons since then, at that time
they were indeed most fearful abodes. In one
damp dark cell, small and confined, where light
scarcely struggled in through the narrow grating
to show the horrors of the place, where the
moisture trickled down the green stained walls,
and the air felt heavy and unwholesome ; in
this miserable den we found an unhappy pri-
soner, who had been confined there for many
weary years. He had been placed there for a
debt which he was unable to pay, and he had
no prospect of ever getting free, Can you see
in this man’s case no likeness to your own?
Look on sin as a debt, a heavy debt, that you
owe: do you not feel that you have no power

to pay it?”
(23) 4



50 Gop’s GIFT OF GRACE.

“None,” replied Mark gloomily ; “ none.”

“T had the will to help the poor man,” con:
tinued Mr. Ewart, “but Providence had not
afforded me the means, I had no more ability
to set him free from prison, than I have to rid
you of the burden of your sin.”

“But the wealthy nobleman,” suggested
Mark.

“He had both power and will. He paid
the debt at once, and the prisoner was released,
Never shall I forget the poor man’s cry of de-
light, as the heavy iron-studded door was
thrown open for his passage, and he bounded
into the bright sunshine again !”

“And what became of him afterwards?”
asked the boy.

“He entered the service of his generous
benefactor, and became the most faithful, the
most attached of servants. He remained in
that place till he died; he seemed to think
that he could never do enough for him who
had restoredehim to freedom.”

“Where is the friend to pay my debt,”
sighed Mark.

“Tt has been paid already,” said the cler
gyman.



Gop’s GIFT OF GRACE. 51

‘Paid! Oh, when, and by whom?”

“Tt was paid when the Saviour died upon
the cross—it was paid by the eternal Son of
God! He entered for us the prison of this
world, He paid our debt with His own pre-
cious blood, He opened the gates of eternal
life; through His merits, for His sake, we are
pardoned and saved, if we have faith, true
faith, in that Saviour!”

“This iswonderful!” said Mark, thoughtfully,
as though he could yet scarcely grasp the idea.
“ And this faith must produce a holy life; but
here is the place where.I went wrong,—I
thought men were saved because they ‘were
holy!”

“They are holy because they are saved!
Here was indeed your mistake, my friend.
The poor debtor was not set free because he
had served his benefactor, but he served him
because he was set free! A tree does not live
because it has fruit, however abundant that
fruit may be, but it produces fruit because it
has life, and good actions are the fruit of our
faith ?”

“But are we safe whether we be holy or
not?”



52 GOD'S GIFT OF GRACE.

“ Without holiness no man shall see the
Lord. Every tree that beareth not good fruit
ts hewn down and cast into the fire.”

“ But I feel as if-I could not be holy!” cried
Mark. “TI tried this day to walk straight on in
the narrow path of obedience to God—I tried,
but I miserably failed. I gained nothing at all
by trying.”

“You gained the knowledge of your own
weakness, my boy ; you will trust less to your
resolutions in future, and so God will bring
good out of evil And now let me ask you
one question, Mark Dowley. When you de-
termined to set out on your Christian pilgrim-
age, did you pray for the help and guidance of
God’s Spirit ?”

Mark, in a low voice, answered, “ No!”

“ And can you wonder then that you failed?
could you have expected to succeed? As well
might you look for ripe fruit where the sun
never shines, or for green grass to spring where
the dew never falls, or for sails to be filled and
the vessel move on when there is not a breath
of air! Sun, dew, and wind are given by God
alone, and so is the Holy Spirit, without which
it is impossible to please him,”



GOD’s GIFT OF GRACE. 53

“ And how can I have the Spirit?” said
Mark.

“ Ask for it, never doubting but that it shall
be sent, for this is the promise of the Lord:
Ask and ye shall receive, seck and ye shall
find, knock and it shall be opened unto you.
Tf ye, being evil, know how to give good gifts
unto your children, how much more shall your
Father which is im heaven give the Holy Spirit
to them that ask lim ?”

“ And what will the Spirit do for me?”

“Strengthen you, increase your courage and
your faith, make your heart pure and holy.
The fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, long-
suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness,
temperance. Having these you are rich in-
deed, and may press on your way rejoicing to
the kingdom of your Father in heaven.”

“But how shall I pray?” exclaimed Mark.
“T am afraid to address the Most High God,
poor miserable sinner that I am.”

“When the blessed Saviour dwelt upon
earth, multitudes flocked around him. The
poor diseased leper fell at his feet, he was not
despised because he was unclean; parents
brought their children to the Lord, they were



64 Gup's GIFT OF GRACE.

not sent away because they were feeble; the
thief asked for mercy on the cross, he was not
rejected because he was a sinner! The same
gentle Saviour who listened to them is ready
to listen to you; the same merciful Lord who
‘granted their prayers is ready to give an answer
to yours, Pour out your whole heart, as you
would to a friend; tell him your wants, your
weakness, your woe, and you never will seek
him in vain!”

There was silence for a few minutes, during
which Mark remained buried in deep, earnest
thought. The clergyman silently lifted up his
heart to heaven for a blessing upon the words
that had been spoken; then, rising from his
seat, he said, “I do not give up all hope, Mark
Dowley, of procuring a situation for you yet,
though, of course, after what has occurred, I
shall find it more difficult to do so. And one
word before we part. You are now standing
before the gate of mercy, a helpless, burdened,
but not hopeless sinner. There is one ready,
one willing to open to you, if you knock by
sincere humble prayer. Go, then, without
delay, ‘seek ye the Lord while he may be found,
call ye upon him while he is near.”



GOD'S GIFT OF GRACE. 55

Mark watched the receding figure of the
clergyman with a heart too full to express
thanks, As soon as Mr. Ewart was out of
sight, once more the boy threw himself down
on the grass, but no longer in a spirit of de-
spair. Trying to realize the truth, that he was
indeed in the presence of the Saviour, of whom
he had heard,—that the same eye which re-
garded the penitent thief with compassion was
now regarding him from Heaven,—he prayed,
with the energy of one whose all is at stake,
for pardon, for grace, for the Spirit of God!
He rose with a feeling of comfort and relief,
though the burden on his heart was not yet
removed. He believed that the Lord was
gracious and long-suffering, that Jesus came
into the world to save sinners ; he had knocked
at the strait gate, which gives entrance into
life, and mercy had opened it unto him!



56 A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS.

CHAPTER Y.
A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS,

“ Upon that place stood a Cross, and a little below, in the bottom,
a Sepulchre, So I saw in my dream, that just as Christian
came up with the Cross, his burden loosed from off his show)-
ders, and fell from off his back.”—Pilgrim’s Progress.

“ WELL, this has been a pretty end to your
fine pilgrimage !” cried Jack, as Mark, resolved
to tell the truth, whatever it might cost him,
finished the account of his rupture with the
farmer. :

“The end!” said Mark ; “ my pilgrimage is
scarcely begun !

“It’s a sort of backward travelling, I should
say,” laughed Jack. “ You begin with quarrel-
ling and stealing ; I wonder what you'll come
to at last?”

Mark was naturally of a quick and ardent
spirit, only too ready to avenge insult, whether
with his tongue or his hand, But at. this
moment his pride was subdued, he felt less in-
clined for angry retort ; the young pilgrim was
more on his guard; his first fall had taught
him to walk carefully. Without replying,



A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS. 57

therefore, to the taunt of Jack, or continuing
the subject at all, he turned to Ann Dowley,
and asked her if she could lend him a needle
and thread.

“What do you want with them?” asked
Ann.

“Why, I am afraid that I shall be but a
poor hand at the work, but I thought that I
might manage to patch up one or two of these
great holes, and make my dress look a little
more respectable.”

“ And why do you wish to look respectable?”
asked Madge, glancing at him through the
uncombed, unwashed locks that hung loosely
over her brow; “we get more when we look
ragged.”

“To-morrow is Sunday,” Mark briefly re-
plied, “ and I am going to church.”

“To church!” exclaimed every other voice
in the cottage in a tone of as much surprise as
if he had said that he was going to prison.
Except Ann, in better days, not one of the
party had ever crossed the threshold of a
church !”

“Well, if ever!” exclaimed Jack; “why
on earth do you go there?”



58 A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS.

“T go because I think it right to do so, and
because I think that it will help me on my
way.”

. “And what will you do when you get
-there ?” laughed Ben.

“T shall listen, learn, and pray.”

Ann, who, by dint of searching in a most
disorderly box, filled with a variety of odds
and ends, had drawn forth first thread and
then needle, stretched out her hand towards
Mark, “Give me your jacket, I will mend
it,” said she.

“Qh! thank you, how kind!” he cried,
pulling it off, pleased with an offer as unex-
pected as it was unusual,

“T think,” said Madge, “that the shirt
wants mending worse than the jacket; under
that hole on the shoulder I can see the red
mark quite plainly.”

“Be silent, and don’t talk nonsense!” cried
Ann impatiently.

The children glanced at each other, and
were silent.

“ Are you going to the near church by the
wood ?” said Ann,

“No,” replied Mark, “T have two reasons



A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS. 59
for going to Marshdale, though it is six or
seven miles off. I would rather not go where
—where I am known; and judging from the
direction in which his carriage was driven, I
think that I should have a better chance at
Marshdale of hearing Mr. Ewart.”

“Hearing whom?” exclaimed Ann, almost
dropping her work, whilst the blood rushed
up to her face.

“Mr. Ewart, the clergyman who has been
so kind, the tutor to Lord Fontonore.”

“Lord Fontonore! does he live here?” cried
Ann, almost trembling with excitement as she
spoke,

“T do not know exactly where he lives, I
* should think it some way off, as the carriage
was put up at the inn. Did you ever see the
clergyman, mother?”

“He used to visit at my last place,” replied
Ann, looking distressed.

“TJ think I’ve heard father talk about Lord
Fontonore,” said Madge.

“No, you never did,” cried Ann, abruptly.

“But I’m sure of it,” muttered Madge in a
sullen tone,

“If you know the clergyman, that’s good



60 A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS,

luck for us,” said Ben, “I daresay that he'll
give us money if we get up a good story about
you; only he’s precious sharp at finding one
out. He wanted to pay us a visit.”

“Don’t bring him here; for any sake don’t
* bring him here!” exclaimed Ann, looking quite
alarmed. “ You don’t know the mischief, the
ruin you would bring. I never wish to set
eyes upon that man.”

“T can imagine her feelings of pain,” thought
Mark, “by my own to-day, when I first saw
the clergyman. ‘There is something in the
very look of a good man which seems like a
reproach to us when we are so different.”

The next morning, as Mark was dressing
for church, he happily noticed, before he put
on his jacket, the word Piternt chalked in
large letters upon the back.

“This is a piece of Jack’s mischief,” he said
to himself, “Iam glad that it is something
that can easily be set right—more glad still
that I saw it in time. I will take no notice
of this piece of ill-nature. I must learn to
bear and forbear.”

Mark endured in silence the taunts and
jests of the children on his setting out on



A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS, 61

his long walk to church, He felt irritated
and annoyed, but he had prayed for patience ;
and the consciousness that he was at least
trying to do what was right seemed to give
him a greater command over his temper. He
was’ heartily glad, however, when he got out
of hearing of mocking words and bursts of
laughter, and soon had a sense even of ‘plea-
sure as he walked over the sunny green fields.

At length Marshdale church came in view.
An ancient building it was, with a low, ivy-
covered tower, and a small arched porch before
the entrance, It stood in a church-yard, which
was embosomed in trees, and a large yew-tree,
that had stood for many an age, threw its sha-
dow over the lowly graves beneath.

A stream of people was slowly wending
along the narrow gravel walk, while the bell
rang a summons to prayer. There was the
aged widow, leaning on her crutch, bending
her feeble steps, perhaps for the last time, to
the place where she had worshipped from a
child, There the hardy peasant, in his clean
smock-frock, leading his rosy-cheeked boy; and
there walked the lady, leaning on her husband’s
arm, with a flock of little ones before her,



62 A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS.

Mark stood beneath the yew-tree, half afraid
to venture farther, watching the people as they
went in. There were some others standing
there also, perhaps waiting because a little

_ early for the service, perhaps only idling near
that door which they did not mean to enter.
They were making observations on some one
approaching.

“What a fine boy he looks! You might
know him for a lord! Does he stay long in
the neighbourhood ?”

“Only for a few weeks longer I believe; he
has a prodigious estate somewhere I hear, and
generally lives there with his uncle.”

As the speaker concluded, young Lord Fon-
tonore passed before them, and his bright eye
caught sight of Mark Dowley. Leaving the
path which led to the door, he was instantly
at the side of the poor boy.

“You are coming into church I hope?” said
he earnestly ; then continued, without stopping
for a reply, “ Mr. Ewart is to preach; you must
not stay outside.” Mark bowed his head, and
followed into the church,

How heavenly to the weary-hearted boy
sounded the music of the hymn, the many



A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS. 63

voices blended together in praise to the Saviour
God made him think of the harmony of heaven!
Rude voices, unkind looks, quarrelling, false-
hood, fierce temptations—all seemed to him
shut out from that place, and a feeling of
peace stole over his spirit, like a calm after a
storm. He sat in a retired corner of the
church, unnoticed and unobserved: it was as
though the weary pilgrim had paused on the
hot, dusty highway of life, to bathe his bruised
feet in some cooling stream, and refresh him-
self by the wayside.

Presently Mr. Ewart ascended the pulpit
with the word of God in his hand. Mark
fixed his earnest eyes upon the face of the
preacher, and never removed them during the
whole of the sermon. His was deep, solemn
attention, such as befits a child of earth when
listening to a message from Heaven.

The subject of the Christian minister’s ad-
dress was the sin of God’s people in the
wilderness, and the means by which merey
saved the guilty and dying, He described
the scene so vividly that Mark could almost
fancy that he saw Israel’s hosts encamping in
the desert around the tabernacle, over which



64 A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS,

hung a pillar of cloud, denoting the Lord's
presence with his people. God had freed them
from bondage, had saved them from their foes,
had guided them, fed them, blessed above all
_ hations, and yet they rebelled and murmured
against him. Again and again they had
broken his law, insulted his servant, and
doubted his love; and at last the long-
merited punishment came. Fiery serpents
were sent into the camp, serpents whose bite
was death, and the miserable sinners lay
groaning and dying beneath the reptiles’
venomous fangs. ;

“And are such serpents not amongst us
still?” said the preacher; “is not sin the
viper that clings to the soul, and brings it
to misery and death! What ruins the drunk-
ard’s character and name, brings poverty and
shame to his door? The fiery serpent of sin!
What brings destruction on the murderer and
the thief? The fiery serpent of sin! What
fixes its poison even in the young child, what
has wounded every soul that is born into the
world? The fiery serpent of sin !”

Then the minister proceeded to tell how, at
God’s command, Moses raised on high a ser-



‘

A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS. 65

pent made of brass, and whoever had faith to
look on that serpent, recovered from his
wound, and was healed. He described the
trembling mothers of Israel lifting their chil-
dren on high to look on the type of salvation;
and the dying fixing upon it their dim, failing
eyes, and finding life returning as they gazed !

“ And has no such remedy been found for
man, sinking under the punishment of sin?
Thanks to redeeming love, that remedy has
been found, for as.Moses lifted up the serpent
in the wilderness, so hath the Son of Man
been lifted up, that whoso believeth in Him
should not perish, but have everlasting life!
Behold the Saviour uplifted on the cross, His
brow crowned with thorns, blood flowing from
His side, and the wounds in His pierced hands
and feet! Why did He endure the torment
and the shame, rude blows from the hands
that His own power had formed—fierce taunts
from the lips to which He had given breath.
{t was that He might redeem us from sin and
from death—it was that the blessed Jesus
might have power to say—*“ Look unto Me
and be ye saved, all ends of the earth.”

“We were sentenced to misery, sentenced
(23) 5



66 A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS.

to death; the justice of God had pronounced
the fearful words—“ the soul that sinneth it
shall die!” One came forward who knew
no sin, to bear the punishment due unto sin;
our sentence is blotted out by His blood ; the
sword of justice has been sheathed in His
breast, and now there is no condemnation to
them that are in Christ Jesus; their ransom
is paid, their transgressions are forgiven for
the sake of Him who loved and gave Himself
for.them. Oh, come to the Saviour, ye weary
and heavy laden—come to the Saviour, ye
burdened with sin, dread no longer the wrath
of an offended God; look to Him and be ye
saved, all ye ends of the earth!”

Mark had entered that church thoughtful
and anxious, he left it with a heart overflow-
ing with joy. It was as though sudden light
had flashed upon darkness; he felt as the
cripple must have felt when given sudden
strength, he sprang from the dust, and went
walking, and leaping, and praising God.
“No condemnation!” he kept repeating to
himself, “no condemnation to the penitent
sinner! All washed away—all sin blotted
out for ever by the blood of the crucified



A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS. 67

“Lord! Oh! now can I understand that
blessed verse in Isaiah, “Though your sins
be as scarlet they shall be white as snow;
though they be red like crimson, they shall be
as wool.” “ Praise the Lord, O my soul! and
all that is within me, praise His holy name !”
That hour was rich in blessings to the
young pilgrim, and as he walked towards
home, with a light step, and lighter heart, it
was his delight to count them over. He
rejoiced in the free forgiveness of sins, which
now for the first time he fully realized He
rejoiced that he might now appear before God,
not clothed in the rags of his own imperfect
works, but the spotless righteousness of his
Redeemer. He rejoiced that the Lord had
sealed him for His own, and given him sweet
assurance of His pardon and His love. Oh,
who can rejoice as the Christian rejoices,
when he looks to the cross and is healed !



68 THE PILGRIM IN HIS HOME,

CHAPTER VI.
THE PILGRIM IN HIS HOME.

“I saw thon in my dream that he went on thus, even until he
came to the bottom, where he saw, a little out of the way,
three men fast asleep, with fetters upon their heels."—Pilgrim’s
Progress.

THE poor despised boy returned hungry and

tired to a home where he was certain to meet

with unkindness, where he knew that he
would scarcely find the necessaries of life, and
yet he returned with feelings that a monarch
might have envied. The love of God was so
shed abroad in his heart, that the sunshine
seemed brighter, the earth looked more lovely;
he felt certain that his Lord would provide for
him here, that every sorrow was leading to
joy. He thought of the happiness of the man
once possessed, when he sat clothed and in his
right mind at the feet of the Saviour: it
was there that the pilgrim was resting now,
it was there that he had laid his burden
down. The fruit of the Spirit is peace and
joy, such joy as is the foretaste of Heaven.
And the love of God must lead to love to-



THE PILGRIM IN Hs NOME. 69

wards man, Mark could feel kindly towards
all his fellow-creatures. His fervent desire
was to do them some good, and let them share
the happiness that he experienced. He thought
of the rude inmates of his home, but without
an emotion of anger; in that first hour of
joy for pardoned sin, there seemed no room in
his heart for anything but love and compassion
for those who were still in their blindness,

As Mark drew near to his cottage, he came
to a piece of ground overgrown with thistles,
which belonged to Farmer Joyce. He was
surprised to find there Jack, Madge, and Ben,
pulling up the thistles most busily, with an
energy which they seldom showed in any-
thing but begging.

“Come and work with us,” said Ben,
“this ground must be all cleared to-day.”

“ And why to-day ?” said Mark.

“Because Farmer Joyce told us this morn-
ing that when it was cleared he would give
us half-a-crown.”

“You can work to-morrow.”

“Ah, but to-morrow is the fair-day, and
that is why we are so anxious for the money.”

“T will gladly rise early to help you to-



70 THE PILGRIM IN HIS. HOME.

morrow, but this day, Ben, we ought not to
work, The Lord has commanded us to keep
the Sabbath holy, and we never shall be losers
by obeying him.”

“Here's the pilgrim come to preach,” cried
Madge in a mocking tone. ~

“T tell you what,” said Jack, stopping a
moment in his work, “ you’d better mind your
own business and be off; I don’t know what
you have to do with us.”

“What I have to do with you!” exclaimed
Mark. “Am I not your brother, the son of
your mother? Am I not ready and willing
to help you, and to rise early if I am ever so
much tired?”

There was such a bright kindly look on the
pale, weary face, that even Jack could not
possibly be offended.

“Now, just listen for a moment,” continued °
Mark ; “suppose that as I was coming along
I had spied under the bushes there a lion
asleep, that I knew would soon wake, and
prowl in search of his prey, should I do right
in going home and taking care of myself, barr-
ing our door so that no lion could come in,

- and never telling you of the danger at all?”



THE PILGRIM IN HIS HOME. 71

Madge glanced half-frightened towards the
bushes, but Jack replied, “I should say that
you were a cowardly fellow if you did.”

“What, leave us to be torn in pieces, and
never give us warning of the lion?” cried
Ben.

“T should be a cowardly fellow indeed, and
a most unfeeling brother. And shall I not
tell you of your danger, when the Evil One,
who is as a roaring lion, is laying wait for
your precious souls. As long as you are in
sin you are in danger. Oh, that you would
turn to God and be safe !”

“God will not punish poor children like
us,” said Madge, “just for working a little
when we are so poor.”

“The Evil One whispers the very same
thing -to us as he did to Eve, ‘ Thow shalt not
surely die ;’ but she found, as we shall find,
that though God is merciful, He is also just,
and keeps His word.”

“There will be time enough to trouble our-
selves about these things,” said Ben.

“Take care of yourself, and leave us in
peace!” exclaimed Jack; “we are not going
to be taught by you!” and turning his back



72 THE PILGRIM IN HIS NOME.

upon Mark, he began to work more vigorously
than ever.

Mark walked up to the cottage with a slow
weary step, silently praying for those who
would not listen to him. “od can touch
* their hearts though I cannot,” thought he.
“He who had mercy on me may have mercy
on them.”

Never had the cottage looked more untidy
or uncomfortable, or Ann’s face worn an ex-
pression more gloomy and ill-tempered.

“ Mother,” cried Mark cheerfully, “have you
something to give me, my long walk has made
me so hungry ?”

“We've had dinner long ago.”

“But have you nothing left for me?”

“You should have been here in proper time.
It’s all gone.”

Exhausted in body, and wounded by un-
kindness, Mark needed indeed the cordial of
religion to prevent his spirit from sinking.
But he thought of his Lord, and his sufferings
upon earth, “My Saviour knew what it was
to be weary and a hungered—He knew what
it was to be despised and rejected. If He
drained the cup of sorrow, shall I refuse to



THE PILGRIM IN HIs HOME. 73

taste it! If this trial were not good for me,
it would not be sent.” So Mark sat down
patiently in a corner of the room, and thought
over the sermon to cheer him.

His attention was soon attracted by Ann’s
giving two or three heavy sighs, as if she were
in pain; and looking up, he saw a frown of
suffering on her face, as she bent down and
touched her ankle with her hand.

“Have you hurt yourself, dear mother?”
said he, :

“Yes, I think that I sprained my ankle this
morning, Dear me! how it has swelled!”

“Tam so sorry!” cried Mark, instantly rising;
* you should put up your foot, and not tire it
by moving about. There,” said he, sitting
down at her feet, “rest it on my knee, and I
will rub it gently. Is it not more easy now?”

Ann only replied by a sigh, but she let him
go on, and patiently he sat there, chafing her
ankle with his thin weary fingers. He could
scarcely prevent himself from falling asleep.

“That is very comfortable,” said the woman
at last; “certainly it’s more than any of the
others would do for their mother; they never
so much as asked me how I did. You're worth



74 THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL.

all the three, Mark,” she added bitterly, “ and
little cause have you to show kindness to me
Just go to that cupboard—it hurts me to
move—you'll find there some bread and cheese
. left.”

Mark joyfully obeyed, and never was a feast
more delicious than that humble meal. Never
was @ grace pronounced more from the depths
of a grateful heart than that uttered by the
poor peasant boy.



CHAPTER VIL
THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL.

“ Now, about the midway to the top of the hill was a pleasant
arbour, made by the Lord of the hill for the refreshment of
weary travellers.”—Pilgrim’s Progress.

Srverat days passed with but few events to

mark them. Mark did everything for Ann

to save her from exertion, and under his care
her ankle became better. He also endeavoured
to keep the cottage more tidy, and clear the
little garden from weeds, remembering that

“cleanliness is next to godliness,” and that if

any man will not work, neither should he eat,



THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL, 75

One morning Madge burst into the cottage
where Mark and Ann were sitting together.
“He is coming!” she exclaimed in a breath-
less voice; “he is coming—he is just at the
gate (*

“Who?” cried Ann and Mark at once.

“The parson,—the—”

“Not Mr. Ewart!” exclaimed Ann, starting
up in terror,

“Yes it is—the tall man dressed in black.”

In a moment’ the woman rushed to the
back room as fast as her ankle would let her.
“Tl keep quiet here,” she said. “If he
asks for me, say that I’ve just gone to the
miller’s.”

“ Mother's precious ictal of a parson,” said
Madge, as a low knock was heard at the door.

With pleasure Mark opened to his bene-
factor.

“Good morning,” said Mr. Ewart, as he
crossed the threshold. “I have not forgotten
my promise to you, my friend. I hope that
I have obtained a place for you as erranil-
boy to a grocer. Being myself only a tem-
porary resident in these parts, I do not know
much of your future master, except that he



76 THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL.

appears to keep a respectable shop, and is
very regular in attendance at church; but I
hear that he bears a high character. Mr.
Lowe, if you suit him, agrees to give you
board and lodging; and if he finds you upon
trial useful and active, he will add a little
salary at the end of the year.”

“T am very thankful to you, sir,” said
Mark, his eyes expressing much -more than
his lips could. “TI trust that you never will
bave cause to be sorry for your kindness.”

“Ts your mother within?” said Mr. Ewart.

Mark bit his lip, and knew not what to
reply, divided between fear of much displeas-
ing his parent, and that of telling a falsehood
to his benefactor.

“She’s gone to the miller’s,” said Madge
boldly.

But the clergyman turned away from the
wicked little girl, whose word he never thought
of trusting, and repeated his question to Mark,
whose hesitation he could not avoid seeing.

“She is within, sir,” said the boy, after a
little pause; then continued with a painful
effort, as he could not but feel that Ann’s
conduct appeared rude and ungrateful to one



THE ARBOUR ON TIE HILL. 77

whom above all men he was anxious to please ;
“but she would rather not see you to-day.”

“Very well, I have seen you; you will tell
her what I have arranged.” Mark ventured
to glance at tlie speaker, and saw, with a feel-
ing of relief, that Mr, Ewart’s face did not
look at all angry.

It was more than could be said for Ann’s,
as, after the clergyman’s departure, she came
out of her hiding-place again. Her face was
flushed, her manner excited ; and, in a fit of
ungovernable passion, she twice struck the
unresisting boy.

“Lord Jesus! this I suffer for thee !”
thought Mark, and this reflection took the
bitterness from the trial. He was only thank-
ful that he had been enabled to keep to the
truth, and not swerve from the narrow path.

On the following day Mark went to his
new master, who lived in a neighbouring
town. He found out the shop of Mr. Lowe
without difficulty ; and there was something
of comfort and respectability in the appear-
ance of the establishment, that was very en-
couraging to the boy. ‘To his unaccustomed
eye the ranges of shining brown canisters, each



78 THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL,

neatly labelled with its contents ; the white
sugar-loaves, with prices ticketed in the win-
dow ; the large cards, with advertisements of
sauces and soap, and the Malaga raisins, spread
temptingly to view, spake of endless plenty
and abundance,

Mark carried a note which Mr. Ewart had
given to him, and, entering the shop, placed it
modestly on the counter before Mr. Lowe.

The grocer was rather an elderly man, with
a bald head, and mild expression of face. He
opened the note slowly, then looked at Mark
over his spectacles, read the contents, then
took another survey of the boy. Mark’s heart
beat fast, he was so anxious not to be re-
jected.

“So,” said Mr. Lowe, in a slow, soft voice,
as if he measured every word that he spoke ;
“so you are the lad that is to come here upon
trial, recommended by the Reverend Mr.
Ewart. He says that you've not been well
brought up; that’s bad, very bad—but that
he hopes that your own principles are good.
Mr. Ewart is a pious man, a very zealous
minister, and I am glad to aid him in works
of charity like this. If you're pious, all’s



THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL. 79
right, there’s nothing like that; I will have
none about me but those who are decidedly
pious !”

Mr. Lowe looked as though he expected a
reply, which puzzled Mark exceedingly, as he
had no idea of turning piety to worldly advan-
tage, or professing religion to help him to a
place. He stood, uneasily twisting his cap in
his hand, and was much relieved when, a cus-
tomer coming in, Lowe handed him over to
his shopman.

Radley, the assistant, was a neat-looking
little man, very precise and formal in his
manner, at least in the presence of his master.
There was certainly an occasional twinkle in
his eye, which made Mark, who was very ob-
servant, suspect that he was rather fonder of
fun than might beseem the shopman of the
solemn Mr. Lowe ; but his manner, in general,
was a sort of copy of his master’s and he bor-
rowed his language and phrases,

And now, fairly received into the service of
the grocer, Mark seemed to have entered upon
a life of comparative comfort. Mr. Lowe was
* neither tyrannical nor harsh, nor was Radley
disposed to bully the errand boy. Mark’s



80 THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL,

obliging manner, great intelligence, and readi-
ness to work, made him rather a favourite
with both, and the common comforts of life
which he now enjoyed appeared as luxuries to
him.

“T have been climbing a steep hill of diffi-
culty,” thought he, “and now I have reached
a place of rest. How good is the Lord, to
provide for me thus, with those who are his
servants !”

That those with whom Mark lived were
indeed God’s servants, he at first never thought
of doubting. Was there not a missionary-box
placed upon the counter—was not Mr. Lowe
ever speaking of religion—was he not fore-
most in every good work of charity—did he
not most constantly attend church ?

But there were several things which soon
made the boy waver a little in his opinion.
He could not help observing that his employer
took care to lose no grain of praise for any-
thing that he did. Instead of his left hand
not knowing the good deeds of his right, it
was no fault of his if all the world did not
know them. ‘Then, his manner a little varied
with the character of his customers. With



THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL. 81

clergymen, or with those whom he considered
religious, his voice became still softer, his man-
ner more meek, Mark could not help suspect-
ing that he was not quite sincere. The boy
reproached himself, however, for daring to
judge another, and that one so much more
advanced in the Christian life than himself.
He thought that it must be his own inexpe-
rience in religion that made him doubt its
reality in Lowe.

Thus a few weeks passed in comfort with
Mark, but the pilgrim was making no pro-
gress, It is not well for us to dwell amongst
those whose profession is greater than their
practice. The fervour of Mark’s first love
was a little cooled. Alas! in weak, infirm
mortals such as we are, how inclined is that
fervour to cool! There were no strong temp-
tations to stir up the flame—no anxious fears
to drive him to the mercy-seat—his prayers
were perhaps more frequent, but they were
less deep and earnest. Mark was tempted to
rest a little upon forms, and think that all
must be right, because others approved.

The Christian must not dream that he is

only in danger whilst dwelling with the care-
(23) 6



82 THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL.

less or profane. The society of professors may
be quite as dangerous, by lulling his conscience
to sleep. He is less on his guard against
inward foes, less able to distinguish true reli-
gion in his heart, from the natural desire to
please, and many of God’s children on earth
have found the arbour more dangerous than
the hill!

Not that Mark did much with which he
could reproach himself, unless it were that he
never sought an opportunity of going to see
his mother. He connected nothing but ideas
of persecution and unkindness with his home.
He thought that by this time John Dowley
might have returned, a man who had ever
treated him with unnatural cruelty; and to
say the truth, Mark rather dreaded going again
near the place. I fear that my pilgrim is
falling in the estimation of my reader; but
I am drawing no sinless model of perfection ;
and, perhaps, if we closely examine our own
hearts, even after they have been enlightened
by the Spirit, there may be something in our
own experience which will remind us of this
chapter of the life of the pilgrim. I said that
Mark suspected a little the sincerity of the



THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL, 83
religious professions of his master. This sus-
picion was painfully strengthened by an incident
which occurred when he had been a few weeks
under his roof.

One night, after the shop had been closed,
and prayers said, and Mark had retired to his
small attic, he fancied that he heard a little
noise down below, and crept from his chamber
to listen. “All was very still, only the clock
on the stairs seemed to tick twice as loudly as
usual, Then again there was a slight sound,
apparently from the shop, and Mark wondered
what, at that hour, it could be. Softly he
crept down the creaking stair, unwilling to
disturb his master, who had retired to rest
rather earlier than usual, happening to feel
not very well. Mark reached the door which
opened into the shop, and there was no doubt
left that, somebody was within engaged in some
occupation,

Mark observed that the door, though or
closed, was not shut, a narrow line of light
showed it to be a little ajar; he pushed it very
gently to widen the opening, and within, to
his surprise, saw Radley.

“Who's there?” exclaimed the shopman ;



84 THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL,

“why, Mark, is it you? That’s lucky, you'll
come and help me, I daresay. I am so sleepy
to-night,—but this must be done.”

“What are you doing?” said Mark, with a
feeling of curiosity.

“I’m mixing this with that, as you see,”
replied Radley, pointing to two heaps of what
looked like coffee on the counter.

“Why should you mix them?”

“Oh! ask no questions, and I'll tell you no
stories,” said Radley, quite dropping his usual
formal manner, with a laughing look in his
eye which startled the boy.

“Do you mean—is it possible—” exclaimed
Mark, his face flushing with indignation as he
spoke, “that you are mixing chicory with
coffee in order to deceive our master’s cus-
tomers ?”

“You are very green, or you would know
that it is constantly done.”

“Tt cannot be right,” said Mark, “to sell
an article under a false name, and get a false
price for it too! Surely Mr. Lowe does not
know what you are doing!”

“Oh, you most simple of simpletons!”
laughed Radley, “do you suppose that I am



THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL. 85
doing it for my own diversion, to serve my
pious master against his will?”

“You do it by his orders then ?”

“Of course I do,”

“TI could never have believed that he could
have been guilty of such a thing!” exclaimed
Mark, more shocked and disgusted by the hypo-
crisy of Lowe, than by any of the open wicked-
ness that he had ever witnessed, “And you,
Radley, how can your conscience let you do
what is so wrong?”

“ My conscience is my master’s, I only obey
what he commands,”

“Your conscience your master’s! Oh, no!”
exclaimed Mark ; “you will have to answer
for yourself before God !”

“If I refused to do this I should have to
leave the grocer’s service.”

“Better leave his service than the service
of God !”

“T say, young man,” replied Radley, still
good-humouredly, though with some appearance
of scorn, “mind your own business, and leave
me to mind mine, When you carry the goods
to the customers, no one asks you whether the
parcel holds tea or gooseberry leaves.”



86 THE-ARBOUR ON THE HILL.

“ But can you endure to kneel down, and
repeat prayers to the Almighty, when you
know—”

“T tell you,” said Radley, as though he
thought it a joke, “my master’s religion and
mine is like the articles in this shop, it is
mixed. But what matter, it makes as good
a show as any, it serves our purpose, and I
really think that the world likes to be taken
in. We get on, look respectable, and thrive ;
what can be better than that?”

“Better to starve,—better to struggle up
hill all one’s life, beset with difficulties and
trials.”

“We'll leave the starving to you, if you
like it; and as for struggling up hill, only fools
do that, if they can find an easier way round!
Now go to your bed, and rest quiet my lad,
and leave me and my conscience to settle our
affairs together !”

Startled as from a dream, Mark returned to
his attic, disappointed, disgusted, and grieved.
“Can a blessing ever rest on this house?”
thought he; “can Lowe ever,*even in this
world, be really a gainer by such awful hypo-
crisy and deceit? Ob, I have been too little



DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS, 87
on my guard in this place, I have been a
drowsy pilgrim on the way,—blessed be God
that I am awakened before too late !”



CHAPTER VIII.
DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS.

“ Fear not the lions, for they are chained, and are placed there for
trial of faith where it is; and for the discovery of those that
have none; keep in the midst of the path, and no hurt shall
come unto thee.”—Pilgrim’s Progress.

Ir was long before Mark could get to sleep, and
he awoke almost before it was light. He felt
a heavy oppression which was new to him, and
rose to open the window. The sky was now
of that deep exquisite blue which it wears the
hour before dawn; the few stars that studded
the heavens were growing pale at the approach
of morning. The street was perfectly quiet,
not a vehicle was moving about, and the
sleepy sound of a cock crowing at some dis-
tance was the only noise that broke the still-
ness,

“T feel as though I could not rest,” said
Mark, “the sun will rise before long; I will



88 DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS.

dress myself and go out, and have a quiet time —
before I am required for work. I have been
keeping too little watch over myself lately, I
have been too easily contented with the little
knowledge to which I have attained. Oh,
what if I should have been deceiving myself
all the time, if I have never entered the
straight gate at all!” Mark had lost for a
time that sweet assurance which had afforded
him such joy amidst trials.

Putting his Bible in his bosom that he might
read it as he walked, Mark opened the door of
his attic. The instant that he did so he
became sensible of a most powerful smell of
fire, and the next moment a volume of smoke
came rolling up from below !

Mark sprang down the stair-case with
anxious haste, every step making him more
certain of the fearful fact that the house of his
master was on fire! He rushed first to the
sleeping apartment of Radley, then roused up
the servant of the house, and bidding her throw
up the window and call loudly for assistance,
hurried to the bed-room of Mr. Lowe.

Startled from deep sleep, hardly able to
comprehend what had happened, only with a



DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS. 89

terrible consciousness that it was something
dreadful, the wretched man rose from his pillow,
and was half dragged by Mark from his apart-
ment, which being immediately over the place
of the fire, was becoming very hot, and full of
smoke, Such an awakening is terrible here,
—but oh, what will it be to the hypocrite
hereafter, when the trumpet of the angel shall
rouse him from his grave, to behold a universe
in flames !

Assistance was speedily given; the cry of
“fire!” brought crowds of neighbours around ;
pails of water-were passed from hand to hand,
and the fire-engine soon came rattling up the
street. The cries and shouts, the crackling
and roaring of the devouring element, the
suffocating dense clouds, through which little
could be seen but tongues of fierce flame, now
darting curling round the wood-work, now
streaming upwards and reddening the black
canopy of smoke,—the stifling heat, the occa-
sional glimpse of burning rafters, which looked
as if glowing red hot in the fire, all formed a
scene which time could never efface from the
memory of those who beheld it!

Half wild with terror, anxiety, and grief,



90 DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS.

Lowe pushed his way here and there through
the crowd, sometimes urging on the firemen,
sometimes trying to assist them, sometimes
standing still, to witness in helpless misery
the destruction of his property, Well might
he look on in misery, for that property was
his all! The hypocrite had not laid up his
treasure in heaven, and he now beheld, con-
suming before his eyes, that for which he had
been daily bartering his soul !

Before the sun had reached his mid-day
height, the fire had been entirely subdued.
The efforts of the firemen had prevented it
from spreading, but a charred and blackened
shell of a house, floors, rafters, windows, all
entirely destroyed, alone remained of the habi-
tation of Lowe !

The unhappy man was offered shelter in
the house of a sympathizing neighbour, and
thither Mark went to see him. He found him
in a pitiable state, his mind almost crushed by
his misfortune, yet still, true to his character,
he professed submission to the decree of Pro-
vidence, even while his excessive grief showed
how little he felt it, and intermixed his lamen-
tations with various texts, thereby edifying his



DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS. 91

neighbours, perhaps, but shocking one who
knew him better than they did.

He received his errand-boy with great kind-
ness, “One of the most bitter parts of my
trial,” said the really kind-hearted though
unprincipled man, “ is that my ruin will throw
you and poor Radley upon the world. I sup-
pose that you will return home directly.”

“T thought that I would go first to Mr.
Ewart, and ask his advice.”

“I grieve to say that will no longer be in
your power. That excellent minister was to
leave Marshdale for Yorkshire yesterday.”

This piece of information fell like a heavy
blow upon Mark, and his face showed how
much he felt it. “Then I must return to the
cottage at once,” said he, in a low tone.

“T can understand your reluctance, my
boy, to become a burden upon your poor
parents,”

There was not a particle of hypocrisy in
Mark; he wanted no praise for motives which
were not his. “I was not thinking about
that,” said he.

“Ah! I understand,” said Lowe, in his own
peculiar tone, “you feel being deprived of the



92 DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS.
spiritual advantages which you enjoyed while
under my roof.”

“Not exactly that,” replied Mark, hesi-
tating and looking embarrassed, for there was
a mixture of this regret in his reluctance to
return home, though it was not his principal
feeling.

The truth was, that Mark dreaded not so
much the poverty and discomfort of Ann’s
cottage—though he did not like that—as the
positive cruelty which he would probably have
to endure if he returned. Having for some
time slipped his neck from the yoke, he
shrank exceedingly from having to bear it
again, A soldier who fights bravely on the
battle-field, if he leave it for a while till his
blood cools and his wounds begin to stiffen
and smart, finds it a much greater trial of
courage to return to his post than to stay
there without ever quitting it.

But Mark seemed to have no other resource,
and bidding a friendly farewell to his late
master, who, whatever he was in the sight of
Heaven, had ever been kind to him, he walked
slowly up the street. The gloomy, threatening
clouds above him, seemed like types of his



DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS, 93

darkened fate, and the forerunners of a storm,
As he proceeded, pondering over the difficulties
of his position, he was startled by the sight of
a lady, who was standing at a door at which
she had just knocked. Mark had seen her
but once before, but her face was imprinted
on a memory naturally good, especially as the
most important event of his life, his repent-
ance and turning to God, was in some way
connected with her. She was the lady who
had dropped the bag by the stile which con-
tained Mark’s precious Bible.

Now, it had often weighed upon the con-
science of the boy, that his dearest possession
was not his by right; and that if ever he met
with its lawful owner, common honesty bound
him to restore it. And yet, to give that away
which had been his life—to walk on in dark-
ness, without that light which had been his
comfort and solace till now—Mark felt almost
as though he could not do it, and stood hesi-
tating and arguing in his own mind till the
lady entered the house, and the door closed
behind her.

“She is rich, she can buy many others,”
whispered the Tempter in his bosom, “She



94 DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS.

is certain to have supplied its loss long ago;
but you, where will you find another? You
will lose all your religion with your Bible,
and fall under the temptations which you will
be certain to meet.” Was not this mistrust
of God’s sustaining power? “And what dis-
grace,” added the Tempter, “ will it be to own
taking and using that which was not yours!
Notwithstanding your care, the book has
been injured; it is not worth returning to a
lady. She may question you about the other
things in the bag—the purse, the money, the
handkerchief with lace ; of course you cannot
betray your family ; you will be looked upon,
perhaps punished, as a thief!” These were
the suggestions of a timorous spirit, magnify-
ing every danger by the way.

But against all this was the plain word of
God, Thou shall not steal. To keep anything
from its owner that might be restored, was
clearly to break the commandment. So, after
a short inward prayer for the help which
he so much needed, with a heart so low,
and a frame so much exhausted by the ex-
citement and fatigue of the morning, that it
would have been a relief to him to have



DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS, 95

sat down and cried, Mark gently rang the
bell.

He felt embarrassed when the servant-maid
opened the door, and inquired what it was
that he wanted. But, recovering himself, he
asked if he might speak with the lady who
had just entered the house. He said that he
had something which he believed that she had
lost; and the servant, without making any
difficulty, ushered him into the parlour,

A silver-haired old gentleman and the lady
were there ; she had just opened a piano, and
was sitting down to play. Her face looked so
gentle and bright that Mark was somewhat
reassured, though most reluctant to part with
his treasure,

“What did you want with me, my good
boy,” said the lady, turning round without
quitting her seat, her fingers resting on the
silent notes of the instrument.

Mark drew from his bosom the Bible. “I
believe, ma’am, that this is yours,” said he.

“ My long-lost Bible!” exclaimed the lady,
rising with an expression of joy. Oh! I never
thought to see it again. Where could you
have found it?”



96 DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS,

“Near a stile, where you had dropt it as
you went to church.”

“Tt was in my bag with other things; have
you anything else?” .

“T have nothing else,” replied Mark, feeling
very uneasy.

“What is your name?” said the old gentle-
man, looking up from his paper.

“Mark Dowley, sir,” answered the boy.

“Mark Dowley! Ellen, have we not heard
that name before ?”

“Oh, yes; ‘tis the name of the boy in whom
dear Mr, Ewart was interested. Do you not
remember his speaking about him?”

“T remember it perfectly well, my dear; it
is easy to imagine what became of the other
contents of the bag.” :

“And where are you staying now?” said”
Ellen, with a look of interest; “I hope that
you have a good situation.”

“T had a good situation last night, but the
fire that happened to-day burnt down the
house of my master, and now I am abroad in
the world.”

Ellen glided to her father, and whispered
something in his ear, Mark’s heart beat very



DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS. 97

quickly, he scarcely knew why; but it was
with a sensation of hope. After a few minutes
of conversation which he could not hear, Mr.
Searle—for that was the gentleman’s name—
said aloud, “ As you please, my dear ; we cer-
tainly were looking out for such a boy. We
could take him with us to Yorkshire; there
could be no difficulty about that.”

“Would you like,” said Ellen, bending her
kind eyes upon Mark, “to become one of our
household, to accompany us to Silvermere?
Your work would be light, and your situation
comfortable. We live scarcely two miles from
Castle Fontonore.”

With a rebound of joy all the greater from
the depth of his late depression, Mark eagerly
accepted the offer. Profiting, however, by the
remembrance of past regrets, and desirous to
be more faithful to his duty in future, he added
that he must first obtain the consent of his
mother.

“You are quite right, my boy,” said Mr.
Searle, kindly; “let nothing ever come be-
tween you and your duty to a parent. Her
will, next to God’s, should be your law; you
never can do too much for her.”

3) 7



98 DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS.

“But it is not desirable to go till to-mor-
row,” said Ellen; “those heavy clouds have
burst ; only see how it rains! The poor boy
looks quite knocked up already; he could oc-
cupy the little room here to-night.”

This arrangement was finally concluded
upon, and the weary but thankful boy again
found a haven of rest. A comfortable meal
was set before him, to which he was inclined
to do full justice. He enjoyed deep untroubled
sleep that night, and awoke in the morning
refreshed and rejoicing. How the difficulties
that he feared had melted away before him !
How one painful effort made, had brought its
own rich reward !



Full Text





THE YOUNG PILGRIM


3

THE

YOUNG PILGRIM:
& Tale

ILLUSTRATIVE OF “‘THE PILGRIM’S PROGRESS,”

oe, &e.

‘This book, it chalketh out before thine eyes
‘Tho Man that socks the everlasting prize:
Tt shows you whence he comes, whither be gocs;
‘What he teaves undone; also what he does:
‘Ttalso shows you how he runs and runs,
‘TH ho unto the Gate of Glory comes,

O then come hither,
Aud lay my book, thy head, and beart together,

dons Busvan.



LONDON:
T. “NELSON AND SONS, PATERNOSTER ROW;
EDINBURGH ; AND NEW YORK,

| 1864,

Ce

|
by
A L.0.£E,
Author of “ The Silver Casket," “The Robber's Cave,”
|





Ir may perhaps be necessary to give a brief
explanation of the object of this little work.
Tt has been written as a Cxtip’s CoMPANION
TO THE Piterim’s Procress, That invaluable
work is frequently put into youthful hands
long before the mind can unravel the deep
allegory which it contains, and thus its pre-
cious lessons are lost, and it is only perused as
an amusing tale,

I would offer my humble work as a kind
of translation, the term which was applied to
it by a little boy to whom I was reading it in
manuscript—a translation of ideas beyond
youthful comprehension into the common lan-
guage of daily, life. I would tell the child,
through the medium of a simple tale, that
Bunyan’s dream is a solemn reality, that the
vi PREFACE.

feet of the young may tread the pilgriin’s
path, and press on to the pilgrim’s reward.
I earnestly wish that I had been able more
completely to carry out the object set before
me; but difficulties have arisen from the very
nature of my work. I have been obliged to
make mine a very free translation, full both
of imperfections and omissions, This is more
especially the case where subjects are treated
of in the Pilgrim’s Progress which concern the
deeper experience of the soul. Of fearful in-
ward struggles and temptations, such as befell
the author of that work, the gloom and hor-
rors of the Valley of the Shadow of Death,
the little ones who early set out on pilgrimage,
usually know but little, They find the step-
ping-stones across the Slough of Despond, and
are rarely seized by Giant Despair. It would
be worse than useless to represent the Chris-
tian pilgrimage as more gloomy and painful
than children are likely to find it.

There are other valuable parts of the Pil-
grim’s Progress, such as the sojourn in the
PREFACE. vii
House Beautiful, which is believed by many to
represent Christian communion, which could
hardly be enlarged upon in a design like
mine ; while the present altered appearance of
Vanity Fair has compelled me to wander still
farther from my original, if I would draw a
picture that could be recognised at the pre-
sent day, and be useful to the rising generation.
Such as it is, I earnestly pray the Lord of
pilgrims to vouchsafe His blessing on my little
work, To point out to His dear children the
holy guiding light which marks the strait
gate, and the narrow path of life, and bid them
God speed on their way, is an office which I
most earnestly desire, yet of which I feel my-
self unworthy. I may at least hope to lead
my young readers to a nobler instructor, to
induce them to peruse with greater interest
and deeper profit the pages of the Pilgrim’s
Progress, and to apply to their own characters
and their own lives, the precious traths con-
veyed in that allegory.

ALOB


1. The Pilgrim's Calla
TL. Difficulties on Setting Out
HTT. Man's Way of Works...
TV. God's Gift of Grace s+
‘V. A Glimpse of the Cross...
VI. The Pilgrim in his Home

‘VIL. The Arbour on the Hill

“

VIII, Dangers, Difficulties, and Doubts...

IX. The Armour and the Battlo
X. Shadow and Sunshine ...
XL The Touchstone of Trial
XII, Pilgrims Converse by the Way
XIIL Distant Glimpse of Vanity Pair
XIV. Vexations of Vanity Fair
XV, Citizens of Vanity Fair
XVI. New and Old Companions
XVII, Life in the Great City ...
XVITL Fogs and Mists oe
‘XIX. Disappointment coe
XX, The Perilous Mine ww.

ro

oo

XXL Green Pastures and Still Waters ..,

XXIL A few Steps Aside.

SEEHEEsszeasseaesc?
XXIIL Regrets, but not Despair
XXIV. A New Danger ow”
XXV. The Lake among the Rocks
XXVL Coming to the River ...
XXVIL The Close of the Pilgrimage
XXVIIL Conc:usion ... ”



S822 8%


THE

YOUNG PILGRIM.



OHAPTER I.

THE PILGRIM’S CALL.

“T dreamed, and, behold, 1 saw a man clothed with rags standing in
8 certain place, with his face from his own house, a book in his hand,
and a great burden upon his back."—Pilgrim’s Progress.

« this the way to the ruins of St.

Gy Frediswed’s shrine?” said a clergy-

man to a boy of about twelve

years of age, who stood leaning against the
gate of a field.

“They are just here, sir,” replied the peasant,
proceeding to open the gate.

“Just wait a moment,” cried a bright-haired
boy who accompanied the clergyman; “ that
is your way, this is mine,” and he vaulted
lightly over the gate.

“So these are the famous ruins!” he ex-
12 THE PILGRIM'S CALL.

claimed as he alighted on the opposite side ;
“I don’t think much of them, Mr. Ewart, A
few yards of stone wall, half covered with
moss, and an abundance of nettles is all that
T can see.”

“ And yet this once was a famous resort for
pilgrims.”

“Pilgrims,—what were they?” inquired the
boy.

“Tn olden times, when the Romanist religion
prevailed in England, it was thought an act
of piety to visit certain places that were con-
sidered particularly holy; and those who
undertook journeys for this purpose received
the name of pilgrims, Many travelled thou-
sands of miles to kneel at the tomb of our
Lord in Jerusalem, and those who could not
go so far believed that by visiting certain
famous shrines here, they could win the pardon
of their sins. Hundreds of misguided people,
in this strange, superstitious hope, visited the
abbey by whose ruins we now stand; and 1
have heard that a knight, who had committed
some great crime, walked hither barefoot, with
a cross in his hand, a distance of several
leagues.”
THE PILGRIMS CALL, 13

“A knight barefoot! how strange!” cried
young Lord Fontonore; “but then he believed
that it would save him from his sins.”

“Save him from his’ sins!” thought the
peasant boy, who, with his full earnest eyes
fixed upon Mr, Ewart, had been drinking in
every word that he uttered; “save him from
his sins! I should not have thought it strange
had he crawled the whole way on his knees !”

“ Are there any pilgrims now?” inquired
Fontonore.

“In Romanist countries there are still many
pilgrimages made by those who know not, as
we do, the one only way by which sinners can
be accounted righteous before a pure God.
But in one sense, Charles, we all should be
pilgrims, travellers in the narrow path that
leads to salvation, passing on in our journey
from earth to heaven, with the cross not in
our hands but in our hearts; pilgrims, not to
the tomb of a crucified Saviour, but to the
throne of that Saviour in glory !”

Charles listened with reverence, as he always
did when his tutor spoke of religion, but his
attention was nothing compared to that of the
peasant, who for the first time listened to con-
l4 THE PILGRIM’S CALL.

versation on a subject which had lately been
filling all his thoughts. He longed to speak,
to ask questions of the clergyman, but a feeling
of awe kept him back; he only hoped that
the gentleman would continue to talk, and felt
vexed when he was interrupted by three chil-
dren who ran up to the stranger to ask for
alms.

“ Begging is a bad trade, my friends,” said
Mr. Ewart gravely, “I never like to encourage
it in the young.”

“ We're so hungry,” said the youngest of the
party.

“ Mother's dead, and father’s broke his
leg !” cried another.

“We want to get him a little food,” whined
the third.

“Do you live near?” asked Mr. Ewart.

“Yes sir, very near.”

“I will go and see your father,” said the
clergyman,

The little rogues, who were accustomed to
idle about the ruin to gain pence from visitors
by a tale of pretended woe, looked at each
_other in some perplexity at the offer, for
though they liked money well enough, they
THE PILGRIM’S CALL, 15

were by no means prepared for a visit, At
last Jack, the eldest, said with impudent assur-
ance, “ Father’s not there, he’s taken to the
hospital, there’s only mother at home.”

“Mother! you said just now that your
mother was dead !”

“I meant—” stammered the boy, quite
taken by surprise; but the clergyman would
not suffer him to proceed.

“Do not add atiother untruth, poor child,
to those which you have just uttered. Do you
not know that there is One above the heavens
who hears the words of your lips, reads the
thoughts of your hearts, One who will judge,
and can punish ?”

Ashamed and abashed the three children
made a hasty retreat. As soon as they were
beyond sight and hearing of the strangers,
Jack turned round and made a mocking face
in their direction, and Madge exclaimed in an
insolent tone, “we weren’t going to stop for
his sermon.”

“There's Mark there that would take it in
every word, and thank him for it at the end,”
said Jack.

“Qh! Mark’s so odd!” cried Ben; “he’s
16 THE PILGRIM’S CALL,
never like anybody else, No one would guess
him for our brother !”

These words were more true than Ben’s
usually were, for the bright-haired young noble
himself scarcely offered a greater contrast to
the ragged, dirty children, than they with their
round rustic faces, marked by little expression
but stupidity on that of Ben, sullen obstinacy
on Madge’s, and forward impudence on Jack’s,
did to the expansive brow, and deep thought-
ful eye of the boy whom they had spoken of
as Mark.

“Yes,” said Jack, “he could never even
pluck a wild flower, but he must be pulling it
to bits to look at all its parts, It was not
enough to him that the stars shine to give us
light, he must prick out their places on an old
bit of paper, as if it mattered to him which
way they were stuck. But of all his fancies
he’s got the worst one now; I think he’s going
quite crazed.”

“ What's he taken into his head?” said

“You remember the bag which the lady

dropped at the stile, when she was going to
the church by the wood ?”
THE PILGRIM’S CALL, 7

Madge nodded assent, and her brother con-
tinued: “What fun we had in carrying off
and opening that bag, and dividing the things
that were in it! Father had the best of the
fun of it though, for he took the purse with
the money.”

“I know,” cried Ben, “ and mother had the
handkerchief with lace round the edge, and
E. §. marked in the corner. We,—more’s the
shame !—had nothing but some pence, and the
keys; and Mark, as the biggest, had the book.”

“ Ah! the book!” cried Jack! “that’s what
has put him out of his wits !”

“No one grudged it him, I'm sure,” said Ben,
“ precious little any of us would have made
out of it. But Mark takes so to reading, it’s
so odd; and it sets him a thinking, a think-
ing: well, I can’t tell what folk like us have
to do with reading and thinking !”

“Nor I!” cried both Madge and Jack.

“TI shouldn’t wonder,” said the latter, as
stretched on the grass he amused himself with
shying stones at the sparrows, “I should’nt
wonder if his odd ways had something to do
with that red mark on his shoulder !”

“What, that strange mark, like a cross,
(33) 2
18 THE PILGRIM’S CALL.

which made us call him the Red-cross Knight,
after the ballad which mother used to sing us?”

“Yes, I never saw a mark like that afore,
either from blow or burn.”

< Mother don't Hie to: hier: it, talked 'of,”
said Madge.

“Well, whatever has put all this nonsense

into his head, father will soon knock it out of
him when he comes back !” cried Jack. “He's
left off begging—he won’t ask for a penny,
and he used to get more than we three to-
gether, ‘cause ladies said he looked so interest-
ing; and he'll not so much as take an egg
from a nest,—he’s turned quite good for
nothing !”
Leaving the three children to pursue their
conversation, we will return to him who was
the subject of it. That which had made them
scoff had made him reflect, he could not get
rid of those solemn words, “There is One above
the heavens who hears the words of your lips,
reads the thoughts of your hearts, One who
will judge, and can punish!” They reminded
him of what he had read in his book, the soul
that sinneth it shall die, he knew himself to be
a sinner, and he trembled.
THE PILGRIM'S CALL. 19

Little dreaming what was passing in the
mind of the peasant, Mr, Ewart examined the
ruin without noticing him further, and Mark
still leant on the gate, a silent attentive
listener.

“I think, Charles,” said the tutor, “that
T should like to make a sketch of this spot, I
have brought my paint-box and drawing block
with me, and if I could only procure a little
water—” :

“Please may I bring you some, sir?” said
Mark. :

The offer was accepted, and the boy went -
off at once, still turning in his mind the con-
versation that had passed.

“Pilgrims in the narrow path that leadeth
to salvation,—I wish that I knew what he
meant, Is that a path only for holy men like
him, or can it be that it is open to me? Sal-
vation! that is safety, safety from punishment,
safety from the anger of the terrible God! Oh!
what can I do to be saved!”

In a few minutes Mark returned with some
fresh water which he brought in an old broken
jar. He set it down by the spot where Mr,
Ewart was seated.
20 THE PILGRIM’S CALL.

“Thanks my good lad,” said the clergyman,
placing a silver piece in his hand.

“Good!” repeated Mark to himself; “ he
little knows to whom he is speaking !”

“It would be tedious to you, Charles, to
remain beside me while I am sketching,” said
Mr. Ewart, “ you will enjoy a little rambling
about, only return to me in an hour.”

“I will explore!” replied the young lord
gaily ; “there is no saying what curiosities I
may find to remind me of the pilgrims of
former days.”

And now the clergyman sat alone, engaged
with his paper and brush, while Mark watched
him from a little distance, and communed
with his own heart.

“He said that he knew the one, only way
by which sinners could be accounted righteous
—tighteous! that must mean good—hbefore a
holy God! He knows the way; oh that he
would tell it to me! I have half a mind to go
up to him now, it would be a good time when
he is all by himself” Mark made one step
forward, then paused. “TI dare not, he would
think it so strange. He could not under-
stand what I feel. He has never stolen, nor
THE PILGRIM'S CALL. 21

told lies, nor sworn; he would despise a poor
sinner like me, And yet,” added the youth
with a sigh, “he would hardly sit there, look-
ing so quiet and happy, if he knew how
anxious a poor boy is to hear of the way of
salvation, which he says that he knows. I
will go nearer, perhaps he may speak first.”

Mr. Ewart had begun a bold, clever sketch,
stones and moss, trees and grass were rapidly
appearing on the paper, but he wanted some
living object to give interest to the picture,
Naturally his eye fell upon Mark, in his
tattered jacket and straw hat, but he forgot
his sketch as he looked closer at the boy, and
met his sad, anxious gaze.

“You are unhappy, I fear,” he said, laying
down his pencil.

Mark cast down his eyes, and said nothing.

“You are in need, or you are ill, or you are
in want of a friend,” said the clergyman with
kind sympathy in his manner,

“Oh! sir, it is not that—” began Mark, and
stopped.

“Come nearer to me, and tell me frankly,
my boy, what is weighing on your heart. It
is the duty, it is the privilege of the minister
22 THE PILGRIM'S CALL.
of Christ to speak comfort to those who require
comfort,

“Can you tell me,” cried Mark, with a great
effort, “the way for sinners—to be saved !”

“The Saviour is the Way, the Truth, and
the Life, the Gate by which alone we enter
into salvation. Believe on the Lord Jesus
Christ and thow shalt be saved. The just shall
live by faith.

“ What is faith?” said Mark, gathering
courage from the gentleness with which he
was addressed.

“ Faith is to believe all that the Bible tells
us of the Lord, His glory, His goodness, His
death for our sins. To believe all the pro-
mises made in His word, to rest in them, hope
in them, make them our stay, and love Him who
first loved us. Have you a Bible my friend?”

“T have.”

“ And do you read it?”

_ “Very often,” replied Mark.

“ Search the Scriptures, for they are the
surest guide; search them with faith and
prayer, and the Lord will not leave you in
darkness, but guide you by His counsel here,
and afterward receive you to glory.”
THE PILGRIMS CALL, 28

Mr, Ewart did not touch his pencil again
that day, his sketch lay forgotten upon the
grass) He was giving his hour to a nobler
employment, the employment worthy of angels,
the employment which the Son of God himself
undertook upon earth, He was seeking the
sheep lost in the wilderness, he was guiding a
sinner to the truth.

“T hope that I have not kept you waiting,”
exclaimed Charles, as he came bounding back
to his tutor; “the carriage has come for us
from the inn; it looks as if we should have rain,
we must make haste home.”

Mr. Ewart, who felt strongly interested in
Mark, now asked him for his name and address,
and noted down both in his pocket-book. He
promised that, if possible, he would come soon
and see him again.

“Keep to your good resolutions,” said the
clergyman, as he walked towards the carriage,
accompanied by Charles; “and remember that
though the just shall live by faith, it is such
faith as must necessarily produce repentance,
love, and a holy life.”

Mr. Ewart stepped into the carriage, the
young lord sprang in after him, the servant
“4 DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT.

closed the door and they drove off Mark
stood watching the splendid equipage as it
rolled along the road, till it was at last lost

t. é

“I am glad that I have seen him,—I am
so glad that he spoke to me—I will never
forget what he said! Yes, I will keep to my
good resolutions, from this hour I will be a
pilgrim to heaven, I will enter at once by the
strait gate, and walk in the narrow way that
leadeth unto life !”

s
F

OHAPTER IL
DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT.

“ They drew nigh to a very miry slough, that was in the midst of
the plain; and they being heedless, did both fall suddenly into
the bog, The name of the slough was Despond.”—Pilgrim’s
Progress.

Eventna had closed in with rain and storm,
and all the children had returned to the
cottage of their mother. A dirty, uncomfort-
able abode it looked, most unlike those beauti-
ful little homes of the peasant which we see
80 often in dear old England, with the ivy-
DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT. 25

covered porch, and the clean-washed floor, the
kettle singing merrily above the cheerful fire,
the neat rows of plates ranged on the shelf,
the prints upon the wall, and the large Bible
in the corner.

No, this was a cheerless-looking place, quite
as much from idleness and neglect as from
poverty. The holes in the window were
stuffed with rags, the little garden in front
held nothing but weeds, the brick floor ap-
peared as though it had never been clean, and
everything lay about in confusion. An untidy
looking woman, with her shoes down at heel,
and her hair hanging loose about her ears, had
placed the evening meal on the table; and round
it now sat the four children, busy with their sup-
per, but not so busy as to prevent a constant
buzz of talking from going on all the time
that they ate.

“TI say Mark,” cried Jack, “what did the
parson pay you for listening to him for an
hour ?”

“How much did you get out of him?” said
Madge.

“ Any money?” asked Ann Dowly, looking
up eagerly.
26 DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT.

Mark laid sixpence on the table,

“T daresay that you might have got more,”
said Ben.

“TI did get more,—but not money,”

“What, food, or clothes, or—”

“Not food, nor clothes, but good words,
which were better to me than gold.”

This announcement was received with a
roar of laughter, which did not, however, dis-
concert Mark. ;

“Look you,” he said, as soon as they were
sufficiently quiet to hear him, “look you if
what I said be not true. You only care for
things that belong to this life, but it is no
more to be compared to the life that is to
come, than a candle to the sun, or a leaf to
the forest! Why, where shall we all be a hun-
dred years hence ¢”

“In our graves, to be sure,” said Ben.

“That is only our bodies, our poor, weak
bodies, but our souls that think, and hope, and
fear, where will they be then ?”

“We don’t want to look on so far,” observed
Jack.

“But it may niot be far,” exclaimed Mark.
“Thousands of children die younger than we,
DIFTICULTIES ON SETTING OUT, 27

there are many, many small graves in the
churchyard ; death may be near to us, it may
be close at hand, and where will owr souls be
then #”

“«T don’t know,” said Madge; “I don’t
want to think,” subjoined her elder brother ;
their mother only heaved a deep sigh.

“Ts it not something,” continued Mark, “to
hear of the way to a place where our souls
may be happy when our bodies are dust? Is _
it not something to look forward toa glorious
heaven where millions and millions of years
may be spent amongst joys far greater than
we can think, and yet never bring us nearer
to the end of our happiness and glory ?”

“Oh! these are all dreams,” laughed Jack,
“that come from reading in that book.”

“They are not dreams!” exclaimed Mark
with earnestness, “ they are more real than
anything on earth! Everything is changing
here, nothing is sure, flowers bloom one day
and are withered the next; now there is sun-
shine, and now there is gloom; you see a man
strong and healthy, and the next thing you
hear of him perhaps is his death! All things
are changing and passing away, just like a
28 DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT.

dream when we awake; but heaven and its
delights are sure, quite sure; the rocks may be
moved,—but it never can be changed ; the sun
may be darkened,—it is all bright for ever !”
“Oh that we might reach it!” exclaimed
Ann Dowley, the tears rising into her eyes.
Her sons looked at her in wonder, for they
had never known their mother utter such a
sentence before. To them Mark’s enthusiasm
seemed folly and madness, and they could not
hide their surprise at the effect which it pro-
duced upon one so much older than themselves.
Ann Dowley had been brought up to better
things, and had received an education very
superior to the station in which she had been
placed by her marriage. For many years she
had been a servant in respectable families, and
though all was now changed,—how miserably
changed !—she could not forget much that she
had once seen and heard. She was not ignor-
ant, though low and coarse-minded, and it was
perhaps from this circumstance that her family
were decidedly more intelligent than country
children of their age usually are. Ann could
read well, but her only stock of books con-
sisted of some dirty novels, broken-backed and
DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT. 29

torn,—she would have done well to have used
them to light the fire. She was one who had
never cared much for religion, who had not
sought the Creator in the days of her youth;
but she was unhappy now, united to a husband
whom she dreaded, and could not respect,—
whose absence for a season was an actual
relief; she was poor, and she doubly felt the
‘sting of poverty from having once been ac-
customed to comfort,—and Mark’s description
of peace, happiness, and joy, touched a chord
in her heart; that had been silent for long,

“You too desire to reach heaven!” cried
Mark, with animation sparkling in his eyes ;
“oh! mother, we will be pilgrims together,
struggle on together in the narrow way, and
be happy for ever and ever !”

The three younger children who had no
taste for conversation such as this, having
finished their meal slunk into the back room,
to gamble away farthings as they had learned
to do from their father. Ann sat down by the
fire opposite to Mark, a more gentle expression
than usual upon her face, and pushing back
the hair from her brow, listened, leaning her
head on her hand. .
80 DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT.

“T will tell you, mother, what the clergy-
man told me, I wish that I could remember
every word. He said that God would guide
us by his counsel here, and afterward receive
_us to glory. And he spoke of that glory, that
dazzling, endless glory! Oh! mother, how
wretched and dark seems this earth when we
think of the blessedness to come !”

“But that blessedness may not be for us,”
said Ann.

“He said that it was for those who had
faith, who believed in the Lord Jesus Christ.”

“T believe,” said the woman, “I never
doubted the Bible; I used to read it when I
was a child.”

“We will read mine together now, mother.”

“And what more did the clergyman tell
yout”

“He told me that the faith which brings us
to heaven will be sure to produce—” Mark
paused to recall the exact words-—“ repentance,
love, and @ holy life.”

“A holy life!” repeated Ann slowly. Pain-
ful thoughts crossed her mind of many things
constantly done that ought not to be done,
habits hard to be parted with as a right hand
; DIFFIOULTIES ON SETTING OUT. $1
or a right eye ; holiness seemed something as
far beyond her reach as the moon which was
now rising in the cloudy sky; she folded her
hands with a gloomy smile and said, “if that
be needful we may as well leave all these fine
hopes to those who have some chance of win-
ning what they wish!”

“The way is not shut to us.”

“TI tell you that it is,” said the woman
impatiently, for the little gleam of hope that
had dawned on her soul, had given place to
sullen despair, “To be holy you must be
truthful and honest,—we are placed in a
situation where we cannot be truthful, we
cannot be honest, we cannot serve God! It
is all very well for the rich and the happy, the
narrow way to them may be all strewed with
flowers, but to us it is closed,—and for ever !”
She clenched her hand with a gesture of des-
pair.

“ But, mother—”

“Talk no more,” she said, rising from her
seat “do you think that your father would
stand having a saint for his wife, or his son!
We have gone so far that we cannot turn back,
we cannot begin life again like children,—
82 DIFFICULTIES ON SETTING OUT.

never speak to me again on these matters!”
and, so saying, Ann quitted the room, farther
than ever from the strait gate that leadeth
unto life, more determined to pursue her own
unhappy career.

The heart of Mark sank within him. Here
was disappointment to the young pilgrim at
the very outset, fear, doubt, and difficulty
enclosed him round, and hope was but as a
dim, distant light before him. But help seemed
given to the lonely boy, more lonely amid his
unholy companions than if he had indeed stood
by himself in the world. He looked out on
the pure, pale moon in the heavens, the dark
seeming to blot her from the sky; then a faint,
hazy light would appear from behind them,
then a slender, brilliant rim would be seen, and
at last the full orb would shine out in glory,
making even the clouds look bright !

“ See how these clouds chase each other, and
crowd round the moon, as if they would block
up her way!” thought Mark. They are like
’ the trials before me now, but bravely she keeps
on her path through all, and I must not,—I
will not despair !”
MAN’S WAY OF WORKS, 33

CHAPTER III.
MAN'S WAY OF WORKS, .

“ Now as Christian was walking solitarily by himself, he espicd
one afar off, come crossing over the field to meet him; and
their hap was to meet just as they were crossing the way of
each other, The gentleman’s name that met him was Mr,
Worldly Wiseman.”—Pigrim’s Progress.

Tae bright morning dawned upon Holyby, the
storm had spent itself during the night, and
nothing remained to mark that it had been
but the greater freshness of the air, clearness
of the sky, and the heavy moisture on the grass
that sparkled in the sun.

As the young pilgrim sat under an elm-trea
eating the crust which served him for a break«
fast, and meditating on the events and the
resolutions of the last day, Farmer Joyce came
riding along the road, mounted on a heavy horse
which often did service in the plough, and drew
up as he reached the boy.

“T say, Mark Dowley,” he called in a loud,

hearty voice, “you are just the lad I was look-
ing for
(aay 3
84 MAN’S WAY OF WORKS.

“Did you want me?” said Mark, raising
his eyes.

“Do you know Mr. Ewart?” cried the
farmer ; and on Mark’s shaking his head, con-
tinued, “why, he was talking to me about you
yesterday,—a clergyman, a tall man with a
stoop,—he who is tutor to Lord Fontonore.”

“Oh! yes!” cried Mark, springing up, “ but
I did not know his name. What could he be
saying of me?”

“He stopped at my farm on his drive home
yesterday, and asked me if I knew a lad called
Mark Dowley, and what sort of character he
bore. Says I,” continued the farmer, with a
broad smile on his jovial face, “I know
nothing against that boy in particular, but
he comes of a precious bad lot !”

“And what did he reply?” cried Mark
eagerly.

“Qh! a great deal that I can’t undertake
to repeat, about taking you out of temptation,
and putting you in an honest way: so the
upshot of it is that I agreed to give you a
chance, and employ you myself to take care of
my sheep, to see if anything respectable can be
male of you.”
MAN’S WAY OF WORKS. 85

“ How good in him,—how kind!” exclaimed
Mark.

“Tt seems that you got round him,—that
you found his weak side, young rogue! You
had been talking to him of piety and repent-
ance, and wanting to get to heaven. But I'll
give you a word of advice, my man, better
than twenty sermons, You see I’m thriving
and prosperous enough, and well respected,
though I should not say so, and I never
wronged a man in my life. If you would be
the same, just mind what I say, keep the com-
mandments, do your duty, work hard, owe
nothing, and steer clear of the gin-shop, and
depend upon it you'll be happy now, and be
sure of heaven at the last.”

“Mr. Ewart said that by faith—”

“Faith!” exclaimed the farmer, not very
reverently; “don’t trouble yourself with things
quite above you; things which you cannot
understand. It is all very well for a parson
like him, a very worthy man in his way, I
believe, but with many odd, fanciful notions.
My religion is a very simple one, suited to 4
plain man like me, I do what is right, and I
expect to be rewarded, I go on in a straight-
86 MAN’S WAY OP WORKS.

‘forward, honest, industrious way, and I feel
safer than any talking and canting can make
one. Now you mind what you have heard,
Mark Dowley, and come up to my farm in an
hour or two. I hope I'll have a good account
to give of you to the parson, and the young
lord, he too seemed to take quite an interest
in you.”

“Did he?” said Mark, somewhat surprised.

“Yes, it’s odd enough, with such riches as
he has, one would have thought that he had
something else to think of than a beggar boy.
Why, he has as many thousands a year as there
are sheaves in that field!”

“ He had a splendid carriage and horses.”

“Carriage! he might have ten for the
matter of that, they say he has the finest
estate in the county of York! but I can’t stay
here idling all day,” added the farmer; “ you
come up to my place as I said, and remember
all you've heard to-day. I have promised to
give you a trial, but mark me, my lad, if I
catch you at any of your old practices, that
moment you leave my service. So, honesty is
the best policy, as the good old proverb says.”
With that he struck his horse with the cudgel
MAN'S WAY OF WORKS. 87
which he carried in his hand, and went off at
a slow heavy trot.

“There is a great deal of sense in what he
has said,” thought Mark, as he turned in the
direction of Ann’s cottage to tell her of his
new engagement, “‘ Keep the commandments,
work hard, and steer clear of the gin-shop, and
you'll be sure of heaven at the last!’ These
are very plain directions any way, and I’m
resolved to follow them from this hour, Some
of my difficulties seein clearing away; by
watching the sheep all the day long I shall be
kept from a good many of my temptations, I
shall have less of the company of my brothers,
T shall earn my bread in an honest way, and
yet have plenty of time for thought. ‘Keep
the commandments,’ let me think what they
are,” and he went over the ten in his mind, as
he learned them from his Bible. “I think
that I may manage to keep them pretty strict-
ly, but there are words in the word of God
which will come to my thoughts. A new com-
mandment I give you, that ye love one another,
and he that hateth his brother is a murderer ;
how can I love those who dislike me, ‘tis im-
possible, I don’t believe that any one could.”
88 MAN'S WAY OF WORKS,

The first thing that met the eyes of Mark
on his entering the cottage put all his good.
resolutions to flight. Jack and Ben were
seated on the brick floor, busy in patching up
a small broken box, and as they wanted some-
thing to cut up for a lid, they had torn off the
cover from his beautiful Bible, and thrown the
book itself under the table! Mark darted
forward with an oath,—alas! his lips had been
~ too long accustomed to such language for the
habit of using it to be easily broken, though
he never swore except when taken by surprise,
as in this instance. He snatched up first the
cover, and then the book, and with fiery in-
dignation flashing in his eyes exclaimed, “I'll
teach you how to treat my Bible so!”

“Your Bible!” exclaimed Ben, with a
mocking laugh, “ Mark thinks it no harm to
steal a good book, but it’s desperate wicked to
pull off its cover !”

“Oh! that’s what the parson was teaching
him!” cried Jack. Provoked beyond endur-
ance Mark struck him.

“ So it’s that that you're after!” exclaimed
Jack, springing up like a wild cat, and repay-
ing the blow with interest. He was but little
MAN'S WAY OF WORKS. 39

younger than Mark, and of much stronger
make, therefore, at least his match in a struggle,
The boys were at once engaged in fierce fight,
while Ben sat looking on at the unholy strife,
laughing and shouting and clapping his hands,
and hallooing to Jack to “ give it him !”

“ What are you about there, you bad boys!”
exclaimed Ann, running from the inner room
at the noise of the scuffle. Jack had always
been her favourite son, and without waiting to
know who had the right in the dispute, she
grasped Mark by the hair, threw him violently
back, and, giving him a blow with her clenched
hand, cried, “get away with you, sneaking
coward that you are, to fight a boy younger
than yourself!”

“You always take his part, but he'll live
to be your torment yet!” exclaimed Mark,
forgetting all else in the blind fury of his
passion.

“He'll do better than you with all your ~
canting!” cried Ann. The words in a moment
recalled Mark to himself; what had he been
doing? what had he been saying? he, the
the pilgrim to heaven! he, the servant of
God! With a bitterness of spirit more painful
40 MAN’S WAY OF WORKS.

than any wrong which could have been inflicted
upon him by another, he took up the Bible
which had been dropped in the struggle, and
left the cottage without uttering a word.

Mortifying were Mark’s reflections through
that day, as he sat tending his sheep. “Keep
the commandments!” he sadly murmured to
himself, “how many have I broken in five
minutes! I took God’s name in vain,—a ter-
rible sin, it is written, above all things swear
not; I did not honour my mother, I spoke
insolently to her; I broke the sixth command-
ment by hating my brother, I struck him, I
felt as though I could have knocked him down
and trampled upon him! How can I reach
heaven by keeping the commandments, I could
as well get up to those clouds by climbing a
tree. Well, but I'll try once again, and not
give up yet, There is no one to provoke me,
no one to tempt me here, I can be righteous
at least when I am by myself.”

So Mark sat long, and read in his Bible,
mended it as well as he could, and thought of
Mr. Ewart and his words. Presently his mind
turned to Lord Fontonore, the fair, bright-
haired boy who possessed so much wealth, who
MAN’S WAY OF WORKS. 41

was placed in a position so different from his
own, ,

“He must be a happy boy indeed!” thought
Mark, “with food in abundance, every want
supplied, not knowing what it is to wish for
a pleasure, and not have it at once supplied.
He must be out of the way of temptation too,
always under the eye of that kind, holy man,
who never would give a rough word, I am sure,
but would always be leading him right. It is
very hard that there are such differences in the
world, that good things are so very unevenly
divided. I wish that I had but one quarter
of his wealth, he could spare it, no doubt, and
never feel the loss.” Without thinking what
he was doing, Mark turned over a leaf of the
Bible which lay open upon his knee. “ Thow
shalt not covet,” were the first words that met
his gaze; Mark sighed heavily and closed the
book.

“So, even when I am alone, I am sinning
still; coveting, repining, murmuring against
God’s will, with no more power to stand up-
right for one hour, than this weed which I have
plucked up by the roots, And yet, the soul
that sinneth it shall die: I cannot get rid of
42 MAN'S WAY OF WORKS.

these terrible words, I will not think on this
‘subject any more, it only makes me more
wretched than I was. Oh! I never knew, till
I tried it to-day, how hard,—how impossible it
is to be righteous before a holy God!”

So, tempted to banish the thought of religion
altogether from his mind, because he felt the
law to be too holy to be kept unbroken, yet
dreading the punishment for breaking it, Mark
tried to turn his attention to other things. He
watched the sheep as they grazed, plucked wild
flowers and examined them, and amused him-
self as best he might.

The day was very hot, there was little shade
in the field, and Mark grew heated and thirsty.
He wished that there were a stream running
through the meadow, his mouth felt so parched
and dry.

On one side of the field there was a brick
wall, dividing it from the garden belonging to
Farmer Joyce. On the top of this grew a
bunch of wild wall-flower, and Mark who was
particularly fond of flowers, amused himself by
devising means to reach it. There was a small
tree growing not very far from the spot, by
climbing which, and swinging himself over on
MAN’S WAY OF WORKS. 43

the wall, he thought that he might succeed in
obtaining the prize. It would be difficult, but
Mark rather liked difficulties of this sort, and
anything at that time seemed pleasanter than
thinking.

After one or two unsuccessful attempts, the
boy found himself perched upon the wall; but
the flower within his reach was forgotten.
He looked down from his height on the gar-
den below, with its long lines of fruit-bushes,
now stripped and bare, beds of onions, rows of
beans, broad tracts of potatoes, all the picture
of neatness and order. But what most at-
tracted the eye of tle boy was a splendid
peach-tree, growing on the wall just below
him, its boughs loaded with rich tempting
fruit. One large peach, the deep red of whose
downy covering showed it to be so ripe, that
one might wonder that it did not fall from the
branch by its own weight, lay just within
reach of his hand. The sight of that fruit,
that delicious fruit, made Mark feel more
thirsty than ever. He should have turned
away, he should have sprung from the wall;
but he lingered and looked, and looking de-
sired, then stretched out his hand to grasp,
44 MAN’S WAY OF WORKS.

Alas for his resolutions !—alas for his pilgrim
zeal! Could sosmall a temptation have power
to overcome them?

Yet let the disadvantages of Mark’s educa-
tion be remembered: he had been brought up
with those to whom robbing an orchard seemed
rather a diversion than asin. His first ardour
for virtue had been chilled by failure; and who
that has tried what he vainly attempted does
not know the effect of that chill? With a hesi-
tating hand Mark plucked the ripe peach ; he
did not recollect that it was a similar sin which
once plunged the whole earth into misery
—that it was tasting forbidden fruit which
brought sin and death into the world. He
raised it to his lips, when a sudden shout from
the field almost caused him to drop from the wall.

“Holloa there! you young thief! Are you
at it already? Robbing me the very first
day! Come down, or I'll bring you to the
ground with a vengeance!” It was the angry
voice of the farmer.

Mark dropped from his height much faster
than he had mounted, and stood before his
employer with his face flushed to crimson, and
too much ashamed to lift up his eyes.
MAN’S WAY OF WORKS, 45

“ Get you gone,” continued the farmer, “ for
a hypocrite and a rogue; you need try none
of your canting on me. Not one hour longer
shall you remain in my employ ; you're on the
high road to the gallows.”

Mark turned away in silence, with an almost
bursting heart, and feelings that bordered on
despair. With what an account of himself
was he to return to his home, to meet the
scoffs and jests which he had too well deserved!
What discredit would his conduct bring on his
religion! How his profane companions would
triumph in his fall! The kind and pitying
clergyman would regard him as a hypocrite—
would feel disappointed in him! Bitter was
the thought. All his firm resolves had snapped
like thread in the flame, and his hopes of win-
ning Heaven had vanished.
46 GOD's GIFT OF GRACE.

CHAPTER IV.
GOD'S GIFT OF GRACE.

“Ye cannot be justified by the works of the law; for by the
deeds of the law no man living can be rid of his burden.”—
Pilgrim's Progress.

“ Waar ails you my young friend?—has any-
thing painful happened?” said a kindly voice,
and a hand was gently laid upon the shoulder
of Mark, who was lying on the grass amidst
the ruins of the old Abbey, his face leaning on
his arms, and turned towards earth, while short
convulsive sobs shook his frame.

“Oh, sir!” exclaimed Mark, as a momentary
glance enabled him to recognise Mr. Ewart.

“Let me know the cause of your sorrow,”
said the clergyman, seating himself on a large
stone beside him. “Rise, and speak to me
with freedom.”

Mark rose, but turned his glowing face aside;
he was ashamed to look at his companion.

“Sit down there,” said Mr, Ewart, feeling
for the boy’s evident confusion and distress;
“perhaps you are not yet aware that I have
GOD’s GIFT OF GRACE, A

endeavoured to serve you—to procure you a
situation with Farmer Joyce?”

“JT have had it, and lost it,” replied Mark
abruptly.

“Indeed, I am sorry to hear that. I trust
that no fault has occasioned your removal.”

“T stole his fruit,” said Mark, determined at
least to hide nothing from his benefactor; “he
turned me off, and he called me a hypocrite.
I am bad enough,” continued the boy, in an
agitated tone; “no one but myself knows how
bad; but I am not a hypocrite, I am not !”

“God forbid !” said Mr. Ewart ; “but how
did ull this happen?”

“T was thirsty, it tempted me, and I took
it. I broke all my resolutions, and now he
has cast me off, and you will cast me off, and
the pure holy God, He will cast me off too!
I shall never be worthy of Heaven !”

“Did you think that you could ever be
worthy of Heaven?” said the clergyman, and
paused fora reply. Then receiving none from
Mark, he continued—“ Not you, nor I, nor the
holiest man that ever lived, One excepted, who
was not only man, but God, was ever worthy
of the kingdom of heaven.”
48 GOD’s GIFT OF GRACE,

Mark looked at him in silent surprise.

“We are all sinners, Mark; all polluted
with guilt, Not one day passes in which our
actions, our words, or our thoughts, would not
make us lose all title to eternal life. The
Bible says, ‘ There is not one that doeth good,
no, not one, Every living soul is included
under sin.”

“How can this be?” said Mark, who had
looked upon the speaker as one above all
temptation or stain.

“Since Adam, our first parent, sinned and
fell, all his children have been born into the
world with a nature tainted and full of wick-
edness, Even as every object lifted up from
the earth, if unsupported, will fall to the

' ground, so we, without God’s grace, naturally
fall into sin.”

“ Then can no one go to Heaven?” said
Mark.

“ Blessed be God, mercy has found a means
by which even sinners can be saved! Sin is
the burden which weighs us to the dust, which
prevents us from rising to glory. The Lord
Jesus came from heaven that he might free us
from sin, take our burden from us, and bear it
GOD’s GIFT OF GRACE. 49

Himself; and so we have hope of salvation
through Him.”

“T wish that I understood this better,” said
Mark.

“T will tell you what happened to a friend
of my own, which may help you to understand
our position towards God, and the reason of
the hope that is in us. I went some years
ago with a wealthy nobleman to visit a prison
at some distance. Many improvements have
been made in prisons since then, at that time
they were indeed most fearful abodes. In one
damp dark cell, small and confined, where light
scarcely struggled in through the narrow grating
to show the horrors of the place, where the
moisture trickled down the green stained walls,
and the air felt heavy and unwholesome ; in
this miserable den we found an unhappy pri-
soner, who had been confined there for many
weary years. He had been placed there for a
debt which he was unable to pay, and he had
no prospect of ever getting free, Can you see
in this man’s case no likeness to your own?
Look on sin as a debt, a heavy debt, that you
owe: do you not feel that you have no power

to pay it?”
(23) 4
50 Gop’s GIFT OF GRACE.

“None,” replied Mark gloomily ; “ none.”

“T had the will to help the poor man,” con:
tinued Mr. Ewart, “but Providence had not
afforded me the means, I had no more ability
to set him free from prison, than I have to rid
you of the burden of your sin.”

“But the wealthy nobleman,” suggested
Mark.

“He had both power and will. He paid
the debt at once, and the prisoner was released,
Never shall I forget the poor man’s cry of de-
light, as the heavy iron-studded door was
thrown open for his passage, and he bounded
into the bright sunshine again !”

“And what became of him afterwards?”
asked the boy.

“He entered the service of his generous
benefactor, and became the most faithful, the
most attached of servants. He remained in
that place till he died; he seemed to think
that he could never do enough for him who
had restoredehim to freedom.”

“Where is the friend to pay my debt,”
sighed Mark.

“Tt has been paid already,” said the cler
gyman.
Gop’s GIFT OF GRACE. 51

‘Paid! Oh, when, and by whom?”

“Tt was paid when the Saviour died upon
the cross—it was paid by the eternal Son of
God! He entered for us the prison of this
world, He paid our debt with His own pre-
cious blood, He opened the gates of eternal
life; through His merits, for His sake, we are
pardoned and saved, if we have faith, true
faith, in that Saviour!”

“This iswonderful!” said Mark, thoughtfully,
as though he could yet scarcely grasp the idea.
“ And this faith must produce a holy life; but
here is the place where.I went wrong,—I
thought men were saved because they ‘were
holy!”

“They are holy because they are saved!
Here was indeed your mistake, my friend.
The poor debtor was not set free because he
had served his benefactor, but he served him
because he was set free! A tree does not live
because it has fruit, however abundant that
fruit may be, but it produces fruit because it
has life, and good actions are the fruit of our
faith ?”

“But are we safe whether we be holy or
not?”
52 GOD'S GIFT OF GRACE.

“ Without holiness no man shall see the
Lord. Every tree that beareth not good fruit
ts hewn down and cast into the fire.”

“ But I feel as if-I could not be holy!” cried
Mark. “TI tried this day to walk straight on in
the narrow path of obedience to God—I tried,
but I miserably failed. I gained nothing at all
by trying.”

“You gained the knowledge of your own
weakness, my boy ; you will trust less to your
resolutions in future, and so God will bring
good out of evil And now let me ask you
one question, Mark Dowley. When you de-
termined to set out on your Christian pilgrim-
age, did you pray for the help and guidance of
God’s Spirit ?”

Mark, in a low voice, answered, “ No!”

“ And can you wonder then that you failed?
could you have expected to succeed? As well
might you look for ripe fruit where the sun
never shines, or for green grass to spring where
the dew never falls, or for sails to be filled and
the vessel move on when there is not a breath
of air! Sun, dew, and wind are given by God
alone, and so is the Holy Spirit, without which
it is impossible to please him,”
GOD’s GIFT OF GRACE. 53

“ And how can I have the Spirit?” said
Mark.

“ Ask for it, never doubting but that it shall
be sent, for this is the promise of the Lord:
Ask and ye shall receive, seck and ye shall
find, knock and it shall be opened unto you.
Tf ye, being evil, know how to give good gifts
unto your children, how much more shall your
Father which is im heaven give the Holy Spirit
to them that ask lim ?”

“ And what will the Spirit do for me?”

“Strengthen you, increase your courage and
your faith, make your heart pure and holy.
The fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, long-
suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness,
temperance. Having these you are rich in-
deed, and may press on your way rejoicing to
the kingdom of your Father in heaven.”

“But how shall I pray?” exclaimed Mark.
“T am afraid to address the Most High God,
poor miserable sinner that I am.”

“When the blessed Saviour dwelt upon
earth, multitudes flocked around him. The
poor diseased leper fell at his feet, he was not
despised because he was unclean; parents
brought their children to the Lord, they were
64 Gup's GIFT OF GRACE.

not sent away because they were feeble; the
thief asked for mercy on the cross, he was not
rejected because he was a sinner! The same
gentle Saviour who listened to them is ready
to listen to you; the same merciful Lord who
‘granted their prayers is ready to give an answer
to yours, Pour out your whole heart, as you
would to a friend; tell him your wants, your
weakness, your woe, and you never will seek
him in vain!”

There was silence for a few minutes, during
which Mark remained buried in deep, earnest
thought. The clergyman silently lifted up his
heart to heaven for a blessing upon the words
that had been spoken; then, rising from his
seat, he said, “I do not give up all hope, Mark
Dowley, of procuring a situation for you yet,
though, of course, after what has occurred, I
shall find it more difficult to do so. And one
word before we part. You are now standing
before the gate of mercy, a helpless, burdened,
but not hopeless sinner. There is one ready,
one willing to open to you, if you knock by
sincere humble prayer. Go, then, without
delay, ‘seek ye the Lord while he may be found,
call ye upon him while he is near.”
GOD'S GIFT OF GRACE. 55

Mark watched the receding figure of the
clergyman with a heart too full to express
thanks, As soon as Mr. Ewart was out of
sight, once more the boy threw himself down
on the grass, but no longer in a spirit of de-
spair. Trying to realize the truth, that he was
indeed in the presence of the Saviour, of whom
he had heard,—that the same eye which re-
garded the penitent thief with compassion was
now regarding him from Heaven,—he prayed,
with the energy of one whose all is at stake,
for pardon, for grace, for the Spirit of God!
He rose with a feeling of comfort and relief,
though the burden on his heart was not yet
removed. He believed that the Lord was
gracious and long-suffering, that Jesus came
into the world to save sinners ; he had knocked
at the strait gate, which gives entrance into
life, and mercy had opened it unto him!
56 A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS.

CHAPTER Y.
A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS,

“ Upon that place stood a Cross, and a little below, in the bottom,
a Sepulchre, So I saw in my dream, that just as Christian
came up with the Cross, his burden loosed from off his show)-
ders, and fell from off his back.”—Pilgrim’s Progress.

“ WELL, this has been a pretty end to your
fine pilgrimage !” cried Jack, as Mark, resolved
to tell the truth, whatever it might cost him,
finished the account of his rupture with the
farmer. :

“The end!” said Mark ; “ my pilgrimage is
scarcely begun !

“It’s a sort of backward travelling, I should
say,” laughed Jack. “ You begin with quarrel-
ling and stealing ; I wonder what you'll come
to at last?”

Mark was naturally of a quick and ardent
spirit, only too ready to avenge insult, whether
with his tongue or his hand, But at. this
moment his pride was subdued, he felt less in-
clined for angry retort ; the young pilgrim was
more on his guard; his first fall had taught
him to walk carefully. Without replying,
A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS. 57

therefore, to the taunt of Jack, or continuing
the subject at all, he turned to Ann Dowley,
and asked her if she could lend him a needle
and thread.

“What do you want with them?” asked
Ann.

“Why, I am afraid that I shall be but a
poor hand at the work, but I thought that I
might manage to patch up one or two of these
great holes, and make my dress look a little
more respectable.”

“ And why do you wish to look respectable?”
asked Madge, glancing at him through the
uncombed, unwashed locks that hung loosely
over her brow; “we get more when we look
ragged.”

“To-morrow is Sunday,” Mark briefly re-
plied, “ and I am going to church.”

“To church!” exclaimed every other voice
in the cottage in a tone of as much surprise as
if he had said that he was going to prison.
Except Ann, in better days, not one of the
party had ever crossed the threshold of a
church !”

“Well, if ever!” exclaimed Jack; “why
on earth do you go there?”
58 A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS.

“T go because I think it right to do so, and
because I think that it will help me on my
way.”

. “And what will you do when you get
-there ?” laughed Ben.

“T shall listen, learn, and pray.”

Ann, who, by dint of searching in a most
disorderly box, filled with a variety of odds
and ends, had drawn forth first thread and
then needle, stretched out her hand towards
Mark, “Give me your jacket, I will mend
it,” said she.

“Qh! thank you, how kind!” he cried,
pulling it off, pleased with an offer as unex-
pected as it was unusual,

“T think,” said Madge, “that the shirt
wants mending worse than the jacket; under
that hole on the shoulder I can see the red
mark quite plainly.”

“Be silent, and don’t talk nonsense!” cried
Ann impatiently.

The children glanced at each other, and
were silent.

“ Are you going to the near church by the
wood ?” said Ann,

“No,” replied Mark, “T have two reasons
A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS. 59
for going to Marshdale, though it is six or
seven miles off. I would rather not go where
—where I am known; and judging from the
direction in which his carriage was driven, I
think that I should have a better chance at
Marshdale of hearing Mr. Ewart.”

“Hearing whom?” exclaimed Ann, almost
dropping her work, whilst the blood rushed
up to her face.

“Mr. Ewart, the clergyman who has been
so kind, the tutor to Lord Fontonore.”

“Lord Fontonore! does he live here?” cried
Ann, almost trembling with excitement as she
spoke,

“T do not know exactly where he lives, I
* should think it some way off, as the carriage
was put up at the inn. Did you ever see the
clergyman, mother?”

“He used to visit at my last place,” replied
Ann, looking distressed.

“TJ think I’ve heard father talk about Lord
Fontonore,” said Madge.

“No, you never did,” cried Ann, abruptly.

“But I’m sure of it,” muttered Madge in a
sullen tone,

“If you know the clergyman, that’s good
60 A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS,

luck for us,” said Ben, “I daresay that he'll
give us money if we get up a good story about
you; only he’s precious sharp at finding one
out. He wanted to pay us a visit.”

“Don’t bring him here; for any sake don’t
* bring him here!” exclaimed Ann, looking quite
alarmed. “ You don’t know the mischief, the
ruin you would bring. I never wish to set
eyes upon that man.”

“T can imagine her feelings of pain,” thought
Mark, “by my own to-day, when I first saw
the clergyman. ‘There is something in the
very look of a good man which seems like a
reproach to us when we are so different.”

The next morning, as Mark was dressing
for church, he happily noticed, before he put
on his jacket, the word Piternt chalked in
large letters upon the back.

“This is a piece of Jack’s mischief,” he said
to himself, “Iam glad that it is something
that can easily be set right—more glad still
that I saw it in time. I will take no notice
of this piece of ill-nature. I must learn to
bear and forbear.”

Mark endured in silence the taunts and
jests of the children on his setting out on
A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS, 61

his long walk to church, He felt irritated
and annoyed, but he had prayed for patience ;
and the consciousness that he was at least
trying to do what was right seemed to give
him a greater command over his temper. He
was’ heartily glad, however, when he got out
of hearing of mocking words and bursts of
laughter, and soon had a sense even of ‘plea-
sure as he walked over the sunny green fields.

At length Marshdale church came in view.
An ancient building it was, with a low, ivy-
covered tower, and a small arched porch before
the entrance, It stood in a church-yard, which
was embosomed in trees, and a large yew-tree,
that had stood for many an age, threw its sha-
dow over the lowly graves beneath.

A stream of people was slowly wending
along the narrow gravel walk, while the bell
rang a summons to prayer. There was the
aged widow, leaning on her crutch, bending
her feeble steps, perhaps for the last time, to
the place where she had worshipped from a
child, There the hardy peasant, in his clean
smock-frock, leading his rosy-cheeked boy; and
there walked the lady, leaning on her husband’s
arm, with a flock of little ones before her,
62 A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS.

Mark stood beneath the yew-tree, half afraid
to venture farther, watching the people as they
went in. There were some others standing
there also, perhaps waiting because a little

_ early for the service, perhaps only idling near
that door which they did not mean to enter.
They were making observations on some one
approaching.

“What a fine boy he looks! You might
know him for a lord! Does he stay long in
the neighbourhood ?”

“Only for a few weeks longer I believe; he
has a prodigious estate somewhere I hear, and
generally lives there with his uncle.”

As the speaker concluded, young Lord Fon-
tonore passed before them, and his bright eye
caught sight of Mark Dowley. Leaving the
path which led to the door, he was instantly
at the side of the poor boy.

“You are coming into church I hope?” said
he earnestly ; then continued, without stopping
for a reply, “ Mr. Ewart is to preach; you must
not stay outside.” Mark bowed his head, and
followed into the church,

How heavenly to the weary-hearted boy
sounded the music of the hymn, the many
A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS. 63

voices blended together in praise to the Saviour
God made him think of the harmony of heaven!
Rude voices, unkind looks, quarrelling, false-
hood, fierce temptations—all seemed to him
shut out from that place, and a feeling of
peace stole over his spirit, like a calm after a
storm. He sat in a retired corner of the
church, unnoticed and unobserved: it was as
though the weary pilgrim had paused on the
hot, dusty highway of life, to bathe his bruised
feet in some cooling stream, and refresh him-
self by the wayside.

Presently Mr. Ewart ascended the pulpit
with the word of God in his hand. Mark
fixed his earnest eyes upon the face of the
preacher, and never removed them during the
whole of the sermon. His was deep, solemn
attention, such as befits a child of earth when
listening to a message from Heaven.

The subject of the Christian minister’s ad-
dress was the sin of God’s people in the
wilderness, and the means by which merey
saved the guilty and dying, He described
the scene so vividly that Mark could almost
fancy that he saw Israel’s hosts encamping in
the desert around the tabernacle, over which
64 A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS,

hung a pillar of cloud, denoting the Lord's
presence with his people. God had freed them
from bondage, had saved them from their foes,
had guided them, fed them, blessed above all
_ hations, and yet they rebelled and murmured
against him. Again and again they had
broken his law, insulted his servant, and
doubted his love; and at last the long-
merited punishment came. Fiery serpents
were sent into the camp, serpents whose bite
was death, and the miserable sinners lay
groaning and dying beneath the reptiles’
venomous fangs. ;

“And are such serpents not amongst us
still?” said the preacher; “is not sin the
viper that clings to the soul, and brings it
to misery and death! What ruins the drunk-
ard’s character and name, brings poverty and
shame to his door? The fiery serpent of sin!
What brings destruction on the murderer and
the thief? The fiery serpent of sin! What
fixes its poison even in the young child, what
has wounded every soul that is born into the
world? The fiery serpent of sin !”

Then the minister proceeded to tell how, at
God’s command, Moses raised on high a ser-
‘

A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS. 65

pent made of brass, and whoever had faith to
look on that serpent, recovered from his
wound, and was healed. He described the
trembling mothers of Israel lifting their chil-
dren on high to look on the type of salvation;
and the dying fixing upon it their dim, failing
eyes, and finding life returning as they gazed !

“ And has no such remedy been found for
man, sinking under the punishment of sin?
Thanks to redeeming love, that remedy has
been found, for as.Moses lifted up the serpent
in the wilderness, so hath the Son of Man
been lifted up, that whoso believeth in Him
should not perish, but have everlasting life!
Behold the Saviour uplifted on the cross, His
brow crowned with thorns, blood flowing from
His side, and the wounds in His pierced hands
and feet! Why did He endure the torment
and the shame, rude blows from the hands
that His own power had formed—fierce taunts
from the lips to which He had given breath.
{t was that He might redeem us from sin and
from death—it was that the blessed Jesus
might have power to say—*“ Look unto Me
and be ye saved, all ends of the earth.”

“We were sentenced to misery, sentenced
(23) 5
66 A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS.

to death; the justice of God had pronounced
the fearful words—“ the soul that sinneth it
shall die!” One came forward who knew
no sin, to bear the punishment due unto sin;
our sentence is blotted out by His blood ; the
sword of justice has been sheathed in His
breast, and now there is no condemnation to
them that are in Christ Jesus; their ransom
is paid, their transgressions are forgiven for
the sake of Him who loved and gave Himself
for.them. Oh, come to the Saviour, ye weary
and heavy laden—come to the Saviour, ye
burdened with sin, dread no longer the wrath
of an offended God; look to Him and be ye
saved, all ye ends of the earth!”

Mark had entered that church thoughtful
and anxious, he left it with a heart overflow-
ing with joy. It was as though sudden light
had flashed upon darkness; he felt as the
cripple must have felt when given sudden
strength, he sprang from the dust, and went
walking, and leaping, and praising God.
“No condemnation!” he kept repeating to
himself, “no condemnation to the penitent
sinner! All washed away—all sin blotted
out for ever by the blood of the crucified
A GLIMPSE OF THE CROSS. 67

“Lord! Oh! now can I understand that
blessed verse in Isaiah, “Though your sins
be as scarlet they shall be white as snow;
though they be red like crimson, they shall be
as wool.” “ Praise the Lord, O my soul! and
all that is within me, praise His holy name !”
That hour was rich in blessings to the
young pilgrim, and as he walked towards
home, with a light step, and lighter heart, it
was his delight to count them over. He
rejoiced in the free forgiveness of sins, which
now for the first time he fully realized He
rejoiced that he might now appear before God,
not clothed in the rags of his own imperfect
works, but the spotless righteousness of his
Redeemer. He rejoiced that the Lord had
sealed him for His own, and given him sweet
assurance of His pardon and His love. Oh,
who can rejoice as the Christian rejoices,
when he looks to the cross and is healed !
68 THE PILGRIM IN HIS HOME,

CHAPTER VI.
THE PILGRIM IN HIS HOME.

“I saw thon in my dream that he went on thus, even until he
came to the bottom, where he saw, a little out of the way,
three men fast asleep, with fetters upon their heels."—Pilgrim’s
Progress.

THE poor despised boy returned hungry and

tired to a home where he was certain to meet

with unkindness, where he knew that he
would scarcely find the necessaries of life, and
yet he returned with feelings that a monarch
might have envied. The love of God was so
shed abroad in his heart, that the sunshine
seemed brighter, the earth looked more lovely;
he felt certain that his Lord would provide for
him here, that every sorrow was leading to
joy. He thought of the happiness of the man
once possessed, when he sat clothed and in his
right mind at the feet of the Saviour: it
was there that the pilgrim was resting now,
it was there that he had laid his burden
down. The fruit of the Spirit is peace and
joy, such joy as is the foretaste of Heaven.
And the love of God must lead to love to-
THE PILGRIM IN Hs NOME. 69

wards man, Mark could feel kindly towards
all his fellow-creatures. His fervent desire
was to do them some good, and let them share
the happiness that he experienced. He thought
of the rude inmates of his home, but without
an emotion of anger; in that first hour of
joy for pardoned sin, there seemed no room in
his heart for anything but love and compassion
for those who were still in their blindness,

As Mark drew near to his cottage, he came
to a piece of ground overgrown with thistles,
which belonged to Farmer Joyce. He was
surprised to find there Jack, Madge, and Ben,
pulling up the thistles most busily, with an
energy which they seldom showed in any-
thing but begging.

“Come and work with us,” said Ben,
“this ground must be all cleared to-day.”

“ And why to-day ?” said Mark.

“Because Farmer Joyce told us this morn-
ing that when it was cleared he would give
us half-a-crown.”

“You can work to-morrow.”

“Ah, but to-morrow is the fair-day, and
that is why we are so anxious for the money.”

“T will gladly rise early to help you to-
70 THE PILGRIM IN HIS. HOME.

morrow, but this day, Ben, we ought not to
work, The Lord has commanded us to keep
the Sabbath holy, and we never shall be losers
by obeying him.”

“Here's the pilgrim come to preach,” cried
Madge in a mocking tone. ~

“T tell you what,” said Jack, stopping a
moment in his work, “ you’d better mind your
own business and be off; I don’t know what
you have to do with us.”

“What I have to do with you!” exclaimed
Mark. “Am I not your brother, the son of
your mother? Am I not ready and willing
to help you, and to rise early if I am ever so
much tired?”

There was such a bright kindly look on the
pale, weary face, that even Jack could not
possibly be offended.

“Now, just listen for a moment,” continued °
Mark ; “suppose that as I was coming along
I had spied under the bushes there a lion
asleep, that I knew would soon wake, and
prowl in search of his prey, should I do right
in going home and taking care of myself, barr-
ing our door so that no lion could come in,

- and never telling you of the danger at all?”
THE PILGRIM IN HIS HOME. 71

Madge glanced half-frightened towards the
bushes, but Jack replied, “I should say that
you were a cowardly fellow if you did.”

“What, leave us to be torn in pieces, and
never give us warning of the lion?” cried
Ben.

“T should be a cowardly fellow indeed, and
a most unfeeling brother. And shall I not
tell you of your danger, when the Evil One,
who is as a roaring lion, is laying wait for
your precious souls. As long as you are in
sin you are in danger. Oh, that you would
turn to God and be safe !”

“God will not punish poor children like
us,” said Madge, “just for working a little
when we are so poor.”

“The Evil One whispers the very same
thing -to us as he did to Eve, ‘ Thow shalt not
surely die ;’ but she found, as we shall find,
that though God is merciful, He is also just,
and keeps His word.”

“There will be time enough to trouble our-
selves about these things,” said Ben.

“Take care of yourself, and leave us in
peace!” exclaimed Jack; “we are not going
to be taught by you!” and turning his back
72 THE PILGRIM IN HIS NOME.

upon Mark, he began to work more vigorously
than ever.

Mark walked up to the cottage with a slow
weary step, silently praying for those who
would not listen to him. “od can touch
* their hearts though I cannot,” thought he.
“He who had mercy on me may have mercy
on them.”

Never had the cottage looked more untidy
or uncomfortable, or Ann’s face worn an ex-
pression more gloomy and ill-tempered.

“ Mother,” cried Mark cheerfully, “have you
something to give me, my long walk has made
me so hungry ?”

“We've had dinner long ago.”

“But have you nothing left for me?”

“You should have been here in proper time.
It’s all gone.”

Exhausted in body, and wounded by un-
kindness, Mark needed indeed the cordial of
religion to prevent his spirit from sinking.
But he thought of his Lord, and his sufferings
upon earth, “My Saviour knew what it was
to be weary and a hungered—He knew what
it was to be despised and rejected. If He
drained the cup of sorrow, shall I refuse to
THE PILGRIM IN HIs HOME. 73

taste it! If this trial were not good for me,
it would not be sent.” So Mark sat down
patiently in a corner of the room, and thought
over the sermon to cheer him.

His attention was soon attracted by Ann’s
giving two or three heavy sighs, as if she were
in pain; and looking up, he saw a frown of
suffering on her face, as she bent down and
touched her ankle with her hand.

“Have you hurt yourself, dear mother?”
said he, :

“Yes, I think that I sprained my ankle this
morning, Dear me! how it has swelled!”

“Tam so sorry!” cried Mark, instantly rising;
* you should put up your foot, and not tire it
by moving about. There,” said he, sitting
down at her feet, “rest it on my knee, and I
will rub it gently. Is it not more easy now?”

Ann only replied by a sigh, but she let him
go on, and patiently he sat there, chafing her
ankle with his thin weary fingers. He could
scarcely prevent himself from falling asleep.

“That is very comfortable,” said the woman
at last; “certainly it’s more than any of the
others would do for their mother; they never
so much as asked me how I did. You're worth
74 THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL.

all the three, Mark,” she added bitterly, “ and
little cause have you to show kindness to me
Just go to that cupboard—it hurts me to
move—you'll find there some bread and cheese
. left.”

Mark joyfully obeyed, and never was a feast
more delicious than that humble meal. Never
was @ grace pronounced more from the depths
of a grateful heart than that uttered by the
poor peasant boy.



CHAPTER VIL
THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL.

“ Now, about the midway to the top of the hill was a pleasant
arbour, made by the Lord of the hill for the refreshment of
weary travellers.”—Pilgrim’s Progress.

Srverat days passed with but few events to

mark them. Mark did everything for Ann

to save her from exertion, and under his care
her ankle became better. He also endeavoured
to keep the cottage more tidy, and clear the
little garden from weeds, remembering that

“cleanliness is next to godliness,” and that if

any man will not work, neither should he eat,
THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL, 75

One morning Madge burst into the cottage
where Mark and Ann were sitting together.
“He is coming!” she exclaimed in a breath-
less voice; “he is coming—he is just at the
gate (*

“Who?” cried Ann and Mark at once.

“The parson,—the—”

“Not Mr. Ewart!” exclaimed Ann, starting
up in terror,

“Yes it is—the tall man dressed in black.”

In a moment’ the woman rushed to the
back room as fast as her ankle would let her.
“Tl keep quiet here,” she said. “If he
asks for me, say that I’ve just gone to the
miller’s.”

“ Mother's precious ictal of a parson,” said
Madge, as a low knock was heard at the door.

With pleasure Mark opened to his bene-
factor.

“Good morning,” said Mr. Ewart, as he
crossed the threshold. “I have not forgotten
my promise to you, my friend. I hope that
I have obtained a place for you as erranil-
boy to a grocer. Being myself only a tem-
porary resident in these parts, I do not know
much of your future master, except that he
76 THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL.

appears to keep a respectable shop, and is
very regular in attendance at church; but I
hear that he bears a high character. Mr.
Lowe, if you suit him, agrees to give you
board and lodging; and if he finds you upon
trial useful and active, he will add a little
salary at the end of the year.”

“T am very thankful to you, sir,” said
Mark, his eyes expressing much -more than
his lips could. “TI trust that you never will
bave cause to be sorry for your kindness.”

“Ts your mother within?” said Mr. Ewart.

Mark bit his lip, and knew not what to
reply, divided between fear of much displeas-
ing his parent, and that of telling a falsehood
to his benefactor.

“She’s gone to the miller’s,” said Madge
boldly.

But the clergyman turned away from the
wicked little girl, whose word he never thought
of trusting, and repeated his question to Mark,
whose hesitation he could not avoid seeing.

“She is within, sir,” said the boy, after a
little pause; then continued with a painful
effort, as he could not but feel that Ann’s
conduct appeared rude and ungrateful to one
THE ARBOUR ON TIE HILL. 77

whom above all men he was anxious to please ;
“but she would rather not see you to-day.”

“Very well, I have seen you; you will tell
her what I have arranged.” Mark ventured
to glance at tlie speaker, and saw, with a feel-
ing of relief, that Mr, Ewart’s face did not
look at all angry.

It was more than could be said for Ann’s,
as, after the clergyman’s departure, she came
out of her hiding-place again. Her face was
flushed, her manner excited ; and, in a fit of
ungovernable passion, she twice struck the
unresisting boy.

“Lord Jesus! this I suffer for thee !”
thought Mark, and this reflection took the
bitterness from the trial. He was only thank-
ful that he had been enabled to keep to the
truth, and not swerve from the narrow path.

On the following day Mark went to his
new master, who lived in a neighbouring
town. He found out the shop of Mr. Lowe
without difficulty ; and there was something
of comfort and respectability in the appear-
ance of the establishment, that was very en-
couraging to the boy. ‘To his unaccustomed
eye the ranges of shining brown canisters, each
78 THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL,

neatly labelled with its contents ; the white
sugar-loaves, with prices ticketed in the win-
dow ; the large cards, with advertisements of
sauces and soap, and the Malaga raisins, spread
temptingly to view, spake of endless plenty
and abundance,

Mark carried a note which Mr. Ewart had
given to him, and, entering the shop, placed it
modestly on the counter before Mr. Lowe.

The grocer was rather an elderly man, with
a bald head, and mild expression of face. He
opened the note slowly, then looked at Mark
over his spectacles, read the contents, then
took another survey of the boy. Mark’s heart
beat fast, he was so anxious not to be re-
jected.

“So,” said Mr. Lowe, in a slow, soft voice,
as if he measured every word that he spoke ;
“so you are the lad that is to come here upon
trial, recommended by the Reverend Mr.
Ewart. He says that you've not been well
brought up; that’s bad, very bad—but that
he hopes that your own principles are good.
Mr. Ewart is a pious man, a very zealous
minister, and I am glad to aid him in works
of charity like this. If you're pious, all’s
THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL. 79
right, there’s nothing like that; I will have
none about me but those who are decidedly
pious !”

Mr. Lowe looked as though he expected a
reply, which puzzled Mark exceedingly, as he
had no idea of turning piety to worldly advan-
tage, or professing religion to help him to a
place. He stood, uneasily twisting his cap in
his hand, and was much relieved when, a cus-
tomer coming in, Lowe handed him over to
his shopman.

Radley, the assistant, was a neat-looking
little man, very precise and formal in his
manner, at least in the presence of his master.
There was certainly an occasional twinkle in
his eye, which made Mark, who was very ob-
servant, suspect that he was rather fonder of
fun than might beseem the shopman of the
solemn Mr. Lowe ; but his manner, in general,
was a sort of copy of his master’s and he bor-
rowed his language and phrases,

And now, fairly received into the service of
the grocer, Mark seemed to have entered upon
a life of comparative comfort. Mr. Lowe was
* neither tyrannical nor harsh, nor was Radley
disposed to bully the errand boy. Mark’s
80 THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL,

obliging manner, great intelligence, and readi-
ness to work, made him rather a favourite
with both, and the common comforts of life
which he now enjoyed appeared as luxuries to
him.

“T have been climbing a steep hill of diffi-
culty,” thought he, “and now I have reached
a place of rest. How good is the Lord, to
provide for me thus, with those who are his
servants !”

That those with whom Mark lived were
indeed God’s servants, he at first never thought
of doubting. Was there not a missionary-box
placed upon the counter—was not Mr. Lowe
ever speaking of religion—was he not fore-
most in every good work of charity—did he
not most constantly attend church ?

But there were several things which soon
made the boy waver a little in his opinion.
He could not help observing that his employer
took care to lose no grain of praise for any-
thing that he did. Instead of his left hand
not knowing the good deeds of his right, it
was no fault of his if all the world did not
know them. ‘Then, his manner a little varied
with the character of his customers. With
THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL. 81

clergymen, or with those whom he considered
religious, his voice became still softer, his man-
ner more meek, Mark could not help suspect-
ing that he was not quite sincere. The boy
reproached himself, however, for daring to
judge another, and that one so much more
advanced in the Christian life than himself.
He thought that it must be his own inexpe-
rience in religion that made him doubt its
reality in Lowe.

Thus a few weeks passed in comfort with
Mark, but the pilgrim was making no pro-
gress, It is not well for us to dwell amongst
those whose profession is greater than their
practice. The fervour of Mark’s first love
was a little cooled. Alas! in weak, infirm
mortals such as we are, how inclined is that
fervour to cool! There were no strong temp-
tations to stir up the flame—no anxious fears
to drive him to the mercy-seat—his prayers
were perhaps more frequent, but they were
less deep and earnest. Mark was tempted to
rest a little upon forms, and think that all
must be right, because others approved.

The Christian must not dream that he is

only in danger whilst dwelling with the care-
(23) 6
82 THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL.

less or profane. The society of professors may
be quite as dangerous, by lulling his conscience
to sleep. He is less on his guard against
inward foes, less able to distinguish true reli-
gion in his heart, from the natural desire to
please, and many of God’s children on earth
have found the arbour more dangerous than
the hill!

Not that Mark did much with which he
could reproach himself, unless it were that he
never sought an opportunity of going to see
his mother. He connected nothing but ideas
of persecution and unkindness with his home.
He thought that by this time John Dowley
might have returned, a man who had ever
treated him with unnatural cruelty; and to
say the truth, Mark rather dreaded going again
near the place. I fear that my pilgrim is
falling in the estimation of my reader; but
I am drawing no sinless model of perfection ;
and, perhaps, if we closely examine our own
hearts, even after they have been enlightened
by the Spirit, there may be something in our
own experience which will remind us of this
chapter of the life of the pilgrim. I said that
Mark suspected a little the sincerity of the
THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL, 83
religious professions of his master. This sus-
picion was painfully strengthened by an incident
which occurred when he had been a few weeks
under his roof.

One night, after the shop had been closed,
and prayers said, and Mark had retired to his
small attic, he fancied that he heard a little
noise down below, and crept from his chamber
to listen. “All was very still, only the clock
on the stairs seemed to tick twice as loudly as
usual, Then again there was a slight sound,
apparently from the shop, and Mark wondered
what, at that hour, it could be. Softly he
crept down the creaking stair, unwilling to
disturb his master, who had retired to rest
rather earlier than usual, happening to feel
not very well. Mark reached the door which
opened into the shop, and there was no doubt
left that, somebody was within engaged in some
occupation,

Mark observed that the door, though or
closed, was not shut, a narrow line of light
showed it to be a little ajar; he pushed it very
gently to widen the opening, and within, to
his surprise, saw Radley.

“Who's there?” exclaimed the shopman ;
84 THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL,

“why, Mark, is it you? That’s lucky, you'll
come and help me, I daresay. I am so sleepy
to-night,—but this must be done.”

“What are you doing?” said Mark, with a
feeling of curiosity.

“I’m mixing this with that, as you see,”
replied Radley, pointing to two heaps of what
looked like coffee on the counter.

“Why should you mix them?”

“Oh! ask no questions, and I'll tell you no
stories,” said Radley, quite dropping his usual
formal manner, with a laughing look in his
eye which startled the boy.

“Do you mean—is it possible—” exclaimed
Mark, his face flushing with indignation as he
spoke, “that you are mixing chicory with
coffee in order to deceive our master’s cus-
tomers ?”

“You are very green, or you would know
that it is constantly done.”

“Tt cannot be right,” said Mark, “to sell
an article under a false name, and get a false
price for it too! Surely Mr. Lowe does not
know what you are doing!”

“Oh, you most simple of simpletons!”
laughed Radley, “do you suppose that I am
THE ARBOUR ON THE HILL. 85
doing it for my own diversion, to serve my
pious master against his will?”

“You do it by his orders then ?”

“Of course I do,”

“TI could never have believed that he could
have been guilty of such a thing!” exclaimed
Mark, more shocked and disgusted by the hypo-
crisy of Lowe, than by any of the open wicked-
ness that he had ever witnessed, “And you,
Radley, how can your conscience let you do
what is so wrong?”

“ My conscience is my master’s, I only obey
what he commands,”

“Your conscience your master’s! Oh, no!”
exclaimed Mark ; “you will have to answer
for yourself before God !”

“If I refused to do this I should have to
leave the grocer’s service.”

“Better leave his service than the service
of God !”

“T say, young man,” replied Radley, still
good-humouredly, though with some appearance
of scorn, “mind your own business, and leave
me to mind mine, When you carry the goods
to the customers, no one asks you whether the
parcel holds tea or gooseberry leaves.”
86 THE-ARBOUR ON THE HILL.

“ But can you endure to kneel down, and
repeat prayers to the Almighty, when you
know—”

“T tell you,” said Radley, as though he
thought it a joke, “my master’s religion and
mine is like the articles in this shop, it is
mixed. But what matter, it makes as good
a show as any, it serves our purpose, and I
really think that the world likes to be taken
in. We get on, look respectable, and thrive ;
what can be better than that?”

“Better to starve,—better to struggle up
hill all one’s life, beset with difficulties and
trials.”

“We'll leave the starving to you, if you
like it; and as for struggling up hill, only fools
do that, if they can find an easier way round!
Now go to your bed, and rest quiet my lad,
and leave me and my conscience to settle our
affairs together !”

Startled as from a dream, Mark returned to
his attic, disappointed, disgusted, and grieved.
“Can a blessing ever rest on this house?”
thought he; “can Lowe ever,*even in this
world, be really a gainer by such awful hypo-
crisy and deceit? Ob, I have been too little
DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS, 87
on my guard in this place, I have been a
drowsy pilgrim on the way,—blessed be God
that I am awakened before too late !”



CHAPTER VIII.
DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS.

“ Fear not the lions, for they are chained, and are placed there for
trial of faith where it is; and for the discovery of those that
have none; keep in the midst of the path, and no hurt shall
come unto thee.”—Pilgrim’s Progress.

Ir was long before Mark could get to sleep, and
he awoke almost before it was light. He felt
a heavy oppression which was new to him, and
rose to open the window. The sky was now
of that deep exquisite blue which it wears the
hour before dawn; the few stars that studded
the heavens were growing pale at the approach
of morning. The street was perfectly quiet,
not a vehicle was moving about, and the
sleepy sound of a cock crowing at some dis-
tance was the only noise that broke the still-
ness,

“T feel as though I could not rest,” said
Mark, “the sun will rise before long; I will
88 DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS.

dress myself and go out, and have a quiet time —
before I am required for work. I have been
keeping too little watch over myself lately, I
have been too easily contented with the little
knowledge to which I have attained. Oh,
what if I should have been deceiving myself
all the time, if I have never entered the
straight gate at all!” Mark had lost for a
time that sweet assurance which had afforded
him such joy amidst trials.

Putting his Bible in his bosom that he might
read it as he walked, Mark opened the door of
his attic. The instant that he did so he
became sensible of a most powerful smell of
fire, and the next moment a volume of smoke
came rolling up from below !

Mark sprang down the stair-case with
anxious haste, every step making him more
certain of the fearful fact that the house of his
master was on fire! He rushed first to the
sleeping apartment of Radley, then roused up
the servant of the house, and bidding her throw
up the window and call loudly for assistance,
hurried to the bed-room of Mr. Lowe.

Startled from deep sleep, hardly able to
comprehend what had happened, only with a
DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS. 89

terrible consciousness that it was something
dreadful, the wretched man rose from his pillow,
and was half dragged by Mark from his apart-
ment, which being immediately over the place
of the fire, was becoming very hot, and full of
smoke, Such an awakening is terrible here,
—but oh, what will it be to the hypocrite
hereafter, when the trumpet of the angel shall
rouse him from his grave, to behold a universe
in flames !

Assistance was speedily given; the cry of
“fire!” brought crowds of neighbours around ;
pails of water-were passed from hand to hand,
and the fire-engine soon came rattling up the
street. The cries and shouts, the crackling
and roaring of the devouring element, the
suffocating dense clouds, through which little
could be seen but tongues of fierce flame, now
darting curling round the wood-work, now
streaming upwards and reddening the black
canopy of smoke,—the stifling heat, the occa-
sional glimpse of burning rafters, which looked
as if glowing red hot in the fire, all formed a
scene which time could never efface from the
memory of those who beheld it!

Half wild with terror, anxiety, and grief,
90 DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS.

Lowe pushed his way here and there through
the crowd, sometimes urging on the firemen,
sometimes trying to assist them, sometimes
standing still, to witness in helpless misery
the destruction of his property, Well might
he look on in misery, for that property was
his all! The hypocrite had not laid up his
treasure in heaven, and he now beheld, con-
suming before his eyes, that for which he had
been daily bartering his soul !

Before the sun had reached his mid-day
height, the fire had been entirely subdued.
The efforts of the firemen had prevented it
from spreading, but a charred and blackened
shell of a house, floors, rafters, windows, all
entirely destroyed, alone remained of the habi-
tation of Lowe !

The unhappy man was offered shelter in
the house of a sympathizing neighbour, and
thither Mark went to see him. He found him
in a pitiable state, his mind almost crushed by
his misfortune, yet still, true to his character,
he professed submission to the decree of Pro-
vidence, even while his excessive grief showed
how little he felt it, and intermixed his lamen-
tations with various texts, thereby edifying his
DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS. 91

neighbours, perhaps, but shocking one who
knew him better than they did.

He received his errand-boy with great kind-
ness, “One of the most bitter parts of my
trial,” said the really kind-hearted though
unprincipled man, “ is that my ruin will throw
you and poor Radley upon the world. I sup-
pose that you will return home directly.”

“T thought that I would go first to Mr.
Ewart, and ask his advice.”

“I grieve to say that will no longer be in
your power. That excellent minister was to
leave Marshdale for Yorkshire yesterday.”

This piece of information fell like a heavy
blow upon Mark, and his face showed how
much he felt it. “Then I must return to the
cottage at once,” said he, in a low tone.

“T can understand your reluctance, my
boy, to become a burden upon your poor
parents,”

There was not a particle of hypocrisy in
Mark; he wanted no praise for motives which
were not his. “I was not thinking about
that,” said he.

“Ah! I understand,” said Lowe, in his own
peculiar tone, “you feel being deprived of the
92 DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS.
spiritual advantages which you enjoyed while
under my roof.”

“Not exactly that,” replied Mark, hesi-
tating and looking embarrassed, for there was
a mixture of this regret in his reluctance to
return home, though it was not his principal
feeling.

The truth was, that Mark dreaded not so
much the poverty and discomfort of Ann’s
cottage—though he did not like that—as the
positive cruelty which he would probably have
to endure if he returned. Having for some
time slipped his neck from the yoke, he
shrank exceedingly from having to bear it
again, A soldier who fights bravely on the
battle-field, if he leave it for a while till his
blood cools and his wounds begin to stiffen
and smart, finds it a much greater trial of
courage to return to his post than to stay
there without ever quitting it.

But Mark seemed to have no other resource,
and bidding a friendly farewell to his late
master, who, whatever he was in the sight of
Heaven, had ever been kind to him, he walked
slowly up the street. The gloomy, threatening
clouds above him, seemed like types of his
DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS, 93

darkened fate, and the forerunners of a storm,
As he proceeded, pondering over the difficulties
of his position, he was startled by the sight of
a lady, who was standing at a door at which
she had just knocked. Mark had seen her
but once before, but her face was imprinted
on a memory naturally good, especially as the
most important event of his life, his repent-
ance and turning to God, was in some way
connected with her. She was the lady who
had dropped the bag by the stile which con-
tained Mark’s precious Bible.

Now, it had often weighed upon the con-
science of the boy, that his dearest possession
was not his by right; and that if ever he met
with its lawful owner, common honesty bound
him to restore it. And yet, to give that away
which had been his life—to walk on in dark-
ness, without that light which had been his
comfort and solace till now—Mark felt almost
as though he could not do it, and stood hesi-
tating and arguing in his own mind till the
lady entered the house, and the door closed
behind her.

“She is rich, she can buy many others,”
whispered the Tempter in his bosom, “She
94 DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS.

is certain to have supplied its loss long ago;
but you, where will you find another? You
will lose all your religion with your Bible,
and fall under the temptations which you will
be certain to meet.” Was not this mistrust
of God’s sustaining power? “And what dis-
grace,” added the Tempter, “ will it be to own
taking and using that which was not yours!
Notwithstanding your care, the book has
been injured; it is not worth returning to a
lady. She may question you about the other
things in the bag—the purse, the money, the
handkerchief with lace ; of course you cannot
betray your family ; you will be looked upon,
perhaps punished, as a thief!” These were
the suggestions of a timorous spirit, magnify-
ing every danger by the way.

But against all this was the plain word of
God, Thou shall not steal. To keep anything
from its owner that might be restored, was
clearly to break the commandment. So, after
a short inward prayer for the help which
he so much needed, with a heart so low,
and a frame so much exhausted by the ex-
citement and fatigue of the morning, that it
would have been a relief to him to have
DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS, 95

sat down and cried, Mark gently rang the
bell.

He felt embarrassed when the servant-maid
opened the door, and inquired what it was
that he wanted. But, recovering himself, he
asked if he might speak with the lady who
had just entered the house. He said that he
had something which he believed that she had
lost; and the servant, without making any
difficulty, ushered him into the parlour,

A silver-haired old gentleman and the lady
were there ; she had just opened a piano, and
was sitting down to play. Her face looked so
gentle and bright that Mark was somewhat
reassured, though most reluctant to part with
his treasure,

“What did you want with me, my good
boy,” said the lady, turning round without
quitting her seat, her fingers resting on the
silent notes of the instrument.

Mark drew from his bosom the Bible. “I
believe, ma’am, that this is yours,” said he.

“ My long-lost Bible!” exclaimed the lady,
rising with an expression of joy. Oh! I never
thought to see it again. Where could you
have found it?”
96 DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS,

“Near a stile, where you had dropt it as
you went to church.”

“Tt was in my bag with other things; have
you anything else?” .

“T have nothing else,” replied Mark, feeling
very uneasy.

“What is your name?” said the old gentle-
man, looking up from his paper.

“Mark Dowley, sir,” answered the boy.

“Mark Dowley! Ellen, have we not heard
that name before ?”

“Oh, yes; ‘tis the name of the boy in whom
dear Mr, Ewart was interested. Do you not
remember his speaking about him?”

“T remember it perfectly well, my dear; it
is easy to imagine what became of the other
contents of the bag.” :

“And where are you staying now?” said”
Ellen, with a look of interest; “I hope that
you have a good situation.”

“T had a good situation last night, but the
fire that happened to-day burnt down the
house of my master, and now I am abroad in
the world.”

Ellen glided to her father, and whispered
something in his ear, Mark’s heart beat very
DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS. 97

quickly, he scarcely knew why; but it was
with a sensation of hope. After a few minutes
of conversation which he could not hear, Mr.
Searle—for that was the gentleman’s name—
said aloud, “ As you please, my dear ; we cer-
tainly were looking out for such a boy. We
could take him with us to Yorkshire; there
could be no difficulty about that.”

“Would you like,” said Ellen, bending her
kind eyes upon Mark, “to become one of our
household, to accompany us to Silvermere?
Your work would be light, and your situation
comfortable. We live scarcely two miles from
Castle Fontonore.”

With a rebound of joy all the greater from
the depth of his late depression, Mark eagerly
accepted the offer. Profiting, however, by the
remembrance of past regrets, and desirous to
be more faithful to his duty in future, he added
that he must first obtain the consent of his
mother.

“You are quite right, my boy,” said Mr.
Searle, kindly; “let nothing ever come be-
tween you and your duty to a parent. Her
will, next to God’s, should be your law; you
never can do too much for her.”

3) 7
98 DANGERS, DIFFICULTIES, AND DOUBTS.

“But it is not desirable to go till to-mor-
row,” said Ellen; “those heavy clouds have
burst ; only see how it rains! The poor boy
looks quite knocked up already; he could oc-
cupy the little room here to-night.”

This arrangement was finally concluded
upon, and the weary but thankful boy again
found a haven of rest. A comfortable meal
was set before him, to which he was inclined
to do full justice. He enjoyed deep untroubled
sleep that night, and awoke in the morning
refreshed and rejoicing. How the difficulties
that he feared had melted away before him !
How one painful effort made, had brought its
own rich reward !
THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE. 99

OHAPTER IX.
THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE.
“Then did Christian begin to be afraid, and to cast in his mind

whether to go back or to stand his ground,”—Pilgrim’s Pro-
gress.

Our Pilgrim rose early, with a heart full of
hope. He determined not to quit the house
till he had seen Mr. Searle or his daughter
again, and waited in the hall till they should
come down. Mark’s attention was at once
riveted by what he had never seen before—a
complete suit of armour hung against the wall;
and while he was looking at it, and admiring
its various parts, the master of the house ap-
proached him unobserved.

“That is a fine suit of armour,” said Mr,
Searle, “such as wag worn in the time of the
Crusades, when warlike pilgrims went to the
Holy Land. Perhaps you have never heard
of such ?”

“Yes, sir,” replied Mark, modestly,

“There is the helmet, you see, to protect
the head.; the mail to cover the body and
breast; the weighty sword, and the pointed
100 THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE.

shield. You observe the red cross upon it?”

The looks of Mark showed the interest that
he took.

“We're not done with fighting yet,” said
the old gentleman, in a quaint manner which
was peculiar to him. “While our three old
enemies, the world, the flesh, and the devil,
are lying in ambush to attack us, and the Holy
Land which we hope to gain is before us, we
must be armed pilgrims, aye, and fighting pil-
grims too!”

“Pray go on, sir,” said Mark, as the old
gentleman stopped; “TI so like to hear of these
things.”

“You see that our Leader has not sent us
into battle unprovided. We have the Helmet
of Proof, the Hope of Salvation, to prevent
sinful doubts from wounding the head. Then
the Breastplate of Righteousness to guard us ;
for we may be full of knowledge, and quite
correct in our belief, but if we give way to
wilful sin, of what avail is the soundness of
the head when the heart is pierced by the fiery
dart? Nor must we neglect the Girdle of Truth,
nor the preparation of the Gospel of-Peace for
our feet.”
THE ARMOUR AND TIE BATTLE. 101

“That is a part of the armour which I do
not understand,” said Mark.

“No? Long before you are as old as I, I
hope that you will experimentally understand
it. Yet I should think that you had known
already what it is to tread some of the rough
ways of life.”

Mark heartily assented to this.

“And every one knows the difference be-
tween walking with shoes and without them.
Were I barefoot, I should start if I trod on a
thorn, I should bleed if I struck against a
sharp-edged stone; and so it is with the
people of this world who are not shod with
the Preparation of Peace. I have known the
smallest thing worry and fret them; they
were as wretched from one small briar in their
path, as if it had been one labyrinth of thorns.”

“And are all Christians safe from these
little vexations ?”

“I can’t say that,” replied the old gentle-
man, “T can’t say that. There are many
who cannot tread down small difficulties, but
go on their whole way to heaven shrinking
and starting at the least of them. But it
strikes me that it is because, while they have
102 THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE.

put on all the rest of the armour of God, they
have neglected the sandals for the feet.
“Well, to proceed with our description of
the armoury of heaven—We come next to the
most wonderful, the most powerful of weapons
—the Sword of the Spirit, which is the Word
of God. Now this flashed so bright, and its
edge was so sharp, in the days of early Chris-
tianity, that many were its conquests in various
parts of the world, and old idolatry fell fast be-
fore it. But when the great enemy found that
it could not be withstood, he devised a deep-
laid scheme to destroy its effect, and made a
curious sheath, all covered with jewels and
gold; and the name of this sheath was Super-
stition. In this, for many ages, was the Word
of God buried; and though flashes of its
brightness shone out here and there, it was
almost quite hidden from the eyes of the
people, till Wickliffe, and Luther, and many
Reformers beside—some yielding up their
ood and their lives for the truth—drew it
from its fatal scabbard, clear and glittering
again ; and it sent forth a flash at its unsheath-
ing that was seen over almost all Europe, and en-
lightened the distant shores of the New World!
THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE. 103

“ And now the last thing that we come to is
the strong shield Faith, Without this neither
helmet nor breastplate could have power. to
resist the shafts of the enemy, St. Peter
threw it aside in a moment of fear, and in-
stantly his righteousness was pierced through
and through. And it is not only in battle
that our faith is precious ; we pillow our head
upon it when we rest, and when we take water
from the wells of salvation, it is in the hollow
of this shield alone that we can raise it to our
thirsting lips.”

Ellen now came down stairs, with her Bible
in her hand; that Bible which Mark had
prized so dearly, and parted with so very
unwillingly.

“T could not have the heart to deprive you
of this,” said she; “take it, and keep it, and
may you ever find it to be your best com-
forter and guide,”

With what grateful joy Mark replaced the
Bible in his bosom, and with what a coura-
geous heart, about an hour after, he set forth
to ask his mother’s consent to remaining with
Mr. Searle! He had very little doubt of ob-
taining it, or he would hardly have advanced
104 THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE.

with such a light, joyous step, When he had
quitted the town, and found himself on the
open plain, he gave vent to his happy emo-
tions in songs of praise. We are commanded
in everything to give thanks; let us never
forget to do so when all seems smiling around
us; no,—and even when mists fall, and tem-
pests gather over our heads, let us still remem-
ber in everything to give thanks.

How many thoughts were awakened in the
Pilgrim’s mind, as again he approached his
home! There was the stile where the Bible had
been found; there the stone upon which he had
sat to read it, and felt such terror flash upon
his mind at the words, “the soul that sinneth,
it shall die ;” there was the piece of ground
which the children had been weeding, when
he warned them, but vainly, to flee from the
wrath to come, There was not a thistle now
left on the spot ; and as he looked at the earth,
all cleared and prepared for seed, Mark silently
prayed that the grace of God might likewise
so prepare and make ready the hearts of his
own little sister and brothers, He could see
over the fields, at a little distance, the old
ruin where he had first met Mr. Ewart ; not a
TUE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE. 105
duy had passed, since that meeting, in which
Mark had not prayed with grateful affection
for him whose words had been such a blessing
to his soul.

And now Mark stood at the door of the
cottage ; a loud, coarse voice which he heard
from within announced to him, before he
reached it, that John Dowley had returned.
There were other things besides to show that
a change had taken place, of which Mark
became aware, as he entered the cottage. A
large pewter pot stood at the door, a black
bottle and dirty pack of cards appeared on
the table, a joint of meat was roasting before
the fire, and Ann, who started with surprise
on seeing him, wore a silk shawl and golden
ear-rings! John must have returned with his
pockets full of money!

He was sitting at the table, a short, stout-
built man, with a louring expression in his
bleared eye, and a face flushed by intemper-
ance ; no one who beheld them together would
have imagined him to be the father of the
pale, thoughtful, intellectual boy, to whose
greeting he returned no answer, but something
resembling a growl, Mark fancied that Ann
106 THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE.

looked sorry to see him; but that, perhaps,
was no sign of unkindness. Jack, Madge, and
Ben, sprang eagerly forward, full of news, and
of things to show him.

“See, Mark, what father has brought me!”

“We're getting so rich now !”

“Look at my brooch and my bracelets !”

Such were the sort of exclamations which,
uttered all together, took the place of any
words of welcome.

Mark, in his secret heart, thanked heaven
that it was not his lot to remain in this
place,
“Sit down, Mark,” said Ann, looking joy-
less, notwithstanding her finery, “and be
silent, you children, will you? One can’t
hear one’s own voice, in the midst of so much
noise |”

The children might not have obeyed their
mother very readily, had not a savage look
from John seconded her words,

“T thought that you had a good situation,
Mark,” continued the woman; “you've not
been so foolish as to leave it.”

“ You have not heard, then, of the fire which
took place yesterday; poor Mr. Lowe has been
THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE, 107

burnt out of house and home, But a far bet-
ter situation has been offered to me, If you
consent, and if father approve, I shall go to
Yorkshire next week, with—”

“Yorkshire !” muttered John ; “and what’s
the gentleman’s name?”

“Searle; he lives at a place called Silver-
mere,”

“Silvermere!” exclaimed both Dowley and
his wife at once. Anne added, in a voice
that was scarcely audible, “That’s close to
Castle Fontonore !” ;

“ Everything is arranged for me,” continued
Mark ; “but I thought that it would not be
right to go so far without coming and asking
your consent,”

“Consent!” thundered Dowley, in a tone
so loud, that the cottage rang again, and the
astonished children shrank closer to each other
in fear. “Do you think that I ever would
consent to your going there ?”

Here was a blow so sudden, so unexpected,
that it almost took away Mark’s breath. Re-
covering himself soon, however, he began, “I
should be able to maintain myself, perhaps
even to assist—”
108 © THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE,

“Don’t say one word more, or—” John
uttered a horrible oath, but left his hearers to
imagine, from his clenched hand and savage
look, what was the threat which he intended
should follow.

“ At least,” said Mark in an agitated voice,
“allow me to return and tell Mr. Searle that
you forbid me to go with him, He would
think me so ungrateful—”

“What do I care what he thinks !”

“Oh! is it not enough,” cried Mark in
bitterness of spirit, “that my way is barred,
that my hopes are ruined—” he could not
speak on, his heart was too full.

“Tf he isn’t going to ery !” whispered Jack.

“A pretty pilgrim to he so soft!” murmured
Ben. 7

These mocking words roused the spirit of
the persecuted boy, but it was rather an earthly
spirit of indignation than a spirit of endurance
for the Lord’s sake.

“Let him go,” said Ann, “and tell the
gentleman that he can’t serve him; he can just
say that you've found something better for
him.”

“ He won't return if I once let him go.”
THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE. 109

“Yes, he'll return; won’t you, Mark?”

“ Yes, I will,” replied the boy, with difficulty
restraining his tears at even so slight a mark
of kindness, John gave ungracious permission
rather by silence than words, and Mark left
the cottage almost choking with his feelings.

Ttwas a little time before he could regain suffi-
cient composure even to look his difficulties in
the face. Oh! it is hard to go down into the
deep Valley of Humiliation, and few are those
called upon suddenly to descend from their
high hopes but meet with some slips by the
way!

Mark was tempted, and this was a grievous
temptation, to doubt even God’s goodness and
merey towards him. Why was he placed in a
situation so painful, why suddenly plunged
back into that furnace of trial from which he
had so lately been snatched? It seemed to
Mark as if the Almighty had forsaken him, as
if God had forgotten to be gracious, and had
left & poor mortal to be tempted beyond what
he could bear !

The pilgrims to heaven must expect on
their way thither to meet sometimes with trials
like this, The Evil One whom they served in
110 THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE.

the days of their ignorance will not suffer a
victim to escape him, without making efforte,
strong and subtle efforts too, to draw back the
ransomed soul to his service, He put rebellious
thoughts into the mind of Mark, like so many
fiery darts, to make him chafe with an im-
patient and despairing spirit, under the difficulty
of obeying the fifth commandment; and which
of us dare say that in such an inward struggle
we should have stood our ground better than
he?

But Mark had not been so lately warned
and armed, to make no fight against his Enemy.
He had still power to lift up his heart in
prayer ; to try to recall some precious promise
on which to stay his sinking spirit. “Zo! I
am with you alway, even unto the end,” was
the word from Scripture with which he now
met the Enemy, The Saviour whom he loved
was beside him here, the Saviour was witness-
ing his struggle with sin, would help him, would
bless him, if his faith failed not. Oh! better
that wretched abode with the presence of his
Lord, than the stateliest palace without it!
Could he who had been forgiven so much,
could he who had been promised so much, faint
THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE. pes

in the moment of trial! Where should the
soldier be but in the battle—what should
a pilgrim do but bear his cross !

With thoughts like these poor Mark was
struggling for submission, and resisting the
suggestions of evil; but the tempter had yet
another shaft in his quiver, and tried by arous-
ing another passion to crush down the resistance
of piety and conscience. Mark heard a quick
step behind him, felt a heavy hand on his
shoulder, and turning round beheld John Dow-
ley.

“You walk fast,” said the man, “I could
hardly overtake you. You were going to the
town, were you not? well, I’ve a little job for
you to do for me there,”

Mark signified how readily he would do it.

“You see these two bright sovereigns,” said
the man, taking two yellow pieces from a
heavily filled purse, and putting them into the
hand of the boy, “I want these changed, you
understand me; buy some trifle at two different
shops, mark me, two shops not too near each
other, and bring back the change in silver.”

“What trifles do you want?” said Mark,
poising the coins upon his finger,
112 THE ARMOUR AND THE BATTLE.

“Anything, gingerbread, or sugar-plumbs,
if you like; only see that the change is
right,”

Mark struck the two pieces against one
another; he did so again, as if not satisfied
with the sound. “Are you sure that these
are good?” said he.

“What does that matter to you? put them
in your pocket, and do as I bid you.”

“Forgive me,” replied the boy; “but I
dare not,”

“Dare not! I did not know that you
were such a coward. What are you afraid
of ?—the police ?”

“T fear doing wrong; I fear offending
my God. Oh! father, I cannot pass that
money.”

“Say that word again,” muttered Dowley
between his teeth, raising a cudgel that he
grasped in his hand,

“ Ask anything else,—anything that is not
wrong! I consented for you to give up my
place. I obeyed you, though in sorrow and
disappointment; but this thing I may not,
cannot do, even if refusing cost me my life !”

“Then take the consequences!” exclaimed
SHADOW AND SUNSHINE. 118
the man in a fury of passion, seizing the un-
happy boy with one hand, while with the
other he showered on him a torrent of blows.
Mark winced beneath them ; struggled, called
out for assistance, but neither fear nor torture
made him lift a hand against his earthly op-
pressor, or yield to the assault of the tempter
within, who urged him to procure mercy at
the price of his conscience !

Wearied at length with his barbarous labour,
Dowley flung his bruised, bleeding, gasping
victim into a dry ditch, and muttering to him-
self that he had served him out at last, walked
with long, hurried strides from the spot.

.
CHAPTER X.
SHADOW AND SUNSHINE.

“ Now at the end of this valley was another, called the Valley of
the Shadow of Death.” —Pilgrim’s Progress.

“On! this is fearful; this is more terrible
than all!” muttered Mark, as he regained

slowly the consciousness that he had half lost.

He attempted to raise himself, but motion was
(23) 8
lt SHADOW AND SUNSHINE.

torture, He called out, but no one answered
to his cry ; he had been crossing the fields, by
a shorter path than the highroad, and there-
fore was not in the direct line of any thorough-
fare, and might lie there for hours unnoticed,
Mark felt as though the Shadow of Death
were upon him; his mind was too confused
and dizzy for prayer; it seemed to grasp no-
thing but the consciousness that something
horrible had occurred. For long he lay there,
half delirious with pain. The Pilgrim was
passing through, perhaps, the darkest’ passage
of his life.

How different was the fate of young Lord
Fontonore, as, with his tutor seated beside
him in his splendid carriage, he rolled along
the highroad towards the north !

“I am so glad that yesterday’s storm is.
over!” cried he, “ there’s nothing like travel-
ling in an open carriage, except when it pours
as it did last night. It raises one’s spirits,
passing fast through the air, when the horses
dash on without touch from the whip; and
the air is so fresh, and the sky so blue, and

every turn of the wheel brings us nearer to
home !”
SHADOW AND SUNSHINE. 115

“Then you are not sorry to return to the
castle ?”

“Sorry! Oh no! I am too fond of it; too
proud of it, for that! I shall be glad, too, to
see the old faces again ; Aunt Matilda, pretty
Clemmy, my uncle, and all. I hope that I
shall find my pony all right. I shall enjoy a
good gallop again! Oh! I shall be delighted
to see my own home, with the drawbridge,
and the moat, and the old yew-hedge; and
the flag will wave on the tower, I know, on
my return, to welcome the little master back!
Then we must go to see my tenants, espe-
cially old Widow Grove; I am impatient to
take her the shell ornament which I have
bought for her,—and my poor dear old friend
who lives at the mill,—what a welcome I
shall have from him! Oh! my tenants will
not be sorry to have me amongst them again!
And yet,” rattled on the lively boy, “I have
enjoyed myself exceedingly here. How I
delighted in our visit to that old ruin; don’t
I see it there,—just beyond the fields?
Now, Mr. Ewart, I have something to
remind me of everything but that; just let
me stop the coachman,” he continued, draw.
116 SHADOW AND SUNSHINE.

ing the checkstring, “and run off for one
stone.”

“TI think, Charles, that we have a long

journey before us; it is hardly desirable to
delay.”
_ “Oh! but Tl not be two minutes, you'll
see, ‘I'll be back again, like the lightning!”
and, without waiting for the steps to be let
down, he sprang lightly out of the carriage.

“Heaven bless the dear boy!” inwardly
prayed Mr. Ewart, as he saw the graceful
form bounding away. “Heaven bless him,
and make him a blessing to many! A noble
career seems to be before him, and he has a
kind, a noble, a generous heart, which has
already, I trust, been given to God. But I
fear for him, the dangers of his position; he will
have so much to nourish pride; and pride,
alas! is his besetting sin. His guardian, and
his aunt, rather foster than check it; and
London, to which he is to be taken in the
winter, will be full of snares to the young
peer. But why should I thus take anxious
thought ; I earnestly strive to impress on his
heart the truths of our holy religion. He is
willing to listen, and ready to learn; can J
SHADOW AND SUNSHINE. 117

doabt that a blessing will rest on my prayer-
ful efforts, or that He who is ever a Father
to the orphan, will guard my dear pupil in
the hour of temptation?”

The clergyman was suddenly arrested in
his meditations by a loud call from Lord
Fontonore, who had reached the other end of
the field, and looking in that direction he saw
the boy waving his hat, and making impatient
and excited gestures as if to entreat him to
come to him, Convinced that no trifle thus
moved his pupil, Mr, Ewart instantly descended
from the carriage, and ordering the man-
servant to follow, proceeded rapidly towards
the spot.

“Oh, sir! Oh, Mr. Ewart, only look here !”
exclaimed Charles, as soon as his tutor came
within hearing. “Poor Mark Dowley, only
see how they have treated him, He is not
dying,—oh, I trust that he is not dying!”

“Help me to raise him,” said the minister
quietly, though his blood ran cold at the
spectacle before him, “Do you not think,
Charles, that you could find a little water.”
The boy was off almost before the sentence
was concluded. “Jones, we must draw off
118 SHADOW AND SUNSHINE,

his jacket very gently,—softly, you pain him,
we must examine his hurts.”

With a hand gentle as a woman's, Mr.
Ewart removed the garment from the half
senseless sufferer, to staunch the blood, and
ascertain the amount of his injuries, But he
had scarcely laid bare the poor bruised shoulders
of the boy, when he started with an expression
of such extreme surprise, that Jones looked in
wonder to see what could be its cause.

“Is it possible!” exclaimed the clergyman,
“can it be really so! Yes, for the countenance
confirms it, so like the mother, it struck me the
first moment that I saw him! And the woman,
—ah!” he cried, pressing his hand on his
forehead, “I remember she would not see me,
she dared not, the base—the treacherous! it
must be so; I see all now,—but the motive,
what could be the motive !”

“Please, sir,” said Jones, touching his hat,
“shall I go to yonder cottage for assistance ?”

“Carry the boy to the carriage ; no, I will
bear him myself, it is not the first time that
he has been in my arms. And listen, Jones,
say not a word of what, we have found, but
seek out two or three stout labourers at once ;
SIIADOW AND SUNSHINE. 119

the police would be better, but we must not
lose time, everything depends upon secrecy
and dispatch.”

While the wondering servant went in search
of the required aid, Mr. Ewart, with feelings
almost resembling those of a father, after
binding with his own handkerchief and neck-
cloth Mark’s most severe wounds, gently carried
him to where the carriage stood waiting.
Once the poor boy unclosed his eyes, and
uttered an exclamation of pleasure on recog:
nising the clergyman, but he seemed almost
too feeble to speak. Mr. Ewart had scarcely
reached the high road when he was joined by
Lord Fontonore, who, flushed and panting in
the eagerness of his haste, brought some cold
water in his cap.

“Go back with him, Charles, to the house
which we have just left, and call upon the
surgeon in your way. Oh, be tender with
him, as if he were your brother!” the clergy-
man’s voice trembled as he spoke.

“ And you—”

“T have a sterner duty to perform, but it
is one of the utmost importance, There, sup-
port the poor fellow’s head on your breast,
120 SHADOW AND SUNSHINE.

you see that the water has made him revive,
all will be right yet by the blessing of
Heaven !”

As the carriage was turned round, and
driven rapidly towards Marshdale, Jones came
up with two powerful looking ploughman, and
almost at the same time Mr, Searle, who was
walking along the road, reached the spot
where they were now standing together.

“Most opportunely met!” cried the minister,
grasping his hand; “you are a magistrate,
you will go with us and lend sanction to our
proceedings.” He drew the old gentleman
aside, and whispered rapidly a few sentences
in his ear, at which the watchful Jones observed
that Mr, Searle looked surprised and shocked.
Then, turning towards the three, “follow me,
my men,” said Mr. Ewart, abruptly, “A great
crime has been committed, we go to seize the
criminals ;” and without giving any further
explanation he led them rapidly towards the
cottage of Dowley.

If Dowley felt any remorse for the barbarous
manner in which he had treated Mark, he
was now occupied in drowning all memory
and feeling in that fiery drink which ruins so
SHADOW AND SUNSIIINE. 121

many souls. He had even filled the cups of
his children with spirits, and the cottage was a
scene of wild unholy mirth, such as might
make the pure angels weep. The sudden
entrance of Mr, Ewart without knock or pre-
vious warning, a grave stern expression on
that usually mild face, startled the party as
though he had been an apparition. He fixed
his piercing eye upon Ann, who shrank back
and covered her face with her hands, then
turned it full upon Dowley whose flushed
face showed mingled emotions of anger and
fear.

“T think that I have seen you before,” said
the clergyman, “is not your name John Law-
less ; were you not once gamekeeper to Lord
Fontonore !”

“That’s not my name, nor never was,” re-
plied the man surlily, “and I never heard of
Lord Fontonore in my life.”

“What, not from your wife there who was
nurse in the family, and entrusted with the
charge of the eldest son?”

“T say, what,” exclaimed the man, starting
up furiously, “I don’t know what brings you
here, forcing yourself into a man’s home with-
122 SHADOW AND SUNSIIINE.

out his leave ; you shall go out a little quicker
than you came—”

“ Ay, but I shall not go alone,” replied Mr.
Ewart, striking the table with his hand. At
the signal, in rushed Jones and the two coun-
trymen, followed by the magistrate, and after
a short but furious struggle, they succeeded in
securing their prisoner.

Ann attempted to make her escape by the
back door; Mr, Ewart laid his hand upon her
arm.

“You are our prisoner also,” he said, “un-
happy woman! nothing remains to you now
but to make all the reparation in your power,
by a frank and full confession.”

Ann wrung her hands in despair.

“What is to be done with the children?”
said Mr. Ewart to the magistrate, looking
round on the frightened, miserable family.

“Their proper home is the workhouse—I
will see to them ; and these prisoners must be
sent to the jail.”

The clergyman gazed on the children with
strong compassion. “We must consider if
nothing better can be done for them,” thought
he. Poor inheritors of misery in this world,
THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL. 123

Heaven grant that they may have been taken
from evil influence in time to preserve them,
through God’s grace, from misery in that which
is to come |”



OHAPTER XI.
THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL

“Looking forward, he saw Faithful before him upon his jour.
ney.”—Pilgrim’s Progress.

A Few hours afterwards, as Charles was sitting
in his own room, amusing himself with his
pencil, he was joined by his tutor, who looked
weary and pale, as if suffering from exertion
and excitement.

“T hope that you have found out who beat
the poor boy so cruelly, and have given him up
to justice,” exclaimed Charles,

“The man whom I suspect is in custody,”
replied the clergyman, sinking wearily down
ona chair. “TI find that Mark is asleep ; ’tis
the best thing for him.”

“Yes, poor fellow, he has been sleeping for
the last hour. The surgeon is to call again
in the evening. But you look exceedingly
124 THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL.

tired, dear sir; let me bring you a glass of
wine.”

“No, Charles, thank you; it is not wine
that I require. I am full of anxious thought,
my dear boy.” And he passed his hand across
his pale forehead.

“ Anxious thought for Mark?” inquired
Charles,

“No, rather anxious thought concerning
you.”

“Well, that’s odd,” said the boy, looking at
him with a surprised smile; “you seemed
pretty easy about me in the morning, and I
assure you that I have been most harmlessly
employed since you were away, first looking
after Mark, and then drawing a plan of a
church.”

“Let me see it,” said the clergyman, holding
out his hand. ;

“Qh, it is not finished, so you must make
allowance,” replied Charles, looking at his own
performance, however, with no dissatisfied air.
“T shall very probably make plenty of altera-
tions and improvements, as it will be more
than nine years before I can carry out my
plans; but I’ve such a glorious design in my
TIE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL. 125

head, something that I will do when I come
of age and have my own money !”

Charles was too much engrossed with his
project to notice the grave, almost sad, expres-
sion on the features of his tutor; so he ran on
in his animated manner,—

“You know what a long way my village
is from the church, and how seldom the clergy-
man can visit my poor people. Well, I am
determined to build a church of my own, a
large, handsome church, with the sittings all
free ; and you shall be the clergyman, my own
dear Mr. Ewart, and live in the Castle with
me all my life! Do you not approve of my
plan?” added the boy, looking into his face
with a bright smile,

“Man proposes, God disposes,” said Mr.
Ewart, laying his hand affectionately upon the
shoulder of his pupil.

Charles felt disappointed. “I thought that
you would have been so much pleased,” cried
he; “I am sure that you wish me to try to
serve the Lord.”

“Most assuredly,” replied the clergyman;
“but the Lord himself will choose out the
way in which we are to serve Him, Do you
126 THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL,

remember the young man who came to our
Saviour, and asked Him what he should do to
inherit eternal life ?”

“Ah! the one who went away sorrowing,
because he had great possessions.”

“T have little doubt,” said Mr. Ewart, “that
had he been commanded to build a place of
worship, or to give liberal alms, he would at
once have willingly complied.”

“But he was told to give up all! Do
you know, sir, that it has often struck me
that that was a command very hard to obey.
T am glad that in these days there is no need
for such commands.”

“There is the same need now, Charles, that
there was then for a spirit of willing obedience.
We may not now be called upon to give up
all, but every Christian must be ready to do
so, If there is anything on earth on which
we fix our hearts, so as to say, I can yield to
God anything but this, that thing from that
moment is an idol and a snare, and we are
breaking the second commandment.”

Charles was silent for a few moments,
thinking over his tutor’s words, till Mr. Ewart
began conversation on a different subject.
THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL, 127

“You must sometimes have heard speak of
an infant brother of your own.”

“Oh, yes, little Ernest, who was drowned
three days before I was born, whose marble
monument I so constantly see in church—a
lovely baby, sleeping amongst water-lilies.”

“His monument is there, but not his
body.”

“No, poor little one, it never was found. I
have heard all about his death many a time:
how his careless nurse set him down to crawl
on the grass; and was either called away or
fell asleep, I forget which, and the poor baby
rolled into the river and was lost, nothing of
him being recovered but his little hat and
plume, which was found floating on the top of
the water.”

“That was the story which was told at the
time by one who shrank not from adding
falsehood to cruelty.”

“And the nurse was half wild with grief,
and dared not wait till the return of her
master, who had gone to London with my
poor mother on account of her health ; but she
soon ran away, no one knew whither, and
never could be traced any more.”
128 THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL,

“She fled the place,” said Mr Ewart, “ with
a man who became her husband—one who
for his bad conduct, had been dismissed by
your father from the office of gamekeeper, with
a threat to send him into jail This wicked
man never forgot or forgave the threat, and
tempted the wretched woman whom he made
his wife, to a crime, in order to gratify his
revenge. The babe was not drowned, but
stolen. After much ill-treatment and cruelty
from the unprincipled pair, who brought him
up as their own son, his true birth was at
length providentially discovered by the clergy-
man who had baptized him more than twelve
years before, from a most singular mark on
his shoulder.”

“You cannot mean Mark!” exclaimed
Charles, in extreme surprise.

“T do mean Mark; the confession of Ann
has confirmed my suspicions. I have not the
shadow of a doubt that the boy is your
brother.”

Tt was strange to watch the various emo-
tions fast succeeding one another on the hand-
some countenance of Charles—astonishment,
interest, doubt, pity, succeeded by a grave,

.
THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL. 129
inquiring look, as he said, “Then, if Mark be
my brother, who is Lord Fontonore ?”

“He is, as the eldest son of your late
father.”

The face of Charles fell. “Then what am
1?” said he. :

“Charles Hope, the same as your uncle.”

“And the estate, and the castle, with its
fine old hall, and all the pictures, everything
that I have so prized and looked on as my
own—are they all his?”

“ Everything is entailed on the eldest son.”

“And have I nothing?” exclaimed Charles,
his manner becoming excited; “what is to
become of me, then?”

“You will enter some profession, my dear
boy, as your uncle did, and earn your liveli-
hood honourably, I trust.”

“But I am only a boy; how am I to be
supported till then?”

“Doubtless either something will be allowed
from the property of your brother, or your
uncle will—”

“Oh! I can’t stand this !” exclaimed Charles,
passionately, springing from his seat, and walk-
ing up and down the room in a state of ex-

(23) 9

,
130 THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL.

citement. “To be dependant—that is more
than I can bear! It is bad enough to be
poor, but to be dependant |”

“Oh! my almost son !” exclaimed the clergy-
man with emotion, “does not this very excess
of grief at its loss prove that what is taken
away would have been a snare to you? May
you not reckon in another world amongst your
chief mercies that which is now so painful to
bear?”

“And all my schemes of usefulness, too !”
cried Charles, flinging himself down again upon
his chair.

“None can say what a career of usefulness
may be before you yet. You may more glorify
God, and more benefit man, than had your
efforts never been stimulated by the necessity
for exertion.”

“Tf Mark had been the younger brother it
would have been far better ; “he would have
been more than contented, and I—”

“Let us never, Charles,” said Mr Ewart,
laying his hand upon his shoulder, “say that
anything which man had no power to alter
could be better than as the Almighty ordained
it. Could we see all that He sees, past and
THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL. 131

future together, could we know all that He
knows, both our powers and our interests, we
should not even wish such things other than
as they are; we should feel that whatever is,
is right.” .

But pride, arrogance, and love of worldly
glory were speaking too loudly in the heart of
Charles to suffer him yet to listen quietly to
the voice of truth. “TI little thought when I
found Mark what I was bringing upon my-
self!” said he ; “and you, sir,” he added bitterly,
“you have thought much more of your new
friend than of your old.”

Unjust as was the reproach, it wounded Mr,
Ewart. “What would you have had me do,
Charles?” he said sadly, but without anger.
“Gross wrong had been done, I could set it
right ; a much-injured boy had been long kept
from his birthright, would you have had me
join with his oppressors in depriving him of
it?”

Charles was silent, but felt ashamed of his
own injustice.

“At present, you and I are alone in posses-
sion of the secret, Ann’s confession was made
only to me; would you wish me, were the
132 THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL.

matter in your own choice, to hush up the
affair, let all things go on as before, and leave
you to enjoy—not enjoy, but possess—the title
and estate which is the right of a brother ?”

“Oh, no! I am not quite so wicked as
that!” cried Charles, throwing himself into
the arms of his friend, and burying his face in
his bosom. “Forgive me, oh! forgive me my
impatience and injustice! You were right;
the things which it pains me so to part with
1 was not fit to keep! They must have been
my idols, though I did not know it. But this
trial seems to have made me full of evil.”

“Tt has not made the evil, it has only
shown it to you, my dear boy. Water often
looks clear until it is stirred ; but the stirring
does not cause the sand which arises, it was
there while the water looked purest.”

“This, then, is one of the uses of trial, I
suppose, to make us know how wicked we
are, An hour ago I felt so good and so happy,
I thought the way to heaven so easy and de-
lightful ; and in the very first difficulty that I
met, all my goodness melted away in a mo-
ment.”

“ But now that you are recalled to yourself,
THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL. 183

now that you remember that as strangers and
pilgrims upon earth, we must not cling too
closely to anything in a world through which
we are but passing, I trust that by God’s help
you will show how cheerfully a Christian can
submit to the will of his Master. You will
not go away, like the rich young man, sorrow-
ing, but following the Saviour through all
life’s changing scenes, rejoice in the treasure
laid up for you in heaven.”

“One thing I should like,” said Charles,
his face brightening again, “may I be the
first to tell the news to Mark? If he is half
as much delighted as I was vexed—I should
80 like to see how he takes it!”

“Most readily do I accede to your wish,”
said Mr. Ewart, “but we must say nothing to
excite him just now, while he is so feverish ;
and it is better that he should know nothing
of the change until all is more decided and
settled. I am just going to write to your
uncle,”

“My uncle!” said Charles, looking again
rather grave ; “ah, how astonished he will be,
and Aunt Matilda, and Clementina! I won-
der if it will make them feel differently to-
134 THE TOUCHSTONE OF TRIAL.

wards me—if I shall lose many friends with
my title.”

“There is one at least whom you will
gain.”

“Ah, a brother! I daresay that Mark and
I will love each other, only I can never fancy
him a lord.” Charles almost laughed at the
idea,

“You must be to him what Jonathan was
to David. One might have feared that the
son of King Saul, who must naturally have
once hoped to succeed to the throne of his
father, would have beheld with jealousy the
shepherd’s boy who was chosen to rule in his
stead. Yet between the two there was only
confidence and love, love which, however much
we may admire it in David, appears tenfold
more beautiful in his friend.”

“We must be like Christian and Faithful
in the Pilgrim’s Progress,” said Charles, now
quite regaining his usual cheerfulness of man-
ner. “He has been passing through the
Valley of the Shadow of Death, and struggling
under all manner of trials, and now the way
is growing smooth beneath his feet, and he
will have a brother to walk beside him. He
PILGRIM'’S CONVERSE BY TIE WAY. 135

will teach me something of the Valley of
Humility, and I will tell him what I know of
Vanity Fair. I feel really ashamed of myself
now—what a worldly, self-seeking pilgrim I
have been !”

“God be praised!” murmured the clergy-
man, as he quitted the room ; “God be praised
who has supported and strengthened my dear
pupil in the hour of his sore temptation.”

CHAPTER XII
PILGRIM'S CONVERSE BY THE WAY.

“J have sowed, and you have reaped; and the day is coming
when ‘both he that soweth and they that reap shall rejoice
together ;’ that is, if you hold out; ‘ for in due season ye
shall reap, if ye faint not.’"—Pilgrim's Progress,

A Frew days after, as Mr. Ewart entered the

room in which Mark, or rather Ernest, as we

must now call him, was sitting in an arm-chair,
propped up by cushions, and looking exceed-
ingly pale, Charles, who was looking over the
back of the chair, addressed his tutor playfully
with the words, “I am so much disappointed,
Mr, Ewart; here’s a young nobleman to whom
186 PILGRIM’s CONVERSE BY THE WAY.

I have been telling all sorts of good news, and
he looks as grave as a judge upon them all.”

“T feel so bewildered,” said Ernest, pressing
his pale brow; “I think that it must all be a
dream,”

“Tt is no dream,” said Mr. Ewart, seating
himself by his side; “all is true that your
brother has told you.”

“Brother!” exclaimed Ernest, fixing his
moistened eyes upon Charles, “ Oh, my lord !”

“He is so wilful,” laughed Charles; “we
shall never get him to sign himself Fontonore.”

“T do not wish to be a lord,” said Ernest,
gravely; “I am not fit to bealord. I know
next to nothing, I have hardly read a book
but the Bible. Oh, do you be the nobleman.
and let me be your brother! You shall have
the fortune, and the estates, and all that, I
never could bear to deprive you of them !”

“You have no choice, Ernest.” said Mr
Ewart, “ you can no more help being a noble,
than you can help being your father’s son;
you cannot avoid receiving the ten talents ;
your care now must be to make a right use
of them. Both Ann and Lawless have publicly
confessed,”
PILGRIM’S CONVERSE BY THE WAY. 137

“I hope that they are not to suffer on
account of me,” said Ernest; “ especially my
mo— she whom I once thought my mother.
It would embitter the whole of my life.”

“ Lawless is committed to trial for forgery
(a purse of base coin was found on his person),
Ann, for her conduct towards you. I will try
to do all in my power, as it is your wish, to
make the sentence of the law fall lightly on
the woman.”

“ And my brothers?” said Ernest.

“What of me?” interrupted Charles, “Oh,
I see that you intend to disown me already,”
he added, playfully ; “ you will neither believe
nor acknowledge me, so I shall leave you to
the management of Mr, Ewart,” and so saying
he left the apartment.

“Tam going to ask what I fear you will
think a strange question,” said Ernest to the
clergyman, as soon as they were alone; “I
know that I am to have a very large fortune,
but—but—shall I have any of it to spend as
I like now?”

“You will doubtless have the same allow-
ance that has been given to Charles,” replied
Mr. Ewart, naming the sum.
138 PULGRIM’S CONVERSE BY THE WAY.

“So much !” exclaimed Ernest in surprise,
“and, Lord Fontonore—I mean my brother?”

“What he may receive will depend upon
his uncle. Poor Charles! he has nothing of
his own.”

“Half of mine at least shall be his, Let
him have it without knowing from whom it
comes.”

Mr. Ewart smiled, and pressed the boy’s
hand.

“ And those unhappy children with whom
T have been brought up, now separated from
their parents, and helpless and friendless, tell
me, sir, what can I do for them?”

“There are some excellent charities in Lon-
don, where such are received, brought up to
an honest trade, and instructed in the princi-
ples of religion. But there is considerable
expense in keeping children at such asylums,
unless they have been admitted by votes,
which in the present case would be very diffi-
cult to procure.”

“Would the remaining half of my allow-
ance be enough ?”

“You would leave yourself nothing, my
dear boy. I honour your motives and feel-
PILGRIM'S CONVERSE BY THE WAY. 139
ings, but generosity must be tempered by
prudence, The little girl you might place at
an asylum.”

“ And the boys?”

“Let me think what could be done with
them. It seems to me,” said the clergyman,
after a minute’s consideration, “ that Mr.
Hope might allow them, if such were really
your desire, to be brought up under the
gardener at the castle.”

“That is an excellent plan!” cried Ernest,
clapping his hands; “ there they would always
be under your eye; you would teach them
also the narrow way to heaven !”

“There might be some objections to the
plan,” said Mr. Ewart, reflecting; “it might
place you uncomfortably to have those near
the castle, who had known you in such a
different position.”

“Tt will be good for me,” said Ernest, with
animation ; “if I ever am tempted to be lifted
up with pride, I shall have but to look at
them, and remember what I was; and if
anything can humble me, that will Will
you kindly write to Mr. Hope directly ?”

“There is no need to do that,” replied the
140 PILGRIM’S CONVERSE BY THE WAY.

clergyman, “I have heard from him to-day,
and came now to tell you that it is his wish
that as soon as you are equal to moving,
you and your brother should start at once for
the castle.”

“Ob, I am ready for anything!” cried
Ernest; “I mean that I am ready to travel,”
he added, correcting himself, “for my new
situation I fear that I am not ready.”

“The two best introductions to any new
sphere of life are,—trust in God, and mistrust
of ourselves.”

“Do you think that I shall have many
dangers now, I mean as a pilgrim?” asked
Ernest,

“You will have dangers still, though of a
different kind. Your battle-field is changed,
but not your enemy. The good seed in your
heart was in peril before from the hot sun of
trial beating upon it, now God grant that the
cares, riches, and pleasures of this world may
not spring up as thorns to choke it! Your
great refuge must be self-examination and
prayer; with these, by God’s grace, you will
safely walk still on the slippery high path
before you.”
PILGRIM’S CONVERSE BY THE WAY. 41

“T trust that nothing will make me forget
that I am a pilgrim,” said Ernest,

“JT will give you this book, which I look
upon as a valuable chart of the way you must
tread,” replied Mr, Ewart, placing in the hand
of Ernest a copy of Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Pro-
gress. In this book you will see the Christian’s
path, over part of which you yourself have
travelled. You will recognise some spots that
are familiar to you, some people with whom
you have had to deal, and you will see, as if a
curtain were drawn up before you, much that
you are likely to meet with in the future.”

“Oh, thanks! this must indeed be a most
wonderful book! But I cannot understand
how it can tell me about things that have
happened or will happen to myself, the paths
of people through life are so many.”

“The paths of men are many,—the Christian
has but one, Our circumstances, indeed, are
very various ; to some the hill Difficulty comes
through bitter poverty, to some from unkind
relations, to some from broken health. Some
pass through the gloomy valley in sunshine,
and see but little of its horrors; some are
helped, some hindered on their way to heaven
112 PILGRIM’S CONVERSE BY THE WAY.

by those amongst whom they live, But there
are certain points in the pilgrimage which
every Christian must know, We all set out
from the city of Destruction,—we are all by
nature born in sin. Even children must flee
from the wrath to come, turning from,—that
is, repenting of their unrighteousness. Even
children must come to the one strait gate,
faith in our Lord Jesus Christ; must knock
by prayer, and having once entered in, must
press on in the way leading unto life! Even
children bear a burden of sin, though the
sooner they come to the cross of the Saviour,
the lighter that burden must be; but were it
only the burden of one unholy word, one sinful
thought, nothing but the blood of the Lord
Jesus Christ could take even that away! Even
children are beset by spiritual foes ; must, if
pilgrims, know something of the battle within ;
even children must wear the whole armour of
God, and to the youngest, the weakest, is
offered the crown which the Lord has pre-
pared for them that love Him !”

“What a wonderfully wise and learned
man he must have been who wrote such a
book as you say that this is :”
PILGRIM’S CONVERSE BY THE WAY. 143

“Tt was written by a man who had very
little learning except what he gained from’ the
word of God itself, The wisdom which he
possessed came from above, and the men of
the world deemed it foolishness, The author
of that book was a tinker, named Bunyan, a
man who supported himself by the labour of
his hands, and who for twelve years, only on
account of his religion, was confined in Bedford
jal”

“Were men put in prison for being re-
ligious?” exclaimed Ernest, in surprise.

“ At all times the world has been an enemy
to holiness, and religion has been liable to
persecution ; but this persecution has at differ-
ent times taken very different shapes. The
early Christians were tortured, beaten, thrown
to wild beasts, till so many people had adopted
their holy faith that the civilized world
began to call itself Christian. Then the Evil
One, seeing that he could not put out the light,
heaped up a thousand superstitions around it,
so that sinners might be prevented from seeing
it. Yet, doubtless, even through the dark
ages, as they are called, God had always some
faithful believers upon earth, whom the world
144 PILGRIM’S CONVERSE BY THE WAY.
would hate, because they were not of it; and
persecute, though not always openly. At
length the time of the Reformation arrived ;
brave men and holy forced a way through the
mass of superstitions which had hidden the
precious light of truth; and then, indeed,
there was a fearful struggle, and persecution
bathed its sword in the blood of martyrs!
Many were the stakes raised in England, Ger-
many, and France, where saints yielded up
their souls in the midst of flames! But no
persecution could tread out the light which
God himself had kindled, as blows upon gold
but make it spread wider, so the very efforts
of the wicked to suppress the Truth, made it
more extensively known.”

“And was it then that Bunyan was im-
prisoned ?” ‘

“Not then, but more than a century after,
in the reign of an unworthy monarch, Charles
TI.; when the light which had shone so
brightly was becoming obscured again by
superstition and worldly policy. Bunyan was
confined for preaching the word ; was separa-
ted from the family of whom he was the
support. That which most deeply wounded
PILGRIM’S CONVERSE BY THE WAY. 145

his heart was the helpless position of his poor
blind child, who so much needed the pro-
tecting care of a father.

“And they imprisoned him for twelve
years? How cruel! What a tedious, weary
trial it must have been to him!”

“God honoured the prisoner far above the
prince; He made the jail a nobler dwelling
than a palace! It was there that the despised
and persecuted tinker composed his wonderful
book. Bright, holy thoughts were his plea-
sant companions, While his worldly judges
were passing through life, surrounded by cares,
business, and amusements, seeing, perhaps, no-
thing beyond this fleeting scene, the prisoner
was tracing the Pilgrim’s Progress, copying
from his own heart the Pilgrim’s feelings, not-
ing from his own life the Pilgrim’s trials, and
describing, from his own hopes, the Pilgrim’s
reward! And when his book was finished,
when with humble faith he laid it as an offer-
ing before Him who had given him the power
to write it, how little could the despised
Bunyan have anticipated the honour which
God would put upon that book! It has been
read by thousands, and hundreds of thousands,

10

Gy
146 DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR.

—generation after generation have delighted
in it—the high and the low, the rich and the
poor, all have welcomed the chart of the Pil-
grim! It has been translated into many
foreign tongues; from east to west, from north
to south, in all the four quarters of the globe,
it has directed sinners to the one strait gate,
and guided them along the one narrow path.
I believe,” added Mr. Ewart, laying his hand
upon the volume, “that, next to the Bible,
from which it is taken, that this book has
been the most widely circulated of any ever
written; and never shall we know, till the
last great day, how many a saved and rejoic-
ing spirit may trace its first step in the hea-
venward way to reading Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s
Progress!”



CHAPTER XIIL
DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR.
“Then I saw in my dream, that when they were got out of the

wilderness, they presently saw a town before them, and the
name of that town is Vanity.”

“An! what a strange remembrance I shall
always have of that old ruin!” exclaimed
DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR. 147

Charles, as again he drove past the well-known
spot, in a carriage with post-horses, on his way
to Castle Fontonore, But this time he had
another companion beside him; Ernest, well
wrapped up in cloak and furs—for the autumn
was now advanced—was resting on the soft
cushions of the luxurious vehicle.

“What will your remembrances be, com-
pared to mine!” said Ernest, raising himself
to look out, and keeping his eyes fixed upon
the grey pile, until it was lost to his sight.

“T went to pick up a stone as a keepsake,
and I found a brother!” cried Charles,

“How much I owe you!” said Ernest fer-
vently. “I make you an ill return, by taking
away what you thought your birthright! And
you, sir,” he added, turning towards the clergy-
man, “my debt to you I can never, never
repay ; but my heart’s gratitude and love shall
be yours as long as I breathe! All the
honours and riches that I possess I value as
nothing, compared with the blessing of having
such a friend,—and such a brother !”

This was the first time that Ernest had
been able to express so much; for, shy and
retiring as he was by nature, and rendered
148 DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR.

more so by the manner in which all the warm
feelings of his heart had hitherto been chilled
and repressed, he had wrapt himself up in a
cloak of reserve, and had few words to show
how deep were these feelings, Mr. Ewart saw
that in the boy’s present weak state he was
easily agitated and excited, and, to change the
subject of a conversation which made Ernest's
voice tremble with emotion, asked him how
he liked the book which he had given him,

“T find it very interesting. I should have
thought it so, if I had only read it as an
amusing story; but what you said about its
showing us things that happen in our own
lives, has made it a thousand times more so.
I could enter into so many of the feelings of
Christian ; his misery with his burden—his
delight when it rolled away. I am almost
sure that Mr. Worldly Wiseman once turned
me aside, and I fancy that I have even known
a little of the Slough of Despond !”

“ The earlier children go on pilgrimage, the
less they usually know of the misery of that
slough. As Bunyan, in his allegory, beauti-
fully represents, there are stepping-stones across
it all the way, and the feet of Christ’s little
DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR. 149

ones usually find these, so that many have
reached the wicket-gate in safety, without one
stain of the slough on their garments.”

“What a mercy it was to Christian to meet
with Evangelist! Sir, you have been Evan-
gelist to me!”

“ And I must be your Faithful,” said Charles,
smiling.

“Oh, no! for then I should lose you in
Vanity Fair,” replied Ernest, looking fondly
on his brother, who was daily becoming dearer
to his heart.

“Vanity Fair is not at all like what it was
when Bunyan wrote,” said Charles, “There is:
no danger of my being put in prison, or stoned,
or burnt, because I may not like the ways of
the place; so you are not in the least likely to
lose me in that manner, and I may be your
Faithful and your Hopeful both in one.”

“Ts Vanity Fair quite done away with
now?” said Ernest to Mr. Ewart.

“No, my boy, and never will be, as long as
the three grand tempters of the world, the lust
of the flesh, the lust of the eye, and the pride
of life, spread their attractive stalls to lure
unwary pilgrims.”
150 DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR.

“T am afraid that you will think me a
very dull pupil,” said Ernest; “but I do not
exactly understand who these tempters are of
whom you speak.”

“The lust of the flesh is, pleasure ; the lust
of the eye, covetousness ; the pride of life is
that fatal pride, whether of birth, riches, talent,
or beauty, which is often viewed with indul-
gence by the world, but which is particularly
‘hateful to God.”

“But must all pleasure be sinful?” asked
Charles.

“By no means, Some pleasure springs
directly from religion. Of heavenly wisdom,
it is written in God’s word, her ways are ways
of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace.
And other pleasure may be hallowed by reli-
gion, but it must be pleasure that has no con-
nection with sin. We may gather life’s flowers,
but we must be careful that they are those
which have not the trail of the serpent upon
them.”

“Ts it wrong to enjoy the riches which God
gives us?” asked Ernest. “Shall I sin if I
look with joy on the noble estate, and all the
beautiful things which you tell me are mine ?”
DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR. 151

“ Qod forbid,” replied the clergyman, “ hath
Tle not given us all things richly to enjoy;
but we must use the world as not abusing it.
There is a test by which we can easily find
out if riches are not clogging and delaying us
in our heavenward path. We must examine,
first, if we receive them with gratitude, as
coming from God.

“ Secondly, if we are watchful to spend them
to the glory of God.

“ Thirdly, if we are ready to resign them,
in obedience to God.”

“T think,” observed Charles, “ that Ernest
will be less in danger from the pride of life
than I was.”

“Yes,” said Ernest, looking admiringly at
his brother ; “ because I shall have so very
much less to be proud of.”

“T never meant that,” cried Charles, colour-
ing ; “ but I fancy that you have been so tried
and subdued, by suffering so much, that you
will never be so foolish and flighty as 1; you
will not be so easily puffed up.”

“T am sure that I could not answer for
inyself,” replied Ernest, simply,

“No; and certainly you are very ignorant

.
152 DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR.

of the ways of Vanity Fair; that’s the part
of your pilgrimage that you are coming to
now.”

“Surely not till I go to London. I shall
see nothing of it while we stay quietly study-
ing at the castle.”

“Little you know!” exclaimed Charles,
laughing. “ My good Aunt Matilda, my pretty
little cousin, and perhaps my business-like
uncle himself, may introduce you—” Charles
stopped, for he caught his tutor’s eye, and its
grave expression silenced him at once.

“ Judge not that ye be not judged,” said the
clergyman, impressively; “there is nothing
so little becoming a young pilgrim as passing
unkind judgment on his elders.”

“Tm afraid that it’s my besetting sin,”
said Charles, “and one that it is very difficult
to get rid of.”

“Like many others, I believe that it springs
from pride,” observed his tutor. “When we
are deeply sensible of our own imperfections,
we have more mercy to show, or less attention
to give to those of our neighbours and com-
panions,”

The journey to Yorkshire took two days,
DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR. 153

travelling by post being so much slower than
by railway. To Ernest they were days of
almost unmixed delight—change of scene, un-
accustomed comforts, the society of those whom
he loved, all the hopes which naturally gild
the prospect of youth—all the brighter for
being so new—filled his cup of enjoyment
very full. Though his manner was not su °
lively as that of his brother, it was easy to
see that his happiness was not less.

We may be surprised that the bitter emo-
tions which Charles had entertained when he
first knew of the loss of his title, seemed so
soon to have entirely disappeared. But his
was an open and generous heart, Ernest’s suf-
ferings had roused his pity, his brother's grate-
ful affection had flattered his feelings, he was
pleased with himself for his conquest over
pride ; and perhaps nothing tends to make us
more cheerful than this, Then there had
been nothing to make him painfully aware of
a change—his tutor's manner had been more
kind than ever—Jones could never address
him but as “my lord”’—Ernest seemed un-
willing to consider himself even as his equal
—all his comforts appeared the same as ever,
154 DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR.

It was therefore with unaffected pleasure
that, as they approached near the Castle Fon-
tonore, Charles pointed out the landmarks to
his brother.

“There now, there’s the lodge, isn’t it a
beauty? That's Widow Grove who is stand-
ing at the gate. Why, there’s quite a little
’ crowd—I knew that there would be one ; take
off your cap, Ernest, they are cheering for us.
Tid you ever see such magnificent timber in
your life? so glorious with the autumn tints
still upon them! That tree to the right is
five hundred years old. Just look at the deer
as they bound through that glade; and now
—yes—now you have a glimpse of the castle,
and there’s the flag waving from the top of
the tower. Is it not an inheritance worth hav-
ing, Ernest? Does it not surpass your expec-
tations?”

“Tt does, it does—I never saw, never
dreamed of anything so beautiful !”

And now, exciting no small stir amongst
the tenants, grooms, stable-boys, and others,
who on various pretexts were crowding the
entrance, the horses, urged on to speed by the
postilion, dashed over the draw-bridge, through
DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR. 155

the arched gateway into the paved court-yard,
and stood chafed and foaming before the door,
where the Hopes stood ready to receive the
young master. Ernest had no time to gaze
round on the romantic pile of building which
surrounded him,—the tower, the mullioned
windows, the walls of massive stone, almost
covered with various kinds of creepers,—he
was so anxious to have a sight of his new
relations, who appeared at the entrance to
welcome, them. There was a rather stout gen-
tleman, whom, from a family likeness to
Charles, Ernest at once set down for his uncle;
a tall, good-looking lady, in a superb silk
dress, that looked rich enough to stand up-
right by itself, and whose very rustle seemed
to speak of formidable dignity ; and a fairy-
like young creature, a little older than himself,
whom, at the first glance, Ernest thought ex-
ceedingly pretty.

Charles, accustomed from infancy to be a
person of importance, sprang eagerly out of
the carriage first, almost before the horses had
stopped. He ran to his aunt—* Where is
Lord Fontonore?” said she, passing him, and
advancing to the door of the carriage. “ Dear
156 DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR,

Clemmy!” exclaimed Charles, taking his
cousin’s hand, “ how long it is since we have
met!” She returned his press indeed, but her
eyes were not looking towards him, she had
not even a glance to give her old companion,
so eagerly was her gaze turned in another
direction.

“Is this the reception that I meet with?”
thought Charles, anger and disappointment
boiling in his heart. “It was then the peer
whom they flattered and caressed—I am now
only Charles Hope, and I must be deserted for
the first stranger who has a title,” and with-
out attending to the greeting of his uncle, or
to that of the servants, with whom he had
always been a favourite, Charles hurried off
impatiently to his own room.

A beautiful room it was, all hung round
with pictures, There was one which Charles
especially valued—the portrait of his mother,
when she was a girl, with deep thoughtful
eyes, so much like Ernest’s that Charles won-
dered that he had not recognized the resem-
blance the first moment that he had seen his
brother. This picture had often exercised a
soothing effect over the boy; the thought of
DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR. 157

his gentle mother now in heaven, drew his
own affections thither; the hope of meeting
her there was so sweet, the desire of being
worthy of her so strong—for his mind had in-
vested her with all the qualities of an angel—
and the parent who had died before he could
know his loss, was the object of the deepest
tenderness of the boy.

“She at least is not changed—she looks
always the same !” exclaimed Charles, clasping
his hands, and gazing upon the portrait till
his eyes became dimmed with tears. He was
disturbed by a low knock at the door.

“Come in!” exclaimed Charles in an impa-
tient tone, hastily dashing the moisture from
his eyes. It was the housekeeper who ap-
peared at the door.

“Please, my lord—Master Charles—I am
sorry to disturb you, but this room Mrs. Hope
desired to be prepared for Lord Fontonore ;
the blue room has been made ready for you.”

Charles rushed out of the apartment with-
out saying a word, in a passion of anger and
resentment, The trial which he had seen but
from a distance was now most keenly and bit-
terly felt. He locked his door, and paced
158 DISTANT GLIMPSE OF VANITY FAIR,

backwards and forwards across the room,
wishing that he could shut out all sound of
voices and tread of feet, as he traced by it the
progress of the party through the castle, which
his relations were now showing to its new
possessor, And thus he remained in his soli-
tary misery, while Ernest painfully missed
from his side one who was more to his affee-
tionate heart than all the wealth of the world,
and with an uncomfortable consciousness of
his every motion being watched by those who
regarded him rather with curiosity than in-
terest, passed through long corridors and
stately apartments, which were expected to
strike him with wonder.

“He is not so vulgar or funny as I ex-
pected that he would be,” whispered Clemen-
tina to some one beside her; “but it makes
me laugh to see him look so shy and uneasy,
as if he were half afraid to look at his own
castle. He certainly has a very interesting
sir, but he is not half so handsome as Charles.”
VEXATIONS OF VANITY FAIR, 159

CHAPTER XIV,
VEXATIONS OF VANITY FAIR.

“1 wis to see no one!” exclaimed Charles,
as again a knock was heard at his door,

“Will you not admit me?” said the voice
of Mr, Ewart—in an instant the door was
thrown open.

“T did not know that it was you, sir; but
I might have guessed who was the only being
likely to come near me.”

Mr, Ewart saw in a moment by the face of
his pupil, as well as by the tone in which he
spoke, that he was struggling—no, not strug-
ling with, but rather overcome by his pas-
sions; and more grieved than displeased by
the conduct of the boy, he led him quietly to
a sofa, on which they both sat down together.

“Tam sorry,” said Mr, Ewart, “that you
left us so soon ; your brother may be hurt by
your absence,”

“Oh! he'll never miss me; he has plenty
to take up his atvention, Aunt Matilda will
never let him out of her sight. Miss Clemmy
will deck herself out even finer than usual, to
160 VEXATIONS OF VANITY FAIR,

do honour to the lord of the castle! And of
course he'll be taken by all the flattery and
fuss; he’l! believe all the nonsense of that
worldly set; he'll be everything now, and I
shall be nothing, because 2 happened to be
born a year before me! It’s very hard,” he
added, bitterly; ties very ar "

“* It’s very hard,’ is one of the Evil One’s
favourite suggestions,” said Mr, Ewart; “ its
meaning was contained in the very first words
which he ever uttered to a human ear. He
would have persuaded Eve that it was very
hard that she might not eat of every fruit in
the garden; and now, surrounded as we are
with manifold blessings, it is his delight to
point to the one thing denied, and still whis-
per, ‘it’s very hard to be kept from that which
you so much desire.’”

“T cannot help feeling!” murmured Charles;
“things are so different now from what they
were,”

“Did you ever expect them to remain the
same? Did yousuppose that your path would be
always amongst flowers? Are you not forget-
ting that you are a stranger and a pilgrim, the fol-
lower of a Master who was a Man of sorrows ?”
VEXATIONS OF VANITY FAIR. 16)

Charles sighed heavily, and looked down.
“ How often have you repeated the lines,—

‘The greatest evil we can fear,
Is to possess oar portion here !’

Had you the power of choice, would you enjoy
that portion in this life, were“it even to be-
stow on you the crown of an emperor?”

“No,” replied Charles, with emphasis.

“Let me refer you to your favourite Pil-
grim’s Progress. Remember what Christian
beheld in the house of the interpreter; that
which we constantly behold in daily life:
Passion demanding his treasure at once;
Patience waiting meekly for a treasure. to
come. Which was the richest in the end?”

“You must not imagine that it was the
sight of the dear old castle, and all that I
have lost, that has made me feel in this way,”
exclaimed Charles. “You saw how cheerful
T was, not an hour ago, and J knew then that
I was no longer Lord Fontonore.”

“Yes; you had seen your cross, but you
had not taken it up; you had not felt its
weight. It is now that you must rouse up
your courage.”

“What I feel,” exclaimed Charles, impetu-
11

(23)
162 VEXATIONS OF VANITY FAIR.

ously, “is contempt for the mean, heartless
beings, who were all kindness to me when I
bore a title, and now have turned round like
weathercocks! I do not believe that even
you can defend them.”

“T think that you may judge them hardly.
You have too easily taken offence; you have
made no allowance for their natural curiosity
to see the hero of so romantic a tale as Ernest's.
Would not you yourself have felt eager to meet
him?”

Charles admitted that perhaps he might have
done so,

“You have taken passion and pride for your
counsellors, dear Charles; the one has blinded
your eyes that you should not see the straight
path ; the other would bind your feet that you
should not pursue it, And miserable counsel-
lors have you found them both; they have
inflicted on your heart more pain than the loss
of both title and estate.”

“What would you have me do?” said
Charles, more quietly; for he felt the truth
of the last observation.

“ First, I would have you endeavour to bring
yourself to be content to be of little importance.
VEXATIONS OF VANITY FAIR. 163

Until your mind is in this state of submission,
you will be like one with a wound which is
being perpetually rubbed.

“ Secondly, I would have you seek your
earthly enjoyment rather in beholding that of
others, than in any pleasure that comes direct
to yourself. Thus, in one way, Fontonore will
be your's still.

“ Thirdly, 1 would have you prayerfully on
the watch against the slightest feeling of jea-
lousy towards Ernest. Never let your only
brother think for one moment that you feel
that he stands in your way.”

“Oh, Mr, Ewart!” cried Charles, starting
to his feet; “how could you imagine such a
thing?”

“Tt rests with you alone to prevent his
thinking it, and you have made a bad begin-
ning to-day.”

“TI will go to Ernest at once,” said the boy,
“and help to show him over the place, He
shall never say—he shall never think that I
am envious of his prosperity.”

In truth, on that first evening of his arrival
in the castle, Ernest was not much to be
envied. He was uneasy about his brother,—
164 VEXATIONS OF VANITY FAIR. |

uncomfortable with his new companions; one
hearty grasp from the hand of Charles, or ap-
proving word from his tutor, was worth all
the smiles, and courtesies, and bows, which he
knew had nothing to do with the heart.
Ernest felt himself out of his natural place,
and was constantly afraid of saying or doing
something that would shock the polished
grandees around him. As far as speaking
was concerned he was indeed tolerably safe,
for he scarcely opened his lips, which made
his companions set him down as dull and
stupid; but he had been accustomed for so
short a time to the refinements of polished
society, and was so likely, in his very anxiety
to please, to forget even the hints that he had
received from Mr. Ewart, that there was cer-
tainly some little danger of his doing some-
thing “shocking.” The presence of half-a-
dozen footmen in gay liveries in the room,
was a disagreeable piece of state to the young
lord; so many eyes were turned upon him
whenever he moved; there were so many lis-
teners if he uttered a'word!

Ernest made the serious mistake of eating
fish with a knife. The shocked look of his
VEXATIONS OF VANITY FAIR. 165

aunt made him sensible of his blunder, and
covered his face with blushes. At another
time, Clementina pressed her lace handkerchief
over her lips, to stifle her too evident inclina-
tion to titter, at the peasant-bred peer helping’
her to something from the dish before him,
with his own spoon, Ernest was very glad
when the dinner was over, which had lasted,
indeed, nearly twice as long as any of which:
he had ever partaken before.

After dinner, Clementina was desired by
her mother to go to the piano and play. She
made so many excuses, said that she was
tired, nervous, out of practice, that Ernest,
little practised in the ways of Vanity Fair,
was inclined to beg that the young lady might
be let off. Great would have been her mor-
tification had he done so, however ; the girl
was only refusing in order to be pressed ; the
virtue of sincerity, if she had ever possessed
it, had all been frittered away by folly. She
sat down to the instrument determined to be
admired, for admiration to her was as the very
breath of life. She played what might be
called a very brilliant piece, full of shakes,
dashes, and runs, but with no melody at all
‘\

166 VEXATIONS OF VANITY FAIR.

Ernest, though fond of music, thought it cer-
tainly not pretty, and, had he been more at
his ease, could hardly have helped laughing
at the affected air of the young performer, and
the manner in which she threw up her hands,
and sometimes her eyes also, in the slower
movements of the piece. Every motion ap-
peared to be studied; self was never for a
moment forgotten. When the performance,
rather to Ernest’s relief, was concluded, with
a satisfied look the stately mother turned to
the young peer, and asked him if that was
not a beautiful piece. “ Rather,” replied
Ernest, after a little hesitation, as much vexed
with himself for saying so much as Clementina
was at his saying so little. Charles, who was
standing near, could not avoid laughing ; and
Ernest read in the eyes of Mrs. Hope her un-
expressed thought—“I have no patience for
this low, ill-bred boor !”

With a secret feeling of constraint, mortifi-
cation, and disappointment, poor Ernest re-
tired at night to his own room. ‘Two maids
were preparing it as he entered, and he could
not help overhearing the words of one of
them,—
CITIZENS OF VANITY FAIR, 167

“Tis a pity that Mr, Charles was not the
eldest son.”

“1'm sure that I think so!” Ernest exclaimed
aloud, to the no small surprise of the girl who
had uttered the observation,



CHAPTER XV.
CITIZENS OF VANITY FAIR.

THERE was another matter that- weighed upon
the mind of Ernest, and was his first thought
when he awoke in the morning. It was the
request which he was to make to his uncle
concerning bringing Jack and Ben to the
castle, Mr, Ewart had declined making the
request for him, and in this Ernest thought
his tutor for the first time unkind. But
Ernest was mistaken, as those usually are
who judge others without entering into their
feelings or position. The truth was that Mr,
Ewart very well knew that no request made
by him would be likely to be granted. He
was almost disliked by Mr, Hope, whose cha-
racter presented a remarkable contrast to his
own, and who treated his nephews’ tutor with
168 CITIZENS OF VANITY FAIR.

bare civility, though as well born and better
educated than himself.

Mr. Hope was what is called a man of the
world; one who made business his sole ambi-
tion; his worldliness, his pride, were in the
sight of the Eternal but—vanity !

Ernest was beginning to more than waver
in his wish to have the sons of Lawless living
so near him. He felt since his arrival at
Fontonore, more than he had ever done before,
how disagreeable their presence might be.
Had Ernest not been a sincere Christian, he
would have tried as much as possible to banish
from his mind all recollection of early days of
humiliation and suffering, and would have en-
deavoured to keep far away from himself all
that could remind him of his peasant. life.
But Ernest felt that this would be throwing
away the lessons which God had taught him
at the cost of so much pain ; and that, in fail-
ing to bring those whom he had once consi-
dered his brothers to a place where they might
benefit from the same instructions that had
been so much blessed to himself, he might be
neglecting the means of bringing them to God.

Ernest therefore resolved to speak to his
CITIZENS OF VANITY FAIR. 169

uncle, much as he disliked doing so; and he
found an opportunity the very first morning,
as Mr, Hope sat alone in the library engaged
in reading the Times.

“Did you want a book, Ernest?” said his
uncle, as the young nobleman stood hesitating
and embarrassed before him. “You'll have
to make up for lost time, I suspect. Let’s
see, how old are you now?”

“T was twelve last March,” replied Ernest.

“ Ah, I remember—in your thirteenth year ;
you should have made some progress by that
age. I suppose that your studies have been
much neglected. May I ask what books you
have read ?”

“The Bible and Pilgrim’s Progress,” an-
swered the boy.

Mr. Hope turned down the corners of his
mouth with a contemptuous expression, little
dreaming that all the treasures of learning
and wit which the most talented mind ever
grasped are useless—worthless, compared with
the wisdom to be gathered from one sacred
volume.

“A puritanical library, more select than
comprehensive,” said the gentleman; “ you
170 CITIZENS OF VANITY FAIR,

must apply yourself to something else in
future. You have a pretty long course of
education before you ere you can be fit for
the station which you hold—Latin, Greek,
French, German, mathematics, algebra, natural
philosophy, and a thousand other things, in-
dispensable for a nobleman, all to be mastered
in the next few years,”

Ernest felt himself at the foot of a new
mountain of difficulty, with a humiliating
sense of ignorance.

“But you wished to say something to me,”
resumed Mr. Hope, leaning back in his chair
and laying down the paper with a formidable
air of attention.

“Now for it!” thought Ernest, struggling
against his shyness, and his extreme disin-
clination to speak to his uncle. “Sir,” said
he aloud, “I am very anxious to do some-
thing for my bro— the sons of Lawless, I
mean, with whom I passed the days of my
childhood.”

“Tf I might advise, you would never allude
to those days.”

Ernest coloured, yet encouraged himself by
remembering that there is nothing but guilt
CITIZENS OF VANITY FAIR. 171

which need cause us shame, and that we
should blush for no situation in which Heaven
has placed us. “I would wish, if you con-
sent, to bring the boys here,” resumed he,
“and place them under care of the gardener.”

“ An extraordinary wish,” replied Mr. Hope,
taking snuff, “Is it possible that this is
really your desire ?”

“Tam most anxious for your leave to do
it,” said Ernest.

“Oh, of course, if you have no objection I
can have none; this is your own property,
and it is only reasonable that you should have
a voice in choosing your dependants, But all
that I can say is, that I believe that you'll
repent it, and the young rogues would be
better in the poorhouse,”

Ernest left his uncle’s presence rather in
spirits, from having accomplished his object
more easily than he had expected. He cheer-
fully pursued his studies with Charles, under
the tuition of Mr Ewart; and the considera~
tion which they showed—never laughing at
his mistakes, ever ready to help him to under-
stand what was new to him—still further
endeared them both to the boy.
172 CITIZENS OF VANITY FAIR,

After luncheon, feeling a little more at his
ease, as Mrs. Hope sat busy at her writing-
desk, and her husband was not in the room,
Ernest amused himself with his pretty little
cousin, Clementina, in looking over a large
volume of prints.

“What a pity that she is so affected!”
thought he ; “she would be so charming if she
did not think herself so.”

On a sudden Ernest jumped up with an
exclamation of pleasure, as he saw from the
window a little open carriage approaching
through the park.

“Oh, I’m so glad!—there are good, kind
Mr. and Miss Searle, it will be such a plea-
sure to see them !”

“The old horrors!” exclaimed Clementina,
leaning back on her cushions, and lifting her
hands in affected alarm.

“The Searles!” cried Mrs, Hope, looking
up hastily. “We're not at home to them;
I’m surprised at their coming. People like
them never know their proper place. I must
request, Ernest,” she continued, seeing him
about to leave the room, “that you'll not
bring such company about the castle, When
CITIZENS OF VANITY FAIR. 178

you are of age, of course, you'll do what you
please ; but while I and my daughter remain
under this roof, I must be careful not to ex-
pose her to vulgar society, Mr. Searle’s father
kept a shop in Cheapside !”

“Vulgar!” thought Ernest, “some of the
excellent of the earth! The Lord’s jewels, at
whose feet we may one day be thankful to
be found! Is this castle too grand, its inha-
bitants too good, for those whose home will
be heaven, whose companions the angels?”

Mrs. Hope, as the reader may have ob-
served, was a very proud woman, one ready
to worship rank, whoever might possess it
She was of rather low origin herself, which
was perhaps one reason why she always
avowed herself most particular in regard to
the company that she kept. No virtue, with
her, could weigh against a coronet ; she valued
her acquaintance—for such characters have
few friends—according to their position in
society. To be a companion of the nobility
was her delight ; to become one of them was
the object of her highest ambition. For this
she encouraged her husband’s efforts for ad-
vancement, and had been delighted to see
174 CITIZENS OF VANITY FAIR.

him a member of Parliament. Her own poor
relations were, of course kept at a distance ,
no one bearing her maiden name of Briggs
had ever been known to cross the threshold
of Castle Fontonore except her brother, an
attorney, who once ventured in, but was never
even asked to break bread in the house, and
who left his sister’s presence with a clouded
brow, and a determination never to trouble
her again, The proud worldly woman never
reflected that in another state, where the high
and the low, the great and the humble, shall
meet together, her love of distinction, her
pride of display, should appear as lighter than
vanity,

What could be expected from the daughter
of such a parent? Even a strong mind might
have been ruined by the education which she
received ; and Clementina, who was naturally
of but slender intellect, was quite spoiled by
the society in which she was brought up. At
a fashion&ble school she had learned a few
accomplishments, and a great deal of folly: .
admiration, amusement, excitement, these were
the three things upon which her whole heart
was set; all that she lived for was comprised
CITIZENS OF VANITY FAIR. 175

in these three words. The quiet serenity of
a soul that rests on one unchanging object,
was of course never known to her. The
slightest incident was sufficient to raise her
spirits to a wild height, or sink them to the
point of misery; she was transported at an
invitation to a ball, wretched if a dressmaker
failed her. She was like a fluttering butter-
fly, shining in its gay colours, driven about
by every breeze on its unsteady, uncertain
course, But I wrong the insect in making
the comparison, The butterfly fills its allotted
place in creation—it does all that its Maker
intended it to do; while the frivolous, silly,
selfish girl remains a blank, or rather a blot,
in God’s world, when she who is called to the
work and the destiny of angels makes that of
a butterfly her deliberate choice.

It is just possible that some thoughtless
girl, whose education and character may re-
semble Clementina’s, may in some vacant hour
of leisure turn over the leaves of my little
book. Oh, that I had an angel’s voice, to
rouse her to a sense of what she is and what
she might be! To make her feel that she is
not her own, but bought with a price, such a
176 NEW AND OLD COMPANIONS,

price as the world could not have paid. That
a soul which must exist for ever and ever—
that a soul for which a God bled, agonized,
and died—is a thing too noble, a thing too
precious to be thrown away at Vanity Fair.



CHAPTER XVI.
NEW AND OLD COMPANIONS.

THE Sabbath came, God’s holy day, and the
family attended a church which was at some
little distance. Mr. and Mrs, Hope and their
daughter, the ladies arrayed in all the splen-
dour of fashion, went in state in the carriage,
with two footmen in attendance, while the
boys preferred walking over the fields with
their tutor.

Ernest, as he entered the church, drew the
eyes of the whole congregation upon himself,
which made him more uncomfortable than
ever, “Am I not to escape even here from
Vanity Fair?” thought he; “cannot even
these walls shut out the world !”

Straight in front of the seat which he occu-
pied was a marble monument of singular
NEW AND OLD COMPANIONS. 177

beauty, which naturally attracted his atten-
tion. It represented the figure of a very
lovely babe, sleeping amongst water-lilies, the
attitude and countenance depicting the peace-
ful slumber of innocence. Below was an in-
scription, which the boy read with strange
emotion :—

IN MEMORY OF
ERNEST,

ELDEST SON OF THE FIRST LORD FONTONORE,
WHO WAS ACCIDENTALLY DROWNED
BEFORE HE HAD COMPLETED THE
FIRST YEAR OF HIS AGE.

“Tis thus the snow-flake from the skies,
Touching the sod, dissolves and dies ;
Ere mists of earth can its whiteness stain,
Raised by the sunbeams to heaven again.

“Though parted now on life’s thorny way,
'Twere weak, ‘twere cruel, to wish his stay ;
We must toil on through trials, griefs, alarms,
He was borne to the goal in his Saviour’s arms.”

After service was over, Clementina took a
fancy—for she was always governed by fancies
—to walk home with her cousins instead of
driving with her parents. She therefore pur-
sued the path across the fields with Ernest,

12

23)
178 NEW AND OLD COMPANIONS.

whilst Charles and his tutor walked a little
way behind.

“I was so much diverted at church,” said
the young lady, in the flippant manner which _
she mistook for wit, “I was so much diverted
to see you looking so seriously at the inscrip-
tion upon your own monument. It was so
funny, I could hardly help bursting out laugh-
ing, only that would have been very improper,
you know.”

“The inscription made me feel anything
but inclined to laugh,” observed Ernest,

“Well, I would give the world,” had the
world belonged to Clementina, she would have
given it away ten times a day, “I would
give the world to know what you were think-
ing when you read those fine verses upon
yourself.”

“T was thinking whether it would indeed
have been happier for me to have died when
T was a little one, before I had known any-
thing of the world and sin.”

“Oh, dear me! those are the dreadful,
gloomy notions which you get from your
horrid, methodistical tutor.”

“Clementina, I will not hear him spoken
NEW AND OLD COMPANIONS. 179

of in that manner,” said Ernest, with a decision
of tone which the young lady had never heard
him make use of before. She was either
offended, or thought it pretty to look so, for
stopping as they reached a very low stile, she
called to Charles to help her over it, She
wished to vex Ernest, and raise a feeling of
jealousy towards his brother; but she was
successful in neither of her designs, as Ernest
very contentedly turned back to Mr. Ewart,
and left the fair lady to pursue her walk with
the companion whom she had chosen.

“T am so sorry for you, dear Charles!”
said Clementina, in a voice rather more affect-
ed than usual; “it is so dreadful to be turned
out of your right by a low, vulgar creature
like that.”

“But you see I don’t think him either low
or vulgar,” replied Charles, good humouredly.
“He has high feelings, and high principles;
and as for being vulgar, a boy who thinks so
much, and upon such subjects as he does, can
never, as Mr, Ewart said to me once, have a
vulgar mind.”

“T find him intolerably dull,” said Clemen-
tina,
180 NEW AND OLD COMPANIONS.

“1 am sorry for it,” was her cousin’s dry
reply.

Clementina was now offended with Charles
in his turn, and had there been a third party
less unmanageable than Mr, Ewart, she
would doubtless have chosen him to accom-
pany her, in the delightful hope of annoying
both her cousins, The silly girl was almost
unconsciously forming a plan to separate the
brothers, and make them jealous of each other,
by sometimes favouring the elder, sometimes
the younger, so as to draw their whole atten-
tion towards herself. You may think that it
was some unkind and bitter feeling that made
her wish thus to destroy their happiness and
union, and act the part of a tempter towards
her companions ; but it was nothing but self:
ish vanity and folly—so that she was amused,
she cared not who suffered; the power to
give pain she considered as a triumph—it is
reckoned so in Vanity Fair.

She turned round to see if Ernest were
watching her movements, but was extremely
provoked to find him so deeply engaged in
serious conversation with the clergyman, that
her presence seemed altogether forgotten.
NEW AND OLD COMPANIONS. 181

Clementina had therefore no resource but to
walk on with Charles, doing her best to put
all the sermon out of his head, by rattling on
about her delight at the prospect of soon going
to London, her distress at its not being the
gay season, her conviction that young ladies
ought to come out at fourteen, how she was
charmed at the prospect held out of a child’s
ball in Grosvenor Square, but in despair at the
dear countess not being in town! Such is
the conversation of Vanity Fair. ,

In the afternoon Mrs, Hope informed
Ernest of the intended move, which circum-
stances had led her to make earlier than she
had intended. “TI propose remaining in Lon-
don till after Christmas,” she said ; “ of course
you and your brother will accompany us.”

“ And Mr, Ewart ?”

“There is no room in our town house for
him,” replied the lady, who, like her husband,
had little love for one, the unworldliness of
whose character seemed a silent reproach upon
her own,

“It would surely be a great pity that I
should leave my studies,” said Ernest ; “ pray
remember how much time I have lost already.”
182 NEW AND OLD COMPANIONS.

“Oh, [I’ve quite decided on your coming,
To acquire a fashionable air, and the good
breeding of the haut-ton, is quite as indispen-
sable as any book-learning,”

The truth was that the lady had no idea of
losing an opportunity of displaying to her ac-
quaintance her nephew, the young peer.

On the following evenitig, Charles came to
his brother, who was engaged in the dry study
of a Latin grammar, to announce to him the
arrival of Jack and Ben, who had just been
landed at the gardener’s cottage.

“TI must go and see them at once,” said
Ernest, rising. -

“Tis late and cold; I think that you
might wait till to-morrow.”

“Oh, no; they are strangers here, poor
boys, they have none but me to bid them
welcome,”

“Then I'll come with you to see the meet-
ing,” said Charles, taking down his cap from
its peg.

There was something of awkwardness, a
little mixed with fear, in the manner of Ben,
as the young nobleman kindly held out his
hand to him; but Jack had lost none of his
NEW AND OLD COMPANIONS. 183

own reckless, impudent air, and strangely did
his voice remind Ernest of former days as he
called out, as if still in his cottage on the
common, “I say, Mark, here’s a fine change
for you!”

“T don’t believe that the boy knows how
to blush,” whispered Charles.

“But I hope that you don’t mean to keep
us long here,” continued Jack, looking round
rather contemptuously on the clean _
er

“What do you mean?” replied Ernest,
“surely you prefer it to the poor-house !”

“Why, you don’t think that I'll stand living
in a cottage, while my brother is in a castle !
That would be rather a good joke I should
say.”

“ He's no brother of yours,” cried-Charles,
angrily.

“T’m as good as he any day,” muttered the
boy, glancing at Ernest with mingled envy
and dislike. The young peer mastered his
temper, though it cost him an effort, “I
have placed you,” said he, “where one much
wiser than either of us thinks that you will
be best ; I hope that you will be comfortable,
184 NEW AND OLD COMPANIONS.

and learn your work, and never have real
cause to regret coming here.” With these
words Ernest and Charles quitted the cottage,
overhearing as they passed out Ben’s disap-
pointed exclamation, “I thought he’d have
made us gentlefolk too!”

“ How hard it is to do good!” said Ernest,
with a sigh of mortification, when they had
walked a few steps from the place. “I see
the wisdom of Mr. Ewart’s doubts, when he
said that he believed that there might be ob-
jections to this plan.”

“Well, you've acted kindly, and you'll have
your reward,” observed Charles.

“Not in the gratitude of these boys.”

“Did you do it to purchase their grati-
tude?” asked his brother. “Mr. Ewart says
that some do good actions to buy praise, and
some to buy gratitude, but both look for an
earthly reward, and, therefore, for one which
can never be sure. It is the cup of cold
water given for the Lord’s sake which is re-
membered and rewarded above.”

“True,” replied Ernest, “and if we do good
only in order to be loved, the many, many
disappointments which we meet with, will
LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY. 185
soon make us weary in well-doing. That
benevolence only will be steady and sure
which comes from a wish to please that Mas-
ter in heaven who never can change or forget.”



CHAPTER XVIL
LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY.

Days and weeks passed, but the instructions
which he received seemed to make little im-
pression on the obdurate spirit of Jack, who
had one idea rooted in his mind, which neither
example nor exhortation was able to shake,—
that it was a sort of injustice to him for one
who had once been his equal to be so rich
while he remained so poor. In vain both the
folly and ingratitude of his conduct were shown
to him: a proud, levelling spirit had taken
possession of his heart, which would neither
bend in submission to Heaven, nor thankful-
ness to those who did him kindness. Would
that this feeling were more uncommon in the
dwellings of the humbler classes, and that they
to whom little of this world’s goods have been
given would remember that, while the rich
186 LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY.

have duties towards the poor, the poor have
also duties towards the rich.

The annoyance which it caused Ernest's
sensitive spirit to be the object of envy and
ingratitude, and the necessity of being ever
on his guard to avoid expressing anger, or,
which is much harder, feeling it, made him
rather rejoice when the day arrived for the
family’s removal to London. He was impa-
tient to see that wonderful place of which he
had heard so much, The winter, also, had
come, and the coldness of the weather made
the prospect of a journey southwards very
agreeable. The boys’ only regret was leaving
Mr. Ewart, whom they regarded more as a
parent than a tutor.

“Good-bye, and heaven watch over you!”
said the clergyman, earnestly, as he stood at
the door to witness their departure.

Charles pressed his tutor’s hand warmly
between both his own; Ernest threw himself
into his arms,

“You must not keep us, boys; we shall be
late for the train,” called out Mr. Hope from
the carriage.

“I can’t conceive what makes them so fond
LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY. 187

of that man,” observed Mrs. Hope in no ami-
able tone.

“You will see more of Vanity Fair,” said
the clergyman, in a low voice; “I have but
one word for you,— Watch and pray, lest ye
enter into temptation!”

The next moment the carriage dashed across
the court-yard ; Mr. Ewart followed it through
the arched gateway, and stood on the draw-
bridge which crossed the moat, watching till
he could no.longer see his dear pupils standing
up in the carriage and waving to him.

A railway journey was a new thing to Er-
nest, and raised many thoughts in his mind
as the train rushed rattling along the line,
sometimes raised on a causeway, sometimes
sunk in a cutting, sometimes lost in the dark-
ness of a tunnel; yet, whether above the
surrounding country or below it, whether in
brightness or whether in gloom, rushing on—
on—on, with wondrous speed, towards the
goal to which each hour brought it nearer,

“T, too, have had my dark portions of the
journey, and now Heaven has been pleased to
raise me,” thought Ernest, “and the sunshine
is bright around me. But when I arrive at
188 LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY.

the end of my journey, how little I shall care
whether it was long or short, through gloom
or light, uncomfortable or pleasant,—it will
be enough if it has taken me to my home!”

And now let us see our young pilgrims set-
tled in London,—in that wonderful assemblage
of all that is noblest and all that is basest in
the world; the abode of the greatest wealth
and the most abject poverty; the seat of
learning, arts, science, crime, misery, and igno-
rance; the city which contains at once per-
haps more good and more evil than any other
spot on the face of the globe. Ernest found
his expectations more than realized as regards
its size: there seemed no end to the wilder-
ness of brick houses,—street crossing street
to form a mighty labyrinth which both aston-
ishes and confuses the mind. The unceasing
roll of carriages and stream of passers-by ; the
variety of vehicles of all kinds and shapes ; the
innumerable shops ; the stately public build-
ings, churches, hospitals, schools, and places of
amusement: all had the charm of novelty to
the young noble, and fresh impressions were
made upon his mind every hour.

Then came a round of all the diversions
LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY. 189

which London could offer at that period of
the year. Days and nights, also, were crowded
with amusements; and Ernest, at first in a
whirl of pleasure, soon began to experience
the weariness of a life devoted to gaiety. His
mind felt clogged with the multitude of new
ideas; his head ached from confinement in
crowded rooms ; his rest was broken in upon ;
he became almost knocked up by excitement,
more tired than he had ever before been, made
by labour, without the satisfaction of gaining
anything by his fatigue. He began to long
for the quiet of Fontonore again, and to ex-
change the bustle of gaiety into which he was
plunged, for calm study and the society of
Mr. Ewart.

And how fared the spiritual health of the
pilgrim ?—was he making progress towards
heaven, or falling back? Ernest had entered
London forewarned and forearmed ; circum-
stances, not choice, were leading him through
the very midst of Vanity Fair, but he was
walking as a pilgrim still, He had made a
prayerful resolution from the very beginning,
to devote the first hour of each morning to
God. Sloth, increased by weariness, often
190 LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY.

tempted him to break this resolution on the
cold wintry mornings, and suggested many an
excuse for self-indulgence, But Ernest knew
that he stood upon dangerous ground, and
kept resolute to his purpose; and that quiet
hour for communion with his own heart, for
self-examination, reading of the Scripture, and
prayer, was his great safeguard amidst the
numerous temptations which encompassed him
in his new path of life, Things which, only
seen in the torch-glare of worldly excitement,
must always have appeared in false colours,
reviewed in the pure light of morning lost
much of their dangerous attractions, I can-
not too earnestly recommend to all, whether
young or old, in high or low estate, thus to
give their first hours to God.

The family assembled so late for breakfast,
that Ernest found that, by a little self-denial,
he might not only have time for devotion, but
also for study in the morning, He was ex-
ceedingly anxious to cultivate his mind; he
felt his deficiencies very painful, and he was
sometimes even tempted to encroach on his
“holy hour,” as he called it, to have more
time for improving his intellect. This is a
LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY. 191

temptation which probably some of my readers
have known, and which is all the more dan-
gerous because it does not shock the conscience
so much as other ways of passing the time.
But still Ernest kept as free as he could from
any earthly occupation, the precious little space
where, apart from the world, he could collect
his strength and renew his good resolutions,
The only member of the family who gave
him the least assistance in treading the hea-
venward way was his brother; and often did
Ernest think of the wisdom and mercy of the
Saviour, in sending His disciples by two and
two into the world. The characters of the
boys were in some points very unlike, but
there was one hope, one guiding principle, in
both, and perhaps the very difference in their
dispositions made them more able to support
one another. Ernest was more shy and diffi-
dent than his brother, but had a deeper know-
ledge of his own heart. Charles had learned
more, but Ernest had reflected more; Charles
was in more danger from love of the world,
Ernest from shrinking too much from its ridi-
cule. Where Hope was impatient, Fontonore
had learned to wait ; their early life had been
192 LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY,

passed in different schools—one the child of
luxury, the other of want ; one tried by plea-
sure, the other by suffering: but both had
passed through the strait wicket-gate; both
were united in sincere love to the Saviour;
both were anxious to struggle against their
besetting sins, and to press onward to the
prize set before them.

Would that we were ever as ready to help
one another in the narrow path, as these two
young Christian pilgrims! If, instead of act-
ing, as we too often do, the part either of
tempters or tormentors, we employed all the
influence which friendship and relationship
give us, to draw our companions nearer to
heaven, what a blessing would rest on our
intercourse below! How much would it re-
semble that which we hope to enjoy above !

One thing which the inexperienced Ernest
soon discovered was, that money disappeared
very rapidly in London, That which at first
had seemed to him an inexhaustible fortune,
appeared almost as though it melted away in
his hand. One of his first cares on entering
the capital, was to procure a most beautiful
Bible, and send it, with a grateful letter, to
LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY. 193

Miss Searle. This was at once a pleasure and
a relief to his heart, for it had been burdened
—not with a sense of owing kindness, for that
is painful only to the proud spirit, but the
feeling that he might appear ungrateful, and
that those who had been his friends in adver-
sity might think that in his prosperity he had
forgotten them,

Then there weie so many necessary things
to be purchased—so many tempting books to
be desired, for Ernest delighted in reading—
so many charities which he wished to aid—
so many objects of pity that he yearned to
relieve, that the youthful nobleman’s once
heavy purse soon became very empty.

Ernest had been some time in London be-
fore he went to visit Madge, in the asylum in
which he was supporting her, He reproached
himself with the delay; but, in truth, the
conduct of her brothers had so disheartened
him, that it was as a duty, and no pleasure,
that he went there at all. Charles, as usual,
was his companion, and his only one; for
visiting charities was little in the way either
of his uncle or his proud wife, though Mrs,
Hope had once held a stall at a grand Fancy-

13

»@3)
194 LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY.

fair, which was patronized by duchesses and
countesses. As for Clementina, she would
never have dreamed of going; she had a
vague connection in her mind between poverty
and dirt, and thought it dreadful if a child of
the lower classes ventured to approach within
two yards of her. Many a tear had the young
lady shed over a novel; for heroes and hero-
ines she had ready sympathy ; she considered
that sentiment and feeling give an added
charm to beauty ; but common every-day suf-
ferings had in them nothing “ interesting.”
She could be touched by the sorrow of a
princess, but the real wants of a ragged child
were quite beneath her regard.

Ernest was agreeably surprised in the asy-
lum. Everything so neat, so perfectly clean ;
such an appearance of respectability in the
matron, of health and good discipline amongst
the children. Poor little Madge also was so
much delighted to see a face that she knew,
after being only surrounded by strangers, that
Ernest felt vexed with himself for uot visiting
her sooner, and emptied his purse of its last
half-crown to place in the hand of the child
This still farther opened the heart of Madge,
LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY. 195

and she talked to him almost as freely as if
she had still regarded him as her brother,
though without the insolent familiarity which
was so repulsive in Jack.

She showed Ernest a letter which she had
received from her unhappy mother, who had
been sentenced to transportation, though for a
shorter period than her husband, on account
of being specially recommended to mercy.
Ernest had, through Mr. Ewart, provided Ann
with some little comforts; and to this, in her
letter, she gratefully alluded, though his kind-
ness, she wrote, only made her feel more
wretched, when she remembered how cruelly
she had wronged him. She implored her
daughter to shun the temptations which had
led her astray, especially the love of dress,
the beginning of all her errors and her misery
—the vanity which had laid her open to flat-
tery, and had made her take the first step in
that downward course which had led her to
prison and a convict-ship. There was deep
remorse expressed in the letter, which gave
Ernest hopes that the poor prodigal might yet
repent, and find merey ; but its tone of cheer-
less gloom showed but too well that the mire
196 LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY.

of the Slough of Despond was clinging to the
unhappy one still.

Perfectly satisfied with Mr. Ewart’s choice
of a home for the more than orphan girl,
Ernest quitted the asylum with his brother,
thankful that an opportunity had been granted
him of repaying evil with good. He was
enabled to provide for three children, whose
parents had inflicted on him deep injuries, and
from whom he had received, during the years of
childhood, unkindness which had embittered his
life, Itis easier to forgive one great wrong, than
a long course of petty provocations ; and when
both are united to rouse the spirit of revenge,
nothing but grace given to us from Heaven
can make us forgive as we have been forgiven.

As the brothers passed a bookseller’s shop,
on their way home, Charles paused to look at
a volume in the window.

“Oh, Ernest!” he exclaimed, “look what
a beautiful copy is there of that work which
Mr, Ewart so much wished to see! Do let us
buy it for him, as a New-year’s gift, to take
back with us to Fontonore. My funds are
rather low; but if we join purses, we shall
easily make out the sum together.”
LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY. | 197

“T really cannot,” replied Ernest, looking
wistfully at the beautiful book.

“Oh! but you must. You know,” said
Charles, lowering his voice to a whisper, “ that
Mr. Ewart never procures these indulgences
for himself. I believe, from what I heard my
uncle say, that he entirely supports an aged
mother. I never knew him spend an unne-
cessary shilling on himself,’’

“Perhaps the book is in our library,” sug-
gested Ernest.

“Tt is not; it was his hunting all over it
for the work that made me know how much
he wished to have it. I wonder, Ernest,”
added Charles, with a little temper, “that one
rolling in wealth like you, should make such
a fuss about a few shillings.”

“T am not rolling in wealth at present,”
answered Ernest, rather vexed at his brother's
tone; “I have not a shilling left in my
purse.”

“Then you must have been wondrously
extravagant. Why, even I, on my half-allow-
ance, have managed to keep a little silver, and
I was never famous for economy.”

Ernest made no reply.
198 LIFE IN THE GREAT CITT,

“We had better go on,” said Charles,

They walked on for some time in silence.

“Tam afraid that I spoke rudely to you
just now; will you forgive me?” said Hope at
last,

“Oh! do not talk about forgiveness,” re-
plied Ernest, cheerfully, “I think that I
could forgive you anything; and one should
never take offence at a word.”

“T ought to have remembered,” observed
Charles, “that the child whom we have just
seen is a great expense to you; and yet you
seem to spend so little, that I hardly fancied
that you could have got through the allow-
ance of a whole quarter. Do you not receive
the same sum that I used to have, when I
imagined myself to be Lord Fontonore ?”

“No,” replied his brother, and immediately
changed the conversation.

They walked on for some distance, talking
on other matters, when, as they were passing

_ through one of the parks, Charles stopped,
as if some thought had suddenly crossed his
mind,

“Ernest,” said he, laying his hand on his
brother’s arm, “just answer me one question :
LIFE IN THE GREAT CITY, 199

How is it that you do not receive the same
allowance that I did?” Receiving no answer,
he continued—*Is it possible that you are
dividing yours with me?”

Ernest smiled. “I am not bound to answer
questions,” said he.

“Oh! I see it all; generous, noble-hearted
brother! And you suffered me to accuse you
in my own mind of meanness, almost to re-
proach you to your face for it, while all the
time it was your money that I have been
spending, and you never even let me know
my obligation !”

“Obligation is not a word for brothers,” re
plied Ernest ; “what I have is yours; what
you spend I enjoy ; let us always have a com-
mon purse between us.”

“No, that must never be!” exclaimed
Charles; “you have burdens enough upon
your hands already, My uncle must supply
me,”

“Do not deprive your brother of his pri-
vilege,” said Ernest, who had seen enough of
Mr. Hope by this time to know that it would
be galling to Charles to be in any way de-
pendent upon him, “You will hurt me if
200 FOGS AND MISTS.

you deny me this favour; I shall think that
you do not care for me, Charley.”

It was the first time that Ernest had ever
used this familiar and endearing name to his
brother, There was something in his tone, as
he pronounced it, and in his manner, as he
threw his arm round Charles, that raised a
glow of affection in the heart of the boy,
warmer than he had ever known before. Both
felt the strength of that holy beautiful tie by
which the members of every family should be
united. Children of the same parents on
earth, children of the same Father in heaven,
with one common home both below and above,
one path to tread and one goal to reach—how
is it that pride and envy can ever disunite the
hearts which God himself would join together?



CHAPTER XVIII.
FOGS AND MISTS.

One evening, after the family had been more
than a month in London, Ernest sat alone in
the drawing-room with his book, Mr. and
Mrs, Hope were absent at a dinner party,
FOGS AND MISTS. 201

which the lady was to leave early, in order to
call for the young people, to take them to the
long-expected ball in Grosvenor Square.

Clementina had been up stairs for more than
an hour, engaged in what was to her one of
the most interesting occupations of life—deck-
ing out her little person in all the extraya-
gance of fashion. Ernest sat by the window,
not that the light by which he read was in any
way derived from anything outside it; but it
amused him to glance up occasionally from his
page, and look out upon what was to him a
novel sight—a regular yellow London fog.

Of the long line of lamps which stretched
down.the street, only the two or three nearest
were visible at all, and they looked like dim
stars surrounded by a haze. Loud shouts,
sometimes mixed with laughter, were occa-
sionally heard from foot-passengers wishing to
give notice of their presence. Now two lights,
like a pair of eyes, would slowly approach,
marking where a carriage moved on its dan-
gerous way ; then torches carried past would
throw a strange red glare on the fog, scarcely
sufficient to show who bore them.

“We sce something like this in life,” said
202 FOGS AND MISTS,

Ernest to himself. “TI think that fog is the
common weather of Vanity Fair. Let me see
in how many points I can find a resemblance
between nature’s mists and those raised by
‘the world.’ Both come not from heaven,
but belong to things below; both shut out
the pure light of day—make us in danger of
falling—in danger of striking against others
—hardly able to tell friend from foe. Yet
people seem particularly merry in both, as if
the very risk were a pleasure, They light
those glaring torches, and walk cheerfully on,
though they can see neither sun, moon, nor
stars, Who would wish to pass all his life in
a fog? Yet some choose to live and die amidst
the mists of Vanity Fair.”

“ Reading, moralizing, reflecting!” said
Charles, in his own lively manner, as he en-
tered the room. “Who would take you for
a young nobleman going to a ball? -It will
be your last for a long time, I suspect; for
Parliament, I hear, is dissolved, and if so, there
will be a new election, and back we must fly
to Fontonore.”

“T am not sorry for it,” replied Ernest,

“Nor I,” said Charles, more gravely. “I
FOGS AND MISTS. 203

am afraid that this is a dangerous sort of life
for me. You never seem to be in the same
peril as myself’; I suppose because you are a
better pilgrim.”

“Oh, no!” exclaimed Ernest ; “ you cannot
look into my heart ; but every one knows his
own temptations best. The truth is, that I
cannot enjoy society so much, because I al-
ways feel that I am not sufficiently educated,
and am in constant fear of exposing myself,
and being laughed at. There is no possible
merit in this,”

“No, if that is all your protection from
worldliness, I should call it a very poor one.”

“Yes, for if it protects me on the one side,
it exposes me to danger on the other. Do
you know, Charles, that nothing astonishes me
so much in myself, as the cowardice that I
find that I possess,”

“You manage well, for no one finds it out
but yourself.”

“T must care for the world, or I should not
fear its ridicule. I was always thought rather
courageous before I became a peer; I know
that I used to speak out truth pretty boldly
in our cottage; but there is nothing that ]
204 FOGS AND MISTS.

dread so much as the quiet sarcastic smile on
well-bred lips. I sometimes fancy,” he added,
laughing, “that I should mind it less if there
were any chance of its being followed by a
blow.”

“ Well, this much I can say for you, Ernest
—I have never yet seen this fear draw you
one step from the narrow path.”

“T could not say as much for myself, dear
brother. The world is a dangerous place.”

“Which would you call the principal temp-
tations of Vanity Fair?” said Charles,

“Temptations to be insincere, ill-natured,
and forgetful of God.”

“Qh, you have not numbered half, Think
of all the extravagance, vanity, love of show,
love of fashion, love of dress, love of trifles of
all sorts.”

“Which donot make us happy,” added
Ernest,

“Happy! no, They remind me of the
beautiful enchanted money in the Eastern
tale, which a man put so carefully by, and
which he found, a short time after, all turned
into leaves, Have you seen Clemmy on this
evening of the ball, which she has been look-
FOGS8 AND MISTS. 205

ing forward to for so long with such plea-
sure?”

“No; is she in very high spirits?”

“She is quite miserable, poor girl. I dare
say that she would cry heartily, did she not
know that red eyes are not becoming.”

“What is vexing her so much ?”

“She has three terrible troubles which she
knows not how to bear. Firstly, she fears
that Aunt Matilda may not find her way in
the fog, so may never call to take us to the
hall; secondly, she fears that even if we
should reach Grosvenor Square, we should
find the rooms empty on such a night as this,
and there would be few to admire her and her
new dress ; and, thirdly, she is afraid that her
pearl ornaments will not come in time; and
this is her worst misery of all.”

“ Have they not arrived yet?”

“No; Clemmy has been in a fidget about
them all day, starting at the sound of every
bell with a ery of, ‘Oh, I hope that’s the
jeweller at last?’ And since she went: up to
dress, Mrs. Clayton has been sent down three
times at least to see if the ornaments have
come; and as she has had always to return
206 FOGS AND MISTS.

with the same unsatisfactory answer, Clemmy
is doubtless by this time in a state of grief
which might make her an object of pity to any
beggar in the street.”

“Poor Clemmy!” murmured Ernest, with
real compassion in his tone.

“You do not pity her, surely, for being un-
happy at such trifles ?”

“T pity her because such trifles can make her
unhappy. Charles, do you know that my con-
science is not quite easy about our cousin?”

“Your conscience! You have nothing to
do with her folly.”

“We have a good deal to do with one an-
other. I see more of her than of any one but
yourself; she is one of my nearest relations ;
and yet I have never tried in any way to help
her on in the right path.” ‘

“T do not believe that she is in it,” replied
Charles. “She is constantly trying to play
us off against each other; nothing would de-
light her so much as to make us quarrel, all to
gratify her selfish vanity.”

“Tf she is not in the right path, in which
must she be? Where will she find herself if
she remains as she is?”
FOGS AND MISTS. 207

“We cannot help her wanderings; they
are no fault of ours,”

“Oh, Charles, we must not act in the spirit
of those words, ‘Am I my brother’s keeper?’
We who meet her so often must have some
influence for evil or good; and think of the
rapture of meeting in heaven with one whom
we had been the means of helping to reach it!”

“T can hardly fancy any delight greater,”
said Charles; “but I do not know anything
that we could do for Clemmy. It is foolish
in me, but when I look at her, and watch her
affected manner, and hear her trifling talk, I
never can realize to myself that she has a soul
at all.” .

“Yet she has one just as precious as our
own,”

“T know that, but I cannot feel it; she
seems just like a pretty plaything, made to be
dressed up, admired—or laughed at.”

“Would that she could be raised to some-
thing nobler, something better !”

“I do not believe that we can raise her.
She only thinks me provoking, and you tire-
some, She never would listen to Mr, Ewart,
and I do believe only goes to church to show
208 FOGS AND MISTS.

off the fashions, I do not see what we could
do for her.”

“We can pray, dear Charles, we can pray
earnestly ; if we have not done so before, we
have neglected a duty,”

“My neglect has been greater than yours,”
said his brother, “since we have been together
for so many years. I have thought it enough
if I were not led to folly by her society; I
never dreamed that I had any other responsi-
bility about her.”

“But now—”

“Now I feel that I have been wrong. I
remember, Ernest, that Faithful roused some
to become pilgrims even in Vanity Fair;
Hopeful himself was one of them. Perhaps
poor Clemmy—-”

“Here she comes ; I hear the rustle of her
silk down the stairs.”

“Have not the pearls been sent yet? Oh,
dear, how vexatious!” exclaimed the young
lady on entering the room, most elegantly
dressed. She seated herself in an affected
attitude on the sofa, with a very melancholy
expression on her face, as she played with her
feather-tipped fan.
DISAPPOINTMENT. 209
“T do believe there they are,” cried Charles,
as a loud ring was heard at the outer bell,
Clementina sprang up eagerly, and hurried
to the door—so eagerly, so impatiently, that
her little feet tripped, and she fell with some
violence to the ground.

CHAPTER XIX.

DISAPPOINTMENT.

“You are not hurt, I hope,” exclaimed both
cousins, hastening to Clementina’s assistance,
and raising her ; for, in her ball-dress, she was
more helpless than ever.

“She is hurt, I fear,” cried Ernest, as he
saw red drops trickling from her brow, and
falling on her Ince dress, “Oh, Charles, do
call Mrs. Clayton directly,”

The lady’s maid was instantly summoned,
and the hurts of the trembling, sobbing, almost
hysterical Clementina examined, She had
received rather a deep cut on the forehead,
nnd a little contusion under the eye. There
was nothing to alarm, but much to. disfigure.

Charles proposed sending at once for the
e 4
210 DISAPPOINTMENT.

doctor, but this the young lady would not
hear of; she had some vague, terrible idea of
wounds being sewn up, and much preferred
the mild surgery of Mrs, Clayton.

In the midst of the confusion occasioned by
the accident, two lamps were seen to stop before
the door, and the thundering double rap which
succeeded announced the return of Mrs. Hope.

The servant who came to say that his mis-
tress was waiting, laid at the same time a
box on the table: it contained the much
wished-for pearls.

“T had better go down and tell what has
happened,” said Charles, quitting the drawing-
room. In two or three minutes he returned
- with Mrs. Hope.

“My darling child! my sweet Clemmy!
what a sad business this is! How could it
have happened? Why, you look as though
you had been to the wars! you will never be
able to go to the ball.”

Clementina leaned her head on the sofa, and
sobbed piteously.

“Dear me! I hope, Clayton, that you have
put on the plaster carefully. I only dread
her being marked for life,” said the mother.
DISAPPOINTMENT. 211

The poor girl’s grief became more viclent.

“You must compose yourself, my dear; you
will make yourself ill. A fall is a great, shock
to the nerves.”

Ernest had left the room as the lady en-
tered, and now silently offered to his cousin’s
trembling hand a glass of sal volatile and
water,

“You had better go to bed at once,” said Mrs.
Hope. “Tis such a pity; all ready dressed
for the ball! I must go, for I could not dis-
appoint Lady Fitzwigram, and I believe that
the Duchess is to be there. Clayton will
take excellent care of you, I am sure. Come,
Ernest and Charles, I see that you are ready.”

“ And Jam to be left all alone, and on this
night, just when I expected to be so happy !”
sobbed Clementina.

“TJ should like to stay with her, I should
indeed,” said Ernest to his aunt ; “I hope that
you will not object to my doing so.”

“Why, what will Lady Fitzwigram say ?”

“She will not care; she has never seen me
but once. You will be so kind as to make
my excuses,”

“Well, it is very considerate of you, cer-
212 DISAPPOINTMENT,

tainly. I don’t know what to say,” replied
Mrs, Hope, very well pleased to be able to tell
a fashionable circle that Lord Fontonore had
stayed behind because her danghter could not
come. So the matter was soon decided; the
carriage moved off slowly with Mrs. Hope and
Charles, and Ernest and his weeping cousin
were left behind, to spend the rest of the
evening quietly together.

Never before had Clementina found her
cousin half so agreeable as now. He was so
gentle, so considerate, so ready to sympathize
with her, that she began suddenly quite to
change her opinion of him, and think the
young peer a very delightful companion. She
had hitherto been rather provoked at his in-
difference towards her ; now, as she had little
idea of the nature of Christian courtesy, she
attributed all his kindness to admiration, She
thought that the white bandage across her
brow might have an “interesting” effect ; and
Ernest's gentle consideration would have lost
half its power to please, had Clementina been
aware that it would have been equally shown
to one in a humbler class of life of the age of
forty instead of fourteen.
DISAPPOINTMENT. 218

As she reclined on the sofa, and Ernest sat
beside her, it was a great comfort to her to
be able to pour out her complaints to him.
“There never was anything so unfortunate,”
said she; “you can’t imagine what it is to
_have such a disappointment.”

“T think that I can, Clementina, for I was
once most bitterly disappointed myself.”

“Oh, but you are such a sober creature,
such a philosopher. I dare say that you
scarcely gave it a thought.”

“On the contrary, I felt myself almost over-
whelmed. I could hardly speak, I could hardly
keep from tears.”

“You!” exclaimed Clementina in surprise.

“T thought,” continued Ernest, “that there
was no one on earth so unhappy as I—that
all happiness in this world was gone.”

“What could have made you so wretched?”
cried the girl, her curiosity so much roused
that her own troubles were for the moment
forgotten.

“T had lost what I greatly desired.”

“ And what could that have been, Ernest?”

“A situation so much below my real rank,
that I smile now to think that I could ever
Qu DISAPPOINTMENT,

have wished for it. Had no difficulties been
in my way, had I had what I desired, I pro-
bably never should have possessed my birth-
right, How glad I am now of what so much
distressed me then !”

“ And what was it that you were so miser-
able at losing %”

“ A place in the service of Mr, Searle.”

“You don’t say so !” exclaimed Clementina,
opening her eyes to their widest extent.
“That was below you indeed ; what an escape —
you made |”

* Bachips nothing that over happens, to
me caused me more pain.”

“Qh! that was because -you did not know
what you really were, or you would have
looked a good deal higher.”

“Now, Clemmy, it seems to me that this
is the very reason why you are so unhappy
Serer:

“What! that I do not know what I really
am? what can you mean!” exclaimed the
girl, yet more astonished than before.

“If you discovered that you were a king’s
daughter, would you fret for a ball, or care for
a blow?”
DISAPPOINTMENT, 215

“ Reully, Ernest,” cried Clementina, half
curious, half inclined to think him
though he did not look so, “I wish that you
would speak so that I could understand you.”
“TI wish you to look higher, dear cousin ;
you set your thoughts and your hopes too low,
on things far more beneath your real station
and privileges than the office of a servant was
beneath mine, Are you not the child of the
King of kings; is not a mansion in heaven
offered to you; may not the white robes and
golden crown be preparing for you now; and yet
you seem as though you knew not of the bliss set
before you, you are content to be a servant?”
“To whom ?” interrupted Clementina.”
“To the world—and oh, my cousin, the
world isa bad master! you have tasted this
night what wages it can give; God grant that
you know not much more of their bitterness
hereafter.”

“ Why, Fontonore, what is the matter? why
_ do you speak so?” cried Clementina, looking
half frightened at her cousin’s earnest face, for
it cost him no small effort to address her thus,
and he warmed with his own words as they
flowed on.
216 DISAPPOINTMENT.

“TI speak thus because I long to see” you
happy, really happy. Now you are only, as
it were, blowing bubbles of pleasure, you touch
them and they break, and are gone for ever.
Oh, let us seek that which is lasting and sure !
that which will be ours when these frail bodies
are dust.”

“Tt is very unkind in you to talk of such
things to me when I am weak and nervous,
it makes one so horribly gloomy.”

“Does it make one gloomy to hear of sins
being pardoned ; does it make one gloomy to
hear of a Father in heaven; to know that
treasures are laid up for us where neither moth
nor rust can corrupt, where happiness is as
lasting as it is perfect. Did it make me gloomy
to hear that I had a rich inheritance.”

“Oh, that was quite a different thing!”
cried Clementina, “from becoming one of your
pious saints, You talk to me now only about
happiness in religion, but I know very well
all the lectures upon holiness, and unworldli-
ness, and repentance that will follow.”

“Still my comparison holds,” pursued the
young peer, “for I have not yet entered into
full possession of my estate; I have yet many
DISAPPOINTMENT. 217

a difficult lesson to learn, nor can 1 spend but
a portion of what is my own.”

“You have a good deal of enjoyment in
the meantime.”

“Thave, Clementina, and in this, most of all,
may my position be compared to a Christian's,
He has great enjoyment, pure, present enjoy-
ment, a beginning of his pleasures even here.
Does not the Bible command us to rejoice
without ceasing ; who can rejoice if the Chris-
tian does not? Yes,” continued Ernest, his
eyes sparkling with animation, “how very very
happy those must be who have gone a long
way on their pilgrimage, when I, who am
only struggling at the entrance, can say, that
T have found no pleasure to equal it! Oh,
Clementia! my joy when I heard that I was
raised from being a poor peasant, forced to toil -
for my bread, to become one of the nobles of
the land; the joy which I felt then was as
nothing compared to my delight when I first
felt assured that my sins were forgiven me.”

Clementina made no reply, and soon after
expressed her wish to retire to rest. Those
who have never known the happiness of
religion find it difficult to believe that it really
bestows any, A blind man cannot understand
the beauty of light, nor the man deaf from his
birth the delight of music. Yet music and
light are around us still, and such to the soul
is “the joy of the Lord.”

“Perhaps some day she may reflect over
what has passed,” thought Ernest, as he bade
his cousin a courteous good-night, “and at least
one thing is left that I can do for her still, I
will never cease to pray.”

OHAPTER XX,
THE PERILOUS MINE

“Now, at the further side of that plain was a little bill, called
Luere, and in that hill a silver mine,”—Pilgrim's Progress.
Next morning Charles came down to break-
make her appearance at all, In answer to
- Ernest's question, as to whether he had enjoyed
himself, Charles answered quickly, “ very much
indeed ;” and added, that he was going to
meet the Fitzwigrams again that day, at the

house of a mutual friend,
TRE PERILOUS MINE. 219

“I am sorry that you are to be absent an-
other evening from me,” said Ernest; and as
soon as breakfast was concluded, he drew
Charles aside, “I wonder at your caring to
be so much with the Fitawigrams,” said he;
“ of all our worldly acquaintance, they seem to
me the most worldly.”

“ There's charity for you!” laughed Charles,

“I do not wish to be uncharitable, or to
judge any one,” said Ernest ; “ but I love you
too well, to be indifferent as to the friendships
that you form, Your whole happiness through
life may depend upon your choice.”

“ Well, I grant you that they are citizens
of Vanity Fair; but they are very pleasant
people, for all that.”

“Let us remember, Charles, the test which
Mr. Ewart recommended to us, when we are
selecting our friends. ‘Before you are inti-
mate with any one,’ he said, ‘consider whe-
ther their’s is the society which you would
wish to enjoy throughout eternity.’”

“That is a very serious test, indeed; few
friendships in the world would stand it, But
don’t make yourself uneasy about me, Ernest,
As we are to be off for Yorkshire on New
Year’s day, I shall not have time to draw too
close with these Fitzwigrams before we leave.”
“You are not going out?” said Ernest, as
Charles walked towards the stand in the hall
on which were placed the gentlemen's hats,

“Yes; I'm going to buy that book for Mr,
Ewart. Feely tere Sach ay ee eee
sold,”

“But I thought that you said yesterday
that you had not the money for it?”

“Yesterday I had not, but to-day I have.
"TD bed then allver in my purse, now I have
gold!”

“Have you received anything, then, from
our uncle?”

“From him! Oh, no! Do you think that
he has a thought to spare from the dissolution
of the Parliament, the prospects of the ministry,
the progress of the canvass, and all that sort
of thing?” said Charles, imitating the pom-
pous manner of Mr. Hope.

“TI wish,” said Ernest, “I wish that you
would tell me where and how you obtained
that money. I need hardly say to you, dear
Charles, that it is no mean curiosity that
makes me ask.”
THE PERILOUS MINE. 221

“Well, if you will have the truth of it, I
won it last night at the card-table, at Lady
Fitzwigram’s, There, don’t look so grave;
I’ve committed no crime ; the money is honestly
mine.”

“T cannot but look grave,” replied Fonto-
nore, “Oh! Charles, if you had but seen what
I have seen of gambling! It gave me a feeling
of pain, when at Holyby, Ann’s poor boys
used to play at pitch and toss, and gamble for
halfpence ; for I beheld in their father how
such amusements might end. The love of
play, which is the love of gold, in one of its
most fatal forms, is what first brought Law-
less to guilt and ruin. It grew upon him,
stronger and stronger, a habit that could not
be broken, till I have known him desperately
stake his last shilling, with his hungry chil-
dren around him wanting bread, to gratify
this miserable passion; nay, gamble away the
very blanket in which his sick little one was

“But I do not lose; I gain.”

“ Whoever gains, some one must lose; you
either receive or inflict a loss.”

“I care little about the money,” cried
Coes | “ee He Ot eee thet
T enjoy.”

“And it is in this very feeling that the
danger lies, There need be no sin in simply
playing © game, I have heard that good Mr.
Searle likes his quiet whist, and no doubt he
enjoys it with an easy conscience; but when
it is not in the game, but in the gambling,
that the pleasure is found, when the interest
is excited, not by exercise of skill, but the
chance of a lucky deal; oh! Charles, is it not
a kind of intoxication which tle young Pil-
grim especially is bound to shun?”

“There is a sort of intoxication in all sorts
of worldly excitement, I think,” observed
Charles, “The expectation of a ball intoxi-
cates my cousin—the chances of an election
her father ; great heroes are intoxicated by a
desire for conquest. What was Napoleon but
a mighty gambler?”

“Yes,” subjoined Ernest ; “ one who played
for kingdoms, and gambled away crown, liberty,
and all.”

. “ Well, to me there is something great and
animating in the idea of putting it ‘to the
touch, to gain or lose it all.’”
THE PERILOUS MIXE. 223

“ If that be your fecling, Charles,” exclaimed
Fontonore, “you are one who should never
touch a card. There is the fuel ready in your
heart, Oh! beware of letting a spark fall
upon it! How can you pray not to be led
into temptation, without mocking the great
Being whom you address, if you, with your
eyes open, seek the company and the amuse-
ments which you know in themselves to be
temptation? You would be as one who, be-
cause the day was fair, and the water inviting,
would venture in a boat close to a dangerous
whirlpool, and while he felt the strong current
drawing himin, would content himself with pray-
ing for some wind from heaven to save him from
the peril into which he had thrown himself.”

“The difference here,” observed Charles, “is
that I can stop when I like.”

“Every gambler begins by thinking that
he can stop when he likes, till he finds that
habit and passion are too strong to be mas-
tered. Ob, Charley! my Charley !” continued
Ernest, with emotion, “much as I love you,
my own only brother, I had rather lose you.—
rather see you laid in your grave, than living
the life of a gambler !”
224 THE PERILOUS MINE.

“You shall never see me a gambler,—]
mean, God helping me,” replied Charles,
touched and gratified by his brother’s anxiety,
“I will give up play after this evening,”

“Do not go this evening; it is playing on
the brink of temptation.”

“Would you have me break an engage-
ment?”

“You can write, and make your excuse.
To-morrow is Christmas day, when we should
especially remember the mercy that opened to
us the gate of salvation, and our duties as
pilgrims and soldiers of the cross, You would
not spend this evening amongst those whom
you yourself call citizens of Vanity Fair?”

“I will not write, then, I will call; it is
more courteous.”

“ More dangerous.”

“T see that you have little trust in me,”
said Charles, but without any emotion of
anger, “Perhaps, Ernest, you know me bet-
ter than I do myself; but I think that, in this
case, I only do right to go; therefore it is not
wilfully throwing myself into temptation.”

Charles found Aleck Fitzwigram at the
house of Leo Chamberlain, his friend, and after
shaking hands with them both, told them that
he had come to say that circumstances would
prevent his joining them that evening.

“Then you'll come to-morrow—no, we dine
out then, and the day after there's the theatre;
but on Saturday, at any rate, we shall expect
you here, you know that you must give us
our revenge.”

Charles took the piece of gold out of his
waistcoat pocket, and laid it upon the table.
“ You will need no revenge,” said he, smiling.

“ Hope, what do you mean by that? This
is some jest: of your’s! You don’t want us
to think that you are not going to play with
us again?”

“I wish you to think thé truth.”

“ Who on earth has put this absurdity into
your head ?” .

Charles would have liked far better if he
could have said that no one had put a fear of
gambling into his head, but that it was the
result of his own reflections on the subject;
for one of the causes of our so seldom benefit-
ing by the experience of others, is the pride
of the human heart, which hates the idea of
being led. But, in the present case, no other

«a 15
truthful answer could be given, and Charles
replied, “ My brother has made me think dif-
ferently upon this subject from what I did
before.”

“ Your brother—Fontonore! Well, this is
the best joke that ever I heard in my life!
You, who have lived from your birth with
those who know what life is, to allow yourself
to be led by @ boy who passed all his early
years with tinkers, or ploughmen, or thieves ;
who is ignorant of all that a gentleman should
know, and prudently avoids opening his lips
for fear of speaking bad grammar !”

Charles felt more inclined to be angry than
to laugh. The arrow fell lightly as regarded
his brother’s conversation, for whether it was
from natural delicacy of mind, or Ernest’s more
than common acquaintance with the pure lan-
guage of Scripture, his speech was never coarse,
and occasionally, when he overcame his reserve,
flowed on in unstudied eloquence, unusual in
one so young. Charles was indignant at the
unfeeling allusion to the trials of Ernest’s
early life, Neg Seg ak yon spe, ot
my brother,” said he.

“He has given you good cause to remember
‘THE PERILOUS MINE, 227
that he is your brother, and your elder brother
too,” said Fitzwigram with a sneer, “ But I
should have thought it enough for him to
have had my name, my fortune, and my estate,
’ without letting him put my judgment also in
his pocket, and not leave me even a will of
my own !”

The blood of young Hope mounted to his
forehead. He was beset again by the same
enemy, Shame, who clung to Faithful in the
Valley of Humiliation. To the Pilgrim that
valley was not yet passed, that enemy was
not yet conquered. But Charles remembered
the words of Faithful, which had made ao
strong impression on his mind: “Shame,
depart, thou art an enemy to my salvation ;
shall I entertain thee against my sovereign
Lord? How shall I then look Him in the face
at His coming?” With a brave resolve to
grapple with his own enemy within, as well
as to stand the ridicule of tempters without,
Charles replied, that if he adopted the prin-
ciples of his brother, he should gain from him
far more than he had lost; and bidding a cool
farewell to his late companions, he quitted the
house more truly a victor than many a hero
228 GREEN PASTURES AND STILL WATERS.

who has written his title to glory in the blood
of his fellow-creatures !

OHAPTER XXL.
GREEN PASTURES AND STILL WATERS.

“T saw then that they went on their way to a pleasant river,
which David the king called ‘ the river of God,’ but John ‘the
river of the water of life,’”—Pilgrim’s Progress,

In various manner was the succeeding day

passed by the different members of Mr. Hope's

household, He himself was absent till dinner-
time, busy in holding consultations with par-
liamentary friends ; why should he remember
that, as on that day, a Saviour was born
into the world? He never considered that he _
needed one! Lady Fitzwigram called in her
carriage for Mrs, Hope, to drive her to a dis-
tant church to hear some very famous preacher.

Arrayed in all the pomp of Vanity Fair, her

mind full of the world, its follies, its ambition,

the lady departed to kneel in the house of

God, and call herself a miserable sinner! Cle-

mentina would have accompanied her mother,

but for the disfigurement of her face. Till
GRKEN PASTURES AND STILL WATERS. 229

the bruise had disappeared, and the cut be-
come healed, she could not endure to let her-
self be seen; so she shut herself up in the
drawing-room with her feet on the fender,
listening sadly to the cheerful chime of “ the
church-going bell,” which brought no thought
of joy to her heart.

Ernest came into the room, Christmas sun-
shine on his face, He had not seen his cousin
that morning until now.

“ A happy Christmas to you, Clemmy, and
a joyful new-year.” No look of pleasure on
her part .responded to the greeting, but she
gave the usual answer, “I wish the same to
you.”

“Thank you; a happy Christmas—I have
it! The new-year—ah! how strange it is to
think all that a new-year may bring!”

“The new-year can bring to you nothing
so good as the old one has done,” said Cle-
mentina,

“This year has brought much to me indeed,”
replied Ernest, thoughtfully. “The Bible—
my first knowledge of Mr. Ewart—my bro-
ther.”

“Oh, your estate—your title!” exclaimed
280 GREEN PASTURES AND STILL WATERS.
Clementina, “The new-year can raise you
no higher.”

“ Only in one way, perhaps”

“ And what is that way?”

Ernest did not hear the question of the
young lady; his thoughts had wandered to
the white marble monument in the church
near Fontonore, When we stand on the
verge of a new-year, and look on the curtain
which hides from us the mysterious future,
what reflecting mind but considers the possi-
bility that the opening year may to him be
the last. To the Christian Pilgrim alone that
thought brings no feeling of gloom.

“ Are you going to church with us, cousin?”
said Ernest, rousing himself from his medi-
tations,

“You had only to look at me to answer
your own question,” replied the young lady
pettishly. “ What could take me to church
with my forehead plastered up, and such a
yellow mark under my eye.”

Ernest could not help thinking that if she
went to church to worship God, and not to be
seen of man, there was nothing to keep her
away now. But to have expressed his thoughts
GREEN PASTURES AND STILL WATERS. 281
aloud would have been only to irritate ; and
the Christian who would lead another to the
Lord must be cautious to avoid giving unne-
cessaty offence. There is a time when it is
ee Seay fe Shek; da eas nen het
wisdom to be silent.

Ernest left the room, and in a few minutes
returned with his own copy of the Pilgrim’s
Progress in his hand. He made no observa-
tion, but he laid it near his cousin, and then
quitted the house with a secret prayer that
the poor girl, to whom religion was as yet
but a name, might be led to read, and be
guided to understand it.

As the brothers returned from church arm-
in-arm, Ernest felt a more than usual joy and
peace shed over his spirit, while all was winter
without, all was summer within. It was one
of those hours which Christians sometimes
meet with in their pilgrimage, perhaps as a
foretaste of the bliss that awaits them, when
their path appears so bright, and heaven so
near, that they feel as though earth’s. mists
were already left behind, and can scarcely be-
lieve that they can ever wander again from
the way which they find so delightful, They
232 = GREEN PASTURES AND STILL WATERS,

could then lay down their lives with pleasure
for their Lord. Life is happiness to them, for
in it they may serve Him, and death no object
of terror or doubt, for they know that it can
but bring them to Him, Bless the Lord, O
my soul; while I live will I praise Him, is
in the thoughts, and not unfrequently on the
lips also, for out of the abundance of the heart
the mouth speaketh, and the heavenly joy
which fills all the spirit will sometimes over-
flow in words,

“O Charley, how joyous the angel’s song
sounded to-day! ‘ Glory to God im the high-
est, on earth peace, good will towards men.’
What wonder and delight must have filled the
hearts of the shepherds when first they listened
to that song !”

“ And the angels, it must have made even
angels happier to have carried such a message
to the world.”

“T have sometimes thought,” said Ernest,
“that if an angel from heaven were to live
upon this earth, and to be permitted to choose
what station he would fill, he would ask,—not
to be a conqueror, not to be a king, nut even
to be one of the geniuses whose discoveries
GUKEN PASTURES AND STILL WATERS. 233

astonish the world, but to be one.who might
constantly be proclaiming to all the good tid-
ings of Saviour’s coming, repeating con-
tinually that song of heaven, ‘ Glory to God,
goodwill towards men !’”

“He would be a clergyman, or a mission-
ary, then.”

“ That is what I should most of all wish
to be,” said Ernest, “if I only could be worthy
of such an honour.”

“Why, you are a lord.”

“Were I a prince, what nobler office could
I have than to follow in the steps of the
apostles and the martyrs—nay, the steps of
the Saviour himself? To sow seeds that
would blossom in eternity, to be a shepherd
over the Lord’s dear flock! 0! Charles, can
we ever realise the full extent of that promise,
they that turn many to righteousness, shall
shine as the stars for ever and ever!”

“T feel afraid to be a clergyman,” said
Charles, gravely. “My uncle spoke to me
about it yesterday; he said that the church
might be the best opening for me in life, and
that it was time for me to think of « profes-
sion. But, Ernest, there was something that
2384 GREEN PASTURES AND STILL WATERS,
went against my feelings in thinking of it in
that light.”

“Tam sure that you were right, my bro-
ther. How could one dare to become the
minister of God from any motive than the de-
sire to serve Him, and proclaim His message
to dying sinners around us?”

“TI was afraid that you would blame me.
I thought that you would urge me to devote
myself to the service of the ministry.”

“Not unless your service were that of the
heart, then indeed I should rejoice at your
choice, But what are your own wishes for
yourself?”

“T have always had rather a fancy for
being a soldier. The danger and excitement
of the life attracts me. I should like to be
just such a warrior as Great-heart, who fought
and conquered Giant Despair.”

“TI thought,” observed Ernest, smiling,
“that Great-heart was intended to represent
a minister, and not a soldier.”

“Do you really think so?” said Charles.

“ Only consider his office, and the nature of
his exploits, Was he not sent to guide feeble
pilgrims, and lead them to the heavenly city 1
GREEN PASTURES AND STILL WATERS. 285

Did not his words cheer and help them on the
way? Did he not show them the spring at
which they drank and were refreshed, and
fight the Giant Maul, who led young pilgrims
into error? Remember his own account of
himself, when he said, “I am a servant of
the God of Heaven: my business is to per-
suade sinners to repentance.” Surely this
is a description of a minister of the gos-

“It never struck me so before.”

“If you love difficulties,” continued Ernest,
“who has greater to overcome than a con-
scientious clergyman? He has the world to
oppose him, Satan to oppose him, his own sin-
ful nature, like a traitor within the gates.
He is appointed a commander in the army of
the Lord.”

“ And a missionary is the leader of a for-
lorn hope,” interrupted Charles,

“ Not forlorn,” exclaimed Ernest, “his hope
is sure ; if faithful, he is certain of both vic-
tory and life.”

“T believe, after all,” said Charles, “that a
clergyman’s is the noblest, as well as the most
anxious of professions, But even did I wish
236 GREEN PASTURES AND STILL WATERS.

it to be mine, the question remains—Could I
ever be worthy of it?”

« Ah, that is my difficulty too,” cried Er-
nest; “and yet,” he added hopefully, “I can-
not but think that He who first gave us a love
for the work, would also give us strength to
perform it.”

By this time the brothers had reached
home. Ernest found the drawing-room empty.
A novel lay on the table near which Clemen-
tina had been sitting, but the Pilgrim’s Pro-
gress had evidently been moved from the
place where her cousin had left it. He re-
mained like many others who try to do good,
in uncertainty as to whether his endeavours
ance that whether successful or not, the small-
est attempt to serve others for the sake of the
Lord, would never be forgotten by him.

In another week the family returned to
Fontonore, whither Mr. Hope had preceded
them by a few days in order to carry on his
canvass, If the castle was beautiful at the
end of autumn, when Ernest first saw his
birthplace, not less striking was its appear’
ance now. The red globe of the winter's sun
GREEN PASTURES AND STILL WATERS. 237

sisi ie se spe ths Wetllainale lesan
faintly on the arched windows crusted with
hoar frost. Every twig on the creepers that
mantled the walls, every leaf on the evergreens
that adorned the entrance, was covered with
white glistening crystals, like the work of a
fairy enchantress,

On the bridge on which Mr. Ewart had
stood to see the boys depart, he again appeared
to welcome them back, and nothing gave so
much pleasure to their hearts as his warm,

Ernest found everything much as he had
left it. Ben appeared indeed to have some-
what improved under the careful instruction
which he had received, but Jack was the same
forward, reckless boy, dead to every feeling
of gratitude or shame. He was noted in
the castle for mischief-making, his word was
never to be depended upon; he seemed to
have inherited his father’s love for gambling ;
but perhaps the most painful feature in his
character was his undisguised dislike of his
young benefactor.

“TI should almost recommend,” said Mr.
Ewart, when speaking on the subject to his
238 GREEN PASTURES AND STILL WATERS.

pupil, “that some other situation should be
found for this unhappy boy, where he might
be under severer control, and less in a position
to give annoyance,”

“It would certainly be a great relief to
me,” replied Ernest.

“He might be apprenticed to some trade,”

“That would cause some expense,” observed
Ernest,

“True, but your uncle—”

“Oh, I never would trouble my uncle upon
the subject. My own quarter's allowance is
now due, but I have spent it already in my
mind. You know my little project for a school
here, both Jack and Ben would attend that
every day. Oh, we must give him a little
longer trial, I cannot afford any changes at
present without sacrificing things more impor-
tant,”

“ But the irritation to yourself,” exclaimed
Charles, who was present, “the constant an-
noyance and worry caused by such a creature
as that!” ‘

“These are the little vexations that are
sent to try our patience and forbearance,” re-
plied Ernest. “If we seck to bear them with
A paw orare supe. 239
a pilgrim’s spirit, perhaps we may discover in
another world that we have owed more to our
enemies than to our friends,”

OHAPTER XXII.
. 4 FEW STEPS ASIDE.

“ Now, a little before them, there was on the left hand of the
oad a meadow, and a stile to go over into it, and that meadow
is called By-path meadow.”—Pilgrim’s Progress,

Ou, the interest and the excitement of an

election! How little we consider, when we

glance over a dry list of the members of the

House of Commons, all the efforts and sacri-

fices that have been made, the anxiety, heart-

burnings, sleepless nights, exhausting days,
that have been endured to place a single name
on that list !

Not only the castle, but all the neighbour-
hood, was in a ferment, for this was to be a
hotly contested election, For some years Mr,
Hope had quietly sat as member for the adja-
cent town of Allborough; but it was now
known that he must have a desperate struggle
for his place—d wealthy, popular man had
240 A FEW STEPS ASIDE.
come forward to oppose him; Mr. Stacey was
the supporter of a very popular measure, and,
though the truth was scarcely acknowledged
at Fontonore, the chances in favour of the
pink were considered equal to those in favour
of the blue, -

Nothing was talked of at the castle, scarcely
anything thought of, but the election, Mr.
Hope exerted himself as if his life depended
upon success ; his lady was, if possible, more
anxious than himself, she was so proud of
being the wife of an M.P., she thought that it
added so much to her dignity in society.
Even Clementina employed her delicate fingers
with a little more energy than she usually
thought “refined,” to make up cockades of
blue satin ribbon—she wished the colours had
been reversed, “as pink is so much more be-
coming ;” but as her complexion had never
been consulted in the choice, she made up her
mind to appear in blue.

The boys naturally caught the infection of
the time. Charles was wild for the Blues, and
accompanied his uncle very often on his canvass-
ingrounds, He felt ready to knock down any
one who dared express a doubt of Mr. Hope’s
: A FEW STEPS ASIDE, 241
success; and though Ernest had suffered too
much, and had reflected too much, to be quite
so violent in his emotions, besides wanting
even the smattering of politics which his
brother had naturally picked up, he also took
his part with interest in the proceedings, and
watched with almost as much pleasure the
erection of the polling-booth, covered with
gaudy placards of red and blue, on which
“ Hope For Ever!” and “ Vore ror Stacey!”
appeared in large, staring letters, as he did the
conversion of a barn into a little school which
he was preparing for the cottagers around.

Sometimes, indeed, the thought would cross
the mind of the boy as he looked on excite:
faces, and listened to animated conversation on
the all-engrossing theme. “How strange it is
that so much more interest is taken in the
things of this life than in what regards another!
It is as though pilgrims to the celestial city
should exert all their efforts, strain every
nerve, to gain possession of some hillock by
the way !”

The day before the election was one of those
mild bright days which sometimes occur in the
midst of winter, like a little green oasis in a

sy 16
242 A FEW STEPS ASIDE.

desert, to remind us of the spring which is to
come, The air felt almost balmy and warm,
and Mr, Ewart and his two pupils walked out
to enjoy the sweet sunshine in the park, There
was a rustic chair beneath one of the fine old
trees, on which the clergyman sat down, while
the boys, on the other and more sheltered side
of the huge tree, amused themselves with

Mr, Ewart had scarcely taken his seat when
a step was heard on the dry withered leaves
with which the turf was thickly strewn A
rough-looking man approached and touched his
hat; Mr. Ewart recognised the butcher who
supplied the castle, and, in his usual courteous
manner, wished Mr. Staines good morning.

The tradesman replied to the salutation, but
stood lingering as if he had something to say,
and yet felt difficulty in beginning the conver-
sation,

“Did you wish to speak to me?” said Mr.
Ewart, observing his hesitation.

“Why, sir, I have been wishing very much
to say a word to you about to-morrow’s elec-
tion.”

“You must be aware,” replied the clergyman,
A FEW STEPS ASIDE. 243
“that I make it my rule to take no part in

politics. :
“I wished to consult you, sir,—”
“T must decline giving advice on these sub-

“ But, sir, it is a matter of conscience !”

“Tf so, then I am ready to hear you.”

“As you of course know, sir,” said the
butcher, rubbing his head, “ Mr. Hope expects
me to give him my vote. I have the custom
of the castle here, and that’s a great matter for
a man like me. But you see, sir,”"—he stopped
and scraped the ground with his foot, then, as
the clergyman waited patiently for the rest of
his speech, continued with a good deal of
embarrassment,—“ you see I think all the
other way from Mr. Hope, and I did promise
to vote for Mr. Stacey.”

“Then what brings you now to me? You
cannot be ignorant that in my position as tutor
to Lord Fontonore, this is a most delicate affair
for me to interfere in.”

“1 know it, I know it, sir,” said the trades- ~
man, lowering his voice; “but I have never
received from any person in the world the
advice that I have received from you. A man
244 A FEW STEPS ASIDE.

needs good counsel, you see, at a pass like this,
where one is afraid of going against a customer
on the one hand, and—and—conscience upon
the other.”

“Conscience before interest always,” said
Mr. Ewart.

“ You don’t mean that I should vote against
Mr. Hope?” cried the butcher, who perhaps
secretly wished that the tutor of the candidate's
nephew might find some means of relieving his
scruples, or take on himself the responsibility
of silencing them at once.

“ Do ever what is right, and leave the event
to a higher hand,” replied the clergyman, rising
to conclude so annoying an interview, and
motioning to the tradesman to leave him,

“My uncle would not thank you for your
* counsel,” said Charles, coming forward as soon
as the voter had departed.

“I hope that he may never know of it,”
subjoined Ernest ; “he would be wounded in
his tenderest point.”

“TI much regret that I was consulted,” said
Mr. Ewart, gravely ; “ but, being so, I do not
see what other answer I could have given.”

“Oh, you did right, as you always do!” ex-
A FEW STEPS ASIDE. 245

claimed Charles ; “ but I hope that that vote
may not lose us the election—it would be
almost enough to drive one wild.”

There was a sudden change in the weather
before the next morning dawned: the snow
was falling fast, mantling the earth with white;
the sky was of one dull grey, the wind shrieked
through the leafless branches, It was a day
when it might have been imagined that no
one would have willingly quitted a warm
hearth to face the inclemency of the weather,
yet no one in Castle Fontonore seemed to re-
gard either frost, wind, or snow. There were
banners flying, bands playing, crowds gather-
ing, the tramp of horses, and the noise of
shouting ; the snow that fell so soft and white
became hardened and brown beneath the hur-
ried tread of many feet ; to the poll, from the
poll—on horseback, on foot—eager messengers
crossed each other, to rouse wavering partizans
to exertion, or carry tidings to eager listeners.

The candidates had been proposed, their
speeches had been made, all that now remained
was for the voters to hasten to the poll, Great
was the excitement in the Castle, when, at the
246 A FEW STEPS ASIDE.

end of the first hour, the statement of numbers
was brought in. Mrs. Hope stood flushed and
panting with anxiety, and looked half sur-
prised, half mortified, to hear that her husband
was but thirteen a-head of his opponent !

The next hour his success appeared yet more
doubtful ; the thirteen had diminished to seven.
Then again Mr. Hope’s majority rose, and his
lady, as if assured of triumph, glanéed proudly
around and repeated for the hundredth time
her assertion that she had never for a moment
doubted of victory.

Ernest and Charles rode on their ponies
amidst the gathered crowds; every cheer that
rose as the Lord of Fontonore and his bright-
haired young brother appeared, with large blue
cockades on their breasts, seemed a pledge of
the success of their uncle.
> At length the eventful moment for the close
of the poll drew near, Mrs, Hope could
hardly endure to await the result in the
Castle; but such was the desire of her hus-
band. Restlessly she paced up and down the
hall, starting at every sound, watching with
breathless anxiety for news from the polling-
place ; not that she would admit that she had
A FEW STEPS ASIDE. 247
the slightest fear of defeat ; it was impossible
that Mr, Hope could fail of election, with his
connexions, his talents, his standing: she only
wondered at the audacity of his opponent, and
stopped repeatedly, in her impatient walk to
and fro, to desire Ernest to write down the
name of some titled friend to whom she must
write by the very first post, to communicate
the news of her triumph.

“Hark! that’s the sound of a horse’s quick
tramp!” exclaimed Ernest, starting to his feet.
“That's Charles, I am sure ; he brings tidings.”
The next moment the hoofs clattered through
the archway, and the rider flung himself off
the saddle, even before the panting animal
stopped at the door.

Mrs, Hope and Ernest hurried to meet him;
but the eager question died on the lips of the
lady, as she saw the expression on her nephew's
face.

“ Lost! all lost!” exclaimed Charles, al-
most stamping with impatience. “Lost by a
minority of one !”

“Impossible! It cannot be!” cried Mrs.
Hope ; “ there must be some mistake, or some
treachery.”
248 A FEW STEPS ASIDE.

But no; there was neither treachery nor
mistake ; every new comer confirmed the
tidings, and Ernest had an opportunity of
again witnessing how heavily disappointment
falls on the citizens of Vanity Fair. Would
that the citizens of a more glorious place
lived so far above the world that its trials
should never have power to drag them down
to the level of its slaves: Are the trifles
which so often ruffle our tempers and depress
our spirits worth such anxious thought from
those who profess that their hearts and their
treasures are above?

Mr. Hope's disappointment, anger, and irri-
tation, knew no bounds. He was ill able to
afford the expense of a contested election; he
had spared no trouble, no exertion, no cost ;
and ta lose it, after all, and by a minority of
one, was more than the worldly man could
endure.

Mr. Hope talked over the events of the
day with his wife in the evening, Ernest and
Charles sitting at a little distance, with the
chess-table before them, but too much inter-
ested in the conversation to attend to their
game. Their uncle spoke in a rapid and ex-
A FEW STEPS ASIDE. 249
cited manner, accusing this persou of bribery,
and that of perjury, and declaring that he
would demand a scrutiny.

“I say, Ernest,” whispered Charles, in a
very low voice, bending towards his brother,
so that no one else should hear him, “ I would
not for ten thousand pounds that our uncle
should know of Mr, Ewart’s conversation with
the butcher.”

“Nor I,” replied Ernest in the same tone ;
“what do you think would happen if he
did?”

“Mr. Ewart would be dismissed at once
from the Castle, I know that Uncle Hope
would be glad of an opportunity to do this.
Lam certain that he dislikes our friend, and
so does Aunt Matilda.”

“Oh, I hope and trust that he never may
know it!” exclaimed Ernest, startled at the
idea of such a misfortune, one of the greatest,
he felt, which could befall him, for his affec-
tion towards his tutor was deep and sincere.

“Tam afraid,” said Charles, still whisper-
ing, “that my uncle will hear something about
the affair, He is aware that Staines was the
last man to vote, and that he turned the scale
250 A FEW STEPS ASIDE,

against him; and Jones told us that the
butcher had been seen yesterday in our park,
and my uncle, who was very angry indeed,
declared that he would sift the matter to the
bottom.”

“You make me very uneasy,” said Ernest.
“What should we say if we were questioned?
You know that we overheard all.”

“I wish that we had been anywhere else,”
cried Charles; “ but I had no idea that the
man had come about anything secret. What
should we say if we were questioned ?”

“We could not betray our friend. Oh,
Charles, if he were to leave us, how could we
ever stand firm against all the temptations
which we should be certain to meet ?”

“Who would help you to carry out your
plans of usefulness +”

“Who would be our guide in our pilgrimage?”

“And it might be ruin to Mr. Ewart to be
sent away. You know that he supports his
aged mother. His voice is not strong enough
for severe clerical duty; he might never be
able to get a church.”

“T would do anything to prevent such a
misfortune happening,” cried Ernest.
A FEW STEPS ASIDE. 251

« Anything # Would you tell an untruth?”

“In such a case as this, I hardly think that
; it would be wrong.”

Charles looked very doubtfully at his brother.

“Why, consider, Charles, all the evil that
might follow if my uncle knew the truth: evil
to us, to all around us, to our dear friend him-
self, Nothing should make us swerve from strict
candour where only our own interests are con-
cerned; but when a good man may be ruined—”

Here the conversation was suddenly broken
off by Mr. Hope’s turning towards them, and
exclaiming in a loud tone, “ And there's some-
thing which you may help me to clear up,
young gentlemen. I have heard a rumour, a
very strange rumour, one that it is scarcely
possible to credit,—that that fellow Staines
was hanging about the park yesterday, and
had a consultation with Mr. Ewart, who ad-
vised him to vote against me, Were you
with your tutor at the time?”

“We were with Mr. Ewart all the after-
noon,” replied Ernest, his heart throbbing very
fast.

“We never left him,” added Charles, as his
uncle glanced towards him.
252 A PEW STEPS ASIDE,

“ And do you know nothing of this pre-
tended interview, which may have been,—
which probably is——nothing but a malicious
calumny,—a fable! Was there any such con-
versation held in your presence? A thing
almost impossible to conceive!”

“No, sir; there was none,” replied Ernest,
in a low tone.

“ Noné,” repeated Charles, looking down,
and blushing.

Mr. Hope surveyed them both with a piere-
ing eye. How uneasy they felt under his
glance! He questioned them no more, how-
ever, but turned round again towards the fire,
and was soon engaged once more in animated
‘conversation with his wife.

“ Have we done right?” whispered Charles
to his brother.

“T don’t exactly know. I hope so; for we
acted from a good motive, We could not
have spoken out, and ruined our friend. I
am sure that God will not severely judge an
act of kindness and gratitude.”

Ah! vain confidence, how many have you
led astray, who judge of the Almighty by
their own false ideas, instead of His pure
A FEW STEPS ASIDE, 258

unerring word! Where do we find in the
Bible that any sin, committed from any motive
whatsoever, finds indulgence from the God of
holiness and truth?

“I do not feel quite easy,” murmured
Charles,

“Nor I; yet I hope that we have not really
wandered from the way. I hardly see what
else we could have done.”

The servants now brought in tea and coffee,
Clementina, looking tired and out of spirits,
came into the drawing-room, and was almost
immediately followed by Mr. Ewart,

“ Mr, Ewart,” exclaimed Mr. Hope, stopping
suddenly in what he was saying, on perceiving
the entrance of the clergyman, and addressing ©
him ina sharp, stern, decided manner, “allow me
to ask you one question.” The tutor silently
‘bowed. - “ Did you, or did you not, converse
yesterday in the park with the butcher Staines?”

“TI did do so,” replied Mr. Ewart, without
hesitation, Ernest bit his lip, till he almost
brought blood.

“Did you, or did you not, advise him to
vote against me?” continued Mr. Hupe, in a
tone of suppressed fury.
254 A FEW STEPS ASIDE.

“TI advised him to vote according to his
conscience.”

“ And you advised these two boys to speak
according to their conscience!” exclaimed Mr.
Hope, in a voice that made the room ring.
“You, the instructor of youth,—you, the pat-
tern of strict morality,—you have taught your
pupils to be hypocrites and liars; you have
corrupted their unsuspicious minds—”

“Sir,” said Mr. Ewart, with dignity; but.
Mr, Hope was too furious to listen.

“I say that you have corrupted them,—
ruined their principles; your conduct to me
I could pass over, but I cannot leave my
nephews one day longer in the hands of one
who would teach them to be hypocrites. You
leave the castle to-morrow, sir,—”

*“O! uncle—Mr. Hope!” cried Ernest and
Charles, springing forward, “ Mr. Ewart knew
nothing of it—it was we—it was I.”

“There is no use speaking!” cried the
indignant candidate ; “from your conduct, I
must judge of the instructions which you have
received. Two of my family to be guilty of
deliberate falsehood! Sir,” he continued, turn-
ing towards Mr. Ewart, “you have heard my
REGRETS, BUT NOT DESPAIR. 255
unalterable decision; you quit the castle to-
morrow.”

REGRETS, BUT NOT DESPAIR.

“L have o key in my bosom, called Promise, that will, I am
persuaded, open any lock in Doubting Castle.” Pilgrim's
Progress. ,

“ Wuar has occurred? what could your uncle
mean by speaking of deliberate falsehood ?”
said Mr. Ewart, as soon as the three were
alone in his room, and the door closed behind
them.

Ernest was too much agitated to speak.
Charles told in a few words all that had hap-
pened, omitting nothing but his brother's
greater share in the fault, Mr. Ewart listened
with a look of distress on his countenance,
which cut both the boys to the soul,

“ We meant well,” said Charles in conclusion,
“ but everything has turned out ill.”
256 REGRETS, BUT NOT DESPAIR.

“You should rather say,” observed the
clergyman, in a mild but sad tone, “ that you
meant well, but that you acted ill.”

“ And you must suffer for our fault,” ex-
claimed Ernest, in bitter grief.

“ What I suffer from most is the thought of
your fault.”

“But that it should be laid at your door,
you who have never taught us anything but
what is right—oh! it is such cruelty, such in-
justice—”

“ Hush,” said the tutor, laying his hand
upon Ernest's, “not a word must you utter
against your guardian ; and remember that he
had grounds for his indignation.”

Ernest leant both his arms upon the table,
and bending down his forehead upon them,
> wept in silence,

“ If you leave us on account of this,” cried
Charles with emotion, “ we shall never be
happy again.”

“Not so,” said Mr. Ewart, soothingly ;
“though the Christian is commanded to re-
pent, he is forbidden to despair. Experience
is precious, though it may cost us dear; it
will be worth even the sorrow which you are
REGRETS, BUT NOT DESPAIR, 257

feeling now, if this lesson is deeply imprinted
on your soul, never do evil that good may
come,”

“ In no case?” inquired Charles.

“ In no case,” replied the clergyman. “We
show want of faith in the power of the Al-
mighty if we imagine that He needs one sin
to work His own good purposes, We can
never expect a blessing on disobedience.”

“ What I cannot endure,” exclaimed Ernest,
raising his head, “is to think what the world
will say. I know the colouring that my uncle
will put. upon the affair—how my aunt will
talk to her fashionable friends. She will speak
of the danger of evil influence, of her anxiety
for her dear nephews, and the shock which it
had been to her to find what principles had
been instilled into their minds Oh, Mr.
Ewart, best, dearest friend, we have injured
you indeed—we have brought disgrace upon
your spotless character!”

“God knows my innocence in regard te
you,” replied the clergyman ; “to Him I com-
mit my cause. To be the object of unjust
accusation has often been the appointed trial
of His servants, He am take copes: saly

(3)
258 REGRETS, BUT NOT DESPAIR.
affliction work for their good. And now, my
dear boys, leave me. I have letters to write,
little preparations to make, and I need a brief
space for reflection.”

“Do you forgive us?” said Charles, pressing -
his tutor’s hand with a mixture of affection
and respect,

“Forgive you! you have erred but through
kindness towards me, I have nothing to for-
give, dear Charles.”

Ernest rushed from the room without utter-
ing a word. Charles followed him through
the long corridor, down the broad oaken stair-
case, to the drawing-room, in which the family
was still assembled.

Ernest came to confess, to plead, to entreat,
and he pleaded, he entreated, with the fervent
. eloquence of one who thinks his whole happi-
ness at stake, Mr. Hope listened with a rigid,
unmoved look ; his lady, who sat at her desk,
observed with an unpleasant smile that the
reverend gentleman had been evidently work-
ing upon the feelings of his pupils. She
interrupted Ernest’s most passionate appeal,
by telling that she was at that moment en-
gaged in writing to her friend, Lady Fitz
REGRETS, BUT NOT DESPAIR. 259
wigram, about a very superior tutor, of whom
‘she had spoken to her when in London. “If
Mr. Sligo should be still disengaged,” observed
the lady, “this affair may prove really a for-
tunate occurrence,”

Fontonore and Charles left the room in
despair. Bitterly reproaching themselves for
having wandered from the right path, they
retired to the chamber of the former, where
they both remained for the remainder of the
night, for companionship in sorrow was their
only consolation in this time of bitter dis-
tress. .

“ It was I who led you into this trouble,”
cried “Ernest. “I have been your tempter,
your false guide; all that has happened has
been owing tome! Tow could I ever dare
to call myself a pilgrim, after all that has
happened, after all the lessons which I have
received, to fall away thus, and disgrace my
profession! Will not Clementina look upon
me as a hypocrite. I could speak to her of
the joy of the Lord, of the pleasures of devo-
tion, of the glories of heaven! Ah, how dif-
ferent will she think my actions to my words!
She may even place my errors to the account
260 REGRETS, BUT NOT DESPAIR.
of my religion; my,sin will be a stumbling-
block in her way.”

“ Ernest, brother, you must not give way
thus. To fall once may not be to fall for ever.
God is merciful and ready to forgive; it is
foolish, it is wrong to despair.”

Poor Charles endeavoured to give comfort,
which he much needed himself, yet his grief”
was not so deep as his brother's, Ernest felt
more strongly, what every Christian should
feel, that he who has confessed religion openly
before men should, above all others, be watch-
ful over his own conduct, The world is ready,
is eager to find faults in such, to excuse its
own errors by those of God’s children, to
accuse of inconsistency, and even of hypocrisy,
those who profess to live by a higher standard.
> Alas, the sins and failings of sincere Christians
have done more injury to the cause of the
religion which they love than all the open
attacks of its enemies !

Ernest’ was also perhaps the most warmly
attached to his tutor. Mr. Ewart had been
his friend at a time when he had no other; it
was through him that he had discovered his
tight to an earthly title; it was through him
REGRETS, BUT NOT DESPATR, 261

that he had learned to hope for a heavenly
one, and to have been the means of inflicting
deep injury on his benefactor wrung the spirit
of the boy with anguish, even greater than
the pang of parting with his friend.

Long after Charles, weary and sad, had
dropped asleep, Ernest lay awake, revolving
bitter thoughts in his mind, almost too miser-
able even to pray. Never in the course of his
whole life of trial had he passed so wretched
a night. The envied Lord of Fontonore, in
his magnificent castle, surrounded by all that
could minister to his ease, was more wretched
than Mark Dowley had been in his cottage,
hungry, despised, and persecuted. Such are
the pangs of a wounded conscience—such the
misery of a backsliding professor |

Ernest fell asleep at last, worn out by the
conflict in his own mind, and awoke in the
morning with a weight on his heart which
painfully oppressed, even before he was suf-
ficiently roused to remember what it was that
had caused it.

Mr. Ewart did not appear at breakfast, and
neither of the boys could taste the meal. The
sound in the court-yard of the wheels of the
262 REGRETS, BUT NOT DESPATR.

carriage which was to take their tutor away,
and the sight of the neat black trunk, labelled
‘and corded, placed ready by the door in the
hall, made their hearts feel almost ready to
burst.

The family of Mr, Hope avoided being pre-
sent, but a number of the servants assembled
to witness the departure of one who was re-
spected by all, Even Jack and Ben were
seen loitering on the drawbridge ; and Lord
Fontonore could not help remarking that the
former surveyed him with a look of even
grenter insolence than was his wont ; but poor
Ernest was too much humbled, too much de-
pressed, to be roused to any feeling of anger.

Mr. Ewart came forth, looking pale and
thoughtful, but he smiled as soon as he saw
his late pupils, and held out a hand to each.
He bade a kind farewell to the numerous at-
tendants, with a word of advice or encourage-
ment to some. There were aprons lifted to
tearful eyes, saddened looks, and murmured
blessings, as the clergyman passed through the
assembled throng to where the carriage was
waiting. The boys grasped his hands, and
kept them within their own, reluctant to un-
REGRETS, BUT NOT DESPAIR. 268
loose that last, firm clasp. He gave them his
earnest, solemn blessing, and bade them put
their trust ii Him who would never leave or
forsake them. :

“Shall we ever meet again?” faultered
Ernest,

“T hope so—I believe so,” replied Mr.
Ewart, cheerfully, “This very morning I
received a kind invitation from Mr. Searle,
If I see no other opening before me, I may
possibly visit Silvermere early in the spring ;
and if so—” -

“ Oh, if you were at the other end of the -
world, we sliould find some means of meeting,”
exclaimed Charles,

“There is one comfort which we may always
make our own, when parting from those whom
we love,” said the clergyman, struggling to
keep down his emotions ; “all pilgrims travel-
ling the same road come to the same rest at
last; though circumstances. and distance may
divide them here, they may look forward in
sure hope to a meeting in heaven.”

And he was really gone! The friend whom
Ernest had loved, the guide whom he had fol-
lowed, the stay upon which he had leaned—
264 REGRETS, BUT NOT DESPAIR.

all was like a painful, bewildering dream,
Again the young peer hastened to his cham-
ber, threw himself on his bed, and vainly
sought for the relief of tears, He was roused
by feeling an arm thrown round his neck, and
looking up, saw Charles, whose flushed face
and reddened eyes bore evident traces of
weeping.

“ Leave me, Charley,” he cried ; “the sight
of your sorrow only makes mine harder to
bear. We can never, never bring back the
past. We can never recall the friend whom
we have lost. I feel almost in despair.”

Charles uttered no reply. Perhaps he could
hardly have trusted his voice to make, one ;
but he laid his open Bible on the pillow before
Ernest, and silently pointed to the words in
Jeremiah, “ Return, ye backsliding children,
and I will heal your backslidings. Behold,
we come unto Thee, for Thow art the Lord
our God.”

“ Oh, Charley !” said Ernest, with emotion,
“ this is the second time that you have opened
the door of hope to your brother !”

“ When did I ever do so before ?”

“When a poor desolate boy stood beneath
REGRETS, BUT NOT DESPAIR, 265
a yew-tree, and watched crowds going into
the church which he was almost afraid to
enter. You came to him then, and said a
few simple words, which roused and

at that time ; and often since, when I have felt
low and fearful, I have repeated those words
to myself, “You must not stay outside.” I
have thought of these words as applying to
the gate of merey open to all. Ob, Charley!
what a good, what a generous brother you
have been to me! Many in your place would
have hated and despised me, taunted me with
my ignorance and with my early life, but you,
even at a time when I have done you great
wrong, when I have deprived you of your
friend, even led you into sin, you come to
comfort and to cheer me; ever faithful, ever
hopeful, ever dear!”
266 A NEW DANGER,

“ Beware of the flatterer. As is the saying of the wise man, so
we have found it this day, ‘A man that flattereth his neigh-
hour, spreadeth a net for his feet’ (Prov. xxix, 5)."—, ‘3
Progress,

Ir was some time before Ernest could regain
his usual cheerfulness ; constant occupation
was what, perhaps, had the most effect in
restoring it. Not only did he turn with
ardour to his studies, bending all the powers
of a most intelhgent mind to master the diffi-
culties of learning, but he was never idle in
his hours of leisure; and so well employed his
time, that Charles once observed, with a smile,
that, the sands in his hour-glass were all of
gold!

We are commanded to let our light so shine
before men, that they may see our good works,
and glorify our Father which is im heaven,
The light of the young Lord of Fontonore
shone brightly, enlightening some and cheering
many. Until his little school could be finished,
he assembled the poor children in an outhouse
of the castle, and not only contributed, almost
A NEW DANGER. 267
beyond his power, to pay the salary of a school-
master, but himself assisted in the task of tui-
tion, and spoke to the little ones with such’
heart-fervour of the duties of o pilgrim and
the love of the Saviour, that the cottagers
said that the children never learned so much
as when the young lord himself was their
teacher. Ernest was often to be seen beneath
the widow's lowly roof: he would carry to
the sick poor little comforts from his own table,
and none knew how often he went without
pleasures to himself, that he might afford to
help those who needed his assistance. Large
as was his allowance, his charity so drained it
that self appeared almost forgotten ; and the
Lord of Fontonore was scarcely ever known to
purchase anything for his own gratification.
Tt was his habit, his privilege, his delight, to
lay his treasures at the feet of his Lord; and
thus, though the possessor of great wealth, the
pilgrim pressed on, unclogged and unburdened
by it.

Nor, in attending to the wants of the poor,
did Ernest neglect his home duties, The affee-
tion between him and his brother was a source
of happiness to both, and appeared to grow
268 A NEW DANGER.

stronger every day ; and Ernest sometimes ven-
tured to hope that he might in time exert a
slight influence even on the frivolous mind of
Clementina. She was, quite unconsciously to
herself, less inclined to utter words of folly or
ill-nature when in the presence of her cousin,
and felt the quiet glance of his eye a greater
restraint than serious reproof from another.
At a time when she suffered from weakness in
her eyes, Ernest, busy as he was, seemed always
to find time to read to her and amuse her:
the book was sometimes her choice, but more
often his; and he gradually led the weak,
worldly girl to take some interest in his fn-
vourite Pilgrim.

It may well be imagined that Ernest became
exceedingly beloved in the castle, His uncle,
indeed, called him an enthusiast, and Mrs
Hope complained that he was too much of a
missionary; but what she would have ridiculed
in any one else, she had great indulgence for
in a peer. There was but one being of all
those who lived at Fontonore who seemed
rooted in dislike towards the young lord, and
that was the envious, insolent Jack Lawless,
whom no benefits softened, no kindnesses won,
A NEW DANGER. 269

I must not omit to mention the arrival of
Mr, Sligo, the new tutor, who came to Fonto-
nore about ten days after the departure of
Mr. Ewart, Seldom has a new instructor been
introduced to his pupils under greater disad-
vantages as regards their feelings,

“TI am certain that I shall dislike him,”
said Charles to his brother the evening before
Mr. Sligo made his appearance. “It will seem
to me as though he usurped the place of my
friend.”

“TI confess that I feel a prejudice against
any tutor recommended by Lady Fitzwigram.
But then such a prejudice may be neither kind
nor just: he never taught in her family, there-
fore has nothing to do with any of the faults
of her sons. We must meet Mr. Sligo in a
fair, candid spirit, Mr. Ewart would have
been the first to tell us to treat our new tutor
as we would wish to be treated in his position
ourselves,”

Mr. Sligo proved quite a different kind of
person from what his pupils had expected.
Instead of a proud, opiniative scholar, bearing
the stamp of one familiar with the haut ton,
—a walking peerage, a follower of the world
270 A NEW DANGER.
ond its fashions—they beheld a mild-looking,
delicate little man, with a manner quick but
gentle, who spoke in low, soft tones, with an
almost timid air, as if afraid of giving offence.
To such a person it was impossible for a gene-
rous spirit to be unkind. The brothers did
all in their power to put him at his ease, and
they were flattered by the grateful, deferential
manner, in which he received the smallest
attentions. Mr. Sligo was soon found to be
not only an intelligent tutor, but a very agree-
able companion. He was ready for anything,
either business or play ; could do anything,
from setting a drawing for Charles to assisting
in the construction of the school: he entered
with pleasure into every project, especially
such as had charity for their object, listened
to pious sentiments with an approving smile,
and delighted in helping forward every good
work.

With such a companion, with such occupa-
- tions and such encouragements, was not our
pilgrim almost at the gate of heaven?

Had Ernest been an angel, free from human
frailty, perhaps it might have been so with
him now. Never had he walked onwards with
A NEW DANGER. 271

a firmer step, never had he been such a blessing
to others, never had he kept his lips more pure,
nor been more watchful over every action, and
yet he was, perhaps, in more danger of falling
than when passing through Vanity Fair! To
a mind like his, the society of a worldly com-
panion might have been less dangerous than
that of Mr. Sligo, And why so? His tutor
never taught him evil, never set him an evil
example. But there was silent flattery in his
admiring look, the attention with which he
listened, the heartiness with which he approved.
With all his quickness of perception, there was
one thing which he seemed to lack,—the power
of discovering a fault in his pupil.

Ernest had endured, without injury, the
flattery of the world,—he attributed it all to
his title. The praises of Charles had nothing
dangerous in them,—he set them down to a
brother's partiality ; but it was something new
to him to be admired for the very qualities
for which, a few months before, he had suffered
persecution ; it was something delightful to be
looked up to by so many, and viewed as a
model of Christian benevolence! We may
wonder that, after his last sad fall, Ernest
272 A NEW DANGER.

could have entertained a thought of spiritual
pride; but our enemy is ever watchful and
insidious and human nature infirm. We do
not willingly dwell upon what gives us pain ;
and often, too often, deceive our own hearts
from the pleasure which it gives us to be thus
deceived.

Ernest had often remarked, that the worldly
are constantly engaged in raising pedestals on
which to elevate self; he had seen the ambi-
tious build his of popular applause ;—such was
Mr. Hope’s, and it had crumbled into dust.
The proud woman believed herself raised by
fashion, the vain beauty by the admiration of
society. But while Ernest could thus observe
the failings of others, he would have been
startled and alarmed indeed had he known
that.he was now raising such a pedestal himself !
His very prayers, his alms, his good works,
were turned into a stumbling-block in his path ;
whatever exalts self, stands between us and
the Saviour, and we are never safe but when
our pride lies humbled in the dust before Him.

I would especially direct the attention of
my reader to this last most subtle device of
Satan to kecp back the pilgrim from heaven.
A NEW DANGER. 273

As God draws good out of evil, Satan draws
evil out of good, and sometimes makes us deem
ourselves most near the celestial city when we
are actually turning our faces from it, The
most experienced pilgrims may be taken in
this snare ; the most zealous, the most devoted
Christians are perhaps in the greatest danger
from it. We are so ready to forget when the
mirror shines brightly, that it is in itself but
dust and ashes, borrowing all its radiance from
heaven,

The tender leaves were now beginning to
appear on the shrubs, and the dark branches
of the trees were spangled with the light green
buds which told the approach of spring, The
crocus lifted its golden cup from the sod, and
the snow-drop trembled on its slender stem.
On the day when Ernest would complete his
thirteenth year, his school-house was to be
opened for the first time. A number of friends
wore asked to be present on the occasion,—
Mr. Searle, his daughter, and a son from col-
lege amongst the rest, Ernest’s often-expressed
wish having at length overcome the reluctance
of his aunt to invite them, There was to be
# band and a collation in honour of the ooce-

)
s
274 A NEW DANGER.
sion; and the children were abroad early in
the sunny morning to gather flowers to deco-
rate the school-room.

The spirits of the young Lord Fontonore
rose high, there was so much to gratify and
elate him. Never had he more admired his
beautiful home, or more rejoiced in the power
to do good. Mr. Sligo had written an ode to
celebrate the day, in which flattery was so
delicately mingled with truth, that it could
hardly fail to gratify and please.

One by one the company assembled, each
with a kind wish or well-turned compliment,
Ernest was of course the hero of the day; and
as everything in the schoolhouse was now
prepared, the tide of silk and velvet, feathers,
and lace, moved on towards the little edifice.
“The school children lined the path on either
side, in clean frocks, with nosegays of wild
flowers in their hands, their ruddy little faces
beaming with pleasure at the thought of their
expected feast. Passing between the lines,
quite unmingled with pride, Lord Fontonore,
accompanied by his guests, proceeded to the
door, which he unlocked and threw open. In
A NEW DANGER, 275

a few minutes the school-room was filled. It
had been decorated with a good deal of taste
by the school children under Mr, Sligo’s direc-
tion, and Charles had fastened two blue banners
above the entrance. There were books for
school use judiciously selected, maps on a
large scale hung round the room; but every
eye in the gay assembly was at once directed
to a large black board hung over the fire-place.
This was designed for the use of classes in
arithmetic, as sums or figures could be chalked
upon it of & size to be seen by the whole
school. But it was neither sum nor diagram
upon it now that drew the attention of every
one present, but a coarse sketch, evidently
chalked by an untutored hand, though not
wanting in spirit or fun, of a boy sitting
astride on the top of a wall, with a gigantic
peach in his grasp; and as the picture might
not be understood by all, beneath it was writ-
ten, in a round schoolboy hand, legible from
the farthest end of the room, “ The pious
Lord Fontonore robbing Farmer Joyce.”

Ernest was taken by surprise, when quite
off his guard; insulted and exposed in the
very hour of his triumph, and he needed not
276 A NEW DANGER.

the sight of Jack’s insolent face at the door to
tell him by whom. A few months before, he
would have struck the boy to the earth; now
the feelings of the Christian, perhaps the dig-
nity of the noble, prevented any such violent
display of his anger; but he clenched his hand,
and with an expression of fierceness in his
flashing eye, which no one present but the
offender himself had ever seen on his counte-
nance before, Ernest exclaimed in a voice of
fury, “ Insolent liar, this is your work |”

A scene of brief confusion ensued. Mr.
Sligo sprang to the obnoxious board, and in a
few moments every trace of the sketch was
removed; but the impression which it had
left on the spectators was not so readily taken
away.

“ This comes of bringing up such a wolf's
cub!” exclaimed Mrs. Hope.

“ What an extraordinary piece of imperti-
nence,” said the ‘baronet, on whose arm she
leant. “Surely,” he added, in a lower tone,
“such a story had never any foundation in
truth.”

Some recommended a severe thrashing to
the offender, some that he should at once be
A NEW DANGER, 277
turned adrift on the world. Ernest felt the
whole subject intolerably painful ; annoyed as
he was at Jack, he was more annoyed at
himself for having been overcome by sudden
passion, Charles, with the quick eye of affec-
tion, read his wish in his look ; and springing
on the table to raise himself above the throng,
he began an extempore questioning of the chil-
dren, conducting his examination with so much
spirit and fun as quite to change the current
of general conversation.

But though the disagreeable subject was
dropped and apparently forgotten, the school-
room duly admired, and the children’s progress
applauded, every word of praise and compli-
ment now fell flat upon the ear of Fontonore,
The discipline had been bitter, but it was just
what he had required. A veil had been sud-
denly drawn from his eyes; he had been thrown
from his pedestal of pride. He had been re-
minded of what he had been, what he had
done, and shown what he still continued to be,
a weak infirm child of dust, subject to passion
and sin, having nothing whereof he could
boast,

“T was not only angry,” thought Ernest to
278 A NEW DANGER.
himself, “but uncandid. I gave an impression
to all who heard me that I denied that of
which I was accused. He who but declared
unpleasant truth, in my passion I called a liar,
Oh! how greatly have I of late been deceiving
myself when believing my conduct to be more
consistent than that of others. One thing,
however, remains to be done. I can yet
make some amends; and I will do so, what-
ever it may cost my feelings, however it may
wound my pride.”

As he showed his guests over the castle and
grounds, Fontonore was remarkably silent and
absent. Charles wondered to himself that the
insolence of a boy should have such an effect
upon his brother; but he did not guess what
deeper feelings were stirring in the breast of
the-Pilgrim, At last Ernest, as if in reply to
some question from Clementina, whose sound _
had fallen upon his ear, but whose sense he
had not taken in, proposed that they should
all go and see the children at their feast on
the lawn,

“TI should have thought that we had had
enough of those children,” said Clementina,
with affectation. “1 cannot conceive the plea-
4 NEW DANGER. 279
sure of watching them eating, and our presence
can be nothing but a restraint.”

Towards the lawn, however, the whole party
moved, where a long table had been laid out
by Ernest's desire, well furnished with a com-
fortable meal, Sounds little befitting a scene
of mirth were heard as the visitors approached,
The schoolmaster, who presided at the top of
the table, was in an angry indignant voice
denying to Jack the right of sitting at it,
after openly insulting the provider of the feast.
The general feeling of the children ran in the
same current; some were loudly calling out,
“Shame, shame, turn him out!” but Lawless,
with his own insolent self-assurance, appeared
inclined to defy them all,

At the appearance of Fontonore and the
ladies there was a sudden silence, and all the
party at the feast turned towards him to de-
cide the disputed question, Ernest walked
firmly up to the head of the table, very pale,
for what he had resolved to do went sorely
against human nature ; and few efforts are so
painful as to trample down pride, and humble
ourselves in the sight of the world.

“Let him sit down,” said Ernest to the
280 A NEW DANGER.

schoolmaster, The children silently made room
for their companion. “Jack Lawless,” con-
tinued the peer, turning towards the boy, and
speaking rapidly, whilst he could not raise his
own eyes from the ground, “I regret that I
unjustly called you a liar; I recall the word
now before all who heard it.”

Nothing can describe the astonishment of
the whole assembly as they listened to this
apology from the young lord. “Brave boy,
well done! He’sa soldier that will not flinch !”
routtered old Mr, Searle, with cordial appro-
bation.

“He must be wild,” exclaimed Mrs. Hope,
“to expose himself so before a company like this!
To acknowledge such a fact! Why, I would
rather have died than have disgraced myself
so before the world!” The lady, however
experienced in the concerns of this life, in
spiritual things was more ignorant than a
child, or she would have known that disgrace
is in the commission of a fault, but never in
the frank avowal of it.
TAK LAKE AMONG THE ROCKS, 281

CHAPTER XXV.
THE LAKE AMONG THE ROCKS,

“ Now I saw in my dream, that by this time the pilgrims wero
entering into the country of Beulah.”"—Pilgrim's Progress,
Tue painful incident recorded in the last,
chapter had been to Ernest one of the most
instructive events of his life, and the young
lord felt that it was so. He recognised the
parental care of his heavenly Father, in openly
rebuking his pride; and was now so well
aware of the peculiar dangers that attended
his position, and how much they were in-
creased by the weak indulgence of his precep-
tor, that he heard almost without regret, on
the following day, that having come into some
property by the will of a relative, Mr. Sligo
was about to resign his present charge,

' Oh, how gladly would Fontonore have re-
called his first friend, him whose love was too
sincere for flattery! This, however, was a
thing quite beyond his hopes, and the boys
tried to content themselves with the thought
that they might soon have the pleasure of see~
282 THE LAKE AMONG THE ROCKS.

Ernest, when he met him at the Castle, that
he expected Mr, Ewart on a visit ; and though
the young peer knew that the clergyman
would not come to Fontonore, as such a step
might be displeasing to his uncle, he deter-
mined to go over himself to Silvermere, as
soon as he should hear that his friend had
arrived there.

One bright, lovely spring morning, with
this idea on his mind, Ernest sauntered forth
in the direction of Mr, Searle’s house. Very
beautiful was the scenery which lay between,
so beautiful that the spot was often visited by ~
strangers, who came from many miles round
to see it. :
A small lake, so small that we might better
term it a pool, lay embosomed in high rocks,
that hung over it as though to look at their
rough crags reflected in its mirror, From this
beautiful little piece of water, sleeping in their
dark shadow, was fed ‘a rapid stream, that,
rushing onward, as if weary of its tranquil re-
pose, made its way for some short distance
through an opening in the rocks, and then
flinging aloft showers of spray, fell with a bold
THE LAKE AMONG THE ROCKS. 283
leap over some lower crags into a wider lake
in the valley below. There was a wooden
bridge over this stream, some way above the
cascade, and on this bridge. Ernest had often
delighted to take his station, where, on the
right hand, he could see the quiet upper lake,
so carefully sheltered and guarded from the
wind by the tall rocks that towered around
it; on the left, the wider sheet which lay out-
spread far below to receive the rivulet which
flowed beneath his feet. It was a lovely spot,
and a fayourite haunt of one who loved to
look up through nature unto nature’s God.
Ernest thought of the current of human life
as he watched the waters bursting forth from
the secluded, shady pool, rolling for some brief
minutes through a narrow, darkened chasm ;
then, as they emerged into the sunny light,
plunging with a deep and sudden fall to mix
and lose themselves in the brighter waters that
lay glittering in the vale.

_ It was some time now since Ernest had
visited this scene, and this morning he felt
inclined to bend his steps thither. He feared
that his constant round of occupations, his
studies, even his charitable pursuits, had made
284 THE LAKE AMONG THE ROCKS,

him of late too much neglect that quiet com-
muning with God and his own heart, which
should be a Pilgrim’s privilege and delight.
Ernest, therefore, did not ask even Charles to
accompany him; peaceful meditation on the
highest subjects that can engage the mind is
best: enjoyed, is perhaps only enjoyed, in soli-
tude and seclusion.

Ernest was tranquilly, but deeply happy.
His discovery of his infirmity had served
rather to humble than to depress him, If he
had less confidence now in himself, he had
more than ever in his Saviour; and what
sweet security came with the thought that it
was on no arm of flesh that he rested! He
who had loved him would love to the end.
This God is our God for ever and ever, He
will be owr guide wnto death,

With holy and happy thoughts for his com-
panions, Fontonore wandered to the little
bridge. It struck him, before he set his foot
upon it, that it looked decayed and injured by
the weather. He stooped down to examine
the rough timber, between the chinks of which
he could see the stream flowing darkly and
rapidly by. A very brief survey strengthened
THE LAKE AMONG THE ROCKS. 285
his suspicion thar the bridge was in a dan-
gerous state,

“T will not attempt to cross it,” said Ernest
to himself, “though it is the nearest way to
Silvermere, I must speak to Mr, Searle, and
have it repaired. I think that the property
belongs to him. The long winter has made
the wood decay; and yet, from a little dis-
tance, it looks safe and beautiful as ever. To
rest our hopes of heaven upon our works, how-
ever fair in man’s eyes they might appear,
would be. like trusting our safety to that frail
timber, and first learning our danger by out
fall.”

Before he quitted the spot, Ernest wished
to climb to the top of the highest crag that
tose above the cataract, as he from thence
would command a view over Silvermere : per-
haps he might even see Mr, Ewart in the dis-
tance, The path which led to the height was
very narrow and winding, encumbered with
thicket and difficult of access, but the prospect
from the summit more than repaid all the
trouble of the ascent, An expanse of beau-
tiful country spread around : here cattle were
grazing in hedge-bordered fields of emerald
“"Tis thus,” thought its possessor, “ that,
from the heights of heaven, we may look down
upon what we most prize below. How small
THE LAKE AMONG THE ROCKS. 287

spring forth into life, and the Lord come to
gather in the harvest of His redeemed.
Presently Ernest saw beneath him some one
approaching the bridge. His elevation, though
considerable, was not so great but that he
recognized the face and figure of Jack Lawless.
It would take some time to reach him by
descending the path, Ernest adopted a shorter
way of warning him of danger, and, leaning
over the crag, shouted loudly and repeatedly,
“Do not try the bridge, it is not safe!” Jack
could not.help hearing the voice, and looked
up; his only reply was his own audacious
smile, Ernest had warned him before of dan-
gers of another kind ; he had disregarded the
warning then, he disregarded it now. As if
he wished to show that he despised any cau-
tion given to him by one whom he hated, or,
perhaps, led only by the foolish daring of a
boy, he set his foot upon the rotten plank, and
the next moment was precipitated into the
water.

Ernest heard the sharp cry, saw the sudden fall;
he knew that the wretched boy could not swim,
and that in a few moments he must be hurried
over the cataract, and dashed to pieces on the
288 THE LAKE AMONG THE ROCKS.

rocks below! Ernest never paused to consider
how slight was the chance of saving him—how
great that of losing his own life in the attempt ;
still less did he stop to recollect that the miser-
able Lawless was one who had treated him
with insult and hate; he only saw that a fel-
low creature was perishing before him, on the
brink of destruction, and unprepared! If he
descended by the path, his aid must come too
late ; Ernest took a shorter and more perilous
way. Springing from the edge of the crag,
swinging himself down by the shrubs that
grew on the rock, clinging, leaping, clamber-
ing, falling, he descended from the height as
never human being had descended before.
Twice he dashed himself against the crags in
his desperate descent ; a thrill of sharp agony
shot across his frame, but now it was impos-
sible to stop. Down he plunged into the
water, almost at the head of the fall, at the
moment that the current was carrying Lawless
over the edge, The left hand of Ernest still
grasped the bough of a willow which he had
caught as he first struck the stream; the
right, hastily extended, grasped the hair of
the drowning boy, and held him back from
the fatal brink, But the fearful effort could
not last, though it was an effort for life.
Ernest felt both his strength and his senses
failing him,—the exhausted fingers must relax
their clasp,—both must perish! No! no!—
there is a loud shout heard,—help is near, an
eager hand is stretched out to save,—a firm
hold is laid on the arm of Fontonore,—he is
dragged to the shore in a senseless state, his
livid hand still unconsciously wreathed in the
locks of the boy whom he has saved !
“Thank God! oh, thank God!” exclaimed
Mr. Ewart, as he laid the two boys side by side
on the turf, dripping, ghastly, insensible, but
living still. He hastened for the aid which
was speedily afforded; Ernest and Lawless
were removed to the nearest cottage, where
every means was used to restore them, A
messenger was hastily despatched for a doctor,
but before he arrived both of the sufferers had
sufficiently recovered to be taken back to the
Castle. Lawless felt no further effect from his
accident than a slight chill and a sense of ex-
haustion; but it was far otherwise with his
youthful preserver, who had sustained very
severe injury in his en descent, and
@
290 THE LAKE AMONG THE ROCKS.

who awoke to consciousness in a state of such
suffering as excited alarm in the minds of his
friends,

The doctor arrived after some delay, and
examined the injured boy, who shrank from
his touch in uncontrollable pain. Dr. Mansell
looked grave, and drew Mr. Hope aside,

“T should wish, for my own satisfaction,”
he said, “that other advice should be called
in, The case is, I fear, of a serious nature,—
could not a messenger be despatched upon
horseback at once to bring Dr. Ashby?” a sur-
geon of great eminence, who resided in a town
at some distance.

“One shall be sent directly,” replied Mr.
Hope ; “you do not apprehend any dan-
ger?” he added, speaking in a low, earnest
tone.

“We will say nothing till Dr. Ashby’s
opinion is given. I hope that there is no cause
for alarm ;” but the manner of the medical
man contradicted his words,

Intense was the anxiety with which Charles
and Mr, Ewart awaited the coming of the sur-
geon, How many, alas, have known that ter-
tible period of waiting for the arrival of the
TNE LAKE AMONG THE ROCKS. 291

doctor, when minutes seem lengthening into
hours,—for the life of a loved one is at stake!
Charles was in such a state of feverish excite-
ment, that Mr. Hope positively forbade his
entering the apartment where the poor sufferer
lay. Long before any one else could hear
them, he caught the sound of carriage-wheels,
and was ready at the bridge to receive the
surgeon, whose lips would decide the fate of
his brother.

Dr. Ashby was a stout, bald-headed man,
with a quick, penetrating eye, and a manner
which inspired confidence, decided, without
being harsh. Charles could hardly have been
prevented from following him into Ernest's
room, in which Mr. Ewart and Dr. Mansell
now were, but Mrs. Hope kept him back with
the words, “ Stay here in the corridor, Charles;
the sight of your agitated face would be enough
to kill him at once.” She entered in, and
closed the door gently behind her.

How long, oh, how long appeared the inter.
val! With what different feelings Charles now
stood at the door of that room which he had
once entered in such grief and resentment on
the day of his return from Marshdale! He then
292 THE LAKE AMONG THE ROCKS.

hated the sounds which showed him where his
brother was moving through the Castle; now
his ear was painfully strained to catch any
accent of that brother's voice; he was then
almost inclined to murmur at the loss of the
broad lands which he had once possessed ; now,
had they been his, he would have given them
all to have had Ernest by his side once more,

At length the door opened, and the two
doctors came out, followed by Mrs, Hope.
Charles looked the question which his voice
could not utter,—his aunt laid her finger upon
her lips.

“They will consult together in another room,”
she whispered ; “ wait here, and I will bring
you the result.”

With a sickening heart Charles leant back
on the wall opposite the door of Ernest's apart-
ment; he tried to pray, but his mind could
scarcely form a prayer,—the suspense seemed
to paralyze all its energies, After the lapse
of some minutes, he heard the rustle of his
aunt's dress again ; she came close to him, laid
her hand on his shoulder, and in a low voice
uttered but one sentence: “Charles, you will
he Lord of Fontonore :”
COMING TO THE RIVER, 293

CHAPTER XXVL
COMING TO THE RIVER,

“ Now I further saw, that between them and the gate was a
tiver."—Pilgrim's Progress,
“ WELL, as you please, but I would not do so,”
said Mr, Hope, in conversation with Mr. Ewart
in the saloon.

“The doctors gave no hope, and I think
that in such cases it is only right—it is only
kind to let the patient know his danger.”

“ Your ideas are different to mine; the shock
of being told that you are dying is enough to
‘put out the last spark of life.”

“Not to one who has the faith of Ernest.”

“ You would then only hide the truth from
a bad man?”

“T would hide it from none; I would act
towards others as I should wish them to act
towards me. It is cruel to conceal their
state from the dying, to send them into the
presence of their Maker unwarned, perhaps
unprepared,”

“ Well, you must break the truth to Ernest
204 COMING TO THE RIVER.

yourself,-—I will not undertake to doit. You
know his feelings better than I do,—I never
could understand them at all.”

Bowed down with affliction, yet with suffi-
cient self-command to be calm and composed
in his manner, Mr. Ewart approached the bed-
side of Ernest.

“What do the doctors say of me?” asked
Fontonore, .

“ They say that the injuries which you have
received are very severe,”

“I thought so,—I suffer so much pain. I
dare say that it will be long before I quite
recover, But you see,” he added, with a faint
smile, “good comes out of evil in this case.
I took advantage of the privilege of illness,
and the claim which your having saved me
has given you, and asked my uncle a favour
which he could not refuse me, nor will you, I
am sure, dear Mr. Ewart: you will be tutor at
Fontonore again |”

The clergyman. pressed in silence the feverish
hand held out to him; he could not at that
moment reply,

“ We shall be so happy, if I only get well!
You do not know how we have missed you!
COMING TO THE RIVER. 295
You will—will you not?—be the pilgrim’s
guide again!”

“You have come to part of your journey,
my beloved pupil, in which God can alone be
your guide.” He felt that the deep eyes of
Ernest were riveted upon him ; he could not
endure to meet their inquiring gaze, Shad-
ing his own with his hand, he continued:
“ When Christian had passed through the land
of Beulah, and drew near to the celestial city,
he saw a river flowing before him—”

“The fiver of death!” murmured Ernest,
and for some moments there was profound
silence in the room. It was first broken by
the voice of the sufferer.

“Ts there no chance of my recovery ?”

“T fear none,” faultered the clergyman.

“And how long do the doctors think that
this will last?”

“Not many days,” replied Mr. Ewart, in a
tone scarcely audible.

Again there was a long solemn silence,

“I thank you for telling me this,” said
Ernest at last; “I little thought that I was
so near the end of my pilgrimage—that I was
so very near my rest. I have often won-
296 COMING TO THE RIVER.

dered,” he added faintly, “ how I should meet
this hour—whether in joy, or in trouble and
fear, I feel little of either just now, perhaps
because I am weak and in pain, but a quiet
trust in my Saviour, because, however sinful
T have been, I know, I feel that I love Him!”

There are many lying on a sick bed, who
could hardly give a reason for the hope that
is in them—whose feeble minds have scarcely
power to grasp the simplest text—to whom it
would be impossible to review their past lives;
but who can yet rest calmly and securely on
the thought, “ Lord, Thow knowest all things!
Thou knowest that I love Thee !”

After a while, the sufferer spoke again.

“Where is Charley? Why is he not with
me?”

“Tt was feared that his grief might agitate
you.”

“Poor dear Charley !” said Ernest with ten-
derness ; “it will be a pleasure to him now to
think that we always have loved one another.
But I should greatly like to see him; I have
so much to say to him before we part.” .

“T will call him,” said Mr, Ewart, rising.

He found poor Charles weeping at the door,
COMING TO THE RIVER. 297

“You must command yourself, dear boy, -
for his sake, Ernest has asked to see you.”

Charles dashed the drops from his eyes, and
made a strong effort to be calm, though the
convulsive quivering of his lip showed the in-
tensity of his feelings. With noiseless step
he glided to the bed-side ; his brother received
him with a faint smile.

“Heaven orders all things well, Charley,”
he whispered; “I always felt that you were
better fitted than I to be the Lord of Fon-
tonore. The time which we have spent together
will seem to you soon like a strange dream that
is past; but you will not forget me, Charley,
mine own brother? You will ndt forget
me?”

Charles hid his face in his hands,

“And you will be kind to some for my
sake, Poor Madge! you will not desert her,
nor turn away Ben and Jack.”

“TI shall never endure the sight of that
boy !” exclaimed Charles, in an agitated voice.
“He has given you nothing but torment, and
now has cost a life ten million times more pre-
cious than his own.”

“ He may have been saved for better things,
298 COMING TO THE RIVER,

and then my life will have been well be-
stowed.”

Mr. Ewart left the two brothers alone to-
gether, and with a slow sad step, proceedea
along the corridor, proposing to visit the gar-
dener’s cottage, to which Jack had now re-
turned.

He met Clementina on the staircase,

“Oh! Mr, Ewart, is it possible?—is he
really dying?” exclaimed the young lady in
unaffected sorrow : “so young, and with every-
thing to make life sweet ; it is really too dread-
ful to think of! Does he know the doctor's
opinion ?”

“He knows all, and is perfectly tranquil.”

“ What wonderful strength of mind !”

“The Lord is his strength,” replied the
clergyman, and passed on.

Many an anxious inquiry after the young
lord had Mr. Ewart to answer from different
members of the household, before he reached
the gardener’s cottage. He was desirous to
know what effect his own deliverance and
Ernest's danger would have upon the mind of
young Lawless,

He did not see Jack as he entered the cot-
COMING TO THE RIVER. 299
tage, and asked the gardener’s wife where he

was,
“Oh, he’s there on the bed, sir, with his
face to the wall He's never moved, nor
’ spoken, nor tasted a morsel, since he heard
that the young lord lay a-dying. I can’t get
him to answer a question ; he lies there as still
as a stone, I can’t say if he feels it or not, he
has such a strange sullen way.”

Mr. Ewart seated himself close to the boy,
who appeared to take no notice of his presence.
“You are not suffering, I hope, from your
fall? Yours has been a wonderful preserva-
tion; but for the generous courage of Lord
Fontonore, you would have been now before
the judgment-seat of God.”

Lawless gave no sign that he heard him.
“T have just quitted his sick-room,” con-
tinued the clergyman ; “he is quite calm in
the prospect of death, for his life has for long
been one preparation for it. The last words
that I heard him utter were of you; he was
re the kindness of his

F tetas andes tel rca:
“ He said,” added Mr, Ewart, “ that if you
800 THE OLOSE OF THE PILGRIMAGE:
were but saved for better things, his life would
have been well bestowed.”

Jack suddenly half raised himself upon his
bed, then dashed himself down again, with
frantic violence, “I can’t bear this,” he cried

Yes, under all the deep crust of selfishness,
malice, and pride, lay a spring of feeling, in

waters gushed forth, and the clergyman left
the cottage with a faint but precious hope
that his loved pupil had not suffered in vain.

CHAPTER XXVIL
THE CLOSE OF THE PILGRIMAGE,

“The foundation upon which the city was framed was higher
than the clouds: they therefore went up through the regions
of the air, sweetly talking as they went, being comforted
because they safely got over the river, and had such glorious
companions to attend them.”—-Pilgrim’s Progress.

[r would be unnecessary, as well as painful,
to mark every step of the progress of the
THE CLOSE OF THE PILGRIMAGE: 801
young Pilgrim through the last stage of’ hia
earthly journey. He had no mental doubts
or gloom ; his mind was calm and unclouded,
sometimes so vividly realizing the joy set be-
fore him that bodily pain seemed almost for-
gotten. Often he appeared buried in thought,
as though his spirit were already holding con-
verse with things unseen, before quitting the
frail suffering body.

“Charles,” said he one night to his brother,
who sat bathing his temples with vinegar and .
water, “hew gently and lovingly the picture
of my mother seems to look on me now. Per-
haps she is waiting to welcome me on the
blissful shore, where there is no more parting
and pain. You will lay me in the vault be-
side her.”

Charles breathed a heavy sigh.

“T have been thinking of that monument,”
continued Ernest, “so strangely prepared for
the living. Buf the lines upon it could never
suit me now—‘ the mists of earth’ have long
since stained ‘ the snow-flake,’”

“It is more spotless than ever,” whispered
Charles: “ is it not written, though your sins
be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow ;
802 THE CLOSE OF THE PILGRIMAGE,
though they be red like crimson, they shall be
as wool,”

“Yes,” murmured the sufferer, “ Jesus can
present sinners faultless before the presence of
his Father. He has loved us, and washed us
in His own precious blood. This is all my
hope.” After a short silence, he continued—
“ My eyes are heavy with long waking, dear
Charley. I wish that I could hear you sing
to me once more; I feel as though it would
soothe this dull pain.”

“T do not think that I could sing now.”

“ Not one little hymn—amy favourite hymn?
But if the effort pains you, do not try.”

But Charles did try, though with unsteady
voice, whose tones sounded strange to himself,
In the quiet night, with no listener near but
one sufferer on earth, and the happy angels
above, he sang this simple evening hymn :—

We are His Who gave His life for our’ sake,
He to whom darkness is as light,
Tenderly guards His slumbering sheep ;
The Shepherd watches His flock by night,
The feeble lambs He will safely keep.

‘Whether we sleep, or whether we wake,

‘We are His Who gave His life for our sake.

Death's night comes; it may now be near;
Lord, if our hopes are fixed on Thee,
Oh, how calm will that sleep appear,
Oh, how sweet will the waking be!
Whether we sleep, or whether we wake,
‘We are His Who gave His life for our sake.

The eyes of Ernest gradually closed ere the
hymn was ended; he lay still in deep slum-
bers; Charles almost trembled lest that slum
ber should be death.

“T have bidden farewell to Ben; I must
see his brother also, Dying words have some-
times weight,—he may listen to me now.
Please raise me higher on my pillow, and call
in Jack to see me.”

Such were the words of Ernest, on awaken-
ing one morning more free from pain than he
had been since his fall,

“The interview will not be too much for
you, Ernest ?” said Mr. Ewart, anxiously.

“Oh! no; nothing can hurt me now. I
feel as though nothing could agitate me again.
Have you seen my cousin lately?” he added.
804 THE CLOSE OF THE PILGRIMAGE.

“Yes; only this morning. She feels this
trial much.”

“Does she?” exclaimed Ernest, a look of
animation and pleasure lighting up his deep
sunken eye. “Qh! tell Clementina that she
must come to me too; my heart is so full of
thoughts,—if I only could utter them! Would
that I had the tongue of an angel, but for this
one day,—before I am silenced by death !”

“ Lawless is at the door, as you wished,”
said Charles.

“Pray, then, leave us alone together for a
few minutes, and then return with Clementina,
dear brother, if she is not afraid to come near
a death-bed ; it will be a new and a strange
scene to her.’’

Jack stood at the door, as if fearful to come
in, like the sinner who dreads that he is
beyond reach of hope. He could hardly
believe himself to be an object of deep interest
to one whom he had so cruelly wronged and
insulted, for there was nothing in his own cor-
rupted heart to lead him to understand free
mercy and goodness.

There was something painfully oppressive
to the boy in the aspect of that darkened
room, coming sut, as he did, from the bright
sunshine. The noiseless manner in which Mr.
Ewart and Charles quitted the apartment, the
solemn stillness that pervaded the place, the
look of the little table beside the bed, covered
with things that reminded of illness and pain,
the appearance of the sufferer himself, almost
as colourless as the pillow upon which he lay,
the lines of death written on his calm, pale
features, so that even a child could not mis-
take them, all struck a chill to the heart of
Lawless. He almost felt as though he were
Ernest's murderer.

“Come nearer,” said Fontonore, faintly,
“my time is short ; I wish to speak to you a
few words before I die.”

“You must not—shall not, die for me!”
exclaimed the boy, in stifled tones of anguish,
as he knelt down beside the bed.

“Think not of me now ;—I would tell you
—if God grants me strength,—I would tell
you of One Who has indeed died for sinners,—
for you—for me, For those who have insulted
Him, and despised His warnings,—for those
who have hardened their hearts against His
salen 7 Aree Ee ree Se ee ot od es

em
806 THE CLOSE OF THE PILGRIMAGE.

to die. Oh! can you resist a love such as
this!” The once proud, insolent boy was sob-
bing aloud.

“See, here my Bible, my precious Bible;
I am going where even that will be needed
no more. I give it to you—keep it, as a
remembrance of me. Will you promise me to
read it, for my sake?”

“For your sake,” groaned Lawless, “1
would do anything! I can never, never forget
what you have done and suffered for me,”

“Oh! rather remember what the High and
Holy One has done and suffered for us both.
Your heart is touched with feeling for me;
you are grateful towards a poor worm of earth,
and can you remain hardened and rebellious
towards the merciful Saviour, Who is now
stretching out His arms to call you to Himself.
Who is so ready to receive you, so ready to
forgive, as He Who has sacrificed His life, that
you may live!”

The boy could make no reply; but the
dying words then heard were branded on his
soul, never to be forgotten while memory
should endure. *
THE CLOSE OF THE PILGRIMAGE, 807

“ Come in, dear Clemmy ; it is very kind in
you to visit the sick-room,” murmured Ernest.
Followed by Charles and Mr, Ewart, Clemen-
tina entered, mingled pity, fear, and awe on
her face. Fontonore held out to his cousin
his white, emaciated hand. ;

“You will be better soon, I trust,” faul-
tered the young lady.

“Yes; I shall be with Ohrist, which is far
better.”

“ But it is terrible to leave all,—so early,—
it seems so cruel! Ernest, you are too young
for—for death!”

“Too young for happiness, my cousin? Do
you remember our conversation in London ;
how I told you that none could be happy as
the Christian, that there is no pleasure equal
to what religion can give? I thought it then,”
he cried, his voice strengthening, his eye kind-
ling, as he spoke; “I thought it then, Cle-
mentina, but I know it now! What is it to
me that I bear the title of a peer, that this
castle is mine, that men cull me great,—I
must leave all, perhaps before the sun sets, I
must leave all, and yet my whole soul is full
of joy; joy beyond all that earth can ever
808 THE CLOSE OF THE PILGRIMAGE.
bestow. I am passing through the river, but
it does not overflow me; beneath are the
everlasting arms—before me are the glories
of the eternal city, where I shall see Him
Whom not seeing I have loved !”

There was a radiance upon the dying coun-
tenance that seemed not of earth but heaven.
Clementina looked upon Ernest, wondering ;
and for the first time felt the littleness of the
world, and the vanity of all that it can give.

“Where is my Pilgrim’s Progress?” con-
tinued Fontonore, more faintly. “Cousin, I
have reserved it for you. When this frail
body is laid in the grave, then read it, and
think of one weak Pilgrim who trod the path
to the Celestial City with feeble steps, too
often, alas! turning aside from the way ; yet
on whom the Lord of Pilgrims had great
merey, whom the Saviour guided by his
counsel here,—and afterward—received—into
glory |”

Ernest sank back on his pillow exhausted.
A change came over his features; there was
breathless silence in the room.

“He is going!” murmured Mr, Ewart,
clasping his hands,
CONCLUSION. 809

Ernest unclosed his eyes, fixed a long last
look of inexpressible love. on his brother ; then,
turning it towards the clergyman, faintly
uttered the single word “ pray !”

At once all sank on their knees, every dis-
tinction forgotten in that solemn hour, The ©
heir of a peerage,—the vain child of fashion,
bent side by side with the convict’s son! Mr,
Ewart’s voice was raised in prayer; he com-
mended the parting spirit to his Saviour, while
Fontonore’s upward gaze, and the motion of
his silent lips, showed that he heard and
joined in the prayer. Presently that motion
ceased,—the light faded from that eye, the
silver cord was gently unloosed ; but the sunile
which still lingered on the features of the
dead seemed an earnest of the bliss of the
freed, rejoicing spirit, safely landed on the
shores of eternity.

CHAPTER XXVIIL

CONCLUSION,

Ir may not, perhaps, be uninteresting to the
reader to trace a little of the future career of
810 CONCLUSION.

those whom Ernest left behind him in the
world.

Charles, of course, inherited the title and
estate of his brother, and, increasing in piety
and virtue as he increased in years, became
an ornament to the high station in which he
was placed, and a blessing to the people
amongst whom he dwelt. He carried out all
Ernest's projects of charity with zeal; and
when, on attaining the age of twenty-one, the
management of his own estate came into his
hands, he erected the church upon his grounds
which he had designed so long before, and
often listened within its walls to the words of
truth from the lips of his early preceptor.

For Madge and Ben Charles procured
respectable situations, and would have done
the same for their brother; but the wish of
the boy was to be a soldier, and accordingly,
when old enough, he enlisted, Blunt and
rough as he remained, the conduct of the
youth showed the power of Christianity even
in a hard, rugged nature. The life of Ernest
had not been thrown away, nor had his prayers’
been unheard,

After many years of service in his own
CONCLUSION. $11

‘country, Lawless embarked with his regiment
for the Crimea, and was present at the en-
gagement of the Alma. As he rushed on,
one of the foremost in the action, he received
a musket-ball on his chest, and fell, as his
comrades believed, never to rise more. How
was it that he sprang again from the ground,
uninjured, and undismayed? The Russian
ball had struck him indeed, but had found a
bloodless resting-place—it had lodged in the
Bible which he carried in his breast, the dying
gift of Ernest of Fontonore !

Mr. Hope sank under an attack of apoplexy,
a few years after the death of his nephew.
The man of the world was called away in the
midst of his business, his schemes of ambition,
at the time that he had attained the object of
his hopes, by being elected member for All-
borough. The expenses of his canvass, and
residence in town, and the extravagance in
which his wife had indulged, had ruined a
fortune which had never been a large one;
and Mrs. Hope had the misery, intolerable to
her proud spirit, of passing the rest of her
days a dependant on the generosity of her
nephew. ‘Truly might she say, in reviewing
$12 CONCLUSION.

her past life, “ Vanity of vanities, all is
vanity!”

And what was the fate of the pretty, affected
Clementina, the butterfly hovering over the
blossoms of pleasure ?

Let us pass over the space of nearly twenty
years, and behold the vain young beauty as
she appears now that the first silver lines
begin to streak her auburn hair, and all the
gay visions of her youth have faded for ever.

Let us enter unseen that low parsonage
house, from which comes the merry sound of
youthful voices. The snow on the ground,
the chill in the air, the red firelight flickering
so cheerfully through the diamond-paned
window, overhung with ivy, all tell that the
season is winter. The room in which we find
ourselves seems all too small for the party of
happy, noisy children assembled within it.
This is the day of the new year, and a merry
day it is to the family in Oakdale parsonage.
Unfailing is the arrival of the welcome box,
which at this season finds its way from Fon-
tonore, and every one is present to witness its
opening, from the ruddy school-boy, home for
the holidays, to the little infant in arms
CONCLUSION. 813
Even the pale-faced pastor himself has laid
aside his book and closed his desk, to join in
the innocent mirth of his children; you might
know him by the likeness which he bears to
" her to be the brother of Ellen Searle.

But who is the thin, careworn looking
mother, who appears in the centre of the
merry group? Is it possible to recognise in
that quiet parson’s wife, in her simple cap,
and her plain woollen dress, the once gay
Clementina? What a wondrous change has
been wrought by change of circumstances—
or rather, by religious principles and domestic
affection! Clementina’s home is now her
world, and the wants of her large family, and
the claims of the poor, leave little margin
for show. Yet there is a cheerfulness in her
tone, and a sweetness in her smile, which in
earlier days neither had possessed; the merry
voices of her children, her husband’s kind
words, and the blessings of the humble mem-
bers of his flock, far more than make up to
her for the now half-forgotten flatteries and
follies of Vanity Fair,

To the eldest boy the post of honour is
committed. He draws out parcel after parcel
814 CONCLUSION,

from the depths of the box, and calling out
aloud the name labelled upon each, gives it to
its eager proprietor.

“Mamma, this is for you,” and a square,
flat parcel was placed in the hands of Clemen-
tina Searle. It contained two small framed
paintings by Charles, to adorn the bare walls
of her humble little home. Perhaps there
was something in the subject of those draw-
ings which recalled thoughts of former days,
for the lady’s eyes grew moist as she looked
upon them,

The one represented a mossy ruin, grey
with age, and near it a rustic gate, on which
leaned a youthful pilgrim. A staff was in his
hand, a burden on his back, and he was look-
ing upwards, with an anxious eye, on the
cloudy, louring sky above him.

The other represented a clear broad river,
glittering in the rays of the setting sun. Be-
yond it were banks clothed with verdure and
beauty, with a rich, red glow over all, and
the openings between the wreaths of golden
clouds seemed to give glimpses of brighter
glories beyond, The same pilgrim appeared,
one foot still in the stream, the other on the
CONCLUSION. 815°
beautiful shore; his face could not be seen,
but the sunny beams shone like a halo‘round
his head; the burden was gone, and fnstead
of the staff his hand grasped the conqueror’s
palm.

“How fondly he is remembered yet,”
thought Clementina; “the brother's love
seems but to strengthen with time.” She was
interrupted by the voice of her son Ernest.

“Mamma, see what a beautiful book Mr.
Ewart has sent me! It looks like an old
friend in a new dress, for I am sure that it is
just the same as the one that you read to us
on Sundays, only that mine is so prettily
bound and illustrated, so I like it much better
than your's.”

“No binding could add to the value of
mine,” replied the mother, with a gentle sigh;
“it was given to me by a dear friend now in
heaven, who was the first to teach me from
its pages the way to the Celestial City. In
the life and death of that young servant of
God, early called to his endless rest, but not
until his work was done, I find pictures of the
scenes described in that book, they are to me
ILLUsTRATIONs OF THE PiLGrnt’s Progress!”
816 CONCLUSION.

And now, dear Reader, you who have
traced with me the steps of the Young Pilgrim,
through the various stages of his mortal life,
suffer one word from your friend ere we part.
Do you know anything of the pilgrimage of
which you here have read? I ask not, Have
you walked soberly through Vanity Fair,
keeping yourself wnspotted from the world H—
if you have struggled with Apollyon, and
been conquerer in the fight, or passed with a
firm and unflinching step through the Valley
of the Shadow of Death? But have you stood
beneath the cross of the Saviour, and found its
power to remove the burden of sin? Have
you ever even felt that sin is a burden, and
knocked earnestly at the gate of Mercy? Or
are you yet dwelling in the City of Destruc-
tion, thinking, caring nothing for the things
belonging to your peace, laughing at the idea
of a pilgrimage to heaven, or putting it off
for a more convenient season? Oh, for the
sake of your own immortal soul, awake to
your danger ere it be too late! The wicket-
gate of mercy is still opened to prayer—the
Uood which flowed from the cross still can
wash away sin, the Holy Spirit is still willing
CONOLUSION. 817
to guide your steps on the narrow way, up
the Hill of Difficulty, down the Valley of
Humiliation, through sunshine and darkness,
through life and through death—to the eter-
nal mansions prepared for you in heaven!



§
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'2012-04-18T05:24:37-04:00'
describe
'23271' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYI' 'sip-files00007thm.jpg'
994fce6c2036be8e8bdb423bd8d1d8da
0786b167f65fe316173d8cfe22cb1d828ec7cd95
'2012-04-18T05:24:56-04:00'
describe
'133031' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYJ' 'sip-files00008.jp2'
b9b7f2156e4b6b0ce535e7626e7feee7
362d41ad62f52ceb5c91cbb11ee5a1b2ccdc55dc
'2012-04-18T05:23:18-04:00'
describe
'121569' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYK' 'sip-files00008.jpg'
b40841581c7dff12d0c7f54fd5757ffe
c270bf68f940191cc71fb28827d95b854eeca076
describe
'17131' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYL' 'sip-files00008.pro'
7f157876c3231f766b3f09345b53357d
09677bda4a8ace95cd0d8091c933e82ec012ee72
'2012-04-18T05:20:51-04:00'
describe
'64293' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYM' 'sip-files00008.QC.jpg'
ee7266d4e561024aee8572ff51486a30
91fa6d6d385540a03a134f21dd9006772d0d3c10
'2012-04-18T05:24:45-04:00'
describe
'1086960' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYN' 'sip-files00008.tif'
f04804d55f2a107c0ebf252b9395ecac
b211867a95f56ede3acf08bf356f34f5580f62dd
'2012-04-18T05:25:53-04:00'
describe
'755' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYO' 'sip-files00008.txt'
0a999f63956ce4b54af09d158b54e00a
d6cec7ecde7cc602e54edffd8c0769ff04aa2f7b
'2012-04-18T05:22:36-04:00'
describe
'36642' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYP' 'sip-files00008thm.jpg'
fb34a93e6379622412afdb7ecc2674a4
92d593643d4d1668aefe7983b4409eb33b57ad06
'2012-04-18T05:30:16-04:00'
describe
'135885' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYQ' 'sip-files00009.jp2'
c3920373e5e33f545578333fc80111a6
68c59405f770f4abeaadd68bf55fd76958e29f31
'2012-04-18T05:28:17-04:00'
describe
'147065' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYR' 'sip-files00009.jpg'
92f36959e410bb1a38a712589dea4a8d
9f94e2a5a53a3afbcd342f426964ca534f9e7974
'2012-04-18T05:25:27-04:00'
describe
'25033' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYS' 'sip-files00009.pro'
fca150578d17bb11d2d1790c8fd2a611
cad1d4f30cf334099ebbf4a7bdc728f4c77512f4
'2012-04-18T05:27:09-04:00'
describe
'75931' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYT' 'sip-files00009.QC.jpg'
4a4c5abe84dbe4fa0b816ce9babdf336
2326ff376cff95a968400ddb33148c415a30801f
'2012-04-18T05:23:42-04:00'
describe
'1110696' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYU' 'sip-files00009.tif'
a5fdc36ff596c2b3c7298a76137ea244
2d593a02d5ce2dd62ac9cdac0e6542f7ff831408
'2012-04-18T05:24:00-04:00'
describe
'1048' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYV' 'sip-files00009.txt'
bd0fbd3202b04add9f16ed631144792b
6704a43490b322cf840b5c4bcd2579e11d3d9f88
'2012-04-18T05:29:27-04:00'
describe
'39749' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYW' 'sip-files00009thm.jpg'
3f295dd68f4148927d6a193c9f291888
90e21b199b62b8978572d5081e557282da184363
'2012-04-18T05:27:43-04:00'
describe
'139861' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYX' 'sip-files00010.jp2'
8a49e87beeb111a17016f45625eb0d6a
55aa26b4982ea39939b66322ffef94d6ad7dffc3
'2012-04-18T05:21:07-04:00'
describe
'132553' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYY' 'sip-files00010.jpg'
96c746d02d6cc45e3a379f363fa7a406
e07b7933dadd4dd185a49b4055890863bff8b385
'2012-04-18T05:25:46-04:00'
describe
'23550' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIYZ' 'sip-files00010.pro'
b8bb114b9166e6248dde521f3d2ae408
608b229bc5887d67b8258556e787be455f887e2e
'2012-04-18T05:26:06-04:00'
describe
'69932' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZA' 'sip-files00010.QC.jpg'
b60d685e83e406688b4187625e71902e
e67ef4435bb58986aa9b69a5b3373466fb069e5e
'2012-04-18T05:23:57-04:00'
describe
'1141828' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZB' 'sip-files00010.tif'
0c0be5aa427fc106fae1df50d3b2315c
3aa05aca612d717a78b641ac08303d9fd076039a
'2012-04-18T05:20:33-04:00'
describe
'1023' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZC' 'sip-files00010.txt'
d5ed0a1eff04d47b651a596512114b4a
ac0021073192d72806ddf717d08abde46d817930
'2012-04-18T05:25:12-04:00'
describe
'38748' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZD' 'sip-files00010thm.jpg'
71f7e2475173b069f76770ab95fc605a
8d2b1468a84ff057f0af9f4e46225febc6a0eeea
'2012-04-18T05:31:19-04:00'
describe
'6163' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZE' 'sip-files00011.jp2'
951444b13cfdadc8bbb0bcbbcb6eb48f
aec1b906ec3bc4913d070f0cd6adae459b1e21c0
'2012-04-18T05:27:36-04:00'
describe
'22141' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZF' 'sip-files00011.jpg'
6f6f8ccd8ab0bf883d1236a839ddf237
cdb8a9f18c78fdbcff8da0f31c8d8e690c1a63ac
'2012-04-18T05:24:30-04:00'
describe
'20002' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZG' 'sip-files00011.QC.jpg'
c84fcf97675fca7018c81189c4bdf446
b3bc1cd9a85ebf938e260012b9ff879752829236
'2012-04-18T05:21:23-04:00'
describe
'1165140' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZH' 'sip-files00011.tif'
0167075300e19a91fb3c2998d22e4c16
2c911f8fda2a54829d1f5a4e2028ac3b3b1de4f3
'2012-04-18T05:27:01-04:00'
describe
'19376' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZI' 'sip-files00011thm.jpg'
73fffe1b17db91e39f456e6bc644339a
f8233852618d59b9eded04d4d27e3ba1881aed30
'2012-04-18T05:25:43-04:00'
describe
'127903' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZJ' 'sip-files00012.jp2'
f513e4a1cf6a1818656eeb67d6f2e2b7
2987e1e3e3c47048e2347a82264a97732658156d
'2012-04-18T05:28:44-04:00'
describe
'93740' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZK' 'sip-files00012.jpg'
51e376c040c2ace190fd6f638832beef
7eb22bd5ca380d5031a4bb98374e63a5264f45f1
'2012-04-18T05:29:23-04:00'
describe
'10804' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZL' 'sip-files00012.pro'
635c9a1bab383b86597a556e8a48ad50
e503314b33f1018d9f2edc1cfcf8b3e8ddd780b7
'2012-04-18T05:27:37-04:00'
describe
'52664' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZM' 'sip-files00012.QC.jpg'
957988d28266e91965baab35899aaa4f
914fe0c136c22fc70d96e30ed356852e5467a375
'2012-04-18T05:21:06-04:00'
describe
'1045188' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZN' 'sip-files00012.tif'
00f1a1fa19b70fa3a9d52da74ed3a11c
35a4314756e96be8e2962e369360f34103833707
'2012-04-18T05:29:51-04:00'
describe
'598' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZO' 'sip-files00012.txt'
e9a00b58266ad610a6ef296105b1395a
9a1bf6a94d4aa5fb0bc54bd1432a0204def78ced
'2012-04-18T05:30:19-04:00'
describe
'32792' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZP' 'sip-files00012thm.jpg'
8448ddeff340d7b381575eafb6836938
e323f935368a0ef04344e5f8487a27181e63831c
'2012-04-18T05:25:45-04:00'
describe
'68890' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZQ' 'sip-files00013.jp2'
09f88a6f593dc6231741693243e77678
ced9b701b2876e024c0b6aa482cfd535cd0c8385
'2012-04-18T05:30:07-04:00'
describe
'50692' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZR' 'sip-files00013.jpg'
e029b0704788df6cb0f43a9b5b2d7d0d
09eefc21fbe8837fa5d824f91b7bbc5e627440e9
describe
'4488' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZS' 'sip-files00013.pro'
ce874f317623b85164345d119ca4268d
26f02cc0ea061c7f7bdef7afee4c7017ec17aa09
'2012-04-18T05:29:54-04:00'
describe
'31992' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZT' 'sip-files00013.QC.jpg'
c1c53bc127e9f123b75417c95ad64c44
49d94ab5d794178f2aa06dba03516a40a0656700
'2012-04-18T05:26:25-04:00'
describe
'1105624' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZU' 'sip-files00013.tif'
1114ecabaa31d698fda4d8cf4965787c
ffcd15f213736635a2de92116e8ac33eaca135cb
'2012-04-18T05:23:01-04:00'
describe
'180' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZV' 'sip-files00013.txt'
afa131b60b40b379ae2dc504a0f8e286
1001304ecc2007ac3f0d8f5387ddf4db7ec39c49
'2012-04-18T05:21:42-04:00'
describe
'24263' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZW' 'sip-files00013thm.jpg'
1958070727ab03d83be35ad20e594167
c64c159c872c579fa7ef4504cc19e25e890929e3
'2012-04-18T05:21:01-04:00'
describe
'138888' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZX' 'sip-files00014.jp2'
9b348a79f6e95ee58856c9b9014c0530
a3cc0233f61bb1fda2a6e213f34f4a16a30760e3
'2012-04-18T05:23:45-04:00'
describe
'115429' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZY' 'sip-files00014.jpg'
94cffe7d1ad9dcdb89401cd2f5a78287
730f39a50287498997513eb7ac8042ddb3dda8fd
'2012-04-18T05:22:29-04:00'
describe
'16014' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACIZZ' 'sip-files00014.pro'
15bd1703fddad6c0588cbc769b687acd
1bcf7fdba14f8de0b0433bc2b50c60b434c290a5
'2012-04-18T05:29:20-04:00'
describe
'58246' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAA' 'sip-files00014.QC.jpg'
6dc32480edee2982c130292568a34db9
86c311be7743eec331b23cd3f6260efa59993f3b
'2012-04-18T05:26:32-04:00'
describe
'1133412' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAB' 'sip-files00014.tif'
33c87e9ee2f789b89032d534483521e8
4d5710ea21529eb8f4370fedab52999c971d0060
'2012-04-18T05:23:36-04:00'
describe
'749' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAC' 'sip-files00014.txt'
871677e7b059b5b569c652288b0b740d
5d7d3a5f8486bf2126d149339617a1c88d9f7e96
'2012-04-18T05:24:58-04:00'
describe
'34707' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAD' 'sip-files00014thm.jpg'
20483e64747e82c9fac1599fabe9fde9
3e8c04eaa5487b1ff87f1810baa68bca140324e7
'2012-04-18T05:28:46-04:00'
describe
'132863' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAE' 'sip-files00015.jp2'
2a52f93d04a59f42dd89ac8a2ee6c656
18d2dd581f781704a0e7492ebb91ebf27fc3f6ba
'2012-04-18T05:22:15-04:00'
describe
'143555' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAF' 'sip-files00015.jpg'
6e0669740cf2f5b357bbcaa487c92bf4
a2040cfbc0bfdc98b158eaf3795735a407deccf3
'2012-04-18T05:22:52-04:00'
describe
'24707' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAG' 'sip-files00015.pro'
3da60fc08844cca47636abbc205252d0
e57f39c664251cd8b0c9621c32f4ae1b82ac594c
'2012-04-18T05:30:25-04:00'
describe
'72564' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAH' 'sip-files00015.QC.jpg'
3c490021a749232fd119b49039455aa0
b8f0d0ec904e7a4357880d83a1039fb1f5d8e6bc
'2012-04-18T05:22:37-04:00'
describe
'1086192' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAI' 'sip-files00015.tif'
5dae4bc65f072b1d64b6462f5c642958
cebcf50e06a579a1fcd9931cce90f310085e8b8b
'2012-04-18T05:23:29-04:00'
describe
'1059' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAJ' 'sip-files00015.txt'
2e5cf763bf0ad792982c5db4bae0a9f5
c9eafe9efdef51dfeb472f9daba6c06b255d9a67
'2012-04-18T05:26:13-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'39903' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAK' 'sip-files00015thm.jpg'
126be975d7d37fb2f48100e9ea7d8339
f62591929378f42643c7f21fe4dcdea6015ca851
'2012-04-18T05:24:53-04:00'
describe
'127166' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAL' 'sip-files00016.jp2'
fe6cc4cb3e2116ce69ee54a594520813
0604ea63f5946989ce6df21808964513b55b5656
'2012-04-18T05:20:46-04:00'
describe
'155087' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAM' 'sip-files00016.jpg'
39c0d707ed3479fbf75bc0a656d763ea
9f31e6e1a9dad4192f8e48c252586dd362c9fe89
'2012-04-18T05:24:25-04:00'
describe
'26659' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAN' 'sip-files00016.pro'
8f57d9bf748b93dcc408b5823a8e6309
13731500da045c0eb317210d92e2e445fc6f5399
'2012-04-18T05:24:59-04:00'
describe
'78318' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAO' 'sip-files00016.QC.jpg'
7e7c5e5dda32aa408379f952219ed6c9
2020bbf6fca896de1e0cc41daa88363f2f8fb076
'2012-04-18T05:27:08-04:00'
describe
'1041452' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAP' 'sip-files00016.tif'
824a56ae147446f949edb2f2d284b766
dffa27ae9038979f916513f29acfaa71a6010707
'2012-04-18T05:30:56-04:00'
describe
'1150' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAQ' 'sip-files00016.txt'
305fd8659134632f1f923dc203131f3b
fe91078919564964bcb00ac04893b94d75a4846a
describe
'42231' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAR' 'sip-files00016thm.jpg'
b2358f998560b62b45079f01edbbca6d
d4938abb6609ecd14beb3e46768b905389cc1ec2
'2012-04-18T05:27:18-04:00'
describe
'134261' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAS' 'sip-files00017.jp2'
365bc0cb6ef483aad9fc919bd36c4e90
7348c005591d00e9fb9ce1c667a9965042522c3d
'2012-04-18T05:25:32-04:00'
describe
'134371' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAT' 'sip-files00017.jpg'
319f3ed848f884c78642403294aef730
d0af232adca76cc8039ade1539c73c9c45dd88c4
'2012-04-18T05:21:13-04:00'
describe
'23053' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAU' 'sip-files00017.pro'
32f8d3a79beb11af4568bba4d9275e4b
f8a6d03e4fc608726ddf0effa27f07fe938754a9
'2012-04-18T05:30:11-04:00'
describe
'67773' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAV' 'sip-files00017.QC.jpg'
29830b3fe9ffad2a5b6c305ed20a3603
30994124d31394f3a8bbb5010ffa9edf3ea5662a
'2012-04-18T05:30:17-04:00'
describe
'1097460' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAW' 'sip-files00017.tif'
8bb1c5dfee201b1e7ee93c4fe947767d
2971fcda31451898ad94e4fac71f666c3754165f
'2012-04-18T05:29:26-04:00'
describe
'1002' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAX' 'sip-files00017.txt'
475f21590239e5a7a64fa1adf12b321e
a6f739ad7000f6ee5224689af3fc158db23bf2aa
'2012-04-18T05:29:17-04:00'
describe
'40062' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAY' 'sip-files00017thm.jpg'
03d2ccacdfc36be5344eefe96e469c70
01d711e15c87e4975a9728533b0b7d4a9663fabc
'2012-04-18T05:22:57-04:00'
describe
'121110' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJAZ' 'sip-files00018.jp2'
7b3d941f82242d65a403bb0111d9b7b9
ce5744e7a862669bdf68e5a1082cc2dcd36f6c03
'2012-04-18T05:22:25-04:00'
describe
'143374' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBA' 'sip-files00018.jpg'
353237aaa1e31ea2c5cd668a458e4843
6bcf0273dc3e100210f8d5c1efcc5170c5f2d861
'2012-04-18T05:23:32-04:00'
describe
'24992' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBB' 'sip-files00018.pro'
766886f4fb9015994f76b073632a2e51
c8ff936f86bdc8f83f2208bff6668498a8c8f9d5
'2012-04-18T05:26:10-04:00'
describe
'73356' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBC' 'sip-files00018.QC.jpg'
40070f714a0884c63bcdbc35b3e8db69
119ad27ca905dfea0631054180e7b4602a9cb001
'2012-04-18T05:23:37-04:00'
describe
'992628' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBD' 'sip-files00018.tif'
d60acb35352519201d61afce09a10da2
7fa5c606fdfb88a404cc308c97ada037f616b459
'2012-04-18T05:30:18-04:00'
describe
'1057' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBE' 'sip-files00018.txt'
2dfb6ef3f959fb35428a3b805cd15e19
1ea6a491151afb4a6a53098d2b2f1d98e7e7a8d8
'2012-04-18T05:22:45-04:00'
describe
'42406' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBF' 'sip-files00018thm.jpg'
63b3cd422bc0ea4f914eb49dc8492c02
054f956d405e328969efe577a05f8cde8b92cbba
'2012-04-18T05:23:20-04:00'
describe
'130938' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBG' 'sip-files00019.jp2'
efd9238c7e9cc16c1ffc44a79e331b8b
3a139726e8ba3dcb9d17c1491295d5b3c01dda51
'2012-04-18T05:28:21-04:00'
describe
'145831' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBH' 'sip-files00019.jpg'
17349a84baca6c16361b90c78425835e
79668c68b3c3ba24e73776b501b26a00285cef2c
'2012-04-18T05:26:22-04:00'
describe
'25059' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBI' 'sip-files00019.pro'
06d91f9ff45ea63de3aa6f2bf8df5197
5fd44f93f631902fbff12dfa821ff922dfa9577e
'2012-04-18T05:30:55-04:00'
describe
'73211' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBJ' 'sip-files00019.QC.jpg'
017f6457f3fd5973321a6a409381dd6c
821eb2c328442bc9fa92946f52b0da39700756ca
'2012-04-18T05:22:17-04:00'
describe
'1071684' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBK' 'sip-files00019.tif'
86c00b60a5a2b06cd96c0c3fe08b35d2
020285700eebc97ed121e752535ddf1b2a20a845
'2012-04-18T05:27:17-04:00'
describe
'1058' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBL' 'sip-files00019.txt'
5ddae5f814112ecf81d0bea619036481
be1dc82aafde895626afadebdbd3c273161aa251
'2012-04-18T05:20:29-04:00'
describe
'41508' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBM' 'sip-files00019thm.jpg'
2c5a727edad4460acb9f6d75fe62bf27
01ae9287edce52ea9903343ae547e694c0662446
'2012-04-18T05:27:03-04:00'
describe
'122704' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBN' 'sip-files00020.jp2'
4e061371cc3c0edbb6fda535da97e553
c6d438c3f8f607970ce5429302246aacab243238
'2012-04-18T05:28:28-04:00'
describe
'146229' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBO' 'sip-files00020.jpg'
d6ba23b2afd04dd42cd2b3b5689ff6a4
9057b8c2618da05d4592623d3457022d547aa290
'2012-04-18T05:26:47-04:00'
describe
'26585' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBP' 'sip-files00020.pro'
b42bb42fd78f5bb605c7fd3d7653f916
4dad81b0b3ca6833c25a452d4a8fb586dd129ad0
'2012-04-18T05:25:07-04:00'
describe
'70631' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBQ' 'sip-files00020.QC.jpg'
a97d0d36fc75edbdf5040006aa111787
aaae66cf8330f32fd2d952c9c94c8630a48047d2
'2012-04-18T05:23:05-04:00'
describe
'998924' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBR' 'sip-files00020.tif'
ed15235490a6c8b33ba6d072ce1f7ab9
c25cc7a434f09d439575c7fa4d63660edc463336
'2012-04-18T05:23:24-04:00'
describe
'1154' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBS' 'sip-files00020.txt'
735e2139fef8c642b3f9b3010d8a1421
3f2a884ae0505cc13a824f1f6d22996107b083f9
'2012-04-18T05:24:28-04:00'
describe
'37433' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBT' 'sip-files00020thm.jpg'
b0ea47074bc6260b86bd723c3cccaf24
96557efdabeac6245db0c2eaf676691075b3bcf8
'2012-04-18T05:23:15-04:00'
describe
'123801' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBU' 'sip-files00021.jp2'
fd488d9b1a6833ae6d1a9766ae40dc5c
f3784299dfef45bef820d0cb02f15076510fc26a
describe
'150311' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBV' 'sip-files00021.jpg'
e32a1ac20732ff50818ef607aa88f4fd
428268b3110453a913bb1b4626a052983e396744
'2012-04-18T05:25:31-04:00'
describe
'25484' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBW' 'sip-files00021.pro'
2e1bcd756bebd363e7d233f75893bf51
4cc06d5864231873c1e0f8ec72734a501a345a7d
'2012-04-18T05:25:11-04:00'
describe
'76546' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBX' 'sip-files00021.QC.jpg'
e23b18d7fc50fa98f8d4e437d9385ab2
d7754a2444854de2e7b0af0d2449d47eb7e37ab4
'2012-04-18T05:28:45-04:00'
describe
'1014608' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBY' 'sip-files00021.tif'
bbd2781f2e7e3a5258ab24b01127ae45
cb47b156205478e7fea6bace0a6bfe9abd2a2225
'2012-04-18T05:22:46-04:00'
describe
'1071' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJBZ' 'sip-files00021.txt'
cd2fb30ff9bdbb122276976892fc477f
edaef7ab20c4cb5589e1dce6804f506fff9ec5f8
'2012-04-18T05:24:01-04:00'
describe
'42734' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCA' 'sip-files00021thm.jpg'
fe9a5db38e3de0fcf92796320eaaa205
f26979e71d51bf198144998940c0d090c68bf75e
'2012-04-18T05:28:14-04:00'
describe
'122788' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCB' 'sip-files00022.jp2'
240609228d06f24e23ea3fe80fc312d1
bbd29cc1c08c3d2864d74111306aac59e0913cac
'2012-04-18T05:27:04-04:00'
describe
'140047' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCC' 'sip-files00022.jpg'
ffd47733a0cc9e092a75d92d59d7dfa0
637720f40a193955dadbf500256e527094e14f2a
'2012-04-18T05:24:52-04:00'
describe
'24336' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCD' 'sip-files00022.pro'
27999bf7909694887ead6c35692d78cb
75042174ad15aabe6536a9f1965b003767dce336
'2012-04-18T05:30:59-04:00'
describe
'71649' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCE' 'sip-files00022.QC.jpg'
35b61bb9ee72da12cdac5ac253053786
29756a365b668995d30eab3a67ff071f2b11313b
'2012-04-18T05:22:43-04:00'
describe
'1006100' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCF' 'sip-files00022.tif'
b10b7f893e183a20a5e1059f08685f42
c4a1e6f810d0a6e43150056dd43f26616dce7a1c
'2012-04-18T05:31:06-04:00'
describe
'1040' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCG' 'sip-files00022.txt'
ae3f22317d09e03ebb0fd2524e5d7ae7
b1d011786b80a7d16d10aa54f1d95b4236990bbd
'2012-04-18T05:24:50-04:00'
describe
'41418' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCH' 'sip-files00022thm.jpg'
17a3fd74bb195c3a9ee200de958d8beb
57048bb232694f58e29c7b572dccb21ccca22137
'2012-04-18T05:29:28-04:00'
describe
'130644' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCI' 'sip-files00023.jp2'
a499e37416383dbc52b49cce3bae5e13
5192acdc87b7ed6da7399aa12e0258dae0af5a7d
'2012-04-18T05:22:28-04:00'
describe
'151343' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCJ' 'sip-files00023.jpg'
2657382618c7ec2f7d2e7e0ef9682481
91ea0c9654b7d022c1098ea53e3f078925a44130
'2012-04-18T05:30:15-04:00'
describe
'25732' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCK' 'sip-files00023.pro'
81909502af9ea75e1ea05cf83289cfb8
5a1c40c4a9cdf4a4609e411000208f170e80e0fc
'2012-04-18T05:22:01-04:00'
describe
'74449' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCL' 'sip-files00023.QC.jpg'
92543196e51067d3113bde4f796a364a
699ba8293308f2dd3cc39618934c52833944c792
'2012-04-18T05:28:04-04:00'
describe
'1068724' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCM' 'sip-files00023.tif'
688d79f53152b16220205e960281c317
645f41e7f68b38eba0bb4eae3002c81577885f4a
'2012-04-18T05:27:35-04:00'
describe
'1093' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCN' 'sip-files00023.txt'
6b6d52e3333bde1167dd01a4cc8d848d
0e21bf0a6225aa53cacbd6bf4525b322cebe6685
'2012-04-18T05:22:14-04:00'
describe
'40540' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCO' 'sip-files00023thm.jpg'
11596d1ebda0dda5f5373ab67da5eeb5
adb73d1c9b0a892b5c815dde848cf1fa52ffc252
'2012-04-18T05:21:18-04:00'
describe
'125343' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCP' 'sip-files00024.jp2'
3fd3937bd20182809ac8fa7a9235e736
7d3a11ce5be434ae70f46de353e0bf017cf0cedc
'2012-04-18T05:24:32-04:00'
describe
'148697' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCQ' 'sip-files00024.jpg'
92419579b15b7f30947ede4918b9c236
23361a71fb1ef0798dfa939dd6c4a25ba1c1a055
describe
'25901' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCR' 'sip-files00024.pro'
df20f03850352d7947388c70d09583ab
b29e48e15ca497171b7881129020723f06c11a7d
'2012-04-18T05:27:07-04:00'
describe
'75929' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCS' 'sip-files00024.QC.jpg'
44a305f60eb7f4366381df988f25f0da
3fffc65a94fc1c4dfc06666a05a506914f880c5e
'2012-04-18T05:23:19-04:00'
describe
'1026672' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCT' 'sip-files00024.tif'
eec3b0079f25a71341b0e50818268a6e
dace1b67706308d2ea31ed07a639e24556eb7ff7
'2012-04-18T05:21:00-04:00'
describe
'1130' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCU' 'sip-files00024.txt'
e627c3e734610073be43fcce787a942a
ce6e76418e36df6fec150fb2d08af859d4b1609c
'2012-04-18T05:24:15-04:00'
describe
'42011' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCV' 'sip-files00024thm.jpg'
c56bfc1cb09ff016fcce1001bfc0eb6a
43296bc44786d588756ca242b7e99cccb7b10f21
describe
'124839' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCW' 'sip-files00025.jp2'
d90894535c1e9beff90cf92841ae5a27
52ea294ee72e96099f40fdd61953a641daa8d4c5
'2012-04-18T05:26:50-04:00'
describe
'143219' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCX' 'sip-files00025.jpg'
698439f1cce7d3ec0dac61929c30c666
e0e14fbe314e3f88703a7654a9127fea72bdb355
'2012-04-18T05:22:51-04:00'
describe
'23886' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCY' 'sip-files00025.pro'
cacb5c099ed6662297e66c9019b0df0f
e2bac03565929c4de1285e4dbc3f125d4bad4716
'2012-04-18T05:23:07-04:00'
describe
'73091' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJCZ' 'sip-files00025.QC.jpg'
46518c4aa52f25a4aa53808fe62df6e5
5f114728cdfffc3b1f7d19c07f3ffbc0c729716c
'2012-04-18T05:26:23-04:00'
describe
'1022308' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDA' 'sip-files00025.tif'
378d251c94a2aab4ae0ab0617bfcf8b5
627e90d5f1c4388921dc36133889e1b6d8be87f9
'2012-04-18T05:28:07-04:00'
describe
'1032' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDB' 'sip-files00025.txt'
7384406b65bb2e99f29e127032d47ae3
5d88162856e4632500cfaa7b152a13bb231ad44f
'2012-04-18T05:26:58-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'41314' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDC' 'sip-files00025thm.jpg'
9653c8ea54a1c4e46d2779a77b49d2eb
06f1d6904ab1720262361a74631acebbf13e2c6f
'2012-04-18T05:22:58-04:00'
describe
'123315' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDD' 'sip-files00026.jp2'
9d9c95ff29bfd2fea3581ee98427766d
0006773829e8d1e10e996fa8cce659263c6e9937
'2012-04-18T05:23:10-04:00'
describe
'150803' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDE' 'sip-files00026.jpg'
d4c7fba95c49a2b775ceffa9f940b4a9
10f341667cb4dfeb76e9f617e969dec02f13a245
'2012-04-18T05:27:30-04:00'
describe
'26355' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDF' 'sip-files00026.pro'
0574fc1053ceb45fff662fce6a168f45
f2ae9747ecc58af2eda1d04fac8a9d5287e9d1d4
'2012-04-18T05:27:06-04:00'
describe
'75263' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDG' 'sip-files00026.QC.jpg'
ab633be5194cf752bc3e5014f5c95847
1f13be8ea49a8501ad4285128919bb5aa118b4c2
describe
'1010552' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDH' 'sip-files00026.tif'
bc3901723b6378ec420716359b99e53c
5ae3af70e64816b0b47da26471a3a7512439862d
'2012-04-18T05:21:53-04:00'
describe
'1140' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDI' 'sip-files00026.txt'
a38d8d441d6c47f7d0a897386a4260f6
3ae14205c833901120bf4378ee830b33c522d05d
'2012-04-18T05:26:16-04:00'
describe
'43190' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDJ' 'sip-files00026thm.jpg'
dbe97d17c8a5ce618bfead6917f4d9c7
2022323f58d940b4c9d99943a012919bfacd5445
'2012-04-18T05:29:45-04:00'
describe
'127219' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDK' 'sip-files00027.jp2'
254b7fca8cfe90498be27d8fd808f4a1
1262841a1ae6c2b1457e894faeec81475b6bd1cb
describe
'130631' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDL' 'sip-files00027.jpg'
0caeace2fca2255860f3fd0418606825
906a585ab90096efd0b735a66c2eaeab38878b8c
'2012-04-18T05:31:11-04:00'
describe
'22286' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDM' 'sip-files00027.pro'
ffdc945705b3e8b5507be3ce6d1f3df8
de75c5c46a85a74b5d0aaa2bf7287d97f69a76b8
describe
'66090' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDN' 'sip-files00027.QC.jpg'
23d0d98640625123e82b81664e1d2829
d286ba8bb245a30ee05c62d6303c88f248cd2067
'2012-04-18T05:21:41-04:00'
describe
'1041208' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDO' 'sip-files00027.tif'
e3dd072291197fad279b7c67d9d780ab
1684c8664a8e9f860c946030c42e216e6edc05b5
'2012-04-18T05:30:08-04:00'
describe
'976' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDP' 'sip-files00027.txt'
5156ac9d49fa5c36976834fe8b3f9fcb
856023c7203ecc3114026e24cbc1cd0b36ce877e
'2012-04-18T05:24:20-04:00'
describe
'38961' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDQ' 'sip-files00027thm.jpg'
8f7ce16df0d10630dddc612b5fe533c2
3250a51b84abc63574d7f0193a181483d959651e
'2012-04-18T05:29:35-04:00'
describe
'126592' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDR' 'sip-files00028.jp2'
a72aa0ce8d1acb5ffd92e6bb142a4d2e
2ee37f324da464ca6e970f12bc1e1f640b2f8df8
'2012-04-18T05:30:41-04:00'
describe
'142004' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDS' 'sip-files00028.jpg'
e300dac95e4419d2b2e58124d4870ed8
cd6594dbbd9b3b4d7ad0bc11e15dd693b72a7499
'2012-04-18T05:28:24-04:00'
describe
'24803' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDT' 'sip-files00028.pro'
b1a565d4a4944111171aff8ca3d5bd7c
e1bcbdf28a8c34387706221b7addd70872b24c3e
describe
'72529' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDU' 'sip-files00028.QC.jpg'
576e5ec28d045a6d61bd89b13f924669
0841af2be05d1887b005dbd8377f034f6a6e48c5
'2012-04-18T05:23:22-04:00'
describe
'1036228' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDV' 'sip-files00028.tif'
8e67f26bd3b4eac4c33776d4dfb7f2f7
56b78a06d15cb9b36c49ce49384cd612c9a161ce
'2012-04-18T05:25:57-04:00'
describe
'1075' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDW' 'sip-files00028.txt'
b74a30ad28935aa8ebf741f7914e2009
02c68c5039424d92f0df5572ec14a1758aeb90c2
'2012-04-18T05:28:42-04:00'
describe
'40423' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDX' 'sip-files00028thm.jpg'
5bc56f43e16ef94ece453e4e60ae0826
7de7a1fed4080b0565b41f2d8dd5c71207119e02
'2012-04-18T05:29:46-04:00'
describe
'121114' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDY' 'sip-files00029.jp2'
0d1aa3599a6876e53a415f1a153dc718
46eaa0e3ac6795c26b25939714c5b152a84e5fca
'2012-04-18T05:22:03-04:00'
describe
'139255' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJDZ' 'sip-files00029.jpg'
b0083844809c4ad79de58342e5e1597a
639fc54e88cf36fd993b8f41875e2754d178f2cf
'2012-04-18T05:22:22-04:00'
describe
'23604' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEA' 'sip-files00029.pro'
b9be0c242343f7355ad07b094c649687
4803dc6349a484298aa4e0e3a0a330a2617ae134
'2012-04-18T05:22:48-04:00'
describe
'70298' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEB' 'sip-files00029.QC.jpg'
d938604ec3daa5e2df8fa6997d7db138
e2640bdfbe68dae183a12ca1522d39bd4f6827d6
'2012-04-18T05:26:21-04:00'
describe
'992944' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEC' 'sip-files00029.tif'
d69a9ce709f0e4eb31fab51e5cbde328
50765ac0e7d9328da8be8bf924d7318c002fb86e
'2012-04-18T05:30:28-04:00'
describe
'1022' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJED' 'sip-files00029.txt'
adb0ab297c9ec0cf5378b81ce5dd6c1a
3fc271d9395f4fbaa1cdf9fc5bc16dfd34f513be
describe
'41524' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEE' 'sip-files00029thm.jpg'
189c982e31ba6ea6d5baaf1564dc7e64
b569dc8983772005bdfc12aa9a4f4897f41c774e
'2012-04-18T05:30:57-04:00'
describe
'121815' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEF' 'sip-files00030.jp2'
2132c2802f90684fbebf2bee23712a26
4122e9a799d99aa5e80da389694d5a02b7bcb7de
'2012-04-18T05:22:16-04:00'
describe
'153795' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEG' 'sip-files00030.jpg'
1b401fe7371214e37b551feac12c6eb6
21dc8ad86226d6267da4f68cc36b33a8d63939dd
describe
'26459' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEH' 'sip-files00030.pro'
b847322e180390e2a2a92cb34d6a10f2
d31086033c11b4d748c28b6699f9b78fd3a9c73d
'2012-04-18T05:20:36-04:00'
describe
'77762' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEI' 'sip-files00030.QC.jpg'
6e767707c712a960342e252eaec88ead
97d6d525ba254a830f565eec09b3cde3d0772a2d
'2012-04-18T05:25:49-04:00'
describe
'998208' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEJ' 'sip-files00030.tif'
04a3a7d8987cd68f05c7ee98f5e9fe1d
df65f70cf6be0ded1a5f4f6b0089a50fcd1f4ef7
'2012-04-18T05:30:24-04:00'
describe
'1134' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEK' 'sip-files00030.txt'
b741c76e7bdc7ffa14f79f5b61d7b501
11f86463874c4376d3b6c24ef5cd8de4a1a59625
'2012-04-18T05:29:50-04:00'
describe
'43873' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEL' 'sip-files00030thm.jpg'
4156c3fd6de1603c1319dc809c223a56
f70f9e661d3fff54558ac2e77c5ef881903448f9
'2012-04-18T05:26:48-04:00'
describe
'127248' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEM' 'sip-files00031.jp2'
40416407a0ec27dcafdd4569c73499bc
48c8f7432d16babd9fd361545df616058fe2897b
'2012-04-18T05:24:55-04:00'
describe
'161650' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEN' 'sip-files00031.jpg'
69b1e3df2438a07b79a1db8736f2ef99
9161d7aac1a98be80282f2237a2c0e5047168d34
'2012-04-18T05:21:44-04:00'
describe
'29035' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEO' 'sip-files00031.pro'
34131ee4375d84faaf3c0cc8d4187a7c
f3bcf94cd53f271b0ea4fea37457fdfd70d79485
'2012-04-18T05:26:20-04:00'
describe
'80904' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEP' 'sip-files00031.QC.jpg'
bea033e8a585c028c58c06da64ad88eb
5789b79f6dc86502c70598a7a7478151e36c8018
'2012-04-18T05:31:20-04:00'
describe
'1041640' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEQ' 'sip-files00031.tif'
7222aa0d3f0283ac7f40b0b857443d8b
338a05df9d73da883f8d60e36c763b4b2593cd1b
describe
'1215' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJER' 'sip-files00031.txt'
8dd3bf0894cbc542efd5ac58b1319586
76fe1c6b3694b99833723b0067cef1e9de364821
describe
'42916' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJES' 'sip-files00031thm.jpg'
320beb266ece41c1bf56229a0360e8b3
09f36b14c89c326d19bed2d553778777e00451dd
'2012-04-18T05:25:08-04:00'
describe
'127250' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJET' 'sip-files00032.jp2'
67f9b16488817c5906453fb5bef9d64e
89f15fcbb4f4cccd18b6f01884d80bf876439b33
'2012-04-18T05:21:24-04:00'
describe
'157197' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEU' 'sip-files00032.jpg'
18818847ef97fdcb7049066ea54ba791
dea6225811633e04f632e4c6f5b05dcca2eac37f
describe
'27428' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEV' 'sip-files00032.pro'
17c4f2cca60f52e690c95b8110df0fab
faf04d9fde399378d2748e7a2e088abff91f3458
'2012-04-18T05:25:42-04:00'
describe
'76314' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEW' 'sip-files00032.QC.jpg'
3cde896f4bb929d6cc7e84ec811475f9
b302f38eab341f8c0571bbd8b792636b95a65027
'2012-04-18T05:30:09-04:00'
describe
'1041684' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEX' 'sip-files00032.tif'
9d912b7b0966367c414451a2d61f2034
49d27c441ee0d6e2447eefb14b0454938f01a75b
'2012-04-18T05:25:28-04:00'
describe
'1172' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEY' 'sip-files00032.txt'
c15b6874bfc44be27b26489846341c7c
c777c182605f507d90928880926f93e0db84aeca
'2012-04-18T05:21:32-04:00'
describe
'42489' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJEZ' 'sip-files00032thm.jpg'
fa7940f37fae328de94c66658c96a61f
f9d1b247f1f6b237375c9df8439f2cf9417dc66d
'2012-04-18T05:23:30-04:00'
describe
'125341' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFA' 'sip-files00033.jp2'
54e5faa33c2153509b6ccbd20ebbadf5
b95c5e8766a40bf322ecfbef35562c4cc1e1caaa
describe
'144114' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFB' 'sip-files00033.jpg'
68cfafc89210d7e2ea11adab7e550887
63913c03a7b469c6563343b500e89969615817b4
describe
'24422' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFC' 'sip-files00033.pro'
919fa2c90477b183b6d696bf465be8af
0d567b10015821972d9a1ffb51a7b7f92ff523b8
'2012-04-18T05:28:49-04:00'
describe
'74418' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFD' 'sip-files00033.QC.jpg'
fee9fc7983237120a1164e1a0ff596ed
d4152d826a25ea0a4ee32e90435a5903be8d5be7
'2012-04-18T05:23:17-04:00'
describe
'1026928' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFE' 'sip-files00033.tif'
ae882abe4e35dcf79ac4f9f53123bbec
7a17640d015f146773cf03df0760276e02d99adb
'2012-04-18T05:26:59-04:00'
describe
'1050' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFF' 'sip-files00033.txt'
1c0eadef49fbe3bb7e62331dc768fec7
605c7f85e1d12342fbc980cd7a7b224b4957b03a
'2012-04-18T05:28:47-04:00'
describe
'42083' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFG' 'sip-files00033thm.jpg'
a704102aa733743f06a95ed33af8e6d0
fc63eb0b2cde007ff6ab667fcac1f3cab409a86b
'2012-04-18T05:26:35-04:00'
describe
'123501' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFH' 'sip-files00034.jp2'
78c14f10c5c0c865f45bcf7ed0941c4b
42489e9d469c9cce977df79b009b461937c9e638
'2012-04-18T05:30:33-04:00'
describe
'148738' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFI' 'sip-files00034.jpg'
0e56a0dda03bdcf51b012e5459d91c50
eee48ea6c741f788b1f3a63d46377ea88417e38d
'2012-04-18T05:21:50-04:00'
describe
'25333' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFJ' 'sip-files00034.pro'
4e9a0dc0ee0fd0d804e6329c6f326e06
f4d5fb1f780c437974d7c10a039c91d39916f7d4
'2012-04-18T05:23:03-04:00'
describe
'75358' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFK' 'sip-files00034.QC.jpg'
79fd8efa3a98534a477e334d306fc622
201348d5e6277266056a00317bab8261cdb53e47
'2012-04-18T05:25:24-04:00'
describe
'1011748' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFL' 'sip-files00034.tif'
f8bba56a15dd60ae718e90af0387dec9
1f138687a9e0e28a8ccf50ac204487fc0cd60ade
'2012-04-18T05:21:59-04:00'
describe
'1083' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFM' 'sip-files00034.txt'
7fc5d7e07b8e345648fe1bdf0c36a645
c82b429ea96f8b2294c72e012ccda619ca0288ad
'2012-04-18T05:25:00-04:00'
describe
'43077' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFN' 'sip-files00034thm.jpg'
46716ffc9c64e78e7cacd8c0e801a421
f58ce959cc7d4a39ef84f2ff4fc5b3d3598e36b3
'2012-04-18T05:24:49-04:00'
describe
'122226' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFO' 'sip-files00035.jp2'
bfae2bf1c4b8ce24a0e9c73392ffccd6
5c85380f8c2963bd19ab688981ddb7859ca86805
'2012-04-18T05:25:38-04:00'
describe
'156938' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFP' 'sip-files00035.jpg'
6daff724be08e5ca12d0d9a8b08edcf8
aea3ff6f1a3d5760114ef501dcf4e54b9b2047d2
'2012-04-18T05:24:16-04:00'
describe
'27592' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFQ' 'sip-files00035.pro'
bde50dd1f962d165f0ba441d18e8fb4d
422f889055d3e29f088d4f8998d6894fd8020b2a
describe
'78524' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFR' 'sip-files00035.QC.jpg'
ccb4acc1b0a9328ab38d6561ff676b73
404c173b37a27e136e28c024d91cc63ab7e1ba68
'2012-04-18T05:24:13-04:00'
describe
'1002436' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFS' 'sip-files00035.tif'
7342b1336cd97a4c47c4483b7ef4c4bf
b2d2611ddf35945ae883bb819c4aa4a625deaa1e
'2012-04-18T05:28:03-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFT' 'sip-files00035.txt'
4b8428b9d2e583704f2d055d1455166d
179c5220bbe930b02f63720bf7543c37fb24ed69
'2012-04-18T05:20:56-04:00'
describe
'44181' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFU' 'sip-files00035thm.jpg'
15b29aa3f0c6c2dbfa5a31b8823304a9
6f10b32a2be0dc50c106d1282aba6494fe5345e3
describe
'116067' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFV' 'sip-files00036.jp2'
ef7789ea57c8eddd33ae9ef2b967d2a7
a257100240bd89e3c21b9822fb1c9ba39e7f706f
'2012-04-18T05:25:15-04:00'
describe
'104331' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFW' 'sip-files00036.jpg'
20cb1e6840074358ed3dc1662412a776
ad6e4d53aec30e7267fe8b191a9b700ad74ceb1f
'2012-04-18T05:27:16-04:00'
describe
'24373' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFX' 'sip-files00036.pro'
15625133467896145e3b7c710f55a6d9
afc9459d1247dfdc524c54fa5af4aff09c0f06e0
'2012-04-18T05:27:47-04:00'
describe
'57998' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFY' 'sip-files00036.QC.jpg'
2587da8cff17ada09b7ca9759f06bac3
8838215b93333762b978fe33eed5e13f0596cd53
'2012-04-18T05:23:53-04:00'
describe
'951640' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJFZ' 'sip-files00036.tif'
4c67decc79cdc162e1d0c0139f54a6ba
8d8c802cc63c9fa75f8ca9c78bb549437e065c05
'2012-04-18T05:23:54-04:00'
describe
'1080' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGA' 'sip-files00036.txt'
3a4f68fa60d08d21b921dc27847197c9
6c40521ccd77dc1086bf91a706836e7bba419bc9
describe
'36682' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGB' 'sip-files00036thm.jpg'
b534ed6d8906237e2e97707665c5efed
0da3b443698b8da1836a8e752a772b1cda1a4554
'2012-04-18T05:29:15-04:00'
describe
'120740' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGC' 'sip-files00037.jp2'
56b4c26665a787787d08701fa5d9e102
d07ae8f566855c923af171cfd32fd965e143ffb9
'2012-04-18T05:30:01-04:00'
describe
'141730' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGD' 'sip-files00037.jpg'
1cd7f8f1d3205f2a615ad894fd60cf7b
f6138fbba1d8770ecb08bbb547bffe0074b63044
'2012-04-18T05:29:40-04:00'
describe
'24634' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGE' 'sip-files00037.pro'
9beeb55aad91c75f877224d8def19fc2
46b1913d4d10ff23e84d617117200a79cdc24ca0
'2012-04-18T05:20:32-04:00'
describe
'73436' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGF' 'sip-files00037.QC.jpg'
74cabdc5b280f1cc738d4ee266432c29
e7f7c5aa3f7926a448ad2194ef59a06841cc9b44
'2012-04-18T05:24:10-04:00'
describe
'990132' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGG' 'sip-files00037.tif'
2f067dffb47e0228bca2e6b01e72ad61
3ce83adc161c88aaa982ca78b7bacc3f4dd52f12
'2012-04-18T05:27:41-04:00'
describe
'1052' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGH' 'sip-files00037.txt'
1df1725ca7485983c44dcd74baf4bbd6
2bf23313345c7a4f22ce1f9619d569b9e8de7fb5
'2012-04-18T05:27:27-04:00'
describe
'42672' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGI' 'sip-files00037thm.jpg'
fea94cfa98d8b4c6c65ae7cd3baea610
99d28302c2665126c83c34ce9369f79e4d64de3c
'2012-04-18T05:21:09-04:00'
describe
'119675' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGJ' 'sip-files00038.jp2'
fb8ace2b1918144b1ee4fa2f5d764458
26b4257e7d8affb461b90b2da153184e7d889a55
'2012-04-18T05:25:01-04:00'
describe
'119343' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGK' 'sip-files00038.jpg'
a6fe943246c87912b4cdd220e48ae477
e94271b1b8679e9db887d69be0dee39ce9d7e445
'2012-04-18T05:27:54-04:00'
describe
'26628' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGL' 'sip-files00038.pro'
77188469d131e8514f22638424a51c36
811343ad612d04bfb60f5475ccdda2b0de898951
'2012-04-18T05:25:10-04:00'
describe
'65869' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGM' 'sip-files00038.QC.jpg'
b21a5d7c9ffb6589468d49dcd39f1539
0b05ed16b44970f8ffb53c29b991f44db45e3042
'2012-04-18T05:28:59-04:00'
describe
'981608' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGN' 'sip-files00038.tif'
9ca6a65fff843f5a061c6a070e522f45
d9950bbc13e3eea1668c1ac1fd6b14ce96d99328
'2012-04-18T05:31:21-04:00'
describe
'1148' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGO' 'sip-files00038.txt'
51d28f9acc96993db2210a920db79425
9d1bfebe5f2c357e37aea556dc45bdc55c5edb60
'2012-04-18T05:23:11-04:00'
describe
'39235' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGP' 'sip-files00038thm.jpg'
ed1e114fb25b92e035d97a057fb8f541
c133449ba82985f75863143d6f1c3db48bba4ba4
'2012-04-18T05:28:48-04:00'
describe
'122195' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGQ' 'sip-files00039.jp2'
f999052210355af519a92ce09dad61d0
0954f34863bbfd990892a6edb3e5985484e07c09
'2012-04-18T05:23:31-04:00'
describe
'153848' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGR' 'sip-files00039.jpg'
2f0cc1a71c6bd5217e011ac27dd60608
ed8151b6b597fa4dcf188a7d2bd7faae6da64df9
'2012-04-18T05:28:39-04:00'
describe
'27581' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGS' 'sip-files00039.pro'
a0b7e4b81e2812d784740ec52d013491
1e0e3c1b3444b91057d5bdbfd87dcbe5274350c0
'2012-04-18T05:24:14-04:00'
describe
'76597' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGT' 'sip-files00039.QC.jpg'
2de5cff744d3e8360881645ca257b32b
3f5bade8054cd6e2ee3301931cad8c9f53f3447f
'2012-04-18T05:25:23-04:00'
describe
'1001672' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGU' 'sip-files00039.tif'
baf3eb26b1eaa78db4a0463d66c1b987
2330d197ef868d70001fd73a46e2eefe603c7023
'2012-04-18T05:26:40-04:00'
describe
'1163' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGV' 'sip-files00039.txt'
4deb7575c9cfcb536b0f6de7710c5d01
37a5536e4b8e6e3fcbbdeea0bcf4e325b434cabf
describe
'43499' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGW' 'sip-files00039thm.jpg'
f6b509edbf8c60f2042475e1cdab300b
38504cd4b67540c1f91d683a5a4240e59c347168
'2012-04-18T05:29:57-04:00'
describe
'120273' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGX' 'sip-files00040.jp2'
688aeab5c8859e2e0feb0c09e20f05cc
8ca27aacb3580cc6da5c986b9efc1cbb926fce0c
'2012-04-18T05:23:02-04:00'
describe
'123257' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGY' 'sip-files00040.jpg'
049b7d9224689fbfeedcb76f4fec2299
aff3a4eb4d71e01686e3b50acb484f8b0eb3c227
describe
'28311' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJGZ' 'sip-files00040.pro'
014fbb48130fe08fa9272e006e448795
93470225e2548905f82f85511271b220564994d2
'2012-04-18T05:26:11-04:00'
describe
'67517' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHA' 'sip-files00040.QC.jpg'
76801661bf03793d072d80639e086990
ef386f152361f8705b1b085d2bdf7a67015c278d
'2012-04-18T05:22:24-04:00'
describe
'985564' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHB' 'sip-files00040.tif'
1b372f56b345785276bfc3c9403ef7ca
69da38b0dce463aa01be2e4a9ef976ad78aaaf4f
'2012-04-18T05:21:48-04:00'
describe
'1216' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHC' 'sip-files00040.txt'
498815efc9e1c18c4866c6c91c078722
9095ae18e51405a4920d9444e387db6322210f2c
'2012-04-18T05:25:09-04:00'
describe
'40023' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHD' 'sip-files00040thm.jpg'
d71431889922344c1fd465989dfe7071
f1980770033b349ee2e4140f299cd074d4e0517e
'2012-04-18T05:31:27-04:00'
describe
'115874' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHE' 'sip-files00041.jp2'
778f13ee98260646ad2bfba902c58660
fa574d239b00f42c9549d6005a49dc04c64e38bf
describe
'156982' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHF' 'sip-files00041.jpg'
ab53b7ffddc89df853bf35e5ca6a7846
b96e4c17b5a0a5f7ea3ff107df195c9b03256fdc
'2012-04-18T05:24:07-04:00'
describe
'27788' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHG' 'sip-files00041.pro'
c4810d4328c98a13f8107a109b912140
a2fc51491f1f30b3e5010ee122b6302b1e29e151
'2012-04-18T05:21:17-04:00'
describe
'75590' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHH' 'sip-files00041.QC.jpg'
94696a9f2888d71765fff385df832c20
6093de68b033a71e9414f7909bfb1a0f16427e73
'2012-04-18T05:31:24-04:00'
describe
'951272' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHI' 'sip-files00041.tif'
e0bd79c07aa3c22685c09038e01f7c87
1bb33bcec9bf6b65a8e09ee0ccb0a9f22e52130e
describe
'1186' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHJ' 'sip-files00041.txt'
8760551ab8dedffb9f8fcfccbb25fdb3
bb54827bcf7c7b76c22fe6cdef13156f0db27a9e
'2012-04-18T05:28:54-04:00'
describe
'44331' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHK' 'sip-files00041thm.jpg'
978f9d12d2e253ddba937f0b437ceb93
86c3caf6fa3ecc8b7b9c001c4e2e811b083dd1d2
'2012-04-18T05:21:52-04:00'
describe
'118822' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHL' 'sip-files00042.jp2'
44ad348bb9f4ebe4fe0c8bafa8ce7af1
cc08bfa4108eb5e8e547030bc74cd10dac9b67c3
describe
'152942' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHM' 'sip-files00042.jpg'
0d77a9733fc362f87e31cc9d1f9fc3c8
caf2f2b68b4b1fad9f6c385fd64a945d7d44cbff
'2012-04-18T05:20:53-04:00'
describe
'27098' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHN' 'sip-files00042.pro'
2e5e18973506def14b336ce98905fbb2
134f86dacc6cf3c8524aefc3a0b06a0ddf790957
'2012-04-18T05:31:12-04:00'
describe
'78472' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHO' 'sip-files00042.QC.jpg'
ba20028f4d8e99314c58d6869bdf9f45
85de1a41d470cf573fbac98dd620a01765edf72f
'2012-04-18T05:30:10-04:00'
describe
'974468' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHP' 'sip-files00042.tif'
9350cfb85f57e63a245edaac6c938419
037f8333f48c013164d9082a59ce68a01d7a2e3c
'2012-04-18T05:28:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHQ' 'sip-files00042.txt'
c9530a1b1703133b1435b9f322e57f85
b1fc5032325673a56d022f6832ed5f1410f2916c
'2012-04-18T05:20:55-04:00'
describe
'44466' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHR' 'sip-files00042thm.jpg'
166bf394f120d3d38810cd1d9c85efdc
7e6bb853e94c916041cb10a7eb7a74152902aa44
'2012-04-18T05:29:18-04:00'
describe
'114356' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHS' 'sip-files00043.jp2'
236d9a98423ad794ca246cc9437c0e3e
91054aa1911f6840320ec56927a66103a4338017
describe
'158955' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHT' 'sip-files00043.jpg'
775b9f172828df8e86a956f5fe405950
442c68bb31c3a4319b85c3daa854b12b3b682ab9
'2012-04-18T05:22:31-04:00'
describe
'28305' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHU' 'sip-files00043.pro'
3879cde539e752f2c1eca1b164fde76f
e8ca558d28a1ee9b20b1d87f974417987a422c20
describe
'80368' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHV' 'sip-files00043.QC.jpg'
99b69528c0c17163c3d076fa3860f76a
0eeb0c416fb81903c75ae4ff14bf4943d11ed87e
describe
'938936' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHW' 'sip-files00043.tif'
f1221130059b83bebfe22563c95c705a
59b45eb55b1132baa3623ba291f735c49757c10e
'2012-04-18T05:23:40-04:00'
describe
'1203' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHX' 'sip-files00043.txt'
4061098521af22ae9217a0de88fed9f0
53722bb71581ab1f2537865ce230d3be6d85b44e
'2012-04-18T05:25:58-04:00'
describe
'45663' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHY' 'sip-files00043thm.jpg'
c6685d8bebd88b6a251c8d9c5cad703c
de9b87e5643cc857504429a7a37dadd59edd11d6
'2012-04-18T05:21:39-04:00'
describe
'120632' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJHZ' 'sip-files00044.jp2'
4691dbfe4355aaa6f70768962e4564eb
9cf867aa8b8a93c73fd2167e6899a8113fb3ebed
'2012-04-18T05:29:33-04:00'
describe
'123242' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIA' 'sip-files00044.jpg'
42d497542b1f552323037c2809016322
139d8a8ddef47eb22ac492cf98dbd84ee194402d
'2012-04-18T05:23:43-04:00'
describe
'27573' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIB' 'sip-files00044.pro'
b9f6cf02b786efff6f6bd3880a87e65a
13ca50c29e933a81c33d87a84003ef12997da371
'2012-04-18T05:31:23-04:00'
describe
'65425' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIC' 'sip-files00044.QC.jpg'
9b25d48910aa89755fad9fbcc01833cf
4cd462baa35cd10cb4736f7827d1dc65aba8199f
'2012-04-18T05:24:11-04:00'
describe
'989092' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJID' 'sip-files00044.tif'
ab1e10e9b28355f24564927f630b84f8
d4f01251f989dbe738422ec877ebbf39047afc44
describe
'1177' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIE' 'sip-files00044.txt'
b535be2bfa2b22d0ae5eb1fa8036ce9c
e74d9cf515d6ef9a135ecd7ec816fcf8c74fabb9
'2012-04-18T05:24:47-04:00'
describe
'39623' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIF' 'sip-files00044thm.jpg'
d61a1ca06daebb283b7f9c94e8d56533
f415bd6913fea6ea803c4a024eb037845b925c8f
'2012-04-18T05:28:10-04:00'
describe
'117555' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIG' 'sip-files00045.jp2'
7fd7e4fd93ff678d6fe5c8467e35a6d5
04797b3e240d805987d28a43f291a0315c89ab43
'2012-04-18T05:30:27-04:00'
describe
'154085' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIH' 'sip-files00045.jpg'
f2da70ce0be8e9f65c16050f59f37599
f057cd115aaf6c2ab77562e34ded4e17e661cb98
describe
'27765' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJII' 'sip-files00045.pro'
8dd814a8acc029736aec9734b00de34e
0f1b3e6ecd7f3b5d13fc8fd40d3e611c9a5f92af
'2012-04-18T05:21:03-04:00'
describe
'77990' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIJ' 'sip-files00045.QC.jpg'
d444aa0b6cd3276fee5789d1d337e2f6
ed0b62d83db0c0559ba951e0ebd9809005309814
describe
'963848' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIK' 'sip-files00045.tif'
eec17b8426615b11934a88997336695a
bcacda7212e03019b70f1b8d75a5d6790e755b8d
describe
'1192' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIL' 'sip-files00045.txt'
5ecda1bc5c1ab77b9c4233b035d31b20
30c19adc10768e161ae10e2ccbd279e859e19883
describe
'44909' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIM' 'sip-files00045thm.jpg'
c3166acf6028025ff547b79bcf2a7f9a
6a2a95f84a4807213767980af2f369b13f2e2835
'2012-04-18T05:24:19-04:00'
describe
'120701' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIN' 'sip-files00046.jp2'
ae0f0d52f6db5015744b7900ec183c59
28989674ca7d1ab2c4c0eef04d7da05bca749499
'2012-04-18T05:28:23-04:00'
describe
'156791' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIO' 'sip-files00046.jpg'
3e2efe0e1f03160db07ff5fd07250567
7473a884091cf8987ac4a50f4cb15570d5418382
describe
'28367' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIP' 'sip-files00046.pro'
6e751f5a05823c0c5a1327d7de38ae35
348157bee9a905c5e1dc523be9d4804a91a9bdac
'2012-04-18T05:24:34-04:00'
describe
'78429' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIQ' 'sip-files00046.QC.jpg'
53b60f2e67c923fad6ae735cba591723
28b0534b4ecd7dc3645029417eb79ae9e2367f02
describe
'989416' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIR' 'sip-files00046.tif'
cdba0654740d6b55230f8a394268c018
8285dcc90c851f99af777d84fdbe58fe99623c48
'2012-04-18T05:25:30-04:00'
describe
'1210' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIS' 'sip-files00046.txt'
4b011e4688745d1b7915a518b8cac72c
613215d5720f6ff61e564fc28afb3e691de0c60b
'2012-04-18T05:27:31-04:00'
describe
'43513' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIT' 'sip-files00046thm.jpg'
d2b93df7884d756b2eed1e3244e4c100
4c4b550d574314d2b444f70283181da360d6010f
'2012-04-18T05:22:09-04:00'
describe
'125390' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIU' 'sip-files00047.jp2'
3ea2ecdfdf93440b31668bd0f3daacc9
81649bc7234f21b41638d0c3551c65b7a719ceac
'2012-04-18T05:29:49-04:00'
describe
'152564' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIV' 'sip-files00047.jpg'
3c0df7210f713df169dd070179acd129
718ad61c7ea44bfdffd31e1ace468400255a9ad4
'2012-04-18T05:23:44-04:00'
describe
'28139' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIW' 'sip-files00047.pro'
ff7491d1b519de43ec275a85bf5c51b1
c7f88aa9b97fd7177d2938536782450ab17593ce
describe
'76747' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIX' 'sip-files00047.QC.jpg'
4efa438ac8b51cf5a72a45b47832faf8
93d469c775c62cf4d61944c3c80a35278d28f5ce
'2012-04-18T05:30:31-04:00'
describe
'1026520' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIY' 'sip-files00047.tif'
48d2bf8b87483bed89dff29ad78ec255
3e30f6f1c4b32f2e82d10eb3eb9a8589d83efede
'2012-04-18T05:21:16-04:00'
describe
'1193' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJIZ' 'sip-files00047.txt'
0f7f6d22ba231a6f384551b99e05f406
166c73028d4b2dbe0aefad8a5704cd83c9387f81
'2012-04-18T05:26:31-04:00'
describe
'41525' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJA' 'sip-files00047thm.jpg'
20bf2a2e638fe199e10a0280f00a6542
7b364e16b15fb8ac148d239048853ef35aa4d731
'2012-04-18T05:26:28-04:00'
describe
'122759' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJB' 'sip-files00048.jp2'
92752a62244b9dee8b0a997533c2f7a5
1fdf610cf43d8dc3c92ae995a3210e47ece06645
describe
'95168' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJC' 'sip-files00048.jpg'
3bb88e5fdecf429b67fd6ffdb3222ba7
dc30e6b607c9a9279931f9d9d5fba53ff99fa8f9
describe
'19457' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJD' 'sip-files00048.pro'
d1607713ed0cae65d185595aa2ad121a
6d7b93406d939137ec8df0fcf7d0c4d9519d5e07
'2012-04-18T05:21:30-04:00'
describe
'53557' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJE' 'sip-files00048.QC.jpg'
85ee53fbd2876a04700a7d72a7e72d25
d00ea4180f4458eca5883a60a4048a845788634b
'2012-04-18T05:30:46-04:00'
describe
'1003728' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJF' 'sip-files00048.tif'
ef705886325a86809ad9a4597772dd66
f848a9855ef9ab4c8e6aa2b7ac08413150570a04
describe
'841' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJG' 'sip-files00048.txt'
4b3958eb8ceb5e913bc89b0d70e2360b
2d3d815ccd491b893b90d8e38efb7f12f615fa46
'2012-04-18T05:21:19-04:00'
describe
'33079' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJH' 'sip-files00048thm.jpg'
a30261a52ddd8d61ed9501fa1e033490
346f06f1354522373cdf4ccbbfbef2a47e706a17
describe
'127235' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJI' 'sip-files00049.jp2'
c39f087a6b158764bcba633cccd055cd
8b9fa46578d68f06752da3736e3a6db07c7b3dd5
'2012-04-18T05:21:27-04:00'
describe
'128023' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJJ' 'sip-files00049.jpg'
d6bfdc26f35476511d0abb0a9568e214
579f353bb3af6e25ccf4acf3c9728b9fae22b022
describe
'23693' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJK' 'sip-files00049.pro'
bba275aad899cd83e046130a0aaa4b99
700f1fdb5682a78524229e329d927acd682ccb0d
describe
'66882' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJL' 'sip-files00049.QC.jpg'
a70376027ee8b528b805833dd2149bb1
9706318a826860d8a316811bcf14477130bbb63e
'2012-04-18T05:22:41-04:00'
describe
'1040436' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJM' 'sip-files00049.tif'
5f54bad49b60ff09edd9ae882b934b23
7bf9b59a4f0e818732893a705dbe2188268ec4b1
'2012-04-18T05:27:21-04:00'
describe
'1033' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJN' 'sip-files00049.txt'
2f0c1d72c09bc32c31bc82198b6d5a1f
c5cdc88dc6e959499e01b7366d763d8ebfd0e38d
describe
'37589' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJO' 'sip-files00049thm.jpg'
e233449966bfb29a42bf2c3e8104a410
1a32feccc0b6610a6ed0d0bc43faafcb918184a8
'2012-04-18T05:20:35-04:00'
describe
'130559' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJP' 'sip-files00050.jp2'
811baebe99a671e991c5629c85a169b2
a79e185c1a0657c5ff7e073aa713741f237b7e52
'2012-04-18T05:24:57-04:00'
describe
'114195' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJQ' 'sip-files00050.jpg'
ff06bd2a64475c2e7ea241605d8b5f1e
34014ff474a9d68e59f908c22a1a86998b664816
'2012-04-18T05:27:13-04:00'
describe
'26458' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJR' 'sip-files00050.pro'
b75c4e2561dcf84d661a28b72a1ba48d
7b00e7fb5d8a0550de3bc00898bde1b8903b0724
describe
'62648' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJS' 'sip-files00050.QC.jpg'
47b55abe2d125650bbf17014b15008db
4200177e2249b3a97dd57d71e5e9b3767d09f825
'2012-04-18T05:25:14-04:00'
describe
'1067464' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJT' 'sip-files00050.tif'
a19dcad6608e404240e48872ef2badf1
9393443963a5ea5fb85e825aa8c71f37ad35ece2
'2012-04-18T05:26:51-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJU' 'sip-files00050.txt'
fdb62212ded4d340aae36dfc80073335
613a56a56770e34a1cd5d3cefa5da488342a13c7
'2012-04-18T05:23:48-04:00'
describe
'36993' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJV' 'sip-files00050thm.jpg'
7a614f35c1a8a3b41f58da1db7351940
d1e99e2701e9615da68bc6d80af416660b7ce8d6
describe
'116888' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJW' 'sip-files00051.jp2'
8c30170647da598f7843a8c7111e8be5
c7ce18367aa22b0dcee3a68985d79ce6f22802c1
'2012-04-18T05:25:40-04:00'
describe
'141148' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJX' 'sip-files00051.jpg'
ae7a5fd57cd500c1a480f5e466f948cb
a5ee62255973c8cfbc7ae80b5b5162c6066f6be8
'2012-04-18T05:27:26-04:00'
describe
'25618' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJY' 'sip-files00051.pro'
a0a1a724d44b9e4d890418b4699830ae
9e0cb1f415e682b01918c8770a43d746deba3fee
'2012-04-18T05:24:02-04:00'
describe
'73367' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJJZ' 'sip-files00051.QC.jpg'
ea105c66c2411560b781f85d05f33201
00b30919cf999a847610b2ba1925f0d35136165a
'2012-04-18T05:27:15-04:00'
describe
'958040' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKA' 'sip-files00051.tif'
48bb83a9a0d370d1f5ee3876dac63590
d55c4e9d25a47fa545eea088d3ee3ae05fd92fc3
describe
'1115' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKB' 'sip-files00051.txt'
c1b6eaafea2ee677413c330b9687f9a7
f4ea5e9fecf310913021bb813c5e84eaa52bf831
describe
'42996' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKC' 'sip-files00051thm.jpg'
fa18649550ba1646e13c019671269846
0cc7403b7425a362ea27e3c16db03f6be41a6ffa
'2012-04-18T05:25:18-04:00'
describe
'132171' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKD' 'sip-files00052.jp2'
9bdbfc92fe301e2ff6743d0224f8dff4
f835b2d0d3973d2767e470dd22afc8f5cc446bcd
describe
'120019' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKE' 'sip-files00052.jpg'
2b6a0ec9f34fd42cccfd7e8ce95fe583
e5ba6852420eede92210139428ef693f1a1d6dc0
'2012-04-18T05:25:05-04:00'
describe
'27261' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKF' 'sip-files00052.pro'
552af16767d748b55d02d37730c53d78
5bdf9735a5f066a7b19600f7744fd98e6e5d42fa
'2012-04-18T05:29:22-04:00'
describe
'64463' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKG' 'sip-files00052.QC.jpg'
2dcc237d0e2566da34a1407c54d203bd
a3188d331661fd1ff6c78a59e25c9039aa6fa561
'2012-04-18T05:23:56-04:00'
describe
'1080536' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKH' 'sip-files00052.tif'
fd0cbf7767f6ad128331a82cc61d26c5
48915c2d04a4daca7606a1cb8b77a6e8c6d6eee3
'2012-04-18T05:22:53-04:00'
describe
'1168' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKI' 'sip-files00052.txt'
bbd9239d5924be06e1740fb6d13e7fa0
70569d389c4acf17b0bed7d18fff6ce16757699c
'2012-04-18T05:29:56-04:00'
describe
'36925' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKJ' 'sip-files00052thm.jpg'
35a4f81178e8da068b9566e8ff06da15
4cf8c1d5c6ab78137e56818dba9f399336e1b74a
'2012-04-18T05:25:33-04:00'
describe
'125854' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKK' 'sip-files00053.jp2'
9667b9de1c61483bf45f826b103a542d
94a218f23ec77e4347782ec0d4544b1763f8f9ae
describe
'137833' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKL' 'sip-files00053.jpg'
b451266a4b38afce3dfb4099815f391b
5be5085a11b3afc90b8fb56b1c698a758d0d9aa9
'2012-04-18T05:30:06-04:00'
describe
'24118' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKM' 'sip-files00053.pro'
d6062d85e0c8ea520504bf0e67c8d103
ba391cffdb385e0bb5a3d8346172f5f8bafb7667
'2012-04-18T05:27:19-04:00'
describe
'72190' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKN' 'sip-files00053.QC.jpg'
4b478005d1b65070c7dc81b100466458
45992893419213105ab4c4d276b90f4ae297007d
'2012-04-18T05:21:12-04:00'
describe
'1029852' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKO' 'sip-files00053.tif'
ac160bcad834fefdf1ab384081a1ef66
ac8e942e6d902e6040c3752b2b4ff91261100a6f
describe
'1038' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKP' 'sip-files00053.txt'
6c8fd9cf85e4ba9031ba484b35a5db79
fe8d86f81ddff22a1402ca0213a92bb7091e4c7f
'2012-04-18T05:24:08-04:00'
describe
'40345' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKQ' 'sip-files00053thm.jpg'
999df47f3c64b1c7eb37625e1cf3460b
0701fa009fb8d0d2f5b9112e66a1fb0b6463bc20
describe
'133392' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKR' 'sip-files00054.jp2'
46785bfe8ac19ecdba41ecdd9667e2b5
6ce0973e709169d198339e567758c63f6ee32b36
'2012-04-18T05:21:14-04:00'
describe
'113103' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKS' 'sip-files00054.jpg'
4e07f75d8218915a59696cd006de6c21
7ebb2847def5219e5a2ce0f961453ac70b6534e7
describe
'25495' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKT' 'sip-files00054.pro'
76f70c2a3bd0764147f077377655fd19
e37b9f2677868360f66f0e955a6866ca809fee80
'2012-04-18T05:27:33-04:00'
describe
'62720' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKU' 'sip-files00054.QC.jpg'
1d8da2f025c8862cc692c6c151fb009a
f3bd0513f350cc5451ae2fa1ffd4ec620cca22f6
'2012-04-18T05:24:05-04:00'
describe
'1091204' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKV' 'sip-files00054.tif'
9cd3896642c34cf709a0adae33dd9867
867ccde1cec8c68f98342c297d76a3c5af6843d3
describe
'1096' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKW' 'sip-files00054.txt'
153089621b3aca3bbbe2f7ddd3367437
3e133cc4d3a9e0b116f067ee649df3a349f859a1
'2012-04-18T05:26:03-04:00'
describe
'35307' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKX' 'sip-files00054thm.jpg'
592293c057bcfc68f815cf6f5b9e1a1a
63d8598bcee9cd01e0097d398597123b8e6ecfca
'2012-04-18T05:26:02-04:00'
describe
'124158' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKY' 'sip-files00055.jp2'
297ceeec9425a34dcef2e0ae35670485
d2a783e7382b94e5d06627b0e64c9819d1bfb367
'2012-04-18T05:22:13-04:00'
describe
'143639' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJKZ' 'sip-files00055.jpg'
fbf7d43839c7fb7a2763b7edf5cd670f
bd4bcfcbcd5ec692a1d6e6f73dacd6e75f6f19e8
describe
'27661' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLA' 'sip-files00055.pro'
ecca3a869cedc4ca1df55feafffef378
d0502fb2fef7c457397c41f6fe7350c480816108
describe
'73064' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLB' 'sip-files00055.QC.jpg'
d0caa5df5783b52d242e56dd1531ce95
3964a42a604bde50cc2f300da5d17adb70699c86
'2012-04-18T05:28:53-04:00'
describe
'1016352' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLC' 'sip-files00055.tif'
1fee1fd4f262db7f79009a23baa25766
c7f2c80a3f6403f2189a035dc102439652a53b54
describe
'1188' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLD' 'sip-files00055.txt'
ac25b5a3a105e77a0e89f525f7073c75
b0ec1bad4e48f9ca39aa6cfb303bc3ea67dee139
describe
'39564' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLE' 'sip-files00055thm.jpg'
0903d8f2d39e796d5a9519e541e47120
5fca19f16b83d31ed5c6ec58512f687fc7fa8f35
'2012-04-18T05:25:56-04:00'
describe
'127835' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLF' 'sip-files00056.jp2'
b2120a3a9adf59f58aa88a10d5321841
b4f05041a854a2489fabbe3d1145484862760f50
'2012-04-18T05:27:22-04:00'
describe
'121039' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLG' 'sip-files00056.jpg'
554c4b58a5cf0e6078d390496f1be060
a6311c0ef28bd30ed6ab16739419a4f40d887c60
'2012-04-18T05:21:31-04:00'
describe
'27426' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLH' 'sip-files00056.pro'
c240d92bf506238d5445809ffcc78c62
e8386a70ddf7dfba6437b03c1e1f40713c9fd392
'2012-04-18T05:30:34-04:00'
describe
'65768' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLI' 'sip-files00056.QC.jpg'
735b669b4d7e8918688cb140672a74fd
4aa5edd22b99932fe1d9f8bdc45236151f9c55bd
'2012-04-18T05:23:49-04:00'
describe
'1045876' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLJ' 'sip-files00056.tif'
4da365af9157fc7dcca36ca8002c10e8
1671989dd7204932ec05c6776732de5e379ceb02
'2012-04-18T05:21:45-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLK' 'sip-files00056.txt'
03574602998b921f9eda2152a5b7fb06
c70ce9db1853246f5dbf6a0bbd82ad683b1bd13a
describe
'35600' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLL' 'sip-files00056thm.jpg'
b5ec24d1a78a4669ecacaf1cc4075995
4dfa715bf98fc8b8ee3ea4ec91318d2ef07b5cf5
describe
'130195' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLM' 'sip-files00057.jp2'
ffe8165f6238aa4d42f53fef0093e6d8
2ee08d61f3262ef5357adb159d6660a43160caa0
describe
'150100' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLN' 'sip-files00057.jpg'
5078b9a21ce9dfeba09b15994afb20fc
55374934d655ec005cd359fa4f0b048dfe622a64
'2012-04-18T05:30:23-04:00'
describe
'28727' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLO' 'sip-files00057.pro'
f4803edee87916c889df3a49a08a0fe4
7d888366d8fc8a2937da88b7441ca32f5763a3f4
describe
'75957' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLP' 'sip-files00057.QC.jpg'
c798863dd33a354844a385a75f6ad81e
38d977d3150b07a862dab8b5be956ff78a55ef90
'2012-04-18T05:26:04-04:00'
describe
'1064912' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLQ' 'sip-files00057.tif'
081def298a068f28688857447133b710
762e39f2951d8fdb77a06650571965d16c906f98
'2012-04-18T05:25:48-04:00'
describe
'1207' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLR' 'sip-files00057.txt'
9a2b24eb4315c3270a19d8567926ceb9
a42f06b5436c5e142018fabc7fee35d4a172ab61
'2012-04-18T05:21:10-04:00'
describe
'38304' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLS' 'sip-files00057thm.jpg'
efabb6bb7dcb5afa696fdca9b3d4cb4e
2123027e9227ae27ff27adf70305848f4e7088fa
'2012-04-18T05:28:25-04:00'
describe
'123932' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLT' 'sip-files00058.jp2'
39d1c1fb1d34b134233711e54270ee7e
a538debced920e275db9da7c2d69ccdde81eed97
'2012-04-18T05:26:34-04:00'
describe
'101081' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLU' 'sip-files00058.jpg'
4096bba3564c80bdfe32c07fc6092672
a6343d474faa690602c073a40c824a97ecea284d
describe
'21372' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLV' 'sip-files00058.pro'
fcece936d3cf8b011d082df3d0413e75
6993b4ec7c96abab64eb154a57840519b518e15a
'2012-04-18T05:23:39-04:00'
describe
'56519' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLW' 'sip-files00058.QC.jpg'
8a7a01e23706cb3825e2b7df9ad0c07e
28f4131d7f4ed003aeadb009f4339e3c697addce
'2012-04-18T05:23:47-04:00'
describe
'1013732' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLX' 'sip-files00058.tif'
d444c4cd878b26733e078bc1273d1875
abf690f583beeaf269b0eac27b6074d5ab50276c
'2012-04-18T05:30:39-04:00'
describe
'915' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLY' 'sip-files00058.txt'
e9416f2fc7c8c557baa2bf1ea2f51493
30c0c0fca7139fda030dce3d25296f9ab88ed7b4
'2012-04-18T05:28:56-04:00'
describe
'33011' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJLZ' 'sip-files00058thm.jpg'
3d821e2a7b54a5828248e569c3d0b97d
48201f5a89771905b5c514ab4d86d15943bf2778
describe
'122053' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMA' 'sip-files00059.jp2'
cba58a39ef4c975cc4a8bf266ad649b9
2e58bc08ec6d726ffcd90ac6169db55b04b07f5d
describe
'131697' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMB' 'sip-files00059.jpg'
60fca67ad5ffcaabfacc1e3b4d59b700
bd548abe6a81f67976bbc552243222d5b13557d4
describe
'25145' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMC' 'sip-files00059.pro'
a0048c15760b2289201bca2abf1227f7
c18a799012a9c431338ab37eb161b7f66f132aa9
'2012-04-18T05:23:00-04:00'
describe
'66836' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMD' 'sip-files00059.QC.jpg'
9f1620a6617f16572a6994c1c9d68168
68d2f1ed798b6c01b01229975b144296678c3a51
describe
'1000160' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJME' 'sip-files00059.tif'
c3b6fe517286242e5a4ce98e7c3b9bd2
a14eb969e3c886b39c744c6bc1df16cce39cc220
describe
'1094' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMF' 'sip-files00059.txt'
8579dc60200dcc774b513672bd0be9df
ea2682e65662e3c6ad90fd4f10b6a2f70d17a9a1
describe
'37606' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMG' 'sip-files00059thm.jpg'
a1691384f86edbbc51decc6f6a0dfac4
e66980da08353f1fa6a8e4668666b1355d21d687
'2012-04-18T05:26:30-04:00'
describe
'119702' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMH' 'sip-files00060.jp2'
8679bd9cd589efb8c000092e845d9c89
2a6bb95a35843f70ec210f7da9d135d2025db1e2
describe
'138108' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMI' 'sip-files00060.jpg'
85d3fe1405c5a567d7ca7b36095b54a1
1628c4de9d948823fc322cf783ad1362d0efa977
'2012-04-18T05:30:36-04:00'
describe
'23744' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMJ' 'sip-files00060.pro'
13f1d04031e5cdb7508023c538da7884
0e3d68474b40f3528994d4ff691c174e3018cac8
'2012-04-18T05:22:49-04:00'
describe
'71157' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMK' 'sip-files00060.QC.jpg'
30cf3dc2dd510ca12642ff97029d4a66
1e006bb93c5bad7a0b604984e626a9f5fd42e317
describe
'980872' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJML' 'sip-files00060.tif'
4eab605f8b8da65f9d44ca0f6ec736db
8d38b2d8e652572d6abad407c5fc8837d89121e8
'2012-04-18T05:24:48-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMM' 'sip-files00060.txt'
dd17524670f1b1f5080bf3968041d78b
7eaa3aea74fb906dbb92266c73f0272f63763f12
describe
'39296' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMN' 'sip-files00060thm.jpg'
ea1221a453babc1258a3597f07739be3
511688f5cc278fd7f55f90a64e1114533020ac19
'2012-04-18T05:28:18-04:00'
describe
'121162' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMO' 'sip-files00061.jp2'
31fd0ecb3e934d63fa22037eb9515db1
7b3a6d970f36f5d14f444e9043c788df36e455b7
'2012-04-18T05:29:34-04:00'
describe
'129597' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMP' 'sip-files00061.jpg'
724b6a3def4be2d7468498ad5ba087b1
e20adbbd7fea98518679325c2bcc683720afae83
'2012-04-18T05:27:29-04:00'
describe
'22702' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMQ' 'sip-files00061.pro'
1fe43c8e760b437c0ae613eb5a3fef63
10b7eeb97095389c28009f76b317afa810ed25c5
'2012-04-18T05:23:04-04:00'
describe
'69424' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMR' 'sip-files00061.QC.jpg'
849c07c8b1d3dc051299f684367c93ee
637568749a741bdf7c52d6f1295dad0e2dc49b66
'2012-04-18T05:24:22-04:00'
describe
'993312' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMS' 'sip-files00061.tif'
36650b3170747fe8cc36bc5f315824ae
21491f68482b1123518ae3cfbd01233bb4570009
describe
'1010' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMT' 'sip-files00061.txt'
d66f1225a6a55a210231f8500ea22120
9ec6f15e3402e5370b783cc2ed51aa109593a797
'2012-04-18T05:27:46-04:00'
describe
'39908' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMU' 'sip-files00061thm.jpg'
568c38852341879263bf6421720625fd
e4debfbe0ff7947525bb077c6b2ce7c3a20726cd
'2012-04-18T05:22:44-04:00'
describe
'121097' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMV' 'sip-files00062.jp2'
10c8c0b198c0a8bbfbadb9e22b002f11
507d260c2af33fd41013e73a1284965472e1eb2d
describe
'136958' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMW' 'sip-files00062.jpg'
81552dcbcf9883f59e1ddc253546e7fd
b6da0b046c50df5b56c172677db2dd3bc455b741
describe
'24239' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMX' 'sip-files00062.pro'
b25258775dc0ccecb7050fb340cec8b0
ea67c052a85350f4f3767930567018dd16db2fa8
'2012-04-18T05:21:08-04:00'
describe
'71244' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMY' 'sip-files00062.QC.jpg'
fdafbb83237c3dee7570cf7deeaa650e
4d7f3033911d5ebbb5b62f9ec3d3d4ccfefb5055
describe
'991928' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJMZ' 'sip-files00062.tif'
3e8aaedcd4d7dd90937cf593b933eef3
7d8e722dfb8adb428f24b40c51aae1c6fe918dc2
'2012-04-18T05:21:38-04:00'
describe
'1123' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNA' 'sip-files00062.txt'
ef3a39f3b7cb2848b329614a9b5353e2
a41dd84f388f7feea2d4d0a4c9f0faa7e8a75770
'2012-04-18T05:31:04-04:00'
describe
'39956' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNB' 'sip-files00062thm.jpg'
17597cea76385a975e04c0e6a0da576a
283de98ebe69c1204a7cce82f45822dceb36de5c
'2012-04-18T05:25:52-04:00'
describe
'117977' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNC' 'sip-files00063.jp2'
369cb99ea75821e1ff0a3579ee5d1030
265cb3e8d5af289e86a65d9dd609d387eed1ffc2
describe
'145935' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJND' 'sip-files00063.jpg'
10c549a0797c052fc85c0e44d5f01d03
fb36c49b8dacffab94967daf33f9176d1d33d5ad
'2012-04-18T05:21:55-04:00'
describe
'27101' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNE' 'sip-files00063.pro'
64016fe643a3b6aed90a25081fc220df
440a9fb119d40e1e3b1aa99b51d88e8f55add754
'2012-04-18T05:28:31-04:00'
describe
'75517' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNF' 'sip-files00063.QC.jpg'
8c4cd887f878f4a061fefef335cf2baf
9447cd8924665d767a253700b702200b7967d7e2
'2012-04-18T05:21:54-04:00'
describe
'967232' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNG' 'sip-files00063.tif'
d89ff6f9829c5137a95873fc1009338b
2dab73f3a10c5487d21c4040d696a7228d583ee4
'2012-04-18T05:24:31-04:00'
describe
'1167' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNH' 'sip-files00063.txt'
4c763ef15be462fa1498e300a82dfc64
d8841ac5b3d1b7ec0768527deff50a2a1a17c441
'2012-04-18T05:26:01-04:00'
describe
'40832' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNI' 'sip-files00063thm.jpg'
4cca00ea581a00c3f6f8f353934542ea
c0c0ec64df5b9a61d9ffbd6263e69701f9392724
describe
'121163' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNJ' 'sip-files00064.jp2'
2f458526d7b7a48f58e370b12f5121c3
e5281df964c37bce92a910cd3fa476b511bd587f
describe
'156472' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNK' 'sip-files00064.jpg'
3d25969002f965d414fa9670baf515bc
f7f3d7992145cc60902c695d789a23b7444fb77d
describe
'28968' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNL' 'sip-files00064.pro'
bfb7be3b550a94a2dd6004ad0403ad71
f5a2bcffd50d57693da65409d912986d23c560fd
'2012-04-18T05:22:10-04:00'
describe
'79211' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNM' 'sip-files00064.QC.jpg'
9c4fca5aa7656792b1deb6092f850dc1
a4144c2c800110e3e95145f0b49a61070f00cabc
describe
'992692' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNN' 'sip-files00064.tif'
cd27abcc86a4122a1ddfd7ffbc952be5
01c0d766e0dbf3bab6a04c0bbd013af313df4f07
describe
'1241' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNO' 'sip-files00064.txt'
bfd7fa7b124294ce38a97e1af3b79dc5
8492fc2adec01daf7d1bcee0a1cfab5836626f68
describe
'40718' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNP' 'sip-files00064thm.jpg'
6d1e75bbac82c630750376e2a810e39f
3d5c404fd267ca978a749df67dfdc3d6aaed95f3
describe
'117520' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNQ' 'sip-files00065.jp2'
0e750f065893b156df12bbe8a2997fb9
b9a77de36eafdc27e49f8f69e63dd8ade68f719c
'2012-04-18T05:20:50-04:00'
describe
'147519' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNR' 'sip-files00065.jpg'
3fb75a25bb1a502e49c4f13154cb9663
986e6f7d1a62684db359430912e850e710f91698
describe
'26579' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNS' 'sip-files00065.pro'
be3ebf6025c2c98db6c1c28c833e61e3
b5a30fe0f392340271f1a30ecf55692347849e78
describe
'73625' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNT' 'sip-files00065.QC.jpg'
bf79d7d1e9caddec70b55e383a962981
ed5b44edca390f9fb6203ab21888e1866618a34b
describe
'964220' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNU' 'sip-files00065.tif'
293500b5c56add18d56da3edc0235b5d
c441737a15b8f7e52674e86f2ccc34ba53ecd0b6
describe
'1151' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNV' 'sip-files00065.txt'
5e5dbb165e4411fdd2f44e476d55bf5f
6070819c1f53eb5b087bc9db56fa133def9d6a9a
describe
'40433' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNW' 'sip-files00065thm.jpg'
aa825ce452ee798ee9ed74a3dae30896
6047d9fc1e085b88ef7a1f81c1a455399c4713f2
'2012-04-18T05:31:13-04:00'
describe
'122180' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNX' 'sip-files00066.jp2'
9fa5b1db67167390b0ac7dc4f5530fb6
c5fc501b2988785ddb32cde6c0e449f5f233c4a0
'2012-04-18T05:21:49-04:00'
describe
'152783' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNY' 'sip-files00066.jpg'
d4dc9c80a3202fe2d6be48b04d34295c
a8bf57de80912529c6e2712e229e19c880905693
describe
'28001' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJNZ' 'sip-files00066.pro'
f6c5d91cda4659c700a756ee5b45ade6
194c5d922dd874776482bfda68533e4d891d2496
describe
'76110' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOA' 'sip-files00066.QC.jpg'
a1ed898a9edf3a13c7d070aa82301669
62e6814ee8bf97b0b615b08322ceeedb191921fd
describe
'1000652' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOB' 'sip-files00066.tif'
e0330c5f916b313351275fa0f7fb72b3
96d5bceba2a66b7a0826b83b9257b3ca30631eea
describe
'1195' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOC' 'sip-files00066.txt'
c33fc7e0b057b14c80fc08ca32476aba
48ed1fb6426ed95ae810f11eac87260109c0c5a1
describe
'39936' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOD' 'sip-files00066thm.jpg'
82483eadaa27296d38f1bb4238f4db16
f8b49f0f53b6b6a685da8d11edc8a89de4a3b855
'2012-04-18T05:24:36-04:00'
describe
'114443' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOE' 'sip-files00067.jp2'
c54f68e5fbe6a9fd90381f0e7b220524
7054fe5c3b5da5ab255ca58c667436d9d14f1082
'2012-04-18T05:28:08-04:00'
describe
'146427' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOF' 'sip-files00067.jpg'
458435346d4966207c5e02f8d468b54d
2439d4444ea5f148a3d204f6902f16924857ebe9
'2012-04-18T05:31:09-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOG' 'sip-files00067.pro'
1f23cae222f03e26ffb46a7487319e5a
ad6d1380375441a93d04aa8560f1ccfc9394ce2f
'2012-04-18T05:30:03-04:00'
describe
'70392' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOH' 'sip-files00067.QC.jpg'
011f9c8cb56fc11ac07b9ac0b448fe7d
80d625d7047132c664730769cc2cccc9da32eeb8
'2012-04-18T05:21:04-04:00'
describe
'933328' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOI' 'sip-files00067.tif'
086583a5abb6bbdbda4cd8f21788f34f
d03142f53ab5ba5d8abc6fee87e9ee522e0c9493
'2012-04-18T05:27:49-04:00'
describe
'1170' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOJ' 'sip-files00067.txt'
568f981b04a09cf76db7f1464173ebb1
0c9c7d0cdc2a0331900c531a25e84757d8085ff7
describe
'35794' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOK' 'sip-files00067thm.jpg'
c7ab1da2d08d2817e0940b0c1e1c6318
1c55ba6e20a74b57e1c39219080ef3ecbaa01661
'2012-04-18T05:24:12-04:00'
describe
'117160' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOL' 'sip-files00068.jp2'
3073640c3dd2b1e4daa380d43efc4c6c
3dc6c8717d1a2297875958f9d350c0401e94c988
'2012-04-18T05:25:25-04:00'
describe
'154304' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOM' 'sip-files00068.jpg'
dc781e514c7f848847f57dba37f2119b
3482c8591a70bd076df4e4e9b2556db0ccd50edd
'2012-04-18T05:30:12-04:00'
describe
'28976' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJON' 'sip-files00068.pro'
3771f710be09bc52e6abdcb860a993bd
eb520f7659a7d19e71471d50976805fa87af05d5
'2012-04-18T05:28:41-04:00'
describe
'74872' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOO' 'sip-files00068.QC.jpg'
26700cbade26052f2bbf316c376f6980
033a0c80c7c26b7317ac998033f639a228c4848c
describe
'954932' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOP' 'sip-files00068.tif'
fde2aaa7a621a6dfd71dc3fff7119900
436342416a4a76bbaabd95e86d61dea66a431e08
'2012-04-18T05:22:39-04:00'
describe
'1250' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOQ' 'sip-files00068.txt'
c99ba85f97e035a9555735480e4fc9b1
509ed731c897b0a13c1cc55db04b65dae1ff3309
'2012-04-18T05:23:13-04:00'
describe
'36742' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOR' 'sip-files00068thm.jpg'
71d6cc65f761dc815ce3e89e2197e28a
cbbf56c3819e3b1873df9c221e52cb8e06d4c07f
describe
'120285' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOS' 'sip-files00069.jp2'
fe7191f5ec2952b07bd267d63cd3a227
025b63bf0fe9dc83651c3bf97fbe365939e4d632
'2012-04-18T05:24:03-04:00'
describe
'150552' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOT' 'sip-files00069.jpg'
a59d73a8b24cad20ecdaf5ccb255c780
5e6e740f345d89e871019502e28574ea817fe8f5
'2012-04-18T05:23:14-04:00'
describe
'28176' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOU' 'sip-files00069.pro'
45f7ca91693e536900670d06279eb709
e00121572b78dddc729c9699fd7e3b5db896e205
'2012-04-18T05:22:21-04:00'
describe
'72813' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOV' 'sip-files00069.QC.jpg'
86dca8c81ada238241c70b11a239f3d4
3aa07a5e42f126f1d749f078530e0ecc8833d015
describe
'979912' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOW' 'sip-files00069.tif'
5e16233612968deb3abb8ed3048fdfcf
122bd41ccfbe4486f5dc85e50b2613949ecc7a87
describe
'1190' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOX' 'sip-files00069.txt'
a813cc2f1deb3d14c42d94895bc43b52
e8b13ea2ff5df7ecfe0c6f0dcbd08b33047e1656
describe
'35140' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOY' 'sip-files00069thm.jpg'
af351b16610b2f0a88eb043f47f21d6c
e364edfc59c156d722272e356cdce9d3c985bf2d
describe
'123276' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJOZ' 'sip-files00070.jp2'
4d365bd6ee9f675b11de51469c967c4f
130c3df35d8b810cb72914f466313fd320215079
describe
'103781' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPA' 'sip-files00070.jpg'
df338d7e03080a86ec83f88e924933a9
f608dcf4864695cca5c8a86f6c6053e02248d743
'2012-04-18T05:23:06-04:00'
describe
'22322' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPB' 'sip-files00070.pro'
d4d7f24072d5fab6a85897ddc60f18fc
c967e3f20acef19fd7c20a9491ca18f770c3c43c
'2012-04-18T05:30:51-04:00'
describe
'56763' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPC' 'sip-files00070.QC.jpg'
3dc89d524669ffcce195599d8567dfd5
2dac6ebc5cf2a7bee411f754e3449c15dc3c5e38
describe
'1008424' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPD' 'sip-files00070.tif'
1afd6ba2841463165bf9013a749344b6
2190d591961dba78284270fa8b3fb6f42bad91c7
'2012-04-18T05:28:13-04:00'
describe
'975' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPE' 'sip-files00070.txt'
fc3f5b20b774fd30be01d38f5f12dbdb
4897048f9a8d7329acf8cdffe313eff7474ef31c
describe
'33513' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPF' 'sip-files00070thm.jpg'
74c70531983604ee69f1b7e70486ec77
1c83aaf6e2ff8c890cba2005fb4d774c36bbeee8
describe
'117036' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPG' 'sip-files00071.jp2'
5a37ca997fb28ed922e99b213894c3a3
bf326aa1afc9c36ab0991c8eb5dcdc262c672f31
describe
'133821' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPH' 'sip-files00071.jpg'
aa0052b5ce367bfd96cf03412d8c9570
a94a5cd70aa180c66d995ac46a5d08100310a7b4
describe
'25877' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPI' 'sip-files00071.pro'
14da1046ae5e58a5b6fe97acbcba84c0
a4adcd51e08f9dae7ac6e116269aa8e70c66f4ed
describe
'65663' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPJ' 'sip-files00071.QC.jpg'
2561e736277f8a706118fed6501398d5
65b887f5714ef1302dbc3246c145930076ba3b6b
'2012-04-18T05:26:46-04:00'
describe
'954064' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPK' 'sip-files00071.tif'
e655769d6c0d02a875c239608d50441b
c3c00ff313eb3654c2ae97baefef8519e29728a9
'2012-04-18T05:28:37-04:00'
describe
'1108' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPL' 'sip-files00071.txt'
53b6adfccb9376395df822a3e81947f8
a9374bd1abb14211880f18167e2e2c7fedd3be06
'2012-04-18T05:25:20-04:00'
describe
'33279' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPM' 'sip-files00071thm.jpg'
42a5e1f40f0f5b1d1a23ac0147c3bfd3
69504c8f24389fb3d9f6791a6e8ff0fec8d2dbdd
'2012-04-18T05:29:09-04:00'
describe
'123774' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPN' 'sip-files00072.jp2'
6d780c1b3324c0ed57e559f23fb7efa3
3c2bb761609b0b0f2252c519b2967f7100326496
'2012-04-18T05:27:56-04:00'
describe
'117285' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPO' 'sip-files00072.jpg'
b49019636b4dc7417b2f0990dca47c7d
e5ddb3fcfa3c797689843b4398592658f61b953c
describe
'26565' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPP' 'sip-files00072.pro'
08c02410fe2254c27523f13815709408
0293897bb9a065f2e07984ee606349359115e4cf
'2012-04-18T05:25:13-04:00'
describe
'63812' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPQ' 'sip-files00072.QC.jpg'
a3bc1ce5fcf2194eb0288e7230e45b13
fd01b31940bbf3374d2e90114d84b1b9a94240ff
'2012-04-18T05:21:43-04:00'
describe
'1012820' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPR' 'sip-files00072.tif'
a190d3d27be916d1122731c79adb7157
25e80c1a1f9a09fad0c4f06865c4c2b5b2dc6221
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPS' 'sip-files00072.txt'
00925370908d33c5c41f955d3f748b2f
03ae332bece67fefdbf62e12c65b4abbd0a5d278
'2012-04-18T05:20:40-04:00'
describe
'35609' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPT' 'sip-files00072thm.jpg'
30671e5d4f6fb24dced0689c4506de31
a73008a25d5e68c8b7a91b1463c44b83769d73e4
'2012-04-18T05:26:26-04:00'
describe
'109557' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPU' 'sip-files00073.jp2'
6ac22c5ba06173b0a4e50a85ab6d6399
72373618df2c3449ad7a6073d8f6d541271133e2
'2012-04-18T05:23:58-04:00'
describe
'143296' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPV' 'sip-files00073.jpg'
145da2d3be953d0ad074110b22bcf727
7ad698578177c95db414084889e98917a00f521c
describe
'25665' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPW' 'sip-files00073.pro'
00b3bc710769233ce0758592464e89af
c988d4a59ce660e20588781b5a3c4efe8a59ffeb
'2012-04-18T05:29:32-04:00'
describe
'72009' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPX' 'sip-files00073.QC.jpg'
85a309f00fc5f38b0b0169c0c22ef2f2
1d9f0bd4a0b0d7f102f5c0de52602efd280b05dc
'2012-04-18T05:25:16-04:00'
describe
'900304' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPY' 'sip-files00073.tif'
4aee2256763b7ec43fec3aedd0deaec1
38e66b7ba7a40bd072f7c699fd00ac8d2af2445e
describe
'1105' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJPZ' 'sip-files00073.txt'
ececfdbb93abcc7fc69e2b50f197cbb4
64208c28e1ba03442c7b329d030c284949d3f3cc
'2012-04-18T05:23:23-04:00'
describe
'42696' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQA' 'sip-files00073thm.jpg'
b062991fb7f77ef7f46b8133b442e79f
e730b7b2c6d8aec219239e1ce3d6aa24d651f1c5
'2012-04-18T05:25:06-04:00'
describe
'119904' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQB' 'sip-files00074.jp2'
ac6b7293c69cf43bed0e65dade1d3822
9ed214e2867e7d0593b7f7854711b876b3f68436
describe
'144419' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQC' 'sip-files00074.jpg'
d58f56bf1e39c22964a801d0c10b5ed4
51e2e0d488c5bb302f242318a846755ec5f84756
describe
'25584' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQD' 'sip-files00074.pro'
5f17d5fa1f8840c4fd028bae451af1b6
89a095ae87406f7bc3a1093e8038c5caad79ef0c
'2012-04-18T05:23:28-04:00'
describe
'74101' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQE' 'sip-files00074.QC.jpg'
aab9fe802049450e262be2521baa8e74
a5ea5bb3a1573f133260914374505c95bc4278c9
'2012-04-18T05:21:20-04:00'
describe
'983684' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQF' 'sip-files00074.tif'
e05fcea8a52e5955a0b1288ebf4141d6
305ae195254f7c7e6c041a0ca6b43e2df75d4095
describe
'1109' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQG' 'sip-files00074.txt'
5e82abd655151edd42a39e52bea334e9
0672a9fa5f7a8637089123bc60d311f3956ec8cc
describe
'40700' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQH' 'sip-files00074thm.jpg'
f2770ed37067951347eaa9f1fcf5b0b9
b036a86b48a2630e5378930cb08bd2884ec8c61b
describe
'115212' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQI' 'sip-files00075.jp2'
52c5dbf12c010fda25fad11576ad95e7
e9db16048060a15f74e8533332271d15a0b6bbf0
'2012-04-18T05:22:18-04:00'
describe
'143591' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQJ' 'sip-files00075.jpg'
ff7c3ae2c670640c4168a37002bf29c8
2ae1d3fb02a671ae60c1b541235c752f5ec907b7
describe
'24701' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQK' 'sip-files00075.pro'
1cb6b18921f763553d8b34c451adc046
66cea294cc82e5abbd3ee3202aaefdce919a7308
'2012-04-18T05:27:55-04:00'
describe
'73108' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQL' 'sip-files00075.QC.jpg'
9427b3869da3085504b902fda54cf4b4
679fb82dc952e8011b7d3f5ae1567cc453a39cbc
'2012-04-18T05:27:25-04:00'
describe
'945396' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQM' 'sip-files00075.tif'
f8c7ca5b457e337042f4fbb81789cc85
54dc646304e5933289555e14fb151673cf607d69
'2012-04-18T05:26:15-04:00'
describe
'1067' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQN' 'sip-files00075.txt'
af97f4e70c7e58f6c1614db31baf995a
f9ad5a7a7de8eafca1742508b3ef4c667d2ab15b
describe
'41127' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQO' 'sip-files00075thm.jpg'
cf85692d903c54a51546535a831106ff
77b622d2d964064ac43347ab1f8a0ca89fb02fcb
'2012-04-18T05:27:20-04:00'
describe
'114844' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQP' 'sip-files00076.jp2'
b081c765260b2cadbef62cbde09c9019
e1232d719da9354daebc0bfc6956822282c0b5fd
'2012-04-18T05:28:50-04:00'
describe
'152534' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQQ' 'sip-files00076.jpg'
2d7921d660c6a6c2f14ff56ecab5644f
dbfab80ccaacfbc6a3de34b4668fe9ca7bb806b6
'2012-04-18T05:24:26-04:00'
describe
'27642' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQR' 'sip-files00076.pro'
7a61a9cb9897e74c649aa3ce136ccbee
ae8c02c6a0e815137f7b42451e6523750bfa2259
describe
'76854' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQS' 'sip-files00076.QC.jpg'
407c0e51fc226d842618d28005e89957
8af515406570ce2737d250ce1a7e3944364a26d8
describe
'942420' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQT' 'sip-files00076.tif'
9aef22a2e794c87def457c68e59b926d
7f258e0628bc571735e5fe33d18fc6b0a657a5e5
'2012-04-18T05:21:02-04:00'
describe
'1202' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQU' 'sip-files00076.txt'
cbad3a27f4fbc1297b7481c9155fb28f
c26ca49686a088d98c3298ae033299512ccf6865
describe
'42530' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQV' 'sip-files00076thm.jpg'
a422924a088f9fe815c800ad10286a57
454b23b7e33da864948721c3529567bf53b117fc
'2012-04-18T05:25:59-04:00'
describe
'120326' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQW' 'sip-files00077.jp2'
a2c1293803fc5ff6b209d6e917ae9d95
81e287ddabea59f799fc699ea9ea5178bd691869
describe
'132513' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQX' 'sip-files00077.jpg'
f5023cc005af452d6eee1fe9dc3f1854
6ac339a66e430ae0e98cda1a7423f39c0950f684
describe
'23642' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQY' 'sip-files00077.pro'
670ce0aa4f9bf26806ea5c7de0e20cb3
e60c2f09b68f1005cc32ca3e82145ef57b121c88
describe
'69838' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJQZ' 'sip-files00077.QC.jpg'
302c86ce37f3b56b333899a73d8bf5e7
77ee4d43cedd62ca3ebf2ef4032ea534c260efd3
describe
'985860' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRA' 'sip-files00077.tif'
eceb69e5f941e1a5771dc4717cbc3553
108aef51e121140c8435af1f7680889033cb958b
'2012-04-18T05:30:52-04:00'
describe
'1041' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRB' 'sip-files00077.txt'
424359942604643ee86ce257fcf2ccb2
b348159d20a3d26ef7c04609ee399d5863606bd8
describe
'37814' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRC' 'sip-files00077thm.jpg'
8115ba1b23231685485a077d7431d9a6
63ae145743871b00a54b49fa7517e21f404dfc0c
'2012-04-18T05:27:38-04:00'
describe
'116667' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRD' 'sip-files00078.jp2'
f78362c4d14007c6ec59864e13c8d724
9d132d6d3310ddb3cb08dc547433420e6b68686f
'2012-04-18T05:26:54-04:00'
describe
'139454' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRE' 'sip-files00078.jpg'
f535def204750d05d07e32bbb0e58dbd
2c22bae867b7ccc0b9ae941da2bdbdcc3ad2a041
'2012-04-18T05:20:39-04:00'
describe
'24182' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRF' 'sip-files00078.pro'
081e8d80e0c629fe62b79eb30fe54762
04f6a6d230a2b8ee5cd24a1445a91ea1d2488653
describe
'71077' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRG' 'sip-files00078.QC.jpg'
e0b4e681a994d8e918cab19276852804
e7ab23cbaa2305aa934f89afd0d4bbc9d920e230
describe
'956516' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRH' 'sip-files00078.tif'
bcc7fa51bb0e3cbdf08484baa6d08d45
573e6a71f91fb0e213ca0e8681b11f8600e7b13d
'2012-04-18T05:31:02-04:00'
describe
'1065' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRI' 'sip-files00078.txt'
c35d0c285dfe4914185974b0656e8b99
8b65cc7496b170ccedb757cebef51f3f1c17ec83
'2012-04-18T05:26:49-04:00'
describe
'40652' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRJ' 'sip-files00078thm.jpg'
f607cebfdfd0e94c16464fd5994337f5
c66b42886e4374d82836e8faa316c523b6470e99
'2012-04-18T05:29:42-04:00'
describe
'111775' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRK' 'sip-files00079.jp2'
29dfd55cf1b61a78b5e0a7fab837cb7d
0626d356d8dfe69e4082d49ff3ec3b5179173de6
'2012-04-18T05:27:45-04:00'
describe
'150668' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRL' 'sip-files00079.jpg'
d4f5dd3fe6a81a4b9d1c8ec36add43e6
9373e7a02a650d97c6a0a642a4baf132ffa141d9
'2012-04-18T05:31:07-04:00'
describe
'26884' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRM' 'sip-files00079.pro'
62919032ebf5041f51e5f10d135ddf37
baa5efcc67463470c5c0ef0f5f24b5e50d2dd722
'2012-04-18T05:20:26-04:00'
describe
'77442' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRN' 'sip-files00079.QC.jpg'
7e6bacd066c194320f2f43302d3f34b6
1e95297ec2c92dde7f7b0c059a231b3d4009b9bd
'2012-04-18T05:29:16-04:00'
describe
'919344' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRO' 'sip-files00079.tif'
cecba3812df614d7862a5a517366d44d
f1b69345b8b0b1146172be9b4155484efda29cf1
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRP' 'sip-files00079.txt'
b1ddf35beb16938792cd1d52a00df015
7e814bfa519f186eb671c322248daae119749383
'2012-04-18T05:25:37-04:00'
describe
'42212' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRQ' 'sip-files00079thm.jpg'
5e1d07e12c25a809cbbb9f0d2e4a7a00
3b9c084e05c7f7735e32f4c3617be78aeefc6483
'2012-04-18T05:20:38-04:00'
describe
'114883' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRR' 'sip-files00080.jp2'
fd46460e8eebd13cd078a6041913aa17
f594f3fc10b3ccfb184050c87627a2c62edcf5de
'2012-04-18T05:23:33-04:00'
describe
'122778' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRS' 'sip-files00080.jpg'
58bf976fe45e231157af7591d4fac69c
84f339c54d81093f13355a4457e66a35cf7d7033
'2012-04-18T05:31:25-04:00'
describe
'27186' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRT' 'sip-files00080.pro'
02fd41029cc2d1a2258671bd8e35a0da
59584b057cd8546b2d10215549960a28cb51ebfd
describe
'67837' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRU' 'sip-files00080.QC.jpg'
4778991650304423c1651cd8cbde13d0
5af9115e4e0ff7a61ffb70794a2f3970869bc5dd
describe
'942404' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRV' 'sip-files00080.tif'
a4a4a0513173ddd7b2bfabc104fe91ef
f982cee2b55b45f810fbdc573d9bc0330214a2f7
'2012-04-18T05:28:51-04:00'
describe
'1174' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRW' 'sip-files00080.txt'
1320d383f51eb9b4e3f0f14e0dfd4dd6
863f8c2901a64cdd897400c460d66b99ad66a4be
'2012-04-18T05:28:30-04:00'
describe
'37697' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRX' 'sip-files00080thm.jpg'
62c1002518fee1d07e674fc5298d7355
3f4db268999ed60caa551aa9912f45dd0f1f53a2
'2012-04-18T05:23:52-04:00'
describe
'113714' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRY' 'sip-files00081.jp2'
ae66b07f44f2f1ca7241a7b94bd4f7e8
67eb9241382a5f14156446b2bbe60dbcc6806523
'2012-04-18T05:26:09-04:00'
describe
'153375' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJRZ' 'sip-files00081.jpg'
79f0799abbc59215f17eb2407b7ecf85
1850954f43f1ce38555701f7b4a52ff8704905a1
'2012-04-18T05:20:42-04:00'
describe
'27280' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSA' 'sip-files00081.pro'
6c7db0a2327d4a29fd72e77277e9a2ae
b1340e798d57318a68a94f6e977047daa1d73608
describe
'78520' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSB' 'sip-files00081.QC.jpg'
a6d19bccb8e1657137d7d0a34d1d842c
4d7bd245ba6431dfd3c650b178d81719095b90e5
describe
'933128' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSC' 'sip-files00081.tif'
143bba7847bc5644247d4df746d2129d
ca8676bf727f5ec277c76c5ef12ab9471a72b975
'2012-04-18T05:30:14-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSD' 'sip-files00081.txt'
7f367b1546386cdd2832a3b53cd3725f
c3ad7e3dba08113b182e35e6fd2d955618315702
describe
'42111' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSE' 'sip-files00081thm.jpg'
8eb65200aa76617edbdc57cf31af728f
c576007885a5cb3b23f3574d90f3ab85608d874d
'2012-04-18T05:24:41-04:00'
describe
'116980' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSF' 'sip-files00082.jp2'
c45356df4463d7e364b8fcaf5008c9d5
83ede7c6cb4236b1755941348d6376eb047f069e
describe
'121867' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSG' 'sip-files00082.jpg'
53d37212a1355ddd6d9ef877aa560e47
dbc5dfcfed9690b6b3307d36d3ad6c341a855a63
describe
'27055' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSH' 'sip-files00082.pro'
a0205b73b3fb3d1011eff434738370ba
4e0f154cbfc7696dad6e936c745ae24ece1d57ae
'2012-04-18T05:26:44-04:00'
describe
'65932' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSI' 'sip-files00082.QC.jpg'
7e523589e790f007d971f23eb0131089
cba9e9238387bfaa97e2f937b17b55d029a77f06
'2012-04-18T05:31:00-04:00'
describe
'959548' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSJ' 'sip-files00082.tif'
398008cbe4bed8b8abb63eeeb41aefa7
5249ca0953fb2969b411e558ed0012615dab0ac7
'2012-04-18T05:28:09-04:00'
describe
'1161' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSK' 'sip-files00082.txt'
96df1ca66b0122f8375797a79c838487
a29094f693e0ff8b1b6685966caae33b7882f52b
'2012-04-18T05:29:21-04:00'
describe
'37370' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSL' 'sip-files00082thm.jpg'
2695e68443481e2e5bbd893111f02d6e
27e30a46d06cfdfb0b876675aa3427008f8633cd
'2012-04-18T05:31:28-04:00'
describe
'103835' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSM' 'sip-files00083.jp2'
1836c0f3c5220ca30fa48ab1ddcdbafb
264482351e643fb777c6c71d4336b8ed8e855939
describe
'149456' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSN' 'sip-files00083.jpg'
0193a8f888726a9687c1579d56f9553f
4c0cd0ec4a2a3c094265bd1b1e6b75b7a821f891
describe
'26707' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSO' 'sip-files00083.pro'
eef1a091d6721bbbd051677248022ca1
53e23afd27e87c2d0c3d184200a73b7374bb1f95
'2012-04-18T05:29:52-04:00'
describe
'76925' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSP' 'sip-files00083.QC.jpg'
0de82bdb65dae92980e3b6a729c42718
4ae200bfa28350eaba3fad4deda2955ec711f785
describe
'854100' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSQ' 'sip-files00083.tif'
3460e124885dc3bf6609289fcbd37176
844d1e0f4f8d8d9ab3a48d8b992037247c0b5a53
'2012-04-18T05:26:41-04:00'
describe
'1142' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSR' 'sip-files00083.txt'
50512c6105a9a953013fab0d714239c8
23da3036601a6f63f2e2c0c07b5243299e251993
'2012-04-18T05:26:08-04:00'
describe
'44899' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSS' 'sip-files00083thm.jpg'
91aa7955ea3987a5f4e5b3e5491e96d6
44e33861acd0880f5fb29e3e17f07f4d068280fb
'2012-04-18T05:30:44-04:00'
describe
'120156' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJST' 'sip-files00084.jp2'
b64fb4b6b0172847538dfcffb9d77051
24804eaddf6ee4ae68305378486b7abda1cb02d3
describe
'150403' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSU' 'sip-files00084.jpg'
15e2c73825415823b488f163d37765da
7f3af772ed194cc29880712804119f140983e0f1
describe
'28267' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSV' 'sip-files00084.pro'
a7298552adcde4a2ed0dd5d77b679cd3
b98ebaa23e12c2b86b84092280a95d0cd0fed150
'2012-04-18T05:24:43-04:00'
describe
'75999' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSW' 'sip-files00084.QC.jpg'
8df57fc9555d2a50951d4930fb9322c1
928947a4ed2229ee766f76a1cdce5a3947ebc5f6
'2012-04-18T05:26:27-04:00'
describe
'984760' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSX' 'sip-files00084.tif'
9b77e2fc598fec9184d6de4e8d4e3782
0181e83f6713dd550fa5319ee69bd59b22863ede
describe
'1220' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSY' 'sip-files00084.txt'
2a64d6cf7a45616e2442635a71729dd3
f555bf24ef562e1d6152753c55f8dd0f735a2044
describe
'41038' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJSZ' 'sip-files00084thm.jpg'
6593e931d6b6dddc5011b1128bc91f7e
cd151078c30c678b9962787c4fdd3a7a0f5ef001
describe
'120230' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTA' 'sip-files00085.jp2'
2dbb7d64cf89042ea79573e22f2a4f6a
92b20ccbffb1018e85820054cc365130c31d0517
describe
'156573' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTB' 'sip-files00085.jpg'
3c27a8040e84a1ab67b8782a3cf5535b
53a88192bfb2d7a971ceefa39fd98ac833d47486
'2012-04-18T05:27:12-04:00'
describe
'28437' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTC' 'sip-files00085.pro'
f7ff3efec3b1b6b0c130984a7988f5da
9cadd551fdb0f4082a4a5772003292afd645d1b7
'2012-04-18T05:20:48-04:00'
describe
'79230' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTD' 'sip-files00085.QC.jpg'
abf3ab63d89afebaea33801c206aa75d
534b8ba6a14befbfce374bcdc623b5ef6ed172c0
describe
'985512' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTE' 'sip-files00085.tif'
5793c7d7c0edfac08b668c1ac72367f8
550ce686a5c045ac43da68d460eea726d35c7617
'2012-04-18T05:23:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTF' 'sip-files00085.txt'
a1d222144b22bddc819801420c61f341
f4e522b0c484346de8bfacf114ed33c53e335fc4
'2012-04-18T05:26:53-04:00'
describe
'41055' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTG' 'sip-files00085thm.jpg'
2dc77942f8e70f98e2ad1de0e470e8d7
edec4dda411a3bb00492f03e047e43edd1466696
'2012-04-18T05:30:53-04:00'
describe
'119789' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTH' 'sip-files00086.jp2'
099a1da532279d7d3347889bad66042f
07944138333ca3aa48a45a6e7a3a1451c1bfe210
describe
'150509' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTI' 'sip-files00086.jpg'
8280c0a3318acae5f87c7ba0fec95eaa
5bd6502f9dba4ae3400255bc55474561b42f34ff
describe
'27347' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTJ' 'sip-files00086.pro'
4778cf09dbdb0aff497234a0d6fb5a62
7d1334cf17445cf2530cacd537720e7d3bece2ac
describe
'75865' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTK' 'sip-files00086.QC.jpg'
3f6e5264fadd02a9e78517efdc3014d2
06a5b92f3e973d8aa9871eff21e978f7d5a862d1
describe
'981756' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTL' 'sip-files00086.tif'
291194bd51d366af40cdc918da39c923
1ca6a90e7c15ac05b4d0aa64ff0c24d98e6c96b2
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTM' 'sip-files00086.txt'
090d003278f987ac286065fc9c792d5b
d9c7c58921d6932e772aca7726d39455a8a20417
describe
'40682' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTN' 'sip-files00086thm.jpg'
e1f77e68b455b98ef544a558a0e96cc0
64a82656fd1db660ad308a5fe18c2663c90a6b73
describe
'117790' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTO' 'sip-files00087.jp2'
8e445c8f9389433af8878202c5b14d03
574c5f3020206d64d1b523e3b0fd1dad306687ce
'2012-04-18T05:25:39-04:00'
describe
'140034' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTP' 'sip-files00087.jpg'
9e54c1e49f847d15fe25992eb9b28369
da315345b2521b006ced2b1ac72fa0c23cefcf2d
describe
'25342' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTQ' 'sip-files00087.pro'
2c559fb83a48e6a1d661ebe1e807e4b3
d81bcc797becbac4143e090585430bba20fc0c14
'2012-04-18T05:28:33-04:00'
describe
'72188' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTR' 'sip-files00087.QC.jpg'
d5f63428e849d9dd3c943973fc05d8a3
82397b749b074c03bd7af96edbc0089bc7cf4b13
describe
'965784' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTS' 'sip-files00087.tif'
110a46f29f57a81303695ed713bb97fb
40701e80ec444bb8789e6e86c85dbc22a879686a
'2012-04-18T05:21:57-04:00'
describe
'1088' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTT' 'sip-files00087.txt'
dca2a28444a97ba94891d92351418763
11ec239a4cbea98f5866c467fded97041535a63c
describe
'40416' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTU' 'sip-files00087thm.jpg'
a180fb58f03e7eca158454c9920da0bb
7c7e938c8313b0042465c23ab9f138af8da4e40a
'2012-04-18T05:21:35-04:00'
describe
'113393' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTV' 'sip-files00088.jp2'
ced104116ff70d96c6a55fe6525a4fe8
a68d35f062f2e3a0a93c62862cca8cdab466fc81
'2012-04-18T05:23:35-04:00'
describe
'140724' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTW' 'sip-files00088.jpg'
8fdd864307942295bc80d4b0ce8088cc
b15e6529e99a468cb8f40082a539b7b60065a6bc
describe
'24397' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTX' 'sip-files00088.pro'
13ecf788ed1e8d7b98c003dd25e9c377
a275d2bb47a5591e884f44068eae6424f65865b7
'2012-04-18T05:20:37-04:00'
describe
'71873' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTY' 'sip-files00088.QC.jpg'
36cbad71cf1da014b32e656ecfb9bedf
192c0e5c6d5a8bd6b845dcb439120a6a169bda18
'2012-04-18T05:24:51-04:00'
describe
'930284' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJTZ' 'sip-files00088.tif'
1b66aaec54d8bb36631b51dddd6f523f
2677ffa4b7a62242ad7add48b0f6302451edbf26
'2012-04-18T05:25:55-04:00'
describe
'1077' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUA' 'sip-files00088.txt'
3736502d0a45bcd804a9a6a305ad3151
ac1db27b9f960b5b60ecfb5fa3aadac1e9117dfb
describe
'41671' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUB' 'sip-files00088thm.jpg'
0d71e8bfb1230e7b08c97857497ff641
9ca38ed4daf6a6f258eec610608625020c977c76
describe
'109108' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUC' 'sip-files00089.jp2'
a4935a400b481b76b4194ba8c37ee469
23f42fd56a351fcf1c395edda19de81657b33fc1
describe
'146002' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUD' 'sip-files00089.jpg'
96ade579746b0eb34ab8d0c4bbad92ba
862ea758c633ce7205e196320d64218e7ce8b2b2
describe
'26369' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUE' 'sip-files00089.pro'
122ba47f82ca2a5618bde9dac637477f
50252dddcd6851ed1cbc9365e7566dc230438d1e
describe
'73842' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUF' 'sip-files00089.QC.jpg'
ce0bffacbb7fcc35a95e71e8019295c1
47bf453a3408655b060d003ccb3b61d176e71a9f
describe
'897360' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUG' 'sip-files00089.tif'
150e7ff3ab3427748142329c19380345
4b729c7800f53e33522118f4990f32978bf3b2b9
'2012-04-18T05:27:57-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUH' 'sip-files00089.txt'
ce91934c1fae4a84961907643a1b334a
e088b2b6ee77a0a983f920ce1103ddbf45110e56
describe
'42294' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUI' 'sip-files00089thm.jpg'
2636dcad9b09cb9200f12df352fbe951
5de51bd158b7fa4a3f2ab6eb38028518380b2cc1
'2012-04-18T05:27:42-04:00'
describe
'116107' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUJ' 'sip-files00090.jp2'
a4ed622cff97d77855ab8b30d35af1be
5f41de952b7d9f6a7fbf072addf30268df0145eb
'2012-04-18T05:20:25-04:00'
describe
'134239' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUK' 'sip-files00090.jpg'
3830ee372bd2edfebbcb5130893ef13c
870d1fd9cbd13c820080b1dc9e6cdcc7ec9f4004
'2012-04-18T05:23:51-04:00'
describe
'24926' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUL' 'sip-files00090.pro'
8834dbbe09ec7e15812434b06f8abacf
7c77a74b52386e68c9d83a6083fd2d739ecb1f85
'2012-04-18T05:25:44-04:00'
describe
'68696' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUM' 'sip-files00090.QC.jpg'
e48b2b79cd3cda29a0e04dd395da9fa8
1495e3e0aaa626d519e47e4edcbb1032d291a366
describe
'951868' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUN' 'sip-files00090.tif'
9df9a3ab9439815a3966c96b1a30b722
ef3fe14e125276cabd8d04ca6fd91e99852fbd6a
'2012-04-18T05:20:49-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUO' 'sip-files00090.txt'
988f5913f8acd665f5ddc170436cd118
1c640011c3c925b6d669835b14320401ee33651c
'2012-04-18T05:21:29-04:00'
describe
'39254' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUP' 'sip-files00090thm.jpg'
a5fe687b5a978d4b09dd2283ac922fa5
4aadb38ce0fde8869810441a4c4032e2a9e83d50
'2012-04-18T05:27:34-04:00'
describe
'110449' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUQ' 'sip-files00091.jp2'
62e21d71988c1c6e230d3b5eb9c2435a
5381d340e0d1cef80bf9e850f7865bee03cc3a83
describe
'155416' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUR' 'sip-files00091.jpg'
8842e24a6bfae92b159a7abc96b13851
d5b76ec47c8093f2c5ead21ab8a928be8a29ac55
describe
'28154' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUS' 'sip-files00091.pro'
31ba0220d9979d0d502aacab5de5d66a
6bdf786c8240111db84e61ad3b171899c37d78b7
describe
'77536' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUT' 'sip-files00091.QC.jpg'
933089ea96d1fde99e28de3a17f71e95
d20f5d873710747d3279643c402bbb21bacb53af
describe
'906852' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUU' 'sip-files00091.tif'
850045a5b463878442549ffcc0521774
6e7fcb5d5390e35e7a410f0316ca104f1684aabf
'2012-04-18T05:29:58-04:00'
describe
'1208' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUV' 'sip-files00091.txt'
c31f5cb6494cbf39cf13f3daa1f2bf14
9c838bd6b84d7cef49beb5d3cf9a752cd1d25cec
describe
'43370' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUW' 'sip-files00091thm.jpg'
750d15155ff5ae56b4f6c6e812e86f44
176444255f7c4ca5bdd159ff07638fe00a4b6c76
'2012-04-18T05:22:05-04:00'
describe
'116912' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUX' 'sip-files00092.jp2'
d4c6c53b6b10d56344d4757cf1836a29
6d09ef5d1e440fc3076491db36eb962392ecd083
describe
'157585' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUY' 'sip-files00092.jpg'
05ea51373bd46b4a7b1b1b18fa027231
e295c0b0296dc8b40fd2f59ad333fd0e8c7d4003
describe
'28484' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJUZ' 'sip-files00092.pro'
1e145ea873a7011d24d1d73c0829fa2d
222ab9a0bcd12eee708e2a9328df5452025d670e
'2012-04-18T05:21:15-04:00'
describe
'79413' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVA' 'sip-files00092.QC.jpg'
7fcd9e74b5b4add99236e6b01b9c4245
8487b1b1212ed0438cf48b4f44445799c91dc1b7
describe
'959244' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVB' 'sip-files00092.tif'
80fc2b23b06be25e1e7d87781d6cd8db
51114abb8b5f8fa26f3b0060fc94388e4333eea2
'2012-04-18T05:26:39-04:00'
describe
'1221' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVC' 'sip-files00092.txt'
6b2ade667e0db90083324e6a1c659b63
c7ab125a409a3f1a1d2452992d2c8b8577d70d5f
describe
'42368' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVD' 'sip-files00092thm.jpg'
6f26d37453628a595e2287a8e7a22ece
e13fd4a1dc555307983cfffcca98fd971cd369fe
describe
'118367' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVE' 'sip-files00093.jp2'
30328bf86dd33f5370689bfd010d5f96
1b98c5837bafc0fecdec705d9d961fab6bd0d54d
'2012-04-18T05:28:00-04:00'
describe
'159782' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVF' 'sip-files00093.jpg'
75b7a9eb83394090025f49977a3bf9e2
4a1d45a6b37a38efc39e9142c0223079e0317ea3
describe
'28786' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVG' 'sip-files00093.pro'
b9627f93f110852b022e301abe350806
8db0c9ec5d3132811547afb131f02bd94dfaf10c
describe
'81510' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVH' 'sip-files00093.QC.jpg'
a342bfc63cd26278ae54b61f389ede68
5256366eabc2c97ca2ea3ab5f68e778d04459637
describe
'970520' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVI' 'sip-files00093.tif'
1d54faf8dddbc84e30ee7328e2cdbd00
04ad1f801fe2aa1dfe31b7848d5cbb78dc60f27d
'2012-04-18T05:29:13-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVJ' 'sip-files00093.txt'
c6a9d1d9555871ccdbc5234a3efd881d
e5721ccfec04c51468acd0f5ad8f9138c8ceab1f
describe
'41820' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVK' 'sip-files00093thm.jpg'
a2b61fe7e39d89163562e5166b17ccb0
e9a3ed0a747b915273e2eb5aa4d5260a98e6c8d5
'2012-04-18T05:30:42-04:00'
describe
'123597' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVL' 'sip-files00094.jp2'
a7ea7099b5c73017801cabedd5e07e3e
581cc50e40e2e24823b3c348bdfe5db6f41695d0
describe
'144089' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVM' 'sip-files00094.jpg'
f6a717e656d8137263399eabb01abd31
4f47e2c1252153d67bae64b15f8dbf8cbe6f1f65
describe
'26032' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVN' 'sip-files00094.pro'
84d82d0b65382fe261f18e62f6123122
80dbf27b1a9a0a14a688f0464f093096e1f759e8
describe
'73865' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVO' 'sip-files00094.QC.jpg'
43c3907f5ad89a542ccf9fca97d5ff03
5bbd28bcf7c125862694e4b560db5ee692a62c24
describe
'1013004' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVP' 'sip-files00094.tif'
a634c647ff2b00e2984ccb4b6d5c2156
a4d67987c2c3fcd3f789d718b185d3ca8dea4e8b
describe
'1124' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVQ' 'sip-files00094.txt'
73bff84cb05ba93698007e32499d1b23
c53a36e7a8c7ee4430026cc4384502304212f072
describe
'40521' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVR' 'sip-files00094thm.jpg'
a1a7aa761c86fbb9ef9b9563ce7e8fda
ef9ebcc24ce3f6dfa2c2696fcc6a154b1040509e
describe
'105203' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVS' 'sip-files00095.jp2'
00b4c4440e79593d7266a983bf3e45eb
b76eeffb86221ce7a5fa6983d06613cd9b0f6c20
'2012-04-18T05:20:59-04:00'
describe
'157865' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVT' 'sip-files00095.jpg'
a93c7a233bdd99d2469c4764543b05e9
e4a383b32f3fa0881ac9236ddb8edede1d7bb9b3
'2012-04-18T05:29:48-04:00'
describe
'27006' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVU' 'sip-files00095.pro'
6dee0161792bb8077e9c8bd807fd6a07
993e2b8ff27fa9a27145aa096fd5a3cf6bdcd702
describe
'78761' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVV' 'sip-files00095.QC.jpg'
2a9b134a3bd378cb229149ac88b376a3
31362b68bc45a3c7a943f15f87d0222ee4eaa261
'2012-04-18T05:20:21-04:00'
describe
'865372' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVW' 'sip-files00095.tif'
c1cb8eeb3c09b01fef804fad727ba3c9
c431c385b80eb82eb7a4064795ef0eee9ee1d984
'2012-04-18T05:26:37-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVX' 'sip-files00095.txt'
d214c3e7f53f41d165915401441a8e06
1f9489ec44234db680de4b0b2ae658c4e27b89bf
describe
Invalid character
'45130' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVY' 'sip-files00095thm.jpg'
85b0036dcc3909ce8443e2e2d09ed3db
af31c12d68548c1ff352df50b6bd563ea89f7f27
describe
'117407' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJVZ' 'sip-files00096.jp2'
99c58845b38040d4418f9220a69d4f8a
7a872dd77ad880324e22c9677dfac1a3d4a12e55
describe
'155407' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWA' 'sip-files00096.jpg'
b8171c3a021033a2e9fd186e896e7245
eb337fec1b48080620e2724fc536d8ad8c99d547
describe
'28110' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWB' 'sip-files00096.pro'
200b912b5b2d24b817008697bb783d2a
6b3abdd7f14ce10cb6fe83e5b4b9bc43c39c6605
describe
'78353' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWC' 'sip-files00096.QC.jpg'
d0930426c0fd006a8793e042721b8c6e
2b3fef4c4ba0bee72f995467a3fa77431778751c
'2012-04-18T05:22:35-04:00'
describe
'962748' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWD' 'sip-files00096.tif'
d1ec42a7390b0daa3af5aaee222c5639
b571f4f9a76081ac6a2ae1bd4ad6a6cbb8138346
describe
'1198' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWE' 'sip-files00096.txt'
15140db4a05e6e06f22c8e149f0126eb
72680aad754bf36ffec0521dcd9c12518e96bddc
'2012-04-18T05:28:34-04:00'
describe
'42469' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWF' 'sip-files00096thm.jpg'
133af4317ca14418e986c76a59da5a96
9d2f94703c1ba3ccbd6e9f4c86b88f9fd95c8540
'2012-04-18T05:30:43-04:00'
describe
'100153' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWG' 'sip-files00097.jp2'
41e7755179469b2809172ef62b8be91b
2082cf52a9f596227f9c1cc0c231caacf79da5ab
describe
'173537' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWH' 'sip-files00097.jpg'
8c7a68cd36ac4bf33bbf7d303a88e5c1
8a52162bca326eb666b984ce7673ee598869639f
describe
'28171' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWI' 'sip-files00097.pro'
9ccf8a59a58fe586788d53d8fe0aa29f
5761df17b24bfc1fe74a065b8ff7fb7f3a0207dc
describe
'85238' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWJ' 'sip-files00097.QC.jpg'
fce5cbae5cd28c639d7db71d7672f85e
1659b5064285c125e6fccd146c462d58e75d6ac7
describe
'825560' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWK' 'sip-files00097.tif'
23bfc3d1d3cf46638507cf30b5ded4ef
278bed61e111bd0f1e5c99e637d4248962578e6d
describe
'1199' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWL' 'sip-files00097.txt'
c2587d2f38da3b0ee853d24ee14a80c0
d1749c9f3618dd7751d3e7a82be984ada57954d9
describe
'47388' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWM' 'sip-files00097thm.jpg'
fa6b60e96585850d337b13036595b302
26a03e011a27fa08935748acf6c327b3c25dafdf
'2012-04-18T05:27:00-04:00'
describe
'114868' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWN' 'sip-files00098.jp2'
cefdd8ff9945737fdd7db3de738091ff
a6dfb55ba9d8f505e4188d98d00810dc69dce2c9
describe
'147937' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWO' 'sip-files00098.jpg'
992701ab8cd11f1f917496be5b26c1bf
a97f50f12b8455b0744000517dc75128e7cff1ca
describe
'25574' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWP' 'sip-files00098.pro'
19ff776751fb9483ead931e99f17d10b
1391756c4b913be5cb15e28c0bc9a6f044258456
'2012-04-18T05:28:38-04:00'
describe
'75852' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWQ' 'sip-files00098.QC.jpg'
ea2b60c4609d25103f3eea6fa0ba17f2
ce8f1f28c03bab4f30073565978d430ec7bec3c8
describe
'942804' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWR' 'sip-files00098.tif'
9abb0dabfc166dcaae7976853592389e
937867bab59c7bd50596aac1c1be95927059d6b2
describe
'1104' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWS' 'sip-files00098.txt'
a1a9a70edfb00e31aff5a67ce3593440
b101ceb3e298dd0eb503daa748bba3f90219b3d4
describe
'41853' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWT' 'sip-files00098thm.jpg'
0b8916770698348802015a09cccf04ca
2bd812d5163f4e1c30a7fd24856cd2314b4d6f77
describe
'101510' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWU' 'sip-files00099.jp2'
8d492aae3b9103cf1b3050349f37cec5
53f5f3228f6999d07fa91e4fb7b7453208df1934
describe
'148444' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWV' 'sip-files00099.jpg'
8cb95bc1ceb48b6e01c87eeaffd28856
a46ad3669d66af6752d68d52804b78de7cf767ed
describe
'23763' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWW' 'sip-files00099.pro'
1b81207f4987f293959aae4543f5f6f0
92a83056e2a68e8cf56c60c7ba1dd7c6b02ec34e
'2012-04-18T05:20:44-04:00'
describe
'72544' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWX' 'sip-files00099.QC.jpg'
29f6ac3684b06fa1daea7a5513b0f8fd
f125d73564cc2173edcfaf3582e7294ab9faa9df
'2012-04-18T05:30:38-04:00'
describe
'835840' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWY' 'sip-files00099.tif'
b9a2f3cf86fe84b4580dc23010cd3061
fd4253a2f24b06cbaceaf9c3c9360d2c3ddc00a7
'2012-04-18T05:30:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJWZ' 'sip-files00099.txt'
56784caf9586a3fcc5a59608f7f9490e
610afe5352b84265fe1d880a0a8b839f38ab4697
'2012-04-18T05:29:19-04:00'
describe
'44441' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXA' 'sip-files00099thm.jpg'
34b01eae05545c5c5a4d75129b66bda7
e96f072a8a8b71770a5807aae7cf66dc4a2fa5c6
describe
'115776' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXB' 'sip-files00100.jp2'
15f632d508ca43ca0854d8659b01ca9d
7f033cb236cf8f8bcb2864008b66b924faf2e98e
'2012-04-18T05:22:12-04:00'
describe
'147666' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXC' 'sip-files00100.jpg'
b2ba55f6b9b8b8bd54ba25544c093016
9c2edb9d895634e4d354d4070183bde081b178f3
'2012-04-18T05:29:39-04:00'
describe
'26971' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXD' 'sip-files00100.pro'
3f670eaa9b249523b8c7ad6b3f84d425
1da568d824711a5f40671be3dbc2ce68c753c4d8
'2012-04-18T05:21:56-04:00'
describe
'75589' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXE' 'sip-files00100.QC.jpg'
da483e540e21c314b6b8200070dc87e8
761827695590b393b5d20ddddfb70c15ef541857
'2012-04-18T05:30:26-04:00'
describe
'950240' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXF' 'sip-files00100.tif'
cae34932741e2d4bb383e7409ab72d86
bd2177810194df45611399f66ccb7aaa36901575
describe
'1165' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXG' 'sip-files00100.txt'
8f743e476b6c1adba56980d2780f3976
93a237840147edde7e925f4d434e94792f49ef70
'2012-04-18T05:22:00-04:00'
describe
'41593' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXH' 'sip-files00100thm.jpg'
33500c9b35bc42dcef4c7f3db3d8875c
38bb2eb392e72150b43926342d2e27affd476446
'2012-04-18T05:21:25-04:00'
describe
'126747' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXI' 'sip-files00101.jp2'
a147f159d52d58fb1ec778b68d2de5da
aeb11342b2a6d5c74496ae1b905f66f538d0d14e
describe
'104267' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXJ' 'sip-files00101.jpg'
64f8785e29769c48798f3fcb514faaf4
ac58983d37b17b5349c02b3066a9f4596b95d1cd
describe
'16492' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXK' 'sip-files00101.pro'
564b03294ef3ccfc363e4f05f6a2dfb5
c3f68715d7dbbdd7e33dec981f0a21dc1a73e05e
describe
'54609' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXL' 'sip-files00101.QC.jpg'
8b44981d15912b67311d35b689638251
96beb671dba23571a771f30a5a4d3c93bbb7cc11
'2012-04-18T05:30:37-04:00'
describe
'1036140' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXM' 'sip-files00101.tif'
5ba77bc1bf945877e7809751de456922
a00d86e3127675fbf8616cdd5766ed302e2a04ff
'2012-04-18T05:27:32-04:00'
describe
'696' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXN' 'sip-files00101.txt'
c7f0d6302219815a55ba378e2ee16b5e
5def890e30a0600958f57863b93b202d261b92d2
describe
'31942' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXO' 'sip-files00101thm.jpg'
1f4515e35cf8855fe17136e137b883f1
bac85d6f9b48d7edbf05a28a5975d0fe8396fd51
describe
'118768' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXP' 'sip-files00102.jp2'
50baebd391a07760e478ef217dd0fe95
968c426d7f1ecc26f9608e60dff74465e617d4a8
describe
'136085' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXQ' 'sip-files00102.jpg'
66f131d68d490e62e1f47ddb15bb9d70
c237aeb35a978afec28e0fbedfbe50d6f93cd0af
describe
'24012' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXR' 'sip-files00102.pro'
d8818beabdb8cec56285e15828aae54d
30dc6b0a62d30c9ac30aa642ae688c57c9d98ab9
'2012-04-18T05:20:54-04:00'
describe
'68564' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXS' 'sip-files00102.QC.jpg'
0dfb6c072873685a438b3bca2d81143f
723eac11bb20c4a47b4d87c1ae18f426055882d5
describe
'973532' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXT' 'sip-files00102.tif'
b45da759132dfdc363eddfa56227a3d9
961d1e4e3199a9c59b7798d5bc73594a7542702c
'2012-04-18T05:27:14-04:00'
describe
'1042' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXU' 'sip-files00102.txt'
d83fd58c437342d6f9b89d2b84560bb9
c442e87414826da641fc93dd57cd2685c69f85b9
describe
'38500' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXV' 'sip-files00102thm.jpg'
4838e75adf36300acaaf9b66c3129ca0
e03a4c6c7d68f7f898b0a979cb1b96e0d73035b9
'2012-04-18T05:22:06-04:00'
describe
'119428' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXW' 'sip-files00103.jp2'
231137ef64758589bf2ece4ca013d9fe
cbf85d60bbcaae8c34f53a42a588034e7f516169
describe
'145778' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXX' 'sip-files00103.jpg'
80b8513020e91b6e2c33f23c0a819763
58d038d2df2d60c80205c857cd30e96716d1e677
'2012-04-18T05:24:17-04:00'
describe
'26206' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXY' 'sip-files00103.pro'
b8126b3ada5c5d5f2f6734660fb0a417
bbf2da4cef5337260b7b20fddbe5de998f0c73a6
describe
'74868' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJXZ' 'sip-files00103.QC.jpg'
178d406eb77e82956b52fcf30a7e7097
1e120c1e9f6e8e255dc98f057477b485467744bf
describe
'978576' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYA' 'sip-files00103.tif'
a2885e1bb1e72d55bdaf7ff5fb4e9c5a
a517893434da5dfceb821d18c3855ec2d2119792
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYB' 'sip-files00103.txt'
273d45c67dd59418fe92edd7ae3aba4b
f37e128b44ab56d3f6694ca3942ac7c9cd59645f
'2012-04-18T05:26:43-04:00'
describe
'40331' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYC' 'sip-files00103thm.jpg'
b509139fe870c54f26a1003e1b2e1f1c
a21a80156dcebba78ccd906da301fcc53f7ce05d
describe
'117391' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYD' 'sip-files00104.jp2'
388871650894054822445f0460f5053f
ee8a10a52e665c2067f9ad270918965770c6489e
describe
'146671' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYE' 'sip-files00104.jpg'
2f21f3d6fcc6aca27593b9f6c37b8bac
bf9e5d06cf6deb0fbd9d3b1039d93cd5a40ec78e
describe
'26654' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYF' 'sip-files00104.pro'
c884f3459f399c8221188495e9aaacc9
e633717cead3ce379ad1723ed882b6ba67d9727e
describe
'75289' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYG' 'sip-files00104.QC.jpg'
cf08c0af2ea1c5df2c902e65f33df6aa
d7690f1bb861a23ce3667561a4a8a16ed4aa4ad4
'2012-04-18T05:28:19-04:00'
describe
'962564' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYH' 'sip-files00104.tif'
a6f8b18f1a0c9c2ab00c645430059997
ae6c6fc6474d2f547901e71fa68d8b10d5ecde6d
'2012-04-18T05:29:31-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYI' 'sip-files00104.txt'
142e34ac7e417bbe5a32de61e5fa50b8
56e3e1dd5e7ae8946a953cf28a08646315b124bc
describe
'40915' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYJ' 'sip-files00104thm.jpg'
6c16bbcfc8799eaab1710bdba0604056
70ba761f923a86fbd4cb2ab07ca5d885b11d0855
'2012-04-18T05:24:09-04:00'
describe
'112442' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYK' 'sip-files00105.jp2'
18decfe189596b5fb757652eaab79cb6
34a3b16e74cf1b10207c709b1f8e56701ae77181
describe
'161500' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYL' 'sip-files00105.jpg'
9ebfd8519ec45587de40ec620c62a1fb
7c6fb5f0de9da5e0bb35e85917b30f833d41e8a2
'2012-04-18T05:28:29-04:00'
describe
'29703' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYM' 'sip-files00105.pro'
d6623630d1b9b86929a8d5c341a6ae1e
d7274214712f330013874a284a6a5e453eda7058
describe
'81659' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYN' 'sip-files00105.QC.jpg'
268fe3470937b6d66aa678d8c6d69a66
d1bf84ad8c989a4482e8e38695d6206eb69f814f
describe
'923248' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYO' 'sip-files00105.tif'
42ae3341caaec238d3dfd4b8f1ac2ae6
e37a7e78d2ac81e5dcb4a6a3c9d1890b01341c09
'2012-04-18T05:27:48-04:00'
describe
'1245' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYP' 'sip-files00105.txt'
ef70eec62c31f5b85ae83dfd31af0732
770a5e5dc3b104c8923f4494c964f600a0b8a53d
describe
'43518' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYQ' 'sip-files00105thm.jpg'
10cb9f1a3ee258a658d908b280d70575
6f844b0913a6d0b40c00be6fea83a372dbdc938f
'2012-04-18T05:29:30-04:00'
describe
'111979' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYR' 'sip-files00106.jp2'
93abf089dc4ffed9e8ad6078593fbebd
b05fcdc3bc5c1d42ee7ae72b7bf697e860bb5c25
describe
'151510' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYS' 'sip-files00106.jpg'
f134c1b18ec7e5f519a3c5f4e25c79d9
09837920de80fa2b558b3901aa45ac53ed9c19ce
describe
'27091' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYT' 'sip-files00106.pro'
0e71e31ded067b5b1c71eb4577d07f9b
fc5eed5ad8db844220e2840edd0160b6335c9f83
'2012-04-18T05:29:55-04:00'
describe
'76143' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYU' 'sip-files00106.QC.jpg'
5a2ea3a3f2b860fa12e7ba56779068bd
9686219482f6d7c070fd5a0de89c77b3d5245b11
describe
'919844' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYV' 'sip-files00106.tif'
db2450931055419d22dbc2dec7fcad59
927b215a837c58ff9811b61dba25f5a288ea68da
describe
'1178' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYW' 'sip-files00106.txt'
a8d57e4cdd7a75a864dc8b7ce0b2b91f
52e713919c942ee2b8ae09d35315fdfa42dffffc
describe
'42308' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYX' 'sip-files00106thm.jpg'
9a05452dd72e07bca091c802d5bb986d
5fcf97b9dfc0a67dc312dc9c3462445c9aad204a
'2012-04-18T05:26:45-04:00'
describe
'113732' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYY' 'sip-files00107.jp2'
aac2697a21ac3ab75a9a5b6675dbe328
c0c9f6e5866142a375ed9777a656f3ff93dbba37
describe
'159580' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJYZ' 'sip-files00107.jpg'
3874722bf85c65c19f62127c2b135e3a
fef224dd4ba1a6988de637429f99d1d90f40c606
'2012-04-18T05:23:27-04:00'
describe
'29178' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZA' 'sip-files00107.pro'
eee078da1aa95695b8b488da3a31845a
98ff289d8814adf3068fb15d623fcbd6c3d16ab6
describe
'79260' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZB' 'sip-files00107.QC.jpg'
ca0c5a7dafc99cb08ca924629af9639c
502db82e32469b9f0aebbf2994032919c49910b4
describe
'933904' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZC' 'sip-files00107.tif'
8c180a4038fdd0ba1afa96601118d2d3
20348c02c82b5f7a4c23347a36f5094cb87926a5
'2012-04-18T05:28:01-04:00'
describe
'1226' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZD' 'sip-files00107.txt'
a0b0760ecfa614a94a6dc4b8d8abf1e8
6ccb23c73d6b7704b3864c572271c16131936c1c
describe
'43003' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZE' 'sip-files00107thm.jpg'
90588eb2cbc578e7f7d746d878fb15ff
a2d180bab93edea86911860e0f1464b7601c2bc1
'2012-04-18T05:29:29-04:00'
describe
'125442' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZF' 'sip-files00108.jp2'
cabf031252c6b7783fe6d2877e6418f2
dcaecf4e5d7168e2bafe055158d6adaceaf84d45
'2012-04-18T05:21:46-04:00'
describe
'150461' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZG' 'sip-files00108.jpg'
f115334159e1d9d1c9c9bd90b2d102c4
19b8fd34db6f681b1bfb3e98028b0f007eefc270
'2012-04-18T05:20:22-04:00'
describe
'27516' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZH' 'sip-files00108.pro'
4422fd2792d03e50a2d2bd927608f505
8cea6d4724bbcd36baf7eec7d6972f8611b03c84
describe
'75685' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZI' 'sip-files00108.QC.jpg'
3d2ad78662a938ceb9084ab088a24eee
e159a1629f678a958acf975ab5235f2c0c3fa854
describe
'1027056' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZJ' 'sip-files00108.tif'
a42de1ffefb1aeb160bd3b26be1069fc
cb1c090a7d0bcc54b9f3ba2fa3364575cc29b967
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZK' 'sip-files00108.txt'
8d485730e61f71065ef14081b3b6f491
ee9e0cc8ef7525f196ac26ba95fba9f593a2dd76
'2012-04-18T05:25:50-04:00'
describe
'40374' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZL' 'sip-files00108thm.jpg'
bf67c524834d81a98bc84b9d00ee541e
a2b60b95dd62cd28183cf63ffdde3adfe3ffa4d0
describe
'114892' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZM' 'sip-files00109.jp2'
35e954c24e4a5c33fd4ec8df8b36d9da
c563cff4c654ef08de7e98dd49413146a64efef6
'2012-04-18T05:29:01-04:00'
describe
'138775' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZN' 'sip-files00109.jpg'
71d4d9f99c1c2358a5cca6c8b4a7c61e
6d4578c0956e994b2937bbb1a14aeb552bbe5ba3
describe
'24682' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZO' 'sip-files00109.pro'
09ca9b77c72bce69756255a92b6c0f67
e660fd9c37e2ca09db680ac2c30eefdaba325485
'2012-04-18T05:25:21-04:00'
describe
'72774' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZP' 'sip-files00109.QC.jpg'
b988616a73d1e71d0d80336a87326a35
4e866a3a8b7bb420f0b3859b5697c04f4c3cd615
'2012-04-18T05:22:50-04:00'
describe
'942272' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZQ' 'sip-files00109.tif'
6d7d3e3ea6df028c5552ba4589b3bf01
6a32847c6180301aeab40d998a8b436b999fa0b5
'2012-04-18T05:25:04-04:00'
describe
'1079' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZR' 'sip-files00109.txt'
1f18734c172f8b0fab85053e859bd416
e94dde6ba59a63d37ba44e254bea62aff02c1177
describe
'40585' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZS' 'sip-files00109thm.jpg'
9f10373683e9cf019a7d2f457745f0d3
179aa91070c1e57cb0c03b2e9752d3adf1172eab
'2012-04-18T05:27:23-04:00'
describe
'118067' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZT' 'sip-files00110.jp2'
a5c086f521217e5e854991cca1ed1abb
f24b17cf755c1c075b8c8846988f91952a627b51
describe
'140871' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZU' 'sip-files00110.jpg'
25a06f51c828d5b0e76af6e5cf1f533e
af9c307e5ea5f54abc203c47b4258a753eb7c422
describe
'24564' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZV' 'sip-files00110.pro'
9ded5f46de9c9b49331cc05519a165bd
305a6509141b77f704cd3604ff7fee3fd8f6bba6
describe
'74138' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZW' 'sip-files00110.QC.jpg'
5001a14e0fb46bcf5634b1575077356c
0b9aa6b07420add1e194b7a37fa5febf914bfe7c
'2012-04-18T05:26:05-04:00'
describe
'967868' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZX' 'sip-files00110.tif'
e5a1a7a6df23f5cf0ae3ee97b9e7f71d
02fe2d863d72e65173fa595fe7c4ac983440cb51
'2012-04-18T05:22:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZY' 'sip-files00110.txt'
4f32438e4ce2a6676715dd881d4e72b3
ddd877852ead4c88c62822aa5ef1cad896d2cec8
describe
'39576' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACJZZ' 'sip-files00110thm.jpg'
a746ff5b04949e88cbe13671761489ba
f8d6dbd37bba192d4393045a0abc346a02b07c02
'2012-04-18T05:23:21-04:00'
describe
'109326' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAA' 'sip-files00111.jp2'
0a7ee61a9342ff05f4b455495bc0f7f0
76d6064fb4cfb9b7d125aadfec74cfe27eecef70
'2012-04-18T05:21:51-04:00'
describe
'142589' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAB' 'sip-files00111.jpg'
263ad2cdb2b6a28b24a122af15a90fe2
ff3998eb2b2f1a992bbfbc73e2fa88c2cef0af09
describe
'24538' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAC' 'sip-files00111.pro'
fe7048ff0c85c723f93e24e845a0b40b
64b3c7c4dda0b5cf712e42c7af9034a43211150d
describe
'76044' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAD' 'sip-files00111.QC.jpg'
e9bd79108e05e41de3275b2a2dfa154e
6f9c23ad03dbcfbfbaf0ac7fad112e3e69bbb913
describe
'897996' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAE' 'sip-files00111.tif'
fa94824f09482fff0c5fa8ef73b41bd5
7b1dadba64da96225e85d81fdbe6ce9603f83c0a
'2012-04-18T05:27:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAF' 'sip-files00111.txt'
87f0583a4fdf2d10299b1af3564e9a99
69da12953ec12645eeb0742583aed953411b9741
describe
'41983' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAG' 'sip-files00111thm.jpg'
d723bbffef5dfe2edfdb0020768a1a50
34a09d9020b777a303c149ff16c17f62c66f82dd
describe
'114815' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAH' 'sip-files00112.jp2'
a7c7d36a4103e8549b6a1ee995453df2
d2033cb7f0358106897841c398294d3fda2d3dff
describe
'126036' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAI' 'sip-files00112.jpg'
21734b415665603986e321a73108a64e
92dadd1b79ab4f705fbc7e90f9fa107ce535a3c1
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAJ' 'sip-files00112.pro'
9230be11f84166b1cc8563460d7514ab
3ae3d44b844a8468b568b226a156077343877c93
describe
'69105' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAK' 'sip-files00112.QC.jpg'
dd7b3d3adc1bb89e284f3af27747c33e
c3439ee17a4b5cd32a9be41eebdd0f0a3f09609b
describe
'942016' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAL' 'sip-files00112.tif'
821379ba252f817634a9f7be79b226b5
8df60fe39fc8b2e94ce13d9099b87e64faaccad7
describe
'1184' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAM' 'sip-files00112.txt'
25a0836d95cdb46ce32f4cfcb5f4c792
a33881f370f17b9618c03626f28e8cc4579bef3e
describe
'38485' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAN' 'sip-files00112thm.jpg'
9e75c4d5c1fd7527cb74d27262f4ee56
724d8800bd0c9bbcef9dbb6a159d26d1ea73d28e
describe
'108410' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAO' 'sip-files00113.jp2'
ccc1512cc1cdd4119b35588982061243
9019574b033c58fcffc5961017e37d8d4b449226
'2012-04-18T05:29:05-04:00'
describe
'162450' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAP' 'sip-files00113.jpg'
5bc82cfa4a43d1650e8f88563e4490e9
9caaa7d1b570e378920388912da7b590aa839cd8
describe
'28655' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAQ' 'sip-files00113.pro'
23436c2c35ef5adb204bab788ab78ba6
ac8da783d372c9a924de463a76a294507040008e
describe
'82725' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAR' 'sip-files00113.QC.jpg'
93ed510f68c7ac1c00d6ecfabfbbd891
b4846f3409175d5cccd16cf8bf6b5103cedc4bdd
describe
'890836' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAS' 'sip-files00113.tif'
6a825968b27ac7f923dd6d2f26fda32c
b874d02e54c1e403a25501b7ca106e0d97bd2ac3
'2012-04-18T05:27:28-04:00'
describe
'1206' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAT' 'sip-files00113.txt'
a26135ca3c0141c2eb9ec573897a76c6
0d6d2b891d58db349dd796800bbf849bfb97436f
describe
'43880' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAU' 'sip-files00113thm.jpg'
29e476b29b730b0ed1f671b83e352b19
01924fcd51cd2606718706fe1fcfcfcc95853bd0
describe
'111689' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAV' 'sip-files00114.jp2'
22c9b4faf71fff78f703feb552ba0138
27048d633edb4c8d4f3beadbe9bdc3fe0ab86ccf
'2012-04-18T05:22:19-04:00'
describe
'124529' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAW' 'sip-files00114.jpg'
8411c86b14b30622eaaccd229c464fe5
4547e64bea9c4c1bf598fc2330007017de08ff86
'2012-04-18T05:26:18-04:00'
describe
'27074' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAX' 'sip-files00114.pro'
80021a63107cf6e731b33e481e2a6cf1
1eede115c3f12a12ac08bf7d67e7ae773583db3c
describe
'65823' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAY' 'sip-files00114.QC.jpg'
784515069185a183c0a6c9c80d15f2f4
279ece715f75ee42fe300484b2cbd115e7c09e59
describe
'917504' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKAZ' 'sip-files00114.tif'
c50decc01e804a413dd7aa549719045e
9f44d8e27e9a67d553a5c9550552887b0cffa911
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBA' 'sip-files00114.txt'
97c76e29215d3ac6fe9e5b3a69e413d1
fae1eb0c33f7fcdb6f56c56b21cf1c9682683690
'2012-04-18T05:26:56-04:00'
describe
'38263' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBB' 'sip-files00114thm.jpg'
576c2eef067a63cdf3d64f1e9d6d8158
1729d170f652f8e3c4f4d21fe94815ffd48f850e
'2012-04-18T05:28:26-04:00'
describe
'113009' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBC' 'sip-files00115.jp2'
1d59201b203a8c2d5ec8747c26427a62
40b0199bf22a339795df02b070f21e7603355dc7
describe
'136145' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBD' 'sip-files00115.jpg'
ba5115f004d45daa6e27474046062a4d
91972544c8e2f0ab579343e6a9a161c20dd6d1dd
'2012-04-18T05:25:03-04:00'
describe
'23164' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBE' 'sip-files00115.pro'
eedb50928b3858dbfa89a661ea848f9d
dec62dd7805653e5057f053c9be698d1c70983ab
describe
'70959' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBF' 'sip-files00115.QC.jpg'
851101d588e23b87715d120d86b345ca
76302cf0fef63b89f491d6e77a1059c4d2aea16f
describe
'927476' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBG' 'sip-files00115.tif'
2febb708d4082429ef6b740cd548918d
c4ba3aa3706bd58d5eea59f2335d22ee6b6b2783
describe
'1000' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBH' 'sip-files00115.txt'
2a2be07fb9fb0646489312e4b21597dc
fc2ac9b80d38aaadc72c84423fa78948a85a0015
describe
'40926' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBI' 'sip-files00115thm.jpg'
4dbf7ac4afdcf48a0b4f82a8ef4a910b
af021d1c62a8b8ac7b64460ba26e45af9fc33d97
describe
'128731' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBJ' 'sip-files00116.jp2'
f63d73da445d6427060d8f92cf6947c6
624fdff7781f2a4dbf368e35413b2ef614f83576
describe
'106491' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBK' 'sip-files00116.jpg'
5b33932ba4f477eba068f388d47395b4
1b98a0d9c0a6c02fd446a0b77c25ce3e607d30f3
describe
'24145' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBL' 'sip-files00116.pro'
f2455c9f311b34296b597ceae577512f
1767aa6e08b39d529bb9fbddf46cce2738116fea
'2012-04-18T05:20:47-04:00'
describe
'57352' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBM' 'sip-files00116.QC.jpg'
7bd8959906ca2b606a79361dedb149c8
25ac419740efd9e709228703f50583e431ad607e
describe
'1052668' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBN' 'sip-files00116.tif'
782ad809795d009f397f01b5e580e513
2422781ad96c0447d3cb4646d9fad9dfdf344704
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBO' 'sip-files00116.txt'
0496c0ca6f2b8461c1ffb39f7e1901bf
d75cd64e98a80064a703f33e3b949ac4e940fbfe
'2012-04-18T05:21:05-04:00'
describe
'33087' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBP' 'sip-files00116thm.jpg'
9788d18115f5d9b1bf6d0cddaf4b9a5a
c4e05d1b7fc2616c593afa58628abf62b3e5cac2
describe
'117233' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBQ' 'sip-files00117.jp2'
076f203bbf149147aac153f84bd03f60
d4541359a1b046492667b8d5b53d078916856111
'2012-04-18T05:24:18-04:00'
describe
'151914' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBR' 'sip-files00117.jpg'
33645d42d390405c36325f4922e70087
6624459f95281e25e6ced03046870c820c0cd9ac
'2012-04-18T05:21:28-04:00'
describe
'27417' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBS' 'sip-files00117.pro'
c828d4818204fef38aa9d42401c0ad5e
2a45b081c9790eb195fce4a497cdb6c5cc4b63c7
'2012-04-18T05:26:14-04:00'
describe
'76813' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBT' 'sip-files00117.QC.jpg'
bc55e92139083fea9fca6dcdd6ab8b6c
b3073d5feee97ba86aace3a4c47b7145f54fc6ec
describe
'961128' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBU' 'sip-files00117.tif'
683906b4c324d4acdd22f4adcab74bc4
5c7f670e26abd34183b541cec21a0e1d6778e120
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBV' 'sip-files00117.txt'
b041aacfded7a1ee6e8fc5562d17ba36
a2a114976f3b703380dafafe8645b2b0ff6fd570
'2012-04-18T05:31:08-04:00'
describe
'40918' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBW' 'sip-files00117thm.jpg'
c1675a4ec7278958693002a39ae297c4
969476371e0ace19c11de1c95377f7cdddea61bb
describe
'123090' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBX' 'sip-files00118.jp2'
e935a8be7e9380fdb5161b2b9a942e05
77814d3dbae1575a08ae1a62977a071cd23867fb
'2012-04-18T05:20:20-04:00'
describe
'154675' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBY' 'sip-files00118.jpg'
015a7724feed87f114b0e1b6c2f6b15a
61c7673f421cb6700b87a0dae63fc267489e07fe
describe
'27502' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKBZ' 'sip-files00118.pro'
e8af934a10d73931bc559eef32d9efb6
745a653ff92bc9f320ef2c44b91830c89e9e3c32
describe
'78204' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCA' 'sip-files00118.QC.jpg'
3e5b2c33b1cbc9a85df8ef16927a8b17
b48ddc064fc0cd5fdf93905b19621a7f35116496
describe
'1009304' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCB' 'sip-files00118.tif'
f3c6329c78ff5bee29454a05edea5bae
365ab5b6a7d2349c6d2a2fd227376374d7e9e4ac
describe
'1181' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCC' 'sip-files00118.txt'
7081403f9900d4e24ecce945e18a8c56
82b0c2c8ca04e30bf095313624c0c2cccbef5d26
describe
'40971' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCD' 'sip-files00118thm.jpg'
5dfc21aa3e70018060e8c384f3861e44
225c296187e8db9b882ccfdf1ee2a20da736899f
'2012-04-18T05:23:09-04:00'
describe
'122462' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCE' 'sip-files00119.jp2'
47d71474993b90f3838a25a31c9d964a
1560d93a0fc52373a8dd0a71bc59ee610867ca43
'2012-04-18T05:27:40-04:00'
describe
'147027' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCF' 'sip-files00119.jpg'
06c656135e6411f20a1c4ae63dbd1d7b
f17695c6636c93f9f86edcc1c59c7c174704b41d
describe
'26892' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCG' 'sip-files00119.pro'
8e8ff3c0065a46299185385c364e77ce
070373de25930220fc7d03f7ff48b9cdfafa0b28
describe
'76329' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCH' 'sip-files00119.QC.jpg'
dd085cb697af074d4e131a63b6c309d1
f5b5cc9d4eb975a66359fd928f117a76ac6eb393
describe
'1003064' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCI' 'sip-files00119.tif'
ec3256c86b5eab7a894b55d2b487db1f
f9c10e2cff9f165eeedf473fb418062a14c87107
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCJ' 'sip-files00119.txt'
94ef0d6b6758f2f181d4acf6a2cd2654
aea184c8c551c4d89d0bf6fe02b044db2b8a053d
describe
'39659' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCK' 'sip-files00119thm.jpg'
fc1c38e8053ba2e235f5323ff0e6cc5c
2c8af663b786468ade152e10f862d6df12d50af1
describe
'122961' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCL' 'sip-files00120.jp2'
268800f92a8374a7c685f96692249ab8
80ddac89b7003999a3bf101819486acf56c7d279
describe
'153667' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCM' 'sip-files00120.jpg'
ea6af3acd0326e0d2f0c3bb57ce47dcc
2dcab16367c52e94ce8e460a46125670f451e129
describe
'27410' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCN' 'sip-files00120.pro'
80527b4f8c401f47c17961bf3d41d036
029b7d3a11df3db429e130b70f501c121f2cd231
'2012-04-18T05:25:29-04:00'
describe
'76804' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCO' 'sip-files00120.QC.jpg'
9dc7e4840a247cc6e44d83bc154f29c4
ab424fbd8d057f0aed64ea313e54735094543ab2
describe
'1007380' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCP' 'sip-files00120.tif'
d08677a7f707e802386ce756b17b9303
8c8850f53f14d5dbe6593b4fe406144ae2a06f72
describe
'1175' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCQ' 'sip-files00120.txt'
d702c150dda26ea0dc5823524bd26122
0d5077e0f031786b1bf09ead2e94abc1b4ca27e8
'2012-04-18T05:26:52-04:00'
describe
'39465' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCR' 'sip-files00120thm.jpg'
a73dbe9fd7b582b8f0d88f0b299ab191
10df749cac7ead9653bca91019e2db6812736e71
describe
'121308' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCS' 'sip-files00121.jp2'
30097dadd9bbbd73627e5c6f48b72806
4febdaf00066f34b58432ef55ac96756cad11e7c
describe
'150990' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCT' 'sip-files00121.jpg'
ae4869ced4c7e4bc58c7bc36ac6c1dce
8d4d9f165a946889747e4d4d1352ede444a23e3a
'2012-04-18T05:30:58-04:00'
describe
'28680' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCU' 'sip-files00121.pro'
3869dbcdf1b0c200a9206355754a078f
0e323d448a688d52c5c37b4528b1443087e8e207
describe
'74824' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCV' 'sip-files00121.QC.jpg'
3643e8468ca5d22b9bc2fd7fa33c543a
7ffe075297e333887c6dd48597168d84c706d8fb
describe
'993968' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCW' 'sip-files00121.tif'
4143ad3889af8a8c3d3450317c7c7e82
2b50c13b7b52550bb31142389a4bed169327fc04
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCX' 'sip-files00121.txt'
1eae0737a9b6413d574d290ca06b5edc
e328c9cb553009b08bc5587026c60bb6c628a04b
describe
'40139' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCY' 'sip-files00121thm.jpg'
2a985d4adfaf0c4b4f226614482028e6
666c020c193c95b7ab65da82b6ccab12a698efb0
describe
'126524' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKCZ' 'sip-files00122.jp2'
1642da5bc3b1b9feb714f7169fe76a22
9b8b81b5a7b38e35687e8e76786c101924658acb
describe
'150469' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDA' 'sip-files00122.jpg'
0e9469995d39de4ec37faad84450d7c8
1fb41444793ddfb8242ac82c5c7fc61e3198a8fb
describe
'26471' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDB' 'sip-files00122.pro'
06018f1470bd58647a2fd741a9db02a3
679f325c5c18f5fb1a57593814e391a6e2718296
describe
'74727' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDC' 'sip-files00122.QC.jpg'
374c73bcfb6d13e10e034f9459c8ac69
9d0e81b239126fb1b780ccd837770013e91b1a6b
'2012-04-18T05:23:12-04:00'
describe
'1035512' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDD' 'sip-files00122.tif'
784efe8974e811eacc22e66871240824
6828443ab3fd7c11fa512ab0ccfdef9cee8bc38f
describe
'1139' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDE' 'sip-files00122.txt'
c0dfda77bdc0e4c3b42d13e8c4329b6a
ff88c3aa48bfab45b535bef5122134b3bab615de
'2012-04-18T05:28:02-04:00'
describe
'39032' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDF' 'sip-files00122thm.jpg'
2acada4e828b39d59966a39052f84492
e450bd2a95f33653bcf3bf3c84a2b28c77f424e5
describe
'116023' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDG' 'sip-files00123.jp2'
ec346cf6f3aeaa28c047698176d0dea7
fb194731d2a9099bae126fe3551465f130cc100d
describe
'149557' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDH' 'sip-files00123.jpg'
96456f3f378cf52638e8921f4676ace4
13e28e74b0a3a52431e96308b57224edca86c7e8
'2012-04-18T05:29:43-04:00'
describe
'27304' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDI' 'sip-files00123.pro'
e403f5321b5409a665fd4c4a67abacf4
7768d011714ce8c360a144d85ea0a2732dffb8a6
describe
'76761' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDJ' 'sip-files00123.QC.jpg'
dd683cd8c4c2a55bf15248976497d0e7
0f88f9e2332ac9ae9381bbd3a0377c8a0cd2a3bd
describe
'952136' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDK' 'sip-files00123.tif'
1f8113b3d1a5e05d83ef78d0da530aaa
e742eab45cb0cbb82561ddc9812a31f761fc3c0f
'2012-04-18T05:27:10-04:00'
describe
'1158' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDL' 'sip-files00123.txt'
e69aea7f13b331cf1abf5ee977d3f9d3
f764c86f09afbb974fda545037512b202c9afa11
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDM' 'sip-files00123thm.jpg'
a928520435c0ccd54d1c75ae1362c9ee
bd98066b42653d93a624ff74e982127739d6ec0d
describe
'130296' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDN' 'sip-files00124.jp2'
d94da0d06248a1db009479e1fab8e910
467ffeef17b2121b2431dcd14ca6c201d61ab76f
'2012-04-18T05:31:01-04:00'
describe
'145283' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDO' 'sip-files00124.jpg'
f2dd6318538a836dc15d5a75a49fdbde
e8e71d8f3a3bd4a9385737dfd715269540e5295d
describe
'26078' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDP' 'sip-files00124.pro'
0b8b0d78f11f173faac4fbc44b70a4f8
56df7ba8bd5e035d7c02a80f45092934a7e9c08e
'2012-04-18T05:22:54-04:00'
describe
'75404' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDQ' 'sip-files00124.QC.jpg'
512701fa0dc6526f51dd580c515e328d
3b5c6beb2ea7d728868527ac55b061aabc077146
describe
'1066168' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDR' 'sip-files00124.tif'
e87820af9387ce4fbcce0aded889a588
a5be3c03ab18c435ec012d8ecbe37c679643be09
describe
'1118' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDS' 'sip-files00124.txt'
bed7944229ae9b98920c13810897902a
ccf8caaf777b055b9c776a517d3b67a9e8ace635
describe
'38613' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDT' 'sip-files00124thm.jpg'
d6aa90af0f23044695c3af6d2f61501f
58b1e0af3b6dd811aadcdcbd9ce7118c6ccfa394
describe
'121709' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDU' 'sip-files00125.jp2'
c5914811a8e3d12e97e3da9698e87b10
aadb5a9dca894d324a8fd0978d59ab8bdab55f51
describe
'144061' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDV' 'sip-files00125.jpg'
4d30597a7ec217ac616c29156a570adb
e232b05fc8fdb2cc6e3da73302fe12509107663f
'2012-04-18T05:27:39-04:00'
describe
'25687' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDW' 'sip-files00125.pro'
282ba7644c75111c8051f00373e97b2a
bcf1bed73f8db40a8d1f49e2cdf726c156b2b5cf
'2012-04-18T05:30:50-04:00'
describe
'73440' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDX' 'sip-files00125.QC.jpg'
b9b8559af7c67896c27c48da5a774743
8e69abc93b681adb53c6de8b5bc8dc0d46dc4194
describe
'998632' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDY' 'sip-files00125.tif'
6c2f1c741c5fdbdd88a1acbc8c5c8dc8
2f2fe616b2e9fdf39bea0a2898c5ee49800d860e
describe
'1102' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKDZ' 'sip-files00125.txt'
d7d4c8daf5f52ff9566bf8f45fe1984a
0d58bda4011bfb6ca302da22ad3f40a9805f8ef9
describe
'38865' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEA' 'sip-files00125thm.jpg'
f146886adcc02c6bfcad01bd9cca232a
fd265237047f4d7275939ffe59208ff14dce02bf
describe
'129528' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEB' 'sip-files00126.jp2'
841c69dc22642b0a621624b7f5ae8dd3
aed58d5ce348c90bee5f18025b69534b4a4c2048
describe
'101370' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEC' 'sip-files00126.jpg'
0b18667cfdff8cb9e6657e1d024e87d1
7e45a8fdcfd2ac65d50b87353208eb18cc6e62fc
'2012-04-18T05:23:38-04:00'
describe
'22361' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKED' 'sip-files00126.pro'
d7fec1cf1d6befd4b8c27557ae6f4cef
c1fcbb0cc3d0c9a924af484b99632c2b4603a747
describe
'56103' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEE' 'sip-files00126.QC.jpg'
5a0da03850a1dbbd94dab3c923bafe41
839b65fc33fde12f01c0c0dcd207330b6b18494c
describe
'1058784' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEF' 'sip-files00126.tif'
67e4cea6c706595035342bf93f225978
19957b94260012b65efdc384986e17c7a84b4495
'2012-04-18T05:22:27-04:00'
describe
'1012' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEG' 'sip-files00126.txt'
5328fcfc61078a13fc0322bdb3818b30
130a4829a3d9b820563daa2052da3a2dffa69e95
describe
'32806' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEH' 'sip-files00126thm.jpg'
abcae510c51204372e582d629c303430
022f95b974e26ca6a51778b56db6ccaf8bad360d
'2012-04-18T05:29:47-04:00'
describe
'117408' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEI' 'sip-files00127.jp2'
37f1ab004871aa1c16aedcd2d77c1cb0
cddda8eb4d2b767a6475b6bd35085116c3fba00a
describe
'136222' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEJ' 'sip-files00127.jpg'
f225454f4f72b0e127c1f74714ca55e8
fd35e1f84bd364b7a9d5def25cc481c671d7c653
'2012-04-18T05:25:19-04:00'
describe
'23922' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEK' 'sip-files00127.pro'
2e3e6ef1777000123a4d5ba08330ffdb
ced309b76bfef2509cdd2b23477e1f4c7372c0a6
describe
'69888' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEL' 'sip-files00127.QC.jpg'
9a0efc202ea5e47e1fa0aa03e5f11355
9ebd2dbbe1653531175d530b4abba4b228a2b5a0
describe
'962736' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEM' 'sip-files00127.tif'
1a82a9bbfa179f1baa6fb88c8618deb6
1c296ececb9959844f3a4591835e21c07f6416bb
'2012-04-18T05:31:18-04:00'
describe
'1034' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEN' 'sip-files00127.txt'
c096c83834f9dd381ca240e66150be7f
58e6646fd862b6affb3e6a45975b05ea3e2be153
describe
'40169' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEO' 'sip-files00127thm.jpg'
3d13eaa78a99838407427c584bb19463
083ce48ef5ffa4f9150c1da7cd25bc960c661d58
describe
'122881' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEP' 'sip-files00128.jp2'
d9e738402872d28f580488c41b907422
33c569005a6cc0760e46c4167b3f25d4805f5b2e
describe
'148903' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEQ' 'sip-files00128.jpg'
733f5a46033236566937aa8c5ea5fcfc
71cf7f51afa48dd50dc4421e49d7b5b1665c5cbb
describe
'26005' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKER' 'sip-files00128.pro'
52dc9c5219f9dee1865aa47fa4a7cf67
e959ef134bd6fa517f22dafedcbc7769ad7d8520
describe
'74505' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKES' 'sip-files00128.QC.jpg'
dbef7b607cc54232a72de2edc49a85ca
77ec7a5921430e1dbfb6d2872a710591e9cb87f9
describe
'1006668' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKET' 'sip-files00128.tif'
88479d908210790cc238cd5c0b55918a
4430f93a4488d93ad1029e02fa2533ccaf09ceb8
'2012-04-18T05:26:29-04:00'
describe
'1128' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEU' 'sip-files00128.txt'
90056dfb08cdb5197be58307c5fae297
ad3f8530fff799c78e185b94049da8c3296d0c69
describe
'39505' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEV' 'sip-files00128thm.jpg'
745fa86915e6dd738f3dbde32e4affab
82bfe06edfcb55b8b5fc5b50ff5d5cdacdad1287
describe
'118794' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEW' 'sip-files00129.jp2'
8b974aee136077c63e26cc4d55efa0f1
0216a140cb7cdf22ebf46624fad24aea98188f76
'2012-04-18T05:26:24-04:00'
describe
'145248' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEX' 'sip-files00129.jpg'
17b406875c046e21f853af6f4f1d1de2
b37076a2919355dc1ff35700711532cdeead9d68
describe
'26949' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEY' 'sip-files00129.pro'
d03f33decaf3ef35d297b977aa96c90b
64cd0979fbe705f00ce30b110d0e6f2151fee89d
describe
'74368' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKEZ' 'sip-files00129.QC.jpg'
2a328e6d6303e95e0fc68f54b40766d6
59cf43cb2ce8168263dd04b5f17aca2602b525db
describe
'973700' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFA' 'sip-files00129.tif'
6fabc011d68ff1434bd389ffe9364d8a
697cb0d3e678bbcaa23533f54fc07b5701d3a887
describe
'1153' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFB' 'sip-files00129.txt'
7faeb91e93336e2e9ce502c63d169bb8
b3c5aec9ebe37958d2421824dbfa11f9a8cbed2e
describe
'40690' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFC' 'sip-files00129thm.jpg'
9c4de73a4b6ea47830a401efa9d70d3c
1dda65f99b9e8d3a8ef4a8485fb34ffc00fbace3
'2012-04-18T05:29:03-04:00'
describe
'124410' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFD' 'sip-files00130.jp2'
e6567aad3fe9aa0bcd0bae70b7c8e345
d76e86b05fe557c7da27610a9e1ad5d170687809
'2012-04-18T05:26:07-04:00'
describe
'144145' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFE' 'sip-files00130.jpg'
5eaeb7c991764eaa1d94df3310c5ecfa
ef088db77b2bf5c8e811b246f908705ff916999a
describe
'25407' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFF' 'sip-files00130.pro'
265676a72621048dec48f9e03da8677d
4d1ce4a00701b9078a5254dcc7cdf34251b6a819
describe
'75700' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFG' 'sip-files00130.QC.jpg'
d5df78f38ba2982adec0f271ca662503
6d949cf543f205afb40aea95341a91c22156e063
describe
'1018724' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFH' 'sip-files00130.tif'
68d8569833f964a06be29fbce99f8c48
7a33ec8ab9b6b040234b68a624e1c1dc3e8a48d3
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFI' 'sip-files00130.txt'
a0bdeb112dfedd0708feb8a07c7a3c5b
6da3609968c9055c051229895fb62d6a0a307208
describe
'39389' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFJ' 'sip-files00130thm.jpg'
cdb1c53389e0bf7d9862ad5b5056b11a
3263da2a074604a2b1d52dced803db30a35f4066
describe
'109681' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFK' 'sip-files00131.jp2'
5611617d5c8a7511de8990344d31f3f2
2e587593d61367a747d05c1b9d354f93ff87af8a
describe
'148559' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFL' 'sip-files00131.jpg'
cc42d63d252e19b49de3436a00c457c4
a7047bf60e172bb2248e61ec378f5384a549489d
describe
'26324' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFM' 'sip-files00131.pro'
d5b9695e9c89d6fcb2d765f4fb49ab83
588b1ef8bd2e433583e4854b832f4289c4ee96af
describe
'75838' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFN' 'sip-files00131.QC.jpg'
8968361cbe64df7527cf98e447b47081
e31243dd8de919c12fe1039de647607637766e88
describe
'901224' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFO' 'sip-files00131.tif'
316cb2b885d2412ba303114a906c84c0
092616976aeea3b0d5b041bfbd3d34bb99967420
describe
'1126' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFP' 'sip-files00131.txt'
a0b1554300faefdd811c42fe6e7eaf9b
49cc007438517a6141311143ff43a84e5e8c304f
describe
'42647' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFQ' 'sip-files00131thm.jpg'
a91d4eb48aa534324bc8e2f3e4ef5a63
a040c27a1926feee2f5ed57a725a9d8c9868fecb
describe
'130778' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFR' 'sip-files00132.jp2'
900afe2528d9709b2dc7e82a00b30101
09dcbbaaef129d54a2c6a6971ea55ed9e88298dd
describe
'133107' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFS' 'sip-files00132.jpg'
78604f6f64ff5c845e74a9faf02f2e9b
99af7b72f219adafc06ac0726b481cc1bfe0798d
describe
'24329' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFT' 'sip-files00132.pro'
66706b7525158848dccf4966148cd542
a3072261da70deddb0483977473a4cd471050fbf
describe
'69221' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFU' 'sip-files00132.QC.jpg'
92d1fa5e09379be77d6a3daeb0faafdc
2014bebc687724f696fd90378373b2169e949124
describe
'1069748' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFV' 'sip-files00132.tif'
c0f3f2ee174004508a030d67bdb0c099
23c91398ca4597fa3f0f79cf48f2ddf71e9062d9
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFW' 'sip-files00132.txt'
4823442f37efe55b1224c01799751a39
ef3b859ced5af1e7ea6b2ec5334359a0df816d39
describe
'37853' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFX' 'sip-files00132thm.jpg'
91e6d78e2c477f68458f2e18bfc384ca
141d18cbc4223f4631702059400eec6141f817c4
'2012-04-18T05:30:40-04:00'
describe
'118664' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFY' 'sip-files00133.jp2'
74b373648adba2f880916fabe5d12bf2
69714caa2ad4891f388e0a30534e2f50779a5d2f
'2012-04-18T05:20:28-04:00'
describe
'141426' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKFZ' 'sip-files00133.jpg'
1c0685f2547cd7723456b3cae095900a
2eb19010d8a107039d3739976d5819b24fbaac8c
'2012-04-18T05:28:16-04:00'
describe
'25802' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGA' 'sip-files00133.pro'
cae0b4d5c7187b53ae42f281cb99879b
fe386a137be2b891b096fe4625c97e8e9f3b4e21
describe
'73115' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGB' 'sip-files00133.QC.jpg'
04dff7ba7aea28172f99b89094a8bacd
bf77a5d461a61cc6f404dc63da07bfc11f7276dc
describe
'972524' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGC' 'sip-files00133.tif'
1f3f7927cb3bf469af2c88a95b6ae38b
92c57e7ddfc4d8623c22188d7f901d100bff1aea
'2012-04-18T05:21:36-04:00'
describe
'1110' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGD' 'sip-files00133.txt'
94c674599b74fe7e8529381c98f3ca56
03ed8d3027cc7fb194802bbc995c9e8fc55f0e87
describe
'40968' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGE' 'sip-files00133thm.jpg'
3167e7cfa7f779fa31657c058c49a046
61b6bbac7ac66c538e1f9ab8aa711b530bf7b85f
describe
'118584' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGF' 'sip-files00134.jp2'
0d6579152b62c4f0f0d0a0e9536d8d41
49ddd656d3ae05afbff2a45bb74e5e25668cffe2
describe
'146553' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGG' 'sip-files00134.jpg'
766f09e721fa402ea3fe6ae098002263
b334bafc938ff8e930e605a6fc270f17bf10d1e5
'2012-04-18T05:22:30-04:00'
describe
'25967' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGH' 'sip-files00134.pro'
d1528f3fc8fe12960bd85ed2167e490a
e525c5f79298f5d4e3c71cc60c89392a4f10e920
describe
'75351' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGI' 'sip-files00134.QC.jpg'
136adaea53ee25db0a65db670b277f5a
6924ee93003e9fb64011c78a877cd5e79ec1de26
describe
'972304' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGJ' 'sip-files00134.tif'
642bba172e2626535af32ab369039026
bcd29aa2bf2626087d243fe56d41b35395c51a40
'2012-04-18T05:26:36-04:00'
describe
'1129' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGK' 'sip-files00134.txt'
da8dd2c4be569de8afc4c2e0e7a85cab
91fd6138c00014e566de7817627109d9da18579b
describe
'40689' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGL' 'sip-files00134thm.jpg'
4d8e18699779fedf1e5986d8d88a8d05
dd7459c4dec801f296df73d7131abe4f187ba2a7
describe
'118304' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGM' 'sip-files00135.jp2'
d2c757560d842ad99fe1ad685ade95c2
c9e8b8f19722696aa777dd0c9cef66fb08fa0787
describe
'151776' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGN' 'sip-files00135.jpg'
5514e7554288abea43a5b5e38186001c
19bf766fa981842a286536b632cb99be2433bb3e
'2012-04-18T05:28:15-04:00'
describe
'28074' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGO' 'sip-files00135.pro'
cc297e8af117413bd90f2b06261af1e9
265810b8276e22aad17437a10daffe1744538b94
'2012-04-18T05:30:30-04:00'
describe
'77413' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGP' 'sip-files00135.QC.jpg'
334536f6952046acd699a50d392c92d1
6592f451d2cb48dd828aab225181cee567322b32
describe
'970140' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGQ' 'sip-files00135.tif'
680012c998e97563674810c626f08255
548eb47c5b5a0cb61265084f7ee6385aa6bd78df
'2012-04-18T05:21:11-04:00'
describe
'1200' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGR' 'sip-files00135.txt'
49c4728f493b895dc0b6ba2b92b52936
698d6202bb8cc544c8f0fef125bfbee1054d79a5
describe
'41488' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGS' 'sip-files00135thm.jpg'
2bb119cde6bb87cd686f0fb400994995
1e284e1fe17fd76c02dac2aae2412f85c1f7041d
describe
'119899' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGT' 'sip-files00136.jp2'
418fa2f17c5542358f8092a54e0767ba
6977801940fcbd0ce5786c66046ea94851c740e9
describe
'152653' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGU' 'sip-files00136.jpg'
e26ac802496939059e03e6d42a416b08
4791eb06cd6171c44a058175d63cf5f809b4872d
describe
'27545' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGV' 'sip-files00136.pro'
3dd08650571f85c42792a2901d9d44d6
ea690fa08f7663976f60c2966f6d136ce14349f7
describe
'76898' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGW' 'sip-files00136.QC.jpg'
b8ef916b9d850e5ed718130b89a93f46
ad1e4af698667c9935aa085d371ad3260aabc659
describe
'982944' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGX' 'sip-files00136.tif'
71200431c11b5e8e2138dd3bb08f614c
4a00ad05e94c814711cf194848dd601f8875972c
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGY' 'sip-files00136.txt'
68ab6d2cbb5c5a83ab7e492b14814d61
da33140d400300e2d04af6f61780cac094f0a5ef
'2012-04-18T05:20:45-04:00'
describe
'41361' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKGZ' 'sip-files00136thm.jpg'
eee7f502dfa575a87e82386254c7f7e0
5a4520ae1f447c3aa9961023df174aee43bad2ff
describe
'117864' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHA' 'sip-files00137.jp2'
ac0ca41ab07d35e99df387e18c1155e5
c56a1b87a0a89bcb4798816a91e8a87d6f095cd3
describe
'143246' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHB' 'sip-files00137.jpg'
dc656a15f471b1d74ed5edcce0bbd4a5
c4a3bab5f683d2aa94822a5780b42205acbe7c57
describe
'25579' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHC' 'sip-files00137.pro'
418b424f66b1950cd31d14e2b4a3f07e
95d58a31bd3a893463509e4b990657df94cf9707
describe
'73689' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHD' 'sip-files00137.QC.jpg'
9e6228812a0b9adab1bf2780fcf4a1ba
c39571b96d2f13f28dc78c4d5cc99b5ec2a2c965
describe
'966164' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHE' 'sip-files00137.tif'
9390e07fa502707dc2ac8ee670773860
abf7fa8422303523b813b8bbcf8521ac03943a07
'2012-04-18T05:22:32-04:00'
describe
'1100' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHF' 'sip-files00137.txt'
b7ab23388fa4b606acfdd3b6e5eeea1d
2f28f5f97cc2fc37f1bec1ee87ba798a2fbfc4d3
describe
'40697' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHG' 'sip-files00137thm.jpg'
bd547d447ecd5c3e9524ff3e6bdca6cf
fa0296ebdae8daa189c6998fddda3bf7c06589fa
'2012-04-18T05:30:20-04:00'
describe
'121618' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHH' 'sip-files00138.jp2'
5d3154519cb38822ef7e8efec8061fbf
0f209a651f5ef27226b4aae011377725d1836708
describe
'110472' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHI' 'sip-files00138.jpg'
04aa122cfe04c42bb9adefa6fcd0e8eb
56aef5b0bbdaedac9fa16a2fb88ca642fc936322
describe
'25316' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHJ' 'sip-files00138.pro'
952c15bc1a00675d0ed228b231cbb59c
3124e830831935c4347356f0221ddd1fefca6634
describe
'58733' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHK' 'sip-files00138.QC.jpg'
a28591ee632c76a9d6decd9264dfbeff
e0ea5772522d8518c29e8dae5c1e98fa8466b939
'2012-04-18T05:29:06-04:00'
describe
'996380' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHL' 'sip-files00138.tif'
75b328917c384b2585925c549d4aba2e
88588f7745c96c7c0fc9ff7f44afdfa62425ab3f
'2012-04-18T05:29:44-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHM' 'sip-files00138.txt'
3954f3402f2184012a7cac6e8f5b72b5
e785fb3e181d0e72fa7a1643982617f9e35be779
describe
'34379' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHN' 'sip-files00138thm.jpg'
1043e582a1b138a0cec6569407b2efb2
22528ad44a996614400d35e673b9e15f61d6c14d
'2012-04-18T05:31:03-04:00'
describe
'114897' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHO' 'sip-files00139.jp2'
9f9440b14a0bb56991392e6365baf442
545ecc7c56d43492879db9d010962f94594a1612
'2012-04-18T05:20:27-04:00'
describe
'148734' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHP' 'sip-files00139.jpg'
f3565022c358126242568d40c86ca793
c511bd6eb7ea2fe2454347a11633dae285f6653a
'2012-04-18T05:29:36-04:00'
describe
'26739' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHQ' 'sip-files00139.pro'
425b2c55ede735190a9a0d15c58ab7a2
d0d1c6382c3fb80097e9ffe85eeb8ea70d1bd304
describe
'76274' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHR' 'sip-files00139.QC.jpg'
c85981fffb4c65b4a0f5e84b34045be4
9d3f73a1239ddc9292892b0cc4eee3a8c6ce400b
describe
'942776' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHS' 'sip-files00139.tif'
858564250089f5de4e24a5df5cde50c7
0363c0ff4a69f1b213911a46dc3dc95c832f3ed0
'2012-04-18T05:30:05-04:00'
describe
'1146' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHT' 'sip-files00139.txt'
087eed8ac8d3eecef2209fb950d137cb
fea2e37d132353ea220165a2495257f4b3fb2f34
describe
'41623' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHU' 'sip-files00139thm.jpg'
4f987c5921aa159c8f691673251e1e7b
6fa6088f1759e08a71c3068d02d2772199a56f5a
'2012-04-18T05:24:33-04:00'
describe
'126151' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHV' 'sip-files00140.jp2'
0d0d4b666e47610598b2ab8613a71f7d
bc469726b8f65a8121e218887b25c131ca85f8e7
describe
'115011' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHW' 'sip-files00140.jpg'
232f0d56cfd1e418ad9ac9a80fbbe062
0f7c01ff4fc05cf2a38ba67a52b3305b4110d5f0
'2012-04-18T05:22:33-04:00'
describe
'26237' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHX' 'sip-files00140.pro'
7dbdde981f0f91c65fcb3f1724a1fc67
bb55cf0cd4fbffaa37084f84aaff1ac7e5e48131
describe
'62841' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHY' 'sip-files00140.QC.jpg'
7adc2fe3954fba2a549c8d6dbdc5072b
71b1cef27b78d8eb43fe6352a2e563d20649a1f2
'2012-04-18T05:30:21-04:00'
describe
'1032584' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKHZ' 'sip-files00140.tif'
b408c440f4b3633bb4c50f24d1c35e6a
f81c0d323ef2f8c67d771bf10c4fbba681a25c00
describe
'1125' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIA' 'sip-files00140.txt'
598f5e31575afd676a7ded2ccad89589
c66fd3740a0aa40cde0de14b9828d81b6975fb2d
describe
'35704' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIB' 'sip-files00140thm.jpg'
d5ef40cfc5d153bbeefddafe4d42f301
cc2ba80cb7622aa5e213a4697c9661eee03fce09
'2012-04-18T05:25:41-04:00'
describe
'124735' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIC' 'sip-files00141.jp2'
daccc879f94658762c2f58ab0e4f26b4
b16aa387fd8b9ae7b6feee8427ec0abe7d3e8564
'2012-04-18T05:30:47-04:00'
describe
'134986' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKID' 'sip-files00141.jpg'
075342d3b6428cecf9197903950dc546
808d8a636d02c06a9aba713afff974e877db9474
describe
'24243' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIE' 'sip-files00141.pro'
56ef8eb9ba9b2a386d927e79d9f58a80
de36be09cc62c0213429de02c29e70491c8092b1
describe
'69599' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIF' 'sip-files00141.QC.jpg'
5b659a50fb8850a65b9a68462b5f2377
4f11a4cf3231f863a92b2f10961974428f49b9f3
describe
'1021192' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIG' 'sip-files00141.tif'
b05b38e2aeb2d15221945f125cbe2507
ff315bac88d121801a10116a9a634cff672ff031
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIH' 'sip-files00141.txt'
bb9d462b6ae29994b828e13708953afd
37e56c4a2751618067f5aecb119d91c91a05dc10
describe
'39646' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKII' 'sip-files00141thm.jpg'
c7d91b5eb45985060a42a892a629c3fd
a61807d75f6c80a238ee1de263317ae6cd020173
describe
'125007' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIJ' 'sip-files00142.jp2'
3379bb0cb1a6cbe8454d4dc3b7ba9e15
a6418ddc5e988b9c001d161a70722c7cddc2ddad
describe
'144993' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIK' 'sip-files00142.jpg'
96ca37bf03a5310d0e49289d54eef20a
39ba80fac55f8a191940f66aa437d5ac68d76984
describe
'25380' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIL' 'sip-files00142.pro'
4c3f02959810c0ee0e53423fcbc57da4
58115f5779ee57dac3a53ac94cdbd09555ad3906
describe
'73797' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIM' 'sip-files00142.QC.jpg'
1ae33bda3f0d44d47755400420e61f95
2963764c8cfa1b74da5c9a8a794b697ab529e673
'2012-04-18T05:22:11-04:00'
describe
'1023512' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIN' 'sip-files00142.tif'
5c54523ff5c2c0c7d1ec35a24ceedeb2
f547e3f07d181e5aa4fbfcdc5cf4835bdcc15694
'2012-04-18T05:31:17-04:00'
describe
'1090' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIO' 'sip-files00142.txt'
f1cbb977b5607072bf673051d27e2801
8552179af467cbd6d50d7ca58fefaf8e4413caad
describe
'39787' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIP' 'sip-files00142thm.jpg'
60c9e2eaabf3f891754378921a28bff1
8bd2ed935e9da888ca2d9949c67e1073d9248255
describe
'124768' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIQ' 'sip-files00143.jp2'
05073fe139112ad95d3f3c7b1b49a61c
464559ecd0019ed56d7c1a4f97f49b7fb52ed690
describe
'140346' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIR' 'sip-files00143.jpg'
4fca43f03b2daaaf37f7429d04b1c538
1171c3d553d9c17f97f75da10afec4d511016a37
describe
'25515' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIS' 'sip-files00143.pro'
90dbed749e7622dd46e2d000b864d52d
bc33430ac8947e2576c91a9625b84b4406212dc5
describe
'73899' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIT' 'sip-files00143.QC.jpg'
0ef6b093ee32ab787bf3e39aa6d0a170
025135f75d8034cebaed017d05034d4f894f389f
'2012-04-18T05:28:35-04:00'
describe
'1022656' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIU' 'sip-files00143.tif'
bf79d3a59d8fd1b777db9f00f920afdd
6f36a33336619ec5e03e4868f021cd99f19b7376
describe
'1081' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIV' 'sip-files00143.txt'
fa36ad7ec6e575ee8db4844122660e96
7b0dcc6dc97669cbf6755bccc6c5527356fe332d
describe
'39959' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIW' 'sip-files00143thm.jpg'
171fd29ad477d52994b785ce3d31afd8
d1687fd3b113940bf0c8910262ae5596929693b8
describe
'122101' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIX' 'sip-files00144.jp2'
82c1bb1ef3c70cda7d80af83dc5f9b7f
e5a3157d80d6f8de3dfb39e8733dc8e56e3a5dd0
'2012-04-18T05:20:30-04:00'
describe
'156916' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIY' 'sip-files00144.jpg'
c4705c4e3702273a24d61ca9ec9512d3
a8dc11f0daf25f9386652654467219083babe9b5
describe
'28801' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKIZ' 'sip-files00144.pro'
006dcb248127278ba4a27573f87d9f60
6fda75b4c573b62b4cc4634fe9d7446b91ffde1a
'2012-04-18T05:24:42-04:00'
describe
'78689' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJA' 'sip-files00144.QC.jpg'
6d9f6defc2efffa400e137490e778059
098f81779ada5339e76a021526ca8f1fb4f71cd0
'2012-04-18T05:20:58-04:00'
describe
'1000964' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJB' 'sip-files00144.tif'
ee768e26f1e862494e90360f5db18488
6ce5ac6d257e186dc6983e3d8f3bb41a7929ae50
describe
'1227' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJC' 'sip-files00144.txt'
ac4c5b313a64eadf081284699f9ad95d
c32ddfa1d9b8b6da86ade4db3bffb8414acc47dc
describe
'40958' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJD' 'sip-files00144thm.jpg'
e1f271a034d90e0987c17313499265f3
1db66fdb55dc716ae7806ef1e8c5a125feec7409
describe
'132921' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJE' 'sip-files00145.jp2'
809124b4e96dcd7960da788a80a6800a
a064e52933290ff5395b9db3b27f9abb2c707905
'2012-04-18T05:27:02-04:00'
describe
'149870' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJF' 'sip-files00145.jpg'
6e5a8419ef86050e163b9e9f04b7cad5
95a636b5140ed8e9c67bacb29ac92d4238938868
describe
'28485' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJG' 'sip-files00145.pro'
e8242d0d6e9c6d60ca29dfe21f1fbe3f
e6468b93ed9ed925bb4fdc5c857c5c03fd50aa24
describe
'75719' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJH' 'sip-files00145.QC.jpg'
94f4d8639cce627e6d1e93535a5d27d9
98e21644ade15473ef2fd44cd40e30c62e388509
describe
'1087684' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJI' 'sip-files00145.tif'
42779c0d6e91d22adb6c50ccf6f33966
9b87e50630422a93330c35f8c105c653f290b166
'2012-04-18T05:24:54-04:00'
describe
'1189' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJJ' 'sip-files00145.txt'
56fd3da866777debef36714346dc778e
17d7a49f4974720abb5c28df033ffd7d5f30a733
describe
'38386' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJK' 'sip-files00145thm.jpg'
232bafa0281a1b4ddbad692e42ee60cb
c6ffaacd9d8dd01bbc4b4f4de2b09419bac70ddc
'2012-04-18T05:20:57-04:00'
describe
'129790' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJL' 'sip-files00146.jp2'
fdbeb7d0be630d4dd849f3ea09ed4b8c
95ab8b72d6780415bf7d4d5d5acfc41bfc75470e
describe
'152669' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJM' 'sip-files00146.jpg'
317fb1b2622ed7b1d804ceabc121ee6a
677fa358e967c12e47b7c64be4fe667aef28d178
describe
'28462' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJN' 'sip-files00146.pro'
cabfa42c3a06b2169bf70c67de293d39
c5497036c2ca3c3026cb7cd1f3dc8cd82fb88eae
describe
'77089' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJO' 'sip-files00146.QC.jpg'
75da2ff68b53295cec3cf934161e9c6e
c2d6d32a8cb5fe7322d944e4ed564494559639f7
describe
'1061388' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJP' 'sip-files00146.tif'
638cf7ad652013518b1c5c127eafeb8d
260dfd3f0e668498ebc723531f153c97eb17d07c
describe
'1209' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJQ' 'sip-files00146.txt'
b8df5d326f3a3b45cf83318beb6fe92b
faf4c2c02ba853bb61448b560ffa762800074dc5
describe
'39075' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJR' 'sip-files00146thm.jpg'
e92d1a5dfd86796e89352c0067bdd0af
ff4385655703c2947424a45d4d3964b651f6ea02
describe
'123584' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJS' 'sip-files00147.jp2'
995ee74de6ded332401597a65abba6d9
994ea1369c47c2268ca827d5fabc1c94b522ce9c
describe
'151047' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJT' 'sip-files00147.jpg'
8c0622075cfe9476f39b2bf73cf91066
b85cde3969f57bf295267cb39cc9dc21032f2493
'2012-04-18T05:28:20-04:00'
describe
'27312' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJU' 'sip-files00147.pro'
bf4d67e2286c859f88eb83e7ac2456dd
f940ed3fa032c5c07b25bfdbcab27a381e108a92
describe
'77542' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJV' 'sip-files00147.QC.jpg'
622bfdd040fbe1353ecab86bd68d0f07
b5b98e3ce19f390d3eb7bb9882d4a6f0c69ba97a
describe
'1012196' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJW' 'sip-files00147.tif'
1820892897d0bfb9502fc3927957803b
098ff4f2d5a16f4ab9c833dac6d9daa687af7529
describe
'1152' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJX' 'sip-files00147.txt'
f2bb7551426c7a2c8c61beaab8541b21
49c90d3785385ddb3460eab36bfc42fd66cd781d
describe
'40223' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJY' 'sip-files00147thm.jpg'
b7af348a0e4822f1c96aaab2fc620cf1
0d66296063ee7d9867072697978b9b2acdd3d5c4
describe
'123264' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKJZ' 'sip-files00148.jp2'
2d18ef38469faf547a61ba455d4e60cc
67c1b9895b10617d8d20788d715efeb849ac8ba1
describe
'158471' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKA' 'sip-files00148.jpg'
271f9c16ca59146ac058d58efacc9740
6b24d18857904913c9dc75be3d4d0766bbe8113b
describe
'28779' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKB' 'sip-files00148.pro'
433975484bd380bc01ba8260679855c3
0775e8c6707e92e5b10ddd7e607535fd7af71191
'2012-04-18T05:24:39-04:00'
describe
'78794' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKC' 'sip-files00148.QC.jpg'
668c7ef0dfbd313de7b5856fa148eed9
4b8d0a636cf6edb78a1795fa33f4e30f077ed0db
'2012-04-18T05:28:27-04:00'
describe
'1010748' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKD' 'sip-files00148.tif'
be0845ec4467b0527f8f723750d02b35
0d0324dc5b31c0abaf68680d5c08edd697a65a4f
describe
'1234' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKE' 'sip-files00148.txt'
dfb9c231a17f9537f5bbe6f0945dca6e
220cfe8e88dffb3f11ee38870b8a23b21724f959
'2012-04-18T05:22:04-04:00'
describe
'39845' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKF' 'sip-files00148thm.jpg'
895a3faf458fb46c01f3685b5a161dd8
6a5e34371841e3dae0199efc5a864ac7253ded18
describe
'128402' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKG' 'sip-files00149.jp2'
52cb77230912220a82f6f3a90c3b0922
d5d8f4cffd0e016763ef5799f5b3d8969ccd2f45
'2012-04-18T05:28:55-04:00'
describe
'136303' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKH' 'sip-files00149.jpg'
3312230d94ab69e201ba38fd8c172066
1396d7042acda56124f855f5e4615ca8210d2c9f
describe
'25904' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKI' 'sip-files00149.pro'
53723b843f87c4b2ff434ed94ac5e165
31d64e394495fae9576818a2ef080328bcf1651d
describe
'68776' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKJ' 'sip-files00149.QC.jpg'
194ea69de844dabd3a444377227632f6
5a0255104711dc1b5e90aabe477bba39cdbb84d3
describe
'1050476' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKK' 'sip-files00149.tif'
b911670583b316ef47722e909c436f1d
0a3dbf62798b914e2a7a3c8d010189b0fe5f1bf0
describe
'1112' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKL' 'sip-files00149.txt'
1d17977a1a472c059f774372074ccacc
b90e65b05f2997ce7c7018e7c64608e63ce5e6c6
describe
'37319' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKM' 'sip-files00149thm.jpg'
d2c1f09e84d40d1160669864617b3ba7
a2b639c493bd0cb754dff833cc2382ffff91812f
describe
'123028' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKN' 'sip-files00150.jp2'
ffff57b2ae62cf1dd23cf85116185368
f67718e02fbab9e411ceef573b83e2724080b8bd
describe
'156340' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKO' 'sip-files00150.jpg'
fcfa2bda5c66f895686f134c42465952
1fab70220ede170cc18bdcb5ed655c0f07a70fd8
describe
'28463' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKP' 'sip-files00150.pro'
7f97843ccdd207a930845b9a89a7b047
719e9e2d5bd81e9012281e1be487703fd0138d89
describe
'78566' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKQ' 'sip-files00150.QC.jpg'
53083cabc6a3ff6bf3b6a52870624819
0e8f9c6460390de6557f357e7f22ab11e5ddafa1
describe
'1007572' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKR' 'sip-files00150.tif'
6e53ea4bb6d9ccb7c0bdb0f52a6443c1
4b1c782a17c2fcdcf6a47b5df0187bec34381c78
describe
'1218' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKS' 'sip-files00150.txt'
0a210e8b07d7411f3bef77d6fcabd003
352a73144371abafb2f02ecd1c0851c3bbcf1ba8
describe
'40315' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKT' 'sip-files00150thm.jpg'
0dc8371aecc78323e6aba4dbc7e282f2
aaa706ceaa8ed76a1f5f6cf2598512ef50185d8d
describe
'122234' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKU' 'sip-files00151.jp2'
a106b58663495c05cf7bad761f04b22a
61ca289af204fd873ab8b6c5940e22a99fe7ea29
describe
'156276' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKV' 'sip-files00151.jpg'
571b6b03e4fdd5c502d4eb5f5b8f953b
228eae9ba4217971ed38bfd6025fd0cc7ec5ad59
describe
'29335' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKW' 'sip-files00151.pro'
e34ca1abf84560b10fa2f31c67c6d69b
73e90803c802f103f30fccdfffa9c67d22ab4a98
describe
'78343' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKX' 'sip-files00151.QC.jpg'
903e050cb24cefd5d82c252ecd235f83
c5042eeb57d2d9e9329844764219536deff8f81d
describe
'1001280' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKY' 'sip-files00151.tif'
b6a6c9ddbfedc478becddd840d53f721
60136d7cde6604bc71a36ceb7b42447721f66339
describe
'1240' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKKZ' 'sip-files00151.txt'
963b9403b2190acc515afda1c4c280a2
53a56facfdb462f28ed9dacf5e05383b4319bf51
describe
'39557' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLA' 'sip-files00151thm.jpg'
ed9a3afd07ec44f8fdf09e6e7d250c35
2b7a31dc081844582502d0f24049aaed7e475cf3
describe
'130312' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLB' 'sip-files00152.jp2'
40b9bd1a8d53b9460c651708a34d4a7c
c8147126e35dc2a10be0a535ad0d18660d19192e
describe
'113855' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLC' 'sip-files00152.jpg'
1c38c59ef8c428f00e0b882175006e3f
f5c941d158df949c7ec91770cf370a2ce729fccc
'2012-04-18T05:24:40-04:00'
describe
'26112' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLD' 'sip-files00152.pro'
c3a25e9b10f4dd4d48ae245bf811643c
17492b6071f23218489e65bdf7519b0b460a8dd2
describe
'61632' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLE' 'sip-files00152.QC.jpg'
c277fee88caf0dcf2bf41b294cb02d1d
0d3f50379b03baa4a95d6a3d4f2243f0917491d3
describe
'1065340' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLF' 'sip-files00152.tif'
318c4f5ad711acdf8152bbb4749b97d9
55aa04bb983cf7ceae3dd2fa46a28a1b6be8a86a
describe
'1119' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLG' 'sip-files00152.txt'
a08c2605b05e77e2e919ee520d8f8f56
2c49dcfef5a9c5cf0dd091a70014b098d0e7995e
'2012-04-18T05:22:42-04:00'
describe
'34565' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLH' 'sip-files00152thm.jpg'
5687e7fe503f54e926f3f085611b8fa3
e5e6eab144656b4f26de7b883dae0d22fa4cf7b5
describe
'122191' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLI' 'sip-files00153.jp2'
bad45450b6663bd3c47292096567e59d
95f1e84a30dad786f63752549b787777f85806ad
describe
'143990' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLJ' 'sip-files00153.jpg'
2262b5202fa519688b83c0c9c97eacc4
042d0863cfd2e0cc6566ee97f5fda77c7ac04b0d
describe
'26553' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLK' 'sip-files00153.pro'
bc628b425ad41b46abde9eddb89d132a
f0d6f229582012aae3714dc7b8dc3230203cc63c
describe
'74660' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLL' 'sip-files00153.QC.jpg'
157d08da18ddc93e234bbf58751bda95
0e6aabac33c023e74e57eb5b4e95e1c13078f862
describe
'1000720' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLM' 'sip-files00153.tif'
e28f6097a07db727310602234b328ed5
d864b63e21d456fb5b0ee0ee2165e1def7ba2387
'2012-04-18T05:31:10-04:00'
describe
'1145' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLN' 'sip-files00153.txt'
e04ae976f4704613b6df803b8ed37d46
4029a488bcac8f4cd5d253d8914aa1333d42f4ee
describe
'40176' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLO' 'sip-files00153thm.jpg'
1f71e3026b2330842040e1b0d5baaf7f
959dbac26c3b61f75693fda80760fbc5adf39c21
describe
'122988' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLP' 'sip-files00154.jp2'
1a741d8635749c0cfeff3daba41df387
32dcbbcbb46bf54670596dcc9afef5118e7142c7
describe
'112813' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLQ' 'sip-files00154.jpg'
124f45efa33f730fe21534ff07e85f71
223d4acc7d0ee2d6296825a436d065e0c435b2e1
describe
'25566' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLR' 'sip-files00154.pro'
702d66ae2dd4d9784157e6707727d3f9
e1b51804ad005f0cc1f42951e031cbdced034823
'2012-04-18T05:28:36-04:00'
describe
'61490' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLS' 'sip-files00154.QC.jpg'
0cb673b7d6225130bb5384c85c69614f
fcc9c1fb700fc49bc504a6387bd73dfdf9460db7
'2012-04-18T05:24:21-04:00'
describe
'1007504' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLT' 'sip-files00154.tif'
ce9f86d70309353e92fdf71b359e9a95
fc736cb09c90ff6f76066a4558e992cab5d6c159
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLU' 'sip-files00154.txt'
5503dafff61b66c530c1d908cc65ef23
22650c29c440eccf9e90a63883e80c8c4589a860
describe
Invalid character
'34882' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLV' 'sip-files00154thm.jpg'
17943b74a8c461b1888d5afcc8c0e7d7
a05bcacf0067f1c4660a715f3260a088002fd4ce
'2012-04-18T05:22:40-04:00'
describe
'115548' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLW' 'sip-files00155.jp2'
c7a715d83cb73bf99a06538cffa77043
9d2e59e570b28855a2ac941738c82166f560bee4
describe
'145582' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLX' 'sip-files00155.jpg'
4bdcd82246e1ce125c64b4c22a4034de
251a7a219a9b669f51d0ceec254e28ca7208f505
describe
'25694' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLY' 'sip-files00155.pro'
f3ae4a038a7397551706920d0b5d2f93
37862400203346a695d99e64d46db94bf74acd35
describe
'75655' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKLZ' 'sip-files00155.QC.jpg'
c4d29d91e172422dc626158bf49efc59
7d2e573a6d35491ede13ffccdf6e9a9aa8e34dd0
describe
'948196' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMA' 'sip-files00155.tif'
aa80df0c1fdfb955a342ce0f0130c549
ba69d46ac79e2144aecdf7415c9c6d5f47825f60
describe
'1111' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMB' 'sip-files00155.txt'
b0e83d9014877aa9c27982e72ca49d6a
3065cd5b208fe45620bdcef5a7ba49576c14c1f5
describe
'39873' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMC' 'sip-files00155thm.jpg'
e291e6ebe8eb51ebd871be37e182d5a4
5666c2c70e410e81ebab4cbefe48dcb372964458
describe
'121962' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMD' 'sip-files00156.jp2'
bfe27a4c521cb15057f0b067bfe21bac
34940607fd31a77ffb8676aaac269cbbb784a0f4
'2012-04-18T05:25:02-04:00'
describe
'127469' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKME' 'sip-files00156.jpg'
b523c235569a59740804bb805d092a08
15d89825425759a1437222d0d955f1b91e32d2df
describe
'28757' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMF' 'sip-files00156.pro'
2c1aa8e8cade9697f51e5d924bb56248
3cf43bebcbaeb6d8bcb52c2a2c992604b21322eb
describe
'67453' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMG' 'sip-files00156.QC.jpg'
183dec9af6924e4136090f390ee1de3d
b0b422cd163d0f2efcaa6e561ac5bbdb498d5250
'2012-04-18T05:25:22-04:00'
describe
'998932' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMH' 'sip-files00156.tif'
502d5f8be3cccfdde776455ac69dfdd3
1cf7798eea0cf505eeea6ea0f4b8f6723737e5b1
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMI' 'sip-files00156.txt'
14fe434dd9e0f159a57501aeec76d378
dc7a64d36ba94e170125eefe8b86489375bfd415
describe
'37042' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMJ' 'sip-files00156thm.jpg'
f182375ada08041b119c53793d7db8d2
e14defecd5c33f35b16500eca48b471c6bda8bd3
describe
'122695' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMK' 'sip-files00157.jp2'
c8a6d1720a1773c29a00db0d6be24609
e09af33b2563706fe33f0c7684c9970773201718
'2012-04-18T05:29:08-04:00'
describe
'149727' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKML' 'sip-files00157.jpg'
08558d14b62c103bfde1d5414e607296
a15cb69252b52b6d21beb90daa035f38df87965c
describe
'27396' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMM' 'sip-files00157.pro'
8e0f6f4b22fb2ad9897f75ecff68b8cb
748c3e570ebea843ce5bde9955f37e58888f4aac
describe
'75020' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMN' 'sip-files00157.QC.jpg'
457a3295cee2159b6a47cc4fa8910fe9
ce216ddc865befa23522f545959102331a9d5ed6
describe
'1005276' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMO' 'sip-files00157.tif'
e5e6f50f43da87eae55dd5f3bb9d078b
c1100b92f6661c74633e0603de2b2c9c1e0cf9d4
'2012-04-18T05:26:17-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMP' 'sip-files00157.txt'
90c9eca59af1bb2b6d4b21a7e73ecf36
3ac2765818d4642c758c7310b15e23179e3563ef
describe
'40357' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMQ' 'sip-files00157thm.jpg'
6fd0b6a2bf2412ad8ccd1f5c6c166eef
f6223d0e72a98222cd873fad11b3d72ccc49c37e
describe
'125101' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMR' 'sip-files00158.jp2'
24f9690a7b55af63c11ae79042395a29
57c1c2cbd6fc2ad7f68f1d5c72df9168be5e5002
describe
'123228' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMS' 'sip-files00158.jpg'
9688a57ce1f612e6018e238be53ddceb
3b2ae7346198079927720efb526fc9ed6053570b
describe
'28736' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMT' 'sip-files00158.pro'
3d350132cc993b3c79a6206c41329b23
589dd5eaf5fe682ca34b2449ebf23b141e2f448a
'2012-04-18T05:24:04-04:00'
describe
'66924' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMU' 'sip-files00158.QC.jpg'
b9bc4c0d92462e6e18394bcfd72a1395
d3d3e3083ae2a168112475c853cfd685a9032252
describe
'1024132' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMV' 'sip-files00158.tif'
0e3d33764a551cf4441c22bf9394ba56
0d4762cea832b721fbeeaee05ee75be42551641e
'2012-04-18T05:25:51-04:00'
describe
'1214' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMW' 'sip-files00158.txt'
00e790045a6a35c2372f5f38895db874
b050c8794b5c45b4fc5d4aee340e16c50559d2e9
describe
'36246' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMX' 'sip-files00158thm.jpg'
0fe4efd174f238d7acdb12acb76dbb4c
fd01873a6d6993c8bf67607e64dee47b13f016e6
describe
'118193' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMY' 'sip-files00159.jp2'
a138afe27ec6c93f5aa4b3590b505260
d67a6278312f106100c756041366274ecae47c65
describe
'154856' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKMZ' 'sip-files00159.jpg'
4ae1b69fa16d78a20acecdbfd9fd83e8
8edab380cadb4598eecb244ab65a9d7f8477dff8
describe
'27910' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNA' 'sip-files00159.pro'
ec11b1ccc771811869a4b0bea855e158
fd5ab4e544b69d65a0031d9fe6214539db7856d5
describe
'78869' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNB' 'sip-files00159.QC.jpg'
4b800b0d5859f0dcf7aa74152a78a883
baaff5f0a025647c318b63cfae4860bbe5fe97ce
'2012-04-18T05:22:02-04:00'
describe
'969092' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNC' 'sip-files00159.tif'
f986df0d629753481df4f1bd9d1e32bb
eb663508b44a3db88401832c421c52dc523457c3
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKND' 'sip-files00159.txt'
51e6a50a8bed9b883e46b78b68570a25
d323656c06b377e24a0d6e65d9ce66810e71c2df
describe
'41599' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNE' 'sip-files00159thm.jpg'
47abd7809e7543c64e8707aa9c0b662f
865b1802952380a8fb5d97ba3b0f1f451e953161
'2012-04-18T05:30:22-04:00'
describe
'131111' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNF' 'sip-files00160.jp2'
9981f9ee5b590761ed3c10d93f5100af
8f71a894270e4f208e02f562968f31121bfc4937
describe
'119260' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNG' 'sip-files00160.jpg'
4133a1e1bc0237e375f2339b58bc8391
caa13b95c073ae35e6588384f1e4a660dbc84746
describe
'27706' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNH' 'sip-files00160.pro'
18219305e0faee2b098a9e6d70ab3cec
16f5186070f4b4a3b495fec7538c56b59b840f52
describe
'64602' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNI' 'sip-files00160.QC.jpg'
b5ae943afda272209adee16b7ed6dce7
b96177981b2e491b429d532d23d915833be32384
describe
'1072188' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNJ' 'sip-files00160.tif'
63b0aa4903e3888e858f84867d78003d
4d279f5eb5c5c6e02a3cbf47daf8fc10b43b5c76
'2012-04-18T05:20:43-04:00'
describe
'1180' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNK' 'sip-files00160.txt'
7e0a00659167461c9ba28366a0b9cb44
9dd0a3f9703a1ef4c37d35ba0d60b66fd22d6cab
describe
'34732' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNL' 'sip-files00160thm.jpg'
afd5e9af93771a06d3605f926431f3a7
e60d519418ee0b5c6ccb5abc0ad9e079b5604b68
'2012-04-18T05:27:11-04:00'
describe
'117157' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNM' 'sip-files00161.jp2'
f21fad9f70c695aef4da175197e9f95e
2a68b2e4bc7865dc108f2708a996ad17f1e6e5eb
describe
'138272' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNN' 'sip-files00161.jpg'
4b959a30491b70002a95be041962db00
0ddcaa91fa55a00226b49d276464ccb8e64bbe6e
describe
'24333' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNO' 'sip-files00161.pro'
aabe30d849b7a7063d59849d25b5c74d
1e3b19b423da9f52c2ab802919c629d0c3bb3b67
'2012-04-18T05:22:07-04:00'
describe
'69781' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNP' 'sip-files00161.QC.jpg'
5cee6ad0d2d47868f607f04765e229d6
02c310649ae08c93466d5095500e2fc5fb1265ca
describe
'959708' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNQ' 'sip-files00161.tif'
68b176e3ba3f225b54adb97ded6fec78
1c64416912eefffac51499d9f0b38e4ca63673d9
describe
'1030' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNR' 'sip-files00161.txt'
1a8e274761e8e59d256a8ba0b11cd600
3119bcef7a45f6c68e177933f9636be20a4d6a14
describe
'37808' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNS' 'sip-files00161thm.jpg'
1b3d3181e61fe0baaf019825b9863d59
ab619300653e2b9d3fbec93c0ff61c4184205169
describe
'121262' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNT' 'sip-files00162.jp2'
0b49970ac6cb030cc9dfb7ff90f4c0c6
ffc83ebe28b70b5e085a7fe919d9ac6b18dd63b3
describe
'105706' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNU' 'sip-files00162.jpg'
0877e3d14653d98953fe52959c9ffc40
30ccf2060e08c2ee7a7d93cec205a4c0a4677167
describe
'23519' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNV' 'sip-files00162.pro'
f23d007176ec30d86bdff0ca4d5c6c3b
322843ec5e773781c18810fb4762d20cab69401c
describe
'58662' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNW' 'sip-files00162.QC.jpg'
893bc36184f38a3ac618a88c735479b9
fe9ee5a6aabd18de2e6f87bf86e8a660cc0a541c
describe
'992204' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNX' 'sip-files00162.tif'
9590fdc5fefc99489c4b013cd76d503c
430063655549b3209cbf39b47a5df7b53223db87
'2012-04-18T05:27:52-04:00'
describe
'1018' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNY' 'sip-files00162.txt'
562769d20a8e0cca0b808eaf615d399b
29b109a7e4ac035082f71ad85b399649924ef506
describe
'34648' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKNZ' 'sip-files00162thm.jpg'
4434304dd9b7f260dbd5336125707a43
2cac595eb37c2c28d7c1d3d79d3eda9b9f98ab92
describe
'111806' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOA' 'sip-files00163.jp2'
826cb2e1f8fb979bb92fc6b0facd2b40
541472dcc35ee761d5e395bc772ed52bf40aae09
'2012-04-18T05:25:35-04:00'
describe
'151271' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOB' 'sip-files00163.jpg'
04111e8097efd7efe9e8536f8f56eae9
941926bddac1ff516e4a3271c357238c6164b97e
describe
'27591' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOC' 'sip-files00163.pro'
687d600ccc44a26cbb4b57f36cdccf40
61ebe7e03cbdae6860be2c309c2c9aa48231ed05
describe
'77059' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOD' 'sip-files00163.QC.jpg'
4d97ad581891ff054c4c4fb90431feda
bab8a5a94c28cd3205b9e192f7ad2e6e1d33663e
describe
'917756' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOE' 'sip-files00163.tif'
93a8d47973236c2965964595739bd593
02612b50eff6cb642bbd85a5ea8cdffe92fd92a6
describe
'1179' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOF' 'sip-files00163.txt'
13c8352d2f658d297d2d78e218cd16c0
84f65644650007f049a47377ae1bae121fdd415e
describe
'42677' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOG' 'sip-files00163thm.jpg'
6ee1c8a7e65fcdcdabb40e23b74f8d25
43789c28d9da10d6dd3fc02de70d78b722fc79d4
describe
'131018' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOH' 'sip-files00164.jp2'
6183986c68a6f77f2fd0c41b20ec1f8b
b4d0a92f1d8fcf323613deefe2e5ccbe264d15b2
describe
'114341' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOI' 'sip-files00164.jpg'
536de28ef3018cce13060379f4a99770
677fb5f2ca16d17bce45c16f68e54bf1290f624b
describe
'26873' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOJ' 'sip-files00164.pro'
38121beb548ffdcc4c9123d05a0ca30c
7fdb51a82f668c905e23a40de08a154457e49745
describe
'62061' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOK' 'sip-files00164.QC.jpg'
2fe69ae80941d92eee52c498d83370bb
a495b57d9bf73f312e6cab408d12a5da2611befd
'2012-04-18T05:29:37-04:00'
describe
'1071384' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOL' 'sip-files00164.tif'
c704de5cfd0292037df19e95404e905f
05ad38e7bb61639aaa4ddfb5acbc512fb18adbcc
'2012-04-18T05:29:12-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOM' 'sip-files00164.txt'
35c55a88d3c8b7daecf3d7babb4add02
d6157900af2e2f3f418bc352cdc8f14e9ecaa9c1
describe
'34852' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKON' 'sip-files00164thm.jpg'
321e6f40230781ea9caeae3d37c1b531
f03a1abc085371cdcf842281cab7883d7fcc91ad
describe
'121430' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOO' 'sip-files00165.jp2'
4a82a2f326814b59f24643ac451b02ba
66bf9bb5b251554fa6b3fa27a58dfc6d83bd9555
describe
'142405' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOP' 'sip-files00165.jpg'
54b0e38d34a7fdbb3c0e9889d20f6b83
6ef923a1513e9b4e8fe61617123da7b8c3ab64aa
describe
'26241' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOQ' 'sip-files00165.pro'
5f85d72b8d74c4fa644f89039ec24cdb
18de38da01af9bffd00529cf5beb764970a3ce0f
describe
'73210' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOR' 'sip-files00165.QC.jpg'
1227e346974f3cebd69adc00f87f8587
a97b6fe0c4afcb983c0584f2ccd5576a8f87d0af
'2012-04-18T05:27:51-04:00'
describe
'994516' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOS' 'sip-files00165.tif'
b5cce402757a13705c16ee13381b95fb
1bc1f3c85bb5b593aceadd46455f76af480d2a1e
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOT' 'sip-files00165.txt'
b545b25dbc084bc860f295a7ca64c537
8fcc6d12a4bb25880201444b956254961b1b26df
describe
'40533' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOU' 'sip-files00165thm.jpg'
b6d30bb893f9200fb500508bcf562dd7
3cffe1ec81e9e2e4186707c102c7ac141cab1b96
describe
'123435' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOV' 'sip-files00166.jp2'
d9c6c3c42898a922c297b041d9df3702
0062b5151a50b815aaf8505e5f73341563530ee7
describe
'112420' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOW' 'sip-files00166.jpg'
9923bf3c4da7faed9c101f7bedc30475
0c492a3cac51744bd83255488a3f2b52082ef5a4
describe
'25330' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOX' 'sip-files00166.pro'
d7a66a90f000a0f31b355872008e8746
e694eb87097ecc793192cabffbd58ea757aed927
describe
'60431' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOY' 'sip-files00166.QC.jpg'
b39e07310c5bdd31f87e57e67d3ffbf7
e8851e4958df7ac10a562b39aa690c0b7b36e48e
describe
'1010472' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKOZ' 'sip-files00166.tif'
f7614eb8a84b0b0e20039b9752878905
eaf6152f0c246c494231f587df7b0265763b36bc
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPA' 'sip-files00166.txt'
8a675017bf6f371dad7721756a1737f7
9bd91278c650b1764cb3c180d82c581a8deab3be
describe
'35697' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPB' 'sip-files00166thm.jpg'
8389f9a9ef3d2fa134d1ac00a6d9fd0a
1f194b867e630fbcb61dbb8b780ca322f47d52f9
describe
'116496' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPC' 'sip-files00167.jp2'
5990b8b54b476ff6302752542358769f
4522a5e2889ea3bbbee3e1766e1d0e4077e7995b
describe
'155075' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPD' 'sip-files00167.jpg'
9e63f3d8cea496db69b17317dfed966c
1009e6e7c2fb29d2f4e3f47123d94a7ae161a179
describe
'28492' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPE' 'sip-files00167.pro'
aabc1674f4570f160474cdd9ff656cc7
6f2435157d296c7b68141a904d3554abe44143ad
describe
'80228' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPF' 'sip-files00167.QC.jpg'
c1eb39c8ca2c4518bd7a324f68188f4e
649b3bde536d3c695c24eeb07c6a34a00da58366
describe
'955760' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPG' 'sip-files00167.tif'
6287f98d85e49fe1d712a1d05e0162ae
0efce83810f194aa66f811894789ee4f07fb4380
describe
'1219' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPH' 'sip-files00167.txt'
57ffce6db0ac484054c2c21f5bda4839
f1a40eee5446dd79861e2992a3dc1fd569a269d5
'2012-04-18T05:22:34-04:00'
describe
'42216' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPI' 'sip-files00167thm.jpg'
9e3dc6a92174ce3b6e95385f462bb654
4f43979cf17da37781f925c1b2e86175a9130bb8
describe
'122000' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPJ' 'sip-files00168.jp2'
aa1fb532bdac1b2312b67a2c9d9a38cc
9a551997e083e9f85561d23a167edce8fe493aa2
'2012-04-18T05:30:48-04:00'
describe
'157812' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPK' 'sip-files00168.jpg'
4407f09b3ddb6698023df22229b41cd4
610c9862e2c51db950b89a484afa02451c0de642
describe
'28981' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPL' 'sip-files00168.pro'
ff590fdaca2e4b349e97e09d5df2e6fb
899eb40c6d73aec097643a9b1b06460728638a9a
'2012-04-18T05:27:44-04:00'
describe
'79121' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPM' 'sip-files00168.QC.jpg'
2f6aedc3dfbd223bb0ce4ee5b1962b84
ae3c70ecfbec9cc13d0f3d31a3889220330e4cb3
'2012-04-18T05:23:16-04:00'
describe
'999200' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPN' 'sip-files00168.tif'
d67db29ac84d48c2ad66d2441ac34ef0
4c9700ffc08cea56486f575cf47267a23116c967
describe
'1229' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPO' 'sip-files00168.txt'
ace905452d4632fe26a1625fd021537f
07cfa8aa437f73f82897b05707d0c73bd2ed2900
describe
'41061' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPP' 'sip-files00168thm.jpg'
5cc5af85af188ae42c683d277badc1ff
4aec3f0f55191de22139643c82b8608ff1c53612
describe
'114067' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPQ' 'sip-files00169.jp2'
da8817a78d9a704eb9cc1700e37ede52
3a29b660292241a0256f9c5e12ab64b5aacc2c5e
describe
'156497' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPR' 'sip-files00169.jpg'
b694b583bd694ca19a9263c17b994d9b
4034373eb1a17ffeed4d4c0d111995a94829d5fc
'2012-04-18T05:22:59-04:00'
describe
'27919' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPS' 'sip-files00169.pro'
d2a7b3d8fe799e3a6e8e4729e9b1abcf
b09d0cc3a8f2c60ab33b1bc958ef131553637d38
'2012-04-18T05:25:47-04:00'
describe
'78965' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPT' 'sip-files00169.QC.jpg'
e181896321358ac1484000ec2cdb4d07
4b5e34d315f6d804d64c4465d76efe2b54d48d8c
describe
'936356' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPU' 'sip-files00169.tif'
1b5f61fdf920734671e33c05fa03a4ef
196a0d923d580e89bf37355fbc724510290bf2f1
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPV' 'sip-files00169.txt'
1627532a2817ff7ed3b82d37c8a42e93
e91b399bac926a21f917d33010e0b54a65fbcb92
describe
'42073' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPW' 'sip-files00169thm.jpg'
d6011db0c7f6f089da3c39d90c904090
1edfb142653506412b1dc0666a47b4990d73c3c8
describe
'119949' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPX' 'sip-files00170.jp2'
e001dad8513ef5124492aebe70caeead
8613cfd34f029ff334d96822f56fd66132002781
describe
'105286' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPY' 'sip-files00170.jpg'
4e0d74d4b9d1059138dd705bf884e7eb
bc4418b8c5c3ae16330ef6cc7e22ff5ab5b879d1
describe
'23149' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKPZ' 'sip-files00170.pro'
4c767472d36852169dd91bcc2259aede
83e07c7ac9113dd843967fc7c4abebca0f93dc1b
describe
'58043' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQA' 'sip-files00170.QC.jpg'
2adecfeb056d6905f7ea9b58a629b1a2
6a4d4337da4c1ffb65f802b19ba180abbc5d1b0d
describe
'981968' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQB' 'sip-files00170.tif'
95f39640f817a11f2f52b933820f2864
9e63bac26fd8a95aa8a374be57e5d5c040c3953b
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQC' 'sip-files00170.txt'
a705f7ebef079f2cfe01133f06bccd75
a85ad05ea474a10d25d09b71b4e4acb3666cb4d7
'2012-04-18T05:22:23-04:00'
describe
Invalid character
'34506' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQD' 'sip-files00170thm.jpg'
b782759fafd5d57e52aa6b2491f0d46d
c8880d0f05d9df7580b61bad262bb006d25fe256
describe
'128051' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQE' 'sip-files00171.jp2'
bb90bee7ef40afe49ba440e97acfac35
035716ce63117027a2c5fb2099f50377d43b8db2
describe
'156249' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQF' 'sip-files00171.jpg'
0d613f25ea8105e4ff09ff1ddc0f7e21
d334c390e5a58de8b1f1c91d5ff799c4a6f4a8f8
describe
'28654' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQG' 'sip-files00171.pro'
cb176507653db45c22e97c126132c0d7
5252ae75b9a7e5c7b2a14ad972bc302e7385f768
describe
'77885' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQH' 'sip-files00171.QC.jpg'
22bb06a1f52d214d6dda206bcc60c3ae
39ad4a33f937c7e4474b4b5b7e4b8fcba9519250
describe
'1047816' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQI' 'sip-files00171.tif'
01aa6f76d67c45a877928922c401081e
90a88176fc8ef770d0d9839819c1a9b51d76b209
'2012-04-18T05:24:38-04:00'
describe
'1201' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQJ' 'sip-files00171.txt'
c651b64630ac6f411949b771e0bd5bd1
594a14dfe983c50b11c660486bf914b5d50b86c8
describe
'40012' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQK' 'sip-files00171thm.jpg'
05e8827094f208f3c74b407bd4901098
debd0d885c7dcfe00441ecb44797e962e60e5bfc
describe
'127738' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQL' 'sip-files00172.jp2'
be4cb4c6174131b688e1fa9d41165c7a
ad75854da21bf5feb7423c5a84335ee40caa3f25
describe
'112464' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQM' 'sip-files00172.jpg'
1a2d5e165baa477e1124604cdcc0fc00
37d4c129780bb88ea4adc3a18b7194aba9f98c8b
'2012-04-18T05:24:24-04:00'
describe
'24947' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQN' 'sip-files00172.pro'
6f8c99dfce94de4d1eff496d416336db
a550af867950b95729e39e5fed35d5a22da5e0ec
describe
'62159' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQO' 'sip-files00172.QC.jpg'
81b71b8d637c1dd9fa72cd54dc5b54f7
cbb9113f6ce4bf8451a3332452933611c062331e
describe
'1044472' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQP' 'sip-files00172.tif'
e461b6c7ff390349b34fb129cd55d234
4282b16bf733139bc24716bb9bfa81276533a0d8
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQQ' 'sip-files00172.txt'
6b3d2ef4c429b747f1925f4922c8f059
06eab189211472a7a5989f14efdbeee938d78e24
describe
'35814' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQR' 'sip-files00172thm.jpg'
2ee950a2b08f21115ec14421d29575e7
72553e5a06bc82c7be66b6161abe274834046d7b
describe
'129526' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQS' 'sip-files00173.jp2'
65acac51ff5bb9d32cb99f603234be68
b1fd23668a2d9ec020de2d1a71b55cb19afcb085
describe
'142322' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQT' 'sip-files00173.jpg'
038dd7c8def4218d8a38cae13362f2d1
c7f67c756da03314d76148510e1cccbf98fc0a30
describe
'25470' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQU' 'sip-files00173.pro'
68e8ec0418e5b2af8d7b8c2d7ecfb770
4b7728aeb81b01a24e992f584b3dcb0417026c04
describe
'73170' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQV' 'sip-files00173.QC.jpg'
6b4120e3bad0f8c7acd7f5cb2b717437
3eeeda2ed7f892826b257cb6a05946458066398b
describe
'1060448' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQW' 'sip-files00173.tif'
6e930853423e9c9358f40c4bb654e92e
e7956f26df65a7259dad31ecf6f95830b478c070
describe
'1082' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQX' 'sip-files00173.txt'
92c3dec212468088aa3c505f0188e3ff
e9c7f38d8d8d2c9bdc221fc93dd333c873cac3b6
describe
'38719' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQY' 'sip-files00173thm.jpg'
825be9cd3631186906033459a4372f86
5ab38f1db492d9064c784227506155feaa63c27a
describe
'127620' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKQZ' 'sip-files00174.jp2'
ddedf6dfc45e4e7a04319e8228daea9c
e216b5079f134313e9a35ba4a65b950143d30d7c
describe
'116084' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRA' 'sip-files00174.jpg'
4412a99feb88985c741a249bb8f0d0a3
3744711dcb1adf572cff177a36521981d3b9754e
describe
'26743' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRB' 'sip-files00174.pro'
42d0ed77aa0d992855eef2474b768f8f
b294d27928f0a98be051bbce27d15ab6210f7c49
describe
'62412' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRC' 'sip-files00174.QC.jpg'
fe08ff97d049c23098e4558ba7ae22e9
3f99500fedd4f10447aa434a59d7397110c3263b
describe
'1044076' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRD' 'sip-files00174.tif'
fd963ee5fce62a168372fa470af31a59
de9f51e279951c6392fde68bbf2b6467762c61b9
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRE' 'sip-files00174.txt'
7fe158b31b7515085a59ea8c57c64e15
8caede58771a5e83a884800d26f39aa592f9eadd
describe
'35520' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRF' 'sip-files00174thm.jpg'
54b1008c9e128203ae80353d4ae7dc5f
baece324d91c8742385f3e7fd7a85fe43f60792f
describe
'124059' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRG' 'sip-files00175.jp2'
12b23806744ebf9da7fc9a223537a2e8
2abbc0838cd4c6e9bd828aa8e8dd48a46261dec7
describe
'144390' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRH' 'sip-files00175.jpg'
ff6e4df814c36c8855ccbebb43d7cc22
ec43f3637e5fef8062fb32fa79675298f751ba0c
describe
'25643' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRI' 'sip-files00175.pro'
8dd90a8793a2989ead45f776e72f0356
4da4ad211b32508bcd361250ab8f8b808fa960a9
describe
'74830' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRJ' 'sip-files00175.QC.jpg'
4b190a0abade44b1a82c3f720531508f
39092fe7f339f34848f9e611c563b5cf54c16d33
describe
'1016012' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRK' 'sip-files00175.tif'
5eb7b62f95d160299a70d30f33b4fc05
21b5028002f7d8e48db6ba72ac605fd9daa0fa3b
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRL' 'sip-files00175.txt'
0081dac4290bb527559adf94816694bf
8cacbba18a88558e4e1f0d7adcf313a940ae73b9
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRM' 'sip-files00175thm.jpg'
1fae6cad5aee84869407f21359b42d80
f06ab15a348ca84df1d6b2c07941cf9961dd95e9
'2012-04-18T05:29:53-04:00'
describe
'128909' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRN' 'sip-files00176.jp2'
511b877ff0119e10dc761aba3e94c2bd
9ff10bc773020f3e2743ff93882c531997e596e2
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRO' 'sip-files00176.jpg'
017dce7c34d965d0ce9b110502bcd386
e5f4f0d9ef9fe4d1a86ef498d8073fb7a4f2307d
describe
'28189' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRP' 'sip-files00176.pro'
320a2c1c16b96de8d05415016933ce17
ef4cc41dd4568a5d74f8d6ef72a595fc7440ead9
describe
'65632' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRQ' 'sip-files00176.QC.jpg'
4189af46af037a0a3b94b8fcd6818e9f
4e451eb8a5aeaa73f48582ab0cbfaf08b1af11c0
describe
'1054028' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRR' 'sip-files00176.tif'
edb4d98971c407d87f8d7eb2a0bd3635
a64c4d4a31a26b02f221f304274cadc8fe5c90f7
'2012-04-18T05:26:19-04:00'
describe
'1196' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRS' 'sip-files00176.txt'
49894752b45772fa4de087b59a2ef41a
f2c618a81b33f792525b4a504d7b35ed9271c48c
describe
'36067' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRT' 'sip-files00176thm.jpg'
398502f6cc73c139e543b397df020652
7b6c5ba46840febcd8e6e242e2102febbf1a883b
describe
'126596' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRU' 'sip-files00177.jp2'
c9debd9fcb31c983f4e76c9bbcea937b
0bdcf0189f7458194493ee208d5256587bb1e0dc
describe
'153990' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRV' 'sip-files00177.jpg'
f578789e1e4a3e3cbbce38f3dbf55fec
fc31f40fe8b3c5434d14b02eb11c27ba79372cdc
describe
'28380' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRW' 'sip-files00177.pro'
ae0f0172c00172de460a1ea3bda89db1
49095863a0c6097b07577c57c8e9de3b9d7aaa28
describe
'78611' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRX' 'sip-files00177.QC.jpg'
6e3c6c2733d4a19e6eb7138d02f50114
28546f2d2862cb6d68ee0e08e694baa167c915dc
describe
'1036412' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRY' 'sip-files00177.tif'
02df1ed4af062cc87868f3f2ece86d18
45c1789eb25286915604997c93a41996339ea407
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKRZ' 'sip-files00177.txt'
5e979a97f38e2729355692180c1af092
06fafed23a12ab3afba0d638fcaff5a13d5901c0
describe
'40066' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSA' 'sip-files00177thm.jpg'
64ce59d2c6777e55e445be18e11938f3
0e12caa8fb73f9f89518e4f619cfeb230e5e0467
describe
'123281' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSB' 'sip-files00178.jp2'
fbeeaf759ba38e192bfb09f3746feef5
10240870fe63a652aeaa0b76ab023f8937a9ad63
describe
'124663' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSC' 'sip-files00178.jpg'
cd281ff92093728dc55259cfa156fe22
8216e57c71a235de1b64505ab2eaab6047c82e3d
describe
'29145' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSD' 'sip-files00178.pro'
943d7476fe9b6c7360071cbfe55a8f9c
c4d4575b20fd3039d209224826bc5473c0d990b8
'2012-04-18T05:26:00-04:00'
describe
'66237' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSE' 'sip-files00178.QC.jpg'
337777414e767522bb45a1f177bbcd9d
12187cac7bbeea27884081c570bb668a1d50638b
describe
'1009448' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSF' 'sip-files00178.tif'
eb4974a2702793d09f497a1f3c6b362e
4cef3b4403215110afbfabb6b29a162e2e439990
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSG' 'sip-files00178.txt'
2bc0cacb4cc44c24dc7df77f5d9fb8e8
3618410a8d49fa8df04d7058b8311eb390b99c7c
describe
'36675' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSH' 'sip-files00178thm.jpg'
73fb1746e82d0499a91f1292936b0cd7
0f18eb2c43824ce7df72cfcb8da8aea20b55ee1b
describe
'130427' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSI' 'sip-files00179.jp2'
5702ee772f81c098d5cec49ea456c357
25fe747c265fd5914f8ad31fce38243af37b66f2
'2012-04-18T05:24:23-04:00'
describe
'104595' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSJ' 'sip-files00179.jpg'
123e3c5671d3f31c261d59ec8bae1ac8
5b978df4d837a580a7a72c627862f35227a7109d
describe
'23227' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSK' 'sip-files00179.pro'
8f83a12a341b6b99c613f3c4cac03d9c
802a4304d2873cf191225423735ea4c6bc6b80e0
describe
'58237' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSL' 'sip-files00179.QC.jpg'
b67e1cce2e55bedec2855eaa003fd00e
ab5b2805412829d97bf87628f717f97920e81377
describe
'1066616' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSM' 'sip-files00179.tif'
1bd665e3816af971162bc4fea51998a6
44c8ce386fb47a12217f6582fba57b86d07d7a6c
describe
'1004' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSN' 'sip-files00179.txt'
c6517d4fdfb3850fe8f76cb74a6ea389
620d4e0824f0ac11508869f239dbad6b350ecb93
describe
'33588' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSO' 'sip-files00179thm.jpg'
d9dda5e134b11ee2365b3aa3ff85e6e5
d0ceb4b09a495696386168e3db2eb50b453870d5
describe
'127184' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSP' 'sip-files00180.jp2'
3feae32c7d0239f1dedb18a81ad2f8fb
2c154ab3c81e8f457395d8253b7d17feda07533a
describe
'124616' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSQ' 'sip-files00180.jpg'
ccdb30e80265f6a39449e615b722a639
5c3459d2bbbb3de94433f84e3559c1c9402dc65e
describe
'25487' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSR' 'sip-files00180.pro'
f3afa540ca970c53f3f4406e3431f8b1
17884143243917c7245cbb12f48d25939fb7d72d
'2012-04-18T05:31:15-04:00'
describe
'63375' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSS' 'sip-files00180.QC.jpg'
f34364cd45d5b98aa1ddbfa1ea298157
faca2121ee3bf0e33364dc58454b9918783447fc
describe
'1039684' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKST' 'sip-files00180.tif'
fc1bbac688b2a86ca2d95f751a9e5ac1
bf2d1c218ea0777d5891b009474ad43804725167
describe
'1230' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSU' 'sip-files00180.txt'
a0f66c2772b733fbb433845e63977f3e
f87fef1ec0da943f857d47f83b6ee4ce58ec0a50
'2012-04-18T05:29:41-04:00'
describe
'35344' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSV' 'sip-files00180thm.jpg'
3654946b16762151d13f1731243b32e3
1ae7ac78ce30edd75f30938110372f4d36ed7031
describe
'123466' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSW' 'sip-files00181.jp2'
c561d35ca1d765dfca05652bcbe27d80
8d4914f87d64f0d6e76610e1ccf28ed8b05de58a
describe
'140053' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSX' 'sip-files00181.jpg'
298d7a2f4e20d609ac18d5e54ff7d681
c24cc98c0e17b8981681d1f0986174e7ee3ca600
describe
'25195' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSY' 'sip-files00181.pro'
e996731fed6e8f4ccba427992c0e6bef
c6c8916b80c6556590b9656b5cff33aa8b50bd6e
describe
'71974' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKSZ' 'sip-files00181.QC.jpg'
6549536a90ccff209f6cd1dccbe43029
b797f578752cf64e4f332cb44968fc2b7a586b77
describe
'1011044' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTA' 'sip-files00181.tif'
4938e677bb8b297f28ec2bfc70f05248
36d520c77bb034b0497828c5ef3c188d2208635f
describe
'1069' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTB' 'sip-files00181.txt'
26f3aaceb5c917ee313e071f2c0241e2
b08916572154fa5080dda65f7033fb163ce327b7
describe
'39171' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTC' 'sip-files00181thm.jpg'
7addef5ced298d7a83bdb6b195ff6fb3
78210c512cbc7883af904807007b8909ac69e8b2
describe
'130727' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTD' 'sip-files00182.jp2'
2d73115e7021f806241bef597b9b1967
d6ed1b90cbb4312f51aba570aba32e3437e024fd
describe
'145027' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTE' 'sip-files00182.jpg'
f5efecddd0f00336f45aec2906708de7
5eb433cd8473b7fda9d26fbc93918d838b1c17ae
describe
'26687' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTF' 'sip-files00182.pro'
3d74f0071894b008a1aba9bd8f5cf89a
bbb4ea507eb091b6a48c9be2d3d58e135948df10
describe
'74581' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTG' 'sip-files00182.QC.jpg'
c1ec044f3ff47c334ac6bbe2bcbfab71
7444a7195c4b0a1ef5c7a4fc802c683362ae7f42
'2012-04-18T05:27:58-04:00'
describe
'1068944' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTH' 'sip-files00182.tif'
c72607779a905dd9a4e1acf40dd4f8e8
fc643e161ec1344e92dfdd66f5ead4e66930b19a
describe
'1147' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTI' 'sip-files00182.txt'
297ccb88732b2082bbe6fd2dcfedabff
6a0bc39dc3480cfd9900bcd43a79f698df474edb
describe
'38737' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTJ' 'sip-files00182thm.jpg'
407ed19372da2db27bc613f692760a8d
ee78dc312cfa790f78299f9cdd75fe6011b91c95
describe
'122850' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTK' 'sip-files00183.jp2'
f2f6f142c431b026334af23bb7fe04e0
142ff9cb8373799b5d988d9267511ada66734193
describe
'152286' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTL' 'sip-files00183.jpg'
64d723163c5addecb7c7dfe3f72d0c2d
197a0933c37a373e6991285bca1293a952142a08
describe
'27667' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTM' 'sip-files00183.pro'
93b4c88c39d0c00fb24d23a2c267c2af
2ef66bea09c18cfa6cd2fd1750918dd6d6045dca
describe
'78499' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTN' 'sip-files00183.QC.jpg'
2be484daa8d6673b6031e6aeea322ea8
fb3e51ee20b37b7d61a2e83c6731cdd007097820
describe
'1006372' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTO' 'sip-files00183.tif'
dbde44ae8d516af39463292ce2e7fae2
32ea667ac6cc82346aead7a02776f32ca751d4e7
describe
'1159' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTP' 'sip-files00183.txt'
c770defa1c53590c4a1c9f3d544f4e92
c97367058c6445e4d00bf8992238f7d4275c8db6
describe
'39395' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTQ' 'sip-files00183thm.jpg'
532e87ad313c92e72693e151abd27e28
e62c5628c5cd7bedb7b52fac3f2fe9e3f9e1e925
'2012-04-18T05:30:32-04:00'
describe
'121091' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTR' 'sip-files00184.jp2'
55ffcdf438dab5026157365938ea98b6
144c15666d5c268e86a4a91d6a25e44646001aae
describe
'150431' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTS' 'sip-files00184.jpg'
a8fbfb91af79103b3ad527eba4e6bab4
0fa3243ded4358ce12f6ed90c8698d588539a2b6
describe
'27231' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTT' 'sip-files00184.pro'
79ea3610b34e126ba128ff94a79628f2
1acedffb1cd85f5577f87d192a07d8d88764003c
'2012-04-18T05:28:52-04:00'
describe
'76087' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTU' 'sip-files00184.QC.jpg'
0026d60e807dc8f2bfd6da97b899ef9a
e25bc5dec293e1e4be1d3ea98c302a34f1d7b13b
describe
'992172' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTV' 'sip-files00184.tif'
a49f356b3397c887a039d26081278b63
c7c2382eb00c9b0b7c4459d7ffd1a4a5c83865fa
describe
'1169' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTW' 'sip-files00184.txt'
391500bae096f15987f48a2c6673ebd1
ada55888fe01590c691dd73bb99e0021fb5ebfff
describe
'40040' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTX' 'sip-files00184thm.jpg'
5a196a7cf03a3e5e633494f30178ee5c
5312d4894800065f2c65b3db5b05ad157032ae99
describe
'116229' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTY' 'sip-files00185.jp2'
0e06948e2934e88c80ba2c05948f3b32
fb138db1a985eeef5703105267956f4e66d70c58
describe
'140763' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKTZ' 'sip-files00185.jpg'
afd575b68e3e1d772fc1e72fa968c324
80a639a0f944c91894b96d801c1ec8ca6f356df6
describe
'24626' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUA' 'sip-files00185.pro'
c2725a1c85605f65e073a15e0dd9e8be
b0bec6bf68176980a57b3113f7d94dc75cb04371
'2012-04-18T05:20:23-04:00'
describe
'73058' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUB' 'sip-files00185.QC.jpg'
b13babfd0803d8576a3ac71edb50f198
845a26b8c1c100ab9086c195d7398c72239c36b6
'2012-04-18T05:21:34-04:00'
describe
'952932' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUC' 'sip-files00185.tif'
463a4ee266aa479308fd0fd3b2158899
804e40beed52723178f426b138c6a6b630a5093e
'2012-04-18T05:20:34-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUD' 'sip-files00185.txt'
d17eeba47f60187c7326fb5e7a2d3a44
d35572439be41199d7bee97705e221ee056f0d07
describe
'40745' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUE' 'sip-files00185thm.jpg'
55d605f8223dcfe0153ca91ff20583b5
8d20ee91788c0bd0b3987d0e959e533a882eeaee
describe
'119135' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUF' 'sip-files00186.jp2'
5c521326b52c5c7badf8c6c0680642a8
460c93ee30b6fda69130d808b0a5000c11b4521b
describe
'141289' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUG' 'sip-files00186.jpg'
6046c02f9b026e764ed54563472fe71f
b7736431028cfe68b8893eb0d793380ff521c5ec
'2012-04-18T05:29:24-04:00'
describe
'24700' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUH' 'sip-files00186.pro'
503dcf6179771958532b11fd104ec28f
bcdee882879b6f1738061ebe26c8eaed1942d13f
describe
'72130' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUI' 'sip-files00186.QC.jpg'
54475d93643d37d036ec64753d66b877
a66f7a7cca05057505ea60eadaa2dc6a224f8e81
describe
'976036' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUJ' 'sip-files00186.tif'
6b1e1455f49f717c35c7506d9cf4a9f8
d0dacb34123bba41f051dcaeaa4ef342d6e400ec
describe
'1072' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUK' 'sip-files00186.txt'
300beea18a7664ae55dc5a9a6fe6d160
4626a50434901a1a57f0d866b1317126bfbd5242
describe
'40000' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUL' 'sip-files00186thm.jpg'
d1dfed6dd1234d29a73f3f1a6f2fbf4a
4ac6fe9fb5613385c3e75f6eb5bf2c1a0a2a92c5
describe
'114785' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUM' 'sip-files00187.jp2'
510c73ae9dd56dbddd87eae9cb33f3aa
b81088032b01413a63d3153505ca11ee85ff252a
describe
'146108' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUN' 'sip-files00187.jpg'
bf81f8c5eee033b0f0f1200dca435dd3
a94ef7a29d952a0c26b3ce3f6c7fdb0c12fe5597
describe
'26958' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUO' 'sip-files00187.pro'
2fc027da56691e443720e5f719f760d5
bd9dd7c69e4015e86992cccc9ed076413f6f00c4
describe
'73570' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUP' 'sip-files00187.QC.jpg'
1e61bcb1505b14b90bdba361b1fe22dd
e8f738594718605c878acc3cf0bcd52c66c15f78
describe
'941096' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUQ' 'sip-files00187.tif'
58a8435705618bf7dba0acd2485088fc
7aec915a0aa4496c640dc3937415a5366c3d4368
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUR' 'sip-files00187.txt'
b60091edf9a340dd7a78779031c84c52
254a2dac63dc86491615c653f70bd1e86fb231e0
'2012-04-18T05:28:32-04:00'
describe
'41899' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUS' 'sip-files00187thm.jpg'
51a4d1fc4f8cd49ed30cc1edff79e812
300e3abbf40685e8ef24e33465de39b98fccbe5d
describe
'130817' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUT' 'sip-files00188.jp2'
b9327c5a7f0137f0b68f3597e55e0a09
507474a5e055a1a0db11142e40d99f17840a81b0
describe
'137207' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUU' 'sip-files00188.jpg'
cd1b14c41e14de33aa4e83155b50f1b6
cdde33f42b6a432741931f3a3503a7589c754092
describe
'24786' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUV' 'sip-files00188.pro'
6f440ddb3f14c5321d867f03a8e29c3c
a729d3aaa21dee8483ef36ee45cdb966f72567a2
describe
'71206' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUW' 'sip-files00188.QC.jpg'
cd47c57c51c3f7799a22c04268073c63
7fc7b796dcab4beba1e1e215576df7b21c3524f6
describe
'1069540' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUX' 'sip-files00188.tif'
dcd0aa0869495867a5671140854b444a
008f9e0c0cf4d97183a9a3687549b0695c95c16f
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUY' 'sip-files00188.txt'
e707c8e552f531e09bfce517ffc2553d
4254a52d4da4b8927efb1da8cf6e7bb28f98d0ce
describe
'36839' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKUZ' 'sip-files00188thm.jpg'
22f5c332b03b92e248f538318ba8ddea
b143e1b0cd4d5559f66fe5f4475474acc015d38b
describe
'118993' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVA' 'sip-files00189.jp2'
b12f88b4b490bc38c0cf4543144ede38
e48ddba22ee9d6a6fef4077422360e7038bd442b
describe
'143872' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVB' 'sip-files00189.jpg'
d6d887b5c48eb1db9d45b336e8a96661
a12c1fc4c43007771bacafd9a04bc3eeec1da3f5
describe
'25963' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVC' 'sip-files00189.pro'
cfd1f0448537071494fe96b17be13aea
0caaf8fc06437f2fad7145bd54cda0be15753cb2
describe
'73618' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVD' 'sip-files00189.QC.jpg'
83da44c8fd2d45cf2756990b0e43499d
00d41e32fe835f2b3115145f3bec60c296261289
'2012-04-18T05:29:00-04:00'
describe
'975204' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVE' 'sip-files00189.tif'
b8145252144cbb18e371942a9a525025
30d5e868acbb53589a958743ff8ed4be427d86cb
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVF' 'sip-files00189.txt'
49e94cd8748f6fc17a23b0e24b6cc7f0
671c5111aad3053ef7f4732b0d7b597ce5d23fd6
describe
'40535' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVG' 'sip-files00189thm.jpg'
e43d2248bf7fb14d62e9391fd2849c8b
59f09cb59b08897c70eebfcb546879051ef415d1
describe
'120839' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVH' 'sip-files00190.jp2'
b5e4634fc26075a4f6344b8a4b9f9c6a
23c930f7e7ff5afdcdc33e4945ee5d1913d837fd
describe
'151895' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVI' 'sip-files00190.jpg'
c97796ef7be3971ce65760536cc2af7d
488ce4779a1acad5da245915d544fec3c217c71a
describe
'27272' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVJ' 'sip-files00190.pro'
6dee1b256f4b8a393def54b90e910522
24bd656f78698744222da61ac8e7185ba54138ca
'2012-04-18T05:22:26-04:00'
describe
'76413' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVK' 'sip-files00190.QC.jpg'
f559e439e5a47437e821e7648ad04166
6d2965d19aa86abd528a7aa780b56e059e93938f
describe
'989944' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVL' 'sip-files00190.tif'
899e3bd79f957a25ad9a72cf4360ea58
6811491b61ab65036cacd6922ff61c4b4e771683
describe
'1164' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVM' 'sip-files00190.txt'
471fb4f374ee00871de7027ccf228a94
b43d0c30d2418db30545630d785ea968bb931ad8
describe
'40835' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVN' 'sip-files00190thm.jpg'
5b7b338a025f86b6181b84012e00431a
4174ae42aa7e5c7d19cdd0e749cc19e4176a43ac
'2012-04-18T05:21:33-04:00'
describe
'109242' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVO' 'sip-files00191.jp2'
e8f9d1d83d0b068bfa30774033038cf6
300e7d5e620a99b6015c630c5b972d67cd8f54fc
describe
'165326' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVP' 'sip-files00191.jpg'
f3dc76428c35dc9ae7684e58bac6537d
470af31a01cf7ee9b9f2e31da065d92a207453a5
describe
'29158' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVQ' 'sip-files00191.pro'
96ae742964fb5a14adf9e9ea359c3ebd
35b51842efd2b57c5a079f0fe0d1ea510bf1d31e
describe
'84950' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVR' 'sip-files00191.QC.jpg'
8fb297929e24c9c5ce7e8da1c2354133
81dd6fe3a838648cdba32b409611214511bedda5
describe
'898288' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVS' 'sip-files00191.tif'
922fab335ebf70e1b105416bd1a7b9b3
ffbe8a96824cb8f39002ebf0f9faf3c827f735d7
describe
'1235' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVT' 'sip-files00191.txt'
4c47577c8c159439a3e46713e9f45c5e
e1e3a48088e5059fb81dda78b31b6389524c32a6
describe
'43237' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVU' 'sip-files00191thm.jpg'
bdfc8d3e1feba4838ea3db3f46622d80
2a67a1087d8e65ec5a31f0c4f6513876d0f01dc3
describe
'121324' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVV' 'sip-files00192.jp2'
449d85b917524bbc050042e115a6fdfc
c6c7468c495e69ad401bf7dc400d2f1ed1cb4683
describe
'156521' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVW' 'sip-files00192.jpg'
9ac4d0126b04d065895f3b39cae5f706
5b0f961a7b835f013925c1ff06cbb2e22e01ad1b
describe
'27936' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVX' 'sip-files00192.pro'
fa56022afcd354e0f53997cc9bcbec4c
799006693278ecdefd7d0a07fb52a047fe32858d
describe
'80152' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVY' 'sip-files00192.QC.jpg'
279d008f43304e3dff5e078ff88c6240
c72681a6d752a51f0b5b2390a31aca1b127cee34
describe
'993976' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKVZ' 'sip-files00192.tif'
6941b7147e06e6f9bb93149ab5ba8fa0
c2e8e5b63b4271f571aa3e26fd8c3a96c04fde93
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWA' 'sip-files00192.txt'
bfdc91aa0c9ac77900ad7b7f4fb1e2d2
953b90658b746e9a57704adb8f5a578d2eadc277
describe
'40152' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWB' 'sip-files00192thm.jpg'
eedf4451c09854688edab36a69ede6d4
e634fed186665305c1c309b514a9dd35f80e2a10
describe
'106166' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWC' 'sip-files00193.jp2'
32dc95e10d703b0519a5641c659275a8
9bb0997d37b75e60d6c2530070984e659886751c
describe
'164439' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWD' 'sip-files00193.jpg'
aba994de1ea8dfa8c5be3e82e6398082
a4ba50ec7ab50e566fa6a0ebd380f983402c1e8e
describe
'28597' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWE' 'sip-files00193.pro'
0b1368e60542a2b91e968d40d52632dd
d5f70e2e910e91bf98679029a9218a809a9ec360
describe
'79693' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWF' 'sip-files00193.QC.jpg'
3ae5f7509071d6138791cb77acd31ce7
96a5ae5922ef49dd05e5f8d4a65fee0cb4436b46
describe
'873220' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWG' 'sip-files00193.tif'
b4a911c0ce8e4920db2c845600e842f5
cb7986ec39c96c463d3fafc9c1898a5887efb1fd
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWH' 'sip-files00193.txt'
0ff9b1eb422ab8ea19c2199db697d5ac
d161d4179b1c5b62a37cc17bb701018c27716994
describe
'44213' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWI' 'sip-files00193thm.jpg'
abdbc912b09589863a529569d01bc369
4eab362962b420f4e09398a35f93820c6424bf90
describe
'115676' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWJ' 'sip-files00194.jp2'
a6c4b33969a55b680f0da21629d6883d
e1da1a074481614e90538a7c92fbaaabca0a4f80
describe
'162608' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWK' 'sip-files00194.jpg'
9e307c504b2e104099b8bb4544dd7107
2d60bdfb2d53e30508784a2d6fd2c47dbbbbabad
describe
'29307' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWL' 'sip-files00194.pro'
6239fb1bbb3122269a43cafbf72e3dc9
8aa377c69787dd7ea1794b163ac731e0823c8ec9
describe
'80594' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWM' 'sip-files00194.QC.jpg'
fcc60137ba922db4291dc72e6946fb0d
14b3a3133b3e0085a7bd1fcf6a98fe3def0469b6
describe
'949512' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWN' 'sip-files00194.tif'
e268e319951673a3f13ad307ab2a7771
32e8caa727e7de37be4a0b52246ba7b893fbe962
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWO' 'sip-files00194.txt'
2987d2fbf3313b733ab48101b356d9f3
4cdf3ec55a78bb7d260b5043515fb3dae2ce9cce
describe
'42243' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWP' 'sip-files00194thm.jpg'
ef10acf5746e4b63c4a6f82613aa1c56
ff3d4bbc4861335fd5f0671a87280b998a31e2b3
'2012-04-18T05:23:26-04:00'
describe
'115973' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWQ' 'sip-files00195.jp2'
0fae4a960fe556007ff322ae72c28c0b
56278d79ae9397c831b7ae0318232a77c76b0cd7
describe
'156226' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWR' 'sip-files00195.jpg'
14d00e95b135265bba25d28ecce4acb5
cafca3e62342d0f2a595d29a7a9c7d525f0cb882
describe
'28391' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWS' 'sip-files00195.pro'
6d197859d337536602af74cc88524385
29532ad506f05aeae997ee6d36a8c817e28c919b
describe
'79087' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWT' 'sip-files00195.QC.jpg'
091ed58034000c3a1e0c3ed2ce2c85a1
c1c1fde35610a6b1f1a1f488f3fea6d2bfb28ee7
'2012-04-18T05:20:52-04:00'
describe
'951624' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWU' 'sip-files00195.tif'
983aabef8e3067dffda3b5735e8adc2a
07e84bdf970abf87ab796f7df57ee10c75abfdaf
describe
'1197' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWV' 'sip-files00195.txt'
3339fd3bc554fc7c55e7412b8243b1b9
be773fb28f0f89f1c9afe568e771bf7a62bc0a4d
describe
'42075' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWW' 'sip-files00195thm.jpg'
21d061b4aea4a99d155e7105da2810fc
6513a0e6615bd4d602d5ef15122374f652a5ac4c
describe
'120169' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWX' 'sip-files00196.jp2'
ae79cfac66e1039d447b4b76de5840f2
1d1b2a3b03c99b6248687ac5464822d2c5baaea1
describe
'156200' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWY' 'sip-files00196.jpg'
c0570033a929434db0b5760cd5e07b24
db20f49430a61f23e363aff8c0d2b2b98af76959
describe
'28376' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKWZ' 'sip-files00196.pro'
c6c19d142a7dfc232ede584ca5c36258
0ba8e528eb270f4fa22017a83ee6b1b0a6f22cb8
describe
'76886' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXA' 'sip-files00196.QC.jpg'
495277c1f15cc7fe3ee1f3c619e6b7b2
08eaf262ed111b773edc298ab623154280391a28
describe
'985048' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXB' 'sip-files00196.tif'
128ad49c3f1601493316bf39c3f0f248
363d18d24e25b8717229b4c626d49301d248c62a
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXC' 'sip-files00196.txt'
96c9edf844b5b0024a90def64df314d7
5803a2356b6f578baa42f4424bb660185d9c2e41
describe
'40695' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXD' 'sip-files00196thm.jpg'
c9223532bdec253d6c12d3332836eb2e
712e4f837cb393f0dd126de21e603c7129e272e1
'2012-04-18T05:26:12-04:00'
describe
'114975' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXE' 'sip-files00197.jp2'
cee48e03496f92a2b785c3ff77eedc15
c51c058b821aace24c04d84e782ef79c24d93635
describe
'158685' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXF' 'sip-files00197.jpg'
8faa1d3c76aec57c4576ad97e0a6c96b
fdfed962bf6b2390c60fe41cf57848b9febe959d
'2012-04-18T05:22:47-04:00'
describe
'29037' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXG' 'sip-files00197.pro'
f0e2375aef3fbba22ad48bed4e2383c7
d1a9b277947499617ea3797099386021be82199f
describe
'78616' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXH' 'sip-files00197.QC.jpg'
320c230bfa064740d2491492477d2caf
90e156522b1c9e45644c70934dcd2bd132f9de77
'2012-04-18T05:26:55-04:00'
describe
'943124' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXI' 'sip-files00197.tif'
25bbac1e582881aacb8710718c196d7c
4742ec567b4543c5b5aab3234c00d548b589d19f
describe
'1225' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXJ' 'sip-files00197.txt'
a2c2bf4a9717cd83cff6deba9c968282
d12888d1190ce68b050994d85aefff99f426ed81
describe
'42018' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXK' 'sip-files00197thm.jpg'
b88255a2950b0cb223218c57f6db20fa
0ed4d7e8bc9bb966262dac9a7a43271d2971f168
describe
'123766' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXL' 'sip-files00198.jp2'
e59d9e22d17363839a9f0255fc19df91
79c4344aefe939ad225cb37cdad8ace5097bb62f
describe
'159498' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXM' 'sip-files00198.jpg'
6ea55cebab9e265c253f50cdacd2b637
a7d3bb89b1dde340b637be1f08c1e608adc9db54
describe
'28556' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXN' 'sip-files00198.pro'
7ef7c9411dae1f1480a5260063ccc6f2
ea82e635bb0e6a0822bd0063b30223665b86fc6e
describe
'77758' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXO' 'sip-files00198.QC.jpg'
e9a95cb1ce79b2d9966e7885876bbf65
8ef5f94ee86537303f068a77e3c937fc533885e0
'2012-04-18T05:25:26-04:00'
describe
'1013928' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXP' 'sip-files00198.tif'
5fc7c79ceea84141111c6a093b94ab01
e82c13da74a4c8ba54e45d71bbaf632716ccec19
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXQ' 'sip-files00198.txt'
94262116060fba10f97a03d661d4c9d2
960d99ade7faed55f19aa5bdc5fb0d40db3c7fa5
describe
'40596' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXR' 'sip-files00198thm.jpg'
a9a727b5ba00717b5cb111dbbd09821a
fb05f46adddb94a8af4333988829f9b4d90621d4
describe
'114934' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXS' 'sip-files00199.jp2'
9acfbdbff4e011113b98ea000e73ee6e
d9e674202ec72cedf078c3e0c3bfdd5f1098ad2c
describe
'152946' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXT' 'sip-files00199.jpg'
a4092f8516dedc533a26f7c555d33d8f
ad16e993356803b90bd96eb7ad2c19f5c4e765d9
describe
'28170' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXU' 'sip-files00199.pro'
e3698792a4672c1ff8705943faed215a
98b4e1e7755ec8da82b287063babe7f60fdc01ac
describe
'77092' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXV' 'sip-files00199.QC.jpg'
d9449e6566b4da779008579286f021f5
f291ff3d830d23cf44cd6536803fa00e119bf733
describe
'943364' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXW' 'sip-files00199.tif'
fdcc6354292f09b5e94485b7fd801cc6
fa08cced43f2c750cbd52a845b2b52a1094d62e9
'2012-04-18T05:29:59-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXX' 'sip-files00199.txt'
c5656429ab574c9909774115e9dc62e2
8ed18aacff5aa36c8250f94bd949a1e6ba59a53c
describe
'42317' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXY' 'sip-files00199thm.jpg'
ba9709f76713b2a42b7cb3b3a83dc267
91ff42a10849c598b4c2234a1ac3cc9865f70b05
describe
'120337' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKXZ' 'sip-files00200.jp2'
8da160c6d7e0c1fc503d865266e754fa
623fad2cc8971ed15ad414805d89abcf1b7a718b
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYA' 'sip-files00200.jpg'
3fdcd814611347b86c506e42a069056d
0e0f1bb03d63b524684ab90c692b508c5b552df1
describe
'25142' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYB' 'sip-files00200.pro'
2fdacfd114c13b473a546af160f68a83
2f61b36616292b97f4d4fb81240eca035803573f
describe
'74722' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYC' 'sip-files00200.QC.jpg'
bef777bffa154ef369e35595cfe36ec0
d55657e9dabd0475ebd8c4e34f8e551b54b65f87
'2012-04-18T05:24:44-04:00'
describe
'986592' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYD' 'sip-files00200.tif'
dd6956bda57d227fac37920f139a5dfa
e77e9267aac16d28638cb6d7812bf1f54c83ada9
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYE' 'sip-files00200.txt'
0d1287191f5ab112c7fd305ea9909a0a
3a89237b09bc997307ffcae6391eb7d45838fb2b
describe
'39800' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYF' 'sip-files00200thm.jpg'
b740e81c37348b370f3c616d7fdb0bea
7741d884480dc6ce4d30575dae80c277e7d26b94
describe
'127350' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYG' 'sip-files00201.jp2'
2ffb4abcbfe1a4ff45b69e025dc81793
50040047656aa8c90ce001d3ca59daacaad507e0
describe
'164653' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYH' 'sip-files00201.jpg'
5b278706510dc8c28d3f99a837ea98d2
2d5ced7988d2c10a93a90696a04a3bfad4e30c22
describe
'25504' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYI' 'sip-files00201.pro'
b5cd9055da9333b4c4eeea3264378a53
b9c91f3d6e1307303b29cf0251528b516bb8aa6d
describe
'77792' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYJ' 'sip-files00201.QC.jpg'
91ad0a2ba7fd21a200b6716f9e7604e9
d524181f63c6c0f3b2720a7a10c94eb0c5ed9646
'2012-04-18T05:28:06-04:00'
describe
'1043808' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYK' 'sip-files00201.tif'
702f2b60844a9c7e39eeebae6bc7b2b3
77ab8189cdbcd9ce1334d6aaaeb1923f6a653cc9
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYL' 'sip-files00201.txt'
5651b7b8059f8a9013c899b572646b7f
bd213db179dc9ef8e27a6ac3e58fe2ed82dc9026
describe
'40865' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYM' 'sip-files00201thm.jpg'
1f0c0d08ad6e50c9b0b68ae35651d67e
369bad48c1f251ce7f39e59aeb3dc19b62aa2779
describe
'124119' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYN' 'sip-files00202.jp2'
788be3e1ee63bb3768dcd4fff9dd68c7
2ae2aa9e0fd8c0fae13058731e5a1675113fc8a4
describe
'127160' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYO' 'sip-files00202.jpg'
875f3d93ecb20194aca7bb1cf539be20
ed0f85e7019d9fe6002d58d3357641fcabd011d5
describe
'24932' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYP' 'sip-files00202.pro'
f1f0bd9c09678cc51b8080b4e6ff4716
2211a27efbf069c74d95cdd8926c9b32d046d0ac
describe
'65733' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYQ' 'sip-files00202.QC.jpg'
54ea508bac90435ae610d94764f47c7d
2921dc7e73119cdeebda4b1a71592e1b2eba19e8
describe
'1016276' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYR' 'sip-files00202.tif'
4e579b3b398f779e81aee390741d5d72
6fc9ae728b6a66bc2d627bbd0923d654713f3d09
describe
'1084' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYS' 'sip-files00202.txt'
121c1cba53c3d67230c7caf710b613cb
12908864adbccf8408c4956c0f11ec5591ffe019
describe
'36525' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYT' 'sip-files00202thm.jpg'
35f06fe9e6ea7de9366e4829ed8b9a04
1d3a0657e7cfb52c864a92b82a9b97941795abb4
describe
'130773' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYU' 'sip-files00203.jp2'
604392f000f2d08f7e93336a808f9f2e
0b2492f8ce129bae0b4de521f7ff7ad3b8eaf4f2
describe
'160875' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYV' 'sip-files00203.jpg'
04d3e3d34c95a93f2c1e9b550facf5aa
3e2e8c5fa783f8d62f0ba60e37ec5edf9bbd58b7
describe
'24084' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYW' 'sip-files00203.pro'
d12b6bf96b2fd530f03cfd3b109f99f1
eac06076e2ace85a20826f4f94710edf538c0e65
describe
'76683' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYX' 'sip-files00203.QC.jpg'
d3603aaf5359916fc03c1e654be2812b
2aff6cad20442336e821fa39caeefb9aa7e817c2
describe
'1069640' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYY' 'sip-files00203.tif'
198036002db78abea4f11e07c93a7f35
c16ae18236eb8706d98f32d99f12b6695371131c
describe
'1044' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKYZ' 'sip-files00203.txt'
7ecbd787cc3397eaff2374ce054c2803
45fa338092191976410798a1266fa758d5d5aeec
describe
'38768' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZA' 'sip-files00203thm.jpg'
0793b081a3f09bb87e30b7b216058b49
919bd4f76432b3f1281687dbbe96c63a14b4ae76
describe
'136051' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZB' 'sip-files00204.jp2'
443a25132fb698233a6a5567b2a35189
6a4c85f41360ac67531dae38f98b878fd0b08412
describe
'139806' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZC' 'sip-files00204.jpg'
ef2ce74c0e835d2634a4210a8391c06a
9ee410136d409894a400a4856a889b89bba12f60
'2012-04-18T05:27:50-04:00'
describe
'29106' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZD' 'sip-files00204.pro'
bde85cade83618076ea8635fb7bbc48f
5378c84661f34388648a151d3857ccc5e91120d3
describe
'68276' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZE' 'sip-files00204.QC.jpg'
60f06ea1574ff73a693774654754967f
28b76537bce948143ee65a2413df54a909f23ada
describe
'1111756' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZF' 'sip-files00204.tif'
7aa6d46381f3fe72a9f21632200d1f12
ca9631977f6d0c1732177a44b97f8e26973685a2
describe
'1243' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZG' 'sip-files00204.txt'
d376c2c9d15d4dca0e35f1819f1b7bd8
245bfc9e6306c4b54027a3b0f5a48de7ce1f8213
describe
'35903' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZH' 'sip-files00204thm.jpg'
ea561b9f49d0263f38f5b5b6c28e0f1d
cea4f11c1435607ade686427990fc80d9c184fa7
describe
'133953' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZI' 'sip-files00205.jp2'
55bc1be2b29378e593eff5e33f1bda55
cfab94c5fc0d370bbd804df7441fba2f27473549
describe
'132970' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZJ' 'sip-files00205.jpg'
f1abf27a4578b9db5e0d13eed220441b
3c87509dbb638b2cd0a44b92d564ec8b55a73a96
describe
'27692' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZK' 'sip-files00205.pro'
aac3259fd5691661ddee25cc62cad3b3
292588f6acba6d9a7d8eb496cdb7ed96057f9c4a
describe
'68269' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZL' 'sip-files00205.QC.jpg'
ff56d25c94c6dc79e3877a25acf0efd2
f08a4513b1986aa327fdfbf2a6b5a9c58de5e1fb
describe
'1095048' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZM' 'sip-files00205.tif'
73c75c033df7d4d1cb005eaf37cfcdd5
10b0c83c0cbbafdc89fd4b56db0d4fbbc12e7fdf
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZN' 'sip-files00205.txt'
57729c18cd41118a00f07ed46ca24f51
421076b90cf98a03670673155a0ba676e54303f8
describe
'36160' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZO' 'sip-files00205thm.jpg'
37ab0458d6d57d5347d824b8a67e3531
d31771c46d35aa31d04ecc6294b9217707cfc924
describe
'133726' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZP' 'sip-files00206.jp2'
e742dad8c6afb306b07ba2e02a027d01
efe311be065ad02e2954e47ecf23fbaeaf11b208
describe
'129462' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZQ' 'sip-files00206.jpg'
98d8d2775b8854f60682204720dff8d7
1f7275c5340a6dcfe70ffe2e0a011d1bd3af7606
'2012-04-18T05:30:04-04:00'
describe
'26410' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZR' 'sip-files00206.pro'
4a8909222f6ff2e33982e5ec18ec9bcc
d1c7d79a9f75cc6788dd4162ae4b14e36ae6f698
describe
'66008' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZS' 'sip-files00206.QC.jpg'
07905be1a68d1434d061b99b81c85429
057c480cec40163c92fd7f696682ebee56708314
describe
'1093088' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZT' 'sip-files00206.tif'
f2eab96d280d5c3661ff3586cea52a86
4bdd4e1d26940768ccabb9dcadea56e9da5567cc
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZU' 'sip-files00206.txt'
2f2b0fc86f65a5236049382a866d557b
d562a1574137ae5b8a7cd5ae2332bdc02e07493d
describe
'34893' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZV' 'sip-files00206thm.jpg'
78d7c2219d130db2db79635a7f9f2fc5
2681d7d2274f81438ed169c89563ca956ff809fa
describe
'129718' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZW' 'sip-files00207.jp2'
3cc6b706c83c64cfdeee7bc39475813a
f180bdcc5331eff1e78b5badf9fc776870472f7b
describe
'160085' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZX' 'sip-files00207.jpg'
5a0b9c621e4b4d23b915611d8d28fdf3
4971281e263f6e8f36147a995e9e2526245bccc8
describe
'24747' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZY' 'sip-files00207.pro'
90a54bc6600414524503b3cdd30060a8
2c33585264f1d77d965dbdbc1ca6d5439cdcd374
describe
'76139' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACKZZ' 'sip-files00207.QC.jpg'
bd36314f8e82ad9f9009553690533caa
55152674ac9e1698539b3430ab79dc71f557122a
describe
'1061932' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAA' 'sip-files00207.tif'
a347e5fb93ca6da5752efe97d2f0fb57
c69a638198b7ad0b634a17b0f0f830f5c0319775
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAB' 'sip-files00207.txt'
6d7767cbd70430ffbdf437af48eda9aa
7831f9263a7e75fa02094f5a90d6081326c01481
'2012-04-18T05:27:53-04:00'
describe
'40615' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAC' 'sip-files00207thm.jpg'
99cdfb63d275f535a73e5e1c5b222928
e65030e5293aa2d07239ae31db80dbd8f588a025
describe
'133576' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAD' 'sip-files00208.jp2'
59b585c8a59b8f813ab76e3f2ff81e28
cd836c20f03df8d7a5bb44b688e1ce594769f682
describe
'169459' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAE' 'sip-files00208.jpg'
7897692485b8576f84aeaf8a17a18213
9791c90cd5e8926592a5c4359083740c59fdde63
describe
'26768' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAF' 'sip-files00208.pro'
984cd485c4d1003fe2c43e780c01498d
bdaf198714162fd46419e5ed18087a840b9f6e46
describe
'77592' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAG' 'sip-files00208.QC.jpg'
cd7516866731f1c64f51acf0ba64db3a
02faf228fd555de6c9fc8ad3d97a659760c6a010
describe
'1092632' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAH' 'sip-files00208.tif'
e4c08f8fa8984a8d72f2f74b181611c2
a468d8ebddd164ddad932440c87058c0d037a703
'2012-04-18T05:24:29-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAI' 'sip-files00208.txt'
5810b64d2eee6a8e0e676baf7cc61174
153beee13f4a709029dc8240706d423bcee88cfd
describe
Invalid character
'38695' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAJ' 'sip-files00208thm.jpg'
bcf6e997557324079fe456a6b6feeca6
1e0f2e387062761e859819dda623932810b053f4
describe
'127525' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAK' 'sip-files00209.jp2'
298e760bb9954bb1ad7ba0b6418b7723
9e5c98f605c700af815d7db3d67d418c9540d658
'2012-04-18T05:27:24-04:00'
describe
'127156' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAL' 'sip-files00209.jpg'
77c32c3b5f31a89cd64922e07485e9de
da4d206ccc006408728bdb2d48f82fa5d675a27f
describe
'25456' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAM' 'sip-files00209.pro'
e327a2daf30c59fa33dee387773ce6d2
c6970f8b52975b08eaed247a87b51aedead75235
describe
'66157' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAN' 'sip-files00209.QC.jpg'
3b364b4fcf2809f0cc8b1de6a4cfe022
95408e60c44c1fd557d0e3134a705edcf760a82f
describe
'1044068' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAO' 'sip-files00209.tif'
e482c07c17d477d4790a2bda7b5ee8a2
53b0b5ef344bca3b4b8293e07a6a2b1cfc67c8a1
describe
'1101' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAP' 'sip-files00209.txt'
7b22eda4157bcce096e50133ba8e2418
cf66fb6be8230722b808807d5804bf09270d5360
describe
'37767' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAQ' 'sip-files00209thm.jpg'
fcc959c696647305c66710dc73209ff7
01c86a1ebce7409d2c73d58e2e454a00378f9ff4
describe
'124390' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAR' 'sip-files00210.jp2'
4c73301cec2803633fd564a99cd9b6b7
9759f187b3dc4a3056e364c77e1ce2ee74ddbfd5
describe
'136471' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAS' 'sip-files00210.jpg'
c1350069cf4c3cd577c06d8eecc7b337
175a0cf35a2d38d7c5b912172dc5f141d68c9130
describe
'25893' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAT' 'sip-files00210.pro'
df3416c0c750a84d55eae95f0b32fa60
3c7daad3d009bae2c660e214bec620653bd3c439
describe
'67040' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAU' 'sip-files00210.QC.jpg'
9de1c8888f3beb1e11f5ff2c783cd191
d859b3dc8a38387fb3710ac8ca305c3a33b2adef
describe
'1019296' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAV' 'sip-files00210.tif'
2d77e289659d54e59fdbb47341dbf1c2
440b931d0dd13c575e48c0fb1d7db424620bfd4c
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAW' 'sip-files00210.txt'
03fd8e5b6da20c9b6159626ecfeb79ef
3e81f193804959bb36d76881a13e223ee08c1a15
describe
'36833' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAX' 'sip-files00210thm.jpg'
f8d962632c6e8766fe5b69f22406dba6
d7d0645858992f593d036e80e09e15e43023f96e
'2012-04-18T05:30:35-04:00'
describe
'131525' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAY' 'sip-files00211.jp2'
586f05933461594ebd7103f97b9ced68
62dd83aecd9eaa6c39c0d1e126ac0adb269b2fe9
describe
'130389' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLAZ' 'sip-files00211.jpg'
2c8832de9c65f9b665e9f354eb28fe61
501f22dae7d49baaafef512d2f2af89f7a955cab
'2012-04-18T05:30:00-04:00'
describe
'24107' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBA' 'sip-files00211.pro'
3b3c6884e43849bdb15e4fb7c30699ea
7264b52bcc2d489a247173133021b68c561917c0
describe
'63916' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBB' 'sip-files00211.QC.jpg'
3530d2d67dc322f5239f3be5010ec9c9
49bf7b3267b9aefe14724ea4cf98af9f8d0aa4be
describe
'1075940' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBC' 'sip-files00211.tif'
c5c272085925b0d7ef18afe6e7f677d3
63e4dc13d5121c9acd83f2b88bee7004b8c312f5
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBD' 'sip-files00211.txt'
b84b3f26f922473f397d6189f25e0d7e
b9a215b61e249b713db315fd3040b6f572f0d8e4
describe
'35571' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBE' 'sip-files00211thm.jpg'
cf28f0e15ad92d94093e1f1954078d50
d8fce7b871f3f5c5ee8eb7db2f4d2d63f20fb798
describe
'135014' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBF' 'sip-files00212.jp2'
f0d7907d174734ebeb7cec446846c50d
217a35c764ae390a03ca017c4beeb848760b7993
describe
'139904' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBG' 'sip-files00212.jpg'
4a8e9ead700bfdd6e0b1b3fad1082f61
d9007e1f7734c1e9653aa19e6ade4eea3b09f92c
'2012-04-18T05:23:55-04:00'
describe
'22402' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBH' 'sip-files00212.pro'
680a31902c83a11f3942bf43aad3634e
1b3474e7a4aa95902c029de9a993202ea320a9a8
describe
'68058' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBI' 'sip-files00212.QC.jpg'
fedb712e988f53b821fd2d545c7c4c66
4cbf376840b19618840a6ac9fb291e70870bbdb8
describe
'1103016' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBJ' 'sip-files00212.tif'
246161187bc4dcc7bdfbda981fb78f26
3bef3e9a60b647750818bed44533f356bf55f441
describe
'999' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBK' 'sip-files00212.txt'
18e22f6c256f51b16953be1373d4bc9f
518bfe456b85428810731a280cb333ea34405047
describe
'286821' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBL' 'sip-files00212a.jp2'
a1475daeee323d3832ece933f4e6d0a0
9265f4b9df4ad2324a42565695125b58eaf89ecd
describe
'165448' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBM' 'sip-files00212a.jpg'
d059044354d8d6207d7cab32a544e625
e05d975d4a44a531ee6f4fe8be0895096d024e04
describe
'27512' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBN' 'sip-files00212a.pro'
40994ed2c4ebe6a4174a97b01e44131a
100bec7495d5b28a7e3fa4d8196651eefa3fa045
describe
'74064' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBO' 'sip-files00212a.QC.jpg'
564fb2a6f664b01b7e1a77429e894896
69b368e91adfc02c2101d8a7d603bf832931d518
describe
'2318232' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBP' 'sip-files00212a.tif'
410726c93b92c126bbcbaa098ef768bb
1c6829c1c05f7e5c4d4e4cea1fecb52c306bd1e3
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBQ' 'sip-files00212a.txt'
219aa5c5bbb40c0a67203642377671bd
f597e4420754ef02498d89cf54f3df03c5980fd7
describe
'36221' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBR' 'sip-files00212athm.jpg'
77975736cdeef40214a484ad446f461c
f7d0c0a29262f9550186b79d6b424a2645484d32
describe
'289069' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBS' 'sip-files00212b.jp2'
d695ebfce3e17973327962c0c9ff8ae6
f288782faf3655b50f8c22f3da7a4b5026f16c62
describe
'159598' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBT' 'sip-files00212b.jpg'
f83b8d872b2eb5b4f7bc15bd08322943
bda9ee832284a45a5205ff5c44fe557fa55be8f3
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBU' 'sip-files00212b.pro'
8ebc730d498a9dc7701c670a3af05d66
5319731a3bf91619c033606bea9cda83eb85a5fe
describe
'71579' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBV' 'sip-files00212b.QC.jpg'
de38ec09ea27a57a0f6078af923c895e
b6d19110c64a43932fe7d8035fca7e8c039ef467
describe
'2335544' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBW' 'sip-files00212b.tif'
0e5a47cac07bc7bf110984f84eacf79f
70489eaa6ed0c3f833cce7ecf04f160f69943ffd
describe
'1135' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBX' 'sip-files00212b.txt'
f88b8b2095994731c0aa39bb541f58ce
f83220579af517515e92a9facbed4e1e0bec1c32
describe
'35871' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBY' 'sip-files00212bthm.jpg'
474d2136a7300bc86f22b51c2e016b1a
e6ac9fbd2199c32a5510e0450f48e03644924ec4
describe
'36802' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLBZ' 'sip-files00212thm.jpg'
a1d42202664b5cc33de22b31ee08c89c
63ec2fb970808a39bc54ebb843c66511a88b64f4
describe
'132065' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCA' 'sip-files00213.jp2'
aaa78b7f8082574e9e6809126b593b69
39dd6b3656c0f57a92492426c4df44476b2b1a44
describe
'163271' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCB' 'sip-files00213.jpg'
c5f1f5297cee276a7180bed719b6bdbb
eb2e697d47e42f5c8436aa91c67885d5d44ea706
describe
'27508' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCC' 'sip-files00213.pro'
96ff3399c8f14a89458083648c6610c3
4665543a6fdfd0d8741f319201b7de88a2359c83
describe
'78548' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCD' 'sip-files00213.QC.jpg'
573a72aadc12f839afb93929754bbb57
80cfa3ade990a2f4a0843944ce804e7a095de29f
describe
'1080152' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCE' 'sip-files00213.tif'
0aa4404b1dd262d77973ac61b9d5a6d7
93fcd2ac25dae105a5b632532d79da9c48ae9b06
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCF' 'sip-files00213.txt'
fdf68fc06fe2cf7b614e8ef5888ec4fe
2abf3aa1330e963f07ff877c6de739733fbe8400
describe
'39752' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCG' 'sip-files00213thm.jpg'
5bba99c1a423c5963965f3362cdd11b4
c6f329eacfbf687485ffcaa851792da10e87bd11
describe
'131345' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCH' 'sip-files00214.jp2'
133f73887a8737c801799a3d386891aa
0596dfc66f13b0c925c05a0345b043f9ef25b3f3
describe
'150002' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCI' 'sip-files00214.jpg'
eff8aa66ce57aee4a957b6504323e391
290d0ae51e6d81e1f84a8e2ca739a69e0367b8ab
'2012-04-18T05:23:46-04:00'
describe
'24168' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCJ' 'sip-files00214.pro'
a592f0447cb1704b0299f3ebc48d52ca
1cc301dcb5673e85f137bcfd89cb5be9f5e222cc
describe
'72235' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCK' 'sip-files00214.QC.jpg'
1b591e90847e66549469d139bb59a0d5
a1a47c14cd9521151f2505e9e5f4156030ccb469
describe
'1074192' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCL' 'sip-files00214.tif'
fdd7ec4590b685e409935f9f4cdeabf4
d206f318350ee2fe87bb38a9a90c12b31c8c25fa
describe
'1076' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCM' 'sip-files00214.txt'
2f2af81a8d0acecf96288709e34caf88
557e9f88965362ab9dbcccdd878a62e1a321e729
'2012-04-18T05:24:46-04:00'
describe
'38794' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCN' 'sip-files00214thm.jpg'
57dec07b1609fad5d69f16e67ff6c7bb
905095846c896b8415fad8d39677a83086bbde33
describe
'129180' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCO' 'sip-files00215.jp2'
7493db0fcf73df11f634710084a982b6
1a9102090f905e49f4ae9e523dd05ca84ebf43e5
describe
'140901' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCP' 'sip-files00215.jpg'
af2611af79c8fbdcc24595a7176a7791
d8332f33aac0d3218d67501790e17b66ec202826
describe
'22536' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCQ' 'sip-files00215.pro'
dda2328b4fad959897ebaa4d930317cc
7d6622e646b21a679b384fa556bc6839eecf3faa
'2012-04-18T05:28:12-04:00'
describe
'70122' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCR' 'sip-files00215.QC.jpg'
df459f26e5e77f89dcffd1e78298a5a5
ab7b157eefdd9565932d9df756ce5fe4c9a7cf40
'2012-04-18T05:28:22-04:00'
describe
'1056840' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCS' 'sip-files00215.tif'
52a48fba3015f746a4e9e8d852cbf653
8c60c5f25da431f0629c08565b3f899515eedea1
describe
'979' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCT' 'sip-files00215.txt'
2f24dad03e20ac3b189935212497cd01
4d7237c6bb116ddaeccdcd34089527bb8b8fa1d6
describe
'39185' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCU' 'sip-files00215thm.jpg'
a8c212fc3bf54518d91efabc62f62eca
1f0f82288bb9a7ec52bb61d4993101cf783796a1
describe
'128944' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCV' 'sip-files00216.jp2'
2326759496fedf213db422f47868d2e7
33eb4c66e643670d669afafb85af4cbd702628d4
describe
'162167' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCW' 'sip-files00216.jpg'
c97b3f13b7ccd21573c4d5de2bf9d9e6
1fde037aee056d6de7e6d09384996e4b14c931d6
describe
'25854' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCX' 'sip-files00216.pro'
0d63982b32f94134e65539e7a6611258
edd917eddeb676eebfb944d1c104df5e4d2d8b7d
describe
'78654' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCY' 'sip-files00216.QC.jpg'
74896ff1731a0e17f6b88e32bcf03d6f
bee767062302756976964202c2d45a0fb7ac2d5b
'2012-04-18T05:29:25-04:00'
describe
'1055332' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLCZ' 'sip-files00216.tif'
3a3a7065cc6f8dbb1dc226ea9a64c0cc
ca31809c989e4f2f68fd06da8dd1af3fcf1316f0
describe
'1099' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDA' 'sip-files00216.txt'
4626bc5d2364aef45e3cee6b8e62077d
d05c83d785adcc5a61f56b61d80335194a3f4f8f
'2012-04-18T05:24:27-04:00'
describe
'39366' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDB' 'sip-files00216thm.jpg'
0af3658638acfa668f11453f0b45839a
90964c9b3e218da46fc6a318ad89fc31f5a99de6
describe
'126660' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDC' 'sip-files00217.jp2'
0054bffd2de98086a7771c1370858213
f1f103da6261d9d7b3180887d206b1ed9b92b4d6
'2012-04-18T05:28:58-04:00'
describe
'160299' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDD' 'sip-files00217.jpg'
a836131ee319de512ee6c0498b172023
d91e4cc51a840c24b1067fa88dcbd43a36b9d548
describe
'26794' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDE' 'sip-files00217.pro'
f4249872cabbacb07dac4ff0720e4099
badee8e3965d091e25b48e370da38e8e26cafe89
describe
'78946' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDF' 'sip-files00217.QC.jpg'
e980c09fb961e5e7a89a2974d9e92665
ffbdd8001520303ddc724e6d1dc33b16f73663ba
describe
'1037440' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDG' 'sip-files00217.tif'
bb4d089078f25ae606873a11cd7609d9
4f3c69cb26ad9142d0ac150d2c350858edf7a89e
describe
'1141' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDH' 'sip-files00217.txt'
c2d10290afcf39326240cd0e5325a136
196eccfe5fbf3428089f7dd71ac85914941804d3
describe
'40475' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDI' 'sip-files00217thm.jpg'
0bea5b560421fbfdd81c44a016f1abd8
47f87c492ad4602406d0359342c00fc6deb33a78
describe
'131664' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDJ' 'sip-files00218.jp2'
f94c877592384ac7bf649dac28005915
ff1f44455d288602be9b6f5ed3e52d98367f718f
describe
'165188' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDK' 'sip-files00218.jpg'
9640bdf9051070d48bf785b867937282
0c14d41f14f2434cfe18225f22c586f6657952c2
describe
'25683' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDL' 'sip-files00218.pro'
8c14a05c00805691e0cacabfd1192003
2fdc59a78b79a5bf9ffeb87a95b6e5458f990fa3
describe
'79488' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDM' 'sip-files00218.QC.jpg'
9ad3888816b2869e4edfb82f04859f26
bd005c452a62a2a7da446b5041b04a5d2f660df6
describe
'1077556' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDN' 'sip-files00218.tif'
d06106fa4be6a1ca4d55125b05e3c4c4
0484349b15f54c888e256db15af4db7c83b10505
describe
'1085' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDO' 'sip-files00218.txt'
1b0d5a9c053c58af3ff7fbce3005be54
b3e3c0475e72718b44081416d80e8dbcebbbad26
describe
'39538' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDP' 'sip-files00218thm.jpg'
ff5ea7fa4bf1b5b607838f96c9b166aa
1fcaefdf8376a4dcbd7083e8c2188d50ab480a57
describe
'131415' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDQ' 'sip-files00219.jp2'
fa6e24dc9f17d739417a03d39b457f28
d921913c66f2084cf9ea90566676988a843c7f9e
describe
'133664' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDR' 'sip-files00219.jpg'
1383ebe467eedc89dc0f0455d202f4d8
be5030c8fc951d099ca18771d1091a6023d5d7d4
describe
'21766' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDS' 'sip-files00219.pro'
2789ca72407c9048c29f676ae91ec72b
0a2c6900ed02eeef2b3e785d117c115883c55178
describe
'64713' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDT' 'sip-files00219.QC.jpg'
69f7ec3dff5bea17a878ba822e02c318
6aa1700ddcad7fb6da76cf764b437afc5131c6c4
describe
'1075024' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDU' 'sip-files00219.tif'
2caf46e11bf758d3552bcf26bfee6f15
2e53da97e3031c416604d68fb02f962f80252916
'2012-04-18T05:24:06-04:00'
describe
'936' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDV' 'sip-files00219.txt'
f1334753aa8b24e275789d4f6df6af86
6d11eb8cb039c674abf729d8191874b3de2cf684
describe
'36028' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDW' 'sip-files00219thm.jpg'
6c2f5517c7f0c36f1033b912b1e9fd67
5434e76dc0d414e73b275b7be973af6541644d64
describe
'131167' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDX' 'sip-files00220.jp2'
494164355a89bd083a1a16bfe889e605
17c0349318912ac5aa42ac87558ed6457262826c
describe
'160385' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDY' 'sip-files00220.jpg'
bba8d454b2f8b1562507ccd20d835b4c
79f9bc1056c4ad171437cf10c29c0f4942f14953
describe
'26431' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLDZ' 'sip-files00220.pro'
e6184939011d547dacff91f116cc1755
2bb23fdfdc98d27a1f2693d860794576688be597
describe
'77720' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEA' 'sip-files00220.QC.jpg'
31286842f3c2fb2da88b4a5d1cfc80b5
5eb2964ff13d4296570652a81b48d4b2aeaa9a37
describe
'1072960' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEB' 'sip-files00220.tif'
1a607d4492ab949e0becd480b0439b0b
35eb21cbd91e2c83c43f096c00096ba6f0f32d5d
describe
'1149' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEC' 'sip-files00220.txt'
df93466b69e8de8ca13d7e13f3ee108e
9de1ca9ce7edd74299137f457d4aa1b58830c6e5
describe
'39417' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLED' 'sip-files00220thm.jpg'
e9ebddd2a5c041c53430612617b760a1
043462b03e28e7a8d29cf79d36024c3112309659
describe
'131117' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEE' 'sip-files00221.jp2'
6c7b8ab6bd285b8ecbef0bee1b5bebee
5a264654e9473fe1d179fcb48d5855494b6257e9
describe
'144246' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEF' 'sip-files00221.jpg'
e40984c8390a504789d51a9e96f3d93c
018336c280a5f41bb4181c6d11a8942140a9f5d4
describe
'23643' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEG' 'sip-files00221.pro'
75b5116ea9ecf879703f8c016fe3508a
31481030445b27777a3efa2b01e48aac55a824e4
describe
'70729' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEH' 'sip-files00221.QC.jpg'
f7daac7391a03a412fd50d3d6f8ca8cc
f9a19cea9115c3e8bba0c0b6f8da31f1f27c19af
describe
'1072352' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEI' 'sip-files00221.tif'
a92cb1550f2cb444c7cb1d3629b5f8cf
2a19f4020adb489df2861dd39a33302ebb3df09a
describe
'1029' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEJ' 'sip-files00221.txt'
c3b33658716857e544573b157dc2d960
b955617de9f97ee856c0828a4cf1eb4e51afc4b7
describe
Invalid character
'39145' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEK' 'sip-files00221thm.jpg'
6a565d2693e5859e104338c2ff971788
2696997d7d45d11da9c657092f32ae07fb7074b7
describe
'132224' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEL' 'sip-files00222.jp2'
ebf68d23d689a0cffb638c651c8f9b12
84dd39a4fbba675b78943bb8c3b5db2a0d22d2c7
describe
'153642' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEM' 'sip-files00222.jpg'
ddf2e0409aee2735827e62ffb5c64e32
f1eb466dbd13e4edcc24133f3e04c4caef308d93
describe
'25786' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEN' 'sip-files00222.pro'
06a1e8aeb275a4e95b203ab5b2420d71
d5bfff86702bc894323a82c03976d4b730c0ca4b
describe
'74522' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEO' 'sip-files00222.QC.jpg'
e49f6c57dd965ac50c73134fc9321ff4
4926157b0e637cb8d05d8f6291bb7fb2024b92f1
describe
'1081128' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEP' 'sip-files00222.tif'
94631d39cde08ee71b4dc075cc6e86c4
9e0cf367df801bbb271f9ceb066567816711d199
describe
'1117' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEQ' 'sip-files00222.txt'
065e694347a7c8b3e04c9857bd8bda9b
15a5781f27895915bffae0bfe1a27a523e93b840
describe
'38918' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLER' 'sip-files00222thm.jpg'
41c0873e69300caaf757cff7c8977a95
19e1d2fa853abbacf156fb4694958d5a60dd7163
describe
'130186' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLES' 'sip-files00223.jp2'
d270f170becb6447168bee087cdd4614
e8f718ce0f49b6254aa4a79c837e56541ad4e545
describe
'155449' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLET' 'sip-files00223.jpg'
24c5269b6b8c5cab1011656b592e540d
6b2aa13f0995e7ae865018d4a7ccc5407ee6af58
describe
'25651' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEU' 'sip-files00223.pro'
8b45064583f1468506343ec06f42308e
dac02206ce193173b532990c66e57cc9acb0a611
describe
'77072' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEV' 'sip-files00223.QC.jpg'
967f03d748314d5334ef9f7dd857746f
d5cc820658174a6c28cfabe0fa8c837b61fe8b12
describe
'1065940' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEW' 'sip-files00223.tif'
fbb3ee0f88681b78c9ff5b8de3b7536f
b43a33d26defe0c71f2157586df88c6e72b0697d
describe
'1073' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEX' 'sip-files00223.txt'
64494d9d9073c1349782ab35bf9d6d11
a90856dedc24b9a42b263d4d29b91d931ce61691
'2012-04-18T05:29:07-04:00'
describe
'39482' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEY' 'sip-files00223thm.jpg'
f1090165e8e6d1421de76add6359e409
a9ae742e29286b7c3989c8daef94d2a48987a860
describe
'131938' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLEZ' 'sip-files00224.jp2'
6212f75172278ab485efe0a2ed0df064
6a8248e35deeb4e60d302ab0fbb1f64a48ab0580
describe
'161882' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFA' 'sip-files00224.jpg'
0f52b2f8a9668ed228911ec5f3d399a6
aa5a7d2b4b6f8bee9e07d95a4ca16534eb60e20a
describe
'27381' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFB' 'sip-files00224.pro'
326c95557836bee4390ed596a3069a41
7bb2d64b8460fdca7a6e6757c3e9bbdb8d182e6e
describe
'77877' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFC' 'sip-files00224.QC.jpg'
bbab544bab4712f7251dd2374229ee8b
23785b78db97b726ca1741ee75b39dab90f230fc
describe
'1079744' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFD' 'sip-files00224.tif'
68f6652d466fbd1c97cab71d9556d3bf
fa553a22078d7423d3fcdf0e7dfaee1de00a0a24
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFE' 'sip-files00224.txt'
42a762e58ea38a4fc495c7f7565bdb42
8ab6f928d8994d0344aaa87eb6764f267ca3c878
describe
Invalid character
'39887' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFF' 'sip-files00224thm.jpg'
0550949e5bfdfc94aedafc841b5790d5
9b7bddb5a845c8abc9bfe8661a36a3b381c13f92
describe
'126215' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFG' 'sip-files00225.jp2'
4e206066627c702dbd24f868ec71aeef
73648fd0a5c6c2a68df5e22c2cccb272328ee4a0
describe
'152033' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFH' 'sip-files00225.jpg'
c84701f9386f7f931dce44866771207d
af301aca145967128953d094f5a53ee9a8fbd1ef
describe
'24977' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFI' 'sip-files00225.pro'
f439b263a0aab9314a46e82374cd426b
02eefe5c1a0a7a051adb567d0ce7d91991efb572
describe
'73765' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFJ' 'sip-files00225.QC.jpg'
e17562ede795cc0f58b5583927ffbfe3
180da4a245cd4bb589208b09d378077b7cba05c9
describe
'1033120' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFK' 'sip-files00225.tif'
2219daf15674bec698e273cbab05a9ed
c742800aba68563b77457f85dd5b1508000e4768
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFL' 'sip-files00225.txt'
4e7f77e7df34df981b7cedc22ad47c23
00073168a8fe3e8b9ee4d229e8ff6fee7c84fe66
describe
'39622' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFM' 'sip-files00225thm.jpg'
db31fbc4c907a27c16c50973d8bfe6d0
efce1797de0663607c18f7bf628f5e583784ab77
describe
'128818' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFN' 'sip-files00226.jp2'
c7191290da7281575b8cadd717b5c4a3
700f33f3396d4cc5f36bcab2e5d5d96b3e57a2a6
describe
'153765' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFO' 'sip-files00226.jpg'
f3c7a11f2a6018f7724fab65ca0155ed
42dbba22b3c0f376f04afdd4948890d9d6c2465a
describe
'24665' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFP' 'sip-files00226.pro'
1634754150bd260c2651bd829b29878e
0124150f216f1024a18ca58f25d088e5d97630ce
describe
'74985' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFQ' 'sip-files00226.QC.jpg'
b6732c97b71906bfe9c50d032b76eb77
786445a38d88b2e5f389f574dbfe289f5f2c4739
describe
'1053908' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFR' 'sip-files00226.tif'
8dec91add54c30fcfb84a22323579448
21def3795daa69e91ba01057d097384badcc55a4
'2012-04-18T05:31:14-04:00'
describe
'1062' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFS' 'sip-files00226.txt'
c0da0e973c07288056d1c4d619573de9
f2ebd14364397e21ca9821199b2cda3e2ccf572b
'2012-04-18T05:23:50-04:00'
describe
'40225' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFT' 'sip-files00226thm.jpg'
c72ff9b2b4e19ca6c43b57b82fc978a4
61acd486d2a8675c0e753b9527ffb87b9608a9b9
describe
'130338' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFU' 'sip-files00227.jp2'
f2709282e741e9449617006b9c7cc61e
cf578b7a5f7e27c7f7729d176b73a75cb8b24a53
describe
'158938' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFV' 'sip-files00227.jpg'
250c6c30a7ef94c1ba5740fa8ffd2864
1aa61d849ce803d722bdff3ccd11c7c2a9e9f9e3
describe
'25343' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFW' 'sip-files00227.pro'
fd068fa1591bc62ba5557a642cb2b1a7
ab8cd3afe70bb947ce80bc177bdaa76542db2fba
describe
'75652' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFX' 'sip-files00227.QC.jpg'
fcc0ea6da1be4a01dfe5219d0505ee9c
6215d4d8ea3edd30027448963e4edcf1b2b67b2b
describe
'1066272' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFY' 'sip-files00227.tif'
3af08ab3df35ed2c1d47345f07b04145
25ccfc42f6dcb13feafa7a70cb0af79f6fa08c1b
describe
'1053' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLFZ' 'sip-files00227.txt'
d99cdd0e5a4c4c981c1bf7a8115876f0
ac76a98b5a41287417239fcb14f7e38adf9ca4b3
describe
'40141' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGA' 'sip-files00227thm.jpg'
dc9f75060a0c384e5435f8d8daa974ae
b4ac56406623f9ef4c0233b051364c83d14e1978
describe
'126528' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGB' 'sip-files00228.jp2'
56cd951dc7602926edf621c12748b930
49d595b2ca24b233d5ae0d7dc6b5ebe0d553db9a
describe
'165159' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGC' 'sip-files00228.jpg'
6f83e82a43fbf4bd60e5c829aaac7c18
b7ad3fe8d5deb2c80ab3b4e4040b179b978b2c15
describe
'28429' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGD' 'sip-files00228.pro'
63eb3c4c293251097e7f4599cc28325d
b82481ac64da0b3271f9c5a03343406212aa3ce0
describe
'78352' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGE' 'sip-files00228.QC.jpg'
ea184f2999a020e766a5c974cb445d7b
45900b4189f397276ea9451a3a66980f855df9b9
describe
'1036804' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGF' 'sip-files00228.tif'
c56257881e93000f1a8fc53a36f2efe6
1bee4f885ee9a2c478b626c3bd2ec58512d959f5
describe
'1144' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGG' 'sip-files00228.txt'
72ea8314e70b1731a0f0755f21e52c0e
1e4996cd53a04b357dff88840b5e4d2582b71162
describe
Invalid character
'41363' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGH' 'sip-files00228thm.jpg'
f0a2abf9d6f21224fcc7b4dbb596cd2a
0c519a906eafa6551d8c8e19e74940d7cc492553
describe
'127193' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGI' 'sip-files00229.jp2'
93b17dfccda9e43f59aa85474f6fea5b
ded5b816eb1a66860d07930afde35a306c965c76
describe
'148705' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGJ' 'sip-files00229.jpg'
fe1bdc75591746ff21b307979dce1d48
9d20c38849daa6ce2489f297b23117f5ad95058d
describe
'24376' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGK' 'sip-files00229.pro'
c1c1d3e588fb1ea16ff9ce6f04bf25f8
3a0cf4c6a6ffa534e5a403066e81c9cb9eb79365
describe
'71764' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGL' 'sip-files00229.QC.jpg'
6a95577ce746537b5984a2f8c7f4cf17
41a44339de8b39b454da37fe32e123e574ed4615
'2012-04-18T05:28:43-04:00'
describe
'1040980' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGM' 'sip-files00229.tif'
9a7250accb7638f4ee99e92668fdf1b1
d7314afab5cb8004534467be659de850cd4ae20f
describe
'1037' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGN' 'sip-files00229.txt'
abe92463cf8fe7bb0b52df27e0069b91
27de696da5d3f7e4a819081398e65784404532cb
describe
'39170' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGO' 'sip-files00229thm.jpg'
15a587a70a2d96ad94291f0aee967a9a
fae22580e1541bf796653c124614f18801ecfcf7
describe
'129900' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGP' 'sip-files00230.jp2'
855feeb828801c7b6495c24e03b32131
a7f8542515ee199e1e6f4dc3698ed313aa6a1388
describe
'149803' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGQ' 'sip-files00230.jpg'
40a2f897f179a0e658bd929a39b61648
1a5b8aa90f34f6724c621c1e18c621175e291ad0
describe
'23409' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGR' 'sip-files00230.pro'
2d14ed2e5a14fc18716cc4cdc29edce8
b5ab4412202598b378980c819cf174226a7157e9
describe
'74180' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGS' 'sip-files00230.QC.jpg'
9c381f22d740977670ba55464e0ac5a9
4c1c7b740815def9d4bc0ed11d80cc79865e1339
'2012-04-18T05:25:36-04:00'
describe
'1063148' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGT' 'sip-files00230.tif'
b7d1bcbb150d8046b9a83925a109ed0a
34994159d438c3b0d6bf9d1192fc7992750d5509
describe
'1006' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGU' 'sip-files00230.txt'
2359154037e1a06a62a950944d932f91
9a72cb4c4c2935d11c91cbfba9abaa0c521f743d
describe
'41141' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGV' 'sip-files00230thm.jpg'
68a4d832f80c415b38b73e38188a6e5e
10c6e3fe9775cf07c227431cce551f2df60ac1f2
describe
'126942' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGW' 'sip-files00231.jp2'
ee8bf9a2d995a7c755c72f3d33daf1ed
beb097fde4063ece4681598e5544d8c6704b958f
describe
'154629' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGX' 'sip-files00231.jpg'
e5bce2cb90027cda8994acb45ead8434
08338cbf0dfa179226a4d023adc16846849803c2
describe
'24615' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGY' 'sip-files00231.pro'
4de4c10ba191431b302708ef33a24e2c
b759c0f37c8186d45de94961e75d5b930b5c98ba
describe
'75961' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLGZ' 'sip-files00231.QC.jpg'
6bfd976f8d143d2b309f78fc7bba17a1
b70710ba6727371399839a7004eda448cea4ee6f
describe
'1039224' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHA' 'sip-files00231.tif'
ff8a63416e1c29c11aa1beeb9b0f8dff
c3afb103f2b0e4f401b810058b538e6db0702d36
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHB' 'sip-files00231.txt'
02bef2cefcfb6f7f1500f558d177043b
3a24c0c8d4b95bb0ac9dd93295d6486a8e758418
describe
'39479' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHC' 'sip-files00231thm.jpg'
67932a1141bc5bc278313fdd3bfe566e
7d9165eae7c5746422c29e9f5aced20c7e7d9a41
describe
'124011' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHD' 'sip-files00232.jp2'
842daa7ec537c52bd618aa1d01054d50
8976d2816b5c6491d911e9c58b589ce06749ac98
describe
'163241' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHE' 'sip-files00232.jpg'
3037f05cd55a731e499533f7498773a5
ef4210123bac4c8460916c8367d17afecd4f2d0a
describe
'28643' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHF' 'sip-files00232.pro'
3348bf1897bf243456adcd6fd5a7d49a
7f9b084d412e2692d2d1ce09ca00605587af1a80
describe
'79355' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHG' 'sip-files00232.QC.jpg'
1712ec1453c3f1f1688f13fb1053a8e4
ac7d36c1935438f3312a4033dcac2eeef23f6425
describe
'1015736' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHH' 'sip-files00232.tif'
837c3c51ade8894e20e0e82ad35fb0ed
8aadc22dc1c5b4fa46423d8932189262afc0b348
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHI' 'sip-files00232.txt'
5dd1074a5c533332854179dd6fb0d8cb
b46b0f068439424ce9c9c446cfd98051c413fc9a
describe
'42022' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHJ' 'sip-files00232thm.jpg'
b8f55d0642274cb754cf4fb677f152a9
520cc6f965f445bcace35f65170389a11f37f6c1
describe
'125554' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHK' 'sip-files00233.jp2'
813594bebdbbdea8ab3b2e9477f28492
534f9cb000da8e257c3896760c43d1cd118dbe2a
describe
'158575' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHL' 'sip-files00233.jpg'
d60c8de063bd6c61b286c24c2bca8621
630f9df54c08817c5476b179ec072fc162da2ea6
describe
'28032' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHM' 'sip-files00233.pro'
2ca0f7d3cfa89aa4a406920ded182387
9a76e54c966e3e4f1606e6fcd7f476682223f68d
describe
'77144' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHN' 'sip-files00233.QC.jpg'
0602847709fb952c4a07df4f6d42e896
ad8d78ec204951236d403d3faaff133f4dc3ccae
describe
'1028464' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHO' 'sip-files00233.tif'
e4efada7db45b18d285e95a626c29078
1c41fd0081d0acabbd0189aef837905f3b539336
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHP' 'sip-files00233.txt'
04487c8fa600b192651fdd3eca2095f2
dd7f9a9edc0f72b801be29e872927f78d1d3b147
describe
'41626' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHQ' 'sip-files00233thm.jpg'
bc42c3e97c422af67d1510b11c7c37ee
4847f1e35d15e48d825ff34ffd634cc04ea9f023
describe
'127228' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHR' 'sip-files00234.jp2'
a9ccd2ad462156fd88b52e86dead48a5
205860a498f7e1be6458c5fc6ebb2a2b41d74cbe
describe
'158100' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHS' 'sip-files00234.jpg'
202146257b3fac25ccdeea4bceec60ac
b9f31bcb9ef2041f614aaca0fe2ae03a48267665
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHT' 'sip-files00234.pro'
53b174405f192dbfff86b3fd45e9382a
8ddf39724e4d4f218741afc34f7e514a813b41a8
describe
'77231' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHU' 'sip-files00234.QC.jpg'
3fed558531c70ea2e254da134cc8ecf5
7ce52d0e188170579c726dca0953c4bd674d1803
'2012-04-18T05:28:40-04:00'
describe
'1041760' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHV' 'sip-files00234.tif'
49504f93cce795e1d4321093d0ca2c82
6704b9acee04fc4aa028d9d2249ff54a44d3b3f9
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHW' 'sip-files00234.txt'
647542d05d2bce814f0ed6c7e9dbe793
f642bea8d7f345505a7729e5e9a87093a855cc5b
describe
'41890' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHX' 'sip-files00234thm.jpg'
dc8b8393b44cfacc3966e5beae752af4
e321686e643a79a18c36c0d0ddc97d9c3499d86e
describe
'124329' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHY' 'sip-files00235.jp2'
036a28fb95b0c7461853c3b88b71656a
1789b4b078f05e83230245bcdaf1d5f5b0aa9895
describe
'151664' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLHZ' 'sip-files00235.jpg'
0db598cfbe632aa9c84ce6d4e1b7f3eb
a4f0114a5604af1ea90b652f4d75358bc94e27e8
describe
'24529' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIA' 'sip-files00235.pro'
b18e34e18b42e8d0f9fef730f9cab8ef
741726798bff04a8c92f8937f6e62e5f1fba64de
describe
'75011' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIB' 'sip-files00235.QC.jpg'
00c8cd5c1c6bb5f37eaa1f1f2cbf526e
92f8840e9a8ab785c7f41db2d833e1d149f5b797
describe
'1018516' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIC' 'sip-files00235.tif'
ef40752bd15d1e56498e16827c700b01
a15497d8a9af66b97cbef13025f1cc75d24f7350
describe
'1039' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLID' 'sip-files00235.txt'
4bcaedbe8398e88a60c1033d4012f728
c5e4b5797ff9d74cecb9a033b1b011a7403d96db
describe
'41284' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIE' 'sip-files00235thm.jpg'
fff9698aa70ecbaffd6a119bbd1fae93
cd94451f35000f1fbc8e478b5c2c9d0f0fd4ec6b
describe
'127011' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIF' 'sip-files00236.jp2'
946d583991c42aae90bad01b0ed374e3
8fd895d01b29fd4bc1b5b65546d21cc7a5c8defd
describe
'151968' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIG' 'sip-files00236.jpg'
b55b679f0342e6db501bea250bc15fa8
9705de55e4694328d174fcfc73b9a9aceea40d75
describe
'24278' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIH' 'sip-files00236.pro'
f0ce8a285c1645c103ffa3d53e94bbdf
4043a9fe31a726d9890dea37299ef1ada1caed6f
describe
'74057' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLII' 'sip-files00236.QC.jpg'
86f171ee479764419048527637f4a30e
12bd0b2651b03dba69efc01eeb5d5cbb8aaa9073
'2012-04-18T05:27:05-04:00'
describe
'1039828' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIJ' 'sip-files00236.tif'
23a4509adc6598da6366069f539b177d
e0836c2de00e8237d44f7fc968fdd9b094cf3242
'2012-04-18T05:20:18-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIK' 'sip-files00236.txt'
a64a7b028a6ad3d823af1a33ee942027
88d98d2cd8af0e068359de86ad4a98df41e2ae46
describe
'39774' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIL' 'sip-files00236thm.jpg'
83cbed2f45c3acd54e7a02c9118fcb09
d3d9ae8ee4b8139d289d0b26d974492cc3f3f23e
describe
'130575' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIM' 'sip-files00237.jp2'
7d3864454e9a7a640ae936fcda6bda4a
fda56b00b9b14dbb28830c5fe218a58cd76aeaa4
describe
'159204' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIN' 'sip-files00237.jpg'
bac105db09e5092aff3a0d6889c2c7ef
c3b59b428d9dae2871c50163a736235ff691bca1
describe
'26613' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIO' 'sip-files00237.pro'
0a3cdce80295269554d5c10f83b07eaa
61113f387d0fdde6b5f6e9d0d912809da4b1de47
describe
'77932' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIP' 'sip-files00237.QC.jpg'
b1566f773142a7cae2d195f52acf5124
aeac06a76ab14ef7204d842246dfc424139fcc11
describe
'1068580' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIQ' 'sip-files00237.tif'
97927a4779b7c149427287015df06742
6f3170ad9727085f6fa4fa357cc4b5e002c3764c
describe
'1132' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIR' 'sip-files00237.txt'
34294456ae0193cb8b7e54d003f22b50
76339ed767decd5bcfb85fe06515010c934d1dc6
describe
'40631' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIS' 'sip-files00237thm.jpg'
a4846799f5fab0d8fa755d4a082dbc3a
15654ffd53c82263afbe95b20c6c5c07cbbf1c27
describe
'130565' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIT' 'sip-files00238.jp2'
2018345bcac0aca9fb7ebb7f43d9854b
bbcf92848e657ba6e7a067ec701c4eece2da4259
describe
'157973' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIU' 'sip-files00238.jpg'
2cf7d586f6e17fde52e5aea81ddb13b3
32e5b7a231bbb0168d3320bea3a46d59fe3259d3
'2012-04-18T05:22:56-04:00'
describe
'26399' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIV' 'sip-files00238.pro'
05c85c70f6ec59ecf0fc6e252eda5817
dec300f4f2aa00a9592612e7913c9d91249baa68
describe
'76662' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIW' 'sip-files00238.QC.jpg'
b73adbdba5ecdd53977bc74376d7808d
e4233b4c3106536f5921a8da61430b7597fbedb4
describe
'1068004' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIX' 'sip-files00238.tif'
81cc03495dac875ba53cb18d4515e9d8
15f42c1e1434260c7a8d82fb7d6138efa786623d
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIY' 'sip-files00238.txt'
3b8d0f5e45a80c363c29383802694b63
556d4915855e06e45b718831cc4248e14280e2a4
describe
'39265' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLIZ' 'sip-files00238thm.jpg'
def6a9160e9bb2d5a9684f0e7f550dda
d11e020c4d8369a2cd228f7c0601d60be5a2ca20
describe
'125383' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJA' 'sip-files00239.jp2'
ec0fa16c9859f0fcc1ecfc78b5b22bb9
d672aac713056d4bb3230555fb1c45e5bf694308
describe
'146072' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJB' 'sip-files00239.jpg'
8de66e94363caaeff9b3ec5bb67e8bcb
ddff546bda3dcbc53b0fc7d2e2a118d31d276592
describe
'23345' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJC' 'sip-files00239.pro'
1f2d25d8ef7f43d52cd0d7c3d4c735b6
36b419c9fa32a5e002ead5b2c250e171874ba2a3
describe
'73004' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJD' 'sip-files00239.QC.jpg'
6c88e3cc78942e1b64d640bc697bccfd
fa19acab35fc245d86592e131c50863d85806861
describe
'1026676' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJE' 'sip-files00239.tif'
e95c4dbc68d6b306977f4ccddbacbd15
38b9380f198f2f61bc07a8455b5a0100b9ce11c1
'2012-04-18T05:23:08-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJF' 'sip-files00239.txt'
ce58187d08a5f490c85d4515e8143854
2d793ba76ad1e816ddb2499d19048b66444be563
describe
'39977' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJG' 'sip-files00239thm.jpg'
40a2c6fbb967cb3df01b8df70bc652b7
1224752fedbc3023f389766bac17db1feba85885
describe
'128038' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJH' 'sip-files00240.jp2'
7f41116ecd73e844cb4bb50e577fbe7b
cfe1965445586317fdf0c08ffd0ea118452d1b96
describe
'136002' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJI' 'sip-files00240.jpg'
19bc2e076bfb1df930779f51c0774a44
23b60fbc779da5ed622467a10b2614f07a4bc439
describe
'22089' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJJ' 'sip-files00240.pro'
51be86f5535a55f626a723d5b8cf7b01
8fa9c30cb843d7bb6abd621f777e79160af3e57a
describe
'66764' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJK' 'sip-files00240.QC.jpg'
b536016cb28f4184018e6f06bb1367aa
3a3806914dd1b6b95b6abf97c295f738327bc032
describe
'1048132' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJL' 'sip-files00240.tif'
987b55ffbba6639f6e4c2a10677edbbb
17ee8e45b391cc2e1b0459093f5ef09fb017cc9c
describe
'952' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJM' 'sip-files00240.txt'
1269a6688460f43850fb80f88bf1a5ec
b57133b1796e9dfe595748b9fca3be7e6408192c
describe
'38180' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJN' 'sip-files00240thm.jpg'
fbaf81de7c0880b82879183b87635a92
f4906971876758c328ea1dab3658073214e586bc
describe
'130373' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJO' 'sip-files00241.jp2'
866471fdf75768fe97acae030473ea63
17195091e5f60a4afeab25681bb6f5f2fa6093bc
describe
'161879' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJP' 'sip-files00241.jpg'
0d9d111eb2d3c26ddbc86c60158599b8
b038efa54991fa52dcb6b9ea6b02a2b63eba7c89
describe
'27125' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJQ' 'sip-files00241.pro'
86f95b3611843c913bf10dd640927b8a
e891a22770c524b6ad4c880625a0f396ca6af615
describe
'76416' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJR' 'sip-files00241.QC.jpg'
156ff7a6f5535aa4cd9009195cd69e76
ddaf11b7d66c3cdd7f104754cca3285ba45a094f
describe
'1066448' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJS' 'sip-files00241.tif'
e99e32085a7fac9568d4ed929a0fcbd7
2d24999b031cd7d6ffe093daf677dfca41bd713e
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJT' 'sip-files00241.txt'
5f135f40a549784842678d4c13e7e5cd
fe2ba80f9775775f50977f226530539ff23fc914
describe
'39822' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJU' 'sip-files00241thm.jpg'
56b7c495909295859d203d179e3224a0
cc6aed56c9b2b50b4081ace28daae497a3fe4a90
describe
'128535' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJV' 'sip-files00242.jp2'
3841fb12787e35710735af2ebaccc5c5
424389f665c67ca5301f93c3045589e3f702d05f
describe
'163953' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJW' 'sip-files00242.jpg'
e1a1c6892be3cda58817440f5509a42f
8399b03e263534b3219369e297a5823bf6ab39c7
describe
'26744' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJX' 'sip-files00242.pro'
d434e2455ecbae9826dc39e612bf34bc
7242b7f205ba6293d8062d566dbec7dfbc0eadd3
describe
'78516' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJY' 'sip-files00242.QC.jpg'
84be7111d1741a07dfb9bdd93ff25127
58e8478afd81387c94504c999f3b947cc0205a2c
describe
'1051760' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLJZ' 'sip-files00242.tif'
0b707e63d6694082f74613a19e9dd303
ece6f89227ec8d2fe86c26b8c6195f34db0f8279
describe
'1160' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKA' 'sip-files00242.txt'
95d94b8a859dc34beb0048af65dd78ad
8c1d6acbcb99007ce1428bbbd11b67472d7905ac
'2012-04-18T05:28:05-04:00'
describe
'41327' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKB' 'sip-files00242thm.jpg'
e80d54e0616d84c9431ec4fab1e19823
144ba8346e0bc063ec85690d31f4bba953cccef1
describe
'125681' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKC' 'sip-files00243.jp2'
031215ab8101fe7d3b7e650c00d8e0da
ccf1f9b18774c0520b8a2c94cec121998f776575
describe
'161880' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKD' 'sip-files00243.jpg'
c06d6808931e83ce04cc41b5e0b36a37
10dbde772298c081e57fdb73806c9a805593f575
describe
'25604' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKE' 'sip-files00243.pro'
51f9a568f3151e95c929e5018d87ecbd
57272b5849df6fb5bb1efb72657d9dbbd0e72d04
describe
'79978' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKF' 'sip-files00243.QC.jpg'
2b5ccfca4402c21c3859393dfacda3b2
0e40d13e9f6205af7c14d06faf1e4553689bcc29
describe
'1030588' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKG' 'sip-files00243.tif'
0604d3e3b022de733b1e467b36bf74b7
e53e75751996cc60c710b0513ba4e73f9c2d0d40
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKH' 'sip-files00243.txt'
dd94ff1f2bee94ae3062aaae3267aa8c
c4c783c6905bfbe042fb0cb9df65a154bd8d2ef4
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKI' 'sip-files00243thm.jpg'
6ed3a81f73bccd48a42a42c4189a0d26
02a6420cd5d54f10610837492b4376daaa17e49e
describe
'130163' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKJ' 'sip-files00244.jp2'
ef241b8a049bb35e9a180de350c74c52
57f633b45a1f5af59c92453a2b0f2e33202ea201
describe
'148231' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKK' 'sip-files00244.jpg'
ecc379754a916a705b2366cbecb21ecd
c55c79aabead5a87d229fb23c1ee624e100b29d0
describe
'24572' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKL' 'sip-files00244.pro'
7807d18cc2f0758d1792b7faf9f3926b
707b4a45431956f64e46dc3d51406f99e77b33f2
describe
'73133' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKM' 'sip-files00244.QC.jpg'
1c5d6c37eef26637daef80a5c4d5a8b5
b5b1c5cc2110d3c517651e4ac279b92bdb5cb068
describe
'1064980' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKN' 'sip-files00244.tif'
58a431b55b92f3707779b442f6faa9cb
ce71dccf1a30c6b4b51f98efa174cc7b560d353a
describe
'1066' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKO' 'sip-files00244.txt'
dd7f4700613eba734af81396b2ef03fc
8c93e7bbc5174201ccc82ca1e709a3ff5bbf1c9c
describe
'39840' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKP' 'sip-files00244thm.jpg'
405e90f5ccb9d3c1744bc610c1a8c1ee
c1f1175fcdcc68606118d5cba6ba6c656f8974f0
describe
'127157' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKQ' 'sip-files00245.jp2'
16f61a7a67cc661f5482a60e145d418f
de80895a06eaa28f4438ec4cf4f1a20ccec21852
describe
'151594' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKR' 'sip-files00245.jpg'
5d7dc261f8e7c8bafce80dea6b37fbf5
10797d3f1d8311d02e59df6fc31726148a522da1
describe
'25110' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKS' 'sip-files00245.pro'
c33cf7f907b4cb6bb4ef022fa93cadeb
c27699af3f5966a76fe115efe71e897499ff7762
describe
'74549' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKT' 'sip-files00245.QC.jpg'
d4ec9de588374d4224ed5861db55f2ea
12d42334549c606212ff563afc1d60e2778843d2
describe
'1041004' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKU' 'sip-files00245.tif'
da0a21b8e20041a9fb66b29832986d9f
b650931e6f7ab82c36e16e5aabe17f448f953330
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKV' 'sip-files00245.txt'
f18207b5eff01effaee09cfeeb23dc6b
f9938b2f7fa0dc48b1ff64da66132d65efa1bf4d
describe
'39348' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKW' 'sip-files00245thm.jpg'
ec7c6bbb23128d62e5ec5a0b75a60d92
7ad10225de78eb5badcbfaa77dad96616d49d244
describe
'129706' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKX' 'sip-files00246.jp2'
fe0b5d9d22ffd70804b6e8e74fdf3cd4
8a77cff50eba073af1d428ae6cf38b467c1dbc87
describe
'161141' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKY' 'sip-files00246.jpg'
4d6821c53396301494797061967a9427
3b0b8188ee2747cc5b05a01a73406df135399294
describe
'25620' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLKZ' 'sip-files00246.pro'
7bee5ae2705ecf064a56c23ffedf4b77
871c22ba19213a6419638cf3e42b649c52f47934
describe
'77975' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLA' 'sip-files00246.QC.jpg'
01e9e40860fc0968b5f226569d7149a8
1ffa224f1a23425b28116b7631d383cae8a5219e
describe
'1061484' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLB' 'sip-files00246.tif'
47d3fb2b2b8799e6649da1377dbc002e
6f27a1f5fa6b508f72ea6e3a04f87bb6d48d975f
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLC' 'sip-files00246.txt'
023952aba0c2572be41cddf95bc1f069
58c2ed173dee4bb0166910e0e12d3f3b80d83295
describe
Invalid character
'40965' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLD' 'sip-files00246thm.jpg'
80e9ba7d58289adad3667a33b45a96a1
922c5bcd473674e72f780a978390c3b01f5b6fa4
describe
'124500' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLE' 'sip-files00247.jp2'
8f3bb3d9ffcf8070235058aef8635b5b
20200fb7c41994e72d7c2f9d01b5acf5ed00f576
describe
'166411' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLF' 'sip-files00247.jpg'
58e2db9fe7b70179aec7b967f00c6601
599958d5a6ef26330f7132944a32e2d133ee3652
describe
'26727' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLG' 'sip-files00247.pro'
0979b5cc0d8aa9dfc9aaebecce74e0c9
edc899c9e1d2b0732a020a94ed48ab80856dbdc6
describe
'79605' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLH' 'sip-files00247.QC.jpg'
85da0824fa0013db656d116733152452
ac4ba7c7a50b4029eb9dd24392801e6a00bb8f24
describe
'1019848' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLI' 'sip-files00247.tif'
5ef3a49f58d380a4e9f4918e1e65578f
0e837fefdc4c16685d179915fdf8490eb1867c19
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLJ' 'sip-files00247.txt'
b359c221bfe78bd7673341adf1fdcf07
7dcbc7d508f40ad6cd7bfbdd5a21ed2a81fab717
describe
'40880' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLK' 'sip-files00247thm.jpg'
8a54dad546eb5efbe1bd09a846e3570a
71c847e7772dbb71a2daa7931a822104c6316633
'2012-04-18T05:23:59-04:00'
describe
'125533' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLL' 'sip-files00248.jp2'
0ba9a36201b882aa4f536f497202cdd8
9fcc5be05a046107655deb7aeb50eea98792de57
describe
'153397' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLM' 'sip-files00248.jpg'
4070acfd54ab6df0cbe650251727d4a4
cb23c48117dbaf166bb2b983919db05fc2f3092e
describe
'25297' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLN' 'sip-files00248.pro'
e883ef3e0a5421ffca821b5ae9065028
8e86734763d0904cc1add00bfd2b658321a22f89
describe
'73930' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLO' 'sip-files00248.QC.jpg'
c2c197aa41fca355fdd91e32d2dd8be0
ecfe1422e579607181b43e49d2bb4bf6c703ba8f
describe
'1027544' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLP' 'sip-files00248.tif'
03383cf745fecfd50912da899eb322c1
23dc391afe18f3c260e43706d389b311b49da05d
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLQ' 'sip-files00248.txt'
fd393d8146b5c6019ecd9406e024eaa1
8e2c9423ba42a79974b9db826078f69290c78f47
describe
'40907' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLR' 'sip-files00248thm.jpg'
25b241ed520d21cdaad29c3d64af83fd
98f880d5be4a12407bf1d5e1a4c31cf252531d85
describe
'128551' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLS' 'sip-files00249.jp2'
b27fde48507902904ccf41a22c4f5a92
767f84365b59c2a013d8846937059fe4bcbcd7ff
describe
'162124' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLT' 'sip-files00249.jpg'
3ab6241cf215d1eec1f2fe9f64cf0ce0
bbfa454073569d18d5ac8f698b4acc2eace71689
describe
'26235' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLU' 'sip-files00249.pro'
2ea982b923c28005f5294b43f90f8911
99a3b8a4855189f74d73cdfd3ea603e7d8ab688c
describe
'77329' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLV' 'sip-files00249.QC.jpg'
0ea11adec39380b8955fc6be7764cb77
d82f2a39823bbf284b31929f4237f8e2f3ede7c6
describe
'1053088' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLW' 'sip-files00249.tif'
96eaaf6b992d0bdca9595fd6ab45cc25
d67fa1f04cec0ad2fddf8f39bfe4a46e4c1377c8
describe
'1107' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLX' 'sip-files00249.txt'
33210b04e30ff91a6ce7d28528f83256
2b5d016e33d57a679156f0242016b0186f4ea4e0
describe
'40497' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLY' 'sip-files00249thm.jpg'
7463bf492dd8cfab4e0fceb07a281f28
8b486a0a6fa789acc04e6b388f131ead7132de75
describe
'130454' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLLZ' 'sip-files00250.jp2'
ce02478c89a003e4318e9d0e8fa6fb9f
4816d66f5bd57af85e5d7c16b03f38ed0fdcaf11
describe
'152711' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMA' 'sip-files00250.jpg'
d439be36e3a0a5c2869cd7cb0f371a62
c66061727e254240d65d3e11e96e86e658ea4353
'2012-04-18T05:29:14-04:00'
describe
'24694' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMB' 'sip-files00250.pro'
45e05f7211266be8542f70d9306dbe6f
288b78d4000706e9ec1574d6ea22e20143b5b9e5
describe
'74486' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMC' 'sip-files00250.QC.jpg'
be77468fd0d7d17018a0b614465d5903
427dd0f9e7c444b91cdf36c5b7216551b4f99e9f
describe
'1067688' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMD' 'sip-files00250.tif'
58eba5c9d10064016aab5109c19e29d0
df6979902cfb66f536857d567181e30ecc6c411c
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLME' 'sip-files00250.txt'
b949a1c42578b13a7ff8d0517eccb74b
e05a5ff7b921eac4360dc7794bd9ad16e1b3e2ab
describe
'39600' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMF' 'sip-files00250thm.jpg'
af9faca22f1735685748309a7b72806c
4a8ab6ecf31643355ac9e8fc9a7132756f11afec
describe
'128104' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMG' 'sip-files00251.jp2'
c843220c66dba7803f94f3b3d4be7cc5
f1cae4ca1b63ae6c56603593542a001796ac513c
describe
'150866' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMH' 'sip-files00251.jpg'
bbb2c35eb0de4fdef3a73cc314ae7a57
8acbd2c441988fc298355beef593c97f0f7589ed
describe
'24606' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMI' 'sip-files00251.pro'
6a55a18930ade20003b9cf4691d2db84
4623e817c7803be70e76b55aba737e7ffb7a2527
describe
'73979' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMJ' 'sip-files00251.QC.jpg'
ed730df22551bcb8748f4b981b1d39fd
a7ef6be16c90a9feb7c01647be46fbbe7402931c
describe
'1048532' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMK' 'sip-files00251.tif'
c7cf9f78df3851752a9368eeac6e2e64
eff5fe54ddfc4e5b8b87b39e76453d776fae7606
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLML' 'sip-files00251.txt'
2f9232cd023b8cee75fe610ec71a4725
83157df9ab1308de6706d9e2ae6b92e6c1b1b8e7
describe
'39812' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMM' 'sip-files00251thm.jpg'
0503117c6ca8e040f1f0dd44870459e3
794bc2cabd655498badf2bb16e924040f95d5676
describe
'128473' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMN' 'sip-files00252.jp2'
84d5adcb8149ce6cf83cb5accc81a972
2319eda097a745fab1ed3b78577087120ccac662
describe
'152933' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMO' 'sip-files00252.jpg'
07f45a74b3a20975243860fd5debf988
b3f6726e3788e43b5a7c1e4708c16918d46f99ad
describe
'25252' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMP' 'sip-files00252.pro'
0fd61fff478358e72bab3c7a721cc8b4
199ddbf56083e561ff08a444a6a6c756b1035e8e
describe
'73652' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMQ' 'sip-files00252.QC.jpg'
95468b4c1adf79561b88714da0bc3dc0
030529452758649659c5196decbb2070354af9f5
describe
'1051640' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMR' 'sip-files00252.tif'
6326a2b0e26f437b9446419b85340625
3a312392914f72ad0d4495c1245c049e307c16dc
describe
'1136' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMS' 'sip-files00252.txt'
b582302453ca9871ff4d46929dff5a16
ad8d8de86f0b3c3792b4831675a0bc3dd30763c6
describe
'40155' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMT' 'sip-files00252thm.jpg'
09958cab920036fb66aca12f2fd0cbf9
a5556eea1d6bb48251e669660fc025f0c545aada
describe
'130610' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMU' 'sip-files00253.jp2'
10f67a9f5828ffb8e453f299500c5523
326f3913318f6939f9de1b044e096fa82a7c96ed
describe
'145975' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMV' 'sip-files00253.jpg'
0da7a3c49b04415c97f6d6bb7087ae21
9e6a6ccbdf7513da8087eb3a050b923eae5519b1
describe
'24189' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMW' 'sip-files00253.pro'
9282ee770b6f10f0eb6adf39fb732cbc
e2cba8437e08ca3fdf0c0b4e2e73ec9b0d7c1488
describe
'70892' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMX' 'sip-files00253.QC.jpg'
f3a4f5ac885f857ed9f05c16a48a63b1
34913a9abff9b5cc62b31f50e406cafb04ea4a61
describe
'1068156' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMY' 'sip-files00253.tif'
f5c9f63b71ec1d773c17d3b66eaf62f1
e2021e6bb7e7be6bdf6c65b055def05ad8e65edf
describe
'1049' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLMZ' 'sip-files00253.txt'
6439832e766b5a7b6fbc7d195edb883a
6cf87e574fa82863761e6bc1be14ae45fc2c66e8
describe
'38595' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNA' 'sip-files00253thm.jpg'
230a1fc04e6304d2c190455bf8ba7e6f
caa45f0b5015e3e379b59e26a3e0ad0127124abd
describe
'128448' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNB' 'sip-files00254.jp2'
a3feb5f0254702806b5a4a0c21ecd590
65b5316862fabf04161edb7a6bbadca6cde522e9
describe
'147508' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNC' 'sip-files00254.jpg'
93cd4e17bab4ffd8507abe8b692dfc37
21cd6854c3e9bbea6e9345876d5fef04ad294127
describe
'23954' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLND' 'sip-files00254.pro'
de827d5dc602d7ca23aee0117e2eb9ed
33996f76a20d898f606fecc6da8365421a2fdddb
describe
'73291' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNE' 'sip-files00254.QC.jpg'
6048f08f8848865879584ae36fddef28
20c7ccd10c9839c843f89b91d1a67f23acd7d5ab
describe
'1051996' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNF' 'sip-files00254.tif'
0dc2379cb01877028040027c30fc8bf7
871b727d48f34f6b5f1f0bef7ff9119ce37e8ddb
describe
'1026' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNG' 'sip-files00254.txt'
777a755568b313b291e1a36e4f0487d8
1ccee8299fda6b72b51be2e9a1f500f623f81c7f
describe
'39968' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNH' 'sip-files00254thm.jpg'
4840eecce6d894fb462a09fd39a9b5c2
a8bca75b2c529006ffc24e9ba68050e93391255b
describe
'127870' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNI' 'sip-files00255.jp2'
ebf9422e16c5f0d773ba556df2d2ab25
8ff6fdb5bc922fa5eaac9c016dea7100cf2d450e
describe
'155103' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNJ' 'sip-files00255.jpg'
6a3637d3a0a43a72639ab92e572adc8e
9b94600d44683093d6a7f137773718f5033b7002
describe
'25944' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNK' 'sip-files00255.pro'
1d9a370648ab74911699d295762383fd
5dc8e8f05bfc1322c07731dd870066988ae4a343
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNL' 'sip-files00255.QC.jpg'
1bf8a396b850c133f76fdc8019ea3587
8e885ad3ca086b4181cad6d58efdd72b75a38d20
describe
'1047512' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNM' 'sip-files00255.tif'
d65f542d7c095a316b635a81bc1985fd
9d6abd9d6d86a984fab27bf9eba94d00d429650e
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNN' 'sip-files00255.txt'
4fc25b7f6481a666fc537ec2089c0062
599a202ed6f837258118b2ad25e6ac12774cbd52
describe
'41578' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNO' 'sip-files00255thm.jpg'
f356ae2c2f8c19dc5cf5a69b414981c5
721e99587d4798f76a090b53d6313022a608135e
describe
'130722' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNP' 'sip-files00256.jp2'
3aca2bc9e5afc8a8e0c4327826d0a707
e9902508a388a2457ce342d0e226429c0e2baf94
describe
'127106' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNQ' 'sip-files00256.jpg'
cea9e7f32a0c0a2cbf5c94d4205c0b5d
683381301118673260704c1015d63cb58e1aaab4
describe
'19134' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNR' 'sip-files00256.pro'
4f38620a76c29c674c24a733ca1eb446
40f8fb8344ebfa8b236bb3bd2552fc9dcabd1d5f
describe
'63944' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNS' 'sip-files00256.QC.jpg'
eec1cf77022a2de50c8a7421123b6343
7dedc4e906f75f31b7f8c04efa0c8d1a5d7f097a
describe
'1068632' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNT' 'sip-files00256.tif'
d2ca99a6ae82e2219a6f2d3ca6383f36
559bdfa08f0062118c9b25fcc34074da5ca4fe04
describe
'850' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNU' 'sip-files00256.txt'
5062f38f1159b86527660b53fdefc110
074a300ce8865a545c4fb7aa2e415a45452e0ce7
describe
'36328' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNV' 'sip-files00256thm.jpg'
c3e4f310151172693d9f229447c84592
b1acab4d40894393c255914135e61dc6192dfcd2
describe
'125766' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNW' 'sip-files00257.jp2'
5a8b4cc42b363c6d5b4c9f02ecc066cb
a3391835f8993e4c81a5513e3fa703ae791ca2ad
describe
'147292' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNX' 'sip-files00257.jpg'
a1c6974da951d434b19af5d1307e2cb9
ced1c45cf9ff04eadd96a9e2314eebc35e959a60
describe
'23299' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNY' 'sip-files00257.pro'
0916bb8f33488e2954f1cd33b89799b1
a10a64c6690531a3fd44d2fb72d08a6e2e4dfd97
describe
'74457' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLNZ' 'sip-files00257.QC.jpg'
fb5465a57e8f661fa04fd3fd4f4da1c1
f3075ab1cb0d3809736d61313aeb855c00c8fd47
describe
'1029920' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOA' 'sip-files00257.tif'
28d0083a6d9eb166fba0e82cf1b792b2
dfb286b5dcf289f3472835a04b30f59f05ad98ce
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOB' 'sip-files00257.txt'
1ea94c4c88b9d37fe57dfe08e7dc974a
c7328080eedc15987ea775c8c5d684059f246dd1
describe
'39921' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOC' 'sip-files00257thm.jpg'
0460270467fc8a10ba6b061c0b6b72a1
d6cf03a61a5a0fa0270e9dddac7104b9061f1186
'2012-04-18T05:21:58-04:00'
describe
'129875' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOD' 'sip-files00258.jp2'
59460dea1b4872ae01feb7b063c62610
52e6736399d390ac195fedc73169947b4c7d0dc4
describe
'158737' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOE' 'sip-files00258.jpg'
d9d1359b20861ea790fbded226c98c2c
83fc5e55d2ec33d233ab5f7bcc321d5dec7db955
describe
'25715' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOF' 'sip-files00258.pro'
c73bf552ac3c571790f5c21bda82d290
1cae3ddc9d8afb9fd5c1e0f84de00d1130c1bfb2
describe
'75910' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOG' 'sip-files00258.QC.jpg'
0592a7f08ff31782fc5853bce383a84d
3713dc5c15fadffb8983335f005be7962255ecd4
describe
'1062604' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOH' 'sip-files00258.tif'
f87a23210393137f9e16f4a047469188
1957d8aaa8f03bda4c8b430f25c165d6b9bd9c8c
describe
'1113' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOI' 'sip-files00258.txt'
e5beb3c9dc4df2c263ae057df7f8b9bb
aadca04be935e4d6ec79120790a693be38d4657b
describe
'40478' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOJ' 'sip-files00258thm.jpg'
a1382a10e731f805ce11de08b90f2e92
23fef0522abc0d1814b274676292b13adf34dda3
'2012-04-18T05:31:05-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOK' 'sip-files00259.jp2'
eb51c49b36fe92ac5ba1f801dabe32e0
aa1bf550124e17bd8be0d5b6184d31c9f3ab061d
describe
'159320' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOL' 'sip-files00259.jpg'
087c50e38a29eb1cc4141f250e5e71b1
5278718f7e80694a3e1f10a9c9749de577e5721c
describe
'25352' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOM' 'sip-files00259.pro'
59e4eea95bf66b11786ee790052e4d03
be0b7ea493974a3dbfe977c9f90e6f1042d0c2a1
describe
'78140' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLON' 'sip-files00259.QC.jpg'
fce016ca8ede8e9a0b3e9cdffcaada22
7fa45dd6a067c926ad3daefcf8f8a648f7cf21df
describe
'1023924' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOO' 'sip-files00259.tif'
21301b6cbaa1fe894d1f9ad1a6a3755c
86a6448d85d498ac88c7c595606d3b23b2db8578
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOP' 'sip-files00259.txt'
0ffa4132b7091345fb36c71870403a22
e8b3db28fe28c0c65443a5825af049315b7b417c
describe
'41685' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOQ' 'sip-files00259thm.jpg'
2382862b4563473342eba965656b24c0
15096246a90a097a3d37693c06bbb2ebeeac2429
describe
'129182' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOR' 'sip-files00260.jp2'
a1be3a0c38b070761cc73ca9ed30aadd
855462655410d6b0ee2e1dcf79e11fa2e303440d
describe
'156851' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOS' 'sip-files00260.jpg'
531ccf4ec2463f324a6347c10ac251c3
63d2099295d0873217debe8ae1ac5946b2927d45
describe
'25691' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOT' 'sip-files00260.pro'
221325d07e7bf4f3b53ed36bf0694154
84c2b2bfbcd010bb32be7bd665214ca6c2ab621f
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOU' 'sip-files00260.QC.jpg'
347b88b747e42ec466ee33163063f2cd
47ed5ddbcf260f3819507971504278007f099c88
describe
'1058264' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOV' 'sip-files00260.tif'
7e5b3b291138f9ea96e6170fe837f384
eaccacf0962ba2be6a26911422c56ff7602a7019
describe
'1087' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOW' 'sip-files00260.txt'
59a03b074e5b5d5c58ddbb7ce03cebeb
c5eee024643c4fecaebc91695dfa534123ca47cb
describe
'41359' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOX' 'sip-files00260thm.jpg'
b58d9f5ddcc9edc8678e888fa4604e4a
232e1701f4004c4fea55575ca2887bc033412b07
'2012-04-18T05:25:34-04:00'
describe
'125283' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOY' 'sip-files00261.jp2'
74bc359254e82dc381687d274379044f
fba4f648d7f4229976a6c935b913ad8c578e77b8
describe
'162349' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLOZ' 'sip-files00261.jpg'
0796cebbc56f9b8184a7e585ae5f9fa1
f75d04fb1ceb311303cef1bd24db80e766c316f5
describe
'27613' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPA' 'sip-files00261.pro'
02789c2020f66770b71b47c46b489746
0e9a5d84a5fb829863dc7b2d60fa6afb8266ee73
describe
'78692' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPB' 'sip-files00261.QC.jpg'
8196b255bee2f27311b07afd471b8542
fe6422825dedf7eef88529d974249e640c6ca5bc
describe
'1026536' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPC' 'sip-files00261.tif'
dc584ac62f7f8e35c3146b2997f9351f
601c3ae4112ebcca743269630e17da22bed40f33
'2012-04-18T05:23:41-04:00'
describe
'1191' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPD' 'sip-files00261.txt'
0cfdb9acae0dafe2fd0251e004f5963c
0237852714921eea42f8b828246b720a4f7c6d77
describe
'41250' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPE' 'sip-files00261thm.jpg'
dd83b2397b6018a1b6e0a2c7aa1ebd96
e13e1cf294174847cf506cc49ff8de8ff2cbcc45
describe
'127891' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPF' 'sip-files00262.jp2'
b54e0870199022c46737a431a41e580e
5a4ba740e99f5aae8821db7b0e4fae5d3f1c135a
describe
'159127' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPG' 'sip-files00262.jpg'
fd473d690b2791aaf53e6a4df027939a
d172686e232b063e4cd9834007d6aed5f6e2e2f2
describe
'27029' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPH' 'sip-files00262.pro'
1516a0bf546c25c5aeaee12b57ea0579
76e42d4a4320b0f0b36f7eee689cb357bf048da0
describe
'77777' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPI' 'sip-files00262.QC.jpg'
77e1e8664e909578626b6c87fb48f42c
70d17fed9722df341efec5053304015771af2e22
describe
'1046868' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPJ' 'sip-files00262.tif'
aac32fad43715c6b1208f3c2df0315d6
7e77bd8866b00f68dba8e2455898f2809b25dd90
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPK' 'sip-files00262.txt'
729c83eda4a7cb82d100d9c11ef478e0
3948fd5ef37d419589a75d9a0942ce67055cd683
describe
'40704' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPL' 'sip-files00262thm.jpg'
896910de25341aa3d7319223ccf877f5
72526f111c02fff63818a6776562ef4f4256b14e
describe
'127949' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPM' 'sip-files00263.jp2'
449baee848040ca5873ab33560be646b
53487ce5ad3538d54eb472005063de62754e949a
describe
'161891' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPN' 'sip-files00263.jpg'
19850fad030594809aa70e282e559b8f
5583a494d7f97d44840d36d6e24fac85b04c53b7
describe
'27061' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPO' 'sip-files00263.pro'
5dc7cbce678df16ca97d1476f9db9083
34e527f376ab3374c7e2af30a08bfe5f150790c2
describe
'79422' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPP' 'sip-files00263.QC.jpg'
e8b57b16b09ed1a8e6943811ce1d25fa
30b37c119c53e3ec29475bb72f3aefe389aeb549
describe
'1047448' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPQ' 'sip-files00263.tif'
f8a5048a8ab4109abc5f0c25046c2ad3
7eb5d59414e417047ff7c0b14f65fc7373f4c8a1
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPR' 'sip-files00263.txt'
0e271305fa8e066f5993f47a861c4c89
02b9051f9037f667afc695da50a126c7eec5f5aa
'2012-04-18T05:30:49-04:00'
describe
'41080' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPS' 'sip-files00263thm.jpg'
1cbe64f9865239ce616e0f763ec24733
aed752bf204fcf0ccaf744e407c96f39c75a27d1
describe
'128153' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPT' 'sip-files00264.jp2'
7668f585fa6890328048c87d12a486e8
d84f4cfe61ad9e277fe59fdd1bc54899d3c6c0a6
describe
'152414' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPU' 'sip-files00264.jpg'
8dca6a77eaf476bb840cf41972ffff61
8d7e02a72db68b3bd9afb84129e29c208ddcbde9
describe
'24418' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPV' 'sip-files00264.pro'
8d5fa42c03a43c6445e3fe3f561ea2a5
1a786256bb9732e877b012622ee41210e8ede367
describe
'75409' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPW' 'sip-files00264.QC.jpg'
f55bf72221855284254fc1b22c1d2391
ab127c5006516e0c9537f883f07c3a3065475bc9
describe
'1049548' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPX' 'sip-files00264.tif'
58417e10dc2c227de07e2a47d59e4a4a
0993b8ef4542a92fe3766f381cd0f97cc2622494
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPY' 'sip-files00264.txt'
c1dd47116e808424ede74c3877a7a698
358e6a74b270889c4fb53857520b8e1dc66ca6c3
describe
'39729' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLPZ' 'sip-files00264thm.jpg'
ad40aa6ea3665b97ce1d5df1b7a02dcb
937ef394eb0a2ca27527d92eab15c053d0359fb4
describe
'127348' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQA' 'sip-files00265.jp2'
af5bb9eea7f313ae85763af0377a051f
45c892a94dd7878e88cdcb8b2e42bccf46d455a4
describe
'156869' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQB' 'sip-files00265.jpg'
e27369f27a8685bfb73782902a4cae4f
f68ae5f103e641ad3ebf6575f60dd51384748098
describe
'25354' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQC' 'sip-files00265.pro'
fc0e827811ae43363f9b63738ab5daab
e92ee9d81ebeafec6c7d730d1b0e05bae2e5ea45
describe
'76646' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQD' 'sip-files00265.QC.jpg'
4585ad4c1c2ff610bfa42728db724026
e0f52b1a7a121a3c426f4890a027756aef8ab930
describe
'1042212' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQE' 'sip-files00265.tif'
56ef80865c853a3b37fb6a426f0759b4
2357cbca9e4522c526b5afeebb0578eaead34230
'2012-04-18T05:28:11-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQF' 'sip-files00265.txt'
bf4a8b23433bf183ec47c2d7e9a970ad
23429ee8b4029f4a146c3dc0432a9510d53ef87b
describe
'39446' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQG' 'sip-files00265thm.jpg'
14875fa1bb6322be84df54c8af353552
b5a4d098fe350ad9ca2b59532eccf5b8cd8f2142
describe
'126585' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQH' 'sip-files00266.jp2'
b73ab3f79f452f633d34223817b83662
516c3c1dbaf964020e8ca08e0a30daa495c52bb0
describe
'120036' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQI' 'sip-files00266.jpg'
069a1d02fe82278714babb9288634a8d
aa4cc85d67436c55b325f9f83c1ea67029bb8a98
describe
'18425' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQJ' 'sip-files00266.pro'
7a55a86bbd61a2a3f50a55d4752c3f73
d52c4432c6f1ded4a15c228ca5ef575004393fac
describe
'60879' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQK' 'sip-files00266.QC.jpg'
9c6d4a4f61640528eed3d360d37e7e08
824a13297c7bb2edbc875a33cbbcf9882ae92351
describe
'1034768' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQL' 'sip-files00266.tif'
9b470a288156e2500637ece53d10c1fb
c62eca75bccb0a78a12c3a63b6f80b71c34be396
describe
'799' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQM' 'sip-files00266.txt'
a3a23e8b600fb24cac342ecd73a75fe1
0ff9552a9e272943df82e35e43bc1c3069ba466e
describe
'34598' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQN' 'sip-files00266thm.jpg'
c293742a592c261592e64267b6151735
6ef639b319c30b430450a4ce81bc9f3cc782fbf8
describe
'126405' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQO' 'sip-files00267.jp2'
5be506bef4210b4ed716d30f76171835
7308dada5f0f7bc346651692a477df930aa39ad1
describe
'146349' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQP' 'sip-files00267.jpg'
c52d2f6a284fac7755c32f4ee016d92f
9a04687a1c664200c9155852b5a83f7b737064f0
describe
'23624' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQQ' 'sip-files00267.pro'
bddc4e59a563841c8b9c0461cad29f38
ceeea64296bd459adb9b9b9b5103b84c303e798c
describe
'70255' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQR' 'sip-files00267.QC.jpg'
d92cbc08b33f5b090818fbb04f8b49a4
0b3dc8ce1e17ef7c901bbac4762e82597a2cd401
describe
'1034240' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQS' 'sip-files00267.tif'
9d9efa4992c70b93c091f92db09d51af
590cbf972cfea4e94cc55319f04ebbaf7aa90565
describe
'991' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQT' 'sip-files00267.txt'
214cae261b59f01c247d75617c0a048f
c0229f912c2bf7a2c0e85ce233fa67e66f29a063
describe
'38325' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQU' 'sip-files00267thm.jpg'
737bf00627d2f260ae5f7383fce13103
ce8cbf7fba4d2424c48e2a368fae02c04de60a95
describe
'129041' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQV' 'sip-files00268.jp2'
5e6f69e67384e2291e155604be65f77b
db88e1de98acdcb830dab13cb501e06224af9749
describe
'163712' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQW' 'sip-files00268.jpg'
0464211d87fa31ee4fbda28eb5146b7a
217e8c74c86b098413e90bb3a74432c8a7ad7361
describe
'27133' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQX' 'sip-files00268.pro'
b27a72ea77531d2100025f6d38b2c6f2
1ff6a8b6d7020726e50e8e22d317dca7f99faf3b
describe
'78687' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQY' 'sip-files00268.QC.jpg'
714bdc9c7bfc90ce784786db5f7307a1
26e5dff9b40e1c3acf8b238f4edb0a15e2bd32cf
describe
'1056328' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLQZ' 'sip-files00268.tif'
46ceba0d7f0550cbdca921748047fc88
b3bcd1c8def654c33694f35c8310b92540f49c29
describe
'1155' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRA' 'sip-files00268.txt'
8138c98adf0c7d5f4c3a5cf747f43eea
d879efb45755da3299b6fe855f5eae4062495c2a
describe
'40376' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRB' 'sip-files00268thm.jpg'
47d01f5c0cd15dea9b44507602af2aad
0304d420dc58884e424519f4ef3dfb9c1ebb6fec
describe
'124640' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRC' 'sip-files00269.jp2'
5c60a7a188a85b24c91209ae7217173e
3a5519c37519753418152dadce38277ea421a025
describe
'164797' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRD' 'sip-files00269.jpg'
ca7cfab00ef40f1bef2554aec0f14659
8e283bf7ca49af506bbd2988b6bc9233397734d7
describe
'28325' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRE' 'sip-files00269.pro'
bb6bc9606717fbf22e614932fd004088
6c33eb5f9fedfa025d9675b122da5cf02790b4c0
describe
'77814' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRF' 'sip-files00269.QC.jpg'
168a9d502f4a979d495eca8eae828e47
d2dd168dcb60d96b23cf5b5a87c7cde9ee17c4bf
describe
'1021204' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRG' 'sip-files00269.tif'
a63198ef3d3f40d89f7784f9f3b96459
0abcd8c2eaadaece63bf38b08c4c98d552adba74
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRH' 'sip-files00269.txt'
cc6b9fa9402b8b0350e683a5a4cba565
003d9d3e364e48768b550c4abbbbecaaabd8567e
describe
'41107' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRI' 'sip-files00269thm.jpg'
53a6b4d1d20ab95d88ed4bf03ce6e2f2
24243d9b81cebf97677cb02f1993a820b888e74c
describe
'126945' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRJ' 'sip-files00270.jp2'
58022b4a4db952a89ad885967204e80d
17998471337858661e50952e4188f26745298850
describe
'155694' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRK' 'sip-files00270.jpg'
f78f85370f6867a2d81bd139f8da7df5
84e74404ef9f610f0e48737f9e015d64e5f0c7b4
describe
'26723' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRL' 'sip-files00270.pro'
280d60c8ba0850bf39a5ed353a409ebf
77a0299297cf272030d267b783d79dc3e977b6f2
describe
'75560' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRM' 'sip-files00270.QC.jpg'
20452ce0d14a22108e7340a8bf7f5fb6
7ae382477c88d7296fd933a2d9171e2aeb7caf1f
describe
'1046396' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRN' 'sip-files00270.tif'
5418a5ec6aa91f8a8a3d9379a41cc38b
7adffe7eda8314549d0735e6e258ce4dee839d86
describe
'1156' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRO' 'sip-files00270.txt'
7c4bdf6ada7d165fd3ef4b0e5a4dc8fd
364ed6e0c507d3a9970af44be854ce66801663b2
describe
'39767' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRP' 'sip-files00270thm.jpg'
22c6722f40f9a487e897dad41cb53894
c0fa6990af8c21106e3378f003f2ce76bdebc88c
describe
'126897' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRQ' 'sip-files00271.jp2'
94e90299cbb6abc671ec63f74fccf773
a29b06561971e1857c440feaa4c854b71ac84734
describe
'160649' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRR' 'sip-files00271.jpg'
53592f65dcf62cb7d1d6935ee3200cec
a73a8fcdbb7b5675ebbd906060568213db9a884b
describe
'27775' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRS' 'sip-files00271.pro'
97dccf327191b0e46d743c47cdf8fa83
73ef68683445b3666072582886ffb1aaa0a07842
describe
'76926' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRT' 'sip-files00271.QC.jpg'
deb0ba561bb0532b3542447d91897f30
cfddeed74fe2b040515af9f10de5bc257c24202f
describe
'1046644' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRU' 'sip-files00271.tif'
f48e5204bb6a842deb568f379073a8de
1b8411af35dc675bd196f55eac8822fefde7be13
describe
'1173' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRV' 'sip-files00271.txt'
7dd98186dd8c01de443c77f30f0dfa74
fc0097fe5c32e2948e5cf0c61f5e26f770796e9a
describe
'40829' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRW' 'sip-files00271thm.jpg'
6ef973a3a999187b1f67713a4c5e0d89
eee51f0810c8bfb6ac2719a5031e652947bcb628
describe
'126673' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRX' 'sip-files00272.jp2'
af9a03ccbed1965a6eef9b7b9fe49322
72c04546e0407fd4936f48e34fea6bb76b7acca1
describe
'166934' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRY' 'sip-files00272.jpg'
8d682d58f649537a8d035be0a19412a6
f9711dd595f53ffdec86244e4b3bde95f5b03216
describe
'28714' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLRZ' 'sip-files00272.pro'
3db41af127304681291d87470ea63355
88f2eb377ba44f4eec13196089a4d9f4d1a54b90
describe
'78626' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSA' 'sip-files00272.QC.jpg'
124b5e12603f3fab1b9f4892b0378128
4e947f46c5094ce447a840218d40cadc31efd4ca
describe
'1045540' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSB' 'sip-files00272.tif'
ccfb6eed0590c7f554e58cc7cce97c5e
cb2a4af68db8a1f44f249b63c5eeab70c4f0214e
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSC' 'sip-files00272.txt'
1e65dc4fe301adc092c69728e8de3d9c
744cccaeba31283a911456a26a9b3a9c83f5b818
describe
'41521' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSD' 'sip-files00272thm.jpg'
92ec74cde00af3ba2741c0201bcb156d
bdc4b7c34d293534058b191186d9bff8d15932f6
describe
'125698' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSE' 'sip-files00273.jp2'
822f5d7e0c4febc39389832c22f8d0ac
ccff4d184140475d5d69a7fa31ba0647e10413d8
describe
'165305' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSF' 'sip-files00273.jpg'
38f4cb465d513104564f86d0031d55ee
bcb758ad263f4d87ec9c57a19c22f711ec96a972
describe
'27622' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSG' 'sip-files00273.pro'
1279fc9de741684f4698446a0e972e3d
b6d8c427bff06b751fc9b99879049ffa6a69cd51
describe
'79781' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSH' 'sip-files00273.QC.jpg'
ffeeb64ccf35d48b4140adbe4d9f917d
260e3a475dd0aca2b9a52ec44f2416f9b4b258a5
describe
'1037698' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSI' 'sip-files00273.tif'
b1f90fb54d0613a4003e38ca415d50d8
3211ca1483ed7f861d6d21199dd682bca44441eb
describe
'1185' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSJ' 'sip-files00273.txt'
a4a8af4119a6f3757b590040600afe75
6449fbe8e38386c646ceb3b464679510b9a2f0c0
describe
Invalid character
'41179' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSK' 'sip-files00273thm.jpg'
4a1072adfc6fae653fb03915c2fa2eb4
ff7a73a2c98fcf3a891794416b31372a38a880cc
describe
'128971' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSL' 'sip-files00274.jp2'
ea851add019a3ec3d1399322405819be
55fcf10377e906c15b1805f42fb451d6ad504e42
describe
'163598' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSM' 'sip-files00274.jpg'
e7a0596b20b63b5689a48362ece868c6
a1b46706d64b1bda532f3d996c0679c8bd2f5730
describe
'28085' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSN' 'sip-files00274.pro'
29edf6e1c00ffd2d4133a46f8c4ab9bf
bdb95c252a6201bc88895385194cf3abb49c50b5
describe
'76981' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSO' 'sip-files00274.QC.jpg'
24d8b542f17fb239fab9cc30cbd004e2
901702aec97bac621845ec172d6f300f8221f222
describe
'1063664' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSP' 'sip-files00274.tif'
87c5c9daef121750eab5bb6faa0a88c9
05882722653bf913b786c38e234577735e5cc760
describe
'1222' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSQ' 'sip-files00274.txt'
2c2ad3609b47e86ce7c73741358c70a5
be1c5eb499e58be6db2cef524d209684cd2c1aff
describe
'40588' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSR' 'sip-files00274thm.jpg'
3c18316a784d05257d6de4906b24c8a3
72a002fc3ca77fd0276287ef068b86a904e50066
describe
'127809' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSS' 'sip-files00275.jp2'
3b033d25058e96eedb0def6adb89ed4f
66511ac0addaaff7568690f89c964cb170b2fe1d
describe
'162677' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLST' 'sip-files00275.jpg'
2b62a615babedf481cf4bee593aa5147
5fe8a13b1a30045ca632cc904ef8ebb53d11d0fe
describe
'29301' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSU' 'sip-files00275.pro'
ea536378f5b61c7494ab0bbad171edaa
9e8ca12095faae1652be641e37515bb7021239c9
describe
'78752' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSV' 'sip-files00275.QC.jpg'
3ec6c80190a5027e9d775ccf9e987edd
a764fc87fc3541194a220d1a3e2dbef5cd58bc12
describe
'1054688' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSW' 'sip-files00275.tif'
6cfd8e809307fc9d95d656388c6b124c
ad29b32c64cdce84d3a7f68762817c418c29049e
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSX' 'sip-files00275.txt'
b7a1ce06a2631d6dba4071747921b9eb
fd1168c37fe538b43f626f2f40211844584eecf5
describe
'40702' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSY' 'sip-files00275thm.jpg'
90f523d8cd86a7bf8c9e9d99e75ddc0f
2fc3496d493ebcda1e5df3588c73ccaac75dac32
describe
'132024' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLSZ' 'sip-files00276.jp2'
f55dc69a250aed86bf8027254884d08e
1a65599ca2fcdd085e68baa6fbd53e0539677931
'2012-04-18T05:31:26-04:00'
describe
'164581' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTA' 'sip-files00276.jpg'
b8e877ebfe565e8c4d676c947a81a7a4
cf44bf8cea7645001adf00d4de3aee6bea20cf19
describe
'27655' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTB' 'sip-files00276.pro'
92ec6146bae02a2b146ed81eb384e3cc
32e9281238d72d0e4e439984e81959fbef4eddfb
describe
'79586' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTC' 'sip-files00276.QC.jpg'
8488a1171737a08d1c679c793b13f005
2497385bd648679f488001cb4ea9cbb80f1946e0
describe
'1088042' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTD' 'sip-files00276.tif'
1ebeafd82691ea36edbe2d6be2c42501
019d6a1f326a50116d62ad62ed60396197384fc2
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTE' 'sip-files00276.txt'
463e3b80d4daf70105cda41fa8bc160c
34e7d96abc7009d958eff3496fd8385bdc0f7e13
describe
'40195' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTF' 'sip-files00276thm.jpg'
a7f88b2dca31ceffeab1ff895d1291ad
2a595f7f02e820b5baf8f3510e5553fadb8ee9cc
describe
'127185' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTG' 'sip-files00277.jp2'
a45d193d7c4bc37f78dcdf3e332185a4
2aa549144fc63bed5a5f4bc8ac33df08ea9a5e90
describe
'153086' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTH' 'sip-files00277.jpg'
19d36a2ce98e7739e269ca425d3ff591
64d878dc15d596aee7325014a1b8a8b5a59f9eb3
describe
'26371' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTI' 'sip-files00277.pro'
9ba5d63a1357ac5b9fe15aa54751ef18
6f7b6eed9e6af635a3c13f66be0253ad440e3604
describe
'74695' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTJ' 'sip-files00277.QC.jpg'
e342926e3d11609ad9a5f62ff2ad4520
76d8539c95798db8e537b1f31bd1b73a78007138
describe
'1048958' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTK' 'sip-files00277.tif'
de1f92aecaa7ad568222baab8773020c
3d596dcce6f0d7aadb744e56cfc3d08fac68f846
describe
'1114' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTL' 'sip-files00277.txt'
866be7a1f1497fb1a9cc2a9e1fa41a0d
5031e991d42fee2a8ee13ba06e198104bb272e0c
describe
'40074' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTM' 'sip-files00277thm.jpg'
fe272f35524472b882df680a8b32ecac
6597dfb561790f1d5e2421fb2192097041944c70
describe
'129384' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTN' 'sip-files00278.jp2'
8cad57c935c1bcc8a2ce9b0694388320
77964bacaa26baecdfdbdb8f9e8fa88f4ca62593
describe
'159439' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTO' 'sip-files00278.jpg'
eba1d511a048d7bd77d68230e22736ab
c1be4290d8c9900f820c5b4efc5aee9376c8a3f2
describe
'26996' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTP' 'sip-files00278.pro'
e84a3846e8df9e65c0376dd6818bcae7
ac25aa945f7e7e5382faa3af7df7eb3fe2e68075
describe
'76935' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTQ' 'sip-files00278.QC.jpg'
eb3b378b7efdc776388afaa9d77235f5
c3cbd0ae1f7c8fa6671cff86cf50ea977c8c83db
describe
'1066376' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTR' 'sip-files00278.tif'
283bdd846f48a961757d05392e18a4f0
9f20850b1d6321bc469a8fbd56bf67a215d60675
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTS' 'sip-files00278.txt'
b665cc0adbfc8199b3cd9b2a1b946ca2
838410266beb750abf6ce916a02206a94bfe84c8
describe
'39899' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTT' 'sip-files00278thm.jpg'
fbd021c5c2060481525952b9b297afce
2238519e0044484b6fe06e5ed0c6ff1f3a6ddb51
describe
'126785' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTU' 'sip-files00279.jp2'
30728b68d39bbd9b6e664c092f6148a9
22554cec6c6187d4672019c8cb8e9ae0698cea77
describe
'160272' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTV' 'sip-files00279.jpg'
e794038d4b8dfdf8f612dd6983840db9
058ea2ab342d09506b52b5d82e5cdea75574a6dc
describe
'26368' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTW' 'sip-files00279.pro'
2b5dc236f0ee4f92e065b84e570f2b20
048bfdb80f8fcf6077e98a5ccdcdae6701e56412
describe
'76826' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTX' 'sip-files00279.QC.jpg'
7318c31ce4f22825cfc5e132980212fe
f94d7d061dc1c01cb021acc6356313318092cd8d
describe
'1045746' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTY' 'sip-files00279.tif'
a2ddad2aae2b0f34bc977a5dc4f4f5d1
22514c769427530c6b6452b9eb36492fefdcfc47
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLTZ' 'sip-files00279.txt'
23d946edb1320cbad1e4f13b7f4d17ca
c9fe45265c3323532294f790b6911a85cd203f4f
'2012-04-18T05:29:11-04:00'
describe
'40297' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUA' 'sip-files00279thm.jpg'
822c0490134c246dcd7ae17e8895ca76
751e4af2ea9eb45bfc8b6ff1da0fa2bb7bc6ae7a
'2012-04-18T05:26:42-04:00'
describe
'128949' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUB' 'sip-files00280.jp2'
be8ebc4b7ba2313e575952bc735ba739
f46525845ee9965d5f359d8b3a528f818a2d92d9
describe
'160739' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUC' 'sip-files00280.jpg'
f7f5965718cd509c54d0092621b32370
f7da2834d455d5b2aaeb0033c031a3ce5f938ad1
describe
'27166' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUD' 'sip-files00280.pro'
4d92ae4ee04b1bf4bcc5dc1f6b9864a4
2fb1a2e627c44a725d1e3f4a383dd56fb5b5a1b9
describe
'78207' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUE' 'sip-files00280.QC.jpg'
616f6f914252393dd9da8d8caa7f17eb
2fcc3ada745aa1bf6a6e0548c905128660df89df
describe
'1063440' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUF' 'sip-files00280.tif'
e1f66f2d74d398988dbc23de3ec08fc5
023ca96cc49f3ac4697e3c3348ed695af2f56d36
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUG' 'sip-files00280.txt'
2441ce4e90dce57aad973d0768b88670
58c9fdcaaf378967f59f473136112992d25a30c8
describe
'40802' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUH' 'sip-files00280thm.jpg'
36881f132d8ece9d1fab9f6c24a02261
f7d892c24eaa9252560299deef6219fc55578293
describe
'125575' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUI' 'sip-files00281.jp2'
20f58d10cc8caedea29cc2fa1d8ac35f
cdccaf2d8da6f962ecb91f084f4652a61fe4bda3
describe
'140002' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUJ' 'sip-files00281.jpg'
2334c446ac30f089c941b7c54b253cac
77bc4edc78af4aacc36f37302899857314481aa9
describe
'23513' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUK' 'sip-files00281.pro'
fce97298a7b76866b47f37349009edc3
32b00a4a62f2adcf56c7bb63422e46a4779ab954
describe
'69205' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUL' 'sip-files00281.QC.jpg'
d8190244af1fb7f702030e78a743f1e3
206bb24092656b91dc6f52a1f82c33913613dc12
describe
'1034860' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUM' 'sip-files00281.tif'
751e343250a8e6e87d058a7fb29b13ee
159086fbfffc2cb8c1a42c8485286e48b8cfe52f
describe
'1005' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUN' 'sip-files00281.txt'
c731a2b374262bbfa937c7b5dd409f1e
6723e23fe329bf00cf88f01815a3a5bdcecf8ea4
describe
'38669' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUO' 'sip-files00281thm.jpg'
76e95ab2a49e936a74eb6f90bab02278
86da0db9c4d27c773e24bfec65f46a61ab6ae100
describe
'130589' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUP' 'sip-files00282.jp2'
09b3cf44b000c6dac546ed059faac9cd
0a072ff630df4ca7c7135b316b14064a56fd6388
describe
'143512' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUQ' 'sip-files00282.jpg'
e4ad3e4beb59cdf461e4328e319f5183
fbf8a1b3a57a4706d8942f481fc3a2bda8525735
describe
'23976' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUR' 'sip-files00282.pro'
ce27b0926a4e338a0295933ea4f697e4
b172e9a4111e1863b850eeaa32e93a1ebc3cecd9
describe
'68910' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUS' 'sip-files00282.QC.jpg'
997e200da5eef02d68d8e5288272d5c6
0f25418e62d8df3977d03fd97338ef962eb1e0c0
describe
'1074744' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUT' 'sip-files00282.tif'
d1cf0b938631443a47844d52110776b4
7cec6a28fd8b03038bd9142d258ad3279b170114
describe
'1028' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUU' 'sip-files00282.txt'
d483a0feb3e7ff7c0bbbbe473578f2d0
d9819e84bdd17f3b33d932a65e8ce8cd563e17b7
describe
'38322' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUV' 'sip-files00282thm.jpg'
1c30f6be0631189b1592febedc633143
dc36c1252e3b4f895ece6e77719f32b40608a78b
describe
'128623' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUW' 'sip-files00283.jp2'
35c3e2bb8fb1fa19f51d54981fbe59fe
d59012489874b31fa4e9778972848767c91781e1
describe
'160496' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUX' 'sip-files00283.jpg'
b7f1c3ed9761395e5866c629976a4062
d2aa31014f897fa99bee1766bd8944f9459966c7
describe
'26706' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUY' 'sip-files00283.pro'
e8ce58fab8eaaf4447c5fd912e0cc0f9
3d06b1d284677dcb1a118a63f1a1ee68be4144fa
describe
'78101' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLUZ' 'sip-files00283.QC.jpg'
fe40bc3044cf5a8f8de1da0c37cc7108
d1f975df687f8d329435381c9253f13d90c4a17b
describe
'1060768' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVA' 'sip-files00283.tif'
8462cf6377ec5f5e7024f72c710bf653
27712880d75da00ff4c57fa4813c83da3323452a
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVB' 'sip-files00283.txt'
87a3c33c5079ecbe7e7e36182366c5ac
0f8902f7a99e72e29ebc9680accfb1afc35804dd
describe
'39997' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVC' 'sip-files00283thm.jpg'
5e1a0134ed8e34929bcc76d5f78cc3da
8d432b094c43cd7382d029d2aeca22da72f420b6
describe
'130432' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVD' 'sip-files00284.jp2'
0ece041cf6fa8e99c44e8a108c45f14c
1d36d6af7cd6a5c267fe95a576af7582f791d4d5
describe
'164411' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVE' 'sip-files00284.jpg'
656142fa1791c349091051f3aebc7713
8f077568efa8fed10e70a9f11070ca89e847cce0
describe
'26965' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVF' 'sip-files00284.pro'
afe51aec99cc759f66e7adbaa7c99e3e
5a1fe033b8f733c4ba0942567ac82ffa50ebd16f
describe
'77694' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVG' 'sip-files00284.QC.jpg'
c80a0f2b31c74186f313bea481829fbf
f80244ad1d654316112fc7e0cf712ea218d44324
describe
'1075284' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVH' 'sip-files00284.tif'
eb0e71b17c20650cddcd1153477424d5
4f8dd371347a922e5b8e2905ce4c2bab5f65160b
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVI' 'sip-files00284.txt'
e107cb979dbd511da2510338a48dc3e2
f62ce853ac60f59d1c4403299715fa85598b92a8
describe
'41118' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVJ' 'sip-files00284thm.jpg'
d6486714f17ef212b705ad627ce2a8b8
31df69274b44656c2a2a32ad7db2ceb72ac820e3
describe
'126144' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVK' 'sip-files00285.jp2'
e951fc841aad0ff8fca5b8527fcf6bc3
b2b5dc60190703a25f67785fd050e317d833d43e
describe
'164800' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVL' 'sip-files00285.jpg'
2403cd1a480c95f4e32a8bb3b187efd3
ada411ddd1b5f4d684762652db8585a28089c340
describe
'27342' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVM' 'sip-files00285.pro'
26a7ee536a57ed9999368e4747f9859a
75b5c077830c4272623dae62fbaa1f01b1a33944
describe
'79312' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVN' 'sip-files00285.QC.jpg'
e3c30e64eab375af205b6565d5c12165
32d83f86bf80d4f14b55e86f24207fe17c04e4b4
describe
'1042004' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVO' 'sip-files00285.tif'
62830b7da011b03b61d145d89ffb1687
2d45254634565a5db93d62a5089602c0598e3c79
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVP' 'sip-files00285.txt'
5875e2682c96b476ac4581ad24cd6ce0
a778da43d1f5628dbf58b295ff399bfc18bacbfb
describe
'41572' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVQ' 'sip-files00285thm.jpg'
268326ab95d349141b2739f5cb461925
a61c5610ab0a2b887d0baa86acb1e9c1efb7c05a
describe
'127855' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVR' 'sip-files00286.jp2'
a82dff9f5869e0c3fff5114e6941f81e
e1672c08af94826dd879fb27a127a379db4dd98e
describe
'155804' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVS' 'sip-files00286.jpg'
06ce867c2631200ed922ae17280e1d3e
1e5fcf7f53ca4e187658d11c28f8423a8d1d8e86
describe
'26496' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVT' 'sip-files00286.pro'
4344900e645682814bc43c00bdf1393d
ee6149effa9b4310dde667156a4a408e4f05fbd3
describe
'77609' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVU' 'sip-files00286.QC.jpg'
0213a336968c6c41220ced8ef932667d
ff7ba6cd9ec91c12421d92fdd67467c6806b4290
describe
'1054682' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVV' 'sip-files00286.tif'
6dcedcc09c0b49f9afdcb8ee0f82f6e9
d68183e842280277ad89951f92ad3f0a6fb744b0
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVW' 'sip-files00286.txt'
23fec86ac299becb9d542a66a6e3de61
db47410d47f4784cfdd208dda2efeb75a3d62f6f
describe
'40931' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVX' 'sip-files00286thm.jpg'
26e5e5142cfd6a04f5156e34c251c0bf
1d92e553ad0e544a2e3ef5a10207a725553f50e4
describe
'125408' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVY' 'sip-files00287.jp2'
9d5d50fe6be9dff1a2f755d670fa8378
0ca3798f7cd61124cbb9cdd08e0695f810aa9349
describe
'164656' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLVZ' 'sip-files00287.jpg'
b3df96ccf52f8c7be4ecefd6bd519ae6
5eed73382d7ad8b7578a292284b7f42f999a76b2
describe
'26941' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWA' 'sip-files00287.pro'
97760ad96b70377f3ac93476d7b88679
7e0efe743d5ca7cd56fec14ff22344f294ebee40
describe
'79838' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWB' 'sip-files00287.QC.jpg'
1dda59276b321728cb3377879d8f1267
95ab0c6b792af116e5bd9442a75e039bd2f1dbb1
describe
'1036126' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWC' 'sip-files00287.tif'
ee8ce7edf465f404a816b4cb311b81bd
e0cce617ea33860c16fd19bc451589b67048e30e
'2012-04-18T05:22:55-04:00'
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWD' 'sip-files00287.txt'
955cf09d2ae3cbc53af1d79b255df09c
f0df4f21f3ed2979831409f7c9910693327dfb30
describe
'41672' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWE' 'sip-files00287thm.jpg'
1f74cac97f66804330aa94038b319d06
2a3ccdf8db14dc958da3bf0fa50047b149dac472
describe
'128317' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWF' 'sip-files00288.jp2'
cb7f7f07f70ec8c72b688163672565d5
73978f60e772fdf8ec34b6bb1f2715c79ef93050
describe
'162582' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWG' 'sip-files00288.jpg'
a727229808b95453fdd5827cfad33b92
4d5603f2f6e8508db84a72d6628321144c1bb7a5
describe
'28609' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWH' 'sip-files00288.pro'
52956ccee18274e6b32a9c57a1c5be32
8887b5d78e0fba8a6d54d7a277c00e0da4e9fcf4
describe
'78721' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWI' 'sip-files00288.QC.jpg'
bfaad9afd358ea30cc8601ae5b72af3d
0ca7774c9e0d1df6f05401d206838d051febc115
describe
'1058864' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWJ' 'sip-files00288.tif'
d69c5ad59cbc1fde3d77878598922f73
51747ba83e968e9f863d373e4213869c3d18b19a
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWK' 'sip-files00288.txt'
8eb484030ac2a244329e4c39de732615
fa8d3e8226bddffb2c62eae8d3e795fb7040188a
describe
'40580' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWL' 'sip-files00288thm.jpg'
d74a0290e8cb48ad1c6f03e53316c158
005eaf99d8a580431cbb57ef72603a3358320b5f
describe
'128004' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWM' 'sip-files00289.jp2'
ed798b60c83270087fe4ff8817af958c
e050a47f1d4c2abce27ea8e80b50898fec81a043
describe
'170739' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWN' 'sip-files00289.jpg'
809deb8c4e4bd8193882df5998eb82b1
5d63f5f36489ff64a3b4d9f476b0b6d6550dc613
describe
'28908' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWO' 'sip-files00289.pro'
9241204f23b303a0218c3ab66ff77b66
a3efbde1b7b1ced46aabb5b5ed55b817424136aa
describe
'81502' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWP' 'sip-files00289.QC.jpg'
198bc26504b02bce1e16d8fe114dfddb
172faa9982e801e1ace3531fdf77008e8c227bb5
describe
'1057192' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWQ' 'sip-files00289.tif'
14966265d552549147c375b62be24ab8
ffb71068e0c5f5737350690451058ffa05f29348
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWR' 'sip-files00289.txt'
45ae0b2a916c9ce38f5f11e0c07683a0
169d7a03136c9db02dcd569cc481bf2e4c78fa1a
describe
'41355' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWS' 'sip-files00289thm.jpg'
53ce74882af9a8cd25268c10a41d1120
9a5a7ec4f62b4da1e86ceb67b1b1113f6c85a430
describe
'127498' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWT' 'sip-files00290.jp2'
3ff7a8ec589beb8dff5d65aa434e5607
5e8e3321ffaeed6866b748764efd8e79c82c4842
describe
'168246' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWU' 'sip-files00290.jpg'
dbc4b3076e137441c9988f5995426f18
ea3e90deea7956c019b991e4bd94881fe6da58eb
describe
'29246' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWV' 'sip-files00290.pro'
0eb172ec2f7f308317ac18cad7bca9d3
a087c094b91a719b5624dd75c92437b30e12d9cf
describe
'81000' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWW' 'sip-files00290.QC.jpg'
c7cabf326564a4b074be7a19fa833e58
a615c67baa2cd15f9546d3cd61023479d1ffdff9
describe
'1052914' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWX' 'sip-files00290.tif'
78d4089cd9a366acbf6489e1aba97b1c
f32624db21510ebe866e1919d3ffee44ee6aa3f9
describe
'1244' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWY' 'sip-files00290.txt'
206c6bb741753166c99d3ba77bf2eafe
c5296232a88fdc56b7e71c9df0bd25dcaca062a7
describe
'41204' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLWZ' 'sip-files00290thm.jpg'
b2b9e5137ce23369217b7d032f22cbf1
795bf51569098330c500f4c835c8d5a5434f87d5
describe
'130932' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXA' 'sip-files00291.jp2'
50aafa4879088a9cc94e71b41e343708
b10e1f017c30bcd1620eea7e600e243c7765f149
describe
'148895' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXB' 'sip-files00291.jpg'
3cfd6622ffad173d780678ea966cb44a
e72a8d730ebf8ae4d0577a0115d0a01843189e45
describe
'25385' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXC' 'sip-files00291.pro'
794722d620880ae884dd7d10cc62d861
9a60a775474e314a6a15d8f7c57eda584ddf898d
describe
'73731' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXD' 'sip-files00291.QC.jpg'
341a499fa6cde8a6f6da60e385a973e0
7ee030280d30ef8c7b48623a193ce116e0dcc390
describe
'1079328' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXE' 'sip-files00291.tif'
101ec5763d9ae907f9ab275849c0aba4
fdb25bce5e7d1d790771171823c1d3484f5c37cf
describe
'1068' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXF' 'sip-files00291.txt'
1b06964b99c7e484754ae631508a89f5
1f1ad7cd77b95d840c18dd075b678d149fc9793e
describe
'40290' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXG' 'sip-files00291thm.jpg'
2b741357b0116013e1b39e95407096f6
fd97d3705e619ba0b398f5a6d6bb60d2dbc78999
describe
'131806' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXH' 'sip-files00292.jp2'
debb7090a58dbd304a4fe241cd54cd25
a42fffc21da8c4ec293c21e9cb64cf25683751f7
describe
'162731' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXI' 'sip-files00292.jpg'
85d803a1257870db43675d50ab5c9af2
6d7bd4f0f6a3d57bd334411b62b7a5ce8b4ae1ef
describe
'27540' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXJ' 'sip-files00292.pro'
0ad9d69d881f5d0b8cb69e9ca78eee1b
e468b4880d130b6603fa69b93cee2b13cea03310
describe
'78638' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXK' 'sip-files00292.QC.jpg'
902f45b42d34f6730d5fca8733cdfd2c
cd677a90bb4c3392d74e9dab201a6ab691cad581
describe
'1086840' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXL' 'sip-files00292.tif'
c63f79b06ca4322f5045a0466d87682c
8b314c2adaf98e8d42a9658f635e3e0924c6b7e7
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXM' 'sip-files00292.txt'
e216e09601e7413ed9e9579fe2506d57
d9d972325a888f38898a3afdd26719380dba8a1c
describe
'40555' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXN' 'sip-files00292thm.jpg'
30da1773b34d6629317322c265173462
0303ddd74c6a3571bf6f5a1bfe50a5692eb0c13e
describe
'129682' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXO' 'sip-files00293.jp2'
39ad0445bf0c2eed2b76f2a18ad5c1bd
eb18e7102e010a507b815321ccaf181966f1f024
describe
'157325' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXP' 'sip-files00293.jpg'
f27afe601a60a1772740aac16df51b97
0ef180e45f6a10723d3afc0f7c32e81764c1de30
describe
'26777' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXQ' 'sip-files00293.pro'
e3e7a7fab8ac95f624bf7360f07029c3
62b942391d32fc933c1985fd32192dd718be8c4f
describe
'76307' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXR' 'sip-files00293.QC.jpg'
e37154d6fbbd7d1f0e7180f85e58564d
9b7740eeacd3d6e6756ed21cd75caf43e7b4c6b5
describe
'1069202' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXS' 'sip-files00293.tif'
8277880940a27c890ecebf10d7310e17
36cdf73a618c5dbfed06f436f7cb9275bc035f1a
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXT' 'sip-files00293.txt'
3fe39e23ba877511f1851abbf9470948
00da18bc2c9baffada2ffd0c89a6270e396d4c41
describe
'40661' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXU' 'sip-files00293thm.jpg'
59b5621d2513d5c85c28e3f54f465683
85a4bc41b78780c42b91f10f8f29d2418540707e
describe
'130808' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXV' 'sip-files00294.jp2'
608f1d82f3a56018bdea4e6ddfac1f93
32f1ce345cb522a2ae9c6acbfa8e75b364697dbc
describe
'126906' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXW' 'sip-files00294.jpg'
09a9107362ab93ac3e05cfa5fd15c73e
3ddbac3d238b0652ab22d0abdc84be38cefbe4fe
describe
'21245' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXX' 'sip-files00294.pro'
880ff5ab584e7371b2f91bda3818c60d
80a09ecf9aadb2befacebc724d520e89c15d0ca4
describe
'63354' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXY' 'sip-files00294.QC.jpg'
2a444aec76dcb4eb34313d2082cb0864
6625522f45e4b9b2aa7674584f3b2d3fc30d009e
describe
'1076588' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLXZ' 'sip-files00294.tif'
30f035814b50d883ceca1211e2f0dffa
fdf9f9d2a8d6dd0ecf69138c98311b2b6b660f5d
describe
'958' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYA' 'sip-files00294.txt'
d9059629c037f0a1e89489d7aa08f863
309e78f957e7c8292b1ccbd799b899729febbd40
describe
'35277' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYB' 'sip-files00294thm.jpg'
01f8c9cef93d4c14f7cc2207490ce507
da00653dafde3c734e4f0176402c431f206dee69
describe
'129663' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYC' 'sip-files00295.jp2'
de9d542cfe2473d770f593d6164879b8
cff00177d8d9c90cfb962fc492651b71f54445ea
describe
'147451' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYD' 'sip-files00295.jpg'
641d1cfb29f43d2d3c430d80b68ae9e3
28ae3354b17edc29d4b1c641a1d1b1fcada7c0d7
describe
'24789' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYE' 'sip-files00295.pro'
4db8a153d1d880c01486ab30023d6530
f55a5767318f8da0ea0af3e6ab7b522ce2f4269b
describe
'72649' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYF' 'sip-files00295.QC.jpg'
79203f2527bdf61a894a5b03fbb5f934
b1c1ecdfc34cd999236ef05ec3401d406c2381e4
describe
'1068704' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYG' 'sip-files00295.tif'
c80e70aa999db7f8ec8580497b0da7fd
8753d91d8de8a64416053ea8f829f81e79fae3e1
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYH' 'sip-files00295.txt'
505053e9b023379568373d559f16d5ab
fac82550a19a6eb164601f75d5a9c02b3290dc43
describe
'39483' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYI' 'sip-files00295thm.jpg'
34c2daf7b2cf7bf0139ef50686af9a9a
af11ceace1e004e676a1631ca8c3040203fd1d2b
describe
'130059' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYJ' 'sip-files00296.jp2'
4b82b0282e571b8cc1e6b096c9599db3
ef9fac14f2c6734cbbe792a75b93fbf8494914a5
describe
'149337' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYK' 'sip-files00296.jpg'
b1a28fa332887b0ce0cea96c96603500
19a0a9a013ccd8b6e3889c17c78748844d717fb9
describe
'24809' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYL' 'sip-files00296.pro'
50fe76d4f717ff0e3193515c65546705
b76c10b925fd36a898804d84e256e589f1307443
describe
'74022' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYM' 'sip-files00296.QC.jpg'
cfe78c2e8b043e32120661c999a7d220
a2a96d7a4895357990ebb617da10a44e30c0ea6b
describe
'1073298' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYN' 'sip-files00296.tif'
d59fe7beb06c4653d1727dbcceaea295
31bafcbeccbcc5ec1f88a6e506284f82975cae30
describe
'1095' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYO' 'sip-files00296.txt'
f3f8ede4e493570afe0adf189bf5f543
dffe9346001f48a3e37b6ffce0bd47d9ea863812
describe
'39470' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYP' 'sip-files00296thm.jpg'
71d3704509ca3b27672742fd7d4c1ac3
568f2e9cb6777b93f8bbd3743d555b73464fe926
describe
'129892' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYQ' 'sip-files00297.jp2'
6d09e2f3876b68e3df713cb4a0b5d4f4
01ccc184bc5e2944ecb580933e7263dbf9b0c348
describe
'156386' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYR' 'sip-files00297.jpg'
75c5031556bc3aec8020d71dfbfc701b
6247b2e7ee7378e5ccd48f0d8de9b5c91c9e198f
describe
'26303' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYS' 'sip-files00297.pro'
d77dd8a1e185ea774a0f4633bb129742
61c3991184cad37da6a5d08d571dc9f77be62fec
describe
'76226' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYT' 'sip-files00297.QC.jpg'
37e0c756ec92029a99c53b38300f37c4
18c6a4c783a44cdeeb6ea0e28f695689abea3e91
describe
'1070746' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYU' 'sip-files00297.tif'
b36fa6e51f514b21539cd3904fce35f4
ca0e246cb8b1dd3aaa4e7255cb766ce7d027026a
describe
'1133' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYV' 'sip-files00297.txt'
4801178de4c5f4571d4309fd427cd6f6
601ae485e29cdf454ff5d7cb0bd9cdb794c5d0b4
describe
'39655' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYW' 'sip-files00297thm.jpg'
1e95d2e64681eb35f6242909cf7d2d52
46d91954f0bfa36a07f6ce12790bd6158e2e5d88
describe
'129822' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYX' 'sip-files00298.jp2'
45fd57920d0df1950219c01675a9e123
8bdf76a3d13ded672b91eeac36470c7f690c4a58
describe
'152943' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYY' 'sip-files00298.jpg'
1848b088f1506cfb7676728827ca6842
a522081f2711b9f86d26129727a9181cbd75756a
describe
'26054' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLYZ' 'sip-files00298.pro'
087367c1a54c9f32e4b96ba9adf9616b
93d1d7834be13377ac6e30d4ca706beabd73731e
describe
'74495' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZA' 'sip-files00298.QC.jpg'
e4081155ff69edaf7fb73ea466f448a9
779bd7dc42cede53beb5908b20a10cca0ee0dbb3
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZB' 'sip-files00298.tif'
b47218b96ad20f8184ff9ec6db869130
71fa9db22ebef675f12e557e9b06aae96af4fea5
describe
'1131' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZC' 'sip-files00298.txt'
df9193dfa76590333bce9555475a4441
197a09c918f3c483b0aa8eb5b36cacfecb4df85d
describe
'39516' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZD' 'sip-files00298thm.jpg'
97d9a3f2b965159bfa320b8aaa23dcc5
c19dfbb24922463d6860d82fab0fd4255db8e9a6
describe
'128230' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZE' 'sip-files00299.jp2'
46d8b30e967c62a1c96af89c67e06235
1a62af854fd802e7639f6f1cd5ea7db926cd2258
describe
'147626' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZF' 'sip-files00299.jpg'
2679a1370e3f00eff2292b29881f520c
637372d1635748f537031f9e28c0772a7e192768
describe
'24064' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZG' 'sip-files00299.pro'
05047d3c8cdb67e1079094d7855d9b9f
b43c4808667c01ed8462065e28c68d89dc502bf6
describe
'72059' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZH' 'sip-files00299.QC.jpg'
c4118c8406b40c83a6ad2989f498616b
139ac03801e1a490ba5b380084c41cb42077d2bf
describe
'1056810' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZI' 'sip-files00299.tif'
04bd3fbe47b3bf5b777fc8822b9a2c49
78d3886e06a278798fd959b7b21276bc0c76b30c
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZJ' 'sip-files00299.txt'
f8aaa95012c74296da05a45e27ca87b8
a580f31d20df1ee40ddfb96c8fee5ddfe491ced0
describe
'39416' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZK' 'sip-files00299thm.jpg'
8c24d5d8ae3cc951357fff6b26ada23c
7e3173973a32d1e2fa65f0d7bd190d44eb33ef7c
describe
'129778' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZL' 'sip-files00300.jp2'
45226a986c5c8b3c9169df646699eca0
201c2ab42b52f79d26df675cb1865d73590fa934
describe
'153406' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZM' 'sip-files00300.jpg'
093e1c7d9bdf491b80e39fe0820e854d
cd216367b55391e6b41b2d11daeb12685079887a
describe
'24735' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZN' 'sip-files00300.pro'
e9761b99b7eba6078dc6b8778a48615f
b737c0d2f2482559f1384e1fb2a593d3e077ef64
describe
'74412' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZO' 'sip-files00300.QC.jpg'
356bbd8b5a54c176510bc2ee42af22d3
01b81e5c6c98d5aefd49588fe70d25cc8efa1e92
describe
'1070088' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZP' 'sip-files00300.tif'
97eb48e414ade99e091480ea748cae97
c7bfdc822fc6e62cfaf1e3c09f4a75686290ba7e
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZQ' 'sip-files00300.txt'
2ba7cb0d4a72b8b854623ab1787fcdd8
a394411fa822bf82814afe2a1de0b0f2e8622d5f
describe
'40092' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZR' 'sip-files00300thm.jpg'
ade91f4fcb9a3d2b33d45bbde76eff4b
78077bd6cd53a9d8dc0aef1d39ba1e14408c9802
describe
'129158' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZS' 'sip-files00301.jp2'
81a065095c3ae47c032a1769a9e47252
d192f163664103d60d9d21b885c9950e48e3b731
describe
'143985' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZT' 'sip-files00301.jpg'
8daaa0b86d314e695cfae62361030555
96a02b17c17a634ff121bdc4e48b18d2b8df72c4
describe
'25153' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZU' 'sip-files00301.pro'
a69538c0a4014f5ec3c3bf59c51c6515
3f9e700ce81b1e20bff585a826948653e2901eb1
describe
'69434' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZV' 'sip-files00301.QC.jpg'
592ce9ad4cb74ada0d5a1198ac20d674
96e5944203491673db30179ac9c1be5de4be2f4f
describe
'1064148' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZW' 'sip-files00301.tif'
1b5ac2029ff57252f3fda283e9fb6a47
ec9d611ba521a3414e244bc51651c8899889c764
describe
'1086' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZX' 'sip-files00301.txt'
c275f64b4e44d4dfeeca18770c0efd53
41d4e67ce8886ddaf3b29250c99d0f99b27ad47c
describe
Invalid character
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZY' 'sip-files00301thm.jpg'
02671d55d95c6050ef447f96d14c7ddd
8acf0eb5bfda894d50f764c3d6fdf9c012170865
describe
'130143' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACLZZ' 'sip-files00302.jp2'
44ee408f44504f5c701c98c4de8be932
902309ec97e49f0eca9cae8a157ab8f8e39fb325
describe
'156891' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAA' 'sip-files00302.jpg'
437c0482aff1f52a774ee7838282440e
8f7c7406ca2f62d47a4e7691a5c84c8048ed7b7d
describe
'27088' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAB' 'sip-files00302.pro'
fc5261b9fe91c62fc0bf705eb320d00b
160fb92e7eded3736b9c2397d86a34cc381dfb38
describe
'75319' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAC' 'sip-files00302.QC.jpg'
42f92ded89b4f59d59ddd902d07ac5a0
3ec5eb57aff15701486d57195cc37d880fd1ebe6
describe
'1072938' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAD' 'sip-files00302.tif'
a275022381be7ec9c1eee2e3d42beecd
e1143ac3c35f5fdad199e91e504167bee5cab47d
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAE' 'sip-files00302.txt'
735fab4b73ef11ac5efab9953030087b
9f585b8e707de35cccf29838265b7ef6083f2b71
describe
'40093' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAF' 'sip-files00302thm.jpg'
022d9f8b6792668d11924d0201a09b8b
61f5e68280ac7937d48c8cddb4ca6ba5d17c5e25
describe
'122492' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAG' 'sip-files00303.jp2'
a8924549106ecd1ac1cbacf82edbf31f
0a8751b1ceccfa2811a89795e2554ce77226e951
describe
'150570' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAH' 'sip-files00303.jpg'
5551e4cf9c5072e6dc4226c0d3041f91
9e5626000e7daa8deb5277774df6472ec54c9268
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAI' 'sip-files00303.pro'
2ff635ff45e2fc7f4fdb3b51eab301c8
f00b47aa7aea88561bd5ff627094fa26bcb6f917
describe
'72385' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAJ' 'sip-files00303.QC.jpg'
e978f93dadd3025d23f21a9980129f27
0ac9e974ca021235928bd354201b1fb16c5b20be
describe
'1003600' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAK' 'sip-files00303.tif'
33bc8d2ec9c1f92cc66a10fcbc463ad4
c2b473de73021ab5dbdf4e8aae6c1756591f430b
describe
'945' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAL' 'sip-files00303.txt'
0834b2b7e367a365de1c1b4b89e5a373
bc08aa6db3c90c6f9e9926c355ef2eab9a2f56d0
describe
'39639' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAM' 'sip-files00303thm.jpg'
20de5d31ea090efa4f80d67449de119e
14cdb3dc05ccdaa4aec8dc826e929bbbab57c1ef
describe
'122362' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAN' 'sip-files00304.jp2'
ed302ce55db85b0e94c785c6ec79d100
73d2954b1677b57dacd62a6061d678580acda85d
describe
'140410' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAO' 'sip-files00304.jpg'
3149a23b09e9ff3f5e6719598dbadb9c
78390aace1a5d5e81392193e836cc73234ee33d9
describe
'22215' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAP' 'sip-files00304.pro'
35d198c5b62f38d06103e4ca4266fe58
5f19cfcba2ef6cec42ad4db6996b74c97e77e0fe
describe
'69028' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAQ' 'sip-files00304.QC.jpg'
7884d79b840e83a6b9b074081fd6ddca
c2b69ae2bfb9997c85f1e985a88bbc7de0090fc0
describe
'1002448' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAR' 'sip-files00304.tif'
185580ed9b7f1c436692097407b0ba4f
221fc58be6f4f70e9557b4738477084219a856c9
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAS' 'sip-files00304.txt'
84c179358e5b6c1b5d0776d221643a50
4951c6677bb3d943aa53af37b22d6c3da529e0fe
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAT' 'sip-files00304thm.jpg'
6f6fb64df37a43febd9a1cf9ef138dc1
e92f49717e78cb74d9e325e14e4df80af66f9a93
describe
'129407' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAU' 'sip-files00305.jp2'
ff7ddf7e89c32f20ee8fcddd887053e4
d08d9d16f50ada750b4b79f84766a581a3cd2bc1
describe
'151615' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAV' 'sip-files00305.jpg'
0914c142c8fa31a43c7ea1d9a6964eb6
ac63115408bbfca15a1baeabf207b794f761b683
describe
'26039' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAW' 'sip-files00305.pro'
c52f7162f9b7cd213c718b828b9e3f2b
d8f4b9ef7110f99c3c4344a3d97da0239e867ee9
describe
'73665' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAX' 'sip-files00305.QC.jpg'
b07f9d0559477d4b8344a04b8f9d7898
8dcb54dcfcf59c44bb621f07d554757bb0b91770
describe
'1059676' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAY' 'sip-files00305.tif'
37419e3ef5836b4a8f37ad016af7c5ff
984dd6f61afd66f588b519d65a2bb03a917b3158
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMAZ' 'sip-files00305.txt'
8ed4b016f9695cb36282a8524735a5aa
2ec8f815b1c4f1c88807bdac9957fb5dd1653f31
describe
'40049' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBA' 'sip-files00305thm.jpg'
6e76935e057098235d57c53c7e1d0b3c
47647df7f6efbdb89e6c08f041065b2138b5de5c
describe
'131131' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBB' 'sip-files00306.jp2'
affccffda9a72fb7c2e95f02b9bcadfc
0d9e198d218d300b40b6b19af379bd82118d9d4b
describe
'164425' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBC' 'sip-files00306.jpg'
f9dd71aa164e37504dfd30e799744f9e
66568e71bc72b1fbb1d84eec57ef4ec21d5449ba
describe
'27180' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBD' 'sip-files00306.pro'
2a0e10a236ca3baf6e2e25f29359e59a
7975678f75aecfb74c45ecf35e69a7c92307782a
describe
'79894' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBE' 'sip-files00306.QC.jpg'
67f0dc49feb280c05c41f6e28d9969b6
108e2cd961d6f60ba5e3aff14fdfcdcce3965248
describe
'1073728' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBF' 'sip-files00306.tif'
6a6d5242996326a83a09fdea6a6ad8f6
0312bd8208baf7901187157c54618f3879cf164b
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBG' 'sip-files00306.txt'
48ea2ab097663283dc73eaadfaece8d8
0d53dbc561d902e7b9bc1e76d78624907a3baae7
describe
'41628' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBH' 'sip-files00306thm.jpg'
e276c65c7417e02bba82ee13cfbf805b
752d36a78667d69823abdf695705083869e04ed9
describe
'132073' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBI' 'sip-files00307.jp2'
864da0eed51236eb26d6513770e74fae
2ef4dfa9175c1471c77678a80953d64c3d4a5d09
describe
'146353' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBJ' 'sip-files00307.jpg'
0d10e9f87ae6bb37ebe8b9f69349cc46
8a92ae01d5dd11205855704e5ab534d8c53d633f
describe
'25674' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBK' 'sip-files00307.pro'
321cd48ee6d3a5b8992643f1ce25c4b0
84f08031a0648bdedf6330723612d7125dfcdeed
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBL' 'sip-files00307.QC.jpg'
4300cf22da55268f7ee4cd9950571b74
cdd9584c59b2de91268ae292dd18476dea4e7d3c
describe
'1087946' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBM' 'sip-files00307.tif'
890e4197d5c9cc75696bef58285e79b0
f356aea4f61955922c1cca09ff728229ebfbb024
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBN' 'sip-files00307.txt'
3b00bbfb1f366b8eb42e6008791a3d35
36b826cf153dda5339e12a4c43e0cb0aeb0992a1
describe
Invalid character
'39710' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBO' 'sip-files00307thm.jpg'
d29c51094357098269f3743db38584c7
77a4fff72af296a2dba5d259da744ded1bac2166
describe
'132906' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBP' 'sip-files00308.jp2'
886e40362b8816189fc85f5e3214b515
5c01127465241ab81aa736346a37c19a343d76af
describe
'159407' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBQ' 'sip-files00308.jpg'
f5e07e92dc7a4dfc1560031fb43f4393
60c05861b66c1f1101830309dd5aa39d08af1526
describe
'24858' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBR' 'sip-files00308.pro'
2476ea3479ca6c85fbd04c6059f13c72
103b9eea9891c6b5d85b7955fd8314b5f0eddd51
describe
'77017' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBS' 'sip-files00308.QC.jpg'
1f7c8eccdf75a5fecae34cbb1ded544d
6d89f7233fe92c70468468f73e6e1e8a00106f0e
describe
'1095276' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBT' 'sip-files00308.tif'
1a1acd23a5a2faacad17692a9085fc64
64fa38763f67752327c368c3da4e9caf4e09b9ec
describe
'1061' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBU' 'sip-files00308.txt'
73b961da3c32b1fa66846619908f882a
a21088ffd2abc0dc6459a11c2bdf11b9af797f96
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBV' 'sip-files00308thm.jpg'
0d74caf32e332771b2a0d4d60ef3e872
ff02fe9f87d4ecdd108e05edb0d19ab5b1960723
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBW' 'sip-files00309.jp2'
fd101b9496f9e18b16f2379a757c52ed
80aa4993706368cd6c98f22a51469881ffc0d4a1
describe
'155404' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBX' 'sip-files00309.jpg'
923dde1367467facc7e6e6458f686f2e
a1d17461b2f7d25503772660cd5d99c7fb4970c8
describe
'25809' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBY' 'sip-files00309.pro'
b9171c95efe5de7d928d2cd591c0f72a
2683337a877d963970e7e48fc97aed9cb1b3cc94
describe
'76185' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMBZ' 'sip-files00309.QC.jpg'
aa47c1921866c9d63d16e266736e53b5
2db0a06ab3313f7c13b6ce1f953da5ec969afd57
describe
'1092670' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCA' 'sip-files00309.tif'
dd4066ecef0e9dd55d6f3ab839d988d1
0ff788330ea944492568217fc24317fdcf96e582
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCB' 'sip-files00309.txt'
f4771e3b61618b9e41b8f635a67f7c71
85924b1994c85391fb2e77991789e0f26e01292a
describe
'40031' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCC' 'sip-files00309thm.jpg'
e203b83077a7f6de7f266d776e3cbcdb
d297e0ca3e89e728bda27c9e2547011d5b1a8253
describe
'134370' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCD' 'sip-files00310.jp2'
867504106f11d57c02e5731c53fbb404
25ddfe91c7a1d6479ff527bc2f91db41388b6934
describe
'138712' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCE' 'sip-files00310.jpg'
373217db2051cb5e286aab8226284f8d
0dc7d11f9af3d81cf27540d83226be8889d40f38
describe
'22827' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCF' 'sip-files00310.pro'
f5213c4db22369347a47db1d096776c8
92136d67001335aa2baf306469fc16011abfa8d5
describe
'68764' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCG' 'sip-files00310.QC.jpg'
41338e40c29bd43c52104641a1a9d5d2
fe8587f1cc8d0fc542ffd728d656b13240c67a79
describe
'1098096' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCH' 'sip-files00310.tif'
fabe3d57b33e6c009be7e24c672f3654
c24715012851d42ccf57a5e7f40e76261121720d
describe
'985' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCI' 'sip-files00310.txt'
508f05aa520005602954cfaae28b2834
e2a5a752ee3dd9b3a96b9dd921b26648e2ab2cad
describe
'36664' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCJ' 'sip-files00310thm.jpg'
a1b3d2723377080e1adfaa83f94882c2
0a403dbc694c68ad2309c29df757a6b826593491
describe
'130418' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCK' 'sip-files00311.jp2'
a1e29e8e747ab03251eed0b8df04f4d9
5f0630d6762f6797a4d0901366e569c83cc64130
describe
'158066' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCL' 'sip-files00311.jpg'
8ee7074ce5383784d1a76bd25605cec2
8229fdd6f0a5d05ea17cae6ead66b2857dca452f
describe
'26544' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCM' 'sip-files00311.pro'
15f9abc55f57f287fe737465c9fa9dcb
dee9430cfbe66ec105259c8e45046832c99ec001
describe
'76395' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCN' 'sip-files00311.QC.jpg'
db6807c5933f402d210769d4451eb67a
416282449f8de03f80a864338a5ec31132067317
describe
'1067048' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCO' 'sip-files00311.tif'
b3e7a370988441c72bf19164fbd4a526
8019a704933ee8a52a09243e6504edc395d0bf16
describe
'1122' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCP' 'sip-files00311.txt'
3abb09444ab2725bdd6630eee92cd0f4
6297ce71eaf5436f98bffe1b38cfb3c8a6ca4d6d
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCQ' 'sip-files00311thm.jpg'
65fd157ec6e1016029d0fc15164ce1a3
7521551dc0a7e34add9a60b39c4db6f76d9c2a68
describe
'132091' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCR' 'sip-files00312.jp2'
e6a6516c029a48c38f948b84ef06dad0
8e4a11897ddbf16c77adc89f8054e4e158e3af64
describe
'164256' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCS' 'sip-files00312.jpg'
d68da596a109831b34ecaf1d59ccf22d
828f577c72a07db9998670bc010dd0c0c85c2dd1
describe
'27822' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCT' 'sip-files00312.pro'
92ee463237b5043a15ebbce25c9e5e95
daa8be297df266904ec0e3485ba729bee448b998
describe
'80729' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCU' 'sip-files00312.QC.jpg'
11065ef3255e8f9df60b863f40b1e59d
66676544a57eec7ddeb3bfd4be2a0be86063e613
describe
'1080836' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCV' 'sip-files00312.tif'
82b7c83f497f9a5000bc73ae602da2f1
a70d65e334c4d7944e44d681458c071fbedcbd76
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCW' 'sip-files00312.txt'
37e16261addd24ab68da84a3044cf92d
5f1843ba4147276bc86c65c52695835a8bb22ea9
describe
'40183' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCX' 'sip-files00312thm.jpg'
eaa314aa187bf8fccdda3ab386330948
fc4c7fcaef7e422c9a32fdff9d0be98fb96a260b
describe
'131677' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCY' 'sip-files00313.jp2'
f3c8d9a37812e2990766b4b6d83fa05a
e762745dd252cf98840c412418c1cce517d16fde
describe
'160386' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMCZ' 'sip-files00313.jpg'
ef065ec86207937df1b34dbee5dc859b
1e5a36c37469e89eab3b6d860fd536f6b6b29c62
describe
'27000' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDA' 'sip-files00313.pro'
8f03b4261303515762a8b6aacbe058df
db26534cbfe7fbf8efb96c564508662fc0eb7ec5
describe
'76888' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDB' 'sip-files00313.QC.jpg'
531d7eda5e7ac986439c35720ca80888
a099343f58557c29a4b87e1e1180f39d33a4e2e2
describe
'1077184' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDC' 'sip-files00313.tif'
af8486f85454113b08164e89282b3942
36efb760ae9a498cd6abb044c53f1110d25a98ec
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDD' 'sip-files00313.txt'
d4bd3f7cd3a672779761026c1e6fb212
b0deca13da2bb7539cd3a0ae9172777cc1369944
describe
'39931' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDE' 'sip-files00313thm.jpg'
c942d4eb986d0898de929dedf45aba27
85bb11d1ecaefbf3c9c3895ddcd67bf119b4c0ee
describe
'133706' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDF' 'sip-files00314.jp2'
b949d6615c60157ebcba17f3c7859bac
44539fc216819ba4579f9cdd278a91880bee5c1d
describe
'162132' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDG' 'sip-files00314.jpg'
fe0c103c0372fb691d9b675967425192
ded4f958dda799fce3cc6bd0ff161a0dae2ad9c4
describe
'27161' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDH' 'sip-files00314.pro'
d57dcd7e7a67e513e7312650a8cbb436
f21cd7e3336faec65907aa5c0312fc7deeafbde6
describe
'78559' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDI' 'sip-files00314.QC.jpg'
cbdb3076b34cb89196fb5b1093091445
8218ef0311c5d0a6aae0c7e8ab3bc31952d60a31
describe
'1093512' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDJ' 'sip-files00314.tif'
b04406d57c54c27f9c01a088798ba9ca
293658b9a775050a10e79d20e356b111773dd7f8
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDK' 'sip-files00314.txt'
12128fdf0522519b16cf9c13d97ebbc3
01d9c339d99e662252b5cd22b69c34e6dbc49163
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDL' 'sip-files00314thm.jpg'
3c68af9342776348c65397a0c2047501
d13060910b5e7c713d7686775a39ed909edcedc6
describe
'135311' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDM' 'sip-files00315.jp2'
80258f2838ea2fb42c52a6297bfcd0a0
50a36a1bf2bcf3b0804e0bd3a373b46ba376b791
describe
'155166' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDN' 'sip-files00315.jpg'
e6c79a5dfc4edd75896e6e80b8669895
91f959a711fd139abeda307303e9de3f5f7e32e4
describe
'26229' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDO' 'sip-files00315.pro'
35751d6068a2e45089f2e625c40612a3
5e56f3bfbc9f3424a3d0945dd2339a355ee17eac
describe
'75495' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDP' 'sip-files00315.QC.jpg'
e219dd3b7a5ea9a373736035683a58bc
c816359cbda4122485e8cdb126507e43b650416f
describe
'1106404' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDQ' 'sip-files00315.tif'
3e6c51e2a8b522e1fc72a164f59bdd75
e5213fb10dab2cdc6ee853beaef839b24b4d4539
describe
'1106' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDR' 'sip-files00315.txt'
40093e222c7936f28f70cb432dcd382a
46a719439f9db91e834f34e651f75418d6dd2fae
describe
'39115' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDS' 'sip-files00315thm.jpg'
000bdcdd19ccc340078f4d199270782d
38decfd1304a11149a80ad9956197f3885fc0413
describe
'130026' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDT' 'sip-files00316.jp2'
88d7051acd0e8e0ac51c78258069354a
7a53c6211db1bd1f97d5d14d5326622cacb651ad
describe
'159585' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDU' 'sip-files00316.jpg'
5acd8c54d48a8a7759024d6fd96086d6
887083abe7a094ba4f40db286962144c8f14fe1d
describe
'28005' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDV' 'sip-files00316.pro'
9ba929ee108ccb0dc3c13a46ef8eb0d9
fa02f415ad6e16817d1dba120ecc880d4c42a78c
describe
'78775' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDW' 'sip-files00316.QC.jpg'
f88a463cfd3ff1612cc6267570e76fe1
ba2f9581505b3fc2fda07e9dc9273c6fa40ed6b4
describe
'1064248' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDX' 'sip-files00316.tif'
d9efb54d2845435b9da0bdf789aba788
490e36ad4a2cf037e2d3a4cc066ddc06b19218e3
describe
'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDY' 'sip-files00316.txt'
84fe40eac3742a7be481a2d7b193f812
4c60359bce425be632a2e937f2fc088c7e5ad3bf
describe
'40623' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMDZ' 'sip-files00316thm.jpg'
4ca3eae28cf8394c2fe0c3d371623045
df719e85806e8a3c153ef912f96aff7e4b06ed93
describe
'132364' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEA' 'sip-files00317.jp2'
4005ad0a4322ca28e3b6237c4c922dfd
96dc55d6feb91d38a7dba79441faaa831bd3428a
describe
'170949' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEB' 'sip-files00317.jpg'
45b2fd13daa95a7a17438cd9278e43c7
f531e7c5b0f71c6fc0528babab4d2c4166c9e150
describe
'28289' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEC' 'sip-files00317.pro'
f04ac2d7629dce86f6f7e547081d98a6
9b3416c3ecc1ca695c7cddf2ac2a625524ad307e
describe
'82335' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMED' 'sip-files00317.QC.jpg'
76942f92b99058f01970ce9a0e73f2b4
a101aaa8510e92738b36b73c551e0e74ac057767
describe
'1083080' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEE' 'sip-files00317.tif'
f116c8074d7aca0b8941f666c0bf53b7
bdce5c3e7527157d052e299ea4360fecc39488d6
describe
'1182' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEF' 'sip-files00317.txt'
45dd0ad59a4cf39457e96e1f9375278c
4b6109ae6570aad8cd60883384b38651372c1a8a
describe
'40740' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEG' 'sip-files00317thm.jpg'
ed1307a21c461035ac20ad9db3ef7cdc
4c0098b2c71c222cdf2834fc423b0648cc941ea8
describe
'93822' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEH' 'sip-files00318.jp2'
1715a679e91ec74aed0a3998b51f90d0
4af2b51e160e6de9872af8a1ab4f58678d44032e
describe
'63163' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEI' 'sip-files00318.jpg'
153748f48f1bf441606cb3b0dd2bbe33
764a1d14fd45ddf077aacb05567e536e466c03e9
describe
'5704' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEJ' 'sip-files00318.pro'
3e3a651719b102c3918fd91368b824a6
3381e4f3c82adce71867bed240418a2a1348c360
describe
'36991' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEK' 'sip-files00318.QC.jpg'
56a16447654eacc18f24cf65221484fc
3c7035ef89c61645c0acc5180714f9c07055db45
describe
'1061060' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEL' 'sip-files00318.tif'
215443f982ebfa5b5a8c48a9b72878df
5a425143440b6c5bcddf521b234bf6ac56f873a1
describe
'281' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEM' 'sip-files00318.txt'
67dfa23e7f563a601f50316cbb9e4c46
dc211f03a9e1dd5c104e7f036cc22b634df3f984
describe
'25443' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEN' 'sip-files00318thm.jpg'
7d11a5490a7d14c1c4add0bb42426f47
9b0e7fb81bb3d8d64166b2450498138c0eb2c026
describe
'343711' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEO' 'sip-filescover1.jp2'
f3d92a5f22ec4feafaff7bc809eae683
5a2ffe5f4ad75c89d55c92989a4c3c6ce6cf2091
describe
'254056' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEP' 'sip-filescover1.jpg'
13fe43fc90892ed46487d17f677f0e35
75d864a1205867702fc8f50a1c227db479222334
describe
'64416' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEQ' 'sip-filescover1.QC.jpg'
3ee1d84697fa67f10b5687babd001f29
f56a7f837d25434831deb0926aea7166389ba4d6
describe
'8269580' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMER' 'sip-filescover1.tif'
97c286edb972b4faa77f4dcfded55ce7
fd4a63e04fe33cb37458ff160ed522cfef10a18c
describe
'27511' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMES' 'sip-filescover1thm.jpg'
27b3c143e3cad85b130bcf8da6b5a1d4
8b1d4db5fe90acee02e6c9d5c004b441784d335f
describe
'343373' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMET' 'sip-filescover4.jp2'
3d06c7d22cd092f9e1c2027552b5ecd5
a8bf3f10b7b5725995bd698d80c50fffdc4ecb35
describe
'230608' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEU' 'sip-filescover4.jpg'
fcd6e6311b355fbc45a6bd0aec18079a
3145cccf11aaf531ab19c69c0f24c991871d5ddc
describe
'57475' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEV' 'sip-filescover4.QC.jpg'
8eda1070f3427997b0b94a611b0cfe7d
69e928784c11119a7971e29fe750354ade6fe29d
describe
'8258488' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEW' 'sip-filescover4.tif'
fe2df2ea05e4a1c3fc8934b5d426fb51
d534cb5f1e3b8685e6cef6956a98d827c581c443
describe
'25682' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEX' 'sip-filescover4thm.jpg'
ebec41eb2183f6e231520a89dee675ea
c7dedaff6ca7c3072f90f361ba50a38a16931a08
describe
'42' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEY' 'sip-filesprocessing.instr'
b95ceb8240f2c5c6e3acda59a1c97b90
8af055065b0fcdea08611d658000c2debe453b72
describe
'90253' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMEZ' 'sip-filesspine.jp2'
e14d0955d9314945324a3f854904b3ce
0f6677c79f67143d43c2c3fd1fb95c6c47d7d4a4
describe
'90950' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMFA' 'sip-filesspine.jpg'
4aa02e33430839240f6825b5a1f7ab5b
41b55b112e9be02162b7bad918e7850e9b3d00c2
describe
'412' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMFB' 'sip-filesspine.pro'
0f0a4e6260b9d580d39c2ee7613a31ab
874586ca79395010ca93a1edfcd08108bf6c73f4
describe
'35593' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMFC' 'sip-filesspine.QC.jpg'
0545f85f2bb8a23b4fec047714557593
30a50761657c1cba28b55f743859341acf109135
describe
'2183928' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMFD' 'sip-filesspine.tif'
82f38f652aa5edeff1a1f20e4a6ba32a
7d423af39c08762e913c31749aa21935119d0200
describe
'56' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMFE' 'sip-filesspine.txt'
a2b1031dc79250328651cee9a4da4962
cf7147b9b87139d592e1d855fcf3f052419c4fbc
describe
'24327' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMFF' 'sip-filesspinethm.jpg'
76f3e2019a8969970d4175489577e4c8
885f6b616c1c3a66529a759254538082879c4821
describe
'371890' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMFG' 'sip-filesUF00003467_00001.mets'
a6e4d9b5827ed8ea68f4b73a5fba365b
29c11903618e51104afd47fb91e321c34727a3aa
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-08T08:22:48-05:00' 'mixed'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsdhttp://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
BROKEN_LINK http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "
".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'477889' 'info:fdaE20091106_AAAAJKfileF20091106_AACMFJ' 'sip-filesUF00003467_00001.xml'
97b2a0b8001a6252e537feec005bd907
e99b8e25b205f82f7b6a5df068e3d0706ce064c4
describe
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.
'2013-12-08T08:22:53-05:00'
xml resolution
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/ufdc2.xsd
The element type "div" must be terminated by the matching end-tag "".
TargetNamespace.1: Expecting namespace 'http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/digital/metadata/ufdc2/', but the target namespace of the schema document is 'http://digital.uflib.ufl.edu/metadata/ufdc2/'.